Citation
The boy crusaders, or, Robert of Marseilles

Material Information

Title:
The boy crusaders, or, Robert of Marseilles
Portion of title:
Robert of Marseilles
Creator:
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[1], 128 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Youth -- Religious life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Crusades -- Juvenile fiction -- Later, 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries ( lcsh )
Knights and knighthood -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Determination (Personality trait) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Humility -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sieges -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898 ( rbprov )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page, engraved.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026598668 ( ALEPH )
ALG2711 ( NOTIS )
63093235 ( OCLC )

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THE BOY CRUSADERS.





: "*Take me; but spare these-others!’”

- Page 61.



BoY CRUSADERS



A JOYFUL SURPRISE

Page 106

T. NELSON AND Sons

London, Edinburgh, and New York



THE
Boy CRUSADERS

Robert of Marseilles



T. NELSON AND ‘SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New Vork





1898



CONTENTS.



i, THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE AT MARSEILLES,
ll, THE MERCHANTS OFFER, ....
III, A FRIEND'S PERSUASION,
Iv, THE DECISION, ie ne La
V. FAREWELL TO HOME, .... as
VI. OUT AT SEA, ...- ae Een Bs
VII, THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP,
VIII. ON A HOSTILE SHORE,
IX. SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM,
X. A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM,
XI, A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT,
“XII, IN THE MARKET-PLACE OF ALEXANDRIA,
XIII. A JOYFUL SURPRISE,
XIV. A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE, Se
XV. SWEET HOME, .... Pe: oe

XVI. LIGHTS AND SHADOWS, .... aves

14
21
27
33
37
43

64
82
84

105
115
123
126









THE BOY CRUSADEKS:



CHAPTER I.

THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE
AT MARSEILLES.

I ORE than six hundred years ago a

report spread through the populous
and influential old city of Marseilles that a
host of boys had gathered in the neighbour-
hood of Vendéme for the purpose of delivering
Jerusalem—the city where our Lord laboured
and died—from the hands of the Saracens. A’
shepherd-boy, Stephen by name, had kindled
the hearts of all these youths to a high pitch
of enthusiasm, giving out that the Lord Him-
self had appeared to him in the form of a poor
pilgrim, and endowed him with full power as



10 THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE.

a preacher of the cross; and many wonders
were said to have been wrought by this
youth, especially at the shrine of St. Denys.
Thousands of boys had flocked around him—
not those of his own class alone, but sons of dis-
tinguished families—forsaking home, parents,
brothers, sisters, and friends in the firm re-
solve to make a crusade in the Holy Land
under a leader thus divinely appointed, and
to deliver the sacred tomb of Christ from the.
heathen.

Some condemned it as a foolish undertaking,
which King Philip Augustus, as well as the
learned masters of the University of Paris,
had wisely refused to encourage; but the
majority believed it to be a movement in-
spired by Heaven. They said that God Him-
self had aroused the children, and entrusted to
their faith His work, which so many kings,
princes, and experienced warriors had in vain
striven to perform.

Of such a nature was the conversation which
passed in a wine-house in Marseilles on an
August day in 1212, A large number were



THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE. Il

assembled there—native and foreign mer-
chants, ship-masters, wealthy artisans, public
officials, regular and chance frequenters of
the house—and all were deeply interested in
the subject. =

Among the foreign merchants there were
two who had been for several weeks in Mar-
‘geilles, and who had lying in the harbour
several large ships not yet laden. Nothing
was known of them except that they appeared
wealthy; and this reputation being justified
by a rather free expenditure on their part,
they were received by the citizens with re-
spectful consideration. Their exterior, how-
ever, was scarcely calculated to awaken con-
fidence. The soul of a candid, benevolent
man looks forth from his eyes: in these men
the spirit seemed to hide itself, or to express
itself only by sharp and cunning looks. Both
had their features disfigured—the one by a
deep, crooked scar across his face; the other
by the loss of an eye, which was replaced by
a black patch. Thus they resembled rough,
war-worn soldiers rather than peaceable mer-

4



12 THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE.

chants. One was named Hugo Ferrens; the
other—the one-eyed man—Wilhelm Porcus.
They were Sicilians.

And now an unusual commotion was heard
without. The passers in the street were at
every moment thronging closer and more
rapidly forward. The cause of the excite-
ment was not yet quite intelligible, but
through the confused mingling of voices the
joyful cry was heard,— -

“They are coming! they are coming !”

It was evident that something very unusual
was at hand, and the company in the wine-
house were immediately seized by the general
excitement.

“Perhaps the time has come,” said Porcus,
raising his voice ; “‘ perhaps the host is already
approaching.” He beckoned to his companion ;
they saluted the company and pressed out into
the crowd.

And now a rider appeared, galloping, covered
with dust, his face glowing. Upon a white
flag, which he waved high~in the air, was a
cross embroidered in red. Horse and rider



Le ee ee

THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE. 18

were immediately so closely surrounded that
further progress was impossible.

After the breathless herald had recovered
himself a little, he cried aloud,—

““God’s blessing be upon you, burghers of
Marseilles! I have desired to be the first
to announce to you the coming of the most
wonderful army in the world. Thirty thou-
sand brave boys—truly the flower of all
France—are following on foot, conducted by
the young Stephen, the divinely enlightened,
the leader attested by wonderful miracles, who .
has been called to destroy the heathen as
David did Goliath—to cut them off root and
branch, great and small. Citizens of Marseilles,
the crusading army send you this flag of peace
and greeting. They hope that you will
hospitably allow them to remain among you
until the time and opportunity shall arrive for
their embarkation for the Holy Land.”

This address was received with almost
universal shouts of rejoicing. The flag, which
the rider threw among the people, was im-
mediately torn into shreds, for which the



14 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

multitude fought, those who obtained them
carefully carrying them away as relics.

CHAPTER II. _
THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

Amone the throng which curiosity had drawn
outside the city to watch the coming of the
young crusaders was Robert Raymond, the
son of a Marseilles silk merchant. He had
climbed a tree in order the better to see the
long procession.

What a strange sight! Thousands of boys
marched slowly, in exact order, to the singing
ofahymn. Banners of white silk, embroidered
in red with the cross and glittering with gold
and silver borders, fluttered above the foremost
ranks. Not far behind these was seen an open
chariot richly draped with costly stuffs, and sur-
rounded by fifty young halberdiers, mounted
and bearing arms. Directly in front of the
chariot some twenty boys were swinging silver
censers, while others carried long wax-candles.



THE MERCHANTS OFFER. 15

Upon the elevated seat of the vehicle sat the
leader of the crusade, the shepherd-bdy Stephen,
a slender and delicate youth, with a countenance
pale, but lighted up by flashing eyes, which
gave him an expression of more mature age >
than was indicated by his boyish figure,

Young Raymond was deeply moved.

“O Lord,” he sighed, in the earnestness of
his heart, “what a wonderful grace Thou hast
bestowed upon this poor shepherd-boy! Iam

already fourteen years old, and what have I
done to glorify Thee ?”

Stephen was simply clad. Only a narrow
gold band confining his clustering, dark-brown
hair, and a golden cross embroidered upon hig
short and light pilerim’s mantle, betokened
the boy’s office and dignity. In his hand he
held a cross made of two thin sticks joined
together. With a clear, shrill voice he gave
out the following hymn, which was repeated, —
line after line, by the rest of the boys :—

“O Lord, restore Thy cross—the true, the glorious ;
Lord God, exalt Thy people by Thy might ;

Be Thy strong arm o’er heathendom victorious,
And shield us for Thy holy tomb who fight,”



16 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

Most of the boys looked well and cheerful,
having thus far been able to withstand the
hardships of the route; their expression was
that of joyful enthusiasm. Hach one wore a
red cross upon his garments, and they bore
pilgrims’ staves and wallets; but very few
were armed. <

To this youthful band, gathered from all
parts of France, and composed partially of
children of families of rank, but principally
of shepherd-lads, a number of older pilgrims
had joined themselves, led by a similar faith
in the wonderful gifts of the saintly boy.

As the procession passed close to the tree
upon which young Raymond had stationed
himself, he recognized his dearest friend, the
son of a merchant of Avignon. They had

been educated together during several years.

Robert could not restrain a cry of pleasure,
and Henry, hearing his own name, and re-
" cognizing his friend’s voice, looked up quickly.
Their eyes met. Robert Raymond could have
sprung from the tree into the arms of his

friend. He descended as quickly ag he was
(936)



THE MERCHANTS OFFER. 17

able, and slipped nimbly through the crowd,
making his way in the direction of Henry,
who could not leave the ranks even for a
minute.

The crusaders did not enter the city, as it
had been expected they would do—how could
so great a number have found lodgment there ?
—but they endeavoured to make themselves
comfortable outside of the walls. The season
and the mild, pleasant weather favoured an
encampment in the open air.

As had been the case at other places, the ,
people came flocking from far and wide to
offer their alms and food; for these children
of the cross had no abundant supply of any-
thing except faith. Pious women and maidens
brought them silver and gold pieces, and be-
sought them to remember the givers before
God at the holy sepulchre; others asked for
some little relic, to be given when they should
return, if only a twig or a dry leaf from the
country where the Lord had dwelt more than
a thousand years before.

The delicate but heroic shepherd-boy, whom

(936) ~ 9



18 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

his followers honoured as a saint, was the chief
object of curiosity and admiration. People
thought themselves happy in being permitted
merely to touch his garments. The magnifi-
cent drapery of his chariot was spread as a
tent for him in the centre of the camp, and
this tent was surrounded by the fifty young
halberdiers as guards.

Even before the messengers of the citizens
of Marseilles had conveyed their greetings
and their offerings to the leader of the
crusaders, the Sicilian merchants Porcus and
Ferrens had urged their way into his pres-
ence, easily finding him, from his peculiar,
surroundings. With uncovered heads and
reverential mien they approached the young
shepherd, who was gazing longingly past
Marseilles toward the sea. Both of the mer-
chants bent the knee before him, saying,—

“ Holy youth, permit us to express our _
veneration for thee.”

“Bow not before me,” replied Stephen,
“but before God alone, whose power has
inspired and prepared me for the work.”



THE MERCHANTS OFFER. 19

Porcus and Ferrens arose.

“We bow before Him in the person of His
holy one. Thou worker of wonders, whose
glance can read our hearts as certainly as
thine arm will overthrow the Saracens, per-
mit us fully to explain the purpose which
brings us before thee. We are Sicilian mer-
chants, and have acquired abundant wealth
by a perilous, laborious life. On coming to
Marseilles a short time ago to freight our
vessels with merchandise, we heard the won-
derful report of this crusade, which is destined
to.be held in glorious remembrance as long as
the world shall stand. The Holy Spirit, who
called thee for this work, touched our hearts
also, and we immediately agreed, for the
honour of Christendom, to be useful to the
best of our ability to thee and to the crusading
army. Wilt thou now tell us in what manner
ye hope to reach the Promised Land? Have
ye ships ready for the voyage ? or, if they are
not provided, is there money et for that
purpose ?”

“ Not yet,” replied the shepherd-lad. “We



20 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

have little or no money. Why should we
have it? Did not the Lord Himself appear
to me and command me to preach the cross ?
If, then, it is His will that we should deliver
the sepulchre of our Saviour, He will surely
bring us to the Land of Promise, even if His
angels themselves must, bear us across the sea.”

“This is the language of a prophet! Such
are the words we expected to hear!” cried —
Porcus and Ferrens, as if carried away by
admiration. “ But permit us, before all others,
to be the instruments of His will—His angels
who shall convey you dry-shod across the sea.
We have ships enough to receive all the host
—a freight more precious than all the mer-
chandise of the world; grant us the favour of
carrying deliverance to the oppressed Christians
of the Holy Land. In but a few days all will
be ready, for we were prepared in advance for
this event. In the meantime the army can
enjoy needed repose.”

Stephen clasped his hands, raised them to
heaven, and exclaimed aloud,—

“ Lord, I knew that Thou wouldst not for-



A FRIEND'S PERSUASION. ~ 21

sake us!” Then turning to the merchants,
he said, ‘Christian men and brethren, ye will
be blessed for this deed. Ye will have part in
the rescue of the holy cross for which we
struggle. Do now as seems good to you.
Think not of our repose: we wish, we need,
no rest until our work is accomplished.”

As Porcus and Ferrens returned to the city
the ringing of the vesper-bell sounded through
the air. They turned their eyes to the camp
and saw the host of children upon their knees
in prayer to God. The soft, golden light of
evening rested upon their young heads.

“If we believed in an almighty God—”
said. Porcus.

“Folly!” answered his companion. “ That
will do for dolts and children: we are men.”

CHAPTER III.

A FRIEND'S PERSUASION,

Ler us return to the moment when the -'

young friends found themselves standing



22 A FRIEND'S PERSUASION.

face to face. They wept from mingled
joy and pain, knowing that the sorrow of
parting must so soon follow the happiness of
meeting.

“You too are going to the Promised Land?”
asked. Robert, with emotion, regarding the
slicht form of his friend, who was a whole
year younger than himself.

_ The eyes of the younger lad shone dunsueb
his tears at the-question,

“Yes, Robert; I and all the rest are
travelling to the Promised Land. Oh, if I
could tell you what I have felt! I am so
happy! When I shall kneel by: the tomb of
the Redeemer; when I shall walk the streets
that He has trodden; when, in the holy scenes
of His passion, I shall feel as I ought His great
love, His unchangeable faithfulness toward all
mankind,—then I shall willingly lay down my
life, even should the heathen slay me with
all their tortures. The Saviour, the Son of
God Himself—did He not die on the cross?”

“But thou art so young,” said Robert, in
distress—‘ so young to meet certain death.”



A FRIEND'S PERSUASION. ' —° 23

“But who can tell that?” cried Henry
earnestly. “Are we not called of God to
deliver the holy sepulchre? Are we not
led by the wonder-working hand of His holy
one? See! When I first heard of a crusade
to be undertaken. against the Saracens by
us boys, it all seemed strange and foolish to
me; but his words have made it all clear.
When I heard him speak I received courage
to fight against the heathen with these poor
fellows. Oh, love makes one strong indeed !
And since I .know the life of our divine
Redeemer, all that any human being can
do or suffer seems poor and trifling. Yes,
we shall conquer, we shall raise the cross
above that holy tomb. Jesus the youth
drove the money-changers from the temple
of His Father: we shall drive the unbelievers
from the shrine of our Lord. The distress of
Christian pilgrims has so long appealed in
vain to the hearts of their brethren that
God has put weapons into the hands of us
boys, to the shame of cowardly and hesitating
men. What need has the Almighty of our



2A, A FRIEND'S PERSUASION.

human strength? Through our weakness
shall the name of God the Father and the
Son be glorified.”

Robert listened with admiration and amaze-
ment to the words of his enthusiastic friend.
They took an irresistible hold upon him. He
pressed Henry’s hand, saying,—

‘You have chosen'well. I, too, can feel His
love and the power of His Spirit. Oh, if I
could but go with you and fight beside you,
my friend! When I was sitting up in the tree
yonder and looking down at that pale, slight
shepherd-boy who has trusted himself to the
Lord, I trembled all over and felt a heat like
that of a sunbeam. It was as if some new
life had awakened in my heart.”

“Tt was indeed the divine admonition that
came to you,” replied Henry, “and you must
not refuse to heed the voice that commands
you to go with us.” 7

“ And leave my parents ?”

Henry turned away weeping.

“O my mother! my mother!” he cried.

“If I but dared!” cried Robert, “ Must I



A FRIEND’S PERSUASION. OB

stay here and only dream of all your wonder-
ful deeds, your victories? The banners will
fly ; Stephen leads the way, and nothing will
be able to withstand you, until you shall take
possession of that holy place. How will
millions of pilgrims bless you for ages to
come! Dear Henry, what shall I do?”

“ Were Stephen with us,” answered the boy,
“he might tell you, for in him lives the Spirit
of God. You are awakened, you are called;
you must forsake all things, and have but
one thought, one love, one will. And if father
or mother would detain you, G'od is more than

father and mother. He who receives the call
dares on no account excuse himself. Stephen
-has told us, and he is an apostle of truth. Is
it not the highest honour that God should +
confide such a work to our feeble arms ?”

“Leave me but a day or two,” entreated
Robert ; “first let me hear what my father says
about-it. When do ycu expect to embark ?”

“We do not yet know in what ships we
are to sail; I trust allo God’s guidance. He
will let us know when the time comes.”



26 A FRIEND'S PERSUASION.

“And must you remain here?” asked
Robert. ‘ Will you not rather go home with
me in the meantime ?”

“T cannot separate myself from the other

- boys,” replied Henry. ‘“ And how can I know
whether your father favours our holy enter-
prise? for many noble and distinguished men
have rebuked us as childish enthusiasts, and
done all in their power to hinder us in our
work.—O Son of God, who died on the cross
for us, thou Being of holiest, truest love, Thou
seest into our hearts. Thou knowest for what
we strive ; Thou knowest whether pure love to
Thee reigns in our souls, so that we would give
up all—alJ—for Thee, and only die at Thy feet.
“What do we other than Thy holy word com-
‘mands? We have left all behind—parents,
family, friends, and home—to strive together
for Thy heavenly kingdom, for the salvation of
our own and others’ souls. Give us love; give
us the faith that removes mountains, that all
may know how strong and mighty Thou art in ~
us feeble creatures.”

The young Depts beat against each see



THE DECISION. Q7

the young eyes overflowed, and their tears
were mingled.

“Farewell, Henry. We shall soon meet
again.”

«Oh, let us both live and die for the cross,”
cried Henry. “Let us repay the love of the
crucified One.”

Robert pressed his hand again.

“ Nothing shall separate us,” he said.

CHAPTER IV.
THE DECISION.

Youne Raymond went home with a firm re-
solve immediately to ask his father’s consent
to his going. But the words died away
upon his tongue: he had never seen his
father in so gloomy a mood. He was silent,
therefore, ‘and’ awaited a more favourable
opportunity.

- On that same evening the merchant re-
ceived a visit from a friend, who had a great
deal of news to impart. Among the rest, he



Seas THE DECISION.

told how Porcus and Ferrens had engaged
to convey the crusaders to the Holy Land
in their ships, free of cost, for the love of God.

“Then is the measure of folly full!” burst
from the silk-merchant’s lips. “Boys who
have run away from parents and teachers,
and men who have become childish, or per-
haps hypocritical scoundrels—God knows—
and who aid this outbreak with all their
powers,—what reasonable man can believe
that this host, were they three hundred
thousand instead of thirty, could drive the
Saracens from Jerusalem?” —

Robert was cut to the heart on hearing his
father’s words. If he might have ventured to
reply, how gladly would he have told him
that the power of the Lord was in the arms
of these children—that it was for their faith
that such wonderful gifts were bestowed upon
them ! . Sie
_ Raymond went on,—

“YT, for my part, cannot understand such
blindness. Those who are flattering boyish
vanity and promoting this work of a heated



THE DECISION. 29

fancy are certainly drawing a bitter curse
down upon their own heads. Our Lord and
Saviour chose men, not children, to be His
apostles.” ;

“ And it is not enough that these children
should go,” said the friend, “but I hear that
in Burgundy, and in Germany too, a multi-
tude of boys and girls are preparing for a
crusade, and have indeed set out.”

“ Nothing,” rejomed the merchant, “is
more illusive than example, even if that ex-
ample be the most thoughtless in the world.
A. fool always finds imitators. These rash
ones, you may be sure, will one day bitterly
repent their folly.” :

“The strangest thing is,” continued the
visitor, “that there are grown people so car-
ried away that they have joined the crusade

-as pilgrims to aid in celebrating the expected
victory and, triumph.”

The merchant laughed bitterly.

“ Just so. The seed of folly must come to
its full a before God’s angel of pune
ment can cut it down,” he said.



30 THE DECISION,

Robert’s mother was silent during this con-
versation. Her mind was undecided. She
honoured the sagacity of her husband, yet
how could she condemn the heroic faith of
the children? If this enthusiasm was not of
God, whence did it spring ?

With deep distress Robert perceived how
much his ideas and those of his father were
at variance. . If he had dared to speak, and
freely to express all that was in his heart—
all his humble love for his Saviour and for
all mankind! Why should the Lord of all
the worlds no longer do wonders for the
glory of His holy name? He prayed to God
to change the feelings of his father, and to
make himself more “worthy of the holy en-
terprise. In his dreams that night he again
saw the passing of the brave and blooming
young army, the shepherd-boy leading in the
hymn of the cross. Brightly gleamed the
pinnacles of Jerusalem; the banners floated
on high. How loud were the shouts of
‘triumph! How gloriously shone the cross,
brighter and ever brighter, until it shed a



THE DECISION. 31

flood of heavenly radiance, and the happy,
triumphant children knelt around the holy
sepulchre.

Thus closed the eventful day with such a
bright and beautiful dream, leading the boy’s
fancy onward and ever onward, until his bur-
dened spirit was lulled into peace. All fled
with the morning light. His father’s anger
stood menacingly between him and the Prom-
ised Land.

On the following day a party of the young
crusaders, including Stephen himself, entered
the city. Porcus and Ferrens had invited
them, with several of the most distinguished
citizens, to a banquet on board one of their
ships. The populace thronged eagerly around
to see the young heroes face to face, and a
thousand blessings were called down upon
their heads. Flowers were strewn in their
way, and the people everywhere greeted them
enthusiastically as the deliverers, the helpers,
of all Christendom.

Nor were the names of Porcus and Ferrens
forgotten. The intentions of these merchants



Jae THE DECISION.

were quickly made known to the citizens, and
the magnanimous Christian pair could scarcely
receive sufficient praise. How many youths
of Marseilles stood around with longing looks,
weeping for shame! But, alas! this day was
to call forth many more bitter and unavailing
tears in that city.

Robert’s feelings were a mixture of joy and
pain, love, longing, fear, and hope. He dared
not confide in his father. That clear-sighted
man had never yet been agitated by so great
and so sorrowful indignation as in these days
upon witnessing events which he could not
but regard as springing from unreason, and
fated to be utterly disastrous. With the
mother it was otherwise. When Robert, with
sparkling eyes, described to her the festal pro-
cession, the hopeful animation of the boys, she
said with deep emotion,—

“God help them! TI cannot say that their
undertaking is wise; yet that they should for-
sake all things to fight for the glory of the
Saviour among the wild heathen—that every
human heart must comprehend.”



FAREWELL TO HOME. 383

The son did not venture to make known
his purpose to her, although in these words
he found a half consent to it, and was thereby
much strengthened in his resolve. When he
again met Henry, the day had been appointed
for the embarkation of the crusade. The
Sicilian merchants had hastened the necessary
preparations, which alacrity tended much to
exalt their Christian zeal in the eyes of most
of the citizens. :

The cheerful confidence with which Henry
spoke of the future—his firm faith that God
Himself had appointed them to this crusade—
fixed Robert’s determination ; he hesitated no
longer. The two boys fell on their knees,
and, hand in hand, looking up to heaven,
vowed to devote their lives to the defence of
Christendom.

CHAPTER V.
FAREWELL TO HOME.

Tu last night under the father’s roof had

come. Robert tossed restlessly upon his
(936) 3



34 FAREWELL TO HOME.

couch ; sleep came not. All was still around
him ; only his heart beat wildly, his pulses
throbbed as with fever. Silently the boy
arose and knelt. He thought long of his
father, his mother, and his little sister, not
yet two years old; then he looked up to the |
image of the Crucified, and said, weeping,—

“Thou most faithful Saviour, if it be Thy .
will that I should give up father, mother, and
sister to follow Thee and to glorify Thy name
among the heathen in distant lands, then,
Lord Jesus Christ, with Thy love and power
stand by me. Forsake me not, feeble boy
though I am.”

What power there is in prayer poured forth
from a sincere heart! Robert felt it; he
could have believed that the face of the Re-
deemer shone down upon him with wondrous,
holy tenderness. For a long time he lay
motionless, then arose, strengthened, and
quietly sought his bed. His earlier years—
the days of his happy childhood—passed
before his vivid imagination, until at length,
exhausted, he fell into a deep slumber,



FAREWELL TO HOME. 85

So at last the momentous day dawned—
the day fixed for the embarkation of the
young crusaders. All Marseilles was in
commotion. Who would have missed a
sight so unique? All who were able brought
alms and provisions, that they might not lose
their share and their reward in the great
_ work. The young heroes of the faith were
greeted with cheers as they moved, singing,
toward the quay. Their path was as yet
over flowers—perhaps only so much the
longer to be set with thorns. With what
joy their faces were lighted up! There lay
the great ships prepared to bear them away
to the Holy Land. High in the air the
streamers floated gaily, as though quivering
with impatience, and stretching themselves
out toward the goal. Some hundreds of
ecclesiastics, all distinguished by wearing the
red cross, had joined the youthful army. Its
numbers had been swelled by many children
of Marseilles and its vicinity. Most of these
had enrolled themselves secretly against the
will of their parents.



36 FAREWELL TO HOME.

When the shepherd-boy came in sight of
the sea he fell on his knees and prayed
aloud; his example was followed by the
whole train. The boys were then received
by a large number of distinguished citizens,
who had come out from the port to meet
them, with the Sicilian merchants. Skiffs
with festal decorations were lying ready to
convey them to the vessels. Amid the cheers
of the crowd Stephen first stepped into one of
these boats; the rest followed, and in about
an hour all the crusaders were on board.

The last skiff returned; the anchor was
weighed ; the wind filled the sails; the fleet
moved off. Friends, family, parents, father-
land—all, all were left behind.

The boys crowded the decks to greet once
more the land of home. From the shore re-
sounded a thousand-voiced blessing; there
were calls, there was waving of signals. But
as the ships with the host of children gailed
faster and farther away over the sea, many a
heart was heavy, many an eye grew moist.

One in the crowd covered hig face with



OUT AT SHA. 37

his hands and wept bitterly. It was the silk-
merchant, Raymond. His soul was bowed
to the earth with grief. Had he then any
misgiving that with every moment his only
son was receding farther and farther from
him ? |

CHAPTER VI.
OUT AT SEA.

Ropert gazed fixedly toward the horizon:
there Marseilles had disappeared. Marscilles!
Oh, what meaning in that name! It com-
prehended all the love the boy’s life had
ever been blessed with. He seemed to
see his father and his mother bowed down
with grief; he heard his little sister call his
name; she stretched out her dimpled arms
for him, while his parents said amid their
tears,—

“What-a return for our love!”

Oh, could Robert have spoken but one
word, one single word, or exchanged but
one look of farewell! But it was too late;

‘



38 OUT AT SEA.

the broad sea lay like a mighty gulf between
them, and swallowed up every ery of gratitude
and love.

“ My Saviour, what have I done?” sighed
the boy, in anguish. He felt some one touch
his shoulder, and, turning, saw behind him
the wonder-working shepherd-lad, who said,
with an earnest look in his bright eyes,—

«Why dost thou waver? The Lord sends
his angels hither and thither across the seas.
Oh that thou couldst but see the heavenly
hosts at the feet. of the Crueified—the ten
times ten thousand who have drawn their
- flaming swords against the heathen!” —

Robert raised his eyes; at. the words of the
enthusiastic boy he thought he saw the light
from the shining wings of the ten times ten
thousand flashing down upon them from the
blue sky.

Stephen continued,—

“Tord and Saviour, Thou who hast re-
vealed Thyself unto me, oh, strengthen this
and all other fearful souls! Anoint the dim
eyes with the heavenly dew of Thy. grace,



OUT AT SEA. 39

that they may see the crown awaiting him
that overcometh !”

“ Amen! amen!” responded a third boyish
voice—that of Henry. He extended his hand
to Robert. ‘Every rolling wave brings us
nearer to the Promised Land. I would I
had wings, that I might hasten onward!
France, which I have left behind, is no
longer my home; yonder it lies—Jerusalem.
The glorious, loving Christ, whom we follow,
is my all and my only One.”

Robert, observing now for the first time
his friend’s pale and emaciated countenance,
- anxiously inquired,—

“ But are you not ill, Henry ?”

The boy smiled.

“JT have never beem so well. And I shall
not die until I shall have seen Jerusalem and
Mis tomb.”

The sound of the mid-day bell called them
all on deck.

The ship in which were Stephen, Robert,
and Henry was the largest and most import-
ant of the little fleet—its admiral-ship. Porcus



40) OUT AT SEA.

and Ferrens also were on board of her. With
surprise the boys saw a great number of
foreigners, who now for the first time made
their appearance. The crew, which was very
numerous, consisted of men of savage and
formidable aspect, who spoke for the most
part in a language unknown to the boys.

Robert could not but say to himself,—

“Tf the heathen are like these men, we
poor boys shall indeed stand in need of divine
assistance.”

The first day passed quickly for the boys
in the contemplation of the manifold novelties
that met their eyes. The most delightful
weather favoured their passage. Cloudless,
in pure and serene blue, the sky stretched
above their heads. The evening sun shone
magnificently, blending the heavens and the
sea in one blaze of glory. The scene shifted.
Countless myriads of golden stars shone forth.
What eye could take in the horizon or receive
all the glory of this grand display? Long
lines of glittering light quivered upon the
_ waves where they reflected the image of the



OUT AT SEA. 4d

moon. Oh, gentle, wonderful repose of a
summer twilight cooled by the softest zephyrs
of night ! :

Robert still remained on deck; his young
and susceptible soul felt the breathing of God
that pervaded His grand and pure creation.
All trembling and fear, all regret and pain,
were laid to rest; of only one thing was the
boy conscious—that he was in the hand of
the Lord. In such a mood as that the poor
and needy soul of man grows strong and
learns to tremble before nothing except the
Almighty.

In the hinder-part of the ship stood Porcus
and Ferrens conversing in alow tone. They
had seen many such nights, and their hearts
were hardened against the beauties of Nature.

“Tn seven days,” remarked Ferrens, “if
the wind continues fair, we shall reach our
destination.”

“We are the shrewdest merchants that
ever lived,” rejoined Porcus. “if we have
ten more lucky years in this business, we
may sit down at our ease.”



42 OUT AT SEA.

“That,” rephed Ferrens, “I never want.
to do. I want to be active and earn money
as long as I live. I hate repose.”

“ And then?” asked Porcus.

“TJ don’t understand you,” said Ferrens.

“T often have strange ideas,” said Poreus.
“What a pity that we must die!”

“That sort of ideas,” said Ferrens, “I put
entirely out of my head.”

“Do you know,” Poreus continued, “ that
the simplicity of these children has some-
times made me pity them? When I look
at them I remember that, once I had a son.
He fell mto the sea and was drowned—my
only child !” :

“What is gone is gone,” replied Ferrens,
with indifference. See

“Tf I only- knew what that ‘gone’ means!
These children would say he is gone to God,
but to us that only seems an idle fashion of
speech. I saw him fall into the deep and
sink ; and there, at the bottom of the sea, the —
fishes have long since torn the flesh from the
bones. Whoever lies there, that is the end



THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. 48

of him; as to going to God from so many
fathoms under the water, it is absurd. And
yet if I could believe it as these children do,
I should be far happier.”

“This is only foolish speculation,” said Fer-
rens; “it leads to nothing. Let us go and
sleep.”

“Tt is only now and then,” returned his
companion, “that I think of such things. I
do not fear death, and yet there are times
when I shudder at the thought of it, and
wonder whether it is the same thing to a
pious man as to one like us.”

“Dying is dying,” answered Ferrens; “all
flesh feels alike. Do you suppose a religious
man has different nerves and sinews from
those of a godless one?”

CHAPTER VII.
THE, TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

Tue morning of the second day was as beauti-
fal and bright as the night had been. Toward



4A, THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

mid-day, however, a little cloud was seen far in
the horizon—a little dark cloud that enlarged
with astonishing rapidity, and in-a short time
_ overspread the whole sky with threatening
gloom. The air was so heavy and sultry that
one could breathe but with difficulty. The
wind suddenly changed, tossing the sea into
whirling waves, and making it leap and foam
as with madness ; it went hissing and whistling
through the cordage of the vessels. Heavy
rain-drops mingled with the froth of the sea,
and the distant thunder rolled with long re-
verberations, blending with the sound of wind
and waves.

The sailors hastened to prepare the ships
as well as they could to weather the coming
storm; with practised agility they clambered
over the masts and the yards in spite of the
gale, which tossed them up and down like a
child’s ball. The sails were soon reefed in,
lest the wind, with power aided by their re-
sistance, should capsize the vessels. At the
same time the port-holes were carefully closed
to prevent the dashing in of the high waves.



THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. 45

And now the ships, with their sails bound
close, went like birds whose wings have been
clipped, trembling and quivering before the
dark tempest.

At the threatening approach of the storm
the children anxiously thronged together on
the deck. Their courage and their enthu-
siasm were not equal to the terrors of the
sea. Some fell on their knees and prayed;
others entreated Stephen to call upon God
for them. From how many eyes flowed tears
of the bitterest regret over home and friends
forsaken! If a narrow strip of blue sky
shone through some opening in the clouds,
it seemed to those affrighted souls like the
heavens above the safe but, alas! thought-
lessly-abandoned roof of home—that home
which they should never more behold, though
their arms should be stretched toward it in
the wild longing of despair.

Robert.and Henry stood grasping each
other by the hand.

«“ At least,” exclaimed Robert, “we can

=

die together.”



46 THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

But Henry prayed softly,—

“Control this storm, Lord Jesus Christ;
Thine is the power. Let us not perish until
we have delivered Jerusalem from the hand
of Thine enemies.”

It was not long before the two friends, with
their companions on the ship, were driven
down into the hold. Stephen himself, who
wanted to remain on deck in prayer, was
forced to go below.

“ Pray as much as you will,” said Ferrens,
with undisguised harshness, “but do not stay
here in the way of useful people. You must
have a strong voice if God in heaven can hear
you through such a storm as this.”

A. fearful night! No one can have an .-
-idea of its horrors who has not experienced
a storm at sea. The stoutest heart trembles
_ when the sides of the vessel groan and seem
to give way under the force of the waves;
the weather-beaten cheek pales at the shrill
howling of the blast that stirs up the sea to
its very depths, so that the waves tower on
high; and the impotent vessel now rides on



THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. AT

their summits, and now with fearful haste
shoots down into their cavernous hollows.
The smooth, flattering sea softly swelling at
morning under the light breeze, the unruffled
surface shimmering with a thousand diamond
points under the sunlight, reflecting the azure
above as though the light and beauty were
all its own, now a tremendous abyss, dark,
yawning, unfathomable, as though the fear-
ful monsters that people the lower deep
should open their gaping jaws to swallow
up vessels and human beings in everlasting
oblivion.

Starless was the night—no light, no hope.
The lightning that darted athwart the sky
in every direction only for an instant lit up
the wild chaos with fitful, unearthly brilliance,
so that the dazzled eye might in the next
moment be overwhelmed with darkness all
the more impenetrable. The rain fell thick
and fast from the sky, no longer a blue,
sublime vault, but seemingly hanging low and
flat above their heads. The incessant deluge
mingled with. the foaming waves, and the



48 THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

thunder with the roaring of the sea and the
fearful raging of the tempest.

Unhappy ships, rudely tossed between sky
and sea, sport of the unchained elements, be-
low them a mighty, devouring tomb, above no
ray of light, no heavenly blue of hope !

The boys, crowded together in the cabins,
were thrown from one side to the other by
the violent lurching of the ship. During
this night they suffered the terror of death.

Dispirited, powerless, in constant dread of
destruction, hearing its approach whenever
the wind splintered a mast or the waves
caused the timbers to creak and_ shiver,
every moment seemed the last, every new
peril that passed by seemed only to prolong
the agony of dissolution. The shouts of the
sailors overhead, sounding like despairing
cries for aid, gave them no comfort, but only
made them more vividly and dreadfully re-
alize the ever-threatening danger.

Hours passed in mortal terror cannot be
reckoned by minutes. How endlessly long
this night seemed! But morning must fol-



THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. 49

low the most frightful night; the darkness
must at length yield to the light of day, the
conflict of the elements be at length stilled.
The storm dies away, and the sea grows calm.

Morning came. The sun broke through
the clouds; the wind drove them from the
horizon, dispersed .them, and they melted
away; again the heavenly vault shone in:
undimmed serenity. Gently-rolling waves
bore the ships smoothly over the blue ex-
panse of the sea. Brighter and warmer at
every moment, the sun rose high in the
heavens; but he looked down upon a sad
scene in the little fleet. The pale, weary
children were out.on the deck, where the
sailors, dripping with water, almost entirely
exhausted, still fulfilled their laborious tasks.

The grateful joy of deliverance, the ‘happy
consciousness of a new grant of life, gradually
enlivened their hearts, but not for long.

Of seven. large ships that had left the har-
bour of Marseilles with swelling sails, and
freighted. with high and glad hopes, only

five, half dismantled, now rode toward their
(936) 4



50 ON A HOSTILE SHORE,

goal. During that wild night two had been
driven by the tempest upon a rock on the
coast of the little island of San Pietro, near
Sardinia. They went to pieces, and the sea
swallowed all, sturdy seamen as well as frail
— children.

Thus prematurely ended this crusade for
many, many beloved youths whose tender
mothers at home vainly and hopelessly la-
mented their absence.

CHAPTER VIII.
ON A. HOSTILE SHORE.

“Lanb! land ahead !”

The boys crowded in joyful excitement upon
the deck. After several days and nights filled
with sorrowful thoughts of their lost com-
panions, with whom they might never share .
the holy conflict and the joy of victory,
a line of coast now lay ne before
their eyes.

“There is Palestine! there is Jerusalem,



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 51

where our Lord and Saviour lived and suf.
fered!” the boys shouted.

Stephen fell upon his knees and raised his
eyes devoutly toward heaven. Suddenly he
sprang to his feet, exclaiming, —

“What is the meaning of that?”

The cross, the sign of the Christian faith,
had disappeared, and in its stead the Turkish
crescent floated from the mast,

“You are surprised, no doubt,” said Fer-
rens, approaching Stephen. “The flag is
changed ; danger compels us to hoist one
that is hostile. You imagine that you be-
hold Syria, but we are really nearing the
Egyptian coast, and that city is Alexandria,”

“And why are we here? Why do you
not steer for the open sea, in the direction
of our destination ?”

“Who can withstand the Almighty ?” re-
turned the merchant, “ Such is His will, and
we must submit. You know how severely
our ships were injured by that fearful storm.
Our supply of provisions is consumed, nor
have we sufficient wager for a single day;



52 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

it is impossible for us to continue our journey
toward Syria in such a condition.”

“But here, of all places! Man, what can
you mean ?” | :

“The danger,” replied Ferrens, “appears
greater than it really is. In the first place,
God the Lord, who has called His crusaders,
will surely protect them from danger. As.
concerns myself, I am well known in Alex-
andria; I have wealthy and influential friends
there who will readily supply us with all that
we need. There will be but a few days’ delay,
during which we can obtain provisions and
attend to the repairing of the vessels. Mer-
chantmen, as our ships are, protected by the
flag we are now under, will awaken no sus-
picion. I will be responsible.”

What could the young crusaders do?
They could scarcely help confiding in these
men, who had undertaken so great an enter-
prise with disinterested devotion, merely for
the love of God—men, besides, whose ripe -
experience certainly qualified them to give
the best counsel. There were’ some, indeed, —



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. ~ 58

who cried out earnestly that they would
rather venture upon the high seas, rather
endure hunger and thirst, than be hindered
on their way to Jerusalem; but the majority
silently acquiesced on hearing Ferrens swear
by all that is sacred that there was but ‘one
alternative—land or death. So they drew
near the enemy’s coast, and the five ships lay
at anchor in the harbour near Alexandria.
Except the sailors, all were ordered to
remain below the deck; Ferrens and his
companion went on shore. Late in the
evening they came back in excellent spirits.
Their confident bearing quieted the youths.
“We have found our friends prepared for _
all demands,” they said triumphantly. “ Pro-
visions, money—we have only to ask for what
we want. But first our vessels must be put
in order; and for the short time necessary for
that you must make up your minds to go
on shore. We have made such arrange-
ments that this can be done without the .
slightest danger. You will be carried to
land to-night secretly in boats; the harbour-



54 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

guards are bribed. You could not be more
safe on board the ships than for these few
days on the extensive domains of our friends.”

A few hours later a swarm of little skiffs
came out to the fleet and conveyed the
crusaders to land under cover of night. The
procession was quietly arranged, and the
host, of boys, with some hundreds of older
pilgrims, disposed themselves to follow their
leaders. The bright moonlight showed them
in the distance the beautiful, glimmering out-
lines of the city of Alexandria. Its peculiar
architecture, and all the novel and foreign
scenes around them, awakened the curiosity
of the young crusaders; but with this curi-
osity was mingled a feeling of deep anxiety.
The wanderer usually blesses the signs of
human life, but, to them all was hostile upon
the unknown soil they were treading, and
that labyrinth of houses sheltered as many
enemies as inhabitants.

Leaving Alexandria on one side, they ap-
proached some country residences with many
large out-buildings and gardens, the -estates



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 55

which the merchants had mentioned as those
where the crusaders were to find shelter and
repose for a few days. They found them-
selves expected. Slaves were in waiting to
conduct them into gardens and courtyards
surrounded by high walls, and spacious enough
to accommodate the whole host.

When all had found places, they prepared
to enjoy for the few hours that remained. be-
fore daylight the sleep which they so much
needed. A large number were in a court-
yard, in the middle of which a fountain was
playing with a cool and pleasant sound. —
Here were found Stephen, Robert, Henry, and
part of the older pilgrims who accompanied
the crusade. The richly-adorned tent which
has before been spoken of was pitched for
Stephen close by the fountain; the fifty
halberdiers who had been his guards on the
march through France took their places
around it. Near them lay the young friends
Robert and Henry. After offering up their
nightly prayer in silence, they stretched them-
selves upon the warm sand, using for pillows



56 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

a part of their outer clothing. Above them
the starry, cloudless heavens stretched.

One who had seen the young crusaders
in their night-encampment near Marseilles—
fresh, blooming, strong in hope—would now
have observed a sad change if he had looked
on the weary and enfeebled beings, in so short
a time exhausted, and to some extent discour-
aged, by the horrors of their first sea-voyage.

“Good-night!” said Robert to his friend.
“God grant us a happy morning !”

“ And soon a morning in Jerusalem,” re-
sponded Henry.

Not even the dread of possible danger
could keep any awake; overcome by fatigue,
all were soon wrapped in that profound slum- —
ber which belongs only to youth. They slept;
but the guardian angel of the father’s home,
whom a beautiful faith sees by the couch of
the dutiful child, was not there to watch over
them and to avert evil from them. The first
command of God to children was forgotten by
the many who had secretly left their parents,
and thus abandoned the angel-cuarded home.



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 57.

And now a man who seemed to be asleep
started up as if suddenly awakened ; he rubbed
his eyes and carefully observed the slumber of
his companions. Then he rose, cautiously
moving one limb after another. As quietly
as a shadow he slipped along by the wall, and
silently pushed back the bolt of a narrow
gate. As he stole out the moonlight revealed
his countenance. It was that of Ferrens.

Cautiously as the gate was opened, the
movement awoke Robert, and he sat up.
He could, however, perceive nothing that
appeared suspicious. Looking around upon
the weary sleepers, so noiseless and motion-
_legs, a cold shudder came over him, as if he
had been the only living being among so
many corpses. He lay down again imme-
diately, closed his eyes, and once more fell
asleep. “His dream was painful. Before him
stood his mother; she stroked the hair back
from his brow and said,— —

“Thou hast not been kind to us, Robert.
See how thy parents weep.” |

Robert would have excused himself, but in



58 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

his dream he could find no words, and the hot
tears seemed to seald his cheeks.

“‘Now I can come to thee only in dreams,”
said his mother. ‘ O my child, shall we ever
meet again?”

Then a severe countenance looked down
‘upon Robert ;- it was his father’s, and the boy
could not meet his eyes.

“ Awake, unhappy child!” said the father
sternly; and with the dream-voice mingled
a terrified ery of “Treachery! treachery |”

Robert awoke with that fearful sound ring-
ing in his ears. In the dim light of dawning
day his eyes opened upon a scene of dread.

The whole space unoccupied by the sleepers
was now filled with armed men, whose wild
and warlike aspect alone seemed enough to
overpower the boys. The Saracens first at-
tacked the pilgrims who accompanied the
crusade, and from whom, as men, they had
most reason to expect resistance. These were
speedily disarmed, and such as were still sleep-
ing were bound before they could awaken.
The young halberdiers lying around their



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 59

leader’s tent awoke directly, and seeing the
enemy around them, did their best to de-
fend themselves and Stephen. The struggle
quickly aroused all the remaining’ sleepers,
bringing them to their feet as if a stream of
fire had poured over their heads. The greater
number -were seized by so terrible a panic
that they scarcely knew what they. were
doing; many threw themselves on _ their
knees, pleading for their lives; while others
called, weeping, upon their parents. Fright-
ened out of their heavy sleep and unarmed,
what resistance could they have made?
Added to this, the alarm was increased by
the piercing shouts of the Saracens, who fell
upon their prey with the cry of “ Allah!
Allah!” Similar noises from the surrounding
gardens and courtyards indicated that the
whole host were victims to the surprise.
Stephen in the midst of his guards saw the
danger and felt how small was the hope of de-
liverance ; still he expected miraculous aid.
“My Saviour,” he cried, “my Lord and
my God, if I am indeed Thy prophet, save,



60 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

save us from this peril! Send down Thy fire
: upon the heathen and destroy them !”

At this devout cry of anguish wrung from
their leader’s heart the boys were for a
moment inspired with fresh courage. They
heard the words of their saintly commander
and raised expectant eyes toward heaven,
looking for the flames to fall. But no light-
ning shot through the serene atmosphere.
God was silent. He acknowledged not the
youth who appealed to Him as His prophet.

“Tord, give us not into the hands of our
foes,” entreated Stephen.

A fierce onset was at that moment made
upon him. The young guards, with a faith-
fulness worthy of a happier fate, strove to
protect the sheplierd-lad. The pitiless men
overthrew the boys without mercy.

But scarcely had the first victims fallen in
that barbarian slaughter when Stephen, with ~
firmness and resolution far beyond his years,
broke through the confusion, placed himself
in front of his faithful companions, and cried
with flashing eyes,—



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 61

“Take me—I am the one whom ye seek ;
but spare these others.”

A heroic soul beamed in the youthful coun-
tenance—a spirit formed for a higher and
better destiny. Even the rough soldiers,
struck by its expression, paused for a moment
without laying hands upon him. But only
for a moment could the boy’s noble courage
overawe their barbarous minds; then they
fell upon him and bound his hands firmly
with cords. The golden circlet which de-
noted his dignity as leader of the crusade was
torn from his head and trodden under foot.

Stephen uttered no complaint, nor made
any resistance, though the sharp and rough
bands so painfully confined his limbs. But at
the sight the other boys burst into weeping.
For him all hope was over. If such a fate
was his, what could his followers expect ?

There was no further attempt at resistance ;
the pilgrims, the only ones capable of wielding
arms, had long ago been overpowered, and
thus was the whole crusade at one blow de-
livered into the power of the Saracens..



62 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

“We must die,” said Robert “O my
mother !”

Henry pressed his hand, saying,—

“Forgive! forgive me! But for me, you
would not have been here.”

“No,” replied the boy ; “it was God’s will,
whatever may become of me now.”

At this moment appeared two men who
were received by the Saracens with respectful
salutations, and by the boys with half-uttered
maledictions. They were Porcus and Ferrens.
Their eyes gloated upon the rich harvest of
their treachery. They spoke with the leaders
of the soldiery, giving further directions.

As they approached Stephen, whose lips
were moving in silent prayer, he raised his
eyes toward heaven, and cried,—

“Cursed for ever be ye, traitors! In the
name of God, a curse upon you and your
children! A shameful death shall ye die in
memory of this hour.”

“Rash boy,” said Porcus, “what should
hinder us from striking off your head at
once? By Mohammed, guard your tongue !”



ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 63

“Call upon your lying Prophet, reprobate
man!” exclaimed the boy; “but the hour
will come when you shall call in vain, your
treacherous tongue stammering his name in
your dying agony.”

“Thou blasphemest the Prophet,” cried
Porcus, “and thou shalt die!”

The threat had almost been fulfilled. A
Saracen who was acquainted with the Frank-
ish tongue at these words swung a sharp sabre
above the head of the shepherd-lad, ready to
slay the victim. But Ferrens caught his arm.

“Hold! Will you rob me of my money @
Who will purchase dead slaves of us? There
are too many killed already. Let them kill
him and quarter him after he is sold. He will
learn soon enough to call on Mohammed.”

“Thou liest, wretched man!” rejoined the
boy angrily. “T call only upon Jesus Christ,
whom I will confess while I have breath.”

Ferrens only said coolly,—

“Lead them all out to the market-place.
Allah has blessed our enterprise. We have
slaves enough for some years.”



64 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

The unhappy captives~were now driven
forth with barbarous. haste, those of mature
~ years in advance, their hands bound, and the
boys in gangs, deprived of what, few weapons
they had, and even of most of their clothing.
Thus ignominiously did that crusade take up
its march, which but a few weeks before had
called forth half of France to greet the deliv-
erers and: defenders of the holy sepulchre.

At the head went the unfortunate Stephen.
Forsaken, abandoned to his enemies, he yet
did not lose faith in his mission. In sign of
_ mockery of him as the leader, the cross had
been pressed into -his fettered hands and a
turban placed upon his head.

CHAPTER IX.
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

Tue crusade of children, together with the
capture of the whole host, was speedily ,
made known throughout Alexandria. Curi- F
osity drew young and old to the slave= -



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 65

market, where so many thousands of Frankish
youths were offered for sale, and with them
some four hundred pilgrims, including about
eighty priests.. Just at this time several’ Sara-
cen princes were sojourning in Alexandria, so
that there was no lack of purchasers. ,

The captives were arranged in ranks and
guarded by armed Saracens. Scarcely had
sufficient clothing been left to the unhappy,
betrayed youths to protect them from the burn-
ing rays of the sun, to which they were so
entirely unaccustomed. What tears had they
shed for those their companions whom the sea
had swallowed up! Now they wept for them-
selves, the survivors, and envied the fate of
the departed. Courage, hope—all was gone.

The treacherous men who had delivered
them into the hands of the heathen walked
about among them unmoved by their distress,
examining their living booty with no thought
save that of their own profit.

“Tf it had not been for that storm!” said
- Porcus. “It is deplorable to think how many ’

we lost. by it, and after such risk, such trouble
(086) 5 :



66 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. ©

and expense! By my faith, when we count
the cost and the loss of the vessels, our gains
are not, after all, so great. We shall have to
set a good price on the Christian hounds.”
_ “They might easily have brought us as high
as a common gallows,” said Ferrens, laughing,
“if any one had chanced to recognize us.”

“Hush! A gallows! The death that I
dread most of all!” :

“Or the people might have spared them-
selves any further trouble by killing us on the
spot. Itis all the same. But an experienced
trader takes all that into consideration. His
well-earned gains are all the sweeter. And let
us not fret about the vessels; we are in the
way of making such captures as this, and can
do it over again.’ Look! there are our cus-
tomers, the noble, wealthy emirs. Oh, see!
there comes the caliph of Bagdad, and there »
the governor of Alexandria. He is a cursed
buyer, who must have his slaves cheap. By
Mohammed, they are a fine company! Allah
send us a good day.”

“Yes, the Prophet’s blessing be upon us!”



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 67

The governor of Alexandria, the caliph of
Bagdad, and ten or twelve Saracen princes ap-
proached. The merchants made low salaams.

«“ Are these the slaves? Mere children!
You must sell them cheap.”

“Tf two ships had not gone down with
more than a thousand on board,” said Ferrens.

‘Great expense, and but little profit.”

The pasha of Alexandria stepped close to
the merchant and whispered,—

“ You remember, Hassan, that you promised
me two thousand slaves for my assistance.”

“ Allah!” cried the trader, in alarm; “two
thousand! My exalted commander, it was
but a thousand.”

The pasha frowned om anerily stroked his
long beard.

“You dare to maintain that . my face ?
Take care what you say !” :

» Ferrens—or Hassan, as the Saracen called
the renegade—bowed and replied,—

“Hye of the Prophet, pardon thy slave.
Tt was but a thousand, my commander.”

The eyes of the Saracen flashed with rage.



68 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

“‘ Avaricious dog! miserable slave! With
whom wilt thou chaffer? Wilt thou cheat
me? Two thousand have I said? No; it
was two thousand five hundred. - Silence,
or thou shalt have as many strokes as thou
wouldst deny me slaves! Do I administer
justice here for nothing? No matter how
many I ask, I must have them. Have the
two thousand five hundred counted off at
once, and set them aside.”

“To hear is to obey,” sighed the trader, not
daring to offer further resistance.

The young friends were still standing side
by side.

“O merciful Father!” prayed Robert ;
‘suffer us not in our misery to be separated
_ from each other.”

Henry leaned heavily upon him.

“TJ shall not long have to endure slavery,”
he said. ‘They will kill me, for I cannot
labour. Oh, I am so weary! All is growing
dark around me. If I could but sleep! My
eyes will never behold Jerusalem that is on
earth, but the heavenly Jerusalem will soon



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 69

shine upon me; this perishing body will be
glorified. Do not weep so, dear Robert; be |
thankful that I die. And if God ever leads
thee back to France, Bree my parents, and .
beg them to forgive me.’

Robert pressed his hand, sobbing ; it Was
for the last time. The boys were dragged
away from each other. Henry fell to the
ground, and a pitiless slave-driver struck him
angrily with his whip, saying,—

“Stand up! This is no time for lying
down.”

Henry staggered to his feet, le with
failing voice,—

“Robert! Robert! Do not forget!”

Robert pushed his way out of the crowd ;
no fear of abuse could stay him. He flew to
his sinking friend, around whose lips played
a happy smile. It was the last. The breath
of life was passing from the frail body, and
lingered--upon his lips in that happy look, as
though they had been kissed by the angel of
deliverance.

In a transport of grief Robert pressed the



70 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

form of his earliest friend to his heart. He
felt not the roughness of the grasp that tore
him away, for his sorrow had made him insen-
sible to all else. Freedom might one day be
regained, but the faithful heart that beat no
more was lost to him for all time.

Stephen stood motionless; his eyes were
not turned upon what was passing around:
him. Absorbed in his own thoughts, sub-
missive to the will of God, he awaited calmly
his fate.

“Here you see,” said Ferrens mockingly
to a dark-looking man who was beside him,
“the shepherd-boy, the saintly leader of the
army, who thought himself able with these
children to obtain possession of the tomb of
the crucified One.”

The Saracen scanned the boy with piercing
looks, which the youth fearlessly returned.

“T buy this one,” said the emir; and going
among the captives he chose seventeen others.

The men again approached the young shep-
herd, and the emir said to Ferrens,—

“Tell him what I have said to you—that



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 71

he shall be the first to forswear his accursed
faith and to acknowledge Mohammed ; and if
he does so, I will treat him as a son.”

“Listen!” said the merchant, turning to
the boy. “Héar what happiness and honour
are in store for you, pitiful young saint!
Here is a distinguished emir, a successor of
the Prophet; he has bought you as his slave,
but will hold you as his son if you forswear
the crucified One, and aloud, on this spot, call
on Mohammed.”

«What is it you propose to me?” cried
Stephen, aroused to anger. “Vile Judas,
you have betrayed the Lord Himself in us
His servants! My Saviour is Jesus Christ,
whom I confess aloud before all the world.
Away with the lying Prophet !”

The emir caused the same proposition to
be repeated to every one of the others whom
he had selected, but the weak, captive children
unanimously refused to deny Him in whose
name they had been baptized.

Their unhappy leader still displayed the
same faith and courage that had animated



72 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

him from the first moment of his supposed
mission. He raised his voice in earnest in-
junctions to his companions not to deny ule
Redeemer.

“ Let us not,” he se “desert the Saviour
who bought us with His own precious blood
and by His death on the cross. My brothers,
my friends, for the sake of your everlasting
salvation, hear me—hear me, and be strong.
What is every earthly good compared to
eternal happiness in-Jesus Christ our Lord
and Redeemer ?”

Such words, spread rapidly from mouth to
mouth, strengthened the resolves of all, and
with wonderful power aided them firmly to
endure the fearful events of that day.

“Thou seest, noble emir,” said Ferrens,
“that this boy with hig fanatical obstinacy
seduces the rest. He must lead them by his
example; he must be compelled to renounce
his false faith. Do that, and I wager my
head upon it thousands will imitate him.”

“Repeat the proposal once more to them.
Tell them that the Prophet ig angry with



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 73

their unbelief, that he has given the sword

into my hand to punish the rebellious. His _
countenance is fearful to the disobedient, but

gentle toward believers.”

“Foolish boys,” cried Ferrens, “hesitate
no longer. The sword hangs over your
heads, and fearful are the punishments of
disobedience. There is but one God, and
Mohammed is his Prophet.”

But the answer came back from boyish
voices with one accord,—

“Praised be Jesus Christ for evermore.”

From rank to rank re-echoed the cry, re-
peated again and again with joyful courage
by those thousands of ill-fated children.

“Tt is easily to be seen that kindness is
thrown away here,” said Ferrens. “ They
will not call on any other name or praise
any but the crucified One.”

The countenance of the Mussulman, who
up to this moment had awaited the result
with apparent composure, now changed men-
acingly. Fanatic zeal glowed in his angry
look.



74 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

_“ Allah! T have tried the way of kindness,
but these unbelievers are determined to feel
the sword.”

The emir turned to the governor.

“My brother, in the name of the Prophet
IT came hither to make believing Mussul-
mans of these Christian children, but it is in
vain. My merciful persuasions are thrown
away, and they adhere to the crucified One.
* Give me authority here and now, before the
eyes of all, to punish the rebellious ones and
terrify the rest by a warning example.”

“My dear brother,” returned the governor,
willing to serve the powerful man, who had,
moreover, the reputation of a holy person,
“command as seemeth good to thee. Let
the unbelievers be run through with the
sword, quartered, burned, if they will not
turn to the Prophet. Allah! they are thy
slaves; do as thou wilt with them. And
if thou desirest besides any of these whom
I have purchased, thou hast but to choose;
they are thine.”

The emir bowed, and beckoned to some



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 75

slaves to bring forward the instruments by
which it was proposed to convert the Chris-
tian children to another religion. Trunks of
small trees were placed crosswise, fastened in
that position, and set upright in the ground
before the eyes of the children. After this
fearful preparation, the emir commanded that
the shepherd-boy, with the seventeen others
whom he had purchased; should be scourged.
As the sharp thongs fell upon their naked
backs, drawing streams of blood, and again
and again with ingenious cruelty returned
upon the same places, the boys who beheld
the scene cried aloud with horror, weeping
and covering their faces; but the sufferers
themselves endured in silence.

The tormentors paused in their dreadful
work, and Ferrens stepped in front of the
boys.

“Have you as yet no better answer to
give? -The emir will still be gracious to
you; he will receive you among his servants.
You do not know how wealthy and kind he
is, nor what comforts you may enjoy, such as



16 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

you have never dreamed of in your miserable
country. Fortune smiles upon you; here, in
a hostile land, you may find a kind master and
father—a second home. Is it your will fool-
ishly to reject all this, and rather to endure
all torments than to enjoy the favour of a
powerful emir? And what is required of
you? Nothing but that you cease to worship
the Crucified, and acknowledge Mohammed
as the true Prophet of God. Why, then, do
you hesitate? Your much-praised Saviour
has not freed you from captivity, and will
certainly not deliver you from death if you
are stiff-necked any longer.”

“Silence, thou renegade !” replied Stephen ;
“thy fiendish tongue cannot seduce us. Our
~ Lord and Master is Jesus Christ, and never
the prophet of lies, Mohammed! If the
Lord of the heavenly hosts leaves these our
earthly bodies in your power, it is that
through pain and shame they may be purified
from all stains of sin. The death with which
you threaten us is but the heavenly deliverer
which shall send us to the presence.of our



~ SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 17

Master and Saviour to enter upon eternal
_blessedness. Under the strokes of your
scourges, yea, even upon the cross, will we
ever cry, «Praised be Jesus Christ !’”

Firmly and joyfully responded the other
seventeen boys,—

“Praised be Jesus Christ for evermore !”

“Thou seest,” said Stephen, “we are of
but one mind. Torture us, kill us; power is
given to you over the body, but God will aid
us to the end, that we may be worthy to
stand in the ranks of His holy martyrs.”

“ Let them be nailed to the cross, my lord,”
said Ferrens to the emir, enraged at this con-
stancy. “Give them no reprieve. These
children brave death ; they do not know what
it is to be nailed hand and foot, to suffer
torments, looking death in the face for hours
before it comes.”

The emir cast a lingering look upon the
bleeding youths, who repressed with manly
courage every sign of their suffering.

“J ghould like to save them,” he said ad-
miringly. “What men such children would



8 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

become, and that one above all! Tell him
he shall be my son. I will make him rich and
eminent; he, now a slave, shall have power
over thousands of slaves. Allah! what a
destiny awaits the youth if he will but confess
the true Prophet! ‘Tell him all this for the
last time. If they still withstand, then they
must all suffer the death of the cross. I
have sworn it.”

Once more Ferrens approached the boys
and offered them life, with enjoyments which
he painted in alluring words. He repeated to
Stephen the brilliant promises of the emir.
But the boys remained steadfast. Stephen’s
reply, as he pointed toward the heavens,
was,—

“ There I have a Father, mightier than any
on earth, who will never forsake me if I for-
sake not Him.”

The trader pointed to the wooden crosses
erected in their sight, saying,—

“As true as I stand before you, if you
refuse any longer, there are the crosses to
which you will be nailed.”

~



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 79

“So be it!” cried the shepherd-boy, with
devout enthusiasm. “Did not our Lord
suffer on the cross? What else could we
desire? Happy death, that leads us to the
Saviour! This is the victory he has promised
us. I see the conqueror’s crown, the white
robes of saints and angels.”

“Insane boy!” returned Ferrens. ‘It shall
be as you desire. You shall die the miserable
death of the evil-doer.”

“And for thee,” Stephen continued, with
prophetic ecstasy —“ for thee and thy associate,
ye instruments of hell and companions of the
traitor who sold his Lord—for you shall be
no blessed death upon the cross; for you shall
be an end like that of Judas. The hour shall
come when the hangman shall fasten you to the
gallows and your souls shall pass into torment.”

The renegade turned pale. The shudder-
ing fear of death that caused -his body to
tremble restrained the insulting words with
which he would have answered the predic-
tion; the smile that he called to his lips
was but a ghastly expression of his terror.



80 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

As the emir had threatened, it was done.

Could the sun shine down with cheerful
light upon so dreadful a scene of martyrdom—
eighteen boys so pitilessly slain ? ‘But no
cloud veiled the heavens, nor was the sun
darkened above the horrible deed. Nature
feels not sympathy: That tender emotion
finds its home in human breasts, and it was a
human being that condemned these eighteen
children to a cruel death for adoring their
Saviour.

Still, in the anguish of martyrdom, they
called upon the holy name. With patient
endurance they received the dreadful chas-
tisement that had fallen upon them for the
folly of their wild enterprise and the sin of
their’ disobedience.

But the fanatical Mussulman was disap-
pointed in the effect he had intended to
produce upon the remainder of the young
crusaders ; for the boys, as well as the older
pilgrims, however horrified by what they had
witnessed, yet refused to give up their faith.

The caliph of Bagdad, more merciful than



SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 81

the others, prevented further cruelties. He
had bought a large number of the ecclesiastics
who were among the pilgrims.

Thus ended this crusade, which had robbed
Hrance of the flower of her youth, and caused
her to reap a large harvest of sorrow and of
tears. Begun in hope, it led to death and
slavery. Many rested beneath the sea; the
wonderful shepherd-lad ended his life on the
cross; and the remainder of the host were
scattered throughout Asia in the fetters of
slavery. Not even the poor comfort of weep-
ing over the graves of their beloved children
was granted to the bereaved mothers.

Yet, sad as was the end of this crusade,
desperate as to human hopes, still, in chains
and in death, a rare victory was won—the
victory of Christian faith; and this not by
men, but by weak children, who preferred
a death of excruciating torture to life pur-
chased by denying the Lord Jesus Christ.
The story of their heroism must have kindled
the hearts of Christians, when at last it be-

came known, to new zeal and emulation in
(936) ; 6



82 A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM.

the midst of their grief and lamentation over
the untimely fate of the young martyrs.

In honour of those lost by shipwreck Pope
Gregory the Ninth caused to be built on the
isle of San Pietro, near Sardinia, a “ Church
of the New Innocents.” An old chronicle
relates that at a later period some bodies of
the unfortunate boys, which had been washed
ashore, were shown to pilgrims in a perfect

state of preservation.

CHAPTER X.
A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM.

Snvmenreen years passed away—a brief dream
for the happy, but for the sorrowing, for the
enslaved, a long, long time. How much does
the stream of time carry away in seventeen
years! How often do the varying fortunes of
war change the victor into the vanquished !
But at length the goal of so many pious
longings—the possession of the Holy City—
had been attained by the Christians. After



A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM. 83

being held during forty-two years by the
heathen, Jerusalem once more received a
Christian ruler, in the person of the German
emperor Frederick the Second, on the seven-
teenth of March 1229. Kameel, the Sultan
of Egypt, had yielded the cities of Jerusalem,
Bethlehem, and Nazareth, with all Palestine
and Sidon, to the Christians, and assured
them of peaceable possession by a truce of
twelve years. —

Again, then, ‘were the sacred spots where
the Redeemer had dwelt, with His holy sepul-
chre, in the possession of His professed fol-
lowers. But who could have rejoiced at this
with true and holy joy when he saw those
venerable places profaned, the city of God
debased to a theatre of partisan strife, the
knights and the deliverers of the sepulchre en-
gaged in mutual dissensions, secret and open ;
even the courageous king who had fought
against the heathen, whose bravery and that
of his German followers had earned the re-
ward of the long strife, now under we ban of
the pope ?



84, A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

O unhappy children! was this a result
worthy the sacrifice of so many lives, of so
much love and all the joy of home?

CHAPTER XI.
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

In a garden at Alexandria two slaves were
labouring. One of them was Robert; the
other, Theobald, a German soldier who had
been taken prisoner in a battle with the
heathen. This German was several years
older than Robert, and was a man of gigantic
frame, broad shoulders, and powerful hands,
far better skilled to wield the sword than to
engage in the peaceful labours of the garden. _

Robert, too, had become a man. The
glowing Egyptian sun had embrowned his
complexion, and made him, except for his
European features, resemble in appearance
the natives of the country; but a trustful
heart beat in his bosom, strong in faith and
in the love of home. However hard. his lot



A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 85

may have been, yet none of the privations
and trials of seventeen years, nor yet any .
allurements of ease and comfort, had been
able to lead him +o renounce his Christian
profession.

Robert was a slave, subject to the will and
caprice of his master, hopeless of ever seeing
his home and his parents again; and yet a
man who preserves the love and the truth
of his childhood, with his faith in God his
Redeemer—how can such a one ever be
quite without happiness? The source of his
strength, of the courage and elevation of his
soul, his master could never take away. Still
he offered the blessed morning and evening
prayers which his mother had taught him ;
still he sang the spiritual songs which had
expressed the devotion of his heart in those
early days. These were precious treasures —
of the memory of which no earthly power
could reb him.

Robert had not been long in forming a
strong attachment for his brave and true
German companion. Sharing the same fate,



86 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

they strengthened each other’s courage and
endurance. Theobald told him much about
the crusade of the German boys—an enter-
prise no less unhappy in its results than that
of the French youths; of the distressing dis-
sensions among the Christians in the Holy
Land; of the heroic courage of the German
emperor; of life at home in Germany; and
of the manners and customs of beautiful,
beloved Swabia.

Many a time, pausing in the midst of his
labour, the German would exclaim, “ Now the
evening-bell is ringing at home,” or, “ Now
my wife is giving the children their supper ;
then they will pray and remember me.” Then
he would pass his broad hand over his eyes
as if the sunlight dazzled them, and then
bend over the earth and work with redoubled
diligence.

But Robert would respond in a low voice,
with a loving look toward the sky that spread
over his own fatherland, “God protect them
all!”

Often, also, rer their work they would



A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 87

sing French or German hymns which they
had taught to each other, and this made the
weary burning hours pass more rapidly than
otherwise they would have done.

Only, the overseer of the slaves must net
hear them. He was a dark-browed, gloomy-
tempered Mussulman, and had conceived a
special hatred for the two friends, because
they sometimes looked as cheerful and con-
tented as if they had not been slaves whose
very lives depended upon a mere gesture of
their owner. He could not comprehend
‘that in their hopeless captivity they were
still more free than the man who ruled over
them, himself the sport of his own whims
and passions and a thousand self-seeking
wishes.

The two were still softly humming the
words of a German hymn when the overseer
came toward them swinging his whip, abus-
ing and threatening the “ Christian hounds.”
Theobald looked him fearlessly in the face.
The Saracen shook his whip, but without strik-
ing the German, and walked away with a



88 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

wrathful curse. He was obliged to treat the
slaves more humanely than before, since the
sultan had shown a friendly disposition to-
ward the Christians ; but he could not restrain
himself from embittering their captivity as far
as lay in his: power, or from robbing them of
what little alleviation of its hardships a
might have enjoyed. ;

Scarcely had he turned his back and gone
beyond hearing when Isidor, a Greek slave
who was working close by, approached the
friends. Shaking his fist at the overseer, he
muttered angrily,—

“Tf only you were my slave!”

“And what would you do?” inquired Theo-
bald. “Would you treat your captive as he
treats his 7” :

“That oppressor,” replied the Greek, “ de-
- serves nothing better. But listen, now, for
the moments are precious. You are men
whom I trust; I have long observed you.
Do you wish to be free?”

At this question the friends trembled with
emotion.



A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 89

“Why do you ask?” said Theobald. “Look
at us! But these are only words. How can
we be helped ?”

With a cunning smile the Greek made
answer,— c

“Words they are which may set you free.
We must escape. Confide in me; I know
the country and the roads, and I will bring |
you safely to a Christian garrison. It is true
that you, Theobald, are not very well ac-
quainted with the language; but I am, and
so is Robert, and that will suffice.”

“Friend, you forget,” said Theobald, “that
here we are surrounded by high walls and
are watched. Besides, this slave’s dress is
hardly calculated for concealment.”

“T know how to manage all that,” rejoined
Isidor. ‘“ For some time I have observed that
we have not been so closely watched as we
used to be, and it will not be difficult for us to
meet some night on the west side of this
wall—over there, where that gate, half cov-
ered by the acacia trees, leads into the olive
grove.”



90 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

“We know the gate; we have often worked
there. But it is always guarded.”

“That guard prevent our escape? He
spends too many nights in the wine-house,”
the Greek went on. “I will procure the key -
to the gate; I will also provide Mussulman
clothing for us all. Have no fears. If I
were not so familiar with everything here
that it will cost me but a little trouble, then
indeed— But be easy. Let us fix upon
the night for our enterprise, and I will take
care of the rest.”

So the bold undertaking was decided upon
—a bold one indeed, even under the most
favourable circumstances.

With feelings divided between fear and
hope the friends awaited the appointed night.
How slowly passed the time! What an age
from one day until the cry of the muezzin
from the minaret announced the next! As
often as they caught a glimpse of the over-
seer in the distance they thought that all
had been discovered, but nothing suspicious
encouraged the idea; he passed them more



A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 91

quietly than usual, seeming scarcely to ob-
serve them. And so at length came the
hour so longed for—the hour of freedom.

-A beautiful, starry night saw the three
allies together at the place which had been
agreed upon.

“ Hide yourselves here for a few minutes,”
said the Greek, “until I bring the keys and
the garments; I could not do it earlier, for
fear of being observed. I will return directly.”

He disappeared among the dark bushes,
while the other two men stepped cautiously
into the shade of the acacias.

“Suppose that man should have goné to
betray us,” said the German, in a restrained
tone.

“ Tmpossible !” returned Robert. “A knav-
ish trick like that! True, it was a still worse
one that made me a slave.”

“You do not know these Greeks ; they are
the most faithless nation on earth. If he were
to give us up, it might secure his own free-
dom. And do you think he would not prefer
the easier way to the more difficult and peril-



pes

92 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

ous one? Yet no; we will not fear or suspect
him because he is a Greek—that is not his
fault. Hold! there he comes. I have-done
him injustice.”

It was indeed their companion aeealing along
toward them laden with kaftans and turbans.

“Ffere!” said he triumphantly, “I have
all we need.”

» Hach quickly took possession of the suit
that fitted him best.

“But weapons?” said Theobald. “Where
are weapons, in case we are obliged to defend
- ourselves ?”

Isidor struck his forehead.

“ Oh, fool that I was to forget them! Well,
it is useless to lament. I have money, and we
can soon provide ourselves.”

The two friends now stood transformed as
to appearance into Mussulmars. Only the
Greek delayed, and stooped down as if search-
ing here and there upon the ground. Theo-
bald urged him to make haste.

“T must have let the key fall here,” said
Isidor.



A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 93

“What else can happen to us?” exclaimed
Theobald. “ We will help you to look for it;
a minute’s delay may ruin us.”

Isidor went back a little distance, placing
himself in the open path, continuing his ex-
ertions, and every moment assuring them
that the important key must be lying close
at hand. All in vain.

At last the German said,—

“Rather than linger here, we will climb
the wall.”

“We will have to venture,” assented Robert,
“high as the wall is. Growing on the other
side there are climbing plants by which we
can easily descend.”

~ Isidor attempted to dissuade them.

“No danger yet. Wait! We shall cer-
tainly find it.”

At this moment a slight rustling was heard
behind a large, dark clump of trees; again the
same sound, but louder.

' “What is that?” asked Robert ly
“ Did you hear ?”
Beforé’ any one could reply, the cause was



94, A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

easily enough perceived. The overseer stepped
out from the group of trees, followed by armed
men, and by others carrying cords and fetters.
Fearfully manifest to the friends was the web
of treachery that had been spun around them.
Thus had one man served his hatred, another
his interest ; for this end the prospect of sweet
liberty had been held up before them to tempt
them to flight.

“ Bind the wretches instantly !” commanded
the overseer.

But before the order could be obeyed, the
powerful German had seized the Greek, who
was about to slink away, with a grasp of iron,
and thrown him with such force against the
overseer that both fell to the ground. Robert
snatched a sabre from the hand of a Saracen,
willing to die with his friend. But God
ordered it othérwise. Their resolute, fearless
conduct might have cost more than one life;
but while some of their assailants gave way
before the extraordinary strength of Theobald,
from behind others threw a noose over his
head and Robert's, so that they weré quickly .



IN THE MARKET-PLACE. 95

brought to the ground and their desperate re-
sistance overcome by the force of superior num-
bers. They were bound, they were chained,
for the rage of the overseer knew no limits.

“You cowards!” cried the German scorn-
fully ; “you fell upon us like wolves.”

“Talk,” replied the Saracen, “as long as
you have the power ; soon enough will you be
silent as the grave.”

They were cast into prison, and passed the
night there in fetters. They slept not, but
each confessing his sins prayed to God for
pardon ; and they vowed together for no fear
of death to deny their Saviour. Thus they
prepared themselves for the end, which they
had every reason to expect with certainty.

CHAPTER XII.
IN THE MARKET-PLACE OF ALEXANDRIA.

On the following day a public crier proclaimed
to the people of Alexandria the punishment
which thé two runaway slaves of the governor



96 IN THE MARKET-PLACH.

were condemned to undergo. Each was sen-
tenced to receive two hundred blows with
a stick, having previously been scourged.
How the populace thronged to see!

With firm and courageous mien the un-
fortunate men stood awaiting ignominy and
death. Near them were the chief of the po-
lice and his underlings, the overseer, whose
eyes sparkled with vindictive pleasure as he
surveyed his victims, and Isidor, the Greek,
carrying the long bamboo reeds. The latter
‘was at once shy and audacious, with the con-
scious manner of a traitor. Some zealous
Mussulmans were mocking and insulting the
slaves because they were Christians.

The attendants of the chief of police pre-
pared themselves to fulfil their office. The

sharp scourges, made of cords twisted to- | -

gether, lay prepared to do their cruel work;
already the light upper-garments of the cap-
tives had been taken off, leaving breast, neck,
and back uncovered. Suspended about his
neck Robert wore a plain, little wooden cross
—a memento of his childhood which he had



IN THE MARKET-PLACE. . 97

caretully preserved ; on the upper part of his
arm was observed a large heart-shaped spot of
a, fiery red colour.

The scourges were raised.

“Hold, hold, in the name of the Prophet !”
cried the voice of a man from amid the mul-
titude.. The minions of the law involuntarily
paused.

A powerful man of noble and grave aspect
pressed forward, closely followed by a boyish- _
looking youth. 7

“Tt is the wise Frankish physician,” mur-
mured some of the bystanders. ‘“ That slen-
der boy is his assistant.” .

“Tn the name of the Prophet,” repeated
the physician, “stop! Do not strike!”

“Tow? What presumption is this, unbe-
_liever ?” cried the overseer, with wrath. “Do
you dare to interrupt the course of justice 4”

“T entreat you, let me speak a word with
you,” said the Frank. “Grant a reprieve of
but one hour, and I will bring you a pardon.”

“Not a moment's delay,” shouted the Sar-

acen. “Away, insolent man!—You there!
(936) 7



98 IN THE MARKET-PLACE.

eut those slaves, that they may learn what. it
_is to have a master.”

“Oh, they will strike!” cried the youth who
attended the physician, clinging to his master as
if he were under the influence of mortal fear.

The physician did not allow himself to be
rebuffed by the threatening words and ges-
tures of the Saracen; the agonizing cry of
the boy seemed to call forth all his intre-
pidity. Instead of turning away, he went
close to Robert, threw his arm around him,
covered him with his mantle, and said, loudly
and impressively,—

“Send for Muley Ismael; he will be my
' warrant. Strike now at your peril!”

This appeal to the eldest of the merchants—
a wealthy and influential man, who, as was
well known, also stood very high in the regards
of the governor—would have had no little
weight on any other occasion. Now, however,
angry passions had been so excited that no
opposing consideration could be listened to.

The overseer’s actions were those of a man
erazy with rage.



IN THE MARKET-PLACE. 99

“Hear him not!” he yelled out. ‘“ What
does the Christian dog know of a man like
Muley Ismael? Drag himaway! Strike him
down !—Mussulmans, do not allow your law
to be insulted! Kill the unbelievers, all of
them together !”

At length the seething, tumultuous crowd
gave way, and became hushed at the appear-
ance of a dignified, venerable old man. -

What a sudden change! The danger was
over. It was immediately remembered that
the Frank had appealed to the testimony~of
this highly-respected personage. He stood be-
fore them, and every one waited impatiently
to see whether or not he would justify the
bold words of the Christian.

The chief of the merchants saluted the
crowd, all reverentially making way for him
to pass. Full of astonishment, he approached
the physician, whom the Saracens released
from their hold.

_“My dear friend,” said the merchant, “in
what a position do I find you!”

“Praised be God that you are come 1” re-



100 IN THE MARKET-PLACE.

turned the Frank, drawing a deep breath.
“In this Christian slave, who was about to
undergo the most terrible punishment for an
attempt at flight, he is found! In vain I im-
plored a delay, and gave your name as my
warrant; you have seen what was the result.
I entreat you, if you. believe that you owe me
any thanks, save him, save him !”

« Are you certain that it is he?”

“ Unmistakably,” the physician’s assistant
quickly answered; “it is entirely beyond
doubt.” :

The physician himself, however, turned to
Robert and asked him in the French tongue,—

_ “What is your country?”

“France.”

«Your native city?”

“ Marseilles.”

“Then you are the son of—

“The merchant Raymond. Seventeen years
ago, having joined with other boys of France
in a crusade to the Holy Land, we were be-
trayed and made captive here. But who are
you? Why do you take so warm an interest



Full Text


Ms


The Baldwin Library

Rm B University


THE BOY CRUSADERS.


: "*Take me; but spare these-others!’”

- Page 61.
BoY CRUSADERS



A JOYFUL SURPRISE

Page 106

T. NELSON AND Sons

London, Edinburgh, and New York
THE
Boy CRUSADERS

Robert of Marseilles



T. NELSON AND ‘SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New Vork





1898
CONTENTS.



i, THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE AT MARSEILLES,
ll, THE MERCHANTS OFFER, ....
III, A FRIEND'S PERSUASION,
Iv, THE DECISION, ie ne La
V. FAREWELL TO HOME, .... as
VI. OUT AT SEA, ...- ae Een Bs
VII, THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP,
VIII. ON A HOSTILE SHORE,
IX. SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM,
X. A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM,
XI, A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT,
“XII, IN THE MARKET-PLACE OF ALEXANDRIA,
XIII. A JOYFUL SURPRISE,
XIV. A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE, Se
XV. SWEET HOME, .... Pe: oe

XVI. LIGHTS AND SHADOWS, .... aves

14
21
27
33
37
43

64
82
84

105
115
123
126



THE BOY CRUSADEKS:



CHAPTER I.

THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE
AT MARSEILLES.

I ORE than six hundred years ago a

report spread through the populous
and influential old city of Marseilles that a
host of boys had gathered in the neighbour-
hood of Vendéme for the purpose of delivering
Jerusalem—the city where our Lord laboured
and died—from the hands of the Saracens. A’
shepherd-boy, Stephen by name, had kindled
the hearts of all these youths to a high pitch
of enthusiasm, giving out that the Lord Him-
self had appeared to him in the form of a poor
pilgrim, and endowed him with full power as
10 THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE.

a preacher of the cross; and many wonders
were said to have been wrought by this
youth, especially at the shrine of St. Denys.
Thousands of boys had flocked around him—
not those of his own class alone, but sons of dis-
tinguished families—forsaking home, parents,
brothers, sisters, and friends in the firm re-
solve to make a crusade in the Holy Land
under a leader thus divinely appointed, and
to deliver the sacred tomb of Christ from the.
heathen.

Some condemned it as a foolish undertaking,
which King Philip Augustus, as well as the
learned masters of the University of Paris,
had wisely refused to encourage; but the
majority believed it to be a movement in-
spired by Heaven. They said that God Him-
self had aroused the children, and entrusted to
their faith His work, which so many kings,
princes, and experienced warriors had in vain
striven to perform.

Of such a nature was the conversation which
passed in a wine-house in Marseilles on an
August day in 1212, A large number were
THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE. Il

assembled there—native and foreign mer-
chants, ship-masters, wealthy artisans, public
officials, regular and chance frequenters of
the house—and all were deeply interested in
the subject. =

Among the foreign merchants there were
two who had been for several weeks in Mar-
‘geilles, and who had lying in the harbour
several large ships not yet laden. Nothing
was known of them except that they appeared
wealthy; and this reputation being justified
by a rather free expenditure on their part,
they were received by the citizens with re-
spectful consideration. Their exterior, how-
ever, was scarcely calculated to awaken con-
fidence. The soul of a candid, benevolent
man looks forth from his eyes: in these men
the spirit seemed to hide itself, or to express
itself only by sharp and cunning looks. Both
had their features disfigured—the one by a
deep, crooked scar across his face; the other
by the loss of an eye, which was replaced by
a black patch. Thus they resembled rough,
war-worn soldiers rather than peaceable mer-

4
12 THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE.

chants. One was named Hugo Ferrens; the
other—the one-eyed man—Wilhelm Porcus.
They were Sicilians.

And now an unusual commotion was heard
without. The passers in the street were at
every moment thronging closer and more
rapidly forward. The cause of the excite-
ment was not yet quite intelligible, but
through the confused mingling of voices the
joyful cry was heard,— -

“They are coming! they are coming !”

It was evident that something very unusual
was at hand, and the company in the wine-
house were immediately seized by the general
excitement.

“Perhaps the time has come,” said Porcus,
raising his voice ; “‘ perhaps the host is already
approaching.” He beckoned to his companion ;
they saluted the company and pressed out into
the crowd.

And now a rider appeared, galloping, covered
with dust, his face glowing. Upon a white
flag, which he waved high~in the air, was a
cross embroidered in red. Horse and rider
Le ee ee

THE ARRIVAL OF THE CRUSADE. 18

were immediately so closely surrounded that
further progress was impossible.

After the breathless herald had recovered
himself a little, he cried aloud,—

““God’s blessing be upon you, burghers of
Marseilles! I have desired to be the first
to announce to you the coming of the most
wonderful army in the world. Thirty thou-
sand brave boys—truly the flower of all
France—are following on foot, conducted by
the young Stephen, the divinely enlightened,
the leader attested by wonderful miracles, who .
has been called to destroy the heathen as
David did Goliath—to cut them off root and
branch, great and small. Citizens of Marseilles,
the crusading army send you this flag of peace
and greeting. They hope that you will
hospitably allow them to remain among you
until the time and opportunity shall arrive for
their embarkation for the Holy Land.”

This address was received with almost
universal shouts of rejoicing. The flag, which
the rider threw among the people, was im-
mediately torn into shreds, for which the
14 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

multitude fought, those who obtained them
carefully carrying them away as relics.

CHAPTER II. _
THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

Amone the throng which curiosity had drawn
outside the city to watch the coming of the
young crusaders was Robert Raymond, the
son of a Marseilles silk merchant. He had
climbed a tree in order the better to see the
long procession.

What a strange sight! Thousands of boys
marched slowly, in exact order, to the singing
ofahymn. Banners of white silk, embroidered
in red with the cross and glittering with gold
and silver borders, fluttered above the foremost
ranks. Not far behind these was seen an open
chariot richly draped with costly stuffs, and sur-
rounded by fifty young halberdiers, mounted
and bearing arms. Directly in front of the
chariot some twenty boys were swinging silver
censers, while others carried long wax-candles.
THE MERCHANTS OFFER. 15

Upon the elevated seat of the vehicle sat the
leader of the crusade, the shepherd-bdy Stephen,
a slender and delicate youth, with a countenance
pale, but lighted up by flashing eyes, which
gave him an expression of more mature age >
than was indicated by his boyish figure,

Young Raymond was deeply moved.

“O Lord,” he sighed, in the earnestness of
his heart, “what a wonderful grace Thou hast
bestowed upon this poor shepherd-boy! Iam

already fourteen years old, and what have I
done to glorify Thee ?”

Stephen was simply clad. Only a narrow
gold band confining his clustering, dark-brown
hair, and a golden cross embroidered upon hig
short and light pilerim’s mantle, betokened
the boy’s office and dignity. In his hand he
held a cross made of two thin sticks joined
together. With a clear, shrill voice he gave
out the following hymn, which was repeated, —
line after line, by the rest of the boys :—

“O Lord, restore Thy cross—the true, the glorious ;
Lord God, exalt Thy people by Thy might ;

Be Thy strong arm o’er heathendom victorious,
And shield us for Thy holy tomb who fight,”
16 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

Most of the boys looked well and cheerful,
having thus far been able to withstand the
hardships of the route; their expression was
that of joyful enthusiasm. Hach one wore a
red cross upon his garments, and they bore
pilgrims’ staves and wallets; but very few
were armed. <

To this youthful band, gathered from all
parts of France, and composed partially of
children of families of rank, but principally
of shepherd-lads, a number of older pilgrims
had joined themselves, led by a similar faith
in the wonderful gifts of the saintly boy.

As the procession passed close to the tree
upon which young Raymond had stationed
himself, he recognized his dearest friend, the
son of a merchant of Avignon. They had

been educated together during several years.

Robert could not restrain a cry of pleasure,
and Henry, hearing his own name, and re-
" cognizing his friend’s voice, looked up quickly.
Their eyes met. Robert Raymond could have
sprung from the tree into the arms of his

friend. He descended as quickly ag he was
(936)
THE MERCHANTS OFFER. 17

able, and slipped nimbly through the crowd,
making his way in the direction of Henry,
who could not leave the ranks even for a
minute.

The crusaders did not enter the city, as it
had been expected they would do—how could
so great a number have found lodgment there ?
—but they endeavoured to make themselves
comfortable outside of the walls. The season
and the mild, pleasant weather favoured an
encampment in the open air.

As had been the case at other places, the ,
people came flocking from far and wide to
offer their alms and food; for these children
of the cross had no abundant supply of any-
thing except faith. Pious women and maidens
brought them silver and gold pieces, and be-
sought them to remember the givers before
God at the holy sepulchre; others asked for
some little relic, to be given when they should
return, if only a twig or a dry leaf from the
country where the Lord had dwelt more than
a thousand years before.

The delicate but heroic shepherd-boy, whom

(936) ~ 9
18 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

his followers honoured as a saint, was the chief
object of curiosity and admiration. People
thought themselves happy in being permitted
merely to touch his garments. The magnifi-
cent drapery of his chariot was spread as a
tent for him in the centre of the camp, and
this tent was surrounded by the fifty young
halberdiers as guards.

Even before the messengers of the citizens
of Marseilles had conveyed their greetings
and their offerings to the leader of the
crusaders, the Sicilian merchants Porcus and
Ferrens had urged their way into his pres-
ence, easily finding him, from his peculiar,
surroundings. With uncovered heads and
reverential mien they approached the young
shepherd, who was gazing longingly past
Marseilles toward the sea. Both of the mer-
chants bent the knee before him, saying,—

“ Holy youth, permit us to express our _
veneration for thee.”

“Bow not before me,” replied Stephen,
“but before God alone, whose power has
inspired and prepared me for the work.”
THE MERCHANTS OFFER. 19

Porcus and Ferrens arose.

“We bow before Him in the person of His
holy one. Thou worker of wonders, whose
glance can read our hearts as certainly as
thine arm will overthrow the Saracens, per-
mit us fully to explain the purpose which
brings us before thee. We are Sicilian mer-
chants, and have acquired abundant wealth
by a perilous, laborious life. On coming to
Marseilles a short time ago to freight our
vessels with merchandise, we heard the won-
derful report of this crusade, which is destined
to.be held in glorious remembrance as long as
the world shall stand. The Holy Spirit, who
called thee for this work, touched our hearts
also, and we immediately agreed, for the
honour of Christendom, to be useful to the
best of our ability to thee and to the crusading
army. Wilt thou now tell us in what manner
ye hope to reach the Promised Land? Have
ye ships ready for the voyage ? or, if they are
not provided, is there money et for that
purpose ?”

“ Not yet,” replied the shepherd-lad. “We
20 THE MERCHANTS OFFER.

have little or no money. Why should we
have it? Did not the Lord Himself appear
to me and command me to preach the cross ?
If, then, it is His will that we should deliver
the sepulchre of our Saviour, He will surely
bring us to the Land of Promise, even if His
angels themselves must, bear us across the sea.”

“This is the language of a prophet! Such
are the words we expected to hear!” cried —
Porcus and Ferrens, as if carried away by
admiration. “ But permit us, before all others,
to be the instruments of His will—His angels
who shall convey you dry-shod across the sea.
We have ships enough to receive all the host
—a freight more precious than all the mer-
chandise of the world; grant us the favour of
carrying deliverance to the oppressed Christians
of the Holy Land. In but a few days all will
be ready, for we were prepared in advance for
this event. In the meantime the army can
enjoy needed repose.”

Stephen clasped his hands, raised them to
heaven, and exclaimed aloud,—

“ Lord, I knew that Thou wouldst not for-
A FRIEND'S PERSUASION. ~ 21

sake us!” Then turning to the merchants,
he said, ‘Christian men and brethren, ye will
be blessed for this deed. Ye will have part in
the rescue of the holy cross for which we
struggle. Do now as seems good to you.
Think not of our repose: we wish, we need,
no rest until our work is accomplished.”

As Porcus and Ferrens returned to the city
the ringing of the vesper-bell sounded through
the air. They turned their eyes to the camp
and saw the host of children upon their knees
in prayer to God. The soft, golden light of
evening rested upon their young heads.

“If we believed in an almighty God—”
said. Porcus.

“Folly!” answered his companion. “ That
will do for dolts and children: we are men.”

CHAPTER III.

A FRIEND'S PERSUASION,

Ler us return to the moment when the -'

young friends found themselves standing
22 A FRIEND'S PERSUASION.

face to face. They wept from mingled
joy and pain, knowing that the sorrow of
parting must so soon follow the happiness of
meeting.

“You too are going to the Promised Land?”
asked. Robert, with emotion, regarding the
slicht form of his friend, who was a whole
year younger than himself.

_ The eyes of the younger lad shone dunsueb
his tears at the-question,

“Yes, Robert; I and all the rest are
travelling to the Promised Land. Oh, if I
could tell you what I have felt! I am so
happy! When I shall kneel by: the tomb of
the Redeemer; when I shall walk the streets
that He has trodden; when, in the holy scenes
of His passion, I shall feel as I ought His great
love, His unchangeable faithfulness toward all
mankind,—then I shall willingly lay down my
life, even should the heathen slay me with
all their tortures. The Saviour, the Son of
God Himself—did He not die on the cross?”

“But thou art so young,” said Robert, in
distress—‘ so young to meet certain death.”
A FRIEND'S PERSUASION. ' —° 23

“But who can tell that?” cried Henry
earnestly. “Are we not called of God to
deliver the holy sepulchre? Are we not
led by the wonder-working hand of His holy
one? See! When I first heard of a crusade
to be undertaken. against the Saracens by
us boys, it all seemed strange and foolish to
me; but his words have made it all clear.
When I heard him speak I received courage
to fight against the heathen with these poor
fellows. Oh, love makes one strong indeed !
And since I .know the life of our divine
Redeemer, all that any human being can
do or suffer seems poor and trifling. Yes,
we shall conquer, we shall raise the cross
above that holy tomb. Jesus the youth
drove the money-changers from the temple
of His Father: we shall drive the unbelievers
from the shrine of our Lord. The distress of
Christian pilgrims has so long appealed in
vain to the hearts of their brethren that
God has put weapons into the hands of us
boys, to the shame of cowardly and hesitating
men. What need has the Almighty of our
2A, A FRIEND'S PERSUASION.

human strength? Through our weakness
shall the name of God the Father and the
Son be glorified.”

Robert listened with admiration and amaze-
ment to the words of his enthusiastic friend.
They took an irresistible hold upon him. He
pressed Henry’s hand, saying,—

‘You have chosen'well. I, too, can feel His
love and the power of His Spirit. Oh, if I
could but go with you and fight beside you,
my friend! When I was sitting up in the tree
yonder and looking down at that pale, slight
shepherd-boy who has trusted himself to the
Lord, I trembled all over and felt a heat like
that of a sunbeam. It was as if some new
life had awakened in my heart.”

“Tt was indeed the divine admonition that
came to you,” replied Henry, “and you must
not refuse to heed the voice that commands
you to go with us.” 7

“ And leave my parents ?”

Henry turned away weeping.

“O my mother! my mother!” he cried.

“If I but dared!” cried Robert, “ Must I
A FRIEND’S PERSUASION. OB

stay here and only dream of all your wonder-
ful deeds, your victories? The banners will
fly ; Stephen leads the way, and nothing will
be able to withstand you, until you shall take
possession of that holy place. How will
millions of pilgrims bless you for ages to
come! Dear Henry, what shall I do?”

“ Were Stephen with us,” answered the boy,
“he might tell you, for in him lives the Spirit
of God. You are awakened, you are called;
you must forsake all things, and have but
one thought, one love, one will. And if father
or mother would detain you, G'od is more than

father and mother. He who receives the call
dares on no account excuse himself. Stephen
-has told us, and he is an apostle of truth. Is
it not the highest honour that God should +
confide such a work to our feeble arms ?”

“Leave me but a day or two,” entreated
Robert ; “first let me hear what my father says
about-it. When do ycu expect to embark ?”

“We do not yet know in what ships we
are to sail; I trust allo God’s guidance. He
will let us know when the time comes.”
26 A FRIEND'S PERSUASION.

“And must you remain here?” asked
Robert. ‘ Will you not rather go home with
me in the meantime ?”

“T cannot separate myself from the other

- boys,” replied Henry. ‘“ And how can I know
whether your father favours our holy enter-
prise? for many noble and distinguished men
have rebuked us as childish enthusiasts, and
done all in their power to hinder us in our
work.—O Son of God, who died on the cross
for us, thou Being of holiest, truest love, Thou
seest into our hearts. Thou knowest for what
we strive ; Thou knowest whether pure love to
Thee reigns in our souls, so that we would give
up all—alJ—for Thee, and only die at Thy feet.
“What do we other than Thy holy word com-
‘mands? We have left all behind—parents,
family, friends, and home—to strive together
for Thy heavenly kingdom, for the salvation of
our own and others’ souls. Give us love; give
us the faith that removes mountains, that all
may know how strong and mighty Thou art in ~
us feeble creatures.”

The young Depts beat against each see
THE DECISION. Q7

the young eyes overflowed, and their tears
were mingled.

“Farewell, Henry. We shall soon meet
again.”

«Oh, let us both live and die for the cross,”
cried Henry. “Let us repay the love of the
crucified One.”

Robert pressed his hand again.

“ Nothing shall separate us,” he said.

CHAPTER IV.
THE DECISION.

Youne Raymond went home with a firm re-
solve immediately to ask his father’s consent
to his going. But the words died away
upon his tongue: he had never seen his
father in so gloomy a mood. He was silent,
therefore, ‘and’ awaited a more favourable
opportunity.

- On that same evening the merchant re-
ceived a visit from a friend, who had a great
deal of news to impart. Among the rest, he
Seas THE DECISION.

told how Porcus and Ferrens had engaged
to convey the crusaders to the Holy Land
in their ships, free of cost, for the love of God.

“Then is the measure of folly full!” burst
from the silk-merchant’s lips. “Boys who
have run away from parents and teachers,
and men who have become childish, or per-
haps hypocritical scoundrels—God knows—
and who aid this outbreak with all their
powers,—what reasonable man can believe
that this host, were they three hundred
thousand instead of thirty, could drive the
Saracens from Jerusalem?” —

Robert was cut to the heart on hearing his
father’s words. If he might have ventured to
reply, how gladly would he have told him
that the power of the Lord was in the arms
of these children—that it was for their faith
that such wonderful gifts were bestowed upon
them ! . Sie
_ Raymond went on,—

“YT, for my part, cannot understand such
blindness. Those who are flattering boyish
vanity and promoting this work of a heated
THE DECISION. 29

fancy are certainly drawing a bitter curse
down upon their own heads. Our Lord and
Saviour chose men, not children, to be His
apostles.” ;

“ And it is not enough that these children
should go,” said the friend, “but I hear that
in Burgundy, and in Germany too, a multi-
tude of boys and girls are preparing for a
crusade, and have indeed set out.”

“ Nothing,” rejomed the merchant, “is
more illusive than example, even if that ex-
ample be the most thoughtless in the world.
A. fool always finds imitators. These rash
ones, you may be sure, will one day bitterly
repent their folly.” :

“The strangest thing is,” continued the
visitor, “that there are grown people so car-
ried away that they have joined the crusade

-as pilgrims to aid in celebrating the expected
victory and, triumph.”

The merchant laughed bitterly.

“ Just so. The seed of folly must come to
its full a before God’s angel of pune
ment can cut it down,” he said.
30 THE DECISION,

Robert’s mother was silent during this con-
versation. Her mind was undecided. She
honoured the sagacity of her husband, yet
how could she condemn the heroic faith of
the children? If this enthusiasm was not of
God, whence did it spring ?

With deep distress Robert perceived how
much his ideas and those of his father were
at variance. . If he had dared to speak, and
freely to express all that was in his heart—
all his humble love for his Saviour and for
all mankind! Why should the Lord of all
the worlds no longer do wonders for the
glory of His holy name? He prayed to God
to change the feelings of his father, and to
make himself more “worthy of the holy en-
terprise. In his dreams that night he again
saw the passing of the brave and blooming
young army, the shepherd-boy leading in the
hymn of the cross. Brightly gleamed the
pinnacles of Jerusalem; the banners floated
on high. How loud were the shouts of
‘triumph! How gloriously shone the cross,
brighter and ever brighter, until it shed a
THE DECISION. 31

flood of heavenly radiance, and the happy,
triumphant children knelt around the holy
sepulchre.

Thus closed the eventful day with such a
bright and beautiful dream, leading the boy’s
fancy onward and ever onward, until his bur-
dened spirit was lulled into peace. All fled
with the morning light. His father’s anger
stood menacingly between him and the Prom-
ised Land.

On the following day a party of the young
crusaders, including Stephen himself, entered
the city. Porcus and Ferrens had invited
them, with several of the most distinguished
citizens, to a banquet on board one of their
ships. The populace thronged eagerly around
to see the young heroes face to face, and a
thousand blessings were called down upon
their heads. Flowers were strewn in their
way, and the people everywhere greeted them
enthusiastically as the deliverers, the helpers,
of all Christendom.

Nor were the names of Porcus and Ferrens
forgotten. The intentions of these merchants
Jae THE DECISION.

were quickly made known to the citizens, and
the magnanimous Christian pair could scarcely
receive sufficient praise. How many youths
of Marseilles stood around with longing looks,
weeping for shame! But, alas! this day was
to call forth many more bitter and unavailing
tears in that city.

Robert’s feelings were a mixture of joy and
pain, love, longing, fear, and hope. He dared
not confide in his father. That clear-sighted
man had never yet been agitated by so great
and so sorrowful indignation as in these days
upon witnessing events which he could not
but regard as springing from unreason, and
fated to be utterly disastrous. With the
mother it was otherwise. When Robert, with
sparkling eyes, described to her the festal pro-
cession, the hopeful animation of the boys, she
said with deep emotion,—

“God help them! TI cannot say that their
undertaking is wise; yet that they should for-
sake all things to fight for the glory of the
Saviour among the wild heathen—that every
human heart must comprehend.”
FAREWELL TO HOME. 383

The son did not venture to make known
his purpose to her, although in these words
he found a half consent to it, and was thereby
much strengthened in his resolve. When he
again met Henry, the day had been appointed
for the embarkation of the crusade. The
Sicilian merchants had hastened the necessary
preparations, which alacrity tended much to
exalt their Christian zeal in the eyes of most
of the citizens. :

The cheerful confidence with which Henry
spoke of the future—his firm faith that God
Himself had appointed them to this crusade—
fixed Robert’s determination ; he hesitated no
longer. The two boys fell on their knees,
and, hand in hand, looking up to heaven,
vowed to devote their lives to the defence of
Christendom.

CHAPTER V.
FAREWELL TO HOME.

Tu last night under the father’s roof had

come. Robert tossed restlessly upon his
(936) 3
34 FAREWELL TO HOME.

couch ; sleep came not. All was still around
him ; only his heart beat wildly, his pulses
throbbed as with fever. Silently the boy
arose and knelt. He thought long of his
father, his mother, and his little sister, not
yet two years old; then he looked up to the |
image of the Crucified, and said, weeping,—

“Thou most faithful Saviour, if it be Thy .
will that I should give up father, mother, and
sister to follow Thee and to glorify Thy name
among the heathen in distant lands, then,
Lord Jesus Christ, with Thy love and power
stand by me. Forsake me not, feeble boy
though I am.”

What power there is in prayer poured forth
from a sincere heart! Robert felt it; he
could have believed that the face of the Re-
deemer shone down upon him with wondrous,
holy tenderness. For a long time he lay
motionless, then arose, strengthened, and
quietly sought his bed. His earlier years—
the days of his happy childhood—passed
before his vivid imagination, until at length,
exhausted, he fell into a deep slumber,
FAREWELL TO HOME. 85

So at last the momentous day dawned—
the day fixed for the embarkation of the
young crusaders. All Marseilles was in
commotion. Who would have missed a
sight so unique? All who were able brought
alms and provisions, that they might not lose
their share and their reward in the great
_ work. The young heroes of the faith were
greeted with cheers as they moved, singing,
toward the quay. Their path was as yet
over flowers—perhaps only so much the
longer to be set with thorns. With what
joy their faces were lighted up! There lay
the great ships prepared to bear them away
to the Holy Land. High in the air the
streamers floated gaily, as though quivering
with impatience, and stretching themselves
out toward the goal. Some hundreds of
ecclesiastics, all distinguished by wearing the
red cross, had joined the youthful army. Its
numbers had been swelled by many children
of Marseilles and its vicinity. Most of these
had enrolled themselves secretly against the
will of their parents.
36 FAREWELL TO HOME.

When the shepherd-boy came in sight of
the sea he fell on his knees and prayed
aloud; his example was followed by the
whole train. The boys were then received
by a large number of distinguished citizens,
who had come out from the port to meet
them, with the Sicilian merchants. Skiffs
with festal decorations were lying ready to
convey them to the vessels. Amid the cheers
of the crowd Stephen first stepped into one of
these boats; the rest followed, and in about
an hour all the crusaders were on board.

The last skiff returned; the anchor was
weighed ; the wind filled the sails; the fleet
moved off. Friends, family, parents, father-
land—all, all were left behind.

The boys crowded the decks to greet once
more the land of home. From the shore re-
sounded a thousand-voiced blessing; there
were calls, there was waving of signals. But
as the ships with the host of children gailed
faster and farther away over the sea, many a
heart was heavy, many an eye grew moist.

One in the crowd covered hig face with
OUT AT SHA. 37

his hands and wept bitterly. It was the silk-
merchant, Raymond. His soul was bowed
to the earth with grief. Had he then any
misgiving that with every moment his only
son was receding farther and farther from
him ? |

CHAPTER VI.
OUT AT SEA.

Ropert gazed fixedly toward the horizon:
there Marseilles had disappeared. Marscilles!
Oh, what meaning in that name! It com-
prehended all the love the boy’s life had
ever been blessed with. He seemed to
see his father and his mother bowed down
with grief; he heard his little sister call his
name; she stretched out her dimpled arms
for him, while his parents said amid their
tears,—

“What-a return for our love!”

Oh, could Robert have spoken but one
word, one single word, or exchanged but
one look of farewell! But it was too late;

‘
38 OUT AT SEA.

the broad sea lay like a mighty gulf between
them, and swallowed up every ery of gratitude
and love.

“ My Saviour, what have I done?” sighed
the boy, in anguish. He felt some one touch
his shoulder, and, turning, saw behind him
the wonder-working shepherd-lad, who said,
with an earnest look in his bright eyes,—

«Why dost thou waver? The Lord sends
his angels hither and thither across the seas.
Oh that thou couldst but see the heavenly
hosts at the feet. of the Crueified—the ten
times ten thousand who have drawn their
- flaming swords against the heathen!” —

Robert raised his eyes; at. the words of the
enthusiastic boy he thought he saw the light
from the shining wings of the ten times ten
thousand flashing down upon them from the
blue sky.

Stephen continued,—

“Tord and Saviour, Thou who hast re-
vealed Thyself unto me, oh, strengthen this
and all other fearful souls! Anoint the dim
eyes with the heavenly dew of Thy. grace,
OUT AT SEA. 39

that they may see the crown awaiting him
that overcometh !”

“ Amen! amen!” responded a third boyish
voice—that of Henry. He extended his hand
to Robert. ‘Every rolling wave brings us
nearer to the Promised Land. I would I
had wings, that I might hasten onward!
France, which I have left behind, is no
longer my home; yonder it lies—Jerusalem.
The glorious, loving Christ, whom we follow,
is my all and my only One.”

Robert, observing now for the first time
his friend’s pale and emaciated countenance,
- anxiously inquired,—

“ But are you not ill, Henry ?”

The boy smiled.

“JT have never beem so well. And I shall
not die until I shall have seen Jerusalem and
Mis tomb.”

The sound of the mid-day bell called them
all on deck.

The ship in which were Stephen, Robert,
and Henry was the largest and most import-
ant of the little fleet—its admiral-ship. Porcus
40) OUT AT SEA.

and Ferrens also were on board of her. With
surprise the boys saw a great number of
foreigners, who now for the first time made
their appearance. The crew, which was very
numerous, consisted of men of savage and
formidable aspect, who spoke for the most
part in a language unknown to the boys.

Robert could not but say to himself,—

“Tf the heathen are like these men, we
poor boys shall indeed stand in need of divine
assistance.”

The first day passed quickly for the boys
in the contemplation of the manifold novelties
that met their eyes. The most delightful
weather favoured their passage. Cloudless,
in pure and serene blue, the sky stretched
above their heads. The evening sun shone
magnificently, blending the heavens and the
sea in one blaze of glory. The scene shifted.
Countless myriads of golden stars shone forth.
What eye could take in the horizon or receive
all the glory of this grand display? Long
lines of glittering light quivered upon the
_ waves where they reflected the image of the
OUT AT SEA. 4d

moon. Oh, gentle, wonderful repose of a
summer twilight cooled by the softest zephyrs
of night ! :

Robert still remained on deck; his young
and susceptible soul felt the breathing of God
that pervaded His grand and pure creation.
All trembling and fear, all regret and pain,
were laid to rest; of only one thing was the
boy conscious—that he was in the hand of
the Lord. In such a mood as that the poor
and needy soul of man grows strong and
learns to tremble before nothing except the
Almighty.

In the hinder-part of the ship stood Porcus
and Ferrens conversing in alow tone. They
had seen many such nights, and their hearts
were hardened against the beauties of Nature.

“Tn seven days,” remarked Ferrens, “if
the wind continues fair, we shall reach our
destination.”

“We are the shrewdest merchants that
ever lived,” rejoined Porcus. “if we have
ten more lucky years in this business, we
may sit down at our ease.”
42 OUT AT SEA.

“That,” rephed Ferrens, “I never want.
to do. I want to be active and earn money
as long as I live. I hate repose.”

“ And then?” asked Porcus.

“TJ don’t understand you,” said Ferrens.

“T often have strange ideas,” said Poreus.
“What a pity that we must die!”

“That sort of ideas,” said Ferrens, “I put
entirely out of my head.”

“Do you know,” Poreus continued, “ that
the simplicity of these children has some-
times made me pity them? When I look
at them I remember that, once I had a son.
He fell mto the sea and was drowned—my
only child !” :

“What is gone is gone,” replied Ferrens,
with indifference. See

“Tf I only- knew what that ‘gone’ means!
These children would say he is gone to God,
but to us that only seems an idle fashion of
speech. I saw him fall into the deep and
sink ; and there, at the bottom of the sea, the —
fishes have long since torn the flesh from the
bones. Whoever lies there, that is the end
THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. 48

of him; as to going to God from so many
fathoms under the water, it is absurd. And
yet if I could believe it as these children do,
I should be far happier.”

“This is only foolish speculation,” said Fer-
rens; “it leads to nothing. Let us go and
sleep.”

“Tt is only now and then,” returned his
companion, “that I think of such things. I
do not fear death, and yet there are times
when I shudder at the thought of it, and
wonder whether it is the same thing to a
pious man as to one like us.”

“Dying is dying,” answered Ferrens; “all
flesh feels alike. Do you suppose a religious
man has different nerves and sinews from
those of a godless one?”

CHAPTER VII.
THE, TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

Tue morning of the second day was as beauti-
fal and bright as the night had been. Toward
4A, THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

mid-day, however, a little cloud was seen far in
the horizon—a little dark cloud that enlarged
with astonishing rapidity, and in-a short time
_ overspread the whole sky with threatening
gloom. The air was so heavy and sultry that
one could breathe but with difficulty. The
wind suddenly changed, tossing the sea into
whirling waves, and making it leap and foam
as with madness ; it went hissing and whistling
through the cordage of the vessels. Heavy
rain-drops mingled with the froth of the sea,
and the distant thunder rolled with long re-
verberations, blending with the sound of wind
and waves.

The sailors hastened to prepare the ships
as well as they could to weather the coming
storm; with practised agility they clambered
over the masts and the yards in spite of the
gale, which tossed them up and down like a
child’s ball. The sails were soon reefed in,
lest the wind, with power aided by their re-
sistance, should capsize the vessels. At the
same time the port-holes were carefully closed
to prevent the dashing in of the high waves.
THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. 45

And now the ships, with their sails bound
close, went like birds whose wings have been
clipped, trembling and quivering before the
dark tempest.

At the threatening approach of the storm
the children anxiously thronged together on
the deck. Their courage and their enthu-
siasm were not equal to the terrors of the
sea. Some fell on their knees and prayed;
others entreated Stephen to call upon God
for them. From how many eyes flowed tears
of the bitterest regret over home and friends
forsaken! If a narrow strip of blue sky
shone through some opening in the clouds,
it seemed to those affrighted souls like the
heavens above the safe but, alas! thought-
lessly-abandoned roof of home—that home
which they should never more behold, though
their arms should be stretched toward it in
the wild longing of despair.

Robert.and Henry stood grasping each
other by the hand.

«“ At least,” exclaimed Robert, “we can

=

die together.”
46 THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

But Henry prayed softly,—

“Control this storm, Lord Jesus Christ;
Thine is the power. Let us not perish until
we have delivered Jerusalem from the hand
of Thine enemies.”

It was not long before the two friends, with
their companions on the ship, were driven
down into the hold. Stephen himself, who
wanted to remain on deck in prayer, was
forced to go below.

“ Pray as much as you will,” said Ferrens,
with undisguised harshness, “but do not stay
here in the way of useful people. You must
have a strong voice if God in heaven can hear
you through such a storm as this.”

A. fearful night! No one can have an .-
-idea of its horrors who has not experienced
a storm at sea. The stoutest heart trembles
_ when the sides of the vessel groan and seem
to give way under the force of the waves;
the weather-beaten cheek pales at the shrill
howling of the blast that stirs up the sea to
its very depths, so that the waves tower on
high; and the impotent vessel now rides on
THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. AT

their summits, and now with fearful haste
shoots down into their cavernous hollows.
The smooth, flattering sea softly swelling at
morning under the light breeze, the unruffled
surface shimmering with a thousand diamond
points under the sunlight, reflecting the azure
above as though the light and beauty were
all its own, now a tremendous abyss, dark,
yawning, unfathomable, as though the fear-
ful monsters that people the lower deep
should open their gaping jaws to swallow
up vessels and human beings in everlasting
oblivion.

Starless was the night—no light, no hope.
The lightning that darted athwart the sky
in every direction only for an instant lit up
the wild chaos with fitful, unearthly brilliance,
so that the dazzled eye might in the next
moment be overwhelmed with darkness all
the more impenetrable. The rain fell thick
and fast from the sky, no longer a blue,
sublime vault, but seemingly hanging low and
flat above their heads. The incessant deluge
mingled with. the foaming waves, and the
48 THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP.

thunder with the roaring of the sea and the
fearful raging of the tempest.

Unhappy ships, rudely tossed between sky
and sea, sport of the unchained elements, be-
low them a mighty, devouring tomb, above no
ray of light, no heavenly blue of hope !

The boys, crowded together in the cabins,
were thrown from one side to the other by
the violent lurching of the ship. During
this night they suffered the terror of death.

Dispirited, powerless, in constant dread of
destruction, hearing its approach whenever
the wind splintered a mast or the waves
caused the timbers to creak and_ shiver,
every moment seemed the last, every new
peril that passed by seemed only to prolong
the agony of dissolution. The shouts of the
sailors overhead, sounding like despairing
cries for aid, gave them no comfort, but only
made them more vividly and dreadfully re-
alize the ever-threatening danger.

Hours passed in mortal terror cannot be
reckoned by minutes. How endlessly long
this night seemed! But morning must fol-
THE TERRORS OF THE DEEP. 49

low the most frightful night; the darkness
must at length yield to the light of day, the
conflict of the elements be at length stilled.
The storm dies away, and the sea grows calm.

Morning came. The sun broke through
the clouds; the wind drove them from the
horizon, dispersed .them, and they melted
away; again the heavenly vault shone in:
undimmed serenity. Gently-rolling waves
bore the ships smoothly over the blue ex-
panse of the sea. Brighter and warmer at
every moment, the sun rose high in the
heavens; but he looked down upon a sad
scene in the little fleet. The pale, weary
children were out.on the deck, where the
sailors, dripping with water, almost entirely
exhausted, still fulfilled their laborious tasks.

The grateful joy of deliverance, the ‘happy
consciousness of a new grant of life, gradually
enlivened their hearts, but not for long.

Of seven. large ships that had left the har-
bour of Marseilles with swelling sails, and
freighted. with high and glad hopes, only

five, half dismantled, now rode toward their
(936) 4
50 ON A HOSTILE SHORE,

goal. During that wild night two had been
driven by the tempest upon a rock on the
coast of the little island of San Pietro, near
Sardinia. They went to pieces, and the sea
swallowed all, sturdy seamen as well as frail
— children.

Thus prematurely ended this crusade for
many, many beloved youths whose tender
mothers at home vainly and hopelessly la-
mented their absence.

CHAPTER VIII.
ON A. HOSTILE SHORE.

“Lanb! land ahead !”

The boys crowded in joyful excitement upon
the deck. After several days and nights filled
with sorrowful thoughts of their lost com-
panions, with whom they might never share .
the holy conflict and the joy of victory,
a line of coast now lay ne before
their eyes.

“There is Palestine! there is Jerusalem,
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 51

where our Lord and Saviour lived and suf.
fered!” the boys shouted.

Stephen fell upon his knees and raised his
eyes devoutly toward heaven. Suddenly he
sprang to his feet, exclaiming, —

“What is the meaning of that?”

The cross, the sign of the Christian faith,
had disappeared, and in its stead the Turkish
crescent floated from the mast,

“You are surprised, no doubt,” said Fer-
rens, approaching Stephen. “The flag is
changed ; danger compels us to hoist one
that is hostile. You imagine that you be-
hold Syria, but we are really nearing the
Egyptian coast, and that city is Alexandria,”

“And why are we here? Why do you
not steer for the open sea, in the direction
of our destination ?”

“Who can withstand the Almighty ?” re-
turned the merchant, “ Such is His will, and
we must submit. You know how severely
our ships were injured by that fearful storm.
Our supply of provisions is consumed, nor
have we sufficient wager for a single day;
52 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

it is impossible for us to continue our journey
toward Syria in such a condition.”

“But here, of all places! Man, what can
you mean ?” | :

“The danger,” replied Ferrens, “appears
greater than it really is. In the first place,
God the Lord, who has called His crusaders,
will surely protect them from danger. As.
concerns myself, I am well known in Alex-
andria; I have wealthy and influential friends
there who will readily supply us with all that
we need. There will be but a few days’ delay,
during which we can obtain provisions and
attend to the repairing of the vessels. Mer-
chantmen, as our ships are, protected by the
flag we are now under, will awaken no sus-
picion. I will be responsible.”

What could the young crusaders do?
They could scarcely help confiding in these
men, who had undertaken so great an enter-
prise with disinterested devotion, merely for
the love of God—men, besides, whose ripe -
experience certainly qualified them to give
the best counsel. There were’ some, indeed, —
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. ~ 58

who cried out earnestly that they would
rather venture upon the high seas, rather
endure hunger and thirst, than be hindered
on their way to Jerusalem; but the majority
silently acquiesced on hearing Ferrens swear
by all that is sacred that there was but ‘one
alternative—land or death. So they drew
near the enemy’s coast, and the five ships lay
at anchor in the harbour near Alexandria.
Except the sailors, all were ordered to
remain below the deck; Ferrens and his
companion went on shore. Late in the
evening they came back in excellent spirits.
Their confident bearing quieted the youths.
“We have found our friends prepared for _
all demands,” they said triumphantly. “ Pro-
visions, money—we have only to ask for what
we want. But first our vessels must be put
in order; and for the short time necessary for
that you must make up your minds to go
on shore. We have made such arrange-
ments that this can be done without the .
slightest danger. You will be carried to
land to-night secretly in boats; the harbour-
54 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

guards are bribed. You could not be more
safe on board the ships than for these few
days on the extensive domains of our friends.”

A few hours later a swarm of little skiffs
came out to the fleet and conveyed the
crusaders to land under cover of night. The
procession was quietly arranged, and the
host, of boys, with some hundreds of older
pilgrims, disposed themselves to follow their
leaders. The bright moonlight showed them
in the distance the beautiful, glimmering out-
lines of the city of Alexandria. Its peculiar
architecture, and all the novel and foreign
scenes around them, awakened the curiosity
of the young crusaders; but with this curi-
osity was mingled a feeling of deep anxiety.
The wanderer usually blesses the signs of
human life, but, to them all was hostile upon
the unknown soil they were treading, and
that labyrinth of houses sheltered as many
enemies as inhabitants.

Leaving Alexandria on one side, they ap-
proached some country residences with many
large out-buildings and gardens, the -estates
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 55

which the merchants had mentioned as those
where the crusaders were to find shelter and
repose for a few days. They found them-
selves expected. Slaves were in waiting to
conduct them into gardens and courtyards
surrounded by high walls, and spacious enough
to accommodate the whole host.

When all had found places, they prepared
to enjoy for the few hours that remained. be-
fore daylight the sleep which they so much
needed. A large number were in a court-
yard, in the middle of which a fountain was
playing with a cool and pleasant sound. —
Here were found Stephen, Robert, Henry, and
part of the older pilgrims who accompanied
the crusade. The richly-adorned tent which
has before been spoken of was pitched for
Stephen close by the fountain; the fifty
halberdiers who had been his guards on the
march through France took their places
around it. Near them lay the young friends
Robert and Henry. After offering up their
nightly prayer in silence, they stretched them-
selves upon the warm sand, using for pillows
56 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

a part of their outer clothing. Above them
the starry, cloudless heavens stretched.

One who had seen the young crusaders
in their night-encampment near Marseilles—
fresh, blooming, strong in hope—would now
have observed a sad change if he had looked
on the weary and enfeebled beings, in so short
a time exhausted, and to some extent discour-
aged, by the horrors of their first sea-voyage.

“Good-night!” said Robert to his friend.
“God grant us a happy morning !”

“ And soon a morning in Jerusalem,” re-
sponded Henry.

Not even the dread of possible danger
could keep any awake; overcome by fatigue,
all were soon wrapped in that profound slum- —
ber which belongs only to youth. They slept;
but the guardian angel of the father’s home,
whom a beautiful faith sees by the couch of
the dutiful child, was not there to watch over
them and to avert evil from them. The first
command of God to children was forgotten by
the many who had secretly left their parents,
and thus abandoned the angel-cuarded home.
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 57.

And now a man who seemed to be asleep
started up as if suddenly awakened ; he rubbed
his eyes and carefully observed the slumber of
his companions. Then he rose, cautiously
moving one limb after another. As quietly
as a shadow he slipped along by the wall, and
silently pushed back the bolt of a narrow
gate. As he stole out the moonlight revealed
his countenance. It was that of Ferrens.

Cautiously as the gate was opened, the
movement awoke Robert, and he sat up.
He could, however, perceive nothing that
appeared suspicious. Looking around upon
the weary sleepers, so noiseless and motion-
_legs, a cold shudder came over him, as if he
had been the only living being among so
many corpses. He lay down again imme-
diately, closed his eyes, and once more fell
asleep. “His dream was painful. Before him
stood his mother; she stroked the hair back
from his brow and said,— —

“Thou hast not been kind to us, Robert.
See how thy parents weep.” |

Robert would have excused himself, but in
58 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

his dream he could find no words, and the hot
tears seemed to seald his cheeks.

“‘Now I can come to thee only in dreams,”
said his mother. ‘ O my child, shall we ever
meet again?”

Then a severe countenance looked down
‘upon Robert ;- it was his father’s, and the boy
could not meet his eyes.

“ Awake, unhappy child!” said the father
sternly; and with the dream-voice mingled
a terrified ery of “Treachery! treachery |”

Robert awoke with that fearful sound ring-
ing in his ears. In the dim light of dawning
day his eyes opened upon a scene of dread.

The whole space unoccupied by the sleepers
was now filled with armed men, whose wild
and warlike aspect alone seemed enough to
overpower the boys. The Saracens first at-
tacked the pilgrims who accompanied the
crusade, and from whom, as men, they had
most reason to expect resistance. These were
speedily disarmed, and such as were still sleep-
ing were bound before they could awaken.
The young halberdiers lying around their
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 59

leader’s tent awoke directly, and seeing the
enemy around them, did their best to de-
fend themselves and Stephen. The struggle
quickly aroused all the remaining’ sleepers,
bringing them to their feet as if a stream of
fire had poured over their heads. The greater
number -were seized by so terrible a panic
that they scarcely knew what they. were
doing; many threw themselves on _ their
knees, pleading for their lives; while others
called, weeping, upon their parents. Fright-
ened out of their heavy sleep and unarmed,
what resistance could they have made?
Added to this, the alarm was increased by
the piercing shouts of the Saracens, who fell
upon their prey with the cry of “ Allah!
Allah!” Similar noises from the surrounding
gardens and courtyards indicated that the
whole host were victims to the surprise.
Stephen in the midst of his guards saw the
danger and felt how small was the hope of de-
liverance ; still he expected miraculous aid.
“My Saviour,” he cried, “my Lord and
my God, if I am indeed Thy prophet, save,
60 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

save us from this peril! Send down Thy fire
: upon the heathen and destroy them !”

At this devout cry of anguish wrung from
their leader’s heart the boys were for a
moment inspired with fresh courage. They
heard the words of their saintly commander
and raised expectant eyes toward heaven,
looking for the flames to fall. But no light-
ning shot through the serene atmosphere.
God was silent. He acknowledged not the
youth who appealed to Him as His prophet.

“Tord, give us not into the hands of our
foes,” entreated Stephen.

A fierce onset was at that moment made
upon him. The young guards, with a faith-
fulness worthy of a happier fate, strove to
protect the sheplierd-lad. The pitiless men
overthrew the boys without mercy.

But scarcely had the first victims fallen in
that barbarian slaughter when Stephen, with ~
firmness and resolution far beyond his years,
broke through the confusion, placed himself
in front of his faithful companions, and cried
with flashing eyes,—
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 61

“Take me—I am the one whom ye seek ;
but spare these others.”

A heroic soul beamed in the youthful coun-
tenance—a spirit formed for a higher and
better destiny. Even the rough soldiers,
struck by its expression, paused for a moment
without laying hands upon him. But only
for a moment could the boy’s noble courage
overawe their barbarous minds; then they
fell upon him and bound his hands firmly
with cords. The golden circlet which de-
noted his dignity as leader of the crusade was
torn from his head and trodden under foot.

Stephen uttered no complaint, nor made
any resistance, though the sharp and rough
bands so painfully confined his limbs. But at
the sight the other boys burst into weeping.
For him all hope was over. If such a fate
was his, what could his followers expect ?

There was no further attempt at resistance ;
the pilgrims, the only ones capable of wielding
arms, had long ago been overpowered, and
thus was the whole crusade at one blow de-
livered into the power of the Saracens..
62 ON A HOSTILE SHORE.

“We must die,” said Robert “O my
mother !”

Henry pressed his hand, saying,—

“Forgive! forgive me! But for me, you
would not have been here.”

“No,” replied the boy ; “it was God’s will,
whatever may become of me now.”

At this moment appeared two men who
were received by the Saracens with respectful
salutations, and by the boys with half-uttered
maledictions. They were Porcus and Ferrens.
Their eyes gloated upon the rich harvest of
their treachery. They spoke with the leaders
of the soldiery, giving further directions.

As they approached Stephen, whose lips
were moving in silent prayer, he raised his
eyes toward heaven, and cried,—

“Cursed for ever be ye, traitors! In the
name of God, a curse upon you and your
children! A shameful death shall ye die in
memory of this hour.”

“Rash boy,” said Porcus, “what should
hinder us from striking off your head at
once? By Mohammed, guard your tongue !”
ON A HOSTILE SHORE. 63

“Call upon your lying Prophet, reprobate
man!” exclaimed the boy; “but the hour
will come when you shall call in vain, your
treacherous tongue stammering his name in
your dying agony.”

“Thou blasphemest the Prophet,” cried
Porcus, “and thou shalt die!”

The threat had almost been fulfilled. A
Saracen who was acquainted with the Frank-
ish tongue at these words swung a sharp sabre
above the head of the shepherd-lad, ready to
slay the victim. But Ferrens caught his arm.

“Hold! Will you rob me of my money @
Who will purchase dead slaves of us? There
are too many killed already. Let them kill
him and quarter him after he is sold. He will
learn soon enough to call on Mohammed.”

“Thou liest, wretched man!” rejoined the
boy angrily. “T call only upon Jesus Christ,
whom I will confess while I have breath.”

Ferrens only said coolly,—

“Lead them all out to the market-place.
Allah has blessed our enterprise. We have
slaves enough for some years.”
64 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

The unhappy captives~were now driven
forth with barbarous. haste, those of mature
~ years in advance, their hands bound, and the
boys in gangs, deprived of what, few weapons
they had, and even of most of their clothing.
Thus ignominiously did that crusade take up
its march, which but a few weeks before had
called forth half of France to greet the deliv-
erers and: defenders of the holy sepulchre.

At the head went the unfortunate Stephen.
Forsaken, abandoned to his enemies, he yet
did not lose faith in his mission. In sign of
_ mockery of him as the leader, the cross had
been pressed into -his fettered hands and a
turban placed upon his head.

CHAPTER IX.
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

Tue crusade of children, together with the
capture of the whole host, was speedily ,
made known throughout Alexandria. Curi- F
osity drew young and old to the slave= -
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 65

market, where so many thousands of Frankish
youths were offered for sale, and with them
some four hundred pilgrims, including about
eighty priests.. Just at this time several’ Sara-
cen princes were sojourning in Alexandria, so
that there was no lack of purchasers. ,

The captives were arranged in ranks and
guarded by armed Saracens. Scarcely had
sufficient clothing been left to the unhappy,
betrayed youths to protect them from the burn-
ing rays of the sun, to which they were so
entirely unaccustomed. What tears had they
shed for those their companions whom the sea
had swallowed up! Now they wept for them-
selves, the survivors, and envied the fate of
the departed. Courage, hope—all was gone.

The treacherous men who had delivered
them into the hands of the heathen walked
about among them unmoved by their distress,
examining their living booty with no thought
save that of their own profit.

“Tf it had not been for that storm!” said
- Porcus. “It is deplorable to think how many ’

we lost. by it, and after such risk, such trouble
(086) 5 :
66 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. ©

and expense! By my faith, when we count
the cost and the loss of the vessels, our gains
are not, after all, so great. We shall have to
set a good price on the Christian hounds.”
_ “They might easily have brought us as high
as a common gallows,” said Ferrens, laughing,
“if any one had chanced to recognize us.”

“Hush! A gallows! The death that I
dread most of all!” :

“Or the people might have spared them-
selves any further trouble by killing us on the
spot. Itis all the same. But an experienced
trader takes all that into consideration. His
well-earned gains are all the sweeter. And let
us not fret about the vessels; we are in the
way of making such captures as this, and can
do it over again.’ Look! there are our cus-
tomers, the noble, wealthy emirs. Oh, see!
there comes the caliph of Bagdad, and there »
the governor of Alexandria. He is a cursed
buyer, who must have his slaves cheap. By
Mohammed, they are a fine company! Allah
send us a good day.”

“Yes, the Prophet’s blessing be upon us!”
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 67

The governor of Alexandria, the caliph of
Bagdad, and ten or twelve Saracen princes ap-
proached. The merchants made low salaams.

«“ Are these the slaves? Mere children!
You must sell them cheap.”

“Tf two ships had not gone down with
more than a thousand on board,” said Ferrens.

‘Great expense, and but little profit.”

The pasha of Alexandria stepped close to
the merchant and whispered,—

“ You remember, Hassan, that you promised
me two thousand slaves for my assistance.”

“ Allah!” cried the trader, in alarm; “two
thousand! My exalted commander, it was
but a thousand.”

The pasha frowned om anerily stroked his
long beard.

“You dare to maintain that . my face ?
Take care what you say !” :

» Ferrens—or Hassan, as the Saracen called
the renegade—bowed and replied,—

“Hye of the Prophet, pardon thy slave.
Tt was but a thousand, my commander.”

The eyes of the Saracen flashed with rage.
68 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

“‘ Avaricious dog! miserable slave! With
whom wilt thou chaffer? Wilt thou cheat
me? Two thousand have I said? No; it
was two thousand five hundred. - Silence,
or thou shalt have as many strokes as thou
wouldst deny me slaves! Do I administer
justice here for nothing? No matter how
many I ask, I must have them. Have the
two thousand five hundred counted off at
once, and set them aside.”

“To hear is to obey,” sighed the trader, not
daring to offer further resistance.

The young friends were still standing side
by side.

“O merciful Father!” prayed Robert ;
‘suffer us not in our misery to be separated
_ from each other.”

Henry leaned heavily upon him.

“TJ shall not long have to endure slavery,”
he said. ‘They will kill me, for I cannot
labour. Oh, I am so weary! All is growing
dark around me. If I could but sleep! My
eyes will never behold Jerusalem that is on
earth, but the heavenly Jerusalem will soon
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 69

shine upon me; this perishing body will be
glorified. Do not weep so, dear Robert; be |
thankful that I die. And if God ever leads
thee back to France, Bree my parents, and .
beg them to forgive me.’

Robert pressed his hand, sobbing ; it Was
for the last time. The boys were dragged
away from each other. Henry fell to the
ground, and a pitiless slave-driver struck him
angrily with his whip, saying,—

“Stand up! This is no time for lying
down.”

Henry staggered to his feet, le with
failing voice,—

“Robert! Robert! Do not forget!”

Robert pushed his way out of the crowd ;
no fear of abuse could stay him. He flew to
his sinking friend, around whose lips played
a happy smile. It was the last. The breath
of life was passing from the frail body, and
lingered--upon his lips in that happy look, as
though they had been kissed by the angel of
deliverance.

In a transport of grief Robert pressed the
70 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

form of his earliest friend to his heart. He
felt not the roughness of the grasp that tore
him away, for his sorrow had made him insen-
sible to all else. Freedom might one day be
regained, but the faithful heart that beat no
more was lost to him for all time.

Stephen stood motionless; his eyes were
not turned upon what was passing around:
him. Absorbed in his own thoughts, sub-
missive to the will of God, he awaited calmly
his fate.

“Here you see,” said Ferrens mockingly
to a dark-looking man who was beside him,
“the shepherd-boy, the saintly leader of the
army, who thought himself able with these
children to obtain possession of the tomb of
the crucified One.”

The Saracen scanned the boy with piercing
looks, which the youth fearlessly returned.

“T buy this one,” said the emir; and going
among the captives he chose seventeen others.

The men again approached the young shep-
herd, and the emir said to Ferrens,—

“Tell him what I have said to you—that
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 71

he shall be the first to forswear his accursed
faith and to acknowledge Mohammed ; and if
he does so, I will treat him as a son.”

“Listen!” said the merchant, turning to
the boy. “Héar what happiness and honour
are in store for you, pitiful young saint!
Here is a distinguished emir, a successor of
the Prophet; he has bought you as his slave,
but will hold you as his son if you forswear
the crucified One, and aloud, on this spot, call
on Mohammed.”

«What is it you propose to me?” cried
Stephen, aroused to anger. “Vile Judas,
you have betrayed the Lord Himself in us
His servants! My Saviour is Jesus Christ,
whom I confess aloud before all the world.
Away with the lying Prophet !”

The emir caused the same proposition to
be repeated to every one of the others whom
he had selected, but the weak, captive children
unanimously refused to deny Him in whose
name they had been baptized.

Their unhappy leader still displayed the
same faith and courage that had animated
72 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

him from the first moment of his supposed
mission. He raised his voice in earnest in-
junctions to his companions not to deny ule
Redeemer.

“ Let us not,” he se “desert the Saviour
who bought us with His own precious blood
and by His death on the cross. My brothers,
my friends, for the sake of your everlasting
salvation, hear me—hear me, and be strong.
What is every earthly good compared to
eternal happiness in-Jesus Christ our Lord
and Redeemer ?”

Such words, spread rapidly from mouth to
mouth, strengthened the resolves of all, and
with wonderful power aided them firmly to
endure the fearful events of that day.

“Thou seest, noble emir,” said Ferrens,
“that this boy with hig fanatical obstinacy
seduces the rest. He must lead them by his
example; he must be compelled to renounce
his false faith. Do that, and I wager my
head upon it thousands will imitate him.”

“Repeat the proposal once more to them.
Tell them that the Prophet ig angry with
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 73

their unbelief, that he has given the sword

into my hand to punish the rebellious. His _
countenance is fearful to the disobedient, but

gentle toward believers.”

“Foolish boys,” cried Ferrens, “hesitate
no longer. The sword hangs over your
heads, and fearful are the punishments of
disobedience. There is but one God, and
Mohammed is his Prophet.”

But the answer came back from boyish
voices with one accord,—

“Praised be Jesus Christ for evermore.”

From rank to rank re-echoed the cry, re-
peated again and again with joyful courage
by those thousands of ill-fated children.

“Tt is easily to be seen that kindness is
thrown away here,” said Ferrens. “ They
will not call on any other name or praise
any but the crucified One.”

The countenance of the Mussulman, who
up to this moment had awaited the result
with apparent composure, now changed men-
acingly. Fanatic zeal glowed in his angry
look.
74 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

_“ Allah! T have tried the way of kindness,
but these unbelievers are determined to feel
the sword.”

The emir turned to the governor.

“My brother, in the name of the Prophet
IT came hither to make believing Mussul-
mans of these Christian children, but it is in
vain. My merciful persuasions are thrown
away, and they adhere to the crucified One.
* Give me authority here and now, before the
eyes of all, to punish the rebellious ones and
terrify the rest by a warning example.”

“My dear brother,” returned the governor,
willing to serve the powerful man, who had,
moreover, the reputation of a holy person,
“command as seemeth good to thee. Let
the unbelievers be run through with the
sword, quartered, burned, if they will not
turn to the Prophet. Allah! they are thy
slaves; do as thou wilt with them. And
if thou desirest besides any of these whom
I have purchased, thou hast but to choose;
they are thine.”

The emir bowed, and beckoned to some
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 75

slaves to bring forward the instruments by
which it was proposed to convert the Chris-
tian children to another religion. Trunks of
small trees were placed crosswise, fastened in
that position, and set upright in the ground
before the eyes of the children. After this
fearful preparation, the emir commanded that
the shepherd-boy, with the seventeen others
whom he had purchased; should be scourged.
As the sharp thongs fell upon their naked
backs, drawing streams of blood, and again
and again with ingenious cruelty returned
upon the same places, the boys who beheld
the scene cried aloud with horror, weeping
and covering their faces; but the sufferers
themselves endured in silence.

The tormentors paused in their dreadful
work, and Ferrens stepped in front of the
boys.

“Have you as yet no better answer to
give? -The emir will still be gracious to
you; he will receive you among his servants.
You do not know how wealthy and kind he
is, nor what comforts you may enjoy, such as
16 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

you have never dreamed of in your miserable
country. Fortune smiles upon you; here, in
a hostile land, you may find a kind master and
father—a second home. Is it your will fool-
ishly to reject all this, and rather to endure
all torments than to enjoy the favour of a
powerful emir? And what is required of
you? Nothing but that you cease to worship
the Crucified, and acknowledge Mohammed
as the true Prophet of God. Why, then, do
you hesitate? Your much-praised Saviour
has not freed you from captivity, and will
certainly not deliver you from death if you
are stiff-necked any longer.”

“Silence, thou renegade !” replied Stephen ;
“thy fiendish tongue cannot seduce us. Our
~ Lord and Master is Jesus Christ, and never
the prophet of lies, Mohammed! If the
Lord of the heavenly hosts leaves these our
earthly bodies in your power, it is that
through pain and shame they may be purified
from all stains of sin. The death with which
you threaten us is but the heavenly deliverer
which shall send us to the presence.of our
~ SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 17

Master and Saviour to enter upon eternal
_blessedness. Under the strokes of your
scourges, yea, even upon the cross, will we
ever cry, «Praised be Jesus Christ !’”

Firmly and joyfully responded the other
seventeen boys,—

“Praised be Jesus Christ for evermore !”

“Thou seest,” said Stephen, “we are of
but one mind. Torture us, kill us; power is
given to you over the body, but God will aid
us to the end, that we may be worthy to
stand in the ranks of His holy martyrs.”

“ Let them be nailed to the cross, my lord,”
said Ferrens to the emir, enraged at this con-
stancy. “Give them no reprieve. These
children brave death ; they do not know what
it is to be nailed hand and foot, to suffer
torments, looking death in the face for hours
before it comes.”

The emir cast a lingering look upon the
bleeding youths, who repressed with manly
courage every sign of their suffering.

“J ghould like to save them,” he said ad-
miringly. “What men such children would
8 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

become, and that one above all! Tell him
he shall be my son. I will make him rich and
eminent; he, now a slave, shall have power
over thousands of slaves. Allah! what a
destiny awaits the youth if he will but confess
the true Prophet! ‘Tell him all this for the
last time. If they still withstand, then they
must all suffer the death of the cross. I
have sworn it.”

Once more Ferrens approached the boys
and offered them life, with enjoyments which
he painted in alluring words. He repeated to
Stephen the brilliant promises of the emir.
But the boys remained steadfast. Stephen’s
reply, as he pointed toward the heavens,
was,—

“ There I have a Father, mightier than any
on earth, who will never forsake me if I for-
sake not Him.”

The trader pointed to the wooden crosses
erected in their sight, saying,—

“As true as I stand before you, if you
refuse any longer, there are the crosses to
which you will be nailed.”

~
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 79

“So be it!” cried the shepherd-boy, with
devout enthusiasm. “Did not our Lord
suffer on the cross? What else could we
desire? Happy death, that leads us to the
Saviour! This is the victory he has promised
us. I see the conqueror’s crown, the white
robes of saints and angels.”

“Insane boy!” returned Ferrens. ‘It shall
be as you desire. You shall die the miserable
death of the evil-doer.”

“And for thee,” Stephen continued, with
prophetic ecstasy —“ for thee and thy associate,
ye instruments of hell and companions of the
traitor who sold his Lord—for you shall be
no blessed death upon the cross; for you shall
be an end like that of Judas. The hour shall
come when the hangman shall fasten you to the
gallows and your souls shall pass into torment.”

The renegade turned pale. The shudder-
ing fear of death that caused -his body to
tremble restrained the insulting words with
which he would have answered the predic-
tion; the smile that he called to his lips
was but a ghastly expression of his terror.
80 SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM.

As the emir had threatened, it was done.

Could the sun shine down with cheerful
light upon so dreadful a scene of martyrdom—
eighteen boys so pitilessly slain ? ‘But no
cloud veiled the heavens, nor was the sun
darkened above the horrible deed. Nature
feels not sympathy: That tender emotion
finds its home in human breasts, and it was a
human being that condemned these eighteen
children to a cruel death for adoring their
Saviour.

Still, in the anguish of martyrdom, they
called upon the holy name. With patient
endurance they received the dreadful chas-
tisement that had fallen upon them for the
folly of their wild enterprise and the sin of
their’ disobedience.

But the fanatical Mussulman was disap-
pointed in the effect he had intended to
produce upon the remainder of the young
crusaders ; for the boys, as well as the older
pilgrims, however horrified by what they had
witnessed, yet refused to give up their faith.

The caliph of Bagdad, more merciful than
SLAVERY AND MARTYRDOM. 81

the others, prevented further cruelties. He
had bought a large number of the ecclesiastics
who were among the pilgrims.

Thus ended this crusade, which had robbed
Hrance of the flower of her youth, and caused
her to reap a large harvest of sorrow and of
tears. Begun in hope, it led to death and
slavery. Many rested beneath the sea; the
wonderful shepherd-lad ended his life on the
cross; and the remainder of the host were
scattered throughout Asia in the fetters of
slavery. Not even the poor comfort of weep-
ing over the graves of their beloved children
was granted to the bereaved mothers.

Yet, sad as was the end of this crusade,
desperate as to human hopes, still, in chains
and in death, a rare victory was won—the
victory of Christian faith; and this not by
men, but by weak children, who preferred
a death of excruciating torture to life pur-
chased by denying the Lord Jesus Christ.
The story of their heroism must have kindled
the hearts of Christians, when at last it be-

came known, to new zeal and emulation in
(936) ; 6
82 A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM.

the midst of their grief and lamentation over
the untimely fate of the young martyrs.

In honour of those lost by shipwreck Pope
Gregory the Ninth caused to be built on the
isle of San Pietro, near Sardinia, a “ Church
of the New Innocents.” An old chronicle
relates that at a later period some bodies of
the unfortunate boys, which had been washed
ashore, were shown to pilgrims in a perfect

state of preservation.

CHAPTER X.
A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM.

Snvmenreen years passed away—a brief dream
for the happy, but for the sorrowing, for the
enslaved, a long, long time. How much does
the stream of time carry away in seventeen
years! How often do the varying fortunes of
war change the victor into the vanquished !
But at length the goal of so many pious
longings—the possession of the Holy City—
had been attained by the Christians. After
A GERMAN EMPEROR AT JERUSALEM. 83

being held during forty-two years by the
heathen, Jerusalem once more received a
Christian ruler, in the person of the German
emperor Frederick the Second, on the seven-
teenth of March 1229. Kameel, the Sultan
of Egypt, had yielded the cities of Jerusalem,
Bethlehem, and Nazareth, with all Palestine
and Sidon, to the Christians, and assured
them of peaceable possession by a truce of
twelve years. —

Again, then, ‘were the sacred spots where
the Redeemer had dwelt, with His holy sepul-
chre, in the possession of His professed fol-
lowers. But who could have rejoiced at this
with true and holy joy when he saw those
venerable places profaned, the city of God
debased to a theatre of partisan strife, the
knights and the deliverers of the sepulchre en-
gaged in mutual dissensions, secret and open ;
even the courageous king who had fought
against the heathen, whose bravery and that
of his German followers had earned the re-
ward of the long strife, now under we ban of
the pope ?
84, A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

O unhappy children! was this a result
worthy the sacrifice of so many lives, of so
much love and all the joy of home?

CHAPTER XI.
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

In a garden at Alexandria two slaves were
labouring. One of them was Robert; the
other, Theobald, a German soldier who had
been taken prisoner in a battle with the
heathen. This German was several years
older than Robert, and was a man of gigantic
frame, broad shoulders, and powerful hands,
far better skilled to wield the sword than to
engage in the peaceful labours of the garden. _

Robert, too, had become a man. The
glowing Egyptian sun had embrowned his
complexion, and made him, except for his
European features, resemble in appearance
the natives of the country; but a trustful
heart beat in his bosom, strong in faith and
in the love of home. However hard. his lot
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 85

may have been, yet none of the privations
and trials of seventeen years, nor yet any .
allurements of ease and comfort, had been
able to lead him +o renounce his Christian
profession.

Robert was a slave, subject to the will and
caprice of his master, hopeless of ever seeing
his home and his parents again; and yet a
man who preserves the love and the truth
of his childhood, with his faith in God his
Redeemer—how can such a one ever be
quite without happiness? The source of his
strength, of the courage and elevation of his
soul, his master could never take away. Still
he offered the blessed morning and evening
prayers which his mother had taught him ;
still he sang the spiritual songs which had
expressed the devotion of his heart in those
early days. These were precious treasures —
of the memory of which no earthly power
could reb him.

Robert had not been long in forming a
strong attachment for his brave and true
German companion. Sharing the same fate,
86 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

they strengthened each other’s courage and
endurance. Theobald told him much about
the crusade of the German boys—an enter-
prise no less unhappy in its results than that
of the French youths; of the distressing dis-
sensions among the Christians in the Holy
Land; of the heroic courage of the German
emperor; of life at home in Germany; and
of the manners and customs of beautiful,
beloved Swabia.

Many a time, pausing in the midst of his
labour, the German would exclaim, “ Now the
evening-bell is ringing at home,” or, “ Now
my wife is giving the children their supper ;
then they will pray and remember me.” Then
he would pass his broad hand over his eyes
as if the sunlight dazzled them, and then
bend over the earth and work with redoubled
diligence.

But Robert would respond in a low voice,
with a loving look toward the sky that spread
over his own fatherland, “God protect them
all!”

Often, also, rer their work they would
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 87

sing French or German hymns which they
had taught to each other, and this made the
weary burning hours pass more rapidly than
otherwise they would have done.

Only, the overseer of the slaves must net
hear them. He was a dark-browed, gloomy-
tempered Mussulman, and had conceived a
special hatred for the two friends, because
they sometimes looked as cheerful and con-
tented as if they had not been slaves whose
very lives depended upon a mere gesture of
their owner. He could not comprehend
‘that in their hopeless captivity they were
still more free than the man who ruled over
them, himself the sport of his own whims
and passions and a thousand self-seeking
wishes.

The two were still softly humming the
words of a German hymn when the overseer
came toward them swinging his whip, abus-
ing and threatening the “ Christian hounds.”
Theobald looked him fearlessly in the face.
The Saracen shook his whip, but without strik-
ing the German, and walked away with a
88 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

wrathful curse. He was obliged to treat the
slaves more humanely than before, since the
sultan had shown a friendly disposition to-
ward the Christians ; but he could not restrain
himself from embittering their captivity as far
as lay in his: power, or from robbing them of
what little alleviation of its hardships a
might have enjoyed. ;

Scarcely had he turned his back and gone
beyond hearing when Isidor, a Greek slave
who was working close by, approached the
friends. Shaking his fist at the overseer, he
muttered angrily,—

“Tf only you were my slave!”

“And what would you do?” inquired Theo-
bald. “Would you treat your captive as he
treats his 7” :

“That oppressor,” replied the Greek, “ de-
- serves nothing better. But listen, now, for
the moments are precious. You are men
whom I trust; I have long observed you.
Do you wish to be free?”

At this question the friends trembled with
emotion.
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 89

“Why do you ask?” said Theobald. “Look
at us! But these are only words. How can
we be helped ?”

With a cunning smile the Greek made
answer,— c

“Words they are which may set you free.
We must escape. Confide in me; I know
the country and the roads, and I will bring |
you safely to a Christian garrison. It is true
that you, Theobald, are not very well ac-
quainted with the language; but I am, and
so is Robert, and that will suffice.”

“Friend, you forget,” said Theobald, “that
here we are surrounded by high walls and
are watched. Besides, this slave’s dress is
hardly calculated for concealment.”

“T know how to manage all that,” rejoined
Isidor. ‘“ For some time I have observed that
we have not been so closely watched as we
used to be, and it will not be difficult for us to
meet some night on the west side of this
wall—over there, where that gate, half cov-
ered by the acacia trees, leads into the olive
grove.”
90 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

“We know the gate; we have often worked
there. But it is always guarded.”

“That guard prevent our escape? He
spends too many nights in the wine-house,”
the Greek went on. “I will procure the key -
to the gate; I will also provide Mussulman
clothing for us all. Have no fears. If I
were not so familiar with everything here
that it will cost me but a little trouble, then
indeed— But be easy. Let us fix upon
the night for our enterprise, and I will take
care of the rest.”

So the bold undertaking was decided upon
—a bold one indeed, even under the most
favourable circumstances.

With feelings divided between fear and
hope the friends awaited the appointed night.
How slowly passed the time! What an age
from one day until the cry of the muezzin
from the minaret announced the next! As
often as they caught a glimpse of the over-
seer in the distance they thought that all
had been discovered, but nothing suspicious
encouraged the idea; he passed them more
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 91

quietly than usual, seeming scarcely to ob-
serve them. And so at length came the
hour so longed for—the hour of freedom.

-A beautiful, starry night saw the three
allies together at the place which had been
agreed upon.

“ Hide yourselves here for a few minutes,”
said the Greek, “until I bring the keys and
the garments; I could not do it earlier, for
fear of being observed. I will return directly.”

He disappeared among the dark bushes,
while the other two men stepped cautiously
into the shade of the acacias.

“Suppose that man should have goné to
betray us,” said the German, in a restrained
tone.

“ Tmpossible !” returned Robert. “A knav-
ish trick like that! True, it was a still worse
one that made me a slave.”

“You do not know these Greeks ; they are
the most faithless nation on earth. If he were
to give us up, it might secure his own free-
dom. And do you think he would not prefer
the easier way to the more difficult and peril-
pes

92 A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

ous one? Yet no; we will not fear or suspect
him because he is a Greek—that is not his
fault. Hold! there he comes. I have-done
him injustice.”

It was indeed their companion aeealing along
toward them laden with kaftans and turbans.

“Ffere!” said he triumphantly, “I have
all we need.”

» Hach quickly took possession of the suit
that fitted him best.

“But weapons?” said Theobald. “Where
are weapons, in case we are obliged to defend
- ourselves ?”

Isidor struck his forehead.

“ Oh, fool that I was to forget them! Well,
it is useless to lament. I have money, and we
can soon provide ourselves.”

The two friends now stood transformed as
to appearance into Mussulmars. Only the
Greek delayed, and stooped down as if search-
ing here and there upon the ground. Theo-
bald urged him to make haste.

“T must have let the key fall here,” said
Isidor.
A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT. 93

“What else can happen to us?” exclaimed
Theobald. “ We will help you to look for it;
a minute’s delay may ruin us.”

Isidor went back a little distance, placing
himself in the open path, continuing his ex-
ertions, and every moment assuring them
that the important key must be lying close
at hand. All in vain.

At last the German said,—

“Rather than linger here, we will climb
the wall.”

“We will have to venture,” assented Robert,
“high as the wall is. Growing on the other
side there are climbing plants by which we
can easily descend.”

~ Isidor attempted to dissuade them.

“No danger yet. Wait! We shall cer-
tainly find it.”

At this moment a slight rustling was heard
behind a large, dark clump of trees; again the
same sound, but louder.

' “What is that?” asked Robert ly
“ Did you hear ?”
Beforé’ any one could reply, the cause was
94, A PLOT AND A COUNTERPLOT.

easily enough perceived. The overseer stepped
out from the group of trees, followed by armed
men, and by others carrying cords and fetters.
Fearfully manifest to the friends was the web
of treachery that had been spun around them.
Thus had one man served his hatred, another
his interest ; for this end the prospect of sweet
liberty had been held up before them to tempt
them to flight.

“ Bind the wretches instantly !” commanded
the overseer.

But before the order could be obeyed, the
powerful German had seized the Greek, who
was about to slink away, with a grasp of iron,
and thrown him with such force against the
overseer that both fell to the ground. Robert
snatched a sabre from the hand of a Saracen,
willing to die with his friend. But God
ordered it othérwise. Their resolute, fearless
conduct might have cost more than one life;
but while some of their assailants gave way
before the extraordinary strength of Theobald,
from behind others threw a noose over his
head and Robert's, so that they weré quickly .
IN THE MARKET-PLACE. 95

brought to the ground and their desperate re-
sistance overcome by the force of superior num-
bers. They were bound, they were chained,
for the rage of the overseer knew no limits.

“You cowards!” cried the German scorn-
fully ; “you fell upon us like wolves.”

“Talk,” replied the Saracen, “as long as
you have the power ; soon enough will you be
silent as the grave.”

They were cast into prison, and passed the
night there in fetters. They slept not, but
each confessing his sins prayed to God for
pardon ; and they vowed together for no fear
of death to deny their Saviour. Thus they
prepared themselves for the end, which they
had every reason to expect with certainty.

CHAPTER XII.
IN THE MARKET-PLACE OF ALEXANDRIA.

On the following day a public crier proclaimed
to the people of Alexandria the punishment
which thé two runaway slaves of the governor
96 IN THE MARKET-PLACH.

were condemned to undergo. Each was sen-
tenced to receive two hundred blows with
a stick, having previously been scourged.
How the populace thronged to see!

With firm and courageous mien the un-
fortunate men stood awaiting ignominy and
death. Near them were the chief of the po-
lice and his underlings, the overseer, whose
eyes sparkled with vindictive pleasure as he
surveyed his victims, and Isidor, the Greek,
carrying the long bamboo reeds. The latter
‘was at once shy and audacious, with the con-
scious manner of a traitor. Some zealous
Mussulmans were mocking and insulting the
slaves because they were Christians.

The attendants of the chief of police pre-
pared themselves to fulfil their office. The

sharp scourges, made of cords twisted to- | -

gether, lay prepared to do their cruel work;
already the light upper-garments of the cap-
tives had been taken off, leaving breast, neck,
and back uncovered. Suspended about his
neck Robert wore a plain, little wooden cross
—a memento of his childhood which he had
IN THE MARKET-PLACE. . 97

caretully preserved ; on the upper part of his
arm was observed a large heart-shaped spot of
a, fiery red colour.

The scourges were raised.

“Hold, hold, in the name of the Prophet !”
cried the voice of a man from amid the mul-
titude.. The minions of the law involuntarily
paused.

A powerful man of noble and grave aspect
pressed forward, closely followed by a boyish- _
looking youth. 7

“Tt is the wise Frankish physician,” mur-
mured some of the bystanders. ‘“ That slen-
der boy is his assistant.” .

“Tn the name of the Prophet,” repeated
the physician, “stop! Do not strike!”

“Tow? What presumption is this, unbe-
_liever ?” cried the overseer, with wrath. “Do
you dare to interrupt the course of justice 4”

“T entreat you, let me speak a word with
you,” said the Frank. “Grant a reprieve of
but one hour, and I will bring you a pardon.”

“Not a moment's delay,” shouted the Sar-

acen. “Away, insolent man!—You there!
(936) 7
98 IN THE MARKET-PLACE.

eut those slaves, that they may learn what. it
_is to have a master.”

“Oh, they will strike!” cried the youth who
attended the physician, clinging to his master as
if he were under the influence of mortal fear.

The physician did not allow himself to be
rebuffed by the threatening words and ges-
tures of the Saracen; the agonizing cry of
the boy seemed to call forth all his intre-
pidity. Instead of turning away, he went
close to Robert, threw his arm around him,
covered him with his mantle, and said, loudly
and impressively,—

“Send for Muley Ismael; he will be my
' warrant. Strike now at your peril!”

This appeal to the eldest of the merchants—
a wealthy and influential man, who, as was
well known, also stood very high in the regards
of the governor—would have had no little
weight on any other occasion. Now, however,
angry passions had been so excited that no
opposing consideration could be listened to.

The overseer’s actions were those of a man
erazy with rage.
IN THE MARKET-PLACE. 99

“Hear him not!” he yelled out. ‘“ What
does the Christian dog know of a man like
Muley Ismael? Drag himaway! Strike him
down !—Mussulmans, do not allow your law
to be insulted! Kill the unbelievers, all of
them together !”

At length the seething, tumultuous crowd
gave way, and became hushed at the appear-
ance of a dignified, venerable old man. -

What a sudden change! The danger was
over. It was immediately remembered that
the Frank had appealed to the testimony~of
this highly-respected personage. He stood be-
fore them, and every one waited impatiently
to see whether or not he would justify the
bold words of the Christian.

The chief of the merchants saluted the
crowd, all reverentially making way for him
to pass. Full of astonishment, he approached
the physician, whom the Saracens released
from their hold.

_“My dear friend,” said the merchant, “in
what a position do I find you!”

“Praised be God that you are come 1” re-
100 IN THE MARKET-PLACE.

turned the Frank, drawing a deep breath.
“In this Christian slave, who was about to
undergo the most terrible punishment for an
attempt at flight, he is found! In vain I im-
plored a delay, and gave your name as my
warrant; you have seen what was the result.
I entreat you, if you. believe that you owe me
any thanks, save him, save him !”

« Are you certain that it is he?”

“ Unmistakably,” the physician’s assistant
quickly answered; “it is entirely beyond
doubt.” :

The physician himself, however, turned to
Robert and asked him in the French tongue,—

_ “What is your country?”

“France.”

«Your native city?”

“ Marseilles.”

“Then you are the son of—

“The merchant Raymond. Seventeen years
ago, having joined with other boys of France
in a crusade to the Holy Land, we were be-
trayed and made captive here. But who are
you? Why do you take so warm an interest
IN THE MARKET-PLACE. 101

in me that you protect me at the risk of your
own life?”

“God is merciful!” said the physician with
deep emotion, without replying to his coun-
tryman’s question. Turning again to the
merchant, he continued: “He is fully iden-
tified. O my friend, my fatherly friend, you
know how much depends upon freedom and
deliverance for this man !”

“Be tranquil,” replied Muley Ismael. “I
shall go to the governor, and F know he will
not refuse my request. I seldom ask favours.
—Take courage,” he said to Robert; “ you
will be freed.”

How did the captive’s heart bound at these
kindly words! But could he forget his dear
friend? Seizing the hand of Theobald, he
said earnestly, —

“ Noble old man, I must share the fate of
this friend; I may not, I will not, be free
without him.”

The merchant cast an inquiring glance to-
ward the tall form of the German, who was
standing as quietly, and apparently as much
102 IN THE MARKET-PLACE.

unconcerned, as though he had had no in-
terest in the transaction.

“Well, let it be two, then,” said Muley
Ismael; and addressing the overseer and the
chief of the police, he continued: “I beg of
you, my friends, to postpone the chastisement
of these slaves until I shall have had an inter-
view with the governor. I will take the re-
sponsibility upon myself.”

Angry as the Mussulmans were, and ready
for any deed of vengeance upon the despised
Christians, still they could not venture to
slight the authority of so influential a man
as the senior merchant. They were obliged
to content themselves with keeping strict
guard upon the prisoners.

Soon the venerable man came, a mesgenger
of peace and deliverance.

“ Behold the seal-ring of the governor,” he
said to the officials. ‘These slaves are given
into my hands.”

The white, wrathfully-trembling lips of the
overseer were dumb.

But who can paint the feelings of the re-
IN THE MARKET-PLACE. 103

leased captives? They held each other in a
silent embrace; they had no words. The
youth who accompanied the physician wept
aloud and thanked God.

We linger a moment while the happy
Christians, under the protection of Muley Is-
mael, speedily leave the market-place. What
heart would not have been touched with sym-
pathy? Who could have beheld them with-
out rejoicing with them? Only one—the in-
human overseer, who stood frantic with rage
at the escape of his victims, his eyes rolling,
his lips foaming.

“They have gone,” he said, stammering
with the violence of his wrath—‘“ gone! Had
they not planned to escape they would still
have been slaves! Ha! old fool that I am!”

He laughed wildly, and looked around as if ~
to find some object upon which he might vent
his fury. All at once he espied the Greek,
who was still holding the bamboo rods. Isidor
trembled beneath his glance. ‘ Unbelieving
hound,” the overseer shrieked out to him,
“who aided the Christian slaves in their
104 IN THE MARKET-PLACH.

fight? It was thow! Why stand there,
wretch, as if Allah had let no bamboo éane
grow for thee? Is it not all thy fault, thou
worthless dog ?” eee

_ Let treachery fail, and all the vengeance of ©
the baffled plotter falls upon the instrument.
At every word the Mussulman’s fury waxed
hotter.

“Have mercy!” entreated the terrified
Greek. ‘“ What I have done was—”

“What thou hast done? Tempted slaves
to escape. Take him! Break the bamboos
upon the soles of his feet. The villain! give
him the blows of which he has cheated us.
No mercy! whimper not for pardon! Thou
hast thy rights—full justice.”

The executioners seized the wretched man,
who struggled in vain; and as his heartrend-
ing cries of anguish in the hands of his tor-
turers were heard, the rabble exulted, caring
little upon whom the sentence fell, provided
their barbarous delight in the bloody spectacle
was not denied them.
A JOYFUL SURPRISE. 105

CHAPTER XIII.
A JOYFUL SURPRISE.

Ler us now follow Muley Ismael into his
home. With him are the two friends and
the Frankish physician; only the doctor’s
young assistant is not present.

Robert turned to the physician, saying,
with joyful eagerness,——

“T can yet scarcely realize that I am free.
And whom am I to thank for this richest of
gifts that can be conferred upon a slave?
Speak, noble man! What moved you to show
such kindness to a stranger ?

“My good friend,” replied the physician,
“have patience. for a few minutes; some one
will appear directly who can answer your
questions better than I can.”

“How long every moment seems,” Robert
said earnestly, “until I learn to whom I am
so deeply indebted !”

But he was not destined long to remain in
ignorance. The door opened, and a young
106 A JOYFUL SURPRISE.

girl in Oriental costume entered. She went
toward Robert and said,— :

“ Dost thou know me?”

Robert regarded her pleasant face with as-
tonishment ; it seemed not unfamiliar to him.

“The countenance, the voice— No, I must

22

mistake!” he cried, bewildered. ‘Or are you
really that slender, girl-like youth who accom-
panied the preserver of my life ?”

“Thou art not wrong,” replied the girl ;
“T was my friend’s companion. And yet,” .
she continued, her voice trembling with emo-
tion, ‘ Robert, thou hast only half recognized
me yet.”

As by a lightning-flash the darkness of
seventeen long years was cleared from his
mind. Weeping and rejoicing, he rushed into
her arms.

“My sister! my sister!”

“Yes, it is I, my dear, only brother, it is
IT; and I have found thee—O my Saviour,
how can I be thankful enough unto Thee ?”

“So long a time! Thou wert not yet two
years old when I left thee.”
A JOYFUL SURPRISE. 107

“T could not, indeed, have remembered
thee,” said Marie ; “ but the Lord led me to find
and to identify thee in the very moment of thy
greatest need. The little ebony cross which
our mother placed on thy neck on the day of
thy baptism; the mark on thy arm; above
all, the resemblance to our father—”

Robert interrupted her hastily.

“Ts he still living? Has he forgiven me?”

“He died three years ago,” replied Marie
sadly. “ He forgave thee and blessed thee in
the hour of his death.”

Robert cast down his eyes in silence, and
covered his face with his hands. He was
dead, that dear father; and love, repentance,
sorrow, were too late.

O thou who readest these words, hast thou
grieved the heart of a parent, a brother, a
friend? Hasten, hasten, while it still beats
for thee with the warmth of life and love.

After a short pause Robert inquired hesi-
tatingly,—

“ And our mother?”

‘She lives,” answered his sister; ‘‘and her
108 A JOYFUL SURPRISE.

only wish is once more to see thee and press
thee in her arms.”

“Oh, tell me of her—tell me everything!
What strange circumstances have brought
thee hither, so far from our mother and from
home ?”

“T was still a child,’ Marie began, “ when
I first heard mother speak of my lost brother.
Whether thou hadst perished with so many
others in that dreadful shipwreck of which
the tidings were brought home to France, or
whether thou wert sold into slavery with the
survivors, she knew not. I heard of that
singular crusade—of the pious enthusiasm of
those thousands of boys; of their march |
through France ; of the courageous shepherd-
boy who was their leader; of their encamp-
ment near Marseilles ; of their festal reception;
and of the great rejoicings and acclamations
when at last. the ships left the harbour for
their distant goal.

“So in all the plays and visions of my
childhood were mixed the curious and beau-
_tiful images which my fancy had formed out
A JOYFUL SURPRISE. 109

of such tales; and among them was constantly -
present the idea of a brother who had been
taken from me in the sad ending of the strange
story. It is true I was bereaved of thee too
early for memory to have any share in my
dreams, yet the possibility of one day finding
thee haunted. me, asleep and awake. It was
impossible for me to believe thee dead. I
imagined thee a captive far beyond the sea.
-But long before my childish mind could under-
stand the difficulties of such an undertaking,
my thoughts were busy with plans for thy
deliverance. The older I became, the more
I learned from our mother, who so painfully,
yet so tenderly, recalled every little incident
of the past, lingering over each scene with
loving recollections; the more I heard from
our neighbours about those sorrowful days, or
about the terrible hardships and conflicts of
the Christians in the Holy Land, and so much
the more fixed became my resolution one day
to be the instrument of deliverance for thee.
Dear brother, I offered no evening prayer
without asking for aid and protection in this
110 ‘A JOYFUL SURPRISE.

design. O all-merciful Love, that hag had
compassion on me, has strengthened me and
led me across the sea!

“T did not venture to confide my purpose
to any one until the time should comg when
it might be carried out. How it was to be I
could not, indeed, imagine; but I did not
doubt that God, from whom the intention had
come, would also provide the means of fulfil-
ling it. So I lived through childhood and
youth, cherishing my secret in my own breast,
- growing year by year in hope and joyful
courage.

“In the meantime our parents left untried
nothing by which they might be informed of
thy fate. All in vain. Pilgrims who went
to the Holy Land either did not return or
brought such uncertain and unreliable informa-
tion as gave little hope. Even the few who
had, through favouring circumstances, been
released from captivity, and had returned to
Hrance, knew no more than that a part of
the unhappy boys had remained at Alexandria,

-, and the remainder were scattered through half
A JOYFUL SURPRISE. 1

of Asia. How many, alas! must have perished
during those long years amid the hardships of
slavery! How many must have been mar-
tyred for their Christian faith! Our hearts
trembled at these ill-boding thoughts, and we
could but weep for the slain. One thing alone
was a heavenly comfort to us in our sadness:
we heard that none of all those boys had
denied his Saviour; so, then we trusted that
if thou hadst indeed departed from this world,
it was to pass in the faith of Jesus Christ to
endless life. ;

“Tt was a year after the death of my father
that this noble friend, whose courage and
faithfulness thou hast this day learned to
know, asked for my hand in marriage.”

“Then,” cried. Robert, embracing the phy-
sician, “I shall be doubly bound to thee. O
happy day, that brings me such a sister, such
a brother !”

“The hand of my dear mother blessed our
love,” continued Marie, “and nothing hindered
our union save the thought of my lost brother.
The wife would be fettered to home and the
112 A JOYFUL SURPRISE.

fatherland; not so the maiden. And who
could find thee, what eye recognize thee, save
that of a sister ?

“To him, the tried and trusted friend of my
heart, I revealed all my thoughts. For my
sake he became thy brother, and together we
gladly vowed to seek thee and deliver thee, or
to ascertain with certainty that thou wert no
more. My greatest fear was of giving pain to
our mother through her anxiety for me, which,
indeed, might prevent her consenting to our
undertaking. But her love for thee—the
longing of her mother-heart for the lost yet
perhaps still living child—overcame her fears.
Besides, we heard the joyful intelligence of —
the possession of Jerusalem by the Christians
and the truce declared for many years, which
would render our enterprise so much less
difficult and perilous. Weeping, yet strong |
in her love, our faithful mother allowed me to
depart under the care of a protector in whose
prudence and intelligence she could confide,
and whose skill in the art of healing would
cause every door to open to him. What
A JOYFUL SURPRISE. 113

could such a poor girl as I have done with-
out him ?

“T assumed the garb of -a young man, and
passed for his assistant. Here; where most
of the crusaders had been sold, it seemed most
likely that we might find some traces of thee :
so to this place we first turned our attention.
Thanks to God, we were not misled! Hig
hand conducted us to this excellent old man,
who has been a second father to us in love
and kind deeds, and to whom we freely con-
fided our secret. He himself made inquiries
about thee among the slaves of the governor,
but in vain ; through the malice of the over-
seer he was deceived, until a wonderful chain
of circumstances united us, and thy freedom
became the gift of our benefactor.”

“ But forget not,” interposed the merchant,

‘in speaking of my benefits, that they are
= a feeble expression of my gratitude. Did
not the skill and the faithful care of thy be-
trothed save my son from death? If I could
give wealth, possessions, everything, for you,

it would be but a poor return. Thank the
(936) 8
114 A JOYFUL SURPRISE.

Creator, who has permitted me to do you a
service. I would I might add many more,
but your home beckons you to return, and
thy poor brother has been too long an exile.”

“But tell me,” said the German soldier,
“how have I, who have not been able to show
love or do service to any of you, found a
benefactor and a deliverer ?”

“What a question!” answered Robert.
“Could freedom have been happiness to me if
my faithful friend had been left to die?”

Robert now related what had been their life
in slavery, from which the treachery of the
Greek—certainly quite contrary to his inten-
tion—had released them. As he went back ©
into the past and told of the wicked stratagem
of the slave-dealers, of the dreadful day of the
sale, and the sufferings of the martyred chil-
dren, the old Saracen exclaimed, [ slovang with
righteous anger,—

“Truly, God is just! Were not those
worthless wretches—the disgrace of the Mus-
sulman name, the betrayers of innocent chil-
dren—called Porcus and Ferrens ?.”
A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE. 115

“Just so. Porcus and Ferrens; by those
names they passed among Christians.”

“Those renegades,” continued the merchant,
“did not escape the arm of the Almighty ;
they were punished. The Frankish king who
now reigns at Jerusalem caused them to be
hanged on the gallows for plotting to betray
him into the hands of the emir of Sicily.”

“Oh, the justice of the Lord!” exclaimed
Robert. “Then the prediction of Stephen in
his dying hour was fulfilled—that poe should |
die the death of the malefactor.”

“God has no pleasure in the treacherous
man, be he Christian or Mussulman. His
curse drove them to their fate. His blessing
be upon you, and bring you safe home !”

CHAPTER. XIV.
-A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE.

Tux physician, the brother, the sister, and
Theobald lingered under the roof of their
hospitable protector only until a favourable
4

116 A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE.

opportunity offered for going home. i
merchant-vessel was chosen which would bear
them all to Marseilles. It is true that
the route was rather circuitous for the Ger-
man; but. he, strong and fond of travelling,
thought it no trouble to traverse a part of
France, if thereby he might yet for a short
time enjoy the society of his friends. During
the short period of their stay Robert, Marie,
and her betrothed did not venture to go out-
side of the merchant’s house. He had admon-
ished them not to do so, lest they might be in
danger from the easily-excited passions of the
people, or from the vindictive wrath of the
overseer, which certainly could not have ex-
hausted itself in so short a time. Only the
German, not to be intimidated, and relying
upon his great physical strength, would not
listen to the dictates of prudence, but on the
evening before their departure strolled through
the streets of Alexandria, which he had never °
hoped to tread with such joyous feelings. He
even passed near the walls within which he
had go long performed menial services.
A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE. 117

Date-palms were waving lightly and grace-
fully in the breeze, and gently rustled the
delicate leaves of the acacias. High tree-
tops were glowing in the last rays of the
crimson sunset, and above all stretched a
firmament as clear and pure as though noth-
ing save peace and joy could find a home
under its canopy. There lay the walled
gardens. How enticing was the cool, green
shade beneath the avenues of trees! Theo-
bald’s heart leaped up in harmony with beau-
tiful, life-breathing Nature. The scene was
not strange to him; yet to-day, for the first
time, he felt all its loveliness, for he felt it
asa freeman. The slave has no eye for the
grace of the palm-tree at whose foot he toils.

Lost in contemplation, Theobald strolled
farther and farther. There lay outspread the
low, sandy coast; there, the deep, mysteri-
ous element whose rolling waves should to-
morrow bear him toward home, wife, and
children.

Amid these varying thoughts and images,
which so fascinated his heart and his imag-
118 A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE.

ination, Theobald scarcely observed that the
shadows were lengthening, and that the twi-
light was wrapping the landscape as in a
dream. He turned at last, however, and
hastened his steps, as it occurred to him that
his friends might be anxious as to his safety.
Utterly thoughtless of danger, he had not
observed that he had been regarded by many
whom he passed with looks of surprise, and
by some with hostility. Approaching the
walls of the governor’s garden on his home-
_ward way, six men suddenly confronted him,
preventing him from going a step farther.
Theobald, instantly perceiving their hostile
intention, placed himself on the defensive.
Setting his back against the wall, he awaited
their attack. He was armed with only a stout
stick, but his great strength must compensate
for the lack of weapons.

The assailants hesitated and seemed to
deliberate. They were all armed, and had
they meant to take his life, the German would
certainly have been lost. But it appeared to
be their purpose to take him alive. They
A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE. 119

attempted to sling a noose around his neck ;
but this was unsuccessful, because the German
laid about him so vigorously with his cudgel
that none dared approach him near enough.

After this skirmishing had gone on for a
little while, a voice not unfamiliar to Theobald
cried out,— i

“ Down, slave, if thou wouldst save thy life!”

Theobald, who had observed behind his
foes the distant glimmer of torches, which
seemed to come toward them, answered, as if
considering ,—

“ And what will you do then ?” :

“To the ground with thee!” repeated the
voice.

“Not yet,” replied the German; “you
must explain yourself more clearly.”

“ Allah! he must die!” said the same
voice ; and six daggers gleamed in the air.

At this moment, however, the assailants
themselves saw the light of the torches
rapidly approaching them, and heard the
name of the German loudly repeated by
several voices.
120 A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE.

Theobald answered.

“Come! It is not hig fate,” muttered the
leader of the attacking party; and as he
slung his dagger at the German with fear-
ful adroitness, the six forms vanished instan-
taneously.

A. quick turn was all that saved Theobald.
The sharp knife flew close by him and buried
its blade in a crevice of the wall.

“Rash man,” said Muley Ismael—for it
was he who came up at this moment with
his servants—“why hast thou despised my
warning and so wilfully exposed thyself to
danger ?” Ss

Deeply moved, the Gin seized the hand
of the Saracen.

“Twice hast thou saved my life! O Mus-
sulman, what kindness showest thou to a
Christian !”

“Be silent!” returned the aged man, not
without displeasure. “Dost thou suppose
that Allah has given us no laws of benevo-
lence and hospitality? or are we all like the
cowardly assassins who have just beset thee?
A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE. _ 121

Young man, thou hast surely never known
Saladin, that prince among princes, that
shining example of generosity and humanity.
If but half the Frankish knights of the cross,
their kings and their great ones, were like
him, no brother would arm himself against
another. But they trample the Holy Land
with unholy feet, and they fulfil not the com-
mands of their sublime Prophet, who never
_ taught them the faithlessness which they
show even to one another, their insatiable
avarice, and all the other vices with which
great and small defile themselves.”

“Oh that it were otherwise!” exclaimed |
Theobald, with shame. “But, believe me,
those of whom thou speakest are not true
Christians.”

“ And those lawless wretches, who -think
they have fulfilled all their duty when they
have performed their ablutions regularly, are
not true Mussulmans; so much we may grant
to each other. We will not lay the excesses
of the professor to the charge of his faith. In
the true believer the law lives in his heart,
122 A TWILIGHT ADVENTURE.

_and passes from his heart to his hand.. He
whose faith and practice are not thus one is
neither Christian nor Mussulman. ‘Trust me,
I, a believer in Islam, am yet no enemy to
Christianity ; the experience of a long life,
with all its remarkable incidents, has taught
me that the origin of every faith is at least
respectable, and that though but one can be
true and divine, yet the Creator of the
universe has patience with all; and above all
_ the laws and customs that separate men from
one another is the higher law of love.”

An attendant who had seen the dagger
sticking in the wall and pulled it out showed
it to his master. Theobald explained how it
came there.

“Take care of it,” commanded the mer-
chant; “perhaps it may lead to the discovery
of the guilty man.”

On their return home the anxious friends
received them with delight. Hearing of the
peril to which Theobald had been exposed,
_ they reproached him affectionately. But he
~ said,—
SWEET HOME. 123

“You are right to reprove me; but yet I
would not, if I could, change the events of
this evening. I have looked into the Chris-
tian-like heart of a Mussulman, and I have
heard words which I shall never forget.”

CHAPTER XV.
SWEET HOME.

Tux hour for departure had arrived. A gentle
breeze swelled the sails; the clear, lightly-
_ curling waves seemed to invite the passengers.
to embark. With warm emotions the Chris-
tians bade farewell to their generous Moham-
medan host.

“Forget not,” said the merchant, “that in
' Alexandria you have a friend whose house
_and heart are ever open to you.”
_ Favoured by the winds, the ship sped over
the sea. Soon only a few of the minarets of
Alexandria were visible ; then they also- were
lost to sight. The coast disappeared, and the
voyagers were surrounded by sky and sea.
124, SWEET HOME.

- Robert stood on the deck and measured
the broad horizon with delighted eyes.

‘“‘ Now the same waves that seventeen years
ago carried me to slavery transport me home- -
ward,” he exclaimed. ‘Oh, how small, how
transitory, are all the works of man com-
pared with the lasting, wonderful works of |
Nature!”

“Not so transitory as thou thinkest,” re-
plied the physician. “Nature, in its great-
ness, its comprehensiveness, increases not, nor 3
decreases ; but the work of man, inspired by
God, grows from age to age, until it spans, the
vast circle of the earth.” :

The passage was short and tranquil; and
now they came in sight of the coast of
France, and Marseilles lay before them; and
now the ship rested at anchor in the harbour.

The passengers were taken to land, but
what was the surprise of our friends when the
ship’s captain caused a great many bales of
costly stuffs and packages of goods, which he
designated as their property, to be unladen at
the same time !
SWEET HOME. 125

“There is some mistake,” the physician
asserted. ‘We do not own these.”

But the captain stood by what he had
done.
“T know Muley Ismael,” he said tartly—
“the richest merchant in all Alexandria. He
is a man of honour; I would go all over the
world on his mere word. He committed these
articles to me as yours, and what he says
_ must be true once and for all.” .

All was now made clear. The gifts were
owing to the inexhaustible generosity of their
host.

“© Muley Ismael,” exclaimed the phy-
sician, “thy noble spirit still blesses us and
does us good, though afar off.”

What were the feelings of Robert as he
once more traversed the well-known streets of
his native city? Seventeen years had passed
away like an evil dream. He beheld the
familiar houses, the public places, and at last
the home of his parents. It seemed as though
he had left Marseilles but yesterday, and were
still, as then, a boy.
126 LIGHTS AND SHADOWS.

With faltering, trembling step he went up
into the house. The heavy oaken doors stood
open. They entered the room where his
mother sat; but she, her head turned away
from the door, supposed it was the servant,
and asked,—

“ What is it, Anna?”

Receiving no answer, she turned and saw
her. children. |

Who can describe the overflowing love and
joy of the mother’s heart ? Parent, children,
and friends all knelt before God in a transport
of praise and thanksgiving.

CHAPTER XVI.
LIGHTS AND SHADOWS.

Happy days followed one another in the house
that had been so long melancholy and de-
serted. The blessing of the mother accom-
panied Marie to the altar, where she gave her
hand to her tried and faithful friend oS a life-
long union.
LIGHTS AND SHADOWS. 127

There was but one cloud upon the joy of
the reunited ones: it was caused by the
parting with the brave German, who directly
after the marriage set off to seek his father-
land, his wife, and his children.

“ And if ever—which God forbid !—your -
own country should no longer be a happy
home for you, then come,” he said, “all of
you, to our beautiful Germany, our blessed
Swabian land. And when you reach the free
imperial city of Heilbronn, on the banks of
the Neckar, ask any one you meet for the
armourer Theobald. Right by the city gate
I have a pretty cottage with a grape-vine
before the door; there at evening I sit with
-my wife and children. Now, God keep you
and. bless you evermore !”

It was not long before the seeming pre-
diction of the honest Swabian was nearly ful-
filled. Stormy days came on in the south
of France. The religious sects of. Waldenses
and Albigenses became the objects of terrible
persecution as heretics. They were sought
out; they were hunted as if they had been


198. LIGHTS AND SHADOWS.

robbers and murderers; unchristian hatred,
self-righteous, fanatical zeal, ministered to evil
passions under the guise of religion. s
Then would Robert often say, in deep,
sorrowful indignation at the news of some

- fresh deed of cruelty,—

«“ And we, with hatred in our hearts, with
curses on our tongues—do we go to instruct
the heathen in the faith that works by love ?
O brother Theobald, thy presentiment was
a true one. This beautiful land of our fathers
is no longer a happy home.—Lord God, Thy
whole earth would be one Holy Land if Thy
creature man did not desecrate it by hatred.” :

4

THE END.
Q22hH4ESE



© SURI Alia ea Dacre Be al al aa rial ed
Se

ca







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describe
'2582' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQO' 'sip-files00008.pro'
36a256d46e2942533315f49a6b37b869
d3cfb56d304b2cdad48ea9900f80d22e3089e489
'2011-12-28T23:51:17-05:00'
describe
'45822' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQP' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
3f836302082324738237a1483e773e19
34fd2f22e2303c7b51312d0c08b8f06e219d625d
'2011-12-28T23:49:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQQ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0f27722fd2370f9be08fc09de7004eb9
cd434281f7225e8003982dcdcf0a061e07a67975
'2011-12-28T23:51:24-05:00'
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQR' 'sip-files00008.txt'
b2c8dedc5a6661849de522851f51eed7
b1b0bbf415654f381a1c2fe91df02d551f63e071
'2011-12-28T23:48:50-05:00'
describe
'10316' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQS' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
9f9f5a6f3861697175b0954069f4ac8e
38d35b0f7b822d18175ab4d6fd1b5f9f9366d32f
'2011-12-28T23:49:03-05:00'
describe
'322789' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQT' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
784be1e091590b396fbf896c7867d733
5a8e626e9bedc76b1a8aff3113387a7ad14e0244
'2011-12-28T23:51:12-05:00'
describe
'138696' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQU' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4ce4421717728cc3d21a0a7688d3a49a
8916f02cd96da63bd4d9cf9524e9920d7d5370c5
'2011-12-28T23:49:11-05:00'
describe
'4876' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQV' 'sip-files00009.pro'
4258410ee5481a0cfb70854c507bb689
7c6403a28ee62b817edee9b00a3d4a1a0372d9cb
'2011-12-28T23:50:34-05:00'
describe
'30784' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQW' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b43682dee61d87509c9a23fd220f0e4e
0471b29705355457dcba7fa1b2066b6fd1515065
'2011-12-28T23:51:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQX' 'sip-files00009.tif'
374d3137e9ce28ff6c2ff4984e6581b8
0ab211829a430eedbfd32797f1f9f22862be858d
'2011-12-28T23:50:40-05:00'
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQY' 'sip-files00009.txt'
d5316176552846118b4ea502dd9cec73
71e79c74f4208dcd0f616567e353f353973f8b4b
'2011-12-28T23:51:10-05:00'
describe
'7379' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDQZ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
006002a7c0d55f1cd42896ae2666f28f
34aae1c6b83922497ea1f0436ab2ef9528d7d2c3
'2011-12-28T23:50:54-05:00'
describe
'322472' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRA' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
3251b5af00ecc3f1d095720c1cb850b0
5b53a98a97f46cc7deb47f1108c85988338ce80a
'2011-12-28T23:50:39-05:00'
describe
'67560' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRB' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
f787b7e7c8dd6eaad0098d5e88037cdb
ed4fb115fdfbf078900a397e66764d9f7a3af658
'2011-12-28T23:50:45-05:00'
describe
'3437' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRC' 'sip-files00011.pro'
00b7c8184dd2dc4f8490f17f91aa92e0
5e244f627304e43eccd91d43482dff8e640955b5
'2011-12-28T23:50:26-05:00'
describe
'15144' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRD' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
749bb6ef5d9aade27f66ec63c17f2d9f
f4f3e675dcad53ef969e45471639e908afd69712
'2011-12-28T23:49:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRE' 'sip-files00011.tif'
95fb7194cf68f18537070fc36d9376f0
a77e1ce642fb008cfaeccae2b4c746b50f5437d7
describe
'112' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRF' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f5f5526106e28404da2e859f8d7c3a32
b41c889581daf917547bf17da8d86e5f48114abd
'2011-12-28T23:49:17-05:00'
describe
'3657' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRG' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
0cb23c883eddb3e212d4258fd0e24ef9
8f62bc61d247f8e806512072763e1a25c80b1924
'2011-12-28T23:52:35-05:00'
describe
'322636' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRH' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a45d15712a58f826d0ed07117b63ecd9
bc33f9b7278df3ed210cfae2d73485c4d0d0eae4
'2011-12-28T23:52:18-05:00'
describe
'86348' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c0b428a0622b1b22cc475d491420d07a
531c8dc3d2d264fe7166d34025e2056f3d836e2b
'2011-12-28T23:49:47-05:00'
describe
'17240' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRJ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
36d154fd9981cf4699e2b54b72f614f1
eb6941741c1f0917af8d5b1827147c7d5278b581
'2011-12-28T23:48:57-05:00'
describe
'22956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRK' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
48d98a80d2d1ff9f6163ffc368f8c4c3
954dc45cb6bd07f43b246bc39eec71dab8d27c5c
'2011-12-28T23:49:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRL' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f3bef8ae50e51d6877d0c6467d98ae52
8d8c4ff444a3c92a812b8d9841b85141c443170c
'2011-12-28T23:49:31-05:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRM' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2632767356240426937c6a98c2b96eeb
817c8e9fd012b608ead5f15248ea1f19b11db952
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'5987' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRN' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b246eecd17f665c90df18cb07acbbde3
36f65d77d1f8bc91d06bdba5ea747fabf9effe39
describe
'322569' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
2eb6d26e780454664b77a093065fe0f1
214efa2424499bcb0ab26b8c5d64eb4a964e5067
'2011-12-28T23:52:34-05:00'
describe
'52060' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
19158b2d94ae859dc596300012e83e58
c82c1a07d1f2af3d4bb6702c84456d221acdf49e
'2011-12-28T23:49:14-05:00'
describe
'9394' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
494c2a9b2face63c353c8ade5ad6d1f3
e14ba9a17a5f2dd4ef39150ec24925c3459791cf
'2011-12-28T23:50:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e6d08ad2818eb4c4fe48636d47456ae5
96fe24a3f53c6c17fd6c09bd794fcb9393ebb9f2
'2011-12-28T23:49:56-05:00'
describe
'1905' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRS' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
9dc7f133e26b882cc0b437a17046ec3a
1672ba1cefe608df9a64b124cb70fcc7975a21e0
'2011-12-28T23:48:53-05:00'
describe
'322799' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
cb061c5c3eab3b08e5269572870119c8
bfabcc7a2c01adbcf6242553f8666b748a1be0a1
describe
'113958' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
42fb90927434a6ebcd892e84b3d9f994
408e30d00f3182d82e59c1d7fd8807d102233f79
'2011-12-28T23:51:21-05:00'
describe
'15793' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
ea7385c01ac9b2924b5f05ef641923cf
9df53f00512e814a62209494c30bc3bf082b58ec
'2011-12-28T23:50:18-05:00'
describe
'30570' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d80463b558e6bccc7739675ab45cb13c
cfc78468f690e66cd4773b9d314a2343ee73cd73
'2011-12-28T23:52:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRX' 'sip-files00015.tif'
77934b22bf38ea6e31a0fe1fef57e13a
c2bc2805e375ed810d43267ed360330bfb503212
'2011-12-28T23:52:14-05:00'
describe
'599' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRY' 'sip-files00015.txt'
fba190eea4d8a90ba65f7ac872f5ecd9
0357924b8502ee52ad865add85c75a1dfed80952
'2011-12-28T23:51:29-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7874' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDRZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4064d4dd04d0bb14619bce75f2a3474e
595c77ac81815e5be435c252cd5c6f6de14ec9b9
'2011-12-28T23:49:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
c84315bd5041cab94b08f5ed85ef1f60
182f99bb83c757f64d11b9543b7586a98fe77603
describe
'143166' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSB' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
692cec1040ecd87c246a37a1f018bc68
290bfbb292f739e091a2228b1a39e45a013bef87
'2011-12-28T23:50:41-05:00'
describe
'26850' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSC' 'sip-files00016.pro'
612cae6c37597984bd5b8e4519cdb1ea
4c807c74267944db516e5ee1aec10121627ac60d
'2011-12-28T23:49:28-05:00'
describe
'42441' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSD' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
78957b09afb93fe02fb339e5c4a20e64
64d4aa204b664e3cc59d59d806549a42a8f17e8b
'2011-12-28T23:50:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2ac07d3db53eae8c545279a8c4e51e99
c24d626dc365ac7df3327337bd22271ea80af9bc
'2011-12-28T23:51:33-05:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSF' 'sip-files00016.txt'
2f73c48151f082ecb72bc8ec9b7448b5
bd130c4d1e53a80cc174479a7929829fe6374ddb
'2011-12-28T23:49:25-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10538' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSG' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
319c177fb5273e655228c59957c97d68
6154f1de92cae0a8d8482c451ead0b9800512973
describe
'322759' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSH' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
edd0d7b851515261dd3d3d54122f3ed8
f7ec299a722e437db893a8efc92c26538c0800fa
'2011-12-28T23:50:43-05:00'
describe
'147463' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSI' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e342bc0b702adeb17e08d4f7e14e94e6
82dbb4f4989926bf5851fcaf3fbce36c78fa6474
'2011-12-28T23:52:21-05:00'
describe
'27847' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSJ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
da809b367476d7c719906e84d00bdae1
b182c895002cc66f6d2e07a5ca1ce09be3f600fb
describe
'43370' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSK' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0dbe3ea267d100ef70b15b597e633790
30aaf0aeb954b22bb3d4d8cca842fbab1392a77c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
3695382185a98e2408dd67c3047623fb
8439a9f8ece9d15d23271faf5be13684d0260188
'2011-12-28T23:49:45-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSM' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d901b4f01de44ab02e526cc969be4c35
b37fc56746c6535f8ec5c4b770daded0f4d4ee79
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSN' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
aea1de44fb954b31d0ae92ed21e554ca
a28d83a6ea9a350478f2e9651ba4634345f51df0
'2011-12-28T23:49:30-05:00'
describe
'322803' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSO' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
fd269244c6310efa387cb5008a865e7c
c31fea2d886bbd0c8895b223d7707d2a8aeed5c9
describe
'137308' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3e513690604d4d742e83618024dc7c4b
eae42be439066ec73d26deaf6e9c64e3ee60cde4
'2011-12-28T23:49:10-05:00'
describe
'24869' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
6ffb24db3f20be39e789e3553a2d54b3
4913b07431a1e50b2b0393f3373756bb31f6a461
'2011-12-28T23:49:34-05:00'
describe
'40524' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c96717f99650f6cae5053711941035e0
b759bb479b73a159ed6eb703de61953c2f33c58d
'2011-12-28T23:49:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSS' 'sip-files00018.tif'
334c4d9681799ea1195213f02cc3b960
d4d2709ed63cfdfd9c9cccd5f08f39b6b856e41d
'2011-12-28T23:50:02-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDST' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ca640957abab56ba9c0a49f3c0f9b82f
df35abeea85e180359d8769325b84246931a7dff
'2011-12-28T23:50:30-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10209' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
f914ce61d1d93375bb76ef2e7e03711a
061a558410e8aaf904ab1f9622631803f99c71f6
'2011-12-28T23:49:00-05:00'
describe
'322788' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
de9b6b2114f877e5233d2960b4d034b8
a12c69bed512c2bd7fc0a590984ddde9f5c0979b
describe
'149909' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
3c72373f412dcbe11348d1b8ddc91426
80766c9c124ff9cc29c3aa83f4b113d706c47708
describe
'27653' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ff088c0a1c200b36e597ab96e4252f8f
65b05c2cff0d9c8a194f0bd317b65bd3ce588277
'2011-12-28T23:51:01-05:00'
describe
'44519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d6fc7cece0a2a2b5a20bc1d1b01d60cb
f8e67073da9625005a36a42c0d8d3a4d07679a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDSZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f28568c30e4c558d773c9838cb6f0dc8
1cf558f278511de6a8282ae53ce15df2a184aa29
'2011-12-28T23:50:03-05:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c07419c9b15954e11124421d55c48134
10264ae76f332df8cc078b40a93212b985032fa5
'2011-12-28T23:50:55-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11375' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b61f0fd15ddfa6687060b56d00fa2699
714556e3167ea92f42e46bea543e1f4bd8f848c0
describe
'322725' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
31e14ff98a85a4dff7c720ae6d5d80c2
1a5476a6c876edb482c7b60d45a9e78ecae1bb0a
'2011-12-28T23:52:30-05:00'
describe
'134938' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
2e7603f904bd88164fe641bbaadf9fde
c4ec87bc8bc01e2b51347c95a28c742cec9361da
'2011-12-28T23:52:19-05:00'
describe
'23185' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
f6848f1809fad974a3e24da0f1a92715
375cc99f6c13c27ca09c79085cb503fd9f438972
'2011-12-28T23:51:03-05:00'
describe
'38124' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ec84f553fa94319a4e6df9637437cfa5
9a1787926bc5a6772cf02085cc7af3c2511a52fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
4886d83f60ffebd099591606a04b2012
3d0e502df849424104e6ead6d0ec5993ce321c10
'2011-12-28T23:49:58-05:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
94903b766a18ac900d919ce36788d93a
8de02fa07b578100c0ebb938ce6653f213853879
describe
'9715' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
2a02e94f399b8d71a73fae606c59803d
369150ccff16c6a5f4577f296c6f23e12a2f9a6e
'2011-12-28T23:50:50-05:00'
describe
'322798' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
5fddf52d3300b0d010fbb0daba3a6b40
2b87d986a57a3d21532a160aefd36893e67d7fd3
'2011-12-28T23:52:01-05:00'
describe
'147770' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
11e08af4a0d3e653ae12732e4f5b059c
c39a8b76dbe7346c8d754edb46e482c64d35f5df
'2011-12-28T23:50:04-05:00'
describe
'28950' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a8725c4250c3da551c3a0fe77d20739a
d47116836ef2466433223b4d0c470c1cff7acad4
'2011-12-28T23:50:46-05:00'
describe
'43349' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3931956ab0e86c336e0a269ea51d2731
a02082a11b5c09eb92be446d5e4c440472322161
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTN' 'sip-files00021.tif'
b4ee2b8c8e57b8a44575d1fb7d8509b7
9ce67a3b8b635d2e193369e8479691b1723eb60e
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
9d46f11bea01622e14688deb30bfdadf
fbf54f4555e3fd960e7c9349a803c17805c2ab99
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10633' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTP' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3abd586cd3a4308dc6d6d614f589dad7
4d2aee0cdff46acc5b258f7dd5f74c6aa4405366
describe
'322677' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
bcf1674212b0a163add8e4a8d4c10642
8aa6fd6aaa6995649e44fd910aa803e5f2428c9c
'2011-12-28T23:51:14-05:00'
describe
'149135' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f20d0c0c418a77472b46a8d0a7e68109
8ff1b07e5011aba336b9d33980c4ce452b57cea9
describe
'27485' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
37c2a2d24fd1fc68ee1e06e678f80b6e
7dddf1ad97488b829feb27ad8ea9da94d57f6154
'2011-12-28T23:49:55-05:00'
describe
'44595' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
27593cc97f42404a757f1275bd6fad8b
a01c41b58e0e7badcc30d3f09240ee12ddc76a36
'2011-12-28T23:49:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTU' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a66f032b1961e4c117eac465f3fd3414
31041b9519c3029330d7f5bf7a93bee7069dfbc9
'2011-12-28T23:49:53-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
20781736728e99f7a217a111667040a5
ea086a0a6e7028709868f1b75b9cf6bf3242ef90
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10880' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
2cd647b2799ae8d0caef596821d1c95a
7b7cf81661da6fd54e787c77982c982c71f17f41
describe
'322754' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a8a2630588dc900f029d9579aab5ae11
139e8a1d5e0e2ea5ebfb026824d1a7848ba20760
'2011-12-28T23:51:28-05:00'
describe
'142719' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e5226e0a0ddaefb9187c3b7161c6689b
40b94d803104d7462b9e0899253b7cdd8c9d81c7
'2011-12-28T23:51:55-05:00'
describe
'26737' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDTZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c6d425896d8792c70831dde2b34697a1
ae3edcbb6d27ef55ded592ed029dd7c729aea78b
'2011-12-28T23:50:08-05:00'
describe
'43108' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUA' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
dcd70f5c3a09f7b2c2bf9093a6af9493
cdc24cb4060a0a4f93550e158ebc8bb4bb97ac91
'2011-12-28T23:50:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
77e3b80386bf989773b3b4f59a70c963
e8ee6194b80d046796359fe1cd16d7da88d22b23
'2011-12-28T23:49:33-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b4e2856b2113d3b38b74ebe69aa36a10
94c342477efd76c41c24dcf5c73ead0793f6bc54
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10330' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fe68a67cb4c1fb3a752b77057d61c0bb
d192b377a09064c1e87d61329f0341781e2a4bdd
describe
'322777' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUE' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
03be0a346fc31622ac0f85307111b8f4
72fc38f34cc8ee5b827b7a3303469ec365f64c8b
describe
'141231' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
f9be66091f9241e775a541bb761ec5d0
27f14db9c0ac2ecacc224157890e80ae1d883742
'2011-12-28T23:49:42-05:00'
describe
'26749' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUG' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e3880068859d66fb69ee09181a71a018
d08d8fbbbf3e75b57ccc634f362c4b4e64d38cef
'2011-12-28T23:49:26-05:00'
describe
'42456' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c57236f6dbf3f39196f560aba3fc2f27
4bea00d587726d320c925bcb10c07cc82aa30243
'2011-12-28T23:49:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
53286cd1d07763d45e62daba2d9fdca1
839995283c61f4dde1ca770c9ab6205d4e736be5
'2011-12-28T23:50:06-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
2dbfd528036a3a7dbbd2b315f618f739
76ec1e0134f83e9bab122562be574077551c57bb
'2011-12-28T23:49:44-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10793' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
7b0a77f287697d7b77a32670f033794e
4e17816c207a3aa094d1ca116e0aaf9af6fca8e8
'2011-12-28T23:49:02-05:00'
describe
'322708' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUL' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d4e5273e3c27529246a4c35323530778
cabd2c1d5867765187417bc741fe1a8008807616
'2011-12-28T23:49:49-05:00'
describe
'143959' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
93b0fa6db21b7c14eb3432a877527b60
ad9dceaa07c34167645b012cee7a8152729e21bb
describe
'27005' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f0fc6bf36b87b8d328c7aa6e40f7a65b
1f2d74e87ebf14da9b5dd89b3a7537e51b50ae02
describe
'43767' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2b269b0f2b1989680a781cf9fb18470f
8093621b4b116381f666d65b0e1758a4f942ba17
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
3b39544e7dea886c5cc0dae1a0e16b90
f39d3f54aae6aafc346585d5af5f4e205e4f04cf
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
0c7dc209218fbbba585b0d0d682dc6bf
75882c2a830f78b481596302a9ae0e60b3da805c
'2011-12-28T23:50:59-05:00'
describe
'11295' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
e5a898f55537371209f08eda2acdffee
3c65c76317df527f85d85ab8ba90c12a5dad4b82
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
dbf4f372ddbaa23269556981e23e194c
325e1d1d7893ff55d8fbbac8bb7830d6ea2f0342
'2011-12-28T23:50:15-05:00'
describe
'143229' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ff55b60cec7af0ae775548107c7fe330
64961421bfbed547aaf85e3c917c4fdd9c9eb1a0
'2011-12-28T23:50:27-05:00'
describe
'27714' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
eadef08e67b1b6dbec19c2cf3ac3fc1e
f7dcfa49941bcc553e93a422546845e352a919fe
'2011-12-28T23:50:20-05:00'
describe
'42899' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
5202bfb513556cb5f5b7235323d4ed00
04512608f5fc3bb4b87ced79a5578fe621f533ac
'2011-12-28T23:49:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e4cfe14977219141b11a4dcdfa847b3e
1130e35374d2ca320f71a1d9fc6423d01ca962bf
'2011-12-28T23:50:31-05:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
b6ea127e29dd3dc951dd24e06d6d62e6
660815e789ba017d0932d4e87991f0c4968f56a3
'2011-12-28T23:51:20-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
979e9a417ed4a53eae0ab4ab9de31ebe
36b1010b6f48e65459ffcfbf8983dc23e2870cce
describe
'322740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDUZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b3605d2359714346dcb081ff24979e85
e16996820140e026635917fa6f33f2cbba1d3c08
describe
'111836' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
55bd16293067f377da0105fb98c8899c
8c1938a0d3f343957db52e1fdd4b1ae99f2f043c
'2011-12-28T23:51:38-05:00'
describe
'22167' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
64d93db158ea46507874642a7d4410c7
db84d0a6e9a1c1c800c77d37e99447593c04a651
'2011-12-28T23:50:21-05:00'
describe
'37220' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
228449392dd1e110f8315442be16ce3b
0d02c0b13dcf4603544f4328314e28cfc0dad6e6
'2011-12-28T23:49:37-05:00'
describe
'2599584' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f33f480c9870779c4fa955438028d456
a82d33b71778b60c1b5a7195a63766c67f5aa061
'2011-12-28T23:52:02-05:00'
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
de16e11fd3b3a7831c5cfaf9d047284a
992592f24e71b0038c9dfb85838c08eaecc0c02b
'2011-12-28T23:50:28-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10207' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
fa94131b422415712854eb0b10dd0285
610a175c5c6e694c24a176dcf0f3ad04eee24730
'2011-12-28T23:49:29-05:00'
describe
'322755' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
1b5d3b7d83c19bf9f06aef691489992b
078271acb6011c623107366b5999fd103bcf9e35
'2011-12-28T23:50:23-05:00'
describe
'143398' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ced3e32b5f52b1c181660a8a0ca743e2
3d3a12d602510f560ddac776a71c6dd0b693fe24
'2011-12-28T23:50:22-05:00'
describe
'26143' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ac323b43a01219a9bd505f0ba5cbbfb2
7a72ca3ba65ff152c60db4f76f0e821b3ba20689
describe
'42192' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
976ae169bf55846d3786b31ae67df7ab
78dda2338a8e1b458ca72c87359413319dde46dc
'2011-12-28T23:50:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1ad791c4fda7f9f23a9ce946056b8111
df230768c9c1dae0e85224a5eff95b41b25df4e9
'2011-12-28T23:51:02-05:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bd0b0c2265388ecff2675e6cd4149ace
277bfa685cffb69fa5c434523fe77c0003990f92
'2011-12-28T23:52:12-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11044' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
354ca527a2e16a87804e4a29eda9e7ae
c073a9fc9889018d6ebeeeaea588c91a4e81a321
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1a6ea993879ab8ca06ed262f4b45db66
e9fe46f35b726d071eae3932983dbe3e6d32b04a
describe
'146374' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
9d266712ab57ffba0fdf963d64e0d39c
09a97975d0929f66821ddc744018c43c7be2a8f1
describe
'27298' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
03f0bd4f0ffb85805b115c7bbc216f18
d5984b5cc6f2406d0d1d3a59c2e9a034e3299bf7
describe
'43994' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d9ed4c72a8b3068201140d8cfcd1bbea
7598aacb28190ab3e1376ae499b9f7eb818b8af7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1dff75d8d75bc8b8ba361054a654def7
b8e18f6f8e5778d23d54d8f225f1ca39dc4710ca
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
f9adede4d32aca15ef25b241c6b0b5a6
bef1d563e38fd1657bc26a77b57609b2b0127e06
describe
'11425' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVT' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f65dcd0913972c82a3271665f62416c6
0336107190462ac7ed6eda9515b28ad3defb202f
'2011-12-28T23:50:17-05:00'
describe
'322774' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
21af178679c170c3cc4fcc8fdd680e54
35fbbf5717e6b8fb88e81581ff3853efd6e1c736
describe
'137736' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
f58223736d93e445155cc59b5b9b66f5
1889ad66d19688c86b1d6a1b5defe4d9e57d95a6
'2011-12-28T23:49:08-05:00'
describe
'25275' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c6cdd72bb5011236eba9ef4f02f69618
1a545e3c015f8d0854fddf67dd119a13c678bf1d
describe
'40506' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
44151a2e9f0899ea596b9d6e98b517e5
0fdcb27de04b838fd12cf3515e1fb254dd2fef17
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9d6dcba36c10ebd2f7e889cb0e2dc7aa
0b3845edd6229a3eb1e9b0a6a64a1786eee2a6d4
'2011-12-28T23:52:00-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDVZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
2a6a24d772b1b09825371b14d310e690
876ea36bf4a21636a92408eca78ed21d26343a32
'2011-12-28T23:51:45-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10175' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
fb450b8edada43680bb62d40fdcf39da
0d6dd614aacd53a3cef099fd83200db91c9783cb
'2011-12-28T23:51:51-05:00'
describe
'322757' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
dc270ebad89db00663cd1fed127c3448
20666ae1f8c12e607ef7c3cf00da7673386c1e83
describe
'145601' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3ad30bbd9c2fe46d2e26902080dc5fd9
ff538ad9622f74496982b6614d7ec298ce919f10
describe
'28186' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
23f87c2f04be7bca859b2900d5cc5091
66562555d345bb2af45c281bf28012aa19d157f6
'2011-12-28T23:52:17-05:00'
describe
'43959' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
5a2d5972600af63ea7bd161c74084be7
85c8dbd710cac4b6241ce54a5e11b1939340c7eb
describe
'2599164' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7a89f2d1d95c139cee58eafa38f3bfe3
4a062e1e0668e02dc7ff5be2bf77dfbd922a4c1a
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7a45de43a846ace0b759a718fcaa4075
770a7bb8ad18e9eeda21df0078b24db165ded5fd
'2011-12-28T23:51:15-05:00'
describe
'10771' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d06e06a64481d665a695898fabda67b0
76afe83d433cce9f18b2e1e17deacfa4d05ec0f8
describe
'322800' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a63730bb20560137e28def3558d3dfe5
da8c97647ee0958ef34bd39e945d047e4869af9f
describe
'144128' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fd3e826309680b2c7f72b70ec23911d4
dd7574912c2c49aa5034ddc2a8f88e1d55b510ee
describe
'27388' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
97ff9790beff781b839caa8265751c2b
b1932330a42fb7c95792a0dea79ae22b8dd28899
'2011-12-28T23:50:56-05:00'
describe
'42848' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d9424544fa7958c3bffced899648bbfd
e296d85dd7b96e2dd2657bc479e5c4e628755cc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
17242f792f76428db15b345510f45315
288cfae76aa09c02d0f4900cd9caff07e1dc68fd
'2011-12-28T23:52:25-05:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
d4798aa86990150e3cb38e7a1978ee00
2cd6753ab8f4f1209ea66971677016515722fcc4
'2011-12-28T23:51:23-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11120' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4fd2307ed835ad3a8502d0885b291ee7
323a1606cfc0246278cd97e74b7e51c9d6669d7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
dd60f4465f94a2bdea16e542a218b333
b96bac582d484731c9f9e581dbba10b2e5f5f602
'2011-12-28T23:51:50-05:00'
describe
'117632' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
23045ed6d2b3404c606ef802165ec0d9
e138379af5c7e7590723ee9c1fa8e3260059457f
describe
'18760' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e1bd6764373ebb4ffdadc5c29d887831
147cee90c65fa2055680086476cb83ebf79d9a66
'2011-12-28T23:48:52-05:00'
describe
'33655' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
10cd6e3ecc2ef5c1441e16519fc7152d
e0e8428cf8f1e86500f5fc138dc2281a69f80f46
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a3422ae533f99d8436ccbf35565398e7
ecaf71496e32eb839424ce12fc1f9494f5c4a721
'2011-12-28T23:50:57-05:00'
describe
'701' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e917015f1ee70cea276cb2c22ad8d8c6
ed5c8cfb590acf81ea923eb80f46762cd3d0749a
describe
'8947' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1cd440949d092f356e0c02814027274e
10a40b601a684276af52b95d72d0e458923a7086
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
424015d90709485126b50d3fa4261ec1
2d4e3fda1258daea6aab45eaece5e5db9cef2d32
describe
'135659' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
34c9a7b42b4026e83dfcd0f18b2fc5b0
259fe25eb3de904df36d9164ebcf3f1c4371fd35
'2011-12-28T23:49:59-05:00'
describe
'25333' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
7c613f20b1b56485f98fab52182d3842
ae6a7cf400bcf07e1a0537ac239d31e400c29667
describe
'40353' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDWZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
865bf3820b4b45d71d5a17ea8b26d0f6
cef91fa2cd47de5941f5119c52c0ea2d5bf1a94b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
78650e5a6a370bc1210f2770c0dbef59
5be79d0a5a92e3dec0e254e6863fbc964ef71dfb
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
71647ceaebaf38085fdea2cf5fb3ecdb
a7e8809ef1a9868518172ad62460f5e9e75b28bc
'2011-12-28T23:50:24-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10352' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
3e008c338638938171854b4ac8bbd9a1
6f7477a3a7e7a18f2d75376159193bdb2148a044
'2011-12-28T23:51:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXD' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
5a5fe3e227c8be47cc50ea2e0e2242c6
f1145388592b788ce33fa59d3ef16e0d547badd1
'2011-12-28T23:52:29-05:00'
describe
'134740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a76e9e6fb511b60e74ca4084df899d3c
60f9cfba53048272485a90308f6d81f27aa98f27
'2011-12-28T23:52:03-05:00'
describe
'24999' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
533e187e836a7dd38696c7e5a0966358
39979e77e8386eecafbe34285e9d0eea8d430a11
'2011-12-28T23:51:32-05:00'
describe
'39463' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
09eb3202100904945a861f5c348cfb8c
4f60e32f7ab5c5a8faf19f58a7b8569ecd6da413
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8820f447f963af3f630eb6a765bd3732
a23f6765abf0e48f73770aa48ffa772ad3cf499e
'2011-12-28T23:50:58-05:00'
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d926cea1294aad069ad277560e88ad5f
3bade8a0d8520b4130ffeb8f5f503af4ff666a3c
describe
'9936' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c428d2b3f6e771801b065b4868e89462
fea3388bf58d9cf142b72cd0b856146ff9a742d0
'2011-12-28T23:49:43-05:00'
describe
'322801' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
804226af4e34f954d16734c8dc550fc8
9d3808be9f12368fe9717fdaacd78b6bb3fd543d
'2011-12-28T23:50:05-05:00'
describe
'145662' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
ccb1e4a501fa8f3e9430331d0f5f014c
ae197c6605fc669cfdcacca1579a08e7d33ab5cd
describe
'26848' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
c8dc2eaffdd657e36d1237ca91fb6b06
03b62b6eb2d16b070bdd09462870acc4a42e1a96
describe
'44352' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
87886205caade33940fe267a0b6b3ce1
7e07f1ced00e48d8726b940009a26c352a2998d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
94ada42427e8acb9b1c5e8535420f40a
fece137745d83337d2f908e74664c56dfc2ac6e6
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
53e0e22789bbeba1fba3f7f5fdad1243
b22dd9727c1b7f110686544bc3760e79f7a294f4
'2011-12-28T23:52:32-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10985' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
ad3965d59248a93b1fae77a29b87c231
c4048fdbae5ed37322a2f9185302c13bd78f24d8
describe
'322588' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ea31a24717b04130c03f9993c40b420a
f33312b29ca8e264e326d28aeb400c2bd3ae9d7e
describe
'141349' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
6e774295e132fc3563aae30dd45a76b6
be628f323065c0476f819e2e079a9b9768c327e3
describe
'25649' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a59983fbea0028ce7c42fcb3f79819e4
7cc227d3b5e220fbab10ca8de5f1f7c858ac0ab7
describe
'42065' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a19f8a48a3e0215fb3ae8f46a18f68d5
574d1719393ed4d817db0ac8e8d34e6f18b52cb4
'2011-12-28T23:49:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
6cf64b6dfbaa3950b1300a464cb9c2c6
8d63b2c3517739b4e27b79dcab4c8cb05216e27a
'2011-12-28T23:51:18-05:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
92be032e4fbae1dd396d8a38347f0392
07dc12f064d72ba22f29581fd767c600158a28e8
describe
'10380' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
046e66662e531aeb1d4a086499927bc7
1df6fc733100424f8682e2e213fdd1dd096b429d
describe
'322697' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
456790d05ac48af033013ff4c52d95a8
346bea16e759cb773af87aa88a6063bfb7f07308
describe
'141314' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDXZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
d0fa8da3f04ba0cb3e8cf876387e9c50
9574c78dfaa6e39f2c3b7f9651425f9008f69a9e
'2011-12-28T23:51:19-05:00'
describe
'27151' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4b85b65b4ed8ea5c57d058bad4989d49
35ea5980488add1a9366bf4eab94b64b2d449315
describe
'41540' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
27f27f606b83e13dbfa48e65948d79c3
766c402df5408a6cff9917195edebc69800cf41d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
913938f22946289bd4503357cee5a2a1
db32151635fa9828018d12fd7cd75f3f29393fe6
'2011-12-28T23:49:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
af68f80c307e71950715b893cde50e01
2ecf927e21bbf0a138f7ecf7713d755159ffa2ab
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10282' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
62a5258b0a9c236574c3054b28828056
d4ea3e87cca7218fc34f71038f9c890e7b73bb1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
3e0b4ba654eafc115c700c0fbbe7a511
7a45afbdcb1bab3bbb00bd9d56a7118290fcfe25
'2011-12-28T23:51:13-05:00'
describe
'128713' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
26549ed2a6605f3a74ae99d71c5e7d51
add9a82ff7233f2cbf349d48ebb77944ba471639
'2011-12-28T23:51:00-05:00'
describe
'23189' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d33d01553a0445e6fca371f86d0156b7
db0324d2ff7fccd071cba91008da845896abee0c
describe
'38484' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d1a7fb3d4fe62dc221bf14ba02e8791e
60358378d8bdfa60f1b23ca006cb4a0060f2e9fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
92b4e5daa6ff5498cf783bab9175eaed
eb8fd550541d0f7f319338c73ef74728582bbc69
'2011-12-28T23:50:13-05:00'
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
93b3ae15d0111e207cab77abdccd7e67
a8bb4c6235abe6c47d0145d28d76ffd112e85de2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
4f17d5c09c85fbcdbaab183406c2cc9b
36835de4f62aa4d6c8dc72953982f9a9aa912288
describe
'322702' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
81790d14e0ec5a2fd256fec6b1bc4ad6
b57a6d6dea4e1c0ca9b94a1b55b8112dbcb2a387
describe
'141032' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
e6df5238a087c06aec096e7dbab296f6
d88b90c7fbdde9be05151d1d77aa24e0424941d5
describe
'26965' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
ddda09e3c19cf1f6137f06271bebc175
024103265aeca6b35a39fefdab942e8145c1c868
'2011-12-28T23:50:10-05:00'
describe
'42178' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
32b1ebdbacde66421a58f5a4fc317aea
200b21c74bec4395f701f2d22f2305c4688601c3
'2011-12-28T23:52:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
8166c8fb08561e455a40e73f6658b297
226587184564d5bae0d1b7368139fba75e6acbb6
'2011-12-28T23:49:20-05:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
95c65e3f6a38326a009fc1cf2f5b01bc
5b9039cbc79751f68f833660efa198056d551f40
'2011-12-28T23:51:56-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10838' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
ad9e9b44e48833553de0e061d059c9cd
1fd5fd71d34fee4234b32656c2ba559745f6ac31
'2011-12-28T23:52:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYT' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
872e4b8c2bca31db99954dc4d7598386
f12e52ba05ba919c65f3c27e79b9bcc23607fb72
describe
'140316' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
e99f83b65e478922a9fb65d6b86d3e0b
158488ac18caca73851f50372d5ce65a64337b63
describe
'26970' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
115ae1e1524874d73f317013f966ed11
1ca3bc1ab50509d0c5c4c04a2f2fcc33d62223e9
'2011-12-28T23:52:05-05:00'
describe
'42002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
cf0a45629d4642e270a4f0736c653f4f
2bf7f73c2cd494eb9cf406b3bb895730b02e147a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYX' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d28eae26668a958b2f8ef3fd0b529d5f
4883a328f31d1c6da58f39d32c173d2af7aac904
'2011-12-28T23:50:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYY' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c6e10bbffa3e63b55588ea3474fef9e7
a533e07c321a097c7b30ac7a6f28734773e24b46
'2011-12-28T23:51:35-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10533' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e88caee06bb65fe3c8f150e8a13d10ef
f7b61e20fd8e690977e3bb07f29d7effea39c649
'2011-12-28T23:51:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
716b319b6fe5f87e0925c00425bd01cc
77b51118a57c816cf9f906e0219f1af4aa4b799a
describe
'142117' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
cc099766d7256e682294f0def1719192
f5a4146ae5a77d6ca54d48a620e1d9263ee98b99
describe
'27195' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b7c74958a10f2b55544b4e69b34225e8
f62d4ca61ee7abf3d9ed8c514910b6c88605707c
describe
'42672' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZD' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0c364ca51820f77c17475238cf37c719
40881aca39ab13a4743415502a75631e4cc01b59
'2011-12-28T23:52:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZE' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f7959d59146ebe5ddbbcf298753eff9d
928364fd956c83767da0e43940bd79a3ea5b0f71
'2011-12-28T23:51:46-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZF' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4dd57b8c0db60e7fecaec6f498e225b4
210e0f64af6f2b3208b2be742180217bb76fad78
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10546' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZG' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
90ba36642075eff59b417e79c3465294
ac747a25cf55dd3cf824b90abac1a7f814b58b2d
describe
'322692' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
220013fb7eb00bd97c1f3d9e8f9ea228
106de2ea4fd9b5be89f520167e62175474111af0
describe
'122477' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
dc4316858bc7d4bf2d3ca7e75f350e93
699c5a02791812fea829637a3b12b35dd6060c69
describe
'21024' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
dd27e563b30c01a72327e1cf058a16a8
6dafa9ee1f374a666cb4ecddac38a7e7496fd4f4
describe
'36473' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
1f4c3c4c4ff76d60454fee68da528eb6
5407062817d0c58f8bc7353c056fe265b22e8ff3
'2011-12-28T23:51:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7815e90b36a230a4d294adb72f40e3b1
a9fcc0d82df43ec8c672f62978f4ea9879c29074
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f95d513fc29559418475754b52b32241
67d802dc4caeac05b53ab99883d2c6c8b1cef3a4
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9326' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
3cc46bd177d70cf51adfd5faec8ba899
c07fdd681368f0ff683e3850cfefb342d1b1d4d3
describe
'322790' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
56769efa2006f1203910a43736274743
6cfbf86a9b61813d187beb64f6a499616373532c
'2011-12-28T23:52:27-05:00'
describe
'133017' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
7f554127440c9f27c790543863082441
c58ad4a2f4f4c9d998a56013bbca65860885c14e
'2011-12-28T23:49:18-05:00'
describe
'24945' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d3e66971e4f0985d8cf3701042cdbee4
25816f74c067d9bdb336a0945ae3ae8991c2b089
'2011-12-28T23:52:26-05:00'
describe
'40260' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
44979c45cf748c14534113961977c1ab
767e1d1c1a922c7bb2182cb76657159765a58d16
'2011-12-28T23:49:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
4bbde8571396004a88e8d8e53c7be1cf
e870aed12dc02170865747ff636117cd1bdf1981
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
19c1dc2ba8e91339a32463bb7d4b9824
868312400b0265693dd63fc97973646ec9f05b9c
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10257' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
e2218804085b59108d5bac7be6203407
169a4ebe61bc84a13da966d885b91b318112d562
describe
'322781' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5e83e830ec00132b6afae7ef89886d5d
438707e043d83958f2bd8f5e211ae165b788e3fe
describe
'113937' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
9562786556d85837dd9f8a9a592ecaae
bd56c85c7cc24e3424042f2acb96b4da23898694
describe
'22940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
ba39fe89fd3abf581dc94fb305ce32e0
4f6f8a507c46372d7daf81d67c914889e9f084fa
describe
'36689' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
7105e9d64c1fe793526c3607696f8477
0f758d7344ec95c84760187f67e42db33a58890d
describe
'2600076' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
96a32c3f633ab4a116bd7293ab98f2b0
65755880d164f693cba99127cd300acee0c4492f
'2011-12-28T23:52:11-05:00'
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
da821569e0819d5d3fc4e42d5dbfd635
3e6095ce4bf70dd7ecf09c68651903b8f6f9537d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10936' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
4e8d1a46ed25b634a513d36f2994d786
b2c6952ee61c23c6584eef293fe0594cda221df8
describe
'322767' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
262ac76c59080e4d9b903e27bce72ff6
0c3e40e1cc2270b4374aec6bbbeca4d16f27d925
describe
'140458' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ad1c94e4f7323d164dcfe1e33236fe90
534ed2feb675bbed8103a197f42ab58eb51c82a5
describe
'26772' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
c954ae6656b61614d844dc7149d986c8
be4db3e823b57f3e2fbbc7322fb9509fb6512e98
describe
'41821' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8cacfae9adcbabde8e8dabdf0fdea05f
f8309c870cd59e777a573ed6941db74782157bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c2ad925b533731996be507ab31749e4d
fd21a33da402c3f374eb4210db34c507e8793a29
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d5610d03e296b1874f8c5638d2137fc5
728c6f251337dc9fbf0a14afe86fdcbf2388808b
'2011-12-28T23:49:05-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10716' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
891541c265b07cb705a81040e37bc382
e332795ee15d859e2529a3cc71f928c23d8e40b3
describe
'322729' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
ba98d4ba514e49bb5c8dac7f9e2eb0ba
4b906a7c1f661b5e7189602fa901b7e30947b50c
describe
'133907' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
9b2a8f25ace22dfd75d406f047162f1d
ff107ae2bdf2f64179d1092bd6830d2cfe468d98
describe
'24549' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
160c5f559b3b801aed6306d6c9780d1b
559db3fde78e6042ed58c1dca5dc7d1b1d0f0503
describe
'40117' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
06098a8ca5bb556c31faec6be9dae3d9
022cc413039be236a8b26767c9fa2d40883ee55a
describe
'2599160' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f506f7d55b32ad3e31a9b616d46a510f
a81d67048f9baf4871a386ee6b6ef8197963aa98
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b74ce5a531333098b5100b2ee9fcc382
9d573bc6432b90769ac923962c549a4f161bb2b9
'2011-12-28T23:49:22-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10436' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
15883c7815433f25813e688b75202484
17cdf05fa47bebb049fb6b7863fb7658e669e439
'2011-12-28T23:52:33-05:00'
describe
'322782' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
b11c5a63266d33bb2f52cbb4ba3cb035
4d8a79c4f1f9c2fda1ba6e1d24ff1c7f85f1d421
describe
'133046' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
af81e548b049e5d479a66031d2529283
5d5dd96cbe0619642cb59297d716d06583d789ce
'2011-12-28T23:50:51-05:00'
describe
'24501' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
6c0cdc4fa1cd2a6704d7f7428083608f
ef99d275d6ecc8ddee07095cc4c41d550b05bd09
describe
'40749' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d552b273defe5465bf4c75a4cdf01ab1
618bc7ce9fcd4a766a9e97e7a676f913949db852
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d2fbed700b7ef5078379165074b126c7
f7cdba604e8b90b2a45647918e03960d45a8469f
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
176a377ad8f54d072f8974d344382000
834f8479935b97c3fbcbfef9e853206f5835fe05
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10028' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
1355a3204f3a4f3145ec82e33718a55d
fb3294e6d1493e0e670062da17207178d81a91a7
describe
'322760' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4345f5f04a787be06e71e8ea56c2b875
49ce6c7cdd69289cbd1bb0b68cc60fe69ccf3b2e
describe
'125292' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
eb9fb1b9e44eb6977c034da79b6b7bf5
b16aa84e3c4425ea24a01a55332915eedad941e4
'2011-12-28T23:50:35-05:00'
describe
'21213' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
bc23645d84ca2d100c28327e7b09260f
1eda7290dc0b26d38286b43780b740231b861999
describe
'36704' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
86334f772f76eb59c92c61ea17f4d6a8
e35bf6a1d3a167c02411d7803c16f2227952e1b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
08622a43488b6826bb008c1a2ece1ab8
1bc14565263b2245d9c32c8e7e1a7edcb1be99a4
describe
'783' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
150899770b920ae1c3f17d1c98cd7d76
7f0b423e4bcdd26da02ba2ed89a926f0e2e7e469
'2011-12-28T23:50:47-05:00'
describe
'9441' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1c7e43941e0eb365b2199402291e5f67
e7de5d5142551d82c14ec6d9dba622f9c7d2aa6c
describe
'322688' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
187d03ea85b87f35ddba2bbed2de07fc
bf1b068f860b2db872f34317967000252d901c88
describe
'145462' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
363ade19d8aeb27c6baab259c4b2dacd
148d7dcc3dd2a71476a47ede9e28ebbae23c9321
'2011-12-28T23:51:25-05:00'
describe
'28192' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
88747931a72048e6b41e5a472c669a15
4b2b32c24c4005bf830dc5ef749350f24c08c101
describe
'43131' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
bf735432b054dff1df32599e12ed9a7c
3c51208013f5bff4d583bb39f260625d86c86c63
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
715e023f7c4650147787119b8b12c088
9c3b51f59c46c20b689b0c2da8984fbe483c8af1
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9f2e062eb05b90d028233b732b95312f
bdbfc6b76acfa457cf25d9f12b244561d23e95ca
'2011-12-28T23:48:59-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10666' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d5d188b9d97dbf5101e22bd30ff8caad
c4028354a3e4c5a3b4b16896ffbc0c64fef380ac
describe
'322805' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9ef7b16841168e14196ba20290a90960
2bb644023b1a5245a45b7cbe4d6da91a7cb40593
describe
'137264' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
aff31a68bd39dae0f848b9df445f1a89
ae657d6951f02f3a7e1a38e9adcbeea86c07629e
describe
'25143' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
179d0c0f18478ac759f77a04f360199c
74ecd0a09b2fa4ac392b50d3f8ae98d6acdd0723
describe
'40951' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
eb2616b327f5d08c9111c9e8776d3aaa
3b28ec2fc06725833bc6920085732d88abde81c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
8774c253e62d060f847cd55233e95b9a
277848bbe3e775e36b992d70aa417bbe2b72fcef
'2011-12-28T23:49:23-05:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
579672e051b7e0ce653a6f2ccb7b3618
789843449819e8b88f2b4a469ae3176963d532cd
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e7978146d06cabb466bbe3e3e97c7830
ffbf6f7271efec6170a2bd71680f519c488cf443
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
4e6f8f547bd4fa98c4363ef401fdc4c3
c4205d36e824383149edd9d9cec36f01333745cb
describe
'140734' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
bd7c795fb31b0ec73d49c3e119b43b2d
09d586c71d5c1e0b52bbd266aec4e0c1bfe10d64
describe
'26049' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
edda2b8bcc030bc010c7132f500c325c
a6e51c160c0fdb0bffee2a7a8c1c33a27e35ae29
describe
'41215' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
9e2fe4b07a9392ae5e44083f0e2063e7
c04acda69a6a1a2e5d9eadbd3e4892d95292f25b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3be2f6af6cb7ee5ef8d2315eb8f2b17b
babbe251ae9335c7f915fff7fe8e234d554089c7
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
fe68bdfcad78955c991abf1369c70cb0
4041fba52ce87f2549d40e241cf0e78c99ed8a80
'2011-12-28T23:50:42-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10401' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d62c54061a89f2adc7ccb087dce14b9d
f9d15eed5c66583f67df05ede1a978028488393e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
af6c55efe64e1e3a88383d955202ec59
2815fca60f2480b12dc81ee31974c67c7ffa7b28
describe
'144887' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
0ee2fde3abb0cbf3aa0ddf8c232c8aa5
d4e42bd1b42ac84f9c804f1b4723ac22d32a784c
describe
'27135' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
a8dbd2e5d3cac43cd4dd28cc4d22ffab
43d45c7fddb184d795f2628060c9d07ee5c0ba35
'2011-12-28T23:51:31-05:00'
describe
'43045' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
a1446a9d1d607bed55b4cd38b571b936
6f046ff1f19f5a89cdedb00566af76d4d11d7531
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
fafba521de8c6b011d7d8b8750243491
7dee1adbc10c8d009b3e71d3ebc3f6983a7057f5
'2011-12-28T23:51:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
a825bcf87b01892741424f177e06f48c
417a15c80a7b0f32970cbaad14245352651c51a6
'2011-12-28T23:50:29-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11091' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e7449bbf6d172a644dfedd2aa447abf1
d9e9859ac3df740ca4749f27c9044324247ceccc
'2011-12-28T23:52:04-05:00'
describe
'322797' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ed2e793453b19b079e82c0f048b21585
7462a21b75172c2ac25e4187c9d7fb49e9edb6db
describe
'143177' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fc660a0be33c745038d1f92aa17a76f9
e6e365855be419f84e5ef472f3573a7576e772fc
'2011-12-28T23:49:01-05:00'
describe
'27154' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0d0b5039682b848fe6d06f7a37ed752e
ff8b69a3fe3b661fdd4797bb04e2d1713de76ac0
describe
'42905' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
bf09f92df852c3edc75eebf1e70e8360
1f1288223857604036b8068a3765c13dc87d4785
'2011-12-28T23:51:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b6b4ad4d4cf47a6572c97711badff680
576727009cf794cbfd12a57cde9da2c62352f994
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
38f190b09f7a77b44497e70a17311ce0
36d8cea46a298352ef135810e05671c25f884e59
describe
'10475' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
538117f4b604ee9d97877a1cd5af4807
e6a6972e5ca7e00dfb40f4509e94e22e0d7dc861
'2011-12-28T23:49:57-05:00'
describe
'322806' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7b2c8dbde9f544e84c03f879b6dac88f
2433a4f430238a29c488f2d3a435246641743aef
'2011-12-28T23:52:31-05:00'
describe
'148395' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
b994858acb5e17dea2ccc4c029330186
25508081208b59d8b0ac1d8dfbf1f7febd6911e5
'2011-12-28T23:52:20-05:00'
describe
'28273' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
0f93ca9139b3feeb493066d4d126a185
2c467c53fff73e331d3731515cb53e82175b87d2
describe
'45304' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2d57e9eaa4f705e8f03e0896a1bcf0f8
a899eddf8bb1f2db60c62faa6729f815c8b5d6ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
648d1a3bfb5789604314f199b33429a2
c2d2020bd0ed9b5c8de12169337462e7356d96c4
'2011-12-28T23:48:58-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ba0a320850ea5532ffe5bd7cf6419c54
abb33f02efd10dc87e78c04bfde42fa433f8c284
describe
'11573' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECT' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
de1c12e2002bf3d8356ce80482d7ea47
73d2d08c9f7a263c21de027e35d60e2570fd5013
describe
'322684' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
116f09014c4c7d1a7637973e35bc76be
b339ff7237239830c7d47369309c8e62614caef1
describe
'119501' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0a3cc75c1a7e67e03dc1f287db67f093
3e569f4840c96df180ea49a289c6a2310ce0b08f
describe
'20303' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
62874e64864f8dea0d5222fb3b7e2abe
76fd18151275cb4e08a8096a7a08030b35751440
describe
'35035' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e65a2bf02eb2ceba105e12e192ec40e8
30ec1e08a803ad822347a50beb52b5513caf641f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
058d58554211c39cc31599f8fb379a9c
d1735494804f2aa2db63b4f76e18f728dff1186d
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABECZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
87438253c120f6c71a50a78b9b29da8e
df34b66a42f183e924824ad7edc1722cb3e3d641
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
a5b220cb1f9dc1aca624959c1fc1461b
d217dddeb03fc94331cdde7b3cb0b1c138e8685d
describe
'322718' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2d9107cb3a72fac591f7c4a3800057fc
b69da71ad293a02fa91fb2405d07ef61f2a3baaa
describe
'139054' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
808b0878624d614b28313c1a91d88261
4e8a499fb70fa554ffdf32883ec2a3b3e2192ff8
'2011-12-28T23:51:34-05:00'
describe
'25629' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e2c3b323df5a532fcbc8535e38e94883
d7f2bedb41ecae1150d9637d6de73f999f1c86d8
describe
'41606' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f4daf4a4a2c795245eab84ccb0cf395c
7dd5c4258634247c0fb2001b96d9f711401bc9e7
'2011-12-28T23:51:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b5a17c465ac0edea3d16320fc8dab7e6
405561e9a52c47d66df9643915d2d25270f54872
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
e8e9165178c9e0966314d8e379f94337
f0ca8129985f4e99135847e4ff3f2750fb0e6ff9
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10870' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
199f8cbb61dd8175e630585d0a867d46
fe73af2c1259cb91940f5a9f0686b5278619c7b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8e132d0564e7f25c2ee0bb73889f8374
17f5cf116c68555805820818c7c46e4dfc927da7
describe
'142912' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7dbd436f6b985ed37d268f1c7796f2f9
5db5cae5fed73c017ad340b584c4c65cf9010f7e
describe
'27143' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
03d7afa975bb3db4078485552c5fa947
98f4b6707d9ad738baec237fd24949c0f088e444
'2011-12-28T23:51:47-05:00'
describe
'42716' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
78c897842cba6c8d95bb687e42b8e6ff
3f1919a56e7a7abbb6f31352663c9da9d76a2c4f
'2011-12-28T23:51:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
994d0f988cde6f01164f97c319830dfd
d9db696fdc196d89bb537982a0b1e3cfde9ff22e
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
94a3be5f1afd3022559c38034a066c60
1749bd4d7995a2578f7d4cc1c29442bf05203f44
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11260' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
8de805c2760e1d7677b327f4856251df
0e24fd8817d1cdcbe249ef006a3e90be1ce1447e
'2011-12-28T23:49:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
83b2304edf458ea9ed2257b30faafba8
78278bb3c24c0fe91ce2f928238a5210536c4120
describe
'147227' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ae32c111b9addad71624c9585711a493
9b1dafdf02c86ea11295d5086e0a634b6eadaa59
'2011-12-28T23:50:53-05:00'
describe
'27718' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
05fe8527bf9d0c2f8ab8b90557c56894
3e258a7d155e105388cd0c6b7e24873a5ee5abd6
describe
'44704' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3b025c94bc9791c36a90828627e8a0e6
778916a5edfd2818a5784a267217cb24158f6000
'2011-12-28T23:50:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ff2a509be711a86f4a915bbbfa961ad5
99ed6f1f421412f1c8d974aed04efecd0dd9ec87
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
ae77fc33724d839fb5ca003fffffad45
7f9e88dc0129844c8b4e388c43bde54a19a18246
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11360' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
eafbbed341beee9aef392271f992a310
c35d6b0979de1a71885266f2a5b2acd8b4905ab8
describe
'322696' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
3dad83db712fdb19e0daef8f984cc887
70a7342cc18b5946f456bf2d3944d93b1dab7b7f
'2011-12-28T23:49:13-05:00'
describe
'144801' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
27ebca0c5b46fb9af4b2759b4a443236
e8495e11825c329ba83e8109d8a3dc9a23589280
describe
'27701' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2eb0a404f03ceeef46eab52c6e613a9c
7fba195a5e644ae5bc8790a7d59cea9044e5777c
describe
'43729' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
077892facf37df39d76b39064b66b9cb
6c6e59542ed533e11aaa6b846877f8bc29d86933
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e6a9d13b202794ddedab304b61a21abd
26867e23f5140c2923ce9157db52656cae3b124c
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
47678c45c29e3b39259fe50af5df0b6d
7951b8f7fda5cd2b6e04494466a955c6eb7b5fe9
describe
'10865' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
70d86ac0188daee18bb42599688d05a5
41368cde280090c6a55324c16f44d5bd7df18224
'2011-12-28T23:51:26-05:00'
describe
'322762' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEED' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
94e3adeadb857b83257667abb7bf67be
32609d09bd8ace2971dad6b4bcb263f7c3d45255
describe
'146341' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e066e93d8a792a3d54e9c3139388f508
c36b2d2f61aa8047cebae6326312bd2052bac802
describe
'27525' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
17523eb34421c6669365ab115523ab1b
f1aa32947a8cd4582bf2b8cbd4d331d6134ff324
'2011-12-28T23:51:43-05:00'
describe
'44427' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
83e57aafbf6b89f37a920998755d084d
b38eb6b5831712881103b5a79586ff5d15e60f80
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
0b097b9fbe6636cd6a9011cc33d5e87f
d12beaf5e23275af8a179fbc54afacaed1023c08
'2011-12-28T23:50:09-05:00'
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3a387465ff8ec6186ef28294f4a72c48
75566df364b805aa001d8d0f959d41f1941a90b2
describe
'11342' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7bf9f1da8c21896338ff2525543e4dc7
0ed40a785f032c66ea3d12e609b6c5912bd0c523
'2011-12-28T23:50:36-05:00'
describe
'322736' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
adf8e999a5d162d1c091cd434c315149
db834ff23a641c35aac1573f333c42e2bb03d1f2
describe
'146821' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
cfb131e6f27e840374763e59a65a1783
81998126fb9dc3efb44a7e40c1b23f9c9e675c5c
describe
'26918' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4266d001577a8909c7cc04b3b2857be1
8a66381f4482e436ec616f370f535f62356e0995
'2011-12-28T23:49:36-05:00'
describe
'43742' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3cb9f21207cc3548645a3f085fa78bae
cdf9c38d6f7ac8b3979d6df7684da7e168532e82
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
ffe12f81e4700a21b7946fb0928cde3c
4d8a3ac1f0c00a0851950351b8e6a0056857e652
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0ff160450e578ac98118408f5b47508c
468e2255d2afacc563b956ee9db483253c29c5e8
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11396' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
4d305d623b24a49c8283daba4f87fb7e
5d36c3a22bbfdbe23623c9f92273d5fa8030e4d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEER' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
714a22bf3f01b4ef9a3808847d922737
d497eddac3014fcb32fc058a0d2a3d01c424eb5c
describe
'141493' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEES' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
0786d3d1990f38001ffa09fad4418443
3b1ed610a919db1a544a9d8f501ad24f3630f273
describe
'26408' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEET' 'sip-files00063.pro'
67d021ae818265ca49127162cd608f9d
b3dfb356c517c08dc9b6ba82f346f57501bc822d
describe
'41932' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a5998fd0516c18344317b2ca55195e2d
461c2113fc9b5c08f888da1ac3f64a5d9d86963e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEV' 'sip-files00063.tif'
138044f57a0b8672850a731aef036510
0859475e7e3ac16c3f53504e1493a0dbbdf55496
'2011-12-28T23:50:14-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
3d0a6d19b25c97f3c54e06768e552afb
9f88641a93b2abe99472422b1b5b473e1ce32e96
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11155' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEX' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
382cbea89ecd41ecebe24b2b256a92bb
1647cbd563dc5ca6b035f28d3bfb7ca047f52100
'2011-12-28T23:52:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEY' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
d643e89c4fb55c435231eec479c55d7a
9e6e84c801d658c5bbb603b22392a3a4edfa80e1
describe
'141133' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
772cfa0b600a30011912bb7ad95cc2e4
b526201921b365a4b261d8b9ef8451972152b877
describe
'26389' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2194c16ee1e6d6ec39e38d8aa3152d6c
498d22638714ca8e07e1270cb0b5fe119650620d
describe
'41064' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
15a3904069e077e3de9fd686e37a0e51
77b4472eb70ce61220b6cb29ef4031f928534060
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
5180c5a9cbab9e9f9840e0fbc3e3146a
874658659ca34dd600dc886699236da329c6cd0f
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
8e36a11fc6294bf6063d32a29a692261
2fcf3bd32671f711e125998ead8f54e35c911b08
'2011-12-28T23:49:09-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10484' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2363e61d7912bdae9f8fa5419586c021
3f4fa2c0dee3fa4c9b483dd0ff3db384f0339d63
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
a5c08e8ae4d73896a8b072ccfe706316
d0559b81cd60fc91a76a02e578e8bea327dc3625
describe
'144956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
a36daa84769abf0fdd81afe0f43dbc6b
07b36a81f6f98e3d2bedfccca7957ec7392e6691
describe
'27840' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
de423608e0985affa3036d1ad85fabcf
186619fb610b630bb68988966a2ca8841ce98f9e
describe
'43304' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
8758b978cdd5a25b47f971ab91b24a68
4d46befb0b2587619d3e664c99870a26372b5fe6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
0cef8755e42cff31f9405df70d626455
929a18a4a809e4a14bd8a091861db289ea4698af
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
be8c03db1d692b65022128df9d526232
70c00223999ffcd7c750d6482bac2e45d5276459
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11439' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5398ba3ff51aa85b2f4cf69e18ba4072
3ae52093d9cf75c68e6c298ed2f0b47d5297ff1c
'2011-12-28T23:52:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
44a8df156f392f6bf36b702950eec290
9c1360cf126dced5abd49874f5c6ce52394e7101
'2011-12-28T23:52:07-05:00'
describe
'141633' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFN' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
41538165b0605bc5e7dc0b4ba302c72a
df843cb159d419efefe0cc206df95f926aaa47a5
describe
'26232' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
efe3005cc69f370cdea20cd13a6c21f9
9ba6deff252fe87fc96c3debc7d2ca318cf5698d
describe
'42082' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
ea9b432386d0db72f106765bd919c8c0
8ba3c31b7e4b95f65bdfc1ad62c8383be80de1b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5d50a7b39a4a9ba5279bb04ca3b3691d
795313070293effd53f3864114dfd3a51a52ad1b
'2011-12-28T23:50:12-05:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
eddf79898732e2190e1ccf8c2e54cc81
8d59e07a4bc8268e0a6ba607493f630a4855851e
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10907' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
675b353103bb07ea7bc90d4c6263f74d
d1fcf8f22e70dee1fc08e1ff1b1eea791270350a
describe
'322796' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
a66be7e094f9e4bf6d0cc5b275d770e0
01219252b951898f65788dba630e3203ac3cded7
describe
'143220' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b136d9eab8bcca0c70940cb521d3342d
c690d7e623b5c3718f340a7c0ce68f660c58bbe1
describe
'27091' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFV' 'sip-files00067.pro'
8f8191bb3451fe293f410f7e9e4625ba
3c717896e8b3f62e07ddd7214be430def3756af8
describe
'42734' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
383c7a31680cf59fa3a54862c01846a3
b7315f819c8042231f885941b4d4a010c6c82e2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2679902b75f5b396706dee5f548bd966
2f9133fafbec3ee49d476f643f5cf1ffdfd815a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
a7a207b06a70e132c4ecd820f5bb9a88
5111b6e0c10cda6bdc2917ad67ea46df6648ef1b
'2011-12-28T23:51:36-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11364' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
7f076463a9f346dda56c2b21ec26965e
f7e743e5f4455e004b7a453ef105b70807efb3e5
describe
'322766' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
789150d58f96ed8679ef43292eac4af2
64f1102555a0b00747466a40fa69fec2fecb1e65
describe
'133214' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
8296a368f2fad0c018d3690faf50b5c3
728ddde28dbcb80d8b647bbb18c99dea5c4a254a
describe
'24583' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
be2693e7d42d553e489fa11f0b147c9f
63f92a334d7dfa9310c101397447e7a7eae2c45d
'2011-12-28T23:48:54-05:00'
describe
'39047' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
316b73982769642444e58a5bcf737b93
5b8b7fcea68431a47b5aec82cb3e488fdaf57497
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGE' 'sip-files00068.tif'
e38b7267a0878db6eeb5c053a1026b34
57d0843bcb8c118e3182b82e5c7fd52bdfb21954
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGF' 'sip-files00068.txt'
84a3e2a244e3f72734bbb7026e709ed7
f2d72499834688a44828a2e28a14083c3f88bd05
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10605' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
0e8aa8906fc28ec812259068072ccd70
55d7ea487e6d5d01f8527d9a667a1d99683fa255
describe
'322699' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
68007a2dfed66ad50d2b9157df21aa5f
20e02580f9bd10131788e2a27ebe719e63cdcdb1
describe
'139348' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGI' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
15e35bc35ee12e7547dec95d8d59d7d6
eae5ae1ceb21c7a5b5201ed6cd69ba3097be41c3
describe
'25526' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
5cd3e9905a6139034c4f489b9a7a9dde
181647dabbef9ee3aaf21ee867fb61b87dad740c
describe
'40715' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0a8c847598ba2e5ea9b835d52dce9f66
267d22bd858572904fe51118f6f8d8fac1fabbbf
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
acefe4ef63fd6d1ce2335b28f4a28045
5d7488a3e4a2453ee1243b5d4b1f128e4e149f7c
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
3e018675802357d6228dbca46b6b0a8d
0126afa3941699e787ec7fdd41f0eb772ae6289f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10698' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
3557348d8560efebb6524a385a573add
5bfe17ffa3ff3b1c56d3eac55f9fb9b62e8c85c2
'2011-12-28T23:51:07-05:00'
describe
'322705' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
8bea79386e94cb81f7cd16e088dbc6c3
e8589bc8e50c917e851ada94750f5002f88990f9
describe
'133251' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
450f4850a03a1c547f2d0f13748efe6c
aa21a74a52bf508893d60c595153b68773429860
describe
'23034' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2dd18f10d952194adeca7e35a9d3ecbe
124cf3280c94138d3c742274094453806119bd08
'2011-12-28T23:51:53-05:00'
describe
'39985' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
40adf54fc9c5edcb66c6e7f453d5dc7f
6da2707d538ed61aef4a5c2eabeb98a03345bb40
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a83ee5fac02d65ab8bc8559d92dadd7f
e2115e0d212fc67fe930ec3405d8724e395fbb03
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a8b1b2029e8109806ab36139d93bae0b
2fa1100fb52e65a0a77b70e44249526fe8ae3e00
'2011-12-28T23:52:22-05:00'
describe
'9903' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
a68fa5ca9d5c52ddb4fba0a4a916af84
50143263c47c91d3b39071acc6eee980b050bf20
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
cb6b3f3e23fea5dc1286a0f5ea97438e
3b594394f613fb51d1c4ac7b96d6fec8fc83f245
describe
'151235' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
d2216691e45bd2f23ecdd7de054207c4
c9f32fc1abcc1291cce34a8ce9150ba96d0d18cd
describe
'28416' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4aeabd0c8e54699a499e71feb43a5d57
460cc330c03cac2dbc68e71599f63350e6626d62
describe
'44259' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
898d1b21cf0da7752830b5dd1434f097
0d9e6e71f111bc2c10ec7cd6c1d1ec97d9219b33
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e9cde290f99612f5a750baaf58d005b8
619f3255eb67258073a936af431329155b408272
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
68e3a019f0f023cd2c87b1e453a5c3ff
7b745dd6014beead32b00ac15ba0a97fcd09facd
'2011-12-28T23:50:32-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11385' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
a55448f4dd8d9f28841f512265d768a9
ff8b551cb1d3d57df5a73da1b537140ef82eb219
describe
'322575' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
89fcbe4c5865fee4ba2e5084489ac36c
4fdc0f3e80a596cb8e056b6edee2574653652493
describe
'138735' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
6f76e4aaa48305d1d45bcb7f088ebbb4
94c8eefaeae69c8ba42422b3bf775f8351f58029
describe
'27082' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
1394f559c50da7c7372c1e7b96961096
d82be23f31dd47ca51046067c9f9a9b7d1d4e865
describe
'40960' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
cbf39243735a042db400dee13286c1a3
843c8a4fdaf9d80790aa895661707074a5b3755e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHG' 'sip-files00072.tif'
467c8cd8bcc44e148418944c5d0d1403
f54e56af2bc83a4ebc06c650929fad58898d5abe
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d3e124c1ecfbf867c422eda922e5dc75
fd58ac03791cfcb567d3df4db38c0d06177d508b
describe
'10314' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHI' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b3859eea2a865b187cd5a529f1a7d05c
6f047d161974378e04f1dcb095ff99ec3e553e5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
5694e6407c14fbe24424ed9de6ccfb40
1ecfe2afd8f0b126865d3dc5998415e58e6dab4e
'2011-12-28T23:50:52-05:00'
describe
'131395' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f64697639cf8429250011c9c016ad867
0ff89ba552ef884be7d4ba8036edf1e59a44e3a6
'2011-12-28T23:49:48-05:00'
describe
'24074' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ca9852e80d15ce2417a920dc374e92a7
f5beef03d7b362687d0cfec5a659e44599496dff
describe
'38464' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHM' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
b56ca9003879a1774e143fa52d39a9b5
6296625c2b7cec0f033f641bf12c11bf0c959c87
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
d415c4793b021e81f8523140b698d986
c640f66256262bb88de7a75336eb44baeb76e793
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
1de56d097355750dd0541abc5f4f41c8
e8a8578f0328be721b3c2b8cf18cae9906b86d9c
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10702' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
ad2bec6253abffb8b5bfebdd87ed0011
bb8b3784f0dcfeb8ded02b82de09fd33e7373192
'2011-12-28T23:51:27-05:00'
describe
'322751' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9d910166e5d9e6e1794d23740e506857
ad2d8c427685ba308efc1e9992757969790557f2
describe
'135970' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
d1a29e93218e251b67ea258d0072945d
27bb0e2cab9ff29da955c793644806f148bea85f
describe
'24896' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHS' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b340cf727f9b2646933c5d6bf26af1f1
07a62331e0cd8ae965094b1b1cd31d5b5a838254
describe
'40772' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
7d5ec0cca96c52d519a039de80c50b57
8dbcf0ff37287c081e21a006e0cc774b6501e4f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
394e2093ce75bccb52d1e43ae7b1bfbf
e45c78891749ad50e076b73d06110c77d4e52326
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
44ce77f32996527d2446895b4c79a4f5
b6742fb3f841a8e7876215bb99bdd9df89a84430
describe
'10063' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHW' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
dbe102fa6fca1aa8f091f241822e8af9
a0409d914cca57e294b0f790a3fe6144c6da1513
'2011-12-28T23:51:39-05:00'
describe
'322771' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
843aef8e76f7c79b5094a7bb7ce17331
f9ba44de5d543378cd5912b8b47cf884c3b26753
describe
'139575' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
38ea593eef3e6bd8f45ce8ba71ab85f5
effeb1346657179dc7ea8ef7c7212bdd2234d735
describe
'24317' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
f75c008be64e9c6c965a91a2095d6261
903ab3d684b98a0cdcd9153b2115ae3aebf260a2
describe
'40857' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
15e8b9dd492fd6857558902ca138595a
e2373aee2fad42fc893b8afe8d50bcf9f4f233cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
2591fd0f96e87664efd12ff8bcb4cacf
bb6702bb52cbed87339393dea8de196bac2716a0
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
678f3e515e7888860b3dd6c1ecc13fb2
8857400203ac0bccc611b9accd27dec0395d05dc
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10172' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEID' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9fb25448a1110d8df25e08d234f46b08
9ba1e3708e7dd1c6cf0ef50131fb47dc30ff95cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
915167021eae6bb45f8211e8f4b92649
84d5d1ff11d9d576afbc499db69e32145c818d86
describe
'136530' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
99ea5ed666aa6483ff99949edb044ccd
4389e050fb890c9b979bd666085ab1ec9c42c2ad
describe
'26055' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIG' 'sip-files00076.pro'
57d1aec4b8e3fd018db61c96d242807b
2054eed3951dd932744e19775ee0fa34e81cf730
describe
'41052' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
82fad4aed3209cd879325f6af599c475
400c78c7d912f98bb7fc686b6fe54d4ed1b6a437
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEII' 'sip-files00076.tif'
4cba5487882a5386c9c00b955664fa04
e35f38657dd24007e5eda559702df75ce845f5e4
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0f53f14b45139157ed39278aa64d0b28
0df1140c6e66909fe6a913f6d846b963a3df9aa3
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10256' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9d6a3a4ecde6287335f4d64b7efc4122
8b785fcac54a817f80ccf27cb31f372e4f4189c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
7f767731318809186806bb464fe459b3
0a69864277de2d689244e53a4df970d5d89ea7c3
describe
'137042' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
be7c85fc589a2a5b495876d32d4c73d7
fdf6fbd5d538923e942021c6f972af0529ecd85e
describe
'26236' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
0f5ccf931f7db56ab07c04a18b5b759a
ba8acc186d0842712279395fd6f054b06c49fb94
describe
'41037' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
7a87d5c02b0597195b210a4866bc7e80
114293abf6e7edd004f67cf4ce5afa12409f696f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
4df8864255fd3aef1c08afce89358888
ca072f282e92ef7719922417fce06eb782ccd8f3
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4ba96deebae57a60bbee12bf9b5bf302
1235b2ff0ee82643ac0bcaeaaf85b54573de58cd
describe
'10441' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIR' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
70e6559e8083b37be061a94196105ef4
cff2b015d1787d888e76fcd401f8cd08bdd1e154
describe
'322689' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
9c1a38b234b0abdf162463b1fc708a83
deb9b49f74b3349a51edf5683059d8fed6df1a33
describe
'140251' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
ac05e97db4f25b1ac9a5f502a13d8559
1ebfe07dd364124eaeee9cc545aeb7ecbe108dc4
describe
'25925' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
81b8b17d65c107beba464da386729e78
0f5b7988fb261b7512c21ae14a23f78ae2d56e4b
describe
'41989' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
81166e4eacc1d3dc009ed4e96974e4a5
4ab771b30bfc8ca137add099f9f64c3e861e33d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
62874a0512791bdc667a6dfff5d6d666
6a28df2ea085bdb37dea6f2111d978d5fffb9bf7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9dbf355326fd157fca2ea16de950adcf
60748bdb50248430bdb15423c08323426096c636
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10570' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
495e199ba8256b448071045aff7f7b3f
139ca6d1db4ed6990a5a60c650dc36a0bb909462
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
6ae96dcb1d019aa80774c111c976d636
d3ee3e02a896fbec9aadd1bd7a0b1fe851ea8f1c
describe
'136243' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1e33ac207c5e4e2b9ac8f2066d5a5cff
a672a83ca4c5e2b1704ba7d5c147c2490078484a
describe
'24341' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
cd17ad0b8a672fe46849d92e847b5273
83c7c5a6cde72a611ea1cf329a258e5eb0b2b02c
'2011-12-28T23:50:19-05:00'
describe
'40276' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
79f4153e7b8ca17da0dcbef716df2bfa
854df8e8203ffdc52065cf11d41272ad71987ce9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
f908cd8282c39a1dbe839c14eca44ebb
1641f380805ce6aa71a5da50e69487299503ffe5
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
fb04bc584a11e1f32ef1af1c7e18788e
556287249f9a9f63ab4c838c225aa321d72c4c0b
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10072' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
46fab0ceb5b1de2d9e9b2ed8077901b5
fac2a0670d7da6739f6b54e43809f991a2723cc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d7466877c4a458c2454d1df01a8fd4e3
632efd324b5810b23800de7ca37dd2c95a0f594b
describe
'135407' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
b2476b2bf1da7ec2a2db22fca9b6da3a
bf80bc80884b56441765bf5ea18bb9204e530d7c
describe
'25787' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
25d976c06db514f58162f4632862a6c7
10358495b350d7567315f87dcfb6ff6a1ba2614b
describe
'40268' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f42860d666da735445720f23cfe0254d
5470419677b7989184ac7fc3b205f1e011d875fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4518d9b120b9614e287c5e801b17de5b
0a937b27a9be6e77ea72e2ba37106cd8145eeb92
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
68e6fdb59a2e80bb6e3ab4b2af3b26b2
7d916adbbc3e1578f628b7a50f5589662ce7041d
describe
'10057' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
e3d9a32bedce46cdcf991d2e64ba4a34
acee05c4aad560613758914581561ae3f9747633
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e4f3c525a90c527ed74b10b79fe1da13
43c7aa60fe3d5c1389134a2798c1f9369c97a2b5
describe
'139895' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
af67a44f54dd0f45f717597aed014464
6e2b053bf9f09eb9b20ee25f2275ee8ace02cdca
describe
'26522' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
44bcc652b2bc9069dc81684ce4554649
7c4336e3c24c5f53622db513a53b3c16e76917fd
describe
'41338' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
8ef9fcefe4d5d316f7f0d5bf3d9351d0
f434ff9988c1687373f65cb8e81a70392af8aff4
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
8e5741796b1754d1c2ea2dc5d11bae5a
7af1d95c5996400510bed6d6ceacdb00f690341d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
94a952b22259744574b20be5e1d9fd52
59f900ea087f4ca5cf02e18c6f8dafee54a15998
describe
'11278' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
8f884540e7087e34d9eba540427b347d
ad76892653bd04be8aae2eb1223975acb41888bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
4f0c76febf4026fea6e678db12d0ca3f
251aa7916096911b723dd0f79e56f346b4751dfe
describe
'147172' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
7a1d5bfaaaca6f27e4082e1e6d21e5e8
1bff27669b040e9a313ddd5e77896fceb36cb358
describe
'27737' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
dfc8f3ee9b980972c825f9d50ec5b6a9
29f575b9eda4af319ce6b0452075f49ce3189599
describe
'44538' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2e918b2093308dcdc742a981a2552e3c
131e8cfc1e1baa832eb7882c19d3fdef26279d3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
85ce8e946bdf44db7f9880f039c117fd
b75a06ce3ab616c4c2c861fcb6bae4407548ae63
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
388fe2aeeada6adb75f2070ccbb46cf2
5dbbc1de7002d58185e30b6b41ea0ec008986bec
describe
'11180' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
17f3f82807c39304b1586b4626254b25
3570306b84af40df5e1aa396e57067370f617940
describe
'322773' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
fee4da6e887989e74dd20159c7914e9b
d19595ba83017f5600f30c13e64dd695248162b2
describe
'142519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
bf377c00e1c76c25e7f2282d407f2518
aecdfcb49fa02aa02624e77c8c6a72c4820f5685
describe
'25988' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
c0689e6840e5186a5614f3e7be79fa1a
98f02f4730df68c97c0302082dd489f185b0da64
describe
'41443' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
7eab5817017907cd505eb3088ee73a09
13211bcaa4100900aaacf6bde6b3c2c7d9080b9c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c49d2cd7acad197fa74c18001c387cb4
75132cc43a744a835059a60d8987c027a8699993
'2011-12-28T23:50:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
97473f854396a7b662b1a1fec646501f
a12fde3976f62d72ea33cf6016c7f63375f3a971
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11170' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fbbb54d39080ef03ba347b888159e175
7923e5f4131e10a10d15769ce904a82213170f9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6ce2cf05243cbf2b7a89609960b09ba5
89e505aeefa165cecc9ad47ff2842e619f681d51
describe
'133116' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
bbbad52ba341c49dabafad61744ad229
1e2f869a5fc57debcc8521bf4e95cbccb09a8369
describe
'24895' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
c732c3ad8bc9596539e77980c0c101c7
4ff2991f79caeaab8be6aacdb85c4272501059e3
describe
'40013' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
202da7f5b40880fb9d3d6595f0d8bb11
1e23e0bb78847e46ad6364e079526cbe01e96252
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7509c9ae737f2a3f0209168c3dea2aa0
67c569ad7a01f518067e7281c075975d90458c58
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
dc9ee3a50ee2801d63fb145c6b9d7816
865ff878ed6ccddfc8ae43e253ddf6c35835e481
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9812' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
59b83bea4e9571879a06b970d8827b70
4bae1ffc58137309fb55c3501562d5fcdfd802d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b4f942f5f3a040d8f1c53bc20909ef0d
887af3f1f5bf4386f0c275f301ae7f868c3b2ac2
describe
'140107' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
636c631fdcefb5addfc0a514d397161b
b31104aaec0b875b25c0c0433a1f1297318d115b
describe
'27310' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
44e7a28d7aa5b21bc4ae193f6532e42c
a5e927c7a97046c92416860b30777fdd5501cdf0
'2011-12-28T23:51:44-05:00'
describe
'41955' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
22a389fc4b94cf16195a10626b521e13
0c87e36d1025e70afa75759658bb41b420ddc626
'2011-12-28T23:51:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
276632fb4415a8b7cc419b4455764309
4402522af2508bb0c5f6043bade30605935499dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a79be466f1f62098fb4dd615c10ff91a
50bf18fd34adb418424967e717f516a8068d1312
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10712' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
9dac0a22bfcc1da505d32a67fe22ce05
ffa8789fc5427b72a0a1edaee80471c3c6f9b9d1
describe
'322779' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKW' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e142e52429525f666bb2875c9452a302
56bcc0610b388dc1781dbb70565f4e1f6dd32eee
describe
'140149' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
64ed0be5c9cf1ebc244b004c7db3435c
01ab027a394ad3856242d3ba9d82770eb246a702
describe
'26280' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
428311119ecf6886fd96a3b6cebb0385
905b584ef5cf814ed3345ce20e8d671e559ee653
describe
'42160' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
7dc558aceceb82ba879a44ce762798be
7355d23f8dbb492054ae0eb7fca2b97353818e0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELA' 'sip-files00086.tif'
158585792604aba1a17c651d4eb44cd6
1686ae3df96f00f99ab6ac1b0cca493ee0821d00
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c2ad01b36414c2ba5a355f50dd08b31b
b02083178b8005805aca597305b66d3b99e36b53
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10503' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
048afd218d27ddc6f6f4feda12baa31d
629e58b2c7ce7df54cc20c76b3fde0b179cc0b8a
describe
'322716' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELD' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
2796d162a56dc75143e4cd9591c74cbf
4b1bd297808392f0d51a39aa679517a0df3c8cc7
'2011-12-28T23:49:46-05:00'
describe
'144207' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
25e811d4a260378d9cf8487576ed2772
5ecc3f74be440575612b1aa866df610a39da64b0
describe
'27927' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELF' 'sip-files00087.pro'
e5f313c6fa431d4b24476a5ed38743e5
cf0aed5cb6f98050c75682bc5154a9cd94aefb48
describe
'42901' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
67987e46d9ac62f9f1e4c70d4e13175a
792d418cac92e8902333f65f672ee615e9ae177c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
05afa3833836e336fc2cd8fb6d563818
15386dd4ca117bd4ced03d371a2e4216528ef0f7
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f70c9067f8349de1df920ed94895d332
168640288b20c48e62926c249c137bc12775a467
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10957' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7115538c40b7c58734333669a0ad6019
6f8d924ab0d4ffe475ad588c697d8690c0e5387f
describe
'322544' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d16497d97a5588cc9d151bc55d5c19e2
59f206527d5e69cd70b2dfaa807aff9e03e4aaef
describe
'130362' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7a02493c0bbafa829c00ccdee4d5a92f
e6506e44e153e1822e79e2b02f7f3fb8cc346cfa
describe
'23110' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELM' 'sip-files00088.pro'
54fbce3d30a27d6a8c2127eaa4ce665a
d00cd10658fe93bbae21144454b36ca11b1c854e
describe
'38429' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
ada3ace3a77199e8b0623af878d9a826
418f3a5341017619064d7a4872728600d87848e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d22e3213613f861d641c27af98058614
5875e9d47a5f0fae4a607deecadda780178f31ca
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
595e405e64ed0d1e12df94a3bc761ef5
20f8f8eaef672347a32bbf1c3d228874a26ee0db
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9846' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
975dee6fe527322cc2cf48c607b4ea71
a96e2479488794fd993a673a55278bc3cdd4911d
describe
'322793' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
a7f2f5a3ed234516ab8be272cb12ddbf
60db6180f114f463b4854f388c4a1ae7b28b831f
describe
'144004' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
84931a765aadf7fa6ba8dce7c22a74d2
e073d8e2f9eb348837f5606484f362ffdc9c0245
'2011-12-28T23:48:51-05:00'
describe
'26699' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELT' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7de047fca14e3aad4db90bbfe0cf7971
2ec40a505d185a015f896c2d6fca0feb289cd1f2
describe
'42490' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
8bf7b4f54b98512f6ebc44d3f800d785
0ff702c0ee5c5cd2b4e066524ce23b42ac6704a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7dd66bb03672949af61cc7139e543af4
e1e25999fa7fc4f9b49522640fd640f0d1fa7f81
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
7aa5f854192e8f96d7b9ebfb737b8126
d4decc3014694ae5f5c3ff944e0bb9d9e30d891c
describe
'10888' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
2492c4ff7bf8983c8e87acf2d0672ea4
1a8dee19de64b2210b1a46d3a4ff1dafbecb611f
describe
'322741' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
184f0c4fa53983be3237e50bba8b166c
1ad102591f0d3563780732d651105759dfd6dac6
describe
'127790' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABELZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
df07baf9baef49f0e34a0856ac77f7a8
265d7f3e275afd325a7c60c7999a38ba2126e21d
describe
'22825' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2a3b4663d29a8453c017249ecce8c411
a0497be715fc891e874eaca4a8c5b1225eaf8cc1
describe
'37306' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
19dd6e10e1e9eb722a4c12b6b3ce79e8
f121a5644870e6942512abcd5d7746e5e3846561
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ddf8b6c2760c9ca8120d78d6ed3898c9
f00a477cbb20904d19d037352baffb9e19942a25
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c6e0b55b541f02b9c89be363683d4463
4756461dc5a977518ef3d99c4d3513bf0adb9cab
describe
'9922' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEME' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
4ddff7ea23ac025e2122bee1a1779e03
98babab2d918ee8312ed4892b9ec6ea7836f11e6
describe
'322717' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
f45637229ac6ab26b16fe9f658bc5494
70aa1e41754ebc578978b6ac99f8669cf8a9ba6a
describe
'138503' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
387cb5fa9770b65f2220194feffcee1e
8760fbd22eca0e55219494ff00ebb86f7395969b
describe
'26109' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
53f50a7407a03892b43ec572ba078fc1
1c78501f493cedd89c3a3ce945d7fb9bd6f3f320
describe
'41261' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
9e03f4859465b17dd4264df2c4d66363
608a960914bf74dedb4ab8348310df0ce9f21aa4
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
0cdd55a100ba4fba979212c863c36eeb
a794c791b21ce5f18714d7274f89fed36f5bd5ca
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
11161a7b6f266988368726241b8dec1b
285f304dd9fa6754b085fff7811392f1ca5b825f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10557' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEML' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
80dd35c93be44165f6c3a4fea0c5c91a
36a32affb1c06d9491db2778b49412fdd1b9424d
describe
'322742' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
cd989b1d6188c57c67c2da254cdc3e76
02c58ea706d2cf9a179991e662bc5b0282b22426
describe
'135843' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
c612a382261cd5ef2e405b20b71fbba0
f955f9847aef30b86deac999fbccdf0ff398af39
describe
'25264' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
f65f32895c7f5b9851c7a5c85bf432f4
8ea79f302ab21d95e50031096f9e40db2e76e855
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
f4a3f63a6b0f0e5cd093b0d9e7605d68
fd75f67349637f87d8a0418fdf2537961ec6b20d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
af009d81e65a7416e818ebf353ecc3f6
be3d10b6492354cdf028631b6afbba6692d7021e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
9caeafefaa707882308957176e4dc95a
7510a0cb7a0299f2ca8c7e2b1d5dc814b382f3d7
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10077' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
dbb89c7593e7cee82ec54313c8169d8f
59234822d223a28bcac587486c22a6e0cc822299
describe
'322783' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
39b4fd0ff56af54dfa4d8cf2ea56ec1d
5c643854fb9016e92b9bb7bc5146bcabbd076350
describe
'138608' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
cf5b8dc7370d6256c6a7c9267eaf252d
1b31da4fd6ebeb0c1755f15b0d39955fed16f9e3
describe
'26087' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
e5a4b048fdc6f8781cb55b0f88d2ce47
289216555ef67297f5021040f95e10b045bd228b
describe
'42294' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
7f7be7022b1b9cb6e6d59186bf20e995
5c0d3d7ce6c78d6fd792855f83f0366007b2d233
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
9065672e8a241c4941d1ea5b90e0b0f5
887f47010ef3e551f424fa5175e7747001d954ad
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
ead6f8817cfb2cc0c45d2a81c973d543
b580dee4b2965b56cc7f57240396a84c00783269
describe
'10740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8524b322e02a5d62a9b11cba0f25513c
6c76487a09bf3ab9eb856c30e4af6a1be8844a97
describe
'322513' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c85bb37e65031c1117e08a03ac021067
a0c30ccb67832633b0bf78e8c22b20c36be26241
describe
'129940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
20449079400ac236185a341ef7b7045b
37550cdfe0a07d71b74b68212cdb26aaad02b592
describe
'24574' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
0f1dd628cdce772f9a47ec3cdd1e7274
8f57e875de4387fa4cec511cb0db6f7203f1280f
describe
'39674' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEND' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ea2336eb88d1b431a820e21a1f94cc1e
4881c99c7e4b8aadf8d8881d8d14f020d898bdbd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
18d0d400434a4f1120e932f14682a80a
148a86ca84aa52f11ed8435758f37a7f5fbda932
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
47b48e48a52eb020abd8ca1e56cdf18d
e87c5cbce7f22be4cd75398992291ac79a777fe9
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9726' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
dd07fd7794b838bdea95965f85454fc0
88c077b2d95ed013cf86da0688d7e830515ed152
describe
'322624' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a732a2b543c13e845a3be276d59c20b0
0e1d208108040aee054cf6b2275aad81aec03b8d
describe
'131850' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bd257117e6f44300b9481162147fa083
c989c04bfb8a00e33bd70623243721818494f5bf
describe
'25055' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
b523b6cf2f95e02e9a8cf2b442a45eb2
f43b63c3dfc942127a7f9f9ab4c3aa757bc7f6cb
describe
'39590' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
35f55dda1e0a39850f5e31cc25fe4a28
9af2743aa7488ff853f5ed34456bb9d2fe0b7067
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e3ab55743a8b51e9e4ab7c4e1315f66e
3eb6a65d961af061ee148ffb79d09a11a35b4a9e
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
d91ef337455b603f480655879eda70fb
848f49185089c6804d5b7ce5dc8b557b5fcca150
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10344' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
7320d04e84d08fb79081ad8ff896eef7
5f08149320a59e9a57b9bc2efcbf6383cd08ed9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
723a274ff093c1fb5db4f03de6323def
05a8a19df55b955ef999694d0a36229a1be03c9c
describe
'137429' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
7cc5aa1ef11817a1753d464416792fda
bda11c76d2878b0cbbdaf733dec2497f2c348c5b
describe
'26227' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
a4164fb1ee6832c488ca440c77c8472d
e59e7aef70335b0c5165056b2b33020552c18db1
describe
'41373' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
f7d3e5cfb24dc2bd95577f73aaf3dc4e
112c27223ba43b90be985a9b36711a976aecd362
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
d92de6dbaf4eec2893980c597cbb78d9
33893aabe9cf1c62f1caefff975a64b4a80b83d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
2e4556f3c5abef27b1f792c58d680bed
ba232b624815d36e49f68c207b3a4b03e8a5daa3
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10825' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
22a4c955165891c468aab4924e8eedcf
60acefdba56178de8733fd1d4a7c529f34d87d32
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
8e2fc3db050ac5264d5febe6bd06abc4
d1a1a1f4f00e93ddf7156dbffd502a9f55c8a4ee
describe
'132740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
38c4f3a074987dda59c567d775e4050a
2eb3dbfdcc471382da89fdf06cfc0793b800fbf2
describe
'25408' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
08d622ef45ed9fc52c4ae724629c1bc9
a90bf0195ddca766158e0c13062a5d3781bebbf3
describe
'40181' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8041f5635790a17355750c65d3edf16c
285007fcc7b3c4e9eedb3a0861985b826e49cead
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABENZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e77dab9826abc0da8dd08a0d8117e3a5
8a3369f27090cf7464fe349d5bc521c1dfdbe15d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
ecb9e716829ccfd2b5ee84ca363f637b
7a59118a2472048d100292f600dac8d18dc66ec7
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10060' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
69a5b7636e1b5f720a5f4e06b141eebb
95a7a5dd8e64b5d336b68d6dd3574ac8860baf0e
'2011-12-28T23:52:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
97ca871fdea78655df361a056203020f
37bfe2e4032bc12bb5ebe86308be6f25463a1d3c
describe
'128744' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
3ed38cb4133a2d9a6647461f9965a976
ac190e0e3365c1e82c31d061033067925dbde2a5
describe
'23188' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e67ddfb4195557bbaef73457f2c4d981
75d050ee9552b3a1254032ce798ff9b2e94510e0
describe
'37753' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
1a03033c421259eadefd082fd408313c
f2bdec07c2b6d51020b01c6a6b3de156dab00807
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
64ae961313e74b4d41e554ab7b2faf54
949bda800479f7fcfe917249b5136c97587fe321
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
746a21f9676d5a3826064db7e06c13ff
d7ac3a2899e96d48aace921bdb53cd5233cbd3a9
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9464' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
1a105e3510dbaec526f3f8ddc8dcbc6d
41e064d6e04e8c4211d29a1f7d95b8eaac6ddf65
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
2a239c066fc66dd975b513ab86db8b45
b40f2f4fd7838c7da108a3b83297ecb25cb09c0e
describe
'130839' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
9846004edd85c8f4037bedfe7e56692f
36d88fe9839601014d1d03cbf5f3073426f027bd
describe
'22862' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
6e10b7680cd038c83d70b179cca62011
eb75eb0997d8280bbe4de6865f42d01c28115935
describe
'38309' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8bd4c8ac25924e76ecd246085914de05
8a83727c24dc063aa19012b9619727a8524a51db
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEON' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5f684d7d833459cb2e0bcd22215a8177
b65c7e29ed66529ceae5adb0c2abd4889cf6d436
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
8a97ee712477a3babc5fb7fb2f9f857f
a5ac2db08cc302adaa28e874f84c13cc5df8a4c1
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9504' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
8f77d189351a28febe3360c46f0c8081
19f93ba2d0f3c1c0861d8bebc672a8599880cc34
describe
'322747' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
1f96bcb5beabf9c12bffac8c9a746255
6e5e534d4c464f933af96563fc9bf337dce48763
describe
'142980' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
0b8a4afd99aaafc4ffc1b9dc41e5362f
27224975efee81b51a610c560cade24b6f4dfa8d
describe
'27595' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
e01fdc533578231464886be41798ba3d
796c8f867e578d65329623b0ca40b44348babf5c
'2011-12-28T23:50:44-05:00'
describe
'41218' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
7a43ca111a7e270eb0629bfa29374d13
e0e8b68db73350e42db8dc3039fca7c81f3609ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
730f1a0d1f72e7cf5bb0df0e7569e1a7
c533cbd47a2ef6aa4fba9f15cdece9e0669c0c6e
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
7db33b2bf64d8655d4dc6cf9c3f709da
2676fee6be258a465335d4fdc92fb5ea0c0b0a18
describe
'10571' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
826121ed5f44a3ce1b84a2ab22e865e8
cfd5bbc6310e0ed42ee4fd8e82be89c0d1ff999e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
1983d639456d5f1c0d391669bdb76650
073eef3d63c7d8ee79d44890fae3f31663039712
describe
'127629' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7eddfb51dd93feea708ac478ad511d2d
68e54d58d55a7f062ec174c001c77b0ff7c7cd76
describe
'23061' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
00bea6f04c37022723d62f171c29da47
a3194c4f8c0aeadec6821d4ed4fecb05aad8ffb2
describe
'38649' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
46da5d50132d0abba043b7c272c35749
b825b55e4c068ec5df717a35d50a53b7aa986f48
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
1f6471e16f4c4b7e29aa775df99f57f6
17403cd16a66fb848736d157ef85b673cb9d2694
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0f5ddb391a8fed4aa46e591b267d1dc2
50963c72160941214c51cdfd43da89708afa3989
describe
'9437' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPD' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ceb4c774673280e7293cb6edd09875fe
64ad66d476ec5aca59753d8c6ad5e6b6c397d749
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
a1c1a2c38b9e65e783e1e2b4a25b208d
8a72dc1778c1680ec76cda87f8cca5c7c6cfcfb3
describe
'147075' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8003516944179984f36f91d3f32c6f24
35461ca663941bf35646510b57e47b86d7321d9b
describe
'27642' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
b45f494c76632d94232b707a0a4dc797
22c39e46601ad9f6c60be457db8158b3d5a8cace
describe
'43483' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
2038280d51408fd6d17b25ace48aa24b
8afbb96f74a3edd1d075874b5bed02fe47c61f31
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPI' 'sip-files00102.tif'
18131be47cc5b61a7c5f83e0c958ed1f
75dd54cb6a682624e674ccda16f271af093b45a0
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
712bd4b4ad5b6962c43a0a251e94717c
f1a85342562128fc390123abef517e3589bbb3e7
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10809' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
357fb7c6c57b59d30171f86359c51666
4fe13889d28783022f7dd5cbcff1f425810d6f62
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
0823da2cb9830d34cbb50d7485f5a798
8cf6d815a1bb6794502222fea571e804dae3ba72
describe
'138917' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
24ca99226e6202fc617f610e460bf89b
0542958e25bcc65444d1fa0b96009978327bc7b6
describe
'25098' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
a9c1d57a4cd9e5c72ba8375e1789eb49
cb64759958189076e331e225d94d5cc7a1125e63
describe
'40989' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
91865a4e7113e78a91a510cfb7911f65
be5bf5d4293819dc436147a3479aec8290441eeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
610a878198fe28ff270e23504a4b257e
4817766c0a51cf4910d719af5d3238ab430a7976
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
aa2c6bc81da23bb6a9c0254e7c5381f5
2ebbe5ddf7e007bc5d0354848a7035d3862caa6d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10186' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
5dff544ff178f3d4129f8efe5179ea9e
3a7c5aa73949f9327df13d7821146c8e1976e228
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
314628b40022946cfcfe3721d22e6260
d0160388163bd7bffd8d137abcd4ec7a29a76e03
describe
'137763' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c468e41b19eaa7a2cc03b1cebd26003b
8d51ec1e04593a632246f409140d13e3c96becca
describe
'26318' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
5d0e867a538181a67aba5a4e8de5c9c4
4a11f484e6b507ed7f40c3b7a2e29b366b80cc4a
describe
'40509' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
f35973afb4ec5e8c4314bc344fb22592
d68b8c93daf70db3d19386a64e8c332ffcc656fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
529f618b8144cad3c54c551326a87a2f
7b434978de690bf12db37ff6a2f43c5874553f51
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
1fa1b86f22d964592fef45a0f4427573
fd115c724958bebdb57a0058ef53e7dd143c070f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10093' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
bce3c3649f9313882b35fc8cc83eada8
dc883d84be5b61f6d5a3399aeb96abf01c5e32ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f2e8d887805ab088b4d2b4c4bdb6ce38
04b2e4e298c1abd5e986990cd3c034ca113d711e
describe
'139473' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
55f1766906abf831b5bd4690c7cef8fe
0ddd60ea5d462642fdd5244d3a4350b392dad475
describe
'25223' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
a1acfa03733fa7d70bb68a3e1ec273d4
20a74a714ce6f46cc95cdd0909a9098ba5194d3d
describe
'41387' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
90d79b61bfc43580b2db8152ca82417c
806793684ebf7b9dfa0152a0c71f187ac5e8975b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
8893d77f0de778cfb612bb10ba9cc477
a57acb7430dc6b83301c8d25fe068fe652083826
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
0582564c6db40618b71eb016780f8282
864fd50bfe501ad766942f853674d96d8684466e
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10714' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
d5d5c6a83eb620c05b14dd59df9cf7c9
b9ce2e2e00dd2f5a28671ac89fdc7b6fe15920a3
describe
'322669' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
b3f73fb76d65ba736108248adaed95c1
9fe186b00c35827f21a11694f7111222252dfee6
describe
'129935' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
35fdd02c6b3e11938c668145d9226655
33cf92a334d47be01d486e2c466e7ecf8fcf66f0
describe
'23320' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
0acf724670a5130f39a1543c80fad3de
5ab14607624759e90a85df3a4866533f63f2d76e
describe
'38782' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
9166d4477ae887764544e6e632ad974a
53d597b9bd50cda562f31aa71d0c20b20c734b79
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
9300ec1e03110b14e8ca9f40aded96f2
cc2b7f97ac40cc48587d82eb9b9ea2cd35b95ad6
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1738321274be50b8a0c2dadafc1083fe
b7ee3676fdb5ff5941a3fb947368e969404b2d84
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9611' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b7232a9c6b565a6bc466aa2add0b7ad2
283c8b5ea50f1b1ace0d19ad199e569e27d6b8af
describe
'322792' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
750fe080517a5508aa628ed86b5a88eb
4c93d020e3f6aa54fb6de9cd3664d591aef8ff3e
describe
'134179' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9e9486e72c88f1884d2a5107d6f11276
40c86a892129d6cf093e36ad723bd25a9c962845
describe
'24364' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
30f9d291bac860cdb067969a5d350af1
560caea882880d361314cf066e5cc32fc9540f6d
describe
'40052' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
e90cab006a30c9b65644ddef7717739b
213bd68c34489acb3821770ead36fab72a439f8e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
72104bafe3d828f4187711e8cdd37af3
2cd8237c2c000e0040c20bb62cf511cb22482ecd
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
7336871cab7dfbdd3152847ed5e0865d
974757e9c36f993de117621cd8c7865bd09cb61e
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10240' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
aeb2127f47172c821ba26f2cbbb0d111
aba2178c7838b77101599e0f813eda0731abe9ed
describe
'322667' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
25c30d45d95cfd62a52f9c5ff66c15de
f5adf80ce79c20de2224959df82f1be8da48aa56
describe
'132386' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
1544e7ab64427ac92d9fb0fe35c4f521
7d85e9f05dd0cd3665001c06fbf8276c0b6e3966
describe
'24962' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
ebb12b8426a8667286dfa5188d99812a
1ffcd611f9f154b8513c7983e76020d93dbd53d0
describe
'39557' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
523d42740be368bcd6323e8d14a60574
ce9da9e8bb525726ad37d53c68e204b3a3ea9a35
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
70838f74bb03db4c38abcdf0e16076e3
da63b0649df4ba1d6d5b94f51254cefe590c314b
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a77ed539b8ae3432272b71a579f61c88
07e75d5f2bf7ffe0521c00a5f90dca67c5d684db
describe
'9951' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
f71c04a34b025a346822b9b1c79280e9
c6bac7fac612ff132e03c21e4f9000c5c164ad08
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
1b3f9cb630cda8c6230afd70fda9db29
fd1e9fd6420bf054a23be239ab57111d67ddbffb
describe
'138436' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
ea23bdd98ab3217d17c5a9d4426bb419
af51438bd33a8d75818dc8511fed0926a6156af8
describe
'26589' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
e5a766c3c047190f908a92d3222835a9
661474476518c6a415e595e0bd6a5526daf1198a
describe
'41720' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
2c6a0d56b774c609984bafc472a98dd4
c60d0189976773ea60fc5239fa4ea90f27f7666a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
a02add3348de99c3ddb75f745ceb1e9a
d59933fe42a06ea850fb0c5c8eab41cb24a706e3
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
517f683b0913be734afd4277462e2350
9a25c9ac040b715f7c6255486577128865afe895
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10309' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
82713845ab818d75e3fdecc7063c0c47
8a1e856f751fe7ab1c6e762c8ce2a528ea6ffa4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
cb09e29b12c6a8f3f5eb88f16de13840
75199d52b260d1b7946fed859d27566ab26e6b05
describe
'132862' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
5f663b94843d4bb4a5b51040637996ad
ec9b84bc1c4d88efdbdd6dff3d38bb820307618c
describe
'23967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
1208cd76547df9421c7bab2d10fc4ff0
cba1416e54bd3a00a9f89d74f94ceb6eb7d4d313
describe
'38980' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a0eee80f8d43125eee6b998ad61923b3
9472e5e5f97ab55c1afef77da50548cec5ce16d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
02286d323316b15ba0dbaf9a637f2d83
ab3b1a54726a8b1d177b0dc49bb56e1a5155384e
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
2e99a7d77cbc533e8310b77b44a72de1
bcee12be86469c70f76a1667a10d8ce7befde4d4
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9829' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
3e009e3171e641832e90293fe63d253f
9ffdb0c19f3608e1e254644fabcdf89ffaf069ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
14dc1e8c2c3e1b04b829cf36a6452378
1c903ed11002fa906e23adaff12aa3e114ada52c
describe
'125517' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e7c8d0a9bb2266c8c2f502a266e62e1d
f45feb9a62d50c49e42942ffee299ed36cfc7e4d
describe
'21515' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
c83fe975adb5350e57a2f9fdfae88c22
4051b5c8a92a47a7f0a1689d4848a3e05816d76f
describe
'36935' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1a5a3918ac85dd802907ad69720a5277
ed45bc7b0c6843dbb55dc265ceb825f6a9aa3eb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0957bc17e6e2e5c706fb858b0dca0117
41c321b795913e5d06b77869147e71794dd37b15
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
aad1ba283d422318ba5eb120b35bffad
a73ec0b5ba72ba45142347f013d2932c06db3d80
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9224' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERV' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
b810b581ba5617703bd32abe7c7269fa
6c3190d99a6a650969feebac33a493f944722914
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
2a16a3431723306a255c59cd154a3607
b5209378527568a0101db1aec3fd94fc78ad696d
describe
'127182' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERX' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
552817e3a228578f245ab6b1ef5b375f
e33cde471f5149203e406c599e641ce0a9a4cbb8
describe
'24076' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
28b34c277661e94db9e239f0d51af02b
7ffcb139752e65d5edee888603a9d74f1fb22097
describe
'38384' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABERZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
46845573fc22a929bdf85ba65e001376
85903227a2b26135a15e1038282f8c1d03a09f10
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESA' 'sip-files00112.tif'
25de68102f29f3ce8c6257117a114631
37ac358ef7ac30df37aeff5e4cac0b5add735f6e
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c7f79d84d2cb84216a7c833df693fccd
9eb3586a0442b93de5958da3232d7383c513be91
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9397' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
2e1a9c263bd1d9ac357d1544a6f8e0ea
333a42a14c41781eb95107a3b5e16e75668ad7bd
describe
'322791' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
61da524d289c418f7130ad036b47915a
53b1d6eebd32df39293cc2ffc270ed276b2f0f82
describe
'129273' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
bd4a1d4b5a7eb3afbc83b9e5df26297f
b611a45dc71735172ea0199c0f84f05bb9e8f316
describe
'24996' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
82362f4703562fcff42d23a111cbd716
4383ccac1b3d1118322f9f5e4d4fefb787bbe1a2
describe
'39101' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
bf5df8edff4cd8af58e20699329dbc08
f7de8e7c3a6a2837c1385923b7a3a6d89bafad0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESH' 'sip-files00113.tif'
77442b385f6a587753ef1fb4aec867ec
14f2dbbabec0b090d89d38d8ee37afd8ae167840
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESI' 'sip-files00113.txt'
417bf3bfe9d0b3339302eea49108a508
4882116cf2738b794a23002a9f2544d9e352220b
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9841' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
9a8decbab8fb7860355e94a977b5525a
48945dbd128cdc3f9475a71f6203f89c52ec15a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
4680bd49579b73be9255837c89438a12
2343a40157772faa06ef3afa39dd3be63e173050
describe
'136945' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
23a4057491afa4c1164b5139792bfcb6
4cbdcb1888a44e42998ca25bdc5c0bc25fc45555
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESM' 'sip-files00114.pro'
e14e37181298694accab8ad9b846952a
51e0fe2a8108a3c37a43a5e0e244c7442b84c0a4
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
a36622b0a06d91ea43e07b419b1bf495
c6410511758b521a247ab1e8cbc47fbb2d9c4502
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
612b498b30966bb3671fb0c0b7dc8ab5
ff6856b7d108232bcdcef9fdecd9329714fe276a
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
16b8f1b18749bbe9e5fe7f55ef39aa7f
7820ee0aebeacb3242df2a8dbda01e28ff465b4c
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10237' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
87514506f4eaa2dba938f9adef6d82cb
e3b566c0ceb890e3a6426beaee6b17430111bf77
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
f8c4d60acc53911e389ff564a7471c5f
5e574381de8de1027f87bcf0967ae225b8dda15f
describe
'149423' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ad0369a6c8fc7984c45ca0af367cbc4e
825a68b13b549b3a7adfeda1adf5db5dfa3831f2
describe
'28491' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEST' 'sip-files00115.pro'
f3f8af955ecacf8984602507a8e9f426
38fd9e5fc2e8585484c6649ad824f26a5a699d77
describe
'44451' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
63925b19001e77cf6003ad4645e52e3c
8226db6187fe72e9226fbd54df7a9ff8ad382214
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
ff1653eb782d5ab2907e27b73e8c3b19
3753fcb1911e773118e319af5e8a96190368de17
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESW' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2f0f96c2f470bb571dde24be7fb23950
ee9d813baf0907bb81a489683a742e1ad3c05342
describe
'10882' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESX' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
5d6cb8777ff6e30d92858c2882d827ba
1ab6b67b3a5d2753835fb86a8a17820004f635dd
describe
'322703' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESY' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c0daa0ac021bb91c8032dfb90ee16d2e
2bd23d7bc3aab4560a1604e5aa777f5faa18e367
describe
'138372' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABESZ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
aed0d7542e4907213998c6ab0c436e99
915d17f803d085f8ff50db372b377689c8b30c0d
describe
'26453' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETA' 'sip-files00116.pro'
58e4127b22aad4dbf9c8e56b3bd09e6d
9aceb6e27e1a68f25b2f657099b3626144dcef0a
describe
'41680' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETB' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d43e81e099f08cfa3974dce697af0eb6
be35eb3a03cc0933023e7469f0f89c17d6c03392
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
ce8ad40dcb88bd97962b17005f4b282d
f08afeac6166a19ef7068669eaca32a785d3735b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETD' 'sip-files00116.txt'
3a160bf315783a68232da3e52b044d9d
084d8d2d70adb5c6eb63c066f37574c486a48956
'2011-12-28T23:51:58-05:00'
describe
'10505' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETE' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
7f62d35a4c18ca743f22bd8e9c50e48e
e557bbdd381387b9603490ded8a04f25bb94332a
describe
'322765' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
6d95308a068a3fb1572cc7e4694ea8b6
5d47696e3abee36ea981813f4cc724185ca3c2b1
describe
'140631' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETG' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
4b1c206168fafb4fa43e9d1b64721cac
c3567939764a2c8dc636b76c4dd33756375bed1d
describe
'26557' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
9d026ead4bcf056f6fe299afd54965e8
f0b911da006fbdde7655317ef8080c340e360af8
describe
'42329' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
3fcd89c0d17233cd3a9dce1921c9cc36
75a4ca66bd8d1f0cdea2fec4cbe472c78e11fce3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
fdeac7009bfa32abe309af02f4a73719
582cc98927abd765f4a12f43968cfb5792be3d0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
796efaa6d8666f67a8185346d066f738
7ddaa2fb291a2c51fd13c20bc5bbe5d9e4b10db2
describe
'10518' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETL' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
1ada62db454daff302d7b7833af1bf9e
8b2d8304ca583af48e156232198682c8ce25129c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETM' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
56b2ddea61a0b86dd5df79a6d49348cd
9ae94ce967ce886ecbd5247db44063670ffb7e4e
describe
'146148' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETN' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d8ffaa3c641184ec2fc562b2a7fddf3a
111125d6d1309761d36057b919ce0f6b63914561
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETO' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b3cb26cb0330479477569b93b1b6bb88
a1f63a4d2d5ae761e19f7c4a4a21cc09fb5b1644
describe
'43728' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
7d7dc1ab6570ab484b211e93ac1d38d1
90fe5698f6d2be3e73ec16af36e095503f3822cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
92962ce6b1a2229a6db5fa5f77d48c6e
99b10b0319bbc01d304ade28388b887d1f9e2361
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
7c79b3fdfc308f822988a3ae1f7cc34f
77db39537772da1bf2fc560e02d693c7b2eb36d5
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10729' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETS' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
68e87705f2684a789f968ec3c182b1c5
0d73e435fa3e2cfbe06315c19597db1a300eee3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
a5644e90809582ad8c830410ee5d1ec2
7003c49a2563a724a70f339ed963be22a7632488
describe
'147823' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
ca8625021cc917d5649a999047791d3c
f9f680411bf42eccc2bebfa1166b3e5d82f728b5
describe
'27645' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
1a6bd87d110e04582fd71e75d2702cbf
f24a66dd5233465ce468b8cc6aae015fed747f47
describe
'43796' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2c433f76f22306d7ccd7e3dd78217a6f
9f294d4b8d18bb297e7d9e375c04221df89495c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETX' 'sip-files00119.tif'
12534b6f8009167fc0ea4ceef70a73f0
b5a873e19dafc581d1720ea9b420034f04288138
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETY' 'sip-files00119.txt'
d8c45b09a6a50fc25fb8d7d06a8a2d11
ce19f617f8b9ca3c44e762449399bdf97628d5ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABETZ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
0c4616b69172308c9f2a73adc87692fd
b57f7072edffead8deea8fb3d3f7327b433d2ef6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b666232f26470d2ca2663ad5be453b1e
eb25c9747a0b3af7060d565225dcc9d6bb50e308
describe
'139896' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUB' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
9b557e238d0a75e10e87757386fa52e0
c5f2f3763ad3b6574f24343a4e7e448b207eb840
describe
'26674' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUC' 'sip-files00120.pro'
5047acff992ef976f8b72f34a22fa4e6
e583cf5a780d71633491976c2a00eeb25fccf130
describe
'42584' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUD' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
74d9731cc25ec15bb0f842d37edee6bb
40bc3389c1265da292befbb8e52e9200c0135c95
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUE' 'sip-files00120.tif'
cfbf1bc3594bef533e2f206aef17533b
8c3cd1d16d8f0ef2d489af21cc27963d7477b6a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUF' 'sip-files00120.txt'
11005fe2d4f8118af315419be5cc79ff
1a50e1ba79c0a0bca3faab6272c502ba5343b18f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11084' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUG' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
74472f92153be97543bb88dfb58626bb
e63a4641f40129e0d6a581eb41f982e3f7d09834
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUH' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
da7e4c6cf2eb72e233657d2d3bc4be91
383ef9b1376d1506535b81a31cf7910391d5f9b6
describe
'130085' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
467d5c2f247e610bad189abaa30bc90e
f0bf21744358f101a8a545bc6c9d4e32cf66dcd1
describe
'22498' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
85574c582e0ef7230d8bf6c098e8a680
b53d71ce91ae1754aea2cf4c633fcf5891a72c62
describe
'38526' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ad8335487ccd0e34259861a281bc5f63
a6e66042670e18ebcf2d3f30907a3835d92c6879
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUL' 'sip-files00121.tif'
cd5b516e204092d30b600e15095592ed
0c2a6e140baaa98d278247cd68bb29514f6a157f
describe
'840' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
99e3969f23d25b256222d5706e1cc712
1cc5018389ed4a511051841d2d9229628970abee
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9916' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUN' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
7feaed9b479abae21369ab0ccae29fa4
7a1e68e22730c4703b053c208f7c3be612deb444
describe
'322726' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
313c0a5ddfe96add96c8424a06c263b3
3ef90be97fe668fc32083929ce75dd936c7c9f7a
describe
'151886' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUP' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
1953ef52c046c856d0da2f333280f00a
ed12035291042112a44efcbb61f27053382e0474
describe
'28784' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
8ff05c2eced095c4dc09853e0c846a9d
9a27ae29fbeb47af44c391154b8011e62b35554d
describe
'46822' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUR' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
48dba7f0d1c9ddc148bc5e228d5bea94
ad84ad280228bd306d720c99943c5c373f8f2ae6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUS' 'sip-files00122.tif'
1e60a510c3e279cb83d65610949f7841
c97c7a5aafbbbda626c2cb7303675d29fe643a83
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUT' 'sip-files00122.txt'
bc200001c3d8b03235c6357c2918ea63
9d31b2ee6813ec6ea05dd68760591cf04d476066
describe
'11588' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUU' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
a0feac5d0ddb707e7ff466f18779e9ff
0d2f6759ef36bd81b0d3d20972076a4dd3ef5aa1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
7174a09f515535f697bf43b1107c1a2b
bf053527fbc230ab3313419713a1cc8e56db3790
describe
'145243' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUW' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6d58a96b09bf7177244857c6d5cd579f
3fd43aae5e572f0225392b58df21d14de386268e
describe
'27336' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUX' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f2f54f1fcd886143b0702a7af696d086
242bdedd63dde4b43e01c1f111a22ac5d9068c46
describe
'43050' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
477f8dcde41ba3a8f1144dd1710d1380
cfa52dfd19fce46097b04655d3b4c50e608571e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
85cb10187dca67d6191614750b38a67e
bacd0de92e65811c03448e0feaac5c20004e2ce9
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
fa470c7e03e443b41f997c7a8b539792
b1099ce0dfa041f0b4cee380e8cdd59102166057
describe
'10929' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVB' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
55ed0f6dba5a366f4d4015d59ed8ee82
4cb6523f173dddec73ab7c5ffae6f1c349a2bd29
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
5feec2f1698738c9b0fc511a9bc54657
27126d980d38a9aff3d7a9fce8e8b30e48d983c4
describe
'144182' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVD' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
d60d1577cb99ccb49fda3b202bcc5801
10174a57cbf5dc870cb54446ca522465622ce849
describe
'27644' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVE' 'sip-files00124.pro'
f44d0c098c0f320e53977c7460be7003
a880adcbabf243c2907c0d2cb7657a24ab6fbaa5
describe
'43351' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVF' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b542f6fbcc58f7a17f15444ca065879b
988f7464d6a5febc785d9a5cd9f0097b71388dab
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVG' 'sip-files00124.tif'
41e429cbcf0b766c2b66f3da03c59fa4
34ea66184509e2f75eea1f04131d0146b3650f3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVH' 'sip-files00124.txt'
452caeb8987070a2b669a85ded98e568
bcfdb1a5a62f258c5f7af4ea32cc2a98a2c06897
describe
'11343' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVI' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
55b93901c8d74888e6eab70bb62dd23e
d1a6632e4b47e333a1ad6a9a4b53fb79c44be4dd
describe
'322734' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a85d70d349719a41876a489e992bee78
5830f5906d4cf25f5c9e2fe9346d77f5ac8a573e
describe
'128294' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVK' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
bc6ed6440d2d9f1a09e5065e5d9f5c03
9f00b2196e53613dc51e027c747868aad6fae9a2
describe
'23540' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
033f3babe53b0b050f12f414ff1da57d
62c314f5d992468ad0cba1d4f52ca72fc4713b22
describe
'36937' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVM' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
0cb4d99db91bbf71468495988a15313d
537093a75fe763c5921423a619ef69069b61e89b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVN' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c4c73df90afc955382dc836feee71ab8
765f0a40e649659d3052ce30704925b508b7abd8
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVO' 'sip-files00125.txt'
4ee8b043440549feb5c0d78043550c89
5865f1e50b6e612c359b937dc3288e46f861a26f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10374' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVP' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ceb341612ce426eeb4cf81f78868b7d6
2bebc75aa3a53a4e3928a002d5958fbf793d1c5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
76e34544e5c2b720264f0dc31b6775ac
a3691c8a38e9531b6192cac99921e6b4e8bac753
describe
'130493' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVR' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
0c64f3af57857e217191eaa211bc5de2
c785785b79edcfe438a72f526c5d6fde42dea7de
describe
'23293' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVS' 'sip-files00126.pro'
be1161c1f75f0570639c52bc5df960d7
8e5736b861c10e7c0e4af6b20fc2e8546a70dacb
describe
'38984' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVT' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
a3b8c4083229c878ec4f824022b187e6
5d2e1aa99e1e769e0bea9533b0361ae7bf04e91d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVU' 'sip-files00126.tif'
e11dd0e1ea92c1977e490594d5f5df3f
f2eac8d0921f1ebc591d79bdedadfc11b5d0541c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVV' 'sip-files00126.txt'
9cc5445b56d3c13c21302c19ddd7b111
c8f2f358c92f9dabd696c5fd08c95d391f79976c
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9651' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVW' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
fbfb9169b621ccffca4a3cee65fa8c20
9c933c00af06f1d4cc84a60015a6c3f6057e778f
describe
'322685' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVX' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1a52543357bdd739b7e57c4263b3b373
54a80b523473b9c3c03500e24e20fe85fc3c30a3
describe
'143113' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
744df9d2b3c6955b41c96315890ef644
2f313101b65c070b24e5c8a57c1343c7dd44e634
describe
'27097' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
b42a8d77cb6676a00e6c6a3ed82b0e01
4a079edd029998372ba1720757bc1b0550293935
describe
'42940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWA' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
44f49861b44a4265fbc9bdc20a46721f
ea01d4d89b417743fb0645af0a927e186c7c100a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWB' 'sip-files00127.tif'
7c1a3759d935c9cd7b25432761c612df
79a54997b67ae4a0ef4d2b6f077d330bb567cb3a
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWC' 'sip-files00127.txt'
0ce5784707d316cfbc5c30ef9ff33dd4
4f414098de0f2c11b84e4c2b2afb4f53fbb6ffda
describe
'10691' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWD' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
656ef5650c5477de08c51b1382b2cafd
8c534d42b2686bc196037a7d295860ce48e1a16f
describe
'322804' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWE' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
2a8bcc05482bf67e5a4955537ec36c81
aa70be987c9d1237dafe16e48acbe0507afa4798
describe
'134402' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWF' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
381bcb60ac0332ed90b252a6d8a79651
c2df134d04e1f059b273e5522671411983826587
describe
'25420' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWG' 'sip-files00128.pro'
58fa3fbcaf9bb301e846cbdf29d6013f
a892e2f524f1a3b7c2219b1212d1b47789f5d20a
describe
'39788' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
3c657bb432b11233dd9753ddb26712da
e2501aa20db7e86fbcc9919b11abe1e58219ae7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWI' 'sip-files00128.tif'
b2f650ea7208deda6fcea343c0421cc5
900cd5dd0a1a0d75f6119dfbbb5fdaeef8b2e4fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
4cae8da5b2d88fcefbe5311e6b6ea72c
fa98c08331e8b7410fa5eb91c80f342f5c114434
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10082' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWK' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
35232c7333da90d1b96945eb961545ea
65880ed7d2ddc0bd68cdeb5bf067a56efb8620da
describe
'322802' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWL' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6dc51e04f3321ff6aa46bd67416d3f82
f9f364289e574b8c3a8fa0cb81e789eb22a38654
describe
'122761' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWM' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f28b7c6bbd922644d481e330674ab9d6
e54755b14a12bfcc77fafa78d640fabcbc886821
describe
'21644' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWN' 'sip-files00129.pro'
0b65f3a09bf6766d9921a4d2e61fc856
5321c6a1fdb3dc1252e7a978858848873d897038
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWO' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
817ad08294b8ab71221c2f069ffbef1e
7533dfe6382d17d503652c3bf0b1f184b7d47f68
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
605860ddec47b5d93f6fd71914b5d086
d9dc3e3fc1daa19cda9c4d3f470bfa5d9922d72c
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
61692f4cd7c3954b583b5528fa5666c8
c87dcd8639db447e318659a019a6f98cfa82799d
describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWR' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9da510b9427524259fa9bcc94dbda14d
6bfdc35375556eaaf3bd15c787dc9e6a0f5e68a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWS' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
9c1a4be3ad2a45eb662b041fbe730f7f
34851a79b8104f64586ae8da30b0d58528f5a8e6
describe
'138126' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWT' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
3c4467146b3c36724a9006af8172f1c6
1e7ed1c47280f26f007f6f0f425b29cdf2569bd8
describe
'25685' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWU' 'sip-files00130.pro'
db2fe6b854e4a24667425b2806a3fc69
bc44c02bfe8f757e78be4ddc48b0d8d66d1df2d3
describe
'41493' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWV' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
e379a53d2df59dd8c9c7192742f8b72a
1278f8bfdf5311f53ae793244702764dc516c150
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWW' 'sip-files00130.tif'
13cc4a32552236fcfa8367abe60270c9
540adc9aa306d279f8fe05a23177ef4372970b68
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWX' 'sip-files00130.txt'
2ee503a5c168eb9d0e581a1d0d926841
2febefb29ed7ded7c4e2810771c1da6698a543c5
describe
'10173' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWY' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
c617739fdaa5c0b7f25396f9cf392852
8486e4448917fe4723d8a8d1042ffa7d4f8712fc
describe
'322795' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
a999ee661edb27aa4b666484c36ddd5f
f7f6ea291410b7f4dcbbad8b46080fa4c0c4aa5a
describe
'131477' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXA' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
e058122f7f879790a4dc36648c99f34a
2787a0d4dc79b05bf3570567cba5a6feb98dccf7
describe
'24135' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXB' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0e6da03c8416f322aaffc841ae08d0d0
ba09a207890641591defcb0bef6a2d74936508c3
describe
'38928' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXC' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
71ecef96bd3a78a9c41277dc7b8d307b
469706feb172933a7bc26222f20b6a1a565aa405
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXD' 'sip-files00131.tif'
97eea5f1fa50bc6b741186397d0a6539
12554931d771bdb683087d440319da8e8648d139
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXE' 'sip-files00131.txt'
0326e6c3a67c4f305730e8550f12bc6b
068dd4281da6d48ac6de0951613c0853c4f2dd1e
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9972' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXF' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f14bf4db380e07039e0af1c5a9d17436
62a2fc84fa591a883adea7d1294c8b78c47e6d92
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXG' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
43c89fffd9750092a656b21c0f24e0f8
cb35c1f67134d57af9adc0a3ea7a5945aab0eb34
describe
'122074' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXH' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
972afd82a3cce0e673387b491a9e14d0
e50ecf59019f4cf79dbc9dc8a3265a6990215c95
describe
'19977' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXI' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3bafe14e06dd013feb98c09fddd468ad
7f65207678cb0f2f06e65e741f61d1dd6cd2bfe4
describe
'34029' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
82657b49e967391181a755caab8cabc1
064f56d3987b04e16aea3b7c97cddb0df330c3c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXK' 'sip-files00132.tif'
93c05d7ec7501fbb34490efcc436c543
bba881de00bc2c2b90fcd47f3208892a42acba1a
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXL' 'sip-files00132.txt'
e56a8e4531b452f0cc839fa042428809
970d9d17e9f6c368e04625430da50091b93b83ca
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9320' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXM' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
643ef20e14c82627e72337431e64ec50
2fe34fc3af4b293e05ac86b5a36e71b83825e691
describe
'322776' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
daa8c6d55f43a89730f794adb4bd9f9b
befe18ee3f3006a86019dd4c65c496ebfb0a275e
describe
'142402' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXO' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
48e462c590136d74643bad813c8b716b
f18ade7eb6e7edf7c84acbf6d06a496f31a207cd
describe
'26576' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXP' 'sip-files00133.pro'
5f42bb0b2f281299cf36b155e144d56b
1eaa0d19924121565091c0af7e6c158e2f17561c
describe
'41723' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
4600e89bea16a9effdfb978995ce995d
221f65718c228550163813e6414fc02d4a8aebf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXR' 'sip-files00133.tif'
37b40eea69f8f9f8f6abd82d75b74436
8a14865c6b04d8543d935b54e72f6cf237ff1f31
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXS' 'sip-files00133.txt'
a353811bd664555a61f10c20adb3d8d5
7457271e280324856feef592f05731866959d8d6
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10786' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXT' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
5f0fabc2bff607c2dc7ed2f97b96ee49
b429cd596426a4adaec41beb7be7d2a6ebdf5f00
describe
'322706' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXU' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b07598f4e9a4850d7a6d084b8d00550b
76cbee74e98f6d5b72d9fbe14b04b0bf556a2445
describe
'126651' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXV' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
b7dd3cc9a8d7944c219fb78e739b9650
41cc75d9c2d3525c9b9a9db3187cb34c18b04136
describe
'16381' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXW' 'sip-files00134.pro'
424536959c9c7534af57618fc61e7dbe
35b3070ceb6e5fbe35cc2987871ccc8e032ca385
describe
'33315' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXX' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
7a668187c78a871c2eea30a8f5f75596
62f4eb9bfd01a6d4e24316ae040c7ad80f202dfe
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXY' 'sip-files00134.tif'
fe8c0a56b2b3892d8ed7cc789e6dba75
67b8239e160e6b62655a7902221802d622ecce0d
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
82a4aa641d64d16f9a9335672a1af0a7
fe5731552546dc5b30be34f74ae01c3875843272
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7861' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYA' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
b9f38bfb4b8e169ada77034a16db29eb
11579d252e365795c3d071ba30784f76ca516dbe
describe
'400609' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
339ddf8fe790c9cb4e586a6ba3f696ca
39d9450a48c079244869084887276512974f0b7b
describe
'70141' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
26da7a3190830a399ee1e43824d4d64b
32b7f9547f1bce91f3e2ca70cec73a23c36e01ff
describe
'16031' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYD' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f81c4449559f502491da115eb80a9821
50c2607ee29c7826c89b6927ceb5f6fbdf6e828b
describe
'9636592' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
8677877ac04e1c75f95e6b1a41ad4ade
4631d6a3cb889c55f76f4769f84caae0d61611ba
describe
'4282' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
f91b6407e6d853a1fc932f751de04df7
001db4e2c62f7e72400d76529f28fbf811bf1030
describe
'389924' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYG' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
85f0fe646a91208b903ed5d73e50bbe8
a450914176d490a51890ea7b58faaf4fb34316af
describe
'106736' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e24e3e085d69cef4e5444d479b767c3b
c7c67fb3db92905d3774d56bd193550aa8a89866
describe
'17907' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYI' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
4be07319ac8fce278fdf14a7a70e4a84
8a8b23465d5c177eb50bced558dbd31823d7c4e7
describe
'9380740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
81a04cc0b27811cc08f0cea2ac8a6fe8
7ef5448c26701893a6ec5eee3d29d148c9ead249
describe
'4123' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYK' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
ff831fd746bc4d5d71ee58eb7d90e382
578ba3e63f172cf3a048c8575d91128baa12ce0e
describe
'70203' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7fa3db6f8963dbb8681f4303abdaf0dc
fb5b9a94f3eb53ebbe2fe89f112fb9efeb6e87d0
describe
'38278' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYM' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
5dd16baff2af06d0174614477eb04cf6
6da3201561c10e2d6e87092488423d42a79ba556
describe
'331' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYN' 'sip-files00139.pro'
9a4bcb7d142a9c3510aa0a809b21e850
7911016626e8f325d962a2194743e57024a6d74d
describe
'10055' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYO' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
2e03180dbd5b99cf03f9f4df6ec3a5fa
02c9193e5b01e565cd4f9b4624ecd87258a9e772
describe
'1706468' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYP' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1489bcb627d278b3639648f0339b5539
06fcd8a3d2fbe44b9edc501c812357b5b258d9b3
describe
'4074' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
899af70ac99971718538cd835f98a8e9
a74655dcf9fb410bad798f60b3532984f4eed1d7
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYR' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
784439b79393174bbcfd411c91cce92a
db6fdd658126c9eb7ee487d7c332ccf9a1498b86
describe
'194221' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYS' 'sip-filesUF00086984_00001.mets'
ea7b6a075944380e11d8f496a7c85056
7b494f6d2bf1fb5db662a21170d15bea2eca6638
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T00:08:50-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'251451' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVMfileF20090114_AABEYV' 'sip-filesUF00086984_00001.xml'
6d43d70af3f4cd2c6bfec19dbc00c943
22d26166d58734be27a88d75abd2070486fc2eca
describe
'2013-12-14T00:08:47-05:00'
xml resolution