Citation
True bear stories

Material Information

Title:
True bear stories
Creator:
Miller, Joaquin, 1837-1913
Jordan, David Starr, 1851-1931
Rand McNally and Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Chicago and New York
Publisher:
Rand, McNally
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
259 p. : col. illus. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bears -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Folklore -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1900 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1900
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Joaquin Miller, with introductory notes by Dr. David Starr Jordan ... Together with a thrilling account of the capture of the celebrated grizzly "Monarch" ...

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
020843444 ( ALEPH )
03803083 ( OCLC )
AHC9800 ( NOTIS )
00005100 ( LCCN )

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Full Text
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TRUE BEAR STORIES,



TRUE

BEAR STORIES

BY JOAQUIN MILLER,

WITH

INTRODUCTORY NOTES

BY

Dr. Davip Starr JorDan,
President of Leland Stanford, Jr., University.

TOGETHER WITH A THRILLING ACCOUNT OF THE
CAPTURE OF THE CELEBRATED
GRIZZLY “MONARCH.”

FULLY ILLUSTRATED.

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK:

RAND MSNALLY & COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.





Copyright, 1900, by Rand McNally & Co..



Made in U.8. A. 5MI-26



DEDICATED
TO
My DEAR LITTLE DAUGHTER,

JUANITA MILLER,

FOR WHOSE PLEASURE AND INSTRUCTION I HAVE MANY TIMES
DUG UP THE MOST OF THESE STORIES FROM
OUT THE DAYS OF MY BOYHOOD.



PREFACE.



My Bright Young Reader: I was once
exactly your own age. Like all boys, I was,
from the first, fond of bear stories, and
above all, I did not like stories that seemed
the least bit untrue. I always preferred a
natural and reasonable story and one that
would instruct as well as interest. This I
think best for us all, and I have acted on
this line in compiling these comparatively
few bear stories from a long life of action
in our mountains and up and down the
continent.

‘As a rule, the modern bear is not a
bloody, bad fellow, whatever he may have
been in Bible days. You read, almost any
circus season, about the killing of his keeper
by a lion, a tiger, a panther, or even the
dreary old elephant, but you never hear of
a tame bear’s hurting anybody.

I suppose you have been told, and be-
lieve, that bears will eat boys, good or bad,
if they meet them in the woods. This is
not true. On the contrary, there are several
well-authenticated cases, in Germany most-
ly, where bears have taken lost children
under their protection, one boy having been

1



2 PREFACE.

reared from the age of four to sixteen by
a she bear without ever seeing the face of
man.

I have known several persons to be
maimed or killed in battles with bears, but
in every case it was not the bear that began
the fight, and in all my experience of about
half a century I never knew a bear to eat
human flesh, as does the tiger and like
beasts.

Each branch of the bear family is repre-
sented here and each has its characteristics.
By noting these as you go along you may
learn something not set down in the school-
books. For the bear is a shy old hermit and
is rarely encountered in his wild state by
anyone save the hardy hunter, whose only
interest in the event is to secure the skin
and carcass.

Of course, now and then, a man of science
meets a bear in the woods, but the meeting
is of short duration. If the bear does not
leave, the man of books does, and so we
seldom get his photograph as he really ap-
pears in his wild state. The first and only
bear I ever saw that seemed to be sitting
for his photograph was the swamp, or
“sloth,” bear—Ursus Labiatus—found in



PREFACE. 3

the marshes at the mouth of the Mississippi
River. You will read of an encounter with
him further on.

I know very well that there exists a good
deal of bad feeling between boys and bears,
particularly on the part of boys. The trou-
ble began, I suppose, about the time when
that old she bear destroyed more than forty
boys at a single meeting, for poking fun
at a good old prophet. And we read that
David, when a boy, got very angry at a
she bear and slew her single-handed and
alone for interfering with his flock. So
you see the feud between the boy and bear
family is an old one indeed.

But I am bound to say that I have found
much that is pathetic, and something that is
almosthalf-human, in this poor, shaggy, shuf-
fling hermit. He doesn’t want much, only
the wildest and most worthless parts of the
mountains or marshes, where, if you will
let him alone, he will let you alone, as a
rule. Sometimes, out here in California,
he loots a pig-pen, and now and then he gets
among the bees. Only last week, a little
black bear got his head fast in a bee-hive
that had been improvised from a nail-keg,
and the bee-farmer killed him with a pitch-



4 PREFACE.

fork; but it is only when hungry and far
from home that he seriously molests us.

The bear is a wise beast. This is, per-
haps, because he never says anything. Next
to the giraffe, which you may know never
makes any noise or note whatever, notwith-
standing the wonderful length of his throat,
the bear is the most noiseless of beasts.
With his nose to the ground all the time,
standing up only now and then to pull a
wild plum or pick a bunch of grapes, or
knock a man down if he must, he seems to
me like some weary old traveler that has
missed the right road of life and doesn’t
quite know what to do with himself. Ah!
if he would only lift up his nose and look
about over this beautiful world, as the In-
dians say the grizzly bear was permitted to
do before he disobeyed and got into trouble,
an account of which you will find further on,
why, the bear might be less a bear.

Stop here and reflect on how much there
is in keeping your face well lifted. The
pig with his snout to the ground will be
forever a pig; the bear will be a bear to
the end of his race, because he will not hold
up his head in the world; but the horse—
look at the horse! However, our business is
with the bear now.



CONTENTS.

IntRoDUCTORY NorTEs, A ;
J. A Bear on Fire,
Il. Music-Lovine BEARS,
III]. My First Grizzzy,
IV. Twin BaBIzs,
V. In SWIMMING WITH 4 BEAR,
VI. A Far Litrte Eprror anp THREE
LITTLE Browns,
VII. TREEING 4 BEAR,
VIII. Brit Cross anp His Pet BEar,
IX. THE GREAT GrizzLy BEAR,
X. As A Humorist,
XI. A Grizzuy’s Sty LitTLE JoKE,
XII. THE GrizzLy as Fremont Founp

Him,

Page

”
13
29
36
44
56

68
76
86
96
106

. 110

. 112



XIII.
XIV.

XV.
XVI.

XVII.

CONTENTS.

Tut BEAR WITH SPECTACLES, . 116
Toe BEAR-SLAYER OF San DiEGo, 129
ALASKAN AND PoLaR BEAR, . 146

MoNNEHAN, THE GREAT BEAR-
HUNTER OF OREGON, i . 156

Tur Bear ‘“MonarcH”’—How Hz
Was CAPTURED, : 3 166



INTRODUCTORY NOTES.



The bear is the most human of all the
beasts. He is not the most man-like in an-
atomy, nor the nearest in the line of evolu-
tion. The likeness is rather in his temper
and way of doing things and in the vicissi-
tudes of his life. He is a savage, of course,
but most men are that—wild members of a
wild fauna—and, like wild men, the bear
is a clumsy, good-natured blunderer, eating
with his fingers in default of a knife, and
preferring any day a mouthful of berries
to the excitement of a fight.

In this book Joaquin Miller has tried to
show us the bear as he is, not the traditional
bear of the story-books. In season and out
of season, the bear has been represented al-
ways the same bear, “as much alike as so
many English noblemen in evening dress,”
and always as a bloody bear.

Mr. Miller insists that there are bears
and bears, as unlike one another in nature
and action as so many horses, hogs or goats.
This much they have in common—bears are

2



8 INTRODUCTORY NOTES.

never cruel. They are generally full of
homely, careless kindness, and are very fond
of music as well as of honey, blackberries,
nuts, fish and other delicacies of the savage
feast.

The matter of season affects a bear’s tem-
per and looks as the time of the day affects
those of a man.

He goes to bed in the fall, when the fish
and berry season is over, fat and happy,
with no fight in him. He comes out in
spring, just as good-natured, if not so fat.
But the hot sun melts him down. His hun-
ery hunt for roots, bugs, ants and small
game makes him lean and cross. His claws
grow long, his hair is unkempt and he is
soon a shaggy ghost of himself, looking
“like a second-hand sofa with the stuffing
coming out,” and in this out-at-elbows condi-
tion he loses his own self-respect.

Mr. Miller has strenuously insisted that
bears of the United States are of more than
one or two species. In this he has the un-
qualified support of the latest scientific in-
vestigations, Not long ago naturalists were
disposed to recognize but three kinds of bear
in North America. These are the polar
bear, the black bear, and the grizzly bear,



INTRODUCTORY NOTES. 9

and even the grizzly was thought doubtful,
a slight variation of the bear of Europe.

But the careful study of bears’ skulls has
changed all that, and our highest authority
on bears, Dr. C. Hart Merriam of the De-
partment of Agriculture, now recognizes
not less than ten species of bear in the limits
of the United States and Alaska.

In his latest paper (1896),a“Preliminary
Synopsis of the American Bears,” Dr. Mer-
riam groups these animals as follows:

I. POLAR BEARS.

1. PoLtAR BEAR: Thalarctos maritimus
Linnaeus. Found on all Arctic shores.

II. BLACK BEARS.

2. COMMON BuAcK BEAR (sometimes
brown or cinnamon): Ursus americanus
Pallas. Found throughout the United
States.

3. YELLOW BEAR (sometimes black or
brown): Ursus luteolus Griffith. Swamps
of Louisiana and Texas.

4, EVERGLADE Bear: Ursus floridanus
Merriam. Everglades of Florida.

5. GuacteR Bear: Ursus emmonsi Dall.
About Mount St. Elias.



10 INTRODUCTORY NOTES.

III. GRIZZLY BEARS.

6. THE GRizzLy Bear: Ursus horribilis
Ord. Found in the western parts of North
America...

Under this species are four varieties: the
original horribilis, or Rocky Mcuntain griz-
zly, from Montana to the Great Basin of
Utah; the variety californicus Merriam,
the California grizzly, from the Sierra Ne-
vada; variety horriaeus Baird, the Sonora
grizzly, from Arizona and the South; and
variety alascensis Merriam, the Alaska
grizzly, from Alaska.

7. THE BARREN GROUND Bear: Ursus
richardsoni Mayne Reid. A kind of grizzly
found about Hudson Bay.

IV. GREAT BROWN BEARS.

8. Tap YAKuTAT Bear: Ursus dalli
Merriam. From about Mount St. Elias.

9. THe SirKA Bear: Ursus sitkensis
Merriam. From about Sitka.

10. Tue KaprAk Brear: Ursus midden-
dorfi Merriam. From Kadiak and the Pen-
insula of Alaska.

These three bears are even larger than



INTRODUCTORY NOTES. 11

the grizzly, and the Kadiak Bear is the larg-
est of all the land bears of the world. It
prowls about over the moss of the moun-
tains, feeding on berries and fish.

The sea-bear, Callorhinus ursinus, which
we call the fur seal, is also a cousin of the
bear, having much in common with its bear
ancestors of long ago, but neither that nor
its relations, the sea-lion and the walrus,
are exactly bears to-day.

Of all the real bears, Mr. Miller treats of
five in the pages of this little book. All the
straight “bear stories” relate to Ursus amer-
icanus, as most bear stories in our country
do. The grizzly stories treat of Ursus hor-
ribilis californicus. The lean bear of the
Louisiana swamps is Ursus luteolus, and
the Polar Bear is Thalarctos maritimus.
The author of the book has tried without
intrusion of technicalities to bring the
distinctive features of the different bears
before the reader and to instruct as well as
to interest. children and children’s parents
in the simple realities of bear life.

DAVID STARR JORDAN.
Leland Stanford, Jr., University.

a













TRUE BEAR STORIES.

I.
A BEAR ON FIRE.

It is now more than a quarter of a cen-
tury since I saw the woods of Mount
Shasta in flames, and beasts of all sorts,
even serpents, crowded together; but I can
never forget, never!

It looked as if we would have a cloud-
purst that fearful morning. We three were
making our way by slow marches from
Soda Springs across the south base of
Mount Shasta to the Modoc lava beds—
two English artists and myself. We had
saddle horses, or, rather, two saddle horses
and a mule, for our own use. Six Indians,
with broad leather or elkskin straps across
their foreheads, had been chartered to

carry the kits and traps. They were men
a 13



14 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of means and leisure, these artists, and
were making the trip for the fish, game,
scenery and excitement and everything, in
fact, that was in the adventure. I was
merely their hired guide.

This second morning out, the Indians—
poor slaves, perhaps, from the first, cer-
tainly not warriors with any spirit in them
—began to sulk. They had risen early and
kept hovering together and talking, or,
rather, making signs in the gloomiest sort
of fashion. We had hard work to get them
to do anything at all, and even after break-
fast was ready they packed up without
tasting food.

The air was ugly, for that region—hot,
heavy, and without light or life. It was
what in some parts of South Amexica they
call “earthquake weather.” Even the
horses sulked as we mounted; but the mule
shot ahead through the brush at once, and
this induced the ponies to follow.

The Englishmen thought the Indians
and horses were only tired from the day







A BEAR ON FIRE. 15

before, but we soon found the whole force
plowing ahead through the dense brush
and over fallen timber on a double quick.
Then we heard low, heavy thunder in the
heavens. Were they running away from a
thunder-storm? The English artists, who
had been doing India and had come to love
the indolent patience and obedience of the
black people, tried to call a halt. No use.
I shouted to the Indians in their own
tongue. “Tokau! Ki-sa! Kiu!’ (Hasten!
Quick! Quick!) was all the answer I could
get from the red, hot face that was thrown
for a moment back over the load and
shoulder. So we shot forward. In fact,
the horses now refused all regard for the
bit, and made their own way through the
brush with wondrous skill and speed.
We were flying from fire, not flood! Piti-
ful what a few years of neglect will do
toward destroying a forest! When a lad
I had galloped my horse in security and
comfort all through this region. It was
like a park then. Now it was a dense



16 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

tangle of undergrowth and a mass of fallen
timber. What a feast for flames! In one
of the very old books on America in the
British Museum—possibly the very oldest
on the subject—the author tells of the
park-like appearance of the American for-
ests. He tells his English friends back at
home that it is most comfortable to ride
to the hounds, “since the Indian squats
(Squaws) do set fire to the brush and leaves
every spring,” etc.

But the “squats” had long since disap-
peared from the forests of Mount Shasta;
and here we were tumbling over and tear-
ing through ten years’ or more of accumu-
lation of logs, brush, leaves, weeds and
grass that lay waiting for a sea of fire to
roll over all like a mags of lava.

And now the wind blew past and over
us. Bits of white ashes sifted down like
snow. Surely the sea of fire was coming,
coming right on after us! Still there was
no sign, save this little sift of ashes, no
sound; nothing at all except the trained



A BEAR ON FIRE. 17

sense of the Indians and the terror of the
“cattle” (this is what the Englishmen
called our horses) to give us warning.

In a short time we struck an arroyo, or
canyon, that was nearly free from brush
and led steeply down to the cool, deep
waters of the McCloud River. Here we
found the Indians had thrown their loads
and themselves on the ground.

They got up in sulky silence, and, strip-
ping our horses, turned them loose; and
then, taking our saddles, they led us
hastily up out of the narrow mouth of the
arroyo under a little steep stone bluff.

They did not say a word or make any
sign, and we were all too breathless and
bewildered to either question or protest.
The sky was black, and thunder made the
woods tremble. We were hardly done wip-
ing the blood and perspiration from our
torn hands and faces where we sat when
the mule jerked up his head, sniffed, snort-
ed and then plunged headlong into the
river and struck out for the deep forest



18 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

on the farther bank, followed by the
ponies.

The mule is the most traduced of all ani-
mals. A single mule has more sense than
a whole stableful of horses. You can han-
dle a mule easily if the barn is burning; he
keeps his head; but a horse becomes in-
sane. He will rush right into the fire, if
allowed to, and you can only handle him,
and that with difficulty if he sniffs the fire,
by blindfolding him. Trust a mule in case
of peril or a panic long before a horse. The
brother of Solomon and willful son of David
surely had some of the great temple-build-
er’s wisdom and discernment, for we read
that he rode a mule. True, he lost his head
and got hung up by the hair, but that is
nothing against the mule.

As we turned our eyes from seeing the
animals safely over, right there by us and
a little behind us, through the willows of
the canyon and over the edge of the water,
we saw peering and pointing toward the



A BEAR ON FIRE. 19

other side dozens of long black and brown
outreaching noses. Elk!

They had come noiselessly, they stood
motionless. They did not look back or
aside, only straight ahead. We could al-
most have touched the nearest one. They

were large and fat, almost as fat as cows;
certainly larger than the ordinary Jersey.
The peculiar thing about them was the
way, the level way, in which they held their
small, long heads—straight out; the huge
horns of the males lying far back on their
shoulders. And then for the first time I
could make out what these horns are for
—to part the brush with as they lead
through the thicket, and thus save their
coarse coats of hair, which is very rotten,
and could be torn off in a little time if not
thus protected. They are never used to
fight with, never; the elk uses only his
_feet. If on the defense, however, the male
elk will throw his nose close to the ground
and receive the enemy on his horns.
Suddenly and all together, and perhaps



20 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

they had only paused a second, they moved
on into the water, led by a bull with a
head of horns like a rocking-chair. And
his rocking-chair rocked his head under
water much of the time. The cold, swift
water soon broke the line, only the leader
making the bank directly before us, while
the others drifted far down and out of
sight.

Our artists, meantime, had dug up pencil
and pad and begun work. But an Indian
jerked the saddles, on which the English-
men sat, aside, and the work was stopped.
Everything was now packed up close under
the steep little ledge of rocks. An ava-
lanche of smaller wild animals, mostly
deer, was upon us. Many of these had their
tongues hanging from their half-opened
mouths. They did not attempt to drink, as
you would suppose, but slid into the water
silently almost as soon as they came.
Surely they must have seen us, but cer
tainly they took no notice of us. And such
order! No crushing or crowding, as you



A BEAR ON FIRE. 21

see cattle in corrals, aye, as you see people
sometimes in the cars.

And now came a torrent of little creep-
ing things: rabbits, rats, squirrels! None
of these smaller creatures attempted to
cross, but crept along in the willows and
brush close to the water.

They loaded down the willows till they
bent into the water, and the terrified little
creatures floated away without the least
bit of noise or confusion. And still the
black skies were filled with the solemn
boom of thunder. In fact, we had not yet
heard any noise of any sort except thunder,
not even our own voices. There was some-
thing more eloquent in the air now, some-
thing more terrible than man or beast, and
all things were awed into silence—a pro-
found silence.

And all this time countless creatures,
little creatures and big, were crowding the
bank on our side or swimming across or
floating down, down, down the swift, wood-
hung waters. Suddenly the stolid leader



22 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of the Indians threw his two naked arms in
the air and let them fall, limp and helpless
at his side; then he pointed out into the
stream, for there embers and living and
dead beasts began to drift and sweep down
the swift waters from above. The Indians
now gathered up the packs and saddles
and made a barricade above, for it was
clear that many a living thing would now
be borne down upon us.

The two Englishmen looked one another
in the face long and thoughtfully, pulling
their feet under them to keep from being
trodden on. Then, after another avalanche
of creatures of all sorts and sizes, a sort of
Noah’s ark this time, one of them said to
the other:

“Beastly, you know!”

“Awful beastly, don’t you know!” _

As they were talking entirely to them-
selves and in their own language, I did
not trouble myself to call their attention
to an enormous yellow rattlesnake which
had suddenly and noiselessly slid down,



A BEAR ON FIRE. 23

over the steep little bluff of rocks behind
us, into our midst.

But now note this fact—every man
there, red or white, saw or felt that huge
and noiseless monster the very second she
slid among us. For as I looked, even as I
first looked, and then turned to see what
the others would say or do, they were all
looking at the glittering eyes set in that
coffin-like head.

The Indians did not move back or seem
nearly so much frightened as when they
saw the drift of embers and dead beasts in
the river before them; but the florid En-
glishmen turned white! They. resolutely
arose, thrust their hands in their pockets
and stood leaning their backs hard against
the steep bluff. Then another snake, long,
black and beautiful, swept his supple neck
down between them and thrust his red
tongue forth—as if a bit of the flames had
already reached us.

Fortunately, this particular “wisest of
all the beasts of the field,” was not dis-



24 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

posed to tarry. In another second he had
Swung to the ground and was making a
thousand graceful curves in the swift
water for the further bank.

The world, even the world of books,
seems to know nothing at all about the
wonderful snakes that live in the woods.
The woods rattlesnake is as large as at
least twenty ordinary rattlesnakes; and
Indians say it is entirely harmless. The
enormous black snake, I know, is entirely
without venom. In all my life, spent most-
ly in the camp, I have seen only three of
those monstrous yellow woods rattle-
snakes; one in Indiana, one in Oregon and
the other on this occasion here on the
banks of the McCloud. Such bright eyes!
It was hard to stop looking at them.

Meantime a good many bears had come
and gone. The bear is a good swimmer,
and takes to the water without fear. He
is, in truth, quite a fisherman; so much of
a fisherman, in fact, that in salmon season
here his flesh is unfit for food. The pitiful



A BEAR ON FIRE. 25

part of it all was to see such little crea-
tures as could not swim clinging all up
and down and not daring to take to the
water.

Unlike his domesticated brother, we saw
several wild-cats take to the water prompt-
ly. The wild-cat, you must know, has no
tail to speak of. But the panther and Cali-
fornian lion are well equipped in this re-
spect and abhor the water.

I constantly kept an eye over my shoul-
der at the ledge or little bluff of rocks, ex-
pecting to see a whole row of lions and
panthers sitting there, almost “cheek by
jowl” with my English friends, at any mo-
ment. But strangely enough, we saw
neither panther nor lion; nor did we see
a single grizzly among all the bears that
came that way.

We now noticed that one of the Indians
had become fascinated or charmed by look-
ing too intently at the enormous serpent in
our midst. The snake’s huge, coffin-shaped
head, as big as your open palm, was slowly



26. TRUE BEAR STORIES.

swaying from. side to side. The Indian’s
head was doing the same, and their eyes
were drawing closer and closer together.
Whatever there may be in the Bible story
of Eve and the serpent, whether a figure
or a fact, who shall say?—but it is cer-
tainly, in some sense, true.

An Indian will not kill a rattlesnake.
But to break the charm, in this case, they
caught their companion by the shoulders
and forced him back fiat on the ground.
And there he lay, crying like a child, the
first and only Indian I ever saw cry. And
then suddenly boom! boom! boom! as if
heaven burst. It began to rain in torrents.

And just then, as we began to breathe
freely and feel safe, there came a crash
and bump and bang above our heads, and
high over our heads from off the ledge be-
hind us! Over our heads like a rocket, in
an instant and clear into the water, leaped
a huge black bear, a ball of fire! his fat
sides in flame. He sank out of sight but
soon came up, spun around like a top, dived





k bear.

ter leaped a blac.

Into the wa’



A BEAR ON FIRE. 27

again, then again spun around. But he
got across, I am glad to say. And this al-
ways pleases my little girl, Juanita. He
sat there on the bank looking back at us
quite a time. Finally he washed his face,
like a cat, then quietly went away. The
rattlesnake was the last to cross.

The beautiful yellow beast was not at
all disconcerted, but with the serenest dig-
nity lifted her yellow folds, coiled and un-
coiled slowly, curved high in the air,
arched her glittering neck of gold, widened
her body till broad as your two hands, and
so slid away over the water to the other
side through the wild white rain. The
cloudburst put out the fire instantly, show-
ing that, though animals have superhuman
foresight, they don’t know everything be-
fore the time.

“Beastly! I didn’t get a blawsted sketch,
you know.”

“Awful beastly! Neither did I, don’t you
know.”

aud that was all my English friends



28. TRUE BEAR STORIES.

said. The Indians made their moaning and
whimpering friend who had been overcome
by the snake pull himself together and
they swam across and gathered up the
“cattle.”

Some men say a bear cannot leap; but I
say there are times when a bear can leap
like a tiger. This was one of the times.



ee
MUSIC-LOVING BEARS.

No, don’t despise the bear, either in his
life or his death. He is a kingly fellow,
every inch a king; a curious, monkish,
music-loving, roving Robin Hood of his
somber woods—a silent monk, who knows
a great deal more than he tells. And please
don’t go to look at him and sit in judgment
on him behind the bars. Put yourself in
his place and see how much of manhood or
kinghood would be left in you with a muz-
zle on your mouth, and only enough liberty
left to push your nose between two rusty
bars and catch the peanut which the good
little boy has found to be a bad one and so
generously tosses it to the bear.

Of course, the little boy, remembering
the experience of about forty other little
boys in connection with the late bald-
headed Elijah, has a prejudice against the

3 29



30 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

bear family, but why the full-grown man
should so continually persist in caging this
shaggy-coated, dignified, kingly and an-
cient brother of his, I cannot see, unless it
is that he knows almost nothing at all of
his better nature, his shy, innocent love of
a joke, his partiality for music and his im-
perial disdain of death. And so, with a
desire that man may know a little more
about this storied and classic creature
which, with noiseless and stately tread, has
come down to us out of the past, and is as
quietly passing away from the face of the
earth, these fragmentary facts are set
down. But first as to his love of music. A
bear loves music better than he loves
honey, and that is saying that he loves
music better than he loves his life.

We were going to mill, father and I, and
Lyte Howard, in Oregon, about forty years
ago, with ox-teams, a dozen or two bags of
wheat, threshed with a flail and winnowed
with a wagon cover, and were camped for
the night by the Calipoola River; for it took



MUSIC-LOVING BEARS. 31

two days to reach the mill. Lyte got out
his fiddle, keeping his gun, of course, close
at hand. Pretty soon the oxen came down,
came very close, so close that they almost
put their cold, moist noses against the
backs of our necks as we sat there on the
ox-yokes or reclined in our blankets,
around the crackling pine-log fire and lis-
tened to the wild, sweet strains that swept
ap and down and up till the very tree tops
seemed to dance and quiver with delight.
Then suddenly father seemed to feel the
presence of something or somebody
strange, and I felt it, too. But the fiddler
felt, heard, saw nothing but the divine,
wild melody that made the very pine trees
dance and quiver to their tips. Oh, for the
pure, wild, sweet, plaintive music once
more! the music of “Money Musk,” “Zip
Coon,” “Ol’ Dan Tucker” and all the other
dear old airs that once made a thousand
happy feet keep time on the puncheon
floors from Hudson’s bank to the Oregon.
But they are no more, now. They have



32 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

passed away forever with the Indian, the
pioneer, and the music-loving bear. It is
strange how a man—TI mean the natural
man—will feel a presence long before he
hears it or sees it. ‘You can always feel the
approach of a—but I forget. You are of
another generation, a generation that only
reads, takes thought at second hand only,
if at all, and you would not understand;
so let us get forward and not waste time
in explaining the unexplainable to you.

Father got up, turned about, put me be-
hind him like, as an animal will its young,
and peered back and down through the
dense tangle of the deep river bank be-
tween two of the huge oxen which had
crossed the plains with us to the water’s
edge; then he reached around and drew me
to him with his left hand, pointing between
the oxen sharp down the bank with his
right forefinger.

A bear! two bears! and another coming;
one already more than half way across on
the great, mossy log that lay above the



MUSIC-LOVING BEARS. 33

deep, sweeping waters of the Calipoola;
and Lyte kept on, and the wild, sweet
music leaped up and swept through the de-
lighted and dancing boughs above. Then
father reached back to the fire and thrust
a long, burning bough deeper into the dy-
ing embers and the glittering sparks leaped
and laughed and danced and swept out and
up and up as if to companion with the
stars. Then Lyte knew. He did not hear,
he did not see, he only felt; but the fiddle
forsook his fingers and his chin in a second,
and his gun was to his face with the muzzle
thrust down between the oxen. And then
my father’s gentle hand reached out, lay
on that long, black, Kentucky rifle barrel,
and it dropped down, slept once more at
the fiddler’s side, and again the melodies;
and the very stars came down, believe me,
to listen, for they never seemed so big and
so close by before. The bears sat down on
their haunches at last, and one of them
kept opening his mouth and putting out his
red tongue, as if he really wanted to taste



84 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the music. Every now and then one of
them would lift up a paw and gently tap
the ground, as if to keep time with the
music. And both my papa and Lyte said
next day that those bears really wanted to
dance.

And that is all there is to say about that,
except that my father was the gentlest gen-
tleman I ever knew and his influence must
have been boundless; for who ever before
heard of any hunter laying down his rifle
with a family of fat black bears holding
the little snow-white cross on their breasts
almost within reach of its muzzle?

The moon came up by and by, and the
chin of the weary fiddler sank lower and
lower, till all was still. The oxen lay down
and ruminated, with their noses nearly
against us. Then the coal-black bears
melted away before the milk-white moon,
and we slept there, with the sweet breath
of the cattle, like incense, upon us.

But how does a bear die? Ah, I had for-
gotten. I must tell you of death, then.



MUSIC-LOVING BEARS. 35

Well, we have different kinds of bears. I
know little of the Polar bear, and so say
nothing positively of him. I am told, how-
ever, that there is not, considering his size,
much snap or grit about him; but as for
the others, I am free to say that they live
and die like gentlemen.

T shall find time, as we go forward, to
set down many incidents out of my own
experience to prove that the bear is often
a humorist, and never by any means a bad
fellows)

Judge Highton, odd as it may seem, has
left the San Francisco bar for the “bar” of
Mount Shasta every season for more than
a quarter of a century, and he probably
knows more about bears than any other
eminently learned man in the world, and
Henry Highton will tell you that the bear
is a good fellow at home, good all through,
a brave, modest, sober old monk.

A monkish Robin Hood
In his good green wood.



III.
MY FIRST GRIZZLY.

One of Fremont’s men, Mountain Joe
had taken a fancy to me down in Oregon,
and finally, to put three volumes in three
lines, I turned up as partner in his Soda
Springs ranch on the Sacramento, where
the famous Shasta-water is now bottled, I
believe. Then the Indians broke out,
burned us up and we followed and fought
them in Castle rocks, and I was shot down.
Then my father came on to watch by my
side, where I lay, under protection of
soldiers, at the mouth of Shot Creek can-
yon.

As the manzanita berries began to turn
the mountain sides red and the brown pine
quills to sift down their perfumed carpets
at our feet, I began to feel some strength
and wanted to fight, but I had had enough

of Indians. I wanted to fight grizzly bears
36



MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 37

this time. The fact is, they used to leave
tracks in the pack trail every night, and
right close about the camp, too, as big as
the head of a barrel.

Now father was well up in woodcraft, no
man better, but he never fired a gun. Never,
in his seventy years of life among savages,
did that gentle Quaker, school-master,
magistrate and Christian ever fire a gun.
But he always allowed me to have my own
way as a hunter, and now that I was get-
ting well of my wound he was so glad and
grateful that he willingly joined in with
the soldiers to help me kill one of these
huge bears that had made the big tracks.

Do you know why a beast, a bear of all
beasts, is so very much afraid of fire? Well,
in the first place, as said before, a bear is
a gentleman, in dress as well as address,
and so likes a decent coat. If a bear should
get his coat singed he would hide away
from sight of both man and beast for half
a year. But back of his pride is the fact
that a fat bear will burn like a candle;



38 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the fire will not stop with the destruction
of his coat. And so, mean as it was, in the
olden days, when bears were as common
in California as cows are now, men used
to take advantage of this fear and kindle
pine-quill fires in and around his haunts
in the head of canyons to drive him out
and down and into ambush.

Read two or three chapters here between
the lines—lots of plans, preparations, dia-
grams. I was to hide near camp and wait
—to place the crescent of pine-quill fires
and all that. Then at twilight they all
went out and away on the mountain sides
around the head of the canyon, and I hid
behind a big rock near by the extinguished
camp-fire, with my old muzzle-loading Ken-
tucky rifle, lifting my eyes away up and
around to the head of the Manzanita can-
yon looking for the fires. A light! One,
two, three, ten! A sudden crescent of
forked flames, and all the fight and im-
petuosity of a boy of only a dozen years
was uppermost, and I wanted a bear!



MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 39

All alone I waited; got hot, cold, thirsty,
cross as a bear and so sick of sitting there
‘that I was about to go to my blankets, for
the flames had almost died out on the hills,
leaving only a circle of little dots and dying
embers, like a fading diadem on the mighty
lifted brow of the glorious Manzanita
mountain. And now the new moon came,
went softly and sweetly by, like a shy,
sweet maiden, hiding down, down out of
sight.

Crash! His head was thrown back, not
over his shoulder, as you may read but
never see, but down by his left foot, as he
looked around and back up the brown
mountain side. He had stumbled, or
rather, he had stepped on himself, for a
bear gets down hill sadly. If a bear ever
gets after you, you had better do down
hill-and go down hill fast. It will make
him mad, but that is not your affair. I
never saw a bear go down hill in a good
humor. What nature meant by making a
bear so short in the arms I don’t know.



40 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

Indians say he was first a man and walked
upright with a club on his shoulder, but
sinned and fell. As evidence of this, they
show that he can still stand up and fight
with his fists when hard pressed, but more
of this later on.

This huge brute before me looked almost
white in the tawny twilight as he stumbled
down through the steep tangle of cha-
parral into the opening on the stony bar
of the river.

He had evidently been terribly tangled
up and disgusted while in the bush and
jungle, and now, well out of it, with the
foamy, rumbling, roaring Sacramento
River only a few rods beyond him, into
which he could plunge with his glossy coat,
he seemed to want to turn about and shake
his huge fists at the crescent of fire in the
pine-quills that had driven him down the
mountain. He threw his enormous bulk
back on his haunches and rose up, and
rose up, and rose up! Qh, the majesty of
this king of our continent, as he seemed



MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 4]

to still keep rising! Then he turned slowly
around on his great hinder feet to look
back; he pushed his nose away out, then
drew it back, twisted his short, thick neck,
like that of a beer-drinking German, and
then for a final observation he tiptoed up,
threw his high head still higher in the air
and wiggled it about and sniffed and
sniffed and—bang!

I shot at him from ambush, with his
back toward me, shot at his back! For
Shame! Henry Highton would not have
done that; nor, indeed, would I or any
other real sportsman do such a thing now;
but I must plead the “Baby Act,” and all
the facts, and also my sincere penitence,
and proceed.

The noble brute did not fall, but let him-
self down with dignity and came slowly
forward. Hugely, ponderously, solemnly,
he was coming. And right here, if I should
set down what I thought about—where
father was, the soldiers, anybody, every-
body else, whether I had best just fall on



42 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

my face and “play possum” and put in a
little prayer or two on the side, like—well,
I was going on to say that if I should write
all that flashed and surged through my
mind in the next three seconds, you would
be very tired. I was certain I had not hit
the bear at all. As arule, you can always
see the “fur fly,” as hunters put it; only it
is not fur, but dust, that flies.

But this bear was very fat and hot, and
so there could have been no dust to fly.
After shuffling a few steps forward and
straight for the river, he suddenly surged
up again, looked all about, just as before,
then turned his face to the river and me,
the tallest bear that ever tiptoed up and up
and up in the Sierras. One, two, three
steps—on came the bear! and my gun
empty! Then he fell, all at once and all in
a heap. No noise, no moaning or groaning
at all, no clutching at the ground, as men
have seen Indians and even white men do;
as if they would hold the earth from pass-
ing away—nothing of that sort. He lay



MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 43

quite still, head down hill, on his left side,
gave just one short, quick breath, and then,
pulling up his great right paw, he pushed
his nose and eyes under it, as if to shut out
the light forever, or, maybe, to muffle up
his face as when “great Ceesar fell.”

And that was all. I had killed a grizzly
bear; nearly as big as the biggest ox.





IV.
TWIN BABIES.

These twin babies were black. They
were black as coal. Indeed, they were -
blacker than coal, for they glistened in
their oily blackness. They were young baby
bears; and so exactly alike that no one
could, in any way, tell the one from the
other. And they were orphans. They
had been found at the foot of a small cedar
tree on the banks of the Sacramento River,
near the now famous Soda Springs, found
by a tow-headed boy who was very fond
of bears and hunting. /

But at the time the twin babies were
- found Soda Springs was only a wild camp,
or way station, on the one and only trail
that wound through the woods and up and
down mountains for hundreds of miles,
connecting the gold fields of California

with the pastoral settlements away to the
44



He threw his enormous buik back an his havnches, and rose up.—Page 40.













TWIN BABIES. 45

north in Oregon. But a railroad has now
taken the place of that tortuous old pack-
trail,and you can whisk through these wild
and woody mountains, and away on down
through Oregon and up through Washing-
ton, Montana, Dakota, Minnesota, Wiscon-
sin and on to Chicago without even once
getting out of your car, if you like. Yet
such a persistent ride is not probable, for
fish, pheasants, deer, elk, and bear still
abound here in their ancient haunts, and
the temptation to get out and fish or hunt
is too great to be resisted.

This place where the baby bears were
found was first owned by three men
or, rather, by two men and a boy. One
of the men was known as Mountain Joe.
He had once been a guide in the service of
General Fremont, but he was now a
drunken fellow and spent most of his time
at the trading post, twenty miles down the
river. He is now an old man, almost blind,
and lives in Oregon City, on a pension re-
ceived as a soldier of the Mexican war. The



46 TRUE BEAR STORIKS.

other man’s name was Sil Reese. He, also,
is living and famously rich—as rich as he
is stingy, and that is saying that he is very
rich indeed.

The boy preferred the trees to the house,
partly because it was more pleasant and
partly because Sil Reese, who had a large
nose and used it to talk with constantly,
_kept grumbling because the boy, who had
been wounded in defending the ranch, was
not able to work—wash the dishes, maky
fires and so on, and help in a general anil
particular way about the so-called “Sod:
Spring Hotel.” This Sil Reese was cet-
tainly a mean man, as has, perhaps, been
set down in this sketch before.

The baby bears were found asleep, and
alone. How they came to be there, and,
above all, how they came to be left long
enough alone by their mother for a feeble
boy to rush forward at sight of them, catch
them up in his arms and escape with them,
will always be a wonder. But this one
thing is certain, you had about as well



TWIN BABIES. 47

take up two rattlesnakes in your arms as
two baby bears, and hope to get off un-
harmed, if the mother of the young bears
is within a mile of you. This boy, however,
had not yet learned caution, and he prob-
ably was not born with much fear in his
make-up. And then he was so lonesome,
and this man Reese was so cruel and so
cross, with his big nose like a sounding
fog-horn, that the boy was glad to get even
a. bear to love and play with.

They, so far from being frightened or
cross, began to root around under his arms
and against his breast, like little pigs, for
something to eat.. Possibly their mother
had been killed by hunters, for they were
nearly famished. When he got them home,
how they did eat! This also made Sil Reese
mad. For, although the boy, wounded as
he was, managed to shoot down a deer not
too far from the house almost every day,
and so kept the “hotel” in meat, still it
made Reese miserable and envious to see



48 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the boy so happy with his sable and woolly
little friends. Reese was simply mean!

Before a month the little black boys be-
gan to walk erect, carry stick muskets,
wear paper caps, and march up and down
before the door of the big log “hotel” like
soldiers.

But the cutest trick they learned was
-that of waiting on the table. With little
round caps and short white aprons, the
little black boys would stand behind the
long bench on which the guests sat at the
pine board table and pretend to take orders
with all the precision and solemnity of
Southern negroes.

Of course, it is to be confessed that they
often dropped things, especially if the least
bit hot; but remember we had only tin
plates and tin or iron dishes of all sorts,
so that little damage was done if a dish
did happen to fall and rattle down on the
earthen floor.

Men came from far and near and often



TWIN BABIES. 49

lingered all day to see these cunning and
intelligent creatures perform.

About this time Mountain Joe fought a
duel with another mountaineer down at
the trading post, and this duel, a bloodless
and foolish affair, was all the talk. Why
not have the little black fellows fight a
duel also? They were surely civilized
enough to fight now!

And so, with a very few days’ training,
they fought a duel exactly like the one in
which poor, drunken old Mountain Joe was
engaged; even to the detail of one of them
suddenly dropping his stick gun and run-
ning away and falling headlong in a pros-
pect hole.

When Joe came home and saw this duel
and saw what a fool he had made of him-
self, he at first was furiously angry. But
it made him sober, and he kept sober for
half a year. Meantime Reese was mad as
ever, more mad, in fact, than ever before.
For he could not endure to see the boy have
any friends of any kind. Above all, he did



50 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

not want Mountain Joe to stay at home
or keep sober. He wanted to handle all
the money and answer no questions. A
drunken man and a boy that he could bully
suited him best. Ah, but this man Reese
was a mean fellow, as has been said a time
or two before.

As winter came on the two blacks were
fat as pigs and fully half-grown. Their ap-
petites increased daily, and so did the
anger and envy of Mr. Sil Reese.

“They’ll eat us out o’ house and hum,”
said the big, towering nose one day, as the
snow began to descend and close up the
pack trails. And then the stingy man pro-
posed that the blacks should be made to
hibernate, as others of their kind. There
was a big, hollow log that had been sawed
off in joints to make bee gums; and the
stingy man insisted that they should be
put in there with a tight head, and a pack
of hay for a bed, and nailed up till spring
to save provisions.

Soon there was an Indian outbreak.



TWIN BABIKS. 51

Some one from the ranch, or “hotel,’’ must
go with the company of volunteers that
was forming down at the post for a winter
campaign. Of course Reese would not go.
He wanted Mountain Joe to go and get
killed. But Joe was sober now and he
wanted to stay and watch Reese.

And that is how it came about that the
two black babies were tumbled headlong
into a big, black bee gum, or short, hollow
log, on a heap of hay, and nailed up for
the winter. The boy had to go to the war.

It was late in the spring when the boy,
having neglected to get himself killed, to
the great disgust of Mr. Sil Reese, rode
down and went straight up to the big black
bee gum in the back yard. He put his ear
to a knothole. Not asound. He tethered
his mule, came back and tried to shake the
short, hollow log. Not a sound or sign or
movement of any kind. Then he kicked the
big black gum with all his might. Nothing.
Rushing to the wood-pile, he caught up
an ax and in a moment had the whole end



52 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of the big gum caved in, and, to his infinite
delight, out rolled the twins!

But they were merely the ghosts of them-
selves. They had been kept in a month
or more too long, and were now so weak
and so lean that they could hardly stand
on their feet.

“Kill ’em and put ’em out o’ misery,”
said Reese, for run from him they really
could not, and he came forward and kicked
one of them flat down on its face as it was
trying hard to stand on its four feet.

The boy had grown some; besides, he
was just from the war and was now strong
and well. He rushed up in front of Reese,
and he must have looked unfriendly, for Sil
Reese tried to smile, and then at the same
time he turned hastily to go into the house.
And when he got fairly turned around,
the boy kicked him precisely where he had
kicked the bear. And he kicked him hard,
so hard that he pitched forward on his face
just as the bear had done. He got up
quickly, but he did not look back. He



TWIN BABIES. 53

seemed to have something to do in the
house.

In a month the babies, big babies now,
were sleek and fat. It is amazing how these
creatures will eat after a short nap of a
few months, like that. And their cunning
tricks, now! And their kindness to their
master! Ah! their glossy black coats and
their brilliant black eyes!

And now three men came. Two of these
men were Italians from San Francisco.
The third man was also from that city,
but he had an amazing big nose and re-
fused to eat bear meat. He thought it was
pork.

They took tremendous interest in the big
black twins, and stayed all night and till
late next day, seeing them perform.

“Seventy-five dollars,” said one big nose
to the other big nose, back in a corner
where they thought the boy did not hear.

“One hundred and fifty. You see, I'll
have to give my friends fifty each. Yes,
it’s true I’ve took care of ’em all winter,



54 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

but I ain’t mean, and I'll only keep fifty
of it.”

The boy, bursting with indignation, ran
to Mountain Joe with what he had heard.
But poor Joe had been sober for a long
time, and his eyes fairly danced in delight
at having $50 in his own hand and right
to spend it down at the post.

And so the two Italians muzzled the big,
pretty pets and led them kindly down the
trail toward the city, where they were to
perform in the streets, the man with the
big nose following after the twins on a big
white mule. .

And what became of the big black twin
babies? They are still performing, seem
content and happy, sometimes in a circus,
sometimes in a garden, sometimes in the
stveet. They are great favorites and have
never done harm to anyone.

And what became of Sil Reese? Well,
as said before, he still lives, is very rich
and very miserable. He met the boy—the
boy that was—on the street the other day





TWIN BABIES. 55

and wanted to talk of old times. He told
the boy he ought to write something about
the old times and put him, Sil Reese, in it.
He said, with that same old sounding nose
and sickening smile, that he wanted the
boy to be sure and put his, Sil Reese’s
name, in it so that he could show it to his
friends. And the boy has done so.

The boy? You want to know what the
boy is doing? Well, in about a second he
will be signing his autograph to the bot-
tom of this story about his twin babies.



NV.
IN SWIMMING WITH A BEAR.

What made these ugly rows of scars on
my left hand?

Well, it might have been buckshot; only
it wasn’t. Besides, buckshot would be scat-
tered about, “sort of promiscuous like,” as
backwoodsmen say. But these ugly little
holes are all in a row, or rather in two
rows. Now a wolf might have made these
holes with his fine white teeth, or a bear
might have done it with his dingy and
ugly teeth, long ago. I must here tell you
that the teeth of a bear are not nearly so
fine as the teeth of a wolf. And the teeth
of a lion are the ugliest of them all. They
are often broken and bent; and they are
always of a dim yellow color. It is from
this yellow hue of the lion’s teeth that we
have the name of one of the most famous

early flowers of May: dent de lion, tooth
56



SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 57

of the lion; dandelion. Get down your
botany, now, find the Anglo-Asian name of
the flower, and fix this fact on your mind
before you read further.

I know of three men, all old men now,
who have their left hands all covered with
scars. One is due to the wolf; the others
owe their scars to the red mouths of black
bears.

You see, in the old days, out here in Cal-
ifornia, when the Sierras were full of bold
young fellows hunting for gold, quite a
number of them had hand-to-hand battles
with bears. For when we came out here
“the woods were full of ’em.”

Of course, the first thing a man does
when he finds himself face to face with a
bear that won’t run and he has no gun—
and that is always the time when he finds
a bear—why, he runs, himself; that is, if
the bear will let him.

But it is generally a good deal like the
old Crusader who “caught a Tartar” long



58 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ago, when on his way to capture Jerusa-
lem, with Peter the Hermit.

“Come on!” cried Peter to the helmeted
and knightly old Crusader, who sat his
horse with lance in rest on a hill a little in
the rear. “Come on!”

“T can’t! DPve caught a Tartar.”

“Well, bring him along.”

“He won’t come.”

“Well, then, come without him.”

“He won't let me.”

And so it often happened in the old days
out here. When a man “caught” his bear
and didn’t have his gun he had to fight
it out hand-to-hand. But fortunately, every
man at all times had a knife in his belt.
A knife never gets out of order, never
“snaps,” and a man in those days always
had to have it with him to cut his food,
cut brush, “crevice” for gold, and so on.

Oh! it is a grim picture to see a young
fellow in his red shirt wheel about, when
he can’t run, thrust out his left hand, draw
his knife with his right, and so, breast. to



SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 59

breast, with the bear erect, strike and
strike and strike to try to reach his heart
before his left hand is eaten off to the el-
bow!

We have five kinds of bears in the Sier-
ras. The “boxer,” the “biter,” the “hug-
ger,” are the most conspicuous. The other
two are a sort of “all round” rough and
tumble style of fighters.

The grizzly is the boxer. A game old
beast he is, too, and would knock down all
the John L. Sullivans you could put in the
Sierras faster than you could set them up.
He is a kingly old fellow and disdains fa-
miliarity. Whatever may be said to the
contrary, he never “hugs” if he has room
to box. In some desperate cases he has
been known to bite, but ordinarily he obeys
“the rules of the ring.”

The cinnamon bear is a lazy brown
brute, about one-half the size of the grizzly.
He always insists on being very familiar,
if not affectionate. This is the “hugger.”

ess in order comes the big, sleek, black



60 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

bear; easily tamed, too lazy to fight, unless
forced to it. But when “cornered” he fights
well, and, like a lion, bites to the bone.
After this comes the small and quarrel-
some black bear with big ears, and a white
spot on his breast. I have heard hunters
say, but I don’t quite believe it, that he
sometimes points to this white spot on his
breast as a sort of Free Mason’s sign, as if
to say, “Don’t shoot.” Next in order comes
the smaller black bear with small ears. He
is ubiquitous, as well as omniverous;
gets into pig-pens, knocks over your bee-
hives, breaks open your milk-house, eats
more than two good-sized hogs ought to
eat, and is off for the mountain top before
you dream he is about. The first thing you
see in the morning, however, will be some
muddy tracks on the door steps. For he
always comes and snuffles and shuffles and
smells about the door in a good-natured
sort of way, and leaves his card. The fifth
member of the great bear family is not



SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 61

much bigger than an ordinary dog; but he
is numerous, and he, too, is a nuisance.

Dog? Why not set the dog on him? Let
me tell you. The California dog is a lazy,
degenerate cur. He ought to be put with
the extinct animals. He devotes his time
and his talent to the flea. Not six months
ago I saw a coon,on his way to my fish-pond
in the pleasant moonlight, walk within
two feet of my dog’s nose and not disturb
his slumbers,

We hope that it is impossible ever to
have such a thing as hydrophobia in Cali-
fornia. But as our dogs are too lazy to
bite anything, we have thus far been un-
able to find out exactly as to that.

This last-named bear has a big head and
small body; has a long, sharp nose and
longer and sharper teeth than any of the
others; he is a natural thief, has low in-

-stincts, carries his nose close to the ground,
and, wherever possible, makes his road
along on the mossy surface of fallen trees

in humid forests. He eats fish—dead and
5



62 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

decaying salmon—in such abundance that
his flesh is not good in the salmon season.

It was with this last described specimen
of the bear family that a precocious old
boy who had hired out to some horse drov-
ers, went in swimming years and years
ago. The two drovers had camped to re-
cruit and feed their horses on the wild
grass and clover that grew at the headwa-
ters of the Sacramento River, close up un-
der the foot of Mount Shasta. A pleasant
spot it was, in the pleasant summer
weather. |

This warm afternoon the two men saun-
tered leisurely away up Soda Creek to
where their horses were grazing belly deep
in grass and clover. They were slow to
return, and the boy, as all boys will, began
to grow restless. He had fished, he had
hunted, had diverted himself in a dozen
ways, but now he wanted something new..
He got it.

A little distance below camp could be
seen, through the thick foliage that hung



SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 68

and swung and bobbed above the swift
waters, a long, mossy log that lay far out
and far above the cool, swift river.

Why not go down through the trees and
go out on that log, take off his clothes,
dangle his feet, dance on the moss, do any-
thing, everything that a. boy wants to do?

In two minutes the boy was out on the
big, long, mossy log, kicking his boots off,
and in two minutes more he was dancing
up and down on the humid, cool moss, and
as naked as the first man, when he was.
first made.

And it was very pleasant. The great,
strong river splashed and dashed and
boomed below; above him the long green
branches hung dense and luxuriant and
almost within reach. Far off and away
through their shifting shingle he caught
glimpses of the bluest of all blue skies.
. And a little to the left he saw gleaming
in the sun and almost overhead the ever-
lasting snows of Mount Shasta.

Putting his boots and his clothes all



64 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

carefully in a heap, that nothing might roll
off into the water, he walked, or rather
danced on out to where the further end
of the great fallen tree lay lodged on a
huge boulder in the middle of the swift
and surging river. His legs dangled down
and he patted his plump thighs with great
satisfaction. Then he leaned over and saw
some gold and silver trout, then he flopped
over and lay down on his breast to get a
better look at them. Then he thought he
heard something behind him on the other
end of the log! He pulled himself together
quickly and stood erect, face about. There
was a bear! It was one of those mean,
sneaking, long-nosed, ant-eating little fel-
lows, it is true, but it was a bear! Anda
bear is a bear to a boy, no matter about
his size, age or character. The boy stood
high up. The boy’s bear stood up. And
the boy’s hair stood up!

The bear had evidently not seen the boy
yet. But it had smelled his boots and
clothes, and had got upon his dignity. But



SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 65

now, dropping down on all fours, with nose
close to the mossy butt of the log, it slowly
shuffled forward.

That boy was the stillest boy, all this
time, that has ever been. Pretty soon the
bear reached the clothes. He stopped, sat
down, nosed them about as a hog might,
and then slowly and lazily got up; but with
a singular sort of economy of old clothes,
for a bear, he did not push anything off
into the river.

What next? Would he come any farther?
Would he? Could he? Will he? The long,
sharp little nose was once more to the moss
and sliding slowly and surely toward the
poor boy’s naked shins. Then the boy shiv-
ered and settled down, down, down on his
haunches, with his little hands clasped till
he was all of a heap. ;

He tried to pray, but somehow or an-
_ other, all he could think of as he sat there
crouched down with all his clothes off was:

“Now I lay me down to sleep.”



66 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

But all this could not last. The bear
was almost on him in half a minute, al-
though he did not lift his nose six inches
till almost within reach of the boy’s toes.
Then the surprised bear suddenly stood up
and began to look the boy in the face. As
the terrified youth sprang up, he thrust out
his left hand as a guard and struck the
brute with all his might between the eyes
with the other. But the left hand lodged
in the two rows of sharp teeth and the boy
and bear rolled into the river together.

But they were together only an instant.
The bear, of course, could not breathe with
his mouth open in the water, and so had to
let go. Instinctively, or perhaps because
his course lay in that direction, the bear
struck out, swimming “dog fashion,” for
the farther shore. And as the boy certainly
had no urgent business on that side of the
river he did not follow, but kept very still,
clinging to the moss on the big boulder
till the bear had shaken the water from his
coat and disappeared in the thicket.



SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 67

Then the boy, pale and trembling from
fright and the loss of blood, climbed up
the broken end of the log, got his clothes,
struggled into them as he ran, and so
reached camp.

And he had not yelled! He tied up hig
hand in a piece of old flour sack, all by him-
self, for the men had not yet got back;
and he didn’t whimper! And what became
of the boy? you ask.

The boy grew up as all energetic boys
do; for there seems to be a sort of special
providence for such boys
- And where is he now?

Out in California, trapping bear in the
winter and planting olive trees in their sea-
son.

And do I know him?

Yes, pretty well, almost as well as any
old fellow can know himself.



VI.

A FAT LITTLE EDITOR AND THREE
LITTLE “BROWNS.”

Mount Sinai, Heart of the Sierras—this
place is one mile east and a little less than
-one mile perpendicular from the hot, dusty
and dismal little railroad town down on
the rocky banks of the foaming and tum-
bling Sacramento River. Some of the old
miners are down there still—still working
on the desolate old rocky bars with rock-
ers. They have been there, some of them,
for more than thirty years. A few of them
have little orchards, or vineyards, on the
steep, overhanging hills, but there is no
home life, no white women to speak of, as
yet. The battered and gray old miners are
poor, lonely and discouraged, but they are
honest, stout-hearted still, and of a much
higher type than those that hang about the

towns. It is hot down on the river—too
68



A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. 69

hot, almost, to tell the truth. Even here
under Mount Shasta, in her sheets of eter-
nal snow, the mercury is at par.

This Mount Sinai is not a town; it is a
great spring of cold water that leaps from
the high, rocky front of a mountain which
we have located as a summer home in the
Sierras—myself and a few other scribes of
California.

This is the great bear land. One of our
party, a simple-hearted and honest city ed-
itor, who was admitted into our little
mountain colony because of his boundless
good nature and native goodness, had
never seen a bear before he came here. City
editors do not, as a rule, ever know much
about bears. This little city editor is bald-
headed, bow-legged, plain to a degree. And
maybe that is why he is so good. “Give
me fat men,” said Caesar.

But give me plain men for good men, any
time. Pretty women are to be preferred;
but pretty men? Bah! I must get on with
the bear, however, and make a long story



70 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

a short story. We found our fat, bent-
legged editor from the city fairly broiling
in the little railroad town, away down at
the bottom of the hill in the yellow golden
fields of the Sacramento; and he was so
limp and so lazy that we had to lay hold
of him and get him out of the heat and up
into the heart of the Sierras by main force.

Only one hour of climbing and we got
up to where the little mountain streams
come tumbling out of snow-banks on every
side. The Sacramento, away down below
and almost under us, from here looks
dwindled to a brawling brook; a foamy
white thread twisting about the boulders
as big as meeting houses, plunging for-
ward, white with fear, as if glad to get
away—as if there was a bear back there
where it came from. We did not register.
No, indeed. This place here on Square
Creek, among the clouds, where the water
bursts in a torrent from the living rock,
we have named Mount Sinai. We own the
whole place for one mile square—the tall



A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. V1

pine trees, the lovely pine-wood houses;
all, all. We proposed to hunt and fish,
for food. But we had some bread, some
bacon, lots of coffee and sugar. And so,
whipping out our hooks and lines, we set
off with the editor up a little mountain
brook, and in less than an hour were far
up among the fields of eternal snow, and
finely loaded with trout.

What a bed of pine quills! What long
and delicious cones for a camp fire! Some
of those sugar-pine cones are as long as
your arm. One of them alone will make a
lofty pyramid of flame and illuminate the
scene for half a mile about. I threw my-
self on my back and kicked up my heels.
I kicked care square in the face. Oh, what
freedom! How we would rest after dinner
here! Of course we could not all rest or
sleep at the same time. One of us would
- have to keep a pine cone burning all the
time. Bears are not very numerous out
here; but the California lion is both numer-
ous and large here. The wild-cat, too, is



72 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

no friend to the tourist. But we were not
tourists. The land was and is ours. We
would and all could defend our own.

The sun was going down. Glorious! The
shades of night were coming up out of the
gorges below and audaciously pursuing
the dying sun. Not asound. Not a sign
of man or of beast. We were scattered all
up and down the hill.

Crash! Something came tearing down
the creek through the brush! The fat and
simple-hearted editor, who had been dress-
ing the homeopathic dose of trout, which
inexperience had marked as his own,
sprang up from the bank of the tumbling
little stream above us and stood at his full
height. His stout little knees for the first
time smote together. I was a good way
below him on the steep hillside. A brother
editor was slicing bacon on a piece of re-
versed pine bark close by

“Fall down,” I cried, “fall flat down on
your face.”

It was a small she bear, and she was very



A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. 73

thin and very hungry, with cubs at her
heels, and she wanted that fat little city
editor’s fish, I know it would take
volumes to convince you that I really
meant for the bear to pass by him and
come after me and my friend with both
fish and bacon, and so, with half a line, I
assert this truth and pass on. Nor was I
in any peril in appropriating the little
brown bear to myself. Any man who
knows what he is about is as safe with a
bear on a steep hillside as is the best bull-
fighter in any arena. No bear can keep his
footing on a steep hillside, much less fight.
And whenever an Indian is in peril he al-
ways takes down hill till he comes to a
steep plane, and then lets the bear almost
overtake him, when he suddenly steps aside
and either knifes the bear to the heart or
lets the open-mouthed beast go on down
_the hill, heels over head.

The fat editor turned his face toward
me, and it was pale. “What! Lie down
and be eaten up while you lie there and



74 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

kick up your heels and enjoy yourself?
Never. We will die together!” he shouted.

He started for me as fast as his short
legs would allow. The bear struck at him
with her long, rattling claws. He landed
far below me, and when he got up he
hardly knew where he was or what he was.
His clothes were in shreds, the back and
bottom parts of them. The bear caught at
his trout and was gone in an instant back
with her two little cubs, and a moment
later the little family had dined and was
away, over the hill. She was a cinnamon
‘bear, not much bigger than a big, yellow
dog, and almost as lean and mean and hun-
gry as any wolf could possibly be. We
helped our inexperienced little friend
slowly down to camp, forgetting all about
the bacon and the fish till we came to the
little board house, where we had coffee.
Of course the editor could not go to the
table now. He leaned, or rather sat, against
a pine, drank copious cups of coffee and
watched the stars, while I heaped up great



A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. 15

piles of leaves and built a big fire, and so
night rolled by in all her starry splendor
as the men slept soundly all about beneath
the lordly pines. But alas for the fat little
editor; he did not like the scenery, and he
would not stay. We saw him to the sta-
tion on his way back to his little sanctum.
He said he was satisfied. He had seen the
“bar.” His last words were, as he pulled
himself close together in a modest corner
in the car and smiled feebly: “Say, boys,
you won’t let it get in the papers, will
you?”



VII.
TREEING A BEAR.

Away back in the “fifties” bears were as
numerous on the banks of the Willamette
River, in Oregon, as are hogs in the hick-
ory woods of Kentucky in nut time, and
that is saying that bears were mighty
plenty in Oregon about forty years ago.

‘You see, after the missionaries estab-
lished their great cattle ranches in Oregon
and gathered the Indians from the wilder-
ness and set them to work and fed them
on beef and bread, the bears had it all
their own way, till they literally overran
the land. And this gave a great chance for
sport to the sons of missionaries and the
sons of new settlers “where rolls the Ore-
gon.”

And it was not perilous sport, either,
for the grizzly was rarely encountered

76



TREEING A BEAR. 77

here. His home was further to the south.
Neither was the large and clumsy cinna-
mon bear abundant on the banks of the
beautiful Willamette in those dear old
days, when you might ride from sun
to sun, belly deep in wild flowers, and
never see a house. But the small black
bear, as indicated before, was on deck in
great force, at all times and in nearly all
places.

It was the custom in those days for boys
to take this bear with the lasso, usually on
horseback.

We would ride along close to the dense
woods that grew by the river bank, and,
getting between him and his base of re-
treat, would, as soon as we sighted a bear
feeding out in the open plain, swing our
lassos and charge him with whoop and
yell. His habit of rearing up and stand-
ing erect and looking about to see what
was the matter made him an easy prey to
the lasso. And then the fun of taking him
home through the long, strong grass!

&



78 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

As a rule, he did not show fight when
once in the toils of the lasso; but in a few
hours, making the best of the situation like
a little philosopher, he would lead along
like a dog.

There were, of course, exceptions to this
exemplary conduct.

On one occasion particularly, Ed Parish,
the son of a celebrated missionary, came
near losing his life by counting too con-
fidently on the docility of a bear which he
had taken with a lasso and was leading
home.

His bear suddenly stopped, stood up
and began to haul in the rope, hand over
hand, just like a sailor. And as the other
end of the rope was fastened tightly to the
big Spanish pommel of the saddle, why
of course the distance between the bear
and the horse soon grew perilously
short, and Ed Parish slid from his horse’s
back and took to the brush, leaving horse
and bear to fight it out as best they could.

When he came back, with some boys to



TREEING A BEAR. 79

help him, the horse was dead and the bear
was gone, having cut the rope with his
teeth.

After having lost his horse in this way,
poor little Ed Parish had to do his hunting
on foot, and, as my people were immigrants
and very poor, why we, that is my brother
and I, were on foot also. This kept us three
boys together a great deal, and many a pe-
culiar adventure we had in those dear days
“when all the world was young.”

Ed Parish was nearly always the hero
of our achievements, for he was a bold,
enterprising fellow, who feared nothing at
all. In fact, he finally lost his life from
his very great love of adventure. But this
is too sad to tell now, and we must be con-
tent with the story about how he treed a
hear for the present.

We three boys had gone bear hunting

_up a wooded canyon near his father’s ranch
late one warm summer afternoon. Ed had
a gun, but, as I said before, my people were
very poor, so neither brother nor I as yet



80 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

had any other arms or implements than the
inseparable lasso.

Ed, who was always the captain in such
cases, chose the center of the dense, deep
canyon for himself, and, putting my
brother on the hillside to his right and my-
self on the hillside to his left, ordered a
simultaneous “Forward march.”

After a time we heard him shoot. Then
we heard him shout. Then there was a
long silence.

Then suddenly, high and wild, his voice
rang out through the tree tops down in
the deep canyon.

“Come down! Come quick! I’ve treed
a bear! Come and help me catch him;
come quick! Oh, Moses! come quick, and
—and—and catch him!”

My brother came tearing down the
steep hill on his side of the canyon as I de-
scended from my side. We got down about
the same time, but the trees in their dense
foliage, together with the compact under-



TREEING A BEAR. 81

brush, concealed everything. We could see
neither bear nor boy.

This Oregon is a damp country, warm
and wet; nearly always moist and humid,
and so the trees are covered with moss.
Long, gray, sweeping moss swings from the
broad, drooping boughs of fir and pine and
cedar and nearly every bit of sunlight is
shut out in these canyons from one year’s
end to the other. And it rains here nearly
half of the year; and then these densely
wooded canyons are as dark as caverns. I
know of nothing so grandly gloomy as
these dense Oregon woods in this long
rainy season.

I laid my ear to the ground after I got
a glimpse of my brother on the other side
of the canyon, but could hear nothing at all
but the beating of my heart.

Suddenly there was a wild yell away up
in the dense boughs of a big mossy maple
tree that leaned over toward my side of
the canyon. I looked and looked with
eagerness, but could see nothing whatever.



82 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

Then again came the yell from the top
of the big leaning maple. Then there was
a moment of silence, and then the cry: “Oh,
Moses! Why don’t you come, I say, and
help me catch him?” By this time I could
see the leaves rustling. And I could see
the boy rustling, too.

And just behind him was a bear. He
had treed the bear, sure enough!

My eyes gradually grew accustomed to
the gloom and density, and I now saw the
red mouth of the bear amid the green foli-
age high overhead. The bear had already
pulled off one of Ed’s boots and was about
making a bootjack of his big red mouth
for the other.

“Why don’t you come on, I say, and help
me catch him?”

He kicked at the bear, and at the same

time hitched himself a little further along
up the leaning trunk, and in doing so
kicked his remaining boot into the bear’s
mouth.

iene ch a eet



TREEING A BEAR. 83

“Oh, Moses, Moses! Why don’t you
come? I’ve got a bear, I tell you.”

“Where is it, Hd?” shouted my brother
on the other side.

But Ed did not tell him, for he had not
yet got his foot from the bear’s mouth,
and was now too busy to do anything else
but yell and cry “Oh, Moses!’

Then my brother and I shouted out to
Ed at the same time. This gave him great
courage. He said something like “Con-
found you!” to the bear, and getting his
foot loose without losing the boot he kicked
the bear right on the nose. This brought
things to a standstill. Ed hitched along
a little higher up, and as the leaning trunk
of the tree was already bending under his
own and the bear’s weight, the infuriated
brute did not seem disposed to go further.
Besides, as he had been mortally wounded,
he was probably growing too weak to do
much now.

My brother got to the bottom of the
canyon and brought Ed’s gun to where I



84 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

stood. But, as we had no powder or bul-
lets, and as Ed could not get them to us,
even if he would have been willing to risk
our shooting at the bear, it was hard to
decide what to do. It was already dusk
and we could not stay there all night.

“Boys,” shouted Ed, at last, as he stead-
ied himself in the forks of a leaning and
overhanging bough, “I’m going to come
down on my laz rope. There, take that end
of it, tie your laz ropes to it and scramble
up the hill.”

We obeyed him to the letter, and as we
did so, he fastened his lasso firmly to the
jeaning bough and descended like a spider
to where we had stood a moment before.
We all scrambled up out of the canyon to-
gether and as quickly as possible.

When we went back next day to get our
ropes we found the bear dead near the root
of the old mossy maple. The skin was a
splendid one, and Ed insisted that my
brother and I should have it, and we gladly
accepted it.



TREEING A BEAR. 85

My brother, who was older and wiser
than I, said that he made us take the skin
so that we would not be disposed to tell
how he had “treed a bear.” But I trust
‘not, for he was a very generous-hearted
fellow. Anyhow, we never told the story
while he lived.



VIII.
BILL CROSS AND HIS PET BEAR.

When my father settled down at the foot
of the Oregon Sierras with his little family,
long, long years ago, it was about forty
miles from our place to the nearest civil-
ized settlement.

People were very scarce in those days,
and bears, as said before, were very plenty.
We also had wolves, wild-cats, wild cattle,
wild hogs, and a good many long-tailed and
big-headed yellow Californian lions.

The wild cattle, brought there from
Spanish Mexico, next to the bear, were
most to be feared. They had long, sharp
horns and keen, sharp hoofs. Nature had
gradually helped them out in these weap-
ons of defense. They had grown to be slim
and trim in body, and were as supple and

swift as deer. They were the deadly ene-
86



BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 87

mies of all wild beasts; because all wild
beasts devoured their young.

When fat and saucy, in warm summer
weather, these cattle would hover along
the foothills in bands, hiding in the hol-
lows, and would begin to bellow whenever
they saw a bear or a wolf, or even a man
or boy, if on foot, crossing the wide valley
of grass and blue camas blossoms. Then
there would be music! They would start
up, with heads and tails in the air, and,
broadening out, left and right, they would
draw along bent line, completely shutting
off their victim from all approach to the
foothills. If the unfortunate victim were
aman or boy on foot, he generally made
escape up one of the small ash trees that
dotted the valley in groves here and there,
and the cattle would then soon give up the
chase. But if it were a wolf or any other —
_ wild beast that could not get up a
tree, the case was different. Far away,
on the other side of the valley, where
dense woods lined the banks of the wind-



88 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ing Willamette river, the wild, bellow-
ing herd would be answered. Out from
the edge of the woods would stream,
right and left, two long, corresponding,
surging lines, bellowing and plunging for-
ward now and then, their heads to the
ground, their tails always in the air and
their eyes aflame, as if they would set fire
to the long gray grass. With the precision
and discipline of a well-ordered army, they
would close in upon the wild beast, too
terrified now to either fight or fly, and,
leaping upon him, one after another, with
their long, sharp hoofs, he would, in a little
time, be crushed into an unrecognizable
mass. Not a bone would be left unbroken.
It is a mistake to suppose that they ever
used their long, sharp horns in attack.
These were used only in defense, the same
as elk or deer, falling on the knees and re-
ceiving the enemy on their horns, much as
the Old Guard received the French in the
last terrible struggle at Waterloo.

Bill Cross was a “tender foot” at the time



BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 89

of which I write, and a sailor, at that. Now,
the old pilgrims who had dared the plains
in those days of 49, when cowards did not
venture and the weak died on the way, had
not the greatest respect for the courage or
endurance of those who had reached Ore-
gon by ship. But here was this man, a
sailor by trade, settling down in the in-
terior of Oregon, and, strangely enough,
pretending to know more about everything
in general and bears in particular than
either my father or any of his boys!

He had taken up a piece of land down
in the pretty Camas Valley where the grass
grew long and strong and waved in the
wind, mobile and beautiful as the mobile
sea.

The good-natured and self-complacent
old sailor liked to watch the waving grass.
It reminded him of the sea, I reckon. He
would sometimes sit on our little porch as
_ the sun went down and tell us boys
strange, wild sea stories. He had traveled
far and seen much, as much as any man



90 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

can see on water, and maybe was not a
very big liar, for a sailor, after all. We
liked his tales. He would not work, and
so he paid his way with stories of the sea.
The only thing about him that we did not
like, outside of his chronic idleness, was
his exalted opinion of himself and his un-
concealed contempt for everybody’s opin-
ion but his own.

“Bill,” said my father one day, “those
black Spanish cattle will get after that red
sash and sailor jacket of yours some day
when you go down in the valley to your
claim, and they won’t leave a grease spot.
Better go horseback, or at least take a gun,
when you go down next time.”

“Pshaw! Squire. I wish I had as many
dollars as I ain’t afeard of all the black
Spanish cattle in Oregon. Why, if they’re
so blasted dangerous, how did your mis-
sionaries ever manage to drive them up
here from Mexico, anyhow?”

Still, for all that, the very next time that
he saw the old sailor setting out at his snail



BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 91

pace for his ranch below, slow and indo-
lent as if on the deck of a ship, my father
insisted that he should go on horseback,
or at least take a gun.

~“Pooh, pooh! I wouldn’t be bothered
with a horse or a gun. Say, I’m goin’ to
bring your boys a pet bear some day.”

And so, cocking his little hat down over
his right eye and thrusting his big hands
into his deep pockets almost to the elbows,
he slowly and lazily whistled himself down
the gradual slope of the foothills, waist
deep in the waving grass and delicious wild
flowers, and soon was lost to sight in the
great waving sea.

Two things may be here written down.
He wouldn’t ride a horse because he
couldn’t, and for the same reason he
wouldn’t use a gun. Again let it be writ-
ten down, also, that the reason he was
going away that warm autumn afternoon

"was that there was some work to do. These
facts were clear to my kind and indulgent

father;but of course we boys never thought
7



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'373260' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSD' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
800b4095bc790d449ec0f1497df83efb
f85cd49c606c0ec698f8c94a9aafe341605341d5
'2011-12-30T13:49:01-05:00'
describe
'105336' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
979d07a0e17594a20c8ae8f5d595f61b
207ca602129a361a373582786d422905cc51489e
'2011-12-30T13:56:41-05:00'
describe
'28080' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
e1b6a1cea60aaeb39c9fa0934c894cac
d7d3e9c763632c4a4b28028406e00a855913cdcd
'2011-12-30T13:54:11-05:00'
describe
'34241' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
42c0ceab0e3c852338cdfa2c65625daa
61b68357731b388e8f44874384c61cab404ad82f
'2011-12-30T13:57:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5bee7ac7e23702b9406a426da4e2ec65
663c2d63a24b93e2ec61ccebf2b25511b8bec973
'2011-12-30T13:49:16-05:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c0566a3a5d6fc0299248797dbbaf48cd
303b67d3c637549e6b3e247b62f8c3f49c284e8f
'2011-12-30T13:54:43-05:00'
describe
'8899' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
a06dd627f71c8a346300810f92c7d2c1
2405f0c878f512dbd65f2738abfe5ff6ef51b042
'2011-12-30T13:53:27-05:00'
describe
'373006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ac53691f2932b052f9d545f0c7d26096
ae43bde6093a95ba1849a06b13f860f3fa510c8e
'2011-12-30T13:56:57-05:00'
describe
'112612' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6e977bb28ec07c9c40a6f588f1681523
d5b97d38aebadd9a79105850864754a233b63f1c
describe
'28900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSM' 'sip-files00012.pro'
14a93541c5b4bd43bfd21b49592cb1d1
c2cc8968180b3f9873045ce0f86fbed34ed8164f
'2011-12-30T14:00:47-05:00'
describe
'34663' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSN' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d60cc0c9f607bc8cf6ae5106ca933836
85762a8eed52d993ba0610adcd0da23c6cf12381
'2011-12-30T13:58:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
40a9db52004b62b9244021cf10775d75
2c7df175bb7088f36e61f3d8f6c5f8260a3a0e07
'2011-12-30T13:50:47-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSP' 'sip-files00012.txt'
48f47ac6ea156ea6fe756253c98a1dd8
27d8c6dd13a83c0baa3144808eaa980d7e71336a
'2011-12-30T13:51:29-05:00'
describe
'8749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e312a74bed3b8d31c0fdae59c5d0922c
c440b92461b0d283d48a496c11afd36d0cc0a11b
describe
'373245' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
bab026f0dad663e4e5694e6605705de1
5fdd35d379b959a443c514ecb393bcc0addbf114
'2011-12-30T13:53:24-05:00'
describe
'119178' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
738e33c14e71e364113259b7500fde23
c78af754a7dd64c3f971060b74e2d5319c259a4e
'2011-12-30T13:52:30-05:00'
describe
'30605' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARST' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b74414952db32a03a774e4467c2eca8d
1a1eb38a502ecf879fc57dedfa614bf241c24a9e
'2011-12-30T13:53:51-05:00'
describe
'37114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0f764c187e46c2124de32e54e32eff87
8e76b4f3a52b77c4f6b331a9b96146e8361fc9a5
'2011-12-30T13:50:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ff19f0abb30c454377d7e6d710dd30cd
f5a4ddac1db2f30092d971fa1c4a6976f84f9ce3
'2011-12-30T13:55:14-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSW' 'sip-files00013.txt'
342128948f15c766bb041387bf489c7d
b2f17dd42470b12d51fa94bd708774297eaa2135
'2011-12-30T13:58:40-05:00'
describe
'9238' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
332490ce0923ba67b83b20ae6c895b89
afac58cd70fc248d92256d8fd9d1b3f388439cdb
'2011-12-30T13:49:09-05:00'
describe
'373154' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6147498fc7e4ed6a60e8cd44d4689e26
6e279d50939ca93c0e457aae409564e1b7285699
'2011-12-30T13:54:39-05:00'
describe
'117004' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8bee4d47314f3b2d559e9673bcd43eab
2b858aaa791411320b5b50b89f2ac3a28b2db3f9
'2011-12-30T13:52:05-05:00'
describe
'31889' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTA' 'sip-files00014.pro'
707f8f06aeaed6d855f385e2a8b427fe
e68c5bd076152ccedc13e38a8cdf108487431565
'2011-12-30T13:53:25-05:00'
describe
'37111' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
82caf6d7c118b7111b10cc37d321739f
add931e695ccc0f46c4e25acbbf0033843f4617f
'2011-12-30T13:52:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
4041a7453b610c38e6b9339d0ae86aab
28f0129adf5111f65016064b8377576c3fd4f91b
'2011-12-30T14:00:43-05:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTD' 'sip-files00014.txt'
12689d208a2d609c2dd3e609a8c3e825
9c65f84470246a58a40d7c0b2061874ecb3388d1
'2011-12-30T13:53:15-05:00'
describe
'9045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTE' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
8a17494743e60e9dab84b5cd632d4571
72f59861419751007608f06a709a73d9ad942c34
'2011-12-30T13:54:31-05:00'
describe
'372910' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
78652071d1caf8279c9a6416af9cd365
6d61e954eb2e02bbdca2c8eb6648f2d6d93ffed8
'2011-12-30T13:53:34-05:00'
describe
'49187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c16fbbad1e2eebb822323c3ac086bb26
74677ca21116212a22eb1ee12504bfc4cca83c14
'2011-12-30T14:00:09-05:00'
describe
'13719' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTH' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d88e1037167b079862f6489bca3b9717
2a564c689559dc5fb884b66503b6f542be8b430e
'2011-12-30T13:58:06-05:00'
describe
'16090' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
cc6ccdadc5a1991ddc18b814b766abff
6b16b8177514e07796d3f192b9fb457047ca79f5
'2011-12-30T13:59:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8e65a126fdd92d0b7e9cf738a85890b6
08afee8ce783a5b64930b3ee2937738a9f40e442
'2011-12-30T13:57:46-05:00'
describe
'699' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTK' 'sip-files00015.txt'
41f0d9e3b2e2f91c86ce0c7753a7e6f3
d05b151a84f5ea71bd72e53244749f707a8cca46
'2011-12-30T13:53:14-05:00'
describe
'5014' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTL' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
b78cd2db079ccf581170dd99ca770992
a7c48f960b92c302b79532bf20a1358073cb20f0
'2011-12-30T13:58:19-05:00'
describe
'373136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTM' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
70faa731a7f901c81489d6221383e24a
a6acd272c24401c8cca81b969300d8af208cbbd7
'2011-12-30T13:50:38-05:00'
describe
'41915' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTN' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
5c9970a97a11a595dfc4963a6ecb8366
75cb0cb8446c19426448cb90465032b4237fa712
'2011-12-30T13:54:52-05:00'
describe
'6670' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
729bd62b7688caeef9f86f3522e1b885
a84177c7aef385583715b2c8e264d7c9aa71d2e3
'2011-12-30T13:55:07-05:00'
describe
'12048' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
1150b633aa8255b4b6de3643157af962
5ec49eecf3809a8450b3eb75bea6703100a0d099
'2011-12-30T13:49:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8fb85105084a3d7f3273e3a590a85db3
98aa4bd648c91b27fc76122116d370bc8e0c7991
'2011-12-30T13:59:03-05:00'
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
65da56bd51bfe4878e7d4f8676b19199
6bb8f03202e777a8fd3be1b0d1da10e61ec138c2
'2011-12-30T13:48:46-05:00'
describe
'3336' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f1ffd28624380455c092b78bbd45812d
7317d126e9a142ff626bc70869d177a2a31d4501
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
08039fdded800a108366bd9f9ba6939f
b43d7dbd090369c91eea055c40653d3b095e9aeb
'2011-12-30T13:53:06-05:00'
describe
'103891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTU' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d68469a6e9a6a0e7bd3a62a821b9f29d
109b65694f47803d25938e37e58babe0fa54de84
describe
'25891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTV' 'sip-files00017.pro'
2e44db826dfe54abb30d1a0a92b5d2c3
e19dfdd51c3ad68b9cff54ae342406de50fad686
describe
'32409' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
abf4edc2e783755d1220996d8d016034
591ddc4495ce799136fd7238de6d0763fc8232de
'2011-12-30T13:57:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTX' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c3cb847c0705451877cad4785ee1d626
5878cc63819cdc1fd2da95561df8c9514e861dfa
'2011-12-30T13:51:57-05:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
42801750cd59f38512ca86e4d3028453
854b14ed5b7f23d4b44005887e82c9ee6542613d
'2011-12-30T13:51:17-05:00'
describe
'8060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
104890a7e7cabb1d0b44fd1d59d25ec8
dedef2e86650da3b67a3c0b03d987d38ad45b99b
'2011-12-30T13:50:23-05:00'
describe
'373180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUA' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c443d642e353d6540483454d2d664509
4d5b912e552ccfc57f48721e5b9175997df26cf3
'2011-12-30T13:48:49-05:00'
describe
'111129' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUB' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
27f6b32247adb46baf1137baca67c4b9
2792c799dc76ae8b6b7c41581f8e959c71737fe2
'2011-12-30T13:55:34-05:00'
describe
'30508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUC' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d76750fde2b3a538e41a2cb8d4ae6853
d6e5bbd87f8e161f4e0d39b43065cc1b12e31d35
'2011-12-30T13:58:32-05:00'
describe
'35556' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUD' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
fa14d734bd60360e0c4efe805e7c934d
df1dc4dfc884f0c9ff08a4d2d1b8d3079e8b63f9
'2011-12-30T13:49:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUE' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3242c0f6ce02630efcde1dc5ea089d7b
c7785c44237bfd0289c5465a29b48071af5e528a
'2011-12-30T13:52:40-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUF' 'sip-files00018.txt'
84d6b3a74d00ad332190387c33a6068c
fb97d6a116af4bc86aa47a2ece73f8eee19fabc0
'2011-12-30T13:53:43-05:00'
describe
'8929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUG' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2cd8d0a3f4beb3e2c0ddf8d888f77d9a
b13ef3d6221e44a00c69b3ca8616f8f0d92ace4f
describe
'373192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
0d2e35fee35cb4583d52567a094fd6d1
a74375813e42532126d9913d1467840c743ba745
'2011-12-30T13:48:47-05:00'
describe
'98635' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUI' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c5a2756b0841b7f792dc349b3e1b7186
26169f4d9f0c0a15928ba1cd5a3a112475651249
'2011-12-30T13:59:53-05:00'
describe
'24545' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0523a38027dc72dd83b4e592d80dbe66
25311348f18bce05dd7e173beb2d400a13207a43
'2011-12-30T13:53:00-05:00'
describe
'32743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUK' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f4c669c15c100d798f21d6cd706292a6
20bcd96b62032dfd71273af57df047c96fdcdfbd
'2011-12-30T13:55:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUL' 'sip-files00019.tif'
bfaeb1396238dd0393adaa800c0feffa
5114dc8eab4df58bb425d86eace81030863ea19b
'2011-12-30T13:57:29-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUM' 'sip-files00019.txt'
a74d369fcb8f8aae88944b2035baf7cf
60d493a803243e355450e1acda8315347290b4ae
describe
'8594' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
55385517f6bde9b9a9ec4c8dcdd77fb3
51e3f99e0cb0bb4609cd3c528b899758384fb529
'2011-12-30T13:58:17-05:00'
describe
'373203' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUO' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
094a3c7c4cd3e1bc493f31e317984b15
72ad6722bc42403b44fd48892ff3685ecbf18fe4
'2011-12-30T13:50:39-05:00'
describe
'99463' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
29e9b815fce6967f2605a18bdb078d44
b7057446d3d01bb79a699e0a7469d82655d8c630
'2011-12-30T13:57:50-05:00'
describe
'23390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0a49601acb02a981d4172db1e4d4f0a9
a232712021f301c3c113fbe9e1dcb88704096448
'2011-12-30T13:56:36-05:00'
describe
'30599' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUR' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
083aaa08464689a0a00c834f36edfdd5
255cd67319b4da0d16f0f2c3af34bc0dff70767d
'2011-12-30T14:00:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUS' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c954d9cd6533593672e8808c052b8103
b0bdd6954e41f6b97339dd820373f108743c71cd
'2011-12-30T13:58:39-05:00'
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUT' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4f53c9a94ad8ba8e85534f37298e55d7
c2f51fcc2cc8584b3a84331c6939bfa50b3ed1ae
'2011-12-30T13:57:06-05:00'
describe
'8241' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUU' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
82ec8edcebda505e7031dad1b2ae1b05
0fa0914a5531a4745edb397857d43740a1b2e23b
'2011-12-30T13:50:51-05:00'
describe
'373250' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUV' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b505109952812bd2919f213588043181
29c518134e4ce841bec901b8607dcb29fe66dee0
'2011-12-30T13:58:20-05:00'
describe
'110651' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUW' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
1dc13465252509311b85c25d34d3f266
842ed6de0a2b1b216593f1cf4b2dea3b3c34ebcb
'2011-12-30T13:59:07-05:00'
describe
'28510' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
dd388aa7423b2194e8a71e462b1124e2
131c9a1962a43283040772bda58fd6d9c0503499
'2011-12-30T13:59:13-05:00'
describe
'34798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
75ba7d416bbd9dded2b002cb286c4719
091ed624982e81b70bd1056dc373853e0997918a
'2011-12-30T13:49:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7dbb0cdbd6c3f9b1b813da0f9a9ef7c2
7f116c5a412cbb8137693821fd8a1cd175e2b82e
'2011-12-30T13:56:43-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d3c945a84e3218f7b58ad30ddb4e028c
5db967a14975f68029ec2bc501d55382ac5b9186
'2011-12-30T13:56:03-05:00'
describe
'8356' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVB' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
c15a12ea82c1fe58a56f788199395fca
2798cabecb712fb0e19f1211e63b851ff05f6001
'2011-12-30T13:50:50-05:00'
describe
'373133' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVC' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6d5e3e1c9d38584eea892665056c1c87
93defa5562ced72ab995eb5dac8f47af987c774c
'2011-12-30T13:51:14-05:00'
describe
'13040' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVD' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7939f042f942d790c0a482494225621a
348cbc295a04cb383f76c0716fbdcd95e04c937f
'2011-12-30T13:49:58-05:00'
describe
'2779' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
9424656724f818c33066a0957f3680e1
09033ac155b9cbc2484b355876f1c0adde4b857e
'2011-12-30T13:58:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9a6183703e13938bec91a094827671af
ceca5edb7c522b97dcdcd8e3714c98698ec5af37
'2011-12-30T13:59:00-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
6851b5af3219f26830fe31e20370f2c5
4e3a6b7490acd1153f79ddb3136bcee760cd1899
'2011-12-30T13:54:50-05:00'
describe
'373230' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
54c00fe94db8ef8c6fee255b06ebc897
8d855cc7666a987521502b6a56350005d660ac24
'2011-12-30T13:50:52-05:00'
describe
'82063' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c1b9f37cea9f59974daf1cee99d85c1a
f3183008cee15c59e005a7399a47a7ebe2b3b587
'2011-12-30T13:59:14-05:00'
describe
'17948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
4cf440172bd6c37c786787f4eb1e54ee
e947b7f951f8e18aab22ef0b6026eb78e7ade524
'2011-12-30T13:48:55-05:00'
describe
'26711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
210e877c78cb3ca93abc8492bca5b8ff
fb390e3c0098e0d79189d4dd6f05a1c5afa30ddf
'2011-12-30T13:52:58-05:00'
describe
'3002904' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a9427fcd324d2b9b629613686a1666db
32c78d2ce9755fa1e0cfb2402e6260325017ebb1
'2011-12-30T13:54:53-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0826464c8ff89fa320e652b65a5f518e
aefb7cab19422f19a583c7a88b55be4c852919b4
'2011-12-30T13:54:38-05:00'
describe
'7284' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
bb09617893c1d328dab0344c6f25b3a7
5e4074a74b8f393d2d06828aa3e47b681be01512
describe
'373037' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
15d3e85c35446d69461623f8114127fe
2d806aaf26e2bebffc6def9b97170690c1a09941
'2011-12-30T13:49:31-05:00'
describe
'105827' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
f2b4124e4ac607a3fc9f7cc9100dc809
9bb28ae0c3b79209d3826d8fc5a6f908aa21eba4
'2011-12-30T13:57:55-05:00'
describe
'25267' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ac97160ba413020ffa8b2f45eef857c3
4d5ca2117a74d509205036e2577555720c3a156c
describe
'32925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
38fa47b0d302496aa1807b6640ab20c7
0aad80923802f7b470199b6b7061a41a9f468d6b
'2011-12-30T13:59:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
b2ff3a8d4f1d158cc9609d2677f881cb
f83a2a06e05646a41edd2055aebc5cd5b5b1cebf
'2011-12-30T13:57:32-05:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVT' 'sip-files00024.txt'
d38865677cf7e7bc8fd42a309ee6df2d
0bdcce5e848de74989551909976c3b4de15556ad
describe
'8438' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
5563466a6a0686767e691f495f645e92
557aa262eb5f31fd3589b538e4430183df319c1d
'2011-12-30T13:55:31-05:00'
describe
'373221' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
11883a30268799253cce0216ad0624f0
f6be99b4d3f111977bea6941a2487cbb111bad4f
'2011-12-30T13:58:15-05:00'
describe
'112077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
324db06120d17466f57dd1f4a18fcce9
c0aad7465a7abbaaf09674fd2d36a43cf97ca823
describe
'25967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b3204799e413b5d9a465a98ce5d826ed
95dd93badcccdc4f5b1db6b88c65f8fe297874ea
'2011-12-30T13:57:36-05:00'
describe
'35545' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
ad7282f791b1770d6f5214416225e5a6
479d3b6001fa8d9004d8dd449d40b11c107f0758
'2011-12-30T13:56:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
9ea3f58e42624aac07c5458013bf50f5
61a7ddae81d86dfefcf7157834a11ca9766fbd82
'2011-12-30T13:51:11-05:00'
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
dd4c2b65f91cd010fe04dedbfe1aeba0
5b010bdd06cd989413922dd51f9e76c23bc96c24
'2011-12-30T13:52:36-05:00'
describe
'9560' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f7cf029351d22952ccff56ddb242d042
726e88df9877d2f7fa83553c43c12a140117edc8
'2011-12-30T13:59:49-05:00'
describe
'373235' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9579ab110b9c53e97d08183cad8e2bf4
0ee6d84ee01809a21ab93d39237dfbbfefd80a49
'2011-12-30T13:52:56-05:00'
describe
'99894' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWD' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
a66cdacb626bb1fae6d7e48dc35dfabf
db370279e7405712e0e8f6e18346910fc20d9657
'2011-12-30T13:48:48-05:00'
describe
'26222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
8aa46c2261b8c52f4de358e4786f6f9c
45ffdc91d4f116eef54fed15a9da9673f26c32a2
'2011-12-30T13:55:45-05:00'
describe
'33513' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
ba373677df9e17f07e069e99df708853
5f284f062b30403b4599a37b99763ce78e52ecc9
'2011-12-30T13:57:13-05:00'
describe
'3002908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fe2fc34483b9485239cab0051c5096e5
e5abaa00f8d20acf83ef7285ba8843987815566d
'2011-12-30T13:59:09-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d7da6da784f3cf5b4519ab45bc355074
805cb5a67048971da65f8a4247e5b4c9feb0efd9
'2011-12-30T13:58:55-05:00'
describe
'8729' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5a16731ff7a19ab8e84de8116c0eb13f
a51b42797ef2fb0590e4ff5a4eb8c1a8d373b9bf
'2011-12-30T13:52:29-05:00'
describe
'373157' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
ba7fc599640a32f6b8b6fdf1243301a1
ffc8683d9a17c86929f998068c696664428e0a0d
'2011-12-30T13:56:52-05:00'
describe
'100274' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6a20b8d7e2514ca2bf9d9c59a3807129
bdd04de2a093b4329faee21d7f815715f14daf77
describe
'25618' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ddd604e8349f89612c6f68ce541ef269
343b18ca3c87d49752bf9022a20bbe2a295e6172
describe
'34107' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
0ebf58c9230c87511c8fc93335c351f9
c04ff9065fa6a4f2e94ff72663704dde6012cd6b
'2011-12-30T13:48:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
af8757b6774e1db81b0e98a3dfb47d28
a8f80ea79994f55b32cc38540039a9867ab80108
'2011-12-30T14:00:24-05:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
b16b3943b8c65a8faa3598ed8674a4cf
9beb769dea9fea1406c7bf4c230538b539b288da
'2011-12-30T13:52:44-05:00'
describe
'8665' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a9ac3b9bfe70f18141b7649eaa1d5941
0eb2a080427a177c554e0c0a2b5ee3bc88dafba5
'2011-12-30T13:55:51-05:00'
describe
'373259' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f5518896bbe842e3363134bdf59194aa
1d8033e9071b08132e64c9bf73ec06cd67c854f1
'2011-12-30T13:54:09-05:00'
describe
'101703' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c53576e4ee9cece9677960c3cd69d820
ebadb9ccbf15ff4f98d899e73e6d0585517af354
describe
'25024' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a69bf9ef1a682a850d56853ea0693451
c68cb302e386e79b30ca91802ad49a0774359d5a
'2011-12-30T13:57:19-05:00'
describe
'32152' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7fe1523e188ab275487c19c90c7646c7
52583020235620c2ef2bf0247f3c0a75a35d4e5e
'2011-12-30T13:50:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
3729ccb37983d248c35b6f2bcf33a17d
a49d90ead3177bfa703a9de7f32f554fd0b30b49
'2011-12-30T13:50:36-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
d7a9ba5feb1f0d3579de26a8601becd9
89bacdd3162a46b50f1c4ed2d5941ec6cbeb510b
'2011-12-30T13:59:40-05:00'
describe
'8245' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
579159db7941cab3ac13508daa5e520d
1eb699b6afc2a09f2adb732942c5fc42becf3090
'2011-12-30T13:52:52-05:00'
describe
'373249' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
34be76c8b121654cea34623d0e088cf4
3cc1f3c325490a7ff158955e5d0b5edd7e5cd1de
describe
'106061' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3cb3ae2869b8adbd32ec425cc79b8c7c
10b240fa7224a86a731a9164eb31e4f901cee0f2
describe
'26131' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e316928f911379439f60238974b0dda9
abe6ca3be0e216787f5ff3a4b55cab6ae7751e46
describe
'33892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
bc650a65bc37f0909702f5efe6708ee5
623f2d45c742e30f6cf11dbd9f024e14fd4eeab1
'2011-12-30T13:56:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
9f8350413bac3d3f64d402bc24d531e6
1d431b56b0602acffe1ef1dff321b82fe30fa371
'2011-12-30T13:57:25-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
95e1257bf81f8cbcecf687b879240128
6b7740536a3cf408cb7a1e777081879086eba400
'2011-12-30T13:51:51-05:00'
describe
'8947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
4decd3d94eb7b898d16b93eddab8459c
dafaf342728bf0c90c0c15355a1c49baa58297f8
'2011-12-30T13:57:04-05:00'
describe
'373128' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6d5685b2dff0c0cc4069d2c13ed52754
5a9a7f875242478f4aa209b03f44fe17f3385316
'2011-12-30T13:53:46-05:00'
describe
'98774' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b5ea1f2066a638002a587efce5f1f0b4
05ef5dc0c7a2cd65a18a182d10958a2eba95b9cb
'2011-12-30T13:50:19-05:00'
describe
'25709' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
5d0a2a28bdb50b8fa7a062ac958ecbfc
041e49bc636dc21a5492ea776165be7e05802254
'2011-12-30T13:56:42-05:00'
describe
'32345' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0d32dbcb5274c392174bc662fd9f9fec
6e6ce1fa380909c8f9f498f65bdf6a18a03debe7
'2011-12-30T13:55:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
086d0eac15447df721d696ab8988f913
c6b30482e8ae28e9e89cfa870302c4ea74382ffd
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e85a3d3a6294175638ba06320ede38fe
007a1818e6bb5bbc5e54ce0d9a65cf8e6d55a173
'2011-12-30T13:54:44-05:00'
describe
'8611' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
8766c5a760a1621ceb956955bba457ec
123762b23df021103a362c3f3956dc3b6316707f
'2011-12-30T13:59:01-05:00'
describe
'373238' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ca599797fc101d4211fa9a604b8736ad
31e0cfb981ed8b4dec154c89574f81d3ab689135
'2011-12-30T13:54:16-05:00'
describe
'98361' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d9293971270bf0c12c07dfb6191c84fd
5b83e62c9dcd2f752eced7502f3d6b6568ed24a5
'2011-12-30T13:52:21-05:00'
describe
'25333' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8adc7d886c92f30f2377e5330e713bec
5b0f4b85a648a0305e52b9bebc517004e76d38b6
describe
'32187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7f5355fa2558adf5d24b4cb5e20d3e2f
e08658daca0f2e23b3af40b0a8d38fcf7011d4e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d0655b4ea800e0856774ab7398713beb
ebf38ffac10d2a73625a1c57c379a7d518fde14a
'2011-12-30T13:56:17-05:00'
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
db63c9b0ab310a3aff33fc5503c8d4a4
b9935a50ca0b4422ebdeeeadb519e6db891e30f4
'2011-12-30T13:52:15-05:00'
describe
'8616' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
ae633fdc3d94a3629312b49fb89d54e8
b1a0130b7cfcdc5c0aedea197b2441ce13f5efee
describe
'373125' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
7868b971fc3a82028912c3dbd0ca5a5f
5ab9617278756d41652550a0d4d7b91eb151437f
'2011-12-30T13:49:55-05:00'
describe
'103640' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
b5e1e77291240004da5664acd7d576f2
b49b444f4ba61f53b25ea41d3590ee704df41387
'2011-12-30T13:54:14-05:00'
describe
'24935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
7877c443d8f4e3b0454865000064f35a
794e6de90aec0f9231f5c2d2a35b7385a26b2280
'2011-12-30T13:56:58-05:00'
describe
'32380' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
c0d128c77b4e7b340f9ff7827ccf74a6
125bad6f218d44e57b16c398bac27e79d077ad40
'2011-12-30T13:57:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e328d4fbf3416250a0afc6dd3dd28d37
e42f1c2b29d1c9b8cba27f4cba3a48ff6e0cb5a7
'2011-12-30T13:49:43-05:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8d8971d2861a328148bf6fca770e6351
ac908e3cd4855038082288841d0a8d9a7e06a0fb
'2011-12-30T13:53:56-05:00'
describe
'8572' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
6ce22524f0745170289475a301daa7c5
03fcd8bd3080b6980c33e54526b31000ac9a15a7
'2011-12-30T13:50:21-05:00'
describe
'373256' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ac4708b565b1d144efeac1e9922bf080
d3845010387ec39a522b721803ad07bdc138397e
'2011-12-30T13:50:01-05:00'
describe
'102359' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
802e1c46dcde13ef75d2d45b568f692d
f9ad0fdd3fdfdc21fdc2a287060cba4df771c3e9
'2011-12-30T14:00:48-05:00'
describe
'25040' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
cab243da68125a45133650e3608d5272
182ce9a4243a22a543a0454c6e4a5717779e9262
'2011-12-30T13:55:28-05:00'
describe
'32123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8082a1ce7b3dd81f2b860cc974e7d9db
530e62031aaee00e0a6e4d532045224624bcfb04
'2011-12-30T13:50:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
bcfca42584f34b890ee57521625ffbe7
e5c1213730a9bd0964b8a89c5ddcc061dc257175
'2011-12-30T13:57:40-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e7e12b0c29a8e0afe1577775e8864cd1
1d6360d7a59e1ac4621af157f43199b12237d52f
describe
'8639' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
82a311feb1eaf900a89217319046a2d9
fb0f5d2e7ac83c5d5c1d9ae646a9b76b7a3ca0fb
describe
'373183' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
6cd3f4a777b10a14654d83269b36de5e
302b1e1cd0da688fd7343cdd57a2cd66c21885d5
'2011-12-30T13:57:23-05:00'
describe
'100197' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
bd16fdc63a5ac5852e392f5c3b6080bc
fff91546d3cf403b968b7649f9b46b5e5cf0b8ce
'2011-12-30T14:00:36-05:00'
describe
'25887' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0507a36261a4ab08538fdcf893be7d25
d1a647ffac1d78dedc0988e029cd70b57a912bc5
'2011-12-30T13:53:26-05:00'
describe
'33759' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6a515e382656ac9c6d866a19059eab9a
4909c85b41291e18c3cce098c0a11b2f2c893edf
'2011-12-30T13:52:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b1c7f9642d3630d8ea0ac352082c65ff
eae5050c502d72908aa0433339a867766e6010f6
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
db88ba67fa956aeebee91e319e0a6cca
638f5fc69dddb82c890f6f21c41f06489384e217
'2011-12-30T13:59:50-05:00'
describe
'8935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
dcfa60b6746c8861667c5304823b6dac
414f735a2532d91bbf7ae211b6b6bdb761d3f9fa
'2011-12-30T13:52:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
376ef56c23893ecd20607c1cd917ad90
e57c0c8745897e1c5c35639c2feda0ada4e8e7fe
'2011-12-30T14:00:11-05:00'
describe
'97249' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a0ec9ad831bf8445dcb8e4ef04f656c8
a54095c3985e31fe9a3dbac720263de4f1b897f5
'2011-12-30T13:59:43-05:00'
describe
'24875' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
752bd5727a6273c5a84a153e340ba25f
aab306be141e4098a42137b2ca57a1ba89a6a9f6
'2011-12-30T13:50:13-05:00'
describe
'32385' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
91fbee092771c29e9faae9116683a8ea
8dd2127f51e5bd35556a2d14d40514b1f66a615a
'2011-12-30T13:58:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
132e3941ede459ec4ff2159057507c5f
4fff1fc6c2dae18563384f60ae931ffab6a8548a
'2011-12-30T13:52:08-05:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
0a0d3a2772be5f38e7b4c9318cd52ba9
a7a57eb5a012512e6115757a7a536bb8522b40ca
'2011-12-30T13:53:48-05:00'
describe
'8445' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b238bfb2a16ef9bc2b9cfdc31d7fade4
d1d9ce698980453ed6035a9ead13fb23aa60f08e
'2011-12-30T13:52:13-05:00'
describe
'373212' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7446e7bfa84cc5c9f5ef26932fabf622
d99bab34d0d2be2bcc9c4822d22df21951b4b616
'2011-12-30T13:54:27-05:00'
describe
'154650' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
4a353bc89567433b65f8d1edb33996c1
51abcc2c78072d1df1551f57b70b2fad147eb679
'2011-12-30T13:49:02-05:00'
describe
'26566' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
6c3df2a6cabdbd9b08959b00652d2d11
e82062653c0027f121e8a3d7ed554b4d2510a4fe
'2011-12-30T13:52:23-05:00'
describe
'64141' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
840e866bb51d0e08fa7c62df4926c7d3
fcd2de73a9d7c389a2536fb26818d2a1da35b453
'2011-12-30T13:56:38-05:00'
describe
'3008264' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ac4c10840628e148ab5331d83fc74f76
a13bbacb13faaf3c342dfc664b031eaf0830a951
'2011-12-30T13:49:08-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
de17a30f1755e8c2ed4ea7f989063513
124d669be5bf2900598bf6dd2fd9ef91d7bd7f4b
'2011-12-30T13:51:44-05:00'
describe
'32531' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
14540a14c8b347e3cb305d7585862ce8
2fb374ad051cee843656b4e4985d1bb7e926e785
'2011-12-30T13:56:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c9563bcf8ee592e3e7010cd02eddb67d
bc30379629a744d8ad68775f1fd43217169c10b0
'2011-12-30T13:52:39-05:00'
describe
'164809' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
572ca5471253dfac8fb66950f19c1cb7
95de31f11e88c73ba1a91239f9624ff42d9c4956
'2011-12-30T13:51:18-05:00'
describe
'4437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1fe584f5e63dabc9504f6678c420f38c
560b2e30055d813f143e3bbf2e0c69888738754a
describe
'36711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
c07df4398e1eff2f5c97c0d2cedbc669
2944048eebb208f8129863ed6c710ee9a2a8ab3a
'2011-12-30T13:51:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
da872710bfcacc056ab3ab41ddc207ac
1e5154c5315bfb7835c31e6b5f6201bbadbcfeb2
'2011-12-30T13:49:35-05:00'
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
17c9aa5340513d53f4bf21cf1ac73b9b
ba6bbbedb7e8fbffacf8f7ba89678fcd6a7c5063
'2011-12-30T13:58:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1b87dcdadd4f77d875e9839eae739547
a541a867d69d9b648cd764b748cc5f312f3e8fbb
'2011-12-30T13:50:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
096a8efcf2200b52d5b30baab1ad0c09
3ce5da25b3ddb1187e6262db86834548b9e99570
'2011-12-30T13:51:32-05:00'
describe
'98623' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
ca8d31902955dccb4f7e613283c61ea1
e17839d1701a7136dce55c8dc1f9d80f1e1f4ab9
'2011-12-30T14:00:28-05:00'
describe
'24095' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1f39e48724b588d2f340fc6080123aac
e96b0a393ba1d1621ddd02149bcf948fcca45a76
'2011-12-30T13:54:57-05:00'
describe
'32332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9013d582d1b03db94820c86eb1757470
72504c952e107c079f039ba6756d9a8329e6b56d
'2011-12-30T13:51:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c0b7f99da4faf6bd8056db78fe701f49
009daea64d49bb9f5080799033e62c29b6b49bc8
'2011-12-30T13:54:06-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
011c0201521cf7bbe2078af207ddea70
e6220f8ebe138f47bf7ca797e90fb30ea9b15f82
'2011-12-30T13:52:06-05:00'
describe
'8967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f17f3e950320e6c0d11d96d8956c80e1
262b0c4ecd232aa77274ee2b62efdf8e5e6c2506
'2011-12-30T13:52:45-05:00'
describe
'372992' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
03f546280f3cb6f757962ca78f3e5d08
3c220106ce58a9a58cbbb83b0accea3930a60579
describe
'41710' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
2c7e9938097f088df336ec7617550ea6
ca031bcb16978aa0f09064f985ba8740c1cfbeca
'2011-12-30T13:49:50-05:00'
describe
'8442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
89ef1286722848cff9df8fe17093bcbb
a91b43aaf351e87872f754ae79b9958758e72522
'2011-12-30T13:52:57-05:00'
describe
'12001' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0b7f8867ac384a6b08004d1aacdc20e9
d554fd571e76d2df4d4bea309ebc2b3f5baaa47c
'2011-12-30T13:59:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9f63ea5dac9c008817bbe7aabf64e5ae
bc933102ed0bd13a9ac84f1de89e87e4cc5292c1
'2011-12-30T13:56:55-05:00'
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e01c800a20d80eff3524d69c8879a8db
523a1ab90793b7d910ef04d1dd6d04e1305f044e
'2011-12-30T14:00:01-05:00'
describe
'3676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
fb4279d9242e92438e66de90412554a7
33e902947a5207b8fb8d20ea4a669831a68eab30
'2011-12-30T13:56:19-05:00'
describe
'373242' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
bbb5507a1a3ceb6d3b8a360f13e8bbe3
3f8c6a78bcc87a945abab2faaafb1f4c235128a2
describe
'85762' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1b8ef0f4a3521e4ed72d25536d9956eb
abfc40d1b0197181f5e98ad2d58df046645f594f
'2011-12-30T13:49:18-05:00'
describe
'21495' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
264648df36e179847b4503e6db26a006
e6605081d9c2de86abc3ed152987cd32142225db
describe
'28710' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
15a9438e5072373829bec11f6f67ca57
a5e65a226f00abe07d99ad07739da6c3d6c94adc
'2011-12-30T13:48:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
5086993eba5266b6c57a7db73a654a02
4dadf12daca3214d0dbf10a585f6f55133412392
'2011-12-30T13:55:17-05:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
d044e94d6b58459df3f9cc5dfc0f5ac0
7da98788caeb24f533514dd0ad144e6d10aa89e6
'2011-12-30T13:54:04-05:00'
describe
'7873' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
71c910d0f538728988509eb8b036186e
365bc8240a54cdddc499f022e391dde7bdb713fd
'2011-12-30T13:55:27-05:00'
describe
'373048' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
6e977c8d3ae7d9c39cd2565d191daf91
726ae8795eda9b0a7051a4156e1907652ed3cf70
describe
'109801' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
84d529f56e0405b21a1680d32ec05c20
625023a5f39b5f88f7658bf954637b52580cae51
describe
'27249' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
6af84418bfb23c86f60797c6c1123d88
a6711bb30da83cc100f3bd700b86343c9902068e
describe
'34745' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e02ebfe15172536e3c3d3bc5a796d45a
72795410ccdab961be514cb48036bc0839bcf08e
'2011-12-30T13:57:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
eedea0739912160ee287d655b1048e6d
43d2ca2f3af21531b5cb91ceacd3f4fd2f03d13d
'2011-12-30T13:55:25-05:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
a6c6974263bcedc5074e3480d9c64ab4
14da7ebe61d0c71792fe6008f3fd78d32158278c
'2011-12-30T13:51:48-05:00'
describe
'8923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b77fcf2612f51c534371a9e1c2a460f6
03e93333af034c4f15a785b5312b71562804eb76
'2011-12-30T13:50:03-05:00'
describe
'373223' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
19455fbf66808f6eab7051cf6b387d65
6efd9edd9e5b53570400ddbab9f26b2ab6bf55ef
'2011-12-30T13:54:17-05:00'
describe
'106789' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
66eb2330e1ff5d35764fb51300bf85d3
3cea07cbf8f6e36b514962dc8c74f2e8f39abfec
describe
'26603' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
cc1f7401e3b47b16ce60e7be79c7b345
744eadeb65f8b716b6b2664bd9137e822a7b1d23
'2011-12-30T13:56:24-05:00'
describe
'34990' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
72feae6e1f4a16f2bf42471206d3ada7
d91d6088358342f7306f2828ad1b804e7adf10c1
'2011-12-30T13:57:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ac567edc47bd87e5461228c9f3ad04e1
e480b8967db90daf14a9410cecff5f35b6d6ddb7
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
cd80466614e12a5d895d52bee4a41dfa
fc40944c1ad2d86156630c99eda2c9837b95aa22
'2011-12-30T13:54:46-05:00'
describe
'8810' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
cbc1dced63e3f92351a2d9ea4d127dbc
21d393d7bdd4e982d69ab483e3bb5d7dbdd40848
'2011-12-30T13:57:43-05:00'
describe
'396337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
568277e684bd43654ccb48eead2d4862
ab97f4b9a5f4283bda84ed0e2ac54e72f09d6900
'2011-12-30T13:53:05-05:00'
describe
'97180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
c8de30c47cab3957cd55b13a0b6b059a
d51428bfea3c003093bb420f07ceb7cf7a9db9d4
'2011-12-30T13:51:38-05:00'
describe
'25948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9755700340f0633023f6acd70b3b2e67
b26aa2490944895d165bfd99bd41ba89bd7ead0a
'2011-12-30T13:51:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
12f4a7a7957a836132af1b4e52327568
0d1e6808dd2130fdaa9adcd1c288feee70f6820f
'2011-12-30T13:57:45-05:00'
describe
'3189488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b64e42f3bf973402f576cba6c4cd5b73
a2e9f301d5a217feb3c532613829c081f55bfb98
'2011-12-30T13:58:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1c256b730b20687c21311728ece5c528
ea619c882b23603c7e3cbf900ad3c30ffa8ae356
'2011-12-30T13:50:46-05:00'
describe
'7950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
585f4ee692cb354c307cd8d1ce70f67a
6988fd409b3d988b4c503d94d3aeede464ee5842
'2011-12-30T13:50:07-05:00'
describe
'373218' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
44a76d1d1c279ef7e6a3dbbce05d2a18
2e07b031f0d48e8e21721dc8cffb302165870ae3
describe
'105796' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
eda6abc8a0736291460ed93fd4348853
96ed86c2bc3ff9ee912071be2065e740fed64957
'2011-12-30T13:54:24-05:00'
describe
'27120' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
b91c0fa17cdd74e17ffdb5ef8663bf9f
c7ace21767b40228e6753971575cdc8e9b47700d
describe
'34991' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ce8b1088536a40d2f301b1a086d9739e
b455f68176b1f0ffd7a297b47b60e8fec28deb56
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
05b737c60965a74a7c753dfb36328b83
0b7d934a90021d6422ff0c10e3f6b2738c683944
'2011-12-30T13:49:30-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
85c2f61e052a347fdd5ed840e4043df0
91f638cabcbea84fc95841288a3e816a837a185b
'2011-12-30T13:53:41-05:00'
describe
'9115' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
7b04f3e6373e6b0335f186095f8c6e29
b9c4703f1bdab5f7f55efd36a4a29d48f9cfe4f6
'2011-12-30T13:55:37-05:00'
describe
'373246' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9b8e16e2146ffa9d4414a16ad31489ae
c5a150cc0e1a7f1041917bdc994c27278df8673e
describe
'104668' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fe9cb9e78ec9ed04eccb97c4b9d0b108
eb6c1269b979f4307b56c7b1ee13b3aabf3db0b4
'2011-12-30T13:59:15-05:00'
describe
'25561' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
8c709f1a5fbd805da51d3d44373f0875
136d7c2bb60e430d344cbc50d5660ab089fcb0d2
'2011-12-30T14:00:04-05:00'
describe
'32847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
20b3c5a7d8d1cb2628f649e98737876b
772708973e83fee031b66ed381e38d6125e7f714
'2011-12-30T13:58:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2baf8b25d6ee0b6503660223b01de4fa
0ba3ab13db5b00460cb07ba1766e0074fe14381b
'2011-12-30T13:55:58-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
9aa5001db4ec975beedcfce6022916dd
433f7af066f753cf3e905de888d8c151d4428898
'2011-12-30T13:52:49-05:00'
describe
'8756' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
2ba5d51f47ca2ec03d4d51a2801b32c3
18ac9068989c149ce9d6aa5edbcbb9489b76e1d7
'2011-12-30T13:53:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
6a0bff43ee4e86312dd5ef401142317b
dadfb50da6d97712709992151bc7608424425372
describe
'95203' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
88c948ee9fcc00c58d3ce69de27c82da
a823ece67aba0eb9d292d1bd062c78d2c92364e4
'2011-12-30T13:50:16-05:00'
describe
'23351' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d27bb296fc917d68a417113c46f4f39d
7c29a9a890e5b76d25d7bf9252ae1556f79511bd
'2011-12-30T13:55:57-05:00'
describe
'30030' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e52d2974be5d89c98cab6e3ed7fb470d
e3b3715f05e2caa588f00accd62155e0e4562708
'2011-12-30T14:00:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
1c39b701db74d8024e9eca9a113370c1
b38eabfce8a20473770d4a56d5f855bbdb625e3d
'2011-12-30T13:56:27-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
3050e80887acf21e88a02e5284e91262
073cf6c59f9b4c649194b046212488110850055d
'2011-12-30T13:53:38-05:00'
describe
'8294' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d0e7618d13f163fd2c29acd2f32721cb
348c1008d0c9e9d2a9b8ac71b530b91a1f4e0937
'2011-12-30T13:50:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
5f858ffeb151338e7ab171b2ddf86e0d
c8f205bcf118ff36690b2b61f47361739b5a0f0b
describe
'81251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f543aff1212b9db2a6de678208672acf
32f24c9a67d83dd027bf93f2e5901d13d0bfe789
'2011-12-30T13:49:42-05:00'
describe
'20301' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b50c88f9db5667151706a992fba2221d
93867714fcf0dc69d140dbf2152749450049d9d1
'2011-12-30T13:54:51-05:00'
describe
'26934' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
9dd3d4f61edccfe174c5b552810efdb0
b14d4fcc33d0cebd1889b8b4fff0058c307784e9
'2011-12-30T13:55:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f3c7463c4379a10c0c07a8eed3f36420
9bced451cc6803b6951f5a35a4b980815f6958d6
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
0e646c1820b43ef54b47964489c93560
873c2ebfc3060595e5b35a2c0408e6bc24f9306a
'2011-12-30T14:00:45-05:00'
describe
'7519' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
04e0caf97a8ae317aa8671e4c8e5e69f
4086e0a0e58d5fe24ba7086aa1244c3c03796581
'2011-12-30T13:50:42-05:00'
describe
'373234' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
f2f5a9b0d9c4e6c8459b5d014d5dc480
0c3204bb9860e2d910cff9ba91c76a76c0743322
'2011-12-30T13:57:24-05:00'
describe
'103928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
e924ff74cd05208df881c0aef814b89e
4c84af2a79d5fbb871764255f78b2394d2940aef
'2011-12-30T13:48:50-05:00'
describe
'26737' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
bb35d9c78614ba9e8bf3d0ab7669fb45
c32c13b39abab4ae7f6b98fb5c81f83125250b73
'2011-12-30T14:00:03-05:00'
describe
'35023' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
811a8fa1b069d907c523e3264056cb46
3f468493460b019f9455d6686b10569b86f64498
'2011-12-30T13:53:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
291f83d379f3f7940d97ade80da4c737
b3a38100683e7ac3bd348bbfb0d9a5e40dd3c0c7
'2011-12-30T13:49:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e61ebb0febfb97779f53df2d0614f101
44df3caa855f353817bb66a72f1f62eef272635d
'2011-12-30T13:55:43-05:00'
describe
'9055' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
2c1ac84f2d172af16429ccc1a91f1d06
4c91fcff29f38770ded081980311b5696463eb71
'2011-12-30T13:55:09-05:00'
describe
'373241' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e9ab70817fd6bb20323cc0b5d6f0a608
3d7d9f95384401d0c30b43a66c12c8d22a2a489a
describe
'106790' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f7cbaf98dde375f5b192b3ec6d9617b1
3729383ff3ec167cd3177d3d8400731a8ddd3a26
'2011-12-30T13:51:00-05:00'
describe
'26389' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3500ec3cabed361c1a80d89eabd6a6df
06f2c47452bfec529b72a902b22b4d7a1475b2cc
'2011-12-30T13:52:32-05:00'
describe
'34368' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
670261c021f2eb623324ba34c2832a13
d4e54796dcfe57d8a8e198a6c820519c9fb6014b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2acf0c1ccaa18bc405e2ed5f7d7f398e
fed6a55b1f5a19c69703e77e4c50f489fbd69458
'2011-12-30T13:54:15-05:00'
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
cd45f2f0d6e863ac7cdfed006c5f29e1
6619309577c02a79a63d8fb3f4f1c5145415ead0
'2011-12-30T13:56:54-05:00'
describe
'8822' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
a69e8bdfd0d1e2da3d69f4e31bd65e49
f1875c073bedc5c89184c72e4ee7d7a769356194
'2011-12-30T13:54:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1e65608862d4919b52513dfe96e179cc
42a4ee4aa77bde78120c7cb5807c86e3528afd32
'2011-12-30T13:54:47-05:00'
describe
'103381' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2e577e6a1fe4026fe57757c05a54abaa
9a81d18658cab2225c8ffe67699be49d257b7ad6
'2011-12-30T14:00:53-05:00'
describe
'25375' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
3b8ee4d69d09360be386b960ac4439fd
966c5b291dec7f1fc227135329dcae2a55bd2fdf
'2011-12-30T14:00:06-05:00'
describe
'31987' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d9a1988a78b6b3b2cbdeaaba10e0bcb9
0c12e6ac6e4e7c6d543a6a2393c620fd636c8d98
'2011-12-30T13:58:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
cf5593c4b419bc4aee50f4d9d7e5d3f5
d1b51d7633d24abe9c6b67386a40048a1fbe0ede
'2011-12-30T13:52:42-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
4e0745859e362d1f4bd206014ae2cdb8
61566184aed64ed7aaf91424420af979cd161fe0
'2011-12-30T13:51:26-05:00'
describe
'8759' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
497c537324470efccc3b1aa1338aaf76
3bc12a3d49c7c5f2aa1619c084de14eaddf972fb
describe
'373181' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e4f9b3386b3426fd6f9195eff94de167
1a889bba86e9bc0ffd40b2fdbc3daaa85b4e6698
'2011-12-30T13:55:53-05:00'
describe
'101738' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3e48ad628f499429c085fbb6fa6149f1
5578392d193a45555a8b6e33a0dc86049695dabf
'2011-12-30T13:58:01-05:00'
describe
'25403' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
6c4ff30159e491c46d5a92be5d1e03a7
8253edcfcc7bb57247afb48d7ce4021e7499c5f4
'2011-12-30T13:57:54-05:00'
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
4f38409f6c955707d3fb373a71a0a196
9f9e92a75c1f3d630994c906762cc5cd98572721
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
6cd6db002709991c8441ec85abb89e1a
1cc28f638938bb19b0dc2ad08384249cf4924bea
'2011-12-30T13:54:58-05:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
3144cf00dc32b152c818afe329c434c3
8574fd7ca49d4a0787a9091dc8f8025db360ef9e
'2011-12-30T13:55:06-05:00'
describe
'8493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
97f9d693bf91f44b98249db9be6857bf
e261adfdc82f806a48e2ddf8c59bc60fb1cc0227
describe
'373129' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
12a9c34d3ca4cef75bcef8950b899abc
28f7771c65c4404d5c17bb8c39d929a99a51c7cb
'2011-12-30T13:50:43-05:00'
describe
'102436' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c5d8452ddfb1923d1e0e8b611f9845f7
c4b210f72466d7c5568f44a55a81ea5f84d4b6c3
'2011-12-30T13:50:14-05:00'
describe
'25085' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
021971685d994db67686739668643c70
7dbca082bb2ff4b6ce4bcc1bc6ece2906dff80a3
describe
'33853' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d29cf76ee0b79b11aedc54c79f7f7bb8
9f0adb5e02b65d38f5bbdf1fbce08a3f819a9f04
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
711b57ca6440369f4ebc4647247dfb69
9c41e51cf0a0a5f7716a693687b53cfd5ba992bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d8c27e80df57f21d0d0614000ca910f1
4657ee0f134dcee55b645cc684d1e8ce2abc3dc8
'2011-12-30T13:56:40-05:00'
describe
'8731' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
efc250981494eb61397a5ef2fc57724a
174c58ccf5f31d3592e7fddd1ca9f7fe97964833
describe
'373261' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
259b25bc9096838fed4b38ce268ce73a
77c89856ecbc203110ff04ce3d1ef991d21b9a8a
'2011-12-30T13:53:58-05:00'
describe
'102374' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
c113153fa90410a18aaeaf1008f6be81
b814abbcf01718d5e195a772e125e0e794e5a290
describe
'27023' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
7e405391a1f1e7bbaa66eae982739736
126bd03212fa62d7e72eb335d14a44315e81bbfa
describe
'33610' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7aabef2bc2f98e612be63afc86200f24
34ad21c5895a242ced32d4a06cf6d3efb9d997ee
'2011-12-30T13:54:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
7527ea606e4e8a22d5266bba5ab15a04
ebeff35ccc50905b3fdf09dd4d0ee89d48d03c4b
'2011-12-30T13:51:24-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
ffec4b809ef776a4250f1cb53b7d9233
52f86e1dee6d9cc1eca94c672a3cf24219dde3b5
'2011-12-30T13:58:03-05:00'
describe
'8541' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8d57fefcb99c82fa61ffb65e2278d4ec
60eef2f7dcce601ab4c991322929d90435e5dfd6
describe
'373199' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6bfed48ee07cbc4923e7d0bf608196cd
f6814f054eff3952b9dec64db1664c6a602856ec
describe
'50184' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
63bcb57902537c3bda8b98472ef29d04
56a9fc8b6e90b9d6931b12e5a355bf1556789e11
'2011-12-30T13:50:17-05:00'
describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
a79ce1cfd8be3a305d3f83d780bd1626
87c4e55b45828c90c648a15a095aae03ae2e40da
'2011-12-30T13:55:56-05:00'
describe
'15754' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
12ec40ee0d2e55ebca54fd9dd99d0454
8c0581771a1b16a0679bd8fe352e6bceb91692e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
6650d2eea69126a468b6baad913a3820
63e40016c5dca2d7c82dc2fc8ce9c80c39ea3c5a
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
026201d117ffd3cfca4c77afd361297d
aa095ca2d6c88abc1a6bf812730d0c0c082711fb
describe
'4434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e4e22e548ecd1d31b052b0fb8b96df90
0fb0f93dddbd97073be43361e84abe2c071af383
'2011-12-30T13:52:04-05:00'
describe
'373229' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
36e188c4b4bf34f8ac738e6a40e887b1
bc85bdc2a0b60e6521ca6f6118f0e8f78aa5ffbe
describe
'138865' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
a1199765ab65926e087d381d02b2fb4b
72c9e8151235de25668b83458b2f2606ff3dc797
'2011-12-30T13:57:28-05:00'
describe
'20209' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
4319a0a9689e7df62dfbc31bd027dc09
8c922cf9ae16520c06a9b0b1879335c06ac7c62c
'2011-12-30T13:58:05-05:00'
describe
'59266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0a45f06266a8f8f43cafe81cb72286f0
9be38e6abde9cbf0e457ad597e146bc252caf8a2
'2011-12-30T13:55:44-05:00'
describe
'3007704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
cc28299b1d20fe099d5434a987c9db21
5bc31652a9f09f1db1b2e6ca0a2f27c5d3cba871
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
2f84cd8abf96712984732fd61e9bc9ec
4a9d5376b0e28a2a98dc47d4186692f0ae4e3ca1
'2011-12-30T13:58:22-05:00'
describe
'31137' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASED' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
01b37a95739e85099aff13d1ae2d17e3
cd2a30134a336a10f13102d107f7a04924f29514
'2011-12-30T13:57:16-05:00'
describe
'358879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
24c6e128b21506d17f2c9f28c6b4edb2
badc87e77b6e1889857e4b2ca989495460a5965f
describe
'153946' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
db6dc41ce9624ed75f62d1be6427b9d4
a52f6c2239d988875c629cf06b216bbf3adc0878
'2011-12-30T13:50:05-05:00'
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
85691f2136366335e9a49b18dc7c02cf
0efa19496e5c450605d3f408dc8173377c436e80
describe
'31533' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
9d081ecdc292f8846488c29dbec69e37
baae4dc9421263fe9d94c4c25af1b3faece5e12c
describe
'8631180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
059b5372e55352eb764ce349eadf4867
02e19858d379f2c780213b552693f3b0fd17a5ea
'2011-12-30T13:58:08-05:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f99ad9f0e435904bd6bd86db8482c55a
445b160fba5e82f993360f58c1007e9a78f51286
'2011-12-30T13:56:32-05:00'
describe
'7828' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
8c3ec33d607165e541765713a9c7cdf3
674cdf6d28360dc3e1b48046de5b9c5161a7a323
'2011-12-30T13:52:28-05:00'
describe
'373240' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
022ce03e72bbfa3e1edea87a7065a477
64db3e552a69ca64e5268e3f2502a375111a9c6d
'2011-12-30T13:57:22-05:00'
describe
'110949' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
fa08b65143e4341979a7761cfb6dced1
189e4c166d7e330f85933c7da821073b88f3e7af
'2011-12-30T13:51:37-05:00'
describe
'25986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
d5a2f2211d1132ec5126c551ac119a95
09ae9911c34c4eb81b53740e270b339a7ad849cb
'2011-12-30T13:54:23-05:00'
describe
'35859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
b7233d3b44de2bfa303d9b27b6286217
bee30a07c0d3fda132fd00ec935e5c7db67762b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
9fe311c3d51eee09f7a485868eacbebf
bec0dd913b6eed48f5b3d98fe511f46fd61996a3
'2011-12-30T13:49:03-05:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b8a279273d3063c73a4138f9adac9fe4
6de2914640059735aa04c2ac440a454f6691358e
'2011-12-30T13:54:13-05:00'
describe
'9427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASER' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3c9b0b0825c1f817388990d6d54577ef
48ee0d3f6bf810167078a0bed9a8246dbfb60f1b
'2011-12-30T13:49:06-05:00'
describe
'373185' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASES' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a0b070c6ac374d5b609925eb7ad539a7
bcbcb0253553e7d0438f19357099ed059d15fa07
describe
'101735' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASET' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
a32ae7ccb9d730fc5b9c48ea1a729e5a
9f98a211aca89bc7a437f8a9f7f6397129db913a
describe
'25862' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEU' 'sip-files00060.pro'
ce02cc39efb388551a246e74984a11dc
2a2704a2f035f82fed4207fa99bf3b6547222515
'2011-12-30T13:52:03-05:00'
describe
'33646' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d2188954b34ebfa474b8a6fc3f9a9577
21277eef518a7f0119a306b33f8fb3e4b44ea8f1
'2011-12-30T13:51:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEW' 'sip-files00060.tif'
9f8209eb6e17842309885a62cd3aa3a2
750c723fd99ff272c0d42df73530452ae660b978
'2011-12-30T13:58:35-05:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEX' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d69ee5fb25eeaf54e97f73d42b3c9238
ad8726060c6f84b7c0bdf769d28d06efc7b21cd3
'2011-12-30T13:55:54-05:00'
describe
'8656' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
0e8243e279ebf1072a433e0dae8e3dbd
d3e605f289a62696f1b247c968f7363f55c2ee9e
'2011-12-30T13:52:11-05:00'
describe
'373162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
487ce6fdbd50f7f11c9fc2f929016d59
2d8fee18f827a9637c247b797e8aa9b35ddf264e
'2011-12-30T13:51:46-05:00'
describe
'101548' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
1de953f86941e19accdedcf31b456968
6835b1a5d9b84697d07ed192ed5962b43a5f79ff
describe
'25225' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
ee0f023511fbbbc7fe19cb2d302ccdab
c57b0f841809b1ac5beac6c6912a4a60ae6d071e
describe
'32092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
35eae6ed63c90da8615b49d2ff68ce0a
634e2177e6bd565e93b95c06ecba4f655f6b7ec6
'2011-12-30T13:49:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f0dd927717aac824a0fbacaaaeac7fe8
36ba55d40bff2ce7a5f4fd72c5a5b775093dadfc
'2011-12-30T13:57:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3abad363151aa2781e5f9ab28f04bcf7
df478ff8088ba103b41e0cc1f42263134e32057b
'2011-12-30T13:57:33-05:00'
describe
'8693' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3094ea8bdb2a19cfa50eb19488d704eb
4b119aa2aa23857a6087ee0552c1900541c2d41a
'2011-12-30T13:57:17-05:00'
describe
'373164' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9672284d4698e4f880e0d075c1b45686
26adf18ba839a18a1109cecb93e2ef1e1b14a1c3
describe
'90370' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c6bc27dcaaf097234288b9996b7ef8f7
4f85f903a7061fe732edc99775eb6ff526444447
'2011-12-30T13:57:09-05:00'
describe
'23688' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
82b25320a616d3a4310cb50c9afe5c01
9304f998fa9d7600f402ad2074c8951338146f7b
describe
'30418' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
2c9a0081c8c49b4ce406c22b77734eaa
674be01c04752d987193100d71b8e6670aa5765b
'2011-12-30T13:54:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
68fe8c94ecdf5a9189a025c42e595b5f
0048f180962215fd2ae1e3f412a535c8f7364560
'2011-12-30T13:59:12-05:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
e7c4fa5c4ce8a8db7c1a76387d8d90a2
c8facd13f21bee5215b870e18660b409d40a90d8
describe
'8333' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
151e3666260524280f97d6cc8c2fa3b1
bb2854de639bac1af6a956d6e6acf50a5cfbd1bd
describe
'373188' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
71cc9be96119b9d9e0fcee267f420449
e553a23da7dd57a78fc2b0a58b7c9af4af95a4b3
describe
'97916' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
3da14697cad863593c70527dd34d1b8d
beb5a1bc87a80d0701a2278447e465f20c4350f3
'2011-12-30T13:49:26-05:00'
describe
'25054' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
457b51b01ee95545cea9322e265091fd
c16a55c83a2915c440d52f25d0726c202709c4ec
'2011-12-30T13:50:12-05:00'
describe
'32279' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
cee33253fc784e57071a89c1e544f8c6
8d09ff53bddf5420115ca223cb561131ae00a212
'2011-12-30T13:58:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
dc1af76e8249ca2d355fed5e1f399d4d
2cd3c5a6a73962aa70bf542e9002aa0838a821a8
'2011-12-30T13:53:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
9340e70e6c09b5817e90596d7a1c6f3e
870711aaa4ff668cf0f1ee1eca863307d0ba8dda
'2011-12-30T13:53:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
02569f718689a126991bb44195270d03
c1a6b9adc17d1bcf48528b10faf28f1fd9dff2a9
'2011-12-30T13:56:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
dd7ae7b9f36f1816069d06c9b37e36de
2f986b88e1b6df5360488c38f0126071625279ea
describe
'101897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
487a39d6ce70a524836c7485f4cce99b
aa2b0f48bf9501c9495e79da889a74dd15e516f2
'2011-12-30T13:51:01-05:00'
describe
'25009' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
5f348f9299c9336b8e4df25ea61fb1a6
aa6c4460c227e62b58b536a66858e7cbe417dde4
describe
'32417' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ff7ff6d102d43e8a6167dcf47eb1a863
c8472ef8e73f9ac81ae7ddc4f9ab983a36627d2f
'2011-12-30T13:50:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFY' 'sip-files00064.tif'
f81aeb3edfe26852889bfc901f742dd0
ee38a42935ad280b1e7963d1cf1c684a8c65cd0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASFZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
3f51caf78029274c49d29556071a72c9
d294a91574848bf9cc2a879c3822c63df02c1ca7
'2011-12-30T14:00:12-05:00'
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
5bec8716c3ab1992dfa2fed3104ad62c
1a32e4520f89b84d383ce052f4b46573b77f9feb
'2011-12-30T14:00:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGB' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
80a87a91bb2771fa51466f25477b3833
de6b43351323bf79c18b31cfc2325eac99133fbf
describe
'104227' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
78317285586e706011430f4b99b9cfe1
fd73343c9a2d991eec4624886e465459d13b57eb
'2011-12-30T13:52:50-05:00'
describe
'26123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7c24cc35c752136695198dcfa646e240
da94cacc7e33393c29d7d03f626ea44ca9b3da91
describe
'34479' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
32c075fa27553d2fe3d6307dd2d40868
e05b08321276d03ad35c7565c3b45be0a132c746
'2011-12-30T13:49:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
137515ea9a5fd2c84c3839d7e559cec5
8c3b7d75fac562065c7883d6bc7ccfd9b2e28b44
'2011-12-30T13:48:52-05:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
d1e15ee5791077ea1e3ccd015fb83d52
f047456f570c6de1d7c3828eb4aa2b3cae7db81b
describe
'8865' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
919c76adb9accdc003d25d2945312dae
b1a13f121b745fa6b62c06d140b3aa00a2c97496
'2011-12-30T13:50:34-05:00'
describe
'373114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGI' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
389071a4f57fd28a2c065ed0aff51b3d
48a7050611d4ba0a3c67d8321404ddc6ced53b52
'2011-12-30T13:55:15-05:00'
describe
'97414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
20336b114e8bafd1f8cea5893b005d2b
ed1b8fc41388defccf4899977564d58357d5ae9e
'2011-12-30T13:49:05-05:00'
describe
'25723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
9e78d51a26b666d4309a3968f8efcef8
49efa4066168142b04b5a119816bfab4af3df252
'2011-12-30T13:49:39-05:00'
describe
'33165' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2a5ec46e8b587ec13142b11d7ca44d07
18e6607406d4691b3cca03fa8fc1673159b0ab69
'2011-12-30T13:58:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3255fce044f29fbc778a7a76d13731b6
6a3846999b2fc1023ce9f244bbe2cfe6804d5068
'2011-12-30T13:55:20-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c5f3276465c7b5fe5552e884cb76635c
6522ea355aa0ef42677bb1bd6a10a95d7cf8c4e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
aa1d544ec0acd9ae3f463aa03e951e40
1e03845c10b303622d4ce46179c6c625c0a21411
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4956f29bda5da170eddcbf75237fac7d
a6c441db95db7b66c21f8a996586fe4822a49f56
'2011-12-30T13:49:00-05:00'
describe
'91658' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d9ec6905e34d614743a797135a59e64b
2a21e569fae8bfbaf1c192a6b9c95c9c8ed3a61c
'2011-12-30T13:56:29-05:00'
describe
'23983' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3695525ef0ae576831e327ed43f52e91
36c19047909ecc200580579260efeaefde8eebec
describe
'30451' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
ee4071b18e6be573e0da32ebf439dcfc
78c0ab1fc7587dfaf0cb98c14e89ba4c39a6e49a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f243b43dede75c95d0777c1084f4061e
ff90393201f964ce69156749586e818aa373d548
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
60da64f9b75cbc52723bc4958ef28649
dee0d9943e1638d443fe9ba73fa496a75fc735e9
'2011-12-30T13:51:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ca2852902c65d51af6a663b7923eedd8
dfbf61ea71294a648ef63bb1cce09d78ca701fe1
'2011-12-30T13:55:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c33ca0880294e7c12aa57a42c968f827
b925212e97f9dd2042dee165357233a762bba7ba
describe
'97974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
fa00ee3742a615ade612a0905c807ba1
2d3e2ed90f149ca6c62b822ee3b7e00e726ffead
'2011-12-30T13:50:25-05:00'
describe
'24404' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
aaef768b5b8a887fd7be037b8c98f785
aaedb5bb863d46c036269eb3dcf6bc02bf16c686
'2011-12-30T13:51:34-05:00'
describe
'32504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
520036a23c8e0e420763542dcf21240b
3addaa06ff24ed2663cc5546dcaf0254373dd4da
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
40c9e29d69f846f7c10e0a75f1be3db3
abb117b32c9fee3da681dac90558df54a2bc143a
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e7e78a40701972dd5ba613aeeaeca98d
64998993f0b9af705f9748dc9b47c40355509028
describe
'8338' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
8b705ee294a88629df5fc252d7f8a820
19431fa7303caee5f4409ea923f10ebc33f30933
describe
'373151' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c1b813bdfa481af7d5d8907e0b56e69b
6ce407dbf67461758b2b3109e446fca3edca7ead
'2011-12-30T13:58:51-05:00'
describe
'62120' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
0d62048a6053311031df2a8ee1b25dca
c007e0ff38a04cbe25abd13f38bfd30de9b0e0a6
'2011-12-30T13:53:20-05:00'
describe
'13588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
4fd7e1afe28fa4c76501ac4b57321d7b
96d3d1510d3537b64ec766dc550b04f33e467f7a
'2011-12-30T13:51:45-05:00'
describe
'19884' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c030a3476fa690b3dd58adc5e18f4ad8
3a87fb5c7a876bf4b262bd8a7843dc984e5d7983
'2011-12-30T13:52:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
4abca08fc19324b67833136fb29cdd78
51155eaaa11dab1510796d99199444375d0a5c4c
describe
'554' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
187c2841298532bcb80efcf02625e0ba
cb08c737ab66cc74aa931b518b59adb7f5cab189
describe
'5357' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
33417c142b173829799da611229b8486
91109e7c6e05f969d7a02e46403d9e010c399f35
'2011-12-30T14:00:15-05:00'
describe
'373258' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
8c9b5ad4be4fa973ca27e0e40f5eb3d0
3b5be5de529da87ebf1afcbc1432c7967cf8a7cf
describe
'79946' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
38dcfa626345698b344e12435b531e3d
7f8c94e933fb360ffa31c5f9c86043685d33f059
'2011-12-30T14:00:38-05:00'
describe
'21067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b3bcad2e62aa5e2d82a0668212dc2a88
414ccf44a22d3a026811982c7888765ca1cd34f9
'2011-12-30T13:58:45-05:00'
describe
'26926' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d17b2828e4935731903d4d5acc43c9c0
d0c6371eac5a14f0efad46b2843a33988f094a07
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
dc97fae4f60bb14e9087ebf5866ca46d
6ed2aeb7643d0652276729f108a93c3532bc2c61
'2011-12-30T14:00:39-05:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1dd1ff8868b35d5db5dcc0ff9fd7cc91
33da99d16d6fdfcc1e73d245962bf99a5cc72b88
'2011-12-30T13:56:11-05:00'
describe
'7443' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
36aa0a98ac77d8944627f48eccb1d3ea
5e9502db508bfca084ad51944359c27c336c640d
'2011-12-30T13:58:25-05:00'
describe
'373215' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e53a05ae580c00e59f47bc461ef3c59c
996657b612897f5214e1ee44e2694c9b4d6a58b7
'2011-12-30T13:55:38-05:00'
describe
'90410' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c6ed98fb8dd419083bfcf7763aea77a8
404f1263087d08e7ba1b25230fcdffae0b599a26
describe
'23653' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHT' 'sip-files00071.pro'
2263ffe71b23ca56b5cbbc73cdcbcd1e
864d30609b7d24102cd504e24f5724b37cd4f2af
describe
'29958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
ec40d7fd7bf7e215a76d720b723f5f96
09e34e0e3c2f24be54885cd1538c03fa8f0520ee
'2011-12-30T13:51:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7a03137f6b79b964bf2a77c8acd70384
7daf947b4a2171ec7508dbc35b0f3a4d5ce41561
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d7c1ad9552593e04965a74a06da6dad6
2557b8a7645215f655eddc5817bbc27bf12d3fea
describe
'8488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
a3a57faada4924e5ec698628f212f75f
119f8880b59120422ef2157678633dd70bb4893c
'2011-12-30T13:54:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
c522a52194b538dab9bc9087ffa06928
520a964102a1ff4847a11a01b7f45384f4990dc2
'2011-12-30T13:54:00-05:00'
describe
'96836' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
95e493aa0fe0899ea5cf281f5d5921d7
2ea57f9a50ecf0c97db87896b1d6ac674620d699
'2011-12-30T13:49:47-05:00'
describe
'24050' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
a3587a617cda706553ecb4a56783e10a
7c1e9cc652873984b0c1fd8c77f4ed907ef9156a
'2011-12-30T13:58:33-05:00'
describe
'31650' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f556c6b6661a87940c7df3cce36f09bc
3c8eed1cfa669038391bbc5373e1ea299235a177
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
5c5e4b4262b760453751bcd676e757fc
a09dd19608ad68f8eecdfdf004185b8cd36938d7
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASID' 'sip-files00072.txt'
6176ae59a663064d6c67f3dc33f239c7
342cc612b5c9ecffe1404900a732b1f3a87b3994
'2011-12-30T13:49:49-05:00'
describe
'8529' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
12d78a1eb832f4c117b6fdfb9c8b5aa8
6b26d41bcc1ddb4a6040c86e401bdcac966767e0
'2011-12-30T13:54:05-05:00'
describe
'373163' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
6f99092396e59bea8f4be7db293be339
5e845e545bc7889f606f86c3d3f134c159541160
describe
'102592' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
13aeae082bf2c6b2eabed17f2da39470
3dffed2aff8a2172419067921cf629c0b5cff4ac
describe
'25458' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
5d021bc0662a51c88156e018e955b601
068fdfa08eb9e24727c9965d229c2c4c7507466f
describe
'34498' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASII' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
31cacf616a2bec63dd26be051f8f0b52
efe3e31e6fce03e73e958f8c0ae1d1f1fdc43653
'2011-12-30T13:53:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
49c4cd68d0b6a7c55c85cf448a9443b9
f1ddc8c36b8326327070dfd47bc05cfef0000d53
'2011-12-30T13:51:58-05:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
4629b1feaac9b8553144a9f3b6a2f4ad
8c8f8682d904d8f061ec23327e7c80c3cdeff79d
'2011-12-30T13:57:26-05:00'
describe
'9263' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
7479a72390f3e1d18bd4c1a5a1a9a0a4
24512a9529911e41f91a0daf2c18033d25c6bf16
'2011-12-30T14:00:31-05:00'
describe
'373210' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
477b0cbfb036a66f12313e3d60f443a7
1241a8c1a1a379f4db964f94343a4a533be2ac13
describe
'103036' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
95b81089c831c5fb31fd45909e107411
d678b9ffba9dd17ac3a00ffe7f1d527bd2763d3d
describe
'26348' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
747f10344183daa96974e26b28c08237
b060a74db1401f32aa5c72f017c5835e9ba29799
'2011-12-30T13:55:08-05:00'
describe
'33653' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
dca2b798aacca27d2044d910d8dbc441
54ac6a5f0934b0edd9e4687cc602bfc934f7626e
'2011-12-30T13:55:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
045876eb3ae80ed9e30023816424aabc
9125d0a01f02159d00cddb252da2d497306ee848
'2011-12-30T13:53:39-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
b079ae03535fdceaa878a70aa3d47ebc
a5e10eef2293cfc3ef74ecb440bf7e3844fb3e76
describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
e35492375ad55671d840cc7968f74dba
f36f4ceca7978f3d4544ca880e17f0af8d9b658c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b2a335730e8b6a90811afbc6a3bd05ba
5872d7ce89f5222f64c3dbd7ffae25dc33d025fe
'2011-12-30T13:55:39-05:00'
describe
'103743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b38ed12db289308883e2a1467d3d96a8
9fde9d2193f797740ecc6f115a3f117efda84a24
describe
'26092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d94547b510b6c197c08769176753d8b6
b24240f1944f8949312d9c1da6a7171858e054a7
describe
'34585' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
aef87d49ba3f8e21c7b4d6eb7ddf3401
965675d91952c18925c8aca87abcd7a63f8ba559
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1ae424a2854350bb77966321f60fea74
2a2580cf6353f6619d83ffc115720c40d9870183
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e39fcd0d1265fb75f5b05583495b8399
836f012e6372ac18c504b211ae5ff08e08e56da0
describe
'9239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
17b283110d0336b67981651b4090770a
fde3a76f8295561399764b42b23750f9f9848191
'2011-12-30T13:53:04-05:00'
describe
'373247' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
77af31df11953999d0879ca40a8852b0
b30f3b33ddbfaf68e011d09963ea39fc86f1bff0
'2011-12-30T13:56:56-05:00'
describe
'98134' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
163d0997faa50d31a5626515f43f25ce
1fb5320a40d58f7c042e643189c748c504e01231
'2011-12-30T13:53:36-05:00'
describe
'24773' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
4bf1791b5ed180ab568e2b8758ec680f
1c55b3560c19a223cfd46ed865d45f558b15948d
'2011-12-30T13:53:28-05:00'
describe
'32889' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
19001dca16bfe524741ff600b78ff3bb
3d6a1f048d7086238454f69f5711c1e42c3dd9e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
047a05ee8519dc6d9e3a1788942e5cff
2d70626edb2195e4ebf0109fe0407baffb98dd78
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b33b6e76beeea0f87c3380fabda3daa1
264fe7857a49698fb350032421d3ef193b2e6d5e
'2011-12-30T13:56:09-05:00'
describe
'8958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
76af11120047440bb9ebc1b94c153a04
baf08a4b5c43c495b0fe3f715c2080a4c565adef
describe
'373244' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJH' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
34478feaaee06640a5851d1a3e4efd8b
1c2174e8e6ceb5ae788558639bf76e0305913042
'2011-12-30T13:57:37-05:00'
describe
'101075' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
7e976402d69a9ecdeb27c32104e9a465
b23edc4fd45d33d8c87460f1e78a2eb7c1c98d98
'2011-12-30T13:54:48-05:00'
describe
'25149' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
3f4118b0279fbcaccb609b392b520fbe
dd084f3c3edad48d2b330e37f65a3165bff162b1
describe
'33763' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b47cbd190f6c81ae72c66e8f50644c1d
9c60ce62286acc6a16a927fef81f3441cb316c2c
'2011-12-30T13:58:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
48c44b22e7b9e77d9949d1b17e572f72
bd0da7f198a3e345e615fd1bc36d1c8ce54961f3
'2011-12-30T13:51:43-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ced8147609d2c0dfea50b3a63027d6d1
9e4c1c312a268a22f5c21de982061e660bc8674b
describe
'9468' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJN' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
1d31e89d3d819b1cd4a52b29d7f30ad2
3b18ff6041a673a81200a31215dce38bcd18b802
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
d13ea1538d585055ecc918a0f58a2174
8ee6e9d24598e82bba3509a8e4a2205e29abdc2a
'2011-12-30T13:57:56-05:00'
describe
'104084' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9f9840e05a12d326027646f3a08f4d73
66be37ca40f03224066d95cb3dfed8eb7f387a36
describe
'26492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a9623184c5deafba40770ba7998d6775
5edc25bcd0b9fee0e47a229c5ae5e03c6f5a3d2c
describe
'35112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
73dfb867503c24c5c17132e2075de8f6
00ca7d42f02ed02aeed6e952193a0180f7c1d4fe
'2011-12-30T13:57:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
3092d72247be983ea7e6ca5d779c1c72
8a5c8eacdbe69cbc58a575f1952f3f2a2aa5fa11
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
5add631212e504b311a0da959450b611
311704d6c01fffa0b9e7ed31a85bd1ce0a410cac
describe
'8980' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
31859496db19cae8713ed7e2a6a1c738
c808007ee0482705495348c354e2919b1819cecd
describe
'373251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c73807aecb948baf09e6671e9ca48c69
5061a768a57e12da6f0e6a289dac3711244d0488
'2011-12-30T13:58:29-05:00'
describe
'94864' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
54f59ef514fd9e681b6b779b4f0218d0
4a1ea9e964d2e887338f1e1b73b585b31b7b6b20
'2011-12-30T13:49:57-05:00'
describe
'24250' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
da67b157c61092f951a725cd453bc222
e7899f46fdfc51c87eaf997b246adca2f8b118b0
'2011-12-30T13:53:47-05:00'
describe
'31362' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
76e07d13776bc9c79c954c7f0c1e31d2
c40fdeee41182d21f337d191ebf9a4de6f23afd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
a76c70dd09ba731e50dddaabfada16d9
62fd9b772f87bddf49f4c8c0f203954f340e0042
'2011-12-30T13:57:57-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1d705af2b39f8ce32924bb2b73f279a8
40300d68bb867e0fd2ac5e658ad02f70ff9d8b8f
'2011-12-30T13:58:18-05:00'
describe
'8495' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
85e4a8b284d6f4d7be9b781fe07d83a9
a3e8dd2fbaecd57e1228d2fb7340ae2fa1968bd4
describe
'373140' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
7a68ce70bfcfc6e6866c855d7c2bec65
da9050e18f1b557d9ace1bd0ab3b227ff5e3d66b
'2011-12-30T13:59:17-05:00'
describe
'110630' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
8a8f19832f372f84c7ec6067b248292a
ced95e91ea1449eef81a9fd5b92002dbff70bb52
'2011-12-30T13:58:48-05:00'
describe
'27284' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f9c84b9a95a7b1347bd40719374b4229
acb991246716e2f1a1a320c61f1c6c71f8ae41bc
'2011-12-30T13:49:59-05:00'
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
d25300f5efb0b515e6de47b77fef40b0
0a671ed1d6f8f543481da5b20c7ac04738a751f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6c69d4d3c2d76083d282055c191e27ba
1266b43fbe89af2d29c8332df79ad7adbcdfffa6
'2011-12-30T13:54:26-05:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
57bdac99cfbf6533b9ece3b39c82b8cd
a88cf84a98f874a5bbb101d68f6efad42c0fe609
describe
'8722' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a3b9e26ddd8259f2eb231bb8096341e7
9a20caa67e090ba4efdb50e6d672487f5c982b63
describe
'373226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d00c0ac12fb8c212d62bd6158f3ea80d
775e8b4487e5cc228fb45da333d59f157df638c8
'2011-12-30T13:56:30-05:00'
describe
'81451' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7e95f1c2e2402e9296559095413b4301
d1f4394013acbb5e64fc5cf12d3a2f88b550e045
'2011-12-30T13:55:36-05:00'
describe
'18598' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
2b06938c89372abfe25d25c9f5e446ea
28cb4e59e3239fe54bab79d43a444ab1bc4e3137
describe
'26114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
039c970113a889eae3cd292678d2ce5e
090c4aba5629ad467114d34177d00a28a6a3084e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
625dc3bd3ee8872ce1d43e71013d7a0a
2c9b567e33c24b89912baa9419f13d0b6e89fb1f
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
dcd32ad820b058a929f41af62d111f6d
3dcbae3f9e18e7d0329ce0d93970feac16d3963c
describe
'7085' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
93da51e6dc0bdfe52add23603ac27397
0ce1b2079b1c5c99d2dc5564b12462bb8537d828
describe
'373038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
4308bab0897642395305799b687ef766
066d8b7aac165478f56a3f010ff229ebacb9c425
'2011-12-30T13:59:52-05:00'
describe
'88109' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
89c92df3276348927857ec122f2f59fd
cc2d5c0149592334aefa0da5701037eb8ce6644d
describe
'21275' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
fa231081ee1ed4c71a49e9edfbc9f6de
5abc130d3881ee3bdb9284bbc4db50840d7114df
'2011-12-30T13:50:30-05:00'
describe
'29021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
d93de27eff7fa0a77122c1d9a8c85ab4
cf36a5fbc661b8d1c521c10c87b0914e999e8d50
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
895b3fbd17279efbb17c5892c790f00b
d84339898a4d020bafa0fd73e0dd4b57fb005d34
'2011-12-30T13:54:35-05:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
2b14fda230c6ae0964a635a37e8f3c3b
f0ff765b7d7692900ae32839a5b2f60058bc6046
describe
'7325' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
398c0224276b639fef09f1965b1ca3c7
1c431178fbf317b54e0c4a9544f1cbd268c86dd9
describe
'373194' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
0f23b9676d36f163f2b15c0c80f9f36c
a4b9b3637ef7c4deccb4fe1b70c3b5604061f592
describe
'99474' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
779723c20dd149403dbe097907abe0c5
4b00ba112650c6ebe83a61ce2dcbfc3450543cfa
describe
'25493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
fc84c4dfea46093b8feef9249677f555
fd0353f3220450a9ab2f003615d5235432e5bd64
describe
'32724' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2b3c7d06f0302efa6df5b53f4d36aef4
37d9f160cd2bdc958af57b7a576e5f33afb0d8d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
375b2683253b2b42fe434e8eef54b202
a25772ca2560f546ca551bbdd6beec3133ba56a1
'2011-12-30T13:59:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
48c32e2129a3da856b1f420e1ee14cd1
c7b2087094ed1c0bc61eaf97286ea894d19fb6d3
'2011-12-30T13:57:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
09042e4046b774df70760e98006318b2
1da131a7436a25c16f0bfa4dfce9e8d57bcb0cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
bc0806b6cf9743692f53b102c1e80b06
7f5506bd1354d8d5fe94ecd9a6050cc309618743
'2011-12-30T13:58:24-05:00'
describe
'109943' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d6255bb4ed6721c7f745c5ae0bedbb87
2bceba9f4794ca775539675eba6c1dc21181d84d
'2011-12-30T14:00:46-05:00'
describe
'26443' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b059e6fa7fef09891284d62efe3df3d9
2b835bcda8a899a4dafbef11b92a4cb1e34c4af5
'2011-12-30T13:59:08-05:00'
describe
'35246' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
f3c82070eff70bebf3badbf8a4b15310
ac6735402c4fbd0217d606c6b75997a7c0a0d27f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
874fb6a5e9a877bfc6db647679702b11
b1541c0b6cabe49dd3acdee394a1953672a5e92b
'2011-12-30T13:53:54-05:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cfe9716d10cb0deb87d02ddf8d690314
45b3debc7877a1704ac43f34d5572b3d5cc4cb4b
describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
bff502f31c58a24d871871c436dac195
3ec649e55741c27b816dcdf63e7b312ce475a3fb
'2011-12-30T13:52:09-05:00'
describe
'373197' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
ccb5863bd9d5a13ff8ce6c313dfea1ab
67a282f349661ecaa32124495f28ad1189dac692
'2011-12-30T13:52:37-05:00'
describe
'105475' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
50201eb9ad1b03d2b965eb190147d1fd
0740f388fa57f72a537f35e0377ea7487c22c42d
'2011-12-30T14:00:16-05:00'
describe
'26058' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
376e2e3f6a5a8fedbcb8d181f7ab8243
10a5f03ebf11e2ed557e061e9f358df8077efb6f
'2011-12-30T13:51:39-05:00'
describe
'34772' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
cda3bbf38250241548cdc2ad00035c91
3ddca9375fa44d11c60ece23b109f3b7ac11b4a8
'2011-12-30T14:00:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
a4d7d470e60c5c6146d9428fc3d746ee
31c67054b62b752f2c86dfad43ed48ab9d727f35
'2011-12-30T13:58:36-05:00'
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
3e90ef79ee3aec53ca7db3a8fe9ff32c
5b1aa093f0997f2c1707c8458df04276d773906a
describe
'8978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8a848805bec4f26961032369f2871b45
e3fcd353ea2eb3bee129f2c7e9b6a5e5df5d214c
'2011-12-30T13:51:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b14361f07db997f80a6986b38a1b8e93
00d4095d65a0bfb0b3d6bdb3ca5ff70f3e26c688
'2011-12-30T13:54:40-05:00'
describe
'97293' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
fd4e74abebba50cf5361cc10d1948d33
739640f8a99e0b5f82f0c5b780dd137b7051a464
'2011-12-30T13:58:42-05:00'
describe
'24764' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4638c0d34e8b178aa336014cd48b0fcc
c42acbf35eb617fa2d91aa47e42351ee50f2602f
describe
'32252' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3b62c8d2573ac48da24f17ce5d0bb190
769172602520e7f2745be6a74e3d9360ead4012c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
86ac1e8ce14c4eb48ac14fb0e612945d
408bd4f447d3d3d2c14254b7f26beedcc886141c
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
49809a8f40071b23f90a63de5c04988e
4a89c44ef0e8c0e20fb7c806bc2ecfbcdb88de0a
describe
'8790' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
4a11c861c0996c7d265acc682f8803c8
22890bcfba053885cb9776d73ef2d0e455e09cc4
describe
'373216' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
032229cab98e78e6afbef796ff39a6d5
e52a74161278f860a5b94186882271d9145f1e7f
'2011-12-30T13:50:48-05:00'
describe
'100221' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
71b6ee0d7bb46e5c162666b8c92352cd
71f2ca43b6b33af42fb2d1a74cd19d022a1775a5
'2011-12-30T13:51:16-05:00'
describe
'26089' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
500ee1452dc27d19e06227314bff7fcf
2c42e6b0f8c462761d9188efc1e1ed7cab959228
'2011-12-30T13:54:36-05:00'
describe
'33803' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1c303f91701ddceb83778dde36463f8b
b88139e81a7dd3987863df860426de9e58545869
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
f63e77c189b9b7ee0f2f87606c227bec
283d9c1f9fe3d2d18b13573f22b81b80de0be80c
'2011-12-30T13:53:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASME' 'sip-files00087.txt'
46babdfce3357287d044c2f91cd4b998
7e19a687b3547a77c08d746329df3af475d42063
'2011-12-30T13:54:22-05:00'
describe
'8768' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMF' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
b6e4afa5f42c590dd731cf2f635291c6
8e99538e58322556061b1dcec1dd404e61dd1aae
'2011-12-30T13:56:18-05:00'
describe
'373094' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
df3c7ff020604444017574352623792d
c09098c46cee9b8675638fdcc2e13c5fffce83b7
'2011-12-30T13:59:04-05:00'
describe
'109834' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
466797dbc6bf597749beacab1e29f31f
913e7cdde6b2720eb10ad65b79257d3369f44f4a
'2011-12-30T14:00:13-05:00'
describe
'26673' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
9bf8417aef7ab721a0f6016becc2a1ac
61194d855b5b1252033fa9c381c6b119e0f3cc5a
describe
'34873' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
156f4b0376952fa6b7d5c48835dd1799
974b3e74ebe0a4312ca9e782464cd22b6123a7ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
be728b03bb734fcfd358200837b45e23
3887a3b65a0e7c11eb6dfaf0b4b8202e812eedf7
'2011-12-30T13:57:03-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASML' 'sip-files00088.txt'
93e70326fb67c5a92f748045897ba0e9
4339806758f61a5e7b7ce5adb433df08bbc92916
describe
'9196' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9cab066ac1e6ab8539102bce966bab94
32cddf04fd26ab57b8825458d90c6bab4b98a340
'2011-12-30T13:49:17-05:00'
describe
'373239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1dea5591033cbf44eaee1b4d35a3174e
85c000a74217a2d2f5481947bd9edb066f135bac
describe
'66886' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
569bac07b7b8c13398a9de41f09f1e23
f4a8a7260f01ebc5f038529b4e3dec7d3653dd08
'2011-12-30T13:58:12-05:00'
describe
'14390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
644148621e0f84a8ddca38cf75fda68c
8f51553f5221720ff647082ad69adf37afc65e00
describe
'19344' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e910ad3f1dbfefcb60a3aae1e378c809
44b45bf5a8e00a833c841f05e8edc5b6ad51cfbd
'2011-12-30T13:53:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
b87e56d211063e77999f4dc12b64bc20
00c577663a2c916c2d9e81440f20639bd14ebd88
'2011-12-30T13:57:10-05:00'
describe
'568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
c49a8c1a9f8978381f6b75a03616e28f
db2acdca56e47a38ef3ff40f6580821f3fde3324
'2011-12-30T13:53:42-05:00'
describe
'5033' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
e9082904bf8395f7e0d0fca5c68f6853
3038028d20eb0e27d544e243362cd2b89fc5da9b
describe
'373093' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMU' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
953cc5988335880d28c6ac1a66637c3d
6e52172b3ae39de33b059c5766d2427767b44a42
describe
'79140' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMV' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6fa40ee0e9f29e2fdce168e45cbaf91b
10da07940e3c16457984a99684ed24eafa7e4b53
describe
'19373' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
6cc90fc744c578d4c1cf8c01fba6d7ec
b46064df01259bed2268b73388959609a50adb4c
describe
'25638' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMX' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d3d662bc13716f5d3514f005ec03cbc4
d4807045a091dec6b4494b3d38fbb82813fb4ffd
'2011-12-30T13:56:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f729feedec32b5a03ca502029a3a453a
71f6dfea9e30e9211cc9eed15d578e96c840739c
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c2d48dae360223f68a8cfec1a4855c4e
a9052c37cd0a35bd37314aa6965ca24c8773068b
describe
'7027' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
aa0fc3081d5cd26d1827ea88c8f1b7ce
a7956ce2546976e523017bfaa7ebd6568dafe45c
describe
'373209' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNB' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
827b8d48f7ec21e00e55c54b61e45859
56cdad9d10c11a207eb6b054d03dd8df4709febf
'2011-12-30T13:58:13-05:00'
describe
'95906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
697d012395cd40459349b568bcf3fc6e
58f54c1c3e6ee366f43b3d2ee2d4a50887064f7b
'2011-12-30T13:51:36-05:00'
describe
'24463' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASND' 'sip-files00091.pro'
5a994c337fdc6f261545849cbafb8768
228823cc27f2c74d7ada2583f231aa405f082211
'2011-12-30T13:55:52-05:00'
describe
'31482' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNE' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
787f8465ea5ba964fb6cff94d46695a7
e2ff2014af5cd0dd2ff0a1f7e995403167ee7ce5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6f2c248f03ac17240e8a2eb6f9922cd7
4ee90a52e3d8468c71c67473944c248ab0d6bf86
'2011-12-30T13:58:10-05:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
497d25397d892e426f6f0ad9aba2e4d5
6e63f77d875c4dff605530a8b732e3158d2b3888
describe
'8734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNH' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ae62798671e8daee7a8683bb7aae2864
4e654b53de4b57f5c72404813c8f41ea78c3d921
'2011-12-30T13:52:24-05:00'
describe
'373005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNI' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
d31905023d3dfff2bdf93fcd9f803a93
a17c122a34135a2cd1d66f1ac896178f85490826
describe
'102761' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
c83c8ab308ac0de769a66b04ce11b6e6
aa47d882ee8530f0f05a04221fba0985b2f252b3
describe
'24651' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNK' 'sip-files00092.pro'
fc14172ce6e551d449e8b7fd80c4075c
70e25907bc015ccdf5a2fde1c2eed5765c7e3e24
'2011-12-30T13:51:30-05:00'
describe
'32153' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNL' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
5e50e99ed53348de5554a9a7ee68c9b8
d5fbeb48fe307a75d530619e3feca8a6c639cda0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNM' 'sip-files00092.tif'
2f05ee94bf674c331e66d061ce8aac7b
e5d4d7317c31a54e54a2742ef68b473713ba9586
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNN' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7b2f20c20101081d119c13bc8f533229
0a47e91fc3b050d368cc504f71c3d13f546c6e5b
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
644c6e53b1e4834d7f8d9cf465f64185
fdf18e31ae06dfcb4111a1385f804507eee99a95
'2011-12-30T13:50:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
30b8fd02a34f286153fe85d58407c9c6
97e35e8dfbcb511b4351de8c1b22a84ac3e47037
describe
'105814' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
8fbc58047821b6b5b2c1af5cf20da0bd
a633537278493414cc8bc30065ecfc508daed81b
describe
'25479' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
16ee5cf0aa9d716a7281c21e4cbf12bf
0542cf3e0229aebf28bc3694d7483c742c0fec89
describe
'33689' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNS' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
758130d64c8c26c98c1c80b622972aa9
51c8399a14eaeaec0b86d331aac88c399b6e7f9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNT' 'sip-files00093.tif'
81986afd8eeca8a6c501fe0b3f8bdd6d
7740c6f97e3c40385e626d13c0052e37cd8edc7a
'2011-12-30T13:49:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
d88665a75750f1e91af7300fb7196a34
f6e0862e713824edd274c6c873bd1975b648c614
describe
'8853' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
31c1f753c658c0d97ae69cc36ffd7cd9
e1a9735288800dbae98a8bcb11638ad169035918
describe
'373168' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
9f803748d583f35dad42baad8ee1754c
350a21c2143cd6744d11bcc051a65b1fa2d284ae
describe
'91175' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
17bda993a8f33a7a6d29ee50176464b5
b7f3142080b63beb95f0d28e531f8d4b962652d5
describe
'22475' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNY' 'sip-files00094.pro'
d01948f932a874fb7049664063c0567b
29fe978a359da29a45057c80d098a6494edc2e6f
describe
'29496' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
3792887c6d739ced42a780e9708b4991
e94de5322d89c6696de62b84999d27281d9f2ccf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
fc029da867838a5fc51dda2558a1149f
9d35e93e06f5e1d647b58c2baa683fa1afc091f0
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
d70ba44c3a35c6d70c6070477d69a586
ccc1f1852555b416b2f60b2334b96555900fb3e8
describe
'8139' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
8d1dca11cf49769593ca71c52f06f30b
035ea0f0967b141c92f678ca8b762f3054fcce51
'2011-12-30T13:59:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOD' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
0d2ad54e92cd0b5ec45305af54b7d637
797f919da696796442bbba0e64122ad8ae3599b6
'2011-12-30T13:54:03-05:00'
describe
'98694' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c50ebe7bb146f0d0b62782831466ee80
4e493e01bf7df6f81b4682aac26be49707226fe3
'2011-12-30T13:48:54-05:00'
describe
'24896' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
7d4d7e1537d86374052412bcbfc9fbff
0da822f6dc225d05328766d59ddda75dbfcf297a
'2011-12-30T13:56:10-05:00'
describe
'32571' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
974873cc5a792152148cdffed262744d
477f64caae806c2cffc0842ca20906f4f2faf492
'2011-12-30T13:49:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
b35c8e8fa1a07079b83490cbc690708a
96bbd86da487fc693dc121204569ac6771fb3968
'2011-12-30T13:56:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
808af2e571534bdadc4da067d4755783
d0e1b21638d34e7071c6c48d57b07cc43b63f507
describe
'8405' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
a83955d4215c4028bc24562d8428d7db
322cb148884b695a2fbcc4c771c2aadb6ac67d43
describe
'373155' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
df009833c97edaa0a16712e336b0e4ac
e6731fb916e48bbdb25c9739b953fdd4b6ef325e
describe
'100038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
0daadfdecd66747818be26de93c92aed
28104ac9467618173e5ca0042f066f068028116c
'2011-12-30T13:55:40-05:00'
describe
'22388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
1b9bf2cdaadcd946f5f49a8a3137e6b9
60edb5157ab0bdfa81a80e98e347518e214b2c0b
'2011-12-30T13:54:29-05:00'
describe
'31146' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASON' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d2057d7668835cce619c77c9640f2e87
5029e18ad40c61b9349c90bcf410c37e5cbc545b
'2011-12-30T13:54:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
292918102dde3a88ebc10ad163adcb17
6b85d7615d6b2fba9ff8b52cf9562c9d47f3895f
'2011-12-30T13:59:18-05:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
427ea52813c80ead998efdaea454c304
b3437fe2526c05bafa7b0824533c41ba084b6c95
'2011-12-30T13:58:38-05:00'
describe
'8337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ce1a4cac512fa61721bdecbf604cc649
194c912fb3a503a864049134df70faf607e4b459
describe
'373172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
352ec21bd0709846bcc17a9f0599f4d0
8bd66553e725c32a0f1cca517d3e29f590734a8d
'2011-12-30T13:56:21-05:00'
describe
'103363' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
5f338edb79b095d3eaa1f668e2d52162
3dc30343d49b683bbac4bb99428adafd12718d32
'2011-12-30T13:50:24-05:00'
describe
'24360' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
a5a2d33ee0b95d9457fede673bb4be7b
749841a2938760d4a594e1765a42f62012d4761b
describe
'33300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d21f61827756abfd5ca2db2b6bfb7c0c
e490688f974064909d26f59756a8fa4c47205763
'2011-12-30T14:00:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
c295e9e2d8f4f9624009e8bac8b4d828
177389130316841298b86be47cc2a8a3827bede7
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
335a25904e434a83948001afc5788f07
b9c436cff96721ea34e462495f32948d14354d7c
'2011-12-30T13:59:11-05:00'
describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
c8ac7cf0d62980f01ba6158fb1781189
51ebe16013233d255db81f143fd9ac14b38db5ae
'2011-12-30T13:55:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
2b4c53b5b48f37da47cea3963e1deae2
b86c44afb2ba0b8538501764e7d18d2549189069
describe
'98880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
af2c585e501b15c3be2a3ee6ab57ff19
733aa4d14bdc1bde3974f8072080ebf6523833d1
describe
'25100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPA' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f5df6347a47f5fcfd5c149f335e4cd16
1ecc77922235402dd321dcd2e6ee23a7950a0f18
'2011-12-30T13:51:03-05:00'
describe
'32292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
e83137d10e6c7bed6a287e20195b9279
8115e0d84a0c0b14efe8b66f14b5e4e05831d68f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
403e01c6a64ec4b5f58110017a011f0d
2ecd3617e7938f4fc7e909f875cf5ed7efe06ddd
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPD' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2ec658e8a591c6161ca9ccde9622a616
4071d9d690a7b430e8af4ecc9e46183474e175ee
describe
'8619' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPE' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a4c86ea3e7611330cc2067bb0371edea
b7e40601721d623ea3e749501d68a10b20eb90bd
'2011-12-30T13:49:45-05:00'
describe
'372948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d37578e05d6acba0bf38574b6144badd
3007a8212d20f8cb9b71f601a35e28bee4669dc3
describe
'38229' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
bbca0b6fdb157a4ac0fa18b113a48aea
3cd41f3e2d04e3ce41fe4ae325898a7ae493fd38
'2011-12-30T13:52:18-05:00'
describe
'7573' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPH' 'sip-files00099.pro'
a3c64b38fde9258a7c2ce46146531385
b2b03184ca398c2b795c312c4b9a9632ba1d7af5
describe
'11864' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
07c7301d65b54fff7306138dc14f9e09
95d1d03a080d5fa1d90fd37837ae43430b466cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
1377a0c5983733c6448bdeade8c4ba0c
55d9c5bc242ab253af83d576068757a392297c33
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b515d4c10cfee092a9e24aae299cb023
1db2999749064038d9d5df4f05a33ea85a6a8ec8
describe
'3215' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
96bddf6229fd4ea9ab5b6f1432c6b28a
b55d83769e00f7ebd68c7ad56e74b5c4eddeb342
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
1d786033a9543e301c51e568ad4d5c1e
5241b8039d1a73047a2ced2ac7ed6a61759a475b
describe
'90343' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPN' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
70361177920b0556d71436bc51e8d27e
2c9f82812025a9beb40aab2831dc87ebc33ec07b
describe
'20166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPO' 'sip-files00100.pro'
7d5efbe533d37ac88941ca9a77ccc54e
30f3d205ae1d257c64a011af309142ef4b1ab74c
'2011-12-30T13:51:47-05:00'
describe
'27060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
1a269b4e05c92f4270319fcac524d23d
7147f1a457c99907ece67a85be0eea622dbc75fb
'2011-12-30T13:53:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
60be4bafabb84bde802914f826a80bdd
626d328ffd100bddefcdc10d4be9327b23c0330c
'2011-12-30T13:49:14-05:00'
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPR' 'sip-files00100.txt'
83166186756ec0a64f151789c47d8783
36569e55ebc4b6b9046c895b9cdc5c8b06f08221
describe
'7244' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPS' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
13ac6a0fe96baf7b4354bf1ef5328fe2
304d6e04d2dbf75507e958347bde54e17ea699db
describe
'373087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
b38d5a0fc5e97072a4403b3603f6a173
461269d9049b2f02f2bfd7e967be6590a835fd1f
'2011-12-30T13:59:56-05:00'
describe
'107960' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPU' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
860878d1aca8296ed3a1304eec9b5145
4cfcc8112a7c9510316c9e7f752de7af1066bac1
describe
'26484' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
20b4ee553775c45f64d0967184b9111c
fc2da2d4140e9c38a45280031c20fa98d7116e45
describe
'35229' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
aa47e9b90d720bf41dfcdb7796da3a3f
1f51ebe458119cc7c5221643247f6da6d3777504
'2011-12-30T13:54:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
e5e31f4e84f575350b2df9034a921789
4badd07862d4cdc749362c03d35ad1560dd2ad4e
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2e0f2588e1f919a6a5cdab5482cdd79a
a1551d9b5742ee3b663273f642afa89314265694
describe
'9085' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
6256c6932824b8301a7c093f9bf1c6b3
fd9ea1ede2a4413f71fbbe0ad23f5d14c7ef9d2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ed7592b69ed536701edc4a6915b54795
e1d4b012bd3cf46b9babc12e0346ad30c1edaaf1
'2011-12-30T13:54:08-05:00'
describe
'105567' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
e4f18bab0af2a460795bdf087730bdb5
4d28cf7dc5963cfec1b3e8451f621764a8e9a62a
describe
'26949' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQC' 'sip-files00102.pro'
61f1a8cde82fa4ca3a490cb623bf1fe4
3205652c05395e96fe47b194b02d621165dbe892
'2011-12-30T13:51:27-05:00'
describe
'33824' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQD' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3111386dcf4071f0c0706264050b69b6
40a65d453fea02f3a282af3246ab039c1a0229d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
50dc445652b68e21105438efc1ab4944
b72f65855493f657f039dbe6c70552036886ff23
'2011-12-30T13:58:50-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c464f48acd9dc5780476ec83ec799459
ce9baea9710389cd2dcfa2d33e3804f75891c643
describe
'9176' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5ecab36d2a695d36880ffeb4e8506ca2
29c529aef83c775484e070fa735185328ea98673
describe
'373193' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQH' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9e1208949ed24fa96235e2e53c84b7bf
ff716866b94617bcf603ee8c46fb5a304e965e0b
'2011-12-30T13:54:55-05:00'
describe
'101424' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
628f624bfb016deb286112f0a4907c29
ce35588e090bfdfb8453c397d41db00c6838d156
describe
'25610' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b0ec0a1b7d0587472b2e8b1938ec26b5
d7cb32dfa68b31240f12d0e9c74569b08c0eb062
describe
'33602' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQK' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
38f7d945e1875297f8e683b1debe6edd
03618ed39b39eef46904932cc66aefd533bd139b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
269d02e64e0bc32ca3c751bfbd10e695
ff31b9f383a0a65e98b7abf518e0cd1ca061c8c8
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
4c72a9f31b8cbc389805594ac4b709cc
679ee9478d989407c00c6b2dece43fde7013798f
describe
'8857' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQN' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9434d48dd7cf54786406c48d97cec7a3
78dcdb84311858682d90a66af2e16f6c60e9fbc2
describe
'373201' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQO' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d6af7e5cc96eb95f538818782ba4c0d4
4c96d87bbf2bab32982721481d844436c8f6b446
describe
'106550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e1c0b989d7ca5b1e7340377595d6ef7e
55962bc499d8548610b71e636bc9ecaf3062bae4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9eb776477bdcad82a809b549727cbeeb
f0bd8b094b5ec576899a0e9b4feef00f5c652e20
describe
'33332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
2cf5341e3767a262287ea53c41a7e6fa
17fc3c0028832ee4944b88c29c0f790416cbd70f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
d929333bee70eb5d929c9347466bf624
30207ae1f02732413d6ac1d217f2dd9b9e7380c2
'2011-12-30T14:00:33-05:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
5e6b661aa876db6450f4b9e8b51c37c2
44367ba67e415e247417f2f5dcf5e701e2c62044
describe
'8538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
073f83634974c9c1e8507c991a210d86
713197e5473dc2196f2d5491591d354343dabb5a
describe
'372903' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
b2684ff486e9c612c102a4b39266efb0
1b4b792a2a7516066cded30626421dd003cfe251
'2011-12-30T13:57:38-05:00'
describe
'105323' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
a46999b602eaa9bfd2aa98af77c7bc1a
f353f25e7934a1be9af1123dd413366ef87fa2cc
'2011-12-30T13:53:21-05:00'
describe
'25678' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
5a1e78cd7ecbdaad53290e5fb0121225
6806b98c3725de842e22847d4d659dcd2cc143b8
describe
'34463' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c3bb3d20cb14b011128f8efdccda5508
2533b1c24c350c01c05af3724a2d5fc48f9aed0f
'2011-12-30T13:56:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
66984fc5c4030ab8575b11c1c164bf21
e77c33b7e2b9edf295031e01f4fd97eb0968ba41
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRA' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b39c05b1708b874e834a931807c83439
d0d1c128639eeeddfb997ec61edbeeccc6d053e7
describe
'8986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRB' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
95b8332dafcc4fc37c5cdf9f467341cb
306f227982849a861ef6dfea88accdf187a73448
describe
'373118' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
ffbdb6eabbe7145162db8c4357ae1c71
0789f4948fd685517e7cdae32e4ab38955bb2c50
describe
'100235' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRD' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
ebdcb12fbc5ff5f99f6f098733445d05
d3f28b09703988a28e1c19d8b1d10947b7ee1f69
describe
'26625' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRE' 'sip-files00106.pro'
2df0d69ec2de9db7c7433280349c919c
54b81783cd9de8fb37c81ecdc687284ec3fe7b91
describe
'34332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRF' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
575ff2dc92551f02fd7b39ed8b7d2ffb
9032e42c9fc7fdfe0d105fdd1a8f2a8260010e51
'2011-12-30T13:58:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRG' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c3d62ad28356302e169d83155a684da7
e4aa2ed0f58867862edca247bc798abf13e81d4e
'2011-12-30T13:54:07-05:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
e767c21460136eeafd2b852ace10b064
874704acc82ff27dc36f373e8ef58036ae46add5
'2011-12-30T13:55:32-05:00'
describe
'9000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRI' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
a9f184fed5529d5508d76abf4198a482
d2d29b0afbfa0e59f78134071c0a348147a81798
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e14ef4099340ea646a64e6b1faea7251
0eec486713a8eea3b071f1e556d3a6a3cde8d251
describe
'101967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
da6353804d996ded87d1e7421c6a354a
e5857091f2a5c4b513268fd4a73426c7d4a289f1
'2011-12-30T13:55:02-05:00'
describe
'26560' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRL' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e5517d492fe30e09b9918ad0c00f2ff2
2730a22d9a08bd957c85862f9bc81289ab357764
describe
'35121' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRM' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b94cedd9b2db433aed90af227a1c71a1
d1a40ef81757edc0ea274ec727a3099b233c1b2d
'2011-12-30T13:52:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRN' 'sip-files00107.tif'
97f29cc1c50576b42ef04e9139a25ba1
f2c31030539d0b6f5bbb0425cc9ca4e86a16cacc
'2011-12-30T14:00:42-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
fe5a3d3a73cbd3a8332c1193683ad363
96777a49df44b0cd360e7463bb61bb35ec5e0f97
describe
'8764' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRP' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
1cc1ca3d5049a74c5c34e114c4b29183
560b589c4bba0dd31c6131c900fb9a67f43e8459
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
adab51f69dafe56b3dfa37c84a1a43e7
68483bf06143eabebecc97194a549dfbc1765141
describe
'102086' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRR' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
50641574826413c208830b168e2940b0
289117952c5d8070836fcd06ba796d9724b175b6
describe
'25637' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRS' 'sip-files00108.pro'
2a55fa216e28066a31c67284de136096
0b898663bbd9e0efeb2a3858a276e66b016bce60
describe
'33846' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
1d4f16ad707e49c903249ad92f171d43
74127ecb78968e5a03980c2740a2ea5542fb3a60
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
26d52f6fe4f1be57544e19e567316adc
8278c75059112f34997e682898d86ac37a6017ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRV' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f9417529a89f868dfed977b7a2fe39cf
4e80d570045069f57fd4cf321c9522e8ae2870d9
describe
'9314' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
8db391074097b3ede69300773068fb9c
1b753b76409efa9aafbb90e2427fe2b41d0fb45c
'2011-12-30T14:00:22-05:00'
describe
'373103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRX' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
7f25099ec347f22965bb90d5907030af
caee3e5b85bf242d18cffca063f554918b77512d
describe
'38892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRY' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
50aa7922dcd33f58cd20e3c2563da7ae
61b667c81d0c32a1660d5d1edc8bd6831d7565eb
describe
'7262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
9ade3d4012d76b2a8183717adbd578f8
9d9254e007a51336ecdbc2199d8b780a8c097a66
describe
'11648' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSA' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
d42222d6dfed0468ad2ffd4b7f8b5e99
887963ad1c7942b205e02f8073d4833f0b79717d
'2011-12-30T13:58:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSB' 'sip-files00109.tif'
e9c21757b2064cb15df23bb313e93436
9e62c35b72295ac92cecab7749bc97b2a0be68a3
'2011-12-30T13:53:29-05:00'
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSC' 'sip-files00109.txt'
24c09a9094ee25beb1141745bbba23c5
ba42839881b714fe413bd067980259d18243c1de
describe
'3590' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSD' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
139e0883dd81a2b914f854ace35dc6c4
195fe5b1703f8a84b6de4144766df5c8f1c28d82
'2011-12-30T13:59:10-05:00'
describe
'373255' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSE' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
cc434bac63fcc7e1c2e865e354daa8df
dd47868cbed4ee5a92a09216934a01800ae966c7
describe
'76752' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSF' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
e4f8919cc2e14d9bcd9b63936600b609
cb3bc9dac8635574976e928d10f69915b9a1b957
'2011-12-30T13:59:45-05:00'
describe
'20593' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSG' 'sip-files00110.pro'
f82a22688b6521551840b2206e28d138
3125cfbd8431dfe7bb190949d6b030a54d03db3b
describe
'24674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSH' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
107551fb082f6ab179e47fa93605f32f
0e22591bcbecfe183af65c12bca42d1e2b8364d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSI' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c12513e3866f7f226a63be67be103790
0a9fc77253528ceb5454b655c1a1ed9d8d2dc4e2
'2011-12-30T13:52:26-05:00'
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
d00f581721c7751d1060ef913b06afd9
756ea0071a687080439f61d45706f24c57eef81d
'2011-12-30T13:52:43-05:00'
describe
'6714' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSK' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
0dd6d29c99149032c3b0f364124a2482
492aaec9154c8ffe3e99e1e81b020edce1ade0cb
describe
'373225' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSL' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
88ceaac4fa5d4cf8ce7857dc6b26e3a5
2ed0080520062189337fd3e2798f2d445fdf2f9d
'2011-12-30T13:56:12-05:00'
describe
'102400' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
fd43837c7eec39b1f168b1dcc3663d3a
f30f62bc964eb310d452d27c15d9851a46cbb604
describe
'27124' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSN' 'sip-files00111.pro'
ee84e6e54e70b9ab3f4d384b76166483
ac0f77eb72a7f443ab9e8242014084dc952634c4
describe
'34924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSO' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ae2d343c5c786a26ed75ce418b3f82f7
0dda2fab751c1207d9252490ba2940b2b559ff60
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSP' 'sip-files00111.tif'
b8d9563ab5034434c73f90793471f2fa
af1d936c8184a1411265b89fcfa81deaf44b62d6
'2011-12-30T13:57:44-05:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
856dc82a77405285d5ccb8dcf75dc816
bae58573be5295d426f12a486a634283c080edb3
describe
'8976' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSR' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
f01fae8f0634d92cdd894612efa5bf6c
135ca67eec5096544162af6a0d4b0c66115b8350
'2011-12-30T13:54:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSS' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
bab9ec88ce46c086b1aedae9b8a116a6
b6bbdcee03353a12789769765797f269b172b862
describe
'104825' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASST' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3678a76614191b53d92165e8863259a6
2c969d23cd0ea7932c2459ff79cd6599d5bc31e6
'2011-12-30T13:49:24-05:00'
describe
'27182' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSU' 'sip-files00112.pro'
996844ea160d92da131134bbbfc2d954
877830c02feaddb37aa8aad3fe2fb3e23f42d796
describe
'34081' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSV' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
171c33833e3d8defad8d71d14f69d089
e16ac1bd4c1edf0bd0465fe9bc3eb3e4354f3f89
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSW' 'sip-files00112.tif'
15a2688efd39b4308aea708eda858b5d
0d765505025300f020e8fd910bdde47ae133aa51
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSX' 'sip-files00112.txt'
29ef5840836b2617e0f47d155345d53a
b8ab80c2335f4335cffb2e2900e8d46b4b66e2d1
describe
'8695' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSY' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
41193ccf94ea6a7cf957e07e109f040b
27f7dddee83a522bfa7e03096e167c8b9cbb8e81
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1fd0ac03de0deaabd6273401ec7abb9f
8496be521fa5be9569bee654ee218b60fa36d12b
'2011-12-30T13:55:26-05:00'
describe
'100841' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTA' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
26e76644cba9699f19eea15812ae9e88
9dda9ff436f31c9e15ad70bfb02a9df735032772
describe
'25469' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTB' 'sip-files00113.pro'
96cddedc264f942180344adc21ba291c
98ffd9a5780f84dd4e0fe55b2682c847e818cac5
describe
'34029' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
376d44e8c9c300ec59b366dc987a5a69
d1488c786055e66451a1fe8279e585d6fe74b1d7
'2011-12-30T13:52:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTD' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5c8bcf92d1673f302ba0901040a7d1f6
ca0ed9576bc07c90c5c34b5c393da78f5caaabd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTE' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a3a58f26be0960f7267c3e9386db0c48
5ad582395118102045da0f0900f8eafbf4252f2a
'2011-12-30T13:49:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTF' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
184a67c6599d6e3c905f24ebb5f50e8e
8cb3b160a5c0a9389df194da244ea7d4b77df5ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTG' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8b222052d61344801773c6db60719d14
701873de7f95e2b118e29f85100c53732fce3bfd
describe
'96845' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTH' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
a094795da6a0d7dfec674118bce480b8
2b444332e04bd9b1deb251e8cd926a4ef8aa1433
describe
'25848' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTI' 'sip-files00114.pro'
756609d970b7510df47e7bbd3a62869a
b895b5c17774b7fc59ff8ed938f013536b9dfee6
describe
'32325' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
8a76aa947a80ab231cef91ee14bf6e8f
7f59e9fbd4858fdb9fead4f84e990d08d3b188f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTK' 'sip-files00114.tif'
5d8996d17910714a5b781c004e2e3d70
eb192beb6455b488d888e81f6ea904bd3eef0c28
'2011-12-30T14:00:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTL' 'sip-files00114.txt'
8e30fdb3058ce4ed6862689887766261
8def5878ebfb828aa01b7d5263389f1c6c630e26
describe
'8554' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTM' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
8cc0a8fadc1e39ded7b520053fac4791
337f1867ae5b29eb0b372db117175a3f82176620
'2011-12-30T13:59:48-05:00'
describe
'373132' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
cbd0c7e5ff7de5327f427b2ffd92d470
24b2a178b2cddc72c4a34a0e771bca282aa60aba
describe
'93638' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6d0355d747ee012beb0c7d6759cf19f2
26958b8b570ec67d431f7d0b10e437f88a4e92b2
describe
'24576' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTP' 'sip-files00115.pro'
762e98f8d706f8e7c9f9f789f1f45a6f
df9ee9483ef4a569312e35edbfd11058733c3409
describe
'31308' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
437ec4daa3cadf0c1b36a29c2d63b52a
ba7010f180afb4d5c804f825046b6e7eb812445e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
131f708f99e1feb23dd168ec0b4902d4
003e72cef0415c1cef60202470163c4b93469ec8
'2011-12-30T13:52:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTS' 'sip-files00115.txt'
ed0bfc2b52cb713a61761523abfa7df5
77222ae5a8751e80a731e3fabf8341265dd92823
'2011-12-30T13:49:12-05:00'
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTT' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1c367b3f43640af99224217ff92fe4d8
6a8d09026e1bfcb58011bbad23918ef06f646344
'2011-12-30T13:58:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTU' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6747706a599bbfbe233d3ef57f9e1dd2
dfde62b4e8c25ac5d983fb7473c6f66d20a8c788
describe
'104478' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTV' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
7a508d01a632ee1d25b892a29578123f
96effdf041e9d2f602f80b6388128c09c6902a8f
'2011-12-30T13:51:15-05:00'
describe
'24811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTW' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c02ca4c7803a19601b91c2b46d156cc4
8fd7d84a125671ba7ca5b716fb1e435152e84045
describe
'32799' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTX' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
36849309de8212824e7105d990e411b2
337abdc9396e1498840887a95676b05c152a85c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTY' 'sip-files00116.tif'
253d06731606a20654611a8ee47d43c0
b9c08bd55487ef15d09e38730e37de8464aca0b8
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
27ebabdb36d7d08efc4cbe2c3cd8f7f5
97fda30f4c7143b58b18f5d8315cc1dc8cf43bf6
'2011-12-30T13:55:12-05:00'
describe
'8587' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUA' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
b46d5d6bc21f5ac15288cc6acb86764e
45c7403352bea111191671a4abd9585b97f3fb9a
describe
'373110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUB' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
df9b6b0000581dfabd0541a73d8fc965
02e2a69f63d1ce149720855243373e8448f89e4b
describe
'105309' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUC' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
a44f48dcde36b2149e8ed7099f8b9cc3
2d0b1c942b5a23e355bb6e71cbfe22ddcf2e4cb1
'2011-12-30T13:56:14-05:00'
describe
'25157' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUD' 'sip-files00117.pro'
e463de27768a9aeabe5b44f7edcf3bc7
e849e1f082a91950104ce2c34a172177f2c162c2
'2011-12-30T13:50:53-05:00'
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUE' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
5ea3025f7a2e4ffc6ecec5446f08a7ff
a7659d9884adf67b0d4d16c0acee119d7dba9eb6
'2011-12-30T13:48:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUF' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ca258fffa6d13b01d938446203eebf15
690d0f908d06605a698e60641ef39e3c36876de3
'2011-12-30T13:56:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUG' 'sip-files00117.txt'
600250ae4e6b9165014c5a27d3efaeee
b7d9274ec4402211c787817b20cb7451fdeb8e80
describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUH' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
e617015fb01372e1e5aa84bc22fe298d
221dde38e599bc2aa22ed4ae3b87f247097dc75e
describe
'373257' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUI' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
4f304e4957c814dcd839c928ab5990e8
3e74df1013e4e82af854f15f70ae9373179b27b6
describe
'102522' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
95da2ef6a78f2e34fbccfacad87b9e57
7cc140d135f24dafd040ae5ca1a13cd42d21584f
describe
'26223' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUK' 'sip-files00118.pro'
6bcc5ad97120215765a45eebf89d20de
925c26585e6dbba0ccf2016274c8dfd663cc7680
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUL' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
57756d341f1109b936c09dd197eb39cf
7dd4bc7690d72a09b3ca274148803edf1a1e4370
'2011-12-30T13:55:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUM' 'sip-files00118.tif'
75876ecc981ea014f94f3ffd482543ff
2d4d0920aa358f13812304c91602c4772b4317eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUN' 'sip-files00118.txt'
38e0af015c78c320c285d6389aa6368b
866e3b55324d0205500a63464673705086290124
describe
'8715' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
b079a09f906fc5894d5cba09e3bb58e3
7a39575d8c4593482eb85e20566427a15631cacc
describe
'373189' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUP' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
ba55ffdecf698a7d163a24ee905b8c8a
6ba6d724ab1dbe7999763f3a5ae3631d30d675ea
describe
'51681' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
105baf38ac524690fc91a75c3c2de49d
f7c459d35dfe86020fc91d43149639dcd7a8b4a7
describe
'10555' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUR' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a13d026699d311d1f9f7fb5bd999eb6e
d2b105353815237ff5b83ab4db0a16cb9369aa6d
'2011-12-30T13:53:55-05:00'
describe
'14922' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUS' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
37877c55cf0970bf0720a619cfa8ea37
2ebc577eba0a0c09c4873b0a78d7ee45e28b66a7
'2011-12-30T13:57:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUT' 'sip-files00119.tif'
59fea9cc9e3eab17ef01707b10c1cd2f
9f0f1411fa0e4aba67023aa20089ba4d4f097bff
describe
'424' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUU' 'sip-files00119.txt'
490caef66fa47e4408b869892b587929
8c3aa11a3bc9fd4ba25b0706e64252b56dc8b6db
describe
'4201' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUV' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
f226a0d753f2342f11800ea9205af69e
99999239b8a53a97bfcd71aafde2be016a89e5a7
'2011-12-30T13:57:15-05:00'
describe
'373236' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUW' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
64e1011e825ed2bf8c969cacb27eb95e
a20126908a7e23b1abb80f88ef082616387f38cc
'2011-12-30T13:58:16-05:00'
describe
'91393' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUX' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
77268a481f406456bbe6163d48ac4bb9
011604ebf6b3f5211a64cd5ad7cf3ead68cf95bd
'2011-12-30T13:55:47-05:00'
describe
'20809' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUY' 'sip-files00120.pro'
047404f7d1a4dfb88c2841ccf4e33eae
b3481ac677b1104865468fe745ce41b025af7e5e
describe
'28771' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
122389b3cdfbb68656df3ebb48f3ac06
d40d806c4cf4a6b22016e7d6eb94d8ae5907cb57
'2011-12-30T13:59:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVA' 'sip-files00120.tif'
9b01f9d0a35902baddb190054e6e68fe
9218f70d194ee3b1e94c68386a48fca7d8fef31e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVB' 'sip-files00120.txt'
f6587c3aa8798ecc7db1e4980cd27d3b
09f33d5ef7dcaeedbeb30ec7cb43c7f51d586701
'2011-12-30T13:55:16-05:00'
describe
'7923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVC' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
62e69e224fc5c9d121aa3bdeb2680979
8928241bcb8d96ba4d2f02a5d1e3c3f2f5dcba66
describe
'373119' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
d94691382da7628e1702685a214e824d
70cfaed60468997bf91b2a6aae65872abb0ed99d
describe
'153843' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
2c9177deeffa3c4f4c3aa26c7a47996d
e3d405a234380c39262cb7b7bd4d480c72661dee
describe
'2151' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
8df6e0d2bde13b1fbb1a80522ad94dc5
b23683f99a6df67c75f9e41fb9edd7a6dd8ebd48
'2011-12-30T14:00:49-05:00'
describe
'34078' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
3700dd6b90bca00a046a06d74a1a287c
fc6e32cf084e668aa2100142b315b6678bd4683c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ea368326076be5ed7412c3bc0848832b
ba3cd5ff5a7a647a3813c1d126e7889724310a74
'2011-12-30T13:54:12-05:00'
describe
'112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
d3ce793b24a8bbbd9b30a0f4ba0b6d2f
6d67ed4eebaf7f678ccb76b48963c0d2f32a789f
describe
Invalid character
'8568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
a81184c968a7364e5643cbc157f91df0
3aeca13bffc4497e560e663c3cb936a5ef378437
describe
'373195' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
f02df7464deb2ab6c2f4ab6a73ca5e87
f580eeda08847e1d32c0502a114949093628a184
describe
'179628' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4a15ad6fb66bcd8b73a7b4d9995cde1e
a639df6072263d9ea00526773eabd29539fed111
describe
'26204' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
b55fd62d4603050ace832ee61a49c352
0f2b549d4d1812da795c66cb88b0f40b67a07767
'2011-12-30T13:53:23-05:00'
describe
'68730' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3e7a94134134323dd0ff3d8baddfef34
0b82487f0d73ef24113dfaa4f13f0f0eee8ea5d6
describe
'3008388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
6f736a13a7d88ba56594efde4c32486c
ec728d67680f466e5b365ce83bbcba2646d6f6b8
'2011-12-30T13:54:49-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b3cc2ca6664ac51ff122bb51aec3c6de
46f9cfd750ddc3f281183ff3d9cc21964530a102
describe
'33516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
30ec1411e0c7044635e48bcf2f6f539c
f80f68c81ac63c296ef7f98dbb91442b17464f85
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
eba68ba5991ac5ac380db91da77c72c8
4cca623cbf10cf22b37b889f7a4c5046efae2bed
describe
'104534' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
42f42c3fa7ea18f0eaded45ed0a496fe
8e265f2f71aa367ab8bb7f9b479c1a776d02605f
describe
'25802' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVT' 'sip-files00124.pro'
9770c60a0d79e49a6b66572cc82e244a
d969e5cec2a14c190f40ad9eafed3dc7a9f952dd
describe
'33201' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVU' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2523e9dcd3e188b625a706e86753cdfe
29357d5dddd60d1e7ef6b430309f4d6025c0deba
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVV' 'sip-files00124.tif'
0647b3189eee41ade64b72b7d175c1fe
2fd7201d21804e995b7e2f5d81725a6fd4f658bc
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVW' 'sip-files00124.txt'
354b27c144f17e798bd5b2ee7932d2c0
8d6fcdf9b6cf3830a7609e7871515a9bc085476f
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVX' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
df9e033e12ecddbc1ca33f34d0405e59
0aa0a1a49ac4ac1ae0ab1ad41f83087453ca32e5
describe
'372950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVY' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
357080bd1685fb37b1100d5ef002ae84
06eb09625a70be07977a7a31f7683b5ec43af8a7
describe
'70314' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASVZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
0f31b2d54f6d274d482a7047eb3539ea
70e5dbfca250aa807fa7327f34a7e744e44a5d8d
'2011-12-30T13:51:09-05:00'
describe
'15305' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWA' 'sip-files00125.pro'
cfff2d873522e247638fcc41f8d98d04
aa39cce33c901088a1f59d3239f56033af3b8368
describe
'21210' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
981cb1b8f645494bcc9401ae1ae977dd
b7e5edf54a3e71b8807ec77344d10634a940a447
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0e1e6eb9c02d9ec800bdcbe23ab01bd1
e4aefe503254ebd86f154edf3dd9275d2c99f91f
'2011-12-30T13:56:50-05:00'
describe
'620' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWD' 'sip-files00125.txt'
9cc03a4e8a510931bcbb20e197c452c1
ba9d300fa36cc75d62b92b5b2cfd12c955104eef
describe
'5627' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWE' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
0882b43d67fc26858a1500b776520426
e2a57faf8880d38d803e3209d12fa243de2fe4e2
'2011-12-30T13:57:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWF' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
4dbeb338b60d41356930f772e40dc85f
80c509e9600022b1037c2dedf54fc828e2875edf
describe
'97305' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWG' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
03e60cabfb567fb19c732c07cb7231ea
89ba4ac4ec78a323be3da8f8cc334abf85e45b1b
describe
'21619' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWH' 'sip-files00126.pro'
f126d4f655c1ee5c0108de7eae1010ad
a01d59682472f03bd1e565286eab8996bd6e1982
describe
'29382' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
591abc1fb45ade61ad7766e149ff8552
7e82176cd253e89e574f2252531aa2d54f48d1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWJ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a9a2f68202aaab834b707e4a20cba904
29bac555ba38397064e98f40c6b8778b145210bb
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWK' 'sip-files00126.txt'
1b598698576f69755c1a4414e4733e1c
43eb8c139e95df33edb42aac7e79acc67dc57bb1
describe
'7834' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWL' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1926313bccdbfbad80ab7da1a8c185f7
6147d0596dbb4d3c72fa72bb9f77d25236875cd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
4c6c0c5db9559e05a9cf2fe3f193b54e
7808a62cb2c16b6efd26dc2aeb5ede5203fc08a6
describe
'104427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
03bf5fb24dfddfd581ef5391d1e9cda6
b4530114a6eb482814e022cdc03577ea0fc8b9ac
describe
'25156' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
7d501fc1614905eac7da673ed01fa41c
55bef5cb8b62380a4bc2ed7dd19563813ea8248f
describe
'33770' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
4a79d6319fec51c2176bd3898917d0cc
3f0cd0e6d1ef5adf892b378e41ced888588dd39c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
d9c0d8109f204252c676389dd07eda62
19af05ea1641186fffae5abe3e0b7e270486514b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWR' 'sip-files00127.txt'
dd29aae2f24505bfc51ba439377b4280
d691cf3875a96d359d43a1210563abf347bad7b4
describe
'9046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
71c6297d993d95554a79b2e8ce4f20e6
9a098b7bbf78df415ad042d0b7cc20027e80a1f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
d7c43d82c3cebd23c15910e4d49434ba
9b5a0ad9cb7230f9bc4d411113fbe6b0ae4f8342
'2011-12-30T13:52:19-05:00'
describe
'86613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
d544d0a67d2f09ae88bf8badf0855c55
ab1877c4186c38c71cc37a33dfc46f639426330b
describe
'20974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
f01fa200fd7ab357e1105b5f36d8ae35
f2c52956714348f07fd50af293985d16094d7db2
'2011-12-30T13:56:26-05:00'
describe
'26997' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
9eaa08116c03f0b971fdb4d635bc584f
1eb20cf7fdb3e9c51fd50a7002c57dda6a11ce43
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
09132f90429a4b3ebea2a2aa2161f2c8
274c59c879b53eee7fd01c7fc3a4a63c36c1a502
'2011-12-30T13:59:47-05:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWY' 'sip-files00128.txt'
80051cf9cd9238e85814845d9b242ebf
fcabf25150d26cc449fe556fee7f256838237b6f
describe
'7103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASWZ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
e1ea54794cfcbd21b874d8383f282fbd
dd520ddad93248d2df8740451bc4288cb1511356
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXA' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
c64275c4ca1cbd64c431105f1563aa7a
5a4dbc2c1be2317df8a18c9f53910ebf235a6fa9
describe
'105593' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
8586cde631aec0db8fb4ea1aedff4263
fa223530c1ca6f0a036049cabc03ef496edfb10f
describe
'26877' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
151566bd015bfa84561dce832556b264
52e818c8a05cb2a73d2389638541450ac8159d5d
describe
'33837' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXD' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
3c355b98bb2b7370ed21032a40dabfb0
bf5c9c41aca72260e45589c2087c20113aa00667
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
314fa2827e1d01baaeb47716858ad324
4f5e2f8a2e9d75e75d20a005846c7ad4d98e83da
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
bc2e6b9596dd9dcefbee26f9af80c2cd
7a1cd1e577e4c43b9cdabc6e79237e9830894f13
'2011-12-30T13:53:35-05:00'
describe
'8653' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9f2afea0d40df8205b025fa6bbd81f39
eae4c2bcd876b21aa516be77d20f2a047170445a
'2011-12-30T13:50:22-05:00'
describe
'372991' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
ba6461bd6922faa8f424782680203947
5915932b68a3331ae423cac9a091812c0ed1fc75
describe
'110019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
73a9034564756af49a916dcc0effff6b
72b2d817ae1cf80befbabd02a6aa6f81cc8fa832
'2011-12-30T13:55:03-05:00'
describe
'26647' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8f718b6e4667956d317ff840b0a4e60c
6b63ff38dcaa677d6d5d3d6129f4c98829e8f3b6
'2011-12-30T13:50:59-05:00'
describe
'34901' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
998e3077452da75628f1715a2d266b8d
672ab8bc5d75e338abd2ee711edf9a6bb850daa3
'2011-12-30T13:56:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
687f25ae51e4b9943304c9d8e9fa2efb
afe5561305d1ca94080a2cbdb9211a35ef5ec584
'2011-12-30T13:58:23-05:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
cf3ed68de6f388548680415547f93ce1
9dc26582c67e1780c05d5ff51e39b53c7a40bddd
describe
'8924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXN' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d5f7702c551f7cef06c83a9f01ea27ce
7248cbe83951656c3265af53eda5679034667316
describe
'373254' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXO' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
5b72eaec204bcaf713c5eaf0ebe44325
696ad0f395f5cdee74c501528aa2edf4806639ea
describe
'92697' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
07109b3e3232d8854ae418f5444f2746
c87713285b756a033cd2aa7a473a33a38dd4d346
'2011-12-30T14:00:35-05:00'
describe
'21375' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0ef076e43e86d1be44d9740f22e13e91
2960d029c6245e8c59381887e02deb2d2d92b109
describe
'28617' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXR' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
9ec6a5ddad365b9dd4b58a18259bc2af
c29f071dc1f9d9709b264abea7c719cdfa085ecd
'2011-12-30T13:51:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXS' 'sip-files00131.tif'
999a81b8e9dd870ee353189110e8f08e
404b2b75f58292d433fdec6b9d92def6d3122e86
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXT' 'sip-files00131.txt'
525d2c85b296d12ca15c0ad06441b2a2
a34155e5be2f186146f5e754ec7be0b3a6407a08
describe
'7416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXU' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
14aa9efad1bdfd31652d5a4caacabbc8
9b8206fbe19196ef37e6bf629e1b4c3d704b049f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
4dcd948c633d2e04790e0ffb508f1e24
8720aef6423b051306d65f22271d5e5fa37ae8c8
describe
'83019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXW' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
95b085ff6a7ba61f2793e0de7635639e
f8a775e8f7317a2df84c39fb72c11f316bd78123
describe
'20273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXX' 'sip-files00132.pro'
7bc2a2ce2b4c8c7b3fd2ab33bbc0bf1c
7dce75b4dc4f611a871021dc11f15be6989d11fa
describe
'26104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXY' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
6af1472319f2600bf040f824720475e9
60945b4c84d5cdb01053d9edd45415ba9be03ffb
'2011-12-30T13:58:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASXZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
21162d0aeaa33e020ea322634481d7cc
0243b6520815ec9705b7f4bf8caf24c5cdc1c711
'2011-12-30T13:53:49-05:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYA' 'sip-files00132.txt'
7d3588d6b218acc3291ef1adbcee2d4b
683514be52e569f53050c68f982c76594527dc85
describe
'7109' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYB' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
771e6a3ab13b38c3a33813d2f2b6ab3a
872797663396614e8dd9a1b19bbadb415fab3f46
describe
'373082' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYC' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
79836b053622a66b9b4118b66f3063aa
d8fd8fb340282ed8145db22906951134b9987124
describe
'96890' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYD' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c14db9e47a9242a851a9edf4a5ba7f1b
cd96740f33c4cd3bc84e41f07db2c11cfc47b8d4
describe
'24214' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYE' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b746cc0bb3fbbd051eb86e045d2e96d4
6db8d9c05bf2fea21ed08f604d4f62708597becf
describe
'30473' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYF' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
96eb83bdb2cf23e9b3b5104d2d8c3ecb
e37bb3d700cd9a9d322f336afd5eb2ac3c841ba1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYG' 'sip-files00133.tif'
76b4824705f35a865829ee0d93c002c4
b855d0abe2270cf229215b2e5b24a6083012f4f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYH' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d6b9f2996007e6003f44ed32b57eaa58
d8c3d5834221756df4c9f37e88cfa9852940ed2b
'2011-12-30T13:50:54-05:00'
describe
'8609' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYI' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
b554e34e96938acb772162320c82f2b9
2058f6dca1a4843db992d1b87e0911f3f6344298
'2011-12-30T13:49:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYJ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
fae9c65790755e1143e3ae98eae1d3d4
4727936ae108356ad81228c27d658e493128d146
describe
'105757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYK' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
a020bca31978a85d225c4525717c5d5c
80414115cc9e3fad07cbb77bc679bdffe864081c
describe
'25025' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYL' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e0293232d366fea4df29549b6a51d2e2
fbda6d798bd65d2cfa256d4807a8bf80b6be166d
'2011-12-30T13:55:55-05:00'
describe
'33831' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYM' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2def2f11e53d490d7b6735b09daefdcc
cf184339afd691ebc0e488a5e2e337f8a708d324
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYN' 'sip-files00134.tif'
8837353be949f46d1a573843905b8434
8d1b611074834d1c864de3ee91e7ac9d991b3dd2
'2011-12-30T13:57:00-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e12b5f84a2c866b9555b56784a4c0a94
ed0c4234ac64b0967d571abda18b9ee166d30129
'2011-12-30T13:52:14-05:00'
describe
'9036' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYP' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
5bfbc898b125611db6e17158bf21c215
6856992d0ced0ca19ec03da17bce7dbb8adf21ca
describe
'373092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYQ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8fb7059da0c571f96e65621040134b85
4623d7bcdbf4fe11989aa2fe420bf123a20a989f
'2011-12-30T13:51:04-05:00'
describe
'105492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYR' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
c7eff757c816ca4c51be5ea3d7330664
ed5b708a21179a495d4a151fb9454fce4992db8e
describe
'24692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYS' 'sip-files00135.pro'
3a0f4fb1e0ff96de59ac7890c4ec2380
b8572f40933422cec00fa20de953f6b0e9891459
describe
'32938' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYT' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
7caaa58f8514d1d7e57ba21044ca58b9
5b9121b0fbcb7fa0b8e5c25b0732c387e4eec347
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
2d16a5292b7ea8dc9e9718e8f6a80fac
f105acac278400f9153bbd2f4c3e31889c2449cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
25e6b31a0b62bd544ee162a616192301
cf1e1277e30e5c75b60512bc353236c6c633c390
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
331444a00d29e2b6442353c27436847c
5aef42c65044fbefab794624cbbb2157de11e67d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYX' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
8c225a00a983d05b30344c8b6b02eacc
546f9b7a702d1423d0a43bafd4b3eeffed2901f2
describe
'103793' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYY' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
73c8f1a2f7658ab08e646658e158f894
5472be1307d1b7d06eb6c9d957466d81dc3ca646
describe
'26538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASYZ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
33ba8da2f77d4faf037e2f68a71f914f
a5d4cb852ada2a2094e0ef9492a74e49a7b52ffd
describe
'33789' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZA' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7214f5424328ec89a6edeafe77acc7d1
a788d7e5db150fe2978f1bf2272830b87d616292
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZB' 'sip-files00136.tif'
aadc58cc044da384a3089db60005968b
c562c332a33a6297e8fb94003b464826be87a90c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZC' 'sip-files00136.txt'
1c094600fa9cd7f7f89e6238cc7120f4
59b9ff63c3daa0b199c2d2aa7360c891b8852c9c
describe
'9008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZD' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
11caf8346da4121234375a506cb730bb
f8de942eae397e07b14c491390fe42c5018ffca6
'2011-12-30T13:54:02-05:00'
describe
'373233' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZE' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
aec4d888ad0e0f7ba884d0d8915029cf
f011a291e8082e3d0cf9da0c23e6f4d2a8a0c272
'2011-12-30T13:52:38-05:00'
describe
'102648' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZF' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
bea16b7af38b59d141c675540ba79da2
b5fe162c397061f7ea787405aba6243c2738b34b
describe
'26133' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZG' 'sip-files00137.pro'
262822ad725b499cedd0ad83e7528c0f
c797707a68310076b96606fd1154a85f7ea22ba8
'2011-12-30T13:51:28-05:00'
describe
'33881' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZH' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
9399c5d07bf328b8204af5c9c64c4bd4
80edfe76266fa2a9ee19d3f639f120d8f5d75e13
'2011-12-30T13:58:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZI' 'sip-files00137.tif'
4078041ac6c6cba53226ec89fc465e04
ded812fcbb96962f18c3bc689703268428503862
'2011-12-30T13:56:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZJ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
12f5ae34ca4327d5a861173e0f221080
e95e463da6c8f2e016f89561cdc0a610c6da5740
'2011-12-30T13:49:15-05:00'
describe
'8736' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZK' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
9a48dd7747a5d984350988b5e3d21826
0662bb0a03c60daee8d1cacf05cd17c7f10dad35
describe
'373156' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZL' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7f3cb13774929c9f68ff31f989a95a70
133729ee48b4e274dc34bf320fd160aba176b62a
'2011-12-30T13:49:33-05:00'
describe
'188005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZM' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
dfb1ec63fb773e6ab506a29cb814a28c
979ef9461a71888b3354049eca3a9ddf08432e4d
describe
'26868' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZN' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1cd1daddede540576cdc004d31215d69
80f6076ae87bc12a423bd81c01d0f2198e90f42f
'2011-12-30T13:55:29-05:00'
describe
'69038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZO' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
59cfbcfc34ef4014b28c6e9585dc0559
db8cff9dca915662d1af450ab2b7ff3016f2bc7e
describe
'3008408' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZP' 'sip-files00138.tif'
29b8b9d8fd8cae148a765c2dad30576e
6a8b9369a26a7718da2fb3e3b64c0ec7976bf9e0
'2011-12-30T13:55:19-05:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZQ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
c744495c26cafcff5d2625f12768c9ee
b4afdc6dcb53f38f31d08dddd1221e39c015b465
describe
'33342' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZR' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
0deade828ed39f4f685269415eafeebf
06ce09f2336e171fb8103019696064428888a0f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZS' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
b073cec82705ea9ebb6548a1fb649fb1
281f63434e0c8409d1cc2d2c4dfe684f130c768f
'2011-12-30T13:58:04-05:00'
describe
'167258' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZT' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
c66170aa8ff4f64bea850f84f16d5a8c
cc6262006e6c4566edc92ce1450fbdf198664fde
'2011-12-30T13:51:54-05:00'
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZU' 'sip-files00139.pro'
4975b1ac38696c0c25220f6777188454
0f4b8bf47a6466bda7fdba5401c8026f059a1bee
describe
'37914' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZV' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
5723e9a3324558facaab3a2fd21b68c2
367db6a395dac30353f7bae25ca1eadf05ed2fc2
'2011-12-30T13:57:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZW' 'sip-files00139.tif'
9828a9d5db37fac19583b3ef38fd66d1
e02132ee2fa67fbdaab4b0b5d25e19d353b8a0d6
'2011-12-30T13:51:25-05:00'
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZX' 'sip-files00139.txt'
8173d3b895ae14793ace79d9c0465703
bd23e3c7323eb6e8cfb2dea715e64c0352ab3889
'2011-12-30T13:49:25-05:00'
describe
'9749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZY' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
ea83bce3a6bc017b4fb528fdb7f0c7a8
a24df8903e1b5062106a6a98009e1fbd6697746d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAASZZ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
fb1941d1c84e19d22446d3752a07a4e8
f90dcc57e3d7bd6a1d655516a1670551cb80e4e3
'2011-12-30T13:57:21-05:00'
describe
'106209' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAA' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
89bfe2635987269a22e27b24a0bbf594
7e5b0147a52f67a9745f41027d9271d7cd50a84c
'2011-12-30T13:52:35-05:00'
describe
'25753' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAB' 'sip-files00141.pro'
75b789922ee258289cb129d5b137c00a
30ad619a8da1a97ea93fa2302c1060c03b87fe07
'2011-12-30T13:51:12-05:00'
describe
'35026' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAC' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c1aae4383ea5a03ceb033c1baa825336
4f6cebe042cca3b680fbc28c24fc807ed5645b4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAD' 'sip-files00141.tif'
5d80eca3572e85322075e94358742b6e
f7bce7bcd3fa25051f6bd38a6976d6668a9a79c7
'2011-12-30T13:49:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAE' 'sip-files00141.txt'
8fc91c62f6355d4a1083e51b2abd07bf
736e459605eadbcda64612b1b1b2ac129c85fe9c
describe
'9444' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAF' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
2b7d08c586914e871dfddba1a180a7e3
6c4af26dd7b5b660cd1d617c5b36d31877c2ebf6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
15026308295c233ce08778bf99231930
20d5d75d23f323b8871a3883ccd407ae5ba38128
'2011-12-30T13:51:52-05:00'
describe
'97636' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAH' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
e61817e8f343039fdc5c4a8ff9d55c9b
f21ef7763f1ae4a24e86c772eb3e5983ed91cd56
describe
'26217' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAI' 'sip-files00142.pro'
49a9e8586acc700fc36eae3ee192f98d
87bb42c398d436274c305584005ad677ff3369f1
describe
'31226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
8e57b50308fba84249cf596f260e019b
cf388f74a1208af82753ad09e1f43536608efd76
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAK' 'sip-files00142.tif'
349a230765d84fe6a6c6c59f37a9faa3
79425b30740d18c635dccdbbcaaca8bcc80d7580
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
8008c96ab8d7f45074ff4eeb7487c21f
ef3765af2879f83fa3999d111240d1a4c0ffaa78
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAM' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
5e54f004eebabbd46771e1dddcc41208
e1292108ddb201478c9f75bb6f833ed16d39c417
describe
'373219' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAN' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
dbbc7e4fde370ec3644b3eb7ba705517
e1a033efd3a88cd79f567704f343b20b7d09ee46
describe
'93819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAO' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
82d76c884889e66f64286d307495a81e
9e5445a18bb1a1f83347b141bb6f571d2a2f4aad
describe
'25224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAP' 'sip-files00143.pro'
fe5a12957ce737e82709fa923890ef86
8361748b193e36c9ce54f9c7e4459d8ebf87136f
describe
'32253' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAQ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
c667f6c68461e16fbef2c54a267f329d
dc50ed0de7307baef1530647c28fef25f02c3564
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAR' 'sip-files00143.tif'
5fb4a47c3b8de1626f4499c8e86b96c6
25bbc07fa967681ac5341b6430c05299275b570e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAS' 'sip-files00143.txt'
d5a339118f4cfd3c907c7a46c7a0d287
284192d2eb0b066482e36414b99f7d9ef9b1ca57
describe
'8591' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAT' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
9e1cb0f964f6ad8a5e5d9618ca0a57b8
e61c18ab0f725f4ac0e4e9c4a7efca7c31bb7f10
describe
'373085' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAU' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
10ee30a6cab20256a0b43b93fa498208
5307a92b6bb2206cf3c2b9e14131a01f9dd79a52
describe
'103013' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
9c9ed061fdb9ca5932f18c6641074a9b
2dc2b64e82a6796c96b1415370816615229b28f7
describe
'25932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAW' 'sip-files00144.pro'
4b9e8c1fba85f9aec88d8124a8d08f04
0a4b1ef5d29dc7f313bfe139983938c8979fe60f
describe
'32477' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAX' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
7333c7d1324e6343b816b5b7a5951f45
d2fc6dede6f38a1c8a7bb55aa854d22d576cf662
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAY' 'sip-files00144.tif'
7aef6e86acd7c852098f04a6d599c538
067f63eb903e17a6aa76133b0cc4aadf5ba737de
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATAZ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
d7b6b43826902355ce415e124ea46a23
d3fc06abfcf598d03dade6a73036e5be6729b385
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBA' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
a08a0caeb388f9809d2bf0ab9343da94
3efb9f3154fb2c96fc5700d5b42441afc7da1b7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBB' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
62eccf1939880d3cc4cb6df335f47282
3384c4029db501e13b18f63c4a501f63349091ff
describe
'100924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBC' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
21f12cdb8915372fbf8cf14aa01aa85b
0f1fb47f8ff3600309844fd0dddedaa6d39d349d
describe
'25144' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBD' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e230273427b88f148c83690bf680bedd
06384b5dce623c17af510834457668d0e877c9fa
describe
'31350' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBE' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
2462a40c98cee57860c1e01f3ebbc514
57c54b023077892eec63b6fa81524c4a0eb7ac1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
b95711b08b2cac8488a8a453c891bdee
ff7adc8dd9778bd0c1704dce079e682ecdf8972c
'2011-12-30T13:53:19-05:00'
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBG' 'sip-files00145.txt'
2b1711845bd9d676518ecfd5e6cead3b
d57a7107896e4325d30ebf0d89a6a8abd6a871a0
describe
'8631' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBH' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
03d546a66f3feaeba671a16754971ed8
a6e3c3489175b02fe311820d0d0c397fd59a13d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
3b86176e2dc1f85b1b2599355976bf1f
f54eb04d28641c12a3870b82b21c8587f9aef832
describe
'83647' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBJ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
22ed3e6ade704d66fe837ac66d2e031e
19f67bc8f7967c77b7e226e11c94ed56f7a627d5
describe
'21422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBK' 'sip-files00146.pro'
2ca2480e40bcb606409e84b25aa7492e
ff76d6eb226f75d710f0f09b22367573390d7cba
describe
'27424' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBL' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
53017e4021c52881d2cac02a98694103
3108f18aa0426f0cf0e6225f5e7272ede21a957a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
da17b6b378b17f721db6d87306851eae
c6e370df73fcc0f4285f27aedcf0c8ca5d70e692
'2011-12-30T13:59:58-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBN' 'sip-files00146.txt'
66986c2b93d7ecba12a0cabc0998f8ff
3bff5c80156f1c809b5329c855af40bbbfad0603
describe
'7550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBO' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
4df91719b329338c81b19a40a9586d9b
a89e15232a9dc8b3bbc2b9ce0e02295b01721503
describe
'373137' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBP' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b3de770fb383f55bcc2dab2918f3860e
a705752beab8341e87c996d671c7b4c1e90ce17e
describe
'85013' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
3756854adb4d20064b8ca67a3cc7c986
30b1065bb1b0430470588b168571eb21f77caeb1
describe
'21909' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBR' 'sip-files00147.pro'
0d638db562bb3828182e9c85a59bfff3
e747df1a0f74b3718b797fa5078bff6ac31af9e2
describe
'28136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBS' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
917f21edabcd993645c9108ab85b4dfe
297203669a5d6f17b46898c15bf1eef941b46804
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBT' 'sip-files00147.tif'
c5362aea27c832be87a8853ddb7dd1ad
303bdaf6fc3a7a0274f90a9c4e1f82546f01917a
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBU' 'sip-files00147.txt'
2f6fcc13f42dba87446dac5628382247
4c56c1196a945a5c7bed7d2aabf446e4a96c2d5b
'2011-12-30T13:48:51-05:00'
describe
'7452' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBV' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
8daa0c323d7f9362f730c09f4c74f057
72df8ee89a11f111e3d2aae8f3b3486afa91bd0b
describe
'373248' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBW' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
f705218880b4e0d8916a9b2a676487dc
bd4de771b3521f91e53fd77e4a333a667aa7ad23
describe
'100751' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5cafd2b5633441ff5106415e4e23a3bd
27fc3713918884b649e70706b4817cced8715d7d
describe
'24832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBY' 'sip-files00148.pro'
fa0459ce80bc7dde76b7cf9df6245d3a
54289910aef4252de28527facfa9dab134bd95da
describe
'33337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATBZ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
a511274c12803ac714b9ad5ea6c9f4c2
14a525d7676aa147ba4b780f28258943387a5171
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCA' 'sip-files00148.tif'
d12d41b0bece921c77a1bd2347827619
3289828796be1e68e72d3f89f5652932b9b314e9
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCB' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6feb9eeea8c4a680f9289956cbff1731
e37f38d4484f612c997b2f67fe3c29f16aff44bf
describe
'8509' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCC' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
6928e041978fb86aaf569f7bb7fccc3a
8c4cbb969fbcc803242e19a06ae53edb5495203b
describe
'373202' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCD' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
fda3a4e73354cef7489f3a34b0bd4487
9d3328b47fa9f2b1b6ae6cec851850bfc316b386
describe
'101506' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCE' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
6c977c37b95edbf7d2ae19ca384245d4
ff9470f491089c4c04fa9e35a0c468bde47ff7c3
'2011-12-30T13:54:30-05:00'
describe
'24826' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCF' 'sip-files00149.pro'
a9019ec4ef7fe74e034346b0c1201eec
a50c7576bbaf31d8084e3227723d47b9d2b7bbf2
describe
'32201' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
d98a22ebd9bc68a5d4ef6e3bf6b0c54e
f3bbe65728edf7370ba57d863511578ad2bbd795
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCH' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e76774597c19db388ce49c9da279ab61
d1ca922995c79b7862bf7640e6911d6fc123d047
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCI' 'sip-files00149.txt'
e064fa6eb3abc16b3fe99e227427d287
782d8e2e1d2cd52fb0c3d2f233233897152fa52a
'2011-12-30T14:00:50-05:00'
describe
'8383' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCJ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d87a358777813f62aec81d82545bafcd
951ec2d242499a12ffa2063eca7fc3b04c33d041
describe
'373217' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCK' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
5674bec7280901b20964621c5f0752c0
e55b7da6796f3d62f75cf9e24519e8e851dd37b4
'2011-12-30T13:49:10-05:00'
describe
'102576' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
425895c46266736679c4ee50ea6579fd
698fda5d099e6772f208fb8daaf09b8341f33489
describe
'25180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCM' 'sip-files00150.pro'
db4b4fb5ac9f5b37c219093c47f17ec9
1bf3f499c36b8019bef81185b3ba5667d5670989
describe
'32932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCN' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
bf36558b38a610b3ff95e7aa948a334a
207472e3c85a4dcd944363c51227635013d43b69
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCO' 'sip-files00150.tif'
946629fbab025a4260c03be38879fe12
237dad81c3927a8bbb161a81d92e7622f7f6f531
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCP' 'sip-files00150.txt'
8cd33e5c77e5ad6c1ad803144d44d11e
b01ed858bc1e6f4ab737dfdeb2da4edc41f64b4c
'2011-12-30T13:56:47-05:00'
describe
'8273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCQ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
e18f3888ab3d6fade7a60df7ad90d023
624f30f21ac9732432a2e69f1f1966db82d44eae
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
3510300707c224a1e1d462cc72371db1
1c2c0708450756c86ee52a3d6c6a61f45e6652c0
describe
'97600' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCS' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
cff6ec60b328052ea7254ce807a95e4a
93dc4844ff20cbaa92497b6d0556edb544e2ee60
describe
'24792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
cb2431873f3d47f2556aa6bec3f54198
4401dbdb923f8d47d24f7a76c9b29094f31a5402
describe
'30380' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCU' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
ddc27dc1632c016ea11703e869adb24f
85e7a3614613a05124fb992a80b1bdb7fc5d7ff3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCV' 'sip-files00151.tif'
131299dc3f66bac92419a7b56ee8d0e9
4d0e7c3d1471e1826d321836da4314b891658e1a
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCW' 'sip-files00151.txt'
fd28702d59340597aa906357957a9b90
6f05cc038ba26516c21213f4a78f3e08596889af
describe
'7794' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCX' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b7e667d9159f35c4eac24e7f1f2d3c8e
31cc021fd01b45fe0cc96abaa22be41ed3a63e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
99b80f87fd9b5891369f96d84d801f38
9cbf062074da4a11b72c5f5b4ce5df4ed4f7d817
'2011-12-30T13:59:22-05:00'
describe
'106436' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATCZ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
9f056fe63f34b96547ecaba27148dca5
0ff275f51e96d56049056a87cefd873ce76e4b46
describe
'25205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDA' 'sip-files00152.pro'
a9004ffd48e6ee58934c3f669c0df708
e7bd15692ba5dd86e379dc12b831c3a0c8e8808a
'2011-12-30T13:53:07-05:00'
describe
'33872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDB' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
0d961a983aac5c335deb1d940e233c66
337d4831f037937ea494dbf44b445f2d335e66e5
'2011-12-30T13:57:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDC' 'sip-files00152.tif'
0860d4278af330f4e2ed3d87d537c442
e77578a0483d149d90eb2f6bd93a6df818c24f3e
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
71c96d81f9a2564f4562f9caa3b43f42
a2302928d5c9ea6fae4723abadb388da32c9101b
describe
'8658' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
de448c6662018634644ad4c1c67c43df
9b4ea608666beb06c64c8acd50535a1535dea0c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDF' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
d5b0cec1188b145de9b84dd69794e1bc
44cfdef76d79fd9e0a8ce5a401af36a87d148551
describe
'105978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDG' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
b258d35ccc1e3cc7698b65e8cca4b9e2
d1097b13dc6f1dedad772b7f381335b466706ffd
describe
'24990' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDH' 'sip-files00153.pro'
9df38fa0b70b778da0052905816eed49
da1a2a5d4b12bcf3bdd654dc2fc4164417d3bb65
describe
'32454' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDI' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
eea5cefbb1f8bcd5af0ce4215230cbbf
d332970d12e55cd8ee0ff0b3230c974af34526a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDJ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
891967c5e860448ac55d660b03300ae2
23da1f67ea7a79ea137b6c56eef9533040d5e353
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
7aafb7b01837a98aabccfd7e37736ffc
48bbf1534129870d65526cdcc36438e858e1de29
'2011-12-30T13:55:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
b2d815a52ad0d16046c4d6338acdef33
b995a4abbe47f9daece4d5f404af92aaf03581c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDM' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
3465da99c5e2cf0e87db477169aec473
5d4c7c69631bd870c4d00b991ed7c9c756363aaa
describe
'101454' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDN' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
30a0ca692a53e286ecbf145ad2b9ec4c
0bb854a46d42edce2ab9a3b5dcaf1a053eaefe6c
describe
'26374' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
4596df810610f0706468b10521105c8d
3340269a57f428b2b558f4718bad9cbacc8aaaf9
describe
'32404' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
103d41a94a497951da1f2dd9b1d4214d
a5d9a3fe018d669642e99d66bda97f845360f611
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDQ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
b353e615f0a32aa65d378054e5c9d5d6
aa0a3aeff6b6aad228eb3f7708186bf96e8fe4df
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDR' 'sip-files00154.txt'
32fd4b8f4833b2ca1687a37c841b4dd6
98d732e7ced6bc7da690122ff43926305cae1668
'2011-12-30T13:58:31-05:00'
describe
'8579' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDS' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
b8ce6eb0a3c8a7c78d2f98de272c2e45
91b5f733ccc330f3002bf8b463a53a2c66c39f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDT' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
ed74ddf880e14d9513539aa4e62ba62e
0c46b06f11f58a4a2f7be15cd25c45a9be7fb02e
describe
'96447' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDU' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
bca253cbf8b17878339266640a18e239
6be886e1c30a73271018bc183ff73131043572ef
describe
'24723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDV' 'sip-files00155.pro'
f9403d1a824293df7869fedb36b7c922
72fc9350bef9a9910e922fbe2c74da0ae532e3ed
describe
'30670' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDW' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
6ee195d7d8a8f3768b1535b10035b703
b7eca26719056ae4fdbaa197a9f32fa7c30c5022
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDX' 'sip-files00155.tif'
34c54de2475ed3031f64f76188badca6
5471d6edb36e9500592c3c99aacd88acaefb3f79
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDY' 'sip-files00155.txt'
df180af68bc0041f21a479e6f7e1b7d7
c3c98fe56ca3c191b4f8050d11961cd56102e6e2
describe
'8287' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATDZ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
a095edb221e2747472fdfce9f7a5fa25
5a0d1b30ca3af94a7cb2b660653e98af6997a582
describe
'373204' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEA' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
cd558087235ab1ace8cee33474d558cd
fec94ab84db0a130f8fc67872ed017913b9f73fe
describe
'99791' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEB' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
21492c2e2706cb361530e4a9defb8bd2
136e1a1e315e9205a9c8250af12da0d731b1012d
describe
'23123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEC' 'sip-files00156.pro'
6a51a257194b24232fd2de60902f24cf
c4be4118e21760964ca01bba378f3cdaf946bff2
describe
'29276' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATED' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
8683f2734217b0824e74c563a1cc7722
51583d9d265f3e33fb6242a4e7973b4ee41be652
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEE' 'sip-files00156.tif'
d907854051ee7d93284fac6a19433629
b7951801450ea853b277317caeada644043d1713
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
c781cc24b7d71f5662474de15a94b7b6
0145eb880f322d3b5d1aa627244aa2fa29d0c844
describe
'8088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
14e8a666698aca905c5c7c8cd0907432
d8ef986e0bd972db7d2db373095c75fa79398f3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
fbe9891068cf26b62b6dbd17c59c4979
cf2bac0ef12c69c92c395ad91eed8fdc00d0efb0
describe
'105437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
f45748f8af2f6075fabe13a0c6f84dcf
8274fd7b688ba2460a7d69daf8e62e01412be163
describe
'25597' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEJ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
01e2fa2f6962d30e2ef102f81e799d9d
b9646a36c93cebbc4e9c0d03f89234be25d2468b
'2011-12-30T14:00:51-05:00'
describe
'32343' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEK' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
cb46ff4b610fe5dcada3d331a176f486
c60a72cbd6ce5507c4f9d78cbf81bef56b588dee
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEL' 'sip-files00157.tif'
1db44b294cde9b419982bc5de032b69e
01207c0ee780d9a542593ead47cbc4ea035a3603
'2011-12-30T13:54:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEM' 'sip-files00157.txt'
18f2de5156f171d44ca7078df03b1846
a02c01eebe2602cc91ecaeb4b82e45d15a11c403
'2011-12-30T13:56:07-05:00'
describe
'8701' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEN' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
67fc968db0cc33767d63a5c37c04ede4
f4ef1e3a9c0848a73ec30d140ec82d0595f8fe8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEO' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
090076df46e488d76d204805433dcf34
64971ea4830b5d69e81e33d15420502a7fc155c9
describe
'100107' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEP' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
6be6093afa5f0d71acd337419be71e96
729113eb33850bcad689fb3465b25a347bf962a0
'2011-12-30T13:50:26-05:00'
describe
'24841' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEQ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
bc147a29a077e8d576b35b5020231b3d
8791446d4624f3177977e49de4fe172bfa4fdef1
describe
'31346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATER' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a9c569663cd44dee2eae1cdf405ea0df
bc9b9f646a62e4216970080b8f28cf86d916a0af
'2011-12-30T13:57:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATES' 'sip-files00158.tif'
fb22ca8e0191456de4e92437b7651961
a23fad31f1997342cf92d3cffe9a0ad40886c14f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATET' 'sip-files00158.txt'
efcb8d580fb5962df849097af8dbdb2b
29e4b2f66a7f89471ebfb7de48dd53a2197d6c39
describe
'8250' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEU' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
3980cc6d8f2b5e0e3be01176ab124200
fc06648267dc831397e6b152a382bb50cc6c51d2
describe
'373159' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEV' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
da7f3fabfc0525655b966c0f88f73ded
a420e1d02a826cb1fdaf26c79cba61411318a892
describe
'100505' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEW' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
cdc8aa53527ce0f2575c796ff1cebbcf
c807a0ea6caac05bc4488ee4cf1524fc97111583
'2011-12-30T13:59:59-05:00'
describe
'25298' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEX' 'sip-files00159.pro'
9e1717fa55834aeb6b7b9408a6b78e70
d8884bfbbe784b19fb44feb462c60745d0a3d5ed
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEY' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
e90796d4cb8c65ff60b326c326bd47be
2cd58028e5bb03a113a3152072f3d6e4e0f5a974
'2011-12-30T13:59:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATEZ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
25efcde3a4f9c91d2ca5083746c55243
8620cba1ba690cbf3315f7b1e6b29f6b5c35cb81
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFA' 'sip-files00159.txt'
29fcf62d1d7d8e6ad9faba63ce85f454
2fda0284968db830fa3a369f0c57547493a6b2b5
describe
'8124' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFB' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
4cdd782e9e8764896e524b2f60f2487e
b83d4bedb93e80a54db7836289f046b0b97d7e97
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFC' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
bf2640b13c4d92d42fbdb81025d89bee
220c1c04365214ae72bf45bc6cf436a6f6f89d4e
describe
'106278' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFD' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
1bc13ac0a17207094a8b2754707783c1
c7556dde07af35b6c6446261e9aafc96d4daf803
describe
'24320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFE' 'sip-files00160.pro'
08a2b5a6fb350ce42bf0e075a96c49f4
a282641828bec2a6086f0e78f5941ab0d50420df
describe
'33708' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFF' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
4c2a211209b62ef10ee767932e59d55e
381611083130e45e01f02b6dacadb724e420b38f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFG' 'sip-files00160.tif'
aa00ec4e39ddd91dfaae7a92d7cd537e
2eaecc22e448046b162aba586d3d3fcb0a1aee4e
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFH' 'sip-files00160.txt'
4ed2656a294698fdb644c9a7a28bc730
1ac4c5d898974f40f6a3b4b6a6d10451ec857b3b
describe
'8811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFI' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
f0f854891914d98dbedaf9a67abfad90
2b5fddda4ccca941b8c7467ad2e0f3e847aedd76
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFJ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
25371b9a0badfb145c61b9012df40d01
6d8cc268922a5d1486138e0c3afe0cceae562a60
describe
'107432' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6020eaa3af7592898599a33731fc3eba
a127ae1013c0189fedfcb1880912226cdda33f12
'2011-12-30T13:55:49-05:00'
describe
'24595' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFL' 'sip-files00161.pro'
c563018ff218f941516dc8256de011de
14b9f9b4f51cd856e21dc7e9baeca9145784aa86
describe
'32488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFM' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
f58330db879dba6653a4b8f944733616
6d8007ecf99fed13986654e0a5274e78910da8cd
'2011-12-30T13:51:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFN' 'sip-files00161.tif'
a765e4f6fae401e71dacaef404c23e26
59dec8e2949f0193a11918511b8e5a5741f44623
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFO' 'sip-files00161.txt'
81173df59ca1fb6f4cdf9c3a174575e8
5a0bdbdd4da10f73a3f3da78e903bf2720eb3e19
describe
'8881' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFP' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
ed2778b6076653145a69f7011e670295
4ee8089caf52e23d1126701c89fc8ce18fab8c99
describe
'373047' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFQ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
8e853daf704b0673e06e5c4714297d0d
aca0b58210a44304b56060ede40bfdb9af903065
describe
'104673' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFR' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
656141b76353efca43e52a2f0d7ec984
273bec5f820a744dd832cc7034efd2cd3035d80d
describe
'26528' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFS' 'sip-files00162.pro'
579be61ee9481a9b9c43b3b457f143bf
ca92dca88a7ced1a24a630e8d008da0b5515bc8a
'2011-12-30T14:00:08-05:00'
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFT' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
7aadcc8df79ae12234d753e7e6abe2c3
3537d170b88bd80b135e9ab6a8c9fbb628744c83
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFU' 'sip-files00162.tif'
5b1ed2085af8863d270e8d9e5c938fdc
83791b2a3ba968b4efaa9f1b68aa9ba08fdc25a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFV' 'sip-files00162.txt'
9094cfd797995793c74ee69a814af351
6aa452f18af9eb8bd265013c693526ccfd4df8e4
describe
'8782' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFW' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
b61f8958624ac0af373df87f4fac9818
bedeb18aa9a2c2dcc015949b21847a0356a5583e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
470cad87b87a8b8fa984a306837aaae6
893790451219f9c8f7f0d1c084fad74277e4ef6b
describe
'95072' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFY' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
0b3861c969258eae6d6e436d91e7993e
8b24b7bfccc1c7b9f8bf4f257d53c0a619ad5575
'2011-12-30T13:51:23-05:00'
describe
'23626' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATFZ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f7950d12a28369cf7fbc9407a40f65e0
c4f921ffbec266f9c0fd8b8d439323ddb29ecf24
describe
'29419' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGA' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
0b0b2ccbe767273c913661058d37ab60
8a4e992fd35579e29841f97e853417523be47206
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
79fae1e3bff4ff90e39a455da945066c
dbdb0bd5fbd6287992e27a133a3310616322dda3
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGC' 'sip-files00163.txt'
ab74da4d1c7a18df411be994f2a8d94c
66dd764fdf28da5e6bb39dd2f76060785b7f77b3
'2011-12-30T13:59:24-05:00'
describe
'8284' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGD' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
6635f0b46a826bb9beccea5bd11f90a8
b0d5107411dcddb697172f30ce6f098f3cdeb740
'2011-12-30T13:50:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGE' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
30fcc81d276ec2e0870475c51e0a25bf
7cb2c7b1ed8c3f7834d142988a7b5b03a62c147b
describe
'95683' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGF' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
a5ede338fde873c145e426bdbca6e21a
26756b4cefbd8f5751f0d325a4fcb0c1a88f9299
describe
'21542' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
b97ddb949972517479c3c9f1c7fe72f6
4d73a9c133fc84c797139c226254cb5f72dadfa9
describe
'28507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGH' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
53541989ed030b0c3345eafbef708d3d
b3cdb4135979b431bc75962a99f3cb22b88a87ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGI' 'sip-files00164.tif'
5683d68126d0a38d32b09f4c5117c5e5
dd360187f3a1d96d7f2d14dfb99506986be16909
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGJ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
576ccf62fe5370c9bd4d2c65b0273628
745eb527e096b95e48f7a6035eaa4060e6432c64
describe
'7821' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGK' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
8aecf097e905b11cbbe5ffe2f46e74d1
6d02b105b4d7c98946cf983acaee1394e0ef9ed9
'2011-12-30T13:57:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGL' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
207d6d99e1c1a4660f2c5ae07f07568a
6920e718fc49d6d5eb870076ce0f4cd62c92a2ed
'2011-12-30T13:52:31-05:00'
describe
'107282' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGM' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1871e30c0d6f03ec6f3813aaddaa9ae9
f33fd0f04bae9005eb6d7603b8b1f222819541eb
describe
'25414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGN' 'sip-files00165.pro'
784a079d10c3eec636012230f348ee2a
7e08f6088da5106fa29e1236563f6f399df9460f
describe
'33226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGO' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
9817d267446c66922fc339482fda6bbb
7158279ba469f0791efc70fb76b7a1e472cc3309
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGP' 'sip-files00165.tif'
8aa4f51e6f5501b75b9efa84611fe1ec
a48d09cfc3ad0d0c3120a107f1419a41c96f364e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6ef38b265c6b70a426f78db898fc1efa
647209df468a49e96eb05b4866de748f18717f1d
describe
'9027' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGR' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
0229a6418ddff5da76dc944bc9caf30e
47eaa0dd858449136478fde8e312709470c0449c
describe
'373220' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGS' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
78b5c381f8f9b1d0bb7f4c055b09b08f
877bbca5c3b698f9453d68e7c25c33081357085f
'2011-12-30T13:54:37-05:00'
describe
'98735' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGT' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
b7f10754a4b5336c791222e0c7400fd8
5e33f26cf1e59927c09bf3ccd6b97defc763bef7
describe
'26296' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGU' 'sip-files00166.pro'
c4a22b42e5b04350b678c6e99ebfa1cc
6db241c6d743beeec771412e7253d4f238359137
describe
'33069' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGV' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
5f57f11aa7974fe68e2155ac7267498e
dcfadc6079677a41cdc4ff3d728068ee54a3980b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGW' 'sip-files00166.tif'
8dc7cdc0ec3a8d39134fa8d2b6fdcd09
a40615a4c1f4d6c897ac7d8f686d44457afb5c3b
'2011-12-30T13:54:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGX' 'sip-files00166.txt'
48cc3a69e66a88919c139988e688159a
03bc3a85e2aa115f714ac214061da5217b6c5730
'2011-12-30T14:00:44-05:00'
describe
'8444' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGY' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
f765d09d8faadd0dc9e68151f976a4bc
d58e5ca905358bd5abf383f7cbfdce77f37efd66
describe
'373160' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATGZ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
bb4abf9918ebaeeebe31c6dff391f364
d09b27970dc52d0c2f73423850870120a3d6543c
describe
'95919' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHA' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
40eaac7bb4e5012930bb8a8804e723f1
0568dff95deff729ec5ed758ef2032668a2d44fe
describe
'25489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHB' 'sip-files00167.pro'
2ea2963e12f645bec6d906159fbc247d
17647ebd21a23c24c4979a0b6151f493bae7184b
describe
'32687' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
42b3f853f645249db189dd001becab0e
bbdbdfd8321faca818eb014f90aa0566a4aba78b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHD' 'sip-files00167.tif'
a3cde38b033130c1ed4192e750545298
ae8f9ae42c9ef8d462fb408b6f8dff3c0839cb03
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHE' 'sip-files00167.txt'
47f7bfaddf9fe62272fc424d2a6af433
d0b5f8d53e3ad6ab2106da6b430893950a2d9ab4
describe
'8091' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHF' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
2ae6883f4307f9b27ed0031dc041d605
cd4b9059b458f2e8491d02b10a72939645e56fc4
describe
'373165' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHG' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
33cd88253549ff32bdd43bbd129ccd47
4bfe91652f27debb32abee0c5a45e1df85fa3fe6
'2011-12-30T13:50:29-05:00'
describe
'105509' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHH' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
71b5ff660d51f833c7c0b7f8e74053a3
3b081af4cb9fcea7493cb72f32dae55fa8fdb1ff
describe
'24866' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHI' 'sip-files00168.pro'
0ab1d0d9d457fb73b02584bd733cf017
679b932c3183b5e959698a0f4bd54b71aaf6008f
describe
'32226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b231b4c6c8b124119d0332082820c31b
e325c363f9b37424a001c7dd69ed900fe5f0c99a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHK' 'sip-files00168.tif'
c80fc30323d0c9a67b85bb0b73de4c88
6ff71969cd564fb15ee6424dc1652e0240b64ee8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHL' 'sip-files00168.txt'
8676fb518baf78d19f97beb100195360
91ee785f8e5a1401347a836447fa0867a2a24fee
describe
'8700' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHM' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
2eb9fb18357a55a3eeb2e79eb9aa4422
851f1ea6017fdadc20a32105a2514771b1d3166c
describe
'373111' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHN' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
b0a081c282c6e64d5e0fefc84283b05c
4363ff35001a3e68bb10f7299fe628b439030a36
describe
'110012' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHO' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
a7d36e6eb7b560100662609f30473487
8c20a7aa4af96a77f28f7220d1ea0508217eaba8
'2011-12-30T13:53:37-05:00'
describe
'26272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHP' 'sip-files00169.pro'
9c9d08ab32ad012d936fef3e2fc0f8fc
420803787031a6d9fd6908c7505486a1d713bd46
describe
'34210' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHQ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
0dcdb4455660f65a7bccae040b8fdf98
8326cffb6566f149481318cb68071369935ec9e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHR' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d30e9b656753cd1cd31d6eac382f5892
6ca87d275acf8ebd162fee03408d51b01a5a9f31
'2011-12-30T13:52:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHS' 'sip-files00169.txt'
2819781d81c08d58ba180b795a45cff3
bf0e6354ef80658f3b13a12c29f33474bbcb6c2b
describe
'8580' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHT' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
43e5c5585f79829ed55480480dcdf2f2
952d18ab6defc52e49e5eda56c0687481b256402
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHU' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
c40ffd8aa7d8a6cba1de6208d3c49011
404bdebd62c16a56d3cc9777f7d60ea0f664921c
describe
'104572' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHV' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
ffea95c954c1a75dc8d27e9de4e74e69
b95fbfcefcdfb2b8b6896a2afed2e79fe0d77e22
describe
'27019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHW' 'sip-files00170.pro'
fe43ac6b932d917cf8cc24dd27fa76b3
b500186767273c8ffa6d7073100f45e2b7433582
describe
'33261' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHX' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
dd80fbd1c5ae68b15ee88495ce125a52
94b39c512be4ed53ee041677f8ab5201ac1c1ed7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHY' 'sip-files00170.tif'
a2383d690f775d21d895e057e4aadc3f
11e617ac7f3da6aba207a9e6c2cc7fc33f32a9ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATHZ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
9d7f706fde9db7e24e8ab87ce244dadc
fd4ac246696174b7c31b9d44b3cde7847438d9f9
describe
'8570' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIA' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
bc01497adad19bc00c7a3b2e6835564e
a57b9109facb6697d71e45f2034ee3b550d51839
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIB' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
60ed3d98c42a358325e30cdba1b5e5f9
77d6570b05f08c120543557b04f25010088aaf7c
describe
'102124' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIC' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
24c6a64de82e585e4adf5731e4a0230b
06d58e5b565ba1434235ff11712e0dfaf0bb9527
'2011-12-30T13:53:22-05:00'
describe
'26234' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATID' 'sip-files00171.pro'
51bafc4111a51926d9dd1269606dc3cc
6f061adbbfec9d73068dec9d94970956e7284797
'2011-12-30T13:49:29-05:00'
describe
'31920' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIE' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
498aaf0c661bccc44711c7f7f26a6f74
1c57d3b3903dd90797fec31e73b8f3699647926d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
29cce02d25cc965dfd93dfd0350bcc79
d2696ad406a3d7bfcf4efceb45016c3d05005916
'2011-12-30T13:49:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIG' 'sip-files00171.txt'
fc2bc19c0d94c5d3d77a6d0698e8665f
63eb9fc0ff1be41401eeab3a8269a9e8d8522e92
describe
'8052' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIH' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
a97b7749cd0ccb9219c08b63ade6b3f3
7e1ab64ed7750f0c6beeef960d76476c61b74c86
'2011-12-30T13:52:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATII' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
03e8766e8d9fba92a39e62d818bb6a26
2db02e15f63d95baa6b21e52d3db37198a8f19b0
describe
'167222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIJ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
f6a6e189835c3f51bd36e74291c65a7c
b03393474b16e71862ba249e3d23e57f665e0880
describe
'25784' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIK' 'sip-files00172.pro'
a6dff1ea2bf82ac472e46fa34123586a
fabe7b6bf20feb2dcd9bd1680afa5f5049e59ad0
describe
'67169' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIL' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
3095e671a4a18221a521efc1dd6598a1
7af561caefe4032371bf6588c4ca609ca4a524af
describe
'3008440' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIM' 'sip-files00172.tif'
963950fb86ca7d638115f10ba002d7d8
77974a275b6bc59ce8f360ec3109788a08178058
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIN' 'sip-files00172.txt'
0d8ab67c4aa368a0fd4eeead684a899c
c9ce29e9930c47e24914dc1a709705fc7920bc3c
'2011-12-30T13:56:00-05:00'
describe
'33291' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIO' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
81727411e28bca70103c8f65803dab47
213e14168c670b78ca95ca3ed7e9e8a0754c964e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIP' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
4d413bfcb13aad8e00fa6fffd3387f5d
a9f7326aec66c08363c7b247e9b7c25fa616285f
describe
'134879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIQ' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
14bef27da429ac34f5c35acdf68efd67
5126f04f47a6e5d77dc01f6849edc94ef0cfb7e2
'2011-12-30T13:55:18-05:00'
describe
'1677' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIR' 'sip-files00173.pro'
8901d5141cac7b5e705deb4a1e74206f
7924b5909407a47e007dcd50b0bc764ce46ae8a9
describe
'29017' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIS' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
485677f930f9a031998d17d3de9afb26
69a541a28387c645339f392d8c893bb36a59121f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIT' 'sip-files00173.tif'
8b25c0fe0f73799af0019bc033aa4b6f
5d3f8f1df5e59f716d3cab03d6b05440e310d75d
describe
'189' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIU' 'sip-files00173.txt'
813337416c21b8080180510887b67719
eb008f905d0661fd80b78f356649e615b8952355
'2011-12-30T13:50:28-05:00'
describe
'7806' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIV' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
4a427d564ffa61a8143602fcc0784dd3
77bcb37527f49f5ebd79e9aff0f6a06915bb1ecb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIW' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
8e93f28a1847809a6d397bc4f006e56a
5e6d5a4771e72e8fe93d2daa9a952e6e316c95ae
describe
'103081' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIX' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
eb34fb185baa7f4c69072fe3e1a9d2af
a37a60e446ba812a22d07a2a7a36d17bb6f84710
describe
'25483' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIY' 'sip-files00175.pro'
49dde5af781ff382cc6b4d122f615b65
e2b850ac2cf6a96d3efd1dec43556ff1d027a3b3
describe
'33162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATIZ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
cbb98cd2080b8b3e6d30a6c682b09ecd
a22f06b2ca660f8a8a32c6534f034349cc6452b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
695bd75a8e2f95eb594254285b4beb74
475d26a361aeeae9cb3bed099e297fd7a2ee32e4
'2011-12-30T13:53:03-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJB' 'sip-files00175.txt'
6141f9d41b6d9d169eb2b334bee1e307
043ffab73b2f20dc6b413a1a79e70a38fcf43448
describe
'8818' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJC' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
fea93ba0617053fd8826b78aed8a888a
b9bd96b6a647cbf31dcc7a407ba5efbb67369ccf
describe
'373016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJD' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
3484796b0d8e866443555f5c88243771
8ade6b94536a03b231470a318f641c00b39782b7
describe
'81524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJE' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
2278b6ba8ba8249973b8dab651956c8b
aa5bc230f56988ae5769a16ea311b3f4159736f5
describe
'20256' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJF' 'sip-files00176.pro'
a9ec35974917f1760abeca687786facf
788e1f08e40f793d13ed5c183c53a4897387581f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJG' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
2543fec43ced5be0dc2728030908b6fc
0cdc23483be137011e781f91a9d2e881118ac1b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJH' 'sip-files00176.tif'
841ea412f253d5f6b2d4f4df75eb3b51
f07e1c1faca0e664b29b78af206cc3b26fe1e106
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJI' 'sip-files00176.txt'
15a67f6478b5ef51f3173b2cdbed9147
066991f4b4d455f03dfbfa1ae093b82613acab34
describe
'6868' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJJ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
15cb3265e9712c19a5910f8cc7e77203
308d03c707713bd1fbbd699d9c35a6bdff76deab
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJK' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
1103c4cce9f6ee56e63a9742b4bda947
5d21cafb30eb91f6b6137f765605c08d1362b951
'2011-12-30T13:51:55-05:00'
describe
'101072' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJL' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
40872b80f14cde93c4ab2ded0c9acb93
cd5c4b5a1ca6008c7e6e03440c998f634971d18c
describe
'26415' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJM' 'sip-files00177.pro'
4fd315c95e40cb5188ea9a64c4bb43bb
b28fc9e5c4af877ceec2ba0e52ce075cacd05f0d
describe
'33294' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJN' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
3aa654bcab2e2ea41d86ecb701022fac
85bb71a0d81fcd10dd1154a06661e09cc5344d27
'2011-12-30T14:00:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJO' 'sip-files00177.tif'
b3fefab0604f6d0f2c9c7b745121619a
b95e285f1138040c548302f701d2482f14f63f0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJP' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b37ced7fd517595f570421682329d358
3daa6b471abc96d15c1cfc982034da27dcad1ff5
describe
'8431' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJQ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
f7f514a8783e7459fc9f014b682ac575
081fd634fa019038d21947032a87834bda979240
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJR' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
196c660787869972a76a077aa5450832
1ba960b22b0684dc0956a4443a12054e9c0ac0eb
'2011-12-30T13:53:16-05:00'
describe
'104645' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJS' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
9e0be38f31b8fdc96fb855d27926edda
d27e4492bad4d8bb563a954b6efd540857db4338
'2011-12-30T13:50:27-05:00'
describe
'25766' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
152c80e29557090e80180666a6e4c2ae
ff83029495cabc3665101a4426d5d6317f52ca2e
describe
'32001' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJU' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
c38f6cf5a991dbc1a6dd6068801e07d3
9ec7cb94150bb7ca36b68bbc3efa3e91615387c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJV' 'sip-files00178.tif'
2d3ae709f9f2588a99e51e54f6dab2ff
5c72c3034c59ed0c453a4276fc15a88017669148
'2011-12-30T13:59:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJW' 'sip-files00178.txt'
0e79581ecdf57a07cb151a7a256b8caa
ea7dae6ed906774867757329b9019d67762b9e18
'2011-12-30T13:55:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJX' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
82c581bcfb0db00e3510ce5cddaba67d
a5f1802d64dd8aed2997b55d152626588c3f1d83
describe
'373121' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJY' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
62910d0063f786cad1051da2ba26c7ec
deee6f1cff9354c5f1fd441f73a08fdf0f9a73cd
describe
'94257' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATJZ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
b8826312e69f3e30ba1d57ddc8e410d2
2584b9c08ae4ad7a68809badb8f6f32f86ae7ddc
describe
'22531' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKA' 'sip-files00179.pro'
9120cead7d662d5548d6990ed862a6a7
ea7527d7de29d31b20940d7a3085d46ce9b10255
describe
'29805' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKB' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
4010c5fbf29dd1497a7225a2205152dc
80f42b3bc15e878721b0cf3d059b2c1e9edc1106
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKC' 'sip-files00179.tif'
952db818ab4e90582c6e5941f3a56ed3
94d34c6ecf1bc9814771277b2bc21033794afb39
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKD' 'sip-files00179.txt'
c6041961c957106f8da3ea81f264177c
74ffe04350b0c86709e2e56bd81586997a039d65
describe
'8031' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKE' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
1592363a8eabe219b92dbfb6abaf82ea
4229c8f21ee7dc0110fac41cb5412da180138209
describe
'373101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKF' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
854723d1638ce9c4df061a09993da4de
44e63cfef86d1ae60e525a7ea0015ebe2d357e29
describe
'107578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKG' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
aa8f4ed28549dcb382cda3f1b7935538
ca6b82d5d773852013ca7dbf1fea628b1fdb5253
describe
'26556' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKH' 'sip-files00180.pro'
50f08ab9006722216cdad25374b32310
0f8bbc3d07b850486477aa9dc148d32899b9c79e
describe
'33310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKI' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
05a08b160ba249d44507a7d393ba783c
600e31b0966d4c5f4417749b6ffbafc319fe406e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKJ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
739f22f283df9c576a4507853436800f
3b48ba5f0db6adc3c20f9ed0d72de067dbd12aa5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKK' 'sip-files00180.txt'
c76d473cd23133cdf3e2a15f24cc1edb
22a319efe793204413fed04262406a913be3be22
describe
'8412' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKL' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
68f3a6f18dd89eaacd5cdd12a8488351
620cafcc5b167e3515be18bdb0087afb8aac7cdd
describe
'373179' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKM' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
e80b47e45e4e22cc1bb9d1a4e9063bc2
012a24d085f44e0a67650778ee5ce2dff2755cba
describe
'96838' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKN' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
47f4e2d41034ef306cbde54e1712b977
026b4f8b7961065b0ed40bce11c1ed5b9b0200de
describe
'24182' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKO' 'sip-files00181.pro'
5a870bfce02247cece02b125932596ae
e83086d1d39559f0a1e4f514391ae5b6f77cb0a9
describe
'30930' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKP' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
38591820404c0134584897721faf3861
414a1aa777200feb22dd76f75f8a0518bdc506eb
'2011-12-30T13:49:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKQ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
a92f2b30cf84246ce1cdbeb6355ddd6a
d43ef4539de6cea10a1db99003efeee7e4a02fcd
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKR' 'sip-files00181.txt'
be9d33b4ee7c041efe1011bd134020bc
70d836cdb0b400a051fbd6fe96beea46ff3e37af
describe
'7808' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKS' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
b4bbcbb6da7846e51307afb5a7d6f0b2
daa31bdd1ea3849b7f5809e3004350a2229b2764
describe
'373122' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKT' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
a22e7be53abf9ae51dcfb1fc96f00636
e068113ef56382fde21c00fc68992e19fba34fbb
describe
'101592' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
7b49aeef2ea97108f0fb68a01708b565
17cf2ff1eba6cba22c04b31bdf2861a9b5d13270
describe
'22776' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKV' 'sip-files00182.pro'
f1bf6a11b708ffec9bc93a5d20b9d55f
e095635868fcb24b22ee1e47472999b84b3cfef4
describe
'30532' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKW' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
f5439dc08c95430c074555d2ca634468
237d27b980e3f76c88ed8101e52b0fd7debfc764
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
a33940c83d7088d0a4242e33636db41b
15a98546970866fe1ddc06d76dbdffb54278c1bc
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKY' 'sip-files00182.txt'
ba3d894307de77b9176c37847e72081f
fe268df86eba98d70a097380d5976728037baa7c
describe
'8291' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATKZ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
6d546106b6d502034da929dc7d505ef7
e844950a944ec5b1adb9df5ff8703b49d67f8acd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLA' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
9ea5ef66a677e7d69c6244ae310f3133
55b4b9ae1a3239237414ec1a7ae83a231974e22d
describe
'103678' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLB' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
fef74de8610d6fa47d14fa7278892573
7a0f270e8af3bb44020428c7bb3bd3e3acdad0da
'2011-12-30T13:56:04-05:00'
describe
'23820' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLC' 'sip-files00183.pro'
0c92d1d5f7c99a0834d13c835b9ae7f6
b37ac8cfedb05bcb5d971f6482765b74f6a6846e
describe
'32194' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLD' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
025364ed7868e10bdfab7f8228b6345c
1255c669ceeffc934fb8f97640c8a6340ac33c79
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLE' 'sip-files00183.tif'
49dfff8bcf8dbca527799a968fc6158b
ab17cecd6f0042b2b1edad4148b7004a6c83ac36
'2011-12-30T13:55:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLF' 'sip-files00183.txt'
903757a16874060de5a63d7d995ba98a
7f8dd59a4b8195aa9b8250a2ec2a0124535733b7
describe
'7837' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLG' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
dde677f2bce30d86369b17e502dcf37c
1d6a6cbe2e1831694a6d92ef422544bbf7e17e2c
describe
'373222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLH' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
4a9385d2a107a689f9c134f7b2838a6e
e91ff64ec92dbae8b8b5dad8207b47e74ecbc7e5
describe
'103295' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLI' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
f811277861ac155de53b189781323326
f24673f5c23da2b09930eec8b00c5c4f2b83fe4f
'2011-12-30T13:56:25-05:00'
describe
'25473' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLJ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
52c89698fbcd40925e1193cfa5795e6a
fcbc342f4b4a884c920a1e95697d340452e6d9d5
describe
'31914' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLK' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
4c2fa713519121e23720ffd080690713
adc3dd4494216ed9d497977447cff451bce55b29
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLL' 'sip-files00184.tif'
0f0f05f1355e584f98f65542ea5c0cfa
84d803cc49ee73deb03d6bb0f2f099879b51c4da
'2011-12-30T14:00:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLM' 'sip-files00184.txt'
667eccd8e08b9c30a602ad501aa8b9bd
dc719aa82b2f74651ff7a93222d4cd32b4e7cfa8
describe
'8023' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
0ef46c9580a204ce90514684f8e4150d
6cd97fb2bd7af72fd6f85edef656b6876bbea940
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
dcfb704ff94504bee93d91f8fdd98860
a3ba8940f55f27193be563d9caf1a043171d106b
describe
'83097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLP' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
42c344e45e2ebf0fb59c1f13b02b486b
d8ed206805f36000726101b0314c160ab613e956
describe
'18985' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
38b49c3d13c8c282e1dfe9a656497975
4a1ee4a8d3f434d01884aecc35cbddab2ffe9063
'2011-12-30T13:52:33-05:00'
describe
'25240' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
b13cbbff8291ac2134c1be3a7faa50a3
9c4ca759526be1ef373bbb3dd2483828e33f939e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLS' 'sip-files00185.tif'
cc19d8a02d9c63dc407f2f69e1b17971
bc42ccfbd39040c93ed21e195050abb7aaf4454a
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLT' 'sip-files00185.txt'
8e9a8d274baad158b11454cca454107e
4ba8420861006a90307e4ee1874dd1542f323a52
describe
'6694' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLU' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
ed1855afee497e0a28a61a1041fb0c91
12367a002e9ac5e6c3f4729d07c701f0f9ed1992
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLV' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
0f9b3d9f5e3e7f4c5cdd0ffdb5142032
38b0c93e37218c6887f6f58eb96fab698100a059
describe
'86947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLW' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
9dbe5d8a48b0b764de054083179162f7
fd609abff05ed2dc90223f6e0c30096df0cff2ef
describe
'19707' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLX' 'sip-files00186.pro'
504de1d7fc503447734307685c40939b
165e212155d1d4cafac60797d78636875100a794
'2011-12-30T13:50:02-05:00'
describe
'26770' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
5c5ab309e5edbb0d66ee1bb68d0eae61
02b3a91c638b58859b3aea62d9992bbbf626abb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATLZ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
bb3409fcf0941df2d5c952e9d12ef6b0
2c8eb1fc9c2d765198b2d37e206d2fc355a1af9b
'2011-12-30T13:52:59-05:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMA' 'sip-files00186.txt'
bc89dfd63aed4e7319e9bcc5ba010e8f
943d56009c5c5647938bef51c56b5788a905441c
describe
'6994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMB' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
4b0633b89064af4cb455f69e08dd93bc
10404dfdfcc119921cd0666cef7b90afe2e19a29
'2011-12-30T14:00:19-05:00'
describe
'373086' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMC' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
35953efdda1466fba5f558defe37c664
7c316b5cd3c51968f90aaeb2f877696e2f9fc28b
describe
'90580' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMD' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f44c7ddc9eec4f8025b83b69b4d73a28
8f5cb48af9c4685c286e964a24a08668c5debe68
describe
'21112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATME' 'sip-files00187.pro'
0533afa1bd020b8bcc053d47f564d40d
6dacdc68311c70fcb39e030fbd3c4bd27b21f440
describe
'28751' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMF' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
807dc99e197e5fd191eafb2073754682
7a3d1106764904ca59643388d5cbc63ccec49075
'2011-12-30T13:53:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMG' 'sip-files00187.tif'
c6036ef089898a203716a028ae30adc9
9741331dd31aeb4906e83e7d7e51b855ded66ada
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMH' 'sip-files00187.txt'
9bc73687dda55fa0045534f5a7cc89f8
693cd824e3186953fe71ad558e6a213130a9fb14
describe
'7637' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMI' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
ced220cb1b22c14743c57fb4340eec52
2c8d8ca85bb205631c63e31814982c41ccef62e1
describe
'373198' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMJ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
8dae84673f63df932a2f06a62d2f8eb3
0982b749952106d4c7deba3481c696662b4832b2
describe
'97224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMK' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
f315eaed9bb11874be98e18ab217925d
d00699840f0f21340d48c962d79ad56be0cec5ff
'2011-12-30T13:59:46-05:00'
describe
'25514' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATML' 'sip-files00188.pro'
30761b1518df86efa84a6f9ad4b1f61f
b1804d815355d9caf5b40bb0514c4becefa46581
'2011-12-30T13:49:54-05:00'
describe
'32455' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMM' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
4f63ea299fa9813db4a5e5c2b7951d01
ae7ea41f92bbbdcb2a21f0ac0b4af5dc0012f76d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
122aaf6daa1d98039898fd63b6dabf4f
3cb8898ed211158308c8d0886784f5fb4f6b5fa2
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMO' 'sip-files00188.txt'
f784bdfe3d8df078517a05790c541807
23d7d52014d4f7493fcc56f27b441bf9079daec2
describe
'8586' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMP' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
0aec4796731962fdbda9e3e54311a6d3
f675f34004db4ebabb2b19e74ad398d300f11456
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMQ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
a14c3882be8941ede37ecde058f2c76b
a17c8426f91ff00b0997adbf3d50a091fa4b7d40
describe
'95442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMR' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
bc8b74b7f0e3209c1ad40561de80dbd8
2ab38e0246ee508ffe6ee8bc988803bb7055f038
describe
'24926' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMS' 'sip-files00189.pro'
8ea17918f4085a5db8cd3fc01e911601
352d7445874ba5d57b91147e267cea499321327f
describe
'31347' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMT' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
6eb14dc908ff00508e33e8d9ac06964b
eedb49bf46e2f1fc2fdf0856a3d29f5efb94dfcb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMU' 'sip-files00189.tif'
21c6a9e565da43032ca721653bbee7b5
45442cada17e2eaa67f5c459bd57e3b71c0ae7ad
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMV' 'sip-files00189.txt'
857fa838ba89e5e9bbb36623962fe73e
10e590ec9e95dd637d2a195eb1d09c0e958c8ef4
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMW' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
e107b18eaaaff6298f0506b33b4b9e41
5b3408f7f742dd84cac3636e00dc6171dced5b98
'2011-12-30T13:58:07-05:00'
describe
'373224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMX' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
8fe8c51a12f4c14807aaf5c661c81d21
68b98b1af79780a59881acb0dda933f0e45de85d
describe
'111776' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMY' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
3aa074f71e92989e95e4929330eac52d
b4a05dd235b0c061aa751955cdbaef3e12543720
describe
'26764' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATMZ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
d92ed88e874e291403f8355c30c75346
b62ca668798abd690e5a40c6956715da989d4e92
describe
'34689' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNA' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ed8d529f23689fc65c7ebf37858af0dd
7e92e494e3eaf2c6d656d21759e54afb30148adf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNB' 'sip-files00190.tif'
471e33bb763ade59399af160a0240c4d
4796cf390640b99357a99c152e4b9249609773af
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNC' 'sip-files00190.txt'
ce7ce728ef7c068518ac4adc31497344
29cb9b3622885977e8b0ebc83657c1738a880b95
describe
'8814' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATND' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
12ea0f7a21795c25c91ccedf46a3e24a
42482b0eed0251f65f11a92cc8e52c54d078cfb0
'2011-12-30T13:59:21-05:00'
describe
'373170' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNE' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
b95136237fc850c2c96dd6cd569a4e64
20ac8d266df95143758ad5efd861ab0079dc0368
describe
'111912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNF' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
e52d4cf767891d9f1b030378c3c37957
aed5995ff8b48522a6a609f3742a685b2ddd3740
'2011-12-30T13:53:40-05:00'
describe
'26295' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
521827c3558f9af7fc4b03251fecbffa
9d829bb0d6bdbd1c872ce86310ba9416293a5318
describe
'34670' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNH' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
6bc9bd9416e6fa692463b8a5caaf3031
df2ddd24d664d8cb928c74ea7023fb88f878d6d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNI' 'sip-files00191.tif'
704c9400c6406f5d95964e1787583566
e90f4fb25e53eb4a1e6ebe45348586336e253ca9
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNJ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
24404aa02d81c7073325259504705ba4
94a970757da76ca8227c1514e6add8e75628856e
describe
'8866' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNK' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
19e1c160e9c5e079f713dde1d7a32043
2e7073b48b1fa5b90be62511c87c0d294750d547
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNL' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
2c2f9d542fcb91337c9fb1940fac2215
ee87bce353454262c2f289fcd29e2479d467879d
'2011-12-30T13:49:21-05:00'
describe
'104542' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNM' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
bf628709084cb1da0f6c8c31b6122106
d2982677b87b462103ee433d9b8bd3d9563df797
'2011-12-30T13:53:57-05:00'
describe
'25801' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNN' 'sip-files00192.pro'
22469ab9372c1557027be9d90972d1e1
cfa5e698109aae8bcfe22e06998ce0f3b3e4c580
describe
'33635' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNO' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
f1541f03b9d34c6e06924290a6aadb71
629508581b507e5a6466ed1913b461bbbe1b164e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNP' 'sip-files00192.tif'
5bf7af5e05b34b5c7a6d47f7c0fa7cbf
a2867278db1d4a5bcd25915e1c335a2fde7375d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNQ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
9274cf69be3e42fdef29ac5a0b6868d7
d4d6ebd2bd7acb3063955ed8d34682605f55cc67
describe
'8880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNR' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
7233205405679fc9bdb01069aa98c7cc
c9992d728bed1a2f4e7486098fb7dcd0dfb0dcd3
describe
'373252' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNS' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
a8befd924fbefe64ef6b0b8e277fb2ea
b315876374769272fea706a385cb688ee7620ed9
describe
'102775' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNT' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
db0612b367e5d6cc347db7c1178e75d8
fd806ad938133576aac09ee4437bcd22e12b70e2
'2011-12-30T13:53:17-05:00'
describe
'26076' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNU' 'sip-files00193.pro'
56c39ca876ca07a6b2d9cc626748d589
01634d05a1b104b396e6080f96394a3b2bcfa135
describe
'32888' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNV' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
3faba971a5b867a56a1bf0a4b1e8aafa
5826fb363717075be1298d06bf6c39193f021db1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNW' 'sip-files00193.tif'
33c87b298c6fb2ca76854f3ed983ca61
f4c78e62baafe1bef731aad06fd39c14a101660c
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNX' 'sip-files00193.txt'
b8c83eb1afbb79b6d7fc78ac95dc06a1
40c5599e23c9521b89a9aee2945b3c8c81cf6017
describe
'8618' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNY' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
517f18733ce36ba2e38193d74686d063
9c0a7af6e8f2190d68f25b30414544ff6015efdd
describe
'373191' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATNZ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
cb2e98b5c378369f70bb0aff082f18c1
e2587d0d0c4e80fc25911f38710cd5cad71d753b
describe
'110032' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOA' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
5ab0a2ae252c8115d519e417b82f2e86
e52438066566b00e87f9a57ecd57a92238ecbe96
describe
'25048' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOB' 'sip-files00194.pro'
3396867b8f764fcf3e2024c9c9a1a9a8
9ad1237e65ca93c2966851df83b8b4affe9fa7dd
'2011-12-30T13:50:37-05:00'
describe
'33982' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOC' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
0bd00325097593714531f98ff896acf6
b901605ac00d04695ae11a45d0279273545c8de9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOD' 'sip-files00194.tif'
0fa3d6fc7a70f1546af9bd5d25d564b5
70c6bbf78cf268bd6c0666856118e67aea9f289a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOE' 'sip-files00194.txt'
19a0d779b9925f32ced379d6d0550ce6
e73e5184dd2a94c1056f90c56254c4627eae5553
describe
'9012' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOF' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
2aff3a70f7dc7b8db96fd711b9fa59e7
a9667176aecac0a93be71f137ac02dcbbd5b4fa9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOG' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
061c34055d241415b160ecc9af2be8d9
ee59f4298a094d357811593e86313c3a21becdf2
describe
'106497' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOH' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
c8f94c88044958f803e2a938225766cf
c95ae7ce7c7706e633c9a743f4823cf67cacc608
describe
'25242' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOI' 'sip-files00195.pro'
b69b9f78f374494ee16c1a157c54ee99
0ece5803d0c3b6de2d02cd40dbd810ff7bd9f88d
'2011-12-30T13:50:00-05:00'
describe
'32859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOJ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
ae43d07eedcafaaf9a8f1cee508d5eb8
5c731174bd0a4972fa7e59208e0747d9103f6267
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
d94b185774172729e6e36d600929102c
b286d4cb101f2429b5c44bc1413e8e4c837c9313
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOL' 'sip-files00195.txt'
9f63b83e636614eec04165ac038115b3
4438d5fb1ed618f35d496e592bb6a683f9756b98
'2011-12-30T13:49:40-05:00'
describe
'8830' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
a2f8bdb01f529b62196f50caa3e261e1
9468b5a7f832365f08eab2b8e7a991fbe3f9819a
describe
'373232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATON' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
bad429ec18a9707d7955e89cc4798ebd
ba8b8460a629678dd71b498adffc378dca222174
'2011-12-30T13:52:17-05:00'
describe
'103977' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOO' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
13e5deafe05f8e54bb882f932a60385b
e10be9955473cd9cc199328851259f3fb4dc3fcf
'2011-12-30T14:00:21-05:00'
describe
'26140' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOP' 'sip-files00196.pro'
e947b28e4057c6438ccc8ac2f161f130
0c242239c4320c199c8a099682dc063b2e421f4a
describe
'33224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOQ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
4b15d236a3383db5107c18c88832336e
e5ef31e17ab402c85cbaea748fafd0930846e53e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOR' 'sip-files00196.tif'
618114db6cf2abd093aee53dabef1f0b
c298b73453ab9bb6827054eac25b1184fbb3fae5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOS' 'sip-files00196.txt'
7d81192269b76c66f6cff4a72967779a
1d11fc0eb5916d6c2d615da49d0a512a1c53c6bd
describe
'8628' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOT' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
e51987fd4993b5fb9b9b0d05fd2173be
754c243ccc69aacd6afded73a2fec8e729783154
'2011-12-30T13:55:04-05:00'
describe
'373178' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOU' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
3cd120df92f50055261870276b79701e
3ba868af311570076ffc5b04b07ee48707563e59
describe
'102633' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOV' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
7a147b0b41417001a90bf1d97adccc80
a9a38030dd6942209d15654e442e8139cc2acb00
describe
'26049' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOW' 'sip-files00197.pro'
38be59d78741a4e68a68cc200cddaabb
724f1b3bf2607a7edf6b59ac4ff61a9191dd878e
describe
'32613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOX' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
f1f38ad729a99e7c5434bdf4d10664a1
c2e7cafb16543d4d9832a9fe6edd48880c15e0b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOY' 'sip-files00197.tif'
ce0bbcb3ca62a18b53f195157e84dc2e
59b593af1a528ef4750e66daf35952f265733141
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATOZ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
9edab4611f9f163875503f25b2429f9d
fd38e3bb9040e3a4a8c5c35c2b232cd917f935bc
describe
'8479' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPA' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
e32cbfcfce66a8312fc05936138821e4
929f87da8e40adb1d654c746126fc950fdbb5245
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPB' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
2d1a746b12dd8c16323dcadea2b55845
f229f185710c89b6c76c294bbff6b6094c3bed42
'2011-12-30T13:58:52-05:00'
describe
'112562' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPC' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
e2a0a10e8f528f7838e321ba6cbfd1b2
5b371f356a00bcaf234cf426c488a9638904abb4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPD' 'sip-files00198.pro'
ece4869813ea88789d2f377b1a642d79
a267e395bdae902aa433639de4d44da5e5a66366
describe
'34364' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPE' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
8f4726314890499890b30c045003be3b
d458db5903722213f8ebe1f600c09e4ba4307c08
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
f9058c5ab9e93167a35ca4e300cd7706
5b26248aa9470e15d6dae598e525b6b1d9ca677b
'2011-12-30T13:49:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPG' 'sip-files00198.txt'
fca5752468b4a34c191b1ba115ff264f
a8cd7e29c7d02c6900151bcbbbd2fcabea53d8c4
describe
'8834' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPH' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
7f0ca5f181645a76f233c91d9dc485aa
243a127a9b48c05680eeb97547e7d9b094189a04
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPI' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
44f9b97d903fb8ad6b0a6989d7ff740d
6aa43cf0df648a6fb26d6fc20d625bfbf407eeb4
describe
'109487' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPJ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
71acb5b1cfecb4f9e203901443cb31bb
e5113f67e1836a9002b2be6cf0b51ff722c5d563
describe
'25791' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPK' 'sip-files00199.pro'
52459e47f7c990228fdf3a170746dd0d
2c036285431529abcff9ee28a00fb0000fca3f3a
describe
'33928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPL' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
1d3afe23bd58e407395eefd7dbb4927e
67a8c548dc07542c51f872681fb57efb1c8cbc6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPM' 'sip-files00199.tif'
bfc224ee77f28257b6f70cf9bf136e35
cd9f1620fc5e3c6c30d4301422ec2d72463bc1cf
'2011-12-30T13:51:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPN' 'sip-files00199.txt'
8d894bdd280d1d88d16f6181a3d37528
a5f0c09c423d3c4f6bcaba0efed9e127a732a670
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPO' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
1b2ba05fc8821cbcf28f837806e2c576
23e84c042cae9e4581eb87ab1a2804ad1c4bce84
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPP' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
e841b05ef9ec002f089654afe4b0c636
406079d688c75eec02dba68da17263269a3b7925
describe
'103769' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPQ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
4140655335f375f8e9bdd8ba8ccca80e
280eb79b4fc7123f48e29cff9b61d56f14a3d792
describe
'26053' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPR' 'sip-files00200.pro'
d0655dc2da89a9d70ef02f0263ea795c
22dfd31d97c54061539c3ce24c8b1ddf0481878e
describe
'32328' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPS' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
c05dc6440cb0b9dcecf2df7f270774b9
17a9557a265b0a55359bb6b0d9dfa591ae98a27a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPT' 'sip-files00200.tif'
141f4e0ab3df90b6ea86dbadd2575626
8be32f75687723276998d7c5e562e88193e14e0f
'2011-12-30T13:51:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPU' 'sip-files00200.txt'
e922ff8f60a91f03789752daba790655
538cf45347ffbdb50d2683a4ef1a4d2bd0bfc126
describe
'8240' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPV' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
975eddcd7c969df9ebea68594b9a08cc
72e07c918b0f23fe76813d17a33dec4e500abe4d
describe
'373187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPW' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
cc6d416b2e8530f0ed8e6497eb9242fd
f8a42d323b7031f8782e0abc59284b0e218e7701
describe
'103100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPX' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
61da746c5e090726073283fbc2d2aa7e
bd74ae1d42707c0facdc44c23f18817d2d32e3bd
'2011-12-30T13:49:51-05:00'
describe
'25806' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPY' 'sip-files00201.pro'
aad11723a18053fe0be61318f321ab39
81bf5d9d3d3267aa20adcfb7ad94a712f5cb169e
describe
'31862' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATPZ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
9c6121e5223ae9b780fb07534255240e
ab29d5a9d952ba50a5e8cfc720d57cef289f5ecf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
c25edda66b291160df8b0fe31879e1c5
c7847ffb95e8a58b9ae5172bb9c0f824d879355e
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQB' 'sip-files00201.txt'
83926a5a4279845edb6d7a07fa3fd6a1
f2d904e594ef523b874663551b31e55acca053e1
describe
'8821' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQC' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
24fb01b97ad2f6712f37ca7219edb4fd
3b67446c8a5a1983c181a92b58780a6dfb05bf86
describe
'373150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQD' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
557705f1ff260e2fcee9a5827f52e21a
6b5f62f52897df0062bb44c64fe57b8900839775
describe
'112442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQE' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
6d7114779de53d2ab2a8d5bdb42cd1aa
6998544c19757dd013f9a868c1e5da372247be39
describe
'25785' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQF' 'sip-files00202.pro'
6f8366ac823ad87cc8775d14816299a2
5ec7018f2ca49bbffaa84532ade6e1902d5e3621
describe
'34820' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQG' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
d9d49d6bfa1cb4a9d3c05b89471a7e58
9307057f425ea3e59b710b1aa3ced287ce157e00
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQH' 'sip-files00202.tif'
90da5c47f04b07656ed587127e3540c7
3c12e55de0bd34073971c66615ba7e17e42fb320
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQI' 'sip-files00202.txt'
f333414c2f4fae04ff447c8b88e9556c
38633b3fb9a5b4591d30ef3407bd62def2baee40
describe
'9042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQJ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
8c7a52b5a9c0588c98e6ba6391576d92
3003c64abfdb73342667fd53476bac4d276f5ba0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
facb63666ca6607cb3197b96b1381ed3
55fbdebb494307e99189add3235fa44cb97503e4
describe
'107695' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQL' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
7bc4b2de8e5c3c01dd1343ec7d914b6e
843d0585fcb859d119c883547e2368ec5f4843d4
describe
'25232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQM' 'sip-files00203.pro'
aadea6c5ce94a167cfa8004bce6ca2ff
b54f2674d4493493d5a083843cedcd76dd953250
describe
'33810' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQN' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
d369ea1de660b51c39c3d15615bf5788
a094a8e464628f6d35a54693cd2356466aba9ccc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQO' 'sip-files00203.tif'
38fe5659fe0a3f7df5666f7fc6de0ed3
4efbdce7b3da78cb1b1919d7f3a4328592407156
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQP' 'sip-files00203.txt'
150748c59f62d2be627a3b73ada6464b
8a47cc47d2c4af2568fa46704b65a41ceb551b40
describe
'8917' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQQ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
8a23f64790bb36477b6e7f7023d6fd88
2f7588d6a6de807809be41736b3f0031bd7bd1cc
describe
'373206' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQR' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
11b64c80514d90dc0f35d0eadd0f9d9a
6ca5c749af3d19fb5b16fe190738a27b224536ed
describe
'107262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQS' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
5c487a56be24132f716a98d51532d5b3
a7bd5bbfd01d6165f99807439e52cbbbd077a552
'2011-12-30T13:57:31-05:00'
describe
'26979' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQT' 'sip-files00204.pro'
3495accc7c5f5fe096dff8a10925e532
9a384c24708f9f5ace7e7c0d4e14bd663f5ce5e7
describe
'33085' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQU' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
22e1984cdb3bcd4ea77ad7630277061c
c9d1a64962a6faf1784c1b01ccc3855acef91171
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQV' 'sip-files00204.tif'
3e35c11cc48ce7cb82f4daf62e79a734
22ea07c0d10d3414f7dae0b2ed892c87e5ceabac
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQW' 'sip-files00204.txt'
70e769144ff157c7804838c0c45cd450
c63f85f3dda508f5d112f186e9a65662d788fdce
describe
'8573' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQX' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
29f2768bf098e7f6407e07b185b10be4
b8f73c3eb9f90fd03ccf5e65373e8d3a4f33eb5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQY' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d5f8a1aa88557c721f0179ba1cc1a4d3
b7059ab2cec7eff7892006704918d3fa968e38f3
describe
'105016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATQZ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
d854a54205b51de275346f858b29dc6f
94f1158f9a04b45b6e36275838486126f28a704d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRA' 'sip-files00205.pro'
c75b6cfdbeba6d75b9a84bb18a7f1561
edaacb9890bdb8386f726ac5cc037aae09b3b1e5
describe
'33466' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRB' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
5ba5d6780ac4bd7ca41674f7763f78f5
9ec79ecb5398623a2f991f0a7b197c54cddf16ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRC' 'sip-files00205.tif'
effc52cf3b0364666fb4f79ba6640309
296db129195c23616594b54a3dc9152e9c728f91
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRD' 'sip-files00205.txt'
2caeb314cbc74a79d93c29c7cbc154dd
e6738f2c43270eb763394ce5ca5654152aa98893
describe
'8525' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRE' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
ae55efd08ac1f1ceb33820af7e119cb8
054fd5443ec3a560898d010eedca701eb0e4d253
describe
'373126' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRF' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
7883efc17557b9d7ce3482ff8c9e35ed
2a8b9c75ac36373e46f4cae2b3489aece304b1a5
describe
'109459' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRG' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
7db9b46d29bf88a51911c9485de92336
a2b1bff4fb683bca5070e355a5e443e6ecebd660
describe
'25711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRH' 'sip-files00206.pro'
bf2d3beae5f1116f0353308a4a960860
48f57bf71912a9015df59b8502609ed2d6318538
'2011-12-30T14:00:05-05:00'
describe
'33086' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRI' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
4da56d16aff4bff02f256dbb5697bb39
1c4605b51f96b2cfd2ad70ee1b3f72ba77072669
'2011-12-30T13:52:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRJ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
3ad5b85e66583c5cc4a131a53832c996
e12b67582c347295eda9946a7280efb2a8c37165
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRK' 'sip-files00206.txt'
6ac07ab1e478cfa39ae12c184c845810
8d150fac8b858994c50b15f4c8532623539b4168
describe
'8741' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRL' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
83fdbcf1620245be56075af1bff2dadd
9413fc30b8f33d0db0e2edf4ac6145a2eb491138
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRM' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
8778dc7807521d11363367f8f525f539
7aca772d86c43d66f133ca2e5fda55cd0a5ef50a
describe
'107895' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRN' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
9bdde8f78c41ca925ae03caddd3cd02c
47694b5d83a19aaebfacf2ff5af565241c251a8b
describe
'25198' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRO' 'sip-files00207.pro'
90e4e5cfe4d84a116e6d4a524b6f0263
4d30ac044dab642eac91193c3a71c6acaa51aab1
describe
'33248' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRP' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
6be89e0f914c52430ab425f3d2cd76fd
312c1e38290d55965a80898a6d42ae6e6322deba
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRQ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
3ad2e248603f8602603a18f77bf20fbc
6e25501160c12e316fb37bbaa678a24bad67df8f
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRR' 'sip-files00207.txt'
995f41ced764695594bee2cbb7715ab0
43a8380ae2713e8489220754b5fb62a211f44bfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRS' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
305d543e99e91e97cc98f73d54d7c74d
774082452cef53d5875c21197f56a48476c1462c
describe
'372733' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRT' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
b1f21c1d18f8b8e9331559d407096e92
d71ede2cc7143ca7fc284edb8488917163feb0ec
'2011-12-30T14:00:02-05:00'
describe
'109117' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRU' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
c4831a462dec1a57ebf605c676ba4556
8bfd0c333d95efe43fe587dce64520ee37f93aff
describe
'26777' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRV' 'sip-files00208.pro'
4d1a587e5bcebf1bf41613223ec4cad2
b817b5b17c28dc7a3853978796f0db2d863c03b6
describe
'34456' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRW' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
b344234d4a230f5d51c33fd548caadfa
8a917812eb5cfc46821038857a8b41d1c66312b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRX' 'sip-files00208.tif'
cb6572d4d648fa43689e548d9a137253
2b52f0d44dc136405b8d5bd776489da08006cfd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRY' 'sip-files00208.txt'
795e80221d433744752ec1c33564cabc
9371e414314d852285a82754e384b60d30eb3fd7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATRZ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
e8da4db1d72452b6e80beef29e2210b9
944d884622c5b4e09f671588cd1727b1a74db7b8
'2011-12-30T13:53:11-05:00'
describe
'373109' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSA' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
78512bdf400a7152c79bccf04d50b626
6876354ed7f238c6d7b8017d95a98a18da9ddbce
'2011-12-30T13:57:59-05:00'
describe
'102977' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSB' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
65da9ffe9568a9627d71feb6a27a2b50
ecfc60a1d7f436cd8d46bf1fab0b1e77142a1f3a
describe
'26381' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSC' 'sip-files00209.pro'
ac34d2f9720b9badd1f3742952a096f0
f93e3506f440130e1bbfc967d51373ad019d4101
describe
'31199' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSD' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
bbfed03457f747003131d871fdac71ca
0b60b41ce2ec6e85eb8168977c60ddce95c72969
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSE' 'sip-files00209.tif'
340b371a50d94b936dd663a9e6d13855
863364ae938e9057707267358b3b5d9df6a48c54
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSF' 'sip-files00209.txt'
c16a333c56d796d1959123825d3179b9
0318afb56aa0f5de2fcc965eda2627dd3debef6e
'2011-12-30T13:56:31-05:00'
describe
'8555' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSG' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
b2f60424de6f3b2c164c2e7217c9eb4e
e518ac79346c9d82b996f5c4797cab70d5dd09b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSH' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
b40aa0ef367f295936d88ce1ed6a290e
47ab7ad4a381daede4ba55548716b89a67410d24
'2011-12-30T13:52:55-05:00'
describe
'111212' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSI' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
0a429f6b0a87fd60f10584a63b38cc7c
b59f4fc604728ddd2857bd3139cbad76c4a0cc56
describe
'26842' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSJ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
f583cf568d24f17ffcf8f8ae040cf33d
98df2d8329e10de451f0f01bf20ad824fa3e263c
describe
'34933' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSK' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
e861d4b8ff0a392eda62474f88364650
da3881575b4fa9165fd9eb408bce53a3c9e07cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSL' 'sip-files00210.tif'
5fa53d9f04106fd64b0315b03907c1f0
1dd9563a6c86a396ea45538b4ddb4d111e2e3493
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSM' 'sip-files00210.txt'
38bdc5784d07fbffc18587cfcc5150e8
90be052d82fe9480f0f81928e0b03d70bb7bdc49
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSN' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
8776afab8d1cb5e8d6036dd38ead14c2
8ef466a7c01b40ead4aa8f457e46e84b0e2db915
'2011-12-30T13:53:13-05:00'
describe
'373211' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSO' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
5552cbac0da835575443a81989ee9653
47236a285b07fbcc39cb714e95c286b5a05996dd
describe
'111868' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSP' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
ab6047073a312628c982f3b1c72b3528
52829c146de9ba0988330cb17df9d182e45b5df6
describe
'26239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSQ' 'sip-files00211.pro'
196531b1e96167d8dea2a1504e0abb71
d57aeafb068680278fadc10db88e749ac36479ec
describe
'33100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSR' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
ab4154417834a35640d6a2220cd434b5
bdaaa78b001a5ca59c9bea0e14a0d88c9a25a83d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSS' 'sip-files00211.tif'
bd0eb8e55c19f4923142e3f8f63e5ab5
1c327e01920bd9add548bc57bc022465737e9e85
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATST' 'sip-files00211.txt'
679e0c8dd3fc8eed54328fdadd754410
11f324e03fc4f286e374281a26318040fbaa6687
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSU' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
ea3bbdea4c37144ba83b16a3ca3719de
fcf244f171b04c43eef280e83e1ea3d0cd6ef85d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSV' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
9eb8128838be42dc581d8f61af18225c
9302c4409fb8e8ad2be841bda3ce04eb5bbb6aa7
describe
'102203' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSW' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
0dbd78f03603a752b88ce1e5acc44e05
3484b2ac414d503da798bc0c3a78968af66e7d13
describe
'24925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSX' 'sip-files00212.pro'
0a505c364e3a4ab5345ffef9ca98b8e6
ff54eea3c000047b95024581fcfefbedbe1d5b3e
describe
'31435' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSY' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
2ff20a54d63856f7b42f97ee2111842b
89a5dfce6bf7ea11100dcb2ad3d17cd1424762c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATSZ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
5fa0a26bccb13b305e193c47c4b8c36a
bc8b2fed9f1fe310d62a4ba352356fb256b12cf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTA' 'sip-files00212.txt'
ac9713456c20ef948618a9701b2c3903
264794c0b1d47581787fc8be9cb08a28ba84e67e
describe
'8533' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTB' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
59f4b21ae827bedbbd22c07efbc97eb5
9d58bbf5abf67ce832ddbcdb8e0a18a4dae6e8fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTC' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
58c8989a6c2736a8c199266636dd1592
4e4d7135f3bb6a415626d31b26de52c26b43dfd0
describe
'96737' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTD' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
c7f11818088a6a9af251a69868e4b9c8
e039d3b8f5c38df83c11d41110e0d942eb35d04a
'2011-12-30T13:56:16-05:00'
describe
'23702' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTE' 'sip-files00213.pro'
dd3a40ab97bdbb3452623f8629c6f03e
2ce8015cb7bcb256f33e99b8296d45ca0daf1a7f
describe
'31332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTF' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
36331921460a6fcf6855600a82898061
10db3d0e12d57dfcd2e829b30f4b5d6360e0ea3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTG' 'sip-files00213.tif'
cbffbac5a5934a911164919cc4bb2121
50c71ae6e8a7d85f1304bda4d673a7fa1e199a35
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTH' 'sip-files00213.txt'
38dc2abe642e2a2e7eca8a08b5b4d999
78132ac815dcceea91cc97478383be3a5f0aeb81
describe
'8342' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTI' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
a0a71fef3bc6e1cbc281ff63231e2813
8ab50a76c65f35c68e94f684d070a42cffb7e35d
describe
'373152' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTJ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
96540e919cdcb2fe3a66c414ae08c029
f16727a896993fa2ee20e10f1723d45e510a7c00
describe
'99804' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTK' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
ee7b6e38e613842058f303cdec518d1c
66ea5894b596da880ef25a396f410a623dff99dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTL' 'sip-files00214.pro'
1e35f4b869c368a5ac8c4ee54c70a85a
c1a2fb1dd264b235387542673d07c4c7b4dee0a9
describe
'31043' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTM' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
af8ef8c4c0d42946273fa25fd223e496
fc1e620863519421677f10ad3cfac9b97bb14107
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTN' 'sip-files00214.tif'
dff8c0e878567c5129a2d7725e061e2b
08b3fdfd50ba947ebfd828d20932e88ecb841ee1
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTO' 'sip-files00214.txt'
f4bee478f145546fcdee1fbdb33b6abc
a3105e88678f807b73c7a615ad6c483e35a87b90
describe
'8102' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTP' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
d9c2a5ca6f4cd0eb33ae8cfae318a0a1
6e0a286033ec42fbf5bf64871379ca27a9d3a95c
describe
'373169' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
8f852e5c00b8950ffa1212237f66e849
cd3e70626ade14e2d1765fcc79c614837ddef05e
describe
'101120' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTR' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
b6364c11a6d0dc397abe386d23109575
f5d39f2ade8f738561ed2dc4bf15073f0a282e92
describe
'24994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTS' 'sip-files00215.pro'
18e504a5713de3a3bae2473375e18389
c7fb2d2a2860defd862c4cd748b27112ad91a06e
describe
'31735' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTT' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
dc93c049479e328cf8a9ad3779411ee9
38011991bdd14535dab3170b8e67728a63b28ebc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTU' 'sip-files00215.tif'
fab801ccd21e0b2adcfe3b4369dba734
7b13d3aa6af1bcaaee7a899d841c01a427bb67bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTV' 'sip-files00215.txt'
c69f2bba2e46e0795b3da1288a342117
107f984084c8b9dee7dabeb9947641014edd364b
describe
'8161' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTW' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
c072651cf5931881b34727d3f86b4c1a
2e09f62880a9f5b665d6518e6e3f1079618288a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTX' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
067a3847152783b7eea9d80748b42333
1cd2611e96b96641de6ea7252b776ad85583ac30
describe
'100679' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTY' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
93e15e07fd9ba5080a6ba25d60fa6e0f
f65a65425a6fa6503c2d0ff9027caaba2ec81ce0
describe
'25699' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00216.pro'
a57480bdb73ce82103ef972cfda3405c
923de4d29ad243a371bb39bc645b2f1720fe559b
describe
'32287' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUA' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
2f1e42d026907e2438ea6827afa854ad
ce627932dcccc84c4b82dc0e270aedf7eef400eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUB' 'sip-files00216.tif'
4c969bc2f018a7a0e6d7b3600718869c
de9c4c2a739167cdf54fdafe0a576d2c4006bfc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUC' 'sip-files00216.txt'
cf4c8330eef24098c0880cffec712706
7c99e97d42e77adce7a3ed890fe06bfa42e460e2
describe
'8840' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUD' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
05c90d48a3a84fab6034a71cd211ed7d
5c75806554c2944279919790cd68a31c2765f378
'2011-12-30T13:55:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUE' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
aa1b64129aec371b63082ae8f479e29c
05d224cb1e0c33a0c161c910c71e48da7f535db7
describe
'100436' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUF' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
cd0c6426018df203861eb36d6980e5e3
059087a5a5048e6c8038b2b802d29478d8ea3d52
'2011-12-30T13:50:44-05:00'
describe
'26179' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUG' 'sip-files00217.pro'
12f4876aaa5799042e42df786149e8bd
99bfc83507c24ce02fa720e5347f3821f583fee3
describe
'33493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUH' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
a88dc3cc7aa06cba70795f29e7e5e324
edf9509825084f5b228efac711d6c912356b3375
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUI' 'sip-files00217.tif'
33e8ac4b45b30bff640a45f349b2f0fe
872e3eb5bbe6a53ab59cbd86484ed29f1666825a
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
1696d957ce351e72a061e38660c501cf
813ae706c9936b7adb77ce8fcaa638c05c251954
describe
'8737' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUK' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
f612b94fb51c498e677cc35f023f0bc9
9a331c6285a5e2595f6a6a4fa6aecb91237067a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUL' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
3185b076c70d50a0b18e362f14ee674d
682e8ae5dc7ac4c674ece77a2be6290705186e4b
describe
'108805' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUM' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
ae436e54400a55ae0ec44a121afb85e0
3c339e0ef80200f63879122bb632ed14d5793dfd
describe
'26277' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUN' 'sip-files00218.pro'
8912b444caa2048ca3d653f26e46fa1c
f55564df580bce24d19c2ac4c6339cf998467c3b
'2011-12-30T13:52:53-05:00'
describe
'33362' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUO' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
77ef09fb69113b62b608638ac3026017
d264a9ad552242fbf07cdf4a03aa66cad10bd8e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUP' 'sip-files00218.tif'
60f18e3b1601dcd0aec742b9499f27f9
a8f2a40387c6a8f1a41a89189c78d7afbbc2d2f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
22b4992de23e557220797cc97e1a2138
e41e4debf447aa715c661f3452b9f4a92ef124b8
describe
'8316' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUR' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
d182595a50ca9a6bf87cbefe81a366a5
fe567679543b1fcf45fa985d942ce9cb39e6f286
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUS' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
43c6ae095a5b8e1a2c2479fe9d01f61f
00cbd5e20aeb727ca617ac5933da0c7ad9a5bd48
describe
'106434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUT' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
d12f5544bf749a67bd472bfa94b4fb2c
bcc5b3536322e5558aba927bdb6c75e559843d00
describe
'26050' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUU' 'sip-files00219.pro'
024220aa1926b6e364b8d90e2955f73e
6547eb4d3ff350299ded2cc3227b81fde8741226
describe
'33426' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUV' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
a30fe7afef7d1d54f2d0eaad44c93c0d
721a9d8ff0ff4e643198c78211ed0e9e59ef89ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUW' 'sip-files00219.tif'
1139aa2083adf738341c7565f2dd8504
003182c24c4b65dc719be2f4ac7223368128e762
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUX' 'sip-files00219.txt'
9fab842b42d47199bb0d93447bab1a5d
339469716da95bf78db589ceaeb17c73a3b75de8
describe
'8512' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUY' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
7dc2c6a0876658101d39453c7e8e63fc
b5da24f2bf0ffbcc1526aa091778bd048222a0d5
'2011-12-30T13:50:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
c56c636361a330761cea22ddb18d37dd
13d3522edd02fe68ed5d4ff9080185b3d5a35082
describe
'99771' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVA' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
06519cd2633395ae5bb29a04b2a7ebd7
4ca3bc768628ac304374c04584855b431d6b9b6c
describe
'25527' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVB' 'sip-files00220.pro'
577b8da0b937b6bcbef863a64c1767e5
118d0eb309c19732b7a7e1a8bf1e2b5d9ac292b4
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVC' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
64e62e6f3f3249c36e65a8f13889cf96
c123a7263553793ba7e8f6ecfe787821dfc798b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVD' 'sip-files00220.tif'
89008d32a1d8956837bf08aa14fb70fb
b0b627dd1cd8630cd9f40b5b5bb9f25160cc0ff8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVE' 'sip-files00220.txt'
9f486c752750d6bd6c51835416d2698a
bfc1dcbc5b3fdcd465b6c6b278a21c461f237348
'2011-12-30T14:00:14-05:00'
describe
'8089' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVF' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
f97cb4f21fbe5033b2aa963e4d91db21
6029b23c466b7e50d0c47931a9bed67917aa79d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVG' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
88bb743c8a235a9b0a92d9af52d9ea9e
39606dc830692aa2a8f0bd878ed16bcfb71c5490
describe
'97128' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVH' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
53a8137e092bc5f5837121bb65925b20
2c1d8cbf39ef40de56877261c54d2da5cd0bf574
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVI' 'sip-files00221.pro'
5f423d3900216e8c91aafe19538e7881
767a5ae499c515a8ec6c0a6a6f94f78dfbf7d749
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
898784cf34a198d6e8510f506588b6ea
d34e4db2ce22d7264f4353c1c519702b97ab63ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVK' 'sip-files00221.tif'
cb1f0fea47d70ac248f4df8a9d8e16f9
a416ea98159fbf4943ba969ac40ae63f62d3bb5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVL' 'sip-files00221.txt'
6e4788ec0466a4876ce0abb107583bc5
e191cdc911acc708d4088027502a2c009b9ce338
describe
'8638' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVM' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
378996c3d8b94049a4ffbefa3a7a104f
e99133ec7d4482b243267ad470e20d92f584e2fc
'2011-12-30T13:56:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVN' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
4fc42e12d00f869e36024564d9ae2e2d
4e32e62144ac9e78c4c512df92e96859e89b3d8d
describe
'103300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVO' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
017f1666bb96936e373caa973b36e81e
833468a497c46898e0a065900ffdbe2648e38b75
describe
'25282' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVP' 'sip-files00222.pro'
d40c9af4b77aa0626406dacc0df1d1e8
2f6d48dda1dcd94fa37e765716afd8c19004738c
describe
'31831' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
ef02317b8a91a7872d51fefaf51f86c5
77ee1ad51944db181a1c1b1d10c6c219460ffa93
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVR' 'sip-files00222.tif'
e9bec5c56b73f24759f2042382804213
2f4b83db7df1d6b9ba008c10ecc6369d52a1dd9e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVS' 'sip-files00222.txt'
9bf381a0928da81e1f26c74fd0ee51f0
ede4c29912bbec13b9645cef407a6f35e5399073
describe
'7995' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVT' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
92230c8b6de5a2bfce9eadf0c74db18b
9b8e3409bf4878786ffb5e33c1501ea5e0289953
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVU' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
54bdfaa5144f85976e084be28f2d3414
9c866def8bed04b8ba2e03db40afe5c99474684f
describe
'103411' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVV' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
733a7eec75be2b986d20c73df8eddda6
c5d19fe3f9b0514649cf34d9df40c5d5b0c2749d
describe
'25687' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVW' 'sip-files00223.pro'
5f402f2da3868c083d50f82ec353895a
15823a6f94875a022a37a257e4cd435f9177bd42
describe
'32493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVX' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
b23bba631b504c63041743932cee53be
8817645920b9232b48fe7053bf2664515818487d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVY' 'sip-files00223.tif'
5cc4b41dd2df60fc300044a8a6796325
083999c52baa3e8f1fbd9c624112d3648ab44691
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00223.txt'
324d27750abd3d769a5b9e58c10541f2
1f497a1f897a77c1c673b27f2fb4ab105db6a55e
describe
'8550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWA' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
a1375c34cf1a38ad383a718db3463a64
31408ffc6fd1365c663e949742dc960d418bb057
describe
'373138' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWB' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
ed95736e029b55a75d8027d714c630c4
90c0a27426e099310c9bb8197168cd93e297addb
describe
'100584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWC' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
69183d65358c41faeae7ffecc2e2ba21
68c6b893b73ec604d1e2f51773500dba06693ed0
describe
'25776' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWD' 'sip-files00224.pro'
c3a235467c05696a556e09ca55f08f24
bf7a4c39b7dd27bea6f513362fcd74b925bfd893
describe
'32319' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWE' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
f161c3995c45a55a080480efccb717d8
1ac2561fa5be82a21d2c1ae8d0aa1f87fc96c42b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWF' 'sip-files00224.tif'
337bd68d18861f067b2215e715f3568d
02d07be41da1cf32363e5d44455e2334628dff7d
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWG' 'sip-files00224.txt'
597e1017916ae4c08b779ceeed780157
daaf791cf35870da5e1d3efe7ea1d835928a4257
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWH' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
97d33d5472232b3afcfd10c1c014b957
b29c21595fa5a30098944aaf09785108ecab7f79
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWI' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
3388ce3714eb2d0e08cc511e9ac1705a
4857995ede2c9f282bac025113b9c783191d22dc
describe
'99525' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
5ec8765921e9c0367e5a7d175857fa29
870a5597daa629087688bf2654d986087d2e254a
describe
'26439' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWK' 'sip-files00225.pro'
ad5f9c111373714b43af8a6578d65058
46e33478c9e710cef4355f71c1084b0c1ead3b34
describe
'33118' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWL' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
460db8aea0b67229640b088b4150bdf9
a9993e6531079e160ff48263a703849e9b801db9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWM' 'sip-files00225.tif'
ee969801a26194d079fbf9a6f9162980
584e79d9c7ea848c66481c5a3fb3f3c85a3635d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWN' 'sip-files00225.txt'
f125838c2df4e369e52227de174c1eaa
962343dc9c8dd94ce86a558a7a3f512227a3b017
describe
'8530' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWO' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
1b4c425db76902da8049651990ebd82e
0a7fc06424e7ddf40126396e79e659a5bceb697b
'2011-12-30T13:55:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWP' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
20804ee53e918ba72e09b79a35d7193f
ea8fd4ddb8f1fad1ed6cb82ef027c6c209598b99
describe
'105538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
ece3937e197a6ff3e19bb3eebbdd826f
7286da8bbaee6f3c69cc7231e175d50838c5ab89
'2011-12-30T13:55:46-05:00'
describe
'26166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWR' 'sip-files00226.pro'
bf3ca3911ae300d077d5ce58fdb9179b
d0eddacf8aa5a2ffbc9bb8ff685cf741af7ffe27
describe
'33559' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWS' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
542c6b3b36fee8a62638d493dd7fbf35
1f6fb9e4c4f7af5044ee50bcea8190b6c5399374
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWT' 'sip-files00226.tif'
15532527ec86d5af9742df575845f8e6
12adaa5363e0cdcd84b60eafb38c0aefb09ceeac
'2011-12-30T13:51:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWU' 'sip-files00226.txt'
0fc6cb471098fab8252339d6dad0e0a1
0c375ff40c708d97b7a7b7436fe6c15b064d120d
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWV' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
d5b1674d7c18b9f2588009ccdc1a6109
93990e276a97a227b2f8f3b889fb99a734872ca9
describe
'372924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWW' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
7359c3c10d734f3ec09026344fc8763c
49d2dfb6e61f1fa9fabee297af1f02dba2b094e0
describe
'106389' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWX' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
479e1723571c70a23fcb9b931c0406f2
47cb464f7ddc6ddcaf208eb8a10b92a042efb5e0
describe
'26845' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWY' 'sip-files00227.pro'
bd9fc1744466a775cf40244d8e6dbe3e
10d80df341e01c59ec60ccd6a30f915b9401448e
describe
'33446' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
3643eb4024e63d52a483d7dfa5872ead
9a912a7ebd9b0046d36b3ff224b9bd8f98d7a9c9
'2011-12-30T13:51:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXA' 'sip-files00227.tif'
fed50762338bfe6390851b6f0ab31f36
37988bd8b5e278ac3b6653cbc6a3be2b296538f8
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXB' 'sip-files00227.txt'
b5d6143b9d453bebf2edee6353fca5f6
141ceab713525a8d510aef0bad4171b42af3493b
describe
'8801' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXC' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
42e6a9e527e49433027acc1797146e6e
c9e94b929ef01dfa8f566142c5bd38edfe5bddd9
describe
'373207' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXD' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
565291e8f90f7c09725caba32b70fa40
5dc11fea7457fa11b84af36fc29120eff27eccfe
describe
'97728' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXE' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
6637ac79921766c458a843c3ebafa6b9
0ca501b7560414e15d7dde9a5507fbad4957cba8
describe
'25150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXF' 'sip-files00228.pro'
70b8d05a2f1e91089ef9cce1832a2cf1
0e4f7ee05e413253ee38f88efed96f171ad29592
describe
'31613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXG' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
6d9ee7cae64d2af722527fe090e7009b
3e55f3d6a8c39d2e1fe7ca37e06cc06bcd0cf18c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXH' 'sip-files00228.tif'
26c858727e77bb5b0278039e44a432b4
f6ac6c3b5fc128d1d334ae46b6fe2f3bfc46baca
'2011-12-30T13:53:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXI' 'sip-files00228.txt'
6b2ab57dedfb7b648be61c76a2d66fd1
81640dca4d14926c8b0eaf2d6d053750d93f43b5
describe
'8260' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
bce1ddb7e702bbad5c8df5ad4e184afa
d129089c5af39f250aedbb987a0e9351955a6bfc
describe
'373175' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXK' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
c041fb7ac7d4a295edf046bb59035715
92558113b5edcd8470ce21d224396b4226e4c0d7
describe
'99847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXL' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
0709edd468b7842cd25d36df0d6543c6
fa6c834969514987d015cd0f4bdea44104b8cb65
describe
'26305' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXM' 'sip-files00229.pro'
a47ea1d58a89573a093c31d64e12538e
571d1a799f199d24e4a3d81bbd0ee3d1aaf36a93
describe
'32568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXN' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
942607273cecf02d12f98e23754d92de
9f4f0e26ca8fba1ae5399cf92e6e79e96589c0ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXO' 'sip-files00229.tif'
3b821474f97882ab9fcefef9dd8e3871
6cfbd279f04527dc08712111b391475b918f14be
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXP' 'sip-files00229.txt'
00809fb5fa14b69053f8e5dfb02760be
9dd696aea73175286fcead0a73a1835ee3ed58cc
describe
'8772' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
28322a9c12cdfae9813d24fdb5aa26ad
e718240397b7a32091682a59294ee2822f324acd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXR' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
d77b0bd55d4fd338a5997aee9bc2176e
a40d484b91882b1428cc0d5f58ef663e4df9e1b3
describe
'174680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXS' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
d78d2278eca4ea3bb79166f0de425012
c4d0d5902b3e582ce3e61100d969b7f4018fe4cc
describe
'26642' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXT' 'sip-files00230.pro'
e9b186a9813ee961435b9c1a604e2454
d6a35f70c3256ff595872cfbced5536f64ec6fbc
describe
'67185' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXU' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
63da1c3875cbb4138302d19a004ca37a
580013cb4c4282e0fda9b10d4a96733168c6de26
describe
'3008316' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXV' 'sip-files00230.tif'
7fcb799d2fd3dee9bc2f1ebc3598a931
ea9711010107f29b83649098234256a5c3129e99
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXW' 'sip-files00230.txt'
86a244e99b17ef6a1f4a3f0498082655
f3856e01c664968a858de69e15dbe48694e38c01
describe
'33150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXX' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
6ab0f4c26b49b0648efe279e886fb683
9072ae39717df73eace6529fda890c8c9e059521
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXY' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
a73361ad366ae6960c0f9e10d0d0692a
b978afd94c4f9ca276a3f9aad1378ed71259fb00
describe
'166234' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
40fff67c58071024d7bcd8f9696bd770
dfa44a66f10b8e23b058fe16ef2459652e565d11
describe
'2384' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYA' 'sip-files00231.pro'
8f81788ac973a2819f225a975d175bf0
c6df568b150ae9f5c89e41aeb1ad6721af73df9c
describe
'38810' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYB' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
eae665734ed9a747a9197a838db97990
3e935d7993f0bb0e1e2f1ef95e67d4e32fadd9fb
'2011-12-30T13:55:48-05:00'
describe
'8979272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYC' 'sip-files00231.tif'
123543972e0bc578745e58d316d91b9f
8c592de38e23b08fb33cde1012823f73fc26b508
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYD' 'sip-files00231.txt'
399fb45740b5292074d64f02cdcadcf8
eac922b561f59f187915eec6b3c3081cbf4d7f03
describe
'9581' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYE' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
fb4db261b54cdba8c39c97bf9b74b5a1
721b94f9773befde5a4ddabf502dfafb9f189a14
'2011-12-30T13:48:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYF' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
18ba3f04d1868c2e1bbe7e03d2f50521
8f3f812ae3b3dc3df399edcfe70424e0002fa154
describe
'103857' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYG' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
a03f3289713c564bd81ca5537d42ed6d
e8d5d5d1364d9103bf98276bca529b55f58dea8d
describe
'25942' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYH' 'sip-files00233.pro'
a08675cb48c9436cc01fb2a025206fe2
5ebf1606126a7e7bc376beceb433382ac082402d
describe
'34101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYI' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
bf357d57f667c0c5486cfa5ec99ee7fd
c8e1d66f9e6fcc3cd8a1212f534cb9270fdc178b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00233.tif'
3f2f455334b6af2a36db58859f3165d4
2f10b7201850edbfffc1158a86cec1be7f6edd11
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYK' 'sip-files00233.txt'
3de23e8cd8d315c95a7960a2dc243d3b
151775db55399ec0765488aad566588bce5e8234
describe
'9078' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYL' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
8fd48964ff94e811e6909d87a5e73c55
74e0afbfe8ffa15fc029a1cca83e2d435833f74b
describe
'373166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYM' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
94248225bb0e90bce6c310ac3c8522d4
e8ad258601838029dfe092fc86313b40801f7782
describe
'95484' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYN' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
a71e1354e6ddc70ac3e3c58db41a10ef
08443b1ec96996346e430f23d19bff3edaf082da
describe
'24586' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYO' 'sip-files00234.pro'
5b450e20baa8d7f25f9af6ba4f675fa1
874b8e8f6fd1c0874db7e7a2b2e3ae1342d383a3
describe
'30929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYP' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
4477655a3a345ca6e70e68bae86b1687
0cbe05f45e7930b8c9057203136ea177c6d51d5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00234.tif'
b14e99e043f4bb039df68fcf13857495
e23911e15fd629cc69a2c53b65ece4853a337d70
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYR' 'sip-files00234.txt'
c6fc0d5d061f42c8d20740a140fcc8f2
5f40e78aa8d4ec5ead86d05fc7da76a40746bad3
describe
'8366' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYS' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
12cd74a073698b8bc9f8a85076f3110e
4aa31e466a51561a3a4f1183f20218ceb9e04c3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYT' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
42a561d598755daa004c02cfd5323c18
959f50c1e8276978a0e8b7fd631d1273db466946
describe
'96130' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYU' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
c667a849d2f11c381cec40e4ab5b27de
eca40e8dec55ef20973da9cb9ef1541a05f80676
describe
'26018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYV' 'sip-files00235.pro'
772ec5295b1c91b60d66b8cd759d89d4
5abbd4b46beb0ead448910e9731e6bcb6e66d666
describe
'31021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYW' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
5bd1408aa97c491983b7f9648ab19904
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYX' 'sip-files00235.tif'
12ca6535bbfa30ef896fb0fd0e596df4
f33826a61c88ea06cb8a70d64dfbdde08a4cc5c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYY' 'sip-files00235.txt'
7da66707763f67c7796c89ad4e85b384
0b7a2dcc8adc0081649cb8b47ff9b8df0a946219
describe
'8644' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
100879cc17417c953538d6cd22ab9e7b
1e74e36870a6cd54b47e518809cf742ac09381a7
describe
'373161' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZA' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
de0001066352605d9d1788fd117ef2e1
74c01f89ac13f5eee0185fd42a3ff0fd3fbcc6d9
describe
'99095' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZB' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
91d67e1a3bf6cbf5a3ad4f98de385b83
ad28621e1d894834bf131f7c0f788af03597f6fa
describe
'24891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZC' 'sip-files00236.pro'
1b18756c81069ac420cd579786dcc0fb
ff613f5bce9c6770060615c50f032e0c61d39b77
'2011-12-30T13:49:27-05:00'
describe
'31556' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZD' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
8f937759bb46d0e2b36dd023ad3541c8
d72d241bc104710e44faccddd384f07debe782d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZE' 'sip-files00236.tif'
5bd024d7924203013b6e1250e44da700
162ad95c5f94f8d649c9c201a8ca22648a1b0730
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZF' 'sip-files00236.txt'
1de3a631b23ca414b5842b22a57fc197
4dfcee452bddec448eb56b2b1f1e3f851011b676
describe
'8211' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZG' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
4f67bedf5a47e8ab88bab1c6a3fd0c36
30008136779edc42cab78e82fa4813e0b626903b
describe
'373097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZH' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
494cd80e89867883e461efc3adf3b138
1e0bb754367ee5004e98eafc6fc1e80322f4167a
describe
'101773' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZI' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
983153dca849f9c45a6a9d14585676c2
a69e3a0b353846b0b5bc4b2191a9f4fdf094614d
describe
'25994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00237.pro'
e3be0b86c0b1a806028314246d36fa5f
78e4b461adc54512ff6938fbefa5a579d9b924f2
describe
'31924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZK' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
d27e5d5477eef7437e3810d3f8d449c8
d249f61f7bf730957833ca67217f108e08e1cb51
'2011-12-30T13:56:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZL' 'sip-files00237.tif'
117524a1952585559b191e17085e7bf6
4397c1573134d37f5f178a4620a1342192c59267
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZM' 'sip-files00237.txt'
e065bbb283a2b196373dd55055ef63e4
f26afff1c81aae2c7f8e45fb61e04cdf46725ac5
describe
'8623' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZN' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
96b48e0916fa222d4eddde2f7c4957fc
71b551d4829a5e42caccbf1431f71b5005c66ecf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZO' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
da0fd5d5155cc83f405ee0673e8d1c8c
9cfd2ed4ca6665bd48e78245216dbb74f2cd4bf1
describe
'93275' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZP' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
0bd13fe8d914b77865a34fe47a454314
1ed9b386362d6369c9be4cce07293cf4416e34c3
describe
'25384' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00238.pro'
43ef7121f3c882cf2441b0146647fd84
49fb12f483fc12297aaaf14a316c21e35dabed4a
describe
'30690' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZR' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
a44197a3aa4b87bb138bc81d2a5a4c32
c4b7098f0a0ca238de5c2f093e66fba8ecaf5767
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZS' 'sip-files00238.tif'
b5f0277bbc16d2b2950a17a02405d4c4
07f16901195a35c2ff537c0bbed97a71d14b9a53
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZT' 'sip-files00238.txt'
ca708f300b557c13948e52116b629071
b0dde3b2317708b873af1b4b4fbe9223c992e634
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZU' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
3ea0f53fd17ce85c972e59da19460b70
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZV' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
b07b6be94f22b6285ecfd81b353c8c9d
f78404f3e8fee4ee4597b9576793f3a8b554a50e
describe
'99455' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZW' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
1c93697febcfdf5c56b91a6da846a369
bbfecc70efb3394a7345bfdf3d5cd0ced608b0fe
describe
'26558' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZX' 'sip-files00239.pro'
ac6b6b58c6a6c95e6cc5a4acf7072321
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describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZY' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
fe96c033a762dedcea79b6e5c7e94ac1
7f3758bb67dbb5015305a498ecf0dc6c093bce57
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00239.tif'
9c6a9e3031f5ae32366a729e1cdcd497
9aa52dabaa68845401936c9fbb68f8dc8dd03f53
'2011-12-30T13:50:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00239.txt'
682ea1459b58906f0eb15e1bb772b7e2
36eee32a8f7355f5606af0ea92bc48d8b45ec596
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
3bcc2ba7d25da6a916bc58bea38b467d
b69d87845699e8199a06347e0a639ac6cc47be60
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
4cca4de8f80c4d424b7f922ddf9a0d7b
35a13c88c2716a0935e0af211e8ffcf1c3e51bf4
describe
'101173' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
0dbcef23d9c4b9469b5dde5a834e24f5
2f3e93d3a1f4d4392bffa821315399c8eee6bc5c
describe
'25883' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00240.pro'
0646ae3e694e05e099bca4ccc9686b7d
884d651b927e06088a7e03398bf317646e7b1f1c
describe
'32524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
b824768e93fec9f588682a0f8215826a
996b9c1d6636bab9f10a29274453f0a52f3474c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00240.tif'
59cdb572b5089bcc671b85ee20d23b7f
bd079b48d278175595cf456b472b60980b938b97
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00240.txt'
66ca0bea9e3a81d3ea483512fa9c7441
51219216751a4effd63b78ef29eefd3e0fb24e8e
'2011-12-30T13:58:59-05:00'
describe
'8367' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
3ca69fdcf89e7f07f5bb5685e1b9206b
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describe
'373167' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
baf5123d597d46b4c7946366e8f35c78
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describe
'98207' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
19bb7444377d4bb58b899b7c7a5f9455
f3aae8c1447db00e49b9ae4c073c4dae4cc520c2
describe
'24972' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00241.pro'
53c5605215c8f0e79586288ffc580193
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describe
'32420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
4a7a928eeb70fd95441d02283b0374b6
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00241.tif'
91aaabb0701fb450615173275547d4d9
e55732558a3da506577c5b8f6e4df8c26a3a1b43
'2011-12-30T13:50:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00241.txt'
3383c2d2ce32d179870cf7aa6b403b11
b953e869e0303f55feeeefd3255c4a609110273a
describe
'8213' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
fd5211fbd4607a9a0bade32b8d16a7c7
5e9b84572673fcd1badb791c06a23384298079de
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
b791266d9e9d2eced81f42b5e05150d2
eb589e078d7cf8bb0e6a0f3559e0d7fcb4995522
describe
'98488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
b04f58b0dfadc1ea8581f5941b9dde13
779c0a23077d14cc7a8f7d2b3d6b657e614573f8
describe
'26010' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00242.pro'
2915e8c4d0a88d59d8efd0a8b292fb80
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describe
'32266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
755a9c0cfcef9bbf4f549b3c246cd70d
be91eee23ad083ae1733d5a54099b1b138cc00f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00242.tif'
83e72dac910475db6183900efec50c26
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00242.txt'
94d386821396472e7110b48531a7687b
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describe
'8743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
b1924eb2fd6036ecd96afeef0e59cf1f
50c67840adf0c24ada5f4afc415bc24ad9257616
describe
'373098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
eebe7bb843bad50538b8d0620f472590
18ac7d1bf11f5ad0c0acaa522f7d3e1820fd1d11
describe
'87859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
b7f7e80aae77c02879a0a2b396bd0acc
db10bae6a70132a586bcbdc17f4d054dd2926515
describe
'23296' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
adafab34c27533f88ac0db73f4de2b6e
c260391eb649fee783917d2e741fa61e330d761c
describe
'30116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
5bcf57d6f4d1ac1f691814dc4681cee8
fb8b138c54bc2fb6d5e42b57ad365261597ca997
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00243.tif'
beb8351872106ade50f68ed2b4be01b6
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describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00243.txt'
976a43abc66f4216b833842cfe743367
b8ac4ea75b5bdd8d5cedc5d37fcc54fcf50c1cbd
'2011-12-30T13:50:33-05:00'
describe
'7779' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
8b91f51cde332fd3744a4b9aef898fa7
65e5b8f669d4addba32df72477fcbc2669f10478
'2011-12-30T13:52:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
147817c76c01ad4f0f29f2f68388ab23
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describe
'98422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
3568095ee3085c9e4ce5590d7e187e9f
cc7bf484f9b504e8cd94a08c9b125d49365cb6cc
describe
'25230' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00244.pro'
70a74f0bcabc57ba5760ac0a2476bfbd
2758374cb948c2a4dfbb727934a3ef9df0d9e809
describe
'31716' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
c852c03ea3e1d410d49d44306b62936c
27d2e30cf7937d027e2b2160044b0aa121f4a5d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00244.tif'
d0ae5822cb358a933251d6629500acba
7044f97e97c73d143d0bbc6e7598b0c6345b1725
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00244.txt'
b501468b4ac7f2f943a182dc0eaa66a3
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describe
'7951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
c78f118ef7e8c866f54bdbd86713de8e
c31229ff653744845aee3222acac7fd3548cebe7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
1e03cdc874bd25611e1303fbcb8013c0
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describe
'99262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
2cf2850fc54ae7854bdecefae2333f82
e9753a4457def26b769ea2d8cb3adbc8c4602974
describe
'25426' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00245.pro'
c49b1d41fd8e57ea0f12b8de616d7a24
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describe
'31313' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
b5a8c33396f2c96f52f6a7136c2be0da
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00245.tif'
f94e7a5f9984414a797157473a707cbb
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00245.txt'
de89fe148437b7e11e9234254d94ae2a
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describe
'7734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
a14a1f8d6752c97be659b2f690d4682e
bb1747c5682c8e59ad1d09959651ffbea6ba1fac
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
e742fc5ef7b7b0701e180333a4faa334
b18bf4d2e7b787d3bce36662a37043426f28a7c3
describe
'99129' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
902715d85dde165fcfc51fed3ef88031
db722446468ed637a8b5deb37ad7babcbac2c4d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00246.pro'
c271052abadc2997e48e1010ba98555e
a254dbc80a46231a2e3bcfe0a4f274e20048b8ed
describe
'33386' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
e075c68073edeed0e7ef63d26c275c5d
36a858eaa9d6b11a790e6feb134512f07f30fca9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00246.tif'
199167742264b1087760d9b6811e2173
50b518863da68d9f2a51b6d3900e56d73c5b8f9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00246.txt'
3b51dcacccede7250e5fbeaac48ec02d
ba58836aaa7027d66687ddacfbd5f9694ae3b84c
describe
'8483' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
59b15de8d3d1fa33fa7aac8aa5219fed
6bbf0120f28fca321ee2aef4693728c00f8ce365
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
151150f3e1d8955f9765ac708f4594f2
affde62c3f7b15a2ab6a07149bbcd0973a0b0feb
describe
'98398' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
398eb6af67b9048a154990cb96411751
be73aca1578d19db04beb412c79e9387bf64504d
describe
'26346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00247.pro'
b73c8de747e1b8a7c95997739bf390e3
1b670fe066a5e6083c09e57d59ca47fb5aeb9e7a
describe
'31829' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
ee5390c269f881e6be73a288c8d640e6
b0f4cc581a209e303c211d782f476bad3c499754
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00247.tif'
d5a9e2274978fc315bdfd2a5b53d9480
4ec5e55e6fb2d4b4aeb3eeb16e7f05f48a78392f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00247.txt'
978b0a336fe3419f148086268249f7bf
e62f7c3edecff51b9c34f5399c82b23011c49a06
describe
'8403' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
43cc617640a517cf5b48b3c21fab65fb
bb659bbbb13f6ff474c94402631328a956a14ce7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
298be9e7683fcff75c53a4f470a0130a
6ccfb562e973397ef7eb1e34675cfc852beecc02
describe
'97409' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
dedb848337022fa1e9253a60bc5fda8c
e3ac953415c2b9da576cd328740e571f7a8cd604
'2011-12-30T13:52:16-05:00'
describe
'23774' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00248.pro'
2c6a1918cddbc8f35c22e95b2e5a85a9
c7241e5c7d3c7e59fbaff8e539870c078d25c71c
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
7884598d947a97273bcbc4167a17a013
de231dcb5aecbad8092e45eca9c051607bb1a82d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00248.tif'
87cc31388200585da943223f3cfc47a1
d0ed365b95c3acb69ae4c7023e7d2c40c14cf8ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00248.txt'
78d3fbe4015b5738c51921230dce44b8
00f5c003b081e25128c48caaa1e9f8e08d48278b
describe
'8047' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
433dd6739c8b35ddd755e44fc1e32a89
cc2a2dc0fd0fbf9e29c1d7427d1c5419ba778138
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
4dbef1acdaf3d5a2b92bc4967202e972
a05feaf4256cd444a83d1169e74f54653aeaebc9
describe
'96262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
239f3d2dae0d55443e4e8c4ff3d27be8
b5afd1c6aba217349bc31c65920676897804e831
describe
'24711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00249.pro'
881325cc0eba7bf9eb53802034b81031
ad95cc35f8910fb5c3a35f957a5db06afbe07024
describe
'31222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
fc51dc611f95d29c023069d8ff73b0f2
52b347d1ab4314c1a3a021557d0bd610d472be56
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00249.tif'
6834e5cf33227feab79f2f279d51b9dc
cebb829451b4a80df503cec5f9862bb81cb68364
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00249.txt'
300a5fd42bb28b029457edc420e04adf
eb3ef97d2a9cc27b771915231d8539e7e698a64c
describe
'8243' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
c8fb104e922d67fd5ac6827f3e0a71a0
150f1c57955dd04077a28bf964ba97ac5c93e95b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
9c2d6093d5904ee2fc47646d970a7fca
3b0f4ad5d2a47f1dbee34ed3792bd98fc79de2d0
describe
'97348' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
2fc3e20b8ca5251988bae91c29f94770
985c9e2222624e3387d96954e93f522b787307fc
describe
'26191' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00250.pro'
728882804f9cb5086efc3701af1f5881
9ef0525b826ca94ce0e1de94cf9ae6d2f9b6ffe6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
146008cad1c5c9c0615315eb9abba05c
b0dd2127da1f3a406758f8ed72a80c25b8b79091
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00250.tif'
470c1f335fb531b3fed91e33bd022a3e
79139e1699c3729771217515c62e89ab5715025f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00250.txt'
ba9ea6728fad627c0f764db478136ad0
6fbe4fc4a65dbe2e0718bcf8f520b6c8c5f2fdb3
describe
'8358' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
65bef496a3bc908bd38d24dbd696866f
68a3ce12f0653d0cbfe025e8e97b59cd7c49b535
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
1ef8224a5d8550f1e2fa538f23d2b25d
52f43bb0d3670a5a0a6779dd64a2f44fd10fec7d
describe
'62363' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
ce5611e43fb087a29e6dfb70ee27c87a
56806f5e7e7df4e7f8140ad70ed5d1e521cd08d0
describe
'14904' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00251.pro'
f2bbf1713d06d5961cb667ac8a2d9bdf
1f08676a40902d028596638343010fdf9f27bc98
describe
'20097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
95416ae8279c1639abddb7a7ff844280
e5540dcf6cbdeb2d5468fab8f301427eecb6ae07
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00251.tif'
9c364580159b876e93de3aabdc65e3b5
e2c19fb0f07f3340b19173fe176064ba0ee401ab
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00251.txt'
f22d57e4132ec34c2de3a7f3c0167e48
f0c08f441aec768a56f9cf08dbd014a6a88c02ae
describe
'6119' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
81df724dca1dfc492f4c224c5c3c0f94
e253ecc480a3f1fb6c2f7e1d51c6a8891f1f7ed7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
b84c6039347119039271a29ef862ed50
98b12b548e619a808d60ef89359f543f23543925
describe
'22576' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
fec4bff1e72b1910eb526ad8050d36ac
dd35f578ba15e8491870ea0cbad7974db5efee0d
describe
'3940' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
dbfa82ba739f8fbe60c2818bc8794a51
cb001d79d67b1decee1df816d7ae559c72be08ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00252.tif'
ee074af36012c17cb0f0ebb25756276f
cc797ab67f205c90b4312cddc572843f7643c572
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
7278211baa35cf039f3443dbbf1db6bf
f5e231ae523abc1902963f628cef879e28ac77e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
91e461098209391e4990c54b37f4d584
81d0391ea9cef65baedb3a47577be5d5ed3fad8c
describe
'29445' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
e0f0926b2310b9e226aa2062cb60d736
0e8f9e50ad9e209ae3a5788169b2c9bf8b70d3bf
describe
'1984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00253.pro'
a2d021750fdc11790727fae3973833b9
297a91c8fdaeb7a29161f407bc33c95a065aaae5
describe
'7322' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
cf90ccf5aaa7e1ef314e1ed51cad7574
96be255a60627ffc425c14190f4352ec54c47d39
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00253.tif'
fe781f20bc19275f3d7153e6374a95e9
33e6f7cac595ad4a2c151566eca68545414f4366
describe
'106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00253.txt'
0da34cbc178aeaf729d1e3e259ca7110
acea7dc0936dd942f37d5fc3a15d6ed1278ffe90
describe
'2092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
d61a91b7e66755f8f7eaad4832e63257
fcb273d6786e3462cb69d41c80d8d3ec4502bb8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
897d679f606b6011f4150aa178848e82
3d111a84b0ad36e6fabb62ef4d8dd02791417c3b
describe
'13714' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
ce55c8d3bfc7c8b6c7a8812b8c56f729
efb7424fba7f5503f8e57eab6f329cc6ba33bf0e
describe
'2741' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
5bc3931ae059a443f609fc1cc37dbb10
d8e494611e29b3c024dbf308255e6504e5fc783f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00254.tif'
20c4eed68728925a4cc421984d0920ff
bffeaa9d587ae2b45c67be0ad265235363cb1f95
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
1255b6888a7116c951833d7dcc4ad831
f3a1c9e804bb693046fdf66af47a96fece85fba3
describe
'373237' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
165f3fa877fa5bbbf2e05fde6ef243fc
4f0ee3c5d8e8fe46f6c607b49b8a5022c56fd3a2
describe
'82412' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
31b228a9276496e327bb7ff69ca87634
a612d8a82f1c8681cfad1f7536330675993fbb7d
describe
'20623' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00255.pro'
eb569ef11e15e48d9111334693c7d5bc
5536f5d9322b8035a46b2e383a720bab831aff27
describe
'26524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
52c1940bfa5af766e56ed8476096f369
cb4ee2473b51c910693e8908f1e6cb37f051b67b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUED' 'sip-files00255.tif'
7906a9de19cf0b959ddb6b2eb3b679f3
1646839c71dee57c51b429906d6063d0e4496de9
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00255.txt'
12f9290fc72fd62c5399b7dfddb72d13
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describe
'7202' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
dcf3ff8553602296ccffd0a0ef827af9
ee00bbbbb94cb1e4d5dfbec09d7b2456e648d9d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
956ea293d1072959820b65930fe9bf75
a5d86a66d21ce4b7790af2e46385ec417a1a2f76
describe
'115125' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
237d6954fefa846768d122e949670708
3c67bca30530911f7d5887b2f8281c600f4ca42a
describe
'27818' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00256.pro'
feb0bdf817d0525092803e96c7bfcfa4
03ab3b22d334e6485dddd65ea55265aeead1cbcd
describe
'35647' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
91bf0c134aeb6511212eba2283f16c6d
c6826a848e33da4f958b9ce585c40ecec11ee9cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00256.tif'
64ad43c241f2878dd93e278c010e39f9
460251bac1939692dcaf4fd04d1eff33e6c032a4
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00256.txt'
a8c619dd59c5a429ef5371913eda61c3
f7e2c121b404a30904fd3a8c6eee1dddae49f7ad
describe
'8816' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
746cd75fd5ecb2cf99f880776bd00d4e
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describe
'373117' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
b6dd75f2f292e4747ad96ecb782ee00d
d84e4e99ac346310a045435401f31e7d7ddc39b2
describe
'108292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
e552eaceb47036c83e68715c453dd64b
cb4de9724d3fba2986721cf06c486555e7cc48c2
describe
'27109' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00257.pro'
6ba2a1375a8241a43d107d4b05cb2056
a7bd7273127157593de8c6ef2ef550b51e319aae
describe
'33052' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
52c5b4df934decccbf4b6817a85e1246
0bc5bc04bbc6b443c9469acf762499637899bc3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUER' 'sip-files00257.tif'
1b5e5594d5497c81e653ef5a43e6037d
f26c8497844f940705b7bb4d0906985a153d48dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUES' 'sip-files00257.txt'
41a64f712568e8cf72d4efd9f03315c1
460c2ee8418b2c3bca12b6b6e56fb1e4d505b400
describe
'8491' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUET' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
41c45c50f05b406e3bb2a06d4922051b
c49e7e86bb0ba12020ff1ae67d066e79fa0a1f78
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
81b132998bb5428fc89800477e6f8d39
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describe
'89331' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
af1da2166d089f2bec19c41cccdf5517
068947e3f82055452f3d8f9cccb58ddd3c653dc1
describe
'21476' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00258.pro'
b2727c170b72b7477fa65eb4f94e5c98
5aee9c619351a7aee062b02310f9aa278767a1eb
describe
'28657' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
f6e452be05269ae762e03018fdd01255
15194a691190d08e470d4cc97a6f8dd206f7f607
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00258.tif'
24b46cd91ca5af33f05dfa347657714f
da22252e8788a045f59b06352974e82c9d4d6e2a
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00258.txt'
fef5a718f74bd6cd365dd4196af9e9e4
c007dd4d4c13b7c30237a5979cd9c698a7e6669e
'2011-12-30T13:56:45-05:00'
describe
'7588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
543fd19bfb46ca777cc71bcacd85698b
ed93b95c1b3e9a4c493f82744f745076b2492e0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
f5e6da7e4f6ca90524f18c86525bf4f2
8bffd27c96f782dbb4c29c7e145bbde2229259c2
describe
'86583' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
0f4d6754ca750f280f04413c45a7ea17
d848e8b44e58c5113f3390c5762cce869d77d66f
describe
'21247' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00259.pro'
4ae317924438a80e2cd4a7eedce6056d
5ae13cd7dbb8027584625cf3711d4ff5d913b48a
describe
'26661' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00259.tif'
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describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00259.txt'
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describe
'6834' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
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describe
'112851' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
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describe
'27187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00260.pro'
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describe
'35057' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00260.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00260.txt'
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describe
'9101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
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describe
'111694' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
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describe
'26812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00261.pro'
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describe
'34573' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00261.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00261.txt'
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describe
'8898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
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describe
'105006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
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describe
'27324' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00262.pro'
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describe
'32868' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00262.tif'
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describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00262.txt'
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describe
'8872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
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describe
'103264' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
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describe
'26113' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00263.pro'
8951d24063d13faa7f6e24a11bab0eda
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'2011-12-30T13:59:05-05:00'
describe
'33924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00263.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00263.txt'
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describe
'8817' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
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describe
'94572' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
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describe
'22098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00264.pro'
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describe
'28543' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00264.tif'
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describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00264.txt'
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describe
'7326' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
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describe
'112175' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
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describe
'27173' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00265.pro'
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describe
'35479' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00265.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00265.txt'
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describe
'9099' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
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describe
'104989' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
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describe
'26832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00266.pro'
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describe
'34206' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00266.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00266.txt'
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describe
'8696' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
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describe
'100755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
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describe
'25695' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00267.pro'
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describe
'32406' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00267.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00267.txt'
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describe
'8584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
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describe
'83689' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
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describe
'17870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00268.pro'
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describe
'24507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00268.tif'
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describe
'705' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00268.txt'
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describe
'6250' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
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describe
'92006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
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describe
'20855' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00269.pro'
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describe
'27310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00269.tif'
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describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00269.txt'
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describe
'7428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
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describe
'95360' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
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describe
'25108' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00270.pro'
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describe
'30263' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUID' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00270.tif'
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describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00270.txt'
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describe
'7875' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
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describe
'38698' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUII' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
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describe
'6757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00271.pro'
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describe
'10416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00271.tif'
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describe
'282' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00271.txt'
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describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
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describe
'92970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
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describe
'21639' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
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describe
'27960' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
da6df478166a6a00fc95f7518f6dadd8
026e96ad55476357532fff60ca0491989697f583
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00272.tif'
dab73c9397591e6fd8a8c2e1eb92f70a
75ac75c9933b16864b16ff5822c223999747db8f
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00272.txt'
89d1307833909f798a3fb87ac9524871
71dc166389ca36c9663ab21503052a350504a4ac
describe
'7434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
9d51578ec07da3c163a8a9f8b2d323d6
a453256570d17760a7853f48b4e96fd416c67ebf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
fec06c46145b4a0b01ff28cf23f7179e
9a49c99f76c05a5d67a4dd23e9a5842016cf78ce
describe
'105053' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIW' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
b40d8f3f1a1beece93f4425ad20a3fa4
83c92d9c5f081fe1cbbf0f2a559a31b7c979b470
describe
'25182' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIX' 'sip-files00273.pro'
78d636f0827306719b7a7583db499c36
babc814948afed9b836e939715857a1e4a8bf074
describe
'33929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIY' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
d31e9a2a0281d0826e358eef18e3ce71
936a08f45619a2dddd9eb6274e5cf95bbafe0295
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files00273.tif'
7fea85b058cbc35dd029b5aaa62aba22
d3f99ecfa423d67c933df3e3fb0a57b15b6207bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJA' 'sip-files00273.txt'
19d01573836e264bc7dc70c5472fe7b7
7c88f834601b14376f9174fc52273bd5f9ea8b52
describe
'8524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJB' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
8631b14549bbb89523154b104f9305c5
cdcec0a03566fde315e69734fe4d1e8432561d75
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJC' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
100bac3c17b7ad961885e090f7c57f30
0bfd8a4a1dd1e16f74457c90acdc9e776a7cac6e
describe
'51130' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJD' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
6156acc31075ed2d207364cc4c340e21
15823f6a531a59101d7622f4ec3fca0f6948274e
describe
'10162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJE' 'sip-files00274.pro'
da2075eef2cc49e53020f4dc5300b21d
b1f4fccc164055280446d7cc83f3746e10c57ee7
describe
'14844' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJF' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
d260d6d3f98b24c5206fe63e62f6978d
311cb022c3e0216807a66a5cf77571901a820ff7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJG' 'sip-files00274.tif'
dfe5faa1cfba9eb1f617893f318ebb92
89060627aa0151db81f9d0475afbb36cec31ebdd
describe
'414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJH' 'sip-files00274.txt'
3243d3a52ea306015d1d120b712a83b3
9c224f49c677f71fd285539146b2143eb623e289
describe
'4136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJI' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
058008b586cd6ea430d35c9e3849bc04
bece3e06e90b87c110000fe070d55c0f4203e36b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
304818cdfc87b7b6ec99e97181b82915
94cf3e9dc7d002780d8b9311f1ed76b707587d9b
describe
'82838' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJK' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
78506a5b259b7eae722ce822e28f93cb
38aead7ec04913f2cd29da5a7cc6fe9357bd2f3e
describe
'19979' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJL' 'sip-files00275.pro'
0254736b7bf3b630a044df062dff210c
2956db078a048d66cb9416c92d1944327f533177
describe
'26828' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJM' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
a99ce65ae45e06d6b55424e2718a3f73
a5c75e2ba48bc583dd123768f70044c1e3319508
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJN' 'sip-files00275.tif'
369e66a6c17f2469114a5cdf8a8e812b
6ca3e3a592158fffd239e67a0f539da971a803d6
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJO' 'sip-files00275.txt'
f7b0441c6a46aea78dee6a40f45ee53f
7109f66969e0d1cdbe2a55f653f2f0446cf977bd
describe
'7056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJP' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
b06969178ad5613531d84c231694c4f4
204275114751b95e18fd8e75a56917cddfd89ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
37c278f463f4fafaadcd4f101db7859d
9300a529e20d1686115f112bcb7a4fb813b5a893
describe
'107746' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJR' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
5eddeccc98394ea41414d7dc9f84e5c6
8415bdea68f1572d0cadce2d7d96f7da641ac0c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJS' 'sip-files00276.pro'
ed479d78c21bee8f6954eb45ca48cad4
1d5bec3a55aab0e8d7dac607aeacfe62feb5ff16
describe
'34422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJT' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
9178de7b872805ec28947ec32cc2708c
b2535ced66eff54fb1a7b93ec3d97513e8a7b892
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJU' 'sip-files00276.tif'
2e9f1804b5f861bf9f2d8ec6ca985ef7
4dec9b5c9bb1af387304391616cf9f31665c4444
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJV' 'sip-files00276.txt'
ba609f890e72df5c500288fd0b438b34
be8737248431388afbf5af3950df11f89657b60f
describe
'8792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJW' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
27110cf819e20304d37ebb2b60932a62
75f1c8fadff8d2a9b4f64c6dde98fbb9d4afe17c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJX' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
c6af0ad25ca4b138c22311b428fa0c2f
51e94c147e8a25edeaab1ebf8ff39ebd873e95af
describe
'108239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
a7036356905892a1f9ec191369ee277b
3342aa1d6a27d468ddbdb1898fcbe8ceb0436200
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00277.pro'
40827636280d8c4f8414677e503e159b
14367bc5a7696aab55fcbb46e9612d9d7673b40c
describe
'34970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
4fa015525cb405e4e9b1c23fddfaeade
a2502920ddd319a85a62f82fc0cda82d7d67edf0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00277.tif'
ebbef2fa1345f41bd575b86f2f3ee985
baa151248ab76dd2f4fd09ec60cf31563a6e03f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00277.txt'
9df0fbe1bafdd59a4db5031a3c600a4a
6c56454e6c0f4dcb965b4547d386ac76ed7e9d2e
describe
'9076' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
2f367ae14b62c2e1965c227daf81846e
f07fb9e7021b17e8a67470227c4ec2e306facfbb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
7bf3edf8751c1470b66237aec095dbc3
7df571e28ed97f20ce18c778ea8bfe8c22262f93
describe
'61753' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
7567cd453773ac64966693bcc9899618
8ca6871f8d20cc0ffdf55669c51fafeab6277c56
describe
'13702' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00278.pro'
3cdba8a94767496af53aa578595a4b9b
073bfbb0d9b2edb1828c8d7171ac128b82cd1f35
describe
'19444' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
f4c0fbb09f8e036aca8a341a7bd85c40
caa0c17832f27adb9de8b0f93e367fb89a98e956
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00278.tif'
bc7bdc85f64c6cc53aba24e179f5c806
e64eab1a470148acac9ab5116962e73d2f60def8
describe
'545' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00278.txt'
e4c01bafe2f9574ef4eea58703ee8424
2da51f3184e69e2b98738e0d6fc33a11e2538652
'2011-12-30T13:59:39-05:00'
describe
'5161' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
38376de1e2c27bda63c47b88253d5348
e35acf8695fa115ca8c9a4ec10f3acc45474bab8
describe
'372967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
abde19d6f3bb8f5059e66db9211b3022
00dfb2b54fe30fef3396203ccbf4eff84f9bea54
describe
'84678' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
3d91784327dafe019eec5c35dfb4d3ff
7ff74225a541a6a4ea3c6e565c042c2c46863f57
describe
'21171' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00279.pro'
39f9257019827230b9b97fbaa6a82438
f2eea542acd17c3f59ec65a9864ac9647459b5c0
describe
'26795' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
4875e7bf0e30e38f2a2feeedcd12a158
e958088ce0f0345370f01714043cecbc1d45bf10
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00279.tif'
fa945cd8bc63b7d498f4d8ea3c29654e
3fc91219346e7f68d8baafc390eeeb38ea941645
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00279.txt'
d0ba5b712fed86667646119a40931d3e
7757c74ef6128f0d6883c84fba5ff79b5b7b0191
describe
'7407' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
6164dd902b0a8c1f0c3f2f371b383997
815722470b443bbba75aa45ca5937d364b745817
describe
'372897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
61a0f6d243d82bcd9054d2a0d54c4662
f5398228ebf92a716044253b9ce60e428b21daa1
describe
'111642' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
5e7a6760105139fedaa84a2e2286d287
cbbfbb85b90cff157a4bfa3d894fd56a6da64e34
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00280.pro'
eabac260c6cb6c38ad44080276ec8b1e
6e8dbe3b65db874d389fefb506b191f3b72e7439
describe
'34284' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
a7e5c171a5c54afe92c0e465de5df7bb
6b79729fcfee73b51fc4d14688325e4350eb4b11
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00280.tif'
ce36d8bf2bd0ca69f004e26304b5ba7c
e0d1664cd48871431845a7e27fac5dcc88e6759d
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00280.txt'
80cb868fd35c77fd3b18862209c08911
7198220abca7e08956e45cc8d34664145ebe60e4
describe
'8944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
56a90eae7622f461a0415c695d63c7ca
f74397b8456efb174ae0022ca6e2027e4384f77c
describe
'373243' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
29cb27d7be0ca9d16efffc0523b9cc27
b559dc9f36a8e4eaea5de42802b59209d04a110e
describe
'95988' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULA' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
72de2dfba72b536100e95f93c7acb8fa
7dc4c76a9fdf4c83a6ffbd1256baef1b4eb022a7
describe
'22721' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULB' 'sip-files00281.pro'
269ee7d2827f1a6df5a7e63bc5f790c6
37b41ba633de9da162d701bb8977f64297e2b22f
describe
'28906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULC' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
0a62ee58a1eff50012b3c696dc625480
c02ca83d78682ffbb0bf17fc2b8b5cef7b48e3d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULD' 'sip-files00281.tif'
a909843293544bac53ea0a26c609c3fe
16c96ff01cd0abc4d967f32af26ccb15f9c61b12
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULE' 'sip-files00281.txt'
65975a088ad7e767d959c1a551a6ffa4
68fc0a693e02546cc5ef11839b89fb8d64d0d89b
describe
'7490' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULF' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
f1fbc90a3fbf8c8586af9767786cf754
95fc10153fa7d04895e32039d76851fe330348d9
describe
'447288' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULG' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
e248ec2ccc3f812f3ac63fe7352cb282
f38f1662405e98cc1e2aa58959dbdcb7feed6ecd
describe
'91488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULH' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
ac8b68eb95f4eddc68588f2d3ba2d3ef
be637d189ecd93b8e2a94eb69b202b9f2efb4182
describe
'21044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULI' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
cc25aeda444101917cf554457383ce14
367cb8888e1156b9adaddffb24a72993e7225d60
describe
'10743412' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00291.tif'
542abb9344ffaa0d80ef7f2d435a38e0
cb40feb78738684789bf2da6fdabb7729fa357b7
describe
'5493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULK' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
6b6f5458d2c874b081aebd5a6d33c899
561f15086350b45f8c5120aa7a6e2ff6151d1938
describe
'451437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULL' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
e9c2d2dd68bba2b30537ca23ce5abc79
0627b63256e992c698695c10497953c654a6df80
describe
'158042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULM' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
3e5a7f170fac5a741dadc0ad7b0dbb94
3cf573e025f71f1bd8418aa80a311433aec03779
describe
'32103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULN' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
033289fd8bf0009d2dd57b4c92fa1886
277a58f1b59b1959751cee851627c76534859d49
describe
'10840240' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULO' 'sip-files00292.tif'
436c19595641112da9ea4ca6e3ef14aa
e4dc896d72b39fe3706c6b2830a6f476e02e4dc2
'2011-12-30T13:57:01-05:00'
describe
'7160' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULP' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
3e412808dc9f80441d967cf730246c2e
69251d0a5467b9c0f852e3c4d5acd0c1e93946ce
describe
'110331' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
fef60035a5dd33194f5e01d0eb5cbe97
b00b372d11421b046971140590c5380f9e957929
describe
'44515' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULR' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
c27fef09d9381a720c129e3912d64781
d6b748b100a85fb8b6ae765fc0302fb88eaa6c41
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULS' 'sip-files00293.pro'
9dc3534314308b736ff838b466d8d5d6
a07e46bb85ee2ea8739de030b2d4e1ab9f500a2f
describe
'10381' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULT' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
106348bf4b3aa4d1d560a02acb3d38aa
8a62c9979c76a9f11beb97114ccf65591055d4c5
describe
'2653576' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULU' 'sip-files00293.tif'
8f4307c17a53d5154f98a3edc125b068
1f0840bab67b7336cbcebfd852ce41cdef2ffaf0
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULV' 'sip-files00293.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'3584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULW' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
659d83f8b8fb0dbfaa55c095bd1d41d5
eb4b619d2d2798d133f5f413468e0b084cf5fdb1
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULX' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
a1b1edeb93179f9a079e80f5858b8abc
3af97765c7c0ada1f6407549ba13db383d57d453
describe
'453420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAULY' 'sip-filesUF00086963_00001.mets'
c46b1b901e471be82c7d88c98b0a4bd5
a22130899d79ca0d64dc29bac3cb97cdeb252fbb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T18:54:33-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'587787' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASYfileF20090121_AAAUMB' 'sip-filesUF00086963_00001.xml'
c3af36d7921136396e62faa1f293ba33
f4934bdc71612f0fa163788b6312d02d3fa26b02
describe
'2013-12-13T18:54:28-05:00'
xml resolution




ae

i
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I fi



TRUE BEAR STORIES,
TRUE

BEAR STORIES

BY JOAQUIN MILLER,

WITH

INTRODUCTORY NOTES

BY

Dr. Davip Starr JorDan,
President of Leland Stanford, Jr., University.

TOGETHER WITH A THRILLING ACCOUNT OF THE
CAPTURE OF THE CELEBRATED
GRIZZLY “MONARCH.”

FULLY ILLUSTRATED.

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK:

RAND MSNALLY & COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.


Copyright, 1900, by Rand McNally & Co..



Made in U.8. A. 5MI-26
DEDICATED
TO
My DEAR LITTLE DAUGHTER,

JUANITA MILLER,

FOR WHOSE PLEASURE AND INSTRUCTION I HAVE MANY TIMES
DUG UP THE MOST OF THESE STORIES FROM
OUT THE DAYS OF MY BOYHOOD.
PREFACE.



My Bright Young Reader: I was once
exactly your own age. Like all boys, I was,
from the first, fond of bear stories, and
above all, I did not like stories that seemed
the least bit untrue. I always preferred a
natural and reasonable story and one that
would instruct as well as interest. This I
think best for us all, and I have acted on
this line in compiling these comparatively
few bear stories from a long life of action
in our mountains and up and down the
continent.

‘As a rule, the modern bear is not a
bloody, bad fellow, whatever he may have
been in Bible days. You read, almost any
circus season, about the killing of his keeper
by a lion, a tiger, a panther, or even the
dreary old elephant, but you never hear of
a tame bear’s hurting anybody.

I suppose you have been told, and be-
lieve, that bears will eat boys, good or bad,
if they meet them in the woods. This is
not true. On the contrary, there are several
well-authenticated cases, in Germany most-
ly, where bears have taken lost children
under their protection, one boy having been

1
2 PREFACE.

reared from the age of four to sixteen by
a she bear without ever seeing the face of
man.

I have known several persons to be
maimed or killed in battles with bears, but
in every case it was not the bear that began
the fight, and in all my experience of about
half a century I never knew a bear to eat
human flesh, as does the tiger and like
beasts.

Each branch of the bear family is repre-
sented here and each has its characteristics.
By noting these as you go along you may
learn something not set down in the school-
books. For the bear is a shy old hermit and
is rarely encountered in his wild state by
anyone save the hardy hunter, whose only
interest in the event is to secure the skin
and carcass.

Of course, now and then, a man of science
meets a bear in the woods, but the meeting
is of short duration. If the bear does not
leave, the man of books does, and so we
seldom get his photograph as he really ap-
pears in his wild state. The first and only
bear I ever saw that seemed to be sitting
for his photograph was the swamp, or
“sloth,” bear—Ursus Labiatus—found in
PREFACE. 3

the marshes at the mouth of the Mississippi
River. You will read of an encounter with
him further on.

I know very well that there exists a good
deal of bad feeling between boys and bears,
particularly on the part of boys. The trou-
ble began, I suppose, about the time when
that old she bear destroyed more than forty
boys at a single meeting, for poking fun
at a good old prophet. And we read that
David, when a boy, got very angry at a
she bear and slew her single-handed and
alone for interfering with his flock. So
you see the feud between the boy and bear
family is an old one indeed.

But I am bound to say that I have found
much that is pathetic, and something that is
almosthalf-human, in this poor, shaggy, shuf-
fling hermit. He doesn’t want much, only
the wildest and most worthless parts of the
mountains or marshes, where, if you will
let him alone, he will let you alone, as a
rule. Sometimes, out here in California,
he loots a pig-pen, and now and then he gets
among the bees. Only last week, a little
black bear got his head fast in a bee-hive
that had been improvised from a nail-keg,
and the bee-farmer killed him with a pitch-
4 PREFACE.

fork; but it is only when hungry and far
from home that he seriously molests us.

The bear is a wise beast. This is, per-
haps, because he never says anything. Next
to the giraffe, which you may know never
makes any noise or note whatever, notwith-
standing the wonderful length of his throat,
the bear is the most noiseless of beasts.
With his nose to the ground all the time,
standing up only now and then to pull a
wild plum or pick a bunch of grapes, or
knock a man down if he must, he seems to
me like some weary old traveler that has
missed the right road of life and doesn’t
quite know what to do with himself. Ah!
if he would only lift up his nose and look
about over this beautiful world, as the In-
dians say the grizzly bear was permitted to
do before he disobeyed and got into trouble,
an account of which you will find further on,
why, the bear might be less a bear.

Stop here and reflect on how much there
is in keeping your face well lifted. The
pig with his snout to the ground will be
forever a pig; the bear will be a bear to
the end of his race, because he will not hold
up his head in the world; but the horse—
look at the horse! However, our business is
with the bear now.
CONTENTS.

IntRoDUCTORY NorTEs, A ;
J. A Bear on Fire,
Il. Music-Lovine BEARS,
III]. My First Grizzzy,
IV. Twin BaBIzs,
V. In SWIMMING WITH 4 BEAR,
VI. A Far Litrte Eprror anp THREE
LITTLE Browns,
VII. TREEING 4 BEAR,
VIII. Brit Cross anp His Pet BEar,
IX. THE GREAT GrizzLy BEAR,
X. As A Humorist,
XI. A Grizzuy’s Sty LitTLE JoKE,
XII. THE GrizzLy as Fremont Founp

Him,

Page

”
13
29
36
44
56

68
76
86
96
106

. 110

. 112
XIII.
XIV.

XV.
XVI.

XVII.

CONTENTS.

Tut BEAR WITH SPECTACLES, . 116
Toe BEAR-SLAYER OF San DiEGo, 129
ALASKAN AND PoLaR BEAR, . 146

MoNNEHAN, THE GREAT BEAR-
HUNTER OF OREGON, i . 156

Tur Bear ‘“MonarcH”’—How Hz
Was CAPTURED, : 3 166
INTRODUCTORY NOTES.



The bear is the most human of all the
beasts. He is not the most man-like in an-
atomy, nor the nearest in the line of evolu-
tion. The likeness is rather in his temper
and way of doing things and in the vicissi-
tudes of his life. He is a savage, of course,
but most men are that—wild members of a
wild fauna—and, like wild men, the bear
is a clumsy, good-natured blunderer, eating
with his fingers in default of a knife, and
preferring any day a mouthful of berries
to the excitement of a fight.

In this book Joaquin Miller has tried to
show us the bear as he is, not the traditional
bear of the story-books. In season and out
of season, the bear has been represented al-
ways the same bear, “as much alike as so
many English noblemen in evening dress,”
and always as a bloody bear.

Mr. Miller insists that there are bears
and bears, as unlike one another in nature
and action as so many horses, hogs or goats.
This much they have in common—bears are

2
8 INTRODUCTORY NOTES.

never cruel. They are generally full of
homely, careless kindness, and are very fond
of music as well as of honey, blackberries,
nuts, fish and other delicacies of the savage
feast.

The matter of season affects a bear’s tem-
per and looks as the time of the day affects
those of a man.

He goes to bed in the fall, when the fish
and berry season is over, fat and happy,
with no fight in him. He comes out in
spring, just as good-natured, if not so fat.
But the hot sun melts him down. His hun-
ery hunt for roots, bugs, ants and small
game makes him lean and cross. His claws
grow long, his hair is unkempt and he is
soon a shaggy ghost of himself, looking
“like a second-hand sofa with the stuffing
coming out,” and in this out-at-elbows condi-
tion he loses his own self-respect.

Mr. Miller has strenuously insisted that
bears of the United States are of more than
one or two species. In this he has the un-
qualified support of the latest scientific in-
vestigations, Not long ago naturalists were
disposed to recognize but three kinds of bear
in North America. These are the polar
bear, the black bear, and the grizzly bear,
INTRODUCTORY NOTES. 9

and even the grizzly was thought doubtful,
a slight variation of the bear of Europe.

But the careful study of bears’ skulls has
changed all that, and our highest authority
on bears, Dr. C. Hart Merriam of the De-
partment of Agriculture, now recognizes
not less than ten species of bear in the limits
of the United States and Alaska.

In his latest paper (1896),a“Preliminary
Synopsis of the American Bears,” Dr. Mer-
riam groups these animals as follows:

I. POLAR BEARS.

1. PoLtAR BEAR: Thalarctos maritimus
Linnaeus. Found on all Arctic shores.

II. BLACK BEARS.

2. COMMON BuAcK BEAR (sometimes
brown or cinnamon): Ursus americanus
Pallas. Found throughout the United
States.

3. YELLOW BEAR (sometimes black or
brown): Ursus luteolus Griffith. Swamps
of Louisiana and Texas.

4, EVERGLADE Bear: Ursus floridanus
Merriam. Everglades of Florida.

5. GuacteR Bear: Ursus emmonsi Dall.
About Mount St. Elias.
10 INTRODUCTORY NOTES.

III. GRIZZLY BEARS.

6. THE GRizzLy Bear: Ursus horribilis
Ord. Found in the western parts of North
America...

Under this species are four varieties: the
original horribilis, or Rocky Mcuntain griz-
zly, from Montana to the Great Basin of
Utah; the variety californicus Merriam,
the California grizzly, from the Sierra Ne-
vada; variety horriaeus Baird, the Sonora
grizzly, from Arizona and the South; and
variety alascensis Merriam, the Alaska
grizzly, from Alaska.

7. THE BARREN GROUND Bear: Ursus
richardsoni Mayne Reid. A kind of grizzly
found about Hudson Bay.

IV. GREAT BROWN BEARS.

8. Tap YAKuTAT Bear: Ursus dalli
Merriam. From about Mount St. Elias.

9. THe SirKA Bear: Ursus sitkensis
Merriam. From about Sitka.

10. Tue KaprAk Brear: Ursus midden-
dorfi Merriam. From Kadiak and the Pen-
insula of Alaska.

These three bears are even larger than
INTRODUCTORY NOTES. 11

the grizzly, and the Kadiak Bear is the larg-
est of all the land bears of the world. It
prowls about over the moss of the moun-
tains, feeding on berries and fish.

The sea-bear, Callorhinus ursinus, which
we call the fur seal, is also a cousin of the
bear, having much in common with its bear
ancestors of long ago, but neither that nor
its relations, the sea-lion and the walrus,
are exactly bears to-day.

Of all the real bears, Mr. Miller treats of
five in the pages of this little book. All the
straight “bear stories” relate to Ursus amer-
icanus, as most bear stories in our country
do. The grizzly stories treat of Ursus hor-
ribilis californicus. The lean bear of the
Louisiana swamps is Ursus luteolus, and
the Polar Bear is Thalarctos maritimus.
The author of the book has tried without
intrusion of technicalities to bring the
distinctive features of the different bears
before the reader and to instruct as well as
to interest. children and children’s parents
in the simple realities of bear life.

DAVID STARR JORDAN.
Leland Stanford, Jr., University.

a







TRUE BEAR STORIES.

I.
A BEAR ON FIRE.

It is now more than a quarter of a cen-
tury since I saw the woods of Mount
Shasta in flames, and beasts of all sorts,
even serpents, crowded together; but I can
never forget, never!

It looked as if we would have a cloud-
purst that fearful morning. We three were
making our way by slow marches from
Soda Springs across the south base of
Mount Shasta to the Modoc lava beds—
two English artists and myself. We had
saddle horses, or, rather, two saddle horses
and a mule, for our own use. Six Indians,
with broad leather or elkskin straps across
their foreheads, had been chartered to

carry the kits and traps. They were men
a 13
14 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of means and leisure, these artists, and
were making the trip for the fish, game,
scenery and excitement and everything, in
fact, that was in the adventure. I was
merely their hired guide.

This second morning out, the Indians—
poor slaves, perhaps, from the first, cer-
tainly not warriors with any spirit in them
—began to sulk. They had risen early and
kept hovering together and talking, or,
rather, making signs in the gloomiest sort
of fashion. We had hard work to get them
to do anything at all, and even after break-
fast was ready they packed up without
tasting food.

The air was ugly, for that region—hot,
heavy, and without light or life. It was
what in some parts of South Amexica they
call “earthquake weather.” Even the
horses sulked as we mounted; but the mule
shot ahead through the brush at once, and
this induced the ponies to follow.

The Englishmen thought the Indians
and horses were only tired from the day




A BEAR ON FIRE. 15

before, but we soon found the whole force
plowing ahead through the dense brush
and over fallen timber on a double quick.
Then we heard low, heavy thunder in the
heavens. Were they running away from a
thunder-storm? The English artists, who
had been doing India and had come to love
the indolent patience and obedience of the
black people, tried to call a halt. No use.
I shouted to the Indians in their own
tongue. “Tokau! Ki-sa! Kiu!’ (Hasten!
Quick! Quick!) was all the answer I could
get from the red, hot face that was thrown
for a moment back over the load and
shoulder. So we shot forward. In fact,
the horses now refused all regard for the
bit, and made their own way through the
brush with wondrous skill and speed.
We were flying from fire, not flood! Piti-
ful what a few years of neglect will do
toward destroying a forest! When a lad
I had galloped my horse in security and
comfort all through this region. It was
like a park then. Now it was a dense
16 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

tangle of undergrowth and a mass of fallen
timber. What a feast for flames! In one
of the very old books on America in the
British Museum—possibly the very oldest
on the subject—the author tells of the
park-like appearance of the American for-
ests. He tells his English friends back at
home that it is most comfortable to ride
to the hounds, “since the Indian squats
(Squaws) do set fire to the brush and leaves
every spring,” etc.

But the “squats” had long since disap-
peared from the forests of Mount Shasta;
and here we were tumbling over and tear-
ing through ten years’ or more of accumu-
lation of logs, brush, leaves, weeds and
grass that lay waiting for a sea of fire to
roll over all like a mags of lava.

And now the wind blew past and over
us. Bits of white ashes sifted down like
snow. Surely the sea of fire was coming,
coming right on after us! Still there was
no sign, save this little sift of ashes, no
sound; nothing at all except the trained
A BEAR ON FIRE. 17

sense of the Indians and the terror of the
“cattle” (this is what the Englishmen
called our horses) to give us warning.

In a short time we struck an arroyo, or
canyon, that was nearly free from brush
and led steeply down to the cool, deep
waters of the McCloud River. Here we
found the Indians had thrown their loads
and themselves on the ground.

They got up in sulky silence, and, strip-
ping our horses, turned them loose; and
then, taking our saddles, they led us
hastily up out of the narrow mouth of the
arroyo under a little steep stone bluff.

They did not say a word or make any
sign, and we were all too breathless and
bewildered to either question or protest.
The sky was black, and thunder made the
woods tremble. We were hardly done wip-
ing the blood and perspiration from our
torn hands and faces where we sat when
the mule jerked up his head, sniffed, snort-
ed and then plunged headlong into the
river and struck out for the deep forest
18 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

on the farther bank, followed by the
ponies.

The mule is the most traduced of all ani-
mals. A single mule has more sense than
a whole stableful of horses. You can han-
dle a mule easily if the barn is burning; he
keeps his head; but a horse becomes in-
sane. He will rush right into the fire, if
allowed to, and you can only handle him,
and that with difficulty if he sniffs the fire,
by blindfolding him. Trust a mule in case
of peril or a panic long before a horse. The
brother of Solomon and willful son of David
surely had some of the great temple-build-
er’s wisdom and discernment, for we read
that he rode a mule. True, he lost his head
and got hung up by the hair, but that is
nothing against the mule.

As we turned our eyes from seeing the
animals safely over, right there by us and
a little behind us, through the willows of
the canyon and over the edge of the water,
we saw peering and pointing toward the
A BEAR ON FIRE. 19

other side dozens of long black and brown
outreaching noses. Elk!

They had come noiselessly, they stood
motionless. They did not look back or
aside, only straight ahead. We could al-
most have touched the nearest one. They

were large and fat, almost as fat as cows;
certainly larger than the ordinary Jersey.
The peculiar thing about them was the
way, the level way, in which they held their
small, long heads—straight out; the huge
horns of the males lying far back on their
shoulders. And then for the first time I
could make out what these horns are for
—to part the brush with as they lead
through the thicket, and thus save their
coarse coats of hair, which is very rotten,
and could be torn off in a little time if not
thus protected. They are never used to
fight with, never; the elk uses only his
_feet. If on the defense, however, the male
elk will throw his nose close to the ground
and receive the enemy on his horns.
Suddenly and all together, and perhaps
20 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

they had only paused a second, they moved
on into the water, led by a bull with a
head of horns like a rocking-chair. And
his rocking-chair rocked his head under
water much of the time. The cold, swift
water soon broke the line, only the leader
making the bank directly before us, while
the others drifted far down and out of
sight.

Our artists, meantime, had dug up pencil
and pad and begun work. But an Indian
jerked the saddles, on which the English-
men sat, aside, and the work was stopped.
Everything was now packed up close under
the steep little ledge of rocks. An ava-
lanche of smaller wild animals, mostly
deer, was upon us. Many of these had their
tongues hanging from their half-opened
mouths. They did not attempt to drink, as
you would suppose, but slid into the water
silently almost as soon as they came.
Surely they must have seen us, but cer
tainly they took no notice of us. And such
order! No crushing or crowding, as you
A BEAR ON FIRE. 21

see cattle in corrals, aye, as you see people
sometimes in the cars.

And now came a torrent of little creep-
ing things: rabbits, rats, squirrels! None
of these smaller creatures attempted to
cross, but crept along in the willows and
brush close to the water.

They loaded down the willows till they
bent into the water, and the terrified little
creatures floated away without the least
bit of noise or confusion. And still the
black skies were filled with the solemn
boom of thunder. In fact, we had not yet
heard any noise of any sort except thunder,
not even our own voices. There was some-
thing more eloquent in the air now, some-
thing more terrible than man or beast, and
all things were awed into silence—a pro-
found silence.

And all this time countless creatures,
little creatures and big, were crowding the
bank on our side or swimming across or
floating down, down, down the swift, wood-
hung waters. Suddenly the stolid leader
22 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of the Indians threw his two naked arms in
the air and let them fall, limp and helpless
at his side; then he pointed out into the
stream, for there embers and living and
dead beasts began to drift and sweep down
the swift waters from above. The Indians
now gathered up the packs and saddles
and made a barricade above, for it was
clear that many a living thing would now
be borne down upon us.

The two Englishmen looked one another
in the face long and thoughtfully, pulling
their feet under them to keep from being
trodden on. Then, after another avalanche
of creatures of all sorts and sizes, a sort of
Noah’s ark this time, one of them said to
the other:

“Beastly, you know!”

“Awful beastly, don’t you know!” _

As they were talking entirely to them-
selves and in their own language, I did
not trouble myself to call their attention
to an enormous yellow rattlesnake which
had suddenly and noiselessly slid down,
A BEAR ON FIRE. 23

over the steep little bluff of rocks behind
us, into our midst.

But now note this fact—every man
there, red or white, saw or felt that huge
and noiseless monster the very second she
slid among us. For as I looked, even as I
first looked, and then turned to see what
the others would say or do, they were all
looking at the glittering eyes set in that
coffin-like head.

The Indians did not move back or seem
nearly so much frightened as when they
saw the drift of embers and dead beasts in
the river before them; but the florid En-
glishmen turned white! They. resolutely
arose, thrust their hands in their pockets
and stood leaning their backs hard against
the steep bluff. Then another snake, long,
black and beautiful, swept his supple neck
down between them and thrust his red
tongue forth—as if a bit of the flames had
already reached us.

Fortunately, this particular “wisest of
all the beasts of the field,” was not dis-
24 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

posed to tarry. In another second he had
Swung to the ground and was making a
thousand graceful curves in the swift
water for the further bank.

The world, even the world of books,
seems to know nothing at all about the
wonderful snakes that live in the woods.
The woods rattlesnake is as large as at
least twenty ordinary rattlesnakes; and
Indians say it is entirely harmless. The
enormous black snake, I know, is entirely
without venom. In all my life, spent most-
ly in the camp, I have seen only three of
those monstrous yellow woods rattle-
snakes; one in Indiana, one in Oregon and
the other on this occasion here on the
banks of the McCloud. Such bright eyes!
It was hard to stop looking at them.

Meantime a good many bears had come
and gone. The bear is a good swimmer,
and takes to the water without fear. He
is, in truth, quite a fisherman; so much of
a fisherman, in fact, that in salmon season
here his flesh is unfit for food. The pitiful
A BEAR ON FIRE. 25

part of it all was to see such little crea-
tures as could not swim clinging all up
and down and not daring to take to the
water.

Unlike his domesticated brother, we saw
several wild-cats take to the water prompt-
ly. The wild-cat, you must know, has no
tail to speak of. But the panther and Cali-
fornian lion are well equipped in this re-
spect and abhor the water.

I constantly kept an eye over my shoul-
der at the ledge or little bluff of rocks, ex-
pecting to see a whole row of lions and
panthers sitting there, almost “cheek by
jowl” with my English friends, at any mo-
ment. But strangely enough, we saw
neither panther nor lion; nor did we see
a single grizzly among all the bears that
came that way.

We now noticed that one of the Indians
had become fascinated or charmed by look-
ing too intently at the enormous serpent in
our midst. The snake’s huge, coffin-shaped
head, as big as your open palm, was slowly
26. TRUE BEAR STORIES.

swaying from. side to side. The Indian’s
head was doing the same, and their eyes
were drawing closer and closer together.
Whatever there may be in the Bible story
of Eve and the serpent, whether a figure
or a fact, who shall say?—but it is cer-
tainly, in some sense, true.

An Indian will not kill a rattlesnake.
But to break the charm, in this case, they
caught their companion by the shoulders
and forced him back fiat on the ground.
And there he lay, crying like a child, the
first and only Indian I ever saw cry. And
then suddenly boom! boom! boom! as if
heaven burst. It began to rain in torrents.

And just then, as we began to breathe
freely and feel safe, there came a crash
and bump and bang above our heads, and
high over our heads from off the ledge be-
hind us! Over our heads like a rocket, in
an instant and clear into the water, leaped
a huge black bear, a ball of fire! his fat
sides in flame. He sank out of sight but
soon came up, spun around like a top, dived


k bear.

ter leaped a blac.

Into the wa’
A BEAR ON FIRE. 27

again, then again spun around. But he
got across, I am glad to say. And this al-
ways pleases my little girl, Juanita. He
sat there on the bank looking back at us
quite a time. Finally he washed his face,
like a cat, then quietly went away. The
rattlesnake was the last to cross.

The beautiful yellow beast was not at
all disconcerted, but with the serenest dig-
nity lifted her yellow folds, coiled and un-
coiled slowly, curved high in the air,
arched her glittering neck of gold, widened
her body till broad as your two hands, and
so slid away over the water to the other
side through the wild white rain. The
cloudburst put out the fire instantly, show-
ing that, though animals have superhuman
foresight, they don’t know everything be-
fore the time.

“Beastly! I didn’t get a blawsted sketch,
you know.”

“Awful beastly! Neither did I, don’t you
know.”

aud that was all my English friends
28. TRUE BEAR STORIES.

said. The Indians made their moaning and
whimpering friend who had been overcome
by the snake pull himself together and
they swam across and gathered up the
“cattle.”

Some men say a bear cannot leap; but I
say there are times when a bear can leap
like a tiger. This was one of the times.
ee
MUSIC-LOVING BEARS.

No, don’t despise the bear, either in his
life or his death. He is a kingly fellow,
every inch a king; a curious, monkish,
music-loving, roving Robin Hood of his
somber woods—a silent monk, who knows
a great deal more than he tells. And please
don’t go to look at him and sit in judgment
on him behind the bars. Put yourself in
his place and see how much of manhood or
kinghood would be left in you with a muz-
zle on your mouth, and only enough liberty
left to push your nose between two rusty
bars and catch the peanut which the good
little boy has found to be a bad one and so
generously tosses it to the bear.

Of course, the little boy, remembering
the experience of about forty other little
boys in connection with the late bald-
headed Elijah, has a prejudice against the

3 29
30 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

bear family, but why the full-grown man
should so continually persist in caging this
shaggy-coated, dignified, kingly and an-
cient brother of his, I cannot see, unless it
is that he knows almost nothing at all of
his better nature, his shy, innocent love of
a joke, his partiality for music and his im-
perial disdain of death. And so, with a
desire that man may know a little more
about this storied and classic creature
which, with noiseless and stately tread, has
come down to us out of the past, and is as
quietly passing away from the face of the
earth, these fragmentary facts are set
down. But first as to his love of music. A
bear loves music better than he loves
honey, and that is saying that he loves
music better than he loves his life.

We were going to mill, father and I, and
Lyte Howard, in Oregon, about forty years
ago, with ox-teams, a dozen or two bags of
wheat, threshed with a flail and winnowed
with a wagon cover, and were camped for
the night by the Calipoola River; for it took
MUSIC-LOVING BEARS. 31

two days to reach the mill. Lyte got out
his fiddle, keeping his gun, of course, close
at hand. Pretty soon the oxen came down,
came very close, so close that they almost
put their cold, moist noses against the
backs of our necks as we sat there on the
ox-yokes or reclined in our blankets,
around the crackling pine-log fire and lis-
tened to the wild, sweet strains that swept
ap and down and up till the very tree tops
seemed to dance and quiver with delight.
Then suddenly father seemed to feel the
presence of something or somebody
strange, and I felt it, too. But the fiddler
felt, heard, saw nothing but the divine,
wild melody that made the very pine trees
dance and quiver to their tips. Oh, for the
pure, wild, sweet, plaintive music once
more! the music of “Money Musk,” “Zip
Coon,” “Ol’ Dan Tucker” and all the other
dear old airs that once made a thousand
happy feet keep time on the puncheon
floors from Hudson’s bank to the Oregon.
But they are no more, now. They have
32 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

passed away forever with the Indian, the
pioneer, and the music-loving bear. It is
strange how a man—TI mean the natural
man—will feel a presence long before he
hears it or sees it. ‘You can always feel the
approach of a—but I forget. You are of
another generation, a generation that only
reads, takes thought at second hand only,
if at all, and you would not understand;
so let us get forward and not waste time
in explaining the unexplainable to you.

Father got up, turned about, put me be-
hind him like, as an animal will its young,
and peered back and down through the
dense tangle of the deep river bank be-
tween two of the huge oxen which had
crossed the plains with us to the water’s
edge; then he reached around and drew me
to him with his left hand, pointing between
the oxen sharp down the bank with his
right forefinger.

A bear! two bears! and another coming;
one already more than half way across on
the great, mossy log that lay above the
MUSIC-LOVING BEARS. 33

deep, sweeping waters of the Calipoola;
and Lyte kept on, and the wild, sweet
music leaped up and swept through the de-
lighted and dancing boughs above. Then
father reached back to the fire and thrust
a long, burning bough deeper into the dy-
ing embers and the glittering sparks leaped
and laughed and danced and swept out and
up and up as if to companion with the
stars. Then Lyte knew. He did not hear,
he did not see, he only felt; but the fiddle
forsook his fingers and his chin in a second,
and his gun was to his face with the muzzle
thrust down between the oxen. And then
my father’s gentle hand reached out, lay
on that long, black, Kentucky rifle barrel,
and it dropped down, slept once more at
the fiddler’s side, and again the melodies;
and the very stars came down, believe me,
to listen, for they never seemed so big and
so close by before. The bears sat down on
their haunches at last, and one of them
kept opening his mouth and putting out his
red tongue, as if he really wanted to taste
84 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the music. Every now and then one of
them would lift up a paw and gently tap
the ground, as if to keep time with the
music. And both my papa and Lyte said
next day that those bears really wanted to
dance.

And that is all there is to say about that,
except that my father was the gentlest gen-
tleman I ever knew and his influence must
have been boundless; for who ever before
heard of any hunter laying down his rifle
with a family of fat black bears holding
the little snow-white cross on their breasts
almost within reach of its muzzle?

The moon came up by and by, and the
chin of the weary fiddler sank lower and
lower, till all was still. The oxen lay down
and ruminated, with their noses nearly
against us. Then the coal-black bears
melted away before the milk-white moon,
and we slept there, with the sweet breath
of the cattle, like incense, upon us.

But how does a bear die? Ah, I had for-
gotten. I must tell you of death, then.
MUSIC-LOVING BEARS. 35

Well, we have different kinds of bears. I
know little of the Polar bear, and so say
nothing positively of him. I am told, how-
ever, that there is not, considering his size,
much snap or grit about him; but as for
the others, I am free to say that they live
and die like gentlemen.

T shall find time, as we go forward, to
set down many incidents out of my own
experience to prove that the bear is often
a humorist, and never by any means a bad
fellows)

Judge Highton, odd as it may seem, has
left the San Francisco bar for the “bar” of
Mount Shasta every season for more than
a quarter of a century, and he probably
knows more about bears than any other
eminently learned man in the world, and
Henry Highton will tell you that the bear
is a good fellow at home, good all through,
a brave, modest, sober old monk.

A monkish Robin Hood
In his good green wood.
III.
MY FIRST GRIZZLY.

One of Fremont’s men, Mountain Joe
had taken a fancy to me down in Oregon,
and finally, to put three volumes in three
lines, I turned up as partner in his Soda
Springs ranch on the Sacramento, where
the famous Shasta-water is now bottled, I
believe. Then the Indians broke out,
burned us up and we followed and fought
them in Castle rocks, and I was shot down.
Then my father came on to watch by my
side, where I lay, under protection of
soldiers, at the mouth of Shot Creek can-
yon.

As the manzanita berries began to turn
the mountain sides red and the brown pine
quills to sift down their perfumed carpets
at our feet, I began to feel some strength
and wanted to fight, but I had had enough

of Indians. I wanted to fight grizzly bears
36
MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 37

this time. The fact is, they used to leave
tracks in the pack trail every night, and
right close about the camp, too, as big as
the head of a barrel.

Now father was well up in woodcraft, no
man better, but he never fired a gun. Never,
in his seventy years of life among savages,
did that gentle Quaker, school-master,
magistrate and Christian ever fire a gun.
But he always allowed me to have my own
way as a hunter, and now that I was get-
ting well of my wound he was so glad and
grateful that he willingly joined in with
the soldiers to help me kill one of these
huge bears that had made the big tracks.

Do you know why a beast, a bear of all
beasts, is so very much afraid of fire? Well,
in the first place, as said before, a bear is
a gentleman, in dress as well as address,
and so likes a decent coat. If a bear should
get his coat singed he would hide away
from sight of both man and beast for half
a year. But back of his pride is the fact
that a fat bear will burn like a candle;
38 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the fire will not stop with the destruction
of his coat. And so, mean as it was, in the
olden days, when bears were as common
in California as cows are now, men used
to take advantage of this fear and kindle
pine-quill fires in and around his haunts
in the head of canyons to drive him out
and down and into ambush.

Read two or three chapters here between
the lines—lots of plans, preparations, dia-
grams. I was to hide near camp and wait
—to place the crescent of pine-quill fires
and all that. Then at twilight they all
went out and away on the mountain sides
around the head of the canyon, and I hid
behind a big rock near by the extinguished
camp-fire, with my old muzzle-loading Ken-
tucky rifle, lifting my eyes away up and
around to the head of the Manzanita can-
yon looking for the fires. A light! One,
two, three, ten! A sudden crescent of
forked flames, and all the fight and im-
petuosity of a boy of only a dozen years
was uppermost, and I wanted a bear!
MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 39

All alone I waited; got hot, cold, thirsty,
cross as a bear and so sick of sitting there
‘that I was about to go to my blankets, for
the flames had almost died out on the hills,
leaving only a circle of little dots and dying
embers, like a fading diadem on the mighty
lifted brow of the glorious Manzanita
mountain. And now the new moon came,
went softly and sweetly by, like a shy,
sweet maiden, hiding down, down out of
sight.

Crash! His head was thrown back, not
over his shoulder, as you may read but
never see, but down by his left foot, as he
looked around and back up the brown
mountain side. He had stumbled, or
rather, he had stepped on himself, for a
bear gets down hill sadly. If a bear ever
gets after you, you had better do down
hill-and go down hill fast. It will make
him mad, but that is not your affair. I
never saw a bear go down hill in a good
humor. What nature meant by making a
bear so short in the arms I don’t know.
40 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

Indians say he was first a man and walked
upright with a club on his shoulder, but
sinned and fell. As evidence of this, they
show that he can still stand up and fight
with his fists when hard pressed, but more
of this later on.

This huge brute before me looked almost
white in the tawny twilight as he stumbled
down through the steep tangle of cha-
parral into the opening on the stony bar
of the river.

He had evidently been terribly tangled
up and disgusted while in the bush and
jungle, and now, well out of it, with the
foamy, rumbling, roaring Sacramento
River only a few rods beyond him, into
which he could plunge with his glossy coat,
he seemed to want to turn about and shake
his huge fists at the crescent of fire in the
pine-quills that had driven him down the
mountain. He threw his enormous bulk
back on his haunches and rose up, and
rose up, and rose up! Qh, the majesty of
this king of our continent, as he seemed
MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 4]

to still keep rising! Then he turned slowly
around on his great hinder feet to look
back; he pushed his nose away out, then
drew it back, twisted his short, thick neck,
like that of a beer-drinking German, and
then for a final observation he tiptoed up,
threw his high head still higher in the air
and wiggled it about and sniffed and
sniffed and—bang!

I shot at him from ambush, with his
back toward me, shot at his back! For
Shame! Henry Highton would not have
done that; nor, indeed, would I or any
other real sportsman do such a thing now;
but I must plead the “Baby Act,” and all
the facts, and also my sincere penitence,
and proceed.

The noble brute did not fall, but let him-
self down with dignity and came slowly
forward. Hugely, ponderously, solemnly,
he was coming. And right here, if I should
set down what I thought about—where
father was, the soldiers, anybody, every-
body else, whether I had best just fall on
42 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

my face and “play possum” and put in a
little prayer or two on the side, like—well,
I was going on to say that if I should write
all that flashed and surged through my
mind in the next three seconds, you would
be very tired. I was certain I had not hit
the bear at all. As arule, you can always
see the “fur fly,” as hunters put it; only it
is not fur, but dust, that flies.

But this bear was very fat and hot, and
so there could have been no dust to fly.
After shuffling a few steps forward and
straight for the river, he suddenly surged
up again, looked all about, just as before,
then turned his face to the river and me,
the tallest bear that ever tiptoed up and up
and up in the Sierras. One, two, three
steps—on came the bear! and my gun
empty! Then he fell, all at once and all in
a heap. No noise, no moaning or groaning
at all, no clutching at the ground, as men
have seen Indians and even white men do;
as if they would hold the earth from pass-
ing away—nothing of that sort. He lay
MY FIRST GRIZZLY. 43

quite still, head down hill, on his left side,
gave just one short, quick breath, and then,
pulling up his great right paw, he pushed
his nose and eyes under it, as if to shut out
the light forever, or, maybe, to muffle up
his face as when “great Ceesar fell.”

And that was all. I had killed a grizzly
bear; nearly as big as the biggest ox.


IV.
TWIN BABIES.

These twin babies were black. They
were black as coal. Indeed, they were -
blacker than coal, for they glistened in
their oily blackness. They were young baby
bears; and so exactly alike that no one
could, in any way, tell the one from the
other. And they were orphans. They
had been found at the foot of a small cedar
tree on the banks of the Sacramento River,
near the now famous Soda Springs, found
by a tow-headed boy who was very fond
of bears and hunting. /

But at the time the twin babies were
- found Soda Springs was only a wild camp,
or way station, on the one and only trail
that wound through the woods and up and
down mountains for hundreds of miles,
connecting the gold fields of California

with the pastoral settlements away to the
44
He threw his enormous buik back an his havnches, and rose up.—Page 40.










TWIN BABIES. 45

north in Oregon. But a railroad has now
taken the place of that tortuous old pack-
trail,and you can whisk through these wild
and woody mountains, and away on down
through Oregon and up through Washing-
ton, Montana, Dakota, Minnesota, Wiscon-
sin and on to Chicago without even once
getting out of your car, if you like. Yet
such a persistent ride is not probable, for
fish, pheasants, deer, elk, and bear still
abound here in their ancient haunts, and
the temptation to get out and fish or hunt
is too great to be resisted.

This place where the baby bears were
found was first owned by three men
or, rather, by two men and a boy. One
of the men was known as Mountain Joe.
He had once been a guide in the service of
General Fremont, but he was now a
drunken fellow and spent most of his time
at the trading post, twenty miles down the
river. He is now an old man, almost blind,
and lives in Oregon City, on a pension re-
ceived as a soldier of the Mexican war. The
46 TRUE BEAR STORIKS.

other man’s name was Sil Reese. He, also,
is living and famously rich—as rich as he
is stingy, and that is saying that he is very
rich indeed.

The boy preferred the trees to the house,
partly because it was more pleasant and
partly because Sil Reese, who had a large
nose and used it to talk with constantly,
_kept grumbling because the boy, who had
been wounded in defending the ranch, was
not able to work—wash the dishes, maky
fires and so on, and help in a general anil
particular way about the so-called “Sod:
Spring Hotel.” This Sil Reese was cet-
tainly a mean man, as has, perhaps, been
set down in this sketch before.

The baby bears were found asleep, and
alone. How they came to be there, and,
above all, how they came to be left long
enough alone by their mother for a feeble
boy to rush forward at sight of them, catch
them up in his arms and escape with them,
will always be a wonder. But this one
thing is certain, you had about as well
TWIN BABIES. 47

take up two rattlesnakes in your arms as
two baby bears, and hope to get off un-
harmed, if the mother of the young bears
is within a mile of you. This boy, however,
had not yet learned caution, and he prob-
ably was not born with much fear in his
make-up. And then he was so lonesome,
and this man Reese was so cruel and so
cross, with his big nose like a sounding
fog-horn, that the boy was glad to get even
a. bear to love and play with.

They, so far from being frightened or
cross, began to root around under his arms
and against his breast, like little pigs, for
something to eat.. Possibly their mother
had been killed by hunters, for they were
nearly famished. When he got them home,
how they did eat! This also made Sil Reese
mad. For, although the boy, wounded as
he was, managed to shoot down a deer not
too far from the house almost every day,
and so kept the “hotel” in meat, still it
made Reese miserable and envious to see
48 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the boy so happy with his sable and woolly
little friends. Reese was simply mean!

Before a month the little black boys be-
gan to walk erect, carry stick muskets,
wear paper caps, and march up and down
before the door of the big log “hotel” like
soldiers.

But the cutest trick they learned was
-that of waiting on the table. With little
round caps and short white aprons, the
little black boys would stand behind the
long bench on which the guests sat at the
pine board table and pretend to take orders
with all the precision and solemnity of
Southern negroes.

Of course, it is to be confessed that they
often dropped things, especially if the least
bit hot; but remember we had only tin
plates and tin or iron dishes of all sorts,
so that little damage was done if a dish
did happen to fall and rattle down on the
earthen floor.

Men came from far and near and often
TWIN BABIES. 49

lingered all day to see these cunning and
intelligent creatures perform.

About this time Mountain Joe fought a
duel with another mountaineer down at
the trading post, and this duel, a bloodless
and foolish affair, was all the talk. Why
not have the little black fellows fight a
duel also? They were surely civilized
enough to fight now!

And so, with a very few days’ training,
they fought a duel exactly like the one in
which poor, drunken old Mountain Joe was
engaged; even to the detail of one of them
suddenly dropping his stick gun and run-
ning away and falling headlong in a pros-
pect hole.

When Joe came home and saw this duel
and saw what a fool he had made of him-
self, he at first was furiously angry. But
it made him sober, and he kept sober for
half a year. Meantime Reese was mad as
ever, more mad, in fact, than ever before.
For he could not endure to see the boy have
any friends of any kind. Above all, he did
50 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

not want Mountain Joe to stay at home
or keep sober. He wanted to handle all
the money and answer no questions. A
drunken man and a boy that he could bully
suited him best. Ah, but this man Reese
was a mean fellow, as has been said a time
or two before.

As winter came on the two blacks were
fat as pigs and fully half-grown. Their ap-
petites increased daily, and so did the
anger and envy of Mr. Sil Reese.

“They’ll eat us out o’ house and hum,”
said the big, towering nose one day, as the
snow began to descend and close up the
pack trails. And then the stingy man pro-
posed that the blacks should be made to
hibernate, as others of their kind. There
was a big, hollow log that had been sawed
off in joints to make bee gums; and the
stingy man insisted that they should be
put in there with a tight head, and a pack
of hay for a bed, and nailed up till spring
to save provisions.

Soon there was an Indian outbreak.
TWIN BABIKS. 51

Some one from the ranch, or “hotel,’’ must
go with the company of volunteers that
was forming down at the post for a winter
campaign. Of course Reese would not go.
He wanted Mountain Joe to go and get
killed. But Joe was sober now and he
wanted to stay and watch Reese.

And that is how it came about that the
two black babies were tumbled headlong
into a big, black bee gum, or short, hollow
log, on a heap of hay, and nailed up for
the winter. The boy had to go to the war.

It was late in the spring when the boy,
having neglected to get himself killed, to
the great disgust of Mr. Sil Reese, rode
down and went straight up to the big black
bee gum in the back yard. He put his ear
to a knothole. Not asound. He tethered
his mule, came back and tried to shake the
short, hollow log. Not a sound or sign or
movement of any kind. Then he kicked the
big black gum with all his might. Nothing.
Rushing to the wood-pile, he caught up
an ax and in a moment had the whole end
52 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of the big gum caved in, and, to his infinite
delight, out rolled the twins!

But they were merely the ghosts of them-
selves. They had been kept in a month
or more too long, and were now so weak
and so lean that they could hardly stand
on their feet.

“Kill ’em and put ’em out o’ misery,”
said Reese, for run from him they really
could not, and he came forward and kicked
one of them flat down on its face as it was
trying hard to stand on its four feet.

The boy had grown some; besides, he
was just from the war and was now strong
and well. He rushed up in front of Reese,
and he must have looked unfriendly, for Sil
Reese tried to smile, and then at the same
time he turned hastily to go into the house.
And when he got fairly turned around,
the boy kicked him precisely where he had
kicked the bear. And he kicked him hard,
so hard that he pitched forward on his face
just as the bear had done. He got up
quickly, but he did not look back. He
TWIN BABIES. 53

seemed to have something to do in the
house.

In a month the babies, big babies now,
were sleek and fat. It is amazing how these
creatures will eat after a short nap of a
few months, like that. And their cunning
tricks, now! And their kindness to their
master! Ah! their glossy black coats and
their brilliant black eyes!

And now three men came. Two of these
men were Italians from San Francisco.
The third man was also from that city,
but he had an amazing big nose and re-
fused to eat bear meat. He thought it was
pork.

They took tremendous interest in the big
black twins, and stayed all night and till
late next day, seeing them perform.

“Seventy-five dollars,” said one big nose
to the other big nose, back in a corner
where they thought the boy did not hear.

“One hundred and fifty. You see, I'll
have to give my friends fifty each. Yes,
it’s true I’ve took care of ’em all winter,
54 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

but I ain’t mean, and I'll only keep fifty
of it.”

The boy, bursting with indignation, ran
to Mountain Joe with what he had heard.
But poor Joe had been sober for a long
time, and his eyes fairly danced in delight
at having $50 in his own hand and right
to spend it down at the post.

And so the two Italians muzzled the big,
pretty pets and led them kindly down the
trail toward the city, where they were to
perform in the streets, the man with the
big nose following after the twins on a big
white mule. .

And what became of the big black twin
babies? They are still performing, seem
content and happy, sometimes in a circus,
sometimes in a garden, sometimes in the
stveet. They are great favorites and have
never done harm to anyone.

And what became of Sil Reese? Well,
as said before, he still lives, is very rich
and very miserable. He met the boy—the
boy that was—on the street the other day


TWIN BABIES. 55

and wanted to talk of old times. He told
the boy he ought to write something about
the old times and put him, Sil Reese, in it.
He said, with that same old sounding nose
and sickening smile, that he wanted the
boy to be sure and put his, Sil Reese’s
name, in it so that he could show it to his
friends. And the boy has done so.

The boy? You want to know what the
boy is doing? Well, in about a second he
will be signing his autograph to the bot-
tom of this story about his twin babies.
NV.
IN SWIMMING WITH A BEAR.

What made these ugly rows of scars on
my left hand?

Well, it might have been buckshot; only
it wasn’t. Besides, buckshot would be scat-
tered about, “sort of promiscuous like,” as
backwoodsmen say. But these ugly little
holes are all in a row, or rather in two
rows. Now a wolf might have made these
holes with his fine white teeth, or a bear
might have done it with his dingy and
ugly teeth, long ago. I must here tell you
that the teeth of a bear are not nearly so
fine as the teeth of a wolf. And the teeth
of a lion are the ugliest of them all. They
are often broken and bent; and they are
always of a dim yellow color. It is from
this yellow hue of the lion’s teeth that we
have the name of one of the most famous

early flowers of May: dent de lion, tooth
56
SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 57

of the lion; dandelion. Get down your
botany, now, find the Anglo-Asian name of
the flower, and fix this fact on your mind
before you read further.

I know of three men, all old men now,
who have their left hands all covered with
scars. One is due to the wolf; the others
owe their scars to the red mouths of black
bears.

You see, in the old days, out here in Cal-
ifornia, when the Sierras were full of bold
young fellows hunting for gold, quite a
number of them had hand-to-hand battles
with bears. For when we came out here
“the woods were full of ’em.”

Of course, the first thing a man does
when he finds himself face to face with a
bear that won’t run and he has no gun—
and that is always the time when he finds
a bear—why, he runs, himself; that is, if
the bear will let him.

But it is generally a good deal like the
old Crusader who “caught a Tartar” long
58 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ago, when on his way to capture Jerusa-
lem, with Peter the Hermit.

“Come on!” cried Peter to the helmeted
and knightly old Crusader, who sat his
horse with lance in rest on a hill a little in
the rear. “Come on!”

“T can’t! DPve caught a Tartar.”

“Well, bring him along.”

“He won’t come.”

“Well, then, come without him.”

“He won't let me.”

And so it often happened in the old days
out here. When a man “caught” his bear
and didn’t have his gun he had to fight
it out hand-to-hand. But fortunately, every
man at all times had a knife in his belt.
A knife never gets out of order, never
“snaps,” and a man in those days always
had to have it with him to cut his food,
cut brush, “crevice” for gold, and so on.

Oh! it is a grim picture to see a young
fellow in his red shirt wheel about, when
he can’t run, thrust out his left hand, draw
his knife with his right, and so, breast. to
SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 59

breast, with the bear erect, strike and
strike and strike to try to reach his heart
before his left hand is eaten off to the el-
bow!

We have five kinds of bears in the Sier-
ras. The “boxer,” the “biter,” the “hug-
ger,” are the most conspicuous. The other
two are a sort of “all round” rough and
tumble style of fighters.

The grizzly is the boxer. A game old
beast he is, too, and would knock down all
the John L. Sullivans you could put in the
Sierras faster than you could set them up.
He is a kingly old fellow and disdains fa-
miliarity. Whatever may be said to the
contrary, he never “hugs” if he has room
to box. In some desperate cases he has
been known to bite, but ordinarily he obeys
“the rules of the ring.”

The cinnamon bear is a lazy brown
brute, about one-half the size of the grizzly.
He always insists on being very familiar,
if not affectionate. This is the “hugger.”

ess in order comes the big, sleek, black
60 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

bear; easily tamed, too lazy to fight, unless
forced to it. But when “cornered” he fights
well, and, like a lion, bites to the bone.
After this comes the small and quarrel-
some black bear with big ears, and a white
spot on his breast. I have heard hunters
say, but I don’t quite believe it, that he
sometimes points to this white spot on his
breast as a sort of Free Mason’s sign, as if
to say, “Don’t shoot.” Next in order comes
the smaller black bear with small ears. He
is ubiquitous, as well as omniverous;
gets into pig-pens, knocks over your bee-
hives, breaks open your milk-house, eats
more than two good-sized hogs ought to
eat, and is off for the mountain top before
you dream he is about. The first thing you
see in the morning, however, will be some
muddy tracks on the door steps. For he
always comes and snuffles and shuffles and
smells about the door in a good-natured
sort of way, and leaves his card. The fifth
member of the great bear family is not
SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 61

much bigger than an ordinary dog; but he
is numerous, and he, too, is a nuisance.

Dog? Why not set the dog on him? Let
me tell you. The California dog is a lazy,
degenerate cur. He ought to be put with
the extinct animals. He devotes his time
and his talent to the flea. Not six months
ago I saw a coon,on his way to my fish-pond
in the pleasant moonlight, walk within
two feet of my dog’s nose and not disturb
his slumbers,

We hope that it is impossible ever to
have such a thing as hydrophobia in Cali-
fornia. But as our dogs are too lazy to
bite anything, we have thus far been un-
able to find out exactly as to that.

This last-named bear has a big head and
small body; has a long, sharp nose and
longer and sharper teeth than any of the
others; he is a natural thief, has low in-

-stincts, carries his nose close to the ground,
and, wherever possible, makes his road
along on the mossy surface of fallen trees

in humid forests. He eats fish—dead and
5
62 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

decaying salmon—in such abundance that
his flesh is not good in the salmon season.

It was with this last described specimen
of the bear family that a precocious old
boy who had hired out to some horse drov-
ers, went in swimming years and years
ago. The two drovers had camped to re-
cruit and feed their horses on the wild
grass and clover that grew at the headwa-
ters of the Sacramento River, close up un-
der the foot of Mount Shasta. A pleasant
spot it was, in the pleasant summer
weather. |

This warm afternoon the two men saun-
tered leisurely away up Soda Creek to
where their horses were grazing belly deep
in grass and clover. They were slow to
return, and the boy, as all boys will, began
to grow restless. He had fished, he had
hunted, had diverted himself in a dozen
ways, but now he wanted something new..
He got it.

A little distance below camp could be
seen, through the thick foliage that hung
SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 68

and swung and bobbed above the swift
waters, a long, mossy log that lay far out
and far above the cool, swift river.

Why not go down through the trees and
go out on that log, take off his clothes,
dangle his feet, dance on the moss, do any-
thing, everything that a. boy wants to do?

In two minutes the boy was out on the
big, long, mossy log, kicking his boots off,
and in two minutes more he was dancing
up and down on the humid, cool moss, and
as naked as the first man, when he was.
first made.

And it was very pleasant. The great,
strong river splashed and dashed and
boomed below; above him the long green
branches hung dense and luxuriant and
almost within reach. Far off and away
through their shifting shingle he caught
glimpses of the bluest of all blue skies.
. And a little to the left he saw gleaming
in the sun and almost overhead the ever-
lasting snows of Mount Shasta.

Putting his boots and his clothes all
64 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

carefully in a heap, that nothing might roll
off into the water, he walked, or rather
danced on out to where the further end
of the great fallen tree lay lodged on a
huge boulder in the middle of the swift
and surging river. His legs dangled down
and he patted his plump thighs with great
satisfaction. Then he leaned over and saw
some gold and silver trout, then he flopped
over and lay down on his breast to get a
better look at them. Then he thought he
heard something behind him on the other
end of the log! He pulled himself together
quickly and stood erect, face about. There
was a bear! It was one of those mean,
sneaking, long-nosed, ant-eating little fel-
lows, it is true, but it was a bear! Anda
bear is a bear to a boy, no matter about
his size, age or character. The boy stood
high up. The boy’s bear stood up. And
the boy’s hair stood up!

The bear had evidently not seen the boy
yet. But it had smelled his boots and
clothes, and had got upon his dignity. But
SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 65

now, dropping down on all fours, with nose
close to the mossy butt of the log, it slowly
shuffled forward.

That boy was the stillest boy, all this
time, that has ever been. Pretty soon the
bear reached the clothes. He stopped, sat
down, nosed them about as a hog might,
and then slowly and lazily got up; but with
a singular sort of economy of old clothes,
for a bear, he did not push anything off
into the river.

What next? Would he come any farther?
Would he? Could he? Will he? The long,
sharp little nose was once more to the moss
and sliding slowly and surely toward the
poor boy’s naked shins. Then the boy shiv-
ered and settled down, down, down on his
haunches, with his little hands clasped till
he was all of a heap. ;

He tried to pray, but somehow or an-
_ other, all he could think of as he sat there
crouched down with all his clothes off was:

“Now I lay me down to sleep.”
66 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

But all this could not last. The bear
was almost on him in half a minute, al-
though he did not lift his nose six inches
till almost within reach of the boy’s toes.
Then the surprised bear suddenly stood up
and began to look the boy in the face. As
the terrified youth sprang up, he thrust out
his left hand as a guard and struck the
brute with all his might between the eyes
with the other. But the left hand lodged
in the two rows of sharp teeth and the boy
and bear rolled into the river together.

But they were together only an instant.
The bear, of course, could not breathe with
his mouth open in the water, and so had to
let go. Instinctively, or perhaps because
his course lay in that direction, the bear
struck out, swimming “dog fashion,” for
the farther shore. And as the boy certainly
had no urgent business on that side of the
river he did not follow, but kept very still,
clinging to the moss on the big boulder
till the bear had shaken the water from his
coat and disappeared in the thicket.
SWIMMING WITH A BEAR. 67

Then the boy, pale and trembling from
fright and the loss of blood, climbed up
the broken end of the log, got his clothes,
struggled into them as he ran, and so
reached camp.

And he had not yelled! He tied up hig
hand in a piece of old flour sack, all by him-
self, for the men had not yet got back;
and he didn’t whimper! And what became
of the boy? you ask.

The boy grew up as all energetic boys
do; for there seems to be a sort of special
providence for such boys
- And where is he now?

Out in California, trapping bear in the
winter and planting olive trees in their sea-
son.

And do I know him?

Yes, pretty well, almost as well as any
old fellow can know himself.
VI.

A FAT LITTLE EDITOR AND THREE
LITTLE “BROWNS.”

Mount Sinai, Heart of the Sierras—this
place is one mile east and a little less than
-one mile perpendicular from the hot, dusty
and dismal little railroad town down on
the rocky banks of the foaming and tum-
bling Sacramento River. Some of the old
miners are down there still—still working
on the desolate old rocky bars with rock-
ers. They have been there, some of them,
for more than thirty years. A few of them
have little orchards, or vineyards, on the
steep, overhanging hills, but there is no
home life, no white women to speak of, as
yet. The battered and gray old miners are
poor, lonely and discouraged, but they are
honest, stout-hearted still, and of a much
higher type than those that hang about the

towns. It is hot down on the river—too
68
A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. 69

hot, almost, to tell the truth. Even here
under Mount Shasta, in her sheets of eter-
nal snow, the mercury is at par.

This Mount Sinai is not a town; it is a
great spring of cold water that leaps from
the high, rocky front of a mountain which
we have located as a summer home in the
Sierras—myself and a few other scribes of
California.

This is the great bear land. One of our
party, a simple-hearted and honest city ed-
itor, who was admitted into our little
mountain colony because of his boundless
good nature and native goodness, had
never seen a bear before he came here. City
editors do not, as a rule, ever know much
about bears. This little city editor is bald-
headed, bow-legged, plain to a degree. And
maybe that is why he is so good. “Give
me fat men,” said Caesar.

But give me plain men for good men, any
time. Pretty women are to be preferred;
but pretty men? Bah! I must get on with
the bear, however, and make a long story
70 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

a short story. We found our fat, bent-
legged editor from the city fairly broiling
in the little railroad town, away down at
the bottom of the hill in the yellow golden
fields of the Sacramento; and he was so
limp and so lazy that we had to lay hold
of him and get him out of the heat and up
into the heart of the Sierras by main force.

Only one hour of climbing and we got
up to where the little mountain streams
come tumbling out of snow-banks on every
side. The Sacramento, away down below
and almost under us, from here looks
dwindled to a brawling brook; a foamy
white thread twisting about the boulders
as big as meeting houses, plunging for-
ward, white with fear, as if glad to get
away—as if there was a bear back there
where it came from. We did not register.
No, indeed. This place here on Square
Creek, among the clouds, where the water
bursts in a torrent from the living rock,
we have named Mount Sinai. We own the
whole place for one mile square—the tall
A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. V1

pine trees, the lovely pine-wood houses;
all, all. We proposed to hunt and fish,
for food. But we had some bread, some
bacon, lots of coffee and sugar. And so,
whipping out our hooks and lines, we set
off with the editor up a little mountain
brook, and in less than an hour were far
up among the fields of eternal snow, and
finely loaded with trout.

What a bed of pine quills! What long
and delicious cones for a camp fire! Some
of those sugar-pine cones are as long as
your arm. One of them alone will make a
lofty pyramid of flame and illuminate the
scene for half a mile about. I threw my-
self on my back and kicked up my heels.
I kicked care square in the face. Oh, what
freedom! How we would rest after dinner
here! Of course we could not all rest or
sleep at the same time. One of us would
- have to keep a pine cone burning all the
time. Bears are not very numerous out
here; but the California lion is both numer-
ous and large here. The wild-cat, too, is
72 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

no friend to the tourist. But we were not
tourists. The land was and is ours. We
would and all could defend our own.

The sun was going down. Glorious! The
shades of night were coming up out of the
gorges below and audaciously pursuing
the dying sun. Not asound. Not a sign
of man or of beast. We were scattered all
up and down the hill.

Crash! Something came tearing down
the creek through the brush! The fat and
simple-hearted editor, who had been dress-
ing the homeopathic dose of trout, which
inexperience had marked as his own,
sprang up from the bank of the tumbling
little stream above us and stood at his full
height. His stout little knees for the first
time smote together. I was a good way
below him on the steep hillside. A brother
editor was slicing bacon on a piece of re-
versed pine bark close by

“Fall down,” I cried, “fall flat down on
your face.”

It was a small she bear, and she was very
A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. 73

thin and very hungry, with cubs at her
heels, and she wanted that fat little city
editor’s fish, I know it would take
volumes to convince you that I really
meant for the bear to pass by him and
come after me and my friend with both
fish and bacon, and so, with half a line, I
assert this truth and pass on. Nor was I
in any peril in appropriating the little
brown bear to myself. Any man who
knows what he is about is as safe with a
bear on a steep hillside as is the best bull-
fighter in any arena. No bear can keep his
footing on a steep hillside, much less fight.
And whenever an Indian is in peril he al-
ways takes down hill till he comes to a
steep plane, and then lets the bear almost
overtake him, when he suddenly steps aside
and either knifes the bear to the heart or
lets the open-mouthed beast go on down
_the hill, heels over head.

The fat editor turned his face toward
me, and it was pale. “What! Lie down
and be eaten up while you lie there and
74 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

kick up your heels and enjoy yourself?
Never. We will die together!” he shouted.

He started for me as fast as his short
legs would allow. The bear struck at him
with her long, rattling claws. He landed
far below me, and when he got up he
hardly knew where he was or what he was.
His clothes were in shreds, the back and
bottom parts of them. The bear caught at
his trout and was gone in an instant back
with her two little cubs, and a moment
later the little family had dined and was
away, over the hill. She was a cinnamon
‘bear, not much bigger than a big, yellow
dog, and almost as lean and mean and hun-
gry as any wolf could possibly be. We
helped our inexperienced little friend
slowly down to camp, forgetting all about
the bacon and the fish till we came to the
little board house, where we had coffee.
Of course the editor could not go to the
table now. He leaned, or rather sat, against
a pine, drank copious cups of coffee and
watched the stars, while I heaped up great
A FAT LITTLE EDITOR. 15

piles of leaves and built a big fire, and so
night rolled by in all her starry splendor
as the men slept soundly all about beneath
the lordly pines. But alas for the fat little
editor; he did not like the scenery, and he
would not stay. We saw him to the sta-
tion on his way back to his little sanctum.
He said he was satisfied. He had seen the
“bar.” His last words were, as he pulled
himself close together in a modest corner
in the car and smiled feebly: “Say, boys,
you won’t let it get in the papers, will
you?”
VII.
TREEING A BEAR.

Away back in the “fifties” bears were as
numerous on the banks of the Willamette
River, in Oregon, as are hogs in the hick-
ory woods of Kentucky in nut time, and
that is saying that bears were mighty
plenty in Oregon about forty years ago.

‘You see, after the missionaries estab-
lished their great cattle ranches in Oregon
and gathered the Indians from the wilder-
ness and set them to work and fed them
on beef and bread, the bears had it all
their own way, till they literally overran
the land. And this gave a great chance for
sport to the sons of missionaries and the
sons of new settlers “where rolls the Ore-
gon.”

And it was not perilous sport, either,
for the grizzly was rarely encountered

76
TREEING A BEAR. 77

here. His home was further to the south.
Neither was the large and clumsy cinna-
mon bear abundant on the banks of the
beautiful Willamette in those dear old
days, when you might ride from sun
to sun, belly deep in wild flowers, and
never see a house. But the small black
bear, as indicated before, was on deck in
great force, at all times and in nearly all
places.

It was the custom in those days for boys
to take this bear with the lasso, usually on
horseback.

We would ride along close to the dense
woods that grew by the river bank, and,
getting between him and his base of re-
treat, would, as soon as we sighted a bear
feeding out in the open plain, swing our
lassos and charge him with whoop and
yell. His habit of rearing up and stand-
ing erect and looking about to see what
was the matter made him an easy prey to
the lasso. And then the fun of taking him
home through the long, strong grass!

&
78 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

As a rule, he did not show fight when
once in the toils of the lasso; but in a few
hours, making the best of the situation like
a little philosopher, he would lead along
like a dog.

There were, of course, exceptions to this
exemplary conduct.

On one occasion particularly, Ed Parish,
the son of a celebrated missionary, came
near losing his life by counting too con-
fidently on the docility of a bear which he
had taken with a lasso and was leading
home.

His bear suddenly stopped, stood up
and began to haul in the rope, hand over
hand, just like a sailor. And as the other
end of the rope was fastened tightly to the
big Spanish pommel of the saddle, why
of course the distance between the bear
and the horse soon grew perilously
short, and Ed Parish slid from his horse’s
back and took to the brush, leaving horse
and bear to fight it out as best they could.

When he came back, with some boys to
TREEING A BEAR. 79

help him, the horse was dead and the bear
was gone, having cut the rope with his
teeth.

After having lost his horse in this way,
poor little Ed Parish had to do his hunting
on foot, and, as my people were immigrants
and very poor, why we, that is my brother
and I, were on foot also. This kept us three
boys together a great deal, and many a pe-
culiar adventure we had in those dear days
“when all the world was young.”

Ed Parish was nearly always the hero
of our achievements, for he was a bold,
enterprising fellow, who feared nothing at
all. In fact, he finally lost his life from
his very great love of adventure. But this
is too sad to tell now, and we must be con-
tent with the story about how he treed a
hear for the present.

We three boys had gone bear hunting

_up a wooded canyon near his father’s ranch
late one warm summer afternoon. Ed had
a gun, but, as I said before, my people were
very poor, so neither brother nor I as yet
80 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

had any other arms or implements than the
inseparable lasso.

Ed, who was always the captain in such
cases, chose the center of the dense, deep
canyon for himself, and, putting my
brother on the hillside to his right and my-
self on the hillside to his left, ordered a
simultaneous “Forward march.”

After a time we heard him shoot. Then
we heard him shout. Then there was a
long silence.

Then suddenly, high and wild, his voice
rang out through the tree tops down in
the deep canyon.

“Come down! Come quick! I’ve treed
a bear! Come and help me catch him;
come quick! Oh, Moses! come quick, and
—and—and catch him!”

My brother came tearing down the
steep hill on his side of the canyon as I de-
scended from my side. We got down about
the same time, but the trees in their dense
foliage, together with the compact under-
TREEING A BEAR. 81

brush, concealed everything. We could see
neither bear nor boy.

This Oregon is a damp country, warm
and wet; nearly always moist and humid,
and so the trees are covered with moss.
Long, gray, sweeping moss swings from the
broad, drooping boughs of fir and pine and
cedar and nearly every bit of sunlight is
shut out in these canyons from one year’s
end to the other. And it rains here nearly
half of the year; and then these densely
wooded canyons are as dark as caverns. I
know of nothing so grandly gloomy as
these dense Oregon woods in this long
rainy season.

I laid my ear to the ground after I got
a glimpse of my brother on the other side
of the canyon, but could hear nothing at all
but the beating of my heart.

Suddenly there was a wild yell away up
in the dense boughs of a big mossy maple
tree that leaned over toward my side of
the canyon. I looked and looked with
eagerness, but could see nothing whatever.
82 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

Then again came the yell from the top
of the big leaning maple. Then there was
a moment of silence, and then the cry: “Oh,
Moses! Why don’t you come, I say, and
help me catch him?” By this time I could
see the leaves rustling. And I could see
the boy rustling, too.

And just behind him was a bear. He
had treed the bear, sure enough!

My eyes gradually grew accustomed to
the gloom and density, and I now saw the
red mouth of the bear amid the green foli-
age high overhead. The bear had already
pulled off one of Ed’s boots and was about
making a bootjack of his big red mouth
for the other.

“Why don’t you come on, I say, and help
me catch him?”

He kicked at the bear, and at the same

time hitched himself a little further along
up the leaning trunk, and in doing so
kicked his remaining boot into the bear’s
mouth.

iene ch a eet
TREEING A BEAR. 83

“Oh, Moses, Moses! Why don’t you
come? I’ve got a bear, I tell you.”

“Where is it, Hd?” shouted my brother
on the other side.

But Ed did not tell him, for he had not
yet got his foot from the bear’s mouth,
and was now too busy to do anything else
but yell and cry “Oh, Moses!’

Then my brother and I shouted out to
Ed at the same time. This gave him great
courage. He said something like “Con-
found you!” to the bear, and getting his
foot loose without losing the boot he kicked
the bear right on the nose. This brought
things to a standstill. Ed hitched along
a little higher up, and as the leaning trunk
of the tree was already bending under his
own and the bear’s weight, the infuriated
brute did not seem disposed to go further.
Besides, as he had been mortally wounded,
he was probably growing too weak to do
much now.

My brother got to the bottom of the
canyon and brought Ed’s gun to where I
84 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

stood. But, as we had no powder or bul-
lets, and as Ed could not get them to us,
even if he would have been willing to risk
our shooting at the bear, it was hard to
decide what to do. It was already dusk
and we could not stay there all night.

“Boys,” shouted Ed, at last, as he stead-
ied himself in the forks of a leaning and
overhanging bough, “I’m going to come
down on my laz rope. There, take that end
of it, tie your laz ropes to it and scramble
up the hill.”

We obeyed him to the letter, and as we
did so, he fastened his lasso firmly to the
jeaning bough and descended like a spider
to where we had stood a moment before.
We all scrambled up out of the canyon to-
gether and as quickly as possible.

When we went back next day to get our
ropes we found the bear dead near the root
of the old mossy maple. The skin was a
splendid one, and Ed insisted that my
brother and I should have it, and we gladly
accepted it.
TREEING A BEAR. 85

My brother, who was older and wiser
than I, said that he made us take the skin
so that we would not be disposed to tell
how he had “treed a bear.” But I trust
‘not, for he was a very generous-hearted
fellow. Anyhow, we never told the story
while he lived.
VIII.
BILL CROSS AND HIS PET BEAR.

When my father settled down at the foot
of the Oregon Sierras with his little family,
long, long years ago, it was about forty
miles from our place to the nearest civil-
ized settlement.

People were very scarce in those days,
and bears, as said before, were very plenty.
We also had wolves, wild-cats, wild cattle,
wild hogs, and a good many long-tailed and
big-headed yellow Californian lions.

The wild cattle, brought there from
Spanish Mexico, next to the bear, were
most to be feared. They had long, sharp
horns and keen, sharp hoofs. Nature had
gradually helped them out in these weap-
ons of defense. They had grown to be slim
and trim in body, and were as supple and

swift as deer. They were the deadly ene-
86
BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 87

mies of all wild beasts; because all wild
beasts devoured their young.

When fat and saucy, in warm summer
weather, these cattle would hover along
the foothills in bands, hiding in the hol-
lows, and would begin to bellow whenever
they saw a bear or a wolf, or even a man
or boy, if on foot, crossing the wide valley
of grass and blue camas blossoms. Then
there would be music! They would start
up, with heads and tails in the air, and,
broadening out, left and right, they would
draw along bent line, completely shutting
off their victim from all approach to the
foothills. If the unfortunate victim were
aman or boy on foot, he generally made
escape up one of the small ash trees that
dotted the valley in groves here and there,
and the cattle would then soon give up the
chase. But if it were a wolf or any other —
_ wild beast that could not get up a
tree, the case was different. Far away,
on the other side of the valley, where
dense woods lined the banks of the wind-
88 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ing Willamette river, the wild, bellow-
ing herd would be answered. Out from
the edge of the woods would stream,
right and left, two long, corresponding,
surging lines, bellowing and plunging for-
ward now and then, their heads to the
ground, their tails always in the air and
their eyes aflame, as if they would set fire
to the long gray grass. With the precision
and discipline of a well-ordered army, they
would close in upon the wild beast, too
terrified now to either fight or fly, and,
leaping upon him, one after another, with
their long, sharp hoofs, he would, in a little
time, be crushed into an unrecognizable
mass. Not a bone would be left unbroken.
It is a mistake to suppose that they ever
used their long, sharp horns in attack.
These were used only in defense, the same
as elk or deer, falling on the knees and re-
ceiving the enemy on their horns, much as
the Old Guard received the French in the
last terrible struggle at Waterloo.

Bill Cross was a “tender foot” at the time
BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 89

of which I write, and a sailor, at that. Now,
the old pilgrims who had dared the plains
in those days of 49, when cowards did not
venture and the weak died on the way, had
not the greatest respect for the courage or
endurance of those who had reached Ore-
gon by ship. But here was this man, a
sailor by trade, settling down in the in-
terior of Oregon, and, strangely enough,
pretending to know more about everything
in general and bears in particular than
either my father or any of his boys!

He had taken up a piece of land down
in the pretty Camas Valley where the grass
grew long and strong and waved in the
wind, mobile and beautiful as the mobile
sea.

The good-natured and self-complacent
old sailor liked to watch the waving grass.
It reminded him of the sea, I reckon. He
would sometimes sit on our little porch as
_ the sun went down and tell us boys
strange, wild sea stories. He had traveled
far and seen much, as much as any man
90 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

can see on water, and maybe was not a
very big liar, for a sailor, after all. We
liked his tales. He would not work, and
so he paid his way with stories of the sea.
The only thing about him that we did not
like, outside of his chronic idleness, was
his exalted opinion of himself and his un-
concealed contempt for everybody’s opin-
ion but his own.

“Bill,” said my father one day, “those
black Spanish cattle will get after that red
sash and sailor jacket of yours some day
when you go down in the valley to your
claim, and they won’t leave a grease spot.
Better go horseback, or at least take a gun,
when you go down next time.”

“Pshaw! Squire. I wish I had as many
dollars as I ain’t afeard of all the black
Spanish cattle in Oregon. Why, if they’re
so blasted dangerous, how did your mis-
sionaries ever manage to drive them up
here from Mexico, anyhow?”

Still, for all that, the very next time that
he saw the old sailor setting out at his snail
BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 91

pace for his ranch below, slow and indo-
lent as if on the deck of a ship, my father
insisted that he should go on horseback,
or at least take a gun.

~“Pooh, pooh! I wouldn’t be bothered
with a horse or a gun. Say, I’m goin’ to
bring your boys a pet bear some day.”

And so, cocking his little hat down over
his right eye and thrusting his big hands
into his deep pockets almost to the elbows,
he slowly and lazily whistled himself down
the gradual slope of the foothills, waist
deep in the waving grass and delicious wild
flowers, and soon was lost to sight in the
great waving sea.

Two things may be here written down.
He wouldn’t ride a horse because he
couldn’t, and for the same reason he
wouldn’t use a gun. Again let it be writ-
ten down, also, that the reason he was
going away that warm autumn afternoon

"was that there was some work to do. These
facts were clear to my kind and indulgent

father;but of course we boys never thought
7
92 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of it, and laid our little shoulders to the
hard work of helping father lift up the
long, heavy poles that were to complete
the corral around our pioneer log cabin,
and we really hoped and half believed that
he might bring home a little pet bear.

This stout log corral had become an ab-
solute necessity. It was high and strong,
and made of poles or small logs stood on
end in a trench, after the fashion of a prim-
itive fort or stout stockade. There was
but one opening, and that was a very nar-
row one in front of the cabin door. Here
it was proposed to put upa gate. We also
had talked about port-holes in the cerners
of the corral, but neither gate nor port-
holes were yet made. In fact, as said be-
fore, the serene and indolent man of the sea
always slowly walked away down through
the grass toward his untracked claim
whenever there was anything said about
port-holes, posts or gates.

Father and we three little boys had only
got the last post set and solidly “tamped”
BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 93

in the ground as the sun was going down.

Suddenly we heard a yell; then a yelling,
then a bellowing. The yelling was heard
in the high grass in the Camas Valley be-
low, and the bellowing of cattle came from
the woody river banks far beyond.

Then up on the brown hills of the Ore-
gon Sierras above us came the wild answer
of the wild black cattle of the hills, and
a moment later, right and left, the long
black lines began to widen out; then down
they came, like a whirlwind, toward the
black and surging line in the grass below.
We were now almost in the center of what
would, in a little time, be a complete circle
and cyclone of furious Spanish cattle.

And now, here is something curious to
relate. Our own cows, poor, weary, immi-
grant cows of only a year before, tossed
their tails in the air, pawed the ground,
bellowed and fairly went wild in the splen-
' did excitement and tumult. One touch of
nature made the whole cow world kin!

Tather clambered up on a “buck-horse”
q
94 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

and looked out over the stockade; and then
he shouted and shook his hat and laughed
as I had never heard him laugh before. For
there, breathless, coatless, hatless, came
William Cross, Esq., two small wolves and
a very small black bear! They were all
making good time, anywhere, anyway, to
escape the frantic cattle. Father used to
say afterwards, when telling about this lit-
tle incident, that “it was nip and tuck be-
tween the four, and hard to say which was
ahead.” The cattle had made quite a
“round-up.”

They all four straggled in at the narrow
little gate at about the same time, the
great big, lazy sailor in a hurry, for the
first time in his life.

But think of the coolness of the man, as
he turned to us children with his first gasp
of breath, and said, “Bo— bo— boys, I’ve
bro— bro— brought you a little bear!” ;

The wolves were the little chicken
thieves known as coyotes, quite harmless,
as a rule, so far as man is concerned, but


BILL CROSS AND HIS BEAR. 95

the cattle hated them and they were terri-
fied nearly to death.

The cattle stopped a few rods from the
stockade. We let the coyotes go, but we
kept the little bear and named him Bill
Cross. Yet he was never a bit cross, de-
spite his name.
IX.
THE GREAT GRIZZLY BEAR.

(Ursus Ferox.)

“The Indians have unbounded reverence for this
bear. When they kill one, they make exculpating
speeches to it, smoke tobacco to it, call it grand-
father, ancestor, etc.”

P. Martin Dunoan, M. B., F. R. 5., F. G. 8.

; Kings College, London.

The Indians with whom I once lived in
the Californian Sierras held the grizzly
bear in great respect and veneration. Some
writers have said that this was because
they were afraid of this terrible king of
beasts. But this is not true. The Indian,
notwithstanding his almost useless bow
and arrow in battles with this monster,
was not controlled by fear. He venerated
the grizzly bear as his paternal ancestor.
And here I briefly set down the Modoc and
Mount Shasta Indians’ account of their

own creation.
96
THE GREAT GRIZZLY BEAR. 97

They, aS in the Biblical account of the
creation of all things, claim to have found
the woods, wild beasts, birds and all things
waiting for them, as did Adam and Eve.

The Indians say the Great Spirit made
this mountain first of all. Can you not see
how it is? they say. He first pushed down
snow and ice from the skies through a hole
which he made in the blue heavens by turn-
ing a stone round and round, till he made
this great mountain; then he stepped out
of the clouds onto the mountain-top, and
descended and planted the trees all around .
by putting his finger on the ground. The
sun melted the snow, and the water ran
down and nurtured the trees and made the
rivers. After that he made the fish for the
rivers out of the small end of his staff. He
made the birds by blowing some leaves,
which he took up from the ground, among
_ the trees. After that he made the beasts
out of the remainder of his stick, but made
the grizzly bear out of the big end, and
made him master over all the others. He
98 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

made the grizzly so strong that he feared
him himself, and would have to go up on
top of the mountain out of sight of the for-
est to sleep at night, lest the grizzly, who,
as will be seen, was much more strong and
cunning then than now, should assail him
in his sleep. Afterwards, the Great Spirit,
wishing to remain on earth and make the
sea and some more land, converted Mount
Shasta, by a great deal of labor, into a wig-
wam, and built a fire in the center of it
and made it a pleasant home. After that,
his family came down, and they all have
lived in the mountain ever since. They say
that before the white man came they could
see the fire ascending from the mountain
by night and the smoke by day, every time
they chose to look in that direction. They
say that one late and severe springtime,
many thousand snows ago, there was a
great storm about the summit of Mount
Shasta, and that the Great Spirit sent his
youngest and fairest daughter, of whom he
was very fond, up to the hole in the top,
THE GREAT GRIZZLY BEAR. 99

bidding her to speak to the storm that
came up from the sea, and tell it to be
more gentle or it would blow the mountain
over. He bade her do this hastily, and not
put her head out, lest the wind should
catch her in the hair and blow her away.
He told her she should only thrust out her
long red arm and make a sign, and then
speak to the storm without.

The child hastened to the top and did
as she was bid, and was about to return,
but having never yet seen the ocean, where
the wind was born and made his home,
when it was white with the storm, she
stopped, turned and put her head out to
look that way, when lo! the storm caught
in her long red hair, and blew her out and
away down and down the mountain side.
Here she could not fix her feet in the hard,
smooth ice and snow, and so slid on and

. on down to the dark belt of firs below the

snow rim.
Now, the grizzly bears possessed all the
wood and all the land down to the sea at
100 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

that time, and were very numerous and
very powerful. They were not exactly
beasts then, although they were covered
with hair, lived in caves and had sharp
claws; but they walked on two feet, and
talked, and used clubs to fight with, in-
stead of their teeth and claws, as they do
now.

At this time, there was a family of griz-
zlies living close up to the snows. The
mother had lately brought forth, and the
father was out in quest of food for the
young, when, as he returned with his club
on his shoulder and a young elk in his left
hand, under his arm, he saw this little
child, red like fire, hid under a fir-bush,
with her long hair trailing in the snows,
and shivering with fright and cold. Not
knowing what to make of her, he took her
to the old mother, who was very learned in
all things, and asked her what this fair and
frail thing was that he had found shivering
under a fir-bush in the snow. The old
mother grizzly, who had things pretty
THE GREAT GRIZZLY BEAR. 101

much her own way, bade him leave the
child with her, but never mention it to any-
one, and she would share her breast with
her, and bring her up with the other chil-
dren, and maybe some great good would
come of it.

The old mother reared her as she prom-
ised to do, and the old hairy father went
out every day, with his club on his shoul-
der, to get food for his family, till they
were all grown up and able to do for them-
selves. f

“Now,” said the old mother Grizzly to
the old father Grizzly, as he stood his club
by the door and sat down one day, “our
oldest son is quite grown up and must have
a wife. Now, who shall it be but the little
red creature you found in the snow under
the black fir-bush.” So the old father Griz-
zly kissed her, said she was very wise, then
- took up his club on his shoulder and went
out and killed some meat for the marriage
feast.

They married and were very happy, and
102 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

many children were born to them. But,
being part of the Great Spirit and part
of the grizzly bear, these children did not
exactly resemble either of their parents,
but partook somewhat of the nature and
likeness of both. Thus was the red man
created; for these children were the first
Indians.

All the other grizzlies throughout the
black forests, even down to the sea, were
very proud and very kind, and met to-
gether, and, with their united strength,
built for the lovely little red princess a wig-
wam close to that of her father, the Great
Spirit. This is what is now called “Little
Mount Shasta.”

After many years, the old mother Griz-
zly felt that she soon must die, and, fear-
ing that she had done wrong in detaining
the child of the Great Spirit, she could
not rest till she had seen him and restored
to him his long-lost treasure and asked his
forgiveness. |

With this object in view, she gathered
THE GREAT GRIZZLY BEAR. 103

together all the grizzlies at the new and
magnificent lodge built for the princess and
her children, and then sent her eldest
grandson to the summit of Mount Shasta
in a cloud, to speak to the Great Spirit
and tell him where he could find his long-
lost daughter.

When the Great Spirit heard this, he
was so glad that he ran down the mountain
side on the south so fast and strong that
the snow was melted off in places, and the
tokens of his steps remain to this day. The
grizzlies went out to meet him by thous-
ands; and as he approached they stood
apart in two great lines, with their clubs
under their arms, and so opened a lane
through which he passed in great state to
the lodge where his daughter sat with her
children.

But when he saw the children, and
. learned how the grizzlies that he had cre-
ated had betrayed him into the creation of
a new race, he was very wroth, and
frowned on the old mother Grizzly till she
104 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

died on the spot. At this, the grizzlies all
set up a dreadful howl; but he took his
daughter on his shoulder and, turning to
all the grizzlies, bade them hold their
tongues, get down on their hands and
knees and so remain till he returned. They
did as they were bid, and he closed the
door of the lodge after him, drove all the
children out into the world, passed out and
up the mountain and never returned to the
timber any more.

So the grizzlies could not rise up any
more, or make a noise, or use their clubs,
but ever since have had to go on all-fours,
much like other beasts, except when they
have to fight for their lives; then the Great
Spirit permits them to stand up and fight
with their fists like men.

That is why the Indians about Mount
Shasta will never kill or interfere in any
way with a grizzly. Whenever one of their
number is killed by one of these kings of
the forest, he is burned on the spot, and
all who pass that way for years cast a stone
THE GREAT GRIZZLY BEAR. 105

on the place till a great pile is thrown up.
Fortunately, however, grizzlies are not now
plentiful about the mountain.

In proof of the story that the grizzly once
stood and walked erect and was much like
a man, they show that he has scarcely any
tail, and that his arms are a great deal
shorter than his legs, and that they are
more like a man than any other animal.
X.
AS A HUMORIST.

Not long ago, about the time a party of
Americans were setting out for India to
hunt the tiger, a young banker from New
’ York came to California to hunt what he
- rightly considered the nobler beast.

He chartered a small steamer in San
Francisco Bay and taking with him a party
of friends, as well as a great-grandson of
Daniel Boone, a famous hunter, for a
guide, he sailed up the coast to the red-
wood wilderness of Humboldt. Here he
camped on the bank of a small stream in
a madrona thicket and began to hunt for
his bear. He found his bear, an old female
with young cubs. As Boone was naturally
in advance when the beast was suddenly
stumbled upon, he had to do the fighting,
and this gave the banker from the States

a chance to scramble up a small madrona. —
106


Of course he dropped his gun.—Page 107.
AS A HUMORIST. 107

Of course he dropped his gun. They al-
- ways do drop their guns, by some singu-
larly sad combination of accidents, when
they start up a tree with two rows of big
teeth in the rear, and it is hardly fair to
expect the young bear-hunter from New
York to prove an exception. Poor Boone
was severely maltreated by the savage old
mother grizzly in defense of her young.
There was a crashing of brush and a crush- -
ing of bones, and then all was still. .
Suddenly the bear seemed to remember
that there was a second party who had
been in earnest search for a bear, and look-
ing back down the trail and up in the
boughs of a small tree, she saw a pair of
boots. She left poor Boone senseless on
the ground and went for those boots. Com-
ing forward, she reared up under the tree
and began to claw for the capitalist. He
told me that she seemed to him, as she
~ stood there, to be about fifty feet high.
Then she laid hold of the tree.
Honuun ately, this madrona tree is of a
108 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

hard and unyielding nature, and with all
her strength she could neither break nor
bend it. But she kept thrusting up her
long nose and longer claws, laying hold
first of his boots, which she pulled off, one
after the other, with her teeth, then with
her claws she took hold of one garment.
and then another till the man of money
had hardly a shred, and his legs were
streaming with blood. Fearing that he
should faint from loss of blood, he lashed
himself to the small trunk of the tree by
his belt and then began to scream with
all his might for his friends.

When the bear became weary of clawing
up at the dangling legs she went back and
began to turn poor Boone over to see if he
showed any signs of life. Then she came
back and again clawed a while at the
screaming man up the madrona tree. It
was great fun for the bear!

To cut a thrilling story short, the party
in camp on the other side of the creek
finally came in hail, when the old bear
AS A HUMORIST. 109

gathered up her babies and made safe exit
up a gulch. Boone, now in Arizona, was
so badly crushed and bitten that his life
was long despaired of, but he finally got
well. The bear, he informed me, showed
no disposition to eat him while turning
him over and tapping him with her foot
and thrusting her nose into his bleeding
face to see if he still breathed.

Story after story of this character could
be told to prove that the grizzly at home
is not entirely brutal and savage; but
rather a good-natured lover of his family
and fond of his sly joke.
XI.
A GRIZZLY’S SLY LITTLE JOKE.

I know an old Indian who was terribly
frightened by an old monster grizzly and
her half-grown cub, one autumn, while out
gathering manzanita berries. But badly
as he was frightened, he was not even
scratched.

It seems that while he had his head
raised, and was busy gathering and eating
berries, he almost stumbled over an old
bear and her cub. They had eaten their fill
and fallen asleep in the trail on the wooded
hillside. The old Indian had only time to
turn on his heel and throw himself head-
long in the large end of a hollow log, which
luckily lay at hand. This, however, was
only a temporary refuge. He saw, to his
delight, that the log was open at the other
end, and corkscrewing his way along
toward the further end, he was about to

emerge, when, to his dismay, he saw the
110
A GRIZZLY’S SLY JOKE. 111

old mother sitting down quietly waiting
for him!

After recovering his breath as best he

could in his hot and contracted quarters,
he elbowed and corkscrewed himself back
to the place by which he first entered. But
lo! the bear was there, sitting down, half
smiling, and waiting to receive him
warmly. This, the old Indian said, was
repeated time after time, till he had no
longer strength left to struggle further,
and turned on his face to die, when she
put her head in, touched the top of his head
gently with her nose and then drew back,
took her cub with her and shuffled on.
I went to the spot with the Indian a day
or two afterward, and am convinced that
his story was exactly as narrated. And
when you understand that the bear could
easily have entered the hollow log and
killed him at any time, you will see that
she had at least a faint sense of fun in
_ that “cat and mouse” amusement with the
frightened Indian.
XT.

THE GRIZZLY AS FREMONT FOUND
HIM.

General Fremont found this powerful
brute to be a gregarious and confiding
creature, fond of his family and not given
to disturbing those who did not disturb
him. In his report to the government—
1847—he tells of finding a large family of
grizzly bears gathering acorns very much
as the native Indians gathered them, and
this not far from a small Mexican town.
He says that riding at the head of his
troops he saw, on reaching the brow of a
little grassy hill set with oaks, a great com-
motion in the boughs of one of the larg-
est trees, and, halting to cautiously recon:
noiter, he noticed that there were grouped
about the base of the tree and under its
wide boughs, several huge grizzlies, em-
ployed in gathering and eating the acorns

112
AS FREMONT FOUND HIM. 118

which the baby grizzlies threw down from
the thick branches overhead. More than
this, he reports that the baby bears, on
seeing him, became frightened, and at-
tempted to descend to the ground and run
away, but the older bears, which had not
yet discovered the explorers, beat the
young ones and drove them back up the
tree, and compelled them to go on. with
their work, as if they had been children.
In the early 50s, I, myself, saw the griz-
zlies feeding together in numbers under the
trees, far up the Sacramento Valley, as
tranquilly as a flock of sheep. A serene,
dignified and very decent old beast was
the full-grown grizzly as Fremont and oth-
ers found him here at home. This king
of the continent, who is quietly abdicating
his throne, has never been understood. The
grizzly was not only every inch a king, but
. he had, in his undisputed dominion, a
pretty fair sense of justice. He was never
a roaring lion. He was never a man-eater.
He is indebted for his character for ferocity
114 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

almost entirely to tradition, but, in some
degree, to the female bear when seeking
to protect her young. Of course, the griz-
slies are good fighters, when forced to it;
but as for lying in wait for anyone, like
the lion, or creeping, cat-like, as the tiger
does, into camp to carry off someone for
supper, such a thing was never heard of in
connection with the grizzly.

The grizzly went out as the American
rifle came in. I do not think he retreated.
He was a lover of home and family, and
so fell where he was born. For he
is still found here and there, all up
and down the land, as the Indian is still
found, but he is no longer the majestic and
serene king of the world. His whole life
has been disturbed, broken up; and his
temper ruined. He is a cattle thief now,
and even a sheep thief. In old age, he
keeps close to his canyon by day, deep in
the impenetrable chaparral, and at night
shuffles down hill to some hog-pen, per-
fectly careless of dogs or shots, and, tear-
AS FREMONT FOUND HIM. 115

ing out a whole side of the pen, feeds his
fill on the inmates.

One of the interior counties kept a stand-
ing reward for the capture of an old grizzly
of this character for several years. But
he defied everything and he escaped every-
thing but old age. Some hunters finally
crept in to where the old king lay, nearly
blind and dying of old age, and dispatched
him with a volley from several Winches-
ter rifles. It was found that he was almost
toothless, his paws had been terribly mu-
tilated by numerous steel traps, and it is
said that his kingly old carcass had re-
ceived nearly lead enough to sink a small
ship. There were no means of ascertain-
ing his exact weight, but it was claimed
that skin, bone and bullets, as he was
found, he would have weighed well nigh
a ton.
XIIl.
THE BEAR WITH SPECTACLES.

And now let us go down to near the
mouth of the Father of Waters, to “Barra
Tarra Land” or Barren Land, as it was
called of old by Cervantes, in the kingdom of
Sancho Panza. Strange how little the
great men of the old world knew of this
mew world! In one of his plays Shakes-
peare speaks of ships from Mexico ; in an-
other he means to mention the Bermudas.
Burns speaks of a Newfoundland dog as

“Whelped in a country far abroad
Where boatmen gang to fish for cod,”

and Byron gets in a whole lot about Daniel
Boone; but as a rule we were ignored.
Barra Tarra, so called, is the very richest
part of this globe. It must have been rich
always, rich as the delta of the Nile; but

now, with the fertility of more than a dozen
116
BEAR WITH SPECTACLES. 117

States dumped along there annually, it is
rich as cream is rich.

The fish, fowl, oysters of Barra Tarra—
ah, the oysters! No oysters in the world
like these for flavor, size and sweetness.
They are so enormous in size that—but let
me illustrate their size by an anecdote of
the war. 7

A Yankee captain, hungry and worn out
hewing his way with his sword from Chi-
cago to the sea, as General Logan had put
it, sat down in a French restaurant in New
Orleans, and while waiting for a plate of
the famous Barra Tarra raw oysters, saw
that a French creole sitting at the same
little side table was turning over and over
with his fork a solitary and most tempting
oyster of enormous size, eyeing it ruefully.

“Why don’t you eat him?”

“By gar! I find him too big forme. You
like?”

“Certainly. Not too big for me. See
_ this!” and snatching the fork from the
Frenchman the oyster was gone at a gulp.
118 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

The little Frenchman shrugged his
shoulders, looked at the gallant officer a
moment and then said in a fit of enthusi-
astic admiration:

“By gar, Monsieur Capitaine, you are
one mighty brave man! I did try him t’ree
times zat way, but he no stay.”

The captain threw up his arms and—
his oyster !—so runs the story.

The soil along the river bank is so rich
that weeds, woods, vines, trench close and
hard on the heels of the plowman. A
plantation will almost perish from the
earth, as it were, by a few years of aban-
donment. And so it is that you see miles
and miles on either side—parishes on top
of parishes, in fact—fast returning to bar-
barism, dragging the blacks by thousands
down to below the level of brutes with
them, as you descend from New Orleans
toward the mouth of the mighty river,
nearly one hundred miles from the beauti-
ful “Crescent City.” And, ah, the super-
stition of these poor blacks!
BEAR WITH SPECTACLES. 119

You see hundreds of little white houses,
old “quarters,” and all tenantless now,
save one or two on each plantation. Cheap
sugar and high wages, as compared with
old times of slavery—but then the enor-
mous cost of keeping up the levees, and
above all, the continued peril to life and
property, with a mile of swift, muddy wa-
ter sweeping seaward high above your
head—these things are making a desert
of the richest lands on earth. We are gain-
ing ground in the West, but we. are losing
ground in the South, the great, silent
South.

Of course, the world, we, civilization,
will turn back to this wondrous region
some day, when we have settled the West;
for the mouth of the mightiest river on
the globe is a fact; it is the mouth by
which this young nation was trained in its
younger days, and we cannot ignore it in
the end, however willing we may be to do

_ So now.
Strange how wild beasts and all sorts of
120 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

queer creatures are overrunning the region
down there, too, growing like weeds, in-
creasing as man decreases. I found a sort
of marsh bear here. He looks like the
sloth bear (Ursus Labiatus) of the Ganges,
India, as you see him in the Zoo of Lon-
don, only he is not a sloth, by any means.
The negroes are superstitiously afraid of
him, and their dogs, very numerous, and
good coon dogs, too, will not touch him.
His feet are large and flat, to accommo-
date him in getting over the soft ground,
while his shaggy and misshapen body is
very thin and light. His color is as un-
lovely as his shape—a sort of faded, dirty
brown or pale blue, with a rim of dirty
white about the eyes that makes him look
as if he wore spectacles when he stops and
looks at you.

As he is not fit to eat because he lives
on fish and oysters, sportsmen will not fire
at him; and as the poor, superstitious, voo-
doo-worshiping negroes, and their dogs,
too, run away as soon as he is seen, he has
BEAR WITH SPECTACLES. 121

quite a habit of stopping and looking at
you through his queer spectacles as long
as you are in sight. He looks to be a sort
of second-hand bear, his shaggy, faded,
dirty coat of hair looking as if he had been
stuffed, like an old sofa, with the stuffing
coming out—a very second-hand appear-
ance, to be sure.

Now, as I have always had a fondness
for skins—having slept on them and under
them all my life, making both bed and car-
pet of them—I very much wanted a skin
of this queer marsh bear which the poor
negroes both adore and dread as a sort of
devil. But, as no one liked him well enough
to kill him, I must do it myself; and with
this object, along with my duty to describe
the drowning plantations, I left New Or-
leans with Colonel Bloom, two good guns,
and something to eat and to drink, and
swept down the great river to the landing
in the outer edge of the timber belt.

And how strange this landing! As a
rule you have to climb up to the shore from
122 TRUE BEAR STORIKS.

a ship. Here, after setting foot on the
levee, we walked down, down, down to
reach the level land—a vast field of fevers.
I had a letter of introduction to the
“preacher.” He was a marvel of rags,
preached every day and night, up and
down the river, and received 25 cents a day
from the few impoverished white planters,
- too poor to get away, for his influence for
good among the voodoo blacks. Not that
they could afford to care for the negroes,
those few discouraged and fever-stricken
planters on their plantations of weeds and
water, but they must, now and then, have
these indolent and retrograding blacks to
plant or cut down their cane, or sow and
gather their drowning patches of rice, and
the preacher could preach them into work-
ing a little, when right hungry.

The ragged black took my letter and pre-
tended to read it. Poor fellow, he could
not read, but pride, or rather vanity, made
him act a lie. Seeing the fact, I contrived
to tell him that it was from a colored ecler-


The bear was waiting there.—Page 111




eke:

LTC STAC ee REE oe TRE nr Oe ne ea Ee



BEAR WITH SPECTACLES. 123

gyman, and that I had come to get him
and his dogs to help me kill a bear. The
blacks now turned white; or at least white
around the lips. The preacher shuddered
and shrugged his shoulders and finally
groaned in his grief.

Let us omit the mosquitoes, the miser-
able babies, nude as nature, and surely
very hungry in this beauteous place of fer-
tility. They hung about my door, a “quar-
ters” cabin with grass knee high through
the cracks in the floor, like flies, till they
got all my little store of supplies, save a big
flask of “provisions” which General Beau-
regard had given me for Colonel Bloom,

' aS a preventive against the deadly fever.

No, it was not whiskey, not all whiskey,
at least, for it was bitter as gall with qui-
nine. I had to help the Colonel sample
it at first, but I only helped him sample it
once. It tasted so vilely that it seemed
to me I should, as between the two, prefer
fever.

and. such a moon! The ragged minister
124 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

stood whooping up his numerous dogs and
gathering his sullen clan of blacks to get
that bear and that promised $5.

Away from up toward New Orleans,
winding, sweeping, surging, flashing like a
mighty sword of silver, the Father of Wa-
ters came through the air, high above our
heads and level with the topmost limit of
his artificial banks. The blacks were silent,
ugly, sullen, and so the preacher asked for
and received the five silver dollars in ad-
vance. This made me suspicious, and, out
of humor, I went into my cabin and took
Colonel Bloom into a corner and told hin
what had been done. He did not say one
word ‘but took a long drink of preventive
against the fever, as General Beauregard
had advised and provided.

Then we set out for the woods, through
weeds that reached to our shoulders, the
negroes in a string, slow, silent, sullen and
ugly, the brave bear dogs only a little be-
hind the negroes. The preacher kept mut-
tering a monotonous prayer.
BEAR WITH SPECTACLES. 125

But that moon and that mighty sword
of silver in the air, the silence, the large
solemnity, the queer line of black heads
barely visible above the sea of weeds! al
was not right certain that I had lost any
bear as we came to the edge of the moss-
swept cypress woods, for here the negroes
all suddenly huddled up and muttered and
prayed with one voice. Aye, how they
prayed in their piteous monotone! How
sad it all was!

The dogs had sat down a few rods back,
a line of black dots along the path through
the tall weeds, and did not seem to care
for anything at all. I had to lay my hand
on the preacher’s shoulder and ask him
to please get on; then they all started on
together, and oh, the moon, through the
swaying cypress moss, the mighty river
above!

It was with great effort that I got them
to cross a foot-log that lay across a lagoon
only a little way in the moss-hung woods,
the brave dogs all the time only a short
126 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

distance behind us still. It was a hot night
and the mosquitoes were terrible in the
woods, but I doubt if they bite the blacks
as they did me. Surely not, else they would
not be even as nearly alive as they are.

Having got them across the lagoon, I
gave them each 25 cents more, and this
made them want to go home. The dogs had
all sat down in a queer row on the foot-log.
Such languor, such laziness, such idiotic
helplessness I never saw before, even on
the Nile. The blacks, as well as the dogs,
seemed to be afraid to move now. The
preacher again began to mumble a prayer,
and the whole pack with him; and then
they prayed again, this time not so loudly.
And although there was melody of a sort
in their united voices, I am certain they
used no words, at least no words of any
real language.

Suddenly the dogs got up and came
across and hid among the men, and the
men huddled up close; for right there on
the other end of the log, with his broad
BEAR WITH SPECTACLES. 127

right foot resting on it, was the shaggy
little beast we were hunting for. We had
found our bear, or rather, he had found us,
and it was clear that he meant to come
over and interview us at once.

The preacher crouched behind me as I
cocked and raised my gun, the blacks hid
behind the preacher, and I think, though
I had not time to see certainly, that the
dogs hid behind the blacks.

I fired at the dim white spot on the bear’s
breast and sent shot after shot into his
tattered coat, for he was not ten lengths
of an old Kentucky ramrod distant, and
he fell dead where he stood, and I went
over and dragged him safely up on the
higher bank.

Then the wild blacks danced and sang
and sang and danced, till one of them
slipped and fell into the lagoon. They
fished him out and all returned to where
I was, with the dead bear, dogs and all in
great. good spirits. Tying the bear’s feet
together with a withe they strung him on
128 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

a pole and we all went back home, the
blacks singing all the way some barbaric
half French song at the top of their melod-
ious voices.

But Colonel Bloom was afraid that the
one who had fallen in the river might take
the fever, and so as soon as we got safe
back he drank what was left in the bottle
General Beauregard had sent him and he
went to sleep; while the superstitious
blacks huddled together under the great
levee and skinned the bear in the silver
moonlight, below the mighty river. I gave
them each a silver dollar—very bright was
the brand new silver from the mint of New
Orleans, but not nearly so bright as the
moon away down there by the glowing
rim of the Mexican seas where the spec-
tacled bear abides in the classic land,
Barra Tarra, Kingdom of Sancho Panza.
XIV.
THE BEAR-SLAYER OF SAN DIEGO.

Let us now leave the great grizzly and
the little marsh bear in spectacles behind
us and tell about a boy, a bear-slayer; not
about a bear, mind you. For the little fish-
eating black bear which he killed and by
which he got his name is hardly worth tell-
ing about. This bear lives in the brush
along the sea-bank on the Mexican and
Southern California coast and has huge
feet but almost no hair. I don’t know
any name for him, but think he resembles
the “sun bear” (Ursus Titanus) more than
any other. His habit of rolling himself up
in a ball.and rolling down hill after you
is like that of the porcus or pig bear. —

You may not know that a bear, any kind
of a bear, finds it hard work running down
hill, because of his short arms, so when a

man who knows anything about bears is
129
130 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

pursued, or thinks he is pursued, he always
tries, if he knows himself, to run down hill.
A man can escape almost any bear by run-
ning down hill, except this little fellow
along the foothills by the Mexican seas.
You see, he has good bear sense, like the
rest of the bear family, and gets along
without regard to legs of any sort, some
times.

This boy that I am going to tell about
was going to school on the Mexican side
of the line between the two republics, near
San Diego, California, when a she bear
which had lost her cub caught sight of the
boys at play down at the bottom of a high,
steep hill, and she rolled for them, rolled
right among the little, half-naked fellows,
and knocked numbers of them down. But
before she could get the dust out of her
eyes and get up, this boy jumped on her
and killed her with his knife.

The governor remembered the boy for his
pluck and presence of mind and he was
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 131

quite a hero and was always called “The
Bear-Slayer” after that.

Some rich ladies from Boston, hearing
about his brave act, put their heads to-
gether and then put their hands in their
pockets and sent him to a higher school,
where the following incident took place.

I ought to mention that this little Mexi-
can bear, though he has but little hair
on his body, has a great deal on his feet,
making him look as if he wore pantalets,
little short pantalets badly frayed out at
the bottoms.

San Diego is one of the great new cities
of Southern California. It lies within only
a few minutes’ ride of Mexico. There is a
pretty little Mexican town on the line be-
tween Mexico and California—Tia Juana
—pronounced Te Wanna. Translated, the
name means “Aunt Jane.” In the center
of one of the streets stands a great gray
stone monument, set there by the govern-
ment to mark the line between the United
States and Mexico.
132 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

To the south, several hundred miles dis-
tant, stretches the long Sea of Cortez, as
the conquerors of ancient Mexico once
called the Gulf of California. Beyond the
Sea of Cortez is the long and rock-bound
reach of the west coast of Mexico. Then a
group of little Central American republics;
then Colombia, Peru and so on, till at last
Patagonia points away like a huge giant’s
finger straight toward the South Pole.

But I must bear in mind that I set out:
in this story to tell you about “The Bear.
Slayer of San Diego,” and the South Pole
is a long way from the subject in hand.

I have spoken of San Diego as one of the
great new cities, and great it is, but al-
together new it certainly is not, for it was
founded by a Spanish missionary, known
as Father Junipero, more than one hun-
dred years ago.

These old Spanish missionaries were
great men in their day; brave, patient and
very self-sacrificing in their attempts to
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 133

settle the wild countries and civilize the
Indians.

This Father Junipero walked all the way
from the City of Mexico to San Diego, al-
though he was more than fifty years old;
and finally, after he had spent nearly a
quarter of a century in founding missions
up and down the coast of California, he
walked all the way back to Mexico, where
he died.

When it is added that he was.a lame
man, that he was more than threescore
and ten years of age, and that he traveled
all the distance on this last journey on
foot and alone, with neither arms nor pro-
visions, trusting himself entirely to Provi-
dence, one can hardly fail to remember his
name and speak it with respect.

This new city, San Diego, with its most
salubrious clime, is set all over and about
with waving green palms, with golden
oranges, red pomegranates, great heavy
bunches of green and golden bananas, and
silver-laden olive orchards. The leaf of the
134 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

olive is of the same soft gray as the breast
of the dove. Asif the dove and the olive
branch had in some sort kept companion-
ship ever since the days of the deluge.

San Diego is nearly ten miles broad, with
its base resting against the warm, still wa-
ters of the Pacific Ocean. The most popu-
lous part of the city is to the south, toward
Mexico. Then comes the middle part of
San Diego City. This is called “the old
town,” and here it was that Father Juni-
pero planted some palm trees that stand to
this day—so tall that they almost seem
to be dusting the stars with their splendid
plumes.

Here also you see a great many old adobe
houses in ruins, old forts, churches, fort-
resses, barracks, built by the Mexicans
nearly a century ago, when Spain pos-
sessed California, and her gaudy banner
floated from Oregon to the Isthmus of
Darien.

The first old mission is a little farther
on up the coast, and the new college,
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 185

known as the San Diego College of Letters,
is still farther on up the warm sea bank.
San Francisco lies several hundred miles
on up the coast beyond Los Angeles. Then
comes Oregon, then Washington, one of
the newest States, and then Canada, then
Alaska, and at last the North Pole, which,
by the way, is almost as far as the South
Pole from my subject: The Bear-Slayer of
San Diego.

He was a little Aztec Indian, brown as a
berry, slim and slender, very silent, very
polite and not at all strong.

It was said that he had Spanish blood
in his veins, but it did not show through
his tawny skin. It is to be conceded, how-
ever, that he had all the politeness and
serene dignity of the proudest Spanish don
in the land.

He was now, by the kind favor of those
good ladies who had heard of his daring
address in killing the bear with his knife,
a student of the San Diego College of Let-
ters, where there were several hundred
136 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

other boys of all grades and ages, from
almost all parts of the earth.

A good many boys came here from Bos-
ton and other eastern cities to escape the
rigors of winter. I remember one boy in
particular from Philadelphia. He was a
small boy with a big nose, very bright and
very brave. He was not a friend of the
little Aztec Indian, the Bear-Slayer of San
Diego. The name of this boy from Phila-
delphia was Peterson; the Boston boys
called him Bill Peterson. His name, per-
haps, was William P. Peterson; William
Penn Peterson, most likely. But this is
merely detail, and can make but little dif-
ference in the main facts of the case.

As I said before, these college grounds
are on the outer edge of the city. The
ocean shuts out the world on the west, but
the huge chaparral hills roll in on the east,
and out of these hills the jack-rabbits come
down in perfect avalanches at night, and
devour almost everything that grows.

Wolves howl from these hills of chapar-
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 1387

ral at night by hundreds, but they are only
little bits of shaggy, gray coyotes and do
little or no harm in comparison with the
innumerable rabbits. For these big fel-
lows, on their long, bent legs, and with
ears like those of a donkey, can cut down
with their teeth a young orchard almost in
a single night.

The new college, of course, had new
grounds, new bananas, oranges, olives, all
things, indeed, that wealth and good taste
could contribute in this warm, sweet soil.
But the rabbits! You could not build a
fence so high that they would not leap
over it.

“They are a sort of Jumbo grasshopper,”
said the smart boy from Boston.

The head gardener of the college campus
and environment grew desperate.

“Look here, sir,” he said to the presi-
dent, “these big-eared fellows are lazy and
audacious things. Why can’t they live up
in the chaparral, as they did before we
came here to plant trees and try to make
188 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the world beautiful? Now, either these
jack-rabbits must go or we must go.”

“Very well,” answered the president.
“Offer a reward for their ears and let the
boys destroy them.”

“How much reward can I offer?”

“Five cents apiece, I think, would do,”
answered the head of the college, as he
passed on up the great stone steps to his
study.

The gardener got the boys together that
evening and said, “I will give you five cents
apiece for the ears of these dreadful rab-
bits.”

“That makes ten cents for each rabbit,
for each rabbit has two ears!’ shouted the
smart boy from Boston.

Before the dumfounded gardener could
protest, the boys had broken into shouts
of enthusiasm, and were running away in
squads and in couples to borrow, buy or
beg firearms for their work.

The smart boy from Boston, however,
with an eye to big profits and a long job,
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 139

went straight to the express office, and
sent all the way to the East for a costly
and first-class shotgun.

The little brown Aztec Indian did noth-
ing of that sort; he kept by himself, kept
his own counsel, and so far as any of the
boys could find out, paid no attention to
the proffered reward for scalps.

Bill Peterson borrowed his older broth-
er’s gun and brought in two rabbits the
next day. The Boston boy, with an eye
wide open to future profits to himself, went
with Peterson to the head gardener, and
holding up first one dead jack-rabbit by
the ear, and then the other, coolly and de-
liberately counted off four ears.

The gardener grudgingly counted out
two dimes, and then, with a grunt of sat-
isfaction, carried away the two big rabbits
by their long hind legs.

As the weeks wore by, several other dead
rabbits were reported, and despite the
grumbling of the head gardener, the tu-

multuous and merry students had quite a
10
140 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

revenue, and their hopes for the future
were high, especially when that artillery
should arrive from Boston!

Meantime, the little brown Aztec boy
had done nothing at all. However, when
Friday afternoon came, he _ earnestly
begged, and finally obtained, leave to go
down to his home at Tia Juana. He
wanted very much to see his Mexican
mother and his six little Mexican brothers,
and his sixty, more or less, little Mexican
cousins.

But lo! on Saturday morning, bright and
early, back came the little Bear-Slayer, as
he was called by the boys, and at his heels
came toddling and tumbling not only his
six half-naked little brown brothers, but
dozens of his cousins.

Each carried a bundle on his back. These
bundles were long, finely woven bird-nets,
and these nets were made of the fiber of
the misnamed century plant, the agave.

This queer looking line of barefooted,
bareheaded, diminutive beings, headed by
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 141

the silent little Aztec, hastily dispersed it-
self along the outer edge of the grounds
next to the chaparral abode of the jack-
rabbits, and then, while grave professors
leaned from their windows, and a hundred
curious white boys looked on, these little
brown fellows fastened all their long bird-
nets together, and stretched two wide
wings out and up the hill.

Very quiet but very quick they were, and
when all the nets had been unwound and
stretched out in a great letter V far up
the hill, it was seen that each brown boy
had a long, heavy manzanita wood club in
his hand.

Suddenly and silently as they had come
they all disappeared up and over the hills
beyond, and in the dense black chaparral.

Where had they gone and what did all
this silent mystery mean? One, two, three
hours! What had become of this strange
little army of silent brown boys?

Another hour passed. Not a boy, not a
Sign, not a sound. What did it all mean?
142 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

Suddenly, down came a rabbit, jumping
high in the air, his huge ears flapping for-
ward and back, as if they had wilted in
the hot sun.

Then another rabbit, then another! Then
ten, twenty, forty, fifty, five hundred, a
thousand, all jumping over each other and
upon each other, and against the nets, with
their long legs thrust through the meshes,
and wriggling and struggling till the nets
shook as in a gale.

Then came the long lines of half-naked
brown boys tumbling down after them out
of the brush, and striking right and left,
up and down, with their clubs.

In less than ten minutes from the time
they came out of the brush, the little fel-
lows had laid down their clubs and were
dragging the game together.

The grave professors shook their hats
and handkerchiefs, and shouted with de-
light from their windows overhead, and all
the white boys danced about, wild with ex-
citement.
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 143

That is, all but one or two. The boy
from Boston said savagely to the little
Aztec, as he stood directing the counting
of the ears, “You're a brigand! You’re
the black brigand of San Diego City, and I
can whip you!”

The brigand said nothing, but kept on
with his work.

In a little time the president and head
gardener came forward, and roughly esti-
mated that about one thousand of the pests
had been destroyed. Then the kindly pres-
ident went to the bank and brought out
one hundred silver dollars, which he
handed to the little Bear-Slayer of San
Diego in a cotton handkerchief.

The poor, timid little fellow’s lips quiv-
ered. He had never seen so much money
in all his life. He held his head down in
silence for a long time and seemed to be
thinking hard. His half-naked little broth-
ers and cousins grouped about and seemed
to be waiting for a share of the money.

The boy’s schoolmates also crowded
144 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

around, just as boys will, but they did not
want any of the silver, and I am sure that
all, save only one or two, were very glad
because of his good luck.

Finally, lifting up his head and looking
about the crowd of his school-fellows, he
said, “Now, look here; I want every one of
you to take a dollar apiece, and I will take
what is left.” He laid the handkerchief
that held the silver dollars down on the
grass and spread it wide open.

Hastily but orderly, his schoolmates be-
gan to take up the silver, his own little
brown fellows timidly holding back. Then
one of the white boys who had hastily
helped himself saw, after a time, that the
bottom was almost reached, and, with the
remark that he was half ashamed of him-
self for taking it, he quietly put his dollar
back. Then all the others, fine, impulsive
fellows who had hardly thought what they
were about at first, did the same; and then
the little brown boys came forward.

They kept coming and kept taking, till
THE BEAR-SLAYER. 145

there was not very much but his handker-
chief left. One of the professors then took
a piece of gold from his pocket and gave
it to the little Bear-Slayer. The boy was
so glad that tears came into his eyes and
he turned to go.

“See here! I’m sorry for what I said.
Yes, Iam. I ought to be ashamed, and I
am ashamed.”

It was the smart boy from Boston who
had been looking on all this time, and who
now came forward with his hand held out.

“See here!” he said. “I’ve got a forty-
dollar shotgun to give away, and I want
you to have it. Yes, I do. There’s my
hand on it. Take my hand, and you shall
have the gun just as soon as it gets here.”

The two shook hands, and the boys all
shouted with delight; and on the very next
Saturday one of these two boys went out
hunting quail with a fine shotgun on his
shoulder.

It was the silent little hero, The Bear-
Slayer of San Diego.
XV.

ALASKAN AND POLAR BEAR.

“And round about the bleak North Pole
Glideth the lean, white bear.”

Nearly forty years ago, when down from
the Indian country to sell some skins in
San Francisco, I saw a great commotion
around a big ship in the bay, and was told
that a Polar bear had been discovered
floating on an iceberg in the Arctic, and
had been taken alive by the ship’s crew.

I went out in a boat, and on boarding
the ship, just down from Alaska with a
cargo of ice, I saw the most beautiful speci-
men of the bear family I ever beheld. A
long body and neck, short legs, small head,
cream-white and clean as snow, this enor-
mous creature stood before us on the deck,
as docile asa lamb. This is as near as ever
I came to encountering the Polar bear, al-

though I have lived in the Arctic and have
146
ALASKAN BEAR. 147

more than one trophy of the bear family
from the land of everlasting snows.

Bear are very plenty in Alaska and the
Klondike country, and they are, perhaps,
a bit more ferocious than in California, for
I have seen more than one man hobbling
about the Klondike mines on one leg, hav-
ing lost the other in an argument with
bear.

As a rule, the flesh is not good, here, in
the salmon season, for the bear is in all
lands a famous fisherman. He sits by the
river and, while you may think he is asleep,
he thrusts his paw deep down, and, quick
as wink, he lands a huge salmon in his
bunch of long, hooded claws.

A friend and I watched a bear fishing
for hours on the Yukon, trying to learn his
habits. I left my friend, finally, and went
to camp to cook supper. Then, it seems,
my friend shot him, for his skin, I think.
Thinking the bear dead, he called to me
and went up to the bear, knife in hand.
But the bear rose up when he felt the knife,
148 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

caught the man in his arms and they rolled
in the river together. The poor man could
not get away. When we recovered his body
far down the river next day, the bear still
held him in her arms. She was a long,
slim cinnamon, said to be the most savage
fighter in that region.

All the bear of the far north seem to me
to have longer bodies and shorter legs than
in other lands. The black bear (there are
three kinds of them) are bow-legged, I
think; at least they “toe in,” walk as an
Indian walks, and even step one foot over
the other when taking their time on the
trail. We cultivated the acquaintance of
a black bear for some months, on the Klon-
dike, in the winter of ’97-98, and had a
good chance to learn his habits. He was a
persistent robber and very cunning. He
would eat anything he could get, which
was not much, of course, and when he
could not get anything thrown to him from
a door he would go and tear down a stump
and eat ants. I don’t know why he
ALASKAN BEAR. 149

did not hibernate, as other bears in that
region do. He may have been a sort of
crank, No one who knew about him, or
who had been in camp long, would hurt
him; but a crowd of strangers, passing up
the trail near our Klondike cabin, saw him,
and as he did not try to get away he was
soon dead. He weighed 400 pounds, and
they sold him where he lay for one dollar
a pound.

I fell in with a famous bear-hunter, a
few miles up from the mouth of the Klon-
dike early in September, before the snow
fell, and with him made a short hunt. He
has wonderful bear sense. He has but one
eye and but one side of a face, the rest of
him having been knocked off by the slash:
of a bear’s paw. He is known as Bear Bill.

The moss is very deep and thick and
elastic in that region, so that no tracks are
made except in a worn trail. But Bill saw
where a bit of moss had been disturbed
away up on a mountain side, and he sat
right down and turned his one eye and all
150 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

his bear sense to the solution of the mys-
tery.

At last he decided that a bear had been
gathering moss for a bed. Then he went
close up under a cliff of rocks and in a few
minutes was peering and pointing down
into a sunken place in the earth. And
behold, we could see the moss move! A
bear had covered himself up and was wait-
ing to be snowed under. Bill walked all
around the spot, then took position on a
higher place and shouted to the bear to
come out. The bear did not move. Then
he got me to throw some rocks. No re-
sponse. Then Bill fired his Winchester
down into the moss. In a second the big
brown fellow was on his hind feet looking
us full in the face and blinking his little
black eyes as if trying to make us out.
Bill dropped him at once, with a bullet in
his brain.

I greatly regret that I never had the
good fortune to encounter a Polar bear, so
that I might be able to tell you more about
ALASKAN BEAR. 151

him and his habits; for men of science and
writers of books are not bear-hunters, as
a rule, and so real information about this
white robber-monk of the cold, blue north
is meager indeed. But here is what the
most eminent English authority says about
the nature and habits of this one bear that
I have not shaken hands with, or encoun-
tered in some sort of way on his native
heath:

“The great white bear of the Arctic re-
gions—the ‘Nennok’ of the Eskimo—is the
largest as well as one of the best known
of the whole family. It is a gigantic ani-
mal, often attaining a length of nearly nine
feet and is proportionally strong and fierce.
It is found over the whole of Greenland;
but its numbers seem to be on the decrease.
It is distinguished from other bears by its
narrow head, its flat forehead in a line with
its prolonged muzzle, its short ears and
long neck. It is of a light, creamy color,
rarely pure white, except when young,
hence the Scottish whalers call it the
152 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

‘brounie’ and sometimes the ‘farmer,’ from
its very agricultural appearance as it stalks
leisurely over the furrowed fields of ice. Its
principal food consists of seals, which it
persecutes most indefatigably; but it is
somewhat omniverous in its diet, and will
often clear an islet of eider duck eggs in
the course of a few hours. I once saw it
watch a seal for half a day, the seal con-
tinually escaping, just as the bear was
about putting his foot on it, at the atluk
(or escape hole) in the ice. Finally, it tried
to circumvent its prey in another maneu-
ver. It swam off to a distance, and when
the seai was again half asleep at its atluk,
the bear swam under the ice, with a view
to cut off its retreat. It failed, however,
and the seal finally escaped. The rage of
the animal was boundless; it moaned hide-
ously, tossing the snow in the air, and at
last trotted off in a most indignant state
of mind.

“Being so fond of seal-flesh, the Polar
bear often proves a great nuisance to seal-
ALASKAN BEAR. 153

hunters, whose occupation he naturally re-
gards as a catering to his wants. He is also
glad of the whale carcasses often found
floating in the Arctic seas, and travelers
have seen as many as twenty bears busily
discussing the huge body of a dead whale-
bone whale.

“As the Polar bear is able to obtain food
all through the Arctic winter, there is not
the same necessity, as in the case of the
vegetable-eating bears, for hibernating. In
fact, the males and young females roam
about through the whole winter, and only
the older females retire for the season.
These—according to the Eskimo account,
quoted by Captain Lyon—are very fat at
the commencement of winter, and on the
first fall of snow lie down and allow them-
selves to be covered, or else dig a cave in
a drift, and then go to sleep until the
spring, when the cubs are born. By this
time the animal’s heat has melted the snow
for a considerable distance, so that there is
plenty of room for the young ones, who
154 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

tumble about at their ease and get fat at
the expense of their parent, who, after her
long abstinence, becomes gradually very
thin and weak. The whole family leave
their abode of snow when the sun is strong
enough to partially melt its roof. .

“The Polar bear is regularly hunted with
dogs by the Eskimo. The following ex-
tract gives an account of their mode of pro-
cedure:

“Let us suppose a bear scented out at
the base of an iceberg. The Eskimo ex-
amines the track with sagacious care, to
determine its age and direction, and the
speed with which the animal was moving
when he passed along. The dogs are set
upon the trail, and the hunter courses over
the ice in silence. As he turns the angle
of the berg his game is in view before him,
stalking along, probably, with quiet march,
sometimes snuffing the air suspiciously,
but making, nevertheless, for a nest of
broken hummocks. The dogs spring for-
ward, opening a wild, wolfish yell, the






ay.—Page 155,

stands at b

the bear

ssed more severely,

Pre
ALASKAN BEAR. 155

driver shrieking ‘Nannook! Nannook? and
all straining every nerve in pursuit.

“The bear rises on his haunches, then
starts off at full speed. The hunter, as he
runs, leaning over his sledge, seizes the
traces of a couple of his dogs and liberates
them from their burthen. It is the work
of a minute, for the motion is not checked,
and the remaining dogs rush on with ap-
parent ease.

“Now, pressed more severely, the bear
makes for an iceberg, and stands at bay,
while his two foremost pursuers halt at a
short distance and await the arrival of the
unter. At this moment the whole pack
are liberated; the hunter grasps his lance,
and, tumbling through the snow and ice,
prepares for the encounter.

“Tf there be two hunters, the bear is
killed easily; for one makes a feint of
thrusting the spear at the right side, and,
as the animal turns with his arms toward
the threatened attack, the left is unpro-

tected and receives the death wound.”
11 a
XVI.

MONNEHAN, THE GREAT BEAR-
HUNTER OF OREGON.

He wore a tall silk hat, the first one I
had ever seen, not at all the equipment of
“a mighty hunter before the Lord;” but
Phineas Monnehan, Esq., late of some cas-
tle (I forget the name now), County of
Cork, Ireland, would have been quite an-
other personage with another sort of hat.
And mighty pretension made he to great
estates and titles at home, but greatest of
all his claims was that of “a mighty
hunter.”

Clearly he had been simply a schoolmas-
ter at home, and had picked up all his
knowledge of wild beasts from books. He
had very impressive manners and had come
to Oregon with an eye to political promo-
tion, for he more than once hinted to my

quiet Quaker father, on whose hospitality
156
MONNEHAN. 157

he had fastened himself, that he would not
at all dislike going to Congress, and would
even consent to act as Governor of this far-
off and half-savage land known as Oregon.
But, as observed a time or two before,
Monnehan most of all things desired the
name and the renown, like Nimrod, the
builder of Babylon, of a “mighty hunter.”

He had brought no firearms with him,
nor was my father at all fond of guns, but
finally we three little boys, my brother
John, two years older than I, my brother
James, two years younger, and myself, had
a gun between us. So with this gun, Mon-
nehan, under his tall hat, a pipe in his
teeth and a tremendously heavy stick in
his left hand would wander about under
the oaks, not too far away from the house,
all the working hours of the day. Not that
he ever killed anything. In truth, I do not
now recall that he ever once fired off the
gun. But he got away from work, all the
same, and a mighty hunter was Monnehan.

He carried this club and kept it
158 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

swinging and sweeping in a semi-circle
along before him all the time be-
cause of the incredible number of rattle-
snakes that infested our portion of Ore-
gon in those early days. I shall never
forget the terror in this brave stranger’s
‘face when he first found out that all the
grass on all our grounds was literally alive
with snakes. But he had found a good
place to stay, and he was not going to be
driven out by snakes.

You see, we lived next to a mountain or
steep stony hill known as Rattlesnake
Butte, and in the ledges of limestone rock
here the rattlesnakes hibernated by thou-
sands. In the spring they would crawl out
of the cracks in the cliffs, and that was the
beginning of the end of rattlesnakes in
Oregon. It was awful!

But he had a neighbor by the name of
Wilkins, an old man now, and a recent
candidate for Governor of Oregon, who was
equal to the occasion. He sent back to the
States and had some black, bristly, razor-
MONNEHAN. 159

backed hogs brought out to Oregon. These
hogs ate the rattlesnakes. But we must
get on with the bear story; for this man
Monnehan, who came to us the year
the black, razor-backed hogs came, was,
as I may have said before, “a mighty
hunter.”

The great high hills back of our house,
black and wild and woody, were full of
bear. There were several kinds of bear
there in those days.

“How big is this ere brown _ bear,
Squire?” asked Monnehan.

“Well,” answered my father, “almost as
big as a small sawmill when in active
operation.”

“Oi think Oil confine me operations, for
this hunting sayson, to the smaller spacies
o’ bear,” said Mr. Monnehan, as he arose
with a thoughtful face and laid his pipe
on the mantel-piece.

A few mornings later you would. have
thought, on looking at our porch, that a
very large negro from a very muddy place
160 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

had been walking bare-footed up and down
the length of it. This was not a big bear
by the sign, only a small black cub; but
we got the gun out, cleaned and loaded it,
and by high noon we three little boys, my
father and Monnehan, the mighty hunter,
were on the track of that little black bear.
We had gone back up the narrow canyon
with its one little clump of dense woods
that lay back of our house and reached up
toward the big black hills.

Monnehan took the gun and his big club
and went along up and around above the
edge of the brush. My father took the
pitchfork and my younger brother James
kept on the ridge above the brush on the
other side of the canyon, while my older
brother John and myself were directed
to come on a little later, after Mr. Monne-
han had got himself in position to do his
deadly work, and, if possible, drive the ter-
rible beast within range of his fatal rifle.

Slowly and cautiously my brother and J
came on, beating the brush and the tall
MONNEHAN. 161

rye grass. As we advanced up the canyon,
Mr. Monnehan was dimly visible on the
high ridge to the right, and father now
and then was to be seen with little brother
and his pitchfork to the left. Suddenly
there was such a shout as almost shook
the walls of the canyon about our ears. It
was the voice of Monnehan calling from
the high ridge close above the clump of
dense wood; and it was a wild and a des-
perate and a continuous howl, too. At last
we could make out these words:

“Oi’ve thrade the bear! Oi’ve thrade the
bear! Oi’ve thrade the bear!”

Down the steep walls came father like
an avalanche, trailing his pitchfork in one
hand and half dragging little brother
James with the other.

“Run, boys, run! right up the hill! He’s
got him treed, he’s got him treed! Keep
around the bush and go right up the hill,
fast as you can. He’s got him treed, he’s
got him treed! Hurrah for Monnehan, at
162 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

last! He’s got him treed, he’s got him
treed!” .

Out of breath from running, my father
sat down at the foot of the steep wall of
the canyon below Monneban and we boys
clambered on up the grassy slope like
goats.

Meantime, Monnehan kept shouting
wildly and fearfully as before. Such lungs
as Monnehan had! A mighty hunter was
Monnehan. At last we got on the ridge up
among the scattering and storm-bent and
low-boughed oaks; breathless and nearly
dead from exhaustion.

“Here, byes, here!’

We looked up the hill a little ahead of
us from where the voice came, and there,
straddled across the leaning bough of a
broad oak tree hung Monnehan, the mighty
hunter. His hat was on the ground under-
neath him, his club was still in his daring
hand, but his gun was in the grass a hun-
dred yards away.

“Here, boys, right up here. Come up
MONNEHAN. 163

here an’ get a look at ’im! Thot’s vaght
Oi got up ’ere fur, to get a good look at
*im! Right up now, byes, an’ get a good
look at ’im! Look out fur me hat there!”

My brother hastily ran and got and
handed me the gun and instantly was up
the tree along with Monnehan, peering for-
ward and back, left and right, everywhere.
But no sign, no sound or scent of any bear
anywhere.

By this time my father had arrived with
his pitchfork and a very tired little boy.
He sat down on the grass, and, wearily
wiping his forehead, he said to Monnehan,

“Mr. Monnehan, how big was the bear
that you saw?”

“Well, now, Squire, upon the sowl o* me,
he was fully the size of a very extraordi-
nary black dog,” answered Mr. Monnehan,
as he descended and came and stood close
to my father, as if to defend him with his
club. Father rose soon after and, with
just the least tinge of impatience and vex-
164 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ation in his voice, said to brother John
and me,

“Boys, go up and around the thicket
with your gun and beat the bush down the
canyon as you come down. Mr. Monnehan
and I will drop down to the bottom of the
canyon here between the woods and the
house and catch him as he comes out.”

Brother and I were greatly cheered at
this; for it was evident that father had
faith that we would find the bear yet. And
believing that the fun was not over, we,
tired as we were, bounded forward and
on and up and around the head of the
canyon with swift feet and beating hearts.
Here we separated, and each taking a half
of the dense copse of wood and keeping
within hailing distance, we hastily de-
scended through the steep tangle of grape-
vine, wild hops, wild gourdvines and all
sorts of things, shouting and yelling as we
went. But no bear or sign of bear as yet.

We were near the edge of the brush.
I could see, from a little naked hillock in
MONNEHAN. 165

the copse where I paused to take breath,
my father with his pitchfork standing close
to the cow path below the brush, while a
little further away and a little closer to the
house stood Mr. Monnehan, club in hand
and ready for the raging bear.

Suddenly I heard the brush break and
crackle over in the direction of my brother.
I dropped on my knee and cocked my gun.
I got a glimpse of something black tearing
through the brush like a streak, but did not
fire.

Then I heard my brother shout, and I
thought I heard him laugh, too. Just then
there burst out of the thicket and on past
my father and his pitchfork a little black,
razor-backed sow, followed by five black,
squealing pigs! Monnehan’s bear!
XVII.
THE BEAR “MONARCH.”

HOW HE WAS CAPTURED.

Much having been said about bears of
late, a.young Californian of great fortune
and enterprise resolved to set some ques-
tions at rest, and, quite regardless of cost
or consequences, sent into the mountains
for a live grizzly. The details of his cap-
ture, the plain story of the long, wild quest,
the courage, the cunning, the final submis-
sion of the monster, and then the last bul-
letin about his health, habits and all that,
make so instructive and pleasing a narra-
tive that I have asked for permission to
add it to my own stories. The bear de-
scribed is at present in our San Francisco
Zoo, a fine and greatly admired monarch.

“Are there any true grizzly bears in Cali-

fornia?’
166
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 167

“Undoubtedly there are.”

“T don’t know about it. I have a great
deal of doubt. Where are they?”

“In the Sierra Madre, in Touloumne
Canyon, in Siskiyou County and probably in
many other mountain districts.”

“That may be so, but nobody can find
them. Now, do you think you could find
them?” —

“T think I could if I should try.”

“Would you undertake to get a genuine
grizzly in this State?”

“Yes, if you want one. How will you
have him—dead or alive?”

“Alive.”

This conversation was held last May be-
tween the proprietor of the Examiner and
special reporter Allen Kelly.

A week ago Kelly brought home an enor-
mous grizzly bear, lodged the animal tem-
porarily in one of the cages in Woodward’s
Gardens and reported to the editor that he
had finished that assignment.
168 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

The following is his account of the hunt
and capture.

The Examiner expedition began the
search for a grizzly early in June,
starting from Santa Paula and striking
into the mountains at Tar Creek, where
the Sespe oil wells are bored. The Exam-
iner correspondent detailed to catch a bear
Was accompanied by De Moss Bowers of
Ventura, who was moved by love of ad-
venture to offer his assistance.

During the first part of the trip the party
numbered five persons, including Dad Coft-
man, a spry old gentleman of seventy-two
years, who was out for the benefit of his
health, a packer and guide, and a person
from Santa Paula called “Doc,” who was
loaded to the muzzle with misinformation
and inspired with the notion that it was
legitimate to plunder the expedition be-
cause the Examiner had plenty of money.
The packer was “Doc’s” son, a good man
to work, but unfortunately afflicted with
similar hallucinations. The expedition was
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 169

plundered because these persons were
trusted on the recommendation of a gen-
tleman who ought to have known better.

At Tar Creek the correspondent was told
that the Stone Corral bear, a somewhat
noted grizzly that had killed his man, had
been recently on Squaw Flat, and had
prowled about an old cabin at night, sort-
ing over the garbage heap and pile of tin
cans at the door, but when the expedition
passed the cabin no fresh sign was found,
and the tracks on Squaw Flat were at least
a week old.

The first camp was in a clump of chinca-
pin brush at Stone Corral. There were
bear tracks in the soft ground at the edge
of the creek, which induced the hunters
to spend two days in prospecting that part
of the country. One of the proposed plans
for capturing the bear was to run him out
of the rocks and brush to some reasonably
open bit of country like Squaw Flat or one
of the small level patches near camp and
170 TRUE BEAR STORIKS.

lasso him, but the impracticable nature of
that scheme was soon demonstrated. On
the next day after making camp the Exam-
iner’s own bear catcher went out on a nerv-
ous black horse called “Nig” to find out
where the Stone Corral bear was spending
the summer and incidentally to get some
venison. The Stone Corral bear was there
or thereabouts beyond any doubt. He ran
the correspondent out of the brush and
showed a perverse disposition to do all the
hunting himself. “Nig” would not’ stand
to let his rider take a shot, but when the
bear gave notice of his presence by growl-
ing and smashing down the brush twenty
yards away, be wheeled and_ bolted
towards camp. Near the camp Dad was
found rounding up the other horses, who
had just been scared from their pasturage
by another wandering bear. It was clear
that not a horse in the outfit could be rid-
den to within roping distance of a bear,
and it is doubtful if three horses fit for
such a job could be found in the country.
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 171

Some years ago the ranchmen and va-
queros frequently caught bears with a
rope, but even then it was difficult to train
horses to the work, and only one horse out
of a hundred could be cured of his instinc-
tive dread of a erizzly.

It was clear also that there were some
defects in the plan of driving the Stone
Corral bear out of the brush, chief of which
was the bear’s inconsiderate desire’ to do
the driving himself. As the hunting would
have to be done afoot, the prospects inci-
dent to an attempt to round up a big griz-
zly among the rocks and chaparral were
not peculiarly alluring. Trapping was the
only other method that could be suggested,
but the absence of any heavy timber would
make that difficult.

The Stone Corral is a singular arrange-
ment of huge sandstone ledges on the slope
of a mountain, forming a rough inclosure
about a quarter of a mile wide and three
or four times as long. The country is very
rugged and broken for miles around, and
172 TRUE BEAR STORIKS.

except along the creek and on the trail a
horse cannot be ridden through it. The
problem of how to catch a bear in such a
place was not solved, because the bear cut
short its consideration by marching past
the camp and lumbering down the creek
bed toward the Alder Creek Canyon and the
Sespe country. The correspondent stood
upon the sandstone ledge as he went by,
and yelled at him, but he did not quicken
his pace.

When it became evident that the bear
was bound for the; Sespe, the horses were
saddled. Balaam the Burro was concealed
under a mountainous pack, and the march
was resumed over the Alder Creek trail to
the deep gorge through which the Sespe
River runs. The man who made the Alder
- Greek trail was not born to build roads.
He laid it out right over the top of a high
and steep mountain, when by making a
slight detour, he could have avoided a diffi-
cult and unnecessary climb. In the broil-
ing hot sun of a breezeless day in June,
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 178

the march over the mountains was hard on
men and horses, and the pace was neces-
sarily slow.

The heat coaxed the rattlesnakes out of
their holes, and the angry hum of their
rattles was an almost incessant accompan-
iment to the hoof beats of the horses.
Where the trail wound along a steep slope,
affording but slight foothold for an animal,
a more than unusually strenuous and in-
sistent singing of a snake, disturbed from
his sunny siesta, caused Balaam to jump
aside. Balaam avoided the snake, but he
lost his balance and rolled down the slope,
heels in the air and pack underneath. The
acrobatic feats achieved by Balaam in his
struggles to regain his footing were
watched by an admiring and solicitous au-
dience, and when he cleverly took advant-
age of the slight obstruction offered by a
manzanita bush, and got safely upon his
feet, he was loudly applauded. The deep
solicitude of the party for the safety of
Balaam and his pack was accounted for
174 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

when he scrambled back to the trail and
gravely walked up to the packer to have
his pack straightened. Every man anx-
iously felt of the pack, and heaved a sigh of
relief. The bottles containing O. P.S., an-
tidote for snake bite, were not broken, but
it was a narrow escape.

“Great Beeswax!” said the Doctor, “sup-
pose those bottles had been smashed and
then some one of us should go to work and
bite himself with a snake! Wouldn’t that
be a fix?”

_ “Dogdurn if it don’t make my blood run
cold to think of it,” said Dad.

Everybody’s blood seemed to be con-
gealing, and as the pack was loose and
the antidote accessible, an ounce of pre-
vention was administered to each man, and
Balaam was rewarded for his timely agil-
ity with a handful of sugar.

No more accidents occurred, and late in
the afternoon the cavalcade slid, coasted
and scrambled down the last steep hill into
the Sespe Canyon, where a camp was made
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 175

under an immense oak beside a deep, rocky
pool. That evening, around the camp-fire,
some strange bear stories were evolved
from either the memories or imagination of
the hunters.

In the morning the search for bear signs
was resumed and prosecuted until noon
without success. Dad was lured by the
swarms of trout in the stream, and went
fishing. Dad is not a scientific fly fisher-
man. His favorite method is to select a
shady nook on the bank, sit down with his
back against a rock, tie a sinker to a large
and gaudy fly, and angle on the bottom
for the biggest trout he can see. He gen-
erally carries a book in his pocket, and
when the trout remains unresponsive to
the allurements of the gaudy fly, he fastens
his rod to a bush and reads until he falls
asleep.

In the afternoon one of the party went
out over a long, brushy ridge, and the cor-
respondent pushed on down the gorge in
search of bear signs. All the bear tracks
176 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

led up toward the Hot Springs Canyon, indi-
cating that the grizzlies had begun their
annual migration to the Alamo, Frazier
and Pine mountains, where large bands of
sheep are herded through the summer.
Some of the tracks were large and fresh,
and a person might come upon a bear at
any time in the bottom of the canyon. Pre-
parations were made for folowing the
bears and directions given for an early
start in the morning. The Doctor recol-
lected that he had important business in
Santa Paula that required his immediate
attention, and he wouldn’t have time to
follow the grizzlies through the rugged
passes of the mountains. Accordingly, he
and Dad decided to remain in the Sespe
camp a day or two, enjoy the fishing, and
then return to Santa Paula, and the bear
hunting party that saddled up and struck
out on the trail of the grizzly in the morn-
ing was reduced to three.

The trail led through the Hot Springs
Canyon, where boiling hot sulphur water
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 177

flows out of the ground in a stream large
enough to sensibly affect the temperature
of the Sespe River, into which itruns. This
canyon was formerly a beautiful camping
spot, and was resorted to by many persons
who believed that bathing in sulphur wa-
ter would restore their health, but about
three years ago a cloudburst uprooted all
the trees and converted the green cien-
aga into a rocky desolate flat, as barren
and unattractive as the sharp, treeless
peaks surrounding the canyon. Afew moun-
tain sheep inhabit the mountains about
the Hot Springs, and occasionally one is
seen standing upon some high and inacces-
sible cliff, but it is very seldom that a
hunter succeeds in getting a pair of big
horns.

The next camp was on the Piru Creek,
where it runs through the Mutaw ranch.
One of the most promising mining districts
in this part of the State takes its name
from the Piru, and in years gone by a great
deal of gold was taken from the diggings
178 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

along the stream. One of the most success-
ful miners was Mike Brannan, whose cab-
ins and mining appliances lie unused and
decaying about six miles from the place
where the expedition camped.

From the camp on the Mutaw the expe-
dition followed Piru Creek down to Lock-
wood, and the latter up to the divide be-
tween Lockwood Valley and the Cuddy
ranch at the foot of Mount Pinos, called
Sawmill Mountain by the settlers. The
mountain is about 10,000 feet high, and is
covered with heavy pine timber. Ever
since Haggin & Carr’s sheep have been on
the mountain, the bears from forty miles
around have made annual marauding ex-
peditions, and kept the herders on the
jump all the summer. The first band of
sheep and the Examiner expedition arrived
at the old Sawmill simultaneously this
year, and the Basque who was herding the
band, having a very lively sense of the dan-
ger of his situation, pitched his tent close
to the camp, where he would be under the
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 179

protection of three rifles. The Basque had
never been on the mountain before, but
he had heard about the bears and their
audacious raids, and he was not at all
enamored of his job. When the campfires
were started, and the forest became an en-
closing wall of gloom, behind which lurked
all the mysteries and menaces of the moun-
tains, the Basque came shyly into camp,
bringing a shoulder of mutton with which
to establish friendly relations, and under
the mellowing influence of a glass of some-
thing hot he became confidential and
as communicative as his broken jargon of
French and California Spanish would per-
mit.

He had come to the mountain reluct-
antly, and having been told about the
herder whose hand was torn off by a grizzly
last year, he was still more unwilling to
remain. He would stay as long as the Ex-
aminer party remained near him, but when
the hunters went away he proposed to quit
and hasten back to the plains, where he
180 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

would have nothing worse than the coyotes
to encounter. Every night after that, so
long as the hunters were in that camp, the
Basque came and sat at the fire until bed-
time, talking about los osos, and when the
grass and water gave out and the expedi-
tion was obliged to move camp about two
miles, the gentle shepherd packed his blan-
kets over the trail to Bakersfield, leaving
his flock in the care of a leathery skinned
bear-hardened Mexican.

The bears were later this year than usual
in coming to the mountain, probably be-
cause the warm weather was longer de-
layed, and for many days the hunters
scanned the trails in the canyons in vain
for the footprints of grizzlies. The first
indication of their arrival was given in a
somewhat startling way to the correspon-
dent one evening as he was slowly toiling
through a deep, rocky ravine back to camp,
after a weary tramp over the foothills of
the big mountain.

The sun had set and the bottom of the


THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 181

ravine was dark as night. The belated
searcher for bear signs skirted a dense wil-
low thicket, and brushed against the
bushes with his elbow. “Woof! Woof!”
snorted a bear within ten feet of him, in-
visible in the thicket. His heart thumped
and his rifle lock clicked, together, and
which sound was the louder he could not
tell. For a few seconds he stood at the
edge of the thicket with his rifle ready, ex-
pecting the rush of the bear, but the ani-
mal was not in a warlike mood and did
not rush, and the hunter cautiously backed
away about twenty yards up the steep side
of the ravine. The cracking of brush indi-
cated that bruin was moving in the thicket,
but nothing could be seen in the gather-
ing gloom. Two or three large rocks rolled
down into the willows started the bear out
on a run and he could be heard crashing
his way down the ravine and splashing into
the pools as he went. The remainder of
the journey back to camp was made
182 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

through the open pine forest on the top
of the mountain.

Superintendent McCullough, who has
charge of Haggin & Carr’s sheep camps on
Pinos Mountain, stopped at the Examiner
camp when he made his inspecting tours,
and consultations were held with him
about the bears. From the reports given
him by the herders he judged that only
the bears that lived on the mountain were
prowling about, and that the invading
army had not arrived from the Alamo and
the Sespe region. A large cinnamon bear
had walked into one camp about ten miles

distant and killed two sheep in daylight, ©

but the grizzlies had not begun to eat mut-
ton. In July or August there would be
bears enough to keep a man busy shinning
up trees. Last year, he said, there were
at least forty bears on the mountain, and
they visited some of the sheep camps every
night. Sometimes two or three bears would
raid a camp, tree the herder and kill sey-
eral sheep. The herders were not expected
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 183

to fight bears or attempt to drive them
away, and the owners reckoned upon the
loss of several hundred sheep every sum-
mer.

Shortly before the first of July the camp
was moved to Seymore Spring, about two
miles from the mill, where good water and
feed were plenty, and search for bear sign
was continued. Every day some deep gorge
or rocky ravine was visited and thoroughly
hunted, and a deer was killed occasionally,
but no sign of bears was found until the
3d of July, when the tracks of a very large
grizzly were discovered crossing a ridge
between the Lockwood Valley and the Sey-
mour. The tracks were followed across the
Seymour Valley to a spur of the mountain
between the mill ravine and a deep canyon
to the westward.

Camp was moved to a green cienaga at
the head of the latter, which was chris-
tened Bear Canyon, and the building of a
trap was begun near the mouth—about
half a mile from camp. Three large pine
184 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

trees served as corner posts for a pen built
of twenty-inch logs, “gained” at the cor-
ners and fastened together with stout oak
pins. The pen was about twelve feet long,
four feet high and five feet wide inside,
and the door was made of pine logs sunk
into the ground and wedged and pinned se-
curely. A door of four-inch planks, so
heavy that it required three men to raise it,
was Set in front, between oak guides pinned
vertically to the trees and suspended by
a rope running over a pulley and back to
a trigger that engaged with a pivoted stick
of oak, to which the bait was to be fast-
ened. Five days were consumed in the con-
struction of the trap, and while the work
was going on a bear visited the camp at
night and stampeded all the saddle and
pack animals out of the canyon.

A German prospector named Sparkuhle,
who was staying temporarily in the camp,
was cured of a severe case of skepticism
that night. Sparkuhle believed nothing
that he could not see, and he declared, with


THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 185

exasperating iteration, “I believe there
don’t vas any bears in der gountry. I look
for ’em every day, thinking perhaps might
I could see one, but I don’t could see any.”
And every night before he turned in,
Sparkuhle said: “Vell, might did a bear
come tonight. I wish I could see one, but
I think there don’t vas any bears at all.”

Sparkuhle scorned the shelter of the
bough shed, under which the Examiner
outfit slept, and spread his blankets on top
of a bank about six feet above a rocky shelf
that was used as a pantry and kitchen.
His only weapon was his pick, and he was
not afraid of being disturbed by any prowl-
ing animal.

It was about midnight when the camp
was alarmed by the snorting of the horses
and the clatter of hoofs galloping down
the canyon, but before the cause of the dis-
turbance could be learned a yell of sur-
prise came from Sparkuhle, followed by a
crash and a terrible clatter among the pots
and pans below the bank. In another mo-
186 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ment Sparkuhle ran into the camp and be-
gan to tell excitedly what had happened
to him. He was so intensely interested
in his story that he paid no attention to a
three-tined fork that was sticking in him
just below the end of his back. He said
he was awakened by the noise in camp,
and looking up thought he saw the burro
standing over him. Seizing his pillow he
made a swipe at the animal, and said, “Get
away, Balaam!” and then the supposed
burro hit him a clip and knocked him spin-
ning over the edge of the bank, but the
blow did no further damage because
Sparkuhle was rolled up in half a dozen
blankets. The noise of his arrival among
the tinware alarmed the bear and when
the party got out with lights and guns he
was out of sight. Sparkuhle slept in the
cabin after that.

Two days later the big bear went into
a sheep camp near the mill, while the
herder was cooking supper, stampeded the
sheep right over the fire, caught one and
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 187

killed it, and sat down within thirty yards
of the herder and leisurely gorged himself
with mutton. The Mexican herder de-
scribed him as “grande” and “muy blanco”
and said he was as tall asa mule. On the
following day at noon the same bear went
into another sheep camp about three miles
from the mill, and stole a freshly killed
sheep, which the herder had hung up for
his own use. Then he suddenly ceased his
raids and disappeared and for the next
three weeks the mountain seemed to be
deserted by the bears.

The herders had put strychnine into the
carcasses of several sheep that had died
of eating poisonous weeds, and McCul-
lough thought the bears must have eaten
the poisoned mutton and become sick. It
requires a strong dose of strychnine to kill
a grizzly, and frequently the bears get only
enough to make them ill and send them
into temporary retirement in some dark
gorge.

But while the bears were away the
13
188 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

mountain lions and panthers managed to
keep things from becoming dull. They
came into camp several times and made
the canyon ring with their yowling, but they
always kept brush between themselves and
the fire-light, and it was impossible to get
a shot at them. Their raids became so an-
noying that two hounds were procured and
brought into camp; after that the night-
prowling beasts kept at a respectful dis-
tance. Being unable to steal any more
provisions from the Examiner outfit, the
lions turned their attention to the sheep
camps. One night a lion sneaked up
through a willow thicket to the nearest
sheep camp and killed three sheep. He was
a dainty lion, evidently, as he only cut the
throats of the sheep and drank their blood
and did not eat any mutton. The same lion
followed the scent of a carcass that had
been dragged to the bear trap for bait, but
he stopped twenty yards from the trap, and
went away, not caring to risk his neck
by going into any such contrivance.


THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 189

Wherever bait was dragged over the
mountain, and it was dragged many miles
for the purpose of enticing bear to the trap,
the lions followed the trail, but they would
not go into the trap. Still it is not safe
to generalize from this fact and assume
that the cougar or mountain lion never will
go into a trap, for he is a most erratic and
uncertain beast. Sometimes he is an ar-
rant coward, and again he is as bold as a
genuine lion. Generally a dog will keep
cougars away from a camp or house, but
once in a while the cougar hunts the dog
and kills him.

One afternoon a cougar jumped into Joe
Dye’s dooryard at his ranch on the Sespe,
picked up Joe’s baby and sprang over the
fence with it. Joe seized his rifle and shot
the animal as it ran, and when the cougar
felt the sting of the bullet he dropped the
baby and ran up the mountain. He had
seized the baby’s clothes only, and the lit-
tle one was not hurt. The next night the
cougar returned, captured Joe’s hound,
190 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

carried it into the mountains and killed it.

On the ist of August, the report reached
camp that the bears were having a picnic
on the Mutaw ranch and were killing hogs
by the score. John F. Cuddy’s sons, the
best vaqueros and bronco-riders in this
part of the country, offered to go over to
the Mutaw with the correspondent and
lasso a bear if one could be found on open
ground; accordingly, the party saddled up
and took the trail up the Piru, arriving
at the Mutaw meadows late in the night,
after a rough ride of twenty miles.

In the morning Mr. Taylor, one of the
owners of the ranch, was found skinning
a grizzly that had eaten strychnine in pork
during the night. Mr. Taylor had put poi-
son out all over the ranch and the prospect
of catching a live bear seemed dubicus, but
all the poisoned meat that could be found
was buried at once, and Bowers and the
correspondent began building a trap to
catch a bear that had been making twelve.
inch tracks around the cabins. The Cuddy




THE BEAR “MONAROH.” 191

boys rode about looking for bear, and one
of them lassoed an eagle that had water-
logged himself and was sitting stupidly on
a rock by the creek. The bird measured
nine feet across the wings. Messrs. Louis
and Taylor, owners of the Mutaw, received
the party hospitably and assisted in the
work of preparing the trap. But Mr. Tay-
lor forgot where he had put some of his
poison, and in forty-eight hours all the
dogs in the place, including the Examin-
er’s two hounds, were stiffened out and
turned up their toes. Chopping off their
tails and pouring sweet oil down their
throats did not restore them.

No chance to lasso a bear presented it-
self, and as soon as the trap was completed
and baited with two live pigs the party
returned to Pine Mountain.

At last it became evident that the bears
on Mount Pinos could not be enticed into
a trap while they had their pick and choice
of the thousands of sheep that grazed on
the mountain. They preferred to do their
192 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

own butchering and would not touch mut-
ton that was killed for them by anybody
else. A cougar raided a camp one night,
sprang upon the sheep from a willow
thicket and killed three within twenty
yards of the sleeping herder. The fastidi-
ous cougar cut their throats, sucked their
blood and left their carcasses at the edge
of the thicket without eating the meat.
But the bears would not touch what the
cougar left.

Shortly after this the herders reported
that the bears were avoiding the sheep and
passing around the bands without making
an attack.

Apparently bruin had made a miscalcu-
lation in his calendar and was keeping
Lent in the wrong season, but his erratic
conduct was explained when some of the
herders admitted that they had put strych-
nine into several carcasses. Some of the
bears had got doses of poison large enough
to make them mortally unwell, but had
survived and sworn off eating mutton.
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 198

They disappeared from the vicinity of the
camps and grazing ground, and went into
solitary confinement in remote and deep
gorges, where nobody but a lunatic would
follow them.

The result of many weeks’ hard work on
Mount Pinos was the acquirement of some
knowledge of the nature and eccentricities
of Ursus ferox, which was glibly imparted
by Tom, Dick and Harry, who assumed
that the mere fact of their having lived
near the mountains qualified them to
speak as authorities on the habits of
bears.

One inspired idiot declared that the best
way to catch a grizzly was to give him
atropia, which would make him blind for
a day or two, and lead him along like a
tame calf. This genius was so enamored
of his great discovery that he went about
the country telling everybody that the
Hxaminer man was going to catch a grizzly
with atropia, and that he (the aforesaid
194 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

lunatic) was the inventor of the scheme
and general boss of the outfit.

“A bear will do this,” said one. ‘He will
do so and so,” said another, and “you just
do that and he’ll go right into the trap,”
said a dozen more. Everybody seemed to
be loaded to the guards with an assorted
cargo of general ignorance about bears,
which they were anxious to discharge upon
the Examiner expedition, but not one man
in the whole lot ever caught a grizzly, and.
very few ever saw one.

As a matter of fact, determined by ex-
perience and observation, a grizzly will do
none of the things laid down as rules of
conduct for him by the wise men of the
mountains, but will do pretty much as he
pleases, and act as his individual whim
or desire moves him. It is a mistake to
generalize about bears from the actions of
one of the species. One bear will be bold
and inquisitive, and will walk right into
a camp to gratify his curiosity, while an-
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 195

other will carefully avoid man and all his
works.

The predictions of an ursine invasion of
Mount Pinos were not fulfilled and when
it became clear that the few grizzlies in
the neighborhood were too timid and wary
to be caught, the expedition struck camp
and moved on, leaving the traps set for
luck.

Considerable annoyance was caused by a
discharged mule-packer, who carried away
tools required in trap building, and em-
bezzled quite a sum of money. The fellow
had attempted to impose upon the corre-
spondent by whittling out pine-bark mod-
els of bear’s feet, with which to make
tracks around the trap; and had proposed
various swindling jobs to others of the
party, explaining that the “Examiner was
rich and they might as well get a hack at
the money.” He had opened and read let-
ters intrusted to him for mailing, and had:
proved himself generally a faithless scam
and an unconscionable liar. A written de-
196 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

mand upon him, for restitution of his plun-
der, elicited only a coarse and abusive
letter, but there was no time to waste in
prosecuting the fellow and he was left in
the enjoyment of his booty and in such
satisfaction as the rascal mind of him
could derive from the fact that he had
succeeded in robbing his employer.

The big bear on the Mutaw never came
near the trap built for his special accom-
modation, notwithstanding the confident
assurances of the bear experts on the ranch
that he was sure to show up within forty-
eight hours. For two months after the
poisoning of his campanero no signs of the
large grizzly were seen anywhere near the
Mutaw, and the hogs roamed about the
hills unmolested.

After leaving Mount Pinos the expedi-
tion built several traps in the mountains
near trails frequented by bears. An old
grizzly that lived among the unsurveyed
and unnamed peaks between Castac Lake
and the Liebra Mountain absorbed the at-


THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 197

tention of the hunters for some time. He
was an audacious marauder and killed his
beef almost within sight of the camp-fire.
Often at night a cow or steer could be
heard bellowing in terror, and in the morn-
ing a freshly killed animal would be found
in some hollow not far away, bearing
marks of bear’s claws. Whitened bones
scattered all over the hills showed that the
bear had been the boss butcher of General
Beal’s ranch for a long time. His average
allowance of beef appeared to be about two
steers a week, but he usually ate only half
a carcass, leaving the rest to the coyotes
and vultures.

One morning Bowers returned from a
hunt for the horses, two of which had been
struck and slightly wounded by the bear
a few nights before, and had run away,
and reported the discovery of ‘a dead steer
within 150 yards of an unfinished trap,
about a quarter of a mile from camp. The
animal appeared to have been killed two
nights before, and the bear had made but
L98 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

one meal off the carcass. As he might be
expected to return that night, all haste
was made to finish the trap. Bowers rode
out to Gorman’s Station to get some nails
and honey, while the correspondent paid a
visit to one of General Beal’s old corrals
and stole some planks to make a door. He
packed the planks up the mountain, and
was using the hammer and saw with great
diligence and a tremendous amount of
noise, when bruin sauntered down the
ridge, looked curiously at him and calmly
began eating an early supper, wholly in-
different to the noise of the hammer and
the presence of the man.

It was nearly dark when Bowers rode up
to the trap, his horse in a lather composed
of equal parts of perspiration and honey,
the latter having leaked profusely from
the cans tied to the saddle. Tossing the
nails to the correspondent, Bowers hastily
dismounted and went afoot up the ridge
toward the dead steer, intending to place
a can of honey near it. In about a min-
THE BHAR “MONARCH.” 195

ute Bowers was seen running from the
ridge in fifteen-foot jumps, and as he ap-
proached the trap he shouted: “The bear
is there now!”

“Ts that so?” said the correspondent. “I
thought he had finished his supper and had
gone away by this time.”

Bowers had approached to within forty
yards of the bear before seeing him, and
the bear had merely raised his head, taken
a look at the intruder and resumed his
eating. As it had become too dark to drive
nails, and there was no longer any reason
for finishing the door that night, Bowers
fetched the rifles from camp and the two
men went up the ridge to take a better
look at the bear. Had there been light
enough to make the rifle sights visible, it
would have been hard to resist the tempta-
tion of turning loose at the old fellow from
behind a convenient log; but it was impos-
sible to draw a bead on him, and it would
have been sheer foolhardiness to shoot and
take the chances of a fight in the dark with
200 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

a wounded grizzly. Besides, if shot at and
missed, the bear would probably not re-
turn, and all the cnances of getting him
into the trap would be lost. So the two
sat on a log and watched the grizzly till
the night came on thick and dark, when
they returned to camp.

The trap was finished the next day, but
a somewhat ludicrous accident destroyed
its possibilities of usefulness, and made it
quite certain that bruin would never be
caught in it. Not expecting a visit from
the bear, for at least two days, the corre-
spondent went up to the ridge just before
dark, made a rope fast to the remains of
a steer, and dragged him down to the trap.
Bowers had gone back to Ventura on busi-
ness, and the correspondent was alone on
the mountain; when he went into the trap
to fix a can of honey upon the trigger, he
placed a stick under the door, in such a
way that if the door should fall he could
use the stick as a lever to pry it up, and
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 201

so avoid an experience like Dad Coff-
man’s.

The precaution was well taken. While
he was arranging the bait he heard snuf-
fling and the movement of some animal
outside. Supposing that some cow or per-
haps the burro was wandering about, he
paid no particular attention to the noise,
but when the bait was arranged and he
turned to go out he saw the muzzle of old
bruin poked into the door and his eyes
blinking curiously at the dark interior of
the trap. Bruin had come down for a feast

and had followed the trail of the steer’s .

remains with unexpected promptness. He
had scented the honey, which was more
alluring than stale beef, and evidently was
considering the propriety of entering the -
trap to get his supper, which might con-
sist of honeycomb au naturel, with Exam-
iner man on the side.

The man in the trap deemed it highly
improper for the bear to intrude at that
time, and quickly decided the etiquette of
202 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the case by kicking the trigger and letting
the door fall with a dull thud plump upon
the old grizzly’s nose. A hundred and sixty
pounds falling four feet is no laughing
affair when it hits one on the nose, and
bruin did not make light of it. He was
pained and surprised, and he went away
more in sorrow than in anger, judging from
the tone of his expostulating grunts and
snorts.

When the snorts of the bear died away
in the distance, the correspondent pried
up the door, crawled out and cautiously
made his way through the dark woods to
his lonely camp.

At this time there were six traps scat-
tered through the mountains within a rad-
ius of sixty miles, all of them set and
baited, and the more distant ones watched
by men employed for that purpose. One
of the traps was on a mountain that was
not pastured by cattle, or sheep, and as
there were no acorns in that part of the
country, the bears had to rustle for a living
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” = 208

and were unable to withstand the tempta-
tion offered by quarters of beef judiciously
exposed to their raids.

The bait scattered around this trap was
discovered by four bears, but for some
time they regarded it with suspicion, and
were afraid to touch it, possibly because
they detected the scent of man near it.
Gradually they became accustomed to it
and the signs of man’s presence, and then
they began to quarrel over the meat, as
was plainly indicated by the disturbance
of the ground where their tracks met. Two
of the tracks were of medium size, one was
quite large and evidently made by a. griz-
zly, and the fourth was enormous, being
fourteen inches long and nine inches wide.

The last-named track was not made by
a grizzly however. There were six toes on
the forefoot, and this peculiar deformity
was the distinguishing mark of a gigantic
cinnamon bear known to hunters as “Six-
Toed Pete.”

it was almost invariably found, during
204 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the long campaign in the wilderness, that
tracks over eleven inches in length were
made by cinnamon bears, and not by gen-
uine grizzlies, although some hunters de-
clare that the cinnamon is only a variety
of grizzly, and that the color is not
the mark of a different species. However
that may be, the difference between the
two varieties is very distinct, and as the
object of the expedition was the capture
of an indubitable California grizzly, no
special effort was made to trap any of the
big cinnamons.

The smaller bears soon gave up the con-
test for the beef and left the field to Pete
and the grizzly, who quarreled and fought
around it for several nights. At last the
grizzly gave Pete a thorough licking and
established his own right to the title of
monarch of the mountain. The decisive
battle occurred one moonlight night and
was witnessed from a safe perch in a fork
of a tree near the trap.

It was nearly 9 o’clock when the snap-
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 205

ping of dry sticks indicated the approach
of a heavy animal through the brush, and
in a few moments the big grizzly came
into sight, walking slowly and sniffing sus-
piciously. A smart breeze was drawing
down the canyon, and the bear, being to
the windward, could not smell the man up
the tree, but he approached the meat cau-
tiously and seemed in no hurry for his sup-
per. While he was reconnoitering another
animal was heard smashing through the
thicket, and presently the huge bulk of Six-
Toed Pete loomed up in the moonlight at
the edge of the opening.

At the approach of the cinnamon the
grizzly rose upon his haunches and uttered
low, hoarse growls, and when the big fel-
low appeared within twenty feet of him,
he launched himself forward with surpris-
ing swiftness and struck Pete a blow on the
neck that staggered him. It was like one
of Sullivan’s rushes in the ring, and the
blow of that ponderous paw would have
knocked out an ox; but Pete was no slouch
206 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

of a slugger himself, and he quickly re-
covered and returned the blow with such
good will that had the grizzly’s head been
in the way it would have ached for a week
afterward.

Then the fur began to fly.

It was impossible to follow the move-
ments of the combatants in detail, as they
sparred, clinched and rolled about, but in
a general way Six-Toed Pete seemed to be
trying to make his superior weight tell by
rushing at the grizzly and knocking him
over, while the latter avoided the direct
impact of the cinnamon’s great bulk by
quick turns and a display of agility that
was scarcely credible in so unwieldy look-
ing an animal. Once the cinnamon seized
the grizzly by the throat and for a moment
hushed the latter’s fierce growls by chok-
ing off his wind, but the grizzly sat down,
threw his arm over Pete’s neck, placed his
other forepaw upon Pete’s nose, sunk his
claws in deep, and instantly broke the hold.
As they parted, the grizzly made a vicious
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 207

sweep with his right paw and caught Pete
on the side of the head. The blow either
destroyed the cinnamon’s left eye or tore
the flesh around it, so that the blood
blinded him on that side, for during the
rest of the fight he tried to keep his right
side toward the grizzly and seemed unable
to avoid blows delivered on his left.

For at least a quarter of an hour the
combat raged, without an instant’s cessa-
tion, both belligerents keeping up a terrific
growling, punctuated with occasional
howls of pain. Neither could get a fair blow
at the other’s head. Had the grizzly struck
the cinnamon with the full force of his tre-
mendous arm, Pete’s skull would have
surely been smashed. Pete finally got
enough, broke away from the Monarch and
fled into the brush, a badly used up bear;
and he never came back.

Having won his supper by force of arms,
the grizzly was no longer suspicious of the
bait, and he ate up the best part of a quar-
ter of beef before he left the battle ground.
208 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

He soon became accustomed to the trap,
and regularly came there for his meals,
which were gradually placed nearer the
door and finally inside the structure. A
piece of meat was tied to the trigger, and
one morning the door was found closed,
and a great ripping and tearing was heard
going on inside. The Monarch was caught
at last.

Upon the approach of the men, the griz-
zly became furious and made the heavy
logs tremble and shake in his efforts to get
out and resent the indignity that had been
placed upon him. Had he concentrated
his attack on any one spot and been left
to wreak his rage without interruption he
would have been out in a few hours, but he
was not permitted to work long at any
place. Wherever he began work he en-
countered the end of a heavy stake which
was jabbed against his nose and head with
all the power of a man’s arms.

Day and night from the moment he was
found in the trap, the Monarch was
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 209

watched and guarded, and he kept two
men busy all the time. Although his at-
tention was distracted from the trap as
much as possible, he found time to gnaw
and rip a ten-inch log almost in two, and
sometimes he made the bark and splinters
fly in a way that was calculated to make
a nervous man loathe the job of standing
guard over him. For six days the Mon-
arch was so busy trying to break jail that
he had no time to fool away in eating. Sol-
itary confinement developed in him a most
malicious temper and he flew into a rage
whenever food was thrown to him.

But his applications for a writ of habeas
corpus were persistently denied by a man
with a club, and the Monarch at last
cooled down a little and condescended to
take a light lunch of raw venison. He was
given two days for reflection and medita-
tion, and when he seemed to be in a more
reasonable mood, the work of preparing
him for a visit to the city was begun.

A running noose was made in a stout
210 TRUE:BEAR STORIES.

chain and put into. the trap between twa
of the logs, and when the bear stepped his
forepaw into the noose it was drawn taut.
. and held by four men outside. Despite the
strain upon the chain the bear easily threw
_ the noose off with his other paw, letting
- the men fall backwards in a heap on the
ground. Again and again the trick was
tried but the noose would not hold.

Then the method of working the chain .
was, changed and the noose let down .
through the top of the trap, and.after many
failures it was drawn sharply up round his
arm near the shoulder, where it held. Ten
hours were consumed in the effort to secure -
one leg and the Monarch fought furiously
every minute of the time, biting the chain,

seizing it with his paws and charging

about in his prison as though he were
erazy. He was utterly reckless of conse-~
quences to himself, and he bit the iron se
savagely that he splintered his teeth and.
whoily destroyed his longer tushes. _ ;

Having secured one leg, it was compar-


Large Black Bear.—Page 250.
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 211

atively easy to get another chain around
his other paw and two ropes around his
hind legs, and then he was stretched out,
spread-eagle fashion, on the floor of the
trap.

The next move was to fasten a heavy
chain around his neck in such a way that it
could not choke him, and to accomplish
this it was necessary to muzzle the Mon-
arch. A stick about eighteen inches long
and two inches thick was held under his
nose, and he promptly seized it in his jaws.
Before he dropped it a stout cord was made
fast to one end of the stick, passed over his
“nose, around the other end of the stick,
under his jaw, and then wound around his
muzzle and the stick in such a way as to
bind his jaws together, a turn back of his
head holding the gag firmly in place.

The Monarch was now bound, gagged
and utterly helpless, but he never ceased
roaring with rage at his captors and strug-
gling to get just one blow at them with
his paw. It was an easy matter for a man
212 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

to get upon his back, put a chain collar
around his neck, and fasten the heavy
chain with a swivel to the collar. The col-
lar was kept in place by a chain rigged
like a martingale and passed under his
arms and over his back. A stout rope
made fast about his body completed the
Monarch’s fetters and the gag was then
removed from the royal mouth. The King
of the mountains was a hopeless prisoner—
Gulliver, tied hand and foot by the Lilli-
putians.

The next morning Monarch was lashed
upon a rough sled—a contrivance known
to lumbermen as a “go-devil”—to make the
journey down the mountain. The first
team of horses procured to haul him could
not be driven anywhere near the bear. They
plunged and snorted and became utterly
unmanageable, and finally they broke
away and ran home. The next team was
but little better, and small progress was
made the first day.

At night the Monarch was released from
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 2138

the “go-devil” and secured only by his
chains to a large tree. The ropes were
removed from his legs, and he was allowed
considerable freedom to move about, but
a close watch was kept upon him. After
several futile efforts to break away, he ac-
cepted the situation, stretched himself at
the foot of the tree and watched the camp-
fire all night.

In the morning the ropes were replaced,
after a lively combat, and the bear was
again lashed to the sled. Four horses were
harnessed to it and the journey was re-
sumed. Men with axes and bars went
ahead to make a road, and it was with
no small amount of labor that they made
it passable. The poor old bear was
slammed along over the rocks and through
the brush, but he never whimpered at the
hardest jolts. With all the care that could
be observed, it was impossible to make his
ride anything but a series of bumps, slides
and capsizes, and the progress was slow.
At the steep places men held the sled back
214 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

with ropes and tried to keep it right side
up.

Four days on a “go-devil” is no pleasure
excursion, even for a tough grizzly, and
when the Monarch was released from his
uncomfortable vehicle, at the foot of the
mountain, he seemed glad to get a chance
to stretch himself and rest. For nearly
a week he was left free of all fetters ex-
cept the chain on his neck and the rope
around his body, and he spent his days in
slumber and his nights eating and digging
a great hole in the ground. Having con-
vinced himself that he could neither break
his chain nor bite it in two, he accepted
the situation with surly resignation and
asked only to be let alone and fed de-
cently.

While the bear was recuperating and
becoming reconciled to what couldn’t be
helped, a cage was being built of Oregon
pine lumber with an iron-barred door, and
when it was finished he was dragged inte
it by the heels. As soon as he saw the
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 215

ropes, Monarch knew that mischief was
afoot, and when a man began throwing
back into the hole the dirt that he had
dug out, he mounted the heap and silently
but strenuously began to dig for himself
anew hole. He worked twice as fast as
two men with shovels, and in his efforts to
escape he only assisted in filling up the old
hole.

For some time he baffled all attempts to
get ropes on his forepaws, having learned
the trick of throwing them off and seizing
the loops with his teeth, but he was soon
secured and stretched out on his back. The
Monarch roared his remonstrances and did
his best to get even for the outrages that
had been done to his rights and his feel-
ings, but the ropes were tough and he could
not get a chance to use his enormous
strength. He was dragged on his back
into the cage, the door was dropped and
the ropes were removed, but the chain re-
mained around his neck and that was made
fast to the bars. As soon as he found him-
216 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

self shut up in a box the angry and insulted
bear ceased roaring and in a short time he
philosophically stretched himself on the
floor and wondered what would happen
next.

The next thing that happened to him
was the standing of his cage on end, but
that did not appear to disturb him. A
wagon was backed up, and the cage was
tilted down again and placed upon the
wagon, which was then hauled down the
canyon and along the river bed to a little
water station on the Southern Pacific Rail-
road, where the cage was put upon a stock
car. The car was provisioned with a quar-
ter of beef, and a lot of watermelons, and
attached to a freight train, then men who
had helped to bring the bear out of the
mountains waved their hats, and the Mon-
arch caught a last glimpse of his native
hills as the train whirled him and the cor-
respondent northward.

It must have been a very strange, per-
haps terrifying, thing to the wild grizzly
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 217

to be jolted along for two days on a rat-
tling, bumping, lurching freight train, with
the shrieking of steam whistles and the
ringing of bells, but he endured it all he-
roically and gave no sign of fear. He ate
well when food was given him, taking
meat from his captor’s hands through the
bars, and slept soundly when he was tired.
He seemed to know and yield a sort of
obedience to the correspondent, but re-
sented with menacing growls the imperti-
nent curiosity of strangers who came to
look at him through the bars.

In every crowd that came to see him
there was at least one fool afflicted with
a desire to poke the bear with a stick, and
constant vigilance was necessary to pre-
vent such witless persons from enraging
him. At Mojave, when the correspondent
went to the car, he found a dozen idlers
inside, and one inspired lunatic was stir-
ring up the Monarch, who was rapidly los-
ing his temper. The cage would not have
held him five minutes had he once tackled
218 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the bars in a rage, and it was only the
moral influence of the chain around his
neck that kept him quiet. When the cor-
respondent sprang into the car, the griz-
aly’s eyes were green with anger, and in
a moment more there would have been
the liveliest kind of a circus on that freight
train. Hustling the crowd out with un-
ceremonious haste—incidentally throwing
a few maledictions at the man with the
stick—the correspondent drove the Mon-
arch back from the bars, and ordered him
to lie down, and for the next half hour rode
in the car with him and talked him into
a peaceable frame of mind.

From the freight depot on Townsend
Street the cage was hauled on a truck to
Woodward’s Gardens, and under the di-
rections of Louis Ohnimus, superintendent
of the gardens, the Monarch was trans-
ferred to more comfortable quarters. His
cage was backed up to one of the perma-
nent cages, both doors were opened, and
he was invited to move, but he refused
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 219

to budge until his chain was passed around
the bars and hauled by four stout men. The
grizzly resisted for a few minutes, but sud-
denly decided to change his quarters and
went with a rush and a roar, wheeling
about and striking savagely through the
bars at the men. But Mr. Ohnimus had
expected just such a performance and
taken such precautions that nobody was
hurt and no damage done.

The Monarch had shown himself a brave
fighter and an animal of unusual courage
in every way. He had endured the roughest
kind of a journey without weakening, and
compelled respect and admiration from the
moment of his capture. But when the
strain and excitement were over, and he
was left to himself, the effects became ap-
parent, and for two or three days he was
a sick bear. He had a fever and would
not eat for a time, but Mr. Ohnimus took
charge-of him, doctored him with medi-
cines good for the ills of bear flesh, and

15
220 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

soon tempted back his appetite with rab-
bits and pigeons.

Soon the Monarch was sufficiently con-
valescent to rip the sheet iron from the side
of his cage and break a hole through into
the hyena’s quarters. By night he was on
his muscle in great shape, and Superin-
tendent Ohnimus sent for the correspon-
dent to-sit up with him all night and help
keep the half-ton grizzly from tearing
things to pieces. By watching. the old fel-
low and talking to him now and then they
managed to distract his attention from
mischief most of the time, but he got in
considerable work and rolled up several
sheets of iron as though they were paper.

It was evident that no ordinary cage
would hold him, and men were at once
employed to line one of the compartments
with heavy iron of the toughest quality
and to strengthen it with bars and angle
iron. This made a perfectly secure place
of confinement. A watch was kept on the
Monarch by the garden keepers during the
- THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 221

day, and by the superintendent and the cor-
respondent every night, until the work was
finished and the Monarch transferred.

The grizzly is now safely housed in the
first appartment of the line of cages, and
under the watchful care of Mr. Ohnimus
will soon recover his lost flesh and energy
and again be the magnificent animal that
he was when he was the undisputed mon-
arch of the Sierra Madre.

LATEST BULLETIN.

Monarch a True Grizzly.

“Monarch,” the Examiner’s big grizzly,
received many visitors yesterday, but, hav-
ing been up all night trying the strength
of his new house, he declined to stand up,
and paid but little attention to the crowd.
His chain had been fastened to the bars
of his cage with three half hitches and a
knot, and the knot was held in place by
a piece of wire. During the night he re-
moved the wire, untied all the knots and
222 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

half hitches and hauled the chain inside,
where nobody could meddle with it. Hay-
ing the chain all to himself, Monarch
was indifferent to his visitors and lazily
stretched himself on his back, with one
arm thrown back over his head.

He had a good appetite yesterday and
got away with a leg of lamb and a lot of
bread and apples. He ate a little too
heartily and had the symptoms of fever. »
Today he will not get so much food. The
best time to see him is when he eats, be-
cause he lies down all other times of the
day. He has breakfast at 10 a. m., lunch
at 1 p. m. and dinner at 3 p. m.

Monarch still looks travelworn and thin,
but he is brightening up, and when the
abrasions of the skin, made by ropes and
chains, are healed up and his hair grown
again on the bare spots he will be more pre-
sentable. His broken teeth trouble him
some and it will be some time before he
will feel as well as he did before he was
caught.
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 228

Several artists went to Woodward’s Gar-
dens today to sketch and photograph the
bear, but he refused to pose, so they did
not get the best results. It would be un-
wise to stir him up and excite him at pres-
ent, and unless the artists can catch him
at his meals they will have to wait a little
while for a chance to study the grizzly un-
der favorable conditions.

Sculptor Rupert Schmidt has made an ex-
cellent model in clay of Monarch, which
will be a valuable assistance in designs
requiring the introduction of the California
emblem.

Mr. Schmidt said:

“I am very glad to have the opportunity
to study the real grizzly, and I find him
very different from the models generally
accepted. I have modeled many bears, but
never one like this. You see in this de-
sign some figures of bears (showing a wax
model of decorative capitals). These were
intended to be grizzlies, but you see they
have the Roman nose, which is characteris-
224 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

tic of the black bear. No other bear that
I ever saw had the broad forehead and
strong, straight nose of the grizzly. He
has a magnificent head, and I think all
artists will be glad of a chance to study
him. I have inquired for grizzlies in
zodlogical gardens all over the world, but
never found one before.”

Monarch has a big, intelligent-looking
heaa and a kindly eye, and is not dis-
posed to quarrel with visitors, but he ob-
jects to any meddling with his chain, and
will not submit to any insults. It was
necessary yesterday to keep a watchman
between the cage and the crowd to prevent
people from throwing things at the bear
and stirring him up. Monarch is getting
along very well and taking his troubles
quite philosophically; but he has had a
rough experience, is worn out with fight-
ing and worry, is sore in body and spirit
and needs rest. It is a difficult thing to
keep alive in captivity a wild bear of his
age, and undue excitement might throw
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 225

him into a fatal fever. If Superintendent
Ohnimus succeeds in his efforts to cure the
Monarch of his bruises and put him into
good condition, he will deserve great
credit, and the visitors are requested not to
make the task more difficult by worrying
the captive. No other zodlogical garden
in the world has a California grizzly, and
it would be a great loss to the menagerie to
be established in the Park if the Monarch
should die.

- It is not surprising that many people
cannot tell a grizzly bear, even when they
see one, aS many zodlogists even differ
widely in regard to the characteristics of
the king of bears. It is astonishing how
little is really known in regard to the griz-
zly bear. Many text-books contain only a
general notice of the great animal, while
those naturalists who have written descrip-
tions of him do by no means agree. This
is due to their lack of specimens. The
grizzly is so powerful and unyielding a
beast that but few have been captured


226 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

alive. There have not been individuals
enough of the species studied to admit of
their being fully generalized. Different
naturalists described the grizzly from the
single specimen that came within their
notice, and hence their various descriptions
are far apart. It is a fact that hardly two
of the animals taken are exactly alike in
color or habits. >

In order to definitely settle the question,
Prof. Walter E. Bryant, of the Acad-
emy of Sciences, was yesterday induced to
visit the bear. He has made the mammals
of the Pacific Coast his study for years, and
probably knows more than anyone else
about California bears.

He examined Monarch very carefully,
noted his every point, and then examined
just as carefully the other bears at the ,
gardens.

When he had completed his investiga-
tion and stood once more before Monarch’s
cage, he was asked:

“Well, what is he?”
THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 9227

“He is a true grizzly bear,’ answered
Professor Bryant, and he added, “a mighty
big one, too.

“T never before saw one of the animals
with as dark a coat as his,” he continued;
“but that is nothing. The bear is a true
grizzly, and has all the characteristics of
one. As far as his color is concerned, griz-
azlies are of all colors; there is almost as
much variety in that regard among bears
as among dogs.”

“How do you know it is a grizzly?” was
asked.

“Well, in the first place, the claws on his
forefeet are longer and stronger than those
of any other species. Then his head is
larger than that of other bears, and his
muzzle is longer and heavier. Another and
more distinguishing feature is the height
of his shoulders. Just back of his neck is
the tallest point. From there his back
slopes down towards his haunches. The
black bear, on the other hand, has low
shoulders, and is tallest at a point rather
228 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

back of the middle of the body. There are
numerous other means of distinguishing
this bear. His teeth are very much larger
and stronger than those of the others, and
the entire structure of the skull is peculiar
to the grizzly. He has neither the short
muzzle of the European bear such as you
see in the pit, nor the rounded muzzle of
the black bear. There are, of course, many
minor points that only a naturalist would
observe, but it is sufficient to say that he
lacks none of the essential qualities of the
grizzly bear, and has none of those of the
other varieties.

“Hig coat is almost black, to be sure, but
it is very different from the glossy black
of his neighbor. If you observe the griz-
zly’s hair, you will see that a great deal of
it is a rusty brown and in certain lights
seems to be very far from black. This vari-
ation in the color of the hair is a peculiar
characteristic of the grizzly. That lanky
mane is another. His legs, you observe, are


THE BEAR “MONARCH.” 229

darker than his body. This is another
characteristic of the California grizzly.

“This animal is thin now, doubtless from
the hard time he had while he was being
brought here. When he gets fat his hair
will have a very different appearance. It |
will be interesting to watch him when he
sheds his hair. The coat that comes after
may be altogether of another color. That
grizzly, I should say, is comparatively a
young bear, and when he gets older the
gray that originally gave him his name will
very likely be pronounced.”

THE END.

SCIENTIFIC
CLASSIFICATION
OF BEARS.



EDITED BY PIERRE N. BERINGER.

le
THE LOUISIANA SPECTACLED BEAR.

Tremarctos Ornatus.

Some of our scientists have very care-
fully divided the Genus Ursus into twelve
species. While I will admit that these gen-
tlemen are conscientious and that they are
thorough in their researches, I wish to
point to the fact that they have entirely
overlooked three or four species found on
the Pacific Coast.

Many writers have completely ignored
the spectacled bear of Louisiana. Is he the
representative of another genus? Does he
belong to the Genus Helarctos (helios, the
“sun,” and arctos, “bear”) credited by the
majority of writers with basking in the
sun, or because of the peculiar markings
of his chest, representing a sunburst? He
resembles the Helarctus Malayanus of the

Malayan archipelago or the Bruang of
233
234 TRUE BEAR STORIKES.

Java. Or is he the Sloth Bear, Prochilous
(or Melursus) labiatus? This bear has been
carefully classified as a separate genus
found from the Ganges to Ceylon. His de-
scription fits rather loosely the so-called
sloth of Louisiana. Possibly the Louisiana
specimen is of the Genus Tremarctos, of
which the learned people tell us there is
but a solitary species carefully isolated in
the Andes of Chile and Peru. I shall call
the Louisiana specimen by the name given
him by our poet, the Spectacled Bear,
Tremarcios Ornatus, and the professors
who have entirely overlooked his existence
may classify him later when they find time.
At one time the Honey Bear was classified
as a “Bradipus,” or sloth, because of its
liability to lose its incisors. It was there-
fore set down as one of the Zdentaia. It has
alsobeen styled the Jungle Bear, the Lipped
Bear, and names as various as the investi-
gators’ fancy. The Zremarctos Ornatus of
Louisiana, or spectacled bear, is not a sloth.
He does not belong to the Zdentata, neither
THE SPECTACLED BEAR. 235

is he lazy. He is essentially the clown of
all bears, a very intelligent animal, and in
many cases the intellectual superior of his
keeper. He is active to a degree, and will
perform the queerest antics for the amuse-
ment of the onlooker. He is quaintly con-
scious of his mirth-provoking powers, much
as a child playing “smarty.” He will
quickly climb an inclined log or tree, and
then slide down either in an upright posi-
tion, clasping the log with the knees, or he
will slide “down the banister” as a child
might. I have seen the merry fellow grab
his tail in his mouth and roll over and over
until dizzy.

His snout is almost hairless, narrow and
proboscis like, and the nostrils and lips are
mobile. He shapes these almost into a
pipe, through which his long tongue is shot
out, drawing things in or sucking them up.
It has claws of a bluish gray that are longer
than those of any other of the Ursidae. The
hair is very long, of a deep brown black.

There is a sunburst upon the chest of a
16
236 TRUE BEAR STORIES

white or fulvous hue. The ears are small
and scarcely distinguishable, owing to the
shaggy mane. The fur is rather coarse and
very long.

It lives mainly upon honey and vege-
tables and sugar cane. In captivity it will
very gratefully subsist upon oatmeal and
occasional sweets. The animal is easily
tamed, and will become attached to its
keeper, giving an exhibition of exuberant
joy at his approach. It is a jolly good fel-
low, and shows a marked preference for
liquors, refusing all others when it may
have champagne.

It will sit on its hind legs and make faces
at the onlooker, waving its arms in the most
grotesque fashion, while it rolls its body
from side to side. This is one of the char-
acteristics that has impressed the negro
with the sacredness of this “Voodoo Bear.”
II.
THE GRIZZLY.

Ursus Horribilis or Ferow.

This is the great grizzly of California,
whose habits have been described by many
writers. It is a shy animal, not nearly as
ferocious as has been claimed. “It will al-
ways run away if it can,” says General
Dodge, “and never attacks unless it is cor-
nered or wounded.” Johnson says “the
grizzly is the king of all our animals, and
can destroy by blows from his paws the
powerful bison of the plains; wolves will
not even touch the carcass of the dreaded
monster, and, it is said, stand in such awe
that they refrain from molesting deer that
he has slain. Horses also require careful
training before they can be taught to allow
its hide to be placed upon their backs.”

In the beautiful legend of the Good Poet

the grizzly is the forefather of the Indian,
237
238 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

and the Indian gives many proofs to show
his descent from the grizzly and the Spirit
of the Mountain. I want to add a curious
fact: The grizzly is the only one of the
Ursidae that moves his toes and fingers in-
dependently of one another just like a man.
Also the bear walks with his foot full upon
the ground. In further proof the grizzly,
when young, and all other bears, except
one, descend a tree backward and head up,
as aman would. The clown bear, or spec-
tacled bear, will sometimes descend head
down and enjoy a good laugh over it. At
least he seems to laugh. After the grizzly
has attained bulk and weight with age, he
cannot climb trees, as his claws are not
strong enough to sustain his weight.

A short time after “Monarch,” the large
grizzly, arrived in San Francisco, my model,
a very considerate young person, who loved
all animals, came to the studio one day
with the story that she had made friends
with the great beast. It was about the time
when “Monarch” was being starved. He
THE GRIZZLY. 238

had been removed from the pit to the cage.
With very little forethought the cage was
built without a cover, and “Monarch” was
found one night making an attempt to es-
cape. He was prodded back with red-hot
irons. It was not possible to work about
the cage, and “Monarch” must be confined
in smaller quarters. A very small cage
was dropped into the enclosure; this had
a slide door and was to serve asatrap. I
believe the grizzly is the quickest of all ani-
mals. Six times a live chicken was fastened
in the small cage, and six times “Mon-
arch’s” long arm had literally “swiped”
that fowl. So quick was he that the slide
fell only as he was already safely crunching
its bones. At the seventh attempt he was
a little slow and was caught. After that
the iron workers placed the roof in posi-
tion. The trapping of the monster took
six days, and “Monarch” received only the
food he managed to get from the trap, and
that which my tender-hearted model was
feeding him (apples and candy) surrepti:
240 THE GRIZZLY.

tiously. As this was against the orders of
the keeper, the young woman could feed
the bear only at irregular intervals. She
continued her kindnessestohimafter he had
been again given the freedom of the larger
cage. Then she went away from the city.
She was gone for two years. She married
and assumed the rotund proportions of a
staid matron, and when next I saw her I
joked her about this, saying that she was
nearly as fat as her old friend “Monarch.”

At this she was. indignant. “Indeed,” she
said, “animals are less forgetful than man,
and ‘Monarch’ undoubtedly will remember
me, even if I am not the slim artist’s model
I once was.” I told her “Monarch” was far
too much like a man, and that he was now
satisfied to look upon the world as well
- lost, and that short of his dinner there was
little that could move him from a comforta-
ble position upon his back, his toes in the
air, apparently content, and like a philoso-
pher, wondering why the human displays
so much curiosity. “I’ll bet he won’t stir,”
THE GRIZZLY. 241

Isaid. The upshot of this conversation was
that we found ourselves just outside the
railing gazing at his lazy majesty. He
rolled his head slowly from side to side,
eyeing each newcomer with his bead-like
eyes. Suddenly the lady in the case said,
“Oh, you dear old darling!” “Monarch”
seemed electrified; he rose as quickly as
possible—certainly he had grown fat—and
then he rushed to the side of the cage. He
was not satisfied with looking at her from
his ordinary standpoint, but rose upon his
feet, extending himself his entire height,
that he might better look upon the friend
of times of trouble. She held up an apple.
“Monarch” dropped to his feet, placed his
snout as far out as the bars allowed, and
opened his immense jaws. She threw the
apple, and the bear sat himself down con-
tentedly to chew it. I firmly believe that
young woman could have walked into the
cage with an apron full of apples and es-
caped without injury. “Monarch” remem-
bered his friend.
Ii.
THE POLAR BEAR.

Thalassarctos Martitimus.

Much uncertainty prevails respecting the
generic classification of the bears. Wallace
has divided them into five genera or sub-
genera, and fifteen species. Wood gives
eighteen, and Gray says twelve. The ap-
pearance of the bear at different seasons
has led to much error in classification. The
practical mountaineer will tell you of some
three or four species in California that have
been given notice of as the young of an-
other species, or that have never been men-
tioned by the learned gentlemen who usual-
ly study bear life in the seclusion of a li-
brary or with the help of a strong field tel-
escope. A glance at the teeth of the bear
will tell you that they incline rather to the
vegetable diet. Their ferocity is almost al-

ways exaggerated. Their courage is des-
242
THE POLAR BEAR. 243

perate in self-defense, but it is seldom that
they become the aggressor. The brain of
the bear is very highly developed, and they
soon learn all kinds of accomplishments.
The lion is an uncouth boor in comparison.

The Polar Bear, Zhalassarctos Maritt-
mus, is the only representative of the ge-
nus. He is an almost wholly carnivorous
animal, his food consisting of fishes and
seals, which he skillfully captures. He can
swim better than any other bear, and has
been known to swim a strait forty miles
wide. The fur is silver white tinged with
yellow. This color is variable in specimens,
and according to the seasons. The head is
much smaller than that of the grizzly or
black bear, and is ferret-like, with a decided
downward curve to the nose. The nose
does not possess the flexibility of that of
the rest of the bear family, although the
polar bear has the higher development of
the sense of smell. Johnson says that the
flesh is good to eat, but other writers do
not agree with him. Kane was poisoned by
244 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

eating of the liver. In speaking of a cap-
ture De Vere wrote as follows: “We dressed
her liver and ate it, which in taste liked us
well, but it made usallsick * * * for
all their skins came off, from the foot to
the head, but they recovered again, for
which we gave God hearty thanks.” Hall
says that the Eskimos of Cumberland
Sound likewise believe the liver to be
poisonous, even for the dogs. Ross says all
who partook of the meat suffered from se-
vere headaches, and later the skin peeled
from the body. Greely says his party
largely lived upon the meat, and that it
was coarse, tough, the fat having a decided-
ly rank flavor.

I believe that the physiognomist may fol-
low the characteristics of an animal by his
facial expression, and that with the aid of
a knowledge of the cranial development he
can gauge the mental caliber of the beast.
Following this system and adding to it the
testimony of credible explorers, it is quick-
ly shown that the polar bear is treacherous
THE POLAR BEAR. 245

and intractable. While he is not the wise
animal the grizzly is, he is more cunning
and is certainly not a coward.

There are times when he is not content
with being let alone, but will take the ag-
gressive. Greely writes: “Doctor Cope-
land was surprised only fifty yards from
the ship by a bear which broke from a bar-
rier of ice hummocks, galloped up to within
five paces, reared up and struck him down
with both forepaws. Copeland had no time
to load his gun, but as the animal caught
his clothes, he swung the butt across his
snout. This and the noise of approaching
comrades put the bear to flight, and he
started off with the swinging gallop pecul-
iar with him.”

The mother bear and cubs display a
great fondness for one another. Koldeway
says: “No sooner did the young ones per-
ceive the hunter than they galloped toward
their mother, who in two strides turned
and stood by them, with such rage ex-
pressed in all her actions that we knew we
246 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

must be careful. Finding, however, that
they were unhurt, she seemed to think only
of bringing them to a place of safety.”

Some authorities have it that only the
she bear hibernates and that the male
continues in the active exercise of all his
faculties. Ross weighed a polar bear
which tipped the scales at 1,131 pounds;
Lyon saw one which weighed 1,600 pounds;
Dr. Neale tells of one measuring eleven feet
exclusive of the tail. Senator Wm. P. Frye
has the skin of one, presented to him by an
explorer, which measures nine feet seven
inches exclusive of the tail of two inches.
Its girth around the body just back of the
forelegs is ten feet.
IV.

THE CINNAMON BEAR.
Ursus Cinnamoneous.

The Cinnamon Bear has been called a va-
riety of black bear. I am inclined to be-
lieve it a separate genus. The head has
many points of difference. It is wider. The
eyes are set deeper, and closer together.
There is a better breadth of brain. The
feet are smaller. The fur is rather longer
than that of the black bear and much
softer. The color is dark chestnut, and as
the bear ages there is an occasional gray
hair. The cinnamon is more dignified than
the black bear, and he also remembers an
injury longer. A baby cinnamon was cap-
tured by a friend of mine and brought to.
the city. A chain was placed about its
neck, and this was attached to a peg that
was hammered in the ground. As soon as

I heard of the coming of his bearship I hur-
247
248 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

ried over and made his acquaintance. He
ate a quart of milk soaked into as much
bread as it would hold, and enjoyed it
greatly. He chewed on my finger every
time I dipped it into sugared water without
biting.

I left him fast asleep. When I returned
in the afternoon he was walking from side
to side, shaking his head, and howling
most dolefully. The cry was much like that
of a child, only louder and more disagree-
able. He was hungry. I went to him and
I said, “Stop it.” At this he howled so it
made my head ache. I picked him up, and
with the aid of a shingle, I gave him a
spanking, just as you would a bad boy.
This stopped his howling, and then his mas-
ter came and fed him.

After this spanking it was very evident
that he did not care for my acquaintance.
He persistently refused to recognize me.
As I approached him his ears would go
back, and his fur would rise. He had de-
cided to cut my acquaintance.
THE CINNAMON BEAR. 249

Some days after, I was watching a tennis
game in the next yard, standing with my
back to baby bruin. He couldn’t overlook
the opportunity to get even, and, watching
his chance, he fastened his teeth in the calf
of my leg.
Vv.
THE BLACK BEAR OF CALIFORNIA,
Ursus Californiensis.

This bear we will label for convenience
Ursus Californiensis, because the title of
Ursus Americanus has dignified the small
black bear of the Eastern states. There
are, however, three species of the black
bear in California that are known, and
there may be more. The large black bear of
California reaches very large proportions.
Ihave seen some that might weigh from 800
to 1,000 pounds. It is hunted for its fur,
which is uniform in color, and for its flesh,
which is quite good, either smoked or fresh.
This animal will never seek an encounter
with man. I remember my original intro-
duction to a bear of this species. It was
in the state of Washington. Owing to ill
health I had been staying at what is known

there as a ranch. A ranch in the western
250
THE BLACK BEAR. 251

Washington forests generally consists of a
shake hut or log house, and a promise by
the “rancher” that he will soon clear
enough ground to raise something. Gener-
ally this vague something is a mortgage.
This particular rancher had a cow, and this
cow often strayed away into the timber and
had to be looked after when milking time
came.

One day, in the exuberance of new
found health, I was taking the greatest of
pleasure in chasing that cow toward the
“shed” road to the ranch. I was feeling
especially good, and I was jumping over
fallen trees, making short cuts and throw-
ing broken branches and an occasional
stone at the old Jersey.

Suddenly I stopped before an extra high
log, and gathering myself together, I
jumped high over it. I landed upon the up-
turned belly of an old she bear. There was
a sound like the escape of gas from a rub-
ber bag. I passed the cow like a streak of
lightning. When I had run a considerable

17
252 TRUE BEAR STORIKS.

distance I turned my head and saw the
bear running in the opposite direction. I
did not stop, however, and I got to the
ranch nearly an hour before the old cow.

In the shingle mills of the North the Nor-
wegian hands have the same veneration for
the bear as the Indian. They always
speak of him not as a bear, but as “the old
man with the fur coat on.”
wale

QUAINT INDIAN LORE

IN REGARD TO THE MYSTICAL POWER OF THE
BEAR AS A GREAT MEDICINE.

This is a legend of the Ojibwa Indians as
told by Sikassige, the officiating priest of
the Ojibwas at White Earth, Minnesota:

In the beginning were created two men
and two women. They had no power of
thought or reason. Then the Almighty
took them into his hands that they might
multiply, and he made them reasonable be-
ings. He paired them, and from this
sprung the Indians.

Then when there were people the Great
Spirit placed them upon the earth; but he
soon observed that they were subject to
sickness, misery and death. Then the Man-
itou called upon the Sun Spirit (the Bear)
and asked him to instruct the people in the

Sacred Medicine. The Sun Spirit, in the
253
254 THE BLACK BEAR.

form of a little boy, went to the earth and
was adopted by a woman who had a little
boy of her own.

This family went away in the autumn to
hunt, and during the winter the woman’s
son died, The parents were much dis-
tressed and decided to return to the village
and bury the body there. So they made
preparation to return, and as they traveled
along they would each evening erect poles
upon which the body was placed, to pre-
vent the wild beasts from devouring it.
When the dead boy was thus hanging upon
the poles, the adopted child, the Bear
Spirit, or Sun child, would play about the
camp and amuse himself, and finally told
his adopted father he pitied him and his
mother for their sorrow.

The adopted son said he could bring his
dead brother to life, whereupon the parents
expressed great surprise and desired to
know how that could be accomplished.

The adopted boy then had the party has.
ten to the village, when he said: “Get the
QUAINT INDIAN LORE. 255

woman to the wigwam of bark, put the
dead body in a covering of birch bark, and
place the body on the ground in the middle
of the wigwam.” On the next morning,
when this had been done, the family and
friends went into the lodge and seated
themselves around the corpse.

Then they saw, through the doorway, the
approach of a bear, which gradually came
toward the wigwam, entered it, and placed
itself before the dead body, and said “Hu,
hu, hu,” when he passed around toward the
left side, with a trembling motion, and as
he did so, the body began quivering, which
increased as the bear continued, until he
had passed around four times, when the
body came to life and stood up. Then the
bear called to the father, who was sitting
in the distant right hand corner of the wig-
wam, and said:

“My father is not an Indian. You area
Spirit son. Insomuch my fellow spirit now
as you are. My father now tobacco you
shall put. He speaks of only once to be
256 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

able to do it. Why he shall live here now
that he scarcely lives; my fellow spirit I
shall now go home.”

The little bear boy was the one who did
this. He then remained among the Indians
and taught them the mysteries of the
Grand Medicine, which would assist them
to live. He also said his spirit could bring
a body to life but once, and he would now
return to the sun, from which they would
feel his influence.

This is called “Kwi-wi-senswed-di-tshi-
ge-wi-nip”—“Little boy, his work.”
VIL.

CURIOUS FACTS ABOUT THE BEAR.

With the different seasons the bear pre-
sents a varied appearance. There are times
when you would scarce recognize the same
animal. In the autumn of the year the
bear takes on fat in preparation for hiber-
nating. At this time the fur is glossy and
long, and in the grizzly almost a seal
brown.

A curious phenomenon now takes place
in the animal’s digestive organs, which
gives it the capability of remaining the en-
tire winter in a state of lethargy, without
food and yet without losing condition. As
the stomach is no longer furnished with
food, it soon becomes quite empty, and, to-
gether with the intestines, is contracted
into a very small space. No food can now
pass through the system, for an obstruc-

tion, a mechanical one—technically called
257
258 TRUE BEAR STORIES.

the “tappen”’—blocks the entrance to the
passage and remains in this position until
spring. The “tappen” is composed almost
entirely of pine leaves and the various sub-
stances which the bear scratches out of the
ants’ nests or the hives of bees. During
the season of hibernation, the bear gains a
new skin on its feet. It will remain in its
den until about the middle of April or the
beginning of May, and will emerge almost
as fat as when it entered, unless it has lost
the “tappen” too soon. _

It will now be seen that the fur has un-
dergone a change. With the grizzly it has
the real grizzly hue; with the brown or
black bear it has a dead look. This is the
hungry season for the bear, and until fall,
when the berries are ripe and the salmon
run in the streams, his bearship has a hard
time of it. By the end of July and until the
middle of August the fur undergoes a fur-
ther change. The old coat is hanging upon
him in shreds, he is much emaciated, and
there is a hungry look in his eye. His ears
CURIOUS FACTS. 259

appear abnormally large, and his paws
seem enormous. When the berries are ripe
and there are fish in the streams, the prepa-
ration for winter begins, the fur is sleek
and greasy-looking again. Mr. Bear is fat
and contented and ready to go into his long
sleep.

When he awakes one of the first things
he does is to suck his feet. This is done be-
cause the skin is new and tender.

In the picture illustrating the fight be-
tween the bear and the boy upon the log,
the bear is shown as he appears during the
emaciated season, a caricature of himself
when well fed. The bear in captivity re-
ceives his food at regular intervals and in
large quantities, and he loses many of the
marked characteristics of the bear in his
wild or untamed state. There is just as
much difference between a society leader
and a man who lives close to nature.




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