Citation
Turkish fairy tales and folk tales

Material Information

Title:
Turkish fairy tales and folk tales
Creator:
Kúnos, Ignácz, 1862-1945 ( Compiler )
Bain, R. Nisbet ( Robert Nisbet ), 1854-1909 ( Translator )
Levetus, Celia ( Illustrator )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Richard Clay and Sons ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Frederick A. Stokes Company
Manufacturer:
Richard Clay & Sons, Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
x, 1, 275, [1] p., [9] leaves of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Folklore -- Juvenile fiction -- Turkey ( lcsh )
Folklore -- Juvenile fiction -- Romania ( lcsh )
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Folk tales -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
England -- Bungay
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title in green and black, with vignette.
General Note:
Preface dated 1896.
Statement of Responsibility:
collected by Ignácz Kúnos ; translated from the Hungarian version by R. Nisbet Bain ; illustrated by Celia Levetus.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026998238 ( ALEPH )
ALH9469 ( NOTIS )
18127810 ( OCLC )

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Full Text







pereemononenneectanees:
ER UO Een Ed StI







AOA ENS BT EN re SAAR OTT AT OP ARES ALAIN IAAP EASE Ut PW ELSE SELES TS



The Baldwin Libeary
University

RMB ha









TURKISH FAIRY TALES
















oO “TURKISH Fira/Pauec’

\ AND FOLK TALES %

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) xX
Collected by Dr lgnacz unos
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{| Translated from es elneeres version

4 =F. Nisser, Bain .
e Ttustrated by e :
Celia Levetus









) NewYork
Frederick i. Stokes Company

lishers



2 >
SOS









PREFACE

'TwEsE stories were collected from the mouths of the
~ Turkish peasantry by the Hungarian savant Dr. Igna-
tius Kunos, during his travels through Anatolia,’ and
published for the first time in 1889 by the well-known
Hungarian Literary Society, “ A Kisfaludy Tarsasig,”
under the title of Térak Népmésck (“Turkish Folk
Tales”), with an introduction by Professor Vambery.
That distinguished Orientalist, certainly the greatest
living authority on the primitive culture of the Turko-
Tartarie peoples, who is as familiar with Uzbeg epics
and Uigurie didactics as with the poetical masterpieces
of Western Europe, is enthusiastic in his praises of
these folk-tales. He compares the treasures of Turkish
folk-lore to precious stones lying neglected in the by-
ways of philology for want of gleaners to gather them

1 He has described his experience in the picturesque and

popular Anatoliat Képek (« Anatolian Pictures”) published at Pest
in 1891.



vi PREFACE

in, and he warns the student of ethnology that when
once the threatened railroad actually invades the
classic land of Anatolia, these naively poetical myths
and legends will, infallibly, be the first victims of
Western civilization.

The almost unique collection of Dr. Ignatius Kunos
may therefore be regarded as a brand snatched from
the burning ; in any case it is an important “ find,” as
well for the scientific folk-lorist as for the lover of
fairy-tales pure and simple. That these stories should
contain anything absolutely new is, indeed, too much
to expect. Professor Vimbery himself traces affinities
between many of them and other purely Oriental
stories which form the bases of Zhe Arabian Nights.
A few Slavonic and Scandinavian elements are also
plainly distinguishable, such, for instance, as that
mysterious fowl, the Emerald Anka, obviously no
very distant relative of the Bird Mogol and the Bird’
Zhar, which figure in my Russian Fairy Tales and
Cossack Fairy Tales and Folk Tales respectively,
while the story of the Enchanted Turban is, in some
particulars, curiously like Hans Andersen’s story,
The Travelling Companion. Nevertheless, these tales
have a character peculiarly their own; above all, they
are remarkable for a vivid imaginativeness, a gorgeous





PREFACE Vii

play of fancy, compared with which the imagery of
‘the most popular fairy tales of the West seem almost
prosaically jejune, and if, as Professor Vambery sug-
gests, these Népmésck provide the sort of entertain-
ment which beguiles the leisure of the Turkish ladies
while they sip their mocha and whiff their fragrant
narghilies, we cannot but admire the poetical taste
and nice discrimination, in this respect, of the harem
and the seraglio.

I have Englished these tales from the first Hun-
garian edition, so that this version is, perhaps, open
to the objection of being a translation of a translation.
Inasmuch, however, as I have followed my text very
closely, and having regard to the fact that Hun garian
and Turkish are closely cognate dialects (in point
of grammatical construction they are practically
identical), I do not think they will be found to have
lost so very much of their original fragrance and
flavour.

I have supplemented these purely Turkish with
four semi-Turkish tales translated from the original
Roumanian of Ispirescu’s Legende sau Basmele
Romdnilort. Bucharest, 1892. This collection,
which I commend to the notice of the Folk-Lore
Society, is very curious and original, abounding as it



Vill PREFACE

does in extraordinarily bizarre and beautiful variants
of the best-known fairy tales, a very natural result
of the peculiar combination in Roumanian of such
heterogeneous elements as Romance, Slavonic, Mag-
yar, and Turkish.

R. Nispet BAIN.
July 1896





CONTENTS

THE STAG-PRINCE aes Bae ao ae ae ie Hl
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS ... nee a ne ane 12
THE ROSE-BEAUTY She Ee ane ee ote Pee 0
MAD MEHMED ... Bs Nee aa bes Aas a 49
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN oe sao tek eo
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH ... ee ee ie
THE CINDER-YOUTH ... ae ne es ae Bee 84
THE PIECE OF LIVER ... yee Be ae ee soo | OE

THE MAGIC TURBAN, THE MAGIC WHIP, AND THE MAGIC CARPET 102

THE WIND-DEMON a Re bao ae ee sao
THE CROW-PERI 6 an ee a A pores:
/ HE FORTY PRINCES AND THE SEVEN-HEADED DRAGON Reap
THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL ae Eon eee lt)
|THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS ado ae .. 166
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR a Peli
STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE ons ie .. =188

THE GHOST OF THE SPRING AND THE SHREW tke .. 196



a CONTENTS

ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-RIDING-ON-THE-WORSE-HALF-

OF-A-LAME-HORSE
THE ENCHANTED HOG
BOY-BEAUTIFUL, THE GOLDEN APPLES, AND THE WERE-WOLF

YOUTH WITHOUT AGE, AND LIFE WITHOUT DEATH ...

PAGE

209
222
244
260







TURKISH FAIRY TALES









|
:
|
|
:



THE STAG-PRINCE

ONCE upon a time, when the servants of Allah were
many, there lived a Padishah! who had one son and
one daughter. The Padishah grew old, his time
came, and he died ; his son ruled ‘in his stead, and he

had not ruled very long before he had squandered

away his whole inheritance.

One day he said to his sister: “Little sister! all
our money is spent. If people were to hear that we
had nothing left they would drive us out of doors,
and we should never be able to look our fellow-men
in the face again. Tar better, therefore, if we depart
and take up our abode elsewhere.” So they tied
together the little they had left, and then the brother
and sister quitted their father’s palace in the night-
time, and wandered forth into the wide world.

They went on and on till they came to a vast
sandy desert, where they were like to have fallen to

1 Wmperor. B





2 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

the ground for the burning heat. The youth felt
that he could go not a step further, when he saw on
the ground a little puddle of water. “ Little sister!”
said he, “I will not go a step further till I have
drunk this water.”

“Nay, dear brother!” replied the girl, “who can
tell whether it be really water or filth? If we have
held up so long, surely we can hold up a little longer.
Water we are bound to find soon.”

“T tell thee,” replied her brother, “that Pll not
go another step further till I have drunk up this
puddle, though I die for it,’—and with that he
knelt down, sucked up every drop of the dirty water,
and instantly became a stag.

The little sister wept bitterly at this mischance ;
but there was nothing for it but to go on as they
were. ‘They went on and on, up hill and down dale,
right across the sandy waste till they came to a full
spring beneath a large tree, and there they sat them
down and rested. ‘“Hearken now, little sister!”
said the stag, “thou must mount up into that tree,
while I go to see if I can find something to eat.”
So the girl climbed up into the tree, and the stag
went about his’ business, ran up hill and down dale,
caught a hare, brought it back, and he and his sister
ate it together, and so they lived from day to day
and from week to week.





THE STAG-PRINCE 3

Now the horses of the Padishah of that country
were wont to be watered at the spring beneath the
large tree. One evening the horsemen led their horses
up to it as usual, but, just as they were on the point
of drinking, they caught sight of the reflection of the
damsel in the watery mirror and reared back. The
horsemen fancied that perhaps the water was not
quite pure, so they drew off the trough and filled it
afresh, but again the horses reared backwards and
would not drink of it. The horsemen knew not
what to make of it, so they went and told the
Padishah.

‘“Perchance the water is muddy,” said the
Padishah.

“Nay,” replied the horsemen, “‘we emptied the
trough once and filled it full again with fresh water,
and yet the horses would not drink of it.”

“Go again,” said their master, “and look well about
you; perchance there is some one near the spring of
whom they are afraid.”

The horsemen returned, and, looking well about the
spring, cast their eyes at last upon the large tree, on
the top of which they perceived the damsel. They
immediately went back and told. the Padishah. The
Padishah took the trouble to go and look for himself,
and raising his eyes perceived in the tree a damsel
as lovely as the moon when she is fourteen days old,



4 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

so that he absolutely could not take his eyes off her.
“Art thou a spirit or a peri?”* said the Padishah to
the damsel. os

“T am neither a spirit nor a peri, but a mortal
as thou art,” replied the damsel.

In vain the Padishah begged her to come down
from the tree. In vain he implored her, nothing he
could say would make her come down, ‘Then the
Padishah waxed wroth. He commanded them to cut
down the tree. The men brought their axes and
fell a-hewing at the tree. They hewed away at the
vast tree, they hewed and hewed until only a little
strip of solid trunk remained to be cut through ; but,
meanwhile, eventide had drawn nigh and it began
to grow dark, so they left off their work, which they
purposed to finish next day.

Scarcely had they departed when the stag came
running out of the forest, looked at the tree, and
asked the little sister what had happened. The girl
told him that she would not descend from the tree,
‘so they had tried to cut it down. “Thou didst
well,” replied the stag, “and take care thou dost
not come down in future, whatever they may say.”
With that he went to the tree, licked it with his
tongue, and immediately the tree grew bigger round
the hewed trunk than before.

1 Fairy.





The Damsel and the Old Witch.—p. 5.





THE STAG-PRINCE — 5

The next day, when the stag had again departed
about his business, the Padishah’s men came and.
saw that the tree was larger and harder round the
trunk than ever. Again they set to work hewing at
the tree, and hewed and hewed till they had cut.
half through it; but by that time evening fell upon
them again, and again they put off the rest of the
work till the morrow and went home.

But all their labour was lost, for the stag came
again, licked the gap in the tree with his tongue, and
immediately it grew thicker and harder than ever.

Early next morning, when the stag had only just.
departed, the Padishah and his wood-cutters again
came to the tree, and when they saw that the trunk
of the tree had filled up again larger and firmer than
ever, they determined to try some other means. So
they went home again and sent for a famous old
witch, told her of the damsel in the tree, and promised
her a rich reward if she would, by subtlety, make the
damsel come down. The old witch willingly took the
matter in hand, and bringing with her an iron tripod,
a cauldron, and sundry raw meats, placed them by the
side of the spring. She placed the tripod on the
eround, and the kettle on the top of it but upside
down, drew water from the spring and poured it not
into the kettle, but on the ground beside it, and with
that she kept her eyes closed as if she were blind.



6 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The damsel fancied she really was blind, and called
to her from the tree. “Nay but, my dear elder
sister! thou hast placed the kettle on the tripod
upside down, and art pouring all the water on the
ground.”

“Oh, my sweet little damsel!” cried the old woman,
“that is because I have no eyes to see with. I have
brought some dirty linen with me, and if thou dost
love Allah, thou wilt come down and put the kettle
right, and help me to wash the things.” Then
the damsel thought of the words of the little stag,
and she did not come down.

The next day the old witch came again, stumbled
about the tree, laid a fire, and brought forth a heap
of meal in order to sift it, but instead of meal she
put ashes into the sieve. ‘Poor silly old granny!”
cried the damsel compassionately, and then she called
down from the tree to the old woman, and told her
that she was sifting ashes instead of meal. “Oh,
my dear damsel!” cried the old woman, weeping,
“T am blind, I cannot see. Come down and help
me a little in my affliction.” Now the little stag
had strictly charged her that very morning not to
come down from the tree whatever might be said to
her, and she obeyed the words of her brother.

On the third day the old witch again came
beneath the tree, This time she brought a sheep



THE STAG-PRINCE fi

with her, and brought out a knife to flay it with,
and began to jag and skin it from behind instead of
cutting its throat. The poor little sheep bleated
piteously, and the damsel in the tree, unable to endure
the sight of the beast’s sufferings, came down from
the tree to put the poor thing out of its misery.
Then the Padishah, who was concealed close to the tree,
rushed out and carried the damsel off to his palace.

The damsel pleased the Padishah so mightily that
he wanted to be married to her without more ado;
but the damsel would not consent till they had
brought her her brother, the little stag: until she
saw him, she said, she could have not a moment’s
rest. Then the Padishah sent men out into the
forest, who caught the stag and brought him to his
sister. After that he never left his sister’s side.
They lay down together, and together they rose up.
Even when the Padishah and the damsel were
wedded, the little stag was never far away from them,
and in the evening when he found out where they
were, he would softly stroke each of them all over
with one of his front feet before going to sleep beside
them, and say—

“ This little foot is for my sister,
That little foot is for my brother.”

But time, as men count it, passes quickly to its

fulfilment, more quickly still passes the time of fairy



8 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

tales, but quickest of all flies the time of true love.
Yet our little people would have lived on happily
if there had not been a black female slave in the
palace. Jealousy devoured her at the thought that
the Padishah had taken to his bosom the ragged
damsel from the tree-top rather than herself, and she
watched for an opportunity of revenge.

~ Now there was a beautiful garden in the palace,
with a fountain in the midst of it, and there
the Sultan’s damsel used to walk about. One day,
with a golden saucer in her hand and a silver sandal
on her foot, she went towards the great fountain,
and the black slave followed after her and pushed
her in. There was a big fish in the basin, and it
immediately swallowed up the Sultan’s pet damsel.
Then the black slave returned to the palace, put on
the golden raiment of the Sultan’s damsel, and sat
down in her place. .

In the evening the Padishah came and asked the
damsel what she had done to her face that it was
so much altered. “I have walked too much in the
garden, and so the sun has tanned my face,” re-
plied the girl. The Padishah believed her and
sat down beside her, but the little stag came
also, and when he began to stroke them both
down with his fore-foot he recognized the slave-girl
as he said—





THE STAG-PRINCE 9

“ This little foot is for my sister,
And this little foot is for my brother.”

Then it became the one wish of the slave-girl’s
heart to be rid of the little stag as quickly as possible,
lest it should betray her.

So after a little thought she made herself sick,
and sent for the doctors, and gave them much money
to say to the Padishah that the only thing that
could save her was the heart of the little stag to
eat. So the doctors went and told the Padishah
that the sick woman must swallow the heart of the
little stag, or there was no hope for her. Then the
Padishah went to the slave-girl whom he fancied to
be his pet damsel, and asked her if it did not go
against her to eat the heart of her own brother ?

‘What can I do?” sighed the impostor; “if I
die, what will become of my poor little pet? If he
be cut up I shall live, while he will be spared the
torments of those poor beasts that grow old and
sick.” Then the Padishah gave orders that a butcher's
knife should be whetted, and a fire lighted, and a
cauldron of water put over the fire.

The poor little stag perceived all the bustling about
and ran down into the garden to the fountain, and
called out three times to his sister—

“ The knife is on the stone,
The water’s on the boil,
Haste, little sister, hasten!”



10 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

And thrice she answered back to him from the fish’s
maw—

«Here am I in the fish’s belly,
In my hand a golden saucer,
On my foot a silver sandal,

In my arms a little Padishah !”

For the Sultan’s pet damsel had brought forth a
little son in the fish’s belly.

Now the Padishah was intent on catching the
little stag when it ran down into the garden to the
fountain, and, coming up softly behind it, heard every
word of what the brother and sister were saying to
each other. He quietly ordered all the water to be
drained off the basin of the fountain, drew up the
fish, cut open its belly, and what do you think he
saw? In the belly of the fish was his wife, with
a golden saucer in her hand, and a silver sandal on
her foot, and a little son in her arms. Then the
Padishah embraced his wife, and kissed his son, and
brought them both to the palace, and heard the
tale of it all to the very end.

But the little stag found something in the fish’s
blood, and when he had swallowed it, he became a
man again. Then he rushed to his sister, and they
embraced and wept with joy over each other’s
happiness.

But the Padishah sent for his black slave-girl,





THE STAG-PRINCE 11

and asked her which she would like the best—four
good steeds or four good swords. The slave-girl
replied: “Let the swords be for the throats of my
enemies, but give me the four steeds that I may take
my pleasure on horseback.” Then they tied the slave-
girl to the tails of four good steeds, and sent her out
for a ride; and the four steeds tore the black girl
into little bits and scattered them abroad.

But the Padishah and his wife lived happily |
together, and the king’s son who had been a stag
abode with them; and they gave a great banquet,
which lasted four days and four nights; and they
attained their desires, and may ye, O my readers,
attain your desires likewise.



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS

In the olden times, when there were sieves in
straws and lies. in everything, in the olden times
when there was abundance, and men ate and drank
the whole day and yet lay down hungry, in those.
olden, olden times there was once a Padishah whose
days were joyless, for he had never a son to bless
himself with.

One day he was in the path of pleasure with his
Vizier, and when they had drunk their coffee and
smoked their chibooks, they went out for a walk,
and went on and on till they came to a great valley.
Here they sat down to rest a while, and as they were
looking about them to the right hand and to the left,
the valley was suddenly shaken as if by an earthquake,
a whip cracked, and a dervish, a green-robed, yellow-
slippered, white-bearded dervish, suddenly stood before
them. The Padishah and the Vizier were so fright-
ened that they dared not budge; but when the

12



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 18

dervish approached them and addressed them with
the words, “Selamun aleykyum,”! they took heart a
bit, and replied courteously, “ Ve aleykyum selam.” *

‘“What is thy errand here, my lord Padishah ?”
asked the dervish.

“Tf thou dost know that I am a Padishah, thou
dost also know my errand,” replied the Padishah.

Then the dervish took from his bosom an apple,
gave it to the Padishah, and said these words: ‘‘ Give
half of this to thy Sultana, and eat the other half
thyself,” and with these words he disappeared.

Then the Padishah went home, gave half the apple
to his consort, and ate the other half himself, and in
exactly nine months and ten days there was a little
prince in the harem. The Padishah was beside him-
self for joy. He scattered sequins among the poor,
restored to freedom his slaves, and the banquet he
gave to his friends had neither beginning nor end.

Swiftly flies the time in fairy tales, and the child
had reached his fourteenth summer while yet they
fondled him. One day he said to his father: “My
lord father Padishah, make me now a little marble
palace, and let there be two springs under it, and let
one of them run with honey, and the other with
butter!” Dearly did the Padishah love his little son,
because he was his only child, so he made him the

1 «Peace be unto you.” 2 «Unto you be peace.’



14 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

marble palace with the springs inside it as his son
desired. There then sat the King’s son in the marble
palace, and while he was looking at the springs that
bubbled forth both butter and honey, he saw an old
woman with a pitcher in her hand, and she would fain
have filled it from the spring. Then the King’s son
caught up a stone and flung it at the old woman’s
pitcher, and broke it into pieces. The old woman
said not a word, but she went away.

But the next day she was there again with her
pitcher, and again she made as if she would fill it,
and a second time the King’s son cast a stone at her
and broke her pitcher. The old woman went away
without speaking a word. She came on the third
day also, and it fared with her pitcher then as on the
first two days. Then the old woman spoke. ‘Oh,
youth!” cried she, “’tis the will of Allah that thou
shouldst fall in love with the three Orange-peris,” and
with that she quitted him. .

From thenceforth the heart of the King’s son was
consumed by a hidden fire. He began to grow pale
and wither away. When the Padishah saw that his
son was ill, he sent for the wise men and the leeches,
but they could find no remedy for the disease. One
day the King’s son said to his father: “Oh, my dear
little daddy Shah! these wise men of thine cannot
cure me of my disease, and all their labours are in



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 15

vain. I have fallen in love with the three Oranges,
and never shall I be better till I find them.”

“Oh, my dear little. son!” groaned the Padishah,
“thou art all that I have in the wide world: if thou
dost leave me, in whom can I rejoice?” Then the
King’s son slowly withered away, and his days were
as a heavy sleep; so his father saw that it would be
better to let him go forth on his way and find, if so
be he might, the three Oranges that were as the
balsam of his soul. ‘‘ Perchance too he. may return
again,” thought the Padishah.

So the King’s son arose one day and took with him
things that were light to carry, but heavy in the scales
of value, and pursued his way over mountains and
valleys, rising up and lying down again for many
days. At last in the midst of a vast plain, in front
of the high-road, he came upon her Satanic Majesty
the Mother of Devils, as huge as a minaret. One
of her legs was on one mountain, and the other leg on
another mountain ; she was chewing gum (her mouth
was full of it) so that you could hear her half-an-
hour’s journey off; her breath was a hurricane, and
her arms were yards and yards long.

“ Good-day, little mother!” cried the youth, and
he embraced the broad waist of the Mother of Devils.
“Good-day, little sonny!” she replied. “If thou
hadst not spoken to me so politely, I should have



16 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

gobbled thee up.” Then she asked him whence he
came and whither he was going.

“ Alas! dear little mother,” sighed the youth,
“such a terrible misfortune has befallen me that
I can neither tell thee nor answer thy question.”

“Nay, come, out with it, my son,” urged the
Mother of Devils.

“Well then, my sweet little mother,” cried the
youth, and he sighed worse than before, “I have fallen
violently in love with the three Oranges. If only I
might find my way thither!”

“Hush!” cried the Mother of Devils, “it is not
lawful to even think of that name, much less pro-
nounce it. I and my sons are its guardians, yet
even we don’t know the way to it. Forty sons have
I, and they go up and down the earth more than I
do, perchance they may tell thee something of the
matter.” So when it began to grow dusk towards
evening, ere yet the devil-sons had come home, the
old woman gave the King’s son a tap, and turned him
into a pitcher of water. And she did it not a moment
too soon, for immediately afterwards the forty sons
of the Mother of Devils knocked at the door and
cried : “ Mother, we smell man’s flesh!”

“ Nonsense !” cried the Mother of Devils. “ What,
I should like to know, have the sons of men to do
here? It seems to me you had better all clean your



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 17

teeth.” So she gave the forty sons forty wooden
stakes to clean their teeth with, and out of one’s
tooth fell an arm, and out of another’s a thigh, and
out of another’s an arm, till they had all cleaned their
teeth. Then they sat them down to eat and drink, and
in the middle of the meal their mother said to them:
“Tf now ye had a man for your brother, what would
ye do with him ?”

“Do,” they replied, “why love him like a brother,
of course!”

Then the Mother of Devils tapped the water-jar,
and the King’s son stood there again. ‘Here is
your brother!” cried she to her forty sons.

The devils thanked the King’s son for his company
with great joy, invited their new brother to sit down,
and asked their mother why she had not told them
about him before, as then they might all have eaten
their meal together.

‘““Nay but, my sons,” cried she, “he does not live
on the same sort of meat as ye; fowls, mutton, and
such-like is what he feeds on.”

At this one of them jumped up, went out, fetched
a sheep, slew it, and laid it before the new brother.

“Oh, what a child thou art!” cried the Mother
of Devils. ‘ Dost thou not know that thou must
first cook it for him ?”

Then they skinned the sheep, made a fire, roasted
Cc



18 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

it, and ‘placed it before him. The King’s son ate a
piece, and after satisfying his hunger, left the rest of
it. ‘Why, that’s nothing!” cried the devils, and
they urged him again and again to eat more. “ Nay,
my sons,” cried their mother, “men never eat more
than that.”

“Tet us see then what this sheep-meat is like,”
said one of the forty brothers. So they fell upon it
and devoured the whole lot in a couple of mouthfuls.

Now when they all rose up early in the morning,
the Mother of Devils said to her sons: “ Our new
brother hath a great trouble.”—“ What is it?” cried
they, “for we would help him.”

‘He has fallen in love with the three Oranges !””—
“ Well,” replied the devils, “we know not the place
of the three Oranges ourselves, but perchance our
aunt may know.”

“Then lead this youth to her,” said their mother ;
“+tell her that he is my son and worthy of all honour,
let her also receive him as a son and ease him of his
trouble.” Then the devils took the youth to their
aunt, and told her on what errand he had come.

Now this Aunt of the Devils had sixty sons, and
as she did not know the place of the three Oranges,
she had to wait till they came home. But lest any
harm should happen to this her new son, she gave
him a tap and turned him into a piece of crockery.



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 19

‘We smell man’s flesh, mother,” cried the devils,
as they crossed the threshold.

“Perchance ye have eaten man’s flesh, and the
remains thereof are still within your teeth,” said their
mother. Then she gave them great logs of wood that:
they might pick their teeth clean, and so be able to
swallow down something else. But in the midst of
the meal the woman gave the piece of crockery a tap,
and when the sixty devils saw their little human
brother, they rejoiced at the sight, made him sit
down at table, and bade him fall to if there was any-
thing there he took a fancy to. ‘“ My sons,” said the
Mother of the Devils to her sixty sons when they all
rose up early on the morrow, “ this lad here has fallen
in love with the three Oranges, cannot you show
him the way thither?”

“We know not the way,’ replied the devils; “but
perchance our old great-aunt may know something
about it.”

“Then take the youth thither,” said their mother,
“and bid her hold him in high honour. He is my
son, let him be hers also and help him out of his
distress.” Then they took him off to their great-aunt,
and told her the whole business. “ Alas! I do not
know, my sons!” said the old, old great-aunt ; “ but
if you wait till the evening, when my ninety sons
come home, I will ask them.”



20 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Then the sixty devils departed and left the King’s
son there, and when it grew dusk the Mother of the
Devils gave the youth a tap, turned him into a broom,
and placed him in the doorway. Shortly afterwards
the ninety devils came home, and they also smelt the
smell of man, and took the pieces of man’s flesh out
of their teeth. In the middle of their meal their
mother asked them how they would treat a human
brother if they had one. When they had sworn upon
eggs that they would not hurt so much as his little
finger, their mother gave the broom a tap, and the
King’s son stood before them.

The devil brothers entreated him courteously, in-
quired after his health, and served him so heartily
with eatables that they scarcely gave him time to
breathe. In the midst of the meal their mother asked
them whether they knew where the three Oranges
were, for their new brother had fallen in love with
them. ‘Then the least of the ninety devils leaped up
with a shout of joy, and said that he knew.

“Then if thou knowest,” said his mother, “ see that
thou take this son of ours thither, that he may satisfy
his heart’s desire.”

On arising next morning, the devil-son took the
King’s son with him, and the pair of them went
merrily along the road together. They went on, and
on, and on, and at last the little devil said these



THE THREE ORANGE PERIS 21

words : “My brother, we shall come presently to a
large garden, and in the fountain thereof are the
three. When I say to thee: ‘Shut thine eye, open
thine eye !’ lay hold of what thou shalt see.”

They went on a little way further till they came
to the garden, and the moment the devil saw the
fountain he said to the King’s son: “Shut thine eye
and open thine eye!” He did so, and saw the three
Oranges bobbing up and down on the surface of the
water where it came bubbling out of the spring, and
he snatched up one of them and popped it in his
pocket. Again the devil called to him: “Open thine
eye and shut thine eye!” He did so, and snatched
up the second orange, and so with the third also in
the same way. “Now take care,” said the devil,
“that thou dost not cut open these oranges in any
place where there is no water, or it will go ill with
thee.” The King’s son promised, and so they parted,
one went to the right, and the other to the left.

The King’s son went on, and on, and on. He went
a long way, and he went a short way, he went across
mountains and through valleys. At last he came
to a sandy desert, and there he bethought him of
the oranges, and drawing one out, he cut it open.
Scarcely had he cut into it when a damsel, lovely as
a Peri, popped out of it before him; the moon when
it is fourteen days old is not more dazzling. “ For



22 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Allah’s sake, give me a drop of water!” cried the
damsel, and inasmuch as there was no trace of water
anywhere, she vanished from the face of the earth.
The King’s son grieved right sorely, but there was
no help for it, the thing was done.

Again he went on his way, and when he had gone
a little further he thought to himself, “I may as well
cut open one more orange.” So he drew out the second
orange, and scarcely had he cut into it than there
popped down before him a still more lovely damsel,
who begged piteously for water, but as the King’s son
had none to give her, she also vanished.

““ Well, I'll take better care of the third,” cried he,
and continued his journey. He went on and on till
he came to a large spring, drank out of it, and then
thought to himself: “ Well, now Ill cut open the
third orange also.” He drew it out and cut it, and
immediately a damsel even lovelier than the other
two stood before him. As soon as she called for
water, he led her to the spring and gave her to drink,
and the damsel did not disappear, but remained there
as large as life.

Mother-naked was the damsel, and as he could not
take her to town like that, he bade her climb up a
large tree that stood beside the spring, while he went
into the town to buy her raiment and a carriage.

While the Kine’s son had gone away, a negro



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 23

servant came to the spring to draw water, and saw
the reflection of the damsel in the watery mirror.
“Why, thou art something like a damsel,” said she
to herself, ‘and ever so much lovelier than thy
mistress; so she ought to fetch water for me, not I
for her.” With that she broke the pitcher in two,
went home, and when her mistress asked where the
pitcher of water was, she replied: “I am much more
beautiful than thou, so thou must fetch water for me,
not I for thee.” Her mistress took up a mirror, held
it before her, and said: “ Methinks thou must have
taken leave of thy senses; look at this mirror!” The
Moor looked into the mirror, and saw that she was as
coal-black ag ever. Without another word she took
up the pitcher, went again to the spring, and seeing
the damsel’s face in the mirror, again fancied that it
was hers.

“Tm right, after all,” she cried; “ I’m ever so much
more beautiful than my mistress.” So she broke the
pitcher to pieces again, and went home. Again her
mistress asked her why she had not drawn water.
“Because I am ever so much more beautiful than
thou, so thou must draw water for me,” replied she.

“Thou art downright crazy,” replied her mistress,
drew out a mirror, and showed it to her; and when
the Moor-girl saw her face in it, she took up another
pitcher and went to the fountain for the third time.



24 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The damsel’s face again appeared in the water, but
just as she was about to break the pitcher again, the
damsel called to her from the tree: “ Break not thy
pitchers, ’tis my face thou dost see in the water, and
thou wilt see thine own there algo.”

The Moor-girl looked up, and when she saw the
wondrously beautiful shape of the damsel in the tree,
she climbed up beside her and spake coaxing words
to her: “ Oh, my little golden damsel, thou wilt get
the cramp from crouching there so long ; come, rest
thy head!” And with that she laid the damsel’s
head on her breast, felt in her bosom, drew out a
needle, pricked the damsel with it in the skull, and in
an instant the Orange-Damsel was changed into a
bird, and pr-r-r-r-r! she was gone, leaving the Moor
all alone in the tree.

Now when the King’s son came back with his fine
coach and beautiful raiment, looked up into the tree,
and saw the black face, he asked the girl what had
happened to her. “A nice question!” replied the
Moor-girl. “Why, thou didst leave me here all day,
and wentest away, so of course the sun has tanned
me black.” What could the poor King’s son do?
He made the black damsel sit in the coach, and took
her straight home to his father’s house.

In the palace of the Padishah they were all waiting,
full of eagerness, to behold the Peri-Bride, and



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 25

when they saw the Moorish damsel they said to the
King’s son: “ However couldst thou lose thy heart
to a black maid ?”

“She is not a black maid,” said the King’s son.
“T left her at the top of a tree, and she was blackened
there by the rays of the sun. If only you let her
rest a bit she'll soon grow white again.” And with
that he led her into her chamber, and waited for
her to grow white again.

Now there was a beautiful garden in the palace of
the King’s son, and one day the Orange-Bird came
flying on to a tree there, and called down to the
gardener.

“What dost thou want with me?” asked the
gardener.

“What is the King’s son doing?” inquired the bird.

“He is doing no harm that I know of,” replied the
gardener.

“ And what about his black bride ?”

“Oh, she’s there too, sitting with him as usual.”

‘hen the little bird sang these words:

“She may sit by his side,
But she shall not abide ;
For all her fair showing
The thorns are a-growing.
As I hop on this tree,

It will wither ’neath me.”

And with that it flew away.



26 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The next day it came again, and inquired once
more about the King’s son and his black consort, and
repeated what it said before. The third day it did in
like manner, and as many trees as it hopped upon
withered right away beneath it.

One day the King’s son felt weary of his black
bride, so he went out into the garden for a walk.
Then his eye fell on the withered trees, and he
called the gardener and said to him: “ What is this,
gardener? Why dost thou not take better care of
thy trees? Dost thou not see that they are all
withering away?” Then the gardener replied that
it was of but little use for him to take care of the
trees, for a few days ago a little bird had been there,
and asked what the King’s son and his black consort
were doing, and had said that though she might be
sitting there, she should not sit for ever, but that
thorns would grow, and every tree it lit upon should
wither.

The King’s son commanded the gardener to smear
the trees with bird-lime, and if the bird then lit upon
it, to bring it to him. So the gardener smeared the
trees with bird-lime, and when the bird came there
next day he caught it, and brought it to the King’s
son, who put it in a cage. Now no sooner did the
black woman look upon the bird than she knew at
once that it was the damsel. So she pretended to be



THE THREE ORANGEPERIS — 27

very ill, sent for the chief medicine-man, and by dint
of rich gifts persuaded him to say to the King’s son
that his consort would never get well unless he fed
her with such and such birds.

The King’s son saw that his consort was very sick,
he sent for the doctor, went with him to see the sick
woman, and asked him how she was to be cured.
The doctor said she could only be cured if they gave
her such and such birds to eat. ‘“ Why, only this
very day have I caught one of such birds,” said the
King’s son ; and they brought the bird, killed it, and
fed the sick lady with the flesh thereof. In an instant
the black damsel arose from her bed. But one of the
bird’s dazzling feathers fell accidentally to the ground
and slipped between the planks, so that nobody
noticed it.

Time went on, and the King’s son was still
waiting and waiting for his consort to turn white.
Now there was an old woman in the palace who used
to teach the dwellers in the harem to read and write.
One day as she was going down-stairs she saw some-
thing gleaming between the planks of the floor, and
going towards it, perceived that it was a bird’s feather
that sparkled like a diamond. She took it home and
thrust it behind a rafter. The next day she went to
the palace, and while she was away the bird’s feather
leaped down from the rafter, shivered a little, and the



28 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

next moment turned into a most lovely damsel. She
put the room tidy, cooked the meal, set everything
in order, and then leaped back upon the rafter and
became a feather again. When the old woman came
home she was amazed at what she saw. She thought:
“Somebody must have done all this,” so she went up
and down, backwards and forwards through the house,
but nobody could she see.

_ Early next morning she again went to the palace,
and the feather leaped down again in like manner,
and did all the household work. When the old
woman came home, she perceived the house all nice
and clean, and everything in order. “I really must
find out the secret of this,” thought she, so next
morning she made as if she were going away as usual,
and. left the door ajar, but went and hid herself in a
corner. All at once she perceived that there was a
damsel in the room, who tidied the room and cooked
the meal, whereupon the old woman dashed out,
seized hold of her, and asked her who she was and
whence she came. Then the damsel told her her
sad fate, and how she had been twice killed by the
black woman, and had come thither in the shape of
a feather.

“Distress thyself no more, my lass,” said the old
woman. “I'll put thy business to rights, and this
very day, too.” And with that she went straight



THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 29

to the King’s son and invited him to come and see
her that evening. The King’s son was now so sick
unto death of his black bride that he was glad of any
excuse to escape from his own house, so the evening
found him punctually at the old woman’s. They sat
down to supper, and when the coffee followed the
meats, the damsel entered with the cups, and when
the King’s son saw her he was like to have fainted.
‘““Nay, but, mother,” said the King’s son, when he
had come to himself a little, “ who is that damsel 2”

“Thy wife,” replied the old woman.

“ How didst thou get that fair creature ?” inquired
the King’s son. ‘ Wilt thou not give her to me?”

‘“ How can I give her to thee, seeing that she was
thine own once upon a time,” said the old woman ;
and with that the old woman took the damsel by the
hand, led her to the King’s son, and laid her on his
breast. “Take better care of the Orange-Peri another
time,” said she.

The King’s son now nearly fainted in real earnest,
but it was from sheer joy. He took the damsel to his
palace, put to death the black slave-girl, but held high
festival with the Peri for forty days and forty nights.
So they had the desire of their hearts, and may Allah
satisfy your desires likewise.



THE ROSE-BEAUTY

ONCE upon a time in the old old days when straws
were sieves, and the camel a chapman, and the mouse
a barber, and the cuckoo a tailor, and the donkey ran
errands, and the tortoise baked bread, and I was only
fifteen years old, but my father rocked my cradle, and
there was a miller in the land who had a black cat—
in those olden times, I say, there was a King who
had three daughters, and the first daughter was forty,
and the second was thirty, and the third was twenty.
One day the youngest daughter wrote this letter to
her father: “ My lord father! my eldest sister is forty
and my second sister is thirty, and still thou hast
given neither of them a husband. I have no desire
to grow grey in waiting for a husband.”

The King read the letter, sent for his three daugh-
ters, and addressed them in these words: “Look now!
let each one of you shoot an arrow from a bow and

seek her sweetheart wherever her arrow falls!” So
30



THE ROSE-BEAUTY 31

the three damsels took their bows. The eldest
damsel’s arrow fell into the palace of the Vizier’s son,
so the Vizier’s son took her to wife. The second
girl’s arrow flew into the palace of the Chief Mufti’s
son, so they gave her to him. The third damsel also
fired her arrow, and lo! it stuck in the hut of a poor
young labourer. ‘“ That won’t do, that won’t do!”
cried they all. So she fired again, and again the
arrow stuck in the hut. She aimed a third time, and
a third time the arrow stuck in the hut of the poor
young labourer. Then the King was wroth and cried
to the damsel: “ Look now, thou slut! thou hast got
thy deserts. Thy sisters waited patiently, and there-
fore they have got their hearts’ desires. Thou wast
the youngest of all, yet didst thou write me that saucy
letter, hence thy punishment. Out of my sight, thou
slave-girl, to this husband of thine, and thou shalt
have nought but what he can give thee!” So the
poor damsel departed to the hut of the labourer, and
they gave her to him to wife.

They lived together for a time, and on the tenth
day of the ninth month the time came that she should
bear a child, and her husband, the labourer, hastened
away for the midwife. While the husband was thus
away his wife had neither a bed to lie down upon
nor a fire to warm herself by, though grinding
winter was upon them. All at once the walls of



32 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

the poor hut opened hither and thither, and three
beautiful damsels of the Peri race stepped into it.
One stood at the damsel’s head, another at her
feet, the third by her side, and they all seemed
to know their business well. In a moment every-
thing in the poor hut was in order, the princess
lay on a beautiful soft couch, and before she
could blink her eyes a pretty little new-born baby
girl was lying by her side. When everything was
finished the three Peris set about going, but first of
all they approached the bed one by one, and the first
said :

‘Rosa be thy damsel’s name,

And she shall weep not tears but pearls!”

The second Peri approached the bed and said:

“ Rosa be thy damsel’s name,
The rose shall blossom when she smiles! ”

And the third Peri wound up with these words :

“Rosa be thy damsel’s name,
Sweet verdure in her footsteps spring!”

whereupon they all three disappeared.

Now all this time the husband was seeking a mid-
wife, but could find one nowhere. What could he
do but go home? But when he got back he was
amazed to find everything in the poor hut in
beautiful order, and his wife lying on a splendid



THE ROSE-BEAUTY 33

bed. Then she told him the story of the three Peris,
and there was no more spirit left in him, so astounded
was he. But the little girl grew more and more
lovely from hour to day, and from day to week, so that
there was not another like her in the whole world.
Whosoever looked upon her lost his heart at once, and
pearls fell from her eyes when she wept, roses burst
into bloom when she smiled, and a bright riband of
fresh green verdure followed her footsteps. | Who-
soever saw her had no more spirit left in him,
and the fame of lovely Rosa went from mouth to
mouth .

At last the King of that land also heard of the
damsel, and instantly made up his mind that she
and nobody else should be his son’s consort. So he
sent for his son, and told him that there was a damsel
in the town of so rare a beauty that pearls fell from
her eyes when she wept, roses burst into bloom when
she smiled, and the earth grew fresh and green
beneath her footsteps, and with that he bade him up
and. woo her.

Now the Peris had for a long time shown the
King’s son the beautiful Rose-damsel in his dreams,
and the sweet fire of love already burned within him ;
but he was ashamed to let his father see this, so he
hung back a little. At this his father became more

and more pressing, bade him go and woo her at once,
D



34 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

and commanded the chief dame of the palace to
accompany him to the hut of the labourer.

They entered the hut, said on what errand they
came, and claimed the damsel for the King’s son in
the name of Allah. The poor folks rejoiced at their
good luck, promised the girl, and began to make
ready.

Now this palace dame’s daughter was also a beauty,
and not unlike Rosa. ‘Terribly distressed was the
dame that the King’s son should take to wife a
poor labourer’s daughter, instead: of her own child ; so
she made up her mind to deceive them and put her
own daughter in Rosa’s place. So on the day of the
banquet she made the poor girl eat many salted
meats, and then brought a pitcher of water and a
large basket, got into the bridal coach with Rosa and
her own daughter, and set out for the palace. As
they were on the road (and a very long time they
were about it) the damsel grew thirsty and asked the
palace dame for some water. “Not till thou hast
given me one of thine eyes,” said the palace dame.
What could the poor damsel do ?—she was dying with
thirst. So she cut out one of her eyes and gave it
for a drink of water.

They went on and on, further and further, and the
damsel again became thirsty and asked for another
drink of water. “Thou shalt have it if thou give



THE ROSE-BEAUTY 35

me thy other eye,” said the palace dame. And the
poor damsel was so tormented with thirst that she
gave the other eye for a drink of water.

The old dame took the two eyes, pitched the sight-
less damsel into the big basket, and left her all alone
on the top of a mountain. But the beautiful ‘bridal
robe she put upon her own daughter, brought her to
the King’s son, and gave her to him with the words:
“Behold thy wife!” So they made a great banquet,
and when they had brought the damsel to her bride-
groom and taken off her veil, he perceived that the
damsel who now stood before him was not the damsel
of his dreams. As, however, she resembled her a
little he said nothing about it to anybody. So they
lay down to rest, and when they rose up again early
next morning the King’s son was quite undeceived,
for the damsel of his dreams had wept pearls, smiled
roses, and sweet green herbs had grown up in her
footsteps, but this girl had neither roses nor pearls
nor green herbs to show for herself. ‘The youth felt
there was some trickery at work here. This was not
the girl he had meant to have. “How am I to find
it all out?” thought he to himself; but not a word
did he say to any one.

While all these things were going on in the palace,
poor Rosa was weeping on the mountain top, and
such showers of pearls fell from her by dint of her



36 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

sore weeping that there was scarce room to hold them
all in the big basket. Now a mud-carrier happened
to be passing by who was carting mud away, and
hearing the weeping of the damsel was terribly afraid,
and cried: “Who art thou?—A Jinn or a Peri ?”—
“T am neither a Jinn nor yet a Peri,” replied the
damsel, “‘ but the remains of a living child of man.”
Whereupon the mud-raker took courage, opened the
basket, and there a poor sightless damsel was sobbing,
and her tears fell from her in showers of pearls. So
he took the damsel by the hand and led her to his
hut, and as the old man had nobody about him he
adopted the damsel as if she were his own child and
took care of her. But the poor girl did nothing but
weep for her two eyes, and the old man had all he
could do to pick up the pearls, and whenever they
were in want of money he would take a pearl and sell
it, and they lived on whatever he got for it.

Thus time passed, and there was mirth in the
palace, and misery in the hut of the mud-raker. Now
it chanced one day as fair Rosa was sitting in the hut,
that something made her smile, and immediately a rose
bloomed. ‘Then the damsel said to her foster-father,
the mud-raker: “ Take this rose, papa, and go with it
in front of the palace of the King’s son, and ery aloud
that thou hast roses for sale that are not to be
matched in the wide world. But if the dame of the



THE ROSE-BEAUTY 37

palace comes out, see that thou dost not give her the
rose for money, but say that thou wilt sell it for a
human eye.”

So the man took the rose and stood in front of the
palace, and began to cry aloud: “A rose for sale, a
rose for sale, the like of which is nowhere to be
found.” Now it was not the season for roses, so
when the dame of the palace heard the man crying a
rose for sale, she thought to herself: “ I’ll put it in my
daughter’s hair, and thus the Kino’s son will think that
she is his true bride.” So she called the poor man to
her, and asked him what he would sell the rose for 2
“For nothing,” replied the man, “for no money told
down, but Tl give it thee for a human eye.”
Then the dame of the palace brought forth one of
fair Rosa’s eyes and gave it for the rose. Then she
took it to her daughter, plaited it in her hair, and
when the King’s son saw the rose, he thought
of the Peri of his dreams, but could not understand
whither she had gone. Nevertheless he now fancied
he was about to find out, so he said not a word to
any one.

Meanwhile, the old man went home with the eye
and gave it to the damsel, fair Rosa. Then she fitted
it in its right place, sighed from her heart in prayer
to Allah, who can do all things; and behold! she
could see right well again with her one eye. The



38 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

poor girl was so pleased that she could not help
smiling, and immediately another rose sprang forth.
This also she gave to her father that he might walk
in front of the palace and give it for another human
eye. The old man took the rose, and scarcely had he
begun crying it before the palace when the old dame
again heard him. “He has just come at the nick of
time,” thought she ; “the King’s son has begun to love
my rose-bedizened daughter; if I can only get this
rose also, he will love her still better, and this
serving-wench will go out of his mind altogether.”
So she called the mud-raker to her and asked for the
rose, but again he would not take money for it, though
he was willing to let her have it in exchange for a
human eye. Then the old woman gave him the
second eye, and the old man hastened home with it
and gave it to the damsel. Rosa immediately put it
in its proper place, prayed to Allah, and was so
rejoiced when her two bright eyes sparkled with
living light that she smiled all the day, and roses
bloomed on every side of her. Henceforth she was
lovelier than ever. Now one day beautiful Rosa went
fora walk, and as she smiled continually as she walked
along, roses bloomed around her and the ground grew
fresh and green beneath her feet. The palace dame
saw her and was terrified. What will become of me,
she thought, if the affair of this damsel comes to be



THE ROSE-BEAUTY 39

‘known? She knew where the poor mud-seraper lived,
so she went all alone to his dwelling, and terrified him
by telling him that he had an evil witch in his house.
The poor man had never seen a witch, so he was terri-
fied to death, and asked the palace dame what he had
better do. “Find out, first of all, what her talisman
is,” advised the palace dame, “and then I’ll come and.
do the rest.”

So the first thing the old man did when the damsel
came home was to ask her how she, a mere child of
man, had come to have such magic power. The
damsel, suspecting no ill, said that she had got her
talisman from the three Peris, and that pearls, roses,
and fresh sweet verdure would accompany her so long
as her talisman was alive.

“What then is thy talisman?” asked the old man.

“ A little deer on the hill-top ;
Tf it die, I also dead drop,”

answered she.

The next day the palace dame came thither in the
utmost misery, heard all about it from the mud-
scraper, and hastened home with great joy. She told
her daughter that on the top of the neighbouring hill
was a little deer which she should ask her husband to
get for her. That very same day the Sultana told her
husband of the little deer on the top of the hill, and



40 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

begged and implored him to get her its heart to eat.
And after not many days the Prince’s men caught the
little deer and killed it, and took out its heart and
gave it to the Sultana. At the same instant when
they killed the little fawn fair Rosa died. The mud-
raker sorrowed over her till he could sorrow no more,
and then took and buried her.

Now in the heart of the little fawn there was a
little red coral eye which nobody took any notice of.
When the Sultana ate the heart, the little red coral
eye fell out and rolled down the steps as if it wanted
to hide itself

Time went on, and in not more than nine months —
and ten days the Prince’s consort was brought to bed
of a little daughter, who wept pearls when she cried,
dropt roses when she smiled, and sweet green herbs
sprang up in her footsteps.

When the Prince saw it he mused and mused over
it, the little girl was the very image of fair Rosa, and
not a bit like the mother who had borne her. So his
sleep was no repose to him, till one night fair Rosa
appeared to him in his dreams and spoke these words
to him: “Oh, my prince! oh, my betrothed! my
soul is beneath thy palace steps, my body is in the
tomb, thy little girl is my little girl, my talisman is
the little coral eye.”

The Prince had no sooner awakened than he went



THE ROSE-BEAUTY 41

to the staircase and searched about, and lo! there was
the little coral eye. He picked it up, took it into his
chamber, and laid it on the table. Meanwhile, the
little girl entered the room, saw the red coral, and
scarcely had she laid hold of it than she vanished as
if she had never been. The three Peris had carried
off the child and taken her to her mother’s tomb, and
scarcely had she placed the coral eye in the dead
woman’s mouth than she awoke up to a new life.

But the King’s son was not easy in his mind. He
went to the cemetery, had the tomb opened, and there
in her coffin lay the Rose-beauty of his dreams, with
her little girl in her arms and the coral talisman in
her mouth. They arose from the tomb and embraced
him, and pearls fell from the eyes of both of them as
they wept, and roses from their mouths as they
smiled, and sweet green herbs grew up in their foot-
steps.

The palace dame and her daughter paid for their
crimes, but beautiful Rosa and her father and her
mother, the Sultan’s daughter, were all re-united,
and for forty days and forty nights they held high
revel amidst the beating of drums and the tinkling of
cymbals.



MAD MEHMED

ONcE upon a time in the old old days when the
camel was only a spy, when toads rose in the air on
wings, and I myself rode in the air while I walked on
the ground, and went up hill and down dale at the
same time, in those days, I say, there were two brothers
who dwelt together.

All that they had inherited from their father were
some oxen and other beasts, and a sick mother. One
day the spirit of division seized upon the younger
brother (he was half-witted besides, Allah help him 3),
and he went to his brother and said: “Look now,
brother ! at these two stables! One of them is as new
as new can be, while the other is old and rotten. Let
us drive our cattle hither, and whatever goes into
the new stable shall be mine, and all the rest shall be
thine.”

“Not so, Mehmed,” said the elder brother; “let

whatever goes into the old stable be thine!” To
42



MAD MEHMED 43

this also the half-crazy Mehmed agreed. That same
day they went and drove up their cattle, and all the
cattle went into the new stable except a helpless old
ox that was so blind that it mistook its way and went
into the old stable instead. Mehmed said never a
word, but took the blind old ox into the fields to
graze; every morning early he drove it thither, and
late every evening he drove it back again. One day
when he was on the road, the wind began to shake a
big wayside tree so violently that its vast branches
whined and whimpered again. ‘“ Hi! whimpering
old dad!” said the fool to the tree, ‘‘ hast thou seen
my elder brother ?” But the tree, asif it didn’t hear,
only went on whining. The fool flew into such a rage
at this that he caught up his chopper and struck at the
tree, when out of it gushed a whole stream of golden
sequins. At this the fool rallied what little wits he
had, hastened home, and asked his brother to lend him
another ox, as he wanted to plough with a pair. He
found a cart also, and some empty sacks. These
he filled with earth, and set out forthwith for his tree.
There he emptied his sacks of their earth, filled them
with sequins instead, and when he returned home in
the evening, his brother well-nigh dropped down for
amazement at the sight of the monstrous treasure.
They could think of nothing now but dividing it,
so the younger brother went to their neighbour for



44 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

a three-peck measure to measure it with. Now the
neighbour was curious to know what such clodpoles
could have to measure. So he took and smeared the
bottom of the measure with tar, and, sure enough,
when the fool brought the measure back a short time
afterwards, a sequin was sticking to the bottom of it.
The neighbour immediately went and told it to
another, who went and told it to a third, and so it
was not long before everybody knew all about it.

Now the wiser brother knew not what might happen
to them now that they had all this money, and he
began to feel frightened. So he snatched up his
pick and shovel, dug a trench, buried the treasure,
and made off as fast as his heels could carry him. On
the way it occurred to the wise brother that he had
done foolishly in not shutting the door of the hut
behind him, so he sent off his younger brother to do
it for him. So the fool went back to the house, and
he thought to himself: “Well, since I am here, I
ought not to forget my old mother either.” So he
filled a huge cauldron with water, boiled it, and soused
his old mother in it so thoroughly that her poor old
head was never likely to speak again. After that he
propped the old woman against the wall with the
broom, tore the door off its hinges, threw it over his
shoulders, and went and rejoined his brother in the
wood.



MAD MEHMED 45

The elder brother looked at the door, and listened
to the sad case of his poor old mother, but scold and
chide his younger brother as he might the latter orew
more cock-a-hoop than ever—he fancied he had done
such aclever thing. He had brought the door away with
him, he said, in order that no one might get into the
house. The wise brother would have given anything
to have got rid of the fool, and began turning over in
his mind how he might best manage it. He looked
before him and behind him, he looked down the high-
road, and there were three horsemen galloping along.
The thought instantly occurred to the pair of them
that these horsemen were on their track, so they
scrambled up a tree forthwith, door and all. They
were scarcely comfortably settled when the three
horsemen drove up beneath the tree and encamped
there. The dusk of evening had come on at the very
nick of time, so that they could not see the two
brothers.

Now the two brothers would have done very well
indeed up in the tree had not one of them been a fool.
Mehmed the fool began to practise pleasantries which
disturbed the repose of the horsemen beneath the tree.
Presently, however, came a crash—bang !—and down
on the heads of the three sleepers fell the great
heavy door from the top of the tree. “The end of
the world has come, the end of the world has



46 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

come!” cried they, and they rushed off in such a
fright that no doubt they haven’t ceased running
to this very day. This finished the business so far
as the elder brother was concerned. In the morning
he arose and went on his way, and left the foolish
younger brother by himself.

Thus poor silly Mehmed had to go forth into the
wide world alone. He went on and on till he came
to a village, by which time he was very hungry.
There he stood in the gate of a mosque, and got one
or two paras! from those who went in and out till he
had enough to buy himself something to eat. At that
moment a fat little man came out of the mosque, and
casting his eyes on Mehmed, asked him if he would
like to enter his service.

“T don’t mind if [ do,” replied Mehmed, “ but only
on condition that neither of us is to get angry with
the other for any cause whatever. If thou art wroth
with me I'll kill thee, and if I get wroth with thee
thou mayest kill me also.” The fat man agreed to
these terms, for there was a great lack of servants in
that village.

In order to make short work of the fat little man the
fool began by at once chasing all the hens and sheep off
his master’s premises. “ Art angry, master ?” he then
inquired of his lord. His master was amazed, but he

1 Farthings.



MAD MEHMED 47

only answered: “Angry? Not I! Why should I
be?” At the same time he entrusted nothing more
to him, but let him sit in the house without any-
thing to do.

His master had a wife and child, and Mehmed had
to look after them. He liked to dandle the child up
and down, but he knocked it about and hurt it, so
clumsy was he; so he soon had to leave that off. But
the wife began to be afraid that her turn would come
next, sooner or later, so she persuaded her husband to
run away from the fool one night. Mehmed over-
heard what they said, hid himself in their store-
box, and when they opened it in the next village out
he popped.

After a while his master and his wife agreed
together that they would go and sleep at night on
the shores of a lake. They took Mehmed with them,
and put his bed right on the water’s edge, that he
might tumble in when he went to sleep. However, the
fool was not such a fool but that he made his master’s
wife jump into the lake instead of himself. “ Art
angry, master?” cried he.—“ Angry indeed! How
can I help being angry when I see my property
wasted, and my wife and child killed, and myself a
beggar—and all through thee!” Then the fool seized
his master, put him in mind of their compact, and
pitched him into the water.



48 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

_ Mehmed now found himself all alone, so he went
forth into the wide world once more. He went on
and on, did nothing but drink sweet coffee, smoke
chibooks, look about over his shoulder, and walk
leisurely along at his ease. As he was thus knocking
about, he chanced to light upon a five-para piece,
which he speedily changed for some lebleb,! which he
immediately fell to chewing, and, as he chewed, part of
it fell into a wayside spring, whereupon the fool began
roaring loud enough to split his throat : “Give me
back my lebleb, give me back my lebleb!” At this -
frightful bawling a Jinn popped up his head, and he
was so big that his upper lip swept the sky, while his
lower lip hid the earth. “What dost thou require 2”
asked the Jinn.—‘I want my lebleb, I want my
lebleb !” cried Mehmed.

The Jinn ducked down into the spring, and when
he came up again, he held a little table in his hand.
This little table he gave to the fool and said:
“Whenever thou art hungry thou hast only to say:
‘Little table, give me to eat;’ and when thou hast
eaten thy fill, say: ‘Little table, I have now had
enough.’ ”

So Mehmed took the table and went with it into a
village, and when he felt hungry he said: “Little table,
give me to eat!” and immediately there stood before

! Roasted pepper.



MAD MEHMED 49

him so many beautiful, nice dishes that he couldn’t
make up his mind which to begin with. ‘“ Well,”
thought he, “I must let the poor people of the village
see this wonder also,’ so he went and invited them all
to a great banquet.

The villagers came one after another, they looked
to the right, they looked to the left, but there was no
sign of a fire, or any preparations for a meal. ‘“‘ Nay,
but he would needs make fools of us!” thought they.
But the young man brought out his table, set it in
the midst, and cried: ‘ Little table, give me to eat!”
and there before them stood all manner of delicious
meats and drinks, and so much thereof that when the
guests had stuffed themselves to the very throat,
there was enough left over to fill the servants. Then
the villagers laid their heads together as to how they
might manage to have a meal like this every day.
“ Come now !” said some of them, “‘ let us steal a march
upon Mehmed one day and lay hands upon his table,
and then there will be an end to the fool’s glory.”
And they did so.

What could the poor, empty-bellied fool do then ?
Why he went to the wayside spring and asked again :
“JT want my lebleb, I want my lebleb!” And he
asked and asked so long that at last the Jinn popped
up his head again out of the spring and inquired what
was the matter. “I want my lebleb, I want my

E



50 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

lebleb!” cried the fool—‘‘But where’s thy little
table ?””—“ They stole it.”

The big-lipped Jinn again popped down, and when
he rose out of the spring again he had a little mill in
his hand. This he gave to the fool and said to him:
“ Grind it to the right and gold will flow out of it,
grind it to the left and it will give thee silver.” So
the youth took the mill home and ground it first to
the right and then to the left, and huge treasures of
gold and silver lay heaped about him on the floor.
So he grew such a rich man that his equal was not
to be found in the village, nay, nor in the town
either.

But no sooner had the people of the village got to
know all about the little mill than they laid their
heads together and schemed and schemed till the mill
also disappeared* one fine morning from Mehmed’s
cottage. Then Mehmed ran off to the spring once
more and cried: “I want my lebleb, [ want my
lebleb !”

“But where is thy little table? Where is thy
little mill?” asked the big-lipped Jinn.

“They have stolen them both from me,” lamented
the witless one, and he wept bitterly.

Again the Jinn bobbed down, and this time he
brought up two sticks with him. He gave them to

1 Lit. the place of the mill was cold one morning,



MAD MEHMED 51

the fool, and impressed upon him very strongly on no
account to say: “ Strike, strike, my little sticks !”

Mehmed took the sticks, and first he turned them
to the right and then to the left, but could make
nothing of them. Then he thought he would just
try the effect of saying: “Strike, strike, my little
sticks!” and no sooner were the words out of his
mouth than the sticks fell upon him unmercifully,
and belaboured him on every part of the body that
can feel—the head, the foot, the arm, the back—till he
was nothing but one big ache. “Stop, stop, my
little sticks!” cried he, and lo! the two sticks were
still. Then, for all his aches and pains, Mehmed
rejoiced greatly that he had found out the mystery.

He had no sooner got home with the two sticks
than he called together all the villagers, but said
not a word about what he meant to do. In less than
a couple of hours everybody had assembled there, and
awaited the new show with great curiosity. Then
Mehmed came with his two sticks and cried : “ Strike,
strike, my little sticks, strike, strike!” whereupon the
two sticks gave the whole lot of them such a rub-a-
dub-dubbing that it was as much as they could do
to howl for mercy. ‘ Now,” said Mehmed, who was
getting his wits back again, ‘I'll have no mercy
till you. have given back to me my little table and
my little mill.”



52 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The people of the village, all bruised and bleeding
as they were, consented to everything, and hurried
off for the little table and the little mill. Then
_ Mehmed cried : “ Stand still, my little sticks!” and
there was peace and quiet as before.

Then the man took away the three gifts to his own
village, and as he now had money he grew more
sensible, and there also he found his brother. He
gave all the buried treasure to his brother, and each
of them sought out a damsel meet to be a wife, and
married, and lived each in a world of his own. And
there was not a wiser man in that village than Mad
Mehmed now that he had grown rich.



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN

ONcE upon a time, in days long gone by, when my
father was my father, and I was my father’s son,
when my father was my son, and I was my father’s
mother, once upon a time, I say, at the uttermost
ends of the world, hard by the realm of demons, stood
a great city.

In this same city there dwelt three poor damsels,
the daughters of a poor wood-cutter. From morn to
eve, from evening to morning, they did nothing but
sew and stitch, and when the embroideries were
finished, one of them would go to the market-place
and sell them, and so purchase wherewithal to live
upon.

Now it fell out, one day, that the Padishah of that
city was wroth with the people, and in his rage he
commanded that for three days and three nights
nobody should light a candle in that city. What

were these three poor sisters to do? They could not
53



54 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

work in the dark. So they covered their window
with a large thick curtain, lit a tiny rushlight, and sat
them down to earn their daily bread.

On the third night of the prohibition, the Padishah
took it into his head to go round the city himself to
see whether every one was keeping his commandment.
He chanced to step in front of the house of the three
poor damsels, and as the folds of the curtain did not
quite cover the bottom of the window he caught sight
of the light within. The damsels, however, little
suspecting their danger, went on sewing and stitching
and talking amongst themselves about their poor
affairs.

“Oh,” said the eldest, “if only the Padishah would
wed me to his chief cook, what delicious dishes I
should have every day. Yes, and I would embroider
him for it a carpet so long that all his horses and all
his men could find room upon it.”

“As for me,” said the middling damsel, “I should
like to be wedded to the keeper of his wardrobe.
What lovely splendid raiment I should then have to
put on. And then I would make the Padishah a tent
so large, that all his horses and all his men should
find shelter beneath it.”

“Well,” cried the youngest damsel, “I'll look at
nobody but the Padishah himself, and if he would only
take me to wife I would bear him two little children



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 55

with golden hair. One should be a boy and the
other a girl, and a half-moon should shine on the
forehead of the boy, and a bright star should sparkle
on the temples of the girl.”

The Padishah heard the discourse of the three
damsels, and no sooner did the red dawn shine in the
morning sky than he sent for all three to the palace.
The eldest he gave to his head pantler, the second to
his head chamberlain, but the youngest he took for
himself.

And in truth it fared excellently well with the
three damsels. The eldest got so many rich dishes to
eat, that when it came to sewing the promised carpet
she could scarce move her needle for the sleep of
surfeit. So they sent her back again to the wood-
cutter’s hut. The second damsel, too, when they
dressed her up in gold and silver raiment, would not
deign to dirty her fingers by making tents, so they
sent her back too, to keep her elder sister company.

And how about the youngest? Well, after nine
months and ten days the two elder sisters came
sidling up to the palace to see if the poor thing
would really be as good as her word, and bring
forth the two wondrous children. In the gates of
the palace they met an old woman, and they per-
suaded her with gifts and promises to meddle in
the matter. Now this old woman was the devil’s



56 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

own daughter, so that mischief and malice were
her meat and drink. She now went and picked
up two pups and took them with her to the sick
woman’s bed.

And oh, my soul! the wife of the Padishah brought
forth two little children like shining stars. One was
a boy, the other a girl; on the boy’s forehead was
a half-moon and on the girl’s a star, so that darkness
was turned to light when they were by. Then the
wicked old woman exchanged the children for the
pups, and told it in the ears of the Padishah that his
wife had brought forth two pups. The Padishah was
like to have had a fit in the furiousness of his rage.
He took his poor wife, buried her up to the waist in
the ground, and commanded throughout the city that
every passer-by should strike her on the head with
a stone. But no sooner had the evil witch got hold
of the two children, than she took them a long way
outside the town, exposed them on the bank of a
flowing stream, and returned to the palace right glad
that she had done her work so well.

Now close to the water where the two children lay
stood a hut where lived an aged couple. The old man
had a she-goat which used to go out'in the morning
to graze, and come back in the evening to be milked,
and that was how the poor people kept body and soul
together. One day, however, the old woman was



\

RE

aD

%
ie

,

= (aya,

s-

f afi hit,
TVA SSA

Clas
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The Golden-Haired Children.—p. 57.



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 57

surprised to find that the goat did not give one drop
of milk. She complained about it to the old man her
husband, and told him to follow the goat to see if
perchance there was any one who stole the milk,

So the next day the old man went after the goat,
which went right up to the water’s edge, and then
disappeared behind a tree. And what do you think he
saw? He saw a sight which would have delighted
your eyes also—two golden-haired children were lying
in the grass, and the goat went right up to them
and gave them to suck. Then she bleated to them
a little, and so left them and went off to graze.
And the old man was so delighted at the sight of the
little starry things, that he was like to have lost his
head for joy. So he took the little ones (Allah had
not blessed him with children of his own) and carried
them to his hut and gave them to his wife. The
woman was filled with a still greater joy at the
children which Allah had given her, and took care of
them, and brought them up. But now the little goat
came bleating in as if in sore distress, but the moment
she saw the children, she went to them and suckled
them, and then went out to graze again.

But time comes and goes. The two wondrous
children grew up and scampered up hill and down
dale, and the dark woods were bright with the
radiance of their golden hair. They hunted the



58 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

wild beasts, tended sheep, and helped the old people
by word and deed. Time came and went till the
children had grown up, and the old people had
become very old indeed. The golden-haired ones
grew in strength while the silver-haired ones grew in
feebleness, till, at last, one morning they lay dead there,
and the brother and sister were left all alone. Sorely
did the poor little things weep and wail, but was ever
woe mended by weeping? So they buried their old
parents, and the girl stayed at home with the little
she-goat, while the lad went a-hunting, for how to
find food was now their great care and their little
care too.

One day, while he was hunting wild beasts in the
forest, he met his father, the Padishah, but he did not
know it was his father, neither did the father recog-
nize his son. Yet the moment the Padishah beheld
the wondrously beautiful child, he longed to clasp
him to-his breast, and commanded those about him
to inquire of the child from whence he came.

Then one of the courtiers went up to the youth,
and said: “Thou hast shot much game there, my
Bey !”—* Allah also has created much,” replied the
youth, “and there is enough for thee and for me
also,” and with that he left him like a blockhead.

But the Padishah went back to his palace, and was
sick at heart because of the boy; and when they



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 59

asked what ailed him, he said that he had seen such
a wondrously beautiful child in the forest, and that
he loved him so that he could rest no more. The
boy had the very golden hair and the same radiant
forehead that his wife had promised him.

The old woman was sore afraid at these words.
She hastened to the stream, saw the house, peeped
in, and there sat a lovely girl, like a moon fourteen
days old. The girl entreated the old woman court-
eously, and asked her what she sought. The old
woman did not wait to be asked twice; indeed, her
foot was scarce across the threshold when she began
to ask the girl with honey-sweet words whether she
lived all alone.

“Nay, my mother,” replied the girl; “I have a
young brother. In the day-time he goes hunting,
and in the evening he comes home.”

“Dost thou not grow weary of being all alone here
by thyself?” inquired the witch.—‘“If even I did,”
said the girl, “what can I do? I must fill up my
time as best I may.”

“Tell me now, my little diamond! dost thou dearly
love this brother of thine ?”

“Of course I do.”

“Well, then, my girl,” said the witch, “I'll tell
thee something, but don’t let it go any further!
When thy brother comes home this evening, fall to



60 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

weeping and wailing, and keep it up with all thy
might. When then he asks what ails thee, answer
him not, and when he asks thee again, again give
him never a word. When, however, he asks thee
a third time, say that thou art tired to death with
staying at home here all by thyself, and that if he
loves thee, he will go to the garden of the Queen
of the Peris, and bring thee from thence a branch. A
lovelier branch thou hast never seen all thy life
long.”—The girl promised she would do this, and
the old woman went away.

Towards evening the damsel burst forth a-weeping
and wailing till both her eyes were as red as blood.
The brother came home in the evening, and was
amazed to see his sister in such dire distress, yet
could he not prevail upon her to tell him the cause
of it. He promised her all the grass of the field and
all the trees of the forest if she would only tell him
what was the matter, and, to satisfy the desire of his
sister's heart, the golden-haired youth set off next
morning for the garden of the fairy queen. He went
on and on, smoking his chibook and drinking coffee,
till he reached the boundaries of the fairy realm. He
came to deserts where no caravan had ever gone; he
came to mountains where no bird could ever fly; he
came to valleys where no serpent can ever crawl. But
his trust was in Allah, so he went on and on till he



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 61

came to an immense desert which the eye of man had
never seen nor the foot of man trodden. In the
midst of it was a beautiful palace, and by the road-
side sat the Mother of Devils, and the smell of her
was as the pestilence in the air all round about her.

The youth went straight up to the Mother of
Devils, hugged her to his breast, kissed her all over,
and said: ‘“Good-day, little mother mine! I am
thine own true lad till death!” and he kissed her
hand. ;

“A good-day to thee also, my little son!” replied
the Mother of Devils. “If thou hadst not called
me thy dear little mother, if thou hadst not embraced
me, and if thy innocent mother had not been under
the earth, I would have devoured thee at once. But
tell me now, my little son, whither away ?”

The poor youth said that he wanted a branch from
the garden of the Queen of the Peris.

“Who put that word in thy mouth, my little son?”
asked the woman in amazement. “ Hundreds and
hundreds of talismans guard that garden, and hun-
dreds of souls have perished there by reason thereof.”

Yet the youth did not hold back. “I can but die
once,” thought he.—‘ Thou dost but go to salute thy
innocent, buried mother,” said the old woman; and
then she made the youth sit down beside her and
taught him the way: “ Set out on thy quest at day-



62 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

break, and never stop till thou dost see right in front
of thee a well and a forest. Draw forth thine arrows
in this forest and catch five to ten birds, but catch
them alive. Take these birds to the well, and when
thou hast recited a prayer twice over, plunge the
birds into the well and ery aloud for a key. A key
will straightway be cast out of the well, take it to
thee, and go on thy way. Thou wilt come presently
to a large cavern ; open the door thereof with thy key,
and, as soon as thy foot is inside, stretch forth thy
right hand into the blank darkness, grip fast hold of
whatever thy hand shall touch, drag the thing quickly
forth, and cast the key back into the well again. But
look not behind thee all the time, or Allah have mercy
on thy soul!”

Next day, when the red dawn was in the sky, the
youth went forth on his quest, caught the five to ten
birds in the forest, got hold of the key, opened there-
with the door of the cavern, and—oh, Allah !—
stretched forth his right hand, gripped hold of some-
thing, and, without once looking behind him, dragged
it all the way to his sister’s hut, and never stopped
till he got there. Only then did he cast his eyes
upon what he had in his hand, and it was neither
more nor less than a branch from the garden of the
Queen of the Peris. But what a branch it was! It
was full of little twigs, and the twigs were full of little



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 63

leaves, and there was a little bird on every little leaf,
and every little bird had a song of its own. Such
music, such melody was there as would have brought
even a dead man to life again. The whole hut was
filled with joy.

Next day the youth again went forth to hunt, and,
as he was pursuing the beast of the forest, the Padishah
saw him again. He exchanged a word or two with
the youth, and then returned to his palace, but he was
now sicker than ever, by reason of his love for his
son.

Then the old woman strolled off to the hut again,
and there she saw the damsel sitting with the magic
branch in her hand.

“Well, my girl!” said the old woman, “ what did I
tell thee? But that’s nothing at all. If thy brother
would only fetch thee the mirror of the Queen of the
Peris, Allah knows that thou wouldst cast that branch
right away. Give him no peace till he get it for
thee.”

The witch had no sooner departed than the damsel
began screaming and wailing so that her brother was
at his wit’s end how to comfort her. He said he
would take the whole world on his shoulders to please
her, went straight off to the Mother of Devils, and
besought her so earnestly that she had not the heart
to say him nay.



64 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

“Thou hast made up thy mind to go under the sod
to thy innocent, buried mother, I see,” cried she,
“for not by hundreds but by thousands have human
souls perished in this quest of thine.” Then she
instructed the youth whither he should go and what
he should do, and he set off on his way. He took
an iron staff in his hand and tied iron sandals to his
feet, and he went on and on till he came to two doors,
as the Mother of Devils told him he would before-
hand. One of these doors was open, the other was
closed. He closed the open door and opened the
closed door, and there, straight before him, was
another door. In front of this door was a lion and a
sheep, and there was grass before the lion and flesh
before the sheep. He took up the flesh and laid it
before the lion, then he took up the grass and laid it
before the sheep, and they let him enter unharmed.
But now he came to a third door, and in front of it
were two furnaces, and fire burned in the one and ashes
smouldered in the other. He put out the flaming
furnace, stirred up the cinders in the smouldering
furnace till they blazed again, and then through the
door he went into the garden of the Peris, and from
the garden into the Peri palace. He snatched up the
enchanted mirror, and was hastening away with it
when a mighty voice cried out against him so that the
earth and the heavens trembled. “ Burning furnace,



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 65

1?

seize him, seize him!” cried the voice, just as he came
up to the furnace.

“T can’t,” answered the first furnace, “for he has
put me out!” But the other furnace was grateful to
him for kindling it into a blaze again, so it let him
pass by too.

“Tion, lion, tear him to pieces
voice from the depths of the palace, when the youth
came up to the two beasts.

‘Not J,” answered the lion, “for he helped me to a
good meal of flesh ! ”—Nor would the sheep hurt him
either, because he had given it the grass.—“ Open
door! let him not out!” cried the voice from within
the palace.—‘‘ Nay, but 1 will!” replied the door; “ for
had he not opened me I should be closed still !”—and
so the golden-haired youth was not very long in
getting home, to the great joy of his sister. She
snatched at the mirror and instantly looked into it,
and—Allah be praised !—she saw the whole world in
it. Then the damsel thought no more of the Peri-
branch, for her eyes were glued to the mirror.

Again the youth went a-hunting, and again he
caught the eye of the Padishah. But the sight of
the youth this third time so touched the fatherly
heart of the Padishah that they carried him back to
his palace half fainting. Then the witch guessed only

22

cried the mighty



too well how matters stood,
F



66 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

So she arose and went to the damsel, and so filled
her foolish little head with her tales that she persuaded
her not to give her brother rest day and night till he had
brought her the Queen of the Peris herself. “That'll
make him break his hatchet anyhow!” thought the
old woman. But the damsel rejoiced beforehand at
the thought of having the Queen of the Peris also,
and in her impatience could scarce wait for her
brother to come home.

When her brother came home she shed as many
tears as if she were a cloud dripping rain. In vain
her brother tried to prove to her how distant and how
dangerous was the way she would fain have him go.
“JT want the Queen of the Peris, and have her I[
“must,” cried the damsel. :

So again the youth set out on his journey, went
straight to the Mother of Devils, pressed her hand,
kissed her lips, pressed her lips and kissed her
hand, and said: ‘*Oh, my mother! help me in this
my sore need!” The Mother of Devils was amazed
at the valour of the man, and never ceased dissuad-
ing him from his purpose, for every human soul
that goes on such a quest must needs perish.—
“Die I may, little mother!” cried the youth, “but I
will not come back without her.”

So what could the Mother of Devils do but show
him the way? “Go the same road,” said she, “that



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 67

led thee to the branch, and then go on to where
thou didst find the mirror. Thou wilt come at last to
a large desert, and beyond the desert thou wilt see two
roads, but look neither to the right hand nor yet to
the left, but go right on through the sooty darkness
betwixt them. When now it begins to grow a little
lighter, thou wilt see a large cypress wood, and in this
cypress wood a large tomb. In this: tomb, turned to
stone, are all those who ever desired the Queen of
the Peris. Stop not there, but go right on to the
palace of the Queen of the Peris and call out her
name with the full strength of thy lungs. What will
happen to thee after that not even I can tell thee.”
Next day the youth set out on his journey. He
prayed by the wayside well, opened all the gates he
came to, and, looking neither to the right hand nor
to the left, went on straight before him through the
sooty darkness. All at once it began to grow a little
lighter, and a large cypress wood appeared right in
front of him. The leaves of the trees were of a burn-
ing green, and their drooping crowns hid snow-white
tombs. Nay, but they were not tombs, but stones
as big as men. Nay, but they were not stones at all,
but men who had turned, who had stiffened, into
stone. There was neither man, nor spirit, nor noise,
nor breath of wind, and the youth froze with horror
to his very marrow, Nevertheless he plucked up his



68 TURKISH FAIRY TALES,

courage and went on his way. He looked straight
before him all the time, and his eyes were almost
blinded by a dazzling light. Was it the sun he saw ?
No, it was the palace of the Queen of the Peris!
Then he rallied all the strength that was left in him
and shouted the name of the Queen of the Peris with
all his might, and the words had not yet died away
upon his lips when his whole body up to his knee-cap
stiffened into stone. Again he shouted with all his
might, and he turned to stone up to his navel. Then
he shouted for the last time with all his might, and
stiffened up to his throat first and then up to his head,
till he became a tombstone like the rest.

But now the Queen of the Peris came into her
garden, and she had silver sandals on her feet and a
golden saucer in her hand, and she drew water from a
diamond fountain, and when she watered the stone
youth, life and motion came back to him. -

“Well, thou youth thou,” said the Queen of the
Peris, “’tis not enough, then, that thou hast taken
away my Peri branch and my magic mirror, but thou
must needs, forsooth, venture hither a third time!
Thou shalt share the fate of thy innocent buried
mother, stone thou shalt become and stone shalt
thou remain. What brought thee hither ?—speak !”

“T came for thee,” replied the youth very courage-

ously.



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 69

- Well, as thou hast loved me so exceedingly, no
harm shall befall thee, and we will go away together.”

Then the youth begged her to have compassion on
all the men she had turned to stone and give them
back their lives again. So the Peri returned to her
palace, packed up her baggage, which was small in
weight but priceless in value, filled the little golden
saucer with water, and sprinkled therewith all the
stones and the whole multitude of the stones became
men. They all took horse, and as they quitted the
Peri realm, the earth trembled beneath them and the
sky was shaken as if the seven worlds and the seven
heavens were mingled together, so that the youth
would have died of fright if the Queen of the Peris
had not been by his side. Never once did they look
behind them, but galloped on and on till they came to
the house of the youth’s sister, and such was their joy
and gladness at seeing each other again that place
could scarce be found for the Queen of the Peris.
But now the youth was in no great hurry to go hunt-
ing as before, for he had changed hearts with the
lovely Queen of the Peris, and she was his and he was
hers. |

Now when the Queen of the Peris had heard the
history of the children and their parents, and the fate
of their innocent mother, she said one morning to the
youth: “Go a-hunting in the forest, and thou wilt



70 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

meet the Padishah. The first thing he will do will be
to invite thee to the palace, but beware lest thou
accept his invitation.” And so indeed it turned out.
Searcely had he taken a turn in the wood than the
Padishah stood before him, and, one word leading to
another, he invited the youth to his palace, but the
youth would not go.

Karly next morning the Peri awoke the children,
clapped her hands together and called her Lala,! and
immediately a huge negro sprang up before them.
So big was he that one of his lips touched the sky
while the other swept the earth. “What dost thou
command me, my Sultana?” cried the Lala.

“Fetch me hither my father’s steed!” commanded
the Peri.

The negro vanished like a hurricane, and, a moment
afterwards, the steed stood before them, and the like
of it was not to be found in the wide world.

The youth leaped upon the horse, and the splendid
suite of the Padishah was already waiting for him at
the roadside.

But—O Allah, forgive me !—I have forgotten the
best of the story. The Peri charged the youth as he
quitted her to take heed, while he was in the palace
of the Padishah, to the neighing of his horse. At the
first neighing he was to hasten back.

1 Counsellor,



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 71

So the youth went to meet the Padishah on his
diamond-bridled charger, and behind him came a gay
and gallant retinue. He saluted the people on the
right hand and on the left all the way to the palace,
and there they welcomed him with a pomp the like of
which was never known before. They ate and drank
and made merry till the Padishah could scarce contain
himself for joy, but then the steed neighed, the youth
arose, and all their entreaties to him to stay could not
turn him from his set purpose. He mounted his
horse, invited the Padishah to be his guest on the
following day, and returned home to the Peri and his
own sister.

Meanwhile the Peri dug up the mother of the
children, and so put her to rights again by her Peri
arts that she became just as she was in the days of
her first youth. But she spake not a word about the
mother to the children, nor a word about the children
to the mother. On the morning of the reception of
guests she rose up early and commanded that on the
spot where the little hut stood a palace should rise,
the like of which eye hath never seen nor ear heard
of, and there were as many precious stones heaped up
there as were to be found in the whole kingdom.
And then the garden that surrounded that palace !
There. were multitudes of flowers, each one lovelier
than the other, and on every flower there was a



72 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

singing bird, and every bird had feathers aglow with
light, so that one could only look at it all open-
mouthed and cry: “Oh! oh!” And the palace
itself was full of domestics, there were black harem
slaves, and white captive youths, and dancers and’
singers, and players of stringed instruments—more
than thou canst count, count thou never so much, and
words cannot tell of the splendour of the retinue
which went forth to greet the Padishah as a guest.

“These children are not of mortal birth!” thought
the Padishah to himself, when he beheld all these
marvels, “or if they are of mortal birth a Peri must
have had a hand in the matter.”

They led the Padishah into the most splendid room
of the palace, they brought him coffee and sherbet,
and then the music spoke to him, and the singing
birds—oh! a man could have listened to them for
ever and ever! Then rich meats on rare and precious
dishes were set before him, and then the dancers and
the jugglers diverted him till the evening.

At eventide the servants came and bowed before
the Padishah and said: “My lord! peace be with
thee! They await thee in the harem!” So he
entered the harem, and there he saw before him the
golden-haired youth, with a beautiful half-moon shin-
ing on his forehead, and his bride, the Peri-Queen, and
his own consort, the Sultana, who had been buried in



THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 73
the earth, and by her side a golden-haired maiden
with a star sparkling on her forehead. There stood
the Padishah as if turned to stone, but his consort ran
up to him and kissed the edge of his garment, and the
Peri-Queen began to tell him the whole of her life
and how everything had happened.

The Padishah was nigh to dying in the fulness of
his joy. He could scarce believe his eyes, but. he
pressed his consort to his breast and embraced the
two beauteous children, and the Queen of the Peris
likewise. He forgave the sisters of the Sultana their
offences, but the old witch was mercilessly destroyed
by lingering tortures. But he and his consort and
her son and the Queen of the Peris, and his daughter,
and his daughter’s bridegroom sat down to a great
banquet and made merry. Forty days and forty
nights they feasted, and the blessing of Allah was
upon them.



THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH

THERE was once upon a time a Padishah who had
three daughters. One day the old father made him
ready for a journey, and calling to him his three
daughters straightly charged them to feed and water
his favourite horse, even though they neglected every-
thing else. He loved the horse so much that he
would not suffer any stranger to come near it.

So the Padishah went on his way, but when the
eldest daughter brought the fodder into the stable the
horse would not let her come near him. ‘Then the
middling daughter brought the forage, and he treated
her likewise. Last of all the youngest daughter
brought the forage, and when the horse saw her he
never budged an inch, but let her feed him and then
return to her sisters. The two elder sisters were
content that the youngest should take care of the
horse, so they troubled themselves about it no more.

The Padishah came home, and the first thing he
74



THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 75

asked was whether they had provided the horse with
everything. ‘He wouldn’t let us come near him,”
said the two elder sisters ; “it was our youngest sister
here who took care of him.”

No sooner had the Padishah heard this than he
gave his youngest daughter to the horse to wife, but
his two other daughters he gave to the sons of his
Chief Mufti and his Grand Vizier, and they celebrated
the three marriages at a great banquet, which lasted
forty days. Then the youngest daughter turned into
the stable, but the two eldest dwelt in a splendid
palace. In the daytime the youngest sister had only
a horse for a husband and a stable for a dwelling ;
but in the night-time the stable became a garden of
roses, the horse-husband a handsome hero, and they
lived in a world of their own. Nobody knew of it
but they two. They passed the day together as
best they could, but eventide was the time of their
impatient desires.

One day the Padishah held a tournament in the
palace. Many gallant warriors entered the lists, but
none strove so valiantly as the husbands of the
Sultan’s elder daughters.

“Only look now!” said the two elder daughters
to their sister who dwelt in the stable, “only look
now! how our husbands overthrow all the other
warriors with their lances; our two lords are not



76 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

so much lords as lions! Where is this horse-husband
of thine, prythee ?”

On hearing this from his wife, the horse-husband
shivered all over, turned into a man, threw himself
on horseback, told his wife not to betray him on any
account, and in an instant appeared within the lists.
He overthrew every one with his lance, unhorsed his
two brothers-in-law, and re-appeared in the stable
again as if he had never left it.

The next day, when the sports began again, the
two elder sisters mocked as before, but then the un-
known hero appeared again, conquered and vanished.
On the third day the horse-husband said to his wife :
“Tf ever I should come to grief or thou shouldst need
my help, take these three wisps of hair, burn them,
and it will help thee wherever thou art.” With that
he hastened to the games again and triumphed over
his brothers-in-law. Every one was amazed at his
skill, the two elder sisters likewise, and again they
said to their younger sister: ‘“ Look how these heroes
excel in prowess! They are very different to thy
dirty horse-husband !” |

The girl could not endure standing there with
nothing to say for herself, so she told her sisters that
the handsome hero was no other than her horse-
husband—and no sooner had she pointed at him than
he vanished from before them as if he had never been.



THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 77

Then only did she call to mind her lord’s command to
her not to betray her secret, and away she hurried off
to the stable. But ’twas all in vain, neither horse
nor man came to her, and at midnight there was
neither rose nor rose-garden.

“Alas!” wept the girl, “I have betrayed my lord,
I have broken my word, what a crime is mine!” She
never closed an eye all that night, but wept till morn-
ing. When the red dawn appeared she went to her
father the Padishah, complained to him that she had
lost her horse-husband, and begged that she might go
to the ends of the earth to seek him. In vain her
father tried to keep her back, in vain he pointed out
to her that her husband was now most probably
among devils, and she would never be able to find him
—turn her from her resolution he could not. What
could he do but let her go on her way ?

With a great desire the damsel set out on her
quest, she went on and on till her tender body was
all aweary, and at last she sank down exhausted at
the foot of a great mountain. Then she called to mind
the three hairs, and she took out one and set fire
to it—and lo! her lord and master was in her arms
again, and they could not speak for joy.

“Did I not bid thee tell none of my secret ?” cried
the youth sorrowfully ; “and now if my hag of a
mother see thee she will instantly tear thee to pieces,



78 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

This mountain is our dwelling-place. She will be
here immediately, and woe to thee if she see thee!”

The poor Sultan’s daughter was terribly frightened,
and wept worse than ever at the thought of losing
her lord again, after all her trouble in finding him.
The heart of the devil’s son was touched at her
sorrow: he struck her once, changed her into an apple,
and put her on the shelf. The hag flew down from
the mountain with a terrible racket, and screeched
out that she smelt the smell of a man, and her mouth
watered for the. taste of human flesh. In vain her
son denied that there was any human flesh there,
she would not believe him one bit.

“Tf thou wilt swear by the egg not to be offended,
T’ll show thee what I’ve hidden,” said her son. The
hag swore, and her son gave the applea tap, and there
before them stood the beautiful damsel. ‘“ Behold my
wife!” said he to his mother. The old mother said
never a word, what was done could not be undone.
“Tl give the bride something to do all the same,”
thought she.

They lived a couple of days together in peace and
quiet, but the hag was only waiting for her son to
leave the house. At last one day the youth had work
to do elsewhere, and scarcely had he put his foot out
of doors, when the hag said to the damsel : ‘‘ Come,
sweep and sweep not ! ” and with that she went out,



THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 79

and said she should not be back till evening. The
girl thought to herself again and again: “ What am I
to do now? What did she mean by ‘sweep and
sweep not’?” Then she thought of the hairs, and
she took out and burned the second hair also. Im-
mediately her lord stood before her and asked her
what was the matter, and the girl told him of his
mother’s command : “Sweep and sweep not!” Then
her lord explained to her that she was to sweep out
the chamber, but not to sweep the ante-chamber.

The girl did as she was told, and when the hag
came home in the evening she asked the girl whether
she had accomplished her task. ‘ Yes, little mother,”
replied the bride, “I have swept and I have not
swept.”—“Thou daughter of a dog,” cried the old
witch, “ not thine own wit but my son’s mouth hath
told thee this thing.”

The next morning when the hag got up she gave
the damsel vases, and told her to fill them with tears.
The moment the hag had gone the damsel placed the
three vases before her, and wept and wept, but what
could her few teardrops do to fill them? Then she
took out and burned the third hair.

Again her lord appeared before her, and explained
to her that she must fill the three vases with water,
and then put a pinch of salt in each vase. The girl
did so, and when the hag came home in the evening



80 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

and demanded an account of her work, the girl
showed her the three vases full of tears. . ‘Thou
daughter of a dog!” chided the old woman again,
“that is not thy work; but Pll do for thee yet, and
for my son too.”

The next day she devised some other task for
her to do; but her son guessed that his mother
would vex the wench, so he hastened home to his
bride. There the poor thing was worrying herself
about it all alone, for the third hair was now burnt,
and she did not know how to set about doing the
task laid upon her. ‘‘ Well, there is now nothing
for it but to run away,’ said her lord, “ for she won't
rest now till she hath done thee a mischief.” And
with that he took his wife, and out into the wide
world they went.

In the evening the hag came home, and saw
neither her son nor his bride. “They have flown,
the dogs!” cried the hag, with a threatening voice,
and she called to her sister, who was also a witch,
to make ready and go in pursuit of her son and his
bride. So the witch jumped into a pitcher, snatched
up a serpent for a whip, and went after them.

The demon-lover saw his aunt coming, and in an
instant changed the girl into a bathing-house, and
himself into a bath-man sitting down at the gate.
The witch leaped from the pitcher, went to the bath-



THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 81

keeper, and asked him if he had not seen a young boy
and girl pass by that way.

“T have only just warmed up my bath,” said the
youth, “there’s nobody inside it; if thou dost not
believe me, thou canst go and look for thyself.” The
witch thought : “Tis impossible to get a sensible word
out of a fellow of this sort,” so she jumped into ‘her
pitcher, flew back, and told her sister that she couldn’t
find them. The other hag asked her whether she had
exchanged words with any one on the road. “ Yes,”
replied the younger sister, “there was a bath-house
by the roadside, and I asked the owner of it about
them ; but he was either a fool or deaf, so I took no
notice of him.”

“°Tis thou who wert the fool,” snarled her elder
sister. “ Didst thou not recognize in him my son,
and in the bath-house my daughter-in-law?” Then
she called her second sister, and sent her after the
fugitives.

The devil’s son saw his second aunt flying along
in her pitcher. Then he gave his wife a tap and
turned her into a spring, but he himself sat down
beside it, and began to draw water out of it with
a pitcher. The witch went up to him, and asked
him whether he had seen a girl and a boy pass by
that way.

“There’s drinkable water in this spring,” replied

G



82 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

he, with a vacant stare, “I am always drawing
it.” The witch thought she had to do with a fool,
turned back, and told her sister that she had not
met with them. Her sister asked her if she had
not come across any one by the way. “ Yes, indeed,”
replied she, “a half-witted fellow was drawing water
from a spring, but I couldn't get a single sensible
word out of him.”

“That half-witted fellow was my son, the spring
was his wife, and a pretty wiseacre thou art,”
screeched her sister. ‘I shall have to go myself,
I see,” and with that she jumped into her pitcher,
snatched up a serpent to serve her as a whip, and off
she went.

Meanwhile the youth looked back again, and saw
his mother coming after them. He gave the girl
a tap and changed her into a tree, but he himself
turned into a serpent, and coiled himself round the
tree. The witch recognized them, and drew near to
the tree to break it to pieces; but when she saw the
serpent coiled round it, she was afraid to kill her own
son along with it, so she said to her son: “ Son, son!
show me, at least, the girl’s little finger, and then
I'll leave you both in peace.” The son saw that he
could not free himself from her any other way,
and that she must have at least a little morsel of the
damsel to nibble at. So he showed her one of the



THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 83
girl’s little fingers, and the old hag wrenched it off,
and returned to her domains with it. Then the youth
gave the girl a tap and himself another tap, put on
human shape again, and away they went to the girl’s
father, the Padishah. The youth, since his talisman
had been destroyed, remained a mortal man, but the
diabolical part of him stayed at home with his witch-
mother and her kindred. The Padishah rejoiced
greatly in his children, gave them a wedding-banquet
with a wave of his finger, and they inherited the
realm after his death.



THE CINDER-YOUTH

Once upon a time that was no time, in the days
when the servants of Allah were many and the
misery of man was great, there lived a poor woman
who had three sons and one daughter. The youngest
son was half-witted, and used to roll about all day
in the warm ashes.

One day the two elder brothers went out to plough,
and said to their mother: “Boil us something, and
send our sister out with it into the field.”—Now the
three-faced devil had pitched his tent close to this
field, and in order that the girl might not come near
them he determined to persuade her to go all round
about instead of straight to them.

The mother cooked the dinner and the girl went
into the field with it, but the devil contrived to
make her lose her road, so that she wandered further
and further away from the place where she wanted

to go. At last, when her poor head was quite con-
84





THE CINDER-YOUTH 85

fused, the devil’s wife appeared before her and asked
the terrified girl what she meant by trespassing there.
Then she talked her over and persuaded her to come
home with her, that she might hide her from the
vengeance of the devil, her husband.

But the three-faced devil had got home before
them, and when they arrived the old woman told the
girl to make haste and get something ready to eat
while her maid-servant stirred up the fire. But
scarcely had she begun to get the dish ready than
the devil crept stealthily up behind her, opened his
mouth wide, and swallowed the girl whole, clothes
and all.

Meanwhile her brothers were waiting in the field
for their dinner, but neither the damsel nor the
victuals appeared. Afternoon came and went and
evening too, and then the lads went home, and when
they heard from their mother that their sister had
gone to seek them early in the morning they sus-
pected what had happened—their little sister must
have fallen into the hands of the devil. The two
elder brothers did not think twice about it, but the
elder of them set off at.once to seek his sister.

He went on and on, puffing at his chibook,
sniffing the perfume of flowers and drinking coffee,
till he came to an oven by the wayside. By the
oven sat an old man, who asked the youth on



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PREFACE

'TwEsE stories were collected from the mouths of the
~ Turkish peasantry by the Hungarian savant Dr. Igna-
tius Kunos, during his travels through Anatolia,’ and
published for the first time in 1889 by the well-known
Hungarian Literary Society, “ A Kisfaludy Tarsasig,”
under the title of Térak Népmésck (“Turkish Folk
Tales”), with an introduction by Professor Vambery.
That distinguished Orientalist, certainly the greatest
living authority on the primitive culture of the Turko-
Tartarie peoples, who is as familiar with Uzbeg epics
and Uigurie didactics as with the poetical masterpieces
of Western Europe, is enthusiastic in his praises of
these folk-tales. He compares the treasures of Turkish
folk-lore to precious stones lying neglected in the by-
ways of philology for want of gleaners to gather them

1 He has described his experience in the picturesque and

popular Anatoliat Képek (« Anatolian Pictures”) published at Pest
in 1891.
vi PREFACE

in, and he warns the student of ethnology that when
once the threatened railroad actually invades the
classic land of Anatolia, these naively poetical myths
and legends will, infallibly, be the first victims of
Western civilization.

The almost unique collection of Dr. Ignatius Kunos
may therefore be regarded as a brand snatched from
the burning ; in any case it is an important “ find,” as
well for the scientific folk-lorist as for the lover of
fairy-tales pure and simple. That these stories should
contain anything absolutely new is, indeed, too much
to expect. Professor Vimbery himself traces affinities
between many of them and other purely Oriental
stories which form the bases of Zhe Arabian Nights.
A few Slavonic and Scandinavian elements are also
plainly distinguishable, such, for instance, as that
mysterious fowl, the Emerald Anka, obviously no
very distant relative of the Bird Mogol and the Bird’
Zhar, which figure in my Russian Fairy Tales and
Cossack Fairy Tales and Folk Tales respectively,
while the story of the Enchanted Turban is, in some
particulars, curiously like Hans Andersen’s story,
The Travelling Companion. Nevertheless, these tales
have a character peculiarly their own; above all, they
are remarkable for a vivid imaginativeness, a gorgeous


PREFACE Vii

play of fancy, compared with which the imagery of
‘the most popular fairy tales of the West seem almost
prosaically jejune, and if, as Professor Vambery sug-
gests, these Népmésck provide the sort of entertain-
ment which beguiles the leisure of the Turkish ladies
while they sip their mocha and whiff their fragrant
narghilies, we cannot but admire the poetical taste
and nice discrimination, in this respect, of the harem
and the seraglio.

I have Englished these tales from the first Hun-
garian edition, so that this version is, perhaps, open
to the objection of being a translation of a translation.
Inasmuch, however, as I have followed my text very
closely, and having regard to the fact that Hun garian
and Turkish are closely cognate dialects (in point
of grammatical construction they are practically
identical), I do not think they will be found to have
lost so very much of their original fragrance and
flavour.

I have supplemented these purely Turkish with
four semi-Turkish tales translated from the original
Roumanian of Ispirescu’s Legende sau Basmele
Romdnilort. Bucharest, 1892. This collection,
which I commend to the notice of the Folk-Lore
Society, is very curious and original, abounding as it
Vill PREFACE

does in extraordinarily bizarre and beautiful variants
of the best-known fairy tales, a very natural result
of the peculiar combination in Roumanian of such
heterogeneous elements as Romance, Slavonic, Mag-
yar, and Turkish.

R. Nispet BAIN.
July 1896


CONTENTS

THE STAG-PRINCE aes Bae ao ae ae ie Hl
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS ... nee a ne ane 12
THE ROSE-BEAUTY She Ee ane ee ote Pee 0
MAD MEHMED ... Bs Nee aa bes Aas a 49
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN oe sao tek eo
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH ... ee ee ie
THE CINDER-YOUTH ... ae ne es ae Bee 84
THE PIECE OF LIVER ... yee Be ae ee soo | OE

THE MAGIC TURBAN, THE MAGIC WHIP, AND THE MAGIC CARPET 102

THE WIND-DEMON a Re bao ae ee sao
THE CROW-PERI 6 an ee a A pores:
/ HE FORTY PRINCES AND THE SEVEN-HEADED DRAGON Reap
THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL ae Eon eee lt)
|THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS ado ae .. 166
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR a Peli
STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE ons ie .. =188

THE GHOST OF THE SPRING AND THE SHREW tke .. 196
a CONTENTS

ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-RIDING-ON-THE-WORSE-HALF-

OF-A-LAME-HORSE
THE ENCHANTED HOG
BOY-BEAUTIFUL, THE GOLDEN APPLES, AND THE WERE-WOLF

YOUTH WITHOUT AGE, AND LIFE WITHOUT DEATH ...

PAGE

209
222
244
260




TURKISH FAIRY TALES



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THE STAG-PRINCE

ONCE upon a time, when the servants of Allah were
many, there lived a Padishah! who had one son and
one daughter. The Padishah grew old, his time
came, and he died ; his son ruled ‘in his stead, and he

had not ruled very long before he had squandered

away his whole inheritance.

One day he said to his sister: “Little sister! all
our money is spent. If people were to hear that we
had nothing left they would drive us out of doors,
and we should never be able to look our fellow-men
in the face again. Tar better, therefore, if we depart
and take up our abode elsewhere.” So they tied
together the little they had left, and then the brother
and sister quitted their father’s palace in the night-
time, and wandered forth into the wide world.

They went on and on till they came to a vast
sandy desert, where they were like to have fallen to

1 Wmperor. B


2 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

the ground for the burning heat. The youth felt
that he could go not a step further, when he saw on
the ground a little puddle of water. “ Little sister!”
said he, “I will not go a step further till I have
drunk this water.”

“Nay, dear brother!” replied the girl, “who can
tell whether it be really water or filth? If we have
held up so long, surely we can hold up a little longer.
Water we are bound to find soon.”

“T tell thee,” replied her brother, “that Pll not
go another step further till I have drunk up this
puddle, though I die for it,’—and with that he
knelt down, sucked up every drop of the dirty water,
and instantly became a stag.

The little sister wept bitterly at this mischance ;
but there was nothing for it but to go on as they
were. ‘They went on and on, up hill and down dale,
right across the sandy waste till they came to a full
spring beneath a large tree, and there they sat them
down and rested. ‘“Hearken now, little sister!”
said the stag, “thou must mount up into that tree,
while I go to see if I can find something to eat.”
So the girl climbed up into the tree, and the stag
went about his’ business, ran up hill and down dale,
caught a hare, brought it back, and he and his sister
ate it together, and so they lived from day to day
and from week to week.


THE STAG-PRINCE 3

Now the horses of the Padishah of that country
were wont to be watered at the spring beneath the
large tree. One evening the horsemen led their horses
up to it as usual, but, just as they were on the point
of drinking, they caught sight of the reflection of the
damsel in the watery mirror and reared back. The
horsemen fancied that perhaps the water was not
quite pure, so they drew off the trough and filled it
afresh, but again the horses reared backwards and
would not drink of it. The horsemen knew not
what to make of it, so they went and told the
Padishah.

‘“Perchance the water is muddy,” said the
Padishah.

“Nay,” replied the horsemen, “‘we emptied the
trough once and filled it full again with fresh water,
and yet the horses would not drink of it.”

“Go again,” said their master, “and look well about
you; perchance there is some one near the spring of
whom they are afraid.”

The horsemen returned, and, looking well about the
spring, cast their eyes at last upon the large tree, on
the top of which they perceived the damsel. They
immediately went back and told. the Padishah. The
Padishah took the trouble to go and look for himself,
and raising his eyes perceived in the tree a damsel
as lovely as the moon when she is fourteen days old,
4 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

so that he absolutely could not take his eyes off her.
“Art thou a spirit or a peri?”* said the Padishah to
the damsel. os

“T am neither a spirit nor a peri, but a mortal
as thou art,” replied the damsel.

In vain the Padishah begged her to come down
from the tree. In vain he implored her, nothing he
could say would make her come down, ‘Then the
Padishah waxed wroth. He commanded them to cut
down the tree. The men brought their axes and
fell a-hewing at the tree. They hewed away at the
vast tree, they hewed and hewed until only a little
strip of solid trunk remained to be cut through ; but,
meanwhile, eventide had drawn nigh and it began
to grow dark, so they left off their work, which they
purposed to finish next day.

Scarcely had they departed when the stag came
running out of the forest, looked at the tree, and
asked the little sister what had happened. The girl
told him that she would not descend from the tree,
‘so they had tried to cut it down. “Thou didst
well,” replied the stag, “and take care thou dost
not come down in future, whatever they may say.”
With that he went to the tree, licked it with his
tongue, and immediately the tree grew bigger round
the hewed trunk than before.

1 Fairy.


The Damsel and the Old Witch.—p. 5.


THE STAG-PRINCE — 5

The next day, when the stag had again departed
about his business, the Padishah’s men came and.
saw that the tree was larger and harder round the
trunk than ever. Again they set to work hewing at
the tree, and hewed and hewed till they had cut.
half through it; but by that time evening fell upon
them again, and again they put off the rest of the
work till the morrow and went home.

But all their labour was lost, for the stag came
again, licked the gap in the tree with his tongue, and
immediately it grew thicker and harder than ever.

Early next morning, when the stag had only just.
departed, the Padishah and his wood-cutters again
came to the tree, and when they saw that the trunk
of the tree had filled up again larger and firmer than
ever, they determined to try some other means. So
they went home again and sent for a famous old
witch, told her of the damsel in the tree, and promised
her a rich reward if she would, by subtlety, make the
damsel come down. The old witch willingly took the
matter in hand, and bringing with her an iron tripod,
a cauldron, and sundry raw meats, placed them by the
side of the spring. She placed the tripod on the
eround, and the kettle on the top of it but upside
down, drew water from the spring and poured it not
into the kettle, but on the ground beside it, and with
that she kept her eyes closed as if she were blind.
6 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The damsel fancied she really was blind, and called
to her from the tree. “Nay but, my dear elder
sister! thou hast placed the kettle on the tripod
upside down, and art pouring all the water on the
ground.”

“Oh, my sweet little damsel!” cried the old woman,
“that is because I have no eyes to see with. I have
brought some dirty linen with me, and if thou dost
love Allah, thou wilt come down and put the kettle
right, and help me to wash the things.” Then
the damsel thought of the words of the little stag,
and she did not come down.

The next day the old witch came again, stumbled
about the tree, laid a fire, and brought forth a heap
of meal in order to sift it, but instead of meal she
put ashes into the sieve. ‘Poor silly old granny!”
cried the damsel compassionately, and then she called
down from the tree to the old woman, and told her
that she was sifting ashes instead of meal. “Oh,
my dear damsel!” cried the old woman, weeping,
“T am blind, I cannot see. Come down and help
me a little in my affliction.” Now the little stag
had strictly charged her that very morning not to
come down from the tree whatever might be said to
her, and she obeyed the words of her brother.

On the third day the old witch again came
beneath the tree, This time she brought a sheep
THE STAG-PRINCE fi

with her, and brought out a knife to flay it with,
and began to jag and skin it from behind instead of
cutting its throat. The poor little sheep bleated
piteously, and the damsel in the tree, unable to endure
the sight of the beast’s sufferings, came down from
the tree to put the poor thing out of its misery.
Then the Padishah, who was concealed close to the tree,
rushed out and carried the damsel off to his palace.

The damsel pleased the Padishah so mightily that
he wanted to be married to her without more ado;
but the damsel would not consent till they had
brought her her brother, the little stag: until she
saw him, she said, she could have not a moment’s
rest. Then the Padishah sent men out into the
forest, who caught the stag and brought him to his
sister. After that he never left his sister’s side.
They lay down together, and together they rose up.
Even when the Padishah and the damsel were
wedded, the little stag was never far away from them,
and in the evening when he found out where they
were, he would softly stroke each of them all over
with one of his front feet before going to sleep beside
them, and say—

“ This little foot is for my sister,
That little foot is for my brother.”

But time, as men count it, passes quickly to its

fulfilment, more quickly still passes the time of fairy
8 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

tales, but quickest of all flies the time of true love.
Yet our little people would have lived on happily
if there had not been a black female slave in the
palace. Jealousy devoured her at the thought that
the Padishah had taken to his bosom the ragged
damsel from the tree-top rather than herself, and she
watched for an opportunity of revenge.

~ Now there was a beautiful garden in the palace,
with a fountain in the midst of it, and there
the Sultan’s damsel used to walk about. One day,
with a golden saucer in her hand and a silver sandal
on her foot, she went towards the great fountain,
and the black slave followed after her and pushed
her in. There was a big fish in the basin, and it
immediately swallowed up the Sultan’s pet damsel.
Then the black slave returned to the palace, put on
the golden raiment of the Sultan’s damsel, and sat
down in her place. .

In the evening the Padishah came and asked the
damsel what she had done to her face that it was
so much altered. “I have walked too much in the
garden, and so the sun has tanned my face,” re-
plied the girl. The Padishah believed her and
sat down beside her, but the little stag came
also, and when he began to stroke them both
down with his fore-foot he recognized the slave-girl
as he said—


THE STAG-PRINCE 9

“ This little foot is for my sister,
And this little foot is for my brother.”

Then it became the one wish of the slave-girl’s
heart to be rid of the little stag as quickly as possible,
lest it should betray her.

So after a little thought she made herself sick,
and sent for the doctors, and gave them much money
to say to the Padishah that the only thing that
could save her was the heart of the little stag to
eat. So the doctors went and told the Padishah
that the sick woman must swallow the heart of the
little stag, or there was no hope for her. Then the
Padishah went to the slave-girl whom he fancied to
be his pet damsel, and asked her if it did not go
against her to eat the heart of her own brother ?

‘What can I do?” sighed the impostor; “if I
die, what will become of my poor little pet? If he
be cut up I shall live, while he will be spared the
torments of those poor beasts that grow old and
sick.” Then the Padishah gave orders that a butcher's
knife should be whetted, and a fire lighted, and a
cauldron of water put over the fire.

The poor little stag perceived all the bustling about
and ran down into the garden to the fountain, and
called out three times to his sister—

“ The knife is on the stone,
The water’s on the boil,
Haste, little sister, hasten!”
10 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

And thrice she answered back to him from the fish’s
maw—

«Here am I in the fish’s belly,
In my hand a golden saucer,
On my foot a silver sandal,

In my arms a little Padishah !”

For the Sultan’s pet damsel had brought forth a
little son in the fish’s belly.

Now the Padishah was intent on catching the
little stag when it ran down into the garden to the
fountain, and, coming up softly behind it, heard every
word of what the brother and sister were saying to
each other. He quietly ordered all the water to be
drained off the basin of the fountain, drew up the
fish, cut open its belly, and what do you think he
saw? In the belly of the fish was his wife, with
a golden saucer in her hand, and a silver sandal on
her foot, and a little son in her arms. Then the
Padishah embraced his wife, and kissed his son, and
brought them both to the palace, and heard the
tale of it all to the very end.

But the little stag found something in the fish’s
blood, and when he had swallowed it, he became a
man again. Then he rushed to his sister, and they
embraced and wept with joy over each other’s
happiness.

But the Padishah sent for his black slave-girl,


THE STAG-PRINCE 11

and asked her which she would like the best—four
good steeds or four good swords. The slave-girl
replied: “Let the swords be for the throats of my
enemies, but give me the four steeds that I may take
my pleasure on horseback.” Then they tied the slave-
girl to the tails of four good steeds, and sent her out
for a ride; and the four steeds tore the black girl
into little bits and scattered them abroad.

But the Padishah and his wife lived happily |
together, and the king’s son who had been a stag
abode with them; and they gave a great banquet,
which lasted four days and four nights; and they
attained their desires, and may ye, O my readers,
attain your desires likewise.
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS

In the olden times, when there were sieves in
straws and lies. in everything, in the olden times
when there was abundance, and men ate and drank
the whole day and yet lay down hungry, in those.
olden, olden times there was once a Padishah whose
days were joyless, for he had never a son to bless
himself with.

One day he was in the path of pleasure with his
Vizier, and when they had drunk their coffee and
smoked their chibooks, they went out for a walk,
and went on and on till they came to a great valley.
Here they sat down to rest a while, and as they were
looking about them to the right hand and to the left,
the valley was suddenly shaken as if by an earthquake,
a whip cracked, and a dervish, a green-robed, yellow-
slippered, white-bearded dervish, suddenly stood before
them. The Padishah and the Vizier were so fright-
ened that they dared not budge; but when the

12
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 18

dervish approached them and addressed them with
the words, “Selamun aleykyum,”! they took heart a
bit, and replied courteously, “ Ve aleykyum selam.” *

‘“What is thy errand here, my lord Padishah ?”
asked the dervish.

“Tf thou dost know that I am a Padishah, thou
dost also know my errand,” replied the Padishah.

Then the dervish took from his bosom an apple,
gave it to the Padishah, and said these words: ‘‘ Give
half of this to thy Sultana, and eat the other half
thyself,” and with these words he disappeared.

Then the Padishah went home, gave half the apple
to his consort, and ate the other half himself, and in
exactly nine months and ten days there was a little
prince in the harem. The Padishah was beside him-
self for joy. He scattered sequins among the poor,
restored to freedom his slaves, and the banquet he
gave to his friends had neither beginning nor end.

Swiftly flies the time in fairy tales, and the child
had reached his fourteenth summer while yet they
fondled him. One day he said to his father: “My
lord father Padishah, make me now a little marble
palace, and let there be two springs under it, and let
one of them run with honey, and the other with
butter!” Dearly did the Padishah love his little son,
because he was his only child, so he made him the

1 «Peace be unto you.” 2 «Unto you be peace.’
14 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

marble palace with the springs inside it as his son
desired. There then sat the King’s son in the marble
palace, and while he was looking at the springs that
bubbled forth both butter and honey, he saw an old
woman with a pitcher in her hand, and she would fain
have filled it from the spring. Then the King’s son
caught up a stone and flung it at the old woman’s
pitcher, and broke it into pieces. The old woman
said not a word, but she went away.

But the next day she was there again with her
pitcher, and again she made as if she would fill it,
and a second time the King’s son cast a stone at her
and broke her pitcher. The old woman went away
without speaking a word. She came on the third
day also, and it fared with her pitcher then as on the
first two days. Then the old woman spoke. ‘Oh,
youth!” cried she, “’tis the will of Allah that thou
shouldst fall in love with the three Orange-peris,” and
with that she quitted him. .

From thenceforth the heart of the King’s son was
consumed by a hidden fire. He began to grow pale
and wither away. When the Padishah saw that his
son was ill, he sent for the wise men and the leeches,
but they could find no remedy for the disease. One
day the King’s son said to his father: “Oh, my dear
little daddy Shah! these wise men of thine cannot
cure me of my disease, and all their labours are in
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 15

vain. I have fallen in love with the three Oranges,
and never shall I be better till I find them.”

“Oh, my dear little. son!” groaned the Padishah,
“thou art all that I have in the wide world: if thou
dost leave me, in whom can I rejoice?” Then the
King’s son slowly withered away, and his days were
as a heavy sleep; so his father saw that it would be
better to let him go forth on his way and find, if so
be he might, the three Oranges that were as the
balsam of his soul. ‘‘ Perchance too he. may return
again,” thought the Padishah.

So the King’s son arose one day and took with him
things that were light to carry, but heavy in the scales
of value, and pursued his way over mountains and
valleys, rising up and lying down again for many
days. At last in the midst of a vast plain, in front
of the high-road, he came upon her Satanic Majesty
the Mother of Devils, as huge as a minaret. One
of her legs was on one mountain, and the other leg on
another mountain ; she was chewing gum (her mouth
was full of it) so that you could hear her half-an-
hour’s journey off; her breath was a hurricane, and
her arms were yards and yards long.

“ Good-day, little mother!” cried the youth, and
he embraced the broad waist of the Mother of Devils.
“Good-day, little sonny!” she replied. “If thou
hadst not spoken to me so politely, I should have
16 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

gobbled thee up.” Then she asked him whence he
came and whither he was going.

“ Alas! dear little mother,” sighed the youth,
“such a terrible misfortune has befallen me that
I can neither tell thee nor answer thy question.”

“Nay, come, out with it, my son,” urged the
Mother of Devils.

“Well then, my sweet little mother,” cried the
youth, and he sighed worse than before, “I have fallen
violently in love with the three Oranges. If only I
might find my way thither!”

“Hush!” cried the Mother of Devils, “it is not
lawful to even think of that name, much less pro-
nounce it. I and my sons are its guardians, yet
even we don’t know the way to it. Forty sons have
I, and they go up and down the earth more than I
do, perchance they may tell thee something of the
matter.” So when it began to grow dusk towards
evening, ere yet the devil-sons had come home, the
old woman gave the King’s son a tap, and turned him
into a pitcher of water. And she did it not a moment
too soon, for immediately afterwards the forty sons
of the Mother of Devils knocked at the door and
cried : “ Mother, we smell man’s flesh!”

“ Nonsense !” cried the Mother of Devils. “ What,
I should like to know, have the sons of men to do
here? It seems to me you had better all clean your
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 17

teeth.” So she gave the forty sons forty wooden
stakes to clean their teeth with, and out of one’s
tooth fell an arm, and out of another’s a thigh, and
out of another’s an arm, till they had all cleaned their
teeth. Then they sat them down to eat and drink, and
in the middle of the meal their mother said to them:
“Tf now ye had a man for your brother, what would
ye do with him ?”

“Do,” they replied, “why love him like a brother,
of course!”

Then the Mother of Devils tapped the water-jar,
and the King’s son stood there again. ‘Here is
your brother!” cried she to her forty sons.

The devils thanked the King’s son for his company
with great joy, invited their new brother to sit down,
and asked their mother why she had not told them
about him before, as then they might all have eaten
their meal together.

‘““Nay but, my sons,” cried she, “he does not live
on the same sort of meat as ye; fowls, mutton, and
such-like is what he feeds on.”

At this one of them jumped up, went out, fetched
a sheep, slew it, and laid it before the new brother.

“Oh, what a child thou art!” cried the Mother
of Devils. ‘ Dost thou not know that thou must
first cook it for him ?”

Then they skinned the sheep, made a fire, roasted
Cc
18 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

it, and ‘placed it before him. The King’s son ate a
piece, and after satisfying his hunger, left the rest of
it. ‘Why, that’s nothing!” cried the devils, and
they urged him again and again to eat more. “ Nay,
my sons,” cried their mother, “men never eat more
than that.”

“Tet us see then what this sheep-meat is like,”
said one of the forty brothers. So they fell upon it
and devoured the whole lot in a couple of mouthfuls.

Now when they all rose up early in the morning,
the Mother of Devils said to her sons: “ Our new
brother hath a great trouble.”—“ What is it?” cried
they, “for we would help him.”

‘He has fallen in love with the three Oranges !””—
“ Well,” replied the devils, “we know not the place
of the three Oranges ourselves, but perchance our
aunt may know.”

“Then lead this youth to her,” said their mother ;
“+tell her that he is my son and worthy of all honour,
let her also receive him as a son and ease him of his
trouble.” Then the devils took the youth to their
aunt, and told her on what errand he had come.

Now this Aunt of the Devils had sixty sons, and
as she did not know the place of the three Oranges,
she had to wait till they came home. But lest any
harm should happen to this her new son, she gave
him a tap and turned him into a piece of crockery.
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 19

‘We smell man’s flesh, mother,” cried the devils,
as they crossed the threshold.

“Perchance ye have eaten man’s flesh, and the
remains thereof are still within your teeth,” said their
mother. Then she gave them great logs of wood that:
they might pick their teeth clean, and so be able to
swallow down something else. But in the midst of
the meal the woman gave the piece of crockery a tap,
and when the sixty devils saw their little human
brother, they rejoiced at the sight, made him sit
down at table, and bade him fall to if there was any-
thing there he took a fancy to. ‘“ My sons,” said the
Mother of the Devils to her sixty sons when they all
rose up early on the morrow, “ this lad here has fallen
in love with the three Oranges, cannot you show
him the way thither?”

“We know not the way,’ replied the devils; “but
perchance our old great-aunt may know something
about it.”

“Then take the youth thither,” said their mother,
“and bid her hold him in high honour. He is my
son, let him be hers also and help him out of his
distress.” Then they took him off to their great-aunt,
and told her the whole business. “ Alas! I do not
know, my sons!” said the old, old great-aunt ; “ but
if you wait till the evening, when my ninety sons
come home, I will ask them.”
20 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Then the sixty devils departed and left the King’s
son there, and when it grew dusk the Mother of the
Devils gave the youth a tap, turned him into a broom,
and placed him in the doorway. Shortly afterwards
the ninety devils came home, and they also smelt the
smell of man, and took the pieces of man’s flesh out
of their teeth. In the middle of their meal their
mother asked them how they would treat a human
brother if they had one. When they had sworn upon
eggs that they would not hurt so much as his little
finger, their mother gave the broom a tap, and the
King’s son stood before them.

The devil brothers entreated him courteously, in-
quired after his health, and served him so heartily
with eatables that they scarcely gave him time to
breathe. In the midst of the meal their mother asked
them whether they knew where the three Oranges
were, for their new brother had fallen in love with
them. ‘Then the least of the ninety devils leaped up
with a shout of joy, and said that he knew.

“Then if thou knowest,” said his mother, “ see that
thou take this son of ours thither, that he may satisfy
his heart’s desire.”

On arising next morning, the devil-son took the
King’s son with him, and the pair of them went
merrily along the road together. They went on, and
on, and on, and at last the little devil said these
THE THREE ORANGE PERIS 21

words : “My brother, we shall come presently to a
large garden, and in the fountain thereof are the
three. When I say to thee: ‘Shut thine eye, open
thine eye !’ lay hold of what thou shalt see.”

They went on a little way further till they came
to the garden, and the moment the devil saw the
fountain he said to the King’s son: “Shut thine eye
and open thine eye!” He did so, and saw the three
Oranges bobbing up and down on the surface of the
water where it came bubbling out of the spring, and
he snatched up one of them and popped it in his
pocket. Again the devil called to him: “Open thine
eye and shut thine eye!” He did so, and snatched
up the second orange, and so with the third also in
the same way. “Now take care,” said the devil,
“that thou dost not cut open these oranges in any
place where there is no water, or it will go ill with
thee.” The King’s son promised, and so they parted,
one went to the right, and the other to the left.

The King’s son went on, and on, and on. He went
a long way, and he went a short way, he went across
mountains and through valleys. At last he came
to a sandy desert, and there he bethought him of
the oranges, and drawing one out, he cut it open.
Scarcely had he cut into it when a damsel, lovely as
a Peri, popped out of it before him; the moon when
it is fourteen days old is not more dazzling. “ For
22 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Allah’s sake, give me a drop of water!” cried the
damsel, and inasmuch as there was no trace of water
anywhere, she vanished from the face of the earth.
The King’s son grieved right sorely, but there was
no help for it, the thing was done.

Again he went on his way, and when he had gone
a little further he thought to himself, “I may as well
cut open one more orange.” So he drew out the second
orange, and scarcely had he cut into it than there
popped down before him a still more lovely damsel,
who begged piteously for water, but as the King’s son
had none to give her, she also vanished.

““ Well, I'll take better care of the third,” cried he,
and continued his journey. He went on and on till
he came to a large spring, drank out of it, and then
thought to himself: “ Well, now Ill cut open the
third orange also.” He drew it out and cut it, and
immediately a damsel even lovelier than the other
two stood before him. As soon as she called for
water, he led her to the spring and gave her to drink,
and the damsel did not disappear, but remained there
as large as life.

Mother-naked was the damsel, and as he could not
take her to town like that, he bade her climb up a
large tree that stood beside the spring, while he went
into the town to buy her raiment and a carriage.

While the Kine’s son had gone away, a negro
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 23

servant came to the spring to draw water, and saw
the reflection of the damsel in the watery mirror.
“Why, thou art something like a damsel,” said she
to herself, ‘and ever so much lovelier than thy
mistress; so she ought to fetch water for me, not I
for her.” With that she broke the pitcher in two,
went home, and when her mistress asked where the
pitcher of water was, she replied: “I am much more
beautiful than thou, so thou must fetch water for me,
not I for thee.” Her mistress took up a mirror, held
it before her, and said: “ Methinks thou must have
taken leave of thy senses; look at this mirror!” The
Moor looked into the mirror, and saw that she was as
coal-black ag ever. Without another word she took
up the pitcher, went again to the spring, and seeing
the damsel’s face in the mirror, again fancied that it
was hers.

“Tm right, after all,” she cried; “ I’m ever so much
more beautiful than my mistress.” So she broke the
pitcher to pieces again, and went home. Again her
mistress asked her why she had not drawn water.
“Because I am ever so much more beautiful than
thou, so thou must draw water for me,” replied she.

“Thou art downright crazy,” replied her mistress,
drew out a mirror, and showed it to her; and when
the Moor-girl saw her face in it, she took up another
pitcher and went to the fountain for the third time.
24 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The damsel’s face again appeared in the water, but
just as she was about to break the pitcher again, the
damsel called to her from the tree: “ Break not thy
pitchers, ’tis my face thou dost see in the water, and
thou wilt see thine own there algo.”

The Moor-girl looked up, and when she saw the
wondrously beautiful shape of the damsel in the tree,
she climbed up beside her and spake coaxing words
to her: “ Oh, my little golden damsel, thou wilt get
the cramp from crouching there so long ; come, rest
thy head!” And with that she laid the damsel’s
head on her breast, felt in her bosom, drew out a
needle, pricked the damsel with it in the skull, and in
an instant the Orange-Damsel was changed into a
bird, and pr-r-r-r-r! she was gone, leaving the Moor
all alone in the tree.

Now when the King’s son came back with his fine
coach and beautiful raiment, looked up into the tree,
and saw the black face, he asked the girl what had
happened to her. “A nice question!” replied the
Moor-girl. “Why, thou didst leave me here all day,
and wentest away, so of course the sun has tanned
me black.” What could the poor King’s son do?
He made the black damsel sit in the coach, and took
her straight home to his father’s house.

In the palace of the Padishah they were all waiting,
full of eagerness, to behold the Peri-Bride, and
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 25

when they saw the Moorish damsel they said to the
King’s son: “ However couldst thou lose thy heart
to a black maid ?”

“She is not a black maid,” said the King’s son.
“T left her at the top of a tree, and she was blackened
there by the rays of the sun. If only you let her
rest a bit she'll soon grow white again.” And with
that he led her into her chamber, and waited for
her to grow white again.

Now there was a beautiful garden in the palace of
the King’s son, and one day the Orange-Bird came
flying on to a tree there, and called down to the
gardener.

“What dost thou want with me?” asked the
gardener.

“What is the King’s son doing?” inquired the bird.

“He is doing no harm that I know of,” replied the
gardener.

“ And what about his black bride ?”

“Oh, she’s there too, sitting with him as usual.”

‘hen the little bird sang these words:

“She may sit by his side,
But she shall not abide ;
For all her fair showing
The thorns are a-growing.
As I hop on this tree,

It will wither ’neath me.”

And with that it flew away.
26 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The next day it came again, and inquired once
more about the King’s son and his black consort, and
repeated what it said before. The third day it did in
like manner, and as many trees as it hopped upon
withered right away beneath it.

One day the King’s son felt weary of his black
bride, so he went out into the garden for a walk.
Then his eye fell on the withered trees, and he
called the gardener and said to him: “ What is this,
gardener? Why dost thou not take better care of
thy trees? Dost thou not see that they are all
withering away?” Then the gardener replied that
it was of but little use for him to take care of the
trees, for a few days ago a little bird had been there,
and asked what the King’s son and his black consort
were doing, and had said that though she might be
sitting there, she should not sit for ever, but that
thorns would grow, and every tree it lit upon should
wither.

The King’s son commanded the gardener to smear
the trees with bird-lime, and if the bird then lit upon
it, to bring it to him. So the gardener smeared the
trees with bird-lime, and when the bird came there
next day he caught it, and brought it to the King’s
son, who put it in a cage. Now no sooner did the
black woman look upon the bird than she knew at
once that it was the damsel. So she pretended to be
THE THREE ORANGEPERIS — 27

very ill, sent for the chief medicine-man, and by dint
of rich gifts persuaded him to say to the King’s son
that his consort would never get well unless he fed
her with such and such birds.

The King’s son saw that his consort was very sick,
he sent for the doctor, went with him to see the sick
woman, and asked him how she was to be cured.
The doctor said she could only be cured if they gave
her such and such birds to eat. ‘“ Why, only this
very day have I caught one of such birds,” said the
King’s son ; and they brought the bird, killed it, and
fed the sick lady with the flesh thereof. In an instant
the black damsel arose from her bed. But one of the
bird’s dazzling feathers fell accidentally to the ground
and slipped between the planks, so that nobody
noticed it.

Time went on, and the King’s son was still
waiting and waiting for his consort to turn white.
Now there was an old woman in the palace who used
to teach the dwellers in the harem to read and write.
One day as she was going down-stairs she saw some-
thing gleaming between the planks of the floor, and
going towards it, perceived that it was a bird’s feather
that sparkled like a diamond. She took it home and
thrust it behind a rafter. The next day she went to
the palace, and while she was away the bird’s feather
leaped down from the rafter, shivered a little, and the
28 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

next moment turned into a most lovely damsel. She
put the room tidy, cooked the meal, set everything
in order, and then leaped back upon the rafter and
became a feather again. When the old woman came
home she was amazed at what she saw. She thought:
“Somebody must have done all this,” so she went up
and down, backwards and forwards through the house,
but nobody could she see.

_ Early next morning she again went to the palace,
and the feather leaped down again in like manner,
and did all the household work. When the old
woman came home, she perceived the house all nice
and clean, and everything in order. “I really must
find out the secret of this,” thought she, so next
morning she made as if she were going away as usual,
and. left the door ajar, but went and hid herself in a
corner. All at once she perceived that there was a
damsel in the room, who tidied the room and cooked
the meal, whereupon the old woman dashed out,
seized hold of her, and asked her who she was and
whence she came. Then the damsel told her her
sad fate, and how she had been twice killed by the
black woman, and had come thither in the shape of
a feather.

“Distress thyself no more, my lass,” said the old
woman. “I'll put thy business to rights, and this
very day, too.” And with that she went straight
THE THREE ORANGE-PERIS 29

to the King’s son and invited him to come and see
her that evening. The King’s son was now so sick
unto death of his black bride that he was glad of any
excuse to escape from his own house, so the evening
found him punctually at the old woman’s. They sat
down to supper, and when the coffee followed the
meats, the damsel entered with the cups, and when
the King’s son saw her he was like to have fainted.
‘““Nay, but, mother,” said the King’s son, when he
had come to himself a little, “ who is that damsel 2”

“Thy wife,” replied the old woman.

“ How didst thou get that fair creature ?” inquired
the King’s son. ‘ Wilt thou not give her to me?”

‘“ How can I give her to thee, seeing that she was
thine own once upon a time,” said the old woman ;
and with that the old woman took the damsel by the
hand, led her to the King’s son, and laid her on his
breast. “Take better care of the Orange-Peri another
time,” said she.

The King’s son now nearly fainted in real earnest,
but it was from sheer joy. He took the damsel to his
palace, put to death the black slave-girl, but held high
festival with the Peri for forty days and forty nights.
So they had the desire of their hearts, and may Allah
satisfy your desires likewise.
THE ROSE-BEAUTY

ONCE upon a time in the old old days when straws
were sieves, and the camel a chapman, and the mouse
a barber, and the cuckoo a tailor, and the donkey ran
errands, and the tortoise baked bread, and I was only
fifteen years old, but my father rocked my cradle, and
there was a miller in the land who had a black cat—
in those olden times, I say, there was a King who
had three daughters, and the first daughter was forty,
and the second was thirty, and the third was twenty.
One day the youngest daughter wrote this letter to
her father: “ My lord father! my eldest sister is forty
and my second sister is thirty, and still thou hast
given neither of them a husband. I have no desire
to grow grey in waiting for a husband.”

The King read the letter, sent for his three daugh-
ters, and addressed them in these words: “Look now!
let each one of you shoot an arrow from a bow and

seek her sweetheart wherever her arrow falls!” So
30
THE ROSE-BEAUTY 31

the three damsels took their bows. The eldest
damsel’s arrow fell into the palace of the Vizier’s son,
so the Vizier’s son took her to wife. The second
girl’s arrow flew into the palace of the Chief Mufti’s
son, so they gave her to him. The third damsel also
fired her arrow, and lo! it stuck in the hut of a poor
young labourer. ‘“ That won’t do, that won’t do!”
cried they all. So she fired again, and again the
arrow stuck in the hut. She aimed a third time, and
a third time the arrow stuck in the hut of the poor
young labourer. Then the King was wroth and cried
to the damsel: “ Look now, thou slut! thou hast got
thy deserts. Thy sisters waited patiently, and there-
fore they have got their hearts’ desires. Thou wast
the youngest of all, yet didst thou write me that saucy
letter, hence thy punishment. Out of my sight, thou
slave-girl, to this husband of thine, and thou shalt
have nought but what he can give thee!” So the
poor damsel departed to the hut of the labourer, and
they gave her to him to wife.

They lived together for a time, and on the tenth
day of the ninth month the time came that she should
bear a child, and her husband, the labourer, hastened
away for the midwife. While the husband was thus
away his wife had neither a bed to lie down upon
nor a fire to warm herself by, though grinding
winter was upon them. All at once the walls of
32 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

the poor hut opened hither and thither, and three
beautiful damsels of the Peri race stepped into it.
One stood at the damsel’s head, another at her
feet, the third by her side, and they all seemed
to know their business well. In a moment every-
thing in the poor hut was in order, the princess
lay on a beautiful soft couch, and before she
could blink her eyes a pretty little new-born baby
girl was lying by her side. When everything was
finished the three Peris set about going, but first of
all they approached the bed one by one, and the first
said :

‘Rosa be thy damsel’s name,

And she shall weep not tears but pearls!”

The second Peri approached the bed and said:

“ Rosa be thy damsel’s name,
The rose shall blossom when she smiles! ”

And the third Peri wound up with these words :

“Rosa be thy damsel’s name,
Sweet verdure in her footsteps spring!”

whereupon they all three disappeared.

Now all this time the husband was seeking a mid-
wife, but could find one nowhere. What could he
do but go home? But when he got back he was
amazed to find everything in the poor hut in
beautiful order, and his wife lying on a splendid
THE ROSE-BEAUTY 33

bed. Then she told him the story of the three Peris,
and there was no more spirit left in him, so astounded
was he. But the little girl grew more and more
lovely from hour to day, and from day to week, so that
there was not another like her in the whole world.
Whosoever looked upon her lost his heart at once, and
pearls fell from her eyes when she wept, roses burst
into bloom when she smiled, and a bright riband of
fresh green verdure followed her footsteps. | Who-
soever saw her had no more spirit left in him,
and the fame of lovely Rosa went from mouth to
mouth .

At last the King of that land also heard of the
damsel, and instantly made up his mind that she
and nobody else should be his son’s consort. So he
sent for his son, and told him that there was a damsel
in the town of so rare a beauty that pearls fell from
her eyes when she wept, roses burst into bloom when
she smiled, and the earth grew fresh and green
beneath her footsteps, and with that he bade him up
and. woo her.

Now the Peris had for a long time shown the
King’s son the beautiful Rose-damsel in his dreams,
and the sweet fire of love already burned within him ;
but he was ashamed to let his father see this, so he
hung back a little. At this his father became more

and more pressing, bade him go and woo her at once,
D
34 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

and commanded the chief dame of the palace to
accompany him to the hut of the labourer.

They entered the hut, said on what errand they
came, and claimed the damsel for the King’s son in
the name of Allah. The poor folks rejoiced at their
good luck, promised the girl, and began to make
ready.

Now this palace dame’s daughter was also a beauty,
and not unlike Rosa. ‘Terribly distressed was the
dame that the King’s son should take to wife a
poor labourer’s daughter, instead: of her own child ; so
she made up her mind to deceive them and put her
own daughter in Rosa’s place. So on the day of the
banquet she made the poor girl eat many salted
meats, and then brought a pitcher of water and a
large basket, got into the bridal coach with Rosa and
her own daughter, and set out for the palace. As
they were on the road (and a very long time they
were about it) the damsel grew thirsty and asked the
palace dame for some water. “Not till thou hast
given me one of thine eyes,” said the palace dame.
What could the poor damsel do ?—she was dying with
thirst. So she cut out one of her eyes and gave it
for a drink of water.

They went on and on, further and further, and the
damsel again became thirsty and asked for another
drink of water. “Thou shalt have it if thou give
THE ROSE-BEAUTY 35

me thy other eye,” said the palace dame. And the
poor damsel was so tormented with thirst that she
gave the other eye for a drink of water.

The old dame took the two eyes, pitched the sight-
less damsel into the big basket, and left her all alone
on the top of a mountain. But the beautiful ‘bridal
robe she put upon her own daughter, brought her to
the King’s son, and gave her to him with the words:
“Behold thy wife!” So they made a great banquet,
and when they had brought the damsel to her bride-
groom and taken off her veil, he perceived that the
damsel who now stood before him was not the damsel
of his dreams. As, however, she resembled her a
little he said nothing about it to anybody. So they
lay down to rest, and when they rose up again early
next morning the King’s son was quite undeceived,
for the damsel of his dreams had wept pearls, smiled
roses, and sweet green herbs had grown up in her
footsteps, but this girl had neither roses nor pearls
nor green herbs to show for herself. ‘The youth felt
there was some trickery at work here. This was not
the girl he had meant to have. “How am I to find
it all out?” thought he to himself; but not a word
did he say to any one.

While all these things were going on in the palace,
poor Rosa was weeping on the mountain top, and
such showers of pearls fell from her by dint of her
36 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

sore weeping that there was scarce room to hold them
all in the big basket. Now a mud-carrier happened
to be passing by who was carting mud away, and
hearing the weeping of the damsel was terribly afraid,
and cried: “Who art thou?—A Jinn or a Peri ?”—
“T am neither a Jinn nor yet a Peri,” replied the
damsel, “‘ but the remains of a living child of man.”
Whereupon the mud-raker took courage, opened the
basket, and there a poor sightless damsel was sobbing,
and her tears fell from her in showers of pearls. So
he took the damsel by the hand and led her to his
hut, and as the old man had nobody about him he
adopted the damsel as if she were his own child and
took care of her. But the poor girl did nothing but
weep for her two eyes, and the old man had all he
could do to pick up the pearls, and whenever they
were in want of money he would take a pearl and sell
it, and they lived on whatever he got for it.

Thus time passed, and there was mirth in the
palace, and misery in the hut of the mud-raker. Now
it chanced one day as fair Rosa was sitting in the hut,
that something made her smile, and immediately a rose
bloomed. ‘Then the damsel said to her foster-father,
the mud-raker: “ Take this rose, papa, and go with it
in front of the palace of the King’s son, and ery aloud
that thou hast roses for sale that are not to be
matched in the wide world. But if the dame of the
THE ROSE-BEAUTY 37

palace comes out, see that thou dost not give her the
rose for money, but say that thou wilt sell it for a
human eye.”

So the man took the rose and stood in front of the
palace, and began to cry aloud: “A rose for sale, a
rose for sale, the like of which is nowhere to be
found.” Now it was not the season for roses, so
when the dame of the palace heard the man crying a
rose for sale, she thought to herself: “ I’ll put it in my
daughter’s hair, and thus the Kino’s son will think that
she is his true bride.” So she called the poor man to
her, and asked him what he would sell the rose for 2
“For nothing,” replied the man, “for no money told
down, but Tl give it thee for a human eye.”
Then the dame of the palace brought forth one of
fair Rosa’s eyes and gave it for the rose. Then she
took it to her daughter, plaited it in her hair, and
when the King’s son saw the rose, he thought
of the Peri of his dreams, but could not understand
whither she had gone. Nevertheless he now fancied
he was about to find out, so he said not a word to
any one.

Meanwhile, the old man went home with the eye
and gave it to the damsel, fair Rosa. Then she fitted
it in its right place, sighed from her heart in prayer
to Allah, who can do all things; and behold! she
could see right well again with her one eye. The
38 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

poor girl was so pleased that she could not help
smiling, and immediately another rose sprang forth.
This also she gave to her father that he might walk
in front of the palace and give it for another human
eye. The old man took the rose, and scarcely had he
begun crying it before the palace when the old dame
again heard him. “He has just come at the nick of
time,” thought she ; “the King’s son has begun to love
my rose-bedizened daughter; if I can only get this
rose also, he will love her still better, and this
serving-wench will go out of his mind altogether.”
So she called the mud-raker to her and asked for the
rose, but again he would not take money for it, though
he was willing to let her have it in exchange for a
human eye. Then the old woman gave him the
second eye, and the old man hastened home with it
and gave it to the damsel. Rosa immediately put it
in its proper place, prayed to Allah, and was so
rejoiced when her two bright eyes sparkled with
living light that she smiled all the day, and roses
bloomed on every side of her. Henceforth she was
lovelier than ever. Now one day beautiful Rosa went
fora walk, and as she smiled continually as she walked
along, roses bloomed around her and the ground grew
fresh and green beneath her feet. The palace dame
saw her and was terrified. What will become of me,
she thought, if the affair of this damsel comes to be
THE ROSE-BEAUTY 39

‘known? She knew where the poor mud-seraper lived,
so she went all alone to his dwelling, and terrified him
by telling him that he had an evil witch in his house.
The poor man had never seen a witch, so he was terri-
fied to death, and asked the palace dame what he had
better do. “Find out, first of all, what her talisman
is,” advised the palace dame, “and then I’ll come and.
do the rest.”

So the first thing the old man did when the damsel
came home was to ask her how she, a mere child of
man, had come to have such magic power. The
damsel, suspecting no ill, said that she had got her
talisman from the three Peris, and that pearls, roses,
and fresh sweet verdure would accompany her so long
as her talisman was alive.

“What then is thy talisman?” asked the old man.

“ A little deer on the hill-top ;
Tf it die, I also dead drop,”

answered she.

The next day the palace dame came thither in the
utmost misery, heard all about it from the mud-
scraper, and hastened home with great joy. She told
her daughter that on the top of the neighbouring hill
was a little deer which she should ask her husband to
get for her. That very same day the Sultana told her
husband of the little deer on the top of the hill, and
40 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

begged and implored him to get her its heart to eat.
And after not many days the Prince’s men caught the
little deer and killed it, and took out its heart and
gave it to the Sultana. At the same instant when
they killed the little fawn fair Rosa died. The mud-
raker sorrowed over her till he could sorrow no more,
and then took and buried her.

Now in the heart of the little fawn there was a
little red coral eye which nobody took any notice of.
When the Sultana ate the heart, the little red coral
eye fell out and rolled down the steps as if it wanted
to hide itself

Time went on, and in not more than nine months —
and ten days the Prince’s consort was brought to bed
of a little daughter, who wept pearls when she cried,
dropt roses when she smiled, and sweet green herbs
sprang up in her footsteps.

When the Prince saw it he mused and mused over
it, the little girl was the very image of fair Rosa, and
not a bit like the mother who had borne her. So his
sleep was no repose to him, till one night fair Rosa
appeared to him in his dreams and spoke these words
to him: “Oh, my prince! oh, my betrothed! my
soul is beneath thy palace steps, my body is in the
tomb, thy little girl is my little girl, my talisman is
the little coral eye.”

The Prince had no sooner awakened than he went
THE ROSE-BEAUTY 41

to the staircase and searched about, and lo! there was
the little coral eye. He picked it up, took it into his
chamber, and laid it on the table. Meanwhile, the
little girl entered the room, saw the red coral, and
scarcely had she laid hold of it than she vanished as
if she had never been. The three Peris had carried
off the child and taken her to her mother’s tomb, and
scarcely had she placed the coral eye in the dead
woman’s mouth than she awoke up to a new life.

But the King’s son was not easy in his mind. He
went to the cemetery, had the tomb opened, and there
in her coffin lay the Rose-beauty of his dreams, with
her little girl in her arms and the coral talisman in
her mouth. They arose from the tomb and embraced
him, and pearls fell from the eyes of both of them as
they wept, and roses from their mouths as they
smiled, and sweet green herbs grew up in their foot-
steps.

The palace dame and her daughter paid for their
crimes, but beautiful Rosa and her father and her
mother, the Sultan’s daughter, were all re-united,
and for forty days and forty nights they held high
revel amidst the beating of drums and the tinkling of
cymbals.
MAD MEHMED

ONcE upon a time in the old old days when the
camel was only a spy, when toads rose in the air on
wings, and I myself rode in the air while I walked on
the ground, and went up hill and down dale at the
same time, in those days, I say, there were two brothers
who dwelt together.

All that they had inherited from their father were
some oxen and other beasts, and a sick mother. One
day the spirit of division seized upon the younger
brother (he was half-witted besides, Allah help him 3),
and he went to his brother and said: “Look now,
brother ! at these two stables! One of them is as new
as new can be, while the other is old and rotten. Let
us drive our cattle hither, and whatever goes into
the new stable shall be mine, and all the rest shall be
thine.”

“Not so, Mehmed,” said the elder brother; “let

whatever goes into the old stable be thine!” To
42
MAD MEHMED 43

this also the half-crazy Mehmed agreed. That same
day they went and drove up their cattle, and all the
cattle went into the new stable except a helpless old
ox that was so blind that it mistook its way and went
into the old stable instead. Mehmed said never a
word, but took the blind old ox into the fields to
graze; every morning early he drove it thither, and
late every evening he drove it back again. One day
when he was on the road, the wind began to shake a
big wayside tree so violently that its vast branches
whined and whimpered again. ‘“ Hi! whimpering
old dad!” said the fool to the tree, ‘‘ hast thou seen
my elder brother ?” But the tree, asif it didn’t hear,
only went on whining. The fool flew into such a rage
at this that he caught up his chopper and struck at the
tree, when out of it gushed a whole stream of golden
sequins. At this the fool rallied what little wits he
had, hastened home, and asked his brother to lend him
another ox, as he wanted to plough with a pair. He
found a cart also, and some empty sacks. These
he filled with earth, and set out forthwith for his tree.
There he emptied his sacks of their earth, filled them
with sequins instead, and when he returned home in
the evening, his brother well-nigh dropped down for
amazement at the sight of the monstrous treasure.
They could think of nothing now but dividing it,
so the younger brother went to their neighbour for
44 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

a three-peck measure to measure it with. Now the
neighbour was curious to know what such clodpoles
could have to measure. So he took and smeared the
bottom of the measure with tar, and, sure enough,
when the fool brought the measure back a short time
afterwards, a sequin was sticking to the bottom of it.
The neighbour immediately went and told it to
another, who went and told it to a third, and so it
was not long before everybody knew all about it.

Now the wiser brother knew not what might happen
to them now that they had all this money, and he
began to feel frightened. So he snatched up his
pick and shovel, dug a trench, buried the treasure,
and made off as fast as his heels could carry him. On
the way it occurred to the wise brother that he had
done foolishly in not shutting the door of the hut
behind him, so he sent off his younger brother to do
it for him. So the fool went back to the house, and
he thought to himself: “Well, since I am here, I
ought not to forget my old mother either.” So he
filled a huge cauldron with water, boiled it, and soused
his old mother in it so thoroughly that her poor old
head was never likely to speak again. After that he
propped the old woman against the wall with the
broom, tore the door off its hinges, threw it over his
shoulders, and went and rejoined his brother in the
wood.
MAD MEHMED 45

The elder brother looked at the door, and listened
to the sad case of his poor old mother, but scold and
chide his younger brother as he might the latter orew
more cock-a-hoop than ever—he fancied he had done
such aclever thing. He had brought the door away with
him, he said, in order that no one might get into the
house. The wise brother would have given anything
to have got rid of the fool, and began turning over in
his mind how he might best manage it. He looked
before him and behind him, he looked down the high-
road, and there were three horsemen galloping along.
The thought instantly occurred to the pair of them
that these horsemen were on their track, so they
scrambled up a tree forthwith, door and all. They
were scarcely comfortably settled when the three
horsemen drove up beneath the tree and encamped
there. The dusk of evening had come on at the very
nick of time, so that they could not see the two
brothers.

Now the two brothers would have done very well
indeed up in the tree had not one of them been a fool.
Mehmed the fool began to practise pleasantries which
disturbed the repose of the horsemen beneath the tree.
Presently, however, came a crash—bang !—and down
on the heads of the three sleepers fell the great
heavy door from the top of the tree. “The end of
the world has come, the end of the world has
46 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

come!” cried they, and they rushed off in such a
fright that no doubt they haven’t ceased running
to this very day. This finished the business so far
as the elder brother was concerned. In the morning
he arose and went on his way, and left the foolish
younger brother by himself.

Thus poor silly Mehmed had to go forth into the
wide world alone. He went on and on till he came
to a village, by which time he was very hungry.
There he stood in the gate of a mosque, and got one
or two paras! from those who went in and out till he
had enough to buy himself something to eat. At that
moment a fat little man came out of the mosque, and
casting his eyes on Mehmed, asked him if he would
like to enter his service.

“T don’t mind if [ do,” replied Mehmed, “ but only
on condition that neither of us is to get angry with
the other for any cause whatever. If thou art wroth
with me I'll kill thee, and if I get wroth with thee
thou mayest kill me also.” The fat man agreed to
these terms, for there was a great lack of servants in
that village.

In order to make short work of the fat little man the
fool began by at once chasing all the hens and sheep off
his master’s premises. “ Art angry, master ?” he then
inquired of his lord. His master was amazed, but he

1 Farthings.
MAD MEHMED 47

only answered: “Angry? Not I! Why should I
be?” At the same time he entrusted nothing more
to him, but let him sit in the house without any-
thing to do.

His master had a wife and child, and Mehmed had
to look after them. He liked to dandle the child up
and down, but he knocked it about and hurt it, so
clumsy was he; so he soon had to leave that off. But
the wife began to be afraid that her turn would come
next, sooner or later, so she persuaded her husband to
run away from the fool one night. Mehmed over-
heard what they said, hid himself in their store-
box, and when they opened it in the next village out
he popped.

After a while his master and his wife agreed
together that they would go and sleep at night on
the shores of a lake. They took Mehmed with them,
and put his bed right on the water’s edge, that he
might tumble in when he went to sleep. However, the
fool was not such a fool but that he made his master’s
wife jump into the lake instead of himself. “ Art
angry, master?” cried he.—“ Angry indeed! How
can I help being angry when I see my property
wasted, and my wife and child killed, and myself a
beggar—and all through thee!” Then the fool seized
his master, put him in mind of their compact, and
pitched him into the water.
48 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

_ Mehmed now found himself all alone, so he went
forth into the wide world once more. He went on
and on, did nothing but drink sweet coffee, smoke
chibooks, look about over his shoulder, and walk
leisurely along at his ease. As he was thus knocking
about, he chanced to light upon a five-para piece,
which he speedily changed for some lebleb,! which he
immediately fell to chewing, and, as he chewed, part of
it fell into a wayside spring, whereupon the fool began
roaring loud enough to split his throat : “Give me
back my lebleb, give me back my lebleb!” At this -
frightful bawling a Jinn popped up his head, and he
was so big that his upper lip swept the sky, while his
lower lip hid the earth. “What dost thou require 2”
asked the Jinn.—‘I want my lebleb, I want my
lebleb !” cried Mehmed.

The Jinn ducked down into the spring, and when
he came up again, he held a little table in his hand.
This little table he gave to the fool and said:
“Whenever thou art hungry thou hast only to say:
‘Little table, give me to eat;’ and when thou hast
eaten thy fill, say: ‘Little table, I have now had
enough.’ ”

So Mehmed took the table and went with it into a
village, and when he felt hungry he said: “Little table,
give me to eat!” and immediately there stood before

! Roasted pepper.
MAD MEHMED 49

him so many beautiful, nice dishes that he couldn’t
make up his mind which to begin with. ‘“ Well,”
thought he, “I must let the poor people of the village
see this wonder also,’ so he went and invited them all
to a great banquet.

The villagers came one after another, they looked
to the right, they looked to the left, but there was no
sign of a fire, or any preparations for a meal. ‘“‘ Nay,
but he would needs make fools of us!” thought they.
But the young man brought out his table, set it in
the midst, and cried: ‘ Little table, give me to eat!”
and there before them stood all manner of delicious
meats and drinks, and so much thereof that when the
guests had stuffed themselves to the very throat,
there was enough left over to fill the servants. Then
the villagers laid their heads together as to how they
might manage to have a meal like this every day.
“ Come now !” said some of them, “‘ let us steal a march
upon Mehmed one day and lay hands upon his table,
and then there will be an end to the fool’s glory.”
And they did so.

What could the poor, empty-bellied fool do then ?
Why he went to the wayside spring and asked again :
“JT want my lebleb, I want my lebleb!” And he
asked and asked so long that at last the Jinn popped
up his head again out of the spring and inquired what
was the matter. “I want my lebleb, I want my

E
50 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

lebleb!” cried the fool—‘‘But where’s thy little
table ?””—“ They stole it.”

The big-lipped Jinn again popped down, and when
he rose out of the spring again he had a little mill in
his hand. This he gave to the fool and said to him:
“ Grind it to the right and gold will flow out of it,
grind it to the left and it will give thee silver.” So
the youth took the mill home and ground it first to
the right and then to the left, and huge treasures of
gold and silver lay heaped about him on the floor.
So he grew such a rich man that his equal was not
to be found in the village, nay, nor in the town
either.

But no sooner had the people of the village got to
know all about the little mill than they laid their
heads together and schemed and schemed till the mill
also disappeared* one fine morning from Mehmed’s
cottage. Then Mehmed ran off to the spring once
more and cried: “I want my lebleb, [ want my
lebleb !”

“But where is thy little table? Where is thy
little mill?” asked the big-lipped Jinn.

“They have stolen them both from me,” lamented
the witless one, and he wept bitterly.

Again the Jinn bobbed down, and this time he
brought up two sticks with him. He gave them to

1 Lit. the place of the mill was cold one morning,
MAD MEHMED 51

the fool, and impressed upon him very strongly on no
account to say: “ Strike, strike, my little sticks !”

Mehmed took the sticks, and first he turned them
to the right and then to the left, but could make
nothing of them. Then he thought he would just
try the effect of saying: “Strike, strike, my little
sticks!” and no sooner were the words out of his
mouth than the sticks fell upon him unmercifully,
and belaboured him on every part of the body that
can feel—the head, the foot, the arm, the back—till he
was nothing but one big ache. “Stop, stop, my
little sticks!” cried he, and lo! the two sticks were
still. Then, for all his aches and pains, Mehmed
rejoiced greatly that he had found out the mystery.

He had no sooner got home with the two sticks
than he called together all the villagers, but said
not a word about what he meant to do. In less than
a couple of hours everybody had assembled there, and
awaited the new show with great curiosity. Then
Mehmed came with his two sticks and cried : “ Strike,
strike, my little sticks, strike, strike!” whereupon the
two sticks gave the whole lot of them such a rub-a-
dub-dubbing that it was as much as they could do
to howl for mercy. ‘ Now,” said Mehmed, who was
getting his wits back again, ‘I'll have no mercy
till you. have given back to me my little table and
my little mill.”
52 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The people of the village, all bruised and bleeding
as they were, consented to everything, and hurried
off for the little table and the little mill. Then
_ Mehmed cried : “ Stand still, my little sticks!” and
there was peace and quiet as before.

Then the man took away the three gifts to his own
village, and as he now had money he grew more
sensible, and there also he found his brother. He
gave all the buried treasure to his brother, and each
of them sought out a damsel meet to be a wife, and
married, and lived each in a world of his own. And
there was not a wiser man in that village than Mad
Mehmed now that he had grown rich.
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN

ONcE upon a time, in days long gone by, when my
father was my father, and I was my father’s son,
when my father was my son, and I was my father’s
mother, once upon a time, I say, at the uttermost
ends of the world, hard by the realm of demons, stood
a great city.

In this same city there dwelt three poor damsels,
the daughters of a poor wood-cutter. From morn to
eve, from evening to morning, they did nothing but
sew and stitch, and when the embroideries were
finished, one of them would go to the market-place
and sell them, and so purchase wherewithal to live
upon.

Now it fell out, one day, that the Padishah of that
city was wroth with the people, and in his rage he
commanded that for three days and three nights
nobody should light a candle in that city. What

were these three poor sisters to do? They could not
53
54 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

work in the dark. So they covered their window
with a large thick curtain, lit a tiny rushlight, and sat
them down to earn their daily bread.

On the third night of the prohibition, the Padishah
took it into his head to go round the city himself to
see whether every one was keeping his commandment.
He chanced to step in front of the house of the three
poor damsels, and as the folds of the curtain did not
quite cover the bottom of the window he caught sight
of the light within. The damsels, however, little
suspecting their danger, went on sewing and stitching
and talking amongst themselves about their poor
affairs.

“Oh,” said the eldest, “if only the Padishah would
wed me to his chief cook, what delicious dishes I
should have every day. Yes, and I would embroider
him for it a carpet so long that all his horses and all
his men could find room upon it.”

“As for me,” said the middling damsel, “I should
like to be wedded to the keeper of his wardrobe.
What lovely splendid raiment I should then have to
put on. And then I would make the Padishah a tent
so large, that all his horses and all his men should
find shelter beneath it.”

“Well,” cried the youngest damsel, “I'll look at
nobody but the Padishah himself, and if he would only
take me to wife I would bear him two little children
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 55

with golden hair. One should be a boy and the
other a girl, and a half-moon should shine on the
forehead of the boy, and a bright star should sparkle
on the temples of the girl.”

The Padishah heard the discourse of the three
damsels, and no sooner did the red dawn shine in the
morning sky than he sent for all three to the palace.
The eldest he gave to his head pantler, the second to
his head chamberlain, but the youngest he took for
himself.

And in truth it fared excellently well with the
three damsels. The eldest got so many rich dishes to
eat, that when it came to sewing the promised carpet
she could scarce move her needle for the sleep of
surfeit. So they sent her back again to the wood-
cutter’s hut. The second damsel, too, when they
dressed her up in gold and silver raiment, would not
deign to dirty her fingers by making tents, so they
sent her back too, to keep her elder sister company.

And how about the youngest? Well, after nine
months and ten days the two elder sisters came
sidling up to the palace to see if the poor thing
would really be as good as her word, and bring
forth the two wondrous children. In the gates of
the palace they met an old woman, and they per-
suaded her with gifts and promises to meddle in
the matter. Now this old woman was the devil’s
56 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

own daughter, so that mischief and malice were
her meat and drink. She now went and picked
up two pups and took them with her to the sick
woman’s bed.

And oh, my soul! the wife of the Padishah brought
forth two little children like shining stars. One was
a boy, the other a girl; on the boy’s forehead was
a half-moon and on the girl’s a star, so that darkness
was turned to light when they were by. Then the
wicked old woman exchanged the children for the
pups, and told it in the ears of the Padishah that his
wife had brought forth two pups. The Padishah was
like to have had a fit in the furiousness of his rage.
He took his poor wife, buried her up to the waist in
the ground, and commanded throughout the city that
every passer-by should strike her on the head with
a stone. But no sooner had the evil witch got hold
of the two children, than she took them a long way
outside the town, exposed them on the bank of a
flowing stream, and returned to the palace right glad
that she had done her work so well.

Now close to the water where the two children lay
stood a hut where lived an aged couple. The old man
had a she-goat which used to go out'in the morning
to graze, and come back in the evening to be milked,
and that was how the poor people kept body and soul
together. One day, however, the old woman was
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The Golden-Haired Children.—p. 57.
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 57

surprised to find that the goat did not give one drop
of milk. She complained about it to the old man her
husband, and told him to follow the goat to see if
perchance there was any one who stole the milk,

So the next day the old man went after the goat,
which went right up to the water’s edge, and then
disappeared behind a tree. And what do you think he
saw? He saw a sight which would have delighted
your eyes also—two golden-haired children were lying
in the grass, and the goat went right up to them
and gave them to suck. Then she bleated to them
a little, and so left them and went off to graze.
And the old man was so delighted at the sight of the
little starry things, that he was like to have lost his
head for joy. So he took the little ones (Allah had
not blessed him with children of his own) and carried
them to his hut and gave them to his wife. The
woman was filled with a still greater joy at the
children which Allah had given her, and took care of
them, and brought them up. But now the little goat
came bleating in as if in sore distress, but the moment
she saw the children, she went to them and suckled
them, and then went out to graze again.

But time comes and goes. The two wondrous
children grew up and scampered up hill and down
dale, and the dark woods were bright with the
radiance of their golden hair. They hunted the
58 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

wild beasts, tended sheep, and helped the old people
by word and deed. Time came and went till the
children had grown up, and the old people had
become very old indeed. The golden-haired ones
grew in strength while the silver-haired ones grew in
feebleness, till, at last, one morning they lay dead there,
and the brother and sister were left all alone. Sorely
did the poor little things weep and wail, but was ever
woe mended by weeping? So they buried their old
parents, and the girl stayed at home with the little
she-goat, while the lad went a-hunting, for how to
find food was now their great care and their little
care too.

One day, while he was hunting wild beasts in the
forest, he met his father, the Padishah, but he did not
know it was his father, neither did the father recog-
nize his son. Yet the moment the Padishah beheld
the wondrously beautiful child, he longed to clasp
him to-his breast, and commanded those about him
to inquire of the child from whence he came.

Then one of the courtiers went up to the youth,
and said: “Thou hast shot much game there, my
Bey !”—* Allah also has created much,” replied the
youth, “and there is enough for thee and for me
also,” and with that he left him like a blockhead.

But the Padishah went back to his palace, and was
sick at heart because of the boy; and when they
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 59

asked what ailed him, he said that he had seen such
a wondrously beautiful child in the forest, and that
he loved him so that he could rest no more. The
boy had the very golden hair and the same radiant
forehead that his wife had promised him.

The old woman was sore afraid at these words.
She hastened to the stream, saw the house, peeped
in, and there sat a lovely girl, like a moon fourteen
days old. The girl entreated the old woman court-
eously, and asked her what she sought. The old
woman did not wait to be asked twice; indeed, her
foot was scarce across the threshold when she began
to ask the girl with honey-sweet words whether she
lived all alone.

“Nay, my mother,” replied the girl; “I have a
young brother. In the day-time he goes hunting,
and in the evening he comes home.”

“Dost thou not grow weary of being all alone here
by thyself?” inquired the witch.—‘“If even I did,”
said the girl, “what can I do? I must fill up my
time as best I may.”

“Tell me now, my little diamond! dost thou dearly
love this brother of thine ?”

“Of course I do.”

“Well, then, my girl,” said the witch, “I'll tell
thee something, but don’t let it go any further!
When thy brother comes home this evening, fall to
60 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

weeping and wailing, and keep it up with all thy
might. When then he asks what ails thee, answer
him not, and when he asks thee again, again give
him never a word. When, however, he asks thee
a third time, say that thou art tired to death with
staying at home here all by thyself, and that if he
loves thee, he will go to the garden of the Queen
of the Peris, and bring thee from thence a branch. A
lovelier branch thou hast never seen all thy life
long.”—The girl promised she would do this, and
the old woman went away.

Towards evening the damsel burst forth a-weeping
and wailing till both her eyes were as red as blood.
The brother came home in the evening, and was
amazed to see his sister in such dire distress, yet
could he not prevail upon her to tell him the cause
of it. He promised her all the grass of the field and
all the trees of the forest if she would only tell him
what was the matter, and, to satisfy the desire of his
sister's heart, the golden-haired youth set off next
morning for the garden of the fairy queen. He went
on and on, smoking his chibook and drinking coffee,
till he reached the boundaries of the fairy realm. He
came to deserts where no caravan had ever gone; he
came to mountains where no bird could ever fly; he
came to valleys where no serpent can ever crawl. But
his trust was in Allah, so he went on and on till he
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 61

came to an immense desert which the eye of man had
never seen nor the foot of man trodden. In the
midst of it was a beautiful palace, and by the road-
side sat the Mother of Devils, and the smell of her
was as the pestilence in the air all round about her.

The youth went straight up to the Mother of
Devils, hugged her to his breast, kissed her all over,
and said: ‘“Good-day, little mother mine! I am
thine own true lad till death!” and he kissed her
hand. ;

“A good-day to thee also, my little son!” replied
the Mother of Devils. “If thou hadst not called
me thy dear little mother, if thou hadst not embraced
me, and if thy innocent mother had not been under
the earth, I would have devoured thee at once. But
tell me now, my little son, whither away ?”

The poor youth said that he wanted a branch from
the garden of the Queen of the Peris.

“Who put that word in thy mouth, my little son?”
asked the woman in amazement. “ Hundreds and
hundreds of talismans guard that garden, and hun-
dreds of souls have perished there by reason thereof.”

Yet the youth did not hold back. “I can but die
once,” thought he.—‘ Thou dost but go to salute thy
innocent, buried mother,” said the old woman; and
then she made the youth sit down beside her and
taught him the way: “ Set out on thy quest at day-
62 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

break, and never stop till thou dost see right in front
of thee a well and a forest. Draw forth thine arrows
in this forest and catch five to ten birds, but catch
them alive. Take these birds to the well, and when
thou hast recited a prayer twice over, plunge the
birds into the well and ery aloud for a key. A key
will straightway be cast out of the well, take it to
thee, and go on thy way. Thou wilt come presently
to a large cavern ; open the door thereof with thy key,
and, as soon as thy foot is inside, stretch forth thy
right hand into the blank darkness, grip fast hold of
whatever thy hand shall touch, drag the thing quickly
forth, and cast the key back into the well again. But
look not behind thee all the time, or Allah have mercy
on thy soul!”

Next day, when the red dawn was in the sky, the
youth went forth on his quest, caught the five to ten
birds in the forest, got hold of the key, opened there-
with the door of the cavern, and—oh, Allah !—
stretched forth his right hand, gripped hold of some-
thing, and, without once looking behind him, dragged
it all the way to his sister’s hut, and never stopped
till he got there. Only then did he cast his eyes
upon what he had in his hand, and it was neither
more nor less than a branch from the garden of the
Queen of the Peris. But what a branch it was! It
was full of little twigs, and the twigs were full of little
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 63

leaves, and there was a little bird on every little leaf,
and every little bird had a song of its own. Such
music, such melody was there as would have brought
even a dead man to life again. The whole hut was
filled with joy.

Next day the youth again went forth to hunt, and,
as he was pursuing the beast of the forest, the Padishah
saw him again. He exchanged a word or two with
the youth, and then returned to his palace, but he was
now sicker than ever, by reason of his love for his
son.

Then the old woman strolled off to the hut again,
and there she saw the damsel sitting with the magic
branch in her hand.

“Well, my girl!” said the old woman, “ what did I
tell thee? But that’s nothing at all. If thy brother
would only fetch thee the mirror of the Queen of the
Peris, Allah knows that thou wouldst cast that branch
right away. Give him no peace till he get it for
thee.”

The witch had no sooner departed than the damsel
began screaming and wailing so that her brother was
at his wit’s end how to comfort her. He said he
would take the whole world on his shoulders to please
her, went straight off to the Mother of Devils, and
besought her so earnestly that she had not the heart
to say him nay.
64 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

“Thou hast made up thy mind to go under the sod
to thy innocent, buried mother, I see,” cried she,
“for not by hundreds but by thousands have human
souls perished in this quest of thine.” Then she
instructed the youth whither he should go and what
he should do, and he set off on his way. He took
an iron staff in his hand and tied iron sandals to his
feet, and he went on and on till he came to two doors,
as the Mother of Devils told him he would before-
hand. One of these doors was open, the other was
closed. He closed the open door and opened the
closed door, and there, straight before him, was
another door. In front of this door was a lion and a
sheep, and there was grass before the lion and flesh
before the sheep. He took up the flesh and laid it
before the lion, then he took up the grass and laid it
before the sheep, and they let him enter unharmed.
But now he came to a third door, and in front of it
were two furnaces, and fire burned in the one and ashes
smouldered in the other. He put out the flaming
furnace, stirred up the cinders in the smouldering
furnace till they blazed again, and then through the
door he went into the garden of the Peris, and from
the garden into the Peri palace. He snatched up the
enchanted mirror, and was hastening away with it
when a mighty voice cried out against him so that the
earth and the heavens trembled. “ Burning furnace,
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 65

1?

seize him, seize him!” cried the voice, just as he came
up to the furnace.

“T can’t,” answered the first furnace, “for he has
put me out!” But the other furnace was grateful to
him for kindling it into a blaze again, so it let him
pass by too.

“Tion, lion, tear him to pieces
voice from the depths of the palace, when the youth
came up to the two beasts.

‘Not J,” answered the lion, “for he helped me to a
good meal of flesh ! ”—Nor would the sheep hurt him
either, because he had given it the grass.—“ Open
door! let him not out!” cried the voice from within
the palace.—‘‘ Nay, but 1 will!” replied the door; “ for
had he not opened me I should be closed still !”—and
so the golden-haired youth was not very long in
getting home, to the great joy of his sister. She
snatched at the mirror and instantly looked into it,
and—Allah be praised !—she saw the whole world in
it. Then the damsel thought no more of the Peri-
branch, for her eyes were glued to the mirror.

Again the youth went a-hunting, and again he
caught the eye of the Padishah. But the sight of
the youth this third time so touched the fatherly
heart of the Padishah that they carried him back to
his palace half fainting. Then the witch guessed only

22

cried the mighty



too well how matters stood,
F
66 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

So she arose and went to the damsel, and so filled
her foolish little head with her tales that she persuaded
her not to give her brother rest day and night till he had
brought her the Queen of the Peris herself. “That'll
make him break his hatchet anyhow!” thought the
old woman. But the damsel rejoiced beforehand at
the thought of having the Queen of the Peris also,
and in her impatience could scarce wait for her
brother to come home.

When her brother came home she shed as many
tears as if she were a cloud dripping rain. In vain
her brother tried to prove to her how distant and how
dangerous was the way she would fain have him go.
“JT want the Queen of the Peris, and have her I[
“must,” cried the damsel. :

So again the youth set out on his journey, went
straight to the Mother of Devils, pressed her hand,
kissed her lips, pressed her lips and kissed her
hand, and said: ‘*Oh, my mother! help me in this
my sore need!” The Mother of Devils was amazed
at the valour of the man, and never ceased dissuad-
ing him from his purpose, for every human soul
that goes on such a quest must needs perish.—
“Die I may, little mother!” cried the youth, “but I
will not come back without her.”

So what could the Mother of Devils do but show
him the way? “Go the same road,” said she, “that
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 67

led thee to the branch, and then go on to where
thou didst find the mirror. Thou wilt come at last to
a large desert, and beyond the desert thou wilt see two
roads, but look neither to the right hand nor yet to
the left, but go right on through the sooty darkness
betwixt them. When now it begins to grow a little
lighter, thou wilt see a large cypress wood, and in this
cypress wood a large tomb. In this: tomb, turned to
stone, are all those who ever desired the Queen of
the Peris. Stop not there, but go right on to the
palace of the Queen of the Peris and call out her
name with the full strength of thy lungs. What will
happen to thee after that not even I can tell thee.”
Next day the youth set out on his journey. He
prayed by the wayside well, opened all the gates he
came to, and, looking neither to the right hand nor
to the left, went on straight before him through the
sooty darkness. All at once it began to grow a little
lighter, and a large cypress wood appeared right in
front of him. The leaves of the trees were of a burn-
ing green, and their drooping crowns hid snow-white
tombs. Nay, but they were not tombs, but stones
as big as men. Nay, but they were not stones at all,
but men who had turned, who had stiffened, into
stone. There was neither man, nor spirit, nor noise,
nor breath of wind, and the youth froze with horror
to his very marrow, Nevertheless he plucked up his
68 TURKISH FAIRY TALES,

courage and went on his way. He looked straight
before him all the time, and his eyes were almost
blinded by a dazzling light. Was it the sun he saw ?
No, it was the palace of the Queen of the Peris!
Then he rallied all the strength that was left in him
and shouted the name of the Queen of the Peris with
all his might, and the words had not yet died away
upon his lips when his whole body up to his knee-cap
stiffened into stone. Again he shouted with all his
might, and he turned to stone up to his navel. Then
he shouted for the last time with all his might, and
stiffened up to his throat first and then up to his head,
till he became a tombstone like the rest.

But now the Queen of the Peris came into her
garden, and she had silver sandals on her feet and a
golden saucer in her hand, and she drew water from a
diamond fountain, and when she watered the stone
youth, life and motion came back to him. -

“Well, thou youth thou,” said the Queen of the
Peris, “’tis not enough, then, that thou hast taken
away my Peri branch and my magic mirror, but thou
must needs, forsooth, venture hither a third time!
Thou shalt share the fate of thy innocent buried
mother, stone thou shalt become and stone shalt
thou remain. What brought thee hither ?—speak !”

“T came for thee,” replied the youth very courage-

ously.
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 69

- Well, as thou hast loved me so exceedingly, no
harm shall befall thee, and we will go away together.”

Then the youth begged her to have compassion on
all the men she had turned to stone and give them
back their lives again. So the Peri returned to her
palace, packed up her baggage, which was small in
weight but priceless in value, filled the little golden
saucer with water, and sprinkled therewith all the
stones and the whole multitude of the stones became
men. They all took horse, and as they quitted the
Peri realm, the earth trembled beneath them and the
sky was shaken as if the seven worlds and the seven
heavens were mingled together, so that the youth
would have died of fright if the Queen of the Peris
had not been by his side. Never once did they look
behind them, but galloped on and on till they came to
the house of the youth’s sister, and such was their joy
and gladness at seeing each other again that place
could scarce be found for the Queen of the Peris.
But now the youth was in no great hurry to go hunt-
ing as before, for he had changed hearts with the
lovely Queen of the Peris, and she was his and he was
hers. |

Now when the Queen of the Peris had heard the
history of the children and their parents, and the fate
of their innocent mother, she said one morning to the
youth: “Go a-hunting in the forest, and thou wilt
70 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

meet the Padishah. The first thing he will do will be
to invite thee to the palace, but beware lest thou
accept his invitation.” And so indeed it turned out.
Searcely had he taken a turn in the wood than the
Padishah stood before him, and, one word leading to
another, he invited the youth to his palace, but the
youth would not go.

Karly next morning the Peri awoke the children,
clapped her hands together and called her Lala,! and
immediately a huge negro sprang up before them.
So big was he that one of his lips touched the sky
while the other swept the earth. “What dost thou
command me, my Sultana?” cried the Lala.

“Fetch me hither my father’s steed!” commanded
the Peri.

The negro vanished like a hurricane, and, a moment
afterwards, the steed stood before them, and the like
of it was not to be found in the wide world.

The youth leaped upon the horse, and the splendid
suite of the Padishah was already waiting for him at
the roadside.

But—O Allah, forgive me !—I have forgotten the
best of the story. The Peri charged the youth as he
quitted her to take heed, while he was in the palace
of the Padishah, to the neighing of his horse. At the
first neighing he was to hasten back.

1 Counsellor,
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 71

So the youth went to meet the Padishah on his
diamond-bridled charger, and behind him came a gay
and gallant retinue. He saluted the people on the
right hand and on the left all the way to the palace,
and there they welcomed him with a pomp the like of
which was never known before. They ate and drank
and made merry till the Padishah could scarce contain
himself for joy, but then the steed neighed, the youth
arose, and all their entreaties to him to stay could not
turn him from his set purpose. He mounted his
horse, invited the Padishah to be his guest on the
following day, and returned home to the Peri and his
own sister.

Meanwhile the Peri dug up the mother of the
children, and so put her to rights again by her Peri
arts that she became just as she was in the days of
her first youth. But she spake not a word about the
mother to the children, nor a word about the children
to the mother. On the morning of the reception of
guests she rose up early and commanded that on the
spot where the little hut stood a palace should rise,
the like of which eye hath never seen nor ear heard
of, and there were as many precious stones heaped up
there as were to be found in the whole kingdom.
And then the garden that surrounded that palace !
There. were multitudes of flowers, each one lovelier
than the other, and on every flower there was a
72 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

singing bird, and every bird had feathers aglow with
light, so that one could only look at it all open-
mouthed and cry: “Oh! oh!” And the palace
itself was full of domestics, there were black harem
slaves, and white captive youths, and dancers and’
singers, and players of stringed instruments—more
than thou canst count, count thou never so much, and
words cannot tell of the splendour of the retinue
which went forth to greet the Padishah as a guest.

“These children are not of mortal birth!” thought
the Padishah to himself, when he beheld all these
marvels, “or if they are of mortal birth a Peri must
have had a hand in the matter.”

They led the Padishah into the most splendid room
of the palace, they brought him coffee and sherbet,
and then the music spoke to him, and the singing
birds—oh! a man could have listened to them for
ever and ever! Then rich meats on rare and precious
dishes were set before him, and then the dancers and
the jugglers diverted him till the evening.

At eventide the servants came and bowed before
the Padishah and said: “My lord! peace be with
thee! They await thee in the harem!” So he
entered the harem, and there he saw before him the
golden-haired youth, with a beautiful half-moon shin-
ing on his forehead, and his bride, the Peri-Queen, and
his own consort, the Sultana, who had been buried in
THE GOLDEN-HAIRED CHILDREN 73
the earth, and by her side a golden-haired maiden
with a star sparkling on her forehead. There stood
the Padishah as if turned to stone, but his consort ran
up to him and kissed the edge of his garment, and the
Peri-Queen began to tell him the whole of her life
and how everything had happened.

The Padishah was nigh to dying in the fulness of
his joy. He could scarce believe his eyes, but. he
pressed his consort to his breast and embraced the
two beauteous children, and the Queen of the Peris
likewise. He forgave the sisters of the Sultana their
offences, but the old witch was mercilessly destroyed
by lingering tortures. But he and his consort and
her son and the Queen of the Peris, and his daughter,
and his daughter’s bridegroom sat down to a great
banquet and made merry. Forty days and forty
nights they feasted, and the blessing of Allah was
upon them.
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH

THERE was once upon a time a Padishah who had
three daughters. One day the old father made him
ready for a journey, and calling to him his three
daughters straightly charged them to feed and water
his favourite horse, even though they neglected every-
thing else. He loved the horse so much that he
would not suffer any stranger to come near it.

So the Padishah went on his way, but when the
eldest daughter brought the fodder into the stable the
horse would not let her come near him. ‘Then the
middling daughter brought the forage, and he treated
her likewise. Last of all the youngest daughter
brought the forage, and when the horse saw her he
never budged an inch, but let her feed him and then
return to her sisters. The two elder sisters were
content that the youngest should take care of the
horse, so they troubled themselves about it no more.

The Padishah came home, and the first thing he
74
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 75

asked was whether they had provided the horse with
everything. ‘He wouldn’t let us come near him,”
said the two elder sisters ; “it was our youngest sister
here who took care of him.”

No sooner had the Padishah heard this than he
gave his youngest daughter to the horse to wife, but
his two other daughters he gave to the sons of his
Chief Mufti and his Grand Vizier, and they celebrated
the three marriages at a great banquet, which lasted
forty days. Then the youngest daughter turned into
the stable, but the two eldest dwelt in a splendid
palace. In the daytime the youngest sister had only
a horse for a husband and a stable for a dwelling ;
but in the night-time the stable became a garden of
roses, the horse-husband a handsome hero, and they
lived in a world of their own. Nobody knew of it
but they two. They passed the day together as
best they could, but eventide was the time of their
impatient desires.

One day the Padishah held a tournament in the
palace. Many gallant warriors entered the lists, but
none strove so valiantly as the husbands of the
Sultan’s elder daughters.

“Only look now!” said the two elder daughters
to their sister who dwelt in the stable, “only look
now! how our husbands overthrow all the other
warriors with their lances; our two lords are not
76 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

so much lords as lions! Where is this horse-husband
of thine, prythee ?”

On hearing this from his wife, the horse-husband
shivered all over, turned into a man, threw himself
on horseback, told his wife not to betray him on any
account, and in an instant appeared within the lists.
He overthrew every one with his lance, unhorsed his
two brothers-in-law, and re-appeared in the stable
again as if he had never left it.

The next day, when the sports began again, the
two elder sisters mocked as before, but then the un-
known hero appeared again, conquered and vanished.
On the third day the horse-husband said to his wife :
“Tf ever I should come to grief or thou shouldst need
my help, take these three wisps of hair, burn them,
and it will help thee wherever thou art.” With that
he hastened to the games again and triumphed over
his brothers-in-law. Every one was amazed at his
skill, the two elder sisters likewise, and again they
said to their younger sister: ‘“ Look how these heroes
excel in prowess! They are very different to thy
dirty horse-husband !” |

The girl could not endure standing there with
nothing to say for herself, so she told her sisters that
the handsome hero was no other than her horse-
husband—and no sooner had she pointed at him than
he vanished from before them as if he had never been.
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 77

Then only did she call to mind her lord’s command to
her not to betray her secret, and away she hurried off
to the stable. But ’twas all in vain, neither horse
nor man came to her, and at midnight there was
neither rose nor rose-garden.

“Alas!” wept the girl, “I have betrayed my lord,
I have broken my word, what a crime is mine!” She
never closed an eye all that night, but wept till morn-
ing. When the red dawn appeared she went to her
father the Padishah, complained to him that she had
lost her horse-husband, and begged that she might go
to the ends of the earth to seek him. In vain her
father tried to keep her back, in vain he pointed out
to her that her husband was now most probably
among devils, and she would never be able to find him
—turn her from her resolution he could not. What
could he do but let her go on her way ?

With a great desire the damsel set out on her
quest, she went on and on till her tender body was
all aweary, and at last she sank down exhausted at
the foot of a great mountain. Then she called to mind
the three hairs, and she took out one and set fire
to it—and lo! her lord and master was in her arms
again, and they could not speak for joy.

“Did I not bid thee tell none of my secret ?” cried
the youth sorrowfully ; “and now if my hag of a
mother see thee she will instantly tear thee to pieces,
78 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

This mountain is our dwelling-place. She will be
here immediately, and woe to thee if she see thee!”

The poor Sultan’s daughter was terribly frightened,
and wept worse than ever at the thought of losing
her lord again, after all her trouble in finding him.
The heart of the devil’s son was touched at her
sorrow: he struck her once, changed her into an apple,
and put her on the shelf. The hag flew down from
the mountain with a terrible racket, and screeched
out that she smelt the smell of a man, and her mouth
watered for the. taste of human flesh. In vain her
son denied that there was any human flesh there,
she would not believe him one bit.

“Tf thou wilt swear by the egg not to be offended,
T’ll show thee what I’ve hidden,” said her son. The
hag swore, and her son gave the applea tap, and there
before them stood the beautiful damsel. ‘“ Behold my
wife!” said he to his mother. The old mother said
never a word, what was done could not be undone.
“Tl give the bride something to do all the same,”
thought she.

They lived a couple of days together in peace and
quiet, but the hag was only waiting for her son to
leave the house. At last one day the youth had work
to do elsewhere, and scarcely had he put his foot out
of doors, when the hag said to the damsel : ‘‘ Come,
sweep and sweep not ! ” and with that she went out,
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 79

and said she should not be back till evening. The
girl thought to herself again and again: “ What am I
to do now? What did she mean by ‘sweep and
sweep not’?” Then she thought of the hairs, and
she took out and burned the second hair also. Im-
mediately her lord stood before her and asked her
what was the matter, and the girl told him of his
mother’s command : “Sweep and sweep not!” Then
her lord explained to her that she was to sweep out
the chamber, but not to sweep the ante-chamber.

The girl did as she was told, and when the hag
came home in the evening she asked the girl whether
she had accomplished her task. ‘ Yes, little mother,”
replied the bride, “I have swept and I have not
swept.”—“Thou daughter of a dog,” cried the old
witch, “ not thine own wit but my son’s mouth hath
told thee this thing.”

The next morning when the hag got up she gave
the damsel vases, and told her to fill them with tears.
The moment the hag had gone the damsel placed the
three vases before her, and wept and wept, but what
could her few teardrops do to fill them? Then she
took out and burned the third hair.

Again her lord appeared before her, and explained
to her that she must fill the three vases with water,
and then put a pinch of salt in each vase. The girl
did so, and when the hag came home in the evening
80 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

and demanded an account of her work, the girl
showed her the three vases full of tears. . ‘Thou
daughter of a dog!” chided the old woman again,
“that is not thy work; but Pll do for thee yet, and
for my son too.”

The next day she devised some other task for
her to do; but her son guessed that his mother
would vex the wench, so he hastened home to his
bride. There the poor thing was worrying herself
about it all alone, for the third hair was now burnt,
and she did not know how to set about doing the
task laid upon her. ‘‘ Well, there is now nothing
for it but to run away,’ said her lord, “ for she won't
rest now till she hath done thee a mischief.” And
with that he took his wife, and out into the wide
world they went.

In the evening the hag came home, and saw
neither her son nor his bride. “They have flown,
the dogs!” cried the hag, with a threatening voice,
and she called to her sister, who was also a witch,
to make ready and go in pursuit of her son and his
bride. So the witch jumped into a pitcher, snatched
up a serpent for a whip, and went after them.

The demon-lover saw his aunt coming, and in an
instant changed the girl into a bathing-house, and
himself into a bath-man sitting down at the gate.
The witch leaped from the pitcher, went to the bath-
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 81

keeper, and asked him if he had not seen a young boy
and girl pass by that way.

“T have only just warmed up my bath,” said the
youth, “there’s nobody inside it; if thou dost not
believe me, thou canst go and look for thyself.” The
witch thought : “Tis impossible to get a sensible word
out of a fellow of this sort,” so she jumped into ‘her
pitcher, flew back, and told her sister that she couldn’t
find them. The other hag asked her whether she had
exchanged words with any one on the road. “ Yes,”
replied the younger sister, “there was a bath-house
by the roadside, and I asked the owner of it about
them ; but he was either a fool or deaf, so I took no
notice of him.”

“°Tis thou who wert the fool,” snarled her elder
sister. “ Didst thou not recognize in him my son,
and in the bath-house my daughter-in-law?” Then
she called her second sister, and sent her after the
fugitives.

The devil’s son saw his second aunt flying along
in her pitcher. Then he gave his wife a tap and
turned her into a spring, but he himself sat down
beside it, and began to draw water out of it with
a pitcher. The witch went up to him, and asked
him whether he had seen a girl and a boy pass by
that way.

“There’s drinkable water in this spring,” replied

G
82 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

he, with a vacant stare, “I am always drawing
it.” The witch thought she had to do with a fool,
turned back, and told her sister that she had not
met with them. Her sister asked her if she had
not come across any one by the way. “ Yes, indeed,”
replied she, “a half-witted fellow was drawing water
from a spring, but I couldn't get a single sensible
word out of him.”

“That half-witted fellow was my son, the spring
was his wife, and a pretty wiseacre thou art,”
screeched her sister. ‘I shall have to go myself,
I see,” and with that she jumped into her pitcher,
snatched up a serpent to serve her as a whip, and off
she went.

Meanwhile the youth looked back again, and saw
his mother coming after them. He gave the girl
a tap and changed her into a tree, but he himself
turned into a serpent, and coiled himself round the
tree. The witch recognized them, and drew near to
the tree to break it to pieces; but when she saw the
serpent coiled round it, she was afraid to kill her own
son along with it, so she said to her son: “ Son, son!
show me, at least, the girl’s little finger, and then
I'll leave you both in peace.” The son saw that he
could not free himself from her any other way,
and that she must have at least a little morsel of the
damsel to nibble at. So he showed her one of the
THE HORSE-DEVIL AND THE WITCH 83
girl’s little fingers, and the old hag wrenched it off,
and returned to her domains with it. Then the youth
gave the girl a tap and himself another tap, put on
human shape again, and away they went to the girl’s
father, the Padishah. The youth, since his talisman
had been destroyed, remained a mortal man, but the
diabolical part of him stayed at home with his witch-
mother and her kindred. The Padishah rejoiced
greatly in his children, gave them a wedding-banquet
with a wave of his finger, and they inherited the
realm after his death.
THE CINDER-YOUTH

Once upon a time that was no time, in the days
when the servants of Allah were many and the
misery of man was great, there lived a poor woman
who had three sons and one daughter. The youngest
son was half-witted, and used to roll about all day
in the warm ashes.

One day the two elder brothers went out to plough,
and said to their mother: “Boil us something, and
send our sister out with it into the field.”—Now the
three-faced devil had pitched his tent close to this
field, and in order that the girl might not come near
them he determined to persuade her to go all round
about instead of straight to them.

The mother cooked the dinner and the girl went
into the field with it, but the devil contrived to
make her lose her road, so that she wandered further
and further away from the place where she wanted

to go. At last, when her poor head was quite con-
84


THE CINDER-YOUTH 85

fused, the devil’s wife appeared before her and asked
the terrified girl what she meant by trespassing there.
Then she talked her over and persuaded her to come
home with her, that she might hide her from the
vengeance of the devil, her husband.

But the three-faced devil had got home before
them, and when they arrived the old woman told the
girl to make haste and get something ready to eat
while her maid-servant stirred up the fire. But
scarcely had she begun to get the dish ready than
the devil crept stealthily up behind her, opened his
mouth wide, and swallowed the girl whole, clothes
and all.

Meanwhile her brothers were waiting in the field
for their dinner, but neither the damsel nor the
victuals appeared. Afternoon came and went and
evening too, and then the lads went home, and when
they heard from their mother that their sister had
gone to seek them early in the morning they sus-
pected what had happened—their little sister must
have fallen into the hands of the devil. The two
elder brothers did not think twice about it, but the
elder of them set off at.once to seek his sister.

He went on and on, puffing at his chibook,
sniffing the perfume of flowers and drinking coffee,
till he came to an oven by the wayside. By the
oven sat an old man, who asked the youth on
86 - TURKISH FAIRY TALES

what errand he was bent. The youth told him of
his sister’s case, and said he was going in search
of the three-faced devil, and would not be content
till he had killed him.—‘ Thou wilt never be able to
slay the devil,” said the man, “till thou hast eaten
of bread that has been baked in this oven.”—The
youth thought this no very difficult matter, took the
loaves out of the oven, but scarcely had he bitten
a piece out of one of them than the oven, the man,
and the loaves all disappeared before his eyes, and the
bit he had taken swelled within him so that he nearly
burst.

The youth hadn’t gone two steps further on when
he saw on the highway a large cauldron, and the
cauldron was full of wine. A man was sitting in
front of the cauldron, and he asked him the way, and
told him the tale of the devil. ‘Thou wilt never be
able to cope with the devil,” said the man, “ if thou
dost not drink of this wine.” The youth drank, but:
“Woe betide my stomach, woe betide my bowels!”
for so plagued was he that he could not have stood
upright if he had not seen two bridges before him.
One of these bridges was of wood and the other was
of iron, and beyond the two bridges were two apple-
trees, and one bore unripe bitter apples and the other
sweet ripe ones.

The three-faced devil was waiting on the road to
THE CINDER-YOUTH 87

see which bridge he would choose, the wooden or the
iron one, and which apples he would eat, the sour or
the sweet ones. The youth went along the iron
bridge, lest the wooden one might break down, and
plucked the sweet apples, because the green ones were
bitter. That was just what the devil wanted him to
do, and-he at once sent his mother to meet the youth
and entice him into his house as he had done hig
sister, and it was not long before he also found his’
way into the devil’s belly.

And next in order, the middling brother, not
wishing to be behind-hand, also went in search of
his kinsmen. He also could not eat of the bread, his
inside also was plagued by the wine, he went across
the iron bridge and ate of the sweet apples, and so he
also found his way into the devil’s belly. Only the
youngest brother who lay among the ashes remained.
His mother besought him not to forsake her in her
old age. If the others had gone he at least could
remain and comfort her, she said. But the youth
would not listen. “TI will not rest,” said Cinderer,
‘till I have found the three lost ones, my two brothers
and my sister, and slain the devil.” Then he rose
from his chimney corner, and no sooner had he
shaken the ashes from off him than such a tempest
arose that all the labourers at work in the fields left
their ploughs where they stood, and ran off as far as
88 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

their eyes could see. Then the youngest son gathered
together the ploughshares and bade a blacksmith make
a lance of them, but a lance of such a kind as would
fly into the air and come back again to the hand that
hurled it without breaking its iron point. The smith
made the lance, and the youth hurled it. Up into the
air flew the lance, but when it came down again on to
the tip of his little finger it broke to pieces. Then the
youth shook himself still more violently in the ashes,
and again the labourers in the field fled away before
the terrible tempest which immediately arose, and the
youth gathered together a still greater multitude of
ploughshares and took them to the smith. The smith
made a second lance, and that also flew up into the air
and broke to pieces when it came down again. Then
the youth shook himself in the ashes a third time, and
such a hurricane arose that there was scarce a plough-
share in the whole country-side that was not carried
away. It was only with great difficulty that the
smith could make the third lance, but when that
came down on the youth’s finger it did not break in
pieces like the others. ‘This will do pretty well,”
said the youth, and catching up the lance he went
forth into the wide world.

He went on and on and on till he also came to the
oven and the cauldron. The men who guarded the
oven and the cauldron stopped him and asked him his
THE CINDER-YOUTH 89

business, and on finding out that he was going to kill
the devil, they told the youth that he must first eat
the bread of the oven and then drink the wine in the
cauldron if he could. The son of the cinders wished
for nothing better. He ate the loaves that were baked
in the oven, drank all the wine, and further on he saw
the wooden bridge and the iron bridge, and beyond
the bridges the apple-trees.

The devil had observed the youth from afar, and
his courage began to ooze out of him when he saw
the deeds of the son of the ashes. “ Any fool can go
across the iron bridge,” thought the youth, “I'll go
across the wooden one,” and ag it was no very great
feat to eat the sweet apples he ate the sour ones.
—“There will be no joking with this one,” said the
devil, “I see I must get ready my lance and measure
my strength with him.”

The son of the ashes saw the devil from afar, and
full of the knowledge of his own valour went straight
up to him.

“Tf thou doest not homage to me, I’ll swallow
thee straight off,” cried the devil.

“ And if thou doest not homage to me, I'll knock
thee to pieces with my lance,” replied the youth.

“Oh ho! if we’re so brave as all that,” cried the
three-faced monster, “let us out with our lances
without losing any more time,”
90 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

So the devil out with his lance; whirled it round
his head, and aimed it with all his might at the youth,
who gave but one little twist with his finger, and
erick-crack ! the devil’s lance broke all to bits. ‘‘ Now
it's my turn,” cried the son of the cinders; and he
hurled his lance at the devil with such force that the
devil’s first soul flew out of his nose.—‘ At it again
once more, if thou art a man,” yelled the devil, with
a great effort. “Not I,” cried the youth, “for my
mother only bore me once,” whereupon the devil
breathed forth his last soul also. ‘Then the youth
went on to seek the devil’s wife. Her also he chased
down the road after her husband, and when he had
cut them both in two, lo and behold! all three of his
kinsfolk stood before him, so he turned back home
and took them with him. ~Now his brothers and
sister had grown very thirsty in the devil’s belly, and
when they saw a large well by the wayside, they
asked their brother Cinder-son to draw them a little
water. Then the youths took off their girdles, tied
them together, and let down the biggest brother, but
he had scarcely descended more than half-way down
when he began to shriek unmercifully: ‘Oh, oh,
draw me up, I have had enough,” so that they had
to pull him up and let the second brother try. And
with him it fared the same way. ‘“ Now ’tis my
turn,” cried Cinder-son, “but mind you do not pull me


The Cinder-Youth and the Three Damsels,—p. 91.
THE CINDER-YOUTH 91

up, however loudly I holloa.” So they let down the
youngest brother, and he too began to holloa and
bawl, but they paid no heed to it, and let him down
till he stood on the dry bottom of the well. A door
stood before him, he opened it, and there were three
lovely damsels sitting in a room together, and each
of them shone like the moon when she is only
fourteen days old. The three damsels were amazed
at the sight of the youth. How durst he come into
the devil’s cavern ? they asked—and they begged and
besought him to escape as he valued dear life. But
the youth would not budge at any price, till he had
got the better of this devil also. The end of the
matter was that he slew the devil and released the
three damsels, who were Sultan’s daughters, and had
been stolen from their fathers and kept here for the
last seven years. The two elder princesses he intended
for his two brothers, but the youngest, who was also
the loveliest, he chose for himself, and filling the
pitcher with water he brought the damsels to the
bottom of the well, right below the mouth of it.

First of all he let them draw up the eldest princess
for his eldest brother, then he made them pull up the
middling princess for his middling brother, and then
it came to the youngest damsel’s turn. But she
desired that the youth should be drawn up at all
hazards and herself afterwards, “Thy brethren,”
92 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

she explained, “will be wroth with thee for keeping
the loveliest damsel for thyself, and will not draw
thee out of the well for sheer jealousy.”

“Tl find my way out even then,” answered the
youth, and though she begged and besought him till
there was no more soul in her, he would not listen to
her. Then the damsel drew from her breast a casket
and said to the youth: “If any mischief befall thee,
open this casket. Inside it is a piece of flint, and if
thou strike it once a negro efrit will appear before
thee and fulfil all thy desires. If thy brethren leave
thee in the well, go to the palace of the devil and
stand by the well. Two rams come there every day,
a black one and a white one; if thou cling fast to the
white one, thou wilt come to the surface of the earth,
but if thou cling on to the black one thou wilt sink
down into the seventh world.”

Then he let them draw up the youngest damsel,
and no sooner did his brethren sec their brother’s
bride and perceive that she was the loveliest of all,
than jealousy overtook them, and in their wrath they
left him in the well and went home with the damsels.

So what else could the poor youth at the bottom
of the well do than go back to the devil’s palace,
stand by the well, and wait for the two rams? Not
very long afterwards a white ram came bounding
along before him, and after that a black ram, and the
THE CINDER-YOUTH 93
youth, instead of catching hold of the white ram,
seized the black one and immediately perceived that
he was at the bottom of the seventh world. . . . He
went on and on, he went for a long time and he
went for a short time, he went by day and he went
by night, he went up hill and down dale till he could
do no more, and stopped short by a large tree to take
a little rest. But what was that he saw before him?
A large serpent was gliding up the trunk of the tree
and would have devoured all the young birds on the
tree if Cinder-son had let him. But the youth quickly
drew forth his lance and cut the serpent in two with
a single blow. ‘Then, like one who has done his work
well, he lay down at the foot of the tree, and inasmuch
as he was tired and it was warm he fell asleep at once.

Now while he slept the emerald Anka, who is the
mother of the birds and the Padishah of the Peris,
passed by that way, and when she saw the sleeping
youth she fancied him to be her enemy, who was wont
to destroy her children year by year. She was about
to cut him to pieces, when the birds whispered to her
not to hurt the youth, because he had killed their
enemy the serpent. It was only then that the Anka
perceived the two halves of the serpent. And now,
lest anything should harm the sleeping youth, she
hopped round and round him, and touched him softly
and sheltered him with both her wings lest the sun
Oy TURKISH FAIRY TALES

should scorch him, and when he awoke from hig sleep
the wing of the bird was spread over him like a tent.
And now the Anka approached him and said she
would fain reward him for his good deed, and he might
make a request of her. Then replied the youth: “I
would fain get to the surface of the earth again.”

“ Be it so,” said the emerald bird, “ but first thou
must get forty tons of ox-flesh and forty pitchers of
water and sit on my back with them, so that when I
say ‘Gik!’ thou mayest give me to eat, and when I
say ‘Gak!’ thou mayest give me to drink.”

Then the youth bethought him of his casket, took
the flint-stone out of it, and struck it once, and imme-
diately a black efrit with a mouth as big as the world
stood before him and said: “ What dost thou command,
my Sultan? ”—* Forty tons of ox-flesh, and forty
pitchers of water,” said the youth. In a short time
the efrit brought the flesh and the water, and the
youth packed it all up together and mounted on the
wing of the bird. Off they went, and whenever the
Anka cried “Gik!” he gave her flesh, and whenever
she cried “Gak!” he gave her water. They flew
from one layer of worlds to the next, till in a short
time they got above the surface of the earth again,
and he dismounted from the bird’s back and said to
her: “ Wait here a while, and in a short time I shall

be back.”
THE *CINDER-YOUTH 95

Then the youth took out his coffer, struck the
flint-stone, and bade the black bounding efrit get him
tidings of the three sisters. In a short time the efrit
re-appeared with the three damsels, who were pre-
paring a banquet for the brothers. He made them
all sit on the bird’s back, took with him again forty
tons of ox-flesh and forty pitchers of water, and away
they all went to the land of the three damsels.
Every time the Anka said “Gik!” he gave her flesh
to eat, and every time she said “‘Gak!” he gave her
water to drink. But as the youth now had three
with him besides himself, it came to pass that the flesh
ran short, so that when the Anka said “ Gik!” once
more he had nothing to give her. Then the youth
drew his knife, cut a piece of flesh out of his thigh,
and stuffed it into the bird’s mouth. The Anka
perceived that it was human flesh and did not eat it,
but kept it in her mouth, and when they had reached
the realm of the three damsels, the bird told him that
he might now go in peace.

But the poor youth could not move a step because
of the smart in his leg. “Thou go on first,” he said
to the bird, ‘‘ but I will first rest me here a while.”

“Nay, but thou art a droll rogue,” quoth the bird,
and with that it spit out of its mouth the piece of

1 The same incident occurs in the Cossack fairy-tale of the
Bird Zhar and the Russian fairy-tale of the Bird Mogol,
96 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

human flesh and put it back in its proper place just
as if it had never been cut out.

The whole city was amazed at the sight of the
return of the Sultan’s daughters. The old Padishah
could scarce believe his own eyes. He looked and
looked and then he embraced the first princess; he
looked and looked and then he kissed the second
princess, and when they had told him the story he
gave his whole kingdom and his three daughters to
Cinder-son. Then the youth sent for his mother and
his sister, and they all sat down to the banquet
together. Moreover he found his sister a husband
who was the son of the Vizier, and for forty days
and forty nights they were full of joyfulness.
THE PIECE OF LIVER

ONCE upon a time there was an old woman who
felt she would very much like to have a piece of
liver, so she gave a girl two or three pence, and bade
her buy the liver in the market-place, wash it clean
in the pond, and then bring it home. So the girl
went to the market-place, bought the liver, and took
it to the pond to wash it; and while she was wash-
ing it a stork popped down, snatched the liver out
of her hand, and flew away with it. Then the girl
cried: “Stork, stork! give me back my liver, that I
may take it to my mammy, lest my mammy beat
me!”—“If thou wilt fetch me a barley-ear instead -
of it, Pll give thee back thy liver,” said the stork.
So the girl went to the straw-stalk, and said: “ Straw-
stalk, straw-stalk! give me a barley-ear, that I may
give the barley-ear to the stork, that the stork may
give me back my liver, that I may give the liver

to my mammy.”—“If thou wilt pray Allah for
97 H
98 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

rain, thou shalt have a little barley-ear,’ said the
straw-stalk. But while she was beginning her prayer,
saying: ‘Oh, Allah, give me rain, that I may give
the rain to the straw-stalk, that the straw-stalk may
give me a barley-ear, that I may give the barley-ear
to the stork, that the stork may give me back my
liver, that I may give the liver to my mammy,”
while she was praying thus, up came a man to her
and said that without a censer no prayers could ever
get to heaven, so she must go to the bazaar-keeper
for a censer.

So she went to the bazaar- keeper, and cried:
“ Bazaar-keeper, bazaar-keeper! give me a censer,
that I may burn incense before Allah, that Allah
may give me rain, that I may give rain to the straw-
stalk, that the straw-stalk may give me a barley-ear,
that I may give the barley-ear to the stork, that the
stork may give me back my liver, that I may give
my liver to my mammy !”

“Tl give it thee,” said the bazaar-keeper, “ if thou
wilt bring me a boot from the cobbler.”

So the girl went to the cobbler, and said to him:
“Cobbler, cobbler! give me a boot, that I may give
the boot to the bazaar-keeper, that the bazaar-keeper
may give me a censer, that | may burn incense before
Allah, that Allah may give me rain, that I may give
rain to the straw-stalk, that the straw-stalk may give
THE PIECE OF LIVER 99

me a barley-ear, that 1 may give the barley-ear to
the stork, that the stork may give me back the liver,
that I may give the liver to my mammy.”

But the cobbler said: “If thou fetch me a hide
thou shalt have a boot for it.”

So the girl went to the tanner, and said: ‘ Tanner,
tanner! give me a hide, that I may give the hide to
the cobbler, that the cobbler may give me a boot,
that. I may give the boot to the bazaar-keeper, that
the bazaar-keeper may give me a censer, that I may
burn incense before Allah, that Allah may give me
rain, that I may give the rain to the straw-stalk, that
the straw-stalk may give me a barley-ear, that I may
give the barley-ear to the stork, that the stork may
give me back my liver, that I may give the liver to
my mammy.”

“Tf thou gettest a hide from the ox, thou wilt get
a hide fit for making a boot,” said the tanner.

So the girl went to the ox, and said to it: “Ox, ox!
give me a hide, that I may give the hide to the
tanner, that the tanner may give me boot-leather,
that I may give the boot-leather to the cobbler, that
the cobbler may give me a boot, that I may give the
boot to the bazaar-keeper, that the bazaar-keeper may
give me a censer, that I may burn incense before Allah,
that Allah may give me rain, that I may give the
rain to the straw-stalk, that the straw-stalk may give
100 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

me a barley-ear, that I may give the barley-ear to
the stork, that the stork may give me back my liver,
that I may give the liver to my mammy.”

The ox said: “If thou get me straw I'll give thee a
hide for it!” .

So the girl went to the farmer, and said to him:
“Farmer, farmer! give me straw, that I may give
the straw to the ox, that the ox may give me a hide,
that I may give the hide to the tanner, that the
tanner may give me shoe-leather, that I may give the
shoe-leather to the cobbler, that the cobbler may give
me a shoe, that I may give the shoe to the bazaar-
keeper, that the bazaar-keeper may give me a censer,
that I may burn incense before Allah, that Allah may
give me rain, that I may give rain to the straw-stalk,
that the straw-stalk may give me a barley-ear, that I
may give the barley-ear to the stork, that the stork
may give me back my liver, that I may give the liver
to my mammy.”

The farmer said to the girl: “Ill give thee the
straw if thou give me a kiss.”

“Well,” thought the girl to herself, “‘a kiss is but
a little matter if it free me from all this bother.” So
she went up to the farmer and kissed him, and the
farmer gave her straw for the kiss. She took the
straw to the ox, and the ox gave her a hide for the
straw. She took the hide to the tanner, and the
THE PIECE OF LIVER 101

tanner gave her shoe-leather. She took the shoe-
leather to the cobbler, and the cobbler gave her a
shoe for it. She took the shoe to the bazaar-keeper,
and the bazaar-keeper gave her a censer. She lit the
censer and cried: “Oh, Allah! give me rain, that I
may give the rain to the straw-stalk, that the straw-
stalk may give me a barley-ear, that I may give the
barley-ear to the stork, that the stork may give me
back my liver, that I may give the liver to my
mammy.” Then Allah gave her rain, and she gave
the rain to the straw-stalk, and the straw-stalk gave
her a barley-ear, and she gave the barley-ear to the
stork, and the stork gave her back her liver, and she
gave the liver to her mammy, and her mammy cooked
the liver and ate it.
THE MAGIC TURBAN, THE MAGIC WHIP,
AND THE MAGIC CARPET

ONcE upon a time that was no time there were
two brothers. Their father and mother had died
and divided all their property between them. The
elder brother opened a shop, but the younger brother,
who was but a feather-brain, idled about and did
nothing ; so that at last, what with eating and drink-
ing and gadding abroad, the day came when he had
no more money left. Then he went to his elder
brother and begged a copper or two of him, and
when that all was spent he came to him again, and
so he continued to live upon him.

At last the elder brother began to grow tired of
this waste, but seeing that he could not be quit of
his younger brother, he turned all his possessions
into sequins, and embarked on a ship in order to
go into another kingdom. The younger brother,

however, had got wind of it, and before the ship
102
THE MAGIC TURBAN 103

started he managed to creep on board and conceal
himself without any one observing him. The elder
brother suspected that if the younger one heard of
his departure he would be sure to follow after, so he
took good care not to show himself on deck. But
searcely had they unfurled the sails when the two
brothers came face to face, and the elder brother
found himself saddled with his younger brother
again.

The elder brother was not a little angry, but what
was the use of that !—for the ship did not stop till it
came to Egypt. There the elder brother said to the
younger brother: “ Thou stay here, and I will go and
get two mules that we may go on further.” The
youth sat down on the shore and waited for his
brother, and waited, but waited in vain. “I think
I had better look for him,” thought he, and up he
got and went after his elder brother.

He went on and on and on, he went a short dis-
tance and he went a long distance, six months was
he crossing a field; but once as he looked over his
shoulder, he saw that for all his walking he walked
no further than a barley-stalk reaches. Then he
strode still more, he strode still further, he strode for
half a year continuously ; he kept plucking violets as
he went along, and as he went striding, striding, his
feet struck upon a hill, and there he saw three youths
104 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

quarrelling with one another about something. He
soon made a fourth, and asked them what they were
tussling about.

“We are the children of one father,” said the
youngest of them, “and our father has just died and
left us, by way of inheritance, a turban, a whip, and
» a carpet. Whoever puts the turban on his head is
hidden from mortal eyes. Whoever extends himself
on the carpet and strikes it once with the whip can
fly far away, after the manner of birds; and we are
eternally quarrelling among ourselves as to whose
shall be the turban, whose the whip, and whose the
carpet.” .

‘All three of them must belong to one of us,”
cried they all. “They are mine, because I am the
biggest,” said one.—*“ They are mine by right, because
I am the middling-sized brother,” cried the second.—
“They are mine, because I am the smallest,” cried
the third. From words they speedily came to blows,
so that it was as much as the youth could do to keep
them apart.

“You can’t settle it like that,” said he: “I'll tell
you what we'll do. I’ll make an arrow from this
little piece of wood, and shoot it off You run after
it, and he who brings it to me here soonest shall have
all three things.” Away flew the dart, and after it
pelted the three brothers, helter-skelter; but the
THE MAGIC TURBAN 105

wise youth knew a trick worth two of that, for he
stuck the turban on his head, sat down on the
carpet, tapped it once with the whip, and cried:
“Hipp—hopp! let me be where my elder brother
is!” and when he awoke a large city lay before
him.

He had scarce taken more than a couple of steps
‘through the street, when the Padishah’s herald came
along, and proclaimed to the inhabitants of the town
that the Sultan’s daughter disappeared every night
from the palace. Whoever could find out what
became of her should receive the damsel and half
the kingdom. ‘Here am I!” cried the youth, “lead
me to the Padishah, and if I don’t find out, let them
take my head !”

So they brought the fool into the palace, and
in the evening there lay the Sultan’s daughter
watching, with her eyes half-closed, all that was
going on. The damsel was only waiting for him
to go to sleep, and presently she stuck a needle
into her heel, took the candle with her, lest the
youth should awake, and went out by a side door.

The youth had his turban on his head in a trice,
and no sooner had he popped out of the same door
‘than he saw a black efrit standing there with a
golden buckler on his head, and on the buckler sat
the Sultan’s daughter, and they were just on the point
106 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

of starting off. The lad was not such a fool as
to fancy that he could keep up with them by him-
self, so he also leaped on to the buckler, and very
nearly upset the pair of them in consequence. The
efrit was alarmed, and asked the damsel in Allah’s
name what she was about, as they were within a
hair’s-breadth of falling. ‘I never moved,” said the
damsel; “I am sitting on the buckler just as you
put me there.”

The black efrit had scarcely taken a couple of
steps, when he felt that the buckler was unusually
heavy. The youth’s turban naturally made him
invisible, so the efrit turned to the damsel and said:
“My Sultana, thou art so heavy to-day that I all
but break down beneath thee!”—‘ Darling Lala!”
replied the girl, “thou art very odd to-night, for
I am neither bigger nor smaller than I[ was
yesterday.”

Shaking his head the black efrit pursued his way,
and they went on and on till they came to a won-
drously beautiful garden, where the trees were made
of nothing but silver and diamonds. The youth broke
off a twig and put it in his pocket, when straight-
way the trees began to sigh and weep and say:
“There’s a child of man here who tortures us! there’s
a child of man here who tortures us!”

The efrit and the damsel looked at each other.
THE MAGIC TURBAN 107

“They sent a youth in to me to-day,” said the
damsel, “maybe his soul is pursuing us.”

Then they went on still further, till they came to
another garden, where every tree was sparkling with
gold and precious stones. Here too the youth broke
off a twig and shoved it into his pocket, and immedi-
ately the earth and the sky shook, and the rustling of
the trees said: ‘“There’s a child of man here torturing
us, there’s a child of man here torturing us,” so that
both he and the damsel very nearly fell from the
buckler in their fright. Not even the efrit knew
what to make of it.

After that they came to a bridge, and beyond the
bridge was a fairy palace, and there an army of slaves
awaited the damsel, and with their hands straight
down by their sides they bowed down before her till
their foreheads touched the ground. The Sultan’s
daughter dismounted from the efrit’s head, the youth
also leaped down; and when they brought the
princess a pair of slippers covered with diamonds
and precious stones, the youth snatched one of them
away, and put it in his pocket. The girl put on one
of the slippers, but being unable to find the other,
sent for another pair, when, presto! one of these also
disappeared. At this the damsel was so annoyed that
she walked on without slippers; but the youth, with
the turban on his head and the whip and the carpet
108 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

in his hand, followed her everywhere like her shadow.
So the damsel went on before, and he followed her
into a room, and there he saw the black Peri, one of
whose lips touched the sky, while the other lip swept
the ground. He angrily asked the damsel where she
had been all the time, and why she hadn’t come
sooner. The damsel told him about the youth who
had arrived the evening before, and about what had
happened on the way, but the Peri comforted her by
saying that the whole thing was fancy, and she was
not to trouble herself about it any more. After that
he sat down with the damsel, and ordered a slave
to bring them sherbet. A black slave brought the
noble drink in a lovely diamond cup, but just as he
was handing it to the Sultan’s daughter the invisible
youth gave the hand of the slave such a wrench that
he dropped and broke the cup to pieces. A. piece
of this also the youth concealed in his pocket.
“Now didn’t I say that something was wrong?”
cried the Sultan’s daughter. ‘I want no sherbet nor
anything else, and I think I had better get back again
as soon as possible.”—“Tush! tush!” said the efrit,
and he ordered other slaves to bring them something to
eat. So they brought a little table covered with many
dishes, and they began to eat together ; whereupon
the hungry youth also set to work, and the viands
disappeared as if three were eating instead of two.
THE MAGIC TURBAN 109

And the black Peri himself began to be a little
impatient, when not only the food but also the
forks and spoons began to disappear, and he said
to his sweetheart, the Sultan’s daughter, that per-
haps it would be as well if she did make haste
home again. First of all the black efrit wanted
to kiss the girl, but the youth slipped in between
them, pulled them asunder, and one of them fell to
the right and the other to the left. They both
turned pale, called the Lala with his buckler, the
damsel sat upon it, and away they went. But the
youth took down a sword from the wall, bared his
arm, and with one blow he chopped off the head of
the black Peri. No sooner had his head rolled from
his shoulders than the heavens roared so terribly,
and the earth groaned so horribly, and a voice cried
so mightily: “ Woe to us, a child of man hath slain
our king!” that the terrified youth knew not whether
he stood on his head or his heels.

He seized his carpet, sat upon it, gave it one
blow with his whip, and when the Sultan’s daughter
returned to the palace, there she found the youth
snoring in his room. “Oh, thou wretched bald-
pate,” cried the damsel viciously, “what a night
Tve had of it. So much the worse for thee!”
Then she took out a- needle and pricked the youth
in the heel, and because he never stirred she
110 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

fancied he was asleep, and lay down to lecD her-
self also.

Next morning when she awoke she bade the youth
prepare for death, as his last hour had come. “ Nay,”
replied he, “not to thee do I owe an account of
myself; let us both come before the Padishah.”

Then they led him before the father of the damsel,
but he said he would only tell them what had
happened in the night if they called all the people
of the town together. “In that way I shall find
my brother, perhaps,” thought he. So the town-crier
called all the people together, and the youth stood
on a high dais beside the Padishah and the Sultana,
and began to tell them the whole story, from the
efrit’s buckler to the Peri kine. “Believe him not,
my lord Padishah and father; he lies, my lord father
and Padishah!” stammered the damsel; whereupon
the youth drew from his pocket the diamond twig,
the twig of gems, the golden slipper, the precious
spoons and forks. Then he went on to tell them
of the death of the black Peri, when all at once he
caught sight of his elder brother, whom he had been
searching for so long. He had now neither eyes nor
ears for anything else, but leaping off the dais, he
forced his way on and on through the crowd to
his brother, till they both came together.

Then the elder brother told their story, while the
THE MAGIC TURBAN 111

younger brother begged the Padishah to give his
daughter and half the kingdom to his elder brother.
He was quite content, he said, with the magic turban
and the magic whip and carpet to the day of his
death, if only he might live close to his elder
brother.

But the Sultan’s daughter rejoiced most of all
when she heard of the death of the Peri king. He
had carried her off by force from her room one day,
and so enchanted her with his power that she had
been unable to set herself free. In her joy she
agreed that the youth’s elder brother should be her
lord; and they made a great banquet, at which they
feasted forty days and forty nights with one another.
I also was there, and I begged so much pilaw! from
the cook, and I got so much in the palm of my hand,
that I limp to this day.

1 Boiled vice, with flesh added and scalded butter.
THE WIND-DEMON

THERE was once upon a time an old Padishah who
had three sons and three daughters. One day the
old man fell ill, and though they called all the leeches
together to help him, his disease would not take a
turn for the better. ‘I already belong to Death,” he
thought, and calling to him his sons and daughters,
he thus addressed them: “If I die, he among you
shall be Padishah who watches three nights at my
tomb. As for my daughters, I give them to him who
first comes to woo them.” And with that he died,
and was buried as became a Padishah.

Now as the realm could have a Padishah in no
other way, the eldest son went to his father’s tomb
and sat there for half the night, said his prayers upon
his carpet, and awaited the dawn. But all at once a
horrible din arose in the midst of the darkness, and
so frightened was he that he snatched up his slippers

and never stopped till he got home. ‘The next night
¢ 112
THE WIND-DEMON 113

the middling son also went out to the tomb, and he
also sat there for half the night, but no sooner did he
hear the great din than he too caught up his slippers
and hurried off homewards. So it now came to the
turn of the third and youngest son.

The third son took his sword, stuck it in his girdle,
and went off to the tomb. Sure enough, when he
had sat there till midnight, he heard the horrible din,
and so horrible was it that the very earth trembled.
The youth pulled himself together, went straight
towards the spot from whence the noise came loudest,
and behold! right in front of him stood a huge
dragon. Drawing his sword, the youth fell upon the
dragon so furiously that at last the monster had
scarcely strength enough left to say: “If thou art a
man, put thy heel upon me and strike me with thy
sword but once more!”

“Not I,” cried the King’s son, “ my mother only
bore me into the world once,” whereupon the dragon
yielded up its filthy soul. The King’s son would
have cut off the beast’s ears and nose, but he could
not see very well in the dark, and began groping
about for them, when all at once he saw afar off a
little shining light. He went straight towards it,
and there in the midst of the brightness he saw an
old man. Two globes were in his hand, one black

and the other white; the black globe he was turning
I
114 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

round and round, and from the white globe proceeded
the light.

‘‘What art thou doing, old father?” asked the
King’s son.

“ Alas! my son,” replied the old man, “my busi-
ness is my bane, I hold fast the nights and let go the
days.” —“ Alas! my father,” replied the King’s son,
“my task is even greater than thine.” With that he
tied together the old man’s arms, so that he might
not let go the days, and went on still further to seek
the light. He went on and on till he came to the
foot of a castle wall, and forty men were taking
counsel together beneath it.

“What's the matter?” inquired the King’s son.—
“We should like to go into the castle to steal the
treasure,” said the forty men, “but we don’t know how.”

‘“‘T would very soon help you if you only gave me
a little light,” said the King’s son. This the robbers
readily promised to do, and after that he took a
packet of nails, knocked them into the castle wall,
row after row, right up to the top, clambered up him-
self, and then shouted down to them: “Now you
come up one by one, just as I have done.”

So the robbers caught hold of the nails and began
to clamber up, one after another, the whole forty of
them. But the youth was not idle. He drew his
sword, and the moment each one of them reached the
THE WIND-DEMON 115

top, he chopped off his head and pitched his body
into the courtyard, and so he did to the whole forty.
Then he leaped down into the courtyard himself, and
there right before him was a beautiful palace ; and no
sooner had he opened the door than a serpent glided
past him, and crawled up a column close by the
staircase. The youth drew his sword to strike the
serpent; he struck and cut the serpent in two,
but his sword remained in the stone wall, and he
forgot to draw it out again. Then he mounted the
staircase and went into a room, and there lay a lovely
damsel asleep. So he went out again, closed the
door very softly behind him, and ascended to the
second flight, and went into a room there, and before
him lay a still lovelier damsel ona bed. This door he
also closed, and went up to the third and topmost
flight, and opened a door there also, and lo! the
whole room was piled up with nothing but steel, and
such a splendid damsel lay asleep there that if the
King’s son had had a thousand hearts, he would have
loved her with them all. This door he also closed,
remounted the castle wall, re-descended on the other
side by means of the nails, which he took out as he
descended, and so reached the ground again. Then
he went straight up to the old man whose arms he
had tied together. “Oh, my son!” cried he from
afar, ‘thou hast remained a long time away. Every-
116 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

body’s side will be aching from so much lying down.”
Then the youth untied his arms, the old man let
the white globes of day move round again, and the
youth went up to the dragon, cut off its ears and
nose, and put them in his knapsack. Then he went
back to the palace, and when he drew nigh to it he
found that they had made his eldest brother Padishah.
However, he let it be and said nothing.

Not very long afterwards a lion came to the palace,
and went straight up to the Padishah. ‘‘ What dost
thou want?” asked the Padishah. “I want thy
eldest sister to wife,” replied the lion. “I give not
my sister to a brute beast,” said the Padishah, and.
forthwith they began chasing the lion away; but
now the King’s son appeared and said: “Such was
not our father’s will, but he said we were to give her
to whomsoever asked for her.” With that they
brought the damsel and gave her to the lion, and he
took her and was gone.

The next day came a tiger, and demanded the
middling daughter from the Padishah. The two
elder brethren would by no means give her up, but
again the youngest brother insisted that they should
do so, as it was their father’s wish. So they sent for
the damsel and gave her to the tiger.

On the third day a bird alighted in the palero and.
said that he must have the youngest of the Sultan’s
THE WIND-DEMON 117

daughters. The Padishah and the second brother
were again unwilling to agree to it, but the youngest
brother stood them out that the bird ought to be
allowed to fly back with his sister. Now this bird
was the Padishah of the Peris, the emerald Anka.
But now let us see what happened in that castle of
which we have before spoken,

In this castle there dwelt just about this time a
Padishah and his three daughters. Rising one
morning and going out, he saw a man walking in the
palace. He went out into the courtyard, and saw
a serpent cut in two on the staircase, and a sword
sticking in the stone column, and going on still
further, and searching in all directions, he perceived
the bodies of the forty robbers in his castle moat.
“Not an enemy, but only the hand of a friend could
have done this,” thought he; “ and he has saved me
from the robbers and the serpent. The sword is my
good friend’s, but where is the sword’s master ?”
And he took counsel with his Vizier.

“Oh, we'll soon get to the bottom of that,” said
the Vizier. ‘Let us make a great bath, and invite
every one to come and bathe in it for nothing. We
will watch carefully each single man, and whosoever
has a sheath without a sword will be the man who has
saved us.” And the Padishah did so. He made ready
a big bath, and the whole realm came and bathed in it.
118 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Next day the Vizier said to him: “ Every one has
been here to bathe save only the King’s three sons,
they still remain behind.” ‘Then the Padishah sent
word to the King’s three sons to come and bathe, and
looking closely at their garments, he perceived that
the youngest of the three wore a sheath without a
sword.

Then the Padishah called the King’s son to him
and said: “Great is the good thou hast done to me,
ask me what thou wilt for it!”—“I ask nought from
thee,” replied the King’s son, “but thy youngest
daughter.”

“ Alas! my son, ask me anything but that,” sighed
the Padishah. “Ask my crown, my kingdom, and
T'll give them to thee, but my daughter I cannot give
thee.”

“Tf thou givest me thy daughter I will take her,”
replied the King’s son, “but nought else will I take
from thy hand.”

“‘My son,” groaned the Padishah, ‘I will give thee
my eldest daughter, I'll give thee my second daughter,
nay, I'll give thee the pair of them if thou wilt. But
my youngest daughter has a deadly enemy, the Wind-
Demon. Because I would not give her to him, I must
needs fence her room about with walls of steel, lest
any of the devil race draw near to her. For the
Wind-Demon is such a terrible monster that eye
THE WIND-DEMON 119

cannot see nor dart overtake him ; like the tempest he
flies, and his coming is like the coming of a whirlwind.”

But whatever the Padishah might say to turn him
from seeking after the damsel fell on deaf ears. He
begged and pleaded so hard for the damsel that the
Padishah was wearied by his much speaking, and
promised him the damsel, nay they held the bridal
banquet. The two elder brothers received the two
elder damsels, and returned to their kingdom, but
the youngest brother remained behind to guard his
wife against the Wind-Demon.

Time came and went, and the King’s son avoided
the light of day for the sake of his lovely Sultana.
One day, however, the King’s son said to his wife:
“Behold now, my Sultana, all this time I have never
moved from thy side, methinks I will go a-hunting,
though it only be for a little hour or so.”

« Alas! my King,” replied his wife, “if thou dost
depart from me, I know that thou wilt never see me
more.” But as he begged her for leave again and
again, and promised to be back again immediately,
his wife consented. Then he took his weapons and
went forth into the forest.

Now the Wind-Demon had been awaiting this
chance all along. He feared the famous prince, and
durst not snatch his wife from his arms; but as
soon as ever the King’s son had put his foot out of
p20 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

doors, the Wind-Demon came in and vanished with
the wife of the King’s son.

Not very long afterwards the King’s son came
back, and could find his wife nowhere. He went to
the Padishah to seek her, and came back again, for it
was certain that the Demon must have taken her, no
other living soul could have got near her. Bitterly
did he weep, fiercely did he dash himself against the
floor, but then he quickly rose up again, took horse,
and galloped away into the wide world, determined to
find either death or his consort.

He went on for days, he went on for weeks, in his
trouble and anguish he gave himself no rest. All at
once a palace sprang up before him, but it seemed to
him like a mirage, which baffles the eye that looks
upon it. It was the palace of his eldest sister. The
damsel was just then looking out of the window, and
lo! she caught sight of a man wandering there where
never a bird had flown and never a caravan had
travelled. Then she recognized him as her brother,
and so great was their mutual joy that they could not
come to words for hugging and kissing.

Towards evening the damsel said to the King’s
son: “ The lion will be here shortly, and although he
is very good to me, he is only a brute beast for all
that, and may do thee a mischief.” And she took
her brother and hid him.


The King’s Son and the Lion.—p. 121.
THE WIND-DEMON 121

In the evening the lion came home sure enough,
and when they had sat down together and begun to
talk, the girl asked him what he would do if any of
her brothers should chance to come there. “If the
eldest were to come,” said the lion, “I would strike
him dead with one blow, if the second came I would
slay him also, but if the youngest came, I would let
him go to sleep on my paws if he liked.”

«“ Then he has come,” said his wife.

«Where is he—where is he? Bring him out, let
me see him!” cried the lion; and when the King’s
son appeared, the lion did not know what to do with
himself for joy. Then they began to talk, and the
lion asked him why he had come there, and whither he
was going. The youth told him what had happened,
and said he was going to seek the Wind-Demon.

“T know but the rumour of him,” said the lion ;
“but take my word for it, thou hadst better have
nothing to do with him, for there is none that can
cope with the Wind-Demon.” But the King’s son
would not listen to reason, remained there that night,
and next morning mounted his horse again. The lion
accompanied him to show him the right way, and then
they parted, one going to the right and the other to
the left.

Again he went on and on, till he saw another
palace, and this was the palace of his middling sister.
122 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The damsel saw from the window that a man was on
the road, and no sooner did she recognize him than
she rushed out to meet him, and led him into the
palace. Full of joy, they conversed together till the
evening, and then the damsel said to the youth: “In
a short time my tiger-husband will be here, I'll hide
thee from him, lest a mischief befall thee,’ and she
took her brother and hid him.

In the evening the tiger came home, and while
they talked together his wife asked him what he
would do if any.of her brothers should chance to look
in upon them.

“Tf the elder were to come,” said the tiger, “I
would strike them dead, but if the youngest came, I
would go down on my knees before him.” Where-
upon the damsel called to her youngest brother, the
King’s son, to come forth. The tiger was overjoyed
to see him, welcomed him as a brother, and asked
him whence he came and whither he was going.
Then the King’s son told the tiger of all his trouble,
and asked him whether he knew the Wind-Demon.
“Only by hearsay,” replied the tiger; and then he
tried to persuade the King’s son not to go, for the
danger was great. But the red dawn had no sooner
appeared than the King’s son was ready to set out
again. The tiger showed him the way, and the one
went back and the other went forward.
THE WIND-DEMON 123

He pursued his way, and it was endlessly long, but
time passes quickly in a fairy tale, and at last a
dark object stood out against him. “ What can it
be?” thought he, but when he drew nearer he saw
that it was a palace. It was the abode of his youngest
sister. The damsel was just then looking out of the
window. “Alas! my brother!” cried she, and very
nearly fell out of the window for pure joy. ‘Then she
led him into the house. The youth rejoiced that he
had found all his sisters so well, but the lack of his
wife was still a weight upon his heart.

Now when evening was drawing nigh the girl said
to her brother: “My bird-husband wili be here
anon; conceal thyself from him, for if he see thee he
will tear thy heart out,” and with that she took her
brother and hid him.

And now there was a great clapping of wings, and
the Anka had scarce rested a while when his wife
asked him what he would do if any of her brothers
came to see them.

“As to the two elder,” said the bird, ‘“‘1 would
take them in my mouth, fly up to the sky with them,
and cast them down from thence ; but if the youngest
were to come, I would let him sit down on my wings
and go to sleep there if he liked.” Then the girl
called forth her youngest brother.

“ Alas! my dear little child,” cried the bird, “ how
124 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

didst thou find thy way hither? Wert thou not
afraid of the long journey ?”

The youth told what had happened to him, and
asked the Anka whether he could help him to get to
the Wind-Demon.

“Tt is no easy matter,” said the bird; “but even
if thou couldst get to him, I would counsel thee to
let it alone and stay rather among us.”

“ Not I,” replied the resolute youth ; “I will either
release my wife or perish there!” Then the Anka
saw that he could not turn him from his purpose, and
began to explain to him all about the palace of the
Wind-Demon. ‘He is now asleep,” said the Anka,
“and thou mayest be able to carry off thy wife; but
if he should awake and see thee, he will without
doubt grind thee to atoms. Guard against him thou
cannot, for eye cannot see and fire cannot harm him,
so look well to thyself!”

So next day the youth set out on his journey, and
when he had gone on and on for a long, long time,
he saw before him a vast palace that had neither door
nor chimney, nor length nor breadth. It was the
palace of the Wind-Demon. His wife chanced just
then to be sitting at the window, and when she saw
her husband she leaped clean out of the window to
him. The King’s son caught his wife in his arms,
and there were no bounds to their joy and their
THE WIND-DEMON 125

tears, till at last the girl bethought her of the terrible
demon.

“This is now the third day that he has slept,”
cried she; “let us hasten away before the fourth day
is spent also.” So they mounted, whipped up their
horses, and were already well on their way when the
Wind-Demon awoke on the fourth day. Then he
went to the girl’s door and bade her open, that he
might at least see her face for a brief moment. He
waited, but he got no answer. Then, auguring some
evil, he beat in the door, and lo! the place where the
damsel should have lain was cold.

“§o-ho, Prince Mehmed!” cried he, “thou hast
come here, eh, and stolen away my Sultana ? Well,
wait a while! go thy way, whip up thy fleet steed !
for I'll catch thee up in the long run.” And with that
he sat down at his ease, drank his coffee, smoked. his
chibook, and then rose up and went after them.

Meanwhile the King’s son was galloping off with
_ the girl with all his might, when all at once the girl
felt. the demon’s breath, and cried out in her terror :
“ Alas, my King, the Wind-Demon is here!” Like
a whirlwind the invisible monster was upon them,
caught up the youth, tore off his arms and legs, and
smashed his skull and all his bones till there was not
a bit of him left.

The damsel began to weep bitterly. “ Fiven if thou
126 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

hast killed him,” sobbed she, “let me at least gather
together his bones and pile them up somewhere, for
if thou suffer it, I would fain bury him.”—“TI care
not what thou dost with his bones!” cried the Demon.

So the damsel took the bones of the King’s son,
piled them up together, kissed the horse between the
eyes, placed the bones on his saddle, and whispered
in his ear: ‘Take these bones, my good steed, take
them to the proper place.” Then the Demon took
the girl and led her back to the palace, for the power
of her beauty was so great that it always kept the
Demon close to her. Into her presence, indeed, she
never suffered the monster to come. At the door of
her chamber he had to stop, but he was allowed to
show himself to her now and then.

Meanwhile the good steed galloped away with the
youth’s bones till he stopped at the door of the palace
of the youngest sister, and then he neighed and neighed
till the damsel heard him. She rushed out to the
horse, and when she perceived the knapsack, and in
the knapsack the bones of her brother, she began to
weep bitterly, and dashed herself against the ground
as if she would have dashed herself to pieces. She
could hardly wait for her lord the Anka to come
home. At last there was a sound of mighty wings,
and the Padishah of the Birds, the emerald Anka,
came home, and when he saw the scattered bones of
THE WIND-DEMON 127

the King’s son in the basket, he called together all
the birds of the air and asked them, saying: ‘‘ Which
of you goes to the Garden of Paradise ?”

“ An old owl is the only one that goes there,” said
the birds, ‘‘ and he has now grown so old that he has
no more strength left for such a journey.”

Then the Anka sent a bird to bring the owl on
his back. The bird flew away, and in a very short
time was back again, with the aged owl on his back.

“Well, my father,” said the Bird-Padishah, “ hast
thou ever been in the Garden of Paradise ?”

“Yes, my little son,” croaked the aged owl, “a
long, long time ago, twelve years or more, and I[
haven’t been there since.”

“Well, if thou hast been there,” said the Anka,
“go again now, and bring me from thence a little
glass of water.” The old owl kept on saying that
it was a long, long way for him to go, and that
he would never be able to hold out the whole way.
The Anka would not listen to him, but perched
him upon a bird’s back, and the twain flew into
the Garden of Paradise, drew a glass of water, and
returned to the Anka’s palace.

Then the Anka took the youth’s bones and began
to put them together. The arms, the legs, the head,
the thighs, everything he put in its proper place; and
when he had sprinkled it all with the water, the youth
128 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

fell a-gaping, as if he had been asleep and was just
coming to himself again. The youth looked all about
him, and asked the Anka where he was, and how he
came there.

“Didn't I say that the Wind-Demon would twist
thee round his little finger?” replied the Anka. ‘“ He
ground all thy bones and sinews to dust, and we have
only just now picked them all out of the basket. But
now thou hadst better leave the matter alone, for if
thou gettest once more into the clutches of this demon,
I know that we shall never be able to put thee together
again.”

But the youth was not content to do this, but said
he would go seek his consort a second time.

“Well, if thou art bent on going at any price,”
counselled the Anka, ‘‘go first to thy wife and ask
her if she knows the Demon’s talisman. If only thou
canst get hold of that, even the Wind-Demon will be
in thy power.”

So again the King’s son took horse, again he went
right up to the Demon’s palace, and as the Demon
was dreaming dreams just then, the youth was able
to find and converse with his wife. After they had
rejoiced with a great joy at the sight of each other,
the youth told the lady to discover the secret of the
Demon’s talisman, and win it by wheedling words
and soft caresses if she could get at it no other way.
THE WIND-DEMON 129

Meanwhile the youth hid himself in the neighbouring
mountain, and there awaited the good news. —

When the Wind-Demon awoke from his forty days’
sleep he again presented himself at the damsel’s door.
‘Depart from before my eyes,” cried the girl. “ Here
hast thou been doing nothing but sleep these forty
days, so that life has been a loathsome thing to me
all the while.”

The Demon rejoiced that he was allowed to be in
the room along with the damsel, and in his happiness
asked her what he should give her to help her to
while away the time.

“What canst thou give me,” said the girl, “ seeing
that thou thyself art but wind? Now if at least thou
hadst a talisman, that, at any rate, would be some-
thing to while away the time with.”

“Alas! my Sultana,’ replied the Demon, “ my
talisman is far away, in the uttermost ends of the
earth, and one cannot fetch it hither in alittle instant.
If only we had some such brave man as thy Mehmed
was, he perhaps might be able to go for it.”

The damsel was now more curious than ever about
the talisman, and she coaxed and coaxed till at last
she persuaded the Demon to tell her about the talis-
man, but not till she had granted his request that he
might sit down quite close to her. The damsel could
not refuse him that happiness, so he sat down

K
130 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

beside her, and breathed into her ear the secret of the
talisman.

“On the surface of the seventh layer of sea,” began
the Demon, “there is an island, on that island an ox
is grazing, in the belly of that ox there is a golden
cage, and in that cage there is a white dove. That
little dove is my talisman.”

“But how can one get to that island?” inquired
the Sultana,

“Tl tell thee,” said the Demon. “Opposite to
the palace of the emerald Anka is a huge mountain,
and on the top of that mountain is a spring. Every
morning forty sea-horses come to drink at that spring.
If any one can be found to catch one of these horses
by the lee (but only while he is drinking the water),
bridle him, saddle him, and then leap on his back, he
will be able to go wherever he likes. The sea-horse
will say to him: ‘What dost thou command, my
sweet master?’ and will carry him whithersoever he
bids him.”

“What good will the talisman be to me if I cannot
get near it?” said the girl. With that she drove the
Demon from the room, and when the time of his
slumber arrived, she hastened with the news to her
lord. Then the King’s son made great haste, leaped
on his horse, hastened to the palace of his youngest
sister, and told the matter to the Anka.
THE WIND-DEMON 131

Early next morning the Anka arose, called five
birds, and said to them: “Lead the King’s son to the
spring on the mountain beyond, and wait there till
the sea-horses come up. Forty steeds will appear by
the running water, and when they begin to drink,
seize one of them, bridle and saddle it, and put the
King’s son on its back.”

So the birds took the King’s son, carried him up
to the mountain close by the spring, and as soon as
the horses came up, they did to one of them what the
Anka had said. The King’s son sat on the horse’s
back forthwith, and the first thing the good steed
said was: “What dost thou command, my sweet
master ?”

“There is an island on the surface of the seventh
ocean,” cried the King’s son, “there should I like to
be!” And the King’s son had flown away before you
could shut your eyes; and before you could open
them again, there he was on the shore of that island.

He dismounted from his horse, took off the bridle,
stuck it in his pocket, and went off to seek the ox,
As he was walking up and down the shore a Jew met
him, and asked him what had brought him there.

“I have suffered shipwreck,” replied the youth.
“My ship and everything I possess have perished,
and only with difficulty did I swim ashore,”

“As for me,” said the Jew, “I am in the service
182 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

of the Wind-Demon. Thou must know that there is
an ox on this island, and I must watch it night and
day. Wouldst thou like to enter the service? Thou
wilt have nothing else to do all day but watch this
beast.”

The King’s son took advantage of the opportunity,
and could scarce await the moment when he was to
sec the ox. At watering-time the Jew brought it
along, and no sooner did he find himself alone with
the beast than he cut open its belly, took out the
golden cage, and hastened with it to the sea-shore.
Then he drew the bridle from his pocket, and when
he had struck the sea with it, the steed immediately
appeared and cried: “ What dost thou command,
sweet master ?”—‘I desire to be taken to the palace
of the Wind-Demon,” cried the youth.

Shut your eyes, open your eyes—and there they
were before the palace. Then he took his wife, made
her sit down beside him, and when the steed said:
“What dost thou command, sweet master?” he bade
it fly straight to the emerald Anka.

Away with them flew the steed. It flew right up
to the very clouds, and as they were approaching the
Anka’s palace the Demon awoke from his sleep. He
saw that his wife had again disappeared, and immedi-
ately set off in pursuit. Already the Sultana felt the
breath of the Demon, and he had all but overtaken
THE WIND-DEMON 133

them when the steed hastily bade them twist the
neck of the white dove in the cage. They had
barely time to do so, when the Wind died away and
the Demon was destroyed.

With great joy they arrived at the Anka’s palace,
let the horse go his way, and rested themselves awhile.
On the next day they went to their second brother,
and on the third day to their third brother, and it
was only then that the King’s son discovered that his
lion brother-in-law was the King of the Lions, and
his tiger brother-in-law the King of the Tigers. At
last they reached their home which was the domain
of the damsel’s. Here they made a great banquet,
and rejoiced their hearts for forty days and forty
nights, after which they arose and went to the prince’s
own empire. There he showed them the toneue of
the dragon and its nose, and as he had thus fulfilled
the wishes of his father, they chose him to be their
Padishah ; and their lives were full of joy till the day
of their death, and their end was a happy one.
THE CROW-PERI

ONCE upon a time that was no time there was
aman who had one son. This man used to go out
into. the forest all day, and catch birds for sale to
the first comer. At last, however, the father died and
the son was left all alone. Now he did not know
what had been his father’s profession, but while he
was searching all about the floor he came upon the
fowling-snare. So he took it, went out into the forest,
and set the snare on a tree. At that moment a crow
flew down upon the tree, but as the snare was cun-
ningly laid the poor bird was caught. The youth
climbed up after it, but when he had got hold of
the bird, the crow began begging him to let her go,
promising to give him in exchange something more
beautiful and more precious than herself. The crow
begged and prayed till at last he let her go free, and

again he set the snare in the tree and sat down at the
134
THE CROW-PERI 135

foot of it to wait. Presently another bird came flying
up, and flew right into the snare. The youth climbed
up the tree again to bring it down, but when he saw
it he was full of amazement, for such a beautiful thing
he had never seen in the forest before.

While he was still gazing at it and chuckling, the
crow again appeared to him and said: “Take that
bird to the Padishah, and he will buy it from thee.”
So the youth took away the bird, put it in a cage, and
carried it to the palace. When the Padishah saw the
beautiful little creature he was filled with joy, and
gave the youth so much money for it that he did not
know what to do with it all. But the bird they placed
in a golden cage, and the Padishah had his joy of it
day and night.

Now the Padishah had a favourite who was
grievously jealous of the good fortune of the youth
who had brought the bird, and kept cudgelling his
brains how he could get him beneath his feet. At
last he hit upon a plan, and going in to the Padishah
one day he said: “* How happy that bird would be if
only he had an ivory palace to dwell in !”

“Yes,” replied the Padishah, “but whence could I
get enough ivory to make him a palace ?”

“He who brought the bird hither,” said the
favourite, “ will certainly be able to find the ivory.”

So the Padishah sent for the little fowler, and bade
136 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

him make an ivory palace for the bird there and then.
“T know thou canst get the ivory,” said the
Padishah.

“Alas, my lord Padishah
‘whence am I to get all this ivory from ?”

“That is thy business,” replied the Padishah.
“Thou mayest search for it for forty days, but if it is
not here by that time thy head shall be where now
thy feet are.”

The youth was sore troubled, and while he was still
pondering in his mind which road he should take, the
crow came flying up to him, and asked him what he
was grieving about so much. Then the youth told
her what a great trouble that one little bird had
brought down upon his head.

“ Why this is nothing at all to fret about,” said the
crow; “but go to the Padishah, and ask him for forty
wagon-loads of wine!” So the youth returned to the |
palace, got all that quantity of wine, and as he was
coming back with the cars, the crow flew up and said :
“Hard by is a forest, on the border of which are forty
large trenches, and as many elephants as there are in
the wide world come to drink out of these trenches.
Go now and fill them with wine instead of water.
The elephants will thus get drunk and tumble down,
and thou wilt be able to pull out their teeth and
take them to the Padishah.”

1?

lamented the youth,
THE CROW-PERI 137

The youth did as the bird said, crammed his cars
full of elephants’ tusks instead of wine, and returned
with them to the palace. The Padishah rejoiced
greatly at the sight of all the ivory, had the palace
built, rewarded the little fowler with rich gifts, and
sent him home.

So there was the sparkling bird in his ivory palace,
and right merrily did he hop about from perch to
perch, but he could never be got to sing. “ Ah!”
said the evil counsellor, “‘if only his master were
here he would sing of his own accord.”

“Who knows who his master is, or where he is to
be found ?” asked the Padishah sadly.

“ He who fetched the elephants’ tusks could fetch
the bird’s master also,” replied the evil counsellor.

So the Padishah sent for the little fowler once
more, and commanded him to bring the bird’s master
before him.

“How can I tell who his master is, when I
caught him by chance in the forest?” asked the
fowler.

“ That is thy look-out,” said the Padishah ; “ but if
thou find him not I will slay thee. I give thee forty
days for thy quest, and let that suffice thee.”

So the youth went home, and sobbed aloud in his
despair, when lo! the crow came flying up and asked
him what he was crying for.
138 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

“Why should I not cry?” said the poor youth,
and with that he began to tell the crow of his
new trouble-— Nay, but ’tis a shame to weep for
such a trifle,” said the crow. ‘‘Go quickly now to
the King and ask him for a large ship, but it must
be large enough to hold forty maidservants, a beau-
tiful garden also, and a bath-house.” So the youth
returned to the King and told him what he wanted
for his journey.

The ship was prepared as he had desired it, the
youth embarked, and was just thinking whether he
should go to the left or the right, when the crow came
flying up, and said to him: “Steer thy ship always
to the right, and go straight on until thou perceive a
huge mountain. At the foot of this mountain dwell
forty Peris, and when they perceive thy ship they will
feel a strong desire to look at everything on board of
it. But thou must allow only their Queen to come
on board, for she is the owner of the bird, and while
thou art showing her the ship, set sail and never stop
till thou reach home.”

So the youth went on board the ship, steered
steadily to the right, and never stopped once till he
came to the mountain. There the forty Peris were
walking on the sea-shore, and when they saw the ship
they all came rushing up that they might examine
the beautiful thing. The Queen of the Peris asked
THE CROW-PERI 139

the little fowler whether he would not show her the
ship, especially the inside of it, and he took her off in
a little skiff and brought her to the vessel.

The Peri was monstrously delighted with the beauti-
ful ship, walked in the garden with the damsels on
board the ship, and when she saw the bath-room she
said to the waiting-maids: ‘If I have come so far, I
may as well have a bath into the bargain.” With
that she stepped into the bath-room, and while she
was bathing the ship went off.

They had gone a good distance across the sea before
the Peri had finished her bathing. The Peri made
haste, for it was now growing late, but when she
stepped upon the deck she saw nothing but the sea
around her. At this she fell a-weeping bitterly.
What would become of her ? she said ; whither was she
going? into whose hands was she about to fall? But
the youth comforted her with the assurance that she
was going to a King’s palace, and would be among
good people.

Not very long afterwards they arrived in the city,
and sent word to the King that the ship had come
back. Then he brought the Peri to the palace, and
as she passed by the ivory palace of the bird, it began
to sing so beautifully that all who heard it were beside
themselves for joy. The Peri was a little comforted
when she heard it, but the King was filled with
140 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

rapture, and he loved the beautiful Peri so fondly that
he could not be a single moment without her. The
wedding-banquet quickly followed, and with the
beauteous Peri on his right hand, and the sparkling
bird on his left, there was not a happier man in the
world than that Padishah. But the poison of envy
devoured the soul of the evil counsellor.

One day, however, the Sultana suddenly fell ill, and
took to her bed. Every remedy was tried in vain, but
the sages said that nothing could cure her but the drug
which she had left behind her in her own fairy palace.
Then, by the advice of the evil counsellor, the young
fowler was again sent for to the palace, and commanded
to go and seek for the drug.

So the good youth embarked on his ship again, and
was just about to sail when the crow came to him and
asked him whither he was going. The youth told her
that the Sultana was ill, and he had been sent to
fetch the drug from the fairy palace. “Well then,
go!” said the crow, “and thou wilt find the palace
behind a mountain. ‘Two lions stand in the gates,
but take this feather and touch their mouths with it,
and they will not lift so much as a claw against
thee.”

The youth took the feather, arrived in front of the
mountain, disembarked, and quickly beheld the
palace. He went straight up to the gates, and there
THE CROW-PERI 141

stood the two lions. He took out his feather, and no
sooner had he touched their mouths than they lay
down one on each side and let him go into the palace.
The Peris about the palace also saw the youth, and
immediately guessed that their Queen was ill. So
they gave him the drug, and immediately he took
ship again, and returned to the palace of the Padishah.
But the moment he entered the Peri’s chamber with
the drug in his hand, the crow alighted on his
shoulder, and thus they went together to the sick
Sultana’s bed.

The Sultana was already in the throes of death, but
no sooner had she tasted of the healing drug than she
seemed to return to life again at a single bound. She
opened her eyes, gazed upon the little fowler, and
perceiving the crow upon his shoulder thus addressed
her: ‘ Oh, thou sooty slave! art thou not sorry for
all that this good youth hath suffered for my
sake?” Then the Sultana told her lord that this
same crow was her serving-maid, whom, for negli-
gence in her service, she had changed into a crow.
“Nevertheless,” she added, “I now forgive her,
for I see that her intentions towards me were
good.”

At these words the crow trembled all over, and
immediately a damsel so lovely stood before the young
fowler that there was really very little difference
149 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

between her and the Queen of the Peris. At the
petition of the Sultana, the Sultan married the youth
to the Crow-Peri, the evil-minded counsellor was
banished, and the fowler became Vizier in his stead.
And their happiness lasted till death.
THE FORTY PRINCES AND THE SEVEN-
HEADED DRAGON

THERE was once upon a time a Padishah, and this
Padishah had forty sons. All day long they dis-
ported themselves in the forest, snaring birds and
hunting beasts, but when the youngest of them was
fourteen years old their father wished to marry them.
So he sent for them all and told them his desire.
-“ We will marry,” said the forty brothers, “ but only
when we find forty sisters who are the daughters of
the same father and the same mother.” Then the
Padishah searched the whole realm through to find
forty such sisters, but though he found families of
thirty-nine sisters, families of forty sisters he could
never find.

“Let the fortieth of you take another wife,” said
the Padishah to his sons. But the forty brothers
would not agree thereto, and they begged their father

to allow them to go and search if haply they might
143
144 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

find what they wanted in another empire. What
could the Padishah do? THe could not refuse them
their request, so he gave them his permission. But
before they departed he summoned them into his
presence, and this is what their father the Padishah
said to them: “I have three things to say to you,
which bear ye well in mind. When ye come in your
journey to a large spring, take heed not to pass the
night near it. Beyond the spring is a caravanseral ;
there also ye must not abide. Beyond the caravan-
gerai is a vast- desert; and there also ye must not
take a moment’s rest.” The sons promised their
father that they would keep his words, and with
baggage light of weight but exceedingly precious,
they took horse and set out on their journey.

They went on and on, they smoked their chibooks
and drank forty cups of coffee, and when evening
descended the large spring was right before them.
“Verily,” began the elder brethren, “we will not go
another step further. We are weary, and the night
is upon us, and what need forty men fear?” And
with that they dismounted from their horses, ate
their suppers, and laid them down to rest. Only the
youngest brother, who was fourteen years of age,
remained awake.

It might have been near midnight when the youth
heard a strange noise. He caught up his arms, and
THE FORTY PRINCES 145

turning in the direction of the sound saw before him
a seven-headed dragon. They rushed towards each
other, and thrice the dragon fell upon the prince, but
could do him no harm. “ Well, now it is my turn,”
cried the youth ; “ wilt thou be converted to the true
faith ?” and with these words he struck the monster
such a blow that six of his seven heads came flying
down.

“Strike me once more,” groaned the dragon.

“Not I,” replied the youth, “I myself only came
into the world once.” Immediately the dragon fell
to pieces, but his one remaining head began to roll
and roll and roll till it stood on the brink of the well.
“ Whoever can take my soul out of this well,” it said,
“shall have my treasure also,” and with these words
the head bounded into the well.

The youth took a rope, fastened one end of it to
a rock, and seizing the other end himself, lowered
himself into the well. At the bottom of the well he
found an iron door. He opened it, passed through,
and there right before him stood a palace compared
with which his father’s palace was a hovel. Into this
palace he went, and in it were forty rooms, and in each
room was a damsel sitting by her embroidery frame
with enormous treasures behind her. “ Art thou a
_man or a spirit?” cried the terrified damsels.—*« A
man am I, and the son of a man,” replied the prince.

L
146 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

‘“T have just slain a seven-headed dragon, and have
followed its rolling head hither.”

- Oh, how the forty damsels rejoiced at hearing these
words. They embraced the youth, and begged and
prayed him not to leave them there. They were the
children of one father and one mother they said. The
dragon had killed their parents and carried them off, and
they had nobody to look to in the whole wide world.

“We also are forty,” said the youth, “and we are
seeking forty damsels.” Then he told them that he
would first of all ascend to his brethren, and then he
would come for them again. So he ascended out of
the well, went to the spring, lay down beside it and
fell asleep.

Early in the morning the forty brothers arose and
laughed at their father for trying to frighten them
with the well. Again they set out on their way, and
went on and on till evening overtook them, when
they perceived a caravanserai before them. “Nota
step further will we go,” said the elder brothers. ‘The
youngest brother indeed insisted that it would be well
to remember their father’s words, for his speech could
surely not have been in vain. But they laughed at
their youngest brother, ate and drank, said their
prayers, and lay down to sleep. Only the youngest
brother remained wide awake.

About midnight he again heard a noise. The
THE FORTY PRINCES 147

youth snatched up his arms, and again he saw before
him a seven-headed dragon, but much larger than the
former one. The dragon rushed at him first of all,
but could not overcome him, then the youth dealt
him one blow and off went six of the dragon’s heads,
Then the dragon wished him to take one more blow
but he would not; the head rolled into a well, the
youth went after it, and came upon a palace larger
than the former one, and with ever so much more
treasures and precious things in it. He marked the
well so that he should know it again, returned to his
brothers, and wearied out with his great combat slept
so soundly that his brothers had to wake him up with
blows next morning.

Again they arose, took horse, went up hill and
down dale, and just as the sun was setting, behold!
a vast desert stood before them. They fell to eating
straightway, drank their fill also, and were just going
to lie down to sleep when all at once such a roaring,
such a bellowing arose that the very mountains fell
down from their places.

The princes were horribly afraid, especially when
they saw coming against them a gigantic seven-
headed dragon. He vomited forth venomous fire in
his wrath, and roared furiously : “Who killed my
two brothers? Hither with him! T’ll try conclusions
with him also !”
148 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

The youngest brother saw that his brethren were
more dead than alive from fear, so he gave them the
keys of the two wells, in one of which was the vast
heap of treasure, and in the other the forty damsels.
Let them take everything home, he said ; as for himself
he must first slay the dragon and then he would
follow after them. ‘The thirty-nine brothers lost no
time in mounting their horses and galloping off.
They drew the treasure out of one well and the forty
damsels out of the other, and so returned home to
their father. But now we will see what happened to
the youngest brother.

He fought the dragon and the dragon fought him,
but neither could get the better of the other. The
dragon perceived that it was vain to try and vanquish
the youth, so he said to him: “If thou wilt go to
the Empire of Chin-i-Machin! and fetch me thence
the Padishah’s daughter, 1 will not worry the life out
of thee.” To this the prince readily agreed, for he
could not have sustained the conflict much longer.

Then Champalak, for that was the dragon’s name,
gave the prince a bridle and said to him: “A good
steed comes hither to feed every day, seize him, put
this bridle in his mouth, and bid him take thee to
the Empire of Chin-i-Machin!” So the youth took
the bridle and waited for the good charger. Presently

1 Turkish for the Chinese Empire, .
THE FORTY PRINCES 149

a golden-maned charger came flying through the air,
and the moment the prince had put the bridle in
its mouth, the charger said: “ What dost thou com-
mand, little Sultan?” and before you could wink your
eyes, the Empire of Chin-i-Machin stood before him.
Then he dismounted from his horse, took off the
bridle, and went into the town. There he entered
into an old woman’s hut and asked her whether she
received guests. “ Willingly,” answered the old
woman. Then she made ready a place for him, and
while he was sipping his coffee he asked her all about
the talk of the town. “ Well,” said the old woman,
“a seven-headed dragon is very much in love with
our Sultan’s daughter. A war has been raging
between them on that account these many years, and
the monster presses us so hardly that not even a bird
can fly into our realm.”

“Then where is the Sultan’s daughter?” asked the
youth.— In a little palace in the Padishah’s garden,”
replied the old woman, “and the poor thing dare not
put her foot outside it.”

The next day the youth went to the Padishah’s
garden, and asked the gardener to take him as a
servant, and he hegged and prayed till the gardener
had not the heart to refuse him. “ Very well, I will
take thee,” said he, “and thou wilt have nought to
do but water the flowers of the garden.”
150 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Now the Sultan’s daughter saw the youth, called
him to her window, and asked him how he had
managed to reach that realm. Then the youth told
her that his father was a Padishah, that he had fought
with the dragon Champalak on his travels, and had
promised to bring him the Sultan’s daughter. “ Yet
fear thou nothing,” added the youth, “my love is
stronger than the love of the serpent, and if thou wilt
only have the courage to come with me, trust me to
find a way of disposing of him.”

The damsel was so much in love with the prince,
and so eager to escape from her captivity, that she
consented to trust herself to him, and one night
they escaped from her palace and went straight to-
wards the desert where dwelt the dragon Champalak.
They agreed on the way that the girl should find out
what the dragon’s talisman was, that they might
destroy him that way if they could do it no other.

Imagine the joy of Champalak when he perceived
the princess! “What joy, what rapture, that thou
hast come!” cried Champalak; but fondle her and
caress her as he might, the damsel did nothing but
weep. Days passed by, weeks passed by, and yet
the tears never left the damsel’s eyes. “Tell me at
least what thy talisman is,” said the damsel to him
one day, “if thou wouldst see me happy and not
wretched with thee all thy days.”


THE FORTY PRINCES 151

« Alas, my soul !”

said the dragon, “my talisman
is guarded in a place whither it is impossible ever to
come. It is in a large palace in a neighbouring realm,
and though one may venture thither for it, no one
has ever been able to get back again.”

The prince needed no more, that was quite good
enough for him. He took his bridle, went with it
to the sea-shore, and summoned his golden-maned
steed. “ What dost thou command me, little Sultan ?”
said the steed. ‘I desire thee to convey me to the
neighbouring realm, to the palace of the talisman of
the dragon Champalak,” cried the youth—and in no
more time than it takes to wink an eye, the palace
stood before him.

Then the steed said to the youth: “ When we
reach the palace thou wilt tie the bridle to two iron
gates, and when I neigh once and strike my iron hoofs
together, a door will open. In this open door thou
wilt see a lion’s throat, and if thou canst not kill
that lion at one stroke, escape, or thou art a dead
man.” With that they went up to the palace, he
tied the horse to the two iron gates by his bridle, and
when he neighed the door flew open. The youth
struck: with all his might at the gaping throat of the
lion in the doorway and split it right intwo. Then
he cut open the lion’s belly, and drew out of it a little
gold cage with three doves in it, so beautiful that the
152 TURKISH FAIRY TALES
like of them is not to be found in the wide world.

He took one of them and began softly stroking and
pr-r-r-r !—away it flew



caressing it, when all at once
out of his hand. The steed galloped swiftly after it,
and if he had not caught it and wrung its neck it
would have gone hard with the good youth.

Then he mounted his steed again, and in the
twinkling of an eye he stood once more before Cham-
palak’s palace. In the gateway of the palace he
killed the second dove, so that when the youth
entered the dragon’s room, there the monster lay
quite helpless, and there was no more spirit in him at
all. When he saw the dove in the youth’s hand he
implored him to let him stroke it for the last time
before he died. The youth’s heart felt for him, and
he was just about to hand the bird to him when the
princess rushed out, snatched the dove from his hand,
and killed it, whereupon the dragon expired before
their very eyes. “’Twas well for thee,” said the
steed, “that thou didst not give him the dove, for if
he had got it, fresh life would have flowed into him.”
And with that the steed disappeared, bridle and all.

Then they got together the dragon’s treasures, and
went with them to the Empire of Chin-i-Machin. The
Padishah was sick for grief at the loss of the damsel,
and after searching for her in all parts of the kmgdom
in vain, was persuaded that she had fallen into the
THE FORTY PRINCES 153
hands of the dragon. And lo! there she stood before
him now, hand in hand with the King’s son. Then
there was such a marriage-feast in that city that it
seemed as if there was no end to it. After the
marriage they set out on their journey again, and
travelled with a great escort of soldiers to the prince’s
father. There they had long held the King’s son to
be dead, and would not believe that. it was he even
now till he had told them the tale of the three seven-
headed dragons and the forty damsels.

The fortieth damsel was waiting patiently for him
there, and the prince said to his wife : ‘Behold now
my second bride!”—*Thou didst save my life from
the dragon,” replied the Princess of Chin-i-Machin, “I
therefore give her to thee, do as thou wilt with her !”
So they made a marriage-feast for the second bride
also, and they spent half their days in the Empire of
the prince’s father, and the other half in the Empire
of Chin-i-Machin, and their lives flowed away in
happiness.
THE WORLD’S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL

THERE was once upon a time a Padishah who had
an only son. His father guarded him as the apple
of his eye, and: there was not a desire of his heart
that was not instantly gratified.

One night a dervish appeared to the King’s son in
a dream, and showed him the World’s most beauteous
Damsel, and there he drained with her the cup of
love. After that the prince became another man.
He could neither eat nor drink. Sleep brought him
neither pleasure nor refreshment, and he all at once
grew sallow and withered. They sent for doctor
after doctor, they sent for wizard after wizard, but
they could not tell the nature of the malady or find
. a cure for it.

Then the sick prince said to his father: “ My lord
Padishah and father, no leech, no wise man can help
me, wherefore weary them in vain? The World’s
most beauteous Damsel is the cause of my complaint,

and she will be either the life or the death of me.’
154
THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL 155

The Padishah was frightened at the words of his
son, and his chief care was to drive the damsel out
of the lad’s head. ‘Tis dangerous to even think of
such a thing,” said he, “for her love will be thy
death.” But his son continued to pine away daily,
and life had no joy for him. Again and again the
father begged his son to tell him hig heart’s desire
and it should be instantly fulfilled, and the eternal
reply of.the son was: “ Let me seek the World’s most
beauteous Damsel.” Then the Padishah thought to
himself: “If I do not let him go he will only perish,
and he cannot therefore be worse off if he goes.” |
Then said he: “Go, my son, after thy love, and
may the righteous Allah be merciful to thee.”

So the next day the prince set out on his journey.
He went up hill and down dale, he crossed vast
deserts, he traversed rugged wildernesses in search of
his beloved, the World’s most beauteous Damsel. On
and on he went, till he came at last to the sea-shore,
and there he saw a poor little fish writhing in the
sand, and the fish besought him to throw it back into
the sea again. The youth had compassion upon the
fish, and threw it back into the sea again. Then the
little fish gave him three scales, and said to him: “If
ever thou dost get into any trouble, burn these
scales.”

Again the youth went on his way till he came to
156 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

a vast desert, and there on the ground in front of
him he saw a lame ant. The little creature told him
that he was going to a wedding, but could not over-
take his comrades because they hastened so quickly.
Then the youth took up the ant and carried him to
his comrades. As they parted the ant gave him a
little piece of its wing and said: “If ever thou
shouldst get into any trouble, burn this bit of wing.”

Again the youth followed his road, full of weary
woetulness, and reaching the borders of a large forest
he there saw a little bird struggling with a large
serpent. The little bird asked help of the youth,
and with one blow he cut the serpent in two. The
bird then gave him three feathers. “If ever thou
shouldst get into trouble,” it said, “burn these little
feathers,”

Again he took up his pilgrim’s staff and went
beyond the mountains, beyond the sea, till he came
to a large city. It was the realm of the father of the
World’s most beauteous Damsel. He went straight
into the palace to the Padishah, and begged the hand
of his daughter in the name of Allah. “N ay,” said
the Padishah, “thou must first of all accomplish three
tasks for me. Only after that canst thou make known
thy wishes to my daughter.”

With that he took a ring, cast it into the sea, and
said to the King’s son: “If thou canst not find it for
THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL 157

me in three days, thou art a dead man.” Then the
King’s son fell a-thinking till he bethought him of the
three scales, and he had no sooner burnt them than
the little fish stood before him and said: “What
dost thou command, O my Sultan ?”—*« The ring of
the World’s most beauteous Damsel hath been cast
into the sea, and I want it back again,” said the
prince. Then the fish sought for the ring but couldn’t
find it; it dived down a second time and still it
couldn’t find it; a third time it descended right down
into the seventh ocean, drew up a fish, cut it open,
and there was the ring. So the youth gave the ring
to the Padishah, and the Padishah gave it to his
daughter.

Now there was a cave near the palace full of gravel
and grain. “My second task,” said the Padishah,
“is that thou dost separate the grain from the gravel.”
Then the youth entered the cave, took out the ant’s
wing and burned it, whereupon the whole cave was
swarming with ants, and they set to work upon the
grain in hot haste. The day was now nearly over,
and the same evening the youth sent word to the
Padishah that the second task also was accomplished.

“The third task still remains,” said the Padishah,
“and then thou mayest have my daughter.” With
that he sent for a maid-servant, had her head cut off
straightway, and then said to the youth: “Thus shall
158 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

be done to thy head also if thou restore not this
damsel to life again.” The youth quitted the palace
in deep thought, and at last he bethought him that
the bird’s feathers might help him. So he took them
out and burned them, and lo! the bird stood before
him ere yet his lips had commanded it to appear.
And the youth complained bitterly to the bird of the
task that was set him.

Now the bird had friends among the Peris, and,
flying up into the air, in no very long time was back
again with a cruse of water in its beak. “I have
brought thee heavenly water which can give life even
to the dead,” said the bird. So the prince entered
the palace, and no sooner had he sprinkled the damsel
with the water than she sprang up as if she had
never been dead at all.

Now the rumour of all these things reached the ears
of the World’s most beauteous Damsel, and she ordered
the prince to be brought before her. The damsel
dwelt in a little marble palace, and before the palace
was a golden basin which was fed by the water of
four streams. The courtyard of this palace also was
a vast garden wherein were many great trees and
fragrant flowers and singing-birds, and to the youth
it seemed like the gate of Paradise.

Suddenly the door of the palace was opened, and
the garden was so flooded with light that the eyes of


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The World’s most Beauteous Damsel.—p. 159.
THE WORLDS MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL 159

the youth were dazzled even to blindness. It was
the World’s most beauteous Damsel who had appeared
in the door of the palace, and the great light was the
rosiness of her two radiant cheeks. She approached
the prince and spoke to him, but scarcely did the
youth perceive her than he fainted away before her
eyes. When he came to himself again they brought
him into the damsel’s palace, and there he rejoiced
exceedingly in the World’s most beauteous Damsel,
for her face was as the face of a Houri, and her
presence was as a vision of Peris.

“Oh, prince!” began the damsel, “thou that art
the son of Shah Suleiman, canst aid me in my deep
distress. In the vast garden of the Demon of Autumn
there is a bunch of singing-pomegranates: if thou
canst get them for me I will be thine for ever and
ever.”

Then the youth gave her his hand upon it, the
hand of loyal friendship, and departed far far away. }
He went on and on without stopping, he went on,
and for months and months he crossed deserts where
man had never trod, and mountains over which there
was no path. “Oh, my Creator,” he sighed, “ wilt
thou not show me the right way?” and he rose up
again each morning from the place where he had sunk
down exhausted the night before, and so he went on
and on from day to day till the path led him right
160 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

down to the roots of the mountains. There it seemed
to him as if it were the Day of Judgment. Such a
noise, such a hubbub, such a hurly-burly of sounds
arose that all the hills and rocks around him trembled.
The youth knew not whether it was friend or foe,
man or spirit, and as he went on further, trembling
with fear, the noise grew louder and the dust rose up
round about him like smoke. He knew not where he
was going, but he might have known from what he
heard that the smaller garden of the Demon of
Autumn was now but a six-months’ journey off, and
all this great hubbub and clamour was the talisman
of the gate of the garden.

And now he drew still nearer and could see the
gate of the smaller garden, and could hear the roaring
of the talismans in the gate, and could perceive the
guardian of the gate also. Then he went up to him
and told him of his trouble. ‘But art thou not
afraid of this great commotion ?” asked the guardian of
the gate. “Is it not because of thee that all the talis-
mans are so impatient ? even I am afraid thereat!”

But the youth did nothing but inquire continually
about the cluster of singing-pomegranates.

‘Tis a hard task to reach that,’ said the guardian,
“yet if thou art not afraid, perhaps thou mayest get
it after all. Three-months’ journey from hence thou
wilt come to such another place of talismans, there
THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEHL 161

also there is a garden, and the guardian of that
garden is my own mother. But whatever thou dost,
take care not to draw nigh to her, nor let her draw
nigh to thee. Give her my salaams, but tell her
nothing of thy trouble unless she ask thee,”

So the youth went on towards the second garden,
and after a three-months’ journey such a monstrous
din and racket arose around him as to make the
former noise seem nothing. This was the greater
garden of the Demon of Autumn, and the great din
proceeded from the talismans of the garden. The
youth lay down beside a rock, and when he had
waited a little he saw something like a man approaching
him, but as it came nearer he perceived that it was an
old woman, a little beldame of thrice thirty winters.
The hairs of her head were ag white as snow, red
circles were round her eyes, her eyebrows were like
pointed darts, the fire of hell was in her eyes, her
nails were two ells long, her teeth were like faggots,
her two lips had only one jaw, she shuffled along
leaning on a stick, drew in her breath through
her nose, and coughed and sneezed at every step
she took. “ Oh-oh! oh-oh!” she groaned, shuffling
painfully along in her large slippers, till it seemed as if
she would never be able to reach the hew-comer. This
was the mother of the guardian of the lesser garden,

and she hergelf wag the guardian of the larger one.
M
162 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

At last she got up to the youth, and asked him
what he was doing in those parts? The prince gave
her the compliments of her son. “Ah, the vaga-
bond!” said the old woman, “ where didst thou meet
with him? That wicked lad of mine knew that I
would have compassion on thee, so he sent thee
hither. Very well, let us make an end of thee.” And
with that she seized hold of him, and cried: “ Hi,
Earless!” and something came running up to him,
and before he knew where he was, the youth found
himself seated. on its back. He looked down upon it
and saw beneath him a creature like a shrunken
huddled toad, that had neither eyes nor ears. This
was Harless, and away.it went with him. When he
first saw it, it was as small as a worm, but the
‘moment he was on its back it took such leaps that
every three of them covered as much space as a
vast ocean. Suddenly Earless stopped short and
said to him: “ Whatever thou mayest see, whatever
thou mayest hear, take care not to speak, or it will
be all up with thee,” and with that it vanished.

There in the rippling water in front of the prince,
like a dream-shape, lay a large garden. This garden
had neither beginning nor end, and within it were
such trees and flowers and sweet fruit as the eye of
man hath never seen. Whithersoever one turned
nothing was to be heard but the rustling of soft
‘THE WORLDS MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL 163

wings and the songs of nightingales, so that the whole
atmosphere of that garden seemed to be an eternal
song. The youth looked all about him, his reason
died away within him, he entered the garden. But
then he heard quite near to him such a woeful wailing
that his heart was like to break, and the thought of
the cluster of pomegranates occurred to his mind.
His eyes sought for them in every direction but in
vain, till he came to the centre of the garden, where
was a fountain and a little palace made of flowers,
and the pomegranates hung down from the flowery
palace like so many shining lamps. The youth
plucked a branch, but no sooner had he done so than
there was a horrible cry, and a warning voice
exclaimed—

“A son of man of us hath ta’en,
We by a son of man are slain !””

The youth scarce had time to escape from the
garden. “ Hasten! fly!” cried Earless, who was wait-
ing again at the gate. The youth jumped on its back,
and in a couple of leaps they were beyond the ocean.
Then only did the youth think of looking at the
cluster of pomegranates. There were fifty pome-
granates on it, and each one had a different voice, and
each voice had a different song—it was just as if all
the music in the wide world was gathered together
164 | TURKISH FAIRY TALES

in one place. By this time they had reached the
old grandmother, the old old beldame of thrice thirty
winters.

“Guard well thy pomegranate cluster,” said the old
woman, “never leave it out of thy sight. If on the
first night of thy wedding thou and thy bride are
able to listen to their music all night without going
to sleep once, these pomegranates will love thee, and
after that thou wilt have nothing more to fear, for
they will deliver thee from every ill.” Then they
went from the old mother to the son; he also bade
them take to heart his mother’s words, and then the
youth went on his way to his sole-beloved, the World's
most beauteous Damsel.

The girl was awaiting him with the greatest im-
patience, for she also dearly loved the prince, and
her days were passed in anxiety lest some mischief
should befall the youth. All at once she heard the
sound of music, the fifty pomegranates were singing
fifty different songs with fifty different voices, and
she opened her heart to the beautiful music. The
damsel rushed forth to meet the youth, and at their
joyous embrace the pomegranates rang out with a
melody so sweet that the like of it is not to be found
in this world, but only in Allah’s world beyond the
orave. Forty days and forty nights did the wedding-
feast last, and on the fortieth day the King’s son went
THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTEOUS DAMSEL 165

in unto his bride, and they lay down and listened to
the pomegranates. Then when the day was born again
they arose, and the pomegranate cluster rejoiced again
in their love, and so they went on their way to the
prince’s own kingdom. There all the feasting began
again, and in his joy the old Padishah resigned his
kingdom to his son, the Padishah of the Cluster of
Pomegranates.
THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS

In the old, old time, in the age of fairy tales, there
was once the daughter of a Padishah who was as fair
as the full moon, as slim as a cypress-tree, with eyes
like coals, and hair like the night, and her eyebrows
were like bows, and her eyeballs like the darts of
archers. In the palace of the Padishah was a garden,
and in the midst of the garden a fountain of water,
and there the maid sat the livelong day sewing and
stitching.

One day she put her ring upon her sewing-table,
but scarcely had she laid it down when there came
a little dove and took up the ring and flew away
with it. Now the little dove was so lovely that the
damsel at once fell in love with it. The next day
the damsel took off her bracelet, and immediately
the dove was there and flew off with that too. Then
the damsel was so consumed with love that she

neither ate nor drank, and could scarce tarry till the
166


THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS 167

next day for the dove to come forth again. And
on the third day she brought her sewing-table, put
upon it her lace handkerchief, and placed herself close
beside it. She waited for the dove, and waited and
waited, and lo! all at once there he was right before
her, and he caught up the handkerchief and away he
flew. Then the damsel had scarce strength enough
to rise up ; weeping bitterly she went into the palace,
and there she threw herself on the ground in a passion
of grief.

Her old waiting-woman came running towards her:
“O Sultana!” cried she, “ wherefore dost thou weep
so sorely ?—what ails thee ?”

“I am sick, my heart is sick!” replied the
daughter of the Sultan, and with that she fell
a-weeping and a-wailing worse than ever.

The old waiting-woman feared to tell of this new
thing, for the damsel was the only daughter of the
Padishah, but when she perceived how pale the
damsel was growing, and how she wept and sobbed,
the waiting-woman took her courage in both hands,
went to the Padishah, and told him of his daughter’s
woe. Then the Padishah was afraid, and went to
see his daughter, and after him came many wise men
and many cunning leeches, but not one of them could
cure her sickness.

But on the next day the Padishah’s Vizier said to
168 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

him: “The wise men and the leeches cannot help
the damsel, the only medicine that can cure her lies
hidden elsewhere.” Then he advised the Padishah
to make a great bath, the water whereof should cure
all sick people, but whoever bathed therein was to
be made to tell the story of his life. So the Padishah
caused the bath to be made, and proclaimed through-
out the city that the water of this bath would give
back his hair to the bald, and his hearing to the deaf,
and his sight to the blind, and the use of his legs to
the lame. Then all the people flocked in crowds
to have a bath for nothing, and each one of them
had to tell the story of his life and his ailment
before he returned home again.

Now in that same city dwelt the bald-headed son
of a bed-ridden mother, and the fame of the wonder-
working bath reached their ears also. “Let us go
too,”
be cured.”

“How can I go when I can't stand on my
legs?” oroaned the old woman.—‘ Oh, we shall be
able to manage that,” replied bald-pate, and taking

said the son; ‘‘ perchance the pair of us shall

his mother on his shoulders he set out for the
bath.

They went on and on and on, through the level
plains by the flowing river, till at last the son was
tired and put his mother down upon the ground,
THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS 169

At that same instant a cock lighted down beside
them with a big pitcher of water on its back, and
hastened off with it. Then the young man became
very curious to know why and whither this cock
was carrying water; so after the bird he went.
The cock went on till it came to a great castle,
and at the foot of this castle was a little hole
through which water was gurgling. Still the youth
followed the cock, squeezed himself with the utmost
difficulty through the hole, and no sooner had he
begun to look about him than he saw before him
a palace so magnificent that his eyes and mouth
stood wide open with astonishment. No other human
being had ever stood in the path that led up to this
palace. All over it he went, through all the rooms,
from vestibule to attic, admiring their splendour
without ceasing, till weariness overcame him. “If
only I could find a living being here!” said he to
himself, and with that he hid himself in a large
armoury, from whence he could easily pounce out
upon any one who came.

He had not waited very long when three doves
flew on to the window-sill, and after shivering there a
little while turned into three damsels, all so beautiful
that the young man did not know which to look
at first.

“ Alas, alas!” cried the three damsels, “we are
170 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

late, we are late! Our Padishah will be here
presently, and nothing is ready!” Then one seized
a broom and brushed everything clean, the second
spread the table, and the third fetched all manner
of meats. Then they all three began to shiver once
more, and three doves flew out of the window.

Meanwhile the bald-pate had grown very hungry,
and he thought to himself: “ Nobody sees me, why
should I not take a morsel or two from that table?”
So he stretched his hand out from his hiding-place,
and was just about to touch the food with it when he
got such a blow on the fingers that the place swelled
up. He stretched out the other hand, and got a still
greater blow on that. The youth was very frightened
at this, and he had scarcely drawn back his hand when
a white dove flew into the room. It fell a-shivering
and immediately turned into a beautiful youth.

And now he went to a cupboard, opened it, and
took out a ring, a bracelet, and a lace handkerchief.
“Oh, lucky ring that thou art!” cried he, “to be
allowed to sit on a beautiful finger ; and oh, lucky
bracelet, to be allowed to lie on a beautiful arm.”
Then the beautiful youth fell a-sobbing, and dried his
tears one by one on the lace handkerchief. Then he
put them into the cupboard again, tasted one or two
of the dishes, and laid him down to sleep.

It was as much as the bald-pate could do to await
THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS 171

the dawn of the day. But then the beautiful youth
arose, shivered, and flew away as a white dove.
Bald-pate too came out of his hiding-place, went
down into the courtyard, and crept once more
through the hole at the foot of the tower.
_ Outside he found his poor old mother weeping all
alone, but the youth pacified her with the assurance
that their troubles were nearly at an end, took her on
his back again, and went to the bath. ‘There they
bathed, and immediately the old woman was able to
stand on her legs, and the bald-pate got his hair back
again. Then they began to tell their stories, and
when the Sultan’s daughter heard what the youth
had seen and heard at midnight, it was as though a
stream of fresh health instantly poured into her.
She rose from her bed and promised the youth a
great treasure if he would bring her to that tower.
So the youth went with the princess, showed her the
walls of the palace, helped her through the little
hole, brought her into the chamber of the doves, and
pointed out to her the armoury where he had been
able to hide himself. After that the youth returned
home with great treasure and perfect health, and
lived all his days with his old mother.

At eventide the three doves flew into the room.
They scoured and cleaned, brought the meats for the
table, and flew away again. Soon afterwards the
172 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

white dove came flying in, and how did that damsel
feel when she saw her darling little dove once more ?
But when the dove had turned into a youth again,
and stood there like a glorious full moon, the damsel
scarcely knew where she was, but gazed continuously
on his dazzling face.

Then the youth went to the cupboard, opened it,
and took out the ring, the bracelet, and the lace
handkerchief that belonged to the daughter of the
Sultan. “Oh, thou ring! how happy shouldst thou
be to sit on a beauteous finger! Oh, thou bracelet!
how happy thou shouldst be to lie on a beauteous
arm!” he cried. Then he took the lace handkerchief
and dried his tears, and at the sight thereof the heart
of the damsel was nigh to breaking. Then she tapped
with her fingers on the door of the armoury. The
youth approached it, opened the door, and there stood
his heart’s darling. Then the joy of the youth was
so great that it was almost woe.

He asked the damsel how she had come thither to
the palace of the Peris. Then she told him of her
journey, and how sick for love she had been.

Then the youth told her that he also was the son
of a mortal mother, but when he was only three days
old the Peris had stolen him, and carried him to this
palace and made him their Padishah. He was with
them the whole day, and had only two hours to
THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS 173

himself in the twenty-four. The damsel, he said,
might stay with him, and walk about here the whole
day, but towards evening she must hide herself; for
if the forty Peris came and saw her with him they
would not leave her alive. To-morrow, he said, he
would show her his mother’s palace, where they would
live in peace, and he would be with her for two
hours out of the twenty-four.

So the next day the Padishah of the Peris took the
damsel and showed her his mother’s palace. “ When
thou goest there,” said the Padishah, “bid them have
compassion on thee, and receive thee in memory of
Bahtiyar Bey, and when my mother hears my name
she will not refuse thy request.”

So the damsel went up to the house and knocked
at the door. An old woman came and opened it, and
when she saw the damsel and heard her son’s name,
she burst into tears and took her in. There the
damsel stayed a long time, and every day the little
bird came to visit her, until a son was born to the
daughter of the Sultan. But the old woman never
knew that her son came to the house, nor that the
damsel had been brought to bed.

One day the little bird came, flew upon the window-
sill, and said : “ Oh, my Sultana, what is my little seed-
ling doing ? ”—“ No harm hath happened to our little
seedling,” replied she, “but he awaits the coming of
174 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Bahtiyar.’—‘ Oh! if only my mother Is ” sighed
the youth, “she would open her best room.” With
that he flew into the room, turned into a man, and
fondled in his arms his wife and his little child. But
when two hours had passed he shivered a little, and
a little dove flew out of the window.

But the mother had heard her son’s speech, and
could scarce contain herself for joy. She hastened
to her daughter-in-law, fondled and caressed her, led
her into her most beautiful room, and put everything
in order against her son’s arrival. She knew that
the forty Peris had robbed her of him, and she took
counsel with herself howshe might steal him back again.

“When my son comes to-morrow,” said the old
woman, “contrive so that he stays beyond his time,
and leave the rest to me.”

The next day the bird flew into the window, and
lo! the damsel was nowhere to be seen in the room.
Then he flew into the more beautiful room, and cried:
“Oh! my Sultana, what is our little seedling doing?”
—And the damsel replied: “No harm hath befallen our
little seedling, but he awaits the coming of Bahtiyar.”
Then the bird flew into the room and changed into
a man, and was so taken up with talking to his wife,
so filled with the joy of playing with his child and
seeing it play, that he took no count of time at all.

But what was the old woman doing all this time ?


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The Padishah of the Peris.—p. 174,


THE PADISHAH OF THE FORTY PERIS 175

There was a large cypress-tree in front of the
house, and there the forty doves were sometimes
wont to alight. The old woman went and hung this
tree full of venomous needles. Towards evening,
when the Padishah’s two hours had run out, the
doves who were the forty Peris came to seek their
Padishah, and alighted on the cypress-tree, but
searcely had their feet touched the needles than they
fell down to the ground poisoned.

Meanwhile, however, the youth suddenly remem-
bered the time, and great was his terror when he
came out of the palace so late. He looked to the
right of him and he looked to the left, and when he
looked towards the cypress-tree there were the forty
doves. And now his joy was as great as his terror
had been before. First he fell upon the neck of his
consort, and then he ran to his mother and em-
braced her, so great was his joy that he had
escaped from the hands of the Peris.

Thereupon they made them such a banquet that
even after forty days they had not got to the end
of it. So they had their hearts’ desires, and ate
and drank and rejoiced with a great joy. May we
too get the desires of our hearts, with good eating
and drinking to comfort us !
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC
MIRROR

THERE was once upon a time a poor wood-cutter
who had an only son. One day this poor man fell
sick and said to his son: “If I should die follow thou
my handicraft, and go every day into the wood.
Thou mayest cut down whatever trees thou dost find
there, but at the edge of the wood is a cypress-tree,
that thou must leave standing.” Two days after-
wards the man died and was buried.

But the son went into the wood and cut down the
trees, only the cypress-tree he left alone. One day
the youth stood close to this tree and thought to
himself: “What can be the matter with this tree,
seeing that I am not allowed to lay a hand upon it?”
So he looked at it, and considered it curiously, till
at last he took his axe and went with evil intent
towards the tree. But he had scarcely lifted his foot

when the cypress-tree drew away from him. The
176
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR 177

wood-cutter mounted his ass and pursued the tree but
could not overtake it, and in the meantime eventide
came upon them. Then he dismounted from his ass
and tied it to a tree, but he himself climbed to the
top of the tree to await the dawn.

Next morning, when the sky grew red, he descended
from the tree, and there at the foot of it lay only the
bones of his ass. ‘Never mind, I'll go on foot,” said
the wood-cutter, and he continued his pursuit of the
cypress, the tree going on before and he following
after. All that day he pursued but could not come
up with it. The third day also he shouldered his axe
and pursued the tree, when he suddenly came upon
an elephant and a serpent fighting with each other.
Believe the truth or not as you will, but the truth
is this, that the serpent was swallowing the elephant;
but the elephant’s great tusk stuck in the serpent’s
throat, and both beasts, seeing the youth staring at
them, begged him to help them.

What didn’t the elephant promise him if only he
would slay the serpent! “Nay, but all I would have
thee do,” said the serpent, “is to break his tusk off :
the work is lighter, and the reward will be greater.”
At these words the youth seized his axe and chopped
the elephant’s tusk right off. The serpent then
swallowed the elephant, thanked the youth, and

promised to keep his word and give him his reward.
‘ N
178 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

While they were on the road the serpent stopped at
a spring and said to the youth : ‘ Wait while I bathe
in this water, and whatever may happen, fear not!”
With that the serpent plunged into the water, and
immediately there arose such a terrible storm, such a
tempest, such a hurricane, with lightning-flash upon
lightning-flash, and thunder-bolt upon thunder-bolt,
that the Day of Judgment could not well be worse.
Presently the serpent came out of the bath, and then
all was quiet again.

They went a long way, and they went a little way,
they took coffee, they smoked their chibooks, they
gathered violets on the road, till at last they drew near
to a house, and then the serpent said: “In a short
time we shall arrive at my mother’s house. When she
opens the door, say thou art my kinsman, and she will
invite thee into the house. She will offer thee coffee
but do not drink it, she will offer thee meat but do
not eat it; but there’s a little bit of a mirror hang-
ing up in the corner of the door, ask my mother for
that!” a
So they came to the house, and no sooner had the
Peri knocked at the door than his mother came and
opened it. ‘‘ Come, my brother!” said the serpent to
the youth behind him.—“ Who is thy brother ?”
asked his mother.—‘‘ He who hath saved my life,”
replied her son, and with that he told her the whole
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR 179

story. So they went into the house, and the woman
brought the youth coffee and a chibook, but he would
not take them. “My journey is a hasty one,” said
he, “I cannot remain very long.”

“Rest awhile at least,’ said the woman, “we
cannot let our guests depart without anything.”

“ Nothing do I want, but if thou wilt give me that
bit of mirror in the corner of the door I will take it,”
said the youth. The woman did not want to give it,
but the youth insisted that perhaps his life might
depend upon that very piece of mirror, so at last she
gave it to him, though very unwillingly.

So the youth went on his way with the bit of
mirror, and as he looked into it he turned over in his
mind what use he should make of it. As he was still
turning it over and looking at it, suddenly there
stood before him a negro efrit, one of whose lips
touched the heavens, and the other lip the earth.
The poor youth was so frightened, that if the negro
had not said : ‘‘ What are thy commands, my Sultan?”
he would have run away for ever and ever. As it
was, it was as much as he could do to ask for some-
thing to eat, and immediately there stood before him
a rich and rare banquet, the like of which he had never
seen at his father’s, the wood-cutter’s.

Then the youth felt very curious about the mirror,
and looked into it again, and immediately the black
180 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

efrit stood before him again and said : “ What dost
thou command, my Sultan?” Nothing would occur
to his mind at first, but at last his lips murmured the
word “ Palace,” and immediately there stood before
him a palace so beautiful that the Padishah himself
could not have a finer one. “Open!” cried the
youth, and immediately the gates of the palace flew
open before him. ,

The youth rejoiced greatly in his bit of mirror, and
his one thought was what he should ask it to get him
next. The beautiful Sultana-damsel, the Padishah’s
daughter, occurred to his mind, and the next moment
his eye sought his mirror and he desired from the
big-lipped negro efrit a palace in which the world-
renowned daughter of the Padishah should be sitting
beside him, and he had scarce time to look around him
when he found himself sitting in the palace with the
Sultan’s daughter by his side. Then they kissed and
embraced each other, and lived a whole world of joy.

Meanwhile the Sultan learnt that his daughter had
disappeared from her own palace. He searched for her
the whole realm through, he sent heralds in every
direction, but in vain were all his labours, the girl
could not be discovered. At last an old woman came
to the Padishah and told him to make a large casket,
line it well with zinc, put her inside it, and cast it into
the sea. She would find the daughter of the Sultan,
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR 181

she said, for if she was not here, she must be beyond
the sea. So they made ready the great casket, put
the old woman inside it, put food for nine days
beside her, and cast it into the sea. The casket was
tossed from wave to wave, till at last it came to that
city where the Sultan’s daughter dwelt with the youth.

Now the fishermen were just then on the shore, and
saw the huge casket floating in the sea. They drew it
ashore with ropes and hooks, and when they opened
it an old woman crept out of it. They asked her how
she had got inside it.

“Oh, that my enemy might lose the sight of his
little eye that is so dear to him!” lamented the old
woman ; “I have not deserved this of him!” and with
that she fell a-weeping and wailing till the men
believed every word she said. ‘ Where is the Bey of
your city?” cried she; “‘ perhaps he will have com-
passion upon me and receive me into his house,” she
said to the men. Then they showed her the palace,
and exhorted her to go thither, as perhaps she might
get an alms.

So the old woman went to the palace, and when
she knocked at the door, the Sultan’s daughter came
down to see who it was. The old woman immediately
recognized the damsel, and begged her (for the damsel
knew not the old woman) to take her into her service.
“My lord comes home to-night, I will ask him,”
182 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

replied the damsel ; “‘ meanwhile rest in this corner !”
And the damsel’s lord allowed her to receive the
old woman into the house, and the next day she
waited upon them.

There the old woman was for one day and for two
days, for a week, for two weeks, and there was no cook
to cook the food, and no servant to keep the place
clean, and yet every day there was a costly banquet
and everything was as clean as clean could be. Then
the old woman went to the damsel and asked her
whether she did not feel dull at being alone all day.
“Tf I were allowed to help thee pass the time away,”
added she, “perhaps it might be better.” —“ I must first
ask my lord,” replied the damsel. The youth did not
mind the old woman helping his wife to pass away
the time, and so she went up to the rooms of the
damsel and stayed with her for days together.

One day the old woman asked the damsel whence
came all the rare meats, and who did the service of
the house. But the damsel knew not of the piece
of mirror, so she could tell the old woman nothing.
“Find out from thy lord,” said the old woman, and
scarcely had the youth come home, scarce had he had
time to eat, than she wheedled him so that he showed
her the mirror.

That was all the old woman wanted. A couple of
days she let go by, but on the third and the fourth
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR 183

days she bade the damsel beg her lord for the piece of
mirror go that she might amuse herself therewith, and
make the time pass more easily. And indeed she
had only to ask her lord for it, for he, not suspecting
her falseness, gave it to her. And in the meantime
the old woman was not asleep. She knew where the
damsel had put the mirror, stole it, and when she
looked into it the negro efrit appeared. ‘‘ What is
thy command?” inquired he of the old woman.
“Take me with this damsel to her father’s palace,”
was her first command. Her second command made
of the youth’s palace a heap of ashes, so that when
the young wood-cutter returned home he found
nought but the cat meeowing among the ashes.
There was also a small piece of meat there; the
Sultan’s daughter had thrown it down for the cat.

The youth took up the fragment of meat and set
out to seck his consort. Find her he would, though he
roamed the whole world over. He went on and on,
he searched and searched till he came to the city
where his wife lived. He went up to the palace, and
there he begged the cook to take him into the kitchen
as a servant out of pure compassion. In a couple
of days he had learnt from his fellow-servants in
the kitchen that the Sultan’s daughter had returned
home.

One day the cook fell sick and there was no heart
184 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

in him to attend to the cooking. The youth, seeing
this, bade him rest, and said he would cook the
food in his stead. The cook agreed, and told him
what to cook, and how to season it. So the youth
set to work, roasting and stewing, and when he sent
up the dishes, he also sent up the scrap of food
that he had found on the ashes, and put it on the
damsel’s plate. Scarcely had the damsel cast eyes
on this little scrap than she knew within herself
that her lord was near her. So she called the cook
and asked whom he had with him in the kitchen. At
first he denied that he had any one, but at last he
confessed that he had taken a poor lad in to assist
him.

Then the damsel went to her father and said to
him that there was a young lad in the kitchen who
prepared coffee so well that she should like some coffee
from his hands. So the lad was ordered up, and from
thenceforth he prepared the coffee and took it to the
Sultan’s daughter. So they came together again, and
she told her lord how the matter had gone. Then
they took counsel how they should await their turn
and get the mirror back again.

Scarcely had the youth gone in to the damsel than
the old woman appeared. Although she had not seen
him for long, she recognized him, and, looking into
the mirror, caused the poor lad to be sent back again
ae ee ee ae



THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR 185

to the ashes of his old palace. There he found the
cat still squatting. When she felt hungry she caught
mice, and such ravages did she make upon them
that at last the Padishah of the mice had scarce a
soldier left.

Very wroth was the poor Padishah, but he durst not
tackle the cat. One day, however, he observed the
youth, went up to him, and begged his assistance in
his dire distress, for if he waited till the morrow his
whole realm would be ruined.

“Tl help thee,” said the youth, “though, indeed,
I have enough troubles of my own to carry already.”

“What is thy trouble?” asked the Padishah of the
mice. The youth told him about the history of the
piece of looking-glass, and how it had been stolen from
him, and into whose hands it had fallen.

“Then I can help thee,” cried the Padishah, where-
upon he called together all the mice in the world. And
he asked which of them had access to this palace, and
which knew of such-and-such an old woman, and the
piece of looking-glass. At these words a lame mouse
hobbled forth, kissed the ground at the feet of the
Padishah, and said that it was his wont to steal food
from the old woman’s box. He had seen through
the keyhole how she took out a little bit of looking-
glass every evening and hid it under a cushion.

Then the Padishah commanded him to go and steal
186 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

this bit of mirror. The mouse, however, begged that
he might have two comrades, sat on the back of one
of them, and so went on to the old woman. It was
evening when they arrived there, and the old woman
was just eating her supper. “We have come at the
right time,” said the lame mouse, “we shall get some-
thing to eat.” And with that they scampered into
the room, satisfied their hunger, and waited for the
night. They arranged between them what they
should do, and when the old woman lay down they
waited till she was asleep. Scarcely had she fallen
asleep than the lame mouse leaped into her bed, made
for her face, and began tickling her nose with the end
of its tail.

“P-chi! p-chi!” the old woman sneezed, so that
her head nearly leaped from her shoulders. “ P-chi !
p-chi!” she sneezed again, and meanwhile the two
other little mice rushed out, picked up the piece of
looking-glass from underneath the cushion, took the
lame mouse on their backs, and hurried home again.

The youth rejoiced greatly at the sight of the mirror,
then he took the cat with him so that it should do no
more harm to the mice, and went into other parts.
There he took out the bit of mirror, looked into it,
and lo! the black efrit stood before him and said :
« What is thy command, my Sultan ?”

The youth asked for a raiment of cloth of gold and
THE SERPENT-PERI AND THE MAGIC MIRROR 187

a whole army of soldiers, and before he had time to
look round, in front of him stood costly raiment, and
he put it on; and a beautiful horse, and he sat on its
back; and a large army which marched behind him
into the city. When he arrived there he stood before
the palace, and surrounded it with his soldiers. Oh,
how terrified the Padishah was at the sight of that
vast army !

The youth went into the palace, and demanded the
damsel from her father. In his terror the Padishah
eave him not only his daughter but his realm. The
old woman was given into the hands of the big-lipped
efrit, but the bride and bridegroom lived happily in
the midst of their glorious kingdom. And close beside
them stood the magic mirror that made all their woes
to vanish.
STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE

THERE was once a poor woman who had one
daughter, and this poor woman used to go out and
wash linen, while her daughter remained at home at
her working-table. One day she was sitting by the
window as was her wont, when a little bird flew on to
the sewing-table and said to the damsel: “ Oh, little
damsel, poor little damsel! death is thy Kismet!” *
whereupon it flew away again. From that hour the
damsel’s peace of mind was gone, and in the evening
she told her mother what the bird had said to her.
“Close the door and the window,” said her mother,
“and sit at thy work as usual.”

So the next morning she closed the door and the
window and sat her down at her work. But all at
once there came a “ Whirr-r-r-r!” and there was
the little bird again on the work-table. “Oh, little
damsel, poor little damsel! death is thy Kismet,” and
with that it flew away again. The damsel was more

1 Fate.
STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE 189

and more terrified than ever at these words, but her
mother comforted her again: “ To-morrow,” said she,
“close fast the door and the window, and get into the
cupboard. There light a candle, and go on with thy
work !”

Scarcely had her mother departed with the dawn
than the girl closed up everything, lit a candle, and
locked herself in the cupboard with her work-table.
But scarcely had she stitched two stitches when the
bird stood before her again, and said: “Oh, little
damsel, poor little damsel! death is thy Kismet!”
and whirr-r-r-r! it flew away again. The damsel
was in such distress that she scarce knew where she
was. She threw her work aside, and began torment-
ing herself as to what this saying might mean. Her
mother, too, could not get to the bottom of the
matter, so she remained at home the next day, that
she also might see the bird, but the bird did not
come again.

So their sorrow was perpetual, and all the joy of
their life was gone. They never stirred from the
house but watched and waited continually, if per-
chance the bird might come again. One day the
damsels of their neighbour came to them and asked
the woman to let her daughter go with them. “If
she went for a little outing,” said they, ‘‘ she might
forget her trouble.” The woman did not like to let
190 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

her go, but they promised to take great care of her
and not to lose sight of her, so at last she let her go.

So the damsels went into the fields and danced and
diverted themselves till the day was on the decline.
On the way home they sat down by a well and began
to drink out of it. The poor woman’s daughter also
went to drink of the water, when lo! a wall rose up
between her and the other damsels, but such a wall as
never the eye of man yet beheld. A voice could not
get beyond it, it was so high, and a man could not
get through it, it was so hard. Oh, how terrified was
the poor woman’s daughter, and what weeping and
wailing and despair there was among her comrades.
What would become of the poor girl, and what would
become of her poor mother !

“TJ will not tell,” said one of them, “for she will
not believe us!”—‘‘ But what shall we say to her
mother,” cried another, ‘‘ now that she has disappeared
from before our eyes ?”—“‘ It is thy fault, it is thy
fault!” “’Twas thou that asked her!” ‘No, ’twas
thou.” So they fell to blaming each other, looking
all the time at the great wall.

Meanwhile the mother was awaiting her daughter.
She stood at the door of the house and watched the
damsels coming. The damsels came weeping sore,
and scarce dared to tell the poor woman what had
befallen her daughter. The woman rushed to the
muy dt
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The Poor Woman and the Three Damsels.—p. 190.
STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE 191

great wall, her daughter was inside it and she herself
was outside, and so they wept and wailed so long as
either of them had a tear to flow. :

In the midst of this great weeping the damsel fell
asleep, and when she woke up next morning she saw
a great door beside the wall. “ Happen to me what
may, if I am to perish, let me perish, but open this
door I will!”—so she opened it. Beyond the door
was a beautiful palace, the like of which is not to be
seen even in dreams. This palace had a vast hall, and
on the wall of this hall hung forty keys. The damsel
took the keys and began opening the doors of all the
rooms around her, and the first set of rooms was full
of silver, and the second set full of gold, and the
third set full of diamonds, and the fourth set full of
emeralds—in a word, each set of rooms was full of
stones more precious than the precious things of the
rooms before it, so that the eyes of the damsel were
almost blinded by their splendour.

She entered the fortieth room, and. there, extended
on the floor, was a beautiful Bey, with a fan of pearls
beside him, and on his breast a piece of paper with
these words written on it: “ Whoever fans me for
forty days and prays all that time by my side will
find her Kismet!” Then the damsel thought of
the little bird. So it was by the side of this sleeper
that she was to meet her fate! So she made her
192 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

ablutions, and, taking the fan in her hand, she sat down
beside the Bey. Day and night she kept on fanning
him, praying continually till the fortieth day was at
hand. And on the morning of the last day she
peeped out of the window and beheld a negro girl in
front of the palace. Then she thought she would call
this girl for a moment and ask her to pray beside the
Bey, while she herself made her ablutions and took a
little repose. So she called the negro girl and set her
beside the Bey, that she might pray beside him and
fan his face.. But the damsel hastened away and
made her ablutions and adorned herself, so that the
Bey, when he awoke, might see his life’s Kismet at
her best and rejoice at the sight.

Meanwhile the black girl read the piece of paper, and
while the white damsel tarried the youth awoke. He
looked about him, and scarcely did he see the black
girl than he embraced her and called her his wife.
The poor white damsel could scarce believe her own
eyes when she entered the room; but the black girl,
who was jealous of her, said to the Bey: “I, a Sultan’s ©
daughter, am not ashamed to go about just as I am,
and this chit of a serving-maid dares to appear before
me arrayed so finely!” Then she chased her out of
the room, and sent her to the kitchen to finish her
work and boil and fry. The Bey was surprised,
but he would not say a word, for the negro girl was


STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE 193

his bride, while the other damsel was only a kitchen-
wench.

Now the Feast of Bairam fell about this time, and
as is the custom at such times, the Bey would fain have
given gifts to them of his household. So he went to
the negress and asked her what she would like on
the Feast of Bairam. And the negress asked for a
garment that never a needle had sewn and never
scissors had cut. Then he went down into the kitchen
and asked the damsel what she would like. “The
stone-of-patience has a yellow colour, and the knife-
of-patience has a brown handle, bring them both to
me,” said the damsel. So the Bey went on his way,
and got the negress her garment, but the stone-of-
patience and the knife-of-patience he could find no-
where. What was he to do?—he could not return
home without the gifts. So he got on board his ship.

The ship had only got half-way when suddenly it
stopped short, and could neither go backwards nor
forwards. The captain was terrified, and told his
passengers that there was some one on board who had
not kept his word, and that was why they could not

get on. Then the Bey came forward, and said that he
"it was who had not kept his word. So they put the
Bey ashore, that he might keep his promise and then
return back to the ship. Then the Bey walked along

the sea-shore, and from the sea-shore he came to a
oO
194 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

great valley, and he went wandering on and on till he
stood beside a large spring. And he had scarce trodden
on the stones around it when suddenly a huge negro
stood before him and asked him what he wanted.

“The stone-of-patience is of a yellow colour and
the knife-of-patience has a brown sheath, bring them
both to me!” said the Bey to the negro. And the
next moment both the stone and the knife were in his
hand, and he came back to the ship, went on board,
and returned home. He gave the garment to his
wife, but the stone and the knife he put in the
kitchen. But the Bey was curious to know what the
damsel would do with them, so one evening he crept
down into the kitchen and watched her.

When night approached she took the knife in her
hand and placed the stone in front of her and began
telling them her story. Ske told them what the little
bird had thrice told her, and in what great terror
both her mother and herself had fallen.

And while she was looking at the stone it suddenly
began to swell, and its yellow hue hissed and bubbled
as if there were life in it.

Then the damsel went on to say how she had
wandered into the palace of the Bey, how she had
prayed forty days beside him, and how she had en-
trusted the negress with the praying while she went
to wash and dress herself. .
STONE-PATIENCE AND KNIFE-PATIENCE 195

And the yellow stone swelled again, and hissed and
foamed as if it were about to burst.

Then the damsel told how the negress had deceived
her, how instead of her the Bey had taken the negress
to wife.

And all this time the yellow stone went on swelling
and hissing and foaming as if there were a real living
heart inside it, till suddenly it burst and turned to
ashes.

Then the damsel took the little knife by the handle
and said: “Oh, thou yellow patience-stone, thou
wert but a stone, and yet thou couldst not endure that
I, a tender little damsel, a poor little damsel, should
thus be thrust out.” And with that she would have
buried the knife in her breast, but the Bey rushed
forward and snatched away the knife.

“Thou art my real true Kismet,” cried the youth,
as he took her into the upper chamber in the place of
the negress. But the treacherous negress they slew,
and they sent for the damsel’s mother and all lived
together with great joy.

And the little bird came sometimes and perched in
the window of the palace, and sang his joyful lay.
And this is what he sang: “Oh, little damsel, happy
little damsel, that hast found thy Kismet!” —
THE GHOST OF THE SPRING AND THE
SHREW

Once upon a time which was no time if it was
a time, in the days when my mother was my mother
and I was my mother’s daughter, when my mother
was my daughter and I was my mother’s mother,
in those days, I say, it happened that we once went
along the road, and we went on and on and on. We
went for a little way and we went for a long way,
we went over mountains and over valleys, we went
for a month continually, and when we looked behind
us we hadn’t gone a step. So we set out again, and
we went on and on and on till we came to the garden
of the Chin-i-Machin Pasha.1 We went in, and there
was a miller grinding grain, and a cat was by his
side. And the cat had woe in its eye, and the cat
had woe on its noge, and the cat had woe in its
mouth, and the cat had woe in its fore paw, and the cat
had woe in its hind paw, and the cat had woe in its

1 Emperor of China.

196
.



:
|



THE GHOST OF THE SPRING 197

throat, and. the cat had woe in its ear, and the cat had
woe in its face, and the cat had woe in its fur, and the
cat had woe in its tail.

Hard by this realm lived a poor wood-cutter, who
had nothing in the world but his poverty and a
horrid shrew of a wife. What little money the poor
man made his wife always took away, so that he
had not a single para’ left. If his supper was over-
salted—and so it was many a time—and her lord
chanced to say to her: “Mother, thou hast put
too much salt in the food,” so venomous was she
that next day she would cook the supper without
one single grain of salt, so that there was no savour
init. But if he dared to say: “There is no savour
in the food, mother!” she would put so much salt in it
next day that her husband could not eat thereof at all.

Now what was it that befell this poor man one
day? This is what befell. He put by a couple of
pence from his earnings to buy a rope to hang
himself withal. But his wife found them in her
husband’s pocket: “Ho, ho!” she cried, “so thou
dost hide thy money in corners to give it to thy
comrades, eh?” Jn vain the poor man swore by his
head that it was not so, his wife would not believe
him. “My dear,” said her husband, “I wanted to
buy me a rope with the money.”

1 Farthing.
198 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

“To hang thyself with, eh?” inquired his affec-
tionate spouse.

“ Well, thou knowest what a hideous racket thou
dost make sometimes,” replied her husband, meaning
to pacify her. :

“What I have done hitherto is little enough for
a blockhead like thee,” she replied, and with that
she gave her husband such a blow that it seemed
to him as if the red dawn was flashing before
him.

The next morning the wood-cutter rose early,
saddled his ass, and went towards the mountains.
All that he said to his wife before starting was to
beg her not to follow him into the forest. This was
quite enough for the wife. Immediately he was gone
she saddled her ass, and after her husband she went
without more ado. ‘‘ Who knows,’ murmured she
to herself, “what he may not be up to in the
mountains, if I am not there to look after him!”

The man saw that his wife was coming after him, but
he made as if he did not see, never spoke a word, and
as soon as he got to the foot of the mountain he set
about wood-cutting. His wife, however, for she was
a restless soul, went up and down and all about the
mountain, poked her nose into everything, till at last
her attention was fixed by a deserted well, and she
made straight for it.


THE GHOST OF THE SPRING 199

Then her husband cried to her: ‘Take care, there’s
a well right before thee !”

The only effect this warning had upon the wife
was to make her draw still nearer. Again he cried
to her: “Dost thou not hear me speak to thee? Go
not further on, for there’s a well in front of thee.”

“What do I care what he says?” thought she.
Then she took another step forward, but before she
could take another the earth gave way beneath her,
and into the well she plumped. As for the husband,
he was thinking of something else, for he always
minded his own business, so, his work over, he took
his ass and never stopped till he got home.

The next day, at dawn, he again arose, saddled the
ass, and went to the mountains, when the thought of
his wife suddenly came into his mind. “T'll see
what has become of the poor woman!” said he. So
he went to the opening of the well and looked into
it, but nothing was to be seen or heard of his wife.
His heart was sore, for anyhow was she not his wife ?
and he began to think whether he could get her out
of the well. So he took a rope, let it down into the
well, and cried into the great depth thereof: “Catch
hold of the rope, mother, and I'll draw thee up!”

Presently the man felt that the rope had become
very heavy. He pulled away at it with all his
might, he tugged and tugged—what creature of
200 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

Allah’s could it be that he was pulling out of the
well? And lo! it was none other than a hideous
ghost! The poor wood-cutter was sore afraid.

“Rise up, poor man, and fear not,” said the ghost.
“The mighty Allah rather bless thee for thy deed.
Thou hast saved me from so great a danger, that to the
very day of judgment I will not forget thy good deed.”

Then the poor man began to wonder what this
great danger might be.

“How many many years I lived peaceably in this
well I know not,” continued the ghost, “but up to
this very day I knew no trouble. But yesterday—
whence she came I know not—an old woman sud-
denly plumped down on my shoulders, and caught
me so tightly by both my ears, that I could not get
loose from her for a moment. By a thousand good
fortunes thou didst come to the spot, let down thy
rope, and call to her to seize hold of it. For in
trying to get hold of it she let me go, and I at once
seized the rope myself, and, the merciful Allah be
praised for it, here I am on dry land again. Good
awaits thee for thy good deed; list now to what I
say to thee!”

With that the ghost drew forth three wooden
tablets, gave them to the wood-cutter, and said to
him: “ Tnow go to take possession of the daughter of
the Sultan. Up to this day the princess has been hale


THE GHOST OF THE SPRING 201

and well, but now she will have leeches and wise
men without number, but all in vain, not one of
them will be able to cure her. Thou also wilt hear
of the matter, thou wilt hasten to the Padishah,
moisten these three wooden tablets with water, lay
them on the face of the damsel, and I will come out
of her, and a rich reward will be thine.”

With that the wood-cutter took the three tablets,
put them in his pocket, and the ghost went to the
right and he went to the left, and neither of them
thought any more of the old woman in the well. But
let us first follow the ghost.

Scarcely had this son of a devil quitted the wood-
cutter than he stood in the Serai of the Padishah,
and entered into the poor daughter of the Sultan.
The poor girl immediately fell to the ground in great
pain. ‘“O my head! O my head!” she cried con-
tinually. They sent word to the Padishah, and he,
hastening thither, found his daughter lying on the
ground and groaning. Straightway he sent for
leeches, wise men, drugs, and incense, but none of
them assuaged her pain. They sent for them a
second time, they sent for them a third time, but
all their labour was in vain. At last they had ten
doctors and ten wise men trying what they could
do, and all the time the poor girl kept moaning:
“My head, my head!”
202 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

“© my sweet child,” groaned the Padishah, “if
thy head aches, believe me my head, and my heart
also, ache a thousand times as much to hear thee.
What shall I do for thee? I know what I will do.
I will go call the astrologers, perchance they will
know more than I do.” And with that he called
together all the most famous astrologers in his
kingdom. One of them had one plan, another had
another, but not one of them could cure the complaint
of the poor damsel.

But now let us see what Docume of the poor
wood-cutter.

He lived on in the world without his wife, and
gradually he forgot all about her, and about the
ghost and the three wooden tablets, and the ghost’s
advice and promise. But one day, when he had
no thought at all of these things, a herald from the
city of the Padishah came to where he was with
a firman? in his hand, and read this out of it in
a loud voice: “The damsel, the Sultan’s daughter,
is very sick. The leeches, the wise men, the astro-
logers, all have seen her, and not one of them can
cure her complaint. Whoever is a master of mys-
teries, let him come forward and doctor her. If he
be a Mussulman, and cure her, the Sultan’s daughter
now and my realm after my death shall be his

1 An Imperial rescript.


THE GHOST OF THE SPRING 203

reward ; and if he be a Giaour’ and cure her, all the
treasures in my realm shall be his.”

The wood-cutter needed no more to remind him of
the ghost, the three tablets, and his wife. He arose
and went up to the herald. “By the mercy of
Allah I will cure the Sultan’s daughter, if she be
still alive,” said he. At these words the servant of
the Padishah caught hold of the wood-cutter, and
led him into the Serai. .

Word was sent at once of his arrival to the
Padishah, and in an instant everything was made
ready for him to enter the sick chamber. There
before him lay the poor damsel, and all she did was
to ery continually: ‘My head, my head!” The
wood-cutter brought forth the wooden tablets, moist-
ened them, and scarcely had he spread them on the
Sultan’s daughter than immediately she became as
well again as if she had never been ill. At this there
was great joy and gladness in the Serai, and they
gave the daughter of the Sultan to the wood-cutter ;
so the poor man became the son-in-law of the
Padishah.

Now this Padishah had a brother who was also
a Padishah, and his kingdom was the neighbouring
kingdom. He also had a daughter, and it occurred
to the ghost of the well to possess her likewise.

1 An unbeliever.
204 TURKISH FAIRY TALES

So she also began to be tormented in the same way,
and nobody could find a cure for her complaint.
They searched and searched for assistance high and
low, till at last they heard how the daughter of the
neighbouring Padishah had been cured of a like
sickness. So that other Padishah sent many men
into the neighbouring kingdom, and begged the first
Padishah, for the love of Allah, to send thither his
son-in-law to cure the other damsel also. If he
cured her he was to have the damsel for his second
wife.

So the Padishah sent his son-in-law that he might
cure the damsel—’twould be nothing to such a master
of mysteries as he, they said. All that he could say
was in vain, the poor fellow had to set out, and as
soon as he arrived they led him at once into the
sick-chamber. But now the ghost of the well had
a word to say in the matter.

For that evil spirit was furious with his poor
comrade. “Thou didst a good deed to me, it is
true,” began the ghost, “ but thou canst not say that
I remained thy debtor. I left for thy sake the
beautiful daughter of the Sultan, and I chose out
another for myself, and thou wouldst now take her
from me also? Well, wait a while, and thou shalt
see that for this deed of thine I will take them both
away from thee.”
THE GHOST OF THE SPRING 205

At this the poor man was sore troubled.

“‘T did not come hither for the damsel,” said he,
“she is thy property, and, if such be thy desire,
thou mayest take mine away also.”

“Then what’s thy errand here?” roared the ghost.

“ Alas! ’tis my wife, the old woman of the well,”
sighed the former wood-cutter, ‘“‘and I only left her
in the well that I might be rid of her.”

On hearing this the ghost was terribly frightened,
and it was with a small voice that he now inquired
whether by chance she had come to light again.

“Yes, indeed, she’s outside,’ sighed the man,
“wherever I may go I am saddled with her. I
haven’t the heart to free myself from her. Hark!
she’s at the door now, shell be in the room in a
moment.”

The ghost needed no more. Forthwith he left the
daughter of the Sultan, and the Serai, and the whole
city, and the whole kingdom, so that not even the
rumour of him remained. And not a child of man
has ever seen him since.

But the daughter of the Sultan recovered instantly,
and they gave her to the former wood-cutter, and
he took her home as his second wife.

ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES
THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-RIDING-
ON-THE-WORSE-HALF-OF-A-LAME-
HORSE

Once upon a time, long long ago, in the days when
poplars bore pears and rushes violets, when bears
could switch themselves with their tails like cows, and
wolves and lambs kissed and cuddled each other,
there lived an Emperor whose hair was already white,
and who yet had never a son to bless himself with.
The poor Emperor would have given anything to have
had a little son of his own like other men, but all his
wishes were in vain.

At last, when he was quite an old old man, Fortune
took pity on him also, and a darling of a boy was
born to him, the like of which the world had never
seen before. The Emperor gave him the name of
Aleodor, and gathered east and west, north and south,
together to rejoice in his joy at the child’s christening.

The revels lasted three days and three nights, and all
209 P
210 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

the guests who made merry there with the HKmperor
could think of nothing else for the rest of their lives.

But the lad grew up as strong as an oak and as
lovely as a rose, while his father the Emperor drew
nearer every day to the edge of the grave, and when
the hour of his death arrived he took the child on his
knees and said to him :

“My darling son, behold the Lord calls me. The
moment is at hand when I am to share the common
lot of man. I foresee that thou wilt become a great
man, and though I be dead my bones will rejoice in
the tomb at thy noble deeds. As to the administra-
tion of this realm I need tell thee nought, for thou,
with thy wisdom, wilt know how it behoves a king
to rule. One thing there is, nevertheless, that I must
tell thee. Dost thou see that mountain over yonder ?
Beware of ever setting thy foot upon it, for twill be
to thy hurt and harm. That mountain belongs to
the ‘ Half-man-riding-on-the-worse-half-of-a-lame-
horse,’ and whosoever ventures upon that mountam
cannot escape unscathed.”

He had no sooner said these words than his throat —
rattled thrice, and he gave up the ghost. He
departed to his place like every other human soul
that is born into the world, though there was never
Emperor like him since the world began. Those of
his household bewailed him, his great nobles bewailed
. BE, Sean ii Sr
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210,

p.

The Emperor and the Young Aleodor.
THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-HALF-HORSE 211

him, his people bewailed him also, and then they had
to bury him.

_ Aleodor, from the moment that he ascended the
throne of his father, ruled the land wisely like a-
mature statesman, though in age he was but a child.
All the world delighted in his sway, and men thanked
Heaven for allowing them to live in the days of such
a prince.

All the time that was not taken up by affairs of
State, Aleodor spent in the chase. But he always
bore in mind the precepts of his father, and took care
not to exceed the bounds which had been set him.

One day, however—how it came about I know not
—but anyhow he fell into a brown study, and never
noticed that he had overstepped the domains of the
Half-man till, after taking a dozen steps or so on-
wards, he found himself face to face with the monster.
That he was trespassing on the grounds of this
stunted and terrible creature did not trouble him
over-much, it was the thought that he had trans-
gressed the dying command of his dear father that
grieved him.

“Ho, ho!” cried the hideous monster, “dost thou
not know that every scoundrel who oversteps my
bounds becomes my property ?”

“Yes,” replied Aleodor, “but I must tell thee that
it was through want of thought and without wishing
212 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

it that I have trodden on thy ground. Against thee
I have no evil design at all.”

“T know better than that,’ replied the monster ;
“but I see that, like all cowards, thou dost think it
best to make excuses.”

“Nay, so sure as God preserves me, I am no
coward. I have told thee the simple truth; but if
thou wouldst fight, I am ready. Choose thy weapons !
Shall we slash with sabres, or slog with clubs, or
wrestle together ?”

“Neither the one nor the other,” replied the
monster. ‘‘ One way only canst thou escape thy just
punishment—thou must fetch me the daughter of the
Green Emperor!”

Aleodor would very much have liked to have got
out of the difficulty some other way, as affairs of State
would not allow him to take so long a journey, a
journey on which he could find no guide to direct
him; but what did the monster know of all that?
Aleodor felt that if he would avoid the shame of
being thought a robber and a trampler on the rights
of others, he must indeed find the daughter of the
Green Emperor. Besides, he wanted to escape with
a whole skin if he could; so at last he promised
that he would do the service required of him.

Now the Half-man-riding-on-the-worse-half-of-a-
lame-horse knew very well that, as a man of honour,
THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-HALF-HORSE 213

Aleodor would never depart from his plighted word,
so he said to him: “ Go now, in God’s name, and may
good luck attend thee!”

So Aleodor departed. He went on and on, think-
ing over and over again how he was to accomplish
his task, and so keep his word, when he came to the
margin of a pond, and there he saw a pike dashing
its life out on the shore. He immediately went up
to it to satisfy his hunger with it, when the pike said
to him: “Slay me not, Boy-Beautiful!* but cast me
rather back into the water again, and then I will do
thee good whenever thou dost think of me.”

Aleodor listened to the pike, and threw it back into
the water again. Then the pike said to him again:
“Take this scale, and whenever thou dost look at it
and think of me I will be with thee.”

Then the youth went on further and marvelled
greatly at such a strange encounter.

Presently he fell in with a crow that had one wing
broken. He would have killed the crow and eaten it,
but the crow said to him: “Boy-Beautiful, Boy-
Beautiful! why wilt thou burden thy soul on my
account? Far better were it if thou didst bind up
my wing, and much good will I requite thee with for
thy kindness.” |

1 Fet frumosii, the favourite name for all young heroes in
Roumanian fairy-tales.
- 214 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

Aleodor listened, for his heart was as kind as
his hand was cunning; and he bound up the crow’s
wing. When he made ready to go on again, the
crow said to him: “Take this feather, thou gallant
youth! and whenever thou dost look at it and
think of me, I will be with thee.”

Then Aleodor took the feather and went on his
way. He hadn’t gone a hundred paces further when
he stumbled upon an ant. He would have trodden
upon it, when the ant said to him: “Spare my
life, O Emperor Aleodor, and [’ll deliver thee also from
death! ‘Take this little bit of membrane from my
wing, and whenever thou dost think of me, I'll be
with thee.”

When Aleodor heard these words, and how the
ant called him by his name, he raised his foot again
and let the ant go where it would. He also went
on his way, and after journeying for I know not how
many days he came at last to the palace of the Green
Emperor. There he knocked at the door, and stood
waiting for some one to come out and ask him what
he wanted.

He stood there one day, he stood there two days,
but as for any one coming out to ask him what he
wanted, there was no sign of it. When the third day
dawned, however, the Green Emperor called to his
servants and gave them a talking to that they were
THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-HALF-HORSE 215

likely to remember. ‘“ How comes it,” said he, “ that
a man should be standing at my gates three days
without any one going out to ask him what he wants?
Is this what I pay you wages for?”

The servants of the Green Emperor looked up, and
they looked down, but they had not one word to say
for themselves. At last they went and called Aleodor
and led him before the Emperor.

“What dost thou want, my son?” inquired the
Emperor ; “and wherefore art thou waiting at the
gates of my court?”

“T have come, great Emperor, to seek thy
daughter.”

“Good, my son. But, first of all, we must make
“a compact together, for such is the custom of my
court. Thou must hide thyself wheresoever thou
wilt three times running. If my daughter finds thee
all three times, thy head shall be struck off and stuck
on a stake, the only one out of a hundred that has
not a suitor’s head upon it. But if she does not find
thee thrice, thou shalt have her from me with all
imperial courtesy.”

“ My hope, great Emperor, is in the Lord, Who will
not allow me to perish. We will put something else
on this stake of thine, but not the head of a man.
Let us make the compact.”

“Thou dost agree ?”
216 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

“T agree.”

So they made them a compact, and the deeds were
drawn. out and signed and sealed.

Then the daughter of the Emperor met him next
day, and it was arranged that he should hide himself
as best he could. But now he was in an agony that
tortured him worse than death, for he bethought
him again and again where and how he could best
hide himself, for nothing less than his head was at
stake. And as he kept walking about, and brooding
and pondering, he remembered the pike. Then he
took out the fish’s scale, looked at it, and thought of
the fish’s master, and immediately, oh wonderful !—
the pike stood before him and said : “ What dost thou
want of me, Boy-Beautiful ?”

‘What do I want? Thou mayest well ask that !
Look what has happened to me! Canst thou not tell
me what to do?”

“That is thy business no longer. Leave it to
me !” .

And immediately striking Aleodor with his tail,
he turned him into a little shell-fish, and hid him
among the other little shell-fish at the bottom of
the sea.

When the damsel appeared, she put on her eye-
glass and looked for him in every direction, but could
see him nowhere. Her other wooers had hidden


THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-HALF-HORSE 217

themselves in caves, or behind houses, or under
haycocks and haystacks, or in some hole or corner,
but Aleodor hid himself in such a way that the
damsel began to fear that she would be vanquished.
Then it occurred to her to turn her eye-glass towards
the sea, and she saw him beneath a heap of mussels.
But you must know that her eye-glass was a magic
eye-glass.

“T see thee, thou rascal,’ cried she, “how thou
hast bothered me, to be sure! From being a man thou
hast made thyself a mussel, and hidden thyself at the
‘ bottom of the sea.”

This he couldn’t deny, so of course he had to come
up again.

But she said to the Emperor: ‘‘ Methinks, dear
father, this youth will suit me. He is nice and
comely. Even if I find him all three times let me
have him, for he is not stupid like the others. Why,
thou canst see from his figure even how different
he is.”

“ We shall see,” replied the Emperor.

On the second day Aleodor bethought him of the
crow, and immediately the crow stood before him,
and said to him: “What dost thou want, my
master ?”

“Look now, senseless one! what has happened to
me. Canst thou not show me a way out of it?”
218 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

“Let ustry!” and with that it struck him with
its wing and turned him into a young crow, and
placed him in the midst of a flock of crows that
were flying high in the air in the teeth of a fierce
tempest.

Then the damsel came again with her eye-glass and
searched for him in every direction. He was nowhere
to be found. She looked for him on the earth, but he
was not there. She looked for him in the rivers and
in the sea, but he was not there. The damsel grew
pensive. She searched and searched till mid-day,
when it occurred to her to look upwards also. And
perceiving him in the glory of the sky in the midst
of a swarm of crows, she pointed him out with her
finger and cried: “ Look! look! Rogue that thou
art! Come down from there, O man, that hast made
thyself into a bit of a bird! Nothing in the fields of
heaven can escape my eye!”

Then he came down, for what else could he do ?
Even the Emperor himself now began to be amazed
at the skill and cunning of Aleodor, and lent an ear
to the prayers of his daughter. Inasmuch, however,
as the compact declared that Aleodor was to hide
three times, the Emperor said to his daughter:
“Wait once more, for I am curious to see what place
he will find to hide himself in next.”

The third day, early in the morning, he thought
THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-HALF-HORSE 219

of the ant, and—whisk !—the ant was by his side.
When she had found out what he wanted she said
to him: “ Leave it to me, and if she find thee I am
here to help thee.”

So the ant turned him into a flower-seed, and
hid him in the very skirts of the damsel without her
perceiving it.

Then the Emperor’s daughter rose up, took her
eye-glass, and sought for him all day long, but look
where she would she could not find him. She
plagued herself almost to death in her search, for she
felt that he was close at hand, though see him she
could not. She looked through her eye-glass on the
ground, and in the sea, and up in the sky, but she
could see him nowhere, and towards evening, tired
out by so much searching, she exclaimed: “Show
thyself then, this once! I feel that thou art close
at hand, and yet I cannot see thee. Thou hast
conquered, and I am thine.”

Then when he heard her say that he had conquered,
he slipped slowly down from her skirts and revealed
himself. The Emperor had now nothing more to say,
so he gave the youth his daughter, and when they
departed, he escorted them to the boundaries of his
empire with great pomp and ceremony.

While they were on the road they stopped at a
place to rest, and after they had refreshed themselves
220 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

somewhat with food, he laid his head in her lap and
fell asleep. The daughter of the Emperor could not
forbear from looking at him, and her eyes filled with
tears as they feasted on his comeliness and beauty.
Then her heart grew soft within her, and she could
not help kissing him. But Aleodor, when he awoke,
gave her a buffet with the palm of his hand that
awoke the echoes.

“Nay but, my dear Aleodor!” cried she, “ thou
hast indeed a heavy hand.”

“T have slapped thee,” said he, “for the deed thou
hast done, for I have not taken thee for myself, but
for him who bade me seek thee.”

“Good, my brother! but why didst thou not tell
me so at home? for then I also would have known
what to do. But let be now, for all that is past.”

Then they set out again till they came alive and
well to the Half-man-riding-on-the-worse-half-of-a-
lame-horse.

“Lo, now! I have done my service,” said Aleodor,
and with that he would have departed. But when
the girl beheld the monster, she shivered with disgust,
and would not stay with him for a single moment.
The hideous cripple drew near to the maiden, and
began to caress her with honeyed words, that so she
might go with him willingly. But the girl said to
him: “ Depart from me, Satan, and go to thy mother
THE STORY OF THE HALF-MAN-HALF-HORSE 221

- Hell, who hath cast thee upon the face of the earth !”
Then the half-monster half-man was near to melting
for the love he had for the damsel, and, writhing away
on his belly, he fetched his mother that she might
help to persuade the maid to be his wife. But mean-
while the damsel had dug a little trench all round
her, and stood rooted to the spot with her eyes fixed
on the ground. The hideous satanic skeleton of a
monster could not get at her.

“Depart from the face of the earth, thou abomin-
ation!” cried she; “ the world is well rid of such a
pestilential monster as thou art!”

Still he strove and strove to get at her, but finding
at last he could not reach her, he burst with rage and
fury that a mere woman should have so covered him
with shame and reproach.

Then Aleodor added the domain of the Half-man-
riding-on-the-worse-half-of-a-lame-horse to his own
possessions, took the daughter of the Green Emperor
to wife, and returned to his own empire. And when
his people saw him coming back in the company of a
smiling spouse as beautiful as the stars of heaven,
they welcomed him with great joy, and, mounting
once more his imperial throne, he ruled his people in
peace and plenty till the day of his death.

And now I'll mount my horse again, and say an
“Our Father” before I go.
THE ENCHANTED HOG

ONcE upon a time, a long long time ago, when
fleas were shod with ninety and nine pieces of iron,
and flew up into the blue sky to fetch us down fairy-
tales, there lived an Emperor who had three daughters.
One day, when he was going to battle, he called these
daughters to him and said to them:

“Look now, my darlings! Needs must that I go
to the wars. My foe is advancing against me with
a huge host. ’Tis with great bitterness of heart that
I part from you. In-my absence, take care that you
have your wits about you, behave well, and look after
the affairs of the household. You have my leave to
walk in the garden and enter all the rooms of my
house, only in the chamber at the bottom of the
corridor on the right-hand side you must not enter,
or it will not be well with you.”

“Depart in peace, papa!” cried they. ‘Never

yet have we disobeyed the words of thy commands,
222
THE ENCHANTED HOG 223

Go without any fear of us, and God give thee victory
over all thine enemies!”

So when he was quite ready to depart, the Emperor
gave them the keys of all his chambers; but once
more he put them in mind of his command, and then
he bade them good-bye and departed.

The daughters of the Emperor kissed his hand with
tears in their eyes, and wished him victory once more,
and then the eldest of the three daughters received
the keys from the hands of the Emperor. .

When the daughters of the Emperor found them-
selves all alone they knew not what to do with them-
selves, the time hung so heavily. At last they agreed
to work a part of the day, and to read another part
of the day, and spend the rest of the day walking in
the garden. This they did, and things went well
with them.

But the Deceiver of mankind was vexed at the
tranquillity of the maidens, so he must needs twist
his tail in their affairs.

“My sisters,” said the eldest of the three damsels
one day, “why do we spend the live-long day in
sewing and knitting and reading? I am sick and tired
of it all. It is ever so many days now since we were
left to ourselves, and there’s not a corner of the
garden that we have not walked in over and over
again. We have also been through all the rooms of
224 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

our father’s palace, and looked at all the ornaments
there till we know them by heart. Let us now enter
into that chamber which our father told us not to
enter.”

“Woe is me, dear sister!” said the youngest
damsel. “I wonder that thou shouldst persuade us
to tread underfoot the precepts of our father. When
our father told us not to enter there, he must needs
have known what he was saying, and why he told us
so to do.”

‘Dost thou fancy, silly, that there’s some evil
serpent there that will eat us, or some other foul
beast perhaps?” cried the middle sister. “ Besides,
how is papa to know whether we were there or not?”

Talking and arguing thus, they had reached the
door of the chamber, and the eldest sister, who was
the guardian of the keys, popped the key into the
key-hole, and turning it round—crack-rack the
door flew wide open. _

The damsels entered. .

What do you think they saw there? The room
was bare of furniture, but in the middle of it stood
a large table covered with a beautiful cloth, and on
the top of it was a wide-open book.

The girls, all full of impatience, wanted to find out
what was written in this book, and the eldest went
up to it and read these words: ‘The eldest daughter
THE ENCHANTED HOG 225

of the Emperor will marry a son of the Emperor of
the East.”

Then the second daughter went up to the book,
and turning over the leaf, read these words: “The
second daughter of the Emperor will marry a son of
the Emperor of the West.”

The girls laughed and made merry at these words,
and giggled and joked among themselves. But the
youngest daughter would not go up to the book.

But the elder ones would not leave her in peace,
but dragged her up to the long table, and then,
though very unwillingly, she turned over the leaf and
read these words—

“The youngest daughter of the Emperor will have
a pig for her spouse.”

_ A thunderbolt falling from the sky could not have
hurt her more than the reading of these words. She
was like to have died of horror, and if her sisters had
not held her she would have dashed her head to
pieces against the ground.

When she had come to herself again, her sisters
began to try to comfort her. “How canst thou
believe all that nonsense?” said they. “ When didst
thou ever hear of the daughter of an Emperor marry-
ing a pig?”

“What a baby thou art!” added the eldest, “as if

papa hadn’t armies enough to save thee, even if so
Q.
226 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

loathsome a monster as that did come and try and
make thee his wife!”

. The youngest daughter of the Emperor would very
much have liked to believe what her sisters said, but
her heart would not allow it. She thought con-
tinually of the book which promised her sisters such
handsome bridegrooms, while it foretold that that
should happen to her which had never yet happened
since the world began. Then she reflected how she
had transgressed the commands of her father, and her
heart smote her. She began to grow thin, and ere a
few days had passed she had so changed that none
could recognize her. She became sad and sallow,
instead of rosy and rollicking, and could take part in
nothing at all. She ceased to play with her sisters
in the garden; she ceased to cull posies and make
garlands of them for her head, and when her sisters
sang over their distaffs and embroideries her voice
was dumb.

Meanwhile the Emperor, the father of these girls,
succeeded beyond even the wishes of his dearest
friends, and vanquished and dispersed his enemies.
As his thoughts were continually with his daughters,
he did what he had to do quickly and returned home.
Crowds and crowds of people turned out to meet him
with fifes and drums and trumpets, and great was
their joy at the sight of their victorious Emperor.
THE ENCHANTED HOG 227

When he reached his capital, before going home,
he gave thanks to God for aiding him against the
enemies who had tried to do him evil. Then he went
to his own house, and his daughters came out to
meet him. His joy was great when he saw how well
they were, for his youngest daughter did her best to
appear as gay and happy as the others.

But it was not very long before the Emperor
observed that, little by little, his youngest daughter
was growing sadder and thinner. ‘What if she has
broken my commands?” thought he, and as it were
a red-hot iron pierced his soul. Then he called his
daughters to him, and bade them speak the truth.
They confessed, but they did not say which of them
had first persuaded them.

When the Emperor heard this he was filled with
bitterness, and from henceforth sadness took pos-
session of him. But he held his tongue, and did but
make all the more of his youngest daughter because
he was about to lose her. What’s done is done, and
he knew that thousands and thousands of words can’t
make one farthing.

Time went on, and he had almost come to forget
the circumstance, when one day there appeared at the
Emperor’s court the son of the Emperor of the East,
who sought the hand of his eldest daughter. The
imperor gave her to him with joy. They had a
228 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

splendid wedding, and after three days he conducted
them with great pomp to the frontier. A little while
afterwards the same thing happened to the second
daughter, for the son of the Emperor of the West came
and sought her in marriage likewise.

Accordingly as she saw what had been written in
the book gradually fulfilled, the youngest daughter
of the Emperor grew sadder and sadder. She no
longer enjoyed her food; she would not go out walk-
ing ; she even lost all pleasure in raiment ; she preferred
to die rather than become the laughing-stock of the
whole world. But the Emperor did not give her the.
opportunity of doing anything foolish, but took care
to divert her with all manner of pleasant stories.

Time went on, and lo !—oh, wonderful !—one day a
large hog entered the royal palace and said: soblaale
O Emperor! May thy days be as-rosy and as joyous
as sunrise on a cloudless day !”

“Good and fair is thy greeting, my son!” replied
the Emperor; “but what ill wind hath blown thee
hither, I should like to know ?”

“JT have come as a wooer,” replied the hog.

The Emperor marvelled greatly at hearing such a
pretty speech in the mouth of a hog, and immediately
felt within himself that all was not right here. He
would have put the hog off with some excuse if he
could, to save his daughter, but when he heard
THE ENCHANTED HOG 229

the court and all the ways leading to it full of the
grunts of the hogs who had accompanied the wooer,
he had nothing to say for himself, and promised the
hog that he would do what it asked. But the hog
was not content with his bare promise, but insisted
that the wedding should take place within a week,
Only when it had obtained the Eimperor’s word that
it should be so did it go away.

The Emperor told his daughter that she must
submit to her fate, as it was clearly the will of God.
Then he added: “My daughter, the speech and
sensible bearing of this hog belong to no brute beast
with which I am acquainted. T’ll wager my head
upon it that he was never born a hog. There must
be a touch of sorcery here, or some other devilry. If
thou art obedient, thou wilt not depart from thy
given word, for God will not allow thee to be
tormented for long.”

“If thou dost think it good, dear father,” replied
the girl, “I will obey thee, and put my trust in God.
Let Him do what He will with me. It must be 80,
I have no other way to turn.”

In the meantime the wedding-day arrived. The
marriage was celebrated in secret. Then the hog got
into one of the imperial carriages with his bride, and
so they set off homewards.

On the journey they had to pass by a large marsh.
230 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

The hog ordered the carriage to stop, got down, and
wallowed about in the mire till he was pretty nearly
one with it. Then he got into the carriage again,
and told his bride to kiss him. Poor girl, what could
she do? She took out her cambric pocket-handker-
chief, wiped his snout a little, and then kissed him.
“Tam but obeying my father’s commands,” thought
she. .

At last they reached the hog’s house, which was in
the midst of a dense forest. It was now evening,
and when they had rested a little from the fatigues
of the road they supped together and lay down to
rest. In the night the daughter of the Emperor
perceived that her husband was a man and not a
hog, and she marvelled greatly. Then she called to
mind the words of her father, and hope once more
arose in her breast. ;

Every evening the hog shook off his hog-skin,
and every morning before she awoke he put it on
again.

One night passed, two nights passed, a great many
nights passed, and the damsel could not make out
how it was that her husband was a man at night and
a hog in the daytime. For he was under a spell; an
enchanter had done him this mischief.

Gradually she began to love him, especially when
she felt that she was about to become a mother, but
THE ENCHANTED HOG 231

what grieved her most was that she was all alone,
with none at hand to aid her in her hour of need.
One day, however, she saw an old long-nosed witch
pass by that way. Now as she had seen no human
creature for a long time, she was full of joy, and
called to her, and they had a long talk together.

’ cried she, ‘‘ the mean-

“Tell me now, old woman,’
ing of this marvel. In the daytime my husband is
a hog, but when he sleeps beside me at night he is a
man. Explain this marvel to me!”

“Tl tell thee that later on, but in the meanwhile
shall I give thee some medicines that will put an end
to the spell that holds him ?”

“Oh, do, little mother, and [ll pay thee for them
whatever thou wilt, for I hate to see him as he is
now.” =

“Very well, then. Take this bit of rope, my little
chicken, but let him not know anything about it, or
it will lose its effect. Now when he is asleep, rise up,
and going to him very very softly, tie his left leg as”
hard as thou canst, and thou wilt see, dear heart, that
on the morrow he'll remain aman. Money I do not
want. I shall be more than repaid if I release him
from this scourge. My very heart-strings are bursting
with compassion for thy lord, my rose-bud, and I
grieve, oh how bitterly I grieve, that I did not come
this way before, so as to help thee sooner.”
232 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

When the old hag had departed, the daughter of
the Emperor took care to carefully conceal the piece
of rope, but in the middle of the night she softly
arose so that he shouldn’t hear her, and holding her
very breath, tied the string round her husband's left
leg, but when she tied the knot—r-rch !—the string
broke, for it was rotten, and instantly her husband
started up.

“Unhappy woman!” cried he, “what hast thou
done? But three days more and I should have been
free of this vile spell, but now who knows how long
I may have to carry this vile bestial skin! And
know, moreover, that thy hand can never touch me
again till thou hast worn out three pairs of iron
sandals, and worn down three staves of steel, seeking
me all over the wide world, for now I must depart.”

And with these words he disappeared.

The poor daughter of the Emperor, when she found
herself all alone, began to cry and sob as if her
heart would break. She cursed the vile witch with
fire and sword, but all in vain, and when at last
she saw that all her cursing and moaning did no
good, she got up and went whithersoever the
mercy of God and the desire of her husband aaa
lead her.

At the first city she arrived at she bade them make
her three pairs of iron sandals and three staves of
THE ENCHANTED HOG 233

steel, made provision for her journey, and set off to
seek her husband.

She went on and on, past nine kingdoms and nine
seas, she passed through vast forests where the tree-
stumps were like barrels, she got black and blue from
stumbling over the trunks of fallen trees, yet often
as she fell, she always got up again and resumed her
way ; the branches of the trees struck her in the face,
the briars tore her hands, yet on and on she went
without so much as looking back once. At last, weary
with her journey and her burden, bowed down with
grief and yet with hope in her heart, she came to a
little house. And who should be living there but the
Holy Moon.

The damsel knocked at the door and begged them
to let her come in and rest a little, especially as she
was about to become a mother.

The mother of the Holy Moon had compassion on
her and her afflictions, so she let her come inside and
took good care of her. Then she asked her: “ How
is it that thou, a creature of another race, hast
managed to come so far as this?”

Then the poor daughter of the Emperor told her
everything that had happened to her, and wound up
by saying: ‘I praise and thank God first of all for
directing my footsteps even to this place, and I thank
Him in the second place because He allows not my
234 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

child to perish at the hour of its birth, And now I
beg thee to tell me whether thy daughter, the Holy
Moon, hath seen my husband anywhere ?”

“That I cannot tell thee, my dear,” replied the
mother of the Holy Moon; “ but if thou dost go on
thy way towards the east till thou comest to the
house of the Holy Sun, maybe he will be able to tell
thee somewhat.”

Then she gave her a roast fowl to eat, and told her
to be very careful not to lose one of the bones, as
they would be very useful to her.

The daughter of the Emperor thanked the mother
of the Moon for her hospitality and kind words, and
after throwing away the pair of iron sandals which
she had worn out, she put on another pair, placed the
fowl’s bones in her bosom, took her child on her arm,
and a second staff of steel in her hand, and took to
the road again.

She went on and on through nothing but plains of
sand, and the way was so bad that she glided one step
backwards for every two steps she went forwards.
On and on she struggled till at last she left these
plains behind her; and now she got amongst high
mountains, steep and rugged, and crawled from rock
to rock and from crag to crag. Whenever she came
to a little plot of level ground she stopped and rested
a little, and reflected that now she was a little nearer
THE ENCHANTED HOG 235

her husband than she was before, and then she went
on her way again. The sides of the mountains were
of hard-pointed flints, which bruised and cut her feet,
knees, and sides till they were covered with blood ;
for you must know that these mountains were so high
that they reached beyond the clouds. There were
precipices in the way too that she could only pass
by going down on her hands and knees and guiding
herself with her staff.

At last, quite overcome by fatigue, she came to a
palace. ;

Here lived the Sun.

She knocked at the door and begged them to take
her in.

The mother of the Sun received her, and was
amazed to see a creature of another race in those
regions, and full of compassion when she heard what
had befallen her. Then, when she had promised . to
ask her son about the damsel’s husband, she hid her
in the cellar, that the Sun might not perceive her
when he came home in the evening, for he always
came back in a bad temper. ;

Next day the daughter of the Emperor was afraid
she would be found out, as the Sun said he smelt a
creature from another world. But his mother soothed
him with soft words, and told him that it was pears
that he smelt. The daughter of the Emperor took
236 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

courage when she saw how well she was treated, and
said :

“Tell me now, how can the Sun be ever vexed,
' seeing that he isso beauteous, and doeth so much good
to mortals?”

“T’ll tell thee,’ replied the mother of the Sun.
“Tn the morning he stands in the gate of Heaven,
and then he is merry, so merry, and smiles upon the
whole world. But at mid-day he is full of disgust,
inasmuch as he sees all the follies of men, and so his
wrath burns and he gets hotter and hotter; while in
the evening he is vexed and sorrowful because he
stands in the gate of Hades, for that is the usual
way by which he comes home.”

She told her besides that she had asked about her
husband, and her son had replied that he knew not
anything about him, as he was living in the midst of
a vast and dense forest, so that his beams could not
pierce through the thick foliage ; the only thing to do
was to go and ask the Wind about it. Then she also
gave her a roast fowl, and told her to take great care
of the bones.

So the daughter of the Emperor pitched away the
second pair of iron sandals that she had worn out,
tied up the bones, took her child on her arm and a
third staff in her hand, and went after the Wind.

On this journey she met with hardships greater
THE ENCHANTED HOG 237.

than any before, for she came upon mountains of flint-
stones, one after another, through which darted flames
of fire, forests untrodden by man, and fields of ice
dark with snow-storms. More than once the poor
creature was on the point of falling, but with perse-
verance and the help of God she overcame even these
great hardships, and at last she reached a ravine
between two mountains, large enough to hold seven
cities.

This was the abode of the Wind.

There was a gate in the wall which surrounded it.
She knocked and implored them to let. her in. The
mother of the Wind had compassion on her, and let
her in and invited her to rest. “If she had hidden
from the Sun,” she said, “ surely the Wind would not
find her out.”

The next day the mother of the Wind told her that
her husband was living in a huge dense wood, which.
the axe of man had never yet reached, and there he
had made him a sort of house by piling up the trunks
of trees one on the top of another, and plaiting them
together with withy bands, where he lived all alone
for fear of wicked men. Then, after she had given
her a roast fowl and told her to take good care of
the bones, the mother of the Wind counselled her to
follow the road that led straight to the sky, and let
the stars of heaven be her guides. She said she
238 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

would, and after thanking her with tears of joy for
her hospitality and for her glad tidings, she went on
her way.

‘ The poor woman turned night into day. She
stopped neither to eat nor to rest, so fiercely did the
desire to find her husband burn within her. She
went on and on till she quite wore out the third
pair of sandals. She threw them away, and began to
walk with bare feet. She cared not for the hard
clumps of earth, she took no heed of the thorns that
entered into her feet, nor of the pain she suffered
when she stumbled over the hard stones. At last she
came to a green and beauteous meadow on the margin
of a forest, and her heart rejoiced within her when she
felt the soft grass and saw the sweet flowers. She
stopped and rested a little. But when she saw the
birds in couples and couples on the branches of the
trees, a burning desire for her own husband came
upon her, and she began to weep bitterly, and with
her child on her arm, and her bundle of bones in her
girdle, she went on her way. She entered the forest.
She did not once look at the soft green turf which
soothed her feet, she listened not to the birds that
chirped enough to deafen her, she regarded not. the
flowers that peeped out from among the bushes, but
groped her way step by step into the depths of the
forest. For from the tokens given her by the mother.
THE ENCHANTED HOG 239

of the Wind she perceived that this must be the forest
in which her husband was staying.

Three days and three nights she roamed tn
the forest, and could see no one. So worn was she
now with fatigue that she fell to the ground, and there
she lay for a day and a night without moving, nor
did she eat and drink.

At last she rallied all her remaining strength, rose
up, and tottering along, tried to support herself on
her staff; but it could help her no more, for that also
was quite worn down so that it was now no good to
her. Still trusting in God, she went on as best she
could. She hadn’t taken ten steps forward when she
saw in a cleft of the rock just such a sort of house as
the mother of the Wind had told her of. She went
towards it, and just managed to get up to it and no
more. It was a house that had neither window nor
door, but there was an opening in the roof. She
looked around her, but there was no sign of a ladder.

What was she to do to get inside it ?

She thought and thought again. She tried to climb
up it, but in vain. Suddenly she thought of the’
bones which she had been carrying all this way. “If
only I could find out,” said she, “‘ how these bones
are to assist me!” She took them out of the bundle,
looked at them, reflected a little, and then put one
atop the other, and—oh, wonderful !—they joined
240 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

on to each other as if they had been glued. ‘Then
she joined another on to the first two and then
another till she made out of them two long bars.
Then she put a little bone across the two bars, and
it stuck fast like the rung of a ladder. She mounted
on it, and placed another little bone across a bit
higher, and then she mounted on that also, and so
she ascended from rung to rung, placing the small
bones across as she went along, till she got quite near
the top; but then she saw that there was a wide gap
between the last rung of her ladder and the door in
the roof of the house, and she now had no more bones
to make the last rung. She must have lost it on the
way. What was she todo now? She bethought her
for a while, and then she cut off a finger and placed
that between the bars. Sure enough it joined on to
and formed the last rung, and mounting on it she
entered the door of the house with her child in her
arms. There she rested for awhile, gave her child to
suck, and sat down herself on the threshold.

When her husband came he was so amazed at what
he saw that he could scarce believe his eyes, and there
he stood looking at the ladder of bones, the last rung
of which was a severed human finger. Fear came
upon him lest there should be some evil enchantment
about the thing, and he would have turned his back
upon the house if God had not put it ito his mind
THE ENCHANTED HOG 241

to enter. So turning himself into a dove, and flying
up into the air without once touching the ladder, lest
evil spells should lay hold of him, he entered the house
in full flight, and there he beheld his wife nursing a
child; and instantly he was full of tenderness and
compassion towards her, for he bethought him of how
much she must have suffered and endured before she
could have found her way to him. Nay, he could
scarce recognize her, so changed was she by her hard-
ships and sufferings.

But the daughter of the Emperor, when she saw
him, sprang from her seat, and her heart failed her
for fright, for she did not know him. Then he made
himself known to her, and she regretted no longer all
she had gone through to find him, nay, she forgot it
altogether, for he was as tall and straight as a lordly
pine.

Then they began talking together. She told him
all that had befallen her, and he wept for pity. Then
he also spoke, and told her his story.

“Tam the son of an Emperor,” said he. “In the
war which my father waged with the dragons, our
neighbours (and evil neighbours they were, ever
ravaging his domains), I slew the smallest of the
dragons. Now his mother knew that thou wert my
destined bride, so she laid the curse of her spells upon

me, and constrained me to wear the skin of an unclean
R
242 ROUMANIAN FAIRY. TALES

beast, with the design of preventing me from having
_ thee. Yet God aided me, and I won thee neverthe-
less. That old woman who gave thee the cord to tie
my legs with was the dragon’s mother, and when I
had but three days more to bear the spell, I was
forced, by thy folly, to go about in pigskin three
years longer. But now since thou hast suffered for
me and I have suffered for thee, let us praise God
and return to our parents. Without thee I should
have resigned myself to living the life of a hermit,
and so I chose this desert for my habitation, and built
me this house so that no child of man should get at me.”
- Then they embraced each other full of joy, and
promised to forget all their past sorrows.

The next day they rose early and went back first
of all to the Emperor his father. When it was known
that he and his consort had arrived, all the world
wept with joy; but his father and mother embraced
them tightly, and the public rejoicings lasted three
days and three nights.

Then he went on to the Emperor the father of his
wife, and he was like to have gone out of his mind
for joy when he saw them. When he had heard all
their adventures he said to his daughter: ‘“ Did I not
tell thee not to believe that he who sought thy hand
was ever born a hog? ‘Thou hast done well, my
daughter, to listen to my words.”
THE ENCHANTED HOG 243

And being an old man, and having no heirs, he
descended from his throne and put them upon it in-
his stead. Then they reigned in peace, and if they
are not dead they are living still.

And now I’ll mount my horse again and say an
“Our Father” before I go.
BOY-BEAUTIFUL, THE GOLDEN APPLES,
AND THE WERE-WOLF

_ ONCE upon:a time, a long while ago, when the very
flies wrote upon the walls more beautifully than the
mind can picture, there lived an Emperor and an
Empress who had three sons, and a very beautiful
garden alongside their palace. At the bottom of this
garden there grew an apple-tree, entirely of gold from
the top to the bottom. The Emperor was wild with
joy at the thought that he had in his garden an apple-
tree, the like of which was not to be found in the wide
world. He used to stand in front of it, and poke his
nose into every part of it, and look at it again and
again, till his eyes nearly started out of his head.
One day he saw this tree bud, blossom, and form its
fruit, which began to ripen before him. The Emperor
twisted his moustache, and his mouth watered
at the thought that the next day he would have a
golden apple or two on his table, an unheard-of thing

up to that moment since the world began.
244
BOY-BEAUTIFUL 245

Day had scarcely begun to dawn next morning,
when the Emperor was already in the garden to feast
his eyes to the full on the golden apples; but he
almost went out of his mind when, instead of the
ripened golden apples, he saw that the tree was
budding anew, but of apples there was no sign.
While he stood there he saw the tree blossom, the
blossoms fall off, and the young fruit again
appear.

At this sight his heart came back to him again, and
he joyfully awaited the morrow, but on the morrow
also the apples had gone—goodness knows where!
The Emperor was very wroth. He commanded that
the tree should be strictly guarded, and the thief
seized ; but, alas! where were they to find him 2

The tree blossomed every day, put forth flowers,
formed its fruit, and towards evening the fruit began
to ripen. But in the middle of the night somebody
always came and took away the fruit, without the
Emperor’s watchers being aware of it. It was just as
if it were done on purpose. Every night, sure enough,
somebody came and took the apples, as if to mock
at the Emperor and all his guards! So though this
Emperor had the golden apple-tree in his garden, he
not only never could have a golden apple on his table,
but never even saw it ripen. At last the poor
Emperor took it so to heart that he said he would
246 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

give up his throne to whosoever would catch and
bind the thief. aan.

Then the sons of the Emperor came to him, and
asked him to let them watch also. Great was the joy
of the Emperor when he heard from the mouth of his
eldest son the vow he made to lay hands upon the
thief. So the Emperor gave him leave, and he set to
work. The eldest son watched the first night, but he
suffered the same disgrace that the other watchers
had suffered before him.

On the second night the second son watched, but
he was no cleverer than his brother, and returned to
his father with his nose to the earth.

Both the brothers said that up to midnight they
had watched well enough, but after that they could
not keep their feet for weariness, but fell down in a
deep sleep, and recollected nothing else.

The youngest son listened to all this in silence, but
when his big brothers had told their story, he begged
his father to let Aim watch too. Now, sad as his
father was at being unable to find a valiant warrior
to catch the thief, yet he burst out laughing when he
heard the request of his youngest son. Nevertheless,
he yielded at last, though only after much pressing,
and now the youngest son set about guarding the
tree.

When the evening had come, he took his bow, and
BOY-BEAUTIFUL 247

his quiver full of arrows, and his sword, and went
down into the garden. Here he chose out a
lonely place, quite away from wall and tree, or any
other place that he might have been able to lean
against, and stood on the trunk of a felled tree, so
that if he chanced to doze off, it might slip from
under him and awake him. This he did, and when
he had fallen two or three times, sleep forsook him,
and weariness ceased to torment him.

Just as it was drawing nigh to dawn, at the hour
when sleep is sweetest, he heard a fluttering in the
air, as if a swarm of birds was approaching. He
pricked up his ears, and heard something or other
pecking away at the golden apples. He pulled an
arrow from his quiver, placed it on his bow, and drew
it with all his might—but nothing stirred. He drew
his bow again—still there was nothing. When he
had drawn it once more, he heard again the fluttering
of wings, and was conscious that a flock of birds was
flying away. He drew near to the golden apples, and
perceived that the thief had not had time to take all
of them. He had taken one here, and one there, but
most of them still remained. As now he stood there
he fancied he saw something shining on the ground.
He stooped down and picked up the shining thing,
and, lo and behold! it was two feathers entirely of gold.

' Compare the incident of the Bird Zhar in my Russian Fairy Tales.
248 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

When it was day he plucked the apples, placed
them on a golden salver, and with the golden feathers
in his hat, went to find his father. The Emperor,
when he saw the apples, very nearly went out of his
mind for joy; but he controlled himself, and pro-
claimed throughout the city that his youngest son
had succeeded in saving the apples, and that the thief
was discovered to be a flock of birds.

Boy-Beautiful now asked his father to let him go
and search out the thief; but his father would hear
of nothing but the long-desired apples, which he was
never tired of feasting his eyes upon.

But the youngest son of the Emperor was not to
be put off, and importuned his father till at last
the Emperor, in order to get rid of him, gave him
leave to go and seek the thief. So he got ready,
and when he was about to depart, he took the golden
feathers out of his cap, and gave them to his mother,
the Empress, to keep for him till he returned. He
took raiment and money for his journey, fastened his
quiverful of arrows to his back, and his sword on his
right hip, and with his bow in one hand and the
reins in the other, and accompanied by a faithful
servant, set off on his way. He went on and on,
along roads more and more remote, till at last he
came to a desert. Here he dismounted, and taking
counsel with his faithful servant, hit upon a road that
BOY-BEAUTIFUL 249

led to the east. They went on a good bit further,
till they came to a vast and dense wood. Through
this tangle of a wood they had to grope their way
(and it was as much as they could do to do that), and
presently they saw, a long way off, a great and
terrible wolf, with a head. of steel. They immediately
prepared to defend themselves, and when they were
within bow-shot of the wolf, Boy-Beautiful put his
bow to his eye.

The wolf seeing this, cried: “ Stay thy hand, Boy-
Beautiful, and slay me not, and it will be well for
thee one day!” Boy-Beautiful listened to him, and
let his bow fall, and the wolf drawing nigh, asked
them where they were going, and what they were
doing in that wood, untrodden by the foot of man.
Then Boy-Beautiful told him the whole story of the
golden apples in his father’s garden, and said they
were seeking after the thief.

The wolf told him that the thief was the Emperor
of the Birds, who, whenever he set out to steal apples,
took with him in his train all the birds of swiftest
fight, that so they might strip the orchards more
rapidly, and that these birds were to be found in the
city on the confines of this wood. He also told them
that the whole household of the Emperor of the Birds
lived by the robbing of gardens and orchards ; and he
showed them the nearest and easiest way to the city.
250 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

Then giving them a little apple most lovely to look
upon, he said to them: “Accept this apple, Boy-
Beautiful! Whenever thou shouldst have need of
me, look at it and think of me, and immediately I'll
be with thee!”

Boy-Beautiful took the apple, and concealed it in
his bosom, and bidding the wolf good-day, struggled
onwards with his faithful servant through the thickets
of the forest, till he came to the city where the robber-
bird dwelt. All through the city he went, asking
where it was, and they told him that the Emperor of
that realm had it in a gold cage in his garden.

That was all he wanted to know. He took a turn
round the court of the Emperor, and noted in his
mind all the ramparts which surrounded the court.
When it was evening, he came thither with his faith-
ful servant, and hid himself in a corner, waiting till
all the dwellers in the palace had gone to rest. Then
the faithful servant gave him a leg-up, and Boy-
Beautiful, mounting on his back, scaled the wall, and
leaped down into the garden. But the moment he
put his hand on the cage, the Emperor of the Birds
chirped, and before you could say boo! he was sur-
rounded by a flock of birds, from the smallest to the
greatest, all chirping in their own tongues. They
made such a noise that they awoke all the servants
of the Emperor. They rushed into the garden, and
BOY-BEAUTIFUL 251

there they found Boy-Beautiful, with the cage in his
hand, and all the birds darting at him, and he de-
fending himself as best he could. The servants laid
their hands upon him, and led him to the Emperor,
who had also got up to see what was the matter.

‘“T am sorry to see thee thus, Boy-Beautiful,” cried
the Emperor, for he knew him. “If thou hadst come
to me with good words, or with entreaties, and asked
me for the bird, I might, perhaps, have been per-
suaded to give it to thee of my own good-will and
pleasure ; but as thou hast been taken hand-in-sack,
as they say, the reward of thy deed according to our
laws is death, and thy name will be covered with
dishonour.”

“Illustrious Emperor,” replied Boy-Beautiful,
“these same birds have stolen the golden apples from
the apple-tree of my father’s garden, and therefore
have I come all this way to lay hands on the thief.”

“What thou dost say may be true, Boy-Beautiful,
but I have no power to alter the laws of this land.
Only a signal service rendered to our empire can save
thee from a shameful death.”

“Say what that service is, and I will venture it.”

“Listen then! If thou dost succeed in bringing
me the saddle-horse in the court of the Emperor my
neighbour, thou wilt depart with thy face unblackened,
and thou shalt take the bird in its cage along with thee.”
952 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

Boy-Beautiful agreed to these conditions, and that
same day he departed with his faithful servant.

On reaching the court of the neighbouring Emperor
he took note of the horse and of all the environs of
the court. Then as evening drew near, he hid with
his faithful servant in a corner of the court which
seemed to him to be a safe ambuscade. He saw the
horse walked out between two servants, and he mar-
velled at its beauty. It was white, its bridle was
of gold set with gems inestimable, and it shone like
the sun.

In the middle of the night, when sleep is most
sweet, Boy-Beautiful bade his faithful servant stoop
down, leaped on to his back, and from thence on to
the wall, and leaped down into the Emperor’s court-
yard. He groped his way along on the tips of his-
toes till he came to the stable, and opening the door,
put his hand on the bridle and drew the horse after
him. When the horse got to the door of the stable
and. sniffed the keen air, it sneezed once with a mighty
sneeze that awoke the whole court. In an instant
they all rushed out, laid hands on Boy-Beautiful,
and led him before the Emperor, who had also been
aroused, and who when he saw Boy-Beautiful knew
him at once. He reproached him for the cowardly
deed he had nearly accomplished, and told him that
the laws of the land decreed death to all thieves, and
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BOY-BEAUTIFUL 253

that he had no power against those laws. Then Boy-
Beautiful told him of the theft of the golden apples
by the birds, and of what the neighbouring Emperor
had told him to do. Then said the Emperor: “ If,
Boy-Beautiful, thou canst bring me the divine
Craiessa," thou mayest perhaps escape death, and thy
name shall remain untarnished.” Boy-Beautiful
risked the adventure, and accompanied by his faithful
servant set off on his quest. While he was on the
road, the thought of the little apple occurred to him.
He took it from his bosom, looked at it, and thought
of the wolf, and before he could wipe his eyes the
wolf was there.

“What dost thou desire, Boy-Beautiful ?” said he.

“ What do I desire, indeed !—look here, look here,
look here, what has happened to me! Whatever am
I to do to get out of this mess with a good conscience?”

“Rely upon me, for I see I must finish this business
for thee.” So they all three went on together to seek
the divine Craiessa.

When they drew nigh to the land of the divine
Craiessa they halted in the midst of a vast forest, where
they could see the Craiessa’s dazzling palace, and it
was agreed that Boy-Beautiful and his servant should
await the return of the wolf by the trunk of a large
tree. The proud palace of the divine Craiessa was

1 Queen.
254 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

so grand and beautiful, and the style and arrangement
thereof so goodly, that the wolf could scarce take his
eyes therefrom. But when he came up to the palace
he did what he could, and crept furtively into the
garden.

And what do you think he saw there? Not a
single fruit-tree was any longer green. The stems, -
branches, and twigs stood there as if some one had
stripped them naked. The fallen leaves had turned
the ground into a crackling carpet. Only a single
rose-bush was still covered with leaves and full of
buds, some wide open and some half closed. To
reach this rose-bush the wolf had to tread very
gingerly on the tips of his toes, so as not to make
the carpet of dry leaves crackle beneath him; and so
he hid himself behind this leafy bush. As now he
stood there on the watch, the door of the dazzling
palace was opened, and forth came the divine Craiessa,
attended by four-and-twenty of her slaves, to take a
walk in the garden.

When the wolf beheld her he was very near for-
getting what he came for and coming out of his lair,
though he restrained himself; for she was so lovely
that the like of her never had been and never will
be seen on the face of the whole earth. Her hair
was of nothing less than pure gold, and reached from
top to toe. Her long and silken eyelashes seemed
BOY-BEAUTIFUL 255

almost to put out her eyes. When she looked at
you with those large sloe-black eyes of hers, you felt
sick with love. She had those beautifully-arched
eyebrows which look as if they had been traced with
compasses, and her skin was whiter than the froth of
milk fresh from the udder.

After taking two or three turns round the garden
with her slaves behind her, she came to the roge-bush
and plucked one or two flowers, whereupon the wolf
who was concealed in the bush darted out, took her
in his front paws, and sped down the road. Her
servants scattered like a bevy of young partridges,
and in an instant the wolf was there, and put her, all
senseless as she was, in the arms of Boy-Beautiful.
When he saw her he changed colour, but the wolf
reminded him that he was a warrior and he came to
himself again. Many Emperors had tried to steal her,
but they had all been repulsed.

Boy-Beautiful had compassion upon her, and he now
made up his mind that nobody else should have her.

When the divine Craiessa awoke from her swoon
and found herself in the arms of Boy-Beautiful, she
said: “If thou art the wolf that hath stolen me away,
Yl be thine.” Boy-Beautiful replied: “Mine thou
shalt be till death do us part.”

So they made a compact of it, and they told each -
other their stories.
256 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

_ When the wolf saw the tenderness that had grown
up between them he said : “ Leave everything to me
and your desires shall be fulfilled!” Then they set
out to return from whence they had just come, and,
while they were on the road, the wolf turned three
somersaults and made himself exactly like the
divine Craiessa, for you must know that this wolf
was a magician.
Then they arranged among themselves that the
faithful servant of Boy-Beautiful should stand by the
trunk of a great tree in the forest till Boy-Beautiful
returned with the steed. So on reaching the court of
the Emperor who had the steed, Boy-Beautiful gave
him the made-up divine Craiessa, and when the
Emperor saw her his heart died away within him,
and he felt a love for her which told in words would
be foolishness.
' “Thy merits, Boy-Beautiful,” said the Emperor,
“have saved thee this time also from a shameful
death, and now I'll pay thee for this by giving thee
the steed.” Then Boy-Beautiful put his hand on the
steed and leaped into the jewelled saddle, and, reaching
the tree, placed the divine Craiessa in front of him
and galloped across the boundaries of that empire.
And now the Emperor called together all his coun-
sellors and went to the cathedral to be married to the
divine Craiessa. When they got to the door of the
BOY-BEAUTINUL 257
cathedral, the pretended Craiessa turned & somer-
sault three times and became a wolf again, which,
gnashing its teeth, rushed straight at the Emperor’s
retinue, who were stupefied with terror when they
saw it. On coming to themselves a little, they gave
chase with hue-and-cry : but the wolf, take my word
for it! took such long strides that not one of them
could come near him, and joining Boy-Beautiful and
his friends went along with them. When they drew
nigh to the court of the Emperor with the bird, they
played him the same trick they had played on the
Emperor with the horse. The wolf changed himself
into the horse, and was given to the Emperor, who
could not contain himself for joy at the sight of it.

After entertaining Boy-Beautiful with great honour,
the Emperor said to him: “ Boy-Beautiful, thou hast
escaped a shameful death. I will keep my imperial
word and my blessing shall always follow thee.”
Then he commanded them to give him the bird in
the golden cage, and Boy-Beautiful took it, wished
him good-day, and departed. Arriving in the wood
where he had left the divine Craiessa, his horse, and
his faithful servant, he set off with them for the court
of his father.

But the Emperor who had received the horse com-
manded that his whole host and all the grandees of

his empire should assemble in the plain to see him
8
258 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

mount his richly-caparisoned goodly steed. And when
the soldiers saw him they all cried: “ Long live the
Emperor who hath won such a goodly steed, and long
live the steed that doth the Emperor so much
honour !”

And, indeed, there was the Emperor mounting on
the back of the horse, but no sooner did it put its
foot to the ground than it flew right away. They all
set off in pursuit, but there was never the slightest
chance of any of them catching it, for it left them far
behind from the first. When it had got a good
way ahead the pretended horse threw the Emperor
to the ground, turned head over heels three times
and became a wolf, and set off again in full flight,
and ran and ran till it overtook Boy-Beautiful. Then
said the wolf to him: “I have now fulfilled all thy
demands. Look to thyself better in future, and strive
not after things beyond thy power, or it will not go
well with thee.” Then their roads parted, and each of
them went his own way.

When he arrived at the empire of his father the
old Emperor came out to meet his youngest son with
small and great as he had agreed. Great was the
public joy when they saw him with a consort the like
of whom is no longer to be found on the face of the
earth, and with a steed the excellence whereof lives
only in the tales of the aged. When he got home
BOY-BEAUTIFUL 259

Boy-Beautiful ordered a splendid stable to be made
for his good steed, and put the bird-cage in the
terrace of the garden. Then his father prepared for
the wedding, and after not many days Boy-Beautiful
and the divine Craiessa were married; the tables
were spread for good and bad, and they made merry
for three days and three nights. After that they
lived in perfect happiness, for Boy-Beautiful had now
nothing more to desire. And they are living to this
day, if they have not died in the meantime.

And now I'll mount my steed again and say an
“Our Father” before I go.
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE, AND LIFE
WITHOUT DEATH

ONcE upon a time there was a great Emperor and
an Empress; both were young and beautiful, and as
they would fain have been blessed with offspring they
went to all the wise men and all the wise women and
bade them read the stars to see if they would have
children or not; but all in vain. At last the Emperor
heard that in a certain village, hard by, dwelt a wiser
old man than all the rest; so he sent and com-
manded him to appear at court. But the wise old
man sent the messengers back with the answer that
those who needed him must come to him. So the
Emperor and the Empress set out, with their lords
and their ladies, and their servants and their soldiers,
and came to the house of the wise old man. And
when the old man saw them coming from afar he
went out to meet them.

“Welcome,” cried he; “but I tell thee, oh
Emperor! that the wish of thy heart will only work

thee woe.”
260
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE 261

“T came not hither to take counsel of thee,”
replied the Emperor; “but to know if thou hast herbs
by eating whereof we may get us children.”

“Such herbs have I,” replied the old man; “but ye
will have but one child, and him ye will not be able
to keep, though he be never so nice and charming.”

So when the Emperor and the Empress had gotten

the wondrous herbs, they returned joyfully back to
their palace, and a few days afterwards the Empress
felt that she was a mother. But ere the hour of her
child’s birth came the child began to scream so loudly
that all the enchantments of the magicians could not
make him silent. Then the Emperor began to promise
him everything in the wide world, but even this would
not quiet him.

“Be silent, my heart’s darling,” said he, “and I will
give thee all the kingdoms east of the sun and west of
the moon! Be silent, my son, and I will give thee a
consort more lovely than the Fairy Queen herself.”
Then at last, when he perceived that the child still
kept on screaming, he said: “Silence, my son, and I
will give thee Youth without Age, and Life without
Death.”

Then the child ceased to cry and came into the
world, and all the courtiers beat the drums and blew
the trumpets, and there was great joy in the whole
realm for many days.
262 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

The older the child grew the more pensive and
melancholy he became. He went to school and to the
wise men, and there was no learning and wisdom that
he did not make his own, so that the Emperor, his
father, died and came to life again for sheer joy.
‘And the whole realm was proud that it was going to
have so wise and goodly an Emperor, and all men
looked up to him as to a second Solomon. But one
day, when the child had already completed his fif-
teenth year, and the Emperor and all his lords and
great men were at table diverting themselves, the fair
young prince arose and said: “ Father, the time has
now come when thou must give me what thou didst
promise me at my birth!”

At these words the Emperor was sorely troubled.
‘Nay but, my son,” said he, “how can I give thee a
thing which the world has never heard of? If I did
promise it to thee, it was but to make thee quiet.”

“Then, oh my father, if thou canst not give it me,
I must needs go forth into the world, and seek until I
find that fair thing for which I was born.”

Then the Emperor and his nobles all fell down on
their knees, and besought him not to leave the empire.
“or,” said the nobles, “thy father is now growing
old, and we would place thee on the throne, and give
thee to wife the most beautiful Empress under the

”

sun.” But they were unable to turn him from his
YOUTH. WITHOUT AGE 263

purpose, for he was as steadfast as a rock, so at last
his father gave him leave to go forth into the wide
world to find what he sought.

Then Boy Beautiful went into his father’s stables,
where were the most beautiful chargers in the whole
empire, that he might choose one from among them;
but no sooner had he laid his hand on one of them
than it fell to the ground trembling, and so it was
with all the other stately chargers. At last, just
as he was about to leave the stable in despair, he cast
his eye over it once more, and there in one corner he
beheld a poor knacker, all weak, spavined, and covered
with boils and sores. Up to it he went, and laid his
hand upon its tail, and then the horse turned its head
and said to him: “What are thy commands, my
master? God be praised who hath had mercy upon
me and sent a warrior to lay his hand over me !”

Then the horse shook itself and became straight
in the legs again, and Boy Beautiful asked him what
he should do next.

“Tn order that thou mayest attain thy heart’s
desire,” said the horse, “ask thy father for the sword
and lance, the bow, quiver, and armour which he himself
wore when he was a youth ; but thou must comb and
curry me with thine own hand six weeks, and give me
barley to eat cooked in milk.”

So the Emperor called the steward of his household,
264 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

and ordered him to open all the coffers and wardrobes
that his son might choose what he would, and Boy
Beautiful, after searching for three days and three
nights, found at last atthe bottom of an old armoury,
the arms and armour which his father had worn as a
youth, but very rusty were these ancient weapons.
But he set to work with his own hands to polish them
up and rub off the rust, and at the end of six weeks
they shone like mirrors. He also cherished the steed
as he had been told. Grievous was the labour, but it
came to an end at last.

When the good steed heard that Boy Beautiful had
cleansed and polished his armour, he shook himself
once more, and all his boils and sores fell from off him.
There-he now stood a stout horse, and strong, and with
four large wings growing out of his body. Then said
Boy Beautiful: “We go hence in three days !’”—
“Long life to thee, my master!” replied the steed ; “I
will go wherever thou dost command.”

When the third day came the Emperor and all his
court were full of grief. Boy Beautiful, attired as
became a hero, with his sword in his hand, bounded
on to his horse, took leave of the Emperor and the
Empress, of all the great nobles and all the little
nobles, of all the warriors and all the courtiers. With
tears in their eyes they besought him not to depart
on this quest; but he, giving spurs to his horse,
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE — 265

departed like a whirlwind, and after him went sump-
ter horses with money and provisions, and some
hundreds of chosen warriors whom the Emperor had
ordered to accompany him on his journey.

But when he had searched a wilderness on the
confines of his father’s realm, Boy Beautiful took
leave of the warriors, and sent them back to his
father, taking of the provisions only so much as his
good steed could carry. Then he pursued his way
towards sunrise, and went on and on for three days
and three nights till he came to an immense plain
covered with the bones of many dead men. Here they
stopped to rest, and the horse said to him: “ Know,
my master, that we are now in the domains of the
witch Gheonoea, who is so evil a being that none can
set a foot on her domains and live. Once she was a
woman like other women, but the curse of her parents,
whom she would. never obey, fell like a withering
blast upon her, and she became what she now is. At
this moment she is with her children in the forest,
but she will come speedily to seek and destroy thee.
Great and terrible is she, yet fear not, but make ready
thy bow and arrows, thy sword and lance, that thou
mayest make use of them when the time comes.”—
Then they rested, and while one slept the other
watched.

When the day dawned they prepared to traverse
266 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

the forest ; Boy Beautiful bridled and saddled his
horse, drew the reins tighter than at other times, and
set out. At that moment they heard a terrible racket.
Then the horse said: ‘“ Beware, my master, Gheonoea
is approaching.” ‘The trees of the forest fell to this side
and to that as the witch drew nigh like the tempest,
but Boy Beautiful struck off one of her feet with an
arrow from his bow, and he was about to shoot a
second time when she cried: “Stay thy hand, Boy
Beautiful, for I'll do thee no harm!” And seeing he
did not believe her, she gave him a promise written
in her blood.

“ Look well to thy horse, Boy Beautiful,” said she,
“for he is a greater magician than I. But for him
I should have roasted thee, but now thou must dine
at my table. Know too that no mortal hath yet
succeeded in reaching this spot, though some have
got so far as the plain where thou didst see all the
bones.”

Then Gheonoea hospitably entertained Boy Beauti-
ful as men entertain travellers, but now and then, as
they conversed together, Gheonoea groaned with pain,
but as soon as Boy Beautiful threw her her foot which
he had shot off, she put it in its place and immediately
it grew fast on to her leg again. Then, in her joy,
Gheonoea feasted him for three days and begged him
to take for his consort one of her three daughters, who
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE 267

were divinely beautiful, but he would not. Then he
asked her concerning his quest. ‘ With such valour
and such a good steed as thine,” she answered, ‘thou
must needs succeed.”

So after the three days were over they went on
their way again. Boy Beautiful went on and on, and
the way was very long, but when they had passed
the boundaries of Gheonoea they came to a beauteous
meadow-land, but on one side the grass was fresh
and bright and full of flowers, and on the other side
it was burnt to cinders. Then Boy Beautiful asked
the horse the meaning of the singed grass, and this is
what the horse replied: “ We are now in the terri-
tories of Scorpia, the sister of Gheonoea. Yet so evil-
minded are these two sisters that they cannot live
together in one place. The curse of their parents has
blasted them, and they have become witches as thou
dost see ; their hatred of each other is great, and each
of them is ever striving to wrest a bit of land from
the dominions of the other. And when Scorpia is
anery she vomits forth fire and flame, and so when
she comes to her sister’s boundaries the grass of the
border withers up before her. She is even more dreadful
than her sister, and has, besides, three heads ; but be
of good cheer, my master, and to-morrow morning be
ready to mect her.”

At dawn, next day, they were preparing to depart
268 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

when they heard a roaring and a crashing noise, the
like of which man has never heard since the world
began.

‘Be ready, my master, for now Scorpia is approach-
ing,” cried the faithful steed.

And indeed, Scorpia it was. With jaws reaching
from earth to heaven, and spitting forth fire as she
approached, Scorpia drew near, and the noise of her
coming was like the roar of a whirlwind. But the
good steed rose into the air like a dart, and Boy
Beautiful shot an arrow which struck off one of the
witch’s three heads. He was about to lay another
arrow on his bow, when Scorpia begged him to forgive
her and she would do him no harm, and by way of
assurance she gave him a promise written in her
blood.

Then she feasted him as her sister had done before,
and he gave her back her severed head; which she
stuck in its place again, and then, after three days,
Boy Beautiful and his faithful steed took to the road
again.

When they had crossed Scorpia’s borders they
went on and on without stopping till they came to a
vast meadow covered with nothing but flowers, where
Spring reigned eternally. Every flower was won-
drously beautiful and full of a fragrance that comforted
the soul, and a light zephyr ran continually over the
youra wirhour AGH 269

flowery billows. Here then they sat them down to
rest, and the good steed said :

“Vitherto, oh my master! we have prospered, but
now a great danger awaits us, which if by the help of
the Lord God we overcome, then shall we be heroes
indeed. Not far from here stands the palace of
Youth without Age, and Life without Death, but it is
surrounded by a high and deep forest, and in this
forest are all the savage monsters of the wide world.
Day and night they guard it, and if a man can
count the grains of sand on the sea-shore, then
also can he count the number of these monsters.
We cannot fight them, they would tear us to
pieces before we were half-way through the forest,
so we must try if we can leap clean over it without
touching it.”

So they rested them two days to gather strength,
and then the steed drew a long breath and said to
Boy Beautiful: “Draw my saddle-girths as tightly
as thou art able, and when thou hast mounted me,
hold on fast with all thy might to my mane, and press
thy fect on my neck instead of on my flanks, that
thou mayest not hinder me.”

Boy Beautiful arose and did as his steed told him,
and the next moment they were close up to the
forest.

‘Now is the time, my master,” cried the good steed.
270 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

“The wild monsters are now being fed, and are
gathered together in one place. Now let us spring
over !”

“Tam with thee, and the Lord have mercy upon
us both,” replied Boy Beautiful.

Then up in the air they flew, and before them lay
the palace, and so gloriously bright was it that a man
could sooner look into the face of the midday sun
than upon the glory of the Palace of Youth without
Age, and Life without Death. Right over the forest
they flew, and just as they were about to descend at
the foot of the palace-staircase, the steed with the tip
of his hind leg touched lightly, oh, ever so lightly ! a
twig on the topmost summit of the tallest tree of the
forest. Instantly the whole forest was alive and
alert, and the monsters began to howl so awfully that,
brave as he was, the hair of Boy Beautiful stood up
on his head. Hastily they descended, but had not
the mistress of the palace been outside there in order
to feed her kittens (for so she called the monsters),
Boy Beautiful and his faithful steed would have been
torn to pieces. But the mistress of the monsters, for
pure joy at the sight of a human being, held the |
monsters back and sent them back to their places.
Fair, tall, and of goodly stature was the Fairy of the
Palace, and Boy Beautiful felt his heart die away
within him as he beheld her. But she was full of
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE 271

compassion at the sight of him, and said: ‘‘ Welcome,
Boy Beautiful! What dost thou seek ?”

“We seek Youth without Age, and Life without
Death,” he replied.

Then he dismounted from his steed and entered the
palace, and there he met two other fair dames of equal
beauty; these were the elder sisters of the Fairy of the
Palace. They regaled Boy Beautiful with a banquet
served on gold plate, and the good steed had leave to
. graze where he would, and the Fairy made him known
to all her monsters, that so he might wander through
the woods in peace. Then the fair dames begged
Boy Beautiful to abide with them always, and Boy
Beautiful did not wait to be asked twice, for to stay
with the Fairy of the Palace was his darling desire.

Then he told them his story, and of all the dangers
he had passed through to get there, and so the Fairy of
the Palace became his bride, and she gave him leave
to roam at will throughout her domains. ‘“ Neverthe-
less,” said she, ‘there is one valley thou must not
enter or it will work thee woe, and the name of that
valley is the Vale of Complaint.”

There then Boy Beautiful abode, and he took no
count of time, for though many days passed away, he
was yet as young and strong as when he first came
there. He went through leagues of forest without once
feeling weary. He rejoiced in the golden palace, and
272 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES |
lived in peace and tranquillity with his bride and her
sisters. Oftentimes too he went a-hunting.

One day he was pursuing a hare, and shot an arrow
after it and then another, but neither of them hit the
hare. Never before had Boy Beautiful missed his
prey, and his heart was vexed within him.. He
pursued the hare still more hotly, and sent another
arrow after her. This time he did bring her down,
but in his haste the unhappy man had not perceived
that in following the hare he had passed through the
Vale of Complaint!

He took up the hare and returned homewards, but
while he was still on the way a strange yearning after
his father and his mother came over him. He durst
not tell his bride of it, but she and her sisters imme-
diately guessed the cause of his heaviness.

“Wretched man!” they cried, “thou hast passed
through the Vale of Complaint !”

“ T have done so, darling, without meaning it,” he
replied ; ‘‘ but now I am perishing with longing for my
father and mother. Yet need I desert thee for that?
I have now been many days with thee, and am as
hale and well as ever. Suffer me then to go and see
my parents but once, and then will I return to thee to
part no more.”

“ Forsake us not, oh beloved!” cried his bride and
her sisters. “ Hundreds of years have passed away
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE 273

since thy parents were alive ; and thou also, if thou
dost leave us, wilt never return more. Abide with
us, or, an evil omen tells us, thou wilt perish !”

But the supplications of the three ladies and his
faithful steed likewise could not prevail against the
gnawing longing to see his parents which consumed
him.

At last the horse said to him: “If thou wilt not
listen to me, my master, then ’tis thine own fault alone
if evil befall thee. Yet I will promise to bring thee
back on one condition.”

“T consent whatever it may be,” said Boy Beauti-
ful; “speak, and I will listen gratefully.”

‘‘T will bring thee back to thy father’s palace, but
if thou dismount but for a moment, I shall return
without thee.”

“Be it so,” replicd Boy Beautiful.

So they made them ready for their journey, and
Boy Beautiful embraced his bride and departed, but
the ladies stood there looking after him, and their
eyes were filled with tears.

And now Boy Beautiful and his faithful steed came
to the place where the domains of Scorpia had been,
but the forests had become fields of corn, and cities
stood thickly on what had once been desolate places.
Boy Beautiful asked all whom he met concerning

Scorpia and her habitations, but they only answered
uu
274 ROUMANIAN FAIRY TALES

that these were but idle fables which their grand-
fathers had heard from their great-grandfathers.

“ But how is that possible?” replied Boy Beautiful ;
“tavas but the other day that I passed by
he told them all he knew. Then they laughed at him
as at one who raves or talks in his sleep ; but he rode

” and



away wrathfully without noticing that his beard and
the hair of his head had grown white.

When he came to the domain of Gheonoea he put
the same questions and received the same answers.
He could not understand how the whole region could
have utterly changed in a few days, and again he rode
away, full of anger, with a white beard that now
reached down to his girdle and with legs that began
to tremble beneath him.

At length he came to the empire of his father.
Here there were new men and new dwellings, and the
old ones had so altered that he scarce knew them.

So he came to the palace where he had first seen
the light of day. As he dismounted the horse kissed
his hand and said: ‘Fare thee well, my master! I
return from whence I came. But if thou also wouldst
return, mount again and we'll be off instantly.”

“ Nay,” he replied, “ fare thee well, I also will return
soon.”

Then the horse flew away like a dart.

But when Boy Beautiful beheld the palace all in
YOUTH WITHOUT AGE 275

ruins and overgrown with evil weeds, he sighed deeply,
and with tears in his eyes he sought to recall the
glories of that fallen palace. Round about the place
he went, not once nor twice: he searched in every
room, in every corner for some vestige of the past ;
he searched the stable in which he had found his steed,
and then he went down into the cellar, the entrance
to which was choked up by fallen rubbish.

Here and there and everywhere he searched about,
and now his long white beard reached below his knee,
‘and his eyelids were so heavy that he had to raise them
on high with his hands, and he found he could scarce
totter along. All he found there was a huge old
coffer which he opened, but inside it there was
nothing. Yet he lifted up the cover, and then a
voice spoke to him out of the depths of the coffer and
said: “ Welcome, for hadst thou kept me waiting
much longer, I also would have perished.”

Then his Death, who was already shrivelled up
like a withered leaf at the bottom of the coffer, rose
up and laid his hand upon him, and Boy Beautiful
instantly fell dead to the ground and crumbled into
dust. But had he remained away but a little time
longer his Death would have died, and he himself
would have been living now. And so I mount my
nag and utter an “ Our Father” ere I go.

THE END


RicHaRD CuLay & Sons, LimitEp,
Lonpon & Buncay.






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WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'12457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQED' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
a46fd6a08d1e2ee645a3ea084fc6a633
7409b28e2f34e37d39b54709b71c0509168be26d
'2011-12-29T18:25:24-05:00'
describe
'570589' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEE' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
cc23368914af6544a545efb4693e0309
50d68a85f08940f538ec15e63df6bdf314db95bb
'2011-12-29T18:20:05-05:00'
describe
'101542' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEF' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
bcefe27d83769241b8d2740d54cb78cd
babe995275f919ebaba7602e03303867f34ea9b0
'2011-12-29T18:30:08-05:00'
describe
'4806' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEG' 'sip-files00002.pro'
f01043f851bc4db559573b06a0a127ae
b5fa2f3d0bca7b12f44a6a5431eb65ccff12e950
'2011-12-29T18:29:22-05:00'
describe
'22864' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEH' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
29589e922a9694c06f44497610254114
9901a56a10bde28473e6c984cbfb91b67cbad9b0
'2011-12-29T18:22:08-05:00'
describe
'13700100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEI' 'sip-files00002.tif'
3bc8f27e6639c7ec95f1a91a92ed0704
1c6fa4a4bba68fa7d9cf322c3434808fb181771c
'2011-12-29T18:34:53-05:00'
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEJ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
263756406c384616a6843beefef68b68
b9e47fd2d9810a3b03ba971c71cb66e03dff07c6
'2011-12-29T18:28:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5745' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
1674a17e653a54f54ad445db471486cc
850ed7ad1e78eee668d93db5095e6389ee51e352
'2011-12-29T18:32:44-05:00'
describe
'506169' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEL' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
304f8ed329a3517fa0184df427ca9943
0ade154586db26f3ac46295efe0d6924f11f1c12
'2011-12-29T18:36:06-05:00'
describe
'66810' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEM' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
97b13b1fbd793532d9a5f70728d56500
19471b6c187abf2238a593b885a2503c80b5c72a
'2011-12-29T18:29:21-05:00'
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEN' 'sip-files00003.pro'
675673b43484a52050086d5896e6096b
598570f01ee821d53117d35d78c1ca5b1754f1e0
'2011-12-29T18:35:47-05:00'
describe
'16559' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
5d36bb4dc647d090f8b5205c89d7a80d
84193b6d1eb805e08f15fca31cb6a4aa4ee3a87f
'2011-12-29T18:21:32-05:00'
describe
'4068824' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEP' 'sip-files00003.tif'
9e247440d609a3a8a54568871947d4c3
0b6bb57d145944aea48d3aefcd429d344f4036ee
'2011-12-29T18:27:20-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEQ' 'sip-files00003.txt'
3df48464bc5aea82d994577d34798eb9
f0a30de51f0611b09d3b09a4a893577ec16d469c
'2011-12-29T18:29:57-05:00'
describe
'4900' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQER' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
ba2fee0b1314ac82e7246715e9e6a580
011f5e7fb8b2fb56b31d781e6e7fc9ee72427ba3
'2011-12-29T18:19:22-05:00'
describe
'506165' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQES' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
3bdb47d485a9c7f96c748d6b97d1ebe0
2b8af74a78c24b21691d0d305cb87dcd8d22b7bb
'2011-12-29T18:37:20-05:00'
describe
'25310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQET' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
c654e595ff2d8167c3718ba1b0d3c510
f5ad3420ab4cda1aae43dbd0ecc6c623ab112433
'2011-12-29T18:30:48-05:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEU' 'sip-files00005.pro'
af7c84717926e045d8cc7876cc8ea076
586102c7af765b2d256a0b06ec6ada12d9da9e35
'2011-12-29T18:28:27-05:00'
describe
'7538' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEV' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
fb5d66626160f3aa0a6b60c59c980f0f
a5c09926ffce5c8250d876968e7d2f42cb9e0f31
'2011-12-29T18:22:17-05:00'
describe
'4067848' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEW' 'sip-files00005.tif'
facc49e5f42739cf37c5ab1ebd720416
5a62ea1bf70e5bda6be2829f66b52f6600cbde92
'2011-12-29T18:29:56-05:00'
describe
'73' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEX' 'sip-files00005.txt'
45499e65f31789085b2d887078f96a29
e54e44f2e791fb77cf439d9d0111f4c0e6df7ffa
'2011-12-29T18:29:53-05:00'
describe
'2646' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEY' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
a42ebd49ed0f6f6f26e1f299cb76609e
c958403e4006982e2a1a6600e2d33c39508d8454
'2011-12-29T18:28:41-05:00'
describe
'489030' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQEZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
4fe6742a83a95fd1b4b59e30a5789f95
ac0e8dcac9ccd34d8e8335ceaafddc983040cf4e
'2011-12-29T18:19:01-05:00'
describe
'125107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
91cc3eeb1df7925617a2636f224d9d0c
85cab46ea91122244e1c3fda7d2f5f52016ffb5d
'2011-12-29T18:24:11-05:00'
describe
'6826' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
85a6f6954af8a0b995464ce7e6bb6a3b
bf6252748461935045de60460c03b4376d1c9070
'2011-12-29T18:28:25-05:00'
describe
'39164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
bac4dedbf46c63cd793917e631fdefd9
a0867c8e49157dec533d4a1c450252b5d3b2367b
'2011-12-29T18:22:23-05:00'
describe
'3930312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ad10b9bd32730ec2862aefcc02aeaecf
c3ee895dd29e91f00ad057a8011856d0e23171df
'2011-12-29T18:37:45-05:00'
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
e3ac4cf1398795a0453fe9f95c227138
13ba26ce79faf88c46ef9b72f6a687104d6d3e97
'2011-12-29T18:28:26-05:00'
describe
'12914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFF' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c4804bc603615943a1cb153b87c14b91
c49637d8268080f2b0e78519776a064e4e2405d9
'2011-12-29T18:25:50-05:00'
describe
'483269' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a64b07c3c430064551436cce94cc8df4
84a7e4aa5f39d233046d76d0b7b469ce704fc9ed
'2011-12-29T18:37:09-05:00'
describe
'79088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
413fcb559d7116bd2533237c202d203c
275cbd59fa104a16bb41c2de08d4568964f0e559
'2011-12-29T18:24:16-05:00'
describe
'24968' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c7819982937168c61fbcb6e15634d5ed
566322208b9e568e6633a9295052358243a1ccdf
'2011-12-29T18:24:24-05:00'
describe
'23843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
be4c916af0b05d9cc124ec5e22bd6222
6c45b126092de93f3d3ee1f6a8c2949c812f60a8
'2011-12-29T18:21:42-05:00'
describe
'3883168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
6d591cfefa8a84dfa83b56990b61987b
c1867475f9a12a0ea25ec12a92e7cc799cd9ade7
'2011-12-29T18:22:34-05:00'
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
98637ae3b39c99b11440c50eee394ea4
11320c471a34d7cc0e964c93f17b4bd96aeaf653
'2011-12-29T18:22:47-05:00'
describe
'6503' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
6ea1f4d88c3840b12c0eb1fc1bc3f691
5ab25da2f369ca37a580a8d5678c6fac7f2123b5
'2011-12-29T18:19:32-05:00'
describe
'481686' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d4555497121e9047ac62d9e85016bfde
d7a8d4f1c7bcea59c15eb9bd4a235ad87fe34e35
'2011-12-29T18:31:03-05:00'
describe
'102014' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
63789af26cbab83e63cb04c6e2cbda9b
a7afb086edb178a06a3d43522fbb5eac70b343e9
'2011-12-29T18:36:57-05:00'
describe
'34157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
37bf153eb06361708424a379a6fa425f
2b24c9c8f311d560ff7e0b9ca66052437be55857
'2011-12-29T18:28:32-05:00'
describe
'32019' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
56c49b70622a6ebe58553983acf5e9db
1fa56bb73c917815dccead8b44f7c023e7ff5ab5
'2011-12-29T18:34:02-05:00'
describe
'3870340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
1a902269a35d9daffc1d6f8b294f224e
c8362ded8991afe95b13afac9fa9300b9e3b9231
'2011-12-29T18:24:30-05:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
92c3cb770748cc1c920aceb19311d718
377d5101867518ae0023f86d9129fef63d53ae2f
'2011-12-29T18:28:43-05:00'
describe
'8836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
9929dca70e1982215b6a4e067e3b2e3a
b38eda80a2e9ffa5b7c4d8e6f03d4c8bceb792fe
'2011-12-29T18:29:51-05:00'
describe
'506356' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e82e999053093cb144f68301b26f0a66
1b6409d145b1be02955662d4c3e70ab78e9c0b5e
'2011-12-29T18:23:03-05:00'
describe
'104339' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8327cd99c8ebf4a122912ea0a85f754f
357aefab724047f189a84b864bfeced3f41226ca
'2011-12-29T18:28:36-05:00'
describe
'32428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
50d4d5b8917461d9389a6be8685e0b62
860eb9eee0af8fcf2bf5e6eeda5ae3c842a873b2
'2011-12-29T18:34:06-05:00'
describe
'32725' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
15f817b703e9709addb3b1e4e89b0344
58db6f4acd161789918713212d5c8e0ab109361f
'2011-12-29T18:33:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
eaafd07f92fc4dda125ee08c74658fa9
b261e773a97dba555922c62e5656b759e267644f
'2011-12-29T18:25:32-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQFZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
19228c4407dac136721092d1bb9678db
9628b4124b70d3155b1012251e2617c5c46bef8a
'2011-12-29T18:30:39-05:00'
describe
'8253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
afdf75b4dc9e195535018e737050ee5b
e0d1a81c0509b9067aba983f9664f46336015b6d
'2011-12-29T18:26:35-05:00'
describe
'506361' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
7e699d11b0f3475831c288c38c2905fd
24ae7fbcb68e256d9a5d5f5e7d77b97785c9d670
'2011-12-29T18:37:08-05:00'
describe
'32013' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
b830758b571788a968518e0a2ba11a51
73449a98256ccb93e316e5a275cbbf20aa2a6ea9
'2011-12-29T18:32:41-05:00'
describe
'7424' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
f376ad69f114fb6f1cd22f29594ea5c2
599579757f98d85d775b3f32c6defe1060da6383
'2011-12-29T18:35:45-05:00'
describe
'9968' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d48f0b93645bd8f377f65cfb0ec088da
5deded1c73c887e56f327ef35ec326345e0b1af1
'2011-12-29T18:34:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
576852337f0ee5abdb292ae45f56bbef
26060380cef5b894fc12f319627fa773c7acb16a
'2011-12-29T18:22:38-05:00'
describe
'340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
453f4e22838092160d46a404ad3eefe2
c74e2a64db19c2ee019529ebeebcafed5c1c4e8c
'2011-12-29T18:24:39-05:00'
describe
'3001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
7bb390c5d5946d617ced185c768f382e
f07275cf8dd28b59a8511b56153f40cf4308349b
'2011-12-29T18:34:42-05:00'
describe
'506362' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
73b3ccfb2210113b8f4a044bca5c88da
3eac56a23a539fe273ab2e994a6cdec1f596e94b
'2011-12-29T18:35:26-05:00'
describe
'52341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a56aa7772e8d188706e43ce7ceecce53
5d94c0230781ab7ea70a8375d6b655ca11aa8e24
'2011-12-29T18:22:36-05:00'
describe
'24850' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b50eaee700880cbec92650838f789d74
cca29bba87bc1263c0e6208a00690ecbf21ed164
'2011-12-29T18:24:25-05:00'
describe
'17320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
238881beda3b7844b941dec04097c5c8
e791101b57015aa6038b5690f9317d29b7a3f206
'2011-12-29T18:27:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
bb4ee7fba6be556524d75dd33f2f3955
fa0d3204b01c428a47dd6341d41fa9ce597a0177
'2011-12-29T18:24:13-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
bc071d08083ec606d2e4e53c4b994e21
e4a0c73ce8d5a01b88168412513394c9c6bef79d
'2011-12-29T18:19:16-05:00'
describe
'4821' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
711db8630580f6ebc54c1316aa6e2f51
a057e7a826a0609a753b7302b3d206551a6b7505
'2011-12-29T18:36:22-05:00'
describe
'506260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
0f7e750ffc27c29da9836b76b78df81a
5356d9b632d495366a9877b09c5c4b842069317a
'2011-12-29T18:32:47-05:00'
describe
'25145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
34734d708197f4a4977a2091df7450dd
42aed1355748f631b57a79671d730d144719a907
'2011-12-29T18:35:28-05:00'
describe
'8395' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGR' 'sip-files00016.pro'
a41332d3ee26aaa13452f83ccb90a11b
669614c78af9bf765ed004a3fc4150353cc46e97
'2011-12-29T18:35:37-05:00'
describe
'8459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bf833d5a06c94dc52e1cc0ea06a5a41b
bc97fa3fd0f3db53ffedf9752d7abef064b865d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
43e83b534fa1bd1d4a3687add244da7e
8248a39e6e217729c01083ee93f66aa04aa09f40
'2011-12-29T18:37:29-05:00'
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
13a4db0eec4d93a0cfbd5271b8a63f2d
c69c220bacdbcffd5e7416354aabcaadd9cf6d46
'2011-12-29T18:32:56-05:00'
describe
'2690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
778fcc532bb3583136ec1374acd32d15
cc600e308c6cfb4ce5e9006ed8b2efa847662cf8
'2011-12-29T18:34:28-05:00'
describe
'506177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
49fa9397a1485743fc426cef967ee187
221459f2e86d8edcf9635a490914bf740d5f897a
'2011-12-29T18:20:24-05:00'
describe
'17145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
60a9e390249b73e7102c2b05d68ad194
08ddf477dc6f688e7696d8d8749ab2c8e793d376
'2011-12-29T18:22:56-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e9e63c87836ba47f55797efae7ca172f
9a6e43692f47d0063fb599a9e46b2b8bfa931759
'2011-12-29T18:34:52-05:00'
describe
'4946' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQGZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
5cb74de9cefca71e40b003b181ae7007
a988d24230a84b92442a6d485dd830a735410baa
'2011-12-29T18:22:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7764a124984fcb2dd2946eb76e6a962e
d4e1ca11c397764d9cb9e4ccd87e441a3bd42616
'2011-12-29T18:35:42-05:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
1e7d57cd1cdfd53710ae7e53455aa40f
a2fb95fa5fa9c61674aef3aa87517aa42c58e200
'2011-12-29T18:35:32-05:00'
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
542a319112253d9493f83672040bb2a8
9159e64f28aca3b33576fa3d4c8ab14a9f2993b5
'2011-12-29T18:22:18-05:00'
describe
'481239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
279a6b92f60b4677ac4493558803eb84
466f4f78abe806c6847c77bb055dc9ad1a8b2bd7
'2011-12-29T18:21:53-05:00'
describe
'8514' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
cfe4ac45253fdb8a93c565342fe990c7
cae03fa10bfa6a3323073f37a605f1fbeb9b8b1c
'2011-12-29T18:33:07-05:00'
describe
'2367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHF' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
96f9358082a790f1366904c5ce6d2382
5f1f851bfd51d6156b09f066e5cf9b1586e7f5b6
'2011-12-29T18:31:42-05:00'
describe
'3867776' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHG' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8320bceb02b4a45a05c09b80c7d65ef6
0c0eefef2e325b6f5eb0f31625f64b109f1fbfd0
'2011-12-29T18:27:07-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHH' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
075c568652ae9ad658ea769323228919
d9caa7713c2e80a599da14859dc9a7338b30d783
describe
'506319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHI' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8e2eb630d684b8c71128fe01c80e7216
53227b02b88c3bf75a68d7ab1e5f2a9f61f1ea3e
'2011-12-29T18:26:33-05:00'
describe
'76244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
46912fcc337416542011d2ab91153983
7bb983a8d3366ee9548f096b7a54b782a3450186
'2011-12-29T18:33:19-05:00'
describe
'23236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHK' 'sip-files00019.pro'
68586b8bba14f4710b262d386a74760a
557fa0e4d76fd686218c4c5b0b1c7a0b409d32d5
'2011-12-29T18:28:58-05:00'
describe
'24143' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHL' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2fb805af5b8d0b02537bae6796a0cc0e
4d1724c10b2a8ff9a59a35b6e3530d0272c6894f
'2011-12-29T18:28:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHM' 'sip-files00019.tif'
232b2023f9c81171597e1a5cb45d5b24
18897262cb354888416f440204d81092b54f8052
'2011-12-29T18:33:21-05:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHN' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8b3eadd5196b46b3477d6e856f6f11f4
6ca9848a5e26fedeb681cae4e587e0bd38712781
'2011-12-29T18:21:01-05:00'
describe
'6223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHO' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
825992c1a816d6e36be25b5d2499d23d
f28173efc5e483318714c2cf9f33eac6622253a1
'2011-12-29T18:28:35-05:00'
describe
'490915' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
61bc1763a54e37923c4b9ca3684d9d2c
bba4b092eac644e77236b4cf7514a5f4d9737656
'2011-12-29T18:33:00-05:00'
describe
'103659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHQ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
287b640a37792c57dd8c687cedd1a705
1ea0d31c53255e481c7c84019cdff79ce9601aad
'2011-12-29T18:20:30-05:00'
describe
'34765' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b0beb670672890545579cce79f57dfbc
37f8f3291d1c3f727f493773bbecbd537476a0ea
'2011-12-29T18:22:01-05:00'
describe
'31864' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
56110dd95d5bbea8151f7ecc474a00a4
89b75e66e85a4d1562c5d2840cbe03c45fdcbea3
'2011-12-29T18:21:36-05:00'
describe
'3944728' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
25c27cd05f0900a8e6413d6a9b122855
5630c18db258986910b04530d837d3c8a70d23b9
'2011-12-29T18:21:03-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
442b1ab3cce0d58d96a4a839cf943788
7b52f1b5364629feca2859f0cc38618e1eb66cd0
'2011-12-29T18:19:30-05:00'
describe
'8363' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHV' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c4301ecf47bbac417ccb5005250ad110
ce9f566c4a4c7f00133d70ac4db2fb4a7f01804c
'2011-12-29T18:34:33-05:00'
describe
'506354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHW' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
592ba819b456d99c3b294cd428380a5c
2e041b33dabb9b6845bb116327fc327ee57f9e6e
'2011-12-29T18:24:18-05:00'
describe
'106148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
5f1b8ebe97280f743963487c339dd296
a2345d311d9b4c2d37a65a1eb41fb818dd743e7e
'2011-12-29T18:24:14-05:00'
describe
'33685' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5aa3035801bd634a2a8cabef2e59226d
92a1738656bc1f2f446973f56a92b2bfa0d53024
'2011-12-29T18:27:22-05:00'
describe
'32726' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQHZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4641b18c7c2af547937f8a12c8439f5b
a0e31f7d8d66932f0ef50ac3b6c61bbcae2bc05a
'2011-12-29T18:26:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
aa4229f5cbb9a82dec45a63717fe669a
72fafba352ddc3f37dc405773b5e9e2d9c8bdb85
'2011-12-29T18:23:57-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
0c18c418f3ea52a3830c3317f93373e4
c02f001809ddd67de3d0e1f27b31d409c8c77cda
'2011-12-29T18:26:14-05:00'
describe
'8565' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b1735c35bdc5caa685da29a42e46743d
03cccd73c2fa185b20f3da08733e5c8fe89a4d82
'2011-12-29T18:35:49-05:00'
describe
'490982' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQID' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
4b287af88324205f176ad17881b2e8b1
f62e31af3f065efd762d6243b591a06498f0f5dc
'2011-12-29T18:30:07-05:00'
describe
'99640' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
4da008241f1ed304ab2ad9dbb65a815b
64abaf21327ecdf8eca546d383235ce02821a5e5
'2011-12-29T18:37:11-05:00'
describe
'32700' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
be6a8bda4b747d8df66b6433e72be230
27775ba1c7101fae057c8e0967cf0a3b0317482a
'2011-12-29T18:32:42-05:00'
describe
'31468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIG' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
15e6b3c71eb2a6e4f5eb896f20c4b239
0f9210dab1ee493748c0862425d6c2f0a55cb97b
'2011-12-29T18:23:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIH' 'sip-files00022.tif'
6c1dbc9ddf5e222f816ad329490c827d
fe63571027d3cde4db9302108c63c27eef198af4
'2011-12-29T18:21:34-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQII' 'sip-files00022.txt'
4ade7f2e4f57474416cc07ed456569c3
e55bcb9e06b315f46ea960737dedb2614616064e
'2011-12-29T18:35:24-05:00'
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ee1c532f6dde9932bcec1b55186610c0
6a478310e0037bf0307ccfed1c2c884e60b1a21c
'2011-12-29T18:21:39-05:00'
describe
'502527' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIK' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
3a1bdcb780e1e182f350435186ef792b
0c8d0240155e99ed7c4cf9a925631efcf6f54f8e
'2011-12-29T18:25:53-05:00'
describe
'133506' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIL' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
85af905e4d0cd08f72fdc5363a3ba4eb
19ffc3c79bde8fd806da4c159b28b45951efdd67
'2011-12-29T18:37:46-05:00'
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIM' 'sip-files00024.pro'
6a96773ec8cd4fe7d11530c700024df2
ae7351be180b931b7a611614b675817f9836e0d2
'2011-12-29T18:36:38-05:00'
describe
'36927' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIN' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e6b3ee486b5ed95ab498199d422a6f6d
d13d7e59e2255fb9e66ec0c66baa007aa6151829
'2011-12-29T18:35:30-05:00'
describe
'4037068' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
31ff4a6a209ee6f5adb372213d4181a2
2bfcb771557184401cd7d94b1708700015358bde
describe
'239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIP' 'sip-files00024.txt'
6c61ee512e088d464ada4a913d140845
e2c5083033bcc6c15f26fe3ca7e1a5de861632f4
'2011-12-29T18:35:04-05:00'
describe
'9771' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIQ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
811939fa7c8bbe151317cb5aa400d9ad
b06fd73babff5d88b7c81987f705222d87c37b84
'2011-12-29T18:34:46-05:00'
describe
'506372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIR' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6530e23f4f57827babfb5df05da49c5c
ed3c935f16cbdc7d84cd626efb788fc7f719ae7e
'2011-12-29T18:25:34-05:00'
describe
'115364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIS' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
05f5c149cfbea74bb152da52b04f5ef3
821775c3b6700f86358d6dd01a32431b8b519228
'2011-12-29T18:35:00-05:00'
describe
'36619' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIT' 'sip-files00025.pro'
ceb24fbdd566cc1f9d647ce71dc7001e
7673e139511f96493727abdc2ea0864adae1a4cd
'2011-12-29T18:36:52-05:00'
describe
'35691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIU' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d0e87e2e53d61836aa414a6da2711e0b
b592e34a0cf61c34fe31d9647c725fab4433770f
'2011-12-29T18:24:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIV' 'sip-files00025.tif'
36246ecddd1cbd540211b127036017d0
eb885d141913ae52aa8126ddfb6121be4daa5743
'2011-12-29T18:25:11-05:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIW' 'sip-files00025.txt'
baf953cb19ce3a42d37c9023750a4320
4d9eb4ac45b263516e3bc8d3250071cdfdbc045f
'2011-12-29T18:21:22-05:00'
describe
'8907' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2aecaedaf7b4dad9de659b39bd63703d
21c2a752460e56bc9add74fe517a10da15674d87
'2011-12-29T18:28:59-05:00'
describe
'477519' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
79d7dd3b90274b9a3fa0dff21bff31d0
1244c10b5673b2b6b763e7c54633c8217f7682a2
'2011-12-29T18:29:00-05:00'
describe
'103462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQIZ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
471f0a674d574da6644b9c0ad797d8e8
95bc7f210be62da69e7ae507dace495b404eda8e
'2011-12-29T18:31:27-05:00'
describe
'34783' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJA' 'sip-files00026.pro'
74e34a6343220e5ba71946d2c9c45543
2957482e528347d7428688774c597e5000d046f2
'2011-12-29T18:30:40-05:00'
describe
'32085' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
04f9f748563e942e2fea0533a0b856db
514262e8d03fbfd852ba4dcdae1b4ee38e8a9f5c
'2011-12-29T18:25:33-05:00'
describe
'3836996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
819ed543be6c2c3f39a889285921bf55
f40e0e6f02e6277431fa8084dbd389ec594780bf
'2011-12-29T18:27:26-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
81cc3944227464441d34a3d574190575
9d7ad886ee62cc3265f146cec7a9a3ee9a4751fd
'2011-12-29T18:29:18-05:00'
describe
'9215' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJE' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0b5fabf9b162b29024518ff589f23e1b
8f80a6848e9896bfdd1a55f788cfe824fd9d25c4
'2011-12-29T18:20:03-05:00'
describe
'506332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
0b633c0461bf7c9bf307befd3c8b2ec7
fe86949bce89d40974806c7304e6c8898b5f8755
'2011-12-29T18:21:37-05:00'
describe
'107227' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
0d3c05cea3300554120f799c73748804
b2f84e813cac8f1d1767e164dc8b3d9886b4a8bf
'2011-12-29T18:29:42-05:00'
describe
'35241' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d52e394a13a46beadc9e7f4aadc49d5f
7262109321bdda5920cc89b1b3e98ff4135615dd
'2011-12-29T18:26:21-05:00'
describe
'33361' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
921bcc502fd1580996764e7ae5cfbdfb
de635ed03ae9a369b9fc348f76be89a8aec030a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
42bd28a841c2bab5e98344dac415bf84
dede526b3e03bb2036318933f5f74e9ca7fe08c5
'2011-12-29T18:25:12-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6d2f14b6bc5c4ee895aea9599f4f7656
92bb7c802177c8ed319403f1831530180a636e9a
'2011-12-29T18:22:55-05:00'
describe
'8391' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
41c8ab42e82db109e6e52b272c264d73
09f73b8243a6dce343b48ba6362920bf2d66e4ce
'2011-12-29T18:31:50-05:00'
describe
'506357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
27081bae20408afe3f86424fd57681e8
441a27b4a71b3cf785a5f3eb854e9740f304ce77
'2011-12-29T18:23:02-05:00'
describe
'102359' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJN' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
49a37a1ff2d15e7901c3b9aba96f4bce
ea6dd4a321caeefaa759f3670089a18c80e87c48
'2011-12-29T18:33:22-05:00'
describe
'34486' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJO' 'sip-files00028.pro'
58a693da70f593e0898e9644e384c1ef
8e01b43b50ce8b766f91af1a10fca013e3c9471e
'2011-12-29T18:32:59-05:00'
describe
'32090' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
ca9b3a71a5e898ff064817c5b7b11cbe
2b9c959ea2989e51dff843dc94e03e3edc76781e
'2011-12-29T18:24:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
44a447960feb47b7299108c62d36b2ba
7a26d5fae8719f4d8cd6385475f74679d2c1dd99
'2011-12-29T18:37:52-05:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJR' 'sip-files00028.txt'
269c02835867bdb06baa30aa288c42a7
df6010049a42715509ab391a8b450320ab0835d7
'2011-12-29T18:28:18-05:00'
describe
'7911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJS' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2c3ace3ea58630c027692946d7c4e5ad
d193757d5b410e72ebf355f9f16fc7ccb3e5d14f
'2011-12-29T18:33:13-05:00'
describe
'506367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJT' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
aee424ed9d67d361eaa1994f3f6f1e5e
2b719db896657d63441e7853b1b14272755edd51
'2011-12-29T18:34:22-05:00'
describe
'101737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJU' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
22d964144cd8e213fec8146b8809f905
fdc9c0b555b270c65169cc2f70b7f111bb59f771
'2011-12-29T18:28:46-05:00'
describe
'34105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJV' 'sip-files00029.pro'
816c00d9943c039ea90be166260d0511
abf4a495f3799f0206351f092c8f301ee1341581
describe
'32070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
dc931a99b61c573980762c153e8c865f
43b5c9839d00d128acc46be53a8cdb5aaecaec27
'2011-12-29T18:19:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJX' 'sip-files00029.tif'
4385c4e8e653c84209d343ff06651714
7ba1bf2474cb05fd61357c601553197c3f056473
'2011-12-29T18:35:48-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJY' 'sip-files00029.txt'
024168ef8db2ea39ad249643e0691618
396ad334d04f500b040a3c7dd92e683ca1e1d191
'2011-12-29T18:32:07-05:00'
describe
'8071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQJZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
602acf3efeb121d820a5013538317b29
a163b31a85e78d3730de85852e4bae59cb4c4eb3
'2011-12-29T18:29:43-05:00'
describe
'506376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKA' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9abe5893761085fd9cd510ed1eeb8579
63d4da5e402d893c661af4c0e7fad7a386773488
'2011-12-29T18:33:33-05:00'
describe
'91541' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKB' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5a7db59658ac72997ea3d213e2bbd56d
873ad1dc24fc4fa078cd33fc88bc8fda24509b9f
'2011-12-29T18:31:23-05:00'
describe
'31151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKC' 'sip-files00030.pro'
eb5c4879724e88d62aff26a70c3b1dd0
bbd98092e93741a599e3443700c40dc89131e403
'2011-12-29T18:31:57-05:00'
describe
'29657' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKD' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
b591167a80b2966104a931fd0277b434
9ee37a5123154e2396e0a744790f83d322fbd92d
'2011-12-29T18:33:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKE' 'sip-files00030.tif'
90d5916f10505a2c2f0d43bc609b0163
a439d51a5f4f34208c672411f6e21e544456a03d
'2011-12-29T18:33:43-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKF' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a26d7c3bd161366d64625fdf2f9bda31
d59507d373b625d6c1eea33c52516f8ac03f38bb
'2011-12-29T18:29:39-05:00'
describe
'7537' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKG' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
dc877b4bc02cd2fb98db178ba54c909e
d59b94251a18dcd2a0f84cff198bdf7735d68ba8
'2011-12-29T18:20:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
69f7e93630ec32fc1aacd6761c809d46
702ce14fb5e709bd5ba1b41ba8859f24a33e6dcf
'2011-12-29T18:31:06-05:00'
describe
'60101' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
992919daf07f0dff1b4a13bbae99ecf5
c7931971d77ea27d24f4cc57d476aff952de0952
'2011-12-29T18:30:26-05:00'
describe
'18673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKJ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d01f54f67fa9bd3e32d7aab1d54cb31e
8676c83c1ac50ad3be2799c4f295711c61827b81
'2011-12-29T18:34:45-05:00'
describe
'19309' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
407da153f1c3bf49869f64085c002e4d
4b330ec0e1256bcd242429df80290610a685ceea
'2011-12-29T18:33:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKL' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7a0de08303e6ea7a0e23557241cbc9d8
88fe1b8dd85c0070a6cb65f19764975d32dc8be2
'2011-12-29T18:24:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f0351d00901c189124d0bb5b5ba1acec
f7ce97b993c37aaced945259fae9492ea152975e
'2011-12-29T18:24:51-05:00'
describe
'5178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKN' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
925d6ab55a3a1f266363798b2dd544e3
9b69dbafea6c1aed5cfeb2193aa6eee23ba006a8
'2011-12-29T18:31:16-05:00'
describe
'506334' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKO' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
05660fd94640c5eb70dcd0ca8225a60a
8c9efc48d5c33f4ac6c1d1daf9454bd305bef5b4
'2011-12-29T18:37:19-05:00'
describe
'76521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKP' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e48eeaa0033d28a09ee34929aa5a157e
ec26675c40f7337c465f8607b43f8e0846d2b50c
'2011-12-29T18:27:57-05:00'
describe
'23987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKQ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
7163f359963ebda4ea720018ccb5afba
38ad5343fddab59d1c901e5d951cf95a148fbd50
'2011-12-29T18:25:28-05:00'
describe
'23547' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKR' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1a24f1c532053d88e3b5365ec3c4e3f7
7745de2e86d0245bb3f887c05a404dc10d7fbed5
'2011-12-29T18:22:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKS' 'sip-files00032.tif'
1fd00a6c529e0a49f558e7c1b67dedb5
b361e33743b03bb2dab78b3cdb374f8c88ca4b4d
'2011-12-29T18:22:03-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKT' 'sip-files00032.txt'
4d37b6b89c39db394584d138926ed685
dedd804bec793ca5bd653884ad45528e7028ed37
describe
'6107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKU' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
5e44bf03a2b430b5573e596900691968
683cce533967eb2ee61d8e74b7ffb292b2d0a80d
'2011-12-29T18:29:55-05:00'
describe
'506293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKV' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
91bf08a80277f7809bf6a888a0e556e7
1d0d27f72b6432b3fbeb3cbeb97df7374be3e406
describe
'109005' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
adabdaa99db2265e0bfb0b6a38e3e49c
e46729af8ea9ff283e64e438b452373fff2181be
'2011-12-29T18:34:11-05:00'
describe
'35581' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ce4b40fe0b6ae670a1bfff3318e53664
2d745362a733d2cdf648d5d7af85e7432f483d7b
'2011-12-29T18:26:43-05:00'
describe
'34355' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKY' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
695ec9e015ffcb0addf31bcfa29a8bea
8c415bc7628fef678de3e3f9bd0d321144a5aeb1
'2011-12-29T18:33:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQKZ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0c082790497130da8780c549df7d6cea
a3cbaad172f9af8220c8b8a0e40196decb15459d
'2011-12-29T18:26:19-05:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e11403e3ece0b79da02ef730b2af5257
443503906f0f94a1040e639479e2ee5864c15ff1
'2011-12-29T18:30:31-05:00'
describe
'8238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLB' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
97d6526f9d2d5da5ab53a028b4d42386
77f1554029e0cfe2202052af5d9a8c95c3bd8393
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLC' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f79873b1201e0ef459755086c0240169
78186a7952458e7b1f0cb084c02626e8a685cc69
'2011-12-29T18:31:31-05:00'
describe
'109229' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLD' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9d77f88dbf2f0bf59d0d4dbe83c27e18
95192394c933161674208e2d6b8c8f44a9cbc1dd
'2011-12-29T18:21:44-05:00'
describe
'36189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLE' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4a208e92962921f083a2624681d68465
2ecf38ef6a4d07bdd83fbfd5c3ed92fd6e62b4af
'2011-12-29T18:19:03-05:00'
describe
'33761' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLF' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0af449093e709d12e3f09b30ddd2e739
d5f66530a4732a21753af332417a551e61bb9e1d
'2011-12-29T18:27:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLG' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f6c374187d31bf721dc80ba2f4d97289
459f48dfcbb3b40e05df21243bdf8ceccd98e1c1
'2011-12-29T18:22:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLH' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2291a887feb5284c23b759869896f0b1
8c46d535db9788dd43e7c3d189346ccfd70bdb0f
'2011-12-29T18:20:55-05:00'
describe
'8286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLI' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
00e1759ff0abbc081634da857bb49a1d
4a664e03a344b89d2a331a5c787fcd13b6527a93
'2011-12-29T18:24:49-05:00'
describe
'506377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLJ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
03da07aa04ff0dc7fa15fdf53dfa2763
5902d9bb89f361f947ce2a836f7467aaeeb6f11b
'2011-12-29T18:37:21-05:00'
describe
'109823' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLK' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4e70fef760043b134cf2f61cf052ea5a
051aec3ab280d7bac017363e5fc0ec4c98d48f25
describe
'35851' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLL' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5c1ffc3c100c3c371c810335ff3fb97c
b226dc8a0227475a732fc5c0bb9a60cc0b77f97d
'2011-12-29T18:20:49-05:00'
describe
'33774' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLM' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
012aab8ffdd15a0cf12639273ffa92ad
30908769da8bab9141d1b92eb3f5c876a67639b3
'2011-12-29T18:31:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
91e83cbe136c7a21b9f64804c9a99c21
780c04b0e4a98eac827a69942277589a73e79259
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
bad5b4c33fc628a1f0a5750ff3112d30
c0a1132bbf56c01db88d4bbc05b9f67f11b0db45
describe
'8414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLP' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b5fd32f103137cf19a638f5c262c6225
fe5220b0b851c2e1b89991a667e62be327089de8
'2011-12-29T18:25:39-05:00'
describe
'498675' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
46ad0b48c68c4172a5b9c621072b65fd
7e7fd5ccb6381fe45488452dac3e2619d1e0ec99
describe
'102206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLR' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
c0994e4405a8dcde6cfcd7dd5aa2b6a2
b0a266388ffdf4b88a92486b377bd72e4081fb85
'2011-12-29T18:22:33-05:00'
describe
'33996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLS' 'sip-files00036.pro'
694090ff751636afed0130810d3d829d
f47585548d4a00f50ee70d6e03f764096ebbfcdc
'2011-12-29T18:28:40-05:00'
describe
'31554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLT' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6472ba1895e535cfdb8d62530a1416be
55e6de16fa6fc5cf307ce97e41e0334f034d613c
'2011-12-29T18:32:12-05:00'
describe
'4006288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLU' 'sip-files00036.tif'
912717dcf0239dcee58705286ed666a1
cbbd41b2d971c49bfc3c2d31de86027e9dcb38cc
'2011-12-29T18:20:18-05:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6eaa7002e96ca1d1eb4c18bb2c1a792d
f86dbf39839b1f61b6ba3a6bbdfd89139b38f696
'2011-12-29T18:28:12-05:00'
describe
'8082' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLW' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
f45b20771d4c2bd9816533517cc0a894
d4115ef64c4c1f2c451ab900b8e4af1fe76cbacf
'2011-12-29T18:34:44-05:00'
describe
'506360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLX' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
5d6857eb0929854b006b0c8c79825322
a0e890b0b80ef0815bdd67f762d6c338ff489426
'2011-12-29T18:31:01-05:00'
describe
'102349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLY' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
ce1d0aa4f4165c5b0c1fe18cdd7f3d96
ad1673ae10c9f02e8c7af171a41dfa2a1a7a88d1
'2011-12-29T18:19:51-05:00'
describe
'33433' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQLZ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
45478fc777a96f216881327c9ec90877
5b1dceacf37c229bfc6f2aa9d6e180a44293dd24
'2011-12-29T18:34:59-05:00'
describe
'32466' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMA' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
836aa06646bfe18bb287f815cc136f46
a02e2f0c483af5e0ee41cdcdbdb3bbb5b66cad98
'2011-12-29T18:32:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
52a1e33a64ba7711e4cd57190dc74ec9
28d532157938d3b9f4c0224549814835227cea65
'2011-12-29T18:19:08-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMC' 'sip-files00037.txt'
2891aa65b5d63338b40c8a4097ccc8d7
8d1e88c03a6cec3a30756169b4ae1f5286abc6ea
'2011-12-29T18:30:29-05:00'
describe
'8742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMD' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
73fde6a6839b753f88d0a37a1acf97af
b4192a8fb6092f05c2eb3deabf07d9fbc67a73f5
'2011-12-29T18:31:12-05:00'
describe
'506186' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQME' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4a1c4a1cc8e83e940ecc85f25ae89f2d
855f2259f455868b5792767a799d15c45a13b993
'2011-12-29T18:31:17-05:00'
describe
'104384' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
d89c5d21c1debdbbdb3eee6ffeffe258
b2a31184156b34cf1d34bedecaa8ef996d96774e
'2011-12-29T18:25:06-05:00'
describe
'34754' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMG' 'sip-files00038.pro'
3604731e9769decbffabe4103110c10c
3bbb4976ed6a31f502440372815c53a93cda0f08
describe
'31983' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMH' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
3d828d613efc2b452ed66b507bcaa495
e9babc0d749c5f85a7c40eaf0a69076dd625c534
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMI' 'sip-files00038.tif'
4e4b4f45ce5369c5474b325f8dfb9a35
81213b438c52d27afc99c04d8e4ce758eef1bf22
'2011-12-29T18:29:59-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMJ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
7e09ad004bba31d12821b931df3be6ca
06c0473a5a573927c81b4d91fe361731bf92e51f
'2011-12-29T18:20:09-05:00'
describe
'8051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMK' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b385cec2bca4722f748b3264d3e497a1
4a99b13be29cf2730b17d023322e650382485ea3
describe
'506339' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQML' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e031c34de138f0f19b95729606dc5c93
60d9995f945783f740526ac711c8b2db381debdf
'2011-12-29T18:26:51-05:00'
describe
'103904' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMM' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
78ea3c285f269c02a510e2a68b6cfd79
3c0d5cab94435766c5309cee5c7b299c1f8798d4
'2011-12-29T18:31:56-05:00'
describe
'34154' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMN' 'sip-files00039.pro'
285420dbe262ab464d6fc704d67534b6
5e6ff12f88d19a0f4738466575d26b2cd11a88a4
'2011-12-29T18:30:11-05:00'
describe
'32512' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMO' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d51cf65b217135f762f020aaa803902b
817b083e7f075e72b004330b44f85510a80667b0
'2011-12-29T18:35:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMP' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c61b6e4a3aa88e2be0ab5d6d044b0da5
3fe95b1e262f54306eb3917fb2c07df7cfd070ba
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMQ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
67cd1405214e350a9d991f9e66f26c69
9dfdcd62b86bf51264662ac22e26a821cff8d2e7
'2011-12-29T18:35:22-05:00'
describe
'8029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
4c93f1bc52644257ca1da2bceb0cdeb1
bd95c88f61927a8e581cc5fe89f1967be7f19948
'2011-12-29T18:19:14-05:00'
describe
'506343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMS' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1be39a12d9777548cf6c3b097397d5a1
99469ece0fb233e78d8363ed2b0886cac8c4e07b
'2011-12-29T18:26:11-05:00'
describe
'108421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
732003559eb6f3590e230b3a138e4e82
b2e50a382ac095ffd95b2b1384249d86cd2bfb60
'2011-12-29T18:30:41-05:00'
describe
'35534' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMU' 'sip-files00040.pro'
fd7c457d832218d108bf623593613bf6
2b8ddd6ca74881cf47215d16d949c9e4a6f40cfa
'2011-12-29T18:30:02-05:00'
describe
'32979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
118c33e00d384a50e2da521d182b4cfb
39507dd3e8c413a8c4cc05f50af539d5c471f1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMW' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1f287c86c3a65dd3c9b9d92e6a72e9c0
bba0d4d77a3210dfea27824ee818613bdd3db9c0
'2011-12-29T18:31:53-05:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMX' 'sip-files00040.txt'
7b1590b0483102553f8010f7a5f0e0da
b1855aab5a3649c62534870d2b3f3b72296703bc
describe
'8223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
1ac0f9618698487986609ec77d5fcf83
b4dbafa1a0a220234e5269567897a558725efb03
'2011-12-29T18:21:12-05:00'
describe
'506370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQMZ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2fb693f7472c1cba3201786bd676f68a
db1a009f7fc742121f2e070d4e26df0c1ae07f50
'2011-12-29T18:22:46-05:00'
describe
'111212' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNA' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c03e898f122bd0a4ac01c913a3ea71f1
e18b45b3e1cb404e08001a06769f41149e109506
'2011-12-29T18:20:44-05:00'
describe
'36476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNB' 'sip-files00041.pro'
57e738b3e3c787b885e568f402d65168
590389c99b6e5ddbe93930627df5eab8d68405ac
'2011-12-29T18:37:00-05:00'
describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNC' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
39208be1b2a195f706467aa70cfc6c04
f2084cf710998abf786346a4db11ad7c14e99b49
'2011-12-29T18:23:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQND' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8e8b723cd442025aa8ca1ab23063dc22
89f4fecee7b6b2de9bfa0724437016b4447f5078
'2011-12-29T18:29:11-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNE' 'sip-files00041.txt'
1be9a13feee0b8fd6a1c71ee3be340bb
c56a289e570e1bf61b1f5f830932cc92dad3fd10
'2011-12-29T18:28:29-05:00'
describe
'8338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNF' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
be7ab95bef87b93a04d365aa83108b44
8d2b3c07c4c84b946801db6794befdd2ba79309a
'2011-12-29T18:24:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNG' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
8786742f5078ebec909f058f3f8e088f
552ae84e02ec9dc5dbc5567fc41961b8b2c2a832
'2011-12-29T18:23:46-05:00'
describe
'104511' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNH' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
a6ee7bf5e0e1b01b72ff5fafe63386a5
5b580e2da8686b25b9171be970b10c3e52dd7775
'2011-12-29T18:37:41-05:00'
describe
'35775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNI' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9bb6e38f7a68a79146508114d89eba42
c06733d9b017fe4aaea10182335728b8e8ef0537
describe
'32702' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNJ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
16dc31b65720cd73974ea39fb42552cd
dd9edd3f046a6e4c2d366e15e00525ed802cd31b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNK' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3c6652b0aea083a14057055832e5ed79
00a8c92c77ddb932b8a131d399ae29f6ed364685
'2011-12-29T18:35:10-05:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNL' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6fa0a4b7dbc13b111d426d122f5b9d88
63f055667a4f955728b0ee2fe16dfd7fb32f2521
'2011-12-29T18:26:41-05:00'
describe
'8310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNM' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
6f33051d6ec4b39b32a1dbb3ceb596e6
9bf21eab422fd85929f06bce98db06335904cc42
'2011-12-29T18:37:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e577d1b8e4ba159118f47a44dca40bb1
3189fcb5ff3b84c097e842f2ef7cfcf65d365822
'2011-12-29T18:23:43-05:00'
describe
'107389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
cb54a3ad40286a49ed4b0fb6e21f916e
6f5fe0f38b1c2b756ee9e704459c02d484030bb4
'2011-12-29T18:32:08-05:00'
describe
'36239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f79db57c86236b6330b01fd13deed27c
408d00d754e9b4c3406163ccbdafcb5fb943672c
'2011-12-29T18:22:28-05:00'
describe
'33094' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a7e51617bd942f484370c309bf3fca22
aae66cb1022f76526b2f11e26d3f53600c7dfee3
'2011-12-29T18:28:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
930ca66415eabb3ec1c2bbfe6d9d34ab
e6519d1331fe45c8112f253484f0e24394eecaf0
'2011-12-29T18:34:23-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNS' 'sip-files00043.txt'
2fb85394be5e90b5cfa2a242bc8c9dfd
d4c1baf402f884f4d084de070ff6c178416a6e29
'2011-12-29T18:31:28-05:00'
describe
'8320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b7733e1c5a5ab955c3048722f245cdc5
dfab998bcc7f226c4b335bf6bbe3d5335b6069bc
'2011-12-29T18:36:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c4c926b7203d066647c3d0d45be40c1d
e0ac183d4fd7ca21995c2056896fcd415ea765ae
describe
'108339' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNV' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
173bbf11ed61f7134ecfa9d431553228
f7d9535e5f6fd302160de7486d249f720e94c2d2
'2011-12-29T18:32:17-05:00'
describe
'35693' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNW' 'sip-files00044.pro'
1d3d53ecb83de069907038d9400a7205
11a3cee54faf4467674ec8839ef48b2926c3673c
'2011-12-29T18:23:18-05:00'
describe
'33626' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
91b9b4084744331a4ba1113f86cc5006
3cc726526e218d1e54aa9c645025651edc810994
'2011-12-29T18:30:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
370910621ce9828aa55312699ef0ac7c
03ab4b74aeb803cb32fec8596c23ec474f8bd002
'2011-12-29T18:21:19-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQNZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ed5871b66a3f46d6881735290374564b
dbf197254b6f4ddab1d616176c087bed3443c278
'2011-12-29T18:24:52-05:00'
describe
'8407' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
b5abd4ac778aa7abbe963bbf98ed2a61
05ebd354e942f62262b6be1c2738d8ca84b4e762
'2011-12-29T18:20:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOB' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
697f4b0ae09980a56b9f83d5010788a4
86f1da5dc8f4e3588e7036ba75433df4afe4ecba
'2011-12-29T18:32:21-05:00'
describe
'83121' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOC' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
664da1d816bfa3a2d5bf1c2db11e13dd
4f6e3de29f0f94994107252017ad80e5d0e387a2
describe
'28019' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
92dc34cbb5fd5eb0f2942bb67f95a2f3
aea469dc3fabd2da312674bace07a171d04450d1
'2011-12-29T18:30:37-05:00'
describe
'26242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
963d38c451fd7c905c6c14abf583b8b4
03b23187011df064666688d80290fe51fbcca4d0
'2011-12-29T18:22:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
722c288086a70cdc8c52352f5bb4ca14
def013970e077e12166654a60655df2e9a358aff
'2011-12-29T18:25:13-05:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a60fbb5fa537d3371a990ccbe3978b3c
1c1eb3a3f48c6b82578b6fae968b95100d2413d5
'2011-12-29T18:20:02-05:00'
describe
'6769' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
bf4ab537aef42880dc53985a464f0563
8d124ad1072fe2b01f6f12d917d96a995560c916
describe
'506365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
10a9a6fb1a7f7bad11c51a3eafb17b32
a2f10e12f7a44e991548603dc4a7a0626914f13f
describe
'104404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
316197c291cc15052296b338f3402aa3
17cbfbd1ed24fd7b2879cceef612ae429aa27e57
'2011-12-29T18:23:58-05:00'
describe
'35265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
48c64e9d81c9400ba2f328b4694e7480
79642e535509626370fc89a6584a9d3fd55eaf7f
describe
'33272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e7118660799857c59a58ad2fbfeb669f
e9b0022525ac7e5758202d3ca98bd8b83b59cb10
'2011-12-29T18:33:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a5ea3d882222612c8adc4e4611e91420
ced5557031fa55a08bc33308d272d2f999e0955f
'2011-12-29T18:36:14-05:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQON' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6bc33c93f3edfcd684a42800134dea99
e64a58f74e3009312d1285de617b461299041833
'2011-12-29T18:32:49-05:00'
describe
'8213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
343326c79bb2ffeedb3415f1aa1dc0b8
a7e8f001dfd6b50071ddb8ebbdde894c641a1d84
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e8014893d58a010e04454ea1c9afa2fa
1aacb632b4fdc2a076cb05586e155914b7b67f28
'2011-12-29T18:28:22-05:00'
describe
'107598' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
4979cb7f1e14541c4a577699b5d02ae5
7905d9d6caa929f53940dc479201f900e43464b6
'2011-12-29T18:27:28-05:00'
describe
'36143' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
3d565002b27fd9cc22f455c6f87e724d
ebd1b5e6fa3227e5415f81dab175f46e71912708
'2011-12-29T18:27:49-05:00'
describe
'34110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOS' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
36010995be5462d52125dcc46d50167f
3df1c23010d622803f9f50d19ea176e7f5af2f34
'2011-12-29T18:21:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOT' 'sip-files00047.tif'
ae337ea057b675bee0dc55ff58eac3fb
bbad388684a25ac9c0c4a94a02ee305c06abd1a4
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
98945c878fcfe8d5b24ba206e85c4514
78692a9be60e0fb0fdfc4e4016a7ec96efdc88b1
'2011-12-29T18:32:14-05:00'
describe
'8298' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9e8cf68cffce9d38d992ed921938556d
012cec9ee972f738ecb541d35aa9179b35cdeb19
'2011-12-29T18:30:04-05:00'
describe
'506375' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
3e2da20e50b994cbf28968f3cece7cef
71af1dfdd0939415ef6852fa9d498f56ae261fd1
'2011-12-29T18:26:36-05:00'
describe
'105792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
27a81739b4c56a79ede53d5bc020a0ef
2b29a63b8f9b946b3ff418b8b83d519b73039595
'2011-12-29T18:32:01-05:00'
describe
'34715' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOY' 'sip-files00048.pro'
2fd3bcadf94ea9dd0c367cd281d6ff41
aa76f628c70f2ce89347e89cefee3035251c8ff9
describe
'32605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQOZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
30202372c2af76a489f9a8b138511d28
b0680b7280b0bcc6afe5e73e379f637e2b008a98
'2011-12-29T18:32:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
dd1c681df26f05931ddc4657d67519bd
a88415efeba4a3ad982e71f4c85598b489810e5e
'2011-12-29T18:27:44-05:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e5ea34bb177911701b1f187b5318b60f
4d1fd0305dbedae226d844edc4e3a6872bf4f3dc
'2011-12-29T18:37:47-05:00'
describe
'8118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
51e0c867795f382ba667d07a5d367c94
2629e486dcc5271f550afb96efe410d7975c842e
'2011-12-29T18:27:32-05:00'
describe
'506292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
04ef1e4a7156adfe9325ad96f31f9b05
5c6f1c1caa9a179c8b07bb799e6a10057a7f0213
'2011-12-29T18:21:24-05:00'
describe
'99302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a15bb5a0891a2ecce51b6239ce9f81e4
8fc3dbbca7da04619b76f0ae5a519c5020fa179b
'2011-12-29T18:34:01-05:00'
describe
'32953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f5b897e9175014cc8ee6526a8e5ac0ee
a78469b3479ae07738dadf7fad984fe610e87cb4
'2011-12-29T18:33:54-05:00'
describe
'30061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
a0231d1ce1a0d01143ecb3ecee468cb0
bbebc19bd466af6e0ce9a7eadeec34bcae0e0769
'2011-12-29T18:19:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
001827729aefd8e92afa828f82c67a8f
940673f00abfa67fc516d42d3a0b346a3dd84db2
'2011-12-29T18:28:56-05:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
d788af6421ad8880b620eedb1e9e84e1
06d2f9ebde6f52b5a7755fdc08add6d0a9f2179a
'2011-12-29T18:23:50-05:00'
describe
'7650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6bf81dd3961b077fcecb09c2251067dc
c334dfeb2c1b2bc30e213ab8b8739b1bf6c53d90
'2011-12-29T18:31:29-05:00'
describe
'506364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPK' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
755cac284cd0fb83965fed95d2a28cf8
531048c49d728e8ab96b949efe24e6a3748e05e5
describe
'77809' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8909942d07b2294c953970a981f0a0cb
d415d8b284d27560f4123954c0f8260f52a6a822
'2011-12-29T18:32:40-05:00'
describe
'25344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPM' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d829edaf2a69a96cedb6c0e646ec00ac
21ef4197e5a182880cd02694874874e40cadaf45
'2011-12-29T18:21:07-05:00'
describe
'23798' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPN' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e800f423df507732a9ca73c15ee4f5f6
7cc628c55ea2f29c05e38ac8ea798eccc0c730bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
bf9a3b0a69909b937e35907a3be06b83
73506d7e8c129c73ba6c707ed953cda91ac8c0b1
'2011-12-29T18:35:46-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
384030824c55c99785819195a6a55896
f6b7126893e5847ae55c71fbbec79eb60b7a7b45
describe
'5984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
166d15b29f8374708b898d0879ab280f
6c88d9593dee53e117c2ab6b685a999046b6834f
'2011-12-29T18:26:03-05:00'
describe
'506327' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6dc2a6fb247e9c79d6f744393f38987a
44cefd2f98877a233442b11c8d072475981b28d6
describe
'109647' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2d0358133f961a0db1494e32087a9fa5
468b3e1828aab4c1f0d101b01c23df98abe459ec
'2011-12-29T18:20:10-05:00'
describe
'36744' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPT' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d76b37f491dafe780cc3b47382297f22
290537a7e3fe7577996ef853dec2dd2eaca48690
'2011-12-29T18:21:59-05:00'
describe
'34457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1c5b39692c512d5a5abaa205611a9546
933381e3addd4bedb31d0b5cc6bbe8d107885514
'2011-12-29T18:25:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPV' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bbd290869a3946e78cb77fdb1f997bed
b9ff5a774c1e1e80289d44ddaac2dc25d62ccaf4
'2011-12-29T18:30:42-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
6573dc1cb789cac6c09981556b7dfe67
28bef5417de62bbade81238b4a4a4b9edcadb00f
'2011-12-29T18:27:13-05:00'
describe
'8449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPX' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cce6ec0306261e7a41c635cbfea0761c
dfece218e50d5edcfe507d1155e3c426fec066d8
'2011-12-29T18:37:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
627e1372a8eef92c693c4339fd6c197f
33e6edd724099282665e9648199324426c489276
'2011-12-29T18:29:04-05:00'
describe
'90980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQPZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
23df065a418f65e42ffd2923ebe98818
ed46138ee8ec14eceaee2dc8562bf3d3ee8fde67
'2011-12-29T18:29:35-05:00'
describe
'30577' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ce669d9ba21b37c8cd07264bcf62ac54
c8b8662dff0751cbff19293f9b9a8a95b50be7f0
'2011-12-29T18:30:05-05:00'
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
86db6fb2bb3a9e1ae89e52fdc8b1eba7
07c84172b693f2160dfd853858ea216e13e1993e
describe
'4067840' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a088ad6dcf03807d6b2be7d7d74b2aa3
f0a8fbfc5f98ef9ca6113f6ab687cd5a6b7fa901
'2011-12-29T18:20:22-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
61ea763907c3a252f1697288ef2c30a0
644f6bf63247c9838c1aa7acdec9a19c308c47a7
'2011-12-29T18:34:13-05:00'
describe
'7455' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQE' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
271e5718752f503306b7dcad89904105
a3263144130000ff260059ee6234a201bbc69ff2
'2011-12-29T18:27:19-05:00'
describe
'506374' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
edd5c59b01f367708641715b7c492734
124f6631872485d526bbb0897a3858a9bc99e2bb
'2011-12-29T18:28:01-05:00'
describe
'105959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a3c98244ac1409fa182159539879cc4b
570238d76219256020f03028689462fba9bb56e1
'2011-12-29T18:28:21-05:00'
describe
'34780' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
51075c839a6f479700990a60d91676e3
83a7cca4755890f911b1e5ca9767a4a8eb2eba85
'2011-12-29T18:34:07-05:00'
describe
'33912' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2bf858c7c00d781ad2ff8b9c7e45e122
e3eec312883b11a35d2ff6b6409cc1a2d50eb92c
'2011-12-29T18:19:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQJ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
5a9621987e64534b258b71bbda69ec75
d6ea939eb4cf98e3436f9dd177f69cb232170093
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
6ab06f325fe668ae79913b5c9800e8c3
fa09203b642c28ffa8ef98c7d4d5976962663f76
describe
'8757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a8b2b5c610c3372ff6a0a19551a73375
929ce660d75f1a8216c28c17b39b5f2582059732
'2011-12-29T18:25:45-05:00'
describe
'506312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
8ce0adad11fa03956c808917d044a68b
385a6521f2a2e49380d50b150cd60df16aa3a445
describe
'104494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQN' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
c5903359e0a4be7a779116f833b85047
7852b760ae68a51c7123b4ac20f0daccca82b37b
'2011-12-29T18:30:17-05:00'
describe
'34279' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQO' 'sip-files00054.pro'
dc65f3ef413fe9c5582dd77660ec5c5e
775d214e1b97f29b4c5be04e4bf63de77ed9767c
'2011-12-29T18:29:13-05:00'
describe
'32256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e0a6e0a3c9c6e0a463f4d6ea18f4533b
d507114d77dccddce0f2c7b413d0a064b237a7a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQQ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
5425b27174f033d2daca506a3d6b1d81
1538174101b3b4522037bf225c7bb79bf135a62d
'2011-12-29T18:33:56-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQR' 'sip-files00054.txt'
92ccf6b14d669acbc0ed323c678c4979
ff50ac9492fff5705d4b4128f8e0644c98f6bc93
'2011-12-29T18:35:25-05:00'
describe
'8074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQS' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
be153088fb81662b5ddd41220604d15f
aec0226afc34bf6f484634bd866e89104471ed12
'2011-12-29T18:23:21-05:00'
describe
'506342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQT' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6525527eaa642f5cdd0095eb36dba171
0175213598ffefdc1beab673a051fef6f2162860
'2011-12-29T18:37:40-05:00'
describe
'107894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQU' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
8c831621b0285e2135932f51c8a70dda
9225fe7c6135a2254f1fa3adc588d075ee9b3dff
describe
'35868' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
aea90de7819158c8af7c2bb964c1f245
cbf26764ca68605fc7e901c3a4f8ae0c10fd411d
'2011-12-29T18:37:48-05:00'
describe
'33955' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6ec5e47e0e0058fb3d33c4c2c3daa168
2ac0a9afb1e32fe752c3e13ec7fea238181b4583
'2011-12-29T18:33:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQX' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2111c4d315322bc2ad9d4a32961c88b3
fb2e912f156cf5f6e4ba6ea0ea410e81d98bfd10
'2011-12-29T18:26:12-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQY' 'sip-files00055.txt'
4231afb921d38d7d899badd4b9506128
9a6f476933fac5e21a561db7c3a6d4ffb40db588
'2011-12-29T18:23:36-05:00'
describe
'8209' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQQZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
635d1428be412b8ee4e77e4a4c758fd8
f2d1241d40deffee65d1598dee2d01561ed8ba32
'2011-12-29T18:37:42-05:00'
describe
'506373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
a1dfd7582723f26507f4bf21dabc27a0
7af036fddf9d54ef51219804cf9f9416130aad8c
'2011-12-29T18:23:19-05:00'
describe
'109014' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
9f8404acfbb9aebfef5f6148a4b89b41
89ae32d2f12d02ac801a756bc8182f447e4f6355
'2011-12-29T18:31:33-05:00'
describe
'37171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
ceaa94f8657079215c4ad0e366cdfae6
0b69152044d98ef350341b1517ef850f1c89eca6
'2011-12-29T18:37:22-05:00'
describe
'33339' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
de19c3a0553c21d70574585f13260728
28528b8c1708b576ec97613075fbb6c551df2629
'2011-12-29T18:19:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1123561969db04b4e12ef65f3d48db78
f35252ce6f0841d21549a530873f98340efca256
'2011-12-29T18:25:02-05:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
2e568ffd2e216da411614858b09dbdc6
9b037a268ad8b93a2caec41a39d16762bb43f581
'2011-12-29T18:35:31-05:00'
describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
52c7e71ef19bd512b746e0c2fc447255
490e8eb707e9f1a2d02a72f42a926d527bbcb512
'2011-12-29T18:35:44-05:00'
describe
'506349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
3d4e62d6102a3cd5c0a844075b4569c9
6b0e727399cad67e304e06e4fcba62666ee77cdc
'2011-12-29T18:33:53-05:00'
describe
'104522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3ca7540d08a1218f1a70f71f1fd187c3
2c02a5fd06185646f366eb00f7462fadbadf540c
describe
'34927' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d00021722028e2904b4b19463dcfc50c
1d50f965dbb8b9ffbcf7b4c008b49b78441ea1c8
describe
'32349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRK' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a1fa13891298c8d632285019a769fcb2
149fcbd7c8891f99deb55b255338f4f97c96a9da
'2011-12-29T18:29:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
461e6e19f20c69cfb4ca770a1380338c
25c6eb140a85b25ddd412e954dc287c351aeeb20
'2011-12-29T18:32:00-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
faf51dfb92986011e80f094190505e84
6c0f3367242883ea1fa690a85a283bdd5151bcd5
'2011-12-29T18:25:07-05:00'
describe
'8194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRN' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
931a74875eeec8319ac2ba06e68f5768
2d51bd840ec1d0fec22149b0fac7588be641bdb7
'2011-12-29T18:27:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
38c3cbcaef16a3751d95157e0bc94dde
3a656053592a16bc1b963cace1234965c805d499
'2011-12-29T18:25:37-05:00'
describe
'111080' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRP' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9f471c47951f05bbdff4682591dcaf52
5f1e37ae5e608b6cf0f67301a510830e59dee22c
describe
'37249' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
907ec11146a9394d658fe000106889f9
d592cc5fd046ed258556b9741d12b9939408e211
'2011-12-29T18:26:22-05:00'
describe
'34632' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fc29ad1879bb833e7224a1f6c46f1c12
5b1036a1bb61f3e59d1c4a29a3182dcf4516dbb7
'2011-12-29T18:20:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c017e519a06a0b2b1c9851cfebd34236
132d3a186d6981979fa92a333751c193e4b73425
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ca652483e508e97364ef80d770779988
ba409501c2cf0a16a30ab9cb47c87fdced5095a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
150d9735ed5c2befd88d4d0656b7eae4
5939a99a8915d21d32600fa527175a76afd9f793
'2011-12-29T18:24:57-05:00'
describe
'506358' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
b2cfb324e8726509c80bdec062ecc348
aba508666c3a91a9b9b43657aab461b72b7f05e9
describe
'97138' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRW' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c3f07e77ecee0f88000d5ff94de9f66f
2e19ab5a77a508446b51d46ecb9c38b80bc08c6f
'2011-12-29T18:29:52-05:00'
describe
'32527' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
eb86ebf95d790e8549b4553209107b66
62cd37930486a18081ff652b79fdaf49afedad23
describe
'30117' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
8170570667a6f28f8487681edd0b45f9
322d776171efbb92dbbf1572883bfd6c8b0bad4c
'2011-12-29T18:34:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQRZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
286ffd25de5edb0b0116ba52eec840d2
e342dd273e08a679ffbc1c0b1e3509472654f5dd
'2011-12-29T18:33:03-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
660450f9881b510b0290a218657e76e7
139094bcb955e8b549cb44f103f5b0ea1f3e9552
'2011-12-29T18:22:02-05:00'
describe
'7863' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSB' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
2d28a019069786d4c5b55daa07269640
e8d495f5d54a9ec17c46a5385a6849ccfca3e46e
'2011-12-29T18:21:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSC' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
15c6fe51d7d0fb848c4f0eca729f0ab7
285e09465cc641d1c704a659bac809a8c65654e3
'2011-12-29T18:20:51-05:00'
describe
'104147' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSD' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f34b867accd35c30abc0c0cee11e401d
bcacc20b786969d0cd7df5fb840058c2fb9dc957
'2011-12-29T18:19:58-05:00'
describe
'34706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSE' 'sip-files00060.pro'
6ae6cdf0dbf75491ebaa00cabe3acd20
8bb2dec3259fff466f6eca6fde7c6e1bb266cbeb
describe
'32483' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSF' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c5d92276c677ef6bedc9aea683bae34d
e6e8297542870df4ba145e156543fe866e658055
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSG' 'sip-files00060.tif'
1bc9cf5ccfd2275987aaa9a1bd0cb6e6
8d0a823434ec9b3c4193e0f11a446c17177a5d44
'2011-12-29T18:31:46-05:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6f2267b575d7d2689353419925b9855d
b2c5119a7c03eddbe767ad00089094647e5cd1b7
'2011-12-29T18:33:08-05:00'
describe
'8164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
74af2ebea6867e57bd445ec7d863706b
b83972896b5b58897f6fa2874d319b7e3467cd83
'2011-12-29T18:20:25-05:00'
describe
'506350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
06bfea140ca807d65917a3305bc9afb2
58dbf6032a257d9a024c41cad4e22c24704fa0a0
describe
'92888' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
0d1e33541bd32c8aa755fb79d2be1a27
3be231edfc654ec8ee1a8256208aaa1a8a2126f4
'2011-12-29T18:31:43-05:00'
describe
'30878' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSL' 'sip-files00061.pro'
62f15dbfb01b2aad81f090ad7d8b7b86
4ccfb944e498c0fe6e2abefeea7a72c618141314
'2011-12-29T18:25:54-05:00'
describe
'28867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
a93100a9e5eea3c8f61fbb8a205c9913
6ecd213a8ebc241ac7217c9a05a6c6d9c9aca7c3
'2011-12-29T18:37:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
a042c73d40749baf24935fea1db553c5
568340d5820e2591392579e75545bc1e60f56f4d
'2011-12-29T18:30:44-05:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
86785f79615185f8f6afd4ae8e51520b
5f7ebe8adff32c36eaa8b786e2ce13093fc79736
'2011-12-29T18:26:34-05:00'
describe
'7231' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSP' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
94877f3781de6c2713b57320ebc2cdda
b2b79d64c9f0349e12c66f02425c79899641db3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
ea1bb0d322ef85665acb64433b551712
773c369fb8c2de64384bbf4fe60463780f00e083
'2011-12-29T18:35:58-05:00'
describe
'72954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
cbf5229a747235c582a776be8233292e
c65202ece721fbd7fc9a14454e42612d732cb526
'2011-12-29T18:29:30-05:00'
describe
'23222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSS' 'sip-files00062.pro'
c6ed30aa31425f617ad4d64f4090e403
a0918473e6b7bc1db4311b37df3ada4a589c0988
'2011-12-29T18:19:43-05:00'
describe
'22431' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQST' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3fd6ace5d8212e96eae39174fc30fab7
c37a80bda51c9ac61602943378c52b6c10427120
'2011-12-29T18:19:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSU' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c371480e377fbf5e717a6a98a87ddf9b
6b9a7d0611991bb76a5a71e0f92ccc7e42634d24
'2011-12-29T18:25:08-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
af9dc2cacd70674517852ec5688596a5
4b78107151ba67efa7ce3312921e52d2e1d06e0f
'2011-12-29T18:24:38-05:00'
describe
'5948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5b42115df5c14ce7c12182b9267dd0cb
7782a4391f5be6701101375436287a006a0fa0dd
'2011-12-29T18:19:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
db0fac5eaaac01af7f1c37f3bb5c1c27
9b644c4a1c285c68bfe3d0da54ddab7e658dc597
'2011-12-29T18:28:47-05:00'
describe
'113273' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
fd98ecb6b013309d60a5c894fec365fc
da64ef493f781391a1afa2b88d87d9db43604423
'2011-12-29T18:37:26-05:00'
describe
'37376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQSZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3692faf93f4ac95dedafa2b8e5f5ad45
4fc41554a72a5b583ae3773c5e85f5ba89ed0096
'2011-12-29T18:31:48-05:00'
describe
'34489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
416d68d8aaf32940c95fb7c183532d87
94e8145053c268fb80ddf382392e4733ec9b001d
'2011-12-29T18:21:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
dd28e94c81fb53a00be8955c2520f841
b85a0d86a292e758bec294a50edd046418cb1dc2
'2011-12-29T18:19:24-05:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
ead1f60430406397aa667e83d21f7f35
3437107f21d24b2f5c3534dccc72b7bc5c1efa38
'2011-12-29T18:22:50-05:00'
describe
'8469' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTD' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
17d23b1d2e07c82a68d72602a89730d1
9b7feda0f5de34a4175a7e2e5707a0fc6e91a50d
'2011-12-29T18:25:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTE' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
7c9289c53bf93e9e294429e77aef577b
69ff173f220c8315075a09a66fe23bb196063b9f
'2011-12-29T18:22:41-05:00'
describe
'107373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
efffb0cdadc9b07056ead6cfcdcf98a9
e4fc3add6f62aafcd353ca46793bd1ee3225f66b
'2011-12-29T18:30:59-05:00'
describe
'35884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTG' 'sip-files00064.pro'
58ca106d527d335890a6e9134e37fa7c
bf304870c0986d85df68fcbaa9df01540da61441
describe
'33313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
53b0faf85598eec003ddbe127e9854ea
e6be38daa84148d5d5890ad668b53ea1429e5f5d
'2011-12-29T18:25:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTI' 'sip-files00064.tif'
113edce44c3f6a744c0d441551584b93
c9fd0d3c1ec393e4c0ec7eb17b93202d46a463b1
'2011-12-29T18:24:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7b46e9cc2719ee409df4115927afb95d
c77a2c5dd7218cae3a69a9c2fb78c107c3f205b6
'2011-12-29T18:37:17-05:00'
describe
'8205' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
4929369d52661087a239e8ec2d87f6fb
3aea68aae8a4f8dca618a00f27ab0ffc5479f97e
'2011-12-29T18:31:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8ff4393b82260eb6756a21207ad728da
3908c4c81b11de285e7b271d0d3dd7842b948b09
'2011-12-29T18:32:25-05:00'
describe
'107139' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTM' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
f7620d17113acca5137f8e1a26e3111c
677e059033707014e7442705d74c5a40d19ffafd
'2011-12-29T18:37:04-05:00'
describe
'35580' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
8b72471b0ea013d799fc0d71c1f8734b
c85ec90c4c65b6c02030df8f36d04e3b157a418b
'2011-12-29T18:20:43-05:00'
describe
'33294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
86ec33673d163f9681989e7c83722a63
d0b787365fad882146393522ebcbbd6f924a8a48
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
cb6acd7c6015eff53cfafa5f74f738c4
3439369d904a3529156a6e6ce98b0efa5a3c71a5
'2011-12-29T18:33:38-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
aa21d735ec59d095b574f811704bebb3
21121ef3bd8075a47202af13be59af92b17e4041
'2011-12-29T18:21:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
c82295bf9170b60c660b87310aaeb8ea
27730bd4bacffe2032339f6a77b88e9758686c0c
'2011-12-29T18:33:25-05:00'
describe
'506287' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0fbb783bc9ef90beff6c71f3db21e0e5
6c575ea08cc242b845a6a9367f2b07b58b456bc7
'2011-12-29T18:37:05-05:00'
describe
'102195' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
b920075182d644d6f9d1de9c583f1267
806280312d699587b2afe6cff798fc089549e4a9
'2011-12-29T18:27:56-05:00'
describe
'34132' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
594601467b9ced7927383c0cf0e77674
acb88c5e896deb740667ae6eddc6d7eb46641823
'2011-12-29T18:19:12-05:00'
describe
'32394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
ae6b49d2f0f20ff9e7f3231b229da6e5
848d63fe610528730ca9f544f61eb94200b5a161
'2011-12-29T18:28:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
d6005089a7f47fdd1b2717bc35fb3581
7ba1b2504eb93f4e1b2590e46805146179af6116
'2011-12-29T18:26:42-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f9144a55623229b4d71d1c639f162113
a92a1527871af424b93697cbbe8bf05b274fc942
'2011-12-29T18:26:48-05:00'
describe
'8065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
bcd6f17ae7646fc2b3079139e25275d4
3f04034b8c6d31164657d59d837993be9272b995
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQTZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bf5f689447a9d7eec801aad7bf22145b
574848921bf0768fe35ffffc83ee9e3419f7ae33
'2011-12-29T18:19:59-05:00'
describe
'103701' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
7682a3760c1193e48e8411255561a24e
4cc98ab65115f23d96d3bb78119dcf1ebd9cfa66
describe
'33505' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
a9d4b5852c9ac818c68482f55eca8615
2d1e5563cc5c2dee2934f12e29c8db53386e13c1
'2011-12-29T18:35:38-05:00'
describe
'33426' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
aba4fe9d7f9f6410cfc095a0cf8d1889
efe287ba73fd2b2dd698cfd34dfcca006e1201b6
'2011-12-29T18:27:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
187c622968443d2764448933d2e1ad67
128c604331171d783fa448916ab1581a850582b3
'2011-12-29T18:19:57-05:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
41903b722d73c2cd108ae8356de28fb2
b9a4edfd3fb9210f3a909830ddc29e96905213cf
'2011-12-29T18:35:16-05:00'
describe
'8337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
a43787bd1adea4b8ff3fdd85896bf077
8c78e0a2deb2b784a450666e828389111aaecbea
'2011-12-29T18:32:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
448d954245d040a76a852695cdb7c084
528c6d5c7ff61d45cf11d6f284b1ac23f91e6cc6
describe
'104042' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
dffdd8326fa7b8b8ba48dd80a2f79e80
fe69a0c4e0f23d87ddc64cf87f5fe28280aaff41
describe
'34554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
ccf74c28fe178956118afd7756ea6b43
7c202885d987b8a38f96c67fb056fde455f3af91
describe
'32343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
f668b78547a01b7c3ac3470c81eb9df4
73c27fe3b1aeb5a70be9b687177712fee68366e8
'2011-12-29T18:33:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
0ccb74b6454112d824a938727530ac49
4f0d1e35384dc9906090d1e1e38631f3e9bc177f
'2011-12-29T18:26:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a02d724249481eb28bb14c90e04dfa68
619e63a38053486e15882a76a1265e09d35e2785
describe
'7995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7d9fbc71d29409e3efbf9f152582bc83
e44b3a8c4e313b3bb202764757f216816bb55fb7
describe
'506311' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
6677ac55ef317ce1cde3bd866c93e630
3bcd2b224f0c298e2a76b10b78fcbacd076b2a12
'2011-12-29T18:25:17-05:00'
describe
'108887' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
175768b6fe9d6b4f4f9653fa492c9f74
26fc8df8cbfce29823958a6ade17d5f005cabd2b
'2011-12-29T18:29:12-05:00'
describe
'35736' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
6abfc29a2c73da1b1b50f781889062e9
04f715c0c52eda5a0398c56c4bf1e5c73e81b253
'2011-12-29T18:26:31-05:00'
describe
'33390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d7d376bdf0b296b17b7ca320a439edd6
c5b4fee589e0c2ad9fae7ab25a9cd58d64eb36de
'2011-12-29T18:24:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUR' 'sip-files00069.tif'
fe7f6f2b9833083a1e866a0309aa41d8
454ef0da7458e1bacf3ff95ffcf67893aeb42965
'2011-12-29T18:19:34-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
0066fb9ea4cd312d398a5f58d87dd12e
2e434b7b138c708443fa9babb7a434266621c73e
'2011-12-29T18:36:54-05:00'
describe
'8571' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUT' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
f1648ae0e00b64b7849ac65b50b2f6ef
8c67f67bd6aa2bc0b7f3a11e7d819c812ea50a35
'2011-12-29T18:20:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c1bd03ebed0628472a3bb03d32ec5d49
09c7f624eeefdd39a1abfc31b5cd9bb93f6fb03e
describe
'99223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
7bf5614d4291bedbe8b90a1eea03c1af
ecd3f0dab338d9698b46aa18d53f3d46f0593060
describe
'33409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
5df943276d18846df33c7baa551a4a7d
e01e985463d80f67409b13aff503898ad2a4e278
'2011-12-29T18:31:25-05:00'
describe
'31198' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
041a9b0a01d50ba316b8690526770776
1831960ec74776f5b5b38793a44dd3ff5407f2f8
'2011-12-29T18:29:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
4edfea65c9d5f389a29a50c0935a0c53
ee3518835f6765777793a2afac04bd96bed8ffaa
'2011-12-29T18:31:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQUZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
8bcda08b98fbcf91fa1570cc67935b06
40f1f3dd8f809c32572dd9913f293e2af262ed97
describe
'8002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
bd1f466dfd36f512dcdae424c07ec699
98219920c0670e1ecdc97a3bf18092b8401eaead
'2011-12-29T18:23:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a6cddd704cbf2e9f9ad9344b88b6d5da
1bdf0c2e4d3aab09fc0bdda1e74fdcc94b85ea46
'2011-12-29T18:27:12-05:00'
describe
'106969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e9145e59cb9fa4c847017ce096aba3b9
ce7976cdaed7be1b04cbb8a46cdf846f8a72c2b5
'2011-12-29T18:22:59-05:00'
describe
'35827' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a5040819dfe93ae871f6b850063b3155
c3fa743b75a1882ed599273224f091f70dd00987
'2011-12-29T18:30:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
0cefa16f3502adc4a282affafab6922a
91b4aaf4d0759ecc97dcd68b1874ee7d1e1fba81
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
c44c3c0ee9bd9b01df024892a0ea3dcd
5d76a9d5a0014180d7e1e102a652f9bff499da45
'2011-12-29T18:28:34-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
cc30bb4e1f3a82d5a5fa83061350d9bc
14f93d5fafe5e72241d2c6d2b84f6c384926c305
describe
'8215' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
305fa2345e68baf173e869f18120725c
283fa4ec112f7e6fbf96f27ac19f6ef65c92da2d
describe
'506242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d52962b164679636b04e2a76a14cde59
1b6d5c5070981263b4288c442a5a25175c22e38d
describe
'57099' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
906d1333f2a115fd39864cf0f4ef8f44
e4b13dd9667406932692ada240459d369d5786a8
'2011-12-29T18:20:16-05:00'
describe
'17632' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e3f46a27ef997769322a80f4a3336735
80284378a79be0ba49bd1b9296ddcb87bd668dbb
'2011-12-29T18:32:15-05:00'
describe
'17986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
72901587ab95fcfb5770c8eb3debe316
110d3d461381b2b7b7088e6674f7217bd8075f09
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a48a61964538a9936d21c1350e75ade2
cfb4397f52b6f4006bb0beced4c8576321a5fe04
'2011-12-29T18:36:15-05:00'
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
0204e6201377de17266e5bad6205005f
fe117fc9ce93ffdd04ced35c5f0927400761fd24
'2011-12-29T18:34:14-05:00'
describe
'4889' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
8b52f4554853490ded7890b91ee28cf4
57882bd90e183cc0789072788945b1a003eb4bc2
describe
'506369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
77fd57bb63df4eaf079ba9f00d6f6685
ff8784a551277520c27bee30d2558c5590c3d14d
'2011-12-29T18:32:26-05:00'
describe
'73670' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
2744ecce03d1040c8a43e77065c24059
a52a7684aaacb77c4f03b34a66a7cbb6f15138cc
describe
'22621' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
2ffa053b3c74d121e41b00befb99a117
f4f27c5749934c0fc15ec9bb9df2efbb7171ab83
describe
'23205' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVS' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
89022f3bc637f0100705da5659016083
74a418a33733316e09a0a759508b75905fa5a73d
'2011-12-29T18:29:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
54be5843ff136f525e20e833f7cb9c0e
2df370b2291647659450ea8351190ee314e94592
'2011-12-29T18:34:43-05:00'
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
1ce6c81196e9363d5e1c7305a340e21d
bc41886fd3107f6111e4c7875e54bb1ef6649823
'2011-12-29T18:32:18-05:00'
describe
'5898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
de76f7ee51f9068785779103a17657a1
91f390526a14d22845a7f7bcf28aef56b9603851
describe
'506182' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
4d2786b765f789fee9ed8707833b2cdc
299c14ba4ea2c949c6ed44ac782cfead7d8863ac
describe
'105179' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e7376a22268eb02838e1413f09c76607
035bb213cd36a6ce50517a979d3d7a5557020b09
describe
'34961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVY' 'sip-files00074.pro'
883327bcccb91cc403af12733f90494d
def0c9ba08bce24c0fa54cb3a93c8841d0076690
'2011-12-29T18:30:36-05:00'
describe
'32323' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQVZ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
85260db9384a6e41ffb6ce0fb1a59b23
d53ad03c9d0e7ad6d7296b4612df2acc660e3045
'2011-12-29T18:28:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9f3aa7755c4bffad3c1039867e87b0cf
d6a0109d96cb6b7e5362d933cb322564605719e6
'2011-12-29T18:35:06-05:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
d97fabe41491ec633eb10aabc1356c01
da0db6698055a471aca3c66d9bf766ac6af42d5d
describe
'8405' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
a070f2945f0855d5555f41b027164ff5
bdb8595cc199a6ec5fbdd6573f45c499276075e9
'2011-12-29T18:26:47-05:00'
describe
'506233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
bea20641010e144de6c3b2123a7c844a
87ebc0d47aa5c21c7f0c51626487048dd4e10824
'2011-12-29T18:22:09-05:00'
describe
'105886' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
da5c2d808d6bcd78d255eec56d220a92
39e7e0a68713c9220a0790b064f24224bc11fd93
describe
'34788' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ccf4cd9817f33349cf4cc340cc39e314
14a5197d8334675b7dfa372c5f96b36e71cc733b
'2011-12-29T18:29:54-05:00'
describe
'32918' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
d7fcc96c4b3a6eb21f6fa401a3547003
883eec955978984f5f5272daac91b756577e86de
'2011-12-29T18:33:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
06ffc76b6f0d4dfac6fd90620400450d
3e62b13d9a1ffd20faf048ad3098725f1a3b865c
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
bfa68861498e52bc3f1d6478dcd2fb3f
fefce42df444f58c1135730c46cb090fbeefe4ad
describe
'8244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWJ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
4641d6701d6bd4560e629aad0d98eb59
8c2b80ff3d1c61f4d491d3f994c8bb834b038521
'2011-12-29T18:34:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
7a8e57407f7b1c1d0dcfa7bf91135016
4c8c76181d173b10aa577dd6d5ecb47bbaf2a8ca
describe
'108788' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a581a0b046524f673596e398655c4e69
ec952b0f66880644147c83a8f7dab8c7fd12ccc6
describe
'35576' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
40ab9291193903871dbc12096116dec8
814088f0e3196fa866ef84a7ed10e1fb28808fa7
'2011-12-29T18:21:27-05:00'
describe
'33811' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
77d342f037f21c35a2f6015fef6ac579
3350fc64d8f116dde5b2272300d05108e61fe180
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8a1fd9e261480356a85ae52607353688
85a8b64b38b6e13a8021ed74ff8e34abea9b69df
'2011-12-29T18:29:02-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
360b4cf8f074525238962a94f2bd998b
40c87c8d9f9f85b72535c27d149ed04b366cf703
'2011-12-29T18:27:36-05:00'
describe
'8615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d25a958a37eb90598d300d576529c46d
ffa24fb463574631e147b219d80aa91abbf242f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6c008cbfaa0a2519a8a411e51f455641
58818a6c4999c9b39612e8f81773e5e5d95c2a96
describe
'127952' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWS' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
af4e6fc00085c476595dab33e4077664
70d33d266ecd53489f4ab91fb8aa4d020190c495
'2011-12-29T18:23:08-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWT' 'sip-files00078.pro'
785fc0e6dca13a20647cf5edc775d736
d2fb370eb65d488786fb471ad4d2557591f6cc64
'2011-12-29T18:21:20-05:00'
describe
'36077' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
7af6fa5358c2b3c43fc9fabec85f85ef
4a9b5697377bb5a760012d0be5240b77af821fa5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
9bb23210f5071a1fa83e871e47a3bb02
7092004430fed3295a34b577e0f773caa2f4012e
'2011-12-29T18:36:05-05:00'
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWW' 'sip-files00078.txt'
75a8c27371a72322c107ab1e0a066c6f
55340ef40c1999a2675d759f98aed15b5048e798
'2011-12-29T18:35:19-05:00'
describe
'9435' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
ebbd5bc04474fb8fee62edb9bcd36fb0
4fe6da9769affe9aa5decc0cd7f1ad49d63e6e06
'2011-12-29T18:24:58-05:00'
describe
'506300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
2aa0c0dccd568a0687a04f6182d14e05
0570b38b5d49e571977e308c6d76668bdf5bedb7
'2011-12-29T18:35:27-05:00'
describe
'112743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQWZ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
eeba283238853bb616064202c51412e6
6fde6ad77f0512b8991e668b8d14716f70de10f0
'2011-12-29T18:31:47-05:00'
describe
'36348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
330e150e0ec9c97142dc27032ca6c6e5
10c0403eb3aa8b7e56018f58202fa9e8d48d9d21
'2011-12-29T18:29:50-05:00'
describe
'35792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
da89a046cb312320e500c9ef98d7ad48
32b5f5c9f78bbb922acd9348116681470aa29e89
'2011-12-29T18:23:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
d9894ac535dbb4f946f3bf5fcda2220d
a2e6e542b9f0877be086eaa325d5eb5bb2351856
'2011-12-29T18:23:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
8198912c22efda7127c23e4a3c5d8ad2
f815dd0ce1f4f685b9ab639ced1a8866cf0beeaa
describe
'8686' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
d1359915a38bfaa65773959b277d7d9b
22715f1141fbc3973c14c3442132b169c59cc6d9
'2011-12-29T18:23:29-05:00'
describe
'506248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
4f9f2a087778ff8e7d8963ae33ebeb5a
ca6a22a08265cebc2ee8eb5cdd8faa1dd1dc35e3
describe
'108924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
e24e79f0ae09dede0928b8aa53d1e3cc
c4fa7082c5cef9ab6a5930a0d2c0e5da8e9683a7
'2011-12-29T18:26:28-05:00'
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXH' 'sip-files00080.pro'
e0011353e81635312a654acc152617bf
a6591bdfac723ec6beacbdff065006c03d505e7f
'2011-12-29T18:31:14-05:00'
describe
'33674' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
a9a44cffe77b11595cd098f70bd9750e
00c2ba6175fab5e36ed74246c5bda71c949656c5
'2011-12-29T18:36:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
af358215f45a7fef4b4804498e48f768
7af61ab81873e75cb6848dd22643c42cb884df4d
'2011-12-29T18:23:01-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
0aa88a61bd2096ba51b81ec6bf9bb855
280c47ad977fe468fa137749842a572172d6b442
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXL' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
08436ea1b0a4fdf636f576e6b0079d58
ff8eef249531738cab96578140281f5fa84649f9
'2011-12-29T18:19:33-05:00'
describe
'506162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXM' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
0099efcf15c97ef416d70261fb704ade
0f9ca006073e02cf18037d1ac002f55ce652c8ed
'2011-12-29T18:24:23-05:00'
describe
'101232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
8ab0d90fba13d57e102e0f7b2f9e92dc
20f712d5ebfad43c9fa72d5310fcd436f44b098b
'2011-12-29T18:30:20-05:00'
describe
'32845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
78078265a46c04a04c5a0361ea985e24
f3caadf61d307cce053e1bcf604638455bb60958
'2011-12-29T18:28:38-05:00'
describe
'31103' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXP' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
08abbd2837222506c870589c2b693ddb
5e4239a8c26d06bdbcf29d04eea5bf1d1168e5eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXQ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
fdd62d7082a4556157e4b853fef7210f
09e1bff0617bbd711242d9a9c8cd09949aebbdbb
'2011-12-29T18:23:06-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXR' 'sip-files00081.txt'
9202de29dbe7236f768913152e41edc3
7bf9d485a0af44fceb8ac5c15b2ef898a2bbfab5
describe
'7989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
bfe2f05b42189bc9b8f774cd11356902
c07c8e02d88a4bb4c2587f888608511c9b83d621
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXT' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
34d63efa94863a8e7743b00c53ae91de
5d26fce0533fcf88cc8642e89558ee81ed61f9c3
describe
'111088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXU' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
069e34e3c8faa1b2f2cc3162fefefe97
33b89933264ec20b537bd89947962ab0b94f0a3d
'2011-12-29T18:30:50-05:00'
describe
'36469' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
b343b81531a2117111201b7b36a1c5e6
64c735a4c3193d63118d3e2ed7d4cc92a78a83bb
'2011-12-29T18:34:25-05:00'
describe
'34437' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXW' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
cb1212e457851ca3b8f4d42b4a206114
1cb350b2f1139cc47dd6a86203a783bba3c401ee
'2011-12-29T18:30:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
405acf70b28a3a77f70037d592406e38
611c5600184189b52d13d1b511c309970f0ddb22
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXY' 'sip-files00082.txt'
54864a2eb1e9f7273e8d3ad45f92cb4a
bab8950749296690abe58def9345870db00b3c33
'2011-12-29T18:26:04-05:00'
describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQXZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
dda7cd162c7fdc3c0dc3096f14a89550
bb239edf29a17c82a3619a12708067c893c162b2
describe
'506345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYA' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
56b69d881245a870c0c694ce4b624484
3dd7554806a661e74f5673c9d97c859f049d6b32
'2011-12-29T18:33:24-05:00'
describe
'111044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
9785cb08d5abfd0ecbab514901c8efc2
58036f6cf925f60d437e212bd76ef816522192c6
'2011-12-29T18:34:36-05:00'
describe
'34953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
8b91cab740365ba543082cb4db39dfd9
f99f275e13091db7ffa3a924662c2008389da134
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
04ab3e770a9948565a761072c0e8ccdd
b8c6e2e77b8f2dede388691ecfee99254bd83edd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
df07c1a6016f4663856f4509ed87285a
52972aea10520dfb3aef82a935cc1f01b9def7ae
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYF' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e9309102970393db649b4bfd8a1b77d1
1155e5e8b8038dbccd014ddda27cb479beb51575
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYG' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
d90e250a74f0a338e58b12bd0a10fe38
7ca381ecbe00ed875a7460c5440111589d1755e7
'2011-12-29T18:30:25-05:00'
describe
'506297' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYH' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
9a8254c3e3f52cb746a72fe149c5f706
849bcb773428d3664fb6a1dbc09ef76f3f1c22a2
'2011-12-29T18:22:53-05:00'
describe
'113301' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYI' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f7a7b7ab7d5fb370b08be2fd79a152de
25189f2c3fd511cd44b97b0ec2732c52c360297f
'2011-12-29T18:33:48-05:00'
describe
'37420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYJ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
ac5e93fa3c2e94755052348ca40a0195
00e110ded766a20fc30a0aac5b816ccf40d8b1d3
describe
'34150' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
cb77fa492154d938d12bfd5a78a38830
d2241327976d5a4502dde1ab0d13da6ca912e5f5
'2011-12-29T18:19:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
76089bc10735bca7b38559fae019d022
6ce8983ec20035102f776ec0011dae4e324a8e57
'2011-12-29T18:32:31-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYM' 'sip-files00084.txt'
bc4dbe15e16fbcc9359b1f751a121956
2fa9932bbdecc6315daaf087b7ac869364c2c64d
describe
'8533' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
7bbd4caacb2be857d8a4b141208b925a
ea48b5aed065ee9ee717522ccbb49dde833a0e07
'2011-12-29T18:32:38-05:00'
describe
'506178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f8097312b3f87c4b9f17f2f184698d0a
b7d41decea45a45d301d122783e7e67193cea9f0
describe
'101843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
c62d8cf9547bb4613574e5dd454ce31e
d609a2caaa893688bd8000407ea92db3a7ed6a93
describe
'32619' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c16bd06b978d7967568ceba036db51e4
0c087d84acddea884f5c07aabbad9abcb3321ab3
'2011-12-29T18:19:09-05:00'
describe
'31321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
4e7bb9071862f733e8d2fc0bea042af3
3a92e8bbd9c30fa3b8795f7780576b33b60d982a
'2011-12-29T18:27:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
a3f4f4111529123f3163bb403f80a3f3
10fe019b9d66cae53cbb6815b61c06bfea21e682
'2011-12-29T18:35:02-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYT' 'sip-files00085.txt'
619fbe4df264ee280a6fc0f50bc30f9b
edaedd3b788af203d86849da5331d1958f1a0e54
'2011-12-29T18:29:17-05:00'
describe
'8075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
dd97c772530cc654ebd709668a860742
1c332af76f13efe869ace038ef70cfdedb2f900d
'2011-12-29T18:37:37-05:00'
describe
'506348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
a53ad68c0500a9ef211cc07e403d07bf
7832dbb1d0c06ca419ddaf61c44fc2381f5d3b12
describe
'114794' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
419feff38129bbdb242c80a328e0232b
3a41c429080ebc01a6bb55055d459906c68af54d
'2011-12-29T18:31:52-05:00'
describe
'37224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
e9ca0457bd96f324ca12b838a7454cce
7c56225f7ac8ffcbd5e511d06e98d26c61a67fa6
'2011-12-29T18:33:17-05:00'
describe
'35157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
faf83416028b02fea1e25d68b476a4d8
e0b75fd69031c375ee306281afce48e8c75785c9
'2011-12-29T18:31:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQYZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e985c1755f4d2cf47cd8bac13e510688
a13967f3a9c667b08ba408d00b2de8185488da3a
'2011-12-29T18:36:48-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ac57134b636197ccd325229882a748ce
3b0254894eb9c1ecf0ccdf9688dd401a6061dbae
describe
'8567' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
2402a9e90b8c5a919fc836898fcc2cea
de64a3b4a987b478f593987eae83eb85efadcaab
'2011-12-29T18:30:24-05:00'
describe
'506259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZC' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
522f7f7e2b49194b3999f7e78556b9e4
d45db000409879c247dc2dc7951e5cc3401780aa
'2011-12-29T18:29:48-05:00'
describe
'102989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZD' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d2c457532fa07a1a5cbae2160c8e899c
011ac10cfa40057020f63819faee4168ce3d8fa7
'2011-12-29T18:33:04-05:00'
describe
'34317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZE' 'sip-files00087.pro'
7c7022b8d23d93eb4aa1ecc286342d85
7d2f31439f644801e0ba79a97a5d4e9a3f677de7
describe
'31576' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
076998cfbce42f62f06509f0dd1fa266
f987b2c29855636a34b89c10f1e0f51d6ab64a15
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
5858099707dfeda20cdf77c1de554b21
c118f6b726887c3987b20ddde2928d4bf747fc07
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
984911446abb26dc7bea14d3f4bc8c21
07960a4a8642da0238d9e90f4ded084403d317a6
'2011-12-29T18:25:22-05:00'
describe
'8202' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZI' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
2fd4fd68978497095af01d2cedb82d01
edf095a34099fbabccff28619e41c2537eb81af5
'2011-12-29T18:29:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
cf1cb1271a9089b3dfc4cf95432cfdef
2069e5c1cc1f972f6cde1725b94f27b9c8b39ff5
'2011-12-29T18:26:13-05:00'
describe
'105628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
be9d72f6521c6070d93c2f2da00bf631
abd5c4e23fe182c3f2c0736b6647c01fa41f0252
'2011-12-29T18:22:49-05:00'
describe
'34728' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZL' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c5a03b5dc37f8122941ff68169deb456
1deb65e2105909669f09e38ef3256bc09b707c94
'2011-12-29T18:36:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZM' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7a3e7342506506b706c58d4ec23703e3
6d0373546aae1bdf5e71a969e3f60cdb814a81ef
'2011-12-29T18:34:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZN' 'sip-files00088.tif'
380ca1a447b98c6ee9d20e42250a6c20
ed513c2e8da5cb05a86b86e348314be2af1b5499
'2011-12-29T18:20:34-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZO' 'sip-files00088.txt'
26b2e03cb39869c12e4db5f1e971872c
73cb6c7c9bddcdff85de0f1f9fbb17a3301c3ec2
describe
'8288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZP' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
e9e05b38d9b5b4432ece9ce709f8e65d
26ae0ea1600e660d1487472bfcb4c1d57cd09b2c
describe
'506347' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZQ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
f48dbce9bde60234b8222b10c63c3e57
9241ef04d9b5e023fd12c1a8ec499c8ff478eaac
'2011-12-29T18:26:16-05:00'
describe
'113585' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZR' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
0cfe44f679370eaa75c570fb207e408f
289737cb273eea955c914e0e86d59c771d04da04
describe
'37641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZS' 'sip-files00089.pro'
c3ce5aa7a936f7559e334b7e87dc6daf
48484be3b6b4532f87a49b6b86d025551f1b434f
'2011-12-29T18:23:22-05:00'
describe
'35475' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZT' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
fa287b4170e0254f8821250a3f3b7ee2
32dba6bf2da29e0542af0eae2b62acfe356823cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZU' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8cec48a39341947e609de3b020a84427
4c6c7393e3297e5a791bbed81da7e3eb8fd5f2b5
'2011-12-29T18:27:47-05:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZV' 'sip-files00089.txt'
59582457c272b6c5c27fdc545fdbf09d
1316ebd3b9a19c3d244ff2a5cc33101388c48520
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZW' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
cc79f1ed78f5ef857aa7a7d3a5e36d5e
c62dbe509ff212ab7c2b64991b5481202b00c70f
'2011-12-29T18:34:47-05:00'
describe
'506278' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZX' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f70d530638c3de42d04753970e9c19c7
5e1accf8e83e4eff44cfa29e56fc7d1a0b3dd513
'2011-12-29T18:27:30-05:00'
describe
'105755' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZY' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6f403e702caf952005efd0231b1e80f6
d32ba4424a827f1de87e59fd513a9129abe8d59f
'2011-12-29T18:34:09-05:00'
describe
'35369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABQZZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
473482e7e69fd0b2cbc693e7f9db8d4d
e3f6d991d7c1db75de29fafadb861317eeafdfc9
describe
'32373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAA' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
63a7e6ce6aee7b10be181af3c5843095
c9eb61c006b0270b5f3061a45093ca1496ab926c
'2011-12-29T18:36:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAB' 'sip-files00090.tif'
840e769ea88a2ac0a6fad9b2a183cf48
8459c8844e75b37378a433c3e2d4335d0ce7d4ca
'2011-12-29T18:26:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e964e67432c2b65ee0313cce27cdf300
ef6a0bb37e9bf50f919449fc686d55dba388e59b
'2011-12-29T18:23:55-05:00'
describe
'8201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAD' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
798595d603beda4d6ae39e815fc0bfd2
b7434c5140d4b175c951f5a81e2a895ce47cce49
'2011-12-29T18:35:50-05:00'
describe
'506366' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
57614d7bc78e30da51f0f836965ef967
ae467a576345f6b4f23f8d1df2cd7d03fb429394
describe
'110435' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d825cd3f6702c93341862769bb98b8cd
316bc1e357e004c7e51457d6ee44114d27d0d5e2
'2011-12-29T18:30:27-05:00'
describe
'36389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAG' 'sip-files00091.pro'
b73d1e768b3bb73a7265cf459bc89867
6f7daa3d600337c9fa16b4ba3c304773fe51cc73
'2011-12-29T18:20:48-05:00'
describe
'34268' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAH' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
10c64a7ed6d89c573c642eb396997c57
7b3906df8c96e9f72aead0282bd0e41785175512
'2011-12-29T18:35:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAI' 'sip-files00091.tif'
3ab4c4671277fc6d340c7a46805db2f0
c491268fd1a7c19d7d06b1e12edd536a1630451d
'2011-12-29T18:27:00-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
40984bb5e1e3ebbee27ad21c6fcda1be
15eb949901d6e8a66d9762659fb84ae129433183
describe
'8319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAK' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ebf0932164b7c2b6498ab0de0eba7141
87ef8bd9c59c34548b1d18e981d8593c83667d90
'2011-12-29T18:20:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
8d3233025b9dca68d3d90d4eda137158
ee38ea7539328ebaa3ba96c56fa329d6b2ff6a57
describe
'101526' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
bf8ac7754ed136460d6c19117fe2fd44
7f4201b790e69366b375a8176d243578be81b2df
'2011-12-29T18:26:54-05:00'
describe
'32681' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAN' 'sip-files00092.pro'
eaf691748470b546a28c8e19bc856e08
3b767f5b530df13981e00969a0e199cb66560e4f
describe
'30802' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAO' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
9d8f1e2df12f6d5cab2736bfb4a618e6
98921f1258ee5fc10503a4e9266ead48eea402f3
'2011-12-29T18:26:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
17b8b4508dab1fdd0cad6cc6d9d5dbee
a0af0736e1b183e7783a31113d43df29fdd0a9a8
'2011-12-29T18:26:25-05:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAQ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
48cd265e325dffea0ff0ccfa15512f63
872b003a03a2bd9bb17620c9dfc7cf2634044789
'2011-12-29T18:35:15-05:00'
describe
'7846' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAR' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
b1bdd1514c7fa3d2742f14936adadf59
dee373ea36531262bc50101a93a4e6cc6f5a9969
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAS' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
7ffe413d4b309ca23fdcf2fd760180b7
6e381d3483d68ec0ba52a0af58b0045f4fae7fb8
describe
'109944' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAT' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
053c744de6ff451eec7c11e71bb03df3
3327b6afaecb87b23859b50cefda2dd48f5487a1
'2011-12-29T18:28:57-05:00'
describe
'36191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAU' 'sip-files00093.pro'
dbdc318b4b6c450b11c8292fc867bd01
78e22fd30414c47a15513f5209f8258adeb5b769
'2011-12-29T18:30:12-05:00'
describe
'33894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
dff18b0d06f5e679c95e096098cfa18d
935b06948d7de16bc460d5b172163e33378bf5d0
'2011-12-29T18:25:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
27b37189464bcc28516c2535df59bf68
ca6c0719c6c0a43421ad5beb3f5ef25cdb779bda
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAX' 'sip-files00093.txt'
36577c5f4a222b803f3fd6acaa42841b
e11d17ff9065a91c3103be9236a859e3d0e9d79e
'2011-12-29T18:25:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
af5965be688214f577af26bbf9ff36ba
a905417f39dc4285be71b11d83da0b2c90bf45bb
describe
'506326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRAZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
571934f69bd9a12ad60874e185460e72
6a4bc721d9e61c23f87a1d7cdcb71eebdcee4fdd
'2011-12-29T18:21:28-05:00'
describe
'110044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
7e5511c76956f7658721f890f4898bb1
d20cecf3f6c1802cb138611374adf52efb7973fb
describe
'36224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
16c22b789be17e116a6f7a219c46cb3b
4ca31f0f908681c6ad14711fc653870c0c17ba40
describe
'33664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
126bc281baa0b317a63a095012c792f1
118959c830c00c178671d460a5606cea1e9a03b5
'2011-12-29T18:21:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBD' 'sip-files00094.tif'
357ac99cd280eed405a76925aa9600c5
604d44216dc002b9b948d9d602dc8b0bf803cda4
'2011-12-29T18:27:58-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBE' 'sip-files00094.txt'
f6483a56a51ab8a08f0b11bb8e53ff6b
d3e8665f631b0b65e038c50ed15716e4deef6b30
describe
'8386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBF' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
8c04685eab66684eb6720c59e857f17a
24e8b0ccd545936f582772d7297b37b2ce478415
'2011-12-29T18:25:23-05:00'
describe
'506222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBG' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9c3c4679d0939e0b4e0843f6f280e97e
d64199f634827b29c75c039ab925299948a82fb6
'2011-12-29T18:29:44-05:00'
describe
'77659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBH' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e03fb20b031892655c7daaf01d783bed
4cb939896edf021697747aee905946609b632773
'2011-12-29T18:32:48-05:00'
describe
'23759' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBI' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a0bbac0641918ab5dbaac118574eedfb
60d0dfa950aad6dc31cd9b196a511521097e7df1
'2011-12-29T18:24:19-05:00'
describe
'23127' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBJ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d75140635375bfa6c0b6bce81859f0f9
614b4ec1e5524ad3cb529db9ec8f33aefc218859
'2011-12-29T18:28:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBK' 'sip-files00095.tif'
5f16515e953429c3ab1e5268e570a19f
fec36c6181a679cc37bd64ecfd708697d04bb919
'2011-12-29T18:19:39-05:00'
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBL' 'sip-files00095.txt'
979eda037c926fc3c025b63811f69ef4
0c2deeadd9ff96db62c5a9e3858621e215b47c70
'2011-12-29T18:25:48-05:00'
describe
'5856' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBM' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
12f2a2971a554a00c7beb7751537ec59
ae9534415c75115a8032ec435440b9198b729fc8
'2011-12-29T18:33:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
baee16cd320138d7cd482dd925f9b15a
8218c477faadf6b505cecd9521ea30f8f3bfb478
'2011-12-29T18:22:12-05:00'
describe
'80354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBO' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
60864b82d342b5466b63995bd8cd4d2b
7520adf62904f73a71818970132f0da1ced69999
describe
'24757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
6f9f6e76801edc37f2ffb37c5b6f4b12
1102cffe6bdb2a9e5ede009d27de04e485a13f53
describe
'24582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
afc3f5314333f05c7d2701e1eb8c94d1
4c4eec24fc8c6b5fb3e1b3484df8d51c0c00a7ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
4c0ed8d6594afe41e903015c0f35377e
a822540ab0dc26997ebb88d8e566d96d7fb834dd
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a0da7e5fa24f166f964702045ecb0fbf
c56b1d8db6c09df116699d92a84a5a82d3d96775
'2011-12-29T18:21:23-05:00'
describe
'5977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBT' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e89848b05fe2eb1a49edb9565db2e0b6
d0041d1db1e02fc451c45c67524003570cd7d531
'2011-12-29T18:35:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2b057bbcf73dfa915e4227431f506731
ae9925ba213d300afd3c52eb8e6e5970f59ff97b
'2011-12-29T18:24:45-05:00'
describe
'109792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
6f8798565f5a122b85edceace31a9c38
913eb39b3380209284786ba1479b33467a174d9e
'2011-12-29T18:31:58-05:00'
describe
'34689' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBW' 'sip-files00097.pro'
3ba80b95dd9d0a9a781b030a7a899626
1b49fe8cbc767d2b0dbd9cbb4a640fa4583d7515
'2011-12-29T18:35:57-05:00'
describe
'34619' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c1db3be123d953eb0efbb2bf316b0dcd
dfb9593ee7568c3907e33c59472f1ca8ac3b892c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
040cd486a3124762db086bc1fee33c87
14eb3ba2a2b8ac220cfc78923f2de59eb802113b
'2011-12-29T18:20:31-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRBZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
41ae099f33746c7545eacfcf5d4100e1
9823686d6375a854d36a870208ccd0b964542d8b
'2011-12-29T18:30:38-05:00'
describe
'8702' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
3608ec98514ff5b39e9ff670cba4a519
16f88755c92a07d3f14349600b86fb2356a258f7
'2011-12-29T18:37:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
685bd24f48585b6218903f45b7fc3d59
932d58f2814c1c42f42a47ad7f78bbe39413c580
describe
'106673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
cb6558f207fbf463ec90d0211b1bac76
d72486b2750c18305d91bc035a279f57136f33d9
describe
'35402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCD' 'sip-files00098.pro'
eddc90b65c1bc9bd728f60351172baa7
6095b2571be4894ca6928ca15f22e6341ef363dd
'2011-12-29T18:29:08-05:00'
describe
'32753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
611fdd2e075cde777c66442905bfe5d0
5677dd2818480338a4e38d2a36d434feec420f51
'2011-12-29T18:27:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
aa237719f263e8ccb87db18276e85228
460d7f5822ede76d704196562f181ed671273642
'2011-12-29T18:33:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCG' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b4d1b2309b5cdc8a49a5903a8c9329b9
07f780ef7d37a4f92a5d666eafb7526bd56dc033
describe
'8293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
fee6ccbebcc49321edc8f836da4f2303
28a67c5e06010606a34a1c5e4062c640b4b84fde
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
4199ef0e7a83ee45261e60096d00a847
b023928e7e41d2d529d8dbf7a058629d7e7cbc6b
describe
'107342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
3ba6f8389b8e7d333151fc91dcb94e7b
31b3342bd56fabc4957d292101ad2c11b7d232d4
'2011-12-29T18:24:41-05:00'
describe
'36409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
b1d9e5a2c5f8d95b8c1771cd9175b34e
c251b28ec1cdadee654f943c0f6b0992b220bcba
describe
'33753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
eed2afe4452c7d4cb6730772c634d986
23eaa9ea611b0fdb9eff782e7191761476119648
'2011-12-29T18:19:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d307ff5208d180675987b1ef6ff1203d
8f0ea75756bbcbeabf2a2102eb37feb6360bf1f3
'2011-12-29T18:26:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1881fed54792554916fd7533442762f0
13af837d8dfc9dd27a51c850bf39f61cee5fae33
'2011-12-29T18:28:10-05:00'
describe
'8404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
ce433562acf9a0616ba7f02a02cffa8d
59e564bf0b97b6dfdaa0bd26158c08a1b0e5a709
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
790e4caf0446ca441c73cef718d06cc7
0ce0928ee862f1468eb0adaaf9ebbb31e9e991af
'2011-12-29T18:20:00-05:00'
describe
'108863' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f6217a44373a63d56dd86684337a7cd4
59af4d1316c1833ae93426f8255ab4af8acf6bc6
'2011-12-29T18:32:43-05:00'
describe
'35871' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCR' 'sip-files00100.pro'
e1d22a0004c19911d16bc25137c9d54d
003599742f8b4f1292eb04af5fdf4122851efc4a
'2011-12-29T18:25:56-05:00'
describe
'34264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCS' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
9cf2afa2fbb79769968d2a95070e5ee8
03015a9d1204eeef9991c54abfb76ec7a6b031c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCT' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c61586ff21c0fa261ac7a8eeef5817e8
bfed55cbf6bfff0130b15b9352a238f4b0102deb
'2011-12-29T18:35:12-05:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
33ea9bd266489b018ec0262fb597010f
ef3a1810a5d138a6c3eb19f57f107139f2890881
'2011-12-29T18:33:52-05:00'
describe
'8376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCV' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
9b928960736148f3cf41417248cba43b
05c7c0be5a075e41f9c926fcfbbbcf2666d9e33a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
8a0f0534627883f611213262f825ff39
f7f997b8f02d0b20a0242eb40bea6c05f678c303
'2011-12-29T18:27:53-05:00'
describe
'110468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8fee28569a23fa86feb2cfaea8b45c66
c47ddccb2e3abc4041ae5e439c2168de5e4b05c7
describe
'35582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCY' 'sip-files00101.pro'
db5ca63f95e854bf87de8c2eb49f1d14
1666da661d13b451b04e44ac357680c66d560f1d
describe
'34812' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRCZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
6245414ccefbc924e20ba721f69f4ccd
ef2d25845b77e46fa1700a867069a4d56ebcbc5d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
192e5ebb3d31d60a266730ae3d625171
e8645585ff87802bd1389e3b48df00d508ad2579
'2011-12-29T18:23:00-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
671d61c794e1d1b3e607e74cecc44c48
0960bf0425b0a04b226aa1bf27b4e5a56007a0ca
'2011-12-29T18:36:02-05:00'
describe
'8822' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e278b059f7a688119586bea2357d031f
42ff9a553a19f19f90ae63bcce5d696d7937cb48
describe
'506145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDD' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
eb26b7853fed016efbeb1d195537e0c3
ce62306b58572f685918bf7c01f3933e3832823c
'2011-12-29T18:33:45-05:00'
describe
'101269' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
04efa73752d2a436bc9ef9d4e1147393
d739106477b8ae243fad0ba75b8ac76bcc719c68
'2011-12-29T18:22:32-05:00'
describe
'34346' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
86ffeabd722516515ca4667e5513d491
a0880d735890037681b10841a697af662eb48986
'2011-12-29T18:23:07-05:00'
describe
'32271' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6c217d63f42e277fee111868761f2889
08ad86490346a61afde38b2ebd0293e0fd124be5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
ab011facc43c5dda55591b9084d7bfe4
8febdc6fd4c65c23f904cfdb708046981020fd4e
'2011-12-29T18:36:10-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
fbda89cd384570c7c586778e19cfaad3
f1b01b4b9d6fb1a176c7c364809ab8297db503ab
describe
'8247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDJ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
9aba7cb53b0a6874621d0f7dea196a3d
e7371a06f3ad6b29a27358a7c2fa04f661f57efe
'2011-12-29T18:33:41-05:00'
describe
'506234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
08a07eeda5b86e6713adbe61fcc59bb4
6bbb9a87481b8b19fbac64a4fb3c598263ba5451
'2011-12-29T18:29:29-05:00'
describe
'103133' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDL' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
411780950c63cae7290a541e5c3bc99b
f82c0ed88a0c0dc2125bfe75733ca2343f2eab78
describe
'33581' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
d11e217fbaae206c11c6c6305937c2ff
535cfb52fdd93599e49b14b759e7d8ee436f9527
'2011-12-29T18:28:30-05:00'
describe
'30864' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDN' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
42e6f3b7da5ec4503687a7323e26bf8b
eeb56903bcf74953de5c133c3a2a5fd0fde3914d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
bb519e816655b897bc03d1e1b0138c60
2539c1bfbaf635fd56bea2da42b2e31a2ba44858
'2011-12-29T18:24:17-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
05e85bfc5a39aebe2889af319ee9a60a
15b6be3902071c0f93f0a6bc74bed70b0b5ec67d
'2011-12-29T18:22:30-05:00'
describe
'7936' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
c65bbb82ce0dfaa941f6170af7f51344
b74015d69e202fd4c99401b8c6eabec3fcf8fac5
describe
'506314' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
11b4221009b4f70630d654e53783fb20
7c39fbd762917829c0a21a17aca48e55b04ae2d3
'2011-12-29T18:25:40-05:00'
describe
'101651' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
14a7b089d9a6eb674d8c9e3523ef6cad
869437ad9eb4b2dad18ee40fcc39d50f2b64846c
'2011-12-29T18:23:12-05:00'
describe
'35197' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDT' 'sip-files00104.pro'
14ef989c507ffdf08134c69ad3ae4a30
d4b9d00405491214ea5b20f4fac10deeee22349c
'2011-12-29T18:20:59-05:00'
describe
'31979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
7170188ad36947cdbecdb6f7fc124cb2
1ab7b8e1491214be766840d1c832230a7c1908a2
'2011-12-29T18:24:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
50a8859074b4ba014e729e3e3515c938
da46f501e986cdd911bd8993fa00c0cd6a30adeb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a10f076ce1a919544e1b04ba1625dea0
ca99667a96a2b05a1d1843d9a6360fa65bcfea3b
'2011-12-29T18:33:27-05:00'
describe
'8061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDX' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
dfce9c881cd67f6a1a4632aa4f6b7d26
4d864f2168b40253976648dfc0e746d26b63ba33
describe
'506274' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f0b7a5a8dce127c1fc921f54b903b2a2
9a5bc153d1c025e1d3024a59f0e2a801cb6f9aa1
'2011-12-29T18:24:31-05:00'
describe
'52024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRDZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
fda4ce8d4b47fa8137122908019097da
76da2c05f94e9a62cdf7c2cbd792639a2b908a5e
'2011-12-29T18:25:30-05:00'
describe
'15506' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREA' 'sip-files00105.pro'
e42dba020c7e8a4395eb9eaf2bb02b89
f02c8f3260ac9e75167c695d5a8e3f2798f8aff7
'2011-12-29T18:26:58-05:00'
describe
'16471' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREB' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
72f590dc616589367624e5b24fbd3f6c
c940dce196e63830a35eb17870e52057adfdee03
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4e8d895925749ee63c1687d527385aa6
bb162881eeb423867048c48098feae4e2d38afc4
'2011-12-29T18:28:42-05:00'
describe
'623' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRED' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c7f3642ffabd62f52ec33268887e7e03
3d3b0dbe0d4d36817f0f29d8f63ca6df69d27e92
describe
'4246' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREE' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
8dd85c757760e375ea89c88328f20c09
d43cffb534f65bd1ecc27500ddba72d26b59652a
describe
'506294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREF' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
64454c5f487aaef982015b99217b24fd
42fa6d1133b935787dba3f69245f9b77d4028fcf
'2011-12-29T18:31:24-05:00'
describe
'73858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
e429977ac1425f6b935fe94176419ecb
b92cb0681cc5cf169cf068880bb24bd38c7b381d
describe
'23376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREH' 'sip-files00106.pro'
155ee7da3129e62dbb69a8f951e602fc
4aca3e8f588a27a955a3117bb740664a7a2125e6
'2011-12-29T18:36:44-05:00'
describe
'23279' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREI' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f681c3418415a4ccfa4e7036029edfaa
7ecccc9815ecfc4073ea391d15ea4a965f1396b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
990540bf6e3878d7cf90fb3cd86b3ad6
ff01f4d154b778dd8a551e8dd576a37187a98ea9
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
b7f918b31ef01e66ba05f88347c2301a
ba1d12906be8ff286b4af17a8d15df1f8576e592
'2011-12-29T18:22:39-05:00'
describe
'5988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREL' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b0eaf273c006a6f91b0ab016a43f66c3
318321bdadcd039f176f6350ac4afd8c429651a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
db6ccfaac54a01a91611e40cc5d77404
b28e89396b84431d4c658c87dbb4b753e8d06a6a
describe
'106710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
ddd4622594853a4e63711e26972cf0d7
869caa5ac3185225cec151ec1133dc0c09f0c4f6
'2011-12-29T18:20:38-05:00'
describe
'34611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREO' 'sip-files00107.pro'
bd464b1609792ead97c1386833810501
a788a79719e954d13f24ca2b4af90a459583f8f0
'2011-12-29T18:30:00-05:00'
describe
'34029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
02e82ff954c580ae179a2cd70215dcef
21586b2a8b9b4f6109705772bd8d1fea486f9126
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREQ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
b2a36dd589b1edee1fca3d90757d749a
f3c6eb418a637ee1a5d8de73ce227596f9d9c4cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRER' 'sip-files00107.txt'
04f7e2440edc16eb93ab63bb0c96494d
2442eb05f2bce8892dd23a0b797653e9fd8ac051
'2011-12-29T18:36:13-05:00'
describe
'8867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRES' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
a2c6aed4926acdbb30a45fdf7c57a420
559810367979ee99de05d95b344738edfe75437f
'2011-12-29T18:27:40-05:00'
describe
'506351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRET' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
9659e5fa28e85c684f03bd09a4272e73
ec8f5aa37257e57d82a3787e1467df61ebf3e857
describe
'103449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
7bba4ef5d168631866d0faf37948aa97
980d6f911bb2cd76ee62f29655a94d63de0cb5dd
describe
'35156' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
29aec1a044cb56afbf0f8076d783b316
42ab2724a46c390dac5e4e005c57096f25144802
'2011-12-29T18:20:54-05:00'
describe
'33184' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f2bb2b3f00a106f14f7d9e1f79f324e9
b6ec8595dfb6a37fc5a8b1603db85b291c720eeb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
36296d8829a0677806cee6a2e3d62086
b1f657bf920fe62253528fad4ad0dee140fa9359
'2011-12-29T18:20:04-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3493004ba5668718bceeedfb4eeb72e0
90cf88ca5f299654d0d54a141c9906d14afb710a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABREZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1337e576568f0b21d6e226f89a24ecfe
08389b75791b8e5d3cab9d12e3bd6136ac681f05
'2011-12-29T18:24:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a866fd40bc39686eda5331a66eb6ffa6
000f2330331e3f3dc06674a9122d9b0a673b50df
'2011-12-29T18:35:59-05:00'
describe
'106737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
fb100fdadecbeb2bffa767d44b08ee8b
965086dcb752797c49fdcee07f80cc7ea35b0353
'2011-12-29T18:27:51-05:00'
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
07fa3ad78cdcef338c45d92b24a2c067
f232c9e42d61be8721421278ebf9973ad8c4398c
'2011-12-29T18:19:23-05:00'
describe
'33849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
088d63c0d697c3f45fbb3f3d34d43c1d
710b363ea318b4f00383dcac95597a76d254454b
'2011-12-29T18:31:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFE' 'sip-files00109.tif'
51137f24fd44ad56a0e53e8c18a4d474
584b8d2dbf2f5305cbfe850a08634bbf320eec48
'2011-12-29T18:31:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
31ba6512918f8c46622643af2ac75451
9044d853780e610df052f6fb4885565ab79564fb
'2011-12-29T18:27:42-05:00'
describe
'8250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFG' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
21246bd1d6fa796559419f6d1fd0b4b0
64ff2503216308e14dd06e4b37fbaef1f89394ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFH' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
fa9dc4cda92f06f8f6df3ce1a6aacc83
b50532f2d344a697e64ae4146a5c515d849ba1bf
describe
'109613' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFI' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
b0dd936fa84d01ea7116bcf6f57da98a
6570ea2cafc86ea57e2b57722490faaf9642fc1b
describe
'37657' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFJ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
cebdc03c08540537442a446600c3c16a
ddad8151e920c4927236186a39ecdb1611567db8
'2011-12-29T18:21:16-05:00'
describe
'33585' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFK' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
d705972cdaa784b29b318bdef2e1ca14
a63d011970ca5e61773e917a7b246d7068957137
'2011-12-29T18:24:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
5c3a482af3c4ce47d5ad030808e57f64
532fd653706790b3b4d3b8308678b57fe25d5042
'2011-12-29T18:31:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0097dee28c86e123535584f50035fb26
76f5292af8dd9a4e7e82f81e2f7fcd7810f73a8c
'2011-12-29T18:34:24-05:00'
describe
'8282' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFN' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
4d5e648d5ae75b7dd9a133ed8864cfde
8a344c2fe4e1002075cc5f79335f3534d2e9979d
'2011-12-29T18:36:23-05:00'
describe
'506359' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
75beabad49e225cdc62a4388e3a9b985
079a175b0e622ef28296058ec9c9f0396fad01c9
describe
'100365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
8478b90197b3d76ddb670fb3e3ee2d51
9138181fcb57916b826d70db7625cdc936733b43
describe
'33796' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
bc6c781b30a84a23dda94b0e8f10503a
04ce5dd68f4e91de94f9f9b35978ff1031e7e05e
'2011-12-29T18:23:37-05:00'
describe
'31293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ebc844bfd659c64768e1c38442256b7d
2e8288aa06e9ecb4008498a95cc08cc23c322943
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
a2fcccebcf4f28df6345b531df5d6617
ffed6a66d6dd7fb0473929e9621c1d60b5a7b2ad
'2011-12-29T18:21:57-05:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0d159419b135bfce6a3be72f315c7f75
1b13ebb2b68c9c6de61e3db21b4973986b38867b
describe
'8056' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
1e4ab1ad14e360b259a072fa5ddd4710
8119110a463fb71270025f6bf202aa4f6f927596
describe
'502475' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
e1015cef1baa66a5cecda7843854fd24
ce953461897b1d5bf83c5dd4fc989959c41c4360
describe
'108071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
26c750573256f6482afb4a018acc9c5a
8599ce0581500fe9a29836ff703654112fc7cfaa
describe
'37383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
61678ea3c5f2eb93d521d407d4c7852d
aca3382ba0cd5dec9793855543e04f45fd7da417
'2011-12-29T18:35:07-05:00'
describe
'34001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
58159bd25341cbe9e6f7ef83d3579cbd
ce9755d298d860498aa2c8903a3e83802603af02
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRFZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
246799bf0f5e5a398279a109ef21b180
445082d9b9c70778c988fad05b76d22d4189b77b
'2011-12-29T18:20:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e5ca11f659d855f0eb8541faae2026f3
17007b6b8d3ea7dd78fa8dea0f6d75852de28611
describe
'8415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
786560bed570c6a864bf337684864119
4575a96f7063cbf4c4003e867b371d03d3836734
describe
'506238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGC' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3010d96435e79ad267a0580c5a259e40
f5e1822f3edacd71e283b5a672a057335195f443
'2011-12-29T18:20:12-05:00'
describe
'130700' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGD' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
689fca39a59bdf8fc5eaf5f6ae11ed4c
0bc67afd7d9855ae93123c481ee493c064f9be20
'2011-12-29T18:36:45-05:00'
describe
'2037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGE' 'sip-files00114.pro'
412f96bf73ee01855d8697f69ce93629
9c7f91c9aa5c07747088f39bd461195bd318d302
'2011-12-29T18:23:48-05:00'
describe
'37556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
d172c2550526e162fdb1365e6986e17d
64ab0614bb55caf0413426c33679ba7257287149
'2011-12-29T18:33:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGG' 'sip-files00114.tif'
6f7574adeffa137a924eed35332c3590
a96198ca9ea0117c4f1f9206250406f2c22b414c
'2011-12-29T18:21:10-05:00'
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGH' 'sip-files00114.txt'
029c046b162ca155c51e109a895f967e
8828b2c72bd31b1e4c98b2811cc0ab617a3d910c
describe
Invalid character
'10351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGI' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
48b0f66ff5bc09a79f1f1592b3728fe5
c07e6d05e3816aa31c91c9263e50ab28146e20c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGJ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a894de9a6209d4d6ceb0cac45e462cd0
4ac1b63c124556c6ccd385ddedf669368bf80621
describe
'110242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGK' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6bc970562c879767681f7abc235e268d
3d86310006ac84d6962804844fc1be7e6f143c9c
describe
'36815' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
93794725d16bf8af15dfb4ec6d2f21fe
100ec386bee7655421640c282dd50e8b0cf90a45
describe
'34228' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
08da48a45fe0004fdd3f70dbf7100b6d
fd9d4967b2c0f5ed3e50e4344ca0194a51c6c795
'2011-12-29T18:37:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGN' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c0d9238adde8e1400b8921fe422bb5f1
5008ab62fb34c58446edec8dbe8c0f1f2c406d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
3968443d525c0326eb3e5ad8a578984b
22480c2db8c54f3a25cca51959934548695d9ad4
describe
'8127' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGP' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c9d34f9b22ceab0cc432c1eb50ded1aa
8018307c03fb2cf4d1a5a6d4f18f11e397a971cb
describe
'506363' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
7d5b253ab314f3ca347bf3ae9399ace2
40fda54abbe3ee794c5bdcd3380baa0bda8975b8
describe
'110267' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGR' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
24d156e517dfff56c4e660a2f5c1ef61
b37e3ec73ad0f8f9dc832150520c2dc6d06227a1
describe
'36943' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGS' 'sip-files00116.pro'
d5512edc34856460d1e2ce006858ce77
2f8592514c9a8851b10bb26801f5a9ffe86c45a4
describe
'33467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGT' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
5661c1cdb9c17cdbe031188390a8932f
19c9cb84ca115837e43549436ae4a5881becca37
describe
'4067844' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGU' 'sip-files00116.tif'
8c8dbf958e261b57e69f50d8a0497f01
686fceba256ddf4584e16b5aa6a786926063b429
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGV' 'sip-files00116.txt'
65c40c968795eed8ff9db28acca136ec
a687eb29a75f92788fb1f6a4d53cab95b1085895
'2011-12-29T18:32:16-05:00'
describe
'8280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGW' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
21faddac6894d6e950d59e39482a8900
b34b75377a604b8dbfa12ca391bf5aaafc1ed05a
'2011-12-29T18:36:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGX' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
63bc8a7fab05282bf1a8719d05ec9e7a
1db3ca68b15b7a17050710033e0359b8cc90e047
describe
'114804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGY' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
7c015d90d58725a59b33302027e83431
c44dc5fc2a1d8fe8b7ccafac6cc6a67f4c536918
'2011-12-29T18:27:35-05:00'
describe
'37349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRGZ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
973df3858ad6e1131e4008267a63ce67
587e9bc63c21c54b6316dbb2307a15b7f1736557
'2011-12-29T18:19:17-05:00'
describe
'35234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHA' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
85f036674d84de8e38dcaaffb41a93f5
e38be08582e98898b083f7def901fced4bfe1f5b
'2011-12-29T18:22:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHB' 'sip-files00117.tif'
787afc5299312b1b6c300520370683a9
0f11198616a304fc2bd3ff1c4135f29a7194ae6e
'2011-12-29T18:21:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHC' 'sip-files00117.txt'
393718acc7a6af4c8bf5abbd9b645eca
5e3ad68e749946f12c9a294d65259e6179d18955
describe
'8453' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHD' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
3ece170cc45c69e8865e7848d06a5ded
1c1f32c9a137ee9dcf9a44c68b689ec7948e4af3
'2011-12-29T18:36:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHE' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
0ab5b1c46af5576b53da8ebc5047ee02
16e2f3907d047425d3799e7b4e072c00b2802a0e
'2011-12-29T18:37:49-05:00'
describe
'109480' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHF' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
ce2d14fa091aaf13785947f934dea2a4
5c967ba41bccc1f7de5193b95f83689cc296fc5a
describe
'36331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHG' 'sip-files00118.pro'
c2c0a5aa92dca7bd166ee3a49d4a10db
e7b9e8a50ed49376f50c8058b46487b8437f50e8
describe
'33470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHH' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
5ecdce9c1ac85ef0ace98eb3d44d9bb5
842dde3a062d62d9d25e35d76e9bcb52cf445842
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHI' 'sip-files00118.tif'
7e098cd73d0edf98e5bf95411cc2b288
01d4e21230b93b4261fca9710afdaca27d47a68e
'2011-12-29T18:29:01-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHJ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
93035bb251f6f2a572735b4d5ca330e1
2bf9c9443025d4406a3b26758b8ce4d4ed216a7e
'2011-12-29T18:29:07-05:00'
describe
'8030' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHK' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
322f9b3d3318fb260f368b5634d08ea6
b4642eedbd735814b9e027459ab9432bc9e916c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHL' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
7531954c6fc0da6b3c221ebe7b0896f6
b342dc3897355cdd55d74510cc6fced1b4bd2eeb
'2011-12-29T18:31:54-05:00'
describe
'109977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHM' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
768ee1a26a0f98e717feff76261f9625
ecd504bff3051114957f971192b46a8e3b80b165
'2011-12-29T18:36:28-05:00'
describe
'37208' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHN' 'sip-files00119.pro'
31c0174851b6806178d1fd9a41a221ee
645f1b390bc2792c1ba536c535c54247dc900e61
'2011-12-29T18:37:43-05:00'
describe
'33010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHO' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
3e5b718eeca90e4f3de957721a540719
aae5c58a7889d7e053d1059e61fe7877d9c28b9c
'2011-12-29T18:34:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHP' 'sip-files00119.tif'
65bf7dee81d46edab98cc06f9f1ed042
cb13bffc9e45966f5f58494066dac6ebee12cc12
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHQ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
97e35d58c9e3180d1bed20326f86b48f
bd7f639bffd549497246eefb5d7543f3dcd1360f
'2011-12-29T18:25:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHR' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
066e1b15e01b88ca97c5ec4ce92a2fba
9152b7720e1fa6c405d9060bcbf56b128b37a0a1
'2011-12-29T18:27:31-05:00'
describe
'496051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
c19ff19e540016e06e17085ba7801820
45b693aee26d4db41e1d3630238a7d3dac837d5f
'2011-12-29T18:26:08-05:00'
describe
'67265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHT' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
739600021bdedd5d645f4b3d052a232c
a10f4efb5a83adb6500d77e2d4e502b47f32803c
describe
'18784' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHU' 'sip-files00120.pro'
fcb0e8e3389eeef3833aefe248115d47
ad1e98fb9bd74b12088be3d720cb6533c1e5f0b6
'2011-12-29T18:25:46-05:00'
describe
'20181' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHV' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8aac9687214aeb12f63a215bdea8cc06
2ab458d542f7c8caa1c0fdeb3abc996f320b4f23
describe
'3986392' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHW' 'sip-files00120.tif'
59c55688892e5455732d638f11840cbc
3b02bbed61acc30a5878e70f88c538959073d70a
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHX' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8003121597a183a7a5bf946230ef07fe
615e8ab7c598c78b2b8a78f69fd6834a91715128
'2011-12-29T18:29:28-05:00'
describe
'4966' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHY' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
405fc11f5d88a96a632950f30c7dd8f1
2d62b8aaf4a778214666f90dce0a90206773e7d0
describe
'506325' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRHZ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d0df07e0605ef3b863e39fdcd5d1bb7e
2275f8c70ee227423e9df351fe889e3d31a66d46
'2011-12-29T18:32:50-05:00'
describe
'80734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIA' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
003e81b2343435d90e43c5e94422402a
598ef6475247fef763391ff72b84e440a01003db
describe
'24816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIB' 'sip-files00121.pro'
460395bcd1619eff7c08335864e175d7
d9a6c354c86d261e386b14010567e8732773a638
'2011-12-29T18:23:20-05:00'
describe
'24941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIC' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
26202265e989b4ddde9311df1c936a1e
621e0b1dcb0c04591341b293f5a22ea2c9331c94
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRID' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ffaaccaa3a8ef2abd2779ea176413527
3c5593e1fa20b264748ddf46302ddb575e22a67c
'2011-12-29T18:19:48-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIE' 'sip-files00121.txt'
738d5a7023b88a67d1ff3b6c4caaaa65
f554725d238e6dc80908e91e11619f5dd5c522d7
describe
'6379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIF' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
7def8a05c7ecff3c6f7e2d9a3703d7e0
b85b624d5c43a9ed8a70a182bad661414b9c99ea
describe
'506368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIG' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
9ca6d585e5fe0af65230e6868c7c3145
f8235b3f85751c71bd58d1f0318cdfac3fa7b9dc
describe
'106635' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIH' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
4b42a71f77a8230d10b48c25b0e69a4b
77c434d1ba9a5fbf19efc8a7866b181ac4c515ad
describe
'35507' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRII' 'sip-files00122.pro'
5c9b5958e980b05fd9e4876d113cab93
caa3a726e2e5325b5ca3ac583f43a4175b7853ed
describe
'33188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIJ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
4538e168a6c20d12a541938cb183512e
0e0bbfe504fe4c2e39f91e1c23815c053b496b59
'2011-12-29T18:20:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIK' 'sip-files00122.tif'
956e311c95d786b690bfa61b61aacb0a
d954231daf46a269c589520613b0269c2d784074
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIL' 'sip-files00122.txt'
05db3fe1b2361d130f83dc17f39ab64a
d6ae38c579e3f46afab8cc8721e895ae7ee91791
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIM' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
e8b079e03261f46de9f48665feb9bc61
70360c4fe8cd311d5b2d682bffb69323748c540d
'2011-12-29T18:37:39-05:00'
describe
'506338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
868dab7b96c8857913a45111ede5eee1
03ce928d0c16a76db9a5936e7a3ef709f4792f53
describe
'107835' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIO' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
994f8ac6be8d956e123bc901f0cc5517
b162d362876c6cf1fa1ef091c20762f3fbab0d8b
describe
'35575' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIP' 'sip-files00123.pro'
dc453a58d9c872eae66adce63e06a37e
e6cf6c706587b126c6cb4dde96ea4cfee0bd1d9f
describe
'32259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIQ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
b9051f4251ca8845253eefe97609c0de
37d2784e7f276773c7c911f8f1a6d934ef64958d
'2011-12-29T18:34:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIR' 'sip-files00123.tif'
db67cec46de5ade780783a10b5d15a82
2f60402c7b4a57d6533460288e0c6b9d38817a5e
'2011-12-29T18:26:46-05:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIS' 'sip-files00123.txt'
d00acab6313fc857b7d60563594c019f
156f697584108c3e61ca630c454d760a7d81c4d9
describe
'8064' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIT' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
aa2127be1eef3cf08156559c2adb40f4
cecb14579758e45ce585b54007c21e0bb5011404
describe
'506346' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIU' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
34889bf5e3e260a9c942707a5d6d93fe
a8ad79ea7dc7de61984a265f9f42753f538f6994
'2011-12-29T18:32:19-05:00'
describe
'106451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIV' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
162115358202d06a4e48966e86c65fa6
bde4d7ef53e57f59a6ca4ed6497ad03f25424e9f
'2011-12-29T18:32:58-05:00'
describe
'34824' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIW' 'sip-files00124.pro'
f5af68708fec5544bf7e3067a9bce993
e690e16d8de7eca20034488232629999b77c8bff
describe
'32071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIX' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
dcd2d44733c1da061f5401a387d3c7cf
bfb4641bf60ac723644b6cf5f0e26a94e645fadb
'2011-12-29T18:29:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIY' 'sip-files00124.tif'
62fefa82455731aee23869c298944e74
923eac09b53b7a48fc39b4b9808873c7c83ad0d2
'2011-12-29T18:25:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRIZ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
96fbb2764df8203c5c1ec2b0bbff6fec
b93bdb5d0f7d53a18613b991f05d9094448655c7
describe
'8242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
336a3f6264b91bf6088bbfb4f4ed6f86
2aa591008be5af8b9bc6f195fa089479190827e0
describe
'506371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJB' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
2f035bce4d5d0f3b38cbed8ff2ac134e
1749b70273320ef34138927f9346996312bcbda2
'2011-12-29T18:31:55-05:00'
describe
'66900' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d5fe2f3b68edd2eaf0dd6defedf3985d
b18a1a18fd066e581116844fd17d7f8cc8d0190b
'2011-12-29T18:23:28-05:00'
describe
'20350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJD' 'sip-files00125.pro'
0dd639ce88d396030e4b069ab536a7ba
766d066fc9b330b01e9412ca8093db72f71c783b
describe
'20260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJE' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
e83cccc49b3da84d107aa325f0714d46
114208b80f00ad53d0d39169db4bf329f86cf59d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJF' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2ba1266a27f2c64132f9b999396e4860
e1bf58650842d089c7c37ef8003f4ec14830e6e3
'2011-12-29T18:24:01-05:00'
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJG' 'sip-files00125.txt'
89eb88a9a4a0b8871e7fac1aa3d62f67
1b9eed6dacd850b73706cbee780fa14836971083
'2011-12-29T18:24:04-05:00'
describe
'5284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJH' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
53366f407d7e53f53d4f05b9894687ee
1bc8c4f1e295889075395de341406a66bee9a5d7
'2011-12-29T18:23:59-05:00'
describe
'506254' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJI' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
c3aab5b08c86a1cfe1617e24edb45284
873f532ea4280a1fb4e8a38fddb641ca3368fec2
describe
'76464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJJ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
4bcf7ae1306f3276042ef11da6146514
3b5d1433c1014678b0fc0e90ec9ae28dd044260a
'2011-12-29T18:20:13-05:00'
describe
'23625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJK' 'sip-files00126.pro'
66ac83e3a4b2af8f0feae8f9741ad474
7175d09be241ae43527082b32a95a77db15a4a5a
describe
'23554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJL' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
a3f60291ceccf5186beab016720b8e6d
507c2353c8ee26b6144583d331856f8cfa8e1b3f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJM' 'sip-files00126.tif'
21822378d629e9e02c4f5bbd037f03f5
16a226215ba437fc38e6d41cf6b7f53e55a3ff88
'2011-12-29T18:20:07-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJN' 'sip-files00126.txt'
2156ee5b68393241f893c2f0c4850f29
c5a3771a65041d8c98cd476c794f6456d7307a21
describe
'6186' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJO' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
bd88c6b78afce3660cea8750a25e3186
dc3074f4e1a3f50639c0ad8ef9655e9f9b20a979
'2011-12-29T18:36:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJP' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1c3c998334122a043740846110028726
34832da2022fa5acb87dda387052056d98f63866
describe
'105920' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJQ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
f11c814255174066e5e22a52b591115d
b15d6a9779df2f6b5127606b2b44eb72283da871
'2011-12-29T18:29:32-05:00'
describe
'35374' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJR' 'sip-files00127.pro'
6a78dc2fceff22b2faf7cc895b8e1052
2b3e0a7e96d89276bfc7455ee6c605f05100930e
describe
'32422' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJS' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
079fe0ad4a8d0c166a9057f9d9a90ebf
902e439acf1170b9ed94c051c4d326153d858073
'2011-12-29T18:31:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJT' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b397900920bb03be0073428b8e5a1203
ac1d537d848b889abdc76537ad8580616b5ba550
'2011-12-29T18:28:05-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJU' 'sip-files00127.txt'
a313c2875cd3eaf28e8f2502c72aac37
b22672b49c214aaedde4297b1c5ea64d585b91c4
'2011-12-29T18:32:52-05:00'
describe
'8316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJV' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
131c692b4cfa2adef4ae4ac991a54d0d
23d27c0a8027951d48c00f524c0275b20038156d
'2011-12-29T18:31:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJW' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
f722dd13a015cb6869ad6965d026eb44
a70fff0d980d896bbf5016006af7d98509d0909d
'2011-12-29T18:23:13-05:00'
describe
'101967' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJX' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a48cf4e004e159d8ef999889f1f9cbc5
d8d4b51fe935ed5779fd038ad9c3c863ca8b15b8
describe
'34054' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJY' 'sip-files00128.pro'
da661611f4a836ac04587f2093421e8c
9e89f1221f3bf1cbbb427543649f47d0f2136efb
'2011-12-29T18:37:16-05:00'
describe
'32367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRJZ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
0525fed55b0cb37dbe8df1871dbdbd72
78ec01467d0f485188dc7dcb94648046c9ffd6cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKA' 'sip-files00128.tif'
b45a5481a11409b98df1b65a9d66ff7d
08cf407b8ceb3b6dcf814179024005a0003ada9a
'2011-12-29T18:30:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKB' 'sip-files00128.txt'
659b8bee557076025222d49b675b73ad
2c6bfede7abcae251213d6b58ccbfa43e333a4fb
describe
'8281' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKC' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
dd80d8ff0a09b215826b848456c8b8ac
9a7e81ae64769707e1de6baf9cf2b594a085db46
'2011-12-29T18:34:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKD' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
400370d674c6e97039a7e0af0cfb180c
42de49976e5f311a8078d585425b1bfa8c1e5f31
'2011-12-29T18:24:43-05:00'
describe
'104286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
042563fa8758d0cf3f9f5e6110828a91
792bf6315fb037fb0e324b91b0b73d833d21aab9
describe
'33640' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKF' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5b39b1765a852c8181181085b2bc162b
0789f334f7648d323b597129da60c7484ccb616e
describe
'32963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKG' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
0d3affc6166877d1bd346f3fb4d17610
10a0796cbdf488ed3c8a892cd946e4e022e0ca8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKH' 'sip-files00129.tif'
85f42c5daf8dcfa268f774c414b33c94
8edfb82d7369a8772a7e5f836442198c7293a35b
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKI' 'sip-files00129.txt'
acb843ca1b1b77cc2643eda99566a42b
a978eb47868e0c1a3e1bc961488d736c85958f77
describe
'8070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKJ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9512e942dc3dc6c23306036f8ddbcf13
6497ec4e42f6b7d35550abf37808a2a2b35136c2
'2011-12-29T18:34:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKK' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
ae32d0462c0fcbc2d0b4ce04dc44b136
bd3f9ae781fbd3700a9a34454fd92f0307d70bf7
'2011-12-29T18:33:02-05:00'
describe
'102278' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKL' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
27af9393ffee5a36a957c2da80fbc3ae
71bc50026eea53207a3a3854164970321e5351df
describe
'34090' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKM' 'sip-files00130.pro'
819eae49e1ca1a4a021677c99ded5c68
a46ee4a0106e8a004410165be3d80afd885790c4
'2011-12-29T18:26:26-05:00'
describe
'33050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKN' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
622346b2ea8a1c6be89984b838946e95
26ef07d05bccf0e7c4d20b9e94b885aa64c3e3ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKO' 'sip-files00130.tif'
75fc73430036941a571eebf58254c9af
5a7ed1b81d2bbb9516b71cb0ad59918580a781ba
'2011-12-29T18:36:29-05:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKP' 'sip-files00130.txt'
81c950d395fc77899223bd7429120268
b7dee8496d54ecc055e5f798012f16c86a3a6001
'2011-12-29T18:22:42-05:00'
describe
'8246' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKQ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
3574615c5af19f6b2169862307ed0f7d
9c8617f40e605f906b30c038111c24fc9f70ee5d
'2011-12-29T18:29:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKR' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
5792f4d2daa6375d2f29871ae4b98a47
36907b04d62a760ca42ae2132db60120926c8587
'2011-12-29T18:19:55-05:00'
describe
'109773' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKS' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
424cf198683597791d9e345904d0ad84
2380112b0644b751bf4f2c81bf5119357c763238
describe
'36406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKT' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6ce8ec68aca262c7568f66e9a4873f4a
55abf76f1c59d51d0fe412cce91644bf4b1c3997
'2011-12-29T18:23:56-05:00'
describe
'33697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKU' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
34f00eaeedd55edc11edf0c1fdbe83e0
607f7e246975012c761154548e133808f6c72eb3
'2011-12-29T18:35:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKV' 'sip-files00131.tif'
69368679fc3069f6146067cd1cd9f627
f31af0cf3d97be07d7283ed03cf43e9a74211488
'2011-12-29T18:22:10-05:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKW' 'sip-files00131.txt'
176ea3c721ae4e6a4b2aff4b7ba3000e
d6ac490598a11dc62aa1cc4042f24f17a12cc19b
describe
'8454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKX' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
e07b90bbdf25c6b005b762c585b8fcb6
941751b59390c1549bb4b24e59359a06bba271e4
'2011-12-29T18:25:14-05:00'
describe
'506328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKY' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
97674be226d46d7e63e40e25954ef3d8
19f382efd04778308e2b986b09908cdb507a2e37
describe
'113011' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRKZ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
91f60d6b3dc94c968bd708ac4df83a65
16d9a83babce4619a12bde491f763e14500810b3
'2011-12-29T18:34:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLA' 'sip-files00132.pro'
c5ff7c1c261f50cc4f8dc2c41c2529b7
9630d5943707d7095c3d04334b64515d205fa2d3
describe
'35042' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLB' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
0d53a133d25938bf19960f2a3d93ad74
3685712a759692aa1622d4f866cb198f54e2bce6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLC' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ee5291d46772f770477ac6e921f2089d
bae7880f987aea9d83a8b963864989fd6e90ca6f
'2011-12-29T18:23:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLD' 'sip-files00132.txt'
110292379aa52749a84d91135acbbfa8
e8ff70051b5e5a2efdf8c1ab4e75a439c3445c1f
'2011-12-29T18:28:09-05:00'
describe
'8630' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLE' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
332967d1f2bb43dba414f1d111c807e1
b42d2ee8b89663f74ca9b33d85857a6deda8416d
'2011-12-29T18:32:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLF' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
78dfc2f18aeec7207403242cbd1d3641
22b0f718a5c9a7a3d2cfbb0d24c6e2c231e8ba1e
describe
'107850' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLG' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
08e32b37b3df30e18addc426fd4cc6b1
b7b90453e2f55987ab1d1ab9c065c0ffe256c403
'2011-12-29T18:36:25-05:00'
describe
'35652' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLH' 'sip-files00133.pro'
504a8d5012b1f8957158173183ba0906
f7c39982c4f91e8de71ce0546e70365d9446a8a1
'2011-12-29T18:32:36-05:00'
describe
'33500' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLI' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
e23be4d6300e6e1899e91898eae91240
dc866e52e90e7f821c2ccd86d2308e9472417c0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLJ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3f256d9b2cb43f8a5bf6dcc964e4c3af
e1dcef8f129177dd585a9836a17666d186ffd19d
'2011-12-29T18:24:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLK' 'sip-files00133.txt'
56abc4207110f7d78a03a8043132b599
19b6d0e4f8c886df757c76627266914b8ca24f9c
describe
'8301' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLL' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
c8ba40863eb042a07cd1ddb519d02f14
633a01ac071e8e316c2308bdb1664fa646b3da3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLM' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
82de20b9230b22a68e024492e8965b77
3b64eb97a442affc8fd1529d3f4f6335151b8028
'2011-12-29T18:32:45-05:00'
describe
'110057' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLN' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
fcaa93968b67d7e3c2810c5c6a5226ab
135e05a0dab789dd503719f49d828d68ce049ea9
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLO' 'sip-files00134.pro'
9289a22d9852fe324232c6c66adcfca8
28c72a7857ef5aee1cc85dffb642bf29cf99c8c1
'2011-12-29T18:32:11-05:00'
describe
'33051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLP' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
1d5dc7631de4ab579ba57e5ee4fdc55f
5557f075e9b03448664fe2a16cccf92e04c9be07
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLQ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
bedb51186eaf42d00642b3a9cb2c29d2
da423943090b46009373f750380283c0575f7db2
'2011-12-29T18:33:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLR' 'sip-files00134.txt'
b2e25c144cb4fac4a651388877732dce
ae8e648ceef2132f827d8c1c7bb5e6696f867c52
'2011-12-29T18:28:51-05:00'
describe
'8108' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLS' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
ede2acc9ce28ef19258f5b3aecdc2120
feac55f4723ed8e645a406c5c25540fe55dd7fee
describe
'506317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLT' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
717626d21dd4d6ab09d2230c37cee58a
584c0f22497c79853e7ab7be4df53b861e96f070
describe
'74294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLU' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
adb5360f19e183ee4f88b2fbf2674ada
6b1264c922dd302169182ab1b1f27eb854273f57
describe
'22779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLV' 'sip-files00135.pro'
64fe6a0e616327d76bb8c39c76001d6a
6c507beb564efca0266c8a9d1f21443ddf64baca
'2011-12-29T18:24:06-05:00'
describe
'22444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLW' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
b5509ca21b9f4e60d11aab5cafef52e9
a027784411e7d9eed500a9ed483db8435a50ec9e
'2011-12-29T18:19:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLX' 'sip-files00135.tif'
e9f8cc3310ae9d57c50342d5eea2f4a0
47b5056f8f678297b4467a2eabf1a3ac2125ad28
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLY' 'sip-files00135.txt'
46ca82b7bdaeca4323ad2df16ff8cc2b
1ca918c7e3a31d6b4fc0484128f3c85dd9e62baf
'2011-12-29T18:32:02-05:00'
describe
'5819' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRLZ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
86274da68c3fa672173e7f0a737119bb
9a61f1a24f96c6040ed808f10cc3384275bc8d33
describe
'506335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMA' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
f31aa96d9adce95b9cf1fb8346464bef
b54caeda596071408542f4548d1aec911e4add01
describe
'80524' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMB' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
5b1f2f47e78915359c5fc5cc150f12c6
f5db6a2190543dddf3bdd5bbc09fc085054fbdda
'2011-12-29T18:19:21-05:00'
describe
'24583' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMC' 'sip-files00136.pro'
c22b9a8faf988a33816d684954cde43b
238e52992500363d74565b92311de99837e9fb07
describe
'24114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMD' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
66191a9fe466614ea5e330a635e7db83
8b8b8bd3a0d1e2b3d84b563244d193014290ca8f
'2011-12-29T18:19:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRME' 'sip-files00136.tif'
b392e2672f2f4837c6f723c54765bc08
de264e5c8c725c7e52580069046dac1d5c087f35
'2011-12-29T18:27:52-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMF' 'sip-files00136.txt'
913d9b5481d3fa1d2544a905bdb25ac4
2e1535ad7e583f35d50399990dc2207fe852d0da
'2011-12-29T18:30:54-05:00'
describe
'5976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMG' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5b011522c1913e3821bc33c5a1026155
6cbc20d7057a2202d3de8ead28affa15baae0204
'2011-12-29T18:32:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMH' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
0281c6ce2c7225c65a7e7995736dd112
0787a786d7e40bcc5377449e90c3f31f61ddf0e3
'2011-12-29T18:23:49-05:00'
describe
'109609' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMI' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
df1c8e5f016c618be9a712a639e12037
0de414f3a802d85b0fa8070d2f71f786798b4248
'2011-12-29T18:19:36-05:00'
describe
'35790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMJ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b3a33d6873a4f61cc24f8509e22e98a7
a6c740fd1b011a258e71bd110ba745e5515d4210
describe
'32879' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMK' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
08bee5e23e7ce6e01518e3e658f2f7e2
18ff0d8488e0a6fc8d33481c184f7d28ce118759
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRML' 'sip-files00137.tif'
8c9d719f1887c8f48e96da5c067d8627
4b5682a712842c919cf0892e6b060988c619d0c4
'2011-12-29T18:29:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMM' 'sip-files00137.txt'
41f175ab193c60061bb4f5c5b1b404c0
f5d14305e53acf67b3c64df6d4701a33cc0a6214
describe
'8211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMN' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
542963ecd6aeda93b33226e2a02f81b1
92d06683245c79b85e97d7011459b957b9861eb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMO' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
f1dc7a5ba014bc27337c0550ae0b19d2
3c016dd4e4cc75970ea840035ad9b69ad3913622
describe
'102041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMP' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
f6263c91a9bf25955a8561fa87cd2a80
4542a146a2dec7b19c3f451180a334618d2c2eab
'2011-12-29T18:37:53-05:00'
describe
'34020' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMQ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
504ec9808b94b5059cfc6494782c5fca
cfc52fe512afa3db0422465242bade98cf224c65
'2011-12-29T18:19:31-05:00'
describe
'31894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMR' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
6d94617b6af7995b1b37c55698485b94
b70d961fd0fc9877852e85bee6e4daeaa50bbc02
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMS' 'sip-files00138.tif'
34c52ad8ed49818f6c2a5b3456e76182
e5a0a434e7d47a0bdae22d17d6bf9d52087dbdce
'2011-12-29T18:35:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMT' 'sip-files00138.txt'
db1447c2d5c23ddec62508428a08dbd9
f65ea46dc3d4e3923a7debe63bba8699a6985017
describe
'8129' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMU' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
209745e707817cc1b3f7aacf808a95f0
35cb3b757b01f455fb5a0690921df108c2902a3d
'2011-12-29T18:36:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMV' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
c180468652c91ced29158be8c97184a9
5b8aa55337ab48eaad363be53193d87689083b1c
'2011-12-29T18:21:52-05:00'
describe
'110494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMW' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
c8329f37907f9c246e6700188f36b9bd
00e8637f4a43ebaa15cafc757ede804da7ca95b3
'2011-12-29T18:20:11-05:00'
describe
'36674' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMX' 'sip-files00139.pro'
a529387475a45341909909a869069406
48888e3af1dee1666740cf0c4ed2e92c68baede8
'2011-12-29T18:23:10-05:00'
describe
'34743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMY' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
74f80203e395cf8bc788c211947f9c23
b2809171034f1bc06ce82b316bde058a14df9a6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRMZ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
4bcae313f80bfa9cbced0c3c3238f234
aa284109c8a5ec44de056d1e292f58db437d26e8
'2011-12-29T18:21:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNA' 'sip-files00139.txt'
710134fee1049a93a11bed88a362f785
e15d1b5d77163a3a8db7dcf41e5bb2159a84b03a
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNB' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
df1b57c7720b9d282c52e9dbc93cd664
e011e2e9547a15c6ffc5183cfd6e4d6f044e4528
describe
'506344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNC' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
e40fb4b4c7fa70f6e43b364726c5f41d
c8b40c577f4840944c91a39d06df6463867a9a5e
'2011-12-29T18:24:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRND' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
04cbc01ac82291eadb4115d169875fc5
cb22e5a34319d7135929916bff1299bae16bcde8
describe
'35279' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNE' 'sip-files00140.pro'
16fc77ccb291c75520430a070cc4a79a
14ec6c20d16c2638420bc7a1bb5f75489419de80
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNF' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
043777e9a3a97bbe2ec9b16d6ccee6d0
7f482b750a6ca20d398bc1ea7d44a1c5b4940142
'2011-12-29T18:22:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNG' 'sip-files00140.tif'
339b478351e3f4329c600b938f6fa198
d5183297754977deaddf849cf5a1f1289ffcbd0f
'2011-12-29T18:28:19-05:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNH' 'sip-files00140.txt'
86af95a74ed0c2e1c93fe542f4656293
b35cab3e4afa688c25c6e53b8de40440e6c705a5
'2011-12-29T18:23:11-05:00'
describe
'8322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNI' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
de2ceeac7e66804b6aa285b02dd06785
5a6eb21eafa150c31decfb7e492aeaca3f74e258
'2011-12-29T18:20:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNJ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
ecba6ef230d83c312ba1615315e89ac9
88ed26f0b0f2a091233cb859b72834c9a2c92d21
describe
'110447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNK' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
f76d04f665765f42cb89cb6897fff799
5d1f0e97e761b988c112ae2734c2d8a0c8d4bd40
'2011-12-29T18:24:48-05:00'
describe
'35961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNL' 'sip-files00141.pro'
383cd7e2f21178c87b1dd4e91e3a1583
ab4a68adc48c828981b29e956b30818860a74394
'2011-12-29T18:29:06-05:00'
describe
'33892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNM' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
5b6546b059f057bbfb1b0aec2874ed91
6fc7ab7d0a7f60dbdad245b0597b0ddd4527582f
'2011-12-29T18:25:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNN' 'sip-files00141.tif'
a419fffacc34bbe04396c2ff938e8c0f
a54ba760ed22675fa6917906121a06bfdd1d33d7
'2011-12-29T18:36:53-05:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNO' 'sip-files00141.txt'
1332da77b78e104ff81aae7e73cd4848
a2a3f358b2f5290db2a936a1cdca2d1559c401f0
'2011-12-29T18:19:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNP' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
3ae36b38f80a7eb18ce73e14a76fbf6c
fc1629127e326f8fe7856babd9478fa05ae1411b
'2011-12-29T18:22:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNQ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
800918be0993abcc8408b297288e1479
9d857edcdfc06d977addbb7ea528c5a42ce3af96
describe
'99237' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNR' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
55de856faece2530be39212ab96c9e32
efeb1c93d322159cdf18d55d44744edf32b8bc0d
'2011-12-29T18:28:48-05:00'
describe
'32701' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNS' 'sip-files00142.pro'
2b9cedb1369f3a50f84b71ab194f0da8
a5adf3c840f6fbcf286b04543d129905f33e53fe
'2011-12-29T18:20:53-05:00'
describe
'31732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNT' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
b60175777cf2b937ff285ab324089a02
f6a47b32e43f47f18bd8670f6df4cf5444dd5862
'2011-12-29T18:32:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNU' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0c8552eea654537a072827ae326eba22
b1104c141c8cbbf46f59bfee5c9484ecb2877690
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNV' 'sip-files00142.txt'
506cb222e1c342d3a0e33484b89e718a
5fc5fdd84f8eb8cbdfdc124627651398ff4b6fac
'2011-12-29T18:28:37-05:00'
describe
'7886' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNW' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
cd72e63d0892b95bbf2b7fbcec2c1590
3a5031eb22755311fcaac9040a21cda4009f7e4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNX' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c4f64f22e927fc4e5809cc852abd5361
d1102aa74ffb35d74f226ebee34401da658d7adf
describe
'106395' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNY' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d6d55328e93e4f8c7f5aa3ebc237ed55
1b76a05aac4f10b1064d62846473387a394c45c8
'2011-12-29T18:34:27-05:00'
describe
'34979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRNZ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
87de78a5f3f40739562e8ad81b93a534
177da6a41b2038e9f1c3ad7ea7eea31fbb9ebc0e
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROA' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0b8be275a3f0a4e7d42c1ffc9380a189
0512d7669b500b69d09bab64ce48ffda6244947e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROB' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ce1c20ca6f09b006941720151ca334b4
d2305d6c0db815b4b7ba54e0ac6cf61730b4847f
'2011-12-29T18:24:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROC' 'sip-files00143.txt'
ee88a63ace755bc5ea97e6a381276096
2804bea9bef047e2ef44ae938115f3310ede2fd7
'2011-12-29T18:22:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROD' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
4c31a94a1ac8de121491fd0168357fac
3f2e98f5b759fc1083644645829aac077d406fcc
'2011-12-29T18:35:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROE' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
d35531014ef0fd641f792452b3db5515
d4af33287d3dcb4d69dbd2427705045c6b4c60b4
describe
'105952' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROF' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
3d49873650f26a848644769edaa517ec
9da19a1a1987f2aae38737e8eaf576b45e22325b
describe
'35148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROG' 'sip-files00144.pro'
aa7a049ab7a34229166c9481e988d663
98ea1f1bfc716786f5a74458b2e15772ea025e47
describe
'32800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROH' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
6dab2d63d163cdeaab3a13e3e97e10a9
ef15d0258c5efc2155868f1d5e689aa3d541483c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROI' 'sip-files00144.tif'
04ca658ac30e226b3fea66c47a3a9508
70d0d5cd338af993b97f146f804588bedd101d95
'2011-12-29T18:35:41-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROJ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e5e4b1b775dd7c041e702fa0d1b7be6c
6f50f65ac2d48aadf4b1e0e8f91cb6c16c721759
describe
'7945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROK' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
0467e0c5f41228193301ff95e959c8f5
2c091480b3023e2bd266a0105ab321257140239b
'2011-12-29T18:28:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROL' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
627807e304cf124b5eb4b1f205ad3545
7179f490d0a151177ebef49170cc6b21baccf244
describe
'140556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROM' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
e7624dfee240c5303d0025f50d96d5f1
fd4f3ec9b05befb771009b605216965ada4734a4
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRON' 'sip-files00146.pro'
884b65e48e946c4b6c61f4ade30f6d9b
8dbf823a72fe5a6f3c6be7a4e24af1c4e6faa13d
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROO' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
9e391ce48a3adf5ea18b29ac4db4ccdd
c548c20b551d56077ae2036d3e7d3ccfd085da8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
27ba0b0c49ffa019ada49e831c05fd3b
b2e070245bbaeddf5f3fc93e72a317b7f883550c
'2011-12-29T18:37:15-05:00'
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROQ' 'sip-files00146.txt'
ac818e6a4a6d4d4f2ec1460e913c72f6
e14799dd91e3b945a17b9c625076478fde6c684e
'2011-12-29T18:20:06-05:00'
describe
'9932' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROR' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
aab5d092112341b7728216adf422c036
4b4f9939759823662bb3816b4da2c19bc5fe4c4c
describe
'506285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
1992cb82963b8433d7a42ced145dcf08
ea3eeb1d9a16e155bf84a2418cf961a0597eca4b
describe
'107025' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROT' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
a44f7853a370a401aafcc23254a15935
fc612aa9d4f8ad3503b46fe64aa21a6edabd88f6
'2011-12-29T18:35:23-05:00'
describe
'34675' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROU' 'sip-files00147.pro'
f75e12d4394db048da041b5482789f80
4bd9e3b4bdf58fe604c4a2397e366be80efdb386
'2011-12-29T18:34:48-05:00'
describe
'33226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROV' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
076a9562ea450f96882f27b8321372f7
0eaeaf45618a8bafa6ba759a30a078228e74038b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROW' 'sip-files00147.tif'
3d7ab68e254368a150ab3e6c7368b79e
984c174c7becbc451b827cd14894217710c7d4d1
'2011-12-29T18:23:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROX' 'sip-files00147.txt'
3592ac2d631c255b44b6da2a24ed7769
2e070c4391cc895b8f895dd813c2562097587711
'2011-12-29T18:36:07-05:00'
describe
'8312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROY' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
00ad623c20fe9071c3c5f4e7e8dba7b9
84554514b84c14189819f049aa3db316058a1488
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABROZ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
2053abfa5b5347c334141fa316cbe774
1e5e67d290c4fe669a90a4879501f6c8b1b978e9
describe
'105735' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPA' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
ed6c88e30132117cdaaa969c83659d1a
b8931c5925ef7385467e739357efe83a058daddb
'2011-12-29T18:33:18-05:00'
describe
'34701' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPB' 'sip-files00148.pro'
8640b915b032284daedfb008e8e5a38e
07c7f424b43bfe8e5197f742ad8adbdd875fbea2
describe
'33168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPC' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
d28708060cea3ad652408c2e5f05af8e
c4c1c3d23b42452a4dd60c391126868be24460f1
'2011-12-29T18:21:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPD' 'sip-files00148.tif'
2d33ec8156fdaa0515b956907e0f47b4
794c420ec25b219794a7e8517c97fd5e225ed433
'2011-12-29T18:32:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPE' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a0c596d68e564f19154d9c9194b682d6
3a6a65225dbf525e6d54a2f1ae0d35681460a222
describe
'8335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPF' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
ee339d465617e229f3f9a60816009c63
e0aeab835145d5ae308e19e7c756b83b92ec9703
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPG' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
c325451833b3bbd7c7ddd68a59131ffd
becc9d466be6bd73e003f52503387b77b1626b8f
'2011-12-29T18:30:03-05:00'
describe
'103654' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPH' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
088248765e07252cb7b9450816e69e7f
8b1f99068812ec965728c10216ad339140cd8afa
'2011-12-29T18:29:20-05:00'
describe
'34446' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPI' 'sip-files00149.pro'
1b2e7184f94333dac4ff29b09d77242f
784b5794cbcffbf2aea3093627c679f961b4b76a
describe
'31708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPJ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
4f4c832409abdf9cc7eaffd641376283
de0b8872b27578be5b206220ca9b037afa901717
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPK' 'sip-files00149.tif'
7226f658e736fe6798891d35bcfa07c2
5ddaf6e3c1f822facfb212f584326a608301c89c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPL' 'sip-files00149.txt'
108c18cf2ecd1d71d15d0250c1c35b48
aeef48b8f14d7ed6b8461931ae974e746a184969
'2011-12-29T18:36:55-05:00'
describe
'8109' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPM' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
cbc239f48cc9e576fcf221cc9f8429e1
97e6686a8b40df11de08d32a4e61d71a165e8abc
'2011-12-29T18:27:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPN' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
ff181fee243a56b3e1816c9b4c0b0120
29a947c28270cb84da7514db0b77dde1d4459855
'2011-12-29T18:35:29-05:00'
describe
'103637' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPO' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
05a544576430984811b436c77a519bb6
ee2150d5dd6e7731e7113d84ff10924a4c2f37ec
describe
'34081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPP' 'sip-files00150.pro'
900d9cf9052f78bcf5e52a01cbddb6a4
43222c353cfa5159d89d88b9c7e44cf9ddc18c3f
describe
'31795' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPQ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
34aed5faee05361e5d01b222d35feee4
71f60a09c82814af7cf6f708522971c7b95779cf
'2011-12-29T18:33:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPR' 'sip-files00150.tif'
034bbe4e41ebe439fcb59a0f4de6f3ef
d4e2cc2f74c26be5262250dc17a6f5981cc759d2
'2011-12-29T18:25:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPS' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4fbb870775d994ec145ded481658c52d
088ab3ad35b49ee162132a74695d628761bf308f
describe
'8101' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPT' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
fc11498f7d2f68805a8c071b39bdf570
a6c430e144dd4a61b434e284cb5697e4abed63b5
'2011-12-29T18:29:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPU' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
fc8af40654cacbe2d89fc932e1b646fe
b85d464bf5740740123e3048f4e12930c882ba5f
describe
'106256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPV' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
2039ec601e1ad64d5d18e5af7e25d3d1
e73607325ed62693c79e1f32a75e7f9bdb871bdf
'2011-12-29T18:23:32-05:00'
describe
'34603' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPW' 'sip-files00151.pro'
15f89e891d66d742595d5fdd22a45f66
9b40a780253edabb0bba972aa6aa2a65a58d0014
'2011-12-29T18:30:09-05:00'
describe
'32946' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPX' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
8f18908e90b9c053fb35b7a880494441
e36d2efdd1ec4a33a2b310034c33523794e14a68
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPY' 'sip-files00151.tif'
db20a5d97398aba0ffa7a994f7ea86dd
f591467690eb38507f86620667e96df257b3d572
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRPZ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
5285d71a2f4f96ecfa7d068a1005befe
0c0577269de6069288fd5a597e8362c18015ec40
'2011-12-29T18:19:26-05:00'
describe
'8117' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQA' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
e9a9f89e24b4b3276d8cff7aff7e13f8
416cc51833cac785b883b9530a6229a10461bf68
'2011-12-29T18:20:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQB' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
08b1a76dd6588fb463517be0bb7b13c8
08a019875e3db600baf02c4923aeedaf35867eb6
describe
'113536' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQC' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
12933d7ab6df94cb2eac5f7ea9827760
e582a781701ceba3e6632bf2126ae680407f7ab1
describe
'36729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQD' 'sip-files00152.pro'
b359e290f8b5d308b541c8e40cc315ff
e9df93d86c990b2258fdce33767eaa5ad119d9c4
describe
'35045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQE' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
17f066ec2a6bac2066e6f61952ad81e9
2f8e6f49b7794c146e9ea8bd5b7ac27fb85c5ca9
'2011-12-29T18:23:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQF' 'sip-files00152.tif'
a037824384b500f41480b66009b521ba
2ade50b2ba4dda6d2e8a03bc829fe130ee83de24
'2011-12-29T18:30:10-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQG' 'sip-files00152.txt'
82d0c7bef1b43bfe928f683eb03de3f2
80fdad475b9053d41b56fb3812625336bf34efad
describe
'8369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQH' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
f7574c9cd6850010b20730466aea92d9
15c36666dee2a9eec8aba79b51e5f1b9d7b63f01
'2011-12-29T18:31:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQI' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
633ec8ed905145b954e75552e0cab900
239d741d34832b54b5d2df8499442e6e811a1aa1
'2011-12-29T18:22:31-05:00'
describe
'105789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQJ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
f42cff2dc364fba96264d36b3988b9c9
9c0aa8090de1ef427c33258b13fcc42eff73d5d7
describe
'34497' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQK' 'sip-files00153.pro'
fdc079e0f6b3209fda7e01e874c4780b
5e0d3ad46c37ffedb3ab8232c65476cf2822922a
describe
'32463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQL' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
d47d93a5c5c28baebb4177c3f38f2229
670bc4344c1349adf9d1b955fb95fd21787d9b8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQM' 'sip-files00153.tif'
800b79e56ba25fc660323be2a31d2806
3d1dcd370dfc808d263ad0ffc42f3804664da4ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
28335cb888c5d1802dada81745ce1c7b
f50f81a1b5e8e2a9239f6d32da27d66ed9eb0a7f
'2011-12-29T18:26:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQO' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
775cbde0f07f2ba7abf347b7828c75f7
9c4a40ae42acde29af59d7c38eb1cfe034cebecc
'2011-12-29T18:25:27-05:00'
describe
'506333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
7dd6b021c9a97e416d704f05b882e6c7
e6de9dc0e47cb2686ede6ec3050959086b593069
describe
'105090' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQQ' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
b77ceed8e38c78b135234eae8ef59055
aac3300fbadabe0388ccda3cc68b300f119c6f28
describe
'34181' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQR' 'sip-files00154.pro'
29b5789fb6c622c7b5682cdef9cbe810
020b663ab978deb3d6e0382613d974b8ceb71b52
'2011-12-29T18:32:28-05:00'
describe
'31502' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQS' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
511eca20b845cb2b3a2a6c9e52859c7d
93fa08279abc4f6b5f6be42bb622c06432d4ca36
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQT' 'sip-files00154.tif'
38a80bd7352495b48cd3e0a59c24781e
9d2a33d0d03ad907272795d5d16c75db0a65df66
'2011-12-29T18:30:52-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQU' 'sip-files00154.txt'
fc7c72e22816d9c60c20df78962c8bbe
11b2003bba9e7539499ac677953e71b35505c95a
'2011-12-29T18:20:40-05:00'
describe
'8069' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQV' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
2ba0d98a912b96ac86dadcc3f1e1efe9
57902c9c5744ec7a1698285d845d722e13ea77aa
'2011-12-29T18:28:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQW' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
4ceeeac0768f3d9a305c48a2311a7b8f
5973012ebf4ca3bf3826f33719713bad767ead39
describe
'104505' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQX' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
8e0e6439172e2370fd1818e26fb7e1e7
0bb517a9f023949eda045f83ba1adbeaf1d90a03
describe
'34466' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQY' 'sip-files00155.pro'
017c99ad72737115b4d2a219d9601653
3c8c0f9281410d7445a810a5693e8fbd31119c57
'2011-12-29T18:36:58-05:00'
describe
'32098' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRQZ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
37d64a771e18df9370a110dbedf9d6cf
bd47769e7f8b6cb71e91d5b90384b2e54437650a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRA' 'sip-files00155.tif'
64d4a4fc58439bee91d82b3721008099
acaf247ab50f7c4b73a18304220d055a996e60e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRB' 'sip-files00155.txt'
285418a50a73e5184dfe5402711a5698
19fc033f69d51a41c5e615a0e386922607ffa33b
describe
'8097' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRC' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
c3b4c22c9eaafce7cdb3a6ee1e754569
91f6d838ef2fa6c7c6c934e12b32d0df1cb852af
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRD' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
02f544fe2edafd6ea5fccb5db536f04d
dd748dd6a41d6e75e0d79cb1f7cbf1e79e6dba6f
describe
'100463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRE' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
83c934eb9bee813f066ea22dad5c2b98
1559dbec6903b8491be358d6ab6c9ffd0f89d9a8
describe
'33454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRF' 'sip-files00156.pro'
38a496ff847822212562c5e6dc919322
99ec44d9487fa903c212ae56b7b5db71033261b1
describe
'30037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRG' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
ef5f426d600ef3b57f57dae4e0a9649a
327a0718b50bf3e3008a454c646a465fdbd52821
'2011-12-29T18:23:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRH' 'sip-files00156.tif'
fcd1dc1b184a77814f758713e41423b3
fc9de1b8b393ec0cbcf01121beef5b118c10419c
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRI' 'sip-files00156.txt'
b7899957bc219b225d2a0dc999cdc8d1
8defd1e10ea4162c93582ef11a12faa2d658a281
'2011-12-29T18:23:23-05:00'
describe
'7824' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRJ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
640d3b15b1209805144a2afadcfee57d
2ebd93a8cd676b175cd66d9ecd0837952d913c69
'2011-12-29T18:37:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRK' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
1d57847920276900e21c6d6e304193a2
1d8b6343f17131acef73bc4d841e7cc97c984b43
describe
'105635' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRL' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
0641ffd2b1d2b93365509b53dd7d0f09
d369ec40858a4f8276561023f0f9967451ae8535
'2011-12-29T18:29:40-05:00'
describe
'34488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRM' 'sip-files00157.pro'
11eefc93380b7b71f87eade077556deb
b33bfd63c0af313e444ba38bca17b537eba14361
describe
'32462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
bcd9cb55e37b7ec8c3f4cfbc1b713189
424c025e53bd26f98d69a28ab43a04f5ae4922fb
'2011-12-29T18:35:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRO' 'sip-files00157.tif'
71e8a958483f94d9953ae78168cce728
126c8bcdffcd4fbc6bbcd0ffa9287d1b08dd724b
'2011-12-29T18:34:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRP' 'sip-files00157.txt'
d239958322917049c7b959890ca8f4b8
c1470f65a10d62a7e80ade170fee3242eb79280e
describe
'8060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRQ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
ffa89342707b7b740aaa8d8b00c3c63d
78156868c1a17585f934b786fa69366afc943373
'2011-12-29T18:21:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRR' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b718a6aa5b8595167cf850948752edaa
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describe
'106582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e0125e4c0befd1359a4020b6503444f1
90b53e7d369b4449d1566cb34a4a7c735aaa1292
describe
'34893' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRT' 'sip-files00158.pro'
a7115c238ff320a753aaf7120efc3de8
d557bfb645735b1b16dbf6182cf3b376a6604e4e
'2011-12-29T18:19:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
624b2b5a20c1d118b617fb505facba3a
ac791f7d209562a38bf673fbca550d564f791973
'2011-12-29T18:29:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
9b78681046b3a8ff473418238ad87fac
e9a12d73cb1dca3f2c110ca42b7ede670cde9861
'2011-12-29T18:28:49-05:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRW' 'sip-files00158.txt'
204a7cae9d1c1dd9b09e647070b4973f
726a8bfc8c4c237de7ff99d70ec7ca92f51518de
describe
'8141' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRX' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
bc70e7b61bcf8f7cda044ae8118f9d90
029ba62f5843cf15c6f993e214bb8bd900aa15c2
describe
'506167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRY' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
2bd40fdbd0385b0e35c3ae819f029c08
1a04143063ca679f7626de41c88be6a5fd9fb006
'2011-12-29T18:24:10-05:00'
describe
'84215' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRRZ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
2f8e505305dc0c46b26741b02d003706
416bf93593001de828a9600300037d614bbc7dce
describe
'26988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
bc00e804aae75485a867b172423a51cd
4bbe3ceaf02ca83c4575f3f3069e98edccbba377
'2011-12-29T18:34:08-05:00'
describe
'25498' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
22e53a285654f2946bb204c6da290881
755d5073fcea77c67678b2bf6a189e108d5d42bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSC' 'sip-files00159.tif'
5fab7fc2218148b4a3c9f503c8d0e240
6a57e79eb04b3948c7fbe3685618feea969f1b39
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSD' 'sip-files00159.txt'
bb02c38a05eba74246231ac508e5386b
0902e64880e0ba455eafc9c9baf3d7f86f43208a
describe
'6387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSE' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
614219171f936de7502410ba457cd299
8a4a9fd23d87cebcfeb0662ad1dc07755a2760a8
'2011-12-29T18:33:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSF' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
21f332c60fa645ef44ff0cd8255596c0
f6edd5064e4f38a6c71408675c9d37965576e853
describe
'73119' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSG' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
3f6c4e637db9a5ff6b27b11701cded0d
80216dfccb6300de0b89fa58d1fe4b8777b8b589
'2011-12-29T18:36:41-05:00'
describe
'23597' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSH' 'sip-files00160.pro'
9aa9a1c7f92ff6d6d8e827189a5260e6
3c2260f13e85e48d785e83cd33360b9f2bc5aeda
'2011-12-29T18:36:37-05:00'
describe
'22648' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSI' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
523dafb05508b3b8f7263b2186bb70e8
029ad0a0b01185b8022e276ddd6168dfb3b47d64
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSJ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
0f3e563a7f7f42f73f8746d314e8e4bc
bb723029c5abfe494d0ce980a3c5c05e1d16d8dd
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSK' 'sip-files00160.txt'
2617bf5fbd8e55f5da6482ab20610c63
b984071f69c364ab7329a6df26b4cee613657abc
describe
'5734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSL' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
9ca41e24e9c7738feaea31ac64f6e7da
3b75c8b76523fe55d85a93b76aeff11eb42ea368
'2011-12-29T18:26:27-05:00'
describe
'506201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSM' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
05b616dcbf8d621ea730ee9d07be5421
e403689053ab218de0d5d84a77b8345ee5631142
describe
'107832' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSN' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
cf4b393bb5bd7895128fbe3fd803b3b8
2288ad0faa13eb3fc5cee6122f561ef4701016c8
describe
'35618' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSO' 'sip-files00161.pro'
ce3ed346fe4b029cd3ae69370663f4a0
154248b52b409c66c965e06e939943c094335ef4
'2011-12-29T18:30:51-05:00'
describe
'33307' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSP' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
fa5ccd9ec81de921b6ed3441bd8c0476
9f9e573cdbfa70188f560e458f3e58f39620db67
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSQ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
c0451bb9089fd44b1a05b052c60ba754
17d5da17801de0f7e17c8a512a078aa768570dc0
'2011-12-29T18:21:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSR' 'sip-files00161.txt'
ac46f92794045179a27fa1a1079b3d1e
63b25d9eafaf4ba2288c82da4f34f83abd465931
'2011-12-29T18:31:22-05:00'
describe
'8255' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSS' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
8dd20e2dfeed35b469a8c186475f1cae
a999c671a1de240e3b8f1644e9d6c0e9f315093e
'2011-12-29T18:35:52-05:00'
describe
'506330' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRST' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
b0c42a903b3bd9d1fe6c3e172be4ce3c
4924f84eb0922198d7ca5387a77fbd874a682dc0
'2011-12-29T18:26:44-05:00'
describe
'102079' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSU' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
aa5d7c5cb25dbf6e64cda308bfa69851
73ff3da386d20c508fe03449a111a238e020baf5
describe
'33896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSV' 'sip-files00162.pro'
5df065c9fb8b265eb3f1349fdc17f47e
45b879722842602e9aa50f3746e02d27014059b3
describe
'31000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSW' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
87473d5d2fcae2fa5a00178438a12730
a04dedcca5aff66130a488f6ca6e9ea5fb5945a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSX' 'sip-files00162.tif'
ca2e4fb6dcfa017eab55d3fc569f2a6e
c26297d06664d856e75238d8479ffb3054829d6b
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSY' 'sip-files00162.txt'
449142f86cd01f1771c38e25246cae6e
3efa13f25fdb7561f9b446d9498bc3f53453518c
describe
'7972' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRSZ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
ece795a65b28ca7caeda541474ac391d
4e3c304985dbbc577b08b4f8d0f36f96b2ca9eb8
'2011-12-29T18:26:37-05:00'
describe
'506213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTA' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
9858baabd68f67b0c5284d199b0244f0
12728c5b04b32d1ac3867c46902bf689f4a0a0e6
describe
'98134' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTB' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
326786fe811080c11544ac99ecb9feac
fa9d4eb2621fb3f84140a3b8f3f4f3f6e055c65f
'2011-12-29T18:22:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTC' 'sip-files00163.pro'
a73e672ef5591249dda56172e1a256d8
9cac6a3628d0d203f358c723b095b9cdb65a2b45
'2011-12-29T18:27:29-05:00'
describe
'30636' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTD' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
655c9e550bf43b77be1d81fc94345ed5
6c0868e96b4ff95af264ffb17fbc2bf015c2ab53
'2011-12-29T18:34:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTE' 'sip-files00163.tif'
1723a6956fd9cf1d6baf8949c9c98cdb
cfa3356716dd6646629d6c13227c6e8b3d1b807f
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTF' 'sip-files00163.txt'
9e6f7ffa64524aba3783b4c694b4a2a0
61348ba6bcbda422d7231ec590f8430835156379
'2011-12-29T18:26:01-05:00'
describe
'7857' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTG' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
da5c01b3562dac482dfdb0f4b2589ce1
425830160744f489fb193c4e1e8adb5c283e7f74
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTH' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
32357b06ed7b6678fb13d00272459e9b
c713d306f4b21b14fb19000253b8c51ab440d7df
describe
'108001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTI' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
886adfa4d0328a41330ebcf7ab04f4f0
9427a5463ee1dc76596175dddf1546f6c714dca3
'2011-12-29T18:36:08-05:00'
describe
'35351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTJ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
8090343c74d5e25ccff2aa7c28838b21
3f0d0b3a432408fdb1c86151f8809f8b48369803
describe
'32586' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
9003027dedaecba5f836ea53fd6894a7
593cc7122f4c20d48c1590f0db14d4e63bc00d64
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTL' 'sip-files00164.tif'
6d1edcfe9661c1a2bb17d2d80ff54c1d
84b79464245fb8834d95e24848288ed3e48f46ed
'2011-12-29T18:31:36-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTM' 'sip-files00164.txt'
f60631abdf30cb9448d1b3f6bde5b314
74f93722a354f246e1d91bb2e907aa76dff4d126
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTN' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
592502306b0dff533f192c3c78eafd3e
393fb477ffef8ee102677298c4d504818c884b79
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTO' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
0181b4c92a7170a2856ed5de511c2c10
6d4a4b839d8de4d430da0e1fea0b747b15cbdb36
describe
'108463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTP' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
414a92dd54ca495cd08cfb9bff509b44
38b0255a13a577eebb334012ed194fa84e88c0e3
'2011-12-29T18:37:25-05:00'
describe
'35470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
43569f59d7f0d39b33ffc8e526c230d5
cbbe4fecc308a51eecaa3880a8d0853a9bd22612
'2011-12-29T18:37:50-05:00'
describe
'32984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTR' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
f1cb9863485fdf9f1631e90a86bead72
6ad2b14ed7833d13aa75f796d34bc9f77175aa74
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTS' 'sip-files00165.tif'
8e95200e2c7cbb57d3191a28303cbf46
5c8f7076bae3419aec068e8f7f1c35002438592b
'2011-12-29T18:30:32-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTT' 'sip-files00165.txt'
89ed12f77fd8e70f8b1f965fdae7bbdb
16d444574179006223207a725299f697058a9658
describe
'8160' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTU' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
23052f7c2377ca3c302a6ddffe96105a
134e1c29d7cae14fc67669f2d087eb961eb5dfc7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTV' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
a3586ac7b6e188f01599c64200c698b8
671e15d95c42c74db963dbdb1c634cf8d6638ab8
describe
'106189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTW' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
0e42649a541c7fac821d54ed739510d8
ee351ca8ba21da82b5c0e54d7c3bf1dc69535be7
'2011-12-29T18:36:24-05:00'
describe
'35633' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTX' 'sip-files00166.pro'
a713f6f29bac996a2f1c1b18b042eeb9
f64b11a0958d1385a45b1f136ac3f70c3d129622
'2011-12-29T18:20:32-05:00'
describe
'31725' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTY' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
b68ce1739cb5ec3822722b5d3b9d21de
1fd579e69c840af9e9313303db96a3490fcaf1d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRTZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
a453a2005bfcc890b5abdde027c3aa31
04d5eb27edfa65a6069f1b424307c3beb1251ae1
'2011-12-29T18:36:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUA' 'sip-files00166.txt'
ca1026aa0f748a838bb05a50d95f07c9
ec69155b0f6fc697a9b41b1792f43e05bf2e12eb
describe
'8048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUB' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
71ad16ced78e52cf4d66f761d68e9536
b9678aaa566d11d39323007c4722df22228ef419
'2011-12-29T18:25:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUC' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
1121a3e3e364b9a8b698a90b56081e65
04e94b050d71b0e1301d6771755a3a524b1c0d39
'2011-12-29T18:24:40-05:00'
describe
'104627' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUD' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
2a23f4044355c6c14adb8e21da658ac3
f982d9737afc30d0178d3b5672215e3e90e2c038
'2011-12-29T18:21:48-05:00'
describe
'34522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUE' 'sip-files00167.pro'
5685c3ff168e30d1c99e946e52612d9c
f325c89fae1acba3b597ac42cee93921e58cc4b2
describe
'32607' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
8eedaa274bca92b8463c305ab603ba9d
09b5060a323e287347f5687049d694aa1a794348
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUG' 'sip-files00167.tif'
b6a75c9ff683670d49a90088cc63aa81
db60405186c4e2b4651edf8adb3c27231b981209
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUH' 'sip-files00167.txt'
0577a52aaa5383775ce639b52f093202
c13543c67b59c2c031f34b9db4902af6e1a1b417
describe
'7793' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
f5938e335d4f34d5cb13877e8a5bde86
3440b6e01cb0aeb9d01bb686b1def21f22c62011
'2011-12-29T18:26:09-05:00'
describe
'506265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUJ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
f61b5cdc45f0c1de3adfb1e09e8ff77a
7a8b36f03cb68946ae5540bd6c222fce76635ad3
describe
'29650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUK' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
e5e53f40cf32af93d79129195869edce
49d25e1c4ac94c660a5b3e572153826a3d7ac304
describe
'7411' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUL' 'sip-files00168.pro'
fae32a32a0dd56808083c104eef764bb
804348ff591b514138d487d32cc961d9585d4d0e
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUM' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
4ec7f9ba2dc93ad3b615b0a01bcfce88
c07a121fc4d64bcccf2ec70ee1c08bb703f5b4c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
4cf388685f8668bf776761f49bbef2af
32c01df32d24fe487aa25fcb0a8f518f55f0e6d0
describe
'299' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUO' 'sip-files00168.txt'
54b4d85f124f5d1800f2b2a303dd27e8
99e3d9c8e39b69af4dc510623deae20a9dc3f3ec
describe
'2642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
13ca2775fb1120e99ba09f4642846115
1beaee482b96f070b57f6a0b0644ac2f05b088d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUQ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
ecd8303de9d7abbd6d22890764675c1d
cf56f5e29e5cc31ddd450273a9714920a30b4dfc
describe
'74922' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d78329893d21c00c9b607b2012747510
f17fdb9ca9e30385389b4cf64df082e912ae7067
describe
'23300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUS' 'sip-files00169.pro'
979972698f56b1a44c0a9cde26e9bb08
0ff9d9df00f5ea814d25e6ad5060ef349ba58577
describe
'23676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUT' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
ab685e98562edc7216062428e471d202
a241305d2e3967a7618003029cfaad4127379a6d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
7b02111dd2f0a1256b20d6f7b93b1d7f
3eafc3fdd59dfb80c181f48df1d080144cbc0c79
'2011-12-29T18:24:37-05:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUV' 'sip-files00169.txt'
7204cec38032cc7f76bf3987e4da7d85
2f8ac5c7f0db6c001a3d5a22cd51009b92eba65c
describe
'6171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUW' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
b8cbb03ba73c8da1dc9bacba1da1edb6
1ea21d395ffe0d53b2f676dc707137fab75e0316
'2011-12-29T18:25:10-05:00'
describe
'485197' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUX' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
a42ea63c99456b1c0e284e19e9626baa
20b5f5f8a9656f772e107a67de822bf6a9717bbf
'2011-12-29T18:20:52-05:00'
describe
'108083' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUY' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
8877778f0b855c04208bf30998a5ae40
be0f7f3cb7db5d14db6960b6d35b4ea17bfe3022
describe
'35183' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRUZ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
54fda341ed3033968a1e062cb9218546
e92806bb65f306beb72e77def62cfd9fd8c0e54a
describe
'33234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVA' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
e637627042a89dc27ff622b34bd5aeb5
69d9651e4b518c8c0797ed83b0b7151fce96d305
describe
'3898796' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVB' 'sip-files00170.tif'
7dc32206d9fba433aa02320eacda9903
c7e838acc75a152e1c100213204709ad856bd3ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVC' 'sip-files00170.txt'
e62b6e3deb6488761797ce78425b8a1e
689a1d427e37d7cf207ea1b6f4ce91b09d8fc725
describe
'8199' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVD' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
e59ee0b6367159bd8f103d6abc6a6706
f916692a88dbe9824d65dec3d3c0be1b33a6bbd4
describe
'506322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVE' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
28b7ede390ecc7a29a167de8f05ba9d8
8adba7a69480a59fa8a78daf49bc7461933d174e
describe
'105476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
59540b71cb6ac0714d3f182e4b8fafd0
4fb39620afe510047252070a85a4abf878d95162
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVG' 'sip-files00171.pro'
d54e298dbeca2576943dcc98e4e3818d
06bdcee80ff8f513b313a8e9713e0bf978d5b4b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVH' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
cba848cd158361bc8b6b48e84d516e34
b91b13c09390e46c915241157ca05e8e09f163a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVI' 'sip-files00171.tif'
ef14d0ea4da1e15d5d6f5970f05aabe9
dc87d1cdde6093950006e30a030cada13b10fe85
'2011-12-29T18:28:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVJ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
10cf29853be67062f7cdfdc566f5dd05
6bab6368faf767e85efd551aba6c55ad61a94f07
describe
'7948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVK' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
42c9978aa2d38966940b4926264795a0
d2aea23c3ad26be8c2c4193a5b5e1be8bdcfe8e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVL' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
2e0d8e8f3b36f74852ccab945ef65de7
94815108615a14a52e5af9e77c68a9cbf7bac3ca
describe
'107176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVM' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
d4812fc10c4b29945b5bb415f764754e
8e88f460d10bb6816c9798cab90d50eadcb011b6
describe
'35319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
634cd9114f1a106b7c1c5180ee5a8d6a
acba7a0d9fe15c440a90a24d7e565b6c4a83388b
'2011-12-29T18:21:56-05:00'
describe
'33237' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVO' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
b31bac3ae979c055d0cd3a6322e75220
4c1928cc7d49e48d734a47026f2ad62ae01d41a7
'2011-12-29T18:29:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVP' 'sip-files00172.tif'
6d59901917242a8e419c74662e6d4ea6
b5b195a40c64a7d4e360dfdeb9d6e14f087b2e52
'2011-12-29T18:22:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVQ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
dbbed094f2208ca0f26a50e32e6825a3
3294d7dc7f7c075328aa29340971e3cf82ab7031
describe
'8474' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVR' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
02de335acb680614db9fde4dfae9cf8a
6ff573597015ba238737e8b4f4cee7cf646779b9
'2011-12-29T18:19:53-05:00'
describe
'506316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVS' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
eab5c078a8a9c79245034fb019db1b5e
fdb9d8a8d80495556faf4ac53029ba00c556a251
'2011-12-29T18:23:52-05:00'
describe
'105457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVT' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
035e3552a7dcba304299692d44ac9579
60105e0eac8ca039aeaa087a8b478d6cdd31520c
describe
'34692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVU' 'sip-files00173.pro'
6903c02281e9372a04d75eaf44763fd4
f297ed002af3c0da1c6aa821cd2fe3379629953d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVV' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
6a0d119bdceed21235d3696b34d9b632
b7130d9f3cdaa6dbc1132b65b63a9bf1fab54bdb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVW' 'sip-files00173.tif'
d259c191e402c86517f8d1b555d81aa0
e6d1d6da913b66ba0997cf620c670df5371853bf
'2011-12-29T18:20:58-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVX' 'sip-files00173.txt'
c0b9facf7676bc1274f62a25db581484
c6006c9b0f2c9057962934189d646109c0767968
'2011-12-29T18:27:18-05:00'
describe
'8120' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVY' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
70437d963cf7a7ad8a49a54e38188267
e32dd4166d1094faaedddcd052451cfa034e8f96
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRVZ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
3eb9b79d6f5364b5867a507ac49c63f3
b9e43cbec3cf5c862f165a679186a035952e7239
'2011-12-29T18:21:02-05:00'
describe
'106717' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWA' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
18184eeeec597440cd78525884cf688a
77e931a406b991481730a264386ee47acff78f8e
describe
'36140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWB' 'sip-files00174.pro'
855aa4ad2405bc49744f09c5589ed5a2
f60b779569f52bc20b7c3ba9a4a3071ab2eeb507
'2011-12-29T18:36:40-05:00'
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWC' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
3d3b4fe3f7c9ea47327188c560310464
9a07584eae0912ef95814d1a99671c313e2d99d7
'2011-12-29T18:33:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWD' 'sip-files00174.tif'
23665628a3fdac1e1e77da4f08da4192
32f31ae174d4a6bb3f4aa346fa1654523bb8e590
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWE' 'sip-files00174.txt'
34c2faf39b50219b23fe2f0ab4d89d70
002271c677678feba46e21186bb236947782193b
'2011-12-29T18:19:52-05:00'
describe
'8021' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWF' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
faf3a00f510098ec4e579d0506ffeeec
ddb03ab35f94d675d74924d4a9d8c949882e8b19
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWG' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
decad5eae984412385f12f039ab28e02
112b4970da4595ad289376004c339865bca3a356
describe
'105911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWH' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
bd424d92e22642c426abc0a715b6f104
d44da312197226b5aef19eb81eac34a591f99350
describe
'35218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWI' 'sip-files00175.pro'
ab374034044fb907b4d861856473c53e
0dd9fedfe78d1c895bf86e4cdac75f15df178500
describe
'31977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWJ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
adeee08b88664103918e8a8e329d539c
38821f4f07c9e8d11d53807bcf1b718ee9600067
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWK' 'sip-files00175.tif'
d8e8121d724496deec8eb047a28b91c9
8a9076f0a22ba1ff5564cd345a94804a88b81f6a
'2011-12-29T18:26:56-05:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWL' 'sip-files00175.txt'
c61a48ef8549d4ffe9348f285ab73cc1
06a282fcd4f0343fe7c53be94fd29b250302798f
describe
'8155' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWM' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
6e6c423310534f766f0c28837a57e256
8502d192cf499f5ec230e3572a508eca3009d68c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWN' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
985972b5efb659aa0cdc3009c1bf1b47
b6c1ccd4b81b80106b091100cb2a85ce9301bb35
describe
'110176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWO' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
3cf78c3722bf1f5683eb81af91147618
9bfe1ba64efa08f0c3749c570cd222774c6ffeb1
describe
'35394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWP' 'sip-files00176.pro'
7b0248b6b5485dc7138f6d48faf30d7b
2a54a36c082ae93eb84e97b1ff8017249a445670
describe
'33787' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWQ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
bd69885d3352277f0c83aa92cfd9af43
14189c42d0010db50146e4413a2b29570a27cd81
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWR' 'sip-files00176.tif'
81054b92f99f8b523b386bd65e71739d
9ddbf5bf0912281daa7ae66c97a05a92f17bf780
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWS' 'sip-files00176.txt'
18d847d034540152a08e63f40742c96f
8ed5e2cffdea5868f67ceb9da70d0158adf269aa
'2011-12-29T18:23:53-05:00'
describe
'8448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWT' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
28ae21a8214906ae457535efc6fe0652
15993306f8f341fdb4a600354d0398ddecd5c04a
'2011-12-29T18:31:04-05:00'
describe
'506353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWU' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
30a5cbafd0be005fc32964aa8158ca74
c2f9d480932b6bad2713b636c088af172a507b5f
'2011-12-29T18:26:15-05:00'
describe
'107761' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWV' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
5eaa926cf607d094035c91e47d10c945
c4061e08594b9966a32c35a6bcc70a35a0c37945
'2011-12-29T18:21:40-05:00'
describe
'36050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWW' 'sip-files00177.pro'
e6c094a2a3513fb993675def19900445
c72a0b62a8c233407782b1596f6c0bb96c8f1dc1
describe
'33934' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWX' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
2e1cd6d903313b3bc56c1ff33d578dfe
fa5861c7bf786cdae4f928aeb2a3c816f213cf72
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWY' 'sip-files00177.tif'
150df09d04f6e60a884b315485d93a2e
6b7b45d6aa8e1dca908cf782d30dee866ac010b7
'2011-12-29T18:29:37-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRWZ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b12834c45509fb2766043f8c984132f8
7ece31b3401dd321de6b6ffd27bf49cec435d887
'2011-12-29T18:25:16-05:00'
describe
'8434' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXA' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
905a1b60cd2cdcba33f2b79df6388fae
09a12760ce8e42804496a7e85f2035aaac9d01f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXB' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e48de377e09e9406eb2e0fffc1673376
69626c4f735c68bdb2fe5eaca6db09f2d5b02082
describe
'111843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
c4740a5a7ccaead0eaab97ea3105f077
aa607e2672074b5bcb83854b5a78e0ad0c36b8fa
describe
'37158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXD' 'sip-files00178.pro'
f0b3bf67d8b1a62da37cc1e0df899786
42621543949f1a14ff710167a58875e176b50fbe
describe
'34048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXE' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
4e639d60eba94b7dbec12490a2c5d363
777ecd74883c8cd4d03482f2b3e76dea3dc44f18
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXF' 'sip-files00178.tif'
b26679773f71ac02d453319f4688ceb2
0619a279e99d87d5c7a08e83e37fd559833d6cde
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXG' 'sip-files00178.txt'
51824dba956fa71c0a3ae71099af7617
4853a4ee74bc2bb86f975ed911bd92b4132b5ce6
describe
'8089' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXH' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
152ef83a3cbd69b97dc549e637dd0d91
06f9d2548e92e07c3c5a43501552bcf7ca51cb40
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXI' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
fab366ca68c955c6c154a0c5219bfb6f
bc63453776c9c152cf46a111d3400d5672afb0d1
'2011-12-29T18:21:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXJ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
d7edab0b1b4d415825f7d453d90c38d1
7c4d08e4f8a10439733612137ec6120f4ffb5382
'2011-12-29T18:25:05-05:00'
describe
'26635' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXK' 'sip-files00179.pro'
4143a889ccbb13edf93643217c7ccd87
d45ad3faabb652e1e2577b846813ceac807437d5
'2011-12-29T18:22:51-05:00'
describe
'24860' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXL' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
d38e00152c401236d2f5e83141bb5b56
fcaf8b9eb2082fd3c962970c0d103e391373407d
'2011-12-29T18:22:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
bded5ab94dc6b8d99f0a689dae0f756f
124b77dda1a0d5d0d6f5ca7a43f60d5576681f23
'2011-12-29T18:25:36-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXN' 'sip-files00179.txt'
0fdba669a6dc34fe3686304b065c66a0
dc10a74859542eb317350468917e817a3d0093d5
describe
'6151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXO' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
f5e227c10feb12b451fcb607cbe38a5b
100d23bccc651b0ad62b960463d7608dd2c0db61
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXP' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
908bea395e78b8882d1fe3a37c0116cf
9501c109928d317fb8281e80124e8415607a2edc
'2011-12-29T18:22:52-05:00'
describe
'80858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXQ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
8b91f950a7d59a1fbb6fc21bf7adbe69
55c7a229e343460042364d086ea6f56af3e48491
'2011-12-29T18:32:10-05:00'
describe
'25131' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXR' 'sip-files00180.pro'
2e55589a260892d91190390c72253a64
d7660d9fe7e42ea76e8f5e07ec954785fe0dab46
'2011-12-29T18:30:58-05:00'
describe
'24333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXS' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
6b698c3106a0a76168accfa428c2640f
5f270564359201f075084031c75d5eb3fac2b8b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXT' 'sip-files00180.tif'
e884f3f3814e00a23fcaf955f14dc2fb
1ea12688c929ceb99a89d4ba63db953fac479e2a
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
5f099ffda478b622c06cfc93911f3985
fb841af2d2e12685de06de939842e80c7ea98663
'2011-12-29T18:24:08-05:00'
describe
'6238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXV' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
edd3f4701b9efeb6b9f880f52142fe23
091603d2cef17835bab0546843b201617529f5b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXW' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
8bed596d6652dddf850bd368cecb617b
0d2d3ae701f4b92c23ac13dd50d8c94ca244fc73
describe
'108470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXX' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
3767cc8a9037cabd662c99213b875cf3
b84b23ba12949213234f5aaed71929916cac105f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXY' 'sip-files00181.pro'
9986cf80681b91916fd8e6d77e8ca50d
a3f8b362175d3a6cfac195a3e6a3d57d9c43212f
describe
'33515' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRXZ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
c470fa6e1445e492b948828685ffd34b
7dc63c4d2bc24992f874e2ebcca43bfe7778c414
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYA' 'sip-files00181.tif'
a05fb436d6b48a7e82afc9c5bc610333
878edfe04b72b6fc2e3504415ee74ce50909ef4d
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYB' 'sip-files00181.txt'
eedeca26a2374bcd4e403b89cd9c006e
3a985eba6debab389debd60c1303a975c04f3464
'2011-12-29T18:32:54-05:00'
describe
'8302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYC' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
33d59c2ab3216cbb090ceb471bdb198e
aed196ffff4f2e97c5a4c5231b67ab8b527253f0
'2011-12-29T18:31:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYD' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
9da50efe30dce739cc6202d953fdbe66
e41c844aabbb63bf2d378460689f1be148a83b32
describe
'106357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYE' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
02985c19853d5cc4b440d70c29e5a065
5d2981412dbcacb809cdbfbfe7cdffabd0025e17
describe
'35715' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYF' 'sip-files00182.pro'
6b0cb48e7e13cf5edc5a29c7fb2dc610
77bbf63037bfd0fb4a8607baab448ea21096df00
describe
'32317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYG' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
405522095ba8c39f79743e9bb0a23860
e9e8761705c76e48618a795626d174cbc495f875
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYH' 'sip-files00182.tif'
410312136c224dd1816d4a74823a2290
a48d918db038963d3282e6abdddfdaaf057f4a96
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYI' 'sip-files00182.txt'
25a31f10a622093323aa7221dcafd275
5a5680bb3c02cb5c665b3a9a29d29137aa2b2522
'2011-12-29T18:22:43-05:00'
describe
'8081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYJ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
8de9bd6ea9ff9825c63d490cb6bc9b18
3026cf5c4d809a4e62730f2c65c3e3cf8c47dbad
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYK' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
926a94beca06d9051223edb9e9c86e59
e1aff94a71c7cbc0a4e8a938914d0466a7cc06de
describe
'108979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYL' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
3ac250bbfcc5262b7eee01900b2b3505
e73a913cee324152bfd70ba1cc0bb6665092fe95
describe
'36501' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYM' 'sip-files00183.pro'
029ab341adcd70a6248ae4ddd7a0859a
77f0970706a0562fedb72954b32b6ba6a2f252c5
describe
'33984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
520484e9ba6ee0bc0a8b8cd3d2a012be
574f3ddced740b2d7eee40ba606a0662d153b94b
'2011-12-29T18:31:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYO' 'sip-files00183.tif'
1b1e2113a4a8998b17afe91b726072b5
60ce1c4273b897b2c0c70984e0b87068d47d94c5
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYP' 'sip-files00183.txt'
d4e7b2dde0f7e80ea26ae7194cc1552e
6bc8963c32a85e6dfad03aa488f4aac34801b9c7
describe
'8318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYQ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
05eb9544d9d581a52a63a54f5c853176
e3c056f071346862fe7c1c7ad6715032deabf869
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
c44eb0cccf611f8bfe44b0d28fd7b1d9
8c656f9b991a793b1a505624f2de05bae207bcfb
'2011-12-29T18:26:29-05:00'
describe
'107568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
079c29da18d9f6617941bfb5d372b1ad
4f0a130db1da0994485d25805606a7cde0fd88c4
'2011-12-29T18:26:59-05:00'
describe
'35325' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYT' 'sip-files00184.pro'
a1df89ee98a519aa58db82912e8692e8
583ab00a142e1bfaa958062cfd7143f5ec362df2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
9d92b82a085ef6b8379144922dbd49c1
d0d99b5a7230e5e41973afce89b20f226aa9c35d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYV' 'sip-files00184.tif'
c6f57dd4c51c5be4139543f62adaee7d
d59ef4dcb1d33917de02f8ff28650c0f9e73cf36
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYW' 'sip-files00184.txt'
2ba56d557a069221fb1cada7233a768e
3404db83af2290d8f5c9ecf265e21946d684da7d
'2011-12-29T18:22:04-05:00'
describe
'8365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYX' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
53dedf3665f02b3d6122e56161af7f9d
e238a4743f6d70bca29548919131058aadaabc7b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYY' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
fa70707e43e6da34698429cdf1046d4f
aa8e76bec4521475f768c148e7eec4fa8227ce3c
'2011-12-29T18:35:39-05:00'
describe
'148026' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRYZ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
801969c01bf819e3d9b309fda4e19623
23d42df7b8673880952ea015eb65a86438851181
'2011-12-29T18:25:38-05:00'
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZA' 'sip-files00186.pro'
bd73dd36b87e00b4cd914d54eba0f60c
9f7f792c9af70a8cbecab3ef56e250cdebd69fc3
describe
'40446' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZB' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
57d9ad6aae64c71d3ba8947da83ed4b5
4cb678d772fbab0840721c48abaed3f81875e015
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZC' 'sip-files00186.tif'
5657cf92dc7145e4256c4856e454c7ab
ddf2d58a1aabdfa1a89b4244ea1fb30d4e7464a3
'2011-12-29T18:34:32-05:00'
describe
'92' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZD' 'sip-files00186.txt'
2a302f08a54b96e22adde72ed78800cb
8a08900adaee5119c232c9478685654bef6c44df
describe
'10558' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZE' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
5809477da1915af2a7459b7dcf655b40
a0c2ece65225f313eed4cd65a531a35658ce9926
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZF' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
6fa282dc487c378f601f98a34f2376da
92ab999d3c6bdbce35bf77215e6d6356e0acbb18
'2011-12-29T18:33:37-05:00'
describe
'108835' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZG' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
092ed234158535711e98fdbd8ee5ca5b
69ef67156d94c239063df5000da4ef718d34eac0
describe
'35302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZH' 'sip-files00187.pro'
a029f57ea49cacf163be9ab96a458dfd
506ff01538211a233864c354b25f772124462583
'2011-12-29T18:34:17-05:00'
describe
'34032' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZI' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
3ef61bfbf9947f247da17b850a14be3c
cbcf117a44170d576b7b9d46e31d7c2f6ee38e83
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZJ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
bb9e98b09193dcff671a101830840e85
95dc0b778880a46481f0452685f47b94a66a0b9f
'2011-12-29T18:23:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZK' 'sip-files00187.txt'
5fda60b91217fccb450e97cb788558e6
2f53962aed3082020f84bb6a869c96d17155c221
describe
'8507' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZL' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
41256aee944cba2e78982dbebb34c8c9
836a3c4d1de02e6203946b5cb75ae87517a5209c
'2011-12-29T18:20:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZM' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
7250bb20c2a8b90b3fec9badea072294
2c92bb3b443734628cb7652d78e931cadf3b3b48
describe
'108051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZN' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
b77098f0a0a6a4dd4aecb4154c209e6a
b58587a90215fc321b3e7d52eca1daea6388009a
describe
'36459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZO' 'sip-files00188.pro'
7d8878ac26cf9518e2d684e4b4276655
0cfaf2c2fb505e2ff4cb2dfa5379cba9fc0f5d8b
describe
'32572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZP' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
7bec54ab47d600cf64f6c6d330d18a8a
058b5d02c5a83d84fe5b0fff01efc7147a38ef09
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZQ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
f3d03abd74b0420a55562f392319ab83
8fdb03892dde02cd200f7235bb9aa2c775badf0e
'2011-12-29T18:33:12-05:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZR' 'sip-files00188.txt'
cd598aa5af913be063f4bebffc9b0e4d
350707a673641897e6de786bff78fa6a5c417caf
'2011-12-29T18:25:35-05:00'
describe
'8083' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZS' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
bde36d1c2e2278c09d76271e295d6605
44da4c3928613302a611a02e62b50a829340c2b2
describe
'506307' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZT' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
aeb422f8726027eb300c7fe9192bebc7
0971b452118cd1b92b784f477a4fe63c5736f718
describe
'111412' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZU' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
105b6d2482d8ecd6b9d03479ea74d1e4
5bbf90da8c66fcb039c01b021febdb7b0e1f8748
describe
'37033' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZV' 'sip-files00189.pro'
a8cf009d5ef95b04f52f2e99f76eddbd
5d2001aa04712d284e73640f35ed043afedf9367
describe
'34530' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZW' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
5f952a8de6232478098b3d8161460c24
669ac0da4221126fe5b9bb56ce7e804464126028
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZX' 'sip-files00189.tif'
f9baba0dc8bf2e7affc56e42f3307163
3a534e5c4422217d53b38162f2ba8bb93aa3a556
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZY' 'sip-files00189.txt'
4d68267aeb1ccb778b23c8738e9d22e4
60bf00cdd2960f1a36e323932dedd255ff3682fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABRZZ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
902178b02ea3efe2634df366aec94a33
067d5248b69108d7b935b0ef8c99d32e64589e11
describe
'506313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAA' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
50daf7476ed293bd35b75ce79001de96
be1dbe9d23043ce61b28fb46640a646782127746
'2011-12-29T18:33:26-05:00'
describe
'108456' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAB' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
695c8ce298a8a41647985c3a425082ba
0ce6f9d4399020bed60f8a142190b346fc478ad8
describe
'35924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAC' 'sip-files00190.pro'
5038d3bc420b3490cd85b4daa5ad2cb9
c49bcf20d4cf40381820ee192fb67d59298662fa
'2011-12-29T18:26:07-05:00'
describe
'32967' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAD' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
1cfe5c28facf2b7ddd3fcee3a4abe1f4
d8270982036911ba348e1a5169305cd504c5461b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAE' 'sip-files00190.tif'
81b23159582c3bab8f6db8c1dab1fd38
766807fefe485a3189c002c861a55cb436a478b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAF' 'sip-files00190.txt'
168115d9ecc698ff384b036b7a0ba511
141a9911e7acfcb09bb3205236c633dad8efadca
describe
'8173' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAG' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
298326c9061dfa50d5c1933bf2952b7d
4a880f9ab8525fac40cdf6f17e57a3dbeb505a7b
describe
'506147' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAH' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
50b4b42d1473e560ea8eef1784aa6887
70c0f91b555deade7b017bf889e85b19b58b57c7
describe
'102211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAI' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
ec399c8ec45a7a64aade573af26330c6
3ef74a00f2b07e85748ae1104f2c270a3486743a
'2011-12-29T18:22:29-05:00'
describe
'33852' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAJ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
389bc5388a1ec81e6a334f63cf9a861b
383a287e9c1c8109a2cacbce98906aec8edb7423
'2011-12-29T18:31:49-05:00'
describe
'30808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAK' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
ab4066e4efc8bf26fe4b5e0c7aeb0af2
935a03c1b4f474afdefd30e98bcb5bf0f13fd1b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAL' 'sip-files00191.tif'
86e54bf4f7150b16e26d5270a2ce4388
f475de7cc1c8766e2f17beee49e3a42ab5ec316b
'2011-12-29T18:34:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAM' 'sip-files00191.txt'
3e7a5935a054f4ddd8f41e5bed9dfa8d
ecfb0ab6aa343f171cbdc8df111cb239e33410c0
describe
'7738' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAN' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
1d484d42b1d3c357a2a7314555a3595a
a95355eec9f854fda0b90b129c38ed49992056d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAO' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
434130d46c2db60e7881c8c2e675ba8a
82bee863c313d9536bbfc079b1194f1cddd3dc1c
describe
'108737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAP' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
bbf956db58e56b1f025380b301edf131
aa042f21f21ea7329ec37d0b888da2a5dc67575e
describe
'35743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAQ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
b46f39d846502be7982ec802eb4e7f88
2ffc64cda05329e6cd8c5ef3f4e2b4c71198103f
describe
'32524' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAR' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
f2d1992c7b560e449da83964b538eff5
8ce633176b251eadb55ac0cf6e466ba6fc370380
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAS' 'sip-files00192.tif'
6f55414b7098fa0bfce69e211a22fdeb
cf55bbbc8564f63befff4a3e1120b8daa99e053b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAT' 'sip-files00192.txt'
2dfd1a9e23a7756fb9094f94fe4c16d5
77ff52ac7d48dc1e24297a6d13e8eb058b5d69f3
describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAU' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
8541de91a6ddc1305a3ca7db78a3b808
606367e25fc339a63a2177cfb9e9cc0dcfc93ebd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAV' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
28564f9a6657c44714cbb4a14d7f103d
24a55ee6bd8ccc8ba2fe602e48e880a5f26c46cd
describe
'44981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAW' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
ae09103042c8e0b7506c93248d9c4946
6188afa624f1025d9668a33737f80bcc03506090
describe
'11157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAX' 'sip-files00193.pro'
267c385eacd6c7858541f08d9bf5fc64
c04f37ddee6a909646208dc39b10066390bd431e
'2011-12-29T18:27:39-05:00'
describe
'12684' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAY' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
7d799c7621c32a837ca29828cb30403d
b98b18535192d39dcd82697c3e98e21c3f422946
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSAZ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
f372fb12d88ba2696f7c58e57bbe43e7
62f15f8521b429e57a8ea8111f1f96fa494a4e00
describe
'444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBA' 'sip-files00193.txt'
299ce7c1c9cf56bd2a658e744dbec72f
40b418da94224939b2d8acbbb60f8534dfa25ba4
describe
'3542' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBB' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
b8c8f19436446b17ce1158cb01c2388d
85d9d384ff787d3ca705fae35776986b0615ae98
describe
'506321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBC' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
99e1355e40d7881efaee41c13405bf2c
142a9f7173a888110316d4ac848606cc0bcf4599
'2011-12-29T18:21:18-05:00'
describe
'77120' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBD' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
473d809222fa4f6176ba728813366077
bd9f4b592e3f57e8e4573f38d1a0de2abfdbe74d
describe
'24663' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBE' 'sip-files00194.pro'
fb7f476672a45c6c3c2042a36ffb6f98
bf5b9a9e159d0ea8d6e6df9b506c269cd35d4c87
'2011-12-29T18:26:20-05:00'
describe
'23561' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBF' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
e2abb3a24d831f5942869220d77fb342
1cb4fc766a48f0a705ce73cb9071ee2c0835192f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBG' 'sip-files00194.tif'
2335e3501fcee973cdbbc647f3d13e72
004f5fc963b6e64c98e7a4d002cbeeb9e64beeac
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBH' 'sip-files00194.txt'
5a841da9f5d243464a7c0ca783df8a6e
dec7a516214c444937c4caeccd05fc13f8d35aa2
describe
'5877' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBI' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
be444723b4c3b679a25fb27dd5cdee60
84341d70d5dda27ec2d6c1d712a807a8b30994ad
describe
'506329' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBJ' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
99636a7d092e691abb579888f21a4cae
4da7b4944ef1141696ef8d6a0368b27079c5a7ab
describe
'105714' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBK' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
c96effaf386920d76c5d1ee06443b6c1
1008d17a94f9aaaeb85edf05d9911922a66e5ea8
'2011-12-29T18:26:30-05:00'
describe
'34500' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBL' 'sip-files00195.pro'
5b6a8c2770fbdffe7d6c5a53f538349e
842f97174389b2815047c483ae89b7a75e06e259
describe
'33260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBM' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
cd9f36df0dc371a5378ed52e13245c48
79b01c1dcc2558d4619dbe83cfcb7e63ff511b46
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBN' 'sip-files00195.tif'
8ac05cb13b396a71504deb60880386b7
c5fa1de08dc186eecf3ae6a738ee4d5312c0c37c
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBO' 'sip-files00195.txt'
d134d58f6c0d806c94ac472c9e48b873
5b0c125c32cbe61f4c2e24f38c29f087a8d90b6e
describe
'8637' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBP' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
866807930b25e8e0e119e3acb9eb6f53
d26028ddb5527fad69598506486f8f731b20c9b1
describe
'506341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBQ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
06e48c19ead815fcc24d6f6086a0cc76
9f017d30f47e65cc8945f0dfeafc1768dda654d5
describe
'103054' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBR' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
3f8c3fc44b5e2fcbb5f8484e6c5f7894
b85b47a546e62228af03c74fb93e442f9963f744
describe
'33872' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBS' 'sip-files00196.pro'
eda30d6a66d72dfc7bbf82ff7a9b4d50
1d0a84e13e95476f3f5ef2fb01d98fd694125afb
describe
'31691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBT' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
6fd01c26bcc7597574d362669e7aec28
2d014457020de16e901f0de4c779cd169df5c4c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBU' 'sip-files00196.tif'
f84d07c3874234cc6bb1114d4a76e17f
ed1b79e3ddaab1194bdf7e3565320c4d3f4a8f13
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBV' 'sip-files00196.txt'
9f9612c6672fafe290e3a1b35ff0748a
8cd6a116d57e0f64d88ddb65c0a4e71ed32b1965
'2011-12-29T18:28:17-05:00'
describe
'7897' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBW' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
2c78f8999f5e17e43ec0f5c34a15c285
941a5d649d28da97d4add6b6374afd3d05f0dfe2
'2011-12-29T18:32:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBX' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
35c15160f52f11b14b4e9017fdc4284c
0a794cab2e01874ba5493d5d9723908b06d0032e
describe
'106259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBY' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
738ef0d227cde211433be4946199a23b
1269fac03a9b66314d63d31b43db909f0a018674
describe
'34784' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSBZ' 'sip-files00197.pro'
deb7bbf20577b8f4be8a07a3caaf1b82
71358e43ae0b457adec082452419681db3f80de5
'2011-12-29T18:36:39-05:00'
describe
'32456' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCA' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
04ca055868675d05c15c9a1abfebdf2c
4f720592d27132f6250506948c82844a2df219e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCB' 'sip-files00197.tif'
dcc760629c9db10c1555b0efff4fec8f
1c055c70d60d3e500387947f9aa8af3daea16ef1
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCC' 'sip-files00197.txt'
bfac9e19df41147b5fd3cd15f5f5cf11
7e843063a46f4d7b81f0533642f4b769e5f17fe0
describe
'8325' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCD' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
0e4bc1be0f5aeb8110e29f67e36101a6
1c2bfdc0efdfaa3008665d4eb43a3fa75a96edc7
'2011-12-29T18:20:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCE' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
544f97af8de5735ec5f12191947cfa69
74fa84321e0660e20e40507c97e513230d0ee0af
'2011-12-29T18:27:04-05:00'
describe
'110195' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCF' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
18912d1396a9533e2069e3c26af71160
e10d7a27f4670d00b4592d72ddbb990199d10f88
describe
'36867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCG' 'sip-files00198.pro'
1a2d12b01f1b9991756b126cb8013582
70a532946bef3d36d68ebea2fde33eac26c9bc86
describe
'33644' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCH' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
49f0b5311f31344715a896e198e4741f
c130ee3081cc18b2912a64f1797dbb804d7b8bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCI' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a237fde2372701e55ba5998fce8166e4
0df2082f550f6b805c94d40037aacc5b8c00d39d
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCJ' 'sip-files00198.txt'
404a1221e9ac20bcb5f463ba163abb73
8ebf24fea16dff16689572fef1a098ed7d4d9f4a
'2011-12-29T18:36:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCK' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
9718a1dfded2713c4b026594dba71f65
572fab2ffee4eca2b3a902251ceda0a110de4179
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCL' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
519362f1eda90a8c0bed64aac113b26f
04ac40455082969c3d82a6bd9d48ce8f08958cf9
describe
'110829' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCM' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
ac11e4fa198c7968407ef149a0a4f454
e40507276d8328fcf9ed2e0b9a8bfa7a0e961e7b
'2011-12-29T18:21:11-05:00'
describe
'36455' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCN' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3fb313849fa2372658bfcebbba951750
9430e0ae22170c898073bee3ed60d2de83a15163
describe
'34602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCO' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
d082543d7d14ac3b54e38abf636b4d6d
7a6e9a414d7310bd2c9e43b0458c3cfd55359703
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCP' 'sip-files00199.tif'
5e157d6bf467b0c0ab90b13ba42f2f49
a20a902f8cf22e1257cdcc2298208733c26b5a12
'2011-12-29T18:29:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCQ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
c26c45113e1c0e2505b20c91eaac955e
22738003e6df431f7be1cbf7cd94445f3b986291
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCR' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
5ef40972db433c770aa1bf140548ed02
c6884829220cf4fb310a951d11520dc9fa31279e
describe
'506288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCS' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
fb798e4158595c7df62a74dd3db2ffa8
0c12ea3f2608d4b80e806278d1b1d2d5e704b3f6
describe
'111528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCT' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
57ab3aeb00c31c7a5bd7cedea7364434
33d32ff6f86cd37d62b9f69a76556ed39a82336b
describe
'35532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCU' 'sip-files00200.pro'
fb92c4e7f97de99b5b89ee8917a02555
793d3e047c4a9436240515366e0ba8802b24906f
describe
'34257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCV' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
f695378a60a3552040d3ac41f624f072
f53c95fce992862954f095a0082a68152402b8b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCW' 'sip-files00200.tif'
86f48d73cbdbc4de693eb25cf599537f
21ce70d5ed82cd5550c1d3c421ca0e81c7b52536
'2011-12-29T18:37:38-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCX' 'sip-files00200.txt'
c9d4df5fee4740156664185663ddeb75
3b385c417f4494aa171f6e64d1f10f620adb8aae
'2011-12-29T18:32:46-05:00'
describe
'8387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCY' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
03bc52cd9cd73fc828673a510688bdf4
1998a4e01be2622e51cffee09ebb3d016306a186
'2011-12-29T18:26:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSCZ' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
648016fdc07622302978d7146fe44a8d
fee709e36babf9290dfd6c98dff754405040179c
'2011-12-29T18:30:53-05:00'
describe
'110949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDA' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
a4d4843a3e5c0d3324a949d7c920aef3
4ef9e9b20a0a59bfc3abd6c09267228694505877
describe
'35672' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDB' 'sip-files00201.pro'
2763505aa3bbc2b38e0567618148244e
4f634f54c3da6f7f2c1edf0f86cd0ed839bb9ee3
describe
'34128' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDC' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
aa073a4e4d6557cebe607ae3bfd256c8
cb72ac92db496d90bc86b6aff5af59fec258c7e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDD' 'sip-files00201.tif'
aed1631374ca81aae0375ebb27dc7fff
ef6c776aa656bd37d2c3c723a963f2d10566b821
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDE' 'sip-files00201.txt'
da5cc222441e7c79110147e7ba8ed8f5
edb2feaf6f6f58fd1ecc6671e6673e68af10ea24
describe
'8357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDF' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
067a02c25f4f685e54dd09a89233a067
b56c2272d9bb86f26e79432cd6102c6056f4e49b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDG' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
00c85c7d9abf9cd38db78feca044c895
755fb655ced636a6a67b8e016f42fe9aa5566dbe
describe
'110217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDH' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
4dfa29b5ddafb6eb47fc885511bde6a7
7e9834db904364ff87ee8bae681686ddb0525576
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDI' 'sip-files00202.pro'
73af15f2e65e23cc4c05587b7b451bab
895e52ea867224959ff869222c68c7e0867925df
describe
'33962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDJ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
0c70bc29b52bdd9734916147823f8a88
dbb21c6a193f93d4cf44d3d793b58bac47618edf
'2011-12-29T18:25:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDK' 'sip-files00202.tif'
35d89d676c643e9a83d7f338cd72ae0e
a68af41f6e60bcb40631fc2c85abd163025c1394
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDL' 'sip-files00202.txt'
a11525c5ae268ac03f68e2285154d37e
43f3eee85d862e496bacc881540633b2bcbe1777
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDM' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
ce2c1a2dabe0d188b6e2973032762703
f6b2c14c3dd1d2d186b41a662fe511ee2664c9fd
describe
'506336' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDN' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
6a85fd740758e6b36181b1c51ad0747c
e5e65b778d61f0fef2d6c37e8e41833dede5895c
describe
'153996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDO' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
82a7227b232ff494cfc9b0a06c25f122
17db6418b9f56c3128ad0e36d6973fc36309413d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDP' 'sip-files00203.pro'
3626dde4086d2fb843ed1aea35fa68f9
e0c0ee1c4143f0a9725a9ac87b7bf26f8c6a92f6
describe
'43152' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDQ' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
8b4ee1159257f15180c866c764491fa4
b9ce61366aa04280c21e66051068d2419a239d3d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDR' 'sip-files00203.tif'
69a430c627919f381e5529db19f8f116
1303f2bb98678c26666bf686b27d70e4ce7c76f0
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDS' 'sip-files00203.txt'
bdff49bae336354673e6c6eeb49aeca0
00165846d79f9316ddc264d848c54951f93fffdc
describe
'11353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDT' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
50508d9a6fe2031a7ca8efddda7a4802
e00f944dfe32889441290cbc733a69473ddc0e43
'2011-12-29T18:30:21-05:00'
describe
'506098' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDU' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
249d3541a6aebee7256ebc39c6687f93
41776e87310ea86f2374f2ed00226b888162e714
'2011-12-29T18:26:00-05:00'
describe
'99838' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDV' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
9a86197751bf188d91941d73471d88f8
7ac1cd5435a65e3574efb59b611a001492a9d295
'2011-12-29T18:35:08-05:00'
describe
'32207' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDW' 'sip-files00205.pro'
bf06c3224a84e29738f84989fc12f87a
cdeb841d8e34657e1860dfc3596dab0f72efc1b3
describe
'31231' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDX' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
3c6e93fd1e338e0121b67db8f487ccbd
7a243b471960f4a62c178e7752d9455e0d981773
'2011-12-29T18:32:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDY' 'sip-files00205.tif'
e0439999ae42aea91642d383a95d26fe
c278532623168f2044f858ad8781957e7cad4855
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSDZ' 'sip-files00205.txt'
f339ee4f5434138d1276e1d7da082cde
2fdf304c39050aa2fe2f7abf0508930cb85c23b0
describe
'7631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEA' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
037ade7d360261882bd10ae735a9efcd
f7f6986160d43c3e6f9af406a35359b68fc985de
describe
'506225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEB' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
4f1cb44ac8178341e1a179741b833485
9d7b0de3d7b335d7b8eff2eb21b47b5c742886cc
'2011-12-29T18:29:24-05:00'
describe
'76414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEC' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
c39b285e2f60ffb76ebbe2e025d27875
22f150170079f946f6b0c6aa9443149a8e759b64
describe
'23691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSED' 'sip-files00206.pro'
0ed4c7a53b051b99c472854e41c8eba8
ba07fb8229cd2a9ff779aec193f431fb146ea0dc
describe
'22944' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEE' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
fbf8b88bf4a2c660841e67e887b83339
3f72977bfbe94069682d10b7f0100b4523bd8664
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEF' 'sip-files00206.tif'
31adc28b3c360ee5dd057d6b323e5e67
fa5077bdbbf854a9e5b79406b525e6354f9d08c5
'2011-12-29T18:31:44-05:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEG' 'sip-files00206.txt'
40fd2f33b5d2dc45f023d6523f9f76f4
61c36ea5ddae6bd380b203a3a023a12fcdb1b31b
describe
'5970' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEH' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
0e93dadf1cd9ad65e22db4c6103c0d62
962d7eb83be702a592bfd6e531a9ae194cfef0a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEI' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
9a9fda30d6467ac8cdb5e3b3da6d2240
5277fbc2d017999554f87fdd096958a2a2f79019
describe
'113965' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEJ' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
869b67f5e728c16c19c1b249736cdf62
a9d34ca1cc7189701f70c8167af0ad724b373587
describe
'37031' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEK' 'sip-files00207.pro'
0ef9b347d57d3c3a435bb81c03c8fe09
0aace8ede7d7f35070315fff06ba3ad79ad0f19d
describe
'35659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEL' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
95115925ea958c165beac20e67c54f4d
d0cb5eeeb2c360d835d316adfe7bb667c9084a3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEM' 'sip-files00207.tif'
327b438e2d7b9b9d5f21383e056a5058
46cb1bc3a289ff940a9d8040d516eb4bb6f404af
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEN' 'sip-files00207.txt'
ac243b22e6b52b666f6deba624f161a5
42e16d94553f70d1e5d6318a954d750a825b5bd1
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEO' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
eb43e072e52ceed389f26038f3439749
67ecd10890f12074c6d972d3d314218d97ef24ef
describe
'486650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEP' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
c647a2ec527474c586fd1aa78a845184
33bbedb21b494d65c62981f632574daf00f4090d
describe
'107589' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEQ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
28e3b3fc0200f26a1a29a455cda2bb72
c3aa37955e7f6a094c333399fec07d6b5368ac17
describe
'35796' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSER' 'sip-files00208.pro'
226894dc81257104c5b978daffc11baa
08b781eaf69d76a5306f616053a569dc2112dc70
'2011-12-29T18:28:07-05:00'
describe
'33009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSES' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
d941a9f202a499a3a1f7c070a8bcb9fa
cfa45f944bb184728d380679192ce314a6265e60
describe
'3910700' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSET' 'sip-files00208.tif'
e3c218718b7f2e24e7b8e604e6f665f8
0ef95b0252661e6a62c78e31785991312b090302
'2011-12-29T18:33:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEU' 'sip-files00208.txt'
fffe08fcd5c63c2bc44154e1775e6c6f
1b26776adb0c4a4279eba5b6ed5388e1ad4660c9
'2011-12-29T18:19:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEV' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
f7181c5129b755615aee99877069de1d
06b234cf82edb48f6d1c6a880296adb036a4d203
'2011-12-29T18:31:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEW' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
3ea828a55d4de7fec5a88bea25988863
a982dff24e379f859eb8a948ed3892ede59e4055
describe
'107792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEX' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
66697473c88a8461cd6cc20d132c1a48
2d90a615b5c56ea22aa18e2be3c95a8a7d78d840
describe
'36636' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEY' 'sip-files00209.pro'
6a9316f3b864321f7580577941397569
c5d6d36957fa98341bb28440308e47eac61a12c1
describe
'34080' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSEZ' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
6732670a6db9e4c6090aabcc39cff289
07b2bc1387517aff300433afb783a0321b238604
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFA' 'sip-files00209.tif'
64904354031014a5515d310a191d0fc0
c9b49ad485ea70643b6a4cfa3e6841d97376d1eb
'2011-12-29T18:28:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFB' 'sip-files00209.txt'
143f46b9f7d65eea5a506f375e800c9e
1093aaee867063917f4678662c9f62bd2452080e
describe
'8364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFC' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
8c2a914449d005c320ea2db2d3a87d69
20d453f1d2d01ed5ae034c8537dac141cb0f70a8
'2011-12-29T18:32:39-05:00'
describe
'506305' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFD' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
1b6c9f1e52ef784ebd0e473c8b037436
db6b6c69200fa71eaca896c63fbfee12c9589e67
describe
'112261' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFE' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
561a297c80e2f0a58efb5698f7b484e6
8c44fcd1637eed336be9e1f27278f576ebb7e9e2
'2011-12-29T18:20:20-05:00'
describe
'37122' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFF' 'sip-files00210.pro'
37610aaa39102367fbe05d9b5c387b5a
99b6045c191324e9a8b134cb84ff0c1593174c0c
'2011-12-29T18:33:40-05:00'
describe
'33451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFG' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
3d91c7114d337e55baa4db9d31d66e7b
0de4089b8fe70248caf60759e6feae70a757dce0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFH' 'sip-files00210.tif'
cd8e84c5a4a62f2e516a332653f9221a
f326fed3b20c4824304abf32e0960622234d5ffe
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFI' 'sip-files00210.txt'
0c8b2bdca9e0d03176e5d86be33a5e1b
7017b92625a112580d7c92778f62c11915151587
'2011-12-29T18:34:26-05:00'
describe
'8249' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFJ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
09e222d41ba18cf3b4974b13c06fa197
35f85882721c3d28b3ee7697ac7d1f71445866bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFK' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
2db0e42b82f821a0bbb6b08548bae5cc
976f454d92ef8645112f4d93960119ba4c7122ed
describe
'110001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFL' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
e334d59dc08b30aeba2bb6ed9c0181ec
d461c776e083f494214d04e31e7aff5d72a301c3
describe
'36153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFM' 'sip-files00211.pro'
1b85606ea7b59b0cee6356aff64d4e94
52cdc88804e2043e312d70f62d31d356faceb48a
'2011-12-29T18:21:30-05:00'
describe
'33798' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFN' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
f4082192c3453d0da30864225ef7e851
5e180ef436a6d141cf3951714d1edf076ba8d69f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFO' 'sip-files00211.tif'
705ea387e90dac196a85a88b76787309
ad3f21d70ac80144a00a9d63ccfeeabf1a5a5870
'2011-12-29T18:24:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFP' 'sip-files00211.txt'
8b315ba4d082d075b3f4e35eb7879bef
605a6cc5e9b261fd2c6b29fdff8ced49a2468235
'2011-12-29T18:29:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFQ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
4730ad9b42b9ea883c82847d74345412
96871bf06294e1e0e890ea596fda135ddf8939a6
describe
'506337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFR' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
dfcd6d46f5cf07391eb70600296cc099
9a46b276f156f829fac0d26ece799183e111075f
'2011-12-29T18:36:09-05:00'
describe
'105413' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFS' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
b9dd704bfa2e4fdac13e7fae04ffef1c
4b46846c4469094bce3234604b006668c7cfcb65
describe
'35054' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFT' 'sip-files00212.pro'
d6ceef520a0e823b9723016ecdb23b6d
7ac8a53dc7fe3af17c2695959e6be9975ef991f1
describe
'31509' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFU' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
269ba933992f5389a3f37b57a1e864d5
6ab62bce94ec6bab4fda9eb030c0d332882906a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFV' 'sip-files00212.tif'
41509cc6b2e8db4b0084cc133f181581
0fd685a619e2f68f40a4129847470485e6bf3c50
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFW' 'sip-files00212.txt'
004a69f3cbe8da7b67e19d318ccff06d
59214661db77b3baa0667c76eed9614d8811a0ea
describe
'7789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFX' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
2d81069817003927be635b3f3be7d4c3
0e48a6e3358a95fdf143ee213cdc18c5ea579324
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFY' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
3c06f1b9ba4db6349b20f1c7457bbc83
633cb67ec673015457bef726435de99c7dccc08c
describe
'107244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSFZ' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
4d5d0202747af2197e463374ef1dcec1
f9796e32ccd64eaf3e4f40c44c786a60307ee4db
describe
'35897' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGA' 'sip-files00213.pro'
8b3939109ce3fef6eb23b96f20d295bc
ab276a6ba57274bf5272257156aa13324b11ab86
describe
'32039' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGB' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
6892f26fc2c0d59615c6d8a2291c9989
9406c45eab7ff52f162a775a69a201e84de68d67
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGC' 'sip-files00213.tif'
7740e5f2aadc704b780bddca871fdd43
aa325d1866cbc9437b1e5faaaca865356bf21134
'2011-12-29T18:28:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGD' 'sip-files00213.txt'
cb7291041abad104b764526d05961788
ef4ebf26dd08dfaa45e6168a48549ce099ed97c9
describe
'8195' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGE' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
544f94295073a94d43616345f7526f63
926ec4059a2dbaa0376099ec5287ca0feec62ab6
'2011-12-29T18:20:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGF' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
55f8f9950fad7ec99055c2bc63d5ab8e
09609e2dc986ef3fdf90d632913fc49b845ade6a
'2011-12-29T18:23:25-05:00'
describe
'106532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGG' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
9934e35d52c520e40b5638a3e8f2736a
db96e3f5f2e3c31217ed72880e7cb77bb48dc256
describe
'35264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGH' 'sip-files00214.pro'
3599ee6a12c22f1df0fa3307a3587e0a
e9c427f0ae87f7ececbc09eac65f65fc5ab6e023
describe
'32170' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGI' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
2271cdf439395779ab2a1cd4bbe1fccb
9ad8c0dfd610407b168516e0c62d8b36959d4825
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGJ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
ef995203f5070ac354b94e218f07eb56
2eb793f021ce7e40bd16179bc96581e8384620d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGK' 'sip-files00214.txt'
4cb1e740a94f4015b8f00d8864c7474f
5efc06afd0dea325b057e0771dc8bc2182a83ea8
describe
'7983' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGL' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
06ec14fc6bfbda36e4cb27e4ccc12210
d05bed7908b7d8b1f987afb61687d8c6159522dd
describe
'506284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGM' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
6e440beee1ee2a8aa80430b79e21b097
c0b40d031e83ef8e07ef3017162b2615dc38705f
describe
'112150' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGN' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
a3c7278a0f98d26cfbe492f7ad540665
337c0ca23c23b8473f76f1ad34915f06ed373470
describe
'36078' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGO' 'sip-files00215.pro'
cc0ff528e9b19342efe6bcdd8c0f3dcc
7145b9c3195014c7349e6a98813d5d748a31eec6
'2011-12-29T18:19:07-05:00'
describe
'33690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGP' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
4f911a344d0c7ae17c6a953c5c191a30
032ac0eaca3ffbc7ab1936828ac2261e348ffc73
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGQ' 'sip-files00215.tif'
60ce232cdb6037a8e510ebdfb4651471
d15627634747cb2b430bc41d4d5072ca798157d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGR' 'sip-files00215.txt'
386ee5ebca0bffec39fa3b94237c7e1f
c71d98556deacfbc863ad8d0f388ef0f7ccaf211
'2011-12-29T18:20:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGS' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
634d4e270104487aad303ba46ce9efa5
fc27e4950293e9bda0776d7c295db5c84ce5d5d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGT' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
7755e4095afd938712ac96b341795a1c
2030de960ac6a17cfde7b638b118b233c40d7f83
'2011-12-29T18:21:26-05:00'
describe
'108108' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGU' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
94780282ab3b19d85848e1032c98435c
d23ab2c7a9b44371a46c3064a3ff5f79c05b3e9f
describe
'35953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGV' 'sip-files00216.pro'
0e3008f37bb2266280748b83b426a60b
8aad4d05d286924823c369b38d8f27c2b8cbb92e
describe
'33623' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGW' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
7bd67e13c478411f57a4cb50f540dd5c
95858f36d96119620d0da9a3754a5107ea34da69
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGX' 'sip-files00216.tif'
4a5859eeb25593994f04662ec848533c
51482f07968d04bce5cdb68909424fdc64627057
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGY' 'sip-files00216.txt'
72bfc225a5d39bc283af773c414e4757
cbf2b5e18e65f516b94d2e2e3a8529776908cf84
describe
'8291' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSGZ' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
ade9b21f51e3847e7497a6c22a9b347a
72ebf1199428fa41930e44fb88f9ec4a9a67e025
describe
'506250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHA' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
351fd9f94ca10912c712062876ae7569
75e529d81362ab7a2effbed64b432b08f07317bb
'2011-12-29T18:37:54-05:00'
describe
'68137' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHB' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
41f339bfd81672d4bc38667fe65c3da0
f235e62368f3fc37214ed9464ba30f7305b75319
describe
'21121' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHC' 'sip-files00217.pro'
98ed4513094b08f88430a966ec41a5e0
55d052df61d2922b637ae80d5ea75cbf1a25ef57
describe
'20161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHD' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
de4d937806ef06d6b42aa1eb6fc6e8c2
0271a060ae193153f6a07a5d4922206de548528d
'2011-12-29T18:21:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHE' 'sip-files00217.tif'
b7c8f3d190447d01ba8b27afbabbc1d5
a4af26f4c3f35b0995d72b1ff1776d0b9e25c1c9
'2011-12-29T18:20:39-05:00'
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHF' 'sip-files00217.txt'
b25aca7acdfc961e36c1504d8475a43f
1d40700975a78ac0e6262f150e812f16217f9854
'2011-12-29T18:35:18-05:00'
describe
'5194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHG' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
71dc983a4f4311d66d5130b21ef57692
f7321839b3ff5277b0221c82f4674cfd333a7add
describe
'506171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHH' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
a12f163b0e64c17522d257d84fb326cc
dd96fb923cdee1a1abcd5bc3ed61c26e9510680f
describe
'80760' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHI' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
6f194493f3869f185ebb2f8cf19b18d6
5d70f47a14f959d256c2d92fd351c20d602fe3a9
describe
'24625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHJ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
4b4010f7d4f2f840734ec8e6046b252f
3e13e1381cce3e4da5b85fe5110f1f68069a2b7a
describe
'24926' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHK' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
d8b7a1c1072c65aaa8958f4bb1578b65
7f005ad8f5db47d473b100b9a1e7f9b6974a54c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHL' 'sip-files00218.tif'
0c263a189b4d97be51a0a3e44a230d66
f31bf7201bb4484e6cd74fd862a9947f2ce26042
'2011-12-29T18:21:51-05:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHM' 'sip-files00218.txt'
b0e9dda7ad168b58ca1b0cf76472708a
a0bde1d27a8eec902b65870c1b001ee0fd3586d8
describe
'6153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHN' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
7d85e7a7cc615eb83aa8ea85e6d638ee
a60e475c848a0d30754bce1fa654d647688be639
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHO' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
91c2257ddf7b769c9f538b00d622b754
d1c57fa08118f67acec1292c42dbc01e210d7d18
'2011-12-29T18:32:51-05:00'
describe
'108947' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHP' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
09fa71d1775b4c10f52fa3040f06fbcc
709a745e625d3980ba62fe5216be995654ec6ec1
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHQ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
35631ae2ab1d6ad2fe81aca16c94d206
671a4fb0bf3131743d6d28aa9d34406ce4bd1433
'2011-12-29T18:19:44-05:00'
describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHR' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
315c34a5158e018dc2d4ec7128f6831d
bc127d2417791e90d97faf6108deb5465bb271a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHS' 'sip-files00219.tif'
14a7822e53e3f01de66ee24d5b19e131
d5ab3c5de82ae34c1eabb20eac437afe59c06254
'2011-12-29T18:31:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHT' 'sip-files00219.txt'
5ff985f20ad3e03ef3f7a3412578b51c
3ea531a568bf24d8a293e3743bbbb91882124147
describe
'8384' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHU' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
a2240e5fba1151512091413bf3d1c5f6
9cbae86c03e5551cf2fac68cf691789d75b94a31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHV' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
6e04314691966114a64c78461f7c193b
4d285b73bff5f7e11a7087ac7dd824ec0ad49b8f
describe
'108107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHW' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
4b869679afaa95c72b4756f2310d1482
678e981e5539c0a9fab7ef96b7c98378a67ffaf1
'2011-12-29T18:24:07-05:00'
describe
'36031' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHX' 'sip-files00220.pro'
f1fad9497257b48cb778672d24482444
30062398af43ab8a9f08b78bde32b804ce32e411
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHY' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
864a7d68eb7ef90c3c4a992d796f8d38
5bc72e1f8a71a0f7f548fc2127568a0873c6a9f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSHZ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
badb729aac745c127a6993c520ffdb35
d7ffd344123430b192d7d098267ea3cc0775ebb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIA' 'sip-files00220.txt'
f4a720b0628300ed1fde513681aad27d
47f17a74ba96ca8aafb0e2b3009246164656c1eb
describe
'8149' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIB' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
8cf44625704ac074c4d6796cb53edccf
4d707409453f48a4094269584ebc510365394cdb
describe
'506217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIC' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
a2c5c788cac890ab90f284e60264a555
fb600e8cb93e5f116ee01f068c0f794a15cb761c
describe
'141639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSID' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
9176a73a2f0fd2ce880c78aa26d0f2b3
285a97bbd745c000b06e082fd448a3d63d756500
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIE' 'sip-files00221.pro'
bf34bc3653d860390211136b19f98925
cbf26daf592155612d825601bf9576532447e021
describe
'39639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIF' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
02c306e8c279a981242d938da5c00abc
64033232b10078d7e53cdab78ab6e7fec9d961a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIG' 'sip-files00221.tif'
0fe904c661354e6695029393dc6904ca
badeaa3c7b4db7abe72641f0a0618d8076f6d203
'2011-12-29T18:35:33-05:00'
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIH' 'sip-files00221.txt'
4ef485133f2e1b7053a7b25f18b4aa84
3f41f3701683bffd4d7fa3a9f14fe73da59aeae9
describe
'10349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSII' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
d2e46c307fd4b83b9ed2bc67cc6250c5
766e99b312b8b2eca83480ca540bc3d57399febf
'2011-12-29T18:25:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIJ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
4d8ee931023fe84d5d584552feae3908
0be86fb96f55024106ede56f146b431cc64fb96e
describe
'111162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIK' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
205b7ca1ae0cb36975802c0e8206e297
146099f557539cef7811ae825fda5c940f678ab6
describe
'37255' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIL' 'sip-files00223.pro'
a40f48edacf0a54445e00fe16203cd8a
9d25c8e609252178e12c564256687659d9de60e2
describe
'34369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIM' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
3254223ec9f29120af8688fa7f1f1a7e
cc83543e19dc8c45a201c5686e2bc0e8a8bd86b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIN' 'sip-files00223.tif'
1f05ba728adfb5135eae249ba6e3ac35
dde00ee27b63f86bf4af15f3c7eb08a367d3a2fb
'2011-12-29T18:35:43-05:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIO' 'sip-files00223.txt'
71674e4c0a74f3e6de7e8915c1ffb760
76f7f5e8c78c25b70802a4b228394de059bd5b3d
describe
'8360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIP' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
398e7a7e693ea2a0f1a4b67c2cbbcefe
65e64f21171739501af460059cd17fb2791000fd
'2011-12-29T18:28:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIQ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
97727c4182cd67e76d5774944f6603ae
8f6c474d15e3b83ba47ad177e3da0c1d6ae2c134
describe
'113750' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIR' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
f8f7323b15db0d4360ed40543e4614ef
6eacd9f6ad1085133e7d13d9239ca268f0100d96
describe
'37308' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIS' 'sip-files00224.pro'
eafe38bac703e9e76ebe0656b5b3b29c
a72456eafae62c88785918a353f819fc052e38dc
'2011-12-29T18:23:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIT' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
258271bf5c8db856d4c8a050c5ae6f55
43e3e6014cf90fc3c9df7b9a6535856eb71e2937
'2011-12-29T18:33:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIU' 'sip-files00224.tif'
a866d0f07bee79a91a5b7c99d2fb0bbf
ffc1ecf7978ba52db59c5da1f7f05ff2d5859e8c
'2011-12-29T18:25:57-05:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIV' 'sip-files00224.txt'
69e3d47393c784dd97e2e4f0de99e8b0
3985afc3c89e2d38b625afb56fe0bb630842d73f
describe
'8433' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIW' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
af12e9c8d5772f0474e52e83b42a39f0
8e1bc4504e5d7680baf9e1d1b6a20c11a86f6780
describe
'506352' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIX' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
cb24ee0ab00408308e7936201df7b420
4c0f58ac54f53f2bd6fec5dbde60ff985e1111f5
describe
'115162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIY' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
cccc88c55c6b6297639cb2e6046ca33f
c6c5534fd8a50ad300b37b5d9730d61f79d125cd
describe
'36228' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSIZ' 'sip-files00225.pro'
22bdf877a9e329a720c95080f66f4043
a6ebe37e4da7a1ba1345dadee64a5cdfca0fd324
describe
'35011' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJA' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
781b4aa2ebee9b474730ef6c8707174f
b08fe0eea308105fb1d50a0a0f6e04339e0f376d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJB' 'sip-files00225.tif'
87302f935cd4b8d944e0086296046b54
2ed673ddf65ae4ae34b4d3b36782c9b4c6b3a284
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJC' 'sip-files00225.txt'
7dc2a5e1d63d4736e83a3cb5be250d81
b4a556d744ced1dfa1d33aad4d445003ece49f0f
'2011-12-29T18:20:23-05:00'
describe
'8800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJD' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
375088df865f75e0dfd6c6b77904ab31
d2891927dd529500163a62e2e8fa84f5529c0df3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJE' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
87c4310a698f5f2e214c122c0b02615b
6f217e96f445efc62ec05842da4709db2ed1177e
describe
'106830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJF' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
fabfea1c8eaa0964b06ed5aad26a2ed4
87b8a70e731bca90005732b9bb1d7085572bf068
describe
'35105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJG' 'sip-files00226.pro'
da7410a8687173dddb143e684f2de58a
f1bf8b8910078f571f95a82a455ad1748dc5a5bf
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJH' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
8dabf228d185b0eb5ce9c9915d2fe13d
49f595eb893c5e20adc23c8daec2bc027be3d0b6
'2011-12-29T18:24:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJI' 'sip-files00226.tif'
c62e6493e1065ed5b57f8c1e709c37e7
e5f8e8e16de16ff850f3a72fba570ec9f6a3aa3e
'2011-12-29T18:20:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJJ' 'sip-files00226.txt'
83df8b3124c61ecd88ea93b7caa6c1bc
d0cd1db1a4e0da4e9ee70b8833791dcdc1d91f04
describe
'8116' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJK' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
ce2f8626eb2ef8625d800ac473c8065b
ee9d971ee9a9ab873c692fb370d1cb9e2a0d87cd
describe
'506103' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJL' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
6b0c2ba79593df5b77dacf1f2b741e96
60982ef961f76e9ffbec035b7c6a5b9eee93a4bf
describe
'97976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJM' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
b61548b167b456be7737aa020999cab9
48021774142ad12ecab9217a140b2e2871834c3f
describe
'31481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJN' 'sip-files00227.pro'
87bac8a044f0f754ecd3ed18057c244b
0312add2bdc71f811b7053986dec89bf8e68dff7
describe
'29140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJO' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
136f1c8cdb8808287d17ed16affac747
671b6a9371ac8628b18c5bbdab2efc5c5ed60529
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJP' 'sip-files00227.tif'
80f865ea8d246a79dea55cc9eaf5245f
ce84bfad2ab56c13c456775be23546ad6ee1f051
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJQ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
95ec1fc3d9e1e992d9847b16b7b8989d
3b201a9271b0be27d06f4dec30dd4b6952b8b6f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJR' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
7123c9028474eef860cbf5c139a3e6a0
c0a3eb5e462a2adf4daeb30dcc20783923d4c52b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJS' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
56cc467ae942d55c3f4c01c21dbaecfe
588ce52d19a31a5bef14c6cf0a06a5970769fd9b
describe
'79332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJT' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
1ba76c1e61878652fe72e9710dd9a668
d99f0f67fe6c0f98d65d9d94dc9b3f6857e83bb1
describe
'24245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJU' 'sip-files00228.pro'
8aa4e986b1c607e84d94d03376ced2fc
e7c2759d2ae3a60a2e30e844c7af644074ef581c
'2011-12-29T18:31:34-05:00'
describe
'24356' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJV' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
1979aeeed745ca143ab53b47fb323319
cdf79b431f790771ed27c87e91db41a48bdb8d9e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJW' 'sip-files00228.tif'
8fe8e20629087c8b2f6a2dfc4696a5ec
a8ff8612796a48aa84a127e9c30b69e6e860e795
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJX' 'sip-files00228.txt'
eb54ea9dfd05037634223d4c183d30cf
31fdfb7c6daf55bc11473fc3631d875e5808c10b
'2011-12-29T18:22:07-05:00'
describe
'5942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJY' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
caa77c45c104df33bcc8cb85b6f95c80
9a3153d0c57cf76350519f78a4a65c8b7b626dd0
'2011-12-29T18:20:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSJZ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
fc4b3df75debb70c5dc0d69113bcd6c4
a113b7e16447cff4f6bcffcb8c2c48ab1b4fbb3a
describe
'105159' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKA' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
d8d8ef948f3271efe25d5722dc1728af
7d5233efc6a024fd2f31e12db6946cdc6c6c0c2c
describe
'34272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKB' 'sip-files00229.pro'
dcfca93bcdbf6347c4d3aabeb1e0e78d
08cc23f26fd5d5581ac8ea7f2182b16c6c859d81
'2011-12-29T18:24:05-05:00'
describe
'33197' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKC' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
6adcd5201c4e6b5b2148add0f1bb5b05
f949af059044375057f0a0e8bda739ef00d922c5
'2011-12-29T18:30:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKD' 'sip-files00229.tif'
84ae2216a1c2aa318065e51643845db7
24a6b7eda3381d2ee0ceee57f9944696d4cb7799
'2011-12-29T18:30:49-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKE' 'sip-files00229.txt'
08dfb1c9bf6d17e01fab7ce0c20f2426
a6c753c41a455558c58c3cb86a066f98538279aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKF' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
24dfeb25960e7fc08ee0f18e6fecc2ce
5df3d67d4a84a14e5685ca34bef0470635be4374
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKG' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
97e9e9284e0db73cc09f1975bebfc6db
8bd09b1e1911390a774ceac83ee71efe9e521bc7
describe
'100673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKH' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
5dd37103398ea17426087b48627f941a
70049a0bfd6000645d31f1d14d009b86e2a5bfe9
describe
'32718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKI' 'sip-files00230.pro'
b03e0435862feb7956b1d3e57074d389
fb0ea60eb6357b7a5ca4e1fe61d8f0c1001cd541
describe
'31259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKJ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
694694583d1b5af61226da723baf88f4
fd6f498e159ab4fc8da38dbea28d40109ece815b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKK' 'sip-files00230.tif'
25a28d4837cbc50db34b5dd1a689471e
cf499932a67ccdcc04f61d2ecddf5aa8263986a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKL' 'sip-files00230.txt'
c6f04e12704d5d661fc76cf26eeaea20
a514200ce93102cb53e40b251c6af53740ea45e7
describe
'8042' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKM' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
81517482a6e812d8efc54531ea4d9742
26bec033d60880a43c5551ff64e8badc664b2829
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKN' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
ded3a4ad0b9d86f1e9bfa553171f1c24
46b26904a3d02aef685d4781fcb5cb31b369a7f1
describe
'112035' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKO' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
517a73d61cff9c03f8be20258df6753c
ecc1c4b02d4b4c2c251c3e17166904a7704aea5e
'2011-12-29T18:20:15-05:00'
describe
'35940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKP' 'sip-files00231.pro'
4d8f6dfa794d5c37435c2f3276e195dd
a998e39fb3cc7c7f06e9efa80b51e5ed46ab2c9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKQ' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
bf4dcd5e9c76547d591489d685e87056
38c71f623f99640477af16418b98f1192dade122
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKR' 'sip-files00231.tif'
82a3786cbe0098aa4a9ee4192e192c7c
589ff6bcaa2eb0a79cee0f2cd93a8a76a1052231
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKS' 'sip-files00231.txt'
4dc9b868f9cea42e6e81ef3ddb9bba62
872c908dac65918b18752e09529706e20a00fa07
'2011-12-29T18:35:21-05:00'
describe
'8690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKT' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
4d83dfc46ba0fe2cd9566e73b0cfaa02
d55a71a78fb2b548c1b1097efc23e09e97fdb7ca
describe
'506275' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKU' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
96117c422a7ee0ed4c5ecc1c8e67d598
1dad0681b55a45582a5974d32b556f2aee7ff7e7
describe
'105830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKV' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
dfbf42bb66f2f6c91a5c6797dfd8c957
7bb843bc58acfb4ada7e952fbb1868f7e83c8cf3
describe
'34649' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKW' 'sip-files00232.pro'
ec295a72c1b6148dceec6fc3497b05aa
54a4fec8d04ecfbbaa26219e1e9ac8bd546ac265
describe
'33161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKX' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
0c204be65bab067ed88de324b8a4d058
0a57a510c3c07fc441fa006a34e77a612a57cfc2
'2011-12-29T18:24:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKY' 'sip-files00232.tif'
e0c1a9f6f3c28a93fce64b079eecc359
78fcd6740729aea7a8ef4e956846fb6b36cfca21
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSKZ' 'sip-files00232.txt'
29c9c075407cfb94ec11398db606c987
87f29937e9f7d7a23be3370842ae61d7f8ce7f6c
describe
'8341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLA' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
973a8ab6f83617c1f31f3ffd05c6c140
f9737b0314163c84668bfe222d705fbfb82f71c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLB' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
6d8bbe21d1f71444e28919d0390d3b0f
b5dcc58878f5a5c94283aeff5314ad40bbec28c4
'2011-12-29T18:21:17-05:00'
describe
'107774' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLC' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
5520ae653cf7a584cb97703f9026327d
761ff086b0c01e77f38e99b7a40ae8eb80e422c7
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLD' 'sip-files00233.pro'
9d3841f8d6eafc2f8f8832402362f5b8
b0fcaea321f38a09c49a501412ad98f6f74c3c0d
describe
'34026' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLE' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
43cd920cf0c0c9e3f3fda74638b9320b
5243861b616355033a4fad4d862609dfdc2fdfb3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLF' 'sip-files00233.tif'
1f239d632f7d80ab857a3d8963abe990
c3ebf8c75c610ebcc85359c71b5369531ded8363
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLG' 'sip-files00233.txt'
4f2d889a563c834fa7c11d492a4f8404
def39f0e1bb67f75e1fe7acbee7977181beb3b06
describe
'8535' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLH' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
6df3aab5558149e81ac8b4627cec46fa
29dba23dc29e58ef11e0976dbd48a6ac3d58fd21
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLI' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
3d453aa1aa14b6895b5956e22d19d522
6e79f4d3ffecbc642755935a1e04e9a3dbe6a354
describe
'103987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLJ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
f43b7b776d48c50f1b5377f50b1c1a27
df7cb3898a30be9ff51cf81309c2959d86811cf1
describe
'33428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLK' 'sip-files00234.pro'
c8b3a09412153cb5ef1fa02c68eb3011
c8a6b50724cc31c6620ac9800a524317f10f385a
describe
'32791' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLL' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
e0b399dc238bc40da32dc7a013d80514
c709d5959492c3276ad97e385e19d95661067429
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLM' 'sip-files00234.tif'
185439168acd2434f536481926d904e5
3430e4bef1a111109968d48c237b2b12cc6dcc91
'2011-12-29T18:29:38-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLN' 'sip-files00234.txt'
3b444a8f6677a39ee668a5b0960762c1
fc361ea5800417c481a73e045d38ca43ea28d827
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLO' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
4e085c59e469e32ffa9fa98e16747c24
5fe79d4b638092de6eac2f0564af65bfed8302e8
describe
'506106' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLP' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
adea7de3b8738183927d94dee284fcff
7988ed2dc68907841336ca682724e4b24a322609
describe
'101883' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLQ' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
f6f15a900ccf3c98f1a953c165d36367
7e8676f2fff379d8155daeeabfe0d7c899b78d7c
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLR' 'sip-files00235.pro'
5dd4511ae7cdba6261d9472bcf621446
787295837ea0d2d31fd7fb73e310f8231765ad69
describe
'31963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLS' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
dcace7f74d431d26220f3808f060e8ce
5b00b43ac9ce391e47d3d907393fd480181aa28e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLT' 'sip-files00235.tif'
ef98d2febb1137f5dfae1f2a6d611c31
b8cdbdd74aa75a051b51d8fdca4b7079dcafa3c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLU' 'sip-files00235.txt'
3c4b0f4c6a5ac8936fc0d7e7a2cd0903
a644070c6ee592b52b7072a439ec5f6a8bcf448b
describe
'8159' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLV' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
c049701608d78f2c13bc7a6debd4a0eb
08666676424d55e1b49e74723ce025996ba5354b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLW' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
8c6a028e0dd45383d9a5fdb4366345c3
2291efe01252ce72ab73d7b215e87bb97bc7b5c8
describe
'103721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLX' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
f6c0555da91c3d7a78cc4685e0f37ade
7ace3c5f06d28ad99c384ed56d37eedab1a0eb16
describe
'33873' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLY' 'sip-files00236.pro'
08575e741599c0a3844c0270624f8521
b4398b4f4866256836fede0e5719437a82a65a52
'2011-12-29T18:27:15-05:00'
describe
'32147' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSLZ' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
81e3611f65c3ce8f99d40de5cb28ddd9
8677f8d7f4c2112abc38b8e67ce98f290b57feb0
'2011-12-29T18:36:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMA' 'sip-files00236.tif'
dcda1d95768701474f4f0e7320f8da0a
6c70e203e656b0d74caac858652043d7aca0bab8
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMB' 'sip-files00236.txt'
821f983f9b870e6018003a99bd5284bc
5791f10b343b383fc7299810d7eae7e0d0cad9f2
describe
'8050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMC' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
e14e7d8399a86d1a69edb10c6ab9ea5c
0ef5af86c57b28a6d613e8da0eff4f699ca643e0
'2011-12-29T18:34:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMD' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
5fd52e2eec29081a696abacceb49ffc1
899763471349990bcdf27b4a3ea2911245c4e314
describe
'92438' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSME' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
c5f66c02162a450614527db1aa4f1a6e
7c4754591d258c6f309213dcfe850246d5bd669c
describe
'29280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMF' 'sip-files00237.pro'
fed8fb3847b0e9514ab3177100e02fef
c5610f7aa11529c7ff52206dc4f45d6e49e404dc
describe
'27897' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMG' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
4f72717090873c54b466484c0c65334f
f55a6ffa9e92ecaaa0ffc705a03eecdabf9a86d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMH' 'sip-files00237.tif'
a7bd6667342252821a502be55b66467a
6de0c67bacfc5ce473951f7e3501218ac044502d
'2011-12-29T18:20:01-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMI' 'sip-files00237.txt'
6135c154991f225848e4da2e663fee75
ff35a693ba464f0b226a73790571c128cfda5535
describe
'7473' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMJ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
aa15bdb08b219eaea315803321c54899
6e5c05a117f6c5ad11cea58acf82ffd5d8f45e44
describe
'506252' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMK' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
d342899b78d3cf3eaccc5a8d363daffd
c5fde2261bb58fd9c168e9fe5c2a4e0eee0ecab9
'2011-12-29T18:27:59-05:00'
describe
'13409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSML' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
a584baad96902b7717e9c7687ab79636
26645173329f4c7a63b3fff0d4585eba849d7365
describe
'2833' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMM' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
805eb9111221b8fa0b9d19e4db47c593
8a8638202c5eca821bb7be3d3aa88419d3227343
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMN' 'sip-files00238.tif'
a65afe6868ac4dc1787c319073caa150
cb99cc6a15d780f9275ab986345e07bcdb0bf373
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMO' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
4756a6cf8a2291c8844051a4dd8ee084
989402c71a206518938c420446842101c29b15a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMP' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
c0b571550844645ef8a862d96118d920
4b5a9e105c905dd8ebcdd7bad56cd8af807aab39
describe
'15950' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMQ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
25b2f0b708839abf85993608ef8108e1
dcd7c20aeed6b520c90570b6cd38a1960f30a7dd
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMR' 'sip-files00239.pro'
0aca351d1e796e1d3a6c9396fe190f4e
5037e01ce6aae520dd5dbf0a36f894a08602d89d
'2011-12-29T18:36:21-05:00'
describe
'4004' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMS' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
aacf5c722764ee3959333068447a8a3c
3d776ea8c3fa5921ce4210b8d0978f0885378f6c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMT' 'sip-files00239.tif'
9ed96495d390f96e3c5ea368d67de9b9
a3465fd1c4e1792646b179c26508168a20e6026d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMU' 'sip-files00239.txt'
67a920509cc34ca04909102cfaf929ab
41298be553d3a9e2a99f9ea4e904b33f9923555a
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMV' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
bdd04e2558b50df338dd2236340ec341
47c535eefc7e375c2eab1fd73b2b14796f1784fe
describe
'506199' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMW' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
671131ede393fe213f94b0c15c81fe87
3234a2eae0fdcf82306e8b4bb1e6f68d10a3534d
describe
'14892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMX' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
3179765484e4908c3d1e46d65c974525
42338fe1c39c33aa0438cb6fadc049ada8b7ae98
describe
'3471' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMY' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
4f0d3625984871a0d3fdeaf5742917f2
02126ca8d9187e4cb369950ba43eaa6e552f0462
'2011-12-29T18:29:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSMZ' 'sip-files00240.tif'
e2eab64323f748797442f969bc4603e0
5aa0314aeddadf6e3142a1b52a29787a6c6c95b6
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNA' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
c6d84bec689c4e742f252307253b5d29
a8e47592b1d2b69127b981e9c5cb8b99278c1b95
'2011-12-29T18:22:35-05:00'
describe
'506303' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNB' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
b32c276802e48420362820fbfe8e8ea8
81473c0bc988caa0de8a27e5aec18a2bfd0823c3
describe
'77694' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNC' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
c421e0df536e14f059a87f503907f918
f12792218138570668479ffb4b2ded34d2ad7b89
'2011-12-29T18:27:50-05:00'
describe
'23508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSND' 'sip-files00241.pro'
dfbaa416b9b9d03491f506e49410b87c
f6fa0285ff6669584f255656764224af357ef20d
describe
'23213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNE' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
75494a72b8116b957da2dd6105155bde
2fef1b7e1b8ac799016d42d33a02163095d5fb0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNF' 'sip-files00241.tif'
024e5e2f48655ce1a331bd73eb10ac5e
68e240920193aef8c0c28877fec30b0ad70e4775
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNG' 'sip-files00241.txt'
8b62effc93a1e877845d0afdef4b4fa6
ab7d7489150c593d8e384373e0473451f9f97073
describe
'6162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNH' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
b2ed2637e216da5104f27da664603c33
2adbff4959cc1a045bd990a4dd0a96e9c3c9bcab
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNI' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
7ecb9cfc1cd94a7f566fbb15a8283cb1
55bea0b4089e95b2484c2d1667d79c99ae21762b
describe
'108405' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNJ' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
ad97a4d21efeac17016d3a45017e0718
7a1d127c479607541ac96df30884180e1aa5ce29
describe
'35849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNK' 'sip-files00242.pro'
c036bd256a4ef06e3572b5a52f2dc4c6
b3a87e4e7beb9867d28aacde5aaf2d1e1d98b051
describe
'32275' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNL' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
a8addb39e5509c3a77cb66f9a360768c
2da5e91de7b23ef1fa75e334d29690ecad262f0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNM' 'sip-files00242.tif'
6783226fafdd1f77337f6f8636d38216
006494bd754ffcc1c61d48a55afc4a3e6a7f7528
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNN' 'sip-files00242.txt'
e82f3ea6b6bef38cc9654706e450244a
aec9463dfa5f6eca2d98a56f3063e6770ed5cb8b
describe
'8362' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNO' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
8cf36f6158ee101c4228e4891a3d8f6d
a804dfb2175b8ca68873335fae77a89dd4f829fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNP' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
92d7a2aab39a30bb674288318152ce47
c917319cacf2d000e4ec4c3545dba458baffbc3b
describe
'148327' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNQ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
1bc03e29949989b2050f671d93b95fae
d892a0338269b7181c1ade5c0541856e3acdd83e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNR' 'sip-files00243.pro'
8d04e9d83b49944a78b759ffddb9fd65
a158718c46602bd0cdc8e593d1069ee879c7e6b9
describe
'40427' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNS' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
e6f28633cff95253d3dd8923bbb2c493
206bb23bf4a6862198489fbf85a365129c375036
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNT' 'sip-files00243.tif'
7b58660c9eda48a2cbe580c5ea07b0db
98cc0b58588f4e78c852c872ea0861ea6c44dba9
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNU' 'sip-files00243.txt'
fba4b2f7edf0150d684c83704ded89d5
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describe
'10408' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNV' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
b6ab310bd37b2fb11c33bf9477608271
f1b3f8bfdb7ab55a0e63bafbda4c6453f607bf50
describe
'506268' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNW' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
956f17a6b5a997a59f5ac466c4868b1b
f92950449d189459ede8bd198d5650056b1406e2
describe
'103683' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNX' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
6c3b773452beabe0da32582ee3e514c1
1950f9d403bcd8fd02f1cd9fa920268333d7b8ed
describe
'33506' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNY' 'sip-files00245.pro'
46e5c4cce72cc0007cf0938089da2c53
f9486288cb35c2d70e7703be6a66270f09ba30ea
describe
'32074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSNZ' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
1b93837f8629552f9f371a6e0c2d5b9f
cdcdc8c9fc64b71300ba12ba27e982531a3b0a4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOA' 'sip-files00245.tif'
75e1075b20c1469b751ffa0d4924a690
a81fd380aa24423c6eb1e01bc3c82e952d7f3de7
'2011-12-29T18:37:06-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOB' 'sip-files00245.txt'
9c0e4d8c0ae5a9b31bdabf763d950629
32265df80eafc7b4c659f0fa10d60ffcb9f8e003
describe
'8163' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOC' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
5efff1b1d4a0a4c0e2150ff87bd88050
52f17dbb68f8bad2b544b254f0b2730473314396
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOD' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
9836921cb85aa5e91e0de8e573dcef17
30c931ca69cb2ad415c462d31c9b52c8ddd4e20e
describe
'102734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOE' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
b61be58d519e3774fa7dc492f4865279
9e4859d29b52a3967ff591f9bf7c68a7e7c3a324
'2011-12-29T18:23:09-05:00'
describe
'33549' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOF' 'sip-files00246.pro'
2dce5f57abb81dfffbd6205eb791270c
3efa8307e01f90a4a3d9367b57d7dfce1917825b
describe
'31126' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOG' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
923036538ac97f0e626a9e944ef6163f
122df2e1bc96db51362b9c5ed48a645a7f8ec0aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOH' 'sip-files00246.tif'
e9c5868d6d5c8fa91b661c41fee80399
86b51536c00d1827f89226b9154801b931b75de1
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOI' 'sip-files00246.txt'
3844db8efb675d8fb860329863f08b83
45d54ea4b926f2dc7061a71650f3b3f929122db1
describe
'7845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOJ' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
8a926d56071571bd71f5f2e55822fb0f
d99ab3fa1994c1317d5ef21714349c38e7abb09d
describe
'506094' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOK' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
4bbf3a3a968a5358903b1f228f00d522
8a8f95923776cce18bca6cbada1c0d53b6f415b7
'2011-12-29T18:25:52-05:00'
describe
'104489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOL' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
f6444e7437cf3a8787ef50edcb1ddbd6
3db3b91ae0acb926566cfcbfaf609e3f88eae85b
describe
'34118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOM' 'sip-files00247.pro'
99edda1d66ef583526b9227dd6ea3166
fc0d11ccc469976a365782c64557a54619125967
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSON' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
1751234333f7df5926eed64dffe035a3
f02de60058962964e8e28c01b5bd9f38ff188455
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOO' 'sip-files00247.tif'
1263bf00afa215170d5850acc052ec0e
6d6d804c1fc1dd29c6924cb1c4712e35db9f9bed
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOP' 'sip-files00247.txt'
1d368c03745ddc778f0057a60baab312
a3a5336af65a34a8cdffd6b96ab21495d4368337
'2011-12-29T18:20:35-05:00'
describe
'8080' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOQ' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
74f675e63c36af7c939c7a9948c0e547
a1171468cb6a7bfb31eca3ec658086a52e695294
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOR' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
4322ea9d42e7502af0a2b8747ba11919
07e6490257a997522ac825f2d33d270d6b7f46b2
describe
'103127' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOS' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
74593258b1a270211bf31bc0ab2936a6
def007c3e244388baba9081c6532b533fe881006
describe
'33399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOT' 'sip-files00248.pro'
11fd756c3251ec18737340cb0614a040
9002be6946bb328ce238fb6c321a8e3bed86f68b
describe
'32077' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOU' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
b0613c0661092c34197bbb05aa43018c
83ebcacd5c6c80b84d3f33a93754afa72b7f985a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOV' 'sip-files00248.tif'
61ea0149856c385130326b95351bfc79
eb0e5811b4a6165ec80e3f8509adcfbcd736a4cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOW' 'sip-files00248.txt'
44a87652293ee8850a6f74e3bfd9bfec
fa458dff0526b5baeb5063a680ab575ab6096c2c
describe
'8343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOX' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
cf975a4fb67dfa56822149f0935ea2f1
cacc55df7ecb90481984e14a03ab5db4c5480275
describe
'506269' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOY' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
4c6171bf9196a990d20f60888ba1d9fc
c5394f365db0e20ae0ecd8a945426f0e8318e1ea
'2011-12-29T18:35:51-05:00'
describe
'101141' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSOZ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
9eb951030e224510b4d86c40b1147724
e5c897292a13a38aeccbdf3b6d79c9b1f801794e
describe
'32242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPA' 'sip-files00249.pro'
7026dd8cad733a7016205cc8708a6632
8d91de20a6801396864d88bb5afaaa9b5514aa40
'2011-12-29T18:30:30-05:00'
describe
'31285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPB' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
2bf4a897de7f6343aff03e11438d2478
8449cc812a56c18984724c10a7ecab05af930daf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPC' 'sip-files00249.tif'
4900ee9e8ec56a826f626a59bdd7c7d7
4927c0d5d6767cf348cb9b8d2034093391edc869
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPD' 'sip-files00249.txt'
0aeedb84a166ebec744f7db892f2dfb7
62b1c650f2b5a30e1a1679cd6d8ed99c8e68e1b4
describe
'8368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPE' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
26abda05bbe8c14637343b921b127547
ff1e9fb8a784a5afe151117ade56586274b50945
describe
'506207' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPF' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
340bd30fa60fe86307b95e1e1241d61e
b83d8ea3f9a00e1af80911e9a4afa71bd6187b0f
describe
'100049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPG' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
d2481e450a62aea4a7c6934b30651914
98a8431646bfe00e4c1f130df0ee4d117a1238af
'2011-12-29T18:27:54-05:00'
describe
'31135' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPH' 'sip-files00250.pro'
d4b2cccfd24337aaeed10587f019a3f3
643353fa1749163a96d0db3607aa8d3e8776010c
describe
'31658' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPI' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
e1009f96f567482285c3520489155499
ce7b5edaf70c4fba886bd303341856367ecde286
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPJ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
0a2699975220b7a60dc3606b68ee7b80
f2eb1590aa430f25ecac67c3e8397045082512f3
'2011-12-29T18:31:07-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPK' 'sip-files00250.txt'
5afbcd6ec16bee084adf74a8bf48be6e
0479c37ad0b4aa51b969f76b05f211806386f63f
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPL' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
4458f4d676cf8badae33bdfbd4aef6c1
28f15e73a4a651ce9fe872447f6926c353c81746
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPM' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
e43b3e8d95616cb7381dfe74de16d14b
d678b9e17324f0ef9ba5a931a4f31e03b25b101e
describe
'96213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPN' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
6e676b824d770b8219bc37684444c23d
67dc1af10af351eabc97d1bc8f4c1f25b2d2c355
describe
'31180' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPO' 'sip-files00251.pro'
eec0125a51225156e60b66183d7d18ef
d12ae96d25d034e62911e32dc7eb8dc9c826480c
describe
'29809' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPP' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
0609b81f485dd773ecb1574322c588df
4761993e361cb6d7b1fe76f0e5c3d0cac6f0f1ce
'2011-12-29T18:19:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPQ' 'sip-files00251.tif'
6ce1267571b3005d0c4f9d09731eea99
bd5965d26369d221f055206169b7bc6eca3a6d2e
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPR' 'sip-files00251.txt'
194a305c6e2ea2e2f78c4269ce4764c2
d0c49dad7c245793aac4adafd610233de2b50cac
describe
'8010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPS' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
8627a1579e6d5d637b42a64a2fd0dc38
26ac6a56a46a4df2b8fcadf2791bdb1a18155570
'2011-12-29T18:35:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPT' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
d97b64d1deac09c3277fb61aaea4c7ac
830b61ee6feb6b86106301469d771e97661a04f4
describe
'106231' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPU' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
3fb814d865e0f5fe702c832830e3471b
95b219e6d3836c04d2c155fb971980b21ed3be43
describe
'34672' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPV' 'sip-files00252.pro'
30eeea87fdf12b032f01bbf129040788
d8891362350663b2977b5ac36b5606782fa5260d
describe
'33838' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPW' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
5d0cee46ce4840a8dd2d811e08fd5659
8dd38ac3963836fbe72b80216040996838780dd0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPX' 'sip-files00252.tif'
fb84555407234a5a5bb6d2fce71d53f7
1bdba704b789b965c139bc6cf5312e55483e5769
'2011-12-29T18:35:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPY' 'sip-files00252.txt'
9b1c675b9854f24ae87f6f7d1ad89407
e41a27232b1257d689af6efda3eb4ff86f97ca67
describe
'8685' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSPZ' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
72bca0c7f183fdca6a2af7dbe6458181
e7b4b0aeadee33ee3b23cd6e518c719a194a32c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQA' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
ed85a0c15d9d4a5e581d9844e263205b
1d7fe90b03bcc35e8020bf0fe1727586a93a77ca
describe
'105504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQB' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
028df830dfaee9aed8b6fef4e678144b
304b944fb30f82f6c1c6401dd0b03d7156535544
describe
'34191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQC' 'sip-files00253.pro'
a7386a4f1572395785721e75362204d3
ee08f4423f0a5ce1097c22e780bb9f7853028b45
describe
'33100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQD' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
89c92976a76877caac18b892a648f20b
e138c29519018674bc0340c399c55e7a831c1eb0
'2011-12-29T18:26:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQE' 'sip-files00253.tif'
750576901e2875d4884f034bc6cbace3
7e12ff56eecbd89d43006ea0f4a91cca23c3fe01
'2011-12-29T18:19:02-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQF' 'sip-files00253.txt'
7e194ffb7518092b2144b0a9cbf0d557
a1dfaeff3caf3dc0a60d2104490a24442e1e7aa0
'2011-12-29T18:23:31-05:00'
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQG' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
e8b7428a909dc9851f44cf2a7d57ea78
5a62cfea10ef4a987c4856872ba9f48a117a4c08
describe
'496686' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQH' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
7b7b55670a8755a246bbbf608d62945f
f27d6c0f161a0211b5050dcb67e88277b24383e7
describe
'105968' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQI' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
cecc86ec919c8edfacafa29264fbc830
36f2809a1bb0616ee6797bf008ba076e4756392d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQJ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
e68057bb3b0ed837bf0e07aebbbcf855
dced6d796e22f9cd981943f895f57a0cd739587c
describe
'32335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQK' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
d7b1b4a3093aa25c424b80a4ae63b229
d6856fa82d209acf03fa1eaeb9b17808a2ccbb54
describe
'3990896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQL' 'sip-files00254.tif'
699085fe62db4d22a3d5e8f60fc8bfed
3d2b96e74306780658b1ae63c426981288d9928f
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQM' 'sip-files00254.txt'
0c5ad0fd42a2c82d75566d4464503311
9b7c16d6f62b91f1fe66e469c0556d3f96260e71
describe
'8536' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQN' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
cac4b817cc008b7920a91992c0eee01c
5fc44d28e57d3822e17bdc5e0be1e0dbb1a5013f
describe
'500582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQO' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
2ec57185b152afa9d717e4c94d106c2c
ed0d2451799b5fd355a59310cf91b36f4f341dda
describe
'108507' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQP' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
a14ca3680570f3b716845ebce8850608
324248f9f26890072710e32296e0518b96140983
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQQ' 'sip-files00255.pro'
95c05ee1da2bdcca7bba121384f93394
ec745d3c693a14c842eb4263f87d082c20a9a6fb
describe
'32840' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQR' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
dfa70edb1d899a5eef6468533d2cc4bb
025520dc7eb492d221890d7a7f96a214fd72bad2
describe
'4021676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQS' 'sip-files00255.tif'
7e61dcfbd32891fc322588065832bdb7
a1ac3196c94e7fe2b5de46ffc4c7b67915ac98d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQT' 'sip-files00255.txt'
41cc9fb41697d80bb90e582ce4d72392
e23e4fc46905083d907bb6c461a14e4173d1527e
describe
'8687' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQU' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
67d352aeb367ba61f4f3892873aefc24
d69d0b5ed02f8d2c4366e31cccfa436a289cd302
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQV' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
eb6bddbde75831ea7f64012150129b14
a69803bbcd7e7b02b4ed2751c22c5d69662cfed3
describe
'76045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQW' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
5bbd4ecdb5b067a615c6d879c093081f
6978af0c1d63abb852ca0b1b3d485dad544288a0
describe
'24028' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQX' 'sip-files00256.pro'
83d04270fad536feaf3ef24712b504e4
eb479efdd70250942b8cc9f5190e2fc2ba37b21c
describe
'23521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQY' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
637c01cd60559120479d3faa91415993
fea2f0bcb11b5c1746b568f488de4e2abfd237e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSQZ' 'sip-files00256.tif'
8c47f963101b51895bfa3b5782d3cb17
8985e1ac81aa6616b898820f0a78fa9a8fd20a74
'2011-12-29T18:21:54-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRA' 'sip-files00256.txt'
9e54f9eeaa6f0fa037d3d8b31e053560
549cc4a62d60a05d2e4ea02c288415374d95900e
describe
'6158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRB' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
d10ce309133b87b56713aed681aaf127
cecebe82d373d6c39634bef4c5c2f2caa33491a9
describe
'506355' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRC' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
de56ca4913d5c1b76732ca40b13d4851
95633509bc7fc442a8c22cd48421a3d3e556fee0
describe
'103836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRD' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
210fba9aca0b0b7532c6ef43c5621fd1
10ef19cd10d2ef877ad189a47a45d53da9e5e134
describe
'33592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRE' 'sip-files00257.pro'
23f7c9d17d8c775405d97121376d9c0d
c43e466df420b407d37597d69c71dfad33adb240
describe
'32808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRF' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
b139e5eef4c15022fb96b199881b8344
af95e0414cde215e506ce0a54d8e4ae50567c68c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRG' 'sip-files00257.tif'
9e0a4e77ff0c32c9228e93f9f50c9ae5
716f719d83d45f1f56eb9aa5538f34feb7fa9f13
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRH' 'sip-files00257.txt'
af06c519c6ed3e38c9d0e419f9c5ae8d
ffcff3b24bd44fe2c3617c21899f37cdf1aa4da6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRI' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
aa9a7305dab8c08f87db1054eec7c537
c565572ad1d25cd9f1c6388f6543d842494eeddd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRJ' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
145a1c84f15eb6a636a24ffc2adb3ca3
46bac5cdd6bba62cb29918fffd2553e59e1c853d
describe
'100260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRK' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
8963479d4f6c1269c4d2efd7b6e34521
98fcb08360ee99999d370ba8de8f90f9fd3aa139
describe
'32715' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRL' 'sip-files00258.pro'
281f222a39f8bb1b674b8ef950f1c594
47dac1fb7982d52310d450192f4823755469f198
describe
'31465' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRM' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
f586b3544ce54736c1455035000dbe5e
81da96c4d0f15ad31937de1c96375e37cd0d25c2
'2011-12-29T18:28:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRN' 'sip-files00258.tif'
ff71fb9043fcc72cc01776f8cb6bc4ce
12f5667d1a9b4f9af60b5e8ecb54d3329341b08a
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRO' 'sip-files00258.txt'
74cc1e91d5e51262da149b80a12d15b8
3eb71444b158f3ddf3913291fd50de160a575482
describe
'7982' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRP' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
fbed2d0dceacce6fe29b4db8bca4efd7
7b2c799aaa77e611f571bdacb0df720bbe487f07
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRQ' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
c9d33957cdb8619e68a7b4f7fa5255ef
fc503cd61926b708f86a51defb4fcc0245af4a9d
'2011-12-29T18:36:36-05:00'
describe
'96720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRR' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
7448bd86ef992fef2d248264badcae1d
bdc8ceff1efb2dd22d9e16c1883b2bff958b8850
describe
'31209' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRS' 'sip-files00259.pro'
526d08c92130360e67d201c8b4f32bef
82796a2d01e0d73c7f84da8e9a12fd50fcd9c316
describe
'30575' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRT' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
938f6cce29c1008f52307ba2781c7aed
c004d337ee78d438120400debd3f89568f5a85f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRU' 'sip-files00259.tif'
436842d36c89fc1af6d19afee19d643b
c8672126808b9716a17593db53d58781a95f1c6c
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRV' 'sip-files00259.txt'
e5a259cd2cf64d824836d639c2544d17
282f2d184066b1982bd0583b063375b0c202ee09
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRW' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
495a98e28944331ca98d083b7e4d79ac
6b4518f87365effbd2a5281c4d90084f46f7b011
describe
'497044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRX' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
1306991ddfb6aaf5d021fd17d3494db3
cbf6f9ee334a4862ad38a7404352f1adb554e0b3
describe
'107254' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRY' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
943442b4e649ba6a0042d88e39001ab7
0591df5efa3811cb0989a59fee4be5cf89fc6642
describe
'35162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSRZ' 'sip-files00260.pro'
1dcbe6839edd7a58b892ce199caaa7ed
d6758b5721cc790e98fc6c7123ddaf6db564746a
'2011-12-29T18:22:57-05:00'
describe
'33444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSA' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
5f50c3a9970f24996abb10ef080b3edc
6563c48c4653318ce6299b78f05259b2d4c8666e
describe
'3993460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSB' 'sip-files00260.tif'
8ba9d8b7957eca0ef12a0ecfe53aff04
c5c3c709d46ba834af18435e7bde01b7d12bcf32
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSC' 'sip-files00260.txt'
ce88be50d288477f49cf0872a7d519b1
084fa6b93431cc36999ceeab312966c62313c0bd
describe
'8022' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSD' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
113a5ad820f59c6f6b33dc60ccfb8337
9049fee427356cafe5f17861bc02510ab3fd1aa4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSE' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
09e4e6c37066a060fe607f0d9f9d2e27
225f3722c6865a281d09b04561ba91a9d6902ccf
describe
'105552' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSF' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
5f8e2c521c4f15002d477afcddd26842
9fa5cc70dc2a57b9eae5817b39cebd5a4dd8eae5
describe
'34243' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSG' 'sip-files00261.pro'
3c03046928399f55853133d8dbf3aaca
773c24defc830b12e2cf82cad8090f6e6dab6cd9
describe
'33526' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSH' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
6ea911564c7a204e8444bcc644ce985f
4476116de077f544591d1d8a9da1d19fe008a604
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSI' 'sip-files00261.tif'
bc6306a56fd3da51c972f003c02795d4
d1dcee7449d16333ade032ef568e1001749179a2
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSJ' 'sip-files00261.txt'
58029ad4bd5be692507de2d300234987
40834e85bfc774b60141f84e66f2d8b281f4a36a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSK' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
d8cbca7b2e1bca30c44dd136ff398e7a
96b07b77b6ae2324318c461a1de3e22fba579342
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSL' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
f39b85e3eebed23c59cafd9326b547d3
900304a7434764729ec47d4c4cce20f8420e59dc
describe
'109394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSM' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
ac55481a97afe09ff6868b93e50a0a67
eff384d42100abea9dabfd8790723c9c2171ca99
describe
'35453' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSN' 'sip-files00262.pro'
eec758bd45c98447c5a361bad2f9f2aa
49179332ae377db3203d34e8c9efee3b2cb9721f
describe
'34350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSO' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
d616b0bc3cbb4de73bff1d3597fbcc7b
9d5bad2977b78ccce63728933d7efdc121c7b55c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSP' 'sip-files00262.tif'
960d3e45638a2acee3ac05ee116c6cbf
8da6ddf41e9eb588d81154f869d6ef9bd32b5e5c
'2011-12-29T18:34:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSQ' 'sip-files00262.txt'
0565354ba1511517927329d2dfd087d0
4e5dad40913c347e50b2018a2fe91af627f59413
describe
'8549' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSR' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
2fbe36beebc681cca6d9db1a353f994e
be154d80ff0fb0fbd0fd5735cfb73a08bdcce184
describe
'506315' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSS' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
6c8033b7e428970c955dfa8c6fface8f
d068af04125a72c110e09b17578a550150fbce1c
'2011-12-29T18:30:15-05:00'
describe
'103887' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSST' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
7fb23340218567cdd47d23ebd1bca8ab
40a02d56d6a137776716297bb1211ca8441cf70e
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSU' 'sip-files00263.pro'
c0cd9bf5d9be9e3e6e8aa2081970dd78
314a18ab38632fd2dbb790973aa88500cc564203
describe
'32835' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSV' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
3b2db3e844e951e27971e1b361a9c077
b36628965f5f913d28a51802a979cd88f4cd3742
'2011-12-29T18:27:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSW' 'sip-files00263.tif'
5bb996e7594292587da4d8a94a2726b5
74f7f171df1409729b02f8819c1e371fcd2b67f8
'2011-12-29T18:19:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSX' 'sip-files00263.txt'
025dafd475608c9a99bebfe67998f27f
91d9d6e1dbcf86cafbdde61956e24cf47f8a4290
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSY' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
7544014eaa8c54d27bdb713a68b9aced
3d00a4bac0ac908e7ddae33a34c1dd5755f0fb66
'2011-12-29T18:35:20-05:00'
describe
'506340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSSZ' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
0d3d6aa6c8e3eb8b4b9f5ec5f358185b
df2233fb7c907ef306f4ce63acbb010b838a1090
describe
'102605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTA' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
25fcbc3613c40616401cc6d0a0981008
275086d337e00061c81c6cd62ba0b562638e2b26
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTB' 'sip-files00264.pro'
c430502ef0ec9cb5ca8cd9c544f62fc0
914a6cc3db3a79ac8757e59d9bd12344ede3b0e5
describe
'32298' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTC' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
59b2638f595dce93c86b320a2e38f8cb
8218c3ddef183c32be5d24130f6800d415cae4bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTD' 'sip-files00264.tif'
0dcbdcb2ebb8ffd9380991a9d3cf18a1
e27af39f5e3257238d53bc43f5e7ba28e1880806
'2011-12-29T18:19:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTE' 'sip-files00264.txt'
ffea9ca10adc3eefb9f432ba0196d7d8
1ec5be4c966d713cc7e427e0e1caafb33169ef49
describe
'8522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTF' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
6d0a97a92b1741b3ed548205479646a7
6684e9cf3b57e15e5480077e83e6391c7b43003b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTG' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
83754ae2a69d38dd508b2563e90b8d94
88fc535a6f4e11adb24bfc852545a75ba32af4e8
'2011-12-29T18:22:19-05:00'
describe
'104009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTH' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
2830b0a3b9faad12739eed9c9ec8991d
15c1f7a8d474035c54878e3c30afa4be6b27e9a7
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTI' 'sip-files00265.pro'
69774cc108b9d608e3ade237467ba148
a0a83069eb936e9e65caf1dd61c7e42cff28a897
describe
'32539' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTJ' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
38bacdd38b1722cf0bf1d7c1452e8b49
ba3a46bc9c62f4240e42d5a3eb49e2969b3caa8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTK' 'sip-files00265.tif'
1616f717ef965e822ff39926aafd34d8
2def7957b811dc0c818b699f5e3bd7bf3b6b06b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTL' 'sip-files00265.txt'
33e7acb0f1bd1018d7913049848beb6a
aa836b0264662dac9e6cdbb0150e1841802a1c8a
describe
'8135' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTM' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
ab48912eaa3e361628dff8a11bc04cd5
8e01ac36975ff6831dcf58f39a7b869eed5837ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTN' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
2bf51a375aa45a629c73d84b883ca4a5
cccc13f9083b75e10c32a5ce9dd1e415854efd34
describe
'103219' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTO' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
0f7f47f4737585396d7c0e6160efbba2
d4bcbe5027b799d195746ae33a9396cb422528e7
describe
'34159' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTP' 'sip-files00266.pro'
1f7402d8761efafe53745986201b7b9f
8b67e15ecfd6e9d52f60bba0bd36b636c4bdbeeb
describe
'32451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTQ' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
8701336336cf3b82f73f4746618e4bf5
17835bcd76c6df15c14ef3c7402b4230c5c385b1
'2011-12-29T18:21:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTR' 'sip-files00266.tif'
6fb0b180d37c3fb9000304a89c1dda03
965133396658bb0915456b590bc6b092f0e6951e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTS' 'sip-files00266.txt'
9673684c58f3d48b799c72056f4c39f1
0dcd9b51053dc54a31b36f765a035ebb333505ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTT' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
658adca28b13f22d33315a4cd39248b2
a3d7ccce8d96adf2bb710c427c8d5870b48b4242
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTU' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
893a3314e447f5f1f31c7b3adce37cf8
97f71d3a5caaee48df5de0b2945ede0dd23da7e0
'2011-12-29T18:22:22-05:00'
describe
'103974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTV' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
adf49795563da887882691cb5ab971ba
3d38e28ee8b42e522d7a0076534268c923f78f77
describe
'34178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTW' 'sip-files00267.pro'
d8eb4aacdc1835fd33422351a9d69773
0e50d55c27b13d94afc0e139ae7b1d59efe8362c
describe
'33106' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTX' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
709c1d4bc3b07469e19a857ca120eba1
0b7cd467ee5dc82acb4e85d1df61c8c03d133059
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTY' 'sip-files00267.tif'
49f79457ce805bca6f12e2662eb3da6a
548cb21152913dacd5c81386724520d53d56f8b0
'2011-12-29T18:29:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSTZ' 'sip-files00267.txt'
82c37dd52e71757f61b4eb7685020f98
54a2e714e98b09a28b35da7b85bc736f727529f4
describe
'8333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUA' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
12af444f9bb2d54e46144c76c1a4cf12
eaabef2d83a4a8a07fb5dad1f11841e9cb88d172
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUB' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
cbfb558c09b9b4e993ff447f15705960
c97efe962eb493c88ade7573b2f2df94413ea166
describe
'104687' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUC' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
666e287b8d399d2e55af53733604b379
9aa4fe1161633be7f53dd52eb9c30a139d208952
describe
'34803' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUD' 'sip-files00268.pro'
23ddb93e273d8e757ae71cc0832ead12
94d7d7a6e383f9bdb79cc166336860e45ab2bd48
'2011-12-29T18:26:49-05:00'
describe
'33557' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUE' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
2b50fb48d0625c6e7352c3fdaaa511a3
c22b8fa9e0614e16d07b3edfce4ed68ae5200760
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUF' 'sip-files00268.tif'
7948182a7d31a6c51aef293354ee760d
11702d96eb352dbe8f35938225e3b285b6161d1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUG' 'sip-files00268.txt'
e9d9ba7d1718da2f5b01b622dcdc5b94
99231d3b60eb9c1afcf2a15b94215248ccf71d78
describe
'8380' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUH' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
a4a6f0f5dc439fde5b89aa3fdc6d7417
87d3676f4b4a60ea60e6ce4ff156d3e59e4fb800
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUI' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
71310c707ef82da0359e3af51bfbdac0
893c6cb4dabca4be78caa2dc21984616d52d2383
'2011-12-29T18:29:23-05:00'
describe
'100852' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUJ' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
e3a9f437eec69be3a651422e88a92e7e
1879245c69ec967ded541cc34d328ec3a5335a8e
describe
'32036' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUK' 'sip-files00269.pro'
b777c94cf5b58dc3340aa1cf762dd0a9
e46f272b473216b28313744688c8d759b4363ff9
describe
'32303' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUL' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
bb27d14793f9a9639d9b21bae2b64ebd
3922692a6527fcff0bde3c9ba2599b123b23985f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUM' 'sip-files00269.tif'
1f60fbf2ee8d63d8b5a1317693b20b4d
4381a8de1e6fff30bafb65f03e9edba471e4a7a0
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUN' 'sip-files00269.txt'
29a07f552771ca71c12078c57934ff8e
1261aba8fb6ddedc6d773fede082b2654966b14b
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUO' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
3b545e601bfcba50e55598da18442162
3b2b5db836f49db2b23779a98daa06fc37f84843
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUP' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
56deff268bcf2cad7d7fe252c18ad7e0
685d82e93b33c48abfe970558897bee5898cff04
describe
'103235' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUQ' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
56b5cf91e062c5319906f9ef1d045c3b
05ee83c54bddd696834f8c08719d10de9f951388
describe
'33425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUR' 'sip-files00270.pro'
ad6362791278f7507d82dbd0ce57e3eb
a16df2f30065c480cffda2a1feb8b0e08218da23
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUS' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
c161ee49bdc59273a2d8c16af6533303
64f86b3663a88efffcaa81421ae48f7fa8770299
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUT' 'sip-files00270.tif'
df5e2d7a1f8b62ac40c6f8a678f7d4db
ea17a14bb4f08bcb929ae593b0d58bc8be85a3e9
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUU' 'sip-files00270.txt'
95bd63bfd9b1133808a783817eb2479f
470135eb6fccf4abbce0838250a7d2a25c5406d7
'2011-12-29T18:36:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUV' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
9f9f1800865f8f370eaeea7a7f6411fb
aaa0358a60ec12608a0949aba2c00e1a4b5135ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUW' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
fbd49e88c0e7707c6a9e2635b60e4dbf
a805dab9485bb555c23281d91019514edc6aedbe
describe
'107280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUX' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
a2287552eae0d8ecbe99de2d0c2ee95c
965322d97c569f7f28b88687230b1de47e225791
'2011-12-29T18:30:28-05:00'
describe
'34571' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUY' 'sip-files00271.pro'
f47e0a6a2f4b84434cf15fb04d05bccb
cffc785961ac1d82bacbea3a8cff542752db0045
describe
'32478' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSUZ' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
b3a977af6bbee0497df48c523f56120f
ac17ec06fd391ed67700b7caab7ac3f1a69a3c52
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVA' 'sip-files00271.tif'
0331aae13ff5479ac41a58e27fcb7e22
e0cf0a4284ce49e4df20848fa01e2b0e7c8580fb
'2011-12-29T18:36:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVB' 'sip-files00271.txt'
81cd5a0c43809d5495cda84d56d54177
030ac6dc841c90aee7696afef7df85934a8cbf82
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVC' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
f4829da21263f9639c2fe0a0805f0dd1
26ec4d8e2d4d111c49adb472412450a4ce5b4156
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVD' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
16f9c73e0f0d672bb34e13202d735a6c
60da6e974283878d4ea37e2e436188efb658f556
describe
'110567' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVE' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
1475ffb12bfaed9f3f89c368e70dd808
dca77d4c621d2cf98cb2b7d8d4e4c9968cebc00e
describe
'36324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVF' 'sip-files00272.pro'
64e06236eb12fbe217a304dbbbea2a0b
42fef1c1e63729a1d73f852f763ec511e15b01df
describe
'34495' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVG' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
bd5db08f90e2251d339270123ab99551
8d6c4150bc0baced297409d33fc270a347366101
'2011-12-29T18:21:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVH' 'sip-files00272.tif'
902067ab2669708b905866cad282c24c
c148d3f5691c1073c245c308de2aad8c0a80a873
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVI' 'sip-files00272.txt'
7f4ff25bc46e081aeeb211c356984790
0068f1d9ba0c48f0c5c2dd3e66b61892a6842f4e
describe
'8425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVJ' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
b0b4d8acc823b57289e2fa307670b882
7216d6eced12c7b7f8d1ab05f2c5cc244b3bf33a
describe
'506320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVK' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
a7e01a95d898a616a17a57f01a7ae9c2
ee9878e4cc7f9ef9118152b56a461351104fd9c9
describe
'108488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVL' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
4724443e9640b287f4f55dc0db9232a0
e2121830a3e6a84b639b1ad89edf72182404579c
describe
'35782' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVM' 'sip-files00273.pro'
db77d7781994329f7ac4f1f048643c08
41ccd3147c8852690a49649b36665da5bb213c63
'2011-12-29T18:23:24-05:00'
describe
'33582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVN' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
50f96d1c2204c8946cf572610dc3ae98
02c8480c5503ae1a5d7983413419ff072bf46fdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVO' 'sip-files00273.tif'
aebee7e7bd479c2772774c93d275dfff
c327e50ec937cec0720de901d6d27e88155ccdaa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVP' 'sip-files00273.txt'
64962276f8399e5f249f91aae87caa28
68c9967de3418d9fadf5950678104ec77d9702fd
describe
'8232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVQ' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
8b0e5aa1d357e963536a35e51c6a2de9
ef43561e1222b6b64594de1d3786a2b995b77755
describe
'498667' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVR' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
0cbd48a0e595649be1b5790db0be61ad
f8f11813be5603d9308833025b1e4f1b550a50b3
describe
'110194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVS' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
8e2db720bf447ec2712cb71e4802d29c
c05de674f53bfce51d4bf452bef9c64ec68a5f23
describe
'37138' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVT' 'sip-files00274.pro'
dccbaffeed71662e82052ab56e422b7c
75b9169eb7adc633c438a10032c13b3a7264c4a1
describe
'33675' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVU' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
f8b78f7d92bf2cd8e7cd804207ebe6a2
b3386d036fa3dbcca0cba727837ec8d67a053bda
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVV' 'sip-files00274.tif'
dc8190e66bd0d4862e4bd914aa5caf12
a8e24029df1169521b955302fe4e3c307013ed1e
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVW' 'sip-files00274.txt'
cc9ffbacbcdb87629938166abb9e569b
98b0f7ff05b31d88c1efc390aed347955e736d6d
describe
'8496' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVX' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
7acfe689fc90ce7c7458a79d5cb0b2db
88229f0e272f96897a16dccf8496d25433310565
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVY' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
4ace35f99e0c2bede932b48d44ffafe9
0449a1bc011b04a8ac6c93edf8311a98f712070d
describe
'106849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSVZ' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
da04beb16f9dc43e83ea270046671d0f
892b169172b7362a128242018f5e70cf25e38385
describe
'34973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWA' 'sip-files00275.pro'
6c01e6108ff68b08aadff54e41d94b00
36ddcbdc7385f0c3c76c920b3b51a7c72645707d
describe
'32965' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWB' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
bdb45ff89672219cf07513ee98b931c0
9c4ff63e870f011a07e2e63e6b7ec2e6b0374e2f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWC' 'sip-files00275.tif'
4005b8c134451afbc63d10e20d99bafe
d783f51b3f884acc14998bdea828b91257bebc70
'2011-12-29T18:25:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWD' 'sip-files00275.txt'
f1a4101548333f8d7561ded42f87f487
13a95cf82dacddc291c23b37b35ad0101852fe52
describe
'8487' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWE' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
58e8b18b4dd6599f07d3f9101ff50e17
cf6e95b51a2620f47f461b12f90c5beff23109fa
describe
'498676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWF' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
2052d955b24786fc89179c94f8563f32
16d278563eef98f4ba8006567c866ef103f64b72
'2011-12-29T18:30:57-05:00'
describe
'106742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWG' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
ced0b2fc9439929263f8dfd5dd0138ce
ba61d3c2ca0701611df53b26aa08fcb02d5be56e
'2011-12-29T18:20:50-05:00'
describe
'35678' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWH' 'sip-files00276.pro'
7a4d1a759c13942fb6ee5a06ea2d372e
a086d184652d0adbe7a73829c81cd94ca1c2405e
describe
'33196' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWI' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
607a546d1353ab923b62ae8b4e3523c2
dc499ce0106666ca515dbbacfd7ab7f78edff097
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWJ' 'sip-files00276.tif'
c5d610fd4cf67adfff0418fcc9a9eccb
2bc133d66155e2aa74cbb7df48ef5839c96c77c4
'2011-12-29T18:24:47-05:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWK' 'sip-files00276.txt'
34b1f3adfc76100757ca471cbd47b0fa
656bb8665317b85e65197fddfa027114b9d5eb6e
describe
'8272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWL' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
82260eb944bdc3be1d6ee8cac3d4b0bf
2a2476550d369c26cd52e357280cc1b9555ec55c
describe
'506215' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWM' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
868de430121d2d6f484646d0fb7b6792
1ba435c37b8c30023ff143ab78ac5f99efcd8802
describe
'30826' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWN' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
01b98d03fbe9b0bf576f8bf070f6e326
3ed60804c8b0f34b93b116bb74402b607f5116cf
describe
'7677' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWO' 'sip-files00277.pro'
186c6839cfa7b54a9e97a4be93cc1844
4cf47f31e808f73f696bb660a369ebcc945eeb84
'2011-12-29T18:22:15-05:00'
describe
'9588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWP' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
84f32ac1f770bef269acb41c0c5a8952
09fcf593ca147a60370b462b450d7112a2d8ecf0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWQ' 'sip-files00277.tif'
0461166a445dd0dc0c8ccf6300a7c032
13a260dcae84f5742d25dd1e03a9c2f98586e38d
describe
'331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWR' 'sip-files00277.txt'
4ddc3fb61b1e65b8246772619dbedf2d
9e7ac94556a9e1b070854980e038f214f7a7eb17
describe
'2718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWS' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
4deb062397b1425d02c9bae0804b1e95
abc504cc6b0605e0370ee298524e06225f4d0e71
describe
'489013' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWT' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
bee5bb89aa42c8f48c5db7ab0f4c5fa7
cd0ac5701046db9528078977c37d1f8e791660d2
describe
'81709' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWU' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
be755426c3b5fea8ec215c5caf30fbde
0fbb048c901d0367f35747e6ab86ec436ddf151e
describe
'25963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWV' 'sip-files00278.pro'
7c139fa89fcf2ad557c2c25776374a35
41aaac3acb93fa903878789cf7f779ec9794a3a4
describe
'25163' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWW' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
5782f2a83a1a84a5191e57baef745926
d69119cc2f508eb77210f2535574a6d72978c831
describe
'3929336' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWX' 'sip-files00278.tif'
40872820e3ab18e5fefe0a5f67e2f6b1
2a766f9bced143b7e1d319e06932a5e2d09e2e6e
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWY' 'sip-files00278.txt'
007fcc55d92c44c73d673c07bd5c74ea
605a08338cf0cf484619a798173e1affb96c7095
describe
'6476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSWZ' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
ad3916f94c21f28c2dbbec7ea3c189d4
6005f6f1b24cb0ac2533a176f7866dc738a18275
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXA' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
40e388cf269065824f7e514b736b76a8
fa8c2f71763fe30fa461cdf030bc9cee2bcc679c
describe
'104628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXB' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
2e988ba0c1f866b0635dd144af6cef83
b62a41cc1c42cbf7589634c892cb17680910edc5
describe
'34941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXC' 'sip-files00279.pro'
eae2065a7d7df54743c2ca8e068356e4
8000d6aecce00f369c20331b287ba8b610990f10
'2011-12-29T18:20:28-05:00'
describe
'33513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXD' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
a373cd01d42d5d7b1c5b55776fe8219f
e0a922b305f31bb96bcef4f59b85589606e8c549
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXE' 'sip-files00279.tif'
ec47a78a605aeab3b911762bf1a2ff6e
3956df3e850e23790dcf5c1c135b973f83558af5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXF' 'sip-files00279.txt'
5230f62e6ab5de3aefa5ead7618c3615
944a06a6f99bf28164ac5a622c6bd7eaa83c2fcd
describe
'8225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXG' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
e9430c506b7218e90c94684fc44e241d
8f691a047ced53f8403d23f840ccca7efe8a4314
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXH' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
8418c9f4510c9272d8551260dfe4f2db
67f182eff551a5b77210258fdb61883b6e3c3279
'2011-12-29T18:27:08-05:00'
describe
'103045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXI' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
ecfd3aae57d9ffc3ddd436af63893a4c
37bd626a17598db077dc817bc359656fe9d17480
describe
'33818' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXJ' 'sip-files00280.pro'
ad82bd3f5f6dd448647978ac9ada569a
b29a13d07093e22ef41b1d7a73af7067a487c618
describe
'32400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXK' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
2e7a7d979b537ed4943d1f4e34ce0d21
210979419f3b4ca3544347e56d964ca72efa32f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXL' 'sip-files00280.tif'
527bc4417ea8ed5b3c7fb02f8bb7439c
109d2c8abf667a11d325c3acf7ef636153f02178
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXM' 'sip-files00280.txt'
522d836998045f070df912fa7f1450e9
6178888867679e67a367bcb3b42f7761479e7211
describe
'8084' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXN' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
05568b9e7fbe0bd2ff7ddc7af99f1130
26b6925e1b62c8df9764e3910a076e2a1e2a0dc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXO' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
b1e458deef831f18fdb42c54e5a2301f
5b191131e7153202f4f26c60699df81118980123
describe
'107720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXP' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
996572ed1223273aec121a910cb3c9a6
d6931303cb89c486e8f4791c01589206d73c59da
describe
'36888' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXQ' 'sip-files00281.pro'
3fc153bfa124408a642b7580c90978b7
9f7f62f041d11a1686fa76ef919803cf3213a883
describe
'33521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXR' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
ce2481f5986924e93f9700e63125a9a0
41bbd9b0135da323dacfd84d6f1695f4a9ac58d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXS' 'sip-files00281.tif'
e146e0f970af683e852cc3fd06a1f964
812235976653a188b4a1205e7003dff06a1768d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXT' 'sip-files00281.txt'
c5602031a7146628dcfc427505a4a55d
1b9576eb7d5e5397f73f508a7719785745c12be3
describe
'8266' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXU' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
e72f2b511bffaf27095020328d388585
f54d0853c90e656358847d535de3fda4d15c5068
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXV' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
35c85cae6a7384ed2dab83d3fd8942eb
c0e5e4bb44931e60e5a1d6dd88a4cee0cd8b07f4
describe
'108849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXW' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
1f5cec19c39207f23b26c80f07d13746
a5c8012701416db5d781820845c8f4c7d63af42e
'2011-12-29T18:24:12-05:00'
describe
'36362' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXX' 'sip-files00282.pro'
bb9c9a439696803226a33283a681ef25
e761544758a2700a37747c943418bee3c4fcdb7f
describe
'33420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXY' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
942008e668d8b253f19fe6df0ff3c4b8
250067f4a468e97e2b06d14d0c9d7e329fdbb187
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSXZ' 'sip-files00282.tif'
a58976ae27a0c1f5ba33586683b12444
4be86f996ee185e0390e39a9bf50a0d1a29e1a31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYA' 'sip-files00282.txt'
1aa08d17441aeec225dbd0c2f2eaf0ad
4b824325c0c66da1b0dcd13905e8a741250092d8
describe
'8497' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYB' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
d6c0620133a4838bf35a40eaf8df6e60
5a9b00c6c222db17d97166be5566979cc48e76f2
'2011-12-29T18:32:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYC' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
89e9304ed8d1deaef5075666d67d0e02
355fb74f14df2202c4783f04ff5f8b8ac8a16a31
'2011-12-29T18:26:10-05:00'
describe
'107748' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYD' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
199917f5d30a181407859d345ecfccc2
3468273db6474bddbe148945a6abe071f29e0792
describe
'35562' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYE' 'sip-files00283.pro'
24dd73f1450ce2e6f5cb49ca978bde3f
c4f4f1a277ff1b6247b8901cf7ec379ef4f4da7b
'2011-12-29T18:23:42-05:00'
describe
'33864' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYF' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
18b05c2dea75d433eaf3f78197af04d8
5609698830eae3786be0c2f0f59eb1c79851dde0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYG' 'sip-files00283.tif'
7e07962767cb8c9697dae85e0e7fc642
e93599d0f5d0ebb064e99a2eb259d4593a25f9a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYH' 'sip-files00283.txt'
da1203c7353e8f8bf5a4e9b82be3eb43
5d4ec7cb51da5a20a05f3a757c4e02fc6a691d97
describe
'8344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYI' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
fc7722e86a2f7beeff06dcc58e76106f
efbcf0bf0b8ff8264a708375e0d1eef9f363dcfb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYJ' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
bf345abca679dd5644ee52f69c317135
acc6cbd15be330343d09e5eb392dbb66a5ab024a
describe
'107808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYK' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
7076a030bfd0ed87ea27f0600d597782
4da317c948b0671d4a19f5c67ff7b4af5358fdcd
describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYL' 'sip-files00284.pro'
4db5c3b26ac3fee1d8a0f8d3a45d6839
b20b54f1381315304821276d0fbc784dd156afd6
describe
'33151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYM' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
1d5950f9b20f0743d61e8acb473cae3b
f54cfad8e7852ad0baec256a811ff08ce1b81385
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYN' 'sip-files00284.tif'
a902c73aae525fef38427ce5dd3e7e0b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYO' 'sip-files00284.txt'
d878e192bed9d4411e9d61b9361381d0
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describe
'8367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYP' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
cb0a2ba871a924a75377b596ba02a372
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYQ' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
556186372ceb9c80240812ce0147cd22
da997140127bd55a340df40a2451a0a811c9bede
describe
'107127' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYR' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
c058898ed3c92fe7c1be38c0fe987b50
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describe
'35488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYS' 'sip-files00285.pro'
e24fe214c174ef7e0f52bf184217a4b3
27db93260c5ec95870998b210551bb1cbe1308b0
describe
'32903' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYT' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
b34f6ffe54698035f58b75f2f189e294
1e105d576571c94ca83b48c6ea3f4c90e15617dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYU' 'sip-files00285.tif'
e0531edee97152131d2985910cd08445
4db1d64adc5a3518902d48d36a89e2bec9d3c047
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYV' 'sip-files00285.txt'
f7c0c054f578a58ac6f4a08bf3542a32
9d6bccd6994428420e8dc5ac47714a1948d6be13
'2011-12-29T18:21:05-05:00'
describe
'8191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYW' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
533a61277f3f14bc577f3ba848a67583
2e9184384d7773af88ba1ba743c63028a62c4f60
'2011-12-29T18:22:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYX' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
4a39a457e792e4cb16a4cef0a11aa8ee
2b83186032560f56e1ab35f94b2859d481ca5dcf
describe
'110224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYY' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
c04b5977b3fe88a1b79a678e51884c38
a9153a7d1dc47f0a9e1c2f31960cebe2e66c7434
describe
'35979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSYZ' 'sip-files00286.pro'
c9b3ed253fe0c50569b727a3ef988a65
5de72f98a8eb8b78f93fcc2b2b9b9d0a0d6ab7cf
describe
'33450' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZA' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
0589e07ab194f62da07a69a9149146f5
79d3c102505f783387fef2702843bab4ea467faa
'2011-12-29T18:21:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZB' 'sip-files00286.tif'
3a1855553e2a5c1b7d1cbf809b7a2c7d
b07493238352c5256ee99329b491318b4f7b9032
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZC' 'sip-files00286.txt'
297a2d2d2c91d4dacaeeb2b13e830669
f8ba7540b63d53a27321f86a1b6e89fc18408fa1
describe
'8284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZD' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
7743f33a205ad85771954008f3f0d4f6
9a9ebe40156b9382e14aeea5e1ed8a8295433198
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZE' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
e914b0032f2a787cccb12cabe60ce85d
9e0bee3331042920782c4aff28abef3191a7eb52
describe
'165145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZF' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
1743d4bcd8a1489d8ce39377a142b8d0
d029db2f8d919a587e0dcf7b8a6dab454d653c94
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZG' 'sip-files00287.pro'
9a7e9614add54ab44749976147185a82
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describe
'43520' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZH' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
3fb7be6a5f99d84b03973c80392a060a
e4b15ac29ffabe77fe3171872e8b2ee3a4a6114d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZI' 'sip-files00287.tif'
578af1ccbb1ffa77ef4a35da95c57755
2c7ea8959d0e276d91c79cebb9eef904c9a948f4
describe
'85' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZJ' 'sip-files00287.txt'
18a82eb6b14fbfcb71452fe939228d45
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describe
'11223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZK' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
0f7de8640ff228ee0d7914a3507bf328
fa7f9a7e3a8672a0361de756f4c7b79cf39f2397
'2011-12-29T18:28:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZL' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
699052a41c43022b268bd2d7f678ddda
57749c410e1d303b329ac4b6b2278ea1187cd24b
describe
'107110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZM' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
2e5f72f318834ab279d3ed5c7f55ae72
b6b8f7edfba5a204fd4dd5c88d6f73992c90b763
describe
'34510' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZN' 'sip-files00289.pro'
aebfd86a125272bae621b2aabe1705bd
1e391443bb246a8a889b33311338d28d9225d544
describe
'33552' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZO' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
d3f5d3e055a05dd5b4ba6f72e84a07b3
f71636b428d6c483f96d0ad7e017f12e7e813bde
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZP' 'sip-files00289.tif'
829bc2d40f508fb4fa35ee7379874ead
3f1d7037a20d061fe082df5eac8e8623a368f826
'2011-12-29T18:28:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZQ' 'sip-files00289.txt'
dfa5fe7055aa002723072bccf4a16cfb
3fdab950c45403652b894ac549978b0e70ed868f
describe
'8560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZR' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
89c7514430f627f6bf1ccc315dde9d82
d8f0e9b0e05029b61aaafec917a3ac0ca7984228
describe
'498609' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZS' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
d3410caa8839e24a7d0aebbdbc6de3dd
ab64c70e58bc61f59f6bff8d926abd3dddbad6bd
describe
'104513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZT' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
79ed2adee410f20be7e103ea5eb42f26
9deb8bdae726c749a53f4488862352eccb652523
describe
'34958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZU' 'sip-files00290.pro'
e6deb6707edc080a0c26f6819ffd8134
36a201459cc595e07670a5f34d6832cc0e189adc
describe
'32911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZV' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
e225d61eca78d1bd75bf17d0431cc047
b1e84ca80c0d0c13fb5cdec6a6c9d6dc916d6927
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZW' 'sip-files00290.tif'
acdb7fac51b320b3817802566949f737
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZX' 'sip-files00290.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZY' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABSZZ' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
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describe
'104176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAA' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
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describe
'34351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAB' 'sip-files00291.pro'
e632417c4f65ee78b956ad4b3072d10d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAC' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
11dbf23acbd3b73596071f61287bf665
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAD' 'sip-files00291.tif'
c31f89e5d94751fbfe96fa009fc69345
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describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAE' 'sip-files00291.txt'
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describe
'7966' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAF' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
f0123ad0bc4655df5d636d88c15e0873
7efbc79cd07ff0bde68b8a13b45be8659119da6e
'2011-12-29T18:23:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAG' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
9ced27bc796fcab34ce9e21a922f56c5
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describe
'108806' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAH' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
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describe
'35191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAI' 'sip-files00292.pro'
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describe
'33805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAJ' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
f7b3399cc0dba0050a7e4c742ab258db
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAK' 'sip-files00292.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAL' 'sip-files00292.txt'
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describe
'8783' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAM' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
ff534bb0970d9d8437ff87dab7b753ce
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'2011-12-29T18:31:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAN' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
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describe
'110385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAO' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
bd22c930d38ce3d420f26f47bffd098f
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'2011-12-29T18:23:39-05:00'
describe
'35742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAP' 'sip-files00293.pro'
8bdd0c04ee3197ed21634a658f9e126a
a32567676a9dfe218a7b024d4c3896ddffab99be
'2011-12-29T18:26:40-05:00'
describe
'34390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAQ' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
1ba5bf67e9bf172d3b401e7e382a8a94
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAR' 'sip-files00293.tif'
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describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAS' 'sip-files00293.txt'
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describe
'8342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAT' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAU' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
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describe
'110144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAV' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
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describe
'35638' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAW' 'sip-files00294.pro'
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describe
'32785' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAX' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAY' 'sip-files00294.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTAZ' 'sip-files00294.txt'
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describe
'8331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBA' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
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describe
'506235' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBB' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
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describe
'57803' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBC' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
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describe
'15940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBD' 'sip-files00295.pro'
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describe
'16350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBE' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBF' 'sip-files00295.tif'
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describe
'652' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBG' 'sip-files00295.txt'
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describe
'4229' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBH' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
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describe
'506170' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBI' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
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describe
'76892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBJ' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
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describe
'24650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBK' 'sip-files00296.pro'
fc6d89767060e7ead13fa7ffab81209b
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'2011-12-29T18:19:15-05:00'
describe
'23855' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBL' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
174d8df5d4684e89aac370d170d9265b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBM' 'sip-files00296.tif'
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describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBN' 'sip-files00296.txt'
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describe
'6187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBO' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-29T18:36:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBP' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
b60534939c8025de79a5cc033fbbfca1
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describe
'99988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBQ' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
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describe
'34204' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBR' 'sip-files00297.pro'
e361debe92749bb4137a191ae183f9ce
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describe
'30818' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBS' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBT' 'sip-files00297.tif'
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describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBU' 'sip-files00297.txt'
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describe
'7706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBV' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBW' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
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describe
'108204' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBX' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
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describe
'36151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBY' 'sip-files00298.pro'
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describe
'33472' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTBZ' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCA' 'sip-files00298.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCB' 'sip-files00298.txt'
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describe
'8031' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCC' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
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describe
'506295' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCD' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
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describe
'109007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCE' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
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describe
'35352' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCF' 'sip-files00299.pro'
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describe
'33800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCG' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCH' 'sip-files00299.tif'
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describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCI' 'sip-files00299.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCJ' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCK' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
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describe
'109335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCL' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
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describe
'36658' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCM' 'sip-files00300.pro'
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describe
'33667' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCN' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCO' 'sip-files00300.tif'
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describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCP' 'sip-files00300.txt'
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describe
'8161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCQ' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCR' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
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'2011-12-29T18:31:19-05:00'
describe
'108164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCS' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
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describe
'35099' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCT' 'sip-files00301.pro'
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describe
'32721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCU' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCV' 'sip-files00301.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCW' 'sip-files00301.txt'
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describe
'8185' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCX' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
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describe
'506256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCY' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
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describe
'110234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTCZ' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
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'2011-12-29T18:31:35-05:00'
describe
'35946' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDA' 'sip-files00302.pro'
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describe
'32988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDB' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDC' 'sip-files00302.tif'
23503aac337161787db0648ecf81f5e1
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'2011-12-29T18:27:37-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDD' 'sip-files00302.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDE' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDF' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
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describe
'109594' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDG' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
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describe
'35858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDH' 'sip-files00303.pro'
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describe
'32817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDI' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDJ' 'sip-files00303.tif'
c30d757c47c6e29af5805501d939fee8
c636c2c6d59561bc37bd13bdeeca3c630844e538
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDK' 'sip-files00303.txt'
25b72b399d5496af9fe4175f61412e40
7f3b060c5baf9e0210d757482d016ad9a6906cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDL' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
2b9e113f2f8e153b6a2300b4b8fbd59b
e942c9ed0396667f0e3160599a9fe31852df869a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDM' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
58c10160793f7cfc8bdec73466fbc7b1
f0a8d1ff8cc36fb8aa7dafa3762750eae070031e
describe
'102920' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDN' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
884cffc4fbac869661bc1f0fb426e45e
dbf7715c4ea3d5921062657497d857c41da8c507
describe
'33139' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDO' 'sip-files00304.pro'
4f342b27a9d6ebf9f4adfb0cdfce6eab
ac04e4a8f2e51355e26a9a42e76d9ec128be1c08
describe
'31463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDP' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
bf96eaea4937f7cba3987c35b53fbb25
2116f5795e09c08c98254847aa173ae0da97a194
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDQ' 'sip-files00304.tif'
5c314a11fa4924956c39471a710b83c6
7ea4a00b5f30cfbc3fd442b3c3a7855c12345702
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDR' 'sip-files00304.txt'
5513d33af4bb72a9b2541c7b77802aa5
352486691739286e217efa64959460bd122bf318
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDS' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
3835bbb07a9bc2773415d095a5f811cd
7de2b5214b6e5cb38fc723667781250c58ac37c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDT' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
c7789cc05db0c7272a540531f77a32bc
283ba144eef9799e182dcd73a2b05abadaf41146
describe
'103453' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDU' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
5b8619112b3dd2091a54930ece8fd190
cfe40a64e0612e457aec79bfbe8638046da84ec9
describe
'33162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDV' 'sip-files00305.pro'
e79e0e98cb9eca9e7fa1e488df3c0df9
86df895d886b12696443faf229d2aec874a9071b
describe
'32087' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDW' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
ecaa92f5aa779071257ae518b2f5ef3d
53f98320bea94ce143840a4f8464af7f63d38f73
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDX' 'sip-files00305.tif'
0192dad67274f69a6ff94bd94c358876
e33389e40fd60d1d126c8670efdd8813498701c4
'2011-12-29T18:24:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDY' 'sip-files00305.txt'
b14e6a4b2ecc208088ec96f538f7e2cc
24d514755462f3d2ea2a18abaf19a85910586702
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTDZ' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
d368b03a1a211e41dd5f59fc1cd596b6
c8e8375804e3dc0493e3c07f4dedea0efbfc583d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEA' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
a2cc70d63fea7395bb4206a824198aa7
615e6009458dcc7d13aa55aa21a35e6c6c21bc7c
'2011-12-29T18:19:19-05:00'
describe
'105919' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEB' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
940a4044ad114e936f3334d38c27c574
dc331fc78a23f69f3ca40a833c541596f6f4a512
'2011-12-29T18:27:43-05:00'
describe
'36111' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEC' 'sip-files00306.pro'
924eb0df52262d508448716cd327d043
8c59500b0e069cecfb75c149e957f9766c676132
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTED' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
c2847bb742ab2c629ae54d72714dfa81
27d0d8d486edf4725fc34c5a8a2dc2b5e0040a61
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEE' 'sip-files00306.tif'
55be155c7aa6cc93696bbf2c451da713
a639ce60b4588fb0007edcd75d6135f200cc0b7e
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEF' 'sip-files00306.txt'
d93942d0da1a722a4d6dc20168fed861
6d339e7fcf2fb2b2a04acba5ba75b5786f6a0a56
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEG' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
5637a5023b989b1f520fccd96d113dcf
35870da1c08084744d82ac16443aa3b23db2413f
describe
'506298' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEH' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
5b704a14513954b6a7b3ff1aa9582647
57c9bc301be9a900a46b4ec82a28704fd8d32fe9
describe
'109130' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEI' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
66e609d6b3d9a4bf94820ff8e1069913
e03aa5ae95654985adaa0f55edd0d5950a30ef80
describe
'36212' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEJ' 'sip-files00307.pro'
ce084f51c05142a7ebc5fff963fd8c79
db3cf21184dacf269ea014c8a7a49e30275f2af7
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEK' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
7f1f833eb511386cb2a09123bc5600ae
345a8fedaca57afca6c53daa2319b9e8b346f6f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEL' 'sip-files00307.tif'
693dbe03c7712a4e27156753e16d82d3
1c8d66bbb20bdbf60931996df7053308444e25a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEM' 'sip-files00307.txt'
3d169d531d874f5727feb437a0b02bcf
06165718e38a4f541b7f0d535ff482739b019187
describe
'8063' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEN' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
4f8b066f7065578ba176244552f35ed9
088d4079c3ab65039130f32ec6a9fa9402193865
describe
'506232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEO' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
50014efeb16662fa179b22337efc4dcd
42440129ba36f2e5a1936252bc2a1a01a4834ba1
describe
'102921' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEP' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
f2c740ab01c6d5e26aef48ef193103f0
299af416ec1e849c363123f3a962577f98fe8c0c
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEQ' 'sip-files00308.pro'
c98e5ad120d926ff438b98f2a004398d
ec4e97bfa25f5ccf9de1459d9e286455a2526c53
describe
'31587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTER' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
48f7d204182e2669b2072141899b93d1
88ff2b4389d6d2e1dbd01a7b8ec3ae2c2073768b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTES' 'sip-files00308.tif'
70de89accabbceeeb45e9a7cb3259d31
2185169cf279b904fb24954b558279d9c8c316f4
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTET' 'sip-files00308.txt'
b811f39ce374a164498a8681d4457202
3b6c0a663db228faeb867ba268eab8d2ba8c6cba
describe
'7986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEU' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
15a6725043cad672b140696d043fdb60
457dca2ed242b3a938ba1d37938b2acfad7cdd57
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEV' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
c0d5506ba5f279904e30e5cfb1e17e81
9167bae5904ce4778a70855fad031fec2cc15610
describe
'99178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEW' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
a44c4736dfdcd5e388ecabb2ba186331
d705eebf4f3421925c7578d52f55e89bf56ed2a4
describe
'33223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEX' 'sip-files00309.pro'
9d85ee5e37d69e3c83bd28c3e6f74b93
207940bacc9fc01104368a1964dcf379d0931416
describe
'31734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEY' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
f48d8b47e2410a673d8fdedcb6490477
9485deb02d50f70e5271dec4c432feb9be9b0237
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTEZ' 'sip-files00309.tif'
1519ac206717ffb51d3649534fa6681f
b8364051527b08ad37deb864cca7454508815f5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFA' 'sip-files00309.txt'
6fb5e8424488e1697edd4c1aa6fc27c3
7129a8ffc57a87e641e36dd7cbe0c521fc2ef9c6
describe
'7974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFB' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
2579c808a6c5c9528268452ea626b8c4
e9dca61ccc9caf764bc5ff8b8018bf3ef3be8449
describe
'506174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFC' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
0dd1fe31c0031dd8c042344c097c6b86
fa010cde559d1fe7f945d11c1fade1aed9b8b508
describe
'104200' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFD' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
f249794ee4c03976fde097cd6a3458af
bf7cfdd8ed3fc174c6a630868ea0fb993dc68fe1
describe
'34452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFE' 'sip-files00310.pro'
487af46667c36dbf7fdba914ac89e918
f558517975b97e70d3a23da82a49bc4730aaa6db
describe
'32051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFF' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
18b6bb12f5e47b5e178bf4984c598790
74c1cf33dfcac9b6aa3d29f1f50a42667c3c080a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFG' 'sip-files00310.tif'
bfba7a3449bc231bd565826336ef3501
9a3d04ec7f2666cca44470f96a2543319565030f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFH' 'sip-files00310.txt'
c470543908f70f2339fea2ace5a4a5f9
049d6ca8aee4bd146ecfbc0625d25162363280b3
describe
'7959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFI' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
da4a86d5c762192577079be705e9da54
3ec482cd4fb5a6b718945e7fe4a0428d444e5abd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFJ' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
b6d57cd024f31dbf117d7940af8baea8
d9db9dfb50536695db9bd5101542c7d2cb1c8283
describe
'106560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAEMfileF20081225_AABTFK' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
30b5849ec408917c8b80ec97cb39074