Citation
An A. B. C. of every-day people, good, bad & indifferent

Material Information

Title:
An A. B. C. of every-day people, good, bad & indifferent
Alternate title:
ABC of every-day people
Creator:
Farrow, G. E ( George Edward ), b. 1866
Hassall, John, 1868- ( Illustrator )
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Dean & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 30 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Alphabet books -- 1905 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1905
Genre:
Alphabet books ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Summary:
An alphabet book of character traits: amiable, bumptious, contented, doleful, etc.
Statement of Responsibility:
by G. E.Farrow ... ; illustrated by John Hassall.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026768973 ( ALEPH )
39871671 ( OCLC )
ALH0047 ( NOTIS )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
RLUSTRATED BY 9 vt eerie nem

160 A. FLEET STREET, E. 6.

HIN HASSALL .

Entered ut Stahouers Hall - if : Tie ‘All RightsReserved:














GOOD , BAD & )JNDIFFERENT.

BY
G.E.FARROW
AuTHOR of “THE WALLYPUG OF WHY”

“THE LITTLE PANJANDRUM’S bDODO”
ETC.ETC.

lwo Ss tT RAT Ee PP

By JOHN HASSALL.

LonpDON DEAN & SON 1004 Fleet ST EAC,





A tHe AMIABLE



A the Amiable!

Ah! what an amiable
party is A,

‘He holds out his hand

in a genial way;

He is hearty and hale,
And he loves a good sail.

What a capital friend on
a fine summer's day!







Borate BUMPTIOUS



B the Bumptious.

Boastful, and bumptious
Bohemian B,

‘\He plays om the hddie
most beautifully;

But is really i. vain,

That some people complain
That his fiddling is nothing |
but fiddle-de-dee.







ONTENTED

HE C

Cr



G the Contented.

Chet Contented, and
smiling is ©, —

A good-natured, pleasant
old lady is) she;

And even her cat,

| [Tho he ismt too fat;

Appears. to be grinning
most amiably.



















D the Doleful.



‘Dear! Dear! What a
dreadfully dolorous D,

ihe picttne of misery
surely is he;

7 When he asks for a penny,
7 And doesnt get any,

a His language is not what
|} his language should be.





© tue ENERGETIC



E the Energetic.

i Behold, @nergetic and
eager-eyed EK,

|} Who has no time to stand

upon ceremony;

He’s all hurry and hustle,
And scurry and _ bustle,

About something or other

continually.







F tye FEEBLE



_F the Feeble.

Fidgety, fretful, and frac-
tious is F. :

For feeble and fragile, and |
i~ail is old PF: :



S

x | a tooth in his head,
: [And now, it te said
f The old fellow’s becoming
remarkably deaf.





G tHe GENEROUS



GS the Generous.

Tas 1s -good- -natured end
generous (x.

A kind little fellow, you ll
doubtless agree;

See him willingly share

That extremely large pear,

How very surprised Pretty
Polly must be.







H tHe HAUGHTY



Ab ithe Haughty.

Hoity-toity! Here’s high-
minded haughty Miss H.

‘|To be so. self-satisfied’s

naughty, Miss H,



C47’) With your nose in the air, —

And . your insolent stare,



// |Iocan’t think what youll
look like at forty, Miss H.



RUGS



I tHe INDUSTRIOUS



I the Industrious.

‘|You can’t help but admire
this industrious [,
Who is studying hard, tho
there's nobody by.

He’s so lostin his book,
He has notime to look

At the ink he has spilt; and
its getting quite dry.











J the Jolly.

This is the Jovial, Jocular J.

Who’s enjoying at Margate
a fine holiday.

He makes everyone laugh,

With his fun and his chaff.

Youve met somebody like
him before, I dare say.









: K the Knavish.

I'd Knock oer the knuckles
this knavish young K:
He’s been picking a pocket
and now runs away.

But Policeman X2
Has this person in view, —

_ |And will certainly catch the
young rascal some day.







VTC DS
“Ki iri





L the Lively.

Lissome and lively is light-
footed L,

Who dances the sailor's
-hornpipe very well.

| From morning to night,

He is merry and bright,

Is this jolly Jack Tar, one
may easily tell.







M tHe MEEK



wees,
i

ay B .
bi sk eee ‘
ge ae
4
Awe -
&
+
gh â„¢ rN
ge" . ‘
ae
oi
wt @
— ae
-
me et ® ad
eke, MT. x
n w «
ee ,
me A
par a
.

Down-trodden, brow-beaten,
meek little M,

This torrent of fault-finding
nothing can stem.

If her mistress were kinder,
No doubt she would find
her

The best of good servants,
a regular gem.





N the Neighbourly.

ee This is goodnatured and
| neighbourly N,
) Who over the wall has been
aes since ten.

KN To the lady next door,

(W ho’s perhaps rather poor)



ML | She's lending her very best

flat-iron again.





EIGHBOSURLY

N tHe N



©) the Obliging.

An Obliging Official is good
P’liceman O.
He holds up his hand, and the

coachman says “Whoa!”

His smile is seraphic,



When stopping the traffic,

/O {To let a small lady cross
over, you know.





HE OBLIGING

FY
=|

O;



|? the Perky.

Perky and i ae is Ppar-
ticular P.

| She wouldn't converse with
a policeman, not she!

But I have heard it said,



)Viat a soldier in red

ft By her is regarded more
—, |







@] the Quarrelsome.

| This is the Querulous, quar-
relsome Q.
Nothing will please her,
whatever you do;
And from morning till
night,
This or that isn’t right,
And whatever you tell her,
she says isn’t true.







Q tHe QUARRELSOME



rR the Respectable.

iT) Pre and | highly respect:
| able R.

About your appearance
most particular.

The man with the broom



Steps aside to make room,

¢ \And wonders, poor fellow, |
~ whoever you are.





RESPECTABLE

R te



~S the Satistied.

In his cooking most highly
Successful is §,

Pa his smiling face doth

satisfaction express. |

| He says, “Very good stew!”
And 50, doubtless, would
you. | |



This person’s a Chef, as you
see by his dress,





S tHe SATISFIED



_ T the Timid.

| Terribly timid is tremulous
T,

Who appears to be sitting



uncomfortably.

ce He looks nervous and ill,
And will certainly spill

aH |All his tea) He has spilt
some already, I see.





T tHe TIMID



U the Unhappy.

Unfortunate and a Un-

willing is Ue

The poor little chap’s in a
terrible stew,

When he’s had the tooth

out
He'll be better, no doubt,

And a new tooth will grow



where the other one grew.



DRPAYNE JD

DENTIST



U THE UNHAPPY



V the Vacant.

| : Utterly Vacant and lost 1s
poor V,

He’s forgotten the date of
the wedding you see.



Be He’s forgotten the ring,

And in tact everything;

MY A remarkable kind of a
bridegroom is he.



CHURCH
Notices
1 a

=a

ChLosecDn
DU RNS
REPAIRS

9



V tHe VACANT



W the Willing.

Perfectly Willing is antique
Miss W,





- ‘Tho: | fear very much that
W | nobody will trouble yOu.

Wi

MM lt is sad bit 2a tace. von
poor ancient Miss W.

Few are anxious to kiss

Such an elderly miss;





| W tHe WILLING



- A the Excitable.

This is the highly excitable
X.

, aiThe result of the poll or
| X | some land we annex,



Drives him quite off his
ee . head:
_ {And I have heard it said >

That such conduct his wite
doth exceedingly vex.





X tHe EXCITABLE



Y the Youthful.

’ Vv This i is the girlish youth- ;
7 ful Miss y,

Whol bestow a sweet smile
as she passes you by.
To look younger than ever
Is her constant endeavour;

Though her age you will



probably guess, if you try.





Y tye YOUTHFUL



LZ the Zealous Zoologist.

Thisisthe zealous Zoologist
7
Examining an hippopotamus
head. |
There’s no cause for alarm,
It can do you no harm,

For the creature, of course,

is decidedly dead.







Z tHe ZEALOUS ZCOLOGIST



{










@e



Full Text
RLUSTRATED BY 9 vt eerie nem

160 A. FLEET STREET, E. 6.

HIN HASSALL .

Entered ut Stahouers Hall - if : Tie ‘All RightsReserved:








GOOD , BAD & )JNDIFFERENT.

BY
G.E.FARROW
AuTHOR of “THE WALLYPUG OF WHY”

“THE LITTLE PANJANDRUM’S bDODO”
ETC.ETC.

lwo Ss tT RAT Ee PP

By JOHN HASSALL.

LonpDON DEAN & SON 1004 Fleet ST EAC,


A tHe AMIABLE
A the Amiable!

Ah! what an amiable
party is A,

‘He holds out his hand

in a genial way;

He is hearty and hale,
And he loves a good sail.

What a capital friend on
a fine summer's day!




Borate BUMPTIOUS
B the Bumptious.

Boastful, and bumptious
Bohemian B,

‘\He plays om the hddie
most beautifully;

But is really i. vain,

That some people complain
That his fiddling is nothing |
but fiddle-de-dee.




ONTENTED

HE C

Cr
G the Contented.

Chet Contented, and
smiling is ©, —

A good-natured, pleasant
old lady is) she;

And even her cat,

| [Tho he ismt too fat;

Appears. to be grinning
most amiably.













D the Doleful.



‘Dear! Dear! What a
dreadfully dolorous D,

ihe picttne of misery
surely is he;

7 When he asks for a penny,
7 And doesnt get any,

a His language is not what
|} his language should be.


© tue ENERGETIC
E the Energetic.

i Behold, @nergetic and
eager-eyed EK,

|} Who has no time to stand

upon ceremony;

He’s all hurry and hustle,
And scurry and _ bustle,

About something or other

continually.




F tye FEEBLE
_F the Feeble.

Fidgety, fretful, and frac-
tious is F. :

For feeble and fragile, and |
i~ail is old PF: :



S

x | a tooth in his head,
: [And now, it te said
f The old fellow’s becoming
remarkably deaf.


G tHe GENEROUS
GS the Generous.

Tas 1s -good- -natured end
generous (x.

A kind little fellow, you ll
doubtless agree;

See him willingly share

That extremely large pear,

How very surprised Pretty
Polly must be.




H tHe HAUGHTY
Ab ithe Haughty.

Hoity-toity! Here’s high-
minded haughty Miss H.

‘|To be so. self-satisfied’s

naughty, Miss H,



C47’) With your nose in the air, —

And . your insolent stare,



// |Iocan’t think what youll
look like at forty, Miss H.
RUGS



I tHe INDUSTRIOUS
I the Industrious.

‘|You can’t help but admire
this industrious [,
Who is studying hard, tho
there's nobody by.

He’s so lostin his book,
He has notime to look

At the ink he has spilt; and
its getting quite dry.





J the Jolly.

This is the Jovial, Jocular J.

Who’s enjoying at Margate
a fine holiday.

He makes everyone laugh,

With his fun and his chaff.

Youve met somebody like
him before, I dare say.



: K the Knavish.

I'd Knock oer the knuckles
this knavish young K:
He’s been picking a pocket
and now runs away.

But Policeman X2
Has this person in view, —

_ |And will certainly catch the
young rascal some day.




VTC DS
“Ki iri


L the Lively.

Lissome and lively is light-
footed L,

Who dances the sailor's
-hornpipe very well.

| From morning to night,

He is merry and bright,

Is this jolly Jack Tar, one
may easily tell.




M tHe MEEK
wees,
i

ay B .
bi sk eee ‘
ge ae
4
Awe -
&
+
gh â„¢ rN
ge" . ‘
ae
oi
wt @
— ae
-
me et ® ad
eke, MT. x
n w «
ee ,
me A
par a
.

Down-trodden, brow-beaten,
meek little M,

This torrent of fault-finding
nothing can stem.

If her mistress were kinder,
No doubt she would find
her

The best of good servants,
a regular gem.


N the Neighbourly.

ee This is goodnatured and
| neighbourly N,
) Who over the wall has been
aes since ten.

KN To the lady next door,

(W ho’s perhaps rather poor)



ML | She's lending her very best

flat-iron again.


EIGHBOSURLY

N tHe N
©) the Obliging.

An Obliging Official is good
P’liceman O.
He holds up his hand, and the

coachman says “Whoa!”

His smile is seraphic,



When stopping the traffic,

/O {To let a small lady cross
over, you know.


HE OBLIGING

FY
=|

O;
|? the Perky.

Perky and i ae is Ppar-
ticular P.

| She wouldn't converse with
a policeman, not she!

But I have heard it said,



)Viat a soldier in red

ft By her is regarded more
—, |

@] the Quarrelsome.

| This is the Querulous, quar-
relsome Q.
Nothing will please her,
whatever you do;
And from morning till
night,
This or that isn’t right,
And whatever you tell her,
she says isn’t true.




Q tHe QUARRELSOME
rR the Respectable.

iT) Pre and | highly respect:
| able R.

About your appearance
most particular.

The man with the broom



Steps aside to make room,

¢ \And wonders, poor fellow, |
~ whoever you are.


RESPECTABLE

R te
~S the Satistied.

In his cooking most highly
Successful is §,

Pa his smiling face doth

satisfaction express. |

| He says, “Very good stew!”
And 50, doubtless, would
you. | |



This person’s a Chef, as you
see by his dress,


S tHe SATISFIED
_ T the Timid.

| Terribly timid is tremulous
T,

Who appears to be sitting



uncomfortably.

ce He looks nervous and ill,
And will certainly spill

aH |All his tea) He has spilt
some already, I see.


T tHe TIMID
U the Unhappy.

Unfortunate and a Un-

willing is Ue

The poor little chap’s in a
terrible stew,

When he’s had the tooth

out
He'll be better, no doubt,

And a new tooth will grow



where the other one grew.
DRPAYNE JD

DENTIST



U THE UNHAPPY
V the Vacant.

| : Utterly Vacant and lost 1s
poor V,

He’s forgotten the date of
the wedding you see.



Be He’s forgotten the ring,

And in tact everything;

MY A remarkable kind of a
bridegroom is he.
CHURCH
Notices
1 a

=a

ChLosecDn
DU RNS
REPAIRS

9



V tHe VACANT
W the Willing.

Perfectly Willing is antique
Miss W,





- ‘Tho: | fear very much that
W | nobody will trouble yOu.

Wi

MM lt is sad bit 2a tace. von
poor ancient Miss W.

Few are anxious to kiss

Such an elderly miss;


| W tHe WILLING
- A the Excitable.

This is the highly excitable
X.

, aiThe result of the poll or
| X | some land we annex,



Drives him quite off his
ee . head:
_ {And I have heard it said >

That such conduct his wite
doth exceedingly vex.


X tHe EXCITABLE
Y the Youthful.

’ Vv This i is the girlish youth- ;
7 ful Miss y,

Whol bestow a sweet smile
as she passes you by.
To look younger than ever
Is her constant endeavour;

Though her age you will



probably guess, if you try.


Y tye YOUTHFUL
LZ the Zealous Zoologist.

Thisisthe zealous Zoologist
7
Examining an hippopotamus
head. |
There’s no cause for alarm,
It can do you no harm,

For the creature, of course,

is decidedly dead.




Z tHe ZEALOUS ZCOLOGIST
{







@e





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