Citation
The cruise of the Comet

Material Information

Title:
The cruise of the Comet the story of a privateer of 1812 sailing from Baltimore as set down by Stephen Burton
Series Title:
Privateers of 1812 series
Creator:
Otis, James, 1848-1912
Shute, A. B ( Illustrator )
Estes & Lauriat ( Publisher )
Colonial Press (Boston, Mass.) ( Printer )
C.H. Simonds & Co
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Estes and Lauriat
Manufacturer:
Colonial Press ; Electrotyped and printed by C.H. Simonds & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
173 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Young men -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Privateering -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Naval battles -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Ship captains -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Schooners -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Naval operations -- Juvenile literature -- United States -- War of 1812 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
sea stories ( aat )
Sea stories ( rbgenr )
1898 ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
edited by James Otis ; illustrated by A.B. Shute.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002395552 ( ALEPH )
AMA0460 ( NOTIS )
07178175 ( OCLC )
c 98000245 ( LCCN )

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Full Text








The Baldwin Library



j
‘







6 Ee



THE CRUISE OF THE COMET







“IT WAS AS IF BOTH BROADSIDES WERE DISCHARGED AT THE
SAME INSTANT.”





Ler for

vt

THE

CRUISE OF THE COMEN

The Story of a Privateer of 1812, sailing from
‘Baltimore, as set down by Stephen Burton

EDITED BY

JAMES OTIS

AUTHOR OF
“THE BOYS OF FORT SCHUYLER,” “ JENNY
WREN’S BOARDING- HOUSE,” ETC.

Ellustratey by.
A. B. SHUTE



BOSTON
ESTES AND LAURIAT
1898

ON



Copyright, 1898
By Estes AND LAURIAT

Colonial [ress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S. A.







NOTE.



\

The details of this story have been gathered chiefly
from letters written by the boy Stephen Burton to a
cousin in Portsmouth, N. H., and my work thereon has
been little more than that of an editor. Young Burton’s
statements regarding the movements of the Comet have
been verified by historians, and there is little or no ques-
tion but that in all things, save perhaps some unimportant
matters, it is a true and faithful account regarding this

certain cruise of the celebrated privateering schooner.

James OTIS.









CONTENTS.

—+—
CHAP. ‘ u PAGE
I. THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER : : . : Ses

II, Lying In Wait A Sea 30
III. THE ATTACK. : : : : : : ee eAy)
IV. THE BATTLE . : : ; : 3 ; 2 04
V. SHARP WORK . : 3 : : : : SS
VI. A PLOT : ; : : : 3 : : Seon
VII. THE CoMET’S CREW . : 3 3 : : . 108
VIII. A Busy Day . : : : : : : eh aeele2NG
IX. OVERWHELMING ODDS ; : : : : Sara:

X. A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT . : : : : . 159

















ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
“JT WAS AS IF BOTH BROADSIDES WERE DISCHARGED AT

THE SAME INSTANT” See page 163. : . Lrontispiece
‘“¢WELL, WHY ARE YOU LADS LOAFING AROUND HERE

WHERE YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS?’” : : : 2 1G)
“OUR BACKS WERE SORE FROM FREQUENT APPLICATION

OF THE ROPE’S-END” : : : : ; : ess,
«“ EVERYWHERE AROUND US IN THE SEA SPLASHED AN IRON

SHOWER”. : : : : : ; : ‘ ee OL
«“ WITH ONE SUPREME EFFORT I SUCCEEDED IN SLIGHTLY

CHANGING THE POSITION OF MY BODY” : : O38
“¢DIp YOU FIND ANY ONE?’ THE MAN WHO HELD ME

ASKED” . : : : : ; : : ; . 10g
“ DURING THE FIRST HOUR THE HUGE VESSEL SEEMED TO

GAIN UPON US” ; . : : : : sete 20
«“ THE RIGGING, CUT IN A HUNDRED PLACES, WAS SWAYING

TO AND FRO”. : 3 3 6 5 3 ‘ . I4!I









TE E€RUISE OF 1HE COMET.

CHAPTER I.
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER,

APTAIN THOMAS BOYLE was my mother’s
brother, and had he been my father I could not
have taken greater pride in his doings.

His schooner, and, of course, I am now speaking of the
Comet, for she was nearer to me than the brig Chasseur,
which he afterwards commanded, was a Baltimore clipper,
and I saw all her building and outfitting, from the time
the keel was laid down until the last gun had been
mounted.

Although I was no sailor, and had never been so fortu-
nate as to gain permission to make even the shortest
cruise, there was in my heart more affection for this same
trim little schooner than for all the world beside, saving,
of course, my mother.

When Captain Tom—lI never dared to call so brave a
.man uncle — first made ready to sail from Baltimore, on
a privateering cruise, shortly after war was declared in
1812, I said all a boy might, in the hope of being allowed

13



14 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

to count myself as one of the hundred and twenty who
manned the Comet; and my good friend and comrade,
Donald Fyffe, was not a whit less eager to do his share
towards teaching the English King that we of the United
States had come to the length of our forbearance, in the
matter of allowing him to impress our sailors.

It was all in vain, however, that Donald and I pleaded.

Neither his parents nor mine would give consent to our
going as privateersmen, and but for a few words Captain
Tom let slip, before he sailed in July of 1812, we should
have lost all hope of ever succeeding in our efforts.

« Wait until you have gained a twelvemonth in age, and
then it may be I shall say a word in behalf of you lads.”

It was little encouragement, to be sure; but yet to
us it seemed much like an absolute promise, and our
hearts were less sore when the Comez, carrying fourteen
guns, — six in a broadside, with a swivel, and a gun
amidships, — left the port.

Of all persons in Baltimore, whether man grown or
boys, we were the proudest, when, in less than a month
from the time Captain Tom set sail, the British ship
Flopewell, carrying fourteen guns and twenty-five men,
arrived at the home port as the prize of our Baltimore
clipper.

She, with her cargo, was valued at a hundred and fifty
thousand dollars, and I dare venture to say the schooner
had earned her cost, including the outfit, twice over in this
one capture.

There had been a most obstinate combat, so some of





THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 15

the prize-crew told us; but the Comet was the victor, of
course, because Captain Tom was in command.

From this hour, we two lads did more than dream of
the time when we should be allowed to ship as privateers-
men, for we talked concerning what Captain Tom had
told us, until it was to our minds as if he had said we
should join him on the next cruise, and laid many plans
regarding what we would do, once we had signed the
schooner's articles as green hands; for we could not
hope to ship in any better berth.

Now, just one word regarding Donald Fyffe, who was
my nearest, and, I might say, only friend in Baltimore,
outside of my own family.

He was fifteen years old on the same day the Come?’s
first prize came into port, and, although I was his senior
by three months, it would have pleased me better could I
have lost that much time in my life, in order that my
birthday might have been marked by so joyous a happen-
ing; for many there were at that time who croaked of
defeat, predicting the downfall of the United States, in
thus attempting to give the English nation a lesson in
good manners.

Donald, as may be guessed from his name, was of
Scotch descent, and more than one of our schoolmates
.ventured to suggest that his desire to ship on board the
Comet did not arise so much from a love of country, as
because all well knew Captain Tom was one who could
tassel the handkerchiefs of his crew with prize-money,
until the gold and silver might become a burden.



16 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

That Donald well loves a shilling I know, but am will-
ing to here set down that there was more in his heart con-
cerning the honour to be gained, than any other thing.
He was as eager to show what might be done by us of
this young country, as the veriest spendthrift that ever
walked a plank, and to give him that which is no more
than his due, I must say a truer comrade, be he Scotch,
Irish, or English, never lived.

His father was in trade, and mine a farmer.

This much for the two of us; and now to the Comet and
Captain Tom Boyle, of whom little need be said, in this
year of peace, 1815, when we have already given his
Majesty the needed lesson, because the people of every
State well know what he did both in the Comet and the
Chasseur. Although there were six other privateers sail-
ing from our home port in July of 1812, my uncle was
oftentimes spoken of as “the Baltimore captain,” and well
did he deserve all the praise which was bestowed upon
him.

In November of this same first year of the war, the
Comet returned, and but for Donald she might have put
to sea again without our being on board.

He it was who suggested to me, when we knew the
schooner was being made ready for an early departure,
that we boldly approach the captain and claim he had
promised to take us with him on the next cruise.

«But he did not really say so,” I objected, fearing lest
this uncle of mine be vexed with our importunities.

« After the success which has been his, I venture to



THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 17

say he has forgotten even the little encouragement he
did give us, and if we are bold in approaching him,
the business is done almost before a word has been
spoken.”

I did not feel as positive, but Donald, insisting, carried
the point, as he always does, and together we went to the
dock, he volunteering to act as spokesman.

Captain Tom was on deck, and in high good-humour,
for the first prize had been sold and the proceeds divided
among his men in a manner which gave him entire satis-
faction. .

Even under such favourable circumstances, my heart
failed me when we stood before him, and he cried, in a
tone which sounded to me like one of sternness:

“Well, why are you lads loafing around here where
you have no business? Two great hulking boys like
you should be at work.”

“And so we count on doing, Captain Boyle,” Donald
replied, boldly, while I stepped behind him timorously,
not daring to face this fighting uncle of mine. “We have
business here, and are ready to transact it.”

“On board this schooner?”

“Ay, sir; for by your promise we are the same as
members of the crew.”

- “How do you figure that, young jackanapes? They be
men aboard this schooner.”

“Else the Hopewell would not have been taken.”

“Have you young sprigs come to tell me that, believ-
ing I did not know it?”



18 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

“No, sir; but to say that mayhap Stephen Burton and
I can show we are older than our years.”

«Well, what then?’’ Captain Tom asked, as if per-
plexed by Donald’s speech.

“Only that we are now to have an opportunity of prov-
ing it, captain, for before the Come? last left this port you
gave us what can be construed as little less than a prom-
ise that, when next the schooner put to sea, we should be
on board, members of her crew.”’

«Did I say that much?” my uncle asked, as he stood
like one racking his brain to recall the past.

«Perhaps not in the very words, sir; but it has remained
in our minds that what you said was to that effect.”

While one might have counted ten, Captain Tom stood
as if debating whether we should not be treated to a dose
of. the rope’s-end, and then replied, with a laugh:

“As for you, Donald Fyffe, I may not speak so cer-
tainly ; but Stephen Burton, my sister’s boy, should have
good mettle in him, and, whether it be that I promised or
no, you shall leave port on board the Comet. Turn to,
now, at whatever your hands find to do, and see to it that
there be no shrinking from duty.”

This sudden agreement with our desires flustrated me,
and I said, stammeringly :

“If it please you, Captain Tom, we have not yet our
parents’ permission to ship.”

“Then why did you present yourselves ?”

“ Because it would avail us little, whatever our parents

might say, providing you were not willing,” Donald replied,





“SWELL, WHY ARE YOU LADS LOAFING AROUND HERE WHERE
YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS?’”











THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 21

boldly, whereat Captain Tom seemed much pleased, and
said, with a hearty laugh:

“Fall to, boys; I’ll see to it that the remainder of the
business be settled according to your wishes, and from
this out you may count yourselves as having regularly
shipped for privateersmen,”’

In order to set down all which befell] us, meaning now the
Comet and her crew, there is little time in which to tell of
our first experiences on board the schooner, while she yet
lay at the dock, when we, as the youngest members of the
crew, were forced to do every man’s bidding, for so many
words would be necessary in thus telling the tale as to
weary both him who may read these lines and the one who
sets them down.

Therefore it seems wiser to dismiss all the wearisome
details of waiting and preparing for the cruise, with no
single word of explanation, and go at once to that twenty-
third day of December, in the year 1812, when, all being
in readiness, the word was passed that an attempt would
be made to slip through the blockading squadron on a
cruise towards the coast of Brazil.

We had bidden farewell to our parents, Donald and I,
twenty-four hours previous, for the command had then
been given that every member of the crew must keep
close on board the schooner during such time as she
might remain at her moorings, without any hope of get-
ting even so much as half an hour of shore-leave, for Cap-
tain Tom was minded to take advantage of his first
favourable opportunity.



22 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The Britishers, knowing full well that the most danger-
ous privateersmen were sailing out of Baltimore, kept.
sharp watch on the port, and many there were, even
among our own men, who questioned if it would be pos-
sible to put the schooner past the squadron undetected.

At near the close of the day I have mentioned, it was
whispered among our men that Captain Tom would, on
that evening, make the venture that might end for ever
the career of the Comet and all on board.

As it appeared to. Donald and me, who were neither
weatherwise nor seamen, no better time could have been
chosen for the attempt. Since three o’clock in the after-
noon a dense mass of clouds had been scurrying across
the sky, bringing with them plenty of wind and a promise
of rain.

That the night would be a dark one all knew, and there
seemed more danger the schooner’s spars would be liter-
ally blown out of her than that she might be becalmed.

It was said among our men that Captain Tom had
taken no one into his confidence, not even the owners of
the vessel, as to the hour he should set sail.

It was near to nine o’clock in the evening when, amid
the most profound silence, our mooring lines were cast off,
and the Come¢ started on the long cruise which brought
to her so much credit, and to us such an ample amount
of prize-money.

When sail was made, Donald and I could do no more
than keep out of the way of those who knew a seaman’s
duty.



THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 23

It can well be fancied that, with a crew of one hundred
and twenty, there are very many who must remain idle at
such a time, and I felt no shame in lying close under
the rail amidships, while others performed the necessary
labour.

As the lights of the town grew dimmer, and the dark
tracery of spars and cordage, which told where lay the
British squadron, became more distinct, my comrade’s
heart must have misgiven him somewhat as to the final
result of the cruise, for he said, in a voice that was not
overly steady:

_ “How think you, Stephen Burton, all this will end?
Are we to come back with both profit and honour, or-
is it to be that we shall never see our homes again?”

I was angered with him that he should have asked such
a question at that moment, for, even as he spoke, I was
thinking of my dear mother, wondering if I should ever
look in her face again, and with his words the tears came
near to dropping from my eyes, which would have been a
sorry way to begin a cruise under such a commander as
Captain Tom Boyle.

I dared not make any reply, lest he should know of the
grief in my heart, and therefore pretended, by rising suffi-
ciently and looking over the rail at the spars of the enemy
which we were approaching so closely, not to have heard it.

On board our schooner not a sound could be heard, save
now and then the faint creaking of the blocks and the
swirl of waters as the Comez’s sharp prow sent them hiss-
ing astern.



24. THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I have said Donald and I lay under the starboard rail
amidships, and as the Comez¢ dashed swiftly over the water
without apparently attracting the attention of the enemy,
my timorousness vanished until I whispered boldly to my
comrade :

«This running the blockade is not such a venturesome
affair as I had believed. The Britishers are asleep, and
a whole fleet of privateers might put to sea without the
redcoats being any the wiser.”

I could not better have chosen words to prove my igno-
rance than I did at that moment.

The older members of the crew — those who had aided
in the capture of the Hopewell — were peering ahead
anxiously, as if believing we were still in a dangerous local-
ity, and Donald had just turned to speak, when it seemed
to me as if the whole side of the nearest war-vessel was _
lighted up by a sheet of flame.

I staggered back half blinded by the glare, not under-
standing what had caused it, and it was for an instant as if
thunder roared all around me, while even above the rever-
berations I could hear what sounded like the rending and
splintering of wood.

“What is it?” I cried, in my fear and perplexity, and
almost at the same instant our motionless, silent crew
were aroused to the greatest activity.

Captain Tom began to shout much like a man suddenly
gone crazy, and it seemed to me as if every person on
board, save Donald and myself, were running to and fro,
or clambering into the rigging.



THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 25

Following this first crash and roar, came jets of flame
from each of the dark hulks on the starboard bow, and I
heard an odd but wicked screaming in the air with every
thunderous outburst.

Donald spoke to me, but I could not distinguish his
words because of the uproar.

Perhaps one might have counted ten before I under-
stood that the men on board the blockading squadron were
not as ignorant of our purpose as I had foolishly supposed,
and that every effort was being made to compass the
destruction of the Comet.

It seems strange to me now as I set it down, that, after
the first terrible fear which assailed me, I suddenly lost all
consciousness of danger, and absolutely forgot that the
King’s ships might send us to the bottom in a twinkling,
by a well-directed shot.

Donald and I joined the crew in running here and there,
as if it were possible for us to be of some assistance, even
though Captain Tom might have been talking in a foreign
tongue for all we could understand of the orders given.

After a time, and before we were out of range, I knew,
from what the men about me said, that our foretop-
mast had been so severely wounded it was necessary to
strengthen it lest the entire spar should go by the board.

Green hand as I was, I failed to understand what was
meant when the first mate gave an order to “fish” the
topmast, and believed it was to be taken down, until some
of the crew began to bind pieces of timber either side of
the weakened portion.



26 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

As a matter of course, it became necessary that the
strain on the spar should be lessened while this task was
being performed, and it could only be done by taking in
certain of the sails, even though we needed every inch of
canvas to aid us in drawing away from the enemy.

Although, as I have said, the night was black with
darkness, I understood by what I both saw and heard
that the squadron was getting under way in pursuit of
us, and once more I grew timorous, believing we must
certainly be captured, crippled as we were.

“Our first cruise is like to be our last, and not overly
long at that,’ Donald said to me, when we were so far
away from the enemy that their fire had slackened ; and it
pleased me to hear a certain quaver in his voice, for I thus
knew I was not the only one on board who was beginning
to show the white feather.

“Then you do not believe we shall escape?” I asked,
not that I was eager to hear his opinion on the subject, but
because I knew of nothing else to say just at the moment.

«Do you think we can?” he asked, sharply, and I made
as if I had failed to hear the words.

Just then I saw my uncle, standing aft, near the helms-
man, as unconcerned as if he were safe at the dock in
Baltimore.

He was watching the movements of the men aloft, now
and then directing them as to the work in hand, and never
once glancing back to where the King’s ships, under such
press of canvas as must have buried their bows deep in the
water, were in full chase.



THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 27

« There is one who appears to have little doubt of our
escape,’ I said, with a sigh of relief, for it heartened me
wonderfully to see him so calm when death was close
aboard.

“We can gather but little comfort from his movements,
for I have heard it said that whenever danger is greatest,
Captain Tom appears the most cheery.”

All this I knew quite as well as did Donald, and from
that moment I ceased trying to appear brave.

Together we two crouched behind the rail, watching the
pursuers astern, and only looking aloft now and then, for
it seemed to us, in our ignorance of such matters, as if the
sailors could do but little towards repairing the mischief
which had been wrought.

After what appeared to be a very long time, I lost sight
of the enemy, and, fearing lest my eyes were Payne me
some tricks, I asked Donald:

“Can you see the King’s ships now?”

«They have been growing less distinct this last five
minutes ; perhaps a cloud has come between them and us,
for it is not possible they would give up the chase so
soon.”

«Not they ; we may count on being pursued so long as
the lookouts can keep the schooner in view.”

Then, quite by chance, I turned my head and was sur-
prised at seeing all the crew on deck.

“Ts the topmast mended?” I asked of that sailor near-
est me, and he replied, cheerily :

« Ay, lad, this ten minutes or more, and since the job



28 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

was done we have begun to show the Britishers our heels.
At one time it looked like a close shave ; but now it’s much
the same as if we were on blue water. It'll need more
than those tubs of the blockadin’ squadron to catch the
Comet when Captain Tom Boyle is in command.”

“Do you really mean that we are no longer in danger?”
I asked, hardly daring to credit the statement.

«« What I am giving out is that we have run the block-
ade in fine shape ; but on a cruise like this I reckon we're
always messmates with danger.”

« But what about the wounded topmast ?”’

«“ She’s holdin’ now, an’ is likely to till we’ve run the
Britishers’ hull down. Then it'll be a matter of putting a
new spar in its place.”

«But we must go into some harbour to do that,” I said,
again giving proof of my ignorance, whereat the man
laughed heartily.

« You're precious green for a lad of your years. If spars
couldn’t be sent down or up without puttin’ a craft into
the dock, there’d be mighty little privateerin’ done, or
fightin’ either, for that matter.”

It was as if a terrible load had suddenly been lifted from
my mind, for I had no question but that the man spoke
the truth, and so great was my relief that I laughed aloud,
although there was nothing to cause mirth.

Then Donald and I could give our entire attention to
watching the gallant little schooner as she stormed along
with all canvas spread, when many another craft would
have been reefed down snug, and there was an exhilara-



THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 29

tion in my heart such as I had never felt before, or
never have since, except under similar circumstances,

We, meaning Donald and I, gave little heed to the
passing of time, and might have remained on deck until
morning but that Captain Tom, suddenly espying us,
called sharply for both to come aft.

“Why are you not below?” he asked, when we stood
before him. “Do you count on learning a seaman’s
duties by loiterin’ around the deck in the night?”

“IT was too frightened to go below while we were sailing
past the Britishers, and after that too happy to think of
sleep,” Donald replied, promptly.

“You must forget how to be frightened before you will
be of much service on a craft like this,” Captain Tom
replied, with a low laugh that reminded me of my mother.
“Now get you below, and remember in the future that
fear is not allowed on board the Comet until all danger
has passed.”



CHAPTER II.
LYING IN WAIT.

E went to our hammocks on the gun-deck, Donald

and I, feeling —for I daresay there was much the

same thought in his mind as in mine—that we had

learned a lesson which would be valuable to us in our task
of becoming privateersmen.

Not much of a lesson, as I look back on it now, but at
the time it seemed of vast importance; yet we, or perhaps
here I should speak only of myself, could not profit by
it, for ever afterward, when the shot of the enemy whistled
among the spars, and I saw members of the crew wounded
by ball or splintered by fragments of our own craft, the
same fear took possession of me which was in my heart
when the Comet ran the blockade out of Baltimore.

However, we turned in, and it was more than one day
before we turned out again, owing to the sickness of the
sea which took possession of us.

There is no reason why I should set down here what
we suffered, for he who has experienced it fancies he
knows better than any other person the deathly sensations
of the malady.

In due time, however, we were so far able to control
our legs and stomachs as to crawl on deck, and, once there,

30



LYING IN WAIT. 31

the second mate, Mr. Harker, set about trying to make
sailors of us.

It was a case of a hard master and dull pupils, and
during the first four and twenty hours of what we might
call the apprenticeship, our backs were so sore from fre-
quent application of the rope’s-end that for the time being
we forgot we had shipped on board the Comet to aid in
upholding the honour of our country.

Among the lessons which he gave, and expected we
‘should remember without ever being told again, was the
method of measuring the schooner’s progress through the
water, and I here set it down, in case this poor tale should
be seen by some lad as ignorant of such matters as were
we two up to the moment when Mr. Harker took us in
charge.

This particular information was given to us when, the
report having been made to the captain that the schooner
was making ten knots, Donald asked the meaning of the
term.

Then it was that Mr. Harker gave us a lecture in some-
thing after this fashion:

«We'll suppose you lads have been taught at school
that 69 1-6 statute miles or 60 geographical miles are equal
to one degree of longitude at the equator. Now the
distance between a statute mile, which is the way they
measure distance ashore, and a geographical mile, which
is the way of figuring it at sea, is that the last is 806
feet longer than the first. These 60 sea miles to each
degree of latitude, or to every degree of longitude at the



32 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

equator, are called by sailormen ‘minutes,’ when they
are reckoning the position of a ship, and as to what this
last may mean you will possibly learn later. I am not
counting on giving you a lesson in navigation just now.

“There are 360 degrees or meridians of longitude, and
21,600 minutes or miles in the entire circumference of
the world at the equator; therefore, learned men have
shown that one minute —that is, a sea mile — is equal
to 6,086.7 feet; but sailormen don’t take up these odd
feet and the fraction, so they call a sea mile, which is a
knot, or a minute, equal to 6,080 feet. That part being
clear in your mind, the rest is easy, because here is the
rule which navigators learn: ‘As the number of seconds
in the hour are to 6,080 feet, so are the number of
seconds in the time-glass used for measuring a ship’s
speed to the number of feet in each unit of measurement
marked off on the log-line.’”’

Mr. Harker must have seen that we failed to understand
this explanation, which he thought was plain, for he added,
an instant later :

«« Suppose we use a half-minute glass, —that is, one
which admits of the sand running through in thirty
seconds. Now, then, your knots must be made in the
log-line exactly fifty feet and nine inches from each other,
as you can readily tell by doing a little figuring. You
saw a man hold a reel over the stern, while I, with the
glass in my hand, shouted for him to let go, and then to
stop. Every knot which went over the rail marked a sea
mile, so you may understand that the Comet, while mak-





“OUR BACKS WERE SORE FROM FREQUENT APPLICATION OF

THE ROPE’S-END,”






LYING IN WAIT. 35

ing ten knots, was doing a little more than eleven and
one-half land miles.”

It was not until we had worked the problem out for
ourselves that Donald and I fully understood it; but once
in our minds it could never be forgotten.

It was my purpose to set down here only that which
concerned the cruise of the Comet while Donald and
I were on board, and therefore what we learned from
Mr. Harker or the other officers is perhaps out of
place.

I will go back to the doings of the schooner by saying
that, on the night of the eighth of January, a little more
than two weeks after having left port, we made Cape St.
Rouque, on the Brazilian coast.

On the following morning Captain Tom spoke a Portu-
guese trader which had just left the harbour of Pernam-
buco, and was told that there were in the harbour three
English vessels nearly ready to sail,—two brigs and a
large ship, all armed.

We had found our game much sooner than the most
hopeful counted on, and it can well be imagined in what
a state of excitement was the schooner’s crew five minutes
after this information had been given us.

“‘T fail to see why the men should be in such high
spirits at what the Portuguese captain told us,’’ Donald
said, privately, tome. “It is not to be supposed Captain
Tom, brave man though he be, will venture to attack
a ship and two brigs heavily armed.”

“Is that your idea of how an American privateersman



36 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

sets about striking a blow at the King?” Mr. Harker, who
had accidentally overheard Donald’s remark, said, quite
sharply. “If there were five ships, and among them
a man-of-war, I dare venture to say Captain Tom Boyle
would run his nose into the midst of them.”

«Then we shall sail directly into the harbour?” I
asked, in dismay as well as surprise.

«Hardly that, my lad. A friendly port cannot be used
in such fashion. We must wait until the fleet is six sea
miles off the coast, and then no one may say us nay.
Until that ship and the brigs have got a good offing, we
shall likely stand off and on, watching for them as a cat
does for a mouse.”

«And we run a good chance of playing the part of the
mouse,” I said to myself; but did not venture to speak
aloud, for of a certainty the rope’s-end would have been
laid on my back again had I dared venture to suggest such
a possibility.

It must be understood that every day after we had so
successfully run the blockade the crew were exercised
at quarters, and when Donald and I were so far recov-
ered from the malady of the sea as to be able to move
around, we bore our part in the drill, — not a very impor-
tant one, for we were known as powder-monkeys, and our
duties were to supply certain of the gunners with ammu-
nition.

Immediately the Portuguese captain gave our com-
mander information regarding the vessels in the harbour,
the hours of drill were redoubled; first, because the men



LYING IN WAIT. 37

needed exercise at their stations, and secondly, if each was
in his proper station, as would be the case while exercising,
we should be ready to give chase instantly the enemy’s
vessels appeared,

Therefore it was that I can truly say we were almost
constantly at quarters, the schooner standing off and on,
under easy sail, and three men detailed to act as look-
outs.

It can well be imagined that Captain Tom and the offi-
cers kept their glasses in active use, and the harbour of
Pernambuco was watched as, perhaps, it had never been
before.

As for Donald and myself, I know that we were al-
lowed a six-hour watch below, —no more; and during all
the remainder of the twenty-four did we pass to and fro
between the magazine and the gunners, even though it
seemed to me I could have described the grain of every
plank in the deck throughout each inch of the distance
we were forced to traverse.

To my surprise, not a single man among all the crew
thought it venturesome in Captain Tom to thus make his
preparations for attacking the three Britishers, although,
even if they were only scantily armed, the united weight
of metal must be greater than ours.

Instead of grumbling because we were to make such a

hazard, the men appeared impatient at the delay, and on
every hand could be heard suggestions as to what would
be done with the prize-money, as if the vessels were
already captured.



38 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

«J believe Captain Tom, in shipping his crew, picked
out those who were as fearless as himself,” Donald said
to me, on this second day of watching for the craft we
hoped to make our prizes. ‘To my mind it is a reckless
piece of business.”

« So it appears to me, and yet the crew look upon it all
as a matter of course; therefore I am inclined to think we
are the only timorous ones on board.”

“Tt will be a fine thing when we portion out our share
of the prize-money,”’ my comrade said, thoughtfully, after
a long pause.

« And not.as fine if one or both of us lays below, griev-
ously wounded, after the attempt has been made, and
failed.”

« Although we be but boys aboard, our share should
amount to more money than we have ever seen,” Donald
continued, dwelling upon the profit to be made; and in this
he showed the Scotch in his nature.

We two talked more than a little concerning all these
things, during the five days we laid off and on, waiting for
the appearance of the enemy’s vessels, but, on the after-
noon of the fourteenth, I became convinced we had
received false information.

If, as the Portuguese captain had said, three vessels
were ready to put to sea, they should have appeared
before this, and I said, with no slight relief on my
heart :

“Our mountain did not even have a mole-hill as its
beginning, for it seems certain the Portuguese captain



LYING IN WAIT. 39

lied, otherwise we would have seen some signs of the
Britishers before this.”’

“T have noted that Captain Tom is growing impatient,
and it may be that what you say is true. It’s a pity we
should lose such a prize as would be ours if the ship
and two brigs could be captured.”

“And it is a relief to know that we stand little show of
being sent below mangled, or wounded unto the death..
For my part —”’

«Sail ho!’’ came from one of the lookouts, and the
words had hardly been spoken before every officer and
seaman was gazing intently in the direction of the har-
bour, where, after a certain time, could be seen even by
us who were on deck, and without the aid of glasses, four
vessels taking advantage of the strong wind to put to sea.

All was excitement on board. Some questioned if this
could be the craft for which we had waited so patiently,
since the Portuguese captain had spoken only three;
others said a fourth Britisher might have put into the
harbour, unknown to us, but that seemed doubtful, for
constant and most vigilant watch had been kept from the
morning of the ninth.

There were very many who believed that the Portuguese
had given true information as to the merchantmen in the
harbour, but withheld from us the fact that they were
convoyed by a man-of-war, and this last opinion gained
ground, until even Donald and I, who had feared an
attack might be made, began to grow uneasy lest we
should be forced to run away.



40 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

However it might be, Captain Tom had no intention of
showing his heels to these Britishers, and I verily believe,
had the fleet been twice as large, he would have given the
‘same orders.

Our course was shaped to the southward, and, once we
were so far from the land that there could be no question
as to the distance, the Comet was hove to until these
strangers should show themselves more clearly.

As nearly as I can remember, it was four o’clock in the
afternoon, perhaps a little later, when we saw the ship and
three brigs, six or eight miles from the shore, sailing a
point or two north of east, and the chase was begun.

Never had I seen the waves as boisterous as they were
when we hauled up to take advantage of the wind, which
appeared to be increasing momentarily.

The little schooner rose gallantly on the crest of the
waves, until it seemed that the hull towered many yards
above the level of the sea; then, with a downward plunge,
she would dive into the hollows, where we were completely
encircled by water, with the sails slatting to and fro as the
wind was thus shut out from them.

Captain Tom remained near the helmsman, conning the
vessels as if engaged in a friendly race, and determined to
lose no advantage if it could be prevented by superior sea-
manship, while Mr. Harker moved to and fro uneasily,
evidently finding it impossible to control his anxiety.

No fault could have been found with the manner in
which the Comet bore herself during this chase.

The strangers, who alternately sank until only their



LYING IN WAIT. 41

topmasts only were in view, and then rose on the swell
until their copper could be seen, were as if anchored, so
swiftly did we gain upon them.

They were under easy sail, and we knew they had no
fear of our little schooner, which was approaching so
swiftly, otherwise their lighter canvas would have been
set at once.

We were storming on, with every stitch drawing, and
making such heavy weather of it that, when the gallant
little Comet went into the trough of the sea, she plunged
her nose so far under that the decks were awash, often-
times waist-deep.

Every timber was groaning from the strain put upon
it, the spars buckled like reeds, and to me, inexperienced
as I was, it seemed certain we had so far overhauled
the fleet as to be able to determine the character of the
fourth vessel.

She was a large man-of-war brig, and we knew by the
small amount of canvas set that she was not only willing
to meet us, but perhaps eager.

Alarmed myself, because we were come so near to a
war-vessel, which with one broadside, properly directed,
could send us to the bottom, I looked scrutinisingly
around at those nearest, to learn, so far as might be from
the expression on their faces, what was thought of this
new phase of affairs.

More than one of the men appeared to be uneasy ; but

-yet the majority of them, having every confidence in
Captain Tom’s skill and ability to extricate them from the



42 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

most serious difficulties into which they might fall, were
calm and apparently unconcerned.

Donald and I, standing side by side, well forward,
waited in anxious expectancy to see the course of the
schooner changed, or hear the command to reduce the
canvas.

No such word was given.

Instead came the order to beat to quarters, and, as
soon as might be thereafter, we were cleared for action,
each man doing his duty promptly, regardless of the
enormous odds against us.

The guns were loaded with round-shot and grape, and
this time Donald and I did more than go through the
motions of serving ammunition, for we dealt it out to each
gun in proper proportion, I, for one, quaking with fear all
the while.

There was no such discipline maintained among pri-
vateersmen as would be seen on board a man-of-war, and
although it was our duty to remain below, both my com-
rade and I ventured on deck, just as the Come?’s ensign
was flung to the breeze.

The stranger replied by hoisting a blue and white flag,
with certain emblems in red upon it, the character of
which I could not make out, and one of the sailors near by
exclaimed :

««She’s a blooming Portugee, an’ how is it a vessel of
that navy is convoying Britishers ?”’

No reply was made to this question, for immediately
after the man had spoken the course of the Comet was so

1



LYING IN WAIT. 43

changed that she would run alongside the war-vessel, and
a few moments later a hail came from the latter’s deck.

“The commander desires to send a boat to you!” an
officer in the rigging shouted, after reply had been made
to his hail. “There are certain matters of importance
regarding which he would speak with the captain of the
schooner.”

I heard my uncle give the command to heave the Comet
to, and at the same time a boat was lowered from the
brig’s davits.

I had rather the Portuguese captain did the boarding
than to have attempted it myself, for the little craft,
manned by ten seamen, was flung up and thrown down in
the swirl of angry waters, as though she had been no more
than an egg-shell, and many times when she descended
into the trough of the sea did I believe she had been
swamped.

They knew their business, however, those Portuguese
sailors, and the gig was brought to the ladder, which had
been thrown over the Comez’s side, as smartly and neatly
as though the crew were manceuvring on a mill-pond.

Captain Tom received the naval officer at the compan-
ionway, and there the two held a short conversation, after
which they entered the cabin.

As a matter of course, we forward had no means of
knowing what was said; but on shipboard any matter of
interest is soon noised about, and, before the two officers
. concluded their interview below, we learned the Portu-
guese had, with considerable swagger, made known to



A4 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Captain Tom that the brig belonged to the Portuguese
navy, and that she carried twenty 32-pounders with a crew
of 165 men.

As quietly and courteously as if he were on shore pay-
ing some pleasing compliment, Captain Tom praised the
appearance of the brig, but did not seem at all alarmed
by the information as to her armament.

Then the naval captain told him, what we already
knew, that the other vessels were English, and under his
protection.

At this Captain Tom fired up, giving the visitor a taste
of his temper by asking very sharply why the King of Por-
tugal was convoying Britishers, and by what right he pre-
tended to do so when his country was supposed to be a
neutral power ?

He announced himself as the captain of an American
cruiser, with the right to go whithersoever he pleased, and
to attack the enemies of his country whenever he found
them beyond the jurisdiction of a friendly or a neutral
government.

Upon this the visitor asked affably to see Captain Tom’s
authority from the United States, and our commander, not
to be outdone in politeness, invited him below.

Here our information ended for the time, and when the
visit had lasted perhaps twenty minutes, the naval officer,
followed by Captain Tom, appeared on deck, taking his
departure in an apparently friendly fashion.

Shortly afterward, we forward heard from the steward,
who waited upon the gentlemen, that the Portuguese had



LYING IN WAIT. 45

advised our captain not to make any attack upon the mer-
chantmen, and this uncalled-for and impertinent suggestion
aroused my uncle once more.

The steward said that Captain Tom told the naval offi-
cer very sharply that he should capture the vessels if it
was possible for him to do so; that he was authorised by
his government to so act, and did not intend to flinch from
his duty.

Then, trying politeness once more, the visitor declared
he should be exceedingly sorry if it became necessary for
him to protect the merchantmen against an attack, and
that he should certainly do so if the situation of affairs
demanded it.

“I shall feel equally sad if anything disagreeable oc-
curs,” Captain Tom replied, “and it is not my intention
to make any attack upon your brig until after you have
tried to prevent me from carrying out the commands given
by my government, or deliberately fired upon me. Then
we will try our strength, and I shall not shrink from the
encounter for which I am full well prepared.”

The Portuguese captain seemed to be staggered by this
bold reply, so the steward said, and, as if he were Captain
Tom’s particular friend, informed him that the English
ship carried fourteen guns, and the two brigs ten each,
which armament, together with that on the war-vessel,
made up the number of fifty-four guns against fourteen.

Captain Tom never flinched a hair, as the steward ex-
pressed it; but told his visitor that, despite the odds, he
should make an attack without delay.



46 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Then it was that the naval officer took his departure,
and he was not yet on board his own vessel when our
schooner was hauled up into the wind.

Before we had well gathered headway, the Portuguese
hailed once more, asking Captain Tom to lower a boat and
come aboard.

Frightened though I was at the prospect of a battle
where it seemed certain we must be whipped, the blood
bounded in my veins when Captain Tom, speaking-trumpet
in hand, leaped on the rail and shouted, as if this demand
from the war-vessel were of but little consequence:

“Tt is growing too dark, and I cannot afford to take the
chances of losing the breeze.”

Then, almost in the same breath, he ordered the yards
to be squared away, and the Comet was sent sharp for the
ship which at that time was our nearest British neighbour.



CHAPTER III.
THE ATTACK,

MONG the gunners — and he was said to be the most
expert of them all—was an old man by the name
of Abraham Dyker, who had shown Donald and me many
favours since we joined the Comez’s crew, and when the
command was given for the men to return to their sta-
tions I took up my rightful position near by Dyker’s gun.
The old man was standing by his piece idly, with no
evidence of excitement on his face, and, believing he saw
in this matter something more favourable for us than did
the rest, I ventured to ask, with an apology for being thus
curious : ‘

“How think you Captain Tom can get us out of this
snarl if he continues to run straight into the midst of the
fleet >?”

“How can he do it, lad? Firstly, I don’t allow we’re in
a snarl, and, secondly, we'll come out of it as a well-armed
Baltimore clipper ought to, —with more than one prize, or
I’m mistaken.”

“Do you believe Captain Tom will really dare to fight
- against such odds?”

“He wouldn’t dare refuse to do so, lest in the future
47



48 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

he should despise himself for having turned tail when
there was no call for it.”

«No call for it!” I repeated, in surprise. ‘Why, it’s
sheer madness to attack four vessels carrying fifty-four
guns against our fourteen!”

“Tf it so be, lad, that you remain on board the Comet a
twelvemonth I venture to predict, and am willing to bet
a farthing’s worth of silver spoons, that you will see a
heap more of such madness. Why is it that Tom Boyle
can have his pick of sailors? Because every man jack of
’em knows he ain’t one as can be easily scared.”

“JT should say not,” I replied, thinking of the odds
against us, and then, in a tone which I intended should
be one of sarcasm, I asked, «When do you allow, Master
Dyker, that the captain of the Comet would be warranted
in turning tail?”

“Well,” the old man began, thoughtfully, as he leaned
against the gun, “perhaps I might say it would be a bit
of foolhardiness to make such a venture if the enemy
carried twice as much metal as does this fleet, but at
the same time I’m doubtful if even that would prevent
Captain Tom from trying to cut out one or more of ’em.”

“Do you really believe he would venture to give battle
with fourteen guns against one hundred and eight?”

“Hark ye, lad. If you are given to timorousness, this
is not the craft on which you should have shipped, nor is
your uncle the master under whom you should sail, for I
tell you that nothing short of a ship of the line would
scare him very seriously. The Comet is out to take



THE ATTACK. 49

prizes, and when the night is as bright as this promises
to be she'll do it, without heeding how strong may be
such craft as are convoying the fleet.”

« Stephen Burton is wanted on deck!”

This summons came from some one aft whose face I
could not distinguish in the gloom, for by this time the
day was so far spent that the gun-deck was darkened by
the twilight, and the lanterns were not fully lighted.

Without thought that he should remain at his station
until ordered elsewhere, Donald Fyffe would have joined
meas I hastened towards the hatchway, but Master Dyker
sharply reminded him that he must stay below, and alone
I went quickly aft, wondering why I had been summoned.

“The captain sent for you,’ Mr. Harker said, as I
appeared, and at the same time giving me a push which
nearly sent me headlong, for just at that moment the
Comet was rising on a huge wave.

After recovering my footing I saluted in proper fashion,
as the second mate had taught me, and Captain Tom said,
curtly, much as if speaking to an entire stranger :

« You are to remain aft here in order to carry messages
below should it become necessary. Keep close by my
side, and, at the same time, see to it that you are not in
the way.”

It was an order which I did not fully understand, and
for an instant was on the point of asking the meaning,
when I realised that a lad would be thick-headed indeed
if he could not obey such commands as might be given in
plain words, therefore held my peace ; and thus it was that



50 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I saw all of this night attack, which could not have been
the case had I remained below serving out ammunition.

By this time the little schooner was well up on the
starboard side of the British ship, and between her, and
the two brigs.

The moon, which had risen before the sun went down,
was shining brightly, while not a cloud showed itself in
the sky, and there seemed little need of the battle-lanterns
which were hung fore and aft.

I was yet staring about me stupidly, trying to discover
the whereabouts of the Portuguese brig of war, when, with
his speaking-trumpet in hand, Captain Tom leaped to the
port rail and shouted to those aboard the ship >

«Back your maintopsail, or I’ll send a broadside into
you!”

So great was the schooner’s headway that even as he
spoke we dashed past the merchantman, and the word
was given to “luff,” in order that we might cross the
ship’s bow.

While the manceuvre was being executed Captain Tom
again ordered the craft to surrender.

Now it was that I saw the man-of-war brig directly
astern of us, and coming up as if she meant business.

I was still gazing at what I believed to be our most
dangerous enemy, when it was as if a volcano suddenly
burst forth beneath my very feet. The schooner trem-
bled from stem to stern, and out of the port side came
great volumes of smoke, which momentarily hid the ship
from view.



THE ATTACK. 51

A broadside had been sent aboard the merchantman,
and, in obedience to orders which I had not heard, our
brave little Comet turned suddenly on her heel, discharg-
ing her starboard guns full at one of the brigs.

Then she was put about, when, to my dismay, I found
that we were close alongside the Portuguese man-of-war.

Even as I looked at that row of yawning ports they
were illumined by flashes of light, and it was to me as
though hundreds of round-shot passed directly over my
head.

At the same moment our gallant little schooner quiv-
ered as if she had struck upon a sunken reef, and the
rending and splintering of wood told that at least one of
the Portuguese missiles had found its mark.

There was a scream from below, followed by groans
which were suddenly drowned in the noise of the Come?’s
broadside, delivered full at the Portuguese, and no less
than two of the brig’s spars were brought down, while
twenty or thirty feet of her bulwarks were ripped off.

“Get you below, lad, quickly, and see what mischief
may have been done by that shot! Do not loiter there,
but return as soon as possible.”

I darted below with all speed, thinking to myself that
for a few moments, at least, I should be in greater safety
than on deck; but afterwards came to learn that he who
stands unsheltered is in less danger than those who work
the guns below, where is possibility of being wounded by
splinters, should a ball find lodgment in the hull.

The scene on the gun-deck was one which I am power-



52 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

less to set down in such fashion as to paint it properly in
words. ‘

The first thing which riveted my attention was the
smoke that filled all the space, and through which could
be dimly seen our men, stripped to the waist and bare-
footed, working the pieces.

To one unfamiliar with such scenes, as was I, it was
impossible, at a single glance, to determine how much
mischief had been done, and I was making my way for-
ward with no little difficulty because of the dense, pungent
vapour, when our port broadside was discharged once more,
—at the three. merchantmen, as I afterwards learned, —
and I was nearly felled to the deck by the terrific noise
like unto that of a fearful explosion.

The smoke became more dense; I could hear the gun-
ners shouting to their mates, and the officers from above
roaring commands down through the hatchway. Now
and then groans from some portion of the schooner told
that this was a game in which many must be killed in
order to give one side or the other the victory, and, worse
than all to me, was the horrible fear that at the next
instant some missile, crashing through the timbers, would
deal a death-blow to the lad who had so foolishly fancied
there was much honour to be gained in warfare.

I was sick at heart and faint from cowardice when I
saw dimly, through the volumes of smoke, Abraham
Dyker, half naked, begrimed with powder, and looking
more like a fiend and less like a man than I had ever
believed could be possible in a human being.



THE ATTACK. 53

Above all my timorousness and sickness was the knowl-
edge that I had a task to perform, and by Master Dyker’s
aid it seemed possible I might be able to acquit myself
with some little degree of credit, even though, properly
speaking, none should be given me.

“T am sent by the captain to find out what mischief has
been done, and know not how to set about it,’ I cried,
whereat the gunner replied:

“Tell him we have only been scratched. One of the
ports was splintered, but the ball buried itself in the
stanchion.”

« Surely it was more than a scratch, Master Dyker,” I
ventured to say, “for some of the men must have been
killed or wounded.”

« Ay, lad, one has lost the number of his mess, and a
couple, maybe three, are under the surgeon’s hands; but
I’ll venture to say that aboard the Portuguese you'll find
‘the cockpit crowded, for our broadside was sent with some
precision, which is more than can be said for them out-
landish man-of-war’s men.”

It would have pleased me could I have spoken with
Donald Fyffe just then; but he was not near at hand, and
to have searched for him would have been to delay when
my orders were to make haste.

Captain Tom gave no token that he heard my report,
although I bawled as loudly as might be, and was on the
point of repeating it when he said, curtly :

“That will do. Remain near at hand until you are
wanted.”



54 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I can only explain what took place during the next half-
hour in such bungling fashion as to say that it seemed to
me as if the Comet were darting here and there, every-
where, among the ships, discharging broadside after broad-
side as rapidly as the guns could be reloaded, at whichever
of the four vessels could best be gotten into range.

Then it was that the schooner reeled as if she had run
full upon a rock, quivered an instant, as if recovering her-
self, and, after no more than a moment’s delay, continued
her work of destruction.

Again I was sent below to learn what mischief had been
done, and this time was able to see for myself the effects
of the blow.

A round-shot had passed directly through the Comet
twelve or fifteen inches above the levelof the gun-deck,
and in its passage had wounded four men, all of whom
were lying as they had fallen, when I saw them.

It was a horrible spectacle, and had I come upon it
earlier in the fight it might have completely unnerved me;
but, like the others, although in not so great a degree, I
was growing hardened and indifferent to suffering as this
unequal battle progressed.

“Tell Captain Tom it is only another scratch,” Master
Dyker cried, as he saw me, and save for the sound of his
voice I would have mistaken him for a negro, so blackened
was all the exposed portion of his body. ‘Only another
scratch, and [’ll warrant you the surgeons on board the
other craft have got their hands full.”

At that moment, Donald Fyffe came up laden



THE ATTACK. 55

with powder, and I stopped to speak with him a few
seconds.

Although it was midwinter, the heat on the gun-deck
was so great that no man could work there while fully
clad, and, following the example of the others, he had
stripped himself, save as to trousers.

The perspiration was streaming down his face, ploughing
here and there tiny strips of white on the blackened skin,
until he looked like an Indian in war-paint, and the resem-
blance was heightened when he, who, a few weeks before,
would have hesitated at causing an animal pain, said,
gleefully :

“We are thinning the Britishers out in brave style,
Stephen Burton, and if the man-of-war will only give us
a chance to use our starboard guns, I warrant you her
scuppers will run with blood, for we are wasting but few
shots, and getting none in return.”

His bare feet were in a crimson pool which was stain-
ing the white deck, and yet he gave no heed to the fact.
His only thought seemed to be of killing.

When I'returned to make my report, the big ship was
so close at hand that I could see her main-deck plainly.

It appeared to be literally covered with dead and
wounded, and the splinters were flying in showers, as
our gunners sent shot after shot with deadly aim.

To me it seemed as if half her rigging was cut; the
immense masts, wounded near the deck, were swaying
to and fro ominously, and all her spars forward, down to
the foremast-head, had been carried away.



56 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The two merchant brigs, sadly disabled, were crawling
away to leeward, and the Portuguese was manceuvring
here and there in the faint hope of giving us a full broad-
side; but, thanks to Captain Tom’s seamanship, this was
impossible.

More than once, when she made ready to rake us, was
the little Comet swung around on her heel like a top, and
away we flew to attack the ship from another quarter.

There came a time, I cannot say at what hour, when I
was startled by hearing a great shout of triumph from our
crew, and I heard Mr. Harker say, triumphantly :

«There go her colours!”

She had surrendered although her metal was as heavy
as our own, and, in addition, we had had forty other
guns opposed to us.

Even as the big ship gave up the fight two well-directed
shots from our main-deck totally disabled one of the brigs,
and the cheers of the men had hardly more than died
away when we saw that the second of the fleet had
surrendered.

Ignorant as I was of such matters, it puzzled me to
understand how advantage could be taken of our victory,
for the moon was near to setting, the waves running bois-
terously high, and I believed it would be impossible for us
to throw a prize-crew aboard either vessel, even though
the Portuguese brig should not interfere.

Immediately after the ship’s flag was lowered, Captain
Tom held a brief conversation with the first officer, and
men were at once told off to take possession of her.



THE ATTACK. 57

I stood where all that took place on our deck could be
seen, and asked myself again and again if it was possible
our officers could be so foolhardy as to venture on board
the prize.

Now many days afterwards I learned that Captain Tom
would sanction, and even order, many wilder acts than
that.

The men set about lowering the long-boat, as if this
embarking on a stormy sea, with enemies on every hand,
was but a trifling matter, and many of the crew came
from below for the double purpose of watching the
movements of the enemy, while there was a lull in the
conflict.

Among these last was Donald Fyffe, and, heedless of
the fact that he had no right to venture so far aft, he
came to speak with me.

We two were talking regarding the proposed attempt to
take possession of the prize, and wondering if any of the
boat’s crew would live to reach the ship, when Captain
Tom cried, as he turned towards me:

“ Here, lad, this is the chance to see something of the
business you are trying to learn. Take your place with
the prize-crew, and see to it that you do all in your power
towards helping get matters into proper shape once you
are aboard the ship.”

But for the fear I had of my uncle’s anger, I would
have refused to take part in any such hazardous venture ;
but I dared not set up my will against his, as I might
have done had another captain been in command of the



58 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Comet, and with a sinking heart clambered into the long-
boat, which was hanging at the davits ready to be lowered
away when her crew should be in their places.

Donald Fyffe made as if he would join me without
waiting for orders, and observing his movement, Abraham
Dyker called sharply after him, saying, when my comrade
stepped to his side:

“Don’t make the mistake, lad, of going where you are
not sent, or Captain Tom may give you a lesson in
discipline.”

I waved my hand to Donald, as the word was given to
lower away, and at that moment firmly believed I should
never see him again, for I was convinced that we could
not make the passage from the schooner to the ship with-
out considerable loss of life.

When we were water-borne and had fended off from the
Comet’s side, the long-boat, heavily laden though she was,
tossed here and there like a feather. As we raced down
the long swell into the trough of the sea, it was as if one
were sliding over icy snow, so swift was the descent, and
each time I marvelled that we ascended the next wave,
for it seemed as if we must plunge straight to the bottom
of the sea.

After two or three of these apparently perilous ascents
and descents, I began to realise that the danger was not
as great as it appeared, and then had opportunity to look
about me understandingly.

Within our range of vision was only the ship and the
schooner.



THE ATTACK. 59

Where the Portuguese brig might be I knew not, and
wondered greatly that she had so completely disappeared,
until, when we were perhaps half-way from our starting-
point and the prize, the man-of-war suddenly appeared
from around the bow of the ship, towering above us, until
she looked higher than a mountain.

I wondered if she was thus manceuvring to take us
prisoners, for the possibility of her firing at our small and
heavily laden boat never entered my head until he who
sat directly in front of me cried, in a tone of alarm:

«The heathen are making ready to give us a broadside !
There is one satisfaction though, for Captain Tom will
make it mighty hot for ’em; but we sha’n’t be near
enough the surface to see the punishment.”

Then came flashes of light, seven I counted before we
could hear the report, and everywhere around us in the
sea splashed an iron shower, until the waters fairly boiled
in their seething, drenching us to the skin, and filling the
long-boat until she was gunwale deep.

The marvel of it was that in all this deadly storm no
missile struck us.

I was not alone in my fear now, for more than one of
the crew gave vent to exclamations of dismay, and the
boatswain, who was in command, cried, hoarsely :

“Tt would be more than foolhardy for us to keep on,
since that murdering foreigner will treat us to another
dose, and likely have better luck next time. What say
you, lads? Are we warranted in going back, although
our orders were to board the ship?”



60 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

«We are not called upon to act as targets for them
Portuguese fiends! Captain Tom is the man who will
square accounts with the gold-laced villain, and we had
best put back to him.”

To persist in carrying out the captain’s orders meant
death for all our crew, and it would be, as Master Dyker
afterwards said, “A needless waste of blood, since by
dying we could do them of the Comet no good.”

From the poor way in which I have set this down, it
would seem as if we hesitated many moments, while being
flung up and down by the angry waters under the guns of
the Portuguese brig, and yet, as a fact, no more than
twenty seconds elapsed from the time the broadside was
fired before we were scudding for the schooner, every
oarsman exerting himself to the utmost.

It was no easy matter to board the Comet once we were
near at hand, and ten minutes or more were spent before
we stood on her deck.

Then it was that I saw Captain Boyle in what the
second mate called a “fighting mad” mood.

«We'll give that Portuguese captain all he may want,
and spend no useless time about it!” he cried, when the
boatswain had come to the end of telling that we put
back because the long-boat was so nearly swamped that
half a dozen bucketfuls more would send her to the
bottom.

Then certain orders were given, and Mr. Dyker, who
had come on deck for the second time, said to me, with
much of satisfaction in his tones:





“ EVERYWHERE AROUND US IN THE SEA SPLASHED AN IRON
SHOWER.”









THE ATTACK. 63

“Now, lad, you shall learn what a fourteen-gun schooner
can do with a brig of war carrying nearly twice her metal.
So far it has been a case of run and strike, but if I’m not
mistaken, from this out you'll see ‘a fight such as will
please you.”



CHAPTER IV.
THE BATTLE.

R. DYKER made a grievous mistake in thinking
any kind of a fight would please me.

Although comparatively little damage had been done us
by the guns of the enemy, owing to poor marksmanship
and the heavy swell, what I had seen below was more than
enough to sicken me of warfare.

Donald, however, having really taken part in the run-
ning fight, was still so wrought up by the excitement of
it all that he was most eager to give the Portuguese
a flogging for having interfered in what was none of his
business, and, being on deck when the order was given to
chase the man-of-war, said to me, in a tone of satisfaction :

“I should be mightily disappointed if Captain Tom did
not overhaul that fellow. He needs a taste of Yankee
shot, and I venture to say he’ll get it.”

“The brig is six guns heavier than the Comet.”

«And it would make little difference to us if she car-
ried sixteen more than we; the flogging would be given
just the same. But why do you look so glum, Stephen
Burton? Surely you are not in favour of letting the
Portuguese go free?”

64



THE BATTLE. 65

“IT am not certain that it is for us to say how he shall
go. We have captured two prizes, and in such an un-
equal fight that it should be sufficient satisfaction for us,
without running after an enemy nearly twice our strength.
Why not let well enough alone, instead of taking the
chances of losing all we have gained ?”’

“J don’t count that we are taking any chances; we can
whip him out of his boots.”

«You have grown wonderfully valiant since you and I
last talked together, Donald Fyffe!”

“Perhaps that is to be accounted for by the fact that I
have been where the fighting was done, instead of here on
deck, with nothing to do save give full sway to my fears.”

At that moment our conversation was interrupted by
Abraham Dyker, who shouted for Donald to come below,
and fortunately my comrade was bound to obey the sum-
mons, for, had he remained with mea single moment longer,
I am afraid something would have been said that might
have caused an unpleasantness between us, so vexed was
I that he should have been thus eager for more fighting.

However, Donald’s bravery and my timorousness should
have no place here while the gallant little Comet is pursu-
ing the hulking brig that had meddled with what did not
concern her.

It can be guessed that with a Baltimore clipper under
our feet, and she commanded by such a man as Captain
Tom Boyle, the chase was not a long one. We could
have sailed three knots to her two, and, in less than
five minutes after my comrade went below, the schooner



66 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

was luffed up into the wind sufficiently to permit of our
gunners raking the Portuguese fore and aft.

Even in the gloom I could see the white splinters fly
from her quarter in a perfect shower, and but for the fact
that immediately afterward our main-deck guns were dis-
charged, I believe we might have heard the cries of the
wounded.

Then it was for the first time I began to share in Don-
ald’s excitement, and longed most earnestly to go below,
where I could be of some service, rather than forced to
remain idle at Captain Tom’s heels.

This punishment seemed to arouse the Portuguese, for
instead of trying to escape, as had at first seemed his inten-
tion, he began manceuvring to get the weather-gage of us.

It can be understood that this was not an easy matter
when such a skilful sailor as Captain Tom was opposed
to him, and, after doing his best for ten minutes or more,
the Portuguese came about.

With each on a different tack, we passed within half a
musket-shot, and when we were abreast the brig she gave
us a broadside without so much as starting a rope, so high
did her shot fly; but when Captain Tom gave the word
our grape cut the enemy’s rigging in a hundred places,
until it seemed certain she must be unmanageable.

It is only fair to say that the Portuguese were good
sailors, otherwise they could not so quickly have repaired
the damage, for in a reasonably short time the brig
attempted to wear, and then was come our opportunity.

Captain Tom bore up, although in so doing we got



THE BATTLE. 67

another broadside; but the guns were as badly served
as before, and then we were well under the brig’s port
quarter.

Now every gunner on board the Comez¢ set to work with
a will, and not a shot was wasted.

I could see the brig’s crew fall here and there, until I
believe no less than twenty were out of the fight, and in
my savage joy I cried aloud with glee.

Captain Tom himself served the swivel on the main-
deck, and three times in rapid succession was it loaded
and discharged, carrying death and wounds to those on
the brig’s gun-deck, before she could crawl out from her
dangerous position.

There was no longer any fight left in the Portuguese;
they had received a full dose of Yankee iron, and were
now most eager to get out of range.

If we had pursued, she must have been sunk offhand,
unless some accident befell us; but our captain, eager to
secure his prizes and not of the mind to continue the
lesson to the brig’s commander, allowed her to sneak
away while we returned to the ship and brig which had
surrendered.

On our course we passed the third Britisher, and she,
believing it was our purpose to serve out such a dose as
had been given the Portuguese, quickly hauled down her
flag.

We had beaten off the foreigner and captured three
merchantmen, despite the odds against us, and little won-
der is it that, when this third English flag was lowered, our



68 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

crew set up such shouts of rejoicing as must have been
heard by all the enemy.

Only two shots had struck our hull, although of course
the Comet’s rigging was cut in many places, and some of
the smaller spars severely wounded ; but, considering the
damage we had done, it was as if the schooner came out
of the conflict scot-free.

Donald came on deck, intending, no doubt, to laugh at
me for having been so timorous as to believe we could not
whip the Portuguese; but finding that the scent of the
battle was in my nostrils quite as strong as it had been
in his, he forbore any sarcastic remarks, and joined me in
the general rejoicings.

Now that our work had been done so handsomely, I was
at a loss to know how we might be able to take advantage
of that which was gained.

By this time, the moon having set, it was so dark that
one could hardly see the prizes with the naked eye.

Both Donald and I were satisfied that there would be
no attempt made at boarding them; but in this we were
mistaken.

Captain Tom ran the schooner alongside the ship, which
proved to be the George, of Liverpool, and her captain re-
ported that so much damage had been done it was only
through the greatest exertions he could keep her afloat.

“Tl stand by you until morning,” our commander
cried, “and should there be imminent danger of foun-
dering, show a flare on your quarter.”

Then we stood off to the last brig that had hauled



THE BATTLE. 69

down her flag, which proved to be the Gamer, of Hull,
and learned that she had been as badly damaged as the
ship.

Captain Tom gave the same command as he had to the
George, and we stood over for the last of the three, —
the Bowes, also of Liverpool.

She had not suffered as much as the others, and to my
surprise I heard the order given for a prize-crew to be
thrown on board.

How it might be done in the darkness and with
such a sea running, I had no idea; but, from the little
we had already seen of Captain Tom, I understood full
well that there would be no hesitation at carrying out
his commands.

After speaking a few moments with the first officer and
Mr. Harker, my uncle turned to me, and said:

“JT am minded to give you lads a better show to learn
sailoring than you can get by remaining on board the
Comet. You will go with the prize-crew, which is to be
under the command of Mr. Harker, and see to it that you
do full duty aboard.”

« Are we to take our sea-chests, sir?” I asked, and the
tears of vexation were very near my eyelids at the thought
of leaving the schooner just at a time when I was begin-
ning, or fancied I was, to forget my timorousness.

“No; what you stand in will be enough, for it may be
you'll join us again before we reach the home port. We
shall rendezvous off Natal.”

Again we took our places in the long-boat, and for the



7O- THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

second time that night found ourselves tossed to and fro
on the dangerous waters; but now there was no Portu-
guese brig to fire into us, and we made the trip in safety,
though not without many misgivings on my part.

It was with a sense of deepest relief that I found my-
self on board the Bowes, and saw her captain formally
surrender the brig to Mr. Harker.

The crew had not come off uninjured during their share
in the running fight. No less than eight round-shot had
found lodgment in the hull. The upper spars were
carried away, and much work was needed to repair the
rigging.

There were sixteen of us all told in this prize-crew, and
thirty-one of the enemy; but such disparity in numbers
gave us no uneasiness, for it was understood that at day-
break, or as soon thereafter as might be convenient, the
prisoners would be transferred to the Comet.

However, it was now only about midnight, and in order
to better protect ourselves the brig’s crew was ordered
into the forecastle, where they must have found snug
quarters, and the hatches closed on them.

The officers were locked in their berths, and when this
had been done, our men set about repairing the brig so far
as might be possible in the night.

We were hove to, as a matter of course, therefore all
hands were at liberty to set about making good the rig-
ging ; but in such a task Donald and I, however willing,
could be of little service, because of our ignorance.

“You shall act as lookouts, lads, one forward and the



THE BATTLE. 71

other aft,” Mr. Harker said, after having set his men to
work. ‘Keep sharp watch with one eye for any signalling
which may be made from the schooner, and let the other
be on the prisoners, for we have too many aboard to take
any chances. There are four wounded men in the deck-
house, and they should be looked after now and then.
The captain tells me none of them are seriously hurt ;
but yet it may be possible for you to do something towards
relieving their sufferings, therefore bear them in mind
every half hour or so.”

I gave Donald the choice as to whether he would go
forward or aft, and he chose the latter place, with the
understanding that we were to take turns in looking after
the disabled men.

Lanterns were hung here and there around the deck
that the crew might be able to see what they were about,
and although I was stationed at some distance from our
men, it was not a lonely vigil, such as usually falls to the
lot of the lookout.

We could only guess where the Comet might be, for
although, now and then, when the vessels rose on the swell,
we could see lights, it was impossible to say whether they
were on board our schooner or one of the other prizes.

In less than half an hour from the time I had taken my
station Donald hailed me to say he was about to visit the
wounded men, and five minutes later I saw him come out
of the deck-house.

«« How are they?” I cried.

“Getting along fairly well, I should say. All are com-



72 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

plaining bitterly, and if they drink as much water when
you look after them as I have just dealt out, you'll have
to pay more than one visit to the scuttle-butt.”

He did not venture to join me even for a moment,
because we two were minded to perform our duties in
such a manner that Mr. Harker would have no reason for
faultfinding, and I turned my attention once more to the
lights of the vessels in the distance.

From below could be heard a murmuring sound, as the
prisoners most likely discussed their situation ; but they
were apparently so quiet that I gave little heed to the
possibility of mischief.

When I believed half an hour or more had passed, I
took my turn at visiting the wounded men, and while
approaching the deck-house observed that Donald was
gazing out over the after rail, and consequently did not
‘see me.

I was on the point of hailing him, when I bethought
myself that Mr. Harker might consider us childish if we
must speak to each other every time we came or went,
and I held my peace.

On entering the deck-house I saw three men lying in
hammocks, and the fourth seated on what appeared to be
a pile of dunnage near the door.

Two had blood-stained bandages around their heads,
the arm of one was in a sling, and the other, he who sat
near the door, was rubbing his leg as if it gave him severe
pain, although I could see no evidence of a wound in that
member.







Ee Te

THE BATTLE. 73

« Are you minded to let us die of thirst?” this last
man asked, in a surly tone, as I stepped inside. “If there
are two boys aboard, it would seem that we might at least
be supplied with water.”

«There ave two aboard,” I answered, quietly, for it was
not in my heart to be angry with prisoners who were
wounded, however harshly they might speak. “We are
acting as lookouts, and if one of us comes here every half
hour it would seem as if that was all the time we could
spend in such duty, for a signal from our schooner may
be made at any moment.”

«Where are you stationed?” the man asked.

“ Forward.”

«But the rest of the crew?”

“Jn the forecastle. The officers are in their rooms
aft.”

“Did you crowd all our men into that one hole?”

«There was no other place where they might be safely
kept, I suppose, although I know but little of such things,
for this is my first cruise.”

“Get some water, will you, and plenty of it. The other
boy brought it in.sparing quantity, and we have thirsted
this half hour or more.”

I believed the man lied; but did not think it manly to
tell him so when he was helpless, and, taking up the bucket
which he pushed towards me with his uninjured foot I went
to the scuttle-butt.

Donald was still gazing astern, and I stood an instant
trying to make out what so riveted his attention, but failed



74 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

to see anything unusual in that direction, after which I
drew what seemed to be an ample supply of water.

Just as I returned to the deck-house and was about to
step inside, I heard a noise aft, as if some one of our men
had fallen, and I looked in that direction until making
certain no mishap had occurred.

Then I continued on, still gazing back with never a
thought of possible mischief, when suddenly what felt like
a man’s pea-jacket was thrown over my head, and my
arms were pinioned to my side.

The bucket fell to the floor as I tried to free myself
and at the same time scream for help.

I doubt if my voice could have been heard outside the
deck-house, so closely was the garment pressed about my
mouth, and as for freeing myself, I might as well have
struggled against bands of iron.

In an instant, and even while I was yet vainly strug-
gling, there came to my mind the knowledge of what all
this meant.

The Britisher who had been seated near the door was
only slightly wounded, —there was still the strength of
half a dozen ordinary men in his arms, —and once I had
been made prisoner it would not be a difficult task for him
to set free those who were confined in the forecastle.

He could go forward, and should any of our crew see
him they would suppose it was I, for no one would pay
particular attention to such a matter, believing the wounded
men incapable of mischief.

The thought that the brig might be recaptured through



THE BATTLE. 75

my carelessness made me desperate, and I continued my
struggles even after one of the other men came out of his
hammock to assist in rendering me helpless.

While the fellow who had leaped upon me held his hand
over my mouth in such fashion that I was nearly suffo-
cated, one of the others lashed my arms and feet, and
then the two set about gagging me.

A wad of oakum wrapped around the end of a belaying-
pin was thrust into my mouth until it seemed as if my
jaws were dislocated, and there it was made fast with a
bit of ratline stuff.

During all this time I had not been able to raise my
voice, and now as a matter of course I was totally help-
less.

The two: men —the second being one of those whose
heads were tied up — bundled me into the hammock, and
I question if Donald would have understood that anything
was wrong had he come in while I lay there.

Now I could hear all that was said, and, so far as might
be possible in the gloom, see the movements of the pris-
oners, who were supposed to be helpless because of their
wounds.

“There is no fear this little trick will be discovered by
the Yankees before that second lad comes here,” the fel-
low who had been seated near the door, and who appeared
to be the leader in this movement, said, in a tone of tri-
umph. ‘TI shall go to the forecastle, taking the chances
that the Americans will believe me to be this boy whom
we have trussed up so neatly, and once there our crew



70 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

shall be let out, one or two at a time, until we are ready
for business.”

«“ There must not be too much delay, for once the other
lad goes forward, the whole affair will be discovered,” the
man who had assisted in my capture suggested, and
the other fellow replied:

«You three have nothing to do, save lay for him here.
Bob shall take my place near the door, and a smart rap
over the head, when the cub first shows himself, will settle
matters, if those in the forecastle have not already brought
the work to an end. Keep your eyes open, for now noth-
ing, save a mistake on your part, will prevent us from
carrying this thing through in proper shape.”

Then the fellow went out, and I noted that there was
no limp in his gait, therefore believed he had shammed the
wound in the hope of being able to do exactly what had
been accomplished.

The man who had aided in make! me a prisoner seated
himself by the door, with a spare pump-brake in his hands,
and my heart was even more heavy than before, for in
addition to losing our prize, and becoming prisoners, it
seemed certain Donald Fyffe would be killed.

A blow on the head from such a weapon as this Brit-
isher held would most likely kill the strongest man, and I
doubted not but that it would be dealt with all the strength
of which he was capable, in order that there might be no
possibility the poor lad could make an outcry.

And all this was due to me. Had I observed such
precautions as would have suggested themselves to almost



LHE BATTLE. 77

any one, save such a simple as myself, the attempt could
* not have succéeded, and, therefore, I might charge all that
followed to my own account.

It would have been better had they killed me outright,
for then I should be spared the mental anguish from
which I now suffered.

How madly I strained every muscle, in the vain hope of
rending the bonds, or so far loosening them that I might
get one hand free! Although I was nigh to death from
suffocation, the pain seemed as nothing, so great was my
anxiety to repair the mischief brought about by careless-
ness.

How long a time passed before we heard anything that
might betoken what the Britishers were doing, I know
not, for the moments were to me like hours, and the
seconds fully five minutes long.

Then I heard a slight noise from the outside, and saw
the fellow near the doorway straighten himself up to deal
a blow.

There could be no question, to my mind at least, but
that Donald was coming to visit the wounded, and I must
lie there helpless while these Britishers killed him!



CHAPTER V.
SHARP WORK.

T is beyond the limit of words to describe the agony of
mind which was mine at this moment, when I fully
expected to see my comrade murdered.

Only a few feet away were friends who would rush to
Donald’s assistance if they had the slightest suspicion of
his danger, and yet there was little hope chance would
bring one of them into the deck-house.

I could hear the voices of the men as they talked or
sang while working, and it was as if this intensified the
horror of the terrible situation.

During the time, when the very seconds were as
hours, I wondered why Donald delayed entering, and yet
I hoped something outside would attract his attention for
a time.

Any delay might bring a reprieve, for I was as one sen-
tenced to worse than death, and clung to the slightest
straw, in the hope of relief.

Then, to my great surprise, I heard an unfamiliar voice
whisper, and, while I thanked God that the moment of my
comrade’s death was not yet at hand, my heart grew even
more heavy, for it seemed as if there was no longer
ground for hope.

78



SHARP WORK. 79

It was one of the Britisher’s shipmates who spoke, and
the weapon was suddenly lowered, as the fellow replied,
much as though relieved because he was not forced to do
murder :

“Ts it you, Jepson? I thought one of the Yankees
had come to visit us, and was ready to give him his last
blow.”

“Tt strikes me you are growing nervous, Tom. Your
plan is moving in great shape, and by this time all the
boys must be on deck, ready for work. It can’t be many
minutes before the word will be given, and the brig is as
good as ours already.”

Now was come to me a sorrow greater than when I
believed Donald alone would be the victim, for I under-
stood that all our crew were in most imminent dan-
ger.

The prisoners had been released by the man who over-
powered me, and a general slaughter was about to take
place..

How I struggled with my bonds, cutting the ropes deep
into the flesh, as I twisted and turned in the vain hope of
loosening them, and all the while expecting to hear the
signal for the beginning of the murderous work!

While struggling, I turned my face towards the edge
of the hammock, and a great joy sprang up in my heart,
as I realised that, by so doing, the gag which had caused
me so much suffering was slightly twisted.

It was yet possible I might free my mouth, and even
though my cries would likely be the signal for my death,



80 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I was ready to utter them, if thereby I could warn the
crew of the danger which threatened.

I no longer paid any attention to what the men might
be saying, but writhed in the hammock with the purpose
of freeing myself so nearly that it would be possible to
make an outcry.

The ratline-stuff which held the gag in place was sim-
ply passed from each end of the belaying-pin around my
neck, and as I pressed my head against the canvas it was
gradually forced out of position until, to my inexpressible
relief, I had freed my mouth.

The bonds still held me helpless; but I could raise my
voice in warning, and even though it was likely this would
cost me my life, it was sufficient.

The only question now in my mind was as to whether I
should cry aloud at this moment, or wait until some of our
friends were near at hand.

I knew full well that I would only be permitted to shout
once, for, instantly I raised my voice, death would come,
and if the alarm was not heard I should have died in vain.

It was well I did not obey the impulse which prompted
me to scream on the instant it was possible for me to do
so, since I should most likely have failed in my purpose.

While trying to decide as to the proper course of action,
I heard, without realising that I was listening, Jepson say
to the man on guard:

“Understand this much, — that while all the prize-crew
are on deck it will be impossible for us to recapture the
brig without great loss of life, for the Yankees are armed,



SHARP WORK. 81

and we without weapons. The plan is to wait awhile, —
say until just before daylight, — in the hope that some of
them will turn in.”

«But the boy we have trussed up will be missed, or, if
not, he who is acting as the lookout aft will soon be here
to attend to the wounded.”

“We can easily take care of him, and must then run
our: chances of his absence being discovered. It is the
opinion of all hands forward that no attempt should be
made until the odds are more nearly in our favour.”

‘Tt shouldn’t be a hard job for you fellows to find what
will serve as weapons.”

«What is a marline-spike against a cutlass, or a capstan-
bar to the man who carries a loaded pistol ?”’

“Have your own way, Jepson, if, as you say, all hands
are agreed upon some plan. I will do my part when the
time comes, even though I think we make a mistake by
delaying.”

Then the Britishers fell silent, and I knew they awaited
the coming of Donald Fyffe.

How earnestly I prayed that he might forget the sup-
posed wants of those in the deck-house ; and by thus pray-
ing I, like many another before me, did not realise what
might be for the best !

No more than five minutes had passed from the time
these Britishers fell silent before I heard my comrade’s
voice within a few feet of where I lay, and then, from such

_ words as could be distinguished, I understood that he was
talking with Mr. Harker.



82 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

It was impossible for me to say what might be the sub-
ject of their converse; but I believed that now had come
the time when I should make known the situation.

If I waited until Donald was alone, he would rush to
my assistance, without thinking of the possible conse-
quences, and the result I could foresee only too well. By
raising an outcry now, it was reasonable to suppose Mr.
Harker would take it upon himself to learn the cause, and
even if Donald and I were both murdered, we should not
have died in vain.

I felt firmly convinced that my death was assured in-
stantly I cried out, and yet, strange as it may seem, I felt
no terror, —my hesitation arose only from the fear that
I might not accomplish that which I desired, by thus
attempting to give an alarm.

“There is treachery here! I am in the power of the
wounded Britishers, who are —”’

This much I succeeded in shouting at the full strength
of my lungs, and then he who was on guard near the
door sprang upon me, with the pump-brake upraised to
strike.

I saw it descending, and knew that the blow, if fairly
dealt, would crush my skull like an egg-shell.

With one supreme effort I succeeded in slightly chang-
ing the position of my body so that the Britisher was
partially foiled in his effort.

The blow was a glancing one, and so far failed of its
purpose that I was not deprived of consciousness.

Before the fellow could raise his weapon again, Mr.





‘WITH ONE SUPREME EFFORT I SUCCEEDED IN SLIGHTLY
CHANGING THE POSITION OF MY BODy.”









SHARP WORK. 85

Harker had sprung upon him, and Donald Fyffe grappled
with the man who had been set free from the fore-
castle,

I understood that all those Britishers who were hiding
near at hand would fall upon us immediately, and the fore-
castle speedily be emptied of its occupants, therefore I
shouted for the benefit of our men:

“ Look to yourselves! The prisoners have been freed!”

By the time these words were uttered, Mr. Harker had
wrested the pump-brake from his adversary, and with one
blow put him past further mischief.

Donald- Fyffe was rapidly being worsted; but now the
mate was free to act, that portion of the struggle was
quickly ended, and then came the report of firearms,
telling that our men were on the alert.

“Release Stephen Burton, and kill either of the men
here who attempt to do mischief,” Mr. Harker cried, as he
sprang out on the deck, and Donald Fyffe would have
come immediately to my rescue but that I urged him to
make certain the wounded men were not ready to join in
the fray.

“Don’t strike!’’ one of them cried, as my comrade
seized the pump-brake, which the mate had let fall as he
unsheathed his cutlass. ‘We are in good truth disabled,
and could not take part in a fight if we would.”

“Be certain they speak the truth before you attempt to
release me,” I cried, and in the merest fraction of time

‘Donald satisfied himself that the two in the hammocks
were really helpless.



86 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Then he set me free by severing the bonds with his
sheath-knife, and I leaped out upon the deck, in ignorance
that the blood was flowing freely from the wound: on my
head.

«Come on!” I cried. ‘We are needed outside, and
these men may be safely secured by locking the door

.

upon them.”

Then I would have run out to take part in the battle
which, from the sounds, we knew was on, but that my
comrade clutched at my shoulder, holding me fast.

“You are seriously wounded, and in no condition to go
out there,” he cried. ‘Let me see what mischief has
been done.”

“Tt can be little more than a scratch, otherwise I should
feel some pain, and we are needed on deck.”

I literally tore myself from his grasp, and ran out, look-
ing about hurriedly for something that would serve as a
weapon.

The battle, and from the appearance of the deck as I
came into the open air it surely deserved that name, was
well-nigh ended.

The firearms in the hands of our crew, which had been
freely used, were the most powerful argument, and I could
hear the brig’s crew crying for quarter.

‘Look to the cabin, you two lads, and shoot down any
of the officers who may have escaped from their berths,”
Mr. Harker cried, as he saw us, and even while Donald
and I ran aft, I knew, by glancing over my shoulder, that
our crew, formed in line from rail to rail, were marching



SHARP WORK. 87

towards the forecastle to make certain there were none in
hiding on the deck.

When we were come to the companionway it appeared
as if our share of the work would be light; the doors of
the several rooms yet remained closed, and I knew the
occupants could not have come out save by battering
them down.

It had been a close shave for us; but happily all danger
was now averted, and, understanding this, it was as if I
had time to realise my own condition.

Now the wound on my head asserted itself, and I grew
faint from loss of blood.

Donald saw me stagger against the hatchway, and at
once led me into the cabin, where, after a certain rude
fashion, he bound up my head, thereby giving me no slight
relief.

Before I was sufficiently master of myself to move
about without reeling, Mr. Harker came below, and, see-
ing Donald’s work, asked with no little concern in his
tones :

« Are you wounded, lad?”

“ A Britisher struck one blow before you appeared, but
save for the flow of blood it is not serious.”

“Your face tells a different story; let me examine the
wound.”

While he was thus engaged I made known that the
attempt at escape was rendered possible by my own care-
lessness, and after the story had been told he said, with
emphasis :



88 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

“You have no reason to blame yourself, lad. Believing
as we did that those men were disabled, and also that
they had surrendered, even I should have gone into the
deck-house without being prepared for an attack.”

«What has taken place?’’ one of the Britishers who
was locked in his berth shouted. “Have you been
attacked ?”’

“ Ay, that we have, and through the treachery of those
who claim to be wounded. While ministering to their
wants one of our men was set upon, and that he is still
alive is no fault of the scoundrel who tried to kill him.”

«Has any blood been shed?”

“We shot down those who had been released from the
forecastle and were about to attack us. How many may
be dead I cannot say, but no less than seven are lying on
the deck.”

At that moment one of our men came to the compan-
ionway and shouted :

“The Comet is bearing down upon us, sir, most likely
to learn the meaning of the rumpus.”

Mr. Harker went on deck at once, and with Donald’s
help I succeeded in following him just as Captain Tom
hailed from the schooner, which was now close along-
side.

“Are you having trouble with your prisoners ?”

“Ay, sir. There was an attempt to recapture the brig,
but it failed.”

“At what loss to you?”

“Stephen Burton is the only one injured. He has a



SHARP WORK. 89

bad wound on the head, which should be attended to as
soon as possible.”

“T will send a boat, and we’ll begin the work of taking
off the Britishers at once. See to it that your men are
well armed when you muster the brig’s crew. Let both
the boys come back, and I will give you a couple of men
in their stead.”

Save for the fact that we were to continue the cruise
on the schooner rather than return home as members of
the prize-crew, I would rather the wound had not been
dressed than make another trip in the long-boat over
those boisterous waves; but it had grieved me to leave
the Comet, and right glad was I that sufficient excuse had
arisen to take us back.

Eight of the Britishers were summoned from the fore-
castle, all of our crew meanwhile standing fully armed,
prepared for any attempt at mischief, and when the
Comets long-boat came up under the brig’s quarter, the
prisoners, together with Donald and me, were put on board
one by one whenever such transshipment was possible.

It was a task which required much time in the perform-
ance, because only when the little craft rose on the swell
to the level of the brig’s rail could we jump on board.

The passage back to the schooner was made in safety,
although there were many times when it seemed as if we
‘must surely be swamped, and Donald and I were taken
on board.

"While the prisoners were clambering over the rail, Cap.
tain Tom called on me for an explanation as to what had



90 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

happened aboard the brig, and after I had told the story,
laying full weight of blame upon myself, he ordered that
the surgeon look to the wound on my head, saying, before
he turned away from me:

“You lads may take up quarters aft, in Mr. Harker’s
berth, from this out, and according to my mind you are
not to be censured, Stephen, because, as nearly as I can
make out, the brig might have been retaken but for the
fact of your pluckily giving the alarm when it was done at
risk of your life. I am beginning to think both you lads
may prove yourselves men before this cruise is ended.”

It was a fine thing, this change from the forecastle to
the cabin, so I thought, as we turned to go down the com-
panionway to inspect our new quarters; but I had no
opportunity of seeing them for some time, because the
surgeon ordered me into the cockpit, where my head was
sewed and patched until the performance cost me more
pain than had the receiving of the wound.

When I joined Donald Fyffe again, I found he had
taken all our belongings to the second mate’s berth, and
he declared that never were two boys quartered in better
fashion on a privateersman than we.

That which made this narrow berth seem all the more
pleasant, was that we had won praise from Captain Tom
Boyle, who never spoke such words unless they were
deserved.

The pain in my head drove away all desire for sleep,
and Donald and I went on deck again to watch the work
of transferring the prisoners, that we might be there also



SHARP WORK. gI

as soon as the night was gone, for both were eager to
learn whether the other prizes could be picked up.

Their lights could be seen a long distance away, to-
gether with those on board the Portuguese ; but it ap-
peared as if the three craft were drifting towards the
shore, in which case it was not improbable they would be
lost to us.

When morning came we learned that these fears were
well founded.

The ship, the man-of-war, and the brig were working
towards the shore as fast as might be in their crippled
condition, for all were seriously cut up, and immediately
the Comet was put in pursuit.

They were too far away, however, to admit of our over-
taking them, and by nine o’clock that forenoon we were
alongside the Bowes once more, hove to while Captain
Tom made a visit of inspection.

Until he returned to the schooner I believed the brig
would be sent home without delay, and, therefore, was
much surprised when the word was passed among the
men that she had been ordered to the Port of Spain,
which is the capital of Trinidad, and this was the same as
saying that the Comet would most likely stop there for
. repairs.

We lay by the Bowes until noon, and then squared
away on our course, which the first officer told me would,
if continued, bring us to the island of Trinidad.

We two lads were notified that we would be excused
from duty during the next eight and forty hours, and once



92 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

the Comet was well on her way towards this island, which
I had long wanted to visit, Donald and I went below to
turn in.

Four days later we were off the entrances to the Gulf
of Paria, and the first mate explained to us that these
channels are known as the Dragon’s Mouths, one being
called the Monkeys’ Passage, another Ship Passage, the
_ third Boca Grande, and that through which we sailed, Egg
Passage, all these names being given, so it is said, by no
less a person than Christopher Columbus himself.

Whatever may be the discomforts of a privateersman’s
life, such as we had known were nearly atoned for by the
wondrous sights Donald and I now witnessed for the first
time.

The passage by which we entered the gulf was so nar-
row that it was as if the schooner actually rubbed against
the shores, and there were times when I felt positive we
could have plucked cocoanuts from the trees by laying out
on the yard-arms.

Then, when we came into the gulf, where the water was
as calm as a mill-pond, bordered by glowing white coral
reefs, I believed, and am still of the same opinion, that a
fairer spectacle could not be found anywhere.

«You lads are now come to that island which Columbus
discovered in 1498,” Captain Tom said to Donald and me
when the Comet was at anchor, and if you are as familiar
with history as you should be, it is needless for me to say
it was during his’ third expedition across the Atlantic that
he made the discovery of this island and the mouths of



SHARP WORK. 93

the Orinoco River, which last he believed sprang from the
Tree of Life in the midst of the Garden of Eden.”

Nothing more was needed to give Donald and me the
liveliest desire to go ashore, and after some hesitation I
begged my uncle for permission to go.

“Ashore, lads? Of course you shall! Every good pri-
vateersman enjoys himself when he can, and so long as
the crew behave themselves while at liberty, just so long
do I make it a point to give them all possible pleasure of
that kind. If you report on board before sunset, and do
not leave the schooner until after sunrise, you are at
liberty to explore the island to your heart’s content while
we are refitting.”

There was in our minds, as we prepared to visit the
island, only the thought of odd sights to be seen, and
no suspicion of the dangers we were destined to en-
counter.



CHAPTER VI.
A PLOT,

EE was not until we were ready to go on shore that
Donald and I understood how venturesome had Cap-
tain Tom been in thus stopping at Trinidad.

Instead of anchoring off the Port of Spain, as we lads
had expected would be the case, the Comet was moored
under the shore in a little cove which, although close by
the point that shut out the ocean from the Gulf of Paria,
was not disclosed to our view until we had actually
entered.

It was a tiny harbour or basin among the coral reefs, and
so nearly screened from view of any one entering the gulf
as to make it really a hiding-place.

It was as snug a port as any privateersman could wish,
and so surrounded by land that the Comet might safely
lie there throughout any weather with but a single anchor
down.

As I have said, Donald and I wondered why we did not
proceed directly to the Port, and had we given more at-
tention to our geography lessons in the past, the sur-
prise would have come to us that Captain Tom had dared
enter this gulf at all.

94



A PLOT. 95

When we made ready to go ashore, I remarked care-
lessly to the first mate that I had hoped we might have laid
so near the Port of Spain that it would be only a simple
task to row ashore, and added, as if eager to display my
ignorance :

“Now, Donald and I must trudge along the sand for
five or six miles, which is the distance from this cove to
the Port, so Abraham Dyker has told us.”

“And are you counting on going to the Port of Spain?”
the mate asked, with an odd expression on his face.

“ Ay, sir; we have the captain’s permission to go ashore
every morning after sunrise, with the understanding that
we shall return before sunset.”

“TI suppose you know that the Port of Spain is on the
island of Trinidad?”

“Why, certainly, sir.”

“And what nation holds possession of the island?”

“It has a government of its own, I suppose.”

“Then I can prove to your entire satisfaction how
necessary it is for lads to know somewhat of history and
geography before they venture into a strange port. Since
1797 the Britishers have held this island, and were you.
to show your tioses in town, the chances are you'd be
clapped into the lock-up with but scant ceremony.”

We stared at the mate in surprise, and after a short
pause Donald asked:

“If this is a British island, how is it Captain Tom has
dared to put in with the purpose of repairing damages?”

“Captain Tom dares do many things another would



96 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

shrink at, and I have an idea that there is in his mind a
thought of lying here in waiting with the expectation of
nabbing one of the enemy’s vessels. I do not fancy the
work of refitting will be so extensive as to prevent our
putting to sea at a moment’s notice.”

“But I understood the orders were for the Bowes to
make the Port of Spain.”

«Those were the orders, lad; but I warrant you Mr.
Harker knows that this cove is the nearest he is expected
to go to the town. We have lain here in hiding before,
as nearly all on board can tell you.”

I was so bewildered by the idea that the Comet was
really in English waters, and so thoroughly vexed with
myself for having been ignorant of the fact, that all desire
for going ashore suddenly fled.

I walked slowly to the starboard rail, and was leaning
over it when Donald came to my side. :

“T fail to understand why we have not heard some of
the men talking about what the first officer has just told
us,” he said to me, and I knew from the tone of his voice
that he had in his heart quite as much shame as I in mine.

«J do not fancy there is a man on board who believed
that two great hulking lads like you and me could be so
ignorant,” I replied, bitterly.

“Tet us seek out Abraham Dyker.”

«To what end? That we may confess our own stu-
pidity ?”

“We have already shown it to the first officer, and I
warrant you the captain will soon know it was our pur-



A PLOT. : 97

pose to visit the town. It will be whispered ’round
about the schooner, and we may as well make a clean
breast of it to the old gunner.”

Without replying, for he turned to go below as he
spoke, I followed him, and we had no difficulty in finding
the one sought, for he seldom left his gun save when sent
on duty elsewhere.

“ Did you not know, Master Dyker, that we counted on
visiting the town?” Donald asked, almost sharply.

“Counted on it, lad? Why, you wouldn’t dream of
doing such a thing! A lark is a lark, but to put your
heads paren the Britishers goes beyond foolhardiness,
even,’

Then Donald explained what we would have done but
‘for the mate’s warning, and Abraham Dyker laughed so
long and so loud that I came nigh to losing my temper.

After a time, however, when he realised that his merri-
ment was displeasing to us, the old man explained, much
as had the mate, regarding the locality which the Comet’s
crew understood to be meant when the Port of Spain was
mentioned.

‘We put in here no less than four times during the last
cruise, in‘the hope of picking up a prize without having to
chase her too far. But for this hiding-place, we might not
have captured the Hopewell.”

“ How can that be?” Donald asked.

“It is a longish story, lad, and I will tell it some time
when you are in a better mood for listening. Just now,
those who have not been given shore-leave are supposed



98 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

to be on the alert, for no one can say how soon a prize
may heave in sight.”

“In which case, what would become of the men
ashore ?”’

“That is their own concern. It is always understood
that no signal would be given if we should find it neces-
sary to slip our moorings suddenly, and if they strayed
very far from the cove there is a likelihood we might not
see them again for many months, although all know full
well that Captain Tom would pick them up as soon as it
should be possible.”

«Will the Bowes put in here?” I asked, still bewildered
by the thought of the dangers we might have encountered
had we not chanced to speak with the mate concerning
our intention.

«Ay, lad, that she will.”

“And suppose an English man-of-war should come into
the gulf?”

“Then there would be hot work for a time. Of that
you may be certain.”

I seated myself on a gun-carriage, and Abraham Dyker
asked, as if in surprise:

“Have you given up all idea of going ashore?”

“I am not minded to take the chances of being left on
the island of Trinidad.”

“There is little fear of that, lad, if it so be you keep
the schooner always in view. After you saw that we
were making sail, there would be time enough in which
to pull aboard.”



A PLOT. 99

“And therefore our only advantage in going will be
to sit on the sand watching for something which gives
token that the Comet is being gotten under way.”

«All that I grant you, lad, on a day like this, with
a stiffish breeze blowing. But suppose it turned calm
to-morrow morning? Then you could ramble around to
your heart’s content, provided you kept at a respectful
distance from the Port, knowing full well that, until the
wind springs up, the Comet must perforce remain in this
snug mooring-place.”

Donald made no objection to staying on board, from
which I understood that he viewed the matter in much
the same light as did I.

We went on deck again, and there observed what we
had failed to note before, —that all hands on duty were
acting as lookouts, ready to spring to quarters without
delay, should necessity arise.

Not more than twenty of the men had gone ashore,
and the distance from our anchorage to the beach was so
short that we could readily see them without the aid of a
glass.

As nearly as I could tell, not a man strayed very far
from the water-line. A few were indulging in a bath, but
the greater number lay under the shadow of the trees
within a few yards of the boat.

The work of refitting had already begun, and Donald
and I observed that it was carried on in such a manner
as to make it possible for us to set sail at any moment,
should occasion require.



100 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The breeze held during this day, and we two lads re-
mained on board, not caring to take advantage of Captain
Tom’s permission ; at least, not while the danger of being
left behind seemed so great.

On the following morning the wind still held strong,
and at about ten o’clock in the forenoon we were aroused
to excitement by the lookout at the masthead, who cried, in
a tone hardly louder than a whisper, that a craft of some
sort was coming through Egg Passage.

There was no need for Captain Tom to give any
commands.

Every man sprang to his station noiselessly, and a small
ensign was run a short distance up in the main-rigging as
a signal for those on shore to come aboard.

By slipping our cable, we could have gotten under way
in less than three minutes from the time the command
was given, and I, who had been exceedingly timorous
since the previous afternoon lest a British man-of-war
should suddenly appear, felt myself trembling with excite-
ment, and fearing the stranger might prove to be no more
than a fisherman, the overhauling of which Captain Tom
would consider beneath his notice.

Then came a certain sense of disappointment, when the
lookout announced that the oncoming craft was none
other than our prize, the Bowes, and, as soon as might be
thereafter, the brig was made fast alongside the Comet,
for in this cove the waters were so quiet that two vessels
might lie side by side without danger of injury to either.

On the next morning a boat was sent seaward through



Full Text





The Baldwin Library



j
‘







6 Ee
THE CRUISE OF THE COMET




“IT WAS AS IF BOTH BROADSIDES WERE DISCHARGED AT THE
SAME INSTANT.”


Ler for

vt

THE

CRUISE OF THE COMEN

The Story of a Privateer of 1812, sailing from
‘Baltimore, as set down by Stephen Burton

EDITED BY

JAMES OTIS

AUTHOR OF
“THE BOYS OF FORT SCHUYLER,” “ JENNY
WREN’S BOARDING- HOUSE,” ETC.

Ellustratey by.
A. B. SHUTE



BOSTON
ESTES AND LAURIAT
1898

ON
Copyright, 1898
By Estes AND LAURIAT

Colonial [ress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S. A.




NOTE.



\

The details of this story have been gathered chiefly
from letters written by the boy Stephen Burton to a
cousin in Portsmouth, N. H., and my work thereon has
been little more than that of an editor. Young Burton’s
statements regarding the movements of the Comet have
been verified by historians, and there is little or no ques-
tion but that in all things, save perhaps some unimportant
matters, it is a true and faithful account regarding this

certain cruise of the celebrated privateering schooner.

James OTIS.



CONTENTS.

—+—
CHAP. ‘ u PAGE
I. THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER : : . : Ses

II, Lying In Wait A Sea 30
III. THE ATTACK. : : : : : : ee eAy)
IV. THE BATTLE . : : ; : 3 ; 2 04
V. SHARP WORK . : 3 : : : : SS
VI. A PLOT : ; : : : 3 : : Seon
VII. THE CoMET’S CREW . : 3 3 : : . 108
VIII. A Busy Day . : : : : : : eh aeele2NG
IX. OVERWHELMING ODDS ; : : : : Sara:

X. A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT . : : : : . 159











ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
“JT WAS AS IF BOTH BROADSIDES WERE DISCHARGED AT

THE SAME INSTANT” See page 163. : . Lrontispiece
‘“¢WELL, WHY ARE YOU LADS LOAFING AROUND HERE

WHERE YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS?’” : : : 2 1G)
“OUR BACKS WERE SORE FROM FREQUENT APPLICATION

OF THE ROPE’S-END” : : : : ; : ess,
«“ EVERYWHERE AROUND US IN THE SEA SPLASHED AN IRON

SHOWER”. : : : : : ; : ‘ ee OL
«“ WITH ONE SUPREME EFFORT I SUCCEEDED IN SLIGHTLY

CHANGING THE POSITION OF MY BODY” : : O38
“¢DIp YOU FIND ANY ONE?’ THE MAN WHO HELD ME

ASKED” . : : : : ; : : ; . 10g
“ DURING THE FIRST HOUR THE HUGE VESSEL SEEMED TO

GAIN UPON US” ; . : : : : sete 20
«“ THE RIGGING, CUT IN A HUNDRED PLACES, WAS SWAYING

TO AND FRO”. : 3 3 6 5 3 ‘ . I4!I



TE E€RUISE OF 1HE COMET.

CHAPTER I.
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER,

APTAIN THOMAS BOYLE was my mother’s
brother, and had he been my father I could not
have taken greater pride in his doings.

His schooner, and, of course, I am now speaking of the
Comet, for she was nearer to me than the brig Chasseur,
which he afterwards commanded, was a Baltimore clipper,
and I saw all her building and outfitting, from the time
the keel was laid down until the last gun had been
mounted.

Although I was no sailor, and had never been so fortu-
nate as to gain permission to make even the shortest
cruise, there was in my heart more affection for this same
trim little schooner than for all the world beside, saving,
of course, my mother.

When Captain Tom—lI never dared to call so brave a
.man uncle — first made ready to sail from Baltimore, on
a privateering cruise, shortly after war was declared in
1812, I said all a boy might, in the hope of being allowed

13
14 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

to count myself as one of the hundred and twenty who
manned the Comet; and my good friend and comrade,
Donald Fyffe, was not a whit less eager to do his share
towards teaching the English King that we of the United
States had come to the length of our forbearance, in the
matter of allowing him to impress our sailors.

It was all in vain, however, that Donald and I pleaded.

Neither his parents nor mine would give consent to our
going as privateersmen, and but for a few words Captain
Tom let slip, before he sailed in July of 1812, we should
have lost all hope of ever succeeding in our efforts.

« Wait until you have gained a twelvemonth in age, and
then it may be I shall say a word in behalf of you lads.”

It was little encouragement, to be sure; but yet to
us it seemed much like an absolute promise, and our
hearts were less sore when the Comez, carrying fourteen
guns, — six in a broadside, with a swivel, and a gun
amidships, — left the port.

Of all persons in Baltimore, whether man grown or
boys, we were the proudest, when, in less than a month
from the time Captain Tom set sail, the British ship
Flopewell, carrying fourteen guns and twenty-five men,
arrived at the home port as the prize of our Baltimore
clipper.

She, with her cargo, was valued at a hundred and fifty
thousand dollars, and I dare venture to say the schooner
had earned her cost, including the outfit, twice over in this
one capture.

There had been a most obstinate combat, so some of


THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 15

the prize-crew told us; but the Comet was the victor, of
course, because Captain Tom was in command.

From this hour, we two lads did more than dream of
the time when we should be allowed to ship as privateers-
men, for we talked concerning what Captain Tom had
told us, until it was to our minds as if he had said we
should join him on the next cruise, and laid many plans
regarding what we would do, once we had signed the
schooner's articles as green hands; for we could not
hope to ship in any better berth.

Now, just one word regarding Donald Fyffe, who was
my nearest, and, I might say, only friend in Baltimore,
outside of my own family.

He was fifteen years old on the same day the Come?’s
first prize came into port, and, although I was his senior
by three months, it would have pleased me better could I
have lost that much time in my life, in order that my
birthday might have been marked by so joyous a happen-
ing; for many there were at that time who croaked of
defeat, predicting the downfall of the United States, in
thus attempting to give the English nation a lesson in
good manners.

Donald, as may be guessed from his name, was of
Scotch descent, and more than one of our schoolmates
.ventured to suggest that his desire to ship on board the
Comet did not arise so much from a love of country, as
because all well knew Captain Tom was one who could
tassel the handkerchiefs of his crew with prize-money,
until the gold and silver might become a burden.
16 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

That Donald well loves a shilling I know, but am will-
ing to here set down that there was more in his heart con-
cerning the honour to be gained, than any other thing.
He was as eager to show what might be done by us of
this young country, as the veriest spendthrift that ever
walked a plank, and to give him that which is no more
than his due, I must say a truer comrade, be he Scotch,
Irish, or English, never lived.

His father was in trade, and mine a farmer.

This much for the two of us; and now to the Comet and
Captain Tom Boyle, of whom little need be said, in this
year of peace, 1815, when we have already given his
Majesty the needed lesson, because the people of every
State well know what he did both in the Comet and the
Chasseur. Although there were six other privateers sail-
ing from our home port in July of 1812, my uncle was
oftentimes spoken of as “the Baltimore captain,” and well
did he deserve all the praise which was bestowed upon
him.

In November of this same first year of the war, the
Comet returned, and but for Donald she might have put
to sea again without our being on board.

He it was who suggested to me, when we knew the
schooner was being made ready for an early departure,
that we boldly approach the captain and claim he had
promised to take us with him on the next cruise.

«But he did not really say so,” I objected, fearing lest
this uncle of mine be vexed with our importunities.

« After the success which has been his, I venture to
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 17

say he has forgotten even the little encouragement he
did give us, and if we are bold in approaching him,
the business is done almost before a word has been
spoken.”

I did not feel as positive, but Donald, insisting, carried
the point, as he always does, and together we went to the
dock, he volunteering to act as spokesman.

Captain Tom was on deck, and in high good-humour,
for the first prize had been sold and the proceeds divided
among his men in a manner which gave him entire satis-
faction. .

Even under such favourable circumstances, my heart
failed me when we stood before him, and he cried, in a
tone which sounded to me like one of sternness:

“Well, why are you lads loafing around here where
you have no business? Two great hulking boys like
you should be at work.”

“And so we count on doing, Captain Boyle,” Donald
replied, boldly, while I stepped behind him timorously,
not daring to face this fighting uncle of mine. “We have
business here, and are ready to transact it.”

“On board this schooner?”

“Ay, sir; for by your promise we are the same as
members of the crew.”

- “How do you figure that, young jackanapes? They be
men aboard this schooner.”

“Else the Hopewell would not have been taken.”

“Have you young sprigs come to tell me that, believ-
ing I did not know it?”
18 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

“No, sir; but to say that mayhap Stephen Burton and
I can show we are older than our years.”

«Well, what then?’’ Captain Tom asked, as if per-
plexed by Donald’s speech.

“Only that we are now to have an opportunity of prov-
ing it, captain, for before the Come? last left this port you
gave us what can be construed as little less than a prom-
ise that, when next the schooner put to sea, we should be
on board, members of her crew.”’

«Did I say that much?” my uncle asked, as he stood
like one racking his brain to recall the past.

«Perhaps not in the very words, sir; but it has remained
in our minds that what you said was to that effect.”

While one might have counted ten, Captain Tom stood
as if debating whether we should not be treated to a dose
of. the rope’s-end, and then replied, with a laugh:

“As for you, Donald Fyffe, I may not speak so cer-
tainly ; but Stephen Burton, my sister’s boy, should have
good mettle in him, and, whether it be that I promised or
no, you shall leave port on board the Comet. Turn to,
now, at whatever your hands find to do, and see to it that
there be no shrinking from duty.”

This sudden agreement with our desires flustrated me,
and I said, stammeringly :

“If it please you, Captain Tom, we have not yet our
parents’ permission to ship.”

“Then why did you present yourselves ?”

“ Because it would avail us little, whatever our parents

might say, providing you were not willing,” Donald replied,


“SWELL, WHY ARE YOU LADS LOAFING AROUND HERE WHERE
YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS?’”





THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 21

boldly, whereat Captain Tom seemed much pleased, and
said, with a hearty laugh:

“Fall to, boys; I’ll see to it that the remainder of the
business be settled according to your wishes, and from
this out you may count yourselves as having regularly
shipped for privateersmen,”’

In order to set down all which befell] us, meaning now the
Comet and her crew, there is little time in which to tell of
our first experiences on board the schooner, while she yet
lay at the dock, when we, as the youngest members of the
crew, were forced to do every man’s bidding, for so many
words would be necessary in thus telling the tale as to
weary both him who may read these lines and the one who
sets them down.

Therefore it seems wiser to dismiss all the wearisome
details of waiting and preparing for the cruise, with no
single word of explanation, and go at once to that twenty-
third day of December, in the year 1812, when, all being
in readiness, the word was passed that an attempt would
be made to slip through the blockading squadron on a
cruise towards the coast of Brazil.

We had bidden farewell to our parents, Donald and I,
twenty-four hours previous, for the command had then
been given that every member of the crew must keep
close on board the schooner during such time as she
might remain at her moorings, without any hope of get-
ting even so much as half an hour of shore-leave, for Cap-
tain Tom was minded to take advantage of his first
favourable opportunity.
22 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The Britishers, knowing full well that the most danger-
ous privateersmen were sailing out of Baltimore, kept.
sharp watch on the port, and many there were, even
among our own men, who questioned if it would be pos-
sible to put the schooner past the squadron undetected.

At near the close of the day I have mentioned, it was
whispered among our men that Captain Tom would, on
that evening, make the venture that might end for ever
the career of the Comet and all on board.

As it appeared to. Donald and me, who were neither
weatherwise nor seamen, no better time could have been
chosen for the attempt. Since three o’clock in the after-
noon a dense mass of clouds had been scurrying across
the sky, bringing with them plenty of wind and a promise
of rain.

That the night would be a dark one all knew, and there
seemed more danger the schooner’s spars would be liter-
ally blown out of her than that she might be becalmed.

It was said among our men that Captain Tom had
taken no one into his confidence, not even the owners of
the vessel, as to the hour he should set sail.

It was near to nine o’clock in the evening when, amid
the most profound silence, our mooring lines were cast off,
and the Come¢ started on the long cruise which brought
to her so much credit, and to us such an ample amount
of prize-money.

When sail was made, Donald and I could do no more
than keep out of the way of those who knew a seaman’s
duty.
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 23

It can well be fancied that, with a crew of one hundred
and twenty, there are very many who must remain idle at
such a time, and I felt no shame in lying close under
the rail amidships, while others performed the necessary
labour.

As the lights of the town grew dimmer, and the dark
tracery of spars and cordage, which told where lay the
British squadron, became more distinct, my comrade’s
heart must have misgiven him somewhat as to the final
result of the cruise, for he said, in a voice that was not
overly steady:

_ “How think you, Stephen Burton, all this will end?
Are we to come back with both profit and honour, or-
is it to be that we shall never see our homes again?”

I was angered with him that he should have asked such
a question at that moment, for, even as he spoke, I was
thinking of my dear mother, wondering if I should ever
look in her face again, and with his words the tears came
near to dropping from my eyes, which would have been a
sorry way to begin a cruise under such a commander as
Captain Tom Boyle.

I dared not make any reply, lest he should know of the
grief in my heart, and therefore pretended, by rising suffi-
ciently and looking over the rail at the spars of the enemy
which we were approaching so closely, not to have heard it.

On board our schooner not a sound could be heard, save
now and then the faint creaking of the blocks and the
swirl of waters as the Comez’s sharp prow sent them hiss-
ing astern.
24. THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I have said Donald and I lay under the starboard rail
amidships, and as the Comez¢ dashed swiftly over the water
without apparently attracting the attention of the enemy,
my timorousness vanished until I whispered boldly to my
comrade :

«This running the blockade is not such a venturesome
affair as I had believed. The Britishers are asleep, and
a whole fleet of privateers might put to sea without the
redcoats being any the wiser.”

I could not better have chosen words to prove my igno-
rance than I did at that moment.

The older members of the crew — those who had aided
in the capture of the Hopewell — were peering ahead
anxiously, as if believing we were still in a dangerous local-
ity, and Donald had just turned to speak, when it seemed
to me as if the whole side of the nearest war-vessel was _
lighted up by a sheet of flame.

I staggered back half blinded by the glare, not under-
standing what had caused it, and it was for an instant as if
thunder roared all around me, while even above the rever-
berations I could hear what sounded like the rending and
splintering of wood.

“What is it?” I cried, in my fear and perplexity, and
almost at the same instant our motionless, silent crew
were aroused to the greatest activity.

Captain Tom began to shout much like a man suddenly
gone crazy, and it seemed to me as if every person on
board, save Donald and myself, were running to and fro,
or clambering into the rigging.
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 25

Following this first crash and roar, came jets of flame
from each of the dark hulks on the starboard bow, and I
heard an odd but wicked screaming in the air with every
thunderous outburst.

Donald spoke to me, but I could not distinguish his
words because of the uproar.

Perhaps one might have counted ten before I under-
stood that the men on board the blockading squadron were
not as ignorant of our purpose as I had foolishly supposed,
and that every effort was being made to compass the
destruction of the Comet.

It seems strange to me now as I set it down, that, after
the first terrible fear which assailed me, I suddenly lost all
consciousness of danger, and absolutely forgot that the
King’s ships might send us to the bottom in a twinkling,
by a well-directed shot.

Donald and I joined the crew in running here and there,
as if it were possible for us to be of some assistance, even
though Captain Tom might have been talking in a foreign
tongue for all we could understand of the orders given.

After a time, and before we were out of range, I knew,
from what the men about me said, that our foretop-
mast had been so severely wounded it was necessary to
strengthen it lest the entire spar should go by the board.

Green hand as I was, I failed to understand what was
meant when the first mate gave an order to “fish” the
topmast, and believed it was to be taken down, until some
of the crew began to bind pieces of timber either side of
the weakened portion.
26 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

As a matter of course, it became necessary that the
strain on the spar should be lessened while this task was
being performed, and it could only be done by taking in
certain of the sails, even though we needed every inch of
canvas to aid us in drawing away from the enemy.

Although, as I have said, the night was black with
darkness, I understood by what I both saw and heard
that the squadron was getting under way in pursuit of
us, and once more I grew timorous, believing we must
certainly be captured, crippled as we were.

“Our first cruise is like to be our last, and not overly
long at that,’ Donald said to me, when we were so far
away from the enemy that their fire had slackened ; and it
pleased me to hear a certain quaver in his voice, for I thus
knew I was not the only one on board who was beginning
to show the white feather.

“Then you do not believe we shall escape?” I asked,
not that I was eager to hear his opinion on the subject, but
because I knew of nothing else to say just at the moment.

«Do you think we can?” he asked, sharply, and I made
as if I had failed to hear the words.

Just then I saw my uncle, standing aft, near the helms-
man, as unconcerned as if he were safe at the dock in
Baltimore.

He was watching the movements of the men aloft, now
and then directing them as to the work in hand, and never
once glancing back to where the King’s ships, under such
press of canvas as must have buried their bows deep in the
water, were in full chase.
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 27

« There is one who appears to have little doubt of our
escape,’ I said, with a sigh of relief, for it heartened me
wonderfully to see him so calm when death was close
aboard.

“We can gather but little comfort from his movements,
for I have heard it said that whenever danger is greatest,
Captain Tom appears the most cheery.”

All this I knew quite as well as did Donald, and from
that moment I ceased trying to appear brave.

Together we two crouched behind the rail, watching the
pursuers astern, and only looking aloft now and then, for
it seemed to us, in our ignorance of such matters, as if the
sailors could do but little towards repairing the mischief
which had been wrought.

After what appeared to be a very long time, I lost sight
of the enemy, and, fearing lest my eyes were Payne me
some tricks, I asked Donald:

“Can you see the King’s ships now?”

«They have been growing less distinct this last five
minutes ; perhaps a cloud has come between them and us,
for it is not possible they would give up the chase so
soon.”

«Not they ; we may count on being pursued so long as
the lookouts can keep the schooner in view.”

Then, quite by chance, I turned my head and was sur-
prised at seeing all the crew on deck.

“Ts the topmast mended?” I asked of that sailor near-
est me, and he replied, cheerily :

« Ay, lad, this ten minutes or more, and since the job
28 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

was done we have begun to show the Britishers our heels.
At one time it looked like a close shave ; but now it’s much
the same as if we were on blue water. It'll need more
than those tubs of the blockadin’ squadron to catch the
Comet when Captain Tom Boyle is in command.”

“Do you really mean that we are no longer in danger?”
I asked, hardly daring to credit the statement.

«« What I am giving out is that we have run the block-
ade in fine shape ; but on a cruise like this I reckon we're
always messmates with danger.”

« But what about the wounded topmast ?”’

«“ She’s holdin’ now, an’ is likely to till we’ve run the
Britishers’ hull down. Then it'll be a matter of putting a
new spar in its place.”

«But we must go into some harbour to do that,” I said,
again giving proof of my ignorance, whereat the man
laughed heartily.

« You're precious green for a lad of your years. If spars
couldn’t be sent down or up without puttin’ a craft into
the dock, there’d be mighty little privateerin’ done, or
fightin’ either, for that matter.”

It was as if a terrible load had suddenly been lifted from
my mind, for I had no question but that the man spoke
the truth, and so great was my relief that I laughed aloud,
although there was nothing to cause mirth.

Then Donald and I could give our entire attention to
watching the gallant little schooner as she stormed along
with all canvas spread, when many another craft would
have been reefed down snug, and there was an exhilara-
THE BALTIMORE CLIPPER. 29

tion in my heart such as I had never felt before, or
never have since, except under similar circumstances,

We, meaning Donald and I, gave little heed to the
passing of time, and might have remained on deck until
morning but that Captain Tom, suddenly espying us,
called sharply for both to come aft.

“Why are you not below?” he asked, when we stood
before him. “Do you count on learning a seaman’s
duties by loiterin’ around the deck in the night?”

“IT was too frightened to go below while we were sailing
past the Britishers, and after that too happy to think of
sleep,” Donald replied, promptly.

“You must forget how to be frightened before you will
be of much service on a craft like this,” Captain Tom
replied, with a low laugh that reminded me of my mother.
“Now get you below, and remember in the future that
fear is not allowed on board the Comet until all danger
has passed.”
CHAPTER II.
LYING IN WAIT.

E went to our hammocks on the gun-deck, Donald

and I, feeling —for I daresay there was much the

same thought in his mind as in mine—that we had

learned a lesson which would be valuable to us in our task
of becoming privateersmen.

Not much of a lesson, as I look back on it now, but at
the time it seemed of vast importance; yet we, or perhaps
here I should speak only of myself, could not profit by
it, for ever afterward, when the shot of the enemy whistled
among the spars, and I saw members of the crew wounded
by ball or splintered by fragments of our own craft, the
same fear took possession of me which was in my heart
when the Comet ran the blockade out of Baltimore.

However, we turned in, and it was more than one day
before we turned out again, owing to the sickness of the
sea which took possession of us.

There is no reason why I should set down here what
we suffered, for he who has experienced it fancies he
knows better than any other person the deathly sensations
of the malady.

In due time, however, we were so far able to control
our legs and stomachs as to crawl on deck, and, once there,

30
LYING IN WAIT. 31

the second mate, Mr. Harker, set about trying to make
sailors of us.

It was a case of a hard master and dull pupils, and
during the first four and twenty hours of what we might
call the apprenticeship, our backs were so sore from fre-
quent application of the rope’s-end that for the time being
we forgot we had shipped on board the Comet to aid in
upholding the honour of our country.

Among the lessons which he gave, and expected we
‘should remember without ever being told again, was the
method of measuring the schooner’s progress through the
water, and I here set it down, in case this poor tale should
be seen by some lad as ignorant of such matters as were
we two up to the moment when Mr. Harker took us in
charge.

This particular information was given to us when, the
report having been made to the captain that the schooner
was making ten knots, Donald asked the meaning of the
term.

Then it was that Mr. Harker gave us a lecture in some-
thing after this fashion:

«We'll suppose you lads have been taught at school
that 69 1-6 statute miles or 60 geographical miles are equal
to one degree of longitude at the equator. Now the
distance between a statute mile, which is the way they
measure distance ashore, and a geographical mile, which
is the way of figuring it at sea, is that the last is 806
feet longer than the first. These 60 sea miles to each
degree of latitude, or to every degree of longitude at the
32 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

equator, are called by sailormen ‘minutes,’ when they
are reckoning the position of a ship, and as to what this
last may mean you will possibly learn later. I am not
counting on giving you a lesson in navigation just now.

“There are 360 degrees or meridians of longitude, and
21,600 minutes or miles in the entire circumference of
the world at the equator; therefore, learned men have
shown that one minute —that is, a sea mile — is equal
to 6,086.7 feet; but sailormen don’t take up these odd
feet and the fraction, so they call a sea mile, which is a
knot, or a minute, equal to 6,080 feet. That part being
clear in your mind, the rest is easy, because here is the
rule which navigators learn: ‘As the number of seconds
in the hour are to 6,080 feet, so are the number of
seconds in the time-glass used for measuring a ship’s
speed to the number of feet in each unit of measurement
marked off on the log-line.’”’

Mr. Harker must have seen that we failed to understand
this explanation, which he thought was plain, for he added,
an instant later :

«« Suppose we use a half-minute glass, —that is, one
which admits of the sand running through in thirty
seconds. Now, then, your knots must be made in the
log-line exactly fifty feet and nine inches from each other,
as you can readily tell by doing a little figuring. You
saw a man hold a reel over the stern, while I, with the
glass in my hand, shouted for him to let go, and then to
stop. Every knot which went over the rail marked a sea
mile, so you may understand that the Comet, while mak-


“OUR BACKS WERE SORE FROM FREQUENT APPLICATION OF

THE ROPE’S-END,”
LYING IN WAIT. 35

ing ten knots, was doing a little more than eleven and
one-half land miles.”

It was not until we had worked the problem out for
ourselves that Donald and I fully understood it; but once
in our minds it could never be forgotten.

It was my purpose to set down here only that which
concerned the cruise of the Comet while Donald and
I were on board, and therefore what we learned from
Mr. Harker or the other officers is perhaps out of
place.

I will go back to the doings of the schooner by saying
that, on the night of the eighth of January, a little more
than two weeks after having left port, we made Cape St.
Rouque, on the Brazilian coast.

On the following morning Captain Tom spoke a Portu-
guese trader which had just left the harbour of Pernam-
buco, and was told that there were in the harbour three
English vessels nearly ready to sail,—two brigs and a
large ship, all armed.

We had found our game much sooner than the most
hopeful counted on, and it can well be imagined in what
a state of excitement was the schooner’s crew five minutes
after this information had been given us.

“‘T fail to see why the men should be in such high
spirits at what the Portuguese captain told us,’’ Donald
said, privately, tome. “It is not to be supposed Captain
Tom, brave man though he be, will venture to attack
a ship and two brigs heavily armed.”

“Is that your idea of how an American privateersman
36 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

sets about striking a blow at the King?” Mr. Harker, who
had accidentally overheard Donald’s remark, said, quite
sharply. “If there were five ships, and among them
a man-of-war, I dare venture to say Captain Tom Boyle
would run his nose into the midst of them.”

«Then we shall sail directly into the harbour?” I
asked, in dismay as well as surprise.

«Hardly that, my lad. A friendly port cannot be used
in such fashion. We must wait until the fleet is six sea
miles off the coast, and then no one may say us nay.
Until that ship and the brigs have got a good offing, we
shall likely stand off and on, watching for them as a cat
does for a mouse.”

«And we run a good chance of playing the part of the
mouse,” I said to myself; but did not venture to speak
aloud, for of a certainty the rope’s-end would have been
laid on my back again had I dared venture to suggest such
a possibility.

It must be understood that every day after we had so
successfully run the blockade the crew were exercised
at quarters, and when Donald and I were so far recov-
ered from the malady of the sea as to be able to move
around, we bore our part in the drill, — not a very impor-
tant one, for we were known as powder-monkeys, and our
duties were to supply certain of the gunners with ammu-
nition.

Immediately the Portuguese captain gave our com-
mander information regarding the vessels in the harbour,
the hours of drill were redoubled; first, because the men
LYING IN WAIT. 37

needed exercise at their stations, and secondly, if each was
in his proper station, as would be the case while exercising,
we should be ready to give chase instantly the enemy’s
vessels appeared,

Therefore it was that I can truly say we were almost
constantly at quarters, the schooner standing off and on,
under easy sail, and three men detailed to act as look-
outs.

It can well be imagined that Captain Tom and the offi-
cers kept their glasses in active use, and the harbour of
Pernambuco was watched as, perhaps, it had never been
before.

As for Donald and myself, I know that we were al-
lowed a six-hour watch below, —no more; and during all
the remainder of the twenty-four did we pass to and fro
between the magazine and the gunners, even though it
seemed to me I could have described the grain of every
plank in the deck throughout each inch of the distance
we were forced to traverse.

To my surprise, not a single man among all the crew
thought it venturesome in Captain Tom to thus make his
preparations for attacking the three Britishers, although,
even if they were only scantily armed, the united weight
of metal must be greater than ours.

Instead of grumbling because we were to make such a

hazard, the men appeared impatient at the delay, and on
every hand could be heard suggestions as to what would
be done with the prize-money, as if the vessels were
already captured.
38 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

«J believe Captain Tom, in shipping his crew, picked
out those who were as fearless as himself,” Donald said
to me, on this second day of watching for the craft we
hoped to make our prizes. ‘To my mind it is a reckless
piece of business.”

« So it appears to me, and yet the crew look upon it all
as a matter of course; therefore I am inclined to think we
are the only timorous ones on board.”

“Tt will be a fine thing when we portion out our share
of the prize-money,”’ my comrade said, thoughtfully, after
a long pause.

« And not.as fine if one or both of us lays below, griev-
ously wounded, after the attempt has been made, and
failed.”

« Although we be but boys aboard, our share should
amount to more money than we have ever seen,” Donald
continued, dwelling upon the profit to be made; and in this
he showed the Scotch in his nature.

We two talked more than a little concerning all these
things, during the five days we laid off and on, waiting for
the appearance of the enemy’s vessels, but, on the after-
noon of the fourteenth, I became convinced we had
received false information.

If, as the Portuguese captain had said, three vessels
were ready to put to sea, they should have appeared
before this, and I said, with no slight relief on my
heart :

“Our mountain did not even have a mole-hill as its
beginning, for it seems certain the Portuguese captain
LYING IN WAIT. 39

lied, otherwise we would have seen some signs of the
Britishers before this.”’

“T have noted that Captain Tom is growing impatient,
and it may be that what you say is true. It’s a pity we
should lose such a prize as would be ours if the ship
and two brigs could be captured.”

“And it is a relief to know that we stand little show of
being sent below mangled, or wounded unto the death..
For my part —”’

«Sail ho!’’ came from one of the lookouts, and the
words had hardly been spoken before every officer and
seaman was gazing intently in the direction of the har-
bour, where, after a certain time, could be seen even by
us who were on deck, and without the aid of glasses, four
vessels taking advantage of the strong wind to put to sea.

All was excitement on board. Some questioned if this
could be the craft for which we had waited so patiently,
since the Portuguese captain had spoken only three;
others said a fourth Britisher might have put into the
harbour, unknown to us, but that seemed doubtful, for
constant and most vigilant watch had been kept from the
morning of the ninth.

There were very many who believed that the Portuguese
had given true information as to the merchantmen in the
harbour, but withheld from us the fact that they were
convoyed by a man-of-war, and this last opinion gained
ground, until even Donald and I, who had feared an
attack might be made, began to grow uneasy lest we
should be forced to run away.
40 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

However it might be, Captain Tom had no intention of
showing his heels to these Britishers, and I verily believe,
had the fleet been twice as large, he would have given the
‘same orders.

Our course was shaped to the southward, and, once we
were so far from the land that there could be no question
as to the distance, the Comet was hove to until these
strangers should show themselves more clearly.

As nearly as I can remember, it was four o’clock in the
afternoon, perhaps a little later, when we saw the ship and
three brigs, six or eight miles from the shore, sailing a
point or two north of east, and the chase was begun.

Never had I seen the waves as boisterous as they were
when we hauled up to take advantage of the wind, which
appeared to be increasing momentarily.

The little schooner rose gallantly on the crest of the
waves, until it seemed that the hull towered many yards
above the level of the sea; then, with a downward plunge,
she would dive into the hollows, where we were completely
encircled by water, with the sails slatting to and fro as the
wind was thus shut out from them.

Captain Tom remained near the helmsman, conning the
vessels as if engaged in a friendly race, and determined to
lose no advantage if it could be prevented by superior sea-
manship, while Mr. Harker moved to and fro uneasily,
evidently finding it impossible to control his anxiety.

No fault could have been found with the manner in
which the Comet bore herself during this chase.

The strangers, who alternately sank until only their
LYING IN WAIT. 41

topmasts only were in view, and then rose on the swell
until their copper could be seen, were as if anchored, so
swiftly did we gain upon them.

They were under easy sail, and we knew they had no
fear of our little schooner, which was approaching so
swiftly, otherwise their lighter canvas would have been
set at once.

We were storming on, with every stitch drawing, and
making such heavy weather of it that, when the gallant
little Comet went into the trough of the sea, she plunged
her nose so far under that the decks were awash, often-
times waist-deep.

Every timber was groaning from the strain put upon
it, the spars buckled like reeds, and to me, inexperienced
as I was, it seemed certain we had so far overhauled
the fleet as to be able to determine the character of the
fourth vessel.

She was a large man-of-war brig, and we knew by the
small amount of canvas set that she was not only willing
to meet us, but perhaps eager.

Alarmed myself, because we were come so near to a
war-vessel, which with one broadside, properly directed,
could send us to the bottom, I looked scrutinisingly
around at those nearest, to learn, so far as might be from
the expression on their faces, what was thought of this
new phase of affairs.

More than one of the men appeared to be uneasy ; but

-yet the majority of them, having every confidence in
Captain Tom’s skill and ability to extricate them from the
42 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

most serious difficulties into which they might fall, were
calm and apparently unconcerned.

Donald and I, standing side by side, well forward,
waited in anxious expectancy to see the course of the
schooner changed, or hear the command to reduce the
canvas.

No such word was given.

Instead came the order to beat to quarters, and, as
soon as might be thereafter, we were cleared for action,
each man doing his duty promptly, regardless of the
enormous odds against us.

The guns were loaded with round-shot and grape, and
this time Donald and I did more than go through the
motions of serving ammunition, for we dealt it out to each
gun in proper proportion, I, for one, quaking with fear all
the while.

There was no such discipline maintained among pri-
vateersmen as would be seen on board a man-of-war, and
although it was our duty to remain below, both my com-
rade and I ventured on deck, just as the Come?’s ensign
was flung to the breeze.

The stranger replied by hoisting a blue and white flag,
with certain emblems in red upon it, the character of
which I could not make out, and one of the sailors near by
exclaimed :

««She’s a blooming Portugee, an’ how is it a vessel of
that navy is convoying Britishers ?”’

No reply was made to this question, for immediately
after the man had spoken the course of the Comet was so

1
LYING IN WAIT. 43

changed that she would run alongside the war-vessel, and
a few moments later a hail came from the latter’s deck.

“The commander desires to send a boat to you!” an
officer in the rigging shouted, after reply had been made
to his hail. “There are certain matters of importance
regarding which he would speak with the captain of the
schooner.”

I heard my uncle give the command to heave the Comet
to, and at the same time a boat was lowered from the
brig’s davits.

I had rather the Portuguese captain did the boarding
than to have attempted it myself, for the little craft,
manned by ten seamen, was flung up and thrown down in
the swirl of angry waters, as though she had been no more
than an egg-shell, and many times when she descended
into the trough of the sea did I believe she had been
swamped.

They knew their business, however, those Portuguese
sailors, and the gig was brought to the ladder, which had
been thrown over the Comez’s side, as smartly and neatly
as though the crew were manceuvring on a mill-pond.

Captain Tom received the naval officer at the compan-
ionway, and there the two held a short conversation, after
which they entered the cabin.

As a matter of course, we forward had no means of
knowing what was said; but on shipboard any matter of
interest is soon noised about, and, before the two officers
. concluded their interview below, we learned the Portu-
guese had, with considerable swagger, made known to
A4 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Captain Tom that the brig belonged to the Portuguese
navy, and that she carried twenty 32-pounders with a crew
of 165 men.

As quietly and courteously as if he were on shore pay-
ing some pleasing compliment, Captain Tom praised the
appearance of the brig, but did not seem at all alarmed
by the information as to her armament.

Then the naval captain told him, what we already
knew, that the other vessels were English, and under his
protection.

At this Captain Tom fired up, giving the visitor a taste
of his temper by asking very sharply why the King of Por-
tugal was convoying Britishers, and by what right he pre-
tended to do so when his country was supposed to be a
neutral power ?

He announced himself as the captain of an American
cruiser, with the right to go whithersoever he pleased, and
to attack the enemies of his country whenever he found
them beyond the jurisdiction of a friendly or a neutral
government.

Upon this the visitor asked affably to see Captain Tom’s
authority from the United States, and our commander, not
to be outdone in politeness, invited him below.

Here our information ended for the time, and when the
visit had lasted perhaps twenty minutes, the naval officer,
followed by Captain Tom, appeared on deck, taking his
departure in an apparently friendly fashion.

Shortly afterward, we forward heard from the steward,
who waited upon the gentlemen, that the Portuguese had
LYING IN WAIT. 45

advised our captain not to make any attack upon the mer-
chantmen, and this uncalled-for and impertinent suggestion
aroused my uncle once more.

The steward said that Captain Tom told the naval offi-
cer very sharply that he should capture the vessels if it
was possible for him to do so; that he was authorised by
his government to so act, and did not intend to flinch from
his duty.

Then, trying politeness once more, the visitor declared
he should be exceedingly sorry if it became necessary for
him to protect the merchantmen against an attack, and
that he should certainly do so if the situation of affairs
demanded it.

“I shall feel equally sad if anything disagreeable oc-
curs,” Captain Tom replied, “and it is not my intention
to make any attack upon your brig until after you have
tried to prevent me from carrying out the commands given
by my government, or deliberately fired upon me. Then
we will try our strength, and I shall not shrink from the
encounter for which I am full well prepared.”

The Portuguese captain seemed to be staggered by this
bold reply, so the steward said, and, as if he were Captain
Tom’s particular friend, informed him that the English
ship carried fourteen guns, and the two brigs ten each,
which armament, together with that on the war-vessel,
made up the number of fifty-four guns against fourteen.

Captain Tom never flinched a hair, as the steward ex-
pressed it; but told his visitor that, despite the odds, he
should make an attack without delay.
46 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Then it was that the naval officer took his departure,
and he was not yet on board his own vessel when our
schooner was hauled up into the wind.

Before we had well gathered headway, the Portuguese
hailed once more, asking Captain Tom to lower a boat and
come aboard.

Frightened though I was at the prospect of a battle
where it seemed certain we must be whipped, the blood
bounded in my veins when Captain Tom, speaking-trumpet
in hand, leaped on the rail and shouted, as if this demand
from the war-vessel were of but little consequence:

“Tt is growing too dark, and I cannot afford to take the
chances of losing the breeze.”

Then, almost in the same breath, he ordered the yards
to be squared away, and the Comet was sent sharp for the
ship which at that time was our nearest British neighbour.
CHAPTER III.
THE ATTACK,

MONG the gunners — and he was said to be the most
expert of them all—was an old man by the name
of Abraham Dyker, who had shown Donald and me many
favours since we joined the Comez’s crew, and when the
command was given for the men to return to their sta-
tions I took up my rightful position near by Dyker’s gun.
The old man was standing by his piece idly, with no
evidence of excitement on his face, and, believing he saw
in this matter something more favourable for us than did
the rest, I ventured to ask, with an apology for being thus
curious : ‘

“How think you Captain Tom can get us out of this
snarl if he continues to run straight into the midst of the
fleet >?”

“How can he do it, lad? Firstly, I don’t allow we’re in
a snarl, and, secondly, we'll come out of it as a well-armed
Baltimore clipper ought to, —with more than one prize, or
I’m mistaken.”

“Do you believe Captain Tom will really dare to fight
- against such odds?”

“He wouldn’t dare refuse to do so, lest in the future
47
48 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

he should despise himself for having turned tail when
there was no call for it.”

«No call for it!” I repeated, in surprise. ‘Why, it’s
sheer madness to attack four vessels carrying fifty-four
guns against our fourteen!”

“Tf it so be, lad, that you remain on board the Comet a
twelvemonth I venture to predict, and am willing to bet
a farthing’s worth of silver spoons, that you will see a
heap more of such madness. Why is it that Tom Boyle
can have his pick of sailors? Because every man jack of
’em knows he ain’t one as can be easily scared.”

“JT should say not,” I replied, thinking of the odds
against us, and then, in a tone which I intended should
be one of sarcasm, I asked, «When do you allow, Master
Dyker, that the captain of the Comet would be warranted
in turning tail?”

“Well,” the old man began, thoughtfully, as he leaned
against the gun, “perhaps I might say it would be a bit
of foolhardiness to make such a venture if the enemy
carried twice as much metal as does this fleet, but at
the same time I’m doubtful if even that would prevent
Captain Tom from trying to cut out one or more of ’em.”

“Do you really believe he would venture to give battle
with fourteen guns against one hundred and eight?”

“Hark ye, lad. If you are given to timorousness, this
is not the craft on which you should have shipped, nor is
your uncle the master under whom you should sail, for I
tell you that nothing short of a ship of the line would
scare him very seriously. The Comet is out to take
THE ATTACK. 49

prizes, and when the night is as bright as this promises
to be she'll do it, without heeding how strong may be
such craft as are convoying the fleet.”

« Stephen Burton is wanted on deck!”

This summons came from some one aft whose face I
could not distinguish in the gloom, for by this time the
day was so far spent that the gun-deck was darkened by
the twilight, and the lanterns were not fully lighted.

Without thought that he should remain at his station
until ordered elsewhere, Donald Fyffe would have joined
meas I hastened towards the hatchway, but Master Dyker
sharply reminded him that he must stay below, and alone
I went quickly aft, wondering why I had been summoned.

“The captain sent for you,’ Mr. Harker said, as I
appeared, and at the same time giving me a push which
nearly sent me headlong, for just at that moment the
Comet was rising on a huge wave.

After recovering my footing I saluted in proper fashion,
as the second mate had taught me, and Captain Tom said,
curtly, much as if speaking to an entire stranger :

« You are to remain aft here in order to carry messages
below should it become necessary. Keep close by my
side, and, at the same time, see to it that you are not in
the way.”

It was an order which I did not fully understand, and
for an instant was on the point of asking the meaning,
when I realised that a lad would be thick-headed indeed
if he could not obey such commands as might be given in
plain words, therefore held my peace ; and thus it was that
50 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I saw all of this night attack, which could not have been
the case had I remained below serving out ammunition.

By this time the little schooner was well up on the
starboard side of the British ship, and between her, and
the two brigs.

The moon, which had risen before the sun went down,
was shining brightly, while not a cloud showed itself in
the sky, and there seemed little need of the battle-lanterns
which were hung fore and aft.

I was yet staring about me stupidly, trying to discover
the whereabouts of the Portuguese brig of war, when, with
his speaking-trumpet in hand, Captain Tom leaped to the
port rail and shouted to those aboard the ship >

«Back your maintopsail, or I’ll send a broadside into
you!”

So great was the schooner’s headway that even as he
spoke we dashed past the merchantman, and the word
was given to “luff,” in order that we might cross the
ship’s bow.

While the manceuvre was being executed Captain Tom
again ordered the craft to surrender.

Now it was that I saw the man-of-war brig directly
astern of us, and coming up as if she meant business.

I was still gazing at what I believed to be our most
dangerous enemy, when it was as if a volcano suddenly
burst forth beneath my very feet. The schooner trem-
bled from stem to stern, and out of the port side came
great volumes of smoke, which momentarily hid the ship
from view.
THE ATTACK. 51

A broadside had been sent aboard the merchantman,
and, in obedience to orders which I had not heard, our
brave little Comet turned suddenly on her heel, discharg-
ing her starboard guns full at one of the brigs.

Then she was put about, when, to my dismay, I found
that we were close alongside the Portuguese man-of-war.

Even as I looked at that row of yawning ports they
were illumined by flashes of light, and it was to me as
though hundreds of round-shot passed directly over my
head.

At the same moment our gallant little schooner quiv-
ered as if she had struck upon a sunken reef, and the
rending and splintering of wood told that at least one of
the Portuguese missiles had found its mark.

There was a scream from below, followed by groans
which were suddenly drowned in the noise of the Come?’s
broadside, delivered full at the Portuguese, and no less
than two of the brig’s spars were brought down, while
twenty or thirty feet of her bulwarks were ripped off.

“Get you below, lad, quickly, and see what mischief
may have been done by that shot! Do not loiter there,
but return as soon as possible.”

I darted below with all speed, thinking to myself that
for a few moments, at least, I should be in greater safety
than on deck; but afterwards came to learn that he who
stands unsheltered is in less danger than those who work
the guns below, where is possibility of being wounded by
splinters, should a ball find lodgment in the hull.

The scene on the gun-deck was one which I am power-
52 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

less to set down in such fashion as to paint it properly in
words. ‘

The first thing which riveted my attention was the
smoke that filled all the space, and through which could
be dimly seen our men, stripped to the waist and bare-
footed, working the pieces.

To one unfamiliar with such scenes, as was I, it was
impossible, at a single glance, to determine how much
mischief had been done, and I was making my way for-
ward with no little difficulty because of the dense, pungent
vapour, when our port broadside was discharged once more,
—at the three. merchantmen, as I afterwards learned, —
and I was nearly felled to the deck by the terrific noise
like unto that of a fearful explosion.

The smoke became more dense; I could hear the gun-
ners shouting to their mates, and the officers from above
roaring commands down through the hatchway. Now
and then groans from some portion of the schooner told
that this was a game in which many must be killed in
order to give one side or the other the victory, and, worse
than all to me, was the horrible fear that at the next
instant some missile, crashing through the timbers, would
deal a death-blow to the lad who had so foolishly fancied
there was much honour to be gained in warfare.

I was sick at heart and faint from cowardice when I
saw dimly, through the volumes of smoke, Abraham
Dyker, half naked, begrimed with powder, and looking
more like a fiend and less like a man than I had ever
believed could be possible in a human being.
THE ATTACK. 53

Above all my timorousness and sickness was the knowl-
edge that I had a task to perform, and by Master Dyker’s
aid it seemed possible I might be able to acquit myself
with some little degree of credit, even though, properly
speaking, none should be given me.

“T am sent by the captain to find out what mischief has
been done, and know not how to set about it,’ I cried,
whereat the gunner replied:

“Tell him we have only been scratched. One of the
ports was splintered, but the ball buried itself in the
stanchion.”

« Surely it was more than a scratch, Master Dyker,” I
ventured to say, “for some of the men must have been
killed or wounded.”

« Ay, lad, one has lost the number of his mess, and a
couple, maybe three, are under the surgeon’s hands; but
I’ll venture to say that aboard the Portuguese you'll find
‘the cockpit crowded, for our broadside was sent with some
precision, which is more than can be said for them out-
landish man-of-war’s men.”

It would have pleased me could I have spoken with
Donald Fyffe just then; but he was not near at hand, and
to have searched for him would have been to delay when
my orders were to make haste.

Captain Tom gave no token that he heard my report,
although I bawled as loudly as might be, and was on the
point of repeating it when he said, curtly :

“That will do. Remain near at hand until you are
wanted.”
54 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I can only explain what took place during the next half-
hour in such bungling fashion as to say that it seemed to
me as if the Comet were darting here and there, every-
where, among the ships, discharging broadside after broad-
side as rapidly as the guns could be reloaded, at whichever
of the four vessels could best be gotten into range.

Then it was that the schooner reeled as if she had run
full upon a rock, quivered an instant, as if recovering her-
self, and, after no more than a moment’s delay, continued
her work of destruction.

Again I was sent below to learn what mischief had been
done, and this time was able to see for myself the effects
of the blow.

A round-shot had passed directly through the Comet
twelve or fifteen inches above the levelof the gun-deck,
and in its passage had wounded four men, all of whom
were lying as they had fallen, when I saw them.

It was a horrible spectacle, and had I come upon it
earlier in the fight it might have completely unnerved me;
but, like the others, although in not so great a degree, I
was growing hardened and indifferent to suffering as this
unequal battle progressed.

“Tell Captain Tom it is only another scratch,” Master
Dyker cried, as he saw me, and save for the sound of his
voice I would have mistaken him for a negro, so blackened
was all the exposed portion of his body. ‘Only another
scratch, and [’ll warrant you the surgeons on board the
other craft have got their hands full.”

At that moment, Donald Fyffe came up laden
THE ATTACK. 55

with powder, and I stopped to speak with him a few
seconds.

Although it was midwinter, the heat on the gun-deck
was so great that no man could work there while fully
clad, and, following the example of the others, he had
stripped himself, save as to trousers.

The perspiration was streaming down his face, ploughing
here and there tiny strips of white on the blackened skin,
until he looked like an Indian in war-paint, and the resem-
blance was heightened when he, who, a few weeks before,
would have hesitated at causing an animal pain, said,
gleefully :

“We are thinning the Britishers out in brave style,
Stephen Burton, and if the man-of-war will only give us
a chance to use our starboard guns, I warrant you her
scuppers will run with blood, for we are wasting but few
shots, and getting none in return.”

His bare feet were in a crimson pool which was stain-
ing the white deck, and yet he gave no heed to the fact.
His only thought seemed to be of killing.

When I'returned to make my report, the big ship was
so close at hand that I could see her main-deck plainly.

It appeared to be literally covered with dead and
wounded, and the splinters were flying in showers, as
our gunners sent shot after shot with deadly aim.

To me it seemed as if half her rigging was cut; the
immense masts, wounded near the deck, were swaying
to and fro ominously, and all her spars forward, down to
the foremast-head, had been carried away.
56 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The two merchant brigs, sadly disabled, were crawling
away to leeward, and the Portuguese was manceuvring
here and there in the faint hope of giving us a full broad-
side; but, thanks to Captain Tom’s seamanship, this was
impossible.

More than once, when she made ready to rake us, was
the little Comet swung around on her heel like a top, and
away we flew to attack the ship from another quarter.

There came a time, I cannot say at what hour, when I
was startled by hearing a great shout of triumph from our
crew, and I heard Mr. Harker say, triumphantly :

«There go her colours!”

She had surrendered although her metal was as heavy
as our own, and, in addition, we had had forty other
guns opposed to us.

Even as the big ship gave up the fight two well-directed
shots from our main-deck totally disabled one of the brigs,
and the cheers of the men had hardly more than died
away when we saw that the second of the fleet had
surrendered.

Ignorant as I was of such matters, it puzzled me to
understand how advantage could be taken of our victory,
for the moon was near to setting, the waves running bois-
terously high, and I believed it would be impossible for us
to throw a prize-crew aboard either vessel, even though
the Portuguese brig should not interfere.

Immediately after the ship’s flag was lowered, Captain
Tom held a brief conversation with the first officer, and
men were at once told off to take possession of her.
THE ATTACK. 57

I stood where all that took place on our deck could be
seen, and asked myself again and again if it was possible
our officers could be so foolhardy as to venture on board
the prize.

Now many days afterwards I learned that Captain Tom
would sanction, and even order, many wilder acts than
that.

The men set about lowering the long-boat, as if this
embarking on a stormy sea, with enemies on every hand,
was but a trifling matter, and many of the crew came
from below for the double purpose of watching the
movements of the enemy, while there was a lull in the
conflict.

Among these last was Donald Fyffe, and, heedless of
the fact that he had no right to venture so far aft, he
came to speak with me.

We two were talking regarding the proposed attempt to
take possession of the prize, and wondering if any of the
boat’s crew would live to reach the ship, when Captain
Tom cried, as he turned towards me:

“ Here, lad, this is the chance to see something of the
business you are trying to learn. Take your place with
the prize-crew, and see to it that you do all in your power
towards helping get matters into proper shape once you
are aboard the ship.”

But for the fear I had of my uncle’s anger, I would
have refused to take part in any such hazardous venture ;
but I dared not set up my will against his, as I might
have done had another captain been in command of the
58 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Comet, and with a sinking heart clambered into the long-
boat, which was hanging at the davits ready to be lowered
away when her crew should be in their places.

Donald Fyffe made as if he would join me without
waiting for orders, and observing his movement, Abraham
Dyker called sharply after him, saying, when my comrade
stepped to his side:

“Don’t make the mistake, lad, of going where you are
not sent, or Captain Tom may give you a lesson in
discipline.”

I waved my hand to Donald, as the word was given to
lower away, and at that moment firmly believed I should
never see him again, for I was convinced that we could
not make the passage from the schooner to the ship with-
out considerable loss of life.

When we were water-borne and had fended off from the
Comet’s side, the long-boat, heavily laden though she was,
tossed here and there like a feather. As we raced down
the long swell into the trough of the sea, it was as if one
were sliding over icy snow, so swift was the descent, and
each time I marvelled that we ascended the next wave,
for it seemed as if we must plunge straight to the bottom
of the sea.

After two or three of these apparently perilous ascents
and descents, I began to realise that the danger was not
as great as it appeared, and then had opportunity to look
about me understandingly.

Within our range of vision was only the ship and the
schooner.
THE ATTACK. 59

Where the Portuguese brig might be I knew not, and
wondered greatly that she had so completely disappeared,
until, when we were perhaps half-way from our starting-
point and the prize, the man-of-war suddenly appeared
from around the bow of the ship, towering above us, until
she looked higher than a mountain.

I wondered if she was thus manceuvring to take us
prisoners, for the possibility of her firing at our small and
heavily laden boat never entered my head until he who
sat directly in front of me cried, in a tone of alarm:

«The heathen are making ready to give us a broadside !
There is one satisfaction though, for Captain Tom will
make it mighty hot for ’em; but we sha’n’t be near
enough the surface to see the punishment.”

Then came flashes of light, seven I counted before we
could hear the report, and everywhere around us in the
sea splashed an iron shower, until the waters fairly boiled
in their seething, drenching us to the skin, and filling the
long-boat until she was gunwale deep.

The marvel of it was that in all this deadly storm no
missile struck us.

I was not alone in my fear now, for more than one of
the crew gave vent to exclamations of dismay, and the
boatswain, who was in command, cried, hoarsely :

“Tt would be more than foolhardy for us to keep on,
since that murdering foreigner will treat us to another
dose, and likely have better luck next time. What say
you, lads? Are we warranted in going back, although
our orders were to board the ship?”
60 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

«We are not called upon to act as targets for them
Portuguese fiends! Captain Tom is the man who will
square accounts with the gold-laced villain, and we had
best put back to him.”

To persist in carrying out the captain’s orders meant
death for all our crew, and it would be, as Master Dyker
afterwards said, “A needless waste of blood, since by
dying we could do them of the Comet no good.”

From the poor way in which I have set this down, it
would seem as if we hesitated many moments, while being
flung up and down by the angry waters under the guns of
the Portuguese brig, and yet, as a fact, no more than
twenty seconds elapsed from the time the broadside was
fired before we were scudding for the schooner, every
oarsman exerting himself to the utmost.

It was no easy matter to board the Comet once we were
near at hand, and ten minutes or more were spent before
we stood on her deck.

Then it was that I saw Captain Boyle in what the
second mate called a “fighting mad” mood.

«We'll give that Portuguese captain all he may want,
and spend no useless time about it!” he cried, when the
boatswain had come to the end of telling that we put
back because the long-boat was so nearly swamped that
half a dozen bucketfuls more would send her to the
bottom.

Then certain orders were given, and Mr. Dyker, who
had come on deck for the second time, said to me, with
much of satisfaction in his tones:


“ EVERYWHERE AROUND US IN THE SEA SPLASHED AN IRON
SHOWER.”



THE ATTACK. 63

“Now, lad, you shall learn what a fourteen-gun schooner
can do with a brig of war carrying nearly twice her metal.
So far it has been a case of run and strike, but if I’m not
mistaken, from this out you'll see ‘a fight such as will
please you.”
CHAPTER IV.
THE BATTLE.

R. DYKER made a grievous mistake in thinking
any kind of a fight would please me.

Although comparatively little damage had been done us
by the guns of the enemy, owing to poor marksmanship
and the heavy swell, what I had seen below was more than
enough to sicken me of warfare.

Donald, however, having really taken part in the run-
ning fight, was still so wrought up by the excitement of
it all that he was most eager to give the Portuguese
a flogging for having interfered in what was none of his
business, and, being on deck when the order was given to
chase the man-of-war, said to me, in a tone of satisfaction :

“I should be mightily disappointed if Captain Tom did
not overhaul that fellow. He needs a taste of Yankee
shot, and I venture to say he’ll get it.”

“The brig is six guns heavier than the Comet.”

«And it would make little difference to us if she car-
ried sixteen more than we; the flogging would be given
just the same. But why do you look so glum, Stephen
Burton? Surely you are not in favour of letting the
Portuguese go free?”

64
THE BATTLE. 65

“IT am not certain that it is for us to say how he shall
go. We have captured two prizes, and in such an un-
equal fight that it should be sufficient satisfaction for us,
without running after an enemy nearly twice our strength.
Why not let well enough alone, instead of taking the
chances of losing all we have gained ?”’

“J don’t count that we are taking any chances; we can
whip him out of his boots.”

«You have grown wonderfully valiant since you and I
last talked together, Donald Fyffe!”

“Perhaps that is to be accounted for by the fact that I
have been where the fighting was done, instead of here on
deck, with nothing to do save give full sway to my fears.”

At that moment our conversation was interrupted by
Abraham Dyker, who shouted for Donald to come below,
and fortunately my comrade was bound to obey the sum-
mons, for, had he remained with mea single moment longer,
I am afraid something would have been said that might
have caused an unpleasantness between us, so vexed was
I that he should have been thus eager for more fighting.

However, Donald’s bravery and my timorousness should
have no place here while the gallant little Comet is pursu-
ing the hulking brig that had meddled with what did not
concern her.

It can be guessed that with a Baltimore clipper under
our feet, and she commanded by such a man as Captain
Tom Boyle, the chase was not a long one. We could
have sailed three knots to her two, and, in less than
five minutes after my comrade went below, the schooner
66 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

was luffed up into the wind sufficiently to permit of our
gunners raking the Portuguese fore and aft.

Even in the gloom I could see the white splinters fly
from her quarter in a perfect shower, and but for the fact
that immediately afterward our main-deck guns were dis-
charged, I believe we might have heard the cries of the
wounded.

Then it was for the first time I began to share in Don-
ald’s excitement, and longed most earnestly to go below,
where I could be of some service, rather than forced to
remain idle at Captain Tom’s heels.

This punishment seemed to arouse the Portuguese, for
instead of trying to escape, as had at first seemed his inten-
tion, he began manceuvring to get the weather-gage of us.

It can be understood that this was not an easy matter
when such a skilful sailor as Captain Tom was opposed
to him, and, after doing his best for ten minutes or more,
the Portuguese came about.

With each on a different tack, we passed within half a
musket-shot, and when we were abreast the brig she gave
us a broadside without so much as starting a rope, so high
did her shot fly; but when Captain Tom gave the word
our grape cut the enemy’s rigging in a hundred places,
until it seemed certain she must be unmanageable.

It is only fair to say that the Portuguese were good
sailors, otherwise they could not so quickly have repaired
the damage, for in a reasonably short time the brig
attempted to wear, and then was come our opportunity.

Captain Tom bore up, although in so doing we got
THE BATTLE. 67

another broadside; but the guns were as badly served
as before, and then we were well under the brig’s port
quarter.

Now every gunner on board the Comez¢ set to work with
a will, and not a shot was wasted.

I could see the brig’s crew fall here and there, until I
believe no less than twenty were out of the fight, and in
my savage joy I cried aloud with glee.

Captain Tom himself served the swivel on the main-
deck, and three times in rapid succession was it loaded
and discharged, carrying death and wounds to those on
the brig’s gun-deck, before she could crawl out from her
dangerous position.

There was no longer any fight left in the Portuguese;
they had received a full dose of Yankee iron, and were
now most eager to get out of range.

If we had pursued, she must have been sunk offhand,
unless some accident befell us; but our captain, eager to
secure his prizes and not of the mind to continue the
lesson to the brig’s commander, allowed her to sneak
away while we returned to the ship and brig which had
surrendered.

On our course we passed the third Britisher, and she,
believing it was our purpose to serve out such a dose as
had been given the Portuguese, quickly hauled down her
flag.

We had beaten off the foreigner and captured three
merchantmen, despite the odds against us, and little won-
der is it that, when this third English flag was lowered, our
68 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

crew set up such shouts of rejoicing as must have been
heard by all the enemy.

Only two shots had struck our hull, although of course
the Comet’s rigging was cut in many places, and some of
the smaller spars severely wounded ; but, considering the
damage we had done, it was as if the schooner came out
of the conflict scot-free.

Donald came on deck, intending, no doubt, to laugh at
me for having been so timorous as to believe we could not
whip the Portuguese; but finding that the scent of the
battle was in my nostrils quite as strong as it had been
in his, he forbore any sarcastic remarks, and joined me in
the general rejoicings.

Now that our work had been done so handsomely, I was
at a loss to know how we might be able to take advantage
of that which was gained.

By this time, the moon having set, it was so dark that
one could hardly see the prizes with the naked eye.

Both Donald and I were satisfied that there would be
no attempt made at boarding them; but in this we were
mistaken.

Captain Tom ran the schooner alongside the ship, which
proved to be the George, of Liverpool, and her captain re-
ported that so much damage had been done it was only
through the greatest exertions he could keep her afloat.

“Tl stand by you until morning,” our commander
cried, “and should there be imminent danger of foun-
dering, show a flare on your quarter.”

Then we stood off to the last brig that had hauled
THE BATTLE. 69

down her flag, which proved to be the Gamer, of Hull,
and learned that she had been as badly damaged as the
ship.

Captain Tom gave the same command as he had to the
George, and we stood over for the last of the three, —
the Bowes, also of Liverpool.

She had not suffered as much as the others, and to my
surprise I heard the order given for a prize-crew to be
thrown on board.

How it might be done in the darkness and with
such a sea running, I had no idea; but, from the little
we had already seen of Captain Tom, I understood full
well that there would be no hesitation at carrying out
his commands.

After speaking a few moments with the first officer and
Mr. Harker, my uncle turned to me, and said:

“JT am minded to give you lads a better show to learn
sailoring than you can get by remaining on board the
Comet. You will go with the prize-crew, which is to be
under the command of Mr. Harker, and see to it that you
do full duty aboard.”

« Are we to take our sea-chests, sir?” I asked, and the
tears of vexation were very near my eyelids at the thought
of leaving the schooner just at a time when I was begin-
ning, or fancied I was, to forget my timorousness.

“No; what you stand in will be enough, for it may be
you'll join us again before we reach the home port. We
shall rendezvous off Natal.”

Again we took our places in the long-boat, and for the
7O- THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

second time that night found ourselves tossed to and fro
on the dangerous waters; but now there was no Portu-
guese brig to fire into us, and we made the trip in safety,
though not without many misgivings on my part.

It was with a sense of deepest relief that I found my-
self on board the Bowes, and saw her captain formally
surrender the brig to Mr. Harker.

The crew had not come off uninjured during their share
in the running fight. No less than eight round-shot had
found lodgment in the hull. The upper spars were
carried away, and much work was needed to repair the
rigging.

There were sixteen of us all told in this prize-crew, and
thirty-one of the enemy; but such disparity in numbers
gave us no uneasiness, for it was understood that at day-
break, or as soon thereafter as might be convenient, the
prisoners would be transferred to the Comet.

However, it was now only about midnight, and in order
to better protect ourselves the brig’s crew was ordered
into the forecastle, where they must have found snug
quarters, and the hatches closed on them.

The officers were locked in their berths, and when this
had been done, our men set about repairing the brig so far
as might be possible in the night.

We were hove to, as a matter of course, therefore all
hands were at liberty to set about making good the rig-
ging ; but in such a task Donald and I, however willing,
could be of little service, because of our ignorance.

“You shall act as lookouts, lads, one forward and the
THE BATTLE. 71

other aft,” Mr. Harker said, after having set his men to
work. ‘Keep sharp watch with one eye for any signalling
which may be made from the schooner, and let the other
be on the prisoners, for we have too many aboard to take
any chances. There are four wounded men in the deck-
house, and they should be looked after now and then.
The captain tells me none of them are seriously hurt ;
but yet it may be possible for you to do something towards
relieving their sufferings, therefore bear them in mind
every half hour or so.”

I gave Donald the choice as to whether he would go
forward or aft, and he chose the latter place, with the
understanding that we were to take turns in looking after
the disabled men.

Lanterns were hung here and there around the deck
that the crew might be able to see what they were about,
and although I was stationed at some distance from our
men, it was not a lonely vigil, such as usually falls to the
lot of the lookout.

We could only guess where the Comet might be, for
although, now and then, when the vessels rose on the swell,
we could see lights, it was impossible to say whether they
were on board our schooner or one of the other prizes.

In less than half an hour from the time I had taken my
station Donald hailed me to say he was about to visit the
wounded men, and five minutes later I saw him come out
of the deck-house.

«« How are they?” I cried.

“Getting along fairly well, I should say. All are com-
72 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

plaining bitterly, and if they drink as much water when
you look after them as I have just dealt out, you'll have
to pay more than one visit to the scuttle-butt.”

He did not venture to join me even for a moment,
because we two were minded to perform our duties in
such a manner that Mr. Harker would have no reason for
faultfinding, and I turned my attention once more to the
lights of the vessels in the distance.

From below could be heard a murmuring sound, as the
prisoners most likely discussed their situation ; but they
were apparently so quiet that I gave little heed to the
possibility of mischief.

When I believed half an hour or more had passed, I
took my turn at visiting the wounded men, and while
approaching the deck-house observed that Donald was
gazing out over the after rail, and consequently did not
‘see me.

I was on the point of hailing him, when I bethought
myself that Mr. Harker might consider us childish if we
must speak to each other every time we came or went,
and I held my peace.

On entering the deck-house I saw three men lying in
hammocks, and the fourth seated on what appeared to be
a pile of dunnage near the door.

Two had blood-stained bandages around their heads,
the arm of one was in a sling, and the other, he who sat
near the door, was rubbing his leg as if it gave him severe
pain, although I could see no evidence of a wound in that
member.




Ee Te

THE BATTLE. 73

« Are you minded to let us die of thirst?” this last
man asked, in a surly tone, as I stepped inside. “If there
are two boys aboard, it would seem that we might at least
be supplied with water.”

«There ave two aboard,” I answered, quietly, for it was
not in my heart to be angry with prisoners who were
wounded, however harshly they might speak. “We are
acting as lookouts, and if one of us comes here every half
hour it would seem as if that was all the time we could
spend in such duty, for a signal from our schooner may
be made at any moment.”

«Where are you stationed?” the man asked.

“ Forward.”

«But the rest of the crew?”

“Jn the forecastle. The officers are in their rooms
aft.”

“Did you crowd all our men into that one hole?”

«There was no other place where they might be safely
kept, I suppose, although I know but little of such things,
for this is my first cruise.”

“Get some water, will you, and plenty of it. The other
boy brought it in.sparing quantity, and we have thirsted
this half hour or more.”

I believed the man lied; but did not think it manly to
tell him so when he was helpless, and, taking up the bucket
which he pushed towards me with his uninjured foot I went
to the scuttle-butt.

Donald was still gazing astern, and I stood an instant
trying to make out what so riveted his attention, but failed
74 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

to see anything unusual in that direction, after which I
drew what seemed to be an ample supply of water.

Just as I returned to the deck-house and was about to
step inside, I heard a noise aft, as if some one of our men
had fallen, and I looked in that direction until making
certain no mishap had occurred.

Then I continued on, still gazing back with never a
thought of possible mischief, when suddenly what felt like
a man’s pea-jacket was thrown over my head, and my
arms were pinioned to my side.

The bucket fell to the floor as I tried to free myself
and at the same time scream for help.

I doubt if my voice could have been heard outside the
deck-house, so closely was the garment pressed about my
mouth, and as for freeing myself, I might as well have
struggled against bands of iron.

In an instant, and even while I was yet vainly strug-
gling, there came to my mind the knowledge of what all
this meant.

The Britisher who had been seated near the door was
only slightly wounded, —there was still the strength of
half a dozen ordinary men in his arms, —and once I had
been made prisoner it would not be a difficult task for him
to set free those who were confined in the forecastle.

He could go forward, and should any of our crew see
him they would suppose it was I, for no one would pay
particular attention to such a matter, believing the wounded
men incapable of mischief.

The thought that the brig might be recaptured through
THE BATTLE. 75

my carelessness made me desperate, and I continued my
struggles even after one of the other men came out of his
hammock to assist in rendering me helpless.

While the fellow who had leaped upon me held his hand
over my mouth in such fashion that I was nearly suffo-
cated, one of the others lashed my arms and feet, and
then the two set about gagging me.

A wad of oakum wrapped around the end of a belaying-
pin was thrust into my mouth until it seemed as if my
jaws were dislocated, and there it was made fast with a
bit of ratline stuff.

During all this time I had not been able to raise my
voice, and now as a matter of course I was totally help-
less.

The two: men —the second being one of those whose
heads were tied up — bundled me into the hammock, and
I question if Donald would have understood that anything
was wrong had he come in while I lay there.

Now I could hear all that was said, and, so far as might
be possible in the gloom, see the movements of the pris-
oners, who were supposed to be helpless because of their
wounds.

“There is no fear this little trick will be discovered by
the Yankees before that second lad comes here,” the fel-
low who had been seated near the door, and who appeared
to be the leader in this movement, said, in a tone of tri-
umph. ‘TI shall go to the forecastle, taking the chances
that the Americans will believe me to be this boy whom
we have trussed up so neatly, and once there our crew
70 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

shall be let out, one or two at a time, until we are ready
for business.”

«“ There must not be too much delay, for once the other
lad goes forward, the whole affair will be discovered,” the
man who had assisted in my capture suggested, and
the other fellow replied:

«You three have nothing to do, save lay for him here.
Bob shall take my place near the door, and a smart rap
over the head, when the cub first shows himself, will settle
matters, if those in the forecastle have not already brought
the work to an end. Keep your eyes open, for now noth-
ing, save a mistake on your part, will prevent us from
carrying this thing through in proper shape.”

Then the fellow went out, and I noted that there was
no limp in his gait, therefore believed he had shammed the
wound in the hope of being able to do exactly what had
been accomplished.

The man who had aided in make! me a prisoner seated
himself by the door, with a spare pump-brake in his hands,
and my heart was even more heavy than before, for in
addition to losing our prize, and becoming prisoners, it
seemed certain Donald Fyffe would be killed.

A blow on the head from such a weapon as this Brit-
isher held would most likely kill the strongest man, and I
doubted not but that it would be dealt with all the strength
of which he was capable, in order that there might be no
possibility the poor lad could make an outcry.

And all this was due to me. Had I observed such
precautions as would have suggested themselves to almost
LHE BATTLE. 77

any one, save such a simple as myself, the attempt could
* not have succéeded, and, therefore, I might charge all that
followed to my own account.

It would have been better had they killed me outright,
for then I should be spared the mental anguish from
which I now suffered.

How madly I strained every muscle, in the vain hope of
rending the bonds, or so far loosening them that I might
get one hand free! Although I was nigh to death from
suffocation, the pain seemed as nothing, so great was my
anxiety to repair the mischief brought about by careless-
ness.

How long a time passed before we heard anything that
might betoken what the Britishers were doing, I know
not, for the moments were to me like hours, and the
seconds fully five minutes long.

Then I heard a slight noise from the outside, and saw
the fellow near the doorway straighten himself up to deal
a blow.

There could be no question, to my mind at least, but
that Donald was coming to visit the wounded, and I must
lie there helpless while these Britishers killed him!
CHAPTER V.
SHARP WORK.

T is beyond the limit of words to describe the agony of
mind which was mine at this moment, when I fully
expected to see my comrade murdered.

Only a few feet away were friends who would rush to
Donald’s assistance if they had the slightest suspicion of
his danger, and yet there was little hope chance would
bring one of them into the deck-house.

I could hear the voices of the men as they talked or
sang while working, and it was as if this intensified the
horror of the terrible situation.

During the time, when the very seconds were as
hours, I wondered why Donald delayed entering, and yet
I hoped something outside would attract his attention for
a time.

Any delay might bring a reprieve, for I was as one sen-
tenced to worse than death, and clung to the slightest
straw, in the hope of relief.

Then, to my great surprise, I heard an unfamiliar voice
whisper, and, while I thanked God that the moment of my
comrade’s death was not yet at hand, my heart grew even
more heavy, for it seemed as if there was no longer
ground for hope.

78
SHARP WORK. 79

It was one of the Britisher’s shipmates who spoke, and
the weapon was suddenly lowered, as the fellow replied,
much as though relieved because he was not forced to do
murder :

“Ts it you, Jepson? I thought one of the Yankees
had come to visit us, and was ready to give him his last
blow.”

“Tt strikes me you are growing nervous, Tom. Your
plan is moving in great shape, and by this time all the
boys must be on deck, ready for work. It can’t be many
minutes before the word will be given, and the brig is as
good as ours already.”

Now was come to me a sorrow greater than when I
believed Donald alone would be the victim, for I under-
stood that all our crew were in most imminent dan-
ger.

The prisoners had been released by the man who over-
powered me, and a general slaughter was about to take
place..

How I struggled with my bonds, cutting the ropes deep
into the flesh, as I twisted and turned in the vain hope of
loosening them, and all the while expecting to hear the
signal for the beginning of the murderous work!

While struggling, I turned my face towards the edge
of the hammock, and a great joy sprang up in my heart,
as I realised that, by so doing, the gag which had caused
me so much suffering was slightly twisted.

It was yet possible I might free my mouth, and even
though my cries would likely be the signal for my death,
80 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

I was ready to utter them, if thereby I could warn the
crew of the danger which threatened.

I no longer paid any attention to what the men might
be saying, but writhed in the hammock with the purpose
of freeing myself so nearly that it would be possible to
make an outcry.

The ratline-stuff which held the gag in place was sim-
ply passed from each end of the belaying-pin around my
neck, and as I pressed my head against the canvas it was
gradually forced out of position until, to my inexpressible
relief, I had freed my mouth.

The bonds still held me helpless; but I could raise my
voice in warning, and even though it was likely this would
cost me my life, it was sufficient.

The only question now in my mind was as to whether I
should cry aloud at this moment, or wait until some of our
friends were near at hand.

I knew full well that I would only be permitted to shout
once, for, instantly I raised my voice, death would come,
and if the alarm was not heard I should have died in vain.

It was well I did not obey the impulse which prompted
me to scream on the instant it was possible for me to do
so, since I should most likely have failed in my purpose.

While trying to decide as to the proper course of action,
I heard, without realising that I was listening, Jepson say
to the man on guard:

“Understand this much, — that while all the prize-crew
are on deck it will be impossible for us to recapture the
brig without great loss of life, for the Yankees are armed,
SHARP WORK. 81

and we without weapons. The plan is to wait awhile, —
say until just before daylight, — in the hope that some of
them will turn in.”

«But the boy we have trussed up will be missed, or, if
not, he who is acting as the lookout aft will soon be here
to attend to the wounded.”

“We can easily take care of him, and must then run
our: chances of his absence being discovered. It is the
opinion of all hands forward that no attempt should be
made until the odds are more nearly in our favour.”

‘Tt shouldn’t be a hard job for you fellows to find what
will serve as weapons.”

«What is a marline-spike against a cutlass, or a capstan-
bar to the man who carries a loaded pistol ?”’

“Have your own way, Jepson, if, as you say, all hands
are agreed upon some plan. I will do my part when the
time comes, even though I think we make a mistake by
delaying.”

Then the Britishers fell silent, and I knew they awaited
the coming of Donald Fyffe.

How earnestly I prayed that he might forget the sup-
posed wants of those in the deck-house ; and by thus pray-
ing I, like many another before me, did not realise what
might be for the best !

No more than five minutes had passed from the time
these Britishers fell silent before I heard my comrade’s
voice within a few feet of where I lay, and then, from such

_ words as could be distinguished, I understood that he was
talking with Mr. Harker.
82 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

It was impossible for me to say what might be the sub-
ject of their converse; but I believed that now had come
the time when I should make known the situation.

If I waited until Donald was alone, he would rush to
my assistance, without thinking of the possible conse-
quences, and the result I could foresee only too well. By
raising an outcry now, it was reasonable to suppose Mr.
Harker would take it upon himself to learn the cause, and
even if Donald and I were both murdered, we should not
have died in vain.

I felt firmly convinced that my death was assured in-
stantly I cried out, and yet, strange as it may seem, I felt
no terror, —my hesitation arose only from the fear that
I might not accomplish that which I desired, by thus
attempting to give an alarm.

“There is treachery here! I am in the power of the
wounded Britishers, who are —”’

This much I succeeded in shouting at the full strength
of my lungs, and then he who was on guard near the
door sprang upon me, with the pump-brake upraised to
strike.

I saw it descending, and knew that the blow, if fairly
dealt, would crush my skull like an egg-shell.

With one supreme effort I succeeded in slightly chang-
ing the position of my body so that the Britisher was
partially foiled in his effort.

The blow was a glancing one, and so far failed of its
purpose that I was not deprived of consciousness.

Before the fellow could raise his weapon again, Mr.


‘WITH ONE SUPREME EFFORT I SUCCEEDED IN SLIGHTLY
CHANGING THE POSITION OF MY BODy.”



SHARP WORK. 85

Harker had sprung upon him, and Donald Fyffe grappled
with the man who had been set free from the fore-
castle,

I understood that all those Britishers who were hiding
near at hand would fall upon us immediately, and the fore-
castle speedily be emptied of its occupants, therefore I
shouted for the benefit of our men:

“ Look to yourselves! The prisoners have been freed!”

By the time these words were uttered, Mr. Harker had
wrested the pump-brake from his adversary, and with one
blow put him past further mischief.

Donald- Fyffe was rapidly being worsted; but now the
mate was free to act, that portion of the struggle was
quickly ended, and then came the report of firearms,
telling that our men were on the alert.

“Release Stephen Burton, and kill either of the men
here who attempt to do mischief,” Mr. Harker cried, as he
sprang out on the deck, and Donald Fyffe would have
come immediately to my rescue but that I urged him to
make certain the wounded men were not ready to join in
the fray.

“Don’t strike!’’ one of them cried, as my comrade
seized the pump-brake, which the mate had let fall as he
unsheathed his cutlass. ‘We are in good truth disabled,
and could not take part in a fight if we would.”

“Be certain they speak the truth before you attempt to
release me,” I cried, and in the merest fraction of time

‘Donald satisfied himself that the two in the hammocks
were really helpless.
86 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Then he set me free by severing the bonds with his
sheath-knife, and I leaped out upon the deck, in ignorance
that the blood was flowing freely from the wound: on my
head.

«Come on!” I cried. ‘We are needed outside, and
these men may be safely secured by locking the door

.

upon them.”

Then I would have run out to take part in the battle
which, from the sounds, we knew was on, but that my
comrade clutched at my shoulder, holding me fast.

“You are seriously wounded, and in no condition to go
out there,” he cried. ‘Let me see what mischief has
been done.”

“Tt can be little more than a scratch, otherwise I should
feel some pain, and we are needed on deck.”

I literally tore myself from his grasp, and ran out, look-
ing about hurriedly for something that would serve as a
weapon.

The battle, and from the appearance of the deck as I
came into the open air it surely deserved that name, was
well-nigh ended.

The firearms in the hands of our crew, which had been
freely used, were the most powerful argument, and I could
hear the brig’s crew crying for quarter.

‘Look to the cabin, you two lads, and shoot down any
of the officers who may have escaped from their berths,”
Mr. Harker cried, as he saw us, and even while Donald
and I ran aft, I knew, by glancing over my shoulder, that
our crew, formed in line from rail to rail, were marching
SHARP WORK. 87

towards the forecastle to make certain there were none in
hiding on the deck.

When we were come to the companionway it appeared
as if our share of the work would be light; the doors of
the several rooms yet remained closed, and I knew the
occupants could not have come out save by battering
them down.

It had been a close shave for us; but happily all danger
was now averted, and, understanding this, it was as if I
had time to realise my own condition.

Now the wound on my head asserted itself, and I grew
faint from loss of blood.

Donald saw me stagger against the hatchway, and at
once led me into the cabin, where, after a certain rude
fashion, he bound up my head, thereby giving me no slight
relief.

Before I was sufficiently master of myself to move
about without reeling, Mr. Harker came below, and, see-
ing Donald’s work, asked with no little concern in his
tones :

« Are you wounded, lad?”

“ A Britisher struck one blow before you appeared, but
save for the flow of blood it is not serious.”

“Your face tells a different story; let me examine the
wound.”

While he was thus engaged I made known that the
attempt at escape was rendered possible by my own care-
lessness, and after the story had been told he said, with
emphasis :
88 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

“You have no reason to blame yourself, lad. Believing
as we did that those men were disabled, and also that
they had surrendered, even I should have gone into the
deck-house without being prepared for an attack.”

«What has taken place?’’ one of the Britishers who
was locked in his berth shouted. “Have you been
attacked ?”’

“ Ay, that we have, and through the treachery of those
who claim to be wounded. While ministering to their
wants one of our men was set upon, and that he is still
alive is no fault of the scoundrel who tried to kill him.”

«Has any blood been shed?”

“We shot down those who had been released from the
forecastle and were about to attack us. How many may
be dead I cannot say, but no less than seven are lying on
the deck.”

At that moment one of our men came to the compan-
ionway and shouted :

“The Comet is bearing down upon us, sir, most likely
to learn the meaning of the rumpus.”

Mr. Harker went on deck at once, and with Donald’s
help I succeeded in following him just as Captain Tom
hailed from the schooner, which was now close along-
side.

“Are you having trouble with your prisoners ?”

“Ay, sir. There was an attempt to recapture the brig,
but it failed.”

“At what loss to you?”

“Stephen Burton is the only one injured. He has a
SHARP WORK. 89

bad wound on the head, which should be attended to as
soon as possible.”

“T will send a boat, and we’ll begin the work of taking
off the Britishers at once. See to it that your men are
well armed when you muster the brig’s crew. Let both
the boys come back, and I will give you a couple of men
in their stead.”

Save for the fact that we were to continue the cruise
on the schooner rather than return home as members of
the prize-crew, I would rather the wound had not been
dressed than make another trip in the long-boat over
those boisterous waves; but it had grieved me to leave
the Comet, and right glad was I that sufficient excuse had
arisen to take us back.

Eight of the Britishers were summoned from the fore-
castle, all of our crew meanwhile standing fully armed,
prepared for any attempt at mischief, and when the
Comets long-boat came up under the brig’s quarter, the
prisoners, together with Donald and me, were put on board
one by one whenever such transshipment was possible.

It was a task which required much time in the perform-
ance, because only when the little craft rose on the swell
to the level of the brig’s rail could we jump on board.

The passage back to the schooner was made in safety,
although there were many times when it seemed as if we
‘must surely be swamped, and Donald and I were taken
on board.

"While the prisoners were clambering over the rail, Cap.
tain Tom called on me for an explanation as to what had
90 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

happened aboard the brig, and after I had told the story,
laying full weight of blame upon myself, he ordered that
the surgeon look to the wound on my head, saying, before
he turned away from me:

“You lads may take up quarters aft, in Mr. Harker’s
berth, from this out, and according to my mind you are
not to be censured, Stephen, because, as nearly as I can
make out, the brig might have been retaken but for the
fact of your pluckily giving the alarm when it was done at
risk of your life. I am beginning to think both you lads
may prove yourselves men before this cruise is ended.”

It was a fine thing, this change from the forecastle to
the cabin, so I thought, as we turned to go down the com-
panionway to inspect our new quarters; but I had no
opportunity of seeing them for some time, because the
surgeon ordered me into the cockpit, where my head was
sewed and patched until the performance cost me more
pain than had the receiving of the wound.

When I joined Donald Fyffe again, I found he had
taken all our belongings to the second mate’s berth, and
he declared that never were two boys quartered in better
fashion on a privateersman than we.

That which made this narrow berth seem all the more
pleasant, was that we had won praise from Captain Tom
Boyle, who never spoke such words unless they were
deserved.

The pain in my head drove away all desire for sleep,
and Donald and I went on deck again to watch the work
of transferring the prisoners, that we might be there also
SHARP WORK. gI

as soon as the night was gone, for both were eager to
learn whether the other prizes could be picked up.

Their lights could be seen a long distance away, to-
gether with those on board the Portuguese ; but it ap-
peared as if the three craft were drifting towards the
shore, in which case it was not improbable they would be
lost to us.

When morning came we learned that these fears were
well founded.

The ship, the man-of-war, and the brig were working
towards the shore as fast as might be in their crippled
condition, for all were seriously cut up, and immediately
the Comet was put in pursuit.

They were too far away, however, to admit of our over-
taking them, and by nine o’clock that forenoon we were
alongside the Bowes once more, hove to while Captain
Tom made a visit of inspection.

Until he returned to the schooner I believed the brig
would be sent home without delay, and, therefore, was
much surprised when the word was passed among the
men that she had been ordered to the Port of Spain,
which is the capital of Trinidad, and this was the same as
saying that the Comet would most likely stop there for
. repairs.

We lay by the Bowes until noon, and then squared
away on our course, which the first officer told me would,
if continued, bring us to the island of Trinidad.

We two lads were notified that we would be excused
from duty during the next eight and forty hours, and once
92 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

the Comet was well on her way towards this island, which
I had long wanted to visit, Donald and I went below to
turn in.

Four days later we were off the entrances to the Gulf
of Paria, and the first mate explained to us that these
channels are known as the Dragon’s Mouths, one being
called the Monkeys’ Passage, another Ship Passage, the
_ third Boca Grande, and that through which we sailed, Egg
Passage, all these names being given, so it is said, by no
less a person than Christopher Columbus himself.

Whatever may be the discomforts of a privateersman’s
life, such as we had known were nearly atoned for by the
wondrous sights Donald and I now witnessed for the first
time.

The passage by which we entered the gulf was so nar-
row that it was as if the schooner actually rubbed against
the shores, and there were times when I felt positive we
could have plucked cocoanuts from the trees by laying out
on the yard-arms.

Then, when we came into the gulf, where the water was
as calm as a mill-pond, bordered by glowing white coral
reefs, I believed, and am still of the same opinion, that a
fairer spectacle could not be found anywhere.

«You lads are now come to that island which Columbus
discovered in 1498,” Captain Tom said to Donald and me
when the Comet was at anchor, and if you are as familiar
with history as you should be, it is needless for me to say
it was during his’ third expedition across the Atlantic that
he made the discovery of this island and the mouths of
SHARP WORK. 93

the Orinoco River, which last he believed sprang from the
Tree of Life in the midst of the Garden of Eden.”

Nothing more was needed to give Donald and me the
liveliest desire to go ashore, and after some hesitation I
begged my uncle for permission to go.

“Ashore, lads? Of course you shall! Every good pri-
vateersman enjoys himself when he can, and so long as
the crew behave themselves while at liberty, just so long
do I make it a point to give them all possible pleasure of
that kind. If you report on board before sunset, and do
not leave the schooner until after sunrise, you are at
liberty to explore the island to your heart’s content while
we are refitting.”

There was in our minds, as we prepared to visit the
island, only the thought of odd sights to be seen, and
no suspicion of the dangers we were destined to en-
counter.
CHAPTER VI.
A PLOT,

EE was not until we were ready to go on shore that
Donald and I understood how venturesome had Cap-
tain Tom been in thus stopping at Trinidad.

Instead of anchoring off the Port of Spain, as we lads
had expected would be the case, the Comet was moored
under the shore in a little cove which, although close by
the point that shut out the ocean from the Gulf of Paria,
was not disclosed to our view until we had actually
entered.

It was a tiny harbour or basin among the coral reefs, and
so nearly screened from view of any one entering the gulf
as to make it really a hiding-place.

It was as snug a port as any privateersman could wish,
and so surrounded by land that the Comet might safely
lie there throughout any weather with but a single anchor
down.

As I have said, Donald and I wondered why we did not
proceed directly to the Port, and had we given more at-
tention to our geography lessons in the past, the sur-
prise would have come to us that Captain Tom had dared
enter this gulf at all.

94
A PLOT. 95

When we made ready to go ashore, I remarked care-
lessly to the first mate that I had hoped we might have laid
so near the Port of Spain that it would be only a simple
task to row ashore, and added, as if eager to display my
ignorance :

“Now, Donald and I must trudge along the sand for
five or six miles, which is the distance from this cove to
the Port, so Abraham Dyker has told us.”

“And are you counting on going to the Port of Spain?”
the mate asked, with an odd expression on his face.

“ Ay, sir; we have the captain’s permission to go ashore
every morning after sunrise, with the understanding that
we shall return before sunset.”

“TI suppose you know that the Port of Spain is on the
island of Trinidad?”

“Why, certainly, sir.”

“And what nation holds possession of the island?”

“It has a government of its own, I suppose.”

“Then I can prove to your entire satisfaction how
necessary it is for lads to know somewhat of history and
geography before they venture into a strange port. Since
1797 the Britishers have held this island, and were you.
to show your tioses in town, the chances are you'd be
clapped into the lock-up with but scant ceremony.”

We stared at the mate in surprise, and after a short
pause Donald asked:

“If this is a British island, how is it Captain Tom has
dared to put in with the purpose of repairing damages?”

“Captain Tom dares do many things another would
96 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

shrink at, and I have an idea that there is in his mind a
thought of lying here in waiting with the expectation of
nabbing one of the enemy’s vessels. I do not fancy the
work of refitting will be so extensive as to prevent our
putting to sea at a moment’s notice.”

“But I understood the orders were for the Bowes to
make the Port of Spain.”

«Those were the orders, lad; but I warrant you Mr.
Harker knows that this cove is the nearest he is expected
to go to the town. We have lain here in hiding before,
as nearly all on board can tell you.”

I was so bewildered by the idea that the Comet was
really in English waters, and so thoroughly vexed with
myself for having been ignorant of the fact, that all desire
for going ashore suddenly fled.

I walked slowly to the starboard rail, and was leaning
over it when Donald came to my side. :

“T fail to understand why we have not heard some of
the men talking about what the first officer has just told
us,” he said to me, and I knew from the tone of his voice
that he had in his heart quite as much shame as I in mine.

«J do not fancy there is a man on board who believed
that two great hulking lads like you and me could be so
ignorant,” I replied, bitterly.

“Tet us seek out Abraham Dyker.”

«To what end? That we may confess our own stu-
pidity ?”

“We have already shown it to the first officer, and I
warrant you the captain will soon know it was our pur-
A PLOT. : 97

pose to visit the town. It will be whispered ’round
about the schooner, and we may as well make a clean
breast of it to the old gunner.”

Without replying, for he turned to go below as he
spoke, I followed him, and we had no difficulty in finding
the one sought, for he seldom left his gun save when sent
on duty elsewhere.

“ Did you not know, Master Dyker, that we counted on
visiting the town?” Donald asked, almost sharply.

“Counted on it, lad? Why, you wouldn’t dream of
doing such a thing! A lark is a lark, but to put your
heads paren the Britishers goes beyond foolhardiness,
even,’

Then Donald explained what we would have done but
‘for the mate’s warning, and Abraham Dyker laughed so
long and so loud that I came nigh to losing my temper.

After a time, however, when he realised that his merri-
ment was displeasing to us, the old man explained, much
as had the mate, regarding the locality which the Comet’s
crew understood to be meant when the Port of Spain was
mentioned.

‘We put in here no less than four times during the last
cruise, in‘the hope of picking up a prize without having to
chase her too far. But for this hiding-place, we might not
have captured the Hopewell.”

“ How can that be?” Donald asked.

“It is a longish story, lad, and I will tell it some time
when you are in a better mood for listening. Just now,
those who have not been given shore-leave are supposed
98 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

to be on the alert, for no one can say how soon a prize
may heave in sight.”

“In which case, what would become of the men
ashore ?”’

“That is their own concern. It is always understood
that no signal would be given if we should find it neces-
sary to slip our moorings suddenly, and if they strayed
very far from the cove there is a likelihood we might not
see them again for many months, although all know full
well that Captain Tom would pick them up as soon as it
should be possible.”

«Will the Bowes put in here?” I asked, still bewildered
by the thought of the dangers we might have encountered
had we not chanced to speak with the mate concerning
our intention.

«Ay, lad, that she will.”

“And suppose an English man-of-war should come into
the gulf?”

“Then there would be hot work for a time. Of that
you may be certain.”

I seated myself on a gun-carriage, and Abraham Dyker
asked, as if in surprise:

“Have you given up all idea of going ashore?”

“I am not minded to take the chances of being left on
the island of Trinidad.”

“There is little fear of that, lad, if it so be you keep
the schooner always in view. After you saw that we
were making sail, there would be time enough in which
to pull aboard.”
A PLOT. 99

“And therefore our only advantage in going will be
to sit on the sand watching for something which gives
token that the Comet is being gotten under way.”

«All that I grant you, lad, on a day like this, with
a stiffish breeze blowing. But suppose it turned calm
to-morrow morning? Then you could ramble around to
your heart’s content, provided you kept at a respectful
distance from the Port, knowing full well that, until the
wind springs up, the Comet must perforce remain in this
snug mooring-place.”

Donald made no objection to staying on board, from
which I understood that he viewed the matter in much
the same light as did I.

We went on deck again, and there observed what we
had failed to note before, —that all hands on duty were
acting as lookouts, ready to spring to quarters without
delay, should necessity arise.

Not more than twenty of the men had gone ashore,
and the distance from our anchorage to the beach was so
short that we could readily see them without the aid of a
glass.

As nearly as I could tell, not a man strayed very far
from the water-line. A few were indulging in a bath, but
the greater number lay under the shadow of the trees
within a few yards of the boat.

The work of refitting had already begun, and Donald
and I observed that it was carried on in such a manner
as to make it possible for us to set sail at any moment,
should occasion require.
100 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The breeze held during this day, and we two lads re-
mained on board, not caring to take advantage of Captain
Tom’s permission ; at least, not while the danger of being
left behind seemed so great.

On the following morning the wind still held strong,
and at about ten o’clock in the forenoon we were aroused
to excitement by the lookout at the masthead, who cried, in
a tone hardly louder than a whisper, that a craft of some
sort was coming through Egg Passage.

There was no need for Captain Tom to give any
commands.

Every man sprang to his station noiselessly, and a small
ensign was run a short distance up in the main-rigging as
a signal for those on shore to come aboard.

By slipping our cable, we could have gotten under way
in less than three minutes from the time the command
was given, and I, who had been exceedingly timorous
since the previous afternoon lest a British man-of-war
should suddenly appear, felt myself trembling with excite-
ment, and fearing the stranger might prove to be no more
than a fisherman, the overhauling of which Captain Tom
would consider beneath his notice.

Then came a certain sense of disappointment, when the
lookout announced that the oncoming craft was none
other than our prize, the Bowes, and, as soon as might be
thereafter, the brig was made fast alongside the Comet,
for in this cove the waters were so quiet that two vessels
might lie side by side without danger of injury to either.

On the next morning a boat was sent seaward through
A PLOT. IOI

Egg Passage, for the double purpose of standing guard
over us, so to speak, and to watch for anything in the
way of a sail that Captain Tom might take a fancy to
overhaul.

From that day until we finally weighed anchor, at least
eight of our men were constantly on watch at the mouth
of Egg Passage.

During more than a week—TI do not remember the
exact time, but it seemed exceedingly long to Donald
Fyffe and myself—the wind held steadily from the
westward, and we remained on board, not daring to
venture ashore while it was possible the schooner could
be gotten under way.

I should say eight or ten days passed, and the repairs
were not yet completed, owing to the fact that the men
worked at a disadvantage, since they must always be
ready to make sail, and never so far dismantle either
vessel but that she could be put to sea at five minutes’
notice.

Then it was the time had come for our long-delayed
excursion, and Abraham Dyker gave us much pleasure
by announcing that he also would take his first shore-
leave, if it so be we were minded to have him in our
company.

It can readily be understood how gladly we accepted
his proposition, for the old gunner had been very friendly
of late, and we thoroughly enjoyed his companionship.

The morning was so calm that a thistledown would
have remained undisturbed on the masthead, and we
102 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

could wander as far from the shore as was our desire,
with the knowledge that, until the breeze sprang up again,
the Comet would not be likely to leave her moorings, for
if she could not get out, other craft could not get in,
and the work of refitting might be pushed ahead more
rapidly than usual.

Abraham Dyker did not prove to be as pleasant a com-
panion on a land-cruise as we had fancied, because of the
fact that he refused to stroll amid the tropical foliage as
we desired, he claiming that there was work enough to be
done on board the Comet, without his coming ashore to
waste his energies in tramping around uselessly.

Therefore it was that to the old man this excursion was
neither more nor less than a few hours of most complete
repose ; for, as many of our men were in the custom of
doing since we had entered the cove, he threw himself
upon the ground, under the shade of the trees, and
refused all our invitations to join us in a voyage of
discovery.

Donald and I set out alone, travelling in the direction of
the Port of Spain, with the understanding that we should
venture as near the town as seemed consistent with safety,
for we both were minded to see the dwellers on this island
of Trinidad.

In order to make certain of holding the course, we kept
the water in view, but yet made our way through foliage
such as we had never seen before, and there was so much
to interest us that we moved but slowly.

In half an hour I do not think we had travelled more
A PLOT. 103

than three-quarters of a mile, and then there came to our
ears, from a thicket between us and the coast-line, the
sound of human voices.

«Some of our men, who most likely left the schooner
after we did, have landed farther down the coast,” Don-
ald said, and would have continued speaking but that I
checked him, as a sudden fear came over me.

«Captain Tom gave orders that all were to remain on
board to-day, because the work of refitting can be pushed
to better advantage now it is calm,” I whispered to him.
“These must be natives, — perhaps Britishers, — and it
stands us in hand to give them a wide berth.”

Having said this, I made as if to go further into the
thicket, at right angles with the course we had been pur-
suing, but Donald stopped me.

“Jt is poor judgment, when in an enemy’s country, to
leave any one in the rear, without knowing if they might
be capable of mischief. Let us first learn who they
are.”

I had no very great desire to spy upon these speak-
ers, but Donald did not give me a chance to refuse, for
straightway he pushed on in that direction from which the
voices came, and before we had advanced twenty yards it
was possible to distinguish here and there a word.

The little which we heard caused me to be decidedly
uneasy, and I realised that it was necessary we should
play the part of eavesdroppers yet further.

Creeping cautiously forward, and, strange as it may
seem, forgetting danger as we advanced, I, having uncon-
104 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

sciously passed my comrade, was arrived at a point where
the speakers could be plainly seen.

They were white men, and from their manner of talking
I believed them to be Britishers. Two had the appear-
ance of sailors; the other three might have followed any
calling, so far as I could judge from their bearing.

“If this calm holds, to-night is the time when the work
shall be done.”

It was one of the seamen who said this, and imme-
diately I suspected that some plot against the Comet was
on foot.

“ How long before the schooner will be ready for sea?”
one of the men asked, and the same sailor who had pre-
viously spoken replied :

“She has been ready at any moment since coming to
anchor ; but because of the calm, I take it, they will push
the work of refitting on both vessels, and, if so, there must
be loose ends left which cannot be gathered up in a hurry.
Twenty-four hours from now they are likely to leave the
coast, if it so be the wind favours, for from what I saw
yesterday there is little need of their remaining here much
longer.”

“Tf that is the case, set about it at once,” he who ap-
peared to be the leader of the party said, in a tone of
authority. “Two of us will stay here to see that there is
no change in the general position of affairs, and the others
must get the men together.”

I looked to see some of the party act upon the sugges-
tion made; but no one moved. All ceased speaking as if
A PLOT. 105

the business was settled, yet remained in their lounging
positions much as though there was ample time in which
to carry out what had been decided upon.

I glanced towards Donald, and from the expression on
his face knew he understood the matter as did I.

Then it was in my mind to return as quickly as might
be to acquaint Captain Tom with what we had heard, and,
so far as was possible, gave my comrade to understand
that we should beat a retreat.

He was not minded so to do, but motioned with his
head towards the shore, and at once began creeping
cautiously in that direction.

It was several moments before I could decide what was
his purpose, and then I fancied he counted on making
certain whether there were others in the vicinity, which
seemed to me a needless precaution as well as loss of
time, for if that which we had heard referred to any mis-
chief meditated against the Come, it was time we went
on board again.

I was watching Donald Fyffe so intently I failed to
observe that one of the men had arisen to his feet, and
was not aware of the fact until he had advanced to within
a dozen yards of where I lay, coming through the thicket
aimlessly, as if simply to stretch his legs.

It was too late now for me to retreat from my dangerous
position, since he was so near that the slightest movement
made by me would be heard by him, and I crouched yet
closer to the ground, hardly daring to breathe, hoping he
might pass without seeing me.
106 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Had the Britisher been told exactly where I was, he
could not have come more directly to the spot, and in less
time than it has taken me to set down these words, he was
so near that I could no longer hope to remain unobserved.

Instinctively I leaped up, hoping to escape by fleetness
of foot ; but before I was fairly under way he seized me
by the shoulder.

I screamed with fear, and was shamed an instant later
that I should have shown cowardice ; but, as was proved
afterwards, I could have done no wiser thing.

«What are you spying around here for?” the Britisher
asked, as he dragged me back to his companions, and I
replied, keeping well in mind the fact that I might aid or
injure Donald Fyffe by my words:

“T am not spying! It was -by accident that I came
upon your party.”

« You were listening to what we said.”

“TI stopped when I heard voices, not knowing whose
they might be.”

«You are one of the Comet’s crew!”’ the sailor who had
first spoken cried, sharply.

For a moment it was in my mind to deny that I knew
anything whatever regarding the schooner, and then I
understood how useless would be such a denial, for my
manner of speaking proclaimed me to be a Yankee.

“ How many came ashore with you?”

I had promised my mother never to tell a lie; but I
believed now had come the time when it was my duty to
at least keep back the truth, and I said, promptly :
A PLOT. IG7

«“ Abraham Dyker rowed me ashore.”

« Where is he?”

“On the beach, where he can keep the Come? in view.
I came down through the thicket because the foliage was
so strange to the eye, and had little idea of wandéring so
far.”

“Tt don’t stand to reason only two men came ashore!”
the sailor cried, and immediately all, save him who held
me prisoner, ran hurriedly through the undergrowth for
my supposed companions.

Every man was heavily armed, as I had seen while
listening to the conversation, and I trembled for Donald’s
safety, believing that should he attempt to flee they would
shoot him down once he gave them an opportunity.

The man, who held me by the collar with so tight a
clutch that I was nigh to being strangled, asked, when his
companions had left us:

“ How much of what we said did you hear?”

“IT had but just come when you rose to your feet.”

«“ You are lying now.”

«Whether I am or not can make little difference, for I
do not believe you would set me free even if I had but
this moment come up.”

“In that you are right; but at the same time we are
not inclined to be hampered with a prisoner.”

At that moment I heard the report of firearms in the
distance, and my heart grew heavy as lead, for there was
to me no question but that Donald Fyffe had been shot.
CHAPTER VII.
THE COMET’S CREW.

N Y captor drew his pistol when the report rang out,
and during what seemed a cruelly long time I felt
convinced it was his purpose to murder me outright.

Holding me with his left hand, he pointed the weapon
directly at my head more than once, standing meanwhile
in a listening attitude, and for perhaps two minutes the
agony of death was mine.

In thinking of the matter now, I believe he feared his
comrades had come upon some considerable number of the
Comet’s crew, and it was his purpose to kill me in case
there should be an encounter, rather than set me free.

As the seconds went by, and no other report was heard,
he lowered the weapon, greatly to my relief, but did not
relax his hold on my throat in the slightest.

Shortly afterwards we heard the Britishers returning,
and as they approached I held my breath in suspense,
expecting each instant to hear them announce the death
of Donald Fyffe.

In this I was happily mistaken.

“Did you find any one?” the man who held me asked,

impatiently, when his comrades came in view.
108


”

“¢pID YOU FIND ANY ONE?’ THE MAN WHO HELD ME ASKED.
THE COMET’S CREW. IIl

“ Not a soul; the boy must have told the truth.”

«What did you fire at?”’

“Martin thought he heard something moving behind
a bush, and took that method of making certain.”

«He deserves to be shot for doing such a thing when
we know beyond a peradventure that the Yankees are
near by, for some of the crew must have come ashore this
morning.”

Now that I knew Donald Fyffe had escaped I was so
rejoiced that only with difficulty could I prevent myself
from crying aloud in exultation; and that he might have
more time in which to get away in case any of these men
were still doubtful regarding my statement, I said to him
who held me:

“The orders this morning were that all hands should
remain on board.”

« How was it you came ashore?”

“I’m only a green hand, and Abraham Dyker, who
accompanied me, was excused from duty because he
had not previously asked for liberty.”

I think all the Britishers believed what I said, for they
at once appeared to be more at their ease, and my captor
cried, in the tone of one accustomed to authority :

“Tt is possible this boy is the only one we have to fear,
and it will not be a difficult matter to keep him quiet.
Bring from the boat that which will serve to tie him, and
then you who are to return to the Port must set out at
pm Onces.

“Ts the prisoner to be gagged ?”’ the sailor asked.
I12 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

« There is no need of that at present, and I am not of
the mind to. cause needless suffering. It were better to
kill him offhand, than do such a thing.”’

“Tt is unsafe to spare his life, unless it might be we
could take him to the Port with us.”

How it might be that good could come to me by
remaining where I was, I knew not, yet a terrible fear
came into my heart when they spoke of carrying me
away.

There was every reason to believe Captain Tom would
not suffer me to remain in the Britishers’ hands without
making some effort towards my release, although I had
little hope any portion of the Comet’s crew could arrive
until after many hours had passed. Then, most likely, these
Britishers would be joined by the others in the plot, and
with this thought came the realisation that it was possible
my uncle might believe it unwise to risk the lives of so
many in order to rescue a useless member of his crew.

My captor put an end to a certain portion of my
anxiety, however, by saying, decidedly:

“We'll keep him with us, for it may be he can give
valuable information.”

“ Perhaps, — if he will talk,” the sailor replied.

“Unless he’s remarkably thick-headed he will not refuse
to answer any question we may put to him.”

This ended the discussion, and five minutes later I was
tied hand and foot, as only a sailor can bind a lad, and laid
on the ground in the midst of the thicket where the party
had been hiding, after which the two seamen and one of
THE COMET’S CREW. 113

the other men went towards the shore, as I believed, to
obey the command that had already been given.

Were I to set down here all the thoughts which came
into my mind during the next three hours, very many
pages would be required, and the patience of whosoever
might read them be severely taxed.

It is enough if I say that I suffered as keenly as ever a
lad could suffer, fearing lest the Britishers from the Port
of Spain would arrive first, and Captain Tom, thinking he
had only five men to contend against, should send a small
squad which might be easily overpowered.

Then there came into my mind the fear that, if an attack
were made, I would be shot offhand in sheer wantonness,
or that many of the Comed¢’s crew would lose their lives in
the effort to aid me.

Although I shuddered at the thought of going into
a British prison, it appeared to me just then as if it were
better Captain Tom should allow these fellows to carry
me away unmolested, rather than make any effort towards
effecting a rescue.

When -I had thus decided, I remembered that, even
though no one came to my aid, a battle must ensue, if
I had understood aright the words used by the Britishers
before they were aware of my presence, and as to this last
I believed there could be no mistake.

They meditated an attack upon the Comet, and fighting
would be done, however Captain Tom might act in the
matter which particularly concerned me.

As nearly as I can now judge, three hours passed from
Ii4 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

the time I was first made prisoner until a boat-load of men
arrived from the Port of Spain.

They numbered twenty, were well armed, and, as it
then seemed to me, were the scurviest lot of scoundrels
I had ever seen together.

From the conversation which followed immediately after
their arrival, I judged that this was but a small portion of
the party who proposed to make the attack, and that boats
were to be sent, one after another, at intervals of half an
hour or more.

None of them appeared to think that those aboard the
Comet might be aware of this gathering, and the newcom-
ers laughed and talked without heed or caution, as if the
Yankee privateer were one hundred miles instead of only
one mile away.

During perhaps ten minutes these last comers boasted
of what they would do, making no secret of the fact that
an attack was meditated upon the Comet, and amused
themselves by taunting me, or otherwise acting the part
of bullies.

Then suddenly, when I was least expecting it, a volley
of musketry rang out, the bullets coming from every
direction, as if this particular portion of the wood was
entirely surrounded, and here and there one of the
bullying Britishers dropped to the ground, or reeled
to and fro as the blood streamed from a gaping wound.

It was as if my heart actually leaped into my throat,
and, as when we attacked the Portuguese brig of war,
danger was forgotten in the excitement of the fray.
THE COMET’S CREW. Ir5

The Britishers were like men paralysed by fear; not
more than four or five had sufficient presence of mind to
discharge their weapons until a second volley was poured
into the crowd, and then they were so reduced in numbers
that resistance would have been worse than useless.

The crew of the Comet had come to my aid, and in such
numbers that there could be no question as to the result.

Those of the Britishers who remained unharmed an-
swered the second volley by discharging their weapons
without being able to see the enemy, and, when the re-
ports had died away, I heard the voice of Captain Tom,
shouting :

«You are surrounded by a force five times that of
yours, and no man can be accused of cowardice who
surrenders under such circumstances. We offer you
quarter, and if it is refused not one of you will leave
this place alive!” ;

The Britishers did not wait to consult with each other.
Those who had: swaggered the most threw down their
weapons first and cried lustily for mercy, while even the
braver members of the party, among whom I counted my
captor, understood that there was but one course to be
pursued.

Now the crew of the Comet advanced until they formed
a complete circle around the enemy, and the first face I
recognised was that of Abraham Dyker.

There were not less than fifty of our men all told.

The Britishers were ordered to fall into line, searched
to make certain they had no weapons concealed about
116 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

them, and then marched up the shore towards the schooner,
after which Captain Tom set about ascertaining the condi-
tion of those who had been wounded.

While this was being done, Donald Fyffe came to my
side, and but few seconds were spent in setting me free.

“T got well away before hearing any sounds which told
of pursuit,” he said, in reply to my eager questioning, “and
you may be certain, Stephen Burton, that I made good use
of my legs between here and the spot where we had left
Abraham Dyker. The two of us pulled for the schooner
with all speed, and once I had gained speech with Captain
Tom, the matter was as good as settled.”

“Did he make any question about sending the men to
my relief?”

“Any question? He appeared to be almost beside
himself with anxiety, and the men were told off, armed,
and rowed ashore with the greatest possible speed. I be-
lieve that in less than half an hour from the time Abraham
Dyker and I stepped on board, this force was on the way
to set you free.”

“ Surely you must have loitered somewhere, for it has
not taken all this. while to cover that short distance?”

“Captain Tom was not satisfied with the capture of the
two who remained with you; but, believing others would
come from the Port, waited until the boat-load arrived,”

There was no time for Donald to tell me more just then,
because Captain Tom ordered us to assist in carrying the
wounded to the schooner, and we laboured at such task
until the afternoon was well-nigh spent.
THE COMET’S CREW. 117

Learning from me that another boat-load of the Brit-
ishers would arrive in half an hour, Captain Tom made his
arrangements to guard against a surprise, but we saw no
more of that enemy who had so suddenly come to grief on
the island of Trinidad. ;

Most likely the next party which arrived at the rendez-
vous saw the signs of conflict, and, rightly understanding
what had happened, returned at once, for, although sharp
watch was kept during the night, we saw nothing of
those who had counted on capturing the Comet and her
prize.

It was said among the crew that Captain Tom and the
first officer discussed the question of sailing down to the
Port of Spain when the wind should spring up, and bom-
barding the town; but better judgment must have pre-
vailed, for, on the morning after I had been rescued, the
Comet and the Bowes put to sea with a southerly wind,
which admitted of our setting all sail.

Before leaving port, the prisoners, and we now had
upwards of thirty, were equally divided between the two
vessels, the brig taking her share and shaping her course,
as Abraham Dyker believed, directly for Baltimore, while
we stood off to the eastward where it was reasonable to
suppose we would come across some of the enemy’s
merchantmen.

Captain Tom made no remark either to Donald Fyffe
or myself regarding our misadventure on Trinidad, which
had gained for him no less than nineteen prisoners, and I
fancied he was not displeased with the part we played,
118 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

poor though it was, for from that day he treated us as
members of the crew rather than as boys.

After the exciting events which had gained for us one
prize, the ten days which followed our departure from the
island seemed most monotonous, for during that time we
sighted but two sails, one of which proved to be a French
ship, and the other an Italian brig.

As Abraham Dyker said, “It was as if the Comet had
outrun her good luck,” and more than one of the crew
began to grumble because there was no further show of
prize-money.

Then, on the fourth day of the month, after every one
had begun to believe we ought to seek out a new cruising
ground, a third sail hove in seek.

When our Baltimore clipper started in pursuit, the
stranger crowded on all canvas, thus giving us good
reason for believing that she was a British merchantman,
although it seemed strange to find such a craft alone in
these waters.

It was nearly sunset; we had made a stern chase of it
more than four hours before being able to say positively
that the stranger was a full-rigged ship, and by that time
the lookout hailed the deck with the report that on the
starboard bow was a second craft, having much the
appearance of a man-of-war.

“The ship most likely carries a rich freight, an’ this
‘ere newcomer is convoying her, or I’m a Dutchman,
which I ain’t,”’ Abraham Dyker said to Donald and me,
when we consulted him regarding the situation, for by
THE COMET’S CREW. 119

this time we two lads were as keen privateersmen as
any to be found on board.

«In that case, Captain Tom is likely to haul off and let
the ship go free,” Donald suggested, whereupon Master
Dyker laughed boisterously.

“Ts that what he did when the Portuguese brig of war
tried to interfere?”

“But this last craft is larger than the brig. I heard
the first officer say, after having been to the masthead,
that he believed she was a frigate.”

«ven that will make no difference to the skipper of
this’ere schooner. We shall do the best we know how to
overtake the ship, and, if the frigate interferes, itll be
so much the worse for her.”

From what we had already seen of the Comet's captain,
there was every reason to believe the gunner spoke only
the truth, and we were not greatly surprised when it
could be seen that we were in good truth chasing the ship
without giving heed to the other stranger.

We overhauled the chase in fine style, keeping her well
in view all the while, for the night was not dark, and
before midnight two matters seemed certain to every one:
the first, that we should come up with the ship before
morning, and the second, that the craft on our starboard
hand was an English frigate, carrying, most likely, four or
five times our weight of metal, and very nearly the Comet's
equal in point of sailing.

It can well be fancied that no one thought of going
below that night.
120 : THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The watch off duty remained on deck, gazing alternately
at the fugitive and the pursuer, and speculating, each with
his neighbour, as to whether it would be possible to escape
the frigate should Captain Tom undertake to capture the
ship.

The crew were gathered in little knots, talking eagerly
as they watched, and, by moving slowly around among
them, Donald Fyffe and I were able to gain much valu-
able information regarding this business of privateering,
which at times. rendered me so timorous, and again so
forgetful of danger.

Hardly one of our men — not even the first officer him-
self — believed it would be possible for the Comez to make
a prize of the ship unless she was willing to engage with the
frigate, which would have been almost certain destruction,
and therefore we wondered, as the hours of the night
passed, why Captain Tom did not take advantage of the
opportunity to run away from such a dangerous enemy.

When the sun rose next morning we were within a
mile, perhaps less, of the ship, and not more than five
times that distance astern was the frigate, looking wonder-
fully large under her enormous press of canvas.

“If we overhaul the chase it is a question of taking
possession and sneaking off in less than half an hour, for
there’ll be little more than that much time allowed us,”
Abraham Dyker remarked, with an air of exceeding wis-
dom, and at that instant came the order for the crew to
go to quarters.

Captain Tom was about to take even more desperate
THE COMET’S CREW. 121

chances than when he cut out the fleet which was
convoyed by the Portuguese.

There is little need for me to say that the Comet was
handled in the most perfect fashion, for our crew to a
man believed that never a better sailor trod the deck than
he who commanded the schooner.

Sailorly qualities would not go very far, however, if
once the frigate came near enough to give us a broadside,
and just at that time I wished Captain Tom was less
venturesome.

However, the opinion of a powder-monkey is of but
little value, as was shown before this day came to an
end.

Less than ten minutes after sunrise we sent a shot
from our ’midship gun over the ship, and, the invitation to
heave to not being obeyed, two well-directed balls knocked
the splinters from her after rail, wounding one of the
officers and the helmsman.

Then it was that she swung around in obedience to our
demand, without so much as firing one of the four guns
on her main-deck.

“Her captain counts on our not being able to get off
with her,’ Abraham Dyker said, as we came about, and
the orders were given to lower away the long-boat. “ Of
course, she’s got no show against us in a fight, but, by
surrendering now, counts on being immediately recaptured
by the frigate, and ’twixt us three, lads, I'm ‘not certain
but that her commander is in the right.”

Although we had no business to do so, Donald Fyffe
122 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

and I ran on deck, and there saw that a prize-crew was
being rapidly told off, in command of the third mate.

Captain Tom had made preparations for taking posses-
sion before going through the formality of hailing the
prize, and it was just as we came on deck that, standing
on the rail near the main-chains, he shouted :

«What ship is that ?”

“The Adelphi, of Glasgow.”

« What is your cargo?”

« Silk and tea.”

At this information the crew set up a shout of triumph,
for she was a rich vessel indeed, and would bring every
one of us, even Donald Fyffe and me, a large share of
prize-money, if we could get her into port.

I heard one of the older seamen speculating as to how
she chanced to be where we had found her, with such a
cargo; but at the moment it was of little importance to
me, —I thought only of the amount she represented.

“JT am sending a crew aboard of you,” Captain Tom
shouted. “Muster your men amidships, and turn over
the command to the prize-master. By obeying orders
you will receive proper treatment.”

«“T shall not be so foolish as to resist, if that is what
you mean, more especially since yonder is one who will
speedily set this matter to rights,’ the commander of
the ship replied, stiffly, and Captain Tom said, with a
laugh :

«JT will make it my business to give the frigate all
the work she wants during the next four and twenty
THE COMET’S CREW. . 123

hours, therefore do not build too much on what it may
be possible for her to do in your behalf.”

I heard some of those on the ship’s quarter-deck laugh
scornfully, as if believing Captain Tom was making idle
talk, and well they might, for the idea that a schooner of
the Comet’s size would dare attack a 74-gun frigate did
indeed seem ridiculous.

In an incredibly short space of time the men detailed to
take possession of the prize stood on her decks, and so
near were the two vessels to each other that we could
plainly see all which took place.

Her captain went through the form of surrendering,
immediately our men were on board, and Donald and I
understood from the movements that the crew were being
sent into the forecastle.

Then the Comet stood off, as if eager to engage with the
frigate.

The oldest sailors aboard looked at Captain Tom in sur-
prise which amounted almost to bewilderment, for we did
not doubt but that it was his purpose to try conclusions
with this enemy, whose single broadside could send us to
the bottom.

I heard more than one of the men exclaim angrily
against what seemed to be little less than madness, and
from the words of fear which escaped from the lips of
those sailors who were accounted as among the bravest
of us, I knew that the danger into which we were running
was unusually great.

Alarmed, more because of what I heard than what I
124 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

knew of my own knowledge, I motioned for Donald to
follow me, and went below, that we might consult Abra-
ham Dyker.

« Standing off for the frigate, eh?” the gunner ex-
claimed, as if doubting the statement, and even when I
assured him that such absolutely was the case, repeating
what some of the men had said, he did not believe me, but
craned his head through the port, where he remained
several moments, as if doubting the evidence of his own
eyes.

When he drew in, there was an expression on the old
man’s face very like that of fear, and it can well be fancied
that Donald and I were not comforted thereby.

«JT have known Captain Tom for a dare-devil sailor this
many a year, but never did I believe him capable of such
folly as that which he now seems bent on ; but it’s none of
our business, lads,” the old man added, as if with an effort.
« We'll stand by, obey orders, and if it so be that the Come
goes to the bottom, we'll drown with her, which is a better
way of going out of the world than falls to the lot of many
a poor sailorman.”’
CHAPTER VIII.
A BUSY DAY.

E bore down upon the British man-of-war until we
were so near that more than one of our crew rec-
ognised her as the famous brig Surprise, and I'll venture
to say her people were as much astonished by our temer-
ity as Donald and I were alarmed.

It was much like a gnat attacking an eagle, and yet
Captain Tom stood aft conning his little craft with appar-
ently as deep satisfaction as if he were going into battle
with the odds all in his favour.

Although the manoeuvre was venturesome, it proved to
be without foolhardiness, and again did we have an exhibi-
tion of our commander’s skill in such matters.

When we were run to within range of the frigate, —
and it was during this time that we were in the greatest
danger, because she might have given us a broadside, —
the Comet luffed. Word was passed to the port gunners,
and in a twinkling we sent a mass of metal aboard the
big Britisher, at least two balls hulling her, according to
Abraham Dyker’s declaration.

Then, with the same swiftness of movement, we wore
around until the schooner was running directly away from

125
126 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

the frigate, without having received so much as a single
shot in reply.

«J reckon we can tease the big fellow a bit, until he
will be glad to look out for himself and let the prize crawl
off,” Captain Tom said, with a look of satisfaction, to the
first officer, and that gentleman replied, gleefully:

«We'll do it, sir, and two or three more such raps as
the last will set them to thinking that a craft of this size
ain’t to be despised, even though she carries only eight
guns.”

By this time the crew had come to understand the sit-
uation, and a shout went up from the men such as amply
atoned for all their grumbling.

What followed after this I am unable to set down prop-
erly because of my ignorance, which might cause me to be
misunderstood.

This, however, is what Donald and I saw, and told in
such language as may be understood better than if I
floundered about to find the proper sea-terms.

It grew to seem even more like a combat between a
gnat and an eagle than when we first bore down upon the
frigate, for the little Comet darted here and there, now de-
livering a single gun with telling effect, and again letting
fly a broadside, but all the while moving so swiftly, and in
such devious and unexpected courses, as to avoid the fire
of the enemy.

It is not true that we escaped wholly without injury.

Twice did the frigate give us a broadside, and no less
than a dozen times fired two or three guns at the same.


A BUSY DAY. 127

moment ; but with all that we were struck fairly by only
three balls, and not one of these inflicted serious damage.

We suffered some loss in our rigging, but nothing more
than could be readily repaired ; and all the while our prize
was crawling rapidly away from her convoy.

Twice the frigate would have left us to go in chase of
the richly laden ship, but Captain Tom continued to do so
much mischief that the big war-vessel was forced to give
us her undivided attention, and every now and then be
plumped a solid shot aboard in such fashion as to do
considerable damage.

Donald Fyffe and I did our full duty in bringing up
ammunition from the magazine, while we also found time
to watch the unequal contest, either through one of the
ports, or by slipping up on deck now and then, and when
we had buzzed around our huge enemy for half an hour,
stinging him here and there in such a manner as must
have caused pain, I grew quite puffed up, until I ventured
to say to Abraham Dyker that I believed of a verity the
Comet could capture the frigate in due course of time.

“You have much to learn regarding naval affairs, lad,
and it is seldom you venture an opinion without exposing
your ignorance. I am free to admit that the schooner has
been handled in shipshape, Bristol fashion, but, at the same
time, we have had considerable luck on our side. Now,
I am willing to predict that if we keep up this ’ere sort
of sport a great while, the Comer will eventually find her-
self in a tight place, and one hard knock from the frigate
is all that’s needed to send the little craft to the bottom
128 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

mighty sudden. We're doing well, and there’s good cause
for crowing, but I’m complaining that you crow a bit too
loud, as all young roosters are apt to do.”

After such a snubbing as this I had sufficient sense
to hold my peace, but I noted the fact that our schooner
could dodge the big craft with but little difficulty, and
firmly believed Captain Tom might keep up this sort
of battle until nightfall without putting the schooner
“into a hole.”

Not until the ship was hull down in the distance did
the Comet draw off, and then, understanding that he could
not overtake the prize, the commander of the frigate gave
us more attention than was pleasing.

When we attempted to run away he gave chase, and
for a time even Captain Tom looked serious; but we all

_knew now, beyond a peradventure, that, whatever might
befall the schooner, the prize was safe from this partic-
ular frigate.

During the first hour the huge war-vessel seemed to
gain upon us, and then, as though the little schooner had
suddenly scented danger, she seemed to take a leap ahead,
after which it could be readily seen that we were drawing
away from the enemy.

When two hours had passed, the frigate was still pur-
suing, but fully five miles astern, and the men had settled
down to their duties or their rest as if we were alone upon
the ocean.

Twice had Captain Tom displayed his wondrous skill as
a privateersman, and although this was but the fifth day of




“DURING THE FIRST HOUR THE HUGE VESSEL SEEMED TO GAIN
UPON US.”

A BUSY DAY. I31

February, we had sent two prizes home, one so valuable
that, even though we made no other capture during the
remainder of the cruise, our share of prize-money would
be large.

At nightfall we hauled around in order to return to the
cruising-grounds between Cape Verde Islands and the
Caribbean Sea.

Next day each man on duty was watching outboard
eagerly, for success made us avaricious, and we hoped to
add another to the list of vessels which the little Comet
had,taken since the war began.

No sail of any nationality was sighted during this twelve
hours, and we turned in, hoping for better things on the
morrow, to be aroused shortly after daybreak next morn-
ing by the cries of those on duty, as they announced to
their messmates below that a fleet of nine merchantmen,
convoyed by an armed brig, were off the starboard
bow.

Donald Fyffe and I made no delay, and as we tumbled
up on deck, I thought, with no slight degree of pride, that
we were rapidly becoming privateersmen, owing to the
fact that the prospect of cutting out one or more prizes
from this fleet, with the probability of an encounter
with the brig, failed to bring about the usual attack of
timorousness.

Abraham Dyker was standing by the starboard rail
amidships when I came below, and it was but natural my
-first desire should be to hear his opinion of what might be
accomplished, for I had come to know that he understood
132 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Captain Tom and Captain Tom’s motives as well, if not
better, than any other man on board.

“Jt is like to be a busy day with us, lad,” the old man
said, as he pointed leeward, where I could see what might
well have been mistaken for tiny flakes of white clouds on
the horizon. ‘ The captain of this ’ere schooner isn’t one
who counts what may be against him, as you have already
had good proof, and I say again it’s. like to be a busy
day.”

«How is it possible the lookouts can decide that there
are nine merchantmen convoyed by a brig, when all the
craft are so far away ?”’ I asked, in surprise. .

“The glass will show what stands but faint to the
naked eye, and besides all that, a sailor, more particularly
a privateersman, needs only a hint to tell him what is
ahead. The lookout scents prizemoney from them ’ere
bits of white yonder, and the thought of it sharpens his
vision.” ~

At the beginning of this cruise I should most likely
have asked Master Dyker whether Captain Tom would
dare venture among a fleet which was watched over by a
man-of-war brig, but now I knew full well what his course
would be, and glowed with what I considered honest pride
that an uncle of mine should be so brave a man.

«You will tassel your handkerchiefs in great shape this

”

cruise, lads,” the old gunner said, gleefully, and then
added, in a different tone, “unless it so be that Captain
Tom Boyle finds himself confronted by a Britisher who is

his equal in seamanship.”
A BUSY DAY. 133

“Then what will happen, Master Dyker?” Donald
asked, .

“In that event it will be a case of the difference in
metal, and he who carries the least must go under.”

“Which is the same as saying that the Come?’s cruise
would suddenly come to an end, for we are not likely to
find many of lighter armament than ours,’’ I replied, with
a laugh, and immediately afterward wondered why I was
not alarmed by such a possibility.

The old man must have understood that his remark
might make us uneasy, for he added, quickly :

“There is one thing you lads must learn if you count
on making your mark as privateersmen, which is, never to
think of disagreeable matters when we are about to go
into action. There’s the fleet, — nine of ’em, — with only
one brig as protector, and it’s hardly eight and forty hours
since we picked up the richest prize that will sail into
Baltimore this year, out from the very nose of a 74-gun
frigate, coming away with no more scratches than was
good for us.”

There was little need of this encouragement, for Donald
Fyffe and I were so eager the Comet should be at her
work once more that it was as if no danger might be
. apprehended from our attempting to cut out one of the
merchantmen.

As we felt, so did all the crew.

The watch below had clambered on deck at the first
- intimation that an enemy was in sight, and there was
much boasting among the men as they talked eagerly of
134 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

‘what we might do, until one would have said a hundred
swarms of bees had taken possession of the schooner.

No one thought of breakfast, —at least I saw no one
with his pannikin of food and hook-pot of tea, such as
would have been the case at this hour on almost any other
morning, and I do not believe a single member of the
Comet's crew went below save when absolutely ordered
there.

Our little clipper overhauled the fleet as she pleased.
Had the merchantmen been close-reefed and we with
every cloth drawing, the race could not have been more
one-sided.

As we came up, hand over hand, the Britishers dodged
here and there, for all the world like a flock of chickens
when a hawk is nigh, and the clumsy armed brig wallowed
towards first one and then another of the frightened
brood, as if to say she would afford protection.

Two months prior to this day I should have felt the
cold chills of fear running up and down my back at the
thought that the schooner might be forced to defend her-
self against the brig, but now it seemed as if all the odds
would be in our favour, even though the convoy carried
at least two guns to our one,

It was grand to watch our captain and his crew, as the
Comet, keeping well to windward of the fleet, that she
might head them off as a dog does a flock of sheep,
bore up for the fastest sailor of them all, leaving the
more clumsy ones for the last, or, as Abraham Dyker
put it, “the tail-enders of the fleet we'll gobble up by
A BUSY DAY. Tes

way of dessert, after attending to the more hearty
food.”

I say, it was grand to watch all hands, as the schooner
approached these vessels; there was an expression of
satisfaction and confidence on every face, telling that,
although we might find ourselves opposed by a heavy
fire, there was no doubt in the mind of any one as to the
final result.

“What with the two prizes we've already sent home,
this day’s work will run off our cruise in proper fashion,
and there’s not a Yankee privateersman afloat who’ll
finger more money than each of us, as the proceeds of
two months’ work,” Master Dyker said, rubbing his hands
gleefully.

“You speak as if we were homeward bound,” Donald cried.

“And that’s exactly the course we'll be on, when the
day comes to an end.”

«Flow do you make that out?”

“Tt’s easy figgered. How many of them bloomin’
Britishers can we take?”

«Every one, if it so pleases us,” I replied, and the old
gunner nodded approvingly.

“Right you are, lad; but we can’t keep on sending
away prize-crews without soon coming to an end of our
shipping-list, and by the time we've satisfied ourselves
from this ’ere fleet, I’m allowing we'll find it necessary
to put into Baltimore for men.”

I now understood that the old man was right, and the
information both pleased and saddened me.
136 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

It would be a fine thing to show ourselves at home with
a long string of prizes; but yet, so great had become for
me the fascination of such a life, I would willingly have
foregone the pleasure in order to remain at sea, despoiling
the enemy.

But what I may have thought has little to do with what
we did, on this sixth day of February, in the year of 1813.

When the Comet had run to the windward of the entire
fleet, she bore down for the foremost, and at this time the
armed brig was three or four miles astern.

The leading craft proved to be the brig Adexis, of
Greenock, and her skipper was a wise man, for he made
no show of resistance when Abraham Dyker sent a round-
shot just ahead of him as a signal that it would be best
for him to heave to. ;

The brig came up into the wind, and Captain Tom
hailed, as usual, learning that she carried two guns and
eighteen men.

Ten of our crew were told off to take her into port,
which would not be a long job, because of her sailing
qualities, and they at once set about boarding the prize.

Then it was that an accident occurred, which could not
have been foreseen, but which most likely changed Cap-
tain Tom’s plans considerably, since it gave the remainder
of the fleet an opportunity to crawl out of our way.

The sea was running high, but not dangerously so, yet
the long-boat was swamped through the fouling of a fall,
and a good hour was wasted before we repaired the
mischief, and threw our men aboard the A/exzs.
A BUSY DAY. 137

This had given the fleetest of the vessels an opportu-
nity to run off to leeward, and allowed the dull sailing
armed brig to come up on us.

The prize had no more than been put on her course for
Baltimore, when the Britisher opened fire, and we had an
exhibition of the poorest shooting it has ever been my ill
fortune to see.

His shot struck ahead, astern, and over us, without so
much as starting a rope, and Captain Tom took it all
quietly, as if ashamed to fight with so clumsy an op-
ponent.

No less than a dozen shots had been fired by the brig
without provoking a reply from us, and I asked, impa-
tiently, as I stood near Abraham Dyker’s gun:

‘Does Captain Tom count on letting that Britisher do
as he pleases with us?”

“Tt’s more than likely he’s getting considerable sport
out of it, though I blame him for allowing our crew to see
such poor gunnery. If you or Donald Fyffe, who have
never handled anything bigger than a musket, couldn’t
come nearer the mark with this ’ere bit of metal,’ and
Master Dyker patted the breech of his gun affectionately,
“T’d never let myself be seen speaking to you.”

“But a shot may come aboard by accident,” Donald
grumbled.

“T reckon Captain Tom will get into position before
that happens,” and the old man spoke as if well content
to await the pleasure of our commander before opening
the sport.
138 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Then it was that we saw how much truth there was in
Donald’s suggestion.

A round-shot struck our port rail, and we below could
hear the splinters flying, although no cry of pain gave
token that any of our crew had been hurt.

«Now the Britisher will get a lesson, I’m thinking,”
Abraham Dyker said, grimly, as he sighted his gun at the
brig, which was coming into view through the open port.

Before I could have counted ten, the order came for a
broadside, and I watched the old man with the keenest
interest. ;

Instead of discharging his piece instantly the word was
passed, he waited until the swing of the sea brought the
brig and schooner nearly on the same level, and then
the gun spoke.

Heeding not the fact that I might be in the way of
those who worked the piece, I leaned far out of the port,
watching the flight of the shot, which I could see dis-
tinctly until it found its target in the port quarter of
the enemy, sending a shower of white splinters in every
direction.

“That’s what you might call a fair shot, though I
counted on striking a bit lower. With our broadside
of six pieces,we have sent six balls aboard the Brit-
isher, and I allow he'll think matters are not going all
his own way.”

What was being done on deck, I had no means of
knowing, save as the crew passed the word now and
then, but in a very short time I understood that the
A BUSY DAY. 139

Comet had turned on her heel, because the order came
for the starboard gunners.

The pieces were discharged with as much precision as
the others, and immediately afterwards we heard a great
shout from those on deck.

“She’s struck her colours, I’m allowing,” Abraham
Dyker said, grimly, as he tried in vain to get a glimpse
of the enemy through our port.

“Surely the battle can’t be over as quickly as this!”
I cried, in surprise.

“There’s good reason why the Britisher is sick of the
scrimmage, for I’m counting that our two broadsides have
cut him up in fine style. We on board the Come? are not
given to much wasting of ammunition.”

“But you're not equal to the task of disabling a brig
with twelve shots.”

“T’ve seen it done.with one, before now, and on board
this same little clipper. If you are doubtful, go on deck,
and then come back to tell me what’s to be seen.”

Donald Fyffe had already started for the hatchway,
and I followed at full speed, gaining the deck above just
as the brig’s maintopmast toppled over the rail.

There was no question about her having surrendered.
Her ensign was no longer to be seen, and she had the:
appearance of a craft that had been under fire two or
three hours.

The rigging, cut in a hundred places, was swaying to
and fro like the ends of thread in a’ snarl that has been
severed by a pair of scissors, and I could plainly see great
I40 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

blotches of blood on her white decks, as if it had been the
floor of a slaughter-house.

As she swung partially around, showing her stern, we
read the name “ Conqueror, Liverpool,” and Donald cried,
with a laugh:

« The last two letters should be changed to ¢ d, and I’m
not certain even that would be exactly right, for she’s been
whipped rather than conquered.”

He was not the only one who had some apt remark to
make concerning this war-vessel, which had been reduced
to subjection in less than eight minutes from the time we
first opened fire, and all were exceedingly merry, when a
hail from the lookout caused some of us considerable
anxiety. :

“That sail to windward, which we took to be a mer-
chantman, has the look of a man-of-war! ie

Captain Tom apparently gave no heed to the informa-
tion, save by one quick glance to windward, but continued
his arrangements for taking possession of the prize.

The captain of the Congueror, on being hailed, an-
nounced that he had twenty-three wounded men in the
cockpit, and two had been killed outright. The brig’s
hull was wounded in several places, but the injuries
could readily be repaired. The rigging was so cut up
as to render the craft unmanageable, and therefore he
had thought it the better part of valour to surrender,
rather than longer receive our deadly fire, to which he
could not reply.

This last prize carried one hundred and forty-three men.


“THE RIGGING, CUT IN A HUNDRED PLACES, WAS SWAYING TO
AND FRO.”



A BUSY DAY. 143

Even after twenty-five had been killed or wounded,
there were still too many to be guarded properly by such
a crew as we could spare from the schooner, and Captain
Tom ordered that sixty should be brought aboard the
Comet.

“J don’t know where he'll stow ’em,” Abraham Dyker
muttered, as the work of throwing the prize-crew aboard
was begun; but this did not disturb me as much as did
the fact that we were rapidly weakening our force, and
down to windward, now not more than four or five miles
away, was a new enemy, whose gunners might be more
experienced than those on the Conqueror.

«The man-of-war will be upon us before we can trans-
ship the men,” I whispered to Donald, and for reply he
pointed grimly to a new sail to leeward, which also had
much the look of an armed vessel.

«We are like to have even a busier day than Master
Dyker predicted, and, however good a seaman Captain
Tom may be, it will not always be possible for him to
hold his own against overwhelming odds. He'll find
his match some time, and it may be before sunset.”
CHAPTER IX.
OVERWHELMING ODDS.

OR the first time since leaving Baltimore I saw a look

of disquietude on the face of Captain Tom, and it can

well be imagined that this did not tend to revive my
courage.

After our men had been sent on board the Conqueror,
there were only sixty-three of the original crew remaining,
and upwards of ninety prisoners.

While fighting at long range we had men enough on
the schooner to handle her properly; but, once we should
be boarded, the Come?’s cruise would come to a very
sudden ending.

These thoughts were in my mind as I alternately gazed
at Captain Tom and the brig of war, which was bearing
down upon us so rapidly.

He gave his orders as calmly and quietly as though we
had time and to spare for the work in hand; but I noted
that both he and the first officer were very careful there
should be no loitering on the part of the men, nor need-
less idling in taking the prisoners aboard.

I question if the captain looked at: the approaching
enemy oftener than once every five minutes, yet I knew,

144
OVERWHELMING ODDS. 145

from what I had read on his face, that he was not easy in
mind regarding the outcome of this matter.

As the moments passed, the stranger to leeward came
nearer, until, by the aid of glasses, the lookout announced
that he made her out to be a merchant ship, and this
information appeared to please Captain Tom wonder-
fully.

The Comet lay by the prize until our men had been
thrown aboard and the prisoners secured, when the cap-
tain shouted, as he stood on the rail :

“Crack on all possible sail, Mr. Sinclair, for the brig
has shown herself to be a poor sailer, and you must con-
trive to run away from any enemy, however small, rather
than take the chances of fighting while your prisoners are
many and your crew few. Keep the old hooker smoking
through it, and have a care that the Britishers are well
secured.”

Then the brig was brought around on her course, and
to the surprise of all, Save, possibly, the first officer, the
Comet was headed for the stranger to leeward, while
the man-of-war was no more than two miles away.

Once we were laying in the same course as that of his
Majesty’s brig, we could see how superior the Comet was
to her, in point of speed, and a more comforting feeling
came into the hearts of all, if one can judge by Abraham
Dyker’s words, five minutes after we set forth in pursuit
of the ship, and were in turn followed by the man-of-war.

“We can show that brig our heels whenever it pleases
us to do so, and there is much satisfaction in knowing you
146 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

can readily run away, if matters are not wholly to your
liking.”

«T have heard you say that Captain Tom would not run
for anything smaller than a 74-gun frigate.”

« And I maintain that same now ; but we have been
working a queer kind of traverse this day, and we will give
more heed to prudence than if we had cruised around two
or three weeks without having come across a Britisher.”

« There will be scarce time to make a prize of yonder
ship, even though she shows no resistance,” Donald said,
thoughtfully.

«Ten minutes will answer, I reckon, for Captain Tom
has a knack of working lively, and then it will be a case of
amusing the brig till the prize-crew get the ship out of the
way.”

Surely there would be no more than ten minutes in
which to capture the craft, put our men aboard, and get
her under way, for the brig was coming down upon us in
fine style, even though we outclassed her in speed, and I
doubted very seriously whether even the captain of the
Comet might be able to push the job so rapidly.

I believed he was only making a feint at taking the ship,
in order to draw the attention of the man-of-war from the
prize we had started towards Baltimore.

We approached within a mile and a half of the ship
before she appeared to understand our intentions, and
then every effort at escape was made, which last fact did
not displease us, since we were thus steadily drawing
away from the brig, and I hoped most devoutly that the
OVERWHELMING ODDS. 147

merchantman would give us a good chase of at least an
hour.

In this I was mistaken, however.

Although, as we afterwards learned, she was a Liverpool
packet, we could have come nigh to sailing directly around
her, and, in half an hour or less, a shot was sent across her
bows with Captain Tom’s compliments, as a request that she
heave to, and do us the favour of changing commanders.

No attention was paid to this first demand, and another
shot was fired, the ball going so close aboard that spray
must have been dashed on to the deck.

Then, instead of coming up into the wind, we saw her
crew go to quarters, for she carried four guns; but before
they could train one upon us, the schooner luffed, and
word was passed below for the gunners to be ready to give
her a broadside.

Close aboard as we were, our six guns, served as they had
been when we attacked the armed brig, would have swept
the ship’s crew from the deck, and I doubt not but that we
could, thanks to the’ skill of our gunners, have reduced her
to a wreck.

Her captain must have been much of the same mind,
for before the command to fire could be given, his ensign
was lowered, and we had made our third prize on this

sixth day of February.

' The brig of war was coming down upon us in grand
style, and Captain Tom, determined to make all possible
profit out of this day’s business, spent but little time in
ceremony.
148 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

He did not even so much as hail the prize; but we read
the name Dominica on her stern when the surge of the
sea threw her around, and in less than five minutes from
the time her ensign came down, fifteen of our men were
being transferred to her decks.

It was a wofully small crew for so large a craft, but
no more could well be spared while the war-vessel was so
near at hand, and I heard Captain Tom advise the prize-
master to enlist from among the prisoners such men as he
believed could be trusted.

«Tt is not overly safe, shipping a crew in that way,”
our commander said, “but better take such chances than
lose the ship outright, for she will prove as valuable a
capture as any we have made.”

This was to the boatswain, an old seaman and a
thorough navigator, who had been appointed _ prize-
master, and had stopped to speak an instant with Cap-
tain Tom before setting forth on what was most certainly
a ticklish command.

We stood by her only until our boat returned, and even
while she was being hoisted inboard word was given to put
the schooner about.

The time had come to give our attention to the brig of
war, who was now almost within range.

I had supposed we were to engage this vessel, which
the first officer claimed to recognise as his Majesty’s brig
Swaggerer, carrying sixteen guns, and a hundred and ten
men; but, as was shown, Captain Tom could be prudent
when necessity arose.
OVERWHELMING ODDS. 149

Instead of so much as firing a single gun, the Comet
was hauled up on the wind, her best point of sailing, and
away we flew, gazing astern with no little anxiety to learn
whether the brig thought it wisest to pursue us, or retake
the Dominica.

There was more glory to be gained in the capture of
a privateersman like Captain Tom Boyle, than in the over-
hauling of half a dozen prizes, and we were no more than
well on our course before the Swaggerer gave chase.

I have always wondered why she fell so neatly into
Captain Tom’s scheme, for her commander knew beyond
a question that our craft could outsail his, and while he
might have accomplished something by retaking the prize,
he could hardly hope to run us down unless some accident
befell the little clipper.

Most likely he counted on bringing about that accident
himself, for from the time the chase began, until we were
beyond range, he kept his bow guns working, and thereby
lost much headway, without doing us any harm whatsoever.

We were not forced to take his fire more than half an
hour, and then the Swaggerer was so far astern that it
would have been wisdom on the part of her commander
had he put about and busied himself with some other
matter.

Greatly to our delight, however, he held doggedly in
the rear, and we had the pleasure of seeing the last of
our prizes disappear from view while he yet remained in
pursuit.

Although we were fleeing from the enemy, our crew was
150 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

a happy one during this day’s flight, and every man had
reason to be in good spirits.

We had taken three prizes since morning, one of them
an armed vessel, and were getting away scot free, with
no more to trouble us than the decreased number of the
crew.

But our good fortune was not ended.

At two o'clock in the afternoon, while the Swaggerer
persisted in continuing the hopeless chase, we made a
small craft directly ahead, and an hour later had taken, at
the expense of one single charge of ammunition, the sloop
Jane, of Hull.

Six men were thrown on board of her, and with no more
of a crew than was absolutely necessary for the proper
working of the Comet, we continued on our flight, convoying
this last prize.

«Jt’s too much luck for one twelve hours, altogether
too much luck,” Abraham Dyker said, in a tone so mourn-
ful that Donald and I could not but laugh. “The Comet
must run up against something that will give her trouble
before many days, or I'll say she’s bewitched.”

“The saying won't make it so, Master Dyker, and we'll
hope you know nothing whatsoever about the matter, for
it would be hard indeed if so glorious a cruise as this
should end with misfortune.’

The old man turned away suddenly, as if vexed with
himself for having spoken, and Donald Fyffe and I gave
ourselves wholly up to the assurance and satisfaction of
the present, as indeed did nearly every one else on board.
OVERWHELMING ODDS. ISI

Not: until sunset did we run the Swaggerer below the
horizon, and then the Comet was jogged on under easy
sail, the little schooner Jaze being sent forward at her
best pace, for it was in the highest degree essential her
voyage to Baltimore should be made in the shortest
possible space of time.

Next day it was whispered among the crew that we
were homeward bound.

One of the men, who had been standing his trick at the
wheel, claimed to have heard Captain Tom say to the first
mate: .

“We'll take good care to keep in the rear, but on the
same course with our prizes, and I’m a Dutchman if we
don’t get into port within twenty-four hours of those
we took to-day.”

No one whom I heard speak on the subject doubted the
truth of this statement.

The Comet was so short-handed that we could not hope
to take any prize, except we should pick them up as in the
case of the _/aze, who had been unattended by any convoy,
and it was like a wilful waste of time to loiter around
half-manned, when we could ship all the sailors that might
be needed, in less than one day, at Baltimore.

Now, instead of speculating as to what the day might
bring forth in the matter of prizes, the men discussed the
chances of running the blockade without mishap, and
the possibility of our losing some of the vessels we had
_ captured ; for it was one thing to take a prize, and another
to get her safely home.
152 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

During three days we held steadily to the course which
would take us to the home port, and then came what
seemed to prove that Abraham Dyker was a prophet of
no mean powers.

Just at sunset, on the night of the third day after we
had shaken off the Swaggerer, the lookout reported a sail
three points off the weather-bow, and Captain Tom, will-
ing to add one more to the list of his prizes, even though
we were homeward bound and short-handed, gave orders
to crowd on all possible sail.

The night was so light that the man at the masthead
could keep the chase in view with a glass, and at midnight
we came to understand that, fleet though the Comet might
be, there were other vessels afloat which might be able to
outstrip her.

So far as could be seen, we had not gained any very
great advantage over this stranger; but the course that
she held was our own, and nothing would be lost if we
failed to overtake her, although all hands would have been
greatly disappointed at being thus convinced that our
Baltimore clipper could be beaten.

Donald Fyffe and I turned in shortly after midnight,
and came on deck again at sunrise. ;

“Yes, we have gained on her; but not so much as will
admit of our doing a great deal of crowing,” Abraham
Dyker said, as we stood by his side, looking out over
the waste of heaving waters at. the white cloud which
we knew to be the object of our chase. ‘“She’s holdin’
her own in great shape; but, excepting it falls calm, ’'m
OVERWHELMING ODDS. 153

allowin’ we shall be near enough by sunset to make her
show her colours. Captain Tom’s worked himself up into
a tremendous fit of passion, because we’ve been staying so
long behind, and if you want to get points on how a
schooner should be sailed, watch this craft to-day.”’

“What do you make her out to be?” Donald asked.

“A fulLrigged ship, with somewhat of a man-of-war look
about her.”

“We might wish she could outsail the Comet, if she
proved to be one of his Majesty’s vessels,’ Donald sug-
gested, gravely, and Abraham Dyker replied, with assur-
ance :

“There's little to be told with certainty from the
top-hamper of any craft in these days.”

“Still she might prove to be a man-of-war, and it would
be a serious matter, short-handed as we are, if the Comet
found herself in too close quarters with such a craft, for
it has been already proven that we should stand a poor
show at running away.”

“True for you, lad; but at the same time you can
count on it, that Captain Tom won’t let the chance of
picking up a rich ship slip him, because of the fear that
she may turn out to be a man-of-war.”

“As the day grew older we could see —and it can well
be fancied that every man aboard watched the progress of
the chase with keenest interest —that we were gaining
slowly ; but when the night came, the Comet had not so
‘far lessened the distance that we could determine her
character.
154 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

The night proved to be a dark one; the sky was cov-
ered with heavy, low-hanging clouds which shut out every
ray of light, ahd it was as if we were sailing through
darkness that could be felt.

If the ship had observed us during the day, and desired
to escape, now was come her opportunity, for we could do
no more than hold our course as we had been doing,
trusting to the chance that hers would not be changed.

To see her even at intervals was absolutely impossible,
and on we went blindly, the little schooner forced to her
utmost speed, despite the fact that the wind had freshened
until there was danger we might jump the spars out of
her by very press of canvas, while at times she laboured
heavily in the swell.

After the darkness came upon us, and we had no
means of knowing how the chase might be progressing,
the men speculated among themselves as to the character
of the ship.

The majority of the crew, and I learned that this also
was Captain Tom’s opinion, believed the stranger could
not be a British man-of-war; otherwise, on seeing us, she
would have come in pursuit, instead of running away, as
it now appeared that she was doing.

But for this, which pointed so strongly to the supposed
fact that she was a merchantman, eager to avoid meeting
with any other craft, we might have been more careful,
taking due precaution lest we should come upon her
during the darkness.

That she was running away seemed positive. Although
OVERWHELMING ODDS. 155

there was a possibility that we had not been seen, it was
extremely improbable such careless watch would have
been kept on board a war-vessel, therefore I maintain
that Captain Tom was justified in doing exactly as he
did.

At all events, whether we were wise or foolish in thus .-
blindly chasing the big craft in the night, we did so, and
yet he who would have reefed down under the circum-
stances could not have been called an overly cautious man.

Captain Tom never started a rope.

The Comet staggered on under every inch of canvas
that could be spread to what was now more than half
a gale, at times so nearly burying herself beneath the
mountainous waves that our decks would be awash from
bow to stern, and he who held not to the life-line stood
good chance of being carried overboard, where his ship-
mates might not give him aid.

Towards midnight, when the gallant little schooner was
making exceedingly heavy weather of it, and every timber
was groaning in protest at the enormous strain which was
put upon it, Donald and I, in our quarters below, were
actually labouring to prevent being thrown from the
bunks by the violent motion of the vessel, when he said
grimly, as the schooner remained motionless for an instant
in the trough of the sea:

“It seems to me useless to discuss whether it be wise
or foolish to keep up this chase, because it can never
“amount to anything.”

«Meaning that the ship will outsail us?”
156 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

“No; but that there won’t be enough left of the
schooner by sunrise to admit of your calling her a priva-
teer. From the noise, I should say each timber was chaf-
ing against the other, and that in time, perhaps not a very
long while, she must fall asunder from very violence of

* her own motions.”

Of course I understood that Donald exaggerated when
he said this was his belief; but it surely was my fear that
our spars would go by the board, for I question if the
Comet’s builders had ever counted on such mad work as
Captain Tom was doing this night.

It was three o'clock in the morning when, unable to
sleep because of the din and the violent leapings of the
schooner, I scrambled on deck, standing half sheltered in
the companionway, where I could dimly see the forms of
two men, who were buckling to the wheel with every ounce
of their strength, trying to hold the schooner steady on
her course.

The first officer came near where I stood to look at the
compass, and, leaning forward under the shelter of the
companionway that my voice might not be literally blown
away, I asked of him if we were yet carrying all sail.

“Ay, lad, every stitch; but why are you on deck?
Better remain below, where there is less danger of your
being knocked over the rail when we take one of these
green waves aboard.”

“Tt is impossible to sleep there, sir, and too much work
to try to hold oneself in the bunk. Think you the spars
will stand the strain which is upon them?”
OVERWHELMING ODDS. 157

“They must, or else go by the board, for I warrant you
there will be no shortening of sail this night.”

It was quite as difficult work to hold myself in the com-
panionway as in my bunk, and I joined Donald Fyffe in
the second mate’s room,

It was impossible for us to hear each other speak save
at such rare intervals as the schooner remained compara-
tively stationary, and until the day began to dawn we
could do no more than cling to the sides of the bunk and
tremble with apprehension regarding what the next moment
might bring forth.

Towards daybreak I fancied the schooner was running
more easily, and when the first light of dawn could be
seen, Donald and I ascended the companionway once more,
just in time to hear an exclamation of dismay and surprise
burst from the lips of the crew.

The ship had not changed her course during the night,
and we had held as directly astern as if the helmsman
could keep her spars in view ; but it were better we had
not done such skilful work at the wheel.

Less than half a mile away, in the act of wearing that
she might salute us, lay a huge man-of-war ship, rising
and falling on the swell, rolling at times so that we
might see every foot of her deck, and again reeling until
the bright copper of her hull was more than half exposed
to view.

“Tt’s the Azbernia!”’ I heard the first officer, who had
his glass to his eyes, say to Captain Tom. “Do you know
how heavy a ship she is, sir?”
158 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET..

«Eight hundred tons, and carries twenty-two guns, if I
remember aright.”

«With a couple of hundred men, I suppose.”

«Ay, as many as that.”

« And she can outsail us?”

. “I am not prepared to say quite that,’ Captain Tom
replied, ‘‘ but certain it is that it’s useless for us to attempt
to run away.”

At this moment I saw a small ball of bunting being run
up her main-rigging, and in another instant the red cross
of St. George was broken out.

“ There goes her challenge,” Captain Tom said, grimly,
“and we must accept it whether we will or no.”

«You have often fought the Comez, sir, with great odds
against you,” the first officer replied, gravely, “but I ven-
ture to say you were never so heavily outclassed as at this
moment.”

:

“That is true, but at the same time we must fight, or
surrender without a struggle, and I choose the former
course,”
CHAPTER X.
A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT.

HE Comet was regularly trapped, although the Brit-

isher had not had much of a hand in bringing about

this state of affairs, save by a neglect to keep proper
watch.

It was indeed as Captain Tom had said: we must either
fight, or surrender without striking a single blow; and I
dare set it down as a fact, that his crew were of one
opinion with their commander.

Matters might have seemed different if our situation
had been brought about by carelessness or foolhardiness ;
but every man Jack of us understood that in this case no
one could be blamed.

Who would have believed that a man-of-war could stand
on her course all day without becoming aware that she was
being followed by an impudent little schooner ?

We could not run if we would, and when Captain Tom
gave the command which sent us to quarters, a hearty
cheer was given by the crew, as if they would thank him
for not flinching when it seemed most likely the end of
the Comet and all on board was nigh at hand.

It must be remembered that the little schooner’s crew

159
'
160 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

was, on this morning, considerably less than one-half the
number shown by the articles. What with the loss in
killed and wounded, and the prize-crews which had been
furnished, it was as if we were absolutely short-handed,
and, as a matter of fact, we had no spare men on
board.

When, during the engagement which was so near at
hand, one of our gallant fellows should be disabled, there
was no hope of filling his place, since every one, even
Donald Fyffe and myself, had some important duty to
perform. ;

The first mate had taken charge of the ’midship gun,
throwing aside his rank for the time being, and Captain
Tom acted as his own sailing-master. In fact, he was
the only officer in charge of the deck when we beat to
quarters.

I was stationed at the main hatch to repeat the cap-
tain’s orders to those below, and Donald Fyffe undertook
single-handed to serve the gunners.

We could hear the ship’s crew going to quarters imme-
diately after we hove in sight ; but that was to be expected,
and it neither hurried nor flurried us.

I fancy we were all of much the same mind. With our
small crew it seemed impossible we could do more than
show our willingness to fight, and the belief that our last
day on this earth had dawned prevented those who other-
wise might have been faint-hearted from giving way to
fear.

We were standing face to face with death, and at such
$

A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. 161

a time, except one be the veriest coward, there is no place
in his heart for timorousness.

Captain Tom was never much given to words, and that
he should have attempted to cheer us on this morning
shows that he believed the situation was as grave as it well
could be.

“The odds are against us, lads,” he said, standing near
the main hatchway that all might hear distinctly, «but you
have fought many times against heavier metal than yonder
ship carries, and have won the day. See to it that every
shot counts, and remember the Britishers are not over-
gentle with prisoners of war taken from privateersmen.”’

Once more the crew cheered, and with such good-will
that those on board the ship must have heard them and
wondered why the Yankees were in such good spirits when
their plight was so serious.

After having addressed the crew, Captain Tom turned
his attention to the schooner as he tried to get the
weather-gage of the enemy, for by this time I question
if he would have beat a retreat had it been possible, and
during half an hour or more the two vessels circled warily
around each other in the hope of gaining an advantage.

While this was being done, the Britisher fired five or six
shots, hoping most likely to cripple us, but none came
aboard, and our men howled in derision because those on
the big craft were thus trying to gain yet more advantage.

“Why don’t you stand up to us like men?” Abraham
Dyker cried, shaking his fist through the open port in
impotent rage. “With twice our weight of metal and
me

162 : THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

more than four times our crew, it would seem as if you
might open the battle in more gentlemanly fashion!”

Donald Fyffe had served all the ammunition that was
allowed on the gun-deck at one time, and now he came to
my side, for there would be nothing further for him to do
until our guns began to speak.

“JTt’s a large contract Captain Tom has on his hands
this morning,” he said, with a brave show of cheerfulness,
«and even though he fills it to our satisfaction, there’s
little to be got in the way of prize-money.”

«T’m thinking we may be accounted victors if we hold
our own,” I replied, with a laugh, for it is indeed true that
I felt no timorousness now, even though affairs for us
looked so dark.

« And in doing that many of us must lose the number
of our mess, Stephen Burton. If I should be among those
who do not answer to their names when the engagement
is ended, will you say a good word for me after you have
arrived home?”

« Not one, Donald Fyffe, but a thousand! Should it be
I who comes not out alive, I’ll trust you to do the same
for me.”

He took my hand in his, and there we sat, looking into
each other’s eyes with but little heed to what might be
passing around us, until Captain Tom cried, sharply :

«Stand by at the main-hatch. Let the port gunners
make ready!”

I repeated the order loudly; Donald darted below to
his station, and, looking out-board, I saw that we were
4A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. 163

passing the big ship at hardly more than the distance of
a musket-shot.

We would give him our broadside, but must receive
his ; and, without being well aware of what I did, I shut my
eyes that I might not see the deadly missiles when they
came screaming towards us.

It was as if both broadsides were discharged at the
same instant.

I felt the little schooner tremble under the concussion
of her own guns, and also heard the enemy’s shot, as they
tore through our rigging.

The ship’s guns had been aimed high, but they did a
deal of execution among our running gear, and our fire
had been more destructive, though perhaps not so
mischievous.

Great gaps could be seen in the ship’s bulwarks; two
of her ports had literally been torn into one, and just
above the waterline I saw a jagged hole, telling that she
had one. wound which must be attended to immediately.

This first broadside surely counted for us, and the
men cheered again and again as they clambered here and
there aloft to repair the damage temporarily, while their
comrades below answered right merrily.

The Comet could be handled more quickly than the
ship, and the Britisher was yet coming around when
-the schooner was in position to use her starboard
guns.

I repeated the orders the captain gave, and a moment
later we could see great showers of splinters from the
164 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

Britisher’s bows, -telling that once more our fellows had
done their full duty.

Then we were about again before the ship’s guns could
be brought to bear on us, and Captain Tom shouted,
joyously :

«That round was in our favour, lads. We gave her
two broadsides for one, which helps to even up the odds.
Half an hour more of such work, and she'll be in shape
to consider our proposition for surrender.”

Five minutes later the battle was on again, and then it
was that the British gunners were more true in their aim.

One ball hulled us, and to me, who was leaning over
the hatchway at the time, looking down, it seemed as
if the entire crew of one gun was swept away by the
splinters.

«What’s the damage below?” Captain Tom shouted,
and I replied, as soon as it was possible to make out
the situation :

« Six wounded, sir, and all from one gun.”

The captain ordered some of those who were above,
working the schooner, to go below, and from that mo-
ment it seemed to me as if the guns of both vessels
were discharged in rapid succession, until the time came
when the engagement ceased, because neither Britisher
nor Yankee was in condition to continue it.

After the third broadside had been fired, great clouds
of smoke enveloped the schooner, until it was impossible
for me to see on either hand. Even the captain, as he
stood near the wheel, was shut out from my view, and
A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. 165

I question whether the gunners could see their tar-
get.

More than once I heard ominous screams from the gun-
deck, and knew our little crew had been still further weak-
ened ; but after the first bloodshed it was impossible to
make-any report to the captain.

The men below were too busily engaged to permit of
their searching around to see who had been killed or
wounded, and I question if Captain Tom himself would
have been willing to inquire.

We were in the heat of battle, and, even though half
our crew had been disabled, those who were yet unharmed
must keep up the work, for none of us had a thought of
surrendering, however sorely wounded our gallant little
vessel might be.

And we were being severely punished, that I
understood, even though it was impossible to see any-
thing.

Our foremast was gone, and the mainmast tottering,
when the schooner rose on the swell or reeled under the
concussion of her guns. I heard one of the men say
the bowsprit was hanging under the stem, and the ends
of severed rope that swung here and there amid the
smoke told of the mischief done aloft.

Then came a lull, as when two fighters pause for

- breath, and after the smoke had so far cleared away that

I could dimly see the ship, it was as if I looked at a
wreck. It did not seem possible our guns could have
done so much execution, particularly since very many of

hy
166 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

the shots must have been sent at random; but yet the
work of destruction was due wholly to us.

I believe that even then both vessels were unmanage-
able, and yet, immediately after the smoke-cloud lifted ever
so little, the gunners were at work again.

It was no longer a question of seamanship, but of
endurance.

The groans of the wounded, the splintering of spars or
hull, and the roaring of the guns were all blended into one
hideous uproar, wherein no one sound could be distin-
guished from the others.

When two hours had passed, —the time I afterwards
learned from Captain Tom,— our mainmast went by the
board; but the work of destruction did not cease.

The captain of the ship hailed to know if we had sur-
rendered, and was told that there was no possibility of our
ever doing that.

“Our flag was carried away by the fall of the mast,”
Captain Tom replied, as if apologising because the stars
and stripes were not in full view, “but it shall be re-
placed in such position that you will be able to see it
every time the smoke lifts. Main hatchway ahoy!” he
added to me, “let the gunners serve more grape, and
less round-shot !”

The Comet’s ensign was raised on a fragment of the
foretopmast lashed to our shattered rail, and the battle
went on until the smoke-cloud was so heavy that the gun-
ners were forced to wait while it cleared away somewhat.

Then we were at it again hammer and tongs, and every
A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. 167

now and then would come Captain Tom’s command that
the carpenter sound the well.

As regards the flight of time, I could not have said
whether one hour or ten had passed when the firing
slackened, but Abraham Dyker believed we had fought
almost continuously with every gun that could be brought
to bear, for at least five hours, and from that out the
pieces were served less rapidly.

Oftentimes as many as five minutes would elapse with-
out a shot from either vessel, so weakened were the crews
of both, and had the Comet been fully manned I believe
of a verity we might have won the day.

More than once did I think the Britisher had struck
his flag, so long did he remain silent; but his men were
as full of pluck as ours, and we fought spasmodically until,
as I learned later, the engagement had continued for eight
hours.

At the expiration of that time it was the big ship, not
the little schooner, that turned tail.

The Aibernia’s flag was not lowered, but she made
every effort to get out of our range, we firing at her all
the while, but too badly wounded to be able to give
pursuit, and then the engagement was at an end.

From early morning until past noon the crew of each
vessel had been trying to kill, that the English King
might be given another lesson, and both craft were little
better than wrecks.

Exhausted though our men were, they crept on deck
when the Britisher was beyond range, and shouted loudly
168 THE CRUISE OF FHE COMET.

in triumph, for we had really won the battle because it
was the ship that first left the field, and every man fell to
congratulating his neighbour on the brave fight, regard-
less of the fact that the schooner might even then be
sinking beneath our feet.

A half-naked, powder-begrimed figure clasped its arms
around my neck, and I knew for the first time in many
hours that my comrade had come out of the conflict
unharmed.

«We could have captured that ship had our full crew
been aboard!” Donald Fyffe cried, as if he had not yet
gotten his fill of fighting. ‘We might have taken one
more prize, Stephen Burton, and wound up our cruise in
a most glorious fashion !”

“To what end? We should have had on our hands
only another wreck, for the Azdernza is cut up as badly as
the Comet, and I think it stands us in hand to learn if we
have a chance of making port.”

«Whether we do or not, we have given the Britishers
such a lesson as they won’t soon forget. A schooner but
little more than a hundred tons whipping a ship eight
times her size is something well worth remember-
ing!”

The scent of battle was still in his nostrils, but I, who
had remained inactive during all that terribly long engage-
ment, could better understand what price was paid for the
victory.

I was forced to learn more regarding the cost than I
cared to know, for at the moment Donald ceased speaking
A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. I 69

Captain Tom ordered me below to see how many had
been injured.

It was a gruesome spectacle I saw in the gloomy
~ cockpit.

Sixteen wounded men, some of them stricken unto
death, and on the gun-deck, where they had fallen, three
lifeless bodies.

I hurried back immediately this information had been
gained, for it sickened me to remain in what seemed like a
human slaughter-house, and made report to Captain Tom.

He received it with an air of relief. It was as if he had
believed many more had fallen, and, although the number
was great in comparison with the size of our crew, we had
come out of the conflict better than he expected.

Then he turned his attention to the condition of the
gallant little Come, and here the Britishers had made
themselves felt.

I can best describe the appearance of the schooner by
saying that she lay on the surge like a complete wreck,
She was completely dismasted; the port rail was gone
clean from stem to stern, and on the starboard side only
here and there portions of it remained. There were ugly,
gaping wounds in her hull, —twenty-eight, as was learned
by actual count ; and through more than one did the water
pour in until we were like to be swamped offhand.

Every man fit for duty was summoned to the work of
setting a jury-rig, that we might crawl into some port for
such repairs as would enable us finally to make Baltimore,
and there was but little time spent in eating.
170 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

It was necessary the men be fed after some fashion, for
we had gone into action before breakfast, and it was now
nigh to supper-time, but we ate standing, and some of us
even as we worked.

Abraham Dyker had come off free save for a bruise on
the shoulder, where he had been struck by a splinter, and,
although he must have been exceedingly lame and stiff, he
refused to remain below, but did his full share of a sea-
man’s duty during this time when we were trying to patch ©
the little craft to prevent her from sinking.

“A man who has come as nigh to losing the number of
his mess as I, and yet got off with his life, should work to
prove his thankfulness,” the old gunner said to me, when I
asked why he did not go on the sick-list. ‘My mate was
killed by a blow that did not seem half as vicious as the
one I got, and I’m at a loss to know why my life has been
spared, unless it is that I may do more than he could
towards working the little Comet into port.”

Well, we got the schooner under jury-rig before day-
light next morning, and crawled rather than sailed away,
shaping our course for Porto Rico.

During three long days and nights we, drenched to the
skin all the while, literally pumped the Comet into the
harbour, and at once set about refitting, for it was by no
means safe to lie where a British man-of-war might spy
us out at any moment.

Here we learned that the Azbernia had made St.
Thomas, and that she had lost, during the engagement,
eight killed, and thirteen wounded. Moreover, it was said
A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. I7I

she had been so badly hulled by our shot that it would be
necessary to put her on the ways, all of which meant that
she would not be in condition to trouble Yankee vessels
for three months or more.

Of doings at Porto Rico it is not necessary to write,
for all the while every member of the crew was working
with might and main to get the schooner fit for the home
voyage, and in three weeks we were under way once more,
' looking forward to the night when we should try to run
the blockade into Baltimore.

When we were finally arrived it was as if the British
fleet had suddenly deserted their stations ; for we sailed up
the bay without so much as seeing a single sail, and the
cruise of the Comet was ended at nine o’clock on the
morning of St. Patrick’s day, when we made fast to
the dock while, as it seemed to me, every man, woman,
and child in Baltimore stood round about cheering and
shouting as if all had suddenly gone mad.

We could the better understand why such a hearty wel-
come was given us, when we learned, to our exceeding
satisfaction, that every one of our prizes had reached port
safely.

But the welcome we received! I almost feared Donald
Fyffe and I would not make our way through the throng,
every member of which insisted on shaking us by the
hand, until the day was ended, and we were both eager to
see our parents.

«Tf my mother were here that I might feel her lips on
my cheek once more, I would not grumble at the delay,
172 THE CRUISE OF THE COMET.

since it is caused by such good-will for us all,” I said, and
the words were no more than out of my mouth when the
best friend a boy can ever have stood before me, struggling
to get near enough for an embrace.

Now the throng might cheer and yell, and impede my
passage as they would, I no longer had any desire to force
my way through, for I was indeed at home, whatever
might be the surroundings, when clasped in my mother’s
arms.

It is here that I should bring my poor account of the
Comet's cruise to a close, and if every privateersman can
end the voyage with his mother’s arms around his neck,
he is indeed fortunate ; but many there be who never see
the home-port again, and who must wait for the mother
until she also has crossed the dark river into the world
everlasting.

Donald Fyffe has insisted that I shall add, even though
all the leaves of, my book are full, that the amount of
prize-money earned by the Comer on this cruise amounted
to more than seven hundred thousand dollars; that he
and I had our handkerchiefs tasselled with big, round dol-
lars till the whole was well-nigh a burden to carry, and
that we both sailed with Captain Tom Boyle when he left
port, five weeks after the Comet’s return, in the dainty
brig Chasseur.

Our poor little schooner had received such rough treat-
ment from the Hzbernia that it was decided she could
not be made sufficiently stanch for another privateering
A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. 173

cruise, and Captain Tom was offered the command of the
finest brig that ever sailed out of Baltimore, —a craft
which did so much damage to the Britishers among the
islands of the Caribbean Sea that the merchants round
about begged the English government to send them a
sloop of war for protection, and that same sloop we of the
Chasseur troubled exceedingly, as I may at some future
time set down.

A twelvemonth after leaving the little schooner, which
is to say when we were returned from our next cruise, —
for the first taste of a privateersman’s life had whetted our
appetites for more, — Donald Fyffe and I had so much
prize-money that we bought a full half of the dear little
Comet, and Captain Tom Boyle paid for the other half,
so that the craft which served us so well will never be
put to ignoble uses.

It is in her cabin, in fact, that J have set down all these
words which serve to make up, in my poor way of telling
it, the cruise of the trimmest, most friendly schooner that
ever curtseyed to salt-water surges.

THE END.










PEAT _———=._ _ ———





- ms aes ap oe
ery & eS ee Seamer aes
- 5 pr







xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008697700001datestamp 2008-10-21setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The cruise of the Comet : the story of a privateer of 1812 sailing from Baltimore as set down by Stephen BurtonPrivateers of 1812 seriesdc:creator Otis, James, 1848-1912Shute, A. B. ( Illustrator )Colonial Press (Boston, Mass.) ( Printer )C.H. Simonds and Co. ( prt; elt )Estes & Lauriat. ( Contributor )dc:subject Comet (Schooner) -- Juvenile literature.Young men -- Juvenile literature. -- Conduct of lifeConduct of life -- Juvenile literature.Privateering -- Juvenile literature.Seafaring life -- Juvenile literature.Naval battles -- Juvenile literature.Courage -- Juvenile literature.Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature.Sailing -- Juvenile literature.Ship captains -- Juvenile literature.Schooners -- Juvenile literature.Juvenile literature. -- History -- Naval operations -- United States -- War of 1812Bldn -- 1898.dc:publisher Estes and Lauriatdc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:format 173 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00086977&v=00001002395552 (ALEPH)07178175 (OCLC)AMA0460 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


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'2011-12-30T03:41:04-05:00'
describe
'482443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1220808f94c0e6a8b5129fd26276a3ae
5946d248f5578e69d2c68c544cf7a0125a20eb0a
describe
'70482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c0dccb109a6ceee67aad6e6e8c6f07ea
6016519ef30202740009cde2d3500d309a95a01d
'2011-12-30T03:41:19-05:00'
describe
'13886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
01440426990ee0c16e8d8a2f29fc6e65
5e155cc0a26675e2a27cf95a7097b00f4e9ab23b
describe
'17430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
513f868bf2cb8c113e0f58b276d2ac7e
18b1ef0ab3f2e8881920520f49fc6e8856b29671
'2011-12-30T03:42:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3e9b4b81846a1d358ffff00079930871
469b16f50c15a4c5761a94ad7c897b2c92f8e3c2
'2011-12-30T03:41:29-05:00'
describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0c43a79972061bf1e051d61883ffc607
e7350ed43d49ac63b59c50aa7a31ba111a9bc038
'2011-12-30T03:41:13-05:00'
describe
'3771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
6d6f1488cfdd052465d37bd75e4b77f8
9ee57aca300e4fdae33772245f6ac801fddd3ead
'2011-12-30T03:45:06-05:00'
describe
'482394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c256831ebf791caaa6692e413970b178
3a90a079dcfae0373d4144d4c6779be0f823a4a2
'2011-12-30T03:41:44-05:00'
describe
'39995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
213f9f349b2fa85a8904a0991f531b05
e5be7235a37deb277135b0e07b29b9bca5adce3a
'2011-12-30T03:42:59-05:00'
describe
'7169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5b95b45bd4a47dd754938d398ba5224d
4207f60e904ae39049ecc78ccbb765a4a4fd93d1
'2011-12-30T03:46:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00014.tif'
06612960b44767fee5c92f35b9f4198b
47a01759b355ad81c02d13136e3947537deb8f13
'2011-12-30T03:41:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-30T03:45:56-05:00'
describe
Zero-length file
Zero-length file
Zero-length file
'1546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
1ee569f0b2b146bd708bb66ae599ab67
4eb9f05196130d196a5c892995a821aebbe520d5
describe
'482406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f29332ed7fcd5399150f18dca3c84b55
899495006fb27ccf004db6acf6403c807a7ea9fc
'2011-12-30T03:41:21-05:00'
describe
'52523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
63937b751cd9bc7f5b08baa7a74b1d8b
47ed281ed91bfdcd67b05ca7e8f579973ab549dd
describe
'12855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
023c9f724d9c86a478d20617bbbd85f9
f7f0f41cac62c31f9e58afdff8b5588be89db1b3
'2011-12-30T03:43:26-05:00'
describe
'12104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
c665d43eb8d2c7590a55f41369f79e95
9731635a7376d193b4eefe6e3562748ea0e6cd5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fc1718a24d84360f2a2cb0672667eb9b
036339b5371e1f307404d3fb770b48288ddddff8
'2011-12-30T03:42:08-05:00'
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
9815bd6bf00a25f47c80e6f73b7b16f7
b13c9e4c2403692d3bd462e803654f7d8e3d0628
'2011-12-30T03:41:24-05:00'
describe
'2815' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
afd6918dd4bee91fd6ee3759736875ba
e6b3f09e9ef71cb17023eb08baf9fe17e3d7fa1e
'2011-12-30T03:41:43-05:00'
describe
'482436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
512c892c4722d623aa602b8f836e3d07
db644649fba7729f3cd9ebb6b40512b21eb857f4
'2011-12-30T03:44:49-05:00'
describe
'37889' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
04091156893d121754fc55080640702a
b4dc4f6a3ea288164e0dbdc95316b4fe607ce69c
'2011-12-30T03:41:38-05:00'
describe
'6425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
31c730ef3c8b7de6943a49b39d6db111
f333077290b284bb1a04468ff49aaaaf14af024f
'2011-12-30T03:44:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
0308010f56089dad17955b37156e89b3
c761af3e97d071b20ad99fd97608e22402277578
'2011-12-30T03:44:53-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
18a75c01474242339c4ef828b4c3a226
5749e90cb774a4e44a0dba125ac24b871a030fd4
'2011-12-30T03:45:44-05:00'
describe
'482439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
816e6491d4bc2ffb182c10b58ebfd42d
1ba426736183b8cb06cc594f16e70a7bf212a871
'2011-12-30T03:43:39-05:00'
describe
'70667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
f4d12bb60abc554e83aecb7fb79754ce
add131280c288012a65b04a743dce5d465e0775b
describe
'18831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
b40119d57004c0cd2a27f1a424a58ed4
4108de3684c8d8b116f254fcce1c7e006c8cd61e
describe
'18063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
577475fff177c5f456ce76d01e183ef0
fcd9f1752a71b29e83056ea27a71ae354f34f033
'2011-12-30T03:44:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
dc31f9d33010aa5f17232327804178a9
d5bb7e30e6861c1bf2f0d617c55e5c11f1843c3d
'2011-12-30T03:44:01-05:00'
describe
'701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
481457a97e10ebd7d80eaef803bfc9d3
7f0a10178f59dab97ab8fc5ed38ac818abc903f4
'2011-12-30T03:43:10-05:00'
describe
'4321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULD' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
749b20353be559f34a14375c113cbcc7
e2b12d1020103e24726e702507514f65f1415e81
'2011-12-30T03:45:05-05:00'
describe
'482368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULE' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
20548dcc61bf4103275a945642610254
edadba8b8958e618ae200370d93d1002d18c2888
describe
'39984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULF' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
80c3b47a2440362da19647ecec189807
06e94fcba881a96ed73e85fbae0fde45d9705bbd
'2011-12-30T03:45:14-05:00'
describe
'7006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7d83d640f1cf403ce9d4934b1cbd3ee4
7cab7b3b5ca6d574da94577ac4bde0d816091834
'2011-12-30T03:42:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
f0476b4b6a09f144bbdee5ff0ba575b5
274945d6150105e0eb7b2c6addc435673dd42fc8
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULI' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
1bdf81d724de0bc19676863da6029784
22f3d99cbd014b5dc4acffc11df092fe26a2248c
'2011-12-30T03:44:54-05:00'
describe
'464161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
7c24389cb28f944ebf9274a47a24758b
1a9f6feda1bbf7af698c63b0f5c3d56f16287c4a
'2011-12-30T03:45:35-05:00'
describe
'95375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULK' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
35d72f905fc7f0eddd2607ae1ea2b0ec
04f51b546f0190a8178ca2ab0dc93355d8da591e
'2011-12-30T03:45:09-05:00'
describe
'24903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b481ccefe162c8dbd48a7716a2936a71
b1788c64a338199ac7e2ca4efd9db5d20b922509
'2011-12-30T03:41:26-05:00'
describe
'25150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULM' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5d3cae90c7c887c16dc6256cc5a2e998
515e7b31f93e057363d927f9f6bb0be0f6e6cc1f
describe
'3730784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULN' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d502e5e10a7468de529c4af0771aeba1
0c0ee232db519ce733bbe8b9614c66fa708a9e7d
'2011-12-30T03:41:51-05:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULO' 'sip-files00019.txt'
6d682c0b8e630133da999f44daa2b22a
388ccfe684b041e407561db03838dd45156db558
'2011-12-30T03:44:38-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'5807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULP' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
dd5b224d311ce2183e60a4da5ac5a2ff
57433d6ac4f4eefe1e41da5ecdba10606b525d68
'2011-12-30T03:42:14-05:00'
describe
'482451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
87f2830a5636bcf0677206b7b06747ab
5254b0bda47cc8156124ce16883863988d3ccf58
'2011-12-30T03:44:27-05:00'
describe
'115621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULR' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
6b445ef86fc8ce6815f836706d0ee14f
84b9b290e410167ccb2bdd15c4eff97ee51f2f6d
'2011-12-30T03:46:02-05:00'
describe
'38766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
3e0ae82c4e3fdf78a0f3552dfa587ffb
dcdd803d988d9ee39551c8f517192462bbc60549
'2011-12-30T03:45:42-05:00'
describe
'31595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULT' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
eaaa8501606f6d50f675bb7d34763d76
b6eadfb7c32f099c439b5aad08ec32de98adb703
'2011-12-30T03:46:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULU' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ee01a3e89120fb2a8f23dab3a553d30d
14366c23f759b926b7a94f24c3b0bead13e24ec3
'2011-12-30T03:46:20-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULV' 'sip-files00020.txt'
34d67c925b3403d6f8e7aea0ccaf0f91
15395fa37c01091f50563263a4362721fc478eaf
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULW' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
23cb189fbdb510b20610c140001481c1
974244329272927a1c50d5432c7a4847e9b9bd77
'2011-12-30T03:41:36-05:00'
describe
'482204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
d909d7e1f6f8d83ec2b4f19afd64e6ce
ab426b1fec0cf898b087a13fdb2eb137b828d1e6
describe
'117608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
09fcae5dfc47717b78b7917d09627404
5bfe15fa2f80de6c28f31f771acfb624ab96d01e
describe
'39583' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAULZ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
06867d8ae5b0385a18bb8da85f2c244a
4e675f58249123e80654e10db5ee4977803fdb83
'2011-12-30T03:41:45-05:00'
describe
'32589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
9ace7f33c3016fb9464d4f87b2ac023d
eb0858096b097e98294f6858648456e396b4d430
'2011-12-30T03:45:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
46b5e37bb5d3a463622d2f2ec3c2cf54
14169135f25c89c9d232affbfb89d8c4361a1d2d
'2011-12-30T03:42:10-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e39658222d63220e217c7224ce88caba
248d67e8e3aa23a536f64a6cf2f38abe45910901
'2011-12-30T03:40:57-05:00'
describe
'7107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMD' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5b625aaeb685388abb05640bf38a942a
1766e2a36c6cb0068cf18301a6164d471e2f9cfb
'2011-12-30T03:41:57-05:00'
describe
'482430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUME' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
13c4321b5a264a1c70b4dfd79be999d9
203f1fd432b8aa9ee05b564622d70f93ac506f76
'2011-12-30T03:41:31-05:00'
describe
'115398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMF' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
aea79e488234ec6678d0e2c62c63cc02
15aab8883b0c688fac80e10867f6c38cc4b464d4
'2011-12-30T03:42:30-05:00'
describe
'39643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMG' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7aa4ff2940127d7a67445d2f23cbeb28
66d2c275fe67543c8b41bc5111189e00c9abdb1d
'2011-12-30T03:45:17-05:00'
describe
'31863' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMH' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
551717a9612161902196eb476f2c7ff2
b28df3445ca6ec1daa590c6c88bfd7d1d5f93483
'2011-12-30T03:45:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0dd598a53a955d9f080178a338b2887a
22be3f100f520995e2d0b7de07ab3667ffcb97eb
'2011-12-30T03:43:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
bae69e6009d55a1a3d60c62981c111fe
de1cb8fc2b0304d8842e1990183243815fc6c00a
describe
'7008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMK' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
5e64eb798221e4e255c09999974c2d24
6340496e22250463aae80446674dc8f056963b97
describe
'475487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUML' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
d828146213da123f098c544e21dd6bab
450cdb4815c0fa6802f9455652fd6143723ec48e
'2011-12-30T03:43:11-05:00'
describe
'111091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
898f9e61c660cecdf18890ab959c0619
376375dacd9cd6d40f9c8b42bc924584dd3e1173
'2011-12-30T03:44:32-05:00'
describe
'34717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
da23f6443649af078329dcaa8d114642
c5e8ca126e27e7aecee9698c861409859eaa464c
'2011-12-30T03:41:53-05:00'
describe
'30708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMO' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d3865a8e20e6319060a183220514c3a6
d07a64df85b79290b3e9536093ad7c54acf683bd
'2011-12-30T03:40:53-05:00'
describe
'3820952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMP' 'sip-files00023.tif'
0b5cbccc18e9749f21719c4058a4097b
67f6156ecef50e915874da2b8065e284dc6929e2
'2011-12-30T03:45:43-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMQ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5400a8db6062f61d0f53ca5d43a35d21
09c69415041f784bcfdfe41d11ecd3c68fba88de
'2011-12-30T03:44:19-05:00'
describe
'6986' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
78e55bf13df5973721de96099ed7a0b8
7c26feb51c8c2c7cc09aba1de071c22e3e1aa0d9
'2011-12-30T03:44:58-05:00'
describe
'482415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMS' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
9c0ee9941c35b6eeeea473419bff2293
f375a4c690e5d89377f3b88c2f221f19ee4ea7dc
'2011-12-30T03:42:01-05:00'
describe
'113158' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
13034d4a0347ea3fd2c6ad1ead99501c
6cbd3163b217582d19e674bf906155267017d701
describe
'38719' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
735d18cb70a4106efd5161f99ed3b329
057472d9106a08fd9f2235cc08a6ba3b92fa1af7
'2011-12-30T03:42:09-05:00'
describe
'29937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMV' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
65451ba99fcb62618bf2ee460de963e5
0efa857702b40dbe3fe5a9774d4ad7c23b674e12
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMW' 'sip-files00024.tif'
715d5560571f2993e8278031f89cdf4e
74d16f61242489cbf132c3591e793d8e25e3967b
'2011-12-30T03:43:20-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMX' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f2ff2a7e625e05f1d27ff8e76c13e1fd
5b6d2899fe2944103ed529c602df7a2f407c9505
'2011-12-30T03:42:40-05:00'
describe
'6804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMY' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
cc07eaa6665ef887243ebae55b6f1017
ee46666fa088c2b00ebaf88fc4e2f0b8335a2151
'2011-12-30T03:44:07-05:00'
describe
'466495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
7c93cdbe1d46d5c59a61639ad6855b95
e003f0b46ef1f45814404531d1ae51cb3e94a86c
'2011-12-30T03:42:49-05:00'
describe
'129803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
319342e36bebeca5912c690c880eecfb
59fd181b0c31e53969e75b798279609bd99b3fc0
describe
'2714' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNB' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e27b21681f41559f1d4a6fa3f14bb10b
36fa9f72fbf8ed9fa044bb339b68392baae2cedf
describe
'30450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
65121451024164d0e20cfc37f3c2c058
f32757d80b532973fd2728f65de204277e4aa57d
'2011-12-30T03:44:03-05:00'
describe
'3749280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUND' 'sip-files00025.tif'
df941f2bc1917f52aebc396123da363f
0c06b0ef76a59f9ca529006ee178124654b18005
'2011-12-30T03:44:30-05:00'
describe
'79' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
15d0a0373b65fe6d1994c57d68d87a96
b9e8c8d299012c9ef292adc0c4610436adc229f3
'2011-12-30T03:43:15-05:00'
describe
'7966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9316d0353394a8a426e60eee8780e6b5
fcda5281de7c6d8996d1a18bee8648a77fa6e9eb
describe
'482198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6f7c6ac8dc8fd59dbaee742a78342cb0
49076aa711c31d721a52ce190cb938d0f85c4332
'2011-12-30T03:42:39-05:00'
describe
'34148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c43d8691d1749b10ae069d79d9376a5e
75a0d9a52e579a889d10993c67d9c812efe74321
'2011-12-30T03:42:44-05:00'
describe
'5731' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
188f16db396ff21307f7a3721b891710
2abe669f3a1a55507cb44b3336e4e4bdf0bb7a27
'2011-12-30T03:41:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e02d12dc1b36bed1eb47cca3112b365c
84e0bbe5f93a5e471cacac8c3efc46003bc1ab11
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f20f0360b380fa54d6efd2a692207da9
4fa022b8e4b3419c36de12773b1638ebfabf5f3e
'2011-12-30T03:46:19-05:00'
describe
'477818' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f6a77a85e637e4f8476559481dce5f44
386f01642cce6884ed69a482a5fe24460b7b22c8
describe
'116338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
dcf7be538ffdc4c093218099e6e6fe5c
7c49e6a383eba1de8854baf3b6187b2b03cb0d65
describe
'39151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNN' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d9a47279397410f58b97bb24eda087b5
9f0df09213c505053a2e9148b15df7ae1748e16f
describe
'32358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
6cd567d81a15c80816b7a58183ecf99f
aea3134986331f91b3f1d53bb8dcabff2fb0891d
describe
'3839448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
52cfc103c377c45592df02b49ed92f0b
684fb058c6be8f70a164ec46543063b0f7dc25e6
'2011-12-30T03:42:17-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
15877a731912aefaa4e50d747dcec31f
c5debbe08daf9058e53ae010847462b8ea82bdcc
describe
'7175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNR' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b237c0e9b45f36507a9d9600cad45f31
a006e3d8e8312be4cbd4f8bc0982c9e77399634a
'2011-12-30T03:41:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
00166b1d1f6051bd94f4284371f9417b
8e27fcc0a3bd4b528e92c2438663e93db947c3ae
describe
'116448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNT' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
8571838c52f3d7314f14027f5f429d86
cd11455a8befbd59999a554a23dbf10f99c39727
'2011-12-30T03:43:05-05:00'
describe
'38342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNU' 'sip-files00028.pro'
dbf70ec6b191a22d6f6d5d8c3f556894
8ea59d296148061aa461a8b0d1ab15c759edcfb8
'2011-12-30T03:43:16-05:00'
describe
'31556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
ccaa7323d2de4a176f06bd7c44384d5a
0e1a0a9aaa146361e3e24dff86ed03dc3d98fa7f
'2011-12-30T03:44:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNW' 'sip-files00028.tif'
515d74ef2d3aa81576113f795126e396
a8b37d5c1fb979f8e92daa289db63821508c7809
'2011-12-30T03:45:45-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNX' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ddc56f8686313b6732284e47d88ed2ce
92bab9172c40bf1c00261b843acb95581f0534cd
'2011-12-30T03:43:45-05:00'
describe
'7163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNY' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6f042083e7e6d118f57ed9ed65ed8336
5bbef5aeb8d745dfaccc67ed136aab58ee8b86a7
'2011-12-30T03:45:21-05:00'
describe
'482433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
521ffc4e5fc7086c4df4ee4353710203
730e41d52afd5345e7376f1961e72282cfb49824
'2011-12-30T03:45:28-05:00'
describe
'117528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOA' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e77882ea1a5b6165498b514175248422
d805bdc09cd62a70a55127a7407764a77feb5004
'2011-12-30T03:46:25-05:00'
describe
'38804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9089e8288b36dae66ef8b125debc28de
3e81cb9f63b05cc2fd12d0155457cfe39abc387f
'2011-12-30T03:42:47-05:00'
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOC' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
22a189515d761cc69621361334320499
4a04436c68bdb01b60d7588d0507a87be8494b48
'2011-12-30T03:41:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOD' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d8a8b94d99c38acc7e22e3939309c6a9
63d9a286b312353ad61e26623b52476f9dafb4bc
'2011-12-30T03:45:23-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
24e4c81347de12ecd5d786f9a717d66c
2d123205ac2b6bccb8ee4d2153c996b630d14cbf
'2011-12-30T03:41:27-05:00'
describe
'7063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOF' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
aa76f7329042ca86c0fe267621a302b4
a4c9310aa7bfb45b10ccfd7bab1d9ca9f0dd29fc
describe
'482445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6d6398f08e0955e67e7a6196e1cd669c
99128f5df86f50887edcafcaa1c05f55d59a7049
'2011-12-30T03:45:15-05:00'
describe
'114052' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOH' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5a24f8be38daa1c420017aff994d221e
a88a88fe1270a33222a6c8ec1c425b5ba1ef2e97
'2011-12-30T03:44:41-05:00'
describe
'38471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOI' 'sip-files00030.pro'
95237bb12b90f10dcdfcc47f16234e95
17680d0a6c7518ba147fe59d813b756750d363c0
'2011-12-30T03:41:33-05:00'
describe
'31235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
314373b6e3c1c0fe8100f5b7e0b529b2
64bc7e0a9e602e90d615b4efeed41d0671ff619f
'2011-12-30T03:43:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOK' 'sip-files00030.tif'
76ea028ee0dfd0f2930667a04e7643f7
e1e2d63a300643aeecd4e769404888f835370e3e
'2011-12-30T03:43:40-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOL' 'sip-files00030.txt'
1a6e0b2663c08249a17aed0f3caa7317
04078674289e7b17f96067e50c6aa634379f5c1a
'2011-12-30T03:40:51-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOM' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
449830f2add852057435dca012b9f55c
cf9335f73c08317edec5a9a06d290cc2a336c537
describe
'482404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUON' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9069d636faf9b72dc41017b271377ae0
4deb2ba9357bd4d1268c916793e5e35568f88550
describe
'114932' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOO' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
03ddc887822769799667cfaa59d3cca9
b8fbdc02099de12660ab17b3e3d3381e778988b6
'2011-12-30T03:43:09-05:00'
describe
'39325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOP' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a89f3db57bcfdc9c3367498424d88ae7
df3d50d9f1b3360776229bb209ed2ffbb73eaba5
describe
'31817' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
05c08c26c5ebc6227e7ab54ea7727ff0
e6293c73da6dc75ae5a1aca4891370bace44cdb2
'2011-12-30T03:43:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOR' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0b8c19acc84b2427de7ec509cce7142a
5c0e6d85a1c0326eb7fd2dae06f2343354cf7e97
'2011-12-30T03:46:14-05:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOS' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4d58e5e477f8406ff1b0ae45da33a6cf
670b2912b72416bd2f8dc9bec55396020f8b9950
describe
'7172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOT' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
723ecaefc679d124b23775105b12ad73
402635bcac62167bfb0e1589edb7dd6641d1d121
'2011-12-30T03:45:55-05:00'
describe
'482411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOU' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ba516051c16707174d1ee108f593d001
9c815cd746540b66441c3d0fcf4fdce953310647
'2011-12-30T03:41:18-05:00'
describe
'118290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
596206593f21245d312f6d88949f6cd6
ed6fecd82dd9e1a267f758e106df7ff1578fd7bb
describe
'39771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8902479106be727b2db38f011fdaf82b
3996f9dc2b25439494022e5f5fc90cdf704ba770
'2011-12-30T03:41:12-05:00'
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1f71c4107fa5292d40ef893712274910
adad4197d95884b47466067c3d761b5a756b7d77
'2011-12-30T03:43:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOY' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d4eae6a1faf86196d01e07fee164b7be
6d1cf2dce5ee6694b7e594500c11d9c1d18d5a0d
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c43bed6ab2daccb13fef44673cf10616
bc90da5ea59af6deeffc9a89fbf75d6882bd48cc
describe
'7120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
05480f635df39ea8977d278cfc94244c
812825fa3b9eee59fab758c005eb4bb27add907a
describe
'482428' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPB' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
033cdf390605f2549862863dd4bd6f93
7f849611d9eb826165cdb83272838b08156b0c0c
describe
'109407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5192c4a4d4b98266f65c6d3a42affcfe
41e34b6325b04d5f1195a68b6f3bd2befa50a9d1
describe
'36712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPD' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5eccb00cd6e601123c18a1f397d8694e
0be5b5c7e9350c21c45b7b584f29d9e5f849a086
describe
'29268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
49b354f16156e23d9ae20fcb91f58c7e
5d1d8fcd7cbf04971442c7f34d3720aa4c4c630f
'2011-12-30T03:45:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPF' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f4a58e9916214c35a43e4dab0b2bb1f5
d0f315f85e0f38b118b5ec1aaefb9ed17a90cc73
'2011-12-30T03:40:58-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPG' 'sip-files00033.txt'
bc51f71ec72554323b217900a70b8cdc
de5d1f02b4446cffaa45aa5634ca3ce269519300
describe
'6844' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPH' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7e400c99d20322d7876cd29d0bb73c58
e27260a334919e53eaea0fe190b95e5c39ff644c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPI' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
afafdd3ad089a8a941991e72cbffed72
cf8717467d9bce9146196729282aae5bdcb72a6a
'2011-12-30T03:42:52-05:00'
describe
'115485' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
0ee193a821dcde462536dc4dba5564fd
8b19a82b178cf6a690759098ae56e030d0e9086a
'2011-12-30T03:43:35-05:00'
describe
'39563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPK' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f2c86c533a976da2aee9496713887eb5
f7b3f10c246a58c97ddbfc94eddbd253cf4dfb15
'2011-12-30T03:41:08-05:00'
describe
'31143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPL' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
b2090b1290b1d6e1c348a57033baf9e2
e8ba5f3965639bd8c93512a4a11fdfb7552537ab
describe
'3876432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPM' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0a39bc036fac7755d27f6c5619a804bf
74df59396f6fff677c19fd6ddeb75fd53fa343f9
'2011-12-30T03:43:55-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
d262126eb72949a2c34a187cf50bb66f
70c03be78ad48a24248c5f4d7142b160498f2dc3
'2011-12-30T03:45:38-05:00'
describe
'6920' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPO' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
99653ca698eec048836c60eaf2f954cf
5b1017fc88120abfb35940fd3d04a7dceaded495
describe
'482373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPP' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
b102695e700147682018d21839e79149
a65984dd3015878130193c1f2976b15331a87306
'2011-12-30T03:41:22-05:00'
describe
'85921' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
7eec4bed5d221bf929f06b8fd430b80c
f1c0b3b68e857dfe4842721e5675a78d0951068c
describe
'24151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPR' 'sip-files00035.pro'
41caa4253c7c1cea3240417eae4f1a4b
2a9b400b9cc4c3cc96b9d6fb1142b4e5a73db86b
'2011-12-30T03:44:35-05:00'
describe
'22131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPS' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3ff472eb3b7931136550c5fb0aa326db
f067fc737a9830fa0fe64b18f06378743bbc54f7
'2011-12-30T03:42:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPT' 'sip-files00035.tif'
fc78def4d9dd188675f0ccfeb94d0f48
6d67b4dcada943898e3ba698a92fa4e17ff24172
'2011-12-30T03:44:29-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPU' 'sip-files00035.txt'
cdfcf9053e44269f92eb691d64bd22a0
9ef5c1d9b57f5505ab597c3dd15e7c827451e70b
'2011-12-30T03:43:12-05:00'
describe
'4996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPV' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
22013579363f4ce325718cbfa96f3a4a
af8787f367724a68f1c1bb3668060e7bc426773f
describe
'482390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPW' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
76c5b25446a43716d1f4b68fe271859a
514cc3d24b43a9b1149bce720123293ea48b3bb4
'2011-12-30T03:44:11-05:00'
describe
'100900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPX' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
58bd9abe789e92e7ff4798918d41870d
30be84ed356773675a37901803ca9e4c0c11bdf2
'2011-12-30T03:46:11-05:00'
describe
'30410' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPY' 'sip-files00036.pro'
17088cc333c7b9c7bac9a86165455360
ddd7642b24f902c8b0e6af411d3019a38397199d
'2011-12-30T03:45:26-05:00'
describe
'27107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d686e4b897e3393c9d8e585fa7828796
06b60340dae704df7629cf23113359c266b10c99
'2011-12-30T03:45:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
35b48b4a0becafe50876f5c6e8a72563
7fdac3bbaa1e1573803fbe42b846179ac90cc56e
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQB' 'sip-files00036.txt'
bd71a535fc9fad37daeba9eeb3c6713c
da16ccdf195366f1b7a7daf90a456795ee6436aa
'2011-12-30T03:42:19-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQC' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
3eaad8f1dbf3a32b36223a1c1020ebf7
d5fedf766b616768d451a68900f3bd5f7467a9c2
describe
'482290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQD' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
49e84fe3e783d0bc3e5d4ffdf1864750
b749d8ca455bdcd02d72b6b541120e3f303bc253
describe
'117303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQE' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
8dc66a4b5e802eda8f7f92ad3db8ad5a
b12fb3620c9eb504ea31b4425385e423aac974e9
describe
'37992' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQF' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4f033f1a72f388a27438e803ddb283f2
3cbe7b92a59f799e310b3019ba1652ba9c00a720
'2011-12-30T03:41:23-05:00'
describe
'31786' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQG' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b9dd6224c37004b62ca93ac24352d441
c8319a2584422be9dd8f98f21ee303b09cc3a09b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQH' 'sip-files00037.tif'
cb2446db36277bee6526cd3468bf0913
8e78edffdb5edee6b223aab351d98a58c6bc9255
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQI' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b922c02b9552deeece6acf3d8280d2a0
0555581cb23ebf4997139d13590ce14d123bc438
describe
'7523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
522387803360f452d6c4d4e7a6739ef4
cbad2240cea2c4c9bffb1a520af0332e782f1120
describe
'482427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQK' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
63469463b3ef4b1b817e941342416d5c
3bf987f4a29227ba2be8fc85cbea5820a0e57bc3
'2011-12-30T03:42:50-05:00'
describe
'118417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQL' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ffc38de2672d489583dd781f7f269433
cc0607d063e324670300e5e55a7ce554a19043f5
describe
'41330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQM' 'sip-files00038.pro'
7a8a625824d8e31d9fdda01da9f8c02a
26450a433f25886db0244940e2dc3a135f847e6a
'2011-12-30T03:45:10-05:00'
describe
'32583' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQN' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6aae18ec04ef5dbf7559349d6c246b54
2cd7717a404a21b9af820af0c874aa1cdeb7b379
'2011-12-30T03:42:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQO' 'sip-files00038.tif'
e092c0d5fa5e1782bcc3b0234f15122f
17467ab229ebc37daa48080c22f36ddf77202038
'2011-12-30T03:43:22-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQP' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d9ea8ccaacd5c13510cfe9677e981fa1
3342e3c062a728e8e84669055923a242208cd225
'2011-12-30T03:40:55-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
85896e1d6284ad68d8b59dedce59174b
2b47fe51fa8eff367f5b56f75d2b85630be3801e
describe
'482378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQR' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
c07f52b1c0afffe902485846e657d654
2fc01b6ab476f2f8780c396ebaa7eb7cf8aaf3bd
'2011-12-30T03:42:22-05:00'
describe
'125315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQS' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
07ca725c83195e1be3815a28f7317f53
20dc1771ea61c275d34cf41cd1caffc379bac621
'2011-12-30T03:46:13-05:00'
describe
'2020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQT' 'sip-files00039.pro'
af86f9d033a38b01051da9a0613b8aee
c43cbb67bca165b302fc214b2be22854b06219fc
describe
'29995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQU' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
32c6737d151a923838faafdd9483916d
02d262c984fd3b6f8e705aa6f38b200a827e9b75
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQV' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d3e0bf061a278af7bc3c7f6c1962b1ce
fa80cca4c746de8b0d8dab6b5a3a7349a9e1d00d
'2011-12-30T03:44:17-05:00'
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQW' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9c0d0c4b104526615094133d7d0b85ff
c56f0223ac41ed38bb3b32386fef9756787b74b9
'2011-12-30T03:41:42-05:00'
describe
'7781' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQX' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
8a6fda18f9741db1308345541de2c8cb
e98d702820c91870a19033ddde1d94f005aa01a3
describe
'482369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQY' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5104c3be211a99e35c3f90c8285d0a1e
767ffcc6dbc03e0f1323a0ea873fdf295bf27c09
describe
'34925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3a5b9d1db21c0a293d988d265d60e90d
2797db9478fb6858f74822520cc2b716d3936b0a
'2011-12-30T03:45:13-05:00'
describe
'6377' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
6a92517d7270fafea1278224e36f339f
58d8a0d3a98dff972c316cd7d56c4c71fc1f96ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
4e481eefb40643d0e0f916487d220a9f
4ed9a0f17d32f92d7a53cfd6835fdc8e7e772963
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
2fadd9db9067c69ae2eff12505e776f6
08dbab93611dcdc92ae004a7e7c59d4f110ccaf7
'2011-12-30T03:45:51-05:00'
describe
'478650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
3eb7ecb244fdfdc6acae6fd676e859b6
d90e32a958f6ad386b70d64a1d5b5b6740e7c05b
describe
'110161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
3122e617a36c2aa84998684db9f13dcd
e3bcafd67d94b803faaea72e0baa54edb47b5e9a
'2011-12-30T03:46:26-05:00'
describe
'37247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ba900def9fc53e336cc75969c9fdd9dd
1eaf024ee4b9de22ce45f2c24a1ba2b5e3daedc3
describe
'28978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
0dff7a3029ede19d9d845609a16161b9
2899835078b82fcb1288c70d7f57a6b87b62c74f
describe
'3846396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d18e04edb9f9c4fd247450f21ed11e66
9516503ba22e916e6ac46f18635a2d01ec07a490
'2011-12-30T03:43:54-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ba57d3debbc0f9e39711e001e0526578
67cd6bd566fb67e36421c4b2efc43d807be089e3
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
078e4dac63445e604db2b72df89a8570
0d36b79b2e4567ad587bac27c672fe2845923dc8
describe
'482339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9a86d72b5526200b01a83df750b7eb44
95b9b85fd65e9585931a95851230d7504afce2b3
describe
'114125' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
d230b7f5e9f4297df33634c419e41f47
3c1c303479237f4a4bd6e43d16e01cf1cc45b3f7
'2011-12-30T03:42:33-05:00'
describe
'37521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9bcd8a7a0314fe1e75b21f4c00104366
2b0ca84899c011f583f76f8f6e1bccd79a51db8f
'2011-12-30T03:41:10-05:00'
describe
'31845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
384880e0f6e4a50df4868b306b995096
0833f2220c406cf8b22110b059f3303d3e39ed08
'2011-12-30T03:41:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
dec591378d84746b04cd12e8a57ea34c
1b0b71350c3578df02d32f6d66254677cb4717f2
'2011-12-30T03:44:46-05:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
7c41bd7e4ea712f52629638f7b71ffba
cdc187fd559fd7eb94f0eab27e4f0fbd30360a0a
'2011-12-30T03:44:52-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
03c5e882aee87ab2820c8f76461a0386
514a545081943a9047134a2eb5dd2c2735cb29af
'2011-12-30T03:45:33-05:00'
describe
'482447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e3aae39cf9144075a2c8b5122052f183
ee48ace968c39fb2982eead35dd9342fb14379ec
'2011-12-30T03:44:56-05:00'
describe
'110527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
b8e0500b2c8a5fea47708c035be11fbc
d38fc5d55e7eaa1bd78d5468c3a0a8e6240b2702
describe
'37103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
eee547e5ac01129d3a9bcfbc0c59b85a
5444904b58f49b64eaadde507e8916e3b9598de8
'2011-12-30T03:42:16-05:00'
describe
'30329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
9722919c5154220c6a99d1ccafc52c9c
4b9b9468e943bfe5cbbbb83996882344602d27a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
64809f46254971ffe7f58ead26523644
3c3e7a537de1812b2c79b332837c5cf2197b7306
'2011-12-30T03:43:33-05:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6dec5af8439999c6930c5c583f60a82b
fa51bf043fd0db3cb1db1c8959973c0b110e8d90
'2011-12-30T03:43:43-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
68e70c9fe067ce06f936094a084b4782
5f1c26be97a19cc1862775bbf8ffec53fee3b905
'2011-12-30T03:45:08-05:00'
describe
'482350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
46d97e30c4bb3124d820a084d0d58fdb
06e0215b21b74dfed660ed01ad075ce51b8dc871
describe
'110573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAURZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
86f63aebce37db571c6a13698244b5ff
8c28f3c541cd11c1efdfc53e58f4da9ef39ab7f9
describe
'36784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
ab45a8da7b296047d534d776012f25c2
27d17955308529faef6ac9c23465f532d6f00001
describe
'30435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2e8b68eac6e1c80def4dfe3fa4792dcc
e5c07a58653823b28c474306ec4b67ab600a1db0
'2011-12-30T03:42:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d230009f3402b9a061c8fdaa8a7dde9b
2157828b005007902fea18e7bdec21a2dc0521ba
'2011-12-30T03:42:34-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
e9f353928e1cf66c32ac0e33b4775f50
e6e29683c4806d20b190359a969b9bea008acce3
describe
'7078' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSE' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
c2b5c1b00e8745375ed983d44648d06a
bda9dc379c10d2fe0e320281cb3ea8190a41b71b
'2011-12-30T03:46:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8dbf0338a918c5e4663b59a7e65da382
4d256d109e7f1aca83406cd51465decabbe14c3f
describe
'114325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
4ff3b427eb72ee96b5dc10fa404abc2d
60dfec79773f3a13fed857a2ca1f65feb213d611
'2011-12-30T03:42:26-05:00'
describe
'38416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
7bef99cbf391665f7729bb29f6ded15c
14ff76c258dd5950172fc6f3068e48070d01b6fc
'2011-12-30T03:45:01-05:00'
describe
'32230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ac9ffe64f5de979ffdd0d97e5251bd8d
5b18e21f7922529dd44fa7c6fbc2cd6923fee174
'2011-12-30T03:46:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ddb429737fdc5316602b90aed04e261c
52561ccd9a97587bc6b81046b48c787062419011
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
343c8d18c121a80919a8787b96b4d6f5
5cc50b9aab099c43c56ec021dce977eefbea58b6
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSL' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9f870ca7b1bcfe3e62ff996bdfbc643d
6576e9c9dfa7d4e8294241726cb5bf9d91c44f14
describe
'482442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
d5fbb4d1a85cc83c4d0872160c258b74
98fc0df3b8e7fc3b1d6e1a48cdb6196b9668bcd7
describe
'118561' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
84ccb5d41898f5a512af9b003a9f5ade
56ca5f3171d95ca4525380795282c5cb1f0ef79c
describe
'41070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSO' 'sip-files00046.pro'
a0708a8fdf6e5c05bdc8f4837ea01ea9
cf849913eae060aa0b7630f25addc8f0a9c4413a
describe
'32868' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3e15b6704feb42ba3dc36ec41d086ad1
f13fec39925dfae3da0aeda5be64b174f2d54442
'2011-12-30T03:44:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
27f4bd37a61319d77124c4f3a8d2a0fb
444ada204908383fc9e530dbd231291e9cb7d256
'2011-12-30T03:43:57-05:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
cb0116783ba7ebf276b021114b928ed4
7f1e66231dd9db3cb2f0c25c13771e169cb5da17
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7082' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSS' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bb949fde6cf9d7f4623eb9a97ca95d6c
fb5ac968582bdd7217c0d8c2c06a6661d6096bed
describe
'482437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUST' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
23e49c3be31245e77f51cb7ca308a562
dd434de3c3b80883e2e5a26fbec4d1bedb203229
describe
'111001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6d4ff29bac906b4932b8b12c2f90d578
b60a335905e74662565b67e4266d012f39af54e6
'2011-12-30T03:42:12-05:00'
describe
'36871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
735f9c058a067ea69b40b9e939f751d4
352d0781995668e4e993fc2a402ba4eda24eabcf
describe
'30706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSW' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
2cfadd73ed3ed77ed16f957da488bc24
579382af233a8af792b0c5c238ec4b3a4a88fc2d
'2011-12-30T03:44:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
bb0e34c6d76cff5e72cc2178a1877a36
bd11e794e3a5ff05705ea82bd23b0e2616b27831
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
7546ed6136957fc0f91420daccda6bd8
cf717b3fcd3a977160b14a76ac2079aa8cdd6820
describe
'6940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
62a3cb5215882cd8652b31ee022eb0e4
88a82b20e2e2f796474dbf70c289735366a9c9fb
'2011-12-30T03:45:03-05:00'
describe
'482314' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
cdbac58bd9eff8864befdea8394b5314
7254b87ad5fabfbabc60f00e0541ea1a9bd488ac
'2011-12-30T03:42:18-05:00'
describe
'108455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f18c8bf431771184b31ab55cb262063f
274b8830d01e11d6e220498ea81573050a62a239
describe
'35796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
f146565cb9e64f6e41f0de2f0443ae93
168cff2f1c39a11c54ee84b0fe89c0adbc47620c
describe
'29854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
3aff3c70cd2033cd98d62df4bc2c81a3
9d38aee17a670792e3115f440ee4c790f0d1331a
'2011-12-30T03:45:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTE' 'sip-files00048.tif'
5689245351fe081a02406e50460ca67c
05e07da4061db7ec024e6f6bc42258c1dc3a39e1
'2011-12-30T03:43:37-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTF' 'sip-files00048.txt'
3552a314193d1195e0b899b14b4e4461
2e0d1703fd48bece5670bb506633d99bb50a8630
'2011-12-30T03:43:32-05:00'
describe
'6785' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ab278f0960318d0ee9168118d7390377
4c005faa2be4803118056cdbd720cb8a603ff0c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
313612468097ed4af116485e08241f1f
f7559b39c2ba6eb6d09b62d2dc8cd5c187a72670
describe
'114243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
632276397a92da62e315c4088241c8a4
3a6d8bfa5ef35dc75680ad1fcd63fd34ab2e569a
describe
'38396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
9285aebd5af2cd7fec1b4dbf4a1eb6e3
ab74b50ec80566f5fe029060f37c8e1438a6664f
describe
'32071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
efcfecc54eea3570af2a48948ff1f9d5
a581d50871484e5a1432d6756723c2e8a22397a1
'2011-12-30T03:46:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTL' 'sip-files00049.tif'
cb76b8200e8302d6ffce6892e730b54d
c1f15e2531fdfb9dfb3c6ef3c7482e776ace7358
'2011-12-30T03:41:11-05:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
753227f0a209c4a3b54251febf0ac71b
e76f4026236f650412269d62be2e225ba6e43c1b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6dbf96402c05381716f49559cfbce222
2b4e890a68f8a5d3e2061b749a9b88326dc29eef
describe
'482434' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTO' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
6877b4a254addd606c7dd303cc57bb39
f79372b038372de2a1a07c54a7feb7b82fa5b85b
describe
'111424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTP' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
689033ea9219430f0f5951069d2a3474
cd063a3e7d6242cd5deafb0c964f1c4419a303a1
describe
'37849' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8e58f396ec6f3af2fd5c4449652d5cf9
c9ebbdae7a602d503f2430f57c9345317287576e
'2011-12-30T03:41:39-05:00'
describe
'31164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTR' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
6e128678dcdf1d8acdcf1e78119a76cf
9239fbb061224d6a51d85b6e050749dd4a22b1c1
'2011-12-30T03:41:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTS' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2348ee2f3f17e924a8d41b5d6a31dddb
872be51e57bdd9e0ffbb029f26a9b2d290a186ab
'2011-12-30T03:45:57-05:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTT' 'sip-files00050.txt'
dd77a587ba40fc6151bc9b74e85e7fce
3766f5daed27253b92036aa65dbafc9a42590db7
'2011-12-30T03:42:00-05:00'
describe
'6661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTU' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
37b5eda60220c9a1a0af1fc5cd0dba3a
01c71630d54fa71646c5180ea6bf84c83a3e235a
'2011-12-30T03:44:51-05:00'
describe
'482441' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a93870e56a6f430acb9eef0375c7475e
04960567286db46f2afd9782eb361444365d4c95
'2011-12-30T03:45:02-05:00'
describe
'114922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTW' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
0e049082078b87cba44d1c9924ad10c0
5a4280acac0c3c34f3e56b8c885e6e31194fbcff
describe
'39858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
933aa3d381a7aa525763f2de1e79495e
322451af535e190b331da35d18f4b6c822f180a1
'2011-12-30T03:45:36-05:00'
describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTY' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
539c6ca8790e8c6fe43d0f0b81095aad
05ec1ea78288c0bebb958f8a0d5814dcf9009e26
'2011-12-30T03:45:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4342ac6e6ad6202273419d9070dcc1d1
fe4e990fb10a66791eb34ec1998820e0a5964b4b
'2011-12-30T03:46:10-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUA' 'sip-files00051.txt'
4d731ce03d7e78558f7a3afb689931c3
3a2fcef74647f18e420bf06de581aba979a47e2c
describe
'6990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUB' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
93451f6c23f4b046b7380b69461ac9a1
d24288e7e27e099bbcbfa33cd5614ecf72eb1901
'2011-12-30T03:44:57-05:00'
describe
'482380' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
55fba85f2a976aec0465d377bf3cc12b
46afdd71636410d497af261b9c2838dc3918edd0
'2011-12-30T03:45:07-05:00'
describe
'81582' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUD' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
83303ea9e6a7c5ffa3b8e6b9340be1d2
e62d2122d9bbda264fd9ce9533cd5ae64c98e92a
'2011-12-30T03:43:48-05:00'
describe
'21870' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
759d56d68fdc87040f911dbd9566617d
905c82e2f369d4fdc4c160bcad662322a7ee22ee
describe
'20761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
b2b76638d23a41ae52e7b56014fcc36e
a2a8de2467341e033b3ead0a3c26e4d727e8033d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
543cf2d05fc351eb9bddaa11d59a06cc
23d32aa3af6cf823e2e6a43840889db5e4f65a6e
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9a1f7efe526395cdceab9271290587b5
cf9d6e87862015802321b010261a0b0a43b2262f
describe
'4607' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUI' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
772b31cf37e6ce683f0411d79cca3b44
9c4add61a49e9b19603b367d06ef64e9c07ee5ce
'2011-12-30T03:44:26-05:00'
describe
'482349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5d49fb785be07c794f3bae8bd309d1b3
b3cf6c0c7b71743ddd8bfb02e609bb0a1b8d6618
describe
'91892' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUK' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7701855ca2034ef5dcad9b34ef3d8229
c8b4fd4b20ad14502335328d4c8792617a83b86a
'2011-12-30T03:45:27-05:00'
describe
'27234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUL' 'sip-files00053.pro'
4b748681bd13fc8c87e37f51e4db3782
f4673e510ca2980ef3f639148c95b0dc1d7d1b83
describe
'24002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e021b72ac72244f7dcff40322ab1b2d2
e5dbe0da7bc1a5cd36bd7e9e3cc04453daf35f4a
'2011-12-30T03:42:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
04842e83d4c7cdba995bc95f3bef0d2c
8c07cd7de82557226e15c8af9c7ba1c11f43b588
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4f8dda8c75124d52cbcb5c1f5749c085
c8a49e16e494c36612ec73d58be6126fda100a7a
'2011-12-30T03:45:58-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
337af21ba207e2e71bbf205666fc2d14
216b2353d9d8903c0ac5170963247dd2fcc165aa
'2011-12-30T03:42:05-05:00'
describe
'482423' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a7ad34862327dec94031783c5d70fa48
193d2e1cfa5e84bc83e804b4dc7a918f5b8292a7
'2011-12-30T03:44:33-05:00'
describe
'115958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
169781d30c309e940e16ebd4af426942
67dce9aa06b6bc2c2f6779eea444a2b6f367be04
describe
'40445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
65a2411fc7ea19a1af4c7b361de25b3b
a2d748e5643886f7694305342489fc75de99a84f
'2011-12-30T03:42:31-05:00'
describe
'31726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
39d430ddf4b35030b06497810e1cfb6b
e0f6b896d3cc15436ae92ae7b238cb9e6068f73d
'2011-12-30T03:41:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c6f18374ad1cbbcaa30114a8d9be48e4
3488ddf0a8ed27bb06a6b6f1d5d3f956c2259a6b
'2011-12-30T03:43:36-05:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
22d830f1dc4fb325204c18d5d4940109
14e97dd5ed90f680b67e634fb66297900278f2da
describe
'7347' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a7d5def458416e60bfba1f0cc3db7c84
4b937ecf4b62499b3f3e2089aca53ac3ee6afd41
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
188da9756aa3dc09892d9bacc54f6311
b67944388d2dfe105d50ef8b0603623124fd9d81
'2011-12-30T03:45:59-05:00'
describe
'116556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
86e0d4d4a7945d6694220696b0335c83
fc9b9535384864f23238e4a98c3a58cea4c72713
describe
'38995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
2ff34d5296856927634c092d2c7f1ca1
e31d4c3585ffd6290e1ebdc45c75e91f4e3f6a62
'2011-12-30T03:44:13-05:00'
describe
'31757' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6a3a995a50555ba71489c98cbb05efa2
9ff633369f41c45b9ee824678b2355d4aa6bc318
'2011-12-30T03:45:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
9dd0e0e3a663be2a58223379e7e1a445
f573e211972a01dc8faab2d612d04fd0fcbeac7c
'2011-12-30T03:41:50-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c56d109f67b2437b78c50055a2e885b3
7076f37e8d203f9e9dd46dbb6a5104da4f49d98a
'2011-12-30T03:42:35-05:00'
describe
'6984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVD' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
201d889788681a379827058e46e5c9a9
9c6b94190fd0b4cce44d8eda5170ba420d678945
'2011-12-30T03:41:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6db94b680953874b8a8ccc8e070a2b7b
28989795c3e69bfca437dbbf5096fc090695917e
describe
'110813' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
43a0ce4f3227b47e718bf401296c16ad
aecee943e8a985b0c478b85d895b9bff4a901e13
describe
'35750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVG' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a9a4c72a9bf838ff09d4681a2938ec61
ccbfb10e72107a08810033a3d122c4f5141c4783
describe
'30107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
11faf94fdab8b7ec974c34bf65518ab4
00d3252c1a24bdcda7451f21194a045c85222c05
'2011-12-30T03:46:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
fcd8cb572d38943888b64b1d81b31eee
5b0f2ddb15a419dcd31de21c7ba7bd537457f498
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
547299a271af470c9bd627a6203edf11
bf0ff4e580d5936585c906e68084840a7afd3c26
describe
'6631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVK' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
d147059eaa7c4cbb77e88c9ef29bc349
e46eb55f99e96e877ab3f4e6ab7a4e6f0f54f547
'2011-12-30T03:42:06-05:00'
describe
'482429' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2bd39b345befa3803547f453597ac322
2557f25769495d7bec0b5312c1b552a8a61a2181
'2011-12-30T03:44:22-05:00'
describe
'118910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b72e447ea62de23604442e786d4d93a3
5aed8e37b1413f674fdb2951982e65ebcd130677
describe
'39862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVN' 'sip-files00057.pro'
170f2e37123385e07f06a447b5ad2cf7
a846c7cf60002e03789fb513c1b4736f47d9e9d6
describe
'32524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVO' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
56254b4419a9142cfed35e249b5cd3ab
1be8fbf5259654e04694db82db9a05631f44e110
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVP' 'sip-files00057.tif'
260e82d54c3ec30b0704d2c6c318de6f
1e5387e9ccee8fd8763a7c20bac4ea617aef4af8
'2011-12-30T03:42:51-05:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
05732b79134bb84ed31089bdacebd793
dc106edeb0f179dccc535115bdd66f771cce0f9c
'2011-12-30T03:42:25-05:00'
describe
'7053' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVR' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
219bcc21db43dc2c943af146b0a65277
6c53cea3942d806339607acf5141998350e14e58
describe
'482414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVS' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
7dc071705011fb5f83f144f3fa527cd9
bfbf047fe174b06bb1ae67fe97692cf71f9f515f
describe
'118016' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVT' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9b1214a35639821ffbd4037699127914
b45319d76836eb084449d2a2b2f42acd8c121d6b
'2011-12-30T03:42:04-05:00'
describe
'39932' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVU' 'sip-files00058.pro'
9e8d41592e09116c5f808f2ad5b1eb09
0e895ca22821384c581560a31d665b09ae790f3f
describe
'32150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
a646039989e3fbe23cb959c0ca3b1be1
ba51317dc6658eaf2ec4c0d9280296b9dc0d0570
'2011-12-30T03:40:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
12d0f8e4d0e5b036410f6a52598cc244
8eb9f7c13f63f284ac43e0442288aa93a5ebb02e
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVX' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ae9c4c7d757cd1fcebb1b5e9688f6869
6e7c172876a28e2d12b29abd67e7990170eaef16
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
50f2e57d6558243c4ac547f596cfe4e0
f8058dcb4b2d48df614bbcd563bfa1d101710577
'2011-12-30T03:45:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
b32310c62ce00509f5fd7708481d8595
27a50efde0207717e02f80759092f9cbc8b529e2
'2011-12-30T03:44:31-05:00'
describe
'110234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
89eefa2572b436edb3b6a9175e2ba62e
683206b2261759a60f9edab56dcad40acbf393e7
describe
'36140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
af3d033bd8fc0e38551f575b1e5ce759
cfbdc1aac1bb29ac4f3305360f040932b45c3e0d
describe
'30157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
35cf6eea46eb75664b5b4e489ee775d6
7e31bb3f12690b16155cb0eb3e4de404d9b75ef2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
52f8455e60c05fb1c2f22ff1d8f51d62
6f1dbd1b4af91fc5579f03881205ebf9e911622c
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4db871e7cf0b511829217386725d4483
962b50d03c42306e5e5724dbadce4c67a97fbd8e
describe
'6754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
b77b94fd47061e70e0165c2fc209ee48
8bca3afb236643e4831df3ab3b4bceb36b1a6754
describe
'482435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a6c01707a934be338ac9e3fe8cffb93c
2558fe4701efe91eb421a187b6decd30ad7e0ff0
'2011-12-30T03:43:29-05:00'
describe
'116671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
81b1774ed20aa771dfe7ef4e18783c42
3c434eaa884139f9061fa5ca4c78ec3f761e3dd9
'2011-12-30T03:41:59-05:00'
describe
'40343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWI' 'sip-files00060.pro'
ee75927b4e9d09e361677b4fbcbf9f4c
99f80470d46e7d08cbe12cb48551a4d801f6ac41
describe
'31935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
97efc08f0b4a245758bcfb162328b5d6
aa2b49495ff95d33994f08c5d045784149c743ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
4169436c70c4895ccebd71769e77a75e
5dd173c036ac07cd039ec8e928dfff00727f7cf6
'2011-12-30T03:43:56-05:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWL' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9b9fa9cc62261da66aff03e8f101a4b5
0ab11c1f09a4a504c5f08bb6eac2a0048d6a40f2
describe
'7346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
4d8570d31c320457c397391b0d68f19c
17228906b0d7cc7ac75ea07ef06a19e8e16df1ef
describe
'482422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWN' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
29e8ff0bf838d6aa99bf9d434bd10ab0
e45ccb053fd2c5fc5d4d9f3ba8d5e7b741959b5d
'2011-12-30T03:46:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWO' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b82fceec6e95528b864693b9f7b1a296
09a949c32cbd32d561fb53fad4ee03fc9dbde6b8
'2011-12-30T03:43:47-05:00'
describe
'38099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWP' 'sip-files00061.pro'
c0410582cceddbc6a2268bd38e3812af
023754e332afb61a1175086b8fc26c60fb0c3048
'2011-12-30T03:43:06-05:00'
describe
'32188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
65064ce59fe00469436881bd81988578
a838e799a4f4ba4a9e2018b92b208cd3fdcbaae8
'2011-12-30T03:43:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWR' 'sip-files00061.tif'
df9d0d2e058c8ce1dbc2a76a77e46024
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describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWS' 'sip-files00061.txt'
4b19027648fb38daed42b8b512666fbf
591bc5581a20a4fb7621409bdb2f6c80adaddf8f
describe
'6975' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWT' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
795abac2ebd5c3c34535e6a559a45a43
b2bd61a85310a5d1c3d3e44d8334c3109a700667
'2011-12-30T03:46:18-05:00'
describe
'482408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWU' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
57383cd9ca51febb61c69a2772638515
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describe
'115028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
a81e0d78a811224388812e7934b034b2
a5c12915d3c0b072a7897baedadbef673550dab8
'2011-12-30T03:41:47-05:00'
describe
'38522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWW' 'sip-files00062.pro'
88ecaf402ac711bade417514027c05c0
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describe
'32622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWX' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
cb594648d8ceba9046736f1e1f62cd20
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWY' 'sip-files00062.tif'
38870c65d5bffe303201f0f15f1e4f21
83be17488ecb777627205b3d2321ec85ccfc95a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d9acf41ae444a8211eef380b46ca1057
5c69bd0703fd19a8bdfe99d8c477b0f14ed61596
'2011-12-30T03:41:37-05:00'
describe
'7047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXA' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
07f06fa65b54b747dd69f3b008ef4df3
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describe
'482444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXB' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
221f73d1fa7c5aba91cc93131f5f058a
f432cb929c9e8d97a85fa682627d74debab2aaea
describe
'112188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXC' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
753294aed99854df3d9ae1fe5fd57f72
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describe
'36605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXD' 'sip-files00063.pro'
136531efb4e950a46ab196b9d55e3262
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describe
'30937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXE' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c75e0e23058c13ee22ccf285d9a59ee9
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXF' 'sip-files00063.tif'
0767b2c14f8309200453c0b81a779df9
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describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
c5fb3be890c65ec1e612f7f9d29bf09f
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describe
'7036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
f67a3dd23a1ad25598ff2e6fdc31bf5d
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'2011-12-30T03:41:49-05:00'
describe
'482405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXI' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
868e57a5e3256f575d63f20390fb943c
e455e82ad0f2537fb4b2c9245eb6e4c5119b61d5
'2011-12-30T03:43:04-05:00'
describe
'113115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b2081b1d8450c34a96453fe880b4022d
fdb9af0ba108f6ef3a840d5d2ea88a5e04d3ffd5
'2011-12-30T03:42:48-05:00'
describe
'37196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXK' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e5f7ece296cda59def3733d37c026006
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describe
'31502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXL' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
12fe8033dc6b132fdf7d9e0ed6241c00
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXM' 'sip-files00064.tif'
91332e5651586753b9494c74353c35f6
8ab79e236c5352fe84ae2795b4c6c683455bd697
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXN' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bcd1fa124ff24d0fdf40131d357aed0b
eca299432df39039896bfa01135a613c30bfde4d
'2011-12-30T03:43:02-05:00'
describe
'6865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXO' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
eff665159623a05f115935d32b8479e9
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
156d3bc5fe9b7fbc06792469751352c9
89f02e0c5e6536b00d5fe7e44c627f482b9b3dff
'2011-12-30T03:45:47-05:00'
describe
'115252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
55ce5ed8e1e60c5c575c943306708c60
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describe
'39717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXR' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ed1a68072344b3ad39416d411b19399e
c5668d4dfaf18f33993a09cae4d502307f2472c3
describe
'31821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
910e96b8d9411472effa1fce030e62dc
582cec37b73e433fbd7185b5fed7625a15cb1572
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXT' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a6c4fbacf2c9b38eeb7ec3179ddf7c2f
d23955d24ae7f0384d70faeba1d298e7dcd4468d
'2011-12-30T03:46:24-05:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXU' 'sip-files00065.txt'
eccd7990c8b96bd9d0c229e04ddc2be8
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describe
'7068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXV' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
f829303f314f4ba196425941bba55e23
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describe
'482418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXW' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9b5467250bae35f131310a02ac6ed362
b1e580767bd801b16db07ffc0b90c917a33bbaaa
'2011-12-30T03:44:40-05:00'
describe
'112640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXX' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
8fcea3c3eece89c6bfbd66466ac9e5ce
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describe
'37461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4a215b6c7497c353e708ccba6f68bd4d
191c6ac92c41d03a710aff7ca03fc0d81804ffb3
'2011-12-30T03:45:30-05:00'
describe
'31099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
9b7c422f32085e994e3c09b15fb2769f
21c489dc5611cfd75718d4c028c4c1ba885e06bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYA' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2fbbfdb9f3a7aca6eafee9d3aa7691be
a2ee5858db3960b18965b678f893c0fb892bbebd
'2011-12-30T03:46:17-05:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
a14473736b6549af359cb548a13c78b7
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describe
'6741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYC' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6f0fbd77f4deb16b0025f4b2c69540ca
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYD' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
5c9df6194f2f5d10e0f53f73429331f9
35cb5d14d408d52d86a8e61ee1ae3fb02dff4491
describe
'125801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
7020dd4a11ea3f9c05e6db075dd5696a
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describe
'4492' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b632971edbac87fc58b0ba118371e851
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describe
'27226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
031ba9c6d535c072092c52f27041b1b4
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'2011-12-30T03:45:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
a5eae5e5501be5f701f349c98bb15e97
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describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
92579cc683b12b0a073d935908aebfe8
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describe
'6628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
66a88f2a7d1a67f82d125e4dde533233
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describe
'482311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYK' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
860fb861d78870b2e710ee1b7e41a1e9
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describe
'35439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
20bae505d364f3663c6546c8400bf0e5
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describe
'6092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
9b53a1c059d10a9945e0d5f2ddd00b43
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
2fe77d0b06421c78c9885876ca0faec4
8c9a76442fb0ad4f33006505cc0f82a1f99b5d29
'2011-12-30T03:42:15-05:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYO' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
e6f2f5fe694207df5a8ec04ef2c2b577
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYP' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e889bd85cd2585f52824b91a015a502a
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describe
'50386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
63eda167beaaf6946da56547212be638
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describe
'7247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYR' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c9b3a49050d2d5f8c625e4b10ea7a5c4
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describe
'10502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYS' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
e135c3d418d31378e33a64c4700323b7
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYT' 'sip-files00069.tif'
32d9b2c7f2ebe9b07266e3416d261984
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describe
'244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYU' 'sip-files00069.txt'
38ee1a923a3a3ce851d9096237c76d93
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describe
'2283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYV' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a1e65bafc6a2e7715c1c12de6f4bd197
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYW' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
fbf51606ab06ac2e1e605fbc2c75b5ac
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describe
'93910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYX' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
9a236d7e83bb6565e4f70b3166889951
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'2011-12-30T03:44:21-05:00'
describe
'28551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYY' 'sip-files00070.pro'
1202bbbf2038035ba0b5e605e23961bf
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describe
'24797' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
56e9f981228db5902869b6138982ee31
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZA' 'sip-files00070.tif'
0e0fa16c3468420b72eb380b3837c94d
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'2011-12-30T03:43:51-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZB' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5efd6f2be524e68c6e5643a8210f0eb7
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describe
'5463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ff9823e8d384bb79b460609d9522cb35
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'2011-12-30T03:42:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZD' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
9ecf211b1a9b2df1b1bd21c26a013958
c4c81b12c6b697b5455f502886fa72ea821b8daf
'2011-12-30T03:42:13-05:00'
describe
'116159' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZE' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
09d0a8877bec38c99327da63f7e62506
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'2011-12-30T03:40:59-05:00'
describe
'39973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZF' 'sip-files00071.pro'
50acc43d76a417c2650a6f78e035b515
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describe
'31888' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZG' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
fc14404e753f03cc2f0a95b550270d2c
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'2011-12-30T03:41:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZH' 'sip-files00071.tif'
bb777e7c02902bf8b52b606ce6fc7ffe
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'2011-12-30T03:42:29-05:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZI' 'sip-files00071.txt'
32054302631a63f95c98ada16cb245f1
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describe
'6691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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describe
'482425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZK' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
cd69d6adb67626016903a72beff58aca
bd98aab128abce15f581f5792e6ea10f3f9505cd
describe
'118558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZL' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
330ebd5cb0017e6a292c40734973fd4c
0446ae39bac7ecd3f79e2966d2ec61329999e668
'2011-12-30T03:43:49-05:00'
describe
'40421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZM' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d1be29a1da4539c6ac16c6ff2aa88912
1aabf2ef26e97143d0d0b809d9900f77f04cdb51
describe
'32855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZN' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e319b4b7d7fed7c2d64e3da2dccf86bc
dbe4364235a8be447753e9fa4edff0e09f3024f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZO' 'sip-files00072.tif'
95e53b5948c2177d8c68e4c82561884c
028876a8e4ce686dc7c57cecbcbda69b56f18c7e
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZP' 'sip-files00072.txt'
01564449d5c3fa56749ef8e712aaa1bb
bb55fb4e845d90c1579bc274b9e0bfdee12c094b
'2011-12-30T03:43:19-05:00'
describe
'7122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
6f077893008c7c15d645957b7456adc3
8bcda0cbc5e4c3b4e84bbc0ed66d65309be4bff9
'2011-12-30T03:41:16-05:00'
describe
'482450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
93420e3086aeeb3200512da35fa3f9ec
d818f1105b83f2927aa30534b078ec31a2a848c4
'2011-12-30T03:41:02-05:00'
describe
'110475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
c78dc915aba0b3cbe3046bb0273f1fbd
33812c18ac2b4c1491035904f15a96934e9cce29
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00073.pro'
8353359cb5e3025044930d45d1aa1fac
59768dd2d1e3fc70e4f0a81215e5149ba520f801
describe
'30074' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e0d03d64248a25781096ee9eb1c5b3bc
478c772599760be03912f03f1450ff20af52f15e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00073.tif'
86e62f9887494de259052cfbf4a9a867
a0808587fcc2b62d83c7cd65408026459ffd1ce2
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00073.txt'
bbb6466074b3f1cd767aa5e385dc8d2c
241e8bf618587af2dad08ec133744436d8137c84
'2011-12-30T03:46:23-05:00'
describe
'7100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
3e6de78e4b6f8b4dd226d084f2516813
0e4020cd35e065699be908ee4d817e5d2ceff53f
describe
'482401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
56e299a503893dc4e1ba45b2d565d2f3
154cd1a14d98d9142307f18494e03e0bb9b0086b
describe
'114402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
cbd072c04210b3dd08dd3dd0398fd3ec
394084f2da6c836c840b47e127a6db52d0d55033
describe
'38006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00074.pro'
11eb4551e5cd2108531eb13395feea05
bec08258b8c101d48541357d24ac87716f4fa852
describe
'31650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
fd52fc0333db03e7d937a901d89256ef
225b3c5c912f337b3fa0dcd6d8491bd3e41c9222
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00074.tif'
5522220664a3694d9fa65a72fdfa4625
4a47d1f516396f037c043a466be37876f0ef5cad
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00074.txt'
53dd937c0c0b09473e92b4442e02fffe
37d7ecadfc455f43a6df507ebb83731a402285ff
describe
'6991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
3f3c67847fd218e26be96892cbaf4415
cf2ac1eff133a86b6eba03aaa7f2ecf16c66f3c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
667932f64101575d77a0422fc3a10412
9d36807f2011f1e52c087cebc7f1b9506d20fb9f
describe
'109965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
21d614c4a8f85ecf1ba06f759e69ca77
8409f8eb5a0ed4863015ceaf64cf01a737497e71
'2011-12-30T03:43:53-05:00'
describe
'36351' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00075.pro'
5b037d2e4a4c8e70c878923f9043ab2b
b44e65478050d96e0c0418f308c1e753f0bf92c5
describe
'30318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
76ebebb42191e1bc7d1c2e5353265cef
1002b734fe3295d53e14803da53727492ec99567
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
010b5eacc5d6dd50ee81966dadb64ac6
e8afc44e0db8b5ac51b0b948201f90e7291b6db2
'2011-12-30T03:43:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00075.txt'
8babcf3f830698f7693fde2edbde8ad3
4572e288f7e8f1edaaa9d88faac2334cecddc393
'2011-12-30T03:46:21-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
89ad2f96c0e6a083c1db150e6e1e5ac2
59abeb91e538a162bac7585e77eda15e2af82a28
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b5de63d088f203321a67190708f16600
458b5cc5dfa4b3739981b7158a045b4a6cbb47a4
describe
'118524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
66d48b21d856c9e1a5b781a2cb3b6383
390a3d1bde17c6f8943a7378d2980f23715dfbf4
describe
'39943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00076.pro'
deb76e8ec004d5700ef760684eadad91
d337f52b1bb12f4add82536a0504012af5b12948
describe
'32948' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
83ce02c21f10c6fedf522c4224f074c1
c2a83a78cc2b578679edf97ee3a6f90a096b9e42
'2011-12-30T03:43:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
ee0afc243d50af92b2ec3f604b7d2d2c
acd4d598898acc23fb12165c4cab0e2fbc9af623
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e08c6612d8a71c88a124b26e98bd3e39
3b56ca5eb0533245b32ba4521875fad3eee5aa5c
describe
'7506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5eff7c89e70276eedb4ba4f68d10e95d
155ffdbb932a41774032047dc89d4a449ca68e29
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b0e7b278a508e2626c0122d5bb5a2c47
b1e97e2c7e225b35a34953a18cfe97f4d0e021f8
describe
'114760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
bc2be99a744baf325f319b78781e6e32
a26472ea4de0681e1289311e1d0840e9fac65b10
'2011-12-30T03:45:41-05:00'
describe
'38520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00077.pro'
74cbfbb730bac46c10ddc4d2cf9ddcd2
530f2edf1c402514ac592fc803a8ac983b7c5a3f
describe
'31488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
9522c2dd748578845c17300c5a13b29e
3aa2a6d4c3e54348dd531f963f24d98c5835343f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00077.tif'
8b84ca3dcba41762a983f0f8cdcdf9e6
8f9413ceef89135ea78160cf2ef8c5dd4170a42e
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00077.txt'
bab9e7f99fdd45aa57451ef16132fe4d
9f783a30268630cdd4f42d1c2cca3657737e8954
describe
'6943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
bb8404dd26c7666944656d4c986b7184
46bf158e77bc6941c8dbf99a019bb01c543713a5
describe
'482419' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
dfc5760da8afb0445e55e4f11b65d5cf
4ab0e7359e05f3f9db28c02ab8c36412ae694cb8
'2011-12-30T03:44:28-05:00'
describe
'110564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4133b25f18b61aab303979a69b96727a
3bee1895a7476f6a00ffde0cf6fa98208a72c8d5
describe
'37224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00078.pro'
d8cff8b77ba0d5e7cb01e8dd521ecbd0
fe61972d1139b1e7c8ac47bdd6055b81261a9611
describe
'30481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
c77c3fa528dcad8bbfe79ec9e5a91dae
49b9b92a1d4f1d45e0e3a6c77d9cea1056acfe4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00078.tif'
c1751492fd484dab0badaa35c78e85ef
ca00e0be63226961fd35fce8a64201d9ac8df9ab
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b1459315d854a9290dc3a889c9469448
d539aabd6da104f2665571b965e2e8039c5a623a
describe
'6840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
217c6a08b4146ca06d2a99813abd1b50
f122fbdf8377fb568fabb848588b84742a71f969
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
f0afff363462ceb14464d2ef0cfca919
00b2d32019fa2c922dcc0dc45bef07fd37d7edd1
'2011-12-30T03:41:15-05:00'
describe
'107664' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
249061a08d7e8831d38a0bd4858df93b
0bbabfd052545aa1623bcd090003fc675e4294bf
describe
'35595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
cbcb941adef7c843ac7ee3c114824f76
11b9f6095cecf469816b35f8f8a30ec7b1c97d50
describe
'29591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
6d43f8a4db5dfd8f4f78e76f73a2a1df
b920a72984b9b6195a7eb37f33d4d11357acf892
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1123ae72234148265e55c4870a1d17ae
9fa3a51806265eecde6ce1901682ec480fb4f68e
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00079.txt'
06580faf9ae5874dd7c2663c69a7b23a
4da1a8a8a380cf96385071e80a5de95f34baeec1
describe
'6713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
56afd29b15797295d7ebd6216a1ed159
b3da211506813c9de082130e0d8ffb6e44f7534f
describe
'482417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
25eb7008b8fd7961f7f2a5f134d82074
2d3c681760fe56c9839c9156f393fad82f525a8f
describe
'114236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
951a7a5be2becb980eb4284b61576f13
16559cfc4c05a597d36cb0cc32664c3467d2e720
'2011-12-30T03:42:07-05:00'
describe
'38808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
324f6c30a8e59227ab39531650116a49
f70a7bd93972425062d2e482dacfdd6181f7ba76
describe
'31794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7cbd2ab562d70c5510cb5a56f6647d57
414277cc950362108454d0f2889e1ec5e5f9fe36
'2011-12-30T03:43:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00080.tif'
84cc848d59e66c7691d98fbcdc67ce78
6ff4cc7cfa24cae2d6f905cf1cec71b7cba271aa
'2011-12-30T03:42:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00080.txt'
44f6f7eb7006405d76259647a497709c
a140cc033ff730c40c7c3c43594ba715ec4f7e04
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7218' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
2d4e2867f4c97da0bf7512c769db5dd4
22f738456b65bf8e32a46692d6ecc3ea28d29bf8
'2011-12-30T03:43:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
a48e27b92ec6c98d1b27f501aa7276cb
6eb9eb6b613613d39bd4d13de6ea8e95767564ab
describe
'112982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
4a7ea38163ce2e853e6ec78643feddfb
b609ad2a4274d9f246cb89aaa876db519fe38780
describe
'37901' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d0a0a86ee385217658ec032939336ab5
091545971be4e751ad27ac28c77e4fce79cf21d2
'2011-12-30T03:43:14-05:00'
describe
'30900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
2ca5e73c1615078548ef2b2838f58f03
e86bf1408e051cbcc3248af4e960b37e8fe4b7d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b78eeb77cb62be9891457a98d5888a60
424a78748c4198336f60db8a179951d25509b2e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b6cdf914487cc26ae067610f0e643a99
65ba9ff7c7f94bcbdd390906d376b780f722e311
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
86a67baf5e418278df826f3b53615e4a
f7fc5303ea925fc85d0402ff271eb0c0f0bc1b76
describe
'482391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCC' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
5e88afbfc1c79b49588f5586b61f7735
0c6fa25f7cff168a27f29da54bf72eeb715a3073
describe
'115320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
da86ad2798c15d19194b8456da0d57df
6dfb573d6782d42be4297649449bd239cd61d86a
describe
'39981' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00082.pro'
f7ce46136fdfcb7058acb0395c2d2a18
4ea49d9137796f711a22abb4a2b713294e6a3cf0
describe
'32268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
dde48f2d5778dbf59b8b606981d36756
50141eae055191674eb54bdf396ef06e8f6747e9
'2011-12-30T03:43:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f359d2e068a7f84b3aaf293da8846bc7
605ebaf31974b423ae97dd324f7926b56ee3081d
'2011-12-30T03:44:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d91c919142c96f60913e63eef2ee1bdb
b56ccea00a14c3f5d2aa5a5b15c8a00a0b03cf08
describe
'7029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
20cc8cb0e8c74ca940eac650176f3dae
61e5d7abcf1cd0664eb92b421ed21cb3289f009a
describe
'482387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
06b5cb14d395e9c564291b94d5b81b41
1b8564f58d8c6ae158ebb68ae290f6d418c3cc31
describe
'91853' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
6b3b363f2b362761d72745d78cf380c2
83d6fa5f462aec965e951253a86c8adcf5b3ca31
describe
'26831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00083.pro'
d0c074a70f1cd33d28a6591a862e7dfb
978da7693effcd2785866529f5181cbd0465137d
describe
'24152' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b6c98147d039b57c95f28bfe16760799
4633ae8c5545b1d5ad43004ca8e9969b91b9d7c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f24e242820b586f36fb1beace1313611
160a5935a30f6acf48c1c2bc5794141742243b1d
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00083.txt'
6744a11c0538925d652be7a6700007f5
68c47366bdfabb6824f4db1432047152a4d8638b
describe
'5514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
1170b3f50f180b313081891a14b2f242
96d12eb1a42938ac7332e3aa79c089c2d500168e
describe
'482343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
43f1eed8645cab3dab773f43c73f820e
2ad6be3411830e5baa3701d395368b6067498543
describe
'94841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
c92561a23987d02731b19a517c117a27
68d08328b7a377376bea013941efa0270bc6f675
describe
'28254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00084.pro'
c28946165da6b8dfbe0b409c205e1586
3b8789ba69b1043e81f18f220affd8b5c9a5c48d
describe
'24958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
ae5acd60409d08578a7a3401a97e8571
d18cc674aac2b52232d69ac0adf69578d2455165
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00084.tif'
010c123a6248a3bd1153fac2ecd3b8f0
70686575acc3a003ebeb56cdb6d59472ab791112
'2011-12-30T03:41:28-05:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2cf562807b3e877dbb2c1135efa207b4
5e5ea910aea5cf0bed315ece0aa0a4db08f20d3e
describe
'5666' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ce8dd6d3620501728bf20dc000098ba4
b53bd40dabedec2c5ab94099d01d9e0214c26338
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c289c5f55b33268f1c89aef6d5acc06f
acc4123a7c352268b00cd22687bac98497843f50
'2011-12-30T03:45:40-05:00'
describe
'110491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
4708f4a01827a06d56c412fc3c19a7fc
2e85e3989cb93aa0f2f487c815e6a181ed49195d
describe
'35909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVCZ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
e4140c302dd05017d49349af055c8a14
0e6b7e79c2b8eac425f631067db5d02d64e72643
describe
'30112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
afa5259fdae43b5d5393d2572c8fc9c0
33d29116f384b02c256386610a423e328cdd9604
'2011-12-30T03:46:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDB' 'sip-files00085.tif'
90e407dcff7ad757eee7de98acd88092
9eac582987215358ba77b0aaee21cbb6bb8dbb06
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDC' 'sip-files00085.txt'
fb4a75d46fa09455d855ba63cac733d6
bc4d2e8173b5d2cb52f406901d398a9eb7d785f0
describe
'6734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDD' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
536f37e254aa398238b804b6ed2d3c66
9e8412c1ef1f37ee52dfaab2e64ce0eabb451e45
describe
'482413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b6ca3f70e1b2d0355abae100a7d627fd
9b0dcb470b88ca5d5c14a86fe6c936d5b0a96653
'2011-12-30T03:45:22-05:00'
describe
'116264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDF' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
8179dbe18262f47ba0986334b308c7e6
e981a804e23f11e36dcc18140ef2830c7361ce47
describe
'39667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDG' 'sip-files00086.pro'
aadfb6bb00dbb7938554f6ace8825ab4
00f87b50a2eee1d11a08daf95a94ab6a25669bce
'2011-12-30T03:44:00-05:00'
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDH' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
76c16319f1dab63be5ec4b20aa3725dd
e09538a741d4134c4f873267e1fb957f4d289a49
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDI' 'sip-files00086.tif'
de8d311f838c8167810e94c423b76f31
efd813360e0c9d6caaeb85096745227d3dae6e12
'2011-12-30T03:41:17-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
40403c8ff3d6d6b2c839c2a347dfe586
0a61e0882dc6d5b6e17d33e98ff52d72cb896c62
'2011-12-30T03:46:27-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6813' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDK' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
66de1df46405fd24c6716f2e0d052439
d0b07a4707700bd4c03ba22eddf3e8f599835ab5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9a82ae3b1c10fb54399310c1904243f6
4f16a7f11309aea613f11000a958adc3e75bcad0
describe
'109699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDM' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
b54c52770920f22a037a707cd97277b8
1b1d395c07fa93de8db63eff8a9bc6b2a9161e2e
describe
'35346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDN' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0916c0d6224fa4e03303602fd1ab3e07
7064e8179ea5aaeeedcc44f7ee3e3cb769a4ce83
describe
'29445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDO' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
70b445b6a1765a37db7dc34c861b7a64
375a8681680e446e8a7759482341e95e9d6d1f86
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDP' 'sip-files00087.tif'
6b86c4b7b1c31710e3c54aed2e49265c
bb1ca9945cacb95766d8f892f264610ab9b67454
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9b2cd1b31e9e1378162ccf394b9362d7
e18f1449a315e35bbaee4f56bd829666d35d1f51
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDR' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
f69c0dec119d95674194e161e6fc2d21
f85e436af121b5ad11ce94a97ad6b4d89550db04
'2011-12-30T03:43:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDS' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
afabcf3acab20863c2158947bc29c70e
856c23e5beb4378f50629e2e7abdcc0f210a6e07
describe
'111575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDT' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
5532414997495bd8778069cd0ec0b328
c7e64fa1835f6b183d23cea2403c9279d74b9274
describe
'37840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDU' 'sip-files00088.pro'
06ffd4d8aefdccb6f7f3e2e389fe2b99
30756eace285d32fbc102b209b2a78a2a7472e52
describe
'30649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDV' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
828f7bb7dc982f12c4fea2be1d64814d
c36286da491093b6939a453815a3716a027bc341
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDW' 'sip-files00088.tif'
5e8d6ab89b118739ca1f36ccc85a0b5b
fa48ec708c4f33b59224ef6a3359d45cdf38b4ce
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDX' 'sip-files00088.txt'
50f88a0fa86dfdd807e7565c933820e5
e43137f58b217acb0be5487242263cde6c47f4f7
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDY' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
18725ccf7bbed265270b764e400ce74d
c672300cb4118351f3e473af16686947536d0836
describe
'482409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVDZ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
6912ec9b06ad5dccff7a8a1b2d70cc7f
e944513179348ecacc995f90c000e0bcdd46d492
describe
'121809' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEA' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f12fff1ff9ccfca4487dd05a08645552
74b4fa221eac188fddef0e0a8bb5939f3427db30
'2011-12-30T03:43:08-05:00'
describe
'3391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEB' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a9f68260a3adc2696af9dc712ba7fec9
176fd5b80b23915536e673889412bd1d47b3b630
describe
'27569' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEC' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
c1ed4b4b47f416ddf256fb9414835b08
9ca673b4bd6404ead24d7464889d95b8e43ce776
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVED' 'sip-files00089.tif'
982939e4cbe6c489ecd8ce90e28b6824
79eeea768b1bf2950caa047838e5716bc782a768
'2011-12-30T03:43:01-05:00'
describe
'84' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEE' 'sip-files00089.txt'
2b9ca550d866c25b5fb9807d06806d46
028661d4e27c6dad890b20acd85111f21b35e421
'2011-12-30T03:44:23-05:00'
describe
'6683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEF' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
895c40ab9c04983fd7ff9a37fdcf5709
9e6d56009f238aa7856e109cc0fcbb67f69ae42a
describe
'482363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEG' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
0b94eca64348bfbc1ae7a4d00f54e448
7b3822e75d02dbdd7a78c6e4bfd302d30ac4e5b8
describe
'34990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEH' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
1e3a3c5d6e2af45ae3c929945c872409
be9c5f6a70d66a38fbf455b6a0ff106e856df5c2
'2011-12-30T03:45:46-05:00'
describe
'6167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
356d895a044fd5a533b5318001d1dc5a
241c34094497e8bcba2ad6da0cc29d50adc52b5c
'2011-12-30T03:45:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f05d98bed09f041022d4182fb74126ca
7d1b469cb2eba738ac5209b8ff75aa3c33fd4979
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
61cb883b66c0532164918eaf4585ee55
1495426e620b209727961e352b01b3ab5ddcc826
'2011-12-30T03:42:56-05:00'
describe
'482440' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEL' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
961fc76ab42e909903bd78a2e483c4ab
962fb858cc19f7858aebc867a6d958ce78299c2e
describe
'111897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEM' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f1d728bffbade4191f45f2db6ac6ad46
530bb5d97f6dfe016228655c6abc0c09c05d9758
describe
'37669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
63795160046b3a7a80df1d342cb962ee
d3e6cce29f9382b9b151092baccc233a60a18447
describe
'31021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
30fe944d3fbc5ae4a1892f675133fbb3
7dad265d2d589f0e79d5deeb2a87de11f665d020
'2011-12-30T03:41:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
8dc8281a688173de52d729619e8ab5bd
274670fd0e08c148a000daa67cb644b7665eb730
'2011-12-30T03:45:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
db4df2a0207a37fc0f2537f471fae690
07b30193b127f42b40054a528e2995fc16f900c3
describe
'6554' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVER' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
cfac8744dfe03cba2d5d22a60e7a3140
0944e44fab937d6ec4930319537fd32bd92ba490
'2011-12-30T03:42:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVES' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1729bca830a0062e51b5e7847b62bfab
33736730235f74abed12941912e0b9cee4c7abff
describe
'108249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVET' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
3cb83b5325add4b1dce9de9037d0c8bb
d215ff00301fc4b9148a6f1ba7c1d83bfed3ab3d
describe
'36338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEU' 'sip-files00092.pro'
0a3092561a8efaf55923f9500acea6b5
23aa6bc4279b2e86396d85cd6f021d51bd3353b9
describe
'29984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
6185974b2b3b6485d4b399fa3bc39006
f8ed0d69f02b0de38b1bf964dd20e3bca6828162
'2011-12-30T03:45:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
e4d4e670982a69d509abcad479a41dd0
13d49d5508b20aa2a94c4ae508c98782df4c5976
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
0291b3fc76592becf81cfcc025c61672
7e25f37b6f983d1617bb39cc50b7b0baba0c1e51
describe
'6900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
98159a8a687eb5c2ca7b60c75b6eeee4
a6094ba87806e781485eab77dcd82334483b73f9
'2011-12-30T03:42:53-05:00'
describe
'482379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVEZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
03a8d41a62b50a84ebd928479b03fa19
ea108f28894e0032fddd7742cce5fb639d071c90
describe
'102629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ca3628f36dee3833d9ca709981276a37
573a794327954c52b8f47da0734f6f08d09dd316
describe
'33154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
fd59f8202ef4ae89c326c41a0b62e020
8b39922d50d82ba896196e35d95d95a678f8d654
describe
'28274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
0f9a0052b74c7593805a5631f377f74b
824ff0f5273f53927e56a989028c7a870d5e08d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
13fd7c9f7806dfbec6295210b4c0a8f4
9507a249315bab8e7993a3da7ff13424a389c3f6
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
8c719fce52af0172a769cf5500cac539
2d13fab959efc3b53de0f30a63f482baced24ff2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFF' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
371363d5d744ca6f1ef2188b4e6d19c2
0929bf38ac9476019290d16f8a1009705f103187
describe
'482265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b1b498ca353cf4507928ebb54dd53cf3
603e40839c07bff0c28233b5a358eb1f2cddc9a8
describe
'105676' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFH' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
4b0411ed2f3401e37bd0998fb9f5081d
69660a743d5b8dc627bab5eb0b03e3989e2afa78
describe
'34234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
199249861aa015eebbb599c7f6013edd
82dca7e374a5c59a90a83321c7482d1a9e12c648
describe
'28899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
3ee37a26fb00f61cf9a76bf32861840e
50c4971b138b5cbefb8eee710e4d613311440783
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFK' 'sip-files00094.tif'
d69e333c67b09662db34d4fe8ce95350
b8ee3e1c80d42eb66ba2f21a54b11252b4d42139
'2011-12-30T03:41:48-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
6e1501bede0cd66ba4e6b0cda964edb1
957646d46b58583408c60bf122bac663cb0382db
describe
'6674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
8c1f1ec859e1c47f0e379d89bd387768
3547b16b4e3c531be6ad33baa6b5b4ce5e2d2204
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
5d17d8a6850d19d7654a8c074c886469
fb40a05865ac2486c073d81913f09c17c8298345
describe
'114254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
b7387616817fe584917fabef6761f903
8107a97fdc5556b539e538deeb1af49ebd1b09fa
describe
'38494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a18c253c9b55e789b67c2fbfd33be449
1f52bb59da8f29dfb490e5c32ac2081d00d4cd77
describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
57e643e035fe98ae097a63af26dd5ea3
00498132f14781438643446f8e62450820215961
'2011-12-30T03:45:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
dd841d020f4aee02cf11bea1695a0c44
d1250520303d834186fb3a4ff0485536ff3c1872
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
663a47160a2ff82949677f4d26f83a9a
e5050820adbf90e4afe625b4718647bfc79b0d8a
describe
'6613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
62fde7742aaaf24e4042ee5f376a428a
16c02acdae7a235ed416c75000ea6d7b3fb6a6df
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
1faab528ff55cdc003317abf8298d2b0
1e77c39e9411c10554a398e325c34cf096c87dc6
describe
'117726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1d63713c3873000a79791ded2a198df6
4fffcc59ac00498521558d610c112381dfbeb50c
describe
'40031' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFW' 'sip-files00096.pro'
fbd77f800e659f268e942574278d1191
6164586a44a7c27c4919393fb48a8e6cb392464a
describe
'32112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
426d575be3bdad59866bc4cbbf32a0c2
dd5235cc852bc985470b230d704d81ae637ee30b
'2011-12-30T03:44:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b92155cc87433780ca4b5ed62caf42b7
b890199088064b01b6db69a76f5fb7ce58f1d1a1
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVFZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0b5f3dc21c9cd16caf9a5ad05c121d55
fd61f989f6ece088f8535db5d0f873a87e0d183f
describe
'7242' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGA' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
65c24df3ba3256b2a1740e3723fcd44a
73992bdfc71abe742577bb014cda907a35b28812
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
8ceeaaedd3b27ee1a32b576166104b9a
5c0f51e269b7c1b71f7694941e888ef615312aaf
describe
'110922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
096be78cbda35fb1f69d8fc38565229b
1c24911ea46bc77d99537341b699d0c32627daf6
describe
'37160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
e41fcae1409f679f863be13c17f1d5b0
6b28c578560adeab86937edd40004752dacac0b3
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGE' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
fcdeb3b28cc9f46033cf49be81e51c77
17d403585b337ad3145ac02bbc241e0d3f453fb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9bbd695fb9c3640aa1a45e6f21fa2621
451c11d70a8550dfa4f0cc84189473d4a0992ba5
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
7ac24f632bf512f9d79f9996f0491202
1f708920f2feff3e33fec244f702492bcce036c4
describe
'6993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e66634596a66bc641a4da6ea6d3a3569
0f15e288d873f221ef2aea71ef1b0594e2726554
describe
'482392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
d9fbb955e641ca606f421debd0017207
57a584ca41d9af4b8e2e545d95a2595580884a5a
describe
'116559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
66ee54612efbbdff68d733f7a93a5b04
6adf51b2bd179c47e8b173099a31cebbe2631602
describe
'39796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
eaafc409c57c81721eece02a809fc558
d2e321d1f07f583ddb50e0d4b58ac3f93c11c2cb
describe
'31661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGL' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
bbb247ca9cc85d5a32c36c21eb808843
d86c980dc4b5ad728a785ccfbd727aa69acb6ea6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2f2dde9b24274a57daeb913e505e669c
ef3bccb17c063a46c692765fbd7725f9d5214db0
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
7c5cf219ae6f3e3837363159f12f3684
d2d805dd2e96ab0b75449a545ce162b8db32070a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
2a06a629d7eb0a236c9018dcb05d7ecd
ed1adf1613fef5efb6f4367f7a30a8ad9c65ae30
describe
'482342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
518dd433f3914ed1c396e37995c03798
ea2afad6108da258a983c98b7e646ca257943430
describe
'82594' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
f01bd4d1c8e2db34266eee9ed01556c6
7bf5ff423b952fd771d6b253e243bea6156fbbef
describe
'22627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
7ab7eb0a618bcbae8524f1b2f0022e04
1998cad245e3a1f65a116550b233ee4d692f8e87
describe
'20788' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGS' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
a9458b3230d48370c2378374208c42cb
d22660ed11df9e0fdd124c03d503cebbdcd033a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
2455a82d5531072628637a9ef242baeb
bfb97c972d1467c45c7af6053371d1e912a8dbf0
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
4e87b0d5e0f44d5a102c254f13f3f4af
c8f6cce80e8dc55625c12ca12250d6632adf4235
describe
'4689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
6a6315f778418a65e41ae34c2f460bdb
178b65e2a13bcf2b9d2885f7e1736ac41a73c187
describe
'482420' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
56510a07c24eaf98d892f0f6807a3fe2
26e1b31a9fe070fafe6b6564e65b998c54c829a7
describe
'91680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a638879a9d08277064d4259e2f572310
9d5db2980164f81158583555024f3b1145b31310
describe
'27099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
4b176232345ccd1aed6d1500d16f860c
bb6ab4eeb3971491919abfe56a58109e9fbee2a9
describe
'24314' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6dbceb51844a663c5922ecb38d6232e9
14a437b04c09614fdb1569969796ae611cc0ffb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
3b2165752ad028c2007db24f35208a04
c90caa1acb8145011c6ba44211593a83a454a1df
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
278bdcd939489ab07bd86d3da6273596
f65c579018de3baf33ae01857b4ab5d465d88912
describe
'5635' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
780dc65f0a04c9d91a84c7cf3c1c0fa5
88f50266790e74e5757b2ba4fdfaf12eb00d5e1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
33df55e4b4302c2abf5206bee12f09d1
457cc56c0ba9e93ee26c7e134e523e2137c440f9
describe
'113260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a29b2f318c41ef04ba56e89a1dddc7f7
6c3bd9477bf09c11d81ca035b89b11b2b9d43270
describe
'37378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
aa3e9c99d5f592796fb02b7b2542bc49
1e7ae4f96cb892bb08170775459459191dff83f2
'2011-12-30T03:45:50-05:00'
describe
'30819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9b03068df29ab6409c923b7e7451bf4a
1093d3352f336d14fb431b78f1b02bd375d7671e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2bec24edc248a4a769adc30d8353974b
114cd49403c6d5e3a32292b1d40e2bb9a4f6274e
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
726134bf64487d0124c671723a25cecb
15020fbed9cb45acae896d7f2e7800a27003d50b
describe
'7015' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
1c6e77698c224308de6a6b06d8183ff7
75ced083b4f4ce7555fdf22d4335990323449e12
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
a694b6a791d6f07de30ca4c186e3348e
966a16eaba85a27efb3604ec032cf7eb627d79e8
describe
'113167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHL' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
e96ada9ff8b432fc0b21bb42753a2d35
74dcfca67a13c1f2a51bc9132f0d0bfa110148fc
describe
'37847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
908253c9273ae5b956d9af033b5f5446
31ef54a4c8e9148e5181afd5b8c7f9f3a1adcfe0
describe
'30396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d1bef31414145e2204010ec7866e834a
ea434a7ff9e788b3ec3b1a075ba323dc50b31074
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
972828013c9bc749e2a70d6918df97cf
11b510cd4808139cda87a1d648a9f7a74bf27678
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
23ddcab0461247e42fe09084641e0f2e
220e758855790e7d409e57ca57757f8d7eb7495b
describe
'6803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
be3f30377a1a53035e540c52235fe2aa
2d39018ddab07bcb2bb0219d35ca2329a71b1d38
describe
'482269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3074ff259168980262b6182bce09600a
b27c4f1a6854acab241a5f30a4ec9bf6a98f6a72
describe
'114222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
f5b8b2513be7388cf228041b4a89110c
5e40a0085e086ed7b6b47577984e7beb015a0ce0
describe
'37028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b158b5485544ae807fc9bffc39ff1e48
c8c7912a1da0256951b2b650f3dacbf380f88c4d
describe
'31032' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a011dcf6d06501efe14fab9c666a028c
f15383b7e2c61ef6a0d7a11a14d782c72574230f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
59e49fac9438c40a5858f1c83e5a9a47
bd4d8097dc5c7fe353c587285c886743d6108fe2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
73774005e6af026d62c527e4e85e8e2f
1cb13d527cc0a0a763d45ccd1cc4e3fa70ace9b3
'2011-12-30T03:44:25-05:00'
describe
'6814' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
86beec8839f19e695b30029c29e39fa7
2b2b48ade2286f8fdb477113cf83d6b217c53088
describe
'482323' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
50d887af2e3298871ec6bfadf6a9af18
fa7d0859f6a197403bb3e68438c9a1935f99491c
describe
'104816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
1af5413ecaec473b221be2d8515528c6
3e4b62cfad3f95ba70b46d45f9473b5657dcd0d9
'2011-12-30T03:42:36-05:00'
describe
'32961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
18a7f96f2da0faf9ce03c61e4f660b3d
5b45471d8612295c5927397dab477ed2b00c1a70
describe
'28442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e629a94f26da9202e81d2ab7088e7194
8b3b67297d20bf2a9022550414dfd9fc5fbf35a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
62edf1022b92e5826f4b087d36555209
7309ecc971e09054f7e6ded7666f983c8d68fc47
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVID' 'sip-files00104.txt'
040ab80ef5fafb0fbd640dd6046c7c0c
ba865dfa492c167dd9de392c1948f1a477d463a1
describe
'6564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
c9915554518b32530e74ea8e5f600ea9
358235af3e916abee2b5e23d9e6673845c2390c3
'2011-12-30T03:40:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
0cc404a4ec3901eba207a0f93d900870
c85ce37013cb73c1d5f437725423f5c99ea45e8b
'2011-12-30T03:41:55-05:00'
describe
'111645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
e4439200f493b3929302ae15cf5cc072
b3011139a7fc57ca9abd6ab56c019ee40019cec0
describe
'36831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
7aadcb7ee19f9353951d7f14faad3f05
4a0dbae27611f91419b4a6601db9932f538e4c55
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVII' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
ae68f1a0af32f5ca6ecc4cad0fa34413
ee48381d583d78fb7c95a3f247bdd8739dcc6e6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
82edcecaf4b2126ba96374507090f510
bf33b2e220fb79aea0422f5e129faae91f09ecb2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
5eeab42a360c4f527a9265314272b59b
fc984ea5777a4f3ab7d3d224467dc15123d27462
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f5ecb9606d07296f5f99abf05e02ccb1
5fb75f2615c192835aa24db589a0414dd51cbcb6
describe
'482416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6cd1ac54057777fddeec7bd22ecf128f
97b1a5d889ffea90c50357111e0c9077710233b8
describe
'119427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIN' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
e5f0c239b7b0ba647673084d973a57a6
6c127c70ca44bc324a1f734e92e1f0f4ec891770
describe
'39951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c6727e404bbfb894abe1ba598a455049
40de623380ed9303aeb0d5abb5b9212a4e250ea5
describe
'33057' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
e31b9e539ea79280a037ae08fd2d7153
1016017dc8c6a43552b45b44db656e1215cc8e2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
3a937e5f42dc8da21d897e2b5056745b
e560c67a958b56f6e4ba91a0ddc9f0c040e61f15
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
36e68cff19f8ea4ccdf8ce548b146d63
da7d1788f3ca55a24ed634fd6768a8d05188f279
describe
'7173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e1bbfba8c32631bdfc01880842eeaaaf
7d5f969d5b6b15d3fa474cbe78bed37c97c05c04
describe
'482452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
3338c5b594ae4bff9df72cc3b8afc24b
1545df8295cc0d0506b8615cb5f145a25355a583
describe
'111119' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7a48a0c17f61600da91dba58c161c553
1c5ec728fd72e3aa3b678cf4e2c9d6b9eaffcb37
describe
'35950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
39b6edf2d284bf4fc93f973b6c31888f
3eb183581f37e7b06a838b1ca9933ded5500c881
describe
'30562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
73648ccde0e00eacf8730f32b5d7f2e0
98f7e8f590de72ff1c83fe72b3982c4984ff1d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
5b3f0cad60c9882f5706f530b5439532
b97aae168e50550c0c34ebe6d4d181bf7f8d3bfc
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
f0a7a9c529b273f0291761c3f9e98855
71d40c0177bb587e7645a008cb4faa26a93f623a
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6eda64eca9e0548f6294971ccc3ff312
b8f982dc098b1d9a6f8dba4c0e87a29c4839a4fd
'2011-12-30T03:42:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
1efd20dcb54264ccb6e01db818349a9b
dc0b92970bcc7d79a29efe9ae808781901c7630f
describe
'113965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
6bcb707ff1c458551e0b676f1d5c98b9
12b1779443a2d317497999823bade8f26be26618
describe
'39050' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
8849ea0f36e8ef450633cba51b181eb3
84057f5083db30e654fdd7d311b97804bbc75f5d
describe
'31566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
ef9ec4641efd46e86baf3ca2447da51e
7572632c79d8116bd23f0af2d4da7b70a2403699
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
31900d69f506195662f501cf187180ec
6374a1728ed1bc3bd696b5cc2858eb0eee1e1aad
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6891c30f605e26e4c913c3e7d8eaff75
2195ee42251a024f8620e8fd25d99459f6f48b3b
describe
'7021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
6dd7a38720387869133cbf77efb08af0
5a86b6c5109f636ee86d7184d48cc040dcd15de3
describe
'482372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0ff8420322e0fab5acd736b05b2bcbf5
20a352c94d9d23736c2d7abddb1344f05de6c148
describe
'114136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
6391b74403185b05e7ff3340c389fd15
e7513ded516524bca10db07fcd3b20038642dcd2
describe
'38769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
f64480eef43a8d38fc2b32e01b6682eb
88d53dfe958895efd9931d13486e670ad95cd1f8
describe
'31500' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b059f34b4c913306e839ec72147fc0dc
3fd8c2134e490377921864931d86b6c6d0b6ff84
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
0c874482c2b248863f4379d0d9334902
f8855c092761e0af69726c0223f6cdda228fd8ff
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
b7b6caf9a26c603cb064e38a299b59b2
959e783f08a09ce455cac20436c9e454221ca532
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJN' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
324ecb3a60a2a80038380c0feffaab31
59d7c79710a10b50733d05646ba15480539a711a
describe
'482393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJO' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
17106e97ec4d897514f63159538e133f
fd17191fb5903d299cb63f87b60e76042532037c
describe
'112920' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
c2fcb177c086d082c8e0df7f7f2afa02
e8c430427d3eaa328e583fac52bf23df58d06e0c
describe
'38209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
53ff4c3e118f0cdb9b5c4fb78f440d40
7172fb0b60f7ddfef82e423d4f4431decbe88d8e
describe
'30062' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJR' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
cd1c7456751d2444e1d5f7687c0a354b
2c557b6d3a89432adfc805aac2b5835cfca3accb
'2011-12-30T03:41:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJS' 'sip-files00110.tif'
d5d3382f4a84bc0139b345c64c90c51d
d8fcc50b41ec15196f719fbba3d7b3f1abd2c22a
'2011-12-30T03:46:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
5f6a17f3490177de2371a41aac35cf48
cfa05889faa2e44038b45d5a4eeeaf700ede661f
describe
'6869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJU' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
6b42c013806457fa700aa71b6820e0e3
cb2019f0c8603df65098253f4db4b1ca6fc53a51
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
031cca330151317722b7a21dbd8fd40c
3d1664d8455aae1c1d468b9f8219590e664a1d98
describe
'115319' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
92417415bf734051fed7d3af099d7b2b
be542ba03bf165ac43f437b56603538d0b37d1bd
describe
'38554' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
b672884473273d68da56afa5667becb8
1222975fccec2f5132d22b09412100382c611019
describe
'31628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
10bbb0671a80e5c851219df45d420f8c
80fba819a806491c0b683d6063cdddb25f53942b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8929b725a82e773f352610196fe13df0
154bb3710110b7ae92982521f6913e3edeb9ac46
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8930ef5737a9c5ebd63a143ded8841a5
52543ab2acc6eabcf50e7c026091d3a4e6f62f1c
describe
'6956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
a2640fbec9f692a154259aaf20a23f41
8aa02adf35a1be48b2cb2b786baa4a75fa8a7a02
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
a1e2a869e66f3e1b3fe7790fe895f7fc
961be1fd36c15c0b668f06841f552ea349569fa6
describe
'114205' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
6f76a4055b1c62e918f724a7d55d995b
e58045d44ec982cb2c6f3e2b290514d0e15812d6
describe
'36859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
ea3d69ffb74b28f0a48d65a0eaeb5417
17176c1e5cbb631a9c72bedb728084eb6590f3c9
describe
'31282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
70fb9d6fa975a2b34b8573ef668b9e59
a5f82431664996bd5b85a5c06b90d55abcbff1c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
d16ffbae9c401bd0010c94d3829e7b34
a114c87d94c5565f2058734a7aa85a2b148bd651
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
373bbc88d154fa7a561ec1f14680a10f
34709bf6690abd6ca547b4e760690a1cd7f3e498
describe
'7231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
bff04e212f929bf282bdbf296ca64005
1b0565a096febd775837312fcbf990d4215a5209
describe
'482318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
9ecdd2c207b00e9c8204e5d8fb6b81d6
c8a4d9726d1618a9ef278899c3c51d3c1d25fd24
describe
'108736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
36b57f4c7c6b7f8113b04569efa33e22
4bddc404f75ebd4677e547f4638752545f0cce73
describe
'34055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
139dc47d09ea2d983432b4344cd91e67
3de7e000ec6cb2f0b90384218f4f62a143dd6f5f
describe
'29358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
f582810d82f3c171117fa1e7b1aff534
3689715fed24870f63f9dab15c93620eb6024211
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
9accdf09a953b629044d88b127c64510
4d4afe637249977dca3d155eae6d60a556906921
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
f78a7ca700abd397cde59a6880760269
1c068d8671cf5b90565d65ae4b8a096bb92b7498
describe
'6770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
238d2f46d5c125a05621f763d973d19e
f036a7fc36785fc8c6db6a1cf343918f6e5874f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
53546eefcf8788718c4812e8b4edf5d5
a56c1ce5c1caf85a62339c3d9bf246d439a5ae98
describe
'94192' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
2e0c02f8a4b9937032731bb0f0e4877d
f3fa664e26da66ec13f91a505a0e6486f2dae62b
describe
'28374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b70cfbfe69b1ec4b48374b62af95b5d5
e9bfb5ce2a1bba7a965c1dc41caeeaaae868211b
describe
'24840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
11fa0062263faf0c4c863f6cd0675e03
99df8036cb16d086952941e2f77c94be11a32fcb
'2011-12-30T03:41:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
bf95f58fc2f9e543e34a5e5978b4101e
c2c0057816c32bd94b85e7a238029ce7cd33eda2
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
e7a70acad5af4c898d3cab53fe0c7390
4cc2602007d0994233cf49943a46771702e627bb
describe
'5645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
77781c34e911d55327b648f53540d890
e799250aa92d0c86fa7bb07aa513efb733a0ddeb
describe
'482231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b923869c19c6c2ef098c4972bdc94615
e828c8519ae92bad4b9066a4bd305a1c54b6bffa
'2011-12-30T03:41:14-05:00'
describe
'130978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
7f97dbc28738d6330a0b37ef1bef9934
92e4bc2833dc0a8f3f15939fb19c57321edaf612
describe
'2981' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVKZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
20fdbdc3e399e5229bf96475f2265e44
0dd07a80a97242482ae70e967cb45cf765790833
describe
'30714' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
3c5e783f663d39ae8bc9f926808de14b
c183a863cf12124b7b7df504a357a52e6b536ec7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c120eb583072849e5c415c1defb4b166
b8a70245630a576c7d5a5d1871df84da0a29d01d
describe
'7359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLC' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
b11d06f2f9550230fed4a1cda514f212
c03dacde9b74fd1b915f546681a6694a88e57e7e
describe
'482266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
a3314574e85d17011581083872c546e6
a24f74d79e0eeb091de7c3a80aeb5e5e6e70bfaa
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLE' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
d37637924403c6d71748db84b95401f9
c0f921f2571503541fab04c8969cedc4fd3b9b95
describe
'6106' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLF' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9dc2fec50238555ad7eca82802003782
ac84e5f976589f26e7be06478dfa82d781b16f3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLG' 'sip-files00116.tif'
1982b75bd010a9d859b9a8995973df4a
b8a00a19952736d03cc9848709d9b98a412b43cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLH' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
1f971e8d04baa03c68a8f9271b7221a0
743dd1ac633d82a0332be057311312276d444665
describe
'482321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLI' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
98cf53c85e5c076e0c5135fc6864a84b
72f973929df39b62e6d2713e8a670c841168e7e9
describe
'107729' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLJ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
914b98cf8a5f186e1af90a486fbe870c
62b361956a906a94c540d3ca748938341bd8fe0c
describe
'35524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLK' 'sip-files00117.pro'
db7cca803cbd632190a5a383f2b87007
1027003c2e4dd2f50d4367db75ea49263dee726c
describe
'28835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
062bfd9523a5da642da64df001b19813
0192d885df963d9b811366f5bbd5d0947c2be4b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLM' 'sip-files00117.tif'
687ca02bb1ba2828fc8cf57a7b97e6e0
966c6abf44c718ee5fec2f4a008025bac35dcf2b
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLN' 'sip-files00117.txt'
2d51f9575595b1cf26f2cf0e1ab75da2
585abcd60fa2579b61e4ef0564796fccbdebfe43
describe
'6810' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLO' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
8dcb8264c23435de2c77d0775edd1515
270fa1e0473152b5f75f07eeae900d46c0b7e872
describe
'482448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLP' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
30c8158bedfe85e273b025363826f212
d81d790b008fb1de2ff82c5deb9e45789ec903a1
describe
'115413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLQ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
78e2f724b50f3fd7ed8b42e20db71454
136102996ac66834cc73d33d9435ba378a26c0a0
describe
'39259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLR' 'sip-files00118.pro'
3881c345a96a229f7c6a88d429e02727
c9dc8ba7c2517031d1131c68bb396faa94adaf3c
describe
'31651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
bd01fc13301be478ecd83acbe1f5d942
ba28dd532f2c628bd977b0cd1b025a5030426dbd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLT' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c2ae802e0fd69aa198dc01d44b166cf9
3097cfdda7ca3206586892501057f2b43e116e04
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLU' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e625bce2b6fb9f8ef53c526343c58684
7df5fea8dd4a53cd02b1b83c73e0909f0098271f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLV' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7339e02d0d094bc049000bc4a0214346
1ea2b624f9fae5395ac0e6c6d91e98e1299a1263
describe
'482333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLW' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
a3e5904cb46fb14d9bdb530ce1c1e69a
54325c1a14c8b464898dfb256a6f69017be8c0ff
describe
'115771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLX' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
8fe083d541bb64c3af116a025b992d5c
8840595cee2c3f31b9a6e7db4c344b10bb4a9a79
describe
'39219' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLY' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e8e8a499800e16865c3ba51033b296d9
cea10d3dd4b2e7a36226bca321c5313df49b2060
describe
'30991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVLZ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
a8cc37025629f088cc5127876d3f92d6
63b6351a41b9223ef482a2bfbcda50223bcd1983
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMA' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c470e4bc8797525a9af60735ccf87406
bcf7ee24f00c8c6bcbf8662aebc2bf2c2af873a5
'2011-12-30T03:43:58-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMB' 'sip-files00119.txt'
bf800a42bc765a0283f8e3e6810521e4
26b4188b5ce998b909b172d67667138600894e1b
describe
'6817' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMC' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
e0018231159a1f7e31a5472243455a5e
d68716a4add6068ed4f26e76b35dae71478f4465
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMD' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4db8ff3298698d4983a3da887ed93627
48bd79f28b3cf6b68d844075a2d8e0bbc4f66131
describe
'111891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVME' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
312b9bc03a73f6a23b1a0b0cd62fd5bc
ca9eb301cb4a0469e8c9834dcf345062f0ed50a4
describe
'38237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMF' 'sip-files00120.pro'
5a0c68f8a1f2aabd4450f42b5632d86e
c2ecb7df2f245955122d18c9d4466c15dad74a51
describe
'29643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMG' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
5c9a63f03218f38ba0b3a29c3b934126
f3d7910fbf816f827179fdff4142609a9675f150
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMH' 'sip-files00120.tif'
e2421ec35a4e56478a9dde402069ae69
b4d556da9aa911bc1d43cbb71d00301cf7d17e27
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMI' 'sip-files00120.txt'
675e1f20f26af95917799dc0eb4b4bd5
e44645cf990bb86f6fa4290e6b29281978eef88c
describe
'6750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMJ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
389fc429d97638c4f57a1755852788eb
8a68a1983e2643ece5329d899f58b0aea88e57d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMK' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
36ce5a0b893ee846924bbec80df585b3
8a3d29771bcaa21c012c5a596185f681e6963b8f
describe
'111520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVML' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
259c70298a8ae426cb22b6662214fe81
9797175ae63b75c98a82f77449069ad3f86a9c8a
describe
'38468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMM' 'sip-files00121.pro'
9f6bd9f13cc8a14c5b29b35ed18a33b4
053025d514a302e7d796f9eae0b800466c9d49f1
describe
'30507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMN' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
034acd4accebb10c5cfb0d2ac1ad5f3f
fd6296b7efb8e9606355b6d99aa603a73f9c2eae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMO' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d8c403019597bc0e371979a406a13eea
f4f032e22c958791bca89a18bf0f39fbb3aeaf0d
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMP' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e585bd7b207b93fb256d617dad6dcb27
983ccc98cbe7bfaaf2c48ff18abb209ab4c9ca6f
describe
'7225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMQ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
d9549936ffa71b1149cc65968e1d585f
ecc7b0517c05a23702af76b2a879416ac612594e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMR' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
e7d370f40a62a0745e6d667d53b5eba4
4ec2a2bae874d8c3722f763fc9814d63a375f17e
describe
'116751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMS' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
d776007d2e021bcd8f623950523e8538
5c4d00a3d4a5e8cec5ba4ca57de3b1848744214f
describe
'40034' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMT' 'sip-files00122.pro'
32113f6dd5d393057df14034b69fb209
85f2da844327001bcffcef35cade1e8952727ce6
describe
'31467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMU' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
56c01fb16749ac2c2221c7673820692a
1ef9f505194c19fe1471426e1d2f238c2ea4faf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMV' 'sip-files00122.tif'
c027220430d2aa9bb91fc8a996222868
f0cd4967dd393445a3493ac51246acf7803a8fe9
'2011-12-30T03:44:18-05:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMW' 'sip-files00122.txt'
f3db167df3acfb8c3e0111b7b45add3a
b849e09691da6e0c81e00a288f886b680bb75239
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMX' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
22eea23b04c95cf2ae04cb28af025b72
4457c947a986cb473e6c2db4a10f23d5332f6125
describe
'482228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMY' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
14e9c7787fefcb9191b677e22ee222a8
d519de76a518815d419f6fd61c076af9deffe433
describe
'118181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVMZ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
29795880d83bbbaaf61c33d9c3cdf95a
b9264262af956d9f771f9de1fba5aee98e17bf7b
describe
'39059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNA' 'sip-files00123.pro'
b45ead96851618c5c41929df25a023c4
a8ea8da5eba6306274593d224ae3d121e60e7cbe
describe
'31988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNB' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
35c1dd70d7e8af902d3402261bd5ae0f
9bbcf4dc6d59d9c556872edea5b1dd9845ffb871
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNC' 'sip-files00123.tif'
afb8b0b8d81bcf56f30276635e7439e4
34ec3f4dee629ca3f8f61dfb5fdea38ea158b834
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVND' 'sip-files00123.txt'
eeb77c5ab0fef99c4957364ee954e2b5
4fd13e4f0e7e99ae55612ee750932b69827513b7
describe
'6979' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNE' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
aab8d020d1d39b8b03620a936e5077d6
64b38d374aec99951d957930bef3130728f56351
describe
'482426' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNF' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
081b9b6f4b783f1c3767590a08f5a2a1
dd44c230e43062ca05ef59df2743a1dd051023fa
describe
'113625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNG' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
d33dade68ec2e59d1c9ae8c83e775968
8d99dfcf58c2e95901e5691119bb30a2500ea824
describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
91fdf46673b4585a828a67200c400d6a
827e8c729b7a1f8e264cf7e18cec21b2ec879298
describe
'31657' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
dcbddcceffdc428b1f531428c6bec702
ca9edb6daa7b304f6bbedf4e4e40f8f24ba9c0a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
ed74a0b36000596bb510ec3e638c5994
3de26b6ea2ba15c7fdf4e427040ca50b421f5722
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNK' 'sip-files00124.txt'
9da4da341232c83b9121b9039c5668e5
4c319d7b7924afe3c95297677927def0d130661d
describe
'7113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNL' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
68a1cb5fd38e65d316ebe4eeabff663e
325b9ccdb1f056074834c115c0f6be5f7439acb6
describe
'482396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNM' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
b464b4584d9189c193888ae70cd42657
c481ef9130612f582b3086e35f30d6a1d89c4b1d
describe
'111677' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a5fbaeaf79865cfa53ee0a7b7bbd5f25
48dd7de518a925814d8672a3c77ff2631817b6d1
describe
'37586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNO' 'sip-files00125.pro'
27167a1dfd087246520c726951225f40
3992237ebd79ab03f563defee2f93eae32178adc
describe
'30076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNP' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
fd6fafc4a920736f212fc398917522ac
e2fd3fb0665ac1ac27ddd3764c06397228b94480
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
fd049f941e361151e1b8cfac58443ca1
30513203a425d65bbc3f6b53ffe842a5f4460492
'2011-12-30T03:44:48-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNR' 'sip-files00125.txt'
5c7a3b5e2b22d830acadf5a77d87ec00
f23bdb262d6db9f9cdf4bcc2d73a4ec464dcd129
describe
'7061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNS' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
409d69113873ee09e7735e81560e5487
d057e9cdc6adc906bed4f88197a5482444949462
describe
'482291' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNT' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
e813f3a6d99fadbde7f65afa7db61c83
54a3f9540c23aa3fea7f56a8518822f3b6cf05a0
describe
'118070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNU' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
df5d4e0c2e68552aac1d64d54e98153b
e731501a72ce42963dd376aaf03b32eaf7ed456e
describe
'40095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNV' 'sip-files00126.pro'
51a7601eda55ba8269e0ffacb0dd1021
d98603a49c375e5eb81e697fa1d720de2fbd9b16
describe
'32739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNW' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
52b4c0f0e3bf8f3d8cf3fc3785e7cf73
01268073e5a4c6c39521615f308796cef375187a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNX' 'sip-files00126.tif'
141b16ce0c186f731861fdbc1a13f3e2
12c7e317cd088a5a11a5fa26a0b475b796a60f23
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNY' 'sip-files00126.txt'
027632816c49cb96350e61f2e354f590
d15ffe405e3ec3abea9c2b807d322b36d55b3ff0
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVNZ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
48c639c91876f62fc5701ccec7c972d9
b0a5205384680e803bdfc9bd75731034f681787e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOA' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
bc02bb00ff921b63c324f1357a341fb3
2ab8e0ee005948b65bb3fc64eb93bb825a5f674d
describe
'113044' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOB' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
6ac4256f8b7123b7724433e9b3aeee97
bb5b12251eb1904121b26f04e93a3524c0250d4f
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOC' 'sip-files00127.pro'
6d6245bc88b82ef63bc03079ba7149d2
74b2e4634970426b7419b3ddfce221a0ca1fadf8
describe
'31525' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOD' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
de422e2c662a9c79065dea30382c6786
57a8e931aec821ec1bb82c6e984cb8acd7478e12
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOE' 'sip-files00127.tif'
35114bbfcf0b564e2e6b45c5c650f776
ea400d3da22dddbd2d310f78fea52d78a2f474ed
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOF' 'sip-files00127.txt'
350055eaf2bed7a2af256e14af20ce54
0cd891b5cd8e442a32a82aad10ee2a94a761089d
describe
'6619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
a2ecc496a46ae3465caf8d495c6a4332
afbfd25eaa0aff98c69ddb50881df6681bffc61d
describe
'482331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOH' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
31571013b981128821b462b6c5fd95fc
9a842b4dba629735dc32a0bde9bddbcac76e7341
describe
'109452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOI' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9e0423ed07bc4c03c13ff56f6ad89354
360010d23b9f40c3baee331751bb558032eb769a
describe
'36749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
a86518d7665292b557875f99ac51af67
a16398818a3abcce2d9334d050a0ff31e69ea333
describe
'29681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOK' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f3f972f78c37e009765759627da6b7d3
6bf2e6d9390d042592bc2c234852f52715589c2d
describe
'3876436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOL' 'sip-files00128.tif'
5cd048daebd8446efe4c3d25ab7eeefe
b15cd074c1d95b208444ea01a3fd6a4376ef5016
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOM' 'sip-files00128.txt'
f3b18b266c9410abd49e3a2769f81af1
331115a7af3444fafd0d75c3ae721236033a59cf
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6543' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVON' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
36c3140c0bb6615f2a738779cafd9d38
99c73659fb992d4103abce9b62e84b90acdddaf1
describe
'482446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOO' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6791ec25e565541b53e20cbf9d420787
40f6b7529a14b5ae7720c66a5998032efe302220
describe
'115766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOP' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
e9c1afd4db8c032f5bdad77d86afc268
8c1368f60a5f0655bedc50ec0bb179f844549f54
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
65450406a9142128c904cd2c99ab9b14
70d69249ac356b664717f6a0deffcea13341f6d0
describe
'31617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOR' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
0da31badcbf7ffb295096ea886dc1112
1b66705e32451e364da5bfec7c0219e2003c577a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOS' 'sip-files00129.tif'
5924824d970266a539c5fc6e2c2f93e7
a5e7b745b263944ebb16a44836af8beebafa77be
'2011-12-30T03:45:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOT' 'sip-files00129.txt'
84f98ace82db6c396770886dcbfb2105
6690c80891720f1abbeff35d7f5721bd5fd111a5
describe
'7104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOU' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
bf4e45e161c1009e92d5f35591ceca15
53a42057bb2063ebd209b6cc9dc77d87fce66384
describe
'482336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
eed08dbb2cf0795ef3386403082ee162
f2020db778b55da64fd92c52df37eac61d693863
describe
'96699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5f11b67f3752443ead78bf889281118b
b68594e8c6f1d74ec4fcb3bc91830c4a69133c50
describe
'28470' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e368910f7f24b51245d5e7b8f801505a
60601e149fcc93ba0efd8275b7b57f2de326fd46
describe
'25416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOY' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
716dc919e398484d7629c332f9c88862
b44c9acbeee503ea4ea6a9bb1f773b0a701fe1be
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
1397f4bf0bdf658dc90ab041f7eb3d86
16e50e12bd4f0cdcfcc1eca38c7105719e7dd371
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPA' 'sip-files00130.txt'
7190499ea8d8d3aea4a58946b2fc2d05
8b34a6faad6b6fd099b7fd429120e92f55949a75
describe
'5441' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPB' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
3e3f8ba808790a4ac3ce2a6e24781500
05d803c3a0d60bdb9e8e3ab84785e7079540a927
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPC' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
de30700c146e9632249bf68becd5a807
532be4758804b09b6fd09e098f45697200b431b0
describe
'98961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPD' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a003efeb9ab65c67b19fa8c32cf7d974
fea351ca3e0a45fb7aa43c21bd7e10482f5b9408
describe
'29538' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPE' 'sip-files00131.pro'
07c1e237ef31e3f349f69b5b797b9f89
375e4f81f316dbd75ff032135fb6787e10ed77e2
describe
'26321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPF' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
b1aee69d50651f065e1c0ddb903431e8
524d0c33f449154efe4fd7ee7e3248f7fba9c070
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPG' 'sip-files00131.tif'
37cd02639db6958d903b3e079282ec19
b62fe66d6712f5b5ef4cdd179e2fb5b5e543a417
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPH' 'sip-files00131.txt'
b719664f157534186123908885dd8a21
0a63baa8f0b238dbe833819b9baa030c5423edb1
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'5585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPI' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
eb85fb62c04ac97613ff7dd9bf19c9ca
d936d17614eaf6adc8d40bd87a9bebc6838cf9f0
describe
'482397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
480e83ba3ea9363388bf3415ff72b6e0
3dfbd9bef0b027b33e69727a2f7bbbd09b2e2987
describe
'114117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPK' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
df4be75081f81801a7c8e987c69da60d
2d3e8c1df9ba14101d28705ce72ad39a20c84f8b
describe
'38387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPL' 'sip-files00132.pro'
1fc256e6ea75bbcb48ad53e4f828d7c9
298a81fe5150a1b20b7cd05bfff3d9c556ba299f
describe
'30519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPM' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
863338f5ba1998b05245e178b02b2b72
bddb3b360a6910a803243e3ee86e50127c1240ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPN' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ad3d4b7e069f4fd2f00e376bb392a0da
4f4b9891780d8c966eb7de06eca89d8d5f287537
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPO' 'sip-files00132.txt'
aa025bb25540d2874ae78a2f648ceeb0
d349dcd0651dc093ab8af726d00696aea6ce180c
describe
'7154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPP' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
8b9b9643e2dd8892764a2302242818f6
20b3f2d6256038838ddac5d264ff5ade7338d995
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
88fc9330e466ee50930cfebec3d0a344
f56216fc2fdce1762cd3c095e23be8f3c1a70972
describe
'123968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPR' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
062b1b1dfd2ec899d0a6950f20a797ee
7bf570dcb1032722ddf322bdaa1287592bb73b62
describe
'42214' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
81eee6002c6a4b207e3541e4f70b6a43
f6f885daefc629793a6d1b434509054d21d5069a
describe
'33953' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPT' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
3c33f9be035caca3a0880035b6e08618
ec80e331ab7dced5825a74cec1cd41558ba5bf33
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPU' 'sip-files00133.tif'
1869c1c6c1c002a2bde8b736ed92648b
02b64e04febeb99314e3d33216b25281825bfadc
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPV' 'sip-files00133.txt'
2c58b023ae6ee5ee76e889a9bd085d78
c441cac5d2927229969a887620fbcfdc5c625091
describe
'7632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPW' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
bf45b743bbd2d0c4b2578f843d945942
4ff07bb6f90ac8a7b5a047a7b9ec18da2a5ae8ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPX' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a5cace0cae6aac2dd05606f07c65d31c
56770d5149474a81f68a15199b731521650412d4
describe
'115808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPY' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
3a552aa786502f1c3430ebf443331a1b
0b462fb1748a56dcbb886a2f460e5c6d499b5f5d
describe
'38496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
7ba84ed54aaca9bf4b19130cfeaaf34e
0ef2467416143702f9a1f528e5ebea6d47351f48
describe
'31260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQA' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
a1a75ba7ce5f22bdf6f74d0ddf884566
6faae9143a7cfe87df492921a9862fd2fbad8e8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQB' 'sip-files00134.tif'
d144f4d354798cc4e287ef13ef0d3565
b0cb2ab8ffb9352a33af82f1a47a44d4ba1d1601
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQC' 'sip-files00134.txt'
4fac64810459cf77412ff861b756d2f4
dfeafd342da04481ba306b14151341633bfc1e2a
describe
'7177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQD' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
d8672f68b706a426fb3bbaaf9ce6033c
2138bbb80feba6ce0cb493021ec73b50b98a0714
describe
'482381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQE' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8dfdd7dc4d2eea73bc47dde6a94f5868
3c612bb5f569204349a31043e07f4ec252a71730
'2011-12-30T03:45:52-05:00'
describe
'114328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQF' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
10b323a27a9fef4ae14756e74cafde67
6f7c68adccffc96bc662acb8c6b7616a49fe4724
describe
'2112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQG' 'sip-files00135.pro'
9bb87d0445e6c2fc70826e2c578f1798
411208980b179c14bf8aad1c3e17b208adb8cc6c
describe
'26532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQH' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
43f7f4a0c0aa3dc07c5e597ee8eba5d2
bacfe5be017c49e360449cd7f9c8a1c362ce71f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQI' 'sip-files00135.tif'
6cfb98f54b21d46caa71df4aced5cd5a
29cdecc37c7400922194caccefdc60144ea8fbc7
'2011-12-30T03:43:52-05:00'
describe
'66' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
18f60caaca47e48a344d9eaf2afbf79d
9a6cf527d1c2ab4879df21f1a856c99d6c215c43
describe
'6645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQK' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4564a240e99f6c3add94f7997a5e3f9d
9acb9a8a98bc83f346a305e4280f21f8ca0341d2
describe
'482424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQL' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
1581d7309d392af0efc067a6b5f39fb8
890654b04c340fba81d62651c1dd22f4411441a6
describe
'33426' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQM' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
2e02968666555c58fb37a17e56e5d446
4ec542e203fbcb5d29a3e396d8e2617247ec316f
describe
'5694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQN' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
197b91bda6c926297e495259895b21ff
e5e8db7f00729ef6cbe1af7b2ab1c3e72c3da367
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQO' 'sip-files00136.tif'
3ab77e75d6c1a5f734cb7aed17d58e1b
36fc4d9a3fd53fae6e4f29d2a4f0b6cfe2deea6a
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQP' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
a017b95b446effab83a55efe42352b70
3a8b8906139e588018764341a96f917c159d2e59
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
99a1522777a8cb5e3824e9df5c22827a
990b6b542466aae89bc751a6aec72575b703b363
describe
'111333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQR' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
dff10601d773a0d400b382c50baa1bf9
c22af559ece445b14f5f14345ec19d5b1816c3b6
describe
'37236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQS' 'sip-files00137.pro'
a8a3ca42c82ab87bc67dd78d933895cc
ffaa218746e78e14bed3ef143b8bb51510c7096d
'2011-12-30T03:44:34-05:00'
describe
'30227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
b55feb75d00df7e9bc99c5ef0102d2fc
9f3424e80f622f2d47ad97e79fef7b3b55bb2cfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQU' 'sip-files00137.tif'
ffd232ee55c2f42ddd18a09045851871
c09f0a938d0e3c14c1094571037a81d13fb2bc0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
3111a563c3802fb6199d3766478b9d12
ee5e8ba93ffe73c92fa56935e69a43c316450b07
'2011-12-30T03:42:55-05:00'
describe
'6588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQW' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
beb4b6cae6630658d1c0481913b25306
45c95771669afa0e29689be2c6a6288a600035ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
941b5a0248e86c31a83288db0de7d2b5
51c1640a67da1dbcc7ba0f25cc27dd4df7e44f0a
describe
'114457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
4e32072127c7a5268f2c439095aee363
b04bee8472dc63b7e45ee1babfbf6f49da75630e
describe
'39228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
214f38ad5babcc312589a1f8d5e41bac
87247a9ef9d36061d76dcb02ad486a72e06f3f86
describe
'31443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
3a4382f00365ef12f390ffcc9c4c707a
1db44900fceb605866c4bb11d487b3fcffe62d0d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
914bc0af34319ee7215328a80155440c
eacfcd6c511bc982ac559cb4cf1e6d48ffba42fa
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRC' 'sip-files00138.txt'
54d40a6358923b80b841284114abc873
a27e5f6dad6f910ed582e5ce390b1878babbfe44
describe
'7195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRD' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
b7bb2c22e4e331d748a70d13d8e59a65
792c8f67762fc26b480e094d368817a7625841f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRE' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
a885fb94caf235fb7fc363af61a9b2f1
2ec33d49c57efd7b50d280cc43e8dfd32c690352
describe
'109855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRF' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
152674039f8d1ba52835523db0c0dfb6
7cad3ec677664e33f7f5f8b04207fb2898eccbd1
describe
'37151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
45cdd4d87aa0e3751bb5d61369fd465a
cfb452a602fd16e2c68f4aa0de6f6542acd8d31e
describe
'30123' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
836fd5e1887d61ef6099fda2c2adfaf3
2cafac31021bf9dd5ebf24388a2d5ebdb36c3156
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
3403e4b1d1bdffe12bb01208a0f857ba
d33bdafb92aa766811560edd5ae5c1464d83f292
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6f5a4c0c93ed1b0f1d1c469d5efe3f5c
d2c32781bc0eddf6cd020c42bb8b13a74ba2106a
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRK' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
d9c0d75c05bd539b6f31972cc104db39
fda13a257ceaf68848edafe5c9bfcf6f7d212de3
describe
'482247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRL' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
f9bf20796fd8674a6c4edfde762cb224
9e29c03a96b53ab13c5beaaed630ec072d995f01
describe
'118744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRM' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
551bdf42fd29ede4637fe0e0af4aa187
b704241ae56f2fb12e18a1724ddabf4c7e95f97b
describe
'39329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRN' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a76d3c17f50d98a4655bc6d45e8fd59d
83e5338f50a71062445ee41fb501a912b2f4881f
describe
'32608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
c41350d38c57889f56fbfdddb00cbf46
5ee8199227de5c2e2ec205cde5589a808e63f60b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
2a25551df8b626460990ead1f1e984df
c9d1873c81a42cd4fdc153d27ae2d756d394cb5c
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
4e3dfb4178b400b0c57130733ca34f91
84a4125bcbcbeae69be194dc703cae18262ae50b
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
f353962603932fd86d20987d651f2e76
212239da4239c3eda937edc603abc8294fdd78e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
d7b4e00bd053de24ee79e7b6fa7189ac
0e43fc15987c3531cc9d538509274ccf4c8dce79
describe
'107880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRT' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
3c4ac17908532bf579c0bd7805a8bfbd
a0c7e4e13aa7033e006fa6ed3bb79cb1f13626da
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRU' 'sip-files00141.pro'
6cea4a01108fc37a648ecff2e0939f78
d2a8e42f9b89d982f54091625c3f9c831d893f0f
describe
'29599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRV' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
856edd59513d6e4a9fcfa2db9d4eb809
5ed39e06cb1e8b31fc6d0c69238a797441f86fc5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
08be0ded6e1630693ca267d25a7a7468
dae9bc7c2e17f3494a1414c87c33272118c6578c
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
44053f8ed0b4a34af32f72b66cb889d2
d8bb36427f2a74980c3b1fe51547c4a4c6bfd88d
describe
'6787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
99b803b482a46724c6ee94b3003048fd
7d587f9190a8bd91283c2f74675cf39403908c96
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
7ae92a4a0ff892baa832133e4e928093
341541a62900d7e002ac41a0a0b9527674f5fc86
describe
'117125' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
91cf6f3229ab19bfa41ba793ba233b41
df195f6ffba6b6234a9ac3fad972c5602b90c71a
describe
'39433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
d4eb5b1cf38ed578729657432c9cf17a
66c8332e8bf4d68ca501766c13d6b87bec80515e
describe
'31909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
a306a2d3652f2185921229150b8886b0
a29b4ca7474acd904413e007b14757a174ad1bc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
687caf3396ec0777a35a2c149413e1d5
f7f073e4c6a6210bf02146fc88319cd3721364b5
'2011-12-30T03:43:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
c922c7205460e93708559eda78d44bc3
57266d02fdcee2b1e2cfe4d41ed6e11d4f1758a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSF' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
ec007ff9c543e89acd84fc8aa631fdb7
e96104667b69bf1361a4a91173224e6f2f055317
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSG' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
10daa653b24784ee38c72d9f59c7d41e
83061a2f608a72c4497abe436fa580ded9c5aff8
describe
'108225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
09405229de0636d75dfcb9564e43e04c
3697860d03891bdb41664863afcfab5ceacbff9c
describe
'35956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSI' 'sip-files00143.pro'
d74176297976303c3a798e89022a3cc8
fa66844fbc42a14067340196949e7f9b6fc7ce66
describe
'29618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
2ddd5df5d490ef8efdc784a1f3e4eb96
21c42b977fd2884748a1f235183e1752943f0e9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
5de43107f80b94d7613059ec5a5a939c
10d32db76a912054106d7a46d621909e189d35a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
9755f55f477778658f6e186ce37e34ad
a3da66d0e41fb4500d7485168b3ef873205a8687
describe
'6961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
d2a495911410b7bfc7c70d3a361dc874
e7f4a91cc7f872991e0e4905bd49597ba5f0bd53
describe
'482383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
7182657072dc590edeb30f8ad7f283c7
5316885df3eae795def995a9adbb322983b0bec5
describe
'111504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
5b128d44d4ff25476f9c52727dee359a
14679623e4a62b2f7018bd8ba7416fdc9211db35
describe
'36599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSP' 'sip-files00144.pro'
e4b86975475666cc5e97b1f5c7398efc
2eb8ca7ce10ce5f32139dbcf2a956f3a44e4590c
describe
'30770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
6f380090b77a4e6c31e0bde738e72dde
4dcfd4b42707a5e226879cd0ed38f2916995d0c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSR' 'sip-files00144.tif'
3ad8113a37ddd75ee36518a56848ea61
833a5f2ea616305dadf769507bf2ab72d7192144
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSS' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ee377edc7d5d6ceaa80010ae7d055f87
6c226dfc72b814e67b8499a3daa322a30c6d6d3d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVST' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
1cabd77a5b624de3839e9e9973b714b8
e6a94858ab28ea1d46f2fdee216585ad2bb09f78
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSU' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
4bcf0891a1a94423fbcac5a8ac2f5ef2
b80aa56da358a9339bb29e1e1f424317e7b7b36b
describe
'113223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSV' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
106b772c0b456ee70cbcfefad7c6d78a
360d57f9d7faf84ccf1fb4ae6d7f373d4664c2e1
describe
'37004' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
740558f659e20e41d7ac350aed85f2d5
e19a0c9e58b68b7e415e68f4f9a41f68ded2383f
'2011-12-30T03:44:06-05:00'
describe
'30767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSX' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
0978f16b011229b389a7794f609cf9a8
a5bdfc4038bb57018a84da4fd3be1f2bf7ca4bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSY' 'sip-files00145.tif'
213cc8767b55527e3b55e09a28e5a427
463117f42e75fbd6273d01069984122b51f40f53
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
02fc92957e63bc794e1fa1704991813a
c0d5462ec37aa35fad19016bb219cfb779f2ad6e
'2011-12-30T03:42:11-05:00'
describe
'7081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTA' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
0f4565c5a9d3de32497733378e18f674
4ac0776594c7652526ec6ae10a2da1e06a0e9747
describe
'482382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTB' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
c9ac309c3b1efa876ef084ee40ac9672
7cd5f9f0cba376a1b90b0ffa94c5bc0d7a432f20
describe
'115772' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTC' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
148808e3290740dc48dd03b478a41d73
b7a529c76b2a141ad23c9befe4e142cf61da9609
describe
'37864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTD' 'sip-files00146.pro'
4b5f1e7666468e3a75d08955ca82772b
f6d90d80eea76dfa6497aff76060efecbd30e76d
describe
'32214' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTE' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
b37b91de07e1be84c0c1d57f0fd5d20a
a9095c71e5a4ccb97a0de3809da9518e942507ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTF' 'sip-files00146.tif'
19dffc70bf8ad9a22903a52d5a65f9b9
2998aedff8febd350722a1b04048e7b8fa8a5c02
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTG' 'sip-files00146.txt'
24c3ac17a6bd302e7d636093c362b0c5
40dcbcda5768ab21f90462f1cae47e13b7922fef
describe
'7213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTH' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
4fd65cdf0284ca5507a68462c9153938
807732d868c35448b8e0f26bae61e77931861b64
describe
'482412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTI' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
2a6704fa7cd5f737449e8094da41be9b
f3b5c4215b9f31dc109031cf148d384260bc03c0
describe
'126920' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
8b311d7d425e15ef19a4457f1d738cca
790b878579bc75c8ef50d42f3ec86a583af1be7d
describe
'2372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTK' 'sip-files00147.pro'
67a3c9b33bd46c20818816be4a9ee70e
cbbfe36d0feb67bdb1853ba0cd828d3fd15ae23e
describe
'28320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTL' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
e889a08e5c3d629e8b48e2ae7243d529
e0952a83719fa15252410a5594d79a2459ed5d88
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTM' 'sip-files00147.tif'
10a91e3fae69178010362d4d31be2420
a26a487a464bfc1a4b76cc3e4dba8d820d3cfa9a
'2011-12-30T03:45:12-05:00'
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTN' 'sip-files00147.txt'
07c53ee2637734d3026c4ebafb65bf13
e32d84219ac0d40479fc066b5630f007db03a7f6
describe
'6890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTO' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
3ef9f3281cae1366c4f2585ef71b4c86
2cfcdd73bee0a1f9fdf6aba8ce9413f0b5ecd2f3
describe
'482347' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTP' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
573b5e50f36cb5f973357fcce72a1379
6a76de42fd2b0138d0c0d5fdb3a788d2a6da8736
describe
'27397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
206e579003f2a4a46b84865926aed313
183a676e3d90fa50a67c0a95d680149fe97fd920
describe
'5765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTR' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5f547a118724d9010dcca9e5dfeea22b
e6abc732b69e465f19eb2e8dda45d2feb9c6bf93
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTS' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c45cf1b923795c2ea973ea1f183fa603
dee2179023b6d8f24c971c04f8a4ed7a9300872e
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTT' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
e24ec331998fe45ea1a8b69bc6877f9a
16bf2d5103f67313d299848442203dd3c6f17680
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
58c192860f0718c4fed9dfacac2a3cae
6cb388c957d69f8046acd6ee9163d70b82f55464
describe
'94629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
c6027eed55f1fc914f01f1346c08f525
b1bd7a66b1436d782b0c87a1b2e936d60e8a124e
describe
'28009' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTW' 'sip-files00149.pro'
b0e75f88f5d248cf670c07658a1a9e23
e22fea7af6036f9197d5dd0ea7c06bdeb20f9f59
describe
'25197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
c14c09ae14919f7f5ec4f7a67e35260d
0b3a2343774e02d6b105dba606950ff9727798f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e904f47cb1fcd8f28865c92419de2aa5
d9f022e97e017746587058894ef557e5ce940403
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
21d41728b09017defa3d4ed06cda2453
e7c97efdaf724736e03c5609758f44e0e4ebde3c
describe
'5598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUA' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a4ebed414fd4a3722aef18afa8e7e847
1378494544a686d9c05b268f433fa6039e6fa370
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
456886c6d1fa3bb0d638ed6ffcdbd1db
cd765c285369155eafb6eb50280de317ed4e123f
describe
'93528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
c4465948d2f2ebb04593ec96151e337d
f670948cb37a155816b84b3887fe9dbb1811f009
describe
'27592' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUD' 'sip-files00150.pro'
6ec0b087141fa47e6a54a8539f4748b1
1a0ea35623e1cc1869d5399476d0d2a1a5608c84
describe
'24583' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
45b1bb3e03af0d0a6e02615da18eff48
3eea4ae246853998ecd2113d089ccc90e081d555
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
b5f43f204d7f9567d2cb03f859696603
6aaa4b2a19adcd7a5fd38cff6b8949969e640ace
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
32f7344c00ab94d8511944bda98da0c7
ae6566c7fe4f76121666604b5a77d7742d539755
describe
'5715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
61183aba68ffa75724f5f3b326bb664d
68e059031afde86e3193e14ddb95f8319cd8e264
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
30fd4efdfc82867f2414680487fa52b8
aaa17c8cf2c6034c77591dfa0dfa6ffc565b5075
describe
'115278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
fa82513e70c3f5af9692c070146b64fd
3b6f05141e00c2a7540202be5cf63afb317f148e
describe
'39690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
bff9768c9bcf19d07f6eb07640715247
2a2eff031e91fd0a2ebf41d8f756fcdae82f20a1
describe
'32048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
8507b689505a6d6f3301e43a7f15dbbf
7450db9eb2c5e8c6e54e3aac21367dcdf937cce9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
49b06679d321055c36dc51cd424a5549
42517defc3830b5f1f6ebf488d35bd4347a0a01b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
54cec92eb7c151916b977060eef8e503
2cc20860bcbb3122d31584dd96b859df1dbcfab6
describe
'7207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUO' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
03f5d7e12930082f084bd2d28f35015e
0e637f1a25136a33fa3911520117b0ee088ff3b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUP' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
e35951647b6b839a5a43b7908a1c0295
ad60f053fa27e1a821125dd9c40a502d17bb31b9
describe
'117409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
0516b52f4c7ae818ad787fb864085b2b
d8302517972f76a8655375e0bbaa1dc3a795c6e9
describe
'38783' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
682fdec0c7728d00eff9c1c012b80f08
74d61a2926fac826b2458712ff4209de346948fc
describe
'32109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
eb42769662c1c617be78fe1354b55913
96e251152a15c9407216255f069d2a323d566e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
3a79222eefab9a7ecbb91507b3432b00
e0d615093310bec16d4ea002f3f5877a6dc01d82
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
87130a926e5e59a45df72a3d7a4c9367
539c48adfd9c24d15fccded76c9dd0a0306b73a0
describe
'7453' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
4365c42c1d05f91f27c0cd3489dea793
2e9fa0d820b6a3cc3b91a8082aff2fc7188b9a7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3cfbbd8ae46df683cfc2e0dcd168dbc4
6249c163d48453765616fa83c6876c953ec5e2c9
describe
'111693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
62f7f77cd614919bcad2f4ffa3516759
9b3c63cc66b1e44c20ec0003063ebf4bebc9ddc4
describe
'37059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUY' 'sip-files00153.pro'
d1d56ef25c7b21f43d69150702b4bbde
d21a903ac6750c9726b678a0606a056888afa3d3
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
7dce04c39bfaca66362bb516746cfffc
540e01210bc9b9f3c3c82a43525b808fb47e6f94
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
e90fa783df2a935b09329f971ba559f1
452c48418e7707fce044f93cf788ca2fe2bc3185
'2011-12-30T03:46:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVB' 'sip-files00153.txt'
46638bfb9ccea4654c0beef230715a11
5efaa31a1aa35890f182a0cbb53a8a254f71bdeb
describe
'6737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVC' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
25047c9eebb97740f4904b9e9e3c827b
890498e555e4cca123327ec19f6ffa65206ffa60
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVD' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
be3aade86e3e58b4e00f208a24b8fd6a
fd81f6cdf7e2f8ff3a81d577b546da72b7ecd2d5
describe
'111155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVE' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
dbc622546e628eb943e2a703d967d23e
aba54025ac3f71269e68529eb17fb06f78b7227e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
48b739650f5571975147b91a0d73ad90
de6c08af45aeb6eb1fbf4b4cc4e47b5c8272c735
describe
'30505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
1b7c0f959a1dfc0f65af6922f11ea879
58c50a792656c1b77456d67ce7b77e317457b6a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVH' 'sip-files00154.tif'
c9b07866fa321023a1fbbe851206d8bf
0498a6159246e0b4752a658fa979e7bd4f569467
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
7af35c475ec3e5ab6c20976eb4c62cfd
7c385cb4712358fef7936cc3fcfdc42ee62e270f
describe
'6879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
44d8e8977734c731380954e849efde65
5a0eb12ee311eceb476666334ced32a39dcc6bea
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
ab92f9c94c330d153ade8f72ed2c4520
3d7cfa0bb8cd5fa90ccfd34c60d93c7555c8f4b7
describe
'112732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVL' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
5724cc4423f3aa151e2ec5c5243e161f
96f651b40b54b8cadddf81231bc80e7ff8b43e93
describe
'38551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
ddb0c6b5556fd80353ea6ad861ccd044
2049114d2452cf6a91905f609ad1f46fc972c7fa
describe
'31173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
65b4bafb276ca5b09e1e6f7ec6bce2e1
6ccaf2f49ddf99467ffdbce69876bc5e2988454a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
990314b084b561003940313116f33fd4
44c1c6c25e4eca0ea26c6cbc5ffe5c116a2b5996
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
811bcbce022c84b4991155bd250b58cc
76aeb70f1aa3c4bce1bb2eace1b16e7c41f54407
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
cd407c118f19a22f4f3f425951a69b18
98667375a8350893758bebac645795167de66ac5
describe
'482438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
6d3990b64c714d83bd4bd60c2a0a36a6
e8927baf65fb9800461ca7ea930c487925750793
describe
'114489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVS' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
92136848c3ca0bab988a322f457ed3a6
d133f92be1ad26e1eb89b1b79e01d56178eaf526
describe
'36964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
d03168430b7a4805427a9f6b74b50310
b85ddf75143a2141aa930007c902416f05cf7b6a
describe
'31097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
fbe2700ce3e05880f1ae63cd660410ed
b28cd28f35a5954596ac113cec7a0db35e25fbfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
11470135ef2ce687bec7f30b3d165d6a
f998cc167fa9f7d02f6196e519d65b795a70c6cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
99389d4097eb8d5fc714a79426f36ec7
93ac41e31f772b3898f6478b66e65e51cf0b2fe6
describe
'7089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
06bd91474a6f161527a898def0dc03d2
7c548f710675a3ffbda9d9d652b92ec86f26f2df
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
dbebbd878f176ebe7a0af50b8d07c9e7
bc1feafa83eb623647e42b3830e2c532bd06dfa7
describe
'113349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
3d34058a6e8bd253c3967f30dbfa86be
88f94c44d2ec4cf3eb1b104e82f3a0c2d243873e
describe
'36979' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
444454a105988fa267318520214e8d87
21fe08d3cc50c8f58e6ceb33efa325084bf564ba
describe
'30742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWB' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
3a105bedc60da1660f8090ccfced14b7
55d19ff81a339fc669d0ac44783a77edc57ba2ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
5dd9d980d33ec5d244a15bd97f3b2469
3a4915b674e811a846e98e9456d44f09ba3640bf
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWD' 'sip-files00157.txt'
4611505f119f38a9fca5299e7c8725ae
bf30541c5690ca20feb98c920ba4e4d6784d88c7
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
aeecec7caa3fd1b92222c6d1d9a76fab
96bcfad743e290ace961ce2a86a4df9a273138da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWF' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
11d74fb8c502ce50a6d2ef082661b92e
b3a6624616aa2fd0aedfce16ce42fb63d90f6c69
describe
'113551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
9faae3dc6e3d13aba4b2aa00e65cbe4c
c94d6ebc05892b20060b04cceff21435f8b9f93e
describe
'39120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWH' 'sip-files00158.pro'
b22cd5203e9b18bcc7743c101b9e45a7
6df3fd9b0f3a0d2e3cc96c23654c3ada2fa387fb
describe
'31482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWI' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
f44150995ed1aff00e1e8e6f241140e9
926577b14a77c34825c18c398423b815268af4cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
6d4d83ddb5b6eb433debeb7be99cb932
f3402362a525f3691d89b1bf4710df10726be81a
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWK' 'sip-files00158.txt'
4e158b3616abdaf86f01d487559829e8
81823f8959a0633196e9961593d8064f402d5e28
describe
'6730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWL' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
abdff619e693e9eeb4418dd23eb5f395
101b2378117f0c899cbdda9f58b35b77c8cff86d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWM' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
4f9cb13c5a8e90252294d7c10a455a4f
467ca7275a12272ba3249da702c463e7abc79ebb
describe
'111513' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWN' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
01c6e7bddb8beb9a942b61b19cf836b4
35e067ce9ead35b6edc69a13cecc13653a108ff6
describe
'37343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
6a305e76e96e2413261f40f74ad02407
8bdb5db4d9b3938e5d0cbe0daaeab55ca34525fe
describe
'30297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
530a9238630e4137939301c42163512c
9f93746414e0748ed763890b676de882f493f41c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
6d14bd8ccd75a23bdc842ef545199162
c27aaa39d3c839a25e55a5909d58a49e11b54c6c
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWR' 'sip-files00159.txt'
bfc585ec4818d3696368b5d69c1b74a2
1f98d0933b84eb3b76105ffa79c3fa220edd4c92
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
f22079b7043cd3eed73990211e313862
ba6214db76153ae4f609aad2bfe823e1d327bd46
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
5410a74fd53440236a94753aa79fbdff
e29c5913051225c502d20242fab172d9ffb94217
describe
'115953' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
c679ac6dce75548cf641061914b2c955
d1eb9348c7b2b451ed1c718d798ca328a41ede38
describe
'38731' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWV' 'sip-files00160.pro'
8a6e64db647d99d3e41261e910085434
1fc29d5c92507be2eba1dd68dd2d3dc5fcdc9e14
'2011-12-30T03:45:18-05:00'
describe
'31338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWW' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
9feb52d50143439bda2554d3c6571a42
0405146d8e0d5535b3f405bc0b129965d06edaf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
44f03a38cf3b6308b0f5c74577a0dccf
d9743bef1650e390348685d1cd98a4e0276101d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
fbe341fade9aba4fc5ae3b5cbda9f89b
f1bb758031493c25ad437fce864a9042ebe1439c
describe
'7249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
e8579e9aa824ce8227e133ffdd5e5d3b
7fe553723a01f902c4bdee45e2847b1a65c7ba4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
1c9678656c0617079fa5666169eba9de
1ad1c2ad43823f95226e2cec93fa4b09703cced5
describe
'114449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6a9238901b10946e5916debe92cfd837
59e2e02f4c9342ccef059b8ec067d950cb6ac69b
describe
'38233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
31cbbc1810dd12c842323d4247936e4e
89cab9265c6952dd65e1b97e87cd75e7c40c389a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
436c3427144e29533fc0afaaf1066729
7563e0a10cfe934976e0fe66e2e6f90864239a5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
9c79c9f7a961c8815529679c6001d2bb
27a767f1154e156c6bb276fe0fd39b0254e058ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXF' 'sip-files00161.txt'
97c6b3aeec7fece48bc018f2fa84a9e8
82b3078965973a7382d9583c5fb375f12682724d
describe
'6958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
43e8afdd47a627f21f8710d6450294e8
18c31ea466c0ce394e0980749c1f411e28be7042
describe
'482421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5f2575a4087f298e4bf10b4f9f18960b
7da634689ba5cbaf004cab80590a069d6aea0222
describe
'115226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
1f5a93e001c13d9e680f66ae5dafcd9b
3f9598adf036af66d3adee54c236313e06eef34d
describe
'39424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
3cf0f1b546f06b31544b5036227b6280
08acbc4284fbdeef9e547beb0229eaa426e64caf
describe
'31857' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
ee4cb358662becd26aeee158a6c5f3e5
3e8b918838a730c9be629c31948f6c6c1dec0aa8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
aab1e277b1d0ad1dc88197b29ca7b254
5efa944e38f4368d81197d729525b8d148a4a3d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXM' 'sip-files00162.txt'
b4386f9d0aefdbb3c705bd274597c089
3325579a96c009dec247e5f070583de6c4c800c3
describe
'6994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXN' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
eb2676edeb88d605cba4729d6f14868d
3e65367f21144bfc4c72d697f936b3b6533b0d95
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
d7b20085588161772ba117a404ba95c8
9995d257ec6af80b0f365170a3acf51ee2605889
describe
'114718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
4cbec58c033ae760509f1f3edf829251
d22f73f0726659f897c44d1372b09e415c156a43
describe
'38461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
5e43fd81d63947549dc98c3abd682999
4a7bdff33dd367765f3c61a8cb2e906f08d42e57
describe
'31238' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
362de31c1d28d6f7d43836a85b38f90f
30dc80db06bd9a4f425c992e79cdc981b3936b80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXS' 'sip-files00163.tif'
cd078dbadeac2c8aeb36ba483a532d82
c7484a1eb6148f49c622a4496da83d02dc26246b
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXT' 'sip-files00163.txt'
a91a7061189f6c5e845365ee0142f764
720de159b75eff50ce741df30440b949b4cc1f83
describe
'6887' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXU' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
9567138c6b7658d7c44466e230f6d99c
f4631e5bc2608e00fde3d786c26a96c6d03281da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
e816103f72b1e61d5fdaaed8c7d11a5d
71a7a1794e7e3daea143429ae9f1a4db77a86885
describe
'84463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
56469fce37f351ea0ecd9932c2f01e84
9ea25abb26b670c44a769b233f942931293e1f08
describe
'23175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXX' 'sip-files00164.pro'
0972e3a65862164d17467341c4865ddb
9ab41f43a8eb1508f86151bdf6b9254674dda1e7
describe
'21461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXY' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
80e55c75a1d3f6e0d8dff167915882ea
a97f359aa776e542676fb5a5f1b86059d1c7c60f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
ba8519fb2659c2263472da22b9af7cda
bc4f0a05d8d6eb58dc37db0ddc987b53f26e54f8
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
76ff34687e7e36eb30651284739c9b2c
3f8b88fa1d6e241d2ca7d4db62eb23f14ae1f23d
describe
'5071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e207409c5331a4628a349000e86bc74d
b958bdbc8e002e12a64989348d082458776f9f6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e207faa97dbb6abb27630925a8f9bea1
c8b15307395e5090b43dbdb24f1cc3c5fb29d815
describe
'94356' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
0c0eee89a25efcc7a2e1ee8ea787164d
8b52f3b3df1fa625f9e93c41005a7645163c5afe
describe
'28064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYE' 'sip-files00165.pro'
4be6504f5235dd68808221a93b2d2a21
4ee6557f0052700a0b5f3e15ce6e423de59d2468
describe
'25284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
a8f598a1f68912fa9d031690a6b453de
2f7121ab0acf3ad22480e84ffd19f1cc5057ea0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
d2fe094b9c71bde29d76cc589c55b042
b49539f47f7146c4bcb1af24738c0eb517dabff9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
f95b41afc154c17b7f7951b22c02dc7a
744e248f52c7fb093d9c22d45f80d10c19df207f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'5445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
2f7262517981a303b925f83614011016
43550d2cebbc823a11289c63d508891bc11a5588
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
ff1db33f1ba628fbf1d5a0c52c4f5e89
2bba2a693dc8701a559cb58550f709daafa97e3a
describe
'111968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
e3adbd1a7ecdc31481e275a5dc962153
545c843240e7c1599e7d1d4a6e9f6e4cce6aac3a
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYL' 'sip-files00166.pro'
b57e1623ef0cd84a5d7d089dc50a54f2
a2b18eb2aa24b265e7df6e61860f13b6ddb9baf5
describe
'31000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
002c1ca48b7a5bbc42a117aed35c5b2c
abf24c888ea697bdcdfce4ab8487de6dd831886f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
60d852278cd96e39c5b742ffa7dc2bcb
a11bd9fb5f11169b100399c7a70d93d3156af6ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYO' 'sip-files00166.txt'
bf7a7c99e1cef90b254aaa0c01d29537
28d526e3060af9afef4cd8441279092fac2e0da8
describe
'7352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
018ee2441b461b129152be9c73cac619
adbec8a5e03ba93b016c49c735b51484e88b9a8a
describe
'482330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
7fdce9f6958bb37f6f9012b5e1925a37
d24d147902ad7a65741b015e4e84845f482cb6f0
describe
'124206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYR' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
0ba1c8fa0d738325f2f977cc78e2c8b3
ae781618475e7d3cc0f3748ea694774be7898be7
describe
'40359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
11a462e9c6be27f386647d48e64377bd
57bc81d28bff42889ed0654908880eed5cbf602e
describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYT' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
be6ed6c6039680935faebb64b2ddad0b
230444ef1ad881ff9e7bd22b1fed34d9ab343459
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYU' 'sip-files00167.tif'
31b30cf97cfe7be654704d9d764ec99a
cdfd2b1b92e5cb85ca990f3817d2a4f20629e911
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
9820134b077e62617659ae98e2fde7b2
7b9e387797ada65cf3ebfa03e3cd8ddc22a81169
describe
'7299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYW' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
a6d764c8e8d3b13c0d42e28e7c293577
a8fa36d6de3f7e4821adbc862d50e2aaf83ff9f6
describe
'482395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
375aa01768c0cb58cbc788752c1ae4e6
70327c569ee22ebf4002a24f3e61d54459dfd3ab
describe
'115801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
c376510cc4658815627405c81d52f9b5
578fc4ca3eb163e00e58ff7ec41d511f4dbcb73c
describe
'37717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
8273816fb69933a4b3c16ddb0d84893e
91d4fc2dd51c1ecd5582b38c44f66707926aa447
describe
'31158' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZA' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
8a39da2e2394f86f87bd9b34fda9837e
5a6054a9b7ac7d47f6a62828a9df17427b715e7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
f12caa4bafaea8efdcb57e966ebf8087
286f22b05cc1457793ed25abeb2c6a9ee43db86a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
d1b28ff31acabef73c031c1f8109804c
e3b23bff678469c3a339e1cabfe7e4848fd35f80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZD' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
1acdd331fe212aa22c779965c00537ad
38fe045789dc13a5a227e754372164f94a7858b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
99de8e024845411b0cca43a9fbe00061
247fbdb74cb8fb394897884719157177ae788d30
describe
'114613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
2518af68cd660fd67ce2b976acf43c61
c83ce63e90d0288e69ce2029c35577188eb9741e
describe
'35678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZG' 'sip-files00169.pro'
2861ab4dcd2ab21d6ad8126bf9afdce4
f6d74cbe0e9bdeeac3e1dc3bbba24a15f1241708
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
0be1c00e97e663098d3c3e289df9b914
471ac90e7fba93fb543dceecaed7b8f64a55b05e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZI' 'sip-files00169.tif'
98651795131202b943d5058fb5a94c21
4c614a8d5c14d81d65028dd85ef0994b6cd101b7
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
1e369542cd4858afd9add6efff9a5c16
d538e9bbce934de490ffe8de6bd301e4c6afeb58
describe
'6847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
47d0e628a1ec83cc09cd524068f7de8e
a4d0dcf46b7b08c0d3073dee67ea122aff899e9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
bdadfe3af2f1bcfec3beb32d658b222b
238db42d0423bc1fdbf98407fb2a6bb2f2e9640b
describe
'117924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
cd3527ac926bc39bae8eda714ae6bcef
03c3a441ebe41be9c88c375b8a1caba6d68ff842
describe
'36963' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
9755f89a7ad4a42c6c7fcbde0d71dd67
659e3ece507d9749721f965ba0dd154a1e575ced
describe
'32064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
f34574c69bb07923c801cd99d22d98fc
2c445de792bd97bca7a22e75c9544497f25d4c44
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
0a1c5dd7a7c953a0500955a57684e62d
9811681acf145a1d35641e61c09c31d0238fdbee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
0e4eaedfcbf76e38a467942ad380e274
4851cd87a1612237aae4e0e145c92b84d0ca0129
describe
'7110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
7ecf5ffe60932acce5ae9d6cdce9b447
cf936683cb9f18342766373dd89dc789778afd0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZS' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
085bf87d0fcfc9b46a33b6ff42a2a9c6
9bb3963f6b45f06da17a045d37eb6e8d7d95d484
describe
'114379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZT' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
600935499c1419ad808f536d1f5768f8
5d6625f5eed086deb71d09cf64e738318b8c1566
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZU' 'sip-files00171.pro'
234f43841b55e645be9d9b4dd9fd9ac2
3b67dcd18b83cb4a81430f5f937c3fd8bf3a1f66
describe
'32386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZV' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
38a793e52a2e2bd346c865b403ce8c5e
7f6eaf3f51721a00d68f9019ea71bdf913d7a918
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e7d9013fda473e3aa7fd4f84f1d82e6e
af38f9bd14f747bc2944e7360661be89d86282d1
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZX' 'sip-files00171.txt'
74c584ada79eaf74c3d99ea95c8b8db5
249f6816f8ff1543dfac7f9da094ee2ec5896e3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZY' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
a9be778669217595beca72d1f3209300
bd2d2953cf0cfac7af6577b8bf777ca18c52f3f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
9375112e2dbca4bc32e9ec65dc5ac3ab
9ce9860203efaba84356e21b16e0979f2ba526b8
describe
'114111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAA' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
7390c54d24805560a63efb426a48935c
470e641755e9172823baf7aef33c8f63805caefe
describe
'38002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAB' 'sip-files00172.pro'
3cb9828cc48a6f128f6ab557c8db4d11
2ae88ca0bde187cb26e09e5d66c642f28e35162f
describe
'31157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
3be8f0811cd351c2ef3e7c2c3ee89f3b
2928cdf50e55d6a1f68f6092c7131a08f944265e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
cc1f2aa2d7d9e7e3ad89107c972d6157
cc9c80e5571bdfd9e4fbebc3ea44a34b671cc4e4
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAE' 'sip-files00172.txt'
5c455366604e873f5658f0530637c01b
be26242adbcce4c95c93cc7abe036ea25b94bed0
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7012' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
b39bb313a8b12db984fc07710591dfbe
94370f326f5b16ab8381f5b9b2f5e540ab29b311
describe
'482238' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
b2cbebd667cde89f5485aa44e12dedf1
0ad163a795ea217101ea3d6bce70e1dbb14596ea
describe
'118224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
7101e5693e4915fd087982ca519ca256
d62d644502e51c9ab9bed5e29090660c26fdec1d
describe
'38100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAI' 'sip-files00173.pro'
4570b74235198e00b6d6bd23da259fc5
db52bb10fc45a07669198a03a732f0c0192e07a5
describe
'32550' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1db1f94ecb22a9da0824006e965d8889
bbb3477e6ef4397a8100badffd699b5e0ccb942b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
d65eb7a2c5d36f96eaf0254ac221c8c8
f55e335f71831f68dd1b1c37495d217df1594156
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAL' 'sip-files00173.txt'
8f1105433b3009bd1b9c0ae15a9ea7de
f60b98005150ee26268a538422892a04a748eef7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAM' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
ec8d7f1f825e3294531dd64530fc50be
3b2fee861cc14e1c3504650f64df99409b096f3c
describe
'482258' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAN' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
a6e1907527a95db8fa8c1ec0b91b2e0c
277e66fafbeb0d23b98235b38d3db62fa5b7eb63
describe
'117364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
1bcaf62b7fc12bd7fbcd725074ba4626
94074e5d42bbe8e2b5451199519ec89facfccc2c
describe
'37119' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
a932d7bb494bf66cb16b3a8bbd91ab69
74874673297317b100d4267f95a907f121004539
describe
'31827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
25ed329bdd1021dc09b74aa5bc252ee2
eab34a5ce7bd75df4c497d0f58c414e95126480e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
1a8cca5162f1959d7828e620740f6e3b
bb12113da9a5950f6058369df944c96179daef9d
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
583cebb8f41e21d977c402117dc39de6
fb3ed89b784a62de10007a94561cb123fbde62f7
describe
'6851' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
1d04fc3788e632132c320f9d2332b14e
edfe3482603a49c39820dbd01913fc1db2bdff6f
describe
'482196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
43194f0ecf3808bde5c253ff45fd93f3
ff39eeeffa427ca29e050dafec883d5b956d7792
describe
'120606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
a8e78d7675b44e563cd7a7b468a77c0d
2a37953d1a068dd1c2607b708f00f7135269e559
describe
'37966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAW' 'sip-files00175.pro'
408aab22de768c0de5e4ba21600de57f
fc0bc5b1d79c25641ef93924f5fe0fb789c8f185
describe
'31539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
b404955731cf1aad01a0973dc34ce9d3
bef520e0beb3687acb83662920e657c283dc542c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
62bcd47d368eddab4df1db12a6453c95
f43f305b1586c0c18680a6977cc4cd9b2cae6a5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
ed6245a8169986fb2fba0a807bf11b65
62deb01d85852db914c5d6f80888c5252d4239f5
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBA' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
788fa778b3c5b47de97be5d4cde11810
458a531ec6d5c370118642515b89828c96b2c3dd
describe
'482332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBB' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
7802c02fa5b39613df00e12e01e9da12
967216b2321ab7fa2d20360c0697ed4eef7994e7
describe
'122852' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBC' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
b23d03a53c671a8928443c86b2608c4c
3427f60e912ebc3f0ee8248cf93581381193d02c
describe
'40681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBD' 'sip-files00176.pro'
b6dba473f0590e705251ed85a0d5f24e
444bf00c04abd669c967b52c585ff7ca821becfa
describe
'33494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
14a59fb553a72a2b9fa94cda4206cd0b
f1056a6600ea0c1e179cf5f850d3dba6c1516ae6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
708bff6cf2ce57a35ca145939c73c9cf
399f83577c64237a29050a0ce4af698b41f88cf2
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBG' 'sip-files00176.txt'
fb9a4c47fb58cde884feae29e9f9cbff
2e67a5e5968b275c9fc3b01239296bc158edad46
describe
'7051' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBH' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d1ced1186f697bea2f32e127a760ce8a
8d1c3a7d7641d633811ff8a0f533ae8120babd94
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBI' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
a7cf75709b106aad7e4b8c2e7f9e971e
06c98040cf664c16ba9a279d7069627ec9edb9ba
describe
'119277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
f0eae8b8202de63e73e96537c27d9d1b
127c84769623dd113faca3c554cd228b535af858
describe
'38847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBK' 'sip-files00177.pro'
480fb33e32c7d80507e29686ce5343a4
451bef5c2443de2977c4fabbea884fdfc18f9414
describe
'31816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBL' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d69e6436800fe590b65c0fd6537f7395
e2a9dae8c0f7c19fc48b404d21b8805c9ef59e16
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBM' 'sip-files00177.tif'
e25ce5727444d0fb28698ea53ced5f55
105f5567605392373f771825f0a87764c8c7bb0b
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBN' 'sip-files00177.txt'
7a215839eec91f84ff7a10968f31fe4e
839b8de0af48c9cc8641bacf35584f9b8e13aa40
describe
'7075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBO' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
e819c1fc796562e5cdf7520b8307583f
8564be39f69d06dbb2a1e9915de83e9018b4ff06
describe
'482233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBP' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
87929d30b7e5460f0b91eb30dd91562a
76357e97ef234970c3119441d644353d2baab7da
describe
'119601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ec460252cb583621765b7d83a1ad9391
1d11ec6b355d62b78963bd52367c42b94177c57f
describe
'38101' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBR' 'sip-files00178.pro'
9c6fb00d55bc0d46943ec85507ec69b6
27b2d9a0d2e19f9d387340b0c1681d53d7ca727e
describe
'32029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBS' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
05f20bde8da68fe463095a4aac0bb29e
8967c67abc183724365c32ef477def6ce16534c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
427b5b48b0da680551975d30fd78914e
ac13b89a12d037fcdd19582c0e30355d0fb40a46
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBU' 'sip-files00178.txt'
b3bf9aced6471ec60a8044b186e6d473
4329b3db4a7ea3b8d070298ff167ead76f9d8a3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBV' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
4ea959375a7a25afabdb824909b576df
5ce870b8915ac47b2dd711424bcf926dfdf9a5cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBW' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
986a284d3452a19d5f80006d988d4e26
aca7b899cad84d1420ea12cf86a6c6133a9708bd
describe
'99799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBX' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
622de1e144f091f367b383a56fe1ee7d
94c05cebbe400a17df51365a86d40494a53d4d95
describe
'28072' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBY' 'sip-files00179.pro'
627e59e922c87a7fcb8bbdb31b7b356c
75ae948df72b9ef32468eb8d8fd3b92ad7aefbbb
describe
'25749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
6f0c625586ef6863387eefd055caba68
f13e0d406f06ee9b730ef3299b575e1ffc2d68e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCA' 'sip-files00179.tif'
126056cb5103ce026ce6d02009820228
eaaef5f28690a5059f43c0759f42af0d54a28d47
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCB' 'sip-files00179.txt'
0643ea9130120c78175afb8a9c10b16e
5976a3aefff4ff2d0b409bb72ef349413b3ef62f
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'5621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCC' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
8c56ab6eee85e88c249bea640d8d3232
98b40c0de34b548eca2f68d8da77c583c48d997e
describe
'559906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCD' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
1b96ac97f58edff27c40ccdd5cec2c31
c2331bfc8daf1e3b970201bb269805012e85b351
describe
'58502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCE' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
a1af8e305a2d36f1a8445f09789021ba
6ce673e4eea6199e351ca8ba9027b5373afa6acc
describe
'13080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCF' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
f9e23c08ac3898d18e78931ee5aaf21b
376d8b02feb841320b1bd8da69c2705c9e8513f4
describe
'13443272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCG' 'sip-files00183.tif'
553a3bbfdf204d082d437ae11e49e0df
ff2a66c76765f77476c929c164c9db98532f564a
describe
'2' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCH' 'sip-files00183.txt'
70e31ac6776e733109977f8afdd234ed
56215022ecec9c4d9872282ede63be4169cfa6c7
describe
'3506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCI' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
104a064b4fab579c04520e99fb74cbf5
708dc9afcad76440257fa53e146ae410f86bf065
describe
'562971' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
91d889fe3e444746f9634c2728a2844b
7ad294a2c13456a9bc4b7c9e3c8f8ce6b77ddd76
describe
'148950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCK' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
9724acd17f5e60943cd9414b1f67238f
69bd3254c751ee804009b3e8d905a8b5c087b3a3
describe
'31812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCL' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
88a8ee1c6bb42260118250e51adf920d
4065eabcebdf80b678020e80c6e60eef2048cf95
describe
'13519212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCM' 'sip-files00184.tif'
b7d2506401eca2a8b7e3b52dd441d96c
6e107b15019aba78f4a64c54ac12fcf8d581b829
describe
'6830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
0e02e5ce15d75e1fec36e0a8a9478943
0ce30e0354c3a35aaf2494fa7a0143b6b0905414
describe
'115329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
10ded8a2299823ccfb55f890b57401bf
7e6a46d393c063a000c79c53ae4378490f46d9c2
describe
'19167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCP' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
48d3ca4fecd4315f09329f79a9e24951
0e99af84965266b69b0cba441d94a90d6f7bf2b0
describe
'11934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
5b5205ef6e467a0e9f9b89e10d8d948d
1eadb7e169f6777a77d3638bddcb3544731d6b77
describe
'4683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
8b52e093c00e496620210acf743fb53b
2de77b83bcf139662253c148c17fa4dc0a5c0e43
describe
'2786852' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCS' 'sip-files00185.tif'
5b2e436b7791343edd6a3ff5c80f9b82
070ecf5af94a2611b59e49907af11019b084ea1a
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCT' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
dca9adebf06eb75b1f841a9bb9ef504b
856e413ad2e0a969ac2a3efbe4e4c6b93b0fdc5e
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCU' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
13172ee1c807ef3afe0f5cae68540a3d
a6c6edcfb4565cd8e491292c2c72ad34a8baed61
describe
'259850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCV' 'sip-filesUF00086977_00001.mets'
a36bc1ae58cb4cabcbff921392237190
4ba908aa48f27519c746ab1e13cf0296b8f17a43
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T22:35:43-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'337293' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATKfileF20090118_AAAWCY' 'sip-filesUF00086977_00001.xml'
bebe3f60754fe0a9bcd298d3694743e7
f9742e542475aa8a70f5a23b5cbbc7ac7ed838c1
describe
'2013-12-13T22:35:46-05:00'
xml resolution