Citation
Master Piers

Material Information

Title:
Master Piers
Creator:
Robson, Isabel Suart ( Author, Primary )
Culley, Robert ( Publisher )
Fletcher and Son ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Robert Culley
Manufacturer:
Fletcher and Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128, [16] p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bldn dy 1898
Boys -- Behavior -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Home schooling -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Interpersonal relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Attitude change -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Obstinacy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Empathy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sharing -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898 ( rbprov )
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Norwich
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Pictorial cover; illustrated endpapers.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Isabel Suart Robson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026937140 ( ALEPH )
ALH7195 ( NOTIS )
30047239 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




ALBERT ROAD,

SOUTHSEA

joe ; 2 ee :
Beasnt espe ye iors YM tase hfe thet ea see erent ete ota

EARLY AND REGULAR

ATTENDANCE DURING 1898.

S. RUNDLE, Superintendent.
E. WARNER, Secretary.





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Frontispiece.

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Foe Saue





Nay

**Oh, Mr, Heron!’ he cried, ‘ would you very much mind helping?’”"—Fage 8.





MASTER PIERS.

ISABEL SUART ROBSON,

Author of “ Into Untried Paths,” “ Kavanagh Major,” “ Uncle Jock's Little Girl,”
“That Odd Little Pair,” &c., &¢., &t.

No .

London:
; ROBERT CULLEY,
2 AND 3 LUDGATE CIRCUS BUILDINGS, FARRINGDON STREET, E.C. 3
2 CASTLE STREET, CITY ROAD, E.C,













Chapter
Io.

Il.

Il.

ve.
VI.

VIL.
VIII.

Tx. .

CONTENTS.

Page

: MARGETSON OF WINDE ; : 5

. MASTER PIERS’ MOTHER . 19
. THE OLD HOUSE . : » 32

THE MISCHIEVOUS ENDING OF A MISERABLE DAY 47

+ AUNT VIRGINIA COMES HOME . » 59
. . . THE NOOK . ; ; 74

» THE “GIRL-BOY” . : be 8Y
. + MILES’ ADVENTURE. ‘ 100

. IN THE BONNY NORTH COUNTRY , + <7











































MASTER. PIERS.

CHAPTER I.

MARGETSON OF WINDE.

“A little boy
With hey-ho, the wind and the rain.”

(ye | was a grey November afternoon



with a sullen sky and a gusty
wind, which swept through the
little hillside station of Charlesford, and
threatened, every now and then, to carry
off his feet the solitary personage awaiting
the arrival of the London express. He was

a sturdy little boy, about eight years old,



6 Master Piers.

with an odd freckled face and-straight dark
hair, cropped so closely that it scarcely peeped
from beneath his fur cap. Master Piers’
friends were in the habit of deploring his
‘lack of beauty, and his old nurse Caxton
would have lost her right hand, she said, to
have given him the golden curls, starry eyes
and graceful figure, which were the common
heritage of his family. Piers himself had no
such wish. He cherished a conviction that
‘good looks” were for girls, and regarded
his tip-tilted nose, his straight hair and
freckles, with secret satisfaction.

He walked up and down the platform, with
his hands deep in his ulster-pockets, consulting
the clock at every turn, and fully assured that
there was something wrong with the works,
since it went so dreadfully slowly.

_ Presently the station-master came out of his
house close by.

‘Why, Master Piers,” he-said, cheerily,





Margetson of Winde.



“T didn’t know you were here or I’d have —
asked you to come in and sit by the fire.
I suppose you drove down to meet the
express. I saw the carriage in the yard.
Expecting visitors up at Winde?” :

‘Well, not a visitor exactly,” replied
Piers, trying to keep step with the man as
he went about his duties. ‘‘My tutor is
coming to-day; you know all the Margetsons
have a tutor when they are eight. Caxton
cried awfully when she heard, but Thomas,
our footman, says that’s because her nose
is out of joint. It must hurt dreadfully
to have your nose out of joint, White,
mustn’t it?”

‘Tt must so, Master Piers,’ replied the
man, concealing a smile; ‘“‘but, no doubt
Mrs. Caxton is a bit sore, seeing she has
looked after you since you was a baby.”

Piers looked reflectively at the lamps the

man was burnishing.



8 Master Piers.

‘‘Mother says that can’t be helped and it’s
silly to bother oneself over what must be,” |
he said, gravely. ‘‘I say, White, I wonder
how I shall know which is Mr. Heron.
I have never seen him, and it would be
awfully funny if I went up to the wrong
man and asked him to go home in the
brougham.”’

‘Well, we don’t get crowds on this platform
most days,” said the station-master, laughing.
‘‘ Anyhow a tutor is sure to be a sober, oldish-
looking chap, may be dressed in a parson’s
rig-out. Keep near me so as I can give you
a hint, and I dare say you won’t make no
mistake.”

“You are very kind, White,” Piers replied,
gratefully; ‘‘ 1 won’t go far away, and then you
can give me a nod if I am going to the right
man. But there’s some smoke ever so far off,
that’s the train coming, isn’t it?”

“Tt is so, Master Piers; you just stand



Margetson of Winde. 9

further back. I wouldn’t like to face Lady
Margetson or Miss Virginia if anything
happened to you.”

Piers nodded and retreated, his eyes fixed
on the approaching puff of white smoke.

In a few minutes the train stood panting
in the platform and Piers might have spared
all anxiety as to the identification of his
tutor, for only one passenger alighted, a tall,
handsome young man, in a brown tweed
travelling suit and cap, carrying a Gladstone
bag and a handful of newspapers.

He called to a porter with the air of
one used to having his wants attended to
speedily.

‘“Tve a bicycle in the van,” he said. ‘“‘ Get
it out for me, and tell me how I shall get
myself and it to Winde.”

“The carriage is in the yard, sir, and
Master’ Piers is here,” said the station-master,

stiffly. The young man might have been





PAS RA TTL











IO Master Piers,

Margetson of Winde himself from his airs,
he told his wife afterwards.

Mr. Heron put down his bag and looked at
the small boy whose existence he had, until
now, overlooked. He had keen blue eyes and
a merry smile.

‘(Master Piers! that’s the name of my
pupil, I think,” he said, pleasantly. ,

‘Yes, I’m Margetson of Winde, though
I’m mostly called ‘Master Piers,’”’ the boy
said, simply. ‘I think I shall like you, and
I’m awfully hard to please.”

“T’m flattered,” replied the young man,
with a pleasant laugh; ‘let us hope that
I shall not pall on further acquaintance.”

“Pall! What does that mean?” Piers
asked, curiously; but Mr. Heron was too
busily superintending the disembarkation of
his bicycle to give a sufficient answer.

‘“‘Tt’s half-an-hour’s drive to Winde,”’ Piers

said, when he and Mr. Heron were at last

1
4







_Margetson of Winde. an

seated in the carriage. ‘We shall know each
other quite well by the time we get there.
You are not a bit like I thought you would
be, Mr. Heron; much nicer; oh! ever so
much !”

‘‘Did you think a tutor must be an ogre,
my boy?” laughed Mr. Heron, regarding his
pupil with amusement.

“Well, not quite, only White thought you
would be serious and like a clergyman, and
mother has told me a dozen times that you
would be sure to keep me in order. That’s
her way of saying you will be awfully strict.”

‘“Oh! I mean to keep you in order, young
man. May I ask if you regard that as
a terribly hard task?”

Piers’ eyes danced as though he could a tale
unfold, but he wisely refused to commit
~ himself.

‘““Well, you see, I am not so very bad for

a boy, only mother is not strong and I get



12 Master Piers.

on her nerves ; it must be dreadfully bothering
to have nerves. I—I hope you haven’t got
any?” he queried, anxiously.

Mr. Heron hastened to reassure him on this

point.
‘‘T’m so glad you have come,” the boy went
on, brightly; “(I was so afraid of forgetting
what I’ve learned, and Aunt Virginia would
feel so ashamed. I say, Mr. Heron, you
won’t tell any one if I am very backward
with my lessons, it would be so horrid for
auntie, you see, because she’s been my
teacher.”

Mr. Heron promised. There was something
frank and chivalrous about the little lad which
pleased him greatly. He had half expected
from Lady Margetson’s letters to find a fragile,
gaily-caparisoned, ‘‘ Little Lord Fauntleroy,”
with flowing curls and cerulean eyes—a type
of boy of whom he was not particularly fond.
Instead, this sturdy little lad wore the shabbiest



Margetson of Winde. ie

serge sailor-suit, not free from mud stains and
with a very perceptible darn in one knee.

Piers caught his tutor’s eyes upon his suit
and his cheeks reddened.

“Oh! I forgot that I promised Caxton
I wouldn’t open my ulster,” he said; ‘‘ I hadn’t
time to change before I came out. I got into
a silly scrape this morning, and all the talk
about that took such a lot of time. When
people are cross with you, they always want
to say the same scolding in such a heap of
different ways. Mr. Heron, have you any
great affection for Fauntleroy suits?”

“Not the least in the world,” replied
Mr. Heron, wondering whither this abrupt
change in the conversation led; “I’m glad
to see you in something a long way off
such frippery.”’
~ “But I have one at home,” Piers replied
dolefully; ‘‘the bother was about that.

Mother admires it so much, and she told



14 Master Piers.

Caxton I was to put it on when I came to
the station. Caxton might as well have tried
‘to put it on Pixie! What’s the good of being
Margetson of Winde if you can’t even wear
what you like? I just threw the old things
at Cax and snatched up my ulster and hid
in the stable-yard. She came down presently
and said she wouldn’t tell of me if I promised
to keep my ulster buttoned, so you shouldn’t
see my old play-suit.”

‘And a Margetson of Winde—isn’t that
the term ?>—doesn’t think it beneath him to
break a promise to a servant, after throwing
his apparel at her, because he happens to
dislike it ?’”’ queried Mr. Heron, quietly. ‘‘We
shall have to have some talk on that subject,
I see, Piers.”

Piers fidgetted in his seat. ‘‘That’s how
Aunt Virginia talks,” he said, not meeting
his tutor’s eyes. ‘It’s such a horrid way too ;

it makes a boy feel as small as a caterpillar.”



Margetson of Winde. 15

Mr. Heron looked out of the carriage
window. It certainly was a little early to
have played the part of preceptor.

Suddenly Piers sprang up and let down the
window with a bang.

‘Put your head out, quick, Mr. Heron, and
you will get a glimpse of Winde,” he cried,
excitedly. ‘Look, down there, between
that clump of larches and the old elm with
the bent trunk. Isn’t it a jolly place?”

Mr. Heron looked out with enough interest
on his bronzed face to satisfy even Master
Piers. The road they were travelling had
been cut in the slope of a long stretch of
undulating meadow-land; a quarter of a mile
away, in the valley, stood Winde, an old
Elizabethan mansion, its red front mellowed
by age and its beautiful architecture unmarred
by the Vandal hand of any restorer.
A plantation of firs came down as a back-

ground for the house; before it, gardens and



16 Master Piers.

fields swept away, green and beautiful, even
under the grey November sky.

There had been Margetsons at Winde since
Plantagenet times; but a little more than three
centuries ago, a Piers Margetson had built the
present mansion ‘for the rest and delight of
his family,” said the legend over the entrance-
door. Max Heron’s eyes grew soft and dreamy
as he looked. An old country-house always
stirred to life whatever there was of romance
and poetry in him. He seemed to see then,
as he did yet more clearly as months passed
away, the long pageant of joys and sorrows,
comedies and tragedies which had been
enacted under that roof. He realised, as_
only a few are able to do, that ‘the dead
past’? is more than an empty phrase. The
past lives on into the present, with its
weight of influence for good or ill.

His reverie was disturbed by the pressure

of a warm little hand.



Margetson of Winde. 17,

‘“‘T’m so jolly glad that you like it,” said his
small companion, softly, ‘‘and of course you
haven’t seen half the place yet! I’m very
little, aren’t I, to have such a big, lovely
place belonging to me? I sometimes sit up
in the apple-tree and try to feel it—that
I’m really Margetson of Winde. It generally
makes me feel queer and unsatisfied with
myself.”

“You had better be playing football or
cricket, young man,” Heron said, decisively.
“You will suffer from a disease technically
known as ‘swelled head’ if you don’t mind,”

‘““T’ve never played cricket or football, but
I’d like to, awfully,” Piers said, thoughtfully.
‘‘All real boys do, don’t they ?”

- “Of course, and it will not be long before
you do too. I shall send up to town for the
“paraphernalia at once, and you can have your
first lesson as soon as the things arrive. But

here we are at your ancestral hall.”



18 oF Master Piers.

“T say, aren’t you making fun?” Piers
said, quickly.

Then, as the carriage was at a standstill,
he jumped out, and lifting his cap with
a quaint, graceful gesture, added, ‘‘ Welcome

to Winde, Mr. Heron,” and vanished.







CHAPTER II.
MASTER PIERS’ MOTHER.

“Tt never was in my soul
To play so small a part ;

But evil is wrought by want of thought,
As well as want of heart.”

ADY MARGETSON will see you

in the library, sir,” said a solemn



footman who had already taken
possession of the new-comer’s bag and overcoat.

Mr. Heron followed him across the hall and
along a thickly-carpeted corridor into a wide
low room, lined with books, and aglow with
the warm light of a wood fire which burned
on the tiled hearth.

Lady Margetson rose from a low chair and
Cz



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|



20 Master Piers.

held out her hand as Mr. Heron entered.
She was a beautiful woman with the softest
of grey eyes, and fair hair curling about her
white forehead. Her little son bore not the
slightest resemblance to her, a fact which
vexed her more than she ever acknowledged.

‘“‘T have ordered tea to be brought here,
Mr. Heron,” she said, after a few questions
respecting his journey. ‘‘I thought you might
like to have a talk with me about your pupil,
before you make his acquaintance.”

“T think we may claim to be acquainted
already,” said Mr. Heron, with a smile;
‘Piers was at the station to meet me.”

“Ah! yes, I had forgotten that he asked to
go,” Lady Margetson replied, lightly. ‘You
find him a rough diamond, do you not?
I must confess that I do not understand the
child very well. He is so blunt and careless
of small courtesies that I have, perforce, had

him with me very little. One can make noth-



Master Piers’ Mother. ZT

ing of the rough, ordinary boy-nature,”’ she
added, laughing. ‘It isn’t picturesque in the
smallest degree. It has just to grow like a tree.”

‘‘A mother works wonders with the strangest
material,” the tutor replied, quietly. ‘I think
that ordinary boy-nature, strong, robust, and
enduring, is a remarkably good foundation to
build upon, if you work carefully. I have not
a doubt but that Piers and I will get on
admirably.”

‘Well, I give a free hand,” Lady Margetson
said, cordially. ‘‘He has, you will find,
a deplorable vocabulary to match his manners.
I have an idea that he glories in using the
extraordinary phrases of the stable-yard.”

“lt is the unusual: that attracts. him;
I dare say,” Mr. Heron said.

‘Yes, and I must own that I shall be glad
' to share the responsibility of his training with
one'recommended so highly by my good friend,

Lord Normanton.”



23 Master Piers.

Mr. Heron bowed, and a moment later the
footman entered with the tea-tray.

‘““ Ask Master Piers to come to the library,”
Lady Margetson said to the man.

But after a prolonged search, Thomas came

back to report that Master Piers was not to
be found. sed.
' His mother turned to Mr. Heron with
a pretty gesture of despair. ‘‘It is always so,
Mr. Heron. The boy likes any place better
than carpet-land. He is by way of becoming
a little savage. I expect he is in the farmyard
or eating bread-and-jam in the gardener’s
kitchen. I turn him over to you to civilise. It
is time you came.”

Half an hour later, Mr. Heron found his |
charge curled up on a rug in the hall, awaiting
his advent.

“Tl take you up to your rooms,” he said.
“TI thought you were never coming!”

“That was the fault of your patience,



Master Piers’ Mother. oe

not my tardiness, Master Piers,’ replied
Mr. Heron, calmly. ‘ Thirty minutes since,
you were not to be found, searched Thomas
never so diligently.”

Piers laughed aloud. ‘I guessed mother
would want me to have tea in the library.
She always does when there is company, and,
of course, you are company on the first day.
It’s awfully sweet of her to want me, but I just
hate it, I always spill the tea on some one and
knock something down, and never, never, get
enough to eat. So I generally slip off to the
housekeeper’s room, and Thomas has strict
orders from Margetson of Winde not to look
there.” The boy laughed gaily at his own little
joke. ‘Sutton gives me a jolly spread, lots
of apricot jam and gingerbread, and strong
tea that Caxton would never let me drink.
Oh! I say, how jolly strong you are!”

For Mr. Heron’s reply to Master Piers’

explanation was to seize him firmly by the back



24 Master Piers.

of his jacket and hold him suspended at arm’s
length, ‘ wriggling like a worm,” to use Piers’
own graphic simile.

“T don’t wonder that you get on your
mother’s nerves and drive Caxton to frenzy,
young man. Your ideas of honour lack
‘a gracious somewhat, as the poet puts it,
whilst your capacity for eluding anything you
do not like is stupendous. Now take me
upstairs.”

Piers chased up the wide staircase and
opened a baize door which shut off the west
wing of the house.

“All the place on the other side of this
door is yours and mine,” he said, gaily; ‘‘ these
rooms once belonged to Uncle Cornelius, but.
they are yours now. When Aunt Virginia
came home from Dresden, she and Uncle
Cornelius went away to live at The Nook.
Don’t you think that they are nice rooms?”

He eyed his tutor with hospitable anxiety.



Master Piers’ Mother. 2 5

‘Splendid!’ Heron said, looking round
him. He was scholar enough to appreciate
the studious aspect of the cosy, oak-panelled
parlour, with its long, low bookshelves, large
study table, and deep, leather arm-chairs, worn
to a comfortable degree of shabbiness. Along
one wall ran a rack for guns, fishing-tackle,
and tennis rackets, and on the hearth was
a bright fire which lit up the old-fashioned
ornaments on the top of the bookshelves and
the few pictures hanging above them.

Heron stood looking at the gardens, grey
and misty in the November twilight, and told
himself he was a very fortunate fellow to have
come upon such quarters. Not so long ago,
the prospect of living in another’s house and

eating another’s bread seemed a thing little

likely to come into his life. He had suffered

reverses which would have inclined a less

courageous man to become sour. Heron was

no coward. He wisely determined to think of





26 Master Piers.

them as seldom as possible. He had a manly
contempt for anything like whining; “a fellow
couldn’t have a finer model than Browning’s

old friar,’”’ he used to say:

“One who never turned his back but marched
breast-forward,
Never doubted clouds would break,
Never dreamed, though right were worsted,
wrong would triumph,
Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better,
Sleep to wake.”

He was frankly glad, since he had to work
for a livelihood, it should be in such good
quarters. A great many high ambitions had
had to be put by, but he was clear-eyed
enough to see that it was no mean task to
take a child by the hand and lead him
aright.

‘““T once thought to be a model landlord
myself,” he said with a smile, “that’s past
and done with; but I may do something to

make Margetson of Winde—poor little lad—



Master Piers’ Mother. OF.

fit for his post. It seems to me that so far,
like Topsy, he’s ‘growed’ morally.”

There was a door on one side of the fire-
place, and, missing Piers, the tutor entered
the adjoining room. He found the boy
struggling with the straps of his portmanteau.

“There! I meant to get it open before you
came in,” he said, looking up with a flushed
face. ‘It’s so new that the straps stick.
Some day I shall have strong fingers like you,
shan’t I? and then things will open quick for
me as they do for you.”

“Tf you run about and play, instead of
sitting in apple-trees trying to ‘feel’ your own
splendour,” laughed Mr. Heron.

“Oh! I don’t do that often!” protested
Piers, indignantly; ‘only when I want to
realize. Shall I get out your dress-suit? You
are going to dine with mother, you know.”

“Not to-night; I have asked her to excuse

me,” replied Mr. Heron, keeping a look-out on







28 Master Piers.

Piers, who was hovering over a pair of razors.
‘You see, I want to get to know you well, and
I could not do that more quickly than by
spending this first long evening with you.”
And what an evening it was! They spent
it together in the schoolroom, which had so
recently been the nursery that Caxton often
forgot it was no longer her domain. She was
mending socks by the fire when the pair:
entered, and appeared greatly disturbed at
being found there, ‘‘having learnt from her
lady that Master Piers had outgrown his old
nurse.” But Mr. Heron would not hear of
her going away. ‘Did she think that he,
a mere man, could take her place with Master
Piers?” he asked, merrily. ‘Why, he knew
nothing of the mysteries of a boy’s toilet, and
as for mending socks, well, he should be
grateful if Mrs. Caxton would take his under
her care, for her darning was really a fine art.”
Caxton bridled and tried to look severe, but



Master Piers’ Mother. 29

there was no resisting Mr. Heron’s good
humour. She sat down again and spread out
her housewife of many coloured darning wools,
and before the clock struck eight, Master Piers’
bedtime, felt herself altogether reconciled to
the invasion which she had previously declared
‘svould certainly darken her declining years.”

‘Tt did her heart good, to see Master Piers’
face,” she said afterwards in the housekeeper’s
room. ‘She'd never guessed before how shut
up in Winde the child was. He just drunk in
Mr. Heron’s words as though he hadn’t felt
a breath of the outside world before.”

Perhaps that was how Piers really did feel.
His eyes shone, and his plain little face was
all aglow as he listened and concluded that his
tutor was quite the most wonderful being he
had ever known. The people who came to
Winde, and a great many did come when

Lady Margetson was at home, always made

Piers feel awkward and insignificant. He never



30 Master Piers.

went near them if he could help it, and would
have laughed incredulously, if any one had told
him that many had lived far more eventful
lives than Max Heron.

Yet, after all, perhaps it was the stories of
things quite within Piers’ reach which most
delighted the boy. Mr. Heron’s early days
had also been spent in the country, but with
this difference: instead of a father away in
unknown lands, Mr. Heron, laird of Heronfell,
liked to have his little son at his heels, and
was as keen as Max about a dozen boyish
sports which the ladies, who had _ hitherto
ruled Piers’ life, had quite forgotten to
introduce to him.

“T say, Mr. Heron, you'll have to tell all
this to Aunt Virginia when she comes home
from Italy. She likes to hear about things
that I ought to do, and she has got lots of fun
in her,” Piers said, when Caxton, having

sedulously avoided noticing that the hands of



Master Piers’ Mother. 31

the clock had long passed eight, at last folded
her work and bade him say “ good-night.”

As the tutor went to his own room, he heard
‘the sound of the piano and Lady Margetson
singing in a voice wonderfully sweet and clear.
It was a sad little song, and it seemed to him
pathetic that she should be all alone in the
ereat drawing-room singing to herself. He
stood at the head of the staircase for a little
while listening, and then went to his room.
His own mother had been dead only a few
months, and, from his babyhood, they had been
all in all to each other. He felt it the saddest
thing that Lady Margetson and her little son
should live so far apart, though under one roof,
when each might have been so much to the
other. He realized, with a sudden thrill of joy,
how much he might have lost during his six-
; “and-twenty years ; instead, his dearest heritage
was the memory of parents who were always

his closest friends and loving comrades.





CHAPTER Iii.

THE OLD HOUSE.

“The stately homes of England,

How beautiful they stand. .....
There woman’s voice flows forth in song,
Or childhood’s tale is told,

Or lips move tunefully along
Some glorious page of old.”

HEN Piers ran into the breakfast-

room next morning, he found his





tutor already there. Mr. Heron
was standing on the hearthrug, looking
thoughtfully into the fire, and, now and .
then, making an entry in the notebook he
held in his hand,



The Old House. (933

He put it into his pocket and wished Piers
a cheery ‘‘ good morning.”

“Tt’s raining hard, and_I was going to the
Long meadow to see Barnes break in the new
horse,” said Piers, dolefully. “Ton’t you hate
wet mornings, Mr. Heron? The house never
seems big enough to spend a whole day in,
and you soon use up indoor games. Mother
said it would interest me to show you the house
this morning. Most people like to see it.”

Mr. Heron regarded his pupil with an

amused smile.

-Doesn’t it occur to you, Piers, that

a pretty large part of your day and mine will
have to be spent in the schoolroom? Life
when we reach the dignified age of eight, is not
all play.”

Master Piers’ face fell. ‘I had forgotten,”
he said: ‘You see, I have only had lessons
now and then, but everybody said it would be

different now.” :

B



34 Master Piers.

“Tl let you down easy, at first,” laughed
Mr. Heron, ‘“‘I have no desire to emulate the
noted Dr. Blimber. Have you heard of that
distinguished personage? Little Paul Dombey
was committed to his care when a good deal
younger than you are. One morning’s work
for him comprised, English and a great deal
of Latin, a trifle of orthography, a glance at
ancient history, a wink or two at modern ditto,
a. few tables, two or three weights and
measures, and a little general information.”

‘“‘T can see in your eyes, Mr. Heron, that is
only a joke of a story. If anybody treated
a real boy like that, I should think he would
be tremendously discouraged.”

Mr. Heron poured himself out a cup of
coffee before he replied: ‘‘I am going to put
you through your paces this morning, my boy ;
I can promise you that I shall be more
moderate than Dr. Blimber in my expectations,

but you must work for the future, you know.”









a ae eee

The Old House. 35

Piers nodded. ‘I must, for I have got to
be clever when I grow up; the Margetsons
have nearly all been great in some way, you
know, and mother would be dreadfully
disappointed in me if I were one of the
ordinary ones. I wish the world was not such

a big place, Mr. Heron, there’s so many things

to learn that one person can’t. learn

everything.”
‘Tt is as much as the best of scholars can

do to learn all about one thing,” said
Mr. Heron. ‘‘ Don’t bother your head, laddie,

about the ‘lots of things to learn,’ but peg

‘on steadily at the tasks at hand. That’s

the secret of making the future a success.
The man who finds life a good and joyous

thing, is the man whose life will make itself

felt.”

He stopped, wondering a little whether he
were not going beyond Piers, and began to-

ask him about his childish pleasures. He
Dez



36 Master Pers.

wanted to identify himself to the utmost with
the child’s daily doings. He had his ideal of
life, and it comprised the following of any
chosen calling with perfection in the smallest
details. He meant to do his share towards
making Margetson of Winde the man he
should be--an aim which took in a good
many lessons not to be learned from
books.

‘He was quite prepared to find his pupil
backward in the matter of education, and
an hour’s examination did not agreeably
disappoint him. The boy’s eyes, however,
forbade the utterance of any judgment likely
to imperil Miss Virginia’s reputation as an
instructress. He closed the books and bade
Piers put them away.

“We shall do better than that in six
months, my boy,” he said, cheerily. ‘‘ Now,
since it still rains persistently, we may as well

make our little journey round the house. Iam



The Old House. 37

curious to see it, for the fame of it reached me
in Scotland.”

“How jolly! It’s no end nice to have
a place that is old and full of stories, isn’t it ?”
Piers cried, eagerly. ‘‘ There’s a book of tales
about us in the library. Grandfather wrote it,
and once I made Thomas read it to me.
Didn’t they have jolly times long ago? They
chopped off each other’s heads at the least
thing. One Margetson killed six men down
at the ferry, because they laughed at
his hunchbacked sister. Afterwards, when
England got more civilised, they had to go
abroad for adventures, but they had splendid
times with the old Spaniards in Queen
Elizabeth’s reign.

‘You bloodthirsty boy!” laughed Mr. Heron.
‘Do you think adventures and glory can only
be won by the sword ?”’

“That would be awfully silly!” retorted

Piers, contemptuously. ‘‘Some Margetsons,



38 ‘Master Piers,

quite famous ones, have been bookwriters, and
father is an explorer, far away in the snow-
lands, near the Pole.” It was Piers’ fancy
always to speak of his dead father as if he still
existed somewhere in those distant regions in
which he lost his life.

Heron was surprised at the boy’s store of
knowledge concerning his ancestors and his
home. He seemed to have a legend to match
each’ curious nook and odd-shaped room,
learned, no doubt, from the old servants, who
adored their young master, and were never
too busy to talk to him. Here was the
window to which Trevor Margetson once
climbed, to take a last look at his mother,
before departing for the Indies; in this room,
a Royalist general with a price on his head, had
been concealed for weeks whilst the whole
county ‘was alive with soldiers searching for
him. The Margetsons had been on _ the ~

Parliamentary side, but never one of them



{



The Old House, 39

would have withheld a kindly hand from
a fugitive, were he friend or foe, At the end
of a dimly-lighted corridor was a small suite
of apartments known as the Priest’s rooms,
and given over to the storage of lumber,
A few Latin books, in quaint lettering, still
stood on the carved shelves, and a truckle-bed,
by no means suggestive of comfortable repose,
yet bore its silk coverlid, now faded and
tattered. Piers sat down on a low stool, and
looked about him with his chin propped on his.
hand.

‘‘] think this is such an interesting room,”
he said, gravely. ‘“‘ One of the good Margetsons
lived here like a hermit till he was tremendously .
old. None of his brothers liked him, because
he became a priest, and no one in the family
had ever been a ‘religious’ before. Aunt
Virginia says they had a feeling, perhaps, that
it was a ‘soft life,’ and Margetsons have always

been strong and daring. It was a wrong



40 Master Piers.

feeling, she says, for a man has to be what
God puts it in his heart to be, and to spend
your life helping other people to be great and
true, must be better than just thinking of your
own greatness.”

Mr. Heron nodded gravely. ‘But the
teacher must first be great and true himself,
laddie. He becomes a teacher of men because
he has trodden the upward path and knows the
pitfalls and rough places, and is desperately
sorry for those who have them still to tread.”

Piers got up and stretched his arms. ‘I’m
chiefly interested in the jolly old priest
because he is the Margetson that looks like
me,” he said, slowly. ‘If you come with me,
I'll show him to you.” He ran down the
corridor, and, when a few minutes later Heron
entered the picture gallery, he found the boy
seated, cross-legged, on the floor, before the
portrait of a shaven priest of Tudor times,

whose whimsical face, firm mouth, and steady,



The Old House. AI

honest eyes, nature had oddly reproduced in
Master Piers.

Lady Margetson was walking up and down
the gallery, with a soft fur cloak covering her
green gown and a dainty hood drawn over
her fair hair.

She nodded a ‘‘good-morning” to the
newcomers. ‘‘I went to the schoolroom to
find you and heard you were doing the
house, so I knew you must gravitate here,
sooner or later. I see Piers at his shrine,
already!” she said, laughing lightly. ‘He
is devoted to the Priest: odd, isn’t it, con-
sidering that he is quite the ugliest of the
collection ?”’

“It’s evidently the attraction of similarity,”
replied Heron, smiling. ‘‘There’s a marked
likeness between the two faces.”

- Lady Margetson turned away, with a little
frown. puckering her white forehead. ‘ Yes,

it is noticeable,” she said, curtly. ‘‘ Come



42 Master Piers,

here, Piers, I am going to Sevenoaks in an
hour, to lunch with your cousins. Mr. Heron
will, no doubt, excuse you since I particularly
wish you to accompany me. You had better
come now, and I will give Caxton instructions
to get you ready.”

Like a sudden summer storm, Piers’ face
clouded. The laughter died out of his eyes,
his mouth set in an expression of very manifest
unwillingness. It seemed for a moment that
he was going to protest, then he walked away
to the window and stood drumming on the
blurred panes.

‘“‘T hate going to Sevenoaks; I hate all the
people there!” he said, crossly.

Lady Margetson shrugged her shoulders.
‘You see, Mr. Heron, poor Piers has a rooted
objection to civilised life! Even the charms
of my society pall before plans of his own
devising.”

Piers reddened, and he fidgetted from one



The Old House. 43

foot to another as the sweet mocking tones fell
on his ear.

“You will have your hands full if you are
going to make a gentleman of this Margetson
of Winde.”

“T have no fears for the future,” Heron
replied, looking at her, steadily. Something
in the look made Lady Margetson lift her head
haughtily, and tell herself that this young man
was presuming to sit in judgment upon her.

“T have not the least doubt you will do
your duty,”’ she said, coldly. “Piers, mind
you do not keep the carriage waiting. Perhaps,
Mr. Heron, you will be so good as to see that
he is not late.”

The tutor, remembering the entries he had
made in his notebook that morning, hastened
to suggest that the afternoon, thus left free,
‘would be a good opportunity for running up to
town to make certain purchases for the

schoolroom. . ©



44 Master Piers.

‘“Go, by all means,” said Lady Margetson,
carelessly. ‘‘I leave all matters of that kind
entirely in your hands; Piers will not need you
before dinner.’”’ Then taking the reluctant
boy by the hand, she swept from the gallery,
leaving Heron wondering where’ he had
offended.

‘Poor Master Piers! he’ll have a rough
time of it, since he has such a rooted objection
to festivities,’ he said, as he went in search of
a time-table, ‘‘and he deserves it too; he
certainly behaved like a young cub. I shall
have to talk to him straightly to-night.”

He pondered, as he ate his solitary luncheon,
over the line of conduct it was best to take
with Piers, and balanced the relative virtues of
severity and leniency. It was so easy to take
a wrong course while his pupil’s character still
lay barely explored territory ; it was so possible |
to take measures which would imperil the

influence he had already gained. Whilst he



The Old House. 45

pondered the question, there came back to
him a long-forgotten passage in his own child-
hood’s history. In asudden fit of anger, one
day, he struck his father. The magnitude of
his fault sobered him in an instant, and he
stood, trembling, in childish alarm, unable to
grasp the severity of the punishment he
deserved. While he stood, hanging his head,
he felt his father’s arms round him, and. his
father’s kiss upon his cheek. ‘‘ My poor, poor
child! To think that you should strike your |
father who loves you so,” he said, ‘‘I forgive
you, I forgive you, freely !”’

That tenderness clung about the memory
of a father dead many a year, and was an
inspiration to Heron now.

‘“‘T’ll try tenderness to its limits,” he said;
‘‘T’ll make the laddie love me, and love has
a trick of working wonders. Then if love fails
—but, there, it can’t fail! If it works slowly,

it works stirely. God helping me I’ll do my



46 Master Piers.

duty to Margetson of Winde, and if it seems

a small sphere, we have, as dear old Browning
says:
**¢ Not to fancy what were fair in life,
Provided it could be, but finding first

What may be, then find how to make it fair
Up to our means.’ ”







CHAPTER IV.
THE MISCHIEVOUS ENDING OF A MISERABLE DAY.

“He is gentil that doth gentil deeds.”—
CHAUCER.

R. HERON was detained ib town
and did not reach Winde until
half-past seven. Lady Margetson







was already at dinner, so, ordering a repast
to be sent to his room, he went to the
schoolroom. The pockets of his coat bulged
with purchases he had made, and he smiled
to himself, as he pictured Piers’ delight when
he heard that both bicycle and football would
be at Winde on the following day.



48 Master Piers.

“As a set-off to the Latin primer and
geradatim he will have to keep to pretty
closely,’ he said, smiling. ‘I don’t know
which is the more necessary in his case.”’

The smile faded from his face, suddenly,
as he opened the schoolroom door. He stood
on the threshold aghast, though it was the
funniest scene it had been his fortune to
witness.

An odour of burning velvet, cloth, and
leather pervaded the atmosphere, and through
the haze of smoke he saw Piers vigorously
prodding with the poker, a smouldering
bundle which lay across the grate.

“You wretched boy! what mischief are
you about!” Mr. Heron exclaimed with
asperity:

Piers lifted a heated and begrimed face.

“I’m burning up that beastly old suit!”
he said, defiantly. ‘‘ Now I can’t ever wear

it again, You wouldn’t like to go out to see



The mischievous ending of a nviserable day. 49

people in a sash and a lace collar, you know
you wouldn't!” There was a decided lack
of due respect in the culprit’s tone, and he
stabbed the smouldering suit as though he
would not have minded transferring the
attention to the person of his tutor. Piers,
‘‘in his tempers,” to use Caxton’s phrase, was
quite impartial. When anything displeased
him he wanted to call all the world to account
for the wrong.

Mr. Heron sat down. ‘Come here, Piers,”
he said, quietly.

The boy came at once, too angry yet to
be ashamed of his mischief, and, by nature,
fearless.

‘Of course you are going to punish me, but
that can’t bring back the horrid old suit,’ he
said, bluntly.

_ Mr. Heron suppressed a smile and replied,
gravely; ‘‘ I have gone about all the afternoon,

Piers, getting this thing and that, and picturing
E











50 Master Piers.

the jolly evening we should have examining
my purchases. I felt sure that your bad
behaviour of this morning was long ago
repented, apologised for, and forgiven.” —

‘“Oh! you don’t know how long I can keep
angry, days and days if I like!” replied Piers,
truculently.

“Well, I am disappointed in you,” said
Mr. Heron, calmly.

Piers fidgetted from one foot to the other.
“You don’t know; big people never do!”
he muttered.

Mr. Heron’s face softened. How well
he recollected the pain of that thought in
childhood. He laid his hand on the boy’s
shoulder and looked into his eyes.

“Try me, Piers! It isn’t a tremendous
time since I was your age, a matter of sixteen
years or so. I've still a notion how it feels to
be-a boy. Let us have the story of your

‘wrongs.’ ”’



The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 51

The cloud lifted a little from Piers’ brow,
he perched himself on the corner of the
table at his tutor’s elbow.

‘“Tt’s been a horrid, beastly day, every bit
of it!” he said with emphasis. ‘‘ Things that
you begin in a rage usually are. But it would
not have mattered in the least, if I had been
sweet ‘as honey, as Sutton says, for I should
jolly soon have got in a rage.” He sighed,
resignedly, and propped his chin in the palm
of his hand. ‘I am. so relieved that you
have never seen that suit,’’ he said, gravely.
“It was so beastly girlish, all green velvet,
with a blue sash and silver buttons. Perhaps
it was silly to burn the buttons. They were
real silver, you know, and I might have sold
them and given the money to the poor, as
Judas, in the Bible, recommended.”

_ “Can't you go on with your - story
without remarks and digressions?” asked
Mr. Heron.



BO ee "Master Piers.

‘“Why, I am going on!” protested Piers,
indignantly. He loved telling a tale too well
to be hurried in the telling. ‘Where did
I getup to? Oh! I forgot, I hadn’t properly
begun. You know how cross I was at having
LOLCO

“It’s a fact which did impress itself on my
memory, for manifest reasons,’ Mr. Heron
observed, dryly.

Piers reddened and continued, rather
hurriedly. ‘Mother saw it too and gave
me a lot of advice, in the carriage, about
behaviour, and about imitating Miles, who
is the nicest boy, she says. Mother is
a darling, of course, but I don’t think she
likes the boy-kind of boy. God ought to
have given her a sort of boy that suited
Lord Fauntleroy suits, oughtn’t He? But
of course, it is too late to change me now,
and I shouldn’t like to be anybody but
Margetson of Winde. Miles has got a book



The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 53

about the boy whose mother invented
Fauntleroy suits and——,” Piers. paused and
looked as though words were quite inadequate
to express his feelings; “I haven’t any
respect for the person who wrote that book.
She has made things awfully hard for boys
like me. Miles loves to look like the boy
in the book; but, all the same, he is
really good and quite jolly sometimes, you
know.”

Mr. Heron had resigned himself to athe
meander course of Piers’ narrative,
“But how did you get on to-day?” he
asked.

Piers shrugged his shoulders. “Oh! to-day?
Miles wasn’t a bit jolly. When we went to
play, after luncheon, he wouldn't do a thing
that was any fun. I had a jolly time, though,
4urning out a box in the garret. There were
some. awfully queer old tools among the

rubbish; I mean to ask Aunt Newington to



54 Master Piers.

let me borrow them to examine, and I might
clean them up for her, mightn’t 1? They are
dreadfully dirty now.”

‘“As I suppose you were, when you had
finished with them!” observed Mr. Heron.

‘Yes, that was the bother,” said Piers, with
asigh. ‘I suppose I did look rather a sight,
and Miles was as prim. as a row of pins.
Mother just said ‘ Piers,’ but she meant heaps
more. Of course, that made me spill more
tea than usual. Some went over auntie’s
dress and there was a fuss! Ladies think
such a lot of their clothes; don’t they?
I= couldn't help-it > if beastly suit on I shouldn’t have been worried
so! I was so mad with it, that as soon as
I got my proper clothes on, I told Caxton
that she might go downstairs and then I just
stuffed it in the fire.”

‘‘ And the most probable thing is that your

mother will write to the tailor and order



The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 55

another suit just like it,’ said Mr. Heron,
calmly. ‘It does not do to allow little boys
to take the law into their own hands in
this way.”

Piers stood aghast. ‘You will not let her!
You will persuade her note tot’ he. cried,
pleadingly. ‘She said you would make
a man of me, and how can I be a man in
a lace collar and a sash? If father were
here, he would say ‘No,’ at once. He hated
finikin things, Barnes told me so, and
I can feel in me that he does.”

Mr. Heron looked at him curiously. His
eyes had grown wide and dreamy and he
was gazing, unblinkingly, at the lamp on the
table. He was looking beyond the school-
room walls, beyond the gardens and the fir-
woods, which bounded the Kentish horizon,
“away to the frozen regions of the North, where
his boyish imagination still saw his father,

struggling against great odds, in the cause of







56 Master Piers.

science. ‘ You see,” he said, ‘‘ father’s life has
always had such big things in it; hardships,
privations, and wonderful adventures. He
went away three years ago, when I was only
five. It was spring-time, but such a cold,
windy, rainy morning; mother and Aunt
Virginia cried and that made me cry, too,
so that I could not see father’s face when
he kissed me. I remember what he said,
though: ‘Be good, my son, be brave, never
be afraid of anything.’ Aunt Virginia says
that it is a very high aim for a boy—to be
quite brave and fearless.”

‘And you think that you have compassed
it to-day ?” asked Mr. Heron, quietly.

Piers reddened and laughed. “I should
think so; I guessed that I should be punished
and I did not care a bit.”

For a moment Mr. Heron was silent ; then
he drew the boy into the circle of his arm.

“That is a low bravery, Piers, unworthy



The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 57

of your father’s son. Real courage bears
disagreeables; true fearlessness, is to go
forward in spite of discomforts. It seems
to me that a cowardly reluctance to bear
what was unpleasant, has distinguished you
to-day.”

Piers slipped from Mr. Heron’s encircling
arm and sat down on the rug, his fingers
clasped round his knees.

Mr. Heron, watching him, felt that his
words had been of the hard-hitting type and
Piers felt them keenly. The boy was very
young and no one, perhaps, since his father’s
departure, had given him that wise guidance
without which love can do little towards
building up character.

‘“Poor Master Piers!” he said, gently,
laying his hand on the boy’s head.

“Piers shook off the hand. ‘Don’t, please,
Mr. Heron,” -he said, without looking up.

“Tam thinking hard because I know you



58 Master Piers.

are right and I have got to make myself
feel it. Would you mind going away,
please?”

Mr. Heron understood, and left the boy

alone.



























CHAPTER V.

AUNT VIRGINIA COMES HOME.

“Learn first thyself, thy spirit to control ;
From all that’s false and evil in thee cease.”

=




|HEN Lady Margetson heard how
Master Piers had crowned the
day’s misdemeanours she shrugged
her shoulders. |

‘* Some mothers would whip him,” she said,
with a little laugh; ‘‘but, perhaps, we had
better not begin that, Mr. Heron. I will talk
to him'sharply, if you send him to me before

dinner.”





60 Master Piers.

When Piers knocked at the door of his
mother’s dressing-room later in the day, he
found her dressing to dine in Sevenoaks. She
received his few words of penitence with a half-
hearted attention.

“Tt was the most ridiculous thing to
do,” she said, holding up a set of emerald
ornaments as she spoke, and pausing to
arrange them on her white neck. ‘In my
young days, little boys were whipped for
much less. I am afraid you are incorrigible,
IRiers.

Piers looked at her steadily; after all,
he thought, he need not have been so sorry
for her; she did not mind very much
when he was naughty. Mr. Heron said
mothers suffered dreadfully when their
children did wrong. Perhaps there were
different kinds of mothers; it was rather
comfortable to have a mother who didn’t

suffer.





Aunt Virginia comes home. Or

“Who would whip me?” he asked,
gloomily.

Lady Margetson laughed. ‘Oh! Mr. Heron.
It is part of his business to relieve me of all
unpleasant duties relating to you.”

‘“Why, you never did whip me!” Piers
protested. ‘I don’t think you could. You
are ever so much too soft and pretty, you
know.”

He was a beauty-loving little boy at all

times, and just now his mother looked very
beautiful in her white dinner-dress of gleaming
satin, with the sparkling emeralds at her wrists
and throat.
' Lady Margetson’s eyes softened, and she
bent her head to kiss the admiring face.
‘There, don’t crumple my gown or pull down
my hair, dear old boy,” she said, lightly.
“Learn to keep out of mischief, and,
Mr. Heron tells me, I shall be proud of you
yet.” :



62° Master Piers.

Piers’ colour rose, and he pressed closer to
his mother, regardless of the white gown. “If
you could be just a little proud of me now,
dear, it would help, awfully!” he said, slowly ;
‘You see, I can’t really help not being pretty
and finikin like Miles, but there are some
things I can do splendidly well for a boy of my
age. I can ride any of the horses bareback,
and groom them too, as far up as I can reach.
Barnes says I am really smart at that! I can
stand to have a tremendous splinter taken
out of my hand, without once pulling away,
and I never call out when I hurt myself.
I can deprive too. I tried once, going
without. my dinner and tea, you know;
Caxton thought I was ill, till I explained
to her. I wanted to see what I could bear,
you know; father has deprivations and hard-
ships; all explorers have, and I want to be
like him.”

‘“A long list of great qualities!” said his



Aunt Virginia comes home. =63

mother, with a little laugh, which Piers said
was not a laugh at all, for there were tears
in her beautiful grey eyes. ‘You are like
your father now, in many ways, Piers,” she
went on. ‘‘He was the best and bravest
of men, and,” she laughed again, softly,
“about as fond of civilised life as you
are;

Piers thought a good deal of that remark of
his mother’s when he went back to the school-
room, and loved her more for it. He had been
rather afraid that; somehow, she believed
bravery and greatness inseparable from the
graces and charms which were his cousin
Miles’. He had had despondent moods,
chiefly when he could not. go out of doors, in
which he almost persuaded. himself that she
felt him to be a disappointment. To-day,
without knowing it, she had given him a new
thought. In his own odd way, Piers revelled
in the thought of his father spilling tea on





64 _ Master Piers.

ladies’ gowns, - breaking strict rules as to
manners, and even in rebellious moods,
burning some hated garment which fashion
ordained befitting to Margetson of Winde.
And, despite all these drawbacks, his father
had been loved and admired by everybody,
and had won and deserved fame, honour,
and glory. Master Piers felt his heart swell
with hope for his own future.

As Lady Margetson told Mr. Heron on the
day of his arrival at Winde, she intended
to leave Piers entirely in his hands, and
neither the tutor nor his pupil saw much
of her during the short, dark days of the
winter.

Mr. Heron dined with her when she was at
Winde, but he soon ceased to feel any surprise
when he found covers laid only for one, and
was informed by the solemn butler that her
ladyship was dining out, or had gone away on

one of the rounds of visits which kept her





Aunt Virginia comes home. 65

absent from home the greater part of the
year.

Sometimes Mr. Heron felt life at Winde
woefully monotonous. The years for him had
been so bright and changeful hitherto; yet he
was too busy to be dull. He and Piers worked
hard in the cosy schoolroom where so many
Margetsons had battled with the difficulties
of learning under tutors more or less
severe. There wasa legend in the ‘‘ Margetson
Chronicle,” of a certain Dame Dorothy
living in the reign of -Queen Elizabeth,
who was a prodigy of learning, ‘“ having
extraordinary knowledge, at the age of six-
teen, of latin, Greek, French, — Italian,
and Hebrew, with theology, astronomy, and
music.” Her tutor was of the rigorous kind,
and the young lady complained bitterly in her
story of ‘nips, pinches, bobs, and blows”
which were the punishment of her slips in

grammar or memory.



66 Master Piers.

Piers affirmed very decidedly that he was
glad not to live in those days; certainly,
Mr. Heron spared no pains to make the path
of learning as smooth as possible for him.
And troublesome hours in the schoolroom were
more than made up for by their out-of-door
life together. They scoured the country on
their bicycles, rode, drove, and played football,
until Piers felt he had never known before half
the delight of being a boy. Mr. Heron found
he was quite at home in the cottages of his
tenants, who, one and all, adored their little
squire. He was such a friendly little chap,
they said, his poor dead father over again. The
old people remembered how, years ago, he too
used to sit by their cottage fires, listening to
tales of Charlesford, real and legendary, with
a credulity which made him a charming
listener.

At Christmas, Lady Margetson brought
a large party of her friends to Winde, and



Aunt Virginia comes home. 67

the old mansion was alive with gay doings.

Piers, who had grown decidedly more sociable
under Mr. Heron’s influence, enjoyed it
all thoroughly; but the chief pleasure of
the season to him, was the distribution of
the generous doles it had always been
the custom to dispense to their poorer
neighbours.

‘Td like to give out each raisin separately,”
he said to Mr. Heron. ‘It’s so jolly nice
giving things to people, isn’t it? They are all
so obliged, just as if they didn’t know that
I loved giving. Poor people are awfully nice,
are they not? Some of mother’s friends don’t
agree with that, though; I heard them one
day, and they talked——” Piers paused for
a word. In obedience to his tutor, he
was curing himself of ‘stable slang,’ and
the right, long word, which he loved, did
not always come just when he wanted it.

He brought it out at last, triumphantly.
F 2















68 Mastery Piers.

“They talked of the dear, poor people quite
disparagingly.”

Heron laughed. ‘All sorts of people go to
make up all classes, my boy, ungrateful as well
as grateful, you will find as you grow
older. We must not expect perfection of poor
humanity, and I don’t see why we should, but
if we do our duty to other people we shall
usually find they are very comfortable beings
to get on with.”

“Aunt Virginia said something like that
once,” Piers observed, thoughtfully. ‘You
and she ought to get on tremendously well,
Mr. Heron, all your good thoughts are so
much alike. I say, it does seem funny that
you've never seen her; you don’t know how
sweet she is—not pretty like mother, nobody
could be, but ever so jolly.”

Mr. Heron nodded. He had seen the
portrait of Miss Margetson hung over the

mantel-shelf in her nephew’s bedroom, and he



Aunt Virginia comes home. 69

was quite prepared to like her very much. She
might not be, as Piers said, beautiful, like
Lady Margetson, but there was something
very winning in the oval, laughing face, with
its frank, brown eyes, and broad, low brow
over which curled dark hair, cut short in
a boyish fashion. It was quite evident that she
had played a large part in Piers’ little life, and
he loved her devotedly.
She came home in the middle ot February,
a week earlier than Piers expected her. He
was playing football with Mr. Heron in the
field which lay between Winde and The Nook
one afternoon, when a tall, girlish figure in
a straight serge gown, came along the footpath.
If Mr. Heron had not guessed whom it must
be, Piers’ face would have told him. The boy
stared incredulously for a moment, then darted
off to meet the new-comer with a shout which
must have startled the cows in the neighbouring

field.



70 Master Piers.

‘Come on, Mr. Heron, it’s Aunt Virgie!”
he cried, and Mr. Heron, laughing, ‘‘came
on.”

—“T see that I shall have to give him a
holiday, Miss Margetson,” he said, when Piers
had gone through the necessary introductions
with many unnecessary explanations. ‘ He
has been counting the days before your
- arrival.’

“We have always been chums, haven’t we,
Piers?’’ Miss Margetson replied, blithely.
‘“And we have such arrears of confidences to
make up that I don’t believe one holiday will
be enough. I have been away six months,
you know, and his letters were woefully
scrappy.”

‘Oh! Aunt Virginia, they took hours and
hours to write,’ protested Piers, ‘and
Mr. Heron told me nearly all the things
to say.”

“Even the flattering things about him-



Aunt Virginia comes home. GA

self?’ asked Miss Margetson, mischievously.
“T think I had better let the subject
of your correspondence drop, Master Piers.
I ran up to ask if you and Mr. Heron would
come down to tea this afternoon, since
I haven’t a half-hour to spare for Winde
to-day.”

“Won't we just!” replied Piers, turning
a somersault on the grass. ‘‘I expect you
have brought a heap of jolly things from
Italy, auntie, and we will help you to unpack
them.”

“You see that he accepts, uncon- -
ditionally, for you, Mr. Heron,” laughed
Miss Margetson.

‘Which makes it rather invidious for me to
have to decline,” said Mr. Heron, smiling.
‘Asa matter of fact, I have an appointment
with the Rector at half-past four. We are
arranging a cricket club among the men, and

they have flatteringly expressed a wish that



oe ' Master Piers.

I should become their president and general.
coach.”

‘And, of course you will accept,” Miss
Margetson rejoined, with a pretty little air of
command. ‘I mean to get up some tennis
parties for the girls as soon as the weather
permits. Village girls have rather a dull time
of it on the whole; if any one wants to do
anything for them it usually takes the form of
a sewing-school or a cooking-class. I was
never one of those wonderful beings who find
recreation in a change of work, and I try
to do unto others as I would have others
do to me.”

“You are quite right,” said Mr. Heron,
thoughtfully; . whereupon Master Piers
murmured, indignantly, that ‘‘ Aunt Virginia |
always was,” and that young lady declared
it was time she carried him off to The
Nook or she might endanger such a high

reputation.



Aunt Virginia comes home. 73

Mr. Heron stood looking after them as they
walked away, Piers with his arm round
_ Miss Virginia’s waist, and a beaming smile on
his odd little face. ‘With her help, we shall
make a fine fellow of Margetson of Winde,”

he said, softly.







‘CHAPTER VI.

THE NOOK.

“ She doeth little kindnesses
That most leave undone or despise,
And nought that sets one heart at ease
Or giveth happiness or peace
Is low esteemed in her eyes.”—.
LowELL.




THE NOOK was near enough to
Winde to make intercourse between
the two houses very close. Lady
Margetson was fond of her sister-in-law
and would have been glad to keep her alto-
gether, though there was scarcely a subject

on which they quite agreed. But so many







The Nook. 75

people were fond of Miss Margetson, and
chiefly, Uncle Cornelius. When he removed
to The Nook, there was no question about
Miss Margetson going with him—he simply
refused to part with her. If she found it
a little dull, poring over natural histories,
making drawings of rare specimens and
discussing the old scientist’s hobby for hours,
no one ever knew it. Virginia Margetson’s
unselfishness was of that fine kind which
passes for self-pleasing. People used to say,
sometimes, that it was odd how her wishes
coincided with those of her companions and
that it really showed a want of individuality.
There will always be some who cannot
understand a girl who seeks not her own,
but finds life a joyous enterprise and every
hour worth the living. Lady Margetson used
to say, pitying, that Virginia had very few
pleasures. Pleasures, to Lady Margetson,

meant, at this time, concerts, balls, dinners



76 Master Piers.

and kettledrums. When Virginia declared
that she got as much enjoyment out of
a scrambling tea in the fields with Piers as
from the most elaborate party, and that her
poor friends in the. village were vastly more
entertaining than the people she met at
a dance and might never meet again, Lady
Margetson lifted her delicate eyebrows and
wondered.

‘After all,” she said, to herself, ‘it
was a good thing Virginia was satisfied to
remain so long at The Nook, since Uncle
Cornelius would certainly fret after her,
and it was the best thing in the world for
Piers.

To be sure, Piers took full advantage of his
privileges in this respect. Whenever he was
not engaged with Mr. Heron, he was sure to
be at The Nook, and it was not long before the
tutor, too, found the cosy little house a very

homelike place. If you ask me whether Miss



The Nook. qT],

Margetson was a_ noteworthy house-wife,
I should be obliged to confess she was not.
Lady Margetson, who sometimes dropped in
to afternoon tea, would say, she did not know
how Virginia lived in such a muddle. Yet

’ simply, that every one

it was no ‘‘muddle;’
carried on his or her pursuit, happily, within
the same four walls. If that place were
the drawing-room, and the pursuit rather

a ‘‘littery” one, well, it did not trouble
Miss Margetson. She was glad that they
were all happy and together.

In one corner, where a window caught the
morning sunshine, Uncle Cornelius wrote his
multitudinous notes for the great book which
Virginia often thought he would not live to
begin. She had her own drawing block and
pencils at another window, and Master Piers,
sprawling on the rug, would study one of the
huge folios of Froissart’s Adventures he had

dragged from the library. Visitors, who had



78 Master Piers.

been to The Nook, always wanted to come
again; it was so delightfully easy to fall into
the ways of the house. There was none of
that tiresome effort to amuse and make much
of them, as outsiders; they became, all at
once, one of the family, and did as he or
she pleased.

Mr. Heron did not wonder that Master
Piers’ studies had been of a decidedly
desultory kind before his arrival. Yet he
was not sure that the boy had not learned,
from sweet Miss Virginia, and simple, kindly
Uncle Cornelius, something better than book-
learning. They had taught him, more by
example than precept, a reverence for all
that is good and great and a fine scorn for
everything that savours of worldliness. Men
and women, girls and boys, were to be liked
‘for what they were, not for what they had;
work was the noblest thing for every one;

‘the blacksmith, whose hammer, ringing on



‘The Nook. , 79

the anvil, sent up the golden sparks the boy
loved to watch, was a greater man -than the
idle, fine gentleman, who did nothing to better
the world he lived in. If Miss Virginia,
unwittingly, had taught Master Piers to hold
rather an exaggerated opinion of the position
of Margetson of Winde, she had also taught
him that no little or mean man could fill
it. Noblesse oblige, he was bound to be
a Christian and no idler.

Piers’ application of Miss Margetson’s
principles did not always meet with his
mother’s approval.

He came to Mr. Heron, early one afternoon,
with the request that he might be given
a holiday ‘for very important business and
not just for play.”

_“T think that I must know more about the
business before I say ‘Yes,’ Piers,’’ Heron said,
looking up with a smile, from the letter he

was writing.



80 Master Piers.

Piers’ face fell. “I'd rather not tell,
please,” he urged. “I really oughtn’t to let
my right hand know what my left hand doeth,
you know.” |

Mr. Heron concealed a smile and laid his
hand kindly on the child’s shoulder.

“It is nothing that I ought to say ‘ No’ to,
if I knew, my boy, is it? Think before you
answer !”’

Piers shook his head, emphatically.
“Then I may go? I will put on my old
clothes and be back to tea,” he explained,
mysteriously.

A few minutes later, Mr. Heron saw him
running down the drive, his hands in his
pockets and his little scarlet cap on the
back of his head. He was singing, at
the top of his fresh young voice, the
opening bars of the Jewel song from
“Faust,” of which Lady Margetson was

fond. She had many a time tried to teach



The Nook. 81

Piers to sing, and often declared that he
had a voice which would repay good
teaching, but he was the most refractory
pupil! He frankly affirmed that he hated
all music but that he heard in church,
and thought his mother and her friends
- “ music-mad.”

Mr. Heron lingered over his letters and
then put on his cap to carry them to the
post office. He meant to go through the
village to see how the men were getting on
with the returfing of the cricket-field, and,
no doubt, he should come upon Piers
somewhere.

At the post office, he met Miss Virginia,
stamping an article of Uncle Cornelius’,
which was to appear in an important
scientific magazine.

“Are you looking for Piers?” she said,
with a little laugh; ‘‘I came across him just

now at old Mrs, Martin’s, and I supposed that
G



82 Master Piers.

you had been teaching him the first principles
of socialism.” .

‘““No! he learns enough of that at The
Nook,” laughed Mr. Heron. ‘What is he
up to now?”

‘““Go down the street and into the first
cottage garden past the church; you will see
then,” nodded Miss Margetson, moving away
to speak to the Rector, who was coming to
fetch his weekly newspaper.

What Mr. Heron saw pleased and touched
him more than he could say, though Caxton
might have had something to complain of in
the appearance which Piers, at that moment,
presented.

The yard behind Mrs. Martin’s cottage was
littered with chopped wood and bundles of
faggots, in the midst of which stood James,
the stable-boy, hard at work with his hatchet.
Piers, struggling in a sea of shavings, was

carrying away what James chopped. His



- The Nook. 83

face was very red and dirty, and there was
a great rent in his jacket, but his eyes
were shining with enjoyment of his self-
appointed task.

“Oh, Mr. Heron!” he cried, ‘would you
very much mind helping? There’s such a lot
to do yet, and I’m so afraid that Mrs. Martin
will get home before we have finished. It must
be nearly five o’clock, too, and Barnes can
only spare James until five. I could not have
done anything without James, you know, for
I promised Aunt Virgie, a long time ago,
that I wouldn’t use a chopper, and the law
hasn’t been repealed yet.”

‘You have not told me yet what all this
business means,” Mr. Heron said, taking off
his coat and gathering up an armful of
faggots.
~ “Of course, if you are a helper you ought
to. know,” Piers said, gravely. ‘I did not tell

you before because it would have made you
G2



84 Master Piers.

uncomfortable, perhaps, to feel that I was
doing a ‘help-the-needy’ kind of work, while
you sat by the fire, just writing letters. You
know how you talked to me last Sunday, about
things a Margetson of Winde should grow
up to be—one of those ‘smallening’ kind
of talks that are for one’s good, you know.
You have some awfully big thoughts,
Mr. Heron, I don’t get all the good of
them just at first. When I told Aunt Virginia
that you said I must grow up to be a rock
of shelter and defence to my people here,
she was so pleased with the thought. She
said that I ought to begin now, whilst I’m
small, by doing little helping things for those
who are poor and helpless. ‘Giving myself
not just money,’ she said. So when I heard
that. Farmer Harris had given Mrs. Martin
a load of wood which she couldn’t chop or
stack because of her rheumatism, I guessed

that was one of the helping things for me to



The Nook. 85

do. Of course, I couldn’t have done any-
)’ he looked
up at his tutor, lovingly, ‘‘1 don’t suppose



thing without James and

that I should have thought of it, Mr. Heron,
if I hadn’t learned such a lot from you.
I owe heaps to you and, of course, to James
too,” he added, careful of the stable-boy’s
feelings.

James grinned and rubbed his heated
forehead with a very grimy hand.

‘There ain’t much as I would not do for
you, Master Piers,’ he said. “It's. been
a nice bit of a change too.”

‘“You deserve Dame Martin’s best thanks,

?

both of you,” said Mr. Heron, heartily. He
set to work to help with such{!good-will that
the tiny yard was soon cleared, the wood
stacked, and the hatchet returned to its place
under the thatch.

After all, he thought, as he went home

with the two boys at his heels, if Margetson |



86 Master Piers.

of Winde paved the way for his future rule
over these country folks by such simple
loving deeds as to-day’s, there was little to
fear for him when he should come to his

inheritance.















CHAPTER VII.

THE ‘* GIRL-BOY.”’

Be ours
Never to blend our pleasure or our joy
With sorrow to the smallest thing that feels.”—_
WORDSWORTH.

JADY MARGETSON came into the

schoolroom, one June morning,



with an open letter in her hand
and a vexed expression on her beautiful
face. Piers was on the terracé practising
some new feat on _ his ~ bicycle, which was
to excite Miss Virginia’s wonder and

admiration. He nodded a bright -‘‘ good=



88 Master Piers.

morning” to his mother through the open
window. S

“Tam afraid that I must give you another
pupil, Mr. Heron,” Lady Margetson said.
‘“‘T have received a letter from my cousin,
Mrs. Newington, asking me to take her little
son, Miles, for a couple of months. She has
arranged a voyage with Captain Newington,
whose health is causing us anxiety, and, at the
last moment, her governess has been called
home. It is not possible, she says, to leave
the child with a stranger; but she would have
every confidence if he were at Winde. It is
extremely vexatious, and Piers will not
receive the news with effusion; he and Miles
are by no means kindred spirits.” She
laughed a little as she recalled his last
visit to his cousin in Sevenoaks. ‘Yet how
can I refuse?”

‘The arrangement is really the best thing

in the world for Piers,’ Mr. Heron said,



The ‘' Girl-Boy.” 89

quickly. “I have often thought that he
missed a good deal through his isolation from
the society of other children.”

‘As an educational medium ?”’ asked Lady
Margetson, laughing.

Mr~ Heron -laughed,:-too;- ~ “Yes, the
discipline of the playground and the school-
room does a lot for a boy. I have been to
a public school myself, and, though the system
has its drawbacks—as what system has not—
a boy gets a lot of nonsense knocked out of
him, of which his friends do not suspect the
existence.”

‘“‘T suppose, some day, Piers will have to go
into the rough and tumble of it all,”
Lady Margetson said, with a sigh.

‘And till then he will be all the better for
seeing as much as possible of other boys,”
Heron said, bluntly. ‘From what I hear,
Miles is a delicate little chap, one of the frail
kind. That won’t hurt Piers! I have



go Master Piers,

a notion that he has yet to learn ‘the strength
in things weak.’ ”

Lady Margetson nodded carelessly. ‘ Well,
if you will kindly allow Miles to share Piers’
lessons, Mr. Heron, I will write at once to
Mrs. Newington. Caxton can look after him
out of school hours; she will be pleased
enough, poor creature. Master Piers will not
be coddled half as much as she would like.”

Piers did not show any enthusiasm when he
learned he was to have a companion.

‘Miles will want to do everything I do,” he
said, discontentedly, ‘and then he won’t be
able to do the things because he is such
a muff. I hate to have girl-boys round.”

“TI don’t think it will do you any permatient
harm to ‘have round’ a few of the things you
hate, my boy,” remarked Mr. Heron, quietly,
opening a book.

Piers flushed and moved away. Wheti his

tutor’s voice took that note, he felt, like the



The ‘ Garl-Boy.” Qi

Queen of Sheba, there was no more spirit in
him. To restore his self-esteem, he went
down. to the housekeeper’s room, where, over
a generous repast of cake and candied fruits,
he confided to Mrs. Sutton the two astound-
ing facts; that ‘‘baby Miles’ was coming ~
to stay, and Mr. Heron was as cross as an
ogre.

Miles arrived a few days later. He was
a fair, bright-eyed little fellow, looking very
fragile in his blue tunic and soft white cap
It was plain that he adored Piers, and regarded
him with admiration not unmixed with awe.
Piers’ brusque off-hand tones seemed to him
the essence of manliness, and his cousin’s
weakest jest won the meed of his laughter and
applause. Piers had little vanity, and this
inordinate respect for his various qualities
caused him to hold Miles’ wisdom in very light
esteem.

It was pleasant, however; to have a playmate,



g2 Master Piers.

and no one could have been more ready to
follow his lead or, as Caxton put it, to play
“second fiddle.” Miles might be depended
on not to complain if the game outlasted his
pleasure, or if Piers extended their rambles until
he felt as though one tired foot would hardly
step before the other. There was some danger,
perhaps, of Piers playing the tyrant without
intending it. Though he had the tenderest
heart, half a dozen times a day he hurt poor
little Miles with his quiet assumption, that,
because he was this or that, courage, endurance,
and ‘‘go”’ were not to be expected of him.
And the boy who lacked these—well, he was
something on a much lower plane than
-Margetson of Winde. It is so difficult for the
strong to understand the weak. Indeed, the
capacity for understanding feelings outside
our own experiences takes some of us a lifetime
to learn. .

Miles had his little hour of triumph when





The ‘‘ Girl-Boy.” 93

the boys went down to the drawing-room
before dinner. He had such sweet manners,
everybody said, and was without shyness or
affectation. ‘‘I wonder he doesn’t curl up on
the rug, and purr like a kitten,” Piers would
murmur, disdainfully, from his hiding-place
behind the curtains.

He would not have owned it for the world,
but he envied Miles a little, at such times.
He did not want to be kissed by the ladies
who were drinking tea with Lady Margetson,
or to be called ‘a nice child” by the men,
but he would have liked to make his mother’s
eyes glisten, as they did when she looked at
pretty Miles. She smiled at Piers not a whit
less sweetly, though, when he came near, but
that was very seldom. For the most part, he
only peeped from behind the curtains—not
seen, but seeing all. |

‘‘T wish that Piers could sing like you, little

Miles,” he heard her say, one day, when Miles



94 Master Piers.

had been entertaining her with a fluty little
rendering of ‘‘ Blue Bells of Scotland.”

Miles opened his eyes wide. ‘‘ Why! Piers
sings ever so much better than I do, auntie.
And such jolly things, too! All about sailors
on the sea, and things with lots of fighting
and shouting in them. The stablemen like
them awfully, and they make me want to
shout too. He can sing soft, low, sad: things,
besides, that sick people like. Mr. Heron lets
him go and see an old woman in the village,
and when he sings to her, she cries ever so,
and says it’s ‘ heavenly.’”’

‘Shut up, Miles,” growled a voice behind
the curtains; but Miles, when excited, had
a habit of ignoring all interruptions.

‘Do ask him to sing something to-morrow,
auntie, and then you will appreciate him
more,” he urged. ‘‘ You know, Piers is a.
tremendously wonderful boy,” he added,

solemnly.



The ‘‘ Girl-Boy.” 95

‘He has got a wonderfully loyal champion,”
said Lady Margetson, kissing the earnest little
face. When, presently, Piers emerged, very
red and discomforted, from his hiding-place,
she kissed him too.

‘‘T am to be proud of you, Master Piers,”
she said, smiling. ‘‘ First, Mr. Heron tells me
so, and then Miles.”

“Oh! Miles! he thinks the least little thing
wonderful,” Piers replied, bluntly. ‘You
can’t count what a baby like that says.”

“Can't I?” echoed his mother, laughing.
‘Well, if he is a baby, I shall expect my
strong boy to look after him, or Aunt
Newington will have something to say to us
all. I have noticed that he often looks tired
and pale.”

Perhaps because Lady Margetson’s words
to’ him were so few, it frequently happened
that they made a deep impression on Piers’

mind.











96 Master Piers.

He went slowly upstairs “after Miles,
considering what she had said. He had
heard the same thing from Mr. Heron
and Aunt Virginia—the strong must always
take care of the weak, but, somehow, he
had never thought before that it had
anything especially to do with Miles and
him.

He went to bed so deeply pondering the
matter, that Caxton decided he was ‘‘in the
sulks,” and made her own remarks few and
far between.

When she had gone away with the light,
he slipped out of his own little bed and crept
across the floor to Miles.

‘Are you all right, Miles?”’ he whispered,
a trifle shyly. ‘Tucked in, and all that?”
he added, forgetting it was July, and hot
weather for that month.

“Too hot!” sighed Miles, through the

clothes drawn tightly over his curly head.



The ‘ Girl-Boy.” 97

“Then I can’t do anything for you?”
Piers turned away to his own bed.

Perhaps Miles caught a note of disappoint-
ment in his voice, for he peeped from among
the. clothes.

‘“Tf_if your bed were not so far away, you
could hold my hand,” he said, regretfully.
‘‘T’ve never slept in the dark before, and it is
so black.”

“You're afraid!’ Piers cried, incredulously.
‘Why, there is nothing to be afraid of.
Nothing can’t hurt you.”

‘No, I s’pose not,” Miles agreed, in a limp
voice, which somehow touched Piers.

“T believe I could drag my bed near
enough,” he said. ‘It is not very heavy, and
I’m strong, you know.”

“Yes, you are splendidly strong,” Miles said,
admiringly. Much in the way Piers had
said the same thing, once, to Mr. Heron. By

dint of tugging and pushing, Piers managed to
ret



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E. WARNER, Secretary.


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**Oh, Mr, Heron!’ he cried, ‘ would you very much mind helping?’”"—Fage 8.


MASTER PIERS.

ISABEL SUART ROBSON,

Author of “ Into Untried Paths,” “ Kavanagh Major,” “ Uncle Jock's Little Girl,”
“That Odd Little Pair,” &c., &¢., &t.

No .

London:
; ROBERT CULLEY,
2 AND 3 LUDGATE CIRCUS BUILDINGS, FARRINGDON STREET, E.C. 3
2 CASTLE STREET, CITY ROAD, E.C,










Chapter
Io.

Il.

Il.

ve.
VI.

VIL.
VIII.

Tx. .

CONTENTS.

Page

: MARGETSON OF WINDE ; : 5

. MASTER PIERS’ MOTHER . 19
. THE OLD HOUSE . : » 32

THE MISCHIEVOUS ENDING OF A MISERABLE DAY 47

+ AUNT VIRGINIA COMES HOME . » 59
. . . THE NOOK . ; ; 74

» THE “GIRL-BOY” . : be 8Y
. + MILES’ ADVENTURE. ‘ 100

. IN THE BONNY NORTH COUNTRY , + <7








































MASTER. PIERS.

CHAPTER I.

MARGETSON OF WINDE.

“A little boy
With hey-ho, the wind and the rain.”

(ye | was a grey November afternoon



with a sullen sky and a gusty
wind, which swept through the
little hillside station of Charlesford, and
threatened, every now and then, to carry
off his feet the solitary personage awaiting
the arrival of the London express. He was

a sturdy little boy, about eight years old,
6 Master Piers.

with an odd freckled face and-straight dark
hair, cropped so closely that it scarcely peeped
from beneath his fur cap. Master Piers’
friends were in the habit of deploring his
‘lack of beauty, and his old nurse Caxton
would have lost her right hand, she said, to
have given him the golden curls, starry eyes
and graceful figure, which were the common
heritage of his family. Piers himself had no
such wish. He cherished a conviction that
‘good looks” were for girls, and regarded
his tip-tilted nose, his straight hair and
freckles, with secret satisfaction.

He walked up and down the platform, with
his hands deep in his ulster-pockets, consulting
the clock at every turn, and fully assured that
there was something wrong with the works,
since it went so dreadfully slowly.

_ Presently the station-master came out of his
house close by.

‘Why, Master Piers,” he-said, cheerily,


Margetson of Winde.



“T didn’t know you were here or I’d have —
asked you to come in and sit by the fire.
I suppose you drove down to meet the
express. I saw the carriage in the yard.
Expecting visitors up at Winde?” :

‘Well, not a visitor exactly,” replied
Piers, trying to keep step with the man as
he went about his duties. ‘‘My tutor is
coming to-day; you know all the Margetsons
have a tutor when they are eight. Caxton
cried awfully when she heard, but Thomas,
our footman, says that’s because her nose
is out of joint. It must hurt dreadfully
to have your nose out of joint, White,
mustn’t it?”

‘Tt must so, Master Piers,’ replied the
man, concealing a smile; ‘“‘but, no doubt
Mrs. Caxton is a bit sore, seeing she has
looked after you since you was a baby.”

Piers looked reflectively at the lamps the

man was burnishing.
8 Master Piers.

‘‘Mother says that can’t be helped and it’s
silly to bother oneself over what must be,” |
he said, gravely. ‘‘I say, White, I wonder
how I shall know which is Mr. Heron.
I have never seen him, and it would be
awfully funny if I went up to the wrong
man and asked him to go home in the
brougham.”’

‘Well, we don’t get crowds on this platform
most days,” said the station-master, laughing.
‘‘ Anyhow a tutor is sure to be a sober, oldish-
looking chap, may be dressed in a parson’s
rig-out. Keep near me so as I can give you
a hint, and I dare say you won’t make no
mistake.”

“You are very kind, White,” Piers replied,
gratefully; ‘‘ 1 won’t go far away, and then you
can give me a nod if I am going to the right
man. But there’s some smoke ever so far off,
that’s the train coming, isn’t it?”

“Tt is so, Master Piers; you just stand
Margetson of Winde. 9

further back. I wouldn’t like to face Lady
Margetson or Miss Virginia if anything
happened to you.”

Piers nodded and retreated, his eyes fixed
on the approaching puff of white smoke.

In a few minutes the train stood panting
in the platform and Piers might have spared
all anxiety as to the identification of his
tutor, for only one passenger alighted, a tall,
handsome young man, in a brown tweed
travelling suit and cap, carrying a Gladstone
bag and a handful of newspapers.

He called to a porter with the air of
one used to having his wants attended to
speedily.

‘“Tve a bicycle in the van,” he said. ‘“‘ Get
it out for me, and tell me how I shall get
myself and it to Winde.”

“The carriage is in the yard, sir, and
Master’ Piers is here,” said the station-master,

stiffly. The young man might have been





PAS RA TTL








IO Master Piers,

Margetson of Winde himself from his airs,
he told his wife afterwards.

Mr. Heron put down his bag and looked at
the small boy whose existence he had, until
now, overlooked. He had keen blue eyes and
a merry smile.

‘(Master Piers! that’s the name of my
pupil, I think,” he said, pleasantly. ,

‘Yes, I’m Margetson of Winde, though
I’m mostly called ‘Master Piers,’”’ the boy
said, simply. ‘I think I shall like you, and
I’m awfully hard to please.”

“T’m flattered,” replied the young man,
with a pleasant laugh; ‘let us hope that
I shall not pall on further acquaintance.”

“Pall! What does that mean?” Piers
asked, curiously; but Mr. Heron was too
busily superintending the disembarkation of
his bicycle to give a sufficient answer.

‘“‘Tt’s half-an-hour’s drive to Winde,”’ Piers

said, when he and Mr. Heron were at last

1
4




_Margetson of Winde. an

seated in the carriage. ‘We shall know each
other quite well by the time we get there.
You are not a bit like I thought you would
be, Mr. Heron; much nicer; oh! ever so
much !”

‘‘Did you think a tutor must be an ogre,
my boy?” laughed Mr. Heron, regarding his
pupil with amusement.

“Well, not quite, only White thought you
would be serious and like a clergyman, and
mother has told me a dozen times that you
would be sure to keep me in order. That’s
her way of saying you will be awfully strict.”

‘“Oh! I mean to keep you in order, young
man. May I ask if you regard that as
a terribly hard task?”

Piers’ eyes danced as though he could a tale
unfold, but he wisely refused to commit
~ himself.

‘““Well, you see, I am not so very bad for

a boy, only mother is not strong and I get
12 Master Piers.

on her nerves ; it must be dreadfully bothering
to have nerves. I—I hope you haven’t got
any?” he queried, anxiously.

Mr. Heron hastened to reassure him on this

point.
‘‘T’m so glad you have come,” the boy went
on, brightly; “(I was so afraid of forgetting
what I’ve learned, and Aunt Virginia would
feel so ashamed. I say, Mr. Heron, you
won’t tell any one if I am very backward
with my lessons, it would be so horrid for
auntie, you see, because she’s been my
teacher.”

Mr. Heron promised. There was something
frank and chivalrous about the little lad which
pleased him greatly. He had half expected
from Lady Margetson’s letters to find a fragile,
gaily-caparisoned, ‘‘ Little Lord Fauntleroy,”
with flowing curls and cerulean eyes—a type
of boy of whom he was not particularly fond.
Instead, this sturdy little lad wore the shabbiest
Margetson of Winde. ie

serge sailor-suit, not free from mud stains and
with a very perceptible darn in one knee.

Piers caught his tutor’s eyes upon his suit
and his cheeks reddened.

“Oh! I forgot that I promised Caxton
I wouldn’t open my ulster,” he said; ‘‘ I hadn’t
time to change before I came out. I got into
a silly scrape this morning, and all the talk
about that took such a lot of time. When
people are cross with you, they always want
to say the same scolding in such a heap of
different ways. Mr. Heron, have you any
great affection for Fauntleroy suits?”

“Not the least in the world,” replied
Mr. Heron, wondering whither this abrupt
change in the conversation led; “I’m glad
to see you in something a long way off
such frippery.”’
~ “But I have one at home,” Piers replied
dolefully; ‘‘the bother was about that.

Mother admires it so much, and she told
14 Master Piers.

Caxton I was to put it on when I came to
the station. Caxton might as well have tried
‘to put it on Pixie! What’s the good of being
Margetson of Winde if you can’t even wear
what you like? I just threw the old things
at Cax and snatched up my ulster and hid
in the stable-yard. She came down presently
and said she wouldn’t tell of me if I promised
to keep my ulster buttoned, so you shouldn’t
see my old play-suit.”

‘And a Margetson of Winde—isn’t that
the term ?>—doesn’t think it beneath him to
break a promise to a servant, after throwing
his apparel at her, because he happens to
dislike it ?’”’ queried Mr. Heron, quietly. ‘‘We
shall have to have some talk on that subject,
I see, Piers.”

Piers fidgetted in his seat. ‘‘That’s how
Aunt Virginia talks,” he said, not meeting
his tutor’s eyes. ‘It’s such a horrid way too ;

it makes a boy feel as small as a caterpillar.”
Margetson of Winde. 15

Mr. Heron looked out of the carriage
window. It certainly was a little early to
have played the part of preceptor.

Suddenly Piers sprang up and let down the
window with a bang.

‘Put your head out, quick, Mr. Heron, and
you will get a glimpse of Winde,” he cried,
excitedly. ‘Look, down there, between
that clump of larches and the old elm with
the bent trunk. Isn’t it a jolly place?”

Mr. Heron looked out with enough interest
on his bronzed face to satisfy even Master
Piers. The road they were travelling had
been cut in the slope of a long stretch of
undulating meadow-land; a quarter of a mile
away, in the valley, stood Winde, an old
Elizabethan mansion, its red front mellowed
by age and its beautiful architecture unmarred
by the Vandal hand of any restorer.
A plantation of firs came down as a back-

ground for the house; before it, gardens and
16 Master Piers.

fields swept away, green and beautiful, even
under the grey November sky.

There had been Margetsons at Winde since
Plantagenet times; but a little more than three
centuries ago, a Piers Margetson had built the
present mansion ‘for the rest and delight of
his family,” said the legend over the entrance-
door. Max Heron’s eyes grew soft and dreamy
as he looked. An old country-house always
stirred to life whatever there was of romance
and poetry in him. He seemed to see then,
as he did yet more clearly as months passed
away, the long pageant of joys and sorrows,
comedies and tragedies which had been
enacted under that roof. He realised, as_
only a few are able to do, that ‘the dead
past’? is more than an empty phrase. The
past lives on into the present, with its
weight of influence for good or ill.

His reverie was disturbed by the pressure

of a warm little hand.
Margetson of Winde. 17,

‘“‘T’m so jolly glad that you like it,” said his
small companion, softly, ‘‘and of course you
haven’t seen half the place yet! I’m very
little, aren’t I, to have such a big, lovely
place belonging to me? I sometimes sit up
in the apple-tree and try to feel it—that
I’m really Margetson of Winde. It generally
makes me feel queer and unsatisfied with
myself.”

“You had better be playing football or
cricket, young man,” Heron said, decisively.
“You will suffer from a disease technically
known as ‘swelled head’ if you don’t mind,”

‘““T’ve never played cricket or football, but
I’d like to, awfully,” Piers said, thoughtfully.
‘‘All real boys do, don’t they ?”

- “Of course, and it will not be long before
you do too. I shall send up to town for the
“paraphernalia at once, and you can have your
first lesson as soon as the things arrive. But

here we are at your ancestral hall.”
18 oF Master Piers.

“T say, aren’t you making fun?” Piers
said, quickly.

Then, as the carriage was at a standstill,
he jumped out, and lifting his cap with
a quaint, graceful gesture, added, ‘‘ Welcome

to Winde, Mr. Heron,” and vanished.




CHAPTER II.
MASTER PIERS’ MOTHER.

“Tt never was in my soul
To play so small a part ;

But evil is wrought by want of thought,
As well as want of heart.”

ADY MARGETSON will see you

in the library, sir,” said a solemn



footman who had already taken
possession of the new-comer’s bag and overcoat.

Mr. Heron followed him across the hall and
along a thickly-carpeted corridor into a wide
low room, lined with books, and aglow with
the warm light of a wood fire which burned
on the tiled hearth.

Lady Margetson rose from a low chair and
Cz
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20 Master Piers.

held out her hand as Mr. Heron entered.
She was a beautiful woman with the softest
of grey eyes, and fair hair curling about her
white forehead. Her little son bore not the
slightest resemblance to her, a fact which
vexed her more than she ever acknowledged.

‘“‘T have ordered tea to be brought here,
Mr. Heron,” she said, after a few questions
respecting his journey. ‘‘I thought you might
like to have a talk with me about your pupil,
before you make his acquaintance.”

“T think we may claim to be acquainted
already,” said Mr. Heron, with a smile;
‘Piers was at the station to meet me.”

“Ah! yes, I had forgotten that he asked to
go,” Lady Margetson replied, lightly. ‘You
find him a rough diamond, do you not?
I must confess that I do not understand the
child very well. He is so blunt and careless
of small courtesies that I have, perforce, had

him with me very little. One can make noth-
Master Piers’ Mother. ZT

ing of the rough, ordinary boy-nature,”’ she
added, laughing. ‘It isn’t picturesque in the
smallest degree. It has just to grow like a tree.”

‘‘A mother works wonders with the strangest
material,” the tutor replied, quietly. ‘I think
that ordinary boy-nature, strong, robust, and
enduring, is a remarkably good foundation to
build upon, if you work carefully. I have not
a doubt but that Piers and I will get on
admirably.”

‘Well, I give a free hand,” Lady Margetson
said, cordially. ‘‘He has, you will find,
a deplorable vocabulary to match his manners.
I have an idea that he glories in using the
extraordinary phrases of the stable-yard.”

“lt is the unusual: that attracts. him;
I dare say,” Mr. Heron said.

‘Yes, and I must own that I shall be glad
' to share the responsibility of his training with
one'recommended so highly by my good friend,

Lord Normanton.”
23 Master Piers.

Mr. Heron bowed, and a moment later the
footman entered with the tea-tray.

‘““ Ask Master Piers to come to the library,”
Lady Margetson said to the man.

But after a prolonged search, Thomas came

back to report that Master Piers was not to
be found. sed.
' His mother turned to Mr. Heron with
a pretty gesture of despair. ‘‘It is always so,
Mr. Heron. The boy likes any place better
than carpet-land. He is by way of becoming
a little savage. I expect he is in the farmyard
or eating bread-and-jam in the gardener’s
kitchen. I turn him over to you to civilise. It
is time you came.”

Half an hour later, Mr. Heron found his |
charge curled up on a rug in the hall, awaiting
his advent.

“Tl take you up to your rooms,” he said.
“TI thought you were never coming!”

“That was the fault of your patience,
Master Piers’ Mother. oe

not my tardiness, Master Piers,’ replied
Mr. Heron, calmly. ‘ Thirty minutes since,
you were not to be found, searched Thomas
never so diligently.”

Piers laughed aloud. ‘I guessed mother
would want me to have tea in the library.
She always does when there is company, and,
of course, you are company on the first day.
It’s awfully sweet of her to want me, but I just
hate it, I always spill the tea on some one and
knock something down, and never, never, get
enough to eat. So I generally slip off to the
housekeeper’s room, and Thomas has strict
orders from Margetson of Winde not to look
there.” The boy laughed gaily at his own little
joke. ‘Sutton gives me a jolly spread, lots
of apricot jam and gingerbread, and strong
tea that Caxton would never let me drink.
Oh! I say, how jolly strong you are!”

For Mr. Heron’s reply to Master Piers’

explanation was to seize him firmly by the back
24 Master Piers.

of his jacket and hold him suspended at arm’s
length, ‘ wriggling like a worm,” to use Piers’
own graphic simile.

“T don’t wonder that you get on your
mother’s nerves and drive Caxton to frenzy,
young man. Your ideas of honour lack
‘a gracious somewhat, as the poet puts it,
whilst your capacity for eluding anything you
do not like is stupendous. Now take me
upstairs.”

Piers chased up the wide staircase and
opened a baize door which shut off the west
wing of the house.

“All the place on the other side of this
door is yours and mine,” he said, gaily; ‘‘ these
rooms once belonged to Uncle Cornelius, but.
they are yours now. When Aunt Virginia
came home from Dresden, she and Uncle
Cornelius went away to live at The Nook.
Don’t you think that they are nice rooms?”

He eyed his tutor with hospitable anxiety.
Master Piers’ Mother. 2 5

‘Splendid!’ Heron said, looking round
him. He was scholar enough to appreciate
the studious aspect of the cosy, oak-panelled
parlour, with its long, low bookshelves, large
study table, and deep, leather arm-chairs, worn
to a comfortable degree of shabbiness. Along
one wall ran a rack for guns, fishing-tackle,
and tennis rackets, and on the hearth was
a bright fire which lit up the old-fashioned
ornaments on the top of the bookshelves and
the few pictures hanging above them.

Heron stood looking at the gardens, grey
and misty in the November twilight, and told
himself he was a very fortunate fellow to have
come upon such quarters. Not so long ago,
the prospect of living in another’s house and

eating another’s bread seemed a thing little

likely to come into his life. He had suffered

reverses which would have inclined a less

courageous man to become sour. Heron was

no coward. He wisely determined to think of


26 Master Piers.

them as seldom as possible. He had a manly
contempt for anything like whining; “a fellow
couldn’t have a finer model than Browning’s

old friar,’”’ he used to say:

“One who never turned his back but marched
breast-forward,
Never doubted clouds would break,
Never dreamed, though right were worsted,
wrong would triumph,
Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better,
Sleep to wake.”

He was frankly glad, since he had to work
for a livelihood, it should be in such good
quarters. A great many high ambitions had
had to be put by, but he was clear-eyed
enough to see that it was no mean task to
take a child by the hand and lead him
aright.

‘““T once thought to be a model landlord
myself,” he said with a smile, “that’s past
and done with; but I may do something to

make Margetson of Winde—poor little lad—
Master Piers’ Mother. OF.

fit for his post. It seems to me that so far,
like Topsy, he’s ‘growed’ morally.”

There was a door on one side of the fire-
place, and, missing Piers, the tutor entered
the adjoining room. He found the boy
struggling with the straps of his portmanteau.

“There! I meant to get it open before you
came in,” he said, looking up with a flushed
face. ‘It’s so new that the straps stick.
Some day I shall have strong fingers like you,
shan’t I? and then things will open quick for
me as they do for you.”

“Tf you run about and play, instead of
sitting in apple-trees trying to ‘feel’ your own
splendour,” laughed Mr. Heron.

“Oh! I don’t do that often!” protested
Piers, indignantly; ‘only when I want to
realize. Shall I get out your dress-suit? You
are going to dine with mother, you know.”

“Not to-night; I have asked her to excuse

me,” replied Mr. Heron, keeping a look-out on




28 Master Piers.

Piers, who was hovering over a pair of razors.
‘You see, I want to get to know you well, and
I could not do that more quickly than by
spending this first long evening with you.”
And what an evening it was! They spent
it together in the schoolroom, which had so
recently been the nursery that Caxton often
forgot it was no longer her domain. She was
mending socks by the fire when the pair:
entered, and appeared greatly disturbed at
being found there, ‘‘having learnt from her
lady that Master Piers had outgrown his old
nurse.” But Mr. Heron would not hear of
her going away. ‘Did she think that he,
a mere man, could take her place with Master
Piers?” he asked, merrily. ‘Why, he knew
nothing of the mysteries of a boy’s toilet, and
as for mending socks, well, he should be
grateful if Mrs. Caxton would take his under
her care, for her darning was really a fine art.”
Caxton bridled and tried to look severe, but
Master Piers’ Mother. 29

there was no resisting Mr. Heron’s good
humour. She sat down again and spread out
her housewife of many coloured darning wools,
and before the clock struck eight, Master Piers’
bedtime, felt herself altogether reconciled to
the invasion which she had previously declared
‘svould certainly darken her declining years.”

‘Tt did her heart good, to see Master Piers’
face,” she said afterwards in the housekeeper’s
room. ‘She'd never guessed before how shut
up in Winde the child was. He just drunk in
Mr. Heron’s words as though he hadn’t felt
a breath of the outside world before.”

Perhaps that was how Piers really did feel.
His eyes shone, and his plain little face was
all aglow as he listened and concluded that his
tutor was quite the most wonderful being he
had ever known. The people who came to
Winde, and a great many did come when

Lady Margetson was at home, always made

Piers feel awkward and insignificant. He never
30 Master Piers.

went near them if he could help it, and would
have laughed incredulously, if any one had told
him that many had lived far more eventful
lives than Max Heron.

Yet, after all, perhaps it was the stories of
things quite within Piers’ reach which most
delighted the boy. Mr. Heron’s early days
had also been spent in the country, but with
this difference: instead of a father away in
unknown lands, Mr. Heron, laird of Heronfell,
liked to have his little son at his heels, and
was as keen as Max about a dozen boyish
sports which the ladies, who had _ hitherto
ruled Piers’ life, had quite forgotten to
introduce to him.

“T say, Mr. Heron, you'll have to tell all
this to Aunt Virginia when she comes home
from Italy. She likes to hear about things
that I ought to do, and she has got lots of fun
in her,” Piers said, when Caxton, having

sedulously avoided noticing that the hands of
Master Piers’ Mother. 31

the clock had long passed eight, at last folded
her work and bade him say “ good-night.”

As the tutor went to his own room, he heard
‘the sound of the piano and Lady Margetson
singing in a voice wonderfully sweet and clear.
It was a sad little song, and it seemed to him
pathetic that she should be all alone in the
ereat drawing-room singing to herself. He
stood at the head of the staircase for a little
while listening, and then went to his room.
His own mother had been dead only a few
months, and, from his babyhood, they had been
all in all to each other. He felt it the saddest
thing that Lady Margetson and her little son
should live so far apart, though under one roof,
when each might have been so much to the
other. He realized, with a sudden thrill of joy,
how much he might have lost during his six-
; “and-twenty years ; instead, his dearest heritage
was the memory of parents who were always

his closest friends and loving comrades.


CHAPTER Iii.

THE OLD HOUSE.

“The stately homes of England,

How beautiful they stand. .....
There woman’s voice flows forth in song,
Or childhood’s tale is told,

Or lips move tunefully along
Some glorious page of old.”

HEN Piers ran into the breakfast-

room next morning, he found his





tutor already there. Mr. Heron
was standing on the hearthrug, looking
thoughtfully into the fire, and, now and .
then, making an entry in the notebook he
held in his hand,
The Old House. (933

He put it into his pocket and wished Piers
a cheery ‘‘ good morning.”

“Tt’s raining hard, and_I was going to the
Long meadow to see Barnes break in the new
horse,” said Piers, dolefully. “Ton’t you hate
wet mornings, Mr. Heron? The house never
seems big enough to spend a whole day in,
and you soon use up indoor games. Mother
said it would interest me to show you the house
this morning. Most people like to see it.”

Mr. Heron regarded his pupil with an

amused smile.

-Doesn’t it occur to you, Piers, that

a pretty large part of your day and mine will
have to be spent in the schoolroom? Life
when we reach the dignified age of eight, is not
all play.”

Master Piers’ face fell. ‘I had forgotten,”
he said: ‘You see, I have only had lessons
now and then, but everybody said it would be

different now.” :

B
34 Master Piers.

“Tl let you down easy, at first,” laughed
Mr. Heron, ‘“‘I have no desire to emulate the
noted Dr. Blimber. Have you heard of that
distinguished personage? Little Paul Dombey
was committed to his care when a good deal
younger than you are. One morning’s work
for him comprised, English and a great deal
of Latin, a trifle of orthography, a glance at
ancient history, a wink or two at modern ditto,
a. few tables, two or three weights and
measures, and a little general information.”

‘“‘T can see in your eyes, Mr. Heron, that is
only a joke of a story. If anybody treated
a real boy like that, I should think he would
be tremendously discouraged.”

Mr. Heron poured himself out a cup of
coffee before he replied: ‘‘I am going to put
you through your paces this morning, my boy ;
I can promise you that I shall be more
moderate than Dr. Blimber in my expectations,

but you must work for the future, you know.”






a ae eee

The Old House. 35

Piers nodded. ‘I must, for I have got to
be clever when I grow up; the Margetsons
have nearly all been great in some way, you
know, and mother would be dreadfully
disappointed in me if I were one of the
ordinary ones. I wish the world was not such

a big place, Mr. Heron, there’s so many things

to learn that one person can’t. learn

everything.”
‘Tt is as much as the best of scholars can

do to learn all about one thing,” said
Mr. Heron. ‘‘ Don’t bother your head, laddie,

about the ‘lots of things to learn,’ but peg

‘on steadily at the tasks at hand. That’s

the secret of making the future a success.
The man who finds life a good and joyous

thing, is the man whose life will make itself

felt.”

He stopped, wondering a little whether he
were not going beyond Piers, and began to-

ask him about his childish pleasures. He
Dez
36 Master Pers.

wanted to identify himself to the utmost with
the child’s daily doings. He had his ideal of
life, and it comprised the following of any
chosen calling with perfection in the smallest
details. He meant to do his share towards
making Margetson of Winde the man he
should be--an aim which took in a good
many lessons not to be learned from
books.

‘He was quite prepared to find his pupil
backward in the matter of education, and
an hour’s examination did not agreeably
disappoint him. The boy’s eyes, however,
forbade the utterance of any judgment likely
to imperil Miss Virginia’s reputation as an
instructress. He closed the books and bade
Piers put them away.

“We shall do better than that in six
months, my boy,” he said, cheerily. ‘‘ Now,
since it still rains persistently, we may as well

make our little journey round the house. Iam
The Old House. 37

curious to see it, for the fame of it reached me
in Scotland.”

“How jolly! It’s no end nice to have
a place that is old and full of stories, isn’t it ?”
Piers cried, eagerly. ‘‘ There’s a book of tales
about us in the library. Grandfather wrote it,
and once I made Thomas read it to me.
Didn’t they have jolly times long ago? They
chopped off each other’s heads at the least
thing. One Margetson killed six men down
at the ferry, because they laughed at
his hunchbacked sister. Afterwards, when
England got more civilised, they had to go
abroad for adventures, but they had splendid
times with the old Spaniards in Queen
Elizabeth’s reign.

‘You bloodthirsty boy!” laughed Mr. Heron.
‘Do you think adventures and glory can only
be won by the sword ?”’

“That would be awfully silly!” retorted

Piers, contemptuously. ‘‘Some Margetsons,
38 ‘Master Piers,

quite famous ones, have been bookwriters, and
father is an explorer, far away in the snow-
lands, near the Pole.” It was Piers’ fancy
always to speak of his dead father as if he still
existed somewhere in those distant regions in
which he lost his life.

Heron was surprised at the boy’s store of
knowledge concerning his ancestors and his
home. He seemed to have a legend to match
each’ curious nook and odd-shaped room,
learned, no doubt, from the old servants, who
adored their young master, and were never
too busy to talk to him. Here was the
window to which Trevor Margetson once
climbed, to take a last look at his mother,
before departing for the Indies; in this room,
a Royalist general with a price on his head, had
been concealed for weeks whilst the whole
county ‘was alive with soldiers searching for
him. The Margetsons had been on _ the ~

Parliamentary side, but never one of them
{



The Old House, 39

would have withheld a kindly hand from
a fugitive, were he friend or foe, At the end
of a dimly-lighted corridor was a small suite
of apartments known as the Priest’s rooms,
and given over to the storage of lumber,
A few Latin books, in quaint lettering, still
stood on the carved shelves, and a truckle-bed,
by no means suggestive of comfortable repose,
yet bore its silk coverlid, now faded and
tattered. Piers sat down on a low stool, and
looked about him with his chin propped on his.
hand.

‘‘] think this is such an interesting room,”
he said, gravely. ‘“‘ One of the good Margetsons
lived here like a hermit till he was tremendously .
old. None of his brothers liked him, because
he became a priest, and no one in the family
had ever been a ‘religious’ before. Aunt
Virginia says they had a feeling, perhaps, that
it was a ‘soft life,’ and Margetsons have always

been strong and daring. It was a wrong
40 Master Piers.

feeling, she says, for a man has to be what
God puts it in his heart to be, and to spend
your life helping other people to be great and
true, must be better than just thinking of your
own greatness.”

Mr. Heron nodded gravely. ‘But the
teacher must first be great and true himself,
laddie. He becomes a teacher of men because
he has trodden the upward path and knows the
pitfalls and rough places, and is desperately
sorry for those who have them still to tread.”

Piers got up and stretched his arms. ‘I’m
chiefly interested in the jolly old priest
because he is the Margetson that looks like
me,” he said, slowly. ‘If you come with me,
I'll show him to you.” He ran down the
corridor, and, when a few minutes later Heron
entered the picture gallery, he found the boy
seated, cross-legged, on the floor, before the
portrait of a shaven priest of Tudor times,

whose whimsical face, firm mouth, and steady,
The Old House. AI

honest eyes, nature had oddly reproduced in
Master Piers.

Lady Margetson was walking up and down
the gallery, with a soft fur cloak covering her
green gown and a dainty hood drawn over
her fair hair.

She nodded a ‘‘good-morning” to the
newcomers. ‘‘I went to the schoolroom to
find you and heard you were doing the
house, so I knew you must gravitate here,
sooner or later. I see Piers at his shrine,
already!” she said, laughing lightly. ‘He
is devoted to the Priest: odd, isn’t it, con-
sidering that he is quite the ugliest of the
collection ?”’

“It’s evidently the attraction of similarity,”
replied Heron, smiling. ‘‘There’s a marked
likeness between the two faces.”

- Lady Margetson turned away, with a little
frown. puckering her white forehead. ‘ Yes,

it is noticeable,” she said, curtly. ‘‘ Come
42 Master Piers,

here, Piers, I am going to Sevenoaks in an
hour, to lunch with your cousins. Mr. Heron
will, no doubt, excuse you since I particularly
wish you to accompany me. You had better
come now, and I will give Caxton instructions
to get you ready.”

Like a sudden summer storm, Piers’ face
clouded. The laughter died out of his eyes,
his mouth set in an expression of very manifest
unwillingness. It seemed for a moment that
he was going to protest, then he walked away
to the window and stood drumming on the
blurred panes.

‘“‘T hate going to Sevenoaks; I hate all the
people there!” he said, crossly.

Lady Margetson shrugged her shoulders.
‘You see, Mr. Heron, poor Piers has a rooted
objection to civilised life! Even the charms
of my society pall before plans of his own
devising.”

Piers reddened, and he fidgetted from one
The Old House. 43

foot to another as the sweet mocking tones fell
on his ear.

“You will have your hands full if you are
going to make a gentleman of this Margetson
of Winde.”

“T have no fears for the future,” Heron
replied, looking at her, steadily. Something
in the look made Lady Margetson lift her head
haughtily, and tell herself that this young man
was presuming to sit in judgment upon her.

“T have not the least doubt you will do
your duty,”’ she said, coldly. “Piers, mind
you do not keep the carriage waiting. Perhaps,
Mr. Heron, you will be so good as to see that
he is not late.”

The tutor, remembering the entries he had
made in his notebook that morning, hastened
to suggest that the afternoon, thus left free,
‘would be a good opportunity for running up to
town to make certain purchases for the

schoolroom. . ©
44 Master Piers.

‘“Go, by all means,” said Lady Margetson,
carelessly. ‘‘I leave all matters of that kind
entirely in your hands; Piers will not need you
before dinner.’”’ Then taking the reluctant
boy by the hand, she swept from the gallery,
leaving Heron wondering where’ he had
offended.

‘Poor Master Piers! he’ll have a rough
time of it, since he has such a rooted objection
to festivities,’ he said, as he went in search of
a time-table, ‘‘and he deserves it too; he
certainly behaved like a young cub. I shall
have to talk to him straightly to-night.”

He pondered, as he ate his solitary luncheon,
over the line of conduct it was best to take
with Piers, and balanced the relative virtues of
severity and leniency. It was so easy to take
a wrong course while his pupil’s character still
lay barely explored territory ; it was so possible |
to take measures which would imperil the

influence he had already gained. Whilst he
The Old House. 45

pondered the question, there came back to
him a long-forgotten passage in his own child-
hood’s history. In asudden fit of anger, one
day, he struck his father. The magnitude of
his fault sobered him in an instant, and he
stood, trembling, in childish alarm, unable to
grasp the severity of the punishment he
deserved. While he stood, hanging his head,
he felt his father’s arms round him, and. his
father’s kiss upon his cheek. ‘‘ My poor, poor
child! To think that you should strike your |
father who loves you so,” he said, ‘‘I forgive
you, I forgive you, freely !”’

That tenderness clung about the memory
of a father dead many a year, and was an
inspiration to Heron now.

‘“‘T’ll try tenderness to its limits,” he said;
‘‘T’ll make the laddie love me, and love has
a trick of working wonders. Then if love fails
—but, there, it can’t fail! If it works slowly,

it works stirely. God helping me I’ll do my
46 Master Piers.

duty to Margetson of Winde, and if it seems

a small sphere, we have, as dear old Browning
says:
**¢ Not to fancy what were fair in life,
Provided it could be, but finding first

What may be, then find how to make it fair
Up to our means.’ ”




CHAPTER IV.
THE MISCHIEVOUS ENDING OF A MISERABLE DAY.

“He is gentil that doth gentil deeds.”—
CHAUCER.

R. HERON was detained ib town
and did not reach Winde until
half-past seven. Lady Margetson







was already at dinner, so, ordering a repast
to be sent to his room, he went to the
schoolroom. The pockets of his coat bulged
with purchases he had made, and he smiled
to himself, as he pictured Piers’ delight when
he heard that both bicycle and football would
be at Winde on the following day.
48 Master Piers.

“As a set-off to the Latin primer and
geradatim he will have to keep to pretty
closely,’ he said, smiling. ‘I don’t know
which is the more necessary in his case.”’

The smile faded from his face, suddenly,
as he opened the schoolroom door. He stood
on the threshold aghast, though it was the
funniest scene it had been his fortune to
witness.

An odour of burning velvet, cloth, and
leather pervaded the atmosphere, and through
the haze of smoke he saw Piers vigorously
prodding with the poker, a smouldering
bundle which lay across the grate.

“You wretched boy! what mischief are
you about!” Mr. Heron exclaimed with
asperity:

Piers lifted a heated and begrimed face.

“I’m burning up that beastly old suit!”
he said, defiantly. ‘‘ Now I can’t ever wear

it again, You wouldn’t like to go out to see
The mischievous ending of a nviserable day. 49

people in a sash and a lace collar, you know
you wouldn't!” There was a decided lack
of due respect in the culprit’s tone, and he
stabbed the smouldering suit as though he
would not have minded transferring the
attention to the person of his tutor. Piers,
‘‘in his tempers,” to use Caxton’s phrase, was
quite impartial. When anything displeased
him he wanted to call all the world to account
for the wrong.

Mr. Heron sat down. ‘Come here, Piers,”
he said, quietly.

The boy came at once, too angry yet to
be ashamed of his mischief, and, by nature,
fearless.

‘Of course you are going to punish me, but
that can’t bring back the horrid old suit,’ he
said, bluntly.

_ Mr. Heron suppressed a smile and replied,
gravely; ‘‘ I have gone about all the afternoon,

Piers, getting this thing and that, and picturing
E








50 Master Piers.

the jolly evening we should have examining
my purchases. I felt sure that your bad
behaviour of this morning was long ago
repented, apologised for, and forgiven.” —

‘“Oh! you don’t know how long I can keep
angry, days and days if I like!” replied Piers,
truculently.

“Well, I am disappointed in you,” said
Mr. Heron, calmly.

Piers fidgetted from one foot to the other.
“You don’t know; big people never do!”
he muttered.

Mr. Heron’s face softened. How well
he recollected the pain of that thought in
childhood. He laid his hand on the boy’s
shoulder and looked into his eyes.

“Try me, Piers! It isn’t a tremendous
time since I was your age, a matter of sixteen
years or so. I've still a notion how it feels to
be-a boy. Let us have the story of your

‘wrongs.’ ”’
The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 51

The cloud lifted a little from Piers’ brow,
he perched himself on the corner of the
table at his tutor’s elbow.

‘“Tt’s been a horrid, beastly day, every bit
of it!” he said with emphasis. ‘‘ Things that
you begin in a rage usually are. But it would
not have mattered in the least, if I had been
sweet ‘as honey, as Sutton says, for I should
jolly soon have got in a rage.” He sighed,
resignedly, and propped his chin in the palm
of his hand. ‘I am. so relieved that you
have never seen that suit,’’ he said, gravely.
“It was so beastly girlish, all green velvet,
with a blue sash and silver buttons. Perhaps
it was silly to burn the buttons. They were
real silver, you know, and I might have sold
them and given the money to the poor, as
Judas, in the Bible, recommended.”

_ “Can't you go on with your - story
without remarks and digressions?” asked
Mr. Heron.
BO ee "Master Piers.

‘“Why, I am going on!” protested Piers,
indignantly. He loved telling a tale too well
to be hurried in the telling. ‘Where did
I getup to? Oh! I forgot, I hadn’t properly
begun. You know how cross I was at having
LOLCO

“It’s a fact which did impress itself on my
memory, for manifest reasons,’ Mr. Heron
observed, dryly.

Piers reddened and continued, rather
hurriedly. ‘Mother saw it too and gave
me a lot of advice, in the carriage, about
behaviour, and about imitating Miles, who
is the nicest boy, she says. Mother is
a darling, of course, but I don’t think she
likes the boy-kind of boy. God ought to
have given her a sort of boy that suited
Lord Fauntleroy suits, oughtn’t He? But
of course, it is too late to change me now,
and I shouldn’t like to be anybody but
Margetson of Winde. Miles has got a book
The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 53

about the boy whose mother invented
Fauntleroy suits and——,” Piers. paused and
looked as though words were quite inadequate
to express his feelings; “I haven’t any
respect for the person who wrote that book.
She has made things awfully hard for boys
like me. Miles loves to look like the boy
in the book; but, all the same, he is
really good and quite jolly sometimes, you
know.”

Mr. Heron had resigned himself to athe
meander course of Piers’ narrative,
“But how did you get on to-day?” he
asked.

Piers shrugged his shoulders. “Oh! to-day?
Miles wasn’t a bit jolly. When we went to
play, after luncheon, he wouldn't do a thing
that was any fun. I had a jolly time, though,
4urning out a box in the garret. There were
some. awfully queer old tools among the

rubbish; I mean to ask Aunt Newington to
54 Master Piers.

let me borrow them to examine, and I might
clean them up for her, mightn’t 1? They are
dreadfully dirty now.”

‘“As I suppose you were, when you had
finished with them!” observed Mr. Heron.

‘Yes, that was the bother,” said Piers, with
asigh. ‘I suppose I did look rather a sight,
and Miles was as prim. as a row of pins.
Mother just said ‘ Piers,’ but she meant heaps
more. Of course, that made me spill more
tea than usual. Some went over auntie’s
dress and there was a fuss! Ladies think
such a lot of their clothes; don’t they?
I= couldn't help-it > if beastly suit on I shouldn’t have been worried
so! I was so mad with it, that as soon as
I got my proper clothes on, I told Caxton
that she might go downstairs and then I just
stuffed it in the fire.”

‘‘ And the most probable thing is that your

mother will write to the tailor and order
The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 55

another suit just like it,’ said Mr. Heron,
calmly. ‘It does not do to allow little boys
to take the law into their own hands in
this way.”

Piers stood aghast. ‘You will not let her!
You will persuade her note tot’ he. cried,
pleadingly. ‘She said you would make
a man of me, and how can I be a man in
a lace collar and a sash? If father were
here, he would say ‘No,’ at once. He hated
finikin things, Barnes told me so, and
I can feel in me that he does.”

Mr. Heron looked at him curiously. His
eyes had grown wide and dreamy and he
was gazing, unblinkingly, at the lamp on the
table. He was looking beyond the school-
room walls, beyond the gardens and the fir-
woods, which bounded the Kentish horizon,
“away to the frozen regions of the North, where
his boyish imagination still saw his father,

struggling against great odds, in the cause of




56 Master Piers.

science. ‘ You see,” he said, ‘‘ father’s life has
always had such big things in it; hardships,
privations, and wonderful adventures. He
went away three years ago, when I was only
five. It was spring-time, but such a cold,
windy, rainy morning; mother and Aunt
Virginia cried and that made me cry, too,
so that I could not see father’s face when
he kissed me. I remember what he said,
though: ‘Be good, my son, be brave, never
be afraid of anything.’ Aunt Virginia says
that it is a very high aim for a boy—to be
quite brave and fearless.”

‘And you think that you have compassed
it to-day ?” asked Mr. Heron, quietly.

Piers reddened and laughed. “I should
think so; I guessed that I should be punished
and I did not care a bit.”

For a moment Mr. Heron was silent ; then
he drew the boy into the circle of his arm.

“That is a low bravery, Piers, unworthy
The mischievous ending of a miserable day. 57

of your father’s son. Real courage bears
disagreeables; true fearlessness, is to go
forward in spite of discomforts. It seems
to me that a cowardly reluctance to bear
what was unpleasant, has distinguished you
to-day.”

Piers slipped from Mr. Heron’s encircling
arm and sat down on the rug, his fingers
clasped round his knees.

Mr. Heron, watching him, felt that his
words had been of the hard-hitting type and
Piers felt them keenly. The boy was very
young and no one, perhaps, since his father’s
departure, had given him that wise guidance
without which love can do little towards
building up character.

‘“Poor Master Piers!” he said, gently,
laying his hand on the boy’s head.

“Piers shook off the hand. ‘Don’t, please,
Mr. Heron,” -he said, without looking up.

“Tam thinking hard because I know you
58 Master Piers.

are right and I have got to make myself
feel it. Would you mind going away,
please?”

Mr. Heron understood, and left the boy

alone.
























CHAPTER V.

AUNT VIRGINIA COMES HOME.

“Learn first thyself, thy spirit to control ;
From all that’s false and evil in thee cease.”

=




|HEN Lady Margetson heard how
Master Piers had crowned the
day’s misdemeanours she shrugged
her shoulders. |

‘* Some mothers would whip him,” she said,
with a little laugh; ‘‘but, perhaps, we had
better not begin that, Mr. Heron. I will talk
to him'sharply, if you send him to me before

dinner.”


60 Master Piers.

When Piers knocked at the door of his
mother’s dressing-room later in the day, he
found her dressing to dine in Sevenoaks. She
received his few words of penitence with a half-
hearted attention.

“Tt was the most ridiculous thing to
do,” she said, holding up a set of emerald
ornaments as she spoke, and pausing to
arrange them on her white neck. ‘In my
young days, little boys were whipped for
much less. I am afraid you are incorrigible,
IRiers.

Piers looked at her steadily; after all,
he thought, he need not have been so sorry
for her; she did not mind very much
when he was naughty. Mr. Heron said
mothers suffered dreadfully when their
children did wrong. Perhaps there were
different kinds of mothers; it was rather
comfortable to have a mother who didn’t

suffer.


Aunt Virginia comes home. Or

“Who would whip me?” he asked,
gloomily.

Lady Margetson laughed. ‘Oh! Mr. Heron.
It is part of his business to relieve me of all
unpleasant duties relating to you.”

‘“Why, you never did whip me!” Piers
protested. ‘I don’t think you could. You
are ever so much too soft and pretty, you
know.”

He was a beauty-loving little boy at all

times, and just now his mother looked very
beautiful in her white dinner-dress of gleaming
satin, with the sparkling emeralds at her wrists
and throat.
' Lady Margetson’s eyes softened, and she
bent her head to kiss the admiring face.
‘There, don’t crumple my gown or pull down
my hair, dear old boy,” she said, lightly.
“Learn to keep out of mischief, and,
Mr. Heron tells me, I shall be proud of you
yet.” :
62° Master Piers.

Piers’ colour rose, and he pressed closer to
his mother, regardless of the white gown. “If
you could be just a little proud of me now,
dear, it would help, awfully!” he said, slowly ;
‘You see, I can’t really help not being pretty
and finikin like Miles, but there are some
things I can do splendidly well for a boy of my
age. I can ride any of the horses bareback,
and groom them too, as far up as I can reach.
Barnes says I am really smart at that! I can
stand to have a tremendous splinter taken
out of my hand, without once pulling away,
and I never call out when I hurt myself.
I can deprive too. I tried once, going
without. my dinner and tea, you know;
Caxton thought I was ill, till I explained
to her. I wanted to see what I could bear,
you know; father has deprivations and hard-
ships; all explorers have, and I want to be
like him.”

‘“A long list of great qualities!” said his
Aunt Virginia comes home. =63

mother, with a little laugh, which Piers said
was not a laugh at all, for there were tears
in her beautiful grey eyes. ‘You are like
your father now, in many ways, Piers,” she
went on. ‘‘He was the best and bravest
of men, and,” she laughed again, softly,
“about as fond of civilised life as you
are;

Piers thought a good deal of that remark of
his mother’s when he went back to the school-
room, and loved her more for it. He had been
rather afraid that; somehow, she believed
bravery and greatness inseparable from the
graces and charms which were his cousin
Miles’. He had had despondent moods,
chiefly when he could not. go out of doors, in
which he almost persuaded. himself that she
felt him to be a disappointment. To-day,
without knowing it, she had given him a new
thought. In his own odd way, Piers revelled
in the thought of his father spilling tea on


64 _ Master Piers.

ladies’ gowns, - breaking strict rules as to
manners, and even in rebellious moods,
burning some hated garment which fashion
ordained befitting to Margetson of Winde.
And, despite all these drawbacks, his father
had been loved and admired by everybody,
and had won and deserved fame, honour,
and glory. Master Piers felt his heart swell
with hope for his own future.

As Lady Margetson told Mr. Heron on the
day of his arrival at Winde, she intended
to leave Piers entirely in his hands, and
neither the tutor nor his pupil saw much
of her during the short, dark days of the
winter.

Mr. Heron dined with her when she was at
Winde, but he soon ceased to feel any surprise
when he found covers laid only for one, and
was informed by the solemn butler that her
ladyship was dining out, or had gone away on

one of the rounds of visits which kept her


Aunt Virginia comes home. 65

absent from home the greater part of the
year.

Sometimes Mr. Heron felt life at Winde
woefully monotonous. The years for him had
been so bright and changeful hitherto; yet he
was too busy to be dull. He and Piers worked
hard in the cosy schoolroom where so many
Margetsons had battled with the difficulties
of learning under tutors more or less
severe. There wasa legend in the ‘‘ Margetson
Chronicle,” of a certain Dame Dorothy
living in the reign of -Queen Elizabeth,
who was a prodigy of learning, ‘“ having
extraordinary knowledge, at the age of six-
teen, of latin, Greek, French, — Italian,
and Hebrew, with theology, astronomy, and
music.” Her tutor was of the rigorous kind,
and the young lady complained bitterly in her
story of ‘nips, pinches, bobs, and blows”
which were the punishment of her slips in

grammar or memory.
66 Master Piers.

Piers affirmed very decidedly that he was
glad not to live in those days; certainly,
Mr. Heron spared no pains to make the path
of learning as smooth as possible for him.
And troublesome hours in the schoolroom were
more than made up for by their out-of-door
life together. They scoured the country on
their bicycles, rode, drove, and played football,
until Piers felt he had never known before half
the delight of being a boy. Mr. Heron found
he was quite at home in the cottages of his
tenants, who, one and all, adored their little
squire. He was such a friendly little chap,
they said, his poor dead father over again. The
old people remembered how, years ago, he too
used to sit by their cottage fires, listening to
tales of Charlesford, real and legendary, with
a credulity which made him a charming
listener.

At Christmas, Lady Margetson brought
a large party of her friends to Winde, and
Aunt Virginia comes home. 67

the old mansion was alive with gay doings.

Piers, who had grown decidedly more sociable
under Mr. Heron’s influence, enjoyed it
all thoroughly; but the chief pleasure of
the season to him, was the distribution of
the generous doles it had always been
the custom to dispense to their poorer
neighbours.

‘Td like to give out each raisin separately,”
he said to Mr. Heron. ‘It’s so jolly nice
giving things to people, isn’t it? They are all
so obliged, just as if they didn’t know that
I loved giving. Poor people are awfully nice,
are they not? Some of mother’s friends don’t
agree with that, though; I heard them one
day, and they talked——” Piers paused for
a word. In obedience to his tutor, he
was curing himself of ‘stable slang,’ and
the right, long word, which he loved, did
not always come just when he wanted it.

He brought it out at last, triumphantly.
F 2












68 Mastery Piers.

“They talked of the dear, poor people quite
disparagingly.”

Heron laughed. ‘All sorts of people go to
make up all classes, my boy, ungrateful as well
as grateful, you will find as you grow
older. We must not expect perfection of poor
humanity, and I don’t see why we should, but
if we do our duty to other people we shall
usually find they are very comfortable beings
to get on with.”

“Aunt Virginia said something like that
once,” Piers observed, thoughtfully. ‘You
and she ought to get on tremendously well,
Mr. Heron, all your good thoughts are so
much alike. I say, it does seem funny that
you've never seen her; you don’t know how
sweet she is—not pretty like mother, nobody
could be, but ever so jolly.”

Mr. Heron nodded. He had seen the
portrait of Miss Margetson hung over the

mantel-shelf in her nephew’s bedroom, and he
Aunt Virginia comes home. 69

was quite prepared to like her very much. She
might not be, as Piers said, beautiful, like
Lady Margetson, but there was something
very winning in the oval, laughing face, with
its frank, brown eyes, and broad, low brow
over which curled dark hair, cut short in
a boyish fashion. It was quite evident that she
had played a large part in Piers’ little life, and
he loved her devotedly.
She came home in the middle ot February,
a week earlier than Piers expected her. He
was playing football with Mr. Heron in the
field which lay between Winde and The Nook
one afternoon, when a tall, girlish figure in
a straight serge gown, came along the footpath.
If Mr. Heron had not guessed whom it must
be, Piers’ face would have told him. The boy
stared incredulously for a moment, then darted
off to meet the new-comer with a shout which
must have startled the cows in the neighbouring

field.
70 Master Piers.

‘Come on, Mr. Heron, it’s Aunt Virgie!”
he cried, and Mr. Heron, laughing, ‘‘came
on.”

—“T see that I shall have to give him a
holiday, Miss Margetson,” he said, when Piers
had gone through the necessary introductions
with many unnecessary explanations. ‘ He
has been counting the days before your
- arrival.’

“We have always been chums, haven’t we,
Piers?’’ Miss Margetson replied, blithely.
‘“And we have such arrears of confidences to
make up that I don’t believe one holiday will
be enough. I have been away six months,
you know, and his letters were woefully
scrappy.”

‘Oh! Aunt Virginia, they took hours and
hours to write,’ protested Piers, ‘and
Mr. Heron told me nearly all the things
to say.”

“Even the flattering things about him-
Aunt Virginia comes home. GA

self?’ asked Miss Margetson, mischievously.
“T think I had better let the subject
of your correspondence drop, Master Piers.
I ran up to ask if you and Mr. Heron would
come down to tea this afternoon, since
I haven’t a half-hour to spare for Winde
to-day.”

“Won't we just!” replied Piers, turning
a somersault on the grass. ‘‘I expect you
have brought a heap of jolly things from
Italy, auntie, and we will help you to unpack
them.”

“You see that he accepts, uncon- -
ditionally, for you, Mr. Heron,” laughed
Miss Margetson.

‘Which makes it rather invidious for me to
have to decline,” said Mr. Heron, smiling.
‘Asa matter of fact, I have an appointment
with the Rector at half-past four. We are
arranging a cricket club among the men, and

they have flatteringly expressed a wish that
oe ' Master Piers.

I should become their president and general.
coach.”

‘And, of course you will accept,” Miss
Margetson rejoined, with a pretty little air of
command. ‘I mean to get up some tennis
parties for the girls as soon as the weather
permits. Village girls have rather a dull time
of it on the whole; if any one wants to do
anything for them it usually takes the form of
a sewing-school or a cooking-class. I was
never one of those wonderful beings who find
recreation in a change of work, and I try
to do unto others as I would have others
do to me.”

“You are quite right,” said Mr. Heron,
thoughtfully; . whereupon Master Piers
murmured, indignantly, that ‘‘ Aunt Virginia |
always was,” and that young lady declared
it was time she carried him off to The
Nook or she might endanger such a high

reputation.
Aunt Virginia comes home. 73

Mr. Heron stood looking after them as they
walked away, Piers with his arm round
_ Miss Virginia’s waist, and a beaming smile on
his odd little face. ‘With her help, we shall
make a fine fellow of Margetson of Winde,”

he said, softly.




‘CHAPTER VI.

THE NOOK.

“ She doeth little kindnesses
That most leave undone or despise,
And nought that sets one heart at ease
Or giveth happiness or peace
Is low esteemed in her eyes.”—.
LowELL.




THE NOOK was near enough to
Winde to make intercourse between
the two houses very close. Lady
Margetson was fond of her sister-in-law
and would have been glad to keep her alto-
gether, though there was scarcely a subject

on which they quite agreed. But so many




The Nook. 75

people were fond of Miss Margetson, and
chiefly, Uncle Cornelius. When he removed
to The Nook, there was no question about
Miss Margetson going with him—he simply
refused to part with her. If she found it
a little dull, poring over natural histories,
making drawings of rare specimens and
discussing the old scientist’s hobby for hours,
no one ever knew it. Virginia Margetson’s
unselfishness was of that fine kind which
passes for self-pleasing. People used to say,
sometimes, that it was odd how her wishes
coincided with those of her companions and
that it really showed a want of individuality.
There will always be some who cannot
understand a girl who seeks not her own,
but finds life a joyous enterprise and every
hour worth the living. Lady Margetson used
to say, pitying, that Virginia had very few
pleasures. Pleasures, to Lady Margetson,

meant, at this time, concerts, balls, dinners
76 Master Piers.

and kettledrums. When Virginia declared
that she got as much enjoyment out of
a scrambling tea in the fields with Piers as
from the most elaborate party, and that her
poor friends in the. village were vastly more
entertaining than the people she met at
a dance and might never meet again, Lady
Margetson lifted her delicate eyebrows and
wondered.

‘After all,” she said, to herself, ‘it
was a good thing Virginia was satisfied to
remain so long at The Nook, since Uncle
Cornelius would certainly fret after her,
and it was the best thing in the world for
Piers.

To be sure, Piers took full advantage of his
privileges in this respect. Whenever he was
not engaged with Mr. Heron, he was sure to
be at The Nook, and it was not long before the
tutor, too, found the cosy little house a very

homelike place. If you ask me whether Miss
The Nook. qT],

Margetson was a_ noteworthy house-wife,
I should be obliged to confess she was not.
Lady Margetson, who sometimes dropped in
to afternoon tea, would say, she did not know
how Virginia lived in such a muddle. Yet

’ simply, that every one

it was no ‘‘muddle;’
carried on his or her pursuit, happily, within
the same four walls. If that place were
the drawing-room, and the pursuit rather

a ‘‘littery” one, well, it did not trouble
Miss Margetson. She was glad that they
were all happy and together.

In one corner, where a window caught the
morning sunshine, Uncle Cornelius wrote his
multitudinous notes for the great book which
Virginia often thought he would not live to
begin. She had her own drawing block and
pencils at another window, and Master Piers,
sprawling on the rug, would study one of the
huge folios of Froissart’s Adventures he had

dragged from the library. Visitors, who had
78 Master Piers.

been to The Nook, always wanted to come
again; it was so delightfully easy to fall into
the ways of the house. There was none of
that tiresome effort to amuse and make much
of them, as outsiders; they became, all at
once, one of the family, and did as he or
she pleased.

Mr. Heron did not wonder that Master
Piers’ studies had been of a decidedly
desultory kind before his arrival. Yet he
was not sure that the boy had not learned,
from sweet Miss Virginia, and simple, kindly
Uncle Cornelius, something better than book-
learning. They had taught him, more by
example than precept, a reverence for all
that is good and great and a fine scorn for
everything that savours of worldliness. Men
and women, girls and boys, were to be liked
‘for what they were, not for what they had;
work was the noblest thing for every one;

‘the blacksmith, whose hammer, ringing on
‘The Nook. , 79

the anvil, sent up the golden sparks the boy
loved to watch, was a greater man -than the
idle, fine gentleman, who did nothing to better
the world he lived in. If Miss Virginia,
unwittingly, had taught Master Piers to hold
rather an exaggerated opinion of the position
of Margetson of Winde, she had also taught
him that no little or mean man could fill
it. Noblesse oblige, he was bound to be
a Christian and no idler.

Piers’ application of Miss Margetson’s
principles did not always meet with his
mother’s approval.

He came to Mr. Heron, early one afternoon,
with the request that he might be given
a holiday ‘for very important business and
not just for play.”

_“T think that I must know more about the
business before I say ‘Yes,’ Piers,’’ Heron said,
looking up with a smile, from the letter he

was writing.
80 Master Piers.

Piers’ face fell. “I'd rather not tell,
please,” he urged. “I really oughtn’t to let
my right hand know what my left hand doeth,
you know.” |

Mr. Heron concealed a smile and laid his
hand kindly on the child’s shoulder.

“It is nothing that I ought to say ‘ No’ to,
if I knew, my boy, is it? Think before you
answer !”’

Piers shook his head, emphatically.
“Then I may go? I will put on my old
clothes and be back to tea,” he explained,
mysteriously.

A few minutes later, Mr. Heron saw him
running down the drive, his hands in his
pockets and his little scarlet cap on the
back of his head. He was singing, at
the top of his fresh young voice, the
opening bars of the Jewel song from
“Faust,” of which Lady Margetson was

fond. She had many a time tried to teach
The Nook. 81

Piers to sing, and often declared that he
had a voice which would repay good
teaching, but he was the most refractory
pupil! He frankly affirmed that he hated
all music but that he heard in church,
and thought his mother and her friends
- “ music-mad.”

Mr. Heron lingered over his letters and
then put on his cap to carry them to the
post office. He meant to go through the
village to see how the men were getting on
with the returfing of the cricket-field, and,
no doubt, he should come upon Piers
somewhere.

At the post office, he met Miss Virginia,
stamping an article of Uncle Cornelius’,
which was to appear in an important
scientific magazine.

“Are you looking for Piers?” she said,
with a little laugh; ‘‘I came across him just

now at old Mrs, Martin’s, and I supposed that
G
82 Master Piers.

you had been teaching him the first principles
of socialism.” .

‘““No! he learns enough of that at The
Nook,” laughed Mr. Heron. ‘What is he
up to now?”

‘““Go down the street and into the first
cottage garden past the church; you will see
then,” nodded Miss Margetson, moving away
to speak to the Rector, who was coming to
fetch his weekly newspaper.

What Mr. Heron saw pleased and touched
him more than he could say, though Caxton
might have had something to complain of in
the appearance which Piers, at that moment,
presented.

The yard behind Mrs. Martin’s cottage was
littered with chopped wood and bundles of
faggots, in the midst of which stood James,
the stable-boy, hard at work with his hatchet.
Piers, struggling in a sea of shavings, was

carrying away what James chopped. His
- The Nook. 83

face was very red and dirty, and there was
a great rent in his jacket, but his eyes
were shining with enjoyment of his self-
appointed task.

“Oh, Mr. Heron!” he cried, ‘would you
very much mind helping? There’s such a lot
to do yet, and I’m so afraid that Mrs. Martin
will get home before we have finished. It must
be nearly five o’clock, too, and Barnes can
only spare James until five. I could not have
done anything without James, you know, for
I promised Aunt Virgie, a long time ago,
that I wouldn’t use a chopper, and the law
hasn’t been repealed yet.”

‘You have not told me yet what all this
business means,” Mr. Heron said, taking off
his coat and gathering up an armful of
faggots.
~ “Of course, if you are a helper you ought
to. know,” Piers said, gravely. ‘I did not tell

you before because it would have made you
G2
84 Master Piers.

uncomfortable, perhaps, to feel that I was
doing a ‘help-the-needy’ kind of work, while
you sat by the fire, just writing letters. You
know how you talked to me last Sunday, about
things a Margetson of Winde should grow
up to be—one of those ‘smallening’ kind
of talks that are for one’s good, you know.
You have some awfully big thoughts,
Mr. Heron, I don’t get all the good of
them just at first. When I told Aunt Virginia
that you said I must grow up to be a rock
of shelter and defence to my people here,
she was so pleased with the thought. She
said that I ought to begin now, whilst I’m
small, by doing little helping things for those
who are poor and helpless. ‘Giving myself
not just money,’ she said. So when I heard
that. Farmer Harris had given Mrs. Martin
a load of wood which she couldn’t chop or
stack because of her rheumatism, I guessed

that was one of the helping things for me to
The Nook. 85

do. Of course, I couldn’t have done any-
)’ he looked
up at his tutor, lovingly, ‘‘1 don’t suppose



thing without James and

that I should have thought of it, Mr. Heron,
if I hadn’t learned such a lot from you.
I owe heaps to you and, of course, to James
too,” he added, careful of the stable-boy’s
feelings.

James grinned and rubbed his heated
forehead with a very grimy hand.

‘There ain’t much as I would not do for
you, Master Piers,’ he said. “It's. been
a nice bit of a change too.”

‘“You deserve Dame Martin’s best thanks,

?

both of you,” said Mr. Heron, heartily. He
set to work to help with such{!good-will that
the tiny yard was soon cleared, the wood
stacked, and the hatchet returned to its place
under the thatch.

After all, he thought, as he went home

with the two boys at his heels, if Margetson |
86 Master Piers.

of Winde paved the way for his future rule
over these country folks by such simple
loving deeds as to-day’s, there was little to
fear for him when he should come to his

inheritance.












CHAPTER VII.

THE ‘* GIRL-BOY.”’

Be ours
Never to blend our pleasure or our joy
With sorrow to the smallest thing that feels.”—_
WORDSWORTH.

JADY MARGETSON came into the

schoolroom, one June morning,



with an open letter in her hand
and a vexed expression on her beautiful
face. Piers was on the terracé practising
some new feat on _ his ~ bicycle, which was
to excite Miss Virginia’s wonder and

admiration. He nodded a bright -‘‘ good=
88 Master Piers.

morning” to his mother through the open
window. S

“Tam afraid that I must give you another
pupil, Mr. Heron,” Lady Margetson said.
‘“‘T have received a letter from my cousin,
Mrs. Newington, asking me to take her little
son, Miles, for a couple of months. She has
arranged a voyage with Captain Newington,
whose health is causing us anxiety, and, at the
last moment, her governess has been called
home. It is not possible, she says, to leave
the child with a stranger; but she would have
every confidence if he were at Winde. It is
extremely vexatious, and Piers will not
receive the news with effusion; he and Miles
are by no means kindred spirits.” She
laughed a little as she recalled his last
visit to his cousin in Sevenoaks. ‘Yet how
can I refuse?”

‘The arrangement is really the best thing

in the world for Piers,’ Mr. Heron said,
The ‘' Girl-Boy.” 89

quickly. “I have often thought that he
missed a good deal through his isolation from
the society of other children.”

‘As an educational medium ?”’ asked Lady
Margetson, laughing.

Mr~ Heron -laughed,:-too;- ~ “Yes, the
discipline of the playground and the school-
room does a lot for a boy. I have been to
a public school myself, and, though the system
has its drawbacks—as what system has not—
a boy gets a lot of nonsense knocked out of
him, of which his friends do not suspect the
existence.”

‘“‘T suppose, some day, Piers will have to go
into the rough and tumble of it all,”
Lady Margetson said, with a sigh.

‘And till then he will be all the better for
seeing as much as possible of other boys,”
Heron said, bluntly. ‘From what I hear,
Miles is a delicate little chap, one of the frail
kind. That won’t hurt Piers! I have
go Master Piers,

a notion that he has yet to learn ‘the strength
in things weak.’ ”

Lady Margetson nodded carelessly. ‘ Well,
if you will kindly allow Miles to share Piers’
lessons, Mr. Heron, I will write at once to
Mrs. Newington. Caxton can look after him
out of school hours; she will be pleased
enough, poor creature. Master Piers will not
be coddled half as much as she would like.”

Piers did not show any enthusiasm when he
learned he was to have a companion.

‘Miles will want to do everything I do,” he
said, discontentedly, ‘and then he won’t be
able to do the things because he is such
a muff. I hate to have girl-boys round.”

“TI don’t think it will do you any permatient
harm to ‘have round’ a few of the things you
hate, my boy,” remarked Mr. Heron, quietly,
opening a book.

Piers flushed and moved away. Wheti his

tutor’s voice took that note, he felt, like the
The ‘ Garl-Boy.” Qi

Queen of Sheba, there was no more spirit in
him. To restore his self-esteem, he went
down. to the housekeeper’s room, where, over
a generous repast of cake and candied fruits,
he confided to Mrs. Sutton the two astound-
ing facts; that ‘‘baby Miles’ was coming ~
to stay, and Mr. Heron was as cross as an
ogre.

Miles arrived a few days later. He was
a fair, bright-eyed little fellow, looking very
fragile in his blue tunic and soft white cap
It was plain that he adored Piers, and regarded
him with admiration not unmixed with awe.
Piers’ brusque off-hand tones seemed to him
the essence of manliness, and his cousin’s
weakest jest won the meed of his laughter and
applause. Piers had little vanity, and this
inordinate respect for his various qualities
caused him to hold Miles’ wisdom in very light
esteem.

It was pleasant, however; to have a playmate,
g2 Master Piers.

and no one could have been more ready to
follow his lead or, as Caxton put it, to play
“second fiddle.” Miles might be depended
on not to complain if the game outlasted his
pleasure, or if Piers extended their rambles until
he felt as though one tired foot would hardly
step before the other. There was some danger,
perhaps, of Piers playing the tyrant without
intending it. Though he had the tenderest
heart, half a dozen times a day he hurt poor
little Miles with his quiet assumption, that,
because he was this or that, courage, endurance,
and ‘‘go”’ were not to be expected of him.
And the boy who lacked these—well, he was
something on a much lower plane than
-Margetson of Winde. It is so difficult for the
strong to understand the weak. Indeed, the
capacity for understanding feelings outside
our own experiences takes some of us a lifetime
to learn. .

Miles had his little hour of triumph when


The ‘‘ Girl-Boy.” 93

the boys went down to the drawing-room
before dinner. He had such sweet manners,
everybody said, and was without shyness or
affectation. ‘‘I wonder he doesn’t curl up on
the rug, and purr like a kitten,” Piers would
murmur, disdainfully, from his hiding-place
behind the curtains.

He would not have owned it for the world,
but he envied Miles a little, at such times.
He did not want to be kissed by the ladies
who were drinking tea with Lady Margetson,
or to be called ‘a nice child” by the men,
but he would have liked to make his mother’s
eyes glisten, as they did when she looked at
pretty Miles. She smiled at Piers not a whit
less sweetly, though, when he came near, but
that was very seldom. For the most part, he
only peeped from behind the curtains—not
seen, but seeing all. |

‘‘T wish that Piers could sing like you, little

Miles,” he heard her say, one day, when Miles
94 Master Piers.

had been entertaining her with a fluty little
rendering of ‘‘ Blue Bells of Scotland.”

Miles opened his eyes wide. ‘‘ Why! Piers
sings ever so much better than I do, auntie.
And such jolly things, too! All about sailors
on the sea, and things with lots of fighting
and shouting in them. The stablemen like
them awfully, and they make me want to
shout too. He can sing soft, low, sad: things,
besides, that sick people like. Mr. Heron lets
him go and see an old woman in the village,
and when he sings to her, she cries ever so,
and says it’s ‘ heavenly.’”’

‘Shut up, Miles,” growled a voice behind
the curtains; but Miles, when excited, had
a habit of ignoring all interruptions.

‘Do ask him to sing something to-morrow,
auntie, and then you will appreciate him
more,” he urged. ‘‘ You know, Piers is a.
tremendously wonderful boy,” he added,

solemnly.
The ‘‘ Girl-Boy.” 95

‘He has got a wonderfully loyal champion,”
said Lady Margetson, kissing the earnest little
face. When, presently, Piers emerged, very
red and discomforted, from his hiding-place,
she kissed him too.

‘‘T am to be proud of you, Master Piers,”
she said, smiling. ‘‘ First, Mr. Heron tells me
so, and then Miles.”

“Oh! Miles! he thinks the least little thing
wonderful,” Piers replied, bluntly. ‘You
can’t count what a baby like that says.”

“Can't I?” echoed his mother, laughing.
‘Well, if he is a baby, I shall expect my
strong boy to look after him, or Aunt
Newington will have something to say to us
all. I have noticed that he often looks tired
and pale.”

Perhaps because Lady Margetson’s words
to’ him were so few, it frequently happened
that they made a deep impression on Piers’

mind.








96 Master Piers.

He went slowly upstairs “after Miles,
considering what she had said. He had
heard the same thing from Mr. Heron
and Aunt Virginia—the strong must always
take care of the weak, but, somehow, he
had never thought before that it had
anything especially to do with Miles and
him.

He went to bed so deeply pondering the
matter, that Caxton decided he was ‘‘in the
sulks,” and made her own remarks few and
far between.

When she had gone away with the light,
he slipped out of his own little bed and crept
across the floor to Miles.

‘Are you all right, Miles?”’ he whispered,
a trifle shyly. ‘Tucked in, and all that?”
he added, forgetting it was July, and hot
weather for that month.

“Too hot!” sighed Miles, through the

clothes drawn tightly over his curly head.
The ‘ Girl-Boy.” 97

“Then I can’t do anything for you?”
Piers turned away to his own bed.

Perhaps Miles caught a note of disappoint-
ment in his voice, for he peeped from among
the. clothes.

‘“Tf_if your bed were not so far away, you
could hold my hand,” he said, regretfully.
‘‘T’ve never slept in the dark before, and it is
so black.”

“You're afraid!’ Piers cried, incredulously.
‘Why, there is nothing to be afraid of.
Nothing can’t hurt you.”

‘No, I s’pose not,” Miles agreed, in a limp
voice, which somehow touched Piers.

“T believe I could drag my bed near
enough,” he said. ‘It is not very heavy, and
I’m strong, you know.”

“Yes, you are splendidly strong,” Miles said,
admiringly. Much in the way Piers had
said the same thing, once, to Mr. Heron. By

dint of tugging and pushing, Piers managed to
ret



epnnqueeargersnesaempetmemenpturmersmanans



peseanecenenen
98 Master Piers.

move his bed the few yards necessary to bring
him within reach of his little cousin.

“There! now you are all right, are you
not ?”’ he said, stretching out a white-sleeved
arm and clasping Miles’ hot hand tightly. .

Miles sighed with complete satisfaction.
‘My governess, at home, says that angels are
always around us, guarding us, but they are
not so satisfying as you, Piers, dear.”

Piers’ cheek glowed with pleasure, though,
in the dark, Miles could not know it.

“You just come to me when anything is
wrong,” he said, feeling equal to a whole
battalion of angels. :

Mr. Heron came into the room, half an hour
later, and saw the two little beds drawn
together, and the boys asleep, hand in hand.
He went down and told Caxton.

‘Don’t disturb them ; it will do Master Piers
a world of good to have some one to take care

of,” he said.
The ‘ Gil-Boy.” 99

“And he will learn that there’s grit under
Master. .Miles’ curls and- pretty ways, or
I'm much deceived,’’ Caxton replied, nodding
her head. ‘It won’t do Master Piers any
harm to find out that a body isn’t all soft
because he isn’t all bold and rugged.”



il 2


CHAPTER VIII.

MILES’ ADVENTURE.

“A soul of love and bravery.”




IASTER PIERS was to find out

Miles’ “grit” sooner than Caxton



anticipated.

Towards the middle of July Mr. Heron
gave the boys a few days’ holiday, leaving
them in the care of Caxton whilst he went
up to town to take afi examination for which
he had been studying. Lady Margetson was
at Scarborough with some friends; a month
later, the boys were to join her, at a little place
Mr. Margetson had, long ago, bought on the

Scottish coast:
Miles’ Adventure. IOI

Somehow, the days seemed very long
without Mr. Heron. Perhaps the absence
of lessons had something to do with it. The
boys would have spent the whole of each day .
at The Nook, had not Aunt Virginia declared,
that a certain part of every day she must and
would have free from their society. Uncle
Cornelius was really starting on the great
book. Sometimes Miss Margetson thought
that he had an idea, if it were not begun
now, it never would be. He had grown
frailer this summer; such little things tired
him; he could not see so well as he used
to do, and was glad of Virginia’s services as
his amanuensis.

‘I must give the mornings to your uncle,
boys,” Miss Virginia told Piers and Miles,
“the rest of the day you may have me as
long as I last. You are an enormous strain
on the system, you know.”

They laughed, incredulously. She would
102 Master Piers.

never make them believe that she did not
thoroughly enjoy cricket, when the thermometer
stood at eighty in the shade, or searching for
. disabled frogs and field-creatures after a heavy
shower—the very best time, Piers explained,
“they are so damp, they can’t run fast.”
Perhaps the boys liked best the days when they
had tea on the lawn. Afterwards, resting
under the trees, Aunt Virginia told them
stories—such wonderful stories; adaptations,
for the most part, from her own reading;
tales from the poets and the fairy lore of
all nations; true stories from history and
queer anecdotes about animals. There
never was such another story-teller as
Miss Virginia. . ‘‘ You don’t just hear about
the things when she tells you, they all
happen,” Miles said, one day. ‘ You should
write a book with all your stories in it, Aunt
Virgie |” |

‘‘And then I might never be able to tell
Miles’ Adventure. 103

another,” she replied, laughing, ‘I have
heard that people who write books, lose the
power to talk them. I know one lady who
was overtaken by that sad fate!”

“Oh! please, don’t write, then,” cried both |
boys; ‘‘let some one else.”

Miss Virginia laughed. “If I help Uncle
Cornelius with his book, it is all I shall do,”
she said. ‘And, after all, it is better, isn’t it,
to help some one to do their great work, than
to be very anxious to do a little thing of
one’s own.”

There came a day when she was obliged to
deny them the afternoon, which they thought
was theirs exclusively. A celebrated scientist
came to The Nook to visit Mr. Margetson,
and Miss Virginia was obliged to act the part
of hostess.

" Unfortunately, Caxton was busy too, and
perhaps a little cross. ‘You are wearing
* Master Miles to death with your hot games,
104 Master Piers.

Master Piers; he looks quite pale and
tired,” she said, sharply, when they begged
to be taken to the town, to make some
little purchases. ‘I'll take you when
it’s cooler, but, now, you must go away
and sit under the trees and read your
books.”

The boys rather dolefully obeyed her.
They chose a shady corner of the orchard
and stretched themselves on the grass with
+« Bevis” and ‘‘ The Swiss Family Robinson.”

But Miles was not studious, and he had
heard the adventures of that remarkable
family so many times, that he. didn’t feel
the remotest interest in them. Piers was
turning page after page of ‘ Bevis,” with
the little upright line in the middle of his
forehead, which meant that he was quite
absorbed in his book.

‘“Piers!’’ Miles began, timidly.

Piers frowned, and Miles decided it was ~
Miles’ Adventure. 105

hopeless to try to make him more sociable.
How still everything was in the orchard this
afternoon! The pale blue sky, through the
network of boughs, seemed very far away,
and the soft, summer breeze in the branches,
sounded like the murmur of the sea, on
a quiet evening.

Presently, Miles got up and wandered into
the copse beyond the orchard. It was
composed chiefly of nut-trees with a thick
undergrowth of brushwood. It was too shady
for flowers and the time of nuts was not yet.
Miles, however, wandered about happily; in
a wood there is always a chance of finding
something interesting.

He was stooping to examine a rabbit’s
burrow, when a clod of earth came bounding
down a bank on his right, with a force which
suggested that it must have been kicked, with
no gentle foot.

He looked up and saw a man with a red,
106 Master Piers,

shaven face, small, disagreeable eyes, and

a dirty, grey cap drawn over a scarred

forehead.

‘Wot are you doin’ ’ere?” the stranger
said, roughly.

Miles quailed slightly at the menacing
tones, but he replied, stoutly: ‘I’m here
because I belong here, but you don’t,
You’re trespassing !”’

‘‘None of your sauce, young sir, or it ‘ll

?

be worse for you,’ retorted the man, slipping
down the bank, after carefully assuring himself
that the boy was alone. He carried a dead
rabbit in his hand and a clumsy old gun
under his arm.

‘‘T s’pose you think as I oughtn’t to have
snared this,” he said, jerking forward the dead
animal, when he saw that Miles’ eyes were
fixed upon it. ‘‘That’s as it may be, but
if you don’t promise not to split on me,

IT can knock you on the head as easy as
Miles’ Adventure. 107

J did this ere rabbit, and no one ’ud be
a bit the wiser.”

‘Oh! I don’t want to tell,” Miles said,
gently. ‘It’s hard on the poor little rabbit,
but there’s plenty about, and I’m sure that
my Cousin Piers wouldn’t mind you having
one or two. He isn’t at all stingy with any
of his things.”

The man laughed, disagreeably. ‘ Well,
of all the softs! So you ain’t the young
squire, but a cousin of his?” He sat down
and stared at the little boy, with an expression
which made Miles’ heart beat uncomfortably.
He would have liked to run away, but he
remembered how often Piers had said that
only cowards did that.

“Tt isn’t one’s luck, often, to come across
any one quite so green as you, young un,” the
man drawled, at last. ‘Don’t know as it
wouldn’t be clear flying against luck to let

the chance slip. I’m off to foreign parts
08 Master Piers.

to-morrow, and I might take something with
me to grease the wheels. There’s silver and
such like up at yon big house, I’ll be bound,
that ’ud help a man to get a start. You’ve
got to help me to some of it, young sir.”

‘Why, you aren’t a thief, are you?” cried
Miles, his blue eyes widening with horror.
“You don’t mean that you want to steal
Piers’ silver things!”

“Don’t you call me no uncivil names,” said
the man, threateningly, placing his gun across
his knees. ‘‘ Ask no questions and you'll hear
no stories. All you’ve got to do is to answer
a few questions, civil, without any lies.”

“T don’t lie! A gentleman never does!”
replied Miles, proudly.

‘The better for you; now, you just tell me,
straight off, where that pompous old footman,
up at the house, keeps his silver basket, and
where the old, ancestral heirlooms, as they

call ’em in the penny books, is kept. May be,
Miles’ Adventure. 10g

I shall ask you to see that a window is left
unlatched in the vicinity. Depends how
obliging you are, whether I let you off easy
or not.”

Poor Miles sat down on the grass; his legs
trembled so that he could not stand. He
wanted, dreadfully, to call for Piers—but
then, Piers also would be at the mercy of
this dreadful man. He was terribly frightened,
but, in the midst of his alarm, there was room
for a doleful joy, that at last, Piers would know
he was not a coward. As Caxton had said,
there was true ‘‘grit” under the sunny curls
and baby face, even though he were not
a Margetson of Winde. He had not the least
intention of answering the man’s questions.
He might not be able to do hard things,
like Piers, but any one, he argued, could
not do things.

“Seems you are not very spry with your

?

tongue, young ’un,” said his tormentor,
LIO Master Piers.

roughly. ‘‘Just you describe the sitiwation .

of that- afore-mentioned silver-chest.”

Miles shuddered. ‘I can’t tell you,” he
faltered.

“Oh! you can’t, can’t you! S’pose you
don’t know ?”

“Yes, I know,” Miles sighed, truthfully.
“ Piers showed me once, but I can’t tell you.”

‘“‘ Won't is more the ticket, but you just have
to, young sir,” the man leaned forward and
nodded emphatically. It was his private
opinion that Miles was ‘‘a little ninny,’’ who
only wanted frightening enough to make him
tell anything. But he did not know that,
sometimes, ‘‘a mighty soul is lodged in a very
feeble body.”

A determined shake of the head and two
preat splashing tears was Miles’ only reply.

“You've just got to tell. I’m not going
to be bluffed by a child even if I didn’t want

the things. You'll have to promise to come
Gt
becall
i i

feats















*°T'll give you till I’ve counted twenty—and then



’"_ Page 111.
Mules’ Adventure. III

down in the dark and let me in too; I ain’t
going to-let you off easy now.” The man
fingered the gun as he spoke, witha significance
which almost drove Miles to frenzy.

“Ts it loaded?” he cried, hysterically.
“Oh! Mamma, mamma, if only you hadn’t
gone away; though, of course, I know you
had to!”

‘“‘Of course it’s loaded. Think I come out
to shoot rabbits without shot? You’d better
make up your mind to tell me, pretty sharp.”

“T can’t, I really can’t,” sobbed Miles.
-“T should be a traitor, and Piers would just
despise me if I did such a thing.”

‘“‘ Who'd tell him ?”’ sneered the man:

‘‘Oh! but God would know and I should,”
Miles wailed: ‘ Anyhow I’ll never, never tell.”

“Well, I ain’t got all day to sit here:
Pll give you till I’ve counted twenty—and
-,’ he lifted the gun with a little
gesture Miles comprehended perfectly: He

then




|



TI2 Master Piers.

was too young and too frightened to know
that the man would never dare to carry such
a threat into execution. It was real enough
to him, and the “ girl-boy”” was ready to face
death rather than dishonour.

don Carel won't tell,” he cried,
passionately, throwing himself on the ground.
‘“T hope Piers will find out and Ail you.”

‘One, two, three, four, five, six.”

Miles sobbed, quietly.

‘Seven, eight, nine, ten.”

There was a rustling among the brushwood,
then a furious ‘‘Oh! what a beast!” and Piers
stormed down the bank. 7

“What are you up to!” he cried, facing
the man, fearlessly. ‘‘Aunt Virginia and
everybody is coming, and you shall be shut
up for trespassing and frightening Miles.”

“Shut up? shall 1? not if I know it,”
replied the man, dealing Piers a violent blow

which threw him back upon the bank and
\liles’ Adventure. LE

making good his escape, whilst there was
yet time.

When Miss Margetson and ‘“ everybody,”
which was Piers’ designation for the celebrity
who was spending the day at The Nook,
appeared on the scene, Miles was bending
over his cousin, begging him, piteously, to
say that he was not dead, that the dreadful
man had not killed him, and that he was,
really, only asleep.

Miles’ story was so incoherent, that it was
difficult for Aunt Virginia to understand
all that had happened, but it needed no
explanation to see that Piers had had a bad
blow and was still unconscious.

Professor Worster picked him up and
carried him to Winde as swiftly as possible.
A messenger was then sent for a doctor,
whilst Miles, without saying anything to any
one, went to the post office and asked the post-

mistress ‘‘to please telegraph for Mr. Heron,
I


I14 Master Piers.

because Piers had been almost hit to death’
by a highwayman.”

The post-mistress happened to know
Mr. Heron’s address, and whatever the tutor
thought of the message, it brought him very
quickly to Winde. It would be difficult to
say who was most relieved to see him, Miles,
who felt he was, in some way, the cause of
the disaster; Piers, lying on the sofa in the
schoolroom, with a bandage round his head
and only a languid interest in what was going
on about him; or Miss Virginia, anxious for
the safety both of her charges and Winde.

For Miles had by this time made his story
quite intelligible, and Miss Virginia was in no
little trepidation lest a night attack should
be made by the burglar. However, though
Mr. Heron and the butler sat up all night,
nothing happened. A°couple of days later,
they read in the papers of the capture of

a convict, who had broken prison a week
Miles’ Adventure. 115

before and crossed the country, committing
some daring robberies on his way. From
the description given of him, it seemed likely
that it was this man whom the boys had
encountered in the copse.

By common consent, neither Piers nor Miles
alluded to the subject until Piers was quite
well again. Then, one morning, in his curt
odd way, Piers dragged Miles into the stable-
yard,

“Pm going to give you ‘Firefly,’ he
said, solemnly; “only really plucky people
can ride him, he’s so spirited; but you’re
a brick, Miles!” oe

Miles’ face crimsoned. ‘ Your own pony,
Piers!” he said, breathlessly. He had never
possessed a pony in his life, for the Newingtons
were not wealthy, and what boy is proof against
the joy of having one of his very own? Yet
' better even than the unexpected gift, was it to

hear Piers say he was a “brick.” It was such
: I 2
TI6 Master Piers.

awfully high commendation from Piers. He
knew now what it felt like to have the Victoria :
Cross, he afterwards told Miss Margetson.

‘““T’m going to have all my curls cut off and
wear suits like yours when mother comes.
home,” he said. ‘‘ You'll like me better still
then, won’t you?”

But Piers shook his head. ‘ Keep them,”
he said. ‘Perhaps other people besides me
are donkeys, and think you can’t be jolly brave
because you’re pretty. You just show them.”
By which it may be seen that Mr. Heron was
right when he said, that Piers had some things
to learn which Miles could teach him better

than any one else.










CHAPT ER lx:

IN THE BONNY NORTH COUNTRY.

“‘T see the sands on the seashore ;
I see the rocks enclosing the sands ;
I see the crags and the smugglers’ caves ;
I see the boats and the fishing nets of the cottagers ;
Fishermen! O! fishermen!”

N August, the boys and Mr. Heron

went northward. Miss Virginia



and Uncle Cornelius were also of
the party, and the month which followed
was a time remembered by all, for one
reason or another.

In the south, the weather had been warm
and sultry. Piers, scarcely recovered from the

effects of the blow he had received in the


118 Master Piers.

copse, was languid and disinclined for work or
play. He and Miles used to spend whole
days lying on the veranda at The Nook, whilst
Mr. Heron, very lenient with respect to
lessons on these hot days, mounted specimens,
made diagrams, or wrote for old Mr. Margetson,
in the cool, shaded drawing-room. Miss
Virginia declared, laughingly, that they used
Winde merely for board and shelter by
night; but she liked to have them with her.
Piers said, one day, that she had grown
prettier and jollier this summer. The smile
. came even more readily to her lip, and the
dancing light to her eyes. She was not
a beauty and never would be, but there was
something about her more winning than mere
beauty of colour and outline. It was the
irresistible charm of a great pleasure in every-
thing that lived and breathed. She enjoyed
every hour because she made the most of

it—not for herself, but for others.
In the Bonny North Country. 119

Mr. Heron had never visited Oykel before,
and upon Piers and Miss Margetson fell
the task of introducing him to the rugged
picturesqueness of the place. Lady Margetson
had -no taste for exploration, but she was
always ready to welcome the wanderers, to
stroll along the golf-links with them, or to sing
to them in the long summer gloaming. She
could not tell stories like Miss Virginia, but
she had the most delightful way of reading
aloud, and the most charming capacity for
listening to others.

‘“‘T wish we always lived at Oykel, mother,”
Piers said, one evening, as he lay on the
veranda, with his dark head in her lap.
““T don’t feel as though I ever want to go away
from the dear place.”

Lady Margetson coloured in the twilight,
and two tears stood in her eyes. She under-
stood what lay below the simple words, and

they went to her heart. She remembered the
120 Master Piers.

time when her baby-boy had been the joy of
her life. Nothing seemed more delightful than
to wile away the day in attendance upon him.
Then came the great sorrow of her life, and
Piers, because he had his father’s smile, and
his father’s odd, abrupt ways, would not allow
her to forget it. She was beginning to see,
now, that-it was a mistake to want to forget.
The wound would have sooner ceased to ache,
and she would yet have had the memory.
When we have lost a great happiness, which
we know we shall some day regain, the
memory of it is a bridge between.

Lady Margetsom had tried to drown memory
in a whirl of pleasures and gaieties, and she
was beginning to see that she was in danger
of losing something no less precious than
memory, the first place in the heart of her
little son. With a pang she discovered, that,
much as he loved her, it was to Miss Virginia

or to Mr. Heron he turned when he wanted


In the Bonny North Country. 120

help. Even a question which required
consideration, or was difficult to answer, was
addressed to them.

She knew, too, that all her efforts to forget,
and her resolve to be happy, had not brought
her the genuine gladness which was Miss
Virginia’s portion. The words of a great
writer came back to her mind: “ He who says,
I will be happy, will never be truly happy at
all. Happiness is picked up by those who are
_ stooping to gather the simple duties which
lie about our feet.’’ After all, she had been
making a mistake, happily it was not too
late to remedy it. Piers had wished that they
might always stay at Oykel; his mother,
silently, resolved that the happiness he enjoyed
there should thrive also at Winde. Never,
never more should he be lonely wanting her.
She would teach him to need her, just as she,
herself, was learning how much she needed
him. The danger in which he had stood,
122 Master Piers.

whilst she was away from him, had shown her
unsuspected depths in her own heart.

“Tf he had died!” she said, one day, to
Miss Virginia, tenderly exaggerating Piers’
danger. ‘I should always feel that I had
betrayed a trust.”

‘Yes, he is a trust, Gracia, none can do for
him what you can,’’ Miss Virginia replied,
softly.

‘It’s an odd thing for me to come to you to
teach me to be a better mother, Virgie,”
Lady Margetson said, sighing. ‘It seems to
me that you have always trodden a path which
I have, somehow, missed ; and happiness, real
happiness lies along that path. Piers’ father
trod it, and in losing him I lost his help too.”

Virginia kissed her. ‘It is the simplest
thing, dear, really,” she said, gently. ‘‘‘ Live
pure, speak true, right wrong, follow the King.
Else wherefore born?’ ‘That’s the secret; it

includes everything.”
In the Bonny North Country. 123

Lady Margetson thought over all these
things as she sat with Uncle Cornelius in the
little garden, whilst the others walked or rowed,
or went out with the fishing boats. The
cottage was near the tiny harbour, where the
boys were never tired of watching the fishermen
coming and going, the landing and packing of
the shining harvest of the sea, and the in-
rushing of the tide, which swept in a narrow
channel, hidden in the sand, between rocks
and sharp crags. Tiny as the place was, the
bustle and stir of the harbour were exciting
after the seclusion of Winde. The boys soon
made friends among the fisher-folk, whose
cottages lined the steep bank on the opposite
side of the harbour. Perhaps chief among
them was the old lighthouse-keeper, who was
never so happy as when explaining to his
small ‘friends the wonders of his eyrie on
the rocks.

-Caxton often exclaimed over their browned
124 Master Piers.

faces, roughened hands, andenormous appetites.
Miles looked a very ugly duckling in his blue
velvets, which now only saw the light of day
on Sundays, and Caxton sympathised in
advance with his mother. But, no doubt,
Mrs. Newington would be only too pleased to :
see the little boy looking so unusually robust.
Caxton, in fact, saw nothing much to admire
in the grassy bents which the sea had thrown
up as a barrier against its own encroachments ;
in the miles of sand on which white-crested
waves chased one another, or in the banks of
hills on the northern horizon, on which was
a soft purple bloom as of a grape. ‘‘ Give me
something more green and restful,” she’said.
‘“‘ Everything here is ashift and moving.”

The others were not quite as glad to say
‘‘good-bye”’ to Oykel as Caxton seemed, when
the holidays came to an end and Miles’ mother
was once more at home and wanting her
laddie.
In the Bonny North Country. 125

They had to take their last look at the sea
and harbour and go speeding southward. |

But, somehow, that couple of months at
Oykel seemed to cut the old life from a new
one upon which Master Piers, Lady Margetson,

Virginia, and Mr. Heron entered. The first

chapter of the little boy’s life was closed.

Things were never quite as they had been
before. ‘‘ Better, a thousand times,” Piers said,
though he had to work harder, since Mr. Heron
was preparing him for the public school to
which he must go in a year or so. The
difference lay in this, that his mother had
come to mean more in his life. There was
still the coming and going of guests, the callers,
and picnic parties, but Lady Margetson was
oftener at Winde, and Piers knew, though no
one told him, that he was always first in her
thoughts.

“Did you find out when you heard that

man might have killed me?” he once asked,






126 Master Piers.

sure that his mother would understand what it

was he felt she had ‘“‘ found out.”
“Ves, I found out then that God and your

father had trusted me with a treasure, and

?

I was guarding it carelessly,” she answered,
solemnly. j

“They'll be awfully pleased with you now,
dear,” Piers whispered, coiling his arm round
her waist, and pressing his round, brown
cheek comfortably against her shoulder. She
had such a lot of time for these talks now. It
was a shame that people should have kept her
so busy all those years!

This pre-occupation of Master Piers with
his mother gave Mr. Heron time to help old
Mr. Margetson, considerably, with the great
book. It turned out that the young man,
too, had a liking for natural history, and had
passed his Bachelor of Science examination
with distinction. In fact, the pursuit of the

science was one of the dreams he had had
In the Bonny North Country. 127

to put by, when a big commercial failure
compelled him to sacrifice his position and
the old home, that his father’s name might
stand untarnished before the world.

The Nook became almost like another home
to him, so often was he there, and when, a little
later, a distant relative left him an income
large enough to take up his old position, no
one was surprised that he should ask Miss
Virginia to share it.

“Tt was the very jolliest thing that could
happen,” Master Piers declared. He had
cherished gloomy forebodings lest he should
lose Mr. Heron altogether, when he went to
school. ‘‘And you are going to build a wing
to The Nook, mother says, that is jollier still,

for



,’ he stopped and looked away with
a rising colour. ‘‘I am so glad that you will
be at hand to give me the tip if I’m not
acting up to what fits a Margetson of Winde.

Mothers get so fond of one, you know, that
128 Master Piers.

they don’t see little things that spoil all one
wants to do.”

Mr. Heron smiled as he looked at the
square, resolute, boyish face, growing, day
by day, more like that of the old priest in
the gallery, ‘the ugliest of the set,” as
Lady Margetson had once said, but yet
inferior to none in point of strength and
nobility.

““T don’t fear for you, my boy,” he said,
proudly. ‘Fear for yourself with a manly
fear, and, if you want a motto, take Aunt
Virginia’s; you want no better, any more
than did the knights of King Arthur’s Round
Table:

“Live pure, speak true, right wrong, follow the King,
Else wherefore born ?’”

FLETCHER AND SON, PRINJERS, NORWICH.




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Duchess Renee. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s. 6d.

Soul Echoes: or Reflected Influence. Cloth,
gilt edges, 2s. :

Eleanor’s Ambition. Cloth, Is. 6d.

Blind Olive: or, Dr. Greyville’s Infatuation.
Cloth, 1s. 6d.

Waiting. Cloth, 9d.
Archer’s Chance Shot. Cloth, 9d.

By JAMES BAILEY.
Sunday School Teaching. Cloth, 1s. 6d.

By ASHTON NEILL.

Wild Lottie and Wee Winnie. Cloth, 3s.

Melissa’s Victory. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s:; cloth, plain
edges, 2s. 6d.

By CAROLINE RIGG.

How Mrs. Hewett’s House was turned
out of Window, and other Temperance Stories.
Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Little Black Rover. Cloth, 94.







2 anv 8 Lupe@aTE Circus BuiLpines, LONDON, E.c.




ROBERT CULLEY.



By EDITH RHODES.

Leighton Family. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s. 6d.; cloth,
plain edges, 2s,

Little Parables for Little Folks. Cloth, 9d.

Broughton Manor. Cloth, 4d.

By EDITH CORNFORTH.

A Woman’s Dilemma. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Bertha Wynchester. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, Is. 6d.

Hagar’s Reparation. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.

Ivy Chimneys. Cloth, 2s.

Stephen Blakemore’s Problem. Cloth, 1s.

By ANNA M. HELLIER.

Talks on the Catechism. Introductory Note by
Professor J. S. Banks. 2s.

In the Sunday School. Cloth, 1s.

By MARGARET HAYCRAFT.

Sunrise Corner. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain
edges, 1s. 6d.

Runnelbrook Valley. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, Is. 6d.
By Mrs. PERRETT.

Beyond the Boundary. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, 1s. 6d.





2 aND 3 LupGaTE Circus BuriLpines, LONDON, E.c.
























































































































































”)

(From ‘Little Parables for Little Folks,


ROBERT CULLEY.



By ANNIE M. YOUNG.

Into the King’s Palace. Cloth, 1s.

‘Doe no YII.” Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain
edges, 1s. 6d.

Scaramouch, and other Stories. Cloth, gilt
edges, 2s.; cloth, plain edges, 1s. 6d.

In Pawn: the Story of a Pledge. Cloth, 1s. 6d.

Chappie’s Charge Angel, &c. Cloth, 9d.

Jackalent. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s. ; cloth, plain edges, Is. 6d.

Crossing the Rainbow Bridge. Cloth, 6d.

By ISABEL S. ROBSON.
Two Little Sisters and Humphrey. Cloth,
gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain edges, 1s. 6d.
The Tempest Cousins. Cloth, 1s.
Life in Malin’s Lea. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Kavanagh Major. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain
edges, 1s. 6d.

Uncle Jock’s Little Girl. Cloth, 1s.

Fabian and Phil. Cloth, 9d.

That Odd Little Pair. Cloth, 9d.

Marjorie’s Stranger. Cloth, 9d.

By Rev. AMOS WHITE.
Sire and Son. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.

By ANNIE B. FOSKETT.

From under the Shadow. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s.
cloth, plain edges, 2s. 6d.





2 and 3 LupGaTrE Circus BuiLpines, Lonpon, E.c.




































































































































































































































































(From ‘‘ Under the Shadow.”)


ROBERT CULLEY.

By ELIZA KERR.
Two Saxon Maidens. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s. 6d.
Hazel Haldene. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.

Two Snowy Christmas Eves. Cloth, gilt
edges, 1s. 6d.

Kilkee. Cloth, 2s.
Mystery of Grange Drayton. Cloth, 1s. 6d.
Mignon’s Message. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s.

By OLIVER PACIS.

Arrows for Temperance Bows. Cloth, 2s.

Chips from a Temperance Workshop. Cloth,
Is. 6d.

Love and Victory: ‘Twenty-five Dialogues, &c.
Cloth, 1s.

By Rev. A. H. VINE.
Songs of Living Things. Cloth, 1s.

By JEANIE FERRY.

Maggie’s Life Work. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s. 6d.;
cloth, plain edges, 2s.

Chrissie’s Faults. Cloth, 1s.

Her Heart’s Desire. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, Is. 6d.

Love, the Conqueror. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s. 6d.;
cloth, plain edges, 2s.

By Dr. WITHROW.
A Victory and its Cost. Cloth, 2s.





2 anD 8 LupGatTE Circus Burtpines, Lonpon, £.c.












(From ‘ Love, the Conqueror,’’)






ROBERT CULLEY.

By ANNIE F, PERRAM.
By Doctor’s Orders. Cloth, gilt edges, 4s.; cloth,
plain edges, 3s. 6d. i

For John’s Sake. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain
edges, 1s. 6d. é

That Boy Mick. Cloth, 1s. 6d.

Lots of Time. Cloth, 1s.

Esther’s Craze. Cloth, 1s.

Little Jim’s Rescue. Cloth, 1s.

Little Miss Pry. Cloth, 9d.

Something to Do, please, &c. Cloth, 6d.

By LILLIE PETHYBRIDGE.
The Autobiography of Chow, the Chinese
dog. Cloth, 6d.

Tatters; and Jennie’s Schooldays. Cloth,
gilt edges, 1s. 6d.

By G. T. SEYMOUR.

The Wonderful Book; Twelve Reasons why the
Bible is the most Wonderful Book in the World. Cloth,
Is. 6d.

By Rev. H. H. Mec CULLAGH, B.A.

Harold and his Sisters in Norway. Cloth,
gilt edges, 1s. 6d.

By EMILY SPRATLING.

Winsome Winnie. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain
edges, 1s. 6d.

A Royal Mandate. Cloth, 1s.

Out of the Dark. Cloth, 9d.

The Morrison Family. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s. ; cloth,
plain edges, 2s. 6d.

2 4ND 3 LupeatE Circus BuILDINGs, LONDON, E.c.






ROBERT CULLEY.





By Rev. SAMUEL GREGORY.
Story of Christian: Life Pictures from the Pilgrim’s
Progress. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s. 6d.
Among the Roses. Sermons to Children. Cloth,
8s. 6d. ,

A String of Pearls. Daily Readings. Cloth, Is. 6d.

By ALICE J. BRIGGS.

The Scotch Girl’s Exile. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.;
cloth, plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Margaret Wattford. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth,
plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Donald’s Ambition. Cloth, 1s.

Grannie’s Darling. Cloth, ls.

Elise Fontaine. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s.

Ned’s Victory. Cloth, 94.

Fritz: the Young Swiss Guide. Cloth, 9d.
Isabelle’s Story. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s. 6d.; cloth, plain
edges, Is. ; ; :

Jim and his Charges. Cloth, 6d.

By W. J. FORSTER.

Twelve Famous Boys. Cloth, 1s.

The Wonderful Half-Crown. Cloth, 1s.
Little Folks at Kelverton Grange. Cloth, 1s.
In Solomon’s Porch. Cloth, 8d.

The Young Conspirators. Cloth, 8d.

Pitch and Toss. Cloth, 8d.



2 anp 3 Lupeate Circus Buripines, LONDON, E.c.






ROBERT CULLEY.





Lucky Carlo. Cloth, 8d.

Harry’s Rescue. Cloth, 8d.
Twelve Bible Children. Cloth, 8d.
A Knotty Point. Cloth, 8d.

The Old Plate’s Story. Cloth, 8d.; cloth, bevelled
boards, 1s.

Nelson Farm. Cloth, 8d.

Ella’s Christmas Letter. Cloth, 8d.
Voices from a Money Box. Cloth, 8d.
The White Mouse, &c. Cloth, 8d.

A Royal Letter. Cloth, 1s.

Animals in Council. Cloth, 1s.

By FLORENCE SPENSER.

Three School Girls. Cloth, 1s.
Lucy’s Temptation. Cloth, Is.

By EDITH GREEVES.

Banners and Battlefields. Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.;
cloth, plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Our Martha. Cloth, 1s. 6d.

Eric’s Hymn. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s.

By Professor J. AGAR BEET.

The Firm Foundation of the Christian
Faith, and Handbook of Christian Evidences. Cloth, 1s.

2 anD 3 Lupaate Cigcus Burtpines, Lonpon, E.c.






(From “Three School Girls.”’)


ROBERT CULLEY.

By Rev. J. J. ELLIS.

Mighty Men and their daring deeds. Cloth,
gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain edges, 1s. 6d.

Unframed Pictures, and other Addresses to Children.
Cloth, 1s. :

Take Fast Hold, and other Addresses to Children.
Cloth, 1s.

By EDITH M. EDWARDS.
The Children’s King. Cloth, 1s.

By KATE Mec CULLAGH.
Bertram and Gerald. Cloth, 9d.

By ANNIE CRAIG.
Mattie’s Rescue. Cloth, 9d,
Our Cousin Noel. Cloth, 9d.
Golden Deeds told anew. Cloth, 9d.

By BESSIE. MARCHANT.
Weasel Tim. Cloth, 1s.

By Rev. JOHN TELFORD, B.A.

Touching the Kettle, and other Addresses. Cloth,

gilt edges, 2s. 6d.’; cloth, plain edges, 2s.

By Rev. W. H. BOOTH, F.R.G.S.

Marjory Flint’s Latchkey, and other Stories.
Cloth, gilt edges, 2s.; cloth, plain edges, Is. 6d.





VA.

2 and 3 LupGaTE Circus Buitpines, Lonpon, E.c. -



Ws
























































































































































































(From ‘‘ Mighty Men and their daring deeds.’’)


ROBERT CULLEY.



By HELEN BRISTON.

It’s my Nature. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s. -6d.; cloth, :

plain edges, 1s.
Ladyboy’s Story. Cloth, 6d.
Ned’s Helper. Cloth, 6d.

By LILLIE MONTFORT.

Broken Purposes. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s. 6d.
Meadow Daisy. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s.
Luther Miller’s Ambition. Cloth, gilt edges, 1s.

By BETH RICHARDSON.
The Ruby Necklet. Cloth, 1s.

By ANNIE M. LAINSON.
Fine Herbs. Cloth, 6d.

By Rev. Wm. ALLEN (C).
The Village Reciter. Paper covers, 6d.

By Rev. J. J. INGRAM.

Self Improvement for Young Men. Leatherette
cover, 6d.

be Salad al OT |
THE
OLD PLATE’S STORY.

By WM. J. FORSTER.
mle ete Eo ate tate 1 Ot ate he

Cloth, 8d.; or bevelled cloth, 1s.














2 anp 3 Lupa@atEe Circus Burnpines, LONDON, E.c.



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'3037392' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQOY' 'sip-files00006.tif'
debff5fc39087e1877822e9a4079d0cb
2160b61387e36b69c840e3af022c4ac4d8c0ece5
'2011-12-29T05:05:42-05:00'
describe
'94' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQOZ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
31194b526ca1e8e3cde808686771355d
e0314d6df30dd905ab88a4edbdf74785933f7ec8
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'11413' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPA' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
f97079ca2521ec315a8a962c6912f3b7
984d3ae8f34ca86869915c716b7660b11549cb2f
'2011-12-29T05:08:27-05:00'
describe
'369415' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPB' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7e7dc9607d3d4fb37c5f66f745a543cf
4961bca8bee8f9d98976023ea1b686aa0e242fae
'2011-12-29T05:05:52-05:00'
describe
'52177' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPC' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
6f71505f1c4feacecb17a89f7c19b68e
414a6d36396768edf99086d0d04028e2f0b4efa0
'2011-12-29T05:08:00-05:00'
describe
'7631' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f92d85f21f27013d1961e008a81825ce
b22d038972eb9483bd6d90f418c8993a2df88c5a
'2011-12-29T05:06:54-05:00'
describe
'14395' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
6ba18aa3a62f2323012e90dc5138e388
95850271af7f5689415dbc91b693f7dd43a18d6f
'2011-12-29T05:08:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPF' 'sip-files00007.tif'
3fa3f8b8ca6d8d3dc7c736df59252a12
6e0db0b559af300b1fd3aa5f6b201fc2b19cf7a5
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPG' 'sip-files00007.txt'
a9f36508d98fd4abf4c8a67a76721b5d
f3a1a0607a75b8c284421d429d1a9a0c967ebf92
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'4066' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPH' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
597be2c276bdf3ccf5e82ca547e12a2a
8434acb5aa1d57a7533c0df3b18d2cfa3e4feb58
describe
'375546' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPI' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3b529e4391ac8897c135ef2464e76090
6a8da2f4027e328c819707d5dc7768e42df973f8
'2011-12-29T05:05:30-05:00'
describe
'42621' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPJ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
1a6e1467e99c4d9dad43a7229bd70aaf
a772e2547ede7762945c0d813f66b5c5553c9ddf
'2011-12-29T05:10:44-05:00'
describe
'11151' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPK' 'sip-files00009.pro'
6c1b21ba73d93c5c6f2cef114325c6f4
e1c29ed319dd087ac47f79429bede844caf056d2
'2011-12-29T05:10:04-05:00'
describe
'12017' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPL' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
935416a800f370f6021f2dc68f2b84fe
5f85805b9a4448fa95f97f056738f61727280c99
'2011-12-29T05:09:57-05:00'
describe
'3024432' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPM' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ea0d2973f10527c6a689308d27b0753b
bd754bc14ff52f60989f5635f71fc25778992664
'2011-12-29T05:09:44-05:00'
describe
'623' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPN' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0f6ecb86d0160c24f8a53f0375b06997
4a384f1f4238609251106749b440a9641458bbd1
'2011-12-29T05:05:46-05:00'
describe
'3795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPO' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
db177df7cf4a3a4e9f97f3648a108ce3
f8b344c68505edc7b70e2f9bcab77603008ea29d
'2011-12-29T05:10:01-05:00'
describe
'360562' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPP' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
66201411bc821dfc37cd33978e825514
e58fed5a72692aedba041f85c8fff8d6ab5c90cb
'2011-12-29T05:08:56-05:00'
describe
'101984' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
40ab08c081c7aed07597d203c52a95bc
062ec1fd93a373e1ba3664e32b31a1820e607f6e
'2011-12-29T05:08:26-05:00'
describe
'11067' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPR' 'sip-files00011.pro'
83d9a13f51801f99793fb09a29773534
ff03e0736b791a02d6c51921847a59a794e3ffda
'2011-12-29T05:06:17-05:00'
describe
'27530' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPS' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
b434145a0bdf7451505a8b1b0ca78fc5
5ecb8d254639c2a6f0e05667ebf6ce919ae96ff1
'2011-12-29T05:07:32-05:00'
describe
'2903472' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPT' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e960dfbc7a1fc62b4fd04642300211ab
5481240d01ce5c2849253ff04ae7a39b49cf440b
'2011-12-29T05:06:05-05:00'
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPU' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c7e74fcae1283e131ace65e966ed9a6e
c907748d76e540b19628bc8dcbc2570808878167
'2011-12-29T05:09:32-05:00'
describe
'7541' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPV' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
86f83a4d4a5c53bf45d15cb4b4f2c4a5
dc20a6eaafacc2b6ac74b4fda21180692dafd82a
'2011-12-29T05:07:08-05:00'
describe
'388899' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
17f0ef41c04a0c2a2c9b335a96478199
62f9ea864e0f64b1983adf132234001064743e3e
'2011-12-29T05:09:39-05:00'
describe
'111052' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPX' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b809cd475b69c47142cc35c869f40b42
f26cbcdc822184cca4722fde3857302b6722198b
'2011-12-29T05:08:28-05:00'
describe
'23737' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPY' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5102be4ecd07463a15be0c6fab63d40d
832c87e1bea5fbd4308737d7397608e9cd0f68aa
'2011-12-29T05:10:29-05:00'
describe
'32952' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQPZ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b4f23aba3c7a4b35cd61c0d7935d8f7a
6d8e4a65a9efd2e014b904db80f5034cf7fdf5f2
'2011-12-29T05:09:18-05:00'
describe
'3128112' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQA' 'sip-files00012.tif'
182bbe833a1df75dffe20a1a2b80f745
9dac5a8c831d6aa094735a7cf22322ccbee2bba0
'2011-12-29T05:10:43-05:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQB' 'sip-files00012.txt'
0976e295037afc35a7a532d1355dfa34
c8005187ff6a06d5433bc90c2951abfa168ddb0e
'2011-12-29T05:10:38-05:00'
describe
'8655' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQC' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
628c8534ecc6bd35cbc3d1b41b0c0aa5
6c4f0e1bb6135fe4aaac30bdd9d2564ed361a395
'2011-12-29T05:06:45-05:00'
describe
'372706' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQD' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a1c3108e36edd8e6674617677e29833c
ad5fad585d74e8e00234458401a582f22b992370
'2011-12-29T05:08:03-05:00'
describe
'112399' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQE' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c0a7d1d52de5a3370f2be9dbc9453e86
35a5841803233a5b7e1f36c8aca80e31c70fbb62
'2011-12-29T05:07:16-05:00'
describe
'21982' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQF' 'sip-files00013.pro'
7e64145912a966a60ef16721ef845f26
7a26251f63970935a57788afbe35869c1bb518eb
'2011-12-29T05:07:30-05:00'
describe
'33340' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
006488d68cd362add21abc77862372ba
180145c1f22f4790ce6be74bcc57f3f27ae60577
'2011-12-29T05:07:39-05:00'
describe
'2998512' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQH' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bb9b2784c4aa92af58162449a28bff52
55e988d21c1b5fb41e6c016040ca64c9338851a3
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQI' 'sip-files00013.txt'
935a634a57f5b0eb11e93b05a2ed6723
2718f33253193d0a66c17e36267b65fd52640268
describe
'8857' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQJ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
4ddca0251051f83d5315a4a6420a3485
865a874f06a9b33953038d4b1889cc870a24037e
'2011-12-29T05:08:14-05:00'
describe
'388898' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQK' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
10a612a71c1f90911296dae3967257f3
44f8adf5f1b9b2ec8777ada9d3aec482e4eee3cd
'2011-12-29T05:10:06-05:00'
describe
'101362' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQL' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
9b5c6153e6627ecc19de9337dbf4961c
3070196a6f81ab6c431697751fd2975de4d7c404
'2011-12-29T05:09:58-05:00'
describe
'22493' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
92e7a7c2ef88e635b48f404a1f9fa7ad
8399b3cf21a7812a621b4f24e94984b7f1b6ee32
'2011-12-29T05:10:42-05:00'
describe
'31592' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
1b17d82c95711a5c687732e962c0cdc1
587743716727d64d3984922b0214249e661de7f6
'2011-12-29T05:07:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQO' 'sip-files00014.tif'
ffd7cf75b77988c512b226b2edfb724f
55379ce5f9b203cb7e9581322cab9dd06630e345
'2011-12-29T05:06:03-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
c3da74ddb35458299980c1aa7ae5881d
d68b83829f35703b6412290c9b242b2b058c0bac
'2011-12-29T05:06:00-05:00'
describe
'8285' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
66782303f7b030d11184204b61c559f7
e5f77fa8c5197d2ed81fb6adeaf23f37fa6405d0
'2011-12-29T05:06:57-05:00'
describe
'388847' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f83584a479ab72ffc74e06fa66024285
2680a3a146f960b3b3e754a9e6201b26b8be836e
'2011-12-29T05:08:37-05:00'
describe
'102799' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
2f3a669dd0a722a6ec15c1725177740c
249e810bc78c10a323df1bd3bde4b36cc808f8f6
'2011-12-29T05:06:31-05:00'
describe
'21823' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQT' 'sip-files00015.pro'
58f4ee58e7c469e24e912950af764dc6
dc4cd67797ff2a742671be31a0863a8fcae2277a
describe
'31480' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7d0158f134d07f5dc024f70d3fe92b03
9d56f8edc8995d782e8d2f25c847a7d5ab9d7ea1
'2011-12-29T05:07:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
eb085d31a03dbeb7861c5cc9e7c92c76
5bd76facfe77ca257ec99134843fc567dd780bad
'2011-12-29T05:10:32-05:00'
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
47047429729f4f71ae634d0eeff84db3
aa6d9b5574fbb611e479a6e99721d1331c612160
'2011-12-29T05:10:18-05:00'
describe
'8897' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
cf4b896faefd0a58355b8d04684d0f9e
d9a93093f776868e3d400a7cb88a95aafa072c16
describe
'388699' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7811ee4b67bdd0bb4d592dce35a5e272
1578b840c7134198262c7d26fcbfb9ddd0c94db7
'2011-12-29T05:08:51-05:00'
describe
'101456' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQQZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
05f6a0f36f586c3d30c15dc674ff5ecd
c221a6b4362b6e410ac75b8073b01080e0c572f0
'2011-12-29T05:07:51-05:00'
describe
'22135' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
429fb1a3ca4082fe65cad00ad2dafb52
8d8de54fd065ebe7ce9d38968713ba6edf4ddd4e
'2011-12-29T05:07:17-05:00'
describe
'31436' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7caca0571829169ab320eb5a79294df2
9e34666c5d99f4c7dceb8eb8540f6a201600e81d
'2011-12-29T05:08:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
805a261a383cef1c35742bc628bf9e22
ff8402c2f9f385b6c26666bcc113334a7ed2663b
'2011-12-29T05:06:50-05:00'
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
9504bafdc94bdc5da6fcea7d1dc462ef
d3f4a47543c649237b962aaf782b0367e1eb5ad4
'2011-12-29T05:06:46-05:00'
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7af8e02998df38be17c0970e81034d13
2aa41808a2ea789f4f44bd5acb547a7bf1ab3baf
'2011-12-29T05:05:58-05:00'
describe
'377389' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
7f87bdce5b4dd7fa4c5c83a6ec581399
a2a7597c58b5e92906d3676dce40b7335255cde3
'2011-12-29T05:09:53-05:00'
describe
'100930' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
fa18a05621d2137d6da1892a047b234c
17c6eee24c7c839d71e92f7e3b15ec1b28dabc65
'2011-12-29T05:07:10-05:00'
describe
'21253' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
7eac74d3a8ce8610da2d18eccf289e2d
4343bb4e1c37e1bde541b6b8a50098e6138e08cb
'2011-12-29T05:08:42-05:00'
describe
'31490' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b8405705625e383319990b83e8921a28
f003fde9eceae05d1f2791e8979788f5207c0b59
'2011-12-29T05:06:02-05:00'
describe
'3037736' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9458593b4d24f06c0cb991aa573c3ea3
206a7570305dbd7ca48cc23cd24a77452567514f
'2011-12-29T05:06:01-05:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6863fe0d28b1130eef37b53565357c66
6c92c2a635b147eebde08c031290ebdeedf04649
'2011-12-29T05:08:31-05:00'
describe
'8334' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
ee2ad514013f4f986f0b7950c1923830
dc0b1f2fd9b2d94370e9c67b4c78fbac2f90aac7
describe
'388911' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8562e48ca05b7d9f8e1f320c8b21a06b
ca0820bfcac4d2d77e58a9eceaca4cfd378a5bb2
'2011-12-29T05:07:44-05:00'
describe
'102127' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
899fb11b2c146429530bc5c9b481ade5
dc5a8381623167dee7321c2d57974667f50a38f3
describe
'22695' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
892f2da19ca3701e74020af2218dbcb4
ebc613e79b72d3ba00f26735f7748e5b8932ba02
describe
'31627' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e06aaca87471435c7d0dd082fe4e4e4f
ef54af8a46b1a0fae005b2ca1cd4cfad7ffd27e5
'2011-12-29T05:06:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9095912e148915c8359bb1834b4ebf20
c4b4d0d9f69a9d8e14bfbe29d23577ccf8b9dac6
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
17a923204f52f5d6d3e04e43a4aa2334
5ffb0112356bea91a38129b691e9e094b838bb0c
'2011-12-29T05:07:26-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8011' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7e2848e92b0ad394134b51b60b8f7a50
107c1bbd3271a994c9d2c7c621863fc07f4341ec
'2011-12-29T05:06:20-05:00'
describe
'385668' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
86bc12ea199281b64f4a82e89d8d4e0c
3a848dd30c25796e81896b8a27bf0951a25e45b4
describe
'103615' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ad0d2647ff55aac4bfa60a839d44224a
312464c168d95e976a4e92045e29a97c0332f37a
'2011-12-29T05:07:47-05:00'
describe
'22713' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
2aa847989206dad3f55585e02e98b995
4381a58883acfac9634902e6a1c523a43ae5d695
'2011-12-29T05:07:03-05:00'
describe
'32288' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
bd3cbbbf452a42482af6b7c7e37ce1fe
25c1032c28d05288076a16b100d1781e964ce98f
'2011-12-29T05:06:56-05:00'
describe
'3102192' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ee06292f75692dcc123f95fd5e9f4517
514430d1a75e4020e7e50aaca66ecaf0ffe65082
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
faea5d0e650edecd1220e5451f3abbbd
9978ba0cb982c5c30af123c33163bea8aacd40a6
describe
'8684' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQRZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8a5ceb95352d2610f1438aef4a6e8a85
6e2f69b0999ce5cb08fcff85b6ee997f2207b168
'2011-12-29T05:07:22-05:00'
describe
'379162' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d558eabd9f905caa7a47280b7bde917a
19133964b4301b2dbea6210e2e900135c1e67d55
'2011-12-29T05:07:45-05:00'
describe
'108419' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
607f4ce0ffe489476d526a7d5fdfce47
48c484b13d98e0d0e67ed7bf4c1100bb7e934363
'2011-12-29T05:08:05-05:00'
describe
'23527' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
6fa059292a76a9623d7df17bedbc6660
e011b7776fb2129ef0876dc111faa691d1332f05
describe
'33784' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
fe8c0452f0c2250da32b548e3296bbff
bd4f3502de4a35fd2b370b82b1a93fcbd3b76752
'2011-12-29T05:09:19-05:00'
describe
'3050352' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c0fa4a741889842163468420bf901f6e
c067166ccfb6281d289de8954d508600526d36e0
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
250c77e4efb5f70511d1c1555897f9da
a9cbb583309193fef5feb84076ad94baaed4e6bf
'2011-12-29T05:09:59-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8781' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
d3a63a57a577835df71fb87d867275a9
5b8ec33578e6e14bf8acbd21673c42ad4918879b
'2011-12-29T05:08:36-05:00'
describe
'371049' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
706334de9b1ea8606dba5b121965d15b
58808b13e33d463d0358a98efa467717b2e38fd1
'2011-12-29T05:10:15-05:00'
describe
'111314' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
8f88a4c34e0e376f9ce95ee6a1f4ffc9
dbcadae9245ecd01a880fec42b7728c20cd0f5c0
describe
'23436' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
92709a8a45d35be780e1dfb4d51b0091
a363109bb5d3c3cc9245bbf8bdb0dc6c33de18dc
'2011-12-29T05:10:33-05:00'
describe
'34205' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
a8be4d696917536c9b36c6754497df6d
2f68d681495d663c9ec8c80267b6e0287215200d
describe
'2985552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
32d6bf85e8b88b20c8b033b670009b8e
b5aace1d319186597084160b35bf814c25c0009f
'2011-12-29T05:06:19-05:00'
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
8be362750640591fcca64c72c0dab10b
352fb59dff6e6a458df31ac321d17854c9a1b295
'2011-12-29T05:10:45-05:00'
describe
'9242' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
358affe96e21dc69a3ccd83c0eabc0f9
d2a11c678ca0f189a9a474bc68382778d396ed6b
'2011-12-29T05:09:43-05:00'
describe
'361050' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
7da980322797ebdd1c29e4d6bf5d19fe
07889a1a2cde53048963590c0989dce50dcf9dc4
describe
'109059' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
17a0357d5ec307e046977b330f940e25
cf7772cec90c5fc97b77baf67f9b325f20675841
describe
'23646' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
38bece8d3b5e4991ef4b59cf8fe8c2b2
adfbde7cc384ace46d5b788a4337c7b1c9011433
'2011-12-29T05:10:37-05:00'
describe
'34003' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
59ca66ec55a9973bef02f1c03a632157
f12849d01caff15c50561325d0972ee7c5440a1b
describe
'2907792' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f5b956dc699da99cc74d8ef442fc7a7f
08242b511cb596d405f96c3c3c90b3156ba57b77
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQST' 'sip-files00022.txt'
10354822c549f7b2cfbc739da67f396e
835c964b573cb03255397a2ab53b71ceb152dd47
'2011-12-29T05:10:28-05:00'
describe
'9587' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
2ca0f94ad4301235782614880451d3bf
647ec4233f8f3ec8b1fc0d4541b50389c9c9aa09
'2011-12-29T05:09:55-05:00'
describe
'362978' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a343fdb02e134d63a7821add9ec4c9ca
cd34e0e1937560347dbcec9728e2591b3ab7a4cf
'2011-12-29T05:07:01-05:00'
describe
'107103' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e92581b015662075b1c7d89b2b5a68ae
c3b6e15cb9f04d6bbe043b887c236576dd8de8e5
'2011-12-29T05:09:52-05:00'
describe
'23554' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bb20a11df4d04e6a6bfe4fb10094fd64
c690c767801e26a33f773f872a468c38172629f9
'2011-12-29T05:07:13-05:00'
describe
'33413' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
876bf8337bb55462f938260b2edbbbf0
3c582442edcc937a404de97876152ffefa062f78
describe
'2920752' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQSZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
87cae810ceb736dd96b5a69b2cfc8347
13cc924755850983fa331fe67034b07121754085
'2011-12-29T05:10:40-05:00'
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
2c1d3de8cafb4de121b658aed1009267
42290908e8c831e14b80eb3148ebbbd223f87ccb
'2011-12-29T05:06:53-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8884' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
da434c180458332f5a5a97e7edf6775f
05a00f172274ab9979076dc0754c7e4857e6988a
'2011-12-29T05:08:07-05:00'
describe
'384037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ca7af86938b3b015ea2e203ea9d4d143
2f9ed6b24788b1dc19a98995b14ebda81ecb291d
describe
'55635' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
ae9388e2fd59b726f6390de35921653d
149e95ac5f7f5ef1806573d1a947cee30e72556a
'2011-12-29T05:06:40-05:00'
describe
'6338' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
2e40d7f57a5b696749bf92b0d965cf64
79b4fb93e62182db4dc802e8816ab5bf1c7ec0d6
'2011-12-29T05:08:12-05:00'
describe
'14089' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
7f34844a8756627cd56624b0f84e9142
40d9a4274a2052b6cd4ac39cf7387e8b7f1d3e2d
describe
'3089232' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a840fde2dc5b152715adf8f317b4f5aa
3a67b3705cf8b0f81dfbab9d208bdc346e636387
'2011-12-29T05:09:24-05:00'
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
16e45b35f8faf9e84dfa645d6b67b448
c515c531b8f5b04064b4da6058c4a4ac9bd18a3b
'2011-12-29T05:06:48-05:00'
describe
'3741' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
53d4b5f0d6c5697b383d90d225ba9588
29ed32572362fbb9cd3e8ffe9ad22fb8a253f9c0
describe
'388890' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8189db31ce118656764c647a02e5bec0
4624586416e06c7a304fef900949aa6cd83320f2
describe
'109809' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4ffced43704e7d00657fa6410cf07356
549693493b6fef8016cf2c54e53c5398a354100c
'2011-12-29T05:07:41-05:00'
describe
'14252' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
41626e13c08a53d13265971015a7e5d7
dfa1c2b83b422e106dc71dad70d195728e12e954
'2011-12-29T05:06:52-05:00'
describe
'29246' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
b7bf1bcacceff951994c83a499a2ac81
1a194a22e430ef5fbd3a7662a98bc7d422369482
'2011-12-29T05:09:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
324aa4a91905cf86bab000a9a4651931
47435fc40157101f5f26b33df3f19b6ab398a26f
'2011-12-29T05:07:11-05:00'
describe
'548' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
346b27c85e99fef8754a0d2dc0c902dc
1862dde6afa2270d61a2e8d97db0b42eaaa00b4a
describe
'7376' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6746624b3de83ce85dec98e250b892b3
9bcfd40a79578b4ef27e5f9126ae5e2d23f1e695
describe
'388883' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
78953f8163dd9aeb92b03c6335c3bf1e
e6f94901544a4f9744c0d08bac285e09c8e97ac8
'2011-12-29T05:06:32-05:00'
describe
'106359' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b85b2848677896483cc2ce84a6dff54b
aa37f806b751d0dae007917305d525dfda259682
describe
'24201' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
53c4ff753c8344b58ff917031a741ff4
ae75aa747eff01083d20430e3761cde3decf31d7
'2011-12-29T05:06:29-05:00'
describe
'32223' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e92497c528c8af58daf62f88a3dbfb25
44e601c9cb1b7dcf11d24e19d58ed92ae9885bdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4d9aa83a80b71168a98d521ae6360688
04c9c91fa9b0e0ee1fae70c238b1066308666746
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d0dd7428492ccdf8b1d2d5a4c48d7c36
fb6fde065e99f7633f12c4a435528dd89a9eabe3
'2011-12-29T05:09:50-05:00'
describe
'8671' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f94ea878ebbaeda71c9f2e8f95ab09de
5220b3a722e575368037a07a3cb5ad2ac6897625
'2011-12-29T05:09:38-05:00'
describe
'388910' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bfe12c5a2919995c2579883ef126134b
2e632122db71ec74ebd623cb68263922625a77dd
describe
'102258' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1a729f24a074f438535a436887499ffb
616b06487f666ae78f6964072333338b7045ac09
'2011-12-29T05:06:30-05:00'
describe
'23518' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQTZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
50fa9d4d3a78abb77a60fbb1735877f7
d3a2300f311301e559587d33728fa05e8b3a49cd
'2011-12-29T05:07:54-05:00'
describe
'31173' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
eda458c5624be8818b55d16fcfb00494
b9d6e86572a8f3faa2a64e224107342bf1d71352
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3fd460abb64268c0a3b9c16237878fbf
ac1c592b939c3ef18121e9be0bbd2b515817dfbf
'2011-12-29T05:09:29-05:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
383b66f335af4746c729ca37f3a4df5b
f2c4a51a12a1927bd0d7f0a0f4c254345fde2f96
'2011-12-29T05:08:11-05:00'
describe
'7964' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c702d24c2f26d7716cd320931c1b1080
56ae1d9a728e44a729e7e329d7d4d229ce167538
'2011-12-29T05:08:50-05:00'
describe
'382395' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
258ac606c29c0fbc23ba8252c4e3b6f8
7918ac6b8c91cc3da8de35faf982443c02aa3d6b
'2011-12-29T05:08:43-05:00'
describe
'95451' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e84443d02a633d248912b0d2b05c164b
029e7c05182d91b200f16959973aad4185282e51
'2011-12-29T05:08:30-05:00'
describe
'21485' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0df6274e0ccd9426e793284c35dd1d73
740df9041efa6942e76f74019cfd7b6ba75d6e4d
describe
'29004' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7be81220894cb2c741b37a3eb37b88ea
1f6d54c451bcada386d0e0415ba51dfac4239b9d
'2011-12-29T05:09:16-05:00'
describe
'3076272' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
89e6798e294c47f70cce58dce3d7c5f4
20495c5dc9eacf86120806044897565a295dc784
'2011-12-29T05:10:12-05:00'
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
4417ff7cd32417d579a78ab02d167cb1
3e13b0b4e0fd41ae66e60f95d26a139185375003
'2011-12-29T05:10:02-05:00'
describe
'7980' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
b946b311e46776974d19eca1ea2ec111
4d3db1230707efd65a3f2bf9288a5ccad56231a6
'2011-12-29T05:06:28-05:00'
describe
'379173' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
760604e9c83749b04c4dc3283b2f5827
dabbc692ad1893a88c0b8de95bfc0e029301463a
'2011-12-29T05:10:20-05:00'
describe
'108688' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f3d987337e256ee66e052f97ef9ab22d
2bd88a9a49c56e0bfbbcd388c391ca0816476612
'2011-12-29T05:08:54-05:00'
describe
'24222' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ad6089f3b0278002a492f8f0b8286926
81f3cfb5e1aa9312c9c8b657a5587ee5c4e08307
'2011-12-29T05:08:18-05:00'
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c5c3d69796a999b044f66d0a5d205937
3cd34ede6304e1922d5857847358d7a247c2bf3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a83955aa64fdc01b11164fcc48eb3a41
d190c095be78e26990155649f80f6b033bd6e176
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
b075106c028988e4415bf92cf81000cc
4e416f846771769ca65b9ce1b7c70f6a311a9f54
'2011-12-29T05:07:06-05:00'
describe
'8665' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
2710ea620e57d21305dcc94701a81493
5a0a160a632bbd76e9d04fb51b1f0b32f9ab6745
'2011-12-29T05:05:36-05:00'
describe
'372678' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
87c3840000d11f6dfc9a21bf02ed7b66
1ffe6b3ef2aeb53c9ed03647c7b5b9261978c875
describe
'107076' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
47502c78ad51731be3eec1386e4556b4
57418fc21fb9a855ffce6ebb17096b7eab930c1a
'2011-12-29T05:07:09-05:00'
describe
'22040' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c8a9408afc2f28034f0d105c53cb3ed9
2bd6060a576b25e6dd43b97d9ce685923f7020ce
describe
'32208' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0640b9e8eaeec21071012f8c6cde983d
2f5ea10c980c3a7a7f768395ece10473e060acf5
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
fe618e5a142ad8554e486c5747a0136e
9ae23151076ae6e1725dba2ef8d4e66b2348bae0
'2011-12-29T05:07:02-05:00'
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
cb823f75d0f341cdd826e3330c94bb5d
cbf42d69e0c036528d4e2ba35c00818b09721aaf
describe
'8922' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1e39794e3f540620287b742707354c00
4eda4c81f5583ccd84c385063fc20d1404008a62
'2011-12-29T05:09:46-05:00'
describe
'382409' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQUZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
dff5ed92b45df0bd76a7dd4114a41d1e
fc5cd3360449932928cb0879b016211f71e05e07
'2011-12-29T05:05:50-05:00'
describe
'116181' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
a6c69f33b3be46057e33cf31a20bf1ba
9d6ed5078091ab7ff78deebbf2ab811f8bd09de0
describe
'24929' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
dd077c52c0cc5b7c08192c7621277d79
891cc8717823a18c5939127f73dae12d80e7f4d3
'2011-12-29T05:09:09-05:00'
describe
'35037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
eb257cee2ee794ed578352b3ea9c4cfb
ef69c634f5801210a7d400c4feab343a9bdfd780
'2011-12-29T05:08:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
cfc95bfd0ce89181b6dadb3587fa586e
a050d6e456eead6ec3da43ff8b40750863c66629
'2011-12-29T05:09:36-05:00'
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f820df2ea842b740809444a671c3ecb7
8cb7f00fb43817f7148979b577516c726a3b4077
describe
'9127' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
a7ddb4acc6eaf4a8392339e738baab56
3b364999279599fe1b295d30c21bae38a60e35b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
78df86b8be0bd32dd9d355b4ca32c05d
b9560741c21db523eab2acf3bf0330b9700de640
describe
'96342' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2767fefe7b5e4a2dcbd3d71596efe06c
932507bc5d9f2f475b570ad7f9bf42b2d97e12e6
'2011-12-29T05:08:39-05:00'
describe
'22028' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
f9c58c2e8e09f9e9b8e315dc11b9251c
d243596771a6c8708d73e28cfb394e48ced40b50
'2011-12-29T05:07:58-05:00'
describe
'28961' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d535ffe673e6e5a3d5a4905c3612bae3
3023ce3b93f916db834ff72ac3d4ec1b4e5322cb
'2011-12-29T05:06:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e5962e2e49920dae93e5705bcb7e842c
8b48826daabe36acf0bb962ede1eab4bbc53f19e
'2011-12-29T05:06:26-05:00'
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
3e88485a3b3d447bf09c40a14e021884
5754329b39ad0bc0676de200d591a70affe4fef2
'2011-12-29T05:10:39-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7826' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
82108dafbde8ec120f54cb187d6fbcc9
be8df2c5a03a21db1c9e005816ed3751cb85b1e6
describe
'388703' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ca8e1b8d337963419af2a41bb32f735b
e96fadf3a17628820462ab558cca1b57686cfb62
'2011-12-29T05:09:40-05:00'
describe
'106613' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
b5e5ec486066d1f46ffa768c8e9a04a0
54d9d09fc9993830be6979364ce7c39c650d557b
describe
'23948' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
113d7523a262cde1292522f0539831ec
f515a08ce3776ccc89059ee37d51a67f07bf2cb2
'2011-12-29T05:07:31-05:00'
describe
'32198' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
3304d8585b081143f835b13f81c5751c
568d3699a7fce0c78e6603e342df82277e902319
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9ef3c289247c726530c3360e989a5fbe
b68e5d2f99cebc90adc9bea227619db298940245
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0f791877b39e5d666b9ce9bddba3237f
69d848d981378521dbf7e977cdbe5e10de6e414a
describe
'9106' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5cd3022e75a860f9be8cd6d37dbc34c8
fe10e7162eb99828b7a01936197e207afc39af83
'2011-12-29T05:10:34-05:00'
describe
'388810' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
341a4c5ee153e848b00818cf6f2d4c82
a46b535628c6fd34574cf4400731b79d9c2ae190
'2011-12-29T05:09:11-05:00'
describe
'105445' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
74c365b23ef01059ce17398a52bdf4bf
7f686253c6f179d20ac1fc5b41edc74c138a3c14
describe
'24730' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
bcd3263a20ef86170f9c91d0a2fd9aa8
023ea833a3098c3c67ef2fa63db7e199ec2eaefa
describe
'32649' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
2dcee9ef67fc295347f4c223254d961d
bb82b69f08b25cd4b61f23245aef4bee5021ff01
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
153efa6e89b8daee03aa58d2f812d5fd
7af4c3c1a07e8653e3f3c04ee1e0f8b14ee38941
'2011-12-29T05:09:37-05:00'
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQVZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
b9831ba3420e884b7377c3e56cd36c40
803c514290d68069b5d132884d73c2a1928876f4
describe
'8326' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
4504e06ad46887b486a84cae0682c1dc
6c8669792e0a62a9683fd8f475529c7e8c7f39b8
describe
'374318' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
3a9d96ede53632ee9e2cfea9efc79fcc
d1f00b8931d2e3db166bb2e73b92c14e3f23e4e2
'2011-12-29T05:10:11-05:00'
describe
'115006' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
94591a190d55ae943a2188774e93b6f1
909fe775e44d1154437f61c876351e21275e6539
'2011-12-29T05:06:16-05:00'
describe
'25125' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3e12e676486f24349002576d1d30834b
20d7a0feb9063d1fc94d12261f426653e34a70f6
'2011-12-29T05:10:17-05:00'
describe
'35271' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a6e3e35cebcf9b34bb23d9285ed2e8be
8d96d3cf11f524613949bd7f3ec5ea0f944ab547
'2011-12-29T05:08:01-05:00'
describe
'3011460' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6f82f2a413801fa4ea8dc9ee00c4ea1b
e0b6bb3ad7916b72e7508f59a68b672e029f9103
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ae6d6ac2e9a1d7558c4cf1e7528d4653
84dfc25a820ca292824ff15b5d24f3202a5bb0d1
'2011-12-29T05:07:42-05:00'
describe
'9430' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
e0b4c45b7729ab87a19127fa71819960
a8707d3a97063cbe234df91aa022898d144ad6bb
'2011-12-29T05:10:03-05:00'
describe
'382398' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
9ba0e028bbe5bd42b3a2ad3d4717537e
bcf5192ba4ed1a83b03ace5165def58bb2e844a6
'2011-12-29T05:06:34-05:00'
describe
'103627' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
658cc83f5083367892f1f5f2bc70ad43
f5fd843bffdccb9f6133167430d679d1f1edef74
describe
'23669' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
050643c4d97deefb3a578192714d28e4
619c8c357b937f3e0c6778266ff975a5cbbf0645
'2011-12-29T05:08:10-05:00'
describe
'32290' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ff6bda0de0add498686a7b7a8a5fd69a
5d86764a3fbf7a23d4f4a241f44793428c3bc305
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f16e0f9d26ea8aa20f35aff0ea81399c
e258620b56757f3af44d8eb48e1f4a46cc9a5d06
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
02c938745d34d4fc90009b17c399b3b9
8cebb1bdcb56d04dafa7da8106afca1465105fec
describe
'8706' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
62b46006c581575c4f027e688cffa7dd
cce7e15d2f2d7b36a86032430cf1b16ac75285f4
'2011-12-29T05:08:23-05:00'
describe
'377568' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
4f88b9f7b06c4081fc471de728a95b04
98d60dae697ff1ce46ccdefacf247bebe9b45598
'2011-12-29T05:06:21-05:00'
describe
'114788' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
505c30f94e32976f0a8e7255a562b8bd
a490260691c60a63aa692ce15ec54a3438d13121
describe
'25547' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWR' 'sip-files00037.pro'
e44bc75655cca44c0aaf3e978b86d15e
4a974bd8354697d09c5ff59d15489f73f5de2807
'2011-12-29T05:09:14-05:00'
describe
'34334' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
ab3f7d2bf787aaa2f5d47ffc6d326e18
2f93538f53712b867c04b78eb1435fc7696fdf2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
8af17cbfd2410d061648ce244c411ebf
0d5390f92b9b09e2e7b6a7604f4821d820d019e7
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dc41f888f880b9aef4fda33cac1c7e5c
e364fa32a748026d6e11c18c55accc837bc5df96
describe
'9155' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
84a598532a35d0fc2ba67a6a77db2787
2f1a400d64213456f6e7fd76d93a25f3cf556019
describe
'382422' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
249d68740fb1e7bf7ed5fe679f34f726
8475ad9a72c2c12abf31c2534bed1666da974a5e
'2011-12-29T05:08:58-05:00'
describe
'99454' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
40fa94dc2220b7c59459b5b338d94de5
6e8b7776dcd5e80e95979fbe590e7c58da5aee00
'2011-12-29T05:10:07-05:00'
describe
'13789' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
aadb6bc452112035535078937baaf9bb
50282654b4887fc09c5f86d2e0a3d7b0cf4a49d6
'2011-12-29T05:08:02-05:00'
describe
'26246' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQWZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
bb7e6a5bf2c62f8377fe9855889a5901
6c9fef38fcc2f9e9df298501eda7bd004368b93b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
957f8c230a586afb055e76698c2d33ac
3010830617be7ecce9863cbdfb901f9078176345
describe
'460' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d1c0f10b908e4d2c1894dc71e7b71e01
5a4073e1b9ea3e35e5cf7ea84528b0853d14c2d1
'2011-12-29T05:07:12-05:00'
describe
'6658' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ba4e8a71d2d81664e1ed9443af46a21f
c15a31910b588ab21d23475387b335a599c10b50
describe
'375951' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
89e24506c39a4fdb8f225e478a70cfd2
2b83a9c276626c499ae75df66680ef060b26366b
describe
'109678' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
ecbc2a57ee76dc8b84fec1e88c498879
d4705244aeaf8a44424dd365e62c3bb25bfc945b
'2011-12-29T05:10:00-05:00'
describe
'21816' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f4833c6aea8b32abc78b41b77c8559e0
eebcb2f4bbbac2976fc96e9e7639e82b2c8289b4
'2011-12-29T05:05:51-05:00'
describe
'32449' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXG' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c0c3b9426d6e678bf5651226b375c9a2
f661f80f1273251327b374fbdb13ae46786c8fed
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
6e4e2f6fbf6ee5604b00eae6b635dfa7
0368e7ece504f4249a5284a6effb5bcdf6db0f77
describe
'817' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f973f777c11fa5ef0cf32f5b33f67452
b93ebec0553f5acf4d6301dc303240be18d82054
'2011-12-29T05:05:32-05:00'
describe
'8758' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
91d59ab09d5e9c7302ab68209c85b6fc
e18f339bb8a70dc86a8b82b2cccaa522c251d616
'2011-12-29T05:08:41-05:00'
describe
'375852' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
dd306f474628de63cd57192db4d9b4ca
9b1ce7ece9065ef83f95627859939f9bb2e3ba47
describe
'112558' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
08ac146bbec821c4a0704c10234ce196
83472b3b0f138a83b7a94ae06b550d9592a1c973
'2011-12-29T05:09:51-05:00'
describe
'24517' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1869f343f5ad8c6ad5841c3b5c32ab60
e5014913954a8faac92269c166925d28be6573fa
'2011-12-29T05:10:27-05:00'
describe
'34431' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
720d26806209df1d09e052195eca0fd6
02bcf8235846935fa823f14a0a30eafe6098d007
'2011-12-29T05:07:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
22505484e59e51c1590deb43639141d4
a520033689f835d5cb8fb0690546f2df597724bb
'2011-12-29T05:09:05-05:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
7e2f866766600bc7844095be6fafb540
ee68199f4525cf0313829004d93b89404b74ccf8
describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
08b61ec141b3112dddd4d9b747e7f0a1
3b56e4bb82fbe6b3d6ec75e1d9b84491ed00abac
describe
'379091' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a78053dda132e5c0ccc1e22591689db2
a08932616014ff9644faac462c809970ec186a5b
'2011-12-29T05:06:43-05:00'
describe
'108792' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
b1fe7d50540b967c70855167a06c6ea7
6366cf2459d114894cf3cccf16cd84d1e726a5c7
describe
'22459' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ee243386e818a0b3397f69b3650775a8
f9bb8edf9ae5e24dd956387a630da7184d4270c1
'2011-12-29T05:07:18-05:00'
describe
'32727' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
2a06d9872f85cc8c77e1b1194586b99a
827613cd2c653f806a967a20abdf0cd639baaa7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
356730ce7153179a58186509504939a8
181fd13af2ea975e4e6557b4e199f0e12024a536
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
d70c09c8f0f1ae69484352f5ca17b3cc
c565d1945a0343c4b821e7e3cb3a1030c470c197
describe
'8743' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
53591ce4e8b3547ffdf326833b5e69a8
06655d8c2cc4d32ac248fcd71d40c1314da066ae
'2011-12-29T05:07:23-05:00'
describe
'388894' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
4268990370ea3eb9ba49c79e41aca810
e207ba39356d2d870ae50eb2ca35a86a5ba246f0
describe
'96378' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQXZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ceb7e1a0c1ed430d4c628f5232f4802f
8c58fc75f4b358cf54f812c09ab12dc304bb4b5e
'2011-12-29T05:07:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
451dfa0d3d0092f5aa20bc2485a4131a
45803b950cb85589032c17e662871689678f6276
describe
'29955' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
7ae981372fd4bc972d7a0b7395bfcd76
73b5723f61fd9b07a9fec77b70c87de40eab4994
'2011-12-29T05:06:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYC' 'sip-files00042.tif'
93caba332c68257ffa4b7b7f0c2ddaba
6ea59ffb73a03038a85e71b04aa1d9a7d1967c25
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b06a828db2d642e40b5a4cd8a140931f
ec86d0a1259c9aca8c3d49be045a1a7311b65122
'2011-12-29T05:09:49-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8111' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e0af28f256d56b3d107b1774b023fe1d
8b8c173cfcc72ef6b23160eda6e28acef6a843e8
describe
'358384' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
701061537919f38e1e63f3f90d548ca8
48fbf9872526e5b8393fd4c85036fbf0ed23a69e
'2011-12-29T05:05:59-05:00'
describe
'102210' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYG' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a6fdc222482d6d286eccf7682644ec33
c825bf87fd460da88341f1fca3cf0db7eb7da502
describe
'22549' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
8f866573602444445be50ee1a1219237
1e592dda6991494f6528ade7a267e873e703d28e
describe
'32361' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYI' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
33951125df5be3598d8b5ed89a28854e
d55d2d4fcbb6cab7b4c8aecd8f08bd5aa3ff4a75
'2011-12-29T05:08:21-05:00'
describe
'2884032' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
984934df620d48236f741b7ed32c064b
00f99fb6e70c5706deec42cc254335b48293b76a
'2011-12-29T05:10:36-05:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ce25d4a4a289e5adb11ba9315daa0948
d4783b97f996eb80c286473efc5ae48b898b5094
'2011-12-29T05:07:15-05:00'
describe
'9474' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYL' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
734536734ac170e1be5928b037f708e1
8e2786f2987b3869145067939baf32b0e875108b
'2011-12-29T05:07:24-05:00'
describe
'377546' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
96d8ab0e9f7de4e0c9545cc0c380998f
6e39a3660272f8bff0f169cb0c24aedf2785f15b
'2011-12-29T05:08:34-05:00'
describe
'112362' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
de10c5ac3ce594999276f15af795b365
e71778eba69842ef229f478ec3631ed9b3d357bd
describe
'24050' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6f5aead6c486cc8377d4af52d570ee26
0a0e5d7babc75fd82ef642b41a62a91850764811
'2011-12-29T05:06:39-05:00'
describe
'33488' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c50ba8b3b995b5214e4a38b713160ad8
365d26dcb8c9e81ebf56dcaad33b600118168e4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYQ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9b8995b264af7dc3c7a1999bcf639223
d027380ab4e5e1d838863c9e772a525a80a2953a
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
0d4e4f06b459772472b13c78b409b12d
3c693ee891dd48bb617fbfb7a2c92bff1975181d
describe
'8854' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYS' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
4efd06b9075a1a2ebef2eac551ef4187
63f6ff33fabbac75b16ee2637c1765cb6cedaa71
describe
'380809' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYT' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8c32845482847229d2c8d49fd7aac626
1b0f46cba01d8af7484781082db65a626cad332e
describe
'115119' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5378b716c41d1c852b224f9dd1679b14
8242fc3a9aaf0a582d6270f808c03bf9c65a91d8
'2011-12-29T05:08:15-05:00'
describe
'24351' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYV' 'sip-files00045.pro'
0899adc2d996fa6bc1f9d080810f6e0a
5b6a1627f46fec76b88ad89fcc5e15048c325828
'2011-12-29T05:09:45-05:00'
describe
'34256' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
0838df892c66b9af303f6d4f608e30eb
2ef3d09289ea5c55a8a894d9ec7382f7321aaa1c
'2011-12-29T05:10:22-05:00'
describe
'3063312' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
989a3785f64789375edc25051aa2fe21
e43afacdd0bae3a8235aad0f2e02a1e5ea373498
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
b74613bd021bc4126b4bd8d94cb45272
06ade68c523b9b9498c0cda0bc92a994d77ed857
'2011-12-29T05:09:42-05:00'
describe
'8953' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQYZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
5c04e933c8929318b3c60dbeb91d2fa5
0ca5791e746e292e4589ee63cec34884e34886da
describe
'377556' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
20a2706677b69291b5c6ec525c286b07
1c4facfdccbba18927cefd7de6b611d2544f9083
describe
'108427' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
9a31a6d10ae83553333ca6a5cab34562
d36e9e16375acde99b42b6910b50036ce3c80d47
describe
'24516' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5742526ad9e087efe203ad07d3ddef41
b675b5c19fd05341707911daaa2900440f0eea70
'2011-12-29T05:09:00-05:00'
describe
'32860' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
46370bf6141495792d8b9f69921221b3
b7123e308cc7cc5927757fe08432fbf2bbfededd
'2011-12-29T05:08:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZE' 'sip-files00046.tif'
66460936ec42688e60b8b792e1c8ca3a
4b5327fb7f3141d0e20addac9b6d0a845fcbe7fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6f1dd66f27b97b035a9b0e28d85ad77d
8f1728d6f08a80880e77d3c1d969b6bc13ad4a93
describe
'8738' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
4d8244be420bde95f4466920c193df85
a093562041203b282d4631634f1ea1827893c9e2
describe
'374582' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
112d6085de76e78298530561ecbcbebb
26effef34d3f12b331464f15bac2bc30aa56b765
describe
'103285' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
148a7db28e157d4564c3ebe54ac45ad6
a19cac7a02fd1ef80be1faaf9c97d6bc4734db38
describe
'21639' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1349e3ad5cb7cf764cb3d2bf2239b564
3a66f857fdd3a22d3c140bad77f7792d490c9a26
describe
'31562' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d73248eafd77e128f3352648c456bc61
7a572d6dec755b740763e31952ffd99ed8a70a6c
describe
'3013632' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
dcf243ff7512d9d4ab3c4fa4962fed60
5c82d703b0f9162e1c4d574843d5052ae558f7f1
'2011-12-29T05:07:56-05:00'
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
5d2e0f67620ab36b628ce9fbd770f4e3
e6b2704266299f66e5d7f65b722228251e7fd4d2
describe
'8242' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0b361eb895147edaa69776eb6e1373d0
074131e134236229ce016396518e48a7fc6e54d2
describe
'371053' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9c73a4aee231a58e1939a19cb58a52c9
3838f4516a637a25ce29326604cce21ac1628852
describe
'105611' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c43cc5555c1fee4cbea641a734851eae
ce0f723371f025701f4c6ca0c5225de37d72c94e
describe
'22209' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b05df9e5a63c1a68187d833911f2b0b9
5fffd47a22f0f4322d1fbc0c202c917b2c60976c
'2011-12-29T05:05:44-05:00'
describe
'32152' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
b49bc571abdb1c70f0a1592fe85ac1da
f809f605a74c34c42f459ad28fb848a792e4e90e
'2011-12-29T05:10:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
95c7d11cbe706df60668bd09152c4ba3
c879467658c5ed1f84b66345b8fd95ab046cb4b1
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
459ca06dfa6e58819ffd8f0e8dc5d598
66bf58b87b0f44f6bd397ef1274424ff41c26a6f
'2011-12-29T05:10:46-05:00'
describe
'8754' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3042a82cd873331331c1fc169e677caf
c872445ae1a4c08d84c24bafd6930fc477dca46e
'2011-12-29T05:05:39-05:00'
describe
'377544' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
f704f1c9cb8da164cc6e9f4e13bd08f6
4cc577c44e41c628fbb335baf591555ac7ba96e4
'2011-12-29T05:07:05-05:00'
describe
'103252' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7f8da3357c476e6652570318c384b38c
ce974d914de567b6b8345ed3ac9cb848b3f4a3db
'2011-12-29T05:09:13-05:00'
describe
'21731' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
7ec6071e8ea93785a3a0fcc602028626
06e2d95aff4ebb3306b9fa4bb9381eab06377f34
describe
'31076' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0945a6344c8db3920cd5ccf98d46af5b
eca466782fc35e9cc257a95c74ec88dcf65609ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABQZZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d8ac575aaabd4e9d7f702edff347aac5
72fadfb86c2a5fd433f033e7e5bb02d2ca7db1de
'2011-12-29T05:05:45-05:00'
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
51a287dc99f7d3fc34e9575b19b0974f
5e2ed00b608c4da2654179d8cb7c1d56fdecf76b
describe
'7999' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e816e100a56ddf45b1c12a16dce6834f
55799d3bcc0f704ea8e52b9784bbb59c6f9f9432
describe
'377571' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
67bfe4bc3d4886606d25b17f9e227eaa
d0892e805cc22a27d5075dc7e68cb0c91303848f
'2011-12-29T05:09:31-05:00'
describe
'108425' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
83aad411ac0d39e95caf65396a2c924c
b319a78519953252100f2cb4c765a964548d81f9
'2011-12-29T05:10:47-05:00'
describe
'24520' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
1ad54bb96ddd10999b7bc6f448553b1a
28108c6e7481f1cc158ead16fe156180b7a36cfd
describe
'33471' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
902c9a5ecc8b1d2bc2e850114c1d5951
5f0d735ed39817f432713dbcff7b402146e5b72a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAG' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a39747697a8689135425539a98d3cd1a
17523baa4a8723aa17527abf6ee1cf8e1b778bf1
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAH' 'sip-files00050.txt'
80dd630fc77a6f091518b2a99f352af2
bde3b93ca2e742982e271c26ba183abae2f28753
describe
'8842' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b44ebab34619ddf66fb39cc40502f88a
964964d7ab999fcb4e7d3fadb2709aa7136ee8e1
describe
'376211' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
abcabe39c50d97b730d1b1509da5fee7
13b08cd33bdd1cbca1495b1d1ddd06c87e949def
describe
'111359' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e18a7e13072fe64892ad6a19dcdf0b93
dcc9270accfaefd16a637d4f298acded22ba55f2
describe
'24316' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
ec708845b63326323c9347a1d5b7e4d5
7d9f3b1fc52a3d3c322f652223ade13e7d691261
describe
'34424' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
58223fe8ff0d67b20539364971a05c68
4642b26dd1d1000cb10fe6ef8c3bfe36b4b7fc46
describe
'3026592' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
5bd6a1255070e336892886700eee3112
2e152b0c87a718a43c363af02a831d89b9689b54
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2274e20412b651ebb8676452e605f893
8e05ddc422d1e9bcf55bc49fd7bef1d89b2b9483
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'9332' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0ead0b22ac173d5e2dff9b933dab9b72
6e5fe3d01d792e01607c27841d0737c2ab428849
describe
'377486' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
d9e2c23aaaae22b2f2f1c45462382140
94c39ffb23fe12f5a4454f72472536308dadd741
'2011-12-29T05:08:08-05:00'
describe
'53372' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAR' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1504077258e50037181e37b0ca47eea3
58faf7b26f237c64c0122c225c69b39b2da461bc
describe
'7029' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
308a1590cd657d1771dbb1123ff2bde0
179483c387127ad9ab07c8c79c425c4a37bd0f2d
'2011-12-29T05:08:04-05:00'
describe
'12879' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e44ea1a29452f50c3798956182488c75
22caf0d753c3752b5a6fda597e3ab7cb8ceffbc0
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
76ea622c1415e994a6d49b8613b230d0
5a23b5e05305796d7f57d889708abda3de7a9f87
'2011-12-29T05:06:55-05:00'
describe
'240' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
0f8a87e4585a741fe3072034a7ab0cfc
daeb86245da6e1fd96b956bfd13515bc65870ac7
'2011-12-29T05:09:01-05:00'
describe
'3294' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
23564036f30972da68d8992f37d1c61c
f0f11d5a7e894a5a252d89e4fc96f4adfee22c4b
'2011-12-29T05:09:04-05:00'
describe
'375973' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
279da828aa562323959e51febd589505
f915f4ef20a8855e7785e2b7722935ee1cbe6a4a
describe
'113313' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
aae0d06eb16415b4dbf7dfd69d126a84
3a487e82245ce41855fb9d5463385a836fd0c3e5
describe
'13406' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRAZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
f22547dca04cfb213e7ca4cfb39e7f61
50815f14d3c93fd679bc3cc35f1a6bfdb994ba24
describe
'30802' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
abb4db62b395d8cb0a3f7de691460a30
5ff884b95f41331bf8a7563d993142419228178e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
62d8371c42bb0bd8dd5d168a4e0e5e3d
3b61859e81c6b4ddf35ad22f218b8b7e0f11a367
'2011-12-29T05:06:12-05:00'
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f329107f431e59466fe4cb0bf2a22302
abff2e1b51c00836d8c2508a4751ca3d4aeaf743
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7969' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBD' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
883ca2ab24d3381780bdd4713358c28a
874d03ae87b475508ad2e546f472be6076ec4381
'2011-12-29T05:07:34-05:00'
describe
'377281' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
dcdcf146bef443c60fd974598069d9ae
30ff5793934eac9b34c4051bc717cf777a0d99e9
'2011-12-29T05:07:00-05:00'
describe
'92472' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
774a5e6dbeae59da91cecfc9e951a272
305a995980fca22a48fbdc2570e6910bceed8edb
'2011-12-29T05:08:40-05:00'
describe
'21682' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
f8d218042f28d28949c69edf67cf7282
983c9d3925fc91d75648be2eb326bef37a0fa7bd
describe
'29205' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
86b8f353da56fb9209250b0bc9d5aeee
e98c2413d4199420ea78a95d30afa3d58ca0529d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a1be00f3408db7463af78634c6f2f1b9
ab34e4a16bf5630bfa38ecd3128705bccf69403a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
05bd8c3531126d26afa19b6747ca2e12
1954ac08c866c61bdbf7cc297b2c64b90e80c4ab
describe
'7981' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
978037496fb2988f35dc3107fd048445
e6c86fc78b0c7c23d82028be1b98bffac8d38311
describe
'379029' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
bd032f111fe7167447bd37987f6e4558
44d9f9698a1c9b2de320c81896227f7e1db81523
describe
'94400' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBM' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
b595ce022d3da6b9743d754c2ef9713c
412b6dc15324ccdd1966c3bf6a69c0a0c805ba4c
'2011-12-29T05:07:50-05:00'
describe
'22534' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
5f763df1ef1b321e9ead8906147d58fc
4ca3532e6497831a5f22d13f25f45ef033a62731
describe
'30032' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
1ac9a733b80df150a1742850452c0c3c
fb62908be04dbe278c600bd02e635525438397a1
'2011-12-29T05:09:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
163619f4c78e6036269fadfe2fb72aea
b8a5525d6e1f4f1aa4379f664ff04afa67e234a3
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
33d3f3ec7f60efb18bbc13b074d8bf55
fffc49633f70e9fbed7d7dcc11132d2f799f78ec
describe
'7943' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
c42cfe7b61087bdae1b9f4a68c7459d0
9e9c68974c849d8f24b6705f63d571b7e83eac45
describe
'388897' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
431cb3f2e8faaf96cc989467b026d899
13de2289713bde7951568b5d3ad1c50b2b6e974a
describe
'94032' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBT' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
ed55a386dc24700e949ad0d633d78c7d
5ed6ebbbfd8c41c2249c4d04df16dd9d0f859f17
describe
'20961' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
89ae307905c3d4a41f52c5a5083be2b7
0f0b0ff6eb77176ff2ea4e2ed855f8411d1ece85
'2011-12-29T05:08:33-05:00'
describe
'27817' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e97495cbecc403ee3a43ad031085ad3f
4e5042e67405d0e5250e42eeeea9c29d6fe5df34
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0e67db188044bc31a103f17eccbeb33c
4b5b836575058dfb760c4b452e5867301d4d4fd5
describe
'770' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
841768f29ece8fc4e580575f7c3941bc
e6bc51bed6091712220d2d6b02c6448ba6777d2d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7647' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
720c3f37224cbf9c80464cc474fa22fa
1dc79cae624155d4f692e77df67b5af56003a6e2
'2011-12-29T05:05:37-05:00'
describe
'379421' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRBZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5b66842be0fb4a342c32241b5e79896f
50ffc0e90c09b37cfefa97300b2fc192b6b2c6d3
'2011-12-29T05:06:42-05:00'
describe
'105412' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
27ab0f12e4352aefc6763663a88ad684
f4c4bfe6945565fb9dc57a5436cbcae5aad7f111
describe
'24013' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
69586e374a148500fb75856fdcb46e3b
6250b4ec0a2fc51c37c058d9dada40273a242489
'2011-12-29T05:09:30-05:00'
describe
'32280' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
8158ebcd45d385e9221a52270ee76b4d
71726d0ee1aafcd7326976b949f9caa68ab1dc7e
describe
'3052512' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0282b8d6fb8d2ef72fd3a36f30a5d6e2
4fdfb1ac4106ba464774ac31e2ba5520943d2f35
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
fbe2ff90955d113faf8762f82f6701c5
2e3207f193b2f2d056976e7996806e29c6246c2b
'2011-12-29T05:07:14-05:00'
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
084790003bf3245c5fbfc6388bfc5f67
4013fb75392428551c2ec6306daf29305e86892b
'2011-12-29T05:09:23-05:00'
describe
'372707' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
ff838f408bd75d50dc6548a93cbfd8cc
dc535f52a28f2209929f9544860f9f1262d41be0
describe
'107127' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
1467f11e6a83e6ec7a0f9bafd313bee1
6e8fa2abf808f8c06a06b694ea30496c7ff27705
'2011-12-29T05:05:48-05:00'
describe
'22336' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b939b425e8b91593d8f401143cee832b
7fbd15c30038f84c00a9c8ccfbfa544e72901a82
describe
'33054' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
4d041728dc7e662bd506c4209500f8e3
22e631c511d28aea110873b174a93e8bab2c96e4
'2011-12-29T05:09:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
713c34167c056179973a3e21a7eb7659
dcfb7703230372982011621b8605dfc35bed71bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
48f36e6f4f4493ca9322aa5fb0395be7
7dacc3eeb463f49dbc45d9fc4c8233485e0f6386
describe
'9046' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
0c8a475f16b537eba1e0e183e1ead202
8998111df961be7b7e9682591097a0bbbd68f7ff
describe
'388901' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
4bd463f7d5de2bab55ab4d00cfe778a9
4ea532be4217ccf5be63777cac050a5875e1e61b
'2011-12-29T05:07:20-05:00'
describe
'107587' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
58cce2d748e2cd3736a546419a898e9f
413d35d22dcf340ca48f79426e0a90fafe68836d
'2011-12-29T05:10:25-05:00'
describe
'22575' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCP' 'sip-files00059.pro'
dda858a47a0975391170042c1716eae9
b421daf2549f1c18cedce3781214c9e62e521651
describe
'32340' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a32ff655672e9c64c971524c1001474e
f0e697bd9c0996d38ceab492019cb5d7f41b0d77
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
681768af29d88dc7d23da66def7e7f1e
11940bdd365a6ad592adf7aff16ab8bc027203d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
18248f7f3403d3be64346bedd16eb713
cb95c545bde8857e4494e939b9a042fe043cefc8
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8709' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
db0caca57095d47406678dbfec01aff1
15ded8e29ab555c52f4f4a69b2f97a6a1c828dc0
describe
'378971' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8267aed2fcdae2be5a7b3c3b8e8bedeb
8eebea34262565d16ac3af82463307d27f36a4fc
describe
'103652' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
07a500ff9fbeb8ee5d3735bdab189db6
751536226379cf8899c012e1ba266bc770b0886b
describe
'23190' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCW' 'sip-files00060.pro'
9ab826ee2ffb2bf84efbd178184bc991
95029f5dd54260c27044fe858cdb329a8dd6479d
describe
'32102' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
11188f781b855ae9e733e131e877b865
c0a9860da4a6caa9d8c5d1c9642f8d238a1873ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a6375086e6cc55e82dc9819b44e3158c
9263c7704b91d1f4b3f1aeb009eb081ed6482d27
'2011-12-29T05:08:57-05:00'
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRCZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
8787104e18ab4456048595d3438f7ebe
dbdbf10cc4e8931b078eec93d08217770e5afe94
'2011-12-29T05:06:18-05:00'
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d23c7b11cde2eb7c2c891ecbf2e69a16
865b64aab21311708f3e180ca1f3b9d835d984ad
describe
'388822' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
3bb1475b6d79bb4ea64a2f080d550705
811c2fa9e1feaebeb6b9df642d51ebea0f470f08
'2011-12-29T05:09:08-05:00'
describe
'106955' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
80653560fae844c1826612796977b819
f24bd2dc355871757a6fa89f68adf7013152ccc7
'2011-12-29T05:06:37-05:00'
describe
'23648' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDD' 'sip-files00061.pro'
752aab071a23131cb158573a687d88d6
ba0cfb758280a3324f64ce1cfddc3f2a87ce95de
describe
'32492' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
9ae3d3e8ab2ea9caf8da3345a82198e1
72f866feab9067aca1e14b7a93a72bae92d2966e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
df879c46c60db59e6743af4feff99456
220d86524161b661da916277eca15deea44d82c9
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
1e0c11779b90fa3ed825c62868023a73
af01c9a84086826b9d6a6ea365e28d74ee039f1e
'2011-12-29T05:07:36-05:00'
describe
'8776' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ac67207c0a5483c24c427e967008161e
ef939bac4fcb742a14e456b42e2be4caab64a53a
describe
'377833' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4313577c6e138a23a99c9194765a7291
192ea09577595793496a2be5eed830381c43cde3
'2011-12-29T05:10:08-05:00'
describe
'108693' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
65e680c4a1afab206f74679f5816e24b
6f5d597051623fe2dd13bf6a8b46de4bfaa5e15c
describe
'23113' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
5858b187a0066120728934e6a493eda5
74b2eb24ade8bdef0be94daa7bba1defe0a730d4
describe
'33415' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
79a3ec50e3785d0208ff8a71dee0c5f2
4ef0bdd711b2cd866259de70452605aba41a6820
describe
'3039552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
631548407f5034ba454290ddb8d42ad7
9f04150d8ca9b3404bf9221819b758126cf88270
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c922f52826643bb3136fbe7d0a961a17
263774b9ce59d57c2fdd478b3efda7de68128d73
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8927' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
076f8cfc58c0a24d4e4ff70ac72a240b
fe31836d0dbe8ab8f141c485a8beea8a07959074
describe
'388856' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4313f4b8569cb1f86d2fb1765e55a08b
18f650abc3106dbc37b27a2724224b0aa23f60b8
describe
'107394' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a1c8bc7c6878e10f40e124b9b00dedc4
4e0c0572dbd0e603719dab1118304ab2c650012b
describe
'22422' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
eb2a4d81d7b0bd6c3f798f1269de0a44
1b10ad2a2612360847345496abf7c69e85166d28
describe
'32056' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
ef4ca8919393be32afd6f6eff5ee67fb
49a31c09b91c837b55fcfbe7f79dda15e123f4c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
8a2d0c32abe8558655e934bf4e4e59ca
bd4ce1dbe7edde521e74c5e480d03acb543b3395
'2011-12-29T05:10:41-05:00'
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
bc105e1495c4ed71f3009eb72a62cd7e
e8a1b1e4901a2e218633938ddf4aef5b193fa67e
'2011-12-29T05:06:06-05:00'
describe
'8641' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
55bd997344eeb75ad4c488a6a0a93900
e9d54e6040cd6257b66b18fd6314930f536679ff
describe
'382367' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
0cfdde9d2247ccd1e6b36be9aace3e1a
746eb3b949ac88c47f1e573cb741b52662a9d772
describe
'48884' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ad3138f42c96bde42492a519df67db1a
0d82ab72cd72a53c96dc0b558dd9da7688ff0546
describe
'4408' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0e90600e9a0f6fc28fdf94939d7874a0
9c74fc5b52bc747be558d37a392246b47f38842c
'2011-12-29T05:09:17-05:00'
describe
'11814' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRDZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
674fca00df969aadd6f494b282fffdfd
6641420b5191e9b97742daada6eca1d541aa79d5
'2011-12-29T05:10:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
aed06517dd22e73f725ae3c44eadbfa7
779175a78180eacf120c0e68166f396e81cdd624
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
41dbdf6f00e1f24d1546ad4e45603b0c
97af85c39e392440bcac7b695dd210574ebf10e3
describe
'3021' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
7dcfb5001b7c9c5544038115c1774c50
254dd72de1061e12229e12f0997d5970c602fec7
describe
'388882' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRED' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
407ed6f1a88528953357291fa556a9b0
a966046b6d99628356cda80129d0c99f08293311
describe
'100952' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
440439e0fbd42773cbe768f777b03335
aac42823179c20bed2a87547b13b47c9f7fe05ba
describe
'12007' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c3e0178081dfc70e37b022ca6515688d
1a297633d669c71d0e52a47611c1eae3f1fa8407
describe
'26324' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
867ddd3e8251f9e3e39ebc9b94df5da8
a92d481904b2ff662f8ec8dcf13ac66bd848f3c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREH' 'sip-files00065.tif'
cc94c028b21857d9aa3ca1581aa8e4ab
73027b4ac9bb29d58470f52e45b4b77df7ef8302
describe
'428' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
1cafebf89afa399a8969a1f34ef0a0bc
9ae83a44ae9e6c2643e69c783246989cc4e4c8ce
describe
'6867' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
fe2e785f2d9b69d80de63500daf32efd
1a820e22779435b2e0671c7707621ac50f7e3c0f
describe
'380803' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREK' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
dedd4796935f97f35e38f81a8b010ccf
fd8b523c5595bb5a35f978b78035a1d86d24d78f
describe
'100168' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREL' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
fe6b89f45072e3220148e5e3301d957a
2e51d825ab98bd34fe188b502ea42862f3a3d0b5
'2011-12-29T05:05:40-05:00'
describe
'21212' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREM' 'sip-files00066.pro'
750e6a4513c5226ee7701e371a7826a8
3470cfbf199e232b59729ac6d4069b7ed55f841c
describe
'29677' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
1d4f7b463276a5c2c10074ae508dd996
639be1644ae957fab2186b0734150b7c95be9577
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREO' 'sip-files00066.tif'
517fb6c3c0282aba749b16d6e0fa3ec2
00bfcbb84d32a4a45ad382147b06fc0452344db1
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREP' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d447f42e5946067722d2f2e39c0e34a7
9434878c1dc979ff4424e60c32e2fa781d8beb2d
describe
'7963' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREQ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
f3277b2c9273c91466b315a5c8dddedc
560836e1f07424f86fe1c93e04bd194eec65f539
describe
'388875' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRER' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9ddd2229453c242e527e654f8c8eea95
794bbdfc4f9023e010c8a3c99cac57f2023f3a5f
describe
'100931' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRES' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a85ef4c2e89c076945233894f6231f05
4a657dcfe711f9f3a346ba3d08e4a14237859ef5
'2011-12-29T05:09:26-05:00'
describe
'20524' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRET' 'sip-files00067.pro'
272926208166b729993176895d15d7e7
0daeab0d35bb6bd4d15e79903905084fe7df92a5
describe
'29926' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
10598cc8333496f3abad214be76a29d9
35e7b987a360813d2a58fb915b9dedb3982281e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f1d580dcce5b0f960c15d544051b2613
9deb9e2e7df0c7d2ae142bc088c9698c612e551d
'2011-12-29T05:10:31-05:00'
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8480c9eaeb67ee3978a2a3f3c896186c
ed13af188fa02194a30396fbf5d80cfd00b5fd1c
describe
'8162' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREX' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
8a63aed31854fba15d38dd968f7c1c0d
ac5d52d325ae8c5f301fa654476b5039cc6bd80f
'2011-12-29T05:08:16-05:00'
describe
'380798' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREY' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
59e5702600da268a58641e80086350ca
625b85048a128ccd38ff9cc84f79fc37916c278c
describe
'102099' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABREZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
3841def4ed89a067c792a8649edb7547
c155f07c235439eb8aac089ed43d0fec6140efad
describe
'24237' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
2908a5e685e68b1f008878632789565a
c512cff24dda0146f1ce70e62fe6b70911377ea7
describe
'31659' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
918c4250ea10b95d752bcad6f61c6d8c
5252edbd49e06a6a2e6f610eb5ce3c611dc03fb0
'2011-12-29T05:07:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFC' 'sip-files00068.tif'
361a539df87e976ac9c15274671fbd75
461c49f95497fa159bf3291205ceab76094549ba
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
9d87cbf34a0475e50efbc2195d7cad4d
3155064fd961adeb412635dbeff34a3e1cfec302
describe
'8566' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFE' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
125f60d730cf532389dc887cc21a1c61
fff4a7a76ffb88ecde13121e2b4589b4a7e296ee
describe
'380770' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFF' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f4a618936e9e6deafbf56c8760300fcf
adc5e663daeb1203a67714dfaac21a2e412c8370
describe
'105200' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFG' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
5a2ca850ab8007fddc302566fc848dbf
a16b16bddd5f6e1ccaefecfbd3bb5049dbe3a989
describe
'23479' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFH' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7ac0d08d5ae8ae4c421d597f3b26b992
6f8e82e62ba8ba06f70a7c92fad10f2a498f6af1
describe
'32993' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFI' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3cb7de0c7af3636a8c5f630dbc982c3c
240fbb24f453e0664f0ad21c8f438eafaaf019c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFJ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
188b40fed4945e526f06906ee634fd64
7118a979a8a08a292f0589b894409eaf813fcd1f
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFK' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d7f0cb20273cc06783286a43a6622011
33e25348e6690ba47e5b64118b9aeb3c18e46181
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFL' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
68ff6a3ae1d079c59d90ea1e8259f32f
a45df50cabeabc7f4116fc6f75355bd3c303ea7e
'2011-12-29T05:05:56-05:00'
describe
'388857' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFM' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
bc5776952206311f2149c2f8dead78d5
cee358ce9e23ae5e0b57c7380350d7be5d5fe8f0
describe
'108256' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFN' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
55dc814b0f125b11b4ba9fe335800c40
6ee6cd7af9aa209616e5964a33b07ea7a40b1a33
describe
'22947' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFO' 'sip-files00070.pro'
32074d55e17c2411493bcd2b30d20299
6a8c2c9e9c75ab535794963042f6ccec333b3907
'2011-12-29T05:07:57-05:00'
describe
'32591' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFP' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b08e95e92894640acacdde106b237336
6dc22ea7c062c30ace6d163c13795e5a4c73654a
'2011-12-29T05:10:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFQ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e1e80300517b813c72a0977ba7ee4d9f
ba739e7f7ec5aec8ef1d11cc44bc5bc1a53dc641
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
625f66f11a4ca16c7535c266148c9684
1ccd2d8b367cce6a3da9ca9a487de7c6cb9179a4
describe
'8624' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFS' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
431ea98c0d955a75ab16a72336046aa2
b09f033366f8cd26cca38c8ec77d0353834fed44
describe
'388896' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFT' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
37d87b96c53f0611f1da7833b54b128d
d27bee47123ce0aba1f7678d9112bbae307f3c6c
describe
'108655' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFU' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e9983cab96f6c2769779704d9550808b
39b0e37b6d007f3ee89e29e2514a156b44049f72
describe
'22676' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFV' 'sip-files00071.pro'
002458440c3e6b4fc6d9fc42fbc099b9
e983dfd1ac44c0c719e82c707760885fdb6be41a
describe
'32160' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFW' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8dd3254ba055b5f6488a5be2d810c400
efc8fb19c48dad6af9bfaf69de198e986c9d706c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e04128516c7c7722b1721269bc464867
0278aaa4c51e3bd1217242d2ed1dba3953d03851
'2011-12-29T05:09:34-05:00'
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
50706bef0b8890cb8554774bff7c3273
95ca6b8c9f68ae15479c065f1bc13d168d81d51d
describe
'8455' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRFZ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
0fd61bc9bf0ffc6bbf6b076dbd33dbe1
d1337d648d01adb47d4af970692b515b292fc105
describe
'379131' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGA' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
92f1e5cebe1a6867cb3c851198670245
cdebf28a856a48764b2c005c115b44184b98d1ad
describe
'102953' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5de0d99ade3c455f565bb1c19d3b94f2
ebd0e5218dd0bf71ab064f89f2312a4466fdb77d
'2011-12-29T05:09:47-05:00'
describe
'24289' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGC' 'sip-files00072.pro'
997ab2287eb9d10756766b500ca27858
d7fbf0bf78e6758c645e0120f31e658481fbe4be
describe
'32784' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGD' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5ac5d85c80d6e6274f6e0e64830f4f04
ef4d725476b2d257d08047d16fb565586e2dc89f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGE' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2a686c31b2a29f100936eaee1eb5b586
5e426d2f7d391a5aefa4b204b33bf637a15a3e97
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
4b89d8c52c442944a35342c59445cc87
7fe60d28f3414562ae162b592f779f7438a61970
describe
'8672' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
f3316a3abe1d253cef2e00ca8f428a9f
a46569993376ac581bd5adfc4fb1dc54d53a8d67
describe
'388859' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGH' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
6f87f938c13f80a2dc85d8b24ece3a49
7ac7537d78a6b0dfef84690b43efae26dd4444df
describe
'100216' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
c6366eee7534a258fbf2b747f1726d3f
87e469dc9823e4b921fbc1601eda8eca3ed55262
describe
'24026' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGJ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
6e90aaed0124d7b8f896a76b16b49f40
44cc16153c7d79f645748a629927b4b94e7421dc
describe
'31576' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGK' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
0aa5e6f15da53e0c5004154e6edaedca
e21b64ec91da3f08f4575d0c050c9ec8fb594d49
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
98cc881505101fed51d5bb840b2c2095
99dd4a10e69016d053780b39c8e65fa8639b51e7
'2011-12-29T05:08:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
bb661def693d42492f1156534801d0d2
48ff00e4f41806388e0c504f9fe323d9b6b3ce52
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGN' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
ca498d46acba3bc1ee59909729105e72
5b446b0e0ca76ee4e2ca357c6b6bc5e73f08bce3
'2011-12-29T05:06:24-05:00'
describe
'388902' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGO' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f20fe5e1c65342afd0c2695ef1a5a3d6
0bd145a6de938e1abaddec4bf8d2d8a161d2627e
'2011-12-29T05:09:07-05:00'
describe
'102352' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e418725aad7d2302b5cb582bac48ec50
554e4a39a5078d75cf18259d95fd6d7a1177b2b1
describe
'22673' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGQ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
cba72e34ea0c009b1ea8592138494e19
ec07d9bb4d133604b5a237d1edd941b4de197160
describe
'31067' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGR' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
06be16c05e9f9c3aee42b29802ae7df8
044885f70637bf4f45b4557fe587fcf8214fcbf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGS' 'sip-files00074.tif'
dac094bf3714f3346a34ea7d97b9e978
efb72f60e7a6f71ed6a0003fa08a587386af2480
'2011-12-29T05:09:15-05:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
7b5ca2b8a034b65c57a812f935935d1b
82dbe6156e20836bd3a6dd3114357d663952d2da
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8451' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGU' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
68a50bfb150d760a077308bf854c2c7b
6e73cd8ed3ce6ac5897e9b51ad524f6536161e85
describe
'388891' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGV' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
9f7b6e18efa1542dc5e5556ea885f35f
f39ccf071d2e70f938b71dbd8b0d3b28dfdbd2e7
describe
'106552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGW' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6811fafb3831f6bb6171145ef8f48546
0952d4408b439c99b1fa24b74d57533362e14500
describe
'24030' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGX' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3bd793221e8c11f815ae7be63f40b328
66d0c084c3077dc8c293142036962f9318660ab0
describe
'32004' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
436b3e3c9845b9e41f7f4ebf0416599d
afb43593fa199786a872881766e7332fdb00e749
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRGZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
82be2c1abbba657a23a7c7818790715c
59246d2c6ae268bebdef6c0aacb077efb2c2ec0d
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e6fcf4af3f391093605db8b3010adfc9
c77e6e95593a6ff1dd4bc6f952148388f66c53c8
'2011-12-29T05:09:10-05:00'
describe
'8380' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHB' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
7263344f94851771b33b1146698ac39a
11623d7b6881d7463a348bb363178725d19137fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHC' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3d9f4372304b1d11b486a60443f6a52c
632bd0205a0900f36539f18da2a71ad299df8ce5
'2011-12-29T05:07:27-05:00'
describe
'90822' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHD' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
bd00c1a30b338167b28027d38cb1cb51
f69b82d01254895fb99630f18bee2e33517d870e
describe
'20395' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHE' 'sip-files00076.pro'
ccc07c27f46a9c056cf2a71225cbf860
97d96662075e03956c2fb93123cd865979faf7f1
describe
'28024' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHF' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
2c6508e0cc210ca8e2bf92f17aa87c0b
9206abb4da1a8d8142a409d594b79490b18a4d35
'2011-12-29T05:06:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHG' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c81ff879f388762c4366d49770d88cca
580eadf981021ed346dabcd3ecb002716a7ba5a8
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHH' 'sip-files00076.txt'
011df8524ed653e62e0f9d98475d94d3
7417fb5d9fe0848a7d23aaf1fd04b13382af55f1
describe
'8046' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHI' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
12015d2739c46d41a907e837b535ffdb
7112ee5d655f1d0a1a221ded26dacacd5bb80331
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHJ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
7638427039774e79ab0e433551093dc4
9bab6d78a294bc235d798c698ecf000eaf5804a3
describe
'96809' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHK' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
c1d7043a34eaf8cc7875d581e5d63442
c3049b974aa12045873c1044382b9db2150f5899
describe
'21728' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHL' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6ebaec47abcb6c2f722e366bdf03e1c8
94db74bbae4f9a555898493c7ce09ce972c6ee8a
describe
'29962' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHM' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
a9c9475a04f9d15ed63565474421487c
ab7967a53bbf01c554c5c9ed42d1e20f2029185c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHN' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a46842ccc8172ab6a9f85c39bbb01941
b2cc9de649d2b9df7d3ee350e6ac96002254c35b
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHO' 'sip-files00077.txt'
f10a9fea6863840d7e6ac34b78734aa1
1bc2029a21de14243a9d1c86cab5b4ec1dacf296
describe
'7906' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHP' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8e3fdaf0670de260dada94949a3bb352
7fb16b556a026850ade10dd857463e2bb68d3093
'2011-12-29T05:08:19-05:00'
describe
'388892' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHQ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c53473d6e1309af4d3573dabe0950fd7
05269abcddb5cd21a9a25127a66deb26e11f0a22
describe
'101660' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHR' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9d9b97415c602b97240dfd838356fac1
63f29738ccb77f35f4542769753f3f945c0b341a
describe
'21583' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHS' 'sip-files00078.pro'
c97cb920056aa8ed4a20f967ee317159
b869729184067f8c898ba6fd82dbea8a5f010b71
describe
'30148' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHT' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
7097d3597d60d422081e6a7bbd33dc7d
238f72cf196ba1b9be70508d0574334d3cba6ae3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHU' 'sip-files00078.tif'
c3f80d211c0266c712fe662da4f04c58
3fa70dba5785333f04377d92c6b7ad0eda861b03
describe
'798' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHV' 'sip-files00078.txt'
6fe534ac64212b5997a71907ca3869bb
5c7b0599fcaca8bb823dcb0d5fb0c9b539c68db2
describe
'8044' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHW' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2a7b4c3857e113468cd75630bb0ddfe7
0309a69fab58ee7d06315dbf4f5e4d59a97fc81d
describe
'388660' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b058dab1b4006997e8f248b05d18fe02
d9b5af7952ab00b7b8f13c0baef8734fe55b9bb6
describe
'61531' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHY' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1f93ea3424f808ac9a8dc139ec1e125d
4c68872aa891e31942d2af3f1e0c7f51c7676207
describe
'7093' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRHZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
3b65f1b4b0f0e1afea5eb939d4e3c443
68e13515d22cb9220915dc9c1d79323141d25f4d
describe
'16387' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIA' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e8203569eb12e0dfa53067ae0a195659
3fedf5111a51542640ea1235c2d0799008f1381b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIB' 'sip-files00079.tif'
d4cbfee99be6ecd1b6a443ea836b6958
aeb99d7c82bcf76b0212f3a2091cb7db6ae2fdb2
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f298fe11e6aca614ba34c4293d4f81de
9d4de8edf7b11a6ed106e9c79c69556bda7abb4d
describe
'3886' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRID' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2db40b2d5a6e8cdabced0c90812346be
384cb24f74c26ba323ca28426764e3e20d252a3f
'2011-12-29T05:08:25-05:00'
describe
'388907' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
43b26d67782f3cf479e9f525b7e8eaa3
4c69ff0b911170e9bebe1aae07ab0c7345f0b017
describe
'98178' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIF' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0d4add94dcd4db008a87ffbc931da516
a090c0dfd20221ed3d2092b88b0c1490e2d8ef2a
describe
'12708' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
24f0b23d420a82da57fb35bb7d288cae
8defb30716421ecb1f05f63e56adeb57bc4d5e11
'2011-12-29T05:08:59-05:00'
describe
'25501' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIH' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
70f8f0c1a2f54402f07ce60ffe944a66
8fdfedd884893e572be4ca81302e262b2aa6b4ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRII' 'sip-files00080.tif'
a94d8e80a65f7d8e3cfb7338bfb56261
1561bf5e0d0bada3853ab72b1519b6dda0ede54d
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
0b099d115f45e64c25a5762b1c86560d
93fc6fab9b870544a7dd42de8ce4a7581b2c4d1b
'2011-12-29T05:06:47-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6688' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
20c2db10d2de0729350aa8a96dea8f6e
f86557926f13209fb9a7494abfdc0bd6fa5a69c6
describe
'388895' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
06e8191ec626cbdb54da3581ed673588
90a064a035a5b82c8bde1038588cca682e8e6ea4
'2011-12-29T05:08:17-05:00'
describe
'110611' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIM' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
049d9cc2032255103026b28f2aae83e6
8762a72c4382c2dfa5b88b1c37303a624a270121
describe
'24058' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
2be6901354b9b44e8e8fa8c8ce2a9091
58f8f028eef159129085effc72d518781252c001
describe
'34040' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIO' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
22691f7d409d64472e18c4dd8db0decf
734012d37fece2d11691eed44a6d76ae34e903fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIP' 'sip-files00081.tif'
4cf4be577309ae571aa7e19465c20664
72437cdd060a84ab7f84f1169a2b46381d290dac
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f7375a0ff4e6ab60ed98b6f032dbebc5
e3e8548169e62fb34ce1f1f09adbc7bd088711d2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8852' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
0e2774a705457b93aad5c19a6a1fe302
657a16365c436c464b29b62ec2708787de6309ff
describe
'388815' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIS' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
fe5623cd37060c917cb7ad83d9b97452
71b4489b5b30b777577c9a53f202ca8dc799a725
'2011-12-29T05:06:44-05:00'
describe
'98145' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIT' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
61bfc52ad794c1fa497f90ce30bb0404
44425d890e1865c1adfaf4c8dfd8ac5fddcb6468
describe
'22550' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
1d3287e66f06d49778f71cd4f642d56f
5830d957f47f03c7f081a27a256e2716495a6171
'2011-12-29T05:06:41-05:00'
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
65782fcb9d6b29dd2df60394215e2bd4
f88c8d38fe401d5f733bccd643506889ae14c79b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
e73ac16e38ea02dea65809bef23bfe0f
0949e22918957b7fefab0502f4aac5cd08cbc40d
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
de108c54110046274a4c9751d477efa0
3888cad1293d3ceb8433920e12d6b6d9e40a3b2a
describe
'8308' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIY' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
2d101c61077802257c4d6dac3214e5f1
813dc8de398f92ec5751bd73e61fff658651a330
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRIZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
ab72d0800e671d087a74b673e42fa8e0
c8ac894f44d7efa2d6490d43a4e4015c0057073e
describe
'106616' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
65765259da03826d3b39c78e048e581f
56182108d2164d6e6bb5bc14052eb233846d18d5
'2011-12-29T05:10:26-05:00'
describe
'23870' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJB' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1e0d64c02ae359b58b016bda3cc643ca
b5fc70c8c42ba6a249dfc3546170ec4416e85e25
describe
'33248' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5f10e606d398ca3909580173cc2ad128
26e92b9e9cdb80002eede081c23ff8496c0093b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
97e552a20dc229fd740ad6ade651dadb
7adb118ea0cde408f8a62e1a70708f43892f84f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
261a18e274c02e58e42ef57afc46d185
9fd11b959bd1ec2f045ed0703508b43ccda8109d
'2011-12-29T05:06:22-05:00'
describe
'8708' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
0b38e9fca83c0679d22fffdbfaa41284
15787260c9753f196cc0904bf8aadda49e44b622
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
44335b1b4fe7e943f2fc26c560f91a24
fd8e2c3eff2b4949acdadab0a6d5feeb60fa19f4
describe
'100260' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
7be49bb3a72f5c38162318b9c55e0027
9f1bfb47bb7db71445463ae42bb7dc57c6883492
'2011-12-29T05:10:14-05:00'
describe
'23362' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
877b5e6a903c61fa754e4f0db006caf2
30b7da51b543073a055c90a47e06799f85739227
describe
'31039' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
db6c6c356ce78f8cdc9192019e054fb2
9269ee89f3c7d251b08c27fdd786382139327619
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7734a79914c972079fd557f01db135de
03a453e316847eaf571966f56ab93895008b9b05
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
612263d80ae90f939b99242d828dc970
6e6616f9935c92e58fd7ab1021e5e0bda7d03bd3
describe
'8249' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
10902c86987ac4f7328ba793b1e673dd
f20a6feba5646c9548f78cc173ec56f62b9635ff
describe
'388900' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
707f60f795fab9ef970bf592cba5f2f1
fcc26042cb20441d1361f3a72cc145f47d8f6262
describe
'97312' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
683cae8002a72fb87762b67287b43a0c
dc5fc7864d726ca9a8dae8819f2e3a4e8e337bc0
describe
'21917' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJP' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c52a3714aa9547c97c46641d31d58a99
19f7562c41d438a827d189f40ca530543e806e33
describe
'29798' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0cc59bb7b79c937b6b7236f900d984b1
8edac65425039d5b226220519fd220dd942bd103
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
3a1305da4604209108baf8a751c13691
441a7ca6a6c80ee512657467cf088a414a959ae5
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
dcb36bc50af69fd1b2708b2f7047c939
4e545b693eb04149b5e96427a98881f8ab128ad7
describe
'7881' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
945d13e63441fa7f80658da7a91bb6e3
e5dd9e34965d936b003c68b5b2fcb96cb308756b
describe
'388889' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b3fb6ec4936defac399042a6e18ddc97
91163407417ce050b4c76be98d05b4fc59ffa041
describe
'94743' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
806ca3d4f9a60d109202796b926fec1f
b322abbe7ffc2e1de31caa1a8c28a553d457f8ad
'2011-12-29T05:08:06-05:00'
describe
'20949' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0b97cba5481422ee3e30cc06b8eed4aa
bf5d04f0ac2ae19447b39f2ee431eba01a40b95a
describe
'28935' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
22d604c32295603e779b0fd80e249711
bbf1806d4cf61fd6616f6e051dfc90b546470083
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
00f5796fbbfb999cd61a68a606032ba6
766058fbd500eb4ab81dc6b10ce3ba6368f2c543
'2011-12-29T05:07:43-05:00'
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRJZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
38ad47ca584dc40606fc27e30bf12c79
527448b577a0957cee2dc1bfd59cc8912960a97c
describe
'7701' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
41573ceb80d8545fbee4cc028eaddc72
63eb247567d76f3c755689107f6bc0b35a51ad30
'2011-12-29T05:09:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
6051979f6a1353d96b7324a64cf972fa
c7277d68e8a9f19d91eed20c0063df938af9b215
describe
'96765' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
544eee711b78e12cce6e913c358b0b4f
39ac5e6f2d8d5ce99159e533b4119547acf5bac5
describe
'21309' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
2d95dca95fc01e23417960cd60eec8a3
d44171a2edfbe2b476c9eced92fe68893fb7d7e5
'2011-12-29T05:05:47-05:00'
describe
'28422' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKE' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1ec4b26aa552864b82302e131e7d1f7e
56b4cdd9f18f6d418e226f84951b55a06819005f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4a92eec3d278fe7263dcbaaea1fd7242
fe38f2ab26efdd0b45dd61939ff83ae3cc0f22a7
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
c9880b6f8dd60598ebb3bb8ff10bc059
4c7f71cca3e55fcd64ea700a8c95f73ebbbb4d23
describe
'8082' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
a6c4220790da19bfe2a399bbe54aaa28
78b84468d902de630c9c127b7d179c1ffb793992
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKI' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
6911e663cc5165a3d18909e5626cfe58
248bb024bc431eae2a4079daa90ff2c5b469556a
describe
'87790' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b835f552bf0cfeaf472bfea25ae2707d
941771d3a52638a8031f78f8f9e11b0725a3c90a
describe
'21254' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d885bbfbc96f992b3062c2d8ede51c69
798494495dd4b86dbe475a67f41a929ed3d360d5
describe
'27636' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
e89ea76b0d0d0a1b80d09bb8943b79c6
2204c222d86ca5f634484c3d6e674bc10279c291
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d420108e52e41ad06591baab2d369fdc
6b3dd8729f00e8132a33112e732e06e3ce90ab76
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
e99196f79f7400100d9ff56d930d4b0b
d303f1f2390865059a76ced548b7da240aa4d68c
describe
'7640' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
30bf0750619f3db0a6c76554fd3efa3e
68b3548ecfeadc68ad9eb1213df8e16dc249aeaf
describe
'388783' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKP' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1e402ec1f39513c19d6874af7ec89d11
dff62cd0a10547e99541db4ea8a05444a47582ce
describe
'88675' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
26aba8f9e9748c89e1e22abd57bd6de6
87731fbbab7c944f60348368d7cbb4441b653682
describe
'22283' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKR' 'sip-files00089.pro'
83ad12d686a376f4e9179bbc0738d05f
a071bf3fd48581fd2ca4b2bad4e9d0d75c5103e6
describe
'28361' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
60a17df275c59c1dc841a02c4144ca13
c5ee8d8d4b8ceec92eb8af1219462c0f9e1495fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKT' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ad8cc91ad8b642e2b621b4f615802a28
ebbadce46ef037c6a1002ea48992df5d9d9f8294
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKU' 'sip-files00089.txt'
ed450d0bcf2f958878b94c7115363e2d
42c93c15617d8c04b8acf19a679c511c1c2d3180
describe
'8217' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKV' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
074da72421e618f0ccc45750ba0ca0dc
3de97fe898185bd8a9410d738b3e164821425bf7
describe
'388823' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
247d4d569538c5a83b453219cfe22cb9
3daf9e6d1ea717912c6d68d8a0111a4d2451f1ca
describe
'107208' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKX' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
744a9dd76169eaf61a24e3452be8df94
f07ede57672b50eb0f93bd10d8f39e0b5b3cb9af
describe
'24359' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
dde5d9f7d45fb5bf71c62a9b5532515b
5331c2701b92ba2c272e6cfea6b152476de204ec
describe
'33151' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRKZ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
ff1340d674e1abc16e05f25a3c36788f
6692b80b4665b021512d0ce8e42c7987503a6fd2
'2011-12-29T05:10:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLA' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d4c4e1b31d0ab32304862fd2b8b2f41d
76d383e91eea4ab2debf83497e3441d51353a155
'2011-12-29T05:08:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLB' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ad1a3b35b70875b6cd86a9c89266e3a5
c0547fb90e2b152d0fbf2338ec8a6c9f80e6e55a
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8881' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLC' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
40d3fa606ea8932b785450efad51e26c
879ddb39c73ea6508616a12400098a6424c0125d
describe
'388908' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLD' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e76a63cedbb32e72ba52bb3ec625f133
5bd521bc9a75b54340d85a697f47ead358cfc786
describe
'98795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLE' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f1eab7613a3d2a49d17e0b32de87164c
524c7a68832cf798d5eef9ccf82cd272a7e25a05
describe
'21862' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLF' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9cb9322846d28426c50d4a9b4907b3a9
9dc3d3767315d55aa5b4edb2f4074d41da780111
describe
'29989' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLG' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4e793f77a3dd2aee7f8f1b22b5996aa9
d545656dd85cd1de676a770f24acb7113747d74e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLH' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f1fd39d55ef444f054d26107da04e10b
21fe5937b5319ac41282c64687dda66a96766948
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLI' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c76fd689303f7a20dabf62c55c700b26
ce6a3e6d647bf0e7040da930739609d61dfd8913
describe
'8000' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLJ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
0dd02071839bc61115a65d005ffd3313
888ec624de9fb67bad0f2caa0031d50197105920
describe
'388700' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
3beed3d008c9d7d8a33925c83fdcff3f
07efa9c75ea64639790f383b8c5842e89a4bf8ee
describe
'49427' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLL' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
bc7cc79b5e08590422a5b0eaf734f53b
f01ff34b58d71a133a69b92f79bfe1ab551207de
describe
'5622' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
8b5719c690ea7600840273b39bb32591
dd95fa8c966183336820398ce7316e047192defb
describe
'12803' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
eb9a4078e10c833c7a7464ae83becced
6530a2dd3ee434a3176476197f48795f40a25322
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLO' 'sip-files00092.tif'
995c597a1d55684053021dbbdc32c16e
af48a17017f017be90e9c1bdd730a4801f2d3abd
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLP' 'sip-files00092.txt'
dfd25ec1726c1f0f6d951fe29f6eba84
ccb31f9425a26528c32b667d275931d4616542ce
describe
'3318' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLQ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
71723a0a535862754d3062e95d82b446
d8c66626debdefc6f0acd428ee239be2c30552b0
describe
'388851' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
f0473aacd3d09f28e5ced59485acada3
05b78d27ac81fe506c515cb7ba360cc16b727ffa
describe
'93252' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLS' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
469ac097db3b4b4190e5b8753409b36d
c7e3d6f146910215c2b2238795df316c0a1b6555
'2011-12-29T05:05:49-05:00'
describe
'11710' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLT' 'sip-files00093.pro'
05802e6c519bf6d39652fc69248fa557
8c1d6613e13ae2055ab6b91cf8dde9512c403668
describe
'24575' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLU' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
79175d906a205a1ed0c87d9cd2382a67
675efefbd51de3389135bc59362f280df865c1de
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLV' 'sip-files00093.tif'
50035f2344a82d08e12cce900e4cf526
05b8ee9619816308647cef1585c0749a5b25e56b
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
ffaedf993715ce4982834a0dee6c9727
7f90201a48a0f87a05aa133536b6b9ae4ae9e6d7
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6454' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLX' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
984b2217955c89a755b572efab9b309e
776672d5f9e3e0a964c6b7c4eb78364468b259b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLY' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
ef96240cd60d4f45433c4b2f208380d7
b8a419e0fc6cddb431b010623158350b33bfd507
describe
'97412' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRLZ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
e15e51c10f89413c4626e19af022ad21
4b9b6735a1ae1db2337e84cbdf8e9a07282d2514
describe
'22765' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMA' 'sip-files00094.pro'
fedb4c973cbac426f5c569961e5114d9
0c59ad8c5ad1fe9a6c923f9f412503385ca0b7de
describe
'29784' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMB' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
28e09fa88b5a3b8d4f855f6ea4044a6f
5224ae621be4c02ac3f83e5a01aad1b95549d94e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMC' 'sip-files00094.tif'
920c8e66355f778b390d44fcb4930680
74e9e41deebe5f244b898a6bdf910f44f8488108
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMD' 'sip-files00094.txt'
32e095551874f740acccad9a5ca3a5c7
0c7150451240e38ae60eea30cc99ccc0e24b0bf1
describe
'7878' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRME' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
9113c10c935f68ab7557ac1b54c5cc11
be7f9bc75fe77d471beb3a5cf772d8611b6ff642
describe
'388844' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMF' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
5859182fd15f8fb13322a7d823b79270
a5e5cd654e75ec65e8b3a17b7e1893a03eefeaea
describe
'97460' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMG' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
3db775b5a8967260dd3e706a6acd2a93
5a4531f3df4f4c4874d664d4b238d40da2fe1b43
describe
'22466' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMH' 'sip-files00095.pro'
cec90800b7de19c18dfe920746c1621e
f82494c8ffb8deb93e25f9ccf3617222cfc414a5
describe
'29237' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMI' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
b750cc95c6a1cc14db5ffa3563df8b9d
263254ffd366d2381ff0c97835d04888d6f88f15
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMJ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ac5d5a830b0d078aeb26e809925b8913
eaced71777d27ebd8a83a5225a8f231fdcd86a00
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMK' 'sip-files00095.txt'
5f15599e64337c514816f1dd436f8969
f5a49a3649b93771a944d8dd74de4f4a70318b62
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7599' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRML' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
d7403a2224e662085000543074f03c22
8fac56892df91be6509247d283d5f058cab0a4c1
describe
'377570' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMM' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e88847f19ef93c64b98f37f1167694d8
5173419625a030526572d825c0ae50111a792a18
describe
'104648' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMN' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
98cbb8793916438441984d8aac566f2b
e437cc2fce0ee64cc23298bf99f8c4ce8592c6ff
describe
'23306' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMO' 'sip-files00096.pro'
9cac0bfdc85dbd11d1156f7fa2d00eaa
51dd7e5f5e00a1b6865783fffa9ddb4883dde28b
describe
'32120' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMP' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
7f1081f5c42bb0a22c3eec3f49cdac1c
f24ddc9e4d7f2745bfb80576cdc67ef30f437b12
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMQ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
43ac3c85a4ebf4c52f52cfd62439b0ac
43f44e631fc030d1a32dbc492ee1f25d4f859f4a
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMR' 'sip-files00096.txt'
39595507b9db03b3f23708d0e6777f15
935fbffe18b6fa54f8379329f63446c4abc2ad9a
describe
'8744' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMS' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e45c8e16337de720906c1a3d889f4edc
7b748fcd6047250f7bef7ea7105d5e97b809bb7f
describe
'388909' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMT' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
3306c9a1e57ea7ba6c05dd11eeda1e4c
a25081e8becb03adbaef71249c4447cb46adc238
describe
'104715' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMU' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
abc1eecb17faaf858e311ded27048c7b
73083804505bc2989e346c8edd3558657fdf1932
describe
'23014' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMV' 'sip-files00097.pro'
b856593b12c4e8dce66e3e14119959ab
d15b754308e9985f5a5ff65437038266381be42b
describe
'30883' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMW' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
6623b8bd088d7ce5ee391502b4f55601
b167505fcc70d832a980d118c430f7b6bdf8050c
describe
'3128104' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMX' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b3dd352ae395d232c3c889227ad7d050
dcada1bf024db327c470252a468593d24a12e7ff
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
255f4a317815f8741e4a99d00b61acdf
db9c5b5d2a04bf49c643aa42db80f5f3be6be748
describe
'9028' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRMZ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e3c86584bfecc456ebdbca3262f3f22d
1c5af874a9e967025b24a0917c3c2fe073ee7d28
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNA' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
5f156346225a2d95dacad81e8fe6458c
3b67bc8ac109eb1fd98970ae94d26c4ba0f2d006
describe
'95681' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNB' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
ce3243ba6cc6ef6cb1f7d459ee06eaa5
e1b32a42f2b7f46fa9517a946c4de38c70b66947
describe
'24307' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNC' 'sip-files00098.pro'
348568b06606d6b86016227a0629dc3e
5195e08de59165213ca7f6f1f19a4f824e2d65d7
describe
'30185' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRND' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
865e73e3dbef76adb6bb7350540ce7bb
91c580d098b221a0bcd40f28db6d225f426d4213
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNE' 'sip-files00098.tif'
212193d800f416e62a424bc68d7eff2c
7cf9b2ea6bc425533e512ac478cb39274ab42794
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNF' 'sip-files00098.txt'
8e7df6b35e6f890902ef84b13ffd9254
38acf70c39cccb6695a361ef7fd7284982983bc1
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8336' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
01e81827bef63402775243d2f3a6ec59
d8a51fceb46808b194b9fae4ef46d9a2dca1b18f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNH' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
22cc4d4933d2293dc2978d3f872e0b02
303553c9a3dd121ad7182b9c1a60699c3732ce1b
'2011-12-29T05:08:52-05:00'
describe
'97465' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNI' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b46c0b099dd3e6578ec0756138842293
21cd29730df845d3b1ccda15e54ca89581d3fc00
'2011-12-29T05:06:49-05:00'
describe
'23743' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNJ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
25b42cd4d7b468bd5107a05927bef26a
7f596e9ee6b049ddff3704215d154c1e707fa036
describe
'31154' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
cab5333100f7c25e6170de6c68939783
0c8ba17e3d9245cefe72ade28da63d9d338a2be7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6b31ad60534f8113468ecbbcd71b70f3
08714754e891528f4da9438df2dbea1ab78f11ac
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNM' 'sip-files00099.txt'
0bc9a8b182d6ea29047a4e3d669220bf
3253472a8f52851d76f3d5214b3b83a40106cb21
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8689' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNN' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
2f90139255e93c1e8f6f739a5f785238
53389fd6f330729c72b57e72d9db67d7066f92a3
'2011-12-29T05:08:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
3451219bf012928beb6bf797edd08665
d023a03715f8565143f3277c783c30a105e17dda
describe
'100342' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNP' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
d9164a3b5598e6a5f9824d0cb9fecc34
57580de1d1fcf78ac5cc6a40be84e112161cb438
describe
'23103' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNQ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
cb56d470b87b438eebce7b30409eae19
fd49daa2356c4857a76698f9e3651e07309c3a3c
describe
'30250' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNR' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
96bee021de1f2a6c0e53d21979fceb77
87964615a53ebae98ff0d583e55e14db1dfb97fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNS' 'sip-files00100.tif'
a21492f9efbe5ae4edb7be76438b56e2
3d742fde2136a344a1c94ceeb7cd3f6a08c0e458
'2011-12-29T05:07:53-05:00'
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNT' 'sip-files00100.txt'
d5c018e373509c35fa7a48755e75dfbf
9aa3354d1a704b965063432dedce86528faf8f38
describe
'8037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNU' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
a8d1bac1811deebf22cf8fb900dc8f20
67159f45400b68f089cc2d325151cd30ef20b6b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNV' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
a6286cf42dc03ab5b8f70a82575c37cc
ad5d71f20407ce3d4feb38ebf4c3637b045f3565
describe
'97249' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNW' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
53b0e2051f79f4c3b2fc3bf96e797e63
01d76839f0d770727ac24d25b592f0bf59393342
describe
'21594' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNX' 'sip-files00101.pro'
1195741cf99f3b3307889c9d85f8f993
a08873ec8eba7c1e97de87b254824e1d7b2f35de
describe
'29192' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNY' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5fd9ae876512329a9f5bc966c42e2867
6b355719cea599934809cd138771982493b78805
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRNZ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
dc0ec9cb56ddad4a06ed40015efb7dd4
8e8df4f3f9ba934d9da792e2cbcf20b25dafd60f
'2011-12-29T05:08:55-05:00'
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROA' 'sip-files00101.txt'
a150458936317eb9a3d1adaf18c510d1
51470db69938bac223d1a273ccb885c2a41049c3
describe
'8114' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROB' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
a99b587c38a949667c4fd1f71a4a984e
375b5598e60bb132b42a9ba11ead995c3664b276
describe
'388833' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROC' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
19b33185eb6833ece015a92c2e13b6d7
ea50fd46331b96beb50ec20c258338ba26d1538d
'2011-12-29T05:06:07-05:00'
describe
'94477' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROD' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
a83b9d9dd2d128ae0f858ff2c56bbda2
f746c325c909b378d30a19a98030fe9c11d15d8a
describe
'20630' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROE' 'sip-files00102.pro'
a5456ac0783504367a091f1bc0e9953b
d23233f005bdb920aa9e8508271a33bd128b73e5
describe
'28690' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROF' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
8d3f242e8ebe2418dbf91ddc7e090882
85dbabbbb84bafe83c0dc801117f427b548b3d7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROG' 'sip-files00102.tif'
6a9c5105923a0215a3bc567ff939258d
491750bf34c2f56882c87b57ec9262730fa443eb
describe
'761' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROH' 'sip-files00102.txt'
ac2092d3213b0114720d7a6a176a5001
88e897486932012da75cdfa3eed2deb6f5f799d8
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8251' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
2bc61d0525dbfc66bae3358505dad02b
c8294c986f23872ecb6390878136d52f48448e1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROJ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e00e43e75820697aa5d9ed935b5a2c1a
30a43e4d901595894c4843e47134114fb0bb5ded
describe
'101458' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROK' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7e8c8d97c180cddc4b8b9c9bac26c5a9
49dec5d5b68b04991a654198759df0361c0e067c
describe
'21465' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROL' 'sip-files00103.pro'
38275208e4369bfd7bfff258c5ebb745
fb6d04391372ccd1748a6e151d5e74cd8af58488
describe
'30462' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROM' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
47bd4ec1f1823b0b26e663f80e06ef0c
a813f2abc140dd820947800767e4ca2dfd166737
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRON' 'sip-files00103.tif'
894527f35f6c28c2b8b014bfa127316b
b55819ee60c6b758ffe95c04cba3f3083de6ce43
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROO' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c6dbf4f7a290dfbafdb5cb754641e085
453a595bb1a25245ec943ae38e23e18230c5a73f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8579' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROP' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
3648aec5c9e53a6eae0abdd82682f127
f6d1c5dea431bcbdde16bdb9b474721fdb9e9292
describe
'388876' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROQ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
335432911ef52c41c454a1774049d8a1
8024afa083ce73c1f7ce4b3b6515659a515f2861
describe
'105208' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROR' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
d135b014c7895c23ef0259c1064d8594
e57e538f0f82c7b3971321a0e776d1244c85390b
describe
'22629' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROS' 'sip-files00104.pro'
7de7c92b5b4b3b2b0f9d5cd0cb15e2c7
65d5579e1392339c5d28380de0c1394624dbe3b4
describe
'31218' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROT' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
1d6a95f74a526fc6f201a324ed683e31
b70dbaf59788af70f8b64ca6d67f3251dcab061a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROU' 'sip-files00104.tif'
07a3d95648e24d006878d21c5009d522
bd6907b78c876586328a73b07610e2caaea05f53
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROV' 'sip-files00104.txt'
dabe2a65977d9cbb4c2cd0d5593c2714
885e90330f248d589b8e668ad31a6e15f35d376e
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8274' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROW' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
0f244faa1ded274b290cc0a5c9dd7150
c4401678b682f8fa3401b29003578d7de6a6aed5
describe
'388828' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROX' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
598a02931f7f77eac3634ecb183f225f
6d9ef5a4fd0b5bfdd947b34e300f82a371928244
describe
'62866' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROY' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
618bfa7c14ec4a7761d9f571103ec912
712f18e8c45896bdc4caa6ffa573d519064bf723
describe
'7497' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABROZ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
a47ca9f16f40fbb39002c7d02aba9500
6d05958471d39df48e7c9cb26662648fcc6e2572
describe
'16091' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPA' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
78302325209446aa76adf6e45850301f
dc9021c62fd2a3c2e41a781aa3cfa2c67b6dff84
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPB' 'sip-files00105.tif'
28d35e45e9863c9ed19b2edfdef94b56
32cfb20f59e848a465ae1cc83223d226014e5c01
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPC' 'sip-files00105.txt'
5be9f86a2a3a4fc01f67fa295a7a3f08
43178c4edcfe40c5ebb5808c346e12331bc83798
describe
'4285' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPD' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
19be0ea7b78f114784e79569b643c3f8
92339e1789a1ee8aeeefe1508762feada1298e34
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPE' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
5ca7951e029c307e9cb3bdc9a5beadb4
cd4ea35b88974e285df7fb62eacac8e6eafc6dab
describe
'100449' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPF' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
98b2e5dc6888626652cf61058398d5f3
9ca1f0ff18874d596799102954ccc8787346d0bd
describe
'13601' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPG' 'sip-files00106.pro'
0901659151d24a924e520fcefe508549
25a1c9a54a36a72c5341847e0d6e2e58d2343b55
'2011-12-29T05:09:33-05:00'
describe
'28542' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPH' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
b260bf5da242a2939d81c0e67b64c2c9
63f802b1deb374c80a2e8709c4ee21e86ed3711e
'2011-12-29T05:06:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPI' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4517026eb3dacd52ca5a9489e0be0d39
2d72c1fbab7188ecb466386043c60a540b914b4d
'2011-12-29T05:06:38-05:00'
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPJ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
41ab42e58492d6bb56a97c2cf690616d
e4bdf31dd7b5bfd9661052cc27da63eb67901b05
describe
'7384' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPK' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
54e07f94e28b67f15d750e71c0b29ab2
d60a522e519a9f9d8773046548410aae64360b80
'2011-12-29T05:06:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPL' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
5e52437c43293426707b1d6de41c1965
38cd5f7ddbc58cb84c88fa664f80597b826ede9d
describe
'104676' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPM' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7c138f5af87450b218604de6142f3bc3
aee11eb0e3fa8637dd1262af031d91af2a6f4bfd
describe
'22696' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPN' 'sip-files00107.pro'
ade9ac2ffeff81bcea1f562bde2cc2fc
7852518481f647542f8df8c47d4ab899c45219cb
describe
'31549' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPO' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
bea561994a2fc44dfd926623be9ec6c3
0b540710637a37390b40aa58e759898f7f525f2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPP' 'sip-files00107.tif'
3fde19f8aa29f201988b75cda344045a
d546b526dfc67effa5d09b47ed88b2fdf4406826
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPQ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
b2294961835367219cb946d4ba5ce60f
7c4f201189455d00a8cfbaa52d233b6d08c79e61
describe
'8366' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPR' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
f3bad29b83cd95128151dcc99f004a43
a5a48b4e7795d36e53e5c97d4e814dcd7cafa427
describe
'388865' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPS' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
842313426327f779e32efd31fb18cd16
3a899ee0f6b2f60bcff04afd7bea65473e869a41
describe
'107582' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPT' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
0ea27dced55db44721323fe72e22744d
42f6b6e371067b98060bd3fac16112ce1f01d061
describe
'23823' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPU' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f7a4a6524fb70c7fb68bfbd1671b38c0
05b68b05ca400b681495e3ca016544c5b1ee6a9f
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPV' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b5a5a13a21d60d54daed88f807aec6b1
feda2d5d3350b10727c6d42276574dd45101f775
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPW' 'sip-files00108.tif'
2d53a330fe2103103a2a3734516ec9f0
a782b02be4e116b955988ec142402a7f5b310879
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPX' 'sip-files00108.txt'
53ed5363be2151e2301e9ef26c39a338
643ed607acc45f2a5dc540a870c9acb26d8888c2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8463' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPY' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
b270ff6fa159c583958b77206217e591
09f6c45142ea72809b10d81e9bc38cef462d3d63
describe
'388879' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRPZ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
8daa3cd94ccc8b8ed5b0cfa6cdad5ef0
b2864b8e955b23637aab88fbdd200d2e0cd730b4
describe
'105306' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQA' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e3d5f69203de656739b89aebd198cbaf
dba21718d4ab84e52fc05675f918cc9423f915fb
describe
'22554' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQB' 'sip-files00109.pro'
590948789022f4fac037ca2076b5f099
e82dc962c5d975c9eb9a7fedf6a949d69f3cf79f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQC' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
c67ef652a4c6294a9004692c4b7e8dd6
9c3ee41d3875b7ebcf4eadde7104fd08fd2bf880
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQD' 'sip-files00109.tif'
a878934f13b2fd92a5453bd32a55e045
f72da8a04271159b291d5ea61359e0fcb47ea8f5
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQE' 'sip-files00109.txt'
6e3057d40980ac156c4294db7a3495d1
13fb23aba37c0705331228d9e79402c1ec849e0d
describe
'8333' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQF' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
a648a2357a9ea1fd1d665d5f766cbc99
2d7c767f3b3874013c9fed7a3428f2456f5ac0d3
describe
'388663' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQG' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
bd27713a272f9e230310a94cfb1f344d
a1a0033e855dd728eef654da8ca0be375112604a
describe
'94987' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQH' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
fbea21d061abe558f0a0be54b5ad504b
7bf47fd929d7db787c52f6fec27bf7eb8c099bcb
describe
'21781' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQI' 'sip-files00110.pro'
4c8b713a6a84f123d6baa8797d7bed64
d247aad73f69a0417a40150b7acb3c7ed82a1552
describe
'29291' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQJ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
4ee26cc6ae77002802135f89fdc40c2d
f5a41464898f6db713c8438b6628d02f5c243027
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQK' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c83b46e9a96b4ae559b650b83ea8d261
87a12ecd0dbfbfd2afc7413d8932876ccc67c771
describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQL' 'sip-files00110.txt'
72f3498980752d561af4493b93181ff5
95086675b9dfb277c4a7f4d405ed02f1df62c670
describe
'7934' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQM' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f5e92e380c8f031e46c001d302fec519
acec4e9ce0718a16c89ec84ed94185977f0a239f
'2011-12-29T05:09:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQN' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9fe9b0b8b2e6229ac5c476065b27788b
ea04e3190d2ea58c3138cfef983ddbc80c17f428
describe
'100411' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQO' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c1719c5899aa9fb15a59020a4fbc19d5
3feae5fd3092dcd253c979d56ce28e0efe121051
describe
'22334' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQP' 'sip-files00111.pro'
9483a683ca726f55b8019655e806cf30
88a0818ba9b3dc64274aa8fe402563cd8b0edde8
describe
'29551' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQQ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
5819909d03c4f4b141851218ff2a36c5
1015ea661c99dea49360afcb0ac8ee2b65b585dc
'2011-12-29T05:09:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQR' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ad143d06aa4deeee275977694626c5ed
d8396ea82860e0e4c5c9d3375625ed8305c4dc0f
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQS' 'sip-files00111.txt'
babb86844ba7e01a06a3a203084c9053
d7ee6c92b4e0edabd574f1e52cf558955ef47f6c
describe
'8007' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQT' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e1941c8ed3bdbc6e513e87a9a54fdb20
2b6cd5848d8e104536432c92ef8b80b1ef747c44
describe
'388862' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQU' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
9c163cfe9909cf3124ac3e9ccc62db1b
85f1e9013e14b4698c583cc56182f16422933e64
describe
'100693' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQV' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
d0974b5ec97083ce462e6391a4817660
683ac87ade2b842f8e27e35772be627ebe429a03
describe
'21270' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQW' 'sip-files00112.pro'
105a0efedcba4a965272a25a4826207b
ad7fd45366bf070757756ef4f7aef1bc5cef8ca2
describe
'30184' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQX' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
0ff5ca9a08d71c8d9c662106977a5794
1488261738d0e61597df0075cf61ae8c12af5dfe
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
5d393e3acefd843f15622656fc7d54e1
4a510be539b14743af8d713620c7f468f6f6284c
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRQZ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
d40518a58c8f3ef3f83910aa98e8dc58
cedf62c19ac63a59955df740235d95972a628447
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRA' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
43cca537c42ba420b697ce7d64163743
50769e89df74612287ac4656e1b7e71980f002b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRB' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
7879f7a8af0bad6530dbb4a4c5e69216
631ac89eb2d7fb863608ed2a2cd86b27d3662d22
describe
'103582' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRC' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
82a8d7479653b9a8c475041b277a8fa2
5f70e1129eb22b7035c7cbd4cbad3c10506c54d0
describe
'22561' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRD' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5fde67b387b0390e0db111ae06c05ad1
2f6776243438f5df9f709e7f87b699bd9c9a4050
'2011-12-29T05:05:31-05:00'
describe
'31205' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRE' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
87eba67640900fb3fda8b60d42345af7
7837d70791756650198f6cb369debdab7525c451
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
547d8310a620071ae9fbcae81da89c63
a044f9d4b8f462e2542cd5ce992ada1a450ec52a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRG' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4cde9623da3a2ce47ee066841ee59cf6
26dd2b597a890148cb3be203e750ec7bad1459d0
describe
'8214' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRH' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
031b6e2ad50f526863e26dc631edcca8
74ce25a45a85b2c9d78227cfe5e73f50bfe9a3d5
describe
'388881' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRI' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8ee3c8a3a0449724feb33462eb6828cb
5a29a9ed48344f8fc23e18c8dabcccea380b4295
describe
'103857' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRJ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
80261b08f1a2f8222997abecc7156afb
a1b18ca4a970a05762799286a5d4712f3d9269a1
describe
'24090' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRK' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d4a8d23d5244f61d1ec108ef06120559
2f9f0d98aa870c8923c482f524c84df82e5abccd
describe
'31898' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRL' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
7719a159650c3b70af22ab9c17d8db6e
cbd2523dcfb12df25300bf52c5958d45bb6fdb5c
'2011-12-29T05:07:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRM' 'sip-files00114.tif'
056c6585f9138f703d318932ec8002a9
a282571a25f57c89c559e113945fccb5a2cd8de0
'2011-12-29T05:06:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRN' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a79ee97241aff7a835e031b0de4098e5
3d4835caa31dab924ebee7c83cb0633efd3865eb
describe
'8204' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRO' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
72ab2ca04ac8e0a9bd3b6ff6f45e04be
272b87e122b5ad32d32b0908bf0d1131b90d0498
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRP' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9b938241fa2a291e1aa9fb66fd901105
c6873ea847fc0ab465f14072b0ad39d5edcc857b
'2011-12-29T05:06:14-05:00'
describe
'102306' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRQ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
540278b01e87204dae7d353c0e3ad41f
fad65e362a879be9f2c44f936cacbf5833f29772
describe
'22714' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRR' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a4438a62bbeafbca7f748b5aa7c05bcc
547f171ebeb9a1e227cd6c89db9aca1ae41ff855
describe
'29984' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRS' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0f8204a95875edac0de570e7e03f63d9
e23d1c8416320333f5db4cac09a1edc79ba72bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRT' 'sip-files00115.tif'
0f876d8e990a946c278bc4fbc37cc1c5
5df43ee503882fdb9ba4719e2447c0b2b9eee053
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRU' 'sip-files00115.txt'
69ca6ca38b82bdcdd43ca294e04f19ea
e6658cb2535731395e255668d181d029f55099f9
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8688' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRV' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
a3874f1953cccd5f938bb825ff0d9d27
977818f1b25d37eafde3f5cfa961628f3d67add9
describe
'374258' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRW' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9a1821f43ab7bd9b34629a749c893f55
a0f2bca5de8dc59039438b9dd7230f6b5ea34510
describe
'104844' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRX' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
525f27b2c9e0c8213a08b1755b472d0e
1e0da0f083c35b15f94a2c4a6c4fde7d93c930f5
describe
'21916' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRY' 'sip-files00116.pro'
991a29d18551dbd4c8cae68884118be4
3313c6cc15283a08459fe868fb5e4bc548471bfc
describe
'31744' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRRZ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
927598fe605887ee394f752fc197a984
ac7d9e365e231e14f7600d42af225fc96355da00
'2011-12-29T05:08:32-05:00'
describe
'3011472' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSA' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5a992b751c197d72c458f01ec83c0b20
5fe3fda5d707e50215960af09b8960202770dc0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSB' 'sip-files00116.txt'
48dc9dc57b154bbc3c1dd899326c1ed5
5a7389b10df4897081d0533546cfe221a52ca4da
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSC' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
54ff4d0c9caa596a7377af4512d49bc5
d7ee1ebbd67f8eda6246fb405a0bb1070030f46f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
8461efcbfbcd6b1ec3cb5966cd1d3355
5be0fad64bef8b12f5bb0d2ccc0d15c46810f1c0
describe
'181424' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSE' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
2917d0c154c9b848eabc96e1c852b7b7
0c60b7c0268a16f2e4aba9e6fd07894985f20889
describe
'2154' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSF' 'sip-files00118.pro'
a28575da0b9da4e6d4c518277a9d3c28
0ec1f951b40ceaed1738e19d03e340f27465b045
describe
'44403' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
7f5f09352cd3e1c6621a361d30d0f30a
82f909c0205847de1b6c01c7861e2e5040175cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
82cfbe562f6be5821bf68e532d050132
bd443195513d6e39e05773cb660003b38139269e
describe
'63' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b48228856af5b7eb92902e8c564e7995
0c44ec6f1ca623df7eaa88e6ad26482279c9797f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'10629' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSJ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
f1a228f0c4084d48a22da9c531e62cf8
1a5bb668290e7e4d533f2900e80b6c90fa40ea27
describe
'388866' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
69bc3c5b70d373b7ead93247d10d649b
09e8e9695a36d8cc359160981b8c18aff7f39b93
describe
'104632' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
4efb50624ad182cb44c28ba9d754b433
645f46c73d3d0a57469c8c47ab679a2207af1fe4
describe
'22940' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
9e38fad05399c1479a487c0599ec7812
92f2b5ca114bde153ccb87ee8ed5168ec22594b2
describe
'31224' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
75bbb5222ee6bf4655106659323af405
b9d3c99de6b668ba3fa514336737f462b663f38b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
1b356e62218973e3b6fbec39152c93ba
88b7964c0a61ec64201e7aac18339ae55c68234d
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSP' 'sip-files00119.txt'
15c75c9d80f67429fda54db9e68ac6d6
9f32fa8cf53a8a047793afae8ecf8ec77824cfec
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8154' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
627b381531afcd41aedcd70c7d7761a3
f92648afd3c2372013b577633d407afc2c230904
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSR' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7a578230731b3cfd0dfa32dcb44d3905
c3e418f88f6cc837574958f08f7413b0efc82e6d
describe
'101387' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
9c2b108c3e285b649fd00e4ab716d713
d51c69cceddce65a9abf2d890fe80f06b4760c6c
describe
'22486' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRST' 'sip-files00120.pro'
46f6d88fec669892056e7202769cf721
5d3f424d340a9d604ff92637257b13b8be9189e3
describe
'30730' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSU' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
b1ad9f4b19d54ff5df665d322c548348
35faf06ae381c8458cec5ebcca724ec11b9a41d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSV' 'sip-files00120.tif'
fb275a3de97db60a2b445dfae350e9ad
af0cadc5f5055ebe7654ab8e833f406584b03a3b
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSW' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1e815fd60caf599efb282a17903fb198
04c65988d3d481dab45fd0ad4cf04194c27a941a
describe
'8091' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
df5a50b7ac90f5f26ea759d8b49e3ad6
75e81a8c2c83c0601b6327a673300a975c58d108
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSY' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
b9f36f107156af33f8c0f11c74138f24
cafaffb358b5c3c87f19479cdd4b92ebbdd48761
describe
'103048' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRSZ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ac539d2173f46f6b677ed43e4375a629
ca1fe7057e6451a64e886a23bc8e17aa172c3fd1
'2011-12-29T05:06:15-05:00'
describe
'22426' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTA' 'sip-files00121.pro'
36ea0d01c5840b1a8938cd99c26a8878
0197f62546f0f72cd1505c1e37b4efa09897aa92
describe
'31243' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTB' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
71ef4f8d858aa6e70195bb9925320007
4a46d52503f9e3589e7a4f5c318b8692da82f40a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTC' 'sip-files00121.tif'
df5216861f3bafe968fbb485bafff4c2
04f8aceba53a1e2c2f9dad3556f1da777b8bf513
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
74f03f7ff6ae6de40b48620019150d87
e1ced09495b25052fc6ea405b5c3b781b60efc77
describe
'8432' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTE' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
8b826797f45e6e74ddb025ae783d29c2
9f99594b21b5e6a46688dd84eef6d5c1d951b65f
describe
'388864' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTF' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
422e3b156bddf0a8e53950beb2b49505
d4760f19753ef591b5d0fca7fe5631faa1308e39
'2011-12-29T05:10:09-05:00'
describe
'106806' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTG' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
092171826a41989ace6aac06882ad38a
e2d15b54087c57fc7b9bdcab2bdf5209ad072ff6
describe
'23895' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTH' 'sip-files00122.pro'
2111779538044ff62aa03c4b7231d0c3
ce07ae55a1f2c6dc2879a7c48820bae8bde59ef4
describe
'32108' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTI' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
41b380b30528014e92420be780844a75
e8b44a750df2d1cc72a0e6eb3d284d9c14d04a1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTJ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
08aa4c7bff52d9cf244b063d922bab2b
3d013277f006b14d5d3b8e34b21fd8ae15cc80f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTK' 'sip-files00122.txt'
cde7c8b08c92c548fd9906296222874d
d32a2c361f87ebf00f1114caa796c20e2fa5efd4
describe
'8346' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTL' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
4d9f66d780e829a8219d80dc375823fc
230de58043611006df59bcd3321a4976460706ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTM' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
4ed3129bd2f98d8066aa3ddf91118515
ac0499365eddf839a25ac6a7d31590e8a9101268
describe
'104264' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTN' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
fc98e48b293c9862cd850a31fc7bc4a0
82cfe1513f089dba6349b5276b91ea8278edfc60
describe
'22878' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTO' 'sip-files00123.pro'
50e29db3120bbc88cda5ea7fb072ac3d
8ec76c7c5c08b1ef38cc3db064d0f9382265450d
describe
'31614' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTP' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
db0f65f30756f7305a1982712246b939
08df969de534e8b9609658accfe4b30184e22f83
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTQ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
af3159227dca81eafd228906f1c7983a
a6de95651a370fe560d716b8942c63e6ba948c1b
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTR' 'sip-files00123.txt'
719c676f913266bc3a0357362bd4ac9e
b0b1078be85519c8c130ec4e8d9c51426371aca5
describe
'8131' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTS' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
02362a9142c22bc535eaaef102d6b8b3
0b1505c5cdce4d3efdd16868b00c0a50f6e4e6a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTT' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c0f8793b4729572f92dc213a9289dbba
763f3922f826cd5ba141eb14c6a8f21d4b882c72
describe
'81879' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTU' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
d240fd3dc33b074be2e4a73077ae1f44
4f8208c18c4076fdc7a50db06a5b867c8c2d65f9
describe
'16665' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTV' 'sip-files00124.pro'
722043069859f041dde4f21a949b9515
1731bc3bb7418eb1ebf21aad8029fe1c20f1482a
describe
'23492' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTW' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
faf418c8bd131384f5f449f362f8c7a6
22510bf9081fa3843052550fe5bdb8aa51f4f190
'2011-12-29T05:09:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTX' 'sip-files00124.tif'
0f85ebe012de7cd0ea1393aa8aa20ad1
23e38d18520fac5149dc317ff7ec976cf375ea17
describe
'608' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTY' 'sip-files00124.txt'
489fcb1c35f759c11dd335d492b9f8bf
2fba32d933d45909d65fcea9863fb00571431c2b
describe
'6257' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRTZ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
271ebbd683567e6a5c7435f9058c1c9a
5fbbb6ead832fbc769d9b2075fac895b492f5533
describe
'388885' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUA' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
fd34f7ff38c008b3be5206f9bff9e3b9
eff57bb2640982d346b0fa137e2c2877befba3ee
describe
'99547' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUB' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
3aed74f07b6ed54e50b1a18e84499bce
3162d952f3e748915c9f3962c4796df34b00062b
describe
'15419' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUC' 'sip-files00125.pro'
fb74ca2b1b106aa547f5b5e58c74bf38
6fb975e5a8d28417bdc5bd5f01f74c0dfe38860c
describe
'26487' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUD' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
9ef83e30eef206ace8304e97044325d7
731bd87edb5616f5d868f785c1bbcf953ff921cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUE' 'sip-files00125.tif'
ddf4f8a146f3b3f06ca3a769e5a9f83a
6eb1d4733c39fbe8f963c95c67ca15192b387afd
describe
'568' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUF' 'sip-files00125.txt'
f3ece4fdc7eb86fd5f988d80f6a74f02
b5847937244170863534c5be3afc17864a95d365
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7099' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUG' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
927b8cf22ad0ba50bb06b934c71360d3
fb691067e656042038ffcf64d48d038ea3c0edb0
describe
'388868' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
ae72af1bbb1636a3ea7843c012f3b56b
9b543031c13ab3d7ca241c999d1efe2e1d0d5ed5
describe
'107860' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUI' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
10d0caac9a66b474270db27492788ace
c496c042cd08204d0e08f2df78576fa92962db50
describe
'24225' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUJ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
4f7e0487c67db4422f187d06c93e4d5d
7ae9f7b7aa1acea56084b704fc8606ad5ff89e1c
describe
'32507' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
ca5fef90a184ba33d17acf5999a09316
c89ad1155d2de0acbf73bd2cb8af4c39c460b060
describe
'3128108' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
df833182426956f344c7417e1c1564ab
6673499fdfc66f7f0ed2de5f5d55ac3ea1e74503
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
89404f9aaeacc38a20d112815c7faa85
0fd09643557a21c615e470204ec17d37a790316e
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8691' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUN' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1756740a6c5d93119954e4a5e42fd8fa
39d08ec389e2642473887cec996edb57f82f20e7
describe
'388906' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUO' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f910f35be7597377a1ec12b0688ae765
be945da443381ac1f6097dbc3b3ade1a0081b316
describe
'105585' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUP' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
aa10e64f7aaa727d1e4f4f9b341b9fe6
8736ba69abaf0aed0ced313de857cb3d523ca256
'2011-12-29T05:09:28-05:00'
describe
'23655' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUQ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
fd52e7dfe2572cda1169e4748db791bf
1e1cd5743a469b158fae70cf57fa30851fc8a07c
describe
'31882' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUR' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
418af4a2b59fc24b80d8a30ff82670ba
c304580c41727656adc67fcfd01b06d4a7f1f864
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUS' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8e22ae62f032f2f7fd74f48025c08ae6
d74e55da5ae3abf2604c1a7a03d7580d9e56fb95
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUT' 'sip-files00127.txt'
399e0bde59b261ca798da0e4d11a8daf
3a421eb286b913bcbfec8f3d0bd928633ab30588
describe
'8637' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUU' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
a5e81b16319d8cb2511aedb41a32538c
aef6080da8d2bb76ab69cf81a8b2fc12e335aa34
describe
'388721' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUV' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
0b70c651b50625c423f03277e548ad2e
7ee92c34bcdefb55aeec310b29e2006fdd284cfc
describe
'106061' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUW' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
60350500ce9b6b4aca4068766ef72267
0426dee2c78af119eeb1e61d7e7d619f91b5d67e
'2011-12-29T05:05:41-05:00'
describe
'24713' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUX' 'sip-files00128.pro'
2e9b937ea67fc955fdbb323cd11439a4
b6df2460310b9fc4893d490618e98aa06a90d25c
describe
'31835' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUY' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5f337542b952c10c09ca1143ff26011a
0aa6938cf948ee3608aa0818534c0498121c4536
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRUZ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
cf43226bf60cedae401802d45ee1ea0a
0b5c731122c1d50663d2caf21c4aaffdd1a71e43
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVA' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2d2538f23274c19dac5f813ef12348de
649238ac379d5e8e62002fbe38d1062a9e7a609b
describe
'8297' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVB' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
07569890c359f505e93f0f023794d262
c1e75d123a181df56d6e113a8904a05d1d062fbd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVC' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
3091aee2b3118c249316c6bb66ddf736
bb9618cc4bb263a2873b5e27027c1977eb3bbe11
describe
'107938' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVD' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
517d056c3e8fae07442d3f4b87fbd953
41c3deae392eac6e22fa6148f03f7063b9a67fae
describe
'24386' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVE' 'sip-files00129.pro'
072e92c8c023d138de80a95e55623358
131553bde3245b333ae4ca10d1185b28b82875bc
describe
'32417' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVF' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a78a9b08a0d9895390b5423ce696f054
6974cbf1583fd39ad20f8a4fe54b1de1b8ca7822
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVG' 'sip-files00129.tif'
f89962bb4ddb84a59b74400743d4d463
307a69a131b11965711724c8c1eab7acba65b9dc
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVH' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7a0d0ff59041cef72647863ab5c21a6b
d29755c136cbbc5d6d4658e88b766b601e13f870
describe
'8966' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVI' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
8ccb0ac9869dd9020a41127a4c48df05
89ffa44c2d4f90899677554757b05c0a23e5f042
describe
'388880' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVJ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
db50454d7cd12e129ececc4c65a5ab53
984dc6cb94951c871a58637a543b9d18e3d47006
describe
'97981' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVK' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6b42f6ac06e1689af83c82f3c8b3e65d
ac9a4a004a4d606a80770b2588d1583a30cb3af2
describe
'22949' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVL' 'sip-files00130.pro'
4a9ef23e2ef3de4a7f864d609389a5b4
78ccc129d705a08977529bf505a50194ec815b21
describe
'30580' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVM' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b3bba752f46965f0a082a636a35354a5
f5e82747d5d1bd25052d2291ef11c79d12b3bb69
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVN' 'sip-files00130.tif'
7a44a95f52e118f41140f5c333e1657a
c41482b17daa08f6bf4d643c34106c71af550538
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVO' 'sip-files00130.txt'
8de44655b9a274f79be4ec235899396c
50b461da8f8baff4324f196b4219032bdce01fa1
describe
'7893' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVP' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
cf4dc572891eedf2df0d9180036e47c0
b497ca69753ee8e95c83629807c2f9a746191d4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVQ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
bd370c08650f7c88def82d6ad421722c
d65c1dce3ad130399e3b2722f8726677e008a398
describe
'106000' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVR' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
3b2cef97d627e889f26120a1bad18263
31e42901d79d1a935e08cd8ed4a4486c27618db1
describe
'24207' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVS' 'sip-files00131.pro'
4b207cea123d4f428b414d45a3b350ce
26ee43e6947686ded61c62c61caac1a27c0e168f
describe
'32484' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVT' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
d69c5a609fbf9b482fefd32891557a83
bcd0a07b4c3ec81ff5c9aae96a295362a7a41e0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVU' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c47ba5ec58ab50135b578ae3fbfd4944
7f55b07f75ddcb7a7760cc5e10c055491ad590bb
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVV' 'sip-files00131.txt'
95726395e7e97341d44cffe506094683
66bdbcb493bf233fb972a90a0830f9b72555b3a5
describe
'8778' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVW' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
faa48a9fa4ce902603949154f48ed0aa
42666e84649ab4c25d62a4e4fc242b34c84f93b4
describe
'388762' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVX' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
938a1cf402d6e59641a19e64acd899e2
289485e76ea315ac5e8129149f99c690bb8ae8c5
'2011-12-29T05:10:13-05:00'
describe
'107750' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVY' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
b3262bc4a95ea4ffcefdbb01c3834b84
35a7646a6a62d591aa7ea5f66e0daad8aa8945ca
describe
'24085' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRVZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
c397ba62655d6da19b729ff6a4127071
df74832526789cf37daefad402ea82263f9835ea
describe
'32595' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWA' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
7690724254b7778257595a5b06b262e7
d396f9dd92aed8cf5a2bd7df97bfaf04db238892
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWB' 'sip-files00132.tif'
01aadaed07407577bde847fce2049dc7
513ad6df381237c47b4d1cb53c97bf143e7073a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWC' 'sip-files00132.txt'
7aa1f9b513119263a9f1b3049adecc71
351b43434a6a79ded363146f65d18be00c7deee2
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWD' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
c94747eaf5e6659d63b5ec1def3da47d
95c97785959e9a7786e0fdbcbe7f26a0cdea08c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWE' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
7dc51ca3283c15e49feeb945b9ac3a4f
f74a44aea9f6a35712248564a1e374532d41db3f
describe
'113210' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWF' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
0f4517938bebd3eb5dd782763ef531e8
f3bb80ca255a887068e9ec6de6c5f8c02045c12e
describe
'23865' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWG' 'sip-files00133.pro'
1024e2a2a3cb2d5d7b869b75054b4b9a
4022fc5a0915b42f74ece85e33844e0ca18d9b71
describe
'34392' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWH' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
0696ed69fa02747f523da684dbf97094
b98cd5b579449d65d06ffc76b0b7a62afa8a2270
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWI' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fa30a7e4b6820d3e453f2490b6b12a9d
eee4922e5510483b4e5203a99c4928c44d8dff53
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWJ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
e155e9e94d4406b0bb07c1341ae96aa4
eac41df0c26a0e4c5c40070a1f6402576329ed21
describe
'8916' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWK' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
631e167530c5195e13f8d0572beb4f02
b9e9d8b8a00cf662022fea9bb575aaa6e2530f6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWL' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
899f209797de5c34ec69b2e129ad42d8
d2abd8a74b8facfea93d77b86849841423a8a6e0
describe
'103519' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWM' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
4da2d4fcf378c0eb0bb2ea90b85a9e36
a1b88c0208f19a0caba2887bcd0328a3b29c876f
describe
'23373' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWN' 'sip-files00134.pro'
62c97586f752e7f88c19b4fe2c22a87e
bee6ac195934e5c6491be119c1e7bca25daf94bb
describe
'31009' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWO' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6d79cee4379787833dfdeaf51ba148b8
d2c1d07ae1f529b626e359aed26ce641b0f07efe
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWP' 'sip-files00134.tif'
8072afeb2f1c2ff6febf22d7affeee54
e4aa7b5973d0355bc0b58c9bdb766311d3f85439
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWQ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
1cc2493951f076058245c0e34738a9bc
f3128068ee14ebc9690c251bbe9b324972ee6bb5
describe
'8287' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWR' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
76a324518b35c9669189610cdbe8f248
67c35b2d9bb24debea8ede6ab222bf6f82f33a78
describe
'376159' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWS' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e5df1d6088baf06db54bfdb3d7be3679
d3b59ce86e625564afd42a2b42e4abe6ccf1bc51
describe
'110920' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWT' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
6e93a649678e9ecc22a5f59d9168d62e
ea981515115f644a3428f28ee0e023d28a3916cd
describe
'24233' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWU' 'sip-files00135.pro'
aae014fd75797bebd572b7047ba3bcc6
b153269e736d79d556e334cf6adbd41cc0791886
describe
'34337' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
ba1cf95e744aa1ae77ebef1367163b11
04c9c6e1a69d42c1fa780ee2099da477f2486daa
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWW' 'sip-files00135.tif'
0968b1788d119793c2153ee46c4d5940
bdb982f912b4c4dabcd5ef23c2e3d2b2c3ed2a41
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWX' 'sip-files00135.txt'
a43070c3bf818dc1b7f9da3d519f4426
cab79ede372065828f370335e0409683b735e254
describe
'8880' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWY' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
198bf840e7eec9b37d535076e11fb7b7
8192978a80db74ed0f8b88dfd30c9a1c09661b9a
describe
'379148' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRWZ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
4ea4b0594deef36d4d5baa3ed3e6dd9e
6e097cc968f8a52d707d953e32f6ac63a1e1893d
describe
'79476' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXA' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
4f2f92c09847f8ca66eb081e384923b9
ac6ca0b632db1446bdfcc1dd0391d92a932897ff
describe
'18157' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXB' 'sip-files00136.pro'
c246d4203c09afe05364c27bcafe09d8
b359f117cf8c718ae74f6b380efc69fca68ff0c9
describe
'23768' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXC' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
a5fca7e637ff2ce952c9f8048ce6424a
436655dce44c06e44266a136ea61ae89357d8836
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXD' 'sip-files00136.tif'
2822a5bceb4223ea56373bf3e9e73cb1
bb9c2f905ff40e4ddf48df2392ce6e30dd23c522
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXE' 'sip-files00136.txt'
17b79d4ecfb6d543b37b66b6093105be
f9d705d88fd0b9c80c6b98b4c9ac8efd72e82152
describe
'6286' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXF' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
6a4d69d999f6e53602d83f865925e509
be768868105c5573e13246bbc559b091b2028411
describe
'382354' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXG' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
346db3217677fff08f9c2f9f4c84a509
cdda2edf83864c9698f1c8755fdb73b989285ac6
describe
'47759' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXH' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
32f52420e246a9fbc9a4eedc82afb02d
3a644fa60c9cd4be161778e39ab0006f92e78707
describe
'2430' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXI' 'sip-files00137.pro'
cb6fc89e3ffe7e587933777af9910159
3ab40630582957bce90e9dece262d02851952f17
describe
'13195' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXJ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
c86434fba679fc4341258b95e56c3c8c
bd2cfa0c6711de02bbed3e74f531dedccd2e63c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
e2f7425f81a2ec138af1c36c9b780133
cc991bd275472bf12ed01a74a3793dd40e250864
'2011-12-29T05:05:53-05:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXL' 'sip-files00137.txt'
cc4cbf4521f19fcaa45d0951a581a6f8
e30cab1d901072e111247febab09aac6c98843be
describe
'4149' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXM' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
68287c45d6f8412ba5d9c581c9f5a5e9
90ca944894c90ef0b07958c95e89947caa39529f
describe
'379117' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXN' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
a40468e6cfb0a49571d05714a7fd561e
fa05449e2701b355919e8e189cd33914f6a9a5de
describe
'79835' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXO' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
637124fd851d2627f60b4e6fd2f1fa35
6388cc844139d7098feb79ecd1e71958b495bec1
describe
'14390' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXP' 'sip-files00138.pro'
725ad3a75149783d2bfb1b5ece23fc70
e1387dfd8dcb2f3638660fe5dc5341ab4ee8eacb
describe
'24888' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXQ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
dffc4ee5a17bc70b8fbfcf930da10957
08bd8051df3891b4d8b880a0e9022d13272abcbc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXR' 'sip-files00138.tif'
e839cb6fa54d63750521f59b2d9ec253
15c0f8abebd5557c3262f1299c8fe3e5d66b1fa5
describe
'552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXS' 'sip-files00138.txt'
089972d8b3334bb63c2912858974584d
89dedf281d2ec7bd1ef27419a4f19a8771ae33ee
describe
'6713' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXT' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
1650baa0da4b768e96723078090c87bd
c74074af44ca9be540fd0d1ebd2ca0c3021ebf3d
describe
'388838' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXU' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
1ecbb68c8d336148900097315f53ae9b
aed0042c6af704c3d1912f0100595b5e6a6edec9
describe
'84104' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXV' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
02f62ee7b38c1eff578f11f9e39cf8bb
c1959d838642c9ebd11d3e6a95c9e721aa8ae4e3
describe
'20116' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXW' 'sip-files00139.pro'
7896f0eb5ae0cd46adb43aac5104ad07
f6218ac072867ba4b75a9df51ac9d3bea116ade8
describe
'26806' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXX' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
61d414c27793f6e311bb2df070af4802
d02f588b850c3f5e2332d300917f809b80f63a93
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXY' 'sip-files00139.tif'
df9257283e2023b436bfb2dbb2909725
37daedc371a767ae64b270f2b910b8e568e48e02
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRXZ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6009cd8c69391db79fbe8e75cbda9b1e
fcf75e290c50ec80a168b7deca3017162f86f7dc
describe
'7531' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYA' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
f8a92bb2099c1f9c8c6048c612140f29
82742ea481b9cc32d43d124bbb802932c334fea6
describe
'388723' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYB' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
d0460028b494cadf9c750f02bf986294
5689a9ebf6e5b01f6d5b18ccf4565f84ef9b5163
describe
'86002' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYC' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
8e92653a67a44e24bb4f39cb9b5d2e01
15e4eedb04550948cfa9b0978ca3e5939effdca9
describe
'22372' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYD' 'sip-files00140.pro'
142cfd34bfe4f58a7ecad864b0381315
9dbfcc6b766d09fde793a6644a90d89610bad19f
describe
'27239' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYE' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6f6cad575e751023d6b136f7a1812e6e
e1f8ecba77dbb2971e92610fd0d04bbca43b35ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYF' 'sip-files00140.tif'
c110e872ec953542fe8a915ab2f2af60
4ae9f690818701dd745a1baa2da21cc9b1d8fc6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYG' 'sip-files00140.txt'
6c9ae5f9f31d82b1769ed9542057a4d2
b1d26b6d9393c2f7da9e7230380cccd8f7e01387
describe
'7947' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYH' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
56753fb94baff801fdbc83f5d863649d
fbe6423fb50980f8a935eb70d9ab8f928d228372
describe
'388867' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYI' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
cdc5c7c8c8534d561f187c0ad1143809
0521417887b117a787f9274ba099eebdb22468ae
describe
'167893' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYJ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
42897fc206147cdc9267ab69ae94136c
ccff8528b365ebb0706940f57515926b52d38764
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYK' 'sip-files00141.pro'
05a4171ad1dae19d1cea55be86baa2aa
5a6a0e2703456a30882f4fba995c38761eabca60
describe
'40057' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYL' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
aa04b313b942baf4c905b84ebf34a86b
bcc99477098bf938aeb337cf2b985965f639dc13
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
374004d588b477408ff3847b68235807
5aee7e704b80ae01a879e7fcc4f36719e18a62cd
describe
'9599' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
9914d595d83db13790a430f1ce7e65f1
ab19f59495e80961c95745718e87cb1c4550e88f
describe
'384001' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
40a1c5bf948074f7548a67c37ca32378
b1103e0bfe5410366cda5a11092c612eec81025d
describe
'94006' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYP' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
a1bd760566c5bd8c471fcba94d7ec8ce
38f5b3e34f9321922d6d920e1726a14d4791195c
describe
'27124' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYQ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
ab25c4a69a3575a8f1f6e3bc174a56b7
feb861988f9b949c83891debca51ce7c09842703
describe
'29412' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYR' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
deb685155ec475550f722f12c4b56057
ac79e61ae25d0e1cb736812626ef61c73f2dec65
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYS' 'sip-files00142.tif'
267863eb64bf0abf58069f17a368c7ba
f11759dec803c25ac240fddb33ad013f6a7b4033
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYT' 'sip-files00142.txt'
6126ccbca7d388abfee2eb4a9fbf043f
c4add655c74e25f7f63fec4c42a9bb5c7f479795
describe
'7731' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYU' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
fdc69e9679951d5ef3b122c4431bdc44
05e140905d6a6677c0d708ffe63651ed766d8583
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYV' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
4ce884c4c0b733d5ef50963d9010c56d
405b9223f0ffe4861f5367b114ba35c5e7b59de7
describe
'158322' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYW' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
74553beaf5f59c25e4cb601c5111b901
6ed7bd1162c8ca9bf8d83b09ee6bc69913b813e5
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYX' 'sip-files00143.pro'
aaf67f704d067d7590e16c558a49711e
7ec2d3cbdbc6533db7b1b43fd8a6300f616c295f
describe
'37704' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYY' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
e24d9b4d041e0cde59a2fae5b0a5e514
e2b0915e97c1680bf26566c4ca73b84906b2425d
'2011-12-29T05:05:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRYZ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ed03b722e03beb0e52fb7aaf4a43f9fb
ce5d4d109595e5547ce4d6551573efe551560652
describe
'27' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZA' 'sip-files00143.txt'
c0c282f6665c77c5f11c81918cd630b6
42c6641898cac6f8799fa227f6c75cf86c7f527f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZB' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
f5e2c1e789e811f5dc4a9eae07aa7fd1
6aa774cdace13e2a7c680fa912eb222d42043566
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZC' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
8755aedd8d0ff8e4bf7ef196be7db868
6cfaad58a1ab0e8c0481f931e50ec6a1541c8920
describe
'80816' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZD' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
27b7cded3dcbb706258a6018d4b2dd4b
d858a0cb6c3f13874694661359fa078e2b2f50d2
describe
'23076' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
905275477342ce4b4fb55ea3eb17904b
4638af798f43fca1d27e749f579fe69afcac2d1c
describe
'26463' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZF' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
9bc82556dcb7a97ed75e15ab05637d70
7e2892509cfc8e7430988c2df117f9742dcf2515
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZG' 'sip-files00144.tif'
fcff64118c9ba63d1aceaea03d909f81
ac7bdbb65d3bf7ce83077eb7be0e8ef283cc3b36
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZH' 'sip-files00144.txt'
bb1db157bde5082951df2b995a383249
96884d5a169bca11c7246466d730026dcb6c4da2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7561' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZI' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
7178bc12f707525d0dbd999336e23431
7b0d2064509ec7a91cfa2403b8c065a9ba0d9d39
describe
'379165' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZJ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2e9dc483cbb95b3ac771c182437d5fd1
317303a1fe5c34a1c2044e09986bfbf144e6cf9c
describe
'177772' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZK' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c7d80aaa0df5ac6af36106f38dc8a6e1
7ef4e7f7ff4c3fd848b9e77ac799144d2aef56fd
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZL' 'sip-files00145.pro'
25821d0deb04b60b6c1196adfa7edf23
5f1e379fcf85150a0ec83c27f86ae762e7631182
describe
'41895' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZM' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
4e04fa2899803a8aee73ba1a033ede73
0e8a82deec5e67b656a5e6ee4cc3a1f69e51fbf0
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZN' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c7bc7ddb2441f1cf8d0320f9a4a67f03
6a70d525ab77efc89399b734413d4b8b4b618950
describe
'30' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZO' 'sip-files00145.txt'
e8c11602a4790bfa15b87347f6209aa0
2345759e22223c13aa5b18e6bf13dffd8744bdfc
describe
'9963' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZP' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
71596b950c433e3dacbf8842c74a5934
c96f42711f89d80ac1d67c59ff0a5f9691dcc6c3
describe
'388759' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZQ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
b50a4a5df6d44351f07a997982378584
358466f5118085747714b0a90b75c42bb9db770a
describe
'98583' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZR' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
a05a75f4c716aca3be7ae0d072843c4d
1df16c8015d81e9f1bda3768e48de72a20d91493
describe
'27095' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZS' 'sip-files00146.pro'
3852ded3488a30a887c6e2b1e6f91f56
1dfb1981559a51d52b493ebe8eea36948bb24065
describe
'30155' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZT' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
cc3fdffd9e8837b30735a743fb4a6cc5
6e137512b527f4ad5d8e9bcc8080a1305780048a
'2011-12-29T05:05:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZU' 'sip-files00146.tif'
c46cf0ea8a08150a8f7bf512af72fd61
b0e92c002fad028ce7b15b9a49ca493f61f5f2ca
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZV' 'sip-files00146.txt'
824f72186b8dc8a10b6904a732d282b0
76c46f67342ca6769132721fc1b9048926717c2f
describe
'7982' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZW' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6e9a60dc47d44de8b6d1eae2f69db31e
f1567bdcae9fc7a9aaa963291ab435775601a602
describe
'387159' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZX' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
2539fea7fc27f412aa887e5c4dcb8fb3
ab485a23d905540606982b0ee0d01eb3635cc378
describe
'95126' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZY' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
6af7112580ae068ee730d09c49351dd9
19e08c9eeb17ffa92fcc7e1b12a5c1b38a7b5df3
describe
'24419' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABRZZ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
a4b9d85097dbad51c5fb50cdc2bf3b23
ca359286da1606f386f4b38f6afa01a4e0e1f21c
describe
'29016' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAA' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
fc5982518103e7e104725f1459f4c920
198ec756d9d4067c7d4bba86067956c041e2bab2
describe
'3115152' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAB' 'sip-files00147.tif'
62f6dafeffea243227d219b6f0262477
c17b7a1fb56caded1c0d4e73105207178b9219d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAC' 'sip-files00147.txt'
4b8214cd8d8b31f97624fab831f8e7be
ef0aa68e7ea08ea1240202695828b2977040f401
describe
'7652' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAD' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
546e4e78fff1cbafd7d366db069e48b4
301f960d512f6f2b4d94baf7720c002c34c0b691
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAE' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9ec5d2127ffaf850ee499c72caa890af
30ea3fef9b703d706505ed140389d6385459c731
describe
'83422' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAF' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d3eee3fcfa45310ca4e320dedab5eb11
d913df276af8bc6d087b14463153cd9534c336c5
describe
'20437' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAG' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a097b8cd3c99ae5a0f9f354cb75e7e45
afabf24ef24ee265625bb184c15bbf59bbf77c03
describe
'25428' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
718fc09ac54385f8d97ec7fd0094bf1d
790cf9548c4e9163a43674f8cf1923b4826f8925
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
24fc241eac8e6c3fe3cd7fad3ffc52fd
a0bdd93c550b14962cc02c7e3a65cc8267780f3d
describe
'750' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
59def6c035e9f6aa4591eb58b2ed1a8c
4cb048d4a42fdad541a52be3dfdcfc9ce679bd46
describe
'7083' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAK' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
00c3d84682501f62e94afdca78617697
16e23bb350dda2d093c101ba505e1365b46ce3f2
describe
'388873' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAL' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
5c4609417ffff0ccfe3cb01580f71a14
3df9257edf3f19ab08f4874fbe13c197e7f1fd52
describe
'140516' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAM' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
5b38548bfad3daa061628995f1a47065
2af08008b5e58385d75e769fe7bdb4ee1b541800
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAN' 'sip-files00149.pro'
332c6c2515143af734a47116a46b0834
1b6791932d9c3d97f1ab2655a866c99754925a82
describe
'33159' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAO' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
c26debc4b247b0be0e23af727991ed0b
5f8ea5e70d792689eea0a01d5d696bacb9bf6670
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAP' 'sip-files00149.tif'
a8cb381dd075b24ccf4afce429016ab0
2cd891688fc3628cc3ee96250ba58978d5b65f89
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAQ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
cb486f440fe775d4f9eced1199357041
c68de6ef07464988ddb0aad4766923df56633547
describe
'8104' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAR' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
843e024b3518e37743068de8539ed052
790be0c6df615b43d073fdbae17ce20118baf81f
describe
'379187' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAS' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6c1d5147554c259d2df851883dcab9a5
b6073a9a2114ee5071ec8433fac03bb5c21d5021
describe
'87067' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAT' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
363105a9b92c6114c2cb2826a304f47e
9859a6ebcb5f7da5270775cb9504b50a8e8f89eb
describe
'20724' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAU' 'sip-files00150.pro'
70009b0db6824bdc98af578fab96df73
2c2fe0ba10369482f2ac46b6af622837b7010f8a
describe
'28016' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAV' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
955c778d82f7c7477caf8c6afd610597
bf998b6a852932f5463462949848bf1f7f21c65b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAW' 'sip-files00150.tif'
c75e504ea8111c73069bb2c70e6b67cd
b364d15b15aa4a6fa918a56c2143b487cc7b3802
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
d2b3a5ed77f57086bf51c9c5caf0c541
77389ee823841a55dfab7080d7ed34920415c404
describe
'7536' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
d1e725b0f56ed3e18e2b6784a4ad7ad3
43efa2416f8971cdc71a0555a6da1b5c28f6205f
describe
'379158' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSAZ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
cd131531fc1ac3f0b6667d32e231bd63
2a04f1f0663dd32c9ad3b054879eef68f34a1aec
describe
'165778' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
abb67571ed4b96ea8b4e20a3e85c8a1c
faeaa07323046f9c4cabf9e3404f6b35b7f032e6
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBB' 'sip-files00151.pro'
290e4ccf1287718b456fc102a7cabbad
d94fa1eb6e52cc122cf20fbd2b58435189880936
describe
'36670' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBC' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
40d1eff1b1424a4740de226c1df4a8f8
a3e34a56bbbc7ca4f9385c20f353f585560f586a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBD' 'sip-files00151.tif'
dbc9be06a43ff96938e33fd3938831c5
ac8e267ed8f438a177570ee26400d50e5dc4e2f6
describe
'8560' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBE' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
5adca9490c896ac2e9f2f6697d846e8d
8d2e37520d5afef55803ce83fd03376c9fb6da33
describe
'374179' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBF' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
347902dedc1d18a8cbd84391a69e742d
78867219c10d55e84c1d1d2ae3612ea0c2eab526
describe
'106728' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBG' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2aaeeebf548e5d5dcf9d68e0f1981497
6b6519adb0b29882a444a6b07b8c72083e756a33
describe
'16533' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBH' 'sip-files00152.pro'
b0df3b5057d8762260f920bb58e0174e
da2ca9123a1a948ea976c69af739f557cf184ea5
describe
'31648' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBI' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
884223edfa02bbd27701e5f8cd757cc2
e504b4d44254e8e14537e1dd1a8473bcdee857f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBJ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
bb247aa9352e52f9f81bb90649cfba72
a7eba2c6a807ccb0c858ec94bd0cfffa7f2c2241
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBK' 'sip-files00152.txt'
1eb049b1099b93a47ad603d8e22e0bc7
0aff03cc8ab85a5c3983ed2f8153ccb5d627ee0d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8660' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBL' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ebd8dcdc42157ce32037ef7417cae743
cddff285407ef3effa6554fbfd6724e64f8462d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBM' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
94319aa6d509c45ec0e3582a7906e4c9
77391154cd0ffcbe9b9624349a988db9b4fe3cdb
describe
'175419' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBN' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
bf5041b3ce6c370a2f1c522feca4ce46
99a7d28957e9c6fcfc012d404db265604eebc4ac
'2011-12-29T05:05:35-05:00'
describe
'47846' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBO' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
268346cfb32ffe95206925eb58829153
703345f27c723903d9f65a66387f17676710607a
describe
'9341988' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBP' 'sip-files00154.tif'
9b2fd6d087613ca90d1dd4e47dfc1389
fc778a8ce633e58b4c17b6ac08017d89698adc01
describe
'10827' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBQ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a53d1ab93ac80dac98f5a822787fc88e
92ad994287e661dd414c95c4730fa964e19537c0
describe
'424047' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBR' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9c41cfe2880696c25b7750661a90cf97
97b8fa21c22495c27c32dea22dde8550769561c2
describe
'190921' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBS' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
8ed85ed3f87f778392be4fff52c0caf8
5ace4fe2de47dcb4ff67b2cb94ee0dfc3a9bdc66
describe
'51974' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBT' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2697f797dfd0c3cdcf9aba802b649d2f
35ff18985480f40c6d03841afbb9b3e5fcd4dfa9
describe
'10186248' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBU' 'sip-files00155.tif'
558cc4e8e86891518fa2ffc46c5180c3
bb62f07b6d8672af5295e602e7772f27a43420aa
describe
'11647' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBV' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
2b737570574984af160d7f591804e6bb
d7ec0ee1dccbabe2b04dae65f8bd0a57f6cc55e3
describe
'434319' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBW' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
985de9d8398e3d0d9da2edb4e6b74709
43649c398139f2e398033fe23f1d80880d0e621c
describe
'94011' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBX' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
09d6faac78e9dc21475cf7361fa11bca
c4c7cdb6c6396e38c4e2f608f1b3152101c16938
describe
'17600' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBY' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
6ca5a3ddbfcddd9b5b114100cb8ae7e5
b48e1d388a74494dbf8915ccfffbd5d9a90e861d
describe
'10432268' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSBZ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
3443a509d4b84d78ca79e775b8a3cf1f
9d5e4120c7e421dac21701b28274375f59768157
describe
'4240' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCA' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
4e17f2ecf1dccaf91c4fd3d05ce4f4a3
f5cfb2b144ec323c4f40a5db0e70888ae8ab9726
describe
'83358' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCB' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
8f94edda4817e5779c0c7379df5f4296
9d175305b4c6f5cc91b815061d16af451532f4a7
describe
'33801' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCC' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
c43747e6d18636b5ee154020bc6ed3ce
dbfa9852a66574f61f009738b472a11cea0e76ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCD' 'sip-files00157.pro'
4ee464e7a35ce4f7222fd1d54539eb0c
5405cfbf808b71faed44f361d5f1768e8b1e1c53
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCE' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
ee99ae971efd358334f60739ea6f007b
f77660d793f1ff13f3b94840139ad637e6e94adb
describe
'2010168' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCF' 'sip-files00157.tif'
f1813b2bce2ffb057a144adc02e2a7de
2ededc061ead97437a7c95a740f2743ab405f1f8
describe
'3439' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCG' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
4abda89580af2198a6590ec17233e9f2
82afa169b5a774e80b68235cc1e9763c4e9541a3
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCH' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
08434f88ca3503a3e34abb9a53ec9051
9ca969d78825f970fc0e98629f45ea2185d55f2f
describe
'226986' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCI' 'sip-filesUF00086981_00001.mets'
fa4e83ea7c732569b17111d519abddc2
5e1b7e1692a86653ddb662e712138cf4b732de63
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T22:57:46-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
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'293678' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAALBfileF20090115_AABSCL' 'sip-filesUF00086981_00001.xml'
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describe
'2013-12-13T22:57:48-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008698100001datestamp 2008-10-21setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Master Piersdc:creator Robson, Isabel SuartFletcher and Son ( Printer )Culley, Robert. ( Contributor )dc:subject Boys -- Juvenile fiction. -- BehaviorChildren -- Juvenile fiction. -- Conduct of lifeConduct of life -- Juvenile fiction.Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction.Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction.Home schooling -- Juvenile fiction.Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction.Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction.Imagination -- Juvenile fiction.Interpersonal relations -- Juvenile fiction.Attitude change -- Juvenile fiction.Uncles -- Juvenile fiction.Cousins -- Juvenile fiction.Obstinacy -- Juvenile fiction.Empathy -- Juvenile fiction.Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction.Sharing -- Juvenile fiction.Aunts -- Juvenile fiction.Bldn dy 1898.dc:description Date of publication from prize inscription.Pictorial cover; illustrated endpapers.Publisher's catalogue follows text.dc:publisher Robert Culleydc:date 1898?dc:type Bookdc:format 128, 16 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00086981&v=00001002236717 (ALEPH)30047239 (OCLC)ALH7195 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English