Citation
Animal land for little people

Material Information

Title:
Animal land for little people
Creator:
Hamer, S. H
Knight, Charles ( Illustrator )
Berkeley, Stanley ( Illustrator )
Corbould, Walton ( Illustrator )
Aldin, Cecil Charles Windsor, 1870-1935 ( Illustrator )
Cassell & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publisher:
Cassell and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
77 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile fiction -- Anecdotes ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1900 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1900 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1900
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
Australia -- Melbourne
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement inside front cover, and publisher's catalog in back.
General Note:
Advertisement for "Mellin's food for infants and invalids" on back cover.
General Note:
Imprint also notes publisher's location in Paris and Melbourne.
General Note:
Some photographs by Chas. Knight; some illustrations signed Stanley Berkeley, Walton Corbould, or Cecil Aldin.
Statement of Responsibility:
by S.H. Hamer.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
024137104 ( ALEPH )
23529020 ( OCLC )
AHN3352 ( NOTIS )

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) CASSELL and COMPANY. LIMITED, LONDON, PARIS,NEW YORK MELBOURN









POPULAR BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

ze Price 1/6 each.

The Jungle School: or, Dr. Jibber-
Jabber Burchall’s Academy.

By S. H. HAMer. With Four Coloured Plates and
other Illustrations by Harry B. NEILSON.

Peter Piper’s Peep-Show; or, All the
Fun of the Fair.
ByS. H. Hamer. With Four Coloured Plates and

other Illustrations by Harry B. NetLson and
Lewis BAUMER.

Master Charlie, Painter, Poet, Rovelist,
and Ceacher.

With Numerous Examples of his Work Collected

by C. Harrison and S. H. Hamer.

Micky Maaee’s Menagerie; or, Stranae
Animals and their Doinas.
By S. H. Hamer. With Eight Full-page Coloured

Plates and 100 Illustrations in the exe by Harry
B. NEILSON. —

CASSELL & COMPANY, Limirep, London ;
Paris, New York & Melbourne.











|



The Baldwin Library

RmB

Vaiveral ity
Florida





Ue Ga Te ee
Lecsfasel
ee JG OF.





“WWho bit my apple?” (see.Z. 70).



2

L LAND



- FOR

—— LADPDLE PEOPLE

BY

= SH HAMER

Authoy of ‘Micky. Magee’s Menagerie,” ““Whys and Other Whys,” etc.



ILLUSTRATED |



—=. CASSELL ano COMPANY, Limitep ~"
LONDON, PARIS, NEW YORK _& ‘MELBOURNE : fe >
oS : : Se. 1900

ALL RIGHTS .RESERVED











CONTENTS.

—VRIGW—
PAGE
Lions anp TIGERS ~~... Bes oe Me Se Be fe fas a See

THE WATER-RAT ... we a tes ae i we eas oe nee Peers?
THE OwL 14
THE Hyrax ae a re Soe Be ee ae at a ae a eaeen i
APES AND MONKEYS ee ee ie nun gece ae Bes Ms Sq Boa 00)
THE Bison... a a tes es ae Sey ee Sen = ar ee O)
THe DonkKEy a Sak os ne ae a res one Be wt ue 24
THe ELEPHANT... eee Sis ae ae me gs oe fags 2G
Tue Brest ANTELOPE ie SS ne ae ate ae a oa ve eo
SEALS AND SEa-LIons
Tue Potar Bear... a eee ie cE ne ae ee pd fe ee Oo)
BEARS 600 aa ee is as Lae Se ee ae me Bi ase
THE CAMEL ate aie Se a Sa os eS a a a son) 4183
Tue HIPPOPOTAMUS AND THE RHINOCEROS... = a Si ae a5 ea
THE HEDGEHOG ... ae as an ee eas a sh ae aca sca AG
ire Moree ee oe oe ae ane ome ue ax Be ie AS
THE GIRAFFE a Es ce ae Baa a oe ba ee a sos AG)
Tue WOLVES ae as oe aN: ce ee Be ae ae Pee oso, BB
THE KANGAROO ... ee ne aes ae Seo an ae as BiG ees)
THE ZEBRA oe hee ue ane es ne a ne oe 600 SO
Tue LittLe Biacxk Pic ... a ee a Zo a See aa ae eso
THe EaGLe oS oe oe ne as ie = sis et eo
‘THE STORY OF THE ELDEST YOUNG PuerFIN ...-... me so at Ee sos (OF
THE TRUMPETER SWAN ... a oe a aa ua ae a aa oo OB
Tue BurcHer Birp ese) O04.
THE CorMoRANTS Boon doe = bs £55 ea ae ae os con (Ot
THE FLAMINGOES ... a a ae an ee ae ce os aa ee O0)
THE PTARMIGAN AND THE WOODPECKER on dao Bee abe B86 aoe ... 68
PARROTS... oe te ae a Dee tet se soe ee re
THe KINGFISHER AND THE Minnow... Bes ae at a ee ee eS)

THE PHEASANT... a oe sae an at oe 380 ae at ss 93



ist ©}

“THE LIONESS WAS WIDE AWAKE”

“
*°¢T OFTEN THINK OF THE Dee WHEN Wr
WERE FREE’” a

“THERE WAS THE TIGER”

“T LIVE AMONG Rocks” ...

THE ORANG-UTANGS ass ses

“SWUNG TO AND FRO ON THE ROPES”...

THE CHIMPANZEE..

“THE LITTLE Cie STARTED AND LOOKED
ROUND” 5 ae nee Bae

“* THERE IS THE GAYAL AND HER LITTLE
ONE’”... fon ee abe Res

TuHE BIson..

“T AM A VERY OLD Paeae 24

“SOME OF THEM ARE STILL WILD”

“HE Lets ME RIDE uPON His Back”...

Mrs. Gnu anp Younc Master GNU ...

“HE HAD BEEN ABLE TO SETTLE THREE
oR Four WOLVES” ...

THE WatTEeR Buck

THE SABLE ANTELOPE

“Just LooK at ME”

“THEY TEACH THEM
TRIcKs”

THE SEA-LION ee sae ae

‘WE FELT RATHER FRIGHTENED AT FIRST”

THe MouFLons

ALL SORTS OF

coe eee eee eee

ILLUSTRATIONS.

—etw—
PAGE
7 “JT woNDER wHAT HE THINKS oF Us”
8 “HE was uP THE PoLE IN NO TIME”
“Wz USED TO START OUT ONA Journey ”
9 “I am THE CAMEL” ee Bee
tr ‘Her opeNED His MoutH” a
15 ‘IT WAS THE RHINOCEROS NEXT Door” a
16 “HeE’s VERY oe IN THE Housr”
17 “Hk BEGAN TO DIG” ae
19 “Don’t You THINK I’M BiG eNouGHeS
_ THE Hoppinc KancGaroo
20 “Two or THREE COUSINS”
“Tur ZEBRA WOULDN'T STOP TO HEAR
21 ANY MORE” ann aSe
23 “IN His Cace He can’r rity HicH”
24 ‘* THEY WALKED ABOUT, HOLDING THEM-
25 SELVES UP”
27 “J am A TRUMPETER Swen ys
28 ‘HE DOESN’T LOOK SO VERY FIERCE”
“THE OLD CORMORANT FLEW IN AND
29 LANDED CLOSE BY THE NEst”
30 “THE OTHERS WERE BEGINNING TO
31 WAKE UP”... a
32 “It’s MUCH BETTER TO HAVE WHITE
FEATHERS THEN”
33 “HE BEGAN TO Tap AGAIN”
35 “THE MACAWS WERE SITTING ON THEIR
36 Little PERcuHEs ”
37. “I am A VERY FINE BirD” ,,, ma

list OF COLOURED, PiwiEs:

1 VG W—

“Wuo Bir My Apple?”

“HE CHARGED AT A MAN oN A GREY Horse”

“I Just Gor Up anp RAN aT THE GENTLEMAN ON THE HorsE” aie

“THEY Pass—ED SOMETHING LYING ON THE GROUND”

PAGE

39

42
43

45

47
48
49
51
55
57

59
61

62

Jo
64

65
67

68
69

7L
74

. Lrontispiece
To face p. 22
46



Anima, Land ror Liprie PRoPL®.



‘““THE LIONESS WAS WIDE



Chas. Kn ght, phot.
AWAKE,”

Lions and Tigers.

HE lioness was wide awake, but
two of the little lion cubs were
rather sleepy. The third one, how-
ever, who had perched himself on his
mother’s back, was quite lively: he
had not had quite so much for dinner
as the others. .

“Mother,” he began, “what do all
these two-legged things come and
look at us for? And why have they
got such funny skins ? Do they ever
have anything to ‘eat, Mother—bones,

and things like that ?”

“Don’t purr so loudly, my dear,”
said the lioness, “or you'll wake your
brother and sister. These two-legged

things are people—the big ones are

called men and women, and the little

They don’t
do us any harm; indeed, some of

ones are boys and girls.

them are very kind to us—they give
us our dinner, and clean straw in our
houses, and help to make us comfort-
able. They do their best, poor things,
so you mustn’t growl at them.”
“Look, Mother,” said the lion cub,



8 AwnimaL LAND FOR LitTrLe PEOPLE.

“that small thing with the white skin
has thrown something into our house!
What does she think we shall do
with it?” |
“Don’t take any notice of her, my
dear,” said the lioness, blinking her
eyes at the little girl (who was ‘‘the

“When was that, Mother?” said
the baby lion. “Do tell me about
its :

“Ah, I didn't always live
house like this, my dear,” replied the

in a

lioness. “I was born far away from

here, in a place called Africa, and I



‘(THOSE PUMAS !’” (%. 10).

small thing with the white skin”) ; “it’s
only something that they call bread—

But
it’s really only fit for elephants or

she thinks that we shall eat it.

bears; we don’t eat stuff like that. I
tasted it once, I remember, but that
was a long time ago, when I was very,
very hungry, and glad to get anything
I could.”

was quite grown-up before I saw a
man at all. We used to live very
happily there in my young days—
though it wasn’t such an easy life as
that we have now. There was no
one to bring you your dinner regularly
every day; no, you had to catch your

dinner first and then eat it, and some-

times we had to goa long time with



ST







““T OFTEN THINK OF THE DAYS WHEN WE WERE FREE’” (4. 10).



Io Anat LAND FOR Little PEOPLE.

nothing but a very small antelope or
-perhaps a bird or two.”

The lion cub’s eyes opened wide
with astonishment.

“ What is Africa like, Mother?” he

said. ‘Did anyone else live there ?”
“Dear me, yes,” answered the
lioness. “All sorts of creatures.

There were antelopes and snakes,
and several of our own relations, and
hosts of others besides.”

The lion cub thought for a little
Then he said, “ Why did you

come here, then, Mother ?”

while.

The lioness growled slightly. From
the next cage there came a loud roar,
waking the two sleeping lion cubs,
and startling the other so much that
he tumbled off his mother’s back.

“Ho, ho, ho!”
‘““T remember! It seemed such a nice
fat young calf, didn’t it?” It was
The lioness

said a deep voice.

the big lion next door.
seemed quite vexed; she had not
known that the lion was listening.
But he had been, and now he seemed
to be in a very good humour, and
went on purring and talking to himself,
but the little lion cubs could easily
hear what he was saying, and paid
the greatest attention.

eV es,”

nice fat young calf, too; I saw it first,

he went on, “and it was a

and I remember thinking that it would
make such a fine dinner for us both.
I never dreamed that there were
hunters about, and it was a trap to

catch us; of course, I was quite young ©
in those days. But it was a trap, and
we were both caught.”

“T needn’t have been caught,”
growled the lioness from the back of .
her cage, “if I hadn’t come to see
what you were doing.”

‘Ah, well,” said the fone Vice
were both of us deceived. And then
they put us into small, strong cages
and took us over the great big water
and brought us here. I often think

of the days when we were free, but

we get along very well here, don’t

we? It’s no use making a fuss about
what you can’t help, and really these
two-legged creaturesare very amusing.”

«“ Yes,” said the lioness, still with a
little growl in her voice, “but one
needn't pretend that one wouldn't
rather be free. Those pumas, now,
are always saying how much better
it is always to live in a cage.”

The lion shook his mane scornfully.
he said. ‘Who would
take any notice of what a puma would
They call themselves ‘friends
They're only friendly

because they daren’t be anything

“Pumas!”

say?
of man!’

else.”

“Do they come from Africa, too,
Mother ?” said the lion cub.

“No, they lived in a place called
America, my dear,” replied the lioness.
‘“ But come, it’s time we went out into
the garden at the back of the house.
So

You must have a little fresh air.”



“THERE WAS THE TIGER” (¢. 12).





12 Animal LAND FoR LirrTLeée PEOPLE.

saying, she stalked through the little
door at the back of the cage and went
out, followed by her cubs, into the
open space beyond.

“Good afternoon,” said a lazy,
sleepy voice from the other side of
the bars. ‘It’s quite a fine day, isn’t
te

The three little cubs all turned
There was the tiger,
stretched out in the sun, looking at

with a start.

them with a sleepy sort of smile.

Of course, it wasn’t a garden really,
it was just a large open-air cage, but
dotted
about all over it, and it certainly

there were rocks and trees

looked very pleasant in the warm
afternoon sunshine.

He was a very handsome fellow
was the tiger, and he evidently knew
it, too. The lioness greeted him
pleasantly, and said with a purr as
stretched herself out on the

ground, “These young people: of

she

mine were just asking me all sorts of
questions; perhaps you can tell them
something interesting that has hap-
pened to you?”

‘““Ee-yow!” yawned the tiger.

“ Do, please,” begged the little lion
cubs, poking their noses against the
bars. “Do you come from Africa,
too?” added the first one.

“No,” answered the tiger, “I come
from India. I used to live in the
jungle.”

“And were you caught in a trap,

too?” said the eager little lion
cub.

““Gr-r-r!” said the tiger, suddenly
“There he

It was an elephant, which
in the

beginning to growl.
goes |”
was slowly walking along
distarice with a number of children on
The tiger looked after him
with a very angry look in his eyes,

his back.

and not until he was quite out of sight
Then he

said to the lioness, ‘“ Excuse me, but

did he become quiet ayain.

. IT never see that fellow without think-

ing how it was one of his relations
eel

I wasn’t full-

that helped to capture me.
shall never forget it.
grown then, and I used to live with
my father and mother and my young
brother in a cosy little home in the
jungle. Most of the men-creatures
who lived near us over there were
brown, you know, not white like the

_ My father
was getting old, and food had become

ones we see over here.
very scarce. One night my father
paid a visit to one of the men-creatures’
villages and brought us home a goat,
and the next night he brought us a
sheep. It seemed very easy to get
food that way, but the men-creatures
didn’t like it, I suppose.”

“Qh, sir,” said the smallest lion
cub, ‘please tell me, did you ever eat
aman?”

The tiger smiled. ‘‘ No,” he said,
“T never did, but my father is

‘Don’t you think we’d better get





Tae Warer-Rar. 1

on with the story?” in the
lioness.

“Well,” said the tiger, “one day
there was a dreadful noise—shouting
and banging of drums and all ‘sorts of

things, and crowds of the brown men

put

came into the jungle, waking us up
out of our afternoon nap. We were

very much startled at first, but my

father told us not to be afraid, and

said he would look after us. Presently
we saw one of those wretched elephants
coming along, and, would you believe
it, he had actually allowed some of
the white men to get into a sort of
castle on his back, where they could
shoot at us in safety! Of course it
was no good. My poor father was

killed, and so was my mother; they

captured me and I was brought here
over the water, and here I have been
ever since.”

The tiger stretched himself out at full
length and yawned again; he seemed
to be quite tired by his long speech.

“Don’t you ever want to be back
again in the jungle?” said one of the
lion cubs.

“Well,” said the tiger, “ sometimes
when it’s cold and damp and foggy, I
do. But it’s fairly comfortable here
on the whole. Now I must wash
And he began to lick his
coat just as a cat does, and the lion

myself.”

cubs, seeing that there was nothing
more to be got out of him that after-
noon, started a game between them-
selves.

The Water=rat. —

E’S such a timid little thing,
However much you try
You can’t get very near to him,
He is so very shy.

He makes himself a little hole
Close to the riverside,

If anyone comes after him
He'll pop in there to hide.

But if the water comes in, too,
He’s very sad at that;

He doesn’t like too much, although
He is a water-rat.

He has such very sharp, brown eyes
And funny, pointed nose;

It doesn’t matter if his coat
Gets wetted, I suppose.

He’s always popping in and out

The water all the day,

And so he hasn’t time to let

His fur dry, I should say.

It must be nice when it is hot
To bathe as much as that,

But when it’s cold I shouldn’t like
To be a water-rat.



14

The Owl.

HEN all the world is fast asleep,
And stars shine in the sky,
And children are all tucked in bed,
Then I awake and fly.

I go to sleep for all the day,

You sleep through all the night;
It seems a funny kind of plan,

But I suppose it’s right.

I cannot bear the light of day,
It’s much too bright for me ;

But when it seems quite dark to you,
Why that’s when I can see.

I fly about through woods and fields
With softly flapping wings,

And catch for. dinner frogs and mice
And other little things.

And sometimes if you wake at night
And see the moon peep through
Your window, you may hear me call—

_“ Tu-whit, tu-whit, tu-whoo!”

The little birds, they know me well,
I think they’re very nice; |
I sometimes catch them if I can,
As well as frogs and mice.

But if they meet me when it’s light
They all set on to me;

And then I have to fly away,
Because I cannot see.

I do not sing like other birds,
I have too much to do;

I only have my one queer cry—
“ Tu-whit, tu-whit, tu-whoo!”

Some people do not like to hear
My hooting in the night ;

I do not think they’d mind it if
They heard it when it’s light.

I do not think I am so wise
As I appear to be,

But some folks think I know a lot,
They're quite afraid of me.

They need not really be afraid :
I could not do them harm,

I only want some cosy place
To keep me safe and warm.

I’m not at all like other birds,
I am a curious fowl; :
Good-night to you! Tu-whit, tu-whoo!
My name is Mr. Owl.



15

The Hyrax.

DON’T suppose you've ever heard
of me: I’m called the hyrax.
Sometimes I’m called the cony, only
that’s a mistake, because a cony is really
only another name for a rabbit, and
I’m not a rabbit at all. I live among
rocks, far away in a country called
Syria. I'am a very nice little person
really, and I eat grass and flowers
and things like that.
toes on my front feet, and only three
on my hind feet.
doesn’t it?

Do you know what some people

I have four

on each hand.
That seems odd,

say about me? They actually say
that I am a relation of the great
big elephant. Well, if I am, I don’t
look very much like it, do I? My
feet are very useful feet, because the
soles have little ridges in them, so
that I can walk straight up a tree,
and I’m quite sure that you can’t
do that, although you have got five
toes on each foot and five fingers
But what use do
you make of your five toes? If you
don’t use them, I don’t see what’s
the good of having them at all.



‘‘T LIVE AMONG ROCKS.”







16

THE ORANG-UTANGS,

Apes and

s HO was that pulled my tail?”

said the cross old monkey sit-
ting in the corner of the cage. “I
won't have my tail pulled, do you

hear? If any one pulls my tail
again, [’]|——”
“Well, what will you do, Cross-

patch ?” said a small brown monkey.
“Do tell us; we should like to

know.” And he threw a nut-shell

at the cross old monkey, hitting him 3

Monkeys. :

on the nose and making him crosser
than ever.

cell complainsito- the: keepers
—“T'll steal all
V’1—T'11—I'll do some-
thing dreadful to you.”

said the old monkey.
your dinners.

‘Oh, go along,” said the little
brown monkey. “ Let’s have a game
at Touch Tails. You're ‘he’!”

And he gave a hard tug at the cross
old monkey’s tail, then darted away



APES AND MONKEYS. rye



“SWUNG TO AND FRO ON THE ROPES.”

up to the top of the cage, with the
old one after him and a number of
other small monkeys after 4772, giving
a pull at his tail every now and then,
till he didn’t know which one to
attack first, and finally gave it up
as a bad job, and retired to his corner
again, jabbering away to himself as
to what he would do, while all the
others danced about with delight and
swung to and fro on the ropes, chuck-
ling with enjoyment.

“What a noise those monkeys do
make, to be sure!” said the chim-

panzee to the orang-utangs. ‘I really
A

think something should be done to
stop them.”
“ Here come some of these little
men-things!” said one of the orang-
“What queer things they
Are they really relations of
ours, do you suppose ?”

utangs.
are!

‘“‘T don’t know,” replied the chim-
panzee, ‘‘but I must say they are
very poor relations, if they are.
Whatever do they put on all those
ridiculous things for?” |

“Yes,” said the eldest orang-
utang. “And what very short arms
they have! I don’t believe they’d



18 AwniraLl LAND FOR LirTLeE PEOPLE.

be any good at swinging about on
trees, do you?”

“Tm sure they wouldn't,” answered
the chimpanzee. “And then their feet!
Do you know they can't use their
feet at all for holding on to anything
Isn’t it silly? They’re
so ashamed of them that they cover
them up in things they call boots; it

as we can?

must be very uncomfortable.”

‘Have you noticed what they do
with nuts?” said the smallest orang-
utang. ‘There was a boy here once
who wanted to eat a nut, and he was
going to crack it in the ordinary way
when his mother said to him, ‘ Don't
do that, my dear; you'll spoil your
teeth!” Just fancy!”

«Ah, but have you ever seen one
of the very small men-things?” said
the chimpanzee.
call

“The things they
They

are the most absurd creatures you ever

‘long-clothes babies’ !
saw in your life. They are covered
with white things (which must get
dreadfully in the way), and they can’t
do a single thing for themselves.
They can’t walk, and they can’t talk,
-and they don’t eat fruits—they just lie
still, and sometimes they feebly kick
about and wave their funny little
arms, and the strange part of it is
that their mothers and fathers seem
quite proud of them.
we're not like that.”

I’m very glad

“So am I,” said the orang-utangs.

“But why do these men-things

wear such a lot of things over their
said the eldest.
“ Oh, they don’t know any better,”

skins 2?”
said the chimpanzee. “You know
they are not nearly so strong as we are.”
“Ah, but they’re very artful, some
of them,” said the eldest orang-utang.
“T should think if they were caught
young, you might be able to teach
them to do quite a lot of tricks.”
“I dare say,” replied the chim-

panzee. ‘Only I expect it would

_ take a lot of trouble and time.”

“Vm glad I’m not a man-thing,”
sane
have to wear

said the youngest orang-utang.
must be horrid to
clothes.” ;

“There are those monkeys again,”
“1 wonder

They

are always up to some game or

said the chimpanzee.
what they are doing now.
other. I declare they are nearly as
foolish as men.”

The monkeys seemed to be all
running after each other, fighting and
squabbling and grabbing at lettuce and
pieces of banana, and making grimaces
at each other, and scolding away until
the chimpanzee could scarcely hear
the sound of its own voice.

“Oh, no,” said the small orang--
utang, who was a kind-hearted little
fellow, ‘“‘they are very foolish, but |
shouldn’t say they were as bad as
that!”

“Well, no, perhaps not,” said the
chimpanzee. .



i.



Q

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‘““ THI LITTLE CALF STARTED AND LOOKED ROUND.”

The Bison.

YTAHE little calf started and looked
round ina fright. “ What’s that
noise, Mother?” he said.

“Why, that’s only the bison, my
dear,” said his mother; “I expect
he'll come over and speak to us
presently. Yes, here he comes!”

“Will he hurt us, Mother?” said

the little calf anxiously. ‘And who
ishhen
“Hurt us? Nonsense!” replied

his mother. “You really must not
be so nervous, my child; remember

we are not common cattle, you and

I and your father; we are really
wild cattle, and we are very rare
indeed, I believe. Here is the bison;
now we will ask him to tell us about
himself, and—why, I declare, there
is the Gayal and her little one. We
shall be quite a party.”

The little calf was very glad indeed
to see the little Gayal, and they soon
became quite friendly, while their
mothers were talking to the bison.
The bison was rather a cross old
chap, but he seemed quite amiable
just now. “g



THe Bison. 21

The Chillingham cow (for that was
6c My
little one was quite alarmed when he

what she was called) began.

heard you butting your head against
the wall,” she said.
that’s nothing to what you could do
if you tried ?”
The bison smiled.

he answered.

‘*But I suppose

“ Qh, dear, no!”
“Why, I was only
just keeping in practice. Now when
I was free’—and here he heaved a
deep sigh—‘‘ we used to have some
grand fights.”

The little Gayal and the Chilling-
ham calf drew nearer.

“Tt was in North America that I
lived,” said the bison, who had now

fairly started. “ We lived on a great
big prairie.”

‘Mother, what's a prairie?” whis-
pered the little calf. “Is it good to
ering 4

“Flush, my dear; don’t interrupt,”
said the mother. “It is a plain—a
sort of very large field without any
fences: or hedges and not such good
grass.’

“There were very many of us
there; we all lived together and_
roamed about just as we pleased, and
then one day the white men came.”

“ Ah,” murmured the Gayal, shak-
ing her ped in Be “White

men—yes |’



‘(THERE IS THE GAYAL AND HER LITTLE ONE'” (9. 20). cS



22 Awnmat Lanp For Lirrze PEOPLE. —

“Of course, I was quite a youngster

at that time,” went on the bison. “I
wasn’t by any means fully grown, so
that I wasn’t able to do much in the
way of fighting; but I saw the elder
"ones do it, and very well they did
it, too, only, of course, they couldn't
They had
But my

stand against the hunters.
guns and things, you know.
uncle made a splendid fight, now.
He was a very strong chap, was my
uncle, and he charged at a man on
a grey horse, and—well, I don’t
think the grey horse liked it very
Emucie a

“And was he caught?” said the
young. Gayal, who had been listening
with great interest.

« Well,” said the bison, ‘‘he wasn’t
exactly caught. You see, our skins
are supposed to be very valuable;
that’s why the white men hunted us,
and my uncle had a very fine skin,
and this white man had a nasty long
knife, and so iy
“Yes, yes, | understand,” said the



Chillingham cow hastily; “but what
happened to yourself?”

“Oh, I. was. taken with several
others,” replied the bison, ‘‘ because
I was quite young, you know; I
don’t think I should be taken quite
so easily now, though.”

“Those must have been exciting
times,” said the Gayal slowly. She
was a very quiet, gentle person, was
the Gayal.

- good-bye, ma’am.

“Weren't you. ever free?” said the
bison.
“Oh, no,” said the Gayal.. “I used
to have to work where I-lived. Of
course, some of my family used to
be free at one time.
I know, was quite wild, but she was

My mother,

captured before I was born; so I
”)
grew up among men.

‘Where that ?”
Chillingham cow.

was said the

“That was in India,” replied the.
Gayal. “It is very hot over there,
and I used to draw wagons all day
I like

being over here very much better.

long and work in the fields.

I don’t have any work to do.”
“When I
Chillingham calf, “I shall run away

am big,” said the
from here, and go and live on a
prairie. I think that must be very
TeCen

“And [Il come with you,” said
the little Gayal. ‘I should like to

see the world, too.”

shes bisonmerunted= ys. idm), aelre
said, “I think perhaps you'd better
stay where you are.” And off he

walked to his own stall.

The Chillingham cow said, “ Well,
I think Id better —
be going. I don’t know that the
bison is a very good person to
(alk (We,

“No,” said the Gayal after a long
pause; “he puts ideas. into the
children’s heads. Good-bye.”





“He charged at a man on a grey horse” (see p. 16).





THE BISON.



24

The Donkey.



““T AM A VERY OLD FRIEND.”

O, there’s nothing strange about
me; I ama very old friend. I’m

sure that all of you know the donkey,
and love him, too. I expect that most
of you have met me at the sea-side
some time or other and had a ride on
my back. People often call me silly and
stupid, and other names like that, but
I'm not quite so foolish as some of
them think I am, or as some of them
and I often have
to put up with a good deal of bad

are themselves,

treatment from some of you men-
But I do put up with it,
and that is why you sometimes say

creatures.

“as patient as a donkey.”

I have known some bad masters
in my time, but I am glad to say that
now I have a very kind one. We
have to go to market every morning,
and quite early he harnesses me to
his little barrow (as he calls it), and
away we go as happy as we can be.
My master doesn’t hit me, because he
knows that I will go much better if I
am treated kindly. -When we get to
market, my master does his business,
but he never forgets to. give me a
carrot, or perhaps a thistle, to eat while
I am so fond of thistles
They

I’m waiting.
—-have you ever tried them?
are very good indeed.

You will come across relations of
mine in many parts of the world.
Some of them are still wild, and
live away from men and gallop about
wherever they please and do just what
they like. I used to think 1 should
like to be wild too, but then that was
when I had a bad master; now, I
wouldn’t miss my trot down to market
in the morning and my. carrot or.
thistle (especially my thistle) for
anything. |

When I lived at the sea-side I used
to enjoy myself, too: I used to go
down on to the sands in the morning
and have my saddle put on: it was not
an ordinary kind of saddle, but it was
made for quite small children, and was



THE DONKEY. 25

really a kind of little basket-chair, and

the children used to be strapped into it:

I was
such a steady donkey that I used to
have the very little ones to ride on me:
how they did like it, to be sure. Of
course I used to go very gently at first
until they got used to me, but some-

so that they couldn’t fall out.

and companions. We arranged who
was to win each time, but the children
never knew anything about it.

There was one little girl, | remem-
very fond of me: she
me sugar which she
would give me out of her hands. She

was a nice little girl.

ber, who was
used to bring



‘‘SOME OF THEM ARE STILL WILD” (, 24).

times I used to begin to trot, and then
_I could hear the children shouting and
laughing and calling out, ‘Gee up,
Neddy !”
races, too: they were great fun; the

And we used to have

children who rode on our backs got
quite excited, but, of course, it was
really all settled by me and my friends

'

But that was a long time ago. I
am getting quite an old donkey now.
Presently I expect I shall be too old
to go to market with my master, and
then he is going to keep me in a field
where I shall have
nothing to do but eat thistles! Isn’t
he a kind master?

all day long,



The Elephant.

LOVE the gentle elephant,
He is so very kind,
He lets me ride upon his back,
He never seems to mind.

He moves along, when once he starts,
With solemn step and slow;
I think, though, that he’d run quite
fast
If he wanted to, you know.

His skin is very, very tough
And crinkled, every bit ;

It is so loose, it looks as if
It really didn’t fit.

His trunk, though, is the queerest
thing
About him that I find:
He seems to have a tail in front
As well as one behind.

I'd like to have a trunk myself
As well as hands and feet.

How everyone would stare at me
When I went down the street !

I don’t know what Id do with it
When I got into bed :

I'd have to cur! it up, I think,
Right underneath my head.

Although the elephant’s so big,
His eyes are very small,

And yet I think that he can see
Us clearly, one and all.

I like to see him have his bath, —
He does enjoy it so ;
Now that is when a trunk would.
be

So very nice, you know.

I'd like to have an elephant
All for my very own:

I’d like to have a baby one
Before he’d fully grown.

I’d keep him in my nursery,
(Whatever would Nurse say ?)

I'd give him buns for dinner, and
I'd play with him all day.

But when he got too big, you know —
I couldn’t keep him then,
Hed take up too much room—l.
think
I'd let him go again. |

Of all the animals 1 know—
Lions, tigers, and the rest—
The elephant’s my favourite,
I think I like him best.







“HE LETS ME RIDE UPON HIS BACK” (4%. 26).





“MRS.

The | Best

“4 RE you going to the meeting,
Z Mother ?” said the little Gnu.

“Of course I am,” said Mrs. Gnu.
« But what that old Moose is thinking
about to come, I don’t know.”

The antelopes were going to hold
a meeting to decide, if they could,
who was the best among them all.
They were all making their way from
various parts, and very pretty some
of them looked.

Mrs. Gnu and young Master Gnu
took up a good position, and the
meeting began.

First of all, the Eland (he was the
biggest of the antelopes) got up and
said that before they began to settle
the question, he would like to know
why the Moose was there. He wasn't
an antelope at all, and as the meeting

GNU AND YOUNG MASTER

GNU.”

Antelope. S

was confined to antelopes, he must
ask him kindly to retire.

Then the Moose got very angry.
Of course, he ought not to have been
there at all, but he didn’t mind.
He said that he thought they were
going to decide who was best, and
didn’t know they were going to keep
it entirely to antelopes; of course, he
would go directly, because he didn’t
want to have anything to do with
such persons; but he would like to
know before he went if any one of
them would care to come outside and
fight him; he was quite willing to
meet them if they were; he had
done a good bit of fighting in his
time; he had been able to settle
three or four wolves all at once, and he
thought he could manage any antelope.



Twe Best ANTELOPE. 29



“HE HAD BEEN ABLE 10 SETTLE THREE OR FOUR WOLVES” (f. 28).

No one seemed inclined to accept
Jhis invitation, so the Moose retired
from the. meeting, and every one
‘seemed very glad when he was gone.

Then they all began to talk at

once, and it was some time before
the Eland could restore order so as
to make himself heard. When they
were a little quieter he explained
how they had all met there that



30 Awnirat Lanpd ror Lirrre PEOPLE.

morning to decide a very important
thing: who was the best of the
antelopes. Those who thought they
ought to be heard could make a
short speech, and after that they
would vote. ‘Of course,’ he said
at the end, “I don’t suppose that
anyone will want to speak, because
it is quite clear that the best antelope
is the biggest antelope, and as I am

the biggest, therefore I am the best.”



THE WATER BUCK.

But there was a tremendous uproar
at this, and the Sable antelope jumped
up directly. He didn’t agree with
the Eland, he said; he didn’t think
it mattered at all how big a person
was (here all the Gazelles said “ Hear,
hear,” very loudly); he thought that
the best meant the one who was
prettily marked, had good horns, and
could run very fast; and he didn’t
think that anybody could doubt that
he was best.

Then a little antelope with four
horns got up. He had two very small
horns in front of the ordinary ones.
He was of the opinion that the
antelope who had most horns was
clearly the best, and he would be |
glad to know whether anyone in the
meeting had more than four horns;
if so, he would vote for him.

The Water Buck, who came next,
didn’t think that horns mattered very

much, though, of course, it. was
better to have them; but that one
was best who was graceful and
gentle, and didn’t put himself for-
ward in any way.

“You're all wrong,” said the
Koodoo antelope; “none of you
knows anything about it. Now it

all depends upon the name: nobody
has such a splendid name as I have;
think of it— Koodoo—why, it’s
perfectly clear that I am the best
antelope.”

“That's rubbish,” said one of the
Gazelles ; “nobody cares about names.
Now, it’s my opinion that an antelope
should be small and graceful, with nice
horns (not too long, but just long
enough), and large eyes, and slender
legs, and what more do you want ?”

“Pll tell you what you want,” said
another of the Gazelles : “just look at
me. Well,

it’s very artful; when I’m on the sand

Do you see my colour?

at home, you know, you could scarcely
see I was there because I’m so like









THE SABLE ANTELOPE



32 Awimat Lanp ror Lirrite Peorte.

it in colour. That makes one so safe,
you know; I think colour should
count for something.”

“And speed,” said the Springbok ;
“speed means a great deal.”
the

too,’ said

Rocky Mountain goat.

“And jumping,

Then everyone began to speak at
once again and nobody could hear a
word of what anyone else said for
several minutes.

At last they were all quiet and the
Eland got up “We
come to a vote,” he said. ‘I think
that
speeches.

again. must
we have had quite enough
Will everyone kindly now
vote for the antelope he considers
to be the best ?”

The method of voting was rather
funny. Each antelope went to a little
corner by himself and found a flat,
smooth place in the sand, and then he



wrote on it with his foot the name
of the one he thought best.

The Eland and the Sable antelope
then went round to count the votes.
This took a very long time, as there
were a good many antelopes present.

As they went on the Sable antelope
and the Eland seemed to grow very
much amused at something, and by
the time they had finished they were
both laughing until the tears rolled
down their cheeks.

The others all crowded round to
hear the result.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” said the.
Eland as soon as he could speak for

laughing. “Iam sorry to say that the

- question is still unsettled. Everyone
has voted for himself, so nobody has
got more than one vote. So, ladies

and gentlemen, each one of you is the

best antelope.”



oo



‘““THEY TEACH THEM ALL SORTS OF TRICKS” (f. 34).

Seals and

AR away up in the North among
the ice and snow, where the
summer is nothing but one long day
and the winter is only one long night,
there lived a family of seals—a father
seal, a mother seal, and a little baby
seal.

They were very happy together, and
the little baby seal used to enjoy him-
self very much; he used to swim about
in the water and have all sorts of games
with other little seals who lived close
by, and sometimes he used to go on
land and lie on the rocks by his
mother, and she would tell him stories

of what happened to her when she was
Cc

Sea= Lions.

a little seal. And the story he liked
best of all was what he called the
“Man Story.” He used to say to his
mother, “Tell me the Man _ Story
again, Mother,” and his mother would
say, ‘“ Why, I've told you that so many
times, dear ; wouldn’t you like a new
one?” But the little seal would say,
“No, I want the Man Story, Mother ;.
I like that best.”

Then the mother seal would begin :
‘Long, long ago when I was quite a
little baby seal

‘As little as me, Mother?” the
little seal would ask.



“Yes, smaller than you are now,



34

*

my dear,” the mother would say. “I

used to live here with my father and

mother, and one day, as we were all
swimming about in the sea, we saw a
great big thing likea rock, only itseemed
to have wings, come sailing along on
the top of the water. I learnt after-
wards that it was called a ship. Well,
presently it came nearer and nearer
and then it stopped, and then a little
ship (which is called a boat) was let
down into the water and it came swim-
ming along towards us all and we heard
the most beautiful music coming from
it. . Now you know we all like music
very much, so we swam nearer to the
boat to listen, and when we got quite
close we saw that there were some
funny-looking creatures sitting in the
boat.” c
‘Oh, those were men, weren't they,
Mother ?” the little seal would say.
“Yes, dear,” said the mother seal;
“they seemed to be quite friendly, and
they made the beautiful music for us,
and we thought how kind it was of
them to come. But that night we
noticed that some of our friends were
missing, and we didn’t know what had
become of them. At last, one night,
my father didn’t come home. He had
been out to listen to the music, and we
waited and waited, and he didn’t come
back, so my mother set out to look for
him. After along time (as it seemed
to me) she came back, and she was in
a great state of mind. She told me

AnimaL Lanpd For LirTLeE PEOPLE.

that my father would never come
home any more—he had been taken
away by those men; it was they
who had taken all our friends. Some
of them had been killed—it seemed
that the men wanted their skins to
make extra skins for themselves—
and others had been taken alive and
They had
captured my father—I am glad to
say he wasn’t killed—and there were

shut up in the ship.

numbers of seals on the ship, and
sea-lions too, our great big cousins,
and they were all going to be taken
away to the far, far south.”

‘““And what were the men going
to do with them, Mother ? ” the little
seal would say, though he knew the
answer quite well.

“They would take them away to
a far country, and there they would
put them into a sort of cage and
keep them there. I believe they
treat them very well; they teach
them all sorts of tricks—even the
sea-lions—and they give them water
to swim in and fish to eat, but we
never see them again.”

“Ts that all of the Man Story,
Mother?” the little seal would say.

“Ves,

answer.

dear,” the mother would
‘“The men haven't come
again, and if they did, we should
know better now, and shouldn’t go
near them to be caught.”

“No,” said the little seal, “I shall

never be caught by men.”





EA-LION.

THE S$





‘WE FELT RATHER FRIGHTENED AT FIRST” (fg. 37).

Sheep.

/{\HERE was very great excite-

ment among the wild sheep.
The lambs were running about, jump-
ing off and on the big rock in the
middle of their garden and racing

round and round and rubbing their

heads against the bars.

“ Mother,” said one, running up to
an elderly sheep, with long horns,
“* what think? A little
girl came and stood opposite our

do you

cage just now, Mother, and she

said ‘

“Yes, Mother,” put
“she did, really; wasn’t it too bad?”

‘And we aren’t, are we?” said a
third.

The elder sheep gently butted at
them with her horns. ‘“ You foolish
little things,” she said ; ‘‘I don’t know
what she did say yet!



in another,

Don’t speak

all at once! One at a time, and



SHEEP. BT

then perhaps I can answer your
questions.”

‘“Well, Mother,” said the first, “she ©

was standing outside looking at us,
and we felt rather frightened at first,
but she had some bread and gave us
some, so of course we came quite near;
and then she said, ‘Aren't they dear
And when she
said that, we all ran away as fast as we
We didn't like to be called
goats, and we aren't goats, are we,
Mother ?”

“No, my. dear,” said the elder
sheep; “the little girl didn’t know
Sh

little goats, Nurse ?’

could go.

what she was talking about.
thought, I suppose, that because we
have horns we must be goats. It’s
very surprising that some of these
people don’t know more things. Goats,
indeed! I should think not!” And
the mother
seemed quite cross.
“Why, they'll be say-

ing that the mouflons

sheep

are antelopes next!”

“Who are the
mouflons, Mother ?”
said the biggest of
the lambs.

“They live close
by here, my dears,”
said the mother ;
“they’rethewildsheep
of Corsica and Greece.
We come from Bar-
bary, you know.”

“What are tame sheep like,
Mother?” said one of the lambs.
“Ugh! Great, fat, stupid, white

things,” said the mother; “no horns,
no beards; they just lie on the grass
all day, never run up rocks and jump
about as we do, ugh!”

“ But they don’t live in a cage, do
they, Mother?” said the biggest
lamb. ’

“What a silly question to ask!”
said the elder sheep. ‘I’m sure it’s
very nice in this cage! What more
do you want ?”

The lambs said no more, but trotted
off and began to play hide-and-seek
seine

smallest of them, when it was left all

round the rock in the middle.

alone, looked out beyond the bars and
said, “I think it must be rather nice
to lie on the grass sometimes!”



THE MOUFLONS,



The Polar Bear.

NAHE polar bear, when he’s at home,
Lives among ice and snow ;
You'll often find him, so I’m told,
A-sitting on a floe.

I don’t know what a floe may be,
It must be something queer,
They haven’t got them at the shops
Or anywhere round here.

And so the polar bear is sad,
At least, he seems to be,

Because he hasn’t any floes
Where he can sit, you see.

He often, too, must find it hot,
We sometimes make a fuss.

‘But then it must be hot for him
When it is not for us.

He always wears that big, white coat,
Winter and summer, too;

He hasn't any thinner things
To wear, like me and you.

But when he wants to have a bath
He goes and swims about,

And doesn’t have to dry himself
As soon as he comes out.

He’s very fond of fish, I think
He thinks it’s very nice,

But always, I suppose, he’d like
To finish with an ice.

It must be very strange for him
To live with us, you see;

It must be very different
From where he used to be,

For we don’t have an iceberg here
Where he can go and play ;

It doesn’t snow here all the time,
I’m very glad to say.

I wonder what he thinks of us;
He must think we are queer ;

When there’s no snow and ice about,
He can’t like to be here.

He doesn’t, like the other bears,
Climb up a pole for buns ;
He just lies still or walks about,

He scarcely ever runs.

I'd like to be an elephant.
And make the people stare,
But, on the whole, I do not think
I'd be a polar bear.



7 aac AE AE ROI AN pm

38).

2:

oa
5
i)
3
wn
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a
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“JT WONDER WHAT







40

Bears. -

YÂ¥\HE sloth bears were very sleepy
—there was no doubt about it.

They lay at the bottom of their cage
and wouldn’t speak a word to the
brown bear next door, although he
was most anxious to have a little
conversation with them, because they
were new arrivals, and he didn't
know anything about them. :

«How do you feel now?” he
asked very kindly. But they only
gave a sort of grunt.

““Where do you come from?” he
went on. Grunt again.

“Don’t you think it’s very hot?”

No answer.

“Would you
eat tes

One of their ears waggled a little.

“What would you like? Meat?

or buns?”

like something to

The large sloth bear opened one
eye and said, “Ants!” then went
to sleep again.

The brown bear was disgusted.
He walked away and sat down in the
corner of the bear-pit and thought
it all over.

‘“Whatever could they mean ?” he
said to himself.
eat ants! It’s perfectly ridiculous!
Now if it had been honey I could
And then being
sleepy in weather like this, too!

“Fancy wanting to

have understood it.

want me to do;

It's such a silly time to
sleep; of course, all sensible people

go to

go to sleep in the winter-time, when
it's very cold and there’s no food
to be got; but this warm weather
There’s
something funny about those two,
I’m sure. They look quite untidy, -
I don’t suppose they ever
They’re nearly

is just what is wanted.

too ;
comb their fur out.
as bad as the llamas or the moulting
hyenas. I don't think I’m very
glad they've come next door. Hallo!
What's that?” Something had fallen
down on the ground from above,
and on sniffing it he discovered that
it was a piece of bun. He swallowed
it, and looked up to see where it
had come from.

Some people were looking over
the railings which ran round the top
of the bear-pit, and one of them, a
little boy, was making signs, and
holding out another piece of bun.

“Oh, yes,” said the brown bear to
himself, leaning lazily against the
side of the pit and looking up at
the small boy. “I know what you
you want me to
climb up that pole and fetch the
bun. But I don’t think I shall; it’s
too hot, and then perhaps it isn’t a
very good kind of bun.”

The little boy waved the bun



BEARS. 4I

about, and threw down a small piece.
The brown bear slowly rose and
and the little boy
jumped about and called out, ‘‘ He's
going to climb now!

picked it up,

He's going
to climb up now!”

“Shall 1?” thought the brown
bear, and he put one paw on the
the little boy could
scarcely hold himself in for joy;

pole, while
“it would be a long way
up”—he stood guite still—
‘Snow dont. thing . will
and he went and sat down
again by the wall, and the
little boy very nearly began to
cry, he was so disappointed.
“Couldn’t - you bring it

me?”

-said the
But the little
boy didn’t understand; he

thought the bear was only

down to
brown bear.

growling, and I don’t think
that he would have considered
it a good plan if he had
understood.

Just then the keeper ap-
peared with some pieces of
meat, and held one out on
the end of a stick.

The brown bear looked up.

“ Ah,” he said, “ now that’s
a different thing altogether!”



He was up the pole in no time, right
up to the top, and leaning back as far
as he could to get the meat. The
little boy was delighted.

When the meat was all finished,
and the keeper had gone away, the
brown bear got down, and sat by
the wall, licking his lips.

“Ves,” he said to himself, ‘ that

. x " ”
was something worth going up for.

“HE WAS UP THE POLE IN NO TIME,”



The Camel.

F course you know who I am?

I am the camel—and a very fine
camel, too, I expect you'll say, and
you'll be quite right. You see that I
have two humps on my back? Well,
we haven’t all got two, some poor

near, please, then I sha’n’t feel so



much inclined to

Hot, do you call it? Why, dear
me, I wonder what you'd say if you
went to the land where I came from.

Now there it was warm sometimes



“WE USED TO START OUT ON A JOURNEY,’

camels have only one; it’s the very
extra-fine ones who have two humps.

Why do I wear this muzzle on my
nose? Well, I think it looks rather
nice, don’t you? What’s that you
say? Bite? Oh dear me, no! I
wouldn’t think of such a thing! I’m
as quiet and gentle as a ebutel
don’t think you'd better come quite so



certainly. We used to start out
on a journey across the desert, where
you know there is nothing but sand,
hot, burning sand, sand for days
and days and days; sometimes
you see a tree, but not often, and
all the time the sun shines overhead
and tries to make everything as hot as

he possibly can. Ah, I think perhaps





» 42)

(7

M THE CAMEL”

IA

‘i



44.

you'd say it was hot there! But here,
why it’s nothing! You always have
shady places here where you can lie
down and rest, and there seems to be
plenty of water about. Do you
know what they call me besides the
camel? They call me the Ship of the
Desert—and I think it’s a very good
name, too. Some people say that
when they ride on me they feel sea-
sick just as they do when they are on
board ship. I can carry a great deal
on my back; I’m sure I’m _ useful.
And I have one very good thing
about me. When I’m going for one
of those long journeys over the hot,
dry sands, I can go for a long time
without having any water at all. How
would you like that? To be for
days without
anything else ?

Ah,

you'd never do to be acamel, I can see.

get very thirsty, wouldn't you ?

I can go very fast, too, when I like.
You see I have such fine, long legs.
He’s a sort of
cousin of mine. He's a smaller, lighter

The dromedary ?

chap than I am altogether; he can’t

The Hippopotamus

GH!” grunted the big hippo-
“] think I shall havea
bath. Oh, dear me, I feel so sleepy (2
And he opened his mouth and gave

potamus.

a tremendous yawn.

a drink of water or |
I expect you would.

Animal Lanp ror Lirrte Peorre.

carry nearly as much. Indeed he’s
generally used for people to ride on
him, he doesn’t do much carrying of
luggage. Now you should just see
me when I’m fairly loaded. First of
all I have to kneel down so that they
can get the things on to my back; if
I didn’t do that, they’d have to get a
pair of steps or a ladder, I suppose.
Weil, they pile up the things on the

top of me and fasten them on, and

then, when everything is ready, we

start, and I look like a great, big tent
with legs walking along.
I have a will of my own, of course.

say
temper, but that’s when they want me

Some people its a nasty
to do something that I don’t want to,
and when I don't want to do anything
I don’t do it.

Egypt is the name of the place that
I come from: if ever you go there, you'll
see some of my friends and relations,
expect:

Now they are going to take my
muzzle off to give me some dinner, so
I think perhaps you had better get a
little further off. Good-morning!

and the. Rhinoceros.

“Well!” said a deep, gruff voice
from the other side of the railings.
“Well! If I had a mouth as large
and as ugly as that, I would keep it
shut, at any rate.”



Tweé FTipPoPpoTAuUS AND THE RHINOCEROS. A5

It was the rhinoceros next
door. The hippopotamus
and he didn’t get on very well
together ; indeed, they were
always quarrelling, so that
it was just as well that there
were bars between them.

The hippopotamus turned
round angrily. “ Ugly?” he
said. “Who are you calling
ugly? I am sure I’m just
as pretty as you are, with
that great horn sticking out
I don’t think

it looks at all nice.”

of your nose.

“* H’m!” said the rhino-
ceros. ‘‘l don’t care if it
doesn't. It’s been very use-

ful to me all the same.”

“Well,” returned the hip-
popotamus, “and so has my
If it had
been any smaller, I shouldn't
have been able to get it round, for it
was rather a large boat.”

‘© Whatever
about ?”

mouth, so there!

are you talking
demanded the rhinoceros.
“‘Look here! Let’s stop quarrelling
for a bit, and you shall tell me your
story and I'll tell you mine. Fire
away!”

“ Ah, that’s just what the men did,”
said the hippopotamus. “We were
all swimming in the river, when they
came down in their boat. It was

what they call a canoe (so the flamin-

goes told me), and most of the men in



“HE OPENED HIS MOUTH ” (/. 44).

it were black ; but there was one white
man who had a curious stick in his
hand which he every now and then
would point at some bird or animal,
and then he made fire come out of the
stick, and the bird or animal generally
got hurt.

“T lay in the water watching them
when, all at once, the white man
pointed his stick at my brother, and
before you could say ‘crocodile’ my
brother was floating away down the
stream with a bullet in his head. The
men in the boat paddled away after



46

him, but that was more than I could
stand, so I went afterthem. I saw
the white man point his stick at me,
but I dived in time and came up just
beside. them; then it was that my
mouth came in so handy. I just
opened it quite wide and then I closed
it again, and, well, somehow the boat
was upset and the men were all kick-
ing about in the water, splashing and
shouting and making no end of a fuss.
But I let them go that time, I only
wanted to give them a lesson. Now
it's your turn. How did your horn
come in useful ?”

‘“Oh, my adventure was on land, of
course,” said the rhinoceros, who had
been much interested in the hippo’s
story. ‘I was snoozing one afternoon

at home when I heard a curious noise,

and I saw some of those black men you _

talk about, followed by a white one on
a horse. Well, before I had time to do
or say anything, the white man pointed
his gun at me (that’s what they call
the stick that the fire comes out of)
and the next moment I felt a bullet

AwnimaLt Lanp ror Lirrte PEOPLE.

knock against my side. Of course it
didn’t hurt me—that’s the advantage
of having a skin like mine ; but it made
me very angry. So I just got up and
ran at the gentleman on the horse ; he
was very much surprised, and so was
the horse, especially when I gave him
a prod with this horn of mine. He
turned right round and galloped away
as fast as he could go, with the black
men after him. Of course I didn’t
take the trouble to run after them.

‘But you see, my horn does come in

useful sometimes.”

“Ugh!” grunted the hippopotamus.
“T suppose it does. But it isn’t pretty,
all the same.”

“Well, anyway it’s better than your
mouth,” replied the rhinoceros, getting
angry again.

1»

“But I can swim!” said the hip-

popotamus.

“But you haven't got such a
tough skin as I have,” replied the
rhinoceros. And they went on

quarrelling until the keeper came
with their dinner.

The Hedgehog.

TTAHE hedgehog is a funny chap:
He is quite short and small,
And when he’s startled he will roll
Into a prickly ball.

And then he’s like a pincushion:
You cannot touch him then.
He waits until you’ve gone away,

Then he unrolls again.





“IT WAS THE RHINOCEROS NEXT DOOR” (4. 45).



ae!



‘© HE'S VERY USEFUL IN THE HOUSE.”

He’s very useful in the house.
We had one, so | know,

He ate up the black-beetles
Wherever he would go.

Aniat Lanp ror Lirrie PEOPLE.

I often used to play with
See itn
Whenever he’d come out ;
{ used to love to see him
come
And poke and run about.

But if our Toby barked at
him,

Or Puss came walking by,

He'd make himself into a ball

Beforeyou’d wink youreye.

He wasn’t very nice to stroke
Or curl up in your lap,

But I was very fond of him,
The funny little chap..

The Mole.

HE mole was very busy, working
away as if everything depended

on his finishing what he was. doing
directly. He was really very hungry
and was looking. about for his dinner.
“Excuse me a moment,” ‘he said,
“but. I thought I smelt a worm; |
must have him.” And he scraped
away the earth, digging a hole in
a wonderfully short time and dis-

‘appearing into the ground. Presently

eal
“he wasn't at
Now what is it
you want to know? Am I really
blind? Oh dear, no! I’ve got eyes,

he popped up his head again.
got him,” he said;
all a bad worm.

though perhaps they are rather small
—still they're good enough for me.
You see I do most of my work, under-
neath the ground and at night time, so
that I don’t want to see very much.
Yes, I like worms best to eat, but
when I can’t get worms, why then
small birds or frogs or mice or things
like that do just as well.

‘I’m sorry I can’t take you and snow
you my house, for I’ve taken a great
deal of pains over it. Of course,
you've seen it from the outside—you
call it a mole-hill, I think—but inside
it's very beautiful; it has all sorts of
passages and tunnels and _galleries,.





“TI just got up and ran at the gentleman on the horse” (see g, 40).



THE ow

and is really very well built, though
perhaps I should not say so.

“.’m sorry to say that farmers

don’t seem to like me at all.. They
say that I spoil their gardens and
fields by my digging, but I don’t see
what else I’m to do; indeed, I
don’t think I could do any- |
thing else but dig. Spade?
“Oh no, I don’t want any
spade as long as I’ve got
my front paws.
“Tm a very good fighter,

too. I have very sharp teeth
and can bite very hard when
I like. Hush!” The mole

stopped short, then he began
to dig away as fast as he
could. “1 must go,” he said,

between the digs. “I hear

49
an owl, -[-cant bear owls!”
By this time-he was nearly buried
under the earth, and just as he disap- —
peared there came a “tu-whit, tu-
whoo,” and a great barn-owl came
flying by, evidently on the look-out

for supper. It was a narrow escape.



“HE BEGAN TO DIG.”

The Giraffe.

AM a giraffe and my name is
Daisy. I come from a hot
country a long way off, called Africa :
~I am quite grown-up now and shall
Don’t you think
1 do.
There is no other animal which is
as tall as I am; I am taller than the
elephant or the camel, but of course |
am not as strong as the elephant is.
You need not be at all afraid of me,
because I will not hurt you. No,

thank you, I do not want to eat you up
D

not get any bigger.
I am big enough as I am?

at all; I should not like to eat little
boys and girls; indeed, I don’t think I
could if I tried, and I am sure | do
I eat leaves and
grass and hay and things like that: I

not want to try.

can reach the leaves of the trees
because I have such a long neck.
One day a lady came to see me
here and she had some very nice-
looking green things on the top of her -
head, and I thought that I would like
to eat them as they looked so nice; so
I just bent my head over the top of



50 AwimaL Land FoR LirrLteE PEOPLE.

the bars of my cage and took a bite at
them. But they were not at all nice
really, and the lady made such a fuss!
She thought I was going to eat her
up, I believe. I heard afterwards
that the things I had eaten were the
flowers on her hat, and they were not
real flowers at all. I don't think
people ought to have such things
in their hats if they don’t want us
Of course, 1 thought
them

to eat them.
that the lady had brought

on purpose for~me, so I didn’t see.

why I shouldn't eat them. But I
don’t think that lady will come quite
close to my cage again.

I lived here alone for quite a long
time, beéause they could not get a
playmate for me. You see, there are
not nearly so many of my family now
as there used to be, and then we don’t
like travelling over the sea at all. But
now I have a playmate and he is a
very nice little chap; of course he is
not as fine and big as I am, but he
will grow up in time and I shall be
very glad to have some company.

I can really run quite fast when I
have room, but here there isn’t room
enough; and I don’t very much mind,
because I’m quite content to walk
about gently, thank you. And then [|
have to take great care of my health,
you know, because I’m rather delicate
and not like the ostrich, who seems
to be able to eat almost anything,
Why, he tells me that he is very fond

of rusty nails, and as for pennies and
half-pennies he considers them most
It’s a very funny sort of
No, it’s no good for

delicious.
taste, I think.
you to offer me nuts, thank you,
because I couldn’t crack them.

My horns, were you asking about ?
We all have horns, both gentlemen
and lady giraffes, but they are always
quite small, like mine. They’re not
much use to us, you know, for when
we want to fight anyone we use our
feet—we can give very strong kicks
with our fore-feet if we like. But, on
the whole, we don’t like fighting ; we
find that it’s much safer to run away
—you see we can run so fast that
there are not many creatures who
can catch us.

Do you see that they have put iron
bars round the trees in my garden?
What do you think that is for? Well,
if they didn’t we should strip all the
bark off the trees, and I suppose the
trees wouldn’t like it. I am, as I
have said, very particular about my~
food and I don't like thorns or
thistles, so when I come acrossa plant
with prickly thorns on it, I carefully
pick off the leaves with my tongue and
leave the thorns behind. I don’t
believe you could do that with your
tongue, but mine is a very useful
tongue and I shouldn't like to change
it with anybody. I sometimes find it
rather awkward to get anything on
the ground which is just between my







“DON'T YOU THINK I AM BIG ENOUGH?” (4. 49).



52

front feet; I have to put my legs very
wide apart and then bend down my
neck. like this. I suppose it does
look rather funny, so I don’t mind if
you do laugh at me. But then, you

know, you look just as funny to me,

with your very small legs and no neck

at all to speak of, and no horns and
no tail; I sometimes wonder how you
can get on at all.

AnmaLt LAND FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.

I come. of a very old family, you
know; I believe that you men have
known about me for a very long
time. ;

If you will excuse me now, I think
I will go in, as I am rather afraid of |
catching cold ; it wouldn’t do for me to

get a sore throat or a stiff neck, would ~

it? Goodbye! I’m so pleased to
have met you. ;

The Wolves.

E was very cold. The ground was
frozen quite hard, all the streams
were covered with ice, and the whole
land was white with snow.
The wolves were very hungry.
They had had -nothing to eat for

days and days, and they were very-

cross.

“When shall we have some din-
ner, Father ?” whined the little wolves.
“Bring us something to eat soon,
Father. We are so very hungry.”
And Grey-fur, the poor- father wolf,
didn’t know what to say. But that
evening, as they were all lying close
together trying to keep warm and
not to feel hungry, there came a
young wolf with a message that the
whole pack of wolves were going to
have a hunt the next day, and would
Grey-fur come with them. Of course,
Grey-fur said he would, and some

“must wait until

of the little wolves begged very hard
to be allowed to come too, but-their
father said they were too small; they
they were grown
up; but he promised to bring back
with him a part of whatever was
caught.

The next day, in the afternoon,
he started out, and went towards
the forest where he was to meet the -
other wolves, and as he was going,
he joined another friend, and then
another and then another, and soon,
when they came to the place where
they were all to meet, they saw that
a very large number of wolves were
gathered together.

They were’all growling and talking
to each other, and evidently very
hungry and eager to be off, only no
one seemed to know where they were

going to exactly: Presently there





“They passed something lying on the ground” (see . 47).



THe Wotves. 53

was a call for silence, and a large
wolf stepped forward, whom Grey-fur
knew to be the leader of the pack.
He did not.make a long speech.
“Brothers, . he said,“ are- you
hungry ?”

What a howl there was, to be
sure! —

“Very well,” said the large wolf;
“then follow me!” And he turned
and began to trot slowly through the
wood. The other wolves threw up
their heads and yelped for joy and
bounded after him, pressing round
him and eagerly asking questions.
But the old leader would tell them
nothing; he said, ‘Wait and see,
brothers! Wait and see!” ;

Grey-fur wondered very much to
himself where they were going. After
a time he saw that the wood was
getting clearer—there were not so
many trees; presently there were no
trees at all, they- were out in the
open fields, which stretched away in
front of them all covered with snow,
far, far away—as far as they could
see. Grey-fur wondered more than
ever. He knew that wolves very
seldom left the forest; they didn’t
Wet
here was the leader going straight

care, as a rule, for open fields.

on—he seemed to know where he’

was going, any way.
Just at first some of the wolves
seemed to be rather uneasy, but the

old leader didn’t stop a moment—.

he kept up a steady trot across the

snow, and the .others followed him
in a long, straggling line.

_Grey-fur had never been so far
away from the forest before. What

could they be going to catch? It

was beginning to get dark by now,
although it was not very late, but
it was in the middle of winter, and
the-sun had gone to bed early.

Presently the old leader stopped
for a moment, sniffed at the ground,
then threw up his head and howled
and started on again. Grey-fur
sniffed the ground, too, and saw a
little hole in the snow as he passed,
then another and another—and then
quite a long line of them, and he
knew what they were; they were
footsteps of men! They were on a
road, and the old leader was taking
them to a village. He was evidently
going to see if he could not get
something there. Grey-fur saw it all
at once—they were going to attack
the village; perhaps they might find
a stray sheep or goat, but it was very
bold. Hehad never done this before,
but he thought to himself that there
were a good many others with him,
and he certainly was very hungry,
and there were his little ones at home,
too, so he ran on with the rest.

In a little while he saw some lights
twinkling in the distance; then they
passed something lying on the ground,

and found it was an old coat which



54

had belonged to one of the villagers.
They must be very close now.

After they had gone on a little
further, the old leader stopped, and
all the other wolves gathered round
nines Now, he said, “each one
must find his dinner for himself!
Down there,’ and he pointed to the
twinkling lights, “there are sheep
and goats and pigs and fowls, but,
remember, there are also men and
dogs! Let each one go his own way
and find what he can!” Then he
darted off like a shot and was lost
in the darkness. |

Grey-fur hesitated for a moment,
then he, too, set off. He ran until
he came close to a cottage, where
he saw a light burning in the window,

and at the back of this he heard a

AwnruaL LAND FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.

clucking noise, and he knew that
there were cocks and hens. Quietly
he crept round, and just over a

low wall he saw quite a lot of fowls

on their perches. ~““hlere is” my
dinner,’ said Grey-fur to himself,
and in less than no time he had

jumped over the wall and was right |
in amongst the fowls.

Just then, from the front of the
house, there came the sound of loud
barking of dogs and the shouting of
men, and almost directly the whole
village was awake, and everyone was
looking after his property.

But Grey-fur was off by this time,
running home as fast as he could
go, and that evening the little wolves
had a good dinner. They were very
fond of a good fat hen for dinner.

The Kangaroo.

HAT is this funny-looking thing ?
Whatever does it do?
Why, everybody knows this is
The. hopping kangaroo.

His front feet are quite short, you
know,
His hind legs very long ;
And if he were to fight with you
You'd find him very strong,

Then he has an enormous tail,
It must get in the way,

°

I wouldn’t like to drag a thing
Like that about all day.
He looks so funny when he
hops, ;
You'd think he must upset ;
I'd rather like a kangaroo

To keep him for’a pet.

But if I had one, I would have
A lady kangaroo,

Because they are the funniest.
What do you think they do ?



THE HOPPING KANGAROO.





56 : AwimaL Land FoR LirtTLeE PEOPLE.

They have a funny little bag
And pop their babies in it,

And there they are quite safe and snug
In less than half a minute.

You see the mother kangaroo
Go hopping round about,

And from the funny little pouch
The little one looks out.

And there it stops quite quietly—
It must be snug and warm,

It knows its mother will not let
It come to any harm.

Then when there is no danger near
The little one jumps out,

And while its mother takes a rest
It hops and plays about.

I'd like to be a kangaroo—
A little one, I mean ;

For such delightful travelling
I’m sure I’ve never seen.

It’s better than an omnibus,
And nicer than a tram,

And I am sure it’s easier
Than a mail-cart or a p’ram.

And so, although he looks so queer,
I like the kangaroo ;

It must be very nice to hop
Like him, I think, don’t you?

The Zebra.

*“(\OOD-MORNING!”’ said the
X giraffe, looking through the bars
into the next compartment. ‘‘‘ Might
-I ask who you are? You're quite a
new arrival, I think, aren’t you?”
~The animal next door nodded his
head. ‘‘ Yes,” he said.

-been here two or three days, and

“T’ve only

I'm so lonely.”

“Oh, you'll soon get used to it,”
said the giraffe, kindly. “I suppose
you've generally had company? By-
the-bye, you didn’t tell me your
name.”

“T’m the zebra,” said the next door

animal, who seemed to be very glad
to talk to someone. ‘‘ Of course when
I was at home I always went about
with a lot of others, and very fine
times we used to have, too. But that’s
all over now, so we'd better not talk
about it.” s

“Oh, yes,” said the giraffe, “it will
do you good to tell me all about it.
Whereabouts did you live? Were
there many of you? Are you the

only one of your kind? I mean, are

there other sorts of zebras 2?”

“Ves,” said the zebra, “there are
two or three cousins of mine who are



THE ZEBRA. 57

rather different from me in the matter
of stripes. I’m afraid there are not
so many of us as there used to be.

You see we are hunted a good deal
for the sake of our coats, I suppose.
They are rather pretty, aren’t they ?”

“Him!” said the giraffe, looking

very critically through the bars. “I
don’t know that I altogether care for
those stripes myself, | like something
rather more irregular ; one doesn’t get
so tired of the pattern. But there’s
no accounting for tastes.’

. “No, indeed,” said the zebra, rather
warmly, ‘and how anyone can think
that a neck like that is beautiful I
don’t know.” . ~

‘Oh, come,” said the giraffe, “don’t
you be impudent, young ~
man. You're only a sort
of donkey after all, you
know. But there,
mustn’t begin to quarrel
- or people will think we’re

we

as bad as the monkeys :
they’re always squabbling
and fighting among them-
You didn’t tell
me where you came from,
after all.”

“Oh, didn’t I?” said
“You asked

so many questions at

selves.

the zebra.

once, you know. I lived in
a place called Abyssinia,
a long way off from here ;
_ I believe it’s in Africa.”

“Dear me! That's funny!” said

the giraffe. “I’m from Africa, too.”
“ Are you, really ?”’ said the zebra,
feeling quite friendly again, though he
had been quite hurt at the remark of
the giraffe about his stripes—zebras
are very proud of their stripes, you
know, and you have to be very careful

not to laugh at them; they don’t like

it. “Then perhaps you know the

lions ?”
“Ye-es,” answered the giraffe,
doubtfully. “I used to see them

sometimes, but I wasn’t very friendly
with them.”

“Nor was I,” said the zebra. ‘I
never liked them very much; they

weren't always very kind to our family ;



‘“TWO OR THREE COUSINS" (#. 56).



58
we used to have to keep out of their
way, especially when they were hungry
—they had such tremendous appe-
tites.”

“Ah, yes,” said the giraffe, with a

“sigh, “T know. It’s rather a painful

subject. They’ve got some here, you
know.”

“Have they?” said the zebra,
nervously. “Where? I’m afraid I

(3 ”)
must be going.

“Oh, you needn’t be afraid,” said

the giraffe; “they're kept in a house
by themselves with the tigers. We
never see them; we can only hear
them sometimes, calling for their
dinner.”

‘“(QOh, that’s all right,

J

’ said the zebra.

The Little

Y name is Porker : I’m a pig,
As anyone can see.
Myself and seven others make
A splendid family.

I am quite black excepting for
A white spot on my nose;
You've never seen so fine a pig

As I am, I suppose.

My tail is curly, look at it! |
Now don’t you think it’s fine ?

Not one of all the others has

- So good a tail as mine.

AnimaL Lanp ror LirTLeE PEOPLE.

Ge hey seem to manage things pretty
well here, I must say. My stable is
very comfortable indoors, and there
seems to be plenty to eat.”

“Oh yess it, asnet sbad;
giraffe, ‘only you'll find the weather

”)

said the

rather cold sometimes, I’m afraid.”

“Well, I shall see you again, I
hope,” said the zebra. “ I’m very glad
to have met you. But you won't talk
about my stripes any more, will you?
or we sha’n’t get on together.”

“Oh, well,” said the giraffe, “I dare
say some people might like them.
There’s no accounting for——”

But the zebra wouldn't stop to hear
any more, and went indoors quite

offended,

Black Pig.

My mother is the old black sow,
She’s very kind to us, <

She never scolds us when we squeak,
However much we fuss.

She’s very handsome, too, I think,
She is so large and fat ;

I hope that when I’m quite grown up
I'll be as big as that.

I’m going to try my very best
A great big pig to be,

‘So I must eat whene’er I can,
Good-bye! It’s time for tea!







“THE ZEBRA WOULDN’T STOP TO HEAR ANY MORE” (4. 58).



60

The Eagle.

HE eagle, I suppose you've heard,
Is sometimes called a royal bird ;
I think he looks it, too,
He seems so very proud and grim,
And when you stand and look at
him
He seems to frown at you.

His beak is very sharp and strong,
His wings are really very long,
He can fly high, I know.
And if you saw him when he’s free
Perhaps you then could really see
-How very high he’d go.

He'd soar away up in the sky,
Above the houses he would fly,
Above the tree-tops high,
Until he grew quite black and small,
And you would scarcely know at
all
That he was in the sky.

And when he’s sailing right up there
He spies a rabbit or a hare
Far, far away below; :
Then down he flies and catches it,
And takes it home, and gives a bit
To his little ones, you know.

It seems most wonderful to’ me
That he so very far can see,
Further than you or I;

' And then how lovely it must be

To float, as he does, easily
Up in the deep blue sky.

But in his cage he can’t fly high;
He knows that, so he doesn’t try,
He just sits still all day.
But now and then he flaps his wings—
‘“What is the use of these big things

Down here ?” he seems to Say.

“These men, they come and look
and stare;
They know I’m caged, or they’d not
dare =
To hurt my feelings so!”
Of course, he doesn’t talk that way ;
That’s only what he seems to say
By looking fierce, you know.

Of course they give him things to eat ;
He dines on pieces of raw meat;

He doesn’t think that’s bad.
But when he thinks where he might be
If he were only loose and free

I think he must feel sad.











HL" (fp.
HIGE

T FLY

HE CAN'T

E

CAG

HIS

“e IN

6a).



62

The Story of the Eldest Young Puffin.

HE four young puffins sat in a

row, resting themselves after

“Where have

you been to, brother?” said one to

their long journey.

the eldest of the four, who was a hand-
some little fellow with his bright red
bill and his twinkling black eyes.
“Oh, I have been such a long way
off,” said he. “I flew and I flew and

I flew until our home was far out of ©

sight and I could see nothing but sea
—deep and dark and blue—all round
me. Every now and then I would

take a rest on the water, but only for



“vTHeyY WALKED ABOUT HOLDING THEMSELVES UP,’

a short time; I soon got up again and
went on flying. The air grew colder
and the sky grew grey, and presently
I saw far away in the distance a big
rock. I made my way to it, and as |
got nearer I saw what seemed to me
to be a number of men walking about.

“1 flew more carefully now, because,
you know, you never can tell what
kind of men you may come across, so
I thought to myself that I would not
be rash. But when I got nearer still,
I found to my astonishment that they
were not men at all—they were birds!
They were much too small for men,
but they walked about holding them-
selves up just as men do. They had
webbed feet just like ours, so of course,
I knew that they could swim, but their
And the

young puffin began to laugh as he

wings! Oh, dear me!”
thought of them, so that he could
scarcely go on with his story.

The other three grew impatient.
“Don’t laugh so much,” they said.
“What was there funny about their
Pellaise!

The eldest young puffin recovered
himself and managed to stop laughing.
“You'll hardly believe it,” said he,
“but these creatures had wings and
couldn’t fly.”

“What!” said one of the others.

“Oh, nonsense!” said the second

wings ?



Tue Story or THE Expesr Younc PurFFin. 63

“Not at all!” put in the third, who
was a very wise little puffin. “There
are some birds that can’t fly. There
is the ostrich, for instance; these
birds you’ve been telling us of must
have been penguins, I think ; could
they dive and swim and catch fish ?”

“ Oh, yes, very well,” said the first

young puffin. “And their wings

helped them very much. But they
were silly birds. It must be dreadful
not to be able to fly.
can fly.

I’m very glad I

So am I!” said two
of the other puffins.

LES Omaimea

The wise little puffin thought for a
“Yes!” he said.

minute. “ So.am

I, too!”

The Trumpeter Swan.

AM a Trumpeter Swan
From the land of ice and snow.
I sound my cheerful note
Wherever I happen to go.
With a

ct aeta= haat

“toot - toot - toot” and a

I'm a capital bird, you know.

I am a Trumpeter Swan,
No common Swan am I.

~I don’t always live among ice and
snow,

But southwards I sometimes fly ;

And far away as we wing our
way

You may hear our cheerful
cry.



“T AM A TRUMPETER SWAN,”





“HE DOESN'T LOOK SO VERY FIERCE.”

64

The Butcher Bird.

E doesn’t look so very fierce,
As you’d think from his name,
But if I were a beetle, I’d
Be frightened, all the same.

He has a thorn with lots of spikes,
And when he’s caught his prey
(A beetle, p’raps, or nice large fly),

He'll put it right away.

He keeps it on the spiky thorn,
Fastened right on the top ;

And there it is for all to see,
Just like a butcher’s shop.

The Cormorants.

HEY were feeling very sad, were

not like to attract the attention of

the three young cormorants.: their neighbours.

Their mother had flown away in search
of food for them, but it seemed such a
very long time since she had started
that they were getting quite uneasy
about her.

There were a great many other
cormorants on the same rock (which
was a very large one), as well as
some other birds, but the home of the
three young cormorants was apart
from all the others, and they were
very shy and frightened, too, and did

The nest was made out of sea-
weed and did not look very com-
fortable, but the young cormorants
seemed to like it, and particularly as
it was placed high up on a flat piece
of rock, so that by just standing up
in the nest and stretching out their
necks, they could see what was going
on in the water down below.

The eldest young cormorant was
doing this now.

“Well,” said the others impatiently,



THE CORMORANTS,

“can’t you see anything? Let me
come and look!”

‘Nothing but silly gulls,” said he,
‘‘swimming about in the sea and
catching lots of fish. Oh, I am so
Mother would
And he opened his big

hungry! I do wish
come home.”
mouth as if his mother were already
there with his dinner.
“Now let look,”

second young cormorant, pushing the

me said the

eldest away and standing up in the
nest and stretching out his neck as

far as ever he could. ‘Oh, oh,
look!” he said, directly, ‘‘ whatever
is that thing down there?” The

other young cormorants were very
much excited, and the second one
went on: “It seems to have four
legs and it moves about in the water
so quickly and part of its body keeps
changing about. I wonder what it
The gulls don't seem
to like it, anyhow.”

“ Now it’s my turn,” said the

- youngest.

can be.

‘Let me come.”

He pushed his way past the
other two and stood up where he.
could see. Presently he gave a
loud squawk, and began to flap
his little wings violently.

‘What's the matter? What's
the matter?” said the others. ze

“T can see something coming
to us,” said the youngest cor-
morant, beginning to talk very

fast; “it has its neck stretched
Eg

‘opnE

65

straight out in front of it, flying very
fast; she’s coming nearer and nearer,
and, yes, she has got a fish in her
mouth. It’s Mother!” he shouted, as
the old cormorant flew in and landed
close by the nest. |

The three little cormorants all ate
their dinner at once, for they were
very hungry. Presently, however,
the second one looked up and said,
“Mother, what is that funny thing
The
mother cormorant looked over and
What is the child
Where is it?” The
young cormorant got up and pointed
out the thing toits mother. ‘ Oh,” said

the old bird, smiling, ‘“‘why, it’s a boat,

with legs, down on the water ?”

said, “ Legs?
talking about ?

my child. Those aren't legs, they’re

oars, and the creatures inside are men!”
2 @) hi

cormorant.

said the second young



OLD CORMORANT FLEW IN AND LANDED CLOSE BY THE
NEST.”



66

The Flamingoes.

T was rather early in the morning,
and the flamingoes were not yet
awake. They each stood on one leg
with their necks curled round in a very
funny way, and their heads tucked
safely underneath _ their
Presently, from one of the cages
close by, the trumpeter bird began
to sound his note, and the youngest

Wings.

flamingo slowly uncurled his neck
and began to look round.
a new arrival in the cage and felt
rather shy.

Very slowly he began to untuck his
leg and put it down.to the ground: by
this time the others were beginning
_to wake up, so after a while the
youngest flamingo said timidly to one
Oh:
please, can you tell me where we have
to have our bath here? There doesn’t

who seemed to be friendly,

seem to be a river.”

“There’s the pond, just in front of
you,” said the other; “what more do
you want ?”

“What!” said the newest arrival,

Well, I
Why, I’ve been used to a

“that tiny little place!
never !

great big river to bathe in every.

morning. I’ve come from India, I
have, and they never used to treat me
like this over there. I do call it a
shame! I shall speak to the keeper.”
And the poor flamingo almost began

to cry.

you,” he said.

He was

The other flamingo smiled gently
and stretched out his leg very, very
“T wouldn’t do that if I were

“You'll soon get used
It's just the same with

slowly.

to the place.
all of us when we first come here. I
came from America, and when they
first put me in here, I was so angry
I didn't know what to do with myself.
They had clipped my wings so that I
couldn't fly, and I was so miserable. |
missed all my friends and my beauti-
ful river and the lovely trees and
flowers that used to grow on its banks;
but after a time I got better and

found that this isn’t such a bad place

after all—there really are some rather
good frogs about, though you wouldn’t
think it. Then the birds here are
rather nice, though some of the gulls
make a dreadful noise sometimes.
But come along with me to the pond
and [’ll introduce you to the others.”

The youngest flamingo cheered up
a bit at this, and followed his new
friend to the pond, and was soon busily
engaged in talking over things with
all the other flamingoes, and also in
finding out where the fat young frogs
lived. :

By the end of the day he felt quite
at home, and as he-tucked himself up
for the night he sighed and said to
himself, “ Well, well, it might have
been much worse!”



“THE OTHERS WERE BEGINNING TO WAKE UP” (4, 66).





68

The Ptarmigan and the Woodpecker.



pos tap, tap /

“Oh, do stop
that noise!” said the Ptarmigan,
crossly. “It’s enough to make one

go quite crazy. I really don’t see
what's the use of you at all, with your
tap, tap, tapping | = :

The Woodpecker stopped for a
“Oh!” he said. Then he
went on again with his work.

“ Now, it isn’t as if you were beauti-
ful like me,” said the Ptarmigan, “or

moment.



“IT'S MUCH
BETTER TO HAVE
WHITE FEATHERS
THEN.”

could fly as well as I can, or
had more than one suit of
feathers as I have. Of
course you know that I have
two suits of feathers?” he
added. -

~The Woodpecker stopped
fora momentagain. “ Ah!”
Then he began to
tap once more.

“Oh, yes,” said the Ptar-
“T have, though ;

he said.

migan.
one for summer and one for
winter. It’s most useful;
because you see when the
snow is about, its much
better to have white feathers
then, so that you can’t be

In the summer,



seen easily.
of course, my feathers are
about the same colour as the
heather: sothat you see I’m always safe.
Now you—I should think—you are
easily caught—you make such a noise.”

The Woodpecker looked down for
a minute. “Hum!” he said.. Then
he began to tap again.

“Well,” said the Ptarmigan, im-
patiently, ruffling all his feathers out
and holding himself quite straight up,
‘well, what good do you really sup-

pose you are? Come, now, I’m quite

_ready to listen to anything you may

have to say.”



THE PTARMIGAN AND THE WOODPECKER. 69

The Woodpecker turned his head
round and slowly looked the Ptar-
‘abeliee "yah

Then he set to work again.

migan up and down.
inquired.

The Ptarmigan was quite disgusted
and walked off, grumbling to himself,
but the Woodpecker paid no attention
to him.

“Fie’s a foolish fellow,” he said
to himself; “if he hadn’t been so
conceited, | could have told him one
or two things that would have rather
astonished him. Just fancy his not
knowing why I tap! Why, I should
have thought that everyone
knew it was to get the insects
out of the bark of the trees;
and very nice they are, too,

And as for

“ d
being caught, why, he’s often

some of them.

caught himself, I know, for all
his two suits, and being per-
fectly safe and all the rest of
it.’ The Wocdpecker paused
again to give a gentle tap, tap,
and to eat up a beetle that
had thought itself quite
secure in the bark of the
tree. This seemed to put
him ina rather better temper ;
he. had really been getting
quite cross with the Ptar-
migan before. Then he went
on, ‘‘And then with all his
boasting about his two suits,
I don’t believe he’s got such a

useful tail as I have. I don’t



believe his would help to keep him
up on trees as mine helps me. And
I’m quite sure his claws wouldn’t be
much good for holding on to the
bark. Then I really don’t suppose
his bill is half as good as mine for
trunks of trees; you need rather a
strong kind of bill for work like
mine. Dear, dear! Well, it only
shows that it’s a good job we're not
all made alike! I must get on with
my work. Zap, tap, tap!” And
the cheerful little Woodpecker smiled
to himself and started work once more.

‘““HE BEGAN TO TAP AGAIN” (/. 63),







7O

Parrots.

UTSIDE the parrot-house there
was a terrible noise; a screaming,
squawking, shouting, and crying, just
as if the whole place were on fire, or
every parrot were being killed.

The macaws were sitting on their
little perches out in the open. air.
They were very proud of themselves,
for they greatly enjoyed being outside
on a sunny, warm day: it was much
better than being in a cage inside the
house. They were all very fine birds ;
some had blue heads and yellow
bodies and green tails; others had
red heads and yellow tails; there were
one or two who were quite white, but
they each one thought that he was a
very fine fellow, and they all shouted
and screamed and squawked at the
top of their voices.

And what was it all about? The

greatest noise seemed to be going on

round one perch where a big macaw
with a blue and green head was talk-
ing very loud and very fast to a group
of other birds close by, and he seemed
to be very angry about something.
In one claw he held a large apple,
- and if you had been near enough you
would have seen that someone had
evidently taken a big bite out of it.
This was what was making all the
bother. Mr. Green-and-Blue-Head
kept shouting out, “Who bit my

apple? Who bit my apple? I won't

have it! I won't stand it! It’s too
bad! It was all right this morning!
I believe it was you that did it!” (this
was said to a white cockatoo). Olin
you bad wicked bird! What. will

Oh, you bad thing!
Who bit my apple?”

become of you?

Go along, do!
But the white cockatoo began to

Ohm le didni tly she

“How dare you say such a

scream at once.
said.
thing? Bite your apple, indeed! [|
wouldn’t do it. Don’t call me names,
because I won’t have it. [ll peck you,
you bad bird! Who are you telling
to get along? Bite your apple, in-
deed !

Then a little green love-bird began
“Tt doesn’t
Mr.
“Tt’s not a very
big bite, though of course it must be
But
Cockatoo didn’t do it if he says he
didn’t. But please don’t let us have
any pecking. You'll find out some
time who did it, I dare say.”

2

Squaw-aw-aw-aw-awk-k-k

to try to make peace.

matter very much, does it,

Macaw 2?” she said.

very vexing. Pm sure Mr.

“Oh, that’s all very well for you,”
returned the macaw, “‘but it isn’t your
apple. Who bit my apple? Who
bit my apple? You'd better tell me
at once, whoever it was, and then
perhaps I sha’n’t be quite so angry!”

“ Oh,
apple,” put in another smacaw, with a

bright red head.

do be quiet about your

‘Who cares about





= “THE MACAWS WERE SITTING ON THEIR LITTLE PERCHES” (%. 70).



72 Awniuat Lani For LirttzE PEOPLE.

Why don't you enjoy
] declare it

your apple ?
yourself out in the sun?
quite makes me think of my young
days, sitting out here.”

“Apple? Apple? Who
shouted another bird from
the end of the row. ‘ Give me a bit!
Give poor Polly a bit! Poor old
Polly! Pretty Poll! Give me a bit,
don’t be greedy! Who's got the
apple ?”

Then four or five others all began
at once: ‘No, no, J want a bit! I

said

apple?”

asked first! I want some too! Over
here! No, here you are! This way
with the apple! Hurry up! Be

quick! Where’s that apple?”

Just then a lady and a little girl and
a little boy came along past where the
parrots were sitting. Instantly all
the birds began to chatter and scream
louder than ever.

‘Look, look at them!” they called
out. ‘“ Did you ever see anything so
absurd! Where are their feathers ?
_ What ridiculous beaks! I don’t be-
lieve they could crack nuts if they tried
ever so hard. They haven’t got any
Oh, how funny! Ha, ha, ha!
Go away, do, you ugly creatures! ”

The little girl and boy and the lady
didn’t understand what they were
But the lady
said, “Come along quickly, children,
and let us get past these noisy birds;

wings.

saying, of course.

they quite give me a headache with
their screaming! ”’

«Well, did you ever!” said the par-
rots. ‘Calling us noisy birds! V’m
sure we're not noisy! They haven't
got green heads and red tails: I don't
see what they think so much of them-
selves for! Well, I’m glad they’ve
gone! If they’d come near me I’d have
given them a bite! Silly things!
Squawk-k-k!”

The macaw with the apple was still
very sad. No one took any notice of
him, and no one would tell him who
had bitten his precicus apple. All at
once, it slipped out of his claw and
fell on to the ground. He tried to
reach it, but the chain which tied him
to his perch was not long enough, and
he couldn’t get it. All the other
parrots began to scream with laughter
at him; they danced up and down
and flapped their wings and shouted,
and made more noise than ever.
Then some sparrows flew down and
began to peck at the apple, and this
made the macaw angrier than ever.

“Hm!” said one little sparrow,
looking up at the macaw with a twinkle
in his eye, “quite a good apple! I
wonder that you threw it away!
Who's been biting it ?”

The macaw screamed and scolded,
but it was no good. If he hadn’t
talked so much he might have eaten
his apple in peace. Now he had lost
it altogether. |

And he never found out who bit

~ his apple.



73

The Kingfisher and the Minnow

KINGFISHER sat on a branch
a of a tree
By the side of a rippling stream,
_ And he sat so still that he seemed to
be |

Fast asleep in a pleasant dream.

Down below in the stream a minnow
played
So happy and gay and free :
He darted in and out of the shade
Of the hanging willow-tree. .

He whisked his tail as he swam te
and fro,
And_ he
bird ;
foro, HO; sald: he, 1 can ssee: you,

laughed at the little

you know.”
But the kingfisher never stirred.

“Wake up,’ laughed the minnow,
“it’s getting quite late,
I’m afraid that you must be ill;
You'd better be quick, for your dinner
won't wait.”
But the kingfisher sat quite still.

The minnow laughed as he swam in
and out,
“Come along, sir, now don’t be shy.
There’s nothing for you to be sulky
about.”
The kingfisher opened his eye.

Flash! Almost too quick for the eye
to see,
The kingfisher darted from shore.
The stream rippled by the branch of

the tree,
But the minnow was there no more

The Pheasant.

I AM a very fine bird, am I not?
You mustn’t think I am a common
pheasant, because that would be a
great mistake. I am a very much
finer bird than the common pheasants,
though they are relations of mine. I
am called the silver pheasant and I

Do

very beautiful my

come all the way from China.

you see how

feathers are?

There is another relation of. mine
who also comes from China, who is
called the He

thinks he is more beautiful even than

golden pheasant.
I am, but of course he is not really,
and he dare not say so when I am
anywhere about, because I should
fight him if he did. Besides, I don’t
think it is nice to keep on saying that
you are beautiful; you ought to leave



74. B AwnimaL LAND FOR LitTLe PEOPLE.

that to other people. Have you noticed
my tail-feathers ?
did ?

I like living over here very much.

Aren’t they splen-

Of course I make all the common
pheasants that I come across do just
as I tell them; if they object at all
I fight them, and they very soon
give in. :

We area very large family. Some
of us live in Japan and others in India.
That golden pheasant that I was

mentioning to you has a ruff round his
neck, but I think it's much nicer not
to have a ruff. I haven't got one.

Of course all pheasants are very
fine birds—even the very common
ones—but | think, and I have given a
good deal of time and attention to the
matter, I really think, on the whole,
that the finest of the family is the
silver pheasant.

I think I told you before that I was

a silver pheasant,-didn’t I ?



‘ST AM A VERY FINE BIRD” (/. 73).



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De A



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|



The Baldwin Library

RmB

Vaiveral ity
Florida


Ue Ga Te ee
Lecsfasel
ee JG OF.


“WWho bit my apple?” (see.Z. 70).
2

L LAND



- FOR

—— LADPDLE PEOPLE

BY

= SH HAMER

Authoy of ‘Micky. Magee’s Menagerie,” ““Whys and Other Whys,” etc.



ILLUSTRATED |



—=. CASSELL ano COMPANY, Limitep ~"
LONDON, PARIS, NEW YORK _& ‘MELBOURNE : fe >
oS : : Se. 1900

ALL RIGHTS .RESERVED





CONTENTS.

—VRIGW—
PAGE
Lions anp TIGERS ~~... Bes oe Me Se Be fe fas a See

THE WATER-RAT ... we a tes ae i we eas oe nee Peers?
THE OwL 14
THE Hyrax ae a re Soe Be ee ae at a ae a eaeen i
APES AND MONKEYS ee ee ie nun gece ae Bes Ms Sq Boa 00)
THE Bison... a a tes es ae Sey ee Sen = ar ee O)
THe DonkKEy a Sak os ne ae a res one Be wt ue 24
THe ELEPHANT... eee Sis ae ae me gs oe fags 2G
Tue Brest ANTELOPE ie SS ne ae ate ae a oa ve eo
SEALS AND SEa-LIons
Tue Potar Bear... a eee ie cE ne ae ee pd fe ee Oo)
BEARS 600 aa ee is as Lae Se ee ae me Bi ase
THE CAMEL ate aie Se a Sa os eS a a a son) 4183
Tue HIPPOPOTAMUS AND THE RHINOCEROS... = a Si ae a5 ea
THE HEDGEHOG ... ae as an ee eas a sh ae aca sca AG
ire Moree ee oe oe ae ane ome ue ax Be ie AS
THE GIRAFFE a Es ce ae Baa a oe ba ee a sos AG)
Tue WOLVES ae as oe aN: ce ee Be ae ae Pee oso, BB
THE KANGAROO ... ee ne aes ae Seo an ae as BiG ees)
THE ZEBRA oe hee ue ane es ne a ne oe 600 SO
Tue LittLe Biacxk Pic ... a ee a Zo a See aa ae eso
THe EaGLe oS oe oe ne as ie = sis et eo
‘THE STORY OF THE ELDEST YOUNG PuerFIN ...-... me so at Ee sos (OF
THE TRUMPETER SWAN ... a oe a aa ua ae a aa oo OB
Tue BurcHer Birp ese) O04.
THE CorMoRANTS Boon doe = bs £55 ea ae ae os con (Ot
THE FLAMINGOES ... a a ae an ee ae ce os aa ee O0)
THE PTARMIGAN AND THE WOODPECKER on dao Bee abe B86 aoe ... 68
PARROTS... oe te ae a Dee tet se soe ee re
THe KINGFISHER AND THE Minnow... Bes ae at a ee ee eS)

THE PHEASANT... a oe sae an at oe 380 ae at ss 93
ist ©}

“THE LIONESS WAS WIDE AWAKE”

“
*°¢T OFTEN THINK OF THE Dee WHEN Wr
WERE FREE’” a

“THERE WAS THE TIGER”

“T LIVE AMONG Rocks” ...

THE ORANG-UTANGS ass ses

“SWUNG TO AND FRO ON THE ROPES”...

THE CHIMPANZEE..

“THE LITTLE Cie STARTED AND LOOKED
ROUND” 5 ae nee Bae

“* THERE IS THE GAYAL AND HER LITTLE
ONE’”... fon ee abe Res

TuHE BIson..

“T AM A VERY OLD Paeae 24

“SOME OF THEM ARE STILL WILD”

“HE Lets ME RIDE uPON His Back”...

Mrs. Gnu anp Younc Master GNU ...

“HE HAD BEEN ABLE TO SETTLE THREE
oR Four WOLVES” ...

THE WatTEeR Buck

THE SABLE ANTELOPE

“Just LooK at ME”

“THEY TEACH THEM
TRIcKs”

THE SEA-LION ee sae ae

‘WE FELT RATHER FRIGHTENED AT FIRST”

THe MouFLons

ALL SORTS OF

coe eee eee eee

ILLUSTRATIONS.

—etw—
PAGE
7 “JT woNDER wHAT HE THINKS oF Us”
8 “HE was uP THE PoLE IN NO TIME”
“Wz USED TO START OUT ONA Journey ”
9 “I am THE CAMEL” ee Bee
tr ‘Her opeNED His MoutH” a
15 ‘IT WAS THE RHINOCEROS NEXT Door” a
16 “HeE’s VERY oe IN THE Housr”
17 “Hk BEGAN TO DIG” ae
19 “Don’t You THINK I’M BiG eNouGHeS
_ THE Hoppinc KancGaroo
20 “Two or THREE COUSINS”
“Tur ZEBRA WOULDN'T STOP TO HEAR
21 ANY MORE” ann aSe
23 “IN His Cace He can’r rity HicH”
24 ‘* THEY WALKED ABOUT, HOLDING THEM-
25 SELVES UP”
27 “J am A TRUMPETER Swen ys
28 ‘HE DOESN’T LOOK SO VERY FIERCE”
“THE OLD CORMORANT FLEW IN AND
29 LANDED CLOSE BY THE NEst”
30 “THE OTHERS WERE BEGINNING TO
31 WAKE UP”... a
32 “It’s MUCH BETTER TO HAVE WHITE
FEATHERS THEN”
33 “HE BEGAN TO Tap AGAIN”
35 “THE MACAWS WERE SITTING ON THEIR
36 Little PERcuHEs ”
37. “I am A VERY FINE BirD” ,,, ma

list OF COLOURED, PiwiEs:

1 VG W—

“Wuo Bir My Apple?”

“HE CHARGED AT A MAN oN A GREY Horse”

“I Just Gor Up anp RAN aT THE GENTLEMAN ON THE HorsE” aie

“THEY Pass—ED SOMETHING LYING ON THE GROUND”

PAGE

39

42
43

45

47
48
49
51
55
57

59
61

62

Jo
64

65
67

68
69

7L
74

. Lrontispiece
To face p. 22
46
Anima, Land ror Liprie PRoPL®.



‘““THE LIONESS WAS WIDE



Chas. Kn ght, phot.
AWAKE,”

Lions and Tigers.

HE lioness was wide awake, but
two of the little lion cubs were
rather sleepy. The third one, how-
ever, who had perched himself on his
mother’s back, was quite lively: he
had not had quite so much for dinner
as the others. .

“Mother,” he began, “what do all
these two-legged things come and
look at us for? And why have they
got such funny skins ? Do they ever
have anything to ‘eat, Mother—bones,

and things like that ?”

“Don’t purr so loudly, my dear,”
said the lioness, “or you'll wake your
brother and sister. These two-legged

things are people—the big ones are

called men and women, and the little

They don’t
do us any harm; indeed, some of

ones are boys and girls.

them are very kind to us—they give
us our dinner, and clean straw in our
houses, and help to make us comfort-
able. They do their best, poor things,
so you mustn’t growl at them.”
“Look, Mother,” said the lion cub,
8 AwnimaL LAND FOR LitTrLe PEOPLE.

“that small thing with the white skin
has thrown something into our house!
What does she think we shall do
with it?” |
“Don’t take any notice of her, my
dear,” said the lioness, blinking her
eyes at the little girl (who was ‘‘the

“When was that, Mother?” said
the baby lion. “Do tell me about
its :

“Ah, I didn't always live
house like this, my dear,” replied the

in a

lioness. “I was born far away from

here, in a place called Africa, and I



‘(THOSE PUMAS !’” (%. 10).

small thing with the white skin”) ; “it’s
only something that they call bread—

But
it’s really only fit for elephants or

she thinks that we shall eat it.

bears; we don’t eat stuff like that. I
tasted it once, I remember, but that
was a long time ago, when I was very,
very hungry, and glad to get anything
I could.”

was quite grown-up before I saw a
man at all. We used to live very
happily there in my young days—
though it wasn’t such an easy life as
that we have now. There was no
one to bring you your dinner regularly
every day; no, you had to catch your

dinner first and then eat it, and some-

times we had to goa long time with
ST







““T OFTEN THINK OF THE DAYS WHEN WE WERE FREE’” (4. 10).
Io Anat LAND FOR Little PEOPLE.

nothing but a very small antelope or
-perhaps a bird or two.”

The lion cub’s eyes opened wide
with astonishment.

“ What is Africa like, Mother?” he

said. ‘Did anyone else live there ?”
“Dear me, yes,” answered the
lioness. “All sorts of creatures.

There were antelopes and snakes,
and several of our own relations, and
hosts of others besides.”

The lion cub thought for a little
Then he said, “ Why did you

come here, then, Mother ?”

while.

The lioness growled slightly. From
the next cage there came a loud roar,
waking the two sleeping lion cubs,
and startling the other so much that
he tumbled off his mother’s back.

“Ho, ho, ho!”
‘““T remember! It seemed such a nice
fat young calf, didn’t it?” It was
The lioness

said a deep voice.

the big lion next door.
seemed quite vexed; she had not
known that the lion was listening.
But he had been, and now he seemed
to be in a very good humour, and
went on purring and talking to himself,
but the little lion cubs could easily
hear what he was saying, and paid
the greatest attention.

eV es,”

nice fat young calf, too; I saw it first,

he went on, “and it was a

and I remember thinking that it would
make such a fine dinner for us both.
I never dreamed that there were
hunters about, and it was a trap to

catch us; of course, I was quite young ©
in those days. But it was a trap, and
we were both caught.”

“T needn’t have been caught,”
growled the lioness from the back of .
her cage, “if I hadn’t come to see
what you were doing.”

‘Ah, well,” said the fone Vice
were both of us deceived. And then
they put us into small, strong cages
and took us over the great big water
and brought us here. I often think

of the days when we were free, but

we get along very well here, don’t

we? It’s no use making a fuss about
what you can’t help, and really these
two-legged creaturesare very amusing.”

«“ Yes,” said the lioness, still with a
little growl in her voice, “but one
needn't pretend that one wouldn't
rather be free. Those pumas, now,
are always saying how much better
it is always to live in a cage.”

The lion shook his mane scornfully.
he said. ‘Who would
take any notice of what a puma would
They call themselves ‘friends
They're only friendly

because they daren’t be anything

“Pumas!”

say?
of man!’

else.”

“Do they come from Africa, too,
Mother ?” said the lion cub.

“No, they lived in a place called
America, my dear,” replied the lioness.
‘“ But come, it’s time we went out into
the garden at the back of the house.
So

You must have a little fresh air.”
“THERE WAS THE TIGER” (¢. 12).


12 Animal LAND FoR LirrTLeée PEOPLE.

saying, she stalked through the little
door at the back of the cage and went
out, followed by her cubs, into the
open space beyond.

“Good afternoon,” said a lazy,
sleepy voice from the other side of
the bars. ‘It’s quite a fine day, isn’t
te

The three little cubs all turned
There was the tiger,
stretched out in the sun, looking at

with a start.

them with a sleepy sort of smile.

Of course, it wasn’t a garden really,
it was just a large open-air cage, but
dotted
about all over it, and it certainly

there were rocks and trees

looked very pleasant in the warm
afternoon sunshine.

He was a very handsome fellow
was the tiger, and he evidently knew
it, too. The lioness greeted him
pleasantly, and said with a purr as
stretched herself out on the

ground, “These young people: of

she

mine were just asking me all sorts of
questions; perhaps you can tell them
something interesting that has hap-
pened to you?”

‘““Ee-yow!” yawned the tiger.

“ Do, please,” begged the little lion
cubs, poking their noses against the
bars. “Do you come from Africa,
too?” added the first one.

“No,” answered the tiger, “I come
from India. I used to live in the
jungle.”

“And were you caught in a trap,

too?” said the eager little lion
cub.

““Gr-r-r!” said the tiger, suddenly
“There he

It was an elephant, which
in the

beginning to growl.
goes |”
was slowly walking along
distarice with a number of children on
The tiger looked after him
with a very angry look in his eyes,

his back.

and not until he was quite out of sight
Then he

said to the lioness, ‘“ Excuse me, but

did he become quiet ayain.

. IT never see that fellow without think-

ing how it was one of his relations
eel

I wasn’t full-

that helped to capture me.
shall never forget it.
grown then, and I used to live with
my father and mother and my young
brother in a cosy little home in the
jungle. Most of the men-creatures
who lived near us over there were
brown, you know, not white like the

_ My father
was getting old, and food had become

ones we see over here.
very scarce. One night my father
paid a visit to one of the men-creatures’
villages and brought us home a goat,
and the next night he brought us a
sheep. It seemed very easy to get
food that way, but the men-creatures
didn’t like it, I suppose.”

“Qh, sir,” said the smallest lion
cub, ‘please tell me, did you ever eat
aman?”

The tiger smiled. ‘‘ No,” he said,
“T never did, but my father is

‘Don’t you think we’d better get


Tae Warer-Rar. 1

on with the story?” in the
lioness.

“Well,” said the tiger, “one day
there was a dreadful noise—shouting
and banging of drums and all ‘sorts of

things, and crowds of the brown men

put

came into the jungle, waking us up
out of our afternoon nap. We were

very much startled at first, but my

father told us not to be afraid, and

said he would look after us. Presently
we saw one of those wretched elephants
coming along, and, would you believe
it, he had actually allowed some of
the white men to get into a sort of
castle on his back, where they could
shoot at us in safety! Of course it
was no good. My poor father was

killed, and so was my mother; they

captured me and I was brought here
over the water, and here I have been
ever since.”

The tiger stretched himself out at full
length and yawned again; he seemed
to be quite tired by his long speech.

“Don’t you ever want to be back
again in the jungle?” said one of the
lion cubs.

“Well,” said the tiger, “ sometimes
when it’s cold and damp and foggy, I
do. But it’s fairly comfortable here
on the whole. Now I must wash
And he began to lick his
coat just as a cat does, and the lion

myself.”

cubs, seeing that there was nothing
more to be got out of him that after-
noon, started a game between them-
selves.

The Water=rat. —

E’S such a timid little thing,
However much you try
You can’t get very near to him,
He is so very shy.

He makes himself a little hole
Close to the riverside,

If anyone comes after him
He'll pop in there to hide.

But if the water comes in, too,
He’s very sad at that;

He doesn’t like too much, although
He is a water-rat.

He has such very sharp, brown eyes
And funny, pointed nose;

It doesn’t matter if his coat
Gets wetted, I suppose.

He’s always popping in and out

The water all the day,

And so he hasn’t time to let

His fur dry, I should say.

It must be nice when it is hot
To bathe as much as that,

But when it’s cold I shouldn’t like
To be a water-rat.
14

The Owl.

HEN all the world is fast asleep,
And stars shine in the sky,
And children are all tucked in bed,
Then I awake and fly.

I go to sleep for all the day,

You sleep through all the night;
It seems a funny kind of plan,

But I suppose it’s right.

I cannot bear the light of day,
It’s much too bright for me ;

But when it seems quite dark to you,
Why that’s when I can see.

I fly about through woods and fields
With softly flapping wings,

And catch for. dinner frogs and mice
And other little things.

And sometimes if you wake at night
And see the moon peep through
Your window, you may hear me call—

_“ Tu-whit, tu-whit, tu-whoo!”

The little birds, they know me well,
I think they’re very nice; |
I sometimes catch them if I can,
As well as frogs and mice.

But if they meet me when it’s light
They all set on to me;

And then I have to fly away,
Because I cannot see.

I do not sing like other birds,
I have too much to do;

I only have my one queer cry—
“ Tu-whit, tu-whit, tu-whoo!”

Some people do not like to hear
My hooting in the night ;

I do not think they’d mind it if
They heard it when it’s light.

I do not think I am so wise
As I appear to be,

But some folks think I know a lot,
They're quite afraid of me.

They need not really be afraid :
I could not do them harm,

I only want some cosy place
To keep me safe and warm.

I’m not at all like other birds,
I am a curious fowl; :
Good-night to you! Tu-whit, tu-whoo!
My name is Mr. Owl.
15

The Hyrax.

DON’T suppose you've ever heard
of me: I’m called the hyrax.
Sometimes I’m called the cony, only
that’s a mistake, because a cony is really
only another name for a rabbit, and
I’m not a rabbit at all. I live among
rocks, far away in a country called
Syria. I'am a very nice little person
really, and I eat grass and flowers
and things like that.
toes on my front feet, and only three
on my hind feet.
doesn’t it?

Do you know what some people

I have four

on each hand.
That seems odd,

say about me? They actually say
that I am a relation of the great
big elephant. Well, if I am, I don’t
look very much like it, do I? My
feet are very useful feet, because the
soles have little ridges in them, so
that I can walk straight up a tree,
and I’m quite sure that you can’t
do that, although you have got five
toes on each foot and five fingers
But what use do
you make of your five toes? If you
don’t use them, I don’t see what’s
the good of having them at all.



‘‘T LIVE AMONG ROCKS.”




16

THE ORANG-UTANGS,

Apes and

s HO was that pulled my tail?”

said the cross old monkey sit-
ting in the corner of the cage. “I
won't have my tail pulled, do you

hear? If any one pulls my tail
again, [’]|——”
“Well, what will you do, Cross-

patch ?” said a small brown monkey.
“Do tell us; we should like to

know.” And he threw a nut-shell

at the cross old monkey, hitting him 3

Monkeys. :

on the nose and making him crosser
than ever.

cell complainsito- the: keepers
—“T'll steal all
V’1—T'11—I'll do some-
thing dreadful to you.”

said the old monkey.
your dinners.

‘Oh, go along,” said the little
brown monkey. “ Let’s have a game
at Touch Tails. You're ‘he’!”

And he gave a hard tug at the cross
old monkey’s tail, then darted away
APES AND MONKEYS. rye



“SWUNG TO AND FRO ON THE ROPES.”

up to the top of the cage, with the
old one after him and a number of
other small monkeys after 4772, giving
a pull at his tail every now and then,
till he didn’t know which one to
attack first, and finally gave it up
as a bad job, and retired to his corner
again, jabbering away to himself as
to what he would do, while all the
others danced about with delight and
swung to and fro on the ropes, chuck-
ling with enjoyment.

“What a noise those monkeys do
make, to be sure!” said the chim-

panzee to the orang-utangs. ‘I really
A

think something should be done to
stop them.”
“ Here come some of these little
men-things!” said one of the orang-
“What queer things they
Are they really relations of
ours, do you suppose ?”

utangs.
are!

‘“‘T don’t know,” replied the chim-
panzee, ‘‘but I must say they are
very poor relations, if they are.
Whatever do they put on all those
ridiculous things for?” |

“Yes,” said the eldest orang-
utang. “And what very short arms
they have! I don’t believe they’d
18 AwniraLl LAND FOR LirTLeE PEOPLE.

be any good at swinging about on
trees, do you?”

“Tm sure they wouldn't,” answered
the chimpanzee. “And then their feet!
Do you know they can't use their
feet at all for holding on to anything
Isn’t it silly? They’re
so ashamed of them that they cover
them up in things they call boots; it

as we can?

must be very uncomfortable.”

‘Have you noticed what they do
with nuts?” said the smallest orang-
utang. ‘There was a boy here once
who wanted to eat a nut, and he was
going to crack it in the ordinary way
when his mother said to him, ‘ Don't
do that, my dear; you'll spoil your
teeth!” Just fancy!”

«Ah, but have you ever seen one
of the very small men-things?” said
the chimpanzee.
call

“The things they
They

are the most absurd creatures you ever

‘long-clothes babies’ !
saw in your life. They are covered
with white things (which must get
dreadfully in the way), and they can’t
do a single thing for themselves.
They can’t walk, and they can’t talk,
-and they don’t eat fruits—they just lie
still, and sometimes they feebly kick
about and wave their funny little
arms, and the strange part of it is
that their mothers and fathers seem
quite proud of them.
we're not like that.”

I’m very glad

“So am I,” said the orang-utangs.

“But why do these men-things

wear such a lot of things over their
said the eldest.
“ Oh, they don’t know any better,”

skins 2?”
said the chimpanzee. “You know
they are not nearly so strong as we are.”
“Ah, but they’re very artful, some
of them,” said the eldest orang-utang.
“T should think if they were caught
young, you might be able to teach
them to do quite a lot of tricks.”
“I dare say,” replied the chim-

panzee. ‘Only I expect it would

_ take a lot of trouble and time.”

“Vm glad I’m not a man-thing,”
sane
have to wear

said the youngest orang-utang.
must be horrid to
clothes.” ;

“There are those monkeys again,”
“1 wonder

They

are always up to some game or

said the chimpanzee.
what they are doing now.
other. I declare they are nearly as
foolish as men.”

The monkeys seemed to be all
running after each other, fighting and
squabbling and grabbing at lettuce and
pieces of banana, and making grimaces
at each other, and scolding away until
the chimpanzee could scarcely hear
the sound of its own voice.

“Oh, no,” said the small orang--
utang, who was a kind-hearted little
fellow, ‘“‘they are very foolish, but |
shouldn’t say they were as bad as
that!”

“Well, no, perhaps not,” said the
chimpanzee. .
i.



Q

NZ

A

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‘““ THI LITTLE CALF STARTED AND LOOKED ROUND.”

The Bison.

YTAHE little calf started and looked
round ina fright. “ What’s that
noise, Mother?” he said.

“Why, that’s only the bison, my
dear,” said his mother; “I expect
he'll come over and speak to us
presently. Yes, here he comes!”

“Will he hurt us, Mother?” said

the little calf anxiously. ‘And who
ishhen
“Hurt us? Nonsense!” replied

his mother. “You really must not
be so nervous, my child; remember

we are not common cattle, you and

I and your father; we are really
wild cattle, and we are very rare
indeed, I believe. Here is the bison;
now we will ask him to tell us about
himself, and—why, I declare, there
is the Gayal and her little one. We
shall be quite a party.”

The little calf was very glad indeed
to see the little Gayal, and they soon
became quite friendly, while their
mothers were talking to the bison.
The bison was rather a cross old
chap, but he seemed quite amiable
just now. “g
THe Bison. 21

The Chillingham cow (for that was
6c My
little one was quite alarmed when he

what she was called) began.

heard you butting your head against
the wall,” she said.
that’s nothing to what you could do
if you tried ?”
The bison smiled.

he answered.

‘*But I suppose

“ Qh, dear, no!”
“Why, I was only
just keeping in practice. Now when
I was free’—and here he heaved a
deep sigh—‘‘ we used to have some
grand fights.”

The little Gayal and the Chilling-
ham calf drew nearer.

“Tt was in North America that I
lived,” said the bison, who had now

fairly started. “ We lived on a great
big prairie.”

‘Mother, what's a prairie?” whis-
pered the little calf. “Is it good to
ering 4

“Flush, my dear; don’t interrupt,”
said the mother. “It is a plain—a
sort of very large field without any
fences: or hedges and not such good
grass.’

“There were very many of us
there; we all lived together and_
roamed about just as we pleased, and
then one day the white men came.”

“ Ah,” murmured the Gayal, shak-
ing her ped in Be “White

men—yes |’



‘(THERE IS THE GAYAL AND HER LITTLE ONE'” (9. 20). cS
22 Awnmat Lanp For Lirrze PEOPLE. —

“Of course, I was quite a youngster

at that time,” went on the bison. “I
wasn’t by any means fully grown, so
that I wasn’t able to do much in the
way of fighting; but I saw the elder
"ones do it, and very well they did
it, too, only, of course, they couldn't
They had
But my

stand against the hunters.
guns and things, you know.
uncle made a splendid fight, now.
He was a very strong chap, was my
uncle, and he charged at a man on
a grey horse, and—well, I don’t
think the grey horse liked it very
Emucie a

“And was he caught?” said the
young. Gayal, who had been listening
with great interest.

« Well,” said the bison, ‘‘he wasn’t
exactly caught. You see, our skins
are supposed to be very valuable;
that’s why the white men hunted us,
and my uncle had a very fine skin,
and this white man had a nasty long
knife, and so iy
“Yes, yes, | understand,” said the



Chillingham cow hastily; “but what
happened to yourself?”

“Oh, I. was. taken with several
others,” replied the bison, ‘‘ because
I was quite young, you know; I
don’t think I should be taken quite
so easily now, though.”

“Those must have been exciting
times,” said the Gayal slowly. She
was a very quiet, gentle person, was
the Gayal.

- good-bye, ma’am.

“Weren't you. ever free?” said the
bison.
“Oh, no,” said the Gayal.. “I used
to have to work where I-lived. Of
course, some of my family used to
be free at one time.
I know, was quite wild, but she was

My mother,

captured before I was born; so I
”)
grew up among men.

‘Where that ?”
Chillingham cow.

was said the

“That was in India,” replied the.
Gayal. “It is very hot over there,
and I used to draw wagons all day
I like

being over here very much better.

long and work in the fields.

I don’t have any work to do.”
“When I
Chillingham calf, “I shall run away

am big,” said the
from here, and go and live on a
prairie. I think that must be very
TeCen

“And [Il come with you,” said
the little Gayal. ‘I should like to

see the world, too.”

shes bisonmerunted= ys. idm), aelre
said, “I think perhaps you'd better
stay where you are.” And off he

walked to his own stall.

The Chillingham cow said, “ Well,
I think Id better —
be going. I don’t know that the
bison is a very good person to
(alk (We,

“No,” said the Gayal after a long
pause; “he puts ideas. into the
children’s heads. Good-bye.”


“He charged at a man on a grey horse” (see p. 16).


THE BISON.
24

The Donkey.



““T AM A VERY OLD FRIEND.”

O, there’s nothing strange about
me; I ama very old friend. I’m

sure that all of you know the donkey,
and love him, too. I expect that most
of you have met me at the sea-side
some time or other and had a ride on
my back. People often call me silly and
stupid, and other names like that, but
I'm not quite so foolish as some of
them think I am, or as some of them
and I often have
to put up with a good deal of bad

are themselves,

treatment from some of you men-
But I do put up with it,
and that is why you sometimes say

creatures.

“as patient as a donkey.”

I have known some bad masters
in my time, but I am glad to say that
now I have a very kind one. We
have to go to market every morning,
and quite early he harnesses me to
his little barrow (as he calls it), and
away we go as happy as we can be.
My master doesn’t hit me, because he
knows that I will go much better if I
am treated kindly. -When we get to
market, my master does his business,
but he never forgets to. give me a
carrot, or perhaps a thistle, to eat while
I am so fond of thistles
They

I’m waiting.
—-have you ever tried them?
are very good indeed.

You will come across relations of
mine in many parts of the world.
Some of them are still wild, and
live away from men and gallop about
wherever they please and do just what
they like. I used to think 1 should
like to be wild too, but then that was
when I had a bad master; now, I
wouldn’t miss my trot down to market
in the morning and my. carrot or.
thistle (especially my thistle) for
anything. |

When I lived at the sea-side I used
to enjoy myself, too: I used to go
down on to the sands in the morning
and have my saddle put on: it was not
an ordinary kind of saddle, but it was
made for quite small children, and was
THE DONKEY. 25

really a kind of little basket-chair, and

the children used to be strapped into it:

I was
such a steady donkey that I used to
have the very little ones to ride on me:
how they did like it, to be sure. Of
course I used to go very gently at first
until they got used to me, but some-

so that they couldn’t fall out.

and companions. We arranged who
was to win each time, but the children
never knew anything about it.

There was one little girl, | remem-
very fond of me: she
me sugar which she
would give me out of her hands. She

was a nice little girl.

ber, who was
used to bring



‘‘SOME OF THEM ARE STILL WILD” (, 24).

times I used to begin to trot, and then
_I could hear the children shouting and
laughing and calling out, ‘Gee up,
Neddy !”
races, too: they were great fun; the

And we used to have

children who rode on our backs got
quite excited, but, of course, it was
really all settled by me and my friends

'

But that was a long time ago. I
am getting quite an old donkey now.
Presently I expect I shall be too old
to go to market with my master, and
then he is going to keep me in a field
where I shall have
nothing to do but eat thistles! Isn’t
he a kind master?

all day long,
The Elephant.

LOVE the gentle elephant,
He is so very kind,
He lets me ride upon his back,
He never seems to mind.

He moves along, when once he starts,
With solemn step and slow;
I think, though, that he’d run quite
fast
If he wanted to, you know.

His skin is very, very tough
And crinkled, every bit ;

It is so loose, it looks as if
It really didn’t fit.

His trunk, though, is the queerest
thing
About him that I find:
He seems to have a tail in front
As well as one behind.

I'd like to have a trunk myself
As well as hands and feet.

How everyone would stare at me
When I went down the street !

I don’t know what Id do with it
When I got into bed :

I'd have to cur! it up, I think,
Right underneath my head.

Although the elephant’s so big,
His eyes are very small,

And yet I think that he can see
Us clearly, one and all.

I like to see him have his bath, —
He does enjoy it so ;
Now that is when a trunk would.
be

So very nice, you know.

I'd like to have an elephant
All for my very own:

I’d like to have a baby one
Before he’d fully grown.

I’d keep him in my nursery,
(Whatever would Nurse say ?)

I'd give him buns for dinner, and
I'd play with him all day.

But when he got too big, you know —
I couldn’t keep him then,
Hed take up too much room—l.
think
I'd let him go again. |

Of all the animals 1 know—
Lions, tigers, and the rest—
The elephant’s my favourite,
I think I like him best.




“HE LETS ME RIDE UPON HIS BACK” (4%. 26).


“MRS.

The | Best

“4 RE you going to the meeting,
Z Mother ?” said the little Gnu.

“Of course I am,” said Mrs. Gnu.
« But what that old Moose is thinking
about to come, I don’t know.”

The antelopes were going to hold
a meeting to decide, if they could,
who was the best among them all.
They were all making their way from
various parts, and very pretty some
of them looked.

Mrs. Gnu and young Master Gnu
took up a good position, and the
meeting began.

First of all, the Eland (he was the
biggest of the antelopes) got up and
said that before they began to settle
the question, he would like to know
why the Moose was there. He wasn't
an antelope at all, and as the meeting

GNU AND YOUNG MASTER

GNU.”

Antelope. S

was confined to antelopes, he must
ask him kindly to retire.

Then the Moose got very angry.
Of course, he ought not to have been
there at all, but he didn’t mind.
He said that he thought they were
going to decide who was best, and
didn’t know they were going to keep
it entirely to antelopes; of course, he
would go directly, because he didn’t
want to have anything to do with
such persons; but he would like to
know before he went if any one of
them would care to come outside and
fight him; he was quite willing to
meet them if they were; he had
done a good bit of fighting in his
time; he had been able to settle
three or four wolves all at once, and he
thought he could manage any antelope.
Twe Best ANTELOPE. 29



“HE HAD BEEN ABLE 10 SETTLE THREE OR FOUR WOLVES” (f. 28).

No one seemed inclined to accept
Jhis invitation, so the Moose retired
from the. meeting, and every one
‘seemed very glad when he was gone.

Then they all began to talk at

once, and it was some time before
the Eland could restore order so as
to make himself heard. When they
were a little quieter he explained
how they had all met there that
30 Awnirat Lanpd ror Lirrre PEOPLE.

morning to decide a very important
thing: who was the best of the
antelopes. Those who thought they
ought to be heard could make a
short speech, and after that they
would vote. ‘Of course,’ he said
at the end, “I don’t suppose that
anyone will want to speak, because
it is quite clear that the best antelope
is the biggest antelope, and as I am

the biggest, therefore I am the best.”



THE WATER BUCK.

But there was a tremendous uproar
at this, and the Sable antelope jumped
up directly. He didn’t agree with
the Eland, he said; he didn’t think
it mattered at all how big a person
was (here all the Gazelles said “ Hear,
hear,” very loudly); he thought that
the best meant the one who was
prettily marked, had good horns, and
could run very fast; and he didn’t
think that anybody could doubt that
he was best.

Then a little antelope with four
horns got up. He had two very small
horns in front of the ordinary ones.
He was of the opinion that the
antelope who had most horns was
clearly the best, and he would be |
glad to know whether anyone in the
meeting had more than four horns;
if so, he would vote for him.

The Water Buck, who came next,
didn’t think that horns mattered very

much, though, of course, it. was
better to have them; but that one
was best who was graceful and
gentle, and didn’t put himself for-
ward in any way.

“You're all wrong,” said the
Koodoo antelope; “none of you
knows anything about it. Now it

all depends upon the name: nobody
has such a splendid name as I have;
think of it— Koodoo—why, it’s
perfectly clear that I am the best
antelope.”

“That's rubbish,” said one of the
Gazelles ; “nobody cares about names.
Now, it’s my opinion that an antelope
should be small and graceful, with nice
horns (not too long, but just long
enough), and large eyes, and slender
legs, and what more do you want ?”

“Pll tell you what you want,” said
another of the Gazelles : “just look at
me. Well,

it’s very artful; when I’m on the sand

Do you see my colour?

at home, you know, you could scarcely
see I was there because I’m so like






THE SABLE ANTELOPE
32 Awimat Lanp ror Lirrite Peorte.

it in colour. That makes one so safe,
you know; I think colour should
count for something.”

“And speed,” said the Springbok ;
“speed means a great deal.”
the

too,’ said

Rocky Mountain goat.

“And jumping,

Then everyone began to speak at
once again and nobody could hear a
word of what anyone else said for
several minutes.

At last they were all quiet and the
Eland got up “We
come to a vote,” he said. ‘I think
that
speeches.

again. must
we have had quite enough
Will everyone kindly now
vote for the antelope he considers
to be the best ?”

The method of voting was rather
funny. Each antelope went to a little
corner by himself and found a flat,
smooth place in the sand, and then he



wrote on it with his foot the name
of the one he thought best.

The Eland and the Sable antelope
then went round to count the votes.
This took a very long time, as there
were a good many antelopes present.

As they went on the Sable antelope
and the Eland seemed to grow very
much amused at something, and by
the time they had finished they were
both laughing until the tears rolled
down their cheeks.

The others all crowded round to
hear the result.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” said the.
Eland as soon as he could speak for

laughing. “Iam sorry to say that the

- question is still unsettled. Everyone
has voted for himself, so nobody has
got more than one vote. So, ladies

and gentlemen, each one of you is the

best antelope.”
oo



‘““THEY TEACH THEM ALL SORTS OF TRICKS” (f. 34).

Seals and

AR away up in the North among
the ice and snow, where the
summer is nothing but one long day
and the winter is only one long night,
there lived a family of seals—a father
seal, a mother seal, and a little baby
seal.

They were very happy together, and
the little baby seal used to enjoy him-
self very much; he used to swim about
in the water and have all sorts of games
with other little seals who lived close
by, and sometimes he used to go on
land and lie on the rocks by his
mother, and she would tell him stories

of what happened to her when she was
Cc

Sea= Lions.

a little seal. And the story he liked
best of all was what he called the
“Man Story.” He used to say to his
mother, “Tell me the Man _ Story
again, Mother,” and his mother would
say, ‘“ Why, I've told you that so many
times, dear ; wouldn’t you like a new
one?” But the little seal would say,
“No, I want the Man Story, Mother ;.
I like that best.”

Then the mother seal would begin :
‘Long, long ago when I was quite a
little baby seal

‘As little as me, Mother?” the
little seal would ask.



“Yes, smaller than you are now,
34

*

my dear,” the mother would say. “I

used to live here with my father and

mother, and one day, as we were all
swimming about in the sea, we saw a
great big thing likea rock, only itseemed
to have wings, come sailing along on
the top of the water. I learnt after-
wards that it was called a ship. Well,
presently it came nearer and nearer
and then it stopped, and then a little
ship (which is called a boat) was let
down into the water and it came swim-
ming along towards us all and we heard
the most beautiful music coming from
it. . Now you know we all like music
very much, so we swam nearer to the
boat to listen, and when we got quite
close we saw that there were some
funny-looking creatures sitting in the
boat.” c
‘Oh, those were men, weren't they,
Mother ?” the little seal would say.
“Yes, dear,” said the mother seal;
“they seemed to be quite friendly, and
they made the beautiful music for us,
and we thought how kind it was of
them to come. But that night we
noticed that some of our friends were
missing, and we didn’t know what had
become of them. At last, one night,
my father didn’t come home. He had
been out to listen to the music, and we
waited and waited, and he didn’t come
back, so my mother set out to look for
him. After along time (as it seemed
to me) she came back, and she was in
a great state of mind. She told me

AnimaL Lanpd For LirTLeE PEOPLE.

that my father would never come
home any more—he had been taken
away by those men; it was they
who had taken all our friends. Some
of them had been killed—it seemed
that the men wanted their skins to
make extra skins for themselves—
and others had been taken alive and
They had
captured my father—I am glad to
say he wasn’t killed—and there were

shut up in the ship.

numbers of seals on the ship, and
sea-lions too, our great big cousins,
and they were all going to be taken
away to the far, far south.”

‘““And what were the men going
to do with them, Mother ? ” the little
seal would say, though he knew the
answer quite well.

“They would take them away to
a far country, and there they would
put them into a sort of cage and
keep them there. I believe they
treat them very well; they teach
them all sorts of tricks—even the
sea-lions—and they give them water
to swim in and fish to eat, but we
never see them again.”

“Ts that all of the Man Story,
Mother?” the little seal would say.

“Ves,

answer.

dear,” the mother would
‘“The men haven't come
again, and if they did, we should
know better now, and shouldn’t go
near them to be caught.”

“No,” said the little seal, “I shall

never be caught by men.”


EA-LION.

THE S$


‘WE FELT RATHER FRIGHTENED AT FIRST” (fg. 37).

Sheep.

/{\HERE was very great excite-

ment among the wild sheep.
The lambs were running about, jump-
ing off and on the big rock in the
middle of their garden and racing

round and round and rubbing their

heads against the bars.

“ Mother,” said one, running up to
an elderly sheep, with long horns,
“* what think? A little
girl came and stood opposite our

do you

cage just now, Mother, and she

said ‘

“Yes, Mother,” put
“she did, really; wasn’t it too bad?”

‘And we aren’t, are we?” said a
third.

The elder sheep gently butted at
them with her horns. ‘“ You foolish
little things,” she said ; ‘‘I don’t know
what she did say yet!



in another,

Don’t speak

all at once! One at a time, and
SHEEP. BT

then perhaps I can answer your
questions.”

‘“Well, Mother,” said the first, “she ©

was standing outside looking at us,
and we felt rather frightened at first,
but she had some bread and gave us
some, so of course we came quite near;
and then she said, ‘Aren't they dear
And when she
said that, we all ran away as fast as we
We didn't like to be called
goats, and we aren't goats, are we,
Mother ?”

“No, my. dear,” said the elder
sheep; “the little girl didn’t know
Sh

little goats, Nurse ?’

could go.

what she was talking about.
thought, I suppose, that because we
have horns we must be goats. It’s
very surprising that some of these
people don’t know more things. Goats,
indeed! I should think not!” And
the mother
seemed quite cross.
“Why, they'll be say-

ing that the mouflons

sheep

are antelopes next!”

“Who are the
mouflons, Mother ?”
said the biggest of
the lambs.

“They live close
by here, my dears,”
said the mother ;
“they’rethewildsheep
of Corsica and Greece.
We come from Bar-
bary, you know.”

“What are tame sheep like,
Mother?” said one of the lambs.
“Ugh! Great, fat, stupid, white

things,” said the mother; “no horns,
no beards; they just lie on the grass
all day, never run up rocks and jump
about as we do, ugh!”

“ But they don’t live in a cage, do
they, Mother?” said the biggest
lamb. ’

“What a silly question to ask!”
said the elder sheep. ‘I’m sure it’s
very nice in this cage! What more
do you want ?”

The lambs said no more, but trotted
off and began to play hide-and-seek
seine

smallest of them, when it was left all

round the rock in the middle.

alone, looked out beyond the bars and
said, “I think it must be rather nice
to lie on the grass sometimes!”



THE MOUFLONS,
The Polar Bear.

NAHE polar bear, when he’s at home,
Lives among ice and snow ;
You'll often find him, so I’m told,
A-sitting on a floe.

I don’t know what a floe may be,
It must be something queer,
They haven’t got them at the shops
Or anywhere round here.

And so the polar bear is sad,
At least, he seems to be,

Because he hasn’t any floes
Where he can sit, you see.

He often, too, must find it hot,
We sometimes make a fuss.

‘But then it must be hot for him
When it is not for us.

He always wears that big, white coat,
Winter and summer, too;

He hasn't any thinner things
To wear, like me and you.

But when he wants to have a bath
He goes and swims about,

And doesn’t have to dry himself
As soon as he comes out.

He’s very fond of fish, I think
He thinks it’s very nice,

But always, I suppose, he’d like
To finish with an ice.

It must be very strange for him
To live with us, you see;

It must be very different
From where he used to be,

For we don’t have an iceberg here
Where he can go and play ;

It doesn’t snow here all the time,
I’m very glad to say.

I wonder what he thinks of us;
He must think we are queer ;

When there’s no snow and ice about,
He can’t like to be here.

He doesn’t, like the other bears,
Climb up a pole for buns ;
He just lies still or walks about,

He scarcely ever runs.

I'd like to be an elephant.
And make the people stare,
But, on the whole, I do not think
I'd be a polar bear.
7 aac AE AE ROI AN pm

38).

2:

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“JT WONDER WHAT




40

Bears. -

YÂ¥\HE sloth bears were very sleepy
—there was no doubt about it.

They lay at the bottom of their cage
and wouldn’t speak a word to the
brown bear next door, although he
was most anxious to have a little
conversation with them, because they
were new arrivals, and he didn't
know anything about them. :

«How do you feel now?” he
asked very kindly. But they only
gave a sort of grunt.

““Where do you come from?” he
went on. Grunt again.

“Don’t you think it’s very hot?”

No answer.

“Would you
eat tes

One of their ears waggled a little.

“What would you like? Meat?

or buns?”

like something to

The large sloth bear opened one
eye and said, “Ants!” then went
to sleep again.

The brown bear was disgusted.
He walked away and sat down in the
corner of the bear-pit and thought
it all over.

‘“Whatever could they mean ?” he
said to himself.
eat ants! It’s perfectly ridiculous!
Now if it had been honey I could
And then being
sleepy in weather like this, too!

“Fancy wanting to

have understood it.

want me to do;

It's such a silly time to
sleep; of course, all sensible people

go to

go to sleep in the winter-time, when
it's very cold and there’s no food
to be got; but this warm weather
There’s
something funny about those two,
I’m sure. They look quite untidy, -
I don’t suppose they ever
They’re nearly

is just what is wanted.

too ;
comb their fur out.
as bad as the llamas or the moulting
hyenas. I don't think I’m very
glad they've come next door. Hallo!
What's that?” Something had fallen
down on the ground from above,
and on sniffing it he discovered that
it was a piece of bun. He swallowed
it, and looked up to see where it
had come from.

Some people were looking over
the railings which ran round the top
of the bear-pit, and one of them, a
little boy, was making signs, and
holding out another piece of bun.

“Oh, yes,” said the brown bear to
himself, leaning lazily against the
side of the pit and looking up at
the small boy. “I know what you
you want me to
climb up that pole and fetch the
bun. But I don’t think I shall; it’s
too hot, and then perhaps it isn’t a
very good kind of bun.”

The little boy waved the bun
BEARS. 4I

about, and threw down a small piece.
The brown bear slowly rose and
and the little boy
jumped about and called out, ‘‘ He's
going to climb now!

picked it up,

He's going
to climb up now!”

“Shall 1?” thought the brown
bear, and he put one paw on the
the little boy could
scarcely hold himself in for joy;

pole, while
“it would be a long way
up”—he stood guite still—
‘Snow dont. thing . will
and he went and sat down
again by the wall, and the
little boy very nearly began to
cry, he was so disappointed.
“Couldn’t - you bring it

me?”

-said the
But the little
boy didn’t understand; he

thought the bear was only

down to
brown bear.

growling, and I don’t think
that he would have considered
it a good plan if he had
understood.

Just then the keeper ap-
peared with some pieces of
meat, and held one out on
the end of a stick.

The brown bear looked up.

“ Ah,” he said, “ now that’s
a different thing altogether!”



He was up the pole in no time, right
up to the top, and leaning back as far
as he could to get the meat. The
little boy was delighted.

When the meat was all finished,
and the keeper had gone away, the
brown bear got down, and sat by
the wall, licking his lips.

“Ves,” he said to himself, ‘ that

. x " ”
was something worth going up for.

“HE WAS UP THE POLE IN NO TIME,”
The Camel.

F course you know who I am?

I am the camel—and a very fine
camel, too, I expect you'll say, and
you'll be quite right. You see that I
have two humps on my back? Well,
we haven’t all got two, some poor

near, please, then I sha’n’t feel so



much inclined to

Hot, do you call it? Why, dear
me, I wonder what you'd say if you
went to the land where I came from.

Now there it was warm sometimes



“WE USED TO START OUT ON A JOURNEY,’

camels have only one; it’s the very
extra-fine ones who have two humps.

Why do I wear this muzzle on my
nose? Well, I think it looks rather
nice, don’t you? What’s that you
say? Bite? Oh dear me, no! I
wouldn’t think of such a thing! I’m
as quiet and gentle as a ebutel
don’t think you'd better come quite so



certainly. We used to start out
on a journey across the desert, where
you know there is nothing but sand,
hot, burning sand, sand for days
and days and days; sometimes
you see a tree, but not often, and
all the time the sun shines overhead
and tries to make everything as hot as

he possibly can. Ah, I think perhaps


» 42)

(7

M THE CAMEL”

IA

‘i
44.

you'd say it was hot there! But here,
why it’s nothing! You always have
shady places here where you can lie
down and rest, and there seems to be
plenty of water about. Do you
know what they call me besides the
camel? They call me the Ship of the
Desert—and I think it’s a very good
name, too. Some people say that
when they ride on me they feel sea-
sick just as they do when they are on
board ship. I can carry a great deal
on my back; I’m sure I’m _ useful.
And I have one very good thing
about me. When I’m going for one
of those long journeys over the hot,
dry sands, I can go for a long time
without having any water at all. How
would you like that? To be for
days without
anything else ?

Ah,

you'd never do to be acamel, I can see.

get very thirsty, wouldn't you ?

I can go very fast, too, when I like.
You see I have such fine, long legs.
He’s a sort of
cousin of mine. He's a smaller, lighter

The dromedary ?

chap than I am altogether; he can’t

The Hippopotamus

GH!” grunted the big hippo-
“] think I shall havea
bath. Oh, dear me, I feel so sleepy (2
And he opened his mouth and gave

potamus.

a tremendous yawn.

a drink of water or |
I expect you would.

Animal Lanp ror Lirrte Peorre.

carry nearly as much. Indeed he’s
generally used for people to ride on
him, he doesn’t do much carrying of
luggage. Now you should just see
me when I’m fairly loaded. First of
all I have to kneel down so that they
can get the things on to my back; if
I didn’t do that, they’d have to get a
pair of steps or a ladder, I suppose.
Weil, they pile up the things on the

top of me and fasten them on, and

then, when everything is ready, we

start, and I look like a great, big tent
with legs walking along.
I have a will of my own, of course.

say
temper, but that’s when they want me

Some people its a nasty
to do something that I don’t want to,
and when I don't want to do anything
I don’t do it.

Egypt is the name of the place that
I come from: if ever you go there, you'll
see some of my friends and relations,
expect:

Now they are going to take my
muzzle off to give me some dinner, so
I think perhaps you had better get a
little further off. Good-morning!

and the. Rhinoceros.

“Well!” said a deep, gruff voice
from the other side of the railings.
“Well! If I had a mouth as large
and as ugly as that, I would keep it
shut, at any rate.”
Tweé FTipPoPpoTAuUS AND THE RHINOCEROS. A5

It was the rhinoceros next
door. The hippopotamus
and he didn’t get on very well
together ; indeed, they were
always quarrelling, so that
it was just as well that there
were bars between them.

The hippopotamus turned
round angrily. “ Ugly?” he
said. “Who are you calling
ugly? I am sure I’m just
as pretty as you are, with
that great horn sticking out
I don’t think

it looks at all nice.”

of your nose.

“* H’m!” said the rhino-
ceros. ‘‘l don’t care if it
doesn't. It’s been very use-

ful to me all the same.”

“Well,” returned the hip-
popotamus, “and so has my
If it had
been any smaller, I shouldn't
have been able to get it round, for it
was rather a large boat.”

‘© Whatever
about ?”

mouth, so there!

are you talking
demanded the rhinoceros.
“‘Look here! Let’s stop quarrelling
for a bit, and you shall tell me your
story and I'll tell you mine. Fire
away!”

“ Ah, that’s just what the men did,”
said the hippopotamus. “We were
all swimming in the river, when they
came down in their boat. It was

what they call a canoe (so the flamin-

goes told me), and most of the men in



“HE OPENED HIS MOUTH ” (/. 44).

it were black ; but there was one white
man who had a curious stick in his
hand which he every now and then
would point at some bird or animal,
and then he made fire come out of the
stick, and the bird or animal generally
got hurt.

“T lay in the water watching them
when, all at once, the white man
pointed his stick at my brother, and
before you could say ‘crocodile’ my
brother was floating away down the
stream with a bullet in his head. The
men in the boat paddled away after
46

him, but that was more than I could
stand, so I went afterthem. I saw
the white man point his stick at me,
but I dived in time and came up just
beside. them; then it was that my
mouth came in so handy. I just
opened it quite wide and then I closed
it again, and, well, somehow the boat
was upset and the men were all kick-
ing about in the water, splashing and
shouting and making no end of a fuss.
But I let them go that time, I only
wanted to give them a lesson. Now
it's your turn. How did your horn
come in useful ?”

‘“Oh, my adventure was on land, of
course,” said the rhinoceros, who had
been much interested in the hippo’s
story. ‘I was snoozing one afternoon

at home when I heard a curious noise,

and I saw some of those black men you _

talk about, followed by a white one on
a horse. Well, before I had time to do
or say anything, the white man pointed
his gun at me (that’s what they call
the stick that the fire comes out of)
and the next moment I felt a bullet

AwnimaLt Lanp ror Lirrte PEOPLE.

knock against my side. Of course it
didn’t hurt me—that’s the advantage
of having a skin like mine ; but it made
me very angry. So I just got up and
ran at the gentleman on the horse ; he
was very much surprised, and so was
the horse, especially when I gave him
a prod with this horn of mine. He
turned right round and galloped away
as fast as he could go, with the black
men after him. Of course I didn’t
take the trouble to run after them.

‘But you see, my horn does come in

useful sometimes.”

“Ugh!” grunted the hippopotamus.
“T suppose it does. But it isn’t pretty,
all the same.”

“Well, anyway it’s better than your
mouth,” replied the rhinoceros, getting
angry again.

1»

“But I can swim!” said the hip-

popotamus.

“But you haven't got such a
tough skin as I have,” replied the
rhinoceros. And they went on

quarrelling until the keeper came
with their dinner.

The Hedgehog.

TTAHE hedgehog is a funny chap:
He is quite short and small,
And when he’s startled he will roll
Into a prickly ball.

And then he’s like a pincushion:
You cannot touch him then.
He waits until you’ve gone away,

Then he unrolls again.


“IT WAS THE RHINOCEROS NEXT DOOR” (4. 45).
ae!



‘© HE'S VERY USEFUL IN THE HOUSE.”

He’s very useful in the house.
We had one, so | know,

He ate up the black-beetles
Wherever he would go.

Aniat Lanp ror Lirrie PEOPLE.

I often used to play with
See itn
Whenever he’d come out ;
{ used to love to see him
come
And poke and run about.

But if our Toby barked at
him,

Or Puss came walking by,

He'd make himself into a ball

Beforeyou’d wink youreye.

He wasn’t very nice to stroke
Or curl up in your lap,

But I was very fond of him,
The funny little chap..

The Mole.

HE mole was very busy, working
away as if everything depended

on his finishing what he was. doing
directly. He was really very hungry
and was looking. about for his dinner.
“Excuse me a moment,” ‘he said,
“but. I thought I smelt a worm; |
must have him.” And he scraped
away the earth, digging a hole in
a wonderfully short time and dis-

‘appearing into the ground. Presently

eal
“he wasn't at
Now what is it
you want to know? Am I really
blind? Oh dear, no! I’ve got eyes,

he popped up his head again.
got him,” he said;
all a bad worm.

though perhaps they are rather small
—still they're good enough for me.
You see I do most of my work, under-
neath the ground and at night time, so
that I don’t want to see very much.
Yes, I like worms best to eat, but
when I can’t get worms, why then
small birds or frogs or mice or things
like that do just as well.

‘I’m sorry I can’t take you and snow
you my house, for I’ve taken a great
deal of pains over it. Of course,
you've seen it from the outside—you
call it a mole-hill, I think—but inside
it's very beautiful; it has all sorts of
passages and tunnels and _galleries,.


“TI just got up and ran at the gentleman on the horse” (see g, 40).
THE ow

and is really very well built, though
perhaps I should not say so.

“.’m sorry to say that farmers

don’t seem to like me at all.. They
say that I spoil their gardens and
fields by my digging, but I don’t see
what else I’m to do; indeed, I
don’t think I could do any- |
thing else but dig. Spade?
“Oh no, I don’t want any
spade as long as I’ve got
my front paws.
“Tm a very good fighter,

too. I have very sharp teeth
and can bite very hard when
I like. Hush!” The mole

stopped short, then he began
to dig away as fast as he
could. “1 must go,” he said,

between the digs. “I hear

49
an owl, -[-cant bear owls!”
By this time-he was nearly buried
under the earth, and just as he disap- —
peared there came a “tu-whit, tu-
whoo,” and a great barn-owl came
flying by, evidently on the look-out

for supper. It was a narrow escape.



“HE BEGAN TO DIG.”

The Giraffe.

AM a giraffe and my name is
Daisy. I come from a hot
country a long way off, called Africa :
~I am quite grown-up now and shall
Don’t you think
1 do.
There is no other animal which is
as tall as I am; I am taller than the
elephant or the camel, but of course |
am not as strong as the elephant is.
You need not be at all afraid of me,
because I will not hurt you. No,

thank you, I do not want to eat you up
D

not get any bigger.
I am big enough as I am?

at all; I should not like to eat little
boys and girls; indeed, I don’t think I
could if I tried, and I am sure | do
I eat leaves and
grass and hay and things like that: I

not want to try.

can reach the leaves of the trees
because I have such a long neck.
One day a lady came to see me
here and she had some very nice-
looking green things on the top of her -
head, and I thought that I would like
to eat them as they looked so nice; so
I just bent my head over the top of
50 AwimaL Land FoR LirrLteE PEOPLE.

the bars of my cage and took a bite at
them. But they were not at all nice
really, and the lady made such a fuss!
She thought I was going to eat her
up, I believe. I heard afterwards
that the things I had eaten were the
flowers on her hat, and they were not
real flowers at all. I don't think
people ought to have such things
in their hats if they don’t want us
Of course, 1 thought
them

to eat them.
that the lady had brought

on purpose for~me, so I didn’t see.

why I shouldn't eat them. But I
don’t think that lady will come quite
close to my cage again.

I lived here alone for quite a long
time, beéause they could not get a
playmate for me. You see, there are
not nearly so many of my family now
as there used to be, and then we don’t
like travelling over the sea at all. But
now I have a playmate and he is a
very nice little chap; of course he is
not as fine and big as I am, but he
will grow up in time and I shall be
very glad to have some company.

I can really run quite fast when I
have room, but here there isn’t room
enough; and I don’t very much mind,
because I’m quite content to walk
about gently, thank you. And then [|
have to take great care of my health,
you know, because I’m rather delicate
and not like the ostrich, who seems
to be able to eat almost anything,
Why, he tells me that he is very fond

of rusty nails, and as for pennies and
half-pennies he considers them most
It’s a very funny sort of
No, it’s no good for

delicious.
taste, I think.
you to offer me nuts, thank you,
because I couldn’t crack them.

My horns, were you asking about ?
We all have horns, both gentlemen
and lady giraffes, but they are always
quite small, like mine. They’re not
much use to us, you know, for when
we want to fight anyone we use our
feet—we can give very strong kicks
with our fore-feet if we like. But, on
the whole, we don’t like fighting ; we
find that it’s much safer to run away
—you see we can run so fast that
there are not many creatures who
can catch us.

Do you see that they have put iron
bars round the trees in my garden?
What do you think that is for? Well,
if they didn’t we should strip all the
bark off the trees, and I suppose the
trees wouldn’t like it. I am, as I
have said, very particular about my~
food and I don't like thorns or
thistles, so when I come acrossa plant
with prickly thorns on it, I carefully
pick off the leaves with my tongue and
leave the thorns behind. I don’t
believe you could do that with your
tongue, but mine is a very useful
tongue and I shouldn't like to change
it with anybody. I sometimes find it
rather awkward to get anything on
the ground which is just between my




“DON'T YOU THINK I AM BIG ENOUGH?” (4. 49).
52

front feet; I have to put my legs very
wide apart and then bend down my
neck. like this. I suppose it does
look rather funny, so I don’t mind if
you do laugh at me. But then, you

know, you look just as funny to me,

with your very small legs and no neck

at all to speak of, and no horns and
no tail; I sometimes wonder how you
can get on at all.

AnmaLt LAND FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.

I come. of a very old family, you
know; I believe that you men have
known about me for a very long
time. ;

If you will excuse me now, I think
I will go in, as I am rather afraid of |
catching cold ; it wouldn’t do for me to

get a sore throat or a stiff neck, would ~

it? Goodbye! I’m so pleased to
have met you. ;

The Wolves.

E was very cold. The ground was
frozen quite hard, all the streams
were covered with ice, and the whole
land was white with snow.
The wolves were very hungry.
They had had -nothing to eat for

days and days, and they were very-

cross.

“When shall we have some din-
ner, Father ?” whined the little wolves.
“Bring us something to eat soon,
Father. We are so very hungry.”
And Grey-fur, the poor- father wolf,
didn’t know what to say. But that
evening, as they were all lying close
together trying to keep warm and
not to feel hungry, there came a
young wolf with a message that the
whole pack of wolves were going to
have a hunt the next day, and would
Grey-fur come with them. Of course,
Grey-fur said he would, and some

“must wait until

of the little wolves begged very hard
to be allowed to come too, but-their
father said they were too small; they
they were grown
up; but he promised to bring back
with him a part of whatever was
caught.

The next day, in the afternoon,
he started out, and went towards
the forest where he was to meet the -
other wolves, and as he was going,
he joined another friend, and then
another and then another, and soon,
when they came to the place where
they were all to meet, they saw that
a very large number of wolves were
gathered together.

They were’all growling and talking
to each other, and evidently very
hungry and eager to be off, only no
one seemed to know where they were

going to exactly: Presently there


“They passed something lying on the ground” (see . 47).
THe Wotves. 53

was a call for silence, and a large
wolf stepped forward, whom Grey-fur
knew to be the leader of the pack.
He did not.make a long speech.
“Brothers, . he said,“ are- you
hungry ?”

What a howl there was, to be
sure! —

“Very well,” said the large wolf;
“then follow me!” And he turned
and began to trot slowly through the
wood. The other wolves threw up
their heads and yelped for joy and
bounded after him, pressing round
him and eagerly asking questions.
But the old leader would tell them
nothing; he said, ‘Wait and see,
brothers! Wait and see!” ;

Grey-fur wondered very much to
himself where they were going. After
a time he saw that the wood was
getting clearer—there were not so
many trees; presently there were no
trees at all, they- were out in the
open fields, which stretched away in
front of them all covered with snow,
far, far away—as far as they could
see. Grey-fur wondered more than
ever. He knew that wolves very
seldom left the forest; they didn’t
Wet
here was the leader going straight

care, as a rule, for open fields.

on—he seemed to know where he’

was going, any way.
Just at first some of the wolves
seemed to be rather uneasy, but the

old leader didn’t stop a moment—.

he kept up a steady trot across the

snow, and the .others followed him
in a long, straggling line.

_Grey-fur had never been so far
away from the forest before. What

could they be going to catch? It

was beginning to get dark by now,
although it was not very late, but
it was in the middle of winter, and
the-sun had gone to bed early.

Presently the old leader stopped
for a moment, sniffed at the ground,
then threw up his head and howled
and started on again. Grey-fur
sniffed the ground, too, and saw a
little hole in the snow as he passed,
then another and another—and then
quite a long line of them, and he
knew what they were; they were
footsteps of men! They were on a
road, and the old leader was taking
them to a village. He was evidently
going to see if he could not get
something there. Grey-fur saw it all
at once—they were going to attack
the village; perhaps they might find
a stray sheep or goat, but it was very
bold. Hehad never done this before,
but he thought to himself that there
were a good many others with him,
and he certainly was very hungry,
and there were his little ones at home,
too, so he ran on with the rest.

In a little while he saw some lights
twinkling in the distance; then they
passed something lying on the ground,

and found it was an old coat which
54

had belonged to one of the villagers.
They must be very close now.

After they had gone on a little
further, the old leader stopped, and
all the other wolves gathered round
nines Now, he said, “each one
must find his dinner for himself!
Down there,’ and he pointed to the
twinkling lights, “there are sheep
and goats and pigs and fowls, but,
remember, there are also men and
dogs! Let each one go his own way
and find what he can!” Then he
darted off like a shot and was lost
in the darkness. |

Grey-fur hesitated for a moment,
then he, too, set off. He ran until
he came close to a cottage, where
he saw a light burning in the window,

and at the back of this he heard a

AwnruaL LAND FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.

clucking noise, and he knew that
there were cocks and hens. Quietly
he crept round, and just over a

low wall he saw quite a lot of fowls

on their perches. ~““hlere is” my
dinner,’ said Grey-fur to himself,
and in less than no time he had

jumped over the wall and was right |
in amongst the fowls.

Just then, from the front of the
house, there came the sound of loud
barking of dogs and the shouting of
men, and almost directly the whole
village was awake, and everyone was
looking after his property.

But Grey-fur was off by this time,
running home as fast as he could
go, and that evening the little wolves
had a good dinner. They were very
fond of a good fat hen for dinner.

The Kangaroo.

HAT is this funny-looking thing ?
Whatever does it do?
Why, everybody knows this is
The. hopping kangaroo.

His front feet are quite short, you
know,
His hind legs very long ;
And if he were to fight with you
You'd find him very strong,

Then he has an enormous tail,
It must get in the way,

°

I wouldn’t like to drag a thing
Like that about all day.
He looks so funny when he
hops, ;
You'd think he must upset ;
I'd rather like a kangaroo

To keep him for’a pet.

But if I had one, I would have
A lady kangaroo,

Because they are the funniest.
What do you think they do ?
THE HOPPING KANGAROO.


56 : AwimaL Land FoR LirtTLeE PEOPLE.

They have a funny little bag
And pop their babies in it,

And there they are quite safe and snug
In less than half a minute.

You see the mother kangaroo
Go hopping round about,

And from the funny little pouch
The little one looks out.

And there it stops quite quietly—
It must be snug and warm,

It knows its mother will not let
It come to any harm.

Then when there is no danger near
The little one jumps out,

And while its mother takes a rest
It hops and plays about.

I'd like to be a kangaroo—
A little one, I mean ;

For such delightful travelling
I’m sure I’ve never seen.

It’s better than an omnibus,
And nicer than a tram,

And I am sure it’s easier
Than a mail-cart or a p’ram.

And so, although he looks so queer,
I like the kangaroo ;

It must be very nice to hop
Like him, I think, don’t you?

The Zebra.

*“(\OOD-MORNING!”’ said the
X giraffe, looking through the bars
into the next compartment. ‘‘‘ Might
-I ask who you are? You're quite a
new arrival, I think, aren’t you?”
~The animal next door nodded his
head. ‘‘ Yes,” he said.

-been here two or three days, and

“T’ve only

I'm so lonely.”

“Oh, you'll soon get used to it,”
said the giraffe, kindly. “I suppose
you've generally had company? By-
the-bye, you didn’t tell me your
name.”

“T’m the zebra,” said the next door

animal, who seemed to be very glad
to talk to someone. ‘‘ Of course when
I was at home I always went about
with a lot of others, and very fine
times we used to have, too. But that’s
all over now, so we'd better not talk
about it.” s

“Oh, yes,” said the giraffe, “it will
do you good to tell me all about it.
Whereabouts did you live? Were
there many of you? Are you the

only one of your kind? I mean, are

there other sorts of zebras 2?”

“Ves,” said the zebra, “there are
two or three cousins of mine who are
THE ZEBRA. 57

rather different from me in the matter
of stripes. I’m afraid there are not
so many of us as there used to be.

You see we are hunted a good deal
for the sake of our coats, I suppose.
They are rather pretty, aren’t they ?”

“Him!” said the giraffe, looking

very critically through the bars. “I
don’t know that I altogether care for
those stripes myself, | like something
rather more irregular ; one doesn’t get
so tired of the pattern. But there’s
no accounting for tastes.’

. “No, indeed,” said the zebra, rather
warmly, ‘and how anyone can think
that a neck like that is beautiful I
don’t know.” . ~

‘Oh, come,” said the giraffe, “don’t
you be impudent, young ~
man. You're only a sort
of donkey after all, you
know. But there,
mustn’t begin to quarrel
- or people will think we’re

we

as bad as the monkeys :
they’re always squabbling
and fighting among them-
You didn’t tell
me where you came from,
after all.”

“Oh, didn’t I?” said
“You asked

so many questions at

selves.

the zebra.

once, you know. I lived in
a place called Abyssinia,
a long way off from here ;
_ I believe it’s in Africa.”

“Dear me! That's funny!” said

the giraffe. “I’m from Africa, too.”
“ Are you, really ?”’ said the zebra,
feeling quite friendly again, though he
had been quite hurt at the remark of
the giraffe about his stripes—zebras
are very proud of their stripes, you
know, and you have to be very careful

not to laugh at them; they don’t like

it. “Then perhaps you know the

lions ?”
“Ye-es,” answered the giraffe,
doubtfully. “I used to see them

sometimes, but I wasn’t very friendly
with them.”

“Nor was I,” said the zebra. ‘I
never liked them very much; they

weren't always very kind to our family ;



‘“TWO OR THREE COUSINS" (#. 56).
58
we used to have to keep out of their
way, especially when they were hungry
—they had such tremendous appe-
tites.”

“Ah, yes,” said the giraffe, with a

“sigh, “T know. It’s rather a painful

subject. They’ve got some here, you
know.”

“Have they?” said the zebra,
nervously. “Where? I’m afraid I

(3 ”)
must be going.

“Oh, you needn’t be afraid,” said

the giraffe; “they're kept in a house
by themselves with the tigers. We
never see them; we can only hear
them sometimes, calling for their
dinner.”

‘“(QOh, that’s all right,

J

’ said the zebra.

The Little

Y name is Porker : I’m a pig,
As anyone can see.
Myself and seven others make
A splendid family.

I am quite black excepting for
A white spot on my nose;
You've never seen so fine a pig

As I am, I suppose.

My tail is curly, look at it! |
Now don’t you think it’s fine ?

Not one of all the others has

- So good a tail as mine.

AnimaL Lanp ror LirTLeE PEOPLE.

Ge hey seem to manage things pretty
well here, I must say. My stable is
very comfortable indoors, and there
seems to be plenty to eat.”

“Oh yess it, asnet sbad;
giraffe, ‘only you'll find the weather

”)

said the

rather cold sometimes, I’m afraid.”

“Well, I shall see you again, I
hope,” said the zebra. “ I’m very glad
to have met you. But you won't talk
about my stripes any more, will you?
or we sha’n’t get on together.”

“Oh, well,” said the giraffe, “I dare
say some people might like them.
There’s no accounting for——”

But the zebra wouldn't stop to hear
any more, and went indoors quite

offended,

Black Pig.

My mother is the old black sow,
She’s very kind to us, <

She never scolds us when we squeak,
However much we fuss.

She’s very handsome, too, I think,
She is so large and fat ;

I hope that when I’m quite grown up
I'll be as big as that.

I’m going to try my very best
A great big pig to be,

‘So I must eat whene’er I can,
Good-bye! It’s time for tea!




“THE ZEBRA WOULDN’T STOP TO HEAR ANY MORE” (4. 58).
60

The Eagle.

HE eagle, I suppose you've heard,
Is sometimes called a royal bird ;
I think he looks it, too,
He seems so very proud and grim,
And when you stand and look at
him
He seems to frown at you.

His beak is very sharp and strong,
His wings are really very long,
He can fly high, I know.
And if you saw him when he’s free
Perhaps you then could really see
-How very high he’d go.

He'd soar away up in the sky,
Above the houses he would fly,
Above the tree-tops high,
Until he grew quite black and small,
And you would scarcely know at
all
That he was in the sky.

And when he’s sailing right up there
He spies a rabbit or a hare
Far, far away below; :
Then down he flies and catches it,
And takes it home, and gives a bit
To his little ones, you know.

It seems most wonderful to’ me
That he so very far can see,
Further than you or I;

' And then how lovely it must be

To float, as he does, easily
Up in the deep blue sky.

But in his cage he can’t fly high;
He knows that, so he doesn’t try,
He just sits still all day.
But now and then he flaps his wings—
‘“What is the use of these big things

Down here ?” he seems to Say.

“These men, they come and look
and stare;
They know I’m caged, or they’d not
dare =
To hurt my feelings so!”
Of course, he doesn’t talk that way ;
That’s only what he seems to say
By looking fierce, you know.

Of course they give him things to eat ;
He dines on pieces of raw meat;

He doesn’t think that’s bad.
But when he thinks where he might be
If he were only loose and free

I think he must feel sad.








HL" (fp.
HIGE

T FLY

HE CAN'T

E

CAG

HIS

“e IN

6a).
62

The Story of the Eldest Young Puffin.

HE four young puffins sat in a

row, resting themselves after

“Where have

you been to, brother?” said one to

their long journey.

the eldest of the four, who was a hand-
some little fellow with his bright red
bill and his twinkling black eyes.
“Oh, I have been such a long way
off,” said he. “I flew and I flew and

I flew until our home was far out of ©

sight and I could see nothing but sea
—deep and dark and blue—all round
me. Every now and then I would

take a rest on the water, but only for



“vTHeyY WALKED ABOUT HOLDING THEMSELVES UP,’

a short time; I soon got up again and
went on flying. The air grew colder
and the sky grew grey, and presently
I saw far away in the distance a big
rock. I made my way to it, and as |
got nearer I saw what seemed to me
to be a number of men walking about.

“1 flew more carefully now, because,
you know, you never can tell what
kind of men you may come across, so
I thought to myself that I would not
be rash. But when I got nearer still,
I found to my astonishment that they
were not men at all—they were birds!
They were much too small for men,
but they walked about holding them-
selves up just as men do. They had
webbed feet just like ours, so of course,
I knew that they could swim, but their
And the

young puffin began to laugh as he

wings! Oh, dear me!”
thought of them, so that he could
scarcely go on with his story.

The other three grew impatient.
“Don’t laugh so much,” they said.
“What was there funny about their
Pellaise!

The eldest young puffin recovered
himself and managed to stop laughing.
“You'll hardly believe it,” said he,
“but these creatures had wings and
couldn’t fly.”

“What!” said one of the others.

“Oh, nonsense!” said the second

wings ?
Tue Story or THE Expesr Younc PurFFin. 63

“Not at all!” put in the third, who
was a very wise little puffin. “There
are some birds that can’t fly. There
is the ostrich, for instance; these
birds you’ve been telling us of must
have been penguins, I think ; could
they dive and swim and catch fish ?”

“ Oh, yes, very well,” said the first

young puffin. “And their wings

helped them very much. But they
were silly birds. It must be dreadful
not to be able to fly.
can fly.

I’m very glad I

So am I!” said two
of the other puffins.

LES Omaimea

The wise little puffin thought for a
“Yes!” he said.

minute. “ So.am

I, too!”

The Trumpeter Swan.

AM a Trumpeter Swan
From the land of ice and snow.
I sound my cheerful note
Wherever I happen to go.
With a

ct aeta= haat

“toot - toot - toot” and a

I'm a capital bird, you know.

I am a Trumpeter Swan,
No common Swan am I.

~I don’t always live among ice and
snow,

But southwards I sometimes fly ;

And far away as we wing our
way

You may hear our cheerful
cry.



“T AM A TRUMPETER SWAN,”


“HE DOESN'T LOOK SO VERY FIERCE.”

64

The Butcher Bird.

E doesn’t look so very fierce,
As you’d think from his name,
But if I were a beetle, I’d
Be frightened, all the same.

He has a thorn with lots of spikes,
And when he’s caught his prey
(A beetle, p’raps, or nice large fly),

He'll put it right away.

He keeps it on the spiky thorn,
Fastened right on the top ;

And there it is for all to see,
Just like a butcher’s shop.

The Cormorants.

HEY were feeling very sad, were

not like to attract the attention of

the three young cormorants.: their neighbours.

Their mother had flown away in search
of food for them, but it seemed such a
very long time since she had started
that they were getting quite uneasy
about her.

There were a great many other
cormorants on the same rock (which
was a very large one), as well as
some other birds, but the home of the
three young cormorants was apart
from all the others, and they were
very shy and frightened, too, and did

The nest was made out of sea-
weed and did not look very com-
fortable, but the young cormorants
seemed to like it, and particularly as
it was placed high up on a flat piece
of rock, so that by just standing up
in the nest and stretching out their
necks, they could see what was going
on in the water down below.

The eldest young cormorant was
doing this now.

“Well,” said the others impatiently,
THE CORMORANTS,

“can’t you see anything? Let me
come and look!”

‘Nothing but silly gulls,” said he,
‘‘swimming about in the sea and
catching lots of fish. Oh, I am so
Mother would
And he opened his big

hungry! I do wish
come home.”
mouth as if his mother were already
there with his dinner.
“Now let look,”

second young cormorant, pushing the

me said the

eldest away and standing up in the
nest and stretching out his neck as

far as ever he could. ‘Oh, oh,
look!” he said, directly, ‘‘ whatever
is that thing down there?” The

other young cormorants were very
much excited, and the second one
went on: “It seems to have four
legs and it moves about in the water
so quickly and part of its body keeps
changing about. I wonder what it
The gulls don't seem
to like it, anyhow.”

“ Now it’s my turn,” said the

- youngest.

can be.

‘Let me come.”

He pushed his way past the
other two and stood up where he.
could see. Presently he gave a
loud squawk, and began to flap
his little wings violently.

‘What's the matter? What's
the matter?” said the others. ze

“T can see something coming
to us,” said the youngest cor-
morant, beginning to talk very

fast; “it has its neck stretched
Eg

‘opnE

65

straight out in front of it, flying very
fast; she’s coming nearer and nearer,
and, yes, she has got a fish in her
mouth. It’s Mother!” he shouted, as
the old cormorant flew in and landed
close by the nest. |

The three little cormorants all ate
their dinner at once, for they were
very hungry. Presently, however,
the second one looked up and said,
“Mother, what is that funny thing
The
mother cormorant looked over and
What is the child
Where is it?” The
young cormorant got up and pointed
out the thing toits mother. ‘ Oh,” said

the old bird, smiling, ‘“‘why, it’s a boat,

with legs, down on the water ?”

said, “ Legs?
talking about ?

my child. Those aren't legs, they’re

oars, and the creatures inside are men!”
2 @) hi

cormorant.

said the second young



OLD CORMORANT FLEW IN AND LANDED CLOSE BY THE
NEST.”
66

The Flamingoes.

T was rather early in the morning,
and the flamingoes were not yet
awake. They each stood on one leg
with their necks curled round in a very
funny way, and their heads tucked
safely underneath _ their
Presently, from one of the cages
close by, the trumpeter bird began
to sound his note, and the youngest

Wings.

flamingo slowly uncurled his neck
and began to look round.
a new arrival in the cage and felt
rather shy.

Very slowly he began to untuck his
leg and put it down.to the ground: by
this time the others were beginning
_to wake up, so after a while the
youngest flamingo said timidly to one
Oh:
please, can you tell me where we have
to have our bath here? There doesn’t

who seemed to be friendly,

seem to be a river.”

“There’s the pond, just in front of
you,” said the other; “what more do
you want ?”

“What!” said the newest arrival,

Well, I
Why, I’ve been used to a

“that tiny little place!
never !

great big river to bathe in every.

morning. I’ve come from India, I
have, and they never used to treat me
like this over there. I do call it a
shame! I shall speak to the keeper.”
And the poor flamingo almost began

to cry.

you,” he said.

He was

The other flamingo smiled gently
and stretched out his leg very, very
“T wouldn’t do that if I were

“You'll soon get used
It's just the same with

slowly.

to the place.
all of us when we first come here. I
came from America, and when they
first put me in here, I was so angry
I didn't know what to do with myself.
They had clipped my wings so that I
couldn't fly, and I was so miserable. |
missed all my friends and my beauti-
ful river and the lovely trees and
flowers that used to grow on its banks;
but after a time I got better and

found that this isn’t such a bad place

after all—there really are some rather
good frogs about, though you wouldn’t
think it. Then the birds here are
rather nice, though some of the gulls
make a dreadful noise sometimes.
But come along with me to the pond
and [’ll introduce you to the others.”

The youngest flamingo cheered up
a bit at this, and followed his new
friend to the pond, and was soon busily
engaged in talking over things with
all the other flamingoes, and also in
finding out where the fat young frogs
lived. :

By the end of the day he felt quite
at home, and as he-tucked himself up
for the night he sighed and said to
himself, “ Well, well, it might have
been much worse!”
“THE OTHERS WERE BEGINNING TO WAKE UP” (4, 66).


68

The Ptarmigan and the Woodpecker.



pos tap, tap /

“Oh, do stop
that noise!” said the Ptarmigan,
crossly. “It’s enough to make one

go quite crazy. I really don’t see
what's the use of you at all, with your
tap, tap, tapping | = :

The Woodpecker stopped for a
“Oh!” he said. Then he
went on again with his work.

“ Now, it isn’t as if you were beauti-
ful like me,” said the Ptarmigan, “or

moment.



“IT'S MUCH
BETTER TO HAVE
WHITE FEATHERS
THEN.”

could fly as well as I can, or
had more than one suit of
feathers as I have. Of
course you know that I have
two suits of feathers?” he
added. -

~The Woodpecker stopped
fora momentagain. “ Ah!”
Then he began to
tap once more.

“Oh, yes,” said the Ptar-
“T have, though ;

he said.

migan.
one for summer and one for
winter. It’s most useful;
because you see when the
snow is about, its much
better to have white feathers
then, so that you can’t be

In the summer,



seen easily.
of course, my feathers are
about the same colour as the
heather: sothat you see I’m always safe.
Now you—I should think—you are
easily caught—you make such a noise.”

The Woodpecker looked down for
a minute. “Hum!” he said.. Then
he began to tap again.

“Well,” said the Ptarmigan, im-
patiently, ruffling all his feathers out
and holding himself quite straight up,
‘well, what good do you really sup-

pose you are? Come, now, I’m quite

_ready to listen to anything you may

have to say.”
THE PTARMIGAN AND THE WOODPECKER. 69

The Woodpecker turned his head
round and slowly looked the Ptar-
‘abeliee "yah

Then he set to work again.

migan up and down.
inquired.

The Ptarmigan was quite disgusted
and walked off, grumbling to himself,
but the Woodpecker paid no attention
to him.

“Fie’s a foolish fellow,” he said
to himself; “if he hadn’t been so
conceited, | could have told him one
or two things that would have rather
astonished him. Just fancy his not
knowing why I tap! Why, I should
have thought that everyone
knew it was to get the insects
out of the bark of the trees;
and very nice they are, too,

And as for

“ d
being caught, why, he’s often

some of them.

caught himself, I know, for all
his two suits, and being per-
fectly safe and all the rest of
it.’ The Wocdpecker paused
again to give a gentle tap, tap,
and to eat up a beetle that
had thought itself quite
secure in the bark of the
tree. This seemed to put
him ina rather better temper ;
he. had really been getting
quite cross with the Ptar-
migan before. Then he went
on, ‘‘And then with all his
boasting about his two suits,
I don’t believe he’s got such a

useful tail as I have. I don’t



believe his would help to keep him
up on trees as mine helps me. And
I’m quite sure his claws wouldn’t be
much good for holding on to the
bark. Then I really don’t suppose
his bill is half as good as mine for
trunks of trees; you need rather a
strong kind of bill for work like
mine. Dear, dear! Well, it only
shows that it’s a good job we're not
all made alike! I must get on with
my work. Zap, tap, tap!” And
the cheerful little Woodpecker smiled
to himself and started work once more.

‘““HE BEGAN TO TAP AGAIN” (/. 63),




7O

Parrots.

UTSIDE the parrot-house there
was a terrible noise; a screaming,
squawking, shouting, and crying, just
as if the whole place were on fire, or
every parrot were being killed.

The macaws were sitting on their
little perches out in the open. air.
They were very proud of themselves,
for they greatly enjoyed being outside
on a sunny, warm day: it was much
better than being in a cage inside the
house. They were all very fine birds ;
some had blue heads and yellow
bodies and green tails; others had
red heads and yellow tails; there were
one or two who were quite white, but
they each one thought that he was a
very fine fellow, and they all shouted
and screamed and squawked at the
top of their voices.

And what was it all about? The

greatest noise seemed to be going on

round one perch where a big macaw
with a blue and green head was talk-
ing very loud and very fast to a group
of other birds close by, and he seemed
to be very angry about something.
In one claw he held a large apple,
- and if you had been near enough you
would have seen that someone had
evidently taken a big bite out of it.
This was what was making all the
bother. Mr. Green-and-Blue-Head
kept shouting out, “Who bit my

apple? Who bit my apple? I won't

have it! I won't stand it! It’s too
bad! It was all right this morning!
I believe it was you that did it!” (this
was said to a white cockatoo). Olin
you bad wicked bird! What. will

Oh, you bad thing!
Who bit my apple?”

become of you?

Go along, do!
But the white cockatoo began to

Ohm le didni tly she

“How dare you say such a

scream at once.
said.
thing? Bite your apple, indeed! [|
wouldn’t do it. Don’t call me names,
because I won’t have it. [ll peck you,
you bad bird! Who are you telling
to get along? Bite your apple, in-
deed !

Then a little green love-bird began
“Tt doesn’t
Mr.
“Tt’s not a very
big bite, though of course it must be
But
Cockatoo didn’t do it if he says he
didn’t. But please don’t let us have
any pecking. You'll find out some
time who did it, I dare say.”

2

Squaw-aw-aw-aw-awk-k-k

to try to make peace.

matter very much, does it,

Macaw 2?” she said.

very vexing. Pm sure Mr.

“Oh, that’s all very well for you,”
returned the macaw, “‘but it isn’t your
apple. Who bit my apple? Who
bit my apple? You'd better tell me
at once, whoever it was, and then
perhaps I sha’n’t be quite so angry!”

“ Oh,
apple,” put in another smacaw, with a

bright red head.

do be quiet about your

‘Who cares about


= “THE MACAWS WERE SITTING ON THEIR LITTLE PERCHES” (%. 70).
72 Awniuat Lani For LirttzE PEOPLE.

Why don't you enjoy
] declare it

your apple ?
yourself out in the sun?
quite makes me think of my young
days, sitting out here.”

“Apple? Apple? Who
shouted another bird from
the end of the row. ‘ Give me a bit!
Give poor Polly a bit! Poor old
Polly! Pretty Poll! Give me a bit,
don’t be greedy! Who's got the
apple ?”

Then four or five others all began
at once: ‘No, no, J want a bit! I

said

apple?”

asked first! I want some too! Over
here! No, here you are! This way
with the apple! Hurry up! Be

quick! Where’s that apple?”

Just then a lady and a little girl and
a little boy came along past where the
parrots were sitting. Instantly all
the birds began to chatter and scream
louder than ever.

‘Look, look at them!” they called
out. ‘“ Did you ever see anything so
absurd! Where are their feathers ?
_ What ridiculous beaks! I don’t be-
lieve they could crack nuts if they tried
ever so hard. They haven’t got any
Oh, how funny! Ha, ha, ha!
Go away, do, you ugly creatures! ”

The little girl and boy and the lady
didn’t understand what they were
But the lady
said, “Come along quickly, children,
and let us get past these noisy birds;

wings.

saying, of course.

they quite give me a headache with
their screaming! ”’

«Well, did you ever!” said the par-
rots. ‘Calling us noisy birds! V’m
sure we're not noisy! They haven't
got green heads and red tails: I don't
see what they think so much of them-
selves for! Well, I’m glad they’ve
gone! If they’d come near me I’d have
given them a bite! Silly things!
Squawk-k-k!”

The macaw with the apple was still
very sad. No one took any notice of
him, and no one would tell him who
had bitten his precicus apple. All at
once, it slipped out of his claw and
fell on to the ground. He tried to
reach it, but the chain which tied him
to his perch was not long enough, and
he couldn’t get it. All the other
parrots began to scream with laughter
at him; they danced up and down
and flapped their wings and shouted,
and made more noise than ever.
Then some sparrows flew down and
began to peck at the apple, and this
made the macaw angrier than ever.

“Hm!” said one little sparrow,
looking up at the macaw with a twinkle
in his eye, “quite a good apple! I
wonder that you threw it away!
Who's been biting it ?”

The macaw screamed and scolded,
but it was no good. If he hadn’t
talked so much he might have eaten
his apple in peace. Now he had lost
it altogether. |

And he never found out who bit

~ his apple.
73

The Kingfisher and the Minnow

KINGFISHER sat on a branch
a of a tree
By the side of a rippling stream,
_ And he sat so still that he seemed to
be |

Fast asleep in a pleasant dream.

Down below in the stream a minnow
played
So happy and gay and free :
He darted in and out of the shade
Of the hanging willow-tree. .

He whisked his tail as he swam te
and fro,
And_ he
bird ;
foro, HO; sald: he, 1 can ssee: you,

laughed at the little

you know.”
But the kingfisher never stirred.

“Wake up,’ laughed the minnow,
“it’s getting quite late,
I’m afraid that you must be ill;
You'd better be quick, for your dinner
won't wait.”
But the kingfisher sat quite still.

The minnow laughed as he swam in
and out,
“Come along, sir, now don’t be shy.
There’s nothing for you to be sulky
about.”
The kingfisher opened his eye.

Flash! Almost too quick for the eye
to see,
The kingfisher darted from shore.
The stream rippled by the branch of

the tree,
But the minnow was there no more

The Pheasant.

I AM a very fine bird, am I not?
You mustn’t think I am a common
pheasant, because that would be a
great mistake. I am a very much
finer bird than the common pheasants,
though they are relations of mine. I
am called the silver pheasant and I

Do

very beautiful my

come all the way from China.

you see how

feathers are?

There is another relation of. mine
who also comes from China, who is
called the He

thinks he is more beautiful even than

golden pheasant.
I am, but of course he is not really,
and he dare not say so when I am
anywhere about, because I should
fight him if he did. Besides, I don’t
think it is nice to keep on saying that
you are beautiful; you ought to leave
74. B AwnimaL LAND FOR LitTLe PEOPLE.

that to other people. Have you noticed
my tail-feathers ?
did ?

I like living over here very much.

Aren’t they splen-

Of course I make all the common
pheasants that I come across do just
as I tell them; if they object at all
I fight them, and they very soon
give in. :

We area very large family. Some
of us live in Japan and others in India.
That golden pheasant that I was

mentioning to you has a ruff round his
neck, but I think it's much nicer not
to have a ruff. I haven't got one.

Of course all pheasants are very
fine birds—even the very common
ones—but | think, and I have given a
good deal of time and attention to the
matter, I really think, on the whole,
that the finest of the family is the
silver pheasant.

I think I told you before that I was

a silver pheasant,-didn’t I ?



‘ST AM A VERY FINE BIRD” (/. 73).



PRINTED BY CASSELL & Company, Limirep, LA BELLE SAUVAGE, LONDON, EC.




~TWO AMUSING GIFT BOOKS.

The Jungle School; or, Dr. Jibber-Jabber Bur-

chall’s Academy. By S. H. HAMER. With Four Coloured Plates and
other Illustrations by HARRY B. NEILSON.. 1s. 6d.

This work tells of the adventures of an Ape (who has escaped from a menagerie) and his endeavours to
introduce Civilisation among the inhabitants of the Jungle. How he siarts a school; how the young animals
all go to it; how the lion-cub gets on; who Tricksy was; what was the end of Dr. Jibber-Jabber Burchall
and his Academy : all these things are told in simple language and most amusingly illustrated.





ee
7 sleet

“Just at that precise moment Dr. Burchall came up.”’ (From “ The Jungle School.”)

Peter Piper’s Peep=Show ; or, All the Fun oi

the Fair. ByS.H.HAMER. With Four Coloured Plates and other Illustra

tions by HARRY B. NEILSON and LEWIS BAUMER. Price ts. 6d.
This book consists of one fairly long story, illustrated by Mr. LEwis BAUMER, and a number of verses
and short stories, illustrated by Mr. Harry B. Nertson. The long story, entitled “The Extraordinary

Adventures of Dicker and Me,” will be found to be of very great interest; while the verses and shorter
stories are similar to those which were so popular in ‘‘ Micky Magee’s Menagerie.”

CASSELL & COMPANY, Limirep, London; Farts, New York and Melbourne.








BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

NEW AND RECENT VOLUMES.



Red Jacket: the Last of the Senecas. By EDWARD S. ELLIS.
With ro Full-page Illustrations. 2s. 6d. (Aeady shortly.)

Iron Heart: War Chief of the Iroquois. By EDWARD S. ELLIS.
With 4 Full-page Illustrations. . 2s. 6d. (Ready shortly.)

Sisters Three: A Story for Girls. By JESSIE MANSERGH (Mrs.
G. DE HORNE VAIZEY). With 8 Plates. 3s. 6d. (Ready shortly.)

A Girl Without Ambition. By ISABEL SUART ROBSON. With 8 Illus-
trations. 3s. 6d. (Aeady shortly.)

Britain’s Roll of Glory; or, The Victoria Cross, its Heroes and their
Valour. By D. H. PARRY. With 8 Full page Illustrations by STanuey L.
Woop. Cheap Edition. Revised’and Enlarged. Cloth, 3s. 6d.

On Board the Esmeralda; or, Martin Leigh’s Log. By JOHN C.
HUTCHESON. Cheap Edition. Illustrated. 1s. 6d.

The Rebellion of Lil Carrington. By L. 1. MEADE. Illustrated. 3s. 6d.

The World of Adventure. Profusely Illustrated with Stirring Pictures and 18
Coloured Plates. Cheap Edition. In Three Volumes. 53s. each.

Little Folks’ History of England. py ISA CRAIG-KNOX. With 32
Illustrations. Mew Ladition. Cloth, rs. 6d.

A History of England. From the Landing of Julius Ceesar to the Present Day.
By H.O. ARNOLD-FORSTER, M.P. ewised Edition. Illustrated. 5s. Cloth
gilt, gilt edges, 6s. 6d. :

Bo=Peep. 4 Treasury for the Little Ones. VEARLY VOLUME. With Original
Stories and Verses by popular Authors. Illustrated with 8 Full-page Coloured
Plates, and numerous other Pictures in Colour. Elegant Picture Boards, 2s, 6d. ;
cloth, 3s. 6d. (Ready shortly.) :

Tiny Tots. «4 Magazine for the Very Little Ones. Set in Bold Type and Profusely
Illustrated. VEARLY VOLUME. 1s. 4d. (Ready shortly.)

BOCKS by EDWARD S. ELLIS.
With Six Full-page Illustrations in each Book. Cloth, 1s. Gd. each.
CAPTURED BY INDIANS. WOLF EAR THE INDIAN.
THE DAUGHTER OF THE CHIEFTAIN. ASTRAY IN THE FOREST.

With Full-page IHustrations. Cloth, 2s. 6d. each.
TWO BOYS IN WYOMING: A Tale of Adventure.
UNCROWNING A KING: A Tale of King Philip’s War.
IN RED INDIAN TRAILS; or, Osceola, Chief of the Seminoles.
SCOUTS AND COMRADES. KLONDIKE NUGGETS.
COWMEN AND RUSTLERS.



In Danger’s Hour ; or, Stout Hearts and Stirring Deeds. Extra Crown 8vo,
prettily bound in cloth. With 4 Coloured Plates and numerous Illustrations.
Cloth, price 1s. 8d.; or cloth gilt, 2s. 6d,

CASSELL & COMPANY, Limirep, London; Paris, New York & Me-bourne.



76






“The extraordinary popularity of LITTLE FOLKS has placed it beyond both
rivalry and criticism. LITTLE FOLKS is at the head of English illustrated maga-
zines for children.” —THE QuEEN.

WIONTHLY, Gd.

Little Folks Magazine.

“Everyone ought to know by this time that Lirrtz Foixsis the best Magazine for
Children.’’— Graphic. A

“LirrLe Fouxs is always a welcome arrival both in the nursery and the schoolroom.
It is among the very best of all the numerous children’s magazines that are now published.
Many of the woodcuts are really quite charming works of art.’—Academy.



Boards, 3s. 6d.; cloth giit, 5s.

Little Folks Half-Yearly Volume.

With Pictures on nearly every Page, together with Six Full-page
Coloured Plates and numerous Illustrations printed in Colour.

“There is reading enough in a Volume of LirrLE Fo.ks to keep a big boarding school
quiet for six weeks.” — Sportsman.

CASSELL & COMPANY, Limirep, London; Paris, New York & Melbourne.

THREE POPULAR GIFT BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

Picture Boards, 1s. 6d.
Master Charlie: Painter, Poet, Novelist, and Teacher.

With numerous Examples of his Work Collected by C. Harrison and
S. H. Hamer. ;

“One of the best of the season’s books for the little ones is ‘ Master Charlie.’ Both letterpress and draw-
ings are genuinely funny, and will entertain adults as well as children.” —G/ole.







; Boards, 3s. 6d.; cloth, 5s.
Whys and Other Whys; or, Curious Creatures and

their Tales. By S. H. Hamer. With numerous Illustrations by Harry B.
NEILSon. i

“A charming gift book is ‘Whys and Other Whys.’ It is full of bright and amus‘ng stories about
‘curious creatures ’ and.a large number of delightful animal drawings. This is a book we should like to see
in every nursery.”.— Westminster Gazette.



Coloured Boards, 1s. 6d.
Micky Magee’s Menagerie; or, Strange Animals and
Ere aes RI ETS
their Doings. By S, H. Hamer. With 8 Full-page Coloured Plates and 100

Illustrations in the Text by Harry B. Neitson.

“* A wonderland that never fails to captivate.”—Punch. ‘
‘Just the thing to keep a whole family happy on a wet afternoon.”—Christian World.
“Mr. Neilson’s pictures will create endless amusement in the children’s room.” —Literary World.

CASSELL & COMPANY, Limiren, Zonaon; Parts, New York & Melbourne.





77
tert caraeaemend

De A



a












SEDs Mountain View, Upper Baneoe North Wels Sen 16th, 1398.

**Messrs. MELLIN’s Foop, Lrp.

: “DEAR Sirs,—I beg to enclose you a photo of our boy, Deiniol Perio, which was taken ioe he
was quite 10 months ‘old. He has been brought up entirely on MELLIN’s Foop and milk. Before he was
6 months old he weighed 264 Ibs. He had his first birthday on July 21st, and-up to now he has not been ill

halfan hour, He is, as you will see, a true picture of health and contentment.
“Yours very truly, F. MORGAN. 2



MELLIN’S FOOD when prepared is similar io ‘Breast Milks

Samples post free on application to _

MELLIN’S FOOD WORKS, PECKHAM, LONDON, S.E.





PrinTED By CasseLL & Company, Limirep, LA BELLE Sauvace, Lonvon, E.C, >





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6671d7b6d856b40e8c3fff14f0f171c7e8f41ae5
'2011-12-28T17:23:47-05:00'
describe
'5806' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a5299e2eaaa90d9fb208c0d987c2ce9a
29cfb142a6b63a484e44e2320b2324934ba73dd4
'2011-12-28T17:22:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOK' 'sip-files00006.tif'
2316cbd088ecafdf43d6d6d536008399
5de5a97044605ed828036b992632e98afb7e1202
'2011-12-28T17:22:27-05:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOL' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
aa3c6b6ce1131f916c8bc58d053b74f9
e7b22ad11d57ed629511fa1e87e55ecbc5776018
'2011-12-28T17:21:47-05:00'
describe
'718391' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOM' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
c7b8f04509ce82497873afea96eac2d5
9c91b79e60df74fe1af779517d40fdb6aa5fb109
describe
'63257' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBON' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
f63f352ae20b566fc00c3e89ce2ad25e
db80a7ae3059da6bff530c49a7387bc2deec6418
'2011-12-28T17:20:06-05:00'
describe
'37136' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOO' 'sip-files00007.pro'
90f6f8e0a3c7e46a339206101320167c
689eab619d80e9751d3f3cfd27ebfd27aec437e8
'2011-12-28T17:19:32-05:00'
describe
'18979' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOP' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
3132b0de17a44766428c51f4076700b8
4a49b6fcd11a8c06984a868e33baf863c855f68d
'2011-12-28T17:21:51-05:00'
describe
'5764608' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
aa6033ebc4f8da825abc877be0bd77a7
de1475fb69dad2238cc894793e4c8af21f11881d
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOR' 'sip-files00007.txt'
00b270c503b3fd465737301ff90eabb6
8e15100ddaad01e7b1cb77f66d3dee4661cb18eb
'2011-12-28T17:23:45-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'4381' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOS' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
a42eed1e42f09a129aacf2937e6e4dcf
488804ec9bc317764cff5f9bbf30059a98e4246c
'2011-12-28T17:20:17-05:00'
describe
'718462' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOT' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
5ab9a45876788d2b6a24ffd41c8ce522
20fb242b89f95d7cb338ea8bd89a3529e76d21dd
'2011-12-28T17:23:03-05:00'
describe
'105672' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOU' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
85fa64401e69a5a96bd260a7e0f6c345
c4b1d8c5a11798f73cec4ac1d468004c5260aaa6
'2011-12-28T17:22:06-05:00'
describe
'59448' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
b1b1a469bb159c53089d045428a1db12
8d3cd1b9474d7a611b3449860955c20372771619
'2011-12-28T17:22:40-05:00'
describe
'29624' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
9654c94677f25e976ad592324ac56165
1cf29ad6b415b54d0ae7dcd927cdd229a2e82525
'2011-12-28T17:21:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
18a0912d97b8ad7770fa091a09c000b0
1d035f4a3bd56f91f3d51e392dfc859e002cd1de
'2011-12-28T17:24:00-05:00'
describe
'2340' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOY' 'sip-files00008.txt'
2c2a0d0cc23a9c977262e22c4fb18768
65af05a2afa4bf82708a93ca8b4e28450f35b8db
'2011-12-28T17:24:31-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6646' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
c424e7e0e4606853895c71623be8a6a4
fcb4b48001222df28ee97e1e24514e4d27971be3
'2011-12-28T17:24:17-05:00'
describe
'718574' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
10b8b723a21a1e7e44f7c92fb95db919
0393562d9649f52f57d6b27828acc426aaca26e0
'2011-12-28T17:23:50-05:00'
describe
'138964' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
11e031e9b71ec38373c4ece126bf5cad
5622e08686106b0684aa13ac53ec5c3443cdcd9c
'2011-12-28T17:20:05-05:00'
describe
'26317' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
940a84d74e7931e04dea72ceeb7362c2
bae52b58033d83172ec1afeb07689ba7cc7648d9
'2011-12-28T17:21:49-05:00'
describe
'35759' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
4fdee9a7ad18576f8ee465c1f8a0c3cf
404b0d757cf2d895964989411f70848ec40ff61c
'2011-12-28T17:20:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
67f08ab4f6d37c49d9df08b189b4d617
5b630798ede521c5f6a2306dcb5ce82d226d3240
'2011-12-28T17:21:39-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
802c3ec4f04576ea80310c2361106070
ecbd27dadcc7d706f386dbfcc7c868662b35950e
'2011-12-28T17:21:50-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8455' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
5c9bc9bf410baaafd8e828bf489550fd
147e88e32884b5c1d9256a9d48578ebd0981c088
'2011-12-28T17:24:29-05:00'
describe
'718710' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
973335297f18ce848e954a2e81de68f1
d616a2311e1f74a144193b2f43bb201ae91eaff1
'2011-12-28T17:21:23-05:00'
describe
'145035' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
729aeda7e382b5bfdaff810e905ce2ce
944b0dce20f81994a448cc26cd7e0af1be45bec6
'2011-12-28T17:19:52-05:00'
describe
'30748' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
632209b5abd5e3e8b2e0ffdd9d22ad4d
98ae0349995ed82c6d8b8fa0409e9359b4041700
'2011-12-28T17:23:33-05:00'
describe
'37413' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
e5aef6da08c9b7a03870f9f0cad39583
35eb1d895a9b800cf9176efb6384d7da67d12572
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f5e0a68988c5258fb109f1059aa5a2e6
509ec61853a1a064023df02a83173485c2e965a4
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
6fbd8274fc14300a3682d31e73ec6741
522b518423120b9cdefb7e0565ce6b52497b3740
'2011-12-28T17:24:24-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8875' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ffa7fcac0c2695d2dfd01bf5e2fd8703
e80d47e6dd670d48288da38b6a2b98ee5c43a048
'2011-12-28T17:19:35-05:00'
describe
'718244' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
59051a46fcee8def3945b755471c5701
e8c0fc1c36c7c4763cb6e3320c542e3d84354b8c
'2011-12-28T17:23:21-05:00'
describe
'89491' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
41d44222f1c5574f4cda938fdefceeef
c1341cd1867fa8ffd1e1b9fc06a3f977d7fa4a77
'2011-12-28T17:23:58-05:00'
describe
'517' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
4a1df3db94ada3b4fabb54ad27855043
9814f245f7eec47bc52ba757cd10a03752e1222e
'2011-12-28T17:23:43-05:00'
describe
'21314' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
33bf8a3ce93aecaee71a6d26f07a281d
3b2ae89058623a9aa909865b5fd4066ce481cd16
'2011-12-28T17:22:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
f107d8e2d41baeae2725e1990461fa18
25aff5acb14a3f37adf81388b8af203e3462bb28
'2011-12-28T17:24:06-05:00'
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
14e4ce8dca0b4ab8b3ec5b5436b6cb4b
cc78b3df3e1bb91f2fc3c93689a5f5a8b56a5b22
describe
'5365' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
627e1e768172f72902a432ab45755626
6de6d821319b77ecbdbb582e8b6da4eca475f100
'2011-12-28T17:23:04-05:00'
describe
'718715' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ff06fcc8e08cefc7006bec3746956e0d
ad951d94fe7c8845fe544480c14f42cbdf830bbf
describe
'144595' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
1774ee3565f3b4112f5375726841ca19
5e588c654e1e45eec27b68c77a9df14ee85e6ee6
'2011-12-28T17:21:41-05:00'
describe
'67699' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
611c259487bef71b1f36d9f9092ec7d9
6d509e1bdb8a1a0ad128099105ef829881a13785
'2011-12-28T17:20:49-05:00'
describe
'39846' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2981fcf0f40fe668ee65d0e5f9a8ad75
aad59d2e7e9ba5a1e30e92c122ea120ca1607f06
'2011-12-28T17:21:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
24a3d77f17582d40ee8f18738531cef9
d512ddb5541cfee18bd0149781774e55a37ce6a0
'2011-12-28T17:23:32-05:00'
describe
'2544' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
ef11f19c9e63da9f96cb6b425ea663ec
c275d8c571380967571e5cdb244d1a805a26c1ff
'2011-12-28T17:22:57-05:00'
describe
'8915' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQB' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e76dd55eadd78510bc3755c5b1100b4b
1412641b1b1b0d26674dcc7f3f6abfff67836bf2
'2011-12-28T17:23:00-05:00'
describe
'718714' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
71b993fc1daeb99a7ebf2536e2d0a032
9e4e3e8302688a9bb69e005589bdd1c8bbec38d7
'2011-12-28T17:21:26-05:00'
describe
'100055' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
08b35d49af0d208c58103b70592b5f33
8b2ab173256bab66e153c1281e8a2910af1e8ac0
'2011-12-28T17:20:40-05:00'
describe
'3479' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
dc66180d42cbf288b77e991ab93429d4
5288608e932dafe021b545b8d402c7cd11adb736
'2011-12-28T17:22:15-05:00'
describe
'23175' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
5ea73030e71ac6dc3a937febdd7bea7e
8f179603512037f20dc6c984aa9ccde42dbe71e8
'2011-12-28T17:22:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
84e45a8ded0b3cdbc9f807bf653fe9e1
d0da0c41e9e67d65429dd22c03850f019afaa332
'2011-12-28T17:23:34-05:00'
describe
'35' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d14cef3a8e5fa193574699c8e86883f0
da42386d92821c9c25b7b6807400c46da85382d9
describe
'5687' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
39e3730df79e2a3c9f91a50775446f2b
a38f41069c7ec287af8a22058588f97f1e67e688
'2011-12-28T17:24:39-05:00'
describe
'718700' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
59af1afb8f02ec25d77c0b3e8425494b
eebf13f67d883526d8e4661b360ce828b90df2f2
'2011-12-28T17:23:30-05:00'
describe
'138166' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
290877d6a786f4b17ff9580dc9c54363
b5b265c39a18480bde22cf7a12010e761fa524b2
describe
'65801' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
53cc22b329021aa3785e1b53f2fc84cd
74f1282d446015448040090d6a167087e84a12c2
'2011-12-28T17:19:42-05:00'
describe
'38299' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
eee11ee8cf4950ee580fd70a6e2559a0
79a7c0b52586c4d989b6783909b023e052882f3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
4838561a5fdef123fb89fc1daf4917ec
e16c83e57c29ec90e6e3a9c9665472905157fbc6
'2011-12-28T17:23:55-05:00'
describe
'2456' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQO' 'sip-files00014.txt'
40cd103e7571642262e8a21a57ba9087
e5a2ab8bbd818b4f07079e58ab602ee24c633f7c
'2011-12-28T17:24:42-05:00'
describe
'8534' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQP' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
10d3e384e1f57182ef4b572dbbc69b42
36fb8cb0a27fac5d5a08517418a2af091b85ce16
describe
'718238' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
bee06f0edd7768fca87eb737eddd67ed
1a26fa2574e71b757917c7fcee42733589281f97
'2011-12-28T17:22:54-05:00'
describe
'115093' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
2ebfef85305f3633e752ea5ef84acd7e
aac063eaa77ea1e22e5b89116611c0eb64323211
'2011-12-28T17:20:03-05:00'
describe
'52285' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
622a9dca99ed260a062270d8f646dc67
3a99bccdb36bf64c87e930d2d7bf83c948b89556
'2011-12-28T17:19:40-05:00'
describe
'31550' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQT' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
122bdb109ca7eafb9d3280529134f055
b0320bcce4b5cc0fcb67d9b492acefa662a0d42e
'2011-12-28T17:22:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
ae79353044eae2ca7f2c7795b4dffba8
ad2775b2553c90c884ab0c4ab01dd0897f97fab0
describe
'1980' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
3ee7e79c4abcd6cc3ce7179754a643b4
d4f7c136a2669d93751b4ce3158ce493838e813f
'2011-12-28T17:22:18-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'7129' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
63a08799c4b782e1e195b52898a1cfa2
c13660ce2aa8d7dbd5ae36415159b7d23c555051
'2011-12-28T17:22:26-05:00'
describe
'718345' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
df94a37406277898600e7db74303bcc5
d2d62bb2d2041dcbb5288a648556bc30e9b4cfe5
'2011-12-28T17:22:09-05:00'
describe
'93679' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQY' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
3597da6ba4b8a236b43268992e87529e
ab75e861d36de02f20cf6ab696b07abb5549f668
describe
'38407' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
1e9a6eb504e7962566311f063c9875a7
291f0e34464ad8e983fd72c6001ce457f578958d
describe
'25007' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d62083ca7ab801c507742a44449d5832
79a3c52947409498af83242f9bfcc606fbfc1a69
'2011-12-28T17:19:20-05:00'
describe
'5763888' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1466d14b2a3c3d910142726fb6e8e8ff
11bf153687dc1691251bc74a1d80d9459103fa90
'2011-12-28T17:23:39-05:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
afcf51137a4bc251a62e31eea13b7974
b4da7d417a1ad859da16ff6b57b1ce03b1fb96a5
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'6021' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
6a6ad9dacbb438c70e2664e35ca41410
5f6b686910fe33c606d175b105681fb35dd77f04
describe
'718329' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5dc59ef4be99e779fe9ecf7c4da8ae2f
33babf20015c6291cc136161f9ce909a11c50340
'2011-12-28T17:20:35-05:00'
describe
'103284' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
094676b5d47fb79169d44ef598b1f883
8694ebf5671e1cd038c545ef7d1792b3c58f9657
'2011-12-28T17:24:36-05:00'
describe
'26649' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRG' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d11c594537a33a26eb1ad689a301b97b
7b0003760afc10ae21dd626289ca5eeb1771d01f
'2011-12-28T17:20:14-05:00'
describe
'25620' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRH' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
77bed8af2067d96bff308b28d2f589f2
2f3a85e5974de8cba4b2854a00c0957a657f4250
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRI' 'sip-files00017.tif'
aaf8a81b974f9240e630a8385d9ea6b9
e12034c0f82a67b4018c1bcefaf9881e067b5c5f
'2011-12-28T17:22:58-05:00'
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cd2bb12fb5742a1174c1b979f38be06a
569e340263c16c9757c6946798cfa706dfe02bb4
'2011-12-28T17:24:41-05:00'
describe
'5916' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
8c31d06108abf577ec51c0dbefb29fe9
258b08d021b70147b95e118f490f48ba7c384102
'2011-12-28T17:22:39-05:00'
describe
'718717' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRL' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
cb8014ad645386fb620fed85c414ddbd
cdf3070123b2c1294c094f982edb41f8a485a1c6
'2011-12-28T17:20:39-05:00'
describe
'92433' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
d08a209a80ce63fa439c44dc6318fc54
8e1be4f015267f7ece3ead7491ea84edfa47353d
'2011-12-28T17:21:22-05:00'
describe
'19951' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRN' 'sip-files00018.pro'
46a92c015b6111e0c1a4ccc38b5ea6ba
84f17fa863f527fe50b501e8b40e8c35aa27623e
'2011-12-28T17:19:37-05:00'
describe
'22901' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRO' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
8a52bec8e748ef1097d370676162f9b7
bb4348fc59b4125d0bf68a0ec5a3682c97e9d81f
describe
'5766664' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ee42ee1ae945cd1e84046e3c83d9b1f6
954d4ce38e53666cebc4879fb93b4f63b259ae92
'2011-12-28T17:19:33-05:00'
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e284c3c111b4512a72920f644832b607
7d140f7ae6e0dee56a91a6ee6491192d270c7145
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'5712' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b390db112dd30d1569f086381edac2a1
6c52800f35c04b16bf78b0de1c3a4d5153bfad15
'2011-12-28T17:20:31-05:00'
describe
'718680' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
164e5f8c62b735b40e1390cc16d7fc2b
86308fb58b69e03e2baf2ad4f3baefbcfed6cc96
'2011-12-28T17:19:41-05:00'
describe
'144489' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d1dfb2451f866db177c82cc9aaaddbd0
5027f24cda3165c16aba0526d969e822a5001053
describe
'28628' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
c93b1d929072e1e32770c60aae68f734
0ae8473d67f9b771b5cbaabbf8370bf64033917f
'2011-12-28T17:24:33-05:00'
describe
'37078' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d6ec3de2a03248be9f70908f704edf32
ed5c64d8b4d919b9056997598f151fd91cf34eed
'2011-12-28T17:19:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d983ec3c9492ab5409dd068cc83c9920
828ba173c89276b22075af846f1f7c86a05877b1
'2011-12-28T17:23:16-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
93552cf85d692c873c717b2909e236af
2d3191693058cb49807e7aefc65ef05d15cc85bd
'2011-12-28T17:22:49-05:00'
describe
'8778' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
f9cbe9e75f93ddacb94f0d5a0f954494
9a69f108204c4543e30635b34190ffee70e2e919
describe
'718668' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
e8c3b0bb8d0565bf3ce2c62a8cf3a729
be734a755f6a4540a6562d25fe03e2b4ae50d759
'2011-12-28T17:24:21-05:00'
describe
'136593' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
191cdbbc31ab9afa5e2e2f77e3886f76
22bc9c214bbe1e8fe8559466d5afc00b2221c3b9
'2011-12-28T17:21:56-05:00'
describe
'66065' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
60208004d18bd5dde7bb54d446e06ab5
05eb05e3a7edc705dbbaf887e74594c89657263b
'2011-12-28T17:20:21-05:00'
describe
'37110' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
470b338eddb1a05cf661e1a963765cda
f54cdd22b79c5cd8af6e3a547251853bf3ed2346
'2011-12-28T17:22:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7a2ccbf86c9d4246dae0a433ebf83463
eedf08af93ba84d172ba90a3313e31b3b2e01224
'2011-12-28T17:19:57-05:00'
describe
'2480' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ec8b00582a591637b99a823aa41c47df
bac5bd21d54ecd6230cac31c34f9196ccf3198cd
'2011-12-28T17:23:24-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'8350' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5d33433d4e502fc4e4ba05e0dc13c82d
ab1da154116c027bc2606c7ad3cd62eb98a540da
'2011-12-28T17:21:25-05:00'
describe
'718471' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
5d7f3199a9c93f9f7d41144411eb4cba
16aa33fa284ed3e569b7236a7a372cb0bd044665
'2011-12-28T17:22:53-05:00'
describe
'183690' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
47d3acb4042ceedd39206028e89fc86e
f17970ae8c5a634700af5ab4d94517511847dd8c
'2011-12-28T17:21:52-05:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
1d285118ce3c2edf44c086f50d3687d9
3b2c29377d4dc7beb4c07681d58fc2a5a4041b77
'2011-12-28T17:24:19-05:00'
describe
'51805' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0ab019db90cc282de321a313b15889b5
96090c40989d23c72da89e42d785a99964357d81
'2011-12-28T17:24:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
76789384e58b3e15068beb9f5f483ece
d059b90788618925a877a4f864fd035a208a053a
'2011-12-28T17:23:13-05:00'
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
2fe73901c0857dbb70ba763053cf332f
2418dc8c310c724ed3cc6894e9d442e62c88afe8
describe
'25579' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
9b49840facb7af48966142e45c4484ea
e0bd6310b4d8e393258eb3d53daa62509afd8e12
'2011-12-28T17:19:46-05:00'
describe
'718716' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0d58d9e92a86f88ab287f91473793128
e9528244cbac1e2ce62af7e1b16ce47b43676ad9
'2011-12-28T17:23:41-05:00'
describe
'159471' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
bcfa960d891db94ea1adc94bb23ad4b6
caf0d526a3cea41ead9715d1a90382450c2b32b9
'2011-12-28T17:22:20-05:00'
describe
'25658' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f78ebb5a846a0c2c11ed0c394fad90be
c38dacd08b3fc2a4dae6f3343478a092a89bade5
'2011-12-28T17:23:37-05:00'
describe
'52032' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
08186d0c1b17f6f6bf0486c37f87966e
143b151e0ee04d3ccdb2dabb3c2b408155ff0024
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7d448ced95ba3dddb289ec51ce01d270
3b75623fb5ca62162015421db7fa91ff7029f307
'2011-12-28T17:20:29-05:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
f925b670bcc6faca08d3d3cfdad58fbe
e912f47fd8144fa0f7a97e5d5980c761d1a017c1
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25143' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBST' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
27c42ed358b65b57bbecfc288d7d83c5
58babfd48eca3404f1c0386c3fef86259008b6f9
describe
'718120' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
470b6001b2b7d4ea07906fe497164bd0
0df77d7dd740bbd15696dab356a9069da152a4bb
'2011-12-28T17:19:39-05:00'
describe
'168441' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
12b4c4ecfd0344b2aaf0b8ef6803d091
194aca1a814205aa72d50f94fd039999d99beaa0
'2011-12-28T17:22:22-05:00'
describe
'29253' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
de1a0ba692102ac1a6da74949b2fe9e5
def76c03aed4ff8acd00ecbcd7d24a99a3440512
describe
'55743' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
18b63c602113cb178d7e59d68bd7f276
e3b3fb4f2c44f443e3baaf19280e2489fea8c062
'2011-12-28T17:22:33-05:00'
describe
'5761824' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
95a7f0f087539658efb8ab0c83097203
4a20cb6ce9ca8a2ab9bac55a3377c1d813bcfa88
'2011-12-28T17:21:34-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ac06f2038ed0e7333fc1d885f6d1d972
7a10afc8af421ad1b5ab92cc2a0e096c1cf154bb
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25889' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTA' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
3bae9514e3681283fd323dd2edb9456e
957e9e41790ddc384f8a0498c091dcc394c4e09a
'2011-12-28T17:20:34-05:00'
describe
'718373' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
cf842424fc451d0aa8cc2e7a1e44f987
7617ce0551bde2b6b0e73830831649b1e9b993e8
describe
'177118' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
c696358cfd19615226cb8f222fa3a38a
a9cb2023615ec96e6ced5cc11bbdc8452c8e02d1
'2011-12-28T17:24:34-05:00'
describe
'63711' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTD' 'sip-files00024.pro'
d75335704f9f97cc3ba3232ffe54c2c0
1387845cdce400e5df4e6938e604344dd6124ca2
'2011-12-28T17:22:14-05:00'
describe
'60505' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4f7ff7c7ba66160ae36796f5eaa0b745
501936b3856d406c26241ad28c552202132789ab
'2011-12-28T17:22:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9390c286b29087027ea5c4e230c88ddb
a7dc38104264714a103819d4c63353656c81d360
'2011-12-28T17:20:32-05:00'
describe
'2324' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
705cf339a203fc021b60244067c065ea
b6404d4a81db0e2bb40e34f4d1ce3bd761927ad2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26387' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
e26292abb24a05719cb7a98c82c7c4d6
6196eebd693305ff76a715ea166ef96ca4cf1e54
describe
'718406' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
072ac5df3afbd0abd36de55701856402
09254280a0799990ba8686216bb111724421e2bf
describe
'173285' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
884c29b634b50c50233dea4c6c948d24
4dcf6f8b470a883d7e41ce5f46ef70b8bba901ba
'2011-12-28T17:23:27-05:00'
describe
'3124' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
016a5c5500d492e6352a4ad7449c7e75
f546305d75299839e309f8395e3f2552abc38fca
describe
'55493' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
bd770e9f9ab604306a83d86d6677b1ba
828480d95c1e7cc668fb1fbc9a073f654b1915a3
'2011-12-28T17:19:30-05:00'
describe
'17258684' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
df4f035df16479e6c8735457e682a3e0
b9b6435649aa0a371669dad9b05d4857c6e0b2e8
'2011-12-28T17:23:09-05:00'
describe
'27605' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTN' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
1318e61b8dd0c32c44e6a90329423384
390c676e4d102bfc641219ceaf990ba454c202ea
'2011-12-28T17:20:36-05:00'
describe
'718647' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f5cb8366932aeaa3a98b2c1b512e8388
d1714a8aab7de21815b404342e1c9b0cdc18014b
'2011-12-28T17:21:58-05:00'
describe
'106754' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
0ecfe8df3ec9298df3b62057e6ec6934
f27f9db207cf85fc4cf0fed058d120bcfc9470da
describe
'2542' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
11e1ada7f5c0a35ba1cee0f95dd12c56
243f8ce9c8f0b9cc7aefabbb941e0d027d8cc69d
describe
'38901' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
8ede6c16230d93eaca187d495906cc9c
056b764695bb590a1d6fe785c61c0c99b3e88d60
'2011-12-28T17:19:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
4e8e66ef4fd5d0d96a7d7229eac133bb
35901d5f1224e4f2a14ccca3a006131ae11c8392
'2011-12-28T17:20:33-05:00'
describe
'12' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d932041efc9140ed06b5fb03662c8205
04632e71b0874ea951ec6e59c7a10c81bc1e9fa4
'2011-12-28T17:21:21-05:00'
describe
'22572' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
0bd03215b338eacd41264aaf227c929f
3890b255ecef71af2a68b7a8828e2060fabf27c0
'2011-12-28T17:19:19-05:00'
describe
'718414' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e3860382153573d5ca3e99bf993ed1e7
ef2ab84bf1913764c2aeb2c8c7cef97330d62cf2
'2011-12-28T17:20:41-05:00'
describe
'167079' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b6a4f76e759f228470036874928159c9
c671f0831d1d65c09d63b59779cce28f18dca6e0
'2011-12-28T17:23:59-05:00'
describe
'47658' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b1503f7d6fb0c47da636c04f287c4b6a
cc0f9bf26cc69707fc3d3f3a53b96cb0dcae640d
'2011-12-28T17:23:22-05:00'
describe
'55938' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
f5bcb1d22a21a7726e81c501f2c40566
814833e682857a79605d80beea611405c20902b1
'2011-12-28T17:23:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
7f2e2df9947bd63240e1294f285fe8a7
bdd35d3c0679e4b4ec28615aef44e63b2dea3269
'2011-12-28T17:20:38-05:00'
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
70f0c4dcba42245a1f945a4e311f0f6c
cfb751234ae9300c5fe85d62c6860e5dbd23d01b
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25585' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
0fa35baf49467e6ba7b511726d93403a
ad54c49d39a6721266f28b6a2f7c787e3d84bb33
'2011-12-28T17:20:02-05:00'
describe
'718713' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
47a0121552145170d51667762cfcf9af
af0ee71540491cc3203db9caa069df81fa38e1c4
describe
'141130' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
15abf43357c934653511e52a479d395d
11b288f5d25d77793bf4867a3b2d9f221c7ce5a5
describe
'31974' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
bdc35c998669107a1874cdaaa5b50f37
dea3c69560118ae619d2531cec9bf76e5ccce6df
'2011-12-28T17:21:38-05:00'
describe
'48350' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8648be1c3e01d4c936df74a985041cd8
ce85a2cd89c127c7b3b7dc1bbee66056b0de3c05
'2011-12-28T17:19:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f40e45e2301c3c992764dabb270180c3
44337888f6fcfecf8a16959b3cc3b1f1095ed4da
'2011-12-28T17:24:26-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
019e84cd22f1f6b8e1c9d16bac0fd05f
a2114af6fe34d95c6ba36fd4c5814bc1dd1313de
'2011-12-28T17:21:57-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'24284' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d34688ebd5e24e7012bd5886449b77fd
acb77398d6a680ee8c1c8e5ffaf92e6b2f8c1102
'2011-12-28T17:24:14-05:00'
describe
'718693' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
fb8fda816fd7953d9a59aec9c6dad1d1
a16fc5dfecb85e70b2ede48869d1ab6a02c43734
'2011-12-28T17:21:29-05:00'
describe
'126724' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d59b7dfd3320c23dc53bd93e14456173
1e7858572b0f2bbf01c3b64e060a3117ac974f23
'2011-12-28T17:19:22-05:00'
describe
'37236' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
e648e0895c5a15f40cb121273377fd17
57d6f4e3cce9585a1af4e8799a983c4a6717355a
'2011-12-28T17:22:43-05:00'
describe
'45033' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
8a4effc99e857e76fd0913033e4d9ad7
4c9b8f7ee12118388b08c67b9ac49f706251f120
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
6bb5554de086ebf83c55fdc92f5af883
3636e368a50cf745b7049b9a3f67cb4e7249b5f3
'2011-12-28T17:22:05-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
66f71523235d253b9d55da9c1ee9469f
d2764350e8ef0c09c57b2b114e334d9e852ae77e
'2011-12-28T17:19:38-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'23308' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
816187de64b7658edda3e41a88906216
9d138a9bf3b0c0bc284edb7eb1e5e49e90dfb878
describe
'718343' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
607d58c99fe9deb2b136719bb4b6c84e
62bd87c5b2398f57ecf86d94fe619c5fa0e5ab7f
describe
'115755' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
27af10a21f5e95af8015ad440d772ee4
91560528515c2011f1388660326abbbed8f32216
describe
'4290' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
fddf05a8b7e118ca8fe8de1504c33a44
e4b3fbd0fc86bafd4e8f31418084883f0ce15266
describe
'40893' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e8d3a02534602d24b120ff59c5baadbd
efa444059fe2e004f884587841f705c42c9dfb69
'2011-12-28T17:24:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
295edb3316efba30c7822d20a1763f48
26a981ddf3ccaa8f3d225eae7426c64500a9e29a
'2011-12-28T17:19:31-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5647284786f7a3ca0c752c5be29c8cec
3445b3fad21471e7d8e1e59472ba3156996b8e09
'2011-12-28T17:22:44-05:00'
describe
'23176' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
61cc0b2e2667f5e868bed66fc03badd8
ced2400c1388eeea3d03c3f52c5447eb8d6c6b0e
describe
'718704' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
0be4c24dfc8280796f12f65eabac9bd7
18456da2b186729bbceb8b5db8959d54d6ab1261
'2011-12-28T17:20:08-05:00'
describe
'157922' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
44d4e62878b8dc77a24160046568e0bb
e74d571dbde8bc5652cae094e90751229c65c80a
describe
'41725' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8759f70a8486509511acad8d85145e80
a532a1935cf7261b5952670712a7ae8ec3e72e48
'2011-12-28T17:22:52-05:00'
describe
'52464' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
277f30e458ac28930902b68da49465e3
53461a60fc978ded79e8074723e3d0c12023df47
'2011-12-28T17:19:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
3cd46e1e9439dfe52e4871971e9b8519
98036d43b50b40e3d769128461574dbce30645de
'2011-12-28T17:19:54-05:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0b89d1dc4814f83e95dc3131407bd288
12fd49a83687df54c4d2c183a921e41c95f35682
'2011-12-28T17:22:04-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'24958' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
74c20d5c3b8f93e3eb7a04f688666c41
2848a2c3e0690a63c53d4705131514ced1422580
'2011-12-28T17:19:24-05:00'
describe
'718423' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
807d219f5b966703733d70937e6f155e
edb3c17b21b1e390ac35ae0d245f17330bc60326
describe
'183875' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a60ce2f7ce3f949c380731c471b99bdd
03e980417e38bcc0cb6cb289fec8807214777043
describe
'11466' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ddaeed0ad024d7e0e30a8c99b81eb80c
b02fdab73824a7bdf03be8faf43fd1654d27e642
describe
'56884' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
b5616fcb5d08b0377018b0d2fff78a4b
529fe8bedf6741740c836fad1c5bff520e3076f3
'2011-12-28T17:20:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
8e988e1e32f33315f7b1fa9deff48a42
08de381b5665492e8146ff562c24681524bc01a6
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9cbac0588e99151bb8aa7749b8e4275a
38baa21dfb869dbd05db114f61cf7278bae40f45
'2011-12-28T17:23:52-05:00'
describe
'26733' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
3ca3f8000f328dbe4ff9a88a98f5ed5b
03a939c065e00a3d59a03e753ab37b3a92436ecb
describe
'718362' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
bb938773273bca29a9be0393eb59dd31
87112545f6bd3a0e488bda8bc7a8d02d89201796
describe
'182021' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2bbbbe959b3c612ca66c8ae3161460d4
c5c7663272020b8d23514a9e102d37cbda43c730
'2011-12-28T17:21:30-05:00'
describe
'55372' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
963598a0b1075eb055e53280ca9c78e5
757799e7a0a4e7aacbdfd7e733be2654c1703893
describe
'59330' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
75d12e409e5161da0e05621503e9c262
bd73584c73729854f186598f9b81e53bae204971
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
caf8d915d36f3f37777dc758dd6c1285
2d82dd668b2d0edbbb9860d12b40a8e0c595a07b
describe
'2065' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7cf6a08a24a50afeddd33bf438d32a46
616dabdb4b33b8c9db79245e97e7f188dd1b29fb
'2011-12-28T17:24:37-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26061' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVR' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
af8e5779c373f75e21aafc58896f1243
85f2c9bf8cf6a4027eee6a9ecad669c93ab724ca
'2011-12-28T17:24:35-05:00'
describe
'718364' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVS' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ae96d9d16fce17d538f23dc1d9a4a365
4542b73fd3b9e99dca7dadf0f6e8924ff4a9014d
'2011-12-28T17:22:01-05:00'
describe
'177294' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVT' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
f16c6ef1b09e7c15ea8a2d549f86e5b8
1a134b925e015fb1d0749666b90900fbc952ef98
describe
'4522' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVU' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0babd19f832344bbe303c39df82668ca
c13ab5907fcc3c6c7b701abceb0a1e0322d67e48
'2011-12-28T17:21:40-05:00'
describe
'54396' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVV' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
f0659db770ca045b6e8605b27441af8b
10be2b3a05eea98833c7257c5b55846dd3f85d57
'2011-12-28T17:24:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
050e8b3c4c872340e049e2537b944f1f
acc32bd4dee5d5a938492dba9a63dd0055927923
'2011-12-28T17:20:43-05:00'
describe
'20' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9055a48eff8923d5a6306e0943dbee09
f260fa867f619688c3e972c3976535d6595d7fc7
describe
'25801' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
d98393d007f5b0ef030f3bb74cbf19f6
bf9c6d335db1f7346e8e0f950f7bd2eec5c958cb
'2011-12-28T17:22:46-05:00'
describe
'718728' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7701ed9cbc31eb03951d7e3e35f3994f
a87cb7451e2b9830b990e566b6da1e39025fe68f
'2011-12-28T17:20:23-05:00'
describe
'155340' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWA' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e7ec257428e4f016d64eacc47fbd5a7b
8374a4329a057be22b10123b6d730454fe9d1831
describe
'39367' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
dfdabe12cd2838752f345d7d008906e2
7f2ba29e961aaa2cd872c14a8d4770358eb9517b
'2011-12-28T17:23:15-05:00'
describe
'51563' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c680fffc62e37c4b6b9d6bcee7233d7b
959a44df839e406272a657e1741732c92fe2e238
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
15d03a9acb58eea8b9775d7d4cd4dc21
0ec5e46af330485e29a3e8ab71db257d836bc485
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWE' 'sip-files00036.txt'
1f686a5230071aa7909177adfe0a3959
b5e0907ade4a373769a04a01935e115a4ee19fbe
describe
'24552' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
11515ff21350792dbba23d5ea369daf1
d0348e5305d26b9d0e1f71505cb3c14e713298a1
'2011-12-28T17:20:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
2e46b876135dc086aead892307abf42f
05c13199a125655eb72303954986c7deb8e14c93
'2011-12-28T17:23:38-05:00'
describe
'166222' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a96975049148f2aef10be368574847a4
7f888f4f608d35f02943f975d387f626ad807a0d
describe
'30842' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
fafbf3de133bcb3e4ead7376e8197710
d8bddf3a54926861078e9df8c467891e5965dffc
'2011-12-28T17:21:36-05:00'
describe
'53669' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
36df1c6c0c95380b0cf40eb95473b369
8fa2ea921e7362f6f4ed7007860fc1cb4d9e34cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
961220b71ce0c4fe70f7ef29595f31fe
aa1fa088b9955a95d2718050e9e70ca0a0c59f05
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
446bd0dbc48d5c1091bafb6bc656f359
5f433fa36a53b69ceb427a1f52de562c7a666878
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25591' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWM' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
58f725a0781325d32088c698ed4656a6
9e9394188b9eab6f52ee1d5848ea52e2fb7fc754
'2011-12-28T17:23:10-05:00'
describe
'718687' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWN' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f555263260b9e6bdfb269623ffd67254
78c47c58c08a22d84381c0c89c9c5a5132a43069
describe
'188103' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
13d2321f2c65adab39192649d210a01b
0be7f3010be3725fc00f19ece52db174109732dd
describe
'68536' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
203e2850da544e490ec5921641296d8a
562a2c1a7a2265ac5fa2493f4b1bc0809f7ff71a
describe
'63998' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
52c6c5931b173ff5d962dbffff3cec88
a818b065474ae20ca673d36788a69b7f94b97c25
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9bfc68785f13cb02bd337c7a0d1bf54e
c1d260ce8752541ea6164faef43128ae0bc3c596
describe
'2554' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
777cac05ed7d2fcb0b609df14a8ae1a3
239ad7ce2301196fabc5416329695c9902c83baa
'2011-12-28T17:22:13-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26767' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
49b0996835e3d1a064753cd1b9541338
4370339934ea3003c3e505a557a303c810246ddb
describe
'718460' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
59baa8447cdea7b1e32fd76430ae44d7
3b2a6949f9be83c4e8ce7970ae24ef82d6863b30
describe
'179690' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f2bb55c6f951f5b1c08825a3a8b47b54
af2f3c8a9f26dde5ab4626346774aa6f4cca7371
describe
'6198' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWW' 'sip-files00039.pro'
8efe996670abb70cb6abce9529c2c833
f8a6b7f659f42f1a9ddba3ce41ee71bd8d6ab4d1
describe
'52469' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
179ddc778ef079c45d160bf2da131646
49c8b234fca8f9c6273390f514023fb1ace8ea3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
62b8d8844db986b1de77d2f3be188f0e
e786ef97b85a0c54c654995302ebea45281bd904
'2011-12-28T17:19:29-05:00'
describe
'15' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
058f1d53b364942583a69747c18d62f1
dc50b15f64a91bee525888e9d0914a1c6b9e4e6b
describe
'25709' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
a2681c82ec9d90bca5288d620ccdeb49
de07f4b74883f5644291250cd9f49633f73b4f28
'2011-12-28T17:20:00-05:00'
describe
'718631' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f83c2fe50e12c4137f902746775fdb37
e687957fd0cac0dda81763cbd7f8fddcb93b9581
describe
'146760' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4cb49cf7b3c654748243913b6c595a03
ea45d971eeaac62e613e7bfda17984794d892835
describe
'20069' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
570e2a4f9d063c439613a670f859e06a
aff60466fcde2864ddedeb66139e06bbfeb1ebd0
describe
'48756' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
30c7ccde0d84eb3e147bcc0ca651c4ab
23148f93bf0ba289866d823be580ca49d6b847a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9bf41a959589e3153e026444fabcb9f2
c709436fb5e10025e93a17ef1fc9a3c27f43d36e
'2011-12-28T17:20:09-05:00'
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
bbe8ed3d19f32a1406217c721970acd6
9e81f9ccc52cfbc260ab3c0948e746436d2c10b2
'2011-12-28T17:19:43-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'24642' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXH' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
0c978179ec5049e5bfd83108864e503c
4ada082b92053599d02246db4de4969d1af4b3a6
'2011-12-28T17:21:28-05:00'
describe
'718724' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c11656a83ed08fb25d8970b2f217b245
eb2cad6d214056937fa4e43f795ac18ef495422e
describe
'171968' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
670731210c01b0779dcdd71e050cc56e
dda3a1bef32606b32560f7a5a8e1a40b9ceda79c
describe
'46242' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
7dee83341709735761d92a04a01712e1
257aa381e1311a0e007d20b1b65449a3cee679b5
describe
'56268' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
7039fce0e0e0a292961c47fa3d8d46f7
101f514e49bf12511e7c03eea466679934e54ea6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1b05d80c2587532845ec3f246bc6b376
af649670bb7ae82778987e657f2016a8898d4370
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
eaabcf4ce6ef126f4cbbfeb6be8b7c18
94806560b1675d5e93ecb21d47eecb0c09c4f265
'2011-12-28T17:22:07-05:00'
describe
'25665' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
f71af1d6a48dbd1ce0825010e5525e39
3a5614292e6d54ebd4f089115f92e57a0a8f268e
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
ccc22d284d4eb4c8adbc12dbecfe3a90
86161d178e3b5644b80a6238a6f7e868e752505f
describe
'122434' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8d889a40d8da35925d9f65b51da87ffd
cdbaeb82fc83fff5f2730f42803d4645828e9ef7
describe
'37548' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
acea272312f77bac91042115142d021d
95c083d0a3d8f3ff5335cbf0105bb06f6578d4bc
describe
'44223' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
39bd9d481340da5fea03ce60d1f0c310
737c85a32c62961c3e592ea08cf770cb9791b01e
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f3ea932cdcf9597a294c0b15e74a69d8
777fc427d20927baec12f50f2bc925b0cc7ea4a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3eb6949a623069ea103e516f3e19ba98
936cd0cc3a33e155c8ee554e32a610860aca2231
'2011-12-28T17:24:11-05:00'
describe
'23617' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
88ec3f90ca050d02562808567b41045e
712604a00a6eabc2d8b2848e694173d9a96092d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
083cc37521c55fbf83bbd66266c59ba0
abf3cf48c80db6d76d9d9216751e2411d461c261
'2011-12-28T17:20:01-05:00'
describe
'190560' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
702411e5baf2be8207b033f636fe7010
2b63ba52b02034c361f1deb0a6e1c50f98c739a2
describe
'4518' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
1573c10674efa2164c042b864e35aaec
0865a23a6509fbb3dd66d98bb52b352a9d81a4bf
'2011-12-28T17:20:22-05:00'
describe
'54236' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
cd5c499535bd07907bf87f9e93055f9c
2ec7141c8408282a64dc05243617322362733fc9
describe
'5763884' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
5b291356d4b037a832d9a5fd0eb8f7a1
3f60ccae5b88b1ed40818585ba2165138cb7208d
'2011-12-28T17:22:23-05:00'
describe
'46' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
0f2148a46fe48b7bfb64c8eeb063a865
2e94806a638b9a371835d92e93bc45da590a3570
describe
'25822' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
7714667aaec4a2e71c5d2539f53652c7
503a2e4da88a4973c770844ecd2f203f344d8aa2
'2011-12-28T17:23:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
95f910261825a590e3873af185e81cc8
6e81b466b30ad7ff087ef81e6c7b418f0e1f8b2f
describe
'166465' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
8226e78b116d23f424228fb15729deab
cce68539b9a929b4e10a04690e1dc12d891ccfcc
'2011-12-28T17:20:07-05:00'
describe
'57219' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
50da2201927d65b8a2515a4d3da92108
d62f079f1ce793c159ad4b4c5c45902a13755467
describe
'57376' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e1ecff5ffee374ddabdd388b3c4543e5
e36440ddccf5a716d1b0c06f980e725111c732c4
'2011-12-28T17:19:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b20e5e8ce023a0d715f089a78b9559f2
97841f0673b579602eb2c499128dcbcaa99b6af8
describe
'2179' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ab1389bbd78e63ee923bf50c08d1f228
7ff4354f4f579156fb0767fc3b4aaf56fbcfbaf4
'2011-12-28T17:20:28-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25661' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9f1f7b8be08b6bc855010fee752d579b
056bd8b57735a1ba0dbfdca96779a89d95160805
'2011-12-28T17:22:30-05:00'
describe
'718600' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
385d9fc5befc3187ff6fc223a1d17c71
f906fc1ca6dc7b0fcf43b14d70246c407e4c1b83
describe
'165394' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e2ebaed490fee80fb00e104da647d5d6
6ae63916cb8ce8ab4bfd3e03800821d03c4b006d
'2011-12-28T17:20:54-05:00'
describe
'35083' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a334c71b02d62a48991d74f35d2d0e58
e9648c0fdba64f54bd5008008c2cc5b2abecfed0
describe
'53787' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYN' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
b04041539ad9c87177b4fab53d4cf38f
bd7ac5e6ebb721ffc7a92fa0b24b9b4151a73001
'2011-12-28T17:20:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
220f6b223e5807b198716c8ec9af2fd3
9f2f23b35318e755cd0f1bea1eb182c425f9dfd4
'2011-12-28T17:22:08-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
cd5cd7e43605c071478fcc6e9b5cc592
4ddc9988cf5249b82b398fcfc817196b128d0c5d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25393' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c2d951d838cc31735f62fe53a52ec14f
5394288902d5155e5045754618577639a5cc149c
describe
'718583' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
3466fb17e976d2d64784ffa63f31d7c8
e8967cbe0974c3440f9754e4ece326cced150028
describe
'143929' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
74e581576ef155168c783ab83d39e3de
a94bdeaed4acb30f30c295a62fd6699a59ebb922
describe
'29897' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
dcf9b0cdcbd3e786765c514c8754f2b5
a5172dc4a7b32ec4167ab85bd1769a895382570c
'2011-12-28T17:23:51-05:00'
describe
'48867' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
0bf0eb8c8351c513b53a978b0081ed4e
86a3d0b30786b19cb372996ccf64419722d5bc9a
'2011-12-28T17:23:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c9e865c0859844ff9729282d64de14fa
d366a89f7aff331c8bea1368151f77fefa598371
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
8f233b34d3e80b4e2113d036cdfd6c0e
3403534962d3debbd2a96cede172205117f4fc13
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'24493' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
45297193e5a4e725435ee9a197b44750
81206fdfecc2b81c8ce73775890bcb951cf82359
'2011-12-28T17:23:46-05:00'
describe
'718099' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
33d67b1e2bfd9093fa325e47db435a1f
e2c8ade8bb37d7d1e3c0705398c49f4004de092b
describe
'118895' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f50857e14a68d1b88aafde82ebe712dd
1819bd4d0f37dc57c025344fb3230d1ac4222005
'2011-12-28T17:24:15-05:00'
describe
'7764' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
837467fa1d39f71cbc1a76b40f52f3aa
9a8ac4ad834831ac4a2980df69428a54bc64a656
describe
'42958' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
04ab1a3d922c6b3dbbc4931b6f2072a0
ac967a7e588fd513e2b27b5c725d7fdf25f0a7dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8737463ae3881a4bbde32fa02160c41b
b941760fd84cde6a92604472fafcb332959022bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
fd8c6cd37d3da4b690e8a5a316231d4e
a4008eb7d7a22f68e8606761ef4dbbeb861a061d
describe
'23456' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
f71b3b3572006dd487547d6949f19072
762f4844b4272c0dd23057c0662faaa5daa6a2ee
describe
'718703' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
cda3fc8019e273858c48ad9dde601fbd
a5bcb30d2f208a9a43bd87f9f3720c081ac3df23
describe
'176483' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
46313eb13b0dadff0046986a2862388a
7e4daea4baf319bf59637d65dd4b9f0127fcf53e
'2011-12-28T17:22:28-05:00'
describe
'62474' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
09e254159e9ddb353dc6704faf782262
72f1b9acfc033eae278bd8c0fb3795fedd941f95
describe
'60056' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8af7231c81aea19528551aeeea1c40f8
32c3ed69623b71067ad909aab7c771008fe9f512
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
14c059e59edfaa3fa401480be8326c65
4160092b717fdd130e7a3c31463a93cf0d24e743
describe
'2332' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2478709bd3e08213f6096688ca8ca34a
37b55175b50d4ed35c0e3b66d027372099682b77
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26057' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
a93abd9d6e410194420cc2eb84068c66
0cffffccd5ba42959aae655eb8b90d570e078719
describe
'718706' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ba5380e3466a71e8cf11bb5861fc6afa
3e06d4d8fdbe16c0e3db6b5960c38a48941e8278
'2011-12-28T17:23:07-05:00'
describe
'182930' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c5ee1e3f842cc012a4f92e788d7b74d3
3af70673714d6603f0918eaa4e05bfefbb228c26
'2011-12-28T17:23:44-05:00'
describe
'44005' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
22976e0c47447f0eb6664270cd99eca2
f244c3ade334a691f645d3712043a0313537a9e5
describe
'59579' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b20320aafb2db3f83f3d671e60bedae6
6e986c69237c15ce2334fd1402a7638d13cf5a4b
'2011-12-28T17:20:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
521ef66690071d368166680fe614c11b
3066d739d377b6d52723f8a8ddb8d4ba1ced8da5
'2011-12-28T17:19:49-05:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZR' 'sip-files00049.txt'
2c3a9862e715b236f9b2756956ee740f
9b45956ad0218af5683ca99439c693aa75636c2e
'2011-12-28T17:19:23-05:00'
describe
'26534' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
cba1230932c550a6214570543c6e4d03
d4cfdc4789b81a0dac5f2192992b61e514e5c0ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
fe99b947e37c4f4746e2c829d119b093
981b42947c93ddf154a069256445c9818599d12a
'2011-12-28T17:22:37-05:00'
describe
'162111' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e58966307f52f5356aee0c606426d312
b0550f35564feeafe05bc6f63868f6ec0fca31e7
describe
'56616' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8be498a619471bd6f624da1d982f7d53
be2f489f275ee53b0888d8e32b72a26e4d969039
describe
'55946' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
70a14faff82cf9c555d7348acef6302e
8c1d17322dc1770734ea9e030707f058b55dd7f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5b6930987be83fcd9149d28894d879a2
b44d1b59aa796cad5ef2f4a94aa514227fe3948f
'2011-12-28T17:24:25-05:00'
describe
'2095' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6135cb41f3fca6ac64ea0e2b3d532fa1
54d4e051ca5c45d8cb5230f84c1c13055d8c6165
'2011-12-28T17:24:03-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25360' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c0cf7c12ee0f6d0072bdbfd6175a7473
15317d78ad5d668a5b94f1f303140ba0550577be
describe
'718509' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAA' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
01291b21a5d8fcad63e0dc9b3ea7475b
0809a96e190aa6633a97ec3ffa38ccbadba041a9
describe
'112623' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
d410f60acef7cce08a58da2f5f363d15
4fdff5d9535dcdc85e3978f82b366c56cbb313cb
'2011-12-28T17:21:42-05:00'
describe
'9166' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f8893b4ebf6c216e7ca9aa8b7c02381e
f9c7e9add260fca286fc764b4757f4d65758f854
describe
'39170' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
4343e129686a3eef64f5276f31fdef9f
045ac5cab36c6bbcfe266facd8663a7558a6d276
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
13ccac9da6b2e4b8c4e1c18cf9ad6c55
5e3c0d2315e529e7d5f62d0b91d8a6a6f380bb08
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
ffbb0a544b685d6027400b606fc9d114
3b062c836ac5cedc7b0374d08c6a4af940aa2570
'2011-12-28T17:22:11-05:00'
describe
'22459' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
62b08b768f5d740a8979ec386c6ddcec
c9dca790f8b0a6ea63d801386cfbfbf0ab683ee1
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
5d1dab6c2af24aa80cd1af667d961562
3c98edc3d0aafea1cd45aa1be6e2742c3d2ba62e
describe
'174682' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
fd5cfe35173340224b9fb939a0dddaaf
bc6985df61eae718a001fb394f81f7f17a57aade
describe
'43738' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAJ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2541d35cab16971c7a805d1aa21c3498
1885b2706da8d292a2b855f694eb5c00d41c5210
'2011-12-28T17:22:10-05:00'
describe
'58243' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
abff690a5c7bd20a38ac954ad703cee9
765b9bb60fcf0832a501fdf1227a19f4b7117065
'2011-12-28T17:21:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a16b6b662f281f877040ff29c512705b
7caece606cca25ee4faab2d4b85f8ef35c4abae4
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAM' 'sip-files00052.txt'
976922b588f341416a04d2cd6252399f
2d4fa79626cee6ac2bf428e4821cce0424a66dfe
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25832' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAN' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a63c4e5fe4b61bf445c08da15693dc1a
20101912bfb9635cab150cf0e16421c5c9e1845a
describe
'718672' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b63986baed1940fcf8454caff0e6486e
b7788a4b213f1a5f0d974145f72f40df54b62a40
describe
'200593' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
5dd25d45c4807a5bd0780eec5f415856
1e86f79087389c81c5728b377ca4a6df824df308
'2011-12-28T17:22:29-05:00'
describe
'2831' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAQ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
42e2be5d127b609b682a244f33cea4c0
99490eecb4f8c543c6ab7ab1cc30a834de114f4d
'2011-12-28T17:20:10-05:00'
describe
'63424' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5db61f4885a783127fa2472945d55bfa
44592fd2729730d360a6f3058868a4d6765307e8
describe
'17264880' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAS' 'sip-files00053.tif'
7cc75bcecd4bf6a140d87fd06a31cfdd
29f18b4208704750663b1105d4884a6c2d5f99a8
'2011-12-28T17:19:25-05:00'
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAT' 'sip-files00053.txt'
07632c65c294ddc95c06369a390f626e
4f8cf8b96da52ae14731ef7a5448294e2fc09dab
'2011-12-28T17:20:04-05:00'
describe
'28920' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
fba7adac718cd6cfcf07e907120a860e
8b1aaf6e5f1805267d1fada5f2268c4ab4471f38
describe
'718375' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAV' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
55d856f24f39815edf4bd0447d25bcfc
ead98ed1ee1b554737d2c9b591ce30007b2f4b5b
'2011-12-28T17:21:55-05:00'
describe
'175612' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAW' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
43fddb8693182949d13a8d1f74f2825b
f89a42dc48faee3591c1b6eeaa4a35878cc4c422
describe
'48105' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAX' 'sip-files00055.pro'
844d55139581baaff298461075ed073a
945983abb8a74544680a2a9d557c515ab3719cb1
describe
'59115' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAY' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
ce68e6f2e766fba99aa841b94817ae28
c941772cc7380374186e45300d58f1b748790590
'2011-12-28T17:23:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a4ec53ab62f12f63685e6b182b86e7ef
d1598fafb55b3da32268f2ded5ffdaac8ba49ad2
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBA' 'sip-files00055.txt'
8cb22d288df246e8d27114b39e6d13d7
c9b884d93a0583dacbc0acfad8da5594fba38953
describe
'25829' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBB' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e4df77ac2c754817c3fbdb660c9efb36
74d8bf148a91d283b87c97629517e248503ecc7d
'2011-12-28T17:23:35-05:00'
describe
'718153' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBC' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
489bf6114466e2b24a6d4c71c627e525
6ae5e0ed7c66ebb8f3fbb7538ff0a50e8fb34204
'2011-12-28T17:20:13-05:00'
describe
'184904' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBD' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
921529309aedb4456571b582076abb53
0974c7323bd0470321224b275122f6615f9abb51
describe
'70714' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBE' 'sip-files00056.pro'
6ba6b08015de1734da3ddd9cc646313a
d0aa48c22b715338fbe68bb2aa622c1165da0094
'2011-12-28T17:21:45-05:00'
describe
'62640' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBF' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b6313fb3e9feb01e73dbd8dc4ef571d2
802f03429eda72697f671f6d7c3ade201feb7b19
'2011-12-28T17:21:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBG' 'sip-files00056.tif'
50e9dcd57650aa35a4ec5310aa9a552d
f2654b9ff3d8f1395edb3203ba91416e51120b17
describe
'2661' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBH' 'sip-files00056.txt'
0ab58b1f5a9683701964b5b12f0c858b
ec7ff4ef2e78aa5559032b6b98048630ac00dcbc
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26218' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBI' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
f3f03c492091d583fec4c83094837495
bc06975d5e897e37e4a3e2ae2a3cd421258bf0aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c7d8cf2ed17249547f5260bcd03e57f5
e62bb95577634304b0c7415c85f2dcb134cfa806
describe
'192786' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBK' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
7b8a3e032367c6bb4e0456de5b80bd9b
68c467f06f96938d5f13880f462937727bb2028e
describe
'4422' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBL' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8d18d949ca6174b61792577014c8c003
63cf8d02ef6f8eea52302fd63636515170a6ea56
'2011-12-28T17:22:02-05:00'
describe
'56301' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBM' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
8fc6d0edcb0edfeb287aafb64d34dc8a
928dc1822282c79ca6595e6b45e22cb9c46e3bcf
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBN' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6992354225663147ec9fcfaebea82b66
db9cb5a3d7c1ec84154958fc4c6ef4d1fa00e793
'2011-12-28T17:23:57-05:00'
describe
'52' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBO' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ef2c3746e5ec42ab1c5fd8ea033f5dcd
0fe9a8d62e8d1dd3fa9fdc2d31d1ed8b371d6636
describe
'26161' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBP' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
8f448a14e4c27f8235fc4c31928685dd
ce55171f757046ef05ab7bf07a1dc453efe649ff
'2011-12-28T17:24:09-05:00'
describe
'718110' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a0c6e86b2fda6785962826020a86b1d8
2c8328ce8e440aa8a35de979d03567d8768cd947
'2011-12-28T17:19:56-05:00'
describe
'181073' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBR' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
86ab4419527177fe292922c44060437d
22205fa38e1a1003722cea5b22a56555dbad8b53
describe
'57315' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBS' 'sip-files00058.pro'
65678d7036ba1115fafa8cb7da6cdcf6
f3956397a4d34d473b2ada6ce8ebaf66c8cb6ed5
describe
'59262' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBT' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2c0a3ecb6a38c950dda2917caaa708c8
b2e316a1485ae1c171ef66ab2aad98d0802cd25c
'2011-12-28T17:24:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBU' 'sip-files00058.tif'
daae1383a106488264c0fd94e508d58f
6b480797dcccd40f63da719160cf1f51aa0e662b
describe
'2127' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBV' 'sip-files00058.txt'
900905bf82108a4bf138f6d6fa3a8b2f
973c71f8b8a41d96a741e77fa05f212678789620
'2011-12-28T17:22:00-05:00'
describe
'25830' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBW' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c1e4b9fefbcab9f902373c48c2609f57
1c11121f6c6779245cb9e390f3fb6066faa02739
describe
'718369' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBX' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f11032a38d8f9efe34dc940b0cb5d5f9
66e7ee9e357a88c479c55c0bd24c45e5a9472060
describe
'88397' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBY' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f877414bb8fa47e62ed577a3aced50e4
8d799cf28e8c01b102857681e71faa0e1c288a5d
describe
'3692' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCBZ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
41ef5dff603a7d78461dbb528dbb4b1b
880ac6c7e0db0804955d2361ff8bde04c7b2c838
describe
'41267' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCA' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
293a8a9d369b284bb3361444fcb88930
3a382d6eda709628d315ec230903938eaf8e53ad
describe
'17264488' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCB' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3137763c77d4a0b3578ee37866464913
70ad44b15d02f51c307ea5b4a2ead3492dc6c721
'2011-12-28T17:22:17-05:00'
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCC' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4778cf84bcd73724e433a06243608147
3bba623dc21842c07a9d4c7967aa2aac00e8faac
describe
'28594' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCD' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
cd5a1200b5417408cfd4fbf01ed16b99
b333e2fafb1d7e152d8e7387cb864a34d55721d0
describe
'718683' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
743515c2291138493885776bc960ec9f
251067d221aecf6e950663479489ce2197b4fb28
describe
'191053' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
301afe924f192431167183b7e2d60616
036ca930f7ed9827eacc224e365b29d39743f159
'2011-12-28T17:24:12-05:00'
describe
'66263' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b7a18be07ac59d76e0d5d0c6fba41a40
4332f7c6802fbd0dc228dd045a632b0d3639b564
describe
'64425' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
131210113e58718a3d5a12597ea1e06c
636a73e7657b35318a1723c8a9c90670060754d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
a9e3e66ba2d43b5440859d0990128ec5
dda7cda925f0907c42fe2b71fcd18911f24eff42
describe
'2509' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
94e3fb06ca9e990934c2953c3b40818f
46a710550367a6ed911399710c8a5116c4ca4968
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26908' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7f27cd96f4fed1b07475911aa81a8629
fb40039ac3035a9024b8067246d22f6e9b0afed0
'2011-12-28T17:21:35-05:00'
describe
'718372' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
8fa9e05c2c53ca70cb24b2fd1ad392b7
a681ae3631ed4c64e4a28730dc6cbf2f91ccb078
describe
'153917' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
870f6b708c23c1515692407658708209
ff6d43cc9a6bf229451506141322fc44b2f251da
'2011-12-28T17:24:22-05:00'
describe
'52310' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8b73fdeeb4aed75f40c3e6341c2e4318
d93d5a5651b1523de76e8888e8240b5e658c9580
describe
'53412' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
25c4d1c32f6c866ee50b96f79ae6e1f9
fdc5eaa7ff763d3871c53ad8dcb7975b903e2172
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
678e65ad568a4ad5d7dab954c7815fa9
43870b5df61b2d503ed6535584bed10c492e4c0e
'2011-12-28T17:24:18-05:00'
describe
'1949' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5f3607e7064aaf05b360a39a05143bbc
03a40ed47f7a08e31fd395e79b4fcfddbce63bcc
describe
'25009' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
917905db20d4c2f2804d16ea15abf1bb
ed6b54326046c09f81813e9301e46c7d537437ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5d1c333786540cca9477a710c77e087f
c1d7dc6c96cf94bb45645f7955b76c806e575f58
describe
'123332' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
90e40452d3c67674cf7a5a3f5a352316
4140d6ba4c3b94d49076ae7919a795a74aa890b9
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3aba5df5ff142df9e68bd9cc1aafd943
7f12c56a914f49b54d6fd5efdd0092f178722492
describe
'42336' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
75178fa10c3eed88ebf3d94f4dd9b1c4
f903830ea6f8523553179a8ecaa9161e607925c0
'2011-12-28T17:22:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
034e6520d16a268ce2c2d33bcc713019
106028d8d4033541d0c0af27f2c55924edf9394c
describe
'23' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
a041b1088c0a52573946dd200b94004a
ed48f6e3f534fa81e627c43ef055daf20f066d2c
'2011-12-28T17:19:18-05:00'
describe
'22931' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
a7ca7dc35f4b7c811695d317310157e2
f06181d079d0486d718162c1be26010c525046a7
describe
'718125' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5a5d887282860ce7f4a0752dec1c1871
22294bcf3181e33bc6c005e23555f8ed0f00f198
'2011-12-28T17:23:26-05:00'
describe
'146285' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
70fbb454c4d9901d4990cbd85af6dcce
648709ce3f0e94f5f921c90ea63d428ec6797bb2
describe
'48576' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
dc371912efbd07362ca99cfce0f28988
47b66da54f55e0aecff53fef013c84270dbb9bc1
describe
'51353' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
b77599da0b747f425edb41ef1e63ca0e
5466b2e90168a382a7721f0c9bc9ea2bd06e15b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
35e9245b6bc14df3bed0b1591f3d1a01
77a073a0d0d3d08afa8c450cf5c5306437394f19
describe
'1810' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
caf5e1c1f5703c75b290b3efd0741807
fb499f9b2dd10684f4e5326785686e58600027ed
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'24783' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6a6204475e1554dbc1b6e8dd6cc6aed4
69140b8b65e806c580f0712b48750b4b9cf256ac
describe
'718380' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
2ddb56f3fc42d3db6e6df8bc8636647c
c22070ee7440613239baa216413a065fbe5d1a9f
describe
'174848' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
36d10f5405bf79c11553b872b88c7051
e9c7b798a61e6d80596d250ac0bbfa4fec5624c8
describe
'46469' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c23868241679d4170481535cfd4ec701
e3c047567d56392948ed9ff150173586f5ba4ede
describe
'58689' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
773779e700d2460d06ca0cc4bc2d3823
9d9765c324d5c3be1a095a10e09684c449bab6d3
'2011-12-28T17:22:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7387b050e91fe2dc01d4f1eca6948dfd
ccd9d7b90fde8cb22057bb90fa1a3e9d8af17b7d
'2011-12-28T17:19:34-05:00'
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
2f29910c497365e422fdb75f28269b26
5fa1e34eafb90c1ef09bced9ece77b14cd6cf8f2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'26437' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
936f2dc1ccb80527613fea171c004f0d
b4b6c022d2fbefb6782f1b0dc623a5d0464f342d
describe
'718694' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
eb59887feafbee7a1132e7f9f7a81d30
af571f4fe2f584b0821f6f8eb4c302b0cd0804e8
describe
'151653' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
fed8973c38c8951aef7f72fd630e0c80
e98bc660b62381b8f7d743cff85b17a1a9df5c2f
describe
'50042' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5253038519e20b4d1c71e0f61d598df1
f3583a75b80a1701e70db30fb15a797256462813
describe
'52114' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e3972f1f446a5546020a28223eb89719
d9d7d398a4637d1c8bef978ad9ce4ba4dc374ff6
'2011-12-28T17:23:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
28cfed1d622e6153681ce2112f74c5c2
4a1918a0b9dcb929345765a8ef52a034e62ac6da
describe
'1871' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
aef579a6cfcee9ba7630e397713e4628
c50a435f5b9eb26453b440e1dd8e6db1eff4595a
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25079' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
fb3df5e2d3780b7a0dc3878e0134fdaf
0eaed7e314483512536a0f5ce2cd37ca9312d470
describe
'718526' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bbdb82cc1fe0fa887cfbf7e4018f1705
bbe69ba65cd93686ace97fd2fc1ac7d841218e4e
describe
'185641' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
1a06085f0d39a41b178dc26a07778800
13e158f7be662d3453ce33d0181aca7c62542ec3
'2011-12-28T17:20:53-05:00'
describe
'5041' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
815fb212361770a992f9081fe6a162b0
873cd56a275644eb747dd9cf5f70afbfaf7ebdfa
'2011-12-28T17:24:08-05:00'
describe
'57266' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
4ff0d211efc1b652e5520552a0b3e4df
dde97ba719e27d966cfcd0560123754f3d0b9cc4
'2011-12-28T17:23:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
72913ddd2c4aa8e92322225fc62a30b1
3a09e944d1b283001c2c29e53bb0ba6956c70b04
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
bb7c36417db0735bade90a2cccbb5bc8
98e54dfe695e0895f261699d64ebb52a1ac361c7
describe
'26936' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
84d1b2a67daecc1fd5416f5ed79d03fb
d71de55c33921c990c22e69e1d80eb4a7b2544d7
describe
'718702' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e3e2b885b945a05fb5f8694d4bd86d84
eaa7a73edb356c537b79fbfb3a2923aae591d9a5
describe
'132742' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e7170abf89615a0b4a4b735aaeb3d6d7
414ea66ee03c04e0f5e890e48b3b6dca624535de
'2011-12-28T17:23:18-05:00'
describe
'40698' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCED' 'sip-files00068.pro'
81111b59b8b5f35fa85885df3589bc72
85bead1107b57324a6cf218137ec14b8aa61b68a
describe
'47253' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
61e7141cb021499003ecbfd7a60c003d
f5f4b3f4050255a42293678e02aa7fa6a578d1c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
13b488f60612d8bf03776f7e1162a40c
09c37704bf705da87932ad2886a19590f1e4b75f
'2011-12-28T17:24:10-05:00'
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
15d25bd895fe5172397d41b9d7c38ffe
bc9f4068b3a0b884edcec6f97d198bfa21911a59
'2011-12-28T17:20:50-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'23801' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
560d3385fbe448cb1991636275692349
5b8d6b095c7f48bda8baab1f57d24cb9819c5810
'2011-12-28T17:21:59-05:00'
describe
'718342' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3afa83ce8222fe63acf33cf5b4b566ac
2a055d0670cb0d3e79ab157be55e137fadada421
describe
'118377' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
0ed30ffe4d15e160c3c9b891a43e883c
9e936532c342383bd9043b4d1c45228885ebe660
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
825f0a2988ae4b505117562ae264009e
ce0236cc2ace695e46ebf1d3bee0836f037adc60
describe
'40210' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
780d8c4d378115695abb68a8b3307952
9652f8d8267c5329f1ec1658ed8728d401555eb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
0fe5640bf41d2a75c1e83172b5dcb1d6
ae667deda8197efb9e1d6c7e377fcec79c49e5ef
describe
'49' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d6add64f71ac063f7295f9db284a703c
b509b7cd4c7ee36b7e828acecc66f3e3b8619577
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'22443' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e27f10a2fa1bd8faa2662ecf7d0a5010
51f5238117ad398065535fb395c4e657124074ba
'2011-12-28T17:24:20-05:00'
describe
'718300' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7676a99b0837ec34e52ec9a738b98d3e
2f21b6375e560aaf9b7b428d631dfc8afd0dac8f
'2011-12-28T17:20:47-05:00'
describe
'168227' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
baa58e81d03c7b113d748fd9592705ab
bee7c1a1241690421b3d0eb1856e2cfc23e8db98
describe
'46936' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCER' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b26c9bf070959b1af8581a87fcfb9313
c123195e4be47115cca3f639e02b221e7514e7cf
'2011-12-28T17:22:51-05:00'
describe
'55655' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCES' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
c0a7442082c08729dd8685a3ffc2b186
b0f7bb7dc4723ba5604ce583a96a1e7082a144de
'2011-12-28T17:20:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCET' 'sip-files00070.tif'
39d4b6befca456d80668b39d60201007
ca832245d7b2525bf6714b83d95308e232b7a423
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c67a70b6bd036d5b8ae12c0208051b97
fc891944490bb0c88f44b0f7e0a2cd9dfb7e111d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25672' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
926e006c555ab8812c55abe2a9845841
dc2e659611c6016327deec71dee29b5021d92b72
describe
'718453' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e689732d76719ced2c8202dade4ae3e1
b910f0cb114601d6886182cd05f69383188da0b3
'2011-12-28T17:21:43-05:00'
describe
'141390' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
aa5b4b925bca06de7ece64fea843336b
a8e61c074b41993969c708e0874ea9a60eb86695
describe
'27720' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3aa15ac85c94424ede5d5d7f6706899e
1379211aaa3cffd05b12736c497a58e689ec5207
describe
'48634' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
b25bcb865600295bb3cac28e71cbade6
b451b73623c5be7db7f228c0bd9aae2c5d849fd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
c58c21f61c6a9e17465b2fa870e005ea
69eb4897fe71756d2c7744972ca62615501d88fc
'2011-12-28T17:20:16-05:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
ad70f8698e752aafa3e5ded55c8c1ef8
e4f72a1b8221bf010495abac2b966e4e7c2e0739
describe
'24372' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
46c9204f56f47a1e23cd99929f9237be
2437f5cd07c782f796d04a4b7b2a04179165b03c
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8c2ab88a9eca714236b9a4e611f31c98
86d158d975082f4bb903535d00d67481509ee980
describe
'146017' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b0a0e2c892a306df8892a67aa7b5ccf8
dbe121edf269e1f2a021c8f6663ebcbff0c41b74
'2011-12-28T17:22:50-05:00'
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
5ad50d710990d6eb16ad2b39fc6de1b8
3a1f7481474d6ac8bca473ceccc1011c55a1bd3a
'2011-12-28T17:20:42-05:00'
describe
'48876' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
71b2fe82c5847a2eb9de3653a0e41239
c3810403f8c63aa2d10ec5adac6cb9ffc8556abf
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8a4fb615a2d8395905ec0352e4bf74bd
2213909571d6a51ac56cd95bcd391612ffb609df
'2011-12-28T17:22:59-05:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
eb29c87966a4f909083d408d51e6a0a4
e45eeccf16375f339d45cfc4dc60788de4fd96d0
'2011-12-28T17:20:45-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'24579' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b42d08ad32363e7f46a1398922e30cb2
795285abf4372ff7a2f6cd77178348db55debd6f
describe
'718697' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
e8a19e0cf756a8873efcdb499766471b
2ca85d68b4ea4999b0f7018030f8595a9739bbcb
'2011-12-28T17:20:24-05:00'
describe
'167396' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
bcc0f8529b1897530248a6fa9aa293fb
50c56ef6b8ac12ceca4631d06fba07a5c6c1b499
describe
'53793' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1def648ad1d76cc149dadb1e0ad47ab7
401b792a5b9ec4255bf1197a53267e42e9adc601
describe
'56277' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
0c854b697f35826aaa7b949c64ef864a
d1d4c5bc6e18b7730d5927b0cf82634a0c55472b
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
fed9f68ae2be1dcfadfe342e0af8b91e
05f47a36366d3080ab8b5a9ec26835532078620a
describe
'2016' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
367f17a0257830fa9c2dd6566208cb59
be5e0fff4851d80fcb38afab8c86bdf7091fcee6
describe
'25499' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
3c8dae96d71d77bc956ddbeb2c1f53c3
af4e9e1b07fb2460887e3021645caab5e578ce81
describe
'718731' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
20773edb673b9271fa64879c165c3a2d
878a8def4d7940b22574d134d91f225e5a405774
describe
'176853' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
c30349dd891ab51552374b09b212b38d
d551d0aba3ce19ecc96e9c707f313934fc0d23e9
describe
'63828' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
e1ceb437bc65d62a724c38d6dd355a24
fcfd9ea5c6fbcf1a6b65dc178b1c833185a504cf
describe
'59151' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
232333ecd84b3702ae99a14885701c41
a13ce471cd14c08ff7d30f16e37313d91b3d3266
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
6522b26a479656463bbb917223265d3b
d04cbd6de653396d4d051ad072339120e422fbd1
describe
'2405' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
539997fe7bd800b994c910b366ee1a29
399944c87fff9e705ee89335d2fa8a56c41412f5
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25759' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
497f6e34b1fbba3bc1d1684fee393881
464a797092eed13df9f1d1a19ad4f6d04797ee52
describe
'718180' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ee4961130a43bd9746a7da93deb6ecad
0e332cffbbe434fd1cd9afbd2939a7670cdfe36f
'2011-12-28T17:21:53-05:00'
describe
'129143' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
4e7456f0815b85b838fb8da52735db4f
b5e23265bf018921b0fe1028b0cfaf21133ae2a9
describe
'2356' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
a41d6a5883867c4dae5850f45c109796
78d169c467c1f21d5a92d685f281a3de9602b490
describe
'43741' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
39c9eced8f6e22ed90d6ab0fd3b2bb83
5cbcb338dda6022e68e2415c06642b971e177a19
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d149aee00ca48ee7c6601a34be9ffddb
cf4916a718896f7ac7fb833510ad0df6f98653a3
'2011-12-28T17:20:37-05:00'
describe
'60' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
dd7b92fa1777760b1832693b9583da24
b8856410cd59e53eab69417e041a5b8bac79bcd1
'2011-12-28T17:23:40-05:00'
describe
'23385' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
cafbdaddd19c9ffb758ae381321fb956
ee9ec0716e81d6e389d85b2d4491e3f4aa4da75e
'2011-12-28T17:22:16-05:00'
describe
'718709' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
76bfb7e6803f63dee3043f167674332d
9420c06db243b90f7dddc4171592e71861fc0b6c
describe
'165383' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
cde923a38467ed5b38efe09d52b1e4f9
14a7d495c6a4b56b55267dc33a9c68d2f3f9d2e8
'2011-12-28T17:19:47-05:00'
describe
'37371' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
f2b1f78779382368f8a3972371940821
3ab6fe0042251712f7d2cd75e6da433d8b7cabfa
describe
'54363' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
0a30593ccdbf28546c07ddf4569c23b3
b420c9727e058e0d994dbcb3a3a707e97947bc50
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3342b9d3094e85bd7e6e20e147402c3c
e6aafe4b8214fb9bba0aba3e28ed77bad583ad5d
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1b070e8ae86857f9a1dfbd05e4adb3d2
def16a240e8ee25ded306669b6764798ea27003d
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25610' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5e3a65bfcd9a6e80b254627a6a098112
8d1e4876830b5ab007a098617369e7ea6b49cf9f
describe
'718457' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
a2af4a2b5c45d2eb57c287e17a4100c9
bda595d0e9fb78b7ad3ee119c76f8eca47940f28
'2011-12-28T17:23:19-05:00'
describe
'183756' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b1ba9bb4ff11a15cc9f3b18746bb11c8
c435b78e226b9e88f83aa7e2fbd00ef045cb6032
describe
'45684' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
77e9d7b8c7d2fab4e62088c8028ad5f9
4f4ad12afde028d62ee1912392cde4b18f853b7e
describe
'59108' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d81b8a139b3e50bc549b3c479070ce3d
87b3c91e6fb8078193a8e085c1fb77a0d852196c
'2011-12-28T17:23:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
8488d217f477ca8927f6ae8c97eab257
d38921c37a6914192f4aeb70563b5d5cdaeca758
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
5a2512c6974a14e960bfd685230d0bc1
c71c5901f63ac0afd2fbaa638b027d6b6808b563
describe
'26206' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
b6e1dbe3f9fe0afb4aeb8259fb2a8281
a20828a7af43b5fa8e53b108f85a8feffcadae5f
describe
'718594' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
01e11b7fdbb43e4a4e2da5c092f6654b
b87b69b2055776fb4884152f2c0756e713f2b927
describe
'179425' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6cf9016d06f9b16c28568561713114a4
21b51a6253485e92bd3ad5d6b5fc34c6a475560d
'2011-12-28T17:19:48-05:00'
describe
'65313' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
6034b102db7ee4c87c5167af8c688fbe
77d7bb3bac9ccfe487be162a68c4eaa3cb299808
describe
'60140' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
0b3a0d7b6a44852a1f41d46f231b6001
bc35bd36de28bfebb1770c292d9df61317b34e50
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
f25ccedbaa31500de04d943435b84867
ba1e34b0424686e3e0d2f40e5ebb82f0a92372b3
'2011-12-28T17:20:27-05:00'
describe
'2484' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
06ed404fae89357602b58de7a0a88833
b7f4fa0c4c99befe597827a8029b9fe7a21998e2
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'25805' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
78482a8da0659dac36b619a452bc78cd
288ace2d09480715a6bf37adfe241f1cc710730b
describe
'718401' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
aa9aa6e8695cabc4066397efbd89b11f
4c5414abdd7335b1bb9a102734264d5756c0be60
describe
'131653' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f326b46d17414d83d5dd717efddb39f1
6326a2e97b35096b43cf77080b71f46d6520fcef
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
20b590da88aeb4ecc2371a7eda870a56
ae4f476b036abb8402ebfa7e287853871ef3e445
describe
'45135' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
320e99c0f339e70305d0bac54b0c3c5a
d4f3c7a35c646b869d88f7f026d8464be6aa265c
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1420de38b3ff01197490f7cf7fb0b82a
1ae508fa5c5fb5c45cbbe46d02a77c059aee562f
describe
'23786' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
973a87db6781a90bde1ed5c92c47c0d6
d99e965bff11f390889607fe73bb9d702c40ea00
describe
'718711' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d9b92975955acfbccd392ef931ed75b1
38a92c71f74c273d25c9fde15da479baf4274304
describe
'180755' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
7b6dc509643489f74fa07aa318930708
16a85b316c4d4f041952522fadee177cbabbe470
describe
'66222' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ffc25b3117f65638b3771e463cfb07c9
8877af2329656a72124d8bb13f4e82b03233a814
describe
'60732' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
d0e418adad10c86c111a66d81d0baf67
acc72dd88db4a5b28ad34ef620f6b5a77d6c13d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c38acd5477c93a91163dc108debe01c2
e0612f13fb47206d131c7b169b92eb3fe30912fa
'2011-12-28T17:20:20-05:00'
describe
'2471' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
bf534e2cc8cc0132faa5f082f7ae4adc
690c2c190cee41b9e436b293892ad733f9984ebb
describe
'26182' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
fd3a979dc620184441ee4ef55ec5ec84
56dcd87e5ed2c00de6f66c1a51e23d0f091d21fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
6cc9c5cbe8b65f549fc3506a3ae93d33
8a782cb87a84898c88dd9255f7b4ca9b5ea3f340
'2011-12-28T17:24:27-05:00'
describe
'141488' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
27ea33387d874ebf691568e9a9943506
e3002f5f5a6b211e6cdc5b26d498049f1459f4fe
describe
'44346' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c855c4df1f53a9bde43f74be80719bba
5d672d61a5d9d1bb0117a39bfad611a1cc9001e7
describe
'51110' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
3a5705f7f9a41f3cf76c2ce3b2ffac5d
fe7c493ba44c8e8909c7add0682f4536bb7633fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
5b4c7464c7ec1dda31a23cb553d54d62
b4caeea8fa60589fec89b413852858ea69627722
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0fdf98b12abc97b66560cfd621b1738d
4f7f741cfe997f61901155973ab764833b3d627b
describe
'24682' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d8f7897acd83159a2b73879698f59192
e0dbd116216b44bbb98ec2397e72bee62e8f5222
describe
'718729' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
cb59ce68e2f4b810d7074f5d0f8e30e7
85ec3c809372f68368e87a9514727ee200a5b2a9
describe
'126768' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
de487afb9846d83161f92d59893c609e
ba24a6e46da344003aac49d191b4c4a578189ae8
describe
'28529' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
59ff738b3a7afcbd2773ee4b15035947
49e7eee163791ece824a82cd8498f7d90c6a43ff
describe
'42493' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
087a92a7dc484b86c6098e5bd8beac89
e0aee782e24d3404c5101e795f52f9214db91fdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
ad63c0a559b2105516bf907b7b1e950e
85263e9a450511e6d4d5f6572a6e4f4a87055eaa
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f7ca3ec36d75798fdf8f622cb0bd077d
8a7146eebf12c7ad9d2d2c90ab0df8f9d29ee5dd
'2011-12-28T17:23:36-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'22738' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
245cb80244324aeb7bc267367f42a45d
d04c728dfecb4979cf41447ab1eb4909dc0d6c32
describe
'718586' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
29291f2a8a25d38b8f35ead8f8358261
f7da7b15805b2506b84ca66e859834d27905af76
describe
'152158' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5245409f26e40085712cfcfe8788d04b
a8f115a42a2af5684d873984eb8a1036da376d05
describe
'33934' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCID' 'sip-files00083.pro'
0d93640e509ccd9c5092bcc864c1c822
32e489e197929cea107f55c04b7b1702b11e644d
describe
'51733' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
6728009d4c696bf364374359eb4e5163
1ba113451ac75ed8dca1b022d3461998c0ae2b50
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
0a05705b06a23e8e1119a3c954e86269
3e4b3da1d9b14807c68b251e2d54e9b4eed05120
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
9344633397fc5493ce3b7ee4477dcb18
5b7938bcc5c9d591ddb09e5a9b68a58e476f485e
'2011-12-28T17:23:48-05:00'
describe
'25352' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
2ec1306dc0b7f9cf490b118f2c2dbef6
ba9e4f6bb56f9775d614fbd852c1c56d0cb32e1b
describe
'718304' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCII' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
cc9349600aa05d64df6df79ca5cd2be7
aac5786bded255cc50b07719c219388c416a01cf
describe
'180628' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f44714ff9b1ab22081621b1af44bb7f1
6234b7fee661954954d0bf5d1fd91ac893864db6
describe
'63956' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7dfa690391f723dbbd027c9b36d7b7ec
1bbcbb8a20eeff9041a9370e8b1ca42ca8ecc9e4
describe
'62197' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
87c967d270558c31ca74fb7b4ae2330b
179f7d43bbc42372cc63662456f94eef4428a8ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
6867fc44d7a44bd117affc4fd13b54c3
d327f2b7e8c3664180b2f78fcc37d0db55aa36d0
describe
'2479' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2efab2850e4d441925070432208c7bb7
a6bcf73fc8d025c65880faabce46206dbcd81b64
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'27202' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
29f7ab1c8f61224da348699788043608
985a2aa3f32709fa66630ecf7b1b9557bb034b7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5fb7255056edb065d6ff28a74a3c664d
58d01d17ced87a95ca233fd473e0b845f44874fc
describe
'165687' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1508241fdb4de2df28bca96b999d8fca
fd9ff09a1fe72221aeaa60e0539e27a15e93ac97
describe
'56793' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c9c088b2822412fc43a8c5562302fbc5
c8aa8b0dc8f64f50083a02c240e377c7fe39b9bd
describe
'57698' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
04fb29ffe4b71855ddd77b6028247ac6
483962ad40a8708a14f9492a14964ad5a3fdab3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
6eafc0f78baa9f783071ddfed9ffad78
256eb8b97798415b4c1cecd49ac20668feb87175
describe
'2241' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5a7f5adfa61574e8e546f5e1df10ff72
09e06f479594c344bb345f59f20afda967bf7062
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'27105' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
f25b0dc19b98e672187426113cc4acd6
3c02c53dc41d7cc5ce97965c6d1606bf46053572
describe
'790443' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
84431b77c719146ed0df3912a5ec637c
53560c0a80fd7d266c131958c75f1ab95cd3b6e1
describe
'102803' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
8fa5735cad4e3a02563ac79ba89f867e
f2d1d1411ca8212ce005b4174c1bd29f9dd3c6be
describe
'27027' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
13fcc6e5aff3c646ca3038d4cb010f5a
59e5466acc6b59ea69d5516e76e6808ea708b60a
'2011-12-28T17:19:53-05:00'
describe
'18976324' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
136b2c4ba549cc9b4c854d61df7a41dc
1c94f6d9a81a6122a5b353886333290f675ba230
'2011-12-28T17:24:44-05:00'
describe
'12102' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJA' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8287fa0b02a35d33949d9a98b80acb92
628a9ecb2541f5e1c77f1962bc618c2313d7e276
describe
'753571' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d500a1321ed5bf99df71654ecfdba52f
bbcb502e30b328e4c1a42b72b9bd4c2776bddad5
'2011-12-28T17:20:51-05:00'
describe
'154791' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
2400a26e3884f4904f19c7f61c9c50e0
e56a2dba30d5e1a9cad12407c54d86f372bb01d1
describe
'30646' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJD' 'sip-files00088.pro'
84d0fee7fa3be2f17924666ea3deb3e6
afe470fbb29cff16b33f941b85cd660d1b5444ed
describe
'44386' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
6e2aad560f69da02096f0446be660d05
52f2418f3ea364b1f30bfa90b601ec25725d70f1
describe
'18093348' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
8dda85aaa9945b33ed7cec8f09fb43e8
076cee8631c4bcc378a4665f26a0549f0499854e
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
24bce7d541ee238969b6fbf7145c19b4
f1af495de53ac37d86a13a069af45f08645e1947
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'18454' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJH' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
0e7cb8988da3fb3bac3cfb861b6a499b
70ddcb1442290723e4cf82e255153b44ea986403
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
ef1a2283bb9538aa387daa9c2cf124cf
9ae604571cb03328c80eae62f14ead6eabad9b06
describe
'144407' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJJ' 'sip-filesUF00086960_00001.mets'
cd4e9e5c1b155f3bf289187a1c4471b8
1808191a8c754241fb283608009a72c42d9891e7
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T01:33:09-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'184295' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAZKfileF20090112_AABCJM' 'sip-filesUF00086960_00001.xml'
72837bd5d99a1d83cc5dcbf666e51aff
0cb7a2f8634ed42690f41745cf023382c3a331d5
describe
'2013-12-14T01:33:08-05:00'
xml resolution