Citation
The Oojah annual

Material Information

Title:
The Oojah annual pictures, stories, and games for little people
Creator:
Daily Sketch & Sunday Herald ( Publisher )
W.H. Smith & Son ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Daily Sketch & Sunday Herald
Manufacturer:
W.H. Smith & Son, The Arden Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
208 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
Children's stories ( aat )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002242267 ( ALEPH )
42694236 ( OCLC )
ALJ3207 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text












THE

OOJAH ANNUAL —

PICTURES, STORIES, AND GAMES
FOR LITTLE PEOPLE



Engraved and Printed for the Daily Sketch & Sunday Herald Ltd ,
Gray’s Inn Road, W.C.1, and 47 Shoe Lane, London, E.C.4, by
W. H. Smith & Son, The Arden Press, Stamford Street, London, S.E.



UNCLE OOJAH’S OFFICE,
LONDON, E.C.

My Very Dears,

Here we are again with our OOJAH
ANNUAL, full of pictures and stories and jokes.
My little friends have worked hard to make this

book for you, and they were all very anxious to get
their own special wishes in.

They made so much noise calling them out that I was
nearly deaf. Jerrywangle said : “ Christmas is coming, it is
Wish them a Merry Christmas,” and Baby Binky wanted me

to put in: “A Happy New Year.” My Don called out:

“Wish them a Pleasant Easter,’ and Snooker added: “Don’t
forget to wish them a Good Old Whitsuntide.” Sissy Lion said :
“T hope they will have a nice August Bank Holiday, with a
month at the seaside and no home lessons,” and Laddy Lion chimed

in: “Wish them a Jolly Guy Fawkes’ Day, with plenty of fun
and fireworks.”

How is your poor old uncle to get all those wishes in? The only
thing I can do is join them all together and wish you a very happy
time all the year round, but especially on holidays and half-holidays.

I like to get letters from you, so be sure you write and tell me
what you like best in your OOJAH ANNUAL. Master Jerry

is in it this year, and you know what he is for mischief.
doesn’t seem to get any better, no matter what I do.

Never mind, we all like a bit of fun sometimes, don’t we?
As Jerrywangle sings :
“Let’s be merry and bright and gay
From now till next OOJAH ANNUAL DAY.”

I mustn’t keep you any longer, for I’m sure you are
longing to see what is inside this splendid book
with the beautiful coloured covers.
will enjoy every page.

He

I hope you

With love from us all,

UNCLE OOJAH.







T was a fine September evening,
A and a full moon shone down on




and his nephew Jerrywangle.

“Tsn’t it nice and moony!.”’” he
smiled. ‘‘ We can see our way to travel
all night. Is this the same moon that
shines in London ? ”

‘““T expect so,” replied Don. “I be-
lieve this is the Harvest Moon, you know.
But I’m not sure; it might be the Hunter’s
Moon.”

‘““My whiskers,
that sounds more
like it!” laughed
Snooker aa Ag cau

you get married and go off for a
holiday.”

Ts “that “all eeeesighed ahs. uncle:
‘“‘ Wasn’t it a pity I never got married !
Wait a minute, I’ve just had a think.
Perhaps Snooker might get married in-
stead of me, and then we could all havea
Honeymoon together. Wouldn’t that be
lovely ?”

“Not for me, thank you,” retorted
Snooker. “It’s easy to see you don’t
know what you are talking about. I
should say a nice little Funnymoon would

could see to hunt
mice in this moon-
light any day of the
week.”

“Would it be
the Honeymoon, I
wonder?” = mur-
mured Uncle Oojah.
““That’s always a
very bright moon,
ioneptee

“You've got it
wrong, you have,”
said Jerry. “A
Honeymoon _ only
comes when

be more in- your
HIS is a most
°¢ exciting story of
Uncle Oojah’s

line.”’
‘“* The very exact-
ly thing!’ smiled
Uncle Oojah.
wonderful adventures in
the country with his little
friends Don and Snooker,
and his © mischievous
Jerrywangle.

Told by
FLO LANCASTER

Pictured by
THOMAS MAYBANK

nephew,



‘“Tsn’t my Snooker
clever to find that
out? Now I must
stop and do a
change in my
mind.”

‘““ What, again ?”
exclaimed Snooker.
‘““My bedsocks, I
don’t like these
changes! They
very often mean a
change for the
worse.”

“Yes,perhaps they
do, sometimes,”



agreed Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ But this one will
be a change for the better. Let London
wait a bit-—come along with me and we’ll
have a first-class Funnymoon.”

wa}LL through the long night they
Wea) walked, and by morning Jerry-
“| wangle was very tired indeed.
=| ‘I can’t manage many more
mee I can’t,” he sniffed. “‘ Dear Uncle



‘*Listen to me, Mr. Jujube—don’t come here
_Get out of

any more with such foolishness.
Ss ; our station at once!”

Oojah, couldn’t we travel the rest of the
way on the railway?”

“Yes, we might try a ride on the
railway,’ noddedhisuncle. ‘ Be patient,
and we'll get on at the very next station.
Now let me see, where can we have our
new Funnymoon ? ”

‘You haven’t told us yet where you
want to go,’ replied Don. ‘I should like
to spend September in the country.”

“ That’s right, make up his mind for
him,”’ chuckled Snooker. ‘“* The country



gives you a good chance to catch harvest
mice, and look at all the young rabbits a
cat could chase before breakfast ! ”’

“T never did any hunting yet,’ mur-
mured Uncle Oojah. “If I tried very
hard I might catch a bat or a bumble-bee.
And then again, I could count all the
blackberries, couldn’t I ? ”

“Hurrah! We’llhavesome fine fun ! ”’
laughed Don. ‘‘ We shall just be in time
for the Harvest Homes as well. Oh! I

do love September ! ”’

“So I should think,’ added
Snooker. “‘If our Oojah wants to
havea right-down good Funnymoon
he can’t do better than try
September in the country.”

‘““We must. go there,’ smiled
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘Oh! here’s the
station. Now, Mr. Porter, we are
going for a little ride on this
railway. Run your train very
-carefully, won’t you?”

““My bedsocks, did you hear
that ?”’ whispered Snooker. “‘ He
seems to think that old porter owns
the railway !”’ ;

‘“Listen to me, Mr. Porter,”
continued Uncle Oojah, solemnly.
“Tam the one and only Uncle
Oojah, and I want your very best
train. Let me have four special
tickets to September.”

“You won’t find it on_ this
line,” replied the porter. ‘‘ And
you listen to me, Mr. Jujube—don’t
come here any more with such
foolishness. Get out of our station
at once! ”’

ANCLE OOJAH dashed out of
the railway station with his



At

last a stopped for breath, and after a
rest they trudged once more on their way.
“It’s hot and dusty this morning,”

~j running for nearly a nae

sighed Uncle Oojah. “Long walkings |
always make very hard workings.”

‘‘T’m tireder than ever, I am,’’ com-
plained Jerry. ‘‘ Look, there’sa farmer’s
cart! Can’t weask the driver for a ride?”



sn’t it nice and moony!”

Uncle Oojah smiled.

Uncle Oojah’s Funnymoon.









“Let me do it,’ said Uncle
Oojah. ‘Stand beside the hedge,
my dears, in case the horse
kicks.” :

So he waited until the cart came
by; then he stepped into the road
and waved his hat.

“Stop, Mr. Driver—stop ! EAS
called. ‘‘ Won’t you please give
us aride in your nice cart? My
little friends are taking me away
for a Funnymoon, and we can’t
walk our poor legs any longer.”

-“ people about,” replied the driver.
‘« And besides I should like to see
the horse that could drag a fat
mountain like you.”

“Work your magic onit, Oojah-
dear,” whispered Don. ‘‘ Make
his horse strong enough to. pull
anything.”

* And so I will,” declared Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ Wait, Mr. Driver, and
I’ll magic your horse as_ strong
as twenty. All do a shut-eye
while you can count ten.” “Stop him, Mr. Oojah!” gasped the driver.

They all closed their eyes and
began counting, but when they opened One by one they climbed into the cart,
them again the horse didn’t seem any but as soon as the driver jerked his reins









different and not a bit bigger. away went the horse at top speed.

“Tts finished now,” smiled Uncle “Stop him, Mr. Oojah!” gasped the
Oojah. ‘‘ You can’t see where I’ve put driver. ‘‘ Take your magic back again,
the magic, but jump into the cart and you quick! This dreadful old horse is runni
will soon feel it moving.” away!” [Now tura

QBOVOE VECO GOQONG GOO0R86

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a When the Moon is high, © Tints the east with red, a
& In the Summertime and Fairies, murmuring ‘‘Good- a
a Spring night !” e
«& ’Neath the starry sky. Flit away to bed. a
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OOOE GOLLOOG VECHLEE GOCE VOREOOKLAQOORQAD

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THERE NOW CHILDREN. STAND BACK
2 AND TATTERS WILL GIVE YOU A FINE
DISPLAY OF FIREWORKS.

HERE WE GO, FIZZ-
BUZZ SISH ail EOVEEY





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PARTY, -TEE- SHUN !!



NOW, BOYS, | HAVE SOMETHING
REALLY AMUSING FOR YOU TO-DAY




NOW WE WILL DANCY - DANCY —
ALL TOGETHER, TUMTY UMTY
TIDDLY UMTY"

HERE, YOU FELLOW, &
YOUR BUTTONS
WANT POLISHING




(ee

7





Ce down to Dumpling Farm some day |
And have a tumble in new-mown hay ;
There are THINGS tosee,as you llsoon find out,
If you wander round and poke about.







ve

ya



There are horses to pull the ploughs and carts ;
And turkeys who “‘ gobble” by fits and starts ;
Thirteen cows, and a BIG black bull,

And lots of sheep wrapped up in wool;



Se

Wy), N
Dp 3 ay







Ducks and geese (they love a ducking}) ;
Cocks and hens all crowing and clucking ;
Pigs and donkeys, dogs and cats

(They have SUCH fun with the mice and rats !);




And Billy, the goat, whose daily joy
Is butting “‘ Willum,” the farmer’s boy .
You CAN’T go wrong, or come to harm,
If you pay a visit to Dumpling Farm!
Be ek:

(More about the Farm on page 31)

Relarpaaery er R



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Lady Eliza in Piccadilly





saw hee basket of roses.
‘“‘T must buy these

9

flowers, he _ said.
‘‘ Lovey-lovekins, look
who is selling them !”’

“It’s Lady Eliza, it
is, said Jerty..0Get
away from here in case

she catches you.”

}

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READY ELIZA
a eae) discovered
wi be) 4 that Uncle
Oojah had gone to
London, so she saved
up her money and
followed him. ‘Then
she lost her purse and
had to sell flowers at
Piccadilly Circus.
“Oh! this Lon-
don!” she _ sighed.
‘““T am so lonely.”

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Lady Eliza in Piccadilly

(CONTINUED)

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—
§



i pei ONT run away
Mjacoiyfrom me,”
aj smiled Lady
Eliza. “Stop a minute
and let me tell you
something.”

“You stop here,” said
Jerry. ‘“‘ Leave my poor
uncle alone ; he doesn’t
want to see you.”

And Jerry tried his
hardest to keep her
back.



DY ELIZA
pushed Jerry
9 oe aside and ran
after his uncle.

Come pack!
Come back!” she
shouted. ‘I only
want to say how glad
I am to see you.”

“Now nor ladon t
want to hear!” he
gasped. ‘‘ Write it
down on a telegram
and send it.”




&
Me



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O
§@
bg 36
: iza in Piccadilly
4 Lady Eliza in Piccadilly }
; 8 (CONTINUED) 8 2
Pe eeeeeeS ele eee eSeSeeeeeeeeeeerseeesseseserrereeseeseeeeeeeeeles))
§ 9
9 §
ve gee (as §
; =| I. 7e th jh z = Sea) 0 last Lady ;
° | \) Hye eee g/&aNG| Eliza caught
§ Wie hog ir i (al @eOoy him by the
9 } Hy Vy eh coat-tails. UncleOojah 9
9 Te mY Z J 6
; wn | B23 struggled to get away, 3
° but she held on. °
§ pHelplae we calleda= x
2 = Dont: leave ames to ;
: her |? °
° ' When Jerry saw this
§ he dashed into a tailor’s
shop for a pair of shears.
) 9
;
9

§
| fine ey
; as | Te | jy = 1 5
6 | | See Small poe) ae 3h
? th Zi 3 9
; Bees ce ao
> tails, “and Lady Eliza °
» was pulling so hard that »
§ ones §
? she fell over. §
6 “That surprised her,
) it did,” chuckled Jerry. © é
° ‘Run !Isaved you this °
? time, but we don’t want »
9 her to catch you again.”
|



12





es OSE up on
E Mistresss bed... mistook
— Masters face for the pillow
and stepped ontt...(hewokeupin idl si
«= SUCHabad ‘onper| Hen



Yam. Had my milk. ,...
Towsers too_ ( while he was biting
the postman !... Dogs ARE silly!)



c n..Master trod
on my tail ( ie was or toknow he
wouldn't see / was on the mat at the
bottom of the stairs?)_and fell into the
hat-stand...(he IS ina bad temper to-day)



aes ue on ihe ae
ene and gobbled up = (on

the fish Master and Mistress couldnt eat. Began to wash myself.
Upset creamand had that too! Cream sticks to one’s whiskers so!



( More excitements later: turn to page 26)
13



ee CCH

JERRY’S PUNCH & JUDY SHOW

: ; A
R>DSDDSDSDSDSDODSSDODoDDS DDS DODD HD OLE

ODDO O

SONS | Oe ROBES

ay lil
oT





peer give a Punch and Judy Show HEN it was ready they crept inside

with my new dog,” said Jerry. ‘‘ We and dressed up for their parts.

ought to collect a lot of money for our Jerrywangle was Punch, his new friend

money boxes.” Dog Toby, and Snooker wore Judy’s
“My whiskers, yes,” chuckled Snooker. dress.

“That’s the best idea you havethoughtof yet.”’ “ Oody-oody, it’s a nice day!’ squeaked
So they built a Punch and Judy box in Jetry. “Come close around and see Mr.

the street. Punch and Mrs. Judy.”

\

SON

~S

SS
BSS

oS
SSS

=

eS

es
oS

—=
Ss

ZZ

UN

shouted Snooker. ‘‘ What comes next, Jerry, in our performance ? ”’
replied Jerry. ‘‘ Keep still and let me give



1?

ALK up, walk up
“Mr. Punch has to give out the punches,

you both a good bang.”
So he gave Snooker a good knock and bumped him into Dog Toby.

14



DDoS



mG) WY CAC

ODY-oody, where’s my Judy ?”’ called
Jerry. “She is always getting lost
she is.”

And he used Mr. Punch’s stick again and
jammed poor Snooker against the side of the
show.

“ That’s enough,” gasped Snooker. ‘‘ My
bedsocks, it’stime this performance was over!”’

27H Vay

JERRYWANGLE began to struggle with Snooke

whole show fell over.



ODDS SSDS DDS DSS DSS DSSS DDS DD SD PNET

JERRY’S PUNCH & JUDY SHOW

(CONTINUED)
ODDS DSSS DSO DOD SDD DDD DPI Hd SLEEVELESS

Dd>O



Se NA
Ce he snatched the stick away from Jerry
and brought it down on his head.

“Stop, stop!” cried Jerry. ‘‘ Don’t you
know that Mr. Punch never gets a
beating ?”’

“ He is getting one now,” replied Snooker.
“Let me tell you that one good beating
deserves another.”




rt. The dog joined in and in the end the

‘“Uncle Oojah, where are you ?’’ called Jerry. “‘ It wasn’t fair to upset me. This is the last

time I'll ever try to run a Punch and Judy Show.”’





‘fe

SealLL BLUEBOTTLE was a
gsmart young fellow who was
gj not content to be just a fly.
4 He wanted to be a w asp—and
it isn’t easy for a bluebottle to become
a wasp.

But Bill tried his hardest. He prac-
tised buzzing for hours, until he was able
to make a sound which really DID make
you think a wasp was in the room. But
you only thought so when Bill was out of
sight. As soon as you SAW him, you
knew that Bill was just a common blue-



bottle pretending to be a wasp. That
. annoyed Bill—he could BUZZ like a

wasp, but he LOOKED like a bluebottle.
One morning he flew into Mr. Mottle-
ton’s sitting room and began buzzing.



DODD]



f Bill Blueb ettle

Now there was a real wasps’ nest
not far from the window, and Mr.
Mottleton had already killed five
wasps since breakfast, and been
stung by another. So when Bill
began to buzz Mr. Mottleton,
whose eyesight was very poor
indeed, jumped up and ee
towards the sound.

““ Where’s that wasp?”
bellowed; ‘‘ where is it ? ”’

Billkepton buzzing,and suddenly
Mr. Mottleton THOUGHT he saw a wasp
dancing up and down the window-pane.
It was Bill really, but it SOUNDED like
a wasp, so Mr. Mottleton slashed madly at
the noise with his newspaper.

It was Bill’s unlucky day. Mr. Mottle-
ton’s sight might be bad, but his hearing
was good, and the newspaper caught Bill
in the small of the back and knocked him
through the window.

For some time he lay breathless on the
rosebed with his legs sticking up in the air.
Then his senses began to come back, and
after a:time he was able to crawl home.
But next morning he was just one big
bruise, and as he limped about he made
up his mind never to pretend to bea ase
again,

he

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PEELE EEE REL LEE EEE REL E REEL REE
Uncle Oojah’s Funnymoon ¢

ELELELEL ELE LEME LE LEE EE EEEEL EEE EYS

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5)





AILE after mile went by and
{ ff still the runaway horse galloped
VA lfon. Presently the reins broke,
£5Q65,8 and the driver tumbled back-
wards into the cart.

“Now were in a nice old fix!”
muttered Snooker. ‘“* My bedsocks, this
puts us all in the cart!”

“Don, Don, what shall we do?”
asked Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Why doesn’t the
horse stop? I wish I hadn’t worked so
much magic on him.”

‘* Wishes will not stop runaway horses,
that’s very certain,’ said Snooker. ‘“‘ My
suffering tail, hold tight for a bump!”

As he spoke the cart ran into a tree,
and down they all came on the ground.

** Oh! my “poor head !-”
groaned Uncle Oojah. ‘* Where
ever am I? Snoo! Donker!
This is terrible !”

““Tt’s worse than terrible,
it’s scandalous!’’ exclaimed
the driver. ‘“‘Look at the
cart—it’s ruined! What can
I say to my master? And
what will Farmer Honeybee
say when he sees this?”

‘““How should I know?
Don’t come asking me,”
moaned Uncle Oojah. “I
have too many worries of my
own to trouble about your
troubles.”

‘“*T know what’s the matter,
Uncle Oojah,” said Jerry.
‘““ You worked a magic on the
horse, you did, but you forgot
to put any magic on the cart.”

‘“Never mind chattering
about magics and mismagics,”’
complained the driver. ‘‘ Are
you going to do anything to
help?”






“Yes, I suppose we must,” sighed
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Lead your horse home,
and we'll cart the cart along for
you.”

So they tied it all together with the
broken reins and carried it away towards
the farm. As they were going along they
met the driver’s master.

“Stop ! What’s happened to my
cart?’? shouted Farmer Honeybee.
‘“Who’s going to pay me for all this
damage—tell me that!”

‘Hush, my dear,” said Uncle Oojah.
“Don’t shout so loud, or you'll frighten
thecrows. Listen tome, Mr. Honeypot—

would you like your old cart made better
than ever?”







ORY
CRRA
an 1
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Ali intr
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eval CU
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REECE oa

nt
a “VM BS
Pens Pe



Farmer Honeybee watched Jerry and Don and
Snooker closing their eyes tightly ; then some-

how his own eyelids came together.
(See next page.)

L728 : B






yeesOU seem very sur-

Aka prised, Mr. Honey-
ye bean,’ said Uncle
emer’ Oojah. ‘Don’t you
want me to make your broken
old cart into a new one?”

“What fancy trick is this?”
inquired Farmer Honeybee.
‘““ How can anybody make new-
carts out of old ones ? ”’

“You wait, my dear, and
see,’ smiled Uncle Oojah. ‘I
can soon unbreak your cart
and make it better. Everybody
do a shut-eye while I work the
magic.”

‘““ No, thank you,” said the
famer. ‘I shall keep my eyes
wide open and watch your
tricks and dodges.”

“'You’d better not, you
hadn't, i (said. Jerry.) .°*-just
you be careful, Mr. Farmer, or
off goes your head and on goes
a cabbage!”

Farmer Honeybee watched
Jerry and Don and Snooker
closing their eyes tightly ; then
somehow his own eyelids
came together, and in two twinks the
‘magic was done.

““My whiskers, our Oojah has done
something this time! ’’ laughed Snooker.
“What does he call that—a cart or a
chariot ? ”

“It’s a cart, Snooker,’ said Don.
“Isn’t it lovely? Look at the silver
paint, and the green wheels, and the
pretty cream cushions on the seat!”

“Yes, it’s a fine cart,’’ nodded the
farmer. “‘ This is much too good for the
rough hauling on my farm. I think I’ll
put it in a glass case and keep it for show.”

“* Lovey-lovekins, that won’t do!”
declared Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Weare all going
away for my Funnymoon, and we want
you to give us a lift on our way in this
cart. That’s why I made it as good as
new.”

Farmer Honeybee walked slowly around
and examined his cart. He felt the cream
cushions, and looked at the silver paint



| | hy

ED & 4 ey
QZ YS
o fi

**T can’t stop him !” he gasped.

and the green wheels; then he laughed
and threw his hat up in the air.
‘*Tt’sgrand!”’’?hesaid. ‘“‘ Ill give you
an invitation, Mr. Oojah. Will you stay
on my farm and work wonders for me ? ””

=a ARM-WORKING must be very
HH nice,” smiled Uncle Oojah. “I
? could go picking up straws in the
wieaaestay fields, and Snooker might carry
the ducks to have their little drinks.”

** Then you will work for me? ”’ asked
Farmer Honeybee. ‘I could pay you
good wages, and give you good
times.”

‘*T’m afraid we can’t stay,’ sighed
Uncle Oojah. ‘* You see we are on my
Funnymoon. These little friends of mine
are taking me to September——.”

‘** But this is September !”’ interrupted
the farmer. ‘‘ It is September every day of
the week, and will be for a long time
vets,




18



‘“* Lovey-lovekins, then we’re here!”
exclaimed Uncle Oojah. ‘ However did
I manage to find the right place? ”

“Harvest is early this year, but I’m
rather late,” said Farmer Honeybee.
‘* When it’s in I always give a Harvest
Supper to my people.”

“What about a bit of hunting?”
inquired Snooker. “Is there anywhere
a cat could keep himself in practice ? ”

‘* My barns swarm with rats and mice,”
replied the farmer. ‘‘ And as for birds—
you should see them at my apples! A
hard-working cat could find plenty to do.”

‘“*T can see this is the place for me,”
chuckled Snooker. ‘‘ You’d better stop
here for a month or two and help me to be
a farmer’s cat.”

‘*Maybe we might,” agreed Uncle
Oojah. “But not for long, Snooker.

READFUL gossips
Were these three men—
They talked from five
Till long past ten.



I want to go off and enjoy my Funny-
moon.”

“Don’t worry about your Funny-
moon,” laughed the farmer. . “ We live
on fun at my farm. It’s cheap, and it’s
healthy, and you can always have as
much as you want.”

‘“ When can we try the new cart?”
asked Jerry. ‘“I should like to ride on the
cream cushions, I should. They are
mice.;7

The farmer decided to let them try it
at once, so they all climbed into the
silvery cart with the green wheels. But
when they started the horse ran so fast
that Farmer Honeybee didn’t know what
to do, and he became scared.

“T can’t stop him!” he gasped. “Is
this' awful old horse running away
again ?”

[Now turn to page 49

DON'T ‘TALK SO-MUCH
l-CAN'T-GET TO
SLEEP !!

DPD ODPDD OD

GOSSIP!

They chattered so hard
They didn’t hear

When neighbours grumbled—
Oh! dear, dear, DEAR!



ISN'T IT LOVELY 9

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NOW WE WILL GO
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VIBRATION 9
YOU'LL SOON
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STEP RIGHT IN AND HOLD YOUR HATS

HULLO, BOYS COMING FOR A RIDE?





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FAMOUS IMITATION ACT

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WITH YOUR KIND PERMISSION | WILL PRESENT ~

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ROBINSON CRUSOE

GUY FAWKES

( THANK YOu, GENTLEMEN, AND



NOW THERE WILL BE FOURPENCE

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21



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BAY Humpty-Dumpty sat on a wall
Wis) # and that Humpty-Dumpty had
rN a great fall. But do you know
why all the king’s horses and all the king’s
men couldn’t set Humpty-Dumpty up
again ?

Years and years ago Humpty-Dumpty
lived in a pretty little village called
Poppleton-on-the-Wolds. He was the
fattest boy for miles round and he was
also a very naughty boy who was always
getting into mischief, and was never out
of trouble for very long. He had often
been told not to sit




ba



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PPA PPPPAPPAPPDPADPHOOODOO COOL

time Humpty-Dumpty had reached the
wood and picked as many bluebells as he
could carry he was hot and tired. So he
scrambled up on the wall enclosing the
wood, and began to fan his face with his
hat.

‘He had not been there more than a
minute before a small but very angry voice
shouted :

ae Hi ! 22

Humpty-Dumpty looked round, but
could see no one. Then he glanced down

. and there, just below him, was a
crowd of FAIRIES, shaking their fists at
him and looking

on walls (he was so 6 6 very angry indeed.
fat that unless the At their head,
wall was very 2 WHAT IS ITP N standing on a tuft
strong his weight § § ofgrass,wasa fairy
eae gen eye ; My first is in leap but not in run; Hie = ae on

estillsat on them use : is head who seem-

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how he came to un, any of them.
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umpty- Dumpty eetis : umpty-Dumpty,

trudged up the hill ° My fourth is in pencil and also who was a very

to Far Wood to § ees 8 annoying boy
. ane bluebells. My whole at nightalight willbe— really.

t was a warm eis S19) UgbyAuKeln:
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road was very fairy, dancing wit
dusty, and by the LPPPAPAPPPCDPOSCHPOOCOOCOCOOOOOO[] Tage; “are you

22



‘*Bluebells are
HOUSES!”
exclaimed
Humpty-
Dumpty.
Then he began
to laugh, andhe
laughed and
fi laughed until he
A couldn’t stop.













deaf ? Didn’t youhearme shout, ‘H1!’”
“Oh!” said Humpty-Dumpty with a
chuckle, “‘ that was you, was it? And
who may you be?”
““T’m King Tiny, the Fairy Queen’s
husband,” spluttered the fairy furiously,
** and—and——”’

SEE EN EN
POOR LITTLE MOUSE!



I HAVE a little garden,
And I have a little house,

BUNUN NESE ENN NNN

ee



And underneath the kitchen floor
There lives a little mouse.

And now I have a little cat
(A perfect little dear !)
I rather think the little mouse

nae a ue apne ener ameeeat

23

“Well, what’s the matter ? ’? demanded
Humpty-Dumpty, fanning himself.

( Matter!?? repeated? the; dane 5:7 the
matter is that you’ve stolen our houses.”

Humpty-Dumpty looked surprised.

“‘T haven’t stolen any houses,” he said ;
‘* T’ve been gathering bluebells.”’

“But—but—but b-b-bluebells ARE
houses—our houses ! ” shrieked the King,
who was really very VERY angry.

‘““ Bluebells are HOUSES!” exclaimed
Humpty-Dumpty. Then he began to
laugh, and he laughed and
laughed until he couldn’t
stop. King Tiny and his
fairies grew angrier and
angrier, but still Humpty-
Dumpty rocked with
laughter at the idea of
bluebells being houses until
... he rocked a little too
far, lost his balance, fell
off the wall with a crash,
and sprained his ankle !

And because he was so fat and heavy
all the Fairy King’s horses—they were
butterflies really—and all his men, couldn’t

-set Humpty-Dumpty on the wall again

. . which, as his mother told him later,
served him right !

ae

Will shortly disappear !
Boos

FASTA SATO a NS SS SASS

senate





OH HE was not exactly an ordinary
fairy, for she had short black
is hair, and a dress made of lace
BAS over which she had slung a coat
of oak leaves; she had no wand, but she
held in her hand a long fountain pen.

She sat with her legs under her, trying
to write a very hard letter, for Queen
Mab had told her she must write in her
name and tell the Giant of the Water
Country that he must not drink up all the
river, as he had
said he would do.

“Tf you write
him a polite note,”
Queen Mab said,
“TL: don’t — think
he’ll doit. Giants
like polite notes,
and this giant is
really quite a nice
one, only he is
always thirsty.”

The fairy sighed.
She waved her pen
about, and a big
blob of ink fell on
to her lace dress.

“* Dear Giant,”
she began, “‘ please



and then,

9

Get heaps

JUST THE THING!

F all the drops of rain that fall
Were ginger-beer, I think
We'd LIKE wet summers now

There’d be such lots to drink !

And if in copper beeches we
Could press a button, and
and HEAPS of

pennies out—
Well, wouldn’t that be grand !

By
V. C. ALEXANDER.

Letters are VERY hard

to write—especially when

they are MOST import-
ant.

don’t drink up all the water in our river,
as we want to wash our clothes and go
for a row and have aswim. There are
several other rivers in Mortal-land which
are ever so much nicer than ours. There’s
the Thames. That is a big river, and you
could drink as much as ever you like and
no one would notice it. Why don’t you
try it? Youcould drink up all the water
between two locks, and then we would
ask the Thunder King to come and fill
itupagain. Please
spare our river,
though, for itis the
only one we have.”

The fairy read
over what she had
written four times,
and then she
sighed again. No,
it wouldn’t do to
end a letter like
that. What would
the poor people
who lived near the
Thamesdo? They
must have water.
So the fairy tore
the letter across
and started again.

E.L.R.



“Dear Giant, please don’t drink up
ourriver. We want it for so many things.
If you must drink up a river, why not go
to the Moon? The man there is always
smiling and will give you as much water
as you want—”’ The fairy paused. Was
there water in the moon? She wasn’t
sure. Now she came to think about it
really hard, she didn’t believe there was.
So she tore up that letter and started once
again,

“Dear Giant, if you really are very
thirsty and want a drink there’s a nice
big Cloud who lives in the south west and
that will give you all the water you want
to drink. Please don’t drink up our
river, though, for we want water to make
our tea with, and we have to wash our
faces sometimes. If you go and see the
Thunder King I daresay he would be
able to give you as much to drink as you
want, only please leave our country alone.”’









Yes, the fairy decided that letter would
do beautifully, and she signed her name
with a big flourish. She was just sealing
the letter when up rushed a fairy.

““ The giant is coming,” she said. “‘ He
has a big sack over his shoulder and I
suppose he means to carry away all the
water he can’t drink.”

Up rose our little fairy. She trailed
her pen behind her, which was a silly
thing to do, for allthe ink ran out. But
she met the giant before he reached the
river, and gave him the letter. He read
it and laughed.

“Why, whatever made Queen Mab
think I was going to drink up her river?”
he said. “I was just going to put some
fresh water in it, and I told her I would
drink up the other first. I expect she
only read the first page of my letter and
never turned it over.”

That, of course, was what had happened,
and the river in fairyland is now full of
clean clear water.

But the fairy with the fountain pen
often thinks of the letters she tried to
write to the giant, and that is why there
are still clouds in the sky.

e

o¢ ¢





WPPDPDDPDPOD(T]

CAN YOU
GUESS THESE ?

Why is an eg¢ likea
naughty boy ?

Because it is often
beaten.

a
|
9
;
;

9
9
C

What is it that some-
times has a finger
and sometimes

DDD PDB ADD DPA DADDADIADADAD OH

hasn’t P
A thimble.
He read ag WALTER
it and BEbts
laughed. DPDPDPDDPDDPDPODPDOOOT



25









§ Domo



PDD DD



PDD D



9.40 a.m.
A NISHED washing.

10.5 a.m. Wandered into
coal-shed and found a very
strong mousey smell....
climbed all over the coals
but never found a mouse
.... dirty stuff, coal!



10.10 am. Washed myself
again, on the spare bed...
(coal tastes horrid !)

10.30 a.m. Got all mixed
up with the jumper Mistress
is knitting. She left it (and
a ball of wool) on the table
when the grocer came ....
I clawed up the tablecloth



to look at it, and—well,
we WERE ina tangle when
she came back! “She
shrieked: ‘‘ You naughty,
NAUGHTY Pinkie!” . .:.
then she kissed me (Master
would have slapped me ifit
had been HIS jumper !)



DD DDD DPP PDP PD PPP PDP PDP PP PPP DP PPDPDP PPP PDP PPO POD PPP PPP POPP PPI DD POPP ID DOP



DP AROPP PPP PP DPPPO PP PPO PD-PD-PODPODOOPPDDPDDDOPDOODOODOOOCO CCH
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STUCK IN THE PASTRY







PPDDDD |]



PPD DDDPDDPD

O



PPDD


















ET ;O%4 Yr.

:
9
ELPED Mistress to
make the pastry. She
makes it in a big bowl, and
in the middle of the busi-
ness Mrs. Brown called. So
while Mistress was out of
the kitchen I climbed on
the table to see what the
pastry looked like, and—
9

and I couldn’t get out! I
was STUCK! I just had to
stay there till Mistress came
back. She was SO angry,

:
and I WAS in a mess!

12.15 p.m. Went to sleep

(after I’d been cleaned) i ree
on Mistress’s knee. eee
Popa. Had

dinner (more
fish !)

1.15p.m. Tasted
Towser’s _ tail.
Didn’t like it—
neither did
Towser, but he
needn’t have
been so snappy
about it . . (he’s
nearly as bad
a as Master !). '
(Half an hour later Pinkte is slabped—hard! See page 40.)

PPP PPPPPPP PP PIO POD. PDD ID OOD

27



:
:
|
|
|

-










Ke Squirrels Dar
2,7 Soa J

= f
SASS, g
SS AVERY am) tay OU AL 3s

S
eS





i PEC
ord An
Die NY

5) bein tie
iff 7)




A NONSENSE STORY

@aage anyone wants to be beauti- Tortoise, addressing no one in particular.
4Miful they must use soap—soap ‘“‘ It’s nearly as good as soap!”
f) fsa and plenty of it,” said the “Who said soap ?”’ Up came a Squir-
fond Re Tortoise, as it admired itself rel. It was a handsome Squirrel with a
in a piece of broken mirror it had found furry tail, and a walnut in its hand.
under a lettuce leaf. “Oh! Gt's (yous, issit 2a) Now live just
“ How often do you use it?’’ asked heard a wonderful story about a bar of
the Bumble Bee, who was longing to get soap. I went into the shop—you know
a glimpse in the mirror, only the Tortoise the shop I mean—the one where they sell
wouldn’t let it. conquers at the other end of the park.”
““T—I never use it,” said the Tortoise, He waited for the Tortoise to say some-
putting his head in its shell and then thing, but it didn’t—it just nodded its
straightening it out again. “I can’t head.
bear it. But I always advise people to ‘As I was saying—I went into the
use it—on principle, you know.” shop and asked for a bar of chocolate.
“What’s principle ?”’ asked the Bum- ‘Oh!’ said the man—it was not a man
ble Bee. It had, at last, caught a glimpse really, but that doesn’t matter—‘ Oh?’
of itself in the mirror. said the man. By the way, it was a Field
“Why did I let him go? Because he Mouse who served me; but the word
bit my finger so!”’ said the Tortoise. It mam seems better.”
was counting its legs and was sure it “You aren’t getting on with the story,”
had five of them. ‘‘ You asked me a_ said the Tortoise. ‘‘What about the
question? I’m a bit deaf—do you mind soap?”
repeating it?’’ But the Bumble Bee “I’m coming to that,” said the Squirrel
had buzzed off. Really the Tortoise in an offended tone. Really the Tortoise
was most annoying, and the mirror was most annoying! ‘‘I went into the
did not make the Bumble Bee look shop and asked for a bar of chocolate.




beautiful. ‘Oh!’ said the man,‘I haven’t a bar
The Tortoise ate a lettuce leaf and of chocolate, but I have a bar of soap—
decided to have a nap. won't that’
“Sleep makes one beautiful,” said the replied; ‘I have heard that soap makes

28



one beautiful, and I’m going to make
myself beautiful and all my friends as
well.’ ”’

“‘ Tmpossible,’’ muttered the Tortoise ;
but what he meant the Squirrel didn’t ask.

“T’ve got the soap here,’’ said the
Squirrel. ‘‘ Let me make you beautiful,
first of all!”

Now, the Tortoise, as we all know, was
very vain, and to be more beautiful than
any other of the animals in the garden
was something he could not resist. So
he let the Squirrel rub and rub until he
had rubbed all the gloss off his shell.

“Now you are beautiful,’ said the
Squirrel with a chuckle,
for he had seen the Bumble
Bee in the distance, and
wanted to try the wonder-
ful soap on him. ‘Go and
look in the mirror.”

“Yes, I am very fine
indeed,” said the Tortoise,
and he twisted himself so
much that he turned over
on his shell, and the
Squirrel and the Bumble
Bee and the Dormouse and
the Hedgehog all had to
come and help to turn him
over again.

“Make me_ beautiful
next,” said the Bumble
Bee.

The Squirrel said he
would.

Now, Bumble Bees are

ticklish things to deal
with, and our friend the Squirrel
knew this. He only pretended to wash

the Bee, but when he told him he was
very beautiful the Bee was quite happy.
He went buzzing off and told all his
‘friends what had happened.

The Hedgehog said he was going to be
the next one washed.

“T don’t know,” said the Squirrel,
regarding him with his head on one side—
that is, of course, the Squirrel’s head. A
hedgehog wouldn’t be so silly as to put
its head on one side, would it? ‘‘ You’re
a tough proposition to tackle, and I think

29

you had better be left to the last—I
mightn’t have enough soap to go round.”

But the Hedgehog insisted, so the
Squirrel very gingerly started to wash each
spike.

It took a long time, and when the
Squirrel had finished the work there was
a long queue waiting for his services.

“JT don’t think I can wash you all
to-day,” he said. “I haven’t enough
soap.”

“Send the Tortoise for some more,”
suggested the Field Mouse, who was a
great believer in soap and water.

So the Tortoise was sent to the shop



The Tortoise turned over on his shell, and the
Squirrel and the Bumble Bee and the Dormouse and
the Hedgehog all had to come and help to turn him

back again.

for some more soap; but you all know
what Tortoises are, and I expect he is
still going, for he never came back.
Maybe he had a little sleep on the way-
side, or perhaps he laughed so much to
think he was so beautiful that he tumbled
over on his shell again, and there was
no one near to turn him right side up
this time.

Anyway the Squirrel started to work.
The Dormouse was rubbed and lathered
until it didn’t want to sleep any more.
The Field Mouse had its skin rubbed into

fur: the Wasp had lost its sting and the



/

g aoe
NR i WR.

" Laos
SNUARNRAM ff
V Cars \ \ POOP
Aaa yj Hy Ys pe eae
\) (f

ton CR v

Lr
1D



‘‘T don’t see that you are beautiful,” said

the Sparrow. ‘‘ This soap business isn’t
good for anyone.”

Robin its red breast. But the Squirrel
assured them, everyone, that the soap
had made them beautiful—and they
believed him.

The Sparrow laughed and said no soap
forhim. He didn’t want to be beautiful ;
he was quite content if he picked up
enough crumbs to keep him going.

“Oh! come on, be a sport!’ said
the Lark, who was wheeling round and
round. The Squirrel had washed all
the song from him, but the Lark didn’t
mind that—he thought he was beautiful.

“T don’t see that you are beautiful,”
said the Sparrow. ‘‘ This soap business
isn’t good for anyone. It seems to me
the Squirrel has been having a game with
you. You look worse to me than you

did before the Squirrel touched you.
You go and ask an Elephant if my words
aren’t true!”

“ There isn’t an Elephant about,”’ said
the Robin. “‘ We might ask that Sheep
over there. I suppose it would do just
as well ?”

“Just!” said the Sparrow, and ran
off to find some crumbs.

The Squirrel had just a small piece
of soap left. He had been wondering
who to use it on, but when he heard the
conversation between the Sparrow and
the others, he thought it was time to be
off.

“ They’ll find out they are not beautiful,
if I stay,” he said, and, taking the soap
in one hand and walnut in the other,
he climbed up the tallest tree. It was
as well! The Sheep, usually the silliest
animal of them all, told them they HAD
been sillies to listen to the Squirrel, who
had been playing with them, and the
best thing for them to do was to hurry
up and be sensible again.

_ “We must tell the Squirrel what we
think of him, first of all,’’ and they went
to hunt for the Squirrel.

But Master Squirrel had been a wise
animal, and was sitting hidden under the
leaves of the top branches of a tall tree.
He was eating a walnut slowly, and chuck-
ling to himself.

“That is the last bar of soap I’ll ever
buy. Next time it will have to be
chocolate.” ‘

SEE

NGUS Alison Alistair Jeeks

je NE

30

A.A. A. JEEKS

Is twelve months old and a few odd weeks;
He sucks his thumb, and when he speaks
He makes the oddest, queerest squeaks.

Angus Alison Alistair Jeeks

Is just like a cherub with rosy cheeks;
He wears a ‘“‘nightie” instead of breeks,
And if his bottle is late he SHRIEKS!



E.L.R.

Sei Uo ama eG






FANCY you would find a
bull
A little bit too masterful
To bea really pleasant pet.
Between ourselves, they some-
times get
A trifle savage, rude and rough —
They don’t know when YOU’ve
had enough!...
(It’s no use being too sedate—
The best plan is to climb a
gate !)

HE bellow of a bull, they

Say,

back,
track.
head

Ted ees:





mM affair !)

the air!

\ Ken ine

Sz
Gear Hoos ECR.

31

Makes people go some other way.
If they refuse, and won’t turn

* You see them soaring through

The bull soon thunders on their

With flashing eyes and lowered
He paws the pasture, “ seeing

And then (of course, it’s THEIR











bake
AW (Xt aN,
: \ \e AY ON

GHERE was once a little boy




ASS called Jim, who had a big
“4 |, box-kite. And one morning,
svi when he was flying it on the
Commer the string broke. Off it soared,
and very soon it was nothing but a speck
in the sky. Then it floated into a cloud.
The appearance of the kite in the
cloud made the fairies who lived there
very excited. One thought it was a bird,
and another suggested that it was a new
sort of cloud. But the Fairy Queen, who
was wiser than any of them, said:
“Don’t be silly—it’s a KITE! I saw
a little boy flying one just like it when I
was staying with the Queen of the Blue-
bell Fairies last summer, and sHE told
me it was a kite! Someone has lost it!”
The fairies caught the broken string,
which was trailing behind the kite,



[JPAPADOD



DPPPPDPPDDPPDPDPDPDPDD PDPDODD

The story of a mistake
made by the fairies

and then crowded round to look at it.
Suddenly one of them, pointing to the
top of the kite, cried :

Look !2?

Everybody looked, and there, sure
enough, was some writing, which the
Queen spelt out very slowly :

“Tuts 1s Jim’s Kite.”

““ Splendid!’ exclaimed the Queen ;
“now we know whose it is we can return
it. Do any of you know Jim?”

“I do,” said a small fairy who had
charge of a sunbeam in the slums. “I
know him quite well.”

So all the fairies hauled at the string
and, guided by the small fairy, dragged
the kite to a tiny house in one of the
London slums. Then they tied it to the
latch of the door and left it.

The next morning the door opened,
and a little boy dressed in rags came out.
When he saw the kite his eyes grew
bigger and bigger. Then he saw the
writing ... and his name was Jim!

(Of course, he was a different Jim
really, but the fairies couldn’t be ex-
pected to know that !)

WDPPDDODPPPDDPPO[]



WHICH LETTER SURROUNDS

GREAT BRITAIN P

DOODDOOO OS





C.



oO

D>



32



O



Doom monm
3 PAPA PAPPAPPAPDA APDA>DD
O



2



PDD DD



JERRY'S SEASIDE BAND









eos PPPPDPDPDPDPDPDPDPPDDD POPP]

PDPDPDPDPDPDPDPDDDPPDD PPDPPDPDPDPPDDDDDD D> a
ERRYWANGLE
was walking

along with
Snooker when they
heard a band play-
ing on the beach.

“‘ It sounds very
nice, it does,” said
Jerry. “I wish I
had a big drum of
my own to bang.”

“You listen to
me,” whispered
Snooker. “If we
can’t have a drum
we can have a

collection.”
@ @ @
NM Zp Ly
§
|
§



‘ HAT’S a
good plan,”
chuckled Jerry.
“Tl use my hat to
takethe money in.”
“My bedsocks
will make good
collecting-bags,”’
said Snooker. ‘I
would sooner have
them full of money
any time than full
Of feet.
So they col-
lected all they could
from the people.



|
|
:
;
;
|
|
;
:
:

m7 DPPPDP POPP PPA PPP PDP PDP DP DBPO PP PPI PPP DPDODP DD OD DP PDD >

SS ees Cc



























Deore PDD D DDD PPDDODD oro~ooT) 9
| JERRY’S SEASIDE BAND
Ogee ADD pea
(CONTINUED) i
RESENTLY a
bandsman saw
a 5 - what they were
ze doing and he soon
‘ =H : = jx oChaséed them:
= Be ; ‘“My whiskers,
: — NY ANG he is after us!”
shouted Snooker.
* Run, Jerry, be-
fore he can take our
money.”

They both ran as
fast as they could
go, and they man-
aged to get away
without being
caught.

© @ &

ATER on they

i came back to

the beach and

found that the

band had stopped
playing.

“What does this

mean?” asked

Snooker. ‘ Look

at all their things

tied on the cart.”

“ They’re going

away, they are,”

replied Jerry. ‘“We

must follow that

band to the next
Diacem

PP PPPS PP PPPPPDAPD PD DPAPPD DPS DPS PDPAPPPPPDDPPPDPSP PDPDPPP POPS]





















Doo Pe
Deo mr neome oO
JERRY’S SEASIDE BAND
De ood

UDDENLY the
S rope gave way,
and down came the
drum on_ Jerry’s
head.

“This drum is
very hard on me,”
he complained.
“Tt’s spoiled my
best hat.”

‘Cheer: ps
Jerry,” | chuckled
Snooker. “You
wanted a drum,
didn’t you? Well,
you can’t say now
you haven’t got

%”

one.



‘“W CAN use this

drum, I can,”
laughed Jerry.
‘Take thetrumpet,
you Snooker, and
we'll have a band
of our own.”

So he played up
and down the
streets and made a
lot of noise.

‘“‘Make a way for
me!’ he called.
‘Walk up and
listen to Jerry-
wangle’s Seaside
Band.”

PAPA DOA DD







BOCPGOGGLCLGGPGLCOCGLCGGCOGOGGGUGCOCOGGCGOOGOGGGOGGGGGGHOOGO

: Tatters Gets Wound Up S

@
GOBGGGLCGLCCLCCGGLGCLGGLGOGGGGOGGOGVGGOGVGGOLGOGOGOO®

AH! THANK YOU, LADY. YOU. ARE VERY KIND.
| SUPPOSE, NOW, YOU WOULD NOT CARE TO

BUY A 00G ?

ROUGH ? MY DEAR
LADY ! HE WOULD
NOT EVEN HURT



HE -BRRRPRRA,
entenint 5eenninreT ais

36



SUCH A

GENTLE LITTLE DOGGIE HE 15,

SO SWEET TEMPERED, A REAL
OARLING !




AND AS FOR CHILDREN ! WHY,
HE SIMPLY LOVES THEM !!



KO
BtéRnars






QLGOGOOOGOOGHOOGOGODGOOWGGOOGGODGGOOGOOY

® On the Briny Ocean 8

@
QLCOLGOLGGCGLOGCLOGOGOGGHGGVGOCLHGCGHGGCGCGGGCUGHGGBGHOGO®D

ME ALONG
os eenan SR ORM aR HERE WE GO WITH THE BEST OF LUCK
TATTERS WILL TAKE YOU OVER THE YO HO HO AND A BOTTLE OF MILI
Sere A SAILOR'S LIFE ON THE OCEAN WAVE
YO HO HO AND A BOTTLE OF MILK '!

ALITTLE FISH
SUPPE
FOR_ SUPPER 62

ALL TOGETHER—

Saal

cs

Beane
Tt)
c









min Fairyland, and she was
BG rather a naughty little fairy.

mamma In the daytime she was always
as wood as gold, but when bedtime came
she wouldn’t go to sleep at the proper
time.

Every night at six o’clock the fairies
bathed her, and kissed her, and tucked
her up in bed, and told her to be a good
little fairy and go to sleep. But when
the Fairy Queen peeped into the nursery
at eleven to see that everything was all
right, Petling was always wide awake.

All the fairies were
very worried about
it. They told her
she would never be
wealthy and wise if
she didn’t go to sleep
earlier, but she said
she didn’t want to
be wealthy or wise
—-she would much
rather be pretty !

Then the fairies
persuaded the night- ;
ingales to pay them 6
a long visit, hoping 9
that they would sing
Petling to sleep. But
that plan was not g
a success — Petling

his tail !)

ee ae eae

MISSED!

ITTLE Tommy Titterton
Went to catch a rabbit.
With his broken pen-knife he
Thought that he would stab it.
Bunnikins refused to wait
For anyone to jab it.
But as it scuttled to its hole
Tommy tried to grab it... .
(Bunnikins turned rather pale

For Tommy's hand JUST missed

DPPDPPDO PPD POLO OOOLPLE PO

PE Dugetman
@,, Does ~~
Trick,






simply stayed awake longer than ever to

listen to them! Even when the Fairy

Queen got quite cross and scolded her

severely it only made Petling miserable

—it didn’t make her go to sleep any

sooner.

“Whatever shall we do—I’m at my
wits’ end!’ the Queen told the other
fairies, who were getting quite thin with
worrying. “It’s perfectly absurd. She
MUST go to sleep earlier, or . . . Iknow!”
she exclaimed suddenly, clapping her
hands, “we'll tell the Dustman about
her.”

So the next time
he dropped in for a
chat and a thimbleful

of roseleaf wine, the
Fairy Queen told the
Dustman all about
Petling and the way
she stayed awake
at night.

4 The Dustman
listened very care-
fully to all the Queen
had to say and, when
she had finished,
considered thematter
for a moment before
he said :

‘Dear, dear! How

(}) distressing—and



very trying for you, very trying indeed !
But if your Majesty will tell her that she
must keep her eyes closed when she is
put to bed, I think I can make her go to
sleep.”

So that night the Fairy Queen gave
Petling another talking to, and concluded
by saying that even if a little fairy
couldn’t go to sleep she MUST close her
eyes—and keep them closed—when she
was in bed. And Petling, who was very
sorry for being such a worry to the
fairies, DID shut her eyes as soon as she
had been tucked up and kissed.

In a little time the Dustman crept
quietly into the room, carrying a sack
full of Magic Sleep-Dust. Very carefully
he climbed up his cobweb ladder on to
the bed, and began to shovel the Magic
Dust on Petling’s closed eyelids.

Of course, the Fairy Queen and all the
fairies were peeping round the door, and
after a time they saw the Dustman shake

the last particles of dust out of the sack,
climb down the ladder, and tiptoe towards
them.

‘Well?’ whispered the Queen anx-
iously.

‘“‘She’s asleep as fast as fast can be,”

said the Dustman. ‘“‘ I’ll come again to-

morrow night, but after that I don’t
think you’ll have any more trouble with
hers

The Fairy Queen thanked him and
gave him a whole bottle of roseleaf wine, ©
because shovelling dust is thirsty work.
Then the Dustman went away to visit
several children whose mothers had been
complaining because they wouldn’t go
to sleep early enough.

The next time you can’t go to sleep
close your eyes tightly, and then, perhaps,
the Dustman will come along and pile
his Magic Sleep-Dust on your eyelids,
just as he did on Petling’s.



The Dustman shovelled the Magic Dust on Petling’s closed eyelids.
39





oO Ooo

r PINKIE IS SLAPPED

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PPD D DAADADDDS

1.45 p.m.
pe to claw Mis-
tress’s lee—great fun !

1.47 p.m. Madea mistake
and DID claw it—NOT
such fun! A lot of little



|
holes came in Mistress’s |
stocking . . . she wailed:
“ANOTHER ladder—
you. WICKED â„¢ kitten!??
and slapped me. /



1.48 p.m. Went into . the
garden and caught a daddy-
longlegs—I like fish better !

2.0 p.m. Rain!





§
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2.25 p.m. Went to sleep.

3.0. p.m. Mistress found
Mme... 1 woke when: the
door Senced: As soon as
she saw me—and the pillow
—she said :





. 41


215 pm.
HUNDER ! . I crept
through the — scullery

window and went upstairs
for my rest.

220 pm. i Climbed, on
master’s pillow . . . I wonder
why my wet ie leave

BLACK marks on a white
pillow—I’ma BLUE Persian!



“Oh, you little wretch !”
Then she pretended to
smack me...I don’t mind

THAT sort oe smacking !
3.10 p.m. Went to sleep
again—in basket.

(A dreadful accident at 4.30 !
See page 60.)

3
e
e
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e
a





wan We
UT TS

nmr Se
AN AT AY AN Aad
ale ,, ADOLPHUS DREW walks up the Street,

\
AS
\\\
The nicest Policeman on this beat !

ANY
He’s very large, I won't say ‘‘ fat,”
‘Cos he might be annoyed at that.

Adolphus Drew walks down the Street ;
I hear the pounding of his feet.
He wears big boots, I do suppose

To give more room for all his toes.

Adolphus Drew stops in the Street
And mops his face, he feels the heat.
I really think he wants to look

Down in the kitchen at our cook!

Adolphus Drew coughs in the Street
And sniffs, Jane must be roasting meat.
He gives a loud and hungry sigh—
P’raps she'll hand him out a‘pie.

Adolphus Drew walks ae the Street ; p7>
LO
I wave, and hope that he will look, |

,\ But no, he smiles “‘good-bye’’ to cook !
MABEL CAVALIER

The pavement echoes ‘neath his feet:



44



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by) of Camden, and the others march
naeeay, around her and repeat this rhyme :—
There was an Old Woman of Camden Town,
Her children grew up with a terrible frown ;
So she hurried away for many a mile
To buy all her babies a smile, a smile.
But on the way home the smile turned to a sneeze;
It caught the Old Woman and made her wheeze.
““Oh!’? she laughed, and ‘“‘ Oh!” she cried,
And she sneezled away till the sneeze had died.
Then she mumbled and grumbled
And skipped and hopped,
Till she stumbled and tumbled
And down she dropped.

The players have to imitate every action named as they come to it, and if
anybody forgets to sneeze or laugh or cry or do anything else at the right time
the Old Woman of Camden takes them into the ring beside her.

The Old Woman goes on taking players into the ring until there is only one
left, and the last player out wins the game.

HOOP HORSES

MET a cardboard box and lay it on one side. Gum some small pieces
| of cardboard in four divisions to make the horses’ stalls. When they
fi are all dry mark a letter over each space, and the stable is ready.
Steet §=Now you want four wooden curtain-rings or four bone serviette
rings for the Hoop Horses. Pencils will do for the Hoop Sticks.

Place the box at one end of a long table, and take your places at the other
end. One stall belongs to each player, and you
stand your hoop on edge and whip it towards your
own stall. The Hoop Stick must only be used
once, when starting off. & B¢o»p

If the Hoop Horse goes into your own stall
it counts one to you, and the player who gets | |
the Hoop Horse into the right stall the greatest ae
number of times wins the game. D_Pr>






PBPPPPOEPPD PP PP PIE PO PPO PPS DP DPODP PPD

43







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QAI 2 SNS E SNS SNF 8 CNIS E SNUIZG SNVISE SNF NENT ES US 8 SNUG 8 SNS EONS 8 ONS EAN ENN GINNING

cae was out with
Snooker looking for work when
they came to a fish shop.

‘“« This will do, it will,” said Jerry.
“ Please, do you want any help ?”

‘Yes,’ nodded the shopman.
‘““You may clear the place up and
make yourselves generally useful.”



O they began to sweep the floor
and carry away the boxes.

“This place will suit me nicely,”
chuckled Snooker. ‘‘ The perfume
is nearly as good as a dinner.”

“‘ All fresh!” said the shopman.
“Can I sell anybody a nice little
haddock this morning ? ”’



RESENTLY a strange cat crept
up and snatched a box of kippers
off the counter. Snooker was sur-
prised.
* Put that box down!” he called.
‘““ My bedsocks, don’t you know the
difference between your own pro-
perty and somebody else’s? Now
for a chase!”





ok oN

SNF" TZ 88. CNA YZ ZINN YT? FANG. TZ NA, IFAW F, 8. 4. 8 F “NZS .
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: ave a Fis a s
AA

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SS. AS
ZZNSNe BUNT OMNIS 8 UNNVSEMNNY, ISG,
FRNA 4 ONS ONS 8 NNN EONS FONG ENN VSO RNAS ENA 0 ONS ENN USE RNS ENNIS ENN

ee strange cat rushed away
with the box of fish.

“Stop him!” shouted the shop-
man. “ Make that robber bring my
fishes back ! ”

*“We’ll do the best we can,” re-
plied Snooker. “ This is a new way
of going out fishing, but I think I’m
going to make a catch.”



OON they caught up with Jerry-

wangle, who had gone off to
deliver a big box. Jerry heard the
shouting, and when he looked around
he guessed what was happening. So,
as the strange cat was passing him,
he dropped the box on his tail and
stopped him.



: T the end of the day the fish-

deri monger was so pleased with
==} their work that he gave them two
fishes as well as their wages.

‘“* My whiskers, we shall be happy
now!” laughed Snooker. “I can
see myself having a tasty supper to-
night ! Hurry up, you Jerry!”

45










SSS
SSS
A fa —
WN WE LE
IC cE
Fala san y Ao { ye SS =

“INCE upon a time, years and
Wyears ago, Peter Bunny lived
AY Hin a snug little home under a
fo -@Nsandhill near the seashore. No
matter how wild and cold the wind was,
Peter and his friends and relations (they
all lived under the same sandhill) were
as warm as toast

One sunny summer morning, when the
sky was blue and the sea as smooth
and bright as a
piece of glass,
Peter popped out
of his burrow,
scrambled to the
top of the sandhill,
and sat down.
Then he looked
round to see if
Polly Rabbit, who
lived under a
neighbouring
sandhill, was up.
Sometimes Polly
was lazy and liked
to lie in bed late;
but on this part-
icular morning she
had got up with
the lark, and was
sitting at her door
pretending to be
very busy comb-
ing her tail.




night,

DPPAPA APO PPOPPODPOOO OOOO OO

THE BATH

HEN bath-time came last Thursday

And Joan and John went up to bed,
Fluffkins, their kitten, followed them:
“T want to see you bathed!” he said.

He jumped upon the bath, and sat
Beside the taps to watch them play ; ©
But when they started splashing HIM
He thought he’d better ran away.

So, very solemnly, he rose
And ...stepped upon the soap, and fell—
The children laughed until they cried,
For Fluffkins had a bath as well!

DPPP PADIS PDP POPP PP PPADPPODD OD

HOW THE
FIRST BUNNIES WENT
TO AUSTRALIA

As soon as he saw her, Peter jumped

up and waved to her, and... at that
moment Puff-o’-Wind happened to be
passing.

Of course, HE could see Peter, but
Peter couldn’t see him; and _ being in
a mischievous mood, Puff-o’-Wind blew
a scrap of paper right under Peter’s
nose. Peter dabbed at it with his paw,
but Puff-o’-Wind was expecting him to
do that, so as soon
as he saw Peter’s
g paw move, he blew
the paper away,
and it went tum-
bling over and
over down to the
beach.

For half a min-
ute Peter and
Polly watched ‘it
fluttering towards
the: seas 7 dehien
Peter scampered
after it as hard as
he could and Polly
raced after Peter.

Puffo-Wind
chuckled to him-
self. It was a good
game for him,
because he could
see all the fun with-

O out being seen,

E.L. R.



Whenever Peter or Polly thought they
had really caught the scrap of paper,
Puff-o’-Wind blew it to one side, or into
the air out of their reach.

But after a time he tired of the game
and blew the paper into the sea; and it
was then that Peter and Polly found the
BOX !

It was bobbing up and down in the
shallow water, and suddenly Peter had
a perfectly splendid idea for a game of
pretend.

““ Jump in, Polly,” he shouted; “ let’s

out to sea they floated the harder Puff-
o’-Wind blew.

As neither of them could swim, Peter
and Polly had to stay in the box—rather
scared, of course, but not so frightened
as might have been expected. It was an
adventure, and they loved adventures.

After a time they were so far away from
land that Puff-o’-Wind couldn’t blow
them any farther. Then his big brother,
Capful-o’-Wind, began to blow, and very
soon HE blew them out of sight of land
altogether.



“Jump in, Polly,” he shouted ;

pretend this is a boat, and that we’re
going for a sail.”

Polly clapped her hands with delight.
Then they both scrambled in and sat
down in the bottom of the box, pretending
it was a real boat.

But as soon as they were safely inside,
Puff-o’-Wind began to blow the box
gently out to sea. He did it so carefully
that before Peter and Polly knew what
was happening they had been blown
into really deep water, and the farther









“‘let’s pretend this is a boat.”

It is terrible to think what MIGHT
have happened to them; but, hours
and hours later, they were rescued by a
ship which was on its way to Australia.

When they landed everybody made a
great fuss of them, for Peter and Polly
were the very first bunnies ever seen in
the country. But to-day there are so
many that a lot of people wish that Peter
and Polly had never been blown out to
sea by that. mischievous fellow, Puff-o’-
Wind.

Oo Oo PDPPADDPI DDD PDD PPD DDD ODDO OL]
WHY IS AN EASY CHAIR LIKE A GREEDY BOY?
BECAUSE IT IS STUFFED
Oooo PPPPPDPPPPODPP OT]







47



































aN
ee ES

x — x
Wy a5
CoN)

HENEVER I encounter
sheep
I always think of poor Bo-Peep,
Who carelessly mislaid a flock—
(It must have been a dreadful
shock }), :
For sheep have very little sense—
In fact they’re rather dull and
dense.
The only word they know is
oe Baa PRE Iae
THAT shows what silly things

S
c



UT lambs are different—
they play

And frisk and frolic all the day.

From morn till night they never
cease ;

They give their mothers little
peace.

Alas! too soon the baby sheep

Become too big and fat to leap—

And then (HE doesn’t care a
button !)

The butcher turns them into

mutton !

48





(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19)

GON’T get so. skerrified, Mr.
Wi Farmer,’ said Uncle Oojah.
““T only worked a magic on
cmeewl your horse to make him
stronger. Can’t he run fast!”

“It’s wonderful!’ said the farmer.
‘* My old horse was broken-winded before
you altered him, but now he is rushing
along like an express train. I shall never
need to travel on the railway any more.”

““You’d better not talk so loud, you
hadn’t,”” whispered Jerry. ‘‘ Look how
our Don is lying back on the seat! He
must have gone off to sleep.”

‘* So he has, poor dear !”’ sighed Uncle
Oojah. ““My little Hum-Jum-Jarum
must be very tired to do his sleeps like
that. We walked him too far, I expect,
all last night.”

“Bring the little boy to my farm
and put him to bed,” said
Farmer Honeybee. ‘‘Can’t my
old horse spank along now! I
never did see such doings!
There isn’t another horse like
him in all the country.”

“Country, did you say?”
repeated Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ That’s
the very place I wanted to go
for my Funnymoon. Do you
mean to say this is really the
country ?” :

“* My suffering whiskers, where
does he think it is?’ muttered
Snooker. ‘I wonder if our
Oojah expects to find a farm in
the middle of Trafalgar Square ?”’

All the way home they talked
and chatted, and then they
wakened Don to have his tea.
They were all very tired, so
as soon as tea was over the
farmer led them upstairs toa big *
bedroom.






“Mind you don’t tumble out,” he said.
49

‘** Make yourselves at home,” he said.
‘* Harvest starts first thing to-morrow
morning, so we must be up very early.
I hope you will be comfortable.”

So they said their good-nights to Farmer
Honeybee, and Uncle Oojah tucked Don

-and Snooker into one bed. Jerry slept

in another bed with his uncle.

‘“* Mind you don’t tumble out,” he said.
‘* Sleep soundly and rest yourselves well.
We must work hard at the harvest
to-morrow.”’








SA AEN Uncle Oojah came down-






PAWVA/A stairs next morning he saw
BAY, Veg Farmer Honeybee just setting
SOAS) off to the cornfields with a



big reaping-machine.
‘““ Are you coming to help?” called
‘Hurry up with your

the farmer.






SB See vee
ew 5
Pee COL

See

WoT TS
< PO ea
STIS

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aa





2 DES
Ra



breakfast and follow after
me.”’

‘* Lovey-lovekins, we can’t
wait for breakfast !”’ declared
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Come along,
my dears. We must be all
there in time to see the harvest
start.”

Before they could go the
farmer’s wife ran out and gave
them hunks of bread and slices
of cold bacon, and all the way
to the fields they were eating
the sandwiches. At the first
gate Farmer Honeybee stopped
and called back to them.

‘““We can make a start on
this field,” he said. ‘‘ With
your wonderful help I ought to
get it finished to-day.”

**Andso you shall,”’ promised
Uncle Oojah. “TIl run the
corn-cutter for you. Stand
back, Snooker, and let me
have room to work the works.”

So he climbed up on the seat
of the reaping-machine, but the
wheels sank deeply into the soft
earth and all the farmer’s horses ;
couldn’t pull them out of the ruts.

“It won’t go,” sighed Uncle Oojah.
** T expect I shall have to cut the corn with
scissors. Run back to the farmhouse,
Don, and borrow a pair for me.”

‘And a nice job that would be,”
laughed the farmer. ‘“‘ I'll do the middle
. myself with the reaper, and you can take
the scythe and cut the corners.”

** Just the very thing!’ smiled Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘Keep out of my way, Jerry, while
Iswing thelong knife. Holdup yourlittle
tail, Snooker, where it can’t get hurt.”

So he took the scythe and had a try at
cutting the corn, but he stopped so often
to look around that Farmer Honeybee
had nearly finished the middle before the
first corner was cut.

‘*My bedsocks, can’t you work a bit
faster?’ complained Snooker. ‘I can
tell you one thing—if you don’t get ona
bit quicker they’ll be sending us away
from this farm !,”

50



So he took the scythe and had a try at cutting

the corn.

WANCLE OOJAH looked across
PB the field and saw Farmer
#4 Honeybee riding towards him
=] on the reaping-machine.

are not getting on very well,”
called the farmer. ‘All you’ve cut so
far wouldn’t make a supper for my old
nanny-goat.”

‘“‘ This scythe is very heavy to swing,”
sighed Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ Maybe 1 might
do better the next time I try.”

He sat down in his corner to rest, and
Farmer Honeybee laughed and drove
around the field again.

“Did you hear that ? He was laugh-
ing at you!’”’ complained Snooker. “ My
suffering tail, if I didn’t want my dinner
I’d phizz that fat farmer !”’

“Hush, little Snooker-cat!’ mur-
mured Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Don’t disturb
me with your noises. I’m doing a very
hard think.”

For a long time his little friends sat







> exclaimed the driver.

‘*Tt’s worse than terrible, it’s scandalous!’



quiet ; then suddenly Uncle Oojah jumped
up and flung the scythe away.

“T’ve found it!” he exclaimed. ‘I
can get the harvest in all by myself.
Do a quick shut-eye, and you'll see.”’

The next minute they had a great.

surprise, for when they opened their eyes
they saw the sheaves of corn dancing
away towards the gate.

“Surely I’m dreaming!” gasped Far-
mer Honeybee. ‘I never saw a harvest
behave like this before. Is it another of
your wonders ? ”

“Yes, I worked a little magic on the
sheaves,’’ smiled Uncle Oojah. ‘“ Now,
my dears, all join in! Come along and
help me to drive this harvest home.”

So they drove the sheaves along to the
barn, but when the farmer and his men
tried to pile them up they could not
persuade them to lie still.




So untrey Was



She really lsoke®
| dsreasfull

So no wonder
she always

Marsh

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Ger
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Agatha Abbey

dabby! &

— Gates ebb pereie ,

Cow she dresseS Bidn'F
care ——

Seermen shabby (

“And no wonder,” chuckled Snooker.
“You need me to do a little bedsock
dance. My whiskers, I can soon tread
them down for you! ” ‘

So he started climbing the ladder,
but as he was getting near the top the
ladder tipped over backwards and let
him fall. Down came the sheaves on
top of him, covering him completely out
of sight.

“Oh, my poor Snooker!’ moaned
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Look, Don—look what
they’ve done to my cat!”

[Now turn to page 56.

o PDDDPDDPDDDODDDADDOAOO DO Oo
9 What word of four letters is the same :
spelt backward ?

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OH DEAR, OH DEAR, OH DEAR,
OH DEAR

WHERE'S

THAT

COME AND SEE THE PUNCH
AND JUDY SHOW-0O!
TOOTLE-TOOT- TWEET
TWEET - CLASH-
a CLASH- BANG !!

COME
HERE AT
ONCE, SIR,
WHEN YOU
ARE TOLD
TO





‘Ad. «@. ¢.

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2 MAKING THE CROCKERY FLY %
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Ls ' Gf
COCCI CELE.

{ THINK & FEW DOZEN PLATES
TO BEGIN WITH, EH, PERCY ?

GOOD MORNING, FRIENDS. A LITTLE
ENTERTAINMENT TO-DAY ? CERTAINLY !

THIS tS
VERY
SIMPLE

THIS WHOOPS!
REQUIRES BAY | HERE WE
GO LIKE A
TEE-TO-TUM!

AH! SIMPLY MARVELLOUS !! IN A FEW
MOMENTS, GENTLEMEN, YOU WILL SEE ALL
RECORDS —~—










‘F course, it was Phoenix who
jstarted it! Phoenix was the
q black cat who sat on the nur-
ui sery mantelpiece. He usually
was quite well behaved, but to-day, be-
cause his little mistress Marie had gone
to the pantomime, he kept on walking up
and down.

“Can’t you keep still, Phoenix ?”’ said
the china dog. “I’m trying to learn my
one times table, and it’s awfully hard.”

But Phcenix’s only answer was to walk
up and down, up and
down.

“Phoenix, I’m try-
ing to put my dress
tidy, but every time
I do it, you walk
past me and give it
a pull. I wish you’d
settle down and do
something,” said the
lady in the crinoline,
who stood in the



tree

e,

Was

Oo DPD PBPBDPDDPODDOPDDDPDDPDDDPDPDPDD OD

:
:

BAD GRAMMAR
a old owl sat in an old oak

As wise and solemn as an owl could
And all he said when he spoke to you

© Tu-whit !
*Tu-whoo! Tu-whoo!”

you must walk up and down, would
you mind bringing back with you that
small jug? I know there is some water
in it, and I’m very thirsty.”

But Pheenix kept on walking.

The china dog and the crinoline lady
and the fern, also the jug with the water
in it, moved to the middle and held a
committee meeting.

““We must stop his walking,’ said
the china dog. ‘‘Here am I trying
hard to learn so that I can be a foot-
ball player some day,
and Phcenix won’t
letime:2

“Ets very sad
the crinoline lady
shook her head.
“What shall we do
to him ? ”

ne bet Sask thts
brother, the real

|

9

$ orotier,

; black kitten. He
;

|

!



Tu-whit!” or

often comes on to the

middle of the mantel- ae oie who had lived in a cage, mantelpiece. Call
P tee t PheAe SEt Escaped, and passed the owl on his ae ak Hows” said
continued to walk. “Ta eates I” said thevowl front lis So Smut, the black

You are making leafy gloom— kitten, was called
me giddy,” said the “ Tu-WHOO!” cried the lark, “ you to the committee
fern, which stood should say ‘Tu-WHOM !’ meeting, and the
at the edge of the end of it was that
mantelpiece... If Cooooonooo ooo OOOO oOo he told Phcenix that








es

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Phoenix lay ina hundred pieces on the floor!

he would race him to the corner and
back.

Pheenix without stopping in his walk,
agreed, and the china dog called out,
‘One, two, three—go!” And they
went.

But now comes the sad part of it. The
china dog, the crinoline lady, the fern
pot and the jug with the water in it, all
followed the two racing, and when they
all came to the edge of the mantelpiece
they fell plomp on to the floor !

DPDDD

—jIAKE a page from an old
exercise-book and draw
a flight of stairs from
S72 SS the top left-hand corner
to the bottom right-hand corner,
one line to a step.

Write on the tenth step from
the bottom ‘‘ Broken,”’ and on the
second from the top ‘‘Trap Door.”

Next draw four small squares
on a slip of paper and number
them like this :—

I 3



2 4
The first player closes his eyes

SSNSNSNENSSNSNS NS SNSNE NSS NS NS NS BSNS NS

y PPPDDPP PD PADPAPDPD PDD DD

PoE ESS SSNS Nee LLL AEE
STEPS AND STAIRS

ELECEE LESTE LESEL EEE ESET ECCLES

55

Smut came off the best. The china
dog had lost an ear; the crinoline lady
had a great rent in her crinoline; the
fern was badly crushed, and the water was
all spilled from the jug.

But even these were not so badly off
as Phoenix. He lay in many pieces on
the floor !

Of course, when Marie came home, she
mended him, but his walking days were
over, and all through his own fault too.

Isn’t it asad story ?



and tries to place his pencil in
one of the squares. Whatever
number he gets he can move up
the same number of steps, but if
the pencil falls on a line or out-
side the squares he gets nothing.

Mark your initials against the
step you reach, and cross it out as
you move up.

If you get on the broken step
you go back five, and if you land
on the trap-door you must start
from the beginning again.

The player who reaches the top
first wins the game.

NBN SNSNSS SNES NS SNBNS NS SNS NB NS SNS

a (2)

NaN

.



NO NGNGNGSGNGSGNGSGNG SG LNGSGRGASGLNSGSGNGLSES
COSY AQ
F Uncle Oojah’ ‘
« Uncle Oojah’'s Funnymoon Z
LOS. HE

FPP AAO VSO SINE NAMES 8 SALES 8 SRL E SRIF 8 SRS SRG 8 SNISNS 8 SNS 8 WIS 8 ANNI 8 SNS 8 SNUG SNA I SNA 8 SNAG SN
13S GUSOS OSIRIS SI SIN SU WISI SUSUWUWWT

Ne. J

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(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51)

- 1VERYBODY worked hard to He took Snooker on his knee and began
“Nie] rescue Snooker, but when they counting his eyes and measuring his tail ;
‘had tossed all the sheaves of then he wrote it all down solemnly.

ZINA ZINA afar.



(Some corn aside they found him “T don’t fancy this insurance. busi-
lying very quiet and still. ness,”’ grumbled Snooker. ‘“‘ Stop a little
“Look at the poor dear!” sighed minute, can’t you? I want to go and
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Have those sheaves see a friend of mine around the corner.”
smothered him, do you think? Send “ Lovey-lovekins, your friend will
for a cat-doctor this minute.” have to wait!” replied Uncle Oojah.

“What's all the fuss about?” in- ‘‘ Lie still, Snooker, and don’t kick!”
quired Farmer Honeybee. “ Don’t go Just then Farmer Honeybee pulled out
upsetting yourselves over nothing. After his watch and looked inside the case.
all, it was only a cat.” “Bed-time!” he called. ‘‘ Good-

When Snooker heard him say that he night, Mr. Oojah. We expect to finish
opened his eyes and wriggled around to our harvest to-morrow, and then you
his feet. will see something happen !”’

“Who said I was only a
cat?” he demanded. “ My
suffering bedsocks, if I wasn’t
a little gentleman I’d phizz you
all round your own farm !”’

“ Splendid ! That shows he is
still alive,” smiled Uncle Oojah.
“Tell me, Snooker—do you
feel very poorly—bad ?”’

“Poor enough, and bad
enough,” replied Snooker.
“Tve had a right good
shaking, I can tell you. Even
my whiskers are aching !”’

‘I’m glad he was saved, I
am,” said Jerry. ‘‘ We ought
to have him insured before he
gets any more accidents.”

“Well, well, what next?”
laughed the farmer. “ Who
ever heard of insuring a cat?
Where are you going to find the
card for him ?”’ i

‘We'll provide the card,”
said Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Don, just
lend me an old postcard, will A SS" ZZ
you? Now,Snooker—come here ‘‘T don’t fancy this insurance business,” .
and have your insurance done.”’ grumbled Snooker.

56



——_







en geal HAT night Uncle
§ SS Oojah sat down beside
the bed and gazed
# sadly into his slipper.
a long wait until to-
morrow!”’ hesighed. ‘‘ What’s
going to happen, I wonder ?
Do you think it will be anything
dreadful ? ”’

“It might mean trouble for
you, it might,” chuckled Jerry.
“Dear Uncle Oojah, they may
want you to drive all the corn
back and put it on the stalks
again!”

“Don’t take any notice of
him; said).Don. 3) 1! expect
it’s only the Harvest Supper.
Farmers always give a feast
after the harvest is gathered in”’

“ Lovey-jimmikins, I must
be there!’ exclaimed Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ Good-night, my dears !
I’m going to sleep double hard,
and then perhaps I shall be
double hungry.”

All next day the farmer’s wife
was busy cooking, and after
the last load was brought home
the harvesters came troop-
ing into the kitchen. For supper they
had cold beef and ham, puddings and
pies, cakes and custards, with jugs of
cream and junkets and jellies.

“‘ My whiskers, what a sight!” laughed
Snooker. ‘‘ One thing is very certain—
we shall not have much room left after
we have finished with this lot.”

“Eat hearty, good people,” said Farmer
Honeybee. ‘‘ We never had an Oojah to
help us before, and I only hope he will
oblige us by coming to our next harvest.”

So they all sat down and enjoyed a
good supper. When it was nearly over
Uncle Oojah reached playfully across to
hook the cream away, but Snooker clung
so tightly to his jug that he went swinging
around with it.

“JTsn’t Uncle Oojah a quaint old
thing ?’’ smiled Mrs. Honeybee. ‘‘ The
pranks he plays are funny enough to make
a pig dance.”



oF

PELL
wR

Snooker clung so tightly to his jug that he went

swinging around with it.

“Pig dance, did you say ?”’ repeated
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘That’s a very good
idea. All stay where you are after supper,
and I’ll show you the funniest wonder
you ever saw.”

5 supper Uncle Oojah
1 leaned over and whispered to
€4 Farmer Honeybee, and the far-
=aurstl mer listened and nodded his
head.

“We can go out and do it now,” he
said. “‘ Before we come back you men
might clear the things out of the kitchen.
Make sure you leave us plenty of room.”

So the two of them hurried across the
farmyard, and while they were away the
harvesters carried out the tables and
chairs. Suddenly the door flew open and
four pigs rushed in, followed by Uncle
Oojah and the farmer.











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ad NM “mY
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** Shut the door and keep them here,”’
said Farmer Honeybee. ‘‘ You can start
your latest wonder, Mr. Oojah, as soon
as I tune up my old fiddle.”

' “This is very nice, it is,’ chuckled
Jerry. ‘I’m going to push in front, I
am, and see all that’s going on.”’

The farmer began to play a lively tune,
and when the pigs heard the music they
stood on their hind legs and danced up

Nanhehsiehshshehsheishs

They stood on their hind
legs and danced up and
down the room.

EEE EEE EEE EEE EEE

WHICH RULER ALWAYS
SERVES?

The Ruler you draw Lines with

DPB PBPBPD PBA PDD POA DAADAPD ADD DD

BOBLSL ICIS BL SL SE SL Be BCS LISLE SL

and down the room. They
waltzed and they jigged and
they jazzed, and the harvesters

clapped and cheered them
on.

‘** My bedsocks, this is a new
touch!’? laughed Snooker.

“It’s the first time I ever
heard of a cat going to a pig-
dance.”

“Don’t they look fat and
funny !’? smiled Uncle Oojah.
‘“* T worked a very good wonder,
didn’t I? Dance again, my
dears, and see if you can go
twice as quick.”

After this the farmer played
so fast, and the pigs danced
so hard, that presently they
bumped into Uncle Oojah and
sent him staggering against

the fireplace.
‘“‘ Jimmy - ninnikins, that’s
enough!” he complained.

“Stop all the dancing this
minute? Go back quietly
to your houses, like the
good little pigs that you are.”

So away trotted the pigs to their
sties, and one by one the harvesters said
good-night and went home. Later on
Snooker was getting into bed when he
sat up and gave a chuckle.

‘‘ My whiskers, we’re having a high old
time!”? he laughed. ‘“‘I wonder what
tricks we shall be getting mixed up with
to-morrow ? ”” [Now turn to page 62.


NENSNENBNSAS SNS NSNS

PPDPDPD PDP PPD PDPDPDPDPD DPA PDD PD PDD SD a)

BoEE EEN





‘*Surely I’m dreaming!” gasped Farmer Honeybee. - °





| HE hen is quite a useful bird
Whose conduct is at times
absurd.
For instance, if she’s mopy, moody—
A certain sign that she is broody,
When some hens try to hatch out













pot-eggs }
(They don’t know that the things ‘ :
are NOT eggs !)— CLES hee ies
She has to be pushed in a pen a i
Till she begins to lay again. a ere
eo \
OCKS are a nuisance—every
morning
Without a single word of warning
They start to crow before the sun
Gets out of bed—and think it fun!
Their owners—still in need of sleep—
Wake up, and wonder why they keep
A creature, puffed up with conceit,
* And usually too tough to eat!
YS
a

iy Ne Tp

i

f'

\

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a

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SP PLPPPPPPDPDPPP PDP PP PPP PDPDPPDPD PPD PDPDPPPPDDPPPAPD DD
$000000000000000000050000000000000000000 00000000000 000000008 F

$ == DRENCHED IN MILK! 3

F999 999 9H99O9O99999099F909 9599999 99F999FH999949H99O909509990500
Say Os AON Ge ES A RAO OE ROE,

Mary to get
tea ready. When
she was out of the
kitchen I put my
head in the milk-
jug to seeif there
was enough .
and [| couldn’ t
Setit-out Wi.)
was awfully
frightened and
drenched: in
milk to the skin. Then I tumbled off the table and the jug
broke . . . Mary heard the crash and came running back
but I was under the gas-cooker by that time !

iT.
:
§
"|
: 4.30 p.m.
ELPED
|
|
9



>

4.35 pm. Finished licking
the milk off myself . . . jolly
good milk, too !



|
:
9

I ETAL AT DO NET PA CTI TDN OPN RRA PDP

60

i
|
:
!
|
|
|
9
|
|
9
|
§
|
|
|
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|



DPD PDPDPDPDDDD PO

PP>DADOPDPD PP PP PPP DP PPDP PPP PDP DPD DPDPDPPD-DPDDDD
errr eters Ceres ere ere reir eeer errr ue er oe

PINKIE IN DISGRACE /






5.0 p.m.
OUND Master’s slippers—
the shiny ones—and played
with them.

5.30 p.m. Master came
home.

5.31 pm. Found his slip-
pers . . . all that was left of
them (he IS a bad-tempered
man !)

6.30 p.m. Had
my milk .
clawed Toa
ser’s nose when
HE tried to
have it too. I
don’t put up
with any non-
sense from
Towser !

(More trouble at 10.40! See page 78.)





5
9
9
9
:

:
i



BEER EEE EEE EEE NEBL ER ERA Rg

< Uncle Ooj ah’s Funnymoon :
EL ELELELELELELELELEE EE EE EE EL EE EES

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 58)

SeiNE morning Mrs. Honeybee

'cooked potato-pancakes and
j/# coddled eggs for breakfast, and
PrkZ76N everybody chatted gaily during
the meal.

‘““They will be busy to-day at the
village,” said Farmer Honeybee. “It’s
the Harvest Home to-morrow, and we
‘ ought to collect something. I really
haven’t the. time, Mr. Oojah—could
you manage todoitforme?” _

**T can collect lovely,’’ replied Uncle
Oojah. “Ill go to the draper and get
a few silks and satins, and then [’ll ask
the butcher for some nice mutton-chops.
Will that be enough ? ”

“Yes, and too much,”
laughed the farmer. ‘“‘ We
need flowers, and berries, and
evergreens—for the decora-
tions, you know.”

Uncle Oojah jumped up from
the table and ran into the
garden, and presently he came
back with a large bunch of
rhubarb, two cauliflowers, and
a pocketful of tomatoes.

‘‘That’s not right; they
never decorate with rhubarb
and cauliflowers,’’ said Don.
** After breakfast I'll take you
upon the hills. We are sure to
find lots of pretty berries and
wild flowers growing there.”

So they finished breakfast,
and then they all took baskets
and wandered up on the hills.
Don showed them what to pick
and they gathered crimson hips
and haws, long trailing bryony
and wild clematis ; afterwards
filling their baskets with dainty
autumn crocuses.

“I think we have enough





CRT Is

i I

now,” said Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ Let me see,
Don—what day will to-morrow be? Is
it my birthday, perhaps, I wonder ? ”

““T know one thing, I do,” chuckled
Jerry. ‘‘ Whatever comes it’s always
your forgettory day.”

They all went back to the farm and
helped to build an archway of leaves
and flowers over the gate, and the rest
of the evening they spent hanging out
flags and banners.

“There! Isn’t that lovely ?’’ smiled
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘I’m a grand flower-
worker when I like, aren’t 1?”

‘““My whiskers, I should say so!”



An archway of leaves and flowers over the gate.
62



laughed Snooker. “ Roll on

the old Harvest Home—we’re Zz
all ready for it!” hi
Spe
To —
ZA
LL next day the bells




fa) Were ringing and the
w4| village was gay with
i | flags and mottoes.
Uncle Oojah spent the morn-
ing with Farmer Honeybee, but
in the afternoon he took his
little friends to see the Harvest
Home, and long before he
reached the tent there was a
crowd of children running after
him.

““Look at the little dears!
They all follow me,” he smiled.
“Listen, children—you shall
have a treat to-day. ’'m going
to give you something special
for your tea.”

““Isn’t he clever ? ” said one
little girl. ‘‘ They have ele-
phants at the Zoo that beg for
buns, but I never heard one
talking before.”’

Uncle Oojah led the children
to the big tent where tea was waiting, and
helped to lift them into their seats.

‘* We'd better start on the cake, because
that’s always the best,” he said. “ If you
are all very good I might give you donkey-
rides on my back later on. Don, pass the
tea-pot, will you? Snooker,take your paw
out of that milk-jug ! ”

They all had a very jolly tea, and after
it was over Uncle Oojah filled the chil-
dren’s pockets with peppermint creams
and chocolate almonds.

‘““Can’t we have a dance next?” in-
quired Don. ‘‘ That would make a good
finish to our day.”

“*T should think we ought to rest after
all this feasting,”’ laughed Snooker. “ My
whiskers, our Oojah has had sixteen help-
ings of cake already!”

*“* Snooker, I’m surprised at you!” ex-
claimed Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ You ought to
know it’s very rude to count anybody’s

\

\
».

C
ey






He danced and capered around the field.

appetite. Now, my dears, start the band
and I?ll do a little dance to please the
children.”

So he waited until the music began ;
then he danced and capered around the
field.

Presently he stopped and asked the big
drummer to let him have a bang, but the
first time he hit the drum both the sides
split open and the drumsticks fell inside
out of sight.

** Oh, Don, this drum has come undone!”’
gasped Uncle Oojah. ‘I’ve spoiled all
their harvesting music. What will they
do to me now ?”’

idrum, Uncle Oojah,’” said
j Jerry. ‘‘ You can always buy
Manother for the band, you



“Very true,’ Jerry,’ nodded his uncle.
“Take my purse, Mr. Drummer, and get
yourselves two new drums. Play them
both together, and then they will make
twice as much noise.”

They finished the afternoon telling
riddles and playing games, and when it
was time they took the children home one
by one.

It was late when they all got to bed, and
next day Uncle Oojah ‘was so tired that
he did not get up until nearly dinner-
time.

“It’s a nice morning. What’s going to
happen to-day ?”’ he asked. ‘‘ What do
people generally do when they are having
a Funnymoon ?”

“Take their friends out for a walk,”
replied Snooker. ‘‘ After all that hard
sleeping I should say you could do with
some exercise.”

“I’m coming, too, I am,” said Jerry.
“Don’t walk me too fast, because I’m
older to-day than I was yesterday.”

So they waited for dinner, and then they
went strolling through the lanes and over
the fields. Presently it started to rain.

‘““ We came too far, I suppose,” sighed
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘Oh, Don, I don’t want -
to get wet to-day ! It might be dangerous
after all the cake I had last night.”

“* Do look at this big mushroom,”’ said
Don. “It’s a pity we are not fairies, or
we might have sheltered under it to keep
the rain off.”

‘“* The very exactly thing ! ’’ said Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ My Don can do some beautiful
thinks when he tries. Shutty-eyes, my
dears, and I’ll show you something that
will give you a surprisement.”

Once more he used his magic, and the
mushroom grew bigger and bigger until
at last it covered them all like an umbrella.

‘* There, isn’t that lovely ? ” he smiled.
*“* Wasn’t Ia smart old Oojah to work that
sowell ? Wait until this rain stops raining,
and we'll gather some nice mushrooms for
supper.” [Now turn to page 71.

OT, £S.
£. DoReTHY can
ra

Ween
— ~

SHY FAIRIES

HEN buttercups and
daisies
Are sprinkled in the field,
The little Wild Flower Fairy

Is cunningly concealed.

ORES og
I vo (é Z
J

Tp
We ai
| qo

Al \

tl



qi

*

The baby breezes whisper
Their secrets as they pass
To little Wild Flower Fairies,

Who hide among the grass.

A ai ik
Li







, K\AYEANK

MAS

ike an umbrella.

The mushroom covered them all |



Pon OF

By E.Ellis[forris.
a







Wai! I am tired of these summer
wy¥ holidays. I shall be glad when
&/ A next week comes and we go
s 4 back to school,”’ said Herbert to
his sister Marie, as they stood in a lane by
a stile.

“Suppose we buy some sweets,’ he
continued, ‘and stand on the bridge over
the river and watch the boats go under
while we eat ?”’

“Lovely !’’ exclaimed Marie, clapping
her hands. ‘“‘ How much money have
you? I have twopence.”

She handed the two coppers to the boy,
who was busy fumbling in all his pockets,
from which he extracted various things—
lumps of sugar, tin-tacks, putty and a
few pieces of string. At last he produced
two pennies—very sticky they were, too!

Theyran offtotheir favourite sweet shop.

Arriving there, they wondered what
they should choose.

They looked at every bottle of boiled
sugar sweets, and at last decided to have
a. quarter of a pound of “ fishes ’’—red,
yellow and white ones.





“Oh! lovely!’ exclaimed Marie, as
they left the shop and made their way to
the bridge.

The river seemed rather deserted for a
time, but while the children were looking
at the water a sudden cry came from
Herbert, who was holding the bag of
sweets in his left hand. He turned very
white, and hastily threw the bag into the
river.

65



“Why did you do that, Herbert?”
asked Marie in wonder.

“Because all those fishes must have
come to life—they moved in my hand—
and look! there they are swimming away
for all they are worth !—and growing so
large too.”

Marie looked, and saw that he was right.

““ Suppose,” she said, ‘‘ we run down to
the towing path and see what happens ? ”

“Yes, we will,” he cried, and they
scampered off, soon reaching the side of
the river.

They
moments.

Their sugar fish had become real ones,
and two, one white and one yellow; swam
to where the children stood! Then a
signboard rose out of the water and red
letters graduaily appeared upon it. They
read these words :

“Marie must ride on the back of the
white fish. Herbert on the yellow one.
Be quick. Don’t argue.”

Then the letters faded away and the
board disappeared.

The children felt dazed, but obeyed the
command. The fish came quite close to’
the bank for them to “ mount.”

Their legs dangled in the water, but the
children, being now enchanted, did not
get wet.

The two fish swam to an island a little
way down the river and then stopped. A
signboard rose up on the island, and words
in red letters suddenly appeared :

stood breathless for a few

E



Fairyland. Not a word
must you speak till you
reach the bridge again.”’

The children jumped on to
the island and as they did so
the whole place changed.
Thousands of goblins were
springing about, some playing
“‘leap-frog”’ over each others’
backs and screaming “‘ hoop-
la

Then a lovely Fairy Queen
appeared in a small golden
chariot, drawn by white
pigeons. Their reins were
made of silver threads.
Many fairies riding on mauve
pigeons followed and they
were dressed in silver tissue,
while each wore a diamond star in
her hair.

The Queen halted, and the fairies rode
round and round her chariot till she raised
her diamond-studded wand in the air.
Then they backed their ‘‘steeds,” and
stood still, some behind the Queen and
others facing her.

Out of the ground rose little white tables
laid with refreshments—fairy cakes, sugar
plums, dewdrops on rose petals, and ices
served in silver thimbles.

The goblins were the waiters. Twenty
attended first to Her Majesty, to whom
two took some sugar plums on silver



The goblins were the waiters.
65










ex



The sugar fish had become real ones !

salvers (which were on the tables) and an
ice in a silver thimble.

They bowed low whilst the Queen par-
took of her refreshments; then, backing
from her presence, they returned to the
tables to serve her fairy attendants.

When the meal was finished a band
struck up a tune. The musicians were
all kinds of birds, who played drums,
violins, flutes, trumpets, oboes, etc. The
orchestra was conducted by two magpies;
one controlled the performers on the left
and the other those on the right. The
idea of having two magpies was because
to see one is unlucky.

It puzzled the children
(who dare not speak) how the
birds could play and conduct,
when they required their
claws to stand upon. Then
they saw they used their fatls
for that purpose—and yet
did not look odd.

The music was charming,
for some of the birds ‘‘chirp-
ed’”’ as they played, and
the Fairy Queen was so
affected by it that a most
unusual thing happened
...her pretty little head
slowly nodded and she fell
fast asleep—which was fatal!

There was a loud crash.
The children were terrified



and clung to each other. Then another
crash came and a mist arose. When
it cleared away slowly the island appeared
as it always was—fairies, queen, goblins,
and birds had gone !

Turning hand in hand towards the
river, the children saw their two fish
waiting for them, and they quickly sprang
on to their backs. Their steeds took them

Demo noo noo ooo



PPP OID

back to the towing path near the bridge
and then disappeared.

In the mud lay the remaining sugar
fish—the children gazed down at them.

“Never again shall I buy sugar
fish |’ declared Marie sadly.

Herbert sighed.

‘‘ Marie, leave the fish in the mud, they
will melt away. Come home,”’ he said.

GDDOOCCCOOooCCO



A KANGAROO CHRISTMAS

F all the animals I’ve seen
In farm-yards or the Zoo,
The one I love the VERY BEST
Is the jumping kangaroo.

One Christmas eve, I’d like to go

And wait in the Zoo grounds,

For Father Christmas Kangaroo

A-leaping on his rounds.

How I should laugh to see him jump!
I wonder what he’d bring:














’Cause little baby kangaroos
Don’t play with anything.

At least, I’ve never seen them play ;
You NEVER know—at night

They may all go a-leaping round,
And play till morning light.

I think that little kangaroos
Have toys to keep them good,
One day, | MUST get left behind—
Oh! how I wish I could!

But brother Bobby always says,

-** You mind what you're about—
If once they lock YOU in the Zoo,
They'll NEVER let you out.”

IN.





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‘HOW DARE YOu
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OWS love a quiet life, they
pass

Most of their time devouring grass

(As grass is green and milk is white,

Somehow that doesn’t seem quite

When full they settle down with
* thuds

Contentedly to chew their cuds,
Using their swishy tails to swat

The flies, and show them what is
what.

HEN milking time comes
(twice a day)
The farmer drives the cows away,
‘ And sometimes if a cow’s put out,
She kicks the pail of milk about
(The milkmaid, too, may “take a
toss,”
Which makes her very very cross—
In fact, I’ve even heard it said
The cow is spanked and put to bed!)



78



Se



puree
HESS



PEE

HH





Uncle Oojah’s Funnies

Hr

Beatie SIE HEE HE ES EE

AG]

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 64.

AMOR nearly an hour they shel-
tered under the magic mush-
room, and still the rain came
hace mi pelting down.

‘““ This is a nice day to take a cat for a
walk!’ grumbled Snooker. * You will
have to do something soon, or we shall be
needing our bathing-suits.”’

“There are too many of us here to go
under one mushroom,”’ complained Jerry.
“The rain keeps driving in ai the sides
allover me. I'm getting wet, I am.”

“Wet, did you say ?”’ repeated Uncle
Oojah. ‘“‘ Lovey-lovekins, this will never
do! Just turn your heads away and do
another shut-eye.”

So they did, and when they
opened their eyes again they
saw two new mushroom
shelters. Don ran to one and
Snooker took the other, while
Jerrywangle squeezed against
his uncle, and there they
waited until the rain stopped.

““Come along, my dears!”
called Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ On our
way home we must pick some
mushrooms for Mrs. Honeybee,
and then she can stew them for
supper.”

So they wandered slowly
across the fields, filling up their
pockets as they went.

“ Rain is very useful—see



how it makes the flowers
grow!” murmured Uncle
Oojah. ‘“‘I watched a little

raindrop come tumbling down,
and the next minute up jumped
a mushroom.”

“IT don’t think they grow
quite so fast,’’ smiled Don.
‘““A mushroom might come up
in a night, but not in a minute.

I expect you have made a mistake.”

‘* Maybe I did,’’ admitted Uncle Oojah
“T think we have plenty now. They
taste very dark-browney, don’t they ?”’

““Have you been tasting them?”
asked Don. ‘*Dobecareful. You might
eat toadstools instead, and then you would
be very ill.”

“Oi! Don, supposing I have!’’ groaned
Uncle Oojah. ~ [ only nibbled a few to
make sure they were ripe. Oh! I do feel
bad!”

‘“ My bedsocks, this puts us in a fix!”
complained Snooker. ‘‘Let’s take him
home, before he fancies himself any
worse.”



And there they waited until the a ia
71






Mjand threw all the
mushrooms away; then
he sank down on the damp grass
and leaned his head against a
gate-post.

“Oh! Don, I’ve spoiled my
dear Funnymoon ! ” he groaned.
“It’s very bad to be so bad—do
T‘look any worse ? ”

“‘ There isn’t anything yet to
worry about,” said Don.
“Perhaps you didn’t eat any
toadstools, after all.”

““ My whiskers, I should hope
not,’ added Snooker. ‘‘ You
want to keep your heart up, and
don’t forget to hold your head
up as well.”

“What a_ pity Doctor
Dromedary isn’t here!” sighed
Uncle Oojah. “I wonder if my
Don could doctor me.”

“TIT can have a good try,”
replied Don: = ** But. 7. ‘can’t
doctor you out in the fields
—let’s run back to Farmer
Honeybee’s house.”

So they hurried him along to the farm
and put him in a big arm-chair. Don
went out to find Mrs. Honeybee, and
presently he came in with a bottle and a
table-spoon.

“* Lovey-lovekins, that’s Castor Oil!”
exclaimed Uncle Oojah. ‘‘Can’t you
give me a nicer medicine? Wait a
minute, let Snooker take it for me.”

“Certainly not!’? declared Snooker.
*“* Everybody must take his own medicine,
and you ought to know that. Give hima
big spoonful, Don, and make him drink
it all.”

Don poured out a large dose of Castor

ap

ae
hese





Oil and handed it over, and after giving.

anotherloudgroan Uncle Oojah drankit off.
*“My Don is a lovely doctor,” he sighed.
“* He ought to sweeten his medicines a bit
more, though.”
“Try a spoonful of blackberry-jam
after it,” said Jerry.
the nasty taste away, it-will.”’

‘That will take

72

‘*Give him a big dose, Don, and make him
drink it all.”

“Thank you, Jerry. Hand me the
jam-jar,’’ nodded his uncle. ‘‘ We haven’t
done any blackberrying this year, have
we? I must gather some before they are
all gone, so hurry up, Doctor Don, and
get me better.”

iLL through the night Uncle

Ds
P

Sy
ei

Wig Oojah kept waking and having
4 drinks of Don’s medicine, but
ite at breakfast-time he came
downstairs beaming with smiles.

** Good-blackberry-morning, my dears!”’
he called. ‘‘Isn’t this beautiful sunshine
nice and shiny ? ”’

‘“My whiskers, he looks better than
ever!’ chuckled Snooker. ‘‘ There is
nothing like a good dose of Castor Oil—
if somebody else takes it.”

“I’m glad you are so well again,”’ said
Don. ‘‘ Weshall havea lovely day for our
blackberrying.”’



After breakfast they took
their baskets out along. the
lanes and picked the juicy
blackberries from the hedges.
Jerrywangle went with them,
but Snooker was nowhere to
be seen.

““Where’s my Kitten-cat, I
wonder ?”’ murmured Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ This is very strange.
Why didn’t he come with us ?”’

““T expect he is not far
away,’ replied Don. “‘ Look,
here’s a big walnut-tree! I

should like some of those
walnuts, they are such
beauties.”

Uncle Oojah threw a stone
at the tree, but he missed it.
Again and again he tried, and
all he knocked off was a couple
of leaves.

“IT shall get something
presently, perhaps,”’ he sighed.
“They ought to trim their
trees with cocoa-nuts, .and
then I could hit them better.
If I had a bow and arrows I
might shoot a few.”’

“Why don’t you pull the branches
down?” asked Jerry. ‘‘ You should be
able to bend that tree easily, you should.”

““My Jerrywangle is always right,
Sometimes,” smiled his uncle. ‘‘ Why
didn’t I remember that at first ? ”’

So he reached up and pulled the
branches down, and his little friends

WEES
i



oO L, A:
Ze
‘LH:

quickly filled all their pockets. They had
a very happy morning, nutting and
blackberrying ; but when they got back
to the farm Snooker was still missing.

‘* Oh! Don, where can my Snooker be?”
groaned Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ Whatever can
have happened to my cat?”

[Now turn to page 97.

PELE EEEEEEE EE EEE EERE

Peter and Pitpat -

THERES A STRANGE
CAT, PITPAT.
1

Bark as Bad as a Bite










EL XTEEN, s’venteen, eighteen,
al nine-een. .. .”

mâ„¢ Bobbie was lying awake
Ete COUNting sheep. He had heard
Uncle James say that the best thing to do
when you couldn’t go to sleep was to
count a flock of sheep, and that was
what Bobbie was doing.

“|, . twent-nine, THIRTY,
thir'tworf. 32%

But, somehow, counting sheep wasn’t
making Bobbie sleepy. He was very much
awake. The sheep were trotting through
a gate in a wall, and he counted their
tails as they disappeared through the gate.
He had counted them once and made the
number 131. Now he was counting them
again just to see that he hadn’t made a
mistake.

thir’one,

id
oO

«|. hundrand thirty, hundrand thir’
one’’ ... there was a pause, and then
another sheep trotted out of the darkness

and through the gate... ‘‘ hundrand
thir’two.”
“Bother!’’ murmured Bobbie, "I

shall have to count them again to see
which is right.’

And then, leaning against the wall, he
saw a very, very old man with a long white
beard and a shepherd’s crook.

“Got ’em wrong, I reckon,” he sug-
gested, smiling.

‘ Yes,’’ said Bobbie. ‘' Now J shall have
to count them all over again.”

““Doan’t ’ee,’”’ said the shepherd, “‘ I’ll
tell ’ee a secret. In every flock there’s
allus a black sheep, an’ our black sheep
’as a white tail! The first time you coun-
ted ’e wuz so ashamed of ’imself that ’is
tail was between ’is legs, but the second
time ’e’d perked up, and it wuz as wavy
as the others! ...Now you go to
sleep!”

And Bobbie went.

od

o 5
a} PBPBP DBP PB PPPP PPP PPD PPPP- PPP PPP POPPA PDPDPPDPPIDDPDPP- PPD DODD DD Oo

FAIRY LULLABIES

ITTLE brown bunnies are full of fun,

And always ready {or play,
Gaily they frolic and frisk in the sun
From dawn till the sky turns grey.

Sas

&

But when the sunset’s gold and red
Grow dim, and the shadows deep,
Little brown bunnies troop off to bed...
And the fairies sing them to sleep!

EL. R.

74



GR EAE ERE AEE EERE EEA EEE EEE AEE
€ JERRY THE BILL-POSTER
SE RRR



= o¢|| GON 2 VM] tm |) SAL TERRYWANGLE
NINA TURE | Cit CURE US ar er | saw a ladder lean-
5 21ND oo =il el ____ against a wall, and he
ane . SEET SR PEs Se i stopped to look.
)) fy \= Weel dee ont °
Del Sh ee [eA i} \Nt “The bill-poster




Se Semi ag

Ae — tea f

i said. ‘I’m going to

Nig Ati 1 Tat lac try that work, and see
eS =| E-p~ how I like it.”

Lae ifs f\'Sue ¢ | chas; gone aways) oe
sete al eae 8,20



‘Tay
& a ape ef: “Yes, you might as

Sey EN —) well,” replied Snooker.
=| “You never know
a A what you can do until
= you do it.”

@ @ @

ERRY carried the

pastepot and brush
up the ladder, and
Snooker stayed down ;
below to hold it ae HSS 3
steady. f, | yA dite say

“ You be careful,” a
he said. ‘“‘ We don’t
want to land ourselves
into trouble.”

‘lA 4
Ma

“T know how to do
it, said: Jerry. “You
just watch the way I
can post the posters.”



ERELELEELELELEELELELLLEEELELLLERS

€ JERRY THE BILL-POSTER

oe

SEELELEELEEEE EEE E EEE EEE ERE RREERE

(CONTINUED)

f. 2




Vo SUNN :
\ Ve ee
Fea 4
Z age ag a ED =
\ Y &
@ ® ©
S Uncle Oojah

walked under the
ladder his hat caught aye!
the pastepot and down
came the paste.

“ Lovey - jimmikins,
what’s this? ”’ he gas-
ped. ‘ Who’s spilling
the paste all over
me?’

“Stop it!” said
Jerry. ‘(If this lad-
der tips over much
more I shall be falling i
off.” aA. Meee yy,

yA
yt oN

“th a n iti i en a2 |




NOOKER gottired

of holding the lad-
der, so he turned
around and sat down
at the bottom. That
explains why he did
not see Uncle Oojah
coming along.

“It’s a nice day for
a stroll,” smiled Uncle
Qojah. “Pm. very
nearly getting over
my summer holiday.”



pi

ABE ue



EEEE LIDIA EEE DETTE EELS EREEEEEEEE
€ JERRY THE BILL-POSTER €
LEE LEELELELEELEE EERE EEE REEL ER AE EE






(CONTINUED)
IST HE ladder tipped
oe =o over still further,
nink am fe,

, ‘ and in the end Jerr

ne) fh Ih sia ; ae pit i: ,. tumbled down on vs
In 4% 3 oh of his uncle.

Sy i} ony! “Help, help!”

fh called Uncle Oojah.

“T don’t want these

bills posted on me!”

“What a way to
work!” laughed
Snooker. ‘I’m enjoy-
ing this better than
the clowns at the
circus.”

rte

® © @

HEN Uncle

Oojah found out
who caused it all he
took Jerry by the collar
and led him home.

“This must be stop-
ped,” he said. 41
can’t have such goings
on going on.”

“It was your fault,
it was,” complained
Jerry. ‘1 was learn-
ing to bea bill-poster,
but you knocked me
over.”





LPP DLP PDP PPD DO PDO POPP OD oO
PPP PD PP POPPE PDP DDD PPP DOD O



DPBS PPAPADAADP PDP DP OO DOS
Doom ono nom

PINKIE IN DISGRACE AGAIN

DP PPADAP PD PPP PDAPDAD PDD DPD DPD PPD DPD DP DP POPP PPP PP LPLP ESL oO







7.0'p-m:
ENT to sleep on
the hearthrug

in front of the fire.



8.0 p.m. Woke up and
scrambled on Mistress’s
knee . . . went to sleep
again.

10.30 p.m. Woke up
frightfully thirsty and
drank Towser’s milk.



|
10.40 p.m. Jumped on back :
of Master’s chair... he hasno
fur on the top of his head!
A fly was walking about on 9.
the bare place, and every now
and then Master tried to catch
it. He couldn’t manage it, so
the next time the fly settled
on his head I sprang onit...
(and would you believe it,
even THAT didn’t please
him !)
s



r
3
|
|

DPD PP PDO PPPS DP DP PPP DP PDP DPD DP PDD PIP DODD DPD PPP POD PD DOOD OD

78





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| A LONG DAY ENDS

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II.O p.m.

E all went upstairs
towed. sk
sneered at Towser as I
passed him, because HE
sleeps on a mat in the

|
hall.
ir.10:pm. Muastress
kissed’ me and said,
“Nightie-night, Pinkie
;
)
;

petkins!’? ‘Then she put
me in'my basket.



Master DOES
make funny noises when
he’sasleep. He’s worse
than ‘Towser.

11.35 p.m. Went to
sleep.



E, L. ROBERTS

§
11.30p.m. Still awake
|
O

















MOONSHINE!

GAY little elf on a moonbeam sat

And sang as he swung his legs
so fat,

‘‘Oho! [Il ride on the moon’s bright
beams

And carry to mortals such funny dreams.”

Said the moen, ‘‘Such nonsense I will
stop!”

He drew up his beams and the elf fell
plop ! ,

He said, as he rubbed bumps everywhere,

‘‘T must have been riding an old
night-mare!”

BERTHA LEONARD







] p

o Uf Winning vA




a ie
a Ata bo 5 tiene
exes heaps of jam in it.



When she had finished making it she

popped it in the oven, and was just
going to light the gas when there
was a knock at the door.

Off she hurried, leaving the oven
door open. Then a strange thing
happened. The roly-poly pudding
jumped out of the dish and walked
through the kitchen-door into the
garden.

“Why should I stay there and
be cooked?” thought he. ‘‘I will
go into the world and seek
adventure.”

And down the garden he walked,
through the gate and into the road.

He looked such a funny little
fellow walking along. He was so
very fat, and so full of jam that
it kept oozing out on to the pave-
ment as he walked.

But he thought he was very fine
indeed and he was very proud of
himself.

Soon two children came
walking by.

‘““Why, what is that ?”’ said one.

“Tt looks like a pudding,’’ said

{, PUDDING

I By

Roty /Poty..

D. STEERWOOD






the other, and they ran towards poor Mr.
Roly-Poly, and picked him up.

“Let us take him home and bake him
for dinner,’”’ said they. And home they
trotted as fast as they could.

He looked
such a funny
little fellow
walking
along.

CES.
B

RHA,
81 F



“Look, Mother,” said the little boy.
“We found this roly-poly pudding.”

‘Give it to me,” said their mother,
“and I will put it in the oven and bakeit.”

So she put it on the top shelf in the

warm oven.

On the shelf underneath
small sausage-rolls and one
large one.

“Oh! dear! Oh! dear!”
sighed the roly-poly pudding.

“What is the matter?”
asked the big sausage-roll.

“‘T don’t want to be baked
and eaten,” said Roly-Poly.
‘<7 wish I could run away.”

But this time the oven
door was shut tightly, and
he could not get out.

Soon he and the sausage-
rolls were baked a nice light
brown in colour. Then the
oven door opened, and the
Mother and the two children
looked in.

“Now they are ready,”
said one of the children.
“ Let us eat them.”










were seven

WA
WEN Hie ches

The jam roly-poly
.. hurried through
the kitchen door,
followed by the big sausage-roll and the five little ones.

“No, you must wait till
dinner-time,’’ said their Mother. ‘‘ Go
in the garden and play,” and she shut the
oven door. ~

“Oh! dear!’’ sighed Roly-Poly. “ I’m
afraid I shall REALLY be eaten this
time.”

“Oh! dear! Oh! dear!” sighed the
sausage-rolls. ‘‘ We don’t want to be
eaten at all.”

At that moment the oven door opened
again, and the two children looked in.

‘‘ How tempting they look!” said the
little boy, and he picked up one of the
small sausage-rolls and began to eat it.
The little girl also took one, and began to
eat that also.

Just then there was a noise in the other
room.

“ Quick, come away ; there is someone
coming!” said the boy. And they both
rushed into the garden, forgetting to
close the oven door in their haste.

“Now is our chance,” said the jam

roly-poly, and he jumped off the dish
and hurried through the kitchen door,
followed by the big sausage-roll and the
five little ones.

When they reached the road the five
little sausage-rolls began to feel frightened.

‘We are going back,” said they. “ We
like it much better in the warm oven,” and
back they all trotted and laid themselves
on the dish again ready to be eaten.

But the large sausage-roll did not feel
afraid, and he followed the jam roly-poly
along the road.

Soon they reached a small lane with
grass growing on either side of it.

‘Where are we going now?” said the
sausage-roll.

“‘T don’t know,” said the roly-poly
pudding. ‘‘ Perhaps if we keep on walk-
ing we shall find a little house in which to

" Tive.”
On and on they walked and they were
soon very tired, but they did not find a

82



little house; instead a very sad thing

happened to them.

Sitting by the side of the lane wasa man.
He was very tired and very hungry. He
was poor and he had no money. All day
long he had been without food.

Just for a moment he had shut his

eyes.
vo Ob !°**thought.:he, “if only I could
see some food in front of me when I open
my eyes again!”

Just then he opened them, and

there standing in front of him was a
large sausage-roll and a jam-roly-poly
pudding.

“Why, the fairies must have sent
them,” said he, and he picked up the
sausage-roll in one hand, and the pudding
in the other.

He took two big bites, and the sausage-
roll had disappeared. Then he tackled the
jam-roly-poly, and soon that was all eaten
up too. And that was the end of the poor
jam-roly-poly pudding.









NINN NNN NNN
‘ THE WORM Z
SS YY,
YY . SS
< COCK called all his children round ye
YY And told them how a worm he found, SY
SY And how to get one from the ground. of
IA NY
> ‘*Ror worms are always found,” Z
eH said he SS
SS 2 WY
7j “Upon the ground beneath a SS
YA, You only have to wait and SS
SN see.” %Y
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SS Y
RN Away they went and his eldest son “wy
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>

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frog called ‘“‘Hi! 7
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choker— YY

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yellow ochre.” SS

EIB. GF

SS

NY Y%

83







(if vas Vea 2 Oy
oe gt SS ee oN
Clg’ tote
MEXICAN a fe -—
= te eae :
MOUNTAINS a . she 2
Ry Ge DON’T think I shall ever take Ve
# 6A ‘‘charrabang ” or taxi
Et To get a little closer to hi 0)
By ploding Cotopaxi. } : Sue
Ui
And I am equally convinced ‘ ae
It needs a man of mettle f i \
To ramble on the rumbling a, y i
slopes & Ors 4
Of Popocatapetl. = a a ’
|



sQggg og ggaUanaeReOREaRgaRanaOgagAOOR|R

3

€3

9 GOING THE WRONG WAY Q
(2

3

ELCICIEY ESESCSESES CUCL ES ES CS CY CS COOL ILS CSCS CN CY CY CSCS CED CY CIENCY CS CE EILS



AE money to
hire a cab, and he
backed his new
horse.) into. the
shafts.

“Stand steady,
Lightning!” he
Said, vies Ei: you
won’t work as a
racehorse, you will
have to earn money
with this cab.”






WA AHEN every-
AY GA thing was
AALS) ready he
discovered that he
had forgotten the
whip.

** Watch him for
me, you Snooker,”’
he said.’ ‘; Stay
there while I get
the whip.”

‘““ Leave him to
me“ “replied
Snooker. “I’lltake
care of your cab.”









Spica |)

Laud

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| ofan | jini
WAY



20000000 8809 080808 0088 828 80000 20808020

3
. 2
3 GOING THE WRONG WAY
ag

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(CONTINUED) :

XS ES RNS

ee
shoo oo AMID py)



by, and they made
it up to play a little
trick.

“My whiskers,
this is something
like ajoke!” laugh-
ed Snooker. “‘ Let’s
take the horse out
and © turn’ = him
round.”





with the whip, and
when he saw the
way his horse was
standing he was
surprised.
‘“What do you
mean, you old
horse ?”’ he asked.
“ T only left you for
a minute and this
has happened!”





=~

ee te a mee ee

Q GOING THE WRONG WAY a

a «3
O00 D000 AOA RARBAGARRAL BQQ000080000 000000

(CONTINUED)



oa ig ready to
drive.

‘“Getup there,
he said. ‘‘ You’ve
found out how to
turn round, and
you'll have to find a
way to turn back.”
And he cracked his
whip and tugged at
the reins.





ig a into a shop
window.

“Pp top! Go
back!” call eid
o Jerry. Vl dont
know what to do
with you now.
You’re no good for
a racehorse, and
you’re not even fit
to pull a cab.”









bh
ge
, =

ESS










Pacific, where its fruit con-
mistitutes an important article

of food.

Ruth was reading aloud from a book
on her lap.

“ That’s not real bread, though, is it ?”’
asked Jerry.

“Oh! no,” replied Ruth; ‘but I am

going to learn to

make real bread O

some day.” §
“Do you mean

to tell me that

you don’t know |



ADD

how to make bread
at your age?”
asked a voice be-
“T aM
Why,

side them.
surprised ! 6
is) ase .easy as. 16
knitting.” Sect)

Beside them
stood a very thin
little fellow with 9 speak!):
such a big head. °
-“T know all
about it,” said
the strange little
mano; Vm the: 9
i Cpe Oe EL

O

you know.”

milk !”



THE MILKY WAY

ABY nibbles at his thumbs
Till another bottle comes ;
As he gulps it down he shows
All his pink and chubby toes.

Then the dimples in his cheek
Say (he’s MUCH too full to

“Look at ME! I’m soft as silk
Because I drink such LOTS of

JPDAPAPAPAOPDPDDDOD

co
oo







“Whatever does that mean?” asked
Jerry.

“Why, Instructor-in- Chief-to-the
Bread-Department-of-the-Royal-H ouse-
hold, of course,’’ replied the little man,
as though every one ought to know
without asking.

“T’m called I.C.B.D.R.H. for short,
the other’s such a mouthful. I’m just
going to give the Princess a lesson in
bread-making;
T’ll show you how
it’s done if you
like. imeveny
clever, you know.
That’s why my
head’s so big. It’s
full of brains.
Now just shut
your eyes while I
count ten.”

And when Ruth
and Jerry opened
their eyes again,
they found that
they were sitting
on the terrace
steps at the back of
a beautiful palace.
Beside them was
a tall plant in a
big pot, and it
had strange square

WPDDPDDDOSD

PDPPDDDDDDDD








7)

il

Ls
y

[li





A procession of such funny-looking people was marching

flowers on it which looked just like

bread-tins.

The warm sun was shining on the plant,
and, as the children watched, soft creamy
dough began to rise above the edges of

the tin-like flowers.
a eLnye!

“* Of course, it’s
bread,’ said the
tall thin fellow
with the big head.
“‘ That’s our Fairy
Bread-baking
Plant. We bake
our bread in the
sun, not in ovens
as humans do.
Come along and
T’ll show you how
it’s done. That’s
the Fairy Bake-
house, just over
there.”

A procession of
such funny-look-
ing people was
marching towards
the Bake-house.

First came an old man with a sack of
best flour on his, back. Behind him was
another carrying a big crock with a jug
of water standing in it. Then came a
little boy with some bread-tins on his
head, and after him a curly-headed man
carrying a bag of yeast.
youth carrying a salt-sprinkler, and, last

Look!”
“Tt’s bread, I do believe.”’

towards the Bake-house.

of all, an important-looking Baker in an

apron and a big white hat.

house.
exclaimed Ruth.

O

DPAPADPADSH





PPD

A GOOD CATCH

RITE your Christian name
and surname in one letter.

You can’t! Oh! yes, you can;
it’s quite easy.

Make a big O on a piece of
paper and write your names
inside !

Now see how many of your
friends you can catch.

SP PPPDP PDD PDP PDPDDPDDDDDDDDD DD
DOD PPP PDPDPPDDPDDDDPDPDPDPD- DDD DD

JPPPAPAPAPPAPPAPPAPAPPPPPPPDPDPDHOL]

call it.”

Next was a
all the lumps.

89

‘** Now, come along in and you shall see
everything,” said the I.C.B.D.R.H. And
the children followed him into the Bake-

“Now,” said their strange companion,
“‘ we'll just make one nice big loaf such

as you have at
home. First of
all,” he went on,
“remember to
have everything
you use nice and
warm. That’s
most important.
Now watch.”

The man with
the yeast cut off
a piece which
weighed just an
ounce and a half.

“He puts that
into a little basin,”’
said their teacher,
‘““and he mixes it
with just enough
warm water to
make it as thin

as cream. Then he stands it in the sun.
Humans put it near the fire so that
it will get warm and ‘work,’ as they

Next came the flour-man and weighed
out just two pounds of his flour and put
it in the crock, and proceeded to rub out



“Now look at the yeast again,” said
the little man. And as they looked they
saw it begin to move, and bubbles rose
to the surface of the mixture.

“ That’s just ready to use now,” said
the I.C.B.D.R.H.

It was then that the important-looking
Baker strode over to the crock. He

shook in a little salt, mixed it with the —

flour, and then poured in the bubbling
yeast, and about half a pint of nice

“‘That’s risen beautifully,”
said the I.C.B.D.R.H.,
‘and it’s so light we could
fly anywhere on it.” ...
He leaped on to the loaf.

90





warm water. These he stirred well and
quickly into the flour until it became a
rather sticky lump of dough.

‘“* Now we put the dough in the sun to
rise,” said the little thin man. “ You
humans stand it in front of the fire with
a cloth over it. The sun does it for us
much more quickly.”

Jerry and Ruth watched it, and in a
few moments the dough began to rise and
swell until it was a large spongy mass.

‘““There! Now it’s ready to
bake. < It, just) has. tobe

kneaded a little
and then ‘plomp’
Y it goes into one
yr of the square
flowers on the
F.B.B.P.,and the
hot sun will bake
it for us.”
Ue a ee oe “How lovely!”
resin exclaimed the
Ti vn children as a
| | beautiful, golden
brown loaf rose
| into view.

MeO en
takes quite an
fer: hour to bake, so
she told me,”
said Ruth.
Then, to their amazement, the loaf
rose right up out of the tin-flower into
the air, and it grew bigger and bigger as
they watched.

“ That’s risen beautifully,” said the
1.C.B.D.R.H., “‘ and it’s so light that we
could fly anywhere on it. Now we must
fetch the Princess and she shall have her
lesson.

He leaped on to the loaf. Then he
turned and held out his big hands to
Ruth and Jerry, and they climbed up
beside him. In a moment they were
flying through the air to the Princess.

“Please, your Royal Highness,” said
the little man, ‘“‘ everything is ready for
your bread lesson, if you will kindly
come.”

‘*Oh ! bother the old bread!”’ exclaimed
the Princess, pettishly; ‘‘ I’m reading a

= ye “alll



















Well,” said



= NS ay we
‘Oh! bother the old bread!” exclaimed the
Princess pettishly.

lovely story about those funny humans,
and can’t be disturbed now. You must
teach me another time.”’

the little fellow to the

children, as they flew away again on the
top of the loaf,
bread now. That’s one good thing learnt.”

And then Ruth and Jerry heard him

“you know how to make

slowly counting ten, back-
wards, and they knew
that he was going.

“* Good-bye, little man;
thank you so much!”
they cried.

“ Little man! indeed!”
cried the little fellow.
““ Please remember that
Pm. the. 1. CB 3D Re. or
I shall never come to
see you again.” And he
was gone,





POST

DO YOU 2?

] LIKE to dig upon the sands;
I like to sail my boat ;
I like to see the seagulls fly
With flapping wings afloat.

I like to catch the baby crabs
That play in every pool...
CI caught a bucketful one day

And took them all to school!)

sooo
—

91



\B I like the smell of salty winds ;
I like large slabs of cake;
@ But most I like to paddle

Where the big waves break!



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—A FEW LESSONS IN SKATING...

HAVING STRAPPED THE SKATES

ON TO THE

BOOTS —







| A NICE COLD DAY

GCOD DAY, FRIENDS



DAY... WITH YOUR KIND PERMISSION

TO-

YOU THEN —
7 SKATE "!

HOWEVER.

TWILL GIVE YOU



YOU

PROCEED

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dares
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THIS MORNING !




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AND HIT ME, PERCY!




92



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Full Text






THE

OOJAH ANNUAL —

PICTURES, STORIES, AND GAMES
FOR LITTLE PEOPLE



Engraved and Printed for the Daily Sketch & Sunday Herald Ltd ,
Gray’s Inn Road, W.C.1, and 47 Shoe Lane, London, E.C.4, by
W. H. Smith & Son, The Arden Press, Stamford Street, London, S.E.
UNCLE OOJAH’S OFFICE,
LONDON, E.C.

My Very Dears,

Here we are again with our OOJAH
ANNUAL, full of pictures and stories and jokes.
My little friends have worked hard to make this

book for you, and they were all very anxious to get
their own special wishes in.

They made so much noise calling them out that I was
nearly deaf. Jerrywangle said : “ Christmas is coming, it is
Wish them a Merry Christmas,” and Baby Binky wanted me

to put in: “A Happy New Year.” My Don called out:

“Wish them a Pleasant Easter,’ and Snooker added: “Don’t
forget to wish them a Good Old Whitsuntide.” Sissy Lion said :
“T hope they will have a nice August Bank Holiday, with a
month at the seaside and no home lessons,” and Laddy Lion chimed

in: “Wish them a Jolly Guy Fawkes’ Day, with plenty of fun
and fireworks.”

How is your poor old uncle to get all those wishes in? The only
thing I can do is join them all together and wish you a very happy
time all the year round, but especially on holidays and half-holidays.

I like to get letters from you, so be sure you write and tell me
what you like best in your OOJAH ANNUAL. Master Jerry

is in it this year, and you know what he is for mischief.
doesn’t seem to get any better, no matter what I do.

Never mind, we all like a bit of fun sometimes, don’t we?
As Jerrywangle sings :
“Let’s be merry and bright and gay
From now till next OOJAH ANNUAL DAY.”

I mustn’t keep you any longer, for I’m sure you are
longing to see what is inside this splendid book
with the beautiful coloured covers.
will enjoy every page.

He

I hope you

With love from us all,

UNCLE OOJAH.




T was a fine September evening,
A and a full moon shone down on




and his nephew Jerrywangle.

“Tsn’t it nice and moony!.”’” he
smiled. ‘‘ We can see our way to travel
all night. Is this the same moon that
shines in London ? ”

‘““T expect so,” replied Don. “I be-
lieve this is the Harvest Moon, you know.
But I’m not sure; it might be the Hunter’s
Moon.”

‘““My whiskers,
that sounds more
like it!” laughed
Snooker aa Ag cau

you get married and go off for a
holiday.”

Ts “that “all eeeesighed ahs. uncle:
‘“‘ Wasn’t it a pity I never got married !
Wait a minute, I’ve just had a think.
Perhaps Snooker might get married in-
stead of me, and then we could all havea
Honeymoon together. Wouldn’t that be
lovely ?”

“Not for me, thank you,” retorted
Snooker. “It’s easy to see you don’t
know what you are talking about. I
should say a nice little Funnymoon would

could see to hunt
mice in this moon-
light any day of the
week.”

“Would it be
the Honeymoon, I
wonder?” = mur-
mured Uncle Oojah.
““That’s always a
very bright moon,
ioneptee

“You've got it
wrong, you have,”
said Jerry. “A
Honeymoon _ only
comes when

be more in- your
HIS is a most
°¢ exciting story of
Uncle Oojah’s

line.”’
‘“* The very exact-
ly thing!’ smiled
Uncle Oojah.
wonderful adventures in
the country with his little
friends Don and Snooker,
and his © mischievous
Jerrywangle.

Told by
FLO LANCASTER

Pictured by
THOMAS MAYBANK

nephew,



‘“Tsn’t my Snooker
clever to find that
out? Now I must
stop and do a
change in my
mind.”

‘““ What, again ?”
exclaimed Snooker.
‘““My bedsocks, I
don’t like these
changes! They
very often mean a
change for the
worse.”

“Yes,perhaps they
do, sometimes,”
agreed Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ But this one will
be a change for the better. Let London
wait a bit-—come along with me and we’ll
have a first-class Funnymoon.”

wa}LL through the long night they
Wea) walked, and by morning Jerry-
“| wangle was very tired indeed.
=| ‘I can’t manage many more
mee I can’t,” he sniffed. “‘ Dear Uncle



‘*Listen to me, Mr. Jujube—don’t come here
_Get out of

any more with such foolishness.
Ss ; our station at once!”

Oojah, couldn’t we travel the rest of the
way on the railway?”

“Yes, we might try a ride on the
railway,’ noddedhisuncle. ‘ Be patient,
and we'll get on at the very next station.
Now let me see, where can we have our
new Funnymoon ? ”

‘You haven’t told us yet where you
want to go,’ replied Don. ‘I should like
to spend September in the country.”

“ That’s right, make up his mind for
him,”’ chuckled Snooker. ‘“* The country



gives you a good chance to catch harvest
mice, and look at all the young rabbits a
cat could chase before breakfast ! ”’

“T never did any hunting yet,’ mur-
mured Uncle Oojah. “If I tried very
hard I might catch a bat or a bumble-bee.
And then again, I could count all the
blackberries, couldn’t I ? ”

“Hurrah! We’llhavesome fine fun ! ”’
laughed Don. ‘‘ We shall just be in time
for the Harvest Homes as well. Oh! I

do love September ! ”’

“So I should think,’ added
Snooker. “‘If our Oojah wants to
havea right-down good Funnymoon
he can’t do better than try
September in the country.”

‘““We must. go there,’ smiled
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘Oh! here’s the
station. Now, Mr. Porter, we are
going for a little ride on this
railway. Run your train very
-carefully, won’t you?”

““My bedsocks, did you hear
that ?”’ whispered Snooker. “‘ He
seems to think that old porter owns
the railway !”’ ;

‘“Listen to me, Mr. Porter,”
continued Uncle Oojah, solemnly.
“Tam the one and only Uncle
Oojah, and I want your very best
train. Let me have four special
tickets to September.”

“You won’t find it on_ this
line,” replied the porter. ‘‘ And
you listen to me, Mr. Jujube—don’t
come here any more with such
foolishness. Get out of our station
at once! ”’

ANCLE OOJAH dashed out of
the railway station with his



At

last a stopped for breath, and after a
rest they trudged once more on their way.
“It’s hot and dusty this morning,”

~j running for nearly a nae

sighed Uncle Oojah. “Long walkings |
always make very hard workings.”

‘‘T’m tireder than ever, I am,’’ com-
plained Jerry. ‘‘ Look, there’sa farmer’s
cart! Can’t weask the driver for a ride?”
sn’t it nice and moony!”

Uncle Oojah smiled.

Uncle Oojah’s Funnymoon.



“Let me do it,’ said Uncle
Oojah. ‘Stand beside the hedge,
my dears, in case the horse
kicks.” :

So he waited until the cart came
by; then he stepped into the road
and waved his hat.

“Stop, Mr. Driver—stop ! EAS
called. ‘‘ Won’t you please give
us aride in your nice cart? My
little friends are taking me away
for a Funnymoon, and we can’t
walk our poor legs any longer.”

-“ people about,” replied the driver.
‘« And besides I should like to see
the horse that could drag a fat
mountain like you.”

“Work your magic onit, Oojah-
dear,” whispered Don. ‘‘ Make
his horse strong enough to. pull
anything.”

* And so I will,” declared Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ Wait, Mr. Driver, and
I’ll magic your horse as_ strong
as twenty. All do a shut-eye
while you can count ten.” “Stop him, Mr. Oojah!” gasped the driver.

They all closed their eyes and
began counting, but when they opened One by one they climbed into the cart,
them again the horse didn’t seem any but as soon as the driver jerked his reins









different and not a bit bigger. away went the horse at top speed.

“Tts finished now,” smiled Uncle “Stop him, Mr. Oojah!” gasped the
Oojah. ‘‘ You can’t see where I’ve put driver. ‘‘ Take your magic back again,
the magic, but jump into the cart and you quick! This dreadful old horse is runni
will soon feel it moving.” away!” [Now tura

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NOW, BOYS, | HAVE SOMETHING
REALLY AMUSING FOR YOU TO-DAY




NOW WE WILL DANCY - DANCY —
ALL TOGETHER, TUMTY UMTY
TIDDLY UMTY"

HERE, YOU FELLOW, &
YOUR BUTTONS
WANT POLISHING




(ee

7


Ce down to Dumpling Farm some day |
And have a tumble in new-mown hay ;
There are THINGS tosee,as you llsoon find out,
If you wander round and poke about.







ve

ya



There are horses to pull the ploughs and carts ;
And turkeys who “‘ gobble” by fits and starts ;
Thirteen cows, and a BIG black bull,

And lots of sheep wrapped up in wool;



Se

Wy), N
Dp 3 ay




Ducks and geese (they love a ducking}) ;
Cocks and hens all crowing and clucking ;
Pigs and donkeys, dogs and cats

(They have SUCH fun with the mice and rats !);




And Billy, the goat, whose daily joy
Is butting “‘ Willum,” the farmer’s boy .
You CAN’T go wrong, or come to harm,
If you pay a visit to Dumpling Farm!
Be ek:

(More about the Farm on page 31)

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Lady Eliza in Piccadilly





saw hee basket of roses.
‘“‘T must buy these

9

flowers, he _ said.
‘‘ Lovey-lovekins, look
who is selling them !”’

“It’s Lady Eliza, it
is, said Jerty..0Get
away from here in case

she catches you.”

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READY ELIZA
a eae) discovered
wi be) 4 that Uncle
Oojah had gone to
London, so she saved
up her money and
followed him. ‘Then
she lost her purse and
had to sell flowers at
Piccadilly Circus.
“Oh! this Lon-
don!” she _ sighed.
‘““T am so lonely.”

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Lady Eliza in Piccadilly

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§



i pei ONT run away
Mjacoiyfrom me,”
aj smiled Lady
Eliza. “Stop a minute
and let me tell you
something.”

“You stop here,” said
Jerry. ‘“‘ Leave my poor
uncle alone ; he doesn’t
want to see you.”

And Jerry tried his
hardest to keep her
back.



DY ELIZA
pushed Jerry
9 oe aside and ran
after his uncle.

Come pack!
Come back!” she
shouted. ‘I only
want to say how glad
I am to see you.”

“Now nor ladon t
want to hear!” he
gasped. ‘‘ Write it
down on a telegram
and send it.”




&
Me



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: iza in Piccadilly
4 Lady Eliza in Piccadilly }
; 8 (CONTINUED) 8 2
Pe eeeeeeS ele eee eSeSeeeeeeeeeeerseeesseseserrereeseeseeeeeeeeeles))
§ 9
9 §
ve gee (as §
; =| I. 7e th jh z = Sea) 0 last Lady ;
° | \) Hye eee g/&aNG| Eliza caught
§ Wie hog ir i (al @eOoy him by the
9 } Hy Vy eh coat-tails. UncleOojah 9
9 Te mY Z J 6
; wn | B23 struggled to get away, 3
° but she held on. °
§ pHelplae we calleda= x
2 = Dont: leave ames to ;
: her |? °
° ' When Jerry saw this
§ he dashed into a tailor’s
shop for a pair of shears.
) 9
;
9

§
| fine ey
; as | Te | jy = 1 5
6 | | See Small poe) ae 3h
? th Zi 3 9
; Bees ce ao
> tails, “and Lady Eliza °
» was pulling so hard that »
§ ones §
? she fell over. §
6 “That surprised her,
) it did,” chuckled Jerry. © é
° ‘Run !Isaved you this °
? time, but we don’t want »
9 her to catch you again.”
|



12


es OSE up on
E Mistresss bed... mistook
— Masters face for the pillow
and stepped ontt...(hewokeupin idl si
«= SUCHabad ‘onper| Hen



Yam. Had my milk. ,...
Towsers too_ ( while he was biting
the postman !... Dogs ARE silly!)



c n..Master trod
on my tail ( ie was or toknow he
wouldn't see / was on the mat at the
bottom of the stairs?)_and fell into the
hat-stand...(he IS ina bad temper to-day)



aes ue on ihe ae
ene and gobbled up = (on

the fish Master and Mistress couldnt eat. Began to wash myself.
Upset creamand had that too! Cream sticks to one’s whiskers so!



( More excitements later: turn to page 26)
13
ee CCH

JERRY’S PUNCH & JUDY SHOW

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oT





peer give a Punch and Judy Show HEN it was ready they crept inside

with my new dog,” said Jerry. ‘‘ We and dressed up for their parts.

ought to collect a lot of money for our Jerrywangle was Punch, his new friend

money boxes.” Dog Toby, and Snooker wore Judy’s
“My whiskers, yes,” chuckled Snooker. dress.

“That’s the best idea you havethoughtof yet.”’ “ Oody-oody, it’s a nice day!’ squeaked
So they built a Punch and Judy box in Jetry. “Come close around and see Mr.

the street. Punch and Mrs. Judy.”

\

SON

~S

SS
BSS

oS
SSS

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es
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UN

shouted Snooker. ‘‘ What comes next, Jerry, in our performance ? ”’
replied Jerry. ‘‘ Keep still and let me give



1?

ALK up, walk up
“Mr. Punch has to give out the punches,

you both a good bang.”
So he gave Snooker a good knock and bumped him into Dog Toby.

14
DDoS



mG) WY CAC

ODY-oody, where’s my Judy ?”’ called
Jerry. “She is always getting lost
she is.”

And he used Mr. Punch’s stick again and
jammed poor Snooker against the side of the
show.

“ That’s enough,” gasped Snooker. ‘‘ My
bedsocks, it’stime this performance was over!”’

27H Vay

JERRYWANGLE began to struggle with Snooke

whole show fell over.



ODDS SSDS DDS DSS DSS DSSS DDS DD SD PNET

JERRY’S PUNCH & JUDY SHOW

(CONTINUED)
ODDS DSSS DSO DOD SDD DDD DPI Hd SLEEVELESS

Dd>O



Se NA
Ce he snatched the stick away from Jerry
and brought it down on his head.

“Stop, stop!” cried Jerry. ‘‘ Don’t you
know that Mr. Punch never gets a
beating ?”’

“ He is getting one now,” replied Snooker.
“Let me tell you that one good beating
deserves another.”




rt. The dog joined in and in the end the

‘“Uncle Oojah, where are you ?’’ called Jerry. “‘ It wasn’t fair to upset me. This is the last

time I'll ever try to run a Punch and Judy Show.”’


‘fe

SealLL BLUEBOTTLE was a
gsmart young fellow who was
gj not content to be just a fly.
4 He wanted to be a w asp—and
it isn’t easy for a bluebottle to become
a wasp.

But Bill tried his hardest. He prac-
tised buzzing for hours, until he was able
to make a sound which really DID make
you think a wasp was in the room. But
you only thought so when Bill was out of
sight. As soon as you SAW him, you
knew that Bill was just a common blue-



bottle pretending to be a wasp. That
. annoyed Bill—he could BUZZ like a

wasp, but he LOOKED like a bluebottle.
One morning he flew into Mr. Mottle-
ton’s sitting room and began buzzing.



DODD]



f Bill Blueb ettle

Now there was a real wasps’ nest
not far from the window, and Mr.
Mottleton had already killed five
wasps since breakfast, and been
stung by another. So when Bill
began to buzz Mr. Mottleton,
whose eyesight was very poor
indeed, jumped up and ee
towards the sound.

““ Where’s that wasp?”
bellowed; ‘‘ where is it ? ”’

Billkepton buzzing,and suddenly
Mr. Mottleton THOUGHT he saw a wasp
dancing up and down the window-pane.
It was Bill really, but it SOUNDED like
a wasp, so Mr. Mottleton slashed madly at
the noise with his newspaper.

It was Bill’s unlucky day. Mr. Mottle-
ton’s sight might be bad, but his hearing
was good, and the newspaper caught Bill
in the small of the back and knocked him
through the window.

For some time he lay breathless on the
rosebed with his legs sticking up in the air.
Then his senses began to come back, and
after a:time he was able to crawl home.
But next morning he was just one big
bruise, and as he limped about he made
up his mind never to pretend to bea ase
again,

he

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| A Comry CHAIR:

| REALLY



YmMuUSYT GO
AND. SEE.
PEELE EEE REL LEE EEE REL E REEL REE
Uncle Oojah’s Funnymoon ¢

ELELELEL ELE LEME LE LEE EE EEEEL EEE EYS

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5)





AILE after mile went by and
{ ff still the runaway horse galloped
VA lfon. Presently the reins broke,
£5Q65,8 and the driver tumbled back-
wards into the cart.

“Now were in a nice old fix!”
muttered Snooker. ‘“* My bedsocks, this
puts us all in the cart!”

“Don, Don, what shall we do?”
asked Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Why doesn’t the
horse stop? I wish I hadn’t worked so
much magic on him.”

‘* Wishes will not stop runaway horses,
that’s very certain,’ said Snooker. ‘“‘ My
suffering tail, hold tight for a bump!”

As he spoke the cart ran into a tree,
and down they all came on the ground.

** Oh! my “poor head !-”
groaned Uncle Oojah. ‘* Where
ever am I? Snoo! Donker!
This is terrible !”

““Tt’s worse than terrible,
it’s scandalous!’’ exclaimed
the driver. ‘“‘Look at the
cart—it’s ruined! What can
I say to my master? And
what will Farmer Honeybee
say when he sees this?”

‘““How should I know?
Don’t come asking me,”
moaned Uncle Oojah. “I
have too many worries of my
own to trouble about your
troubles.”

‘“*T know what’s the matter,
Uncle Oojah,” said Jerry.
‘““ You worked a magic on the
horse, you did, but you forgot
to put any magic on the cart.”

‘“Never mind chattering
about magics and mismagics,”’
complained the driver. ‘‘ Are
you going to do anything to
help?”






“Yes, I suppose we must,” sighed
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Lead your horse home,
and we'll cart the cart along for
you.”

So they tied it all together with the
broken reins and carried it away towards
the farm. As they were going along they
met the driver’s master.

“Stop ! What’s happened to my
cart?’? shouted Farmer Honeybee.
‘“Who’s going to pay me for all this
damage—tell me that!”

‘Hush, my dear,” said Uncle Oojah.
“Don’t shout so loud, or you'll frighten
thecrows. Listen tome, Mr. Honeypot—

would you like your old cart made better
than ever?”







ORY
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Farmer Honeybee watched Jerry and Don and
Snooker closing their eyes tightly ; then some-

how his own eyelids came together.
(See next page.)

L728 : B



yeesOU seem very sur-

Aka prised, Mr. Honey-
ye bean,’ said Uncle
emer’ Oojah. ‘Don’t you
want me to make your broken
old cart into a new one?”

“What fancy trick is this?”
inquired Farmer Honeybee.
‘““ How can anybody make new-
carts out of old ones ? ”’

“You wait, my dear, and
see,’ smiled Uncle Oojah. ‘I
can soon unbreak your cart
and make it better. Everybody
do a shut-eye while I work the
magic.”

‘““ No, thank you,” said the
famer. ‘I shall keep my eyes
wide open and watch your
tricks and dodges.”

“'You’d better not, you
hadn't, i (said. Jerry.) .°*-just
you be careful, Mr. Farmer, or
off goes your head and on goes
a cabbage!”

Farmer Honeybee watched
Jerry and Don and Snooker
closing their eyes tightly ; then
somehow his own eyelids
came together, and in two twinks the
‘magic was done.

““My whiskers, our Oojah has done
something this time! ’’ laughed Snooker.
“What does he call that—a cart or a
chariot ? ”

“It’s a cart, Snooker,’ said Don.
“Isn’t it lovely? Look at the silver
paint, and the green wheels, and the
pretty cream cushions on the seat!”

“Yes, it’s a fine cart,’’ nodded the
farmer. “‘ This is much too good for the
rough hauling on my farm. I think I’ll
put it in a glass case and keep it for show.”

“* Lovey-lovekins, that won’t do!”
declared Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Weare all going
away for my Funnymoon, and we want
you to give us a lift on our way in this
cart. That’s why I made it as good as
new.”

Farmer Honeybee walked slowly around
and examined his cart. He felt the cream
cushions, and looked at the silver paint



| | hy

ED & 4 ey
QZ YS
o fi

**T can’t stop him !” he gasped.

and the green wheels; then he laughed
and threw his hat up in the air.
‘*Tt’sgrand!”’’?hesaid. ‘“‘ Ill give you
an invitation, Mr. Oojah. Will you stay
on my farm and work wonders for me ? ””

=a ARM-WORKING must be very
HH nice,” smiled Uncle Oojah. “I
? could go picking up straws in the
wieaaestay fields, and Snooker might carry
the ducks to have their little drinks.”

** Then you will work for me? ”’ asked
Farmer Honeybee. ‘I could pay you
good wages, and give you good
times.”

‘*T’m afraid we can’t stay,’ sighed
Uncle Oojah. ‘* You see we are on my
Funnymoon. These little friends of mine
are taking me to September——.”

‘** But this is September !”’ interrupted
the farmer. ‘‘ It is September every day of
the week, and will be for a long time
vets,




18
‘“* Lovey-lovekins, then we’re here!”
exclaimed Uncle Oojah. ‘ However did
I manage to find the right place? ”

“Harvest is early this year, but I’m
rather late,” said Farmer Honeybee.
‘* When it’s in I always give a Harvest
Supper to my people.”

“What about a bit of hunting?”
inquired Snooker. “Is there anywhere
a cat could keep himself in practice ? ”

‘* My barns swarm with rats and mice,”
replied the farmer. ‘‘ And as for birds—
you should see them at my apples! A
hard-working cat could find plenty to do.”

‘“*T can see this is the place for me,”
chuckled Snooker. ‘‘ You’d better stop
here for a month or two and help me to be
a farmer’s cat.”

‘*Maybe we might,” agreed Uncle
Oojah. “But not for long, Snooker.

READFUL gossips
Were these three men—
They talked from five
Till long past ten.



I want to go off and enjoy my Funny-
moon.”

“Don’t worry about your Funny-
moon,” laughed the farmer. . “ We live
on fun at my farm. It’s cheap, and it’s
healthy, and you can always have as
much as you want.”

‘“ When can we try the new cart?”
asked Jerry. ‘“I should like to ride on the
cream cushions, I should. They are
mice.;7

The farmer decided to let them try it
at once, so they all climbed into the
silvery cart with the green wheels. But
when they started the horse ran so fast
that Farmer Honeybee didn’t know what
to do, and he became scared.

“T can’t stop him!” he gasped. “Is
this' awful old horse running away
again ?”

[Now turn to page 49

DON'T ‘TALK SO-MUCH
l-CAN'T-GET TO
SLEEP !!

DPD ODPDD OD

GOSSIP!

They chattered so hard
They didn’t hear

When neighbours grumbled—
Oh! dear, dear, DEAR!
ISN'T IT LOVELY 9

| 0O LOVE
MOTORING,

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Fk
fr
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bt

NOW WE WILL GO
A BIT FASTER —

VIBRATION 9
YOU'LL SOON
GET USED TOIT

THAT'S
NOTHING.

KA Att
WE
A

STEP RIGHT IN AND HOLD YOUR HATS

HULLO, BOYS COMING FOR A RIDE?


we

WLGBEY,

FAMOUS IMITATION ACT

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EXCUSE ME —

MY FIRST

ROBIN HOOD

ADIES AND GENTLEMEN,
WITH YOUR KIND PERMISSION | WILL PRESENT ~

iL
NEXT=

TO YOU MY FAMOUS IMITATION ACT






ROBINSON CRUSOE

GUY FAWKES

( THANK YOu, GENTLEMEN, AND



NOW THERE WILL BE FOURPENCE

EACH TO PAY FOR

SEATS





NAPOLEON

CAPTAIN HOOK, AND-

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BAY Humpty-Dumpty sat on a wall
Wis) # and that Humpty-Dumpty had
rN a great fall. But do you know
why all the king’s horses and all the king’s
men couldn’t set Humpty-Dumpty up
again ?

Years and years ago Humpty-Dumpty
lived in a pretty little village called
Poppleton-on-the-Wolds. He was the
fattest boy for miles round and he was
also a very naughty boy who was always
getting into mischief, and was never out
of trouble for very long. He had often
been told not to sit




ba



wn

PPA PPPPAPPAPPDPADPHOOODOO COOL

time Humpty-Dumpty had reached the
wood and picked as many bluebells as he
could carry he was hot and tired. So he
scrambled up on the wall enclosing the
wood, and began to fan his face with his
hat.

‘He had not been there more than a
minute before a small but very angry voice
shouted :

ae Hi ! 22

Humpty-Dumpty looked round, but
could see no one. Then he glanced down

. and there, just below him, was a
crowd of FAIRIES, shaking their fists at
him and looking

on walls (he was so 6 6 very angry indeed.
fat that unless the At their head,
wall was very 2 WHAT IS ITP N standing on a tuft
strong his weight § § ofgrass,wasa fairy
eae gen eye ; My first is in leap but not in run; Hie = ae on

estillsat on them use : is head who seem-

..and that was » My ae s in cake but not in ed angrier than
how he came to un, any of them.
fall ! 4 My third you will find in both 4 PaDeG st, yOu
eee noes ° women and men ; § ea ‘ asked

umpty- Dumpty eetis : umpty-Dumpty,

trudged up the hill ° My fourth is in pencil and also who was a very

to Far Wood to § ees 8 annoying boy
. ane bluebells. My whole at nightalight willbe— really.

t was a warm eis S19) UgbyAuKeln:
Fad’ day, the The answer to this is easy to see. : xC l a im e d Me
road was very fairy, dancing wit
dusty, and by the LPPPAPAPPPCDPOSCHPOOCOOCOCOOOOOO[] Tage; “are you

22
‘*Bluebells are
HOUSES!”
exclaimed
Humpty-
Dumpty.
Then he began
to laugh, andhe
laughed and
fi laughed until he
A couldn’t stop.













deaf ? Didn’t youhearme shout, ‘H1!’”
“Oh!” said Humpty-Dumpty with a
chuckle, “‘ that was you, was it? And
who may you be?”
““T’m King Tiny, the Fairy Queen’s
husband,” spluttered the fairy furiously,
** and—and——”’

SEE EN EN
POOR LITTLE MOUSE!



I HAVE a little garden,
And I have a little house,

BUNUN NESE ENN NNN

ee



And underneath the kitchen floor
There lives a little mouse.

And now I have a little cat
(A perfect little dear !)
I rather think the little mouse

nae a ue apne ener ameeeat

23

“Well, what’s the matter ? ’? demanded
Humpty-Dumpty, fanning himself.

( Matter!?? repeated? the; dane 5:7 the
matter is that you’ve stolen our houses.”

Humpty-Dumpty looked surprised.

“‘T haven’t stolen any houses,” he said ;
‘* T’ve been gathering bluebells.”’

“But—but—but b-b-bluebells ARE
houses—our houses ! ” shrieked the King,
who was really very VERY angry.

‘““ Bluebells are HOUSES!” exclaimed
Humpty-Dumpty. Then he began to
laugh, and he laughed and
laughed until he couldn’t
stop. King Tiny and his
fairies grew angrier and
angrier, but still Humpty-
Dumpty rocked with
laughter at the idea of
bluebells being houses until
... he rocked a little too
far, lost his balance, fell
off the wall with a crash,
and sprained his ankle !

And because he was so fat and heavy
all the Fairy King’s horses—they were
butterflies really—and all his men, couldn’t

-set Humpty-Dumpty on the wall again

. . which, as his mother told him later,
served him right !

ae

Will shortly disappear !
Boos

FASTA SATO a NS SS SASS

senate


OH HE was not exactly an ordinary
fairy, for she had short black
is hair, and a dress made of lace
BAS over which she had slung a coat
of oak leaves; she had no wand, but she
held in her hand a long fountain pen.

She sat with her legs under her, trying
to write a very hard letter, for Queen
Mab had told her she must write in her
name and tell the Giant of the Water
Country that he must not drink up all the
river, as he had
said he would do.

“Tf you write
him a polite note,”
Queen Mab said,
“TL: don’t — think
he’ll doit. Giants
like polite notes,
and this giant is
really quite a nice
one, only he is
always thirsty.”

The fairy sighed.
She waved her pen
about, and a big
blob of ink fell on
to her lace dress.

“* Dear Giant,”
she began, “‘ please



and then,

9

Get heaps

JUST THE THING!

F all the drops of rain that fall
Were ginger-beer, I think
We'd LIKE wet summers now

There’d be such lots to drink !

And if in copper beeches we
Could press a button, and
and HEAPS of

pennies out—
Well, wouldn’t that be grand !

By
V. C. ALEXANDER.

Letters are VERY hard

to write—especially when

they are MOST import-
ant.

don’t drink up all the water in our river,
as we want to wash our clothes and go
for a row and have aswim. There are
several other rivers in Mortal-land which
are ever so much nicer than ours. There’s
the Thames. That is a big river, and you
could drink as much as ever you like and
no one would notice it. Why don’t you
try it? Youcould drink up all the water
between two locks, and then we would
ask the Thunder King to come and fill
itupagain. Please
spare our river,
though, for itis the
only one we have.”

The fairy read
over what she had
written four times,
and then she
sighed again. No,
it wouldn’t do to
end a letter like
that. What would
the poor people
who lived near the
Thamesdo? They
must have water.
So the fairy tore
the letter across
and started again.

E.L.R.
“Dear Giant, please don’t drink up
ourriver. We want it for so many things.
If you must drink up a river, why not go
to the Moon? The man there is always
smiling and will give you as much water
as you want—”’ The fairy paused. Was
there water in the moon? She wasn’t
sure. Now she came to think about it
really hard, she didn’t believe there was.
So she tore up that letter and started once
again,

“Dear Giant, if you really are very
thirsty and want a drink there’s a nice
big Cloud who lives in the south west and
that will give you all the water you want
to drink. Please don’t drink up our
river, though, for we want water to make
our tea with, and we have to wash our
faces sometimes. If you go and see the
Thunder King I daresay he would be
able to give you as much to drink as you
want, only please leave our country alone.”’









Yes, the fairy decided that letter would
do beautifully, and she signed her name
with a big flourish. She was just sealing
the letter when up rushed a fairy.

““ The giant is coming,” she said. “‘ He
has a big sack over his shoulder and I
suppose he means to carry away all the
water he can’t drink.”

Up rose our little fairy. She trailed
her pen behind her, which was a silly
thing to do, for allthe ink ran out. But
she met the giant before he reached the
river, and gave him the letter. He read
it and laughed.

“Why, whatever made Queen Mab
think I was going to drink up her river?”
he said. “I was just going to put some
fresh water in it, and I told her I would
drink up the other first. I expect she
only read the first page of my letter and
never turned it over.”

That, of course, was what had happened,
and the river in fairyland is now full of
clean clear water.

But the fairy with the fountain pen
often thinks of the letters she tried to
write to the giant, and that is why there
are still clouds in the sky.

e

o¢ ¢





WPPDPDDPDPOD(T]

CAN YOU
GUESS THESE ?

Why is an eg¢ likea
naughty boy ?

Because it is often
beaten.

a
|
9
;
;

9
9
C

What is it that some-
times has a finger
and sometimes

DDD PDB ADD DPA DADDADIADADAD OH

hasn’t P
A thimble.
He read ag WALTER
it and BEbts
laughed. DPDPDPDDPDDPDPODPDOOOT



25






§ Domo



PDD DD



PDD D



9.40 a.m.
A NISHED washing.

10.5 a.m. Wandered into
coal-shed and found a very
strong mousey smell....
climbed all over the coals
but never found a mouse
.... dirty stuff, coal!



10.10 am. Washed myself
again, on the spare bed...
(coal tastes horrid !)

10.30 a.m. Got all mixed
up with the jumper Mistress
is knitting. She left it (and
a ball of wool) on the table
when the grocer came ....
I clawed up the tablecloth



to look at it, and—well,
we WERE ina tangle when
she came back! “She
shrieked: ‘‘ You naughty,
NAUGHTY Pinkie!” . .:.
then she kissed me (Master
would have slapped me ifit
had been HIS jumper !)



DD DDD DPP PDP PD PPP PDP PDP PP PPP DP PPDPDP PPP PDP PPO POD PPP PPP POPP PPI DD POPP ID DOP
DP AROPP PPP PP DPPPO PP PPO PD-PD-PODPODOOPPDDPDDDOPDOODOODOOOCO CCH
DPAAPPA PA PPAPPPPPDPDPPPDPDPDDD> DAD

STUCK IN THE PASTRY







PPDDDD |]



PPD DDDPDDPD

O



PPDD


















ET ;O%4 Yr.

:
9
ELPED Mistress to
make the pastry. She
makes it in a big bowl, and
in the middle of the busi-
ness Mrs. Brown called. So
while Mistress was out of
the kitchen I climbed on
the table to see what the
pastry looked like, and—
9

and I couldn’t get out! I
was STUCK! I just had to
stay there till Mistress came
back. She was SO angry,

:
and I WAS in a mess!

12.15 p.m. Went to sleep

(after I’d been cleaned) i ree
on Mistress’s knee. eee
Popa. Had

dinner (more
fish !)

1.15p.m. Tasted
Towser’s _ tail.
Didn’t like it—
neither did
Towser, but he
needn’t have
been so snappy
about it . . (he’s
nearly as bad
a as Master !). '
(Half an hour later Pinkte is slabped—hard! See page 40.)

PPP PPPPPPP PP PIO POD. PDD ID OOD

27



:
:
|
|
|

-







Ke Squirrels Dar
2,7 Soa J

= f
SASS, g
SS AVERY am) tay OU AL 3s

S
eS





i PEC
ord An
Die NY

5) bein tie
iff 7)




A NONSENSE STORY

@aage anyone wants to be beauti- Tortoise, addressing no one in particular.
4Miful they must use soap—soap ‘“‘ It’s nearly as good as soap!”
f) fsa and plenty of it,” said the “Who said soap ?”’ Up came a Squir-
fond Re Tortoise, as it admired itself rel. It was a handsome Squirrel with a
in a piece of broken mirror it had found furry tail, and a walnut in its hand.
under a lettuce leaf. “Oh! Gt's (yous, issit 2a) Now live just
“ How often do you use it?’’ asked heard a wonderful story about a bar of
the Bumble Bee, who was longing to get soap. I went into the shop—you know
a glimpse in the mirror, only the Tortoise the shop I mean—the one where they sell
wouldn’t let it. conquers at the other end of the park.”
““T—I never use it,” said the Tortoise, He waited for the Tortoise to say some-
putting his head in its shell and then thing, but it didn’t—it just nodded its
straightening it out again. “I can’t head.
bear it. But I always advise people to ‘As I was saying—I went into the
use it—on principle, you know.” shop and asked for a bar of chocolate.
“What’s principle ?”’ asked the Bum- ‘Oh!’ said the man—it was not a man
ble Bee. It had, at last, caught a glimpse really, but that doesn’t matter—‘ Oh?’
of itself in the mirror. said the man. By the way, it was a Field
“Why did I let him go? Because he Mouse who served me; but the word
bit my finger so!”’ said the Tortoise. It mam seems better.”
was counting its legs and was sure it “You aren’t getting on with the story,”
had five of them. ‘‘ You asked me a_ said the Tortoise. ‘‘What about the
question? I’m a bit deaf—do you mind soap?”
repeating it?’’ But the Bumble Bee “I’m coming to that,” said the Squirrel
had buzzed off. Really the Tortoise in an offended tone. Really the Tortoise
was most annoying, and the mirror was most annoying! ‘‘I went into the
did not make the Bumble Bee look shop and asked for a bar of chocolate.




beautiful. ‘Oh!’ said the man,‘I haven’t a bar
The Tortoise ate a lettuce leaf and of chocolate, but I have a bar of soap—
decided to have a nap. won't that’
“Sleep makes one beautiful,” said the replied; ‘I have heard that soap makes

28
one beautiful, and I’m going to make
myself beautiful and all my friends as
well.’ ”’

“‘ Tmpossible,’’ muttered the Tortoise ;
but what he meant the Squirrel didn’t ask.

“T’ve got the soap here,’’ said the
Squirrel. ‘‘ Let me make you beautiful,
first of all!”

Now, the Tortoise, as we all know, was
very vain, and to be more beautiful than
any other of the animals in the garden
was something he could not resist. So
he let the Squirrel rub and rub until he
had rubbed all the gloss off his shell.

“Now you are beautiful,’ said the
Squirrel with a chuckle,
for he had seen the Bumble
Bee in the distance, and
wanted to try the wonder-
ful soap on him. ‘Go and
look in the mirror.”

“Yes, I am very fine
indeed,” said the Tortoise,
and he twisted himself so
much that he turned over
on his shell, and the
Squirrel and the Bumble
Bee and the Dormouse and
the Hedgehog all had to
come and help to turn him
over again.

“Make me_ beautiful
next,” said the Bumble
Bee.

The Squirrel said he
would.

Now, Bumble Bees are

ticklish things to deal
with, and our friend the Squirrel
knew this. He only pretended to wash

the Bee, but when he told him he was
very beautiful the Bee was quite happy.
He went buzzing off and told all his
‘friends what had happened.

The Hedgehog said he was going to be
the next one washed.

“T don’t know,” said the Squirrel,
regarding him with his head on one side—
that is, of course, the Squirrel’s head. A
hedgehog wouldn’t be so silly as to put
its head on one side, would it? ‘‘ You’re
a tough proposition to tackle, and I think

29

you had better be left to the last—I
mightn’t have enough soap to go round.”

But the Hedgehog insisted, so the
Squirrel very gingerly started to wash each
spike.

It took a long time, and when the
Squirrel had finished the work there was
a long queue waiting for his services.

“JT don’t think I can wash you all
to-day,” he said. “I haven’t enough
soap.”

“Send the Tortoise for some more,”
suggested the Field Mouse, who was a
great believer in soap and water.

So the Tortoise was sent to the shop



The Tortoise turned over on his shell, and the
Squirrel and the Bumble Bee and the Dormouse and
the Hedgehog all had to come and help to turn him

back again.

for some more soap; but you all know
what Tortoises are, and I expect he is
still going, for he never came back.
Maybe he had a little sleep on the way-
side, or perhaps he laughed so much to
think he was so beautiful that he tumbled
over on his shell again, and there was
no one near to turn him right side up
this time.

Anyway the Squirrel started to work.
The Dormouse was rubbed and lathered
until it didn’t want to sleep any more.
The Field Mouse had its skin rubbed into

fur: the Wasp had lost its sting and the
/

g aoe
NR i WR.

" Laos
SNUARNRAM ff
V Cars \ \ POOP
Aaa yj Hy Ys pe eae
\) (f

ton CR v

Lr
1D



‘‘T don’t see that you are beautiful,” said

the Sparrow. ‘‘ This soap business isn’t
good for anyone.”

Robin its red breast. But the Squirrel
assured them, everyone, that the soap
had made them beautiful—and they
believed him.

The Sparrow laughed and said no soap
forhim. He didn’t want to be beautiful ;
he was quite content if he picked up
enough crumbs to keep him going.

“Oh! come on, be a sport!’ said
the Lark, who was wheeling round and
round. The Squirrel had washed all
the song from him, but the Lark didn’t
mind that—he thought he was beautiful.

“T don’t see that you are beautiful,”
said the Sparrow. ‘‘ This soap business
isn’t good for anyone. It seems to me
the Squirrel has been having a game with
you. You look worse to me than you

did before the Squirrel touched you.
You go and ask an Elephant if my words
aren’t true!”

“ There isn’t an Elephant about,”’ said
the Robin. “‘ We might ask that Sheep
over there. I suppose it would do just
as well ?”

“Just!” said the Sparrow, and ran
off to find some crumbs.

The Squirrel had just a small piece
of soap left. He had been wondering
who to use it on, but when he heard the
conversation between the Sparrow and
the others, he thought it was time to be
off.

“ They’ll find out they are not beautiful,
if I stay,” he said, and, taking the soap
in one hand and walnut in the other,
he climbed up the tallest tree. It was
as well! The Sheep, usually the silliest
animal of them all, told them they HAD
been sillies to listen to the Squirrel, who
had been playing with them, and the
best thing for them to do was to hurry
up and be sensible again.

_ “We must tell the Squirrel what we
think of him, first of all,’’ and they went
to hunt for the Squirrel.

But Master Squirrel had been a wise
animal, and was sitting hidden under the
leaves of the top branches of a tall tree.
He was eating a walnut slowly, and chuck-
ling to himself.

“That is the last bar of soap I’ll ever
buy. Next time it will have to be
chocolate.” ‘

SEE

NGUS Alison Alistair Jeeks

je NE

30

A.A. A. JEEKS

Is twelve months old and a few odd weeks;
He sucks his thumb, and when he speaks
He makes the oddest, queerest squeaks.

Angus Alison Alistair Jeeks

Is just like a cherub with rosy cheeks;
He wears a ‘“‘nightie” instead of breeks,
And if his bottle is late he SHRIEKS!



E.L.R.

Sei Uo ama eG



FANCY you would find a
bull
A little bit too masterful
To bea really pleasant pet.
Between ourselves, they some-
times get
A trifle savage, rude and rough —
They don’t know when YOU’ve
had enough!...
(It’s no use being too sedate—
The best plan is to climb a
gate !)

HE bellow of a bull, they

Say,

back,
track.
head

Ted ees:





mM affair !)

the air!

\ Ken ine

Sz
Gear Hoos ECR.

31

Makes people go some other way.
If they refuse, and won’t turn

* You see them soaring through

The bull soon thunders on their

With flashing eyes and lowered
He paws the pasture, “ seeing

And then (of course, it’s THEIR








bake
AW (Xt aN,
: \ \e AY ON

GHERE was once a little boy




ASS called Jim, who had a big
“4 |, box-kite. And one morning,
svi when he was flying it on the
Commer the string broke. Off it soared,
and very soon it was nothing but a speck
in the sky. Then it floated into a cloud.
The appearance of the kite in the
cloud made the fairies who lived there
very excited. One thought it was a bird,
and another suggested that it was a new
sort of cloud. But the Fairy Queen, who
was wiser than any of them, said:
“Don’t be silly—it’s a KITE! I saw
a little boy flying one just like it when I
was staying with the Queen of the Blue-
bell Fairies last summer, and sHE told
me it was a kite! Someone has lost it!”
The fairies caught the broken string,
which was trailing behind the kite,



[JPAPADOD



DPPPPDPPDDPPDPDPDPDPDD PDPDODD

The story of a mistake
made by the fairies

and then crowded round to look at it.
Suddenly one of them, pointing to the
top of the kite, cried :

Look !2?

Everybody looked, and there, sure
enough, was some writing, which the
Queen spelt out very slowly :

“Tuts 1s Jim’s Kite.”

““ Splendid!’ exclaimed the Queen ;
“now we know whose it is we can return
it. Do any of you know Jim?”

“I do,” said a small fairy who had
charge of a sunbeam in the slums. “I
know him quite well.”

So all the fairies hauled at the string
and, guided by the small fairy, dragged
the kite to a tiny house in one of the
London slums. Then they tied it to the
latch of the door and left it.

The next morning the door opened,
and a little boy dressed in rags came out.
When he saw the kite his eyes grew
bigger and bigger. Then he saw the
writing ... and his name was Jim!

(Of course, he was a different Jim
really, but the fairies couldn’t be ex-
pected to know that !)

WDPPDDODPPPDDPPO[]



WHICH LETTER SURROUNDS

GREAT BRITAIN P

DOODDOOO OS





C.



oO

D>



32
O



Doom monm
3 PAPA PAPPAPPAPDA APDA>DD
O



2



PDD DD



JERRY'S SEASIDE BAND









eos PPPPDPDPDPDPDPDPDPPDDD POPP]

PDPDPDPDPDPDPDPDDDPPDD PPDPPDPDPDPPDDDDDD D> a
ERRYWANGLE
was walking

along with
Snooker when they
heard a band play-
ing on the beach.

“‘ It sounds very
nice, it does,” said
Jerry. “I wish I
had a big drum of
my own to bang.”

“You listen to
me,” whispered
Snooker. “If we
can’t have a drum
we can have a

collection.”
@ @ @
NM Zp Ly
§
|
§



‘ HAT’S a
good plan,”
chuckled Jerry.
“Tl use my hat to
takethe money in.”
“My bedsocks
will make good
collecting-bags,”’
said Snooker. ‘I
would sooner have
them full of money
any time than full
Of feet.
So they col-
lected all they could
from the people.



|
|
:
;
;
|
|
;
:
:

m7 DPPPDP POPP PPA PPP PDP PDP DP DBPO PP PPI PPP DPDODP DD OD DP PDD >

SS ees Cc
























Deore PDD D DDD PPDDODD oro~ooT) 9
| JERRY’S SEASIDE BAND
Ogee ADD pea
(CONTINUED) i
RESENTLY a
bandsman saw
a 5 - what they were
ze doing and he soon
‘ =H : = jx oChaséed them:
= Be ; ‘“My whiskers,
: — NY ANG he is after us!”
shouted Snooker.
* Run, Jerry, be-
fore he can take our
money.”

They both ran as
fast as they could
go, and they man-
aged to get away
without being
caught.

© @ &

ATER on they

i came back to

the beach and

found that the

band had stopped
playing.

“What does this

mean?” asked

Snooker. ‘ Look

at all their things

tied on the cart.”

“ They’re going

away, they are,”

replied Jerry. ‘“We

must follow that

band to the next
Diacem

PP PPPS PP PPPPPDAPD PD DPAPPD DPS DPS PDPAPPPPPDDPPPDPSP PDPDPPP POPS]


















Doo Pe
Deo mr neome oO
JERRY’S SEASIDE BAND
De ood

UDDENLY the
S rope gave way,
and down came the
drum on_ Jerry’s
head.

“This drum is
very hard on me,”
he complained.
“Tt’s spoiled my
best hat.”

‘Cheer: ps
Jerry,” | chuckled
Snooker. “You
wanted a drum,
didn’t you? Well,
you can’t say now
you haven’t got

%”

one.



‘“W CAN use this

drum, I can,”
laughed Jerry.
‘Take thetrumpet,
you Snooker, and
we'll have a band
of our own.”

So he played up
and down the
streets and made a
lot of noise.

‘“‘Make a way for
me!’ he called.
‘Walk up and
listen to Jerry-
wangle’s Seaside
Band.”

PAPA DOA DD




BOCPGOGGLCLGGPGLCOCGLCGGCOGOGGGUGCOCOGGCGOOGOGGGOGGGGGGHOOGO

: Tatters Gets Wound Up S

@
GOBGGGLCGLCCLCCGGLGCLGGLGOGGGGOGGOGVGGOGVGGOLGOGOGOO®

AH! THANK YOU, LADY. YOU. ARE VERY KIND.
| SUPPOSE, NOW, YOU WOULD NOT CARE TO

BUY A 00G ?

ROUGH ? MY DEAR
LADY ! HE WOULD
NOT EVEN HURT



HE -BRRRPRRA,
entenint 5eenninreT ais

36



SUCH A

GENTLE LITTLE DOGGIE HE 15,

SO SWEET TEMPERED, A REAL
OARLING !




AND AS FOR CHILDREN ! WHY,
HE SIMPLY LOVES THEM !!



KO
BtéRnars



QLGOGOOOGOOGHOOGOGODGOOWGGOOGGODGGOOGOOY

® On the Briny Ocean 8

@
QLCOLGOLGGCGLOGCLOGOGOGGHGGVGOCLHGCGHGGCGCGGGCUGHGGBGHOGO®D

ME ALONG
os eenan SR ORM aR HERE WE GO WITH THE BEST OF LUCK
TATTERS WILL TAKE YOU OVER THE YO HO HO AND A BOTTLE OF MILI
Sere A SAILOR'S LIFE ON THE OCEAN WAVE
YO HO HO AND A BOTTLE OF MILK '!

ALITTLE FISH
SUPPE
FOR_ SUPPER 62

ALL TOGETHER—

Saal

cs

Beane
Tt)
c






min Fairyland, and she was
BG rather a naughty little fairy.

mamma In the daytime she was always
as wood as gold, but when bedtime came
she wouldn’t go to sleep at the proper
time.

Every night at six o’clock the fairies
bathed her, and kissed her, and tucked
her up in bed, and told her to be a good
little fairy and go to sleep. But when
the Fairy Queen peeped into the nursery
at eleven to see that everything was all
right, Petling was always wide awake.

All the fairies were
very worried about
it. They told her
she would never be
wealthy and wise if
she didn’t go to sleep
earlier, but she said
she didn’t want to
be wealthy or wise
—-she would much
rather be pretty !

Then the fairies
persuaded the night- ;
ingales to pay them 6
a long visit, hoping 9
that they would sing
Petling to sleep. But
that plan was not g
a success — Petling

his tail !)

ee ae eae

MISSED!

ITTLE Tommy Titterton
Went to catch a rabbit.
With his broken pen-knife he
Thought that he would stab it.
Bunnikins refused to wait
For anyone to jab it.
But as it scuttled to its hole
Tommy tried to grab it... .
(Bunnikins turned rather pale

For Tommy's hand JUST missed

DPPDPPDO PPD POLO OOOLPLE PO

PE Dugetman
@,, Does ~~
Trick,






simply stayed awake longer than ever to

listen to them! Even when the Fairy

Queen got quite cross and scolded her

severely it only made Petling miserable

—it didn’t make her go to sleep any

sooner.

“Whatever shall we do—I’m at my
wits’ end!’ the Queen told the other
fairies, who were getting quite thin with
worrying. “It’s perfectly absurd. She
MUST go to sleep earlier, or . . . Iknow!”
she exclaimed suddenly, clapping her
hands, “we'll tell the Dustman about
her.”

So the next time
he dropped in for a
chat and a thimbleful

of roseleaf wine, the
Fairy Queen told the
Dustman all about
Petling and the way
she stayed awake
at night.

4 The Dustman
listened very care-
fully to all the Queen
had to say and, when
she had finished,
considered thematter
for a moment before
he said :

‘Dear, dear! How

(}) distressing—and
very trying for you, very trying indeed !
But if your Majesty will tell her that she
must keep her eyes closed when she is
put to bed, I think I can make her go to
sleep.”

So that night the Fairy Queen gave
Petling another talking to, and concluded
by saying that even if a little fairy
couldn’t go to sleep she MUST close her
eyes—and keep them closed—when she
was in bed. And Petling, who was very
sorry for being such a worry to the
fairies, DID shut her eyes as soon as she
had been tucked up and kissed.

In a little time the Dustman crept
quietly into the room, carrying a sack
full of Magic Sleep-Dust. Very carefully
he climbed up his cobweb ladder on to
the bed, and began to shovel the Magic
Dust on Petling’s closed eyelids.

Of course, the Fairy Queen and all the
fairies were peeping round the door, and
after a time they saw the Dustman shake

the last particles of dust out of the sack,
climb down the ladder, and tiptoe towards
them.

‘Well?’ whispered the Queen anx-
iously.

‘“‘She’s asleep as fast as fast can be,”

said the Dustman. ‘“‘ I’ll come again to-

morrow night, but after that I don’t
think you’ll have any more trouble with
hers

The Fairy Queen thanked him and
gave him a whole bottle of roseleaf wine, ©
because shovelling dust is thirsty work.
Then the Dustman went away to visit
several children whose mothers had been
complaining because they wouldn’t go
to sleep early enough.

The next time you can’t go to sleep
close your eyes tightly, and then, perhaps,
the Dustman will come along and pile
his Magic Sleep-Dust on your eyelids,
just as he did on Petling’s.



The Dustman shovelled the Magic Dust on Petling’s closed eyelids.
39


oO Ooo

r PINKIE IS SLAPPED

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PPD D DAADADDDS

1.45 p.m.
pe to claw Mis-
tress’s lee—great fun !

1.47 p.m. Madea mistake
and DID claw it—NOT
such fun! A lot of little



|
holes came in Mistress’s |
stocking . . . she wailed:
“ANOTHER ladder—
you. WICKED â„¢ kitten!??
and slapped me. /



1.48 p.m. Went into . the
garden and caught a daddy-
longlegs—I like fish better !

2.0 p.m. Rain!


§
€

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2.25 p.m. Went to sleep.

3.0. p.m. Mistress found
Mme... 1 woke when: the
door Senced: As soon as
she saw me—and the pillow
—she said :





. 41


215 pm.
HUNDER ! . I crept
through the — scullery

window and went upstairs
for my rest.

220 pm. i Climbed, on
master’s pillow . . . I wonder
why my wet ie leave

BLACK marks on a white
pillow—I’ma BLUE Persian!



“Oh, you little wretch !”
Then she pretended to
smack me...I don’t mind

THAT sort oe smacking !
3.10 p.m. Went to sleep
again—in basket.

(A dreadful accident at 4.30 !
See page 60.)

3
e
e
®
e
a


wan We
UT TS

nmr Se
AN AT AY AN Aad
ale ,, ADOLPHUS DREW walks up the Street,

\
AS
\\\
The nicest Policeman on this beat !

ANY
He’s very large, I won't say ‘‘ fat,”
‘Cos he might be annoyed at that.

Adolphus Drew walks down the Street ;
I hear the pounding of his feet.
He wears big boots, I do suppose

To give more room for all his toes.

Adolphus Drew stops in the Street
And mops his face, he feels the heat.
I really think he wants to look

Down in the kitchen at our cook!

Adolphus Drew coughs in the Street
And sniffs, Jane must be roasting meat.
He gives a loud and hungry sigh—
P’raps she'll hand him out a‘pie.

Adolphus Drew walks ae the Street ; p7>
LO
I wave, and hope that he will look, |

,\ But no, he smiles “‘good-bye’’ to cook !
MABEL CAVALIER

The pavement echoes ‘neath his feet:



44
0



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$ TWO JOLLY GAMES

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0












by) of Camden, and the others march
naeeay, around her and repeat this rhyme :—
There was an Old Woman of Camden Town,
Her children grew up with a terrible frown ;
So she hurried away for many a mile
To buy all her babies a smile, a smile.
But on the way home the smile turned to a sneeze;
It caught the Old Woman and made her wheeze.
““Oh!’? she laughed, and ‘“‘ Oh!” she cried,
And she sneezled away till the sneeze had died.
Then she mumbled and grumbled
And skipped and hopped,
Till she stumbled and tumbled
And down she dropped.

The players have to imitate every action named as they come to it, and if
anybody forgets to sneeze or laugh or cry or do anything else at the right time
the Old Woman of Camden takes them into the ring beside her.

The Old Woman goes on taking players into the ring until there is only one
left, and the last player out wins the game.

HOOP HORSES

MET a cardboard box and lay it on one side. Gum some small pieces
| of cardboard in four divisions to make the horses’ stalls. When they
fi are all dry mark a letter over each space, and the stable is ready.
Steet §=Now you want four wooden curtain-rings or four bone serviette
rings for the Hoop Horses. Pencils will do for the Hoop Sticks.

Place the box at one end of a long table, and take your places at the other
end. One stall belongs to each player, and you
stand your hoop on edge and whip it towards your
own stall. The Hoop Stick must only be used
once, when starting off. & B¢o»p

If the Hoop Horse goes into your own stall
it counts one to you, and the player who gets | |
the Hoop Horse into the right stall the greatest ae
number of times wins the game. D_Pr>






PBPPPPOEPPD PP PP PIE PO PPO PPS DP DPODP PPD

43




FZ WNVIZ 0 SIZ 8 SUZ 8 OIF. 8 RIFE VSS MNS GE ONS OMA GN NES ENA BNGRNGENGIENGIENGIENEBENTI STIS
USU SUSU SSNS SUIS IWNUSWUWIWUSW@IIW#IS TINT ESS
S20 WZ
ress e Ws
asad VA
WN GY
NY e~N
ey) S
Y, SS
SS 0b
y 28 Ss AGN
USS. SENN
QAI 2 SNS E SNS SNF 8 CNIS E SNUIZG SNVISE SNF NENT ES US 8 SNUG 8 SNS EONS 8 ONS EAN ENN GINNING

cae was out with
Snooker looking for work when
they came to a fish shop.

‘“« This will do, it will,” said Jerry.
“ Please, do you want any help ?”

‘Yes,’ nodded the shopman.
‘““You may clear the place up and
make yourselves generally useful.”



O they began to sweep the floor
and carry away the boxes.

“This place will suit me nicely,”
chuckled Snooker. ‘‘ The perfume
is nearly as good as a dinner.”

“‘ All fresh!” said the shopman.
“Can I sell anybody a nice little
haddock this morning ? ”’



RESENTLY a strange cat crept
up and snatched a box of kippers
off the counter. Snooker was sur-
prised.
* Put that box down!” he called.
‘““ My bedsocks, don’t you know the
difference between your own pro-
perty and somebody else’s? Now
for a chase!”


ok oN

SNF" TZ 88. CNA YZ ZINN YT? FANG. TZ NA, IFAW F, 8. 4. 8 F “NZS .
Sz ae. i : VANS
Ue ° WZ
O44 Ress
WN WN
: ave a Fis a s
AA

Ee ke
Zant

SS. AS
ZZNSNe BUNT OMNIS 8 UNNVSEMNNY, ISG,
FRNA 4 ONS ONS 8 NNN EONS FONG ENN VSO RNAS ENA 0 ONS ENN USE RNS ENNIS ENN

ee strange cat rushed away
with the box of fish.

“Stop him!” shouted the shop-
man. “ Make that robber bring my
fishes back ! ”

*“We’ll do the best we can,” re-
plied Snooker. “ This is a new way
of going out fishing, but I think I’m
going to make a catch.”



OON they caught up with Jerry-

wangle, who had gone off to
deliver a big box. Jerry heard the
shouting, and when he looked around
he guessed what was happening. So,
as the strange cat was passing him,
he dropped the box on his tail and
stopped him.



: T the end of the day the fish-

deri monger was so pleased with
==} their work that he gave them two
fishes as well as their wages.

‘“* My whiskers, we shall be happy
now!” laughed Snooker. “I can
see myself having a tasty supper to-
night ! Hurry up, you Jerry!”

45







SSS
SSS
A fa —
WN WE LE
IC cE
Fala san y Ao { ye SS =

“INCE upon a time, years and
Wyears ago, Peter Bunny lived
AY Hin a snug little home under a
fo -@Nsandhill near the seashore. No
matter how wild and cold the wind was,
Peter and his friends and relations (they
all lived under the same sandhill) were
as warm as toast

One sunny summer morning, when the
sky was blue and the sea as smooth
and bright as a
piece of glass,
Peter popped out
of his burrow,
scrambled to the
top of the sandhill,
and sat down.
Then he looked
round to see if
Polly Rabbit, who
lived under a
neighbouring
sandhill, was up.
Sometimes Polly
was lazy and liked
to lie in bed late;
but on this part-
icular morning she
had got up with
the lark, and was
sitting at her door
pretending to be
very busy comb-
ing her tail.




night,

DPPAPA APO PPOPPODPOOO OOOO OO

THE BATH

HEN bath-time came last Thursday

And Joan and John went up to bed,
Fluffkins, their kitten, followed them:
“T want to see you bathed!” he said.

He jumped upon the bath, and sat
Beside the taps to watch them play ; ©
But when they started splashing HIM
He thought he’d better ran away.

So, very solemnly, he rose
And ...stepped upon the soap, and fell—
The children laughed until they cried,
For Fluffkins had a bath as well!

DPPP PADIS PDP POPP PP PPADPPODD OD

HOW THE
FIRST BUNNIES WENT
TO AUSTRALIA

As soon as he saw her, Peter jumped

up and waved to her, and... at that
moment Puff-o’-Wind happened to be
passing.

Of course, HE could see Peter, but
Peter couldn’t see him; and _ being in
a mischievous mood, Puff-o’-Wind blew
a scrap of paper right under Peter’s
nose. Peter dabbed at it with his paw,
but Puff-o’-Wind was expecting him to
do that, so as soon
as he saw Peter’s
g paw move, he blew
the paper away,
and it went tum-
bling over and
over down to the
beach.

For half a min-
ute Peter and
Polly watched ‘it
fluttering towards
the: seas 7 dehien
Peter scampered
after it as hard as
he could and Polly
raced after Peter.

Puffo-Wind
chuckled to him-
self. It was a good
game for him,
because he could
see all the fun with-

O out being seen,

E.L. R.
Whenever Peter or Polly thought they
had really caught the scrap of paper,
Puff-o’-Wind blew it to one side, or into
the air out of their reach.

But after a time he tired of the game
and blew the paper into the sea; and it
was then that Peter and Polly found the
BOX !

It was bobbing up and down in the
shallow water, and suddenly Peter had
a perfectly splendid idea for a game of
pretend.

““ Jump in, Polly,” he shouted; “ let’s

out to sea they floated the harder Puff-
o’-Wind blew.

As neither of them could swim, Peter
and Polly had to stay in the box—rather
scared, of course, but not so frightened
as might have been expected. It was an
adventure, and they loved adventures.

After a time they were so far away from
land that Puff-o’-Wind couldn’t blow
them any farther. Then his big brother,
Capful-o’-Wind, began to blow, and very
soon HE blew them out of sight of land
altogether.



“Jump in, Polly,” he shouted ;

pretend this is a boat, and that we’re
going for a sail.”

Polly clapped her hands with delight.
Then they both scrambled in and sat
down in the bottom of the box, pretending
it was a real boat.

But as soon as they were safely inside,
Puff-o’-Wind began to blow the box
gently out to sea. He did it so carefully
that before Peter and Polly knew what
was happening they had been blown
into really deep water, and the farther









“‘let’s pretend this is a boat.”

It is terrible to think what MIGHT
have happened to them; but, hours
and hours later, they were rescued by a
ship which was on its way to Australia.

When they landed everybody made a
great fuss of them, for Peter and Polly
were the very first bunnies ever seen in
the country. But to-day there are so
many that a lot of people wish that Peter
and Polly had never been blown out to
sea by that. mischievous fellow, Puff-o’-
Wind.

Oo Oo PDPPADDPI DDD PDD PPD DDD ODDO OL]
WHY IS AN EASY CHAIR LIKE A GREEDY BOY?
BECAUSE IT IS STUFFED
Oooo PPPPPDPPPPODPP OT]







47
































aN
ee ES

x — x
Wy a5
CoN)

HENEVER I encounter
sheep
I always think of poor Bo-Peep,
Who carelessly mislaid a flock—
(It must have been a dreadful
shock }), :
For sheep have very little sense—
In fact they’re rather dull and
dense.
The only word they know is
oe Baa PRE Iae
THAT shows what silly things

S
c



UT lambs are different—
they play

And frisk and frolic all the day.

From morn till night they never
cease ;

They give their mothers little
peace.

Alas! too soon the baby sheep

Become too big and fat to leap—

And then (HE doesn’t care a
button !)

The butcher turns them into

mutton !

48


(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19)

GON’T get so. skerrified, Mr.
Wi Farmer,’ said Uncle Oojah.
““T only worked a magic on
cmeewl your horse to make him
stronger. Can’t he run fast!”

“It’s wonderful!’ said the farmer.
‘* My old horse was broken-winded before
you altered him, but now he is rushing
along like an express train. I shall never
need to travel on the railway any more.”

““You’d better not talk so loud, you
hadn’t,”” whispered Jerry. ‘‘ Look how
our Don is lying back on the seat! He
must have gone off to sleep.”

‘* So he has, poor dear !”’ sighed Uncle
Oojah. ““My little Hum-Jum-Jarum
must be very tired to do his sleeps like
that. We walked him too far, I expect,
all last night.”

“Bring the little boy to my farm
and put him to bed,” said
Farmer Honeybee. ‘‘Can’t my
old horse spank along now! I
never did see such doings!
There isn’t another horse like
him in all the country.”

“Country, did you say?”
repeated Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ That’s
the very place I wanted to go
for my Funnymoon. Do you
mean to say this is really the
country ?” :

“* My suffering whiskers, where
does he think it is?’ muttered
Snooker. ‘I wonder if our
Oojah expects to find a farm in
the middle of Trafalgar Square ?”’

All the way home they talked
and chatted, and then they
wakened Don to have his tea.
They were all very tired, so
as soon as tea was over the
farmer led them upstairs toa big *
bedroom.






“Mind you don’t tumble out,” he said.
49

‘** Make yourselves at home,” he said.
‘* Harvest starts first thing to-morrow
morning, so we must be up very early.
I hope you will be comfortable.”

So they said their good-nights to Farmer
Honeybee, and Uncle Oojah tucked Don

-and Snooker into one bed. Jerry slept

in another bed with his uncle.

‘“* Mind you don’t tumble out,” he said.
‘* Sleep soundly and rest yourselves well.
We must work hard at the harvest
to-morrow.”’








SA AEN Uncle Oojah came down-






PAWVA/A stairs next morning he saw
BAY, Veg Farmer Honeybee just setting
SOAS) off to the cornfields with a



big reaping-machine.
‘““ Are you coming to help?” called
‘Hurry up with your

the farmer.






SB See vee
ew 5
Pee COL

See

WoT TS
< PO ea
STIS

Spy



aa





2 DES
Ra
breakfast and follow after
me.”’

‘* Lovey-lovekins, we can’t
wait for breakfast !”’ declared
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Come along,
my dears. We must be all
there in time to see the harvest
start.”

Before they could go the
farmer’s wife ran out and gave
them hunks of bread and slices
of cold bacon, and all the way
to the fields they were eating
the sandwiches. At the first
gate Farmer Honeybee stopped
and called back to them.

‘““We can make a start on
this field,” he said. ‘‘ With
your wonderful help I ought to
get it finished to-day.”

**Andso you shall,”’ promised
Uncle Oojah. “TIl run the
corn-cutter for you. Stand
back, Snooker, and let me
have room to work the works.”

So he climbed up on the seat
of the reaping-machine, but the
wheels sank deeply into the soft
earth and all the farmer’s horses ;
couldn’t pull them out of the ruts.

“It won’t go,” sighed Uncle Oojah.
** T expect I shall have to cut the corn with
scissors. Run back to the farmhouse,
Don, and borrow a pair for me.”

‘And a nice job that would be,”
laughed the farmer. ‘“‘ I'll do the middle
. myself with the reaper, and you can take
the scythe and cut the corners.”

** Just the very thing!’ smiled Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘Keep out of my way, Jerry, while
Iswing thelong knife. Holdup yourlittle
tail, Snooker, where it can’t get hurt.”

So he took the scythe and had a try at
cutting the corn, but he stopped so often
to look around that Farmer Honeybee
had nearly finished the middle before the
first corner was cut.

‘*My bedsocks, can’t you work a bit
faster?’ complained Snooker. ‘I can
tell you one thing—if you don’t get ona
bit quicker they’ll be sending us away
from this farm !,”

50



So he took the scythe and had a try at cutting

the corn.

WANCLE OOJAH looked across
PB the field and saw Farmer
#4 Honeybee riding towards him
=] on the reaping-machine.

are not getting on very well,”
called the farmer. ‘All you’ve cut so
far wouldn’t make a supper for my old
nanny-goat.”

‘“‘ This scythe is very heavy to swing,”
sighed Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ Maybe 1 might
do better the next time I try.”

He sat down in his corner to rest, and
Farmer Honeybee laughed and drove
around the field again.

“Did you hear that ? He was laugh-
ing at you!’”’ complained Snooker. “ My
suffering tail, if I didn’t want my dinner
I’d phizz that fat farmer !”’

“Hush, little Snooker-cat!’ mur-
mured Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Don’t disturb
me with your noises. I’m doing a very
hard think.”

For a long time his little friends sat




> exclaimed the driver.

‘*Tt’s worse than terrible, it’s scandalous!’
quiet ; then suddenly Uncle Oojah jumped
up and flung the scythe away.

“T’ve found it!” he exclaimed. ‘I
can get the harvest in all by myself.
Do a quick shut-eye, and you'll see.”’

The next minute they had a great.

surprise, for when they opened their eyes
they saw the sheaves of corn dancing
away towards the gate.

“Surely I’m dreaming!” gasped Far-
mer Honeybee. ‘I never saw a harvest
behave like this before. Is it another of
your wonders ? ”

“Yes, I worked a little magic on the
sheaves,’’ smiled Uncle Oojah. ‘“ Now,
my dears, all join in! Come along and
help me to drive this harvest home.”

So they drove the sheaves along to the
barn, but when the farmer and his men
tried to pile them up they could not
persuade them to lie still.




So untrey Was



She really lsoke®
| dsreasfull

So no wonder
she always

Marsh

eae

Ger
——_

Agatha Abbey

dabby! &

— Gates ebb pereie ,

Cow she dresseS Bidn'F
care ——

Seermen shabby (

“And no wonder,” chuckled Snooker.
“You need me to do a little bedsock
dance. My whiskers, I can soon tread
them down for you! ” ‘

So he started climbing the ladder,
but as he was getting near the top the
ladder tipped over backwards and let
him fall. Down came the sheaves on
top of him, covering him completely out
of sight.

“Oh, my poor Snooker!’ moaned
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Look, Don—look what
they’ve done to my cat!”

[Now turn to page 56.

o PDDDPDDPDDDODDDADDOAOO DO Oo
9 What word of four letters is the same :
spelt backward ?

NOON. 3



DPPDDPOODAS







Sl


WN
Sw

CFAILAE. OFAPFAELAG. CLAIPAOPAPDAPLAILAILAPMAOLADHAD. AGP AS. ‘Ad. AGLAGLAS. CFAOCFAGLAGHAGHA
es Vey
Zs PERCY IS DISOBEDIENT Zs
Wes Lo
WO UCELLE LEC EEE CECE







OH DEAR, OH DEAR, OH DEAR,
OH DEAR

WHERE'S

THAT

COME AND SEE THE PUNCH
AND JUDY SHOW-0O!
TOOTLE-TOOT- TWEET
TWEET - CLASH-
a CLASH- BANG !!

COME
HERE AT
ONCE, SIR,
WHEN YOU
ARE TOLD
TO


‘Ad. «@. ¢.

ws ‘Ad. é. %
2 MAKING THE CROCKERY FLY %
GY, WA
Ls ' Gf
COCCI CELE.

{ THINK & FEW DOZEN PLATES
TO BEGIN WITH, EH, PERCY ?

GOOD MORNING, FRIENDS. A LITTLE
ENTERTAINMENT TO-DAY ? CERTAINLY !

THIS tS
VERY
SIMPLE

THIS WHOOPS!
REQUIRES BAY | HERE WE
GO LIKE A
TEE-TO-TUM!

AH! SIMPLY MARVELLOUS !! IN A FEW
MOMENTS, GENTLEMEN, YOU WILL SEE ALL
RECORDS —~—







‘F course, it was Phoenix who
jstarted it! Phoenix was the
q black cat who sat on the nur-
ui sery mantelpiece. He usually
was quite well behaved, but to-day, be-
cause his little mistress Marie had gone
to the pantomime, he kept on walking up
and down.

“Can’t you keep still, Phoenix ?”’ said
the china dog. “I’m trying to learn my
one times table, and it’s awfully hard.”

But Phcenix’s only answer was to walk
up and down, up and
down.

“Phoenix, I’m try-
ing to put my dress
tidy, but every time
I do it, you walk
past me and give it
a pull. I wish you’d
settle down and do
something,” said the
lady in the crinoline,
who stood in the



tree

e,

Was

Oo DPD PBPBDPDDPODDOPDDDPDDPDDDPDPDPDD OD

:
:

BAD GRAMMAR
a old owl sat in an old oak

As wise and solemn as an owl could
And all he said when he spoke to you

© Tu-whit !
*Tu-whoo! Tu-whoo!”

you must walk up and down, would
you mind bringing back with you that
small jug? I know there is some water
in it, and I’m very thirsty.”

But Pheenix kept on walking.

The china dog and the crinoline lady
and the fern, also the jug with the water
in it, moved to the middle and held a
committee meeting.

““We must stop his walking,’ said
the china dog. ‘‘Here am I trying
hard to learn so that I can be a foot-
ball player some day,
and Phcenix won’t
letime:2

“Ets very sad
the crinoline lady
shook her head.
“What shall we do
to him ? ”

ne bet Sask thts
brother, the real

|

9

$ orotier,

; black kitten. He
;

|

!



Tu-whit!” or

often comes on to the

middle of the mantel- ae oie who had lived in a cage, mantelpiece. Call
P tee t PheAe SEt Escaped, and passed the owl on his ae ak Hows” said
continued to walk. “Ta eates I” said thevowl front lis So Smut, the black

You are making leafy gloom— kitten, was called
me giddy,” said the “ Tu-WHOO!” cried the lark, “ you to the committee
fern, which stood should say ‘Tu-WHOM !’ meeting, and the
at the edge of the end of it was that
mantelpiece... If Cooooonooo ooo OOOO oOo he told Phcenix that





es

ee)

SAS
Ge
A,

Ep fale sy)
ae



Phoenix lay ina hundred pieces on the floor!

he would race him to the corner and
back.

Pheenix without stopping in his walk,
agreed, and the china dog called out,
‘One, two, three—go!” And they
went.

But now comes the sad part of it. The
china dog, the crinoline lady, the fern
pot and the jug with the water in it, all
followed the two racing, and when they
all came to the edge of the mantelpiece
they fell plomp on to the floor !

DPDDD

—jIAKE a page from an old
exercise-book and draw
a flight of stairs from
S72 SS the top left-hand corner
to the bottom right-hand corner,
one line to a step.

Write on the tenth step from
the bottom ‘‘ Broken,”’ and on the
second from the top ‘‘Trap Door.”

Next draw four small squares
on a slip of paper and number
them like this :—

I 3



2 4
The first player closes his eyes

SSNSNSNENSSNSNS NS SNSNE NSS NS NS NS BSNS NS

y PPPDDPP PD PADPAPDPD PDD DD

PoE ESS SSNS Nee LLL AEE
STEPS AND STAIRS

ELECEE LESTE LESEL EEE ESET ECCLES

55

Smut came off the best. The china
dog had lost an ear; the crinoline lady
had a great rent in her crinoline; the
fern was badly crushed, and the water was
all spilled from the jug.

But even these were not so badly off
as Phoenix. He lay in many pieces on
the floor !

Of course, when Marie came home, she
mended him, but his walking days were
over, and all through his own fault too.

Isn’t it asad story ?



and tries to place his pencil in
one of the squares. Whatever
number he gets he can move up
the same number of steps, but if
the pencil falls on a line or out-
side the squares he gets nothing.

Mark your initials against the
step you reach, and cross it out as
you move up.

If you get on the broken step
you go back five, and if you land
on the trap-door you must start
from the beginning again.

The player who reaches the top
first wins the game.

NBN SNSNSS SNES NS SNBNS NS SNS NB NS SNS

a (2)

NaN

.
NO NGNGNGSGNGSGNGSGNG SG LNGSGRGASGLNSGSGNGLSES
COSY AQ
F Uncle Oojah’ ‘
« Uncle Oojah’'s Funnymoon Z
LOS. HE

FPP AAO VSO SINE NAMES 8 SALES 8 SRL E SRIF 8 SRS SRG 8 SNISNS 8 SNS 8 WIS 8 ANNI 8 SNS 8 SNUG SNA I SNA 8 SNAG SN
13S GUSOS OSIRIS SI SIN SU WISI SUSUWUWWT

Ne. J

é. CsA, x \ ZINAYZ

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51)

- 1VERYBODY worked hard to He took Snooker on his knee and began
“Nie] rescue Snooker, but when they counting his eyes and measuring his tail ;
‘had tossed all the sheaves of then he wrote it all down solemnly.

ZINA ZINA afar.



(Some corn aside they found him “T don’t fancy this insurance. busi-
lying very quiet and still. ness,”’ grumbled Snooker. ‘“‘ Stop a little
“Look at the poor dear!” sighed minute, can’t you? I want to go and
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Have those sheaves see a friend of mine around the corner.”
smothered him, do you think? Send “ Lovey-lovekins, your friend will
for a cat-doctor this minute.” have to wait!” replied Uncle Oojah.

“What's all the fuss about?” in- ‘‘ Lie still, Snooker, and don’t kick!”
quired Farmer Honeybee. “ Don’t go Just then Farmer Honeybee pulled out
upsetting yourselves over nothing. After his watch and looked inside the case.
all, it was only a cat.” “Bed-time!” he called. ‘‘ Good-

When Snooker heard him say that he night, Mr. Oojah. We expect to finish
opened his eyes and wriggled around to our harvest to-morrow, and then you
his feet. will see something happen !”’

“Who said I was only a
cat?” he demanded. “ My
suffering bedsocks, if I wasn’t
a little gentleman I’d phizz you
all round your own farm !”’

“ Splendid ! That shows he is
still alive,” smiled Uncle Oojah.
“Tell me, Snooker—do you
feel very poorly—bad ?”’

“Poor enough, and bad
enough,” replied Snooker.
“Tve had a right good
shaking, I can tell you. Even
my whiskers are aching !”’

‘I’m glad he was saved, I
am,” said Jerry. ‘‘ We ought
to have him insured before he
gets any more accidents.”

“Well, well, what next?”
laughed the farmer. “ Who
ever heard of insuring a cat?
Where are you going to find the
card for him ?”’ i

‘We'll provide the card,”
said Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Don, just
lend me an old postcard, will A SS" ZZ
you? Now,Snooker—come here ‘‘T don’t fancy this insurance business,” .
and have your insurance done.”’ grumbled Snooker.

56



——_




en geal HAT night Uncle
§ SS Oojah sat down beside
the bed and gazed
# sadly into his slipper.
a long wait until to-
morrow!”’ hesighed. ‘‘ What’s
going to happen, I wonder ?
Do you think it will be anything
dreadful ? ”’

“It might mean trouble for
you, it might,” chuckled Jerry.
“Dear Uncle Oojah, they may
want you to drive all the corn
back and put it on the stalks
again!”

“Don’t take any notice of
him; said).Don. 3) 1! expect
it’s only the Harvest Supper.
Farmers always give a feast
after the harvest is gathered in”’

“ Lovey-jimmikins, I must
be there!’ exclaimed Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ Good-night, my dears !
I’m going to sleep double hard,
and then perhaps I shall be
double hungry.”

All next day the farmer’s wife
was busy cooking, and after
the last load was brought home
the harvesters came troop-
ing into the kitchen. For supper they
had cold beef and ham, puddings and
pies, cakes and custards, with jugs of
cream and junkets and jellies.

“‘ My whiskers, what a sight!” laughed
Snooker. ‘‘ One thing is very certain—
we shall not have much room left after
we have finished with this lot.”

“Eat hearty, good people,” said Farmer
Honeybee. ‘‘ We never had an Oojah to
help us before, and I only hope he will
oblige us by coming to our next harvest.”

So they all sat down and enjoyed a
good supper. When it was nearly over
Uncle Oojah reached playfully across to
hook the cream away, but Snooker clung
so tightly to his jug that he went swinging
around with it.

“JTsn’t Uncle Oojah a quaint old
thing ?’’ smiled Mrs. Honeybee. ‘‘ The
pranks he plays are funny enough to make
a pig dance.”



oF

PELL
wR

Snooker clung so tightly to his jug that he went

swinging around with it.

“Pig dance, did you say ?”’ repeated
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘That’s a very good
idea. All stay where you are after supper,
and I’ll show you the funniest wonder
you ever saw.”

5 supper Uncle Oojah
1 leaned over and whispered to
€4 Farmer Honeybee, and the far-
=aurstl mer listened and nodded his
head.

“We can go out and do it now,” he
said. “‘ Before we come back you men
might clear the things out of the kitchen.
Make sure you leave us plenty of room.”

So the two of them hurried across the
farmyard, and while they were away the
harvesters carried out the tables and
chairs. Suddenly the door flew open and
four pigs rushed in, followed by Uncle
Oojah and the farmer.








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ad NM “mY
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** Shut the door and keep them here,”’
said Farmer Honeybee. ‘‘ You can start
your latest wonder, Mr. Oojah, as soon
as I tune up my old fiddle.”

' “This is very nice, it is,’ chuckled
Jerry. ‘I’m going to push in front, I
am, and see all that’s going on.”’

The farmer began to play a lively tune,
and when the pigs heard the music they
stood on their hind legs and danced up

Nanhehsiehshshehsheishs

They stood on their hind
legs and danced up and
down the room.

EEE EEE EEE EEE EEE

WHICH RULER ALWAYS
SERVES?

The Ruler you draw Lines with

DPB PBPBPD PBA PDD POA DAADAPD ADD DD

BOBLSL ICIS BL SL SE SL Be BCS LISLE SL

and down the room. They
waltzed and they jigged and
they jazzed, and the harvesters

clapped and cheered them
on.

‘** My bedsocks, this is a new
touch!’? laughed Snooker.

“It’s the first time I ever
heard of a cat going to a pig-
dance.”

“Don’t they look fat and
funny !’? smiled Uncle Oojah.
‘“* T worked a very good wonder,
didn’t I? Dance again, my
dears, and see if you can go
twice as quick.”

After this the farmer played
so fast, and the pigs danced
so hard, that presently they
bumped into Uncle Oojah and
sent him staggering against

the fireplace.
‘“‘ Jimmy - ninnikins, that’s
enough!” he complained.

“Stop all the dancing this
minute? Go back quietly
to your houses, like the
good little pigs that you are.”

So away trotted the pigs to their
sties, and one by one the harvesters said
good-night and went home. Later on
Snooker was getting into bed when he
sat up and gave a chuckle.

‘‘ My whiskers, we’re having a high old
time!”? he laughed. ‘“‘I wonder what
tricks we shall be getting mixed up with
to-morrow ? ”” [Now turn to page 62.


NENSNENBNSAS SNS NSNS

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BoEE EEN


‘*Surely I’m dreaming!” gasped Farmer Honeybee. - °


| HE hen is quite a useful bird
Whose conduct is at times
absurd.
For instance, if she’s mopy, moody—
A certain sign that she is broody,
When some hens try to hatch out













pot-eggs }
(They don’t know that the things ‘ :
are NOT eggs !)— CLES hee ies
She has to be pushed in a pen a i
Till she begins to lay again. a ere
eo \
OCKS are a nuisance—every
morning
Without a single word of warning
They start to crow before the sun
Gets out of bed—and think it fun!
Their owners—still in need of sleep—
Wake up, and wonder why they keep
A creature, puffed up with conceit,
* And usually too tough to eat!
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$ == DRENCHED IN MILK! 3

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Say Os AON Ge ES A RAO OE ROE,

Mary to get
tea ready. When
she was out of the
kitchen I put my
head in the milk-
jug to seeif there
was enough .
and [| couldn’ t
Setit-out Wi.)
was awfully
frightened and
drenched: in
milk to the skin. Then I tumbled off the table and the jug
broke . . . Mary heard the crash and came running back
but I was under the gas-cooker by that time !

iT.
:
§
"|
: 4.30 p.m.
ELPED
|
|
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>

4.35 pm. Finished licking
the milk off myself . . . jolly
good milk, too !



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PINKIE IN DISGRACE /






5.0 p.m.
OUND Master’s slippers—
the shiny ones—and played
with them.

5.30 p.m. Master came
home.

5.31 pm. Found his slip-
pers . . . all that was left of
them (he IS a bad-tempered
man !)

6.30 p.m. Had
my milk .
clawed Toa
ser’s nose when
HE tried to
have it too. I
don’t put up
with any non-
sense from
Towser !

(More trouble at 10.40! See page 78.)





5
9
9
9
:

:
i
BEER EEE EEE EEE NEBL ER ERA Rg

< Uncle Ooj ah’s Funnymoon :
EL ELELELELELELELELEE EE EE EE EL EE EES

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 58)

SeiNE morning Mrs. Honeybee

'cooked potato-pancakes and
j/# coddled eggs for breakfast, and
PrkZ76N everybody chatted gaily during
the meal.

‘““They will be busy to-day at the
village,” said Farmer Honeybee. “It’s
the Harvest Home to-morrow, and we
‘ ought to collect something. I really
haven’t the. time, Mr. Oojah—could
you manage todoitforme?” _

**T can collect lovely,’’ replied Uncle
Oojah. “Ill go to the draper and get
a few silks and satins, and then [’ll ask
the butcher for some nice mutton-chops.
Will that be enough ? ”

“Yes, and too much,”
laughed the farmer. ‘“‘ We
need flowers, and berries, and
evergreens—for the decora-
tions, you know.”

Uncle Oojah jumped up from
the table and ran into the
garden, and presently he came
back with a large bunch of
rhubarb, two cauliflowers, and
a pocketful of tomatoes.

‘‘That’s not right; they
never decorate with rhubarb
and cauliflowers,’’ said Don.
** After breakfast I'll take you
upon the hills. We are sure to
find lots of pretty berries and
wild flowers growing there.”

So they finished breakfast,
and then they all took baskets
and wandered up on the hills.
Don showed them what to pick
and they gathered crimson hips
and haws, long trailing bryony
and wild clematis ; afterwards
filling their baskets with dainty
autumn crocuses.

“I think we have enough





CRT Is

i I

now,” said Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ Let me see,
Don—what day will to-morrow be? Is
it my birthday, perhaps, I wonder ? ”

““T know one thing, I do,” chuckled
Jerry. ‘‘ Whatever comes it’s always
your forgettory day.”

They all went back to the farm and
helped to build an archway of leaves
and flowers over the gate, and the rest
of the evening they spent hanging out
flags and banners.

“There! Isn’t that lovely ?’’ smiled
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘I’m a grand flower-
worker when I like, aren’t 1?”

‘““My whiskers, I should say so!”



An archway of leaves and flowers over the gate.
62
laughed Snooker. “ Roll on

the old Harvest Home—we’re Zz
all ready for it!” hi
Spe
To —
ZA
LL next day the bells




fa) Were ringing and the
w4| village was gay with
i | flags and mottoes.
Uncle Oojah spent the morn-
ing with Farmer Honeybee, but
in the afternoon he took his
little friends to see the Harvest
Home, and long before he
reached the tent there was a
crowd of children running after
him.

““Look at the little dears!
They all follow me,” he smiled.
“Listen, children—you shall
have a treat to-day. ’'m going
to give you something special
for your tea.”

““Isn’t he clever ? ” said one
little girl. ‘‘ They have ele-
phants at the Zoo that beg for
buns, but I never heard one
talking before.”’

Uncle Oojah led the children
to the big tent where tea was waiting, and
helped to lift them into their seats.

‘* We'd better start on the cake, because
that’s always the best,” he said. “ If you
are all very good I might give you donkey-
rides on my back later on. Don, pass the
tea-pot, will you? Snooker,take your paw
out of that milk-jug ! ”

They all had a very jolly tea, and after
it was over Uncle Oojah filled the chil-
dren’s pockets with peppermint creams
and chocolate almonds.

‘““Can’t we have a dance next?” in-
quired Don. ‘‘ That would make a good
finish to our day.”

“*T should think we ought to rest after
all this feasting,”’ laughed Snooker. “ My
whiskers, our Oojah has had sixteen help-
ings of cake already!”

*“* Snooker, I’m surprised at you!” ex-
claimed Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ You ought to
know it’s very rude to count anybody’s

\

\
».

C
ey






He danced and capered around the field.

appetite. Now, my dears, start the band
and I?ll do a little dance to please the
children.”

So he waited until the music began ;
then he danced and capered around the
field.

Presently he stopped and asked the big
drummer to let him have a bang, but the
first time he hit the drum both the sides
split open and the drumsticks fell inside
out of sight.

** Oh, Don, this drum has come undone!”’
gasped Uncle Oojah. ‘I’ve spoiled all
their harvesting music. What will they
do to me now ?”’

idrum, Uncle Oojah,’” said
j Jerry. ‘‘ You can always buy
Manother for the band, you
“Very true,’ Jerry,’ nodded his uncle.
“Take my purse, Mr. Drummer, and get
yourselves two new drums. Play them
both together, and then they will make
twice as much noise.”

They finished the afternoon telling
riddles and playing games, and when it
was time they took the children home one
by one.

It was late when they all got to bed, and
next day Uncle Oojah ‘was so tired that
he did not get up until nearly dinner-
time.

“It’s a nice morning. What’s going to
happen to-day ?”’ he asked. ‘‘ What do
people generally do when they are having
a Funnymoon ?”

“Take their friends out for a walk,”
replied Snooker. ‘‘ After all that hard
sleeping I should say you could do with
some exercise.”

“I’m coming, too, I am,” said Jerry.
“Don’t walk me too fast, because I’m
older to-day than I was yesterday.”

So they waited for dinner, and then they
went strolling through the lanes and over
the fields. Presently it started to rain.

‘““ We came too far, I suppose,” sighed
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘Oh, Don, I don’t want -
to get wet to-day ! It might be dangerous
after all the cake I had last night.”

“* Do look at this big mushroom,”’ said
Don. “It’s a pity we are not fairies, or
we might have sheltered under it to keep
the rain off.”

‘“* The very exactly thing ! ’’ said Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ My Don can do some beautiful
thinks when he tries. Shutty-eyes, my
dears, and I’ll show you something that
will give you a surprisement.”

Once more he used his magic, and the
mushroom grew bigger and bigger until
at last it covered them all like an umbrella.

‘* There, isn’t that lovely ? ” he smiled.
*“* Wasn’t Ia smart old Oojah to work that
sowell ? Wait until this rain stops raining,
and we'll gather some nice mushrooms for
supper.” [Now turn to page 71.

OT, £S.
£. DoReTHY can
ra

Ween
— ~

SHY FAIRIES

HEN buttercups and
daisies
Are sprinkled in the field,
The little Wild Flower Fairy

Is cunningly concealed.

ORES og
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The baby breezes whisper
Their secrets as they pass
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ike an umbrella.

The mushroom covered them all |
Pon OF

By E.Ellis[forris.
a







Wai! I am tired of these summer
wy¥ holidays. I shall be glad when
&/ A next week comes and we go
s 4 back to school,”’ said Herbert to
his sister Marie, as they stood in a lane by
a stile.

“Suppose we buy some sweets,’ he
continued, ‘and stand on the bridge over
the river and watch the boats go under
while we eat ?”’

“Lovely !’’ exclaimed Marie, clapping
her hands. ‘“‘ How much money have
you? I have twopence.”

She handed the two coppers to the boy,
who was busy fumbling in all his pockets,
from which he extracted various things—
lumps of sugar, tin-tacks, putty and a
few pieces of string. At last he produced
two pennies—very sticky they were, too!

Theyran offtotheir favourite sweet shop.

Arriving there, they wondered what
they should choose.

They looked at every bottle of boiled
sugar sweets, and at last decided to have
a. quarter of a pound of “ fishes ’’—red,
yellow and white ones.





“Oh! lovely!’ exclaimed Marie, as
they left the shop and made their way to
the bridge.

The river seemed rather deserted for a
time, but while the children were looking
at the water a sudden cry came from
Herbert, who was holding the bag of
sweets in his left hand. He turned very
white, and hastily threw the bag into the
river.

65



“Why did you do that, Herbert?”
asked Marie in wonder.

“Because all those fishes must have
come to life—they moved in my hand—
and look! there they are swimming away
for all they are worth !—and growing so
large too.”

Marie looked, and saw that he was right.

““ Suppose,” she said, ‘‘ we run down to
the towing path and see what happens ? ”

“Yes, we will,” he cried, and they
scampered off, soon reaching the side of
the river.

They
moments.

Their sugar fish had become real ones,
and two, one white and one yellow; swam
to where the children stood! Then a
signboard rose out of the water and red
letters graduaily appeared upon it. They
read these words :

“Marie must ride on the back of the
white fish. Herbert on the yellow one.
Be quick. Don’t argue.”

Then the letters faded away and the
board disappeared.

The children felt dazed, but obeyed the
command. The fish came quite close to’
the bank for them to “ mount.”

Their legs dangled in the water, but the
children, being now enchanted, did not
get wet.

The two fish swam to an island a little
way down the river and then stopped. A
signboard rose up on the island, and words
in red letters suddenly appeared :

stood breathless for a few

E
Fairyland. Not a word
must you speak till you
reach the bridge again.”’

The children jumped on to
the island and as they did so
the whole place changed.
Thousands of goblins were
springing about, some playing
“‘leap-frog”’ over each others’
backs and screaming “‘ hoop-
la

Then a lovely Fairy Queen
appeared in a small golden
chariot, drawn by white
pigeons. Their reins were
made of silver threads.
Many fairies riding on mauve
pigeons followed and they
were dressed in silver tissue,
while each wore a diamond star in
her hair.

The Queen halted, and the fairies rode
round and round her chariot till she raised
her diamond-studded wand in the air.
Then they backed their ‘‘steeds,” and
stood still, some behind the Queen and
others facing her.

Out of the ground rose little white tables
laid with refreshments—fairy cakes, sugar
plums, dewdrops on rose petals, and ices
served in silver thimbles.

The goblins were the waiters. Twenty
attended first to Her Majesty, to whom
two took some sugar plums on silver



The goblins were the waiters.
65










ex



The sugar fish had become real ones !

salvers (which were on the tables) and an
ice in a silver thimble.

They bowed low whilst the Queen par-
took of her refreshments; then, backing
from her presence, they returned to the
tables to serve her fairy attendants.

When the meal was finished a band
struck up a tune. The musicians were
all kinds of birds, who played drums,
violins, flutes, trumpets, oboes, etc. The
orchestra was conducted by two magpies;
one controlled the performers on the left
and the other those on the right. The
idea of having two magpies was because
to see one is unlucky.

It puzzled the children
(who dare not speak) how the
birds could play and conduct,
when they required their
claws to stand upon. Then
they saw they used their fatls
for that purpose—and yet
did not look odd.

The music was charming,
for some of the birds ‘‘chirp-
ed’”’ as they played, and
the Fairy Queen was so
affected by it that a most
unusual thing happened
...her pretty little head
slowly nodded and she fell
fast asleep—which was fatal!

There was a loud crash.
The children were terrified
and clung to each other. Then another
crash came and a mist arose. When
it cleared away slowly the island appeared
as it always was—fairies, queen, goblins,
and birds had gone !

Turning hand in hand towards the
river, the children saw their two fish
waiting for them, and they quickly sprang
on to their backs. Their steeds took them

Demo noo noo ooo



PPP OID

back to the towing path near the bridge
and then disappeared.

In the mud lay the remaining sugar
fish—the children gazed down at them.

“Never again shall I buy sugar
fish |’ declared Marie sadly.

Herbert sighed.

‘‘ Marie, leave the fish in the mud, they
will melt away. Come home,”’ he said.

GDDOOCCCOOooCCO



A KANGAROO CHRISTMAS

F all the animals I’ve seen
In farm-yards or the Zoo,
The one I love the VERY BEST
Is the jumping kangaroo.

One Christmas eve, I’d like to go

And wait in the Zoo grounds,

For Father Christmas Kangaroo

A-leaping on his rounds.

How I should laugh to see him jump!
I wonder what he’d bring:














’Cause little baby kangaroos
Don’t play with anything.

At least, I’ve never seen them play ;
You NEVER know—at night

They may all go a-leaping round,
And play till morning light.

I think that little kangaroos
Have toys to keep them good,
One day, | MUST get left behind—
Oh! how I wish I could!

But brother Bobby always says,

-** You mind what you're about—
If once they lock YOU in the Zoo,
They'll NEVER let you out.”

IN.


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WHILE THIS 1S
KNOWN AS
JUMPING ELIZA

‘HOW DARE YOu
BREAK MY EGGS!



=
ul
a8
itr
xo
ae
Lf
ob
Le
Sw
ar
ay
as
ww
2


OWS love a quiet life, they
pass

Most of their time devouring grass

(As grass is green and milk is white,

Somehow that doesn’t seem quite

When full they settle down with
* thuds

Contentedly to chew their cuds,
Using their swishy tails to swat

The flies, and show them what is
what.

HEN milking time comes
(twice a day)
The farmer drives the cows away,
‘ And sometimes if a cow’s put out,
She kicks the pail of milk about
(The milkmaid, too, may “take a
toss,”
Which makes her very very cross—
In fact, I’ve even heard it said
The cow is spanked and put to bed!)



78
Se



puree
HESS



PEE

HH





Uncle Oojah’s Funnies

Hr

Beatie SIE HEE HE ES EE

AG]

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 64.

AMOR nearly an hour they shel-
tered under the magic mush-
room, and still the rain came
hace mi pelting down.

‘““ This is a nice day to take a cat for a
walk!’ grumbled Snooker. * You will
have to do something soon, or we shall be
needing our bathing-suits.”’

“There are too many of us here to go
under one mushroom,”’ complained Jerry.
“The rain keeps driving in ai the sides
allover me. I'm getting wet, I am.”

“Wet, did you say ?”’ repeated Uncle
Oojah. ‘“‘ Lovey-lovekins, this will never
do! Just turn your heads away and do
another shut-eye.”

So they did, and when they
opened their eyes again they
saw two new mushroom
shelters. Don ran to one and
Snooker took the other, while
Jerrywangle squeezed against
his uncle, and there they
waited until the rain stopped.

““Come along, my dears!”
called Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ On our
way home we must pick some
mushrooms for Mrs. Honeybee,
and then she can stew them for
supper.”

So they wandered slowly
across the fields, filling up their
pockets as they went.

“ Rain is very useful—see



how it makes the flowers
grow!” murmured Uncle
Oojah. ‘“‘I watched a little

raindrop come tumbling down,
and the next minute up jumped
a mushroom.”

“IT don’t think they grow
quite so fast,’’ smiled Don.
‘““A mushroom might come up
in a night, but not in a minute.

I expect you have made a mistake.”

‘* Maybe I did,’’ admitted Uncle Oojah
“T think we have plenty now. They
taste very dark-browney, don’t they ?”’

““Have you been tasting them?”
asked Don. ‘*Dobecareful. You might
eat toadstools instead, and then you would
be very ill.”

“Oi! Don, supposing I have!’’ groaned
Uncle Oojah. ~ [ only nibbled a few to
make sure they were ripe. Oh! I do feel
bad!”

‘“ My bedsocks, this puts us in a fix!”
complained Snooker. ‘‘Let’s take him
home, before he fancies himself any
worse.”



And there they waited until the a ia
71



Mjand threw all the
mushrooms away; then
he sank down on the damp grass
and leaned his head against a
gate-post.

“Oh! Don, I’ve spoiled my
dear Funnymoon ! ” he groaned.
“It’s very bad to be so bad—do
T‘look any worse ? ”

“‘ There isn’t anything yet to
worry about,” said Don.
“Perhaps you didn’t eat any
toadstools, after all.”

““ My whiskers, I should hope
not,’ added Snooker. ‘‘ You
want to keep your heart up, and
don’t forget to hold your head
up as well.”

“What a_ pity Doctor
Dromedary isn’t here!” sighed
Uncle Oojah. “I wonder if my
Don could doctor me.”

“TIT can have a good try,”
replied Don: = ** But. 7. ‘can’t
doctor you out in the fields
—let’s run back to Farmer
Honeybee’s house.”

So they hurried him along to the farm
and put him in a big arm-chair. Don
went out to find Mrs. Honeybee, and
presently he came in with a bottle and a
table-spoon.

“* Lovey-lovekins, that’s Castor Oil!”
exclaimed Uncle Oojah. ‘‘Can’t you
give me a nicer medicine? Wait a
minute, let Snooker take it for me.”

“Certainly not!’? declared Snooker.
*“* Everybody must take his own medicine,
and you ought to know that. Give hima
big spoonful, Don, and make him drink
it all.”

Don poured out a large dose of Castor

ap

ae
hese





Oil and handed it over, and after giving.

anotherloudgroan Uncle Oojah drankit off.
*“My Don is a lovely doctor,” he sighed.
“* He ought to sweeten his medicines a bit
more, though.”
“Try a spoonful of blackberry-jam
after it,” said Jerry.
the nasty taste away, it-will.”’

‘That will take

72

‘*Give him a big dose, Don, and make him
drink it all.”

“Thank you, Jerry. Hand me the
jam-jar,’’ nodded his uncle. ‘‘ We haven’t
done any blackberrying this year, have
we? I must gather some before they are
all gone, so hurry up, Doctor Don, and
get me better.”

iLL through the night Uncle

Ds
P

Sy
ei

Wig Oojah kept waking and having
4 drinks of Don’s medicine, but
ite at breakfast-time he came
downstairs beaming with smiles.

** Good-blackberry-morning, my dears!”’
he called. ‘‘Isn’t this beautiful sunshine
nice and shiny ? ”’

‘“My whiskers, he looks better than
ever!’ chuckled Snooker. ‘‘ There is
nothing like a good dose of Castor Oil—
if somebody else takes it.”

“I’m glad you are so well again,”’ said
Don. ‘‘ Weshall havea lovely day for our
blackberrying.”’
After breakfast they took
their baskets out along. the
lanes and picked the juicy
blackberries from the hedges.
Jerrywangle went with them,
but Snooker was nowhere to
be seen.

““Where’s my Kitten-cat, I
wonder ?”’ murmured Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ This is very strange.
Why didn’t he come with us ?”’

““T expect he is not far
away,’ replied Don. “‘ Look,
here’s a big walnut-tree! I

should like some of those
walnuts, they are such
beauties.”

Uncle Oojah threw a stone
at the tree, but he missed it.
Again and again he tried, and
all he knocked off was a couple
of leaves.

“IT shall get something
presently, perhaps,”’ he sighed.
“They ought to trim their
trees with cocoa-nuts, .and
then I could hit them better.
If I had a bow and arrows I
might shoot a few.”’

“Why don’t you pull the branches
down?” asked Jerry. ‘‘ You should be
able to bend that tree easily, you should.”

““My Jerrywangle is always right,
Sometimes,” smiled his uncle. ‘‘ Why
didn’t I remember that at first ? ”’

So he reached up and pulled the
branches down, and his little friends

WEES
i



oO L, A:
Ze
‘LH:

quickly filled all their pockets. They had
a very happy morning, nutting and
blackberrying ; but when they got back
to the farm Snooker was still missing.

‘* Oh! Don, where can my Snooker be?”
groaned Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘ Whatever can
have happened to my cat?”

[Now turn to page 97.

PELE EEEEEEE EE EEE EERE

Peter and Pitpat -

THERES A STRANGE
CAT, PITPAT.
1

Bark as Bad as a Bite







EL XTEEN, s’venteen, eighteen,
al nine-een. .. .”

mâ„¢ Bobbie was lying awake
Ete COUNting sheep. He had heard
Uncle James say that the best thing to do
when you couldn’t go to sleep was to
count a flock of sheep, and that was
what Bobbie was doing.

“|, . twent-nine, THIRTY,
thir'tworf. 32%

But, somehow, counting sheep wasn’t
making Bobbie sleepy. He was very much
awake. The sheep were trotting through
a gate in a wall, and he counted their
tails as they disappeared through the gate.
He had counted them once and made the
number 131. Now he was counting them
again just to see that he hadn’t made a
mistake.

thir’one,

id
oO

«|. hundrand thirty, hundrand thir’
one’’ ... there was a pause, and then
another sheep trotted out of the darkness

and through the gate... ‘‘ hundrand
thir’two.”
“Bother!’’ murmured Bobbie, "I

shall have to count them again to see
which is right.’

And then, leaning against the wall, he
saw a very, very old man with a long white
beard and a shepherd’s crook.

“Got ’em wrong, I reckon,” he sug-
gested, smiling.

‘ Yes,’’ said Bobbie. ‘' Now J shall have
to count them all over again.”

““Doan’t ’ee,’”’ said the shepherd, “‘ I’ll
tell ’ee a secret. In every flock there’s
allus a black sheep, an’ our black sheep
’as a white tail! The first time you coun-
ted ’e wuz so ashamed of ’imself that ’is
tail was between ’is legs, but the second
time ’e’d perked up, and it wuz as wavy
as the others! ...Now you go to
sleep!”

And Bobbie went.

od

o 5
a} PBPBP DBP PB PPPP PPP PPD PPPP- PPP PPP POPPA PDPDPPDPPIDDPDPP- PPD DODD DD Oo

FAIRY LULLABIES

ITTLE brown bunnies are full of fun,

And always ready {or play,
Gaily they frolic and frisk in the sun
From dawn till the sky turns grey.

Sas

&

But when the sunset’s gold and red
Grow dim, and the shadows deep,
Little brown bunnies troop off to bed...
And the fairies sing them to sleep!

EL. R.

74
GR EAE ERE AEE EERE EEA EEE EEE AEE
€ JERRY THE BILL-POSTER
SE RRR



= o¢|| GON 2 VM] tm |) SAL TERRYWANGLE
NINA TURE | Cit CURE US ar er | saw a ladder lean-
5 21ND oo =il el ____ against a wall, and he
ane . SEET SR PEs Se i stopped to look.
)) fy \= Weel dee ont °
Del Sh ee [eA i} \Nt “The bill-poster




Se Semi ag

Ae — tea f

i said. ‘I’m going to

Nig Ati 1 Tat lac try that work, and see
eS =| E-p~ how I like it.”

Lae ifs f\'Sue ¢ | chas; gone aways) oe
sete al eae 8,20



‘Tay
& a ape ef: “Yes, you might as

Sey EN —) well,” replied Snooker.
=| “You never know
a A what you can do until
= you do it.”

@ @ @

ERRY carried the

pastepot and brush
up the ladder, and
Snooker stayed down ;
below to hold it ae HSS 3
steady. f, | yA dite say

“ You be careful,” a
he said. ‘“‘ We don’t
want to land ourselves
into trouble.”

‘lA 4
Ma

“T know how to do
it, said: Jerry. “You
just watch the way I
can post the posters.”
ERELELEELELELEELELELLLEEELELLLERS

€ JERRY THE BILL-POSTER

oe

SEELELEELEEEE EEE E EEE EEE ERE RREERE

(CONTINUED)

f. 2




Vo SUNN :
\ Ve ee
Fea 4
Z age ag a ED =
\ Y &
@ ® ©
S Uncle Oojah

walked under the
ladder his hat caught aye!
the pastepot and down
came the paste.

“ Lovey - jimmikins,
what’s this? ”’ he gas-
ped. ‘ Who’s spilling
the paste all over
me?’

“Stop it!” said
Jerry. ‘(If this lad-
der tips over much
more I shall be falling i
off.” aA. Meee yy,

yA
yt oN

“th a n iti i en a2 |




NOOKER gottired

of holding the lad-
der, so he turned
around and sat down
at the bottom. That
explains why he did
not see Uncle Oojah
coming along.

“It’s a nice day for
a stroll,” smiled Uncle
Qojah. “Pm. very
nearly getting over
my summer holiday.”



pi

ABE ue
EEEE LIDIA EEE DETTE EELS EREEEEEEEE
€ JERRY THE BILL-POSTER €
LEE LEELELELEELEE EERE EEE REEL ER AE EE






(CONTINUED)
IST HE ladder tipped
oe =o over still further,
nink am fe,

, ‘ and in the end Jerr

ne) fh Ih sia ; ae pit i: ,. tumbled down on vs
In 4% 3 oh of his uncle.

Sy i} ony! “Help, help!”

fh called Uncle Oojah.

“T don’t want these

bills posted on me!”

“What a way to
work!” laughed
Snooker. ‘I’m enjoy-
ing this better than
the clowns at the
circus.”

rte

® © @

HEN Uncle

Oojah found out
who caused it all he
took Jerry by the collar
and led him home.

“This must be stop-
ped,” he said. 41
can’t have such goings
on going on.”

“It was your fault,
it was,” complained
Jerry. ‘1 was learn-
ing to bea bill-poster,
but you knocked me
over.”


LPP DLP PDP PPD DO PDO POPP OD oO
PPP PD PP POPPE PDP DDD PPP DOD O



DPBS PPAPADAADP PDP DP OO DOS
Doom ono nom

PINKIE IN DISGRACE AGAIN

DP PPADAP PD PPP PDAPDAD PDD DPD DPD PPD DPD DP DP POPP PPP PP LPLP ESL oO







7.0'p-m:
ENT to sleep on
the hearthrug

in front of the fire.



8.0 p.m. Woke up and
scrambled on Mistress’s
knee . . . went to sleep
again.

10.30 p.m. Woke up
frightfully thirsty and
drank Towser’s milk.



|
10.40 p.m. Jumped on back :
of Master’s chair... he hasno
fur on the top of his head!
A fly was walking about on 9.
the bare place, and every now
and then Master tried to catch
it. He couldn’t manage it, so
the next time the fly settled
on his head I sprang onit...
(and would you believe it,
even THAT didn’t please
him !)
s



r
3
|
|

DPD PP PDO PPPS DP DP PPP DP PDP DPD DP PDD PIP DODD DPD PPP POD PD DOOD OD

78


ODD D>



DOP PPE OPPPD PPO PDD DDD DD ISP
PPA PPPAPAPAP- DPD DD DPD. PDPPP- PIE PP PD PDPOD- POD DP PDD DDO OO OL [es]

| A LONG DAY ENDS

oO DPPPP PPPOE PP PPP PPP PP PPP PP PP PPP DD PDD PPP PPD D-DD DDD D> C
PDPPPP PAP PP PPP PPP PA POPP PDP PD PPDPD PDP. PPD PPD-PDDPDPD-PDPD-D PDDD-OD DOD 0

II.O p.m.

E all went upstairs
towed. sk
sneered at Towser as I
passed him, because HE
sleeps on a mat in the

|
hall.
ir.10:pm. Muastress
kissed’ me and said,
“Nightie-night, Pinkie
;
)
;

petkins!’? ‘Then she put
me in'my basket.



Master DOES
make funny noises when
he’sasleep. He’s worse
than ‘Towser.

11.35 p.m. Went to
sleep.



E, L. ROBERTS

§
11.30p.m. Still awake
|
O














MOONSHINE!

GAY little elf on a moonbeam sat

And sang as he swung his legs
so fat,

‘‘Oho! [Il ride on the moon’s bright
beams

And carry to mortals such funny dreams.”

Said the moen, ‘‘Such nonsense I will
stop!”

He drew up his beams and the elf fell
plop ! ,

He said, as he rubbed bumps everywhere,

‘‘T must have been riding an old
night-mare!”

BERTHA LEONARD




] p

o Uf Winning vA




a ie
a Ata bo 5 tiene
exes heaps of jam in it.



When she had finished making it she

popped it in the oven, and was just
going to light the gas when there
was a knock at the door.

Off she hurried, leaving the oven
door open. Then a strange thing
happened. The roly-poly pudding
jumped out of the dish and walked
through the kitchen-door into the
garden.

“Why should I stay there and
be cooked?” thought he. ‘‘I will
go into the world and seek
adventure.”

And down the garden he walked,
through the gate and into the road.

He looked such a funny little
fellow walking along. He was so
very fat, and so full of jam that
it kept oozing out on to the pave-
ment as he walked.

But he thought he was very fine
indeed and he was very proud of
himself.

Soon two children came
walking by.

‘““Why, what is that ?”’ said one.

“Tt looks like a pudding,’’ said

{, PUDDING

I By

Roty /Poty..

D. STEERWOOD






the other, and they ran towards poor Mr.
Roly-Poly, and picked him up.

“Let us take him home and bake him
for dinner,’”’ said they. And home they
trotted as fast as they could.

He looked
such a funny
little fellow
walking
along.

CES.
B

RHA,
81 F
“Look, Mother,” said the little boy.
“We found this roly-poly pudding.”

‘Give it to me,” said their mother,
“and I will put it in the oven and bakeit.”

So she put it on the top shelf in the

warm oven.

On the shelf underneath
small sausage-rolls and one
large one.

“Oh! dear! Oh! dear!”
sighed the roly-poly pudding.

“What is the matter?”
asked the big sausage-roll.

“‘T don’t want to be baked
and eaten,” said Roly-Poly.
‘<7 wish I could run away.”

But this time the oven
door was shut tightly, and
he could not get out.

Soon he and the sausage-
rolls were baked a nice light
brown in colour. Then the
oven door opened, and the
Mother and the two children
looked in.

“Now they are ready,”
said one of the children.
“ Let us eat them.”










were seven

WA
WEN Hie ches

The jam roly-poly
.. hurried through
the kitchen door,
followed by the big sausage-roll and the five little ones.

“No, you must wait till
dinner-time,’’ said their Mother. ‘‘ Go
in the garden and play,” and she shut the
oven door. ~

“Oh! dear!’’ sighed Roly-Poly. “ I’m
afraid I shall REALLY be eaten this
time.”

“Oh! dear! Oh! dear!” sighed the
sausage-rolls. ‘‘ We don’t want to be
eaten at all.”

At that moment the oven door opened
again, and the two children looked in.

‘‘ How tempting they look!” said the
little boy, and he picked up one of the
small sausage-rolls and began to eat it.
The little girl also took one, and began to
eat that also.

Just then there was a noise in the other
room.

“ Quick, come away ; there is someone
coming!” said the boy. And they both
rushed into the garden, forgetting to
close the oven door in their haste.

“Now is our chance,” said the jam

roly-poly, and he jumped off the dish
and hurried through the kitchen door,
followed by the big sausage-roll and the
five little ones.

When they reached the road the five
little sausage-rolls began to feel frightened.

‘We are going back,” said they. “ We
like it much better in the warm oven,” and
back they all trotted and laid themselves
on the dish again ready to be eaten.

But the large sausage-roll did not feel
afraid, and he followed the jam roly-poly
along the road.

Soon they reached a small lane with
grass growing on either side of it.

‘Where are we going now?” said the
sausage-roll.

“‘T don’t know,” said the roly-poly
pudding. ‘‘ Perhaps if we keep on walk-
ing we shall find a little house in which to

" Tive.”
On and on they walked and they were
soon very tired, but they did not find a

82
little house; instead a very sad thing

happened to them.

Sitting by the side of the lane wasa man.
He was very tired and very hungry. He
was poor and he had no money. All day
long he had been without food.

Just for a moment he had shut his

eyes.
vo Ob !°**thought.:he, “if only I could
see some food in front of me when I open
my eyes again!”

Just then he opened them, and

there standing in front of him was a
large sausage-roll and a jam-roly-poly
pudding.

“Why, the fairies must have sent
them,” said he, and he picked up the
sausage-roll in one hand, and the pudding
in the other.

He took two big bites, and the sausage-
roll had disappeared. Then he tackled the
jam-roly-poly, and soon that was all eaten
up too. And that was the end of the poor
jam-roly-poly pudding.









NINN NNN NNN
‘ THE WORM Z
SS YY,
YY . SS
< COCK called all his children round ye
YY And told them how a worm he found, SY
SY And how to get one from the ground. of
IA NY
> ‘*Ror worms are always found,” Z
eH said he SS
SS 2 WY
7j “Upon the ground beneath a SS
YA, You only have to wait and SS
SN see.” %Y
YY, SS
SS Y
RN Away they went and his eldest son “wy
< Soon cried out that he’d found one. -
Ve) A clever thing he thought he’d done! SN
>

But a rude young «

frog called ‘“‘Hi! 7
Minorca, <
‘“‘*The worm you've YA
found will be a SY
choker— YY

“It’s just a tube of Ye

yellow ochre.” SS

EIB. GF

SS

NY Y%

83




(if vas Vea 2 Oy
oe gt SS ee oN
Clg’ tote
MEXICAN a fe -—
= te eae :
MOUNTAINS a . she 2
Ry Ge DON’T think I shall ever take Ve
# 6A ‘‘charrabang ” or taxi
Et To get a little closer to hi 0)
By ploding Cotopaxi. } : Sue
Ui
And I am equally convinced ‘ ae
It needs a man of mettle f i \
To ramble on the rumbling a, y i
slopes & Ors 4
Of Popocatapetl. = a a ’
|
sQggg og ggaUanaeReOREaRgaRanaOgagAOOR|R

3

€3

9 GOING THE WRONG WAY Q
(2

3

ELCICIEY ESESCSESES CUCL ES ES CS CY CS COOL ILS CSCS CN CY CY CSCS CED CY CIENCY CS CE EILS



AE money to
hire a cab, and he
backed his new
horse.) into. the
shafts.

“Stand steady,
Lightning!” he
Said, vies Ei: you
won’t work as a
racehorse, you will
have to earn money
with this cab.”






WA AHEN every-
AY GA thing was
AALS) ready he
discovered that he
had forgotten the
whip.

** Watch him for
me, you Snooker,”’
he said.’ ‘; Stay
there while I get
the whip.”

‘““ Leave him to
me“ “replied
Snooker. “I’lltake
care of your cab.”









Spica |)

Laud

%, mt im



| ofan | jini
WAY
20000000 8809 080808 0088 828 80000 20808020

3
. 2
3 GOING THE WRONG WAY
ag

200008 000 000 08008 GO000 BOO00 BENQ OBO0000

(CONTINUED) :

XS ES RNS

ee
shoo oo AMID py)



by, and they made
it up to play a little
trick.

“My whiskers,
this is something
like ajoke!” laugh-
ed Snooker. “‘ Let’s
take the horse out
and © turn’ = him
round.”





with the whip, and
when he saw the
way his horse was
standing he was
surprised.
‘“What do you
mean, you old
horse ?”’ he asked.
“ T only left you for
a minute and this
has happened!”


=~

ee te a mee ee

Q GOING THE WRONG WAY a

a «3
O00 D000 AOA RARBAGARRAL BQQ000080000 000000

(CONTINUED)



oa ig ready to
drive.

‘“Getup there,
he said. ‘‘ You’ve
found out how to
turn round, and
you'll have to find a
way to turn back.”
And he cracked his
whip and tugged at
the reins.





ig a into a shop
window.

“Pp top! Go
back!” call eid
o Jerry. Vl dont
know what to do
with you now.
You’re no good for
a racehorse, and
you’re not even fit
to pull a cab.”






bh
ge
, =

ESS










Pacific, where its fruit con-
mistitutes an important article

of food.

Ruth was reading aloud from a book
on her lap.

“ That’s not real bread, though, is it ?”’
asked Jerry.

“Oh! no,” replied Ruth; ‘but I am

going to learn to

make real bread O

some day.” §
“Do you mean

to tell me that

you don’t know |



ADD

how to make bread
at your age?”
asked a voice be-
“T aM
Why,

side them.
surprised ! 6
is) ase .easy as. 16
knitting.” Sect)

Beside them
stood a very thin
little fellow with 9 speak!):
such a big head. °
-“T know all
about it,” said
the strange little
mano; Vm the: 9
i Cpe Oe EL

O

you know.”

milk !”



THE MILKY WAY

ABY nibbles at his thumbs
Till another bottle comes ;
As he gulps it down he shows
All his pink and chubby toes.

Then the dimples in his cheek
Say (he’s MUCH too full to

“Look at ME! I’m soft as silk
Because I drink such LOTS of

JPDAPAPAPAOPDPDDDOD

co
oo







“Whatever does that mean?” asked
Jerry.

“Why, Instructor-in- Chief-to-the
Bread-Department-of-the-Royal-H ouse-
hold, of course,’’ replied the little man,
as though every one ought to know
without asking.

“T’m called I.C.B.D.R.H. for short,
the other’s such a mouthful. I’m just
going to give the Princess a lesson in
bread-making;
T’ll show you how
it’s done if you
like. imeveny
clever, you know.
That’s why my
head’s so big. It’s
full of brains.
Now just shut
your eyes while I
count ten.”

And when Ruth
and Jerry opened
their eyes again,
they found that
they were sitting
on the terrace
steps at the back of
a beautiful palace.
Beside them was
a tall plant in a
big pot, and it
had strange square

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A procession of such funny-looking people was marching

flowers on it which looked just like

bread-tins.

The warm sun was shining on the plant,
and, as the children watched, soft creamy
dough began to rise above the edges of

the tin-like flowers.
a eLnye!

“* Of course, it’s
bread,’ said the
tall thin fellow
with the big head.
“‘ That’s our Fairy
Bread-baking
Plant. We bake
our bread in the
sun, not in ovens
as humans do.
Come along and
T’ll show you how
it’s done. That’s
the Fairy Bake-
house, just over
there.”

A procession of
such funny-look-
ing people was
marching towards
the Bake-house.

First came an old man with a sack of
best flour on his, back. Behind him was
another carrying a big crock with a jug
of water standing in it. Then came a
little boy with some bread-tins on his
head, and after him a curly-headed man
carrying a bag of yeast.
youth carrying a salt-sprinkler, and, last

Look!”
“Tt’s bread, I do believe.”’

towards the Bake-house.

of all, an important-looking Baker in an

apron and a big white hat.

house.
exclaimed Ruth.

O

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A GOOD CATCH

RITE your Christian name
and surname in one letter.

You can’t! Oh! yes, you can;
it’s quite easy.

Make a big O on a piece of
paper and write your names
inside !

Now see how many of your
friends you can catch.

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call it.”

Next was a
all the lumps.

89

‘** Now, come along in and you shall see
everything,” said the I.C.B.D.R.H. And
the children followed him into the Bake-

“Now,” said their strange companion,
“‘ we'll just make one nice big loaf such

as you have at
home. First of
all,” he went on,
“remember to
have everything
you use nice and
warm. That’s
most important.
Now watch.”

The man with
the yeast cut off
a piece which
weighed just an
ounce and a half.

“He puts that
into a little basin,”’
said their teacher,
‘““and he mixes it
with just enough
warm water to
make it as thin

as cream. Then he stands it in the sun.
Humans put it near the fire so that
it will get warm and ‘work,’ as they

Next came the flour-man and weighed
out just two pounds of his flour and put
it in the crock, and proceeded to rub out
“Now look at the yeast again,” said
the little man. And as they looked they
saw it begin to move, and bubbles rose
to the surface of the mixture.

“ That’s just ready to use now,” said
the I.C.B.D.R.H.

It was then that the important-looking
Baker strode over to the crock. He

shook in a little salt, mixed it with the —

flour, and then poured in the bubbling
yeast, and about half a pint of nice

“‘That’s risen beautifully,”
said the I.C.B.D.R.H.,
‘and it’s so light we could
fly anywhere on it.” ...
He leaped on to the loaf.

90





warm water. These he stirred well and
quickly into the flour until it became a
rather sticky lump of dough.

‘“* Now we put the dough in the sun to
rise,” said the little thin man. “ You
humans stand it in front of the fire with
a cloth over it. The sun does it for us
much more quickly.”

Jerry and Ruth watched it, and in a
few moments the dough began to rise and
swell until it was a large spongy mass.

‘““There! Now it’s ready to
bake. < It, just) has. tobe

kneaded a little
and then ‘plomp’
Y it goes into one
yr of the square
flowers on the
F.B.B.P.,and the
hot sun will bake
it for us.”
Ue a ee oe “How lovely!”
resin exclaimed the
Ti vn children as a
| | beautiful, golden
brown loaf rose
| into view.

MeO en
takes quite an
fer: hour to bake, so
she told me,”
said Ruth.
Then, to their amazement, the loaf
rose right up out of the tin-flower into
the air, and it grew bigger and bigger as
they watched.

“ That’s risen beautifully,” said the
1.C.B.D.R.H., “‘ and it’s so light that we
could fly anywhere on it. Now we must
fetch the Princess and she shall have her
lesson.

He leaped on to the loaf. Then he
turned and held out his big hands to
Ruth and Jerry, and they climbed up
beside him. In a moment they were
flying through the air to the Princess.

“Please, your Royal Highness,” said
the little man, ‘“‘ everything is ready for
your bread lesson, if you will kindly
come.”

‘*Oh ! bother the old bread!”’ exclaimed
the Princess, pettishly; ‘‘ I’m reading a

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Well,” said



= NS ay we
‘Oh! bother the old bread!” exclaimed the
Princess pettishly.

lovely story about those funny humans,
and can’t be disturbed now. You must
teach me another time.”’

the little fellow to the

children, as they flew away again on the
top of the loaf,
bread now. That’s one good thing learnt.”

And then Ruth and Jerry heard him

“you know how to make

slowly counting ten, back-
wards, and they knew
that he was going.

“* Good-bye, little man;
thank you so much!”
they cried.

“ Little man! indeed!”
cried the little fellow.
““ Please remember that
Pm. the. 1. CB 3D Re. or
I shall never come to
see you again.” And he
was gone,





POST

DO YOU 2?

] LIKE to dig upon the sands;
I like to sail my boat ;
I like to see the seagulls fly
With flapping wings afloat.

I like to catch the baby crabs
That play in every pool...
CI caught a bucketful one day

And took them all to school!)

sooo
—

91



\B I like the smell of salty winds ;
I like large slabs of cake;
@ But most I like to paddle

Where the big waves break!
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ce SS it, and you will have a very
good idea of Kittikins, Mrs. Brown’s
Persian kitten.

His mistress called him ‘‘ the prettiest
kitten in the world,” and perhaps he was.
Certainly he was one of the most mis-
chievous—and that was really the reason
he became a fairy kitten . . . for ten
minutes !

This was how it happened.

One beautiful summer morning when





Just in front of him he saw the stump of an

old tree.

the sun was shining and the birds singing,
Kittikins slipped out of the house as soon
as Cook came downstairs and opened the
kitchen door. He ran as hard as he could
down the garden, and Cook ran after him
as fast as SHE could—which wasn’t very
fast—calling to him to come back. Of
course, Kittikins took no notice of her,
and just as she had very nearly caught
him, he darted through the hedge at the
bottom of the garden and found himself
in a wood.

Kittikins had never been outside the
garden before, and for a moment he stood
listening and looking round the Big
World fe had discovered. Then, just
in front of him, he saw the stump of an
old tree.

Kittikins sat down and gazed at it.

“TI wonder what the world looks like
from up there ?”’ he thought,
glancing up. ‘‘I—yes, T’ll
climb to the top.”

So, slipping and scratching,
he clawed his way to the top
of the tree stump, and then. . .
there was a sudden crash, and
Kittikins went tumbling down
the inside of the tree. It was
HOLLOW !

Down he fell and fell—in
fact, he kept on falling so long
that he began to think he was
never going to stop. But he
DID stop—suddenly, and with
a big bump !

Wondering what had hap-
pened to him, Kittikins showly
opened his eyes. Where do
you think he was ?

He had fallen into the Fairy
Queen’s banqueting hall, and

94










‘* A kitten ! how lovely !” murmured the fairies.

the Queen and all her fairies had jumped
up from their chairs, looking very surprised
and startled, for Kittikins had landed in
the middle of a fairy blancmange, and as
it was rather a soft blancmange it had
splashed everybody.

Perhaps it was the blancmange that
saved him from being hurt. At all events
he very soon sat upwith a loud “ Miaow!”
Then he began to lick the blancmange off
his whiskers.

“Who are you ? ”’ demanded the Queen
when she had got over her surprise a little,
and had been wiped clean by her fairies.

“T’m Kittikins,”’ replied the intruder,
“and I’m Mrs. Brown’s kitten.”



“A kitten! How Lovety!”
mured the fairies.

The Queen waved her wand.

“You WERE Mrs. Brown’s kitten,” she
corrected, ‘‘ but now, of course, you're a
fairy kitten. Take a seat and help your-
self.”

Kittikins stopped washing himself. He
wasn’t sure that he wanted to be a fairy
kitten.

mur-

“Can I have lots of
milk and cream?’ he
asked.

“MILK!” repeated the
Fairy Queen; “‘ of course
we’'veno milk. Whoever
heard of a fairy cow?
Fairies drink dew! The
blancmange is made of
cloudy dew.”

“Then if you haven’t
any milk or cream,” said
Kittikins firmly, ‘‘ I don’t
want to be a fairy kit-
ten. I’m ever so thirsty, so
you must magic me back
into Mrs. Brown’s kitten

at once.”
As soon as he said
that all the fairies

began to dab at their eyes with tiny
handkerchiefs.
““We’ve always so wanted a fairy
kitten,” sighed the Queen, “‘ and ie
“JT want my MILK!” miaowed Kitti-
kins; ‘‘I WANT my MILK! I WANT MY
M a?





“Stop !’”’ cried the Fairy Queen, putting
her fingers in her ears to shut out the
dreadful noise. Then she waved her
wand again and...

Kittikins found himself back in his own
garden ; and as soon as he saw where he
was he rushed into the kitchen, and rubbed
himself against Cook’s legs until she gave
him a big saucerful of new milk.

oO} DODDDODOOOOCOO COCO OOC OOOO COCO COCO C OCC CC OC OL]
9

WHY IS THIS BOOK LIKE A PLANT?
BECAUSE IT IS A HARDY ANNUAL. 9

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HUT up inside a cosy sty eee

Pigs lazily recline, and lie TBM es

About all day—they never leap Sega
AGLETS %





Like frisky lambs, but simply sleep

And eat (theyre VERY fond of
‘ srub ” !)

Until each pig looks like a tub...

And when it comes to killing time

The fattest pigs are labelled ‘‘ prime.”








LTHOUGH it cannot dance a jig,
A useful creature is the pig :
When it is much too fat to walk
It makes the most delicious pork,
And ham, and sausages (though these
Are one of life’s great mysteries),
While other parts of pigs provide you
With all the bacon stowed inside you!








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LEEELE EY EY EE EE EE ERE RE REM EE

Uncle Oo] ah’s Funnymoon
YS, WS, UE, US, US, UE YE UE UE UE US UE UE OE OE Ee Be Be Be

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22

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(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 73)

INCLE OOJAH looked all
} around the farm for Snooker.
D yy He searched in the barns and
Biers the dairy; he peeped into the
alle! -pails and the churns and everywhere
else he could think of.

‘Oh! Don, it’s no good!’ he com- |
plained. * Would Farmer Honeypot un-’
build his stacks, do you think, and let me
have a see underneath ? ”

** Our Snooker wouldn’t be there,”’ said
Don. ‘I tell you what, couldn’t you
bring him back by magic ? ”

“Yes, I might find him that
way,” nodded Uncle Oojah.
‘““Shutty-eye and don’tee cry,
Snooker come back by and by.
Did you hear that, Don
it pretty and rhymy ? Aftersuch
beautiful poetry I ought to do
some lovely magic.”

Jerrywangle and Don closed
their eyes and waited, and
presently a big lump of earth
came down with a thump close
beside them.

** Jimmy-ninnikins, what’s the
matter now?” exclaimed Uncle
Oojaire ae Ohe!e looks here:s =a
shower of stones and clay falling
down ! Lovey-lovekins, what have
I done to deserve this?”

They all tried to dodge the
falling lumps, and suddenly they
heard a loud phizz and saw
Snooker tumble plump into a
heap of soft clay. Don ran and
pulled him out, and Snooker sat
up and began phizzing again.

‘“‘ That’s a nice thing to happen -
to anybody !”’ he gasped. ‘“ My
suffering tail, was it an
earthquake, or a catquake?”










97

‘“ Splendid! That sounds just like my
own Snooker,’ smiled Uncle Oojah.
‘“‘ Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, where have you
beengpes

“Now you're asking something,”
grumbled his little friend. ‘‘ There was I,
hunting at the bottom of a rat-hole, when
up went the earth and down came
Snooker ! ”

‘* Poor little cat |”’ sighed Mrs. Honey-
bee. ‘‘ Come in by the fire and I'll give
you a nice drink of new milk. Then you
must all have your suppers and get off to

"eB

o

eo

‘* Here’s a shower of stones and clay falling fi
down! Lovey-lovekins, what have I done
to deserve this?”
bed, for I want early

to-morrow.”’

you up





A Bm ext morning Uncle Oojah
| rushed downstairs to breakfast
4 and ran to take the chair next
aus) to Farmer Honeybee.
What’s going to happen to-day?”
he asked. ‘Hurry up and tell me. I’m
so anxious to know why we were sent to
bed early last night.”

‘“* This is our Apple-day,”’ replied Far-
mer Honeybee. “‘ If you will work hard
to help up we are making plans to give
you a grand Wassail.”’

‘““That sounds very nice,’’ said Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ Could I have some for break-
fast—just to try a little taste?”

“Tt isn’t anything to eat,” explained
the farmer. “‘ Every January we have a
Wassail around the apple-trees, but if we
get done early to-day we are going to have
a special one for you.”

He went on with his breakfast, and
when it was over he took everybody









3

He began shaking the tree.
the apples.



Down came

98

along to the orchard. His men brought
ladders and leaned them against the
trees ; then they climbed up and started
the apple-picking.

‘““Tt’s a poor crop this year,” sighed
Farmer Honeybee. ‘‘ There is nothing at
all on some of the trees.”

‘*What a pity!’ said Uncle Oojah.
‘* Listen to me, Mr. Honeybutton. Order
your men to come down, and tell them to
wait while I go around that corner.
Don’t let them watch me, will you ? ”

Uncle Oojah went out of sight and
worked another magic, and then he
came back and began shaking a tree.
Down came the apples and the leaves as
well, and every leaf that touched the
ground turned into a ripe and juicy apple.

‘* My bedsocks, that’s quick growing ! ”
laughed Snooker. ‘I’m glad to see our
Oojah can still do something right when
he likes.”

Everybody rushed to gather the fallen
apples, following on from tree to tree ;
but the more they picked up the more
came down.

‘“T never saw so many apples
in all my life,’ smiled Farmer
Honeybee. ‘‘ You have worked
well for me to-day, Mr. Oojah.
Wait until to-night, when the
moon shines bright—you shall
have the very best Wassail we
can give you!”





4, and helped Mrs. Honey-
Ethie} bee to prepare a feast.
Uncle Oojah roasted the apples,
Don sprinkled in the sugar, and
Jerrywangle stirred the mixture
in the bowl. Even little Snooker
was doing something.

‘*“ My bedsocks, I call this hard
work !”’? he complained. ‘‘ Hasa
cat to stand here all night
scraping nutmegs ? ”’

‘*Oh! dear, no,’’ smiled Mrs.
Honeybee. “It’s nearly twelve
o'clock, and high time we


were in the orchard. I’m glad
the moon is shining.”

‘“This is your Wassail, Mr.
Oojah—perhaps you will carry it
out,’ said the farmer. ‘‘ We can
Wassail the middle tree—that’s
why I left all the apples on it.”

Uncle Oojah took the Wassail
bowl and carried it out to the
orchard, walking very slowly in
case he spilt anything.

‘This is one way of passing
the time, but it’s too slow for
me,” grumbled Snooker. ‘* Who
wants their old Wassail? I’m off
to have a bit of fun.”

So he waited until Uncle
Oojah was busy filling up the
mugs, and he climbed up the
tree and hid ‘himself among
the branches.

‘““Wassail to the old apple-
tree!” called the farmer. ‘‘ Next
year send us bags full and bags
full of apples—and ten times more
than that. Wassail!”



They joined in a ring and danced round

‘* Wassail!’? they all echoed,
and they emptied their mugs ;
then they joined in a ring and danced
around the tree.

Suddenly there was a change, for as they
were dancing the apples came rattling
down. One knocked Farmer Honeybee’s
hat off, and another caught Uncle Oojah
on the forehead.

‘* That’s our Snooker, it is,” said Jerry.

the tree.

‘“Is that where he went?” asked
Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘I see you, Snooker—
where are you? Come down this
minute, before I stop all your bedsock
money.”

‘“* Hi, Master Snooker—listen to me!”
shouted the farmer. “It’s Michaelmas
Day to-morrow, and we are having a goose

‘‘He is hiding up that tree. Look how for dinner. Do you want to be left out
he is throwing down the apples!” of the feast >?”

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AH, YOU ARE JUST
IN TIME FOR THE GREAT RACE BETWEEN
TATTERS AND PERCY



BUT MY
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down to the sands
with his spade and
bucket.



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““Come on, you
Snooker ! ”’ he called.
““We can have a
good time digging the
sand.”’

“Tm with you,”
laughed Snooker.
“We might as well
build ourselves a
sand-castle.”’

O they started to
build a big sand-
castle, and Jerry
tried hard to make

a good one.
“It’s doing well,
iteeaistee= he Said:

“Does our castle
look anything like
the Tower of Lon-
don?”

Se 2NeOst. meawec sh.
chuckled Snooker.
“ Straighten up your:
chimney, and I’ll do.
the front door.”

102


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Jerry’s Seaside Holiday

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9



§

EFORE they

could finish, two
donkeys raced over
the castle.

Sealihat-s; sas mice
thing to do!” com-
plained Snooker.
“The beach is big
enough. Why
couldn’t they go an-
other way >?”

* Our ee is no
good now,’ sighed
einen es Bet Sarco
and find some other
game to play.”



°M going to have
a little swim,”
declared Snooker.
“The donkeys can’t
bother us in the sea.”’

** And I shall come
with you,” — said
Jerry. ‘I always
enjoy swimming in
the ocean.”

So they went to
look for a bathing
machine, and Jerry
led the way into it.



§ §
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Jerry's Seaside Holiday

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AO

Heb ON witlhtesy:
were ready
Snooker came out
and looked at the
water.
= Jupp eee lees
called Jerry. ‘‘ Don’t
get skerrified. I shall
be near you if any-
thing happens.”
They both dived

* head-first into the
- sea, but Snooker
soon discovered that
it was too deep for
him.









ERRYWANGLE
rescued his little
friend and carried
him up the beach.
eaeleshpieSamlesanOsuer
Snooker, it is,’ he
said. ‘‘ I had to save
him from the water.”
“ Thank you, my
dear,” said Uncle
Oojah = The nexts.
time you go in swim-
ming make sure you
keep one foot on the.
shore.”

— J ;
del






fe

104


MR. CHICKWEED’S LETTER

By C. E. BERNARD




Rta ak. CHICKWEED was a jolly
} 4 ff old elf who lived in a little hut
VA If on the top of a hill.

& He was very happy in his
little home, with his pets to care for and
his garden to look after; but there was
one trouble in his life which worried him.
He had no friends or uncles or aunts, and
so he never got any letters.

Now the fairy postman was a very busy
person, and Mr. Chickweed used to sit by
his window every day and watch him go
by laden with letters and parcels for other
lucky elves and fairies of the village.
And Mr. Chickweed would sigh and long to
have a letter all for himself.

And then he had a bright idea !

He would write a letter to himself every
day, so that no longer would the postman
pass by his door without even looking in
his direction.

He sat down and wrote a lovely long
letter to himself, full of all sorts of
interesting things, and put a row of kisses

CHESS

atthe bottom. Then he went down tothe’

post office and bought a stamp and stuck
it on the envelope, and dropped it in the

- pillar-box. ©

The next morning there was a sharp
rat-tat-tat on his door, which was at the
side of the house, and Mr. Chickweed
jumped out of bed, and opened the door,
and there was the postman smiling all over
his face, holding a letter in his hand.
It was exciting. He jumped into bed
again, chuckling to himself, and tore open
the envelope, and out dropped a letter,
but it was not his own.

‘* Dear Mr. Chickweed,”’ it ran, ‘‘ I saw
you post your letter to yourself yesterday.
You must not do it, as it is a waste of
stamps. I will write to you myself every’.
day instead.—From Sarah Honeysuckle.’”

Mr. Chickweed was overjoyed.: He
jumped out of bed, and danced round the
house in his night-gown.

And ever afterwards he got a letter
each morning, and on Saturdays a big fat
parcel full of chocolates and cakes from
his kind friend. Wasn’t he a lucky elf?

105°

[f-


o> 2
Se z wae

Dont those rocks look funny Fido, just
Tike the backs of some giant tortoises?






ire Good Gractous | they ARE alive
and they DO look like tortolses.’



106
Td like to chance
a ride on this
little one







| SS Sn
My stars. Sa
He's Yunntn ST
away — we must

See Off :

Somehow.






ik \ ay ~ ¢
“Good Heavens! Fido,
the Yorks havent
moved — I wonder
uf Ive been asleep ?



4)

107
It was a hot summer day and

Margery and Michael were sitting

in the shade reading fairy tales.

‘*Hello!” shouted Michael, ‘‘there’s

a fellow stealing one of Farmer
Podger’s geese!”



Up they jumped after the thief and
Michael clutched him, but a very
strange feeling came over him. He
couldn't /et go! And Margery
couldn’t let go of Michael! They
tried to get free, but couldn’t.



It was most mysterious! The wicked thief grinned back at them. Then Nursie

came shrieking after them and caught Margery, but she couldn’t let go either!

They were getting awfully tired and Daddy and Mother, hearing their cries,
came running after them.
—And Has a Terrible Dream



‘‘T say, stop!” shouted Daddy, grabbing Nursie’s arm. Then he couldn’t let go!

‘‘Oh ! come back,” cried Mother, clinging to Daddy. On they tore until old

Billy Bloggs, the policeman, came in sight. ‘‘ You’re exceeding the speed limit,”
he said. But he couldn’t let go either!



It was awful! The children were —and looking up, Michael saw

exhausted, but still the impish boy Nursie! ‘‘Oh, you children do take

flew on—right to the edge of the a lot of waking. Come along, tea’s
cliffs— ready!”

109
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99 )
nl cee and Snooker at Covent Garden }}

99

eS Se aneree om“ PP PDA o DP PAPI OS See
PPP PPPS PPDDPPP OPPS |





ERR YWANGLE

and Snooker
went out to work
at Cowent Gar-
den Market.

‘‘Tsn’t this cart
heavy,” sighed
Jerzy. <1 didnt
know they were
so hard to push.”’

‘These old
fruits are’ very
fruity,’’ com-
plained Snooker.
‘When we get
our money, we
shall have earned
ited

PLP LP LP LP LP LD LP LP

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S

§ CUDDENLY, a

6 wheel came

4 cif the cart, and

® everything fell

§ into the road.

> “Now we rein

§ forit!’’ muttered

* Snooker. ‘‘It

4 seems to me that

? being a porter

‘ isn’t all j | jam and | (i

® honey.” “aes

9 “You mutter Faz- ae SL 8
2 too much, you jw MBE
§ do,” grumbled |

9 Jerry. “ Pick it |

4 allup before our |

% man comes.”

My

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110
9
9
9
9
9
9
§
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
!
9
9
9
§
9
6
§
9
9
9
O

§ § 9
h §

Jerry and Snooker at Covent Garden 4

C] DP PPP DP DP LDP LD DDD DPD DDD PP PDD DD PDD DPD PD DDD DD SDS DPDDDPDD DD CJ

(CONTINUED) ‘)





HEY were ?
toolate,for 4

the fruit mer-
chantsawthem 4
and came run- 9
ning up. 4
“What does ?
this mean?’ he 4
demanded. 2
“Take those §
turnips away. ?
Oh! you pair.”’ §
“My bed- 9
socks,”’ replied ;
Snooker, “it’s 9
coming to §
something }
when you turn i
a cat into a tur-





nip carrier.” 4
po gath- oe
ered up the Us. oo SS be ah en6
things as fast as | I |
they could, and §
Jerry piled the 8
baskets on his §
head. ;
Presently 9
Snooker spied 3
a mouse run- §
ning across the
pavement.
‘“My whis-
kers, I’m going
after you!”’ he y
Fat eine di. “ol 6
never miss a y
chance when I 4
meet one of :
your family.” °

111
9

§lDoooch
PPAF

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9
Jerry and Snooker at Covent Garden
O



DB PDPPPB PPB PPPB PPP PDPDPBPBPBPBPBPE. PPBPBPPBPBPDPBPAPDPAP PPA PDPAPAPAPA PAP PA DAL
DBP PB PDP PE PPP PPDPB PP PPB PP BPD DPD PPBPBPBPDPA PDP PPAPAPDPPDPAPDAD SD DDD

(CONTINUED )

te a



NOOKER fran
(| into Jerry
“ and nearly
|| knocked him
down.

iL “Stop it, can’t
you?” called
Jerry. ‘“Howdo
you expect me
to carry baskets
when you go
running into
mene

“T’m sorry,
don’t be upset,”
said Snooker.
»«That mouse
got away from
me after all.”
























AS Jgesietsy.
moved a-
way the baskets
toppled over,
and down they
went on the
irutt mer -
chant’s head.

‘ 'That’s the
en dso-f my
WOK. “Sald
erry. “SWed
better runwhile
we are safe.”’

“‘T think so,
too,” chuckled
Siooker. < can’t say we're
a success as
fruit porters.’

PB PA PBPID DPD PB PDD PB PBIB PAP. PB BABA PBB DO BDA DPD. DPD PPA DPA PDA DADA. PDPAPDPAPDPDPAPAPD D>

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112

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Â¥



“al have noticed THAT before,”

Zi WY murmured Jamie in astonish-

wéieed ment, as, from the depths of
his cosy armchair, he gazed up at a
quaintly carved and curiously marked
-black box which reposed upon the top of
the old bookcase. ‘‘ ButeI am sure it
never WAS there before,’ he went on,
sitting upright, and peering hard at the
mysterious object above his head. ‘‘ Where
CAN it have come from ? ”

And then another thought came to
him.

‘““I wonder if there is anything inside
Ab srie

The next moment he had clambered on
toa chair, but found that he was unable to
reach the queer black box.

And then a strange thing happened:
Either the chair upon which Jamie stood
got bigger or the bookcase became smaller,
for Jamie actually found himself reaching
out and taking hold of it. In another
few moments he was sitting upon the

floor with the mysterious black box before >

him.

Truly, it WAS a mysterious box, for no
matter which way he turned it—this way,
or that—always its quaint carvings seemed
to take on a semblance to a face; a queer,
half-smiling, funny-looking face. What
appeared to be its mouth was really the

®~ The Door Behind






A
Nees

Su







lock, and Jamie noticed for the first time
that a heavy golden key was in it.

With a soft click the key turned, and
Jamie raised the heavy lid. He gave a
cry of disappointment, for there was
nothing in the box but another and larger
key. He picked it up. Why, there was
some writing upon it! He looked closer,
then made out these words :

“Tam the Key of the Little Door
Behind the Window Curtain :
Use me.”

“ T never knew there was a door there ! ”’
Jamie cried, jumping up and running over
to the window, where he paused, not
knowing on which side to look. First
he pulled aside the heavy curtain on the
left—there was no door to be seen; but
when he held back the curtain on the right
he gave a cry of delighted amazement,
for there, sure enough, was a little oak
door, studded all over with shiny brass
knobs.

“What a dear little door!” he cried,
as he fitted the key intoitslock. Another
moment, and the mysterious little door
swung open.

“Well, Inever!’’ gasped Jamie. Then,
crouching down upon his hands and
knees, he peered through the doorway.

He found himself gazing down what
seemed to be the crooked little main
street of a crooked little town. Every

113 H


It was a strange sight indeed which he beheld!

house in the street was crooked, each was
different from its neighbour, and all
seemed—like the black box-—to have
quaint faces, some smiling, some woe-
begone, others sleepy or careless-looking,
and yet others haughty and proud. Jamie
was hardly surprised to observe that some
of them were even quarrelling. One, in
particular, a little larger than the others,
seemed much aggrieved that it should
have such tumble-down and_ shabby-
looking neighbours.

“Oh! what a funny place,” Jamie
laughed. “I must find out more about
tn

So saying, he crept on all fours through
the tiny doorway, and was soon standing
before the first house to the right of the
queer, crooked street.

As he gazed up at it a little timidly he
felt sure that one of its shining eyes—
which, of course, was really one of its
windows—winked at him, and that its
front door, which stood wide open,
broadened into a smile.

“This one seems
friendly, anyhow,”’
Jamie told himself,
glancing as he did so
at the house beyond,
which looked decidedly
cross. ‘I think Ill go
inside.”

Before doing so, how-
ever, he knocked gently
on the door with the
heavy brass knocker, in
case there was anyone
at home. But there
was no answer, so he
went into the hall and
looked about him. The
pictures on the walls
hung crookedly, and as
for the staircase, Jamie
wondered how anyone
could ever mount it?
Allthesame, he thought,
he would like to try to
climb up himself and
find out what was to be
seen upstairs. He soon
found that the task he had set himself was
most difficult, for the stairs were so slanting
and uneven that every three steps he
mounted he fell down two, and as there
were no banisters to hold on to, Jamie
seemed in danger of falling into the hall
below.

“T won’t give up yet,’ he said with
determination, as he slipped down for the
seventh time just as he was nearing the
top.

Then he jumped, and almost fell—so
startled was he—for a curious sound came
rumbling through the house: the stairs
began to rock and the pictures on the wall
to swing. What could the matter be ?
Then Jamie understood. The house was
laughing at him! Louder and louder
grew its queer, rumbling laughter, and
more and more did the stairs sway and
shake and the pictures swing.

He crept down again, backwards, step
by step, holding on very hard to the stair-
case, which was now rolling and tossing
like a boat on a rough sea. A sudden

114



gin j

y

S| |

ann



\





La
oo

a

The stairs began to rock.

lurch sent him sliding down the last five
stairs, and as soon as he reached the hall
he ran out of the rolling house.

Jamie hurried past the next two houses,
which looked angry and scowled, and did
not pause until he had almost reached the
end of the crooked, winding street.

When he did stop it was to gaze curi-
ously at a one-sided strange-looking
dwelling-place which stood back a little
from the roadway, surrounded by a
garden in which grew the strangest plants
and bushes Jamie had ever seen.

Everything in this garden seems to be
on the verge of tears. As for the house—
well, it did look upset !

The one-sided house called to him in a
wailing, trailing voice

‘“ Please come and help me, I’ve such a
bad pain inside!”

“I am very sorry,” Jamie told it,
gently. ‘‘ Where is the pain ? ”








Wy Ve
j Uf ss R Gj >

“T don’t know,” the house
snivelled, “‘Come and find it
for me, will you ?”

Jamie pushed open the stiff,
creaking gate and _ stepped
into the garden. Tears were
running fast down the quaint,
cobbled garden path, and he had
to jump from stone to stone
in order to keep his feet from
getting soaked.

“Could you manage to hold
your tears back just while I
slip in at the front door?’”’ Jamie
asked kindly, for he was really afraid of
getting a drenching.

“T-PH t-try,’”’ the house whimpered,
gulping, so that Jamie nearly slipped over
the door mat (for, of course, its door was
its mouth as well).

But no sooner was Jamie safely inside,
than the one-sided house began to weep
such large tears that the water started to
flow into the halland on into all the rooms.

Jamie, who had entered the sitting-
room to look for the pain, soon found
himself knee-deep in water. After a
hard struggle against the fast-rising tears,
Jamie at last succeeded in reaching the
hall once more, where he managed to
climb on to the second stair of the queerly-
carved staircase.

“Whatever shall I do?” he asked
himself, as the lake of salt water rose
higher and higher, and the wailing became
louder and louder every moment. Then
he had an idea. “If only I can find the
pain AT ONCE, the house will stop crying,
and I will be safe.”” And then and there
he began to run up the stairs. As he
looked back he saw with alarm that the
water was rising fast behind him.

‘““T must hurry,” he panted, stumbling
forward on to the very top stair of all, just
as the water made a rushing swirl up-
ward. But though Jamie searched in
every room in the weeping house, no pain
could he find. |

He had just come back on to the landing
and was wondering how on earth he was
ever going to get out of the weeping,
watery house safely, when he caught his

115
foot in something and fell
heavily to the ground with
a big thud.

““Q-oh!’’ squealed the
house, ‘““ You’vE got it!
TuaT’s where the pain
isi{

Jamie picked himself up,
and found to his surprise
that he had stumbled over
an enormous nail, which
was sticking half in and
half out of the landing
flooring. Taking hold of it
with both hands he tugged
it hard, while the house
screamed that he was
making the pain worse.

“It’s like having your
tooth out, you know,”
Jamie told it soothingly
“Tt hurts—but you feel
much better afterwards.”

Then the nail came out
with a jerk and over Jamie
went again. He was
amazed on regaining his
feet to find that the tears
which the house had wept
had already almost dried
up, and he was very glad and relieved
to hear the house laughing merrily.

“ T’ve had that pain for fifty years and
two days,” it told him, “‘ but now I feel
as though I must dance a jig.”

“ Then I’m off! ’’ Jamie said under his
breath, for he had had quite enough jolting
and tumbling in the other house, and be-
fore the one-sided house could say another
word, he had run out into the front
garden, and was quickly in the crooked
street again.

“T don’t think I will go into any more
of them,” he told himself. ‘‘ There is no
knowing what might happen to me in the
next one.”

So saying, he ran back the way he had
come. But do you suppose he could
find the little door through which he had
CEN ae Te SESSISSESERESISSRS CRS SEs oR
i SAY THIS QUICKLY





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325893 BSH eRe SPSsissBses Se2se05 05305503 30.5000 208208005 298 205.02 005.303 584
116



MN
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1)
dt)

Jamie pushed open the stiff, creaking gate.

crept some time before ? No, he could not.
What could have become of it ?

Then Jamie gave a gasp of dismay.
There was the door with its little brass
knobs—but it had become very, very
small.

“TI can’t possibly get through, now,”
Jamie cried, dropping on all-fours: “I
can’t even get my head through.”’

Then he heard a cracked laugh above
his head, and—what do you suppose ?>—
he found himself back in the armchair in
the parlour once more, and the laughter
was coming from the queer black box.

Jamie rubbed his eyes to make sure
he was not dreaming, then opened them...

Yes, he was back in the room, sure
enough—but the mysterious black box
was gone.





SSESSESSESERSEROSRESRS SE SESSISSIS ERS EROET EST SPS SI SIS IS SESE OES SE OSES SESSESSESERT ERS SRTSRS ESET ST EOT one




ricks Trixy.
sees rteamatestsctecaseaecosceserscsaces tts cesct se
Dumplingfarim m

Ne (a

re
~





T’S jolly riding on a horse,
A very quiet one, of course—
Not one that jigs as off you go,

And never walks, and will NOT
66 whoa,”

But prances gaily (HOW it jolts !),
Or gets quite out of hand and bolts, (
Until into the nearest clump Ay
Of nettles you go fyiag. . BUMP!

we
=

HE donkey (sometimes called

yy LZ, an ass)

We \ Likes lots of thistles in its grass.
be \ It hasn’t all the horse’s tricks,
3) But—GOODNESS, how the beggar

| \
pwr y Bw)“ kicks !
Most people, some time, try their
SUR hands
At riding donkeys on the sands... .
(They like to sit down in the sea,
Which doesn’t much appeal to me !)


¢ Jerrywangle’s Minstrel Show ¢
LELECELELELELE ELEY EY vey LE EE YE EEE



VED they came to
the beach they be-

gan to sing, but nobody
' took any notice of them.

““My bedsocks, what’s
the > matter? 7, ‘called
Snooker. ‘‘ Haven’t you
any money to give
away?”

“They don’t want to
hear us,” sighed Jerry.
““ Shout louder, and they
will have to listen.”

ERRYWANGLE and

Snooker made it up to
go singing on the sands,
so they dressed up and
set off.

“Now for a happy
time ! ” laughed Snooker.
“There is no place like
the seaside for fun.”

PLUS very mice, itis,
said: Jerry. =, Wait ull
the people hear my latest
song.”


SELLE ELELEELE RENEE ELLE EEE EES
« Jerrywangle’s Minstrel Show ¢

¢
E_CLYLELRELRE EEE ELLE EEE EEE ery res

(CONTINUED)

Vas this they made
so much noise that
the people chased them
off the beach.

“Stop throwing those
things at us!” called
Jerry. “ You don’t know
good singing when you
Hear it:%:

Don’t. talks. Jerry:
puffed Snooker. ‘“‘ Save
up all your breath for
running away.”



ai

Ole Ou @)
Cy the way home they
met Don. |Z
“This place is no good, V3
it isn’t,” complained ZZ

Jerry. “We sang our ——==e
best songs and_ they
_ chased us away.”

Poor old jerry!
smiled Don. ‘‘ Why don’t
you try them with a Min-
strel Show ? Come home
with me and I'll tell you
what to do.”

iH


Goo EEE EEL EEE LEE ERE E Eas

¢ Jerrywangle’s Minstrel Show
ELLE EE OS ENE ENE IEE IS

(CONTINUED)

NSENSNS

De explained how

they could have a
Minstrel Show, and they
all got ready.

“There is one thing
about this plan,” chuckled
Snooker. ‘“‘ My complex-
ion is dark enough with-
out any help.”

““ Go easy, you Snook-
el, said. Jetty: vou
nearly brushed that black-
ing into my eye!”



ERRYWANGLE’S

Minstrel Show was a
great success, and the
more songs they sang
the more” the people
wanted.

“Our Don is taking a
big collection,” laughed
Snooker. “ Bang away
on your banjo, Jerry, and
we'll give them another
good old seaside chorus.”


CEELEELEEE EEE LEE EY EEE ee ede eee

oe
oe
22
22
oe

Uncle Oojah’s Funnymoon
YS, HS, YE, US, US, BE UE, OS, US, OS, UE UE US, UE OS UE OE OS UE OO

NBS

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 99)



%AAHEN Snooker heard Farmer
Ai Honeybee’s threat he soon came
Nia scrambling down the tree.
abss§ ‘‘ My whiskers, you’d better
not leave me out of the fun,”’ he called.
“*T wouldn’t miss the Michaelmas Goose
for anything.”

They had one more dance around the
apple-tree, and then they all went home
to bed. Next morning when they came
down to breakfast they found Mrs.
Honeybee looking very upset.

‘“Our goose hasn’t come yet,” she
complained. ‘“* Farmer Greengrass hasn’t
sent it, and he promised it would be here
early.”

‘“ What a pity you don’t grow your own
geese!’ said Uncle Oojah. ‘Never mind,
my dear; Ill go and fetch
it for you.”




They all walked on, chatting and
laughing; but suddenly a large black
dog rushed after them and began to bark
and snap at the goose’s head.

‘“‘ Lovey-lovekins, we can’t be dogged
about like this |!” exclaimed Uncle Oojah.
“Go away, you dark doggie, and leave us
alone.”

The strange dog still kept on worrying
them. At last Uncle Oojah flung the
goose at him, and it landed right across
the dog’s back. First he gave a yelp,
and then he snapped the goose up by the
neck and dashed off with it.

‘* Jimmy-ninnikins, there goes our good
goose!”? groaned Uncle Oojah. “ And
there goes our good dinner as well—what
will Mrs. Honeybee say?”

So he went off with his little [/2RgZz age

friends to the Greengrass farm,
and before very long they were
on their way home with the
goose.

‘““TIsn’t Mrs. Honeybee nice 2”
murmured Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ She
is always giving us little treats.
Yesterday it was a wassail,
and to-day it’s a goose. To-
morrow it might be I don’t
know what.”

“There is one thing that
puzzles me,”’ chuckled Snooker.
‘““ What will the old goose say
when he finds himself stuffed
with chestnuts ? ”

““ It wouldn’t say anything, it
wouldn’t,” laughed Jerry.
“When it’s stuffed it will
be too full to speak. That’s
very funny, it is—our Snooker
doesn’t know the difference be-
tween a goose and a gander !”’



It landed right across the dog’s back.
121
INCLE OOJAH chased the
strange dog and tried very
hard to get back the goose, but
i a the dog jumped a hedge and
raced away across the fields.

“T can’t get over that hedge,” sighed
Uncle Oojah. “Oh! Don, won’t Mrs.
Farmer think we are four great gooses—
I mean geeses—for going home without
her bird ? ”

‘“* There will not be time for us to get
another goose,” said Jerry. ‘‘ We can’t
do anything now, we can’t.”

** My whiskers, young Jerry’s forgettory
will soon be as bad as our Oojah’s,”
laughed Snooker. ‘‘ What about a nice
little bit of magic ? ”’

““ The very exactly thing ! ’’ exclaimed
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Put your best foot for-
ward, my dears. We must go home and
tell them not to worry.”

So they travelled back to the farm and
told Mrs. Honeybee how the strange dog
had stolen the goose, and
Uncle Oojah promised to magic
another one all ready in time
for dinner.

The farmer’s wife nodded
and went on laying the table,
and presently Farmer Honey-
bee came in and looked around.

‘““What’s happened to our
dinner ?”’ he asked. ‘“‘ There
is nothing here but knives and
forks and salt-cellars.”’

Just then the door opened
and a delicious smell floated
into the room. The next
moment in came Uncle Oojah
with the Michaelmas Goose.

““My beautiful bedsocks,
that’s something like a feast ! ”’
laughed the Kittencat. ‘‘ Cut
me off a leg and a wing, and
Pll soon show you what
Snooker can do with them!”

“You know what’s good,
Master Snooker,”’ smiled
Farmer Honeybee. ‘‘ That bird
must weigh every ounce of fifty
pounds. I could do with a
flock like that in my farmyard.”







“Yes, I suppose you could,” nodded
Uncle Oojah. ‘“‘I must magic a few for
you later on, if I don’t forget. But I’ve
no time for wonder-works now, Mr.
Funnybee—I want to sit down and taste
my Michaelmas dinner.”

saiHE Michaelmas dinner was a

ASS great success, but Uncle Oojah

Py] and Farmer Honeybee had so

SS many helpings of the fifty-

pound goose that they both fell asleep,

and it was long after supper-time before
they awoke.

‘“* Lovey-lovekins, it must be nearly
to-morrow !” sighed Uncle Oojah. “ Let
me see, didn’t I promise to do a something
for somebody ? I wonder what it was?”

“Farmer Honeybee can tell you, he
can,” replied Jerry. ‘‘ You told him you



would magic some of your special geese
for him.”

The next moment in came Uncle Oojah with the

Michaelmas Goose.

122
‘*“Swarms? It’s more like a plague!” exclaimed

the farmer.

“ That’s right, Mr. Oojah,”’ nodded the
farmer. ‘‘ I should like to make certain
of those big geese. That is, if you feel
fresh enough to do the work.”

‘““Of course I can. I feel as fresh as
two daisies,” smiled Uncle Oojah. “‘ Come



along, my dears. I couldn’t do
my dreams properly if I went to
bedwithout keeping a promise.”

So they all went into the
farmyard and Farmer Honey-
bee moved a_ wheel-barrow
out of the way.

‘““ Now it’s all ready,” he
said. ‘“‘ Magic as much as you
like, and the bigger you make
the flock the better I shall be
pleased.” :

Once more they closed their
eyes and waited while Uncle
Oojah got his magic ready,
and in a few minutes they
heard a tremendous cackling.
In through the gate they came
waddling, great white geese
almost too heavy to walk, until
the farmyard was nearly filled
with them.

“Ten, fifteen, twenty, one
hundred,” counted Don. “‘ Just
look! Here’s another lot
coming ! ”

** Yes, and another lot behind
them again,’’ added Snooker.
‘““My suffering tail, there are
swarms of them!”

‘““Swarms? It’s more like a plague!”
exclaimed the farmer. ‘“ They will eat
me out of house and home, and I shall be
ruined. We can’t feed them all, Mr.
Oojah—send them away from my farm !”’

(Now turn to page 145)

GREER EERE REELED AROSE

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RABIA, I understand,
Is mostly miles and miles of
sand,
Without a single drop of sea—
The place does not appeal to me!

J
The Arabs live in tents, and so |
A wind produces wails of woe,

No wonder Arabs get the grumps—
Even the camels have their humps !





N Greenland’s icy mountains
Are lots of frozen fountains
That never really thaw,
Because the sun is shy there—
And as for things you buy there
Like reindeer skins,
§ And fish-tooth pins
’ Of various makes,
’ And walrus steaks,
| They’re always rather raw !
|



RTICK
BUTCHER



|

(Greenland is nowhere YOUR
way,

But somewhere north of
Norway !) Bol Rs

PPBAPDBPPPDPDDDDPDPPDD DPD PDD DPDDPDPPDDPDADDDPDDAPD Oo

124






EES OW you gobble!” said Whis-
“eA kers disdainfully, and she
turned to stare at Toby eating
Yao his dinner. “It’s really shock-
ing manners to eat so fast, and very bad
for the digestion too !”’

“It’s all very well for you to talk,”
mumbled Toby, as he bolted the last
mouthful and licked his chops. ‘‘ When
there are a score of hungry chaps after
your grub, you have to look sharp or
you'll go pretty short.”’

_“ What on earth do you mean ?”’ ex-
claimed Whiskers crossly. ‘“‘ You’re the
only dog in the house, and it would make
ME positively ill to eat your horrid dinner.

JOOADPPPDD





BY H. WADDINGTON SEERS.

Ugh!” and she gave a little shudder of
disgust.

Toby looked foolish.

“Well, I feel just as if there were a
crowd round me as soon as I see my dish
put down and I simply can’t help gobbling.
T wasn’t made a cat, and I don’t mean to
begin mincing over my food.”

“ There’s another silly habit,’’ began
Whiskers, as, lapping her milk, she
watched Toby scratching at his cushion
and turning round and round on it till
he flopped down in the little hollow he
had made.

“Oh! do leave a fellow alone,”
growled Toby. ‘“‘I do like a little shelter
when I sleep. You're at a great disad-
vantage if you lie out in the open.”

“The opEN!”’ jeered Whiskers. “I
like that! It’s time you dropped this
nonsense about being a wild dog, hunting
with the pack, fighting for your food and
sleeping hidden in the grasses. You're a
well-fed house-dog and lie soft on a
cushion. You’ve no one to share with
and nothing to fear,—and you know ites

‘But I must remember my past. his-
tory,” began poor Toby humbly.

“Think of the present instead,’’ snapped
Whiskers angrily, and curled herself up
for a nap.

DPADPA DDD ODPDOOODDO OOOO OOOO TL

WHY IS A BRAKE LIKE A SAVAGE DOG?
BECAUSE IT BITES.

[ODP PPP PAPO OPPO PPADOP PP OOD PDP PO PPP POD PCDOPO OCS PO CCST]

f 125
GE REEEEEEEE EERE EEL EEE AREER ERE E ERS
€ A SPINNING TOP €
CEEEEEEEEE EEE EEE EEE EEE EEE

Pe RR Y
stopped to
: | watcha boy
a his top
along the sidewalk.

*) Come 77.0 0,



Jerry! 2 Snooker
called.
“2 wish had

a spinning - top,”
sighed Jerrywan-
a “ T should like
to play with one, but
I never have a top
when I want it.”



cared Poeneoke! eae
can turn as fast as
you like. How is this
for a good spin?”

He lifted up one
foot and began spin-
ning around on the
other, and _ every-
body that came by
stopped to look at
him.


GEE EEE EEE LEE ELE E LEBEL EEEEEES

= A TOPPING SEIN €

BEE SE EE EE Ee Be Bebe Se Bede Be Bede
j;

NOW VLL MAKE SNoonER
s SPIN FASTER .
fy





02S eaERRYWAN-
2 GLE ran
(SeS 8 across to the
little boy and bor-
rowed his whip, and
he came back looking
very pleased with
himself.

“IT know what to
do,” he nodded.
‘“* Now I’ve got the
whip I'll make

Snooker spin faster.”




(es \

away at his friend,
and Snooker went
spinning around so
fast that they could
scarcely see him.

& Stop itl he
called. ‘‘ My suf-
fering tail, what are
you doing? I’m
not. a top to be
whipped.”


CROCODILE TEARS

RAS EY Be Lies waiting for his
Boas “| = dinner...
(Whatever may
Stray round his way
Will serve to stay
His fear of growing thinner !)

alie~

(Ks

On either hand
Are miles of sand,
An outlook far from cheerful—
Perhaps that’s why
The ‘‘crocs” all lie
About and sigh,

And sometimes get quite
tearful.



































































































































































































ty Bi
Ns GAME

























m=yQU have all heard of the House







i AN that Jack built and all the
wy queer people who lived in it,
minted Haven't you?

Well, now you will read all about the
House that Benjy built—for it was all
so strange and wonderful.
* = % * i

It was a wet afternoon—so wet, that
Aunt Dora said that Benjy could not
possibly go out and play in the garden.
Benjy thought it was horrid of her, and
anyway, he said to himself, he hated
staying with Aunt Dora, who fussed
about him all day long and would never
let him make a noise.

_You see, Benjy’s father and mother
were in India, and so he lived with Aunt
Dora while they were away. All Benjy’s
toys were stored away in a warehouse
with the rest of the things from his
father’s house, and so on this wet after-
noon, Benjy had nothing to play with.

“There are plenty of books to read;
amuse yourself quietly until tea time,”’
Aunt Dora said as she shut the door and
left Benjy all alone.

‘‘ Beastly old books,” Benjy muttered.
“No pictures in them and horrid long

4 i

SE THAT
ENJY BUILT

i
| ae
\t Kh

Wonderful
Things
Happened to a House of

a

\ : Cards Built by a Little Boy

words,” and he flung the volume he had
taken from the bookshelf into the far
corner of the room.

For a few minutes he wandered about ;
then he looked out of the window and
watched the rain come pitter-pattering
down. It was plain to see that it would
not clear up before tea-time, so Benjy,
being a sensible little boy, decided to
make the best of a bad job.

In the corner of the room stood a
cupboard, and cupboards—specially when
you've never seen inside them—always
seem to be extra interesting. So Benjy
decided to find out what was inside
this one.

After much tugging and pulling he
managed to open the doors, but was
very disappointed to find all that the
cupboard contained was—a pack. of
cards.

“Can’t amuse myself with those,”
Benjy thought, and was about to shut
the door, when a bright idea flashed.
through his mind.

“‘T’ll build a card house,’”’ he said to
himself. ‘‘ That’ll be better than doing
nothing,” and so he set to work.

At first, the cards simply wouldn’t

129 1



wy oy
a

om ®:

a

All the cupboard contained was a pack of cards

stay up. As soon as Benjy put one on
top of another down they went.

However, after a bit, things went
swimmingly, and soon Benjy had built
up the WHOLE pack of cards into a HIGH
TOWER.

Trembling with excitement he stood
up to survey his work, hardly daring to
breathe lest he should upset it.

Then, as he stood looking, the tower
seemed to grow taller—it was either
that or that he grew smaller, to this
day Benjy never knows which—and
stronger until it looked exactly as if it
were made of bricks.

At the foot was a flight-of steps, and
almost before he realised what he was
doing, Benjy was running up those steps.

Up and up he went, and round and

round until he found himself at the top:

of the tower. He looked out of one of
the windows and saw, far, far below, the
room with the furniture looking no bigger

than doll’s house furniture. Really,
it was all most strange.

There seemed to be several rooms,
too, and feeling very brave, Benjy
pushed open one of the doors and
walked in.

He found himself in a long hall,
at the end of which was a golden
throne. On the throne was sitting
a King, who, Benjy saw imme-
diately, was the King of Diamonds.
By his side sat the Queen, while
the Knave was standing in front
of the throne, looking very cross.

“T tell you,” the King was saying
in a cross voice, “‘ you are to let
your baby brother, play with your
toys if he wants to.”

“ Certainly you must,” said the
Queen: li sie

But, just as she was about to say
more, the King caught sight of
Benjy, who was standing in the
doorway, staring in wonderment at
the sight he beheld.

“Hi! Courtiers,’ the King
shouted. ‘‘ Bring that man here.”

And at once, from all sides
servants came running, Hearts,
Clubs, Diamonds and Spades—at least,
that is what they looked like to
Benjy.

They caught hold of him and dragged
him in front of the throne.

“Now, what have you to say for
yourself, young man?” demanded the
King.

“Well, considering that I built this
house,’ Benjy said, ‘“I don’t see why
I shouldn’t come into it. And if you
don’t take care, I’ll knock the whole
thing down, so you had better be careful,”
he added warningly.

‘« Just listen to him!” said the Queen,
“Why, we have been here for years
and you speak as if you’ve just built the

place. Absurd !’”
And all the courtiers round said
** Absurd !”” ‘‘ Ridiculous!’ ‘‘ Send him

away,’ and the Knave drew his sword
and waved it in Benjy’s face in a most
impertinent manner.

130
There was such noise and such con-
fusion that Benjy became quite alarmed.

(Your hormid,) shorrid,*>people,’-: he
shouted. ‘‘I am going to knock your
house down now—just to show that you
can’t threaten me.”

And he jumped and jumped and
stamped with all his might.

The King and the Queen and the
Knave and all the courtiers were very
frightened and begged and implored him
to stop—but Benjy wouldn’t, and in a
few moments the tower began to sway
and totter, then with a loud crash it
fell to the ground.





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He found himself
in a long hall, at
the end of which
was a golden
throne,



sig a Ef & *
With a start, Benjy came to his senses.
There, in front of him, lay the cards in














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a scattered heap, and Tinker, the cat, was
rubbing himself against Benjy’s hand.

Whether it was the fall that woke
Benjy up, whether it was Tinker who
knocked down the tower, or whether
Benjy had really knocked it down when
he had jumped—he never knew.

Again and again he has tried to build
up the pack of cards, but up to the
present he has not succeeded. So he
doesn’t know what the King and the
Queen and the Knave are doing for a
house.

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By V. C. ALEXANDER.

iq UPPOSE you were eight years
ia old, and had just been in for a
history examination and you
Bete Were sure you had done very
badly in it, what would you do?

Would you sit down and cry? No, I
don’t think you would do that. I think
you would open your history book and
look up the mistakes you had made
so that you could do better next time,
now wouldn’t you?

Well, that is what Peter did, and
whether it was that the nice warm fire
made him drowsy, or whether he really
did see them will never be known, but the
little boy pulled himself up with a jerk
when he found he was nodding, and saw
before him fighting on the hearthrug
Sir Walter Raleigh and Robin Hood!
He knew it was Sir Walter Raleigh because
he had a very muddy cloak round his
shoulders, and of course it was Robin
Hood, for he was dressed all in green and



A

carried a bow and arrows, which he shot
into the air, while Sir Walter Raleigh
tried to catch them on the tip of his
sword.

“Oh! dear,’’ said Peter, ‘‘ what do
you want to fight about? Why can’t
you be friends ? ”’

“We would have been,”’ said Sir Walter
with a courtly bow, “ only you said we
were to fight, and so we have to do it.”
And his sword went up to catch another
of Robin’s arrows.

““T said you were to fight!’ said Peter
slowly, and then he remembered. He
must have said in his history paper that
Sir Walter Raleigh had sailed round the
world, and then had come home, and
before he was sent to the Tower he had
fought a duel with Robin Hood!

“Oh! dear,’’ said the little boy again.
“T’m afraid I haven’t many marks for
that question. I do hope I haven’t done
the others as badly as that, though I

134
am very much afraid I
have!”

Peter watched Sir Wal-
ter and Robin Hood fight
until they reached a
mouse-hole, and then they
disappeared.

Suddenly from behind
him came an angry voice.

“T tell you I will not
sign it! J will never sign Paeiial3 A
it! I don’t intend tosign Favs) #H|| y/)

ZBI
‘ LZZP

ps

it! And if Ido sign it 1 Agi? A39 oN
must have a fountain pen ! eaten J

Bring me a match, some er ein 9 Tams

sealing wax, and some
blotting paper and I will
sign it at once!”’

Part of the nursery had
disappeared, and in its
place was an_ island.



Several men in armour Someone in the crowd brought her a fountain pen.

were standing around a

table on which was a large piece of parch- Someone in the crowd brought her a
ment. They wore the dress of the thir- fountain pen and lit a match. She drew
teenth century, but the lady who was a ring from her finger, which she put on
waving her hands about was dressed ina the wax, then signed her name with the
gorgeous gown of the sixteenth. She had pen and blotted it.

red hair and spoke with a raspy voice. “T have signed the Magna Charter,



J ii {il agsvtag SS >
ss Me ON Fawn
gue

Sitting at a table was a
man dressed in Quaker
clothes, writing in a big
book.

135






and now my men can win
the Spanish Armada!”
And Elizabeth, with her
head in the air, walked
past Peter sitting on the
mat.

“Something has gone
wrong there,’’ thought
Peter, as the picture of
the island vanished. ‘I
have made a terrible
mistake.”’

Peter was more de-
pressed than ever, and
when he heard someone
singing ‘God Save the
King,’ he stood up on
the rug.

Sitting at a table was
a man dressed in Quaker
clothes. He was writing
in a big book and singing

_at the same time. Out-
side the window, for a
room panelled in dark
wood had gradually come
into the picture, could be
heard the throbbing of a
motor engine.

“Now, who is this?”
thought Peter. ‘I don’t
remember a Quaker anda
motor engine.”

“You don’t ?” said the
Quaker in a deep voice.
“Did you not say that
John Milton wrote many
books and poems and
songs, including our Na-
tional Anthem, and that
he travelled in his spare
time up and down the
country ?”

“Yes, I believe I said all that.
I didn’t say he went in a motor car.”

“You meant to write it,” said John
Milton, “only the next question claimed
your attention. Let me tell you, I did not
write ‘God Save the King,’ for you
should have remembered that I am a
Republican. And that as for travelling
in a motor car, even if they had been
invented, I should never have trusted
myself to one of them. Good-bye, young
man, and don’t forget all I have told
you.”

“It’s worse and worse,” groaned
Peter. “Surely that must be the last
of them.”

But it was not.

Down the chimney came a soldier of
the early seventeenth century. He had
a lighted torch in his hand. Behind him
came a stout man, breathing very heavily.
He had a velvet hat on, a large gold chain
around his neck, and as he wore a beard,
Peter had no difficulty in recognising
him.

“ By my codfish, I will have some of
that fellow’s fire. I will blow up my
Parliament, for they will not give me
Hampton Court to live in, and it is the
only palace on the banks of the Severn
that I care about.”

“Now, what did I say about Henry

But



“‘ By my codfish, I will have some of that fellow’s fire.”

the Eighth?”’ thought Peter, as he looked
into the fire. “‘I know. I must have
said Guy Fawkes discovered gunpowder,
and he wouldn’t sell the secret to Henry
the Eighth, who wanted to know it so
that he could blow up the Houses of
Parliament. That’s wrong, I know, but
Henry did want Hampton Court Palace,
and somebody wouldn’t give it to him.
Now who was it?”

“ Tn addition to all my other discoveries,
such as America,” said a voice at his
elbow, “I found the great colony of
Australasia—at least you have said I did.
And I brought back from there many
rabbits, for the colony was overrun with
them. Is that right ?”’

“No, it’s all wrong,” cried Peter. ‘I
don’t want to hear any more of my
mistakes. Go away, all of you!”

“Peter, Peter! Wake up! Who do
you think has got the history prize?
You'll never guess, so I must tell
you—why, you, of course! Aren’t you
pleased ? ”’ i

“T don’t understand,’ said Peter.
“‘ Something is wrong somewhere.”

But there was nothing wrong with the
prize. Peter had won that all right. I
expect all the people in the history book
wanted to give him a fright, and that is
how they did it. What do you say?

136
{ELEC CECE SCCL CELE SEC EEE EEL STEELS f
GEOGRAPHY HASH

An Amusing Game

§ SBS LLL TS

NENBNBNS
BSNS

DH raeegACH player takes a pencil and paper, and writes at the top
bq ‘‘ The capital of” and leaves a space at the side and

L aby underneath.

(ues For the second line is written: “It isnoted for’; 3rd

line, ‘‘ The inhabitants are”’; 4th, “ And they live on”; 5th, “‘ The

chief products are”; 6th, ‘‘ The principal manufactures are” ;

7th, “‘ The people are” ; 8th, ‘‘ Because they.”

When this is done you fill some ridiculous answer in the first space.
Fold the paper to hide what. is written and pass it along. So the
game goes on until the spaces are all filled.

Each player then reads a slip out, and the result should be some-
thing like this :—

‘“* The capital of Greece is Greenwich. It is noted for tea leaves
and tin tacks. The inhabitants are giants, and they live on rhubarb
and radishes. The principal manufactures are pills, powders, and
plasters. The people are always walking sideways, because they are
limp and lazy.”




PPP PPD PD PPP PPD PD PDIP PD-PPDPDDDDDD (J





a




OL Wey ‘ ;

— Saal .
THE WALLYBOO OMNIBUS
137
ELLE LELE ELLY YE ELLE ELLE LE LEST EEE
x% 9 e e
€ Jerrywangle’s Holiday Trip

22
IES EE ee ee Ne bee eee Ne Se Bede



HEY got into
the boat’ and
started off, and at
first they enjoyed

their trip.

PUL aw ay 5
jetty. laughed
Snooker. ‘ There’s

no place like the
ocean, after all.”

“Steer straight,
and keep a good look
out,’ < ‘said Jetry-
“We don’t want to
go running on to any
rocks.”



NENSNSNS

ERRYWANGLE

asked Snooker to
go out with him for a
row.

‘* This is our last
day at the seaside,”
he? satdi. seltowonct
do you any harm just
for once.”

“Very well, Jerry,”
said Snooker. “Don’t
blame me if any-
thing happens.”

So they dressed up
and went off to hire a
rowboat.
oe
oe
oe
22
22
22



EFORE they
could row ashore
the boat sank so low
that they were in
danger.
fitbedp, hel pa?
shouted eaiy:
‘We're drowning,
we are, or at least
we shall be soon.”
““T can’t see any-
body coming,”’ said
Snooker. ‘ Shout
louders Jerry. (We
must try to make
them hear us on the

beach.”

LLLCLELEL ELLE E EE EE LEE EE EEE EEE EEE
J errywangle’s Holiday Trip

MYNME eee Be Be Se Se eee eee BI

NSENSNSNS

S UDDENLY
Snooker jumped
up and gave a cry of
dismay.

““My _ bedsocks,
what’s this?” he
asked. ‘““Do you
know that our boat
is filling up with
water ?”’

= Ehats: the old
boatman’s fault,”’
Said: ijerry., oe ex=
pect he forgot to put
the cork in. We
must get up and
shout hard for help.”


BEE US SOS IS OS OS Ee eae seo
- | lee Holidas Er
S errywane? es Oll ay rip

EEECEELELEEE EEE EEE Reh eRnReknk

(CONTINUED)

NBNSNSNS,

NCLE OOJAH

heard them call-
ing, and he came out
with Lord Lion in a
little steamboat to
the rescue.

“ Don’t get skerri-
fied, my dears!” he
called. ‘“‘ Leave it all
to us and we shall
save you.”

When they got
near enough they
threw out two life-
buoys, ‘ with ropes
tied on.



FTER a hard

struggle _ they
hauled their little
friends in by the
ropes.

““My _ bedsocks,
what a day!” gasp-
ed Snooker. “‘ Any-
body can have the
sea, for I don’t want
it.”

“T’m so glad you
were, saved,”’ smiled
Uncle Oojah. “‘ This
has been a watery
ending to our. sum-
mer holiday.”


wal TE King and Queen were as
B@poor as church mice. They
- just been deposed by
Kenitheir subjects for refusing to
pass a ‘‘ Law for Providing Milk Pud-
dings for Pale People.’’ Though they
had not been allowed to take anything
from the Palace, they still had their cat
Peterkin, who was washing himself on
the hearth in front of the empty grate,
trying to pretend there was a fire.

The King was striding up and down in
his coronation robe (now used as a dressing
gown), wondering how he and the Queen
and Peterkin were going to live for the
rest of the week on 74d.

“Pish!’’ he exclaimed. ‘‘ A pale person
couldn’t live on it, and I’m sure a King
can’t. I must sell something. But what
have I got that is worth selling? ...
Ah ! my sceptre ns

At that moment the door opened and
the Queen entered. She threw her hat
on one chair and the small parcel she was
carrying on another. A

“ Well,” said the King, ‘‘ any luck?”

“ve sold your second-best crown,”
replied the Queen. ‘‘ The grocer bought it.
He said it would make a nice plant pot
for his parlour. He gave me a pound of





T THINK (75 A MousE-
-TRAP, PETER,



butter for it, but as he hadn’t any change
I had to take another half pound of
butter instead.”

‘““A pound and a half of butter for a
crown!” exclaimed the King, throwing
himself into a chair. ‘‘ It’s—it’s =

“ Eatable,” snapped the Queen, ‘“‘ and
the crown wasn’t—but where 1s the
butter? I know I brought it-in!”

She looked everywhere for it without
success. Then she remembered... .

“You're SITTING on it !’’ she shrieked.

The King leaped to his feet. He was
sitting on it! . . . and in warm weather
a dressing-gown (which has been a coro-
nation robe) is not improved by its wearer
sitting on a lump of butter !

No wonder the cat laughed !



How O0OES IT WORK,
tL WONDER? PITPAF


IIE SENOS EIS I

2 GEOGRAPHY AT A GALLOP

@
BGCOLLCOGPCGGCGHGLCWGGCOGGGLGWGOGGHGLHGOGOGGGOGGGOCOGLGOGHGDOGOH

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@
@
QD.
@

@

N Mexico, when people fight,

They either shoot their foes
at sight,

Or stick a knife in them—

Both customs to condemn !

“ce

So: af; you. are mot: ini the
know ”

\\ You won’t live long in Mexico !



eee live near

to Greece—

They do not really care for
peace,

For, almost anywhere

The traveller may turn his
feet,

He’s always pretty sure to
meet

A brigand in his lair...

(A brigand, as I understand it, |
Is little better than a bandit !)



,
|

o DBDPDBQDB BBD PB PDD PPD PPD DIA PD PDP PAD DPD PDPPDPD. DD PDA ADD PP PDADPPDPDPDDPDPDDPDDD"

142
OO OG ae eee ye ea

¢ Grandpa Rook and the Artful Caterpillar ©
GOSOCGOLOOSCOSLOGSLBSHOEGHSPOVSOOSOSSSSSOOSOOS



of HEN Johnny
Caterpillar had an

idea.

He started his cater-
pillar capers.

“How very amus-
ing,’ laughedGrandpa
Rook as he sat down
to be amused.



S fous along
one fine evening,
Grandpa Rook espied
a fine, plump cater-
pillar.

“'The very person I
would wish to meet,”
he cried.

“'Phe children
simply love cater-
pillar pie.”



“TQ EALLY, I shall

never stop laugh-

ing if [look any more,”
cried Grandpa.

‘Oh, dear lic. Oh,
dear! Oh! you funny
caterpillar ; the child-
ren will be amused.”

But just then Johnny
Caterpillar gave an
extra jump and dis-
appeared.
GOAT is generally not
Contented with its little lot:
When fastened to a chain or rope
It really has but little scope. |
It has a beard (it never shaves),
And very often misbehaves
By butting people when they pass
Across its little strip of grass.

- J) UT Bill, I think you ought to note,

Is not an ordinary goat.

He isn’t fastened up—oh no!

He wanders freely to and fro;

And sometimes, when the day is fine,

He chews the washing on the line...

(He doesn’t like the farmer’s vest

But takes a bite at all the rest !)



144
v
5
a
2
a
3

SS



99

‘Now I’m going to ask you a very hard question.
CeCe eee eee eee EEE EEE O OE EE EOEOO OE ETESE SEES EE EE THEE EEE EES
Perce eee reese eee eee eee Ee EEE ETES OODLE LES OEE DEE EE EEE EEE TED
Cee meee ee ERE O SACLE HOODEO HOSE EEE TOOT OE EEE SHEE EOE EHH ESE EE EEE

Peete eee eee eee eee reer esse eEEHESEEEEE EEE EEE EEEEEE DOES OSES

Smee CeCe eee ore Oe Eee reese S EEE EE EEE ETS ESE E SESE EEE EEE EEES

See e rere sees eereseessnseeseseeeeeeeseereeeeessesseses

Peed eee e eee oosesesce sees eee reser ees esHesesseseeseeeess
Peer reese eer cern ves eees ress ees er OO EOOEHeeeeeeeseeeseeee
PO eC Cece rete ees eee e SEE Ene eo EHS OES HEE SESE EEE EeEeees



CPC e eee eer ee reereceser es eee sees EseeeeesesseeEEesenseeeee

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 123)

RY M very sorry, Mr. Farmer, I
3 forgot you would have to feed
eau all these geese,” said Uncle
aed assy Oojah. ‘“*‘ Let me see if I can
unwork the magic for you.”

They all closed their eyes again, and
when they opened them nothing was
left of the geese but a cloud of feathers
floating in the air.

‘““My bedsocks, they’re all gone!”
complained Snooker. ‘‘ You might have
left a couple, just to give a poor cat
another goose-feast.”

**Don’t worry about that,
Snooker,’ said the farmer.
‘You shall have a taste of
game soon, when the pheasant-
shooting begins.”

One morning Farmer Honey-
bee lent them his gun, and off
they all went to the woods.
Suddenly Uncle Oojah stopped
and began peeping amongst
the trees.

‘** There’s a bird!”’ he whis-
pered. ‘‘Stand back, Snooker,
and let me do a gun-shoot.”

So he blew down the gun and
dropped a peppermint into the
barrel, but he took so long over
his loading that by the time
he was ready the pheasant had
disappeared.

“‘“Where’s the pretty bird?
Has it gone?” he asked. “‘Why
couldn’t it wait a minute, and
give me a proper chance?
Hush, my dears—here’s an-
other one coming!”

He took a long aim and
fired, but the pheasant flew
away. Again and again he
tried, but all he got for his




Master

trouble was a broken tail-feather.
“* This is a fine day’s sport, if you like!”
grumbled Snooker. ‘“‘ Have a try at the
rabbits. You won’t find many feathers
there.”
““My Snooker is very true,” sighed
Uncle Oojah. “I might bring down a

fat rabbit, perhaps, and then we can have
rabbit-stew for dinner.”

So they all sat down beside a burrow,
and presently a young rabbit popped its
head out.

“* Lovey-lovekins, here’s one!”
claimed Uncle Oojah.

ex-
‘Oh! Don, take









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Again and again he tried.
this awful old gun away! I can’t shoot

that dear little rabbit.”

Sea] NCLE OOJAH handed the gun

b= to Don and gazed sadly down
at the rabbit.

# “This is a nice disappoint-

to give anybody!’ complained

““We expected rabbits stewed




ment
Snooker.
and rabbits boiled, but all we seem likely

{?

to get is rabbits spoiled

““Oh! Snooker, don’t say unkinderies
to me!” sighed Uncle Oojah. “I can’t
do shoots at the poor dears. It wouldn’t
be right to hurt Rabby Bunnit’s foreign
relations.” ji

‘‘ The rabbits are peeping at you, they
are,” whispered Jerry. “‘I expect they
want to come out and see you.”

‘**Lovey-lovekins, let them come!”
said his uncle. ‘‘ This way, you bunny
rabbits. Have you ever heard of Uncle
Oojah? That’s my name, and I have a

Rabby Bunnit of my own at home.”

One by one
the rabbits
crept out of
their burrows,

and presently fie
they all came SoG

scampering
around.

** My whisk-
ers, what a
Cit 0; w d.}2?
laughed
Snooker.
“They ought
to beat school,
I should say,
instead of
playing hide-
and-seek out

here.”’

era], Can
school - master
them,” de-
clared Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ We
might take

the examina-
tion first, shall

|
|



we? I wonder if anybody can guess
who I am?”

*““You are Uncle Oojah!” called one
little rabbit. ‘‘ We know that, because
you told us so just now.”

‘“‘ Quite right, my dear; you shall go
up one for your answer,” said Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘ Now I’m going to ask you a
very hard question. Can any of you tell
me where I live?”

‘“Under your hat!’’ shouted another
rabbit. ‘‘ That’s where all people live—
when they are wearing them.”

““They are right again, Don—aren’t
they all clever? ’’ smiled Uncle Oojah.
‘*Wait a minute, is that a dinner-bell
I hear ringing ? ”’

““Tf-it isn’t it ought'to ‘be,’ replied
Snooker. ‘‘I can tell you one thing, my
appetite has been ready for dinner all
the morning.”

‘“* Yes, but then it generally is,”’ nodded
Uncle Oojah. ‘‘ Well, good-bye, my little
friends. Keep good, and I might come
and see you again this afternoon.”





way
~ ‘ Ewe 29.3) home
Uncle Oojah
kept talking

about his new
rabbit friends,
and he was so
eager." to. - see
them again
that he could
scarcely spare
time for
dinner.

“We can
finish it on the
way back,”’ he
said. “Tl ask
Mrs. Honeybee
to make our
dinner into
sandwiches.”’

““My _ bed-
socks, this is
too much of a

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‘*Get your sandwiches, my dears, and come

along.’’.

good thing!” grumbled Snooker. “‘A
rabbit is all right in its place, and that’s
a pie or a pot, but why should we waste
the day running after them ?”

“Snooker is very fond of his little
bit of rabbit,” smiled Uncle Oojah.
““Get your sandwiches, my dears, and
come along.”

So he took his little friends back to
the woods, Every time they met a
rabbit he stopped to have a talk, and





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I want to know

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they rambled about the hills until
the daylight faded into dusk.

‘ Jimmy-ninnikins, this will
never do!” exclaimed Uncle
Oojah. ‘‘We must hurry back
to the farm while there is still
light enough to see.”

They wandered on and on,
trying to find their way and all
the time it was growing darker
and darker.

““My suffering tail, we’re lost !””
complained Snooker. “You are
always losing something, it seems
tome. This time you have lost
the lot of us.”

“I’m so tired,’ sighed Don ;
‘* couldn’t we sleep where we are
just for to-night ?”

‘““-Ves, I suppose we could,”
nodded Uncle Oojah. “Stay
there, my dears, and I’ll see if
I can find anything to cover us.”’

So he stumbled away under
the trees, and before long he
came back with a large bundle
of wild clematis.

‘* Now perhaps we can be com-

fortable,” he said. ‘“‘These
fluffy seeds make beautiful blankets,
don’t they?”

They ali lay down and covered them-
selves with the clematis, but suddenly a
loud scream startled them out of their
sleep.

‘““My whiskers, what’s that ?”’ gasped
Snooker. ‘‘ We shall have to get up
and see. Take my word for it, there is
somebody in trouble in this wood.”

[Now turn to page 167.

>





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DEAR ME! A RABBIT! DO YOU ALWAYS
CARRY RABBITS IN YOUR HAT, SIR?



148
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149


Pig.

we
The Sad Story of AG
a Greedy Little “ ec:

eg ORKY was a fat little pig who
s lived in a farmyard with his
! mother and his five little
Egeie@y brothers and six sisters.
Porky was the fattest and largest of all
the piggies, and also the greediest.

He would eat and eat and eat all day
long—and all night, too, if he got the
chance! Whenever there was any food
Porky was on the spot first. He would
push his brothers and sisters out of the
way and try to gobble it all up himself.

His mother would get very angry with
him.

“ You greedy little pig!’’ she would
say. “‘ One of these days you will get so
fat you will burst.” But Porky didn’t
care. The fatter he got the better he
liked it.

One day the door of the pig-sty was left
open, and Porky thought he would go out
and see the world. So through the gate
he went and out into the farmyard. When
the ducks and geese saw him coming they
stood still and stared at him.





tes
ees

“What
a fat little pig! He must eat too much.”

But Porky puffed out his chest and
made himself fatter still.

“ They are thinking how handsome I
am,” thought he.

“Cluck, cluck, cluck!’’ said the hens
to their chicks. ‘‘ Get out of the way of
this greedy fat pig.’ But Porky thought
they were admiring him, too, and he
chortled and grunted and looked extra
proud of himself as he walked by.

Out of the farmyard he went into the
road.

Sometimes, as Porky walked along,
people would turn and look at him, and
then he would feel very proud indeed.

“ They are thinking what a splendid pig
Iam,” he thought.

Soon he came to alittle house. He was
beginning to feel very hungry, so he
thought he would walk in and see if he
could get something to eat. So up the
garden-path he went and knocked at the
door.

150

“Quack, quack!”’ said they.
Two children opened it to him.

“Why,” said they, “what a nice fat
pig! You are just in time for dinner.

Come along in.”’
' Soin Porky walked.

There was the dinner steaming away on
the table, and the children fetched a knife
and fork and set a place ready for Porky.

When all was ready they went out of
the room to fetch their mother.

Then greedy Porky did a dreadful
thing. He jumped on the table and
gobbled up everything as quickly as he
could. When the children came back with
their mother, nearly everything had gone,
and there was horrid Porky, grunting and
snorting and eating away as fast as he
could.

“Oh! you wicked pig!” said their
mother. ‘‘ Take that, and that,’ and she
hit him hard with a stick and drove him
out of the house. ,

But greedy Porky did not mind. He
had had his dinner, and that is all HE
cared.

On and on he walked, until at last he
came to a farmyard.

“ T will go in here,” thought he. ‘‘ There
is sure to be plenty to eat.”

Then the farmer came along.

‘This is a fine, fat pig,” said he. “I
will put him in the sty with the others.”
So he put Porky in the pig-sty with two

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LO

Then Porky began to eat. He kept on
eating and eating and eating. He pushed
the other pigs out of the way so that they
hardly got any food.

Every day he got fatter and fatter, but
the other pigs got thinner and thinner.

‘You will be sorry one day,” said they,
“for if you get much fatter you will
surely burst.”’

But Porky did not listen.

‘They are only jealous because I am
so handsome,”’ thought he.

One day they all went down to the
stream to drink. Porky looked in the
stream and saw himself reflected in the
water.

“What a splendid fellow I am!”
thought he. ‘‘ Why, I am nearly as big
as a cow.” Then he puffed and blew
himself out. ‘‘ Now, I am nearly as big
as a horse,” thought he.

Then he puffed and puffed and blew
himself out still more.

‘Now I’m quite as big as a horse,”
thought he. ‘I'll try to make myself still
bigger.’’ So he puffed and puffed and
puffed, and now he was like a balloon, but
still he went on puffing and puffing and
blowing and blowing, and then—pop—
a dreadful thing had happened. Porky
had burst, just as a balloon will, if it is
blown out too much, and that was the
sad end of greedy Porky.




—
_—

Thee Awiul End:

151
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HO’S WHO: An Interesting Game

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DDADPDPDPPDPPAPDPDPDDDS






a)

bq a number, and they all
(4 choose a name in secret
â„¢ for themselves. The names
are whispered to the scorer, and he
puts them down beside the players’
numbers and keeps count.

A slip of paper is taken, and each
player writes in turn a description
of some thing or place he is supposed
to represent, such as ‘‘4, A summer
flower,” ‘“‘ ro, An autumn fruit,” «6,
A manufacturing town,” ‘‘2, A sea-

seal HE scorer gives each player

“ Sonny,

"But be

GREET Hit’ BYTE

QS funny
Ghat you' ve

inishea Your
Greakfast
You must !

ais ber no heed,
And so grear was bis grees —
That be afe om and on

PPDDDDOLD

side resort,” ‘©5, A wild animal,”
and so on.

Only the scorer knows that the
correct answers would be ‘‘ 4, Rose,”
810; VAppley 60) aeeed ssi tna,
Brighton,” ‘‘5, Tiger.”

The players then make lists and
put down they what think the des-
criptions mean. When the lists are
all finished the scorer strikes out the
wrong names, and the player who has
the most answers right wins the
game.

DPB PDPPB PPD PD PD PPOPDP DPA PD PPD DP PIEPDPDDPPDPDPDPDPDD PAD DAP PDPPPDPDDD

Said
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152



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GEOGRAPHY AT A GALLOP

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N China, music seems to be
All drum and clash of cymbals ;
And Chinese gentlemen drink tea
From cups as small as thimbles—
At least that’s what I’ve heard !
A pleasant custom, but I think
That after one I should not shrink
From asking for a second drink,
And possibly a third !



(CF course, you've heard of Dixie,
Where the coal-black mam-
mies are,
And coal-black piccaninnies
(With coal-black little tums)
Suck coal-black thumbs,
As they roll their coal-black eyes
at a coal-black papa.

These coal-black songs of Dixieland

May sometimes make you think \\ v. -
_ That everything down Dixie way \\ \\
Must be as black as ink.







153







usual at the beginning of
Wiathe summer, the Queen of the
Rose Fairies and the Queen of
ILadybirds were making plans
to get rid of the Green-Fly.

‘It’s no use pretending we were a
success last year,” confessed the Queen
of the Rose Fairies, ‘‘ because we weren’t.
Wherever I went I heard people com-
plaining about their roses. There was
old Mr. Pottlebury, for instance, who
lives in Rose Cottage at the bottom of
Green Lane, he was——”

“Angry,” suggested the Queen of the
Ladybirds helpfully.

“ Angry,” repeated the Queen of the
Rose Fairies, “he was FuRIous! I
was passing one day when he was looking
at his roses, and my ears tingled. The
things he said were—well, I really couldn’t
let the butterflies listen, so I sent them all
up to Miss Meek’s !”’

“It was a bad year,’ admitted the
Queen of the Ladybirds. ‘‘ For some
reason there were very few ladybirds, and
though we gorged ourselves on green-fly
till we could scarcely move, it seemed to
make no difference. We——”

“Hist!” warned the Queen of the
Rose Fairies, rising quietly from the
leaf on which they were sitting. ‘‘ What
was that noise ?”’

1 ie

,
Y Oe





Peter and Pitpat

said the{Queen of
“but Dll go and see, if

“JT heard no noise,”
the Ladybirds ;
you like.” oh

She crawled on the underneath side
of the leaf, and in a short time came back,
looking a little red in the face.

“Well! ’’ said the Queen of the Rose
Fairies.

“Tt was a green-fly,”’ panted the Queen
of the Ladybirds ; ‘‘ the impudent fellow
had been listening to us. But I settled
him,” she said, licking her lips ; “‘ HE won’t
spoil any more roses ! ”’

PPDPDDODPDPD

Can you Guess P




Sammy Squi

rrel

SUB bea IPE o
4 /











looking hard into
Barley Bunny’s
burrow. In_ his
paws he helda net.
Now you may be
sure that Red Fox
was up to some
mischief, for there
was a cunning look
in’ his. eye... Yes,
he was hoping that
Barley would come
out so that he
could catch him
for his dinner.
Suddenly, Red
Fox pricked up his
ears and would
have shouted
| “hooray!” but
feared Barley
Bunny would
hear him. Yes,
Barley Bunny was
coming out of his
burrow.










































But old Red Fox
hadn’t reckoned
with Sammy
Squirrel, who lived
at the top of the

| tree; and Sammy

was a great friend
of Barley’s and he
didn’t like the way
Red Fox was look-
ing into Barley’s
burrow.

“Tll drop him a
hintc tort co.
chuckled Sammy,
as he plucked a big
acorn.

Suddenly, biff!
right on Red Fox’s
nose fell thatacorn.

“Ow,ow, wow!”
cried Red Fox.

Barley Bunny
took the hint and
didn’t come out,
and Red Fox took
the hint and went
away—for acorns
‘hurt when they fall
on one’s nose!












eos PPE POLAD PLP PDPPP |_|
° A POT OF HONEY !
fee RRYWANGLE wandered ““ Jerrywangle, where are you?” he



A Rinto the kitchen in search of _ called. “* Come out this minute—I want
Bee Something to see you.”’.
Fo Ost tasty, as {WHERE'S ae) Of course, Jerry
a last he peeped ran out to see who
into the pantry and wanted him, and
saw a jar of honey when he was not
on the shelf. looking Snooker slip-
“That will do ped inside with the
nicely, it will,’ he glue-pot.
said. ‘“ I’ll keep it all “This will be a
for myself and have surprise for Master
a quiet little feast.” Jerry,” he said. «I'll
So he took down give him a lesson in

;
9
;
;
: j db : >
§ greedy.
|

























to eat the honey So he poured all
with a spoon. Pre- the glue into the

sently Snooker h sete
“ oney jar; then he
looked in and saw took the glue-pot

:
What he was eating. | away and hid be
Well done! You hind the door. Pre-
seem to have found sently Jerrywangle
something good,” he came rushing into

laughed. ‘“* My bed- the room.
as ,

socks, it’s half gone ! “ Nobody wanted

me, after all,’ he said.

‘““ Now, perhaps, I 9

can finish my feast.”

Once more he sat

down with the jar

of honey, but after

the first spoonful he

stopped and made

a face. :

9

0

“Something _ has
gone wrong, it has,”
he complained.
“This honey tastes
funny.”

“Yes, Jerry—it’s
glue!” laughed
snooker. “That’s
what you get for not
sharing out. Don’t
be so greedy in fu-
ture.”

Where’s my share ?”

“You go on. It’s
all mine,” replied
Jerry.

“ That’s a nice
way to treat your
friends!” protested |, .
Snooker. ‘“Very|-
well, Jerry. Don’t
blame me if you are
sorry for it.”

He went outside
and walked up and
down for along time;
then he ran off'to the
workshop and put
the glue-pot on the
fire. When the glue
was melted he took it
in, butfirst hestopped
outside the window

; and gave a shout.
Oo



156
a PPD PPLPEPLPP DDPIPDPODO DO DDDPPADAOPD>DPOOOODODOGCOCOOO CCC SO QO

A VERY HOT DINNER

PPPPDPDPPDPDPPDPDPDDD-D-PD>OD>D





SAE RRY walked along a “Pass your plate over, and I'll
fq country road with Snooker. soon make it hot for you,” said Jerry.
“T should a Snooker handed
RGM like a Down eae his plate across the
house of our own to table, and in a
live in,” said Jerry. twinkling Jerry
“When we come to emptied the pepper
a town we must look and mustard pots all




























out for one.”’ q over it.

But when they ar- ““ Stop! What are
rived atthenexttown you doing?” ex-
they couldn’tseeany- claimed Snooker.
thing to suit them. “ That’s pepper and

“Tm hungry, I
am. Let’s go some-
where and have din-
ner,” sighed Jerry.

““Now you men-
tion it I could do
with a bite to eat my-
self,”’repliedSnooker,
“‘Here’s a likely place
we might try.” Z

So they went in | oe | y
and sat down at a @ aL suares
table. Jerry ordered

FASS YOUR PLATE. I'LL Soon
- MAKE IT HOT.
the dinner and
> g

mustard, can’t you
Seeses 2?

““ T can see, I can,”
chuckled Jerry.
“You wanted some-
thing hot, and your
dinner should be hot
enough now.”

** There’s one good
dinner spoiled,”
grumbled Snooker.
‘‘T must see if they
have any more, for
I can’t eat that.”

He rang the bell
and ordered roast
duck and green peas,























Snooker picked up a
paper and looked at
the “* Houses to Let”
until dinner was
served.

“Put your paper | :
down,” said Jerry. Nf ]
‘** Here’s a very nice \¥ | f
dinner waiting for |)@

» Say ” Hare YouR DINNER Should
you. ee ee Sues BE ROT EXouGN Row.




was over they paid
the bill and went
out.

“* T feel better after
that,” said Jerry.
“ Now we can go on
looking for a house.”

“You come along
with me,’ replied
Snooker. “I saw a
house to let in the
paper, and if it’s
good enough we’ll
take it. Then we can
go and fetch Uncle
Oojah to live with
us,”’




















Snooker lowered
his paper and looked :
at the table, then he
pushed his chair back
and looked again.
“My bedsocks,
what do you call
this ? ” he demanded.
“Cold ham, cold beef |
andcoldeverything! I
wanted a hot dinner.” |"

a




a








and after the meal |

PPDPODD DOCS]

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DI PPP PRADPPA PP PPA PPPPPDPPPDPOPPDAPDPP PP DDD PPDDP POPPPPPDDDD
SOOO PPPOE SOLOS POCA OS COCOL OCS ECODOCE ESOC O VORP OCHO CEOLOOO VE OS

Geography at a Gallop

DPD S09 GG 999 H9999 9999999990959 9H DH GSO OGG OO HO HO HOOD OHO DDH GHOGH OOH
LIPPPPAPP PDPRPADP PPDAPPPPP PP PPDDPDPP PP PPD PPD PPDPPDPP DPD DS DOT]

09O9O0OH
SOOO SOOO

HE Llamas live in
far Tibet,
Whose climate is ex-

tremely wet,
And also rather chilly—
They cough and snuffle,
wheeze and sniff
In draughty barracks
on a cliff
(Tibet is very hilly !);
And if you go
Through slush and
snow,
Quite late at night
I think you might
Possibly see a funny
Sightia. ec:
Parties of bony, bearded ’
Llamas
Pillow-fighting in pink
pyjamas !



PPD? PP OPPO DPD DOP DLP ODIO PO ODO DPOOOODPQOOOO | PPDPDPODOD

Le Soudanese (so

I’ve been told)
Has got a skin as black
as night—
No matter how much
soap is used
Itnever makes it white.
His head is like a large
bird’s nest
(You ought to see the
way he does his
HAIR!) and so the Sou-
danese
Are always called the

Fuzzy-Wuggies !
‘a Boke
»





; @Ncave which was on an island in
the middle of a lake, and he stole cows and
sheep and, sometimes, even children.

At length the people of the country
went to the Fairy Queen and said :

““ Please help us to get rid of this horrid
giant.”

And the Queen said she would. So, as
soon as they had gone home she hurried
off to see the King of the Beavers, who
lived at the mouth of the stream which
flowed out of the lake, to ask him to help.

“Of course, I'll help,” the King said.
‘We'll soon teach this blustering giant a
lesson he won’t forget.”’

DADO D



Peter and Pitpat



HOW NURSE CAN -
ALWAYS TRLL —

You KNOw \T'S
LA MYSTERY TO ME-



TRE GIANT WAO
JAVED IN A AVE

The following morning
the King set all his beavers
at work building a dam
across the stream. They
worked so hard that ina
eee week it was ten feet high,
Ge and very soon it was twice

ee as high again. Then the
Fairy Queen flew off to her
sister, the Queen of the
Rain Fairies, who sent a
terrible thunderstorm in
the night, and lots and
lots of rain.

Very soon the level of the
lake began to rise, because
the water that flowed into
it could not escape past thedam. Higher
and higher it crept until it was level with
the top of the giant’s island. Then it
began to trickle into his cave, and when
he woke up with a roar, the water was
pouring down in a torrent . .. and he
couldn’t move hand or foot, because the
Fairy Queen had sent her spiders to weave
their strongest cobweb round him.

The giant tried to struggle out, but the
rush of water swept him back, and in
avery short time the water rose to
the roof of the cave, and the giant was
drowned.

Then the Fairy Queen waved her wand,
and the water, breaking through the dam,
went laughing and gurgling down the
stream.



A Dark Mystery
= PD

%! Dumplinglatn a

Yi, Fi eae
% ie ‘/ Se
wy =

aot. i
“hy
ANE -») :
BEAN eX
hy ili
HE dog, known as the ‘‘friend of Man,” =
Obtains a Master if he can, a
Then dogs his steps from morn till night, Zo
For everything HE does is right. ee
A dog about the house all day : SS
Keeps tramps and hawkers far away; ‘ ae
Though not too friendly with the cat, Gh: ae
He simply /Joves to catch a rat. \Qrn



i ae










HEN there’s a cat about the house
You very rarely see a mouse,
ForZcats and mice are mortal foes
Who veryzquickly come to blows,
And then you find that Pussykins’
_Is usually the side that WINS...
(She spends her spare time lapping milk
And washing till her coat’s like silk!)

Celerhacary. rELR

160
SST,

ay
-

i!

99

lament opens.

Parl

r

o-night ou

Af

‘

! 9

Screech

a

66


BUELL EEE EER LLL RRRKARRK,

Uncle Oojah’s Funnymoon

EE Ne Ne ee Be Be Be Be Be oe ee Se





(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 147)






eae NCLE OOJAH sat up in the
Ref] P| moonlight and blinked his eyes
apy WA sleepily at the trees.
i ‘This is very strange,” he
murmured. ‘‘Do you know, my dears,
I thought I heard a noise. I must have
dreamt it, perhaps. Good-night!”
- He lay down again and tried to go to
sleep, but the next moment there was
another loud scream.

‘“‘ There it is again,’ complained Jerry.
““T don’t like this, I don’t. It’s enough





lovekins, they ought to know better.
How do they expect us to do our sleeps
with those awful noises going on ?””

‘“‘Hush!’? whispered Don. ‘“ There
they are, perched on the trees. Can you
see them ? ”

Uncle Oojah looked around and saw
the owls flutter down from the branches
and land in a circle on the ground.

““ Screech!’ cried one owl. ‘“‘ To-night
our parliament open, and there are
serious things to consider. The price of

to give anybody the cold shivers.” mouse-meat is going up. We must find
““We must - oi out the
find out what’s reason.”’
the matter,” WHO THREW THESNOWBALL?P ; “My whis-
said his uncle. % a kers, don’t
“Wake up, they look sol-
Don! There’s emn!”’ laughed
an Ovtrh er. Snooker. ‘“‘Our
screech — did Oojah won't
you hear it ?” let me _ go
Don rubbed rabbit - hunt-

his eyes and
rolled over;
then he looked
up at the trees
and began to
laugh. ‘‘ You
needn’t be
scared,’ he
said. mots
’ only the owls
in the wood.

ing, but I don’t
suppose he
will stop me
from bird-
scaring.”
With one
big jump
Snooker land-
ed right inthe ~
middle of the
parliament,

Phey “care y and the owls
screech - owls, Pe flapped their
= QZ~ .
you know, and A YY y wings and flew
that’s. their =e Y/, All) up amongst

way of talk- A CA the trees. _
ing.” Re ae, Vee se Oa «“ Stop it,
“Ts that all ~ SSS Snooker!”

it is?” asked
Uncle Oojah.
“Love y -



called Uncle
‘Oojah: SL
wanted to ask

161 L
the owls a special question, and now
you have frightened them all away.
How am I going to call them back ? ”



FAHY don’t you creep after the
owls?” suggested Don. ‘‘ You
Vera are sure to find them somewhere,
M633 if you go far enough.”

“That’s right, it is,” ‘said Jerry.
“Stay behind and rest, you, Don. We
know how to take care of each other.”

So Don lay down again, and his friends
tip-toed off through the woods. At last
they saw the birds perched on the trees
in the moonlight.

“Don’t fly away, you owl-people!”
called Uncle Oojah. ‘ Wait here a little
minute. I want to ask you a special
question.”

‘“* We know you,” said one bird. ‘‘ Our
cousins from Oojahland told us all about
you. Uncle Oojah is welcome
in our wood, but we don’t want
the cat.”

“And the cat doesn’t want
you!’ retorted Snooker. ‘“* My
suffering tail, you ought to be
in a glass case on a mantel-
piece !”

“Hush, Snooker, and let
me do the speaks,”’ said Uncle
Oojah. “We are lost, my
dears. Can you tell us the
way to Mr. Honeybee’s farm? ”

““That’s easy to find,”
replied the bird. “‘ The moon
shines right over that farm.
Always follow the moon and
you will be safe.”

‘“‘Tsn’t he a wise old owl?”
murmured Uncle Oojah. “* Per-
haps he might answer my
special question next. I want
to give my Don a nice present,
because it’s near the end of
our Funnymoon. What would
a boy like best ? ”

‘“* Give him a box of snails,”
said the owl. ‘‘ He can play
marbles with the shells.”





iF
CZ,








Pe
re

ae
4
PY





‘That wouldn’t do, it wouldn’t,’”’ ob-
jected Jerry. ‘I don’t think much of
that wisdom.”

‘“‘ Neither do I,” added Snooker. “* My
bedsocks, our Oojah could find better
advice with his eyes shut. Why don’t
you have a good try ?””

Uncle Oojah sat down and closed his
eyes, and his friends waited to see what
would happen. Presently he jumped up
and began twirling around.

“T’ve got it!” he smiled. “I gave
myself some extra splendid advice. Listen,
my dears—little Don shall answer my
special question himself! ”

PE eERRYWANGLE led the way
ee # back to the place they had left
Don, but when they came near
nein they found he had fallen asleep.
““My bedsocks, don’t wake him!”
whispered Snooker. “‘Can’t we carry

him home just as he is?”








Uy
Y

Up Sy, S
aoe tt



AL.
¢; Be ae

(ne

=
RESRS
~ nae ~
a BES



‘‘ Always follow the moon and you'll be safe.”

162
“We might, if we walk
very slowly,” said Jerry.
““How much of him could
you carry ?”

“‘Teave it to me,’’chuckled
Snooker. “Our Oojah can
take the first turn, and
when he gets tired I'll have
him.”

“ But that wouldn’t do,”
smiled Uncle Oojah. “I
couldn’t possibly get tired
carrying my Don.”

‘** That’s what I thought,”
laughed Snooker. “I knew
it was safe, or I wouldn’t
have made such a foolish
offer.”

So they carried their little
friend home and put him to
bed, and he slept until long
after breakfast-time. Jerry-
wangle and Snooker sat
beside the bed and watched
him, and as soon as he
opened his eyes they jumped
up.

“Come along to break-
fast !”? called Snooker. ‘‘ Our
Oojah is keeping it waiting on purpose
for you.”

Don soon dressed and ran downstairs
and Uncle Oojah handed him a large
plate full of porridge.

“* Help yourself to the sugar,’’ he said.
“Now, Don, my dear, I have a special
question to ask you. Our Funnymoon
is very nearly over, and I want to give
you *a present. What do you want
most ? ”

‘I’m not sure that I need anything,”
replied Don. ‘‘I have you, and Jerry,
and Snooker ; and we are always having

THE

DPPPODDPODD



Doman







WHICH LETTER REMINDS YOU OF A HORSE?P
G.



They carried their little friend home.

such jolly times together that I don’t
seem to want anything else.”

‘* My whiskers, I wish I could say that !”
laughed Snooker. ‘“* Have another little
think, Don—there’s plenty to want if
only you’ll want it hard enough.”

‘““There is something I should like

better than a present,” said Don. “Td
simply love to go back to London.”
“Splendid! So should I!” smiled

Uncle Oojah. ‘* Pack up your things,
my dears, and we'll travel to London.
Never mind the old Funnymoon—let the
owls finish that.”

END.





DPOADODD

|

ooo





PDAOD

163
ou a

avis ~~ Dumpling

——_,






HEREVER there are ducks and geese
There’s lots of noise and little peace,
For, whether it is wet or fair,
All day they waddle here and there,
Saying: ‘‘ Quack-quack ! What lovely weather
We're having !” when they meet together
Before embarking on the pond—
Of water they are VERY fond !

ND sometimes you will find a hen

(Cooped up inside a tiny pen)
Has hatched a family of ducks,
To whom she very proudly clucks.
But some day, when she takes them out,
Before she knows what they’re about,
They will be swimming. .. . (Mrs. Hen
Will wish she’d hatched out chickens THEN !)






164


* »
OF 4
5 i WN -
Moy 4 we? 5 UY \g
ANY wh >
7

ff

2, ONE
‘F. GIRAFF


LLL
YY, Y,
4 TATTERS’S MECHANICAE HORSE z















LET ME INTRODUCE YOU, BOYS, TO GLADYS.
MY GENTLE LITTLE STEED. SHE GOES BY
CLOCK-WORK



wow !
STEADY,
GLADYS,
MY LITTLE
PEG
BE A NICE
| SWEET LITTLE
HORSIE !!



THAT'S NOT RIGHT
WE WILL TRY THE OTHER
EAR——









AH! THAT'S
BETTER!
SEE WHAT
A NICE
QUIET
CREATURE
SHE IS!

GLADYS !!

166
5
=
4
g
2
5
8
g

AS PERFORMED BEFORE THE DUKE OF

| SHALL GIVE THIS
KNOWN BARREL ACT,

MORNING MY WELL-

PASS THE HAT
ROUND, PERCY


LeEeKe ee RRRRRRR RRR RRR Ree

Jerrywangle Freezes Himself
EEEELELELEEELELEELELELEE EEE

jie
ee

1 ol
Nee
ay\/

ERRYWAN-
GLE bought
an ice-cream cart,
and he thought he
would make a lot
of money.
es Walk up, walk
up!” he called.
‘‘'This ice is nice,
iiss

& @

HEY found so many cus-
tomers that the ice-cream
freezer was soon emptied.

“¢ Sold again ! ” laughed Snooker.
“Scrape it round, Jerry, and see
if you can fill another glass.”

Jerry leaned down to have
another try, but, suddenly, he
slipped into the freezer.





168

ENT ASI y
a is
Se es ‘)
A 7

“My whiskers !
I should say so!”
added Snooker.
“Who wants the
next glass? Hurry
up and buy before
it’s all gone.”

® ®

ee a nice thing!” ex-
claimed Snooker. ‘‘ What am
I going to do with him?”

“Help, help!” shouted Jerry.
‘*‘I’m freezing hard, I am, and I
don’t like it.”

Snooker caught his friend by
the foot and pulled away and the
cart fell over.


SSeS EEE EERE RRR

And Nearly Loses His Head
EE Ee ee EEE EE eee eee ekiek

HEN Jerry

discovered he
was stuck in the
freezer. ‘‘ Let me
out! I’m stiflicat-
ing 2) she called,
‘‘Where’s Snooker?
Why doesn’t he
come to help me?”’

@ @

WWE this was going on Lord

Lion came up and asked what
was the matter.

‘My bedsocks! can’t you see ?”’
demanded Snooker. ‘‘ Young Jerry
is freezing himself.”’

“We must get him out,” said
Lord Lion. ‘ You pull one side
and I'll pull the other.”

al



“I’m beside
you,” replied
Snooker. ‘It’s
all very well to say

\\\ \\=2 8
—— \\ \ = i get you out, but

how am I to do
ities

O they took Jerry and the freezer

and pulled different ways, and

after a long struggle they got him
out of it.

““That’s a big relief,” puffed
Snooker. ‘‘ Master Jerry generally
manages to put his foot in it, but
this time he very nearly lost his
head.”’






G
ve
3

CBS

Ss
Se

eI LLY had always wanted to be
se Bue. mountaineer and to climb
Ba BS Yccreat heights. After listening
BSeeeGelto his uncle’s adventures in
Switzerland he wanted to do so more
than ever. Uncle Douglas had climbed
so high that he was right above the
clouds and when there was a path it was
So narrow that he had to be roped to the
other climbers in case he should fall.
Often steps had to be cut in the ice to
enable him to reach the mountain top.

To-day Billy was going to have an
adventure of his own, he was going to
climb the highest mountain in the world.
No one grown up was about when he
started, only his favourite woolly dog,
the Teddy Bear, and Gladys, his sister’s
doll—what she was doing just there he did
not know, but she stayed in the little
town at the foot of the mountain and
watched him all the time. Ponto looked
as if he would like to come too, but Billy
could not possibly take him because he
wanted his hands to be quite free to hold
on with.

Billy put a biscuit that was left from



WANNA” SB
Dye





By Ruta Cons

his last night’s supper into his pocket ; he
did not want to get tired and have to rest
often. He had on his thickest jersey,
fortunately, so he need not mind the
weather.

lt was very fine and he thought he
could not have chosen a better time to
make a start.

He saw above him a range of moun-
tains just as Uncle Douglas had described,
but one peak was higher than the rest and
that was the one Billy was going to
attempt. He was not going to try any
easy climbs, but the most difficult of
them all. He meant to reach the top,
nothing else would satisfy him. Perhaps
it was a pity that his handkerchief was
rather grubby ; he had been trying to clean
his wheelbarrow earlier in the morning,
However, clean or dirty, it must wave as
a flag on the mountain top.

The most difficult thing of all was
making the start; there seemed to be
nowhere to put his feet and the wood at
the bottom was distinctly slippery.
There appeared to be nothing very secure
to hold on to, and he clearly felt the

170
mountain rock and for a second he was
afraid that he was going to fall to the
ground.
With a tremendous effort he managed
to pull himself up and to his great relief
he found he had reached a plateau
where he could rest for a few moments,
although he had to keep hold all the time.
He was glad to wait, for there were’a
good many interesting things to see from
where he was. Just below he saw some
brightly coloured flowers in a pattern,
spread out like a carpet or cushion cover,
just as Uncle Douglas had said.
He was still able to see the
ground below, he was not too
high up for that; there they all
were, Ponto, Teddy and Gladys,
gazing up anxiously at him, as
if his position were very unsafe.
“Tt’s topping up here,’’ he
called out; ‘‘ there is a wonderful
view,’ but he was not certain that
they could hear him. It was no
use wasting time, he had to push
on in case the weather changed.
The steepest part was before him,
and it might be luncheon time
before he reached the top.
Great masses of clouds floated
above him, and from them rose the great
white snow peak, so high that no one

had ever been able to reach it. Billy
wished to be the first to touch the un-
SNe
oes . AP TSN
UP 7

71
















He felt the mountain rock and for a second
he was afraid that he was going to fall to
the ground.

trodden snow and to stand on the very
topmost point.

Cautiously he began to move on; it was
nervous work and there was absolutely
no foothold ; the sides were quite straight
now. The mountain was inclined to shake
again and he felt a little frightened.
What if he had attempted the impossible.
With another great effort
he pulled himself up and
in a second had reached a
narrow ledge. It was very
narrow, but he sat astride
it with his legs dangling in
the air.

He felt safer and could
breathe freely again; but
suddenly there was a noise
outside, the door opened
quickly and in came Nurse.

“Good gracious! Master
Billy, whatever are you
doing on the top of the armchair like
that? You'll break your leg,” she
cried.

She was not a moment too soon, for
the chair tipped up and she was just
in time to catch him in her arms. She
would not listen to all he had to say.

“She had: no patience with that sort
of thing.”

But Billy had a lot to think about, and
if he had not quite reached the actual
mountain top, he had climbed very far
up and sat where no one had ever done
It had been a great adventure.

before.



a



(THE Duckling Boys took rod and line
To catch a fish or two;
They came upon a little house
Close to some water blue,

But ere they had a bite,
The owner of the house came back

§
The baited hooks were soon cast in, |
And gave them sucu a fright.

PLP POPP PP PDP PPO PP PD PDP PDD PD PDO PPD OD DDO DPOGDDPIOPPD#ODPOD POPOL]

172
WAY UP NORTH



===
ERE are “ Little Lou”
= =. and ‘< Big Lou”
a= In the doorway of their “‘ igloo.”
“ Tittle Brother” with a will

Is harpooning poor ‘‘ Old Bill.”
a=

Sasling on the heaving ocean
-wa He doesn’t seem to like the motion |

Mr. Bear (in search of dinner )
Looks as if he'd be the winner |

178
She MAG Cc .

CO




SEH chair and bent over the little
meee girl, “I have never seen a
child write so badly as you do and make
so many blots. Your copy is most untidy.
You must stay in this afternoon and
write it out again.”

Stella looked up with a face almost as
black as the blots.

“T can’t help it,” she muttered sulkily.
“It isn’t my fault. It’s this horrid pen.
And the inkstand ieaks—I’m sure it does,
and it’s if

“‘ Everyone's fault except your own,”
interrupted Miss Robinson quietly. ‘‘ That
copy must be properly written, Stella,
and you will stay here till it’s done.”

She turned over the blotted leaf and
gave Stella a new nib.

“Now see if you can’t keep this page
clean,” she said, as she went out of the
room.

Stella sat still and stared crossly at the
book in front of her. The copy ran:
“ Be wise in time.” As she looked at it,
to her surprise the letters seemed to move
and get out of their places. Stella saw
each letter had tiny black arms and legs,





BOOKS

M. Rogertrs WestT

and in a minute they began to run all
over the table.

B was chasing T and N, while all the
E’s and I’s played see-saw with a pencil
over a piece of indiarubber. W dis-
appeared by himself into the history
book. And S and M sat down on the edge
of the inkstand and began to talk in
funny squeaky voices.

‘‘T wish the others could come back
and play with us,” Stella heard M say
dolefully ‘‘ They’re all prisoners now
and there are so few of us left.”’

‘‘ Stella makes blots on purpose, I know
she does,” answered S angrily.

“‘She’ll catch us, too. I’m sure she
will. Think of spending one’s life tied
down to a dirty copybook !”’

“‘ She’s a horrid little girl, that’s what
she is.”

“Tm not!” burst in Stella indignantly.

At the sound of her voice all the letters
jumped up in a great hurry. All the E’s
and I’s fell off the see-saw and hurried
away to hide. B, N and T got behind the
pencil box. S followed W into the history.
But Stella was too quick for M and
caught him just before he disappeared
into the inkstand. rats

at

174 : im


But Stella was too quick for M, and caught him just before
he disappeared into the inkstand.

She held him carefully in her hand for
she was afraid of hurting him, he was so
very small.

‘Why do you think I’m horrid?” she
asked.

M sat down carefully in the palm of
her hand and crossed his tiny legs.

“Because you take all our family
prisoners and you won’t let them go,” he
explained.

“J don’t do anything of the sort,”
‘cried Stella.

““Oh! yes, you do. Don’t you know
that all the letters in a copybook are
allowed by the fairy of the inkpot to
come out and play when lessons are over.
When your book was new there were a
great many of us. And what lovely games
we had!”

‘“‘Didn’t we?” It was one of the E’s
who had crept out of hiding to join in the
conversation. ‘‘ Beautiful games—races
and hide and seek.” .

“But when you make blots,’’ M con-
tinued sadly, ‘‘it ties them down to the
page and they can’t come out. There are
lots and lots of them inside that book
now.”

“And all the little I’s are blind,”
_ remarked W, popping his head out of the
history book. ‘‘ You forgot to give them
their dots.” r

Poor Stella ! She did feel ashamed, and
to her horror she found she.was getting

smaller and smaller

every minute. All

the letters were

standing round her

and pointing their
' fingers.

“Take her to see
them. Perhaps then
she'll be sorry,”’ said
T severely.

“Yes, yes!’ cried
all the letters. And
Stella was hustled
along towards the
copybook.

As she entered
between the covers a
chorus of groans and

murmurs met her.

“Has anyone seen my cross? She
forgot to cross me,” a T was complaining.
“ And I can’t go home without it.”

“‘T’ve lost my tail,’’ moaned Y.

** So have we,” cried G and J in chorus.

‘* All my loops are full of ink.”’

“So are my pothooks. And she can’t
see the difference between M and N.”

Stella looked round her. She was in a
long white room covered with lines like a
copybook. All round were hundreds of
letters chained to the lines. And what
misshapen letters they were !

‘Here’s Stella,’”? someone called out.
“‘ What shall we do with her?”

‘“‘ Throw her into the inkpot,’”’ shouted
one.

‘‘ Stick her down to a page,” suggested
another.

Stella was beginning to be frightened, |
when there was a sudden hush. Coming
down the room was a fairy. She was
dressed in black velvet and a velvet cap
was perched on her long black hair. Even
her wings were black. She carried a quill
turned pen like a wand.

“What’s all this noise about?” the
Fairy of the Inkpot asked. Then she
turned to Stella.

‘ Well, Stella, are you sorry now?”

“Oh! Iam. Can’t I do something to
let them go?”

The fairy nodded approvingly.

175
“Yes, you can if
you really want to.
But it will be hard
work.”

“T don’t mind a
Stella began.

“Well,” said the
fairy. “‘ If you write
your copy as well as
ever youcan without
a single blot the spell
will break and all sea
the letters will be en SORE
free. But if you S—
make one mistake
the poor little things
will have to stay
here for ever. Can
you doit?”

wi letry. hard,”
whispered Stella.

The fairy waved her wand and in a
Moment Stella was back in her chair with
the clean page of the copybook in front
of her. She dipped her pen in the ink and
began to write very carefully.

At last it was finished. All the T’s were
crossed, the I’s dotted, and there was not
a single blot.

As she laid down her pen there was a
little buzzing sound and hundreds of



a fairy.

=]

INNHVUUTTTATAOUU UU TA

IAAL

Leap-frog






Stella was beginning to be frightened when there
was a sudden hush. Coming down the room was

letters flitted past her and disappeared
into the inkstand. And Stella thought
she saw the inkpot fairy smiling at her
from the lid.

Miss Robinson was very pleased with
Stella’s copy, and so, for the matter of
that, was Stella. And now she is always
very careful with her writing, for it
wouldn’t do to imprison a fairy letter,
would it ?

Iii:

ISIOTIUUUUOUUUTHU UT
“The Reditehed Boul






Gr



By V. C. ALEXANDER. Sy a i

fi il i (





ik





a








CHARACTERS :

ans Sisters.

ALICE

BESS Friends
JENNY of the

CISSIE above. \
MAGGIE

THE WITCH



HE children can wear ordinary
clothes. An oldcloak anda hump will
be all that are required for the Witch.

ScENE.—A kitchen, with a dresser full
of pots and pans and tins and bags. A
large table to one side of the stage, with a
bowl on it, with spoons lying beside it,
and ingredients for cake. Other furniture
as wished. The stage appears to be
empty when the curtain goes up, but
ELFIE comes from under the table and peeps
around.

Erie (looking round): Hush! Tm
going to have some fun to-day. Mother.
- has told us we can make some cakes, and
I’m going to put some pepper in them.
It will be fun. I wonder if I can find the
pepper pot. (Runs around and looks

177




ING WEA
i

a sl
if

oy
A
ae OnE ACY en




rai
Si 4) i on the dresser, upsetting
a bag of flour, which she
tries to scoop up with one
of the spoons. Footsteps
ave heard outside, and
ELFIE hastily retreats
under the table.)

Enter FiFt. Shelooks
around and seeing
no one goes up to
the table and peeps
into the bowl.

Firt: Thisis good! I
never thought I should
be the first in the
kitchen. Mother has
said we might make
some cakes. I’vealways
longed to make cakes,
and as I’m the first
one here, I’m going
to start. Oh! (seeing the flour lying onthe
floor). Whoever has done that? It
must be that kitten of ours. Now we
shan’t be able to make any. I must tell
the others.

fh y
N ,






rr

i

(Exit.)

(ELFIE is just coming from under the
table when THE OLD WITCH enters.
ELFIE hides again, and THE WITCH
enters, chuckling.)

Witcu (chuckling): This is just what
I wanted to happen. I have long made
up my mind to bewitch some mortals,
and at last I shall be able to do it. (She
examines the basin, then glances toward
the dresser.) Ah! ha! they are making
cakes! I will bewitch them! (Pauses and
thinks.) Now how can 1 doit? No, I will

M
bewitch the bowl instead. Everybody
who touches the bow] will begin to dance,
and will not:stop dancing until one of the
mortals says the word “Carrot.’’ (THE
Witcu dances herself.) That will be never,
because no mortal is here to hear my
spell. (She waves her hand over the basin.)
Wink, wonk, pinky po. Japanese eggs.
(She does a grand flourish and disappears.)
(ELFIE comes from her hiding place
and stands looking at the bowl.)
ELFIE: Oh, G
no,l’mnot going
to touch you!
The witch little
thought I was
hiding under the
table. I’m go-
ing to watch the
others, and see
whether they
really are be-
witched. Here
they come.

(ELFIE goes over
to the dresser and
begins touching
the different
things.)

Enter half a
dozen children,
led by FiFi, who
is talking ex-
citedly.

FIFI:

Catching

it was that I
discovered the one bag of flour was
broken! And isn’t it lucky that mother
had another in the store-cupboard !
Now we can get to work. Hallo! Elfe!
Did you upset that bag of flour? Never
mind! Here’s another! I’m going to
start. You, Alice, can bring me the raisins ;
you, Bess, the sugar; you, Jenny, the
milk; you, Cissie, the baking powder ;
and you, Maggie, can bring me some
water. I don’t know what you can do,
Elfie.

ELFIE: Don’t you bother about me.
T’ll watch. (She leans against the table,





while FiF1 goes towards the bowl. The
others follow her, and F1F1 pours some flour
into it. She touches the sides of the bowl
with her hands, and immediately begins
to dance. She can’t stop dancing. The
others stave at her in amazement.)

Firt: I can’t stop dancing. I must
dance. Alice, you carry on. My dancing
fit will soon be over. (She comes to the
front of the stage, dancing a slow measure,
curtseying, etc. ALICE seizes the spoon,
cg drops the raisins

into the mixture.

Puts one hand on

the side of the

bowl, and im-

mediately be-

gins to dance.

ELFIE 1s holding

her sides and

laughing.

ALICE’S dance

should be a dif-

ferent one from

Firt’s,but should

harmonise.)

ALIcE: Ican’t
stop dancing.
Do finish the
cake, Bess. (She
follows FiFi
vound the stage.

9 BEss seizes the
? sugar and drops
6 it into the cake
9 mixture. She
touches the side
of the bowl as she does so, and begins to
dance.) ;

Bess: Iam bewitched. (Catching sight
of E.Fir’s laughter.) What have you done?
My feet won’t stand still. Jenny, you
finish the cake. Elfie has bewitched me.

ELFIE: Indeed I have not, but I
know who has. I want to see what
happens to Jenny, Cissie and Maggie,
and then I'll unbewitch you.

JENNY (putting her hand on the side of
the bowl, and pouring the milk on the foor,
at the same time her feet begin to move) :
Why aren’t you bewitched as well?

178
her say that if I
repeated a .certain
word, you would all
stop dancing.

ALL: Oh! do say the
word, quickly, please.

ELFiE: I guess
you must be pretty
tired of dancing, so
T’llsay it. ONIONS!

(They all dance
harder than
ever,and ELFIE
looks first be-
wildered, then
Frightened.)

Oh! dear, I’ve for-
gotten the word, and
now you will have to
dance for ever.

(The others all
make avrun at
her, still danc-
ing, and close
round her. In

doing so it should be clearly shown
to the audience that ELFIE by mistake
touches the bowl. Immediately she
begins to dance. Now they can all



‘‘Now you will have to dance for ever.”

Oh! dear, I can’t keep still now. Someone
else must finish the cakes. Do, please,
Elfie, unmagic us at once!

(ELFIE laughs merrily, as CISSIE and

MacGIeE snatch the baking powder
and the jug of water and seize hold
of the bowl. They immediately begin

dance the same, and there is music.
Erie should certainly be the most
prominent dancer. They dance, say,

for five minutes. Then ELFIE, still
dancing, comes tothe front of the stage.)
ELFIE: I now can say the magic word,
It is one we have often heard,
If you should forget, just think

of parrot,
And you will remember the

to dance, and the contents of wt
become upset. ELFIE 1s roaring
with laughter. The others are all
dancing. One could be doing a
highland fling, another a minuet,
another an Ivish jig, two could
join together and do a fox trot,
while the sixth could do a Russian word is CARROT.

or a skirt dance.) (They all stop dancing, and join hands and

Exrigz: I'll tell you who bewitched bow io the audience.)
you now. It was an old witch, and I heard CURTAIN.

GSE EE EEE EERE E EERE REE EEE eg
€ Which Letter Reminds You ofa Bird? J
22

BE OS 1S 1 OE UE EE EE ee NN Ne Be Be Be be Se be Be Be SCL

179

NSS
a THE ene SHOW

Ol DP PPD DDD PDPDDDPD PPDPD OD

®POPDPODODDODODDDPDOOOD OD
rt SS
ȴ



‘“Pay your money here!” called
Snooker. ‘‘ No half-price to-day. Full
fare if you want to
see the Tumblers.”’
Snooker had a busy
time taking _ the
money. When the
tent was full they
dropped the flap and
went inside, and
Jerry lifted a cloth
off a table to show









money : a That’s a
thing [’m always (
willing to listen to.”
“You do what I
tell you and we shall
soon be rich,” de-
clared Jerrywangle.
“We'll get a couple
of tumblers and have two empty glasses
Py aoe Tas way TS SHE ea standing on it side
; y THE Tomarers ! }ONEY HERE by side.
do.” ‘““Your show is a
‘““That’s all very long time beginning,”
well, Ls where can |said a little boy.
you find the tum- ‘‘Where are the
blers?”’ = inquired Tumblers you told us
Snooker. “‘ And how about ? ”
are you going to pay “Here on the
them, I should like table,’ replied Jerry.
to know ?” “Can’t you see the
“You ask too two glass tumblers ?
many questions, you [WHERE Arc = nes They're very good
do,” replied) Jerry. knee) ; .\| tumblers, they are—
eek " all to me, I only bought them
and you'll see.” to-day.”’
So they hired a The crowd made

tent and put it up a rush to get at
by the roadside, and

Snooker painted the
notices while Jerry-
wangle went off to
see about the Tum-
blers.

When everything
was ready they hung
their notices on the
tent, and Snooker
stood by to take the
money.

“Walk up, walk
up !”’ shouted Jerry.
“This way to see
the Tumblers! Six-
pence each.”

too late, for the show-
men darted out and
began running along
the road.

“Steph vielye
Jerry,” muttered
Snooker. “* We’d bet-

ter tumble out of this,
| and quick, too!”

“Those people
are running after us
very fast, they are,”
said Jerry. ‘“ Hurry
up, you Snooker!
We don’t want any
of them to catch us.”

them, but they were




DPB PBPBPBPBPBPPBAPPBDB PPA PPD PDPPD PDP DPD PD PDPD PPO PPA POD POD PADD DPDPDPAPAD AD

mae RRYWANGLE sat up in bed

ia and looked

ge Snooker
eexCams was nearly
out of sight under
his blankets, and he
seemed to be asleep.

“Tm tired of i
having no_ fun,” \\
complained Jerry.
** T’ll go to the circus,
and I won’t let our
Snooker know.”

He carried his
clothes into the back
room and began to
dress; but Snooker

|
§



Wm Gams Our bw
MYSELF TODAY.

<<
SS

S Se =|

=

peeped in at the door.

“That Snooker
talks too much, he
does,” continued
Jerry. ‘‘ I’m going
out all by myself
this time, to have a
rest from him.”

‘““Are you? We
shallsee about that,”’ |}
chuckled Snooker.
‘*T know somebody }
that will have a sur-
prise before the day
is over.”

So he crept down
to the kitchen and
drew a face on the
tablecloth with a
piece of charcoal.
When this was done
he ran down the lane |MWiay
with it and waited
for his friend.

Jerrywangle took
his own time to
finish dressing ; then
he tiptoed downstairs
and opened the door.

181

PDPDPDPDPDDPDDSD DD

; MIXED PLEASURE

across the room. he said.





‘* Now for a good day at the circus,”
“ve dodged our Snooker

oT Eee
i i
Lh | |
“ral
i}

nicely, I have.”

As he turned away
a white figure came
stalking slowly to-
wards him, making
moans and noises as
it moved. Jerry was
so surprised that he
staggered back, but
he tripped over a
stone and sat down
on the ground.

Suddenly the cloth
was thrown aside,
and he saw Snooker
laughing at him from
underneath.

““Good-morning,
Jerry!” he called.
“You're out early,

iM

f

aren’t you? I’m
very pleased to meet
you.”

Buti) my) not
pleased to meet
you,” replied Jerry.
= You's"ought "710
know better than
skerrify anybody
like that.”

““And you ought
to know you can’t
give me the slip,”
retorted Snooker,
“Come along, and
we'll go to the circus
together.”

But they soon had
to stop and make
way for a long line
of caravans.

““Here’s another
disappointment !”
complained Snooker.
““ My whiskers, they
are moving away!”

Ve



|
|
|
CELELELEELEEEEL EEE EUR eee eee

€ oe
¢ Retold Fairy Tales—
oe

oe
pe er ee




% J Well: Ker A Wise
uy
or gee
Pot Tie

esis
ay a i
a Ie m a iy FT













es gh



Business was very Eee at the offices’ of

Kidd and Napper. Suddenly the telephone

rang. ‘‘Ha! Ha! It’s Baron Overdraft.
A job at last!’ cried Kidd.





= >. a " Ani a

i Gi
Cea | ak ]
zal ho

Finding the babes in the Park with their
pretty nursernaid, Kidd engaged her atten-
tion while his partner hurried away with
the pram, giving him time to get away—

“al ee y Da
Ig .














Snatching up their best hats and cloaks

they were soon over at the Baron’s private

office. ‘‘It’s a little removal job: my
niece and nephew,’’ he explained.







i a

—Kidd Pune after himito their waiting

motor-car. Lugging™ “the ¢children from

their pram, Napper jumped in and they
were soon miles away in the country.
ELECELECEEES EEE EEL EEEe eee eknknnrg

ae Tea hie (any oe
A

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i y eH) 5

Ui
eh. Pe







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20
Ch,

—.
ent Seer
Ne ~
AT
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AYR

On they went until it was nearly dark.

Then the two villains stopped close to a

great forest. Here they deserted the
children and disappeared with the car.

lye

L6G ae
WN wll! <5)
WZ , S N ry
IN (taal XS

——

Whss
TH WLAN tot Keil PEGS

~

There was a Scout camp close by and the

boys wrapped them in nice, warm blankets,

and they sat by the fire. The next morning
the Scouts took them home.

: __The Babes in the Wood é
Be

ELCECELELESELES ELEEEE ELE eeeeek €







ety :
ih 5 Ll fa i
i HANNS *
i y S








v | ‘

TAM e L ae
4
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4

HUNG

Ae GF SNES

Ai J \ Sa
Te LMT. +e
VWAe a Gh c i
Nha SWja7 /
The Babes cried themselves to sleep, and
the Robins were just covering them with

leaves when they were awakened by a little
dog barking. Then a Boy-Scout appeared.




WW =>



ee ~~ rs _Saxsc nA

And as Kidd and Napper had a breakdow

they were captured by the Scouts and taken

to the Police Station. Now they are safely
in prison.
Re, i Wf;
SS Ne

Tae) Pe

/ y Vee

Ba // eas Bs
Hint:
re IM Me. :







Mn
ayi® ' "

Wa ETER was coal black and curly,
Bawith a splash of white upon
aa @@evahis chest, a pointed nose and
(Ssimilarge, faithful brown eyes. He
was a good-tempered dog; the only
things which ever upset him were cats.

Peter loved his master Pat, aged six,
who believed in fairies.

On cold winter’s evenings, when the
fire was burning brightly in the nursery
grate, Pat would sit on the mat in front
of it, Peter at his side, and together they
would see the fire fairies.

“Look, Peter!”? Pat would say sud-
denly. ‘ There’s the Fairy Queen right
in the middle of the fire. She’s staring
right at us, Peter. Can you see her?”
And Peter would blink his own brown
eyes wisely.

When he woke up on the morning of
Christmas Eve and saw the snow on the
ground, Peter got especially excited. He
frisked and barked and gambolled, until
he saw a lump of white snow just near
an old rose tree, and he stood still and
looked with just that same wise expression
in his brown eyes which they wore when
he saw the fire fairies.

**Oh, Peter!” exclaimed Pat, “I do
believe you’ve seen a snow fairy. Do
tell me where she is?”

But in a flash, Peter was away frisking
and gambolling in the snow, until it was
time to come in for tea.

And now we come to the red patent
leather collar.









Rita StTrRAuvsS

It was Pat’s Christmas present to
Peter, and was presented to him with
all due ceremony after tea on Christmas
Eve, so that it could be worn on Christmas
Day. Pat had saved up for weeks to
buy it, for Peter’s old brown leather
collar had grown very shabby.

“* Sides, he’ll look much nicer in red,”
Pat said, ‘‘’cos red’s a fairy colour, and
will help Peter to see the fire fairies.”’

Peter seemed delighted with his present,
and the red patent collar looked very
smart against his curly black coat.

After tea, Peter in his new red collar
sat on the mat at Pat’s side, gazing into
the fire and looking for the fire fairies ;
but to Pat’s great surprise and disappoint-
ment, there were no fairies to be seen
that evening.

““°Spec’? they’re all helping Father
Christmas get his presents ready to pack
up, Peter,” he said, as he put his hand
on the doggie’s red patent collar and
drew him closer. ‘“‘ Don’t you wish,
Peter, that this mat we are sitting on
was a magic carpet and we could fly out
of the window all the way to Iceland and
see what Father Christmas is doing?
Oh! I do wish we were sitting on a real
magic carpet, don’t you?”

The words were scarcely out of his
mouth when he felt a sudden dizzy feeling.
As he told nurse afterwards, it seemed
as if the room were going round and
round, until all of a sudden he discovered
that the room wasn’t going round, but

184
that the mat on which he
and Peter were seated had
risen from the floor and was
floating up towards the
open window. Out of the
window it floated high up
near thesky, wherethousands
of stars glittered. Pat felt
very cold—you see, it was
freezing hard and he hadn’t
any coat on, only his little
thin indoor suit.

“Oh! dear, I wish I had Ss
a coat on!” he exclaimed ; =

‘““a big thick fur one would
be nice up here.”

No sooner had he expressed
this wish than he found
himself clad from head to
foot in fluffy white fur.

**Tsn’t it grand, Peter?’’
Pat exclaimed. ‘‘I seem to be getting
everything I wish for. Oh! I wish we
were in Father Christmas Land now,
watching Father Christmas pack up all
the presents.”

The next moment they bumped up
against something—the carpet had come
to a stop.

They were on top of a high, snowy
table land, and had just bumped into a
sleigh drawn by two beautiful reindeer
and driven by an old man dressed all in
red with white fur on his cap. He had
rosy cheeks, a white beard and seemed
very cross.

‘* You might look where you’re going ! ”
he exclaimed. ‘“‘ Don’t you see I’m in
a hurry!”

‘**T’m sorry, I didn’t see you!” ex-
claimed Pat politely, “Is this Father
Christmas Land ?”’

“* Of course it is, and I’m one of Father
Christmas’s hundred thousand million
servants. I’ve got to go thousands of
miles to deliver these presents for him,
and all in ten hours!”

** Would you like to ride on my magic
carpet ?”’ asked Pat.
“Magic carpet?
Carpet ?”’

voice.

Who said Magic
exclaimed a bluff, hearty






SSS \\ i! Gy
SS gut, /Z

= ai
Se SS I]
Sail Hl Why

Zee

Nit

_—



found himself clad from head to foot in fluffy

white fur.

Pat turned round and saw Father

_ Christmas himself, who had drawn up

on his big sleigh, which was simply laden
with presents of all kinds.

‘Hi! steady there, I’m coming!”
he called out. And he jumped out of
his sleigh with an armful of presents.
““T’ll accept your invitation, Pat,’ he
said. ‘‘ Wish yourself down your own
chimney.”

Pat wished, and the next thing he
knew was that he and Peter and Father
Christmas were sailing down the drawing-
room chimney at home, simply covered
with soot. When they got down they
found Mummie asleep in one chair beside
the fire and Daddy in another. Father
Christmas told Pat and Peternot to make
the least sound, and he put a nice square
parcel beside Mummie and one beside
Daddie. In the meantime, Pat felt so
excited that he let go of Peter’s collar.

‘* Wish yourself up the chimney again! ”’
whispered Father Christmas. Pat wished
but nothing happened.

“Wish, quickly !’’ said Father Christ-
mas. Again Pat wished; but again
nothing happened. Then, “Tl wish
myself!’ exclaimed Father Christmas—
he was quite angry now, and he caught
hold of Peter’s red leather collar and

= 185
wished, and before he could
stop him, Pat saw him taking

‘Peter up the chimney, collar

and all.

*“¢ Come back, Peter, come
back! Come back!’ Pat
called out. But ina moment
Peter was lost to sight.

* * x *

‘““Why, what’s the matter,
Master Pat? Have you
been asleep and had a bad
dream ?”’ asked Nurse—for

Pat was in front of the
nursery fire now, feeling
very miserable. He no

longer had on his suit of
fur, and the mat was gone,
and so was Peter.

“Oh! Nannie, Father
Christmas has taken Peter
away on the magic carpet,”
he sobbed.

‘““Why, you silly boy,
here’s Peter,” said Nurse.
And next moment, Pat
felt Peter’s cold, soft nose
rubbing against the palm of his hand.
Pat gave him such a hug.

“But Father Christmas has taken his
collar away, Nurse, look! ” wailed Pat.

““Here’s Peter’s new collar—I found
it lying on the grass ; he must have shaken
it off. You must fix it on tighter next
time, sonnie,’” said Nannie. Pat took
the collar and put it on Peter’s neck.

““Where’s the magic carpet?”
exclaimed.

“Bless the child, he means the old
nursery mat. Peter had it out on the
lawn just now. It looked as if he were
shaking it to bits. I just managed to
save it and have hung it on the line for a
good beating.”

Oo

Pat

PIPPI DPDPADPDOD







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‘Hil steady there. I’m coming!” he yelled.

“Oh! isn’t Peter clever!’’ Pat’s face
was all smiles now. ‘“‘ You see, Nannie,
Father Christmas stole him and _ the
magic carpet, and he’s brought it back
to me again, and his patent collar is
magic. It is a wishing collar, Nannie—
watch!” '

‘“‘ T wish Daddie would come along with
lots of presents!’ he exclaimed.

And, would you believe it, that very
moment Daddie walked into the room
laden with parcels. Daddie and Mummie
called it coincidence; but Pat knows it
was the magic collar—even though Peter’s
red patent leather collar has lost its
magic ever since, and is just an ordinary
dog’s collar now!



ooo oecT

WHAT HERB REMINDS YOU OF THE

HOURS ?



Oo



THYME



Droooool



186
PDPGOOGGGLCVGODGLVHOGGOGOGHGIDBVGHGOGGHOGGGBGLHGH GOGH
© The Sergeant’s March |
: e Sergeants are 3
: :

DOOOHGSOOGHSSGOHHSHSSOOOHSOOOHSHSSOHOHHSGHOOSS

WANE player is the Sergeant, and
4 the others are supposed to
14 be soldiers. They line up one
eeeSt by one, with their hands on the
shoulders of the player in front; then
they all march along and sing:— |






One step high and one step low,
One step quick and one step slow ;
Turn and have another try—
One step low and one step high.

Oe

The soldiers have to act the verse as
they sing it, and at the word ‘‘turn”’
they drop their hands and twirl around ;
then they take their old places and go
on stepping.

The Sergeant watches his men very
closely, and if he sees a soldier not
marching properly he calls him out.
When he has called four out he can go
back into the line, and the first player
to be called takes his place.



‘SMILE, PLEASE!”

187


d airy Tales—

ay



SSS

SAAB ES STEN



SLOWLY

SW
4)



Poor Dick was very fed up and had run

away. Getting off his bike for a rest he

took out his wireless set. ‘‘ Hello, Pussy,
what’s this ? Cat wanted ! ”’



Returning to London they found a ship
about to sail for Mintrocko. As Mintrocko
was overrun with mice the Captain had
promised the Sultan to take back a cat.



Dick’s pussy was chosen, and Dick felt

very lonely, but he waved good-bye.

**Cheer up, Dick,’’ Pussy purred. ‘‘ I'll
soon be home again ! ’’

When the ship arrived at Mintrocko the

Sultan gave a banquet to the Captain.

But the mice joined in! So did Pussy !
The Sultan was simply delighted.


Pussy ate as many mice as he could and
then laid the rest out in neat rows while

they took his photograph for the So back to London sailed the Captain with

“Mintrocko Morning Mail.” Dick’s fortune. And Dick dispatched
‘* Take these few—

—jewels,’? said the Sultan, ‘‘and send
me more of these wonderful animals.’’

hundreds of pussies.

Rare i
rer ay \



Dick was now a wealthy man, so when

he asked for the hand of Alice, whom he amid great rejoicings. Pussy came back
had long loved, old Alderman Fitznoodle from Mintrocko, and was their mascot ever
consented gladly. afterwards.

189
>

} SITTING UP AND SITTING DOWN







SaERRYWANGLE and Don hours to get tidy,’ objected Snooker.











i feral agreed to play a game of ‘Run upstairs and take a hot bath.
paced faeee Strect foot- : I’m going as soon as
Seca ball, but |) Sor AT Nome. You can't I’m ready.”

GO TO THE PARTY LiKe THAT! /
Jerry went up to

the bathroom, but
instead of having a
bath he took a bar
of soap down to the

nak Got anes

just as they got to

the door a messenger

came with a letter.
“Tt’s from Lady yg

Eliza,’ said Jerry. hb

“She is having a front door.
dinner party to-day, |" 7: He knelt down and
and she gives me an }. )"): rubbed the step until

there was a coating
of soap all over it.
Presently he heard
footsteps, so he got
up and jumped out
of the way.

The door opened
and Snooker came
out, talking to some-
body inside.

““Good evening,”
he said. ‘‘ Don’t sit
up for me to-night.
I may be late.”

As he was speak-
‘) ing his feet slid from
i under him, and he
sat down suddenly
on the soapy step.

‘* No, you won’t be
late, so they needn’t
sit up,” chuckled
Jerry. ‘‘ You’re just
in time to sit down,
you are.”

‘“*Thisis your trick,
Isuppose,”’ grumbled
Snooker. ‘“* Well,
Jerry, you’ve spoiled
my appearance. The
best thing we can
do is stay at home.”

|

invitation to come k{-4"?
with my little friend |" ”
Snooker.”

‘**T know why she
sent it ; she wants to
see me,” laughed
Snooker. ‘* Come up-
stairs and dress. [ll
show her how well I
can look when Ilike.”’

/ ‘* There is plenty of
time yet,”’ said Jerry.
‘“T’m going to play
football first.”

Snooker went up-
stairs and dressed
himself carefully.
He was nearly finish-

9 ing when Jerry came

into the room with |=
his clothes torn and
very muddy.

“My bedsocks,
you can’t go to the
party like that!”

““'You’re too par-
ticular, you are,”’ re-
plied Jerry. “Ican
soon get dressed.
Wait for me.”

oO

“Certainly not.
It will take you



190





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HOOK OR CROOK







ME RRYWANGLE locked the
M4 door of their suis and set
Pe off with
pitee@ave his friends.

ae i m glad we
have come out this
morning,” he said.
“Tt’s better than ie
staying at home
and never having
any fun.”

Before they had
gone far they saw
some workpeople
putting up a new
building. A tall
crane was hoisting |).
beams and _ girders,
hanging by a hook
from the end of the
chain.

Pee?



1 WANT To SEE et
EY ARE DOIN
We fey

114 Cotes Cont, ee]
oy bs te “a
: i rN
t a eae hs
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ET Ese
as C
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HD,
any

““They’re build- |
ing, they are,” said y Tae >
Jerry. a

‘“*Let’s watch them

I'L, GET UP THERE BY HOOK OR BY CROOK.
for a minute or two,” “ES :

Wy vi
suggested Snooker. Pit “ey 4 ne
**T shouldn’t mind ips 4 2 RMS ee :
helping them with % ya f

a trowel, if they a
would let me.”
Jerrywangle was Al

not satisfied with @

Ni
a
standing down _be-
low. First he got
on a_ wheelbarrow,
but that was not
high enough, so he
began to climb up
one of the poles.
‘“*T want to see
what they are do- I
ing,” he said. “ Pl |\==¢ (j
get up there by hook \y al =
or, by orale, HE TE edgy finecoc
takes me all day. TC CROGKE
““ Come down, Jer- Magy,

ry! You are too fat Seats teveu

191





to climb,” warned Snooker. ‘‘ My bed-
socks, yen "ll be hurting yourself! ’

The hook of the
crane became en-
tangled with Jerry-
wangle’s jersey.
Somebody gave the
signal to hoist, and
before he knew what
was happening, he

‘| found himself swing-

ing in the air.

‘“* That’s doneit !”’
laughed Snooker.
‘“'You’ve had what
you wanted, only you
are going up by the
hook and not by the
crook.”

“et amie ysgiet
down!’ called Jer-
ry. ‘I don’t like all
this swinging about.
It’s dizzying me.”

The next moment
his jersey gave way
and he dropped into
a large pile of freshly-
mixed mortar.

‘“* Help, Snooker—
help me out!” he
shouted.

‘*My whiskers!”
chuckled Snooker.
‘* Where was Jerry
when his _ jersey
broke? You know the
answer, don’t you ?”

Lord Lion helped
Snooker to pull him
out of the mortar.

** This is not fair,

‘| it isn’t,” sniffed Jer-

ry. ‘“‘I don’t know
how it is, but I al-
ways get a lot more
than my share of

trouble ! ”



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NY
AN Ni
7 LL her life Jennifer had played
of alone. She had no sisters, and



Zerg} lived far away, and her mother’s

cottage was a long distance from the
village.

Her home was situated on the edge of
a winding river which was quite narrow
at the end of the garden, with water
plants and reeds and overhanging trees.
Just beyond it widened suddenly and
continued getting wider, till it reached the
sea, twenty miles away.

The corner was her favourite place to
spend her playtime. She had built her-
self a little house out of branches, in which
she would sit with her toys, or making
dolls’ clothes, and sometimes do not..ing
but gaze over the stream, where a mer-
maid lived who would not tell Jennifer
her secret. One day after it had stopped
raining the sun came out. Gladly Jennifer
ran down to the water’s edge.

“Perhaps the mermaid will tell me

her secret to-day,” she said to herself.
‘*T hope she will come. Oh! there she
is,’ and she gave a joyous shout as she
saw the mermaid peeping out from
among the reeds with a smile on her
curious little greenish face. Her long
straight hair was a dull greyish green,
but when she moved there were bright
rainbow tints of green and blue and pink,



and silvery lights on her little neck and
arms.

“Good afternoon,”’ said Jennifer. ‘“‘ You
said you would tell me your secret to-
day.”

The mermaid was holding to the edge
of the bank with both her hands, and she
let herself sink down till only the top of
her head and her bright blue-green eyes
were above the level of the water; then
reassured by the honest, eager little face
looking down at her, she blurted out :

“T can’t swim.”

“You can’t swim!” gasped Jennifer.
“But why not?”

‘“‘T don’t know.”

** Well then, how do you—how do you
—go ? 22

““T hold the weeds and things, one
after the other,’ answered the mermaid,
‘“and I catch on to the stones and drag
myself along,’ and then, her voice
changing fiercely, she cried, “‘ But don’t
you tell anyone!”

‘“Of course, I won’t,” said Jennifer.
“But Id like to help you find a way to
learn.”

“* Tt’s dreadful not being able to swim,”
said the mermaid, breaking into bitter
tears. ‘‘I’ve tried everything, and they
all laugh at me. I tried swinging on a
reed, but it broke. Once a frog said he’d
show me how, but when we had gone a

193 N


little way he suddenly let go and I
fell down on the stones and hurt myself

all over. Once I took lessons from a
fish, but he was always interrupting the
lesson to look at anything that passed,
and when I told him of it he said I was
too clumsy and that I’d never learn.”

“Oh! don’t cry,’ said Jennifer. ‘ We'll
find a way. There’s mother calling. I
must go, but I will think of something ” ;
and she rushed away indoors.

All through tea-time and the rest of
the evening she was busily turning over
in her brain different ways of trying to
make mermaidsswim. After tea she took
_ down the old dictionary and laboriously
hunted up this word, ‘“‘swimming.’’ Ah!
here it was. ‘‘Toswim, to move on, orin
a fluid.” But that was for people with
two legs. She looked up the word “‘ frog,”
and learned it was ‘‘an amphibious
animal.’”’ Fishes were ‘‘ animals living in
water.” Lastly she found ‘‘ Mermaid,”
which was described as a fabled sea-
woman ; but she went to bed at last with
the problem still unsolved.

In the morning she had something else
to interest her, and it was evening before
she went to the stream. The mermaid
was getting dreadfully impatient among

the reeds when Jennifer at last came
running over the grass. —

The mermaid only looked very
angry.

“ T have waited all this time, and
I don’t believe you have anything
to tell me. I suppose you don’t
want to help me.”

“T’ve thought of a plan, truly,”
said Jennifer, kneeling down on the
grass. “If you could get a real big
fish to let you hold on to his tail
he’d swim and you could copy him.”

“T don’t like it,” said the mermaid,
ungratefully.

“But youcan try,” urged Jennifer.

And the mermaid consented to
try, and presently when a beautiful
big fish came along the mermaid
clutched at his tail with both her
hands. The result was astonishing.
The fish dragged his tail free, leapt
into the air, and turning round, butted
his head so violently against the mermaid
that he drove her down to the bottom.
Then he shot like a streak of lightning
out of sight.

The mermaid came up through the
water gasping with fury. She churned
up the mud with her tail till the water
was thick and brown, and tried to break
the reeds, and she bit at the water-weeds
in her rage.

“¢ It’s your fault!’’ she shrieked, as soon
as she could speak. ‘* I knew it wouldn’t
do. I’ll never speak to you again!”

“I’m very sorry,” said poor Jennifer,
with the tears running down her cheeks.
“ Tl] think of another plan.”

“*T won’t listen. I won’t speak to you.
I don’t like you”; and the mermaid
began splashing her awkward way up the
river.

‘“‘T suppose she will never come back
again,” Jennifer said to herself sadly ; and
she went indoors and to bed, and after a
time forgot her troubles in sleep.

Early in the morning, just after sun-
rise, she thought she heard her name
called, and she rose and looked out of the
window. As she gazed eagerly at the
river she could see the reeds being agitated

194


Jennifer saw the fish leap into the air.

to and fro, and guessed that the mermaid
had come back. She hurried into her
clothes, and ran out of the house.

“Oh! Dm so glad you have come
back,”’ she said, and she lay down on the
grass so that her face was on a level with
with the little mermaid’s.

“I am sorry I was angry with you,”
said the mermaid. “I did not mean
what I said yesterday. I like you,” and
she threw her arms round Jennifer’s neck
and pressed a wet kiss on her cheek.
Then she let go her hold—and found that

DPADPDAD OD

POD tr RPDS |

PETER AND PIFPAT
A “Hard” Riddle

she did not sink! Something was
keeping her near the surface. She
threw out her arms; unconsciously
she waved her tail to and fro, and.
found she was moving in the water.

Jennifer, breathlessly watching
from the bank, suddenly guessed
the truth.

“You can swim,” she cried
excitedly; ‘“‘ you’re swimming!”

The mermaid shot backwards and
forwards in the water, dived and
came up again, and turned about
in the most gracefulway. At last
she approached the bank, and her
face transformed.

‘““How did you do-it?” asked
Jennifer.

“T don’t know,’ answered the mer-
maid joyfully. ‘It was when I kissed
you that I felt suddenly I could swim.
T’ll swim out to sea, all the way down the
river.” :

They were both so happy that they did
not think about their separation.

Jennifer stood on the bank and watched
the mermaid gracefully swimming along
in the sunshine till she was only a silver
speck in the distance. She did not feel-

sad because she felt sure that the mermaid
would come back again to her see some







- ,LIKE AN EGG

OVERDONE?


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REGGIE’S INVENTION—

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HERE WE GO—
NEXT STOP
—., MARBLE ARCH




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SQUNE evening when Uncle Oojah fell down again and again on the floor.
“* We shall get n

ONE BED BETWEEN FOUR.

“JA cottage he

muchand made them
so sleepy he said they
had better go to bed.
“Supper: first,’?
replied Snooker. “Pll

tell you what’s wor- }

rying me; there is
only one bed in the

cottage. Where are |*“*%

-we all going to
sleep?”

‘*“ We must divide
ourselves,’’ said Lord
Lion. “Tl sleep on
the sofa, and that
will make more room
for you.”

So they all sat
down and had supper
and after it was over
Lord Lion said good-
night, and the others
made their way up to
the bedroom.

** It’s very narrow,
isnt it 23s sighed
Uncle Ooojah. “* We
shall not have much
room, I’m_ afraid,
with one bed between
four.”

“Tm glad there is
no more,” said Jerry.
“T want a _ good
night’s sleep, I do,
before we start any
more travels.”

That night poor
Snooker had a great
disappointment, for
his place was right

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TURN AND TURN ABOUT

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o comfort here, that’s

certain,’ he com-
plained, as he
climbed back. “ My
bedsocks, I’might as
well have pegged
myself out on the

‘ clothes line!’

Do’; be}: quiet,
Snooker,’’ said Don.
“You are keeping
us awake with your
muttering.”

When Uncle Oojah
heard the talking
Fo Te Om bre
turned around to
see what was the
matter; but as he
rolled over he took
up so much room
that all three of his
little. friends. were
pushed out on the
floor.

‘This is a nice
thing—when Uncle
Ooojah turns we all
turn out!” grum-
bled Snooker. ‘It
seems to me I might
as well walk around
for the rest of the
night.”

‘* Make the best of
it, Snooker,” advised
Don. ‘Collect all
the cushions off the
chairs and _ settle.
yourself in the cor-
ner.”

In the end that’s

g what Snooker had to
1 do, and he spent the
| rest of the night

among the cushions
on the floor.





Leocey

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iY, Hw

AR ue iyy FX
CHARACTERS.
PACK ae: A jolly boy.
ApoLtpHUS'.. ~ A boaster.
Doris A timid girl.
ADA A more courageous girl.

SCENE: A room with four chairs and a
fur rug.
[Enter JACK.]

Jack: Iam glad it is my birthday, and
Ada, Doris and Adolphus are coming to
tea. There’s a topping cake. I wonder
what presents I shall get. I wish they
would hurry up and come.

[Enter ADA AND Doris.]

ApA (handing Jack a box of soldiers) :

~Many happy returns.

Jack: Thanks. What jolly soldiers!

Doris: Many happy returns [hands
hima ball]. ~

Jack: Thanks awfully.

[Enter ADOLPHUS. ]}

Apo.LpHus: Many happy returns
of the day [ gives him a book].

Jack: ‘Thanks. Let’s have
a game till tea is ready.

Gir~ts: Yes, What shall we
play at ?
ApoLtpHus: There won’t be

much time for games before tea.
Let’s tell each other tales.

[They seat themselves ; the girls
farthest from the exit, and
side by side ; the boys side
by side with the rug in front,
ApoLPHus being nearest
the girls.]

ALL: You begin, Jack.

Jack (after thinking a moment) :
Er—once—er—oh, I can’t !

Apa: I'll try then. There was
once—no, I don’t think I can.
You try, Doris.

ty peer
7/7,







PLAYLET By E.STEAD.

Doris: Oh, no! I really can’t!

ApoLpuus (patronisingly): I will tell
youa tale. I hope it won’t frighten you
all, though, as it is a ghost story. I know
it is perfectly true, because it happened
to my cousin Marmaduke’s grandfather.

[All look at him, puzzled but interested. }

Apotpuus: Before I begin—will you
be scared, Jack ?

Jack (laughing) :
donkey.

ApoLpHus (solemnly): Ada, are you
nervous ?

Apa (smiling) :
even of you.

No. Don’t be a

No, Adolphus—not




OTe Lene

me

‘Many happy returns of the day.”
199
ApoLpHUS: Well, Doris, are
you nervous ?

Doris (hesttating) : Er—no-o.

ADOLPHUS (pompously): I am
never frightened of anybody or
anything. And now for my story.
There was once a big, lonely
house that was hundreds of years
old. It stood all by itself—

JACK (interrupting): It’s a
wonder it did. It might have
wanted propping up.

ApotpHus: Don’t interrupt.
If you do I shan’t be able to
make up the story.

ApvA: I thought you said it was
true.

ADOLPHUS: Er—oh! yes. I
mean I can’t remember if
anyone talks. Well, this house
had long, rambling, dark passages,
and there were strange sounds.
{Starts up] I say, what was that
noise ?

Jack: Nothing. Go on with
the story. It is getting interesting.

ADOLPHUS (sits down and looks nervously
about him as he continues): There were
. awful tales about the things that haunted
the house.

[Doris draws her chair close to ADA,
who puts an arm round her, and
smiles and whispers to her re-
assuringly.]

AboLpHus: One of the most terrifying
stories about it was—I say, how dark it
is getting! [Passing his fingers through
his hair, making it stand up on end.]

JACK AND ADA (smiling) : Oh! do goon;

:

iL



i

"Sa

—— Se

iN



yy,




Zits

Yi
yy














nD






oH




IT,
Lg Al NE S
Bie Bs
‘* Help! help! Save me!” aS
a

ADOLPHUS (looking away from Jack and
at the girls) : People who had actually seen
it, said that the house was haunted by a
strange-looking monster, that used to—

[JACK slips the rug over himself, and
taps Adolphus on the leg. Adolphus
gumps up, shrieking, and upsets
his chair, which one of the girls
picks up and puts out of the way.]}

ApotpHus: Help! help! Save me!
Don’t let it get me !

[ JACK, under the rug, chases ADOLPHUS
round and off the stage; ADA and
Doris follow, laughing merrily.]





it’s lovely. CURTAIN.

JAPPPAPPAD PDADAD DPDPADPDPDAPDPDD D> [PDPPDPDPPDOT]

3 :

3 WHY DID THE MOONBEAM ?

9

BECAUSE THE SUNSET.
9

[J PPEPPP PPPDPPDDD PPPPD(]j

20

0
s ONE WINDY D OS

ge
QZ

DON
NZ

u
UF

~
>

2

4,
ofa

ax UY did so want a puppy, but
¥ Adsva0q his Daddy said he hadn’t the
NEW py Money to buy one.

RG Mrs. Wiggins, who lived next
door to Guy, had four big dogs, and one
day she showed Guy’s daddy a lot of
little puppies and said that she was going
to sell them.

““How much do you think she would
want for one of her puppies ? ”’ asked Guy
that night.

“IT don’t think she would take less
than ten shillings,” replied his daddy.

Alas! Guy had not ten shillings. He
turned out his money box and found he
was just sixpence short.

‘*“I wonder if I could earn it,” he
thought. ““I know! J will sell my mustard
and cress. I expect Mr. Green likes it.”

Mr. Green
was the rich
old man who
_ lived at the
other end of



ie]



ZY BZ



PUZZLE PICTURE

i YS Re Sige, AY



4,
OFAN FFAG.

given Guy sixpence, but the poor old
gentleman was in such pain that he was
quite disagreeable and told Guy to hurry
off home.

It was a very windy day and beginning
to rain, so Guy turned up his collar and
started for home.

Just as he turned the corner of the road
there was a tremendous gust of wind
which blew the basket of mustard and
cress right out of his hand, and nearly
blew him over too.

*“Oh!’’ exclaimed the little boy, but
he forgot what else he wanted to say, for
he had caught sight of Mrs. Wiggins.
She was trying to hold on her hat, and
lead four dogs as well. The dogs had
caught sight of a cat and they were trying
to chase it: the leads were all tangled up.

Guy ran to
- her rescue.
sod bank:
you very
much, Guy,”

§
? rays Ogee

the road. HA & said Mrs.
Guy cut his ° ; Wiggins. “I
mustard and § 4 must give you
cress very, § {ff ’ a present for
verycarefully 9 §& helping me.
and put it in 2 § What would
alittle basket 9 Le you like?”
which he 9" “T really
covered with don’t want
tissue paper. Le anything,”

““T’m sure ; 8 Guy said.
he will give § : “But if you
The 2S7ix = would like to
pence;7s che § giveme some-
thought, as § ? thing I would
he marched ; ‘ likea puppy.”
up to Mr. sOWihysOb
Green’s door. § course!’’ said
oe if ; 2 Mrs. mi ge

re Treen 4 ‘ gins. An
hadn’t had § : that is how
gout so badly g Who is chasing Tom Tabby P Guy got his
hemighthave Fjoromo LJ puppy.

201
‘eee’ OF
vace®

Ve

iy OE
ae TA

ee RE RODS
‘“‘ Well, well, and if it isn’t Sinbad home But as soon as the water got warm,
again!” cried his mother. ‘Yes, crack went the shell and out jumped
the biggest chicken you ever saw.

mother, and I've brought a fine roc’s
egg!” ‘‘I’ll boil it for supper,” she said, “‘Gracious!” said Mrs. Sinbad.



ee eer tee By zs
EY \ X V () LD A (x) KX) =. Py
COR) eT ae
LEY ; ne};
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Ie

=

BS '
eX
YX)
Wy

)
Xe




AX
CASS io
We
AX Tf] sale
RA Rrra
AAA Ratha



It grew into a bird like nothing on earth,
and then one day it tried to fly away.
‘But Sinbad just managed to cling toits legs.

202

They put it in the hen run, and it grew,
and grew, and grew—and it ate, and ate,
and ate—it was always hungry !
Sailor



PSV
eS ww hur.

After a very exciting time in the air he ‘‘If you want to fly, Birdie, you shall,”

managed to tie a rope round the bird’s_ said Sinbad; ‘‘but you’re taking me too!”

neck and lead it home. It looked so And he made a bridle and flew all round
dismal Sinbad laughed. the city.



V i = ‘ : ral mee SNH TLE

And still that bird grew ; but soon became quite tame, so that by and by Sinbad
was able to carry passengers. And now, as you see, he is kept very busy, and is
ready to take any of you for a trip.

203
Toby Tabs had sent
him a lovely kipper.
Now most cats would
have gobbled that
kipper up at once,
but Thomas Cat
was wiser than most
cats.

“Tf I hang this
kipper outside my
window, and let a
ladder down, those
Mouseykin Boys are
sure to come and try
to steal my kipper,”’
he said. ‘‘ Then I can

catch them, and so

I shall have kipper

and mice for supper
to-night. Oh! Iam
a wise old Tom, I

204

Now, as Thomas
Cat had expected, it
wasn’t very long be-
fore those Mouseykin
Boys smelt the kip-
per, and you may be
sure they were all
very soon climbing
up the ladder to

Sgetat:

Thomas Cat was
hiding just behind
the window sill.

Suddenly, just as
Marmaduke Mouse
had reached the top
of the ladder, out
popped Thomas Cat.

My word! those
Mouseykins were so
surprised that they
simply fell down the
ladder.

““ What a narrow
escape!” cried Ma


EXELELELELELELELELELEEE EE LEE EEE ES

$
€




Jerrywangle
— UT out the model, paste on to
iyq a sheet of thin card, and press
A ey to keep flat. When dry cut
PP out the pieces. Cut out the hole
marked “Cut Out,” pierce the holes
“A” and “B” on Donkey with a hat
pin; take the Donkey and fix “A” to
“A.” Put a paper fastener through
*B” on Donkey, taking care that
the fastener goes through the “Cut
Out” hole. Now fix the strip “B” at
the back (see back view of model).

Working Model

SEEEEEED EEE E EEE Eee EERE hnnee

Na

le Sa
—a———>
GE DT

oF

Ss “
JAMES CLARK.

in the Cart

Cut four thin pieces of cork; pierce
a hole in each and place over “C,” “ E,”
“FF and “D.” Then take the cart and
place over these and fix with fastener.

Push the strip “‘B” up quickly and
the Donkey will kick Jerry into the cart

Remember there are only five pieces
that cut out—the bottom of the picture
is one big piece.

Don’t forget to copy out the games on the
back of this page before you begin to cut tt
up. If you do not wish to cut out this page

Then fix Jerrywangle loosely to ‘you can, of course, take a careful tracing of
Dees the picture and work from that.
205

Â¥


PP DARDDDAADPRPPARADPDPPADPAPADDPRDDDDPAD>P PDO DPDPDDPD- PDP DDADD
SSUNQUDUCUAULGHLAUEAAUEOEEGNOOGUUCEOUENEAUEMUEUTAQUEOETEUOEATEUUEURE CEEOL NEUEN OAL EEOU TOES OUUEED MELA TE ADEE TEOOATEOUOOAOCEODUCEAU OER OO AME AEEATEGG GOT BUC OUN OOOOH eS

TWO GOOD GAMES

Oo

al



THE TRAVELLER

NE player is picked for the Traveller, and
44) he goes to each player in turn and gives
the name of a country. Then he repeats
— I’ve travelled around the world from Spain,
And here I’ve come journeying back again ;
What can I buy in the markets there’?
Something to eat ? Something to wear ?
Something to use, and something to lose ?

Each answer must begin with the same first letter
as the country given by the Traveller. If he said
** Egypt ” the player could reply :— i

““ Eggs to eat, and an eyeglass to wear; elastic
to use and earwigs to lose.”

If a player cannot find the four answers while the
traveller counts twenty, he gets a black mark, and
the first player to get three black marks must take
the traveller’s place in the next game.

THE FAT LADY
NePNE player is chosen for the Fat Lady,
H and the others join hands and dance
4! around her, singing this rhyme :— Jo

ax

ve







There was a Fat Lady, a lady was she, 7)
As round and as plump as a lady could be; |
Each day she grew fatter, right down to her toes,
And soon she had more than one chin and one

nose.

And she walked in and out, and waddled
about ;
§ Oh! please, can you help this poor lady
so stout ?

As the song ends they let go hands and run away,
and if the Fat Lady can catch one of them before
. they join in a ring again that player must go into
the ring with her.

Next time they both run after the singers and
every time a player is caught the Fat Lady gets
fatter and fatter, because they all stay in a bunch.
The last player left unca ht wins the game.

Oo



{

ce
DDD D> Fe) DDD PID DPP PDD PDP PIP PDP PPD DD PDP? D DD



3




§
§
9
§
)
§
9
§
9
9
§
;
9
§
9
O



TWO LITTLE WOOD-CUTTERS

pee UT out the model and paste
KY fatgeea down on thin card. Put this
ANG gop] under a heavy weight until
Pests dry. Now cut out the strips
marked ‘‘E F” and the Saw; punch
. the holes “E,” “E,” and “F” with
a hat pin and fix the hole “E” to
“FE” on the Saw. Place the strip
‘““E F” behind the trestle and fix
“FF” to “FF” with a paper fastener.



Now take Don and Snooker and fix
their legs on. Then place Snooker on
the left hand side of the trestle and

DPDPDPPD DPA PP PPP PPP DPIPPAODPPDPPDPPDPPD

207



fix his feet to ‘‘B.” Put Don on the
right hand side of the trestle and pin
his; feet: to’*? D7?“ Bix.<:G).t0"** G2’
and 6G H 29 to oe H.”’

Move the strip ““E F” backwards
and forwards and Don and Snooker
will saw the log.

Dowt forget to copy out the game
on the back of this page before you cut
it up, or, tf you don’t want to spoil your
book, you can take a careful tracing of
this pictuse and work from that.

er





Oo PPBPDPD PPA DPD PDPDDPDPDPDDDIDIDDPDPDIDID

| ANOTHER WORKING MODEL |
an nt wvvrretcgueecneseececenneencceecgencenceecenegncceetnuncoegceaerenngnrencecegaea tenet §


0
SSUTDELUUOULUCATEERTEDEUEOUELOEEUUOUOUGUEVEEEOOESEUEOEENEEOEHOOEOQUOVEDEEOOOUQEOUOUEQEDEGODEOEGEOUOUOUOUOUOEOEEUEOOONOUEVEQESEQEVOOOUOVSUNEUGEONOUEDOUEOOENOOEUEUECUQENOEESUOEVEELES

| = INDOOR FUN” & |



SOUUUEOUEOOUUEEUUEREUCEETAUEEEER EE EAEEC ATAU

THERE WAS AN OLD CAMEL



Sj the last page of your
VERY Own ANNUAL, here are two
games to cheer you up.

One player is counted out for
the camel, andthe rest join up in
a ring and dance around him,
singin g this rhyme :—

There was an old camel,
He had a big hump ;

He lived on “potatoes
And grew very plump ;
But after his dinner

He took a high jump,
When Timothy gave him



on the back. He is Timothy, and the players hold up their hands to form
arches while the camel chases Timothy around and in and out of the ring.

If Timothy is caught he has to take the camel’s place in the ring, but if he
is not captured by the time one of the players counts 50 the camel has to go
back himself for the next game.

DODO PDD OD DO DDD PDI OP PLO OP DOO SOOO OPO OO OO OO OCOOOOL]

FLIP-FLAP-FLOP

iS LL sit in a circle and place an old
Ni top hat or small box on the floor in
€4 the middle.




* The game is played.with cards of
any kind—old postcards, playing cards, or last
year’s Christmas cards.

Divide the cards equally and start on the
right. The first player throws a card into the
hat and calls ‘‘ Flip.”

The next player says “‘ Flap,”’ but the third
player cries ‘‘ Flip-Flap-Flop,” and then every-
body throws a card in the hat.

But the first time any pla ih misses he must pick his own card up again
the hat.
the end with cards in his hand loses the game.



and also take anothe
The player who i



2

|

§

A thumpitty-thump

At the last word the player who stands behind the camel gives him a tap
§

9

|

|





De oi








xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008706500001datestamp 2008-10-23setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The Oojah annual : pictures, stories, and games for little people.dc:creator W.H. Smith and Son ( Printer, Printer )Daily Sketch and Sunday Herald ( Contributor, Contributor )dc:publisher Daily Sketch and Sunday Heralddc:date 19--dc:type Bookdc:format 208 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087065&v=00001002242267 (ALEPH)42694236 (OCLC)ALJ3207 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English




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'2011-12-30T11:35:18-05:00'
describe
'720973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYG' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
a1b172a89a0c892da52754417404ce9a
07c21a8fdc2703516f003543533a6f4fc8a6b15e
'2011-12-30T11:31:56-05:00'
describe
'152068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYH' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
60945f344677dfe8b1365d9409ae95a0
5cf0d690b093b2e0c15150a9191a735c95702fef
'2011-12-30T11:36:46-05:00'
describe
'49513' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYI' 'sip-files00005.pro'
6ae05124686f07f9e402d5c1d1fbae9f
2d27b0b0e8de09ce7c310a2eb5cac0bf9ea890cd
'2011-12-30T11:35:59-05:00'
describe
'40091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYJ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
33ca8228b9d48fe6f60d598f43c98b28
95be6da7db15140a4e3cbcb90306eb07fe31ff30
'2011-12-30T11:36:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d8e9f0e6fc9a3c51cb818dd36e555e19
9684591fbb23315d4be375c0f94477ea6b32c6c1
'2011-12-30T11:33:49-05:00'
describe
'2096' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYL' 'sip-files00005.txt'
52da43d516fead4c9521b7e13d216b38
3b130285ab8d0b9841a6ab40ab877f37f42d26b6
describe
'9968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYM' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
69057d2166a856c1b7376759530616af
d3eee933152167c38262864df8699c0a6da9fdb6
'2011-12-30T11:33:10-05:00'
describe
'720592' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
4efa6f4a03e0e65e48cd454a1261bb73
b86a826d151c9b7c09be3cef8c776ada6584327a
'2011-12-30T11:36:54-05:00'
describe
'162077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYO' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
819ca8e39e79ca1793cbf5a9e603dd6c
8f7ac13c1de0b8232c5a1c923cea3ce31bf25a05
'2011-12-30T11:30:47-05:00'
describe
'67256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
e0de823713e4f0b1d3bac51492d84a35
f18cd7d8d94a68d9298db14c77b88d1f616cb50d
'2011-12-30T11:39:22-05:00'
describe
'40942' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYQ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
3fbbe00a6d6289418f74d1b2623e9577
f7326940c24b6f7a8b2da1e0cf568daf3a4ec25e
'2011-12-30T11:30:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYR' 'sip-files00006.tif'
995f0f813ac8358c36ceb2ed5a125bf3
9af5caf9be56ee104621abbe60fec041bc1f828b
'2011-12-30T11:38:22-05:00'
describe
'2890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYS' 'sip-files00006.txt'
b04a03cc51ecd3d236547bc03fa9d8ce
425025f8ab66984209c9db4d0f1a92901fe013ae
'2011-12-30T11:33:21-05:00'
describe
'9433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYT' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
22e9e85921be52f0fc7a7ff008e4fe95
5d48568a4484de9c848777a5accc8d1d0481c90d
'2011-12-30T11:37:16-05:00'
describe
'720633' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYU' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
5b4c2a66e53d9c0a0582bebbadb7bb83
065e478973a9eaa2f5d83651c2e4ccf78dc4e155
'2011-12-30T11:32:02-05:00'
describe
'149392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYV' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c89a2f25e86ba6aff66cfc4ed7dc954d
da0583c0d526ce3f112ba9a7828798bf1608f487
'2011-12-30T11:35:17-05:00'
describe
'3455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYW' 'sip-files00007.pro'
351b06aa6c7f2555a482dc01b61d2537
77527593ef827aba52bdd4940d328069983068e5
'2011-12-30T11:35:10-05:00'
describe
'35890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYX' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
dbd12fad825a747bb12a5937565c50b1
0c76357af5c069c1f11c44275366b01414239f0b
'2011-12-30T11:34:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYY' 'sip-files00007.tif'
5c39a7950fa9294103fb826260c5285c
1ab4d26a8810a56394be8d1ea25b289013f4dac7
'2011-12-30T11:32:49-05:00'
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXYZ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
c49a70582047cae4e16172ecc141ba7b
4203a3c034f24bdc88f151c6eb371c1537a6366e
'2011-12-30T11:38:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZA' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
277e8ff4ec02b02bf19397f56ccb1aad
4bcfbeee1f253e45c41f467c590eda88212b037c
'2011-12-30T11:34:10-05:00'
describe
'720624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZB' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
a373ceb36bb8038caba61aa77757c321
457b3ab49b25198e8b4c7fa9b520bc15b46168e3
'2011-12-30T11:33:19-05:00'
describe
'129773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
9a1bd79c39dddfa5d00aef69d121c3e1
a70f520030aee2b395acc24198c73b12b9cd98be
'2011-12-30T11:31:05-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZD' 'sip-files00008.pro'
9dea44acf38228b595d95487891536c8
11c75751974bdfaf58869b9c7c44d2dc0dfe656e
'2011-12-30T11:34:24-05:00'
describe
'32270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZE' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
6e0ef924d7578386c3cf1031acec0e15
d0be331073ee4f066f9aff5d9961fc706fbb5c87
'2011-12-30T11:37:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZF' 'sip-files00008.tif'
6bfc30c828b16ebe1d3cd94c89bd4b4c
eb71ae2ad310fd9791d6d603b24c0836b2bfee6c
'2011-12-30T11:38:58-05:00'
describe
'69' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZG' 'sip-files00008.txt'
6be644d7aea070729a8b66b6c38c87e2
b433315cc368bbd15fe821e2d1b3b4a8f18f3476
describe
Invalid character
'8997' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
53bd914c27a33cf571acad7a2a16b919
8e6178a95f813cf3fcaccd5f8aa77c524d3018e9
'2011-12-30T11:37:44-05:00'
describe
'720634' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZI' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
830f8a09078fae9884e1f163681c0fe9
5aa9a3d044667d7e9d8a126cf4cf115069c625b6
'2011-12-30T11:33:26-05:00'
describe
'146793' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZJ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
740cf273344926e2ee962819d6c94156
da2c6e3eaaf9cecc579c7549bb0bb4ee77ea86a4
'2011-12-30T11:34:26-05:00'
describe
'48573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZK' 'sip-files00009.pro'
12ff699ee3d7b8b3aedaf73f66414b59
f49c52cad0f60982a14cee723270a655dec0a387
'2011-12-30T11:32:36-05:00'
describe
'38017' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZL' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1e17d6c42cf79eb64e047f6231baaa54
cf5ba79cee44cf6c61290433be1a0ce3718b3ce5
describe
'17317000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZM' 'sip-files00009.tif'
15cd196c336affb68b78c1f675ebf372
f84c4ace059ab6b1a3fb4698dba8a4b422243d8c
'2011-12-30T11:34:04-05:00'
describe
'2189' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZN' 'sip-files00009.txt'
bf007050c97556266aa253dd7ef92a47
aa634d80a240f628f1b6672667a71a131786c590
'2011-12-30T11:37:01-05:00'
describe
'9465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZO' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c1ed2d4304fede0cf9050d996e968054
d1ef939a76c43b598cda688742fa1960adf82982
'2011-12-30T11:36:14-05:00'
describe
'720614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZP' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
5c24aa9712705a8434d88a8a4e403e06
5b1d7b6e7bd4d3e2acb0b8cfb00732cc49941aee
'2011-12-30T11:30:54-05:00'
describe
'141245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZQ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
60809ed4aa89998a67827c3b3d6a94a9
c10e3df495290b524f998c7a521950df3d84a442
describe
'6431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZR' 'sip-files00010.pro'
8ca4fd6ea2f4db56f27afdb7241bf9eb
071def8cf813b6213ca811fa6bd4ef53ad21aa18
'2011-12-30T11:33:33-05:00'
describe
'40815' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZS' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1d8b3f116875c7941bbfc9dd94b56ff9
0afec91eeffa4c29eaaa402082e80512a294f073
'2011-12-30T11:35:33-05:00'
describe
'17318568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZT' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c78ac57365e4636e3b0b5f40ca4ac2ad
a0e5c2f862123e89c0181b11db98c882ad9573c9
'2011-12-30T11:34:44-05:00'
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZU' 'sip-files00010.txt'
beb7c9a54eeb64f8157439b36e2fe356
efe7c689cb848ff47ab51b84a80977d01ba06076
'2011-12-30T11:31:51-05:00'
describe
'10800' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZV' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
3fe5169d6acad75bdf354f2abb855351
5b1838665af4fa61efc05451a41abffc0deed870
'2011-12-30T11:39:51-05:00'
describe
'720626' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZW' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
3801634b5fe62e4ac97778bb08a0c0f7
b297de0bd5dabade36c8d28659c80958940dd166
'2011-12-30T11:33:56-05:00'
describe
'134595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZX' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
b686a147b502bfe9cd4fec50b71b7adf
5a262494fb25bdb984012a12a3a5d63e4417decf
'2011-12-30T11:34:14-05:00'
describe
'7158' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZY' 'sip-files00011.pro'
faacbea07eb26b116e59096d85216b83
19970da1bbc985fcdc032f88e16807cbaf7b78bc
'2011-12-30T11:30:42-05:00'
describe
'38505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABXZZ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
828e4f532a6e4753d7e9e5e3297f4014
d96cdb1bd51dc192d8844d0bbdfe24a0012df486
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
eee64b1df308b3b1a662d316342f305d
f8b1cbb0cc56445f8d02921a1d686f611236da94
'2011-12-30T11:40:21-05:00'
describe
'326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAB' 'sip-files00011.txt'
95beb0d31f7d5f90d962948878924ca3
097bf15741cc20f3e9cfd1bf65179b6c3f6728ac
'2011-12-30T11:36:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAC' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
a4e0a61a80df512571523b1b4a02f267
7c75dbef58d1d20bb01a3a1c3ac108ba77ab1314
'2011-12-30T11:31:26-05:00'
describe
'720615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAD' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
26935f30a67e7a9c630e53d2cf1d270b
658da6309c28ecee470a09f974110278baabc74e
'2011-12-30T11:34:54-05:00'
describe
'94913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAE' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b929ff103da066c4daab4563ab73cb1b
b2281d8ad5f6b77e88e782d566c34ded0fadd02b
'2011-12-30T11:35:40-05:00'
describe
'10218' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAF' 'sip-files00012.pro'
eebf04f725261585daddb188c8ae51d3
383565207e3b756c22d293327415169c48320c55
'2011-12-30T11:37:19-05:00'
describe
'28126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAG' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5294d9b26494d8be5e0001d96a4f3507
3f2553d7370a5b294ce973ae19e6976e924f8c96
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
aa5ecb7254b0f6493674838b1a644722
babc8bd492f466b508ce0181608f6d2904b99753
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAI' 'sip-files00012.txt'
1adff68301574d6b344883b919e066fb
0212c6c2c71dd2811685479fed22c37a1b2380e7
'2011-12-30T11:38:27-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAJ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
438a5ffcc6e9abeef9bbf3da37d9204b
7ea7604cd741fd1895ecc9c6be6acf6f64dcc880
describe
'720608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAK' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e5b0a254142117364c0edfc207100462
5801f848f3d240eb0af1556b982457f166b2abc7
'2011-12-30T11:32:07-05:00'
describe
'98449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
aadf51e1010886e2ef94997785b7fa29
8c81d8fa02d1116d452d21f6651f1c5b300b61f0
'2011-12-30T11:32:04-05:00'
describe
'11555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAM' 'sip-files00013.pro'
21da4e81c47e5027498fa9a0d84986f9
39ad77b6b6d2a9811aeced2f627aa3fdbaa2390c
'2011-12-30T11:33:09-05:00'
describe
'28199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAN' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cfa37e48488b75f5c6947ffd5a30ef9b
d4cb68383d17c09546cf07e306d0b1645cd5e945
'2011-12-30T11:35:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b61b9dbb13e41654d315a5537aa2f00d
ebc6739148d8981607fff7dd28c94a914dede259
'2011-12-30T11:36:31-05:00'
describe
'544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b7b5a6d23d703f4ddf3e4bc23006d25e
24b565febdc7e34342bfd1ba44ad40b24bb16c50
'2011-12-30T11:33:28-05:00'
describe
'8076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAQ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
daab754aee655c508ccd77330501b6c5
cb798b14a4b5e265afaaf58bf0ce183d7251d11a
'2011-12-30T11:39:20-05:00'
describe
'720636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
42fe4b77886fb35c1d9179a969a7059a
e0412f12165633f2186ee8a2701658f8545e37bb
'2011-12-30T11:38:30-05:00'
describe
'139032' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f3babaa41875717a49803100116e858f
011a48cad37e53b0033dbc5312e52e42bf9b5857
'2011-12-30T11:32:42-05:00'
describe
'16400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAT' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c0cbb8262097cbeba7c6aa51333512e1
572ace11f24cb586b7aa550813268d6afb2d2cc0
'2011-12-30T11:36:26-05:00'
describe
'36267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
10d9666e1ecc1a3277a5d1f3dcd00289
df5ba4403fca930f61aaeb47ab37101330fe9d5a
'2011-12-30T11:30:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e223bcf475620a4527ca8195018f01f9
4a822b206ce6ca2844c26cee57db6d791661a921
'2011-12-30T11:37:21-05:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
08e05cfe86b83feb4c7a8d4e1adf67d4
af19f101e799fbffd982360932cc7efcc832d44d
'2011-12-30T11:38:14-05:00'
describe
'9131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
670a8846c1dc8e21d5d5b5686e56ec66
5f20b30d50c8aaf124d61aed2102ad4108064c03
'2011-12-30T11:33:27-05:00'
describe
'720564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
68c079986b22e069123104376039438a
6ef6c702253d7ed31dc8302b09ea6ddd317d5457
describe
'133898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYAZ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ee06cb52606f352fb79afd7a0ddd8d1d
056eef43ca30a64f5844ebb615c9d6da593629b5
describe
'18964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
2aa3f67c5a519eb7335c55c15e4c949f
b65a03895e320c6a9426e7093cc89eaed55d7988
'2011-12-30T11:37:51-05:00'
describe
'35168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
72407e9ffb1cdca5306d425d7f1554f7
f16238de4f06b49508f444457162af9ca62ae776
'2011-12-30T11:35:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
f3e09d8340194b78a9ea4df35449f426
713ffd817702c2c2652b2835889ec68e2bd4b10e
'2011-12-30T11:32:56-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e4ff27cf55bc457a35eb51d9123f88f4
1b73f569b8f0eaf27600e519db2f183c08c18ef4
'2011-12-30T11:34:57-05:00'
describe
'9083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBE' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
e89a1b5c8a8a1814dbcf3a131cd78cfd
1bfe88ffad37859c1826986be84a80acf48544ff
describe
'720620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBF' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e8c5002891dee2ae3089d5fdc60c41fe
c7643d9d59b90d4f8cfdeb6270b5e3d0e3a4294a
'2011-12-30T11:32:48-05:00'
describe
'122923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
1425a2c302d76032583866c9853819cb
b176a30afd00f5a5293ec095100ffdafed10864c
'2011-12-30T11:37:02-05:00'
describe
'22699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBH' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3c8efadeb56e34ba6a35213c542a8e5d
5891a1d28cd297e1f5b6e0ca447c592c46c6cefb
'2011-12-30T11:35:26-05:00'
describe
'32692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
8db62d7933fbae5d38f82074b6a7ac65
3e42a0b4f9062413588e3c4f3a2cf65dbb80b84f
'2011-12-30T11:38:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
40fed75d928035437dae19fe92a605c6
7019558397de0d525f23dde0f6514db2cfa24852
'2011-12-30T11:34:05-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
e19c53a5eb7ba011d7b11909734c67ba
5cc85a7ed304d66db9c5f0f4dbe100e27455a814
'2011-12-30T11:31:21-05:00'
describe
'8667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
acda79b8299ff1e2913db9af5cf498b4
85bea5c2747ad8b36e20edbafef387ce8c89750a
'2011-12-30T11:36:29-05:00'
describe
'720631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
7bdb96f02d6049aa25f340f5f471349a
75836eec6a2b9639d17b09b897e3e8acd157a3c5
describe
'120172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBN' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
1c639c9a8cde194fe673ee6e15facacd
df03562f66bffa38d4b99146498f11e2cddd8d8d
'2011-12-30T11:33:52-05:00'
describe
'18948' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
17ef7bb4bf7285582fa1f76a640d39b9
964e7b1e7ef2dc15bd7d7cff48c1c663d222e606
'2011-12-30T11:32:03-05:00'
describe
'34329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
97d89fa6295ad67a1315be8791bf1799
3d36c8e0d8b073b66c68f3618eb8f81701278d4c
'2011-12-30T11:32:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
22aea8c277b27a2d8a725839544daf7f
ec5875ad31b32e9f2766bd904e1565ab03f99e92
'2011-12-30T11:34:08-05:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBR' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cf5120a982d074cab8776f359b13b0dc
78c6e83091d3f913ecd34fd053ecb40e6486a425
'2011-12-30T11:39:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBS' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
2f04ec0a78f2d6d937a33315250f7d92
dce4ba4a6fddb878fd4e1e2858478b98fce363a2
'2011-12-30T11:33:07-05:00'
describe
'720609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBT' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
7cc492ebebe64de75ff12e52b1bddb75
6b18fba4bd794f945ed24653ff8bebdaeddadedb
'2011-12-30T11:37:37-05:00'
describe
'174519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
bd2ac92ea6249d51e12780bda35e549f
1e7ae4916700c7335c264720425bf8d46dda93b7
'2011-12-30T11:31:06-05:00'
describe
'23579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
03df4a9961eaf5a87f534856b1126eb6
9176fe36ab4ce7f09abf33f45e8937a287a2ad7c
'2011-12-30T11:33:45-05:00'
describe
'44678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBW' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c5ec114a64dc80a54da3c9ca17eae6a5
d5082065bbbf04ff7191a326440a899095478e8c
'2011-12-30T11:31:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBX' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6645cb303d981f3c3034b38e2c609ef6
b6b65f45e2faae74751e1cbc204b06dfb156f267
'2011-12-30T11:36:28-05:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBY' 'sip-files00018.txt'
cc5bf6109e1c40035ad90239dc52d829
c5763b877f5e623228211ad9c59a1d6f66c1b2e7
describe
Invalid character
'10821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYBZ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
f4a41df514a8a0d9df9f7926bdb1dbff
95fdecf6f98ef8068cd579dd097918cc4ff16497
'2011-12-30T11:32:14-05:00'
describe
'720602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCA' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f88c0c7ec0b5c00e50f2fb1049589219
11c6e166e49482715c919a0bbfd797b28566a737
'2011-12-30T11:38:31-05:00'
describe
'171019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCB' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
02caa49449cba012f3b1ca01aab6bd6e
57874fdd7e68f6013aa678b617aaa1abd52de6d5
'2011-12-30T11:35:00-05:00'
describe
'22555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCC' 'sip-files00019.pro'
98f2498a2a21ed3dd4febd760bf9cfd9
9564d9ba585a051116e887ebd8e958793c713c1a
'2011-12-30T11:31:16-05:00'
describe
'44176' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCD' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3877db464fe4048d4aa3fb678b01e800
bdb61a1577c810e9660f0e20f5108eeb16261703
'2011-12-30T11:32:52-05:00'
describe
'17310728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCE' 'sip-files00019.tif'
314f210ae937dc8292510f89d33ab32f
1771b0b926bf7c0958b638e1ace69d0cbeca2bbb
'2011-12-30T11:37:15-05:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCF' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c5d0c9988f9e29277c94a949a9b46931
908d0675e8c5dd2713028ead4c7be6274a3b0116
'2011-12-30T11:31:46-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCG' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8f7c42ea8c9454148c0c5d13fde7e2ba
452eb99230589e1eb401629e18c71b761a0f13c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCH' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7ba5bf6a3200d266289c068a8b1cf54f
e11652558ecf8c3633070dd6126772aa0148efd8
'2011-12-30T11:31:33-05:00'
describe
'144494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCI' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
da1b5759ad2e45821e2027b413c1551b
d3e806f2a6b0c392e718de8399d721e904e514c4
'2011-12-30T11:35:03-05:00'
describe
'46053' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCJ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
dbdcf515988ce1871a32bebe8843eb94
2f55c50cd6781fa07a006460606f3ba6f3c1d15e
'2011-12-30T11:31:38-05:00'
describe
'37070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCK' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b3ced2e7084a6ce13254b526919e6b6b
95e4b3ade47fb49dc261b01d63d006378e521915
'2011-12-30T11:32:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCL' 'sip-files00020.tif'
feca8ed5397ee7ae15e403b0bc59ecea
3b6f36e1f2edd6208ea3cf5829cad3d02312f175
'2011-12-30T11:38:41-05:00'
describe
'1962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCM' 'sip-files00020.txt'
02c825cd53852fc1cb7c71097bf3906e
7d0a5a1321e56e010355d00908698e6cf203d23b
'2011-12-30T11:33:15-05:00'
describe
'9287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCN' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
d2f4a7f51c2ff6ad565f580513fc7126
f4fcdb11d4ba379162b52d56e58358f6c1f15008
describe
'720610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCO' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
ba8073e4e2e63b82f54bc9fde90fd6dc
a025a088d603a92c108e8c6457c01591d29877dd
'2011-12-30T11:35:34-05:00'
describe
'176917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
537a05ccd4478063b5c9a85e58e2c54d
96b78f19dca89e37a40794b0f32aee505948e8c2
'2011-12-30T11:35:58-05:00'
describe
'54274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCQ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e8e14096846b2082742fe919832f9b1d
68ae102a0e22979fcaa2c6141b8384ae2aaf1a06
'2011-12-30T11:34:48-05:00'
describe
'45926' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7718d6d82e74e96a0a9aba19a631daf9
7d5a2f8ea2a376a77c8415b24a6fce836e8d0f23
'2011-12-30T11:36:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCS' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0f186cbde4e51ecacf98e1fbf38fc6f4
876a48cb858001fdbe984819bc067596002eb6a0
'2011-12-30T11:36:50-05:00'
describe
'2297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCT' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d1c686aa6fc261711a4e1e875b0c5b62
3e68aac0b929096ab0d6d64f6ca7db870e1aa9f5
'2011-12-30T11:31:27-05:00'
describe
'10938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCU' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
755fa289b717e4e2b0ff55805d42b1f4
26e0297d42d2e1fca420382d10eef90eb83b4c0c
'2011-12-30T11:37:27-05:00'
describe
'720600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCV' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e676ecdbeccdeac7d8cf3ae4f14e1f29
738c13cbc3218a4dabca0d55b34484f1a8d7a0a7
'2011-12-30T11:36:02-05:00'
describe
'182072' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCW' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
5792d8390efcacced8eb30d59733e06b
ef8ae2a08f9974515a9a1b0243e304c82a591d9a
'2011-12-30T11:32:30-05:00'
describe
'61208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCX' 'sip-files00022.pro'
18eb07a6e7d94b7814307d878f8097a4
afadac2319d6249dae704c01de0bc9eb2694bde1
describe
'45492' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCY' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
121727868f9c8a0f43c70f0dde310105
f193debe935ebfd464c042ea04aeb5b4953efc97
'2011-12-30T11:40:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYCZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7ac92b46e9abbfa02a9a692808aa06ba
335ac5da6bce93925e6dfbbf1deacd7f523fdea5
'2011-12-30T11:34:01-05:00'
describe
'2512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDA' 'sip-files00022.txt'
60e24f037b759add178c8308a041003b
ba144e911e5bd72223e7bb8248e4c0d62bc3bf7d
describe
'10532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDB' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
33335e29da2c0c44b8e97964fe241fba
46a939177afbb32f5b53285680487148966dbe87
'2011-12-30T11:40:29-05:00'
describe
'720579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDC' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8b5b7d0b756e3b63ea4c57d5d062e3c6
e2f96012559aa1b283f71ce30e496a1b5973be45
'2011-12-30T11:31:36-05:00'
describe
'154196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDD' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
caf122ac75c0a28ea42ce0c58d48ec91
10ee03f8d620981e2ba6c545f44a22e9883885ad
'2011-12-30T11:39:35-05:00'
describe
'41025' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDE' 'sip-files00023.pro'
ba6786b86d370c0429290205668d8fe7
e6ac753e400ea7b283e11901698c6d6e3baa43a3
'2011-12-30T11:31:12-05:00'
describe
'41254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
14691f218f1769f20783a0d4414157dd
eb13190d6a4786637a6be9fdca76c746eaf87de6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDG' 'sip-files00023.tif'
23b0df71fc426fe6bd4714eb5e233741
cf1bde85f98505ff6e03933dc70f74bbbfee2b9a
'2011-12-30T11:30:34-05:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDH' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c6221e57b409bc11e5d5b2a34ce2a1ac
144a33fb42d10dad841fa2697ce1e277c5fc719d
'2011-12-30T11:35:49-05:00'
describe
'10317' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDI' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
17ca7a5a2aa5e12bf0a20ead55f685ad
7130f139fa6f5aa6bb2af36946a383e42b78fb2b
describe
'720612' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDJ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
befa1fa5ff55402e9836b0d56214e0c8
6e9bb6ec698e5ee503e1da6b6c2b552453178dac
'2011-12-30T11:39:58-05:00'
describe
'153927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
7501b85de712ede88abb3d29a53e75d1
3ada3eb894b67c31801bbce5330b3e63377491f6
describe
'8294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
88d3f6288493edd67d68dbe08e1c34e2
cc5907be8551f93a65d04b2ff2553abc7cde65bc
'2011-12-30T11:36:10-05:00'
describe
'41619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
3ed0e4230575b1ae4a74319bf52f73ab
c11998e4ee4eea5200b77de9e028ec1e970d63ff
'2011-12-30T11:39:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
daf101a6f8ac8667b4092c732cc28fb9
0e592ee8d67fc8a1971825106e1e74ed21e059a2
describe
'373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
2fccb6486eec007cdf12c9ea33324670
1c169beded3d529dd755039ccfd1d52c9743b34c
'2011-12-30T11:35:20-05:00'
describe
'10639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDP' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6e16835894545b3c3a4b291821176f71
27c462c3730482472fb202ce154594e09c5ab8c1
'2011-12-30T11:32:50-05:00'
describe
'720430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
00afcdc6d8fd0c2c3c73564e1dd277ab
3c2e5f4eff1465661e72db40470777b75d00e285
'2011-12-30T11:37:46-05:00'
describe
'139839' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDR' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
413cbec97c55773a3b0462512fc4debd
800ec2b8839c9d32c8d96967907e0b0263656000
'2011-12-30T11:32:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
9d3532b44ec10ab51d66ba5580bc59a5
c83fe1826203115dd21aaa16f7cde1c965c7636a
'2011-12-30T11:31:30-05:00'
describe
'39234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDT' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5f8e005b1c7fcb7df1b0c5a751bf1741
7ad4c727baf9d590040a9d17eeeebe094820b86b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e8102f2792ecffcd29392e16139492c5
8d0ab9a435ed15b8b2fbbde2086846ca3115cb80
'2011-12-30T11:35:01-05:00'
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDV' 'sip-files00025.txt'
c5853ad53edb4da372d8e06546618160
648456e9e8c3555bed0f8d3d841cef5c2d0835ff
'2011-12-30T11:34:56-05:00'
describe
'10359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
7679a0daaeb229adc36ecb3bff6570d6
8cf6ee6e06d57b873f678a32f9fc9d3b97f2a432
describe
'720537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDX' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
73c2e479c81ebbd5e1177b9b931b16ca
7afcf4321c31a80e5cc3ed689404ba9b960bc440
'2011-12-30T11:33:48-05:00'
describe
'153718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDY' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
e5798df8d5eb7021676228cea453775f
ac8faac0cae9cca4680dcf3d08135786452ca754
describe
'48450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYDZ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
7c5d1055c43baeccd84764b3855b12d2
8bc71c07319fd840add57e3409dd9df24aca9797
'2011-12-30T11:34:40-05:00'
describe
'40445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEA' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
5b012d034a0c8dcdcfdbf2fab7887d4f
5dc6210993c502e8f322bdcead388743f77d4627
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEB' 'sip-files00026.tif'
994c1849711daa7c964b018b2cab30fe
6e819b365790efa4b7b7e622c59d54ea461afc2b
'2011-12-30T11:39:00-05:00'
describe
'2054' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEC' 'sip-files00026.txt'
da4d598c2fc68d4cb41fca87fe7038c3
bff44c038016c9adc27beefedfa390c6271d3000
describe
Invalid character
'9795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYED' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6484166940730461ed46fadc64ea9e4b
f0f0437b90cbd02df87195e13b3b4aed09edc797
'2011-12-30T11:39:26-05:00'
describe
'720638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
cbe4dfb91889e90465bcf835c4ff318e
cf41682abbf2bfee83c7e0fbaa6bc053443d69f9
'2011-12-30T11:35:53-05:00'
describe
'139608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
ac9ec524a93e82b83b8ce7f10543661e
b0f8f43b7cf23e7bda4b7d01e47c368e52f6fb2c
'2011-12-30T11:35:21-05:00'
describe
'42160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEG' 'sip-files00027.pro'
3abc54f50d50818d422a323c47a46536
411d2fa8f3bb51c570ca248fcc2f79053430cc25
describe
'36476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEH' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
0828925d4d1f4350abd9d3cf994389f3
dedf0dc39ea5137dc6cbec56b0dbabac454eecd2
'2011-12-30T11:38:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEI' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d209f09ce1e508d245da9d73fdf2b30d
662d506dcde6a93c89a2f3032a6a38e3bc28fa12
'2011-12-30T11:32:16-05:00'
describe
'2007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEJ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2b3fc49d5c1851a99c55b381423af07e
6a24435e058944a19eb5a84ec3916fd9e82233cd
'2011-12-30T11:37:55-05:00'
describe
'8872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEK' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f3751f7515ef870ade83ccf0e019d353
689f23161a0b1f75127c4285d52bdcd9afa04749
describe
'720627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
0eafb0f2fd5321278cea0d0e85f7c01e
692fba53cfc9a01591a4688e7d81ae73d347be90
'2011-12-30T11:37:13-05:00'
describe
'153902' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
fc614ac6559bdc556ef539957b1f46b9
104f07678f8979913980a11c9a6962761337601b
'2011-12-30T11:40:12-05:00'
describe
'53879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
07f7eebe67347c77face8447a53ecbd9
831ed3fabfabf80f5fd8ae2a34ed39ac4f687dcb
'2011-12-30T11:39:44-05:00'
describe
'39828' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
e2af2b14e5d3eaae63fe78622b284a59
a9f1730c228cf3aedbf872f23f1cabc6de7385d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
5696c4b6ac5a36e04422f79f80ce8ccb
09e776571501a6f78b1b4f5936c4ec4bd8159c58
'2011-12-30T11:31:25-05:00'
describe
'2562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
8e9d734982bc1fc2c5f3a74611850849
79ce3ecde4f05c27ace9910b7d0204dbc7c9edc5
'2011-12-30T11:38:07-05:00'
describe
'10092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYER' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6658c187183afc96929fd520064fe7bc
fef20dc927e5f4ec6aec70ae5cf2c25dfbed2e5e
'2011-12-30T11:32:57-05:00'
describe
'720508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYES' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
227427868fdc2321319c3298d02bff86
23f886dc682c9d30a04306766c0ec7eb9adaaa90
'2011-12-30T11:34:58-05:00'
describe
'148768' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYET' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8283dd716d496e41f5c968c5f751b746
de0d1edc5b9e5ce365a12f6f70a879d78a819960
'2011-12-30T11:35:32-05:00'
describe
'53204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0ae91e66343e0133dfd66d196438b3f7
c5cfaa6e46bef2b5712ad622f380e9cc5404c76a
'2011-12-30T11:37:10-05:00'
describe
'38044' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
788dd14e2eab5c44b5210089d355582c
dd9ba9c655bf15a542dc653950bca2f79fab331f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f6615fb9645f6ed939e5e1ff6e3a1bea
899a411785307540f3a6d102ee480c40aefbca5a
'2011-12-30T11:33:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
df367b6e6d69d29e2e693c3de3f878c2
6e1cd5cc08e9f0c8af63b6c0963bbd7a66650f9d
'2011-12-30T11:35:11-05:00'
describe
'9207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
34abea4a0835a99bbc73b88c3351bbe9
a3fe7f40de212a01def15db75f2ad4911ca3b643
'2011-12-30T11:33:29-05:00'
describe
'720618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYEZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
dc7611e1649ebe79615f5f7950bbc2c4
3d76573d3294213f123215b438c37ca01a44f882
'2011-12-30T11:35:45-05:00'
describe
'128722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
c4e73d453ba1993a3d7541e49a3d52eb
242f3be67c92207aa8dbf0f22f41ea501731b80e
describe
'17582' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2eb6800a010514496895cf8873afb21a
27ebdad7edaf2011a1b60895d702fcce7f0b7e2f
'2011-12-30T11:36:45-05:00'
describe
'35067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0dfba6848fad355aa11348d236e1a1c8
d9828f857738a9a5c87db867244ee8e3a9967b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
917f9d9ea09c6560bb7953a59a010023
2a9e596435c862273aeb5f96e696ac0e9222ec4c
'2011-12-30T11:39:40-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
9f51ba450e79dddc76dabc5bebc10eb5
34c0cded0918c9bc6fc8ddf5f3273cec5801c3f2
'2011-12-30T11:38:33-05:00'
describe
'9245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
84edf3792a0b94175fc6ff8265a3d4af
ecd05dedf8771952d0ef56536fab897feb91177a
describe
'720343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFG' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
29092bf572c55938bb143166692b40f7
12f2abfac1a7edf712501c9b9aaf8f8bb21fdccd
'2011-12-30T11:38:26-05:00'
describe
'138791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
900592519b64647b6de8ab01e4ccb9d0
efb2e9ab8d6c85a336fa31a444f0cc3ec20a3819
describe
'21495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFI' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c3c17bed591b40250e2feed4689c13b7
d55de1918086717962025d8b4a455067743b9c53
'2011-12-30T11:30:46-05:00'
describe
'38594' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFJ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7fb513a4c8b806c7a4bd0f210a0dc321
3733e200bc444d97318e29aaf8dc2b39a57b950d
'2011-12-30T11:37:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
ef1aaca12bc76e2759f6f7008a97db06
478fc1c1fd5ce58e452e32ff3a39289a8363d4dd
'2011-12-30T11:38:56-05:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFL' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4fcdc5666c001a7d6ca73d94badabccd
c5da3d3654f71c9a50f80544d0d675ff37fb31a0
describe
'9451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFM' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9cc8f61125cb247876b57f8a6758c1ea
cbd8673ea434cae0ecf8ead8574d7b020bd61f48
'2011-12-30T11:37:26-05:00'
describe
'720597' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
214e4bb44635226a7a648a7b2d06a5a1
ac8b08f9c68c581fdf54a5c15985318e35d5d650
'2011-12-30T11:34:23-05:00'
describe
'156758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFO' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
b5ae3ad567fe54b97fd6320b5c3d68c1
cf42f61735b90961ac0d4d4184012b04edbc2717
'2011-12-30T11:35:44-05:00'
describe
'57355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFP' 'sip-files00032.pro'
1b58ea39718d9bcc952e32371f5893ee
8b819db947815553726a600faaef0b0acb0551d5
'2011-12-30T11:30:49-05:00'
describe
'41900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFQ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
10b3cd2b7ddbde341bb189357b2cf815
3ec8cfadf99ace5ce649689378a260bbdd6d406b
'2011-12-30T11:34:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFR' 'sip-files00032.tif'
3e4b95943debabcb2439fe6303015e1d
9e04f634898e09f9a7a962e6daea43d6e819c716
'2011-12-30T11:30:57-05:00'
describe
'2322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFS' 'sip-files00032.txt'
1e90037a59907b54ee2f46091c3ab125
7184e9b99ac87720ab09f83f39d18fe0829a6c00
describe
'9982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFT' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
d5dedd6810cfdab53be64f70a9cafd68
a148b095f7f7594121c794983289216cc81a007f
'2011-12-30T11:31:07-05:00'
describe
'720544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFU' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
cfb6032ed78740e7115263e8f2beb53c
52a028cff8a27d309790cdf072f637678e88c65d
describe
'172485' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3eb3c76dcfa4a60e17a9aba9667a8da4
bed799071d52b37696cab584f0f695819e99f7d6
'2011-12-30T11:37:28-05:00'
describe
'72437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFW' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3279c97b01880c6370031aca87166450
cd959a91cfaadb1b7af6e24a170d310c6e88e0e9
'2011-12-30T11:31:11-05:00'
describe
'43909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
53ca2c694b1e9bee90a13b5102038da1
92d1c6789d85dac6d61e6e9f909a57dce391f74a
'2011-12-30T11:31:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
e315ace1b37ea98a7b22b7c2bbfbdd8c
aec09a783ab1eac0dc6b99ab9ad21856673c8ca9
describe
'2941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYFZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6420fbd608786bb89bca32cccf7c7e3f
6ffec06dd06bbd7d3a3cca9dea5e0c03084b9903
'2011-12-30T11:34:09-05:00'
describe
'10516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
b5118ff998c00c0357847bd71837216c
910c78a43b38ac70d06dc4ee99cb4149da9c86a4
'2011-12-30T11:40:20-05:00'
describe
'720474' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f8a7c286b7bbeaea20b26486e0cef967
be68bd00b86991c83962f94e2c72be2cdc96bdeb
describe
'153296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
1ae5263cdde55ff18f42f90912f90cde
a4f03bb9546af9ea867f33f6f77661aa0524403c
'2011-12-30T11:36:43-05:00'
describe
'61085' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
45fa3b63b71ef31737c44c8658d2f522
2e5cc653aa722a81a9cf33df72a4229954ea6237
'2011-12-30T11:39:52-05:00'
describe
'39108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
deffcdf4005738c3bbbc31abab3d645a
74344714a6eb08e0d65a353fec2e9313829a9c26
'2011-12-30T11:37:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
9e8e2b18b956c2f0f333dd3f64e82274
61340f21b21d17dd07e30b5b398926f8cbe4c961
describe
'2720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
aee102fedfadb591809ca16a0dca43af
7e06d7ff44107ef82ad9f7116c739cfa07761395
'2011-12-30T11:37:33-05:00'
describe
'9425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
71ef7d53d8867dc29943fa4e0c9f6196
527dfe03bc37a9ac8b657be8b244ce7fe653e33f
'2011-12-30T11:35:39-05:00'
describe
'720581' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
10d1934799f37ec737768396537ee015
d6d5af64de496d752565358adc4d0443de63db26
describe
'111150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
ec53dc1f479d16c013fea3df7e0a826e
9c3308a9ea50f96c72bb97d28e4f80c4e3ea0fa6
'2011-12-30T11:33:11-05:00'
describe
'16039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
08a8e7901887023a0616c8087a261312
6c0636ddd099c91f37c100eb708c84773eb063f9
'2011-12-30T11:31:17-05:00'
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8671f48ecf064321eaaa4728b8b71338
8fd74d569539b03cfe64dd46b83a0c29b19e9e27
'2011-12-30T11:39:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d1709bd63ff3745ed70f45c14d1903f6
503aad917bac1460615d8aa4dcbc36ccd7c72c53
'2011-12-30T11:30:44-05:00'
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGN' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5016c19e184b955c1c8ba5e383ccf253
e79e107fb8c6e629378f9d006d481086f21ee0dc
'2011-12-30T11:36:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
ab49b80fcd318e6048cf189d4b42a3dc
fe61ea89d7475c831aaabca4379662d5712565ed
'2011-12-30T11:33:31-05:00'
describe
'720428' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
cb5ee351e7eab6585f0b724b8e9bf558
d97d5e293c628b183d8e55fa0dfd7607cd34a12c
'2011-12-30T11:39:14-05:00'
describe
'147824' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGQ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
50bb74fc2bd0a1bfd54518ea35146c3c
db824a222cbffeddf3f51e0e422485a09d5b127c
'2011-12-30T11:35:28-05:00'
describe
'46228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
8575ba5f83f9e075b62342cf61636d11
2309a3caa4524bf2cf5a5181365cdb57536d74d1
'2011-12-30T11:31:01-05:00'
describe
'38586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGS' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b0655a72517f0b2379f6e1b42cf072af
94b1af2ca5efeffb59dbfc7dca5c6c7806f845b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGT' 'sip-files00036.tif'
eca38a3e4d0ab6b61d29df22e67f957e
46b86353831e1e937dde844eee46d48b3e3686d3
'2011-12-30T11:36:13-05:00'
describe
'1987' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGU' 'sip-files00036.txt'
bab558e1b04e07d55dc331d3c5cbeed4
c54649d1ad5a6afb82e5639f4ef844f06befaba1
'2011-12-30T11:30:55-05:00'
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGV' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
bd2b21ad0c71f6d56f526683f3ee10de
d635e236c274026762c38acd289cb44eeabc11ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
68bd67611742b003da3c8cfc106a7582
94e27546579df346fa96a2595ab244ff16d58d6a
'2011-12-30T11:34:38-05:00'
describe
'121354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
5b07cb1f7270715347af296e7e288a2c
32585967992584762019847790ba6293ecf6ef2f
describe
'19325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
75db836ce7e105647a4b7a059a7f721f
0637799017a22f9fdf4ccf37e734c1a4597fcc9e
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYGZ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
cc01a9794bf02aa883e5a26bdfcca991
ef4160f5ddf97e1901bd4593c7726d4bc7b27eb5
'2011-12-30T11:34:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
41d06d40b2b7f93ba4e02e7d3d51c533
24087e73030c6a36473002ff38584f6435c01601
'2011-12-30T11:32:22-05:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ef118fbc59cd6b2fecbc378eca364c95
81c71912dca1ae8b139395d655fa7bf499fddfa1
'2011-12-30T11:33:38-05:00'
describe
'8355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
876ea69cbbc8cc0b453a3eb56da99348
b96852fdb7f54646abc9f66af68480af0d699290
'2011-12-30T11:33:50-05:00'
describe
'720472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
7626c05ad285b8de9edab7cb7295e715
2259ec13065025db3dff9cc585bebd663a13d90a
'2011-12-30T11:34:59-05:00'
describe
'124599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
5afea71c43e1ffa7a1bc8f9efe868116
92ac32453796cef8a386aa5a099f5e0dd2e2e1d2
'2011-12-30T11:32:54-05:00'
describe
'16082' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
695ee7082b4ef304420ed3b361008721
d8041b44c67d41e88966a62b62cc704efdb409bb
'2011-12-30T11:38:10-05:00'
describe
'35490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
355ee2f26a22d28cc8c5aa4498f547be
e0c7e9d5bd53887c3cff45652164f87ba79658cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
eaf01a5f593716e585766f125d89182d
c26a5015262d89b29af8f09daa46a06855efa204
'2011-12-30T11:34:07-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
f08eb97d8a496625cbb9df26ad3225b5
5cc60225a3231a4d8b65575d88b1b48e6a38b4d9
'2011-12-30T11:37:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
a1858489c97061c02e07bae1adb91bdc
759beeca7d5d6b82aa155598e34603c8480e29f9
describe
'720637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
d8e8145adce6486f1969db4cd5fe7391
5fdc5bb77a36e4b918a20aeb741c9740f7b482a4
describe
'131191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b8f14080cbe61ef19c20dde89311a485
63e0ebd0c8e97d8b0ecd98dd23769f774c317cd4
'2011-12-30T11:39:06-05:00'
describe
'18876' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
2ab6a2bd22195992dd2be2b0bf5ef0ec
7918dd544973ecfa92e65f4bcc272d2bb69b8f40
describe
'35994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHN' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9c7d5fc3a356306be490aa2b7043ca12
bb8bdf18bddc90be7a18aea1c804172f1070cf2f
'2011-12-30T11:39:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHO' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8e6b7702a6c6d5b93c8f57ed56e72389
d252139f2f87ddeee983187d7a59b62d2f085995
'2011-12-30T11:38:01-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHP' 'sip-files00039.txt'
da99ecb7802cf0701211243f27ca8c34
1fa4634915c41ceae914b5c13f91c6d4e87e51dc
'2011-12-30T11:35:08-05:00'
describe
'8911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ce5906a4a50ad20804e5a376241adb75
ca3d5934ce45060124a30d296f3af5c87a621851
describe
'720988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
c8cd7429334d0157d23a5aaeb2357a87
2852915b396186789592cb8e97a7a5bbdd85d22f
'2011-12-30T11:36:30-05:00'
describe
'113080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHS' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
024e50748af1c00104acfe7369104fbf
37666f788586b903ce8e5f65202c2625437d657f
'2011-12-30T11:36:22-05:00'
describe
'9652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHT' 'sip-files00040.pro'
ef7eac2e58a215b4e9589d468ed192fa
a1ef882f4574bde51defa48531935640a0f08aad
describe
'31164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5f2f6a56d0ea5cca83c9c64fde9646e9
be4f8a879a02a0015319369b33959429e568c952
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d9f947bbbda3ae5ad2a147c3b5ba42ea
8bcc183d537167c116de24731570e44ccbcc3059
'2011-12-30T11:32:47-05:00'
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHW' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e4729e21638258f35d073ca597b01e8d
b848959e58a5605fe23562ea953f630de1fd168e
'2011-12-30T11:37:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
a501ff9ba45f575390477803f7437b71
b88190d71ea5f68c565c50cf7dbd9135dbb75d85
'2011-12-30T11:37:50-05:00'
describe
'720577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
57af7358ae994afaa2a5d587eb060c76
4d32a989f3dc6818273df1c20a959251888911a9
'2011-12-30T11:36:49-05:00'
describe
'135643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYHZ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
a2126e149a53273da270ddfa2c092345
847d33b97fa46969a418b7781440f1cb88642b0e
describe
'7161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
cd97d9c9d681ba78b404ce4c35242f7f
39362c410e9ca7bc2b8840497ec8e697015920b0
describe
'35775' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIB' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
584e5ab5f28c65423445358b9c308e7a
76e5d6c315edf3cfefa68571fbd5227acce32dd6
'2011-12-30T11:34:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ffd72e299b82929cd8ee6b672ba4f585
881fd58c3e2a44c4edc398e1c7082514ee82cfb0
'2011-12-30T11:33:55-05:00'
describe
'378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYID' 'sip-files00041.txt'
2b2567f4b120a2be8c60de63bf0806cc
d7b476ca1f5435fb79b55b860d1281c0e3f1bf9f
'2011-12-30T11:31:28-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIE' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
67a449383db43beb3ccc0f5b97dfcbb5
3d4b0c4173fceeb05b3133ed1bb39379ad4d9219
'2011-12-30T11:36:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIF' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
13b9a9640b57506518f86a9171dbcd33
da564907618ee3f18e2771820738e30adbe73025
'2011-12-30T11:37:38-05:00'
describe
'147874' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIG' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
bca48cd9a3de95f1458d0cf3cb485043
763559e76e31d49dca2de2da93b52518c14eecd2
describe
'57558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIH' 'sip-files00042.pro'
87ad4cbee2128fac858494fc56d6d8cb
7437745f09aa384742af4c308d67d0ef0f9d92b7
'2011-12-30T11:39:13-05:00'
describe
'40226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYII' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
6198952806146c237d51c0234d7bb879
6def55fbd0bcf9189b92394e907b2f62ce1e7cc3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIJ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6070694d01715d1f0cd027c535a2c1d4
1eaf917c3f5d8b622cd2db8f5914d753834d2529
describe
'2415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIK' 'sip-files00042.txt'
62f6e14f8c4e6da7bec06128543e58a5
aaf40eacc9bee56876b416a6a8d5ae43bd923d46
describe
Invalid character
'9694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIL' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
71fcf744cc9192401dceb8af3eb9e6ff
5f6c483b064127443ca6d20d33e3890c23b52165
'2011-12-30T11:30:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIM' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
420c1f6fc4950cc6f7c3551649510ce3
66cc2674c3e8ad685a915d688e176bec02bf11ec
'2011-12-30T11:38:54-05:00'
describe
'143600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIN' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
fecf5e753e155d102ca3abcb2f54dcdd
ae2ee36d495cea5d34393377aeb306819d24e26e
'2011-12-30T11:33:05-05:00'
describe
'43559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
a3387200c7767ccac8c1e66104fca43b
12b3fd4d74658423065b82698ee90323ad0368cd
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
58ad49acdb070addd545088a53506fc9
bd2279a200872b3f5cfb8b0b181e417ca5ac5d65
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d59a7793119a13dc8f7c80273fea078f
5ae8d3d4f868eb326641a0bf9a9f0eaecb9f3095
'2011-12-30T11:31:53-05:00'
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIR' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6e3a8e02c81565397e4281fb5718c058
5726749d30ea72babb9f5c350681029cf5de287d
describe
'9275' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
74b8ab17758b7372132c3d7ee0b3310b
096ce76a2b9b8c9ac694e5f8fe01eb28cb83a59a
'2011-12-30T11:38:39-05:00'
describe
'720639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIT' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4ee58ebf3f62cde3825115373e064d27
e07c6bad4f389cb796fdb498f83ba3e428b69457
'2011-12-30T11:32:37-05:00'
describe
'96988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
46deb25396ab1fcff150dc999be75ca6
6397389bf820a6bacb1f10d792426ba1386b8dec
'2011-12-30T11:31:42-05:00'
describe
'13726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c93dfbf7e376ffd96bb5f271101bc395
4dcb6fba02f9fd5bb58503fdbd860f40446732f1
'2011-12-30T11:36:20-05:00'
describe
'27361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIW' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e8f16d7e6434db2c47647a656b374bb7
5c649723fb7baeead1524fd5df95b700707c66e4
'2011-12-30T11:39:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0d78bf900603015d36104aa371235e32
67ca5eb20b84d98f1e515eb7702a311a004801a6
'2011-12-30T11:35:06-05:00'
describe
'686' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIY' 'sip-files00044.txt'
35046d0f8aa3266fa866b9c72ca3fc08
a51e26a9df0364e18bd8abc4924449a150561c00
describe
'7198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYIZ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
47fef6301974f8f1452fea9e5c31215b
a595e3fdd441443b6ccc5554b24ec9797bf16ee5
'2011-12-30T11:38:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d14c7466e7a0177d9ad1f172a8aaaeee
8e22975fdcf5f3d8accf29e821c358a26676818d
'2011-12-30T11:35:02-05:00'
describe
'113616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2f202660a5f8bd417d970f4dafd87a1c
4d693f1b6a3076c3099f1e45eb7dfce42eb6bbba
describe
'17576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJC' 'sip-files00045.pro'
17bfc18a3a50506d3d24413e19b5a1e4
129df9c3a4cf82c68fc85eb7a031c4426773aaf9
'2011-12-30T11:34:21-05:00'
describe
'32143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJD' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4e35a52c6073a3a780229d5ce394c63e
5163d1ec5fb8d94de38f0d9cee6a1f28d16c22ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e17e9711a96349d1d163e9f475d089ea
5f3f1548e8ef3ddab8628e460cf85085dc9f8301
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJF' 'sip-files00045.txt'
045a53c998b9589f93d2387d6f7ec7fb
252ef21c7248c39fa4b023253e697a7ad1d32079
describe
'8345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJG' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
1041546d7360e911f37efc91015a0512
0ca5fbdbaf892fead7ae0886478026f7b2954a9a
describe
'720497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJH' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
137e00768a1bbf837c42f77d84431c2a
6ab8bf9ad95608112a86905d1c0739c9abd585f9
describe
'117491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJI' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a6e72a14de6df076c1846a09bed76985
8deaa94d2e4107eedad9af71f995e5b969616699
describe
'19458' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJJ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3448275fa448b026a508d8fed7b3e792
c6681aed4c2a8ddcd4e3aacd8cfb014f807836c8
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJK' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
cf75b1ecbc7ec46762f2c43e5cb559df
e8976454c8e3bf40ebd0fd9f6e1007ac48a63dd3
'2011-12-30T11:35:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJL' 'sip-files00046.tif'
763439bc19946d6196b13b622627f8f6
a4be536c96a74d97967b87d5e4ad9cce3ddc3b06
'2011-12-30T11:37:12-05:00'
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJM' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f1aa0704699542c10edacdf3b7ca5d38
82df43f0cbb95f8e620017587b9d7aed5172387c
describe
'9414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJN' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c14eb3c7f87b7d8defa19cb0f2b9a3f0
194bc5cd597278d52eaf6ac7fef6c1f47d9af3e8
'2011-12-30T11:34:12-05:00'
describe
'720629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJO' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
092ac6846dfa4e06e9ef46c14d9295eb
7e61b97e47250906e949320816cc25feda6cebad
'2011-12-30T11:32:06-05:00'
describe
'149129' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f1a7ba59b673afcfabdb6a11fa066c29
60b4d0c350cd2aa5fc6f48b25bcaaf5e766f82a5
'2011-12-30T11:40:27-05:00'
describe
'45613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJQ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
26947566ccf912f43b08e1bd71b9bb00
ba364442acfc3e616d2ea8e28556ee953d16ca9e
'2011-12-30T11:37:29-05:00'
describe
'40769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJR' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b5871749c0d857ccac3bbb047e364ba4
980673d439333c48e1dbd1d9c13d7ed34e59065c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
30a43d0897569a0e68a3fafb80c462b8
07759ec354f9d9f8879ab3fe0bf311fa99a06fdc
'2011-12-30T11:37:42-05:00'
describe
'2341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJT' 'sip-files00047.txt'
60403303799954df92a472e64bd6aac1
25a9a0931b2e60b414783b9f61ef093683ac6721
'2011-12-30T11:40:18-05:00'
describe
'9909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJU' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0294cc81337140eaa1a2766f7cecb678
fbfdd08cef54485c269d9043be6c4d65ab813c77
'2011-12-30T11:35:56-05:00'
describe
'720640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJV' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
2f711081e4218eb6a358308b97c5503f
f72a13196b49fbb36fca327ce508c02f08db5769
'2011-12-30T11:31:35-05:00'
describe
'133855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJW' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
64dd70894faed94cc74bf1bbe2ff4058
16e033ab4c976ac1fdd75f26635b041128f2fe6f
describe
'26906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJX' 'sip-files00048.pro'
11d2f1bfdad2d89ba9ac0764013e9029
f5f9547e62f4a6ef816a57f440f68adda28e991e
'2011-12-30T11:40:25-05:00'
describe
'36215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJY' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
a7863582933976d8e97613f78823ed3c
6e4a856a83e315d1b76abdb941fabd4e4459bc48
'2011-12-30T11:31:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYJZ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9b6240b864ef98d266493f130735af63
127577609a16401b5b168df5b0d0d23fd5f2c467
'2011-12-30T11:39:43-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e6f16050fa68475cdcdfbf97954581b0
7729a8bc5a4f47c70888e8c9510ef0a6078a70f5
describe
Invalid character
'9077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKB' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
fb7b5d06d2adb3dcd124d8c287a73441
445bb8a15cef9af3227df40ba39dee60a30bcc0d
describe
'720621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKC' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9533ed75258ae3854ca70e1ccc2fc9b5
e75f3572671dcc2c410187a14f0a5a5fa1c284a4
describe
'127447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKD' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
66457854af8690d3407eb58e72a5c6ca
cebcef38b360ce65e9b5d07c0d74cf280cb7f9fe
'2011-12-30T11:37:52-05:00'
describe
'26837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKE' 'sip-files00049.pro'
969d6e0f1779fc65e02227ec7ec3ff72
3db089f451504a5eb15db2467a5bd2f74ec19251
'2011-12-30T11:39:42-05:00'
describe
'34827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
64f7f3cbd60c3f1fc0b6022a08b4214a
3aebdf24bd147ba1097fd73fb7de2a29bd78f907
'2011-12-30T11:36:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKG' 'sip-files00049.tif'
81e74a113baf3e596ae2a02de03f7a92
72ba35e3c2b9a26f50a782d75be1972629225bf3
'2011-12-30T11:33:03-05:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKH' 'sip-files00049.txt'
b8b2e73f262a782257c32e051ffa4704
6578e3aa85cc8d34160400e1fc78d061216fc3f8
'2011-12-30T11:37:45-05:00'
describe
'8802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKI' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
89847a205a97cfb518a22397b6989d8e
3b3fbdd24c999a69dd25b8e02e17dd2d07a26ea8
describe
'720518' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f855a2b5f4e7a70cfc53fd7b3ae0c114
dc7e7c4d0d4d5f75353f3fffcd353e16d01bf8c3
'2011-12-30T11:32:10-05:00'
describe
'142934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
beb01479931e89fb3784f4ff6f3b4a6e
8e900b3d9b481ed7e713f26c7b1e5eec558be7d0
'2011-12-30T11:36:35-05:00'
describe
'55086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
b229d0c2b9883c3506344437eb4c1afb
1810ea82d0577470883ad03cea8509e0c252201c
describe
'39062' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
eb92e7b00d6a3d87fe8f542b3c6d39db
0f27db1e9407c13544667dbe15f4232e73069217
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
69245accf134cd0e1f142bebacd59634
7d4a1c4648dbd4a69e86156629310fb9dea2caeb
'2011-12-30T11:33:40-05:00'
describe
'2428' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ac2de4e01a10b05222d1bcc9993a9fed
0beb31080790d17c45cd840ec310c68f8bb12576
'2011-12-30T11:38:16-05:00'
describe
'9555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKP' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
07acbe94ba0bfedf29ce90fdce9ffaa5
b8ebe1e84a9752c4bf95658619218ecbc5e4c86d
'2011-12-30T11:34:31-05:00'
describe
'720539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKQ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
3f1591ee551ade0874d0c411b53b8879
8dcd40962be648a916987f0de83212cf42f79482
'2011-12-30T11:33:14-05:00'
describe
'145001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKR' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
dcdcef6e15563c2c4e7c2086f1e00dda
6f02c84e998bcfdd7eb1807c8ee86b3208b0c4e3
'2011-12-30T11:39:34-05:00'
describe
'49342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKS' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d4581c6f5fa21a8bccf889d4ea2cb437
71acc4ef605ca312b793005d2f936be5579323b1
'2011-12-30T11:35:29-05:00'
describe
'38365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKT' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
86e41f76d1ceca0abaf48ba625e4141d
74194cb7990a4c9677d0b4e7d9a238941807a559
'2011-12-30T11:35:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKU' 'sip-files00051.tif'
19e0f98c2aca7e697d6157498abf47cd
df094ebe416eb1a8b8192db0c18e49037f80599e
'2011-12-30T11:32:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKV' 'sip-files00051.txt'
061d3820bd63431c02e52040fd52869f
231fedce108bea7ae949dae0ca44c4d48970059e
'2011-12-30T11:35:13-05:00'
describe
'9447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKW' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
30a0f6b5ca6892a5f02911d57bdf261c
e93f4d20e38915d2cd7fb2c0550bffa1ced6c885
'2011-12-30T11:38:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKX' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
0403f452b2659992bccd597a7f76974a
95992e39c823dbbb3be0d278a6d7ea4bb8ca5004
'2011-12-30T11:35:12-05:00'
describe
'108369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKY' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1988d1c74a9b2c8ce56aa9f85ce25dc0
f1271cdf1376de87ded3d6ab7b1755f509a8ff40
describe
'18973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYKZ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5d98c24a68033f925b2eb569f4828a72
8e585deb269cef522a4dea99c7d7d5513978950b
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLA' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
f11f15643b3010cd0cb88481c8949981
2fa572091f7a373d63851f95a27d286347a82da8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLB' 'sip-files00052.tif'
04c7ad8b6eee23d10eaa642ddd4acaa3
124ee1819c6faeb3ad0d8d771611b5ed373fa857
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLC' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a52ac24bf837455e5b1aca7158b2b0c4
965539afa3ee7002cd2f7d51284ce4f5587d83a1
'2011-12-30T11:31:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLD' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
8e91f2a9514087ce9168058a12b5e283
ba8b016610af00e9c07f26d6a6c7c2dcdbbde02e
describe
'720613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
4af6c85a4992a2fa4273b9ee9e17bd7a
5111e220ce050ce8e1670ecf39ff038c07c89f44
describe
'174077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
8a8e8c3cc82c6a92b4551f9f46c25e5c
a6ec4257d4cca88de73fc1ff5097b3baf29a2583
describe
'55243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLG' 'sip-files00053.pro'
be250eb4e81827895206d09bbafd7ccd
c2166f9e6f85eeabeee6b915e4c3dce6777b4631
describe
'44971' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e4af3e49a0985efae531726097325869
ae1ad50de053573dca32d3959480b127ede034b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLI' 'sip-files00053.tif'
99b7b922930749ef7edb806353daf295
5addc281ab6a89dc0e590fca723f6701855b24fe
'2011-12-30T11:34:42-05:00'
describe
'2318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLJ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
08337e3cde0aec44027010c6085a9408
3d78a5bf32c5259006576a082e53a2290f6d834e
'2011-12-30T11:38:11-05:00'
describe
'10733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLK' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
dec64b10dfdbd5c61cf07a2a138de6e4
66c4c31e103664b268e2850d370d235f4661dab5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLL' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7bbfedbdb07b09c8c83a1d7511d5f580
8a96a617eff926b151c58532582db23023a2010b
describe
'174145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
0d5d62314ebc22a9f4166a1f120deffc
0368e8b7bb504e74c901bcc50a5d09e1a673936b
describe
'65497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLN' 'sip-files00054.pro'
97c2bc91fe86e72c30f1d0ad7e2a3c70
a2040cf7fd14d7b413750258f1afe749d5549fff
describe
'43881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
1a68e8b5e050c1979b1eb3471bb958dc
094f76404355ab3d5b5e058a87d7e2f169a5da78
'2011-12-30T11:39:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9c9940587303c58194c562e8751743cc
4fdc1d3572a31730f964d13ec3681cdce70b866b
'2011-12-30T11:30:38-05:00'
describe
'2675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLQ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
ddbf0c533926f7b1905cdc1e717ec036
0b045368aa9c201aeb50272bc699303cbbfb0c29
'2011-12-30T11:31:59-05:00'
describe
'10196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLR' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a9aea13580340e3b2132f1d703b8119e
1a1e08ee790f1841ab4b90cdde3330383d5e3d43
describe
'720580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLS' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b6ff36297b7c1bcbf3a4828f1d00eb17
8d492a68cd89620a0f27ed9ca4d9bf8f74a09efe
describe
'138345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLT' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
7ed7487034da6fe6305550df0af8f4fe
b8eaa355e07bd3ea2573c95da730afe79e085d43
describe
'3084' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLU' 'sip-files00055.pro'
2b2ee431fcea901bbdd6d86fcd76f5eb
0ef6efe7be1f6fa11c86d0c2f734d0f7e9d5c1fd
describe
'35553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2e5aadb49b572dfd221dcb894c1094f2
865da2ec8bdfaadee75b73556fa01434311d378f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLW' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d6cd0b3b984b04312caf24f8d2f9fa3c
73cf58378d58ab6f46b2b7e104f0ca6bbe550115
'2011-12-30T11:32:59-05:00'
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLX' 'sip-files00055.txt'
8bf0d7cfd4189f67ac078d51df5b3ff2
96251aaf633ce7aea34e4e0788dd8dfef4ff815c
'2011-12-30T11:31:32-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLY' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e33ff96eee09c13287c5bdfffb17db80
cb0a557a25d02dd5f5894f5b58740a50f54aeedb
'2011-12-30T11:34:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYLZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2c94bc6279d2da9b140cd6bdb39f0240
91421986b7918b99da1df9d6c159fd00ddff0303
describe
'140284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d21b91854eb07977411c83125273228f
0f7f8d5bb1ea54eb4c7f91bd9363a38a2b7f7242
describe
'38007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
69d471faaa8a00ae211537849a32c3ac
bc7c1b8740519ffe2d46dc856d66cf0fc159617e
describe
'37632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
1b5962abc783678b105594eb91c9bbec
4df63ae1f222177dd51e83237e25a42e9aa5a05b
'2011-12-30T11:36:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
f8bbddb0b792e24b328c8fe5eb2d8f2a
4d645933f875ff679913aea41c105295aa908c5b
'2011-12-30T11:37:56-05:00'
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYME' 'sip-files00057.txt'
11b3f0ef212140297270097f22c51d9c
e6fd0ced9dc72c87c79ee4128dde525fe7679d73
describe
Invalid character
'9713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
667cfa40fd2dd006f5364f3c7fc9fa09
ec24062c2569b4427247ceba5a6474dc68163e7c
describe
'720552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
063e975a0d457d151edd2d29646435d8
a549646b4ab3cf4886cd5fbeaa2a68f9490226de
'2011-12-30T11:37:34-05:00'
describe
'150149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
3c46898873e587bb0cefbea37d816050
62490939b06a421daa4583e97e32d854c66e1936
'2011-12-30T11:38:03-05:00'
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
77c73f0e44188fabe105d3851fff6099
6a18b0305b657d2b9c8edbb6e3a29896e0d3d11e
describe
'38973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
781a9ad1109306459e7bbdba7601ef0c
66f230b89e8d9d213b34d579948cb044b8c29600
'2011-12-30T11:35:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
2ff914bca8ea2ea1cf8ae48ace6a8e1e
37208db55501a5f43994677ac4c3fca0f88b8ca3
'2011-12-30T11:34:28-05:00'
describe
'504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYML' 'sip-files00058.txt'
fcd9de35ea9caa0a6e124cb08d71f9f7
e1891e8cf32aee634b526d51aac994eb8075ad36
'2011-12-30T11:30:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
aa3ee50169a9f4a0701c0a9b97cccc94
58e2a8ee1aabadea5defadda76dbd193ab3fc343
describe
'720641' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
227620d3c0d377bdc9ed3deb97328f20
a8af12d2d6d01f22bb4ad65b47f7d288bdf9f146
describe
'150184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
b9d5dd5c68b7b07d3ddd382026ab9bad
20aa392e2b9d88de30e1c4050fdf82b68c59ab82
'2011-12-30T11:37:47-05:00'
describe
'3881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMP' 'sip-files00059.pro'
741d3cab68284f8f2067cfc28fb6df33
1673969eeb05ccb5a352a603b572e14b1af71298
'2011-12-30T11:40:26-05:00'
describe
'41716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
aeab67cf217acf977c9007caea20d1dc
389439cf313e08499e7b43f37b6c15ab3a5b9f8d
'2011-12-30T11:33:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
f0163601dfeaa91bc62a0414bededb1c
6228c7592a734fbfe9e32fabb8121f9f33add41b
'2011-12-30T11:32:35-05:00'
describe
'163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
9bd7f592b0694c9b8a9f89c9b774b7aa
0ecb542d014911176a8f498cfad5ff1a4d5db567
'2011-12-30T11:37:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
678f62e61095a393405d46861adccd4c
3048290d237aab5adb89a5ee5a0234990aa5197d
describe
'720483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
33075abe3b5d82840332de72de31bc41
8e023f7f4e40e2d5ca5b705afb7d0892dee0f08a
'2011-12-30T11:31:03-05:00'
describe
'159739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9884c9b1f2e8d0ad3a53df7f4956fcb8
f4668034c069c89f1f36e0fb196f2d7b2473b3ba
'2011-12-30T11:35:14-05:00'
describe
'56613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMW' 'sip-files00060.pro'
249e47b9a2bd0862bb877223e4e876d3
771973f2cb008eefa54351ae756831da99a96d43
describe
'41133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f0262fb95ef79e323a292c7f52e779fc
a89e65d7acef49bf3dcf1fdb1bdd0c7d00243437
'2011-12-30T11:33:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
9411fecf79c8bfb6dba3d160374694d2
7a95e6e1b0e6b7d318337de46620bfa9abe3594f
'2011-12-30T11:33:16-05:00'
describe
'2544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYMZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9f67182f812930555d5359e490351f76
4a5e0758da35dd1e59527d78d35843e7fff13ee0
'2011-12-30T11:37:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
0757219323f55a86c4d39968faf075e8
5214ea09bc5935997b8a36716f8724345e0c27ee
'2011-12-30T11:31:39-05:00'
describe
'720632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
dba9f35243256e45f0a8e96bc9e6b0f1
bf6af906461f91a6d390a2cac261797b623bf1a0
describe
'158582' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
62d407922d41ac53c6c8d4a42823b917
13e90de8cf60067eb83fa86a21da0366e957c90b
describe
'45572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYND' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b76f8fb0bcbe3d7b307d3b60c7186eec
d51113ba0d0a7b34fd6e6bf681059304a1e5e6bb
describe
'40206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
4acd7f8cc1e5ff6b68cc30dff4b93866
ab4412d4b9dda60b0653d17ebc2e517c0f56a2e9
'2011-12-30T11:38:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
3156bbb21c04e4adb48553294203e5b8
ccbeaad6831df8142f70d5be51605f07108a365d
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a0241953a900f4ea333109d6cd4d1ca9
21f43c09be5b0a1bfb900727a3e1a91c15e1b9f1
describe
'9952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
9b7037ab1cc4111629440d033a4c180b
7f68a4e566459ac4df587f6fca858fc13dac1a85
'2011-12-30T11:40:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
517014fce78cd1dadaa92a9d4bc370d5
bb71f685e21532b80709080deb11cab949a0b111
describe
'167681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
cf71a58726d5df46800401b50a577673
f060be1acc8c53913ed5db37568b7aa4e8504947
describe
'52980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
2b08497df51bdd2223b86f4148379252
e549d26bb3bcb855f062638bd42633a429f7265b
describe
'43095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
1278a45730309053fa1524f8dd812c88
5af290bd661421c6d4f8f2bacdc094f9425317e0
'2011-12-30T11:38:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
de568d1ebd37b199460c1f9432ee8552
b879907a250302323018bd5b1b64ad8b2a759ee5
describe
'2190' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
6693d4eaf0406ecb30abe9a5e1424246
c7428ad48cc30fe45dbb2612b5067cc96e8592c3
'2011-12-30T11:39:59-05:00'
describe
'10388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
cbfa55f9f18559ebb6e1e80286172231
b14cdeb8b79855afa47e46b4392b9b82a03f5415
describe
'720591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
255d799dee765057329dfaa37f89ef93
93d327bb7be5a2c8575c645c33b2c10c2072ba4e
describe
'175456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
b8be76cf95bab6bd2c78cd630e83a04f
3748db59b58ac10626b000346427b96e8eda620d
describe
'61654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
94ff0955f7e65736977446744cf9f141
6f307edb020b06d996b037a10cec4cbb2a2ed7cb
'2011-12-30T11:38:23-05:00'
describe
'44800' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
041d0c330be8c39b4e79f5ad3a5f53c3
04985d181a9a38678805e97be8419a5db20be0ea
'2011-12-30T11:34:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
f3cad59ac0cab7bfc8998d222f1f1649
a540c5192933f0c8c84c89e866bcf259aa6b2714
'2011-12-30T11:39:53-05:00'
describe
'2563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
0dc5ae3376ab4c70abbcc0f8959ff3fa
32376f7d6a93e206e0c5c2bd034f033482f1d7f9
describe
'10553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1d57e6fb24684de194e8cc952dac24cf
68b76574d4fca23b7641166267fb25408a5af5c6
'2011-12-30T11:33:46-05:00'
describe
'720529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
0c6d004f5d94217c0ed3c027f39aa101
dc9dd9a98cf1d35de81a327f7623f87587ca4b16
describe
'158467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
e2eab60fe926a8e3395dc2b8c0ebb7d2
ee3a2141b964bfc5110b5c9dc6deaa73cfaaf568
describe
'42168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
adfe221dadb7607f4f2736845f1afb0a
4a20bf7572ff78a82a0be49d2523969d64423992
describe
'41775' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYNZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1ec9f81020d356640ae1c5b07736ac60
027bb50258caeb6de09b93338a016ff9058dd4d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b449138cafe560f54f542a8b663c479c
ccd0e3ff75e00e43bd33b0eade373cbde385b8fc
'2011-12-30T11:32:46-05:00'
describe
'1993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
318a8211051af114d10ba282d9aa86ce
9097021d025cb08c9a60f2491156b66030aad230
describe
'10228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
3c3e8e41853ed63934e58e4bb89714e5
4b1eef43ff500a4f232eba01749110330d850681
describe
'720555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOD' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e0f69e9eb98da313b91b8d6303e94e10
997f5252405b6a6a5311e12b2a0eae10804e8e28
'2011-12-30T11:34:29-05:00'
describe
'147534' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOE' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
859fa6117e16b9e7dac28ef666379e39
4ec26b8e1688fb2db562ed6afa58cb83af7dcc34
'2011-12-30T11:31:10-05:00'
describe
'3483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1152e4b201ff7c18c6ff8b2a8701bc7e
fb940b3c04d0e2c310eb3c30b41aef60a268e472
describe
'36185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOG' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
dd367ea145199db978924264564f83b6
073dbcdb615b288f8358b05f71d5d9a0fd630e4b
'2011-12-30T11:36:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
411bbc975123f332e2b7ce3802fbe7f5
4add6ce5d3a784c4166d8d059f99cfdac13dd772
'2011-12-30T11:38:02-05:00'
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8726a0f58b15466b7a6d9ae3954a2b80
ef6c352444f3483012c715474db1e7b72b58d7d1
'2011-12-30T11:32:18-05:00'
describe
'9598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
0eec29cf28d2c748ef1cde9afba0841d
c7c35b3002cac622d61df38d677c5623854f7dfb
describe
'720249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
012fc14e12f5ea87801b78bd3ab86774
ede29d6b7bcb530f46fb1779c6df24ac5ad5a060
describe
'115355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
1dfa08f4928b125d04f6fb5396e708ae
a1b10c54e95d0c4d2af1f044899adceacf7db435
'2011-12-30T11:36:42-05:00'
describe
'16197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
87665f0cb998348bd0eb6eb905c2372f
99c29eb4258e1c8edb0897aac7c207746d0c8f54
describe
'31661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYON' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
f460354352793a2207d87e84178e4190
cd7dc987ace1476f0404590adfb407b8a974f71c
'2011-12-30T11:37:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
d552ba8a31450f36aa1b4eac9e955259
fbb9b746e30ba540c0d7df6525faa873c177c804
describe
'675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
95fda58a6fbaec1b7a6c20c7821eebda
7859c447c6f10010aba5e7cc80b9badc9c7f832e
describe
'8578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5657ea084da15519165356dd3e9d8cc2
5fcdc202adae67dfd7ad1879545246b87298b841
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
bc73350a37467054c0bbfb44719e999b
e4aaa9b8861398f3246b59e7116622af0054b11f
describe
'122793' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
06a7104637a5b871b56b696eb642e1da
c8aff3b9ea8539a22096c0a2e4be017e2f142ab3
'2011-12-30T11:38:24-05:00'
describe
'12658' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
1744adbb4ccc8143bfafd449566098c6
a50a44ad1be600b25009a005069a90857bb15e0d
describe
'34035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
dca2a3c7926964c05595488a843d5626
489491fd16b12b433c203230837b5258aaa1a46c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
58cd418ff49cb5cba012ce785a01fcb9
f4211cbb3d322920dd098c59c82be3a71838dcad
'2011-12-30T11:36:48-05:00'
describe
'654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a856036a7d989343c6a18c63d79263a9
050d4310f29d19cb479b08ae29f8da6178a1cf78
describe
Invalid character
'8761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
99bb072e14032804fe3a4c6a50e84ce4
4400744d8398c3ebd8a251d516633e04337ef228
'2011-12-30T11:33:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
41ac0f5b7809cbfb8fb6a3877d6cec43
6d9d7e0a41729fe37efa6fa2af9b9aace19c2a40
'2011-12-30T11:34:33-05:00'
describe
'112867' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYOZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
e1a0af3a035e74edeb8609d3d2f67ccd
e34b7a37a9589d840c0849b43642ebdda81d0b99
'2011-12-30T11:34:36-05:00'
describe
'14752' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPA' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c4e91add27397184bec80c39bff88f5f
90b393c475dad89e1b8c3b5902a58ca2d1bfc7f9
describe
'30311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPB' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
51d06d5f6de627baedc1291688fa0311
bbabe3c45070812d24d3cb55d7f9f0726be1b575
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
bf26fdc70be46dcac4e0daa8a3dffa84
658024dac50138eb0faa23da25e8923a694a4386
'2011-12-30T11:39:19-05:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
40b79cb0bb62948dd5f8136933a6c959
0dd5a50f12d4971f628541fc0bca7f4bd8c21308
describe
Invalid character
'8020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ecd8d39b56c0d9bfe2c069635cb816c1
6e233f9b1248f0691382b0345283b59fa2b16cef
'2011-12-30T11:32:38-05:00'
describe
'720540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPF' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
66dfe5876f7ab683aab9fe3eb2047af0
dcb8cfc4c3f0febb0874fa64ad1efeb78659e756
describe
'173593' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
5e1ff4cbe83f14c9cf3ca7fa33605fec
f7c67dff2e9c3b109dfa80c8006647454328ddef
describe
'51543' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
0ac19c695176e019f944e356f6972e7e
1058cd578ee7eed2054047b3fe77b5ab7bae4475
'2011-12-30T11:35:51-05:00'
describe
'44922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPI' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a3927139ed0c5cf1d58366ec8a7975be
a0a4c82b5762d52775a493f22fd05fac49b7c292
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPJ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2726852cb2261270e1df1d6b5f159376
9f8f92550572cb5a7774f84e0e7056d4a64dfc90
'2011-12-30T11:34:47-05:00'
describe
'2122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPK' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4b1680c5349c0d69071870c1f120182c
2c05a46c838d1d0b7bc31602b91a0f88117f15c2
'2011-12-30T11:31:57-05:00'
describe
'10759' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPL' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
25e895de85cee23a842ba936b5165310
69d5e0c214dbc31768af023908ca4e4c6c07215b
'2011-12-30T11:32:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPM' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
52edeb3e7f69c980463b09f2a9cabf32
3e1bbb22da38141ce026f2f068bfe2162ceaed12
'2011-12-30T11:38:49-05:00'
describe
'163505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPN' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
040f381c313f6a5cfca2e1d3dd7ad789
190d646400392abc963b196d314c52e1df4a8fe3
'2011-12-30T11:35:31-05:00'
describe
'57626' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPO' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7bdcd522632d50a1caecb7c32413134d
20f72dc6bbafa2e8462c496e7db953fb1c8af61c
describe
'41323' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPP' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
347e8c09e12cebd3cac06452dff99dc1
9bf7a80555a924021df525c581dfca66b3c5b73b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e7eac1a3b478012fdd5cfadcad9d7931
774114981568b05a0067df2e9c4aedc54347a4b9
'2011-12-30T11:39:47-05:00'
describe
'2446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPR' 'sip-files00071.txt'
bff7442be9884d522f55a43d66100656
e8870e63f4fe2e38d20049309e9f4bf75b3b066c
'2011-12-30T11:33:13-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9828' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPS' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
656e664781ef910bc4ee67c8ed5c1748
de2a0cac3ebc65122634f76af7569ca8466f11e6
'2011-12-30T11:40:17-05:00'
describe
'720599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPT' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a7b2c90d22af6f4305ac38beb06d6a5f
5c1f64b4a22348a740ff3d9a2df1512cfefb2a9e
'2011-12-30T11:39:25-05:00'
describe
'163434' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7ca0e430b0c09b92669339531b703997
b4535d79d1e06952f82068bce9dff95aa9d0ae29
'2011-12-30T11:39:01-05:00'
describe
'45524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
2c02660b8554cbf37208566c73d85525
cd2bc19af0ebefb56ec87fef35b9aaec420e9272
'2011-12-30T11:32:21-05:00'
describe
'42923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPW' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
68def5ac4e4200d9cbe894e2ff4b63c4
22eb2556583232a42acaee2d7f5b1a65baf2a6da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPX' 'sip-files00072.tif'
f2dd81b6b60bf8f9e33da0b7d04ab9f8
4d741bef99f8dde932b8a887d7b703a1182694c1
'2011-12-30T11:35:41-05:00'
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPY' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c7b3578b32b49a974e0b526dd19f0916
c2abba03b988809f4d785e435d3fbfb79806dae8
'2011-12-30T11:32:15-05:00'
describe
'10353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYPZ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
651ae2b8d7b3930c16e600196f1e2ec0
bb742d0b9ab318790657398786a46f4a8e0aa663
'2011-12-30T11:34:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQA' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
de4ee7a012f18990eb2bda6b4e0b23ed
935d42df649c425fd934a288fa4d5464521da457
'2011-12-30T11:34:03-05:00'
describe
'142121' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQB' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
1d558a97b27008177cc0ca1ae5753c33
1a343ecaf45e9d79362b452bfe374df68ea672e9
'2011-12-30T11:30:43-05:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQC' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a1e7ed7116c1e2c8cc4cb36a6133f9ec
4338b8d836487a2a36beaa39a60ebc97e1991b51
'2011-12-30T11:36:47-05:00'
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQD' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
661ed65508349bb76e624f1e84f65155
3c361e0337b87f58b3e9d0ad76c80f052d394eb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
89dd4091401bc7c57bfa6b148be8c32e
dac14166c2d73ead5289c3a5a06f1033d0c132ec
'2011-12-30T11:30:48-05:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQF' 'sip-files00073.txt'
02b2eaf3084233b7d315456d3d0eb31b
5f31a53c5cfe720dff454992b1f4495a38b3d938
describe
'8541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQG' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
641bf483d78c5adbbfa77c225747badf
85c74bda4de77d722b0a94234a384adfe99e6a2a
'2011-12-30T11:40:01-05:00'
describe
'720588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a38591f7bdd7cc07da90d14bf30db2ca
d6a4258bd66fa369b531d63ed73db5e014178e80
'2011-12-30T11:31:48-05:00'
describe
'144937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQI' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6d81abde4ea72164014e93a7a54477e2
cc08b3a799d112dead3166357ae5d1389b1ff46a
describe
'66233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
93d33b9936736a0ca61619e3f30cc667
0519821f0f4b009d5c27b289ba0613f29a12e51c
'2011-12-30T11:32:11-05:00'
describe
'37793' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
478da9e5c6a171e5121fa429ea875fc4
0116ca011e109572a7dff869e2fe01a436f01d96
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQL' 'sip-files00075.tif'
73f09b8c8903a798d2326078a02c47d5
b8e281b235bb30df62aa87807a57f59f3409cf3b
'2011-12-30T11:35:25-05:00'
describe
'2689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
96190291e95820abb56de56b30860f5e
456234b541e0d1cd2941fa2776aebda7c1222883
'2011-12-30T11:33:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQN' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
93baf4d4bfd739e32b328087ab9b93bf
48fcfc65a8120aab4e1f4ee0c270038fc58f938c
'2011-12-30T11:40:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQO' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
5e5a8b3a1c09084e46632e9c211b8e09
4611f0bc83f2656873384132ab7bbde625e92012
describe
'155583' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQP' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d64fb446410d3bd5f625ec7fcd84dfe4
21f5a35a837927c3d22a652423c089a337f483f5
'2011-12-30T11:34:16-05:00'
describe
'56757' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
d8f204518eb306f08f5ec02ac3278a1a
8770796041e98caf0f1c4cd6e6143d4cb341b18a
describe
'40137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f10aa8f1b9f77228b1af9310ade0520a
44507a9743deb74016723f7633101bbbc69edbe2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQS' 'sip-files00076.tif'
a69c7c0ff641124f82e838342ae1849c
bf35d2ca00cb7ee3f6b5d442e6b362a3544c4c47
describe
'2532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
fbe2678e940908d10be41d70d841cd6f
7b5129747382520c0aa2fc2830bc36ac2c113892
describe
Invalid character
'9397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
de8e4d117b165c62ff7c80d4b9894fb1
075f32de43343518b7bc5c5c17485ccdfffb3002
describe
'720856' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
bd7d6a12b87e61808bd735ad4d4a02f3
a47788910965dbd4e881c9d721a64b5a81bc85cc
describe
'117552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
59dbe57ecf38ff52cab373dbd032d7db
7423866dcefff3fb36bfe2d08c85f98cc66b0dc8
'2011-12-30T11:38:28-05:00'
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
4b57941a76723ebe908ea742417c81a8
a3e30de192ebcce86ea4f5eecbad02c72e103549
describe
'31834' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQY' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
21213f31eb54d6817adb8168aad6d57f
460ce54d97c47d7b92d5396599330faae256614a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYQZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
94fff0b53279e1a127e9efb4b4947eee
e600ba45334d8094abcb55d523ed6037fccb1d8a
'2011-12-30T11:37:08-05:00'
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
86738b54dd1f44379c3ed0e892ccd1a3
1c396a002791935322daeb1056b2f99af7bd0581
describe
'8361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
422f516787eebae238717f7f2ec967e1
db85329491ba44599d1b5d72f83c863bbd668f80
describe
'720968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
116f897bb4afff9ee28bef1cfc82ff29
eba89f445b7c36b38ffdbfa29038eedd3de1a8f5
'2011-12-30T11:39:38-05:00'
describe
'127695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b89c788204a2e4eb2a362ac890ef8150
959143b7931d03fbd7cec00d477b454e80866b41
describe
'9291' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e7c9372eff7c959864193e4c12f93e33
5f47ec9f954bc80053bc7dcfdca8c7c0b2085e09
'2011-12-30T11:40:13-05:00'
describe
'36105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d48156b262b0a70560d9fd837c182b2b
9ae9cf280faa1f51127885634aa207d1b1c50df7
'2011-12-30T11:37:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
47f3f4c5beb0dfcae11c4288997dc8c5
b7fdc3e5f7f68b7f21bfa396291ad3e4539009e9
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
d681a155a2eefd8594a6c7449f0d8e12
c09de114265c05b1597d8b5ccfd883f3f6fa13f8
describe
'9569' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRI' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e024258d12cc4d61ce1a7844dd699014
3263d2dd0c5ff304305b48b9126439b31b0cff69
'2011-12-30T11:35:38-05:00'
describe
'720511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
11ef8ea346c4748bfb239e4544b6a07d
027063a8363c6f0634912d09c874e8116920999f
'2011-12-30T11:31:41-05:00'
describe
'126407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c8325411f25588f0b9c92b3847c6d522
6506ae8b6ae066af11843f4a74824e5724ce018e
'2011-12-30T11:36:58-05:00'
describe
'7940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
80bd2f1d9b130e224fc127abc873e9a0
441e870bfd588a9621f34d739ea9b337d93c256a
describe
'34455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
fb7ed19228286d3db1a0a1e67cebe1e2
0c9a20cf861a73b292262c62f0148d3f9ad48e0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ee38f057dec8f0b32a62ae130698ff76
96e4a968ac020816ffe8d0569078cf09817082fe
describe
'349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
09fbc132e8523d82827b41d68a6ba6d0
41229e528ca59c122a6c7f2e1fa8b1bcb23e2416
describe
'9208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
30ef6055b01a49424f6f17f5de3fd01d
e43e1e61e455976b5274a9d840c5f1330f6cc005
'2011-12-30T11:38:45-05:00'
describe
'720495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f9692a9289b659738b1efe172740b178
ade2d5d35980e1aa7993e05cdb60cc364f1dc9e4
describe
'107449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
3f2a93874005e83bc0ac1d60558238e7
83f7d77dad94b350d14455dbf66b95ccaef39702
describe
'17924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
7d0d4fdf4f2276219b51c099318a79df
c970f6e951b3838fa85e7d3cdd648ac7f7fbd31e
describe
'29035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
342cac78d6cf68c0e59c7ffbcbf80ea7
2a89983dab0b5ed4cee7bbb6618397b200576cd8
'2011-12-30T11:39:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRU' 'sip-files00080.tif'
8a9c6dddccc9d8c500d0f1206ed98cae
d4072341ff1dd66a2e40ecb4a41e1fff5be00790
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
50fc914154a225b3345be210412a41f6
cf743a96ee5a78156b74b2ea0be19316b5f4c046
describe
'7954' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
1414b7273bb1911e28eba26ea5c64079
0e3843a5cc047f7ada1dcb76f4cb89fd7108f6e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b8b3350d1176ef07cedc596d86b0df1e
983cf00bf25cbfcdb06c35defb354c506b977486
describe
'167423' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
04da36c05bdf15f0c6a68c0ff1e4ebe4
2864403d8303586d7e8cf98c6b7602205fc97c27
'2011-12-30T11:30:51-05:00'
describe
'52970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYRZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
830f09e8e30d45d99e99b43e11bd3741
702b9f953c4144e7f9aa3051499b4feb7f3ba108
describe
'43726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
715f309aca5b4c1702ebca6cc3df4ab1
3950a00680ff13907a68fbf09fcf0828abcaf376
'2011-12-30T11:35:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
16298740c02b3315505a9213ec79988e
8da8d3e61ed02901a7c2f150641f1773a21bd69a
describe
'2232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
37f4a2ba4a1dfa88e99575af3a4b26c5
d201f8637fa3a8688d6ecd79279b4b6bb0ad8766
'2011-12-30T11:31:45-05:00'
describe
'10070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSD' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
bcc1095bb14b5b6da1ddfd1b83d2b596
bbc39f45f515bf571eaac404f9ab458e979d7188
describe
'720604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f3c3fdf976e01fe32445dc15662dd1ab
6b0cb3af7d590188457b033021f9d2587498f393
describe
'156069' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
47212ea09851373fa0e015df0f89e93c
9a9ce60d6e4ccfee016a2ed500fd4df9b72b7d19
'2011-12-30T11:32:45-05:00'
describe
'60911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSG' 'sip-files00082.pro'
17b10afe63990bf41131278e3dd46bbd
6068febc782ef3c7de3263afa8bc554295d3a625
'2011-12-30T11:39:54-05:00'
describe
'39866' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
52b27f89d811b59825ff31a8fa313090
7d4acddeadda8baaf4b44a2c0fa80183cfad08f4
'2011-12-30T11:39:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
5d31a42e2eade6a2bba2290df235f2a0
60a2bf33b9ddb2c0ac8bca04a4d07691b5230224
describe
'2602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
3f79f0fdfd79ef328f0a7f6eea74643b
408c17f1c5ca5c07ceda497795df0c939a19f414
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSK' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
c29a09ecc8e3792cb6b04b6adc447d59
312fbe0e70e8e14cad3c70d1e93ba04d54e84ad0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b966c9aca8725577a8653d984848673a
4f820dbc098329baa5e1ec807d38a28457fcb268
describe
'154964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
9246df93c70bc271560b536ebef2c9ea
f5b46a1469860cd114acd8c4b9f81d1561e8590b
'2011-12-30T11:38:04-05:00'
describe
'39499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSN' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4a8961908c62c100cd091dc9e8f5291c
5b3dbba3a106a10f00ca66a7ae6f5e0998127cdc
describe
'39672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2c3280f718190053fbb515700365767a
81c4edb2d952ece9161c7110efeba61c06074e61
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f2a255becc1cabee5423d813569144ba
4a1bd0994154e05f8b54333640f6f5854b0459e5
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3f53b636b4d680f14586204a0248340a
deca3925301ee87af444ee77be07dbf03dc3cdb0
describe
Invalid character
'9613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSR' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
72d32f1ecb8baf110f94028d16e457f5
3206b940db7dc8fbd199d5432ffd5690b59f3f58
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSS' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
c80b91867c91b8031e38fcfc0e396b1d
a09b85f8b5e5e6e4ffa9bbdaccb09615df17ba05
describe
'152940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYST' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
33368ab7c581c997c81a35345a8d72a9
452389cbd9136aa8c5b2cc93bf35f0db838ac1f9
'2011-12-30T11:34:20-05:00'
describe
'48592' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSU' 'sip-files00084.pro'
cee47e3cbdcd22c2c86beaa491054795
58a91134eb464914dbdf1b6060c903a529c95dd6
describe
'40313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
effa9d3895373ba19d603aa59ab8b1ef
fdba902fc008a2b242b1335c1388821ebae8a17f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
512cad1551d60d1705ed7e11cbf0f264
fa94df7e25b9aab81563efb434ee6ef3d0ab9398
'2011-12-30T11:32:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSX' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2ee1f9e1d3942e546a7912b221f8bf2c
0d83668a4472a2cc5405eb92432339fa28d36042
describe
Invalid character
'9601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
03d7c6935dd8d6d403c6eed1b3817d83
02e5f4c3ac0186616b339a690c439fe61e51fb2b
'2011-12-30T11:37:39-05:00'
describe
'720623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYSZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
ff242086c5fed0c707b445e573d7b811
5ba83022b394f4e09c84898c3c5c8af3ef7f38a5
'2011-12-30T11:31:08-05:00'
describe
'133264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTA' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
56823cdfb7218e1e9a18030c6c0fe11b
d9e9b85d17e33156fbd969ce63a6b5f0955dcfd8
'2011-12-30T11:39:15-05:00'
describe
'24623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTB' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0c524e49a908160c685ee0b48b690193
dcd05a8117feb071f1c6fd71fee8c97c37908d28
describe
'36717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTC' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c54faa411b0c428ac9dbd27e510f7658
5cde617d977a48decbe478c3b2bd3656d6daf1f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
946c483c6fb006a5ea4267af50d347ce
75b255359f983d471ea07b7b3b00c894ac063ab1
'2011-12-30T11:39:46-05:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
0c1867e0522ca81af4dead917fac2bea
59f08144b218ebe341b33ff581d774480f36ab3a
'2011-12-30T11:36:56-05:00'
describe
'9358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1f5f63860c21f86d0e5af5363f9ed1d8
41596b9a70d1e1269b0205ad91c3247f2bf18ab3
'2011-12-30T11:37:05-05:00'
describe
'720357' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
58f9be3811d3497e07c5206253a81e8b
85a0b374f9673c324077e39f0e6be4a4bab27462
describe
'123392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
1de9f484e66210135c44620f683463b9
c300f9d645be2265b9d4f316184fa8fc192ee5dc
describe
'20670' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTI' 'sip-files00086.pro'
d03ac72ce710cbafdd41047349396bd8
b5f5a148c8b38534b35f280ce26052a948172156
describe
'32838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
f4df82c50cf2822ca51de2c2d66dc0a1
ac9b1f2e5e03d9b56a76c6d8a0d2c584d95146c3
'2011-12-30T11:35:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5e73dfce011a488314d6d5fc28f92d63
60ad7d253168dc2e24aafd368b349851fdc73b90
'2011-12-30T11:38:52-05:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
5354bbe50921b17a4a55cd43643cb310
3c272b2c38489042c6668e6fb96d30be43bc138f
'2011-12-30T11:32:29-05:00'
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
6f0e7e6a7c667edf7bb7f90245944e6b
f5baf89fe96c93e8a81ace7f67c80bb266e0c6b9
describe
'720625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTN' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
155df77600aa2c90d5ecee4dfaad9fb9
6e1efc59a3a721c71ca576340261e95a4644a118
'2011-12-30T11:38:51-05:00'
describe
'128985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
45d86ddee3c7bf58781e60ea81174fe1
96b9e1b8d5382cb317231fece8a38076782213f1
describe
'22045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTP' 'sip-files00087.pro'
311acaff1ba6dce07bbddf622ea3626d
b8a0a76007ff32cdedac84b4faacc235468045b8
describe
'34988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
749488761ab5fb4c505dd5b155dde92c
1fd9da15ba7acf43beb8d6222c79f1ead7a7555e
'2011-12-30T11:34:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTR' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8798e044c3b6c22150aea32b3cad9336
3618b01bb2cd0f52ca8f34cda1bf4cf246c8f0ea
'2011-12-30T11:35:43-05:00'
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTS' 'sip-files00087.txt'
0a90acaccd92dce5e64b9fa90b97ed9b
fb595c85014f30cec4306739153c5c0e87f78e5b
describe
'8924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
df3ac004d5ba5d48686662e7dc679803
49c0fcd386e2659b8769a82759f3626495133f6f
describe
'720559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTU' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fa6e0f416051cd69659ff2d523dde11d
fecbfa5d308cd5cf53c7467719bfe57254db5070
'2011-12-30T11:37:06-05:00'
describe
'118918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTV' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
df65e6cd52f5c669292df9f403890548
05974091d4d8a10a3006160cf370aa0e5a4283b4
'2011-12-30T11:33:17-05:00'
describe
'17896' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTW' 'sip-files00088.pro'
ff9180ed27d54e0d4686e1fe1f76022b
b47e838be6eaf422e566b4751f4f499767a33a44
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTX' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
385091fca7bda15dbd1956aa36f70c73
ad424bcb2319144a94d85a8a7ada0018b0945088
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTY' 'sip-files00088.tif'
baa4f3aa751d7423fab7c168070ea0d9
6ca4913a09d579769aa969ab6174f6ab9c52b3a3
'2011-12-30T11:38:13-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYTZ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
01ee233615a94ec1d25638bab7b6104f
af8146bd1ff1c8e50f3b274fa0d0bbfe6ec94852
describe
Invalid character
'8613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUA' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2110144399deffc4935ff7fe353a0c5f
35520c08e6524c1f80a196bd02d2faf5669aa160
describe
'720571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
df9103b10b5c647ed7f89f083176c948
f94b75029d4825619c43e92e39143b31df184f28
describe
'116732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUC' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
6497c79a9b47b66a89201bebbbebb443
d56d6e982e39bf4c4259cead3946f462d2cfdf85
'2011-12-30T11:36:57-05:00'
describe
'11587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
5b1cd34bc50ac210d7daa2f5234f12db
207fc48b9fab192cedd297f4709b65738d557c3c
describe
'31485' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
788b91fa2e29072470ed135e83bbd73f
2c9b21e7341f930c37fdb5a74c6c8d244088b8d7
'2011-12-30T11:35:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUF' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8673b99cb8db884512bce71c0e5b7655
0ba4202bfa27a0e08f5943f3fb1717d2f3276cff
'2011-12-30T11:37:30-05:00'
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
96b36b4910c13b3e19e6293353c279a7
d9661c68359beb3888b2f54b11b17b0ef7625e69
describe
Invalid character
'8128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
796245eb6751115727fe59450c9286b0
68faa75837855d32f2786a4d139603387ef9bc51
describe
'720445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUI' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
48389bd8f1c3f454dd1b312708ad8de6
e5a65f033a82b4017b9c2a8fb99d31523d8f3e9f
describe
'101576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUJ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
de937e3b6d662ac81e2231c5d17a4d62
d586d2fafa0ed41412ffa53d5c53300b945aedf5
describe
'10206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUK' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e7f7cc31059b383806248068627559a1
b7d563f0841a6771cb31638e5059e15c2dfbd5c6
describe
'27742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUL' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
c36534155418eeea8559c919619bffdb
98b5c686b9ab7f503f731d2e3c4cb691fda1e143
'2011-12-30T11:33:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9032448f66d83001a30db4c3e89fc401
0874f16ad136a18272518b9ddd78b13b415b11a2
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e9fe15bd1a47bfdcf14eaec90402f44c
4ae8dfdff55231a62f6376c34879e254e6be05f2
describe
'7401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUO' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
32b5dad1c4813e97efb64078dca42935
cad4b36829f6f6b9bc7116cad9ebc393410c71a6
'2011-12-30T11:34:50-05:00'
describe
'720616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
be4fbefcf3ff133d2e823b59dee01383
df596416dd9efc37c564807920250184136fe768
'2011-12-30T11:36:01-05:00'
describe
'148291' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
83d92189833747ea79f317e9766ae464
b0ee1539eab58436f27d6797c0ed39b8c310bc9e
describe
'30838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUR' 'sip-files00091.pro'
501756accb6edd4f702bbffa448ecac9
de241966a0f6d39564e0c1fecec10630ffd7cfd1
describe
'40422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4ac46dcc9fc056a0b23cbd2bc0cb0ffd
470d5784558060539d00691f30454c3263fdf53e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e7e1f9763ef8a7ca554bfc11f70c344d
920631ef8546f04b18e70f993a757771f0c3bfd2
'2011-12-30T11:33:24-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c549390ce79eaaa98773c175497d7da3
447a59957863af4276d0b362bb90ff3ca1d011f1
'2011-12-30T11:33:53-05:00'
describe
'10478' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
4528fe34fadee4fd9e9c67cbfc594e9c
e8bb3b1128fbcbe1aecc53223fc812bf2453ee09
'2011-12-30T11:33:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUW' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1fb3838e58dd0ae31cb65329ec00e90f
febe69f6fba5da8e40fc32f8538f104f3b805dc4
describe
'155145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUX' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
74d9545924ea2060e2a32243481a943f
910abea561d44eeb84524703ca307175afeb2fef
describe
'66030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUY' 'sip-files00092.pro'
564718084d337fb3e54a96096c57bdaa
3fba4084df650a5de403de294e05b0a1f4e7e9ef
describe
'40648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYUZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
59f2eb2894ce733a1f20b538705ef409
7de37b18c5e8b7d46306871c5e2753772025f7ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVA' 'sip-files00092.tif'
27e4b9825fd561dea4182399ae3a4897
e6a6165be90a63d24d6e1cd48297ce262fe475da
'2011-12-30T11:35:05-05:00'
describe
'2729' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
fc862c3696935fdfa3dc2637ea879914
73bff31f08ac6f657299e0b59281a87f1b62f781
describe
'9811' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVC' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3f00d8c7f89f6d6656575770795700c7
5e1b2ae760f0c389b77964775a50aef452d817b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVD' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2ed912d6bb658f01d74902f0437a0cf0
d92cefc7f35615b8096def7a80400540e3c496b3
describe
'131848' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVE' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
7ed702aa0399cc94dda00d16a9202115
258b825c2d797a28b425cc4e4689fb04a872ce08
describe
'47157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c96bf76b7fbd1ceacbb4e1b527e4858c
e2e139b11cba7d5a97a1fb7f79769c711b53594c
'2011-12-30T11:32:41-05:00'
describe
'36655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVG' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
f57de062523fca6a56f5900b0f090661
812d3f66d9dc64fd706aa376d9896c35a60ae51d
'2011-12-30T11:36:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVH' 'sip-files00093.tif'
ff66b6393617404596faaa04d9c0d20a
05c0bd252a6112a5b2a274b95b4086905089fd6d
describe
'2274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVI' 'sip-files00093.txt'
e5a3ce465a5e4594d6d5efe9d47e2dcd
c81debc494cfed3302cda3c34bb96e1461a516c9
'2011-12-30T11:39:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8852' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVJ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b0c549dfd27c28347f0bacec61ab94e5
bc3a5fa5c010587b79bbcead99476e2342f3e55d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVK' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
904769568cc076ee3d456c1d5a772293
92d66f68554944a03d3c362f1ed0aa51ffffff7e
describe
'119183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVL' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
78ba4888467c830857b83705c52cff18
cc5bd6fbdf3eef422a61fc7b64f3ebf2e569213e
'2011-12-30T11:33:42-05:00'
describe
'6535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVM' 'sip-files00094.pro'
efcef1007280f38b6d9748602cbdf43a
2508d6847968deaf72baf249ef99bf39b8253727
describe
'32255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVN' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c7d6a291c43961241d46229841a25718
0cb4a1f382ed7a39cfa566d2c241671ad88f8d2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
c9de38773cc85f657f0ff7d9cf8ca127
32df79d546c6a3b2f0655b0f438c97c27ee24550
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVP' 'sip-files00094.txt'
76e56117c45d01a803adced5f0f99797
095eb2dfc0b3e118dfd2bede46c55996787a1fb6
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVQ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
dd29578f77d52206f8b52d2db43a895e
5c8038867ed3b27b976ebbac382b54689452c923
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVR' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
33bdda20a9b964a29b0f897952b2c245
69145b0883cddf993264abe49a393f77934d4ab6
describe
'148411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVS' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ff8f28404d85b8ad4253c287ad6c2622
849b9e20b80adcb7f652da53e5f3aeefadc03d10
'2011-12-30T11:34:02-05:00'
describe
'18211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a92a2db7507af42c2625f56b98e25e8e
cc582e7e324c748829c230e05175d75110c1de61
'2011-12-30T11:33:51-05:00'
describe
'40771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVU' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
9183fd25de42f17b6f3f9f878fd78880
a58e79a20efcbd6f3f33a9b238cb9812cc096211
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVV' 'sip-files00095.tif'
112d86bc0eaf94f3102e391379c5dcaa
994156a23c9b4c84ff5073129a4a63b07f704c49
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
029824d748dff51576576fc68abe2922
7813c7a44a59009412c5c49443e5aee7c67b90ec
describe
'10613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVX' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
1bf8c91805a721378a05c712e5833536
30ac0f4d83cf01c5dbf635987b80a92a9792368e
describe
'720619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
6329135cadf88ab23649b6533744f7f3
12b3f0381b48e10e8b593fd2717eb294cfb8ecce
describe
'139723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYVZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
92957aa3e1be068b95bc154669052e85
7c3e88e4437f213b1aa17dffc2fe31927a0a48b4
describe
'18035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWA' 'sip-files00096.pro'
fd7c120aaa88ac9acb24e6fdbbb1a6c7
453ce3e245cb7c431be7427fa3e8b09645c0981e
describe
'38748' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0b55ee1f74bfdcc928c6f422a13122b7
89df0598200e327f88b001670c33ec8d17a01583
'2011-12-30T11:40:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7ac516fd6194fa5704c7099be52f9777
3116601462950ddc732fc9e959281bda3dbe5eca
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWD' 'sip-files00096.txt'
24b6c5d28eb228dada30402e32635dc4
7063e0040ab60aa722da4da687022a09e12783f1
describe
'9882' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
af195e0866d02388a3753e5708c76085
4e0778b48de6cef0a3fc849beb17b49fb4e2fd6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWF' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
7929230edf07567dcf768fea16ec1c94
734cf1b8323d35c262f4a4dcc13af1320fea6a62
describe
'152071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWG' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
463b96d910ef89c41ec3a745f54d82b8
4affeb4b7cc852ec5881bff43d525ac436dc3289
describe
'16093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
da3e9ae485ee26655d2fe3b3cbc51487
264f1351a39fe30d3c613578ef7a327747992fe7
describe
'41070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5e5fd20f9be213610d5f531a256dfde0
b6ae5f564c0b2d9e9296078ec84d6279138f5944
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
0316569c3c3c8e5a949afc47b25eba00
1d8ed32c3d4e609e0defd7c59d3105fe3798ef16
'2011-12-30T11:35:09-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a802e66ef4d52577894fdade63af9aa8
ad1ee2aa7a988371e6f1286f2383a3a0b5105250
describe
'10722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWL' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
3d7fe50910010245f019e7b8f7d8a5aa
9ab7debc3d99df6d5ac8e6e7be5c4a761b760935
'2011-12-30T11:37:32-05:00'
describe
'720628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
b25c95c4b376a765d48a209219a9656a
e0678a68b558a7bab272200c2144077282c9785a
describe
'142320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWN' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
62ac7ec4c709bd7e45bd187d0bf55215
02845ab0243c1d5c38c44d5c9a5accfcf232a46e
describe
'48228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWO' 'sip-files00098.pro'
8f8c5cbcb17588624e08f2d9314d5080
fe732dfd8eb3745f4049e6b81c3adde0ea63f8b1
describe
'38075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWP' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b42688dd49f062c318c91e579fd36ca2
9d4e5043db88266d7b9050a4f8022652fa05235e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWQ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ec7d649c5f1afca899459c61b41c4c97
d316c98634fe6b58926007265a690dcdd647f060
'2011-12-30T11:31:00-05:00'
describe
'2248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
5d97829194ab336da75afff2927b0c1c
0ceecc72cfbcba3e8c2d786751c8201b0fe2179c
describe
Invalid character
'10198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWS' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
eaf32c61eb6101afb41a47448a285e18
c02a4d11fe2b239973bc62838c9847866e0e6160
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWT' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d74010fe461a6bdc6288b67d5c2e63df
08119124d382909826584cefe53ea5ebbba0d9af
describe
'148888' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWU' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0a964965d16d7e3b41ca026e08e2af7c
87325a7ed3ff0f55109399a53381caad1f5d68f4
describe
'57197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
1bf492bc034cdd3e1d734642b19f2aad
745ea1d4b95febf79bd02f0b940d44342e0c46bd
'2011-12-30T11:39:21-05:00'
describe
'40184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWW' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c7d16d99be144edb431cbc48286615ad
a5208dfdd93f9fea38024b61f562bba25e0571e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
afe4ee518b983d182d0a8d9a8ae23e75
762f67ba3750a7a7460b3e84d0fee4e110ad8127
'2011-12-30T11:38:06-05:00'
describe
'2373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c821a3154bb8ffac6e13d82241318cec
44ad862e364e24a48c9c715bc8348c36f9ca376f
describe
'9759' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYWZ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b6ffe1add773beb59b8632b5963a409a
137fcda62c2278211c221211d54a30440dee18e6
'2011-12-30T11:37:53-05:00'
describe
'720355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXA' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
b43a5ff37bd16c4c417ab86ce5b04141
85ac3dbc585ea6f0e05e4cab0b116c1521f97f95
describe
'148377' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
dbc1d667f5c90b1cffd3e7aad4524636
41304ff6214b74df5d68017800318fd626b0c39d
describe
'55457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXC' 'sip-files00100.pro'
07c6bf481dc7b35edb93fd0fe0745c15
ff769cb55865cee521458bb60eac65984f2cae09
'2011-12-30T11:40:23-05:00'
describe
'38374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
17d107a72bec49652d20aeb0f09eca2e
07b555881436b40ec9dbb03144258c2dee5e9081
'2011-12-30T11:31:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXE' 'sip-files00100.tif'
30a44beb06be9c07a59e251778684dc3
17927cd331596c2a64ddc619f470eec985ffb838
'2011-12-30T11:38:50-05:00'
describe
'2523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXF' 'sip-files00100.txt'
8318eaad3a1c7c20137e4ef9a63aa260
e7449f804b6394fb7e782ccef439b94a1992a1cb
describe
Invalid character
'9448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXG' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
851002a3f365a3d7260361c11877e0dd
546b89f94cf0aa74950d430cac3140ab451d8fa7
'2011-12-30T11:39:09-05:00'
describe
'720191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
59c358aab1190db980bab70762fcb1b0
ba4e1b902005bd4559e511ab1461723d2f4d2ac8
describe
'127773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXI' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
5873787450316c53ef090155e4b9e2df
f10546e03cb16ba2e62d8e5ef129c6916f7a936a
describe
'28551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
825d08f161bbf7fdb4057a80318a430c
84de3feda8af003add49f42d83edeede71d410d0
'2011-12-30T11:38:35-05:00'
describe
'33714' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
4b149f3aa105fa9501b8006ef314f4b7
758727b2b512d87f844c1964487f978afcc91de9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
9a193f37afae8e13c4e38966e83b7343
00efe34ff9869a327037555893fa56fb95c3dffa
'2011-12-30T11:32:25-05:00'
describe
'2200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXM' 'sip-files00101.txt'
feb63ef99c0fcdbf5c670eaf519eb775
12b0397a8c26836ced6e2b819c2acb148dac4a41
describe
'8766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXN' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
c5d2df71a10a97d68b6080ef8a834fe4
60c43bdd71f107758bf98e2fa3e2f34b7a2276e8
describe
'720421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXO' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
acb596f7cba8eec3b2c7d65c1615f1a8
3c24bb4e34a200463d6edcbef01cc47fdbd8f789
describe
'148535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXP' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
4d5b330d795d5770056e8aeb62f1d088
305ab2d0542a7a21f5ad7094b1195ee8777db92a
'2011-12-30T11:31:54-05:00'
describe
'5713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
8d5c3385c27033bd29bd85c38b97d449
a32ee40ce504b2bad372d579a18bacfad238517b
describe
'40723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
9788d8c0ee3ee0b086de288c17890ab0
c7f60f37a8ace79ba2c43ff3d2583fc4c8d2bba8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXS' 'sip-files00102.tif'
542b20a1faea96b85edf0da27cc20a03
ef8ce9e192bf2361c48c8b790553a120120ec471
'2011-12-30T11:35:16-05:00'
describe
'256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXT' 'sip-files00102.txt'
1cef7667ead884d2453cbfb9d57de71f
050b2a834c3263be7bf172d4add32575b6f0fa4e
describe
'10782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
216c0058c6a6c0753ada208f67356976
f04861e14359da1ec1b8a37effb9ad645534aa1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
5f22dec7919db4edbadf93969f412129
18cb4ceb982c6248b8500737558e0c7ef8096dad
describe
'136322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXW' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
90b3a094fdee83852f76efbb668330a8
bd0c327015aacfff31de9de894db509592287e4f
'2011-12-30T11:36:11-05:00'
describe
'6795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
478716bad07cc933fdf1e84e3696249f
e6587ed98ee85c54091031abc2850a0fa5f6f3f4
'2011-12-30T11:34:11-05:00'
describe
'38132' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXY' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
6bb0782297d4c357bd11c8882932c504
01b2591ef85890fc4e9eeadfa7af890e52004878
'2011-12-30T11:32:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYXZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
9266972f09b0673b29db48c7b6999a75
3ff6a16092fe7f40fe13dd08020e307d8a20b57e
'2011-12-30T11:34:19-05:00'
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYA' 'sip-files00103.txt'
1d2facf40000f60896762a96e7a50de3
16e262f411ad3d6b37853a03c19032e5ec757d8c
describe
'9961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYB' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
6c8cd8ccfe25d52ca121d14444e6fc8e
631fdea71b3d1e36c4ab3e7427e4848e34f2abdf
'2011-12-30T11:33:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
78b235d76aa5e7dc332dffdd0a8cda6b
c89ffe12d48cc4cdf31bfd4aea9a69f8e6cf0906
describe
'156177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYD' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
7fb1fe681e20956bfb9c5ced0c16633d
570ee296e6d537b0c3174e9c47bb18a37561cba6
'2011-12-30T11:37:07-05:00'
describe
'52427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYE' 'sip-files00104.pro'
687207bed31390ba81735d0d895385dd
d9b677ec712b310a3776d018b29131f1fcef9795
describe
'40028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
09142bf9933bee6e3b37f35d87fe9e70
021f719310b16fc94e1454cbdcc048e822755659
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYG' 'sip-files00104.tif'
95a2b5bcc5a00dbac5a9d5f676478fcd
8b2650eb724e040a4c37b124fd3254228d2944a2
describe
'2479' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
97847d75bc4b71f84eaf41bc40be9ee5
142e0ebc4c8c91557af43f05602f9f376758ace1
'2011-12-30T11:31:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYI' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
0ee1a2502287ba910aab2c26ba8b371b
0b60fde204218c0701a455ef7478df5aa80c940e
describe
'720532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYJ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
6531752fb737df9fb7cf8358d35fa80d
19bd987e23fb960b36e4b34f207b545f8c39ef4d
'2011-12-30T11:32:31-05:00'
describe
'163568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYK' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
a44f51a99dbcb11c1ae0573cbca93585
b7988350368b1d94500fdd7e809a187a02b6c94b
describe
'52224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYL' 'sip-files00105.pro'
711f1dc96ac59481e25cea849e99f584
0d2817d13554f48dd8a0520ac6c743f799af7159
describe
'42453' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
737395e2e4f929330375641b87b2cdca
f23c5dbb5c75806dbccd5172479c668c97928b0f
'2011-12-30T11:36:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYN' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e9ad64cb6bdc0ccc7c4b9d401422e1db
42cd3d343da39fa8e8af16660e2d1c306b265f30
'2011-12-30T11:40:15-05:00'
describe
'2405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
d97799175b91e118d811914d702ac23c
02dda0f8808f50571992f296a283a1ec14a12d0b
describe
'9637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
e01ca5b98f7a51bbf0aa5798d7e6d61c
4c5ba7743e99f62f45a0900d448f4b260417d4e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
dc5739daad4f80092e961c918f388b60
719b79a694f4e31556779a575408b332f1c19c82
describe
'115385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYR' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4b67ee14331faa5a1321bf81383baa58
7b7faf77354e245d4777fefb35fea0c967a1a077
describe
'16925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
645820b7c2198beba40103aa3299f387
7c7f775f910ca2911ee6e56c642a511b035433e4
describe
'31029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
8e4dc36e1fe0e18f12ffbf82c285c2ec
007647428ee18b9e95b24000eac2fa0c402bd7f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYU' 'sip-files00106.tif'
fea54f42459e963480ce8a9f10e98d90
f010f9137bdb97302af283bcab7c0d6c82c453b3
'2011-12-30T11:36:53-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYV' 'sip-files00106.txt'
f52657eace58ab9f46144ac02f159614
56734abd06eb5bec9bd6d13f7355918be845d5ad
describe
'8136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYW' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
108f7730e209f8462f4d058416ba0808
eb84a1b8ca710da185ad85a2170ef82b3d463830
describe
'720530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
5198d877745409c26e0bad34fc7fb376
ccc607b35045bc14335c4a4aaf3405f3b65b8a0d
'2011-12-30T11:40:08-05:00'
describe
'155675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
024d5ef9a5016a5cecf7b3d172233a4c
f9de88014884854a004c81f3b632c53431aa86a3
'2011-12-30T11:32:43-05:00'
describe
'51430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYYZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
a531c81836be443d917983dbcaa18166
6ef802d76a83e91496f6dede343334b947da029c
describe
'40411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b2f1f7a8c8b5295e753e058284572f3a
0646e649af3452e0b807567c73f6bdd6b6558c27
'2011-12-30T11:31:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
9d383eade4fb33c3fc35d266c71b8bd3
52b68b9270493e84694f0912d075e46d569b3098
describe
'2148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZC' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0d2db4672c996dfd2ad745f917fd7448
4c9dac67a1ec73a576c0b4f7bfaab47906143313
describe
'9533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZD' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
de3e4b2bfde409eb7d9a66da73022364
c55051000043d54bafad17efee382c38fd9b72f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f8efe7993ae8978f72da67d48dc1b7b5
456b4664241ccee9b7add080d01cf88885ab1708
'2011-12-30T11:36:34-05:00'
describe
'159054' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZF' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
bc83b7de5e8ba0c4a03fef1f0a820d31
182e8dfe058ba269259de5c4cc609310e1e436f7
describe
'65308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZG' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b7bc16d043a931652b90b87db1192657
5044ff0909dc3d9f5d42cb0a54d1b75638809891
'2011-12-30T11:30:41-05:00'
describe
'41439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
860bb1d761e574ecf801a5775c37c0bb
8daebaf5609d46b3d5445efa7c24903b429fa990
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZI' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b45f1c4ed67f9c7f90df4351ba4438e8
126a67dd73d8f97956740a0dfa9399ec7d1007ba
'2011-12-30T11:34:17-05:00'
describe
'2871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
24ac48be49d98d591656f12357a57b11
1446168aa30ee9c50425b678b80d1516df816818
describe
Invalid character
'9700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZK' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ebfcd96dc2a5334de79bc96620834dbf
11dbdb975ee622ca85bb8c72e1459ba3d6097121
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
b9abe5fbb1cf66c25c986f60ec9e812f
59bbd78871de1cb1a366d45f0a4fef20e13727b2
describe
'153471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
ee6236afb693356149cd2472521e9b16
41eb112b2df761aa2ed4e2a30a50b39691f1dee4
'2011-12-30T11:34:43-05:00'
describe
'43958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZN' 'sip-files00109.pro'
cf46cc0f8d6b6bd7fcd59751d46c4b0a
177b3cdad52ac74a80e38e8190353de3d0bc4c3a
'2011-12-30T11:34:52-05:00'
describe
'41621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZO' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
3ef79cf4d7189f58a49ae8fc0d6fcf05
ed5671301e8bd52bb7a3624e44d5596fc9b68d39
'2011-12-30T11:35:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZP' 'sip-files00109.tif'
1db8e04fb70dc44c82c2059cf5bf5e84
0529ce34570a26c6290436780499db0fcb66acbb
'2011-12-30T11:35:52-05:00'
describe
'1946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
19db48a8e222bbb26523be1d1e1ae1a7
ba218849f58eb19bff908a9ee14717500031be81
describe
'10227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZR' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
d02c558c597f400f71919761d0fa629d
9aab44357c1b345e069c8d744bd86ae888727a5a
'2011-12-30T11:33:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZS' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f85a7e068081ee9807ca262d2a9c1d82
8ca7c7679d8c1d99d587b1595655a09afd0fcdcb
describe
'130606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZT' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
44ca48d82f2160bde5f9501496a1c899
35a577d46c22bb868965193b960218e3dd7a9429
describe
'9911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZU' 'sip-files00110.pro'
371ab9b002a5c3c622d54096b3bd19b5
bf59f9af3d48c96edaa9a6b424aee5e14a8b6372
describe
'37277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
879e291f86997715b0ec463df4f738fa
35380bbe46ba46c576c24fbebeaf11ff0fbbefef
'2011-12-30T11:32:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
9a7899262892bfdb38b16f4bf60ac4ba
c5a80654944187b45aa16d2b5c46ac3d5e5aca52
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
905681af092a5275834d9f2305a6a702
74267d1a6ebdea77aac0504f2d6019571733e4dc
describe
'10333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
10527705816dabbd5113e835b23d57a6
47691aeaea89573393597fe052f3740beaebb439
describe
'720603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABYZZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
abbc6ab483637d5d2220ebb98831497e
6e71b24321c61f716169b250ec3df57bd1d4de21
describe
'130872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
503336cc55c56e2ac19fdebee0a731a9
2bfa42786b400446294f985dc75bf2ef9ed19d4d
describe
'8584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAB' 'sip-files00111.pro'
c034bd7eb0dc719e75f351c1884a8d82
ec5541f6102a7eb62d70f8446685cc04aa0571f0
'2011-12-30T11:37:58-05:00'
describe
'37982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
3090b488c28fa517d8d9677c9b0ba5a3
01ce5c459bcb0816879254506f68f80b7b0d74a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAD' 'sip-files00111.tif'
a8ae14e711b5695e9bc2050a4a6e5ea3
a53c3469232c2b2174bcb079104559a264b24ea0
'2011-12-30T11:38:43-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c2dc4e9665cf534f3e08c787d0883743
9846cb683abacc80f751929074f8427d2ba949ce
describe
'10342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
24e223f5b247bb4cdc73b63bd726aba5
cfc56cf614c73b8edf02427f9b1548a966973ac6
'2011-12-30T11:35:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAG' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b81e2c1219dbfdda226350563a20e89d
8888cd35b09f48d29de513589c6ba74f8f4ba2db
describe
'133201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAH' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
5013cadb14a109681a1791802b7d0f8a
958cf6e96053753b1f9d0cae34ebb1cfcff4741c
describe
'16364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAI' 'sip-files00112.pro'
995e24633b47b1301cd3ec94b1d41a8c
2393ce76534a5862c4e9073463e8e3396e76c3a0
describe
'35475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
7a674c5230a9926c3a82e9518b37a839
494f660d5292baf3c718721f1ffc339b4a46b79d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
ba360d783900ee8a5269a1af3b11f7b3
89784af7f04b22c20e46840d00082bcd36c4da89
'2011-12-30T11:34:51-05:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
a1944c3df81d0b59863c72a625ff5a23
ac9481fd62b4737868affb6e826520c53b8a5e4d
'2011-12-30T11:37:24-05:00'
describe
'9315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
bea41fba6225711ffdca52cfa83d80aa
49299143c9b316f2da5d45e1b4c2de3d0ca10155
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
cbeecd4251d91a51211a07209ee1c791
1b6d61fbbe171acb4b0bec7f4636d8d1f99176f5
describe
'143929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
3688c23759d3cd8df6d63d2b8dab4fe9
16d9016780c55c0c905acc2a6aae5a806d63ad40
describe
'17333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
dd1de2002f28ecb514156b921bc09ceb
a3dd5d4098c90de1fbfeddef3397e3d1866d5e06
describe
'37604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
92540ff5ddaff65768e79bb73dbaf1d8
0a9a9f77239944478d2b1b3d6c1c1451ad851b22
'2011-12-30T11:38:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
7c63cc377544829fff14faafe2bd7cbb
bfc28b7e0ad1745085854b7a9b64455147be2972
'2011-12-30T11:30:50-05:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
2fa049887dd27a8aa8cec48ec8f47789
47a0a4d642e7896046da67b425c45275dd9e835b
describe
Invalid character
'9443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
bb7a84b123b434a139dc7c919e4fb25c
efaaa2d4729847f65238d39be365043daeb4b071
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
cf607ad58846a04894d4278fb62a797b
b804e13a93bb7fb04121a2a7437f2c79e5499258
describe
'151487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1c74ce9ded452b7c37143dbd0aa6780f
2d4d1b4e219c664f962f1ce1faabb1ce8afdfc24
describe
'20587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
65689ad6136a91b2a81fc1907f8cfb92
8d0341971c5f4c45d23db72a429cf3f5a84d75c4
describe
'39172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAX' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
b0ead65bdadf337f53d8770468c91bff
f8c4826ee36712fd09768e066ae436754602bef3
'2011-12-30T11:33:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
33b968bc149f04aab29231e765741b1a
30a72bfa1ac8c20848892fa9b327ea527f9e73f0
'2011-12-30T11:37:04-05:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZAZ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d74e0f2f9e55b2daedd624657daa401b
d59733a1ebeb0187c452a3d0e7328d892e2131e6
describe
'9844' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBA' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
6b17b1e354ba9d563d2e492f5228223d
a3af3071c9957ce80f4567dfc71b4bb3097d3ebd
describe
'720563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBB' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
175280d12845002266830a7193b139f9
e67b5eb20e4b2e874dbd01f10aee50437e111f3a
'2011-12-30T11:37:48-05:00'
describe
'150522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
10492d3f1e0413e061aaf000a828dea7
b1de9a56dc23c31443d642fd8b44fc425755e516
describe
'50150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
4aab8f204f1684cbf43b645e8b3d189e
3fbda964c3554eeb861cad4beb4e7ec30a2e117f
describe
'39118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
9ec8d7971062c8760bb7c3e14ec5879d
6dd206eeaf942518214bb645591e0a657c0a7923
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
ca6a6616aa3f6d15726b9adea05ced09
6e4b25cb401c5c630d3d80608caf9c2604b809bf
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBG' 'sip-files00115.txt'
9bc73a6413752ec7be137e3edcbeedf3
925ed3ff3ce36daf9a0fe2461cb3d9922c1be2de
describe
'9840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
0c9e80ddd3097e19b916ec118e5f1ff8
c3a8b5b29b2b0f507d035ba8ce24635b4f1bab97
describe
'720570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
a0f3270875081400d3829a304d850ca2
6c52fbb6ea944c1c4adcdf8c0601d3276b4a99c7
describe
'118373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9fe84c4d0fce9dd6a0c99f5110557a6e
dba5798777505dc997edda3b759962b3bae48681
'2011-12-30T11:39:05-05:00'
describe
'7248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
47eecd628cc7de910607ea968c021950
a6b1fa1a405075fe68f799c7f912360f56c88895
describe
'32177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a598ac6632dfcb3a74fc3cb5b54df32b
0afae268dc8bec36c05137f7f70ed29f22cf8703
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBM' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0c86c1df5aa741175ba7eea9d9532300
83a14db4f5d34093ddc3f17194014624ec68753d
describe
'321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBN' 'sip-files00116.txt'
958bcfbce12f2068e1816b68c068fd05
4b39954837387d29bd7e43cacf04bb64ce3c5c74
'2011-12-30T11:30:36-05:00'
describe
'8928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBO' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
554d0fc783a975b01dbcc635cf4d30ff
e0f714913fb6213376418a6717d0c885b08104cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
16685cf4a47941ef6a4eaf24026539ca
694ecb819df0339585316816901b490ba27c2713
describe
'104399' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8900b9abb3b3605adb66710582d7d02e
ecadfa6405f1910d7bfba4441ec71ac789c77676
'2011-12-30T11:32:12-05:00'
describe
'8549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBR' 'sip-files00117.pro'
e9728d64dc0d9a7e3f76b8b5aaefb87b
936313a18785334bfda9d66d1683bbb8abbd0055
describe
'29037' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBS' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
79dabfa828ec91aec3cfb08ce85678f3
788ecf399ab445360ee2ae9d8036542145301931
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBT' 'sip-files00117.tif'
dc49e47a1767b7fa8d5fd2161879d8e5
eae0e43273eba4ad7b74aef6ff2586597ac88a54
'2011-12-30T11:34:22-05:00'
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b49dc275ff18a1a56d597c349688769e
f17bd85273c691b31a420da37503c2bbb4a8965e
describe
Invalid character
'8253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
c7ff938119497b1b98303ea2ea6c2982
630fa8614c2f925171bc938f976774dbbcd0430d
describe
'720482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBW' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5cd7a2cadc569ddf72b5856caea42787
d40bbb4e5e851c254b20058e428646a8b08d8af1
describe
'130932' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBX' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
af6fc7da0cde4b7f60d369e844bfdd85
8a0e3d881c14d0b3ecb07545a7e09bd13e57742f
describe
'20846' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBY' 'sip-files00118.pro'
143accf45b320c2d55d54cd4836cd9f7
aabb6ebf674aec02d6b88d7c22670f0cf3351b91
describe
'36240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZBZ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
862d457e5f5ba3fd60b5de024b43cf44
fbbeab38702087124ac021a39484829e53fe86e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCA' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d13a7f676617caf060805ef57282c338
1447c6657ebf4fb16bb292b5b4793c3f9e703314
'2011-12-30T11:31:34-05:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCB' 'sip-files00118.txt'
754a46c2ba19c2b0b59d1b8615556977
1e6d3a3a358f316d74a7cd5e1193cac5525a1af6
describe
Invalid character
'9680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e5c1fb3473cfafa0fe45c6978252377e
7445d50e4bd7d41ba9643c46f82420a130c288b2
'2011-12-30T11:33:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCD' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
c2e9c0249bc992a8fe8425ea28a4e5b9
6dae64a7e8b66ccb964469580f0ba613ddead647
'2011-12-30T11:34:13-05:00'
describe
'123661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCE' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
35b2206629fdc7ba6597054b518e173e
00a3fc60bd0905cb23673fdc3fecca80b52d5b87
describe
'14058' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
ef9d89749ad7251db7fd1ed387ad648a
fd1d26836323186500bbc672bb014607c3c459c9
describe
'34860' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCG' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
10ffc26e82c292641561154648252a90
c719e9308b3d12e3d8857761fda07e734e1a75c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCH' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3c86491c352b2793d744f64e667627d4
d3f1d505a3c1c28efd63d875aadefb8392e3b90a
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCI' 'sip-files00119.txt'
38ecf4059f06aeef212663d5876044a0
e7129d7b645e62b7de17a0b370d31f572e51be38
describe
'9273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCJ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
8919ab22afc7e7178c06a7c99f0e7dcb
6aadcd8e16dedbf3ee8f0d3bdbdf7593e5f0a746
'2011-12-30T11:32:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
affcc59a2ca2b7295b30fd54fca2f19d
488698b1dd59c81902a9ef2683c764e88c922b39
describe
'142086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
afcbe9c3dff3410c762301e0e1245638
399e513b5d07ee600e77c309b5a0718fe3e15eb8
describe
'22412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCM' 'sip-files00120.pro'
63d100303e8d4cc20b18b6c0a448c6be
292c16937937da9df614164d2bdea476660b2e5c
describe
'38213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCN' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
c0d9e61a13a6bc910c41040c8ff840a7
c15ce4594de6a2174a4272572af8e846f6ea6eb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ee8e3d0615bfe69589ae9ff6843b6a70
5498e286384b88f9e650d55cab860e6b7c62926c
'2011-12-30T11:40:19-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
db1dcef8196e8f8daa3fa19863546aab
9f80212d87bc8f0a234cd355b27c6f0973af3d5a
describe
Invalid character
'9636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCQ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
20832c5ad21ccb6c65942aac555a6bfb
ac7db5ff25ccc3d1bbee54ae1cbbe45f4184f541
'2011-12-30T11:31:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCR' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
0922ac757665ebda64f03b39718834fc
49ac4da337e83e65cd0f2278b6c9dcbea62b5274
'2011-12-30T11:31:55-05:00'
describe
'149570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCS' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
5047a9de6d0aadca0b8ee152580fd59a
8bd6c6a4faba427303941a23bd49a9ee07d365b2
describe
'22682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCT' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fc2c0f8a7e51c9d2eee65b073f958e76
b4f94ec3ae2f81bfe0febec3f35c7de61b2a9e7d
'2011-12-30T11:38:38-05:00'
describe
'40929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCU' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
8494633c3d6d49672fca83f364f9c4c2
cd2c9f39f4a280d1e3fe06584f565928716f5937
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCV' 'sip-files00121.tif'
6fedaa52e142bc41e19cadbfd1b8a63d
32806c88a2efeba18fd6d4fde45a8ce39a32e860
describe
'1870' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5c32d560518a11f31c61d705b4c0b6b8
3718f772561ca08bfee4ad70c8e4fcba49ee3544
describe
Invalid character
'10380' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCX' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
c438e8849438ca6507e087e6ba44c614
924cb9292f0c5009f5b542bb33cca70396679d4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCY' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
f8c88fa55962fa8fec6c1e2328d11103
0374753f9b102150798e650ab9279b978f543909
'2011-12-30T11:35:35-05:00'
describe
'151056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZCZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
c86313ee8431e4a8c742817573ef886a
ae26a447fea365686ea9496a02ec92adb29c6047
describe
'22721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDA' 'sip-files00122.pro'
25efa044af5354f656cd7bb757067a11
293596146a64764ebb90c75c62676e35294a77d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDB' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
07c3b517498f26a578769cbdf42baf22
b02546cce55789ad7938a26a996d0518ee6ccf96
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDC' 'sip-files00122.tif'
a1cc572f16534b1a1c103cf81350aae1
539d497f35aa4a443eb8f6e1fe6d45d81e3a7080
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDD' 'sip-files00122.txt'
22b14924eb0c6bfb1995f56334a5e260
8cdc57b667084ba171b2eb860b336b6170b063f7
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDE' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
5245e823f9352e75bf3361b27bd1c945
8076acc2c0bee2681250b625c62d86c21b6ba106
describe
'720545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDF' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
2cfcec254595086bb436aaeb44172c01
c1c94bf2ff3ed8d749243d31e93c137f26d75a44
describe
'159952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDG' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
db240915845b5df7675d261abcee71d7
e5715860c2ccc92fa097e4236eff31c62c63706a
'2011-12-30T11:39:50-05:00'
describe
'61594' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bfa544c4c1e6d1cf116c0e5bb5e40570
9ec3b2f03e292374d1cbe7b9f455f4284ce9199a
describe
'41093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
b7060938b9b5108246bfd87ff86b7226
4b74c2ce479844ae733314d763e05b4e3efa9efc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
7afd5ac358c405af60b40673acb6b921
c94f182a19df09d85c2198e1c1384111f3ebe2e2
'2011-12-30T11:32:23-05:00'
describe
'2575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
75b318aed404ab734f2116aef5726ca3
6d06becff7d7b479a39000b40a55e2d330f01c39
describe
'9848' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDL' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
b9c25316861955550ab2e707ea1e743f
0bf42375229390910c416f3df2798e60e38dc24a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDM' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
275fae1192318732b1a7b0b64d139efe
a2f733df66199fbca76c63c4d880bdcfcaa180f5
'2011-12-30T11:38:55-05:00'
describe
'168640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDN' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
35d20bf49c95968d992f9b3e595eb684
ad5a56fabafb5ffa7adf7a621bd91a72fa00d723
describe
'65637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDO' 'sip-files00124.pro'
546dda586ce94e81f49de5f82788e81f
038d4e23fa02ef71785bc2b88210f134e2073cd2
describe
'43338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDP' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
3f9950427d1194a22aeabf44bfdc17b8
d7b21792941b791491b9a9dcd8002665ca2649a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDQ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
e698f4998aead8ef9c7fcd383b3e98df
4ed76d119effc49eae5ebe6405f723418462e016
describe
'3068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDR' 'sip-files00124.txt'
bf8ba6b899f0900f1d58c929be670355
41ae6d748c5c7e033fa26463e20cdc0883d5e8d1
describe
'9936' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDS' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
e497677f20af8cb9b34c6cceff2d045f
c3f6d3643a7ba2206989356eeb926dee67f5fb4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDT' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
b77324583aa71094d992782920ad7996
21207b74d10c0305ba0dd3334ed4ee4f806fd85b
describe
'176041' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDU' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
fba5134bab7aa5b1491a9dcebb4eaa34
86be4b7512a72da4d0bc320a6bb05722c1e56285
'2011-12-30T11:34:15-05:00'
describe
'70227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDV' 'sip-files00125.pro'
ac10f63b1cd6cd755cf2c97db2eec04c
0de9b1c177e5b3831c02482e0d91934dc9a7b477
describe
'44594' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDW' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
65d65ec8e18a5ebd093eff5bb97732a9
6b4d4138cccd92ec8b48834254b6010c7ae27215
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDX' 'sip-files00125.tif'
fde55457c5556431164deffccc84258f
5133949d4c376703ddf80e2aaef0a9effa7e5873
describe
'2983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
6ed5cfcf17bead276e3d70af8be00bbb
c104187cb0f222009bf27ee9e0355141e6cd397b
describe
'10179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZDZ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
59fc8ac08ab9d074bd83675bd5b06e3e
2d7b04a46d5764d441308af47b501caa003be91a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEA' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
d89bf5b3df97dddf1d25acf2079b3512
cfeef398ee731e881e494a4fc92dcfb040b15d18
describe
'172118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
5d8d3a32e5cfd2e8fe9a6a750dac1b80
9e6e90c623bcc2d8b791bfe14631e492446ba239
describe
'57505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
73acee5c622453deacc2bc247d81d5ac
311fa57c3b563eff0a247b1c288570ec33833fe8
describe
'43269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZED' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
c67e8ce6cab7b38ba1b8c4987680b936
954014089739ae7a989fcf94e8168c38f054b323
'2011-12-30T11:36:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEE' 'sip-files00126.tif'
9fa9eb2b9d6ac046b61b08c1c75a8bee
cf5f82934075005f445e7cc19a333c5b39d197c5
describe
'2325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEF' 'sip-files00126.txt'
8ec14437a5faa10470266e2ba9220484
7368899371a6fe206a969873b6ceeb56c352d03a
'2011-12-30T11:35:24-05:00'
describe
'10104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEG' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
d9840dc5892663d8cc96aa199c7d3f0b
f7e20695d6fc38afaac00b26d3634059b019ca08
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9e35d8086af55b7cfacd23b3cb821a3c
04601e59e5fc53e4a912f29d938fa04e772806a4
'2011-12-30T11:37:23-05:00'
describe
'115661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEI' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5ba473b175a079498f058ef5964efefb
2c566aa8054fb668d7c29851a8a1291d6b3cf837
describe
'17535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEJ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
89bdb0dcdc6ab174397a25bf64997b85
99b357b999ada6ec8ad11073a71681c4bc3368b1
describe
'33091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
2da01013f73d78f5c821c434bbe86453
dc1789d2c91e63a05df2e2897ba91c0242ee2397
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEL' 'sip-files00127.tif'
641bfdc33e8b6d70508ff0227cadafbf
9201d02ec4f4da8a06ffe8f2280b12acf9bd4048
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
d81757435c756835b50e6c0e31f32a44
ee79cb61658ef8fdf9610bad34cd8898f58ae3e9
describe
Invalid character
'8865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
f0186449f0f8a5c119dff8baaec3999f
b0e53e3679da7e2b85132bd662418bde5b2e707b
'2011-12-30T11:33:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEO' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
abc6c70aa5bc57370f0b1b71fea8cddf
6072b485f2a06535d0b9cb24c316c2c0a2660b31
'2011-12-30T11:35:36-05:00'
describe
'135212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b0400171872e5e59285e332713f0929b
6e7a8d1cbc1923e5c5b07198504dff32794770d7
describe
'16138' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
7ffc8b1a2a343bfeaeffae761cc4877c
81706d0b8d9b66a4c7529703f291933f6956f697
describe
'37069' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZER' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
dbbe925b381cbe3f88c855f157f2dea8
3b33d1dc4c953efcb85aac87bf43791f819a7576
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZES' 'sip-files00128.tif'
847bc519e9f41866703b64e15b885fb3
8544f84127ab39cfdf1859591140d83ec0e59061
'2011-12-30T11:33:34-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZET' 'sip-files00128.txt'
0112bf3d35dacb522f55ef28ab6b3e51
0b2d1cded924fd593951d22997ee1f836ca731bb
describe
'9487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
bd0bee9a3ac8fd2c105587d7e4df845a
f94fe74748b572e0dbb68d036ff088bff9230a42
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
215655cfb2c53033bf8c6a9ea9d08694
8562893ca71de54d730b26f6d42c4638e9984429
describe
'134814' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEW' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
dcd6eacc39f7ae4801a682f79b86ce7f
d1b26a18f30f96959e9ac7c125b1921b5faa8a9b
describe
'16742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEX' 'sip-files00129.pro'
d7e2688c829fa3fd2fdad8e00b07d52a
71a31ff421fab476f7303d988bf6862a43322123
describe
'37414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEY' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
dc8fdc4c732a95f98097f693cca9869e
293301a23ec5643b0efa7edd6d694ea3f03a29d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZEZ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
e1d35a21f97b7596ff293bb7a2a8b8a9
92a55ccaa77b8f9126a6e8e175897d63c8f3b0ee
'2011-12-30T11:40:07-05:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFA' 'sip-files00129.txt'
91b991e64e8afd14689671050527d98d
ca7968d27c927a6509948b11b79f73905bce450e
describe
'9696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFB' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d3d01ec7929682cda34a83a53b02873d
1ad434af4b4c48590f074e749bc78874c3d26dd6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
356d2601d1670183a63b9cd55f77f6a7
4e255c51c68fc1fd98ada0b582e85971c392ed51
describe
'138346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFD' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
2464f262023086a6a33239611de1f288
c06de0fa978bd3473efb95f5dfa90e17862dbc90
describe
'17611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFE' 'sip-files00130.pro'
30f5c82965a301da4d5c16ecd14a9147
9579ce2727b473a71bb1104c7d4435b701189e42
describe
'37504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFF' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
eec451523df0935c37b213dced992681
04bf1f51b7b58e85e7fa1711578d218e9f43b499
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFG' 'sip-files00130.tif'
8ac8584fe3019d1b38b18347195a297e
067bf805b199a3510ea125cf36fdd2959881a350
'2011-12-30T11:35:37-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
370452e882d5447d47206d7c7d4712c6
314b0ca40680fd2f20f50dbe8cb96e3f74169c87
describe
'9671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFI' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d590c464fb2c25a5a4c75678640aaeef
00945e5b286c99b0da2454dfd26a6e42d0694fff
describe
'720598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFJ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
2a21b1af0cc55fc0825ec991f33fe119
4d7a6184cd71ecea3fe56fe22baa1fce0e9201bd
describe
'173146' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFK' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
b8f6e596a8c67b3e30efd16e9ebdc8f7
d6c3ae873749e47f3c826f1216c83fb3ea8b2dbd
describe
'53117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
885c1df725c9e2a0cddc7acc848d44fb
fb2aceace45f7ff39281f6e41b74a4c956d8906d
describe
'44653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFM' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a2b7a1affd2ad2b1640f2b25db7bf790
856bb22ceb309e1a8dc9a13c356238f794c4ca83
'2011-12-30T11:34:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFN' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a9d37ef4b5cb38a5e066bf25ecb41441
0d62fe823ba440674853fa48e6661f63f46c62c6
'2011-12-30T11:37:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFO' 'sip-files00131.txt'
aab1d58805fd45ce654abb16dff7c2f2
b07ab0cf8b5c4dbdf46c1ac2edd2d2eacc11c7b9
describe
'10558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
7f28804a3fb38d6a2c5d1a0c635918cf
fa686ccebd902de6f0ca86f681db621ef42ec80a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFQ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
36f4fb87539819791e157749de566627
dde9d688e1a0b51b69f301d6325ce39a980e3365
'2011-12-30T11:32:09-05:00'
describe
'176393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFR' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
63aa0108f31ccc7659ac14f0ec5276b4
a8b1bf9d3c1eca9cd721ef81befc51f055750b91
describe
'62443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
bfe8c93fc701164fcb0c66ab242e7e32
9853dda193bf64b568a629c8134180def60463a4
describe
'43754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFT' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
7cd8c0c067c0318f6fdebdb5a6711bc4
4f66911d63cb51946c1408e349cd339cc9d13533
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFU' 'sip-files00132.tif'
df8216789a4e522fd55df13f45915cea
5c66daa3ebca159bfe9fdef65d56b1497f20b35d
'2011-12-30T11:36:32-05:00'
describe
'2587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFV' 'sip-files00132.txt'
aae6e5274499d6efe062220417f8a91e
7974b2ab07fa45f9a398bad0f67650ebcdecd29f
describe
'10292' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFW' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
9cdb5579ab741e7040e07a052c09237e
32b9512e9293fa091c4d8a61651ecb76e5c65966
'2011-12-30T11:36:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
1caf9849e56b8f47a29190c2d978ea19
fc769910519bc9c7b1626b01f6626b9e91822ac6
describe
'152495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
7cbd78b961e18b21dc9b3f1e405b61d0
7ed5ca03614f86484b16a7edb1625fd591829703
describe
'37109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZFZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
8df60e957702a9e4c7ed25802a962740
04475e97a642faead88bbf60cb02f41e5f385580
describe
'39614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
7cc51ab57c8510a0269403f36879987e
46faeb1f2a6670f79f0fead29edbc7acae885348
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
064870525fc0fbac223a826ff1958e7f
ce5fa76de7e1f05cd2e389e76d382a8de16bbf0d
'2011-12-30T11:36:07-05:00'
describe
'1843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b4c93b36ad00252c4bdad3beb6e904f6
36f8d80a20d5f66b5719b744ee08cc3b8254aff4
describe
'10066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGD' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
4ac6df2fc27e895a3b071517793713be
633f58e39792421f7a347934ad86a94dddc2db9f
describe
'720466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGE' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d2cbcba50f49ce0d35559fa9f8b796f3
9189e0df7a3b6034da4a83b55b7a90841daa7375
describe
'116867' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
b929a4e1b23c3629b643e23fbd398634
8adbba38024cb401a2cc46bb9c69f457359ae841
describe
'25036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGG' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e6b990141caf9a9c14ad31c44f279d03
05ef5a45d6e0223b9ec0e840bc2497c25919f30c
describe
'31937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGH' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
8a375a8678e23d48a0b2f2e788b29830
733810f88b5f0370cec1c0d5b7c865fbd2df3fa2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
40f907840d07b3d5979b30ee25059e30
37192acb4c3bbad77c52716b6b837d6503b11798
'2011-12-30T11:32:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
514d32f48f6d022cefb9bf0e64670bc4
f45c21f289cba603f4caf0b804fdd82f95ccfd5c
describe
'7992' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
d237450a428c81ff21f84e43a0f31442
11d7be5253b8f49bd64d74e1945c6cc8191bc02f
'2011-12-30T11:32:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e833f1f9b3aff990955644c0a9a46598
fbf3f0d5488b169c61fa143bd9084162caa8f7ee
describe
'153220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2cfc342b7e16d277ece6f54e46e0e317
4c389e22e3e7552c10299350f23eb22e2831047f
describe
'46539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGN' 'sip-files00135.pro'
b76121e6442dfd61fd3e5ab3f59a2c91
b178b9cf9b1f2bfdfb3dcf08b0c58f48f4c1f073
'2011-12-30T11:39:57-05:00'
describe
'39471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGO' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
fcf1a46d979934f41672f61e0e964da8
215f918ba09fba9f0b4855674a5f28288cdda3e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGP' 'sip-files00135.tif'
454c52b733e105e058d9f84bca5ac1be
1adb6647db51c23c53edcd30f967f99843e1da66
describe
'1910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGQ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0588ede97d40e77dcf6cfb833ba2b40f
d6b15f11f5c6ddd81af0d1e1a1e272b9698c6967
describe
'9921' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGR' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
14eba801193cbcc7f3b5dd5cb65c6d38
5f266e89642dc4aae41d50d7991c4c96bfaea989
'2011-12-30T11:37:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGS' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
2e5bbfa37f49a0143271b7b94616e5da
5bf02967a35eda6793bd82873538d1bac83a0eca
describe
'131959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGT' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
0935faa9c6d290ad7c89a57a8356c614
f99581d30437a188513bf7c67c39f913e2218870
describe
'14444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGU' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1b6a03e5a3edb8d0f35855b02f6c7ca0
9febd677efc1281938a7fcfb00aa0f6dc98e7b02
describe
'37075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
926dae00ba231adaa813750021819721
69d92996392bee54b83b69f8091c8bde9268e36d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
685c7aecb394c18c6c0e7b36067fa694
97197369ea59d888c1ec8ff8a4f08abac071730d
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGX' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ecaea35f8f3839e4b14508d04c250c2c
81d71543adea66d7cec06a9e42ab9d078328e756
describe
'9616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4fb758a65ae7d156a1f852282cfb67a7
dda559945961733f0632ed098a72283246f8d0d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZGZ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
8d6be10410a8a1711379d08d4fbd5735
857edc29d0b477bafb3f29743676e83fcc0131cd
describe
'133297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHA' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
738d8b9cbe3a00c46ca0e6c6b8e31796
c0d950fd904458186b6ad5a5fd1ab769997fb510
describe
'16602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHB' 'sip-files00137.pro'
5c098f406a55ce3861db79de9ea9ce8e
8162bf73fc08e943e7475dcccb2f762e41af1402
describe
'38349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHC' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
3fc205e3776f95cdc535067fcecad3dc
ae9111fe095cc2c67fd0a70ad8cf3f2f11bf3716
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHD' 'sip-files00137.tif'
2cdf133f05b978d557a9e7317aaf124f
bb30e11c63fceb270cc068c8b1db8531d62ef414
'2011-12-30T11:30:39-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHE' 'sip-files00137.txt'
06198e3f6cc55f7193f332eedce4e9e9
e445c19566221277ed7c6843dcdc077158f3cbb8
describe
Invalid character
'10016' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
9c1393171fc5f271badb1b3dfb49a144
3094409fcd36ef3e1c493e08c23a58e50a125e0b
describe
'720359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHG' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
703b9862ca8e7de53bbf356be1b0f0f3
ff5549be622847b6aeafe43e0d53d462d8e936d9
describe
'127146' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
277d991b02fd4d21636b97794893671f
1344c284f2fd77ef8f69d8a75e897daf987aa458
describe
'8955' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHI' 'sip-files00138.pro'
5c7f5ac14a59f5238ff5ff0a36514db0
739dea9b98114ecc40b254984d1a780e47f1ac81
'2011-12-30T11:36:08-05:00'
describe
'32108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHJ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
d1110af0c487f90adde1507fcc8c8664
362e884d94bc09dae5f2098f262538dcd05772cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHK' 'sip-files00138.tif'
c014e8be24ace1ac2febcc69a1138a40
2fe66d1dadbb198c774638d11f68874d0b01a185
'2011-12-30T11:36:39-05:00'
describe
'418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHL' 'sip-files00138.txt'
b97213942de2a345b1317fbc353fba11
1fb20cb5cb5c029d76cfbb8ad1087c81213a7291
'2011-12-30T11:39:55-05:00'
describe
'8288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
9832e74b034d6cb9eb38d97b3348a543
d9ef979d93d2e7f177c05fb7fa1d8f4ae0dd2816
'2011-12-30T11:40:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHN' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
be2cb936e018099f2b7c39c2a2a5cd3b
b9bd1fe62a6633b01f90d49adc004578dfa5fd1a
describe
'141715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b1a7a26bd99c37b93fb8a45fd4138f15
9fdf308d4296831c8d1343a45b3d63e8afd52d39
describe
'55334' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHP' 'sip-files00139.pro'
9b86b418dba335d0af771a009cea897c
1039adbb9e4ad225717da309899b1f9b22fb2450
describe
'37022' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
e8702fcddb3e7554b81d416ae36d5797
8c48f23d9e263aed95ab7cd014dd67620ad4181b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHR' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c41e95638ac30d32d3baa5bbc50c17a5
2ce331a1954753c338569769df87523779a9a3a7
describe
'2309' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHS' 'sip-files00139.txt'
df1cc12fb3a01f1f9c72aa31a4ccdbf0
0454733b874fc8278ba96a0d681000d4be5ecb40
describe
Invalid character
'9072' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHT' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
5fa749b22b622387d574411be48c4ed0
e467464339f4f0615c46d2c25e3fe73afffe9cd1
'2011-12-30T11:36:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
db8d519517b9c44e45b3d118e0ec1a4b
f20947c40ababedf11829451f5ae12ef4994e8c3
describe
'143671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
dbdb2b51f19eab6c04466fe85628559c
b64528a936c6b8d9bf7ab826a713c108b12007ff
'2011-12-30T11:32:39-05:00'
describe
'65631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHW' 'sip-files00140.pro'
521b095858c106811aacd704b7d44ab6
30ea4196de9b87aabc0110b6a710323dc9bf3547
'2011-12-30T11:33:18-05:00'
describe
'36237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
bd4e1792532e2887f68399bae356e538
1386dfb22f751127fb4387bcbad222954f49373e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHY' 'sip-files00140.tif'
9cd30525a8b4e8ee92eb767bfe0ff5a6
55052965dceb21cd96340ee27796f802bc08cd49
describe
'2832' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZHZ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
9933f7795d10bb6383d54accf14907ce
f4370d6ec94935ac3ddd73c3d755cc0598e9027f
describe
'8605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIA' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
6c79016a2dec3e42fa7c95e7a48af44d
9090800e93047a77b8a028b44788256c97ea3b80
'2011-12-30T11:32:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIB' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
5e37dca78e460a79979d9a625540fd4a
015fdc2713ae489136dffaaf2fc1cbefb6e2b243
describe
'121654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIC' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
8a22e66ea35edd2da67a1fd93ee213d4
9943efc4f40aac77f9b467af7196adff08efaa06
describe
'30537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZID' 'sip-files00141.pro'
6a4719b83faa46fff2b50ef4525510ba
b25e7ba93c6a03fbb1f59043aa5e27a752075841
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIE' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
5d7a114cf4be4e065fafa7a06bd230fc
99c14d791d8689ac76e99dc95302781155c5a101
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIF' 'sip-files00141.tif'
4ff7fd21e055fd6c38a0b69ee37f00a5
8b466b23598b285b4d7c4260282d644871b66b12
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIG' 'sip-files00141.txt'
22da2233964a1dc8f3d944648a1368f8
8ff29d751e3c8ffccdaf88ea19a6e13e492ac047
describe
Invalid character
'7267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIH' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
b9e80671d92f9c64e98a89f0ceff81af
2c62eae8c94c3c0e25f6d7b7a5e2ca1bb60d6f2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZII' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
34af6c742bba7d651c7238df5910fd7d
a9b073ab929439fc330d6599454268a8ded0d7cf
describe
'130516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIJ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
308e3075821076ab97ecc31166a100bb
7957298ab402e09e6d00a9ea85d0c3d729ecb763
describe
'7047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIK' 'sip-files00142.pro'
359e0fc522bbb2f28ce71b2ca84bc629
4fb27e80f98fbe9b64498353dc87583fb7641eb5
describe
'36445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIL' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c2b1b6cb87563787710543278f65f790
ae84ca784d107e80a52a3ef5d4b5f9286ff7a5cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIM' 'sip-files00142.tif'
3cde24051e821d7f2a8e1c5dbd6e961a
9ac4c6e44180166d59b8acb79d52e048fbd1104b
'2011-12-30T11:36:21-05:00'
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIN' 'sip-files00142.txt'
36a1ee69552701654a0bf6a101dd3213
75cd5b86bf4d86963e9d22d41c07c96b0e23c6c7
describe
'9745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIO' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
54e69923242f2cf072b659f8089a3dce
97c69d392e2ea776b1098924c5954c4db83b9964
'2011-12-30T11:31:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
839a0597e45007840e7a74ac2306ef64
61e85e0d8a0025cff69494901b038935a1098a8e
'2011-12-30T11:32:00-05:00'
describe
'117072' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIQ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
842b8ca998648738df94128933407f73
ef5ccf780e478cc9d47ea890713f1e74ef11249f
'2011-12-30T11:39:02-05:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIR' 'sip-files00143.pro'
d364c155e4c1e0621d0cb7cf6f8f441b
5fb0bafca326b0c746096921d23bbf8055a81496
describe
'32576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIS' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
3d2cffd012655bac7b3e8fbda26a062e
1989233d485da9a6be67f3d0e5d9c1f7b2aa30c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIT' 'sip-files00143.tif'
3c15f6fe1743c46aca82d8b2bda9597b
3996c7bc7f6e64c3c5f5128d5ce1b40841ac5d50
describe
'43' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
efeb476b3792ba50892d75500f115077
bba19bd9a6d23aee3f96cff9f41890dc9c0cc71e
describe
'8758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
9f304a55743646a3ed9711996db514bf
16435746d9d70e09f31073572c71a55980efbc55
describe
'720601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIW' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
a99e9e92adddbb0f633c77dc64872305
c48dd43d30e85e17f910ab3be0a872ee4318c53c
describe
'149847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIX' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
49150eee7da21074a468b4e1a7eec6f5
f14c61193a99519858ddceb9f669a13f24d2050c
describe
'44713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIY' 'sip-files00144.pro'
5ccbe876633137e4745c23198dddd12a
aa5eb9cac3b1727e45d415183f1ba73acc6f5d41
'2011-12-30T11:38:34-05:00'
describe
'38785' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZIZ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
5b3882350d2ca4e034be654787e55836
60643940a8abcf0c69b966c8b58c7c2616a8b5b4
'2011-12-30T11:32:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJA' 'sip-files00144.tif'
8764cb03d8f217ecc2da52054c409b1b
1a054f56d45a19392a825b2e65148fb8003c8be6
'2011-12-30T11:33:08-05:00'
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJB' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ca8bb307a163d3abfe39ff29fa930a1b
a6f73ee8c19472c1c31b53d36e8d6ba6a167592f
describe
Invalid character
'9299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJC' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
0143ca5d90866a14aa028cd6cd87099f
0239fda177022fd36b2184fb2ee5e25542f7f713
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJD' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
a81ed725b07b758ed5e9206ec65b4761
c23a6321c5ce4da1c76c3ee8a36a94c0baf22aaa
'2011-12-30T11:39:16-05:00'
describe
'150120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJE' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
18ee45c6d1fe9af126f38f9dda87c409
cb2263c07bcb7a7b7f62edd48e38f444b0a3479b
describe
'44362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
29957386b1f3ebb48329d1a2aa2d9fe6
0db6313f32fb783c42298f6a868a37ad484517bc
describe
'37837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJG' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
751edfea51b887f4084ecb00dbf03f93
6266af9541f0bf0b4546a7a2e7059b409fd4a8cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJH' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c0df04a1b0949cf7ef1a0edd47d358b0
c1f7d26902e3f05ad51b33d4406d31d8010690dd
'2011-12-30T11:39:24-05:00'
describe
'2025' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJI' 'sip-files00145.txt'
4e3ef696fe7977b7e35832f6cc771958
ead4d1fc127fbe53a31a87a0c067e3ada96ed9a7
describe
'9128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJJ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
9b09f235d739387146aac7bd99b44958
14df31cab70d139658fda4905b870969a10bbb2b
describe
'720617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJK' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
e1685209bb26ecacfdbc0f41dd4a0a77
8bae3c69088d8235319844329241c00a119f02df
'2011-12-30T11:38:12-05:00'
describe
'155504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJL' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
753f9e83042e06eb3be561efb225eba9
90e567790d91a5cb2a1964c055f8561f15f95c4d
describe
'72693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJM' 'sip-files00146.pro'
f4c82d693335fb57acf9c6e6e2bb5f0f
46937ab1a633a4e963d38623ccd2a4d3599b633f
describe
'40604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJN' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
33a3208f2ca70c4bfa83fbe5a72c9d51
222367526b283b64a1ce72bf9e8ea6277482eed0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJO' 'sip-files00146.tif'
f84465ffab81ea8a8a146b6b19f18fa1
69e6a206097024295c0ea1a13d0309f55b8df24d
'2011-12-30T11:31:14-05:00'
describe
'2970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b561eb7bc3ca196438e559ddf2f574d3
097dbaa97ebefbb65cf6a5f5859ad08b75929f57
describe
Invalid character
'9522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJQ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
7f748d2387e3880497475e7ec4a97110
304c0c0533b0031cefbb2aa8b0dbcb6a42bacc8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJR' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
3632e3f6f32fa741af2dcfbe247aaf0f
ed05b4074b9f50547e9e4e112c37e9d8a64cd83d
describe
'128127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJS' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
76f984efd0513d9f98ef86420aeea519
7fae3dc849de1a1113bb59c53c54a4739a5aa618
describe
'25872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJT' 'sip-files00147.pro'
ac8e21e8f34c40a8c87866ada5e3a5af
3ca97613535404c23b1e48a481951c2871dce28d
describe
'34280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJU' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
af2f3cbfe40a190589cf227bb203315b
552a378c76230fe3e8bbf3c3629391e8f2ffb928
'2011-12-30T11:32:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJV' 'sip-files00147.tif'
50e4fb39ae8cd6073bd72c44b4d3a410
40737fa27eb4faf8c4c5ad47203a190d97656f68
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
e6e7cb53d239ab62d6a160b14b8a5ab1
2e7bcc6f00b18fd83d05b952908dfd10020e4444
describe
'8706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJX' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
929a492e9b3af59d2f6f7438c6010e15
aadd27c3e06b871f9986d58c132e49552ff346a7
describe
'720611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
105ab7917503930513586d5d99ef4cd8
b266d5f8e5d63461219cfaa6aeca6f7975671500
describe
'135421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZJZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
db3b79bdc8410f4ecc89ff8aa0ba2e3d
7c569f3df330ac7be65241d4dc97e6569f1dd5df
describe
'19872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKA' 'sip-files00148.pro'
0ba4522646e4a65b13aa867c02890f37
dad9d66665b8568c4e90870c11a660cf157b4450
'2011-12-30T11:34:45-05:00'
describe
'36856' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5318cb76ed73fad7aef3fe542a780d8b
42d51a4f26f39b7e5025067feaa3733e461817e2
'2011-12-30T11:40:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKC' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c2fc4bd1e7d10e2544141cd7828f3cac
51e868ced5a587bb83186450b408a274dcb3b631
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKD' 'sip-files00148.txt'
34aed00769ac5f0878dc635e7fdfa2c8
b4c330a7625330e7f89d0d8a18b9b594422d67d4
describe
'9610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKE' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
a97c436c1655b5f4b74141709d164b4a
70dcb8ac6fbd5c8d1ddc6a0d8186fc850e9fd9b2
describe
'720501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
9d12bdf2405d545918a4b9d00f4cc166
c0803f711ced3a1e19c048d41f6cbd6240c21a7a
describe
'141763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKG' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
b6b2ffd2e13c09f5114016f879cefb55
09a782ee6c00ba2781300c514b12e7ebe8006c6a
describe
'22885' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
fdea0b97fc4e88dd70800f5c4ec42e86
e6fc86cac82f92899e0fdd3c1ae25cff0a6a89d0
describe
'39005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
e597a248c5bb4653b58511ed1001ce06
0fface6bcf6337019b0e9e83735445fef54e2d4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e55b35ab41d21164e6704fbbc8102183
0663fe22d29d0a04d85a6c970cdc7be099567cac
'2011-12-30T11:38:37-05:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
46930a02c0f3f7676da6f5f11792d697
77af9b385460b82ebd336da9c48f1e1cfad8dfeb
describe
'9764' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKL' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
9632a2513ad3cbe00fee1daf97f8da2f
d0f2836a073d4635d049ecc316f9692f3f694c7e
describe
'720595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
97bf61eb06d987062c1da94109df46f2
794e150aca8d38586dfc98ab38a788e8a5a73272
describe
'150227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKN' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
a89f6209e4396090fe2f64c911e3a164
62ca08aa77ea1fdb343bbc34e35455e9fc087ac0
describe
'18343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
c7ed9549321b562dd31e4246f41d6cb0
d314a6eb1c5e47ea45c13d10ad53e7245938af89
'2011-12-30T11:36:09-05:00'
describe
'40533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKP' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
3a40532838fa863a4e27fe482048643c
177ed0f23f8c47b3281ec3155c6e952f050437fe
'2011-12-30T11:33:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKQ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
7b82ba442bc722d239bafc0cad58c0e1
0b05235d2b0bb28871d999276981bd9de07f55e5
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
b2d8553c6ebef2bb13fec0647f752a8a
cbe4c92ebf471903071a1d2d5b6c0712a865747f
describe
'10253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKS' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
825f18496d84b399d194c5a4f5cbfd01
ff903735e106bd99e7981c8a3ad36fd1219bfecb
describe
'720606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKT' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
b23991e29d24e598d9a41457fde676c6
7368bc694de2279dc45b8714cb53ffc1584f0037
'2011-12-30T11:33:57-05:00'
describe
'135649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
8cc4f9acc80c3a34867cebe28d2fabd2
3226575db912420a5195e15edd01695d7241f0ba
describe
'47144' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKV' 'sip-files00151.pro'
7d522a8530d0d9d1ae053cc97632bcbd
a89b0f602d48ecac57d413f7da9878d4fa62e8ba
describe
'35910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKW' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
2dc5d700992f31deda1bb8bdb1bd312f
355779d98520ad94933237a3d9913da8ef99a685
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
d6a237f5b4f61525b6cc76ae01b2473f
4f956036b2e5ad38187f301b2c3eca0cf5498d13
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
528b2215e7f07ecb6324e70921c6e8f9
ebd5723eb0fee6b0012fb2dcbe00e4a3245159c0
describe
'8918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZKZ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
9a54fe1a9e82cfacffac6b2618c465cc
d261cb5f49a77df5f4606d1e3b1d650f233bf579
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
e6c5f7437b6d7c3919fd6a283f117eda
985c218d33b8af59bf551769d47afcd1b2427b18
describe
'101999' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
668753717f0d0160260e777b8ec0681b
bb88391573e7847d864669c117845824626b2df9
describe
'14529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLC' 'sip-files00152.pro'
bfb585f737919e32ef3b0fd67ffcb66c
825c702764c33cb16244ad8c42944a6915685df9
describe
'28084' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
9f088eadbfe691ecc9b056a782eb8db3
30597e6103f283e00ae821e19726aaca5dff0829
'2011-12-30T11:38:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLE' 'sip-files00152.tif'
afb63be044d07fa2e5f89170ec158484
68c4a1fd1ae79ef13d4fc67f56192ab8339d7911
'2011-12-30T11:39:29-05:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLF' 'sip-files00152.txt'
90b0b3184d1a8d0a69879b8a5ccecad3
85d0f718c7ed4e5ecceb9b7aee4094e9640281b7
describe
Invalid character
'7315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
f4ab623fd82ada5f7d279e01d1ec607d
128cfb451ff7e991bed511d9c9c665f4aef08945
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
5a0ac9e99c230740fc87ea739853caae
fe2bc157b9918ad0b779d0214bf904cf56cafc7c
describe
'131977' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
89997df9aae313ab7cd6a328a4721375
034a1bb3e8bb1a7fcbede578b1a5035818b83158
describe
'17361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
f72d92ef71d53a0a666fcfbcb684d946
37545eca15fb688f0681d61f91f42d5b6c40aeb3
describe
'35844' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
91ffae9278e6c4ec0f15b7a934f576c5
41a682e2f23cdd08ac41eab258b36451cf3b2697
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLL' 'sip-files00153.tif'
126f79606d9c478f8160876a09eb8b87
50726050c1bfc04644124a1515f17846ec740ae0
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLM' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a41487425b8be16bf4199a83c045926e
a8c6477df91ead65c676862fe1d8a3ab19ba2a36
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
0b3641403c7412a41cd1ac0aa6402498
6d0f94ad7c028d5a7ff577c3422fa23d2bdc835e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
4f6c91b25ba4123a713fa16d1e40a061
acffbbfbbd769e785e24f99122481c1501698ed5
describe
'102141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
86bb608bbd4e6a360c5e0a4c717055ba
f0ebb700ffb176d944e9991ce7ff20436d4903a7
describe
'14321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
21c030c5ec4d887fdfb2fb6daacb2111
46aef6cf390d77db1d3b27b60ff5d6c6a0b226cf
describe
'27966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
beae09e75c43d09604fe8aa3785012a0
75f3d0bd86db36a78099f02955decfc13a2199c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
887875951539b4a5b118485b75a79942
9db11c371a3887e311a5e096f8ea9f2e9f8fe3eb
'2011-12-30T11:37:59-05:00'
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
e67c468ec83e8f1e8a8b1bd11c426fa7
f09d113ca19f230fdaf700dc5184434b2a5116f3
describe
'7517' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a2c49c08deda257839e39621dbb53b6e
041d0e23bfb11c7fb8dfd026d0741e885f4facb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
f98eea8990c5b758e6bd8b8b27b8f2be
67387c15522af15e740ab9c813f23e00e61afb20
'2011-12-30T11:33:36-05:00'
describe
'132442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
97902f5118595590961389c4a49e7fc2
d5cc5a5cd6f99eca35fe78dc51993e1ec6ec309c
describe
'3783' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0e8a04babbdd4374722dec89fa88b65a
e2de4da4dc959887e614df134a598e7eb1566d3e
describe
'32555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2ad0ac2657d5e2a9f583ad4d7d41751f
2b83121136ccfcb93beaccd4b7679ecd73c161f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZLZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
2e4fe4f446255d1db800a9395cbb3462
8acd4dfb6e99f1693a71c0cf40ab5f045360820a
describe
'250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
b6384aa49e829a5a8d202925e6ba7334
6ba65d42a8ce58b15bb45b76880b0dcfa948c2b1
describe
Invalid character
'9084' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
31713d391ef6a1de9732c1ab0d2ee09b
97204b2971fdec01c4feeac2753d1d14b9c20b6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
46cdb0308a926d1f0784cc8302e17ea7
2072ff37df714762288fc54ea2612ea864419ab6
describe
'169165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMD' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
a8c066e064c9ddc9f65db70284e84cea
04210d34ffbd44776e2901bfb304669c32a3b628
describe
'46673' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZME' 'sip-files00157.pro'
6f96fa7ae80ff8f7ce50b029a6df408a
9f736e02c471403df1eae2c4cc0443fd7ba2058b
describe
'43204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMF' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
384f18f6c677fa9ef864d6b728c7cbbe
337f9512191fceae76a6ac2c8a1ea5a0e8aef0f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
2bcd0838135b4b67a9cb340db1bacbef
7d361839b6e054b0c1f2c737991c4b38ff84e2e3
describe
'1917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMH' 'sip-files00157.txt'
4d4b11ad10dd6579e9e171f7d13e85c9
b749fc2064b6f9f463d57bda0d09053fa794b2b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMI' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8baea64151b0bc3cc8c65974203e76c9
28539278beacb329ce706d47847912b7634af898
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
8f19967f1b68425d9928cf414421dc14
a77a2cc1bb9908ccaaa0dc638e721b9200a9cccc
describe
'154028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMK' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
2cfe122821bf775c65ff7ed7487c5df8
422e09fbf2f89a76a444ce61f7973a83d8745e7e
describe
'63432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZML' 'sip-files00158.pro'
3beb4d30a826ffa676495e462b774a77
b46469562af348c39c197fb32d2d8868cdfbba2d
describe
'41954' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMM' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
d8fc6d6bcc09a5150f1c249511f17651
be368797ef597d2673fe09f50474adc5712ee1bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMN' 'sip-files00158.tif'
75cc29b6439f4d424b5190b3e8435418
959bf9c1ab3d25e21e00a8ad64e79a753035679f
describe
'3139' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
98fa8bc830d4d32ed5691338be137a8d
25e6f67108fc4441fea4bae60fd36dc3d02c9651
describe
Invalid character
'9893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMP' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
c149c6a35daa0346b6afb4aea930a80d
69f36540be393d06bfb0cc59e8567885ff8aa1c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
55bf5e67b3d83b3bbddf3a6ee6187816
e7cba512d4b18f4143cb6af523f49d4f5d60a603
describe
'165777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
45d1e84c00167a123b73b6f90e3f878f
8718c4b6e07442b4119b5f7ca0bfe5f5304cd3d4
describe
'46231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMS' 'sip-files00159.pro'
7df625a2cb64e97369f869f5f50749e8
74d842876bfbba4df81175665ce0206480839935
describe
'43916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
93ba5d262a7d5ab30abe9f6a5ffc5880
bc3262d0ced543221a229f946763b42fe7973026
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
d91db86e6ab6769403af27caf129efa4
40910dab53199f4c2ccb1f83ee70c7e37199476e
describe
'2307' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMV' 'sip-files00159.txt'
0cf8e1855dca912eb669a227984249f3
933433bfe61164e0f7371ce97fbea53f6625a4f1
'2011-12-30T11:37:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMW' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
032686a9d48dba1a3ba4a6e1602fb027
898f6826bd2d46bd8c6fd3e0320b29b1f95b50e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMX' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
9c1cddc734619ba72e5192700d619f94
70ffa84442564462c6cb2a512d68ccaa2fcf1ba3
describe
'147801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMY' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
5d4396ae3fbaf35b6fcf9bae853a5deb
ed2e7fbd2bcec84cff1277ceecca01925b2a1841
describe
'6804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZMZ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
2edc661fb378be0bb563f995eb95be4b
0416a0c860b49e23321c69fc907b4eaee78ccc5a
describe
'39671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNA' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
da5ba385919d97444259cdf27ee92c50
ec5827ad4d17c00a81b3a7a5d6ad9ff4ca94123b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
61884d450583cbbbf4a8ace3731773f2
d68cdb8c6dbdc0c546ae7fa89a55df20fa1533c1
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNC' 'sip-files00160.txt'
4e2a41014bb4e1a9e6da1c06f4003358
6befe886ee3b40298fd84c7dacba0a6e0555c74e
'2011-12-30T11:31:15-05:00'
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZND' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
5e1e79578bb597c8dbe2c50b443e1d1a
cdba63657c57571c086f2329f354cc49dfd913a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNE' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
ce6ef3e38c17305bf426c1f29c7aed5e
d36c41345a4a9f17c0f5db6a88c1d809b6256e9c
describe
'150109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNF' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6dce067714bf893fa1a03d7ae46e98f2
02e1bb94641386d71c17a8537f2a1072fa084338
describe
'6287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNG' 'sip-files00161.pro'
0ad1ab7829aa80f8be83d3875d924c25
cad21d53216ab4b08edd261a6ba27174afdd50e5
describe
'39650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
62355c2f6a28c16df29bfb21e11f91b5
75e0203834ea2d9f552a6a7e0aef68cdd3c0d9e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
c6c8a315d8e13af182354f90e4aec3a8
98d0fe18509bc85e24b1e6653d2b4273f57d4ee6
describe
'279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNJ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
ab7acdb4904910357c80593c14083084
2ed4c88990478babf1c1e591b47d92ae787202a7
describe
'10619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNK' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
242b5d1911b9cbb0b15e4acaaf4ea42b
577d574963282831f0e4211c5d18c3e0b8cae5a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNL' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5e624d026909b85e82d63c855fe706fa
6ca335a05ca48161d42beb6edba0fbb28e1ae0f7
describe
'140985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
608f6817b1a00e5f4618a593f7ac8d9f
3d87d7cb447cebc56f4dbc9adb7b468bc359256f
describe
'47336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a3819446ab7f44e9bfdb0a7957329102
d985f11fa31c49aaf920ad21886892d610e34702
describe
'36838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNO' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
901605765bddabc7993b471089afb6eb
b36c54a6d01b614d5cfba9e61e394bf53f8d38ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNP' 'sip-files00162.tif'
7c71eca4e7ce0543dc25e9d3c6469cbb
313471fb91819268926769656f2bcad1acd38dc0
'2011-12-30T11:38:36-05:00'
describe
'1956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNQ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
75efb4d851521de0ef4462aee767fdb8
355435f533d1ea7329a59441625aa9a34a99f827
describe
'9099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNR' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
bcc587fa6e2ea629b5b834a9073fc81c
f154b2074e75995f53a00a037487377a74352726
describe
'720622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNS' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
4fd9fe908f28a4128049bef8aed2f374
2a4455a1bf29747c4003732b47be779c7e1afbbe
'2011-12-30T11:34:41-05:00'
describe
'160113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNT' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
3567d69ef28ed900a2fe9239e49be849
ec780066484d19e4537cc607c17f4d15e740aa22
describe
'59613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNU' 'sip-files00163.pro'
0704468a2241d8eea1f9a06ed1142f2a
abe838e7b7af5ca6184e4909d1cc3fe4f698477e
describe
'41563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNV' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
2fb7c096701cc377f1568b19a7e1d983
20e95c30b77bd42c2fe6b9f0253de6f303e5293a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
434e06270cbc8406b66d00a37fe9af35
4eb5d67733437eaa3000c379a18f4fdbe72493b0
describe
'2392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
24288fa55153fcc5e967f4e512666eaa
88ad07b6ee05668c968ed2da446544de70716e84
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
14d5fb57a418646d1eb59174a6076a3a
022e777587dbef5060eb48bf310f6eee315226de
describe
'720590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZNZ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
c2b486e822bfdd6a17d805a651291016
6239c382d307cb6d628dc52c33b3b49c9c4affdf
describe
'126915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOA' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
665c17942a3824b8c0b80f5dd7b22db0
43d43719248c4e131413453ee03fcaf2a0cecf5e
describe
'26594' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOB' 'sip-files00164.pro'
0a53fc1ea38d9c72a5495991dac21e5e
ed94cddc1e202b5c4829a2856f4118bf587a141f
'2011-12-30T11:37:18-05:00'
describe
'35859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOC' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
3f30b0bd95fad1d223f7dea4c1c11155
ae8ae73c7f5a15a3021bbde018a32ca89bdf64c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOD' 'sip-files00164.tif'
2648ba74405eebcb7935ff02b300e84b
fb6e891019d636ca2347ba32092095eb4e15aca0
'2011-12-30T11:38:29-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOE' 'sip-files00164.txt'
48229d712cad41b21614a94eb27537c5
dc080b4039f4e2e9afcbec090c807b46cfa1e31b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOF' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
df92911f2ac50d455f1ec812788cba8c
47a0d1ed0fc29a03e55a62d01625fbfd515ae96c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOG' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e7b38befd3325a75659daf0d5c1887fd
f716a60c97288846d88a5f928df3c175a082b900
describe
'116952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
5ba1cfedd31e551481a1ca47dd4b4f29
b5ee86ee5f7aaa1548a4cab671d800e88c96a456
describe
'19779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOI' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6c24082f5b63b0fe3324ac5a78bf7b1e
0d2b3fd96f48b59d41c309383deee945ead1e7cb
describe
'32473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOJ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
cf4738b216b176241090873e58c71257
be202051c1d9987acb934523760810677551f783
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOK' 'sip-files00165.tif'
ee85dbb877b6a479d55a4750df61ad65
b6e12942c9d26192994a9363c6c1c9770ec28088
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOL' 'sip-files00165.txt'
9c031412fb365603bfd542bda1b90016
578df21be40315b4b32f39e563583ae93216fa53
'2011-12-30T11:32:19-05:00'
describe
'8484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOM' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9e2de41874c6f8f643bac1fd08fc67dc
9741c1ea404ae4546eedf8d89f57cd40283035c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZON' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
a19e661ba3e7d21d4beaf0cad8867458
f260c6ebfea69f730e50ef0225954a61d00c47f2
describe
'161524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
470716a4884fefe333e9f04aeed9f66b
44f88a04a2cca7f9aa3e3054946d2d5a51b72b68
describe
'42096' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
63d50cedfcb4555d75d692e6dd08c98d
0b979342e78a2350e66c3fd199df9f3f580d6461
describe
'42798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOQ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2c2ff5bdbde8ef14d38930f603663a63
b327583ac62fd48aeef3512b160a996b24f81f57
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
c265ec2e7c8a8c175b1300ddcfdf7903
81aa37e983aaf7dfb40d5ce18a6c457569a973f2
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOS' 'sip-files00166.txt'
5c37ca3c761dcb08143f9161ee897a7a
a45c070433d899ac36355c8ffb2dd709bfc4290c
describe
'10415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOT' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
4a645a7436dc0b8b59c5d0ad1d041af1
505152dcf6d54312e034ac2b87405a53d795e49a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOU' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
daadafca8cc94f1d78126f212e5baca7
cd02f58799c68e1dc972a576e89cc0b13aed74f4
describe
'153717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOV' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
43ac84957a2041f09dc89c14ca0e7851
fdf8f47a9ff6c574ce95d0c4e95dada5656df307
describe
'28123' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOW' 'sip-files00167.pro'
0a3e07d1b92d69987d1580860f9281a7
2601da7ab3fa7362be35dbbc145e79140a397008
describe
'42163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOX' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
deb8dcf24f48cc82d996c1e709abfa91
1e096c2b126e764b1e29daabd0ac6a19b0341bb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOY' 'sip-files00167.tif'
7d34b4b0306f83ef2dfd0216be0ef1b0
8dc46d97737b74b96e73a78df3aae3b95e94570a
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZOZ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
3025510907c55697f5820c1208d2e18d
5460beafc74968d27d97736979d9081eeeb85fad
describe
Invalid character
'10584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPA' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
9dfaf4caeebb3766db082868ac851792
737d81f30d915aa9644dc4ec23cabfb4db65ba8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPB' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
c85f6ea9f9a474a06b50e41157381667
fe42e3076b799250cdf0bcd4d72b7febf416271e
describe
'171518' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
0b015d1a543fcf1a431c2cf6ca363499
4573c2adf58432ec08981ccdb6294c5a3b504d59
describe
'71097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPD' 'sip-files00168.pro'
09c8439456be500e99e8f11c1eb0821b
27152e1c06b2478feeec461777f1000521e9d69a
describe
'46003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPE' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
5b2a4c05d193a1336b636c100b42ae29
c0d2adccc914c7a49b0d4238cf708cd2759c4b8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPF' 'sip-files00168.tif'
92c90b9e79457d78aa5eaf82ef5f907e
e99dc6377f34d820ba568b6a46cbb3bdcaf7e069
describe
'3617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPG' 'sip-files00168.txt'
4e8fe37804e8e589cbaa96061e8aa3ee
467d1b321f64aab3fabf09758328d786ac248728
'2011-12-30T11:30:56-05:00'
describe
'11264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPH' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
bed1c0122b66f845061402bf14168b4a
7618b01e2e270fe3e0988ce0f67d5f71623da481
describe
'720630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPI' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
cc7fb8a181d1a566d39562e097b744f9
b66389c22c28d70454f256eb00b661ec5a806e95
describe
'175864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
4d7b1e18e7df4fead627067f66b8575e
df13ef48a3dddf9c9fa3df37b64de275f00b549a
describe
'73510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
f53eb48299bbcb0aed6cd417f5fc4adf
3432bdd82855ec8d812510b507e88487f329486a
describe
'47046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
78ea774c435620dec05ba2157b9406db
ae5f80152cb2488124f7d414f084de8a55c530fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPM' 'sip-files00169.tif'
c718ede4f3c92d83e2bcea922ca9f91d
eb65b065d66829f6aeba8d7292fcb463feecf808
describe
'3730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPN' 'sip-files00169.txt'
bcf1a284aae4be10aa4350eb8b0556b9
6b9ee16b07aa482cee33f28f47f01a8e5e020bea
describe
'11345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPO' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
a7080b0396a7fbf937598e379ffee891
940c5c11536e144ae601957c938d1b1317799334
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPP' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
480f3ba9d0de9f178ae3c7bc828abcac
98ec80ca254c7d2bb251e81d46f050f770f98f0a
describe
'123599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
5b246fee020a949433364035bf46d37b
60902950e76ee43d7571bdae876b6a442125a858
describe
'18770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPR' 'sip-files00170.pro'
c4106f96e8647ad2fea63a37b7f37269
4b4909bce741a9a145739278c7c1b4f11204aad8
describe
'34278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPS' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
1d60e40277709485950d89f3059affb3
553ed092c51230387b72adda6413ee35c6074142
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPT' 'sip-files00170.tif'
111672fc742686201ab52dfa17564db5
d49f78680a4429de93de86fe8624372e309de262
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPU' 'sip-files00170.txt'
aa630a3374d3ac092a95712d75848169
11eaf582062bdbf311102374f52d1996c8435301
describe
'9171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPV' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
34f665a58ecaf671118ce865210d982a
8367b408ec59b7b170d70825f9f011030124a9d1
'2011-12-30T11:39:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPW' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
2c10ff942c915b407439897108d8f068
2ea493fa85c0dd4e32ccf740f05875a2ee9c9c61
describe
'173845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPX' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
b38a10b651006f03a5ed98cb59c2f2d6
5ac05bcf524293b02e5e2411716040e31ad42c2d
'2011-12-30T11:33:44-05:00'
describe
'50099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPY' 'sip-files00171.pro'
267f8e750d9851302eb61aa79a3c92bd
6e037511d6d933233751ea0eec2a6f5f65d3753b
describe
'45471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZPZ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
1f13d36f8f872696aeeeb45916ae91c5
03cddc27044ef091e091455595ca7d907ecc00af
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQA' 'sip-files00171.tif'
7f4a53cb533afd0b506fc09b6f48328c
5cc79ea0e201f6c5cf2695d231242fcf916a5ffe
'2011-12-30T11:38:25-05:00'
describe
'2283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQB' 'sip-files00171.txt'
d0fb2539e45ebc5953a68cbe7b546a36
e880de0e1e64bbab1447e100f6efc671ad741165
'2011-12-30T11:40:30-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQC' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
49c6a7ec9f8df0de5c9d6370d58e9b13
7cc3a0afff206c85bd33614962f24dc460ea6e2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQD' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
919da92a60866aed9d603507f383945a
36bb022d18730ddce1eb0994b5b83d98197e3192
describe
'119788' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQE' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
b16eb0ab60c7b8a70978cfb75c73cfdf
ec85ec3b731f033b3c9642f10219cddf7933f031
describe
'17635' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQF' 'sip-files00172.pro'
71734ec478ab837f913fe92b4391adf1
d78fce89f7605c6d5ee7d22fdaed8a3c4b737e27
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQG' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
dec932c773ae086630571c70d2e8778b
c35064817aa4394dffcc7bcd45771a3f732f7f59
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQH' 'sip-files00172.tif'
2a25c1478d0b13b6d1b765959909f70c
01af5a6da916a07935791d60896cb62d899f99ca
'2011-12-30T11:34:18-05:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQI' 'sip-files00172.txt'
1f7bb9a1d0589c5141bad89f25317080
edb6682e2a6826f365e3a38197c25215f84498e2
describe
'8106' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQJ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
af393fb0be92d07d9c1df8dc369ce954
9ef629f084af8accafd409d4b02a9ef1040d07d4
describe
'720549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQK' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b3c0e5468969b2c37144e4bdad7a77de
fd0f4621e870ffe311044088c43ac350a7c3a6a5
describe
'148666' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQL' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
dd17cff25e5939a42583163973cfae5f
59daaf1d0a4d73c3108dc00106003b9b215b23ba
describe
'2246' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQM' 'sip-files00174.pro'
fa47665580e02899166974490a1b4ad6
29d63c2007b31d129524eec0d624bf4566be235a
describe
'37290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQN' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
c1a9945a799a979b4c62f2a63505614b
8ade43a27b4f1c117c7130f0bdd1509fcf6bbea5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQO' 'sip-files00174.tif'
c10c51c765a4f68c159606f4b0f24d57
8ed2c40a06456cbbeded1c11f3918a1f1e22fe9f
'2011-12-30T11:39:32-05:00'
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQP' 'sip-files00174.txt'
ed28ff534f6d11efe443c2c724159dcc
4d02c7e1b99c4ff2eb0204c8de65d2da808adc35
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQQ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
6286b31b6915612fe64bf0e9b7d83665
3196120d6ff4a07527f7d233096338355d5ed63c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQR' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
f3ef163b5ba6cd2f79a58e3d111ab54b
e59cfa5dda325a211dc32050ce8874c8cfc3eed0
'2011-12-30T11:38:17-05:00'
describe
'165079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQS' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
fb96aa294c27dd2892b1ae57a88753fa
282c4b93510ed971cb4bc1be270f5ab4149d415b
describe
'49700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQT' 'sip-files00175.pro'
8014bf50d0b053765595576c8e6e7beb
3b2fbfb6729602745f17324e6d8c894f627cdd9e
describe
'45476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQU' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
e042af44416e27aac2c7fb454790de6f
de308b304ae0e1221f68deeeadb5efb1bc98af47
'2011-12-30T11:39:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQV' 'sip-files00175.tif'
8120e321aae06ce11ba3eea1f066efda
156c71f462efc7a6776b3374621a616b9a89278e
describe
'2726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQW' 'sip-files00175.txt'
2ea9352f15a1a65ff4b3b6dbe1959690
c19ad4353e4d3c74a4a2403173f98047b47c6784
describe
'10841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQX' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
b184d74e9dfe18af23774eb6a2847156
5295ac5d7751bd49a659c1c3c8f075a73e238190
'2011-12-30T11:30:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQY' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
c5c561ac53da303dc58876b12f684311
8e8b9ef1745b0d9e606c4a8b0b906e31972a9165
describe
'161256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZQZ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
771a0aa27c008997ed49a104b3d27b30
b4cdca38793db26cc9643f478159b6dd38b1ad29
describe
'56987' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRA' 'sip-files00176.pro'
1921ee510ac06be25c36ebd278acf501
bad9bde355ffe09e23377040b7eb10e65692b643
describe
'42446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRB' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
a4af753423869c710ebbb81b5ec01815
3b7e4aa3d3456ab0149a0407cfbd945884014f04
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRC' 'sip-files00176.tif'
a8b83fe7a6712de7b7221d7fa02ef584
70f7ae8041eed7cdcdf0c3a5e0cf162bbc9b06a0
describe
'2349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRD' 'sip-files00176.txt'
f0060cdf86595ed96de8990b92341ed3
f02b63eab40e0443e9d8bcda0df0f9a27aaa9247
describe
'10122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRE' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
79651c70d18e547b50fa904d353bcb8b
37e0b2784f844497396c0efc329930869ab97795
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRF' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
61afd5db72351a951724307fc136e26a
034df43e72fa1087da4f9fac2421b6f18fc6045d
describe
'154927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRG' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
2556d4834edc2c8ea633fe4b42fae3b5
2124d7e22790f4f393fe4748718b74325e8979b6
describe
'45854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRH' 'sip-files00177.pro'
62613be534814bc1ba8c5a831ae9a497
d530df5e796ce9503dd148200923ac05114ae629
describe
'39249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRI' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
911930f7606cb0529dbd801fb7e5af79
6a9c76b6dcf76201f0309bd0c301aee36dc5a1b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRJ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
886587635863811095da67bde515640f
e49a86e72e90b28e8a3c2d550dc50e08b33964cb
describe
'1953' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRK' 'sip-files00177.txt'
338d47b91975559a8b10bf58882dc838
0b6dc3016bdd12c2e097f03acba171aae9b7e44e
describe
'9383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRL' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
cfe374344bf1739ebbec6cf3c7b4d898
d3db2051f0cb90d7cb97011090b532b82bb0adc5
describe
'720589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRM' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
4be8751ff59b4e4ec75e6c4ba22c6e67
ae8704778f34bde197ed0b5db81d9f9cf9721eee
describe
'96765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRN' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ecf24b8f26edd6c96f89abed495b583e
4920f220cc65910e1fc9f0ccaa9fd0f2a766496f
describe
'16147' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRO' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2491931faff2a1601911d51cc7d11279
0d24203a443f58cf08c5e4c7faa47315403bd866
describe
'26294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRP' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
201ee766a754d4e79013ef392139640f
19dc506ead312000dd2e50fb44a62c6e5b635b94
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRQ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
94df0816201e912620d7c67f96681919
15c33bdd466c74e979b865f265bb99e651264d2b
'2011-12-30T11:31:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRR' 'sip-files00178.txt'
5ae7bc12dd11d6f1763dbf1bdaf35c2e
8c4ce294f74a6b9f4ac7e43d7252a87a7cb69b82
describe
'7231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRS' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
60f8a81dd2fe76a2e3a56ef1412f9038
93c1de97a3a4ad7eceb5d711140201f390949abc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRT' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
a2e7ce6f0cca587c116762e5f84d440b
9120168885de939644bf4c00431687253e1b70c0
describe
'140955' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRU' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
1920b384b91873e1ae3a7584bf5a5501
c3486899a714304d42930faf2792a643895da3f2
describe
'567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRV' 'sip-files00179.pro'
8fe388b6e8d9224596e79ba90f8df1da
6f498b1ed61e806dc0b3bfe7d032ae081ae8df4b
describe
'38345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRW' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
0beecc93981e984332827911e91b7a3e
7aa9e5e1cc1db0dab54c95b65c8e73b06d45deba
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRX' 'sip-files00179.tif'
1e290f3e1484fee73fa81c4d49b29555
836fe80e8b7526aee42d36d460e23b704b82a1cf
describe
'21' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRY' 'sip-files00179.txt'
15151ed3b1a78f16a09dfeb3d08e1474
c88186c8eaa3778729f02778c842df10b1c53c4c
describe
'9972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZRZ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2f1aa5d615c8fc60cf1a750be54a264e
33b4136bd51004f344a02503e1581706f14722dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSA' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
1900de126130920f033a9b7b93e51104
82dae5c5db272853e77e67ae592f173225aecd2c
describe
'134184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSB' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c401d4f0bca8b90da51a52312f563a06
02710f14109fdf380e89a3763f46a00e05a61e3b
describe
'5239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSC' 'sip-files00180.pro'
baf9380ab974ea1169dd1b8f2dee2c57
d598dd830b3b11fde1f79d6908c78c2529ae9f88
describe
'36279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSD' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
754593b30858a250b4023122599246e6
c1ee30747deedfa398e52fd5a6325b442531ccee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSE' 'sip-files00180.tif'
a1db35291201f86722495c34403a23b3
b550e9387bdf50ac0d4469ddd77f7c841a6bee69
'2011-12-30T11:36:25-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSF' 'sip-files00180.txt'
d7ed4e04c4dd93258340dc45718f6896
522239175a1ba2969193f1056bfd20cedf3b9389
describe
'9321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSG' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
65b79414495efda67d1569162a3ee00d
2773f3cb9f16d6551be32b9c151bf94b4d44e1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSH' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
0076c84667995218ff66bba1bd32d794
5464bcd8fc05b141cd9647d53827dff2ece4851e
describe
'137048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSI' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
b23d847820e416b869311bcb60a26699
348a9e334f47fbacedfbc5438c99cc38d7a8b8e0
describe
'5643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSJ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
327e8ca90ac9fb7ac07ce0c8ef7a4431
3c9355dc8e2806927d85f45452d0e865f79972d9
describe
'36930' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSK' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
3458201929ea095ed4c44dc20c00c9de
893ae693a5ddbddb157c56c5e4f0d176d4243235
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSL' 'sip-files00181.tif'
1fe35d2c1ff63a2f88b318127f2f52cf
e9c9a242f1188c5684a127a3ec7ce0697428c994
'2011-12-30T11:32:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSM' 'sip-files00181.txt'
b7187a1f470a06d2dcdbf57afcdeb312
fb5b46d546ed57d2c6032d0183d372b7f210a933
'2011-12-30T11:36:51-05:00'
describe
'9740' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSN' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
5ef927f64e91050a777ef95e8fcb0fbc
8ea772774b7f6fd63ab2a3602e2e172799f97c63
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSO' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
1cfaed0d3c759de0bcd3dee93810c412
c1448daf29d4be3e958d763a09a25b8a0a54af0e
describe
'133914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSP' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
3e314a697254397c83dd8a105f3b32ba
7c8cf19275b48f8ef882d404abfa647fba14968d
'2011-12-30T11:38:32-05:00'
describe
'23128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSQ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
092d575f3f9af60f533a875e43d95697
aec68c0514a1fde0b49b654d4c9e09f744be0741
'2011-12-30T11:38:42-05:00'
describe
'36299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSR' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
fc31d580b4cee423e029ec72146a7629
9a6e936cff6de621c950840bcb1071b1d89876e1
'2011-12-30T11:38:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSS' 'sip-files00182.tif'
1555932da991e612261c5b28acadf583
f42bf3a729cdce7a829365cdc2eb6e5b9e0f1631
'2011-12-30T11:40:09-05:00'
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZST' 'sip-files00182.txt'
d7af117586159f871af8479b04449aba
80ea219bf6f83b67ff1a9b3cd1b49c976da7e46d
describe
Invalid character
'9639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSU' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
cf49da89432e6bef8822e04ee52ec1c9
c6be3cdb206baf5d0b012c5955808917877d558b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSV' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
4c8382eee7e97771c60bc446ca72fff0
afab1eb1b1bf2b809dbc9e51841c632a953371e6
describe
'127142' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSW' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
bf0264eefaebea5c3ccbc74472625f96
0fedd8ee3db4b03f00f3b17d0eafdf8dc4420a5d
describe
'21362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSX' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5efe008e4e7f60c194ec5703c76b05a0
ebc898b053b459ae21c72dc465f8f6861e141763
describe
'34075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSY' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
9b027a0a8a8ad0c07556bc5bbca1bd5c
9ef0ec00baca1aeca52b2562d8947f7863b64cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZSZ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
8d1a825f6c2b6f8b687d0140b660fa6d
114c42a25ad4c7d9d9a9a1cebd378db9a8e7b46a
'2011-12-30T11:31:49-05:00'
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTA' 'sip-files00183.txt'
a55dda0ad020270a8b6c7ef8ac7b2df9
4660b511b449b5816cbd6c87b83bbd62e951b2de
describe
'8995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTB' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
9c71b6d789acb7473b57889a25e3d024
7efc81ef04734d457fc30bf2689ec02f5d8f2c12
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTC' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
15c45590ef6cf97f672d15c5d0d93143
d83506b1c61223c74b23eed37954b6157d7681e1
'2011-12-30T11:37:36-05:00'
describe
'140606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTD' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
9fb7e6e306154b71832e7e35d44c2fcb
c0c822039b3e3ae576a2a0ac8f0974157a9bfc14
describe
'52371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTE' 'sip-files00184.pro'
8c5597cb2b3e41a3cdebb0595676fdc0
38de96b93e79a79ace3e2da4af4859d7bd13b2f5
describe
'36552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTF' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
44f438a8696b97cfb2eb6f90d4ee93ef
e533c6ebc32c10b3c312adae0d07aa156d775b1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTG' 'sip-files00184.tif'
cbe073f089b94c746e1d30405d35bb93
4e6cf9c6355acf94b9942c988e1c3f572693ded5
'2011-12-30T11:33:04-05:00'
describe
'2156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTH' 'sip-files00184.txt'
223963d4343e1489983962afebc1ed73
60589a703160451e04054d9adbf340210c5ce6d4
describe
'8791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTI' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
be3f4687e05291ede233915f6f844f6f
f5deed6ffa8c2bca93db70c7ba81b41e9991d039
'2011-12-30T11:39:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTJ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
fe1fef627220d61ffb2641e9d24f072c
6c83bc562c62d6145390e64136d32a6deca7dafc
describe
'158374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTK' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
fa08752f4334b8b8140a266e076e2360
ef51f03629bb744f66ef7ee2dd964e007c6bd79a
describe
'52500' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTL' 'sip-files00185.pro'
7785f86668d9a06ffa008e4c804dee6a
82b47390015b72a7686a762271051f9355f05e98
describe
'39818' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTM' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
34ba639876c383e8bdf6292641d7a8f9
c216de3548ab932ddbdb59cd9e8b2b0beafaba7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTN' 'sip-files00185.tif'
f92496a9ef80147bbc124463b5fe03a6
332578b6edc83b1776a5fd434b7761d9c4378fad
'2011-12-30T11:30:37-05:00'
describe
'2313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTO' 'sip-files00185.txt'
cc02d2d3e6ccecd7da6e26f1db1f3da0
e30b40ec377bf77be6d5cefe1cfa72c6fee206e8
describe
'9716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTP' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
d5bb61cbe82989333cba6171a7477dd6
b8c7c0a9b2a5c8ac8e34335efc8daec12df547ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTQ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
79e8b03460856d4acc9603038de24a3f
d0ddd13bab43238d49d8cd15d83a81caf96ee69e
describe
'117558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTR' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
0d3e0d0881284499383bf8237624341a
b8dcb950b94944083d3e5fd37402c2d023b99f09
describe
'12484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTS' 'sip-files00186.pro'
d17874c1569f755073d4e9b73ffe7a1d
99f1f49c5f4b9517428924996244eaaf0fc52aa4
describe
'32915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
614289b0a38afffe372442251c7b71d4
e09ee87510f82ee0732636f0b4a4243a73c4fcd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
d5d0a97e149cb54f61d62dc9d1d2d19c
32dcc12fc515e13fa7224092cf20b8ab3455ca4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTV' 'sip-files00186.txt'
82b46bb9c76c8b34590cd4d2cc4a59de
1338ee9ae4f42ba8d57d7e0c092eba73c6612cf6
describe
'8763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTW' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
244cae4c56b8bf154800cfad573f7398
f509f8b15431002978cae66d987837ad758ae98a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTX' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
925f7608a8e57dcc3eab93e2a65b9b5c
321c4cccde7014705da662b6cc1c231167fdd28f
describe
'114646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTY' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
a16bdd0dc8febb20649cf9a0d2a64fc9
6f24ff0496bdc8d547a0f7fb785e363c1c9add19
describe
'10395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZTZ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
38c76c6419fc1977e28f518b8a8b18af
29fd7a54a5a0d329b0ca3ac33d8c2fec1eb8176c
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUA' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
eafe93639f9ca6dd1f7707f667ce5b4b
4861834d94f13331516f3ddd740c2e0820f717b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUB' 'sip-files00187.tif'
158b633513c0e8dabc2bc20bd475ef32
0ce434dc62a8451c45fbcba3024cdf0b70a15114
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUC' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e8cd9b955e3b7d142481906c44a0c8b9
9b2f5197f52f2fa61b69a8c4bc6d92aeafa744da
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUD' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
5c02fd75320f94a3509955f3e3ee4e84
53d324204471f381b951c1b2b04b310e65b79a01
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUE' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
a30e21da6daad4a3c5307a4570a970d2
042a66cb090b01e7f6746b2899f3405c57029d9a
describe
'137780' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUF' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
4aacca816d6a737b0f8eeca151a6fab3
60b5fc80497949799733eb96d179cb0aef9266d2
describe
'54239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUG' 'sip-files00188.pro'
b4ca7c6188c07172cbba44d94e34def7
9b7cf976ab4086da3c7f282c2ae2d67e43906485
describe
'36568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUH' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
02e81537c7754d6d0e06c96d1044fe8d
19c4709fd32df68f053870013b99f00f0d91e77b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUI' 'sip-files00188.tif'
4e9992b33388c5e799aa15c0be329825
e8c00c8384c9c870a78af310142813f5f5c4cf5c
'2011-12-30T11:33:23-05:00'
describe
'2217' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUJ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
0cf1f64a2efcf53cc87a661bdd0f8212
c9ace0372b1e8d9b21fa47a8ad5191a92dce7192
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUK' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
61b77edd9af8238104eeb5f40109a0bb
37b1d9107bf54a73091fb1de74f43b9cdfd3e2ab
describe
'720503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUL' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
328f94039b99792f8c8ada9ace75131f
08c8d291fa4629e1973c9926d36ef932a8a54953
describe
'157226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
eaffc563f93b7fea9fe8fb79de08659f
c9e27831306c8db4603c83fa57c3242d64b4c73d
describe
'70508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUN' 'sip-files00189.pro'
3c15aa9d4eefa4ea2ee5a61c1d49c477
6a2a633872120201ac95ae897a109e99c2f74bd3
describe
'41600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUO' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
4eba0a8c51afbc1b648e93a23a18a5b5
0fc25ba4bd6dfc13d5451dc6857f9ff650bc5a67
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUP' 'sip-files00189.tif'
b2e9682552af9dca3320785f52371155
a5a67c9df82f1a8d5beefe3bc0e10617565b17fb
describe
'3191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUQ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e3b01dc15cd660fc390b04b38d88b611
7e0b35f083577dc3b2b7588156708cc80f33d9d5
describe
'9826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUR' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
7972a924e26bbeb758442600ae7e3a55
a4e9698e3e9c79fa8d0dbc45db065af4792f3890
describe
'720578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUS' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
8a9571ef24e3495ade93a886423a7ff2
be509887cf767772c35fe3821001b6f738971ee9
describe
'126372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUT' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
d47c6b63acfed68b2603189493af2a53
7af7291c79476fd6c43f826a492eab90d28577e6
'2011-12-30T11:39:27-05:00'
describe
'33766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUU' 'sip-files00190.pro'
2dfb56065a2d2a5324a00fd5cd5c38ea
b25bb2252dc6abf944193e02ef74e947408505ef
'2011-12-30T11:36:40-05:00'
describe
'33542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUV' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
c96da960de9e76e2454725d7d736aaab
8b97e937aaba877f8a7fc4c2f24522130c0566df
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUW' 'sip-files00190.tif'
ec3505fcc5446ead1ff23d539b637696
55677e308038c609a289f87e6dda89ec1b1892ff
'2011-12-30T11:33:30-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUX' 'sip-files00190.txt'
390b790a0c1ba93baec7b3335d3507fc
d7f6f25e54cdf5e4f6ff5d5b43b0bc214148a0ef
describe
'8617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUY' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
0c37251aecb1bdb646c42efc4bc8ce79
25f8a24b032080e5189543a2b4e6cc1b2e6d1299
describe
'720407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZUZ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
9d2ca4292aa39842720cd645614f5d6a
dbb9a3d8b0dbfe73167ea12e5b6bac1d2b7e97c1
'2011-12-30T11:37:40-05:00'
describe
'151671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVA' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
4c2cb4616d4fe466429c0ec60a30b1b5
27833b8e4f6af5288b6e392766f906621f59156f
describe
'51121' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVB' 'sip-files00191.pro'
f44f77c8e67fd3a0ed035f00e436a2fe
7e1029d21d65a5f9036bcc2d764cf4ae81c9396d
describe
'39758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVC' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
f069d7033c5286825a979e278eb6e3fb
834bd97fc90de09c20178b2f72d43ab801c5a703
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVD' 'sip-files00191.tif'
b9c48aa3237e5f97c8996f2074fb88be
07005cd77432929261e0ac1d6f77a8b8fe6b67b6
'2011-12-30T11:31:58-05:00'
describe
'2452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVE' 'sip-files00191.txt'
941316117835060038631b0cb0fac412
8e90dd5a83f660792ea0452d9e250661cd42fbec
describe
'9785' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVF' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
4ca312a80a1583391fd9665fd7e04b98
0b105b732ae8ece85d495fb096beb8d04bbd32d9
describe
'720468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVG' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
23a7197dc3dfca828dcb49a29cd30991
5df623a7c555e0786aa77d85da28d851af901f5a
describe
'160733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVH' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
e37fbdbe1bcbfb3c20392a434002ec6e
e877823fc132db3344749ca990eb3b768464a1d0
describe
'73815' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVI' 'sip-files00192.pro'
e8820714115a206af4ce51a4edc80fea
e7a3d9e811b921d822807f0b64e6c0c02afc034c
describe
'42590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVJ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
891e59fd1eacc1ead4556f64c6fa8698
5dd6ad6a3fe4f4f9b82abc999f7682c2f9911002
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVK' 'sip-files00192.tif'
526a186c18860d70627713713e9ae9d0
cb34d3db8f1af6705bffc80f91070c69bb3744fd
'2011-12-30T11:31:18-05:00'
describe
'3521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVL' 'sip-files00192.txt'
89fb36c9869634f7a8a6955c4c8f459b
063d06427b6b6837c3637c5c8792a0385cb3a87f
describe
Invalid character
'9824' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVM' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
7d9e5936736a374ff11f302f80dbc933
461dff1f025bfee48d0d358136439e184f2087a5
describe
'720491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVN' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
e824dbf861252c6f58182817867ff82a
c2b89a5144d7d5e5c7935be9d16a6eba8031bace
describe
'144919' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVO' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
2b7baae36e65808232db985b954f2952
a4e353e74612e46485b28c7ed698364a34671922
'2011-12-30T11:40:10-05:00'
describe
'45718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVP' 'sip-files00193.pro'
a37769bec989d8f7e0da556e7d1997d5
6d979da32ecefbe58939c83499a216c987f89c75
describe
'37995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVQ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
c98b176d27b154d1bbac201c15967e8c
ab735dca766c276282804102ccb8f40296dbd771
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVR' 'sip-files00193.tif'
0d893adae53175faf495e15674ccd537
2926ccb663e6059dfd8c1218038da6de23139321
describe
'2627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVS' 'sip-files00193.txt'
c75e2608fe8b7e113213c66b84c9a15f
782a814181d9c9099f870c0f69bbd9e11fa0c18a
describe
'9816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVT' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
c1f160c672e26c06215660127c04aa84
82a3c4aa3d48556da4a2a519ece27a82e8d2adaa
'2011-12-30T11:36:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVU' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
8231bf6ac02682f37a59f0d8b9d6d3d7
7a0c29150d6d96a346f5c14297315977107717f2
describe
'178364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVV' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
6b83e2c40aa73dba370a77588a574be9
e88ecce4befba447bf6b217e9e791bb1c693fbf2
describe
'71839' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVW' 'sip-files00194.pro'
50932946b1566fd34f09bf497027dfe8
9f98b106a10e21ee24ee63a0d509247e5537661f
describe
'49048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVX' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
71c9bfba41ccd330c6e7e5d8f5a1747c
3d9f5f46bfa03cd74a812fcb84770c1451c381cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVY' 'sip-files00194.tif'
3cb07b85dcbe29c049d6b27c00aa0762
cd1fbbba88d21f10255060c5f25f76ca423f431f
describe
'3622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZVZ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
1024f44c589613e725817798ea9db3cc
a921ea2dceab8c8bc95ea6e3932ab60b03fb60d2
describe
Invalid character
'11459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWA' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
e49aa46e6e3ad2ffe41ccfe5b71191f7
61efffd01a1be8ab5f87b370b91905fc5f7f56af
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWB' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
c384d1dddbe0ce78cbb3b81805c36418
cbadf4d247c88fd890e270cf9cbe4188ec20b318
describe
'187773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWC' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
74ce38c1239d1a50589da96fe388a793
ebc88f020d0112b0674216c7d6b7199c45c6d02d
describe
'71942' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWD' 'sip-files00195.pro'
197f4023dfbd51935740a0c26e896356
080cba52abdc817a232033ad195a15e40f86d3d1
describe
'49792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWE' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
59b50b6ac9132431c8b4c0c404c9e5b9
25eec9ab51f763b5a697091d6b51da6b0c459dc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWF' 'sip-files00195.tif'
d7ec5fb28b86aec22f05872863b23e75
09bd46476d714d8eb1fba0bee79af63a5597ef1e
describe
'3613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWG' 'sip-files00195.txt'
b03ace1f68476107bac0a5c1ff2659bd
7b074e9a50c3069a22557b6f6d68e2773ce13aea
describe
Invalid character
'11841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWH' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
c753e923a7280c94bc385938008ce4a2
3c1343384172ed15e277815f4092ab5d9204dd8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWI' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
2498a7c0890a67aeb92528b0a130ef38
fe287ba50a4fcabd28f4b6a05f8e1295e6c2c342
describe
'163712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWJ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
c990b333724eb307a7ba0dcc409f738a
8ebfb68d2d52943cd48752b32ae1e7f2cb8dd416
describe
'18255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWK' 'sip-files00196.pro'
c8758e55b25bda411045e85de3914cda
dbd958085bbdcd6e3b4b87ea62b0bc86f4139a98
describe
'43792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWL' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
9bfdf4c7233dbbd8e42996586d2ced1a
b45ab0f58d763713c5877ff68e9d49218983ffd5
'2011-12-30T11:31:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWM' 'sip-files00196.tif'
8d4599f6099760f8f70df166134db9e0
ea1113172679bb73011233702a654e3090ba441b
'2011-12-30T11:30:52-05:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWN' 'sip-files00196.txt'
ac778d5cb0a7232bdfbd08423356ad58
a6123f1ed642ab4350d817bbb26c58b621d8fbf7
describe
Invalid character
'10862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWO' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
064f7d5d232644b5fbdce1c4e6f70060
31ef8e93aa5c3256fa4905602acd69094634f39d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWP' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
ad949f526a7e1427847acd1fc3480074
53a4b706b1996f75c4f40cf407bd8a6821cda6f3
describe
'184110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWQ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
bc6b6c8079daed5239dbcfb9bb64171d
ba68ca3edc5a0a30a3fd8d93db9da82f3681663f
describe
'16924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWR' 'sip-files00197.pro'
70df99ba1c59a7791b471428cc4811d1
bb81c15bd0fbd69f87774a6ecead43359485c388
describe
'46786' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWS' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
660f06a7fe279cc348dcbcc4692d9840
02c73581c9243a145c891afc809169c5bedc359d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWT' 'sip-files00197.tif'
cfd4129d42780cf6943775f71a5697d5
4af4a40b8597c602a9b7252c72faf00cfca19110
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWU' 'sip-files00197.txt'
d679d4bd75ba0113371c28b2fddebfaf
4258b50fb153e06ae037334f0facb1d9e6da8918
describe
'11412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWV' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
8e397212dd2c5aff61de0a379968e191
0664b41dd96cf8a0f1ec850a56c6a83c41c35535
describe
'720411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWW' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
c185be64f4885138cb358219c7f7c5cd
182fd61cab4c976d504b6c6922e7952d39cb642b
describe
'164649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWX' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
143496ee3dbf079118f543b8b100aa30
d2c187daa258a3703a0abc4e417582f212953e20
'2011-12-30T11:39:03-05:00'
describe
'69114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWY' 'sip-files00198.pro'
a0dc4678d9a3700a313b6ff8416dc645
fbc3a416ecc403f597c618bf05383938727fd764
describe
'42049' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZWZ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
5a67a590fc135dc8d227132084549aef
df340da6645b143e4eff568c82c5712b25a5ea62
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXA' 'sip-files00198.tif'
5ec5919da0e59e3c554e6ab1da29ba13
c9356ba23e56890cdf8a4034568ad2824f8a9f9c
describe
'2789' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXB' 'sip-files00198.txt'
a69689d88fa122795067920d3f46718e
b1705dc98d9a3e2368555234ff4756e2e712a9c1
describe
'9787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXC' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
4bfa10130ad47350446d9e5ff4dd947c
7f74798cb61ea93f1fdc7cc0e06105d03245f042
describe
'720585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXD' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
deb309d2d36d9b4759a7bf1ac528e6e8
d1a63e6822c848af9f85aaecfbce1ec205bca9e2
describe
'165639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXE' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
160c103909eabd0ea8988dd712f4c6df
bd77465546a346875202507e03baa6743164e088
describe
'72525' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXF' 'sip-files00199.pro'
cda947b9f75118c1b72008a5365683f3
d73f4dc2c294fefd3919ce86fc63f8da14e5db7e
describe
'42002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXG' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
2283ddfd9f50f0388fcbe854116b7bd1
1e38646cc1fcd157e707ea3347f9c99b566fc960
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
caaa5bb7cbdf3732b613fd6c0b14d547
c28c654272626cf72f234c3ba3f7b228f262f413
'2011-12-30T11:38:46-05:00'
describe
'2985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXI' 'sip-files00199.txt'
abfcbc945099dcbf68801be31306f0e9
6c404fd885cb69c912dc08cd99f060e5dc25acbe
describe
'9567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXJ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
3d0f821282a651dd84ddd54b2599b06b
bc56cb70987070d09d02abd219b439f3bf68af87
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXK' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
35bc06bdda88c9f170466bb2eae72fd2
cea7905746af8bf797de540532b4a4daa18107da
describe
'145762' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXL' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
3d8865f948055873903305e61e870824
817c4a31599d27102f53d63432e2263f30f30cd8
describe
'51375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXM' 'sip-files00200.pro'
2c7b472de742bc21166e6027da6e2e0d
cfc24d1730a4baf9e98e6fe8ccacad58e23d393f
describe
'38127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXN' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
15c6be350179f7d86e0af667cbdf369c
c47d7ebd07abf0f26fe2b6e9571a3c5670b5b344
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXO' 'sip-files00200.tif'
b581a25c2efa2c9e8da36e59d6df91b9
d02df2e7f77cc940ef2af518111284e91d627549
describe
'2183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXP' 'sip-files00200.txt'
84003c9097d5e649f9bf702ad4681713
8a03d286e722024419e099f87f800de259ecf99b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXQ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
cacf5fa5ceff7ab1ac9052a5661db0cf
7ef50f20847bec273e0c866894ada4b8558eb42d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXR' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
30a1ddb2af59f64d99300484c54ab4ec
19f70f2fb9fb6e968102e405001727a56f075d32
describe
'135581' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXS' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8882b1583028e93d906bc5843254954f
792e55b2e88558ae4fa23b0de5a0e136970bbc07
describe
'20838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXT' 'sip-files00201.pro'
4844672310bf955bc76903b92a1b1600
66a1b07e543bf644bf75a4bd830463fefb599d75
describe
'35495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXU' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
99757b6a95c1a905bf4d27f1dcafab63
a3b0fc596d5b20d8750ad430784932040b99d56c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXV' 'sip-files00201.tif'
5c44d3eb65b27ba8fa1e7fabc6318048
96ac8df4604aaf67aaf3c07940061a5190fe25cd
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXW' 'sip-files00201.txt'
23dc5502cb88ed3775fe9898039509a0
2a846b40ca14c1d48d2bb18c3a6c9df7929f5b4b
describe
'9178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXX' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
69629cc050e7b0a1c20d7ece81151246
043e1093ffe746ec2783c3e916cd107b2801c4b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXY' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
67d6c6b242ab17023934e4a7b051309b
c6abc733b7061b3733f871f6a28874cd167bae12
describe
'157762' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZXZ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
63de3508ccf0e83f892d958606024dc2
6027d157a6e4ae08a598efe3d91e1b50b22e4a81
describe
'17279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYA' 'sip-files00202.pro'
5acef4069ecfc5aab0492fbb86259075
ae151bcb4d7d6f631b31eddc951333e786cdb355
'2011-12-30T11:38:08-05:00'
describe
'40922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYB' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
071b3c7674ef1e30f376fec2d2da3eac
51dc0aea80b9929bca5997bda5dd18aefae73ee4
describe
'17310732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYC' 'sip-files00202.tif'
a3f7a81456de8a159e524c5de62205e6
66d554efafca40a92e8f5f3cd375e38216a69ed9
'2011-12-30T11:33:01-05:00'
describe
'724' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYD' 'sip-files00202.txt'
c4db8818fbf40938e7ec4c7d3c8cfb85
dcb4fcbe3ebf051315bd721df206d809a91c0753
describe
Invalid character
'10312' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYE' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
6a256077aff6284d944401578dfc7c6f
0e4e0c552475f556aecdb03cc7bce57ce4bd5244
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYF' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
547002223dc301b71a288da9201aaf31
313a010ac9d6e3ff8fe5797db975ed57842176e5
describe
'165422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYG' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
316f0be40010fec40932f79ee2d8bd74
73e3cfbd2daf7fb0f7a6d42db50c4ebbfb0af0eb
describe
'17390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYH' 'sip-files00203.pro'
f38163b0ea1413c74faa7265c9d37ccc
2d2d0475c50c515f68b2d8f818058affaec08697
describe
'42698' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYI' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
83700ba6a1767daa79ae0f8b8aa152cb
6c9704c5259afbce77a990afb11745cd04e9c42a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYJ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
8c2320580fa701b53662a10e3f31a257
2a367365f99edf5494f202840478e86fa6fbb764
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYK' 'sip-files00203.txt'
10ffa98feda9d19461de263e4e845c7a
a5a1cc082562dcdc83d445e821f723178239a7eb
describe
'10770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYL' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
a6aa3ee076c76cd04cad94323f454b51
d43f3a36624307328738369025d36a017ba39ed0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYM' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
ed51adbf70b806721437764b706b433e
b4f2826b2d307c647447c1f56a911e3e5ca32be2
describe
'169763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYN' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
e7a7a35bce255e3ebf7874f60f4d0cb0
25b9d00312c365a0aa7c005cb90bbdb9bbcaf1c2
describe
'68634' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYO' 'sip-files00204.pro'
43340cd0f167988028d955db618cd9f5
20a5e61e5e5000ca6d473dc3e84e6723ba634953
describe
'46624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYP' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
b7d28346c224d7cec3558093e4fa8cd8
70ec7e63eb2667bc0af4e29ecb8b528b027444b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYQ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
bd616aba1bb71d7a7b9ef6e1655af050
bf38e1e18a253e1e5c0e66dbf2e86e0a844bb901
describe
'3232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYR' 'sip-files00204.txt'
8e5551856ba3d46a1f5d6590a311518a
02b74ac7c91c6971b7225764d712cd8780290e34
describe
Invalid character
'10959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYS' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
7f6d6648382bef06be9aff8057f837f0
f75152bafba737f6d64954856a54fd16a7159627
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYT' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
a51abfa2ae550bc6159864598a199f31
b4ccc01f2095b1880468b4d25b85fc5909e6dfec
describe
'181084' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYU' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
7099f799e0c2813354f1ea4ef5d8b085
6dfb473b5d5f36a1ee93930722912c49536b6f36
describe
'72996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYV' 'sip-files00205.pro'
bf14f5d770b6eb2e2d8bd321db51be26
f7d23f8088970953df2ce85a291521f57405b84c
describe
'47806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYW' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
360dfe8f3181ca70e2f9c2b8a739a136
8086252e659463bcad711616156f3d3ad0a7554b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYX' 'sip-files00205.tif'
bcf0335d362f3570fb886f9303979cc0
2c11e5b11fbdb120707a5ef4c4028f873a012588
'2011-12-30T11:32:51-05:00'
describe
'3542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYY' 'sip-files00205.txt'
6c8731a2dc68b87324ff63d43f00a4c3
d74cc1eef3442b60300bbca8dd825f2057198799
describe
Invalid character
'11146' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZYZ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
bbb130e6830b2116a629b3c661146aea
7fbc6bc3aee8090968d3845eddca1ad60f336daf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZA' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
5b444a84c46f09ff9eb94b1ac2212e99
5b6ed31e157c9c26c4f3cc268e2178d23a581064
describe
'157109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZB' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
6a58a7ea899b579ac37b83177affa824
6e6b18ce4355f5fd29f58bb709c584ab54a5cbc2
describe
'8160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZC' 'sip-files00206.pro'
d6138cce7a9af4a70944ef1f16e4c2e3
76ae1b0557d1abe9b861e98948ffbe491b1818d4
describe
'40168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZD' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
3f3c7be9611a8bb640d8c5f30b854488
2faca4ee4c65a5291a3ca0778a1697827b74ce74
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZE' 'sip-files00206.tif'
e8854dc2ae8bfebd4b71a4647d78d85d
79ace626a00b8c0d534181bb2473f407c44426a6
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZF' 'sip-files00206.txt'
366d65b0dd6f9414a729e4f0cf62c8b4
52ee1458a6b25a2efc03608a651df8af17741e3e
describe
Invalid character
'10020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZG' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
42ca95b56b580977cf0740b075c2f5af
3c0e0435be28488909fd231eebef243ff67e305c
describe
'720333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZH' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
bac1a3ebe90f3558b1c91580a5426767
681dbdc14f7ec801a386edd91ab96dc8fa0c7e41
'2011-12-30T11:39:49-05:00'
describe
'143767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZI' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
9d6781bd028feba1def22f6dc3b37017
af72fa648a384c8c1d1b530c1d06db583d1a9326
describe
'61303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZJ' 'sip-files00207.pro'
0caa731c6b36cc43049756682776ac34
367556abac36ab2ccb22539bc37f8017eeac191f
describe
'36768' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZK' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
66fab213a07245b066319e7a20790e2a
eed4258b79fd04eac1496b2be763d111d5482c5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZL' 'sip-files00207.tif'
be036857437ef69677a6cae9acf6f2ca
c58b69a551db495f91420b7e8b01ce654fc7d14d
describe
'2468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZM' 'sip-files00207.txt'
23fe9ae5a653cb98a056e3093a993e24
aff4d8fa9ad322c25f6d19f1c20870de941a87e0
describe
'8881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZN' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
8c703384560a0af736ab1d376c7fa05b
b8c4064b49e1b19570fd2af2729219aa69b6b128
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZO' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
cd07eea26f1eff5f3553a2e8bfbbfa81
b7ca7b70fd60d9e1149ab6135543797483e845ac
describe
'157668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZP' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
1c1329fb38d558d0dda9b1a5fd9a7644
41a9bad19d6b2dda4ab13c2c7ec9fe8039b14246
describe
'78730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZQ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
e22578f2f5c02e75c336ee09f9223b55
4df31a9447e3b49109dc5e7493957a8eade29c55
describe
'40528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZR' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
e8ec556ccf39f194f12ba897cfb5b7c7
29b49c7a78eb27ce5915e3fcfb4426b2a2a938e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZS' 'sip-files00208.tif'
e790095e862664ab63f78f5de0af2df2
3390723140fee0ea3d25d177127e134e3940d323
describe
'3276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZT' 'sip-files00208.txt'
3d937f88fdb636f0c69154e21d22360b
4ec7c634a3e98f4d3500c20a799c14e2883bec14
describe
'9374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZU' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
e02efa5d4563a807db2a87c4426aaa26
35d97c0c1b3f4387015cc8dc1ec00a0f78688dc7
describe
'720635' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZV' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
d0356a86839779fd21f99822c7418ea8
10d2e01752221e08513299f9bb5853d030b7a825
describe
'146985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZW' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
91bc0922f9d5f1481f0148aba9c569ff
4a9cf6e38907fe284c00591c2fe8321f0beb3e4c
describe
'43102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZX' 'sip-files00209.pro'
a16ad3d4ac7b278032cc444f675862c2
a4f1fa5014b87325ede5f463c796f691673a2507
describe
'39015' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZY' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
ce2037f5e16f41c301f70fb570d1b726
4536c238c667ef43ff96281d32312eb853942589
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AABZZZ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
68fb05bee1adff33c23574ab8babb629
b69df2698360fdec9d0083e7c425ca791f31884a
'2011-12-30T11:39:17-05:00'
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAA' 'sip-files00209.txt'
9181f067862a5ea6bd745d114b44465d
ca08ce35482452a497d1e3a9e67d0950ea3249cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAB' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
67707d2b06549f5d4c4b974351788923
08431d74115f179660d7fe3104f50f1493e8ab15
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAC' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
13c6902a324bf9bdf817316783da9dd4
b3936f3d20cd9de01382227dc771ae81f5a2f755
describe
'121126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAD' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
2ea5e207353f150953cac345f050cf8d
35f137be75cfc1146ba01aab5f0e98d06534700d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAE' 'sip-files00210.pro'
39a5fb13e43e3711becb3594b9ca4bc4
92b52247f778c1367b9a2deb0e91379993ff1e47
describe
'32936' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAF' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
a08df05f9f32b1d5d428171f0987aff0
43b9ba0660355d1e2b6d0ad8c2f869da0bc50161
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAG' 'sip-files00210.tif'
90ef1867dccdadbdd9c8a11ab7692496
0f461e877377124f33277e3c9a3846a5f1a7f28a
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAH' 'sip-files00210.txt'
2b6ec805bf3bb7dbe47621ba5f5d9b60
15d9f5988857c3aad59f1ef2c0e4a7bceb34f2fb
describe
'8807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAI' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
4617e334a33bcfb95d63546979a13bdf
93e54f92861627d6b7acc36c39c388097d824786
describe
'720548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAJ' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
04b2bc41a4e3b10bce4aba6cf7f48d58
c6c0603f43e554823fa2adeb6de93e6a303c2662
describe
'135846' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAK' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
71e9b1443094cf19eeb7df28bf0e25d8
a66dd60e68524ca0c7a2791f8aa8f28c22d41130
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAL' 'sip-files00211.pro'
68b51bafb3f89fc613a65adb4bdab074
d16a8303d311fe061e2da5a536de14c7417cb35a
describe
'37157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAM' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
8c927d5b9d98d3bc061bcb93c50a9edf
a77db021866bb6ffe9855e4d809c681072e6d38b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAN' 'sip-files00211.tif'
1f8d2fe12d0dbd03e70772331f397a07
87b10af3a367fdc6f5a79afaafba80156f24fefc
'2011-12-30T11:40:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAO' 'sip-files00211.txt'
1fe5f50b799f53fe0161fd956fc3280c
06a79f25c01e90d1ae64f044b19876542abd616d
describe
'9503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAP' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
19f928265a40e25b99f46528562a6512
e232c56ba52810d0a99eca546659523a3dd35fb9
'2011-12-30T11:35:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAQ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
55058bb762e7ddd3626516347335896a
b3adf90f4b9b5f03a4f35e7724d0adb247cab1d1
describe
'164752' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAR' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
85006ed9fc67d1e02404c97ca2d97c3c
2de54cfa3cc620ffc5b1659e3792f84a899171f8
describe
'74244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAS' 'sip-files00212.pro'
0afee7754a7ca22a3bc2cfd784881906
54eb46925ac786bfc8865f2d90e2342f7d9dfe56
describe
'44504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAT' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
123abd247ed3feb2720444d61a747fad
9c5a20ec2c4fefbba66b033757eee345e5b39c6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAU' 'sip-files00212.tif'
1168853a0ced086fd0ef9eacf00d1ceb
b3ae8a93023a358e09abbc0593a23eaba1dc53e5
'2011-12-30T11:35:42-05:00'
describe
'3669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAV' 'sip-files00212.txt'
43a051967788f374072b2ff08bc1a2ee
3e6604f8e8205dcd9c41a941d9f715e3fbb2bf8e
describe
'10383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAW' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
888d0a7f3b1a32623729c5ba6f54be26
dd07027c67c50b60d11dc4578203b6fbb6ea4a38
describe
'720524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAX' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
1a99a6737d6c5ca10046b1e9fe9d35d7
c3212e52c291ad1dc3795c12f42645023326b4d6
describe
'150413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAY' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
e6ba871cd3fc7497c3429bd8c273b915
3a7ba437573d296b59abf1775effb44d8a3159db
describe
'43950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAAZ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
797d7bfea1841e04327ba8d6b9665310
79a4b3a3672854aef77b84a75182016f6936eabe
describe
'39286' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABA' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
e003a42345eea89c9203538f5c9d20de
8908178ed756275fa109182ceeb10606ff56e896
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABB' 'sip-files00213.tif'
faf91405a778b4464a9606e9ae9e5a8a
5a4286211824daeeed4383c18dfca6991a0ea319
'2011-12-30T11:31:40-05:00'
describe
'1887' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABC' 'sip-files00213.txt'
83d4d9cdbbb9e8c340205f9082468bb5
6e78b73c56068ff94f67fa19d61692d44d328276
describe
'9746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABD' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
3dea698b510f9dc95e4a6ed330eeb6f0
2e14683d5820489a1a03d3a2b6c2ae7bde99e5e3
describe
'720496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABE' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
dd9dc08da65e036bb0a6fea9e7c3533f
5dc39feb994531107311b846da2be82a6710282b
describe
'141587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABF' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
60e76abca5d493e338501bb66c554509
ab5d6b4cbe88c8dd266982937276b4d6d52c9d08
describe
'46767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABG' 'sip-files00214.pro'
6e7f2b82113c5287348f5268b2769730
a325903905913d91a34255bffcfaa51dafe13939
describe
'36541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABH' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
6aa28d218390c50312c73bcee466ef43
b2ac90b14bd85446edaffcac980c259980d488d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABI' 'sip-files00214.tif'
06cec2ac7822913079da7d55a607e4f7
d5a752a98d598726d02813f84dc5a93f8761c49a
describe
'2016' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABJ' 'sip-files00214.txt'
540a321b51191342d96269ee7a86097d
da59fbce5361eb304c9cb02ca322bef045d29f75
describe
'8625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABK' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
cf715401dd29eae9a1526e361d158f24
ad1b88e3236585bb099d130a344cfb12f6318519
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABL' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
925ad5ea224b0ee6322248b04b06fcee
50790aa3fa8dbebc058ff09ab8f3f6e583090d7f
describe
'156931' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABM' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
4a1272d302eca322b98438ab562af858
b17820554275550a186598b90239ed9fa5fc97aa
describe
'56253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABN' 'sip-files00215.pro'
042300b1a42fb4739a1ad848cc27bf33
b576a8b1ce01b27d4813866731796b28e35cb7a1
describe
'41270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABO' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
d7463bb177ebb84b315021b1f28cc6cc
7af7a93fe2529770d3a482357182d8941515eb18
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABP' 'sip-files00215.tif'
b86d6bc035f9c2f769d7e40566725b1c
7de475ead595c871f9adbc26f070273bf68e5a95
describe
'3000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABQ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
a23b1b9f87da7ce6cfdf8c362c555d5b
f06b1dd4f3d7357898d45110d136a4e3fa8bed9f
describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABR' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
db39e23246c1e6f10704408050acca71
ef1400f425f0ff1707aab4e22437e6c95d5749c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABS' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
b3c0d0ae0704d9d5ff1c504bffaa4849
3509ae49f4531b74611c3b881edb0ebe5bf98b63
describe
'152168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABT' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
140bf43c03f5009818f74288fc15ad8b
df046fb9847e0e6fe694eb37de6dac8a3a8d760c
describe
'17810' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABU' 'sip-files00216.pro'
b9c4c8e48edab1c81e2d61562b4a738f
ed4635a35b27404d1eff4880ec62719270a53bd8
describe
'39827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABV' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
322d6b375aa46e7cd9866c54602f415a
682274d488471cef0964fb0ea4a82587d2e98176
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABW' 'sip-files00216.tif'
3987667dfc64f444deba20aac74ff654
8cd2f7c162df4fbebd8c7be72ff79f35d242aeda
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABX' 'sip-files00216.txt'
36f9cc4ab8b56ab37bf6352ecaf47cd3
5a11579e2537c69b3d9f005cdeca3b4b35c39bea
describe
Invalid character
'10057' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABY' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
a76690e1d32eb0473068790aaa7e6f14
6393f6e6347bc1ee6211efdbe460f4772b824692
describe
'720484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACABZ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
77a678d2063d683f813a3b25d856aa7c
ef9efd74c8273001550f775681453c887b15f75d
describe
'159027' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACA' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
7be9c714cb0dccdde6e60b81cfc6ddad
7675e2a371e703ea24ed6c98af584918d09dee93
describe
'15497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACB' 'sip-files00217.pro'
44900752636e335a1662e9f199121991
914b96885aa4f6bdeda0159ca5fc13fb32a1226e
describe
'39744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACC' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
9b3c052b136b2e3271d46b2d05b2f45e
322676fdbe7f6383f352cf9cce4e1ecfc709c67a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACD' 'sip-files00217.tif'
302986bd19018abbe09e85bf77777460
6517aa555446cfb51368b978c082fef8001e279c
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACE' 'sip-files00217.txt'
bd071e2dffef3d47c36124b44ea380f4
99106a671ca4b746574c95c3c8f4ade85d121cb5
describe
Invalid character
'9236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACF' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
aa58762e355aba3dd4473052c24c394a
b495c1cd2d4b89a547f25adbc5da087e1d5ad1c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACG' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
97c1733f0d79c6e5b6e420147046d375
fcab0f75eb030bfa71611d29c7f48f8459e4caf6
describe
'131903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACH' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
52930371ac172f9b5fa8369b90fa5d61
1cc04c6a88df38d130e632efafff54d457ed1224
'2011-12-30T11:33:20-05:00'
describe
'24478' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACI' 'sip-files00218.pro'
05729911f8174d94dca5c5d48ea1ef36
bbcc75f54a1c1bee07b20029d0188ace261680f6
describe
'36885' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACJ' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
1b9cca5427341278ed78cbcbbfc51a28
6081ac5b554c8f6d7edd27b870e696e90078a8e8
describe
'17310724' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACK' 'sip-files00218.tif'
db91c63287e7f9f89a0e19dd93150459
9099183fa84b56f40b2c2c1746449a2770fa25c1
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACL' 'sip-files00218.txt'
876b4fb72bbf11894da983fcfc23bdc9
807dae0144692ab416589b09b64df341c7cf52e7
describe
'9373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACM' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
9b879845c8475ea729f7a0010a9614d2
abdfff09c3a5607139ef8fe28d33db49823b8c98
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACN' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
a41a39bc28dd6ad5173e2dae6c5b4497
07eaf22f00a40d241b976b80a4945af87e7c8816
describe
'140643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACO' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
59b28dc630906bdd37ffa3bdbeb16b30
4922ec08bfb82382d700a2d71196ae0e2b5ebc50
'2011-12-30T11:40:06-05:00'
describe
'28284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACP' 'sip-files00219.pro'
2b54441073c6bfacf526549d3469e8fc
e38a5b42d67c67682cb6df6d96097afc8cf7bb3e
describe
'38808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACQ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
a5ee6b961a921f6e79cc0b50f2f8ddfd
54575b7ac10ff5526f6834a14f89189e94a7ed6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACR' 'sip-files00219.tif'
825277e8316a61612b0d8697821d6a2f
5e1a877207f8ba2d71464e2257ff06dc0ff27781
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACS' 'sip-files00219.txt'
3e1e901c59004c331bd6b15d3b310133
b0cccb3bc8586a0c4698bd0b57fc2a7b8be28b7d
describe
'9798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACT' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
e52f7eaa7f75988a1160a34efd4847f2
cd29965416615f63bcce3e83518e9c5a5177f6eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACU' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
be2669c20a787c0823a547e35cf3cf58
7296b8bd1fa27fd7dae5ee34cb1f58cae8fe6f73
describe
'130059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACV' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
505760010f58b5e2a664eb5e0f07367b
ceab27db156fbf3320f68b5d05d646ad1abdbf25
describe
'45432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACW' 'sip-files00220.pro'
86cb83733241dbc3fd242bc664fafba1
4ebb6febe1b7f6be32869c826faee45ea78f74cd
describe
'34721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACX' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
f842f195874bb8c9cf3e193c21dc6f5c
b6c34f7a49a0aa23ca5b52c5966dadeaf1ff9ebf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACY' 'sip-files00220.tif'
a968b7cd7ce0ac676dd446a48b397be6
b0022d9b9b404e841572a1425ab0388a36509149
'2011-12-30T11:39:28-05:00'
describe
'2456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACACZ' 'sip-files00220.txt'
ec6c037999469463f8ebd657c7ed6bba
ed4f64d55274c1376aed43a68db53044486f3f13
describe
Invalid character
'8789' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADA' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
f533fa53921bb3495bb35b74d4ebc887
6cb08f94571234918344987ae1da3adfac97185e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADB' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
de44b6721c86385c351da1713047ada9
c5219029ee3bde53c7f93333548649efd58e5b13
describe
'140061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADC' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
fb92ce8a47aa68eea05e72b0b79148b5
75da05da60be91c0d55d63b3c8aa98f8c3034f8e
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADD' 'sip-files00221.pro'
ced0d00c6b3477da5326464327e3983d
71e42d9e49999c5c27dd5f1e249648211711e1fd
'2011-12-30T11:34:27-05:00'
describe
'38202' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADE' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
d081254dbf58318585f7174da458a0be
dc9a18a5f22f993353361bcf38cf8d904bcd7391
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADF' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b05b334775e3f334e9345abdcbeb9dcf
6933ef09cbf026e96664494d008aff94fa7063f8
'2011-12-30T11:36:06-05:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADG' 'sip-files00221.txt'
0555b4186b7e609656c1f0f954cc13c1
e84b74fdc3dcfff2d97434919f3852d1e86b0cec
describe
Invalid character
'9778' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADH' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
1dd799e8b11f04d3c82193949c5c4312
a16041d4e813724fa109052a269fa6d735903ae9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADI' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
171268c25a874b8f7bcab59f115e9b96
2e71ff49cd8af80ab7d85ea0b6d123cda053c2f1
describe
'131287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADJ' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
c105010d82716bcd1e0867dd6003e69d
a0922b5de57b7b991cacdf7b81b3a5f20cbe3d8e
describe
'42875' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADK' 'sip-files00222.pro'
719b03aa5677dad5fa6b891cfbe180da
39a51e24079928a250896e0d7cb19edbad661dc2
describe
'36387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADL' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
9b888cbf459c2054c6e2fe797d830651
55c3cd8ade2ad492a5a4d50af6e769112d9ebb3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADM' 'sip-files00222.tif'
5753d3e8c492af711d097294a4bd64d6
64b3e26d34fd82b3d2742f6c70f91acad4b4e5bb
'2011-12-30T11:31:24-05:00'
describe
'2556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADN' 'sip-files00222.txt'
612c4e6c7f545825460d8146bf7b1198
6dd4f8116f9ec18d0ffdaab48b89730d1f7589e3
describe
'9184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADO' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
fce2272fceb0eac75b1ecf208bee1cd9
de1bdf97156aa163bf573d21cab959e9ef4f83e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADP' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
7a608a87cd890744c4127fcb68f9be1f
db8e24aedaf1062522a16752a353cc501208a060
describe
'117216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADQ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
60d2f00136628e22c89483246a7c17b9
35834b2d48dd3c1b13cf4d7dbfe958093676b74e
'2011-12-30T11:39:45-05:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADR' 'sip-files00224.pro'
3c5d18059cc543494f5377f70f44125b
63a00c200491a4ae37f1ffbefe56da54a8f8502c
describe
'29667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADS' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
cd0367dbd78b8fa89207df3c93f224d0
e8bce7860bc09a30035f3b09e5da45c9cde90225
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADT' 'sip-files00224.tif'
8513047fe0b520c85da1f586a55886c2
b83b97a26a45d838a6bf2792497c29e8976111ea
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADU' 'sip-files00224.txt'
ee3b10883eb3be1dc3a767332168362e
b870930577a67df4eba878c66366f5ee8929b2a3
describe
Invalid character
'8409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADV' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
424c78c2e2e84d63f15a8685fcd414f9
f2ce38e3c023196e9ed1c3ed0cfb272a26876e48
describe
'808194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADW' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
0410c782571008bf81a7e42f9e63a16e
dd7391eea0b20620b94f0ded43c9b928005f373a
describe
'125089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADX' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
27c7c6c4045ab05be1c373594c9a0c01
f3610bb4db3aa1f2aa8f3136a70db67d1ba6521c
describe
'32042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADY' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
b834595c7a1d7fdf579c171371545f31
403fd75de677fd64c0218c7c714baa639cd8a9fb
describe
'19414376' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACADZ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
7cb5717e53f1bcfec1f8a45d91887af6
cc818347317193e7aa2d4782bc281fd1b035d568
'2011-12-30T11:31:31-05:00'
describe
'9145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEA' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
03c4210b4bc4a6597ec09307aeed302a
7e348dac51b786078fab48713cd05a4fddcfdb66
describe
'800188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEB' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
b82c0fba5358d3286fe37b2d5011403d
3a1320606fb0dfc3d25f3352160c680809ac8f9f
describe
'176732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEC' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
9c9c989f066d0e836c6fb9d18e05362b
a7e8f8a198fe35de31954c4e35a017622d3e536c
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAED' 'sip-files00226.pro'
e2d4534dfb8d7ed937592a1c16381c70
3b65514008ec2a58308079c4311f209b615cb0ad
describe
'46616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEE' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
adbeabd5e2b1c2c378e233bdfc67c33d
da727b30487bb0d4e23df46f823218e807f88538
describe
'19215472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEF' 'sip-files00226.tif'
577495bf0c36a82a544ba940608558d6
6534c118af62b7e3020b34f6289254ed1af7d2cb
'2011-12-30T11:33:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEG' 'sip-files00226.txt'
67c2f4a9595006d7fb37143fc592de6b
192700777e59af83ee3068fa3784ce8da1a7429b
describe
'11495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEH' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
d91beccd98c4f40b0df4e48c4aefcda6
040285b603c82d3fc9d90892525923272f2a2782
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
8b958945acfd7bb6cdc2ea59cbf9c48e
9c617c8215e828841f782ae1fee5f40fcd707a54
describe
'323282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEJ' 'sip-filesUF00087065_00001.mets'
7d6f44d7b4b514fbe7ccd26b4d1772dc
c516beed84d9c01e277bdd93ecd1e6ca7508c1f2
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T21:20:17-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'420763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATZfileF20090118_AACAEM' 'sip-filesUF00087065_00001.xml'
6d77658f16e1483bab7c81602d22f2ed
17a9b120807a4c83f31508e89186908501e66581
describe
'2013-12-13T21:20:14-05:00'
xml resolution