Citation
The stolen children

Material Information

Title:
The stolen children a narrative compiled from authentic sources
Creator:
Bleby, Henry, 1809-1882
Woolmer, Theophilus, 1815-1896 ( Publisher )
Hayman Brothers and Lilly ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
T. Woolmer
Manufacturer:
Hayman Brothers and Lilly
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
220 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Abduction -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Juvenile fiction -- United States ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Free African Americans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fugitive slaves -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cruelty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
African Americans -- History -- Juvenile fiction -- To 1863 ( lcsh )
Plantation life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Factual information in a fictional setting.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Henry Bleby.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026594876 ( ALEPH )
ALG2548 ( NOTIS )
84208120 ( OCLC )

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THE

Sroren (CHILDREN.

A NARRATIVE

Compiled from Authentic Sources,

BY HENRY BLEBY.

“(NATURE IMPRINTS UPON WHATE’ER WE SEE,
THAT HAS A HEART AND LIFE IN IT, ‘BE FREE.’
< COWPER,

HLondsows
T. WOOLMER, 2, CASTLE ST., CITY ROAD, E.C.3
AND 66, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.G.



HAYMAN BROTHERS AND LILLY,
PRINTERS,
HATTON HOUSE, 113, FARRINGDON RGAD,
LONDON, EC,





THE
STOLEN @HILDREN.
ee
CHAPTER I.

VISIT TO AMERICA.






ZN the year 1858, I was sta-
tioned in Barbados; and my
health having suffered from
over-exertion at my last
sphere ¢ of. labour, I determined, with
the permission of the Missionary
Committee, to pay a visit to the
United States of America, hoping
that relaxation and change of climate would restore
my wasted energies; in which I was not disap-
pointed,

When I arrived in America the anti-slavery
struggle was approaching its climax; both the
parties concerned were putting forth all their
power, the one to break down and destroy, the
other to strengthen and uphold the domestic insti-
B





2 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

tution, as it was euphemistically designated, by
which more than four millions of human beings
were subjected to slavery. The pro-slavery news-
papers were endeavouring by the grossest mis-
representations to create the impression that
emancipation in the British colonies had been a
total failure, and that the emancipated negroes in
all the islands had degenerated into hordes of
paupers and thieves.

It soon became known that a Missionary from
Barbados had arrived in Boston, where I was
invited to supply for a Sabbath the pulpit of an
absent minister; and some of the leading men
in the anti-slavery movement, including the noble-
hearted, indomitable William Lloyd Garrison, re-
quested me to aid them in refuting the misleading
statements of the pro-slavery press, by describing
the real condition of affairs in the emancipated
colonies. This to me was an easy task, coming, ag
I did, from an island where every acre of ground
was cultivated by negro labour, and where crops
of sugar were being raised three or four times as
large as in the days of slavery. I spoke several
times at public meetings, and gave addresses upon
this subject in many of the Congregational and
Methodist Churches in New England: and on the
requisition of a goodly number of the leading
divines and editors in New York, including Dr. _
Stevens, Henry Ward Beecher, Dr. Porter, Dr.
Cheever, Horace Greeley, Oliver Johnson, I



VISIT TO AMMRICA, 3

delivered an address in Dr. Cheever’s church on
the results of West India emancipation.

At the request of anti-slavery “friends,” I
accompanied Mr. Garrison and others to an anti-
slavery convention atWestchester,in Pennsylvania,
near to the borders of the slave state of Maryland ;
where many of the Quaker community resided
and took an active part in the operations of the —
“ynderground railway,” by which so many
thousands of fugitive slaves found their way to
freedom in Canada. The convention lasted three
days; and I shall never cease to remember and
appreciate the loving and bountiful hospitality
with which I was entertained amongst the
“ friends,” at Westchester, and at Philadelphia.

‘It was at Philadelphia that I first became
acquainted with some of the facts embraced in
the following narrative ; and here I was introduced
to one of the members of the family, whose
romantic history created, for awhile, no small
sensation wherever it became known; exhibiting
as it does, in a most impressive light, the mamni-
fold atrocities of slavery.

At Philadelphia I was taken to the anti-slavery
office, where I found a young man of dark com-
plexion, but of respectable appearance, employed
in the capacity of clerk. He was introduced to
meas William Still. During my stay I had a
good deal of intercourse with him, and with Mr.
McKim, the able and enterprising agent of the

B2



4 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Pennsylvania Anti-slavery Society. From Mr.
Still I first heard of the extraordinary events
which had occurred in his family ; the kidnapping
of his two brothers, and the wonderful restoration
, of one of them, after enduring the oppressions of
slavery upwards of forty years. From the Rev.
Samuel J. May, of Syracuse, an eminent minister
and one of the leaders of the anti-slavery move-
"ment, I obtained further particulars; and also a
printed account of the wonderful adventures of
Peter Still, which enables me to compile the
following story. It serves as an illustration of
the fact that truth is sometimes stranger than
fiction. Possessing all the interest of a novel, it
is a relation of simpie matter of fact.

PRD arrest rrr



CHAPTER If,

KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVERY.

FAMILY of free coloured
people occupied a small cot-
tage in the outskirts of the
: rapidly-growing city of Phil-
adelphia, near to the banks of the
‘| Delaware river, in the early part of
this century. The family consisted
of father and mother and three children, a girl and
two boys; also a niece of the mother whom she
had taken to live with them, and an old lady who
was grandmother to the little ones. The eldest
boy was named Levin, after his father, and was
between six and seven years of age. The other
little fellow, who was remarkably shrewd and |
intelligent, was called Peter, and was between four :
and five years old. The parents were highly —
esteemed by those who knew them, and gained a
comfortable livelihood for their family by honest
industry.

It was a beautiful summer evening, and nature
was arrayed in all her glory, when the mother,





6 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

haying carefully placed her little ones in bed,
without a doubt as to their safety, left the cottage
for a short time accompanied by her daughter and
niece. The grandmother also was absent; the two
boys were the only occupants of the cottage.

When they found themselves thus alone, the
little fellows left their bed and went out into the
street to play. They ran races down the road,
and gave themselves up to enjoyment; their happy
laugh ringing out clear and free, their eyes gleam-
ing with merriment, their white teeth glistening
in the pleasant light, and contrasting brightly
with the dusky hue of their faces. The only dress
that covered them was a cotton shirt reaching to
their knees, abundantly sufficient in that bright
and balmy weather.

As the shades of the evening began to fall
around them, wearied with their active sports,
the little ones began to yearn after their mother.
They looked into the house, where all was still and
lonely. Mother’s bed was there, covered with a
clean blanket; but mother was not to be seen.
There also stood grandmother’s bed; but grand-
mother was not there. Every article of simple
furniture stood in its accustomed place, but no
sound could they hear within. Where could they
all have gone P

Frightened with the silence and solitude they
began to cry. At length Levin said, “I reckon
mammy’s gone to church. The preachin’ must be



‘KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVER1. 7

mighty long! O! I’ssohungry! I’se gwine to
meetin’ to see if she’s thar.”

The “church” they were accustomed to attend
stood in the woods, about a mile off; for coloured
people had no admission to the sanctuaries where
white people worshipped God. It was an old
building, that had formerly been occupied by a
family now living in a large brick house close by.
The boys had often been at the church with their
father, who kept the key of the building, and
opened it for worship on Sundays, and prayer-
meeting nights.

“You better not go thar, I reckon,”. replied
Peter. “Mammy ’ll whip you well if you goes to
foller her to meetin’ and all about.”

“Mammy! O mammy!” Thus they called
upon their mother, and cried because she did not
answer, till their eyes were swollen, and their
pleasant play forgotten.

Their childish grief was broken in upon by the
sound of an approaching vehicle; and lifting up
their eyes they saw a handsome gig, driven by a
tall dark man, with a white hat surmounting a
mass of black glossy, bushy hair. He looked
earnestly at the little boys as he came near, and
checking his horse he stopped, and in apparently
kind tones asked for the cause of their distress.

“OQ, mammy’s done gone off, and there’s no-
body to give us our supper, and we’re so hungry.”

“Where is your mother ?”



8 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Don’t know, Sir,” replied Levin; “but I
reckon she’s gone to church.”

“Well, don’t you want to ride?” said the
stranger. ‘Jump up here with me, and I'll take
you to your mother. I’m just going to church.
Come, quick! What! no clothes but a shirt P
goin and get a blanket. It will soon be night,
and you will be cold.”

Unsuspicious of the villany the stranger was
meditating, the little urchins both ran upon this
errand. Levin took the blanket from off his
mother’s bed, while Peter snatched the covering
from the couch of his grandmother; and it being
large he tripped and fell over it several times
before he reached the vehicle, for he was in haste
to be restored to his mammy.

The stranger lifted them into the gig, and
placing them between his feet covered them with
the blankets, that they might not be cold. All
the time he was‘soothing them with kind words,
and assuring them that he would soon take them
to their mother. And away they went very swiftly,
rejoicing in their childish hearts to think how their
mother would wonder when she saw them coming,
and travelling in such unwonted style.

After riding for some time,—how long they
could not guess—-they suddenly upset into the
water with a great splash. The driver of the
vehicle, in his haste to accomplish his villany, had
driven too near the brink of the river, and the











KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVERY. 9

vehicle had thus been overturned. He soon
rescued the children from the water and raised the
vehicle. The boys were much frightened but not
hurt. Nothing was injured by the accident, and
in a few minutes, once more covered over with the
blankets, they were speeding along the river bank
faster than before.

When the gig stopped again it was at the water
side, and before them lay many boats and vessels
of different kinds. They had never seen anything
like this before, but they had short time to indulge
their wonder and curiosity, for they were hurried
into a boat which left the shore immediately.

How long they were on the boat they could not
tell. The children were lulled into security by
promises that they should soon see their mother,
and by gentle words and cakes of marvellous sweet-
ness, with which the stranger had taken care to
supply himself. These were always forthcoming
when they manifested any impatience at the
length of the journey; and their childish hearts
could not distrust one, though a stranger, whose
words and acts wereso kind. Atlength all their
troubles and anxieties were lost in the oblivion of
sleep.

How far they went in the boat, or by what
other means they travelled they failed to recollect,
but at length they reached a place called Versailles,
in the slave state of Kentucky. Here their self-
constituted guardian placed them in a waggon, with



10 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

a coloured woman and her child, and conveyed
them to Lexington.

Here they heard their kidnapper addressed as
_ Kincaid. By this time he had dropped all his
kind words, and no longer regaled them with cakes.
He took them to a plain brick-house, the residence
of a mason named Fisher, who was the proprietor
of a large brick-yard. After some conversation
between these two worthies which the children did
not understand, Kincaid took them to the kitchen,
and presenting them to an elderly negro woman
who was acting as cook, said to the terrified chil-
dren, ‘‘ There, my boys, there is your mother; we
have found her at last.”

“No! No! shrieked the children, “ that’s not
mammy! O, Sir, please do take us back.” With
tears and cries they clung to the ruffian who had
so vilely betrayed their confidence, and begged
him not to leave them there.

This scene was soon ended by the interposition
of Fisher, who, giving them a hearty blow on each
cheek, bade them “ Hush! You belong to me now,
you little rascals, and I'll have no more of this.
There’s aunt Betty, she’s your mammy now, and if
you behave yourselves she’ll be good to you.”

Kincaid soon departed, and they never saw him
again. The ruffian had stolen the poor children
from their parents, and sold them to Fisher, who
became a willing party to this wicked transaction,
paying for Levin a hundred and fifty-five dollars,



KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVERY. 11

(about £32) and for Peter a hundred and fifty
dollars (about£31). Poorchildren! the dark heavy
cloud of slavery now shadowed their young lives.

For the first few weeks the children constantly
talked of going back to their mother—except in
the presence of their master. They were soon
taught that they must not mention that subject
when he was near. Hewas in the main a kind
indulgent master to his slaves: but were not these
boys his money? why should he allow them to
prate about being stolen, when he had bought, and
paid a good price for them ?

“Father,” said John Fisher’s young son, “isn’t
Philadelphia a free state ? ”’

“ Certainly : it is in Pennsylvania.”

“Well, then, I reckon,” said the lad,’ that those
two boys you bought were stolen, for they lived
with their mother near the. Delaware river; and
Aunt Betty says that isat Philadelphia. It was
too bad, father, for that man to steal and sell them
here, where they can never hear from their
mother.”

“Pooh, boy! don’t talk like a fool! Most likely
they were sold to Kincaid, and he told them he
would take them to their mother, in order to get
them away withoutany fuss. And evenif he did
steal them, so were all the negroes stolen at first.
I bought these boys and paid for them, and I'll
stop their talk about being free, or 1’ll break their
black necks.


12 THE STOLEN: CHILDREN.

country; just to spoil the sale if I should happen
to getshutof them! Free, indeed! And what’sa
free nigger? They’re better off here thanif they
were free, growing up in idleness, and nobody to
take care of them.”

Before night the young offenders were
thoroughly kicked and beaten, and impressed with
the assurance that they should be killed outright
if they dared to tell such a tale again. So they
grew cautious, and spoke of the sweet memories of
home and of “ mother” only in whispers to each
other, or tosome fellow-sufferer who knew how to
sympathise with their sorrows.



CHAPTER III.

EARLY EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY.






had been, through villany,
wee consigned to the oppressive
| and corrupting influences of slavery,
| and were constrained to learn its
-| terrible lessons. They shrank from
the evils which they feared were awaiting them;
but-in vain they appealed for pity to the hard-
hearted man who called himself their owner ; and
their young hearts, so merry hitherto, became sad
and anxious.

Levin and Peter were not long in divining,
with the tact of childhood, their exact position,
domestic and social; and they soon learnt the
necessity of concealing their true feelings. “A
servant should be merry:” so says the slave-holder.
A gloomy face is a perpetual complaint; and why
should it be tolerated P

Fisher, the master of the two young slaves, was
a large, fine-looking man with a free and hearty



14 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

manner, and some kindliness of disposition; but
he never suffered this latter quality to interfere in
business matters; and as, in addition to his brick-
making business, he rented a large plantation about
a mile out of town, he had no time to waste in
unprofitable sentimentalities. How to get the
most work done with the least expense was the
problem alone worthy his attention ; and his success
in business showed that he had considered it wei.

Mrs. Fisher, their mistress, was a stout woman
with a freckled face, plain and unpretending in
manners and dress, and devoted to her husband
and children. She had twoboys, John and Sydney;
and for the first three years that he lived with them,
Peter was their constant playmate. Levin was
sent to work in the brick-yard the second year after
Fisher bought him, he being then between eight
and nine years of age.

At night the little slave boys rolled themselves
up in their blankets, and lay down to sleep on the
floor of their mistress’ room. They would often
awake in the morning under the bed, or the bureau,
where the mistress had shoved them with her foot
the night previous, that they might be out of the
way. They had no want of food or clothing; and
if they kept silence about their mother’s house on
the Delaware river, they were kindly treated.
But if a word on that forbidden subject reached
the ear of their master, he became furious and
treated them with great cruelty. By stripes and



EARLY EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY. 18

kicks he taught them that they had no right to
the blessed memory of “home” and “ mother,”
that they were his property; and that he pos-
sessed unlimited power to silence their restless
tongues.

The plantation rented by Mr. Fisher belonged to
a Mrs. Russell,a widow lady. It was situated about
a mile from the city; and directly across was the
residence of the celebrated Henry Clay, one of the
magnatesofthe country. To this place Peter, while
he was too young to work in the brick-yard, was
sent daily for the cows and to obtain vegetables
from the garden. As he had plenty of leisure time,
being only between six and seven years old, he
spent many pleasant hours in playing with the
slave children of Mr. Clay: and frequently the
merry group would be enlivened by the addition
of Mr. Clay’s two sons.

The young Clays were noble boys, glowing with
all the ingenuousness of youth; and Peter’s heart
warmed toward them both. Mutual confidence
sprang up between them, and Peter soon confided
to them the sad history of his wrongs. One day
when Mrs. Clay, as was her custom, spoke kindly to
the dusky playmate of her sons, Peter took courage
and recited to her the story of his sorrows; and
asked her if she did not think some one would
send him back to his mother. She quieted him
with cakes and other delicacies and then gently
dismissed the children to their play. —



e

lo — THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Butthe brave-hearted boys, not as yet corrupted
and hardened by contact with the world and with
slavery, longed to do something to help their little
favourite; and they advised him to tell his story
to their father. They felt sure that he whom they
had been taught so greatly to honour could not
fail to do his utmost to redress such a cruel wrong
as Peter and his brother had suffered.

Made sanguine by the generous spirit mani-
fested by his playmates, Peter, the first time he
was alone with his brother, said, ““O Levin, I
reckon we'll go back toreckly ! ”

“Go back! Whar?”

“Why home to see mother! Mass’ Theodore
Clay say his father so good to everybody; he know
he’ll send us back if we tell him how we got stole ;
says his father allers helps folks whar gets in
trouble.”

“‘Mass’ Theodore say soP Reckon then we
will; kase Mr. Clay mighty good to all his people.
Hi! Mas’r John Fisher! you’se gwine lose these’
chillerns!”

Then, with many comical grimaces, Levin
executed a series of remarkable shuffles, indicating
the confusion that awaited ‘“‘ Mas’r John.”

Not long after this conversation, Peter saw Mr.
Clay standing near the court-house with a letter
in his hand. His little heart bounded within him
as he ran towards the great statesman, “O Mr.
Clay!” he exclaimed, ‘I’m stole.”



EARLY EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY. 17

“Stole! who stole you, and where were you
stolen from ?”

“T’s stole from my father and mother on Dela-
ware river. Folks say that’s Philadelphia; but I
don’t know. Please, Sir, won’t you send me back
to my mother?”

“To whom do you belong P-”

“T ‘long to Mas’r John Fisher, in Thaine
Street, and I want’s to go back to my mother.”

“Well, my boy, I have no time to talk to you
now: you carry this letter to Major Pope. You
know where he lives; and then come back and I'll
attend to you.”

Away ran the child dancing with delight and
crying, “I’s free! I’s free! I’s gwine to my
mother ! ”

“What is that you say?” asked a gentleman
who met him. “I’s gwine to be free,’ said the
lad. “Mr. Clay gwine to send me back to my
mother, kase I was stole away from her.”

“Now here, you little negro,” said the man,
who knew the child, and understood the temper of
his master, ‘‘ you’d better not talk about that to
Mr. Clay, for he will tell your master, and old John
Fisher will be sure to skin you.”

Thus rudely, but kindly, perhaps, was the
bright vision dispelled which hope had presented
to poor Peter. With drooping head and tearful
eye he returned to tell his brother of their disap-
pointment; and after that they both avoided Mr.

c



18 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Clay. Mr. Clay was among the first and greatest
men of ‘his country with many good and amiable
traits in his character; but the great statesman
was himself aslave-holder, and he had not courage
to face the odium of interfering to restore the
stolen boy to his mother. Thus ignobly did the
great Henry Clay become the associate of thieves,
by tacitly protecting them in this great wrong.

' Still hope, that “springs eternal in the human
breast,” did not desert the boys. They cherished
the remembrance that they were born free, and
looked for something to turn up some day or
other to restore them to liberty; a hope that was
destined to be realized in one of them; to be
blighted in the other.

When Peter was nine years old he was sent to
labour in the brick-yard as “ off-bearer.” Three
thousand bricks a day was the task for two boys.
If one of them chanced to be disabled by any
means, his companion must “ off-bear” the whole.
The moulder must not be hindered.

These moulders, slaves themselves, were often
cruel tyrants. The boys, though seldom abused
by the master himself, suffered much from the
caprices and passions of these men; and their
master permitted any punishment they chose to
inflict.

Their favourite mode of chastisement was
called “ standing in the wheelbarrow.” The culprit
was placed with a foot on each side of the wheel,







EARLY EXPERIENCE UF SLAVERY. 19

and then made to reach over and grasp a handle
in each hand. The “ off-bearers’”’ were then com-
pelled to whip him with cow-hides (pieces of hide
twisted into the form of a whip). If he lay still
_ and took twenty-four lashes without attempting

to rise he was let off. If he made an effort to
change his position before that number was
inflicted, the moulder, who presided over the
punishment and counted the strokes, commenced
again at “one,” and caused the twenty-four to be
repeated.

One day a large man, named Charles, was put
into the wheelbarrow, and received over three
hundred lashes before he took the twenty-four
without moving. Peter was one of the boys
selected to inflict this horrible punishment; and
they were all trembling with terror. If one of
them, through pity, failed to strike with all his
power, the moulder, who stood by with a cowhide,
punished this merciful short-coming by a violext
blow on his own back.

02



CHAPTER _IYÂ¥,

SOLD TO A NEW MASTER,

MID such scenes passed the

early youth of the stolen
boys. They were both dis-
* tinguished by great mildness
of temper and cheerfulness of dis-
position which made them almost
universal favourites so that they
escaped much cruel treatment that fell to the lot
of some of their companions. But a change came
upon them. When Peter was about thirteen years
old and his brother near fifteen their owner,
Fisher, determined upon removing to Cincinnatti
where a brother of his had taken up his abode.
This rendered it necessary that he should dispose
of his brick-yard and sell his slaves; for Cincin-
natti being in the Free State of Ohio he could
not own his slaves there.

Levin and Peter were overwhelmed with grief
when they heard of the intended sale. With all
their apparent humility, and submissive, gentle
manners, deep in their young hearts was the






SOLD TO A NEW MASTER. 21

fondly-cherished feeling that freedom was their |
natural birth-right. There was degradation in the
thought, young as they were, of being trafficked
like horses. Besides, they had never ceased to
cherish the hope that they should be sought after
by their parents, and changing owners would
lessen the chances of their being discovered. But
the sale was resolved on.

Mr. Fisher found some difficulty in disposing
of the boys, for their old story of having been
stolen from a Free State had: not been forgotten ;
and men hesitated to buy where there was un-
certainty about the title. As the master confidently
affirmed that he had so conquered them that it was
many years since they had been heard to mention
it, a sale was at length effected. The purchaser
was a Mr. Nathaniel Gist, of Lexington, who gave
four-hundred-and-fifty dollars for each of the
brothers (about £93 15s.)

The change of owners was far from being
agreeable to the young slaves. Nat Gist, or Mas’r
Nattie, as he was generally called, lived in a small
brick house in Hill Street. He was a short, stout
grey-headed man about fifty-six years of age. He
was a Virginian by birth, and had been a soldier.
He swore freely and drank hard, being intoxicated
every day;-and as he was a bachelor his home
was seldom visited by any humanising influences.

Nat Gist owned a brick-yard, and twenty slaves
called him master. These he fed sparingly,



22 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

clothed scantily, and worked hard. In the winter
when brick-making was necessarily suspended, he
was accustomed to hire out his slaves to those who
would pay the highest price for their services.
Besides Levin and Peter he had two other boys,
named Alfred and “Allison. These were brothers
who had been sold away from their parents in
Virginia. Some years after their mother with
several of her children effected her escape to the
free land of Canada by “the underground rail-
way.”*

Peter soon became a favourite with his new
master. But he carefully abstained from showing
his preference either by word or act. He believed
that there was nothing so good for niggers as the
liberal use of the cowhide and whip. While
therefore he kept Peter near him as much as
possible to wait upon him, he never abated one

* The underground railway is a figurative expression, indicating
the various means by which fugitive slaves were aided by benevolent
individuals in making good their esce pe toa land of freedom. Some
of these are well described in Mrs. Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
Large numbers of fugitives from the slave states escaped to Canada,
or to the Eastern States of the Union, notwithstanding the utmost
vigilance of the slave-holders ‘and the efforts of slave-hunters
employed to track. and overtake them, The arrangements made by
the Quakers, and other friends of hutanity, to help the slaves on
their way were so perfect, that no traces of the runaways could be
discovered. One of the planters, to whom this was altogether
inexplicable, remarked concerning some of his lost ones, ‘‘ They must
have got off by an underground railway.’’ It was a happy idea.
The anti-slavery friends took hold of it; and it soon became the

_custom to say concerning the runaways, ‘‘ They are off by the

underground railway.” The stations were numerous all the way
from the Slave States to Canada,



SOLD TO A NEW MASTER. 23:

jot of his severity towards him. An incident
occurred soon after he purchased the boys which
serves to show his method of governing his slaves.

He had come home as usual much intoxicated,
and ordered Peter to scatter a couple of bundles
of oats on the ground for his horse. The boy
obeyed but strewed them a little more widely than
was necessary.

In a few minutes his master inquired, “ Did
you give Ned his oats ? ”

“Yes, Sir. I did as you told me.”

“ What did you throw them all about for?”

“Why, Mas’r, you tell me to scatter them.”

Quick came down the old man’s cane on the
boy’s head. ‘I didn’t tell you to scatter them all
over the yard.” Then with many fierce oaths, he
said ‘“ Follow me to the house. I'll give you a
lesson to remember. Peter walked slowly behind
him to the door. ;

“ Now take off your shirt, you rascal, and eross
your hands.”’

The boy obeyed: and his master, after tying
his hands together, drew them down over his
knees, where he confined them by means of a stick
thrust under his knees. He then beat him fiercely
with a cowhide until his drunken rage was appeased.

‘There, you black cuss,”’ said he, when he had
finished, ‘I mean to make a good nigger of you,
and there’s no way to do it, only by showing you
who’s master.”



24 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

This method of confining a negro for punish-
ment was called “‘bricking,” and was much practised
in slave-land. The culprit was frequently left in
the brick several hours—sometimes, indeed, all
night; and in such cases the protracted straining
of the muscles caused intense pain.

About this time, a few right-minded persons in
Lexington, opened a Sabbath School for the in-
struction of such slaves as might be permitted by
their masters to learn. This excited the high in-
dignation of Mas’r Nattie, the owner of the boys.
“Twon’thave my niggers spoiled by getting learning.
No, indeed! Niggers are bad enough without
being set up by such rascals as these Sunday-
school teachers. They’d better not meddle with
my property. IfI hear of one of my boys going
near the school, I’ll give him such a flogging that
he'll never need any more education.”

Levin submitted. But in the breast of Peter
there was an intense thirst for knowledge; and
even this terrible threat could not deter him from
making an effort to obtain it. Peter went to the
school.

The teacher received him kindly, but inquired
for his “pass.”

“ Ain’t got none, Massa.”

“JT am sorry,’ said the teacher, “for we are
not permitted to instruct any servants without the
consent of their masters.”

Peter knew this very well: and he also knew



SOLD TO A NEW MASTER. 25

that to apply to his owner for a “pass” would only
be to ask for whipping; but he did so long to
learn to read he could not go away. He looked
around on the pupils: they were all slaves and
their masters allowed them to come, and none of
them he thought could learn quicker than he. He
determined to make a desperate effort to remain
that day at least. So he told the teacher,
“Mas’r don’t care nothin’ ’bout my comin’. I'll
get a pass next Sunday.” He was permitted to
remain.

The next Sabbath when the school was opened
Peter presented himself among the pupils. The
other boys presented their papers: he had none
to offer. Poor Peter had not been taught the evil
of lying among the other lessons of slavery, nor
had he learnt “we may not do evil that good may
come.” He had “ forgotten to ask his master,” but
would be sure to remember it next Sunday.

On the third Sabbath he was no better off.
“Mas’r go away early in the morning. He no
hab time to get pass.” He was suffered to remain,
but assured that no such excuses would be accepted
in future.

The fourth Sabbath came, and Peter walked
boldly into the school. “ Pass, boy,” as usual
was the first salutation.

“ Ain’t got none,” replied he; ‘‘ Mass’ Nattie,
say don’t need none: nouse, no how!”

The teacher saw now the true state of the case.



26 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

He would gladly have aided to illuminate that
young intellect, so eagerly stretching towards the
light; but he was compelled to thrust it back into
the darkness, lest a prejudice should be aroused
that would paralyse all his efforts. So he posi-
tively forbade Peter’s future entrance to the school
without a pass. Peter had in these four Sundays
learnt the alphabet, and could spell a few words.
Hard and bitter he felt to be the fate that con-
signed him to hopeless ignorance.

“OO!” said Peter, ‘if I could only learn to
read, I could find out the way to write myself.
Then I-might write letters to Philadelphia, and let
mother know what’s come of her chilluns. I’s
seen white boys running off to keepclar of the Mas’r
in the morning. Reckon if I could go to school,
nobody wouldn’t cotch me running off that way.”



CHAPTER V.

HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY.

worked in the brick-yard
when their master hired them
os=3 to a Mr. George Norton, a
tobacconist. Peter and Levin had
been hired to different persons during
: 5 the winter months. One of these
winters Peter spent as waiter in the service of
a Mr. Sandford Keene, from whom and his amiable
and noble-hearted wife he experienced genuine
kindness. But to this Norton they were hired for
a whole year. Little cause as they had to love
Mas’r Naittie, they dreaded to exchange him for
this new master, for of him report never spoke
kindly.

Norton was a self-complacent, consequential
person, full of pomposity, and cruel and hard-
hearted as he was conceited. He had an overseer
named Kisich, small, and pale, and lame, and
awkward in his manners, A “rich brogue”
plainly indicated the native of the Emerald Isle.






28 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

He had been a clamorous brawler for liberty in his
own country. But here he had become the callous,
degraded slave-driver who, when he found

“ His fellow guilty of a skin,
Not coloured like his own,”

could see him bought and sold, and tasked, and
beaten without a single impulse of pity.

Thirty men and boys were employed in Norton’s
establishment. Three were white. They acted as
spies and informers, making the privilege of acting
the tyrant over their dark-skinned fellows a sort of
compensation for the degradation which in slave-
land is inseparable from the necessity of labour.

The boys succeeded in pleasing Norton by their
ready obedience, and their sprightly, nimble move-
ments. Yet they won no praise. It was but their
duty, and they had reason to rejoice if they escaped.
the cow-hide. They were brought up to regard
the fear of punishment as the only motive to
obedience; and but for their brother-love, and the
dear, sweet memory of “mother,” their hearts
must have grown callous and incapable of affection-
ate response.

Levin and Peter revelled in the fond remem-
brance of that bright morning of their young lives
before the appearance of the kidnapper brought a
dark cloud upon their destiny. Humble was the
cabin which they delighted to remember, but the
sunshine came freely in at the open door, and no



HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 29

harsh word was ever heard within the lowly walls.
How sweet and soothing were these cherished re-
trospects! Often, when their daily tasks were
finished, the two brothers would stroll away from
the noisy mirth of their companions at the twilight
hour, and in low tones converse of home, and dis-
cuss the possibilities of an escape from slavery.

Many plans of escape they suggested to each
other. But all of them required more knowledge
than they possessed or could acquire. Then there
were so many who failed in the attempt, and were
always fearfully punished. The gaol was always
crowded with recaptured fugitives. No, they could
not run away.

But, perhaps, some day they might buy their
freedom. They could work nights and Sundays,
and earn the money, and then they would be safe.
in these bright anticipations they joyously in-
dulged, until they learnt through the sad experi-
ence of others how uncertain was even this fair and
open way of obtaining theirfreedom. The history
of one man, with whom they became acquainted in
Lexington, chilled their ardent hopes, while it
taught them a lesson of caution, and deepened their
distrust of seeming friends.

Spencer was a fine-looking intelligent mulatto,
belonging to a Mr. Williams, who kept a lottery-
office in Lexington. His master hired him out;
usually to hotel or livery-stable keepers, and some-
times to Spencer himself. He was a favourite



30 _ HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

with the white people, and had excellent opportu-
nities of making money by extra services about the
hotels and stables, and by his skill as a veterinary
practitioner. He sometimes speculated in lottery-
tickets. But here success availed him little. He
drew at one timea house and property in Lexing-
ton, worth 30,000 dollars, and was deprived of it.
Many white persons declared that it would be
robbery to takeitfrom him; but it was deemed an
unsafe precedent to allow a negro to acquire so
much property. So the prize was adjudged to the
gentleman who stood second on the list of com-
petitors.

After this Spencer conceived the idea of buying
his own freedom, and proposed the subject to his
master. Williams received the suggestion favour-
ably, and fixed the price at 1,000 dollars. Habitu-
ally industrious, Spencer had now a new spur to
his industry. So untiring was his diligence, that
in a few years he had paid his master within
twenty-five dollars of the whole sum, and the goal
of liberty was just in sight. Then the sweet cup
of blessing was dashed from hislips. The unmiti-
gated scoundrel Williams, having robbed the poor
fellow of his earnings, denied having ever promised
him liberty, and bade him never to mention the
subject more. Spencer was sorely disappointed,
but not discouraged; and when, not long after, a
gentleman, who had heard the history of the decep-
tion, offered to purchase-him, and give him his



HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 31

freedom as soon as he could earn the price which
he must pay to Williams, the hopeful slave eagerly
and thankfully accepted the offer.

The bargain was soon concluded, and with
earnest zeal the poor fellow gave himself to his
labours. He took the precaution this time to ask
for a receipt whenever he made a payment. This
was readily given, and Spencer thought himself
safe. But he had fallen into the hands of another
villain. When he had paid 980 dollars, his owner
suddenly left the town ; and before he had any idea
of such a change approaching, an agent of the bad
man whoowned him had sold him to another master.
Indignant at this outrageous fraud, he produced the
receipts for his money, which he had carefully pre-
served. But thisavailed him nothing. They did
not shew to whom the money had been paid. And
even if they had not been fraudulently written,
they would have profited nothing; for the law held
that a slave’s money, as well as his person and
labour, belonged to his master.

Even yet hope was not extinguished in the
breast of this poor unfortunate slave. Again he
tried a man who was lavish in his expressions of
sympathy, and loud in the denunciation of the
baseness from which he had suffered ; but it was

only to be again betrayed. Into the Hana of this
pretended friend—for the third time—he paid the
hard-earned price of his redemption. And when he
should have received his free papers, he was chained



32 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

in a gang, and sent to the cotton and sugar-fields
of the South, there, if he did not yield to despair
and commit suicide, to wear out a most wretched
existence in wasting, unrequited toil. The world
could scarcely furnish a parallel to the ruffianism
and villany that were to be found in the Slave States
of America, until a just and holy God let loose His
vengeance upon them.

To the ears of Peter and his brother came many
tales like this, and the lessons of caution they con-
veyed the youths treasured in their inmost hearts ;
while, by apparent contentment and cheerful man-
ners, they won the confidence of those in whose
power they were placed.

They had been half the year at Norton’s, and
neither of them as yet had fallen into any serious
difficulty with their brutal master. They had wit-
nessed many exhibitions of his cruelty, and one
that occurred about this time filled them with
horror.

Norton’s personal servant, a large black man,
incurred the displeasure of his haughty master.
He was immediately put in a brick, and in the pre-
‘sence of all the men and boys Norton inflicted on
his naked back three hundred lashes with a cow-
hide. The blood gushed out, and ran in streams
upon the brick-floor of the shop.

When the stick was removed from under his
knees, the poor victim was unable to rise. At this
his tormentor was enraged. He seized a board that



HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 33.

lay near full of shingle nails, and with it struck
him several violent blows, every one of which
brought the blood in streams, as if he had been
pierced with a lancet.

Here young Peter’s habitual caution failed him
fora moment. His eyes, usually so mild, flashed
with fierce indignation; and he declared in a low
voice to his brother that George Norton should
never strip him and put him in a brick to whip
him—he would die first.

The poor lad’s remark was overheard and
reported to the tyrant, who from that day only
waited an excuse to punish him. An opportunity
thus sought is soon found.

The next Saturday evening, as the boys were
sweeping the shop, an old woman came in and
asked for alittle tobacco. Peter, being nearest the
door, gathered up a few of the sweepings and
handed them to her. On the following morning it
was Peter’s turn to make a fire in the sweat-room.
Having done this, he locked the door of the shop
and went to his old master’s, where he usually
spent his Sundays.

Peter had left the shop but a short time when
Mr. Norton took a fancy to go in and look at the
tobacco. He tried the door and it was locked, the
key being nowhere to be found. He turned away
veryangry. Harly on the Monday morning he was
in the shop, anger gleaming from his eye, and a
dark frown upon his countenance. It was clear

D



3b THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

_ that something was wrong. Presently the great
man spoke :

“Whose business was it to make a fire in the
sweat-room yesterday P”

“Mine, Sir,” said Peter.

“ Did you attend to it?”

“Yes, Sir.”

“You did! Where were you when I came
here?”

“Don’t know, Sir. Reckon I was up at home.”

“Where is your home, you rascal P”

“Up to Mas’r Nattie, Sir.”

“Tl let you know, nigger, that this is your
home, and that I am your master.” Saying which
he strode outof theshopin a rage. It was his law
that no one in his shop should be called ‘“‘ master ”
but himself.

Before sunrise next morning Norton appeared
at the door. He was trimming a switch and
whistling, as he never did, except when his brutal
nature was about to revel in the infliction of
punishment. It was a real pleasure to him to
lcok upon the sufferings of others.

After taking a few turns up and down the
shop, he spoke:

“Peter!”

“ Sir.”

“‘ Where were you yesterday P ”

“Here, Sir, strippin’ tobacco.”

“Well, Sunday, where were you?”



HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 35

“ Home to Mas’r Nattie’s, Sir.”

The hot blood mounted to Norton’s face. “I
am your master, you black rascal, and I'll let you
know that you are to go to no other home than
this. Who swept the shop on Saturday ? ”

“We boys, all of us, Sir.”

“Who was it that gave tobacco to an old
woman ?”

“T gave her a handful of sweepings, Sir; no
*count, no how.”

“Well, you'll find I am your master, and you
are to obey me. Come here, and lie down across
this box.”

Peter obeyed, wondering that he had not been
ordered to strip. Itwas not Mr. Norton’s custom
to whip his servants over their clothes, and the boy
had on a new suit of blue linsey. He had heard
what Peter had said a few days before, and
thought it best to avoid an unnecessary contest.

When the boy was extended over the box,
Norton struck him a blow with all his might.
Peter lifted himself up. ‘‘ Lie down, you nigger,”
and he renewed the blows. Peter raised himself
up again. ‘Lie down!” cried the tyrant, with a
curse. Peter obeyed, and many blows fell hard
and fast. Once more he rose. ‘Lie down, I say,
you cursed nigger. If you move again till I bid
you, I will beat you till you cannot move!”

The boy stood upon his feet and looked his
tormentor steadily in the face. ‘Ihave laid down

D2



06 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.
three times for you to beat me when I have done
nothing wrong. I will not lie down again.”

Norton instantly seized him, and attempted to
force him across the box, but failed. ‘Here, Mr.
Kisich, Ladlock, all of you, help me conquer this
nigger,” plenteously larding his speech with oaths
and. blasphemies.

Quickly came the overseer and the other white
men in the shop, and all fell upon him at once.
Peter screamed “ Murder!” and fought with all
his strength. The ruffians tried to bind his hands,
but he struggled so fiercely that they were in
danger of breaking his arms. They succeeded in
throwing him upon the floor, and there he struggled
and screamed, and bit their legs and ancles, and
they despaired of being able to fiog him, unless
they could succeed in tying him.

At length they managed to pass a slip-noose
over his head, and got it fastened about his waist.
They dragged him by the rope to the back part of
the shop, where stood a number of large tobacco
presses, about eightfeethigh. If they could hang
him up on one of these he would be entirely at
their mercy. As they raised the rope to fasten it
to the top of the press, he sprang aside and crept
- into the narrow space between it and the wall.

Here he remained for some time bleeding and
panting, his blood-shot eyes glaring at his perse-
cutors, while they were engaged in beating him
over the head with cow-hides and hoop-poles, and



HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 37

thrusting sticks and pieces of iron against his
bruised flesh. Atlast they dracged him from his
refuge, and he was too exhausted to continue the
struggle. He made no further resistance; and
Norton, roused to fiend-like fury, with bitter oaths
and curses threw him across a barrel and whipped
his bleeding back with a cow-hide until his ven-
geance was satisfied, swearing he was the first
nigger that ever tried to fight him, and that he
should be humbled if it cost his life.

When this episode of cruelty was finished,
Norton and his aids took themselves off to break-
fast, and the negroes, agape with horror at the
scene, returnedto their work. The poor, trembling
victim, fearfully bruised and cut, with only a few
shreds left of his new linsey suit, crept out of the
shop and succeeded in gaining his old master’s
residence on the hill. Mas’r Nattie had gone
down town, but Aunt Mary, the cook, pitied the
sufferer, and dressed his wounds. She had two
sons, who were slaves.

Peter rightly guessed that his owner, cruel as
he was himself, would not like to see his property
damaged by others. He had no gentle word for :
the sufferer. He would not intimate toa “nigger ’
that a white man could do wrong, but he sought
Norton and-cursed him soundly for having abused
a boy belonging to him.

Peter remained a week with Mas’r Nattie, and
was then sent back to the shop, where he remained



83 y THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

to theend of the year. Norton was either ashamed
of his ferocious violence, or afraid to repeat it; for
never after did Peter get an unkind word from him
or his satellites.

As the year drew near its close Norton applied
to Mas’r Nattie to hire the boys for another year,
stating that they were all anxious to remain with
him. But as soon as the year expired, Levin and
Peter, and the two other boys, all ran off to their
owner, and he, finding they were not willing to
serve Norton, did not force them to go back to
him.



CHAPTER VI,

THE BROTHERS SEPARATED.






| REAT trouble came upon the
* loving brothers in the fall of
the year 1817. Levi Gist,
a nephew, and a special fa-
Mivourite of old ‘‘ Nattie,” resolved,
with his uncle’s sanction and aid,
Hito go and establish a cotton plan-
tation in Alabama ; the old man promising to go
himself if his nephew should like the country and
determine to continue there. Six of the negroes
were to go and assist the young man in putting
in his first crop.

The command to prepare to go with Master
Levi fell with crushing weight upon the poor
slaves who had been selected for the purpose.
Going South was always dreaded as a great cala-
mity. To none did this arrangement bring deeper
sorrow than to the brothers; for Levin was one of
the number chosen to go to Alabama. In all their
sorrows thus far they had been together. They
had shared the same little pleasures, and their



40 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

hearts had been as one. And now to be sundered !
How could they liveapart? The thought that his
brother must go to the South was agony to Peter.

“O Levin, Levin, if they take you away off
there I shan’t never see you no more, sure!”

“OQ yes,” sobbed Levin, his heart almost
breaking, while he yet strove to speak cheeringly to
his weeping brother. ‘“O yes, Mas’r Nattie say
he’s gwine bring ye all next year when he come.”

“Mas’r Nattie! He never gwine ’way off
there! He’ll stay here as long as he get breath
*nough to curse. He’s too old to go there, any
how.”

“Well, he’ll have to die some day. He can’t
live a mon’s long time, sure.”

“Yes, and if he dies, we'll all be sold. They
allers has an auction when folks dies, and then
deir people’s scattered all about. O pears like
*taint no use livin’ in this ere world. I shan’t never
see you no more.”

The preparations for the journey were com-
pleted. ‘“ Mas’r Nattic,” said Levin, as they were
all assembled in the yard to say good-bye, “please,
Sir, give-me something ’fore I go, to ’member you
by.”

Te Well,” said the old man, “go in and bring me
the cow-hide, and I’ll give you something you'll
never forget. If I should give you a coat, ora
shirt, you would wear it right out, but if I eut
your skin to pieces, you will remember this parting



THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. Al

as long as you live. And mind, you rascal, when
I come out next fall Tl bring the cow-hide, and _
if you don’t behave yourself I’ll give you enough
then — d’ye hear?” Such, interspersed with
curses and blasphemies, was the kind farewell of
Old Nattie Gist. The fun of the slave-holder is
ferocious, and ‘the tender mercies of the wicked
are cruel.”

The poor slaves left behind returned to their
work with heavy hearts, not knowing how soon
they might be sent to the South, or chained in a
gang, and driven away by some barbarous trader. .

Peter was taken away from Mr. Martin’s, where
he had been hired the first part of the year, and
sent by his master to take Levin’s place as waiter
in the family of a Mr. Young. His new master
was an intelligent gentleman, of pleasant manners,
and great kindness of heart. His wife was the
reverse—of fierce, ungovernable temper. Scolding
the servants from morning to night, she kept the
house in a continual turmoil.

During the five months that Peter spent in the
service of Mr. Young, he passed many pleasant
hours at the house of Mr. Clay, with whose
domestics he had formed an intimate acquaintance.
The young masters, Theodore and Thomas Clay;
though no longer the playmates of their coloured
favourite, Peter, continued to treat him with the
utmost kindness. He spent many a pleasant
evening at Ashland.



42 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Amongst the slaves of Mr. Clay, and one of the
merriest of them all, was Aaron, the coachman,
who was the father of Charles, Mr. Clay’s body
servant, a special favourite of his master, and
during the last years of the great statesman’s life,
ever at his side.

Aaron was an excellent servant—quick, intelli-
gent, and energetic. His mirthfulness and good
feeling rendered him a favourite with all; and his
stories, songs, and many jests often made the
kitchen ring again, and proved a great attraction
to Peter.

But Aaron had one great infirmity. He loved
a dram, and when tempted by the sight and smell of
his favourite liquor, he could seldom resist the
yearnings of his appetite. This was peculiarly
annoying to the lady of the house, as it sometimes
unfitted him for duty when she had most need for
his services.

He one day drove her carriage into town, and
while she was paying a visit, he took the oppor-
tunity to indulge in a glass of the loved liquor,
which he enjoyed so much that he took another,
and another, and when his mistress was ready to go
home he was quite incapable of taking his place on
the driving-box, and she was obliged to hire a man
to take his place and drive the carriage home.
For this serious offence Mrs. Clay resolved that
Aaron should be punished; but it could not be
done without her husband’s consent, as the over-



THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. 43

seer was forbidden to strike one of the house-
servants without his express permission.

To Mr. Clay was recited the story of Aaron’s
misconduct, and the inconvenience and mortifica-
tion to which he had thereby subjected his mistress.
As he had tried various milder means to cure his
slave of this mischievous habit, he decided that
more severe measures must be resorted to.

The next morning he sent for the overseer, and
directed him to take Aaron into the carriage-house
and give him a slight whipping. “Now do it
quietly,” said the master, “and be sure not to cut
the skin. I don’t want to hear any disturbance.
Do it as gently as possible.”

The overseer respectfully assented, and went
out, glad to have an opportunity of venting a little
long-cherished spleen against “ that saucy coach-
man.” But one of the maid-servants chanced to
overhear this conversation, and she stole out of
the house and sought Aaron.

“Look yer,” said she, “ you know what massa
say P”

“ Know what massa say P No! How I know what
he say when he never speak to me dis mornin’ ?”

‘Well, he say to de overseer, ‘ Aaron must be
punish; for he get drink when Mrs. Clay want him
for drive the carriage. You may take him to the
carriage-house and whip him, but don’t cut him
up.’ ”

“*Don’t cut himup!’ Massa say so? Well,



4A THE STOLEN CMILDREN.

well, reckon this chile be ready. Overseer mighty
good; he talk so clever; ’pears like he think I’s
white sometimes, but the debilin himeye. He
done wanted this long time to get.a cut at me. I
knows what overseers means when dey gets too
good. Yah, yah! He tink now he gwine gib dis
chile all he owes him.” !

The girl’s astonished eyes followed Aaron as he
leaped over the fence, and ran towards a small
grocery that stood at a short distance. Here he
had no difficulty in procuring a dram, and having,
as he concluded, fitted himself for the anticipated
contest, he returned home and resumed his work.

Soon theoverseer called from the carriage-house
door— Aaron.”

“Yes, Sir.”

“Come here.” In a moment the slave stood
before him.

“ Aaron, Mr. Clay says you must come into the
carriage-house and be whipped.”

“Did massa say so P ”

“Yes. Jiesays your habit of drinking annoys
your mistress so often that you must be punished
for it. He says he has tried to persuade you to
leave it off, but it does no good. I don’t like to
whip you, Aaron; but it is Mr. Clay’s orders.”

“Well, if massa say so, then it must be so;”
and he walked quietly into the carriage-honse,
followed by his kind friend, the overseer, whv care-
fully fastened the door on the inside.



THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. 45



“Now, Mr. ,” said Aaron, “ you may whip
me, if massa say so, but you needn’t tie me. I
won't be tied.” i

“Very well,” replied the overseer, throwing
down the rope he had in his hand; “ you needn’t
be tied if you will stand still, But you must take
off your coat.”

“Yes, Sir; but if I take off my coat to be
whipped, you ought to take your’n off first to whip -
me.”

The overseer perceived that he had taken a
dram, and knew he must indulge his whim if he
would obey Mr. Clay’s orders to keep quiet. Sohe
pulled off his coat, and Aaron quickly laid his
beside it on the floor. Then followed the vest, the
slave insisting that the overseer should first re-
move his own. “Now your shirt, Aaron,” said
he.

“Yes, Sir, but you must take off your’n first.”

This was going further for the sake of quiet
than the overseer intended or approved; but he
hesitated only fora moment. It would be best,
he thought, to humour him. He had long wished
for a chance to humble Aaron, and now the time
had come.

He proceeded to comply with this last wish of
the culprit. But, no sooner had he lifted his arms
to. pull his shirt over his head, than Aaron seized
the garment, and twisting it round his neck with
his head still muffled in it, he held him fast as in



46 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

a vice. Then, catching up the whip, he applied it
vigorously to. the overseer’s naked back, raising
the skin atevery stroke. His victim screamed and
threatened vengeance; butallinvain. The blows
fell hard and fast, laid on with a will, and by an
arm of muscular power vastly superior to his own.

Mr. Clay heard the uproar, and grew very
angry. ‘I told him,” said he, “ to make no noise,
and to be sure not to whip the poor fellow
severely. He must be cutting him to pieces with
all that outery.”

He hastened as fast as possible to the carriage-
house. The door was fastened within; but he
could hear the whizzing of the whip as it descended
on thesufferer’s back. ‘‘ Open the door,” he cried.
‘‘Didn’t I tell you not to whip him hard? Open
the door, I say!”

“O, Mr. Clay,” cried the overseer from within,
in a muffled voice that was scarcely audible, “it’s
Aaron whipping me! I haven’t given him a
blow!”

“« Aaron,” cried the master, “ open the door.”

The command was instantly obeyed. With his
right hand, in which he still held the whip that he
had used to such good purpose, he moved the
fastenings of the door; while, with his left hand,
he retained his vice-like grasp of the twisted shirt.
His face was all complacence, and his master could
see his eyes twinkling with mirth, and a roguish
smile lurking at the corner of his mouth,



THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. 47

Mr. Clay stood for a few moments mute with
astonishment at the strange scene. But when he
fully comprehended what had been’ taking place
there, he could not refrain from bursting into a
hearty laugh. The overseer, as soon as he was
released, proceeded to explain the manner in which
he had been caught, and how grievously he had
been ill-treated ; and insisted that now he ought
to be allowed to whip Aaron. The master did not,
however, seem to feel the cogency of the arguments
by which the disappointed functionary urged his
claim to be permitted to visit Aaron with a sound
whipping. The master quietly expressed his
opinion that there had been whipping enough ;
and returned to his room greatly amused with
Aaron’s exploit, which, in after years, often served
to promote a laugh amongst his friends.



CHAPTER VII,

THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER,

\







=ETER was sent by his owner
| to his brother, Mr. William
Gist, to be employed on his
plantation, in April, 1818.
He: had not been there long before
Mas’r Nattie’s health began to fail.
¢~ | For a long time he struggled against
disease, and refused to acknowledge that he was
ill: but at last he was obliged to yield. His con-
stitution was worn out by intemperance and the
indulgence of evil passions, and no medical skill
could arrest the approach of the angel of death.
When Peter visited the town, which he had to
do every week, he noticed the sunken eye and
hollow cheek of his owner, and his heart sank
within him. He had but little affection for his
master, for who could love old NattieGist? But
if he should die there would bea sale. The traders
would be at the auction; and then adieu to the
last hope he cherished of one day joining his beloved
brother.



THE DEATH OF A SLAVYEHOLDER. 49

The wretched old man continued to fail, and
his last days were spent in loneliness and gloom.
His housekeeper and cook, Aunt Mary, was his
nurse. Poor woman! She had learnt patiently
to endure all his caprices. Her will, her very
womanhood, had been crushed into submission to
his authority; for, although a slave, he called her
his wife. And now in the death hour the down-
trodden woman moistens the parched lips, all
heedless of the bitter curses and blasphemies they
utter. ;

On the Saturday morning that witnessed the
closing scene of the bad man’s life, Peter had come
to tHe: market, and went to see Mas’r Nattie. His
brother and the doctor stood silently by, witnessing
his agony as he strove with the King of Terrors.
There was no light of Christian hope in the fast-
glazing eye; no love in that obdurate heart. He
would resist, he would live ! Why should he die ?
But “the wicked is driven away in his wickedness.”
Fearful was the frown upon his face as the wicked
oppressor was forced to yield to the great con-
queror. He struggled, groaned, gasped, cursed,—
and the wretched spirit was alone with God.
Horror sat upon every countenance as the nurse
silently closed his eyes.

The old man had sold most of his slaves, and
only eleven, including the six that had gone to
Alabama remained. All these, with some other
property, he hequeathed to his favourite nephew,

RE



50 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Levi Gist. So that Peter and Levin, without
the dreaded auction, found themselves both still
belonging to the same owner.

Peter started for his new home in Alabama on
a cold Sabbath morning in December, with John
Gist, a younger brother of his new ‘‘ Mas’r Levi.”
He carried with him a grateful remembrance of
Miss Maltha, who, with a kindly smile and good
bye, handed him a handful of biscuits as he was
setting off on his journey. This kind act he never
forgot.

Peter’s only regret in leaving Lexington was
associated with the idea that possibly after all
these years his parents might come in search of
their children. and find that both of them were
gone. But that idea he scarcely dared to indulge,
it had become now so very unlikely. He had a
heavy sinking of the heart, at the thought that he
must henceforth be exposed to all the hardships of
the South, of which he had heard such dreadful
accounts. But he endeavoured to banish all such
unpleasant reflections, and comforted himself on
the journey with the thought that he was going
to be restored to the companionship of the brother
he loved so dearly. Levin was at the end of the
journey.

Poter’s heart beat fast as he approached Bain-
bridge, which was to be his future home. But
it was not until the sixth of January, that they
ceached their destination, having paid several visits



THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 51

at different houses on the way. Everything he
saw appeared strange and uncouth. The “ Town,”
consisted of about thirty log cabins scattered here
and there among the tall old forest trees. Groups
of white-haired, sallow-skinned children were play-
ing about the doors, and between the trees were
seen the bright waters of the Tennessee ee
in the sun-light.

“Well, Peter,” said Master John, “this is
Bainbridge. How do you like the looks of the
place?”

“Looks like ’taint a town, Mas’r John. I
never knowed folks have a town in the woods.”

“QO! The woods will be gone in a few years.
Don’t you see, many of these trees are dead now?
They girdle them that way, and next year they
die.”

Peter could hardly believe that those two log
cabins with an open passage between them, con-
stituted Mas’r Levi’s residence in Alabama. ‘“ Ole
Mas’r Nattie say that they all gwine get rich out
here. What he say now, if he see his young
gentlemen a-livin’ in a cabin in the woods ’mong
poor white folks.” He followed his travelling
companion into the house, and was joyfully re- |
ceived there by Aunt Peggy the cook. ‘“O I’s so
glad,” exclaimed she, “to see somebody from de
ole place.”

From Peggy heascer tained that Levin was-well.
Presently the sound of wheels was heard. “ Dar’s

B2



52 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

my ole man with his waggon,” said Peggy; ‘he’s
gwine to de mill whar de boys is all to work.”

' A moment more and Peter was seen bounding
into the waggon by the side of old Frank, an old
fellow-slave. He was hastening to the embrace
of his brother Levin, and could hardly in his im-
patience collect his ideas sufficiently to answer all
the old man’s questions about his former home
and the dear friends he had left behind. Joyful
was the meetiug between the two brothers: and
glad was Peter to find there Alfred and Allison,
who had for years been the companions of himself
and Levin, and to whom both were attached with
almost a brother’s love.

After two weeks spent about the house, Peter
was sent to the cotton field. Here a new world
opened before the young slave. Widely different
was the beautiful forest scenery that presented
itself to his gaze from the brick-yards, and the
fields of corn, tobacco, and hemp, amongst which
his boyhood had been spent. The crop was
now about half picked. The employment was all
new to Peter; and though it did not seem to be
difficult, and he worked diligently all the day, at
‘ night he had picked only twelve pounds and a
half. The other boys played many jokes upon
him, and were greatly amused at his awkward-
ness. But Peter was not the boy to be outdone
by any of them.

At night when Master Andrew weighed the



THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 53

cotton that each had ‘picked, he told them that he
would give a new pair of shoes to the one who
should pick fifty pounds the next day. Allison
was nearly barefoot, and he worked hard for the
prize. But Peter had learned wisdom by one day’s
experience in the cotton field. To the surprise
of everybody, he had at night seventy pounds.
After this he was seldom out-done in the cotton
field. His fingers were long and nimble, and he
could pluck the fleecy treasure from the frost-
browned ball almost without an effort. He was
one of the most valuable and efficient servants
amongst all that his master called his ‘‘ property.”

Bainbridge, where Peter now was, had been
mainly settled by poor whites who gained a scanty
subsistence by hunting and fishing. It was sur-
rounded by the estates of wealthy planters,
some belonging to the aristocratic families of
Carolina or Virginia; but others were owned by
ignorant and vulgar men who had gained wealth
as overseers and negro-drivers, or as negro-traders,
and through these refined pursuits had become
entitled to take rank amongst the aristocrats of
Alabama. The store of Messrs. Gist was the
favourite resort of these planters; for there the
post-office was kept, and there all sorts of liquor
were sold. -

For two years Peter pursued his avocations
on the farm with his brother, experiencing none
but kindly treatment. The farm made excellent



54 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

crops in proportion to the number of hands em-
ployed; and the business of the store was very
lucrative. During the winter Peter and Levin
and their fellow-slaves, had many opportunities
of earning pocket-money. Flat-boats laden with
cotton, while coming down the river, were some-
times stove on the rocks, in the mussel shoals, near
which the small town was situated. The cotton
getting wet was rendered unfit for market, unless
the bales were opened and dried. This furnished
employment for the negroes on Sundays. The wet
cotton was spread on rocks or boards in the sun-
shine, and frequently turned and shaken until it
was dry and fit to be packed for the market. For
this labour they sometimes received a dollar, (four
shillings and twopence English money) per day,
thus supplying themselves with the means of
obtaining many little comforts which could not
be obtained otherwise.

In the year 1821, Peter’s master, Levi Gist,
bought a plantation of four-hundred-and-eighty
acres, about seven miles from the town. He
also built a new large brick house in Bainbridge.
In the fall of the year, all the slaves except Peter
were removed to the new plantation. Peter was
retained to attend upon his master and the young
and beautiful bride whom he brought to the new
house in December. From this lady Peterreceived
generous and uniform kindness, which he never.
ceased to remember with heartfelt gratitude. She



THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 55

had come on a visit to her sister, Mrs. McKiernan,
who, with her husband, had recently settled on a
plantation near to that purchased by Mr. Gist.

Peter had now to perform the duties of cook,
housemaid, and waiter; he being the only servant
in the house excepta little boy. These were some
of the brightest days of his life hitherto. His time
was fully occupied, but he succeeded in giving satis- _
faction to his young mistress, and her approving
smile and gentle kindness shed brightness upon his
lowly path. But for the one cloud that shadowed
his spirit, he would have been content and happy.
He could not forget his mother and hishome. His
heart yearned for these, and while he still cherished
hope, he was often tempted to fear that he was
destined never to see them again.

Now arrived a memorable era in Peter’s life.
Hitherto he had been gay and thoughtless, full of
levity, and regardless altogether of the claims of
religion. Nor, since he left his mother’s roof, had
he met with any who cared for his soul, or paid
any attention to religious matters. He was now
twenty-one years of age; and he began to exercise
his thoughts upon those things that relate to the
soul and eternity. There were many religious
slaves in the wide circle of his acquaintances; and
it was probably through conversation with these
that Peter first began to feel concerned about his
soul. But whatever were the means, it is certain
that the young slave experienced a gracious change,



56 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

and became a new creature in Christ Jesus. He
saw now, in a new light, the moral degradation
that prevailed all around him amongst those of his
own colour; and he looked with abhorrence upon
the unblushing licentiousness in which the white
men indulged, and shuddered as the blasphemous
oath, the obscene jest, and the fulminations of vin-
dictive passion fell from the lips of those who were
the gentlémen of the neighbourhood. He had been
accustomed to these things ever since he had
entered the slave-land, and he had regarded them
with indifference. But now he saw and heard
them with loathing, and he resolved, by Divine
help, to shun the insidious advances of every vice.
‘He had partially contracted evil habits; but now
he abandoned the use of tobacco, which he had
commenced when buta boy. He had sometimes
taken a dram with his companions ; now he deter-
mined (it was before the era of total abstinence
associations) that he would henceforth touch no
intoxicating drink. His character for integrity,
truth, and honesty became firnily established ; and
though he was but a slave, he won the confidence
of all with whom he was connected.

With this great change came a more earnest
yearning after freedom. He was born free, and
the knowledge of that embittered to him the
curse of slavery ; and with every power of his soul
aroused against the stupendous wrong, he resolved
that, God helping him, by some means he would be



THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 57

free. By flight, if opportunity served; or by pur-
chase, if it were possible, he would win back his
birthright. And there seemed to be something
whispering within him that his object would be
achieved, and he would breathe the air of the
free.

He faithfully pursued his round of humble
duties, trusting in the living God, and patiently
waiting till he should see some opening in the
dense, dark cloud that enveloped him and his
fortunes.

In October, 1822, Peter’s owner relinquished
his share in the store to a brother, and removed to
the plantation. His slaves were all well-treated.
The discipline of the mistress was that of kindness ;
and for good order, comfort, and happiness the
plantation and household of Levi Gist was pro-
nounced by one who knew it well an oasis in the
desert—a, solitary star in a midnight sky.

Two years have passed since the family came
to live at the plantation. Mas’r Leviis prosperous
as wellas happy. His crops all look well, and his
negroes are healthy and obedient.

“O, mas’r!” says a voice at his side. He turns,
and sees Levin. He has grown tall and manly, a
fine, stout fellow, whose gentle ways make him a
favourite with all on the plantation.

“Well, Levin, what do you want?” responds
the master. ‘‘ What is the matter?”

“©, nothin’s the matter, Sir; only I wanted



58 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

to ax you if you’s willin’ I should get married,
Sir?” es

“Get married P Why, yes. You're old enough,
I suppose. Over twenty, aren’t you?”

“Yes, Sir. Jis twenty-five.”

** Well, where’s the girl you want to marry P
You can have a wife as soonas you like, if you will
get one of the right sort.”

“T wants Fanny Hogun, Sir; and ole Mas’r
Jimmy, he say I may have her if you’s willin’,
Sir.”

-“Fanny Hogun! Old Jimmy Hogun’s Fanny!
The very worst place in the neighbourhood for a
fellow to be running! Fanny! What put into
your stupid head to go there to hunt for a wife ?
No, you can’t have Fanny. You may have a wife
and welcome; butno boy of mineshall be spending
his nights and Sundays at old Jemmy Hogun’s;
d’ye hear? ”

“But, massa, Fanny’s a good girl, and ‘pears
like *twont do no hurt to go and see her, Sir. I
don’t want nary nother wife, Sir.”

“But I tell you, Levin, I can’t let one of my
boys have a wife at sucha place as that. So don’t
talk any more about it. Youcan hunt up another
girl that will suit you better.”

Levin walked away sadly disappointed. He
knew his master had good cause for disliking to
have his people associate with Old Hogun’s
negroes. His place was the resort of wild and



THE DEATH OF A SLAYEHOLDER. 59

reckless characters ; for there the rein was given to
every evil passion without the least restraint.

All this was well known to Levin. But Fanny,
he was sure, was good and true, and very different
from her companions. Besides, he and Fanny
loved each other dearly, and he could not give her
up. He disliked exceedingly to offend his master,
who had always been so kind to him; yet he couid
not decide to sacrifice his true affection. Forsome
time he hesitated; but love conquered at last,
and without the approbation of his master he
took the lively Fanny for his wife. His master and
mistress were displeased. They didall they could
to prevent what they considered an ill-advised
procedure, and Levin’s disobedience gave them
real pain.

Levin hoped that, once married, all his troubles
would be past. But he was disappointed. He
could seldom go to see his wife, for the overseer,
aware that his master disapproved of the connec-
tion, placed all possible impediments in his way.
He went so far one day, after one of Levin’s stolen
visits, as to strip and tie him up to whip him.
This the master prohibited. But when Fanny
dared to come to see her husband, she was under
no such friendly protection. In spite of Levin’s
prayers and protestations, he mangled her tender
flesh with the whip.

Soon after his marriage Levin’s health began
to fail, and his kind mistress took him into the



60 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

house to do lighter work. Renewed efforts were
made to induce him to give up Fanny and refrain
from visiting her. But in vain. His love for
Fanny was warm and true. Mr. Gist’s patience
at length gave way. He would not thus be baffled
by a slave. He would force him to obey his wishes.
He accordingly bound the astonished slave, and
three hundred and seventeen lashes fell on his
. naked back. But when the master’s passion sub.
sided, he was filled with remorse. He bitterly
regretted the great wrong he had done to his poor
slave, and confessed it to him. After that the
true-hearted pair were suffered peaceably to visit
each other,



CHAPTER_ VIII.

PETER’S MARRIAGE








Cys

\$== BOUT two yearsatfter Levin’s
: marriage, Peter also took to
VA \e himself a wife. The object of
hischoice was named Lavinia,
commonly called Vina. She was
the daughter of a slave woman

P LEE named Sally, the ‘“ property” of a
Mr. Foxall. Mr. Foxall was kind to his slaves;
and he was overcome with grief and humiliation
when these trusting servants—more his friends
than slaves—must be sold and scattered to pay the
creditors of a gambling partner, he having fled
with all that he could scrape together of the
common property.

O! what sorrow rushed over the spirits of
those doomed slaves when they learned their
destiny! As many as could be disposed of by
private sale were thus parted with to save them
from falling into the hands of the traders. Vina
was the first of all the number to be sold. She
was, at the time, hired out to service at the kotel



62 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

in Courtland. It was Sunday morning, and Aunt
Sally, her mother, was coming in that day to see
herchildren. She had just finished some domestic
duties, when Dr. P. , of Courtland, entered.

“ Your name is Vina,” said he, “ and you be-
long to Mr. Foxall?”

“Yes, Sir.”

“Well, I have bought you, and you must be
ready to’ go with me in an hour.”

He left the room, and Vina gazed after him be-
wildered. It was so sudden—only one hour, and
her mother had not yet come.

She looked into the street. There was no one
that cared for her. Buta thought struck her :—
she would go and see her master.

Mr. Foxall lived near. Thither the excited girl
hastened ; but it was only to be disappointed.
Well-nigh broken-hearted at the necessity of
parting with his servants, he had shut himself up,
and could not bear to meet any of them after
selling them to strangers.

The poor girl returned to the hotel. There she
learnt that Dr. P. had not bought her for him-
self, but, being indebted to a Mr. McKiernan and
a Mr. Strut, of Nashville, he had, at their request,
bought her and a young girl named Rosetta for
them. With an aching heart, she stood watching
for her mother. :

“Ready, girl?” shouted a coarse voice.
“Come, can’t wait. Bring along your traps, if







PETER'S MARRIAGE. 63

you’ve got any; but you can’t take a big bundle,
for there are two of you to ride.”

Vina gazed for a moment at the speaker, a
coarse, ill-looking man on horseback. Seeing that
Rosetta, her companion in misery, was holding
another horse by the bridle, she picked up ‘her



little bundle and went out. One long look she
cast up the street, with a faint hope that she might
see her mother approaching in the distance.

The hope was in vain. She saw several happy



64 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

mothers, with their children, walking to the
House of God; and maidens of her own age came
tripping by, but no heart sympathised with the
great sorrow that filled her own bosom. Mechani-
cally she mounted the horse, Rosetta sprang up
behind her, and they went on their dreary way.

Late in the evening the two maidens reached
their destination, and were conducted to the kit-
chen, where many wondering and scrutinizing eyes
rested upon them. Vina especially was very
. sorrowful; yet no tear moistened her eyelid; no
sob gave vent to the anguish of her troubled heart.
Presently, a young girl entered with a message.

‘‘Missus say come in de house; want to see
what ye all looks like.”

“Den go ’long, honey,”’ said the kind old cook,
as she drew Vina from the shaded corner, and
placed her beside Rosetta. ‘‘ Hol’ up your heads
now, chillern, and look peart when ye goes in to see
missus. Go long.”

“De Lor’ help ’em, poor little critturs,” sighed
the good old woman, as she watched them from
the kitchen-door. ‘“ Dey’s gota she-wolf to deal
wid now. ’Pears like dey ain’t used to hard times,
no how; but nobody can’t say dat dar ’bout ’em
arter dey’s done staid on dis yer place one year.”

Vina and her companions had not fallen into
very good hands. Both Mr. and Mrs. McKiernan
had been thoroughly corrupted and embruted by
contact with the influences of slavery. He would



. PETER’S MARRIAGE. 65

have been a fit companion for Mrs. Stowe’s
Legree. She was worthy of the place she
occupied.

Timidly the two girls advanced into the pre-
sence of their future mistress, She scrutinized
them for a moment with her keen, cold eyes, ir
which shone not the slightest gleam of womanly
softness, and then addressed herself to Vina :

“What can you do, girl: Dee

“T’s bin used to missin’, ma’am, and waitin’ in
the house.”

“Did you ever work in the field ? ”

“No, ma’am.”

“ Ah!”—sneeringly—“you’ve been raised quite
alady! Can you round corn? or can you chop
through cotton ?”

“No, ma’am,’

“You're such a oy I suppose you never saw
any cotton grow ?”

“Yes, ma’am, I’s seen plenty cotton growin’,
but never worked it.”

Mr. McKiernan then approached, and, unfasten-
ing her frock behind, examined her back. ‘ Have
you ever been whipped ?” asked he.

“No, Sir.”

sf So I thought. Your back is as smooth as
mine.’

Martha,the young girl that hadsummoned them

to the mistress’s presence, accompanied them back
to the kitchen. ‘‘ Your frock is unfastened,” said.
F



66 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Rosetta, as they went out, “stop a minute till [
button it.”

“QO, no,” whispered Martha, “I can’t have it
fastened, my back’s so sore.”

“What's the matter with your back ? ”

“Why, whar missus cuts meup. She’sallers
a-beatin’ me. O, I wish I’s dead.”

The. two girls exchanged mournful looks; but
no more wasspoken. As the new-comers were un-
accustomed to field-labour, it was determined to
keep them for the present in the house, and send
Martha to the field, who was glad to get away from
the jealousy and cruelty of her mistress. To Vina
was assigned the post of housemaid and waiter.
Rosetta was installed as nurse to an infant, and
both gave satisfaction for several months. But
Vina pined and wasted through anxiety concerning
her mother and brothers. She had never been able
to learn what had become of them, or to whom they
had been sold. Her shrunken figure and the look
of melancholy that never left her face shewed how
wretched she was.

One morning her mistress chanced to discover
a ladle in the kitchen, which Vina had accidentally
left there. It was the first instance of carelessness
or neglect that had occurred in Vina’s department
since she had been in the house. With’ quick
anger, the mistress seized the cow-hide, and with
her own fuir hands, whipped the trembling slave.
She did it much more gently than was her wont;



PETER’S ‘MARRIAGE. 67

yet the blood oozed through the bruised skin that

was swelled in ridges across poor Vina’s back. She,

poor ignorant girl, imagined that she had been

severely punished. Ah! the day was coming

when she would regard such a whipping as “ only
-@ bresh.”

From that time she resolved, if possible, to get
away from the immediate jurisdiction of her mis-
tress ; and as soon as she could find him alone, she
asked her master if she might go to the field.

He asked, ‘What put that into your head?
You don’t know anything about field-work, do
you?”

“No, Sir, but [reckon I could learn. I mought
as well take my chance in the field. But, please,
Sir, don’t let missus know I axed you.”

“ Look here,” said he, to his amiable spouse,
soon after this conversation, “ Martha don’t do
much in the field; she is sickly, you know, and
she can’t keep up with the others. I reckon we’d
better bring her back into the house, and take
Vina in her place. She seems to be well, and

- willing to work.”
“Well,” replied the lady, in her characteristic
asperity of tone, “I’d rather have Vina in the
- house; but if you can’t manage Martha, send her
in. Ican make her work. She won’t conquer me
with her sickly complaining.”

‘Vina went to the field, and soon was perfect
in the lessons to be learnt there. Soon after Mr.

Â¥2



. 68 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

‘Strut, for whom one of the two girls had becn
vbought, came to claim his “ property.” The

McKiernans mancuvred to keep Vina.

When the busiest season was over, Vina ob-
tained a “pass” to go to Courtland, to obtain
some clothes she had been compelled to leave be-
hind when she was hurried away. Shealso obtained

. the loan of a horse, and set off with a beating
- heart; for she hoped now to see her mother and

brothers, or at least to learn how they had been

‘ disposed of.

How eagerly she looked about her as she rode
through the familiar street! At length her eyes
rested on an old acquaintance, and she inquired in

_ trembling accents for her mother.

“Ta! honey,” replied the old woman she had

-accosted, ‘ whar you bin all dis time, and never

knowed your mammy sol’? Mr. Peoples done
bought her. He got ole Moses and Jeny too.
Yer mammy’s mighty lucky; got sol’ ‘long o’ her
ole man” ( Vina’s stepfather) ‘‘and one o’ her
boys. Mr. Peoples mighty. good master, too;
leastways, so all de folk say whar lives out dar.

- But yer mammy to Mr. Mosely’snow. Mr. Peoples

. done hire ’em all out for de balance dis year.”

Her horse’s head was immediately turned to-
wards Mr. Mosely’s. She could not rest till she
reached the goal of her hopes—her mother’s side.

Aunt Sally was at work in the field, little
dreaming of the pleasure in store for her. Vina



PETERS MARRIAGE. 69

left her horse at the house, having paid her respects
to the mistress, who was very different from Mrs.
McKiernan. She came near the working gang,
when Aunt Sally raised herhead. “My chile! my
chile!” she cried, as with uplifted hands and
streaming eyes she ran and pressed her daughter
to her heart. Mrs. Mosely had kindly bidden Vina
to tell her mother she might have a holiday while
she remained. And when the first gush of emotion
subsided they walked towards the house.

“ O, Vina,” said her mother, ‘‘ how I did mourn
when I come to town dat Sunday, and you was
gone. I reckon I skeered ’em alla screaming and
takin’ on. I didn’t know what to do; so I went
right to mas’r. He felt mighty bad too; but he
say he can’t help it. He’s ’bliged, he say, to sell
everything, and de Lord know he wouldn’t part
with his servants if dar was any way to keep ’em.
He cried a heap while Iwas dar. He couldn’t tell
me nothin’ "bout de place whar you done gone. O,
Lord! how my heart done ache! And it ’pears it
never done stop achin’ till I see your blessed face.
Is you got good massa and missus, chile ? ”

“Not over and "bove. But dey ain’t troubled
me much yit. They’s mighty tight on the rest.
O, how some o’ de people thar does git cut up!
Pears like dey will kill ’em sometimes.”

“Poor chile! poor chile! May de good Lord
keep de wolves off o’ your flesh! Dar ain’tno way
to live with dem kind, only to pray to de Lord to



70 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

keep de lions’ mouth shet up. We’s poor critters:
in dis yar world, but dar’s a crown for us up yon’,
if we minds de Word of de Lord, and keeps patient
to the end.”

Old Sally was a pious woman, and of a kind
and loving disposition. Her whole trust was in
her Redeemer, and as well as her enslaved condi-
tion permitted her to exercise influence over them,
she taught her children the fear of the Lord.

Swiftly passed the hours till Sunday; and very
pleasant they were. - Then, as her “‘ pass” specified,
Vina must return. Jeny, her brother, saddled her
horse and brought him to the door. She tore
herself from her mother’s arms, and was gone. A
great load had been taken from her heart, now
that she knew her loved ones were in good hands.
The old light came again into her eye, the accus-
tomed elasticity to her step ; and the old cook re-
marked that “little Vina gone mighty peart like
since she tuck dat are jaunt to de ole place.”

McKiernan’s plantation was only a mile from
Mr. Gist’s, and there being a near relationship
between the families, a greater intimacy existed
between the servants than was usual between the
slaves of even near neighbours.

Peter was at this time a fine cheerful fellow in
the full, fresh vigour of manhood. TheMcKiernans
both liked him, and amongst the servants his
bright, good-humoured face was always welcomed.

Even little Vina, who was developing into a



PETER’S MARRIAGE. “1

handsome girl, felt the genial influence of Peter’s
presence, and her shyness and reserve gradually
melted away in the warmth of his smiles. From
the first Peter regarded the desolate, sorrowful
looking girl with pity, for he knew well the character
and temper of the mistress into whose power-she
had fallen; and he never failed to speak kindly
to her.

Week after week, and month after month
the sympathy deepened between the kind-hearted
youth and the timid, shrinking maiden, until it
ripened into love, and by the time Vina had been
a year at her new home, they had confessed their
mutual attachment, and only waited an opportunity
to be married. Vina was at this time only fifteen
years old.

Mr. and Mrs. Kiernan marked this growing
attachment with much satisfaction. Vina’s owner
had long looked with a covetous eye upon Peter,
and he encouraged his attachment to Vina, in the
hope that when he had a wife away from home the
inconvenience of it would induce Mr. Gist to part
with him. To his own master and mistress he was
afraid to communicate his wishes. His mistress
always wanted him at home. She depended much
upon him; and he knew that she would object to
having his attention diverted from her business by
family cares of his own. Yet Peter felt that he
was himself aman. ‘‘ Am I not twenty-five years -
old? Surely, when I have waited so many years



72 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

upon my master’s family, they may be content to
spare me now and then of a Sunday.”

Still he knew they would oppose him; and he
resolved to keep his own counsel, in the hope that
“something would turn up.” He was not dis-
appointed.

Mr. and Mrs. Gist had for several years been
proposing to pay a visit to their friends at Lexing-
ton; and Peter had been made happy by the pro-
mise that he should drive the carriage. Now they
resolved to fulfil their purpose. To the astonish-
ment of all, Peter declared he did not wish
to go.

“Not go!” cried the master. “I thought there
was nothing you would like so well?”

“Well, so I would,” replied Peter, “ butit’s so
long now, that I’m afeared everybody there done
forgot me. There wouldn’t be nobody glad to see
me, no how.”

“Well, well, then old man Frank can go; he'll
not want to be asked twice.”

The family took their departure, all the servants
assembling to see them off, and express warm
wishes fora pleasant journey. They thenseparated’
to their respective labours. Peter alone remained
with dimmed eyes gazing down the road where the
carriage had disappeared. Ah! it was a great
pleasure he had sacrificed! “ What a fool I am,”
he said to himself, “here I stand, and they are gone;
and I might have gone too, to see my friends.’



PETER’S MARRIAGE. 73

But ’ll be married to Vina ’fore dey come back ;
. den it will be too late to make fuss ’bout it.”
Vina had made her home with a woman called
Aunt Lucy since she had gone to work in the field.
Thither, when his work was done, Peter hastened
with light and cheerful step. It was not difficult
to win Vina’s consent to an immediate marriage ;
for she had given all her young heart’s love to
Peter. Her master readily assented to the wishes
of the young couple, and on a pleasant evening
in June they. were married. Old Peter Hodge, a
Baptist preacher, a slave belonging to one of the
neighbours, performed the ceremony ; and a merry
company, consisting of all Vina’s fellow-servants,
and a few of Peter’s intimate friends, enjoyed a
substantial supper in the master’s kitchen.

The bride was very pretty, notwithstanding her
grotesque attire, which consisted of an old white
dress and a few quaint, old-fashioned ornaments,
the discarded finery of her mistress. The few
clothes she had brought from Courtland had been
worn out or stolen by her fellow-slaves. A white
linsey frock, which her mistress had given her, the
only article of clothing she had received since she
had been on the plantation, was minus the front
breadth. As she had no immediate prospect of
getting another frock from her owners, Peter gave
her a black surtout coat of his own, with which
she patched it. It was now half black and half
white, but it was decent and comfortable,



74 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Peter, however, had good clothes; and when
he found that McKiernan would supply Vina with
no comforts, he sold his own things to provide
decent clothing for his wife.

Soon after her marriage, Vina obtained per-
mission to pay another visit to her mother. Many
long and earnest conversations were held between
them ; and many times the Good Lord was thanked
for all His kindness towards them. Aunt Sally
had’a good master, and both her boys were close
at hand.

The young wife received many items of advice
and instruction from her mother, in which religion
was not lost sight of. The few days of her leave
expired all too soon, and the beloved daughter was
forced to say, Good-bye. This time there was less
of anguish in the parting—all she loved was not
left behind.



CHAPTER IX.

CHANGES AND DEATH.






N their return from Lexing-
ton the master and mistress
received a warm welcome.

Nee ‘How d’y, missus?” ‘O

| you’s purtier dan ever.” “ How

=| glad 2 is you’s come home once
| more.” These are the loving greet-
ings. Nor are the master and the baby forgotten.

When the supper is brought in, and Peter takes

his place as waiter, the master says :

“Well, Peter, so you’ve stolen a march upon
us since we've gone ? Been gettin’ married, eh? ”

“Yes, Sir, I’s been gettin’ married.”

“Ha, ha! You thought the folks at Lexington
had all forgotten you. Well, since you’ve been so
smart, I must try and buya wife for you. You'll
not be worth much if you have to be running off
every week to see your family. Besides, Mr.
McKiernan .intends to move to Bainbridge about
Christmas, and then you'll have a long road to
travel.”

But Vina’s master had no intention of selling



76 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

her. She was one of the best servants he had.
He would, however, be glad to buy her husband.

That was out of the question. Neither Mr.
Gist, nor his wife, would consent to sell Peter.
Andif they had been willing, Peter himself would
have remonstrated. He knew McKiernan too well
to wish for such a change.

McKiernan removed to Bainbridge. He had
bought a new plantation, much of it new land, and
to clear and plant it with corn and cotton required
the utmost diligence. There was no time to build
cabins, though there were not half enough to re-
ceive the people. All, therefore, that wished a
house to themselves, were obliged to spend their
Sundays in building it.

Peter immediately commenced preparations for
building a cabin for his wife. Every Saturday he
walked to Bambridge, a distance of seven miles ;
and early on Sunday morning he was at his work.
All the holy day he toiled, and often when the
moon shone far on into the night. Then by the
first peep of dawn on Monday he was away to
commence his labours for his master.

The house was at length finished, more sumptu-
ously than most cabins, inasmuch as it had a floor
formed of slabs. Peter had earned all he could,
working nights and holidays to get a little money
to buy necessary articles of furniture, but it was so
little he had to sell more of his clothes. Two or
three cooking utensils, two chairs and a trunk was



_ CHANGES AND DEATH. 77

all that he could get at first. To these he soon
added a walnut-wood bedstead, and a straw-stuffed
bed. McKiernan allowed his slaves a peck of
meal and three-and-a-half pounds of bacon per
week. Whatever vegetables they might require
they must raise by their Sunday labour, and in
this way they must procure clothes and comforts
as they could.

Mr. Gist had bought a shoemaker amongst his
slaves, and Peter having formed a friendship with
him, he cheerfully instructed himinhisart. This
was of great use to Peter, as he was able to make
shoes for himself and his wife, and thus save many
dollars. He also earned small sums by making
shoes at night for his fellow slaves. Thus Peter
was able to buy a cupboard for Vina, and a chest,
in which she could secure her own weekly allow-
ance from the half-clad, ever-hungry negroes. He
had bought a barrel to assist his wife’s house-
keeping. But before he could get it to her Mr.
Gist’s overseer took the liberty of appropriating
it to his own use.

“That’s my bar’l, Sir,” said Peter, “and I
want to use it myself.”

“Curse you! hush your mouth, you nigger.
I'll let you know you're not to forbid me to use a
barrel when I want it.”

“ Butit’s mine,” persisted Peter. “TI bought
it, and I’s gwine to carry it to my wife.”

The overseer was greatly infuriated. He could



“78 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

take no vengeance except by showering curses upon
Peter for claiming what was his own. So he went
and complained to Mr. Gist that one of the niggers
had been impudent to him, and swore to have
revenge. “ And if,” added he, “I don’t whip him
now, Tl] give him something that will hurt him a
heap worse.”

The master hesitated, but finally, concluding
from the fellow’s temper, that such a course would
be safest for the slave, he gave him permission to
whip him very slightly. Accordingly Peter was
tal.en to the stable, where twenty-five lashes were
inflicted on his naked back,

In September, 1826, the wailing of a tiny voice
was heard in Vina’s cabin. A new fount of love
was opened in that young mother’s heart, and her
frame thrilled with joy as she proudly placed in
her husband’s arms her first-born boy. She knew
her babe was born to slavery and sorrow, but hope
whispered that perhaps his lot, after all, might be
a happier one than thatof his parents! Peter had
managed to provide materials for a comfortable
wardrobe for the little stranger, and Vina took great
pleasure in making up the tiny garments. They
were coarse and without embroidery, but when
they were finished and laid in the trunk, she could
not help now and then lifting the lid to see how
nice they looked.

After going out to the field, the young mother
had but little time tolook after her boy. He was left



CHANGES AND DEATH. 79

all alone on the bed. Four times a day, for a few
moments only, she was permitted to go and minister
to his wants. Then, however he might cry, or even if
he were complaining of some of the little maladies
incident to children, she had to leave him. The
cottun must be picked. How often, when working
near at hand, she could hear his plaintive cry; but
she dared not leave her work to goto him. After
going from the field she washed her boy, and put
clean clothes upon him, and then washed his
clothes, her own, and herhusband’s. All this, with
mending, often found her occupation until near the
dawn. “But I wouldn’t see my child go dirty
and raggety,” said she, “if I neber get a wink o’
sleep.”

When little Peter was about a year old, Vina
had a severe illness from inflammation of the brain,
caused by the brutal treatment of the overseer.

“He tied my hands with his hand’chief, and
pulled my coat off o’ the waist ; and then he beat
me till Icouldn’t hardly stand. He struck me o’er
the head mos’ly,and tried to knock me down with
the butt end o’ his bull whip. My head was cut
in aheap o’ places, where the scars is on it yit.

“Treck’n he wouldn’ta give me so much, but
I tried to fight him atfirst, and he had to call two
o’ the men to help him tie me. He got so mad
that he jist went ’cordin’ to his own mercy.

“When he done beatin’, he curse powerful, and



80 2HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

say if I ever tole dis yer to massa, or to any person
close, so it would get to him, he’d gib me a heap
more; andif that didn’t do, he’d shoot me. Iwas
feard he mought kill me sly; so I never said nothin’
*bout it to anybody but Peter. He came home a
Sunday, and when he’s sittin’ by me, he sort o’ put
his arm round me. O! says I, don’t, put yer arm
thar, you hurt my back.”

‘<< What’s the matter o’ your back P’ says he.

“ done beat me,’ says 1; ‘but don’t you tell nobody,
for if he finds out I don’ tol’ the tale, he’ll kill me,
sure.’

“ Peter felt mighty bad when I tell him. ’Peared
like he could a’ gone out and kill ole Bill Simms
on the spot.

“The next Sunday, Simms come up afore my
house and speak to Peter, whar was a standin’ at
the door. Peter answered him mighty low, and
that made him mad, case he ‘lieved I done tol’ him
howI bin’ bused. ‘Seems to me,’ says he, ‘ you’re
gettin’ mighty grand. You're too great a gentle-
man to speak to a white person with respect.
Never mind, I’ll do-you a kindness some o’ these
days; I owe you somethin’ this long time.’

“* Well,’ says Peter, ‘that debt will be paid at
the judgment day.’ :

“When I hard dis, I tremble every minit; for
I’lieved I should have to take more next day.

“T had a heap o’ misery in my head all the time



CHANGES AND DEATH. 81

for two weeks arter I tuck that beatin’, and then
I got right sick, and they said I’s out 0’ my senses
for aweek. They sent for the doctor; but I didn’t
know nothin’ "bout it; and he said I’d tuck some
mighty hard blows on the head. Missus sent for
Peter to come, for they all ‘lieved I was gwine to
die. Then Peter tol’’em all ’bout what’s done
make me sick.

““Mas’r was mighty mad. ‘Why didn’t she
tell me this afore P’ said he.

“* Bekase,’ says Peter, ‘she know’d your rule
that, however bad the oversee beats your servants,
if they come for complain to you, you will give them
wus.’

“T reck’n I shouldn’t never done get well, if
they all hadn’t tuck such good care o’ me. When
T got so I could talk, mas’r ax me why I never
tell him what a beatin’ ole Simms gib me?

“«What I come to you for?’ saysI; ‘you allers
tole us never to do that, without we wanted more.
If I'd ’heved ’twould done any good, I’d a come to
you, Sir, mon’s quick.’

“ Soon’s I’s able to get out 0’ bed, mas’r come
to see me, and bring ole Simms with him. Then
he axed me ’bout that beatin’, an’ I up and tell
him ’fore his face. He couldn’t deny it. Mas’r
cursed him mightily, and tell him he should pay
my doctor’s bill, and for every day I was sick. I
nebber know’d "bout de payin’, but mas’r drove
him off the place, and he never come on it ’gain.”

G



82 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

In the spring of 1830, Peter’s master and:
mistress once more planned a visit to Lexington.
As the carriage drove away from the door, Aunt
Ceely, the cook, sobbed out, ‘‘’Pears like some-
thin’s gwine happen. I’s had mighty bad dreams
dese las’ nights.”

“O! you’s allers a dreamin’ — reckon your
dreams ain’t much ’count,” replied a cheerful girl
at her side. “I reckon nothin’ ain’t gwine hurt
dem, no how. Dey’s bin to Kaintucky ’fore dis.”

But that young mastér was never again to be
seen in his own home. After some months’ sojourn
in Lexington, they were about to return, and a
- large, gay party was assembled ata farewell dinner
on the day before their departure. The fond wife
saw her husband’s face turn ashy pale. He was
borne from the table to the sofa; but before any
medical aid could be summoned the spirit had
passed to its destiny, and the loving wife was a
widow.

The desolate woman returned with her children
to her now darkened home. It was a heavy blow
to the slaves. The master had his faults, and
sometimes they suffered from violent fits of passion
on his own part, but he protected them from the
violence of overseers and other ruffians, and sup-
lied them comfortably with wholesome food and
clothes. The master died without a will, and till
the law determined the distribution of his property,
the widow remained on the plantation, and pre.



CHANGES AND DEATH. 83

served, as far as possible, the accustomed order of
affairs. =

A yet more painful bereavement to Peter was
soon to follow the loss of his young master. Just
a year after, Levin’s health which had been far
from robust, began rapidly to decline, and it soon
became evident that his work was done. Levin
was a true Christian. He had put his trust in the
bleeding Lamb, and for some years, according to
the knowledge he possessed, had earnestly sought
to follow his Redeemer. Now, as death approached,
he experienced the fulfilment of the Master’s words
“My peace I give unto you. Not as the world
giveth, give I unto you.”

It was a great comfort to Levin that Fanny was
permitted to be with him during the last few days.
It was on the twenty-eighth of December that the
changecame. “ Call Peter, Fanny,” said he, sud-
denly awaking out of a gentle sleep.

“ Peter’s gone to Bainbridge, dear Levin.”

A shade of disappointment passed over his face.
For a few moments he remained silent in prayer.
Then suddenly he cried out aloud, “ Peter! Peter!
O, dear Peter.” There was a slight struggle—a
faint gasp, and the happy spirit of poor, deeply-
wronged, kidnapped Levin was atrest within the
veil. :

They placed the lifeless form in a rude coffin,
and bore it to its lowly grave. Where is the
ruffian that stole him from his home and his mother,

a2



84 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

never again to look upon them, and consigned him
to the multiplied wrongs and villanies of slavery ?
The time will come when the justice of the Al-
mighty will certainly find him out.

The death of this dear brother, whom he loved
with a strong and yearning affection, cast a heavy
gloom upon Peter’s spirits. He felt that he was
now alone. All his cherished hopes of one day
attaining. freedom were associated with Levin.
There was none now to share with him the
memories of their early childhood, their mother’s
love, and of the sad day when they were stolen
away.



CHAPTER X.

VINA’S TROUBLES,







: heart shared with her hus-
-£2) band. Vina was Aunt Sally’s
veanie child; and she was de-
votedly attached to her mother.
It was a comfort to the old
slave when her daughter became the wife of
Peter. In one of her frequent conversations with
old Moses, her husband, on this subject she re-
marked, “I’s mighty glad de poor chile done got
married. ’Pears like she won’t be so lonesome
now. I’d like to see her ole mas’r. But her
missus; she’s a screamer! Vina say de little gal
whar waits in de house gits her back cut up power-
ful, and she’sa sickly little thing. Hi! won’tdem
kind o’ ladies catch it mighty when de bad man
gits em? De Lord years all de screams o’ His
chilluns ; and He ain’t gwine put harps o’ gold in
dem dere hands, whar’s allers a playin’ wid de
cow-hide.”

Suddenly old Sally’s master announced his





86 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

intention to remove with all his able slaves to
Florida, of whose beauty and fertility he had
heard flattering accounts. Aunt Sally was over-
whelmed with sorrow, for the parting from her
children might be a final one; and such was the
pressure of the crop up to the very day of setting
out she had no time to visit her daughter, whom
she had not seen for several years. She must set
off on this dreary journey without telling her loved
one ‘“ Good-bye.”

Vina did not hear of the intended removal of
Mr. Peoples and his servants, until her mother
was already in Florida, and scarcely a hope re-
mained that they would ever meet again. Her
grief was extreme to lose her mother thus with-
out even a parting message ! This was harder than
all her previous trials.

Happily for Vina, Mr. Peoples did not like
Florida; and when he had made one crop he re-
turned with all his slaves in glad procession to his
former home. How did Vina’s heart dance for
joy when, soon after their return, Aunt Sally was
permitted to pay a visit to her daughter !

Thanks to Peter’s industry, Vina and her
children had always decent clothing, and their
‘cabin boasted many convenient articles of furni-
ture, such as slaves seldom possess. And to the
scanty dole of meal and bacon served out to them
on the plantation, Peter found means of adding a
little coffee and sugar, or a few pounds of flour.



VINA’S TROUBLES. 87

Aunt Sally rode briskly homewards, proud and
happy that Vina had found so good a husband, and
had two such “ peart chilluns.” Her joy endures
-but for a few months, and is then painfully inter-
rupted. The tidings circulated through the negro
quarters, to the consternation of all the inhabitants
of those cabins, that Mr. Peoples has bought a
plantation on the Gulf Coast, and thither his slaves
are all to be conveyed as soon as they can make
the necessary preparations for the journey.

The good old woman had taken a heart.
breaking farewell of Quall, her son, who remained
behind. It was their last fond meeting—their last
heart-crushed “ Good-bye.” Then old Sally and
her companions in trouble proceeded on their
dreary journey. The rendezvous for starting down
the river was at Bainbridge; and this being only
a few miles from McKiernan’s plantation, a faint
hope sprang up in her mind that she might once
more see her daughter, and bid her a final fare-
well. She determined at least to make an effort.

Arrived at Bainbridge, she had to wait for the
boats. Seeing a gentleman slowly riding by, Aunt
Sally approached him almost in despair. He pitied
her distress, and listened kindly while she recited
the cause of her sorrow.

“ So your daughter is at McKiernan’s ? What
is her name ?”

“ Her name Vina, Sir.”

“Vina? Why that’s Peter’s wife.”



88 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Yes, Sir, her man name Peter. He ‘longs to
Mas’r Levi Gist.”

“ Well, I’m his brother, Andrew Gist. Jl find
Vina myself, and send her down to see you.
Come, cheer up, aunty, you'll have good times
yet.”

Well mounted he rode fast, and soon made
up to a group of women in McKiernan’s field.
“Which of you all,” he inquired, “has a mother at
Peoples’ ?”

“ T¢’s Vina’s mother whar lives dar, Sir. Yon’s
Vina,” said a young girl, pointing to a woman who
was working apart from the rest.

“ How dy’e, Vina?” said the rider, ‘does Hou
mother belong to Peoples ?”’

“Yes, Sir.”

“ Well, if you go down to the landing, you'll see
the last of her, I reckon, for she’s going down the”
river. Peoples is moving down to the coast.”

He turned and rode away ; and Vina gazed after
him in speechless terror. Her mother! The coast!
How could it be? As soon as she recovered her-
self a little, she left the field, and took her course
with trembling steps to the house. Fortunately
both master and mistress were at home, and she
happened to find them in unruffled mood. She
told them what Mr. Gist had said; and they bade
her go to the landing, and stay with her mother as
long as the boats remained.

As she neared the landing she beheld many



























VINA’S TROUBLES. 91

fires, and around them groups of unhappy slaves.
All were weeping and sad; for there was scarcely
‘one that was not enduring the pang of hopeless
separation from husband, wife, children, or parents.
Vina could not hear her mother’s voice in the sad
murmur that met her ear. But, entering one of
the flat boats there, on a low stool, near a fire, sat
a female figurelooking quite disconsolate and hope-
less. Vina came near, and Aunt Sally, lifting her
head, sprang up, and with a cry of intermingled
anguish and joy, clasped her daughter to her breast.
“QO, my chile,” she exclaimed, “I’s studyin’ ’bout
you, whether I’s ever gwine see you agin or not.”
She sobbed aloud. “O! how can I go and leave
you, honey? Ishan’t neber come back no more!
Way down on the sugar farm I shall die, and der
won't be no daughter dar to see ’em lay me in de
grave.”

It was Friday ; and after Vina had been there
some hours, until near midnight, it was announced
that the boats would not probably leave Bainbridge
until Monday morning. Aunt Sally obtained per-
mission to spend the nextday with Vina. Swiftly
sped the hours of that day, and at night Vina
accompanied her mother back to the landing.
There they parted, the mother promising to return
in the morning and spend that day also with her
loved ones.

Early dawn saw the loving Vina on her way
to the river. She walked rapidly, for every moment



92 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

was precious. She came in sight of the landing,
and started back with a heavy groan; for there
all is vacancy where she had expected to find her
mother. There are smouldering fires, and here
and there a bit of an old blanket that has been
forgotten. But the boats are gone!

She meets her mother no more. That Gulf
farm is fatal to many of Mr. Peoples’ slaves. After
gathering only one crop, he sold his plantation and
removed to Mississippi, there to resume the culti-
vation of corn and cotton. Aunt Sally went with
him there. After several years she sank peacefully
to the grave, her heart filled with holy joy and
triumph over death. All who saw the light of
love and hope beaming from her eye in the dying
hour knew that she had been with Jesus. And
those who saw the heavenly smile that lingered on
her face when her pulse was still, and her cold
hands lay meekly folded across her breast, felt
that she was with Jesus, and that her happy spirit
had reached the happy home where she had so
often longed to be at rest.

Her master, who had always been kind to her,
wrote to her children to inform them of her
decease, and her final triumph over the powers of
the grave.

In October, 1831, another little voice was heard
in Vina’s cabin. While her children were small,
not an article of clothing was provided for them
by their owner—not until they were old enough to |



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'2011-12-30T10:21:35-05:00'
describe
'287249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
3308c97093d2ac91c3ca52753cfffb85
a981053d38e96d4390a14d8f3cb4d03af4f77993
'2011-12-30T10:24:57-05:00'
describe
'133828' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
672df4f4a461955e075fa099c2a23826
f849218767e30e2e91c5980eb18ea79decfddf0f
'2011-12-30T10:21:54-05:00'
describe
'36275' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUP' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2a9e07bdb61ed819a78608c4adbad2f1
23225678eca2f3d3edce678a9fa62e2479add115
'2011-12-30T10:22:58-05:00'
describe
'41665' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
6cb26ff67bc6743fdedb1cac296a8d97
3b632c287c8313ef5526eeae0cd0d13a8070258a
'2011-12-30T10:21:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
90a9ddc4339d20e81ab06157677d445e
3aa3ee185a91c3fa314bb1856ea968f24e849b90
'2011-12-30T10:23:52-05:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
fcfa7acf3fad3567527b993de1805535
d42379a54e6662143e927820f4c8984bdca70ae0
'2011-12-30T10:22:41-05:00'
describe
'9454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUT' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
388dcd7c044f2020ff414a5d8ceb5af4
c84685fadda13b05964678821ff0a575cf2dedd6
'2011-12-30T10:24:43-05:00'
describe
'287245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
8c6abc8c2ac2c32f15d7ced9d1331cf1
bc8d59cd2507d60e351f39e471b0a9bbff0a7a50
'2011-12-30T10:21:34-05:00'
describe
'132220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
88ddd4351ca271c70ee553fe9a493500
f410a0c51a0009ebf1d970311725ad418ce7a92f
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUW' 'sip-files00011.pro'
84a7c6476c69e69783da5396f5d68e40
8338c0a60fd7180108c089d0581e64b4a320f380
'2011-12-30T10:24:47-05:00'
describe
'40384' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUX' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8124effa48cf13baff6358210db33558
4f150e33cbcaf7726c60c35819e32ba1d53f908c
'2011-12-30T10:20:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2d9108de8dc81c5aa9d674f44696ed0d
da441dc830653ce4093faf2f64650aec92c4e3fa
'2011-12-30T10:22:18-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJUZ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2197549321f722a3e5fb5ca373a0b5f8
f200aa632144c15127d50816d5a4a9665b2c5336
'2011-12-30T10:22:45-05:00'
describe
'9311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
1a12418c9f68f60655d485e941722a44
5419fc9695fd834398db2bbc2580fe0780b2766b
'2011-12-30T10:26:30-05:00'
describe
'287262' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVB' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a60e9ca186c4f746fe388bd02f16a94c
450512a9d847d3a3b1282157e570ff3254afc38f
'2011-12-30T10:21:11-05:00'
describe
'90784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d2e1bd28fbd7be006f8c6946ff6e3dd2
b25f09b747bc063161fdb0134f7488b4d1b3b7f5
'2011-12-30T10:26:47-05:00'
describe
'19003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
63dddc4c40ee4c1591d8578c37a24628
e2cdd88779f4982627b8ff6208cbb77563b79631
'2011-12-30T10:23:49-05:00'
describe
'25095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
c0cf7c6c00f35382bcb8bd17fe3b199a
b40c020b3e76c77e1f99374c1ce877da2d8aef57
'2011-12-30T10:24:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVF' 'sip-files00012.tif'
55f335f6917fa6864ad97e4353cfc6a1
06ec9bedebceaa53081b89d57c53046e2bae995f
'2011-12-30T10:26:03-05:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
fda267a822335e4aea27508a51af8d42
f5bbce7acc08a3edff842176b2037ecfb2941018
'2011-12-30T10:22:54-05:00'
describe
'5699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
5ccc88b8b80bf6f162b629211f6bb6b5
c85c883b42931cea819b6e442f3b6a03b60a663d
'2011-12-30T10:21:50-05:00'
describe
'287200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
09ba13c96904c4508af3f1af8d28b453
b28fd1e28b4455a59605e9fbc8b5761b84b7b65d
describe
'116766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8f52b4e569384a81678c457e1f3cc0e9
4aefa59d72f7c6a42fed5a9dbd9d41705e23f679
'2011-12-30T10:27:11-05:00'
describe
'22862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d2ad6c32f23ba732b844aae5595ff20a
89decd126930dea4857e46ba3733e5c0e63f7532
'2011-12-30T10:20:54-05:00'
describe
'32189' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
44e375f45207b23ffd393e84b2e4ae3c
a5e71475c75c9516b1f38cdac256069a579e5bc6
'2011-12-30T10:21:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f92aa0ad59416b6ae2bd20870e22cea4
69d68d916d1956ac4be5af945cf197eedb271f23
'2011-12-30T10:22:32-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
f973ab6595fa3c1fe10a20b9a666765f
2aa0de51c15c3cbfd96fad46961c3d91370d5a3f
'2011-12-30T10:20:45-05:00'
describe
'7650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c44e54e7600efbe702edf0b0b5a23b45
765f6af907bbb90139fa58d625dbc9cc3f361b5d
describe
'287179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
555794f0fe1ce204f772e570f9638f2b
7fa6725e252de54585d2f6c46a16d632daa49fa2
'2011-12-30T10:24:44-05:00'
describe
'138353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
6d77f30a227d1c63bb1938a38dacb237
181edd7ec754e70a4855d2fa9a2c12d3be6380a6
'2011-12-30T10:25:04-05:00'
describe
'35577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
629a37a39aba5d918409d289e7237016
98c200ee8e04b533ace510e019e93b67a7da634a
'2011-12-30T10:22:09-05:00'
describe
'41336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a54ce299a03ae2c07af8899d3a1b06ea
ce1b50abd03cdfa93a196ce39b01bd004e18e771
'2011-12-30T10:21:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f786c0296ef9c218f5c9fd2968ee8db0
00cc91ab4ce3323efbd6d82bd05f72f3ceb781cd
'2011-12-30T10:21:14-05:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
9e7b9b30d0ead400986d78b3318cc9e1
7185ebc34ed3bb1316be6020990bbf3089aadc71
'2011-12-30T10:23:51-05:00'
describe
'9346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b14b04a3a9af1d97aaa3d377d8d3a550
cd361d530797eedc77d032938ad3b6bacbd20a97
'2011-12-30T10:25:43-05:00'
describe
'287265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
42b3bd1265a204c1f4519ee0f2717b4c
9ca07dda44ec063d34139ef86e20699da683012c
'2011-12-30T10:25:51-05:00'
describe
'131732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
2661111945c41507a7651ad6d8516774
76aa3f81d7741b278f6789dc37bc12a97445a218
'2011-12-30T10:21:16-05:00'
describe
'34140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cff7f390658f7fc05fbf247c1addc80a
9e419427ca0d2e22066415d2143faf186f6b1849
describe
'39624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJVZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
5bb3c3afa1d3c2ecc041942a237970a6
10522769e5f4644e9130d66e2a966489fb2f5f45
'2011-12-30T10:25:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
575ce1ab0f764b5062abed2d1828daf0
1128ef5eb1873399be4061c9d0ce729c0a69003e
'2011-12-30T10:23:37-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ca600b4176593f72895ff49ded929d92
7e96c772bf3375de2e7ea8f7ebfe38a9dceb82e8
describe
'9482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5c952edb8c914bfcdf7baf3e9d189204
52e91cf11e0716beabadf9b06ca1ea7f1534aa33
describe
'287214' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6ea3a8e31ab5ee810a8b1163386cab65
85fd1feddc52be36733e04443f0ab2b6de77a7c4
'2011-12-30T10:21:00-05:00'
describe
'140000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
92eb592828b7110baf0931d029cc11ab
b1af75d4f93e7f9290a6d6fd606d3f2de8823477
'2011-12-30T10:20:43-05:00'
describe
'34663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
241ca8a7114923252109675c667f7ef9
46e3c904132c5b65ceadc0d176d4bf9b9a664824
'2011-12-30T10:27:13-05:00'
describe
'40581' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
191d5934b44013e772d671f19147b144
3c45728f22faead17d0e8376483982640aaa3f47
'2011-12-30T10:23:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
700d25e295d71cb34050f7773a6a1506
e9d0728bea877ee7d3aa6db223483740f1863518
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
be9fe7ce0464bd68422829a7d9e23cb4
68baf3ab098e3024aeb71e20f321daac2f8653c6
'2011-12-30T10:25:40-05:00'
describe
'9289' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
a318be3f2a58603d586aa9cbea7ba8d4
74536a20752788a1e20d474f2952b0f515228e8d
describe
'287182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e15d876b38752e6a6771f2ab2d8eff83
55c61549acf8597003667d53c17f479e33b4e03c
'2011-12-30T10:22:55-05:00'
describe
'138017' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
6707f4190df6eeb97531aec132314a32
508c752c80493bcae9837f396d23d6c2a0b1ee00
'2011-12-30T10:24:40-05:00'
describe
'35944' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
075da7acb357a2144124d876eea27c7c
a227d8479aed8399c89b219e34180335677d3478
'2011-12-30T10:22:26-05:00'
describe
'41852' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b3cc4ab0fa1ff92ae5b0fab72d46af54
ee308dd1085ad5147536f5882d87fbd04321c3ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
22ca07ea3ad4610bfd194715c4350e3b
a65683470a96b7a5b3f617a3ea64baea33f9ddf2
'2011-12-30T10:27:39-05:00'
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
bf397b4ad0692ad8c20e13f7a02c57ba
1b77f436dd23f686b3db848ad8116a0a3357aaf5
'2011-12-30T10:22:53-05:00'
describe
'9836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
6806209cafa2dd438ec6c45bee60e8a6
09d57f72a15650d6e38aa7b0d810fb2b7a42fd0f
'2011-12-30T10:21:42-05:00'
describe
'287275' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a974d5a88405d3504e44d9fd044e4cdd
71ed9889a16b03d495ae1651eb5ec56a504cbcdd
'2011-12-30T10:27:18-05:00'
describe
'138409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
63da5d17e7d1129e7ee3369f323756d5
312f2fd5fdba938860448998537b7154524921cb
'2011-12-30T10:21:49-05:00'
describe
'35585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
3496c8b2ad9e89698c33cbb8d7ed72f8
44ca700a75718083d72aa332a515da5f9c14fc15
'2011-12-30T10:24:16-05:00'
describe
'40716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
44b2e3b37e2437cd599105ff593bb57e
8c27ed660935905d46391bb25f4b0962ca799ed3
'2011-12-30T10:23:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
34c2f13b159e790530b2b8efa72fa578
77f54d5b5ccad472f8c7eec31d33d45b61915d90
'2011-12-30T10:24:30-05:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWW' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b64aef48c80c1d323b6308978dba6130
1cc0cc17eb92a788949619da3016d8ae699dbc33
'2011-12-30T10:25:08-05:00'
describe
'9576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b4ab56d4a32bff7f689b6450ca0c6562
8a3314df5e2084ad56807ae27542465f2f5fbb34
'2011-12-30T10:24:31-05:00'
describe
'287194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
c47042bb74bc7d045cd8a4f1d663c80e
49edef0cd08183673a8503042f91ac16b2114170
'2011-12-30T10:27:36-05:00'
describe
'138736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJWZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
9ed2125f49c6c5958e9cc809ee5cb41c
21edfa9e6705702cea0b7578a9bcfc0db41c5152
'2011-12-30T10:20:49-05:00'
describe
'35044' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
2a5886dcb30a5e7e6b31eb753a6fe394
8dde2dcc46afcbb142d8b2807b9a9e3dab39886b
'2011-12-30T10:27:17-05:00'
describe
'41151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
8af66704a9933b4dc79b291e31f9ccd0
7ec2567943f7f2c843b31c0d9ae709011c227f2c
'2011-12-30T10:20:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
39b9af633dea1f4fa058db7cd864180e
6df1175a7396024a5e75568affb71602093acc45
'2011-12-30T10:23:42-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
122d7dac8b86fc85d9c6a57370e7f3ba
c3e6cb4af28dc29142c0688c343c9089de93257a
'2011-12-30T10:22:11-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
989017f9b775580638074fad806d39a6
c4777036f0f354f5894992731554a28b65024c65
describe
'287164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
8b966d10ed956038ce5e7285064bd67f
d15f6cf4c120b52515e2a86248d60e7a4f695cb9
'2011-12-30T10:20:44-05:00'
describe
'79335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
3df493b58894d9e9ca8a844f2e6baa12
16199e37d7f14a008bc2b0fb15e20a72207893ee
'2011-12-30T10:24:42-05:00'
describe
'15754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
6006337b974ac61fbeb8a45784cadd81
3bb529c669c989bd14f9fab2e85b646f74c3ab57
'2011-12-30T10:25:20-05:00'
describe
'21643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
cdd1e955695fe9128a01db116717a1ce
3089eea557b3facb3d4f399e26eb6ef945ec6bb9
'2011-12-30T10:25:22-05:00'
describe
'2314492' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
baa36e0ec0a3be939dac77974aba870a
68408a360538d90accf5b0331b88b79f54672ec6
'2011-12-30T10:27:16-05:00'
describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
9d8f87967aedc86d9f299db159fcc7d2
f5b0b7121a8f2229c49cc4a745fadfd1c66369da
'2011-12-30T10:25:39-05:00'
describe
'5198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
dfe3492b5f9ef96f4f31bc58766aa529
8755f558342240894c5eebffda14b0d26ff99d13
describe
'287059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
5ba9a053217c1462f33a94ed6f360a9e
3ef8bbadc99e0b165affe75eef60de1cf3ead06b
describe
'116284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXN' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
23527d0a962aef06537a00720892e060
da9921deebdef05be11f88b374ee034592999ec5
describe
'22468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
3d1790edc760fd27964d590c3089971b
2d82349cc80f2ae9a45c787da679d069e538f245
'2011-12-30T10:23:47-05:00'
describe
'31782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7461e49e8884de5536bebc76981bc60d
391e38c161c1766ad3027cf4ca568c96cb3875c7
'2011-12-30T10:25:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
51376705e0eb1d1fad92f7bdb87b6728
35c2301d4b2dad848fc1bff3a649b5da63372140
'2011-12-30T10:26:20-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
bd8c2bc724f31aa8ae5e4b1d0c92ba87
c315d14fbff837966e36dbbdd1a5766dc4ae7826
'2011-12-30T10:20:40-05:00'
describe
'7715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXS' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
92ce5013fd7068172912f2bcd2cb99f3
68b75c423a2f91ed0e4d41eb20b89e2de15e62eb
describe
'287274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
98655f8d04bb08970d1bea7554fc4ea6
4c45f608987fb92e289ef9a41453634a9c482ab1
'2011-12-30T10:23:35-05:00'
describe
'136337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
5b285ff72d9217f36490be1ab506fcad
9e51487e468c399e1abc1f71cfe742f2455929a5
'2011-12-30T10:23:39-05:00'
describe
'37295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7650b025a5a53038510c6da450fbbc53
e618597112f9b8a1ac10db1f76ba59d8fb06b75d
'2011-12-30T10:23:45-05:00'
describe
'41283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXW' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7fc604a4493015c5b1a98612c55f61fd
3d643b97be7400a2ff914575bdd93201ed966db9
'2011-12-30T10:25:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f552056ec3a4a441df8e227292ff51e2
e2499e1fa2bb36faf7c5e4d26d4387a4d48ba905
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b4bf5ca8128fdc02e9788240e4e085a2
c361640999972380096c7c9a469f6da2c4dc999c
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJXZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
077e0af5939256d95b7332869d7ce661
09e1f0d705b086a0867614e1893c2bfdc279764e
'2011-12-30T10:21:46-05:00'
describe
'287177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
439aa47bf239aa9b3a2a23c7a8fef866
b4c02eb02872661a466671c1b907d73d2ecc9ea4
'2011-12-30T10:23:05-05:00'
describe
'140007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
5350975ba16549aeb040bd32bea5013c
a0fca8fd399d5ff6b344328a79de9f295970a337
'2011-12-30T10:21:25-05:00'
describe
'35355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
4ac05b72c52bd0e698a17df957639ea6
520623f7cacefb4998802e3ef0a54cd1861e4b9b
'2011-12-30T10:27:06-05:00'
describe
'41488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYD' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
25f4673933168d182354087e38e58c6f
d82473da8109dc399d014f2fe4504f6e22b60c91
'2011-12-30T10:23:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
71d39b96f4be99131d353552012aa163
6da4044e5ea72ba1e75781881b48b2c529e596d8
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b41828e4e5ffc28cdbcc3c996a60341d
f4bbbe7f3b577ec23cabb5b97f1815e5abd4edd4
'2011-12-30T10:25:18-05:00'
describe
'9800' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ee5d4e75cec9be503ae06533da5d37a6
dd48a186ba0c6fad156584650d29d882a09d9e32
describe
'287202' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2c74172899723c0bd94a7e95b7d5b237
2a240834e9cec0e6d6a9141655937fa716f6e895
'2011-12-30T10:24:37-05:00'
describe
'127773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYI' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
feb435f4cf864683cc578d67e8c840d1
2e89f33948b411f8a6f9e3e00241f3ff2eb6eac7
'2011-12-30T10:21:40-05:00'
describe
'33818' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYJ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
26056ec7d2d540ad64d97a71b17be65d
b950582f4f861216369a17d6073a84bf8b215026
'2011-12-30T10:22:35-05:00'
describe
'38913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYK' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2534a8f88cecf68aadc71a11943564ba
88d9152065454c7e5bb7b7066ea107c67e461916
'2011-12-30T10:26:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
214691c89f675669a7a426856d985919
b6ace05b9aa8f5b3d5f4697fe7e6a056b4039c66
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3df7207f028f3d792e24b6a81f9e261f
54a8f8e68ed2965ae3716ba739da54d84bf0b986
describe
'9385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
db7ed4ed4771edba928a5313eafb62e1
9e60044f2b30c1cf09d7cb2ecb55a397d638e801
'2011-12-30T10:21:26-05:00'
describe
'287205' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ced6c937f2b6cf245beb5e65346eb199
3da7b43b68331e3ec0f8ecd02192b36bc76b8fa0
'2011-12-30T10:23:08-05:00'
describe
'131080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
28d232334d03e4fee5c4726f385b0c2a
1f77ebd5abd98844e789284f8c0ca7166b0f4aaf
'2011-12-30T10:22:51-05:00'
describe
'31924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5ddf0be174f4c4a20d7d87de564f1fee
d6b3d57588ae37d769829efd936ee8e52cb71a35
'2011-12-30T10:26:24-05:00'
describe
'38494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
66f217d2cf150142dbf8907750696a43
92b292c8a09e9827f7b8aa4f733dc201310d93e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
6e74160bac98ae1c7a9d2333af41fe6e
8985d9d2c4c138b2c5308fe9ad2578f7f833a4d5
'2011-12-30T10:22:05-05:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYT' 'sip-files00025.txt'
75c15a2d1d23653d8759f99fc72913e6
a691b755450f0003713bb566e3106c6139d1cdaa
'2011-12-30T10:26:54-05:00'
describe
'9292' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f8de39bc99e037e3b178037c7989ff98
dcbef08b5f614d90980c271987ff80475ecc6690
describe
'287106' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d6d8189f82489088835bda252056d5e2
1276d767169d42b8f755b1a00c386baefef7d1aa
describe
'130711' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
0b09050275054c31a6c0d1058aaa9513
14f8b4627285378fd799606cfe225a7ba8c807bf
'2011-12-30T10:22:38-05:00'
describe
'34827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
3b758237c6998563241cfa171f610372
56cbf1de55321e680000c588b6fd1126ca51649b
describe
'40407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
7b98112eb1629af7f4bb2f5eeb069dea
a981b06bb243377d19fd17d1e5f1ce33bd00dca7
'2011-12-30T10:24:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJYZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
befda8a9fdbb470531d7caa5e1f0ce4d
ab3966311efcae68ac5f1d31bb6227014d729a32
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ea30492af8fb58511e265cc8ad39f65d
16fe620a0c54a5401df646b0e070038f0a376037
'2011-12-30T10:22:23-05:00'
describe
'9698' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZB' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
eca0e5eb245d7ab3a279dc9cedcfc247
947bb8d8a34f9130f52cb967bd30342ef032b0be
'2011-12-30T10:26:13-05:00'
describe
'287229' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZC' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
01910697f554803cb3a1897c11adb328
564c68d0eded3d7c8956543c1f6b23973fe47208
describe
'106321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
46fed096b5368aec36d155dd56fd9b2a
4a5482c3db5cac0ff17b69d5cad4950f3d0b7165
'2011-12-30T10:24:06-05:00'
describe
'24346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
9bbf78330cae5c9d33c3b19ead612d29
d1ce5fc7b997bfe4b2efc46154060b4f8bccac68
'2011-12-30T10:22:31-05:00'
describe
'31493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZF' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
47ebad2cc14f75d6228cfa11487c8f2d
3b8c759ff0226df40613299b78f31e6c4ca71659
'2011-12-30T10:23:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ac4d3fe394670279d1f826a7bea0fd15
7326c0ad88be967991f02a63b6e17ab3ce58872a
'2011-12-30T10:21:24-05:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
3448fb1177f6b9ca58f4a5afa8442323
45e92c8a099d637d5bd4608bdd054a1a3efffa36
describe
'7373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c5a0c1d6986b5bdc472ff3f00d49fd29
87df0a45b387cf8f736db106ad1b4652afbc73db
'2011-12-30T10:20:59-05:00'
describe
'287197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e6f206a61f069290cc37d8432b263ff7
8f9bf9a0b33b79d377a8af14ca15a557e3c419f1
'2011-12-30T10:27:35-05:00'
describe
'111659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
35928241f688f05a09194c20125e8b1b
28e395822f3dca8fba7a1f595f131d130f20e140
describe
'22776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
636b3a329ecc4255f0db701d66f19b27
73a5773f252086825235997a9717634845983a7c
describe
'32038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
d416d08c45b0a7de6da725ee46d95317
94bf59353bb5a02da5cb52d08ba5b624349b5dd1
'2011-12-30T10:24:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
4098e5fe87952af17e2032bc7333c17c
d1131f479c6eed98b543c72c5f8c75c2014214ca
'2011-12-30T10:24:48-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
aa2c8c2256fc49b8528ad2c137e15138
21f9b7ace6ddb79e0e70a6395e5545b302d61842
'2011-12-30T10:22:37-05:00'
describe
'7623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
262fc247389ae641fd3a25bdb70637ce
492c404c4d541b0d693a55bf86978a11a1e37418
'2011-12-30T10:20:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c2800ad857d9765d5e80d387247529cf
9c106faafffc4411034fc0c9481bcaa6f843b1e0
describe
'138805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f6482a86cf8cd4d7b668e3bf17024aa3
2d6319f48cb20a2f65edc6d68721496ccf546568
'2011-12-30T10:24:02-05:00'
describe
'36168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZS' 'sip-files00029.pro'
6678e6c8935d9d737fe2b1f0e37fa99a
966f31d4c792c01bc49979c8129ec3b20af065e4
describe
'40534' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8d43448ed1cb35f8183f7115a5fd0c24
df138fbba0b0875d56c90474c9e9df258bf40677
'2011-12-30T10:27:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8a7e1139edd7aeb930ca0a04d78e3564
67db51df183197f7ab6df37cadde43b86d744a07
'2011-12-30T10:22:39-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
527ae8d468ddeb9d1afbe012cc752cc9
f30c934faac418439e88ad2c6e6f2eb63dad7cb7
'2011-12-30T10:24:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
0781981a675d599c26db0e3703992936
17a4adae30a17b1b6ea7f86463ac57d1b4bd40df
describe
'287195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9d75eaf78dd8bf5affc0a71833fdd918
52855d8a1f091be4c8d7f666dda25fa69d905e2c
'2011-12-30T10:26:42-05:00'
describe
'146906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
e7aa27f6f2433d4f59235a3b0ddb2129
2e458361c4602aebaf6fbd26332019dd72dcf9f5
describe
'48241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACJZZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
f86e1f67856f91ec144414db39e08635
a521d5e863f71945af3d52895c22a3519cbae66f
'2011-12-30T10:20:35-05:00'
describe
'41076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
bf088bd55a23ef6a9c90b5cfd7f806ae
7f728af1e837e12b921f4cb8694c94097c4efc31
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d4371d078823b80f2d2bfcae40ce9a84
9ca2a4d72ce7d812f473217f8c6397d06a1d8b92
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8e5d263021596ce3cc323b9c5550e3d0
2a9bd6610d597b6b21e0a7261464cdf9f542a072
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
8c99a1ee5771497724f0743bba1ad69e
2807972047718615b2fbda692a237e722672c090
'2011-12-30T10:26:23-05:00'
describe
'287041' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
48531286e4c13104fe7d753e999ca8a4
051d827d551d73262806ae056063c70cf225e483
'2011-12-30T10:22:02-05:00'
describe
'125983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
aebf48850332a6cb741011c33ad546d9
273a4056d468788e3f9ef802ed72f679810b5d9d
'2011-12-30T10:26:27-05:00'
describe
'32278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
9304d0239c78bf37cd74beb72f3e8020
014f352121eaf990727a96682ad45aa8b10af7f0
'2011-12-30T10:21:18-05:00'
describe
'37162' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
1e3595c421e2b4c09c7e6c078c47df6d
3470b0c9e32009963b9dc8ad4c5a83736e9cd627
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
aec54fc9b3b0bb1bb883f989590a8ce2
31f4b0dfdd985bf4f308d4eac491f49fbfb5c10b
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAJ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ba5661464797915d6f7319edc501914e
183bd3674ac255d8298d3e5c055cda1e7b357bfe
'2011-12-30T10:26:05-05:00'
describe
'8960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAK' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
e683986cbb3c637ce9c60916e223ad8b
f63332fd267439d1ab9b94adc0cfcf32d3c1bd5c
describe
'286926' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAL' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
0df1a583408e399496c019d3d9f06993
5f06d6e5124cdcbd7bac86068710f6b0ea753d43
describe
'131160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAM' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
095e38569dadbcc8f280056126a9eb58
7d30976f127ec55dbad7fbc0392696adb53b4ec1
'2011-12-30T10:27:31-05:00'
describe
'33694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
72985ab48efab3ed7335b6d12f839124
f135b4c53178644e8ca75df9a7250d1bd1fd5bd9
'2011-12-30T10:27:07-05:00'
describe
'37608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b63af199254752bbef65eed452dc7789
006dacda8a1898562aa75f457c0ee8e681d82218
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c396856690113d9e0484d4bdcfd66d1a
c9a93994e7daeff4cf5a0eff54d2e619f011c1ae
'2011-12-30T10:22:01-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a52dc7b20e6dbcc3ecd8d7455ff8bf27
86005d3e758159ca77e45e2a74b0546bb2e50752
'2011-12-30T10:21:39-05:00'
describe
'8873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
00a996a3a0a638b250401f85c5571fea
e2cf1bb10ab5f328fe4622d9f8cc8ad8c88daefd
'2011-12-30T10:23:48-05:00'
describe
'287276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
6a5bea7fe863f37756ada8e054e5c7ca
a88820e6b9d0578be95140f60413f2d67a0ae503
'2011-12-30T10:25:44-05:00'
describe
'128430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0f0875105a1d8a032208836edffcb9c6
d986bd928012ca2dabb7191c00ed76c47e8529cb
describe
'33643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
34a2ce6807aa23dfdb8d9553f336defd
9380186790f6a0e0493719190f8bc8d2716a6f77
'2011-12-30T10:22:27-05:00'
describe
'38684' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAV' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
0614c701d8bd96a18ebdac5ef7b49172
8933938b4bf249f847a8fb3c793cf0668f0de838
'2011-12-30T10:21:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
2caf5098b36a95642529eb86b77411e3
0c4d89d66d8ac0bfecd852570ef9c73b91189b03
'2011-12-30T10:25:33-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
1b6800a7c016083bf87744791a32dd6a
0c8c0172cbc9ebb566a24ae7919366e5923bcee0
'2011-12-30T10:20:39-05:00'
describe
'9136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
267be99895d37794213453c23e2b2e0e
657e0cd52457db7ddedd6fd60cc88f2e6063653c
'2011-12-30T10:20:31-05:00'
describe
'287268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKAZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
d203fd2dc657ec2e3b31df4aa6b64561
267da3d3fb65de3844160b257c0bad2d0ee35d41
'2011-12-30T10:23:57-05:00'
describe
'91980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
47cdac53d4241612a472d7cfad6f57cf
bee72e5433f8a9fff29ca06c292d68fd4993ab4f
'2011-12-30T10:27:41-05:00'
describe
'21631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
1617934520393217833be9e3fd0b7553
a06106d79125024cdde14807e85b6f4bb5f6c6ff
'2011-12-30T10:27:22-05:00'
describe
'26240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBC' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
723410afef9f2e6947005e3d92aab534
ed6d2442b457a11685a991b693ffeef9fdb3efcd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
bf35dd84b0978244fc0c95601acd479b
e67af345ebd66c0eabc59cb86debbea15f2a5876
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
8fb73a14b70f807c9d2025a2bb886de5
6ada6b4b5c841170ee9e20143a6f690a8b32f4b6
describe
'6174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
0f2c4c5a0101265c46e275fe6156e178
636e0212768dd400fe5758e8416847703f2df8d7
describe
'287225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ee8f545f27bd50ff02d0a0f51de947f5
1937a56afb118ee338ab956d7de57016722e6364
'2011-12-30T10:26:07-05:00'
describe
'106969' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
134c0dd2e958c13300ac39127f33cb2e
6e9fec4182153a55565dfcd03aaa8253dda263c2
'2011-12-30T10:23:01-05:00'
describe
'22037' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
64ca4ae3e38455db00b859a70f30fb2d
09ac92afcba87a1bef6b77611396719e3208a115
'2011-12-30T10:20:33-05:00'
describe
'31515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
52671fc1eadc40d6b7a17f2c96d1d6e6
0d87a8c0ab3d3db82ce18537ea48d1a8f5ad4c65
'2011-12-30T10:27:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2f76472768aff39d4f11a6d6c31e8b96
67da78ee78d687449cb5b762817b3d6bcd87826c
'2011-12-30T10:26:32-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
764a7ff765411e24c5a33efab51848a2
c0751581d1491c4cdfb6300367c6eb4f117579eb
'2011-12-30T10:26:04-05:00'
describe
'7615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a43f17aa996c21635c638655cd4aad95
75a6289ba6ab9a3fbcf758cd006ab7fa7a306f14
'2011-12-30T10:27:44-05:00'
describe
'287267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
52ec483d9b69af9b55d65c90ff6b5735
47b80bc75393f41344c86b275f563d48dc228482
'2011-12-30T10:23:14-05:00'
describe
'134951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
818fffcdb9eafba5d948bf05a33cb3b0
cbba6060acd0c0609a60475ce8429a8307d32181
describe
'34163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f4f829e91d98648099c6296176ad39b9
3e0f2969b8c7a4115ae9f4f0d1a8abba1f6b5847
'2011-12-30T10:23:02-05:00'
describe
'39435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3bd1580b0b6696a3127fd451ec31d80a
3bcf8940d7a82f61f485d7a92a13beed2b5dda29
'2011-12-30T10:20:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0bec56f443c113d3c50300c693fd03d0
31eb4062a373e59f18b9b78bb7557e89f7673cd9
'2011-12-30T10:22:15-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6f27d2eaa784e6321d5469fb9ef9ba50
759bdc1ab83eda3070d0bf6d9c2600df4ef20a3a
'2011-12-30T10:26:17-05:00'
describe
'8666' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBT' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b6e3a772db6c65a07b857ac7e79f06b2
352ab14e629850ab37cc55e3ef6c7863fa9e23c0
'2011-12-30T10:22:36-05:00'
describe
'287253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
1dd52e2750cdb6c1314f1a430a1f3599
5a52ccd4d5992a6ffae2006b798594d3a85abfb3
'2011-12-30T10:22:17-05:00'
describe
'141113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBV' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
143c803b81d56713b2a3d8e5e883c158
4856a737bb4229a07b53e195e6a16ffe74fa1f68
describe
'36097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBW' 'sip-files00037.pro'
90d67a4ae23f672f6f0b2874977d2904
88d497940890285c78a052e1534c5933490183e7
'2011-12-30T10:27:14-05:00'
describe
'41440' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
049bcfba15cc702494f6aa015029ce99
7399593386b1645b6ab0fb5fc07ed53bef1a7df6
'2011-12-30T10:23:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5a8ffcb0012eb13a7a98de0305901af3
3204901e467e7e92b399e36ed4d8bdb66a26e432
'2011-12-30T10:21:08-05:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKBZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b8e73b2da96655c3335139235f319863
b862c1335ff721a117a081680fa1f12f60d9a76e
describe
'9442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
c4135eabe50dd6e98b4f7c11e1aba638
f2540376d5b78fadfbb2a7e299d46e88f6f750c1
'2011-12-30T10:22:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
8a814a8b82adf9236c5b444cd9e4dcb8
479163011545b643da1ebd2c7c4df2adf5bd3c4c
describe
'138682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
bf08d034598e753b070433d04de646a3
9d7da703fbd126e41b17d5a07fcb05440b1df401
'2011-12-30T10:23:54-05:00'
describe
'37045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
370bf492cfd9e076cf96026b1ac7f19c
bda2aec56ec3e53405676418695c347245a4dfe7
'2011-12-30T10:21:29-05:00'
describe
'41565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
83732946f9e02f1e8cf79b326417c945
4b4d0a21a782bcb6cb981f97d31c83128b25d7af
'2011-12-30T10:22:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
48608ac34b7a17781a482bd8d36e1878
067fefd2cc1155c1310bd4c19e3102726ad2c13e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2a0e73ae1eae8b6a2598444d641dad0d
09e0b22e35ad93e08460ad0f70134fa3fd3fc99a
describe
'9495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ed55fa289f8a9d7332578f3a9d90668e
814b895f961d7d1a3185a3fccda9ac2495f3acf0
describe
'287095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5461d257c03d9703a3db7893a586307a
45829286e52b70276c045b83b037ae010068c553
'2011-12-30T10:25:29-05:00'
describe
'140623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e5ca0eba6e2bb4d48b190cf28df8d6f7
5ebf4232efb5efd5dcf5c0b2a9fe0256479f5dc0
describe
'36705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
30b302a25a2d0b74bf99d0f0af73004c
2d9bdfcf1c78ea5083f7898d12b657b1d44ac4f0
describe
'42636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2b9250167b91b72f0d6d522fe55200ad
59aaa40ee6e1531016c3defe226acae87499613a
'2011-12-30T10:21:57-05:00'
describe
'2314488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8b87045475c29ed6e2c623d3efa68007
5936be1aad21eec669abd99857f8559125e0ed94
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
0a3a068f03265ee36e94527c370aecb5
356011dc32ea5e1eeaa447ae43545616e912de5e
describe
'9769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
070760acd9206b342570bf15124608ca
8fc0d374221ae281899d110bf3895fe0142730e7
describe
'287173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
dad7dfeafd573882996fb9e7eba35bff
6f6f3974cb754d8cb1724f35ab91ed49d6aad27f
'2011-12-30T10:23:43-05:00'
describe
'130095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6b3ddd1888de01723c88a7703e464daf
e827feeab20f0759f9845e0270964bc42f1e55b2
describe
'35327' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d86a1a8dab1062879d61b9798acea47c
9c61db5f6be8648567194b6c42ec7fdfe8e849ec
describe
'38753' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
4bd7a3a63997e348ff7b66d9b1661369
c5c6f69df559de3490149f495b6aab9b287a7ff1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f8c8962f04aef4d64ea22814a1d1233b
0d85551224e977063f12cff6db7c8ff486efb793
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
b44ed8ea759ee23d9c6b529908f714a1
d9023082f02f8762a7aae839c3b0e97e8c8d2965
describe
'9032' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
185624fdff5c9e919a4c108b41497a59
f15e54f1afc060a5fc0783fc1f6a2e9e7387cec6
'2011-12-30T10:25:27-05:00'
describe
'287198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6f79a299d92d8c6608a91d44886e65ba
3f2b57cd253661cd70467697c6af02fded48d7d3
'2011-12-30T10:23:18-05:00'
describe
'131807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
057c02656ccf0e9cc174b058c96e2803
383d3f65c56c2f5a4e34e48791e02983f5585e52
'2011-12-30T10:24:00-05:00'
describe
'34224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8b1a27c050a02f8b9bb1e65dcc747b23
5188ea15d187bb4a6e21c9c84ef4ec0bf5c3c451
'2011-12-30T10:25:53-05:00'
describe
'40408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKCZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
0985211cd8a11bd57d035e1cb8a8943d
566c274be34b3dafefb22e73bdf6492e7b0e0c94
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
043b22bb075b0633e3e34e61d1da6464
2b193e0b142bbcd3be8437635d800d2886bb48c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
07146d3d5e8e21baf680ce950a1d5400
d4c51bd9f60b2c48ef12f25497dbeb0754d48236
'2011-12-30T10:23:03-05:00'
describe
'9467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
b90f1d4c5b00ee356779678770b0c4f8
5c22a103a07be40d9914c6222a1059cd5ef4c879
describe
'287174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
040440c0ba7737f8edd199318d9fe098
dedce076477d4ff99f25d9c4267ab3eefac4ae39
describe
'107217' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
90b434c7e52469e7a39cc3aeb7e98dfb
76d368dbd1e843eabb496caff2f0ebdd7804df00
describe
'26103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ce73f272c747b1972f8d9007f09a5461
63deedcef31a57d812706bf3ee0b7d1563812e73
'2011-12-30T10:26:58-05:00'
describe
'31066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fc2eeeb4d2d53f230e741ffed171be77
db1638cefd6bb55bb8279ce5f38635dc27894f38
'2011-12-30T10:27:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a1da5f4dfa30c0e21fc8b6881dc6a67a
d518531965d31a593fbb1bc26a7287c8c7710d2e
'2011-12-30T10:26:39-05:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4c5c336ae41c6ab02f85f98f2ca363eb
045b25deaca1f607daa5fa257aba8cfe002ab90b
'2011-12-30T10:23:53-05:00'
describe
'7707' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
cf03e1e330f246aeb6b47470d05d1baa
855d0a325e2b9b4082f0fee609003079024f57ad
describe
'286893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
6cff448fbcaacccc23de78c2e38f5190
bd3419018465505a220520c0d1bb9aaa1721974f
describe
'129539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
41b6e54f73ecf05c218f91792c5dd38e
85a49695787b6a9d81a9b6deece38f77254a98d2
'2011-12-30T10:20:24-05:00'
describe
'32476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
fba0b91191a7bbbc455175af501f96ae
02f0dd54deebc0a7224673a1867b81739b61cd7c
'2011-12-30T10:21:53-05:00'
describe
'38823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
52fc473b481d9f8c874bb96ebbb8318a
4fad1c1a737d36067d093f9a7bc07c8bb0620397
'2011-12-30T10:22:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b11c0e1d7dc3e68a890a0325f99e705f
692dc081e9329edbeae15c28a9d7ea7be84c1fb7
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
733334c219b2bc6b4696b0ea39a2ebe8
8ff2db0cc74db2737aee6ef111b9afb6f2ba3e39
describe
'9320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
680bf09204979c46901790d78c73bb0b
b6370d009344b1f43edc2a445e8f45b939e7888c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
68cbd0ece5d5f53861b975b2a44e3b55
6e23cb6d8d8f547d0c3880ace5aa8499b378b9fd
'2011-12-30T10:20:27-05:00'
describe
'134450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a62c0173c00feb2c52196533e9645355
0875f73586964b452735bc5863628c46b31e19d4
describe
'36209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
e57881a16870d5711b8dc5b25e9ac0ef
d607e8da579c337a4b6d02b4f60fa8cc7ac0c3cd
describe
'40373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
5cfbe12f9a867813b7bf97589dd44187
05420061f3844be7ea4ae3d521d6bb094cec73ea
'2011-12-30T10:26:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d9e1ca1789e72aa580b2bcf9fa1618ba
57c4987c55ceff92c833f234d2268ffd9366e4d7
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
330f7f83579bf210ccc3eaafe3460be1
6720596dace64125e9915bc91b9c39f98bbbb732
'2011-12-30T10:21:55-05:00'
describe
'9152' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
83643d27351acf691da7284d2e912e23
0307a8c1acc6b751471285ddb83292853f0f061d
'2011-12-30T10:21:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b8288a48fb82b9f5b691b44e8f7a3c1e
1051b401ed17949d5f45ab92941f88c5d290a0cf
'2011-12-30T10:23:25-05:00'
describe
'138228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKDZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a3f4f99413ff8483e2bc8e6223411b53
9f21630595a9d07233b4bd4c0b9c08d063e4df80
describe
'35896' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
ef26a79434d9e1262b898f2c02f4ce9a
c4548a7f5f8fc1a67f9bdfe4fbb043e339e78900
'2011-12-30T10:20:34-05:00'
describe
'39390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4db515c69fd35f95ee634d1be769382c
7cc107785407fdd8667d24aac3272e8c6e89097d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
df744fc9d364b2159c698ae0247931a7
0f8f97d07ffbc7acdd31261c1756acac532d1355
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKED' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1f2474e17539a00abc39cbe9bbe8279b
6ff4c7a449a65120034829b18d3cd4c6e666a836
'2011-12-30T10:26:43-05:00'
describe
'9270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
41ed5bb6b30dc8d8ea49f12ba40e392c
465e49d0720b621fdc35f81cd7e1aa6c9ec2c090
describe
'287277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7df08f59e8d3f7bac8bbed20c18f303d
17b794d54ea09d6e9f2bb8a1c7914bfb6dd584f7
'2011-12-30T10:22:20-05:00'
describe
'74003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
4108b50e4a86a95bf35ba6b154162094
4c0fbc4d1107e4b655e1d80f44c857408c00d225
'2011-12-30T10:24:52-05:00'
describe
'14094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
395e454a6a37477cb02d230085e36211
6f72c54561d2f12d18d5727ee633f30f29caf145
'2011-12-30T10:20:42-05:00'
describe
'19297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
acc5673dd488c3563656f8f29b966678
739538d7ace5fa89515552efb850c641fb323f4f
'2011-12-30T10:25:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
65921b824a88361d5877858359df8582
4296f87cf49d21636191685373693e742c04c444
describe
'585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
9a773977be6e21e003d7deaa59de1622
999a3f4744a06d2107ce882d0284b3d4142c3b07
'2011-12-30T10:24:58-05:00'
describe
'4589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
1e9230f5e126bbce94d235683aef5e25
bd9de085ead91f3fa94fc9447851e3123165c9e2
describe
'287209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1b2d0e9e77660d9fde354612d25c5d67
bb5fe71e1600474dbf52c0582c4eac4e51c9bb95
'2011-12-30T10:22:34-05:00'
describe
'109370' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
00c3720a5f2cbf245a2407e33ee716a5
03e8c65cc57f78efbd31f5ebde7e429665e3f283
'2011-12-30T10:22:40-05:00'
describe
'22661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
80d9e5c5319dfdf78c59de79a60e18e3
c1d1e747136c850df48544457fa8ff3a9d2c8d71
describe
'31713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
865cf31bb3f6a8013f3e343aa3f58540
5f38543fd32159c28b32493954b337f87a362c55
'2011-12-30T10:26:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
242b4466558c47fde5e54028e2d533d9
70d10755d237992270e51073ef955a7b23dab4d9
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKER' 'sip-files00047.txt'
14c53dd69b1a2a0e96bfec57f29ab100
33c123e7bab8b24550cf85944b1ac3c6732950fc
describe
'7316' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKES' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
8704a067f1ce33d75f1f37fcdc2031f9
2e2982149c361ee5083b2e2122c1d289a64324fd
describe
'287280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKET' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9692e4855f2ee5f146b8478a38a3da30
0177fc0127e2ccca9ec9c00fb012b3b4a2d9a1fd
'2011-12-30T10:25:24-05:00'
describe
'128216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
efcf79f54fac2bb2425b1247578b45b2
c11d54b71c2f22e9934f117180fd1ce2cc8df382
'2011-12-30T10:22:12-05:00'
describe
'33679' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
077b3f5375adbe54831488a875542af7
44e11b164658ba58005e16cec3aef4f06da5869b
describe
'38751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
0d9fce484114b6202c6bdbf5dc8b0943
4263240693230de9b46f1859a34b26c0cf574143
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
32e0873ce43726b861c6ca60240a6e5b
0c99c814a4cf20730061feccc6cef18a65c97e0a
'2011-12-30T10:27:32-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
6b4f3d758697f0f6d670f3f336b8324a
85ad32796b3dd1d7067ac9fc5682ab5be60ad11c
'2011-12-30T10:27:25-05:00'
describe
'9161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKEZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4cb13fe7bc4b47bde5292f8a4a2faf0f
5538375c884d0ef11165f91f65414be35ac642c6
'2011-12-30T10:22:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
449ae0ca431a371253da7c9962f21ad1
d8b71063238f08dbf282a1eb7569e47e601938e3
describe
'139176' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8966fdcd60ff272cc220e9a775095597
d341cfdcb0e6ac6c5b04532ad562e9925d263111
'2011-12-30T10:21:48-05:00'
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
a2f55b85303c520b10f3de3b5a8f2869
47398b4e03f447a8e4add6646dd2b5a953484cdf
'2011-12-30T10:21:07-05:00'
describe
'40502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ce4b0d496cb102f9c67a8ef98111741b
68715f317ffcf448a6c33a6dfa40cb5ca9e24f43
'2011-12-30T10:27:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e2a4c9243d0a3dacdbe7a20a1e19d25d
bea5d8ba0e3dee2cc4771db6de43b02b97c5db5f
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3cf4eb604d72f75ddc350d1234b046af
187ec7bd58cd1999794a39b2f72bea1f5397b0f1
'2011-12-30T10:23:24-05:00'
describe
'9308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
38639fd4eb194a8db4f28d5b30b696ef
5b2e6ddf2ed5063b66fe605db46779ae2b391475
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
cff992dbf46e429a792c455cab3e0a79
cf2257e042ef07028452a9f902d565b7147f2693
'2011-12-30T10:27:40-05:00'
describe
'128306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1a5f695f729e5786ce183d63a5a3ad04
817804a41194d2b93f527ca403fd7d7c98011719
describe
'34878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3dc46656cd0e6a63e3d84edb18664408
9bcf67d1f5d419326e48bd558e9d14b367c6ee4c
describe
'38890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
68b4472c612610997166a14c707238d4
b81e2c6f62b62b59cdc9160dc95c858d9cc587ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0cfd396660bb8ccea6fd1419048c2bd8
abf8c80bb18f68abf8e5a53e41696837e19e43cf
'2011-12-30T10:21:36-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c7bdf779ac288c305731862f0c0dac58
9a17c6aa925e3895d231f00a3ff97244549a11cc
'2011-12-30T10:22:25-05:00'
describe
'9198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
525f78f1ba0bf5280d6b71517c00d2bb
44193d559c286c174d1e0048f649b6e7b7c4f28d
'2011-12-30T10:23:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1b8e11e11f20d7c5dad8aacb763a49ed
5887fe1c92838eb8d58df464bdf66c1f171e5fd4
describe
'128247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
d2ae228d9a830da29b9ec76db156a8eb
0a71a8c4b18be57053b376f4aa647058a879dfe7
describe
'33722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c45e81083aef3bb457e421f1b115db36
eda16965476de756840524cc450155e0332f7960
describe
'39288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
737e05621c18e46228358fb532e4ab73
0d76fea7b2a03f397b9554b4757b0eeb7f554abc
'2011-12-30T10:26:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
48c5d78983993ddfa974bee2b30e6dfe
173bee5dd561a10a9a33933b260c28cb0a43f9bd
'2011-12-30T10:27:38-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
121ad947652469bd1634698d5fa4643d
275d36f27545b26bd2c870a44f1e7a235b221dd1
'2011-12-30T10:22:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
6b60efa0f04072f24b02adde4f5d5bec
597dcbaf1d5672dd7280f743b1aac1e1328fa076
describe
'286981' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
605a2b7e51a38b417af769648bdcb647
9ed9c75f9e21b99e629add39fedf450097de833b
'2011-12-30T10:23:56-05:00'
describe
'126766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
349645a272458dc540dcba671aa31933
2b558c19863098d32e9979bb94857c1b032972a9
'2011-12-30T10:24:14-05:00'
describe
'32547' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5aba8b6ccc327b43ae4b07f123df99f3
1ba1e34cac39dabb268d0c6505a61972e5aedf07
'2011-12-30T10:27:04-05:00'
describe
'36890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d600f1ccb89157fbef9941114b498bf7
dd0b25131e5aa314fcbb12636ea93c4f51f3e347
'2011-12-30T10:22:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKFZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ad3a1ffa863b4096bd9af6710ad040ae
d22f74ac7be96b2c6c3630f3576a908b21081e98
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
79ff325032507be891c4d791c9ae7d88
1e0c0d9c6ec7b12ed5b3ae3029ec48145b39e154
describe
'8445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d3199e064fb80ccc16f7c97e0f240aa5
37cb341850e308e7459ffca9d26d4cb1655f0e38
'2011-12-30T10:27:49-05:00'
describe
'287004' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
9d63e06d447b484c2a178b6538990bf7
a671b32c343114d68ebee4e1eb76170d488f3ffe
'2011-12-30T10:21:58-05:00'
describe
'123256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
d2b1373caf98de6afe8a03643e0c7213
b0302c09603c052a264d8e639541c9b718a796f6
describe
'32284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
397ba1e068970f250c90ed93140b7b2d
4bfab71f8109cdad6cb7e98718d3a2c3d6549a95
'2011-12-30T10:22:06-05:00'
describe
'37332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
4ca83b0fc824667600a0e2eacbbb8337
fa3f00cbe6ef9320d135fd7635a7be282b14ba1e
'2011-12-30T10:25:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
3b347e2700b8b7db051d83759f2587bf
f5cd5dc67ad952c920f71520745281896f76d0ce
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
62e935aa7e244b08cf97720d295668e2
4ff0929b446a65624b726bb2a0699510aca38bea
describe
'8974' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
67b709ecf9d325e31ca68c6ff1fc4f13
1abf02866ed6647ca70a23e2d44dcaae2355af31
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9a3151f96085980bdb994abc7fd2b412
21f187a3272d0e46f771facc71cec756f44167b1
describe
'131855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
3210a047a2d387266b291399a7a10a5b
b13aaeb80f28f18dcb8eddeeab851cf49a5b9f87
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
993bf98dd1c037a5c6ab31aade19f117
8fe6bf7a4734ee18d9d2b93e211be0b8a921240c
describe
'39798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
b2e7a44a45c97b976fb7e40c01372a5f
c1be1788beffea20d295a8ce1e287268058bb2d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3975d4d7fc650d2aaf54ac0a106089fc
c74e3ce6691d2c12952663924d7f16e72a4f104f
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5a0ad25552dcef35ddf980c5f0874cc4
8568071a270265a6414d7e0ddfc7657295540f27
describe
'9237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6ea1d957c990efc9703091b835350085
d3eb560cf0127944365d6c89166432640c786965
'2011-12-30T10:21:44-05:00'
describe
'287240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
2498cb6d29c9edfc98ec85bd6ab8c065
bed215da94043036d64b568cf245bf6103d87250
'2011-12-30T10:22:19-05:00'
describe
'95135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f3982cf39d780a65063cb33072f39535
673eb70826b90845f54b0c80542ff0eaee8d060a
'2011-12-30T10:24:05-05:00'
describe
'21181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
c6e9bc16a09812503d7a914569254f54
839a81c80c4b2daab36be6aad5c13606ef76bdc2
describe
'27616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c0ef1fade614c041bad513bc4c498880
021f31ea95d7d67a61a6817397c199b1e329582e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
055bf19bbe5519210b7422599641b13a
b52f8e1547cd9bde14b7ae95f9c077b27e4efb15
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
a59470c5541ab396c778028185a0f54f
ad56e0bf23267e46bd90b1bc1471d821257e5964
describe
'6308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
2c6aa160be52e54b52347cb1717738c8
a494d62f45877985fe4b837fde575c9abab73584
'2011-12-30T10:24:15-05:00'
describe
'287273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
04a5e4781378f33e981fb7ee4e109aca
fa197eecd5b97909dbd943575262f0c6b0a5cd4d
describe
'112519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c9d975693f57e38910b098159f4e6c7f
ac91bad9552b8d3c46f4417c3a4566ef5975cbaa
'2011-12-30T10:21:03-05:00'
describe
'23269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKGZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e789d511ab6f283cc0cba0473e6f6a04
9a13e71164b1b29e67a31c100aea62bcc7e44ce5
'2011-12-30T10:22:08-05:00'
describe
'31064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
c5625d18d5713fb3b5b03af482ba612d
a1c2ba99dde5e8f3357e344d8aebd6de4cc950ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
5a8aee824dbee7ac656626481c4c51a7
2832c5aa8f99c4d5eb32fb2db4987cd7576a1df4
'2011-12-30T10:23:04-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
5bd230fe0409534b5e576d805f0f5ed1
da71a5dd9f57946a0a1e66b1b71f0177e1068244
describe
'7339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
34b5066585f0655c7e62a99053f23f6f
6d93c1b2ea6c3241cc2c8ef921de2cc81bd2aa14
'2011-12-30T10:24:08-05:00'
describe
'287128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b62b5af60ab8e2bb8c98ea798f75063c
a5621efbf5a1ec90bb60ef2aad602548447726fe
describe
'137484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b9b12785a492cdbbddb0770ac3d91430
0f43a190b34022a42801c36fd2272e66b3d483d0
'2011-12-30T10:23:38-05:00'
describe
'35316' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
60b54311da46de5699302c9a6b7031d3
016485de02305155f476c32cd312ec38ca5b8d3c
describe
'39807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
41b83db17974e71e9e29bffb655d5967
664c33ead9f987d98a8973129c9327d2fdeeda85
'2011-12-30T10:27:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
4d851125c4834f4bd69d7021630e084e
74a879fd75b41b7b148fdb0975705bffb72355eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
78e1b51a4c38621400e9ab19b2852116
d0657b138edb94f6acca5740a2cf5657ff32127a
describe
'9194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
5c67cddec30f4dc78dc283dd168df642
0740443d413901d3447a479c1bb7a978fe18e2a8
'2011-12-30T10:27:29-05:00'
describe
'287210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1ee0d4309ce82a550107dd540ef6400e
2bb8db5ee369df491b4fd7f333f0e4ecead85ae7
describe
'133230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
810c3ee538afdc0c5439960be25b038d
de62c5da88e9f2a63db6fdb0e9ae54ac7c7b9e1d
'2011-12-30T10:22:50-05:00'
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
4aaf315364c5a6bf898420a9cc3644b2
57a600ea5a17a504697367a3144cf9643922e309
describe
'39887' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
5cec4d0f461274b28ab542be17ba26f0
a470f957466ae5092c2cdee12578593332bd6089
'2011-12-30T10:23:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ec92f89d4b7534aabb00c686d26b235b
5f46b53ebf4dc2840bde3e75a438c7e1a17f91ae
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
8c8a48bbcf98415b7bb07dc21eb1abaa
1083164c2aa1733f9bed57579ef9bca0e976707f
'2011-12-30T10:20:30-05:00'
describe
'9183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
a70e9b0b14dc38d9ebdfbbdc1fd1a242
df853f6ef612d758f3b2c019891e62e787a98674
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f3151989f93add4da24abbd5e22ee6dd
f35b5796c663e08cc7c5ca860ee7be6d2db02968
'2011-12-30T10:24:59-05:00'
describe
'129222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
5fd9afea3503db32e5c40a8013d454e9
3a03ae37d4c4671c44141b02d0eaa27f93908af4
describe
'33073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
f286ef90753983aaaf9f2a3848ef12d7
dafdfa4359e87045a4f4a9ea07c6d8290d56b20e
describe
'38045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
f85d9582a731774f54fef161b44cb0ae
6547cda1e6ac79edda75049f8447c36511137280
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
4766168d8062691ff533ec7bb796b70f
2d75fafaec0efdab827f4c273b9728192ab0da23
'2011-12-30T10:25:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d5e73a3a1089a36d25b4f6d86320529a
eed1befedb84cc3a7118aa46980322b2a8ed2556
describe
'9060' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
0583a2b3b7c70df85412551f03c53136
1f20219eb3d1149f1d30ff0f30a9682ff43c3a83
'2011-12-30T10:21:37-05:00'
describe
'287259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKHZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2621bcdb2840e66e65c93d0ba152c082
afc66f4056ef93899fe1643f6138284e272dddd0
'2011-12-30T10:23:06-05:00'
describe
'135959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
4e80a8df1b71a890695e56108d239f34
b693121e4257f7ca9378454479cabb849571591d
describe
'35030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
afa2573cda5c680cb04eedc8afdf87b7
05e090b2a898e34f397c74e42a0b14fe5365903c
describe
'40976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c13d571dd131e2b7921f11577cb26871
27986fdab25a7afb3b59e5be47b2ec1b91c30311
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKID' 'sip-files00060.tif'
3b115eadf1512762993f59645811227d
8a5e099cb086ee5224b830e83dbe8e216d59d3b6
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
cc51e4164fe26261bc219460e2b11fa6
8bddfda034575030e22d03c404a37ba0c8b81a26
describe
'9093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
49e1464cb02d9ad012cd3bc654bfb8ba
d3dc8ff517eaaec2b7fb9d83f373b9da271f8ba2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
3190195ff725a8e997136195c3ba9c7d
ff68f322fbf1127423dcc804f79b0e90fa265df0
describe
'136222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
25ad29e8992c5eafbf7a20f8145388c3
5945c088c86e0462cb6a6967e9d258fa9273c5f8
'2011-12-30T10:26:36-05:00'
describe
'35934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKII' 'sip-files00061.pro'
aaac09d9865a558188dcb844c33116fd
d1d3c0fe40769efe7836dbe655f23f583399767e
'2011-12-30T10:26:40-05:00'
describe
'40495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
5f05ec126cd0ee7094cfe3a90792b261
fcc8a1f843899be1b8152af7ebf38f309cfa53d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
ad7d088ebf1567424a2d607496ec697d
846f50a98f14c5d2a011e362ee4356dd318e1180
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
7de421e3b2beabb1375437199a2f3426
a4e094d67bd02d1d61b60ac912773ec19dbcf085
describe
'9295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fdd24828407a13a75e782e75c3874b1f
5063308798bd6b3ef184b6405cbac01cb89e1113
describe
'287264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
603d18b9aceae27bbbcc071ca6a5af6e
fcc7c13fedad0964b472a68353d76aefbd312f56
describe
'139208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e0a37a1dbef4c579e86049df1716e7bf
c9ce9caa64293e1fb068738310eaa7b3250ddcd4
describe
'36321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
5812a57462042288bc1ff9e89c0457ec
9d9fc1caf0d2ff09e832bbb7ff6dd0551ec99f6d
describe
'40764' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e74d15077e4346c1276d8bc49c67575f
d0d35bab9d3e903d2378e634f3ef1c0843f0f790
'2011-12-30T10:27:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
1becb017a9326690abb033b845ce8a95
c9a09ef077a04c4477bb18d58cbbe67358da1d1f
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
fde80320ab846f2cb6541ff55066befc
a6579d84a6c1ccc29c9a5d645f41f9cbe809a546
'2011-12-30T10:22:43-05:00'
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
8e83b40e8274e6098a3fd225f81f6b1a
0545b9e1ae5d1e8372a039451a9fcc8306b26cf7
describe
'287221' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
10f33232c8884e064f7f6d32558b3896
cc88c534fc83730413dda59cb8ac3b871f038542
'2011-12-30T10:25:14-05:00'
describe
'139350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
34923fdd42a306c200faa42fe5dab5b0
78c612b289451baca2ea612676461020d16850c6
describe
'37808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
09724fda374e2450abe5cef70ac613d3
203b55241f7a57c23af1b28fdcaf36fb7da7d138
'2011-12-30T10:27:08-05:00'
describe
'42705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
b4be8ef451794ce6ceac6df9cb328a58
811f0b2aa065be8b49b122678dcabb45705163e8
'2011-12-30T10:21:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
efbe04ec4a856086c423f0ee314c828a
1534a6af4c9ef52acc83eb72f441534f249d5abc
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKIZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b91f7fcd53b94dba5787bccaf2de1288
e9d9548d53546cd37d288e07b26eda2b395d1e8d
'2011-12-30T10:21:17-05:00'
describe
'9696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
b2ddd03dbea542ea34bb8d2207189e4e
ca20fda2292d8623cf418524385eb77dd135e184
describe
'287270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
4ac2c6063eff101d5a4475c003d2199f
71f974fd25ae336606a4b3ce76f8e8f262e80cc2
describe
'139002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3a12e63931dcc7eed2fc979226a32d12
b2814467f119119859dbb6a0988d2a3006ef3aba
'2011-12-30T10:22:48-05:00'
describe
'36835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
dc48689c3e0284a0bbac881a6506d8c5
c88a960ea2e9ab111c78b47e52c613497bd62de4
'2011-12-30T10:24:35-05:00'
describe
'41734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5db8dc4cf0ff20f1f4979701589d9964
5a28df5ae1af75b8173728586422588e2de80e84
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
db2ccb310d838d0c764708517d990a5e
959855f2fe06f97d11651a04ad0c00497ed0ac4c
'2011-12-30T10:27:19-05:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
622bb193bd96f40fe29ad338c968c2d3
ff8a53734d7430be79d688ddaff59f6b993bf9c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6d9ae912004db3125dd3b57d5dae157a
a0410ec1ea5684e36957c7dbfad26cdbca10d83a
describe
'287238' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
2c9756deb146a4b660c8ba73f432999c
3a7e1a8a731bb6f714af7d133a11c1ae6f5c06a6
'2011-12-30T10:20:29-05:00'
describe
'132467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
44ff683a0358892d19451cb36c4b9243
eae91d257b9604fb5c1879a571e257b932c57a47
describe
'33940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
30d281c7eed8ae5d1bdc7d8611fa8041
a320b1f7f96d77ae4c62bb93813a9e00ebec57c1
describe
'39360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e4f724107466971e773459430a8429b7
f0dc7e5d3d37590b576e503689dab8657a7655c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
598956d8f4f4b9a2c47a726d0919f1e7
7c20ff984488661d8abf170a9a5a42a4908f9373
'2011-12-30T10:27:02-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
fe9c750c60b21853f5e18fcc886bde82
3ef618bf4c1a73436f5cd5cd6f42ddec7bf890a0
describe
'9266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
bcebbfe2cde8d1496f414c88aa6a695b
40a9a569fa49f71b1860858c4aca651ff9cf3c2c
describe
'287278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e4171f049e0e6b2f0de1420f491457d5
a604ba387cfc6d56857e2562040d345d1f6302d1
describe
'125710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
4a6d3a2686ac0d02fcd24a2496ae52d3
c5ac0481f83042e57dd7fafa997da3b15625342d
'2011-12-30T10:27:55-05:00'
describe
'31396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
ab837466df224a80d4367547f0a6ad8f
8e1c1e81cd57cc73d73250e4835bc3ceb1ff3fdb
describe
'36975' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5ba90b2bdb327d9e5db6078456f13280
75321e37764b0def37712996c0ef5795824f0789
'2011-12-30T10:21:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
e4fbcc9e92e245ae2c30c7bb5b896eca
b3607c749e5d47ae757816f95f5dd3f75ce72fe2
'2011-12-30T10:26:45-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7d77de7c3112560bee7245cb53f5d378
43c1e218d6d7511e9ba1d7d8f8a6fcd9501bea02
'2011-12-30T10:25:13-05:00'
describe
'8722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
372ce5a225f6ae7aeb9003e0f9591580
e24a2e4912df4573ca164533ec14369f6a4a27b1
'2011-12-30T10:27:24-05:00'
describe
'287208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bf6c7d4dc634b10cde5e0b349f39dc6d
a56f97963c8bec3336730c85a7079d28f13b7e14
'2011-12-30T10:26:14-05:00'
describe
'130646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
1e523973568b74ae9880a099284ee264
d036941ecd647953b9c421ad9c29415747a64c86
'2011-12-30T10:27:47-05:00'
describe
'35948' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
771503a31a46ec7b0c583925266bcb40
cb6f9b97d2ed511f6cdbbc9a30fd0b3f84bfd5d1
describe
'40533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKJZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
60eb9880b4dc20e43d024c1b72c2f928
e2b952d1fd3b9b7c51d1ba17df0206dcd464a653
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c09059ca2aa2edb81350ba510cf7548c
51ec0a49bc4a35b44b4ab9e78fbcd934cb68642e
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
e812326cb5b8b3e3c6ade79701b77d09
fccbc0d016311f242eacab925e419db601254a71
describe
'9436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
bbd8a52e48bafbbfb44aa71ab6fb6276
163910b1271359b132b2305f9adb4fb3e2ca2343
'2011-12-30T10:24:41-05:00'
describe
'287220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
cb95e80e996a30ec5199842de72a8d2b
2812e00c0c720d77bcca796d9a70eeb09a91a850
describe
'83329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
a89fdf133b6db30a3ed3abac970a10f6
30b6e6c748136056ce4bdab564cc9de6011ae21d
'2011-12-30T10:24:01-05:00'
describe
'16873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
6a2b7c543a4b428598ad27ea2f941f46
7feabe81509bd57bfd2fd8f88cddc5b51b67c665
describe
'22080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
1aa654bd14429590a2ce95f7ccd9ad4c
89edc5fa76f445a61015641df301a32205f822ad
'2011-12-30T10:20:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
2b3c4baf9507f37e57360f5a10bd92af
5dae8ed09b2bac1fd8354e99744ff7447c7c78aa
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
aa85fcab43d8d3920a3bdcd7ad01f945
bccbc2b6ca0e91afaa175f1078e93824d5cbd17f
'2011-12-30T10:24:17-05:00'
describe
'5113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7c8210ca34065708591b24b8cce3e14c
d08551aa2f68951ea058dd98d18872dfd7746eb4
describe
'287232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
cfb6f4de79cddfc6b2a3bb02555c1612
ad26baccc54c9e51029fd2b275c77ce7748adc5b
'2011-12-30T10:25:00-05:00'
describe
'113027' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
b7cd2710f083d9c278a5da8b3c982ca0
a9ab216906ab0828af5183bcf73e3e30dd8f8ec3
describe
'22559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
d1a4834406992250704f908349851b5a
ac2d47ba13aae5e438e78b8ebb99a4ac2be34ddc
'2011-12-30T10:27:05-05:00'
describe
'32193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
82f8dfa3f23f38ba0f3164167b776bf6
2b094b18b43cf68b770052060294377186f99cc4
'2011-12-30T10:25:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
73142111e65c52ee4da88c4385fe13f8
93e9ff3cb19f9cb55600759ca90743bb295a641d
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
29f8d073fb291060c3d5cf9a0dbe952b
5269868f3d3ab495d2ff6d0712a52c32117a6572
describe
'7406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b027bd898636309b40543893adb1f83c
4d9fb5b07b91cf531b23c3f30b5905e4c93b1263
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c21dcccc789808876671f5f32827468b
16f181c79ae0d05c62c646cf8bf6b4271ad5f1d2
describe
'124231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
40f5805efc49dd61d991214f9dd8762b
5549ee7fd922a1a2fd9ecddb6a1963bdd5c08ca1
describe
'32310' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKT' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e1a9c8e0d8adb8eda133ca995c749850
4cb32d1c8aace038f94cf4acda3cb36947b998cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d10b77dee76ad8c4eb14d78378a42d12
d591b49a6ed7a495a0e0b391007effda9f9420f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5eaf9cd126f508520f3494f6157d2fd9
c2336f1305d026a2b4e6ae56ba37df739d66db37
'2011-12-30T10:27:43-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
36b5ce56288527298ec3a6ada6bccb6d
4b039f8829fef8511f3761edfb62dd6fbbdf19b7
describe
'8799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
79c5f260c454a5c48e17fbe312097b4a
ae609115572794324c3056d9816d7210acfc57c9
'2011-12-30T10:26:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
8545e5541f44fa80d39e824789f97820
742450f427d3fb8c9043fbf8936eed23275d52df
describe
'161277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKKZ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
46ae69282f2ef2544d32a9ce75c2da1a
4d91932168ad7c1946d499b49f16389ba8662e4d
describe
'12248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLA' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d347ebc048827d8844486365fcea09ca
ec0af8726626107c083d04363fe3713d05892559
'2011-12-30T10:23:41-05:00'
describe
'41741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d16c15bd4d57e4fe63d6fd18b64215a6
769965b7be513c1850fa834cddf44674c5786a98
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6724b8eba1ebe9894ee149d322199f96
3693e1be18883c7e0d6555f07730db0d7e645f66
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLD' 'sip-files00071.txt'
ac8743384acb9893a386e47f83d1751a
976937866720f78732ee08201f4d4c46c1dac00f
'2011-12-30T10:26:31-05:00'
describe
'9646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d12dc93d151fdb6d369d417e1ac8c37d
637a947c46efc81a928117f1b4f5abb59a1c0f9a
'2011-12-30T10:22:16-05:00'
describe
'287237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d5ce2b9b204e40a4dbb1be5221224bdc
903ab6bc469b7c91e26955ccab5fca08b2a3153e
describe
'135961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLG' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
06bfdbb8dddc6050b383241b12cc0ece
4dbc9dd87ceb0b9252348511b46ba0525a3ced5c
describe
'35342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c0f94660e53dffe68df3b8e31725cf93
4bdf78103923cabcb3192ca0c18c85f222029af2
describe
'40271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLI' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
30d4e02c7ee2d0a85e36f4e00633fb00
1ce48fa375fb32da20949af228c9c66b64bb4439
'2011-12-30T10:22:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
af29d504af3659630143714b298b1519
75d6bbfd210d88f3828b28cc01640bebd4043eb5
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d3c48315a281e01f94ae8bed4a68b34e
8696500660cb18df9538b3b6098e6a1a2834c40f
'2011-12-30T10:25:12-05:00'
describe
'9097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLL' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
065fc66d992070ae41b2341203f2d533
9e91b93ec7362e7155834d3b6adf7ad841e31c82
describe
'287263' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
87084b32ffcecfffe71d4cfc2f9686ea
56fe8f709bc6414b1006f5b2d57f72c81c615ad0
describe
'117327' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f5d12ce0f5f852343b6a2f94b10278ae
d6670d529b648ec61987a91289c78860e7f5526a
describe
'27528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
262457762ef9284a50c6264d61030e79
c622264f82c20e112dfd19cdb413c767040e53a4
describe
'32855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
8e438d416ca0a9fe1ace756057bf192a
34b30ad1479cb0ad4572c2cc0900ea7579882126
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
611720afc512fa5fb8e693910f1bcb92
fb694c0d3bd6354e770e2906aa45c5dc4508d5d0
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLR' 'sip-files00073.txt'
b65cce94bae4c6779b9ea126f3713b27
7ea7b0efd7017fac32f87a712cff08085436799a
describe
'8389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
426cad76c8cf53df905f51b9d11147f7
6e5c45567aa29095c743f123262fc224a0557c5c
'2011-12-30T10:25:32-05:00'
describe
'287186' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
11dcfc748eabb94a03095a39ff5c48c2
8ace397fb41107ed829c3be23557ba352c6a5623
describe
'130102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1d416516089ce8521f29ac161b31e266
7f681e5780eff1971b8b229b6dca5375164ee10d
describe
'34608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
a51bc18f0c5333844f6d1264caec93c9
7dd946af31404cecc37cf9b1c96b4e2265df61b3
describe
'39549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
e1c42eb4a1fb5ada487e17b91dc9de93
4bec6d200c5df1e6678abe2afd0b1b92772235b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
577fbb9019474b1d69cb48ecd63fb528
626408ae811fce3568fd805699e94a54b6c1ea4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
0d080b7cd06f8db8f33eb68696eb8549
5084e66a84c9dc102a56c2a59cb066ef378d7a48
describe
'9126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKLZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
2af4b71217916cf322822b832d4e3184
240cb8620a6da8e12eaa894cf865f248b5dc9e75
'2011-12-30T10:21:33-05:00'
describe
'287213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e2d3749dfe4ef3ddcb088750c2c0487b
44d83092e4bcaef2442571b328caf4ddcb54c45e
describe
'125213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b30bb8d2831009a19cd0e9e636e1cace
f12db5853186a57b9f4d2567d07fec56fbbcc1fd
describe
'33301' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
34c4d5969f3a0e5f2f0b3f119170c5dd
d6fa5918bf0124165e788b47b40db576054a80b7
describe
'38792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e86f51726e90dd30174026427d9cf78b
d3052b828a011676bb211ec2eed7a0e3ecbbccaf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKME' 'sip-files00075.tif'
310cdfb55d168475667bce537ccaec28
011c54b9360187a6424e5388bb5dce927fd1f570
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b3dc39f42cede431194471aada2ee2a7
7fee027d67429900cba38653b69ee56e896e405f
'2011-12-30T10:20:51-05:00'
describe
'9553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9a4809f51351b401d33d36a3fc998fab
bc14b857d5d1c0efd63095a4f48be9783f8b22c1
'2011-12-30T10:24:19-05:00'
describe
'287230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
f549359663dccf7d6c6fe9d1bdae4a97
1384ee9c65e7140c259dec44b99baca074371f40
describe
'131799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6b84c5a10a28cab1cdf4ce3a72511f48
0c7638f76ca0f4bc4f63bab93af19edda306fe16
describe
'34822' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
f6ad529a9c6aa6152c9fbec30b513f58
ab0626db0895c747946d7c24a66f44d6cfc2149f
'2011-12-30T10:24:23-05:00'
describe
'39079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
c6624785bf923c9c5a38129d2b60cd0b
9bad67dcfa6b94ea6c13ad264ba35e1315e8a2bc
'2011-12-30T10:27:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKML' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8f3e099baee87999a4935c8eddcbc99e
cc8df92e3bac5b06f2f8449544785fd9083fdca0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMM' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b972f52b4eb0e1e1dd10ddf60dd6f206
c24539669f405553104b6cd0b978c02987a6335b
describe
'9274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
79a3c07c689d9d9686c6c76498a6eb92
987ff742fb6d67e56a5f5df42eef6476eaf9f29a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
deed2afb6fcf1a10a3c66432ee03c2d4
f7e6eb5d497c63018234619ac43d9b37e8b06646
describe
'141219' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
6f2e79e09ef69682615fdd3768da7491
7b9bebe4c1516072e848ab8f5f6f283c3c5f14c8
describe
'36728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
7b3f0e8ebf8e6a9dc5d8d5a960e058d1
06e33c0100822c15f39d22b8d1b1e849cb7240c8
describe
'41930' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMR' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e43bf467532a2a97c18086412511d216
a95d17c7bbcd4150b6d11df92ebf0e4844e82750
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
334ce05c1f2b5fad4e2653f614a7f5af
a709b76e87ed2190abcde9848433a126b7679d05
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMT' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ec282495a8fc0070e90c108b2b01dd4b
74f79c9d16ac2d17a822faba8a6c1b4056e13bb7
describe
'9443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
6d1be2e8da3196a45105b06b86c17185
588812be42b2a3739e00d3490ba00bd053ffaee9
describe
'287258' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1e7988611f57951676038fafe1194a84
ef73206ef46ef63c3784427013cb16af3971210d
'2011-12-30T10:27:12-05:00'
describe
'141268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
1a1e1702d3a2223e2c2f9237a5fab55f
1ce43265cb76cb4c3e0dff67856b27db68a8d15d
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
def81a02f6a7b6e8e1ec516fe74c09fe
592bc118e777468973106b80e56a7eae8c16e8a2
'2011-12-30T10:25:58-05:00'
describe
'42384' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
00b61da232bef4ab917d18f7039a60a9
fd691e58f2faa2b3345b7a8694dab859d924dedd
'2011-12-30T10:25:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKMZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7f23dd395756a378b8e7f0b2e71ae5a7
99fe76903bef601d2ef1148f72089c4746f3ca1f
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
fdaae911f369b50c1fde50673a8077ee
1302ab541cbb74e508693dd026dbf4821e08ac0a
describe
'9421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
f42f20612494eb2148de8391edf81ebb
4cf6ea7e9189b9771b7ed9e6d1fda147ba57bc74
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNC' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
bfa0619b718c012079e40aa3809e6762
0b41cf015ef09f6c7b556fad86d14c55479cca2a
describe
'138945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKND' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c77e2b979868d0a3ca5d47480628427c
ca40f10bb9ad4e8fd82d8a2384060f811cb9b23a
describe
'34984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a4a29d285c6083051c620a3749068aef
ff3c7c3610044092873e2ec2b20f1e13aecc280e
describe
'41567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNF' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
24b394f62621edb610f5a90cfab58a05
6811f1beafe22e41eca78634006a4fd139c823a1
'2011-12-30T10:24:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
be91242fbbc07dc57ff71fa56f49a2be
2a9f2fcc55c96484dcc2166181ae213123a4b969
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
150d9660b2859aee755158af0288810b
f17e74bcabaa732bb9cc5e5433806381b17a5726
'2011-12-30T10:26:38-05:00'
describe
'9220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
ef3fccaab1dd032142e4c6cccd948be3
a9a4d30b8717711315ef3ecafde3dc5281d2de36
describe
'287145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
dde213bf667b28d6b3e020b8543f88b4
7da169ff457578c30629f74314db3014f5c8acf8
'2011-12-30T10:23:11-05:00'
describe
'126202' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
792d6df71661933adc8e50b173ee1142
4ce905dd28fbbf0f9d8e2fc1a83ce571f31bba0f
describe
'33455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNL' 'sip-files00080.pro'
35dd50e5cec31d2765fa7917b9b3f8fb
afdff30e0745d5478a57fadebae0367fee461a1b
describe
'37453' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNM' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
cd3b21f9be4dd43b16727831eb4df7e6
74f63c44bfffde80039d0fa66294de2866fe6ec9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
df04ae8263482ee622563f30868b2866
700b8192d16dc7f27e78ee32e7f3f9743ff2b6c1
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNO' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a18dc1771b12ad31407e40c0329f3ae3
45bdb408a79e12a8fd89dfbef282f41cf5e5b92f
describe
'8797' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
95d557d6a21b6021c630bd8a0c9ad606
1c837a8589224c1641b1b72a9e7205e3e165d898
describe
'287132' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
156cd211bed0c9681dd938f674fe5336
914ae8922c1675c2ba647bf7131defb7538d35a4
describe
'140480' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7bf1a44206cd74cbe6813268bb340ee4
0adebd0a281521e11d85b7a3c26fd2700523a0ab
describe
'37006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNS' 'sip-files00081.pro'
99b81390b8e6c5e579ebd3a23f672a12
0521d7ee9b19df9b4fc12cb9a7dc8bca26e8d290
describe
'41290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
180676930f7313ba8f728750a4a68d6c
0a2ee1d6b163c25d0d326de5e2d0e34a4cd9ea32
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
c343993a16e32df870bac24e5c1a37b3
b90954ae83fc3aa14fcf5be8e17d469329f01d98
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNV' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4f941b2744bdeb5e147a76d8eb187b7b
e1a1df4f856beff2537248eef5e306cbd74fe90f
describe
'9404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
911764f00c6bbbd43d49d1e10d60a6af
5be0dd191b7aa24b99872dbbee87b94b75345c50
describe
'287124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c67115dba6d7d0df1f7d1a3e88d1ddc2
bf534900f28f6f6f24f944233ffa7bf842795296
'2011-12-30T10:23:22-05:00'
describe
'87209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
3d4c17457a95867e7a7fc228c3f6d9cb
b9a75d34ae4df7e46246c55b126bb4ac63d45e25
'2011-12-30T10:22:33-05:00'
describe
'20285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKNZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
050d14e28a34780017b2e76e5a518c4d
0d20a775cc33628e81df1955ec6cf136d13cc4ca
describe
'25253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
64bd3212e5ec79f74177d689f3e59033
cb0023797578fc0d0e682707c35a197dd51415e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
20b8c7c956401f9c241ec25d960a30f0
28154b343f2b98728082ac4925f05c3ecea4c842
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
048454cf28239051d7da5c356300f917
3e8a3cb3ad90f78dd0e1090f54b6a53786c5fa1a
describe
'5874' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
beec2b832d001c1049806fb591b5f222
018ab6603aba0f5deb8a596fd4926dc525c47bcc
describe
'287212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
1b5aaa736a72859fe9714ebe56220d2a
75bb3786bc85fffab856d7021049896331eeac4d
'2011-12-30T10:24:25-05:00'
describe
'112580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
ac9d3e283e7ce18e99340b6234cbcfa4
043bbdf3c5bbd044a51d7037ffd982f8771c78e0
'2011-12-30T10:25:42-05:00'
describe
'22798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1afb1334a39a43fdc5a3fd5d65699af8
38321009672a37eef05d3ebcb7e954ff7c05f645
describe
'32301' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5201535769b4dd34b27124c5ca70ee34
dac89972845e21ace0e62594fb0985a4928d5ab0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e0fae43f50c52c51ab15779226273ef6
d3b58087eda6ca7aead9e2a32648271bbd469e97
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
84548e7994cb34edd4d80d1b9fde4655
ecb5a9b03d08d81a81b9e9b55ccca510db72c6e6
describe
'7655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
dd1986ab5a8a2b0cb39bb1b825f98173
bcb70e211870c7831cfe47767ba1101db9971544
describe
'287261' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
bbfcee6584907757995a7f831ae1d3b1
654e7698bb715be3e1801cc8e92fcd85d9e36740
describe
'133496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
bd070b2e92471e9c83273af69e3e7564
2cb1e9db92b7927faa5f0f93b33a9018fe5270d0
describe
'35701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKON' 'sip-files00084.pro'
f28bfd8a48a50c150d1300b956bb8066
43f7927eb753967c99b1b6eeb2904dd497184b16
describe
'39693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOO' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
00ac46fab4aadf116ef445cffd886081
7fc5352b0b9356168baca15d06d9df87dd1bd540
'2011-12-30T10:21:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOP' 'sip-files00084.tif'
1fc9ef5d764fc6739247a0a54b20431a
eee09a7ca108807f8dae43a77d8de38b0bfb9e34
'2011-12-30T10:23:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOQ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
df0c4a7e4ee239d739ddd3ed10934060
c055385ae62768626fa2e6a7869064268288d9c4
'2011-12-30T10:26:21-05:00'
describe
'9284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d0bf7b90cfc780d38d0d9e20418b7321
b4f90bd3b39ef731841486d0e0da69e5029137d7
describe
'287228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
9ce1ed940fc8815e03d71a086682c2a3
1c0f19d67545fd1ac8c8609b9c4908837e5075f7
describe
'133057' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOT' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
946c54e184c3aa7dcf5ecf23e248ca24
ecb77ef844d707e2a79e8d7e035e66b5538fb34a
describe
'33807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
8d94d785c087bc2c4d4922fa1e5196df
7ff2b8f44ddc70493fb5bca61829294b344e20b1
'2011-12-30T10:24:12-05:00'
describe
'39570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
72d6e25d72628a67bd0e370e77043683
8ecb969bd7fa9291529dedaafff836a352d10735
'2011-12-30T10:24:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
86871c8dea1bea384db4540ebfa1bbf7
18fbee2a8662f9092500438be32f1b9815eef2ea
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
abf5be3be2f46cc852de6efdd76eb5f0
f56fcd9f3d6fbc372c90b059f53196f969140522
'2011-12-30T10:24:28-05:00'
describe
'9018' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
dd29dd4b8112314bf7498a0ce561842f
df80b8e1a572a69555329f14c084417457ec61be
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKOZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
00f82b4d9506d3a6629e9413583f6593
bd8513f260af04ba6a8d1ffda0c99e94c4616762
describe
'132369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
584c5eb6dafa1ca1af2e1d6d318e6fb4
9cf34a348333db3a80a8b995b2f9ac4ebf195476
describe
'35725' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
24f67ddfb82a88c22489e82ad390f76e
426327c72a8c7daaea9a04506a4696c187dabd0c
describe
'41042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPC' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
a716ac43abd1aeb891f3e4ec386f5aa3
c32d9ee0be49b40c0873a6d33b18a9bf4bb47368
'2011-12-30T10:25:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e68136ef03ddecc8555c74dc7e0c6285
a83ccd49db894500d6f4a61c141fcb53735ab29d
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
65c97c9ab19a13934bbbd98ad016d928
3de3f17c39c54b64288ac87797f327dfde0dda80
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPF' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
0eec3baa954f0997b56850d9522021d8
674cf02cc92d59cb8f884559c91843253d28a673
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
e1d136d1b472c7c3d3559a64608dd8a7
4204a9543eddc62551cd217e200547f9ec8481e5
describe
'128984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
fd27ee36dfa0b4bf7f84bdb366f85c1b
5351d5df3a02154bab90bee7d08a9af9f43a2ccd
describe
'35223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
bf403f310de64d0de6d7995d492ba1fb
7a0128d28c744358f958072822f2c69caa8ba034
describe
'38462' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
f86affaa7fd89bfd8ee7c57b3f6b7e56
e3a5d317c27bb40e3866020e1fffa71a5067f5a0
'2011-12-30T10:23:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
fe2926b80b4c780659184759ab9f9a1d
cb57357b5f2eaad67c0c4688869ac0a75e0cd6b0
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPL' 'sip-files00087.txt'
1440a6a90c50ffc26028114270f92e50
15e659359f75858f2560ee73d246e6f2f62319b7
'2011-12-30T10:21:38-05:00'
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
2f3397c26db759894624a603bd849f55
e33e9c5af63eab98811ecd58bb3ad55782059c65
'2011-12-30T10:21:02-05:00'
describe
'287126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
06a6ecbbaa1ce0c8fbafe5198eed7c9f
8c1c66aa53caa1fe234501324a70646e56e48155
describe
'125882' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
316bcfaf81400cf23c1f42f2a5e65b36
d2bf0bbf301682533e3be3403c84f1f03dc28c9b
describe
'34442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
1feee6b8b52590e2974126b04fcce100
997836aae176a754ac940862ee7182319135a0bf
describe
'37769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
36654462ba9e5da8acf71fef266dab85
3bab5eb40e4e573feeacc3b51d76e7226f677209
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7cb6a71f828c7cb7614870cf210ad2aa
75aed81fed496d930360be47f66f9a22a849791e
'2011-12-30T10:27:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
dfdf60680f90cdcba7ee99d024bc2b77
23552e8215a33beb16442438d0c08930b915ea2c
describe
'9242' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPT' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3dea5d6afded40668367e50aea6a5a17
09698af76d60c537153185d805f01cbc69521fdd
describe
'287032' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
392298edbc16365b5bac08a55d627256
721415bf429cc6df995ebca5ca5f477b4875cec3
describe
'130350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
fd3fc82f9f09ea9e06196d8ac64afcb4
eb34c21115f24c731aa1fa8f103308f8393a8106
'2011-12-30T10:21:01-05:00'
describe
'34354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPW' 'sip-files00089.pro'
3b4f2ccd4f024d76abfeeaa52efdeda7
1a17a0fb90582bd34aabb95f3228f0e4c3b6bbd8
describe
'39064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
b8346d80c633cadfaf2a3d8e899d5e18
3a417290be97289ab2beb11d10149b488979fd2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
15433d2dee81a70b1f58330408f9afc5
00664e32aecb96a708c4f0926b55ebfd9d4404a9
'2011-12-30T10:24:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKPZ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
d5c7389cd06255d139f703d17eedad2b
b7c4436e4c091c7b6fb6c682a7ae4208959629c8
'2011-12-30T10:25:46-05:00'
describe
'9209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
74b823c4b1b80a63c60221fd0dc9992d
d050846e093ecff2afb37fe356fd1373eb5b5c78
'2011-12-30T10:22:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
3c64fa8bbf4a2e30f94b2f7be6e9e0e3
2e65eb3a520daf386a370edbaec189800bbafb8c
'2011-12-30T10:25:09-05:00'
describe
'130519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
fc92f6cc6d1258e321131c15050c440f
801245e44601c9ae5e8b6ae7364048ce1fe8a4f7
describe
'35379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQD' 'sip-files00090.pro'
845b72b8b94f409cef0627da68b6f848
1b65aad36555d53a8baac35d4f18f8e27b2cd836
describe
'39453' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f88ffc7af961b768af2c76de06e2adeb
f4b9211d33920368580ee39741b5a0daf309b8e0
'2011-12-30T10:20:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
2b932caf44e9486f0989490385da3597
e90645010e1bb6f505df2795d4b9eea857449254
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
4233033f8780512f648ca60a82b8a7b8
49e9a0fef1b179b4b9f52967e992ff54ec2bf742
describe
'9293' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
3bfd417b26da19af459115d39a391914
0333ea272a2b04f51abf14544c932e8a8a51cf6c
describe
'287149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2b15317e462c6a3f4368d06e808f9ef0
38ef4ce215825d7caec777a691f8c0fb12d5b432
describe
'129556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
6ee8f90be15b0ca59b8e9caf68b90039
082bcdfc8850e35a7ecacccdd4086fc0f88712d7
describe
'34392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7d0a410839a8d67d597ccbbb2b14d5f6
1e38b0140a44bcc19e9d726624c1e72d51b545ed
describe
'39021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
a1103ea9f21b8673b9e754e1925a8980
0301ccd4fcf32819e42f7aac3cc4409d28b07724
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
dc5d7ddc79c87b4125975c94b73e8856
7c3e5a786402122d6da20941d9539d0984fab92d
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b10b548daa26f71298b575620970607d
9cb405875974f6085e5da58230b2b756b25dcc5e
describe
'9233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
eb7ddc21df90e88f8535907c157439b1
b792dfaaa755f4c511fb37a6da7095671d85d771
describe
'287244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
633f5a1ea1e5b1e14bc060d235f39868
51a23995de1baea72aed7185809462d899fd83cc
describe
'74772' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
3919fd2de55a2d15298d8887d945283a
108a648a973f9d665f7e034bbc5393dfd20e7e7e
describe
'15172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQR' 'sip-files00092.pro'
fb4889996851f69790ce831c24726710
777374d458a519d3834bc5ee58483c6a2af6345f
describe
'21409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
497fefc5e5111d426f668982d05459d3
12302e1c9c2a6490bc657a93991043d7d938f4da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
1d728b68f9eb5d8a7b03d9b5a12c0a73
f57891fab7b93a66c97ba039b5b471c09629cd9d
'2011-12-30T10:26:50-05:00'
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
89fcbba6d19aad986e25ccc83bf2b49b
38eccaef3e0e78d8cfc51d0f0fdac418a93f7f99
describe
'4925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
65ea61ce718c5607422a4cf638fcc559
a05e4b4d8bacb91c2a724ce9a59a9f63fb3ce39a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
ab9456fcd1a7a4e3555aaced63fa0d50
9ef8e7cc57ed867c2d264c3e87213f44351bd2a0
describe
'116070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
08b34afe951e93dbe094d87e8cf9c354
722fd242e45b0d12345801aefe7b6b7f1bda0fe3
'2011-12-30T10:26:10-05:00'
describe
'23368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
3fd5f7b9703aba5f8e646b7fc2a4ec13
78377274293a718199dc8e9301528b354562829b
describe
'33893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKQZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
cd85f344991129cc34ca153e5d604ac5
c7597c8a2e33dc96a30d35f0927eddc9591d188a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
6cf98e1165b50d8a7bea8304c7d3653c
d14e2d62595b422fb7a3c0cc1c5989d8686ebf93
'2011-12-30T10:20:48-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRB' 'sip-files00093.txt'
37e36c70791654b65bde0641f5e0f5f9
61b480bc08a5dab56f173a8c39b89e93edb9bfb1
describe
'7871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
781cebfb800dbd4062ceea285e602fb4
f62b3a78feb1c5424f91b436da5a188f46268c68
describe
'287196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRD' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
6ae47180b14ca8e1dda6c1bb5cb09bf8
39e7f30e5962d723e156158d56fc2c4a1d1cf8c7
'2011-12-30T10:26:34-05:00'
describe
'125321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
67a9ce2b051753d143b66fd19f460eca
6cf98c70496dd52744cf525ffabf9f65cd527c49
describe
'35404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
14478be7d89502550e6625588013441e
8242fd2ebfaf191a52d8150b81b02b3ffe2a47bf
describe
'39744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
35ee091ac99983cf131a9421ad584def
dfab6e91666cfc2a758469a0173bf79bdc05be00
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
583087c83452988202d641568af97e46
cbb78496bc24558d940ca3ab42fac25b54004ee3
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRI' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1c35e3d8c07317188d55aa5ecbe56938
8efc4db3caee4837396c36e502921385b6978427
'2011-12-30T10:26:18-05:00'
describe
'9473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
3372cadf40626d22d429797153cdef25
5275c9a56efec8a54c16f9b56f285cc0d2bfd153
describe
'287255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6abad6fca2c0cc53af8b6d61df45870b
764582574553fff0d948375895e13b7bc016c01c
describe
'133375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
8a9888e92ea0cc5031c53ea91108481a
7d494e371c148c2ace4bc27079b3fa437c18c960
describe
'34650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRM' 'sip-files00095.pro'
7bc3bc9191ff409d9d0ca58bcc992e34
33d361b793dbfc8ee95096885e97795feaa6e8c6
'2011-12-30T10:25:50-05:00'
describe
'39215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
9f94ab8df1adf2ffe065c609500d0a7f
037643c615cc654e322666c401fe948fc9b9043a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
94bef78f259475bfe78e8270559dfd4c
caa4d9b0a19f54a1b664a15a89350f9313f764d8
'2011-12-30T10:21:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
5368625d60bec3964c7c1927af0340b1
7cedb329d31ce2b8fb1d51fc368a7ceb301b9800
'2011-12-30T10:25:26-05:00'
describe
'9135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b377e82eefef8e2183d7f07e255f598f
adc5f1e595920c33215e5e65e6faface48590e94
'2011-12-30T10:27:03-05:00'
describe
'287233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e9ae02cbaf0c1681f8de8986dabffe86
0cff6ddb08a8181d313382d8f12f576faab595e8
describe
'113918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
f77108350ab625b5605f8f0ca782f61a
105a6d51d56a4e20f9b9b34de003ae6299b1804a
describe
'31807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
f8ee2345c7a189d3ef555ab3dc642cc9
0be5915f7dac7a3a89f43282f1fb2affd3b5e508
describe
'36507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
cb3a89a6c9cc1d7ecbbb3bd33d1969ec
42681e8545f785b26bd13795f9303faad49e7894
'2011-12-30T10:20:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3e2028dadde54d1a01b4e9132b42cb45
fcb62e5e1c40919c436bd95c082e837788842c53
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
ea7d57da5ce47223292f7ccda293f978
ee651286d414cc4d7c73847d45f2c2f91294248f
describe
'8927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRX' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
7b9dcf78c98da3fff8e3e802eb08a7bd
fd7ae1e08d8306c9e123e49d60c55222e3bf0a4a
describe
'287199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRY' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
4b31677451bc1e61fcb87a99d5a0c52c
06db30436a664c0af54170909a6364e0cad229f8
describe
'194444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKRZ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ae670db6340df1c66566f80f6031d418
96310c827b56a13470f67c664fd152e4dec3fa81
describe
'47127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSA' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
22f1b366c298ff2c9e89f4b6e1b1af2a
b22609c601dd0924450e7c6d749926711fcd5311
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSB' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8bc1da83c3ac66d0f334cabcac02f152
7aed0550e097195870a29ac7a74a66eeb0d77f9b
describe
'11081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
7ae02f4d79582613a04a562596e80a00
4c6e34696944c935a91d6c4c3e64175660fc548b
describe
'287178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
c5b2c418bb64163caf59c5adbb9c172a
7a71db9ac4efd393cc6cc82e2b41beaac22889da
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
23b510cbf352d39c48c6d47e7f27c85b
0ad14d1e5c0cf3dfe40616702699a03e5f8c0022
describe
'6454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d70fdf80900007a53de3bf7e0579cc44
808e512697a3d87b5e4d8b90b64396bb59361572
'2011-12-30T10:25:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d43a20d359e158219ff9014711f8cc63
dff2c30a3a7808cd5b20ee8fe4cfa86705ae6174
'2011-12-30T10:27:20-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
d727807be45dbabc7283244ce88e563c
662068d72aa0de263ad0eeb75b34a58ac4bfc7bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
887760b14e645f881119935f416da05a
1c64f5315166406a37a8b1ee854fcde1a6df7f40
'2011-12-30T10:26:12-05:00'
describe
'140435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
aae1d95719e2272d295d52a3adc51a0c
37dc2c0cac12f69d71a8e466331f22a3188d950b
describe
'35630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
eb7b080682449eef0caab678196313d3
19ab3dda860730d618d61323f4c0167a94a935b1
'2011-12-30T10:27:42-05:00'
describe
'39873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2471422ba1300088c787516986465b10
f312d5e5b4385f000ae17d9f815c402446fbbf48
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
073bffb66d2665b8588fc7a34434aa3c
6b99446c9d8dec58ca7166d72cfd0cd5e67688cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
47d0a765c4910f481a801ffa45701aea
d6bccc95bf4608684a5c4ba6ab99b373a51bc93a
'2011-12-30T10:23:27-05:00'
describe
'9322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
53497d05c19ef913737cf95545b66120
902d31289f50b93c287fa8a98c925f6878a3b958
describe
'287215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
99c60d9d46617ed1242fa862a15e2924
62f9efaf4cd303cae75f5bae082b59bed34d8191
describe
'132573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
00efbc96f07236d743eef72c25c32e20
d036a4eaec97682a8cf84da1ee9ae6c372ac6c69
describe
'35360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSR' 'sip-files00100.pro'
91868697a1cb68504fb2e468cab1a103
2d6c8aec9742a9583ccfdf4c78d92e31d9d807f6
describe
'40303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSS' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
141f03eb45636d7cbe2db34bf61b9c5d
03f938ad4a145659f1792f8ebbb0f49734b93e56
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKST' 'sip-files00100.tif'
768ddb7195c23403768b7059c6d13059
b02342b3e6756e99f397d19d024aa95d16318ee3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
fd368a43af2e63d9fd92cf3642a3131d
209a60a3bf0f405d6eb29c93493b01e2b0908cba
describe
'9476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSV' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
a6a42e4aa998b5a80f08f0d07e165269
e6918797df920e0f8924497a7882284c67e80df1
describe
'287241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
72d84d25f73628258719ebd18ed09aca
17d7921d59857add9f2011788af7ecbf1f276769
describe
'129496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
04c09bbc12fd63923c6db4eb8cc54f62
c8ac7e7a51db15644c3795d1fa1fa37fcce21b04
describe
'34891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSY' 'sip-files00101.pro'
ea779f15a44830101644dbda6e71db84
efb265bef28f26d314a0da893e6cd0cff794d55f
describe
'40315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKSZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
4496374026f5a7af4c32e2431f41ba5d
bd240ea778708ceca5bdf8570fdc4f15777ebae1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d4e7d4cd0eaed90f20279401d7013f76
62daf39b7516f525200df0342f82a50e2134223a
'2011-12-30T10:22:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0c481ec1d0490ab86be8dd48bed3a7e4
0bbdd07f5f131d22f3f83f5af535f8093256e4c1
describe
'9227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
a141b399b79abc55ab929c386bbcedf3
e582701fc161747051d81aafd0b32f850321ae8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTD' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
51da01798ed8209f6111401f62d68c07
9cb5bed4d7b7ca7812ad6359fdba479a6307aab8
'2011-12-30T10:26:15-05:00'
describe
'85108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
570e7d79e8f8bc244ba04ab3599dc9e2
dea9a58f3ef1e4f1e835065271df6b7f72b5e1ca
'2011-12-30T10:21:41-05:00'
describe
'18343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c1ce0b0add6d4f76641a1c432cd3bec7
b7dcabca6a163f731f4a84a1b0f30eaa164a6877
'2011-12-30T10:27:21-05:00'
describe
'23794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
2ebfe9bd201e67da36f0d927b8c553df
2cd03ee184e10e52254dc14125e56124a7cd831f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
22cd9ccfab37886db02901aeb8e30143
1cd8525a00080415625336fe4a3cbf8243e8fd4a
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
a94652e37c1690d942f14c93bbd4e3a0
cc94c1fe5094f69a5208b5d610cd162d8ec5ba25
'2011-12-30T10:20:55-05:00'
describe
'5842' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTJ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
3cc385fa3dc75a60c979abfc9bd9b255
59565f6eea8d6d4fc995b07a850c47e5393c8d99
describe
'287252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
0149ed62a52cb3907580bf5f175e66b6
60750b1ace8605c4eaa2aff551adc38892bbb28b
describe
'112911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTL' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
05465fbf9626c910c4a02e4c71e65861
efe7ac035502e38fc75ecc2c153ce38dd0b6f8bc
'2011-12-30T10:26:00-05:00'
describe
'24668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
c3d4c3eb45db2431496afe2c0b1b5860
776380cd045a46bffb51cdef8bc0ec9f8bded32b
'2011-12-30T10:25:37-05:00'
describe
'33512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTN' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
40f5c2d65fbbed6433e7e685415c3723
89ff60eab46af85df4ec89c497b6da219fe0d0ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
71ac19eac2ed9a4b26f3ee8969b600eb
e6a2ee9117e95e5e1ef649d0e7b89a9974c3dd7a
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
fb162c74811484acc39ee4fdd3c3691a
0f93c63f8a624ffd06020b727883d13b960dbebe
describe
'7629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
c8f82b51e8fea60e627e0a74c181f0f2
9afb4d07bdd94bf89e38b9a3b82a02407a32a260
'2011-12-30T10:21:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
47ba0cf38ff233d179a5ed8a5c87480d
82e5ebd6e102fe03a8390411e3e8d69e9cb70ed4
'2011-12-30T10:21:15-05:00'
describe
'138712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c3e85587e48dfd17d079adf0cae1bca6
fe3c133424b61556625eb845e31f595d939a8be9
'2011-12-30T10:26:25-05:00'
describe
'37134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTT' 'sip-files00104.pro'
19b3efbe5ab644840ac05a8ad795594e
0e3f8dc78825c2810eeab40fed73396a36ce96c3
describe
'41274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
230c06bcc3cae1062afe1d318a045109
5ecb30218c144dda8885d2a8ab164df18253697d
'2011-12-30T10:26:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
912ec9d42ac3b89270cd7cac878135e6
4671b1207708a532df5b3eb40c53792161aeacee
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
596da53630b3267f296bfb9213fadb8e
4de096e35026226ed4dd95b4661cd18a916bdaf0
'2011-12-30T10:24:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTX' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
81c38b5d1fa16a14f330789a4dc2124d
481ee24903358ba6dcbb857b999b3186c405e88d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
4046bf0113b3006d0d9bbe01d52802cc
de252087573c56273bde9d95403035eef1438879
'2011-12-30T10:26:02-05:00'
describe
'133336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKTZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
4bca863fbddc22971e0e13ac04417201
51c93de52a9f97b996cabc2e7808340be70bb3f8
describe
'35774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUA' 'sip-files00105.pro'
512fc00bbbddb60a229b80459b9317bd
63ea7814050ed3c73dcc13525530c5580fe3c383
describe
'40630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUB' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9be6efecaff00ec9e0c283a06922a49d
ec1959a7a008d75a402af23e91b65a99ed0ba9ea
'2011-12-30T10:25:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
46c5b74c006bbfa2d98493403529c9d3
7f2b71352824d339183249ee6dd38ce29c16bd95
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUD' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c10ef1f1425888ba5eadfbe55ba1a6b4
0be378f5031da4a5cc315dd6db2ad2b5cc5b1238
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUE' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
7f973f9e43ce9415d15e8ea59dd6f7d0
dfc2097b9889f885f6e6aa12be5925dd610d0788
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUF' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
d54e2cb7d8457e52cebc27405abc5661
3b0831adc07d5d83694799e92c71b621d8cab1d5
describe
'140388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
cfbc94b362916d4073503217f9fbd56a
3740d78c4145ae7215a0f8479fb3448dd0fe4d36
describe
'36252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUH' 'sip-files00106.pro'
16a98b269ef9fbce56c21a618ad90b95
8d9d0265fe7e9913fb596386a30838d3e411e885
describe
'42564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUI' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
772b57aaca8215e2569ccc3754768516
839510653337faf88c107b2a0217566399797644
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
95d8bcd0ca26a4101bb88d588f1da851
a94b56f321bb3164dd9a8190cc4983635171dcea
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5b56be231b6e076b3f93fccc48062784
f59ad860f3ab96f1e9894ebf11859a09fc5e6393
describe
'9565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUL' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
89a0d7a321c2875774d2df58d91cb9a2
59526838e22c2cea8862c86ca444538f062811e5
describe
'287231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
0e78a9a707981ad3c10acab953e9b774
38eaee8003d5da40924b9204c6dca7c54d69b0f8
describe
'134744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
59377691606a82e384b6bdbbf8338031
252afe637cae58ec63b3aa9cd00b3d0583a15315
'2011-12-30T10:25:01-05:00'
describe
'36247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUO' 'sip-files00107.pro'
24f3cafaae85e3580f3b95ff33bcd516
ead73e973ae4acbae64b80373993c41bf3424b4e
'2011-12-30T10:25:35-05:00'
describe
'42569' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
71846a0d409150c4ddad01cc6c1579d5
5a17e9ddc83129a99b23467c35eda28765d4ed5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUQ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7face016b9bb84eb0f90eee91a200ec3
d131089cab284855087b263c6423165a911d9507
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUR' 'sip-files00107.txt'
e5630962ae49ad4b6b6bb7cfbaa48371
dc513ffc264b484fd01bb0b1018b80a3447e306f
describe
'9819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
4e875ee3e0cdd7957d424f8db2c42b65
6c73ca35289efc1b0086507ffda32447e6a30bf2
describe
'287176' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUT' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
e69d284291e8cf3bc1ad137b24f77a9e
231ec380d0d9f1e7a20ac83c2c7cfd81a9405b17
'2011-12-30T10:24:18-05:00'
describe
'136761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f900e30d8f2353ae0c745754a9395ba2
36a1a4ccac1941e482d6b561b0595cb0f4a6cc5e
describe
'35359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d103feb38032aa7909d5988673a8640e
5ed57c8d6fa3a5b25fe708a1f2f8f601aae2daf6
'2011-12-30T10:25:34-05:00'
describe
'40841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
625dd67400832159446aa84b5827fac7
678c0fd04ca120c240a3b95e55e33f1149664223
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
8f2fde779da26e0985ea46cd28675d39
8426b95dd26a919db2476f040fd221cb1dff98fa
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
79766589c2252dad12b4814d3b15fc75
0c5a79e4428d7862c848d69064cfc5e9aceb2bd0
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKUZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
379018c20a68955464fb4cd01c2a1df6
7ea6455623f5b8574534e2fa641cdb807b5dedb6
describe
'287222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
436c0fba2bf6b51de31ce03b0b2a411f
15d298fd198b1348fd62d16efece339d39d33161
describe
'135805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
a1ae7daca22a568107301c341c7f2c9a
88df56c7f7b17b9634db60f74979d7ae371c279b
describe
'35005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
e21dd3e63c73b5e717de4bb0364f8882
8c802f16fcdc4ece276d9fa86f3372d874432df0
describe
'40564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
c563aef6a2f221a50fe46b461c5a5cec
49f76fdc8af92396f88ba9676d1ece7d6c2cccd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVE' 'sip-files00109.tif'
fc2f8f8b82afdd7d21ca49cc2ee93d57
d73d20dbe33c22e953b745d0ae17787bd8d532b6
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
29a2f130b82885b9a1dc6fed35f826f6
6f5419f13988473a0c6dc5b5c37d0592509aa220
describe
'9657' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVG' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
9110f67dcaba96867cf8a268bad4af41
befd5ea4ed411e72288f550490316c1a9008b546
'2011-12-30T10:24:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVH' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
e2ba4095afa44ed9180b278ddf009e83
fa35b440adb84670f84ea35cb983c8827f92e6af
describe
'137095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVI' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
9f611177bc5cf7a22c10aee7e953f2a6
2df893fe86ae844c16d49a4675349a4b2e49efdb
describe
'36267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVJ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
858fd53fe60b6d27be0b9be9ba0c401e
224c758995860d5581c10a275910d95936ea2c6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVK' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
c1af7055f8a0dfcc2a1f3388e7e3afa4
84b6c2b1316fe721ca7d9662653568d3bbbc6f20
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
45790dd3abe74770daa8ddaa8048ce4b
fcd88ee8e0014e1087f5736e6d18eb4b993e15ea
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3ef68fd0e2058473e3c2480e10db486e
2c3559876cc8512984a916cd8e8b71ba5f7032a5
describe
'9695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVN' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
5447c4335463e8ac2846c93001f56fd9
986aeaa52d0e08214f4397515ce2fff3d8f90fa1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
44233838519e7ad8c5e215f965a5f69c
884d93aa880581efb529c5d39160d9a3464edc97
describe
'134506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
a9290ddf0d53925d0cd679aac672d6bf
46fe451b901a87204a37552c95c2656267046b9a
describe
'34790' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
2df35e0e819e21283b39433fa838ed49
e74fd84734539cac5f2e67a220a5640861ca69cb
'2011-12-30T10:27:26-05:00'
describe
'39943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1475b051f8b216354a206ec9fa2fc9d2
939213d87d2d8c82a6bc13163171e4415c6c7072
'2011-12-30T10:26:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
e5e67a7d514876b3c159a6e6232c852a
c7a8b58301e4b839281dc3579f9d7c29db3ec23b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
b2b7ed2483ba01c9759584cba51dd827
bf163dc5338ad0a053c75dfadd6f2f071dd4bec9
describe
'9521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e011845945e30a5ef4d39fea6cf167c3
096e6040ec9ca2903778e2a979b9bbf7e3e35ea8
describe
'287236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
69e764db340de27900f391cb80d9937e
507c835cca04c33a14de78e7d807875678c80a12
describe
'131019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
50c4fcf87465b910bc83c1c614a011f8
781d415be58f8214fa9b90c6273f49e84c0f23ff
describe
'32353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
ae88ec07da2a3596b182e2047c190ddd
497b4d2a5ec6b9737f85f11786ba73d1cebf8bb8
'2011-12-30T10:22:30-05:00'
describe
'37904' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
543e6b240a933b9bba15ace6840a2a9a
4cd8afb949f5747ecb22bedb4a4e2571831d7efb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKVZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2465f9c61d071e2285881af2ea8699a0
68adb0bc656556c3c802764ed9dc49e6095126da
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
a09d81b0d13bb2c0a93faa4b75525873
a1bde42a4121e66433c3e993a31d87649c7770c4
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
81fdbd21e3b94da093d213c533479d12
a0df0dcaef6c97ec3c135a4ea799918b0372a147
describe
'287109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWC' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
fe1da08808c102c32c43575f6f35f4d3
cb2ca2c278dc9efaf6a961463c492a2556efe8e5
describe
'116050' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWD' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
8eee2e6161a8027a79e55db1a246c10e
e65586f17660b3bce3df84fdb5c955680034e4d9
describe
'24063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWE' 'sip-files00113.pro'
80fba93fd9755debf82c61eefb7f5a21
a659012f5f01f980fa47c94c603bfed47b8238e1
describe
'32504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWF' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
ea1a08ac3065383050d4baadf8413efb
9e5adc1c85623ed81f459253bea9dea953a5f8b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWG' 'sip-files00113.tif'
e8cb5e67e841279eecec266cfc4abbec
4b3d4025dfa4b0c2f4194093f23341f399dc189e
'2011-12-30T10:21:19-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWH' 'sip-files00113.txt'
3d1efd070199d3638085e4baf854b020
cc207d9948136354e00a6a90dea141592473fd05
describe
'8035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWI' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
deaf3bb6e706c31065458cf7728a132b
bae9732bcd087c838c8008daea05ebc902c66974
describe
'287169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWJ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
fe4be9e4dbadcaf1a204fb62c3eabd35
ec43e766caa952b8a1fd8cbb55be8968950979a0
describe
'136028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWK' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
ce007dde4423cf26208e3e96ab992bf6
2e59d946a38ffd39106af67e5afc90944325f01d
'2011-12-30T10:27:53-05:00'
describe
'35962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWL' 'sip-files00114.pro'
7e0d2b5f5ecb838903075fee51c3e2e2
8b2d5bf2b93f6185613f591a7bd93ffb1d59827a
describe
'42074' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWM' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
0a28a649f44da7437d0b945f1b76b56c
2b0424ba3d31ca83c99d11c0c0d681ef028a23c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWN' 'sip-files00114.tif'
9a4755ae3dfc0e5edbef25cd547ef330
63b8c953f35ef89a3216148869689299d629ff07
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWO' 'sip-files00114.txt'
41d48285a33341a867991457fc1ea622
91294ea3220202beeefdc78f46ef8a917dfcc17c
'2011-12-30T10:26:49-05:00'
describe
'9546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWP' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
ad31262deb1e6b4269eaf0381faeff77
dba66394b776411d3eebff2b773f71756691b920
describe
'287281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWQ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
90fbb9f493bbc52a66aeb7af8a551a00
d5ece28ea7a7f611bb58937d1338a074bd24557c
'2011-12-30T10:25:19-05:00'
describe
'144880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWR' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
831ef1de1db492e0e40a9b94a5ab8286
4a0de14e9f10c63f5e88e0270e6ebdb914bfefce
describe
'37484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWS' 'sip-files00115.pro'
51cdd0fd86f21178aa946a0e5ebe5c7e
0a0ff3a04aca4d60fe31d255d94ade2ffc4ddb82
describe
'42422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWT' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
50ef3e821237bd4d3d09fb5d27883f02
a157d032b7726524694210e01d405978eae3178e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWU' 'sip-files00115.tif'
a1bd8bb2c35a1ae5abcf6c6cd4b0e6f9
348d6004289bf1e029ab61718cc1e68956401c72
'2011-12-30T10:24:07-05:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWV' 'sip-files00115.txt'
f8f6432608a1325662e770d3204c03b3
137f91386fae200b43716a2e8531cbc15f9ddde1
describe
'9655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWW' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
713243a8dab5ad8d84d0e787331e3d48
71f482efc1e6cf3431e18c03a20d180a24a59d86
describe
'287251' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWX' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
19958739a8b407908c37724a45a2b011
23150c4b1a0cef93531e776318d2e82c6fc5aa2e
describe
'139581' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWY' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
a626643cab56b54f8294f954caad6a8a
d9932e97b5ac5b8277397fa851c80cb686f76125
'2011-12-30T10:26:57-05:00'
describe
'35798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKWZ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
2f3dd3d23341f5346eb94cbd882d94d0
3fa6b115cf0794936fa5de95fecfd562e728f259
describe
'41306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXA' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
0a5c4713461d2586290fb38bef3bdda2
41f5138ccf946dc4693f156d70125601c11a4fd6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
db7cf5152fdb1d725b1a49c74669ed76
38ee8dc92ed49e548865501e230a4efb8493c52d
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXC' 'sip-files00116.txt'
968c72ae12b4bf594462bdc40d745972
7a06632a5c836f205da7dccfbd402af81595bb5f
'2011-12-30T10:24:38-05:00'
describe
'9356' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXD' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
34cd9cc1c6d482f3473a6ca014416478
97eacee6eb5b8bbfd0c84a4c7b20d16283f217ab
describe
'287279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
2fb2c7b6a58ca61b7103280d8f65ccd2
498d51e39e5ae0f266f33498ac85622b69e29bc1
describe
'141335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXF' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
c3f7349fea76f2da48385e31655318d4
e85fc1efde14220ad0c0da90957c5ff251bdbacb
describe
'34873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXG' 'sip-files00117.pro'
f12cb4181bee4dc0f7db6f2e6a2c35c3
07e14928262bccb81c5ced0e1e81cc962a3a41ed
describe
'41571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXH' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
8e312bf29047d1f060663405ef77201b
dedceab5d9242d212acfbd42bb572820aa0fa3d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXI' 'sip-files00117.tif'
35b5f584b46c673dd0176ce0214970f7
f4b8b94dfe6f0425cb6720502db5069b15aae808
'2011-12-30T10:25:07-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
41430266ab6b209b023e22343f403410
456524094b5f7e1d6264ecaf17a0e18b562af5b5
describe
'9484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXK' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
418f022a027fdeb91b5455aab788c6c4
3b101e88af2b31fb831d4f03bd6a811698039b6a
describe
'287242' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXL' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ddba7535e1804d915f9bf9fba4461998
da7da1c786bd18b1da755c323a5c9d62b676ad94
describe
'134903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXM' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
ffebcac939e4c3e5544712abe0b5c21e
6ce972203db940fa14623e51655214915f46e6f0
describe
'36106' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXN' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b5a31d116d81003270cae80183195620
169cd4b81b5fea081ae707b3ca9033d4171d6832
describe
'41136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXO' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
93786f382d167a3d908d9bd306a9aebb
9d8e4981c81543bfbc727a5b6f4e1d1a479b1134
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXP' 'sip-files00118.tif'
472786e0b4ff4b30ac69f9404441c53e
1285b818f464fc817750bfd5116f14b2cb81796d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXQ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
ea32b2e86e79c314e8523c441df5b15b
f84cf9b10f5e261475b364f0bd0697f931563aca
'2011-12-30T10:27:34-05:00'
describe
'9584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXR' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
8971ee69ae060d0497e3f0ef7b82d533
0ad3b0ec52bd1b59e718fd4c741d7dc148cc9a06
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXS' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0ab6189bc54b63bc4cf25a67c65c78e0
05f80abb9438d7c89ce31f1c8dbb09936568bdb6
describe
'135867' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXT' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
9692c6a65f0488afcd633061859493f5
49f9363a64184a0d8af297dd49c378a7693cb8dc
describe
'36829' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXU' 'sip-files00119.pro'
1c5137f084917e8aa95460afc76ec721
590cd8e40bc6e6582df35fde27e830d8750e8a0c
describe
'42281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
dd12d79745749da5d6ecc98b7e136506
66d26726372aeb76d9b1140f5112af8d008ecca9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXW' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c8fb181bccb54515823949c9b94a6288
94ee5c6a896198fedcd7ed8c5a90585fa3faf65e
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXX' 'sip-files00119.txt'
642f1f9a8a2294b9810dfe6d1b153a2a
32cc3aa0843224b92a311c51742bddfadcc34e4a
describe
'9789' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXY' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
a72d41ac58b7f30f5b08ce6403af8d0b
0d3d8bd4f806809c0eaef65288c66941db547358
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKXZ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1c79eefcfe04f95d5c3b1534b67fdf5c
1ec3ef486a4644a18e3c3439414d605ca5e933d0
describe
'135922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYA' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
99351e051a0f0e9f5c985753c4857d06
90d352c0208be989dd3df4afa3651ac1751c536c
describe
'35672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYB' 'sip-files00120.pro'
5c05dd0e1d1ca64a43d9c85d2fccf080
2598ec848011793df6fa69cf9a91a012fa1c3d39
describe
'40191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYC' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
03436167386673a3d339b341fdd9571c
e64c477f5a0eb2297650288f5c133db6443c175a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYD' 'sip-files00120.tif'
64fa4106b11070361816f1d8c5a61fd3
cbb2fc9740259077f282e49a0ba2bb594bd63eaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYE' 'sip-files00120.txt'
4bfd8c7ea528767d4816f0e658bcc130
43bc0a059cd5adf08e45825f29238600c5067ea3
describe
'9317' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYF' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
ebadaad77945a946f972fc518dc77662
e7dc5bada46cdfad6081beadc2f902fb966feb00
describe
'287185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYG' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
71782635a16a8cf6c8b3b64c3240a3d4
6d88012d47d9e6760766b3b6d1f8de6916655074
describe
'132693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYH' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e48d15dcb3da384a565ed04d4c1a396c
92c048ecc1d0db93d9fbe8ae7b46a3aa925a263c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYI' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c4026346843056fd45c541f453d724d7
083e2b91696fcb5a79fc846d3348ca27c438a61f
describe
'39477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYJ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
a7b3a111ba682d5a8c1d4eb5e9761caa
826fe519704d12cac33be7a083a745c54b3ab8d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYK' 'sip-files00121.tif'
1d5fc1a2f7cc3215c03e8ba59e8fc2d4
0edd82fe57f9efb9c9f4635756c34585c8542308
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYL' 'sip-files00121.txt'
eaa0054d541332148bef7f1975fa1e14
8fd5d266f6e904e52521820a9ff7cfe844eda1fb
describe
'9138' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYM' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
9e366e7a5ae8c1629c14fba6b58cfa9c
0c0bccc77c56da4632550d4642871a828af67ec7
describe
'287260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
3db082dd3e13a1e5bcb58600cead3291
249b005c83689aa10904b4a7563b0648061e7721
describe
'130059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYO' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
8b680e66fe1c23be46d237ad73cd1a7d
1b6f40f8934ef4777c0d92b80667d3ae3bf8bb73
describe
'34058' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
7eab21b2d1844f7a4e2ef5ae2cbef4c7
c7afc26eb2bb0711a316e84fca4017f64b00048b
describe
'38640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
0bc0d04617935476ae514977956661bf
51651b0ef75cca1360a0e1355175c7804e590870
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ccf3d6987b2523a9187071b0b0297e87
36d9761757d89c840b65dacd7719b0bc972753c0
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYS' 'sip-files00122.txt'
808110033b59afd67831d256fd33f4b3
bb0b2368facafa953a9d11f5824702d847b2429b
describe
'9369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYT' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
dfdf10b7e30bdebef154b21d14ef0ede
0dbefacad161d4762b6dd5b5443c3cda7362de1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYU' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
ac0a9a963cd26f57fd122942c792fb27
51073be77be69c73aef786249e8986c8916970aa
describe
'136228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
60166e337d0d1015e06d3987937754be
e576d111b6ebac3b5a8e944b53bc11ac67d34d0f
describe
'36767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYW' 'sip-files00123.pro'
0c8af0fac9b95d2b80dc393925bd2019
889dd492fe45b2ae83d4e476820291cec3f7db3d
describe
'42930' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
4ff0a0a300814a6d6492c2b0cc79d59b
304c2a9131700f0660cf389c6cb35b0e9f4c3465
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
22292491d16bf658bd80ac674153974b
90bdd5b7fd4ef0df181409a3d9b96af7dd810b4b
'2011-12-30T10:23:15-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKYZ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
42df7c6ee558f452e025a9452727f251
ac6a6fb8ca2dd099b55a28c00f7a0fce7f53622c
describe
'9902' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
33d525745d0d269f7f4e8e3f65293ae8
e76b90b26a8a8610273f33c6fdda0f003fe2cc91
'2011-12-30T10:24:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c2bcf40bd48ebd4e1f7a4853a3a38627
86a56cfd20cfb2f60ff8243e9aa707ddb4be1a4c
describe
'135636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
90b2413eca4c40f6039de05139f4603d
ba84b3c0b1b6ca5b84ded6383918b4ecb13d8387
describe
'35762' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZD' 'sip-files00124.pro'
cba6e339dd600b03a569238ae19ab7ee
8d7a0c7469275a02d0b4d1ce94c4ea82f46ef821
describe
'40683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
3f5af8845daa8c3e71078cbc3f61aba3
0d24253c23205f3a985c50da7bd7ee31e2830b0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
dbdc02e329ba5caf1ff05948ec1cd287
6803c25d7379948007eba4657db2e68e7886d250
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
332dcb40f76d32f65713e058d60711ed
595cbebd84ae6a8fcfe1fc7c65b2011ecb5619cb
describe
'9191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
ffe3e513f2e4e19daacf76026ad3d593
dd01bb21578814557b6cb2cf3b95d4eae7098a99
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
734350bb2d9d9014d49fa88b28eda5a4
11ad11ea740d63cd9690dc0fb38815dcec4a7848
describe
'109794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
82a73aa80488f7be82ffb38dbe963af3
3ab0f7e13cbebcd2184daf584548997631dbdf6d
'2011-12-30T10:22:46-05:00'
describe
'23339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
e291201b3d841427cb8cba2aff3be512
d69af4c7f5af56f5805227eeede9f7d87eb174e4
describe
'31115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
5f983cde8bd3c7eeb2232b8593937f31
63264bd7302e6ea5d24ef60c0eaaeea201cf4db3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZM' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9d95e1305dc6ba88df52f2197e7cc3c4
740df7313710470b49c6a2cf4d438d0db10acd9e
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
eb9a7c6f838b971e7493c146f50fe8b3
68b0a75d9732782b2ec7a09eecf74ba2d2531b78
describe
'7590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
6d41f9072a57b0b93ac95dc6ba587e11
bbfa817360e066f42e0e42e4c3158a9bce5861a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZP' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
37e92566cf675752f939026bda57734a
52764da5c56109e33de9a81343be05f961f1e572
describe
'123630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
f0a34d0118113abc105e0f98a3ffb30a
4429566c29e851b0deb860577b19a5be70b1e418
describe
'30695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZR' 'sip-files00126.pro'
c408c3d50779dec38dc048567b4e0d6d
203ac5c74ed5e6c8abd7d46c1ebb60ba8c5eeeb5
describe
'36681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZS' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
b99bf12cf25d0a708152ac38d1db1688
f6c771cc1a41f4bad0bdd72f68f44e4f81620208
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a52222c94d34c011ec4f7274220019cc
f30ceeb9c79ec4cea84233aa6767bbc397601e2e
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZU' 'sip-files00126.txt'
482992ccbb09316f02c3b16ea03aaa9f
b0d9f6310f4d51e00e0cde7be4335da9d5ed4631
describe
'9122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZV' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
e778408d2e3bb554bb8439f4d8e92b4b
d42daee763c8de274a9686695d7b7406cedd4d90
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZW' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1c9f610a75d72ac397060f83c4103795
2dc1b093bc893de9f63a52f80c17c4f3d40a2123
describe
'131737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d8f6c2edf1c6af5eb1f4c1c330fb9428
7899d523c485706cfc89cef6b866fcc0a87c88ea
describe
'34141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZY' 'sip-files00127.pro'
2a20208a74f8a94ea13f2cfbba8163ed
7c2a4eca8906fa979b9631f5d603764345e33cf3
describe
'38638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACKZZ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
da1c70d0abb0ecc948cd69757645e99d
8aea5c0874f30b906757dd543d6f65f0615e5de6
'2011-12-30T10:23:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAA' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c387dc297cc9a46e4b5fe443ffdec6f0
967792f97ddb4512989ba180ffdeb376961eb786
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAB' 'sip-files00127.txt'
244a50921855cfedcc1a72f09fe53dcb
fd5e85d4be65c294055b1452586197898388fe72
describe
'9156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
678758e19e989e232ff067e99943bbc8
6925b1191fadf5085b4d0a893728b62f11f4ab7f
describe
'287113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAD' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c419420d542b227071bf1ec883b8984e
0b0604d5de238188e1a8209522da3129b591505f
describe
'130142' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAE' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
63128b323091feb2a1f2dec54a8ce4f5
0c984bbc383ce9c451ee1b1cdbf8388d68498718
describe
'34424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAF' 'sip-files00128.pro'
0f2dee3bdb8029275b83a25beb670517
b9da9badbae22e538180d922293b6d466bf56491
describe
'40155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAG' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
ad4a56e66b4d10e918772a86c784e522
af37680ed59575c37e7a03c9ba1f9cf8699e6ce0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAH' 'sip-files00128.tif'
d1454d2bb01509382c6c0cad349aa0fb
b70a828b9a4a69cbd03b4b5f0c85aa165a3f1fbf
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAI' 'sip-files00128.txt'
7207eaaeee9f8d29df3d7d5f73debbb9
8889f3bfe99903ed83fb3836a020cf59417d2cb2
describe
'9359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAJ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1b4c693098d41ef09508a66e2d58593e
15630a6ea2a3ffcf7340a611ae77e6080fdeec1d
describe
'286964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAK' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
662807bfc947f5a33b880116596aae4f
2c1f7d1f78aa83f403dadd7a7b4776f8bfb99c03
describe
'128944' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAL' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
7eff2426cd715548fb4df7a38564086c
1e8669eb4e264fbcd5a7295bd1311904a587ea36
'2011-12-30T10:25:05-05:00'
describe
'31584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAM' 'sip-files00129.pro'
c57ae0940e077522ff123246dc6b6cf5
182aa1a9a5befe008087eeccab1f79e83c61b2a9
describe
'38424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAN' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
d513496d026c64f77420515e09962faa
3330822e5dbbf4d0c4091ab690eb5730d3d931dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAO' 'sip-files00129.tif'
f86bf64dae18f7277700a985c7098548
1705e4d61a4cb1271ae2a95fcb1b83426152ea1b
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAP' 'sip-files00129.txt'
bf9c1df89335d15a7e079720d409c4ca
d1456aa19e330d081b47f60505a21bf39c5fb0b5
'2011-12-30T10:26:06-05:00'
describe
'9362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAQ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
bda73e940fdc1bda144c6e510e0c9c3d
28a0c847770528b38127d2d0d9762252594ce0c2
'2011-12-30T10:25:11-05:00'
describe
'287148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
6efab488271013ebf2121d3ea62dfb93
f62e5dde3241a66e19d65f1fa3635f26b12e5221
describe
'135859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
66b50a1734be13f0148cd9cd3d4a9a8f
955f9f7bf0755ae4a329174ee9f6d40f11bcb129
describe
'32814' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAT' 'sip-files00130.pro'
dc20903318b1d3f6f5af83fc4b3df152
a3662e6a0444d6fec1682ac388dbcd7ed9a63b40
describe
'39199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAU' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
4630b09466ea9491259732961086ac44
701ab097159baa5068928b22d474bde152dd0ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAV' 'sip-files00130.tif'
4f598f651acdb1d8c1626f2e086fe107
8709c894c832af76bc8bea5ac50f619c725cb2f0
'2011-12-30T10:23:55-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAW' 'sip-files00130.txt'
73e3d8528fd4166dd56ca22173a24cb7
695482165d75ee7cf1a0954136660156d92f7bef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAX' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
e4bd3a7575dbe857d88ba5f327cb6e6c
1a496dd289bea368033e1ab0eaa7094f250b8976
describe
'287247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
558d5fa31388d4520a374cef086c08f5
2ce3147cc5224f5be4e0b618b0b543226cc480dc
describe
'132327' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLAZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
48bd397d1251237de4b1caee6216c817
62cec8db5873bd2eb6d65bc8f4022f47f00b9e3c
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBA' 'sip-files00131.pro'
9e0806dc8cf631ef1e1975c14974a0c5
006687d6b4cf0f03354e2718fb8ad4a1929802ae
describe
'38524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBB' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
66ff695a74b1be69c3b1f209931a1875
522cd36f5ee29b261bbc9b5c1f391ff9285db089
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBC' 'sip-files00131.tif'
77c9c0e30a7cdb6e2cc26c1bcbed034c
cf6afb4bd8b5edecfb08a3b39ed1e989b9c573fe
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBD' 'sip-files00131.txt'
189328fd4ef218bc8cb4d7faf19de2d5
19fd0f80ec50c17f6bf78e2b826d1e587ad2ef49
describe
'9155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBE' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
cea2cfde04477854a1be91dcec367614
2c70f047edaddddde1477930ced25033e7fe8517
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
4a0b2788073a792b678fd752eea63e7d
d7f62987042cd68048500b1d768ea53507c4e906
describe
'130712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
18fd95734f12f19e4f62258e73ffda2c
902132f20d838ea735cd729ac2d65fcca1c3e1fd
describe
'34121' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBH' 'sip-files00132.pro'
cab3a7e4a1c954911ec3a3b70ac86d09
59ce995bd5828be8f067b5dead3fdee8218b68d2
describe
'39877' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBI' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
55ecb3c1efcb306ff311b2bb3cbb99cc
5e121fe9ff55b1e42892ec08efba2ea1eeb8f92b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
71de082dc55d0f17140b4112f3f30910
037a689ff5e2c454bfa4fd1bb116032b3b6c8561
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
0dd01127cc1e97e5b250fccaa0e3e871
77e0034fcd504379c5a5e460f3aa7b74e4262c4f
describe
'9310' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBL' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
a21775777f0f78a63a3d34ccf49c08b4
3219dbe1fc00a20d9f398dbe57b00d7a8edb3828
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBM' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
6956c80135171c1b4086ce68fb48b116
ab69595cbca439783b2d42bdee504ccdfd3df41f
describe
'104751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBN' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c0ca280aebcfc56023fe70bee1e8fa0b
be9114df3b01482cbcd60d131564505c5c0d659f
describe
'24003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBO' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4ad17e53b67fe793371ee854c22048a2
287b83830963b3bdd9942849815047403fa9141e
describe
'29889' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9530751830e6f0b23514e6de17ab7e87
7970498501b0170b24aff59a432c137ce437b92d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
ac5fbd5e5bde74bb5ed8b66aa5d73713
16b2a9a658a70141875ba5996f51a25ddc47a743
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBR' 'sip-files00133.txt'
203ba25e17fb55eded3cbf015ab263ed
56abf746cb992a975f4e99733565f55d3cc8cbe8
describe
'7095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
bdf03d413766359af9796f4f6382a8d1
aed2e67b0477a0adcba3af22ac0946d2895cf9e6
describe
'286985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
634fedfa14c952f1a9482eaac3d4361f
eb4f086fa9cb004b2524d9bc83a483377b385b47
'2011-12-30T10:25:16-05:00'
describe
'117580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
9183f1722dfbeffd34c6e4bf8c306598
558146dc3f4dfda568e12b7993b4f68f0f8f20ae
describe
'24859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBV' 'sip-files00134.pro'
726196c350293c6d7af56ad49ba890e1
15fb9cba8b9ea24f9093c4d758878db68cf3355d
describe
'32854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
f3d18c654c2570c483f237125ea6bf0b
4f8c69fc42d7556f39d02f07f71d0ba14776c727
'2011-12-30T10:26:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
5fd1cbb8fe1e7e70e65f75580c84c0a1
64e313e2e026042016e040ce1b363cfded82f66b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBY' 'sip-files00134.txt'
ab4281c8a740f541fd751fe10b450261
4499ea6ca80a21deaa3fd35c4aac3341f89a1546
describe
'7803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLBZ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
b886429f874cf9948d2bfdc432468ce4
13a052a3606060054e4d8a8b72676401a263b2c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCA' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
fda0735ba3ef2b1f1a6818d6044c9776
d5ff27ee0051cc7d7cb9a00a6acb0ff4f2a5183f
describe
'156076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCB' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
80b27369855b18313faf30165144eb04
21ad5075d93452dbf2f9fde9cd5c3cfd1395fc50
describe
'12195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
f255fe3d2f124f0a3c3491b0d8e71f58
4cb5a097d706fabad86840113a126fe7a5094b1f
describe
'41325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCD' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
bd906d5dd065af6e4d826423a914b256
c3a4b040ad9478e94b15a022e28c37c5479abe52
'2011-12-30T10:25:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCE' 'sip-files00135.tif'
185ee5bd0ab9255aa164da99b0ab2339
ef165261dc7270402af8b1a994ff309e261995cc
describe
'509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCF' 'sip-files00135.txt'
6c64332ed41a70e10aae1303bfddb13b
f8d1744f4f8857e99ebaa201f398df12d40fc23c
describe
'9803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCG' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
8057fa10be64a275347f69403be779d4
a1ddbc6ae1a2403b84c4f73e9a63027453d882a3
describe
'287190' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCH' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
99b754d21961d21e55b2b69d0987c7a6
d39b5feb27417e2a847402940eb5565003044d67
describe
'128313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCI' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
2b2ede4c35501973d734927cf9579be3
369e9886b40906c8e9b61bbae5bf2795188eeeec
describe
'34239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCJ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e13ff7f2084d8aaf3a74cc8573c89813
8a72fb76509b1bec084b3a40d101738ce10b065a
describe
'38985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCK' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
74fcf463e2186704b0b455403d1ed9f9
9227c49ad00a608bee457a323d2dd35427a27d13
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCL' 'sip-files00136.tif'
9de8ff4c92d4f8d02089713a8f522bd4
bf649271c0e04e77fed16c47c70a49108da3b275
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCM' 'sip-files00136.txt'
fb010045d1859eb07ec84a1f594bd6f6
54a33f1e9d524684cd6a1b869d0d165bd583586d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCN' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
546101d95ac4b40da7b02a88b5344cfa
11119dc3f96454a95c1c5bf931b6134b12df52c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCO' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
6f5512e73a445d4299622fce68e4acfd
7215a230f9d3f9e6163e7e2dc4a94f803e47190d
describe
'134970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCP' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
afba51746ffed44db679c79729e5e815
f9cda4f54de268bc105f56ade9f318e204f17d0a
describe
'34333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCQ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
59ef3f2844f3b3c855e236d065f2fef9
08407f2945eb5aa5f5abcf88b7584ce3b5b3a2e3
describe
'39625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCR' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
c91c7eeda33cc927fc1d653e9880612c
10c590a2015b69b99739229be575f4b8f02e0282
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCS' 'sip-files00137.tif'
45f4a3e598dbc2d09ee89c090223c0e4
ee625185673cac96218a7e976496691f35c8db1b
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCT' 'sip-files00137.txt'
606685a0de99ffbcdef5865f43fe65ca
f4c2af07b05b793328d1a6fb8b9da67e401030dd
describe
'9062' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCU' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6f7555005ecb1d55454d409130cbf36a
babcf0e9ad043ed9d072870eef20e82c8f09ace9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCV' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
6a7def8f6c6368cf8a10282c2d1b7a86
35ef36fdef403d1b67460c69d8225a40bdd597d1
describe
'124914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCW' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
a628ea504dc3038fe792287abaf76f7c
6536db39c0ff3eb2bf2ee6d9c56af6ee8d8bdca2
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCX' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1a72397772a5bb796942bd8d04de7aa8
af8bf26b20e3e36ddad5dca0490c68af3465a94a
describe
'37876' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCY' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
4dbad6f4486a5c8521e32b6e890201d8
047813c664d75ee53dc4327209ad8cb02e12f611
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLCZ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
055d5ff276c93503037c2902925c64be
ae3e6be8c7382b3087708ffdaca92b3feab313ec
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDA' 'sip-files00138.txt'
6258c5310039c8237b767b36b678590d
d23235757edd85788f2d94860bf4d952dff25e4d
describe
'8726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDB' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
efa0f49064a566d53e10a75b17baaf42
40f6e06aac7a2cb7914ea2d04267ed1ac9384e21
'2011-12-30T10:25:30-05:00'
describe
'286982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDC' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
38363274d3f06fc5c4efd76011689b1e
688affcaf3fd0372dd5623104bc94feb548fdb83
describe
'123095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDD' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
e642e09848a0135aef00640fced5d6d8
8d7735e77291f90e03da4126167ff4931a1c43d2
describe
'32751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDE' 'sip-files00139.pro'
a508d57ef29f253627811c1f8cbcceb1
12cf8e7cbca2e7a0d9dab0d617e06950b32882b9
describe
'37254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDF' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
6d4eeaecb1f2e10736e3fbed8a25c2eb
8e7f188f8f774d5ef92aac065cc59a127ed11fd7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
077bd3faf779ace3eb4a3d6302e8c8c8
a42aabcdf821bd21cad8dd36a14ec11bec9a63bf
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDH' 'sip-files00139.txt'
23ef40c813fbfa546cb258b95f767c19
e172e38f5bcc447ae9a184748353c664bcb0c9f8
describe
'8914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDI' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
fb884849570f275b2d1226753cdf6744
8dee3fcc7cc5af3590bae4ecc76fd3593f0c62af
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDJ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
319a98032af1c0a23560d9f5cf42e8bd
5dc5cbadea694a0e5995bf891dd888de08ae2e30
describe
'131830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDK' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
c7c49891a1126a2953bcd6c12a8f30ad
0c9686ce175139da445a333eb09c0f1f79813d71
describe
'35456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDL' 'sip-files00140.pro'
9a2daf457b9ccae8c58615edee3e2e4a
79ac88c54b4d3725f43757a488680a23ef5345d3
'2011-12-30T10:26:56-05:00'
describe
'39497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDM' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
3d7e212f1c93fe95d249111946adba12
a65ad96d9f1d06f863a4a4e0cde9ab356bdc4440
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDN' 'sip-files00140.tif'
5520d7b5c3252a73a79474031b04cb26
d2bfc14eb42b339b80d66654608ea0cab4c69ee4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDO' 'sip-files00140.txt'
42c9953c87974382e68c8dbec9226cc0
78ce07e51b4402f33b3606eb34214cab26501c8d
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDP' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
5841c6e8a125ea44d0a48c26096aa36c
cc45c24dd450ef7becdb127a0ccec782c66220ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDQ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f821750b391a22862bebf034f5acd090
e62afd7ae43f85e6e7eb65b5f8132f8ac3bcfc8a
describe
'138003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDR' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
07d96c8ac10d17e0ae199352e0706509
fbdf63917e3b80ffd0d686cea3ec196975d522d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDS' 'sip-files00141.pro'
53c34ca27d5ed78ee12fe83a5d234ff7
074f306da9d260e951d14fbd88353ff637462e37
describe
'39953' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDT' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
a17b37f18870b9a09510b5c7257a3166
cd7defa1728014f8edf7df496569feebca88e8ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDU' 'sip-files00141.tif'
0842a7179f85b54c98038a8c8c40bfef
b116ed71ab98ec134be2acd2cd100327f2d5786a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDV' 'sip-files00141.txt'
a8d3d5a15b1807fc45ea83757784a1a1
f36bb6c0f249a6b3f0c8095f4b3b70eb26bae994
describe
'9215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDW' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
88cbd41da56fb8eaee65a08ee86b49f3
288196d6e7cf77460430b85d21bbd193bc963071
describe
'287082' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDX' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
bdfad719c13a530c7681e8dcb9b2438d
1a0a51ec03a83c304e8a31b5140bc0d8a57b82f1
describe
'126881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDY' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
eff82d864058a0d6cb299213bc4e6e57
daeedf1c99258ca3b8113b0a652fbba3b835b5a2
describe
'34302' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLDZ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
b028a4d2a27c0cd8b70ca1247d5f0c1f
2cdcb33dd288787c323e00a351622b8e923544a6
describe
'37436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEA' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
9bb5ab6fe1e9c52525936a76aadf310d
01ca6d912ddb93f4acd2f1102108ff5857f40166
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEB' 'sip-files00142.tif'
fb38ddc1140453a39a6af9000c4f8f1d
93c54eea7991b2e67fd60366b41953b81447d1cd
'2011-12-30T10:23:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEC' 'sip-files00142.txt'
3dd6c4bdd99bda603823ff959b63b0b2
4f5f84aa860e87ea8606119fa3dc19e30d935316
describe
'8957' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLED' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
61db2d46cc7b340eeca10ca57362384d
d2b3d20681f8b8722a86ea8da7d29800172227f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEE' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
023a37d23312b5f01d9e0a9120f88a95
f6bf13c948232b13e962de67e9e30e3dc5675105
describe
'127638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEF' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1de3ae644fc417f453f7b0fb251a03bc
5a1dad74c8e10d145ea5739980d6668ee0941b42
describe
'32991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEG' 'sip-files00143.pro'
a8d7ff6e2defd870bd6b44b3864257aa
d1ef9c14060e1f35f0e651e901c8ddc2cd92b53f
'2011-12-30T10:25:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEH' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
46fa6dbaa9bbc4b596dd33ddcba16593
6fb537c76999d9e9175726cd2c920d0490c004b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEI' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ef7d6ae56bf9564a60a2cf10af2e6694
f29a74f5a51c964b3e96527c511a5edce0f4b94f
'2011-12-30T10:25:52-05:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEJ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
fa6cae05f508c762d9075d663b40e151
c9fae986b952fa398b8f9aaa8276db7b908240b5
describe
'9128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEK' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
4beaf0451dc6fc5bf137a09a5a8d2a5b
8f0dcee88ded44ffa519fa1539afc5d8babb5df1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
44fc95edadd4964599e30e61366340b7
7f539e5bb2e4879589af145b503376918e447fc3
describe
'127846' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
b9ead2985426ff9613d2b81bdd104e40
781d72b8f7f58d35cfa321435e14ba16ce8b365b
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
53fc2436fadcd582041b453608c5f92b
6a3b5335d2fae0794bf21174794b4e7f75892141
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEO' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
41eac5e0e7aabda470ccd94c8d2784f8
72b7f1ef205272c34fa4f740940f8b976f689a0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
a924e55fba95ba0225f405e7f83ea0bb
4f1df91eb9a4c087f39cc80eb002bf0d0029b97a
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEQ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
3679d06b0edc79657461f84562aeabf3
9e9b0ad4f79b401f90451337210060a53eb4cbc6
describe
'9146' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLER' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
0f9266735ab166c3edf73732c97a1bb4
6b1683d8c295b21b68e48c3469ebc357129d2cc1
describe
'287243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLES' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
4ebbec916f562a6352d30f65a343fda6
debb2278dc73ca333fe24822eb123fc501f2ab29
describe
'126460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLET' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d35b48ee0a8a13a50174e6ab6cca2143
8f074762dce628c0a1c3e907af757afd57d3ac89
describe
'33850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEU' 'sip-files00145.pro'
ebbc6213eb03b3480c6b47c06d56aef6
9c1a70b8d877e6f4154f745bf7554645b4c41d9e
describe
'36929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
796ca9e9a07c65c0fb1e2520b52c71a6
69d92b0de8800b59039896afbe4579e5d2e79d34
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
5c3f4b20614e5dcc7232563e7b7d5436
2f394480ffebe16d769a2ddf2133614ba9af9699
'2011-12-30T10:22:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEX' 'sip-files00145.txt'
463f18f0be6e89b9a7ceaf23c0d98afc
93a7e43773553c8ad62666b14ce16951457c877c
describe
'8986' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEY' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
dee2dae9a699fa0661705844fd6583da
554e4c80596a1fbe45d335a28c4ce5c033d43e96
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLEZ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
1e2febb016bcaff8a7409fd88a03afd5
5a93a1a8dc6c68251233b4fede5a56513a48c06f
describe
'126326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFA' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
f8537d7b5b4b06836c9c6ed5cffe6f88
cbc4ede634f4dba5edecc84a6dcad8cd2a815e36
'2011-12-30T10:26:52-05:00'
describe
'35151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFB' 'sip-files00146.pro'
cd440b24396e19a54845bb11bdd3a107
5c5402371ea3f53f771cc2a4aa931705e8ab0bfa
describe
'39534' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFC' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
01026ad5b6e7e8a21a166d8fecf38316
ff2ce6349fcf39f469e53386d910ee52a0009535
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e23b58f45deeb3ed3039a43fd767602f
af1067ecc4511a3145370ec7789f590e99583950
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
e2b95e0a852d3575f37bb59f2fa00a56
40497378d2b79106ae06e00b1361f395be48207b
describe
'8918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
9c8bda517c1abdd53c9fa0386ba4f7a9
0d212fe7c7627a91e672cb56040ca4dd28af6e29
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
37ee04af6f6c4ac37a65a5acfbb693a1
7f37a862f45460ba509dced5e74ff155f698316f
describe
'128645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
599898646b48616c42f88b33c0f17422
208f1f4b59b03a68e4e58cd3e1aced0eaa1bf9c8
describe
'35920' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFI' 'sip-files00147.pro'
07f9a9fb8e718b89dcc379cd9a14a54d
8891d03421023f0bdddee73ef8171984ac577396
'2011-12-30T10:27:51-05:00'
describe
'39826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
241dae7a3fde1036fe5000f74597e42d
d1a20de8a593f1cbb22601e2162a6f6bba5ad142
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
97fef64669de2b49aab50151edfad622
7c83309bf250c7c3bed1c47cbdbd9d4ce8065ad0
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
a589b5888a2981f461c04c4d1bc3b5bc
22c0bfeef10e3b678cc58b2325ddae578981329e
'2011-12-30T10:27:37-05:00'
describe
'9341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFM' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
ff41915e8587fa78fb977519907d0e14
6254cba4e4dee6ea32bad2ab01610493a7273c57
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFN' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9efbf99a6cc16e196cf02a8d3c80738a
5eb286682392c89cf5ba73c1d98d66f1ebabdd3b
describe
'130563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFO' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
4e493337fed177120999b8073d279b2a
cd0027cdd441905675baa50bd58bcfcaff8012a0
describe
'35174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
d1f80cc4ddad751f4cfee350297988f9
9d31e58ed5722b10c6b3425db894b853874fcb46
describe
'40237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
cb60f66f1c5f8592fa314a5481086d06
75d920c6064ed1e231b9c630d684203b52b67970
'2011-12-30T10:26:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
8d564622e5c54416d532bb7dfe99fbee
747991f19020829787e0afde4c641e89cee8c2e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFS' 'sip-files00148.txt'
689f03daf98de40cf0e09f8cedd8db70
f1700b8126f706c5fac748abfff95f59df352601
describe
'9179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFT' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
db375c38dad8e37ece93926e747752ef
b46f6c7b051f9e484dc4ffbe3ec4a6ec15efb4be
describe
'287250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
c597f1ef241e78e6306ac9d009cf919c
52eaf5a9872032267149886f7143da115e604bc8
describe
'136077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
faa9a0c5abb3075b626699521995b4ea
924039af2fc4cf69aa83d427246e13513c6d33b8
describe
'35239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFW' 'sip-files00149.pro'
2f6886b177f1d35ba853f163a981c358
b31bed2ccaa51546af744bff13624f7faa4769c7
describe
'39639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
431f2c1207b40965cf60e6460e0358e5
531e834923303838d4e05f7a6f965b83bcb56ef5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
755e98e214057b6a616d972c48ef3bb4
89c2b9f0d016551bcb25381cea26a505cfb52d2f
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLFZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
83f80accb64ec8c434f07ae7f4273cdf
55f1aec07553608d92a455e681a14f5368060eaf
describe
'9165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGA' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
56ad3d2bf6a4e8ceb6d63fdb1736f2f4
41bb256f1caa61b7a623ef1334ac90aebf5af20e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
e84498cc161e71b47337ffcac5dd6387
9336f4ea2bc59438a6d1457ff6e7a0bb59ed6361
describe
'127757' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
2e911a1b6c59bad11c603a3c13398fb5
b053b84c9b6d651cced74bf30cc3cfa53751c526
describe
'33337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGD' 'sip-files00150.pro'
32680baadc8d1a4793f08ee2d4cdff3e
8bac4ed933b6a0993a7d2288c9d8a3fad32061fc
describe
'39024' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
42bfdc56087e4b6b7e8d6d95c764f7fa
fd3f22fd4589b495a86dedea8c3ccb7f2c221267
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
c9c75c5d1385f78e4402b6d12d40f7bc
d39d25ac6dc1005b924e7e704493b80bd1702c23
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
bdafdce4354f5f7aa84dc3879c654540
2048ca2d3a05fc489f188e8c1c6a7110565b26e5
describe
'9002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
3868d646b5fbc57aec5cea07db1f566a
f3dab1b6053490890d5ab37e8ec96448d0251cfb
describe
'287246' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
384c5295bb9df70ba59c2dcf95aefc45
fa586aaf49cb6cac39ab82aab5112a18f54cd540
describe
'115978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
0d0e6fcc38d02d16bb7593f2b1c2789b
e14ba8f361a481dd6579af4831ebbc52ed0b43be
describe
'31193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
37faf1b42de132cb366c06dd29b144d2
e8656f812c2622e3447f209af31fbe9271392105
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
b061685c6355de3536e482e9c9992055
9132a0d9cdfefecdc2a0315f8df069b39b5202b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
9d4f84acc84848b95297b104f2d350f0
4acddf41a42a30615a0ba74a295dbe85abcb3e21
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
0f415f6583144eda0be55a97a3b8c164
2a92923ec3f329dffd3e3daf24c42f8ccea41f77
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGO' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
fc42ec5eef50042a7bc3bff72ec2bb80
4784521729f3bcc679c6cde29d18bd146fa42320
describe
'287219' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGP' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
3af8cff7fe869daf10aff239bd1fe678
75e5b673365f1067eb1de18a4c8f4831698ff51c
describe
'154449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
5fc0cfb0e9090c3e37d9c94cf471005d
256c3b841a9f9823f4cb75f4bfe4044998e4b731
describe
'13890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d8ea59c709e8b831f3c7ef4cffbc0f2c
7a4b13514602c075805c6c7318e0c9d3e7203771
describe
'40499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
40d964399d3035bdbe2aacb3bd39b16a
65fa48d23b39fe498c622ebfded683cd55d8d4f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
3e84450a8f2af3c00f1794984c37055a
6dfe0a267ca2e1f8ee5c511ca143ad123817625d
'2011-12-30T10:24:53-05:00'
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
bc7052446c6851b52b9b5f2ef29466a2
8c8ea83cfba19d0bf319bafc8d0a118a489802a0
describe
'9780' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
9774272c2f3982542cb0f8e042f0217e
e9b0b18eb88ed32f48c824960c0763bd6c9fd5d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
a8af2d461802a9df1782a59b3e067c42
f89add90c2662b5bba1b7037eb8989504b1184ed
describe
'132588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
c939c402dcf861d181c6f04406e748fe
f23a8c1636abe335eaacc2b2f475a4cc1e984566
describe
'33298' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGY' 'sip-files00153.pro'
3e0a4701bff8f8d693eb7a09f1106afb
86e2eace1a660e88e8e2e4244edfc8d077dcd424
describe
'39923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLGZ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
1f0094815665bd2bc5b01302e37a1499
873c86276b51283fdeece5c3ead2bdb2903fdd3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
aa8c41f7530827f10708f322535a2501
c4a0534a62e91d3111aee39d74f1aa426cf05315
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHB' 'sip-files00153.txt'
f6a30e45c8e8ad1eefc4b89303ea7e0b
ce74a191baca06816eb8437127d8e93ed738b0e1
describe
'8978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHC' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
3960c0d46baf6a24f51f26f808640fbd
3bae41a564bcd5fa0a38e4b0dec67c9f2ee0a667
describe
'287257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHD' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1737e7cb08ac689e05d2c0ad48962dac
261e3c19f8bc110dbe7807644bc2b40ab807431a
describe
'108991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHE' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
80edc5a89256f2a8734fde1f0f4c193a
e904c8fd07365dab67668fcd7a2672fd2fcb43ee
describe
'22629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
cc36812fcf77f728fb1e037311208e49
e7f9b9f972cf0ea099831a35d5c06dc6ea903b16
describe
'30342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
4106a8e364004934d892e99a1dd59056
7d1835771f12ae70315bb90f61cfbb82d0195265
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHH' 'sip-files00154.tif'
25f6134cb263d2a3e35df8c159e76558
b0001350e9ac637b94819279ef6fb0479e7ebcd6
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
0ddeac66401054c2592bad94e56f841e
d2998050f77d652f71063fb1bf3319cce9807a75
describe
'7640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHJ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
33dc97eb57833853f1d320741f2af98c
5a09746064e4f54345b0aa9c4b524505fcaf6caf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
c83d82fcc0d2bf2a21e4055ef8307995
e3a93a11f228ed73d9a59c07e692709dd0bb4a80
describe
'137361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHL' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
066e56ac11f550cf3570351a8b122329
ad7e2521c39b35509bee1864bfb9fba412cfaa73
describe
'35102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
e45359b7bf4d34ed8471d5c045f41912
2b6265b500f81151c08ab9791e45b0b821ee3acd
describe
'40489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
b858f1f8ad71e63ddbb8e076e543273d
66fd32a3c3ea356ad5ac1a9af35673aa5b8e79c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
aa13e325c9cf915bc6da6bf3a41f5522
b115606ab7e450a0287357a87d2debbee45cf09a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
d972662ec238963a94ca6f33ff023c5b
911ac2c7d05a4f5897c16173bdb8b5a5b4cedaff
'2011-12-30T10:26:41-05:00'
describe
'9283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHQ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
c919eec58b6f97421b4f61052fbedb68
fbe31e8451056288c5adfc9ce2c1029c0475442f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
38b469cb5237b766ad4adc7f0d7226f1
19492a88003bc9e875593b12a98fa683bf8c373a
'2011-12-30T10:27:10-05:00'
describe
'130843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHS' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
b990063dc52e37cedb3c7703927bf12d
f3c50ffd6eb1a38cd4c8f1557b372864fbac2885
describe
'34385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
944e1a450fb82f6d23d3bfa72bb470a0
89b48231a4504d62a5c11b696dc16edf39ece865
'2011-12-30T10:27:09-05:00'
describe
'39683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
402ca30bd85047bd52efb287b3d06260
267f9e0886b71fe4abf03854fa1aed57ef512ab9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
7cea719512ee38452fe872f01e6e8261
8dca6caa7994cd8f99c02eee27ed2d6665b1434c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
e40793a6ceac2dbd65c649b7ba50d3fe
ab0ce6973173975069811d572bca80eb98c05df6
'2011-12-30T10:21:10-05:00'
describe
'9212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
ded8e4e9ab59d52400c1cf7a3816dba9
4c03ffb6aa344c2ff794d7b66063c1c554d86579
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
e8861c425791ad520b5d9c2fc311a9f3
fa0570f0a2727a53ad5c525d51d1a3ae3c359918
describe
'133423' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLHZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
8dbdacd9b169b43bb636fdfc70c2b678
ee6351d00189e565308cce712f4cb031ff4d10a8
describe
'35799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
65e948972c554ecbc121ed12206891ce
61a39f5434025a31afa1c951a2826f9e1118ac5e
describe
'40791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIB' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
2178e019760077624ea1fa4773d3ce28
8f595c2eb1d027c95b7f40009fbcfec421253690
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
673995d5b83597200212089daa086e37
2926dd20d7fca9f356488d12c5eabf748ab5a2c9
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLID' 'sip-files00157.txt'
5f487d33cf32c87c4b2f4741f129b126
48fd2ad23f0f2bd3ce70c2f501347775e291472e
describe
'9372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
a396cdbe3e3f8fdb196359ad3dd3dd36
e0940a3d0060d901db015e90223395b3b27b4b59
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIF' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
03463553736192164007fca46b5186cc
9b61d9ac01a5f390286677d7e4f7d1f2d21ee0a7
describe
'136986' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
8a2a02f0382233f3673bcaf22ee512ac
49142d8206f17848f420b2148e746bc4053f9231
describe
'35665' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIH' 'sip-files00158.pro'
f71a94b61cd5cf460e055b535cff10d5
a5a6dd48d8be2770cbec0a37bd819a20196db400
describe
'39681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLII' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
48c5d391369223735fc0be0cce1fcaa0
60a5c826b7a75aea9700e2b9bbf2ddbd1fa5cba9
'2011-12-30T10:26:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d2b308b13ba0ffe414de6b52405e6fac
e7c77c7aa9ad832ca817c686d7f5f2b5e7e601ca
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIK' 'sip-files00158.txt'
8c01ef18761b4d382e5a7687796d6b16
6f51a5015e17efb4e66d1cae4054b964903df4ad
describe
'9387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIL' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
7bc87ebd9db9ef856d03e7d10ddc1cc8
aec6cdc5603614165489e3b08d38d58112f32b84
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIM' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
ac41579d3c50c5c7b11cf04b297857d0
199b32723e114099927df01b1217d9265b02f48b
describe
'135234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIN' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
c0beaaf556322f70b73445b580db3e5f
3aa381b152ce28c8a6313dee605e75a0590a1f13
describe
'35557' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
de0913e26513d256dce422faa7d6d285
44fb9874a693ff14a23cb07ee9d3b260b65226a3
describe
'40590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
005c028f070cb9a3eaa11c7053f69c29
185d1a03b10de51a2a3589348c43e205ef1f97b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIQ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
61cdf6cfc9803e3fb48923e82029b758
27277541dbe31f22e912ff0ffcdb27a4f43acf35
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIR' 'sip-files00159.txt'
35e9b33bb90d2a5611b2bdf17198beb9
49ab4d3c43fe05a92cacdc02725d366d0c9bf3c3
describe
'9411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
49a587be0aeaf204527cc054953e5233
0aee33690962f3a605d1d85198a8a74905a7aff5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
02aab1a2c905920390ca070dc90a4f60
8680b48fdef4132cb204c6722ec11eebcd0f01a8
describe
'134075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
6096d0ffc559da2d59e76ec2650b837f
e438ebb5a77cee7ea486a3288924b25541b7a14c
describe
'34441' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIV' 'sip-files00160.pro'
a7488bf230dfe553bda8a5962a4ab9e8
8de743ea2aa4b88d0631c2373fdd5560e48ff213
describe
'40366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIW' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
e3b7a6cf852e9385ea63524876c9e3eb
aa8382548ae3b9f21d112d7d1e35dd22ad4588d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
2ead3abd1351737c786b9aef7e2f5d35
9dd4b9e119ada2f7d26381f07cf57ea4bd382c50
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
d399bef46d845b90a1f6691aa0411fc2
856209a65cd6b010a50e75dcf0f62adeb23de7a7
describe
'9213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLIZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a44f058089e99f4b8c18b846ee8fca6d
41b33b6646e9b02e6533f32fddd83dcac42a183c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
e562182dd207f5b5488f6e9a03c208d0
73064836aef3e3984e493f48f1f45e7f254ed2cd
describe
'80661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
dadc9f47a4e0c3a177e90638dd5fe11e
c354a8dfadb18d2fc1f4d02de21a224d404a6ade
describe
'16459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
452eb864c341f68fafb3d43f2c63d7a4
609f4c2157cc1504a9d27979cefb2bf0d6833740
'2011-12-30T10:20:57-05:00'
describe
'22386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
f36ee0c1ebb23378d0204bdfbb9bdfb5
d28dae804c7ecd6596ec3581e1819e77863ba7ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
99713c0a1f2ba13f4278c7a324d99a1d
99b26194ddbf5e863fef715712ac1713f64614bf
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJF' 'sip-files00161.txt'
36cbdf611e0f49319f48bc6cbd6f9654
efe4eec2edee207e0c04721bd917c8643e74c6ae
describe
'5216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
bff49c8f1dd8e0417b1aec22ec43482e
9c5049e3ee7290484600c165994bf802cd5bd64d
describe
'286919' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
707f8dec5d08476c269b9a8fd1e604a5
8bbea4a7c40c7b26430c4995d4b442b1d7226401
describe
'118976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
c4ade0ebe7b8c40362b86016b6b9b15a
9a3abe1baa3aec4d140e9a1e3e4bc89be1a8239c
describe
'25644' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJJ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
bd9f3925c128c6f29958ab877b65f8d4
b177aa22ed1f76af04bd366bdb6cfc0c73a55be5
describe
'34255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e1d5505f3bd6cba03fc7f885638a55f9
f5b97a9368d6ea12599d2c83a0f49f1450b88c68
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
4eabdc6302ecdffd6b128c7112210adb
ce08a66fa2920ae6e83b745bc6da618816f2813e
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJM' 'sip-files00162.txt'
1b075fda52f83e7b7162a23c5ed56b30
dc2989eebd29850aa69e3370cccfe0b62a53c8ae
describe
'7968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJN' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
67d8a70ae3761ca62f85c9fe5b50db33
1de9aeba42e85c31b03ddc22ab167dfa3b851ca0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
697797e9419d99a79637cde16af9d344
689d6f9dd5d7cb302e1ea3b4a806d4c5eb222c6e
'2011-12-30T10:21:43-05:00'
describe
'135402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
4fffc2cbd8bafdb945cf46c59fd786bc
88a5a1b149c1d7bb67e18a6efbcbc9e8666827bb
describe
'34648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f89cefdd8ccee7228e9dde906ed6d635
562fe83721051d173eaa8d107134bca2b673c604
describe
'40152' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
74e6918e842b3890a59242b1d01d72af
8e9a602e21756f2e0a677279f72674b555ebd672
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJS' 'sip-files00163.tif'
678395c01875741fb4687e352e3c1796
a65a1387055fe7fc46c7e7909e1a1d841f0073f1
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJT' 'sip-files00163.txt'
250cff0f636f66abad34cacc6a5f9989
81fff9bed86de898406f2783860c4e3fdc9222ed
describe
'9568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJU' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
b20a07ee89f80e5581e91fe65815be3e
64f67fee98e89d9394270c870f4a29b42d15e421
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
53b560df0d877204eadbdff19ac651d3
dffeb2b007561304c895a7ac71c87518ddac8db7
describe
'136073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
a9dd2bdf0e66bb300d92aec1347e17b8
db7a421c374d6f17de0ae17ba9510eb927c57d78
describe
'35472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJX' 'sip-files00164.pro'
9b16f4eb76a64e6a47b3474e1df062d3
9515fbdfde02ad26c264c1c321670262a809dcc7
describe
'40021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJY' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
8aaa01da53806f100862c31c5938fc5c
786425f85f62c0965a317bca52b2da39bdf4a02d
'2011-12-30T10:27:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLJZ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
c06ab382ed5fa35c3c20c16b5ac49bde
cf9a7b15d7a3e78a74f401f02741b9a920a6dbbb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
228895d0508979ce9cc93cf3a980cc57
d451b31a7817c978b922ffddfe55fbfbf240aef4
describe
'9357' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
64287e5bda482cdfdfaa2378451558a9
5516467a6d20bb55379ccce96cee21e44a3c93f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
80f0c6b80531265d1ca52a77752187c2
33153df088cdbfda92b0ccbee7fe68c2f3e0b6cb
describe
'131268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
7a968e68010a89b805febd2d0649f277
0a458df5da0c0e3fbf924f1a38c10afca57eef2b
describe
'35549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKE' 'sip-files00165.pro'
aea4177abb3c8a87f04393e192c93b86
fadc2c6cd20b51132915831f2621f5bdc82c9483
describe
'40756' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
bf0a42322e1844ad87a72a326887fba2
0a02281d96fc0dd0e1f2b71a0691f6e77ab49771
'2011-12-30T10:25:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
16f98b2103c8aa5486b53b6c34a37324
fd0e1d677303f39f79c8a81a014e3dd6db393fff
'2011-12-30T10:26:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
2c257c61cb72c54e8f890364109e784e
3777f9578df32aeb4c06cbc2417d85af2bb681a5
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
14dab5db89a7795863671a827ff9cf11
0d9f38373a9729479d7b770b387f6ac8a05d7893
describe
'287254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
a9e01965f7cbbe9449dd62ae43010135
68f7e0306cd060a16018344d0fd055a031837518
describe
'113108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
0c8d27d3f1ac0e0699d687630a9b2d9b
d61367c4d2613bfbd659ce1896df5a739419f564
describe
'27512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKL' 'sip-files00166.pro'
5620b98dc902c8a7f55b6dd4fd68692a
fcf7963d7fef440fc8a1f37aff7f5e4a8b1d39aa
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
4ebcafadfe5b3058c0b5f9119a3dc99b
f0575df4c819b5f428f38e5ca07738f585f7605e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
b8b7c1591d5211feff0098e00216e6ff
3bfeb9566c748cb1dfbace8b8a99516b4f4639a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKO' 'sip-files00166.txt'
7cfb81e41948b6b093dfa697c9f382fd
9ec925af42bafd35e8ae011a4a51df3fecc92881
describe
'8130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
c082551bdd3561de287f4b60fe503aa8
03bbf44346052ccbf22144a192737e544094d7c3
describe
'287065' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKQ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
fe4385c5a2fc48d0907e2534f733cc84
1180c165b3b2a2d97d548bc9948d600d6440bb07
describe
'126351' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKR' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
b8776a8f5e9db907894bb703bcffebe5
1a1155e70265dbb17c68b92eb01dd9fc0886750c
'2011-12-30T10:22:57-05:00'
describe
'31857' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
2a500e20d625878b99b4d1bc71e7d2ef
ab13531ce9baffe2f9e7f8cd4f43c5b82f1dc597
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKT' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
696ae7c8c48f101f2eb35f872ed5e9ce
38d79f682f88edad3d37e88a9bc73b81e769b5d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKU' 'sip-files00167.tif'
95c178edb64b9333fa7f45e6ec89e851
4d40add4abd462333e08b58ffcf7ea4466ed24d8
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
30e72ad541c28f05359c60d5aca852e6
c41baf0660fa7fe43edc51111b24bf9c73da1dcf
describe
'9110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKW' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
ac4417b74d7f5a2acc37a415d890a8e4
38cb199d0aa1870c70ccb849c2f550be44c08e34
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
226d6149d68b769444210991bd6c8753
a9a6ac876ac707d8b04f6c2955f5e4f73c726b1d
describe
'134624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
5724dc66e6ddae221c9ed015e3295938
90a25eec3cdc5f151aea3e8302689fb73818f106
describe
'36469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLKZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
60493212ce17f72e33f2ca729bcca9a1
6189ff2be30d1ae2a48fadfaa62f887be3f17f6b
describe
'41483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLA' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
17fb9b8f3bf6d6b3c0bfddaf867ccd35
dd130a5644c9c7db0f8cd632625a0b0fdb9dd87e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
d67052903553320f13ebc6c02e6409c7
27ec6222da0fc80669b5e18cf40b845bcb5c17ea
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
b37842acd91d6394d364feb9edf3a655
5b2a209ef4a23dbec0bd1f9f5b207f25288e5ed0
describe
'9787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLD' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
59d9f5c5ecfb45472fdb34d2b794e238
a8f4962ea9486307922a17fd17a6fc90ccdfb8b6
describe
'287151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
679398caed09f2b0bd3719d6964bbc37
068c71b467d8d6199e6b1041c1a48ba9f99fb93e
describe
'149864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
66b497d0dc398a26f3408bf11ec388a8
21e7c9d493c8396ffd1a19b97e87a8c6c09a8d39
describe
'11213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLG' 'sip-files00169.pro'
6f3ac7531110098c133d819afdc53d21
f7464113adf93ad8bb8181aab8bcb18b9ebe475f
describe
'39960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
141c2a2babaa523800c8d99603df5255
337a227b44336bf3f92996ef9edff8f21315c181
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLI' 'sip-files00169.tif'
34c323de759b183532927ef4a5e03a32
1aa7937c07566b938ceb1368d87420a8fa997314
describe
'503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
507fd64b119eb2372143c44af857c5ec
a1b5893990521cd78c18d1186a4d86ba16749c2e
describe
'9572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
ccb4973eb02db2adf787d8ba0917bde4
8226574c3e74533dbcbf7a86cac332f68f53c7f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
07604ca04b7f78d6116a3363e9ca781c
c7ae719fe92765a128429156f4cd2d56365cd805
describe
'143360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
0893940d8cbc717a8d0d8dd230236665
82e1d2149399b04979620cf4415cbd40820efd88
describe
'36673' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
da601a38c9d7f9eeeed9722b28b805b3
be573ceb28aa67bf011938b87ef3be9adb1518f0
describe
'42338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
969b8c121eb33d1961cc56f2376b91ae
036d77be8a9ea7698ddaf643bf8a1bc55ba6768c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
232897175f8edea69e1781815572b56a
0afe4cc36128a3fca05c9dd0162b0e080098a925
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
a2af25f23180dfa3819eb1652a93ff20
8e73c08097f31901f15668c1271429ef905c1ce0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
74f4835aa8b1c1f96f6c2035e3714085
f12c9cc9496c2db30f86b255e3b6316b44aaafdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLS' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
cb62414e6f8c4b0ef1e78bb70e8ecc31
4f6cc7b29ef3a22554796025129f021cb65e170d
describe
'134833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLT' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
4738c4f35a9d6859e2cbde02e5268455
4e3c2aaca2b941c8e799ba2c0fd238f60df7853b
describe
'35865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLU' 'sip-files00171.pro'
7fb9c0dc1c7e53b6156f29ec6237eb81
213a341c778609b6a02d16a8306d997a46e038b2
describe
'40862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLV' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
b6851c5060e0170f818756edd8d5c49d
72e6502318eeaa8020a4d310a9ae4e0dd6824052
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
5b8c065b696cceee5702ffbcd21b4750
dbce916d3bf99648057ffdec04ad908ffe3d1fae
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLX' 'sip-files00171.txt'
cf7b7455f6e5f407204328a5cfa84481
140a4066a6f31a36f02595aea7bb5d3fc3766e03
describe
'9197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLY' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
2aa76eed8c4ce1d2f227b634a42c7cab
6f7a2e037eeddad45eb5def74374071614632df0
describe
'287069' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLLZ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
a9a69faf8d95d6818c152bc3c6c80da8
3a604d42018d5373cdf2253df793abb74eeaf840
describe
'129179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMA' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
3558c5861cfbcab793828552cfbba5d5
3fcd4ab6d55b941bd377babb4d541a090ceb32f0
describe
'32294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMB' 'sip-files00172.pro'
90ea04dddc2ae629437f2854654a2fba
de99e948734059bd9510a9e19ea898e38aa894b0
describe
'39835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
998b3285d49cc6353b04b3d9b91f5ca7
2e3a68be9c82b4aa9339a17bd5718380facfa0ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
c0fc0ed053af63735ead2eb12ddac41c
80149427897aa340296e47964f0287cc0dc30c23
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLME' 'sip-files00172.txt'
cbbd5b438dbc2cc6310ba403d291a503
1994d6cc7aafae63a62a21adfa7e6ab10acb86c7
describe
'8947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
b7b628ca1cdb4c106db759e0dfa73bdc
094158253e40af57baa48a315cb42c9be79db451
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
0a961b1a57f2435bad0b492d5fb4f16d
5e4f6fd99f6b502a72360acb1f6875796e6dfa09
describe
'122091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
646f54b329b1e7fde8050354a8678dda
b2ac90673fb63f19b190cbfe77d9cb647206e7f3
describe
'33689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMI' 'sip-files00173.pro'
83e398033a7a3419c3bc78d661e6c906
76fbfc5e62c4f6d11030e0c5aaae443e47917772
'2011-12-30T10:24:55-05:00'
describe
'39322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMJ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0d2ca6a51457615b0be98d139e72396a
a05d94eeb8163fe307423fde3a136841f48f1753
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
2cd21294d6387e6a017b3913caf34990
477c05461dbdad10470878d25d9cfa4f37ffd569
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLML' 'sip-files00173.txt'
79ae6e807efe0322ecd4e87cd38d7e42
8d843be26303fec8f7d43d70ccc91aa754ffaf1d
describe
'9223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMM' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
a8f0365c3a031fb79e9e92293a6f940f
51b9963b5e03c87ad477cc484de2849362274fb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMN' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
54be633963185a67ddb463c8ee38ee0a
6f6ab5e9c14ff468ad4abc27fc10bf59de51b1e8
describe
'133514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
a3d56ae9ec3ea13d18ee96093b4775e7
ae8b1a3a762f0d6ccd0dfbba65c10a6b6baed904
describe
'34056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
930c084d2fc1cdfca88ef81fa7adb5e3
110eedfa687d5e6a17a0cde32ce22409d71295db
describe
'39035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
4dbf920f7e754c12e06b21901180a64c
70cf42a903fcdaead1479e066b872ad74efed2d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
8b522d18a17b4ec360d9b3c580800122
bd0446d215f3e065bf7fec75529e303d35b931e3
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
04a27fdf492c32018422fb9d0b9453eb
539731baedb305b10ffb777fcf01d782c71d37e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
37bebc53709d0512dad97151e7b96f57
a6fd2ab7a9e21ef6619d7a364bb2519059d0b1bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
1408834456d64b88eb1ad47749d13c93
42e54cc9f9e7274eab0f38f85912e8aed8095caf
describe
'114574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
18a901bda3b0d9e487687690d8f3ede0
b5198004deac6dc995209024663ba6aa027b9c99
describe
'29333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMW' 'sip-files00175.pro'
3ffabe7b37878b4487852bd6fc79f21d
cd50d629f27d153a907ec128877ccf3180391fd7
describe
'34231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
1a5aa12042e0c30c9abc1ebe43053093
4a98cbde07e8b7d7683d34faf6102d82efade913
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
aecb7dca11e35f37c7fbce52c946399a
13a9af84944c31a8512fa20c49115c239effb738
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLMZ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
9e3ccc161caad06bbc3d12c3298d5a66
38a54dcf224f5d1072a12fccc8019f25c7a3e1ff
describe
'8408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNA' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
207de01997fab59ffb7824e6c63a25d2
0bbc6d71f8e812afc83a2b53ed34457bb21f86de
describe
'287172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNB' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
cce80ead33da00379fa7d8ec8c346dce
854daec6207f7ea82f3e9894860c73964b60d0af
describe
'125360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNC' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
542004281fc73bf831f1720988b77168
297154c042508afe22ae64fbe30c44bdbcc9e882
describe
'34054' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLND' 'sip-files00176.pro'
e9c87e716598113fcdb5eaebffc63316
f24637a857344dde10f8b9eeead122e75f211cf0
describe
'38287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
0994499fe579205e510ae5f94c002587
d0e28dd09b005f804c6b34dee7fbdb26ed834b56
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
12adc7b1ed98c65f50d24da68095a89a
6c9947d3b9e8f15603d5412965b310db2c0bc6a8
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNG' 'sip-files00176.txt'
1ee19612e21e748bdcb44fd67b862b2a
2bfc57f74c78854d2ddf1d3333da6d261392c024
describe
'9225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNH' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d57434ac699681490701c402013f2311
479c8c16bb14b373946cb9f94e169c9325f9265b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNI' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
1ad0bb9739a36a5d9e93e9430317a747
f8b9349da6b096f3155a4680243a9f35e1fc44b1
describe
'122629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNJ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
b72ea2ad38230d45755210edefbae409
a29d1601fb433ae39d6e99e40e6892d7f87bb193
describe
'33140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNK' 'sip-files00177.pro'
a7583075f7a2635364964249a37dc3c5
2c0b489f488f648efce875d7c891db9a04e8d48b
describe
'38615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNL' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
0c89669ed76b189e5a173e208e8e282d
be47a3fe241ac389a482d7cca0b4f6399b6f5d7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNM' 'sip-files00177.tif'
a1d50f28dd8af41f96907cdcb4b1541f
8e791b3fa315f66b3d6d6c444777287f34ed0ca1
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNN' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b30b289c4274d1f1bf776dcd09a72933
ce37b335ae7cf365b0c83dbb10819124a5baf90e
describe
'9286' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNO' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
a961021d2b97443d5f52201ce66e1bc6
21c488eb5261f780a581639019f16c3306730461
describe
'287217' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNP' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
75eaf32cce3ae0ecbccb7fa091982f24
968fa617256c5138b8d9eb73693ade285c8712a4
describe
'132107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNQ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
89c0c3306f3aa523d275d475e9ba9366
c9f7eb99211177a32551c9d4ae524a1348214d6f
describe
'34483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNR' 'sip-files00178.pro'
a69afe474d57cda954d2a315a150a367
bdd6625f6749b3d714b274e4777a2bc67fa7fc68
describe
'39010' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNS' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
c9e846f1647ba923561928e9477d2b86
9c5fd82dea2175a4341ac594eaec623a1b5e3f98
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
1a2465675d644bfc9142136badaa50e5
4fd36bcda8d0f3c379e6f4a57d244c9acb41beb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNU' 'sip-files00178.txt'
56c9c836a67eb76f1eb718ac670eb0a6
7f2ec8466d069f1b229a33780d0b1f31223272e8
describe
'9095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNV' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
f0fd63c21c6c69d7b1af98627b683894
11b3996f3d1a6866a768b29b1da7a706451c9c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNW' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
6bcf4c4c2be9d064f7e38abf08e60176
c89a0638cf003e4bc7e48e6defc8589d3ecba1f4
describe
'132406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNX' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
723805ac2738aa32b25d51d4664d4c48
b3a2edba170894436e59d0c953a9b4dccaf35a2a
describe
'34628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNY' 'sip-files00179.pro'
008c412a68e2ab563f972aa46aca0493
f71da2b83b136f726e717f973448ed7aeb72c779
describe
'39411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLNZ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
7fee368c3439dc8df99d5bcc27258d33
1ee6b5c33559ab9dd1aa23d05ef49edf74bd2d5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOA' 'sip-files00179.tif'
97b11206af9d64e30e713b1fb877d2ce
ea5c2408e140694aeab45a20267deacbac5d1054
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOB' 'sip-files00179.txt'
b3756d2fbf67ff36826e7cfb1c1ce50e
a43ccc5608a781c80b896fe78797a6b9b34c60a0
describe
'9276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOC' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
1523be57fdc335590e2aeb0c9de12cf1
688bc6be30c5b8d53bcdc48aefc91b28f2bd676e
describe
'287161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOD' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
b94507b3d63a8804915f2d0c654594d2
99518c435858eb0ba6c28f6468785007d15ba322
describe
'49685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
e98656b7498b83940fcf9147794a2a63
d6861a569b428afe2b1b56040376a099fe6301f8
describe
'6408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOF' 'sip-files00180.pro'
66efd061748c707557e327da75386a2d
b3f0768d0e06c39ce664f7301e706323c80b5e8b
describe
'12371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOG' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
8e012693a463fbd6cf47ad25984c7932
1448be2dca378e05016fec1bf4dfef74cc5b2645
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOH' 'sip-files00180.tif'
d9483fa4b04b3004a8342c89df02017c
916e11e7a84c0049555d484b785717f18bd39233
describe
'271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOI' 'sip-files00180.txt'
cbe338130f666df280b1512912c8fc53
9ac20f8f5e86ffd71bd30592451ae8d4f085bbf2
describe
'2974' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOJ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
fe9932ef8eece057092aaadba41289cd
0fba0ad0c5599292448d8a1c551a324b64593ec9
describe
'287223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOK' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
10cf49748406b20fb122ad63ba9f1f6b
1dfe80aa08c052a24dfa9458fc64fcc74d04a835
describe
'113800' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOL' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
a99f2ee4665ee5bbdc023ed235767f24
2cb286c68b74ee41729995aaeedb9fe4f20ffa46
describe
'24287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOM' 'sip-files00181.pro'
2ed34b631e60b9fa88b4dae7ef748f73
2a28d06600791bbe63e34aee72e3f1303863fad0
describe
'33700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLON' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
2936b423b4ab7fecea1a2d210be8382a
0057962d50cf175d483fc2094291fb8be16135bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOO' 'sip-files00181.tif'
d23500ababc7c38bacf4b8928792d56d
80f42a81c9f8c25b108f824210402040be1a611b
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOP' 'sip-files00181.txt'
ceb636646281d22ea2ba363c07d143ec
b021c34aa774d93a4bf95e957aac9427be8cff39
describe
'7929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOQ' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
6974cc4e090776a174ff6f76cab24a41
6b125d8509d11ce5e4c490e77c706a84a56bebde
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOR' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d25e929e6485c767132ff55e0d3122c4
90c06b3f8ab45c9cc7f35cdb78a6969cea8792e2
describe
'126790' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOS' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
f8c3fb3f1a54630103ae23097bc8bf98
ff1c5788f957352717cfde7b34c6d30753099896
describe
'34387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOT' 'sip-files00182.pro'
abf2c5b3535b677d5b3afb4f7a737cc0
283dab4eff54fe94dcb0f13c92caa9c5900a10a7
describe
'38831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOU' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
33f8d45f70d8edf8ade97d43060bb4b8
56acccce85f9f34befb0e26fc42df6785ccacf77
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOV' 'sip-files00182.tif'
af05e2ac7507d919e7b785ccd28c6b8a
8517198247859f9f2a452f7e3ea5e4e4e14cf21a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOW' 'sip-files00182.txt'
61e7f8d26acefc8c776bf3e57e0a076b
7f2cc31d193b7acd35e55dd1cf89dc15318a7a5b
describe
'9111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOX' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0bb976a049dc76125026f11c70d996ba
ef2c05e018efd6edabf4981604bdf851848a2095
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOY' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
b9b7ed9c5c3c01b773a298e65cce22e4
f430e48ce1cd1f1a04143eb6876cd5df3b5fce34
describe
'133970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLOZ' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
95f4b8a9d2a2567b505b4d64a405423b
3838ca4a5f971361d2a6415c451b41f9d6fa84ab
'2011-12-30T10:25:47-05:00'
describe
'33406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPA' 'sip-files00183.pro'
2457d5ea95936d028457683649804ee5
7e55ad02664f0d69c487ca65e4c080c5613dde64
describe
'38821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPB' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
ace8943ec76ebc933e1988155635bcbd
dfbb8ecdad0c396e88b219d0a82f374bd4961bfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPC' 'sip-files00183.tif'
b971a0c558955bc077213c292b99fe2b
d66544fac9106dbf07876421b6e74d81d0c296bc
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPD' 'sip-files00183.txt'
05762c288d18cde05bb4eeda62a6bc7a
fd1580a1a9a296452aa55a91b1a45c67886813e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPE' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b827873d1ebf47f68f8d9fad4399c973
593a74be7b5d53243e280ba251c2690375b1fcce
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPF' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
d04d8996f25c966e3f9e3d54862f4c3f
fd78690ba2ada564e1a05d64a585d7b9454d72c8
describe
'137156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPG' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
3e30e56277c3259cc48f14df705fd66f
c60492592bc82af796ddeb19a33bcb6232743697
describe
'34881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPH' 'sip-files00184.pro'
7eca66aa1da59d5a36c3d89083768f1b
3a526abdfdd1b3eabcee9f88ad5cd3c8dc79d9c0
describe
'40924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPI' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
0e33ffdf7994f99e7d5aea7da90e5e9a
909f72275bf2af3797b6ae39cd21cb007c108945
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPJ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
49a68c1d5a00d682c74c4c5e646fbf43
15188d39a4c6b9792423101457bfcfb6e4471a26
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPK' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8d598230f0c7a7edb905880dcfc7bbe6
4ee4fab0eb92cf85a12e67b680ccba6c9d0995a3
describe
'9590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPL' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
608732a6df99179be79de613fe2d582c
06de3d2d0ad0379443429caf6e23b4f509b60765
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPM' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
825e5c3d54f0cee41ce2aa21afbc2149
06999eefa79551f16203ed21c280aa7cddbec983
describe
'126947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPN' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
f7b27b39698783ba6d8c5d6e6ba8e9b8
cd8ffc8683ce93cbec594c77d8d57542523b44be
describe
'31915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPO' 'sip-files00185.pro'
18dd51f996c04d6ba708aa8c7821f412
574a4125e4f408c154c2b205747003ea392624ec
describe
'38163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPP' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
17ba9da50b794eccbdc849080f3a7568
1acefa5f47798c463186199165cd1c97c193f1a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPQ' 'sip-files00185.tif'
105b284eb75ef3e48f389f61befed1e8
9a05a12d45e787d12e476a06029f999d3400ff71
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPR' 'sip-files00185.txt'
a3f694820e1ef235ce8a039445de097c
1c6f33bc8e116fa0ab649aa90efe779f66f8b592
describe
'9125' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
85b8d86bd04b83200d6d8a5df6eb582b
c38a1870ad0123744f9caaecc37c14127c8995d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPT' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
e89b24d9d16bee9c589a67cd3b39faf1
1fe21a48a1fe5c1b767d2724e844570caee968d1
describe
'130157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPU' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
46abdf7dc93d33dcdfa9c649e486d106
137e4118eced77bd0cd25b7257bd11c0a8e6e53d
describe
'32556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPV' 'sip-files00186.pro'
e0d77399d3eaa10c84cf1a1913576baa
073073c1a74c636370fa770aaa968bcd1ec49047
describe
'39135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPW' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
1458c1a1744e28cbb5699f420d5f4591
7c5114fb1285a1e26dbd56a24514877a884a7715
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPX' 'sip-files00186.tif'
65cc551b68d390aead6f3df4ceebe3ef
9a6d57966da979abbfd4a8f45ed8bfa4edf9c2ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPY' 'sip-files00186.txt'
335c6683e4f5abf562acf3a03ada7d7c
11840edd0885d2ddc756cbdcb3a74b0f52de2823
describe
'9142' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLPZ' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
47569a55a3886e2121a9b6f59e9fade8
cdd48278c26295eceacc43c47f6dd0dec73138d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQA' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
bb19d786f22807dbb9935d3f28c10f55
51dee2daa48397c120ce7709d647d387dc3d300b
describe
'135463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQB' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
6787d978783e83938b3fcc63840181fc
0b31f46d313391c12e2ca170000482055ee179fc
'2011-12-30T10:23:36-05:00'
describe
'34156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQC' 'sip-files00187.pro'
4ac50646ca334bb732e82a111c3cfb42
0321943be96ddc2d0787395bdc867f9c11ee9cf0
describe
'39774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQD' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
274294ac41f9cd319bd55fadd7a088f8
6d252591bc0083c33a122dab997927e47691fb6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQE' 'sip-files00187.tif'
56978f9be8d9d26be784f6fddbb6c769
407cd7c203cbcec0881eadb9dd8dcc5793623a07
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQF' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e6730ebb6f18840a2034eaf029586398
6fe14d305bd70760266684ad643af686cb3a393f
describe
'9397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQG' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
98019cfbd6fcc38f3ecbf99b6f6d69d2
70d6152153008cb46bb1602a80ef9354ad175678
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQH' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5d609149423f0df11578cecb188f01ef
410d8d7caee3a6cddbbb5482f0ead45a82e0f91c
describe
'124256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQI' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
6563d43f09093a7e14291b5f2e9755e5
d1c98989bdecdbe2aaf07442139fae8916654091
describe
'33709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQJ' 'sip-files00188.pro'
b36b1edaabd3fcb26c162a2ae09d00d6
28df73dd54532e260ca14a7c37bd5fa6b497110c
'2011-12-30T10:24:27-05:00'
describe
'37416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQK' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
c2cac5d33ebf711e66195b042edc654f
2bc2ae463a440e8602653279360d2b1d15c7e66f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQL' 'sip-files00188.tif'
eec8f5227bdd5afad0b8db7540fec90e
6574167a52b20dc7e94c61498ba87310d6d8a408
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQM' 'sip-files00188.txt'
a7dc00328aeb6085cbf9e89c3bb8278d
33198a8aa01b8fd5d2e6e066c5bc11c342b79a63
describe
'8956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQN' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
b4dd242483fc94388968294ce6584395
bc5279b793572a984d94cfa6dfdeaee5026c98cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQO' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
94e97c0df63f9bc8ff515affad7d48cd
a53ad50dc2aa9482e7c0930c21bfe2473d41250c
describe
'124622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQP' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
276bcb0b282bdb97b28e672813e86625
225c67a4eda0b37fc2158a1e396544a101d4145a
describe
'33393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQQ' 'sip-files00189.pro'
95dced28cbf329231408c3e2bd496dd0
0d47cc5ad0f180e8e3d9042d3554095c1a19a549
describe
'38672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQR' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
2a7469fbcec46145cc3b973baf7e3230
ab4f68c9f6e645295d77d599aada440de87ce455
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQS' 'sip-files00189.tif'
4646e423beacb4f8be6e5fbcf9c09a0a
18334bc6a079a02bd541a4bc80207f83c14ff905
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQT' 'sip-files00189.txt'
2593928f61a735d77b6dc2139bcb7a4a
91594a89282ed3e79f24686f41429bf29d28e09a
describe
'9207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQU' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
955e97df40a67085148094c423e708b6
a681ba7be909c28cf31dddebe1c80497e42e29eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQV' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
18b88844ad9eb9032431f851129dd4ee
3b356bd13a4c67e191ec4fd239b41030f6802591
describe
'125373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQW' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
3400c262e9c3178171490a2022db38c6
eb75e321ae833db4422a1ec2c86f5a97c7e3967e
describe
'32634' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQX' 'sip-files00190.pro'
78a904cb2b7e3e957b72f1a3013133d0
dc0cf6039c826d34ae3d0df1a2cd2e0e36635c5c
describe
'38290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQY' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
292298c2fae678d0a506904aeaca4cd2
7163193df262b218f044e18e7f1aa50a6b7f0e55
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLQZ' 'sip-files00190.tif'
7142a3b429ca2ff9adf0bf9f4ce03fa2
6b133f49f7f874083268c233f52ce13f8f54dd51
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRA' 'sip-files00190.txt'
42ddf7bf75be223944813e3ef4e2f229
a658416a4c6e2ec32b88a032cfc9d531e6622315
describe
'9012' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRB' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
095599d8681a45f9f63926c218c2279c
42eb6ad0d19ea31abafb85dd4179f7e1feb79ec5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRC' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
fa887863cc6a3ca0c4a5a22d6a636145
e7d5e71019e3dc790a630ac958a4dd23c414082e
describe
'130056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRD' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
4009fe65d13c91df5903807c229257be
4e98db2afbb1fbd96de990e4bd5b1c6073b7ae61
describe
'33378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRE' 'sip-files00191.pro'
0c823494659f5f3da125a4f9589222cb
95c3432e82ef99ecc9f675ec7e95922c758eba4b
describe
'38439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRF' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
a9eb30cfb20f5047b21fe0d1e5e83496
964231909a4ea7ef6e87e370052405eb1c40d975
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRG' 'sip-files00191.tif'
57063bb119f786914ef68eb488b4d6cc
0df107d97da594f4ced77d375ee4ff17c07dea83
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRH' 'sip-files00191.txt'
8a18d63211b5727c949b3ab4a9bba3ae
f07f63d4d61834f7a261c0f58c069477b026d1cf
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRI' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
87e0afee5ccba67306d4ee7c22c3ed77
99950587e3eae7a82797f0384ae9a2a032229129
describe
'287156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRJ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
9d2756fe68fc21ea0cb52ddab29265a4
3bb3dfd8a4030c849b9ee5dabb00cb8b9018b38b
describe
'130993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRK' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
8d4f1d7c87a8465a5dec4f010bcdfbb0
2dba06d711ba7b8dc25e100c1f335ad3a9a13dcd
describe
'34199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRL' 'sip-files00192.pro'
69dd2be9575e73950468826b5892dfb2
32dff048a806ba760e4a44ce65fcbfe956c8fdfe
describe
'40602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRM' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ebd8c8e604b248d6c58272ec8b6562fd
f26e6f52874d7a27749eda3dad7d5fd8d708a4f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRN' 'sip-files00192.tif'
c4f569e29d46fda88580322cfc9729d7
fe799a57cf0088cd6e7adab89f7764c4f11d6df2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRO' 'sip-files00192.txt'
8f4fe90936dea9c70dc5a8db3025497e
ba4ee9a3bb8a35b15f7cd2b505b40e0788701422
describe
'9429' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRP' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
f4ad3c117cdc6774c3d417f4de92b656
1e3e08617e41854eab1171619273922f42135f45
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRQ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
670469822d066b37c3d3395a3d10ab3c
64827a4d7c940021f83ef652547ffec4cff71081
describe
'122746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRR' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
33ac31ca39412158b2d6fa518b8edf88
b2d758eaa38ae7c4430940706857df30a34a6aae
describe
'32030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRS' 'sip-files00193.pro'
4637f9250c6d4b0e9693ec940a0777c3
374e4eaa994be2ebe8eb5aa4110d179f6fa21272
describe
'37668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRT' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
a4bcf3a492781563db43be471761a548
48abed79f56306bbf45b22adeb52a547ecc16bf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRU' 'sip-files00193.tif'
efb18a93363d5f8940a93e24b3d1c5ab
7656a0bf0d9d1ed36245315f49d2f86fc5968904
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRV' 'sip-files00193.txt'
08b773dd65328fa70dc0eab42de12364
27691c182d79541155b3c2df4bb14608befdb5a2
describe
'9251' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRW' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
59dcea033e8b31655ba4b4bda2af42ce
e3f6ff371a02d8213ecfcf3753df7f84989967cf
describe
'286999' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRX' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
3f254b54b860f7b06ef9aa6cbc04ae70
8797f13764abf52205c0a8ea021665085170c5e8
describe
'124648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRY' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
691fe6a746f4c5b12ab191afeca998d4
467a24f30262021092672aaa66c1bfcf927eda9f
describe
'32033' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLRZ' 'sip-files00194.pro'
d0cea578f09226852536a5689ad64235
56880c55fea7711221f7c99af8ce1da9b8cef202
describe
'38777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSA' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
ecb290f7b0277aec528d4bb6a4f9b91a
cad0b44def60df0f7bc15703b63ad1265cc8676d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSB' 'sip-files00194.tif'
4e775e34f14cb7689b1263ea25acf652
4900308daa3f4dc9c867c19b91ae171b20c866f6
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSC' 'sip-files00194.txt'
ce54253de999e93374a340360d1aaabd
21748253ad9323a90bdba200f0fc72302bf64bb0
describe
'9039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSD' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
a2f0146553058bcce3a3ea37fe32c341
249a1651fce160a7a53feb0393cd148ee0364aa8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSE' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
8b6b9ff344fa911abb154f705f88bc2f
3af6155f0d9e085a1c35704fa002f0f4ea63865f
describe
'109562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSF' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
2f02d8edf3d6f5cc167f675788f5aadd
73de055400c5baed07d08d41a87fed74a6ff7f60
describe
'22802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSG' 'sip-files00195.pro'
8ea661a472dc6d9e39acdcbe645ab7b3
17600a22f59e05719b62b2ca30bb1a5b95768661
describe
'30938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSH' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
72ada3dc0cfc5fb96d31559950c9620c
ce7766fb94e96750342241d3b7824096bf23a662
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSI' 'sip-files00195.tif'
5d970f71ade4a3d617fd3c02fa0a0397
2a06c650b46ead2ab688a7c8a909c61a8688692f
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSJ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
ab11157a525a1e729ab841fb057d8786
8d90f4e04d1e3fb9eea78c9c0c7284a3ec22ce0b
describe
'8055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSK' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
09c68ddba9cc64ff1a614f64f966658f
8e1fc4d068b8636df2b87fa9eace07cbdaee05c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSL' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
fb2d0eade0cb078211500fe32ed0bf0f
20e7353e9c97ae85c6900cade9feb42ad688a527
describe
'138169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSM' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
b43e8002b74b1f9612b29c268ca0745d
426224f116868570f26a81426a320852278ad7b2
describe
'35295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSN' 'sip-files00196.pro'
8eefe77c69ef0f104e8cddab5009a889
8054d933f63731ded540577aad477a8ec70c15bd
describe
'40797' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSO' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
d4402802c1fb1de034dd71772ae3bb9f
288cce57f4613bec122d8c6b96ce2d125fbbd345
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSP' 'sip-files00196.tif'
6385b398482a4b74c02d7d842b7d3a28
56637b342718de431459129c59b87728823b311b
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSQ' 'sip-files00196.txt'
7800b2a2cc66e9cda3623babd1d35b25
b7e9ef7c24f8d12e0411ced89e99ae8fdfb5ee24
describe
'9496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSR' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
65f0fa06dce7f5a3cd5ad8c5d12023ca
3d53d2a68396c930dc4394d404f5f87ab6e3fb7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSS' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
cec49a5f8dc950efd88adcfa11471d31
2370b2e9058cdd9645246d99b8a82a53a1eacfdc
describe
'140605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLST' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
1ce0e14bc885e94c87035abecc5ea4ab
bdd0e7a72eadb0eff4acb0f6139aca823727a816
describe
'36948' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSU' 'sip-files00197.pro'
7c866fe5bc5564a3aee368d3a9e927e9
4651ce7dce7d03d4478a313b1a85885ba7a862be
describe
'41917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSV' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
00f81030c7b9297db5d49e3f068a3fa5
1ce5543405c7cf02eb3c07bfc4506d9fb62fba38
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSW' 'sip-files00197.tif'
fb417827ce555e7d8800b9dcb4f9d92e
86371db5d8236eed6cb837919460490a0730ee50
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSX' 'sip-files00197.txt'
102455c67e94b0dcfd1dde31c886f45a
946c9e3390140cbefe2c7d4c8648b0bcdf3567e3
describe
'9533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSY' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
7e2ec27a4fa57f175971ba6676a927e2
5cdce3e6e9e2bf4737df4d87dff3cd79abd69d43
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLSZ' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
ad8068fedbfd02e89288a7da72f5512e
9caa764050da3e78562b588691c0400b1e71909e
describe
'137520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTA' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
b7f9bc01102df34db038f9c881c83f7f
ee629ea5ca6177aa66fe59826972698e9cb3a73e
describe
'35893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTB' 'sip-files00198.pro'
4568e47b69ee929d0046bfac65c62823
8055f5712695e2a34cffc0d61dfa83e3104d1495
describe
'41249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTC' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
1606b9d3e4894b8618815111174cccce
eb13fed731a6d1a84458c73a97fe84ead503c58e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTD' 'sip-files00198.tif'
c758a55c95fe9edea69cef14da74bb96
9add7a11df6965babde7ffddb346872afa1b99a2
'2011-12-30T10:24:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTE' 'sip-files00198.txt'
d2723c64921bcd0cd26c961ef511a95f
96871c9c3529c634e64fd6d5653429d319372c9c
describe
'9615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTF' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
dac58a1cef8da537165cfa1ef4f3bf37
b641236c60024dc5d8d589c9a9685a77768fca42
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTG' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
6ff62809f4df7bfe063f4de3b7e56f74
0e6db6b58b227694130fccf83c96bf6a5d3ebd7a
describe
'133196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTH' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
5620a10cd047c414cbe067a0390abd07
6c193f6c17da2e0dd6df57fd76836d1a1bc0c542
describe
'36284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTI' 'sip-files00199.pro'
9eb4ea215f81599db1f175800327c720
ef69e9c84ea4e6f082ad2cb5498aa306066307a8
describe
'42354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTJ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
013489be56a39db571714428bec3092e
b634d24a823e30f0caa00048779f6c6d8a155ef2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTK' 'sip-files00199.tif'
fceb5e76b325de2a8c0e532d473fd9e6
b0fb6f62bb43dc0a3f5c33da0127038627952a53
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTL' 'sip-files00199.txt'
20508eee6799fabcc7d39218f510035e
5deec9efdfa592515c42811e79a1a5c17d32f700
describe
'9644' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTM' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
b29af743ffb619e11804396674d736b6
98eb69500ba96920778890275f9520ef26f816e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTN' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
10584570a90cdea1385506ea331957e6
6c87bdd9c71a6e43125267dc48a91405e06563d9
describe
'137669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTO' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
c8be693b6a904c2224d10ea1e810190d
776037ba206bcd85ae0a57f54035753e1209e421
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTP' 'sip-files00200.pro'
c4e35264f045bea1e40540ba7915a5bd
e224d5122f79dc648e5e04e62d9aa9ff911df96c
describe
'41720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTQ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
a775ee6170d9d75ede85eadedcd48145
5d1d3d86e5afb39e65fca3519b8b3040f9a2ecd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTR' 'sip-files00200.tif'
7432f7a8801a2ff95779684508b58c44
351f0e1072d7b71e95383b1235b1dd771aa0ae91
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTS' 'sip-files00200.txt'
b474afa7c455a0fa162216b230fe574f
4fc54c70a109d0a869b359fd27f71e040e5a2a22
describe
'9405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTT' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
2c18178e303c5a0b245ce9a40fbbf8a9
80255873f2d9d88e00ded60c3c631f32223ae494
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTU' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
1c170358dc10fdf0e1d7b23473bdad25
77a9ea2e38d712f56f398939cb56521d47128bf1
describe
'133981' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTV' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
9120f1d53555578de04c949057966c87
3e791a97c04797d07d501792bca016e08cb8f4bc
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTW' 'sip-files00201.pro'
6282329634eea23cb87e5dcb6c719ae7
ad479702d1049abb3029a7fa112dceaf8d6a770f
describe
'40276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
02083401df3c9c93775d3e1de32468d1
48fc43cd0165b0180d11164fe1e342a655c19d83
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTY' 'sip-files00201.tif'
4c1b1456b3242846e0d0050d5badf21c
e5d1d0070cffad6f5223b4d7377c09d8c7f2fe98
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLTZ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
3767ee7b0a4208023b1204e756b817d2
1553c817ccb2e58fa789f555f51748a351d8f399
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUA' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
e9cbb691aad8829595e7d45b4f991d8e
0e38e174a781e5482e10f37912f3cd2eded128b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUB' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
9f988eacc3cde9d5787b8da4153ea858
9054866b3ed391e06a9aaf14bb6966dfc84b96fa
describe
'145343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUC' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
49446bf5712fbe38a7f85fb11e4b21d7
4753800c900934507517f71aed5034197c67572f
describe
'36590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUD' 'sip-files00202.pro'
dbc573e571579d1c3b6f2a91c244440c
c7d1275e4424815fe4be548f84ddb86e574b7448
describe
'43115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUE' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
a7716f0a0130eb0b3fe209f8a9c8d227
706a74c8bd5b6375f4942877a5aaec16107811bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUF' 'sip-files00202.tif'
5188a6ace0ffc5f1e86000abdfa09913
aaa403a373701fa0c41f73014787f698586e6440
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUG' 'sip-files00202.txt'
7bc99079c8c81b1db7d590bc8fee5eff
2f02b2ce9233314ee7ef0147dd1f74b3808584cd
describe
'9394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUH' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
6a8b7fba3074a22b6011938c627ca1b9
e79cce8d31effff2033364c5abcfc22b6576ee88
describe
'287117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUI' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c6b23e7f5ba5584879e23e9f2d47a12f
dcccf441728a5d8d398f9c045c912ca543c07f94
describe
'127916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUJ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
3de6a5dc02907bf1a3d361171efc0695
2578262425dbd39b03a9ef637c61b9477ef9f2ba
describe
'31593' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUK' 'sip-files00203.pro'
52fb762f4f34c012d352ae3d27b072f3
2e657ae9ba15833bfe4c5ee90b83a2ba7d67a874
describe
'37184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUL' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
222a3c65c92b19be632e8d30d29b367c
1f3ee2015a0d4d8e7bbe6fc0d562c332a1e0a7e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUM' 'sip-files00203.tif'
8bb405c714c89f8cbc4037e172f3ac91
c90f87bcd78bfc0d835cea9ec02952bc740b4eea
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUN' 'sip-files00203.txt'
d690a019d6e7a4c1878c52e8ae97a36d
1dbb5ecf3a5a0dd79f5c640268768ad859f4a395
describe
'9109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUO' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
992d2070630df74c8f5753b8286199a2
40ec39802c3ece3d77e6e7491350306babbce58c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUP' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
08161f3cddbf20c512f006c2577140cb
a79eb51f1851258bef49b67231bc1e2adfa4374f
describe
'133401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUQ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
819279fd178169b0c4fe0295bc8f312c
57f9e7b36cbd1d7f223b89113c9463939f8dbcfa
describe
'34613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUR' 'sip-files00204.pro'
7c38073984bc8908b1a13463313b7eb5
ebb067c6b6b35d1bce08c951769c889386039232
describe
'41713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUS' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
1d5691b8e33438b4296693024011c3f7
54f234a5efa5d9a1bfc16664fdefc8cc1cd35158
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUT' 'sip-files00204.tif'
8b966b02c8b4444b0a7a01f659a694d0
fba95cbb4d95de81a5871fcf503b0a473576d507
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUU' 'sip-files00204.txt'
182d416095e70c8c31a95c73e8940780
df747e64e28861b805923aa8589764abc6bf2d17
describe
'9573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUV' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
e711f48827d408031d1f49cb6c1e6bd4
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describe
'287150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUW' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
35ef9db8a985ff7ba79be95ddd67acd3
ef20aba3d487e55c3dbf25baa83882d6d2f4075a
describe
'126922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUX' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
e07fe19daccd7a611782a4d0096ff2ff
7403cb005f27c6b3c854b081a27d3227b713f599
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUY' 'sip-files00205.pro'
2238db026696b18ecbf88e0b2a67405b
ca83a4373d7009bf0d7512ed1f21ff46249fda47
describe
'39917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLUZ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
cdc42fc84ebc1ed1326b4803687d3f75
c826bdbf89eb2f47250941bd57e15a874e72fc7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVA' 'sip-files00205.tif'
bd7d42ea2ace84c7d8027a31237e6a6b
77adb86d9642db71793a4537ff4ab91f0ef5b1fe
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVB' 'sip-files00205.txt'
11f4f7bae7ffb4c578ec242893fd9208
c44abb25c20bd49ab48259bb3e2c6451de7a2196
describe
'9064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVC' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
7f60026687b55770a95f60e1812b383f
effa6ceae94067a7e4c4f9c157a063e0e4568db9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVD' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
67662c4005415f65700bb4fe21bfaa73
06c3cddd1757174ff030f99d386d6bb5a99ed59f
describe
'119486' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVE' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
f8e74cb9e2d6b9f450c07e2890e4d649
b759f069eaed354db6544890e67b0c611a430196
describe
'32545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVF' 'sip-files00206.pro'
04043e6b875d6edcb73de7b01d14353c
948591a1250c96dccc358e4c5ec4041d2e7e9157
describe
'36964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVG' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
b11dc37894b78b3ee3642ec670eb9889
45e8a9ca18339edcc056bab920e412dae2387415
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVH' 'sip-files00206.tif'
fe6aa386d6ed941152eae0c307f840d4
879b5ecb3e04999c8928b9f85c22d88837f8df94
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVI' 'sip-files00206.txt'
835b9bb428cb44258986607f9c334fc2
bf35bf166fb72847818bc75f7e9950b753bda159
describe
'8895' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVJ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
9631c57fe35fde447bd6762220fa98b5
c650681e7a597b2732a39908b8921113307b25a5
describe
'287206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVK' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
adedd41a2cf0c37b39c04028c74814c5
510538f71086fc40c9f54729de69006198f7fd0f
describe
'113731' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVL' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
c6cf2d0e35c24ddd4d8b3ea15977f1f1
b953e0945bb01be1bb25a6b0df752f72f5a43a57
describe
'28829' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVM' 'sip-files00207.pro'
10707ed813415549a0406d8a31669c3c
5dd938eeae4332bd76b6a9fb6eaa1c0bad559854
describe
'33983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVN' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
26122ffa1455d0ad57cd302e64698473
532fe769019231f1c43b0f4e4025c8d10b39f0b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
888bfe5fb805fd2d1fe72bf5bcf6adc6
3bc591d8bb926102afef9485623a1899173971fd
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVP' 'sip-files00207.txt'
99a269ec9db4c061c428946f6bec299e
52d43d624af679be445e7b5d2decb1aecc6e2c1b
describe
'8475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVQ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
be55b457cb3c6ea3128e24505cd8be0a
1b0a35e090c4d232a9f46239a8b2f2479620c3c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVR' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
f0ee35ba7bea301e4457a998edbefb01
ae742f4cd8be7111e424507c21b5cf4f6edf16d0
describe
'135548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVS' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
4ad7f5c5f45870d3bcad92a52aecc2f6
0aa3f73985052eddc554b01734b5edc4c1a65afd
describe
'36982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVT' 'sip-files00208.pro'
418030c11a8029dccd7cce7837733107
f6ce6d78dd1fe891fe9971a7adec225eae517d71
describe
'41390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVU' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
82ad9a5f32a0359952b4d24cdf1bca74
8bd5c3f6d1c7175fdc975912d8f890f543f12b73
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVV' 'sip-files00208.tif'
53c11be18e3d53d3c99d76deee6890c9
9a177fff89561c91b770103707e6311a1d601072
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
228b393c65d533e93a26c9d8ad916c5a
bfe6078886540a869e4abc70ffbea7480111c6f5
describe
'9053' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVX' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
952cee05341c085262e6d4d4732962b4
678c9670853b00c91ed131c4a2469b1b94a1f34e
describe
'287152' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVY' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
bceda04d816fe44902d304f839f16c88
ed2e980d62f0ee1f74a7a3f13c0311ce3d5e70a8
describe
'141208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLVZ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
d55c3c3fe7659e858daf1b078af713e0
4bf530386d74a5b6fbd079e45cc764547dc768e0
describe
'37279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWA' 'sip-files00209.pro'
092099ea24601db3be51a8e61bb27aa9
0d72f4c855f62b17f5e543500724e477cbbfb234
describe
'42048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWB' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
c760564a8c7de311d685717d279f8d41
468c2cf2174fcef7853b3c5f9fc771e4047d538d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWC' 'sip-files00209.tif'
e31407e7017b89272c4ffaa740eda8cc
f09fb892d0aad290ecf271e8bb93d53549ab7b0b
'2011-12-30T10:25:59-05:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWD' 'sip-files00209.txt'
ce74ef726209aaa0f70dfa7ce8abbe14
366def5b9d7962d93c5a1af08852cc91cb034b60
describe
'9718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWE' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
71fcb521fca966468c9c4f45c081cf35
b403b67595e21c931b2599dc753cc7b4fe5169a6
describe
'287166' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWF' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
6917762a0164929756ad2e39bf15cda6
4b279fe13bd4235581a5df271b134d25866f4208
describe
'123849' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWG' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
742f7451ded5fec6a4740e436e11f586
17d79f970a654c66de31da1a6eb11843df1744b0
describe
'31529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWH' 'sip-files00210.pro'
c1165de595beb632a0cc1a61f6f37e1b
37c13d78332d897c6d0b9f0e953d83e56881d087
describe
'36983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWI' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
1fb291b1cf697df897db5b0b1c29dd2c
ee2c97e6948d025f1075d9d7b865023e6e68ca1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWJ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
7ff51ec065e6f435858ceb67c2e064d5
d8821e8dbf11dac2ae1ee1c7ed70e7acb1ee8649
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWK' 'sip-files00210.txt'
80637c109eb6440fff8c733120a43573
00586e95fa9fed26ffa0df8c3320af732a95d7f0
describe
'9049' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWL' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
f2793a72d160bb3d0f71670209a52cf9
20e4afe33f2986a97eee64761915c636fb374eb9
describe
'287158' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWM' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
257587c9ed45b35658b14e69b22caf95
282ed4fb513452b2e7155dd8375cdabca8a86bed
describe
'139441' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWN' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
0cdb430ab5d6466a659841fc07618fca
7eee1738f0b2ac17fa158843c540696bbfd4c69b
describe
'35617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
57388134ead038716870d662a71999a9
a504a28678757073c4c420a38b5cdf6accf3498f
describe
'41063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
40ef9d5e440641d340b372652b40fc7a
519a331a6fecc2dafc63d5fde674aca2621573d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWQ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
d37d69a502f48d2d30fe5f109bc6bf9f
e347a0875c28259358a360f9480ea8cb4277f28b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWR' 'sip-files00211.txt'
acf7ba15415742d4af42eb393010f540
3bea93e01a2bd13f2793ffd56854714616ee535e
describe
'9545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
f76cdd06ebfb17f1a9b68810f40ac798
d26a7f22b14642eda9697fd46da524839724b725
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
fceea4ff73c33ade427b305955eb0f36
a72e901f27b2dd41296ed5625bd21d7d52c35ace
describe
'131001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
5a6c66ee4e83a6481f6ed3f9cd984b91
fbed5ee923e2e05e411062d80e91c2477463a1a3
describe
'33675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWV' 'sip-files00212.pro'
4b73d6d3fafc19245d1307751fedc41c
9395a4641c57715a50c29e03f151114a6cd0c146
describe
'39661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWW' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
ba23036dfd1443c0411c5f754a75bea2
4a638d143f2daa69eee9200b53e4d9138e7e3944
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWX' 'sip-files00212.tif'
ca1abd9a6df766c7b09563ab731e4841
7338088809fea2655756f72c6bc7ed11cdb049ca
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWY' 'sip-files00212.txt'
b7dcd75b2dbdeb781e67423585343dee
82d72016b5a100e9892af4973c6aef491b9c2f58
describe
'8990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLWZ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
83008bdf136e3ea2cb37a5fd4c9540d7
6f71c0dc5d647c5b544a301057c5793967179525
describe
'287089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
ccb9402364e3fb1ba2acdc2e72a30677
5c6ac07577d65f3e423ef0f0fa4d6b4706e2822c
describe
'126753' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXB' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
752fdb10da84a80a5a4a302bc364bcd5
04fcd59f1f6c1c873de958e8fed0014e211a0883
describe
'31999' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
ba86b4209cfceee47a8bb1097bf0925f
6ab26c8a4e6b448c89d254035b110bd05409f886
describe
'37393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXD' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
737025015ba07dd56b9ca49335655750
5bfff2813831fe448729765f18db9a737ff2e79f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXE' 'sip-files00213.tif'
5c572338d73efc3552db5bfb8b9e56fe
0d082a7dedc71422de8ee97b29f77fe98c9a939c
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
d7d38600cf3efcc4d0c960a3e3600c54
03eeecfed658f0e65d78497fdc31a47a0622a06d
describe
'8929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
4d05f471e42a52f387ea9f7e50496af5
4b9c3e6cf7155b47340543e6000fd8c6a642a72f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
80a9a4d3476d9371967ccdb71457ea8b
459c44fad84357da586b48c0972a7889a4c3bde6
describe
'131228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
3aa6996d12553a706576a21ff9c0c02e
63db078f7e9f22a7743514efd0e04f2a31750973
describe
'34412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXJ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
56d08baa533ef363aea2eb88b546e8b1
14c7f718df0aba4f8c41f25972ff432c90247d5f
describe
'39902' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXK' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
18ac1a16473761f5ecd72b24d14160e0
c074167c903dab410dfc21f01b746ba9b8c7a9b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXL' 'sip-files00214.tif'
53d52df2fd587794db80b26310004b33
f6fd1fce96f22efbad1b3bbf9d4ae7c52b38c162
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
7f39f8c70510c8222ee0cc1e774646d9
803f25bd8d22bffecaa9687443eb118daa2d5d7e
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
0f538f68074e77f3aea9b1d4a83c2a6a
9a75f37f2ac00e14cc57f515ea7ea17ffd837b75
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
641908e60cdd2c8b8167fde5a5032c6a
3e9184288e6859112b0a7c52d06bc17499ab017e
describe
'79963' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXP' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
0a9f955d4f024bcc12a6ab42bfd05eef
ccfc85ef1ec4445d1bdff2d14d5488ad6d0e4683
describe
'16497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXQ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
99e9a0d3e1b73094e1f6acabf146e6bd
b44f770c83e2afd7d3d54e2fa6fa300ae2ecbe0a
describe
'21728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXR' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
ae956e2e6092cbc85344a7ae771159ef
eb536bd2a43305aaa91666bcf8b906df671db33f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXS' 'sip-files00215.tif'
f7c3453f2f843d4a24ec8618e1bc95aa
3072a3f6b8ff18ebde7e7df8f0b6c9c9f70e684a
describe
'683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
a735df0a3ae4ba7c95cd6e4359dee07c
ce701eaa4d1b15c083b8f50384b01803d9346cd2
describe
'5266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXU' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
5f34ed0610e80b31afa5cf69d4dbcf5f
419e7cf3607982eb046785dabaf88ca75efcf674
describe
'287269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXV' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
833076746849fb0d29b4b4f77896b2ce
3a3e4ebc2e8828daced7cefefbd3c24555d6c2f4
describe
'102821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXW' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
102036b3366f6f2af865bc5545ebaca4
c321d4630e3201a979009e18756dfd0f315d8c5d
describe
'22115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
a0589fa973d9aa5157781c067fb48f0c
2a46f1d28d1235963ba6e9184702cb1988fd28d8
describe
'30249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
aeb98764d356e81b0a1df057d4ad7499
8ac4affd63dd19b8dba737e2550cd76e78302091
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLXZ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
aebed6e7c84ab0c818a2967c2205835e
99916989bd968884f4dbe8e096399e2fffe415b4
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYA' 'sip-files00216.txt'
8cbc9d7e3d09718ec3c2aae6a5bed601
aef24e41d59ef1e6d5f1422e5ee0bd46d160691c
describe
'7355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYB' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
373eb44c488fc16296af4b45ea1dee4d
3db3dff65a0ef992475e075c12c76a7388e6231c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYC' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
b3ac20869fd417dd1c0cff67fe495f51
383a9dbc1c8470a727b7f5a3f2413a45cd6ead77
describe
'133504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYD' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
d91d092ffcf45518b02a3740a20e74b9
4df1822f12b671f4ea5ce28b79f284d6a887072c
describe
'34760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYE' 'sip-files00217.pro'
0c80f15be2c4102b1c17bbea52b3a941
c1eec9eea85795a590044eb61caecc3de6271a52
describe
'39165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYF' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
6b141c35720cd67c936903354c75091d
39971f112622aa6997b7481a4a80b5de67caa928
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
006262d8b307ef7817c4f5d8313946e7
89ce4a3afdcbef78a68075e30dd16f6243770f10
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYH' 'sip-files00217.txt'
c7f12554b6316b2bf127b4536fba5001
d7452cb89e222ebd513bff8388fcaff0f40e815d
describe
'9321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYI' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
239d0dd34229e1c86b96c0ac45e9e8b9
b234d674a4de059bb34ea7b58debc1ce038dcfdf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
1cdb37ddfdab41ce4702826af268bd40
7ca7d54aa0be32673fc5726f0d0788986c59f80e
describe
'116125' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYK' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
87cb39b5b7bc9d6dc682bddd842d089f
2c89b8e3ccf6fa437a7b6bd1844b894af31f7579
describe
'29008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYL' 'sip-files00218.pro'
6ba1c3820d4f781e0461ea29cad49e6b
6123839d53a8beebf621b692317b3a1114371a24
describe
'34124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYM' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
05aa6305ee7da58d27fd2d12d49596af
a2b63d0eb01844fcaaa0f500ae6871817ca69bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYN' 'sip-files00218.tif'
d45b0ee7ff595f262b19cf2f2b83eb46
67e70df63edc294bdbfd9a97afd1903402f357e5
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYO' 'sip-files00218.txt'
96c69e7fb0b39e8e759df469068a6284
c7c597a7960ed667e9e27695fd67dbc0024cedb9
describe
'8348' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYP' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
1616723c08d482ac64c68001d5461154
05ce932a993c484e7e3ab8354ab205f1a2f46798
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYQ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
20b3f131351c721b164562e27b578df7
d67118fe5be36e85c7edc3232ed013ac012bb8de
describe
'121760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYR' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
4bc4a83184c0593b453e43bd802eb8d3
8a78c01988ef084a1c539a5b385d72d864a1e493
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYS' 'sip-files00219.pro'
399ceb8b86f3f066114b7a545d72c202
14009846b69a29fc94d1123e8b5ee418afffe122
describe
'36580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
c524aa6d74b887d5c402cd2adc0abece
801a9ecbcfa9e94294dc460d75eaadbb24dd9736
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYU' 'sip-files00219.tif'
72ef6ffb4463425764a6887c836706b4
7ca23211bdff893b59d85e110eea3790f584f4f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYV' 'sip-files00219.txt'
781f48a1d91f08c4d0507af59a2c29dc
706d97fff3b1ec121265c8cd07b13d301ad4181d
describe
'8949' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYW' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
f4bd6f57397b000d7f277147ca9bcc2c
03a9a6f737a071c6a392bddacb77487d9f99a687
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYX' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
cf237344490c0dd9878f1f743404b19b
04109a2cc3739e4106b7f76c31558e009b9dce33
describe
'131865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYY' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
a92825884fbe1eb1fb48bf2b0b8f2229
13ef68e0718dfe09916fdea0e1e68b605249d668
describe
'33771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLYZ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
9e754104c837ae746811157238e093d5
0ae5faa61db07e7b19731b3c08e32c5b0ac07c7e
describe
'39695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
5454a583f4900376e760bd272ac0be00
f681f4ded79c7fb88a365ac284644aa10ade76aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
5183cd2f3c73d52badafde678787ef97
6ebd71b14c77a1f539f4b0375fd2e8fda8c13d9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZC' 'sip-files00220.txt'
87f2d8cb8a1df90295783bbedc292db0
bea7b501c00f74d32036f9a65de392afb40a3e67
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZD' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
bd0fa4bb2ee117ba4b1b4e5df8e1baff
9553e7387ad4f1ee34e5598be5aa92f700046eab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZE' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
86ee622baddf05a287923357989dbb2b
593e56059a88ea398e7c4b9c32665c40b9604280
describe
'122473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZF' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
01556c6eaa22e63732b6a9d702460250
8e16a39761e9aeff053cae403f36058b6da93ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZG' 'sip-files00221.pro'
49979d66c5258df125cd990aadf6d9c2
552466478697d3effe25a58cea83710c18eafd42
describe
'37509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZH' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
f7ba87ffa416802e002589bc026d292c
2a110e2951fe2708bfb7847ad505931b786c80ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZI' 'sip-files00221.tif'
f37c9045d85a6b3ad1163bb0bd13402b
0678a8973bcf14517af431bcc236bd679503a67c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZJ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
2eaef35b8ef8bccb0904bc9847a436d8
d6b8e3757b6bc0448b006398be419f9aa212a84a
describe
'9332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZK' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
d2c19194f883454bc7a7c1131defc7b2
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZL' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
cccdc961c8e4891e4f2d582022bbefc4
ac6f8fde4272b408c6602e341f56d3295e3dcb18
describe
'125122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZM' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
a007639a62465a8a32fbf5bf12a9890e
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describe
'32920' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZN' 'sip-files00222.pro'
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describe
'38262' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZO' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
2904cd47c7fd36ad406454ff74bdadc4
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZP' 'sip-files00222.tif'
39d2f86adb8de72f2b5f4455d68055df
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describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZQ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
07f292afb772516401dccac394a2ccd9
de31b49fc15f36dc1c30d3af3ffacfe5c6a8781d
describe
'9033' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZR' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
87f7a3ec944eb916e1cb7571dcdbba00
5283611158f2f0b18b3d99aebfe5f390c8fa15b9
describe
'287235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZS' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
aecfe6f4be7d990b472915fcc8fd0de7
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describe
'136011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZT' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
a78d924b4b7d75b7e377bdc1f6bdfa29
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describe
'35979' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZU' 'sip-files00223.pro'
54dc0eb9c42d4315d5d3a1c23b4c5d7c
5eb53e34aca71560086578b0d6e6cebaa901e0d9
describe
'41563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
b8d6415cb15c5d99aa199fe531b6eb09
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
ad6e201c270351ee4f2c0ca8e62a65cc
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZX' 'sip-files00223.txt'
3c837c10062086e6bd3202bdbb3b5aef
7840b91f6d382be5346580764ae03967c7cfb948
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZY' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
a4d0db40677fc3bcb2302c5c67976c60
ccbcc5f2e3939c508c204df391497ca867d36dcb
describe
'287107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACLZZ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
73bb3e74aa29e8035d1932893713053c
91ed0a0a7ccf01455545a8dda1582b6dbcbd1406
describe
'136306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAA' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
d267671853987e552243f0b4ef20d473
c0619132e7aab8e8688708afa8065d1388f04886
describe
'36004' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAB' 'sip-files00224.pro'
5d46a35ed5f01ae9423d87759985c0a8
0251133354c5d006a7d901c3903acf95bb604338
describe
'40857' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAC' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
6d6aa1c886000dc94249989d0f9af949
671054018fb7c893a92708150d8f7e06f39d985b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAD' 'sip-files00224.tif'
d5ccad7f0e93ebc336cb4603794b984b
c396cb6ce197e5cfc00b0cc40693ff2b20169a3b
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAE' 'sip-files00224.txt'
01d59c497aa43575cde07c31c0ad5259
c2d9154d4b04d58eda63d607919bdd2052712529
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAF' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
8f82936040dbe40d271c1326dad355f5
f4068c952ae6ed63fd089104aa6e0520628b3e57
describe
'287127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAG' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
51edd314f4a667c5425e84d54c34b1cc
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describe
'137036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAH' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
cf4d774881b4523bdab407bb21931b2f
314069b3ec673613623a3f0fe79633b2ef15cf6c
describe
'36292' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAI' 'sip-files00225.pro'
972a109185113539e9df00d610d33fd8
8e5f6d91b72ee181f12edcabe688aada031ec6e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAJ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
74c6696b859ca1d3ce5989547594a2ce
af9ee78577ebcdd5d51ddbb184b68212645b7db7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAK' 'sip-files00225.tif'
e6264474ec194da8f2c46d7feff892a5
6e46c7a485840d9fe27af322ddd25c305f6daeb7
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAL' 'sip-files00225.txt'
92a479994bdcb86f8b2849568f7a3fdf
186d4689e1a446468f1ac43dc15501deb3298e4e
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAM' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
440e0e9a7926608490af0a57467fe981
6d2d193c3384406f49086015879f568d666543cc
describe
'287256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAN' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
b4e75b8df1cc78934ce5c1ed671a2e6f
a977b720fb9a24addb605dd72019eacaacd525b1
describe
'126367' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAO' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
662e0da57b854df8d9359b57f1bb3ebe
5b46eac12d419dfc1fe672a8825dba5bd7537437
'2011-12-30T10:24:50-05:00'
describe
'37170' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAP' 'sip-files00226.pro'
c9e04c62dd9e645083532ac4537d468c
ca04aa699134cd4dacf2411af02be941e4f97b97
describe
'40648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAQ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
b4f296b54c637f65c895e8216c12c68c
8c0db83a41629811a226f6cab182925a136aa94e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAR' 'sip-files00226.tif'
9a0593ef3a4a4495ef8f6cb62e5e3231
829adcc23dd11aa0d7cc5e231c5f9fb3e19786fb
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAS' 'sip-files00226.txt'
7503f5444af61e2e64797a7e74816b96
0d9dc6b1f2983425fafe7f27854ac831167f2279
describe
'9203' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAT' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
6b419e1f61eab8a61d29ee4f7e0e6f22
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describe
'287183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAU' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
71124c1fba3fa5e33a5af4c066305a7d
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describe
'126075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAV' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
3e67ffca045f0b939b68bf3ccea314f6
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describe
'36519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAW' 'sip-files00227.pro'
f964f7c2fce7dea781b1164e43e488d8
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describe
'39792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAX' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAY' 'sip-files00227.tif'
ec9442aaaa80176e7cbdd4266c2215ca
79d97606d5642cf5d19972fd10ef71b503d52e0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMAZ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
50269fd62c19adf8d41f1d98e044eb92
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describe
'9417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBA' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
2ce35dbaac43f8b69b2b97a1469203bd
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBB' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
4a6f609158f8dc90f38516ee668ffe9f
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describe
'131405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBC' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
119ee84925da18e847addde79178c701
a77f049f36a24cf0a62e682e55a7ca0cf6424fc3
describe
'33871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBD' 'sip-files00228.pro'
ff16f49eeb0f6b9d4a3e756c8fd13fc1
1ee17ee8c6ecb98409377340cded376d304f1beb
describe
'39827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBE' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
ede53945a68b081df9688e1d9bd49f89
fd8d4f4b9b8c9235fda4f7d2379b6e59ba786aad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBF' 'sip-files00228.tif'
9c09e6152399af2c576f9513987bcb20
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBG' 'sip-files00228.txt'
59c73134e53bc5cbfc8bbf1545b6f122
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBH' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
040b493d8b5329314b928b8dfe617cde
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describe
'287187' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBI' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
a4670e33edc620a95442f10f60cbfc2e
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describe
'184663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBJ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
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describe
'53300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBK' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
32cd9d91755d2f6d0003c44698e77f18
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBL' 'sip-files00230.tif'
2c24d2bb12b52d43a64ff9b75a4c4847
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describe
'12038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBM' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
961cf4f0aeb49c4d4c3f94b82c08d6ec
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describe
'353897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBN' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
4345b54af90131130fae77af9256cb93
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describe
'200571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBO' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
59ab53327a2eb863576744bf4be41d53
cc7c1340cc8be1df111fad4e9a873d93e8c53855
describe
'56141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBP' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
227fdf2eef313f72f13dfe5090eab926
b2d07b8ab3d67a2d4b536cba61654fc5979a58a6
describe
'8516432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBQ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
450fafa17e39c086de9950be364cf434
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describe
'12732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBR' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
f671af1b3af2017b2fce389d94dbdb61
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describe
'351330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBS' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
381fa0f3f99b4253452ed63e895ef855
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describe
'103781' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBT' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
f22021e077adcbb9cb453b83fa08fa43
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describe
'19495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBU' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
5aecbef2ca0511b2f227b083686945e1
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describe
'8452928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBV' 'sip-files00232.tif'
fdbb1af17b3e3bbbfa2226fae3eeea36
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describe
'4352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBW' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
0d7b6b4c86527d2f9a6d8b04282b7ca0
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describe
'85721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBX' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
597ef0c74e2b6c7c3c4f506a67b368d3
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describe
'47117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBY' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
5b5faf82e6826c143be7c296f3f7d174
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describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMBZ' 'sip-files00233.pro'
9e5e6dc363ca5b0949a0a48eeb154f34
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describe
'12636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCA' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
c036b5a79bfc724b942f9252c358395a
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describe
'2074360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCB' 'sip-files00233.tif'
0d34733fa7bc1c40a2ed2c9e60892f2d
9c9dba083cdc09bd916b14de924e4944b96fdc7e
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCC' 'sip-files00233.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'4793' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCD' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
ce78bd9dd27854f020c376ba4b3baee7
8a295e78290c8a08d5557cd1608dee7432fb6d40
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCE' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
92939099047303aaf6e51199c6a5f9b1
87cdfc5e79bdff028903eb49508e0e1df030e60a
describe
'341054' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCF' 'sip-filesUF00086986_00001.mets'
acccae2653bd67211bb6fb39c3fd464b
4e06408fc52d7b324e43ed7677ade3d5f2cd9023
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T20:29:07-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'443935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUEfileF20090118_AACMCI' 'sip-filesUF00086986_00001.xml'
29505fe697580a6d7957f129fe015479
6ae5492143115f4500c80f204d2ad8442d7d3dd0
describe
'2013-12-13T20:29:11-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008698600001datestamp 2008-10-21setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The stolen children : a narrative compiled from authentic sourcesdc:creator Bleby, Henry, 1809-1882Hayman Brothers and Lilly ( Printer )Woolmer, Theophilus, 1815-1896 ( Contributor )dc:subject Still, Peter, -- Juvenile fiction.Still, Vina -- Juvenile fiction.Abduction -- Juvenile fiction.Slavery -- Juvenile fiction. -- United StatesChristian life -- Juvenile fiction.African Americans -- Juvenile fiction.Free African Americans -- Juvenile fiction.Fugitive slaves -- Juvenile fiction.Cruelty -- Juvenile fiction.African Americans -- Juvenile fiction. -- History -- To 1863Plantation life -- Juvenile fiction.Bldn -- 1875.dc:description Factual information in a fictional setting.dc:publisher T. Woolmerdc:date 187-?dc:type Bookdc:format 220 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00086986&v=00001002222311 (ALEPH)84208120 (OCLC)ALG2548 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English



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A NARRATIVE

Compiled from Authentic Sources,

BY HENRY BLEBY.

“(NATURE IMPRINTS UPON WHATE’ER WE SEE,
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< COWPER,

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HAYMAN BROTHERS AND LILLY,
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THE
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CHAPTER I.

VISIT TO AMERICA.






ZN the year 1858, I was sta-
tioned in Barbados; and my
health having suffered from
over-exertion at my last
sphere ¢ of. labour, I determined, with
the permission of the Missionary
Committee, to pay a visit to the
United States of America, hoping
that relaxation and change of climate would restore
my wasted energies; in which I was not disap-
pointed,

When I arrived in America the anti-slavery
struggle was approaching its climax; both the
parties concerned were putting forth all their
power, the one to break down and destroy, the
other to strengthen and uphold the domestic insti-
B


2 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

tution, as it was euphemistically designated, by
which more than four millions of human beings
were subjected to slavery. The pro-slavery news-
papers were endeavouring by the grossest mis-
representations to create the impression that
emancipation in the British colonies had been a
total failure, and that the emancipated negroes in
all the islands had degenerated into hordes of
paupers and thieves.

It soon became known that a Missionary from
Barbados had arrived in Boston, where I was
invited to supply for a Sabbath the pulpit of an
absent minister; and some of the leading men
in the anti-slavery movement, including the noble-
hearted, indomitable William Lloyd Garrison, re-
quested me to aid them in refuting the misleading
statements of the pro-slavery press, by describing
the real condition of affairs in the emancipated
colonies. This to me was an easy task, coming, ag
I did, from an island where every acre of ground
was cultivated by negro labour, and where crops
of sugar were being raised three or four times as
large as in the days of slavery. I spoke several
times at public meetings, and gave addresses upon
this subject in many of the Congregational and
Methodist Churches in New England: and on the
requisition of a goodly number of the leading
divines and editors in New York, including Dr. _
Stevens, Henry Ward Beecher, Dr. Porter, Dr.
Cheever, Horace Greeley, Oliver Johnson, I
VISIT TO AMMRICA, 3

delivered an address in Dr. Cheever’s church on
the results of West India emancipation.

At the request of anti-slavery “friends,” I
accompanied Mr. Garrison and others to an anti-
slavery convention atWestchester,in Pennsylvania,
near to the borders of the slave state of Maryland ;
where many of the Quaker community resided
and took an active part in the operations of the —
“ynderground railway,” by which so many
thousands of fugitive slaves found their way to
freedom in Canada. The convention lasted three
days; and I shall never cease to remember and
appreciate the loving and bountiful hospitality
with which I was entertained amongst the
“ friends,” at Westchester, and at Philadelphia.

‘It was at Philadelphia that I first became
acquainted with some of the facts embraced in
the following narrative ; and here I was introduced
to one of the members of the family, whose
romantic history created, for awhile, no small
sensation wherever it became known; exhibiting
as it does, in a most impressive light, the mamni-
fold atrocities of slavery.

At Philadelphia I was taken to the anti-slavery
office, where I found a young man of dark com-
plexion, but of respectable appearance, employed
in the capacity of clerk. He was introduced to
meas William Still. During my stay I had a
good deal of intercourse with him, and with Mr.
McKim, the able and enterprising agent of the

B2
4 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Pennsylvania Anti-slavery Society. From Mr.
Still I first heard of the extraordinary events
which had occurred in his family ; the kidnapping
of his two brothers, and the wonderful restoration
, of one of them, after enduring the oppressions of
slavery upwards of forty years. From the Rev.
Samuel J. May, of Syracuse, an eminent minister
and one of the leaders of the anti-slavery move-
"ment, I obtained further particulars; and also a
printed account of the wonderful adventures of
Peter Still, which enables me to compile the
following story. It serves as an illustration of
the fact that truth is sometimes stranger than
fiction. Possessing all the interest of a novel, it
is a relation of simpie matter of fact.

PRD arrest rrr
CHAPTER If,

KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVERY.

FAMILY of free coloured
people occupied a small cot-
tage in the outskirts of the
: rapidly-growing city of Phil-
adelphia, near to the banks of the
‘| Delaware river, in the early part of
this century. The family consisted
of father and mother and three children, a girl and
two boys; also a niece of the mother whom she
had taken to live with them, and an old lady who
was grandmother to the little ones. The eldest
boy was named Levin, after his father, and was
between six and seven years of age. The other
little fellow, who was remarkably shrewd and |
intelligent, was called Peter, and was between four :
and five years old. The parents were highly —
esteemed by those who knew them, and gained a
comfortable livelihood for their family by honest
industry.

It was a beautiful summer evening, and nature
was arrayed in all her glory, when the mother,


6 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

haying carefully placed her little ones in bed,
without a doubt as to their safety, left the cottage
for a short time accompanied by her daughter and
niece. The grandmother also was absent; the two
boys were the only occupants of the cottage.

When they found themselves thus alone, the
little fellows left their bed and went out into the
street to play. They ran races down the road,
and gave themselves up to enjoyment; their happy
laugh ringing out clear and free, their eyes gleam-
ing with merriment, their white teeth glistening
in the pleasant light, and contrasting brightly
with the dusky hue of their faces. The only dress
that covered them was a cotton shirt reaching to
their knees, abundantly sufficient in that bright
and balmy weather.

As the shades of the evening began to fall
around them, wearied with their active sports,
the little ones began to yearn after their mother.
They looked into the house, where all was still and
lonely. Mother’s bed was there, covered with a
clean blanket; but mother was not to be seen.
There also stood grandmother’s bed; but grand-
mother was not there. Every article of simple
furniture stood in its accustomed place, but no
sound could they hear within. Where could they
all have gone P

Frightened with the silence and solitude they
began to cry. At length Levin said, “I reckon
mammy’s gone to church. The preachin’ must be
‘KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVER1. 7

mighty long! O! I’ssohungry! I’se gwine to
meetin’ to see if she’s thar.”

The “church” they were accustomed to attend
stood in the woods, about a mile off; for coloured
people had no admission to the sanctuaries where
white people worshipped God. It was an old
building, that had formerly been occupied by a
family now living in a large brick house close by.
The boys had often been at the church with their
father, who kept the key of the building, and
opened it for worship on Sundays, and prayer-
meeting nights.

“You better not go thar, I reckon,”. replied
Peter. “Mammy ’ll whip you well if you goes to
foller her to meetin’ and all about.”

“Mammy! O mammy!” Thus they called
upon their mother, and cried because she did not
answer, till their eyes were swollen, and their
pleasant play forgotten.

Their childish grief was broken in upon by the
sound of an approaching vehicle; and lifting up
their eyes they saw a handsome gig, driven by a
tall dark man, with a white hat surmounting a
mass of black glossy, bushy hair. He looked
earnestly at the little boys as he came near, and
checking his horse he stopped, and in apparently
kind tones asked for the cause of their distress.

“OQ, mammy’s done gone off, and there’s no-
body to give us our supper, and we’re so hungry.”

“Where is your mother ?”
8 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Don’t know, Sir,” replied Levin; “but I
reckon she’s gone to church.”

“Well, don’t you want to ride?” said the
stranger. ‘Jump up here with me, and I'll take
you to your mother. I’m just going to church.
Come, quick! What! no clothes but a shirt P
goin and get a blanket. It will soon be night,
and you will be cold.”

Unsuspicious of the villany the stranger was
meditating, the little urchins both ran upon this
errand. Levin took the blanket from off his
mother’s bed, while Peter snatched the covering
from the couch of his grandmother; and it being
large he tripped and fell over it several times
before he reached the vehicle, for he was in haste
to be restored to his mammy.

The stranger lifted them into the gig, and
placing them between his feet covered them with
the blankets, that they might not be cold. All
the time he was‘soothing them with kind words,
and assuring them that he would soon take them
to their mother. And away they went very swiftly,
rejoicing in their childish hearts to think how their
mother would wonder when she saw them coming,
and travelling in such unwonted style.

After riding for some time,—how long they
could not guess—-they suddenly upset into the
water with a great splash. The driver of the
vehicle, in his haste to accomplish his villany, had
driven too near the brink of the river, and the








KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVERY. 9

vehicle had thus been overturned. He soon
rescued the children from the water and raised the
vehicle. The boys were much frightened but not
hurt. Nothing was injured by the accident, and
in a few minutes, once more covered over with the
blankets, they were speeding along the river bank
faster than before.

When the gig stopped again it was at the water
side, and before them lay many boats and vessels
of different kinds. They had never seen anything
like this before, but they had short time to indulge
their wonder and curiosity, for they were hurried
into a boat which left the shore immediately.

How long they were on the boat they could not
tell. The children were lulled into security by
promises that they should soon see their mother,
and by gentle words and cakes of marvellous sweet-
ness, with which the stranger had taken care to
supply himself. These were always forthcoming
when they manifested any impatience at the
length of the journey; and their childish hearts
could not distrust one, though a stranger, whose
words and acts wereso kind. Atlength all their
troubles and anxieties were lost in the oblivion of
sleep.

How far they went in the boat, or by what
other means they travelled they failed to recollect,
but at length they reached a place called Versailles,
in the slave state of Kentucky. Here their self-
constituted guardian placed them in a waggon, with
10 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

a coloured woman and her child, and conveyed
them to Lexington.

Here they heard their kidnapper addressed as
_ Kincaid. By this time he had dropped all his
kind words, and no longer regaled them with cakes.
He took them to a plain brick-house, the residence
of a mason named Fisher, who was the proprietor
of a large brick-yard. After some conversation
between these two worthies which the children did
not understand, Kincaid took them to the kitchen,
and presenting them to an elderly negro woman
who was acting as cook, said to the terrified chil-
dren, ‘‘ There, my boys, there is your mother; we
have found her at last.”

“No! No! shrieked the children, “ that’s not
mammy! O, Sir, please do take us back.” With
tears and cries they clung to the ruffian who had
so vilely betrayed their confidence, and begged
him not to leave them there.

This scene was soon ended by the interposition
of Fisher, who, giving them a hearty blow on each
cheek, bade them “ Hush! You belong to me now,
you little rascals, and I'll have no more of this.
There’s aunt Betty, she’s your mammy now, and if
you behave yourselves she’ll be good to you.”

Kincaid soon departed, and they never saw him
again. The ruffian had stolen the poor children
from their parents, and sold them to Fisher, who
became a willing party to this wicked transaction,
paying for Levin a hundred and fifty-five dollars,
KIDNAPPED AND SOLD INTO SLAVERY. 11

(about £32) and for Peter a hundred and fifty
dollars (about£31). Poorchildren! the dark heavy
cloud of slavery now shadowed their young lives.

For the first few weeks the children constantly
talked of going back to their mother—except in
the presence of their master. They were soon
taught that they must not mention that subject
when he was near. Hewas in the main a kind
indulgent master to his slaves: but were not these
boys his money? why should he allow them to
prate about being stolen, when he had bought, and
paid a good price for them ?

“Father,” said John Fisher’s young son, “isn’t
Philadelphia a free state ? ”’

“ Certainly : it is in Pennsylvania.”

“Well, then, I reckon,” said the lad,’ that those
two boys you bought were stolen, for they lived
with their mother near the. Delaware river; and
Aunt Betty says that isat Philadelphia. It was
too bad, father, for that man to steal and sell them
here, where they can never hear from their
mother.”

“Pooh, boy! don’t talk like a fool! Most likely
they were sold to Kincaid, and he told them he
would take them to their mother, in order to get
them away withoutany fuss. And evenif he did
steal them, so were all the negroes stolen at first.
I bought these boys and paid for them, and I'll
stop their talk about being free, or 1’ll break their
black necks. 12 THE STOLEN: CHILDREN.

country; just to spoil the sale if I should happen
to getshutof them! Free, indeed! And what’sa
free nigger? They’re better off here thanif they
were free, growing up in idleness, and nobody to
take care of them.”

Before night the young offenders were
thoroughly kicked and beaten, and impressed with
the assurance that they should be killed outright
if they dared to tell such a tale again. So they
grew cautious, and spoke of the sweet memories of
home and of “ mother” only in whispers to each
other, or tosome fellow-sufferer who knew how to
sympathise with their sorrows.
CHAPTER III.

EARLY EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY.






had been, through villany,
wee consigned to the oppressive
| and corrupting influences of slavery,
| and were constrained to learn its
-| terrible lessons. They shrank from
the evils which they feared were awaiting them;
but-in vain they appealed for pity to the hard-
hearted man who called himself their owner ; and
their young hearts, so merry hitherto, became sad
and anxious.

Levin and Peter were not long in divining,
with the tact of childhood, their exact position,
domestic and social; and they soon learnt the
necessity of concealing their true feelings. “A
servant should be merry:” so says the slave-holder.
A gloomy face is a perpetual complaint; and why
should it be tolerated P

Fisher, the master of the two young slaves, was
a large, fine-looking man with a free and hearty
14 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

manner, and some kindliness of disposition; but
he never suffered this latter quality to interfere in
business matters; and as, in addition to his brick-
making business, he rented a large plantation about
a mile out of town, he had no time to waste in
unprofitable sentimentalities. How to get the
most work done with the least expense was the
problem alone worthy his attention ; and his success
in business showed that he had considered it wei.

Mrs. Fisher, their mistress, was a stout woman
with a freckled face, plain and unpretending in
manners and dress, and devoted to her husband
and children. She had twoboys, John and Sydney;
and for the first three years that he lived with them,
Peter was their constant playmate. Levin was
sent to work in the brick-yard the second year after
Fisher bought him, he being then between eight
and nine years of age.

At night the little slave boys rolled themselves
up in their blankets, and lay down to sleep on the
floor of their mistress’ room. They would often
awake in the morning under the bed, or the bureau,
where the mistress had shoved them with her foot
the night previous, that they might be out of the
way. They had no want of food or clothing; and
if they kept silence about their mother’s house on
the Delaware river, they were kindly treated.
But if a word on that forbidden subject reached
the ear of their master, he became furious and
treated them with great cruelty. By stripes and
EARLY EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY. 18

kicks he taught them that they had no right to
the blessed memory of “home” and “ mother,”
that they were his property; and that he pos-
sessed unlimited power to silence their restless
tongues.

The plantation rented by Mr. Fisher belonged to
a Mrs. Russell,a widow lady. It was situated about
a mile from the city; and directly across was the
residence of the celebrated Henry Clay, one of the
magnatesofthe country. To this place Peter, while
he was too young to work in the brick-yard, was
sent daily for the cows and to obtain vegetables
from the garden. As he had plenty of leisure time,
being only between six and seven years old, he
spent many pleasant hours in playing with the
slave children of Mr. Clay: and frequently the
merry group would be enlivened by the addition
of Mr. Clay’s two sons.

The young Clays were noble boys, glowing with
all the ingenuousness of youth; and Peter’s heart
warmed toward them both. Mutual confidence
sprang up between them, and Peter soon confided
to them the sad history of his wrongs. One day
when Mrs. Clay, as was her custom, spoke kindly to
the dusky playmate of her sons, Peter took courage
and recited to her the story of his sorrows; and
asked her if she did not think some one would
send him back to his mother. She quieted him
with cakes and other delicacies and then gently
dismissed the children to their play. —
e

lo — THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Butthe brave-hearted boys, not as yet corrupted
and hardened by contact with the world and with
slavery, longed to do something to help their little
favourite; and they advised him to tell his story
to their father. They felt sure that he whom they
had been taught so greatly to honour could not
fail to do his utmost to redress such a cruel wrong
as Peter and his brother had suffered.

Made sanguine by the generous spirit mani-
fested by his playmates, Peter, the first time he
was alone with his brother, said, ““O Levin, I
reckon we'll go back toreckly ! ”

“Go back! Whar?”

“Why home to see mother! Mass’ Theodore
Clay say his father so good to everybody; he know
he’ll send us back if we tell him how we got stole ;
says his father allers helps folks whar gets in
trouble.”

“‘Mass’ Theodore say soP Reckon then we
will; kase Mr. Clay mighty good to all his people.
Hi! Mas’r John Fisher! you’se gwine lose these’
chillerns!”

Then, with many comical grimaces, Levin
executed a series of remarkable shuffles, indicating
the confusion that awaited ‘“‘ Mas’r John.”

Not long after this conversation, Peter saw Mr.
Clay standing near the court-house with a letter
in his hand. His little heart bounded within him
as he ran towards the great statesman, “O Mr.
Clay!” he exclaimed, ‘I’m stole.”
EARLY EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY. 17

“Stole! who stole you, and where were you
stolen from ?”

“T’s stole from my father and mother on Dela-
ware river. Folks say that’s Philadelphia; but I
don’t know. Please, Sir, won’t you send me back
to my mother?”

“To whom do you belong P-”

“T ‘long to Mas’r John Fisher, in Thaine
Street, and I want’s to go back to my mother.”

“Well, my boy, I have no time to talk to you
now: you carry this letter to Major Pope. You
know where he lives; and then come back and I'll
attend to you.”

Away ran the child dancing with delight and
crying, “I’s free! I’s free! I’s gwine to my
mother ! ”

“What is that you say?” asked a gentleman
who met him. “I’s gwine to be free,’ said the
lad. “Mr. Clay gwine to send me back to my
mother, kase I was stole away from her.”

“Now here, you little negro,” said the man,
who knew the child, and understood the temper of
his master, ‘‘ you’d better not talk about that to
Mr. Clay, for he will tell your master, and old John
Fisher will be sure to skin you.”

Thus rudely, but kindly, perhaps, was the
bright vision dispelled which hope had presented
to poor Peter. With drooping head and tearful
eye he returned to tell his brother of their disap-
pointment; and after that they both avoided Mr.

c
18 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Clay. Mr. Clay was among the first and greatest
men of ‘his country with many good and amiable
traits in his character; but the great statesman
was himself aslave-holder, and he had not courage
to face the odium of interfering to restore the
stolen boy to his mother. Thus ignobly did the
great Henry Clay become the associate of thieves,
by tacitly protecting them in this great wrong.

' Still hope, that “springs eternal in the human
breast,” did not desert the boys. They cherished
the remembrance that they were born free, and
looked for something to turn up some day or
other to restore them to liberty; a hope that was
destined to be realized in one of them; to be
blighted in the other.

When Peter was nine years old he was sent to
labour in the brick-yard as “ off-bearer.” Three
thousand bricks a day was the task for two boys.
If one of them chanced to be disabled by any
means, his companion must “ off-bear” the whole.
The moulder must not be hindered.

These moulders, slaves themselves, were often
cruel tyrants. The boys, though seldom abused
by the master himself, suffered much from the
caprices and passions of these men; and their
master permitted any punishment they chose to
inflict.

Their favourite mode of chastisement was
called “ standing in the wheelbarrow.” The culprit
was placed with a foot on each side of the wheel,




EARLY EXPERIENCE UF SLAVERY. 19

and then made to reach over and grasp a handle
in each hand. The “ off-bearers’”’ were then com-
pelled to whip him with cow-hides (pieces of hide
twisted into the form of a whip). If he lay still
_ and took twenty-four lashes without attempting

to rise he was let off. If he made an effort to
change his position before that number was
inflicted, the moulder, who presided over the
punishment and counted the strokes, commenced
again at “one,” and caused the twenty-four to be
repeated.

One day a large man, named Charles, was put
into the wheelbarrow, and received over three
hundred lashes before he took the twenty-four
without moving. Peter was one of the boys
selected to inflict this horrible punishment; and
they were all trembling with terror. If one of
them, through pity, failed to strike with all his
power, the moulder, who stood by with a cowhide,
punished this merciful short-coming by a violext
blow on his own back.

02
CHAPTER _IYÂ¥,

SOLD TO A NEW MASTER,

MID such scenes passed the

early youth of the stolen
boys. They were both dis-
* tinguished by great mildness
of temper and cheerfulness of dis-
position which made them almost
universal favourites so that they
escaped much cruel treatment that fell to the lot
of some of their companions. But a change came
upon them. When Peter was about thirteen years
old and his brother near fifteen their owner,
Fisher, determined upon removing to Cincinnatti
where a brother of his had taken up his abode.
This rendered it necessary that he should dispose
of his brick-yard and sell his slaves; for Cincin-
natti being in the Free State of Ohio he could
not own his slaves there.

Levin and Peter were overwhelmed with grief
when they heard of the intended sale. With all
their apparent humility, and submissive, gentle
manners, deep in their young hearts was the



SOLD TO A NEW MASTER. 21

fondly-cherished feeling that freedom was their |
natural birth-right. There was degradation in the
thought, young as they were, of being trafficked
like horses. Besides, they had never ceased to
cherish the hope that they should be sought after
by their parents, and changing owners would
lessen the chances of their being discovered. But
the sale was resolved on.

Mr. Fisher found some difficulty in disposing
of the boys, for their old story of having been
stolen from a Free State had: not been forgotten ;
and men hesitated to buy where there was un-
certainty about the title. As the master confidently
affirmed that he had so conquered them that it was
many years since they had been heard to mention
it, a sale was at length effected. The purchaser
was a Mr. Nathaniel Gist, of Lexington, who gave
four-hundred-and-fifty dollars for each of the
brothers (about £93 15s.)

The change of owners was far from being
agreeable to the young slaves. Nat Gist, or Mas’r
Nattie, as he was generally called, lived in a small
brick house in Hill Street. He was a short, stout
grey-headed man about fifty-six years of age. He
was a Virginian by birth, and had been a soldier.
He swore freely and drank hard, being intoxicated
every day;-and as he was a bachelor his home
was seldom visited by any humanising influences.

Nat Gist owned a brick-yard, and twenty slaves
called him master. These he fed sparingly,
22 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

clothed scantily, and worked hard. In the winter
when brick-making was necessarily suspended, he
was accustomed to hire out his slaves to those who
would pay the highest price for their services.
Besides Levin and Peter he had two other boys,
named Alfred and “Allison. These were brothers
who had been sold away from their parents in
Virginia. Some years after their mother with
several of her children effected her escape to the
free land of Canada by “the underground rail-
way.”*

Peter soon became a favourite with his new
master. But he carefully abstained from showing
his preference either by word or act. He believed
that there was nothing so good for niggers as the
liberal use of the cowhide and whip. While
therefore he kept Peter near him as much as
possible to wait upon him, he never abated one

* The underground railway is a figurative expression, indicating
the various means by which fugitive slaves were aided by benevolent
individuals in making good their esce pe toa land of freedom. Some
of these are well described in Mrs. Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
Large numbers of fugitives from the slave states escaped to Canada,
or to the Eastern States of the Union, notwithstanding the utmost
vigilance of the slave-holders ‘and the efforts of slave-hunters
employed to track. and overtake them, The arrangements made by
the Quakers, and other friends of hutanity, to help the slaves on
their way were so perfect, that no traces of the runaways could be
discovered. One of the planters, to whom this was altogether
inexplicable, remarked concerning some of his lost ones, ‘‘ They must
have got off by an underground railway.’’ It was a happy idea.
The anti-slavery friends took hold of it; and it soon became the

_custom to say concerning the runaways, ‘‘ They are off by the

underground railway.” The stations were numerous all the way
from the Slave States to Canada,
SOLD TO A NEW MASTER. 23:

jot of his severity towards him. An incident
occurred soon after he purchased the boys which
serves to show his method of governing his slaves.

He had come home as usual much intoxicated,
and ordered Peter to scatter a couple of bundles
of oats on the ground for his horse. The boy
obeyed but strewed them a little more widely than
was necessary.

In a few minutes his master inquired, “ Did
you give Ned his oats ? ”

“Yes, Sir. I did as you told me.”

“ What did you throw them all about for?”

“Why, Mas’r, you tell me to scatter them.”

Quick came down the old man’s cane on the
boy’s head. ‘I didn’t tell you to scatter them all
over the yard.” Then with many fierce oaths, he
said ‘“ Follow me to the house. I'll give you a
lesson to remember. Peter walked slowly behind
him to the door. ;

“ Now take off your shirt, you rascal, and eross
your hands.”’

The boy obeyed: and his master, after tying
his hands together, drew them down over his
knees, where he confined them by means of a stick
thrust under his knees. He then beat him fiercely
with a cowhide until his drunken rage was appeased.

‘There, you black cuss,”’ said he, when he had
finished, ‘I mean to make a good nigger of you,
and there’s no way to do it, only by showing you
who’s master.”
24 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

This method of confining a negro for punish-
ment was called “‘bricking,” and was much practised
in slave-land. The culprit was frequently left in
the brick several hours—sometimes, indeed, all
night; and in such cases the protracted straining
of the muscles caused intense pain.

About this time, a few right-minded persons in
Lexington, opened a Sabbath School for the in-
struction of such slaves as might be permitted by
their masters to learn. This excited the high in-
dignation of Mas’r Nattie, the owner of the boys.
“Twon’thave my niggers spoiled by getting learning.
No, indeed! Niggers are bad enough without
being set up by such rascals as these Sunday-
school teachers. They’d better not meddle with
my property. IfI hear of one of my boys going
near the school, I’ll give him such a flogging that
he'll never need any more education.”

Levin submitted. But in the breast of Peter
there was an intense thirst for knowledge; and
even this terrible threat could not deter him from
making an effort to obtain it. Peter went to the
school.

The teacher received him kindly, but inquired
for his “pass.”

“ Ain’t got none, Massa.”

“JT am sorry,’ said the teacher, “for we are
not permitted to instruct any servants without the
consent of their masters.”

Peter knew this very well: and he also knew
SOLD TO A NEW MASTER. 25

that to apply to his owner for a “pass” would only
be to ask for whipping; but he did so long to
learn to read he could not go away. He looked
around on the pupils: they were all slaves and
their masters allowed them to come, and none of
them he thought could learn quicker than he. He
determined to make a desperate effort to remain
that day at least. So he told the teacher,
“Mas’r don’t care nothin’ ’bout my comin’. I'll
get a pass next Sunday.” He was permitted to
remain.

The next Sabbath when the school was opened
Peter presented himself among the pupils. The
other boys presented their papers: he had none
to offer. Poor Peter had not been taught the evil
of lying among the other lessons of slavery, nor
had he learnt “we may not do evil that good may
come.” He had “ forgotten to ask his master,” but
would be sure to remember it next Sunday.

On the third Sabbath he was no better off.
“Mas’r go away early in the morning. He no
hab time to get pass.” He was suffered to remain,
but assured that no such excuses would be accepted
in future.

The fourth Sabbath came, and Peter walked
boldly into the school. “ Pass, boy,” as usual
was the first salutation.

“ Ain’t got none,” replied he; ‘‘ Mass’ Nattie,
say don’t need none: nouse, no how!”

The teacher saw now the true state of the case.
26 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

He would gladly have aided to illuminate that
young intellect, so eagerly stretching towards the
light; but he was compelled to thrust it back into
the darkness, lest a prejudice should be aroused
that would paralyse all his efforts. So he posi-
tively forbade Peter’s future entrance to the school
without a pass. Peter had in these four Sundays
learnt the alphabet, and could spell a few words.
Hard and bitter he felt to be the fate that con-
signed him to hopeless ignorance.

“OO!” said Peter, ‘if I could only learn to
read, I could find out the way to write myself.
Then I-might write letters to Philadelphia, and let
mother know what’s come of her chilluns. I’s
seen white boys running off to keepclar of the Mas’r
in the morning. Reckon if I could go to school,
nobody wouldn’t cotch me running off that way.”
CHAPTER V.

HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY.

worked in the brick-yard
when their master hired them
os=3 to a Mr. George Norton, a
tobacconist. Peter and Levin had
been hired to different persons during
: 5 the winter months. One of these
winters Peter spent as waiter in the service of
a Mr. Sandford Keene, from whom and his amiable
and noble-hearted wife he experienced genuine
kindness. But to this Norton they were hired for
a whole year. Little cause as they had to love
Mas’r Naittie, they dreaded to exchange him for
this new master, for of him report never spoke
kindly.

Norton was a self-complacent, consequential
person, full of pomposity, and cruel and hard-
hearted as he was conceited. He had an overseer
named Kisich, small, and pale, and lame, and
awkward in his manners, A “rich brogue”
plainly indicated the native of the Emerald Isle.



28 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

He had been a clamorous brawler for liberty in his
own country. But here he had become the callous,
degraded slave-driver who, when he found

“ His fellow guilty of a skin,
Not coloured like his own,”

could see him bought and sold, and tasked, and
beaten without a single impulse of pity.

Thirty men and boys were employed in Norton’s
establishment. Three were white. They acted as
spies and informers, making the privilege of acting
the tyrant over their dark-skinned fellows a sort of
compensation for the degradation which in slave-
land is inseparable from the necessity of labour.

The boys succeeded in pleasing Norton by their
ready obedience, and their sprightly, nimble move-
ments. Yet they won no praise. It was but their
duty, and they had reason to rejoice if they escaped.
the cow-hide. They were brought up to regard
the fear of punishment as the only motive to
obedience; and but for their brother-love, and the
dear, sweet memory of “mother,” their hearts
must have grown callous and incapable of affection-
ate response.

Levin and Peter revelled in the fond remem-
brance of that bright morning of their young lives
before the appearance of the kidnapper brought a
dark cloud upon their destiny. Humble was the
cabin which they delighted to remember, but the
sunshine came freely in at the open door, and no
HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 29

harsh word was ever heard within the lowly walls.
How sweet and soothing were these cherished re-
trospects! Often, when their daily tasks were
finished, the two brothers would stroll away from
the noisy mirth of their companions at the twilight
hour, and in low tones converse of home, and dis-
cuss the possibilities of an escape from slavery.

Many plans of escape they suggested to each
other. But all of them required more knowledge
than they possessed or could acquire. Then there
were so many who failed in the attempt, and were
always fearfully punished. The gaol was always
crowded with recaptured fugitives. No, they could
not run away.

But, perhaps, some day they might buy their
freedom. They could work nights and Sundays,
and earn the money, and then they would be safe.
in these bright anticipations they joyously in-
dulged, until they learnt through the sad experi-
ence of others how uncertain was even this fair and
open way of obtaining theirfreedom. The history
of one man, with whom they became acquainted in
Lexington, chilled their ardent hopes, while it
taught them a lesson of caution, and deepened their
distrust of seeming friends.

Spencer was a fine-looking intelligent mulatto,
belonging to a Mr. Williams, who kept a lottery-
office in Lexington. His master hired him out;
usually to hotel or livery-stable keepers, and some-
times to Spencer himself. He was a favourite
30 _ HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

with the white people, and had excellent opportu-
nities of making money by extra services about the
hotels and stables, and by his skill as a veterinary
practitioner. He sometimes speculated in lottery-
tickets. But here success availed him little. He
drew at one timea house and property in Lexing-
ton, worth 30,000 dollars, and was deprived of it.
Many white persons declared that it would be
robbery to takeitfrom him; but it was deemed an
unsafe precedent to allow a negro to acquire so
much property. So the prize was adjudged to the
gentleman who stood second on the list of com-
petitors.

After this Spencer conceived the idea of buying
his own freedom, and proposed the subject to his
master. Williams received the suggestion favour-
ably, and fixed the price at 1,000 dollars. Habitu-
ally industrious, Spencer had now a new spur to
his industry. So untiring was his diligence, that
in a few years he had paid his master within
twenty-five dollars of the whole sum, and the goal
of liberty was just in sight. Then the sweet cup
of blessing was dashed from hislips. The unmiti-
gated scoundrel Williams, having robbed the poor
fellow of his earnings, denied having ever promised
him liberty, and bade him never to mention the
subject more. Spencer was sorely disappointed,
but not discouraged; and when, not long after, a
gentleman, who had heard the history of the decep-
tion, offered to purchase-him, and give him his
HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 31

freedom as soon as he could earn the price which
he must pay to Williams, the hopeful slave eagerly
and thankfully accepted the offer.

The bargain was soon concluded, and with
earnest zeal the poor fellow gave himself to his
labours. He took the precaution this time to ask
for a receipt whenever he made a payment. This
was readily given, and Spencer thought himself
safe. But he had fallen into the hands of another
villain. When he had paid 980 dollars, his owner
suddenly left the town ; and before he had any idea
of such a change approaching, an agent of the bad
man whoowned him had sold him to another master.
Indignant at this outrageous fraud, he produced the
receipts for his money, which he had carefully pre-
served. But thisavailed him nothing. They did
not shew to whom the money had been paid. And
even if they had not been fraudulently written,
they would have profited nothing; for the law held
that a slave’s money, as well as his person and
labour, belonged to his master.

Even yet hope was not extinguished in the
breast of this poor unfortunate slave. Again he
tried a man who was lavish in his expressions of
sympathy, and loud in the denunciation of the
baseness from which he had suffered ; but it was

only to be again betrayed. Into the Hana of this
pretended friend—for the third time—he paid the
hard-earned price of his redemption. And when he
should have received his free papers, he was chained
32 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

in a gang, and sent to the cotton and sugar-fields
of the South, there, if he did not yield to despair
and commit suicide, to wear out a most wretched
existence in wasting, unrequited toil. The world
could scarcely furnish a parallel to the ruffianism
and villany that were to be found in the Slave States
of America, until a just and holy God let loose His
vengeance upon them.

To the ears of Peter and his brother came many
tales like this, and the lessons of caution they con-
veyed the youths treasured in their inmost hearts ;
while, by apparent contentment and cheerful man-
ners, they won the confidence of those in whose
power they were placed.

They had been half the year at Norton’s, and
neither of them as yet had fallen into any serious
difficulty with their brutal master. They had wit-
nessed many exhibitions of his cruelty, and one
that occurred about this time filled them with
horror.

Norton’s personal servant, a large black man,
incurred the displeasure of his haughty master.
He was immediately put in a brick, and in the pre-
‘sence of all the men and boys Norton inflicted on
his naked back three hundred lashes with a cow-
hide. The blood gushed out, and ran in streams
upon the brick-floor of the shop.

When the stick was removed from under his
knees, the poor victim was unable to rise. At this
his tormentor was enraged. He seized a board that
HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 33.

lay near full of shingle nails, and with it struck
him several violent blows, every one of which
brought the blood in streams, as if he had been
pierced with a lancet.

Here young Peter’s habitual caution failed him
fora moment. His eyes, usually so mild, flashed
with fierce indignation; and he declared in a low
voice to his brother that George Norton should
never strip him and put him in a brick to whip
him—he would die first.

The poor lad’s remark was overheard and
reported to the tyrant, who from that day only
waited an excuse to punish him. An opportunity
thus sought is soon found.

The next Saturday evening, as the boys were
sweeping the shop, an old woman came in and
asked for alittle tobacco. Peter, being nearest the
door, gathered up a few of the sweepings and
handed them to her. On the following morning it
was Peter’s turn to make a fire in the sweat-room.
Having done this, he locked the door of the shop
and went to his old master’s, where he usually
spent his Sundays.

Peter had left the shop but a short time when
Mr. Norton took a fancy to go in and look at the
tobacco. He tried the door and it was locked, the
key being nowhere to be found. He turned away
veryangry. Harly on the Monday morning he was
in the shop, anger gleaming from his eye, and a
dark frown upon his countenance. It was clear

D
3b THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

_ that something was wrong. Presently the great
man spoke :

“Whose business was it to make a fire in the
sweat-room yesterday P”

“Mine, Sir,” said Peter.

“ Did you attend to it?”

“Yes, Sir.”

“You did! Where were you when I came
here?”

“Don’t know, Sir. Reckon I was up at home.”

“Where is your home, you rascal P”

“Up to Mas’r Nattie, Sir.”

“Tl let you know, nigger, that this is your
home, and that I am your master.” Saying which
he strode outof theshopin a rage. It was his law
that no one in his shop should be called ‘“‘ master ”
but himself.

Before sunrise next morning Norton appeared
at the door. He was trimming a switch and
whistling, as he never did, except when his brutal
nature was about to revel in the infliction of
punishment. It was a real pleasure to him to
lcok upon the sufferings of others.

After taking a few turns up and down the
shop, he spoke:

“Peter!”

“ Sir.”

“‘ Where were you yesterday P ”

“Here, Sir, strippin’ tobacco.”

“Well, Sunday, where were you?”
HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 35

“ Home to Mas’r Nattie’s, Sir.”

The hot blood mounted to Norton’s face. “I
am your master, you black rascal, and I'll let you
know that you are to go to no other home than
this. Who swept the shop on Saturday ? ”

“We boys, all of us, Sir.”

“Who was it that gave tobacco to an old
woman ?”

“T gave her a handful of sweepings, Sir; no
*count, no how.”

“Well, you'll find I am your master, and you
are to obey me. Come here, and lie down across
this box.”

Peter obeyed, wondering that he had not been
ordered to strip. Itwas not Mr. Norton’s custom
to whip his servants over their clothes, and the boy
had on a new suit of blue linsey. He had heard
what Peter had said a few days before, and
thought it best to avoid an unnecessary contest.

When the boy was extended over the box,
Norton struck him a blow with all his might.
Peter lifted himself up. ‘‘ Lie down, you nigger,”
and he renewed the blows. Peter raised himself
up again. ‘Lie down!” cried the tyrant, with a
curse. Peter obeyed, and many blows fell hard
and fast. Once more he rose. ‘Lie down, I say,
you cursed nigger. If you move again till I bid
you, I will beat you till you cannot move!”

The boy stood upon his feet and looked his
tormentor steadily in the face. ‘Ihave laid down

D2
06 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.
three times for you to beat me when I have done
nothing wrong. I will not lie down again.”

Norton instantly seized him, and attempted to
force him across the box, but failed. ‘Here, Mr.
Kisich, Ladlock, all of you, help me conquer this
nigger,” plenteously larding his speech with oaths
and. blasphemies.

Quickly came the overseer and the other white
men in the shop, and all fell upon him at once.
Peter screamed “ Murder!” and fought with all
his strength. The ruffians tried to bind his hands,
but he struggled so fiercely that they were in
danger of breaking his arms. They succeeded in
throwing him upon the floor, and there he struggled
and screamed, and bit their legs and ancles, and
they despaired of being able to fiog him, unless
they could succeed in tying him.

At length they managed to pass a slip-noose
over his head, and got it fastened about his waist.
They dragged him by the rope to the back part of
the shop, where stood a number of large tobacco
presses, about eightfeethigh. If they could hang
him up on one of these he would be entirely at
their mercy. As they raised the rope to fasten it
to the top of the press, he sprang aside and crept
- into the narrow space between it and the wall.

Here he remained for some time bleeding and
panting, his blood-shot eyes glaring at his perse-
cutors, while they were engaged in beating him
over the head with cow-hides and hoop-poles, and
HIRED TO A TOBACCO FACTORY. 37

thrusting sticks and pieces of iron against his
bruised flesh. Atlast they dracged him from his
refuge, and he was too exhausted to continue the
struggle. He made no further resistance; and
Norton, roused to fiend-like fury, with bitter oaths
and curses threw him across a barrel and whipped
his bleeding back with a cow-hide until his ven-
geance was satisfied, swearing he was the first
nigger that ever tried to fight him, and that he
should be humbled if it cost his life.

When this episode of cruelty was finished,
Norton and his aids took themselves off to break-
fast, and the negroes, agape with horror at the
scene, returnedto their work. The poor, trembling
victim, fearfully bruised and cut, with only a few
shreds left of his new linsey suit, crept out of the
shop and succeeded in gaining his old master’s
residence on the hill. Mas’r Nattie had gone
down town, but Aunt Mary, the cook, pitied the
sufferer, and dressed his wounds. She had two
sons, who were slaves.

Peter rightly guessed that his owner, cruel as
he was himself, would not like to see his property
damaged by others. He had no gentle word for :
the sufferer. He would not intimate toa “nigger ’
that a white man could do wrong, but he sought
Norton and-cursed him soundly for having abused
a boy belonging to him.

Peter remained a week with Mas’r Nattie, and
was then sent back to the shop, where he remained
83 y THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

to theend of the year. Norton was either ashamed
of his ferocious violence, or afraid to repeat it; for
never after did Peter get an unkind word from him
or his satellites.

As the year drew near its close Norton applied
to Mas’r Nattie to hire the boys for another year,
stating that they were all anxious to remain with
him. But as soon as the year expired, Levin and
Peter, and the two other boys, all ran off to their
owner, and he, finding they were not willing to
serve Norton, did not force them to go back to
him.
CHAPTER VI,

THE BROTHERS SEPARATED.






| REAT trouble came upon the
* loving brothers in the fall of
the year 1817. Levi Gist,
a nephew, and a special fa-
Mivourite of old ‘‘ Nattie,” resolved,
with his uncle’s sanction and aid,
Hito go and establish a cotton plan-
tation in Alabama ; the old man promising to go
himself if his nephew should like the country and
determine to continue there. Six of the negroes
were to go and assist the young man in putting
in his first crop.

The command to prepare to go with Master
Levi fell with crushing weight upon the poor
slaves who had been selected for the purpose.
Going South was always dreaded as a great cala-
mity. To none did this arrangement bring deeper
sorrow than to the brothers; for Levin was one of
the number chosen to go to Alabama. In all their
sorrows thus far they had been together. They
had shared the same little pleasures, and their
40 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

hearts had been as one. And now to be sundered !
How could they liveapart? The thought that his
brother must go to the South was agony to Peter.

“O Levin, Levin, if they take you away off
there I shan’t never see you no more, sure!”

“OQ yes,” sobbed Levin, his heart almost
breaking, while he yet strove to speak cheeringly to
his weeping brother. ‘“O yes, Mas’r Nattie say
he’s gwine bring ye all next year when he come.”

“Mas’r Nattie! He never gwine ’way off
there! He’ll stay here as long as he get breath
*nough to curse. He’s too old to go there, any
how.”

“Well, he’ll have to die some day. He can’t
live a mon’s long time, sure.”

“Yes, and if he dies, we'll all be sold. They
allers has an auction when folks dies, and then
deir people’s scattered all about. O pears like
*taint no use livin’ in this ere world. I shan’t never
see you no more.”

The preparations for the journey were com-
pleted. ‘“ Mas’r Nattic,” said Levin, as they were
all assembled in the yard to say good-bye, “please,
Sir, give-me something ’fore I go, to ’member you
by.”

Te Well,” said the old man, “go in and bring me
the cow-hide, and I’ll give you something you'll
never forget. If I should give you a coat, ora
shirt, you would wear it right out, but if I eut
your skin to pieces, you will remember this parting
THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. Al

as long as you live. And mind, you rascal, when
I come out next fall Tl bring the cow-hide, and _
if you don’t behave yourself I’ll give you enough
then — d’ye hear?” Such, interspersed with
curses and blasphemies, was the kind farewell of
Old Nattie Gist. The fun of the slave-holder is
ferocious, and ‘the tender mercies of the wicked
are cruel.”

The poor slaves left behind returned to their
work with heavy hearts, not knowing how soon
they might be sent to the South, or chained in a
gang, and driven away by some barbarous trader. .

Peter was taken away from Mr. Martin’s, where
he had been hired the first part of the year, and
sent by his master to take Levin’s place as waiter
in the family of a Mr. Young. His new master
was an intelligent gentleman, of pleasant manners,
and great kindness of heart. His wife was the
reverse—of fierce, ungovernable temper. Scolding
the servants from morning to night, she kept the
house in a continual turmoil.

During the five months that Peter spent in the
service of Mr. Young, he passed many pleasant
hours at the house of Mr. Clay, with whose
domestics he had formed an intimate acquaintance.
The young masters, Theodore and Thomas Clay;
though no longer the playmates of their coloured
favourite, Peter, continued to treat him with the
utmost kindness. He spent many a pleasant
evening at Ashland.
42 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Amongst the slaves of Mr. Clay, and one of the
merriest of them all, was Aaron, the coachman,
who was the father of Charles, Mr. Clay’s body
servant, a special favourite of his master, and
during the last years of the great statesman’s life,
ever at his side.

Aaron was an excellent servant—quick, intelli-
gent, and energetic. His mirthfulness and good
feeling rendered him a favourite with all; and his
stories, songs, and many jests often made the
kitchen ring again, and proved a great attraction
to Peter.

But Aaron had one great infirmity. He loved
a dram, and when tempted by the sight and smell of
his favourite liquor, he could seldom resist the
yearnings of his appetite. This was peculiarly
annoying to the lady of the house, as it sometimes
unfitted him for duty when she had most need for
his services.

He one day drove her carriage into town, and
while she was paying a visit, he took the oppor-
tunity to indulge in a glass of the loved liquor,
which he enjoyed so much that he took another,
and another, and when his mistress was ready to go
home he was quite incapable of taking his place on
the driving-box, and she was obliged to hire a man
to take his place and drive the carriage home.
For this serious offence Mrs. Clay resolved that
Aaron should be punished; but it could not be
done without her husband’s consent, as the over-
THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. 43

seer was forbidden to strike one of the house-
servants without his express permission.

To Mr. Clay was recited the story of Aaron’s
misconduct, and the inconvenience and mortifica-
tion to which he had thereby subjected his mistress.
As he had tried various milder means to cure his
slave of this mischievous habit, he decided that
more severe measures must be resorted to.

The next morning he sent for the overseer, and
directed him to take Aaron into the carriage-house
and give him a slight whipping. “Now do it
quietly,” said the master, “and be sure not to cut
the skin. I don’t want to hear any disturbance.
Do it as gently as possible.”

The overseer respectfully assented, and went
out, glad to have an opportunity of venting a little
long-cherished spleen against “ that saucy coach-
man.” But one of the maid-servants chanced to
overhear this conversation, and she stole out of
the house and sought Aaron.

“Look yer,” said she, “ you know what massa
say P”

“ Know what massa say P No! How I know what
he say when he never speak to me dis mornin’ ?”

‘Well, he say to de overseer, ‘ Aaron must be
punish; for he get drink when Mrs. Clay want him
for drive the carriage. You may take him to the
carriage-house and whip him, but don’t cut him
up.’ ”

“*Don’t cut himup!’ Massa say so? Well,
4A THE STOLEN CMILDREN.

well, reckon this chile be ready. Overseer mighty
good; he talk so clever; ’pears like he think I’s
white sometimes, but the debilin himeye. He
done wanted this long time to get.a cut at me. I
knows what overseers means when dey gets too
good. Yah, yah! He tink now he gwine gib dis
chile all he owes him.” !

The girl’s astonished eyes followed Aaron as he
leaped over the fence, and ran towards a small
grocery that stood at a short distance. Here he
had no difficulty in procuring a dram, and having,
as he concluded, fitted himself for the anticipated
contest, he returned home and resumed his work.

Soon theoverseer called from the carriage-house
door— Aaron.”

“Yes, Sir.”

“Come here.” In a moment the slave stood
before him.

“ Aaron, Mr. Clay says you must come into the
carriage-house and be whipped.”

“Did massa say so P ”

“Yes. Jiesays your habit of drinking annoys
your mistress so often that you must be punished
for it. He says he has tried to persuade you to
leave it off, but it does no good. I don’t like to
whip you, Aaron; but it is Mr. Clay’s orders.”

“Well, if massa say so, then it must be so;”
and he walked quietly into the carriage-honse,
followed by his kind friend, the overseer, whv care-
fully fastened the door on the inside.
THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. 45



“Now, Mr. ,” said Aaron, “ you may whip
me, if massa say so, but you needn’t tie me. I
won't be tied.” i

“Very well,” replied the overseer, throwing
down the rope he had in his hand; “ you needn’t
be tied if you will stand still, But you must take
off your coat.”

“Yes, Sir; but if I take off my coat to be
whipped, you ought to take your’n off first to whip -
me.”

The overseer perceived that he had taken a
dram, and knew he must indulge his whim if he
would obey Mr. Clay’s orders to keep quiet. Sohe
pulled off his coat, and Aaron quickly laid his
beside it on the floor. Then followed the vest, the
slave insisting that the overseer should first re-
move his own. “Now your shirt, Aaron,” said
he.

“Yes, Sir, but you must take off your’n first.”

This was going further for the sake of quiet
than the overseer intended or approved; but he
hesitated only fora moment. It would be best,
he thought, to humour him. He had long wished
for a chance to humble Aaron, and now the time
had come.

He proceeded to comply with this last wish of
the culprit. But, no sooner had he lifted his arms
to. pull his shirt over his head, than Aaron seized
the garment, and twisting it round his neck with
his head still muffled in it, he held him fast as in
46 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

a vice. Then, catching up the whip, he applied it
vigorously to. the overseer’s naked back, raising
the skin atevery stroke. His victim screamed and
threatened vengeance; butallinvain. The blows
fell hard and fast, laid on with a will, and by an
arm of muscular power vastly superior to his own.

Mr. Clay heard the uproar, and grew very
angry. ‘I told him,” said he, “ to make no noise,
and to be sure not to whip the poor fellow
severely. He must be cutting him to pieces with
all that outery.”

He hastened as fast as possible to the carriage-
house. The door was fastened within; but he
could hear the whizzing of the whip as it descended
on thesufferer’s back. ‘‘ Open the door,” he cried.
‘‘Didn’t I tell you not to whip him hard? Open
the door, I say!”

“O, Mr. Clay,” cried the overseer from within,
in a muffled voice that was scarcely audible, “it’s
Aaron whipping me! I haven’t given him a
blow!”

“« Aaron,” cried the master, “ open the door.”

The command was instantly obeyed. With his
right hand, in which he still held the whip that he
had used to such good purpose, he moved the
fastenings of the door; while, with his left hand,
he retained his vice-like grasp of the twisted shirt.
His face was all complacence, and his master could
see his eyes twinkling with mirth, and a roguish
smile lurking at the corner of his mouth,
THE BROTHERS SEPARATED. 47

Mr. Clay stood for a few moments mute with
astonishment at the strange scene. But when he
fully comprehended what had been’ taking place
there, he could not refrain from bursting into a
hearty laugh. The overseer, as soon as he was
released, proceeded to explain the manner in which
he had been caught, and how grievously he had
been ill-treated ; and insisted that now he ought
to be allowed to whip Aaron. The master did not,
however, seem to feel the cogency of the arguments
by which the disappointed functionary urged his
claim to be permitted to visit Aaron with a sound
whipping. The master quietly expressed his
opinion that there had been whipping enough ;
and returned to his room greatly amused with
Aaron’s exploit, which, in after years, often served
to promote a laugh amongst his friends.
CHAPTER VII,

THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER,

\







=ETER was sent by his owner
| to his brother, Mr. William
Gist, to be employed on his
plantation, in April, 1818.
He: had not been there long before
Mas’r Nattie’s health began to fail.
¢~ | For a long time he struggled against
disease, and refused to acknowledge that he was
ill: but at last he was obliged to yield. His con-
stitution was worn out by intemperance and the
indulgence of evil passions, and no medical skill
could arrest the approach of the angel of death.
When Peter visited the town, which he had to
do every week, he noticed the sunken eye and
hollow cheek of his owner, and his heart sank
within him. He had but little affection for his
master, for who could love old NattieGist? But
if he should die there would bea sale. The traders
would be at the auction; and then adieu to the
last hope he cherished of one day joining his beloved
brother.
THE DEATH OF A SLAVYEHOLDER. 49

The wretched old man continued to fail, and
his last days were spent in loneliness and gloom.
His housekeeper and cook, Aunt Mary, was his
nurse. Poor woman! She had learnt patiently
to endure all his caprices. Her will, her very
womanhood, had been crushed into submission to
his authority; for, although a slave, he called her
his wife. And now in the death hour the down-
trodden woman moistens the parched lips, all
heedless of the bitter curses and blasphemies they
utter. ;

On the Saturday morning that witnessed the
closing scene of the bad man’s life, Peter had come
to tHe: market, and went to see Mas’r Nattie. His
brother and the doctor stood silently by, witnessing
his agony as he strove with the King of Terrors.
There was no light of Christian hope in the fast-
glazing eye; no love in that obdurate heart. He
would resist, he would live ! Why should he die ?
But “the wicked is driven away in his wickedness.”
Fearful was the frown upon his face as the wicked
oppressor was forced to yield to the great con-
queror. He struggled, groaned, gasped, cursed,—
and the wretched spirit was alone with God.
Horror sat upon every countenance as the nurse
silently closed his eyes.

The old man had sold most of his slaves, and
only eleven, including the six that had gone to
Alabama remained. All these, with some other
property, he hequeathed to his favourite nephew,

RE
50 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Levi Gist. So that Peter and Levin, without
the dreaded auction, found themselves both still
belonging to the same owner.

Peter started for his new home in Alabama on
a cold Sabbath morning in December, with John
Gist, a younger brother of his new ‘‘ Mas’r Levi.”
He carried with him a grateful remembrance of
Miss Maltha, who, with a kindly smile and good
bye, handed him a handful of biscuits as he was
setting off on his journey. This kind act he never
forgot.

Peter’s only regret in leaving Lexington was
associated with the idea that possibly after all
these years his parents might come in search of
their children. and find that both of them were
gone. But that idea he scarcely dared to indulge,
it had become now so very unlikely. He had a
heavy sinking of the heart, at the thought that he
must henceforth be exposed to all the hardships of
the South, of which he had heard such dreadful
accounts. But he endeavoured to banish all such
unpleasant reflections, and comforted himself on
the journey with the thought that he was going
to be restored to the companionship of the brother
he loved so dearly. Levin was at the end of the
journey.

Poter’s heart beat fast as he approached Bain-
bridge, which was to be his future home. But
it was not until the sixth of January, that they
ceached their destination, having paid several visits
THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 51

at different houses on the way. Everything he
saw appeared strange and uncouth. The “ Town,”
consisted of about thirty log cabins scattered here
and there among the tall old forest trees. Groups
of white-haired, sallow-skinned children were play-
ing about the doors, and between the trees were
seen the bright waters of the Tennessee ee
in the sun-light.

“Well, Peter,” said Master John, “this is
Bainbridge. How do you like the looks of the
place?”

“Looks like ’taint a town, Mas’r John. I
never knowed folks have a town in the woods.”

“QO! The woods will be gone in a few years.
Don’t you see, many of these trees are dead now?
They girdle them that way, and next year they
die.”

Peter could hardly believe that those two log
cabins with an open passage between them, con-
stituted Mas’r Levi’s residence in Alabama. ‘“ Ole
Mas’r Nattie say that they all gwine get rich out
here. What he say now, if he see his young
gentlemen a-livin’ in a cabin in the woods ’mong
poor white folks.” He followed his travelling
companion into the house, and was joyfully re- |
ceived there by Aunt Peggy the cook. ‘“O I’s so
glad,” exclaimed she, “to see somebody from de
ole place.”

From Peggy heascer tained that Levin was-well.
Presently the sound of wheels was heard. “ Dar’s

B2
52 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

my ole man with his waggon,” said Peggy; ‘he’s
gwine to de mill whar de boys is all to work.”

' A moment more and Peter was seen bounding
into the waggon by the side of old Frank, an old
fellow-slave. He was hastening to the embrace
of his brother Levin, and could hardly in his im-
patience collect his ideas sufficiently to answer all
the old man’s questions about his former home
and the dear friends he had left behind. Joyful
was the meetiug between the two brothers: and
glad was Peter to find there Alfred and Allison,
who had for years been the companions of himself
and Levin, and to whom both were attached with
almost a brother’s love.

After two weeks spent about the house, Peter
was sent to the cotton field. Here a new world
opened before the young slave. Widely different
was the beautiful forest scenery that presented
itself to his gaze from the brick-yards, and the
fields of corn, tobacco, and hemp, amongst which
his boyhood had been spent. The crop was
now about half picked. The employment was all
new to Peter; and though it did not seem to be
difficult, and he worked diligently all the day, at
‘ night he had picked only twelve pounds and a
half. The other boys played many jokes upon
him, and were greatly amused at his awkward-
ness. But Peter was not the boy to be outdone
by any of them.

At night when Master Andrew weighed the
THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 53

cotton that each had ‘picked, he told them that he
would give a new pair of shoes to the one who
should pick fifty pounds the next day. Allison
was nearly barefoot, and he worked hard for the
prize. But Peter had learned wisdom by one day’s
experience in the cotton field. To the surprise
of everybody, he had at night seventy pounds.
After this he was seldom out-done in the cotton
field. His fingers were long and nimble, and he
could pluck the fleecy treasure from the frost-
browned ball almost without an effort. He was
one of the most valuable and efficient servants
amongst all that his master called his ‘‘ property.”

Bainbridge, where Peter now was, had been
mainly settled by poor whites who gained a scanty
subsistence by hunting and fishing. It was sur-
rounded by the estates of wealthy planters,
some belonging to the aristocratic families of
Carolina or Virginia; but others were owned by
ignorant and vulgar men who had gained wealth
as overseers and negro-drivers, or as negro-traders,
and through these refined pursuits had become
entitled to take rank amongst the aristocrats of
Alabama. The store of Messrs. Gist was the
favourite resort of these planters; for there the
post-office was kept, and there all sorts of liquor
were sold. -

For two years Peter pursued his avocations
on the farm with his brother, experiencing none
but kindly treatment. The farm made excellent
54 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

crops in proportion to the number of hands em-
ployed; and the business of the store was very
lucrative. During the winter Peter and Levin
and their fellow-slaves, had many opportunities
of earning pocket-money. Flat-boats laden with
cotton, while coming down the river, were some-
times stove on the rocks, in the mussel shoals, near
which the small town was situated. The cotton
getting wet was rendered unfit for market, unless
the bales were opened and dried. This furnished
employment for the negroes on Sundays. The wet
cotton was spread on rocks or boards in the sun-
shine, and frequently turned and shaken until it
was dry and fit to be packed for the market. For
this labour they sometimes received a dollar, (four
shillings and twopence English money) per day,
thus supplying themselves with the means of
obtaining many little comforts which could not
be obtained otherwise.

In the year 1821, Peter’s master, Levi Gist,
bought a plantation of four-hundred-and-eighty
acres, about seven miles from the town. He
also built a new large brick house in Bainbridge.
In the fall of the year, all the slaves except Peter
were removed to the new plantation. Peter was
retained to attend upon his master and the young
and beautiful bride whom he brought to the new
house in December. From this lady Peterreceived
generous and uniform kindness, which he never.
ceased to remember with heartfelt gratitude. She
THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 55

had come on a visit to her sister, Mrs. McKiernan,
who, with her husband, had recently settled on a
plantation near to that purchased by Mr. Gist.

Peter had now to perform the duties of cook,
housemaid, and waiter; he being the only servant
in the house excepta little boy. These were some
of the brightest days of his life hitherto. His time
was fully occupied, but he succeeded in giving satis- _
faction to his young mistress, and her approving
smile and gentle kindness shed brightness upon his
lowly path. But for the one cloud that shadowed
his spirit, he would have been content and happy.
He could not forget his mother and hishome. His
heart yearned for these, and while he still cherished
hope, he was often tempted to fear that he was
destined never to see them again.

Now arrived a memorable era in Peter’s life.
Hitherto he had been gay and thoughtless, full of
levity, and regardless altogether of the claims of
religion. Nor, since he left his mother’s roof, had
he met with any who cared for his soul, or paid
any attention to religious matters. He was now
twenty-one years of age; and he began to exercise
his thoughts upon those things that relate to the
soul and eternity. There were many religious
slaves in the wide circle of his acquaintances; and
it was probably through conversation with these
that Peter first began to feel concerned about his
soul. But whatever were the means, it is certain
that the young slave experienced a gracious change,
56 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

and became a new creature in Christ Jesus. He
saw now, in a new light, the moral degradation
that prevailed all around him amongst those of his
own colour; and he looked with abhorrence upon
the unblushing licentiousness in which the white
men indulged, and shuddered as the blasphemous
oath, the obscene jest, and the fulminations of vin-
dictive passion fell from the lips of those who were
the gentlémen of the neighbourhood. He had been
accustomed to these things ever since he had
entered the slave-land, and he had regarded them
with indifference. But now he saw and heard
them with loathing, and he resolved, by Divine
help, to shun the insidious advances of every vice.
‘He had partially contracted evil habits; but now
he abandoned the use of tobacco, which he had
commenced when buta boy. He had sometimes
taken a dram with his companions ; now he deter-
mined (it was before the era of total abstinence
associations) that he would henceforth touch no
intoxicating drink. His character for integrity,
truth, and honesty became firnily established ; and
though he was but a slave, he won the confidence
of all with whom he was connected.

With this great change came a more earnest
yearning after freedom. He was born free, and
the knowledge of that embittered to him the
curse of slavery ; and with every power of his soul
aroused against the stupendous wrong, he resolved
that, God helping him, by some means he would be
THE DEATH OF A SLAVEHOLDER. 57

free. By flight, if opportunity served; or by pur-
chase, if it were possible, he would win back his
birthright. And there seemed to be something
whispering within him that his object would be
achieved, and he would breathe the air of the
free.

He faithfully pursued his round of humble
duties, trusting in the living God, and patiently
waiting till he should see some opening in the
dense, dark cloud that enveloped him and his
fortunes.

In October, 1822, Peter’s owner relinquished
his share in the store to a brother, and removed to
the plantation. His slaves were all well-treated.
The discipline of the mistress was that of kindness ;
and for good order, comfort, and happiness the
plantation and household of Levi Gist was pro-
nounced by one who knew it well an oasis in the
desert—a, solitary star in a midnight sky.

Two years have passed since the family came
to live at the plantation. Mas’r Leviis prosperous
as wellas happy. His crops all look well, and his
negroes are healthy and obedient.

“O, mas’r!” says a voice at his side. He turns,
and sees Levin. He has grown tall and manly, a
fine, stout fellow, whose gentle ways make him a
favourite with all on the plantation.

“Well, Levin, what do you want?” responds
the master. ‘‘ What is the matter?”

“©, nothin’s the matter, Sir; only I wanted
58 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

to ax you if you’s willin’ I should get married,
Sir?” es

“Get married P Why, yes. You're old enough,
I suppose. Over twenty, aren’t you?”

“Yes, Sir. Jis twenty-five.”

** Well, where’s the girl you want to marry P
You can have a wife as soonas you like, if you will
get one of the right sort.”

“T wants Fanny Hogun, Sir; and ole Mas’r
Jimmy, he say I may have her if you’s willin’,
Sir.”

-“Fanny Hogun! Old Jimmy Hogun’s Fanny!
The very worst place in the neighbourhood for a
fellow to be running! Fanny! What put into
your stupid head to go there to hunt for a wife ?
No, you can’t have Fanny. You may have a wife
and welcome; butno boy of mineshall be spending
his nights and Sundays at old Jemmy Hogun’s;
d’ye hear? ”

“But, massa, Fanny’s a good girl, and ‘pears
like *twont do no hurt to go and see her, Sir. I
don’t want nary nother wife, Sir.”

“But I tell you, Levin, I can’t let one of my
boys have a wife at sucha place as that. So don’t
talk any more about it. Youcan hunt up another
girl that will suit you better.”

Levin walked away sadly disappointed. He
knew his master had good cause for disliking to
have his people associate with Old Hogun’s
negroes. His place was the resort of wild and
THE DEATH OF A SLAYEHOLDER. 59

reckless characters ; for there the rein was given to
every evil passion without the least restraint.

All this was well known to Levin. But Fanny,
he was sure, was good and true, and very different
from her companions. Besides, he and Fanny
loved each other dearly, and he could not give her
up. He disliked exceedingly to offend his master,
who had always been so kind to him; yet he couid
not decide to sacrifice his true affection. Forsome
time he hesitated; but love conquered at last,
and without the approbation of his master he
took the lively Fanny for his wife. His master and
mistress were displeased. They didall they could
to prevent what they considered an ill-advised
procedure, and Levin’s disobedience gave them
real pain.

Levin hoped that, once married, all his troubles
would be past. But he was disappointed. He
could seldom go to see his wife, for the overseer,
aware that his master disapproved of the connec-
tion, placed all possible impediments in his way.
He went so far one day, after one of Levin’s stolen
visits, as to strip and tie him up to whip him.
This the master prohibited. But when Fanny
dared to come to see her husband, she was under
no such friendly protection. In spite of Levin’s
prayers and protestations, he mangled her tender
flesh with the whip.

Soon after his marriage Levin’s health began
to fail, and his kind mistress took him into the
60 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

house to do lighter work. Renewed efforts were
made to induce him to give up Fanny and refrain
from visiting her. But in vain. His love for
Fanny was warm and true. Mr. Gist’s patience
at length gave way. He would not thus be baffled
by a slave. He would force him to obey his wishes.
He accordingly bound the astonished slave, and
three hundred and seventeen lashes fell on his
. naked back. But when the master’s passion sub.
sided, he was filled with remorse. He bitterly
regretted the great wrong he had done to his poor
slave, and confessed it to him. After that the
true-hearted pair were suffered peaceably to visit
each other,
CHAPTER_ VIII.

PETER’S MARRIAGE








Cys

\$== BOUT two yearsatfter Levin’s
: marriage, Peter also took to
VA \e himself a wife. The object of
hischoice was named Lavinia,
commonly called Vina. She was
the daughter of a slave woman

P LEE named Sally, the ‘“ property” of a
Mr. Foxall. Mr. Foxall was kind to his slaves;
and he was overcome with grief and humiliation
when these trusting servants—more his friends
than slaves—must be sold and scattered to pay the
creditors of a gambling partner, he having fled
with all that he could scrape together of the
common property.

O! what sorrow rushed over the spirits of
those doomed slaves when they learned their
destiny! As many as could be disposed of by
private sale were thus parted with to save them
from falling into the hands of the traders. Vina
was the first of all the number to be sold. She
was, at the time, hired out to service at the kotel
62 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

in Courtland. It was Sunday morning, and Aunt
Sally, her mother, was coming in that day to see
herchildren. She had just finished some domestic
duties, when Dr. P. , of Courtland, entered.

“ Your name is Vina,” said he, “ and you be-
long to Mr. Foxall?”

“Yes, Sir.”

“Well, I have bought you, and you must be
ready to’ go with me in an hour.”

He left the room, and Vina gazed after him be-
wildered. It was so sudden—only one hour, and
her mother had not yet come.

She looked into the street. There was no one
that cared for her. Buta thought struck her :—
she would go and see her master.

Mr. Foxall lived near. Thither the excited girl
hastened ; but it was only to be disappointed.
Well-nigh broken-hearted at the necessity of
parting with his servants, he had shut himself up,
and could not bear to meet any of them after
selling them to strangers.

The poor girl returned to the hotel. There she
learnt that Dr. P. had not bought her for him-
self, but, being indebted to a Mr. McKiernan and
a Mr. Strut, of Nashville, he had, at their request,
bought her and a young girl named Rosetta for
them. With an aching heart, she stood watching
for her mother. :

“Ready, girl?” shouted a coarse voice.
“Come, can’t wait. Bring along your traps, if




PETER'S MARRIAGE. 63

you’ve got any; but you can’t take a big bundle,
for there are two of you to ride.”

Vina gazed for a moment at the speaker, a
coarse, ill-looking man on horseback. Seeing that
Rosetta, her companion in misery, was holding
another horse by the bridle, she picked up ‘her



little bundle and went out. One long look she
cast up the street, with a faint hope that she might
see her mother approaching in the distance.

The hope was in vain. She saw several happy
64 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

mothers, with their children, walking to the
House of God; and maidens of her own age came
tripping by, but no heart sympathised with the
great sorrow that filled her own bosom. Mechani-
cally she mounted the horse, Rosetta sprang up
behind her, and they went on their dreary way.

Late in the evening the two maidens reached
their destination, and were conducted to the kit-
chen, where many wondering and scrutinizing eyes
rested upon them. Vina especially was very
. sorrowful; yet no tear moistened her eyelid; no
sob gave vent to the anguish of her troubled heart.
Presently, a young girl entered with a message.

‘‘Missus say come in de house; want to see
what ye all looks like.”

“Den go ’long, honey,”’ said the kind old cook,
as she drew Vina from the shaded corner, and
placed her beside Rosetta. ‘‘ Hol’ up your heads
now, chillern, and look peart when ye goes in to see
missus. Go long.”

“De Lor’ help ’em, poor little critturs,” sighed
the good old woman, as she watched them from
the kitchen-door. ‘“ Dey’s gota she-wolf to deal
wid now. ’Pears like dey ain’t used to hard times,
no how; but nobody can’t say dat dar ’bout ’em
arter dey’s done staid on dis yer place one year.”

Vina and her companions had not fallen into
very good hands. Both Mr. and Mrs. McKiernan
had been thoroughly corrupted and embruted by
contact with the influences of slavery. He would
. PETER’S MARRIAGE. 65

have been a fit companion for Mrs. Stowe’s
Legree. She was worthy of the place she
occupied.

Timidly the two girls advanced into the pre-
sence of their future mistress, She scrutinized
them for a moment with her keen, cold eyes, ir
which shone not the slightest gleam of womanly
softness, and then addressed herself to Vina :

“What can you do, girl: Dee

“T’s bin used to missin’, ma’am, and waitin’ in
the house.”

“Did you ever work in the field ? ”

“No, ma’am.”

“ Ah!”—sneeringly—“you’ve been raised quite
alady! Can you round corn? or can you chop
through cotton ?”

“No, ma’am,’

“You're such a oy I suppose you never saw
any cotton grow ?”

“Yes, ma’am, I’s seen plenty cotton growin’,
but never worked it.”

Mr. McKiernan then approached, and, unfasten-
ing her frock behind, examined her back. ‘ Have
you ever been whipped ?” asked he.

“No, Sir.”

sf So I thought. Your back is as smooth as
mine.’

Martha,the young girl that hadsummoned them

to the mistress’s presence, accompanied them back
to the kitchen. ‘‘ Your frock is unfastened,” said.
F
66 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Rosetta, as they went out, “stop a minute till [
button it.”

“QO, no,” whispered Martha, “I can’t have it
fastened, my back’s so sore.”

“What's the matter with your back ? ”

“Why, whar missus cuts meup. She’sallers
a-beatin’ me. O, I wish I’s dead.”

The. two girls exchanged mournful looks; but
no more wasspoken. As the new-comers were un-
accustomed to field-labour, it was determined to
keep them for the present in the house, and send
Martha to the field, who was glad to get away from
the jealousy and cruelty of her mistress. To Vina
was assigned the post of housemaid and waiter.
Rosetta was installed as nurse to an infant, and
both gave satisfaction for several months. But
Vina pined and wasted through anxiety concerning
her mother and brothers. She had never been able
to learn what had become of them, or to whom they
had been sold. Her shrunken figure and the look
of melancholy that never left her face shewed how
wretched she was.

One morning her mistress chanced to discover
a ladle in the kitchen, which Vina had accidentally
left there. It was the first instance of carelessness
or neglect that had occurred in Vina’s department
since she had been in the house. With’ quick
anger, the mistress seized the cow-hide, and with
her own fuir hands, whipped the trembling slave.
She did it much more gently than was her wont;
PETER’S ‘MARRIAGE. 67

yet the blood oozed through the bruised skin that

was swelled in ridges across poor Vina’s back. She,

poor ignorant girl, imagined that she had been

severely punished. Ah! the day was coming

when she would regard such a whipping as “ only
-@ bresh.”

From that time she resolved, if possible, to get
away from the immediate jurisdiction of her mis-
tress ; and as soon as she could find him alone, she
asked her master if she might go to the field.

He asked, ‘What put that into your head?
You don’t know anything about field-work, do
you?”

“No, Sir, but [reckon I could learn. I mought
as well take my chance in the field. But, please,
Sir, don’t let missus know I axed you.”

“ Look here,” said he, to his amiable spouse,
soon after this conversation, “ Martha don’t do
much in the field; she is sickly, you know, and
she can’t keep up with the others. I reckon we’d
better bring her back into the house, and take
Vina in her place. She seems to be well, and

- willing to work.”
“Well,” replied the lady, in her characteristic
asperity of tone, “I’d rather have Vina in the
- house; but if you can’t manage Martha, send her
in. Ican make her work. She won’t conquer me
with her sickly complaining.”

‘Vina went to the field, and soon was perfect
in the lessons to be learnt there. Soon after Mr.

Â¥2
. 68 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

‘Strut, for whom one of the two girls had becn
vbought, came to claim his “ property.” The

McKiernans mancuvred to keep Vina.

When the busiest season was over, Vina ob-
tained a “pass” to go to Courtland, to obtain
some clothes she had been compelled to leave be-
hind when she was hurried away. Shealso obtained

. the loan of a horse, and set off with a beating
- heart; for she hoped now to see her mother and

brothers, or at least to learn how they had been

‘ disposed of.

How eagerly she looked about her as she rode
through the familiar street! At length her eyes
rested on an old acquaintance, and she inquired in

_ trembling accents for her mother.

“Ta! honey,” replied the old woman she had

-accosted, ‘ whar you bin all dis time, and never

knowed your mammy sol’? Mr. Peoples done
bought her. He got ole Moses and Jeny too.
Yer mammy’s mighty lucky; got sol’ ‘long o’ her
ole man” ( Vina’s stepfather) ‘‘and one o’ her
boys. Mr. Peoples mighty. good master, too;
leastways, so all de folk say whar lives out dar.

- But yer mammy to Mr. Mosely’snow. Mr. Peoples

. done hire ’em all out for de balance dis year.”

Her horse’s head was immediately turned to-
wards Mr. Mosely’s. She could not rest till she
reached the goal of her hopes—her mother’s side.

Aunt Sally was at work in the field, little
dreaming of the pleasure in store for her. Vina
PETERS MARRIAGE. 69

left her horse at the house, having paid her respects
to the mistress, who was very different from Mrs.
McKiernan. She came near the working gang,
when Aunt Sally raised herhead. “My chile! my
chile!” she cried, as with uplifted hands and
streaming eyes she ran and pressed her daughter
to her heart. Mrs. Mosely had kindly bidden Vina
to tell her mother she might have a holiday while
she remained. And when the first gush of emotion
subsided they walked towards the house.

“ O, Vina,” said her mother, ‘‘ how I did mourn
when I come to town dat Sunday, and you was
gone. I reckon I skeered ’em alla screaming and
takin’ on. I didn’t know what to do; so I went
right to mas’r. He felt mighty bad too; but he
say he can’t help it. He’s ’bliged, he say, to sell
everything, and de Lord know he wouldn’t part
with his servants if dar was any way to keep ’em.
He cried a heap while Iwas dar. He couldn’t tell
me nothin’ "bout de place whar you done gone. O,
Lord! how my heart done ache! And it ’pears it
never done stop achin’ till I see your blessed face.
Is you got good massa and missus, chile ? ”

“Not over and "bove. But dey ain’t troubled
me much yit. They’s mighty tight on the rest.
O, how some o’ de people thar does git cut up!
Pears like dey will kill ’em sometimes.”

“Poor chile! poor chile! May de good Lord
keep de wolves off o’ your flesh! Dar ain’tno way
to live with dem kind, only to pray to de Lord to
70 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

keep de lions’ mouth shet up. We’s poor critters:
in dis yar world, but dar’s a crown for us up yon’,
if we minds de Word of de Lord, and keeps patient
to the end.”

Old Sally was a pious woman, and of a kind
and loving disposition. Her whole trust was in
her Redeemer, and as well as her enslaved condi-
tion permitted her to exercise influence over them,
she taught her children the fear of the Lord.

Swiftly passed the hours till Sunday; and very
pleasant they were. - Then, as her “‘ pass” specified,
Vina must return. Jeny, her brother, saddled her
horse and brought him to the door. She tore
herself from her mother’s arms, and was gone. A
great load had been taken from her heart, now
that she knew her loved ones were in good hands.
The old light came again into her eye, the accus-
tomed elasticity to her step ; and the old cook re-
marked that “little Vina gone mighty peart like
since she tuck dat are jaunt to de ole place.”

McKiernan’s plantation was only a mile from
Mr. Gist’s, and there being a near relationship
between the families, a greater intimacy existed
between the servants than was usual between the
slaves of even near neighbours.

Peter was at this time a fine cheerful fellow in
the full, fresh vigour of manhood. TheMcKiernans
both liked him, and amongst the servants his
bright, good-humoured face was always welcomed.

Even little Vina, who was developing into a
PETER’S MARRIAGE. “1

handsome girl, felt the genial influence of Peter’s
presence, and her shyness and reserve gradually
melted away in the warmth of his smiles. From
the first Peter regarded the desolate, sorrowful
looking girl with pity, for he knew well the character
and temper of the mistress into whose power-she
had fallen; and he never failed to speak kindly
to her.

Week after week, and month after month
the sympathy deepened between the kind-hearted
youth and the timid, shrinking maiden, until it
ripened into love, and by the time Vina had been
a year at her new home, they had confessed their
mutual attachment, and only waited an opportunity
to be married. Vina was at this time only fifteen
years old.

Mr. and Mrs. Kiernan marked this growing
attachment with much satisfaction. Vina’s owner
had long looked with a covetous eye upon Peter,
and he encouraged his attachment to Vina, in the
hope that when he had a wife away from home the
inconvenience of it would induce Mr. Gist to part
with him. To his own master and mistress he was
afraid to communicate his wishes. His mistress
always wanted him at home. She depended much
upon him; and he knew that she would object to
having his attention diverted from her business by
family cares of his own. Yet Peter felt that he
was himself aman. ‘‘ Am I not twenty-five years -
old? Surely, when I have waited so many years
72 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

upon my master’s family, they may be content to
spare me now and then of a Sunday.”

Still he knew they would oppose him; and he
resolved to keep his own counsel, in the hope that
“something would turn up.” He was not dis-
appointed.

Mr. and Mrs. Gist had for several years been
proposing to pay a visit to their friends at Lexing-
ton; and Peter had been made happy by the pro-
mise that he should drive the carriage. Now they
resolved to fulfil their purpose. To the astonish-
ment of all, Peter declared he did not wish
to go.

“Not go!” cried the master. “I thought there
was nothing you would like so well?”

“Well, so I would,” replied Peter, “ butit’s so
long now, that I’m afeared everybody there done
forgot me. There wouldn’t be nobody glad to see
me, no how.”

“Well, well, then old man Frank can go; he'll
not want to be asked twice.”

The family took their departure, all the servants
assembling to see them off, and express warm
wishes fora pleasant journey. They thenseparated’
to their respective labours. Peter alone remained
with dimmed eyes gazing down the road where the
carriage had disappeared. Ah! it was a great
pleasure he had sacrificed! “ What a fool I am,”
he said to himself, “here I stand, and they are gone;
and I might have gone too, to see my friends.’
PETER’S MARRIAGE. 73

But ’ll be married to Vina ’fore dey come back ;
. den it will be too late to make fuss ’bout it.”
Vina had made her home with a woman called
Aunt Lucy since she had gone to work in the field.
Thither, when his work was done, Peter hastened
with light and cheerful step. It was not difficult
to win Vina’s consent to an immediate marriage ;
for she had given all her young heart’s love to
Peter. Her master readily assented to the wishes
of the young couple, and on a pleasant evening
in June they. were married. Old Peter Hodge, a
Baptist preacher, a slave belonging to one of the
neighbours, performed the ceremony ; and a merry
company, consisting of all Vina’s fellow-servants,
and a few of Peter’s intimate friends, enjoyed a
substantial supper in the master’s kitchen.

The bride was very pretty, notwithstanding her
grotesque attire, which consisted of an old white
dress and a few quaint, old-fashioned ornaments,
the discarded finery of her mistress. The few
clothes she had brought from Courtland had been
worn out or stolen by her fellow-slaves. A white
linsey frock, which her mistress had given her, the
only article of clothing she had received since she
had been on the plantation, was minus the front
breadth. As she had no immediate prospect of
getting another frock from her owners, Peter gave
her a black surtout coat of his own, with which
she patched it. It was now half black and half
white, but it was decent and comfortable,
74 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Peter, however, had good clothes; and when
he found that McKiernan would supply Vina with
no comforts, he sold his own things to provide
decent clothing for his wife.

Soon after her marriage, Vina obtained per-
mission to pay another visit to her mother. Many
long and earnest conversations were held between
them ; and many times the Good Lord was thanked
for all His kindness towards them. Aunt Sally
had’a good master, and both her boys were close
at hand.

The young wife received many items of advice
and instruction from her mother, in which religion
was not lost sight of. The few days of her leave
expired all too soon, and the beloved daughter was
forced to say, Good-bye. This time there was less
of anguish in the parting—all she loved was not
left behind.
CHAPTER IX.

CHANGES AND DEATH.






N their return from Lexing-
ton the master and mistress
received a warm welcome.

Nee ‘How d’y, missus?” ‘O

| you’s purtier dan ever.” “ How

=| glad 2 is you’s come home once
| more.” These are the loving greet-
ings. Nor are the master and the baby forgotten.

When the supper is brought in, and Peter takes

his place as waiter, the master says :

“Well, Peter, so you’ve stolen a march upon
us since we've gone ? Been gettin’ married, eh? ”

“Yes, Sir, I’s been gettin’ married.”

“Ha, ha! You thought the folks at Lexington
had all forgotten you. Well, since you’ve been so
smart, I must try and buya wife for you. You'll
not be worth much if you have to be running off
every week to see your family. Besides, Mr.
McKiernan .intends to move to Bainbridge about
Christmas, and then you'll have a long road to
travel.”

But Vina’s master had no intention of selling
76 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

her. She was one of the best servants he had.
He would, however, be glad to buy her husband.

That was out of the question. Neither Mr.
Gist, nor his wife, would consent to sell Peter.
Andif they had been willing, Peter himself would
have remonstrated. He knew McKiernan too well
to wish for such a change.

McKiernan removed to Bainbridge. He had
bought a new plantation, much of it new land, and
to clear and plant it with corn and cotton required
the utmost diligence. There was no time to build
cabins, though there were not half enough to re-
ceive the people. All, therefore, that wished a
house to themselves, were obliged to spend their
Sundays in building it.

Peter immediately commenced preparations for
building a cabin for his wife. Every Saturday he
walked to Bambridge, a distance of seven miles ;
and early on Sunday morning he was at his work.
All the holy day he toiled, and often when the
moon shone far on into the night. Then by the
first peep of dawn on Monday he was away to
commence his labours for his master.

The house was at length finished, more sumptu-
ously than most cabins, inasmuch as it had a floor
formed of slabs. Peter had earned all he could,
working nights and holidays to get a little money
to buy necessary articles of furniture, but it was so
little he had to sell more of his clothes. Two or
three cooking utensils, two chairs and a trunk was
_ CHANGES AND DEATH. 77

all that he could get at first. To these he soon
added a walnut-wood bedstead, and a straw-stuffed
bed. McKiernan allowed his slaves a peck of
meal and three-and-a-half pounds of bacon per
week. Whatever vegetables they might require
they must raise by their Sunday labour, and in
this way they must procure clothes and comforts
as they could.

Mr. Gist had bought a shoemaker amongst his
slaves, and Peter having formed a friendship with
him, he cheerfully instructed himinhisart. This
was of great use to Peter, as he was able to make
shoes for himself and his wife, and thus save many
dollars. He also earned small sums by making
shoes at night for his fellow slaves. Thus Peter
was able to buy a cupboard for Vina, and a chest,
in which she could secure her own weekly allow-
ance from the half-clad, ever-hungry negroes. He
had bought a barrel to assist his wife’s house-
keeping. But before he could get it to her Mr.
Gist’s overseer took the liberty of appropriating
it to his own use.

“That’s my bar’l, Sir,” said Peter, “and I
want to use it myself.”

“Curse you! hush your mouth, you nigger.
I'll let you know you're not to forbid me to use a
barrel when I want it.”

“ Butit’s mine,” persisted Peter. “TI bought
it, and I’s gwine to carry it to my wife.”

The overseer was greatly infuriated. He could
“78 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

take no vengeance except by showering curses upon
Peter for claiming what was his own. So he went
and complained to Mr. Gist that one of the niggers
had been impudent to him, and swore to have
revenge. “ And if,” added he, “I don’t whip him
now, Tl] give him something that will hurt him a
heap worse.”

The master hesitated, but finally, concluding
from the fellow’s temper, that such a course would
be safest for the slave, he gave him permission to
whip him very slightly. Accordingly Peter was
tal.en to the stable, where twenty-five lashes were
inflicted on his naked back,

In September, 1826, the wailing of a tiny voice
was heard in Vina’s cabin. A new fount of love
was opened in that young mother’s heart, and her
frame thrilled with joy as she proudly placed in
her husband’s arms her first-born boy. She knew
her babe was born to slavery and sorrow, but hope
whispered that perhaps his lot, after all, might be
a happier one than thatof his parents! Peter had
managed to provide materials for a comfortable
wardrobe for the little stranger, and Vina took great
pleasure in making up the tiny garments. They
were coarse and without embroidery, but when
they were finished and laid in the trunk, she could
not help now and then lifting the lid to see how
nice they looked.

After going out to the field, the young mother
had but little time tolook after her boy. He was left
CHANGES AND DEATH. 79

all alone on the bed. Four times a day, for a few
moments only, she was permitted to go and minister
to his wants. Then, however he might cry, or even if
he were complaining of some of the little maladies
incident to children, she had to leave him. The
cottun must be picked. How often, when working
near at hand, she could hear his plaintive cry; but
she dared not leave her work to goto him. After
going from the field she washed her boy, and put
clean clothes upon him, and then washed his
clothes, her own, and herhusband’s. All this, with
mending, often found her occupation until near the
dawn. “But I wouldn’t see my child go dirty
and raggety,” said she, “if I neber get a wink o’
sleep.”

When little Peter was about a year old, Vina
had a severe illness from inflammation of the brain,
caused by the brutal treatment of the overseer.

“He tied my hands with his hand’chief, and
pulled my coat off o’ the waist ; and then he beat
me till Icouldn’t hardly stand. He struck me o’er
the head mos’ly,and tried to knock me down with
the butt end o’ his bull whip. My head was cut
in aheap o’ places, where the scars is on it yit.

“Treck’n he wouldn’ta give me so much, but
I tried to fight him atfirst, and he had to call two
o’ the men to help him tie me. He got so mad
that he jist went ’cordin’ to his own mercy.

“When he done beatin’, he curse powerful, and
80 2HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

say if I ever tole dis yer to massa, or to any person
close, so it would get to him, he’d gib me a heap
more; andif that didn’t do, he’d shoot me. Iwas
feard he mought kill me sly; so I never said nothin’
*bout it to anybody but Peter. He came home a
Sunday, and when he’s sittin’ by me, he sort o’ put
his arm round me. O! says I, don’t, put yer arm
thar, you hurt my back.”

‘<< What’s the matter o’ your back P’ says he.

“ done beat me,’ says 1; ‘but don’t you tell nobody,
for if he finds out I don’ tol’ the tale, he’ll kill me,
sure.’

“ Peter felt mighty bad when I tell him. ’Peared
like he could a’ gone out and kill ole Bill Simms
on the spot.

“The next Sunday, Simms come up afore my
house and speak to Peter, whar was a standin’ at
the door. Peter answered him mighty low, and
that made him mad, case he ‘lieved I done tol’ him
howI bin’ bused. ‘Seems to me,’ says he, ‘ you’re
gettin’ mighty grand. You're too great a gentle-
man to speak to a white person with respect.
Never mind, I’ll do-you a kindness some o’ these
days; I owe you somethin’ this long time.’

“* Well,’ says Peter, ‘that debt will be paid at
the judgment day.’ :

“When I hard dis, I tremble every minit; for
I’lieved I should have to take more next day.

“T had a heap o’ misery in my head all the time
CHANGES AND DEATH. 81

for two weeks arter I tuck that beatin’, and then
I got right sick, and they said I’s out 0’ my senses
for aweek. They sent for the doctor; but I didn’t
know nothin’ "bout it; and he said I’d tuck some
mighty hard blows on the head. Missus sent for
Peter to come, for they all ‘lieved I was gwine to
die. Then Peter tol’’em all ’bout what’s done
make me sick.

““Mas’r was mighty mad. ‘Why didn’t she
tell me this afore P’ said he.

“* Bekase,’ says Peter, ‘she know’d your rule
that, however bad the oversee beats your servants,
if they come for complain to you, you will give them
wus.’

“T reck’n I shouldn’t never done get well, if
they all hadn’t tuck such good care o’ me. When
T got so I could talk, mas’r ax me why I never
tell him what a beatin’ ole Simms gib me?

“«What I come to you for?’ saysI; ‘you allers
tole us never to do that, without we wanted more.
If I'd ’heved ’twould done any good, I’d a come to
you, Sir, mon’s quick.’

“ Soon’s I’s able to get out 0’ bed, mas’r come
to see me, and bring ole Simms with him. Then
he axed me ’bout that beatin’, an’ I up and tell
him ’fore his face. He couldn’t deny it. Mas’r
cursed him mightily, and tell him he should pay
my doctor’s bill, and for every day I was sick. I
nebber know’d "bout de payin’, but mas’r drove
him off the place, and he never come on it ’gain.”

G
82 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

In the spring of 1830, Peter’s master and:
mistress once more planned a visit to Lexington.
As the carriage drove away from the door, Aunt
Ceely, the cook, sobbed out, ‘‘’Pears like some-
thin’s gwine happen. I’s had mighty bad dreams
dese las’ nights.”

“O! you’s allers a dreamin’ — reckon your
dreams ain’t much ’count,” replied a cheerful girl
at her side. “I reckon nothin’ ain’t gwine hurt
dem, no how. Dey’s bin to Kaintucky ’fore dis.”

But that young mastér was never again to be
seen in his own home. After some months’ sojourn
in Lexington, they were about to return, and a
- large, gay party was assembled ata farewell dinner
on the day before their departure. The fond wife
saw her husband’s face turn ashy pale. He was
borne from the table to the sofa; but before any
medical aid could be summoned the spirit had
passed to its destiny, and the loving wife was a
widow.

The desolate woman returned with her children
to her now darkened home. It was a heavy blow
to the slaves. The master had his faults, and
sometimes they suffered from violent fits of passion
on his own part, but he protected them from the
violence of overseers and other ruffians, and sup-
lied them comfortably with wholesome food and
clothes. The master died without a will, and till
the law determined the distribution of his property,
the widow remained on the plantation, and pre.
CHANGES AND DEATH. 83

served, as far as possible, the accustomed order of
affairs. =

A yet more painful bereavement to Peter was
soon to follow the loss of his young master. Just
a year after, Levin’s health which had been far
from robust, began rapidly to decline, and it soon
became evident that his work was done. Levin
was a true Christian. He had put his trust in the
bleeding Lamb, and for some years, according to
the knowledge he possessed, had earnestly sought
to follow his Redeemer. Now, as death approached,
he experienced the fulfilment of the Master’s words
“My peace I give unto you. Not as the world
giveth, give I unto you.”

It was a great comfort to Levin that Fanny was
permitted to be with him during the last few days.
It was on the twenty-eighth of December that the
changecame. “ Call Peter, Fanny,” said he, sud-
denly awaking out of a gentle sleep.

“ Peter’s gone to Bainbridge, dear Levin.”

A shade of disappointment passed over his face.
For a few moments he remained silent in prayer.
Then suddenly he cried out aloud, “ Peter! Peter!
O, dear Peter.” There was a slight struggle—a
faint gasp, and the happy spirit of poor, deeply-
wronged, kidnapped Levin was atrest within the
veil. :

They placed the lifeless form in a rude coffin,
and bore it to its lowly grave. Where is the
ruffian that stole him from his home and his mother,

a2
84 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

never again to look upon them, and consigned him
to the multiplied wrongs and villanies of slavery ?
The time will come when the justice of the Al-
mighty will certainly find him out.

The death of this dear brother, whom he loved
with a strong and yearning affection, cast a heavy
gloom upon Peter’s spirits. He felt that he was
now alone. All his cherished hopes of one day
attaining. freedom were associated with Levin.
There was none now to share with him the
memories of their early childhood, their mother’s
love, and of the sad day when they were stolen
away.
CHAPTER X.

VINA’S TROUBLES,







: heart shared with her hus-
-£2) band. Vina was Aunt Sally’s
veanie child; and she was de-
votedly attached to her mother.
It was a comfort to the old
slave when her daughter became the wife of
Peter. In one of her frequent conversations with
old Moses, her husband, on this subject she re-
marked, “I’s mighty glad de poor chile done got
married. ’Pears like she won’t be so lonesome
now. I’d like to see her ole mas’r. But her
missus; she’s a screamer! Vina say de little gal
whar waits in de house gits her back cut up power-
ful, and she’sa sickly little thing. Hi! won’tdem
kind o’ ladies catch it mighty when de bad man
gits em? De Lord years all de screams o’ His
chilluns ; and He ain’t gwine put harps o’ gold in
dem dere hands, whar’s allers a playin’ wid de
cow-hide.”

Suddenly old Sally’s master announced his


86 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

intention to remove with all his able slaves to
Florida, of whose beauty and fertility he had
heard flattering accounts. Aunt Sally was over-
whelmed with sorrow, for the parting from her
children might be a final one; and such was the
pressure of the crop up to the very day of setting
out she had no time to visit her daughter, whom
she had not seen for several years. She must set
off on this dreary journey without telling her loved
one ‘“ Good-bye.”

Vina did not hear of the intended removal of
Mr. Peoples and his servants, until her mother
was already in Florida, and scarcely a hope re-
mained that they would ever meet again. Her
grief was extreme to lose her mother thus with-
out even a parting message ! This was harder than
all her previous trials.

Happily for Vina, Mr. Peoples did not like
Florida; and when he had made one crop he re-
turned with all his slaves in glad procession to his
former home. How did Vina’s heart dance for
joy when, soon after their return, Aunt Sally was
permitted to pay a visit to her daughter !

Thanks to Peter’s industry, Vina and her
children had always decent clothing, and their
‘cabin boasted many convenient articles of furni-
ture, such as slaves seldom possess. And to the
scanty dole of meal and bacon served out to them
on the plantation, Peter found means of adding a
little coffee and sugar, or a few pounds of flour.
VINA’S TROUBLES. 87

Aunt Sally rode briskly homewards, proud and
happy that Vina had found so good a husband, and
had two such “ peart chilluns.” Her joy endures
-but for a few months, and is then painfully inter-
rupted. The tidings circulated through the negro
quarters, to the consternation of all the inhabitants
of those cabins, that Mr. Peoples has bought a
plantation on the Gulf Coast, and thither his slaves
are all to be conveyed as soon as they can make
the necessary preparations for the journey.

The good old woman had taken a heart.
breaking farewell of Quall, her son, who remained
behind. It was their last fond meeting—their last
heart-crushed “ Good-bye.” Then old Sally and
her companions in trouble proceeded on their
dreary journey. The rendezvous for starting down
the river was at Bainbridge; and this being only
a few miles from McKiernan’s plantation, a faint
hope sprang up in her mind that she might once
more see her daughter, and bid her a final fare-
well. She determined at least to make an effort.

Arrived at Bainbridge, she had to wait for the
boats. Seeing a gentleman slowly riding by, Aunt
Sally approached him almost in despair. He pitied
her distress, and listened kindly while she recited
the cause of her sorrow.

“ So your daughter is at McKiernan’s ? What
is her name ?”

“ Her name Vina, Sir.”

“Vina? Why that’s Peter’s wife.”
88 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Yes, Sir, her man name Peter. He ‘longs to
Mas’r Levi Gist.”

“ Well, I’m his brother, Andrew Gist. Jl find
Vina myself, and send her down to see you.
Come, cheer up, aunty, you'll have good times
yet.”

Well mounted he rode fast, and soon made
up to a group of women in McKiernan’s field.
“Which of you all,” he inquired, “has a mother at
Peoples’ ?”

“ T¢’s Vina’s mother whar lives dar, Sir. Yon’s
Vina,” said a young girl, pointing to a woman who
was working apart from the rest.

“ How dy’e, Vina?” said the rider, ‘does Hou
mother belong to Peoples ?”’

“Yes, Sir.”

“ Well, if you go down to the landing, you'll see
the last of her, I reckon, for she’s going down the”
river. Peoples is moving down to the coast.”

He turned and rode away ; and Vina gazed after
him in speechless terror. Her mother! The coast!
How could it be? As soon as she recovered her-
self a little, she left the field, and took her course
with trembling steps to the house. Fortunately
both master and mistress were at home, and she
happened to find them in unruffled mood. She
told them what Mr. Gist had said; and they bade
her go to the landing, and stay with her mother as
long as the boats remained.

As she neared the landing she beheld many


















VINA’S TROUBLES. 91

fires, and around them groups of unhappy slaves.
All were weeping and sad; for there was scarcely
‘one that was not enduring the pang of hopeless
separation from husband, wife, children, or parents.
Vina could not hear her mother’s voice in the sad
murmur that met her ear. But, entering one of
the flat boats there, on a low stool, near a fire, sat
a female figurelooking quite disconsolate and hope-
less. Vina came near, and Aunt Sally, lifting her
head, sprang up, and with a cry of intermingled
anguish and joy, clasped her daughter to her breast.
“QO, my chile,” she exclaimed, “I’s studyin’ ’bout
you, whether I’s ever gwine see you agin or not.”
She sobbed aloud. “O! how can I go and leave
you, honey? Ishan’t neber come back no more!
Way down on the sugar farm I shall die, and der
won't be no daughter dar to see ’em lay me in de
grave.”

It was Friday ; and after Vina had been there
some hours, until near midnight, it was announced
that the boats would not probably leave Bainbridge
until Monday morning. Aunt Sally obtained per-
mission to spend the nextday with Vina. Swiftly
sped the hours of that day, and at night Vina
accompanied her mother back to the landing.
There they parted, the mother promising to return
in the morning and spend that day also with her
loved ones.

Early dawn saw the loving Vina on her way
to the river. She walked rapidly, for every moment
92 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

was precious. She came in sight of the landing,
and started back with a heavy groan; for there
all is vacancy where she had expected to find her
mother. There are smouldering fires, and here
and there a bit of an old blanket that has been
forgotten. But the boats are gone!

She meets her mother no more. That Gulf
farm is fatal to many of Mr. Peoples’ slaves. After
gathering only one crop, he sold his plantation and
removed to Mississippi, there to resume the culti-
vation of corn and cotton. Aunt Sally went with
him there. After several years she sank peacefully
to the grave, her heart filled with holy joy and
triumph over death. All who saw the light of
love and hope beaming from her eye in the dying
hour knew that she had been with Jesus. And
those who saw the heavenly smile that lingered on
her face when her pulse was still, and her cold
hands lay meekly folded across her breast, felt
that she was with Jesus, and that her happy spirit
had reached the happy home where she had so
often longed to be at rest.

Her master, who had always been kind to her,
wrote to her children to inform them of her
decease, and her final triumph over the powers of
the grave.

In October, 1831, another little voice was heard
in Vina’s cabin. While her children were small,
not an article of clothing was provided for them
by their owner—not until they were old enough to |
VINA’S TROUBLES. 93

do slight work about the house. Their mother
might manage to clothe them, or let them go naked.
She called her third boy William. His little
brothers gave him a joyous welcome; and so did
his parents, though, in truth, they scarcely knew
how they were to supply his baby wants. “ But
"pears like,” says the contented Vina, “every baby
I had I growed smarter, so when I had three I
tuck just as good care of ‘em all as I did of the
first one.”

When little William was a few months old a
woman, named Ann, left her children in her cabin
while she went to work in the field. She had built
a fire to make her children comfortable, as it was
winter. On her return she found her youngest one
burned to death. After this all the slave-mothers
were required to bring their children to the
kitchen when they went to the field, and leave
them in care of the cook.

One morning Vina, after being up most of the
night washing and mending for her husband and
children, slept a little later than usual. She
thought she would leave her children in her cabin
until she came in to nurse the baby. Then she
would take them to the kitchen,

The keen, malignant eye of the “ Missus”
detected the absence of Vina’s children, At the
breakfast time Vina took her three little ones to the
kitchen, and sat down to nurse her baby. Shortly
after Mrs. McKiernan came in, cow-hide in hand.
94 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“How’s this, Vina?” said she, “I thought I
told you that you wasn’t to leave your children in
your house of a morning ? ”

“Well, missus, I’s pushed this mornin’. I
hadn’t time a

“J don’t care how much you was pushed. I
told you to bring them here; and if the sun was
an hour high youshould obey me. Lay down your
child. I’m going to whip you now, for I said I
would doit. If your children had got burnt up
you would have blamed me about it.”

“No, ma’am, I wouldn’t——”’

“Tay your child down. T’ll let you know you
are to obey me.”

Vina obeyed, and when her weary shoulders
had received twenty hard lashes of the cow-hide
from the hands of this southern lady, she went
out to her work,


CHAPTER XI.

ADDITIONAL TROUBLE FOR PETER,









C= ORROW and macy were
again brought to Peter,
through the marriage of his
mistress to a Mr. Hogun, a
planter, who owned several planta-
- | tions, and ruled the destinies of
more than a hundred slaves.

This event rendered it necessary that the
property of Mr. Gist should be divided between
the mother and her five children. The slaves
were to be divided into five parties, to be appro-
priated by lot, the families being kept together as
far as practicable. Only one Jot was chosen at that
time, as the children were of tender age. Peter
was not in the lot that fell to the mistress, at
which he rejoiced. He was sorry to leave that
loved mistress; but he was glad to escape the hard
fate of falling into the power of her husband.

Hogun was a hard man. His heart knew no
mercy towards those upon whom the laws of the
State allowed him to trample. He had a will that
brooked no resistance, and a temper which, when
96 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

roused, was capable of inflicting any cruelty. His
servants were his, he thought, body and soul, and
his wishes must be their law in all things.

Peter often rejoiced, when he heard of the hard-
ships and cruelties the slaves endured at the hands
of this heartless ruffian Hogun, that it had not
fallen to his lot to become his property. Tor six
-years after the mistress’s marriage the slaves be-
longing to the Gist plantation after the mistress
had taken hers away were kept together, an over-
seer inhabiting the family mansion. Peter was
made foreman of the hands, which position he re-
tained until the plantation was broken up. Every
evening the overseer gave him orders concerning
the next day’s work. In the morning he was
obliged to rise first, call his fellow slaves from their
slumbers, and see that the work was properly
commenced, All day he took the fore-row, and led
the work-people. At night it was his business to
see that the tools that had been used were safe and
in order, and the people all in their cabins before
hecould go tobed. His duties were very arduous.
The people under the new arrangement were kept
on full stretch, that the overseer might please his
employers with a good crop. The kind word of
encouragement to which they had been accustomed
was wanting, and the voice of commendation was
strange to their ears.

In the year. 1839 it was determined by the
guardians to sell the plantation and hire out the
ADDITIONAL TROUBLE FOR PETEB. 97

negroes. The tidings of this approaching change
spread a panic among the slaves. They had suffered
much since “ Massa’ died, but they had suffered
together. Now to bescattered! The thought was
excessively painful. But there was no escape.
They could only submit to their fate. “O!”
thought Peter, “what's the use in livin’. Mas’r
Levi’s gone and Levin; and then missus, she must
go too, and leave us all without nobody to care
whether we lives or dies. Here I’ve sarved the
family all these years; and now I must go and wait
on strangers that won’t care for nothin’, ouly to
get all the work they can for their money. O!
if they send me off where I can’t see Vina, it'll kill
her, sure.”

The last Christmas came which these doomed
people were to spend together at the old place.
Instead of the mirth which usually reigned at that
season, there was universal weeping and mourning.
The slaves had all been hired out here and there ;
and after the holidays (three days being allowed
them at Christmas) they were to separate for their
‘new homes. Fourteen of the number, including
Peter, were destined to spend the ensuing year on
the plantation of a Mr. Threat, about four miles
from Bainbridge.

The one great dread, that of being conveyed
still further from his wife, was now removed; but,
otherwise, his situation was not bettered. Mr.
Threat had immigrated from Virginia, and bought

H
98 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

a small plantation, but he possessed no slaves. His
ambition was to procure some through the toil, and
sweat, and blood of the negroes he had hired.
Peter was continued in the post of head man, but
his labours were by no means diminished, and his
fare was very scanty.

The parents of Peter’s new master resided in
the neighbourhood. His father had failed in busi-
ness, and some wealthy connections of his mother
bought all the property under the hammer, and
settled it upon the lady and her children, giving
her the entire control. She was a perfect virago.

This lady kept no overseer, and hesitated not
to shew her unhappy slaves that the sole authority
vested in herself, and that her arm was strong to
punish their short-comings. She frequently rode
over her fields, cow-hide and rope in hand, to in-
spect the labour of her.slaves. If she found one
remiss in any-way, she quickly dismounted and
ordered him to strip. After directing him to be
tied, she vigorously applied the cow-hide until her
anger was appeased.

One spring morning, while Peter was hired to
her son, she mounted one of the carriage horses, a
large bay, and rode to the field. She had, the day
before, cruelly whipped a large, powerful negro;
and on this morning was proceeding with rope and
cow-hide on a similar gratifying errand. To the
great joy of the whole gang, when she had nearly
reached the spot where her people were at work,
ADDITIONAL TROUBLE FOR PETER, 99

her horse took fright, and, starting aside, threw
her violently to the ground. She was picked up
and borne home. But she never recovered fully
from the effects of the accident. Her hip was badly
injured; and ever after she was compelled to use a
crutch, dragging’ one foot after her when she
walked. Her cruel right arm was not weakened,
as the scarred backs of many of her poor slaves
could testify. This may be regarded as an extra-
ordinary instance of female “ chivalry ;” but, in
truth, similar cases were not. rare in slavedom.
Frail, delicate ladies, whom one would instinctively
shield from a rude breath of air, could strip and tie
their slaves, both men and women, and flog them
until the blood ran in streams, with all the zest of
a base-born overseer.

Towards the close of 1840, Peter was hired for
the ensuing year to Mr. McKiernan. To this he
was greatly opposed, even though he would, by such
an arrangement, be able daily to enjoy the society
of his beloved Vina and family. He loved his wife
and children most fondly ; but their master had
long sought to buy him; and Peter feared, if he
went there, McKiernan might succeed in accom-
plishing his wishes. The idea of becoming the
property of such a man was dreadful to him. But
he carefully concealed his feelings on the subject
from any that would report them to McKiernan.
His wife was in the tyrant’s power, and he dared
not offend him.

H2
100 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

On the first of January, 1841, Peter commenced
-hig labours on the plantation of McKiernan. Now
came his most intimate acquaintance with the reali-
ties of slavery. Both in Kentucky and Alabama
he had endured enough in his own person to give
him some idea of the meaning of the word slave ;
.but never did he comprehend its full, fearful
import till he learned it here.

Personally Peter suffered little from the violence
of the master, beyond two or three rounds of
cursing. He carefully avoided all that would
annoy theirritable man. Besides, McKiernan was
anxious to buy Peter, and knew that he would not
be sold without his own consent. But the moral
malaria of the place filled his soul with hatred of
the oppressions by which it was engendered. On

.this plantation a new phase of slave-life was exhi-
-bited, and more revolting than any he had else-
where witnessed; for here the women suffered
most, and oftenest by the hands or the orders of
their mistress.

The principal house-servant was Ann Hliza,
-who knew how to read well, understood all the
branches of good housewifery, and was a woman of
good sense and true piety. Her services in the
house were invaluable, and her conduct above re-
proach. But her mistress hated her. ‘She was
too handsome, and had such a tongue.”

Ann Eliza was not impudent or bold. But
when her mistress, under the influence of strong
ADDITIONAL TROUBLE FOR PETER. 101

drink, violently upbraided and falsely accused
her she fixed her large, clear eyes upon her face,
and declared her innocence. This was answered
only by the cow-hide, and the mistress frequently
exhausted her own strength in fruitless efforts to
subdue the spirit of her slave.

“ Took here, Mr. Anderson,” she said to aman
about the estate, “I want you to go to the gin-
house and get Ann Eliza, and give her a good
whipping. Ihave whipped her myself till I am
tired, but it does no good. She needs bringing
down, for she is the torment of my life. Lay it on
well; you needn’t be afraid. It is a good time now,
as Mr. McKiernan is away from home. He is
mighty careful of the girl himself, and that is what:
makes her so impudent.”

“Yes, ma’am, I'll give her a lesson she’ll re-.
member.”

Ann Eliza saw him coming, and knew her
doom. ‘She cast one imploring look at her husband,
who was working at her side. He returned it
with a glance so full of pity and intense desire to
avenge her wrongs that all her powers were
roused, and she felt strong to endure the worst.

Peter stood in the shelter of one of the out-
buildings, and would have interposed, but he knew.
it would only aggravate the punishment of the
sufferer. He saw, with swelling heart, when the
ruffian bound her hands. He marked the flash of
vengeance in Edward’s dark eyes as his wife was
102 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

led away, and then saw his head droop low as he
realised his utter helplessness.

She was taken to the orchard. There the ruffian
“staked her out” upon the ground, and with a zest
that only such brutal natures could feel, he applied
the cow-hide to her naked back. Her screams of
agony only excited his demoniac mirth. “ That’s
right,” he cried, “I like to hear you shout ; that’s
the way ye all shout at the camp-ground. Shout
away ! you’re getting happy now.”

He beat her there, mocking her cries of pain,
till she became too much exhausted to utter
another sound. Then untying her, he delivered
her to her mistress. ‘Thar, ma’am,” said he,
“ she ain’t got use for no more this time. She’s
got the devil in her, but I reckon he'll keep still
till she get o’er this ’ere.”

Much religious feeling existed among the slaves
at this time, especially upon McKiernan’s planta-
tion. This accounts for the ruffian’s allusions to
the religious habits of his victim. A Baptist
preacher, named Archie Eggleston, was among the
slaves hired by McKiernan; and he preached to
his brethren in bonds the love and compassion of
Jesus, and the blessed home of the faithful among
“the spirits bright.” His language, full of the
quaint idioms of his race, was characterised by an
earnest, uncultured eloquence, that spoke with
power to the hearts and consciences of his hearers.
They received the word with gladness; and many,
ADDITIONAL TROUBLE FOR PETER. 103

sheltered by faith within the shadow of the
Saviour’s cross, were strengthened greatly to
endure the manifold wrongs and sufferings arising
out of their lot in life.

The cruelties that Peter was compelled to
witness on McKiernan’s plantation were horrifying.
This was particularly the case during the time that
a man named Bruton was overseer. He deprived
the slaves of their Sundays, compelling them to
work all day for the estate; and when one of the
men refused, he nearly whipped him to death.
Another he shot through the leg, and disabled him
for many weeks. Worried by his brutality, several
of the slaves ran off and betook themselves to the
woods. Peter and Vina had their feelings dread-
fully harrowed by seeing their eldest boy, Peter,
tortured by a hundred stripes upon his tender
flesh.

The effect of Bruton’s constant whipping and
crippling the hands soon became manifest in the
fields. So many of the people were driven to the
woods, or otherwise unfitted for their usual labours,
that the corn was choked, and the cotton could
scarcely be seen amid the tall, rank grass. This
unpromising state of his darling crop at length
opened the master’s eyes. He rode through the
field when the people were at work, one day when
Bruton was not there. ‘“ What,” says he, with a
curse, “ails you all? I never was in the grass like
this.”
104 . °@HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“No wonder,” replied one of the boldest men.
“ Reckon you'll neber git out de grass long ’s you
keeps ole Brunton yer. He knows nothin’ ’bout
farmin’, no how. He jes beats yer people, and cuts
"em up constant; dat dar’s all he know. Dem
whar’s able to work at all can’t do past half a
day’s work, kase dey’s all so bruised and cut up.”

“?Pears like,” said Vina, “ dis teched his heart.:
He’s mons’ ’shamed o’ bein’ in the grass so much
wuss ’an all his neighbours.”

Soon after McKiernan cursed the overseer and
turned him off the place. For the discharge of this
’ monster, though the people rejoiced, the master re-
ceived no thanks. He deserved none. His servants.
knew that he cared nothing for their sufferings. He
was only concerned about the grass that checked
the growth of his corn and cotton. “ When it come
to dat,” said Vina, “ we didn’t try to git him ont o’
de grass. He done keep dat mean ole Bruton dar
all de forepart o’ de year, and let him cut up de
people ’cordin to his own marcy; and now we
wasn’t gwine try to make a crop. So that year
we didn’t make corn enough to last till Jane. We
had to go half fed ; and the mules got so poor they’d
fall down in the picdeh They didn’t get nuthin’.
but fodder ; for it comes mons’ hard to buy corn,”.


CHAPTER XII.

PETER PASSING THROUGH VARIOUS CHANGES,







ZN addition to the three boys,
Peter, Levin, and William,
Vina had a little daughter,
~ about three years old. Dur-
ing the autumn of 1833 she buried

little Silas, after remaining with
‘ her a year, was borne away to the hill-side.
Again, in March 1840, a little daughter of five
months was strangled by the croup. In July,
1841, another little boy came to the cabin of
Peter and Vina, upon whom they bestowed the
name of Bernard. The three oldest boys, plundered
at the moment of their birth of all human rights,
and doomed to an inheritance of slavery, were now
old enough to work on the plantation. They had
been carefully trained by Vina, and their obedience
and loving kindness to their mother abundantly
rewarded all the anxious care she had bestowed
upon them.

Peter remained only one year on McKecraaes 8
plantation. At the beginning of 1842, he was hired
106 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

to Mr. J. A. Stoddard, teacher of a boy’s school in
Tuscumbia. He was from New England, an elder
in the Presbyterian Church, and an exception to
the oft-quoted rule that “persons who have been
raised in the Free States make the worst slave-
masters.”

The peaceful home of Mr. Stoddard formed a
‘pleasant contrast to the plantation he had gladly
quitted so recently. His labour was light ; he was
now well fed ; and he was furnished during the year
with four suits of clothes, consisting of cotton shirt
and jacket and trousers of blue jean. They were
not rich or costly, but they were always clean.

Once in two weeks he went to see his family,
twelve miles distant, and was often able to carry
them some little comforts, as he had spare time at
- his disposal. Sometimes he went on foot to the
plantation ; but often a kind gentleman would lend
him a horse. How eagerly did Vina and her
children look out for these visits! And with what
rapturous shouts did the little ones bound forth into
the dark to meet him when they heard his footsteps
approaching the cabin!

During this year the youngest daughter of his
former master, Levi Gist, was married to Mr. John
H. Hogun, a son of her mother’s husband; and
now a division of the property must be made. To
one old man the guardians granted his freedom.
He had become too old to be of much service to the
plantation. The other thirty-three were appraised,
PETER PASSING THROUGH VARIOUS CHANGES. 107

and divided into three lots. The lot in which Peter
was placed was drawn by the young bride’s agent ;
and as the bridegroom was only eighteen, the
guardianship of their affairs was transferred to her
father-in-law, the elder Hogun. Great was the
consternation among the party of slaves that fell to
the young couple when they learned that “Ole
Hogun ” was, for a time at least, to be their master.
They knew his character, and feared that he would
take them to work on his own plantation. Great
was their joy when it was arranged for them to be
continued where they were to the end of the year,
and then to be hired out again. Poor old Pompey,
who was so kindly set free, was about eighty years
old. His wife was the property of a Rev. Mr. L——,
of Leighton. The poor old man was not wanted
there, and for some time he wandered to and fro, half-
starved, and persecuted, and beaten by patrols and
other ruffians, until the young lady, Miss Gist, took
pity on him, and gave him a home and food during
the remainder of his life,

After serving Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard for a year,
Peter was recommended warmly by that gentle-
man to his pastor, the Rev. Mr. Stedman, who
hired him of Mr, Hogun for the ensuing year. He
soon became ardently attached to his new master
and mistress. They treated him as aman, and not
asaslave; and nothing was spared on their part
to promote his comfort and happiness.

He gave himself cheerfully to his duties, and
108 - (HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

never thought he could do too much to please
those who shewed him kindness such as he had
never met with since he was kidnapped from his
home. He took care of the church, kept it clean,
and rang the bell, and built the fires. He procured
all the wood for the family, and prepared it for
use; drew water from the spring, and performed
the duties of waiter and errand-boy. When the
cook was sick he took her place and did her work
efficiently, glad in any way to promote the comfort
of those who treated him not as a brute, but as a
man.

Most grateful was it to Peter that morning and
evening all the servants were called in to the
family worship ; and the man of God offered prayer
and praise to the Great Father through the Atoning
Son. Mrs. Stedman was a native of New England ;
and from her Christian conversation and lady-like |
manners Peter received his first impressions of life
in “the North.” O! how ardently, as he listened,
he wished that he might one day behold that
wondrous land where all are free.

When the Christmas holidays arrived Peter, to
accommodate his kind mistress, remained with her,
as she had need of his services, instead of going
to spend the week with the other slaves at his
owner’s house. This was resented by “Ole
Hogun,” as a sign of increasing independence of
his master’s family. Such an offence must be
punished. Instead, therefore, of hiring him again
PETER PASSING TILROUGH VARIOUS CHANGES. 109

to Mr. Stedman, which both he and Peter earnestly
desired, he hired him out to another master.
When Peter expressed his preference ‘for the
service of the Stedmans he received only curses.
“Task no odds of a nigger,” said “Ole Hogun.”
“You've got mighty independent all at once. You
couldn’t come out Christmas to tell me where you
wanted to live; so. now you shall go where I
say.” a x
On New Year’s Day Peter found himself in the
service of a Mr. Pollock. He was kindly treated,
and his labour was not severe. Here he proved
himself diligent and faithful; and his employer
ever after spoke warmly in his praise.

During this year, 1844, Peter was hired, at his
own request, to go in the capacity of cook with a
company of gentlemen to the Whig convention at
Nashville, which was designed to secure the Presi-
dency for Henry Clay. The party numbered
sixty-three ; and they were well supplied with tents,
provisions, and all necessary conveniences for
camping on the road. The.journey to Nashville
occupied three days, and was attended by much
enjoyment. They spent a week at Nashville, and
then returned home.

- Peter had hoped that during his stay at Nash-
ville he might find some chance to escape from
slavery. It was with this purpose he had asked
leave to go. He had brought with him his little
stock of money. It amounted to only fifteen
110 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

dollars (abeut three pounds), but it seemed to him
a large sum, and he was sure it would do him “a
heap of good,” if only he were free. Thoughts of
leaving wife and children made him sad} but the
idea of freedom was mighty. He resolved to try ;
and “ Who knows,” said he, ‘ what I may be able
to do for Vina and the chillerns?”

He walked in the evening down to the river;
but on no boat could he espy a corner where he
might hide and sail away to the far land of the free.
The week passed, and he had discovered no avenue
of escape. Little did any of the gentlemen, who
noticed and praised his active industry, guess what
a brave true heart he bore; or how that brave
heart was even then struggling to be free. His
failure to escape from thraldom had not caused
him to despair; and as each day rolled on the con-
fidence grew strong within him that a brighter
morn would yet appear.

Another change: On the first day of 1845
Peter entered the service of Mr. Michael Brady,
a wealthy Irishman, and a merchant in the town
of Tuscumbia. He wasa bachelor. In this employ
Peter gained much information of a general kind.
He was occupied about the store and doing errands,
and was frequently a listener to conversations
which the speakers did not dream that he had
sense to understand. His habits of close observa-
tion tended to his rapid advancement in a know-
ledge of human nature. Few more shrewd and
PETER PASSING THROUGH VARIOUS CHANGE? 41

correct judges of character could be found in the
town than this quiet, docile slave.

Mr. Brady was exceedingly kind to Peter ; but
had some peculiar notions. He paid for his board
at a hotel, and forbade Peter’s performing any
service for any person except his partner and him-
self. In this prohibition Peter felt the galling yoke
of slavery. He had a heart that took pleasure in
obliging others. But Mr. Brady was firm. He
did not intend that his servant should need favours
from others. He preferred supplying his wants
himself; and often, when Peter was going on
Saturday night to make his accustomed visit to his
family, the young man would give him some little
present for them from the store. For all these
kindnesses Peter was grateful ; but they could not
sweeten the slavery-cup. It still overflowed with
bitterness, and in his heart he spurned the draught,
and vowed he would be free.

The next year, 1846, the young master, John
H. Hogun, having become of age, assured the
control of his wife’s property, and hired Peter to
Mr. Allen Pollock, a bookseller, of Tuscumbia.
Some weeks before Christmas Mr. Pollock pro-
posed to Peter that he should live with him the
following year, and hire his own time. Hé had
not much for him to do, he said, and after do‘ng
such little work as he required, he could get wark
elsewhere in town; and all he earned above the
eighty-five dollars hire which Hogun must receive
AL " HE STOLEN CHILDREN.

should be his own. True, this arrangement was
against the law ; but if it were kept secret it could
do no harm. ~

Peter hesitated. Mr. Pollock was said to be
close and penurious, and he doubted the disin-
terestedness of his motives. Still there was a
chance that he might succeed in saving something.

.He might, at least, procure some additional com-
forts for his family, and he resolved to try.

So the bargain was concluded, and Peter,
trembling, entered on the new year. The eighty-
five dollars must be earned ; and that was a great
sum to be raised by five cents, and ten cents, for
doing little jobs about town.

Ata short distance from the store was Major
Pope’s hotel, where he engaged his board, for which
he was to pay by waiting at the table. He was
recommended, by some friend, as a neat and care-
ful man to keep the rooms in order. He was imme-
diately engaged for this service, which occupied
him two or three hours each day. He did white-
washing jobs, and found profitable employment at
weddings and parties. Ifa cook was sick, Peter
would take her place, and when required, he would
engage to dig agrave. He was, at the same time,
nired by the month to take care of several stores,
plack boots, take up ashes, and to carry water.
‘Linus he became well known in the town.

He was a favourite with a number of young
inen who frequently gave parties, and entrusted all
PETER PASSING THROUGH VARIOUS CHANGES. 113

the arrangements to Peter. His ready kindness,
and his promptitude in executing his employers’
wishes, won him the esteem and confidence of
all, These diverse occupations were exceedingly
fatiguing. Yet, though his limbs grew weary, his
energies of spirit never drooped.

Every week or two he paid his hire to Mr.
Pollock, who several times proposed to act as his
treasurer. Peter declined this, alleging that he
spent a good deal of his money upon his wife and
children. At the end of the year he found that he
was the possessor of seventy-five dollars, after
spending thirty-five dollars during the year for
Vina and the children. But this was a profound
secret to all but Vina. It was understood by all
around that Mr. Pollock, though he permitted him
to make his own bargains, received all that Peter
earned.

His success this year was an astonishment to
himself. It opened a new world before him. Hi-
therto his only hope of escape from slavery had
been in flight; but now came other thoughts.
“Seventy-five dollars in one year! How long will
it take to buy myself, if I can but get the same
chance every yearP O! if I could be free.”

_ “Well, boy,” said Mr. Hogun, a few days before
Christmas, “ do you want to live with Mr. Pollock
again, next year?”

No, Sir,” replied Peter. ‘I don’t keer "bout
livin’ with him.”
114 THE STOLEN CHILDREN. = 2

“Why, I reckon he’s used you well this year
and he offers to pay me up now for your hire.
It’s not often a man offers to pay money befcre it’s
due.” :

“Well, Sir, if you hire me to Mr. Pollock, I shall
have to stay with him.~ But there’s Mr. Joseph
Friedman ; he'll pay you as well as Mr. Pollock,
and he’d like to hire me for the next year.”

The young master called on Mr. Friedman ;
and the result was he hired Peter to the Jew before
he left the store.

“The Jew!” Yes, Mr. Joseph Friedman was
a German Jew, who had resided in Tuscumbia for
six or sevenyears. He kept astore, and associated
in business with a brother named Isaac, had accu-
mulated a handsome fortune. From the hands of
this Jew Peter was destined to receive more
brotherly kindness, than from all those who called
themselves Christians, through whose hands he had
passed.

By manly independence and stern integrity,
the brothers had lived down the strong prejudice
that existed towards them when they first settled
in the town, and were greatly respected.

Peter’s master, Joseph Friedman, was small
in stature, with black hair and keen black eyes,
from which gleamed a soft and attractive light.
Peter had learned to read the eyes of those about
him; and itis creditable to his sagacity that he
rightly understood the expression. of Mr. Fried.
PETER PASSING THROUGH VARIOUS CHANGES. 115

man’s eye, and felt powerfully attracted towards
him. During the year that he was with Mr.
Pollock, his thoughts had been intensely occupied
in devising some method of gaining his liberty,
which he regarded as his right, to be gained by any
practicable means. One great difficulty was ever
present to his mind. He knew nota man in whom
he could trust. Should his secret yearning after
freedom once get known, from that moment he
would be regarded as unsafe property. Then he
would be sold to the South, and the light of hope
be for ever quenched.

And even if his master should be willing to sell
him to himself, what security could he have that
he would not deceive him, rob him of his hard-
earned ransom, and still retain him in the iron
grasp of slavery. Long acquaintance. with the
villainies of slavery and slave-holders had made
him wary. He remembered Spencer Williams, of
Lexington, who three times paid the price of his
own redemption, and was at last sent to the hated
South in chains. No wonder that he weighed care-
fully each word that fell upon his ear, that he might
discern the spirit of the speaker.

His ear thus bent to catch the breath of honesty,
- gome chance remarks of Mr. Friedman drew his
attention, as they revealed a spirit of sympathy
with the suffering, and his hatred of injustice and
oppression. This induced him, before the year
expired at Pollock’s, to ask Mr. Friedman to hire

r2
116 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

- him for the ensuing year. To Peter’s request the
kind-hearted Jew readily assented. The bargain
was concluded, and Peter rejoiced in the hope of
becoming better acquainted with his real character.
And perhaps—O ! how the bare idea thrilled him !
—he might thus find the path to liberty.

The private contract with his master was the
same as with Pollock. All that he could earn,
after paying his hire, was to be his own. He was
generously treated by the Friedman brothers, who
not only gave him material from the store to make
new garments, but their own cast-off clothes.
From others, young men or ladies, he often obtained
second-hand clothes as presents. These he never
wore himself, but sold them to the slaves on the
surrounding plantations, receiving in payment
eggs, or chickens, or other articles from their ~
garden patches; for which he obtained a ready
sale at the hotel where he served. He was laying
up for freedom,

The confidence between the worthy Jew and his
faithful servant was constantly on the increase.
The more he knew of him, the more Peter respected
his master as a man who had both heart and con-
science, and allowed them to rule him in all the
affairs of life. Several other persons wished to
hire Peter. But he told them all that he thought
he should stay with Mr. Friedman another year.
And, at Peter’s request, his Jewish friend engaged
him for the second year.
CHAPTER XIII.

PETER BUYS HIMSELF,






ma BE year 1848 brought a
qe crisis in Peter’s history. He
& commenced his second year
ce: On with Mr. Friedman with high

hopes. The gains of the last year
had greatly encouraged him. After
spending over thirty dollars on his
fanily. he found that he had made one hundred
and five dollars, which, with the savings of the
former year, and thirty dollars he had before,
made two hundred and ten dollars now in his
possession.

His hope of being free he had communieated to
none but his true-hearted wife. But now satisfied
that Mr. Friedman was his friend, he determined to ©
ask his aid. It was with great fear and trembling
that he entered the counting-house for the purpose.
“Mr. Friedman,” said he, “I’ve got something I
want to tell you; but it’s a great secret.”

“ Well, Peter——”

“Tve bin a thinkin’, Sir, I’d like to buy my-
self; and you’ve allers dealt so fa’r with me, I didn’t





118 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

know but you mought buy me, and then give me
a chance.”

The Jew’s countenance brightened. He had
become much attached: to Peter. He had often
wished to see Peter free; but this-plan had not
occurred to him. “‘ Can you get the money, Peter ? ”
said Mr. Friedman.

’ “Treckon I could, if you didn’t pay too high
for me.” —

“ How much shall I give for you?”

“T think, Sir, five hundred dollars is as much

as you ought to pay.”
' “ Hogun will not sell you for that price. John
Pollock offered: him six hundred. Some men in
town would give eight hundred, because they know
you.”

“Well, Sir, ve served the family for thirty-
five years, and have earned for them a heap 0’
money. Dey can afford to sell me for five hundred
dollars.”
«. The'proposition of the Jew received, at first,
-butlittle favour. Peter was an old family servant.
‘They did not wish to sell him.

“Well,” said Friedman, “I would like to buy
him, He has a cough, and I would try to cure
it. I will give you five hundred dollars.”

Hogun turned away. The Jew tried again with-
out success, Then Peter went to see him aboutit.
‘His cough was always troublesome when any of the
family were near. Now it annoyed him exceedingly.
PETER BUYS HIMSELF. 119

“Ugh! ugh! Mas’r John Henry, I come to see you
‘bout Mr. Friedman buyin’ me. He say he done
name it to you.”

. “Yes, he-did. But he offered only five hun-
dred dollars. Ican get a thousand any day.”

“Ugh! Ugh! I tink you mighty hard to ask
such big price when I bin in your service so long
and Miss Sarah done get all my arnins. I think
five hundred dollars ‘nuff for me.”

. “Well, Peter it makes no difference to you
whether I sell you for a big price, or a little one.”

“ Yes, Sir, it does, Mas’r John; ’kase if a person
gib thousand dollar for me, he “lows he’s gwine to
work it out o’ me. But Mr. Friedman just wants
me to wait on him ’bout the store. And he says
he’ll cure my cough. Ugh! Ugh!” Here Peter’s
cough was particularly troublesome, till he coughed
himself out of the yard.

The good Jew hired Peter for another year.
Peter was a good deal cast down; but matters
turned out better than his fears.. Two “likely
negro. boys”’.were for sale and Mr. Hogun was
particularly desirous. of becoming the owner of
one of thern; and to effect the purchase, Hogun,
after a good deal of chaffering, agreed to sell Peter
to the Jew for five hundred dollars.

“Very well,” said the Jew, “your money is
ready when you want it.”

It was night, and Joseph Friedman sat at his
desk reviewing the business of the day. The door
120 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

was cautiously opened, and Peter entered, “ Now
Mr. Friedman,” said the slave, while his voice
trembled, and his whole frame was agitated with
emotion, “I have come to pay you that money,
and I reck’n you won’t cheat me. I’ve worked
mighty hard to git it. There’s three hundred
dollars in this yer bag.”

He looked round carefully to see that no spy
was concealed in any corner of the room. He
placed a deep leather bag upon the table and pro-
ceeded to empty it. It contained pieces of silver
of all sizes and pieces of gold also glittered in the
lamp light. Peter paused when the bag was about
half-emptied. It would be so easy to lose it all;
and he had known so many slaves defrauded of
their hard-earned gains, it seemed impossible for
him to trust. “But then,” said he to himself,
“T’ve known Mr. Friedman long time, and I never
know’d him doa mean thing. I can’t never be
free without trustin’ some person, anyhow. If I
can’t trust him, the Lord help me!” He counted
the sum upon the table, and both counted it twice.
It was three hundred dollars.

Mr. Friedman wrote a receipt and signed it.
Peter received it trusting that all was right. He
couldn’t read. But “he never know’d Mas’r do
any mean trick,’ and he was resolved to trust
him. The next day Hogun received the stipulated
five hundred dollars and gave a bill of sale :—
PETER BUYS HIMSELF, 121

500 dollars. For the consideration of five
hundred dollars, paid to me this day, I have sold
to Joseph Friedman a negroman named Peter. I
bind myself and heirs to defend the title of said
negro, Peter, to the said Joseph Friedman and his
heirs against all claims whatever.

“Given under my hand and seal this 15th
January, 1849.

“ Jonn H. Hocun.”

Great sympathy was professed in Tuscumbia
for “poor Peter.” That he should be sold at all
by the Hogun family was bad enough, “ but to sell
him to a Jew.” And much speculation was in-
dulged in as to the cause of the sale, and what
probably would be the fate of Peter. Many expec-
ted no less than that Friedman would make money
out of him and then sell him to be taken off to
the rice swamps. One gentleman said “ Why
didn’t you let me know, Peter, that your master
wanted to sell you? Id not let that Jew get you.
He'll sell you again; or perhaps work you to
death.”

“No, sir, I reck’n not. Mas’r Friedman allers
bin good to me.”

Meanwhile the despised, noble-hearted Jew and
Peter were arranging their future relations to each
other. ‘“ You may work as you did before,” said
he.to Peter, “‘ and when you have got two hundred
dollars, I will give you free papers, and you shall
£122 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

‘go where you like, Get all you can for your-
iself.””

.The heart of Peter bounded at these words,
and the tears of gratitude flowed from his eyes.
.He went to his labours with a light heart, he had
no hire to pay ; his earnings were all his own. At
-various times he handed over his gains to Mr.
Friedman, and at the end of fifteen months his
purpose was accomplished: he had earned the
price of his redemption.

While thus employed a heavy grief came upon
‘Peter and his faithful Vina, in the loss of Vina’s
‘favourite son, William, who was drowned while
bathing. With deep sorrow they laid him beside
the children who had died young.

Late in the evening of April 16th, 1850, Peter
sought once more the counting-house of Mr.
Friedman. Timidly he drew forth his leather
‘bag, and commenced counting its contents.
A footstep approached. Mr. Friedman quietly
placed some papers over the coin, when Mr.S., the
auctioneer, walked in.

“‘ What Peter,” said he, “ are you paying up P”

“Yes, Sir, Mas’r Joe make me pay him up
close.” :

‘*Yes, that is so,” said Mr. Friedman, “TI like
to keep all close: and Peter must pay me promptly.”

“When the neighbour’s chat was ended, during
which Peter sat in trembling anxiety, and they
heard his receding footsteps on.the side-walk,
PETER BUYS HIMSELT. 12%

Peter shoved the shining heap of money towards
the Jew, and felt now how entirely his fate hung
upon the will of the little man. Mr. Friedman
took up his pen and wrote a receipt in full, with the
coveted certificate of freedom, which ran thus :—

“Wor and in consideration of the above five
hundred dollars, I have this 16th day of April,
1850, given Peter a bill of sale, and given him his
freedom

“ JosEPH FRIEDMAN.

“Tuscumbia, Ala., April 16th, 1850.”

-- Precious was.this paper in the eyes of the self-
ransomed slave. Mr. Friedman had charged him
no interest on the two hundred dollars advanced
to purchase him from Hogun, and had during the
year bestowed upon him many little gifts. In him
Peter had found a true-hearted benefactor. All
honour to the noble-hearted Jew! How admirably
does the conduct of this despised man contrast
with that of the so-called “ Christian’ oppressors
and plunderers of the poor slaves all around.

The whole transaction was yet a secret, known
only to the brothers Friedman, and to Peter and
his family. Peter was obliged to conceal his
feelings, lest he should place in peril the freedom
he had so dearly won, or involve in trouble the
generous benefactor who had assisted him. At
‘the’ approach of summer Mr. Joseph Friedman.
124 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

determined to sell off, and remove to. Cincinnatti ;
quitting the slave land altogether. Peter requested
permission to go withhim. It would bean admir-
able opportunity of carrying out the dearly-
cherished object he had in view, of going to seek
his mother. Since he had paid for his redemption
he had earned eighty dollars; that, he thought,
would be sufficient to meet his expenses.

The Tuscumbians again became excited about
Peter. “Now, Uncle Peter,” said one, “if you
find out that those Jews are about to sell you, just
let me know, and I will buy you.”

“Tt will be too bad for them to speculate out
of you,” said another, “ but I expect that is what
they bought you for.”

To all these things Peter replied “Mas’r Joe ©
and Mas’r Isaac always has bin good to me; any-
how I belong to them.”

“ What a contented old fellow he is!” said
one, who had heard Peter’s reply, “I'd like that
some of the cursed Abolitionists should hear him
talk; they would be obliged to own that niggers
pining to be free is moonshine.”

Before his departure, Peter went to pay a fare-
well visit to his family. There he unburthened
all his heart. He had great hope that if he could
find his relations they would help him in the pur-
pose he had formed of working out the redemption
of his loved ones.

Monday morning came and the loud horn
PETER BUYS HIMSELF. 125

called the family to their cheerless toil. The
children said “ good-bye,” but Vina lingered. O!
it was hard to see him go away alone. But she
could not bid him stay. She mounted her mule
that she had to drive in the plough, and rode
towards the field while Peter walked by her side.

His heart was heavy but he spoke hopefully of
the future, and bade her not to fear for him. “TI
will come back,” said he, “whether I find my
people or not. I will come back and let you know.
Take care for yourself and the chillerns; and
mind they don’t tell the secret.”

Too soon their paths diverged. When they
came opposite the half-ploughed field, they stopped.
“ Well, Peter,” said the brave-hearted wife, “ this
yer’s your road, and yon’s mine. Good bye.” One
pressure of the hand—one last earnest look—and
they each pursued a different road: the one to
slavery’s hopeless labour, the other toward that
paradise of hope—the North.
CHAPTER XIV.

TIIE KIDNAPPED BOY RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER.





that Mr. Friedman and Peter
took the boat for Louisville,
4az Peter paid his fare thither
yy working onthe boat—the “Greek
== Slave.” The cholera was raging
= = {at Louisville and Mr. Friedman
hastened on to Cincinnatti and- took Peter with
him, On the morning of the twenty-sixth of July,
the free soil of Ohio was pressed by his weary
feet. Now he gave way to his emotions of delight.
Springing from the boat, he clapped his hands in
ecstacy, shouting, “I’m free, I’m free! This is free
ground! The water runs free! The wind blows
free! I’m aslave no more!”

“Hush, Peter,” said Mr. Friedman, “people
will think you are afool.”

That day, in the house of his brother, Levi
Friedman, Peter revealed to his late master the
story of his life. He told him all that he remem-
bered of his early childhood ; of his being stolen; of
his brother’s life and death, and of the one hope that





_ RESTORED TO HIS: MOTHER. “127

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had animated all his labours for forty years—that
of returning to the spot where he was born, to
find, if possible, his kindred, and to see his mother’s
grave. ae :
“No, no,” cried the Jew, as he listened with in-
-ecredulous astonishment to this narration; “you
came from Kentucky: your master told me so.”
“Yes,” replied Peter, soI did come from Kain-
tucky ; but I was stole and. carried there when I
was.a little boy. . 1 remember the Delaware river.
128 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

It was not far from my mother’s house; and that
river is at Philadelphy. Leastways, so people tell
me; now I want to go and find my relations.”

The wonder of his auditor was intense. He
could not comprehend how, during all these
years, so cruel a wrong had been suffered to go
unredressed.

After spending a day and a half at Cincinnaiti,
he started for Pittsburgh. A cousin of Mr. Fried-
man accompanied him to the steam-boat. How
anxious was his heart as the steamer dashed along
on her course! He was now alone; but he
trusted in the Lord, and kept a cheerful counte-
nance.

There were two or three suspicious-looking men
on board, who eyed Peter very closely and attemp-
ted to draw him into conversation. When the
boat approached Wheeling several individuals
came to Peter and proffered advice. One young
gentleman with a pleasant countenance stooped
down, and said in a low tone, “ My friend, there
are a great many watching you. Ifyou are free,
stand to it. Don’t leave the boat; just say you
are free.” “I thought,” said Peter, “the Lord
sent that young man, and that he was a true
friend. So I determined to take his advice.”
Attempts were made to get him to land; and one
fellow offered him five dollars, with some very
treacherous advice; neither of which did Peter
think it proper to accept. Peter happily escaped
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 129

all the plots of these ruffianly manstealers, and
arrived safely at Pittsburgh, where he was con-
ducted by a coloured fellow-passenger to the
house of a friend of his where they got break-
fast.

He remained about five hoursin that city, and
then took the stage to cross the mountains. He
was anxious to reach Philadelphia by the first of
August, as there would be a great turn out of the
coloured people on that day he had been told,
and that would be a favourable time to seek his
kindred.

As he gazed upon the ever-varying grandeur of
the Alleghanies, Peter thought of his wife and
children, and he pictured to himself the home and
its dear inmates he had left behind. O! that they
were with him!

After twenty-four hours’ travelling by stage, he
took a seat in a railway car. This was another
wonder! Hehad never dreamed of such travelling
as this. The bright locomotive, and the long
trains of elegantly-furnished cars astonished him ;
whiie the frequent villages he passed, the sub-
stantial farmhouses, and the highly-cultivated fields
impressed him with still greater wonder.

On the afternoon of the first day of August, the
train reached Philadelphia. Getting possession of
his trunk, Peter stepped aside and stood an
amazed spectator of the noisy scene. He stood
still by his trunk till his fellow-passengers had all

K
130 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

dispersed. He had been advised, while at Pitts-
burgh, to go to a certain boarding-house in Philadel-
phia; but the name he could not now remember.
‘* Suppose,” said he to himself, “some Abolitionist
should come along now, mighty friendly, and tell
me where to go, and so I should be entrapped and
sold again. I must be very careful.”

After he had stood alone for half-an-hour, an
elderly coloured man came up, and kindly accosted
him, “ Do you wish to go any whar ?”

“Yes,” replied Peter, “I was recommended in
Pittsburgh, to go to a boardin’-house kept by a
Christian man, a preacher. I should like to find
it.”

The stranger suggested many names, and at last
mentioned Dr. Byas.

“Thar, that’s the man. I know’d I should
remember it, if I hard it spoken.”

- “Well,” said the stranger, “I know whar he
lives, and I will carry your trunk there for a
quarter.”

Peter assented. The man took up the trunk,
and Peter followed him as he moved off, In a
short time he was glad to stand before the modest
residence of the good doctor. Mrs. Byas herself
answered the bell. She was a bright mulatto
woman, with a kind smile and a pleasant voice. Dr,
Byas, she said, was not at home. Peter explained
to her that he was sent there by some friends at
Pittsburgh,
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 131

“Oh, well, then, come right in,” she said, “I
will take good care of you.”

“Do you know,” said Peter, after being in the
house for a few minutes, “how fur it is to the
Delaware river ?”

“Why, yes: it is right down here at the
wharf.”

He sprang to his feet. “That is just the river
I’m a huntin’ for. Iwas born dar, and I want
to go down and find the ole house where my
father and mother lived, right on the side of the
hill.”

It was with difficulty the kind hostess prevailed
on Peter to wait and take a little refreshment
before setting out on his search for his friends.
During this hurried meal she learned the outlines
of his history. She then directed him to the river,
having taken care to furnish him with the name
of the street and number of her house, that he
might be able to find his way back.

When he reached the river, he walked a long
way, looking for the well-remembered woods on
the hill-side. No humble cottage, like the one in
his memory, met his gaze. Forty years makes a
wonderful difference in the suburbs of a great

American city like Philadelphia. All was strange
~ to Peter; and he returned thoroughly wearied
and disappointed from his fruitless search to the
residence of his kind landlady.

She was much interested in the stranger and

K2
132 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

his history. Next day she sent a man with him
into the streets, to inquire of all the aged coloured
people they might meet, for a man named Levin,
and his wife Sidney, who lost two children about
forty years before. Peter had retained the memory
of his parents’ Christian names, but their surname
he had utterly forgotten.

This search was unsuccessful. He resumed it
and met with an old man who had lived in Phila-
delphia fifty-three years. He knew of sixty
coloured children that had been carried off in one
year, and forty missing in another, of whom no
traces were ever found: but he had never heard
of the Levin and Sidney whom Peter sought. He
was forced to abandon this method of search and
returned for counsel to Mrs. Byas, whose husband
was away at Cincinnatti.

The good woman after some deliberation advised
Peter to go to the Anti-slavery Office and ask
them to search their records. She forgot that no
anti-slavery office or association existed in
America for many years after Peter had been
stolen. But Peter did not know this, and he ac-
companied the guide sent with him. This man
had little confidence in Peter’s story; and Peter
on the other hand mistrusted his guide. Peter
had been taught to dread and hate the Aboli-
tionists of the North, who were represented to
him as persons engaged in decoying coloured
people and selling them to the South, He was
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. * 183

therefore fearful of being entrapped into some
snare fatal to his new-found freedom.

They reached North Fifth street, and passing
the window of the Anti-slavery Office, saw a young
coloured man writing at a desk. They entered
the office. The young man was alone, and they
found him gentlemanly in his dress and deport-—
ment. The guide, addressing himself to the young
clerk, said, “Here is a man from the South who
is hunting, he says for his people, and he wants to
make me believe that he was born in Philadelphia.
Mrs. Byas sent me here with him to see if his
parents’ names can be found in your books.”

“What were your parents’ names?” asked the
young man of Peter P

“T was stolen away from Delaware river,” said
he, ‘when I was about four or five years old, with
my brother Levin. My father’s name was Levin,
and my mother’s name Sidney. He had two
sisters, one named ’Merica, and the other Charity ;
but Levin said that ’Merica was our cousin. One
day when mother was gone to church, a man came
along in a gig, and ask’d us if we did’nt want to
rideP He told us he would carry us to mother.
But in place o’ carrin’ us to mother, he taken us
- off into Kaintucky and sell us. We used to talk
a heap about mother; but nineteen years ago
Levin died in Alabama. Now I’ve bought my
liberty, and am huntin’ for my relations.”

The young man listened with great interest, and
184 TUE STOLEN CHILDREN.

when Peter had finished his simple story, requested
him to wait until he had finished putting up those
papers he was engaged with for the Post Office.
Then he would help him all he could.
Peter constantly grew more uneasy as he sat
_ waiting. He could not shake off the idea that
some snare was being prepared for him; and he
' eradually shuffled his chair nearer to the door, that
he might be ready to start and escape if any
violence should be attempted.

When the papers were prepared for the mail,
the clerk sat down and entered into conversation.
“Tt will take some time,” said he, ‘‘to look over
those old papers. This man,” the guide, “may as
well go home. I will show you the way back to
Mrs. Byas’.” ;

The guide rose to depart: “I'll go too,” said
Peter, his fears greatly increased.

“No, no, stay,” said the clerk. “Tl do my
best to help you find your friends.”

Peter was greatly alarmed. He thought he
could detect a.mutual understanding between the
two. He consented to remain very reluctantly ;
but seated himself as near the door as possible,
watching intently every movement of the young
man, whose treachery he so much feared.

When they were left alone, the clerk questioned
him closely concerning his early memories of home.
All this only increased Peter’s fear. At length
the young man, looking him in the face, said,
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 135

“Suppose I should tell you that I am your
brother ?”

Had a thunderbolt fallen at his feet, he could
not have been more astounded. But fear of
treachery was still uppermost in his mind, and
with an incredulous look, he answered, “ Supposin’
you should P”

“ Well,” continued the young man, “ from all you
have told me, I believe that you are a brother of
mine. My father’s name was Levin, and my
mother’s name was Sidney. They lost two boys
named Levin and Peter long before I was born.
I have often heard my mother mourn about those
two children, and I am sure you must be one of
them.”

The young man’s voice trembled as he spoke.
Peter more frightened than ever, knew not what
to say. He did not believe one word that the clerk
said. Atlast he spoke. “I want to ask you one
question. Is your father and mother alive.”

“My father has been dead some years; but my
mother is still living.”

“ Well, sir,” said Peter, “then your mother is
not my mother: for my mother must be dead.
My brother said, before he died, that he was sure
she must be dead; and that is nineteen years ago.
My mother must be dead. I don’t expect to find
her alive; but [thought I might find her grave.”

In vain the young man strove to convince him.
Tn vain he related little incidents connected with
186 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

the loss of the two boys that he had. heard from
his mother’s lips. Peter still believed he was
plotting to deceive and betray him. “0,”
thought he, “what a fool I was to tell him.” At
length after some minutes spent in painful thought,
he inquired, “ Whar does yer mother live ?”

“She lives in New Jersey. But I have two
sisters living in this city.”

“New Jersey!” said Peter to himself, “ whar
can that be. It must be a great way off. “New
Jersey,” said he aloud, “How fur is that from
yer?”

“O, it is just across the river. My mother
lives about fifteen miles from the city. Come, go
with me to my sister’s; one of them lives quite
near. She is several years older than I am, and
can tell you much more about the family.”

“No, sir; if you please show me the way to my
boardin’-house. It is night; and I’d rather go
thar.”

After much persnasion Peter at last consented
to accompany Mr. William Still, the clerk, upon
whom he yet looked with much suspicion, to see
his sister Mary, an unmarried woman, who taught
a little school, and kept a few boarders.

The lady took no notice of the stranger, but
went downstairs into the basement with her
brother; and Peter was in an agony of apprehen-
sion as he heard them conversing in low tones.
He had heard of kidnappers who employed coloured
RESTORED TO. HIS. MOTIIER. 187

agents to ensnare their victims ; and the perspi-
ration started from every pore as he thought
himself thus entangled. He would have fled, had
he known how to find his boarding-house.

After a few minutes the brother and sister
veturned to the room. “Sister,” said the clerk,
“here is a man who tellsa strange story. He has
come to Philadelphia to look for his relations ; and
ET should like you to hear what he has to say.”

She turned to Peter. “For whom are you
looking ?”’ inquired she.

“QO,” he replied “I's looking for a needle in a
haystack: and I reck’n the needle’s rusty and the
haystack’s rotted down : so its no use to say any more
about wt.”

“But, tell her,” said the young man, “ what
you related to me in the office.”

He proceeded to relate his story. When he
spoke the names of his futher and mother, his
listener could sitno longer. Seizing the candle
and holding it neur his face, she cried, ‘‘O! it is
one of our lost brothers! I should. know him by
his likeness to mother.” Then turning to the
young brother, she said, “O, William, this will
kill mother!”

Peter was not yet convinced. He was so
unprepared for such a joyful greeting, that he
could not believe they were sincere. He promised,
however, to come again in the morning, and go to
see an older sister residing in the city.
138 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

The clerk accompanied Peter to his boarding
house. “Good evening, Mrs. Byas,” he said, “ did
you send this man to the Anti-slavery Office ?”’

“Yes, Sir. I thought he might find there some
account of his people.”

“Well, he is my own brother.” Seeing her
amazed look, he continued, ‘“ My parents lost two
children over forty years ago: and from this man’s
story I am convinced he is one of those brothers.
I have brought him back here as I promised, but
I want him to go home with me, and in the morn-
ing I will take him to see other members of our
family.”

“No,” said Peter, who did not yet fully trust
his new-found brother, “I’d rather stay here
to-night, and I can go with you in the morning.”
When Mrs. Byas joined in urging him to go home
with Mr. Still, he consented.

“ Still”—thought he, as they walked along—
“it seems this man’s nameis William Still. Then,
if he is my brother that must be my name too. I
wish I know’d. And his mother has allers loved
the boys she lost, and talked a heap about ’em.
Well, this is an uncommon case; pears like they
all believe this man’s tale; but I can’t think my
mother’s a livin’ yet, and that I’ve come right on |
to one of her chillerns. It seems mighty queer
that they are all so ready to own a stranger, any-
how. Well I shall know more about it to-morrow,
when I come to see the other ’ooman. I’da heap
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 139

ruther stayed with Missus Byas this yer one
night.”

Thus full of doubts and fears he walked silently
by his companion’s side. Mrs. Still was away on
a visit to her husband’s relatives in New Jersey.
The brothers separated for the night. Left alone
in his chamber, Peter gave way to his long pent-up
grief. O why had he thus exposed himself to such
dangers? What would Vina and the children th ink
if they knew the perils that surrounded him? O!
if he should find after all that the tale of these people
was true! Perhaps they were all Abolitionists, and
lad contrived a plan to carry him off and sell him !

For fear that he might fall asleep and be sur-
prised, he piled the furniture against the door, first
carefully looking under the bed, to see that no
enemy was concealed in the chamber. He lay
down, and after wearying himself in striving to
devise means of escape from the imaginary dangers
he fell asleep. All night his dreams were gloomy
and frightful, and he awoke unrefreshed. The
light was cheering, and he was glad to find him-
self safe, and anxious to learn more of the people
who claimed him as a brother.

After breakfast, he returned to his boarding-
‘house. A conversation with Mrs. Byas seemed to
relieve his doubts and fears, of which she was
utterly unconscious ; and her frankness and
evident confidence in the integrity of “ Mr, Still”
went far to remove them from his mind.
140 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

At the appointed hour he went to the house of
Miss Mary Still, who received him with sisterly —
affection. This strengthened Peter’s hope that all
was tight. The two soon started for the residence
of the other sister. Her name was Kitty. She
was a widow. Her daughter was standing at the
window, and as soon as she observed them she
ran to her mother, ‘“‘O, mother,” cried she, “ Aunt
Mary has come, and brought a man that looks just
like grandfather. Come and see him.” |

“ Kitty,” said Mary, as her sister approached,
“here is one of our lost brothers. He came to
William last night, and I’m going right away
with him to see mother.”

Kitty saw in him a striking likeness to both
her parents; and after the first burst of joy was
over, she prepared to accompany them. “ Yes,
Til go, too. How glad I am!” exclaimed she.
“What will dear mother say ?”

They were soon on board the steam-boat.
Alternately the sisters questioned and congratu-
Jated their new-found brother. ‘“ It must be real,”’
Peter thought. The joy was greater than his
brightest hopes had promised. Of one thing he
was sure: he was on the Delaware, the river that
for more than forty years had been ever in his
thoughts, and he must be near his childhood’s
home. Thus between hope and fear he wavered
all the time until they reached Long Bridge, where
they took the stage for Medford, where was the
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 147

residence of their brother, Dr. Still. ‘ There,”
said one of the sisters, ‘‘ there is brother James,
now walking towards the barn.”

He turned and looked towards them. The
moment Peter glanced athisfaceall his doubts ceased
for ever. There was the very image of Levin,
the dear brother that was lying in his lowly grave
in Alabama. There could be no mistake. A full
tide of joy rushed over his soul. He had found
brothers and sisters! His mother lived! He
should yet look again on that dear face!

It wasa joyfulevening. All the family greeted
him as one received from the dead; and his like-
ness to the family was so very striking, that none
hesitated to receive him as a brother. In relating
the history of his long years of bondage the hours
fled rapidly until far on in the night they retired
to rest.

Peter’s fluttered heart was now at rest. He
had realised the dream of his boyhood, the dearly
cherished hope of riper years! ‘‘O that Levin
were here! O that Vina and the dear children
were now free, like myself!”

Dr. Still and his newly-recovered brother, with
the two sisters, set off early the next morning to
visit their mother. They agreed to avoid surpris-
ing their mother by communicating the good news
too abruptly, as she was near eighty years of age,
and it might be too much for her. She was living
with her son Samuel, the eldest next to Peter,
142 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

upon the farm owned by her late husband. As
they approached the house, the venerable woman
was standingin the doorway. Peter’s first impulse
was to jump from the waggon, and clasp the
precious form to his heart, but his sisters restrained
him. Forcing down his feelings, he followed his
sisters with placid face, as they advanced to greet
their beloved parent. E

“Mother,” said Kitty, “you know it is the
custom when one of your daughters marries, for
her to come home and bring your new son-in-law.
Now which of these would you rather take for
your son?” pointing first at Peter, and then at
the person who had driven the vehicle. The
mother answered with a smile, and led the way
into the house.

Peter chose a seat near his mother, and a
tumult of feelings agitated his breast as his mind
rapidly ran over the history of the past. There was
the mole on the face he and Levin had so often
talked about as they remembered together all that
mother’s love. The excitement of their arrival
having subsided, Peter, addressing himself to his
mother, inquired, “ Are all these your children? ”

“Yes,” she replied, “the most of them are
mine.”

“You have a large family.”

“Yes ; I have had eighteen children.”

“ How many have you livin’? ”

“T have buried eight, and I have eight living.”
RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 143

“T thought you said you had eighteen. Hight
livin’, and eight dead are only sixteen.”

The breast of the aged woman heaved as with
pent anguish, “Ah!” said she, “them two boys
have been more trouble than all the rest of my
children. I’se grieved about them a great many
years.”

‘What became of them ?” asked Peter.

“J never knew what became of them. [I left
them asleep in the bed, the last time I ever see
them, I never knew whether they were stole and
carried off, or whether they was dead. I hope,
though, they’re in heaven.”

At that moment her oldest daughter, Mahala,

given as “’Merica” by the stolen boys) who lived
near came rushing in. ‘Do tell me,” cried she,
half out of breath, “what is the matter? Is
anybody dead ?”

No one answered. She glanced round the
room. ‘ Who’s this talking to mother? Do tell
me, who is he? Isn’t he one of mother’s lost
children? He favours the family, and I’m sure
he must be one of them.”

“WhoP Me?” cried Peter.

“Yes; mother lost two children a great many
years ago. You must be one of them.”

“Tm a stranger from Alabama,” said he.

“T can’t help it,” cried the excited woman,
“I’m sure you’re one of mother’s children: you
are so like the family.”
144 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

One of the other sisters then approached the
mother, and broke to her the joyful news. The
aged woman sat for a moment bewildered by the
strange tidings, then rising, she walked into the
next room, and knelt in prayer. In a short time
she returned, trembling in every limb, though her
face was calm. “Who are you?” said she,
approaching the stranger.

“My name,” said he, “is Peter, and I had a
brother named Levin. My father’s name was

»



Levin, and my mother’s name was Sidney


RESTORED TO HIS MOTHER. 145

“©, Lord,” she cried, as she raised her tear-
dimmed eyes devoutly to heaven, “how long
have I prayed to see my sons! Can it be that
they have come! O, if you are my child, tell me
lowd’y once more! ”

The long-lost son was blest. How greatly
blest! He clasped his mother to his warm, full
heart, and joyful tears stole down his dusky cheeks.

One week Peter spent with his loving kindred.
As he related to them the history of his years of
bondage, and the varied scenes through which his
path had led, his listeners were never weary.
And when he told of poor Levin’s sorrows and
patient suffering, and of his peaceful happy death,
it seemed to them as if the spirit of their departed
brother hovered over the little-circle to whisper to
each of the weepers there, “ Dry now your tears,
for where I dwell there are neither tortures nor
bonds, and sorrow and sighing are unknown.”

Peter soon discovered how false were the
representations given him in the South of the
habits and conditions of the free negroes. He
found his relatives all industrious and frugal, and
consequently in very comfortable circumstances.
He saw how slavery had kept him ignorant and
poor. “But times will change,” thought he,
“and if ever I get my family, my children shall
have a chance to know as much as others.”
CHAPTER XV.

PETER’S FAREWELL VISIT TO THE SCENE OF HIS
BONDAGE,







: HTER’S friends would have
/ detained him in their midst,
but he resolved to return to
the South, to acquaint his
family with his success. He knew
=| the dangers that awaited him if his
secret should be discovered; but
he had promised his family that he would return:
and he would rather lose his life than forfeit his
word to them. He knew that his love was the
one blessed light that shone upon Vina’s darkened
path. From his own lips she should first hear of
his great happiness, and together they wouid devise
a plan by which she and her children might come
to share his joy.

Perhaps he could purchase their freedom. This
had ever been his hope: and though his friends
regarded it as impossible; they could not shake
his confidence. He had rescued himself from bon-
dage, and “he knew no such word as fail.” “TI can


FAREWELL VISIT; 147

die,” said he, “but I cannot live without tryin’ to
do something for my family. I must go back.”

It was hardest of all for his aged mother to give
him up; but she earnestly commended him to the
Lord to deliver him from every danger and on the
eighth of August, Peter left Philadelphia on his
return to Alabama. A kind Providence attended
him, and he reached Cincinnatti without meeting
any one likely to betray his secret by reporting
his journey to Philadelphia. There he found his
former master, to whom he related his success and
communicated his plans for the future. The good
Jew was astonished and delighted at the good
fortune of his humble friend, and readily promised
to aid him as far as possible in negotiating for the
purchase of his family.

He remained in Cincinnatti while his free papers
were prepared. These he was anxious to obtain
to carry with him to Alabama, as something might
occur that would render it necessary for him to
prove his freedom.

The precious document was completed, given
under the hand of H. HE. Spencer, Mayor, and the
corporate seal of the city of Cincinnatti, August
22nd, 1850.

Peter was now aman. He possessed free papers.
But he might lose them, or be robbed of them, and
again bought and sold as a slave. The precious
paper was carefully laid in the bottom of his trunk,
and he started for Tuscumbia, travelling meekly

L2
148 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

as a slave with a “pass,” furnished to him by Mr.
Friedman. This pass was directed to a Mr.
Alexander, of Tuscumbia, who had before acted
as a guardian to Peter in Mr. Friedman’s absence.
Tt requested this gentleman to permit Peter to
stay at Tuscumbia as long as he should wish, and
to send him back when he was ready to return.
Peter arrived at Tuscumbia the last day of
August.

Many were the friendly greetings he received
as he passed through the streets that day. Many
gentlemen also questioned him very closely
respecting the Free States ; how he liked Cincin
natti, and whether he saw any Abolitionists.
His ideas of the Abolitionists had been greatly
modified by what he had learnt during the last
few weeks. But he gave such replies as were
calculated to preserve his secret.

It so happened that on the day of Peter’s
arrival, his services were in requisition to white-
wash the seminary and put the whole building in
complete order. Thus he fell at once into the old
channel of promiscuous labours; and those of the
Tuscumbians who had most jealously observed his
“ movements, decided that not even a trip to Cincin-
natti could spoil uncle Peter. He had too much
good sense to be carried away with the folly of
the Abolitionists.

On the Saturday evening after his arrival, he
rode out to Bainbridge. He would not go sooner,
FAREWELL VISIT. 149

being determined to do nothing that could betray
the least unusual excitement of his feelings. As
he rode on, he thought he never could be really
free while those he loved so well were slaves.
But how should he get them? He knew not
what course would be best; but he knew how to
trust in that Good Father who had thus far pros-
pered him. He resolved to work hard, and earn
all he could; for whatever plan he might adopt,
money would never fail to be of use. :

He hastened on, yet it was quite dark before he
reached the plantation. He halted at the door of
Vina’s cabin, and glanced anxiously at the group
within. They wereallthere. Vina was preparing
to cook the supper, and the boys were busy at the
fire. Thank God! they all lived! .

His approach was soon perceived. “ Yes, it is
father !’’ burst at once from the lips of the two
sons: and after the first joyful “how d’ye do”
they took the horse and led it away.

“O Vina,” whispered Peter, as he still held her by
both hands, “I’ve found all my people. I’ve seen
my mother! Vina, my mother’s a livin’, and [ve
got five brothers and three sisters! ”

Soon the boys came in, and then the history of
the journey and its joyous results was related to
tliem. How they marvelled as he described to
them the great cities through which he had passed,
and all the strange sights he had seen. Still
greater was their wonder at the story of their far-
150 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

off relations, to whom their father had come as
from the dead, And then to think that father’s
people were all free! And how greatly, but
silently did they exult in the hope he held out to
them of being with him in the land of the free!

The slaves on the plantations were anxious to
learn what Peter saw in the Free States, and how
the people lived there. The mistress also questioned
him. To allhe gave very brief answers: but spoke
‘gratefully of the kindness of the Jew whom they
supposed to be his present owner. ‘“‘And Massa Isaac
say he’ll buy my family if Ido well. Do youreckon
ole Mas’r would sell em?” This was addressed
to Mrs. McKiernan.

“T don’t know,” replied the lady; “he thinks a
great deal of them all. I don’t believe that less
than three thousand dollars would buy them all;
if, indeed, he would consent to let them go at
all.”

To his wife and children Peter revealed all his
plans for their redemption. He would work in
Tuscumbia, till he had earned enough for his ex-
penses back to Philadelphia. While in Alabama
his liberty was all unsafe. ‘‘ My people told me,”
said he, “that folks are running away constant, and
gwine to Canada, a place away in the North, where
they never let the masters go to hunt them; but
I prefar buyin’ ’ye.” Then he told them his pur-
pose to labour and get friends to help him with
loans, which could be refunded when they were
FAREWELL VISIT. ~ 151

all free and able to work. “But,” said he “if
they do send a man to help ye get away, you must
be ready, and do the best ye can.”

During two months and a half that he remained

in Tuscumbia, he earned sixty dollars. On the
ninth of November, Peter rode to the plantation
for his last visit. The family were expecting him.
and they knew it would be his last visit. How
precious were these hours! It might be they were
the last they should ever spend together. Peter
had disposed of everything he possessed very
quietly, except his clothing, and such articles as
he knew would be useful to his family, which he
brought with him.
. Now came the time of parting. He renewed
his promise to buy them, if possible, and charged
them to hold themselves ready. ‘“ Now, boys,”
said he, “you'd best not marry till you yer from
me, for, if I live, I will get you all, sure. And be
good and kind to your mother, for she'll have
nobody else to look to but you. Aud you, Catherine,
don’t do anything thatwill make yer mother’shamed
ofyou. She hasaheap o’ trouble any how, and you
all ought’nt to give hernomore. Behave yerselves
well, and then people ’Il trust you.”

Poor Vina! She was the last to say farewell
to. She possessed not the buoyant hopes that
filled the hearts of her children. She had perfect
confidence in her husband’s truth, yet she could
not quell the fear that this was the last timo they
152 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

should ever meet in this world. She selected from
her simple wardrobe two or three articles of
clothing which he had been accustomed to see
her wear, and gave them to him. “When you
wants to see something that looks like me,” said
she, “you can look at these yer. They’ll make
you think of Vina.”

Peter lingered a moment at the cabin door.
There stood his wife and daughter, and great tears
were in their eyes. Once more he kissed them
both; then mounted his horse and rode away with
a sorrowful heart, and leaving very sorrowful
hearts behind.

On the next day after taking leave of his family
Peter, with “a pass” furnished to him by Mr.
Alexander, commenced his return journey to Phila-
delphia, though all supposed he was only gone to
rejoin Mr. Friedman at Cincinnatti, and to be em-
ployed by him on the river steamers, hiring him
out as his slave. He travelled by stage about
thirty miles to Hastport. Here he took passage in
a small steamboat to Paducah at the mouth of
the Tennessee river. From this place he proceeded
in one of the large river boats to Cincinnatti after
having been rudely turned off another by the
imperious captain.

Arrived at Cincinnatti he bade a final adieu to
the slave-land. How happy would he have been
but for his family and the anxiety he felt for their
release. Ah! when he thought how long a time
FAREWELL VISIT. 153

might pass before he could set them free from
bondage he could only trust in God, and pray for
patience. But he was resolved that all his energies
should be devoted to this great object.

Peter was disappointed when he found that
the friendly Jew was absent on a journey to
Tllincis. He therefore hastened on to Pittsburgh,
and thence to Philadelphia, where he found all his
friends well. His free-papers he carried with him
in his pocket, prepared, should occasion arise, to
vindicate his claim to freedom. Butasno zealous
slave-catcher chanced to put his greedy eye upon
him, Peter had no need to show them on the way.
CHAPTER XVI.

PETER’S FAMILY ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE FROM SLAVERY.





He could by no means be
‘| satisfied to enjoy the advantages of
; =| freedom himself while his loved wife
and elildren were enduring all the complicated
ills of slave life. The idea of sending a man to
rescue the family was again suggested. Many
of the anti-slavery friends of his brother William
were earnest advocates for such a plan. It would
take too long to raise a sum requisite to purchase
them. Besides which, the offering of money for
their ransom would, in some sense recognize the
right of the slave-holder to claim property in
human flesh. ‘‘ We are anxious,” they said “to
aid your family in escaping from bondage, but we
cannot bear to give gold to him who has so long
defrauded the helpless labourers of their hire.”
To all these arguments Peter opposed the
dangers of their scheme. It would be very diffi-
ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE. 155

cult for them to escape; and then if they should
be pursued and taken, the sufferings of their whole
past lives would be nothing to the punishment
they would receive. Worst of all, they might be
sold; and then all chance of getting them would
be for ever lost.

Peter’s objections were overruled. And he
waived his scruples all the more readily, as these
were educated men, and he was only a poor eman-
cipated slave, who had never read a book in his
life. He was on a visit to New Jersey when he
was summoned in haste to Philadelphia, where
zealous friends were holding council as to the best
method of bringing his wife and children away
from the slave land.

On his arrival there he was informed that a
white young man named Seth Concklin, a New
Englander, whose soul was imbued with the deepest
abhorrence of slavery, had volunteered to go and
bring away Peter’s loved ones from the house of
bondage, He had heard of Peter’s case and felt
a strong sympathy with the kidnapped man, whose
history presented another phase of the horrible
system that inflicted so many wrongs upon the
helpless. He asked no further equipment for the
journey but a sufficient sum of money to defray
necessary expenses, and some sign whereby the
family would recognize him as a friend.

Peter’s heart trembled. He had all along
cherished the hope that they would abandon the
156 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

plan of stealing away his family, and aid him in
accomplishing the safer plan of getting them by
purchase. He felt noscruple except on the ground
of the danger, for he knew it was their right to
be free, and to belong to themselves. He however
gave them all the aid in his power.

He gave Concklin an accurate description of
McKiernan’s plantation, with directions concerning
_ the best method of approaching it. He told him
also the names and ages of his family ; and gave
him a cape of Vina’s—one of the articles she had
given him as a keepsake. ‘‘ When she sees this,”
said he, “she’ll know you is a friend; but please,
sir, be careful and don’t get ’em into trouble. It’
go mighty hard with ’em, if they try to run off,
and Mr. McKiernan cotches ’em.”

Peter had received a hundred dollars from
friends in New Jersey to help him in getting his
family. This was devoted to paying the expenses
of the expedition; and Concklin departed on his
perilous undertaking.

It was a daring enterprise indeed! The plan-
tation that he had to reach was in the very depth
of the slave land, and he had to traverse two slave
states, Kentucky and Tennessee, in order to reach
it. Every step was surrounded with perils; but
he braved them all for the noble purpose of plucking
the poor bond-woman and her children from the
power of the oppressor.

He took with him neither bowie knife nor
ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE. - 157

pistol, lest he might be tempted to use them, and
so increase the danger. His first object was to
explore the route, and find safe hiding-places if he
should succeed in escaping with his protegées
from the Slave States. At Cincinnatti he met
with devoted friends, willing to aid him to the
utmost of their power. But in seeking to provide
places of refuge in Illinois and Indiana, he found
that the southern boundaries of these States, free
as they claimed to be, were infested with ruffianly
men thirsting for the rewards of those who were
willing to do the work of blood-hounds, hunting
the outcast, and dragging back the fugitive to
bonds and slavery. ‘Searching the country
opposite Paducah, Kentucky, I found” he wrote
to a friend, “ the whole country fifty miles around
is inhabited by Christian wolves. Itis customary,
when a strange negro is seen for any white man
to seize him, to convey him through and out of
the State of Illinois to Paducah, and lodge him in
gaol; and claim such reward as may be offered by
the master.”

Concklin made his way to McKiernan’s plan-
tation, and succeeded in obtaining an interview
with Vina. Trembling, the faithful wife went to
the place where, it had been intimated to her, she
would hear from her husband. She was almost
afraid to venture forward, lest some trap were laid
for her unwary feet. But the thought of Peter
overcame her fears.
158 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Ts your name Vina?” said the voice of oné
emerging from the darkness.

“Yes, Sir,” she whispered.

“ Are you Peter Friedman’s wife ? ”

“Yes, Sir, I’s his wife.”

“ How would you like to go to him ?”

“Td like it mons’ well, if I could git thar.”

“Well, I’ve come on purpose to take you to
~ him. Do you believe me? ”

“T don’t know, sir.”

“Can you see me, so as to know me if you
should meet me again?”

“No, Sir, it’s so dark, I can’t see your face
good.”

“Do you feel my hand. If you see me again
you'll know me by that hand. You feel that the
forefinger is cut off.”

“Yes, Sir, I feel it.”

“Do you believe that I came from Peter?”

“T don’t know, Sir.”

He drew from his pocket the gingham cape
that Peter had given him for a token. She
could feel its form and recognised it immediately.
That moment all doubt of his sincerity was
gone.

Yet she hesitated; for, like Peter, she knew
there was danger in the attempt to get away.
But Peter, she thought, never would have sent a
man if he had not considered “ we mought git off.
Leastways we'll try.”
. ATTEMPT TO. ESCAPE. 159

. “When does you want us to go?”’ inquired

Vina.

“Just as soon as you can get ready. How
long will it take you?”

“T don’t know, Sir, I don’t believe we could
git ready short o’ four weeks.”

“ Well, I can wait. I must go back to Louis-
ville to do some business before I take you on.
But I want first to see the boys. Where are
they?”

“O, they’re off on the island. ‘They won’t
come home ’fore Saturday night.”

“Well, you tell them to come down to the
‘landing on Sunday; I will keep this hand in sight.
You tell them about it, and they will know me.
Now, good bye. Don’t be afraid. I will do all I
can for you, but you must help yourselves.”

The next Sunday Peter and Levin walked down
to the river. There they discovered the stranger
by the mutilated finger their mother had described
to them. They all turned aside into the woods,

- where Concklin revealed to them his plans, and
listened patiently to their suggestions. Lest any
wanderer in the woods should come upon them,
they speedily departed.

Concklin proceeded by steamboat to Louisville.
The trip down the Tennessee convinced him that
it would be unsafe to attempt the escape of his
humble friends upon a steam boat. On his
return, he procured a skiff, having made the best
160 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

arrangements he was able to transport his charge
beyond the domain of slavery. For two weeks he
had to wait before all the family could find oppor-
tunity of leaving the plantation without suspicion.

Vina and her daughter got passes to go to a Mrs.
Jackson’s, and the "boys procured some to go to
South Florence. The mother walked away in
silence, with stealthy step, having first locked the
- cabin door,and requested Susannah, a neighbouring
girl, to prepare supper for them to-morrow. They
approached the river and descried the skiff.
Levin whistled. No answer. Could it be that
Concklin had disappointed them? They turned
and walked down the stream a little in search of
him. “Thar,” said Vina, “this yar jaunt’s
gwine to turn out bad: for nobody hasn’t good
luck whar they turns back after they’s started on
a journey.”

They returned to the skiff, and stooping down,
perceived Concklin asleep at the bottom of the
boat. He had been overcome with fatigue and
waiting. It was near three o’clock: and they at
once entered the skiff and hastened off. Both the
boys knew how to use the oars as well as Concklin,
and they flew through the water. Soon after day-
light on the following day they meta steamboat, but
a small island lying between them, the skiff was not
perceived. It so happened that McKiernan, the
master of the fugitives, was among the passengers,
then on his return from Louisiana. Had the boat
ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE. 161

been perceived, Levin and Peter at the oars would.
prokably have been recognized,

Vina and her daughter lay at the bottom of the
skiff covered with blankets. Parties sometimes
spoke to them from the shore; and on Monday



























































































































































































































































morning two men in'a skiff came alongside, de-

manding where they were going, and where from P:

“Are you all black men aboard?” they inquired.

The boys replied, “ White ‘Mas’r lyin’ thar, Sir,”
M
162 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

pointing to the bottom of the boat. Concklin lifted’
his head, and answered their inquiries, when, to the
great relief of all on board, they bowed, and giving
the boat a scrutinizing look, retired.

After a voyage of fifty-one hours they arrived at
the Ohio. On this river they intended to travel
exclusively at night, but circumstances compelled
them to travel as much by day as bynight. After —
being seven days in that frail skiff, exposed to dis-
covery and seizure every moment by the watchful
and numerous spies of slavery, they landed at
New Harmony, Iowa. Now, although their feet
pressed the soil of a Free State, their perils were
not passed: and they pursued their way towards
the North with anxious hearts.

Concklin, who had assumed the name of Miller,
had changed the shabby garb he had worn before.
The others also had put on more respectable
apparel than they had ever worn before, and would
scarcely have been recognised, even by those who
had often seen them at their labours, as field-hands
from McKiernan’s plantation.

All day they travelled on the public road: and
though they “met a heap of people,” they were
not questioned. At night they reached the house
of a friend, and were kindly provided for. All the
next day they remained. there: and, after supper
another friend carried them northward to his home,
the two women riding horses that had been brought
for them. Here they remained all day, then
ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE. 163

resumed their journey, and travelled all night on
foot. In the forenoon of the following day,
(Thursday) they reached another station, where
they rested until Friday morning.

By this time they had travelled so far from the
river that Concklin thought they might venture
to travel in the day-time; so he proposed to con-
tinue their journey. Vina had been troubled with
uncomfortable dreams and ventured to remonstrate.
“ we starts to-day. You can do as you likes, Sir,
bat if I was you I’d put off this yer jaunt till
night. ’Pears ’taint safe, no-how.” But Concklin,
naturally hopeful and bold, regarded this as idle
superstition; and being so nearly beyond the
reach of danger, he resolved to push on.

This was an unfortunate decision, as the result
proved. Late in the afternoon they passed a saw-
mill, in front of which stood a large man gazing
hard at the little company as they were passing
by. “How d’ye, Aunt Lucy,” he said to Vina,
“which way are you travelling.” They made no
' reply but their hearts beat quick with fear as they
hastened on.

Just before night they approached the dwell-
ing of the friend where they were to rest. His
son lived in a small house close by. Here Conck-
lin bade them “run in out of the rain,” while he
went on to the main station to announce their
coming. While they were sitting round a good

M2
164 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

fire drying and warming themselves, and thank-
ing God for having brought them safely to, the
end of that day’s journey, their hearts sank within
them as they heard the sound of horses’ feet
coming near.

One glance at the window was sufficient; for
there, halting at the gate, were seven men on horse-
back. ‘They done come after us,” hoarsely
whispered one of the boys.

“Yes,” answered Vina, “I'll lay anything
we're gwine to be tooken now.” .

The men dismounted, and tied their horses
to the fence. Among them was the man who
had accosted Vina at the saw-mill, a short time
before.

They entered the dwelling, and after question-
ing Vina and the boys, seized upon them and
proceeded to bind their victims. Levin and Peter
would have resisted, but they had no weapons of
any kind, while their assailants were all armed
with pistols and bowie knives. Then they were
all carried off in a waggon the slave-hunters had
procured for the purpose, amid the boisterous
laughter and coarse blasphemous jests of their
captors.

When they had proceeded a short distance
Concklin came running after them, convinced, too
late that, in travelling by day-light, he had made
more haste than good speed. He sprang into the
wageon, and proceeded to untie the captives,
ATTEMPT 10 ESCAPE. 165 __

when the ruffians presented their pistols to his
head and swore that they would blow his brains
out if he did not desist. He remained with the
unfortunate ones until they reached the gaol at
Vincennes.

It was late and the gaoler had gone to bed.
With some difficulty he was aroused, and, after
some conversation with the chief of the ruffianly
band, he took the prisoners in and locked them
up. “But he acted,” Vina said, “like he feel
mighty sorry for us: and I b’lieve if we had’nt a
been so closely watched, he mought a let us go.
He was kind to us.”

Concklin came and talked with the captives
every day through the gaol window. Vina begged
him to leave them there and look to his own safety.
“Now you can’t do us no good, Sir, no-how, and
*pears like you best take care o’ youself.”

“O,” replied he, “I don’t feel at all uneasy.”

“Well, Sir, I feels oneasy bout you, and you
best not stay round herenolonger. It won’t make
it no better for us, and you'll get. into trouble,
sure.”

But some dream of rescuing them haunted his
mind. He could not bear to leave them. He
had set his heart upon delivering this family to
the husband and father, who, he knew, was waiting
with a trembling heart to welcome them.

The party of slave-hunters into whose hands
they had fallen svon ascertained that “ Four likely
166 TEE STOLEN CHILDREN.

negroes had been stolen from Bernard McKiernan,
near South Florence, Alabama, and their owner
had offered a reward of four hundred dollars for
the property, and six hundred for the apprehen-
sion of the thief, and his delivery in South
Florence.”

Upon the receipt of this information, Concklin
was immediately seized and cast into prison.
Stillhis brave hopeful spirit bore him up. “’Peard,”
said Vina, “like he couldn’t feel discouraged.”

It was night, and though her children were all
in deep slumber, Vina could’nt sleep. She was
busy picturing to herself the sorrows to which
they were returning, the tortures that awaited
them, and all the hopelessness of their future
lives. Her children branded as runaways would
be exposed to grievous ills to which hitherto they
had been strangers. Suddenly she started, for
she heard a vehicle stop in front of the gaol; and
a coarse voice fell upon her ear that she could not
mistake. It was the voice of her master. “I
wish you would ‘let me in. I would like to see
them.”

Vina roused her children, and said to them,
“We'll git toted back now. Old McKiernan’s a.
comin’. He’s a talking out yer.”

Soon the key turned in the lock, and the
gaoler entered, followed by a stranger and the
“old master.” His cane was in his hand; his
face looked redder than usual. He approached
ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE. 16?

the bed on which his slaves were still lying, and
for a moment looked down on them in silence.
“Ha! boy, what are you doing here?” said he
.to Peter.

No answer.

“ Speak! you rascal, or. I'll knock you on the
head with this stick. Don’t you know? -Ain’t I
your old master ?”

Reluctantly Peter answered, “ Yes, Sir.”

“Well,” said he, with bitter cursing, ‘‘ What
are you doing here?”

“Don’t know, Sir.”

“Don't know! Til make you tell a different
tale from that when I get you home.”

The tyrant turned to the mother. “See
here, girl, how came you to leave home?” No
answer.

Cursing bitterly, he said, “ Ain’t it astonishing
you all can’t answer when you're spoken to?”
- Still no answer came, and he turned to his com-
panion and said, pointing to Vina, “Ah, that
huzzy! She’s at the bottom of all this. If it
had’nt been for her, and that rascal Peter, they
-would never have left me in the world.”

“What Peter is that?” asked the man.

“Why, he is this girl’s husband. He got in
with a Jew, and persuaded him to.buy him; and
a few months after that, Peter bought himself.

_This scrape was in the bargain at first, Pm
certain.”
“168 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Where are this Peter and his master now P”

“T don’t know exactly. But if ever they show
their heads in Tuscumbia again, I’ll have them
hung sky-high. Peter is at the bottom of this,
but he never had sense to doit alone. He’s had
help, I'll swear. Some Abolitionist has had a
hand in it. I believe there’s some of them in
Franklin county, and if I can hunt them out, they
shall be burnt or I’ll have their heads.”

He proceeded to question the family concerning
their escape. But he could get no satisfactory

information from them, as they were anxious to
-shield-Concklin as far as possible. He then left
them and went into the room where Concklin was
‘confined. He was anxious to find who, if any,
had been privy to their escape. Vina overheard
him saying in tones of passion mingled with ex-
pletives we care not to write down, “Its aston-
ishing that you won’t tell who started you in this
business! Would you be such a fool as to be
carried back in irons, and lose your life for the
sake of saving other people?”

“Té is of no use for you to question me about
them,” replied Concklin. “You have me now,
and it isn’t worth while to bring other people into
trouble.”

“ Well, how do you feel in them irons?”

“T suppose I feel better than you will at some
future gaye in consequence of cues them to be
put on me.’
ATTEMPT: TO ESCAPE. ~ 169

“ How is that ?”

“You will have plenty of time to find out.” »

Finding that he could get no satisfactory

‘answer from the “ thief,” he returned to the room
‘where Vina and her children were’ confined.

_ Here he spent an hour in alternately cursing |
them and asking questions in vain. ‘The next
morning they were summoned to take their places
in the stage. Concklin was also brought out in
irons and put in with them. It was after dark
when they reached Evansville where they were to
stay for the night. Afraid to put them in the
gaol lest they should disappear before morning,
they were taken to a private house and locked up
in a room in the second story, and the master of
the house kept guard over them on the stairs all
night. ;

Concklin would have attempted to escape by
jumping from the window, but Vina interposed.
“O!” said she, “don’t go out thar. -You’ll be
dashed to pieces, sir, jumping out o’ that ’ar high
winder. O! if you had tuck my advice and run
off when they first cotch us, you’d a bin safe

now.”

Morning dawned, and after an early breakfast,
McKiernan came with his attendant, Emison, to
conduct them all to the boat. Peter and Levin
would have made an attempt to escape, but they
could not desert the mother and sister who were
so dear to them. So they meekly followed their
170 TIE STOLEN CHILDREN.

old master ; while they knew his footsteps led to
cruel torture, perhaps to death.

Once on board the river boat—“ The Paul An-
derson”—the captives were deemed safe: still
whenever the boat approached a landing-place
they were closely watched. Concklin was confined
in a state room, where his poor friends had no
chance to speak to him. The poor negroes had
but a troubled sleep during the night: but towards
morning they were aroused by people hurrying to
and fro with lights, and calling to each other in
every direction. Presently McKiernan came to
Vina and inquired, “ Where are the boys?”

“Yer they lie, Sir.”

“Well, that rascal’s gone,” meaning Concklin.

“Ts he?” Such was Vina’s only answer: but
her heart beat quick with the hope that he had by
some means escaped in safety. Every part of the
boat was carefully searched, but no trace of him
was found.

It was some years before Vina became ac-
quainted with the mournful truth; but poor Mr.
Concklin had found a watery grave, and sacrificed
his life in the benevolent attempt to relieve the
oppressed, and help the kidnapped husband to
obtain his wife and children. The manner of his
death will'remain a mystery until the resurrection
morn. It is not likely that he was drowned by
the slave-holding and slave-hunting ruffians who
liad him in custody: as he was too securely in
ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE. 171

their power to leave any doubt as to the fate that
awaited him, by hanging or burning, in Alabama.
It has been ascertained that there were parties on
board “The Paul Anderson” who sympathised
strongly with the captives and their deliverer, and
reprobated the conduct of the ruffians who had
dragged, or were dragging, them back to slavery.
Perhaps Concklin was encouraged and aided, as
far as they were able, in the attempt to escape by
these parties. About a week after, the body of a
white man in irons was found in the Ohio river.
This, no doubt, was the body of Seth Concklin,
who had fallen far more nobly than if he had
perished on the battle-field, and is to be numbered
with God’s heroes.

Arrived at Paducah they had to await the
arrival of “The Greek Slave,” to convey them up
the Tennessee river. The mistress of the hotel
at which they stopped was very anxious to pur-
chase Vina and her daughter, in whom she mani-
fested much kindly interest. But McKiernan
was not to be prevailed upon to part with them.
“JT raised this family myself,’ said he “and
even if there is danger of their running off
again, I may as well hold bad property as any-
body else.”

“The Greek Slave’? made her appearance at
the appointed time, and the melancholy company
were soon ascending the Tennessee. The trees
were clothed in freshest green and wild flowers
172 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

exhibited their brightest bloom; but there was no
spring-time in the hearts of the poor captives.
Darkness, like the shadow of death hung over the
spirits of all of them, and a dreary prospect lay.
spread before them,
CHAPTER XVII.

THE FUGITIVES RETURNED TO SLAVERY







a\N Saturday, April 5th, 1851,
Vina and her children re-
turned to their deserted cabin,
s They had been absent three
| weeks, and through what an age
of anxiety and suffering had they
passed! How terrible the disap-
Sener that had fallen upon them.

The best of their clothing and farniture had
been stolen and carried away; but this they
heeded not in their despair. Now that liberty had
been rudely snatched from their grasp, they had
no tears to shed for minor losses. When the
people came in from the field many of them looked
-wistfully upon the captured fugitives and said
“How d’ye?” ina mournful tone. A few were
glad that they had been brought back, “ bekase,”
they said, “ dey’s nuttin’ but niggers, no how, and
dey’s allers so mighty good, and niver gits de
cowhide. Now dey’ll des find out how good it feels
to git a cuttin’ up.”

They were sent to the field the same day, for


174 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

just then their labour was greatly needed; but
they knew well the day of vengeance was only
postponed. In gloomy silence they pursued their
labours until Wednesday morning, when Mr. Mc-
Kiernan, attended by Smith, the overseer, entered
the field. Vina knew their errand, and her indig-
nation rose; but she was helpless. She saw them
approaching the spot where young Peter was at
work, and heard them order him to strip. Poor
fellow! He was wholly in their power, and he
obeyed.

The poor mother stood and counted the two
hundred lashes that fell upon the naked back of
her first-born son; and every blow smote upon her
heart. He bore the torture bravely. Not one cry
for mercy did he utter; not one imploring look did
he vouchsafe to the rufians who sought thus to
bend or break his spirit; and not until they had
finished did he speak. “This is the last time,”
said he then to the overseer, “that you shall ever

- strike me. I never will be whipped again by any
man.”

“Hush your mouth, you rascal,” cried the
master, “or I'll have as much more put on you.”

They left the young man and came to his
mother. Smith attempted to tie her. ‘No, Sir,”
said she, “I don’t belong to you, and you ain’t
gwine to whip me. Yer’s my mass’r. I belong
to him, and he may kill meif he want to; but I’m
not gwine let you tie me nor whip me. You
RETURNED TO SLAVERY. 175°

don’t like me, and I never did like you, no-how.
If my mass’r wants me beat, he must do it
hisself.””

Mr. McKiernan was sitting on his horse, but at
this he dismounted and bade the overseer give
him the whip. Smith complied, and the master
ordered her to take off her coat. He then tied her
hands, and gave her less than a hundred blows:
a slight punishment for arunaway. He did it
gently too, for the skin, though sorely bruised,
was not cut by the cowhide. k

This done, the two worthies repaired to the
blacksmith’s shop, where Levin was at work.
His back was bared, and then the fierce lash of
the overseer whizzed through the air, as though it
loved the sport.

Neither the stocks, nor the runaway’s heavy
irons were called into requisition. Perhaps their
success in once reaching the Free States warned
the master against provoking’ another attempt at
flight.

Catherine escaped the cowhide. She seemed
to know so little about the plan of the escape, that
her master told the overseer it was not worth while
to whip her. “ It’s that Peter that’s been at the
bottom of all this,’’ said he, “and I believe the
Jew has done the work. There’s Catherine, she
didn’t understand any of their plans; but her
mother, she’s got sense enough. It would be just
like her to try it again, but she’ll never go and
176 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

leave her daughter. She’s always doted on the
girl; and Catherine’s a likely wench. So it’s
best to keep one of them on the island—I reckon
the old woman. She would’nt be long starting off
again, if she took it into her head. She was
always bound to have her own way, though, to tell
the truth, she’s as clever a woman as ever I
owned.”

- The next Sunday Vina received the order to
go to the island—an island in the Tennessee river
that belonged to Mr. McKiernan—and with great
promptitude she repaired thither. “TIliked stayin’
on the island a heap the best,’ she said, “there I
was out o’ sight mostly both of mass’r and missis.
Me and them had fell out, and I did’nt never
want to make friends with ’em no more.”

There was one young heart that swelled with
mingled emotions of delight and grief at the
return of Vina and her family. Her name was
Susannah, a bright mulatto girl, the daughter of
“Aunt Patsy.” She was a quiet well-behaved
girl that had been raised on the place, and ever
since they were children young Peter and she had
loved each other. But when his’ father went away
and left to his family the assurance that they
should be free, Peter determined to obey his
counsel: and so the union of the youthful pair
was postponed to an indefinite period.

The master’s watchful eye had long noticed
this attachment, and imagining that if Peter had
RETURNED TO SLAVERY. 177

a, wife he would be less likely to run off again, he
determined that now they should be married. No
favourable opportunity occurred for him to urge
the matter until the crop was laid by in August;
when, according to his annual custom, he gave his
slaves a barbecue—a sort of harvest-home feast.
Then he determined that the marriage should take
place. ;

Pigs and chickens, and the flesh of sheep and
oxen in abundance, were roasting o’er the glowing
coals in a trench, when Peter, who was aiding in
the preparations for the feast, was summoned into
the presence of his master. ‘How would you like
to marry Susannah, boy?” inquired McKiernan.

“T don’t care bout marryin’ anybody, now,
SIPs!

“But Susannah says she loves you, and you
ought to have her.”

“No, Sir, [don’t care ’bout marryin’, without
my people’s willin’.”

“Tt’s no matter about your mother, boy, I give
you leave, and you need’nt ask her anything about
it. Go and dress yourself.”

“You give me nothin’ to dress in.”

“Well go and put on clean clothes, anyhow, and
then come back to me.”

Peter went to his mother’s cabin; but was un-
decided how to act. His love for Susannah was
not silent; but he could not bear to vex his
mother: He had a suit of Sunday clothes; but

N
~178 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

these he would not put on to please his master.
So he dressed himself in a clean suit of working
clothes, and scarcely knowing whether he was
doing right. or wrong approached the presence of
his master. Susannah, having received an order
from her master to dress and come to him, was
already there.

One of their fellow-slaves, a preacher named
‘William Hendy was now called to marry them.
In a few minutes they were marching round the
field under the orders of the master at the head
of a troop of their young companions who, with
gay songs and merry laughter, were celebrating
the marriage. ae
. Vina soon heard of what had occurred. She
was one of the cooks, and she continued quietly
to baste the meat, though every moment her wrath
was rising higher. Levin was helping his mother.
Soon thé master approached, “ Why don’t you
march with the others?” said he to Vina.

“T ain’t a soldier, and I don’t know nuthin’
*bout marchin’,” she replied.

“What’s that? Say that again.”

She repeated her words, and added, “ There’s
not a plantation in a million o’ miles whar thar’s
sich mean works as thar is yar.”

“ Better mind how you talk, girl, or I'll give
you a slap.”

“T don’t keer what you do. I wouldn’t keer
if you killed him and me too. . You’ve done made-
RETURNED TO SLAVERY. 179

& heap o’ matches, and none of ’em ever prospered,
no how.”

“OQ! I was so mad!” she said, “every time
I looked down, ’peared like I could see sparks 0’
-fire a comin’ out o’ my eyes. Then he went to
the house, and told missis. She ‘lowed he ought
to be ’shamed o’ himself, ’kase, she said, he’d
done me mean, and she didn’t blame me if I was
mad.”

About a year after, a little boy was folded to
Susannah’s heart—a fine, “peart” healthy child.
She named him Edmund; and he soon became
very dear to the hearts of all his kindred. But
Vina was sad at the advent of this little one, as
‘she lived in expectation of a summons to her hus-
band. She loved the baby dearly; but she knew
it formed another tie to bind the young father to
the slave land.

But the tie was soon broken: ‘When only a
few months old, the baby was seized with the
whooping-cough; and Aunt Patsy having a large
-number of little ones to take care of, could not
give the little one all the attention he required.
_As the child grew weaker, O! how his mother
longed to stay in and nurse him! She appealed
to the overseer in vain; and when she begged her
mistress, who herself had laid four little ones in
the grave, to allow her to attend her sinking child,
she was rudely rebuffed. ..“ Go out, to work,” said
she, “it’s no use for you to stay in. You don’t

N2
“180 YHE STOLEN CHILDREN.

know how to take care of children; if you did,
your baby never would have been so bad.”

A week later, a messenger was sent to the
field to bid Peter and his wife come and see the last

of their child. Obtaining permission of the over-

seer they went. The -baby did not know them
now. Though the young mother fondly kissed
his lips, and breathed his name in tenderest accents,
she could awaken no answering smile. A fierce
convulsion shook the little frame—it passed—the
child was dead.

“ Ah well,” said the mistress, when she was
told that Susannah’s child was dead, “they will
be better off. My life is nearly worried out of me
by sick children, and I am sure I wouldn’t care if
they werealldead. Itis just as well for Susannah,
‘for it never would have done her any good if it
had lived.”

Early in the spring of 1854, another son was
born; and this they called Peter. Vina had come
in from the island and resumed the office of general
nurse, which she had often, and for a long time,
filled before. When little Peter was five weeks
old, the master asked her if she thought Susannah
was well enough to go out to the field,

“No, Sir,” replied she, “she ain’t over and
above strong, no how, and she oughtn’t to go out
when the weather’s so bad.”

“Well, if you think so, ’'ll give her another
week,”
RETURNED TO SLAVERY. 181-

But the overseer was pushed, and before three
days had passed Susannah was sent out to the
field. A heavy rain carne on soon after, which
was followed by a chilling wind. “ Please, Sir,”
said the young mother to the overseer, “may I
go to the house? I’m mighty cold, and my side
aches powerful.”

‘*No, no; you used to be smart enough but
now you are always complaining, and getting to
be no account. Go ’long to your work.”

A week longer she laboured, and then her
work was done. She became soill that the doctor
was called; but he could do nothing to relieve her.
Consumption had grasped heras its prey. Month
after month she lay in her cabin a patient sufferer
doing what she could for her little Peter who was.
weak and sickly.

“ Don’t stay long,” said Susannah to Peter as
she saw him going out of the cabin, one Sunday
morning in August; “it’s so lonely when you're
gone.”

Peter, with sorrowful heart, returned, and sat
down by her side. All day she talked sweetly to
him of that blest home to which she was hastening.
Susannah knew and enjoyed religion; and the
long lonely days of her sickness had been spent
in sweet communion with her Saviour, and in
thinking of her blessed home within the veil.
“T’m gwine away from you now, Peter,” said the
dying girl with a countenance beaming with,
182 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

heavenly light, “but I shall leave our little baby
with you. You'll take good care of him for my
sake—won’t you? O Peter you'll be lonesome
when I’m gone; but you must think I’m happy,’
and it wont be long before you come too.”

Her eyes grew very bright. as she strove thus
to comfort her young, sorrowing husband. But
when the sun was sinking in the west her eyelids
softly closed—she had gone home to God.

For more than two years after her return from
“dat dar jaunt to de Norf,” Vina remained upon
the island. Sometimes her sons were both with
her there; but Catherine was kept constantly at
the home place.

“Well, girl,” said her master, some months
after the recapture, “Do you remember the road
you travelled, when that rascal carried you all
off ?”

“Yes, Sir,” replied Vina, “I remember every
inch I went; and I could go over it again with
my eyes shut.” .

The boys also were questioned concerning
their knowledge of the route, and they gave similar
answers. This did not at all diminish the master’s
fear that they might make another attempt to
escape, and after all give him the slip: and he
resolved to take all possible precautions to prevent
another trial.

Vina had not been many months on the island
before the mistress began to wish for her presence —
RETURNED TO SLAVERY. 183

on the home place. She was an excellent nurse
in sickness; and for many years she had been
called in to wait upon any of the white family
when they chanced to be sick. So faithful and
competent was she, that when Vina was in the
sick room the mother felt no uneasiness about her
sick children. Among the slaves she was both
doctor and nurse, unless in extraordinary cases
when the services of a medical man were plainly
required.

At last Mrs. McKiernan told her husband that
they must get Vina back, or they should never
be able to raise any more children. “The trouble
with them commenced,” said she, “when Vina
and her family first ran off; and since that time
there has been nothing but bad luck with both
the women and the children. There’s Delphia
might have been alive now if it had’nt been for
those fools of doctors.”

“ Well, Vina,” said the master, when she had
been about two years on the island, ‘how would
you like to go back to the low place?”

“T don’t keer ’bout gwine back, Sir.” |

“ But your mistress says she would like to have
you back. Several of the women will be sick
soon, and she wants you there.”

“TJ. don’t want nuthin’ to do with ’em, Sir.
You done send me off yer out o’ spite, and now
the sick ones may take keer o’ theirselves. I ain’t
gvine to be runnin’ after ’em.
184, THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

“Well, if you don’t go now, you may not get
a chance when you do want to go.”

“T don’t keer nuthin’ ’boutit, sir. I don’t want
to go thar never.”

But after a few weeks, when further urged,
Vina packed up the few little articles she possessed,
and returned to the old cabin. She had not given
up all hope; but she was dark and gloomy, for
the chance of ever seeing her beloved husband
again seemed to lessen day by day. There was
much sickness upon the plantation, and in allevia-
ting as she was able the sufferings of her enslaved
sisters, she found a transient forgetfulness of her
own griefs.

But her sympathies were often strongly moved,
and her feelings harrowed, as she witnessed the
cruelties practised by the overseer. This overseer
was a cowardly fellow, and his brutalities were
chiefly exercised upon weakly women and children.
“He knowed,” said Vina, “ the people mostly would
fight him, if he tried to beat ’em, and so he
managed to do without very much beatin’. But
them what’s feared of him fared mons’ hard. ’Pears
he never know’d when to stop, if he git mad at one
o’ them kind.

Poor Delphia, of whom mention was made by
“missis” when she expressed her wish to have
Vina back from the island, was the victim of this
wretch’s cruelty. He kept much company on
Sundays; and as the overseers were furnished by
RETURNED TO SLAVERY: 185

their employers with corn and bacon for their
households, as well as flour, coffee, and sugar, so
many guests were very expensive to Mr. McKiernan.
One Sunday afternoon, the master walked down
to the quarters and saw two horses hitched at the
overseer’s gate.

“Whose horses are these?” asked he of a
group of women that stood near. :

Delphia was the one to reply to this inquiry.
Then the master asked, “Smith has a heap o’
company, don’t he?”

“Yes, Sir,” said Delphia, “last Sunday thar
was six horses hitched to his fence, and all of ’em
was carried off and fed.”

Some evil-minded person reported this con-
versation to the overseer, and he was greatly
enraged. A few days after, the master expressed
his opinion to Smith as to the number of guests
he received; adding he knew it was so for he saw
them there himself.

“You did not see them,” said Smith. ‘“ Some
nigger has told you, and it is no other than that
lying, tattling girl, Delphia.”

‘From that hour he vowed vengeance on the
poor woman; swearing at the same time that
there were other ways to kill a cow besides shooting’
her, or knocking her on the head; and Delphia
would find it out.

The ruffian after that never gave Delphia a
moment’s rest from his cruelty. She was one of
186 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

the ploughwomen; and though she was not in a
condition to bear extreme fatigue, he compelled
her to plough day after day with her mule driven
at the fastest pace that was possible. She dared
not stop, for the fellow’s eye was always upon
‘her, gleaming with fiendish malignity. When the
other women told her she was killing herself, she
only replied, “You know how Smith hates me,
and he will beat me to death.” ’

Thus week after week, she ran all day in the
plough, till at last she was forced to stop, and she
went with her mule to the quarter. Smith was
at his house and sawher coming. “ Whatare you
there for P”

“T’s sick, Sir, I can’t work.”

“No, you're not sick. You need’nt put out your
mule—tie him there: and in just two hours you
shall go out again, Ll zive you that lone to
rest.”

She went into her cae, and in less than two
hours the doctor was sent for. Before night, poor .
Delphia lay still and cold in death, with her dead
baby lying by her side.

As two of her fellow-slaves were digging her
grave the overseercame up. The hardened ruffian
jumped down into the narrow house they were
hollowing out for the victim of his malice—
“There,” said he with an oath, “this is the place
where all liars and tattlers ought to go.”
CHAPTER XVIII

PEVER REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN,






7HEN Concklin left Phila-
- delphia on his ill-starred
expedition, Peter returned
42s to his mother’s house, where

the remained restless and anxious
for many weeks, At last his brother
William, who had heard from
Concklin, wrote to communicate the glad intelli-
gence that he with Vina and the family had
arrived in a Free State. He hastened to Phila-
delphia, his heart swelling with the hope of soon
embracing his loved ones; but the day after his
arrival there, alas! all his visions of approaching
joy vanished away.

“©, Peter,” said his sister Mary, as he entered.
the room where she was sitting, “ have you heard
the news ?”

His heart sunk within him, as he noticed how
her voice trembled with emotion. Still he calmly
answered, “ No.”

“ Sit down,” said she, “and I will read it to
you.” She had the “ Ledger” in her hand, and
188 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

proceeded to read several extracts from Indiana
papers, giving an account of the seizure of four
slaves who had escaped from Bernard McKiernan,
of South Florence, Alabama, and also of a white
man, calling himself Miller, who had them in
charge.

Peter listened in silence till she ceased to read.
“Tt is just what I feared,” said he in a hoarse
voice, “just what I told them all. O! if they
had heard to me!”

Peter, for a while, was overwhelmed with dis-
tress. His thoughts followed the trembling
fugitives on their return to slavery; and under
every torture which he had been accustomed to
see inflicted upon runaways, he fancied that his
dear wife and children, even then, were groaning.

He remembered a boy belonging toa professedly
pious man in Tuscumbia who was, at the time he
came away from the slave land, wearing a heavy
iron collar upon his neck, and an iron band round
his body. A rod of iron was welded to each of
these upon his back, and extended further above
his head than his hands could reach. Rods ofiron
were also fastened to the collar on each side, and
at the point of each shoulder they were bent up
and reached higher than his head. To the highest
of these rods a bell was fastened, which tinkled
constantly. In the morning the boy was locked
to the plough by a chain that was fastened to the
band around his body: and thus he was obliged to.
REDEEMS HIS WIFS AND CHILDREN. 189

‘plough till noon. The head man then unlocked
the chain, and led the mule away; leaving his
fellow-slave to follow to the house. All the after-
noon. he was made to plough in the same manner,
and at night locked in his cabin he was left to cook
his scanty supper alone, and to get what rest his
torturing irons would allow. Peter thought of
these cruel badges of the runaway, and shuddered
as, in imagination, he saw his own beloved sons
enduring similar punishments.

Another image of terror presented itself in the
form of a poor slave belonging toa Mr. G., of
Tuscumbia who died, shortly before Peter left that
town, from wearing an iron collar in hot weather.
It rubbed the skin off the poor fellow’s neck; but
his master swore he should wear it till he died.
Soon was his threat fulfilled; for the flesh morti-
fied under the heated: iron, and when the sufferer
uttered his last groan, the instrument of torture
was still upon his neck.

He knew also that even the women on McKier-
nan’s plantation had been made to wear irons, and
he trembled for Vina and Catherine, knowing as
he did the brutal and vindictive character of their
master. Well he remembered Mary—a beautiful
woman, and a special favourite with her master.
She had experienced so much cruelty and torture
at the hands of her drunken jealous mistress that
life became burdensome, and she fled to the woods |
to escape, at least for a time, from the daily perse-
190 / THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

cutions she was compelled to endure. After being
three or four months in the woods she was brought
in. Then came the punishment for running away.
First, her master gave her a cruel beating, and
then the overseer inflicted upon her a like correc-
tion: and after that she was daily flogged by her
mistress’ orders. This was continued until she
became so emaciated that they feared she would
become useless, and then the irons were brought
in requisition. The collar was welded on her
slender neck, and a heavy band of iron upon her .
ancle, to which was attached one end of a heavy
log-chain, the other end being brought up and
locked round her waist. Month after month was
the poor woman compelled to wear these galling
irons. Peter, himself had often seen her coming
from the field at night “ lookin’ every minit like
she would drop down to the ground with the
weight of her shackles.” The image of this tor-
tured woman would rise before him now—the
elanking of her heavy chain would rack his ear.
No wonder that he could not rest when he thought
of his faithful Vina and Catherine both in the
power of the ‘same cruel wretches. No wonder
that all labour and privation seemed to him as
nothing, if he could yet gain the ransom of these
loved ones.
Peter started immediately for Cincinnatti, in

the hope of finding his late master and obtaining
his assistance. But Mr. Isaac Friedland was away
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 191

in Illinois.» His brother Levi, however, warmly
espoused his cause, and had he not been kindly
warned that such a step would be dangerous and ~
futile, he would have gone himself to Tuscumbia
to see what could be done for. the relief of the
family, A friend informed him that the inhabi-
tants of Tuscumbia were highly incensed against
both himself and his brother, whom they regarded
as instigators in the attempt to escape.

Peter had brought a letter of introduction to
“Mr. Levi Coffin, a well known philanthropist
residing. at Cincinnatti. This he delivered, and
Mr. Coffin soon made his case known to several
benevolent gentlemen of the city. One of these,
Mr. Samuel Lewis, at Peter’s request, addressed a
letter to Mr. L. B. Thornton of Tuscumbia, a
gentleman who had charge of the boys’ school
there, for whom Peter had often performed little
‘services, and whom he regarded as one of his best
friends. The letter contained a request that he
would ascertain from Mr. McKiernan, whether or
not he would sell Peter’s family, and at what price
he valued them; and also requested him to send
the result of these inquiries:to Mr. William Still,
of Philadelphia.

While he was in Cincinnatti, as Peter was one
day standing on the side-walk, anxiously pondering
the practicability of obtaining the release of his
loved ones, a pale lady sitting in a carriage
beckoned him towards her. She asked him if he
192 . THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

would like employment, and if he could drive.
He replied in the affirmative, and was. soon seated
on the box. For several hours he drove the
carriage about the city; and so kindly did the
lady address him, that, before leaving her, he told
her all his grief. She listened with much interest
to his story, and expressing her sympathy with
his sorrows, told him her husband was a friend of
the unfortunate, and that perhaps he could assist
him in his efforts to buy his family. She accord-
ingly directed him to her husband’s office, and
entering he found himself in the presence of Hon.
Salmon P. Chase, a gentleman who has now for
some years filled the office of Chief Justice of the
United States.

Mr. Salmon took a lively interest in the case,
and wrote a letter to Mr. John Gist of Kentucky,
a brother of his former master, to whom McKiernan
was largely indebted, to interest him in furthering
Peter’s wishes to buy his family. Peter waited
three weeks in Cincinnatti; then, as no answer
came from Mr. Gist, he returned at the end of
June with a heavy heart to his friends in New
Jersey. He had done all he could; but no how
could he discern a ray of hope.

Asan idle life was not in Peter’s way, he settled
himself at service, in Burlington, New Jersey.
His mistress, Mrs. M. A. Buckman, treated him
with great kindness, and assisted by her two
daughters, undertook to teach Peter to read.
.REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN, 193

How earnestly had he desired this ever since his
few stolen visits to the Sunday School where he
mastered the mysteries of the alphabet. When,
through the kindness of these Christian ladies, he
became able to read the New Testament, he felt,
as he pondered the precious words, that his efforts
to be free had not been all in vain.

Sometime in the month of August, came the
following letter from Mr. McKiernan, to whom Mr.
Thornton had referred the letter of Mr. Samuel
Lewis, addressed to him from Cincinnatti. We
give it just as it was written, as showing what sort
of men controlled the destinies of millions of poor
slaves in the Southern States of America, until a
jast and holy God, in righteous anger, extinguished.
the hateful system in the blood of hundreds of
thousands of its cruel and depraved upholders.

“South Forence, Alabama, 6th August, 1851.
“Mr, William Still, No 81, North Fifth Street,
Philadelphia.
“Sir, a few days sinc Mr. Lewis Thornton of
Tuscumbia Alabama shewed me a letter dated 6th
June 51 from cincinnatti synd samuel Lewis in
behalf of a negro man by the name of peter Gist
who informed the writer of the Letter that you
were his Brother & wished an answer to be
directed to you as he peter would be in Philadel-
phia. the object of the letter was to purchis from
me 4 Negroes that is peters Wife & 8 children
: 0
194 TIIE STOLEN CUILDREN.

2 sons and 1 girl the Name of said Negroes are the
woman viney the (mother) Eldest son peter 21 or
2 years old second. son Leven 19 or 20 years 1
Girl about 18 or 14 years old. the Husband and
Father of these people once belonged to a relation
of mine by the name of Gist now Decest & some
few years since he peter was sold to a man by the
Name of Friedman who removed to Cincinnatti
ohio & Tuck peter with him. of course peter
became free by the voluntary act of the master.
some time last march a white man by the name of
Miller apperd in the nabourhood & abducted
the bove negoes was caute at vincanes Indi with
said negroes & was thare convicted of steling
& remanded back to Alabama to Abide the penelty
of the law & on his return met his just reward
by Getting drownded at the mouth of Cumberland
River on the ohio in attempting to make his
escape. I recoverd & Braught Back said 4
negroes or as you would say coulard people under
the Belief that peter the Husband was acsessery
to the offence thareby putting me to much expense
& Truble to the amount of $1000 which if he
gets them he or his friends must refund. these 4
negroes here are worth in the market about 4000
for tha are extraordenary fine & likely & but
for the fact of Hlopement I would not take 8000
Dollars for them but as the thing now stands you
can say to Peter & his new discovered Relations
in Philadelphia I will take 5000 for the 4 culerd
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 195

‘people & if this will suite him & he can raise the
money I will deliver to him or his agents at paduca
at mouth of Tennessee river said negroes but the
money must be deposited in the Hands of some
respectable person at paduca before I remove the
property it wold not be safe for peter to come to
this countery.
“Write me a line on recept of this & let me
know peter’s views on the above.-
“Tam Yours &e
“B. McKernan ”
“'N.B.—Say to peter to write & let me know
his views amediately as I am determined to act in
a way if he don’t take this offer he will never have
another opportunity.
“B. McKrernan.”

This letter was circulated among those
friends who had become interested in accomplish-
ing the re-union of the family. So enormous was

he price demanded for the slaves that few
persons deemed it possible: for Peter to procure
the means to ransom them. But his courage did
not falter. He could not live in freedom sur-
rounded by his friends, and supplied with every
comfort, and yet make no effort to redeem those
he loved far better than life, or even liberty, from
the cruel bondage which they endured. For a
time he hesitated as to the means that would be
safest and moss sure aud speedy in effecting his
o2
196 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

purpose. Give it up he would not—that was
settled.

He thought of going from place to place to
solicit aid; but then he was unknown, and the
benevolent might, without some credentials, justly
regard him with suspicion. It would be useless
to write to any of his old friends in Tuscumbia
for testimonials; for there, in consequence of the
attempt to run off his family, he was branded as
a negro thief. After pondering the subject
anxiously for a while, he bethought him of the
young ladies who had been teachers in the seminary
at Tuscumbia, to whom, both in person and
character, he had been well known. He got a

. friend to write to Rev. S. J. May of Syracuse, to
make inquiries concerning some of these ladies,
who, he knew, had returned from the South, and
who had been previously residing near Syracuse.
The letter was promptly answered, but the reply,
through some post-office misadventure, never
reached its destination, while Peter’s mind con-
tinued to be racked by alternate hopes and
fears.

Accidentally Peter heard one of his mistress’
visitors speaking of his home in Syracuse, and he
soon found an opportunity to inquire of the gentle-

- man if he had ever known the ladies from whom .

he was so anxious to hear. To his great joy Mr.

—— knew them both, and Peter was very soon able

to open a communication with his lady friends. He
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 197

had saved a hundred dollars since he had entered
into service which he joyfully devoted as the first
contribution towards the ransom of his wife and
children.

He resolved to visit Syracuse and wait upon
the friendly lady from whose testimony concerning
him he hoped to realize important results. He
was sanguine that he should be able to collect the
money, because wherever he related his story it
called forth strong manifestations of sympathy.

It occurred to Peter’s mind that perhaps it
would be best to buy his wife and daughter first,
and afterwards try to raise a sufficient sum to
purchase the two boys. He determined at least
that the old master should be sounded on this
point; and for assistance in making this inquiry
he applied to Dr. Ely, of Medford, New Jersey
who wrote for him a second letter to Mr. Thornton
of Tuscumbia. To this came in due time the
following answer :—

Tuscumbia, Alabama, Aug. 19th, 1852.

“HA. N. Ely.—Dear Sir—Your letter has re-
mained unanswered for so long atime because I
have not been able to have an interview with Mr.
McKiernan on the subject about which you wrote.
I have just seen him. He says he will not sepa-
rate the family of negroes, and the lowest price
he will take under any circumstances is five
thousand dollars: and if that is placed in my
198 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

hands, or with any responsible persons for him,
he will let the negroes go.
“T would like Peter to get his wife and
children, and think this amount avery high price:
- but it is the lowest, I know.
“Very respectfully,
“Lewis B. THornton.”

’ Peter received from his friends at parting but
small encouragement to hope. The sum required
was so enormous: and the idea of paying gold to
him who had already robbed them of the earnings
of long years was so repugnant to the feelings of
the best men, that it seemed almost useless to
attempt to raise the money. A few days before
he started, his brother William said to him, “ You
ought not to feel so uneasy, so perfectly restless
because your family are slaves. There are
thousands of people as good as they are who are in
the same condition. Do you see that woman
across the street? She is just as good as you are,
and she has a mother and sistersin slavery. You
cannot expect people to give you five thousand
dollars to buy your family, when so many others,
equally deserving, are just as badly off.

“Tiook here,” replied Peter, “I know a heap
of men, as good, and as smart as I am, that are
slaves now ; but—lI’ve bought my liberty, and my
family shall be free.”

On the 8th of November, 1852, Peter loft Bur-
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 199

lington on his travels, inspired by a noble purpose,
and carrying with him the kindest wishes of all
who knew him. He took with him the following
certificates from those whom he had served in that
city :—

“ Burlington, November, 6th, 1852.

“Peter Still (a coloured man), has lived in
my employ for some months past, but I have
known him for two years. It affords me much
pleasure in being able to recommend him as an
honest, sober, industrious and capable man,
perfectly trustworthy, and ever willing to make
himself generally useful either about the house or
stable. I part with him reluctantly ; he leaves me
to make an effort to redeem his wife and children
from slavery. “. E. Bonpinoz.”

“The above named, Peter Still, was in my
employ ten months, during which he fully sustained
the character given of him by Mr. Bondinot. It
gives me pleasure to add my name to this recom-
mendation.

“Many A. Bockman.”

“Judge Bondinot is one of our principal
citizens, and I have entire confidence in his re-
commendation of Peter Still.

‘* CorRTLANDT VAN RENSSELAER.”
“Burlington, New Jersey, Novr. 6, 1852.”
200 THE STOLEN CHILDREN,

Peter went first to Brooklyn, where he visited
his brother John, who, by his advice and sympathy
did much to cheer him on his way. ‘‘ Now, Peter,’’
said he, “you can call upon me at any time for
fifty or a hundred dollars; and whenever you need
clothes or anything else that I can furnish you,
just let me know. Be careful whom you trust.
You will find plenty of friends, if it is known you
have a little money. Be on your guard, and watch
well for rogues.”

He reached Syracuse on the 16th November,
and delivered a letter from Mr. James McKim, the
warm-hearted secretary of the Pennsylvania Anti-
slavery Society, addressed to the Rev. 8. J. May,
a name d2ar to thousands as belonging to one of
the noblest philanthropists of the age. Associated
with William Lloyd Garrison, the founder and
principal leader of the great movement that ended
in releasing more than four millions of the down-
trodden children of Africa from the yoke of slavery,
Mr. May wrought with untiring energy and in-
domitable self-denial, in the face of appalling op-
position, until “ liberty was proclaimed throughout
all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.”
Hundreds of fugitive slaves were aided by this
truly good man to reach the land of the free.
This lover of humanity listened with great interest
to Peter’s thrilling story, found out for him the
lady-friend he had come to seek, who had befriended
him when a slave, and furnished him with letters
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 201

of introduction to many friends who were able to
aid him. Mr. May’s signature was a sufficient
passport to the confidence of all the numerous
supporters of the anti-slavery cause. Thus
equipped Peter dismissed all doubt from his mind
that he would accomplish his purpose and redeem
his loved ones from the hands of the oppressor.
His first stop was at Auburn where a, letter
from Mr. May, the testimonials he carried with him,
and above all his modest earnestness of manner
secured to him a favourable reception. The
clergymen of the different churches commended
him to the liberality of their people and he obtained
there fifty dollars. Here, in the Rev. Mr. Millard’s
church, he appeared for the first time before the
public. “I was mighty skeered,” said he, “ when
Mr. Millard took me with him into the pulpit,
and told me I must stand up myself and tell my
story to the people. ’Peared like I could’nt stand,
no how; but I said a few words and Mr. Miller
he helped me out; so I got along mighty well.”
From thence he went to Rochester ; and every
where he went he found friends ready to treat him
with hospitality and kindness. He returned to
Syracuse with two hundred dollars, and then pro-
ceeded to Boston with letters to the leading men
of the Anti-slavery Society. Before doing any-
thing here he went to Andover, to deliver a letter
of introduction to the authoress of Uncle Tom’s
Cabin. Mrs. Stowe received him cordially, head-
202 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

ing a subscription list which produced forty dollars
She also gave him the following letter, which Peter
says “helped me mightily.”

“Having examined the claims of this unfor-
tunate man, I am satisfied that his is a case that
calls for compassion and aid.

“Though the sum demanded is so large as to
look hopeless, yet if every man who is so happy
as to be free, and have his own wife and children
for his own, would give even a small amount, the
sum might soon be raised. ‘As ye would that
men should do for you—do ye even so for them.’

“A. B. Srowe.”

The newspapers now began to take an interest
in the case and to help Peter considerably. An
article appeared in one of the Boston morning
papers, giving an account of the kidnapping, and
Peter’s release from slavery and his providential
meeting with his brother, and the present circum-
stances of his family. This was copied into the
papers of almost every town in New England, so
that wherever Peter went his way was prepared
before him, and he met with many sympathizing
friends.

From Boston, Peter visited Portland, Maine,
Brunswick, Bath, Laco, Bideford, Portsmouth,
N.H., Hampton, Newburyport, &ec., &c., and at
the end of five months found himself in possession —
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 203

of nine hundred and fifty dollars, which was
deposited in the lands of Mr. Ellis Gray Loring,
who had consented to act as the treasurer of Peter’s
redemption fund.

He now determined to visit his friends in New
Jersey and Philadelphia, and in passing through °
New York a few friends presented him with
seventy-five dollars. Notwithstanding his success
thus far his relatives, less sanguine sho himself,
had no confidence that he would be able to raise
the whole amount. When asked what he would
do with the money he had gained, if, after all, he
failed to accomplish his object, his reply was,
“*Pears like the Lord won’tlet me fail.” Anxious
to do all they could to help him his friends at
Philadelphia got Mr. Dillwyn Smith, of Burlington,
who from the first had taken much interest in his
case, to write to his former mistress, Mrs. Hogun,
of Alabama, to solicit her influence with Mr.
McKiernan, in the hope of procus some abate-

ment of the price.

For two weeks Peter waited at New Jersey
for an answer to this letter. But none arriving
he resolved, trusting in the Lord, to prosecute
himself his great work. Friends here presented
him with forty-five dollars. Then he went on to
Syracuse where he received, in a few days, a hun-
dred and twenty-five dollars. The Hon. Gerritt
Smith presented him with a generous sum, and
also with a note of recommendation. At New
204 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

Bedford he obtained a hundred and fifteen dollars.
At Lowell he gained a hundred and eighty-five
dollars ; at Somerville, thirty-six, and at Cambridge
nineteen. At Worcester he gathered in two weeks
a hundred and seventy-five dollars ; at Fall River
and the vicinity about two hundred.

In January, 1854, Peter was in New York.
There and in Brooklyn he met with many sympa-
thizing friends who aided him to the extent of
eleven hundred and forty-six dollars. His heart
now beat high with the hope of a speedy re-union
with his loved ones; and even those friends who
had been most desponding now cheered him on,
They looked upon him with wonder, and admired
the indomitable resolution which conquered what
they had regarded as insurmountable difficulties.
All unlettered as he was—but four years out of
slavery—they could hardly credit his strange
success, while hearing from his own lips the story
of his travels.

He again visited New York where he received
from Horace Greeley of the New York Tribune a
“stter addressed to a friend in Albany.

“New York, May 10th, 1854.

“My Old Friend,—Peter Still, who will hand
you this, was born free in New Jersey : kidnapped
thence when six years old, with his brother, two
years older, and sold into slavery; served forty
years in Alabama; finally bought himself free,
REDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 205

leaving his wife and three children in the hands
of the scoundrels who had robbed him of forty
years’ work; and he is now begging money to buy
them out of bondage. His chivalrous robber only
_ asks him 5,000 dollarsfor his own wife and children.
It is robbery to pay it, but inhumanity to refuse ;
and as the time has not yet arrived for paying
such villains with lead and steel, rather than gold,
I wish you could help him raise part of the money
among those you know.
* Yours,
“ Horace GREELEY.”
“ Gzorce Dawson, Esq.”

At Albany he received seventy-five dollars: at
Pittsfield, Mass., one-hundred-and-five ; at Spring-
field, one hundred; at New Haven, three hun-
dred, and at Hartford, three hundred. After
visiting Nethersfield, Middleton, Bridgport, New
London, Norwich, and Northampton, he directed
his course again towards Syracuse. A friend
residing there, who had watched Peter’s effort
with lively interest from the beginning, said in a
letter to a friend:—“‘ How different were the
emotions that now swelled his heart from those
which dwelt there when he first approached tha
city.

“Tt seemed almost a hopeless undertaking.
The idea of raising five thousand dollars by the
simple recital, in his own uncultured words, of his
206 TILE STOLEN CHILDREN.

strangely-interesting story was certainly not
probable: and but for the wonderful providences
that had restored him to his mother, and his
earnest faith in the success of his project, it would
have seemed like mockery to encourage him to
go on. * But that simple faith was mighty, and he
went out. Wherever he met generous and noble
natures, there he presented his plea for aid—and
notin vain. Many of America’s proudest names
are enrolled amongst those who delighted to
encourage his true heart by kindly words and
generous gifts. The blessing of the All-merciful
rest upon them! He who has said, ‘Inasmuch,
as ye have done it unto the least of these My
brethren, ye have done it unto Me,’ will not forget
their labour of love.

“The 5,000 dollars is ready. It is a great
price to pay the mean man, who has appropriated
to himself all their past years of hard labour. But
they are his property. * * * *

“ But little more remains for our patient friend
to do, before he shall have arranged for the exit of
those loved ones from the house of bondage.
There are, no doubt, kind hearts that will find
pleasure in assisting to raise the sum necessary to
defray their travelling expenses.”

Peter visited Buffalo and several other places
where he obtained liberal aid, and thus became
furnished with the means of paying the expenses
BEDEEMS HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN. 207

of their removal as well as the redemption of the
captives.
He now returned to Burlington to complete
the final arrangements. Some months before,
- negociations had been opened by Mr. Hallowell, a
wealthy merchant of Philadelphia, with Mr. John
Simpson, of Florence, Alabama; who had agreed,
as soon as the requisite funds should be forwarded
to him, to buy the family for Peter. Accordingly
soon after Peter’s return, a clerk of the house of
Hallowell and Co., was sent to Florence with the
money, and with instructions to receive the family
and conduct them to their future home among the
free.
CHAPTER XIX.

THE FAMILY RE-UNITED,




i NN there was no pressing neal

for her services on the home planta-
tion. Susannah had died during
the summer; and now the boys
were both with their mother, leaving Catharine
sole tenant of the old home cabin.

On Sunday morning, December 17th, as she
was sitting alone in her cabin on the island a
woman came from a. neighbouring plantation to
pay her a visit. “What do you think, Vina?”
said she, as soon as she was sure there were no
listeners, “I heard a great secret in towa last
night.”

“O, I don’t know what I thinks till I yers
what its "bout,” said Vina.

“ Well, Peter’s done sent for you all, and dar’s
a man in town whar’s come from some place ’way
off to de Norf dar, to tote you all off.”

“ How does you know?” asked Vina her eyes
THE FAMILY RE-UNITED. 209

dilated, and her whole frame trembling with excite-
ment.

“ Why, I’s to town last night to Mr. Simpson’s
store, and I yer Mr. Simpson say so hisself. Dey’s
all’s a makin’ out de papers, and dey’ll send for
you ’fore many days.”

The visitor departed, and Vina sat down to
think ; but her brain was in a whirl, and she was
glad when her sons came in to share with her the
great joy that swelled her heart. The mother and
sons after consultation resolved to say nothing on
the subject until they should hear more. They
could not see Catherine before the next Sunday.
O, how they wished she could share their joy.

On Monday morning they went to work as
usual. The bright glad hope that warmed their
hearts shone not in their dark faces. They had
schooled their features to wear ever the same calm
look. Soon after midnight on Wednesday morn-
ing the island people were all called up. They
were to kill hogs that day, and everyone upon the
place was obliged to be in motion. Soon all was
noise and bustle; for though the day’s work was
no trifle, it was a change in the monotony of their
lives, and fun and frolic prevailed.

Amid all the confusion, Vina, with throbbing
heart, was looking for a messenger to confirm the
glad tidings she had heard. About ten o’clock
she saw her master coming up the hill from the
river. He walked towards the cabins and soon

P
210 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

called “Vina! Vina!” With a powerful effort
she subdued all appearance of emotion; and when
the master reached the spot her face was as calm
_ and her voice as clear as usual.

“ Well, Vina,” said he “how would you like
to see Peter?”

“ Mons’ well, Sir,” replied she.

“Do you know where he is?”

“T reckon, Sir, he’s in Cincinnatti.”

“ No—he lives in Philadelphia, and he’s bought
you all.”

“ Bought us?”

“Yes, he’s bought you ;—how would you like
to go to him P”

_“Why, if it’s true, Sir, I’d like to go mighty
well.”

“ Tf ts true ?—don’t you believe it?”

“T don’t know, Sir, whether I believes it or no.”

“Well, don’t you suppose I can sell youif I
choose ?—Don’t you belong to me?”

“Yes Sir, I know you can.”

“Well, if you want to go, make haste and get
yourselves ready; for I’ve got to carry you all
over to Florence to night. There’sa man there,who
has come for you—he can tell you all about Peter.
You ought to have been there before now.”

He then went to the boys, and told them the
news ; but they, too, made strange of it, and seemed
to doubt his words.

“Well,” said he, “you all act like you don’t
THE FAMILY RE-UNITED. 211

believe me. Now, I am no ways anxious to sell
you, and if you don’t want to go you can stay.”

They required no further urging. The mother
and sons entered their cabin and gathering up such
things as were easiest to carry they hastened to
the river. Crossing to the mainland in a canoe,
they sprang into the waggon that waited for them
and with the master drove towards home.

Arrived there the overseer was despatched to
summon Catherine. He found her busy chopping
down a tree. “Here, girl,” cried he, “ give me
your axe—go quick to the house. You're sold,
and master sent me for you in a hurry.”

Half bewildered, yet guessing the truth,
Catherine walked as fast as possible towards the
quarter. Her mother’s figure was the first that
met her eyes. Her pulse beat quicker, and she
bounded forward.

“Mother, what is it?” she inquired.

“Why, yer father’s sent for us chile—leastways
massa Says SO.” ’

“ Has he done bought us?”

“Yes; so yer mas'r says.”

“TJ don’t want no more,” cried the girl, as with
eager hands she assisted her mother in their hasty
preparations.

McKiernan remained in sight, and every
minute shouted to them to hurry, or they could
not cross the river ; thus confusing them that they
could scarcely think of anything. Vina wished

P2
212 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

to see her mistress, who owed her about three
dollars for chickens. Vina knew that she would
not refuse to pay her now; but the master would
not let her go. ‘‘ Never mind,” said he, “ I'll pay
you when you get to town.”

“ Wouldn’t you like to take your little grand-
child with you P ” asked the master.

“Yes sir.” said Vina, “if I could. How much
you ask for him? ”

“Oh, a trifle!” replied he. “Id sell him to
you for a trifle, perhaps for a hundred dollars,”

“Well, sir, here’s all my things: they costa heap
of money, and if I had time I could sell ’em all.”

“Tll pay you for them when we get to town.
But come, hurry yourself.”

Vina understood the value of this promise to
pay her for the goods she left behind : but she was
helpless. She put a change of clothes for each of
them into her trunk, and tying up ker feather bed
which Peter had bought for her some years before,
she said “Good bye” to a few mothers who
chanced then to be coming in from the field to
nurse their babies and left her cabin to see it no
more.

After all they were not in time to cross the
river before dark; but on the following morning
they did so. They stopped at Mr. Simpson’s
store, where the papers were to be signed; and
here they were introduced to the young gentleman
who had been sent to release them from slavery.
THE FAMILY RE-UNITED. 213

It was a cold raw day. “I wish, Sir,” said
Vina to her master, as they stood shivering in the
chilling wind, “you’d give me money enough to
buy a thick shawl.” This was addressed to the
man who had been robbing her of her labour all
her lifetime.

“Why, girl,” said the selfish cold-hearted
fellow, “‘I couldn’t do it. I came from home in
such a hurry, that I didn’t have time to get any
change. I have nothing with me less than a ten-
dollar bill.”

‘Seems to me,” said his son-in-law, who stood
by, ‘these niggers are poorly dressed to be forsale.
You might get her the shawl now, and pay for it
another time.”

“OQ!” said McKiernan, they’ve got better
clothes, but they won’t put them on.”

Vina thought of his promise to pay her for
the chickens, and also for the goods she left
behind; but she would not ask him again herself.
When she saw a crowd of gentlemen standing
around, she sent Peter to tell him she Wanted the
money for her chickens.

“Why, boy,” cried he, feeling in his pocket,
“T have no money smaller than ten dollars.”

“Yes,” cried Vina, when she heard his answer,
“so I thought when you wouldn’t let me stop to
see missus. I know’d you wasn’t gwine to pay
me in town.”

“ McKiernan,” said one that stood by, with a
214 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

curse, “ why don’t you give your servants some-
thing P You ought to give them a present for the
good they’ve done you.”

He muttered something to himself, but made
no answer.

After awhile Peter went to him again and
asked him how much he would take for his baby ?

“The baby, eh PO, you may have it for two
hundred dollars.”

The young father’s hopes were dashed. He
could not raise so large a sum, as he had learned
that the sum sent by his father was only sufficient
to defray the travelling expenses of the family.

“Tsay, McKiernan,” said a gentleman standing
by, who pitied the distress of the slave father, “I
think you ought to give that old woman her grand-
child. I heard you say she has always been a
good servant—that you never struck her a lick,
and that she never deserved one—and that her
family have always behaved themselves well.
Give them the little one for good measure.” But
he spoke to one whose nature was so thoroughly
embruted as to render him incapable of a kind or
generous action.

“O, I'll sell the child cheap to them.”

“Ha! sell it! They’ve no money to buy it.
Give it to them. That would be no more than
fair.” But he spoke in vain. The lowest depth
of human meanness, selfishness, brutality, and
depravity was to be found amongst the Southern
THE WAMILY RE-UNITED. 215

slaveholders of America ; and McKiernan was one
of them.

The business was at lastconcluded. Vina and
her family were free; and the stage drove up that
was to convey them to the boat at Hastport.
“‘ When we got in the stage,” said Vina, “Tfelt free.
’ Pear’d I didn’t weigh no more’n a feather.”

The young gentleman who had them in charge
was closely questioned by the captain of the boat
and by other officious persons. He was, however‘
allowed to go on board with them ; and they were
glad, for soon they had their supper, the first food
they had tasted since daylight in the morning.

All went smoothly till they reached Paducah
Here they had to change boats; and again was
their young guardian subjected to a series of im-
pertinent questions as to what he was going to do
with the negroes, &c. He at length succeeded in
transferring his charge to a Louisville boat; but
the captain of this steamer was exceedingly uneasy
about the slaves—slaves no longer—he having
seen them when McKiernan was conveying them
back to slavery several years before. This young
man was evidently from the North; indeed he did
not scruple to acknowledge it. If he should be
running these niggers of; and if his boat should
bearhim on in the commission of such treason against
the Constitution and the Umion, alas! what ruin
would ensue? ‘Yet he had straight papers, and
did not act in the least like an Abolitionist. So
216 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

after much deliberation, he concluded to let them
come on board ; but at the same time he resolved
to watch the whole party well, “lest the fellow
should play some Yankee trick.”

They arrived in safety at Louisville, and Tost
no time in seeking a.boat for Cincinnatti. But
the valorous captain of the packet they had just
left was before them, and his safe warning pro-
cured from the commander of the: Cincinnatti
vessel a stern refusal to take them on. The young
man was sorely perplexed; but recollecting that
he had an acquaintance in Louisville who was a
merchant of good standing, he hastened to find
him out. Through his En anenoe with the cautious
captain a passage was at length secured for the
freed family and their guardian,

The nearer they approached the end of their
journey the more restless and impatient became
Vina. She had learned well to endure suspense
and sorrow. She had waited and been patient:
but this rapid and sure approach towards the ful-
filment of her long-cherished hopes awakened
feelings strange and new. She could not eat or
sleep for joy. The attention of the younger ones
was more easily diverted by surrounding objects;
and as the boys found occasional employment on the
boat the time with them was far from wearisome.

It was the morning of the Sabbath—the last
day of the year 1854. Peter had been in Cincin-
natti a week, waiting to greet his loved ones; and
THE FAMILY RE-UNITED. 217

he rose very early and walked down to the landing-
place of the steamers. While he had been waiting
his heart had tremblingly alternated between hope
and fear. One hour he felt sure that he should
soon clasp in his fond arms the precious forms of
wife and children—the next.saw him exercised by
painful fears that all his efforts would end in dis-
appointment. He had never heard from them
since the papers had informed him of their return to
slavery—perhaps to torture and death. Four sum-
mers had passed since then—four seasons in which
sickness is wont to make its desolating visits to the
dark, wretched, unhealthy quarters of the slaves.

But on this happy Sabbath morn none of these
gloomy apprehensions disturbed his mind. But a
few hours had passed since the telegraph with
lightning speed had brought him the glad tidings
of the safe approach of those for whom he waited.

A large steamer slackening her speed is seen
coming up the river and approaching the landing-
place. It is the “Northerner.” Peter steps on
board, and the first person he meets is the young
gentleman whom he recognizes as the clerk of
Hallowell and Co. A moment more and wife and
daughter are clasped to the true heart that has
loved them so fondly; while on either side are
the two manly sons gazing with grateful reverence
upon the face of that father who has acted so nobly
towards them.

The ransomed family found a hearty welcome
218 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

at the house of Levi Coffin, whose large heart
sympathized with, and partook of their delicious
joy, as they felt that now they were really free.
The only drawback to their happiness was the
remembrance of the noble-hearted, heroic man who
had sacrificed his life in the effort to set them free,
and had so nearly accomplished his purpose:

The news of this happy re-union spread amongst
the citizens of Cincinnatti, and on two successive
evenings public meetings were held for the benefit
ofthe shivering strangers. Gifts of warm clothing,
and of money to defray expenses of their onward
journey, were gladly offered by those who loved “to
clothe the naked,” and rejoiced in “setting at
liberty those who were bound.”

On the third of January they left for Pittsburgh,
where also they met with a kindreception. While
there, a meeting was held for them in the Bethel
Church; the family being presented to the congre-
gation in the coarse dirty clothes they wore from
the plantation. On the tenth they reached Phila-
delphia, and then proceeded to Burlington and
took possession of the lodgings which Peter had
previously prepared for their reception.

The first few days were spent by the re-united
family in resting themselves from the fatigue of
their long journey, and in rendering themselves
presentable to the new relatives and friends that
longed to greet them, Then came the delightful
visit to Peter’s mother. She had heard of their
THE FAMILY RE-UNITED. * 219

arrival at Cincinnatti, and had been, for some days,
expecting them at her home. ,

Who can picture the glad meeting of the vener-
able woman with the wife and children of her long-
lost son. The sight of their happy faces filled her
heart with holy- gratitude: for im each form so
lately released from the hated chains of slavery,
she saw a living witness of her Great Father’s love.
Year after year, her heart had sorrowed for her
sons; and now, as Israel said to Joseph, she could
say, “Thad not thought to see thy face, and lo!
God hath showed me also thy seed.”

Early in February, Catharine went to reside
with her uncle, William Still, in Philadelphia, for
the purpose of attending school, and receiving
from her aunt instruction in the practical duties of
a free woman. Young Peter obtained an eligible
situation insthe service of Mr. R. Ely, at New Hope,
Pennsylvania, and Levin obtained employment
with the view of perfecting his knowledge of the
blacksmith’s trade at Beverly, New Jersey. ' Peter
the elder and Vina took service in a large boarding-
house, in Burlington, until they were able to perfect
the arrangements which for the first time in their
lives would enable them to enjoy the comforts of
their own home.

In these “short and simple annals of the poor”
we have an example of patient self-reliant energy,
and perseverance in well-doing, that many, who
are moving in a much higher walk of life than
220 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

this poor illiterate slave, may study and imitate
to their great advantage. Peter did what his
hand found to do, for himself and those he loved,
with all his might; in the face of manifold dis-
couragements his faith did not falter nor did he
grow weary in well doing. And he reaped the
fruit of his patient toil in the freedom and happi-
ness of himself and those who were dearer to him
than self.

* Active doer, noble liver,
Strong to labour, sure to conquer.”

Six years after Peter and his family settled in
the free land, God in his wisdom and justice per-
mitted the planters of the South to rush into the
madness of civil war, which brought about the
abolition of the wicked system from which Peter
and his family, in common with millions of down-
trodden slaves, suffered somuch. On the 18th of
December, 1865, after the guilty land had been
deluged with blood, during a war of more than
four years’ duration, the official proclamation was
signed by W. E. Seward, Secretary of State, that
put an end to the curse which had rested upon the
land for so many years and gave the blessing of
liberty to all that had been held in unrighteous
bondage. None expected such a speedy and
effectual overthrow of this execrable sum of all
villanies. “It is the Lord’s doing, and it is mar-
vellous in our eyes.”


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1