Citation
Lafayette

Material Information

Title:
Lafayette the friend of American liberty
Added title page title:
France and the American revolution
Added title page title:
Friends of American liberty
Creator:
Burton, Alma Holman ( Author, Primary )
Baldwin, James, 1841-1925
Werner School Book Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Boston
Chicago
Publisher:
Werner School Book Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1898
Language:
English
Physical Description:
85 p. : ill., map, ports. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Generals -- Juvenile fiction -- France ( lcsh )
Statesmen -- Juvenile fiction -- France ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Battles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Liberty -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Juvenile fiction -- United States ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- France ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Biographical fiction -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1898
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Biographical fiction ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover.
General Note:
Title page engraved.
General Note:
Frontispiece signed by Lafayette.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Alma Holman Burton, author of "The Story of our country," "Four American patriots," etc. ; with an introduction by James Baldwin.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026615852 ( ALEPH )
ALG3414 ( NOTIS )
13016991 ( OCLC )
98001190 ( LCCN )

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FRIENDS OF AMERICAN LIBERTY

LAFAYETTE







THE FOUR GREAT AMERICANS SERIES

Biographical Stories of Great Americans
for Young Americans

EDITED BY
James BaLpwin, Ph.D.

VOLUMES NOW READY

Four Great Americans
GEORGE WASHINGTON, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,
DANIEL WEBSTER, ABRAHAM LINCOLN

By JAMES BALDWIN, Ph.D.
Cloth, 246 pages - - - - Price, 50 cents
II, Four American Patriots

PATRICK HENRY, ALEXANDER HAMILTON,
ANDREW JACKSON, U. S. GRANT

By ALMA HOLMAN BURTON
Author of The Story of Our Country, etc.

Cloth, 256 pages - - - - Price, 50 cents
III. Four American Naval Heroes (tn Press)

IV. Four American Poets (In Press)

OTHER VOLUMES IN PREPARATION












FRANCE AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



LAFAYETTE

THE FRIEND OF AMERICAN LIBERTY |

BY

ALMA HOLMAN BURTON

Author of ‘‘ The Story of Our Country,”’ ‘‘ Four American Patriots "’ etc:

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
JAMES BALDWIN, Ph.D.



WERNER SCHOOL BOOK COMPANY
NEW YORK CHICAGO BOSTON



Copyright, 1898,

By Werner ScHoot Boox Company

Marquis do Lafayette



EL. FORD, ve

INTRODUCTION.

The story of the Marquis de Lafayette.forms one of the
most interesting chapters in the history of human liberty.
To understand clearly the nature of Lafayette’s services,
both to America and to the whole world, we must first
think of the conditions of life at the beginning of his
career, and then contrast them with those which now
prevail. One hundred and forty years ago, when Lafayette
was a child, the world was not so pleasant a place to live
in as it is in our own time. Even in the most enlight-
ened countries of Europe, the majority of the people were
downtrodden and oppressed. Men had scarcely so much as
heard of liberty. Outside of England and her colonies, the
idea of popular freedom was unknown. < :

This idea, as you may have learned etsewheser-séems to
have been a sort of birthright of the Anglo-Saxon race. Ever
since the barons of England forced King John to grant them
a charter of rights, the peoples of that race have defended
and cherished it. Like a spark of fire in the midst of gen-
eral gloom, it has oftentimes been almost extinguished; and
yet, no matter how its enemies have tried to stamp it out,
it has survived and been rekindled.

The American colonists, because this idea of liberty was

7



8 INTRODUCTION.

implanted in their hearts, rebelled against the tyranny of
George III., and boldly demanded their rights as freeborn
Englishmen. Frenchmen, at that time, would not have done
this. They would have tamely submitted to every form of
oppression, not yet having learned that the common people
have certain rights which even kings must respect. Indeed,
at the very time that the American patriots were refusing to
obey the unjust laws of their English rulers, the common
people of France were suffering from oppressions ten times as
great; and yet they had no thought of resistance, but sub-
mitted silently, as creatures whose only duty was to obey their
masters. At the very time that our forefathers were resisting
the payment of the tax on tea, the common people of France
were paying all the taxes for the support of the French king
and his nobles.

So burdensome were these taxes that they consumed the
greater part of every man’s earnings. The people had no
voice in the management of public affairs, nor had they any
rights save to toil unceasingly for those who had set them-
selves over them. Every year thousands of persons died of
starvation, because the earnings of labor, instead of providing
food for the laborers, were taken for taxes. Meanwhile, the
nobles, or privileged classes, who owned all the land, were
living in ease and luxury; they did no work of any kind;
they paid no taxes; they seemed to live for no purpose but to

gratify their own pleasures and do honor to the king.



INTRODUCTION. 9

Such was the condition of France at the time Lafayette
was preparing to aid the cause of liberty in America. Do
you ask why he did not first help the oppressed in his own
country? They were not yet ready to be profited by such
assistance. The time was not ripe for any movement against
the tyranny of the king and his court. To the downtrodden
people of France, liberty seemed a thing so impossible that
they had not even so much as dreamed of contending for it.

Lafayette was not one of the people—he was a member
of the nobility, and we should naturally expect to find him
arrayed on the side of the oppressor rather than on that of
the oppressed. But here his patriotism seems all the more
praiseworthy because it was wholly unselfish, What could he
expect to gain by befriending the American colonists ? They
could not even offer him a salary as an officer in the con-
tinental army. Did he hope to win fame by great achieve-
ments in war? There were in Europe other and more promising
fields for the display of military genius. In only one way can
we account for his ardor in behalf of American liberty, and
that is by saying that he was imbued with the true spirit of
freedom, and was, therefore, a friend to all mankind. He
thought that he saw in America the first opportunity to do
good by striking a blow at oppression. The results were
greater than any one could have dreamed. Without his aid it
is hardly possible that our revolution would have succeeded;

without it, the American colonies might have still remained



10 INTRODUCTION.

under the control of Great Britain. But his friendship for
American liberty turned the tide and made the history of the
nineteenth century very different from what it would otherwise
have been. The success of the* American cause aroused the
long-oppressed people of France to a sense of their rights and
_ urged them to a similar resistance to tyranny. Thus, through
lending aid to the colonists, Lafayette found the surest means
of doing service for his own countrymen, and the people of
two continents thereby became his debtors.

What has been the final result of these uprisings for
liberty? The spirit of freedom has extended its blessed influ-
ence over the whole globe, and to-day there is hardly a
country under the sun from which tyranny and oppression
have not been banished. The right of every man to life,
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is no longer disputed; for
men everywhere have learned the true meaning of liberty and
have acquired the courage to stand up fearlessly in its
defense.

To the great leaders, statesmen, and warriors, through
whom American independence was won, the whole world
owes a debt of gratitude. And, while every American citi-
zen takes pleasure in commemorating the deeds of Washing-
ton, our greatest patriot, let the place next to him in our
affections be reserved for that brave friend of American liberty,
_ the Marquis de Lafayette.

James BALDWIN.



CHAPTER

II.
ITI.
IV.

VI.
VII.
VIIl.
IX.

XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

Tue CoLonies IN NortH AMERICA
Tue Younc Marquis

Tue CouRTIER

Tur DInNER Party .

Ture DEPARTURE FOR AMERICA
WasHINGTON’s AIDE-DE-CAMP
Lovis XVI. Promises A FLEET
Tur FurLoucH .
Tur Victory at YorKTOWN
A Visit To Mount VERNON
Tue NationaL ASSEMBLY

Tue FrencH REVOLUTION

An EXILE AND IN PRISON

Tue Man or Two Wor.ips

Tue Last Days or a PatrioT

PAGE

15
20
25
28
32
37
44
46
51
56
59
61
68

73
80







ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Portrait OF LAFayETTE : : : f ; frontispiece
Map or Our Country IN 1750 ; a & : : : pumas
GerorceE III. : 5 : : a : s : . 18
CHATEAU DE CHAVANIAC : F : : : ¢ : . 20
Louris XVI. 4 : : 5 : ‘ : : : : 26
A BritTIsH SOLDIER : ; : : 5 3 5 aor
Baron DE Kaz . A : ; : é : ; a 34
Stas DEANE . : ; i : : : : : 5
GEORGE WASHINGTON . ; : : : : : : 39
ALEXANDER HAMILTON . : : : 3 ‘ : : . 40
WASHINGTON AT VALLEY ForGE : : i : : : 43
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 5 : : : : : : ; PaaS
LAFAYETTE’S SwoRD . ; ; ’ : : : : : 50
Brenepicr ARNOLD . : : : : 3 : : ‘ eh 2
GENERAL ANTHONY WAYNE . t 3 : ; : 5 a 53
Lorp CornwWALLis . 5 eT : : . : : peo.
Mount VERNON . : : : d - : ? : _ 56
FREDERICK THE GREAT . : : : E : : ‘ Leh
THOMAS JEFFERSON : ; : : : . : : : 62
TuE BAsTILLE : : : ; f : : : : . 64
Marie ANTOINETTE. : : ‘ : : : . : 66
James Monroe. : : . : . . : . : 70
NapoLeoN BONAPARTE . ; i : : i ; i eel
La GRANGE . ‘5 s é : ‘ : % : _ é 72
STATUE OF LAFAYETTE . : j : 3 3 2 ; Beker A:
Joun ADAMS : s fei : : 3 : : : 70)
Bunker Hitt MONUMENT. : - : : : ‘ 3 77
DANIEL WEBSTER. z A 2 : Z : : i 78
Louis PHILIPPE . : : : 5 : 3 : : : 82
LAFAVETTE’s GRAVE , : : 3 : 3 : toh)

Liperty ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD . : : q ; ‘ 85











A

MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

I.—Tue Cotonres In NortH AMERICA.

One hundred and fifty years ago North America was

Spain claimed

15

Florida, Mexico, and the country west of the Rocky
OUR COUNTRY IN 1750,

glaimed by three kingdoms of Europe.





16 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

Mountains; France claimed Canada and the vast region
between the Rocky Mountains and the Alleghanies;
and England claimed a wide strip of land extending
from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Florida, and running
straight through the territories of France and Spain, as
far west as the Pacific Ocean.

Now Spain did not fear England’s pretensions in the
least. The Pacific slope was an unknown region beyond
the Rocky Mountains, and no one dreamed that an Eng-
lishman would ever cross the trackless wilderness and
climb those dizzy heights. But France knew very well
that whenever the thirteen colonies along the Atlantic
coast became densely settled, the English would try to
seize the fertile valley of the Ohio. And so, while
English colonists were cultivating farms and building
towns east of the Alleghany Mountains, French soldiers
were setting up a strong line of forts west of them.

At last, some English traders ventured across the
mountains. They built rude huts, and were laying the
foundations of a fort, where the city of Pittsburg now
stands, when a company of French soldiers attacked
them and drove them away.

‘“‘Such impudence must be punished immediately,”



THE COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA. 17

said the English; and General Braddock, with an army of
British regulars, was sent to recover the fort. He met
with sore defeat at the hands of the French and Indians,
and but for George Washington, a young lieutenant of
Virginia, the army would have been wholly destroyed.

Thus a long war began between England and France.
The English conquered Canada, and because Spain had
helped France in some European wars, they also seized
the Spanish island of Cuba.

In 1763, envoys from France, England, and Spain
met at Paris to sign a treaty of peace. They were very
polite to one another, and took a great deal of snuff, after
the fashion of the time; but, for all that, each envoy was
determined to get the best terms for his king that he could.

In the end, the map of the New World was greatly
altered. England had exchanged Cuba for Florida,
while France had ceded Canada and the country between
the Mississippi River and the Alleghany Mountains
to England, and all west of the Mississippi to Spain.

This treaty of Paris gave to England and Spain
the exclusive ownership of North America. There was
not a foot of the land which the French could call their

own.



18 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

The king of France grieved over the loss of his
possessions. He said he hoped the thirteen colonies
would prove so unruly that the English king would
wish the French back in Canada to help keep them in
subjection.

Now, if George III. of England had proved to be
a good and worthy king, perhaps this hope would never
have been realized. At the begin-
ning of his reign, his colonies were
prosperous and contented. They cele-
brated his birthdays, set up his
statues in public parks, and offered

prayers for the members of the royal



family. But, after a time, he began

GEORGE III.

to oppress them by levying unjust
taxes, and when they refused to pay the taxes he sent
an army to punish them.

The Americans then resolved to fight for their
rights. In 1775, delegates from the thirteen colonies
met at Philadelphia in a Continental Congress. They
called for troops and elected George Washington com-
mander-in-chief of the army.

Of course, all the monarchs in Europe were anxious



THE COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA. 19

to see how this quarrel between George III. and his
colonies would end. The French king was more
interested than any other. Some people said he would
equip a fleet to aid the Americans; yet he was in no
haste to adopt such a bold policy as that.

‘It would not be wise,’ he said, ‘‘to try to assist
those who are too weak to assist themselves;’’ and he
waited to see what George Washington, at the head
of the Continental troops, would do.

But one of his courtiers, the Marquis de Lafayette,
was not willing to stand idly waiting while the Amer-
icans were fighting for their liberties. He said to
his friends: ‘‘Let us join these patriots in their
struggle against the tyranny of an unjust king. We
may be defeated; but we shall have the satisfaction
of knowing that we have fought on the side of justice
and the right.’’

In the following pages you may read of some
of the events in the life of this young French
nobleman, who helped to secure the independence
of the American Colonies, and afterwards laid
the first cornerstone of the present republic of

France.



zo STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

II.—Tue Younc Marguis.

The chateau of Chavaniac was in the province of
Auvergne, in the south part of France. It was a lofty

castle, with towers and narrow windows from which

[ied

Hee TT
Lote

=a Th if

mn nT



CHATEAU DE CHAVANIAC, LAFAYETTE’S BIRTHPLACE.

cannon once frowned. down upon besieging foes.
There was a deep moat around it, with a bridge
which was drawn up in time of war, so that no man,
on horseback or on foot, could pass in at the gate with-
out permission of the guard.

Low hills, crowned with vineyards, stood near the



THE YOUNG MARQUIS. 21

castle, and beyond the hills stretched mountains
whose peaks seemed to pierce the sky. In all France
there was not a more charming spot than Chavaniac;
and among all the nobles of the court there was no
braver man than its master, the Marquis de Lafayette.

Sometimes the king left the pleasures of his palace
to spend a day at this castle; and whenever the young
marquis and his beautiful bride went to Paris, they
were treated with the greatest respect.

One day, the drawbridge was let down over the
moat, and the gallant marquis rode away to the war
in Germany. After taking part in several engage-
ments, he was shot through the heart in a skirmish
at Minden. His comrades buried him on the field.
The drums were muffled, the band played a funeral
dirge, and three rounds of musketry announced that
the hero’s body had been lowered into the grave.

When swift couriers carried the news of his death to
Chavaniac, the sorrow of his family and friends was
most grievous to see. The castle was like a tomb;
the rooms were darkened; and the servants, clad in
black, went about on tiptoe, scarcely daring to whisper

to one another.



22 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

In the midst of this mourning, on September 6,
1757, the only son of the dead marquis was born.

The little orphan was carried to the chapel and
christened Marie Jean Paul Roche Yves Gilbert- Motier
de Lafayette. That seemed a very long name, indeed,
for the tiny baby lying so quietly in the good priest’s
arms; but it was the custom in France to remember
distinguished ancestors at a christening, and there
were so many of these that the loving mother really
thought the name should be longer than it was. She
said that his everyday name should be Gilbert.

When Gilbert was old enough, she walked with
him instead of leaving him to the care of servants.
Sometimes they climbed a high hill to see the sun set
over the towers of the chateau. Then she told him
how the de Lafayettes, long before Columbus discovered
America, had driven the Arabs from France, and how
“they had helped to banish the English kings from
France, and how his own father had died for the glory
of France.

_ Sometimes, as they walked through the halls of the
castle, she showed him the coats-of-mail which his

ancestors had worn, and she told him about the swords



THE YOUNG MARQUIS. 23

and banners and other trophies which the de Lafayettes
had won in battle.

“IT would not have you less brave than they, my
son,’’ she would say.

The boy longed for the time to come when he
might show his mother how very brave he was. He
grew tall and strong, and carried himself like a prince.
He wanted to be worthy of his great ancestors.

The year he was eight, there was much excitement
about a wolf which prowled in the forest, killing the
sheep in the pastures and frightening the peasants
nearly out of their wits. Gilbert made this wolf the
object of all his walks. He would persuade his mother
to sit in some shady spot while he should go a little
way into the forest.

“T will return in an instant, dear mamma,’’ he
always said; and, lest he might alarm her, he walked
quite slowly until a turn in the road hid him from
view. Then he marched quickly into the dark
wood,

He did this for many days, seeing only frisking
squirrels and harmless rabbits. But one morning, as

he sped along a narrow path, his eyes wide open and



24 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

his ears alert to catch every sound, he heard a cracking
in the underbrush.

The wolf was coming! He was sure of it. His
mind was made up in an instant. He would spring
forward quicker than lightning, and blind it with
his coat, while with his arms he would choke it to
death.

“It will struggle hard,” he thought. ‘“‘Its feet
will scratch me; but I shall not mind, and, when all is
over, I shall drag it to the feet of mamma, and she
will know, and the peasants will know, that I can rid
the country of these pests.’’

He stood listening. His breath came fast. Again
he heard the breaking of the bushes, ‘‘I ought first to
surprise the beast by coming up on it quickly,’’ he
whispered.

He tore off his coat, and held it firmly as he hurried
on. Soon he saw the shaggy hide, and the great eyes
shining through the thicket. He leaped forward with
outstretched coat, and—what do you think?—he clasped
in his arms a calf that had strayed from the barnyard!

It was a rude shock to the boy. He returned to

his mother, who was already alarmed at his absence,



THE COURTIER. 25

and confessed that he had tried to kill the wolf but had
found only a calf.

‘‘Ah, you were brave, my son,’’ she said; ‘“‘I am
quite sure that you would have ended the days of that

terrible wolf had he but given you the chance.”

IJJ.—Tue Courtter.

When Gilbert was twelve years old, he was sent
to school at Paris. His teachers knew how the king
had loved his father, and they were very kind, although
they did not always give him his own way.

Once, when a prize was offered for the best essay
on ‘‘A Perfect Horse,’’ he tried to excel. He described
a beautiful animal. Its eyes were large and intelli-
gent, and its nostrils trembled with desire to speed
away at the first word of its rider; but when the master,
instead of speaking gently, raised a whip to strike it,
the horse threw him to the ground.

The teacher said that a perfect horse should have
been better trained, and gave the prize toa boy whose

horse endured the lash of an unjust master.



26 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

“T’d rather lose the prize than describe a horse

’

that would tamely submit to injustice,’ wrote Gilbert
to his mother.

He received many letters from his mother telling
him how she loved him and how sure she was that he
would always do his duty.

One week no letter came;
but, instead, the family car-
riage drew up at the gate of
the school. The coachman
and footman on the box
looked very sad, and his old
nurse sat within, crying. She

told him his mother was so



ill that he must hasten home.
His dear mother died. A

few weeks later, his grandfather also died, and he was

LOUIS XVI.

left sole master of Chavaniac. He was called the
‘“‘Marquis de Lafayette,” and the peasants knelt humbly
by the roadside whenever he passed. The king soon
sent for him to appear at court, and, when he saw
what a fine, manly fellow the young marquis was, he

made him a page to the queen.



THE COURTIER. 24

A few years later, Lafayette became a member of
the Royal Guards, and, just about that time, he married
the daughter of a powerful duke.

When the old king of France died in 1774, Louis
XVI. and Marie Antoinette were crowned with much
pomp. The young queen was beautiful and gay.
The king loved her so dearly that he tried in every
way to make her happy. If she wearied of one palace,
he calied his courtiers together, and, on horseback and
in carriages and sedan chairs, they went to another.

His favorite palace was at Versailles, a few miles
from Paris. It was in a splendid park, where fountains
played and birds sang all day long.

One room in this palace was so large that hun-
dreds of people could dance together in it; and its
walls were lined with mirrors in which the lords and
ladies might see themselves as they smiled and bowed
and danced.

The queen once gave a masquerade ball in this
mirror room. The Marquis de Lafayette was there,
with his wife. He was dressed in a coat-of-mail

which his great-great-grandfather had worn in a war
with the Turks.



28 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE,

He was tall, and his face was very pleasant, with
its high forehead and clear brown eyes. As he walked
down the long room, his wife said to herself: ‘‘He is
just like a knight of the olden time!’’ She smiled
when she saw him glance into the mirrors. She thought
he was a little vain of his good looks.

But the young marquis hardly noticed himself.
He was gazing at the shining armor and wondering if
he would ever have achance to fight in a just cause,

as his great-great-grandfather had done.

IV.—Tue Dinner Party.

The Marquis de Lafayette soon tired of the idle
life at Versailles, and, in 1776, when he was just nine-
teen years old, he went to Metz, a town then in France,
as captain of an artillery company.

He was a born soldier. He loved to hear the
boom of cannon and the rattle of muskets on the drill
ground. The very first time he called off orders to
his men, he felt that, if he were only in battle, he

could add some glory to his already famous name.



THE DINNER PARTY. 29

But he said to himself: ‘‘Kings make war for
conquest. I wish that I might enlist my arms for a
more worthy object.’

That same year an English nobleman, the royal
Duke of Gloucester, chanced to visit Metz. He had dis-
pleased his brother, King George III., and for that
reason had been banished from England.

The commandant of the garrison gave a dinner-
party in honor of the royal guest. '

Lafayette and the other French officers were in
full uniform; but the Duke of Gloucester was the
most splendid of all who sat about the table. There
was much laughing and drinking of toasts and speech-
making, until a guard announced that a messenger was
at the door with despatches for his royal highness.

‘“‘Ah, news from England!’’ exclaimed the duke.

“‘Show the man in,’’ ordered the commandant.

A courier, with dust on his garments, entered the
room, and, bowing low, delivered a bundle of letters.

“TI beg your Highness to read without ceremony,”
said the commandant.

The duke glanced over the papers for some time

in silence. He looked grave. At last, he said: ‘‘My



30 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

courier has brought despatches about our colonies in
America.”

‘‘Ah,” said one; ‘‘are the colonies acting badly?’’

“Yes, they demand to vote their own taxes.”’

‘‘How absurd! Why, the people in France do not
vote their own taxes.”’

‘You must know,’’ said the duke, ‘‘that many years
.ago, one of the kings of England gave a charter to our
people which granted them the right to impose their
own taxes. They now elect representatives to a par-
liament, where they decide how much money should be
used by the government. Sometimes, when the king
asks for more money than he really needs, they refuse
to increase the taxes; but they are usually quite willing
to pay whatever he asks.”’

“What do these Americans complain of, then?’
asked Lafayette.

‘Taxation without representation,’’ answered the
duke. ‘‘They insist that, as loyal subjects, they should
be allowed either to send representatives to our Parlia-
ment, or to have a Parliament of their own. Neither
privilege has been granted. Our Parliament imposes

taxes on them, and, when they refuse to pay the



THE DINNER PARTY. 31

taxes, the king sends an army to force them to do so.
These despatches inform me that the rebels have
driven our troops out of a town called Boston, and that
delegates from the thirteen colonies have met at another
town called Philadelphia and adopted a declaration of
independence.’’

“The rabble!’’ cried one of the French
officers.

“Your fine troops will soon crush the
- rascals,’’ cried another.
‘‘My brother, the king, is stubborn,”’

said the duke, with a smile. ‘‘He ban-



ished me, gentlemen, because I disobeyed a sores
him. He will conquer these disobedient ar tee
colonies; but, since our common people are not will-
ing to fight their cousins, he has hired Hessians from
Germany to help our soldiers.”’

“What, your highness!’’ exclaimed Lafayette, who
could hardly believe that he had heard aright.

‘Yes, many thousand Hessians are now on their
Way across the sea.’’

Lafayette thought it was cruel for a king to send

a foreign army against his own subjects; but he remem-



32. STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

bered that the English king was the duke’s brother,
and he said nothing in reply.

“TIT am not so sure, gentlemen,’’ said the duke,
after a pause; ‘‘I am not so sure but the Americans
are in the right. They are fighting as freeborn
Englishmen.”’

“The Americans are in the right,” said Lafayette
to himself; and, while the other officers were making
merry about many things, he was silent. As soon as
he could do so, he excused himself from the table.
He hastened to his room and locked the door.

“This is, indeed, the hour I have sought,’’ he
murmured.

He sat down to think, and then he arose and paced

the floor until it was almost morning. When, at last,
he threw himself on the bed to sleep, he had resolved

to leave the pleasures of rank and fortune, and even to
separate, for a time, from the wife he loved, that he

might use his sword in the defense of liberty.

V.—Tue DEparTURE FOR AMERICA.
As soon as the young captain of artillery could get

leave of absence from duty at Metz, he hastened to



THE DEPARTURE FOR AMERICA. 33

Paris. Here he found everybody talking of England’s
war with her colonies.

Now, the French people hardly knew whether Bos-
ton was the name of a town or of a whole state; but they
were so delighted because the haughty English generals
had been defeated there that they had ‘‘Boston’’ whist,
and ‘‘Boston”’ tea, and ‘‘Boston’’ snuff.

Lafayette sought out some American agents who
were buying arms secretly, and the more he heard
about the unjust taxes, the more determined he was
to help the patriots resist them.

His father-in-law opposed his plans; but, to
strengthen his resolution, Lafayette adopted the
motto, ‘Cur non?’’ which means ‘‘Why not?’ ‘Cur
non?”’ he said, when he saw his wife in tears.
‘“Cur non?’’ he would say again, when his baby girl
stretched out her tiny arms as if to hold him back.
With Baron de Kalb, an officer who had been in
America, he organized a Boston club, to talk about
raising an army.

When Louis XVI. heard this, he was displeased.
He said that if any French noblemen joined the rebels

it might cause England to declare war against France,



34 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

Late in the fall, news came of a battle on Long
Island, in which the patriots were badly defeated.

‘You see,’’ said the king; ‘“‘those Americans are
only a mob. They will soon be disarmed;’’ and he
forbade the meetings of the Boston club.

“Cur non?” said Lafayette;
and the meetings were held
secretly.

About this time, the Ameri-
can Congress sent Silas Deane,
of Connecticut, to France, to
seek aid; and Lafayette asked
De Kalb to go with him to



BARON DE KALB.

visit the envoy. When the

two men met, they shook hands; but, as neither under-
stood the language of the other, they said nothing.

De Kalb, who could speak both English and French,
told Silas Deane that the Marquis de Lafayette wished
to join the American army.

“We have no money to pay our officers,’ said
Deane.

“I will serve without money,’’ repeated De Kalb

after Lafayette.



THE DEPARTURE FOR AMERICA. 35

‘“We have no ship to carry you and your men,”’ said
Deane.

“T will buy a ship,” was the answer.

Still, the American hesitated to accept the services
of such a boyish-looking officer.

Then the modest Lafayette
would have blushed if he had
understood what his friend said

‘in his behalf. De Kalb told of

his wealth and rank, and explained



what a powerful ally he might be-

SILAS DEANE,

come.

In the end, Silas Deane gave Lafayette a contract
to sign, in which Lafayette promised to serve in the
army of the United States whenever he was wanted.

When the venerable Benjamin Franklin came to
Paris, Lafayette was among the first to greet him. He
was enchanted with the famous philosopher, whose
simple manners and plain dress befitted well the herald
of a republic.

‘‘Now, indeed, is our time of need,"' said Franklin.
Lafayette waited to hear no more. He bought a

ship, and ordered it to be equipped for the long voyage.



36 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

While the ship was being made ready, he visited
England, where his uncle was the French ambassador.
George III. feared that Louis XVI. would aid the
Americans in their rebellion, and tried to be friendly
to France. Lafayette was treated with distinction
at court.

He met some English officers who were just ready
to start for America, and was invited to Portsmouth
to see the ships set sail with troops; but he refused
to go.

““T cannot be a hypocrite,’’ he said to himself; ‘‘I
shall soon have my own ship launched for America.’’

While at Lord Rawdon’s, who had just returned
from New York, he heard how General Washington,
on a Christmas night (1776), had captured the Hessians
at Trenton. He expressed such delight over the news
as to arouse suspicion, and, when he found that his
movements were watched, he returned to Paris secretly.

The ship was not yet ready. Meantime, George III.
heard about his plans, and wrote to Louis XVI.
against the expedition; but, when the letter reached
Paris, Lafayette, with De Kalb and eleven other offi-

cers, had already set out on his journey.



WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. 37

King Louis sent messengers in pursuit, and then
Lafayette disguised himself as a courier, and galloped
ahead of his friends to order the relays of horses.
In one town, during a wait of three hours, he lay
concealed in the straw of a stable. In another town,
when he was recognized by the innkeeper’s daughter,
he made her a sign to be silent just as the pursuers rode
up tothe door, and she sent them away by a different
road.

At last, he reached Pasages, on the Spanish coast,
where his good ship Victory was anchored. And,
when the king’s messengers arrived at the edge of
the water, all covered with the dust of their swift pur-
suit, the sails were already spread, and the Marquis de

Lafayette was on his way to America,

VI.—WasuinctTon’s AIDE-DE-Camp.

The voyage across the ocean was stormy and long.
Lafayette spent most of the time trying to learn to
speak English.

The Victory cast anchor near Charleston, South



38 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE,

Carolina, and the party landed about midnight. As
Lafayette and De Kalb stood on the beach, they clasped
each other's hands, and, looking up to the stars,
vowed they would conquer for liberty or die on foreign
soil.

They found shelter at a farmhouse, and, on the
following day, proceeded to Charleston. Here Lafay-
ette purchased carriages and horses to ride nine hun-
dred miles to Philadelphia, where the Continental
Congress was in session. When the carriages broke
down because of the bad roads, the officers mounted
the horses and continued their journey.

Lafayette could not talk much with the people
whom he met, but he soon saw that America was quite
different from France. There were no beggars lying
by the roadside; the farmers did not kneel when fine
carriages passed, and one man really seemed to be just
about as respectable as another.

‘‘T am more determined than ever,” he said to De
Kalb, ‘‘to help these people preserve the liberties they
have enjoyed.’’

He reached Philadelphia on July 27, 1777.

Now, King Louis had directed Franklin to write



WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. 39

to the Congress requesting it not to give Lafayette a
commission in the army; but the shrewd envoy had
taken no pains to hurry his letter, and, as it had not
been received, Lafayette was given the rank of major
general.

i The outlook for the Americans was not very
encouraging. Washington had
retreated from New York, and
the British general, Sir William
Howe, was preparing to attack
Philadelphia.

' Lafayette first met Washing-

ton in the Quaker City, and knew



him at once by his noble face.

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

He had a talk with the comman-
der, who took him to inspect some fortifications, and
invited him to cross the Delaware to see his
army.

When Lafayette arrived at the camp in New Jersey,
‘the troops were on the drill-ground. Many of them
were ragged and barefooted. Even the officers lacked
suitable uniforms, and the guns were of all shapes and

sizes.



40 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

““We should be embarrassed at thus showing our-
selves to a French officer,’ said Washington.

“Ah!" replied Lafayette, with tears in his eyes;
‘“‘men who fight for liberty against such odds will be
sure to win.”

Washington was so pleased with the modest zeal of
the young marquis that he brade him one of his aides-
de-camp. Lafayette was then just
twenty years old.

Another aide of about his
age was Alexander Hamilton.
Hamilton spoke French almost
as wellas Lafayette, and the two

officers became devoted friends.



ALEXANDER HAMILTON.

General Howe sailed up Chesa-
peake Bay, and, landing, marched to attack Philadel-
phia. Washington, with his army, went to meet him,
and there was a terrible battle near Brandywine Creek.

Lafayette was in the thickest of the fight until he
was forced to fall back on account of having received
a musket ball in the calf of his leg.

“Take care of the marquis as though he were my

own son,” said Washington to the surgeon.



WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. "41

The Americans were badly defeated at Brandy-
wine, because the British were better disciplined, and
had superior arms. Washington retreated, and Phila-
delphia was taken.

His wound confined Lafayette to his bed for six
weeks. During this period of idleness he spent much
of the time writing letters to his wife.

‘‘Now that you are the wife of an American gen-
eral,’’ he wrote, ‘“‘I must give you a lesson. People
in France will say, ‘They have been beaten.’ You
must ‘answer, ‘It is true; but with two armies, equal
in number and on level ground, ‘old soldiers always
have an advantage over new ones; besides, the Ameri-
cans inflicted a greater loss than they sustained.’

“Then people will say, ‘That’s all very well, but
Philadelphia, the capital of the colonies, is taken.’
You will reply, politely, ‘You are foolish; Phila-
delphia is a poor city, open to the enemy on all sides.’ ’’

The devoted little wife repeated these words
at court, and thus helped the American cause in
France.

When Lafayette was again able to mount a horse,

he led an expedition against a post of the Hessians



42 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

with such skill that he was given command of the
Virginia militia.

After some battles around Philadelphia, Washington
made his winter quarters at Valley Forge, about twenty
miles away; and, while the British were enjoying
themselves in the best houses of the Quaker City, the
Americans suffered great privations in tents and rude
cabins.

This was in the winter of 1777. The weather was
very severe. Some of the soldiers were without shoes,
and their feet bled as they walked over the frozen
ground; yet, all through the stormy days, the little
army drilled and worked on the fortifications, while,
at night, those without blankets sat around the camp
fires to keep from freezing to death. Lafayette, who
had been used to luxuries all his life, willingly shared
these hardships, and went limping about from tent to.
tent with a pleasant word for everybody.

Meantime, a British general, Sir John Burgoyne,
having attempted to invade New York from Canada,
was forced to surrender his whole army to General
Gates, at Saratoga.

‘You see,” said some of the American generals,



WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. 43

who were jealous of Washington, ‘‘the army in the

North is successful; but just look at the army in the

South! It has lost Philadelphia, and is only freezing
to death at Valley Forge.”







































































































WASHINGTON AT VALLEY FORGE,

These jealous generals plotted to remove Wash-
ington from command, and tried in every way to induce
Lafayette to favor their evil designs. One night, they
invited him to a dinner. After toasts were offered in

honor of several officers, Lafayette was grieved to



44 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

note that the name of Washington had been omitted.
He arose to his feet. :

‘“Gentlemen,’’ he cried, ‘‘I drink to the health of
George Washington, commander-in-chief of the Amer-
ican armies!”

The toast was honored in silence. The treacherous
men saw plainly enough that the Marquis de Lafayette

would never join in a plot against his general.

VII.—Lovts XVI. Promises a FLEEt.

Now, all this time, Benjamin Franklin was at
Paris, working for the colonies. He found that very
many of the French people wanted to aid in the war
against England.

The noblemen said: ‘‘England robbed us of our
colonies, we should now seek revenge.”

The manufacturers and shopkeepers said: ‘‘England
never allowed the Americans to buy goods directly from
us, and, if we help them win their liberty, we shall
get most of their trade.’’

The wretched peasants did not understand what



LOUIS XVL PROMISES A FLEET. 45

liberty meant, but they knew all about unjust taxes,
and were glad the Americans were refusing to pay them.

But the French king hesitated to send his armies
across the sea. He did not believe that the Americans
were strong enough to win a
single great battle.

“As for helping King
George’s subjects set up a
republic,’ he said, ‘that
would be a dangerous experi-
ment which my own subjects
might wish to try.’”’

Franklin despaired of se-



curing aid from France. One

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

day, as he sat alone, won-
dering what plan he must next pursue, an American
courier arrived from Boston. Franklin met him at the
door.

“Sir,’? he asked, without waiting for the man to
speak, ‘‘is Philadelphia captured?”’

“It is, sir,’ answered the courier.
Franklin turned sadly away. All.seemed lost.

“But, sir, I have better news than that!'’ exclaimed



46 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

the courier, and he showed despatches from Congress
which told of the battle of Saratoga, and of Burgoyne’s
surrender of six thousand men.

Franklin was overjoyed, and hastened to court with
the news.

“Really,”’ said the king to himself, ‘‘this is the
time to give John Bull a fine dose of bitters; these
rebels may yet become a great nation.’’ And so he
acknowledged the independence of the United States,

and promised to send a fleet to America.

VIII.—Tue Furwoucu.

Lafayette was delighted when he learned that his
king had recognized the independence of the United
States and had concluded a treaty of alliance.

The event was celebrated on a May day with a
grand parade at Valley Forge. There was a salute of
thirteen cannon, followed by a volley of musketry, and
then the army, drawn up in two lines, shouted: ‘‘Long
live the king of France!’’ and gave loud huzzas for the

new American States.



THE FURLOUGH. 47

A few days later, Lafayette had occasion to show
his skill. It happened in this way:

Washington had sent him, with two thousand
men, to occupy Barren Hill, half-way between Valley
Forge and Philadelphia, and he was directed to fall on
the rear of the British if they should attempt to leave
the city. He had hardly chosen the camp, near a stone
church, with the Schuylkill River on one side and a
wood on the other, when spies reported his arrival.
The British general, who was attending a grand military
ball at Philadelphia, laughed aloud at the news.

'“Ha, ha! He, he!’ he laughed. ‘‘That will
make a fine close for our dance.’’ And he went about,
saying to the ladies: “I invite you to my house on
to-morrow night to meet the Marquis de Lafayette.”’

Before daylight, nine thousand red-coats were on
the march. One division was sent round bya circuitous
route to cut off retreat to Valley Forge, while two
other divisions approached Barren Hill.

‘The little French boy is in a trap,’’ chuckled the
British general, as he pushed his way through the mists
of the early dawn.

Meantime, scouts brought word to the camp that



48 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

the ‘‘Bloody Backs’’ were coming. The patriots were
in a panic. They ran hither and thither, crying, ‘All
is lost! We cannot escape!”’

Lafayette perceived the danger; but he calmed their
fears with a jaunty air, and smilingly said: ‘‘We will
now lead the British a livelier dance than they had last
night!”’

He had studied the ground and discovered a ford
which the enemy knew nothing about. He laid his
plans well. He boldly advanced a few columns as if to
give battle, and, while the red-coats were preparing to
attack them, he hurried the rest of the army across the
ford; then he quietly withdrew those who were in the
pretended line of battle, and, when the British charged
up Barren Hill from opposite sides, they only met one
another!

The affair was so very ludicrous that, when the nine
thousand marched back to Philadelphia, they were the
sport of everybody.

The British general, hearing that King Louis was
sending over a fleet, abandoned the Quaker City.
Washington pursued him across New Jersey, and there
was a hard-fought battle at Monmouth. In this battle,



THE FURLOUGH. 49

Lafayette bore himself heroically all day long, and, when
night came, with the victory undecided, he slept on the
field by the side of Washington.

The enemy retreated to New York, and Washing-
ton stretched his lines from Morristown, New Jersey,
to West Point, on the Hudson.

While the patriots thus kept watch of New York,
Lafayette was granted a furlough. It was thought
that he might obtain more aid from France. When
he reached Paris, he was placed under arrest; for
King Louis had once promised the English ambassador
to put the bold young marquis in prison if he should
ever return.

And what do you think his prison was?

It was the house of his own family, and the chains
that were bound tightly around his neck were the arms
of his loving wife.

He was forbidden to enter the king’s presence
for a week as penance for having disobeyed royal
orders; but, at the end of that time, he was again
restored to his old place of honor. It is said that the
queen and every lady of the court kissed him on both

cheeks.



50 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

Lafayette turned this whirlwind of favor .to the

advantage of the patriots. He said that no European

army would sufferthe tenth part of what the American

LAFA-
YETTE’S
SWORD.



troops did, and boldly declared that the cost
of a single royal ball would equip the whole
army.

He talked much about Washington.

“Do you know, Doctor,’’ said the queen
one day to Franklin, ‘‘ that Lafayette has
really made me in.love with your General
Washington? What a man he must be!”

When, at last, Lafayette was ready to
return to America, he went in the uniform
of an American general to bid the king
good-bye. At his side hung a sword, with
handle of gold and blade of steel, engraved
with his arms and his motto, Cur non? It
had been presented to him by Franklin in
the name of the American Congress.

When he landed at Boston, the bells of the

churches rang a welcome, while the citizens marched

in line to escort him to General Hancock’s house on
Beacon Hill.

y



THE VICTORY AT YORKTOWN. 51

As soon as he could do so, Lafayette went to army
headquarters on the Hudson. There Washington
greeted him as if he had been his own son; but he
looked anxious and sad.

‘‘Alas, my boy,” he said, ‘‘there is bad news for
you. We have been defeated in the South. Our con-
tinental money is so counterfeited by the enemy that
it is almost worthless, and our sick and starving sol-
diers are without supplies.’’ 3

“Ah!’’ cried Lafayette, with a joyous laugh, ‘‘I
have remembered my general during my absence.
There are six thousand land troops, under Rochambeaun,

now on the way, and money, and clothing, and arms.’’

IX.—Tue Victory at YORKTOWN.

Not long after Lafayette’s return, he went with
Washington to inspect the fortifications at West Point.
While they were there, Washington discovered that
Benedict Arnold, the commander of the fort, had been
bribed to betray it to the British.

West Point was saved; but Arnold, the traitor,



52 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

escaped toa British ship, and enlisted in the service of
the enemy. This was in September, 1780.

A few months later, Arnold led a British army into
Virginia, and Lafayette was ordered
south to attack him.

“Look before you leap,’’ were
Washington’s parting words.

Lafayette remembered the warn-



ing, and moved forward with caution.

BENEDICT ARNOLD. : -
At Baltimore, he borrowed ten

thousand dollars from some merchants to supply his
men with shoes and hats, and to buy the linen which
the women of the city made into summer garments.

Then he marched to Richmond, Virginia. Arnold
soon sent a letter to the camp about an exchange of
prisoners. Lafayette said to the messenger: “I will
answer the letter of any British officer; but I will not
even read a letter from Benedict Arnold, the traitor.’’

A few days later, the British general, Cornwallis,
took command of Arnold’s troops.

“The Frenchman cannot escape me!’’ he said.

The youthful major general warily avoided an

engagement with Cornwallis. He joined his forces



THE VICTORY AT YORKTOWN. 53

with those of Anthony Wayne, and followed the British
at a distance.

Some of the best young men of Virginia and Mary-
land had hesitated to take up arms
against the king; but, when they
saw the skill and courage of this
stranger, they mounted their own

horses and joined his ranks. Thus



Lafayette’s army kepi daily increas-
ing. GENERAL ANTHONY
Now, just at this time, all Europe age
was awaiting events on two rivers in America. The
Hudson, in the North, lay between Clinton and Wash-
ington; and the James, in the South, held on its banks

the opposing armies of Cornwallis and Lafayette.
‘Whose army will conquer?’’ was a question which
King George and King Louis anxiously asked.
It was not long before they had an answer.
Cornwallis threw up fortifications at Yorktown,
and moved his camp there. Then, Washington and
Lafayette agreed to unite their armies to attack
him.

Soon a French fleet, under Count de Grasse, moved

E L.FORD,



54 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

up Chesapeake Bay, and anchored before Yorktown.
Lafayette and Wayne marched nearer and nearer,

until Cornwallis was surrounded by land and

sea.

De Grasse urged Lafayette to make the attack at
once. It was a temptation for the
young major general. He knew
that Europe would ring with his
name if he should win the victory
alone; but, when he thought of
the patient commander in the
North, who had borne the bur-

dens of the long war, he said to



De Grasse: ‘‘No, if we strike the
enemy now, our losses will be too great. I shall await
the arrival of Washington. To him alone should belong
the honor of giving Cornwallis this final blow.”’

Meanwhile, Washington left the Hudson. Rocham-
beau, with the French troops, joined him, and together
they marched to the South. When the united armies,
under the command of Washington, stood in front
of Yorktown, Lafayette’s division was the first to storm
the redoubts,



THE VICTORY AT YORKTOWN. 55

Cornwallis surrendered October 19, 1781; this ended
the war, and America was free.

Lafayette received a leave of absence to return to
France. When he reached Versailles and found that his
wife was attending a ball at the palace, he sent her a
message. The tidings of his arrival ended the dancing.
Everybody stopped to tell everybody else that the Mar-
quis de Lafayette had returned from America; and the
queen called her own carriage to accompany the happy
wife home.

Honors were showered on the hero; but he modestly
declared that most of the credit of victory belonged to
Washington. Whenever he dined with the French
officers, he proposed a toast to the health of Washing.
ton, and when his son was born, he named him George
Washington. After the treaty of peace between Eng-
land and America had been signed, he wrote to Wash-
ington: ‘‘As for you, my dear general, who can truly
say that all this is your work, what must be your
feelings!”’

Later, he wrote: ‘‘The eternal honor in which
my descendants will glory will be to have had an

ancestor among your soldiers.’’



56 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

X.—A Visir tro Mount VERNON.

In 1784, Lafayette visited Washington at Mount
Vernon. The two friends spent many happy days
together. They rode after the hounds, or walked on
the banks of the Poto-
mac River, or sat in the
library musing over the
battles they had fought
for liberty. They talked

much about the thirteen





MOUNT VERNON. new states, which had
not yet formed a permanent union.

’

‘There are three things I wish,” said Lafayette;
“first, that France and America form an alliance; second,
that the thirteen colonies be united under one govern-
ment; and third, that the slaves in the colonies
be freed.”

Washington agreed with Lafayette about all these
measures. The two visited the battlefields of the
South, and lingered at the grave of De Kalb, who had
fallen at Camden, in South Carolina.

When, at last, Lafayette started north to resign



A VISIT TO MOUNT VERNON. 57

his commission, Washington. accompanied him as far
as Annapolis. On returning to Mount Vernon, he
hastened to write: ‘‘In the moment of our separation
and every hour since, I have felt all that love, respect
and attachment for you with which length of years
and your merits have inspired me. I often asked
myself, as our carriages separated, whether that was
the last sight I ever should have of you.”

It was, indeed, the last time they met on earth.
Lafayette returned home. He was kept busy for years
by important events, and when he again visited America
the noble Washington was in his grave.

Perhaps the best service of Lafayette to our country
was the good name he gave it in Europe. He also did
what he could to improve our trade by finding new
markets for our products.

The fishermen of Nantucket were so grateful for
his help in the whaling industry that they held a public
meeting. Every man present promised two milkings
from his cow to make a cheese. Barrels of milk were
accordingly collected, and a great round cheese, weighing
five hundred pounds, was made; and one day it arrived

at Chavaniac, not a whit the less fragrant for its long



58 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

voyage across the sea. The planters of Virginia were
so much pleased with Lafayette’s efforts in behalf of
the tobacco trade, that they ordered Houdon, the sculp-
tor, to make two marble busts of him. One was placed
in the capitol at Richmond, and
the other was presented to the
city of Paris.

Now, the kings of Europe
did not like the new ideas about
liberty which had spread over the
world after the American revo-

lution. Frederick the Great, of



FREDERICK THE GREAT.

Prussia, invited the Marquis de
Lafayette to his court for a visit. In one of their
talks, King Frederick said: ‘‘By and by, the United
States will return to the good old system of monarchy.”

‘‘Never, sire, never,’’ replied Lafayette; ‘‘neither
monarchy nor aristocracy can ever exist in America.”’
“Sir,” said Frederick, with a penetrating look, “I
knew a young man who, after he had visited countries
where liberty and equality reigned, conceived the idea
of establishing the same system in his own country. Do

you know what happened to him?”



THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY. 59

‘“‘No, sire.”’

‘‘He was hanged.’’

Lafayette looked up with a calm smile; but he did
not betray to the anxious king what his thoughts were.

XI.—Tuer Nationa ASSEMBLY.

It was, indeed, time for the monarchs of Europe
to be concerned about the safety of their thrones.
Nowhere was the danger greater than in France.

While King Louis had been helping King George's
subjects, his own subjects were suffering. They were
grievously taxed to support the splendor of the king
and his nobles. Whole counties were reduced to
starvation, and thousands of wretched creatures wan-
dered over the kingdom, begging or robbing as they
went.

Louis XVI. saw little of all this misery. He was
happy himself, and he wondered why everybody else
was not happy. If he chanced to see a pallid face
through the window of his coach, he said: ‘‘That poor

fellow is ill,’”’



60 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

No one spoiled his drive by telling him the man
was hungry.

The thoughtless king kept asking his ministers for
more money, until they told him the treasury was
empty. Then the taxes were increased. The people
began to hear how the Americans had won the right
to vote their own taxes. They asked one another why
the French might not have that right too. It really
began to look as if there might be a revolution in
France.

When Lafayette returned from his visit to Mount
Vernon, he advised the king to call an assembly of the
nobles to decide what should be done. The assembly
was summoned. Lafayette was one of its members.
He declared that there must be less extravagance at
court instead of more taxes on the workingmen.

“Citizens ought to be allowed to vote their own
taxes,” he said. ‘‘Let us call a national assembly
with the common people represented in it.’’

“What!” cried the other nobles, ‘‘would you dare
to put that request in writing for the king to read?’

“I dare do anything that may broaden the liber-

”

ties of my fellowmen,’”’ replied the patriot.



THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 61

He wrote a petition asking that his majesty permit
the people of France to elect representatives to help
make the laws. He was the only one who was bold
enough to sign the paper.

”

“The marquis will be sent to the Bastille,’’ whis-
pered the nobles to one another, and they expected
to see him seized by the guards. :

King Louis did not send Lafayette to prison; but
he gave no heed to the petition.

Things went from bad to worse until at length
the king consented to summon a national assembly
to meet at Versailles.

Lafayette represented the nobles of his province
and took his seat on May 1, 1789. It was just one
day after the inauguration of Washington as President

of the United States.

XII.—Tue Frencu REVOLUTION.

The members of the National Assembly marched
in a body to the Church of Saint Louis for prayers.

The representatives of the common people walked



62 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

first, dressed in black; then the noblemen came, in
silk and velvet and lace with gold chains about their
necks; and last of all came the king and the highest
officials of the court.

It was a magnificent pageant, attended with the
clang of trumpets and the chant of
priests. The streets were crowded
with sight-seers, among whom was
Thomas Jefferson, the American
minister to France.

Now, the men in black had



come from all parts of the kingdom

THOMAS JEFFERSON.

to right the wrongs of the people;
yet at the first meeting they heard of nothing but the
king’s need of more money.

They grew desperate, at last, and boldly declared
that there must be better laws. The king listened
in silence; then he put on his gold-laced hat; the
nobles did the same, and then—whdt do you think?
—the men in black put on their caps!

The king was amazed, and the nobles stared at
one another in astonishment; for the common people

had never before dared to wear caps in the presence



THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 63

of royalty. But the men in black did not stop at
that. They held a meeting among themselves and
resolved not to return to their homes until the king
had signed a written constitution for the government
of France.

Lafayette drew up a Declaration of Rights. It
was something like one which the American Congress
had sent to George III. Louis XVI. agreed to make
reforms. Perhaps he tried to do so; but he really
did not know how to change the old order of
things.

While there were bread riots around the public
buildings in Paris, he gave a grand ball at Versailles.
Some one hurried to tell the hungry people about it.

‘‘Louis mocks at our misery!’’ they cried.

And the very next day they stormed the Bastille.
They broke down the great doors and set the prisoners
free, and then they battered the massive walls to the
ground. King Louis was afraid to leave his palace at
Versailles.

. Electors met in the Hétel de Ville, or City Hall.
They declared there must be a commander of a national

guard to keep order in Paris, and when one of them



64 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

pointed to the bust of Lafayette which Virginia had
presented, he was elected by a unanimous vote.
The mobs grew wilder in spite of all the new

guard could do. Once when they were raising a









































































THE BASTILLE,

gallows upon which to hang a harmless priest, there
seemed no way to quell their fury.

Lafayette sprang to a platform. Just then his
little boy came to the place with his teacher. He
seized the child and held him high up.

“Gentlemen,” he said, ‘I have the honor
to present to you my son, George Washington
Lafayette!’’

The name of the American patriot acted like



THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 65

magic upon the crowds below. Cheers rent the air,
and, in the confusion, the poor priest escaped.

As winter came on, food became scarcer than ever.
Yet the court at Versailles was feasting. Some one
said that when the queen heard the people had no
bread, she laughingly asked: ‘‘Why don’t they eat
cake then?’ and that a nobleman said: ‘‘Nay, let
them eat grass!’’

The rage of the mobs increased. Lafayette
stationed the National Guard on the road to Versailles
to prevent them from going there. But one day a
fish-woman beat a drum. The ragged and hungry
people ran together, and soon thousands were on
their way to Versailles.

“Bread! Bread!’’ they cried.

The guard gave way. The mad creatures reached
the palace. They killed the Swiss guards at the
doors and ran their pikes into the queen’s empty bed.

Lafayette had followed swiftly with the National
Guard. He drove the intruders from the palace and
talked to them until they seemed more calm.

Then he led Louis to the balcony above them.

‘‘Long live the king!’’ they shouted.



66 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

‘““Come,”’ said Lafayette to Marie Antoinette, She
appeared with the little prince and the princess.

“Not the children!’’ ‘“‘Not the children!” they
cried; for they did not wish the innocent to suffer,

The terrified queen sent
the children within. She
stood on the balcony alone.
She expected instant death.

Lafayette stepped for-
ward. He bowed low and
kissed her hand. The people

again forgot their anger.



“Long live the queen!”
“Long live the general!’’ they shouted as they beat
their pikes together.

“Perhaps things would mend if their majesties
left this costly palace,’’ said a grimy blacksmith to a
thin-visaged tailor.

“They must go to Paris!’’ screamed the tailor.

“On to Paris!’ was the cry from a thousand
throats.

The royal family was forced into a carriage. ot

was a strange procession that went back into the great



THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 67

city. Lafayette and the guard rode on each side of
the splendid carriage, but, before and behind, marched
men and women with wild eyes and unkempt hair.
Some held on their pikes the pillaged loaves of bread,
and others the bloody heads of the Swiss guards, while
the fish-woman led the van with her drum.

At last, their majesties were safe in the palace at
Paris. Lafayette had rescued them from death; yet
he was “fein in his devotion to the liberties of the
people.. He said to the National Assembly: ‘‘If the
king will sign a constitution for the just government of
France, I shall defend him; if he refuses to sign, I will
fight him.”’

Soon after this Louis signed a constitution which
was much like that of England. On July 14, 1790,
the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille, the French ,
celebrated the beginning of their freedom. In an
open field where thousands of the people had assem-
bled, the king and the members of the new assembly
pledged to support the constitution.

When Lafayette ascended the steps to take the
oath, in the name of the army, there was loud applause;
and, as he rode at the head of the National Guard ia



68 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

the parade which followed the solemn ceremony, all
eyes were fixed on him. .

In his joy at what seemed to be the end of
tyranny in his native land, he sent to Washington the
key to the fallen Bastille, where men had once been
imprisoned for life without trial by jury. To-day,
you may see the great iron key among the historic

treasures of Mount Vernon.

XITI.—An Exine anp IN PRISON.

The French people had not yet learned the first
lesson in self-government. The constitutional mon-
archy soon failed. Mobs imprisoned the royal family
and set fire to the houses of the nobles.

Lafayette was grieved over these events. He had
led the enslaved people toward liberty, but as soon as
they were free they had outrun their guide. Because
he would not join them in their excesses, they called
him an aristocrat and threatened him with death.

He fled from Paris and wrote to his wife to join

him in England. ‘‘Let us go to America,’ he said,



AN EXILE AND IN PRISON. 69

“and establish ourselves there. Some day, when the
storm is over, I may yet serve France.’’

But the monarchs of Europe said: ‘‘This Marquis
de Lafayette, who brought these outrageous ideas of
liberty from America, must be silenced.”

He was arrested on the frontier and imprisoned
in Prussia for a year. Then he was sent to a dungeon
at Olmutz in Austria. He had wretched food. His
clothes rotted with dampness. His bed was a pile of
straw. Yet when he was told he might be free if he
would betray the military strength of France, he
refused to leave his cell. He expected to die in his chains.

One morning he heard a rattle of keys and bars.
He arose from his straw and saw his wife and two
daughters enter beneath the crossed swords of the
guards. The joy was too great. He fell in a swoon.
When he recovered his senses, he tenderly embraced
his loved ones.

‘And where is my little George?’”’ he asked.

‘He is at Mount Vernon with Washington,”’
replied his wife.

“‘God be praised for such a friend in our hour of

need,” exclaimed the now happy father.



t

7o STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

When he was strong enough to bear it, the Mar-
quise told him what had happened at Paris. It was a
sad story. ;

The king and queen had been beheaded; her
own grandmother, mother, and sister, with thousands
of others, had been led to the scaf-
fold during a reign of terror. She
herself had been in prison until
released through the efforts of
James Monroe, the new. American

minister to France. After many



trials she had obtained permission

JAMES MONROE.

to share his captivity.

The devoted wife remained at Olmutz.

Meanwhile, Washington, Jefferson and _ other
friends appealed to the Austrian emperor to set the
patriot free. ,

“It is impossible,” replied the despot. ‘‘Lafay-
ette’s existence is. a menace to the kingdoms of
Europe.”

When, at last, Napoleon Bonaparte, at the head
of his French troops, defeated the allied powers, who

were trying to place another king upon the throne of



-AN EXILE AND IN PRISON. 71

France, he refused to sign a treaty of peace until all
the French prisoners were surrendered.

Lafayette was liberated. He went to Hamburg,
in Germany, with his wife and daughters. His son
returned from America, and
the united family lived for a
time in exile.

When Napoleon became
First Consul of France, he
pledged himself to restore
the constitution for which
Lafayette had struggled so
long. The patriot then re-



turned to his native land.

NAPOLEON BONAPARTE,

Most.of his property at Cha-
vaniac had been confiscated, and he made his home
at La Grange, in the province of La Brie.

Formerly the peasants on his estates had knelt when
he passed. -The revolution had changed all that; but
when he taught them self-respect, they showed respect
for others without servility.

The Americans did not forget Lafayette in his

retirement. In 1805, President Jefferson offered to



72 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

appoint him governor of Louisiana; but his wife’s
health was too feeble to permit of the long voyage.
Two years later the noble wife died. At her

own request she was buried in that part of the













LA GRANGE, HOME OF LAFAYETTE,

cemetery of Picpus which is called the ‘‘cemetery of

the beheaded,” because there lay the bodies of her

relatives who had fallen victims to the mobs.
Napoleon did not keep his pledges to obey the

constitution. He made himself emperor of France.



THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. 73

After a time he was exiled by the allied powers of
Europe, and Louis XVIII. was placed on _ the
throne.

Lafayette was a member of the National
Assembly for several years, trying always to preserve
the liberties of the people. Then he retired to La
Grange, where he expected to live quietly with his

children for the rest of his days.

XIV.—Tue Man or Two Wor tps.

In 1824, in accordance with a resolution of Con-
gress, President James Monroe invited Lafayette to
visit the United States. He gladly accepted the
invitation, and set out on his journey with his son
George Washington and a private secretary.

“Tt has been thirty years since I last saw the
people of America,’ he said to himself. ‘‘I must be
prepared to meet indifferent glances; for most of my
friends have long since passed away.’’

He expected to land quietly in New York and



74 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

secure private lodgings; but when he arrived he

found that he was the nation’s guest.

The city was having a holiday in his honor.



STATUE OF LAFAYETTE,
UNION SQUARE, N. Y.



Thousands stood on the wharves
to greet him, while cannon
roared and banners waved.

‘“WELCoME, Laravette !”’
was inscribed on the arches
beneath which he passed, and
his portrait, stamped on blue
ribbon, was everywhere to be
seen.

Lafayette now understood
that he had not been forgot-
ten, and his eyes overflowed
with tears.

As he went about from
city to city, he aroused the
greatest enthusiasm.

He limped a little as he

walked. The people said it was because of the

wound he had received at Brandywine, and their

gratitude seemed without bounds. In one public pro-



THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. 75

cession was the model of a ship with his youthful
pledge: ‘‘I will purchase and equip a vessel at my
own expense.’’

In another a chorus of white-robed girls sang:

“We bow not the neck and we bend not the knee,
But our hearts, Lafayette, we surrender to thee.”’

It all seemed like the close of a fairy story where
the armed knight, who had once rushed to the rescue
of young America in distress, returned again after
many years to behold her golden days of prosperity.

The thirteen small colonies had become twenty-
four united states;" the population had grown from
three millions to twelve millions; towns had become
cities; forests had been transformed into farms; and
the ships, ~which sailed on every sea, carried the
products of soil and loom and forge to the markets
of the world.

When, from the well-filled public treasury, Con-
gress presented two hundred thousand dollars to the
hero, he received the gift with touching words of
gratitude; but when the legislatures of Virginia,

Maryland, and other states began to vote large sums



76 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

of money for him, he firmly refused to accept of
their generosity.

He stood at the tombs of Washington, Hamilton,
Franklin, and other soldiers and statesmen who had
helped to establish liberty,
and he visited Jefferson and
John Adams, whose totter-
ing footsteps had almost
reached the grave, to. learn
from their lips the story of
the new republic.

On June 17, 1825, the



anniversary of the battle of

Bunker Hill, Lafayette as-

JOHN ADAMS.

sisted in laying .the cornerstone of the Bunker Hill
monument.

Many thousand people came to Boston to witness
the ceremonies. During an eloquent address, Daniel
Webster turned to the French patriot. ‘‘Fortunate,
fortunate man!’’ he exclaimed; ‘‘you were connected
with both hemispheres and with two generations!

Heaven saw fit that the electric spark of liberty
should be conducted through you from the New World



THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. Ti

to the Old, and we, who are now here to perform this
duty of patriotism, have all of us long ago received it
from our fathers to cherish your name and your
virtues.

‘‘Those who survived the
‘battle of Bunker Hill are
now around you. Some of
them you have known in the
trying scenes of war. Behold
them now stretch forth their
feeble arms to embrace you!
Behold, they raise their trem-

bling voices to invoke the



blessings of God on you and

BUNKER HILL MONUMENT,

yours forever!’’

“On July 4th, Lafayette was at New York and
listened to the reading of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence. Well did he remember the dinner party at
Metz, nearly fifty years before, where he had first heard
about this Declaration of Independence. And as he
sat upon a high platform and looked down upon the
thousands before him, he smiled in content, for he

thought he saw in their happy faces the fulfilment of



78 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

his youthful dreams. Yet afew weeks later he began
to fear for the safety of the Republic.

There was a tremendous uproar during a political
campaign for the election of the next President. At
the taverns, on busy streets and lene, roads, in every
nook and cranny of the country,
people disputed about whether An-
drew Jackson, Henry Clay, John
Quincy Adams, or William H. Craw-

ford would make the best President.



Public opinion was so divided

DANIEL WEBSTER.

that when election day came no
candidate received a majority of votes. The French-
man thought that there really seemed no way to settle
the result except with pistols and swords.

He did not know much about the laws of. the
United States. But he soon learned what a. great
instrument of good government our Constitution
is.

The Constitution provides that when no candidate
has received a majority of the electoral votes, the
three highest names on the list. must come before the

House of Representatives.



THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. 79

When, at last, John Quincy Adams was chosen by
the House, all factions accepted the verdict.

““Ah!’’ exclaimed Lafayette, ‘‘this is, indeed, a
wonderful nation. It is built on a solid foundation,
and cannot fall.’’

The more he traveled in the United States, the
more he was impressed with the greatness of its
future. When he sailed up the Mississippi and the
Ohio and saw the rude cabins on their banks, he
said: ‘‘These are the beginnings of cities.”

When he drove over the National Pike Road or
made a voyage on the new Erie Canal, he said:
“These are the beginnings of yet greater highways
which will one day unite’’—Do you think he said the
Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean? No, he did
not say that, because in 1825 the Mexicans claimed
most of the territory west of the Rocky Mountains.
He said—‘‘which will one day unite all sections of the
country.”’

Lafayette spent more than a year with his friends.
When his visit was over, he embarked in a new
American frigate, the Srandywine, and the prayers

of millions followed him as he sailed away for the



80 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

last time from our shores. So much honor had been
shown this guest of the nation that, for many years
after, if any one received special attention, he was said
to be ‘‘Lafayetted.”’

Nor was the hero forgotten in his absence. Old
places in the East and new places in the West and
South remembered him until, to-day, there are over
ninety towns and counties in the United States whose
names recall him or the home of his old age.

The boys and girls who are so fortunate as to live
at La Grange, or Lafayette, or Fayetteville, or
Fayette Hill, or any other Fayette, must surely think
often of the gallant young French marquis who came

to the rescue of our thirteen struggling colonies.

XV.—Tue Last Days or a PATRIOT.

When Lafayette arrived in France he was received
with open arms by his countrymen. They called him
the protector of their Constitution. And, indeed, just
at that time the French Constitution needed pro-

tection.



THE LAST DAYS OF A PATRIOT. 81

During Lafayette’s absence Louis XVIII. had died
and Charles X. had come to the throne. King Charles
was determined to restore the old order of things.
He destroyed the liberty of the press, dissolved the
National Assembly, and chose his favorites as ministers.

The members of the Assembly met again of their
own accord, and declared they would resist these
unconstitutional measures. Then the people of Paris

rushed together. They barricaded the streets, defeated
the royal troops, and drove the king from the city.

Lafayette might have been elected President, but
he refused to accept the office; for he knew very well
that the French people were not ready for a republic.
He desired a constitutional monarchy like that of
England. He visited Louis Philippe, the Duke of
Orleans. This prince had traveled in the United
States and England, and understood what a govern-
ment ‘‘by the people, for the people’’ meant.

“You know,” said Lafayette to the duke, ‘‘that I
regard the Constitution of the United States as the
most perfect that has ever existed.’’

‘I think as you do,” replied his highness; ‘‘it is

impossible to have passed two years in America and



82 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

not be of that opinion. But do you believe that the
French people are ready for that?”

‘"No, they are only ready for a throne surrounded
with republican institutions.’’

“Such is my _ belief,’’
said the duke.

Soon after this the Na-
tional Assembly met in the
Hotel de Ville. The Duke
of Orleans was there. He
pledged himself to receive

the crown, not by right of



birth, but as the free gift

LOUIS PHILIPPE.

of the people.

Lafayette led him to an open window and
embraced him.

‘““Long live the Duke of Orleans!’’ shouted the

people who had assembled below to greet him.

Not long after, he was crowned King of France
by the Assembly.

“Long live King Louis Philippe!’’ cried every one.

Lafayette felt that he had at last won his long
fight for the constitutional liberty of his beloved



THE LAST DAYS OF A PATRIOT. 83

country. The aged patriot retired to La Grange,
where he lived yet a little longer among his children
and friends. In his favorite room hung the portraits
of Washington and
Franklin and a paint-
ing of the siege of
Yorktown; and here
he loved to sit and
muse over the exciting
scenes of his early days.

One beautiful morn-
ing, May 20, 1834, he
died at Paris, sur-

rounded by his family;



and there was mourn-

LAFAYETTE’S GRAVE AT PICPUS.

ing throughout France,
His remains were placed with great pomp by the side
of those of his wife in the cemetery of Picpus. As
the casket was lowered, earth from America, mingled
with that of France, was strewn upon it.

‘Lafayette was a man of two worlds,’’ said the
Paris papers which were banded in black.

Church bells tolled in his honor in many countries.



84 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

In the United States, Congress wore mourning for
thirty days, and, by order of President Jackson, the
same honors were paid to his memory by the army
and navy as had been paid to that of George Washing-
ton.

As the years went by, the French people learned
to govern themselves. They created a republican
government, and to-day the Republic of France is one
of the great powers of Europe.

As for the United States, the government has
grown steadily stronger and greater upon the founda-
tions which Lafayette helped to build.

It was Washington who said: ‘‘Lafayette deserves
all the gratitude which our country can render
him.’”’ ‘

And on October 19, 1898, the anniversary of the
victory at Yorktown, young patriots in every city,
‘town, and village in our country remembered these
words. They held memorial services in Lafayette’s honor,
and contributed funds to erect, in the city of Paris, a
noble monument to his name. And all agreed that
the monument should be dedicated on July 4, 1900,

the anniversary of our Declaration of Independence.



THE LAST DAYS OF A PATRIOT. 85

For it was the news of Liberty’s birth which first
taught the young captain of artillery at Metz what his

mission in life should be.



LIBERTY ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD.

Presented by the People of France tothe Republic of the United States.




































Full Text

Bs
z

cs
a


FRIENDS OF AMERICAN LIBERTY

LAFAYETTE




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FRANCE AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



LAFAYETTE

THE FRIEND OF AMERICAN LIBERTY |

BY

ALMA HOLMAN BURTON

Author of ‘‘ The Story of Our Country,”’ ‘‘ Four American Patriots "’ etc:

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
JAMES BALDWIN, Ph.D.



WERNER SCHOOL BOOK COMPANY
NEW YORK CHICAGO BOSTON
Copyright, 1898,

By Werner ScHoot Boox Company

Marquis do Lafayette
EL. FORD, ve

INTRODUCTION.

The story of the Marquis de Lafayette.forms one of the
most interesting chapters in the history of human liberty.
To understand clearly the nature of Lafayette’s services,
both to America and to the whole world, we must first
think of the conditions of life at the beginning of his
career, and then contrast them with those which now
prevail. One hundred and forty years ago, when Lafayette
was a child, the world was not so pleasant a place to live
in as it is in our own time. Even in the most enlight-
ened countries of Europe, the majority of the people were
downtrodden and oppressed. Men had scarcely so much as
heard of liberty. Outside of England and her colonies, the
idea of popular freedom was unknown. < :

This idea, as you may have learned etsewheser-séems to
have been a sort of birthright of the Anglo-Saxon race. Ever
since the barons of England forced King John to grant them
a charter of rights, the peoples of that race have defended
and cherished it. Like a spark of fire in the midst of gen-
eral gloom, it has oftentimes been almost extinguished; and
yet, no matter how its enemies have tried to stamp it out,
it has survived and been rekindled.

The American colonists, because this idea of liberty was

7
8 INTRODUCTION.

implanted in their hearts, rebelled against the tyranny of
George III., and boldly demanded their rights as freeborn
Englishmen. Frenchmen, at that time, would not have done
this. They would have tamely submitted to every form of
oppression, not yet having learned that the common people
have certain rights which even kings must respect. Indeed,
at the very time that the American patriots were refusing to
obey the unjust laws of their English rulers, the common
people of France were suffering from oppressions ten times as
great; and yet they had no thought of resistance, but sub-
mitted silently, as creatures whose only duty was to obey their
masters. At the very time that our forefathers were resisting
the payment of the tax on tea, the common people of France
were paying all the taxes for the support of the French king
and his nobles.

So burdensome were these taxes that they consumed the
greater part of every man’s earnings. The people had no
voice in the management of public affairs, nor had they any
rights save to toil unceasingly for those who had set them-
selves over them. Every year thousands of persons died of
starvation, because the earnings of labor, instead of providing
food for the laborers, were taken for taxes. Meanwhile, the
nobles, or privileged classes, who owned all the land, were
living in ease and luxury; they did no work of any kind;
they paid no taxes; they seemed to live for no purpose but to

gratify their own pleasures and do honor to the king.
INTRODUCTION. 9

Such was the condition of France at the time Lafayette
was preparing to aid the cause of liberty in America. Do
you ask why he did not first help the oppressed in his own
country? They were not yet ready to be profited by such
assistance. The time was not ripe for any movement against
the tyranny of the king and his court. To the downtrodden
people of France, liberty seemed a thing so impossible that
they had not even so much as dreamed of contending for it.

Lafayette was not one of the people—he was a member
of the nobility, and we should naturally expect to find him
arrayed on the side of the oppressor rather than on that of
the oppressed. But here his patriotism seems all the more
praiseworthy because it was wholly unselfish, What could he
expect to gain by befriending the American colonists ? They
could not even offer him a salary as an officer in the con-
tinental army. Did he hope to win fame by great achieve-
ments in war? There were in Europe other and more promising
fields for the display of military genius. In only one way can
we account for his ardor in behalf of American liberty, and
that is by saying that he was imbued with the true spirit of
freedom, and was, therefore, a friend to all mankind. He
thought that he saw in America the first opportunity to do
good by striking a blow at oppression. The results were
greater than any one could have dreamed. Without his aid it
is hardly possible that our revolution would have succeeded;

without it, the American colonies might have still remained
10 INTRODUCTION.

under the control of Great Britain. But his friendship for
American liberty turned the tide and made the history of the
nineteenth century very different from what it would otherwise
have been. The success of the* American cause aroused the
long-oppressed people of France to a sense of their rights and
_ urged them to a similar resistance to tyranny. Thus, through
lending aid to the colonists, Lafayette found the surest means
of doing service for his own countrymen, and the people of
two continents thereby became his debtors.

What has been the final result of these uprisings for
liberty? The spirit of freedom has extended its blessed influ-
ence over the whole globe, and to-day there is hardly a
country under the sun from which tyranny and oppression
have not been banished. The right of every man to life,
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is no longer disputed; for
men everywhere have learned the true meaning of liberty and
have acquired the courage to stand up fearlessly in its
defense.

To the great leaders, statesmen, and warriors, through
whom American independence was won, the whole world
owes a debt of gratitude. And, while every American citi-
zen takes pleasure in commemorating the deeds of Washing-
ton, our greatest patriot, let the place next to him in our
affections be reserved for that brave friend of American liberty,
_ the Marquis de Lafayette.

James BALDWIN.
CHAPTER

II.
ITI.
IV.

VI.
VII.
VIIl.
IX.

XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

Tue CoLonies IN NortH AMERICA
Tue Younc Marquis

Tue CouRTIER

Tur DInNER Party .

Ture DEPARTURE FOR AMERICA
WasHINGTON’s AIDE-DE-CAMP
Lovis XVI. Promises A FLEET
Tur FurLoucH .
Tur Victory at YorKTOWN
A Visit To Mount VERNON
Tue NationaL ASSEMBLY

Tue FrencH REVOLUTION

An EXILE AND IN PRISON

Tue Man or Two Wor.ips

Tue Last Days or a PatrioT

PAGE

15
20
25
28
32
37
44
46
51
56
59
61
68

73
80

ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Portrait OF LAFayETTE : : : f ; frontispiece
Map or Our Country IN 1750 ; a & : : : pumas
GerorceE III. : 5 : : a : s : . 18
CHATEAU DE CHAVANIAC : F : : : ¢ : . 20
Louris XVI. 4 : : 5 : ‘ : : : : 26
A BritTIsH SOLDIER : ; : : 5 3 5 aor
Baron DE Kaz . A : ; : é : ; a 34
Stas DEANE . : ; i : : : : : 5
GEORGE WASHINGTON . ; : : : : : : 39
ALEXANDER HAMILTON . : : : 3 ‘ : : . 40
WASHINGTON AT VALLEY ForGE : : i : : : 43
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 5 : : : : : : ; PaaS
LAFAYETTE’S SwoRD . ; ; ’ : : : : : 50
Brenepicr ARNOLD . : : : : 3 : : ‘ eh 2
GENERAL ANTHONY WAYNE . t 3 : ; : 5 a 53
Lorp CornwWALLis . 5 eT : : . : : peo.
Mount VERNON . : : : d - : ? : _ 56
FREDERICK THE GREAT . : : : E : : ‘ Leh
THOMAS JEFFERSON : ; : : : . : : : 62
TuE BAsTILLE : : : ; f : : : : . 64
Marie ANTOINETTE. : : ‘ : : : . : 66
James Monroe. : : . : . . : . : 70
NapoLeoN BONAPARTE . ; i : : i ; i eel
La GRANGE . ‘5 s é : ‘ : % : _ é 72
STATUE OF LAFAYETTE . : j : 3 3 2 ; Beker A:
Joun ADAMS : s fei : : 3 : : : 70)
Bunker Hitt MONUMENT. : - : : : ‘ 3 77
DANIEL WEBSTER. z A 2 : Z : : i 78
Louis PHILIPPE . : : : 5 : 3 : : : 82
LAFAVETTE’s GRAVE , : : 3 : 3 : toh)

Liperty ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD . : : q ; ‘ 85





A

MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

I.—Tue Cotonres In NortH AMERICA.

One hundred and fifty years ago North America was

Spain claimed

15

Florida, Mexico, and the country west of the Rocky
OUR COUNTRY IN 1750,

glaimed by three kingdoms of Europe.


16 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

Mountains; France claimed Canada and the vast region
between the Rocky Mountains and the Alleghanies;
and England claimed a wide strip of land extending
from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Florida, and running
straight through the territories of France and Spain, as
far west as the Pacific Ocean.

Now Spain did not fear England’s pretensions in the
least. The Pacific slope was an unknown region beyond
the Rocky Mountains, and no one dreamed that an Eng-
lishman would ever cross the trackless wilderness and
climb those dizzy heights. But France knew very well
that whenever the thirteen colonies along the Atlantic
coast became densely settled, the English would try to
seize the fertile valley of the Ohio. And so, while
English colonists were cultivating farms and building
towns east of the Alleghany Mountains, French soldiers
were setting up a strong line of forts west of them.

At last, some English traders ventured across the
mountains. They built rude huts, and were laying the
foundations of a fort, where the city of Pittsburg now
stands, when a company of French soldiers attacked
them and drove them away.

‘“‘Such impudence must be punished immediately,”
THE COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA. 17

said the English; and General Braddock, with an army of
British regulars, was sent to recover the fort. He met
with sore defeat at the hands of the French and Indians,
and but for George Washington, a young lieutenant of
Virginia, the army would have been wholly destroyed.

Thus a long war began between England and France.
The English conquered Canada, and because Spain had
helped France in some European wars, they also seized
the Spanish island of Cuba.

In 1763, envoys from France, England, and Spain
met at Paris to sign a treaty of peace. They were very
polite to one another, and took a great deal of snuff, after
the fashion of the time; but, for all that, each envoy was
determined to get the best terms for his king that he could.

In the end, the map of the New World was greatly
altered. England had exchanged Cuba for Florida,
while France had ceded Canada and the country between
the Mississippi River and the Alleghany Mountains
to England, and all west of the Mississippi to Spain.

This treaty of Paris gave to England and Spain
the exclusive ownership of North America. There was
not a foot of the land which the French could call their

own.
18 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

The king of France grieved over the loss of his
possessions. He said he hoped the thirteen colonies
would prove so unruly that the English king would
wish the French back in Canada to help keep them in
subjection.

Now, if George III. of England had proved to be
a good and worthy king, perhaps this hope would never
have been realized. At the begin-
ning of his reign, his colonies were
prosperous and contented. They cele-
brated his birthdays, set up his
statues in public parks, and offered

prayers for the members of the royal



family. But, after a time, he began

GEORGE III.

to oppress them by levying unjust
taxes, and when they refused to pay the taxes he sent
an army to punish them.

The Americans then resolved to fight for their
rights. In 1775, delegates from the thirteen colonies
met at Philadelphia in a Continental Congress. They
called for troops and elected George Washington com-
mander-in-chief of the army.

Of course, all the monarchs in Europe were anxious
THE COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA. 19

to see how this quarrel between George III. and his
colonies would end. The French king was more
interested than any other. Some people said he would
equip a fleet to aid the Americans; yet he was in no
haste to adopt such a bold policy as that.

‘It would not be wise,’ he said, ‘‘to try to assist
those who are too weak to assist themselves;’’ and he
waited to see what George Washington, at the head
of the Continental troops, would do.

But one of his courtiers, the Marquis de Lafayette,
was not willing to stand idly waiting while the Amer-
icans were fighting for their liberties. He said to
his friends: ‘‘Let us join these patriots in their
struggle against the tyranny of an unjust king. We
may be defeated; but we shall have the satisfaction
of knowing that we have fought on the side of justice
and the right.’’

In the following pages you may read of some
of the events in the life of this young French
nobleman, who helped to secure the independence
of the American Colonies, and afterwards laid
the first cornerstone of the present republic of

France.
zo STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

II.—Tue Younc Marguis.

The chateau of Chavaniac was in the province of
Auvergne, in the south part of France. It was a lofty

castle, with towers and narrow windows from which

[ied

Hee TT
Lote

=a Th if

mn nT



CHATEAU DE CHAVANIAC, LAFAYETTE’S BIRTHPLACE.

cannon once frowned. down upon besieging foes.
There was a deep moat around it, with a bridge
which was drawn up in time of war, so that no man,
on horseback or on foot, could pass in at the gate with-
out permission of the guard.

Low hills, crowned with vineyards, stood near the
THE YOUNG MARQUIS. 21

castle, and beyond the hills stretched mountains
whose peaks seemed to pierce the sky. In all France
there was not a more charming spot than Chavaniac;
and among all the nobles of the court there was no
braver man than its master, the Marquis de Lafayette.

Sometimes the king left the pleasures of his palace
to spend a day at this castle; and whenever the young
marquis and his beautiful bride went to Paris, they
were treated with the greatest respect.

One day, the drawbridge was let down over the
moat, and the gallant marquis rode away to the war
in Germany. After taking part in several engage-
ments, he was shot through the heart in a skirmish
at Minden. His comrades buried him on the field.
The drums were muffled, the band played a funeral
dirge, and three rounds of musketry announced that
the hero’s body had been lowered into the grave.

When swift couriers carried the news of his death to
Chavaniac, the sorrow of his family and friends was
most grievous to see. The castle was like a tomb;
the rooms were darkened; and the servants, clad in
black, went about on tiptoe, scarcely daring to whisper

to one another.
22 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

In the midst of this mourning, on September 6,
1757, the only son of the dead marquis was born.

The little orphan was carried to the chapel and
christened Marie Jean Paul Roche Yves Gilbert- Motier
de Lafayette. That seemed a very long name, indeed,
for the tiny baby lying so quietly in the good priest’s
arms; but it was the custom in France to remember
distinguished ancestors at a christening, and there
were so many of these that the loving mother really
thought the name should be longer than it was. She
said that his everyday name should be Gilbert.

When Gilbert was old enough, she walked with
him instead of leaving him to the care of servants.
Sometimes they climbed a high hill to see the sun set
over the towers of the chateau. Then she told him
how the de Lafayettes, long before Columbus discovered
America, had driven the Arabs from France, and how
“they had helped to banish the English kings from
France, and how his own father had died for the glory
of France.

_ Sometimes, as they walked through the halls of the
castle, she showed him the coats-of-mail which his

ancestors had worn, and she told him about the swords
THE YOUNG MARQUIS. 23

and banners and other trophies which the de Lafayettes
had won in battle.

“IT would not have you less brave than they, my
son,’’ she would say.

The boy longed for the time to come when he
might show his mother how very brave he was. He
grew tall and strong, and carried himself like a prince.
He wanted to be worthy of his great ancestors.

The year he was eight, there was much excitement
about a wolf which prowled in the forest, killing the
sheep in the pastures and frightening the peasants
nearly out of their wits. Gilbert made this wolf the
object of all his walks. He would persuade his mother
to sit in some shady spot while he should go a little
way into the forest.

“T will return in an instant, dear mamma,’’ he
always said; and, lest he might alarm her, he walked
quite slowly until a turn in the road hid him from
view. Then he marched quickly into the dark
wood,

He did this for many days, seeing only frisking
squirrels and harmless rabbits. But one morning, as

he sped along a narrow path, his eyes wide open and
24 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

his ears alert to catch every sound, he heard a cracking
in the underbrush.

The wolf was coming! He was sure of it. His
mind was made up in an instant. He would spring
forward quicker than lightning, and blind it with
his coat, while with his arms he would choke it to
death.

“It will struggle hard,” he thought. ‘“‘Its feet
will scratch me; but I shall not mind, and, when all is
over, I shall drag it to the feet of mamma, and she
will know, and the peasants will know, that I can rid
the country of these pests.’’

He stood listening. His breath came fast. Again
he heard the breaking of the bushes, ‘‘I ought first to
surprise the beast by coming up on it quickly,’’ he
whispered.

He tore off his coat, and held it firmly as he hurried
on. Soon he saw the shaggy hide, and the great eyes
shining through the thicket. He leaped forward with
outstretched coat, and—what do you think?—he clasped
in his arms a calf that had strayed from the barnyard!

It was a rude shock to the boy. He returned to

his mother, who was already alarmed at his absence,
THE COURTIER. 25

and confessed that he had tried to kill the wolf but had
found only a calf.

‘‘Ah, you were brave, my son,’’ she said; ‘“‘I am
quite sure that you would have ended the days of that

terrible wolf had he but given you the chance.”

IJJ.—Tue Courtter.

When Gilbert was twelve years old, he was sent
to school at Paris. His teachers knew how the king
had loved his father, and they were very kind, although
they did not always give him his own way.

Once, when a prize was offered for the best essay
on ‘‘A Perfect Horse,’’ he tried to excel. He described
a beautiful animal. Its eyes were large and intelli-
gent, and its nostrils trembled with desire to speed
away at the first word of its rider; but when the master,
instead of speaking gently, raised a whip to strike it,
the horse threw him to the ground.

The teacher said that a perfect horse should have
been better trained, and gave the prize toa boy whose

horse endured the lash of an unjust master.
26 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

“T’d rather lose the prize than describe a horse

’

that would tamely submit to injustice,’ wrote Gilbert
to his mother.

He received many letters from his mother telling
him how she loved him and how sure she was that he
would always do his duty.

One week no letter came;
but, instead, the family car-
riage drew up at the gate of
the school. The coachman
and footman on the box
looked very sad, and his old
nurse sat within, crying. She

told him his mother was so



ill that he must hasten home.
His dear mother died. A

few weeks later, his grandfather also died, and he was

LOUIS XVI.

left sole master of Chavaniac. He was called the
‘“‘Marquis de Lafayette,” and the peasants knelt humbly
by the roadside whenever he passed. The king soon
sent for him to appear at court, and, when he saw
what a fine, manly fellow the young marquis was, he

made him a page to the queen.
THE COURTIER. 24

A few years later, Lafayette became a member of
the Royal Guards, and, just about that time, he married
the daughter of a powerful duke.

When the old king of France died in 1774, Louis
XVI. and Marie Antoinette were crowned with much
pomp. The young queen was beautiful and gay.
The king loved her so dearly that he tried in every
way to make her happy. If she wearied of one palace,
he calied his courtiers together, and, on horseback and
in carriages and sedan chairs, they went to another.

His favorite palace was at Versailles, a few miles
from Paris. It was in a splendid park, where fountains
played and birds sang all day long.

One room in this palace was so large that hun-
dreds of people could dance together in it; and its
walls were lined with mirrors in which the lords and
ladies might see themselves as they smiled and bowed
and danced.

The queen once gave a masquerade ball in this
mirror room. The Marquis de Lafayette was there,
with his wife. He was dressed in a coat-of-mail

which his great-great-grandfather had worn in a war
with the Turks.
28 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE,

He was tall, and his face was very pleasant, with
its high forehead and clear brown eyes. As he walked
down the long room, his wife said to herself: ‘‘He is
just like a knight of the olden time!’’ She smiled
when she saw him glance into the mirrors. She thought
he was a little vain of his good looks.

But the young marquis hardly noticed himself.
He was gazing at the shining armor and wondering if
he would ever have achance to fight in a just cause,

as his great-great-grandfather had done.

IV.—Tue Dinner Party.

The Marquis de Lafayette soon tired of the idle
life at Versailles, and, in 1776, when he was just nine-
teen years old, he went to Metz, a town then in France,
as captain of an artillery company.

He was a born soldier. He loved to hear the
boom of cannon and the rattle of muskets on the drill
ground. The very first time he called off orders to
his men, he felt that, if he were only in battle, he

could add some glory to his already famous name.
THE DINNER PARTY. 29

But he said to himself: ‘‘Kings make war for
conquest. I wish that I might enlist my arms for a
more worthy object.’

That same year an English nobleman, the royal
Duke of Gloucester, chanced to visit Metz. He had dis-
pleased his brother, King George III., and for that
reason had been banished from England.

The commandant of the garrison gave a dinner-
party in honor of the royal guest. '

Lafayette and the other French officers were in
full uniform; but the Duke of Gloucester was the
most splendid of all who sat about the table. There
was much laughing and drinking of toasts and speech-
making, until a guard announced that a messenger was
at the door with despatches for his royal highness.

‘“‘Ah, news from England!’’ exclaimed the duke.

“‘Show the man in,’’ ordered the commandant.

A courier, with dust on his garments, entered the
room, and, bowing low, delivered a bundle of letters.

“TI beg your Highness to read without ceremony,”
said the commandant.

The duke glanced over the papers for some time

in silence. He looked grave. At last, he said: ‘‘My
30 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

courier has brought despatches about our colonies in
America.”

‘‘Ah,” said one; ‘‘are the colonies acting badly?’’

“Yes, they demand to vote their own taxes.”’

‘‘How absurd! Why, the people in France do not
vote their own taxes.”’

‘You must know,’’ said the duke, ‘‘that many years
.ago, one of the kings of England gave a charter to our
people which granted them the right to impose their
own taxes. They now elect representatives to a par-
liament, where they decide how much money should be
used by the government. Sometimes, when the king
asks for more money than he really needs, they refuse
to increase the taxes; but they are usually quite willing
to pay whatever he asks.”’

“What do these Americans complain of, then?’
asked Lafayette.

‘Taxation without representation,’’ answered the
duke. ‘‘They insist that, as loyal subjects, they should
be allowed either to send representatives to our Parlia-
ment, or to have a Parliament of their own. Neither
privilege has been granted. Our Parliament imposes

taxes on them, and, when they refuse to pay the
THE DINNER PARTY. 31

taxes, the king sends an army to force them to do so.
These despatches inform me that the rebels have
driven our troops out of a town called Boston, and that
delegates from the thirteen colonies have met at another
town called Philadelphia and adopted a declaration of
independence.’’

“The rabble!’’ cried one of the French
officers.

“Your fine troops will soon crush the
- rascals,’’ cried another.
‘‘My brother, the king, is stubborn,”’

said the duke, with a smile. ‘‘He ban-



ished me, gentlemen, because I disobeyed a sores
him. He will conquer these disobedient ar tee
colonies; but, since our common people are not will-
ing to fight their cousins, he has hired Hessians from
Germany to help our soldiers.”’

“What, your highness!’’ exclaimed Lafayette, who
could hardly believe that he had heard aright.

‘Yes, many thousand Hessians are now on their
Way across the sea.’’

Lafayette thought it was cruel for a king to send

a foreign army against his own subjects; but he remem-
32. STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

bered that the English king was the duke’s brother,
and he said nothing in reply.

“TIT am not so sure, gentlemen,’’ said the duke,
after a pause; ‘‘I am not so sure but the Americans
are in the right. They are fighting as freeborn
Englishmen.”’

“The Americans are in the right,” said Lafayette
to himself; and, while the other officers were making
merry about many things, he was silent. As soon as
he could do so, he excused himself from the table.
He hastened to his room and locked the door.

“This is, indeed, the hour I have sought,’’ he
murmured.

He sat down to think, and then he arose and paced

the floor until it was almost morning. When, at last,
he threw himself on the bed to sleep, he had resolved

to leave the pleasures of rank and fortune, and even to
separate, for a time, from the wife he loved, that he

might use his sword in the defense of liberty.

V.—Tue DEparTURE FOR AMERICA.
As soon as the young captain of artillery could get

leave of absence from duty at Metz, he hastened to
THE DEPARTURE FOR AMERICA. 33

Paris. Here he found everybody talking of England’s
war with her colonies.

Now, the French people hardly knew whether Bos-
ton was the name of a town or of a whole state; but they
were so delighted because the haughty English generals
had been defeated there that they had ‘‘Boston’’ whist,
and ‘‘Boston”’ tea, and ‘‘Boston’’ snuff.

Lafayette sought out some American agents who
were buying arms secretly, and the more he heard
about the unjust taxes, the more determined he was
to help the patriots resist them.

His father-in-law opposed his plans; but, to
strengthen his resolution, Lafayette adopted the
motto, ‘Cur non?’’ which means ‘‘Why not?’ ‘Cur
non?”’ he said, when he saw his wife in tears.
‘“Cur non?’’ he would say again, when his baby girl
stretched out her tiny arms as if to hold him back.
With Baron de Kalb, an officer who had been in
America, he organized a Boston club, to talk about
raising an army.

When Louis XVI. heard this, he was displeased.
He said that if any French noblemen joined the rebels

it might cause England to declare war against France,
34 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

Late in the fall, news came of a battle on Long
Island, in which the patriots were badly defeated.

‘You see,’’ said the king; ‘“‘those Americans are
only a mob. They will soon be disarmed;’’ and he
forbade the meetings of the Boston club.

“Cur non?” said Lafayette;
and the meetings were held
secretly.

About this time, the Ameri-
can Congress sent Silas Deane,
of Connecticut, to France, to
seek aid; and Lafayette asked
De Kalb to go with him to



BARON DE KALB.

visit the envoy. When the

two men met, they shook hands; but, as neither under-
stood the language of the other, they said nothing.

De Kalb, who could speak both English and French,
told Silas Deane that the Marquis de Lafayette wished
to join the American army.

“We have no money to pay our officers,’ said
Deane.

“I will serve without money,’’ repeated De Kalb

after Lafayette.
THE DEPARTURE FOR AMERICA. 35

‘“We have no ship to carry you and your men,”’ said
Deane.

“T will buy a ship,” was the answer.

Still, the American hesitated to accept the services
of such a boyish-looking officer.

Then the modest Lafayette
would have blushed if he had
understood what his friend said

‘in his behalf. De Kalb told of

his wealth and rank, and explained



what a powerful ally he might be-

SILAS DEANE,

come.

In the end, Silas Deane gave Lafayette a contract
to sign, in which Lafayette promised to serve in the
army of the United States whenever he was wanted.

When the venerable Benjamin Franklin came to
Paris, Lafayette was among the first to greet him. He
was enchanted with the famous philosopher, whose
simple manners and plain dress befitted well the herald
of a republic.

‘‘Now, indeed, is our time of need,"' said Franklin.
Lafayette waited to hear no more. He bought a

ship, and ordered it to be equipped for the long voyage.
36 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

While the ship was being made ready, he visited
England, where his uncle was the French ambassador.
George III. feared that Louis XVI. would aid the
Americans in their rebellion, and tried to be friendly
to France. Lafayette was treated with distinction
at court.

He met some English officers who were just ready
to start for America, and was invited to Portsmouth
to see the ships set sail with troops; but he refused
to go.

““T cannot be a hypocrite,’’ he said to himself; ‘‘I
shall soon have my own ship launched for America.’’

While at Lord Rawdon’s, who had just returned
from New York, he heard how General Washington,
on a Christmas night (1776), had captured the Hessians
at Trenton. He expressed such delight over the news
as to arouse suspicion, and, when he found that his
movements were watched, he returned to Paris secretly.

The ship was not yet ready. Meantime, George III.
heard about his plans, and wrote to Louis XVI.
against the expedition; but, when the letter reached
Paris, Lafayette, with De Kalb and eleven other offi-

cers, had already set out on his journey.
WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. 37

King Louis sent messengers in pursuit, and then
Lafayette disguised himself as a courier, and galloped
ahead of his friends to order the relays of horses.
In one town, during a wait of three hours, he lay
concealed in the straw of a stable. In another town,
when he was recognized by the innkeeper’s daughter,
he made her a sign to be silent just as the pursuers rode
up tothe door, and she sent them away by a different
road.

At last, he reached Pasages, on the Spanish coast,
where his good ship Victory was anchored. And,
when the king’s messengers arrived at the edge of
the water, all covered with the dust of their swift pur-
suit, the sails were already spread, and the Marquis de

Lafayette was on his way to America,

VI.—WasuinctTon’s AIDE-DE-Camp.

The voyage across the ocean was stormy and long.
Lafayette spent most of the time trying to learn to
speak English.

The Victory cast anchor near Charleston, South
38 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE,

Carolina, and the party landed about midnight. As
Lafayette and De Kalb stood on the beach, they clasped
each other's hands, and, looking up to the stars,
vowed they would conquer for liberty or die on foreign
soil.

They found shelter at a farmhouse, and, on the
following day, proceeded to Charleston. Here Lafay-
ette purchased carriages and horses to ride nine hun-
dred miles to Philadelphia, where the Continental
Congress was in session. When the carriages broke
down because of the bad roads, the officers mounted
the horses and continued their journey.

Lafayette could not talk much with the people
whom he met, but he soon saw that America was quite
different from France. There were no beggars lying
by the roadside; the farmers did not kneel when fine
carriages passed, and one man really seemed to be just
about as respectable as another.

‘‘T am more determined than ever,” he said to De
Kalb, ‘‘to help these people preserve the liberties they
have enjoyed.’’

He reached Philadelphia on July 27, 1777.

Now, King Louis had directed Franklin to write
WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. 39

to the Congress requesting it not to give Lafayette a
commission in the army; but the shrewd envoy had
taken no pains to hurry his letter, and, as it had not
been received, Lafayette was given the rank of major
general.

i The outlook for the Americans was not very
encouraging. Washington had
retreated from New York, and
the British general, Sir William
Howe, was preparing to attack
Philadelphia.

' Lafayette first met Washing-

ton in the Quaker City, and knew



him at once by his noble face.

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

He had a talk with the comman-
der, who took him to inspect some fortifications, and
invited him to cross the Delaware to see his
army.

When Lafayette arrived at the camp in New Jersey,
‘the troops were on the drill-ground. Many of them
were ragged and barefooted. Even the officers lacked
suitable uniforms, and the guns were of all shapes and

sizes.
40 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

““We should be embarrassed at thus showing our-
selves to a French officer,’ said Washington.

“Ah!" replied Lafayette, with tears in his eyes;
‘“‘men who fight for liberty against such odds will be
sure to win.”

Washington was so pleased with the modest zeal of
the young marquis that he brade him one of his aides-
de-camp. Lafayette was then just
twenty years old.

Another aide of about his
age was Alexander Hamilton.
Hamilton spoke French almost
as wellas Lafayette, and the two

officers became devoted friends.



ALEXANDER HAMILTON.

General Howe sailed up Chesa-
peake Bay, and, landing, marched to attack Philadel-
phia. Washington, with his army, went to meet him,
and there was a terrible battle near Brandywine Creek.

Lafayette was in the thickest of the fight until he
was forced to fall back on account of having received
a musket ball in the calf of his leg.

“Take care of the marquis as though he were my

own son,” said Washington to the surgeon.
WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. "41

The Americans were badly defeated at Brandy-
wine, because the British were better disciplined, and
had superior arms. Washington retreated, and Phila-
delphia was taken.

His wound confined Lafayette to his bed for six
weeks. During this period of idleness he spent much
of the time writing letters to his wife.

‘‘Now that you are the wife of an American gen-
eral,’’ he wrote, ‘“‘I must give you a lesson. People
in France will say, ‘They have been beaten.’ You
must ‘answer, ‘It is true; but with two armies, equal
in number and on level ground, ‘old soldiers always
have an advantage over new ones; besides, the Ameri-
cans inflicted a greater loss than they sustained.’

“Then people will say, ‘That’s all very well, but
Philadelphia, the capital of the colonies, is taken.’
You will reply, politely, ‘You are foolish; Phila-
delphia is a poor city, open to the enemy on all sides.’ ’’

The devoted little wife repeated these words
at court, and thus helped the American cause in
France.

When Lafayette was again able to mount a horse,

he led an expedition against a post of the Hessians
42 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

with such skill that he was given command of the
Virginia militia.

After some battles around Philadelphia, Washington
made his winter quarters at Valley Forge, about twenty
miles away; and, while the British were enjoying
themselves in the best houses of the Quaker City, the
Americans suffered great privations in tents and rude
cabins.

This was in the winter of 1777. The weather was
very severe. Some of the soldiers were without shoes,
and their feet bled as they walked over the frozen
ground; yet, all through the stormy days, the little
army drilled and worked on the fortifications, while,
at night, those without blankets sat around the camp
fires to keep from freezing to death. Lafayette, who
had been used to luxuries all his life, willingly shared
these hardships, and went limping about from tent to.
tent with a pleasant word for everybody.

Meantime, a British general, Sir John Burgoyne,
having attempted to invade New York from Canada,
was forced to surrender his whole army to General
Gates, at Saratoga.

‘You see,” said some of the American generals,
WASHINGTON’S AIDE-DE-CAMP. 43

who were jealous of Washington, ‘‘the army in the

North is successful; but just look at the army in the

South! It has lost Philadelphia, and is only freezing
to death at Valley Forge.”







































































































WASHINGTON AT VALLEY FORGE,

These jealous generals plotted to remove Wash-
ington from command, and tried in every way to induce
Lafayette to favor their evil designs. One night, they
invited him to a dinner. After toasts were offered in

honor of several officers, Lafayette was grieved to
44 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

note that the name of Washington had been omitted.
He arose to his feet. :

‘“Gentlemen,’’ he cried, ‘‘I drink to the health of
George Washington, commander-in-chief of the Amer-
ican armies!”

The toast was honored in silence. The treacherous
men saw plainly enough that the Marquis de Lafayette

would never join in a plot against his general.

VII.—Lovts XVI. Promises a FLEEt.

Now, all this time, Benjamin Franklin was at
Paris, working for the colonies. He found that very
many of the French people wanted to aid in the war
against England.

The noblemen said: ‘‘England robbed us of our
colonies, we should now seek revenge.”

The manufacturers and shopkeepers said: ‘‘England
never allowed the Americans to buy goods directly from
us, and, if we help them win their liberty, we shall
get most of their trade.’’

The wretched peasants did not understand what
LOUIS XVL PROMISES A FLEET. 45

liberty meant, but they knew all about unjust taxes,
and were glad the Americans were refusing to pay them.

But the French king hesitated to send his armies
across the sea. He did not believe that the Americans
were strong enough to win a
single great battle.

“As for helping King
George’s subjects set up a
republic,’ he said, ‘that
would be a dangerous experi-
ment which my own subjects
might wish to try.’”’

Franklin despaired of se-



curing aid from France. One

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

day, as he sat alone, won-
dering what plan he must next pursue, an American
courier arrived from Boston. Franklin met him at the
door.

“Sir,’? he asked, without waiting for the man to
speak, ‘‘is Philadelphia captured?”’

“It is, sir,’ answered the courier.
Franklin turned sadly away. All.seemed lost.

“But, sir, I have better news than that!'’ exclaimed
46 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

the courier, and he showed despatches from Congress
which told of the battle of Saratoga, and of Burgoyne’s
surrender of six thousand men.

Franklin was overjoyed, and hastened to court with
the news.

“Really,”’ said the king to himself, ‘‘this is the
time to give John Bull a fine dose of bitters; these
rebels may yet become a great nation.’’ And so he
acknowledged the independence of the United States,

and promised to send a fleet to America.

VIII.—Tue Furwoucu.

Lafayette was delighted when he learned that his
king had recognized the independence of the United
States and had concluded a treaty of alliance.

The event was celebrated on a May day with a
grand parade at Valley Forge. There was a salute of
thirteen cannon, followed by a volley of musketry, and
then the army, drawn up in two lines, shouted: ‘‘Long
live the king of France!’’ and gave loud huzzas for the

new American States.
THE FURLOUGH. 47

A few days later, Lafayette had occasion to show
his skill. It happened in this way:

Washington had sent him, with two thousand
men, to occupy Barren Hill, half-way between Valley
Forge and Philadelphia, and he was directed to fall on
the rear of the British if they should attempt to leave
the city. He had hardly chosen the camp, near a stone
church, with the Schuylkill River on one side and a
wood on the other, when spies reported his arrival.
The British general, who was attending a grand military
ball at Philadelphia, laughed aloud at the news.

'“Ha, ha! He, he!’ he laughed. ‘‘That will
make a fine close for our dance.’’ And he went about,
saying to the ladies: “I invite you to my house on
to-morrow night to meet the Marquis de Lafayette.”’

Before daylight, nine thousand red-coats were on
the march. One division was sent round bya circuitous
route to cut off retreat to Valley Forge, while two
other divisions approached Barren Hill.

‘The little French boy is in a trap,’’ chuckled the
British general, as he pushed his way through the mists
of the early dawn.

Meantime, scouts brought word to the camp that
48 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

the ‘‘Bloody Backs’’ were coming. The patriots were
in a panic. They ran hither and thither, crying, ‘All
is lost! We cannot escape!”’

Lafayette perceived the danger; but he calmed their
fears with a jaunty air, and smilingly said: ‘‘We will
now lead the British a livelier dance than they had last
night!”’

He had studied the ground and discovered a ford
which the enemy knew nothing about. He laid his
plans well. He boldly advanced a few columns as if to
give battle, and, while the red-coats were preparing to
attack them, he hurried the rest of the army across the
ford; then he quietly withdrew those who were in the
pretended line of battle, and, when the British charged
up Barren Hill from opposite sides, they only met one
another!

The affair was so very ludicrous that, when the nine
thousand marched back to Philadelphia, they were the
sport of everybody.

The British general, hearing that King Louis was
sending over a fleet, abandoned the Quaker City.
Washington pursued him across New Jersey, and there
was a hard-fought battle at Monmouth. In this battle,
THE FURLOUGH. 49

Lafayette bore himself heroically all day long, and, when
night came, with the victory undecided, he slept on the
field by the side of Washington.

The enemy retreated to New York, and Washing-
ton stretched his lines from Morristown, New Jersey,
to West Point, on the Hudson.

While the patriots thus kept watch of New York,
Lafayette was granted a furlough. It was thought
that he might obtain more aid from France. When
he reached Paris, he was placed under arrest; for
King Louis had once promised the English ambassador
to put the bold young marquis in prison if he should
ever return.

And what do you think his prison was?

It was the house of his own family, and the chains
that were bound tightly around his neck were the arms
of his loving wife.

He was forbidden to enter the king’s presence
for a week as penance for having disobeyed royal
orders; but, at the end of that time, he was again
restored to his old place of honor. It is said that the
queen and every lady of the court kissed him on both

cheeks.
50 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

Lafayette turned this whirlwind of favor .to the

advantage of the patriots. He said that no European

army would sufferthe tenth part of what the American

LAFA-
YETTE’S
SWORD.



troops did, and boldly declared that the cost
of a single royal ball would equip the whole
army.

He talked much about Washington.

“Do you know, Doctor,’’ said the queen
one day to Franklin, ‘‘ that Lafayette has
really made me in.love with your General
Washington? What a man he must be!”

When, at last, Lafayette was ready to
return to America, he went in the uniform
of an American general to bid the king
good-bye. At his side hung a sword, with
handle of gold and blade of steel, engraved
with his arms and his motto, Cur non? It
had been presented to him by Franklin in
the name of the American Congress.

When he landed at Boston, the bells of the

churches rang a welcome, while the citizens marched

in line to escort him to General Hancock’s house on
Beacon Hill.

y
THE VICTORY AT YORKTOWN. 51

As soon as he could do so, Lafayette went to army
headquarters on the Hudson. There Washington
greeted him as if he had been his own son; but he
looked anxious and sad.

‘‘Alas, my boy,” he said, ‘‘there is bad news for
you. We have been defeated in the South. Our con-
tinental money is so counterfeited by the enemy that
it is almost worthless, and our sick and starving sol-
diers are without supplies.’’ 3

“Ah!’’ cried Lafayette, with a joyous laugh, ‘‘I
have remembered my general during my absence.
There are six thousand land troops, under Rochambeaun,

now on the way, and money, and clothing, and arms.’’

IX.—Tue Victory at YORKTOWN.

Not long after Lafayette’s return, he went with
Washington to inspect the fortifications at West Point.
While they were there, Washington discovered that
Benedict Arnold, the commander of the fort, had been
bribed to betray it to the British.

West Point was saved; but Arnold, the traitor,
52 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

escaped toa British ship, and enlisted in the service of
the enemy. This was in September, 1780.

A few months later, Arnold led a British army into
Virginia, and Lafayette was ordered
south to attack him.

“Look before you leap,’’ were
Washington’s parting words.

Lafayette remembered the warn-



ing, and moved forward with caution.

BENEDICT ARNOLD. : -
At Baltimore, he borrowed ten

thousand dollars from some merchants to supply his
men with shoes and hats, and to buy the linen which
the women of the city made into summer garments.

Then he marched to Richmond, Virginia. Arnold
soon sent a letter to the camp about an exchange of
prisoners. Lafayette said to the messenger: “I will
answer the letter of any British officer; but I will not
even read a letter from Benedict Arnold, the traitor.’’

A few days later, the British general, Cornwallis,
took command of Arnold’s troops.

“The Frenchman cannot escape me!’’ he said.

The youthful major general warily avoided an

engagement with Cornwallis. He joined his forces
THE VICTORY AT YORKTOWN. 53

with those of Anthony Wayne, and followed the British
at a distance.

Some of the best young men of Virginia and Mary-
land had hesitated to take up arms
against the king; but, when they
saw the skill and courage of this
stranger, they mounted their own

horses and joined his ranks. Thus



Lafayette’s army kepi daily increas-
ing. GENERAL ANTHONY
Now, just at this time, all Europe age
was awaiting events on two rivers in America. The
Hudson, in the North, lay between Clinton and Wash-
ington; and the James, in the South, held on its banks

the opposing armies of Cornwallis and Lafayette.
‘Whose army will conquer?’’ was a question which
King George and King Louis anxiously asked.
It was not long before they had an answer.
Cornwallis threw up fortifications at Yorktown,
and moved his camp there. Then, Washington and
Lafayette agreed to unite their armies to attack
him.

Soon a French fleet, under Count de Grasse, moved

E L.FORD,
54 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

up Chesapeake Bay, and anchored before Yorktown.
Lafayette and Wayne marched nearer and nearer,

until Cornwallis was surrounded by land and

sea.

De Grasse urged Lafayette to make the attack at
once. It was a temptation for the
young major general. He knew
that Europe would ring with his
name if he should win the victory
alone; but, when he thought of
the patient commander in the
North, who had borne the bur-

dens of the long war, he said to



De Grasse: ‘‘No, if we strike the
enemy now, our losses will be too great. I shall await
the arrival of Washington. To him alone should belong
the honor of giving Cornwallis this final blow.”’

Meanwhile, Washington left the Hudson. Rocham-
beau, with the French troops, joined him, and together
they marched to the South. When the united armies,
under the command of Washington, stood in front
of Yorktown, Lafayette’s division was the first to storm
the redoubts,
THE VICTORY AT YORKTOWN. 55

Cornwallis surrendered October 19, 1781; this ended
the war, and America was free.

Lafayette received a leave of absence to return to
France. When he reached Versailles and found that his
wife was attending a ball at the palace, he sent her a
message. The tidings of his arrival ended the dancing.
Everybody stopped to tell everybody else that the Mar-
quis de Lafayette had returned from America; and the
queen called her own carriage to accompany the happy
wife home.

Honors were showered on the hero; but he modestly
declared that most of the credit of victory belonged to
Washington. Whenever he dined with the French
officers, he proposed a toast to the health of Washing.
ton, and when his son was born, he named him George
Washington. After the treaty of peace between Eng-
land and America had been signed, he wrote to Wash-
ington: ‘‘As for you, my dear general, who can truly
say that all this is your work, what must be your
feelings!”’

Later, he wrote: ‘‘The eternal honor in which
my descendants will glory will be to have had an

ancestor among your soldiers.’’
56 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

X.—A Visir tro Mount VERNON.

In 1784, Lafayette visited Washington at Mount
Vernon. The two friends spent many happy days
together. They rode after the hounds, or walked on
the banks of the Poto-
mac River, or sat in the
library musing over the
battles they had fought
for liberty. They talked

much about the thirteen





MOUNT VERNON. new states, which had
not yet formed a permanent union.

’

‘There are three things I wish,” said Lafayette;
“first, that France and America form an alliance; second,
that the thirteen colonies be united under one govern-
ment; and third, that the slaves in the colonies
be freed.”

Washington agreed with Lafayette about all these
measures. The two visited the battlefields of the
South, and lingered at the grave of De Kalb, who had
fallen at Camden, in South Carolina.

When, at last, Lafayette started north to resign
A VISIT TO MOUNT VERNON. 57

his commission, Washington. accompanied him as far
as Annapolis. On returning to Mount Vernon, he
hastened to write: ‘‘In the moment of our separation
and every hour since, I have felt all that love, respect
and attachment for you with which length of years
and your merits have inspired me. I often asked
myself, as our carriages separated, whether that was
the last sight I ever should have of you.”

It was, indeed, the last time they met on earth.
Lafayette returned home. He was kept busy for years
by important events, and when he again visited America
the noble Washington was in his grave.

Perhaps the best service of Lafayette to our country
was the good name he gave it in Europe. He also did
what he could to improve our trade by finding new
markets for our products.

The fishermen of Nantucket were so grateful for
his help in the whaling industry that they held a public
meeting. Every man present promised two milkings
from his cow to make a cheese. Barrels of milk were
accordingly collected, and a great round cheese, weighing
five hundred pounds, was made; and one day it arrived

at Chavaniac, not a whit the less fragrant for its long
58 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

voyage across the sea. The planters of Virginia were
so much pleased with Lafayette’s efforts in behalf of
the tobacco trade, that they ordered Houdon, the sculp-
tor, to make two marble busts of him. One was placed
in the capitol at Richmond, and
the other was presented to the
city of Paris.

Now, the kings of Europe
did not like the new ideas about
liberty which had spread over the
world after the American revo-

lution. Frederick the Great, of



FREDERICK THE GREAT.

Prussia, invited the Marquis de
Lafayette to his court for a visit. In one of their
talks, King Frederick said: ‘‘By and by, the United
States will return to the good old system of monarchy.”

‘‘Never, sire, never,’’ replied Lafayette; ‘‘neither
monarchy nor aristocracy can ever exist in America.”’
“Sir,” said Frederick, with a penetrating look, “I
knew a young man who, after he had visited countries
where liberty and equality reigned, conceived the idea
of establishing the same system in his own country. Do

you know what happened to him?”
THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY. 59

‘“‘No, sire.”’

‘‘He was hanged.’’

Lafayette looked up with a calm smile; but he did
not betray to the anxious king what his thoughts were.

XI.—Tuer Nationa ASSEMBLY.

It was, indeed, time for the monarchs of Europe
to be concerned about the safety of their thrones.
Nowhere was the danger greater than in France.

While King Louis had been helping King George's
subjects, his own subjects were suffering. They were
grievously taxed to support the splendor of the king
and his nobles. Whole counties were reduced to
starvation, and thousands of wretched creatures wan-
dered over the kingdom, begging or robbing as they
went.

Louis XVI. saw little of all this misery. He was
happy himself, and he wondered why everybody else
was not happy. If he chanced to see a pallid face
through the window of his coach, he said: ‘‘That poor

fellow is ill,’”’
60 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

No one spoiled his drive by telling him the man
was hungry.

The thoughtless king kept asking his ministers for
more money, until they told him the treasury was
empty. Then the taxes were increased. The people
began to hear how the Americans had won the right
to vote their own taxes. They asked one another why
the French might not have that right too. It really
began to look as if there might be a revolution in
France.

When Lafayette returned from his visit to Mount
Vernon, he advised the king to call an assembly of the
nobles to decide what should be done. The assembly
was summoned. Lafayette was one of its members.
He declared that there must be less extravagance at
court instead of more taxes on the workingmen.

“Citizens ought to be allowed to vote their own
taxes,” he said. ‘‘Let us call a national assembly
with the common people represented in it.’’

“What!” cried the other nobles, ‘‘would you dare
to put that request in writing for the king to read?’

“I dare do anything that may broaden the liber-

”

ties of my fellowmen,’”’ replied the patriot.
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 61

He wrote a petition asking that his majesty permit
the people of France to elect representatives to help
make the laws. He was the only one who was bold
enough to sign the paper.

”

“The marquis will be sent to the Bastille,’’ whis-
pered the nobles to one another, and they expected
to see him seized by the guards. :

King Louis did not send Lafayette to prison; but
he gave no heed to the petition.

Things went from bad to worse until at length
the king consented to summon a national assembly
to meet at Versailles.

Lafayette represented the nobles of his province
and took his seat on May 1, 1789. It was just one
day after the inauguration of Washington as President

of the United States.

XII.—Tue Frencu REVOLUTION.

The members of the National Assembly marched
in a body to the Church of Saint Louis for prayers.

The representatives of the common people walked
62 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

first, dressed in black; then the noblemen came, in
silk and velvet and lace with gold chains about their
necks; and last of all came the king and the highest
officials of the court.

It was a magnificent pageant, attended with the
clang of trumpets and the chant of
priests. The streets were crowded
with sight-seers, among whom was
Thomas Jefferson, the American
minister to France.

Now, the men in black had



come from all parts of the kingdom

THOMAS JEFFERSON.

to right the wrongs of the people;
yet at the first meeting they heard of nothing but the
king’s need of more money.

They grew desperate, at last, and boldly declared
that there must be better laws. The king listened
in silence; then he put on his gold-laced hat; the
nobles did the same, and then—whdt do you think?
—the men in black put on their caps!

The king was amazed, and the nobles stared at
one another in astonishment; for the common people

had never before dared to wear caps in the presence
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 63

of royalty. But the men in black did not stop at
that. They held a meeting among themselves and
resolved not to return to their homes until the king
had signed a written constitution for the government
of France.

Lafayette drew up a Declaration of Rights. It
was something like one which the American Congress
had sent to George III. Louis XVI. agreed to make
reforms. Perhaps he tried to do so; but he really
did not know how to change the old order of
things.

While there were bread riots around the public
buildings in Paris, he gave a grand ball at Versailles.
Some one hurried to tell the hungry people about it.

‘‘Louis mocks at our misery!’’ they cried.

And the very next day they stormed the Bastille.
They broke down the great doors and set the prisoners
free, and then they battered the massive walls to the
ground. King Louis was afraid to leave his palace at
Versailles.

. Electors met in the Hétel de Ville, or City Hall.
They declared there must be a commander of a national

guard to keep order in Paris, and when one of them
64 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

pointed to the bust of Lafayette which Virginia had
presented, he was elected by a unanimous vote.
The mobs grew wilder in spite of all the new

guard could do. Once when they were raising a









































































THE BASTILLE,

gallows upon which to hang a harmless priest, there
seemed no way to quell their fury.

Lafayette sprang to a platform. Just then his
little boy came to the place with his teacher. He
seized the child and held him high up.

“Gentlemen,” he said, ‘I have the honor
to present to you my son, George Washington
Lafayette!’’

The name of the American patriot acted like
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 65

magic upon the crowds below. Cheers rent the air,
and, in the confusion, the poor priest escaped.

As winter came on, food became scarcer than ever.
Yet the court at Versailles was feasting. Some one
said that when the queen heard the people had no
bread, she laughingly asked: ‘‘Why don’t they eat
cake then?’ and that a nobleman said: ‘‘Nay, let
them eat grass!’’

The rage of the mobs increased. Lafayette
stationed the National Guard on the road to Versailles
to prevent them from going there. But one day a
fish-woman beat a drum. The ragged and hungry
people ran together, and soon thousands were on
their way to Versailles.

“Bread! Bread!’’ they cried.

The guard gave way. The mad creatures reached
the palace. They killed the Swiss guards at the
doors and ran their pikes into the queen’s empty bed.

Lafayette had followed swiftly with the National
Guard. He drove the intruders from the palace and
talked to them until they seemed more calm.

Then he led Louis to the balcony above them.

‘‘Long live the king!’’ they shouted.
66 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

‘““Come,”’ said Lafayette to Marie Antoinette, She
appeared with the little prince and the princess.

“Not the children!’’ ‘“‘Not the children!” they
cried; for they did not wish the innocent to suffer,

The terrified queen sent
the children within. She
stood on the balcony alone.
She expected instant death.

Lafayette stepped for-
ward. He bowed low and
kissed her hand. The people

again forgot their anger.



“Long live the queen!”
“Long live the general!’’ they shouted as they beat
their pikes together.

“Perhaps things would mend if their majesties
left this costly palace,’’ said a grimy blacksmith to a
thin-visaged tailor.

“They must go to Paris!’’ screamed the tailor.

“On to Paris!’ was the cry from a thousand
throats.

The royal family was forced into a carriage. ot

was a strange procession that went back into the great
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 67

city. Lafayette and the guard rode on each side of
the splendid carriage, but, before and behind, marched
men and women with wild eyes and unkempt hair.
Some held on their pikes the pillaged loaves of bread,
and others the bloody heads of the Swiss guards, while
the fish-woman led the van with her drum.

At last, their majesties were safe in the palace at
Paris. Lafayette had rescued them from death; yet
he was “fein in his devotion to the liberties of the
people.. He said to the National Assembly: ‘‘If the
king will sign a constitution for the just government of
France, I shall defend him; if he refuses to sign, I will
fight him.”’

Soon after this Louis signed a constitution which
was much like that of England. On July 14, 1790,
the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille, the French ,
celebrated the beginning of their freedom. In an
open field where thousands of the people had assem-
bled, the king and the members of the new assembly
pledged to support the constitution.

When Lafayette ascended the steps to take the
oath, in the name of the army, there was loud applause;
and, as he rode at the head of the National Guard ia
68 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

the parade which followed the solemn ceremony, all
eyes were fixed on him. .

In his joy at what seemed to be the end of
tyranny in his native land, he sent to Washington the
key to the fallen Bastille, where men had once been
imprisoned for life without trial by jury. To-day,
you may see the great iron key among the historic

treasures of Mount Vernon.

XITI.—An Exine anp IN PRISON.

The French people had not yet learned the first
lesson in self-government. The constitutional mon-
archy soon failed. Mobs imprisoned the royal family
and set fire to the houses of the nobles.

Lafayette was grieved over these events. He had
led the enslaved people toward liberty, but as soon as
they were free they had outrun their guide. Because
he would not join them in their excesses, they called
him an aristocrat and threatened him with death.

He fled from Paris and wrote to his wife to join

him in England. ‘‘Let us go to America,’ he said,
AN EXILE AND IN PRISON. 69

“and establish ourselves there. Some day, when the
storm is over, I may yet serve France.’’

But the monarchs of Europe said: ‘‘This Marquis
de Lafayette, who brought these outrageous ideas of
liberty from America, must be silenced.”

He was arrested on the frontier and imprisoned
in Prussia for a year. Then he was sent to a dungeon
at Olmutz in Austria. He had wretched food. His
clothes rotted with dampness. His bed was a pile of
straw. Yet when he was told he might be free if he
would betray the military strength of France, he
refused to leave his cell. He expected to die in his chains.

One morning he heard a rattle of keys and bars.
He arose from his straw and saw his wife and two
daughters enter beneath the crossed swords of the
guards. The joy was too great. He fell in a swoon.
When he recovered his senses, he tenderly embraced
his loved ones.

‘And where is my little George?’”’ he asked.

‘He is at Mount Vernon with Washington,”’
replied his wife.

“‘God be praised for such a friend in our hour of

need,” exclaimed the now happy father.
t

7o STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

When he was strong enough to bear it, the Mar-
quise told him what had happened at Paris. It was a
sad story. ;

The king and queen had been beheaded; her
own grandmother, mother, and sister, with thousands
of others, had been led to the scaf-
fold during a reign of terror. She
herself had been in prison until
released through the efforts of
James Monroe, the new. American

minister to France. After many



trials she had obtained permission

JAMES MONROE.

to share his captivity.

The devoted wife remained at Olmutz.

Meanwhile, Washington, Jefferson and _ other
friends appealed to the Austrian emperor to set the
patriot free. ,

“It is impossible,” replied the despot. ‘‘Lafay-
ette’s existence is. a menace to the kingdoms of
Europe.”

When, at last, Napoleon Bonaparte, at the head
of his French troops, defeated the allied powers, who

were trying to place another king upon the throne of
-AN EXILE AND IN PRISON. 71

France, he refused to sign a treaty of peace until all
the French prisoners were surrendered.

Lafayette was liberated. He went to Hamburg,
in Germany, with his wife and daughters. His son
returned from America, and
the united family lived for a
time in exile.

When Napoleon became
First Consul of France, he
pledged himself to restore
the constitution for which
Lafayette had struggled so
long. The patriot then re-



turned to his native land.

NAPOLEON BONAPARTE,

Most.of his property at Cha-
vaniac had been confiscated, and he made his home
at La Grange, in the province of La Brie.

Formerly the peasants on his estates had knelt when
he passed. -The revolution had changed all that; but
when he taught them self-respect, they showed respect
for others without servility.

The Americans did not forget Lafayette in his

retirement. In 1805, President Jefferson offered to
72 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

appoint him governor of Louisiana; but his wife’s
health was too feeble to permit of the long voyage.
Two years later the noble wife died. At her

own request she was buried in that part of the













LA GRANGE, HOME OF LAFAYETTE,

cemetery of Picpus which is called the ‘‘cemetery of

the beheaded,” because there lay the bodies of her

relatives who had fallen victims to the mobs.
Napoleon did not keep his pledges to obey the

constitution. He made himself emperor of France.
THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. 73

After a time he was exiled by the allied powers of
Europe, and Louis XVIII. was placed on _ the
throne.

Lafayette was a member of the National
Assembly for several years, trying always to preserve
the liberties of the people. Then he retired to La
Grange, where he expected to live quietly with his

children for the rest of his days.

XIV.—Tue Man or Two Wor tps.

In 1824, in accordance with a resolution of Con-
gress, President James Monroe invited Lafayette to
visit the United States. He gladly accepted the
invitation, and set out on his journey with his son
George Washington and a private secretary.

“Tt has been thirty years since I last saw the
people of America,’ he said to himself. ‘‘I must be
prepared to meet indifferent glances; for most of my
friends have long since passed away.’’

He expected to land quietly in New York and
74 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

secure private lodgings; but when he arrived he

found that he was the nation’s guest.

The city was having a holiday in his honor.



STATUE OF LAFAYETTE,
UNION SQUARE, N. Y.



Thousands stood on the wharves
to greet him, while cannon
roared and banners waved.

‘“WELCoME, Laravette !”’
was inscribed on the arches
beneath which he passed, and
his portrait, stamped on blue
ribbon, was everywhere to be
seen.

Lafayette now understood
that he had not been forgot-
ten, and his eyes overflowed
with tears.

As he went about from
city to city, he aroused the
greatest enthusiasm.

He limped a little as he

walked. The people said it was because of the

wound he had received at Brandywine, and their

gratitude seemed without bounds. In one public pro-
THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. 75

cession was the model of a ship with his youthful
pledge: ‘‘I will purchase and equip a vessel at my
own expense.’’

In another a chorus of white-robed girls sang:

“We bow not the neck and we bend not the knee,
But our hearts, Lafayette, we surrender to thee.”’

It all seemed like the close of a fairy story where
the armed knight, who had once rushed to the rescue
of young America in distress, returned again after
many years to behold her golden days of prosperity.

The thirteen small colonies had become twenty-
four united states;" the population had grown from
three millions to twelve millions; towns had become
cities; forests had been transformed into farms; and
the ships, ~which sailed on every sea, carried the
products of soil and loom and forge to the markets
of the world.

When, from the well-filled public treasury, Con-
gress presented two hundred thousand dollars to the
hero, he received the gift with touching words of
gratitude; but when the legislatures of Virginia,

Maryland, and other states began to vote large sums
76 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

of money for him, he firmly refused to accept of
their generosity.

He stood at the tombs of Washington, Hamilton,
Franklin, and other soldiers and statesmen who had
helped to establish liberty,
and he visited Jefferson and
John Adams, whose totter-
ing footsteps had almost
reached the grave, to. learn
from their lips the story of
the new republic.

On June 17, 1825, the



anniversary of the battle of

Bunker Hill, Lafayette as-

JOHN ADAMS.

sisted in laying .the cornerstone of the Bunker Hill
monument.

Many thousand people came to Boston to witness
the ceremonies. During an eloquent address, Daniel
Webster turned to the French patriot. ‘‘Fortunate,
fortunate man!’’ he exclaimed; ‘‘you were connected
with both hemispheres and with two generations!

Heaven saw fit that the electric spark of liberty
should be conducted through you from the New World
THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. Ti

to the Old, and we, who are now here to perform this
duty of patriotism, have all of us long ago received it
from our fathers to cherish your name and your
virtues.

‘‘Those who survived the
‘battle of Bunker Hill are
now around you. Some of
them you have known in the
trying scenes of war. Behold
them now stretch forth their
feeble arms to embrace you!
Behold, they raise their trem-

bling voices to invoke the



blessings of God on you and

BUNKER HILL MONUMENT,

yours forever!’’

“On July 4th, Lafayette was at New York and
listened to the reading of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence. Well did he remember the dinner party at
Metz, nearly fifty years before, where he had first heard
about this Declaration of Independence. And as he
sat upon a high platform and looked down upon the
thousands before him, he smiled in content, for he

thought he saw in their happy faces the fulfilment of
78 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

his youthful dreams. Yet afew weeks later he began
to fear for the safety of the Republic.

There was a tremendous uproar during a political
campaign for the election of the next President. At
the taverns, on busy streets and lene, roads, in every
nook and cranny of the country,
people disputed about whether An-
drew Jackson, Henry Clay, John
Quincy Adams, or William H. Craw-

ford would make the best President.



Public opinion was so divided

DANIEL WEBSTER.

that when election day came no
candidate received a majority of votes. The French-
man thought that there really seemed no way to settle
the result except with pistols and swords.

He did not know much about the laws of. the
United States. But he soon learned what a. great
instrument of good government our Constitution
is.

The Constitution provides that when no candidate
has received a majority of the electoral votes, the
three highest names on the list. must come before the

House of Representatives.
THE MAN OF TWO WORLDS. 79

When, at last, John Quincy Adams was chosen by
the House, all factions accepted the verdict.

““Ah!’’ exclaimed Lafayette, ‘‘this is, indeed, a
wonderful nation. It is built on a solid foundation,
and cannot fall.’’

The more he traveled in the United States, the
more he was impressed with the greatness of its
future. When he sailed up the Mississippi and the
Ohio and saw the rude cabins on their banks, he
said: ‘‘These are the beginnings of cities.”

When he drove over the National Pike Road or
made a voyage on the new Erie Canal, he said:
“These are the beginnings of yet greater highways
which will one day unite’’—Do you think he said the
Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean? No, he did
not say that, because in 1825 the Mexicans claimed
most of the territory west of the Rocky Mountains.
He said—‘‘which will one day unite all sections of the
country.”’

Lafayette spent more than a year with his friends.
When his visit was over, he embarked in a new
American frigate, the Srandywine, and the prayers

of millions followed him as he sailed away for the
80 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

last time from our shores. So much honor had been
shown this guest of the nation that, for many years
after, if any one received special attention, he was said
to be ‘‘Lafayetted.”’

Nor was the hero forgotten in his absence. Old
places in the East and new places in the West and
South remembered him until, to-day, there are over
ninety towns and counties in the United States whose
names recall him or the home of his old age.

The boys and girls who are so fortunate as to live
at La Grange, or Lafayette, or Fayetteville, or
Fayette Hill, or any other Fayette, must surely think
often of the gallant young French marquis who came

to the rescue of our thirteen struggling colonies.

XV.—Tue Last Days or a PATRIOT.

When Lafayette arrived in France he was received
with open arms by his countrymen. They called him
the protector of their Constitution. And, indeed, just
at that time the French Constitution needed pro-

tection.
THE LAST DAYS OF A PATRIOT. 81

During Lafayette’s absence Louis XVIII. had died
and Charles X. had come to the throne. King Charles
was determined to restore the old order of things.
He destroyed the liberty of the press, dissolved the
National Assembly, and chose his favorites as ministers.

The members of the Assembly met again of their
own accord, and declared they would resist these
unconstitutional measures. Then the people of Paris

rushed together. They barricaded the streets, defeated
the royal troops, and drove the king from the city.

Lafayette might have been elected President, but
he refused to accept the office; for he knew very well
that the French people were not ready for a republic.
He desired a constitutional monarchy like that of
England. He visited Louis Philippe, the Duke of
Orleans. This prince had traveled in the United
States and England, and understood what a govern-
ment ‘‘by the people, for the people’’ meant.

“You know,” said Lafayette to the duke, ‘‘that I
regard the Constitution of the United States as the
most perfect that has ever existed.’’

‘I think as you do,” replied his highness; ‘‘it is

impossible to have passed two years in America and
82 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

not be of that opinion. But do you believe that the
French people are ready for that?”

‘"No, they are only ready for a throne surrounded
with republican institutions.’’

“Such is my _ belief,’’
said the duke.

Soon after this the Na-
tional Assembly met in the
Hotel de Ville. The Duke
of Orleans was there. He
pledged himself to receive

the crown, not by right of



birth, but as the free gift

LOUIS PHILIPPE.

of the people.

Lafayette led him to an open window and
embraced him.

‘““Long live the Duke of Orleans!’’ shouted the

people who had assembled below to greet him.

Not long after, he was crowned King of France
by the Assembly.

“Long live King Louis Philippe!’’ cried every one.

Lafayette felt that he had at last won his long
fight for the constitutional liberty of his beloved
THE LAST DAYS OF A PATRIOT. 83

country. The aged patriot retired to La Grange,
where he lived yet a little longer among his children
and friends. In his favorite room hung the portraits
of Washington and
Franklin and a paint-
ing of the siege of
Yorktown; and here
he loved to sit and
muse over the exciting
scenes of his early days.

One beautiful morn-
ing, May 20, 1834, he
died at Paris, sur-

rounded by his family;



and there was mourn-

LAFAYETTE’S GRAVE AT PICPUS.

ing throughout France,
His remains were placed with great pomp by the side
of those of his wife in the cemetery of Picpus. As
the casket was lowered, earth from America, mingled
with that of France, was strewn upon it.

‘Lafayette was a man of two worlds,’’ said the
Paris papers which were banded in black.

Church bells tolled in his honor in many countries.
84 STORY OF MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE.

In the United States, Congress wore mourning for
thirty days, and, by order of President Jackson, the
same honors were paid to his memory by the army
and navy as had been paid to that of George Washing-
ton.

As the years went by, the French people learned
to govern themselves. They created a republican
government, and to-day the Republic of France is one
of the great powers of Europe.

As for the United States, the government has
grown steadily stronger and greater upon the founda-
tions which Lafayette helped to build.

It was Washington who said: ‘‘Lafayette deserves
all the gratitude which our country can render
him.’”’ ‘

And on October 19, 1898, the anniversary of the
victory at Yorktown, young patriots in every city,
‘town, and village in our country remembered these
words. They held memorial services in Lafayette’s honor,
and contributed funds to erect, in the city of Paris, a
noble monument to his name. And all agreed that
the monument should be dedicated on July 4, 1900,

the anniversary of our Declaration of Independence.
THE LAST DAYS OF A PATRIOT. 85

For it was the news of Liberty’s birth which first
taught the young captain of artillery at Metz what his

mission in life should be.



LIBERTY ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD.

Presented by the People of France tothe Republic of the United States.






























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'89640' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDIW' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2ffa0b707cf72c9023428446ccbbd170
b9e0e1f2c2aae28d6ab86429a5802546cf794ecb
describe
'21254' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDIX' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
16da4738a72cacde349f41155b0555e7
880ebe2f3754895ecfa3c7bc06dd38124619e441
'2011-12-28T17:28:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDIY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
bcbc8434593cc89227585dbb6ef5ee69
6acd492183d68bf47bf5a343c51f41ec7780a060
'2011-12-28T17:30:21-05:00'
describe
'5071' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDIZ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9a582d16b33be7ef7bba7e3b2ad7e02b
ce566bffeb84cda8db9354b6967ce7788ebd9008
'2011-12-28T17:30:13-05:00'
describe
'333138' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJA' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3df94dbc552db653e10075d83c76e179
e4657173ec4d3f83c1434e63945192c6c3d95870
'2011-12-28T17:29:31-05:00'
describe
'42412' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJB' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
a50de9a47a60d66ef865330c9428e3fd
4c833d9a3ede323c957288448d44d6fb0e719402
'2011-12-28T17:30:07-05:00'
describe
'7344' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJC' 'sip-files00012.pro'
c09be152a09e3573a5c38eba40125fd2
14c6fba91187691416c88bae647b31a09b7002ed
'2011-12-28T17:30:12-05:00'
describe
'14289' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJD' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b997dffb87138a10a421fef8312111f3
fa6b0b00fbe8ef29c55247708488f435ebfdf90f
'2011-12-28T17:29:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJE' 'sip-files00012.tif'
c3149d99e6c4847149de0d02bb0ebdd9
8820ad7d1ac8898b66cdfa9fe7fd8a5ecdf7de87
describe
'357' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c80d89cc881d69a25ab75c0e98e324f0
7e2660f5c96454fa79d88733f62f13d10f83d781
describe
'4194' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJG' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
936fa0453f1351f01d23160b4b5d15d7
e760ee5c89aa95ca356d987f10f5642ceb99d6cd
'2011-12-28T17:28:44-05:00'
describe
'332941' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJH' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
4e660cbf36f401ccabdef4c5228a1637
b1142c65e0994913f4b4a572a7e325c5f2f1122e
'2011-12-28T17:29:46-05:00'
describe
'15664' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
577fe51f2bbe4632f00c25f11964bdbd
172903edc8d8be0d1c01cc2c3a72849c9976e9e6
'2011-12-28T17:29:04-05:00'
describe
'1986' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJJ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4b87ab267493ef421af79db249c89bf3
c4e7cbd40478626f1c1bca7ca819a4e0dd08cce1
'2011-12-28T17:29:45-05:00'
describe
'3911' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJK' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
4ba6137005778e673f0b18b135a79c7f
ee164ab2c8d04545a89c1eb87c63719e5edf70ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJL' 'sip-files00013.tif'
fb2ebf327606e52d37a8331036969ac4
928da62cb4939e39c9036a48680975c0fc8667e2
'2011-12-28T17:28:29-05:00'
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJM' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b324344ed447fb9edb6149632c0b019b
304de406ad5e9c8e8678a505f52bf9a2303baa82
'2011-12-28T17:28:19-05:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJN' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
33622fee662ff3f3e4faeb5296610239
667a4ba7d3941eeb13f16764ea31c2232a557574
describe
'332980' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
89ddb4e00a21ef653f2007d39c701b05
1705511af446d2bf57cb92b70fdea6df07da4d2e
'2011-12-28T17:28:48-05:00'
describe
'88673' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
bbe2119366ea260b3e818547e16e0e31
c0d181b6954d2759d7542330355e1e1261d2e43b
describe
'32236' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJQ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ba9019408030dfd71933cfe72acebc23
bdf2354aa50c5e8f2f6c3f287fd36ce355e8ea24
'2011-12-28T17:28:59-05:00'
describe
'29820' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJR' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c24dfad18e69b578e4cdbd78ee3f1999
82e6c23fa3eb7e14dfe38e678df34033affde091
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJS' 'sip-files00014.tif'
156e061d776e20b702819c41196a688c
0196681e3de9d841d005badf4d21f0e3d365a33b
'2011-12-28T17:28:17-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJT' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1bff39057a0d35971361ff5539a65245
3bd353e9d3319cdcf6fe831dd7976c2da6136d4c
describe
'7761' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJU' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
150335729d531a38553b1fb6449f4fcd
fadbbddb3bd8c3f7eb00bf8916e27c71159956af
'2011-12-28T17:29:43-05:00'
describe
'333148' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8dfd0e2f530609ec0c8f430b4b2f8d28
d0f1235c25062f0483a54976f9dad0b959836b51
describe
'102075' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJW' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ba57b5dc544fd2445dc4590a11d5f322
506f356687ddc5b51413a758e11cb92e38f7ec4f
'2011-12-28T17:29:53-05:00'
describe
'38277' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJX' 'sip-files00015.pro'
30b1ba08a4bdd4b6f2ec31b56fdf290a
920411e0652cd04b6ef9cad74a757830e336a5ee
'2011-12-28T17:29:34-05:00'
describe
'34152' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d8b84951698b46b5fa5975a728ee5da5
6808cbe2c03fb3e1abb2bd25699f2febc7fe1e7a
'2011-12-28T17:28:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDJZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0583395b8cfc996ca77712f59b0a9466
c8b572377616c8131fa6ca1bf31ffe0897c0b5ab
'2011-12-28T17:30:04-05:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKA' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c37d7dba710a360f898fed98fa3b3bf6
b22e5fbe81065b44646b76415871836d8fc93a67
'2011-12-28T17:30:22-05:00'
describe
'8252' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKB' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
9eff8e2ee02a826fda7a012c03d96daa
3a9c5a48c14579a315ecd65cd5a50ce46039983a
'2011-12-28T17:29:33-05:00'
describe
'333151' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKC' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
cb46c1d5b01d8e6986c8422302f096c3
623122f845c95b6e8aeb904897440deff0773f3c
'2011-12-28T17:28:18-05:00'
describe
'103825' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKD' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7c65e1612ce74620fb855c31b6392bc7
a33dba32a6860b723ac438e13447d553b7ddfe82
'2011-12-28T17:28:24-05:00'
describe
'39165' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKE' 'sip-files00016.pro'
707824772ff0f60488059699b975c398
f2755c099b023400a146f098a06f92766d27e3aa
'2011-12-28T17:29:52-05:00'
describe
'36169' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKF' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
3797ea7a7e280a6eeb275b36c2b9fb21
34dbc4e350d3570c18710ab564fac5512e872e52
'2011-12-28T17:29:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
651984d82976915a91267a53658b62df
a7c81250681b9d63dff55f57d181fb7faf863cf5
'2011-12-28T17:28:32-05:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKH' 'sip-files00016.txt'
39fc4d2be57fe62804f4f6333ed9ef6d
a2866be5d39631cafea857fc2c74413f2d9186a3
'2011-12-28T17:28:16-05:00'
describe
'8917' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
e99181821fe2baee8fbd61abd6a94bc2
0c4592578310b5b9536cd41f86cafef58c87ac78
'2011-12-28T17:29:37-05:00'
describe
'333162' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKJ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3ecd5cf9d67c1466e85e53a4109217f0
a7ff523d37b9f748d2ba53d4dbb71765f6bb8b6b
'2011-12-28T17:28:31-05:00'
describe
'98746' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKK' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b7d577ed03dc49ba6bce2eec1fed294e
b68019d32adfdae9df143afa0da39235f94a6511
'2011-12-28T17:28:37-05:00'
describe
'36391' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
ad50521a79a1a2b2034eb3bf0a3f8591
fce63338835547b6a95cdb17b02e568c11baf6e4
describe
'32567' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
37d3c018c028b22faacbc10fe6d56107
4591fffb8b15f2f5399f95f86c1ac36920f1303e
'2011-12-28T17:29:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
cde08e5a452ab453376ea2f24c56751a
672dd00edc05d0ca005c89ef529d45730f1b098b
'2011-12-28T17:28:20-05:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9f24b63c4dcce63a8151c117aed12572
f69f4bc54324ade335b073b5bd0e060ec8f06482
'2011-12-28T17:29:32-05:00'
describe
'8096' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKP' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c0a2d0459a421ad6301882990b788d8b
eb27c473ff400664a36fdbd2f004189114b3bf03
describe
'333071' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6f8744357f10667d4ac84fc1d29a2800
18555dd85d924f36066e206282cf2aaf46634d76
'2011-12-28T17:29:27-05:00'
describe
'52128' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c2ba08420555a8c61b8747de2357eec9
1a12ae7628d27969dff08ea651c96c4e82593cb3
describe
'18066' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKS' 'sip-files00018.pro'
086650ed0239a00836f5430379ce6879
0389a2b06d342674f541911909172233fd55a4f5
'2011-12-28T17:30:18-05:00'
describe
'17531' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c7f8570fcc28f38d647c47b03426fc3e
301914d71d7f6e66c7258a8b7233bc2adfd708e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
79ea4eb92aa48674744f028654ca731e
466d79f042e224b1b89ff951b306874e761844c8
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKV' 'sip-files00018.txt'
13beebcda132d856a314e46d3f0596f6
d5f6097d917eac44810031291cbdccc8fec907a0
'2011-12-28T17:28:38-05:00'
describe
'5075' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
0c773f5e915397ce9cb9e794c1a06010
21744edeb8c6e3cca03d6108e25b8df5957229ea
'2011-12-28T17:29:29-05:00'
describe
'332959' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
5de6da770b3685b2aee9c00682c2d9de
4c138deea45387cda609eac41362da6801345961
describe
'11812' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
1d05a358cc70c62b95e862efbb38513a
c9bde9fbd3ab71bcad2e8baf00cc229f372b6d26
'2011-12-28T17:30:10-05:00'
describe
'2527' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDKZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
279d91d39c06d1ba852c05a6579e8429
7c6646e494f12a353bbbcacade68382c289b03c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d7819d39777edb51654a2312a89c02ce
c0e8cbfb2faf84948944b8b2289e4cfc4dac035d
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9e00e9f327cc05f23eae969a6b243516
b4eddbc52274b9b58eaf8f58936fe8965e342f67
'2011-12-28T17:30:17-05:00'
describe
'332922' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f2fc84e9145e22941ce5a744739f06e1
a1ca24b15d728bef7111e8cabd9ec9b1d3f79070
describe
'65795' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
bab8413e8e774ee92a507aa3ec9664a1
ce9d6c493ffeffdb69d99ebebb60d3beeeac3a56
describe
'19216' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d8611d9d3a3a7cbe19770780b7ba8bc8
d660e9b328724cf03502ad85f03319424c486595
describe
'21601' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
2363ac73d18fae825dab00dbc49e7ef6
320dd6c4aa7c5a5896a0bd1c27c4617feedba4c9
'2011-12-28T17:28:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
9993bb31fac65e72062b0f58dc1c78d8
ac46d3db4b3bc99b19bf354d348ab2962cac1cef
'2011-12-28T17:29:15-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
13e5fc2ad29e7304e2c4df719bf61845
74175c15ee5139da36c859c0bf9468bfb9c7e978
'2011-12-28T17:29:40-05:00'
describe
'5210' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5dddfb3ab23fcba036ce3264b75e21b6
e821fb5cdc86d8302da856b52f539d84438a4116
'2011-12-28T17:29:54-05:00'
describe
'332960' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
678a53080ed389e2b8a597dfdf31df7b
06a2e83097cbbbcc774cb7c2c6ebf426ac3d8c55
'2011-12-28T17:29:05-05:00'
describe
'11082' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
df2c59d331e993d6085028244583b6c0
d196ddbbe7fce2d50af4faa805150a345e54df33
'2011-12-28T17:28:57-05:00'
describe
'2409' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
f7a034ffb99ade4505b93552883ed3f0
cb57d54b0bf1d2244f04f309e1719a6a68c722d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e81c275e6c826a0e26cbacbfb45848bb
1665c28e6c745549c493129d1a505ba42b7172a7
'2011-12-28T17:28:13-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
4940852537d042560475e712edef192f
c6f3fe5921caf5cf38509512f882f2ab45dc74dd
'2011-12-28T17:29:20-05:00'
describe
'333026' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c05414e4e311e33880554184d81c0bfd
4bae9f0b08cacd8abb0f5dcf5087c397a6272a54
'2011-12-28T17:28:22-05:00'
describe
'111082' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e5a2b67920e2a1ce9bd90185a564d23a
7307a8b0f34e777b1d7aeda6313c50e7bc9bc0ce
describe
'6188' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
27d4f2c328060dc0cfd554c754031702
53539fdbfdbf33796a641972b290e8dc9c0eff12
'2011-12-28T17:28:27-05:00'
describe
'28557' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
e909dea255da9dc4e8c50a08c67ec82a
87e85b887c7128b9433da6fe47a4a04faae3af3e
'2011-12-28T17:28:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1eb00f3b868369a3e5e0f449d8c47420
23c5e6ffbc38cd5a70b5a82de7afc70c2f8cbb6b
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1978bbfdb029acc244d5c3220ea50ada
fd08644d13260e7d5a8a51659b6f8a8e936ef4d6
describe
'6988' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a8fcfcffac3ff3f910b02efb102aa035
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'2011-12-28T17:30:27-05:00'
describe
'333134' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
0bda061eb90ee44e4355e7a0f37cb275
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describe
'106533' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
06d0c3f6df576cb63e48c15442fb1248
67200654d1964582392e2b90e71644e16e0efacf
'2011-12-28T17:29:14-05:00'
describe
'31623' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a0e8386e18581e52c47fcc6702fbcfdd
bf8857d1f82f167293d9ced008d919b3ee0733c2
describe
'35252' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
71e4b92fd77f0ae4c3f38f055cbaf62b
ab8e96e5e4fcc37d45c5e772373457539d07656d
'2011-12-28T17:29:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDLZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
6438e9ebb52ec72f643305767a680f53
48cc529f4819b66204928fda85bdafa88148c4c1
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
55bbbc3b6f491fdabeba142386a56d3b
63b19326dc985b6fcd7aad835b7fcd9619fd2d5e
describe
'9193' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
bc88c5fea890723376b359aeb2e21637
9db0edee4241cbfe6f3e311acbf46c4cdcc42687
describe
'333118' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
c77a96a0053ffda4f71a8b7f81a160a0
5571d168dabcb3e75a9093c48a2314ef60147c07
'2011-12-28T17:29:16-05:00'
describe
'107540' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3a065cc7ae15a2ce13bd2c5f11acc071
10399f26ff3e2b2ca5e67d60db59b7de60cd8701
'2011-12-28T17:29:28-05:00'
describe
'31337' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDME' 'sip-files00024.pro'
4b2ae37f0054b5dccbcdbba5b3264baa
3df10443b439fa3d4da3e321a6febbecb3aaeb8f
'2011-12-28T17:29:09-05:00'
describe
'34861' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
edfc8aa7a09ad48ed861ebd7068a11ea
7db7e0e3411e7adfe576100a7ca880bfe1cd0105
'2011-12-28T17:28:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c05f72ac36aabc8440f463acf1089075
4c30a070d965e4273bbb4b9f457ebe6dee9697a1
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
8adbcc262fcd41e6f18da2db5084a0ff
ac38dfbe74e1de3a1eb22d92aa5201631afcba5c
'2011-12-28T17:28:40-05:00'
describe
'9155' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6c159d2504e360af673c048da457efab
5b18405af329cc47a54248af764c588a02b1941d
describe
'332972' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a797197c293cc11da89aea5d5a230ad6
bbb193c9c73ba92055aa3fb2f8dff7acc1702640
describe
'107556' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
fa68f93ba2b562b2d305bf6955f38431
21f82ceedd02ecce7eff0cfcbc8b3d5d40897d07
'2011-12-28T17:29:23-05:00'
describe
'27295' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDML' 'sip-files00025.pro'
7b485f31f2782c11b7901652ba9341ab
1909e28d978efd4c49c128209d254540136c79b1
'2011-12-28T17:30:14-05:00'
describe
'33831' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
9b901929abe5f8adb4a957512cd8e8c2
c7caba9ae33262aa5faee1f35ffb00c6c683ddd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b489dd71b8dc56be537515d42dd77512
8c76d180bbcc3b781323d7095afa752e3aff88b2
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
52830809dd16598bfee242aa90d2c9f0
368f786b6418bb2844eedbc5c0f2a7867da2ecdc
describe
'9092' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
b6483fad47d965fa0f026a921636c540
440de8431cbcf9daae4ac253f2b2d8b1780385e5
describe
'333018' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d952cf19dec5cc53862fe1ad054ab117
25063ef1de6da4a6a85864eed80d0a2f79abb5ca
'2011-12-28T17:30:20-05:00'
describe
'101623' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ca7adb0541fb2016fce4b67778402a1b
a17a9ef079a1d4d86c325cd09ef5e50b710d9129
describe
'28892' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
508c0e224688692b9ebf07955927a537
94dd34a2d65e7989b349c450b22c2c9eeaf98762
'2011-12-28T17:30:31-05:00'
describe
'32828' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
68a311be3900b102579d7e08090d2dac
050306dc46f4704fdd92e67d68a0d042ce3b6b3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ed27d8ac39fc7779ba73c61a2070c36b
be2a9cc3acae2d2e1722e67940682431405e1d80
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
9692f41c8c17d3d8eab6cac2f43abf01
59c821532265f95423eb67cccf065893ae0be57c
describe
'9316' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5d0e77261dcc3781463f499020fad4b2
700316bed10383c045548118df1dabb4b101c147
'2011-12-28T17:28:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
500cc41505504b89aeaca340a9519b50
f8a92f7afbe095e5d2d92e93e10bba19826a1c65
'2011-12-28T17:30:16-05:00'
describe
'128353' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
cc4123e1dd963500976cf5a64edaebac
4222b807d50ea8df2842b832c3e93eb1bd5d0783
'2011-12-28T17:29:11-05:00'
describe
'14023' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDMZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f6a5a7603a226935a5e805c22ecfa6f2
ae223776fb8a436fbb215b7da9b0cdfad4f3acf6
describe
'36606' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f6882464abb64fb1a5643747100ae1db
43ae6c7380a664c4dec95405872c72dbc22e032a
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
74e50a6c35b2a74aeb8ce8c0687c357b
97b0890c3ab94b26cd89fe10d06050db7a56cf30
'2011-12-28T17:28:30-05:00'
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7f1c0b7a0cbd0071b4073c95e0eba3ea
73361df536f075acc79e68591c537097e0cba2e4
describe
'8807' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDND' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
feaffade4578a2fe2de59dba5b31cd43
bbcb24c14d84f5cf152c54c2105d12260578ec3c
describe
'332955' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
473f56db644ce34b5fe3096fc378ba1d
cf7a679d322f34f3ee9fed571b5f59ffd511f87d
describe
'107739' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
765cffa24947ec462398c852c3f3bd6a
90724ce9806eaf10b73a2005a5a90f7302fbedbf
describe
'30343' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
351a61a7eca2664c4bcddef70d8ab42a
5642e3dfb1c25225dd61e3b635416246d2600d5e
describe
'34451' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
8286444b09997920c2807b18efd4a34d
eb234aa57b2b566e39cfe5832b533bf9915dbb36
'2011-12-28T17:28:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ff003ab4e5d8aedbbf5c3ac0c8af5f0e
a70125bdb25c15af2824dac51adb29adaad8c081
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9e38e3f3248c9275c31283b32a6808ed
5c50fd64a889f4d7c9ae06204c513bdc0b82ba66
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
33d415625188651edb84f339014a3738
4314438ec279f9a21bb33e5cad2b3afcc1e8274f
describe
'333164' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c32694bcfea93acf46150b86a2101699
df86c273513688530e844705761771a62d3e8ee1
'2011-12-28T17:29:38-05:00'
describe
'107796' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ad576bc6bfb45ab81c639d4153a3bce1
70af9c7dc6c4e577ef4879151ddce55b83ff7153
describe
'30663' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e8be6565c9957fc4bca4a19825c821f0
5227275061c0073b8035838b349f86301892f9ca
describe
'35078' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
fc3e6e44070c44f0f9e5c81d16e7d236
a3bcc6ce71a9c78d5be6b5f013549cbbd92abf20
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
2f0598db96880c4b9e195f18da9b0cf3
b6fd89cfb759ae86f15c3b11ee60e36d373b2bc2
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
7a3b8602f12630ed5addeb621a15cbab
f7189f45fcb9e9570977fd979d28e0a591f68c11
describe
'8957' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
17d665bf0bb513968cd8b70d14cb85a2
36658021272624390649bf68bafa8d4fa3b86b92
'2011-12-28T17:28:26-05:00'
describe
'333154' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9a2abd2af23ecf9a22dacf7b4e845d4a
afe5decf1648a7c0445d94f2459b2be29a4f3d3a
describe
'98829' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
77a4c9124ea601aefc20c82328b93ce3
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'2011-12-28T17:29:08-05:00'
describe
'27645' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
7911170b05f6b331894b5ed6207a085e
3e0356698e6f0da911312225f9401d4fa281a0cc
'2011-12-28T17:30:11-05:00'
describe
'31085' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
f308efb28f788fa8525a12b0dbfc9bed
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'2011-12-28T17:28:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
3373c939dc3fc477e8735bf7b8666d49
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describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
71c9715d3360495ff3b3f0a8ad5d0e66
4bf4e3cb734297026fba2254aa367780d9205022
'2011-12-28T17:30:19-05:00'
describe
'8270' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7f2dbf7b34e16b52ffaad992f08e5f70
ac80aa3777cb80f142d28acec3f2f851cff1d661
'2011-12-28T17:29:35-05:00'
describe
'332728' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDNZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c3235e52eb52c51cc8eee0d36b9d8542
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describe
'101469' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e33d664b0b40f82a60f43ff9391ac065
90760241431322a76ce4960d59cd4cc4b35484d8
'2011-12-28T17:28:52-05:00'
describe
'27362' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
ad510166b45c217f73b0e851a193051d
8cfb2b831aacba23da20610ecc1a7e1ada8cfc6b
describe
'32951' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c3f0767cf6e2ebfc5f9f3321961e3e30
1a416a0bbff8d6071fd8291af5f98f43b165b070
'2011-12-28T17:29:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
dca545f35f7e504288d77313d7ba36bd
9d8c07f480968e880649855b65dd050f9c5a5b34
'2011-12-28T17:29:13-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
04c2431adbf4c72c232d484ccf4cd3f1
3fadc44eca52ba303d314c5be69c5cef8ad3b7c5
describe
'8878' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
5b92884eb0073ae19bd180ca5bb0cac1
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describe
'333089' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c3dcf94349023c9581262c515b8a3f30
a97eae0f2c9b0c2b73b8a1c5613510a1a57f0b34
'2011-12-28T17:28:53-05:00'
describe
'94184' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
442cdd04f46f33c9a792858be78fe591
f1a8132a95c726b2afbcdd292076852ec113047b
describe
'25297' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
4329c4770ca68eaddf3ce5540721341c
61051fddfb85fd0eeb0c7718d44e2332aa142a68
describe
'30247' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
32c0f015e774a844f166cc62075bd3d0
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'2011-12-28T17:29:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
1dc768c24ecf10fd2684f22d2c79072f
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'2011-12-28T17:29:49-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
00a73b46b6917f5ec41befec09e0953e
1f319160961b03f3111d86358f1e073680feaed8
describe
'7886' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
deff4bd2ce7635c1c740eabaeeaef866
15382825a27b99ecf2deee4260fa7d3470089dda
describe
'333157' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDON' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
7e5f7f990f5e6a6ec552b20c09e9e5a4
15adc79cb52e6779c00ba19b9dd49b9f2db95e9d
describe
'111319' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0a695503959227b0e0045edd53d0b327
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describe
'24830' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a55bac494113f60731a45d7affc63299
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describe
'33813' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
c6360f809261c66a1ded67daa68806e1
e6c05766a7184a8625e31fd8634dab8540827407
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
42993da5339c170ac7113b36ffe9a573
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describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ac27ec2525aabb202b72d0f379e034f7
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describe
'9042' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
bffbdfc05eff7a26b3929877abccca5f
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describe
'332836' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8091775f6710051cfcf20ca9379d22d7
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'2011-12-28T17:29:36-05:00'
describe
'102467' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3a6e49f1852b03642a8af7eb3a745e88
751c056382da490860c7800390870798033a3b3c
'2011-12-28T17:28:28-05:00'
describe
'28398' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
c923e75ee49e3ce058a909c88a5b7c1d
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describe
'33023' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3930a877e7294acbedb8f86be6e1336f
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8c6782317390b33fde0b79e6272e483e
068828f31aec80653747d239c70b5f008eac4c3e
'2011-12-28T17:29:56-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDOZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
55bd61002c655bac61cf23a682ad4dac
069c304b9451f04984e91233250494053bcf6375
'2011-12-28T17:30:09-05:00'
describe
'8608' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a9641590c4f453db9b4ef724e7728d6b
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describe
'333153' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
a8275dfea82fd1c7aaef11cfb8c64ea1
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'2011-12-28T17:28:25-05:00'
describe
'98543' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
6b9985bac7697b24519bd654b237065e
c74ba487bf776df1f83cc3f0af6b75d31fc653f0
describe
'26314' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fd997d7c45518b3eb693fdf21ac67dc2
d1d23d44b6c34b130a6767ececb125facceb836b
describe
'31006' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9be40f30b875e7c197aa64b035e1b466
2a8a11f720cbea49fc1d5119b3e4ce0f6b2bc812
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d3a1d75b519bd6e79d5e15de02986824
075652861c421015ff18cc7959da55cf5b5f9c61
'2011-12-28T17:29:19-05:00'
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
22f67c290877b150f8cae092af894c78
97177b2675545e0bae2b314fdf4c869546c5ae34
describe
'8145' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c4ad55f9d1bbe60ffa5a3c71eaae54c3
f29a7f6bcc78f84e99e2ce202fc77758fe7863af
describe
'332999' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a145e3b312e34dc299e4e1fe7a3f84f0
f0ae1c8940759660b7b8383dc2b1f1247d07f738
describe
'104883' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
6ee5a10fa1bfd10765f85c6e856361c9
1e5d63863b20630c555f4e839c0adbdc80489639
describe
'28246' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
163e89fb036a95fcc28591d37083f60a
453d959903a25033a55967c211fbd3b9ad3c67c5
describe
'33268' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
445f94af0877809a64ba2cb8e3065dd9
ddecd4481f957ecdec543f7d68f7884b56351714
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0f7b5c6582629fa36955158e261f95ed
35f455f9c29b14e395ace56af6d25a0f389fa7b6
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
65514e9b9f2a7c8c340ee5ae83fddd43
b83521990cc0e76d7654cf02ab3d302fb0b42765
'2011-12-28T17:28:47-05:00'
describe
'8885' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
221ea422780ee7990257b497130cf193
1848d5f6cbef9c61dcd27fa2bc75372edc5cbf1d
'2011-12-28T17:29:30-05:00'
describe
'333128' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
aa3f2eb014b75a6fec5df77eea69e819
2445e4599b409683ddca624ec0d6dd9faa0f6e49
'2011-12-28T17:28:35-05:00'
describe
'95644' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
7caa6692e87c79824b58ecd73c0e2c3b
4f7f136f6c275ccb3e3e923905563923badb7d71
describe
'28535' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPR' 'sip-files00037.pro'
bcfdb8b518c0dad5e61c6751b40d055c
08da6f19551b6cf1a01eb9f8ac58fa1b094d05ba
'2011-12-28T17:29:10-05:00'
describe
'32360' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
073cb46048442a37b90d89cc99ca5bec
c729eb968b3e6fc8fdeb272a96452cc4e4b93a29
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
05b28c18da3d3a8448a2a7f084743357
bbebb967e2abe0f6cc3d7057265853333d1dc81c
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
feb3a41a56fe0b20f7273c90bca58c4e
dbf2a0d81e10971a39ef07483434f514210f978a
describe
'8680' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1a2708d799e7c59702ba418d439443ac
632971cfa43e4b9afdf6de9eb13d48778aa64319
describe
'332969' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
233defaaca0a65d417b20ffa7806b14d
f4ba026d57d7968a5a082686e18eada38f9f9685
describe
'93932' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4bb995d28c0a0928d825af9fd89f5157
ffd8cb9f484b0bdf9638c7bcc156ff482d392682
'2011-12-28T17:28:51-05:00'
describe
'26569' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
0cd4813f32cd4e9d5fc8d3cb87451284
1faef047358a604fe1eacf06366f4df179e536e3
describe
'30541' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDPZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
324d5e951c94227e8e7902bf167e2b89
a5f768656c54a50025efacce77df2531cb9fbc03
describe
'2680756' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0d5beae1f06b96daff0645e6e0eabc38
7176ee0c9a197597c677ec2327c55a3df9e89825
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
da1e7569d428e21d3bd5afed28d107a8
00eb4830336081ae56f375191a662fa8e98f898b
describe
'8361' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
201fae6d08229290757f81466fd9649b
0df89864910d1016785dcd060d4859fb8f93b9f9
describe
'332983' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f3975ee57789e653b9023ebdb8d798e8
0d9a89b393f08a05cd51ec86fc3d40628721976c
describe
'91091' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
bfe5f3c590da58042132578a60a7d783
118741f1e24360ee9283d6a2ad6d62f28e2daaf3
'2011-12-28T17:30:02-05:00'
describe
'26085' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
379df2c61b1b9f7bca17de9485db14ca
26d874ae9c28b06fa39c2bbc9aa1115e99489fce
'2011-12-28T17:29:42-05:00'
describe
'31282' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQG' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2c730b62083bb8233675f3e4cc690be4
3c307062b6e1de7dc0d7376ec1888c8c310df67e
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c127ed02312c8a190bb3cfcbe628e587
de22bc491207ef08e12ce5c8ae488c30873d75aa
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c6986f48813c3778b3b0eb0d9d5691ff
0253244f2ed1ffe3ac79eefa3bb5f7fc44215a20
describe
'8392' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
c54671f9cf14d0e2065782dea4b492f1
d07ae00b91bac3a7d66a35c7d59d94d3c56843ba
describe
'333136' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
74ee9e4d9ff47368fcc847fb8a902020
30a9a6bcc34852daccb9fc29b81364141283a5ab
describe
'95797' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
7a04de083c9e9da47c7a4befc3a56b1b
82c4c463f9ecdddd5fb744c92e350b2148bb5356
describe
'28916' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7233302fe81e00390c2768af85802f82
c28a5def5bc0a03fdcbe12ae16287cdf1c681920
describe
'32615' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f44be9990bf13a53fa840b3b77504a57
b1d63aaf36b9df361ebd7d2fafa95beccb18e256
'2011-12-28T17:30:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
70f3fc08f435a9e0f6f5d124f3c293f2
fc3af613670359398a3feb07ed237d10ed512318
'2011-12-28T17:28:09-05:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
396b958751139f93e825c336a0a9ab61
286b265e1a0c062b5cc4dfd8ef309efaaa2cd004
describe
'8468' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d8260639fe13d32f89105fe7518882b7
02aaf5c104a88d8048be0227a985b0c78b620144
describe
'333158' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e44ad73ed479e6cc3207b3aebd6c0ae8
ecb026f84cca113072f8d39ca0ec90b0df175ebb
describe
'97212' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
826fdef40249792c634cc6a59375052a
abb25f5f20c58cc92c539205e5ac669b24ea2be7
describe
'22668' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
a861bc81f24fec05700329877ce5af88
34fc70970f888afda6ec10f9da2de788a5dbca97
'2011-12-28T17:30:23-05:00'
describe
'32241' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
03f830b39110cd9afc8b72128cef5480
075276a98688ac727716018a327ba9cf97366df6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a81e8d387ef1842fccde1f8a670d8b56
de5102a7dd66467ddda2a7929d655c38303acebc
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
0b175842b4db15021cb7f287cbf3e5ca
93f6e11ee7880e3bdc54f247b015fb582ca26b4e
'2011-12-28T17:29:59-05:00'
describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
347050e0bd7b33ef5cb6a1be6419dd80
a47fae5870f7e9423473ef551ba6ea2fcdfb8fa2
'2011-12-28T17:28:41-05:00'
describe
'333135' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
c1435c9cbc2a5e9bd84b356f47becc48
5439a2313d54f1acf792ad1a8c17525dc640a637
describe
'97097' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDQZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
47d6ba23a0b3b4daadc31ef4618c9e72
e0cb2b50e23f3e53912e98d00a4205e3d264657a
describe
'25305' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
fce2bfb5d33b3133a68081784a535077
86f62f0015aaed524770487d9390bfe2ef92f807
'2011-12-28T17:30:00-05:00'
describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e5508038d73317de26c3eb31fbb95c4e
8ac545de2860e816325c2837f1ea656fb4478666
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRC' 'sip-files00042.tif'
629eff92d7982ce65fe01cff97fbde4d
44d8ed587232a43ce46eca69741381225212799f
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
7704883669f125b719fab495e71b3fdb
80545932699138ef73c23a71efd9f7c209666241
describe
'8213' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
50821fd383e034b9c8b7a3589372917d
25881b09b5cbc394ca5096d32a2154e21d80dda0
describe
'332930' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
f9147d84a873b16bc55b61aa07a29584
528b28bec698f1f886f6070baef29c4275f4b809
describe
'99164' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRG' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f8d642e6454e58b79a237084e333e6c7
a6e100e9c484c412cb0926ed6192216944a604a6
describe
'28208' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e657c4b60d38100ece87043dde5fd59e
2b7dcb5dd68407fd052742e358a0d947ff45945a
describe
'33817' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRI' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c69947918637785f6f5310e631fb0554
d90bdba58e28a4d94db9f7aea1ec2fde97193d47
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b2e3ce733a010ba5473976449a5e21a7
a847b5a044d94e1bf02d729f46de83878dc726c5
'2011-12-28T17:28:50-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
90c5f9e6e67251bbd1b263545ddcdd75
b54c36212ae1f31e34c1981a9dd58c38cc03d22c
describe
'8920' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRL' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
7712a4f9797e218fc19364dbe8a56533
d3258e6d89a275b318deaee9bec50d16c5210f8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
2f2523179384125ef576b56413129474
c9807f8600ba59877ffe3723980b7ca880bc7948
describe
'85509' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
0f305eb495d8c55067276cc7d4c48868
982dbceeaee08dccb6751b3b4f5e5df2d4b89618
describe
'24905' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
1a68278253e7062a3a5eb65a414c1067
be978881d5a6f345c34459b131ae60c9df698f7c
'2011-12-28T17:28:49-05:00'
describe
'27146' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c2ee5d7faf20c3b48dd17a87dc07d16e
2b12abc61927bf0c3bac7dc95634f4051c38c29d
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRQ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
004c16f01c2675043bffa9b8bf0a378e
48c8d920a14189758cf8f9b503865be3dedcb82e
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f7c461b63162e25354c7b99a0cdfe8f9
cdb3b80270fe2967eaa76d3d3ce07b001c25b345
describe
'7744' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRS' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f63523d02f819c198d95d7ab32785fa9
68385a99bea62a95eb12c42c062d37456cb2576f
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRT' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8081322feb7b77dfa239839136e2b500
68e0524b9be47f00eddf0f95c5bf64cf731a0ee6
describe
'98519' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8a8776bc7ae0dc2d1b05819074108276
9d28c6e384a24137470924b03d10c31e329bd9fc
'2011-12-28T17:28:45-05:00'
describe
'28686' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRV' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a96d788461151b71b1ca72c0ee11f047
024046a4a132ce6cad6d107ac66a1d495a45b51f
describe
'32339' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d8ba3cd64a9162e43df774fa6ab6d8b1
8020ed232c1691d3addb0463823d3cf66792f5d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
2dcdf8a61e8d2581e4f7495a200cd3f4
0140f60ebe14ad61787f117375f7580b3f026370
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
39a5e1ba4f2450ffacbfe9d40506a3c6
614d0a812125a883a03bfb2ea990872a7dcde5a1
describe
'8711' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDRZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b0bf092f1150f859cbe0bdacded925e7
54aa6dd0f7dddd10d9d8a73e6af1d02475180c50
'2011-12-28T17:28:10-05:00'
describe
'332963' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
66a1ce6eb9962be314ca173af2783353
60bea87d643444729024260bf82087623bbdeb12
describe
'97318' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fdca038044823b24d3120edd5ecc712c
099ce8e3bc72090ae4f0cdf9c279f2435a42b5d1
describe
'23648' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
fee934852bb2d1ecf894c22d06b95a43
fe79a8750f3fbfc166db45349969f46492a71de9
describe
'31347' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
33b30fa871ba55c2839b40e72099535d
f4fe3e179b4d726888e01a44facb72a547088ee7
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSE' 'sip-files00046.tif'
748d5a84b027444be04f971a892ddacc
557617f7f8f23f01cc7c639bf1f968f733edd9ab
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
54fcc18134292d09db992fd257211132
35c8c4a3e141cb6ea828de048d7445b7cfd39d8b
'2011-12-28T17:29:00-05:00'
describe
'8577' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8247d7e19c16f8b7403522158132c2dc
995b4ce7795485b4bbfdb119ed4df6ccfb6e66ea
'2011-12-28T17:30:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
106fa262b2206af6ce207b538833c182
532d38f8986b68bfb16f1528d5fd2b699e445bff
'2011-12-28T17:30:05-05:00'
describe
'99346' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
d3835d045074a04b535346979d988cd4
9ade31c144a9d6532c5e4d0e2787f59fb8398db3
describe
'26450' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8a782a521ec128961492e6de6cf7b975
34bbf96be9fa5fde07a9d2f43e73294f0ea6c4ed
describe
'32966' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5a24921a401012c5cc8901efdc4c0c76
f3ae20f8eae1695ddc4f236dac1e7add61245049
'2011-12-28T17:30:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f863ada34ea6567ac8c67127d93d250f
55087b6090eee06f62cb99fe03044e7234376847
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
dbec5f3e96db53c51fdb2cf4729f0a84
fa779ef86693e48f510322e964e6270b071c22a0
'2011-12-28T17:29:18-05:00'
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
812622ae4e2b1551fa9449ea426a4e26
67fe7e4e618c204f5f6bbbe97b7ecf5eef0da51e
describe
'333125' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
23dddf771a3380138bf25ab9f8b53791
e3943b2b1ba00eb66bb59d13733ffe49e63a4bca
describe
'96822' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
74550a5e4e8e859a624a2959aa2e5b07
228e9dc1abb51687efac886b810e632e939ac7ea
'2011-12-28T17:29:55-05:00'
describe
'29314' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0fe642f88ded42291e18aec9ede99a1a
374591a7b2278d041edfeef89d9b735a83f24b9c
'2011-12-28T17:28:33-05:00'
describe
'32800' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c2fc7741f089ef40b608548df8081da9
55059b2882217e9f618244c7eb5def76bd8f7396
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
83ce6acf48a578b5bcbccaef4eb98536
c481bd11358f03be50b20141f3fcad6cc76bc4ce
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDST' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2fdd68e96ad5b055e53db353320edb0a
b881f496f429757ee497a53c923b9b0282fbabac
describe
'8938' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
8ad1d74c389f442a2f81c3c39695b866
0984d1105cd20a4a76dab4bd86870defbd8140da
'2011-12-28T17:29:26-05:00'
describe
'333123' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
630cd524824a4debc3fc900e48f36def
6b77e255da42e2fde9ebbb36899cd8dce8c7b7c7
describe
'97052' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
4d45b0cb7e306e211c3108456939b0ef
a4e2bb15bb5690a3bf1c18a5569e9b6b4ddd3e7a
describe
'27888' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6e2a7b74174f4739d472c5f08ab045ed
ab99e6409fc607220177d5640c27d55c441cfb5e
describe
'33958' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7cd38b473328ca0b2b0ef13d1a7b36ea
2854bd3992a2f9a2f60c7559f7469a4479cd9aa2
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDSZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d4c8d99c7896a92c852f7bf19b3044a4
cfe6ffbc556d3d9e24f42777c22c8ebf3c68cd90
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4d2fc841855ae33353ce6b3d2b4736bd
18681f567e70c581502198f203ffc9897d6d2363
describe
'8796' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
70af3523f538f17067c9a5b6524d47e4
d205ff396188a79ff9f4a9180097030c7316e978
describe
'332984' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
680e2b13b1bea0a72b782f1d4f8a4d62
dc064815196ab7490064df5f73664ef30ab316f5
describe
'134772' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
35ea1ac18e10ac28a40f8a7823bec021
8e669b5d1b1affdd5998bae59ca6e444ab4cffce
describe
'13388' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3e1b4ca119e5174119799efa8505a37e
382243ef9a0458be4b40a5d39062b86275b0fe64
describe
'37808' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e2655daed4bcdd931c3a5a23beac9490
128a76515635873e5f8ed7f4de484aa00ca2277d
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTG' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a86dfe013fd63e4bc90aebdcc89c9fdb
32610853515dcb36d389a0782f465312544239bd
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTH' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6046de40fe8cb205f8d5811d232ade96
87a4820632094e6e689acd09e922f81d13841366
describe
'9280' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
18d79232beb738ec3242f6ba108f1fa1
c53291c0e170d0aa30e27fedd6c17386b7fee69f
describe
'332841' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
86dbd3ff857aad10ffaf2a4d34fa11f5
bcc10e34a971c8d5d10403ac3b666dae688d81ac
describe
'82343' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
cb4402c21a593c9070e6f66d62578fe7
ad98a11948ccffe54583821a9eace0fab20cae87
describe
'22499' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b6d6e03145e6f826f13f2ffcb519c7d9
7e9ae7585e9368f7b144268beac1f1284a425a24
'2011-12-28T17:29:06-05:00'
describe
'28700' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1720fbdb47c83bb84d243e2303644492
053a644d5fba77aa6d7ad9775c72f76682a9c26f
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bd18c6d4ea5d672003166ce826cdf132
53693330801db3b7199f7a02d6dd2c588865587d
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
b5892b8e152c4a416e8a77e89ebc9311
6613a69c78440b6b306ddce92b1a4b57a3a81696
describe
'8032' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
fc41078400fd853c1eccbf1d94ad93f5
e8e65231b613890de360ded224808d9155ac4a12
describe
'333139' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
22ee9aa02d14f9ba69450fa1edcbd39a
9d2e743bb9d422cff85a3e8f3bad539fa0ae6fd2
'2011-12-28T17:29:21-05:00'
describe
'101308' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTR' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
d80715167b819807889d1ef323d6021d
b9eea24fa2a428eb6f5e2a7daa78686278a9c608
describe
'23403' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
171946d6bcaf8277408049414f81eb8c
940f6159673e0c15e1592443643acc43d85f729a
describe
'31589' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
5602c4a502ea96ec8f6620f93bfd0b46
67458813d12ca3dd7f21049f27b5ac6ba4d16e8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8765f945cae88878cdaab26843617666
73f2005b473bef9234c023ab631f0993bdd82064
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
c2d09021bb19e632be7c70ce54b3e80c
ddd36b0789f002a1636cf5f419c512d2e4a43e23
describe
'8506' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
3368bb6de601f839f95e1736b414f9de
cbc9c04d79611d5e967c5dd58fce1b8f90810af2
describe
'333144' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
02103f536732e8d2d9939bc0e20b9905
15f32060e87615974996d3a20f753aa303e6eaa7
describe
'85751' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
fa07326a948e301905b8f2a60209ebfd
2ccf6b3ddddcadbdc9a2d477ab09be9e046ae170
describe
'23659' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDTZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
f1a4d2eb16bc0625a4530b2285d5b092
b5c34ce6caedc925a75c6bf8a178dc1769277ece
describe
'29037' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d9f251ba9953fbc38de5e117d5cbb55b
cc38cb7b7da88219bcdc8e030c9680a1a186cf86
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
c033528f74d2157381230cb642ce93a1
60d68fd1c1a44bd5294dca9c309905f2d38239f0
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
3fbf255e6458d6cd27ab83f75e98acbf
5026b0b972b0955dc7a35d72a7e7ca9a9706ecba
describe
'7734' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUD' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1b4b8dfc4b3f85a90895d0fc6a8bce71
f5600f11d831010f3d83408a6642e19c97dc0533
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
6664eae1f09d0c0d38491bc0cf7537b1
507049e5d3e86bfcf7a2524f183c65e338279763
describe
'98990' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
1e48009c2f650b928aa13ea6ad44104f
d72f75e6d3316ffee387258abe541d6798f0df18
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
b72aa1ec575d1811b98f3a2d532760a4
cefd6981ffdcf67378268bf6e6ae5f43acf73b3f
describe
'33878' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
08327b3831b3e69c740bb313c7f88e49
d73182ac091ac36303e1a79d39b6dcfaf0e63808
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9ebea237a2757aa5067ae47796b8d76b
13be08c3b26c0cebf9b3ef61fca51d8d1977c80e
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
3331889d69a3343e53772bf0be7d5042
fe4ec60b4fa2a67c1d156159cdae97c19a76b3c0
describe
'8585' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
c9beda0a247237ae9a9e2e42fb1d1e2f
73615a956a16697ac17a4b0fed0751b34d71df69
describe
'332989' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
add27857b2603f7f0ee122daee3f5e30
c35c52844763a5fee7cd6d7188e068cf2898bac7
describe
'95742' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUM' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c0c028d06acfaf1d37ce6d620ef50289
eae0a5e5c8c3adf433ee247bc75e3368a55c1269
describe
'28865' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
a082ceb3932611ea35b1919907acfed2
e8d0c021d1e65b98d89b8a48176b6650858881b4
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d126e47d725b288d4bb02fad10d0ef61
8ba106170d303bbdd810084327f6088111a2beec
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2249a034cd756b4aacbc47c45f97ec04
3ebfe3ac413ce77c5ec2bc6bdc18315e0f65a98a
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
cd3f0e15aa15b3f28911773379226419
8f56b8c6d716decf43c9bb1ddc012eaa07615d35
describe
'9116' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
37c5cdd4fc41bdc0680af015d4a0cbf6
1da3d026304606bbf2e97b9508757db298f5368c
describe
'333095' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
2fe127e426973f808c3aa819f0ce604e
a79cf97ea1a4fc2049faec80905ca2b78a33f8e8
describe
'91743' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUT' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
1b87240ae3ac145be52c5595805d108c
3722154f1bf5c336179a25903151d1084f0ae972
describe
'27063' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e24ec9c146bb07c56cfb799981d05534
1fd5ca47ebb807684e332d5232e4d0b5440106aa
describe
'30460' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
99027eaa4cc3d231f136bba9938e009c
06ccf01acf3361c8b9c33a7bf50fc747c246f3c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
224886e4146268e91f4e8bd765eea21f
50587185e16ec52e1a675c5d59f5fe5a409c6833
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
1ae00acdad3444fa9ed4704cb0045bc5
aebf1e6e5b0b21f06e5f5ec5c56b4472bc43644c
describe
'8475' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b5e5c82048b856bb789ffe418618c50f
a81c3083d0fc4284d929d5a1e1a6c5d0e3d7ffbe
describe
'333106' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDUZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
8c8450dd9586ebb22cbde92075d227b1
c2cf047fb7b38c386e54fb0541f30a5bccb3cb98
describe
'93068' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
544727a13dc1f8885901af1156338d16
5e01193da8463a59c4cfaf4f9788bdc62c68ac40
describe
'25821' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
c95651e3aea30785b9e7c0bdf3b4b0c0
b3e1481d56c5ffc3220a6f3a25e284b7c3eaf741
'2011-12-28T17:29:25-05:00'
describe
'31495' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
37645524711b928de28d109fc8c2d8d2
446c42fb698b5eea221bb8dcd5050c1b51228e23
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
275f882979aeb7844f1893406d07d295
8eb8dfca548d91ec193d48dba84ef30cbb7b9cd3
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b46993a9f8ea079cf6d6bb1b443740f7
c6967ac297ccf0d6fd73113bf2497b3181c1a656
describe
'8521' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c423d7ba52090f17e762dd1f01952a26
74b76af8fbae8e4b39a6a8eff737954569c34aee
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
ccf5442442c1907a64d31927cee2be4b
0e35c062c83ce7b7f94fe7c958af3532f24e367c
describe
'86171' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
b8e5a0107920dc355d16a34c75be639f
978ed820c01a50b9b982294698ac67e73629fdb1
describe
'24980' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a18e3ef5565fe921fec68e98f8fb06dc
aca722593469f7f520b9f429efb0ec8cb2eda767
describe
'28053' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e99ee0b3e9fab6b0c3b65ecb7626f661
5b9d868776ec805634efa4521617111a3ac8659b
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
46717ef0c32594aa616c9c0976ab5b9d
0829fd3e72e5339bb560b3b4f86be1da3ad9ec2f
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c4a7330fe8997d8c3f8ecc6ec79726fa
12d191d7d63c5f8fe2d68afaf8959eee996008d6
describe
'8196' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
0bfbc213fce4b2b4a48d4fe0aafc7b8c
ea84e1d5bd8faba7cfd3b224c4d37500559d5ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
51a23db56e6feb0a13dd924aeb587f8d
7ab2a14e14d22b511f525b9276188215fc24e4da
describe
'101386' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
3a18a8f30b8d7773afb667bc5723bbd5
dbe4e50af7883fb0bfcadb4b21871d44b7188f63
describe
'28114' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVP' 'sip-files00059.pro'
810c47b427df6d47e401002e2a5f73b1
5fe6bd400d6e96ab45617c54d04b0eb20b93c154
describe
'32113' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
f1d7f31d90fb858638d05cde3e54cec2
45074cdd96afa6ebb6842dfbe9da643913720974
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
035e57d0773ce90f1a69ac6f1e07e5b5
8f9f3dcf5966fa7fd1c2d94a532bd8ae3403def0
'2011-12-28T17:28:21-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
adc9379461d7c4b22b781941a15e3df5
1f605e2c91bca891dc718e940694e6caa08b0f8b
describe
'8524' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
93ba1178aa7befeb9ce065eae21ba795
c2c386c33ba07c2eefd361aca4f0631af09b351b
describe
'332990' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f3b1c67beda06b312059ad5277e799c2
f533088a92c3da3ff465441dfacbef7e4b9cc812
describe
'97637' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f76d4f89eae85c1641ed0a5132e400e8
04be1332cf63894f45656ea614a94680d97f779c
describe
'26449' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVW' 'sip-files00060.pro'
6a490e5c3dde0f5baee029a3f966a877
fc54db31616cc7b7646befc0de35864292bf2be7
describe
'31522' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
46b565bf1e2aff7fdd5d6863a41ae8e6
01a963ce67d3a4bdb4e2e8cac9065fbcd13d1080
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f533eb681317bb3adfdcf058d3135031
3052f921ae5e788cb04c6cc7032efc6c98a3c313
'2011-12-28T17:30:08-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDVZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
87cccdfd185d2e92d7e361d545278850
a3cb38ccc2d8df4ec519bed00bf940338cb39e49
describe
'8569' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
dc0f1be490f5b3cf72a62d13ad23ce69
581b1d0803f7be656844bb071e13609f0319d8c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b80a0662e8fd06626f2a74da334a5747
4272d9a4e75e44fdad90a9a26d4dd7ab521abc9d
describe
'102272' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
98a15f8a32e94375cdc6eeddff515f7d
394c71792292abce150853644d0524e8d07646e7
describe
'25614' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWD' 'sip-files00061.pro'
21025ed9ed809dee0a57cbcef57e13bf
12e483bc79c4d5ffe02922123d2506290d8a0329
describe
'32861' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
9beff31d1e3ff30b901565a5ec0818fd
e8acedb0bcf7b9109d1a7413a8bf9b56a5656547
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
814edf4b82359ed62ef68dcdcafc9c93
24b201fd4dddb369056c067859cc5ae1019553df
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
cd4bd057bd73b472e3e01af3eae4671b
34ecf47e1fd94dc8435317d313ea888506ce239a
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ad123e2b8ca0ae85e0b33dcecaf9f320
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describe
'332988' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
0d76eb119eaa06def0219a7bbc69e8fb
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describe
'96484' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
94c2095bc81465d991273275db1dd0cc
bc25bf346e852b2b1c58453e44b8ee7e7f6e18f5
describe
'28824' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6538deea3b68ba5fe78cc0827e9fde26
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describe
'33325' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ac33b9e8792c56e57396367004afdc56
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e276e3ece62b9e4e5a703dd4fecb99fd
d344ee14122c0c7b6e91da90af1b2afd81bb6ff6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f3cbd27248b30676cd388608e4d13f22
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describe
'8446' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
af0206b9f6958e16a743cbf5334e2294
656f1ddb7bf9d640540f750cf607eba400f872e3
describe
'333143' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
29183966e3f4b46b9227e24d08d68a0b
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describe
'99038' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5d4450cf89c44a29483b0e637a5d5410
658e38f3fc5ff4aea02d326b7f5f4e8d0931490b
'2011-12-28T17:28:36-05:00'
describe
'24192' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
6504e2e249c39fc6c07c8d3c05ccfb27
6cb989865d5cc4f381adab8bbefe2a0a318c9559
describe
'32123' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2b59b86baa52d339b11bb5a967f1144c
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
30497ed3630fd6634ed8d496f7ce899c
1d88736f6ac0b395a6c1733293d76d08ab9892cb
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
061c4d8e529981f13e173aa0c5159a73
9aa40a77b4ece26c070e3d929108f896dfac4d26
describe
'8447' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
929ccfd1f6a7e768854615f52a49b64e
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describe
'333126' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
009b8c19f021e7fb0ad4c21755705011
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describe
'103147' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
04fae2a55874624156bea861fccb59ff
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describe
'30879' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
95bd65dce5fb8c6eafd5e43fdef233bb
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describe
'35526' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDWZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
cf6be18f23e9448629f1bf99fff8ffc1
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
718cbf35801ffea0b4f5bd2055c38c00
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c2939be27d10d33e6689fc4a384ab119
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describe
'9326' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
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describe
'332946' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXD' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b2f8f9af200dcbb5d097960d36661ad3
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describe
'107709' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
3cfe43fb32ad7a8ef638ac958704b26b
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describe
'27997' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
295f449034510a4ebe57c0137e903555
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describe
'33284' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0bf28ba86686c0d8e0521e347b4a26d6
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXH' 'sip-files00065.tif'
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describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
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describe
'8904' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
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describe
'333080' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXK' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
4a7d17f7d80dc837b47e6a6c4aeac9d9
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describe
'78341' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXL' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9a96d153d470518d9912c232dff09433
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describe
'21979' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXM' 'sip-files00066.pro'
094c5f30023d720b4749d82112f423d4
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describe
'26567' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
f1374c0bfdf061f08df655a5d2c0fe34
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXO' 'sip-files00066.tif'
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describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXP' 'sip-files00066.txt'
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describe
'7492' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXQ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
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describe
'332978' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXR' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
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describe
'96782' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXS' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
90eff152a361b5f51fd8551fa06d4780
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describe
'28678' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXT' 'sip-files00067.pro'
ab5764ab39be2ea87e73082938b277d6
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describe
'32178' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
29136d0fadbb7dda8737c114f64bcfe0
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
7ca693b6845272ddece1e72d3b913cc2
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
01ebf561d5998909433af508c750113c
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describe
'8571' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXX' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ff0dc30deaaf15957a908333b0b9c4e8
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXY' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
15374b4944e4ce05bd4f4bf4350ef03f
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describe
'82238' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDXZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ab09958cefc61d5104a644995b10cbf3
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describe
'23334' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
02e60913c466ed1bdd40a9e023ce1e93
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describe
'27961' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
d564817767b4dc8fd1f307bcb01039f7
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYC' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d48006f4c2faf8c84badb11450179188
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describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
9761fd58ab48bc61800d883a1afc2a1b
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describe
'7800' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYE' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5aabd984c51de3b988017cb488f8e0ae
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYF' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
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describe
'99462' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYG' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d7d52e170e1e44d243887f3abe73eb5e
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describe
'27286' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYH' 'sip-files00069.pro'
20d76de0eb6ed7c14ea3f2a12cd50b76
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describe
'31766' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYI' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
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describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYK' 'sip-files00069.txt'
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describe
'8827' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYL' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
763f0fe26088b8d78050ff43fd8acf1e
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYM' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c6528ec9d8fac79d0c79a66634b62600
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describe
'92959' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYN' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
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describe
'28028' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYO' 'sip-files00070.pro'
ab00d8b4a09756f991abd8f11b6c9b3d
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describe
'33638' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYP' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
8873bcb574074521742c8f85e497ac02
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describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
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describe
'8894' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYS' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
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describe
'333161' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYT' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
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describe
'101653' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYU' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
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describe
'15471' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYV' 'sip-files00071.pro'
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describe
'29287' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYW' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
fb78227d3f5aefa1e3b945b4c4360843
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describe
'717' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
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describe
'8122' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZA' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
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describe
'93112' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
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describe
'27830' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZC' 'sip-files00072.pro'
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describe
'33434' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZD' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZE' 'sip-files00072.tif'
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describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b84537083501eebe32b4c50ca92f78fd
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describe
'8561' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
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describe
'333156' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZH' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
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describe
'98314' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
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describe
'24058' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
e4f22dc7d5b7add09b08453c2b56c5d2
36a3302f1d46ae057c5667b239098397eff6ac24
describe
'33302' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZK' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f638fa482f997d101b0bb2d5bb0a4600
a6ae5da0a58c12a01132aa4ed207e027c0c399b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
db14de21981ac4266656b2eede4ced56
0a8c53766d757e28c008b300539498a8af677eec
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
4faae7a2d1a1e5d790c91d8511e116c0
898e512c9063be0a06d086443fae84394de5979e
describe
'8793' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZN' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
93051bef2805ade7f44158334fd078da
ac544e9e485b29300827082c547e889e733e98ea
describe
'333147' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZO' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c967400fd28917bf5bb2cd56de9ab6d9
dccb94d705718723ff5bf7c4d7ed1255a88db33d
describe
'99113' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e624955823797c51017c49300eabb4ec
958a501072bee03665e6eb22a94c0a5d7bbeb2e4
describe
'30425' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
8b4b53fb3ddaad5f68150ea9e969d3a3
5e48c62ad6f121a536cec15cab47aa4695a77954
describe
'35308' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZR' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ec4ece2498a8daeda81f74194898ae44
b0d941ea78c4e9e38bdf87e860544b40cc1ca3a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZS' 'sip-files00074.tif'
ee0d7e7cf98c95c1fbdf97a053aa0e66
84e84998786e647178def7071e20a8d8129f64e6
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
59b2ea0f62a5fe085631f48d8a3be040
0c58819aa4e31dab66fe57ab572e8472cfdb6692
describe
'8994' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZU' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9ca78228c55d6d970380e1ff54e1035d
9d722f98ccdf28ad424c8997d1e487b142a869c9
describe
'332958' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZV' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ee547f71eb590a468d0c7701c0c2de89
3f352bd8f466b8aedd7fcb1e3a1067781afef5c9
describe
'88149' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZW' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
681a56d27765b645d799e0e84230c16a
f84dd1cd328129c26f87d7c73d67ca14bf1b0a8f
describe
'25376' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZX' 'sip-files00075.pro'
6d9b4832627895fb085d6254ecc6e490
274130f5fb94d0f2bc51cd1282409c72f3a57b5f
describe
'32090' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
b565a33de2f2d60103e83041b34a9f08
98b2e40a1209eca48fe3b7d56fd71ebe23e3d127
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
592bebe9c342d4f2324b9d19840682df
bcb41e405d02291c61f9be902a44f8c3b41c4ec8
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ac11061a499d374e6ee607c528d1d480
88559ac3450c40ede2ab13f36f4201034a42fef7
describe
'7953' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAB' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
caa5a197cfcc7635058f8fb342a6e83b
a021c59477ad07bb08dec1424a69159a6fb1a702
describe
'333155' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAC' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
199627ea59e70269b302a9a7d852e994
b1c51eb69f3e7e67b30152bf5ce8bb8330c184dc
describe
'93048' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAD' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6fe2609702ed6fd6ca62a83172c63fb5
33ac7fe6ff6e29fa6e123f52bee2679fe48ff162
describe
'28341' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAE' 'sip-files00076.pro'
b4b8136fbf45791603ccc0db1427461f
4c0a944895a154c9bc3ad19fab9e1125d127166a
describe
'32179' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAF' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
74c16d6558a93724213ed23ce62be56f
7b652a7f65e2ebb41c2a8e12bbe2c87427b73b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAG' 'sip-files00076.tif'
cd52aab8cb88d3d5b35b819cdfe83f0b
862d9ec461b2efd43d750d84edc191f7e80f4cc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAH' 'sip-files00076.txt'
45cf0b2e7ea995669a688803afd014ef
9c7d0d702a452a8da4d57854140b90cb610714b1
describe
'8461' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAI' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d38ca2cbf00528dddd145812ce79046f
c9db0115443b8910019da2699fcea26a88323c89
describe
'332948' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9b5776d41b2461bb21b5a7b19359b664
2e5f04139746fe2f762dc828f8e0b7243b88b6af
describe
'92239' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAK' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
73ad24fb0c95a2008eee9b7dc50c1334
4a8de2dc3035da878ce5f0e0e172ba98a1af9f3c
describe
'24628' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAL' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6a58e1c49d2a4b9963901e63634f4203
421504b11f611855c68f3a127b3302187b36bb15
describe
'30904' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAM' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
054aa471734ba3131181cb143b10af5d
7c896c32818f18f5a8bac19b74db1b5c0a3073d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAN' 'sip-files00077.tif'
c17aa3ce88eba3ba0aa4cf9a852da18e
a63f5be90cce6b6e87dd20af13fa21683b1948b9
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAO' 'sip-files00077.txt'
eb47776574d89e758fd85a1f2b8044c7
bdee47c0cfc84bbd38ef760bab3f96942d43eccc
describe
'8406' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAP' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
b313a05ade01147d32e667274c603988
4e0916e34908412e61ef2b7ed38a63b9f96b3048
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
76d6ddc52afc00176fc91b850a6fd3f5
fbbd8ebe2aa4c91689e8326f40c5d06e27f26ae6
describe
'102742' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAR' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3da9fbf5a183b5310a7497c2c9cb181b
e060c10ffc306c6cf42c5054c0266ff41ad2a1f1
describe
'23829' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAS' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a3398fc6e52477f457f17b174fdc173d
c108248717d9f14be9db306a7ed10a846c2cd9c5
describe
'34385' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAT' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
1fe5172765824de1cbcd83a6e89043a7
f4ea5627b7106942322642fea33dc43f942230db
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAU' 'sip-files00078.tif'
9e59aab059990124d0d1c5199377ab0e
1d37158b4ab189876bef300424f1339d6f869ccd
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAV' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b934f5248fd942d970c7361e60c7b246
3a3823dd0be170e9a542a677d6b5b570c02a7ecf
describe
'9009' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAW' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
11980ea2d0b1a2613f3752d909526b3d
238ad1a72935c926cd2b4175ce21db761b30439f
describe
'333140' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ff8acdb9853f4faeac9fe3f5ad562f5f
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describe
'128021' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAY' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
827a30ed74d526ca32d1fe56a7eb9ae2
68cb51b35ef07a3abbbdff3f4a94c846176542a0
describe
'13397' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9a103a57d0b002f412d525a2e137b609
4a54d1c03e4ce23f45c1a48c1e3c6bcb8f3f285c
describe
'37345' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBA' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e6704a253ed28b4ebff81d28c21d368a
2ea5801a0b72b0859c1df41549daa03c1eb44722
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBB' 'sip-files00079.tif'
fafc1b1a891f2c03ef82592deb01c27f
0437e21e77c1e11836a9f1a47558f106feecf6aa
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
9564006e37c2cae151d0ef73b1a668d1
71c5283880400d0e24b69f5d24187bd1a341c5e6
describe
'9295' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBD' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
0ebfaba2cce96330cb2436f4477d4f5c
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describe
'332977' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
42cc099fee31933afb455ca05dc25aae
df550c76486939a823d7e3e39dd857060a2d6534
describe
'78308' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBF' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
a11c2e1f6e4da392fff99e8359e03d16
0363966dc05b4706b398ae7b8a928e12469be27c
describe
'22950' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
a6afad66e369fb3664579585ed3155f7
8fb882d267c863a7501a5c2bc5804d9fb8221a4d
describe
'23764' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBH' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f8216f7735a31fcb77ece99619c24de9
6da6bbf3b9106a1e66763256b090be0a9b1bdeaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBI' 'sip-files00080.tif'
766300a5399bdd8a9a65f6b1aa601d03
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describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
479a7ec38bcf3af4e9262e23ed087801
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describe
'7514' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c2c09b2293b1d5d28a601af230a02487
9e7949b04dc90bdf3b3142a8be85d9f9a73d06af
describe
'332985' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5b65f312db887b40e1cfb39e598fa72e
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describe
'99290' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBM' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
234db1f613ac9540cf112af785a46ae6
1c8dd16dd0074ffde0a7d34a0c90b1d2e23f344b
describe
'20500' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
54a2a5481eba9a1b3ad83d67422ea064
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describe
'30378' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBO' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7f2314dcd43b8bba18621db75e837f5e
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBP' 'sip-files00081.tif'
23088ff33f799c1e3353aa59037a0284
9c17a6449949145d4bab6aa5ece45d5ff7fe0041
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
396a2aa1e3006b49eae7d6c0bec7e2c0
da12089d5b7928f377930a330f547efe54b9a9e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
44afbf125a4db7aa6ea94ddcce1aed33
22c32bcae6c8c7927559670a390f787103ddf75b
describe
'332979' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBS' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
e3e576d37be60cd185146fdc2e50e2a4
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describe
'90570' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBT' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
5fcad3f09d4bc33c778720a92156f91b
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describe
'28044' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
1223aef8a98540b797a341151600a773
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describe
'31292' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7b0d80f744a7a4ebaa14a8392c048bcf
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
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describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
98b3168c80e769d41a5beedc7c298f9c
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describe
'8682' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBY' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d4f6322097967d2c32cdbc1a9b0e0e56
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describe
'333150' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
167ad0c93aa7e95b6c6a490597a1efe3
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describe
'98657' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
bddf4f13223d938107c81a8f9af2fe15
aaf85cc3a7c8ff736784a049541477672fb3173e
describe
'23991' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECB' 'sip-files00083.pro'
01cdeafda99552b43f2dbf1c7372ccff
6687494f909f2f380af0b28db79eada3e369b57b
describe
'32035' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
cbe9c8099dcfe4a9d780fc6d7ecaa05e
c8ce25b2b908686e4edc8203e686efa463f6eeaf
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c894e4b7ca7978be56626bc7e3ace3e4
ec33909a309b0752ef650934af750491da935e56
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
cd06fc9ae311d8355a38b90de288d375
8e31e7cb4ceb21e189aeee82709ec588cfc0ed47
describe
'8805' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
cd3a237bd58bde4aa4be81aa7e501a13
cd7d687dd16f28bdaf6ae470b6e0844126d9550f
describe
'333160' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
d4c1d35c59e97cd1be1cab5027cadd6d
cd982f150e9db796fd85cceac62c1ed97ebc2605
describe
'95156' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d730a58330ba19f390b29e9b67ac79af
932e8f4ea57b874a24d6d423a931464a9f7bd13e
describe
'24219' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a1f6c05840883faf1b464504f65e220d
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describe
'30809' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
53d97ff367c6cc3fca606bd3a683ec53
0b9296848bae592a9c9ec5c3d1252b53b2d8eb70
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
2e4bcc37075b40736aa642c1292de0bc
e7317b56440db6a531cbbb3ca202fa0a98909df7
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6b428c96fac5fdc9b211002a975f72d1
27a1f554fdedd2d764c52b6be89e783e1b724882
describe
'8527' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a867fcd269cd6b324533436da9e7b5da
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
24695ea018725deafa00bd219b7d5052
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describe
'97366' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
a9a030d39846143bd826410d2e01c99d
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describe
'27150' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECP' 'sip-files00085.pro'
4fe6f62b60c3e2c0ed78a1e8e3f42714
52fbc506040184bd114271340bd3e63e0a0d1c10
describe
'31476' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
44e3195d31cb18631a6bc90a90c192b7
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
8bbd602881ea05d5a1147b7ea0c1ee33
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describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
cc658fe1e4ea70c80c34f53a3c574840
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describe
'8778' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
ab5f7106d38834f4288d7621069d54a7
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describe
'333115' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
aaf4714e95f12e767258174c01cd6c0d
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describe
'93428' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
66af6401c20bfb4d851d35f4cd080d0c
5654d1ea076e52dec98d0c535548c9bd9d222db1
describe
'28454' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c0ad791423a0f4adbade6284daf76e58
8ceb7cd093dc58bdd1b8d17b86b095eeecf9c536
describe
'31366' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
c690f4b9f94c6efb3d655cadbe5cec6a
d4b258c5535fa620d7659950e35e58dd9816a0f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
51e62b94b9f0e809fd84df979890725a
7c25b60872cdba865e16af832ba0461198993376
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABECZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
80060606288bcad6765b1df21ceaf70a
b9e5fed849d6cff79c2b48365270adfd6cf15d28
describe
'8679' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8ae11fb6fc79f6665d95160b79f9b1f7
2f7c15a4ddc1422c5851f10ccbe48ae5d90edba9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
c62b06a7dc40c56c3cf05ec67e23b274
2e1529b9d2b007b43c94f35ad9f6cca64d97871f
describe
'86667' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
103792d443a388280e1cff94bb324c16
b5fc2167608834b5889faf119592610cac63e6cb
describe
'25292' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
a377028be52a2d975a73a69d14a458d2
41668c745e4c9d2fae3f8c7be811f10dd20ad810
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDE' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
4681ba3a1b323a6ca983eba8032fceb0
606b29dddd5bb28893e52173d4bcd989cec91673
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
c3900054cfc43f3f7e41eefa5043bd17
9b06d85797401da6114468137a04dd73306960bb
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
281bb5a1fea8428b3fbb8b496e79a391
41f1eaf84ffd664da2010b562aa19a5b4500096d
describe
'8109' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
bf6e8d9a859fc15ca8d3e6db606be0fd
032f5cd76ccb9b36e5133a438074939632163221
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDI' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fea5df34a070ce762e31973f4a719432
a9741d624837d8dc8a39b9263294eb048a39cf2a
describe
'100847' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
2ba0175331799c971df0d46e7107c065
9db4323365358d162d5156bae72da8ac50d3d982
describe
'31206' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
987dfd16555d9326c520abe8d03cb717
c522141e36f01c91f362e07c56ab1c35c99fe4bf
describe
'32566' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7311cdeedaf8a98bf17b0b6762376d75
322aa18aefb31f964c12355cb3c88212278c01cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3af897b3500288fbb1925597f4de7309
0a607054d6cb1a0bea846d13e74d64f27010c89a
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
0cf0f4e3d5201d6c9572d8030f79d253
da33ad698e7536f484a40abaafb380e313bcaaf9
describe
'9031' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
566bfcc2bf315555a7e74aef482b35af
3a6d8f194ef446a38fb8a4a27878881c009701c8
describe
'333159' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDP' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
51bed12ece1275a4e6836d1a9f594293
ba4aab1fdcc780447a46ea5b0c085f5431caceff
describe
'96152' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1bce15e751c1e650c90022101cbcd4c0
8449d0774a66492cbd9eb1bbe5df7047d3174540
describe
'21939' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDR' 'sip-files00089.pro'
8fa34204a586635f0d43197a8485b8c3
7ecf29f750f940146d717d50746b2f31e537809a
describe
'30799' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
29304ffd6aad071f77b4a22c57d62852
7251fc2635a8a7a588b8c21cd100714c8bd95e88
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDT' 'sip-files00089.tif'
1999af92efa995e7dc2c9c2e2fc19bc7
60fa9eb7f1f70455f1cf3941af0c40b7e317dc5d
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDU' 'sip-files00089.txt'
b022f1118a62802bd1edde605ffc767c
85fb041924f2d26370c96d2b7669ded91c96641e
describe
'8640' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDV' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
952631aae241e2fa733010591b5060bb
8426cc0b01796d43e497e08b1deca3b352565b7a
describe
'332987' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
071b0246909036222c9b1d8454631a7f
03e34966043a520e9316c7a9fa47c210fbe497ba
describe
'111148' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDX' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8d1293304be5a58639a4f1acf1aa6849
60193254b2d8385300fcdfd3033ed9cb4f51eb1a
describe
'22231' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2322871520d849f156339ec2c0752a71
6f1ca0724a0980d06bccb016edfbdca7b1379930
describe
'35260' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
abcfdcf03716254a7166a7f28f5284c8
5f49456995040cbd590ecb8d6fe57d37123ded12
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEA' 'sip-files00090.tif'
5961500a49fd6b802eb777f25d80e0a1
07b899e931d0535bbf46bc3167c8ad3d2a192a43
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEB' 'sip-files00090.txt'
32c297499bff360d9b14847203c924b8
e5b7d95c7ff9034dcfff8ef36132a60931304371
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEC' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
9899203ee0d35ae9ccd9f9812bf5315c
2515fd1f68f6fe963a9cc45f0c12bf3c7c79baca
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEED' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d8ce0be82a7f72fc5bf286115e6ebabc
cf82d54f95b57dbcfb4bc99f8db7248e9697110b
describe
'95507' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEE' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f48244d67ceb04f4e4da3039be29c8fb
502967ae863595c7e568f8ce44f9b7edaeab507e
describe
'28194' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEF' 'sip-files00091.pro'
152cfacbf566fa03adbc7fc73acf3039
fc2b7812837237b3033e61d465629bd3d2a0581a
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEG' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
d653ba91edad271770af5b851346d414
a3b81077af522697767813b3ac59ed57e7b34ab3
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEH' 'sip-files00091.tif'
917ea3adc351f02c965dbc8a83c942de
351051597783bd3798dc33a6645c308837b71362
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEI' 'sip-files00091.txt'
16f3c0c051f364c13d3f28ed91b509b7
a1f448a7042766477a85c7d903ed706e20a7db55
describe
'8723' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
e391f1eb22d8b57014e721580f3c0639
b543798c5f3e4f9b968ca253224125e65ec20ebe
describe
'332952' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9261af31438ebba59ebcb5a6d13890a5
5b3e06c9ab9071746af5781c19dd010c28fef438
describe
'51090' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEL' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8af4718c568086d25c46ce8fcf973061
2403ff3e6982bcc83e842356492a5ee028288308
describe
'7081' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d19f2dd963a77789e195350dface72d8
a7fcf369b80b822f6ef461a2128443aaf09b25b0
describe
'15308' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2b4634d9b0170bc6424402465a877cdd
80daa0b0df1ac952b21eb6baf2aa2b630fae1fc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEO' 'sip-files00092.tif'
bfa069f8764c9167f7a5c81bfc75b022
100e53bdb7af44b5a09c86c2403f4cab3401ca84
describe
'302' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEP' 'sip-files00092.txt'
c6b65a8a75dae276e61d6adebc41cb92
523c6323c0aa9039f98ac45a03d8772c0baf931f
describe
'4185' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
0c873bf62acb87043255dc6dfe9d9545
c671acfb32c9d94c61f477de8fec4a7bb323addc
describe
'388758' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEER' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
948c1874bfc2f62d3cad1c0456726170
2d62a215310915104002d684969216aa0502d162
describe
'64587' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEES' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
2555163a83520a81e15ef398c53a70c8
4c115c3ad3b37e93d843a9d4cb2fc803743167a0
describe
'14199' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEET' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7f891f3b9a23ebddb477eeefc1faa6df
92ffe25fcf50a184ef3b6ab8916f5a79da5fb0bc
describe
'9336700' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEU' 'sip-files00098.tif'
5076ee9653077b5baa0aa7efa03bb502
83a86efb85ed0510423bb9a082a183c293a9672d
describe
'3511' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEV' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6838662f08588fa0b8bace0d65b2ab63
db249b1034556532708643d05bd62004f6437e39
describe
'371789' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEW' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
30b1a868eac522ac384b4882d2090b0a
01c9086cc7eb9b9d00e50bab229bb16b42677783
describe
'106850' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEX' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a80d06c47d363cbb23b2eee7e0419262
3edd8604988c9edd86c92df73f7480d420cf2cb5
describe
'22815' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEY' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0473fd00f72fe208dd2e2c9bbd6d3c09
65c4a1b222367d92a2dbf8538c2c664c2cbab70a
describe
'8931436' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6871b184b39fea1d3b07b673aedcd9f8
d33f1ef89217b838f73dacdcba1677003fb27026
describe
'4727' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEFA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
ca88e7e6fb01dc26ffdf9625bd0a54a5
25433b7c7ee84f9849a1bb816e9c3bc391e312d4
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEFB' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
530e17b80b5e0cb73c8a2b31306bdca2
7c6b80cb5416f8ed2586c7f8ad18b877c885272e
describe
'130778' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEFC' 'sip-filesUF00087072_00001.mets'
5261e3b8c7bdfacd7fac24f52fa80b2a
3993514de437c5f646188ef0caa5ef48ea242822
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T01:20:40-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'168424' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZMfileF20090112_AABEFF' 'sip-filesUF00087072_00001.xml'
9b1d2c89838f995106df82f6ec45fcfa
0a3afeee9c113976c635025490a1492023bebcfd
describe
'2013-12-14T01:20:41-05:00'
xml resolution