Citation
Tar-bucket and pipe-clay, or, The life and adventures of Nicholas Brodribb, middy and marine

Material Information

Title:
Tar-bucket and pipe-clay, or, The life and adventures of Nicholas Brodribb, middy and marine
Portion of title:
Life and adventures of Nicholas Brodribb
Alternate title:
Tar bucket and pipe clay
Cover title:
Tar-bucket & pipe-clay
Creator:
Groves, J. Percy ( John Percy )
Griffith, Farran, Browne & Co ( Publisher )
Morrison and Gibb ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Griffith, Farran, Browne and Co., Limited
Manufacturer:
Morrison and Gibb Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
224 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ship captains -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Heroes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Temperance -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1897 ( rbprov )
Sea stories -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
sea stories ( aat )
Children's stories
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.
General Note:
Date from colophon: 7/97.
Statement of Responsibility:
by J. Percy Groves.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002391569 ( ALEPH )
ALZ6459 ( NOTIS )
252713160 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


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The Baldwin Library

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TAR-BUCKET AND PIPE-CLAY





THE CAPTAIN CLINGING TO A PORTION OF THE STANDING
RIGGING.—Lage 58,



TAR-BUCKET
avd PT PE-CLAY

OR

The Life anu Adventures of Nicholas Brodribb

MIDDY AND MARINE

BY

Major J. PERCY GROVES, R.G.A.
(LATE XXVIItH INNISKILLINGS)

AUTHOR OF
FROM CADET TO CAPTAIN,’ ‘A SOLDIER BORN’ ‘REEFER AND RIFLEMAN?
‘ANCHOR AND LAUREL,’ ‘ON SERVICE,’ ‘WITH THE GREEN JACKETS’
ETC. ETC.

GRIFFITH FARRAN BROWNE & CO. LIMITED,
35 BOW STREET, COVENT GARDEN,
LONDON.



The Rights of Translation and Reproduction are Reserved,



CHAP.

CONTENTS.

—_~o——_

I. Introduces our Hero, and gives some Account of Me

II.

III.

IV

VIL

VII.

VIII.

IX.

XI.

XII.

XIII.
XIV.

XV.

XVI.

Parentage, . .

Relates how Mr. Jacob Brodribb took a Walk in the
Country, and how he fell in with a Ea, of French
Grenadiers, .

Shows how the French landed’ i in Temes, and oe our
Hero’s Father paid the Debt to Nature, .

Relates how young Nicholas Brodribb made his frst
Start in Life, a EY

. Gives some Account of the Tojaae of the Marathon

to Table Bay; introduces a Gentleman of the
Name of Pennefeather, and relates how he and our
Hero spent a Night ‘up in the Clouds,’ . .
A Night on Table Mountain—The Melons SIE ‘A
Fight with Bruin,’ . .
The Marathon proceeds on her Voyage—The ae
A Terrible Disaster, . . .

After the Storm —A Ship in Bae ve ‘peuath
the Waves !’

The Rescue—Raoul Giraud—A Sad Story,

» Relates how the Marathon struck upon a Rock, sha
how Nicholas and his Friends Secaee from the ”

Wreck, . .
Wreck of the Masai ioie = recany one out of Two
Hundred !—The Desert Isle, : .

Relates the further Adventures and Experiences of our
Hero and the other Sue of the Marathon—A
Sailor’s Epitaph, . .

A Lucky Find—Pat Murphy wales a prdposa

The Building of the Boat—Hard Times—A Narrow
Escape,
Relates how the eee paid his Debt to Nani a

how Major Pennefeather and his Breads quale an
Attempt to Mutiny, f .

Introduces William Ashcroft, A.B., on lies how he
confided the Story of his Life to our Hero, .
5

PAGE

12
16

22

28
33
42
46
50
56
60
69
76

81

9g!



CHAP.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX.

XX
XXI.

XXIL
XXIII.

XXIV.

XXV.

XXVI.

XXVII.

XXVIII.

XXIX.

XXX.
XXXI,

XXXII.

XXXIII.
XXXIV.

XXXV,

Contents.

Relates how Nicholas Brodribb, and Others of the
Shipwrecked Company, proceeded ona Voyage of

Discovery, . . .
Gives some Account of the Dinghy" s Vovase; said shows
how it ended, ‘ : ° ‘ F
Relates the further Adventures of Mr. Ashcroft, Raoul
Giraud, and our Hero, . . . ‘
A Friend in Need, ‘ : :
The Kraal—Our Friends prepare to return to ae iaaad
—Sailho! . . . .

Accounts for the Unexpected Circumstance slated at
the end of Chapter XXI., .

Homeward . Bound !—A as Pas area for
the Fight, - 3

Describes the Action between the Rattlesnake and. Le
Cerf, and shows how a certain Bullet found its
Billet,

Tells how the Corvette Le bot was ciiniel :

After the Action—A Scene of Horror—Arrival of the
Rattlesnake and. Prize at Plymouth, . .

Nicholas Brodribb dons the Red Jacket—The Major’s
Presentiment, - : . . .

Tells how Nicholas Brodribb visited his Father’s Native
Village,.and of the Adventure he met with on the

way, : :
Tells who was thie Young Lady hon our Flero had the
Good Fortune to rescue, . ‘ . e

Shows how -Nicholas was welcomed by his Father’s
Relatives, and how Major Pennefeather’s Presenti-
ment was fulfilled, . : é 5

Nicholas joins the Crescent, and sails for Guernsey—
Shows how Captain Sir James Saumarez saved his
Squadron from being captured by the French, .

Nicholas is appointed to the Hussar quae eee in
the Mediterranean, .

Relates how Captain Reynolds aud ee Officers Salas a
Visit to the Chateau Noirmont, and how they were
surprised by the French Dragoons, . .

Relates how Captain Reynolds and his Party retired from
the Chateau Noirmont, and how ‘ Old Soundings’
captured three French Soldiers, . . .

The Last of this ‘Eventful History,’ . ‘ .

PAGE

108

113

120
130

134
140
151
157
166
170

174

177

183

193

197

201

206
216













TAR-BUCKET AND PIPE-CLAY.

CHAPTER I.

Introduces our Hero, and gives some Account of his
Parentage.

GN one of the ponderous registers of the parish
‘church of Saint Peter’s Port, in the beautiful

Sart island of Guernsey, there is an almost illegible
entry testifying to the important fact that on the oth
day of September, in the year of grace 1778, an infant,
baptized Nicholas, first saw the light; and it is further
set forth that the said Nicholas was the offspring of
Jacob Brodribb and Amélie Judith, his wife.

Jacob Brodribb was a Hertfordshire man, a native
of F n, a. village near to Rickmansworth, where his
family had dwelt for many generations.

The Brodribbs had from time immemorial been
humble ‘sons of the soil,—honest, though ignorant
peasants, ever ready and a to do a fair day’s







8 LTar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

work for a fair day’s pay,—but the parents of Jacob

Brodribb, being thrifty folk and in constant employ,

were able to allow their sons to attend an endowed

school, established in the village by a former rector,

instead of sending them out to earn their living at an

early age, and thus gave them a far better education

than the children of an agricultural labourer usually

received in those fine old days when the Georges ruled ©
over Great Britain and Ireland.

Jacob Brodribb, who was the ‘Benjamin’ of the
family, showing greater aptitude for learning than his
brethren, was kept at his books until he attained his
sixteenth year, when Squire Oldacre, of F——n Manor,
put him into his land-steward’s office.

With the steward, Jacob remained five years, and he
would in all probability have succeeded to his lucrative
and respectable situation, had not an irrepressible desire
to see the world driven him one fine morning to Rick-
mansworth fair; where, falling in with that prince of
recruiters, the redoubtable but mendacious Sergeant
Kite, he was persuaded to accept the ‘King’s shilling,
and engage to serve His Most Gracious Majesty as a
trooper in the 17th Regiment of Light Dragoons.

The 17th were then stationed in Ireland, and to that
country Jacob Brodribb was shipped off before he was
many days older, in company with a score of young
_ men of all sorts and conditions, whom poverty or some

other pressing necessity had forced to seek the ‘bubble
reputation even at the cannon’s mouth,’



Jacob Broadribé. 9

There was great consternation amongst the good folk
of F. n when it became known that ‘old Nick Brod-
ribb’s Jacob’ had ‘gone for a sojer;’ and the village
Solomons shook their grey heads and declared that
the boy must be daft; but, for all their talk, young
Brodribb had no reason to regret the step he had taken,
for being a proper-built, well-conducted lad, and far
better educated than the majority of his comrades, he
received a corporal’s stripes as soon as he had passed
his drills.

After that, his promotion was very rapid, and when,
in the spring of 1775, the 17th Light Dragoons. were
sent across the Atlantic to take part in that most
lamentable struggle between England and her North
American colonies, Jacob found himself quarter-master
of the D troop, commanded by Captain Oliver de
Lancey.

The regiment disembarked at Boston towards the
end of May, 1775, and on the 17th of the following
June, Quarter-Master Jacob Brodribb received a severe
wound during the attack on the Americans’ position at
Bunker’s Hill; when a dismounted party of the 17th
Light Dragoons, under Captain de Lancey, proceeded

with a reinforcement sent out from Boston to support
' the troops engaged.

This misfortune terminated Jacob’s career in the
gallant 17th, for the authorities, judging that a one-
armed dragoon would not be very effective in the field,
sent him home. His services were, however, not for-





ro Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

gotten, and shortly after his arrival in England he was
gazetted ensign of an Independent Company of Invalids
stationed in the island of Guernsey.

In the autumn of 1777, Ensign Jacob Brodribb was
married to Mademoiselle Amélie Judith, daughter of
Monsieur Pierre Le Noury, a small shipowner of Saint
Peter’s Port, and their union was blessed with one child
—the boy Nicholas, whose birth is recorded at the
commencement of the chapter, and whom we now beg
leave to present to our readers as the hero of this
‘strange and eventful history.

Of Master Nicholas’s infancy we know nothing—no
doubt he was afflicted, in a greater or lesser degree, with
the numerous ailments peculiar to the very earliest days
of the human existence; it may likewise be fairly
assumed that he gave his mother about the same
amount of pleasure, trouble, and anxiety as the general
run of infants give ¢iecry mothers—so we will pass on
to his early childhood, when the poor little fellow
experienced a misfortune; one of the greatest that a
child can experience; he lost both his parents within
four-and-twenty hours.

Nicholas was between two and. thice years of age
when this melancholy event occurred. Madame Brod-
ribb had been ailing for.some weeks, and, as her malady
completely puzzled the entire faculty of Sarnia, her
husband proposed that he should take her to Jersey to
consult a certain physician, residing at Saint Heliers,



Death of Madame Brodribé. tt

who was held in no small repute by the Channel
Islanders.

The doctors in attendance on the poor woman making
no objection to his suggestion, Mr. Brodribb applied for
leave of absence, and on the 29th December, 1780, he,
his wife, and child sailed from Saint Peter’s Port in old
Pierre Le Noury’s sloop, L’l[utrepide. They arrived at
Saint Heliers the same evening, and Madame Brodribb
was carried ashore to the house of a friend. On the
following morning Doctor P n was called in. He
shook his head gravely the moment he saw the patient,



who was greatly exhausted and scarcely conscious.

‘It is too late, monsieur, he whispered to the anxious
husband. ‘I can do nothing for your wife, beyond,
perhaps, prolonging her life for a few days,’

“Do you mean that my Amélie is dying?’ asked Mr.
Brodribb. ee

‘I do, monsieur,’ was the sad reply. ‘It is my opinion
that the poor lady will not last another week.’

Unhappily the worthy physician’s opinion proved. only
too correct, for on the morning of the 5th January, 1781;
Madame Brodribb breathed her last.





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CHAPTER IL

Relates how Mr. Jacob Brodribb took a Walk in the
Country, and how he fell in with a Party of French
Grenadiers.



ORACOB BRODRIBB’S grief at the death of his
ie beloved wife was extreme. For several hours,
Né\9 in spite of the entreaties and remonstrances
of his father-in-law and friends, he refused to quit the
room in which she died, but he sat by the bedside,
completely stupefied by the sorrow that had befallen
him—unexpectedly, because he had never fully realised
the gravity of her illness. Towards evening Dr, P n
happened to look in, and, being appealed to by Madame
Godefroy, the mistress of the house, he went up-stairs,
and kindly but firmly insisted that the bereaved husband
. should leave the death-chamber.

‘Remember that you are a soldier, monsieur, said the
doctor, ‘and endeavour to control your grief. It is
wrong—more than that, it is cowardly—to give way
like this.’

‘You are right, doctor, murmured Mr. Brodribb, rising
12





The Doctors Advice. . 13

from his seat, ‘I acknowledge that your reproof is
deserved.” And, casting one last look at the lifeless
form of his wife, he followed Dr. P. n from the room.

‘Come home with me, monsieur, said the kind-
hearted physician, as they passed down-stairs ; ‘ or, better
still, take a walk into the country. It is quite dark
now, and the fresh air will benefit you. You might
walk as far as the Grouville Redoubt, and by the time
you return, I shall have finished my evening rounds,
and will be at home to receive you.’

‘ Mats, M’sieur P nm!’ exclaimed Madame Gode-
froy, who was not a little scandalised by the doctor's
proposition, ‘ what will our neighbours think if’—

‘Madame, I care not what people think!’ he inter-
rupted. ‘I consider the living before the dead. It
cannot harm the poor lady who has gone to her rest
that her widower should pass the evening with me
instead of brooding over his sorrow by himself; it is
good for him that he should do so, therefore I say to
him, “Come!”’

Though by no means convinced by Dr. P——n’s
sensible argument, Madame Godefroy made no further
objections to Jacob Brodribb accompanying him; so
the two men passed out of the house into the road.

‘Now, my friend, said the doctor, as soon as they
were alone, ‘take my advice, and walk until you are
thoroughly fatigued. You will then, I trust, obtain a few
hours’ sleep, of which you stand greatly in need. You
know your way, I think?’









14 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

' £Yes, doctor,’ rejoined Jacob; ‘this is not my first
visit to Saint Heliers, and I am pretty well acquainted
with the neighbourhood.’

‘Bon! I shall be at home in a couple of hours;
until then, au revoir !’

Grouville was little more than three miles from Saint
Heliers, but, being determined to follow the doctor’s
advice, and, so to speak, walk himself to sleep, Mr-
Brodribb took a somewhat circuitous route, and thus
it was close upon eleven o’clock before he came within
sight of the redoubt commanding Grouville Bay.

He now thought it high time to return to Saint Heliers,
and he was debating which way he should take, when
he heard the measured tramp of marching men coming
from the direction of the redoubt, which was not more
than three hundred yards from the spot where he stood.

‘The patrol, I suppose,’ he muttered, drawing close
to the hedge, in order to avoid being seen, for in his
state of mind he did not care to meet anybody.
‘Judging by the sound, I should say they must be un-
usually strong to-night, thirty or forty files at least’

A few minutes later, a company of soldiers marched
down the road leading to the redoubt, and passed close
to Jacob Brodribb, who, to his intense surprise and
alarm, saw that they did not belong to any British
regiment, nor to the Jersey militia, but that they were
French grenadiers, completely armed and accoutred,
and evidently ‘on the war-path,’

‘They must have landed in the bay, and surprised



The Guard at Grouville surprised. = 15

the guard at Grouville, he said to himself, crouching
down right under the hedge, lest the Frenchmen should
catch sight of him. ‘ Well, there'll be warm work for all
of us who wear King George’s livery, and many a fine
fellow may never see another sun rise. Who knows but
that I and my poor Amélie may be reunited before
morning!’

But these thoughts did not keep Jacob Brodribb from
what was now his bounden duty, and, as soon as the
Frenchmen were well out of hearing, he crept from
beneath the hedge, looked cautiously around to make
sure that the coast was clear, and then set off at a
rapid pace for ‘Le Mont Patibulaire, where he knew
that some companies of the 78th Highlanders were
encamped.

While Ensign Brodribb is hastening to give the alarm
to the Highlanders, we will relate how it came to pass
that a company of French grenadiers should be making
a midnight march along the roads of Jersey, and, to do
that satisfactorily, we must needs borrow a chapter from
the history of the island.





SS

5 fe 4
SSS IN



CHAPTER III.

Shows how the French landed in Jersey, and how our
Hero's Father paid the Debt to Nature.

HE importance of the Channel Islands as naval
stations has ever been appreciated by the
rulers of ‘La Belle France,’ and, since the days

when Philip Augustus wrested the province of Normandy
from the English crown, many attempts have they made
to bring Jersey and Guernsey under their sovereignty—
attempts which the sturdy islanders have always success-
fully resisted.

The last of these petty invasions was undertaken by a
hot-headed, ambitious Frenchman, Monsieur le Baron de
Rullecourt, who, on the 5th of January, 1781, not only
effected a landing in Jersey at the head of a small body
of troops, but actually gained temporary possession of
the town of Saint Heliers before he met with any serious
opposition.

The force with which Monsieur de Rullecourt set out
on this hazardous expedition, consisted of some two
thousand volunteers from the regiment of the Chevalier
de Luxemburg and from other infantry corps stationed





De Rullecourt’s Expedition. 17

in the neighbourhood of Granville on the coast of Nor-
mandy. Having collected a sufficient number of vessels
in which to transport his small army, the impetuous
baron embarked his troops, and put to sea, regardless of
the state of the weather, and the immediate consequence
of his ill-advised haste was the dispersion of his flotilla
ten of the vessels, with nearly half his force on board,
being driven back to France, whilst he, with the
remainder, was forced to seek shelter at Chausey—a
small island, or rather cluster of islands, situated between
the coast of Normandy and Jersey.

Undeterred by this misfortune, and without waiting for
his scattered ships to rejoin him, De Rullecourt seized the
first opportunity of fair weather to pass over to Jersey ;
and, thanks to the skilful piloting of a treacherous Jersey-
man who had taken refuge in France to avoid arrest, he
succeeded in clearing all the dangerous rocks and currents.

Steering through the rocks of La Roque Platte, the
French flotilla came to an anchor in Grouville Bay, and
De Rullecourt landed his troops in the dark, at a spot
called Banc du Violet, some three miles from Saint
Heliers. The coast was, however, so dangerous, that a
privateer and four other craft went on the rocks, and a
number of men, sailors and soldiers, were drowned.

The redoubt commanding Grouville Bay was held, as
we have already seen, by a guard of the Jersey militia,
but, the sentries not being on the alert, the guard was
surprised by a party of French grenadiers; thus De

Rullecourt gained a footing in the island without any of
B



18 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

the inhabitants being the wiser, with the exception of
the captured militiamen and Mr. Jacob Brodribb.

- Leaving a small garrison in the Grouville Redoubt, De
Rullecourt marched to Saint Heliers, and was in posses-
sion of the town before the townsfolk had risen from
their beds; so at daybreak, they found, to their horror,
a hostile force drawn up in the market-place, and they
themselves prisoners of war. Fortunately, however, two
English officers, Captains Aylward and Mulcaster,
escaped from their quarters to Elizabeth Castle, and
gave the alarm to its garrison.

Havingestablished hisheadquartersinthe Court House,
General de Rullecourt caused Major Corbet, the lieutenant-
governor of Jersey, Major Hogge, the fort major, and
Messieurs Durell and La Cloche, the king’s procureur and
constable of Saint Heliers, to be brought before him ; and
to them he presented his terms of capitulation, demanding
their signatures with all the arrogance of aconqueringhero.

The terms were, that the island of Jersey should be
surrendered to the crown of France, and that the British
garrison should at once lay down their arms; and to
induce the lieutenant-governor’s immediate acceptance
of these terms,—for on their immediate acceptance all
his hopes of a permanent victory depended,—General de
Rullecourt declared that he had already disembarked
five thousand veteran troops, and that, if he met with
any resistance, he would destroy Saint Heliers, and put
the inhabitants to the sword. After much remonstrance

_and hesitation, Majors Corbet and Hogge signed the



The Taking of Saint Heliers. 19

capitulation, but Procureur Durell and Constable La
Cloche resolutely refused to do so, even when threatened
with immediate death.

De Rullecourt now flattered, himself that all his diffi-
culties were surmounted, and he proceeded to summon
Elizabeth Castle under the terms of the capitulation ; but
Aylward and Mulcaster had now got the garrison under
arms, and were prepared to resist, vi ef armis, so they
peremptorily refused to pay the slightest regard to the
capitulation, or to any orders issued by the lieutenant-
governor so long as he remained a prisoner of war.

Furious at being thus thwarted, Baron de Rullecourt
ordered an immediate attack to be made on the castle;
but the assaulting party met with such a warm reception
from the intrepid garrison that they quickly went to the
right-about, and doubled back to the town to seek
shelter from the storm of bullets that came rattling and
whistling about their ears.

Whilst all this was taking place in Saint Heliers, Mr.
Jacob Brodribb reached the camp of the 78th High-
landers, and informed their commanding officer of the
landing of the French. The alarm had already spread
to other parts of the island; the militia assembled at
their different rendezvous, and marched in a body on
the town, the greater number joining the 78th at Le
Mont Patibulaire ; the 83rd and 95th Regiments of the
line also got under arms: and in a short space of time a
very respectable force was brought together, of which
Major Pierson, of the 95th, assumed command.



20 LTar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

Pierson, who was a young officer of great promise,
formed his force on the heights near Saint Heliers, and
occupied a hill which had been overlooked by the
enemy.

Presently there arrived two French officers, accom-
panied by the unfortunate lieutenant -governor, to
summon Pierson to surrender; but the gallant major
replied that if within twenty minutes General de Rulle-
court and his troops had not laid down their arms, he
should most certainly attack them.

Major Pierson was punctual to his word, and made a
very masterly disposition of his forces; forming them
into columns of attack, of which the two principal ones
were each preceded by a howitzer.

The assaults were then made in all accessible places
with such impetuosity, that, notwithstanding the advan-
tage the Frenchmen derived from the possession of the
streets and houses, they were driven rapidly in upon
their centre, and soon were compelled to make their last
stand in the market-place. Here a sharp and almost
hand-to-hand fight ensued, in which our friend Jacob
Brodribb took a prominent part, using his one arm with
such good effect that more than one of De Rullecourt’s
veterans fell beneath his blows.

When De Rullecourt saw that the fight was going
against him, and that his men were wavering on all
sides, he called two of his grenadiers, and bade them
bring forth the luckless lieutenant-governor, swearing
that he should share his fate.



Death of Major Pierson. 21

His orders were immediately obeyed ; the lieutenant-
governor, who, to do him justice, bore himself under
these trying circumstances with coolness and dignified
courage, was led out of the Court House and placed ina
position where he was exposed to the fire of his own men,
De Rullecourt standing behind him holding his arm.

Seeing Major Corbet’s perilous position, Jacob Brod-
ribb rushed forward to his rescue, followed by two or
three of the 78th Highlanders, and a militia officer—
Captain Hemery, of the Saint Heliers Artillery Regiment.
The Frenchmen parted before their impetuous charge,
and Jacob was on the point of seizing the French
general, when a grenadier made a thrust at him, and
drove his bayonet deep into his chest. Jacob staggered
blindly forward, and, uttering a wild cry, fell to the
ground, dragging his assailant with him. Almost at the
same moment, De Rullecourt was hit by a musket ball,
which broke his jaw-bone, and he fell back in the hands
of Major Corbet, who thereupon half carried, half led him
into the Court House. But the Baron’s hour had come,
and in a few moments he expired in the arms of his pri-
soner, thus falling a victim to his own ‘vaulting ambition,’

By this time the French, unable to resist the impetuous
onslaught of the regulars and militia, gave way on all sides,
and the officer who had obtained command surrendered
to Major Corbet ; but, ere the firing could be stopped, one
more life was sacrificed, for the gallant Pierson was shot
through the heart at the very moment of victory !



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CHAPTER IV.

Relates how young Nicholas Brodribb made his first Start
in Life.

YOyeE have narrated in the previous chapters how
~ it came to pass that our hero was left an
orphan at a very early period: of his exist-
ence ; we must now use the bookmaker’s time-honoured
privilege, and, taking a flying leap over the hoary head
of Father Time, request the reader to accept the fact
that the world has waxen some ten years older since
Ensign Jacob Brodribb met with a soldier’s death in the
market-place of Saint Heliers.

Immediately after his parent’s funeral, Nicholas was
taken back to Guernsey, and during those ten years,
over which we have so lightly skipped, he remained
under the care of his maternal grandsire, Monsieur Le
Noury, who treated him with unvarying kindness, and
gave him the best instruction that the educational
resources of Saint Peter’s Port would admit of. Thus,
Nicko—as he was usually called—throve apace, and at
the age of thirteen was a proper-built, sturdy youngster ;





Nick's Early Life. 23

full of life and energy, and unmistakably possessed of
the same adventurous spirit that impelled Jacob Brod-
ribb to ‘go for a soldier, rather than settle down to an
uneventful existence in a Hertfordshire village.

That Nicholas had also inherited his father’s courage
was proved to all the good folk of Guernsey by the
following incident.

Amongst Nicholas’s schoolmates was an English boy,

Jackson by name, a distant connection of the lieutenant-
governor of the island. Between our hero and Harry
Jackson a close friendship existed ; they were kindred
spirits, and, out of school-hours, were seldom apart.
One fine morning, shortly after Nicholas had celebrated
his thirteenth birthday, young Jackson proposed a trip
over to Herm, in a small sailing-boat, which Monsieur
Le Noury had lately presented to his grandson; who,
even at that early age, could manage a boat with no mean
skill,
It was a holiday, and, the weather being propitious,
Nicko readily assented to his friend’s proposal; so,
having secured a small basket of. provisions, the two
lads raced down to the Salerie Battery, where the
Dragoon—as Nicko called his cockle-shell—was lying,
and got her afloat.

Herm was reached without mishap, and, after they had
wandered about the tiny island for some time, Harry
Jackson said he would have a bathe. To this Nicholas
objected, because the currents rendered bathing a
dangerous amusement, particularly at that hour of the



24 - Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

day ; but his companion would not be turned from his
purpose, and, throwing off his clothes, plunged into the
sea. Now Jackson was not a very strong swimmer, and
he unfortunately overrated his skill and endurance ; so
- presently Nicko, who was anxiously watching him,
noticed that he had begun to show symptoms of distress,
he being then between fifty and a hundred yards out.

‘Come back, Harry!’ he shouted at the top of his
voice ; ‘the current runs very strong, and you'll be
carried out.’

But Master Harry was obstinate, and, instead of
swimming straight ashore, he must needs make for a
point some two hundred yards from the spot where
Nicholas stood. Before Harry had swum twenty strokes,
he got into a strong current, against which he could
make no way, and he presently found himself in
imminent danger of being swept out to sea ; whereupon
he did what he should have done at first—struck out
direct for the shore. By dint of great exertion, he
succeeded in getting clear of the current, but then his
strength failed him, and, feeling himself sinking, he
uttered a despairing cry for help.

Happily for the drowning boy, help was already nigh
at hand, for the moment our hero perceived his friend’s
danger, he threw off coat and shoes, and swam boldly
out to his assistance; reaching him just as the water
was closing over his head.

By this time Harry Jackson was under the influence
of the unreasoning terror that so often seizes upon a

-



A Gallant Act. 25

drowning person, and he made a desperate clutch at
Nicholas, who, however, with great presence of mind
eluded his grasp, and then, swimming round him, caught
him by the hair, and with no slight difficulty managed
to tow him into shallow water.

‘Nicko!’ exclaimed young Jackson, when they were



once more on ¢erra firma,‘ you've saved my life! I'll
never forget you!’ And, wringing his friend’s hand, he
burst into tears.

Jackson was as good as his word, for he reported our
hero’s gallant conduct to the lieutenant-governor, who



26 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

immediately sent for him, and, hearing that his one
ambition was to be a soldier, promised to interest him-
self on his behalf. The result was, that the military
authorities put down Nicholas’s name for a commission,
which, however, he was not to receive until he attained
the age of sixteen.

Now, it unfortunately happened that, not many
months after the boys’ adventure at Herm, Monsieur Le
Noury sustained a heavy pecuniary loss, owing to the
foundering, with all hands, of a vessel of which he was
owner, when making the passage between Weymouth
and Guernsey ; and this sudden calamity so preyed
upon the old man’s mind, that he took to his bed, and
died within a week.

When his affairs came to be wound up, it was found
that he had left comparatively little property, for, after
all debts and other claims were paid, there remained
only some five hundred guineas to be divided between
eleven persons. Under these circumstances, Mr. Jack-
son, Harry’s father, who had lately returned from
Calcutta, where he held an appointment under ‘John
Company,’ advised Nicholas not to wait for the promised
commission, but to at once enter some profession, in
which he might have a chance of earning a decent com-
petency, and he offered to obtain for the boy a midship-
man’s berth on board one of the Honourable Company’s
Indiamen.

‘You will then have a fair start in the world, said Mr.
Jackson, ‘with every prospect of future promotion. If,



A Start in Life. . 27

after a year or two, you do not like the life, you can give
it up, and accept the commission in the army which has
-been promised you. Only remember, my boy, honour
and glory are very fine things in their way, but rupees
are better. It’s not of much account to wear a laced
jacket, if it covers an empty stomach !’

With considerable reluctance, for his heart was set
upon following in his father’s footsteps, Nicholas Brod-
ribb accepted this offer, and on the 19th day of April,
1792, he bade farewell to his friends and home, and
sailed for England, to join the Marathon East India-
man; which vessel was commanded by Captain Edmund
Lucas, to whose care he had been specially recommended
by Mr. Jackson, .







CHAPTER V.

Gives some Account of the Voyage of the ‘Marathon’ to
Table Bay ; introduces a Gentleman of the Name of
Pennefeather, and relates how he and our Hero spent
a Night ‘up in the Clouds.

India Company’s service towardsthe end of the

He last century, there were few finer or of higher
repute than the Marathon, of 800 tons burden. She had
made two long voyages with safety and success,and was, in
the spring of ’92, chosen by the directors to make a third.

According to custom, the Marathon completed her
lading and received her passengers on board at Graves-
end, and on the 8th May, 1792, she sailed through the
Downs in company with three other East Indiamen,
the Chive, Rajah, and Bombay Castle. The four ships
cleared the Channel on the sixth day after their
departure, when Captain Lucas, finding that the
Marathon had the heels of her consorts, and wishing



to take advantage of her superior sailing qualities, stood
on alone, and soon lost sight of them.
28



The ‘ Marathon, East Indiaman. 29

By this time our hero had pretty well shaken down
into his place as junior ‘guinea-pig’—the name by
which the Company’s middies were generally known—
of the Indiaman. His freedom from the terrible
mal-de-mer,—that appalling sickness which would
‘take it out’ of Old Neptune himself if he once
had a bout of it,—and the fact that he was not alto-
gether ignorant of things nautical, told greatly in his
favour, and gave him a certain standing amongst his
messmates, such as a ‘green hand’ does not usually
attain. Then, too, when Nicholas joined the ship,
Captain Lucas had received him with marked kind-
ness, complimenting him on his gallantry in saving
Harry Jackson’s life; so altogether the boy may be
said to have commenced his career under very favour-
able circumstances.

With weather somewhat variable, the Warathon made
good progress, until the 16th June, when she met with
a heavy gale, which, however, only served to prove how
well she could behave, and how ably she was commanded.
The gale blew itself out in a couple of days, and a fair
wind set in, which continued until the 21st, when the
Marathon anchored in Table Bay, after a smart run of
less than seven weeks’ duration.

Nicholas Brodribb was now well up in his various
duties, and the second officer, Mr. Thomas Garland, to
whose watch he belonged, reported very favourably of
his energy and attention; so when, on their arrival at
Cape Town, one of the passengers, Major Pennefeather,



30 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

invited Nicholas to accompany him ashore, he had no
difficulty in obtaining leave.

Major Jordan Pennefeather was an officer of the
Marine Corps, who, having been ‘lent’ by the Imperial
Government to ‘John Company,’ was proceeding to
Bombay to superintend the training of a number of
sepoys as marines. He had taken a great fancy to
our hero, and during the voyage imparted to him much
useful knowledge, and furthermore taught him how to
play single-stick, and use a small sword, he himself
being an accomplished swordsman, having been in-
structed by a French officer—a prisoner of war.

As the Marathon was to remain in Table Bay for
several days, Major Pennefeather and some of his
fellow-passengers determined to live on shore during
her detention, and Nicholas was invited to be their
guest as long as he could be spared from his duties.

On the third day after their arrival, the major and
three other gentlemen proposed to ascend the far-famed
Table Mountain, and Nicholas accompanied them, It
was late when the party set out, and scarcely had they
ascended half-way, when their guide, seeing that the
clouds were beginning to roll down from the summit of
the mountain, refused to go on; alleging that they would
soon be enveloped in a thick mist, so it would not only
be dangerous to proceed, but, even if they succeeded
in gaining the top, they could see nothing, as the mist
must inevitably confine their view to a very few yards.

Notwithstanding the guide’s remonstrances, Major



‘ Up in the Clouds.’ 31

Pennefeather and his companions persisted in continuing
the ascent, and they told the guide that he could go
back if he pleased, but that their motto was ‘ Excelsior!’

So on the party went, and the farther they proceeded,
the more difficult and dangerous became the track;
until at last they were ‘brought up all standing,’ it
being impossible for them to ascend any higher.

‘We have lost the path, I fear, said Major Penne-
feather, looking doubtfully at his panting companions.

‘We were fools not to take the guide’s advice,’
rejoined a short, stout gentleman, who had found the
climbing rather too much for him, but was too proud
to give in. ‘I’m soaked to the skin, and the mist is
thickening, so that in a short time we shall not be able
to see a yard before us.’

‘Pon my honour, you're right,’ said the major. ‘We
weve fools—great fools! However, my dear doctor,
experientia docet, and the next time ’—

‘Ugh!’ grunted the doctor, interrupting him. ‘Next
time indeed! If ever I attempt to ascend Table
Mountain again, may I be’—

‘Dosed with your own physic, interposed Major
Pennefeather, finishing the sentence for him. ‘But
there, doctor? he added, slapping the little gentleman's
shoulder, ‘don’t get testy. All we've got to do is to
right-about-face and go home.’

‘Qh, that’s all, is it?’ was the rejoinder. ‘Then the
sooner we're off the better, or we shall probably spend
the night here.’



32 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

So the party began to retrace their steps.

The dense mist having rendered the way extremely
slippery, they found it even more difficult and tedious
to descend than it had been to ascend. They could
only see some two or three yards around them, and
having passed several dreadful-looking precipices, they
proceeded with the utmost caution, and were frequently
obliged to turn about and descend backwards, laying
hold of the scrub and bushes to save themselves from
going down headlong.

Thus they went on for some considerable time, feeling
every foot of their way; until at length they found
themselves in a wood, or rather thicket.

‘Lost our path again, sir, said Nicholas, who was
next to his friend the major. ‘I don’t remember this
place.’

‘Neither do I, my boy,’ replied Major Pennefeather,
in an undertone. ‘I’m afraid we shall have to pass the
night on the mountain side. It is very dangerous
travelling under present circumstances,’

Such appeared to be the opinion of his companions,
for they all came to a halt together, and, after a brief
consultation, reluctantly came to the conclusion that
it would be sheer madness to proceed any farther; and
so they decided to bivouac in the thicket until the

morning.





CHAPTER VI.

A Night on Table Mountain—The Major's Story:
‘A Fight with Bruin’

& AVING made up their minds to remain where
they were until daybreak, Major Penne-
feather and his companions looked about for
a suitable place to bivouac for the night, and they
presently hit upon a spot beneath two trees, the branches
of which entwined, and so formed a sort of natural
shelter.

‘We must have a fire, major, said young Nicholas,
who looked on the whole affair as an excellent joke.
‘There’s plenty of brushwood about, and if it’s not too
damp, we shall have a rare blaze.’

‘Pray how are you going to 4gf¢t your fire, young
man?’ asked Doctor Somers, who did not by any
means see the joke, and was not in the best of humours.
‘I don’t suppose any one has a tinder-box or flint and
steel with them.’

‘I have a brace of pocket pistols, and four or five

charges,’ said the major; ‘so you may make your mind
' Cc






34 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

easy on that score. As Master Nicko says, welll have
a rare blaze in a few minutes. Come, doctor,’ he added
cheerfully, as the little sedico flopped himself down at
the foot of a tree, and gave vent to a dismal groan,
‘we might be worse off, you know.’

‘Curried szoek, a larded capon, a real mutton ham,
and etceteras, murmured Doctor Somers, with a long-
drawn sigh. ‘To think that I should have missed them
all!’

‘Missed what?’ inquired Major Pennefeather, pausing
in his task of converting a piece of brown paper into
touch-paper by rubbing it well with gunpowder.

‘Why, my supper, to be sure,’ rejoined the doctor
dolefully. ‘I was engaged to sup with old MacDougal
at eight this evening, and now, instead of enjoying an
excellent’—

A roar of laughter interrupted Doctor Somers’ lament,
in which, after a comical effort to appear annoyed, he
joined ; for he was really a good-natured, light-hearted
little man, only rather too fond of the luxuries of life,
more especially of the ‘ pleasures of the table.’

They now, one and all, set to work to collect brush-
wood to build up a fire, which was not only necessary
for their comfort, but for their safety, as in those days
there were many wild beasts to be met with on the
mountains in the vicinity of Cape Town.

‘How about lighting it?’ said one of the party, an
Irish gentleman, O’Connor by name.

‘That’s easily done, rejoined the major, drawing the



A Night on Table Mountain. 35

charge from one of his pistols. ‘Nicholas, give me the
moss you have gathered. Pick out the driest, my
boy.’

Nicko handed his friend a quantity of moss, which
the latter rolled up into a ball.

‘Now the touch-paper, said Major Pennefeather.
‘That’s right!’ He then fired the paper by the priming
of the pistol, from which he had drawn the charge, and,
placing it in the middle of the ball of moss, made a
bellows of his lips, and blew it into a flame. They then
set a light to the brushwood in three or four places at
once, and very soon had a bright fire.

‘Very good !’ exclaimed Doctor Somers approvingly,
as he squatted down and began to warm his hands.
‘The next question is—have we anything in the shape
of food or drink?’

‘There are some biscuits and cold meat and a small
flask of wine in my haversack,’ replied Major Penne-
feather.

‘Enough to go round?’ was the worthy doctor’s
anxious inquiry.

‘Well, that depends upon what you call enough,
rejoined the other, with a smile. ‘We shan’t /eas¢
doctor ; but I think we shall have sufficient to enable
us to hold out until breakfast time.’

‘Umph!’ grunted the doctor. ‘Suppose you produce
your supplies, my gallant warrior, and let us judge
for ourselves,’

‘Willingly,’ rejoined Major Pennefeather, emptying:



36 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

his haversack of its contents. ‘Remember, we share
and share alike.’,

So the biscuits, meat, and wine were fairly portioned
out, and our friends made a sufficient, if not a hearty
meal. ;

‘This’ll not be the first time you’ve spent a night in
the open?’ observed Mr. O’Connor to the major, when,
having satisfied their hunger, they drew closer to the
fire and prepared to make themselves as comfortable as
possible until morning.

‘No indeed,’ was the reply. ‘Since I was a boy no
bigger than our young friend Nicholas here, I have led
an adventurous life, and seen many strange sights.’

‘And passed through many dangers,’ put in Doctor
Somers, as he lighted his pipe. ‘Come, Pennefeather,
he went on, puffing out a volume of smoke, ‘suppose
you spin us a yarn.’

‘Hark to the doctor!’ cried O'Connor, slapping the
little »edico on the back. ‘Shure now, isn’t a yarn the
right thing under the circumstances?’

‘Well,’ said the major, after a moment’s consideration,
‘T’ll relate an adventure that befell me some ten or
twelve years ago, while I was on a visit to a relative in
Russian Lithuania. It is a story of a bear-hunt, and’—

‘Therefore will dear telling,’ interrupted Doctor
Somers, with a chuckle.

‘And will, I think, interest you,’ the major went on,
casting a withering look at the wretched punster. ‘I
must tell you,’ pursued he, ‘that my father’s only sister



The Major's Story. a7

is married to a Russian«merchant, Serge Stransky ; and
when, on. the reduction of the Marine Corps after the
Peace of ’83, I was placed on the half-pay list, I applied
for and obtained leave to pay my aunt a long-promised
visit.

‘At that time Monsieur Stransky resided at Mozyr,
a small town in Minsk, a province or government of
Russian Lithuania. Minsk is a level, well-wooded
district, watered by the Dnieper and its tributary the
Pripet, and in its vast forests bears, elk, wild oxen, and
many other wild animals abound. Monsieur Stransky
and his son Ivan—a young man some three or four
years my junior—were both of them ardent disciples of
Nimrod. The house was crowded with trophies of the
chase; bears’ heads decorated the walls; bear-skins
covered the floors, chairs, and couches; in fact, bear-
hunting was my uncle’s hobby, and many and wonderful
were the tales he could have told of his encounters with
“grim Bruin.” Ivan was a “chip of the old block,” and
longed to emulate his father’s deeds.

‘Now Monsieur Stransky had in his employ an old
Finn, who had been noted in his.own country as a most
successful bear-hunter. Stremidoff—for that was the
old fellow’s name—was an excellent servant; honest,
sober, and fairly clean in his person and habits; but he
had one serious fault in the eyes of my uncle and cousin
—he was given to boast that, whereas the Russian bear-
hunters were wont to attack Bruin with dogs and guns,
his countrymen would set forth for the chase armed only



38 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

with a spear, and, forcing their quarry from his lair, would
engage him, so to speak, in a hand-to hand combat.

‘He used to show a spear with which he declared he
had slain at least a score of bears, and he so worked
upon the imagination of my youthful cousin Ivan, that
the latter had resolved, at the first opportunity, to have
a tussle with Bruin @ /a Finnots.

‘Ivan broached the subject to me very shortly after
my arrival at Mozyr, and I agreed to accompany him
and Stremidoff to the forest of Grodek, which was not
more than a couple of miles from the house, and receive
a lesson in the use of the bear-spear.

‘We had some little difficulty in obtaining my uncle’s
consent to this expedition, but he at length gave the
required permission, on condition that Stremidoff carried
a gun, which, however, was only to be used in case of
dire necessity.

‘Early next morning we three started for the forest,
leaving the dogs at home. Stremidoff was armed with
a gun, Ivan and I with spears which had been specially
sharpened for the occasion; we also had long-bladed
hunting-knives stuck in our belts.

‘On reaching the village of Grodek, we learned that a
fine she-bear with cubs had been seen in the neighbour-
hood, and was supposed to have her den near a place
called “Blue Spring.”

‘Thither we bent our steps, and very soon perceived
traces that convinced my companions we were on the
right track. But now, to our great astonishment and



The Major's Story. 39

annoyance, old Stremidoff showed symptoms of trepida-
tion, and tried hard to persuade Ivan to abandon the
chase.

‘Ivan was very indignant, and upbraided his servant in
no measured terms, and they were engaged in hot argu-
ment, when suddenly a noise in our rear attracted my
attention, and, looking round, I perceived an enormous
bear playing with her cub not twenty feet from the spot
where we stood.

‘Stremidoff caught sight of the huge brute at the same
moment, and, pushing Ivan aside, he levelled his gun,
pulled the trigger, and shot the cub dead. In my own
mind I have not the slightest doubt that the poor old
Finn really aimed at the mother, with the intention of
shooting her, so as to prevent Ivan and me attacking her
with our spears; but, unhappily, his hand was not as
steady, nor his eye as keen as of yore, and thus he killed
the cub instead, which was just the most unfortunate
thing he could have done, as it raised the old she-bear
to a pitch of ungovernable fury.

‘Ivan was nearest to her when she. charged, and was
knocked down by her rush. I then brought my weapon
to the charge, and attempted to deliver point; but the
maddened brute, rearing herself on her hind legs, gave
me a fearful blow with her paw, knocking the spear from
my hand, and sending me head over heels. Before I
could regain my feet, the bear charged down upon
Stremidoff, and dashed him violently to the ground;
then she turned upon me again, and I found myself upon



40 - Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

my back, with the animal bestriding me! I made sure
that my last hour was come, and, offering up a prayer
for pardon, had resigned myself to my fate, when to my
amazement the bear reared up again, and stood on the
defensive. The next instant four large dogs sprang upon
her, and strove to drag her down.

‘T was badly bruised and half stunned, but managed
to seize my spear, and, staggering to my knees, thrust
the keen point into the bear’s side. She now tried to
escape, but the dogs had fastened upon her, and would
not be shaken off; whilst I pressed home the spear with
all my strength, driving it deeper and deeper into her
body, until at length the huge creature sank down ex-
hausted. I remember nothing more of the struggle,
because I fainted away.

‘When I came to myself, the bear lay stiff and stark
at my feet, and one of the dogs was stretched dead beside
her; the other three were crouching near my cousin’s
prostrate body, and I was not a little amazed when I
recognised them as his own hounds.

I struggled up and went up to Ivan; he was alive,
but insensible. I then looked at Stremidoff, and found
the poor old man quite dead ; his white locks crimsoned
with the blood that had flowed from an awful wound in
his head.

‘With the greatest difficulty I managed to crawl back
to Grodek, from whence I despatched a couple of peasants’
with a cart, to bring in Ivan, and poor old Stremidoff’s
corpse. I was then driven back to Mozyr, and for six



The Major's Story. 4I

weeks lay ill of a brain fever; whilst Ivan, though he
ultimately recovered, was brought very near to death’s
door, and it was more than a year before he recovered
from the effects of that terrible encounter.’

‘But how came the dogs on the scene?’ inquired
Nicholas, when the major had finished his ‘ yarn.’

‘Why, my uncle had them loosed shortly after we
started on our foolhardy expedition, and they, following
in our track, arrived just in time to save me from the
fangs of Madame Bruin,’

‘Bedad, sir” said Mr. O’Connor, ‘that’s a sort of ad-
venture I’d rather hear of than meet with! What say
you, doctor darlint ?’ :

But the little doctor had fallen asleep, and replied to
his friend’s question with a loud and prolonged snore;
which reminded the rest of the party that it was getting
late, and that they too might just as well have a few
hours’ rest. So, having replenished the fire, they stretched
themselves on the ground, and were very soon in the
‘Land of Nod,’

By dawn of day our friends were astir. The thick
clouds having dispersed, they could see the vessels lying
at anchor in Table Bay, so were able to shape their
homeward course, and they arrived safe and sound, but
very damp, at the house where they were staying, just
as breakfast was served—much to the joy of Dr. Somers,
who now made up for the loss of his supper.





CHAPTER VII.

The‘ Marathon’ proceeds on her Voyage—The Gale—
A Terrible Disaster.




(KRESH water and provisions having been re-
ceived on board, the Marathon, on the 5th
t July, once again stretched her snowy canvas
to the breeze, and with ‘a fair wind and a flowing sheet’
proceeded on her voyage.
On the second morning after her departure from Table
Bay, she encountered a stiffish gale, and Captain Lucas,
‘who was a very careful officer,—anticipating still
dirtier weather, gave orders that the necessary prepara-
tions should be made to meet it. Accordingly the top-
gallant yards were sent down on deck, and all the small
sails and lumber removed out of the tops; and a try-sail
was brought aft and bent, and the gaff lowered. The
Marathon was then steering due east, between latitudes
35° and 36°
Gradually, but surely, the gale increased in violence,
the seas rising higher and higher, whilst the dark storm-
laden clouds coursed rapidly across the skies, and the



The Gale. 43

Pe)

wind howled and whistled ominously through the rigging,
until by sundown it blew almost a hurricane. Top-sail
after top-sail had been furled, and the Marathon now
flew through the water under reefed fore-sail and storm-
staysail; whilst it was with the greatest difficulty that
three men at the wheel could keep the helm, such was
the terrific force of the blows which the ship received
from the heavy seas on her quarter.

Night came, and with it a darkness that could almost
be felt. Towards twelve o’clock the wind shifted a
little, and produced a still wilder commotion. Wave
after wave raged after the flying vessel, threatening to
engulf her, but, like a bird on the wing, she lifted gallantly
to the swell, and rushed down the steep abyss, tracking
her path with brilliancy and light.

There was not one seaman in the ship took advantage
of his watch below to sleep that night; the storm was
too dreadful !

At length day dawned, and with it came another shift’
of the wind, but the gale raged with unabated fury. The
wind being now dead against her, the Marathon was
hove-to under a close-reefed main-topsail, and orders
were given to furl the fore-sail.

A score of the smartest sailors in the ship sprang
aloft to execute the command. Already were they out
upon the yard gathering up the folds of the heavy canvas,
when a tremendous sea struck the vessel on the bows
and broke with appalling violence on the deck. There
was a crash, mingled with one wild, tumultuous yell, and



44 ‘Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

when the spray had cleared it was found that the fore-
mast had gone by the board, and every one of the brave
fellows on the foreyard were engulfed in the raging sea!
A few remained entangled in the rigging, but man after
man they were washed away.

The gale continued all that day and throughout the
night, but at daybreak on the following morning the
wind abated and the sea went down. Preparations were
now made for repairing damages, and it was with much
satisfaction that Captain Lucas heard the carpenter’s
report, that the ship herself had suffered no serious
injury.

‘I was afraid she might have strained herself and
sprung a leak,’ said the captain to Major Pennefeather,
who had come on deck and was standing with him beside
the companion-hatch.

‘Yes, indeed,’ rejoined the major. ‘I fully expected
to hear that we had started a timber or two, for it seemed
to me that the finest vessel afloat could not long have
withstood such shocks as she received yesterday. By
the way, Captain Lucas, I hope no harm has befallen my
young friend Nicholas?’

‘No, major, was the reply. ‘The boy was here just
now, but I sent him below to get something to eat, for
he looked quite worn out. He is a fine lad, sir, and
will make a prime seaman one of these days.’

‘If he doesn’t turn soldier, laughed Major Penne-
feather. ‘You know, I think his heart is with us, and
he’d prefer “ pipe-clay ” to the “ tar-bucket.”’



The Gale. 45

‘Well, there’s no accounting for tastes!’ retorted the
captain. ‘Anyhow, the boy will do credit to whatever
profession he may finally choose ; of that I’m certain!’

Orders were now given to get up a jury-foremast, and
all hands were soon busily engaged. Sailors are rarely
discouraged, and—if well commanded by officers in
whom they can put faith—will work until they drop.
The loss of so many of their shipmates, the wrecked
state of the vessel, and the fact that for more than forty-
eight hours they had been on duty, almost without
cessation, did not prevent the crew of the I/arathon from
exerting themselves to the utmost, and by evening the
ship was once’ more under sail.





SSE SSS DRT DEDSE TSEC Sy
2



Ne aS Se SSI e ISCULLA

CHAPTER VIII.

After the Storm—A Ship in Distress—
° Sunk beneath the Waves!

\ HE evening was closing in; those of the ship’s
company who were on ‘watch below’ were
3’ looking forward to a good ‘caulk’ after their
exertions, and the passengers to a quiet night’s rest,
free from the terrors and miseries of a storm at sea,
when the heavy report of a distant gun came booming
over the waters. Another and another followed in rapid
succession ; a lengthened pause, then a fourth and fifth
were heard by those on board the AZarathon.

‘Signals of distress!’ exclaimed Captain Lucas, who
had just sat down to a late meal, the first he had taken



below since the commencement of the gale. ‘Excuse
me, ladies and gentlemen ;’ and, rising from his seat,
he quitted the cabin.

‘Can you see anything of her, Mr. Hartley?’ said he
to his chief officer on reaching the deck.

‘No, sir, was the reply. ‘I’ve sent young Brodribb to
the maintop-masthead ; he has sharp eyes, and will



A Ship in Distress. 47

make her out if she’s in sight. Hark! There’s another
gun.

‘Masthead there!’ hailed the captain, placing his
hands to his mouth. ‘Do you see her?’

‘I thought I saw a flash, sir, replied Nicholas, at the
top of his voice.

‘Where away?’

‘About two points on the starboard bow, shouted
Nicholas.

‘That’s just about where the sound comes from, sir,’
said Mr. Hartley. ‘But I doubt whether the boy saw
the flash.’

‘Well, we'll stand towards her, returned the captain.

So the Marathon’s course was altered, and she steered
for the quarter from whence the signals proceeded. As
she approached nearer and nearer to the object of her
search, the reports of the guns became more and more
distinct, and ere long the flashes were unmistakably
visible—first from the masthead, then from the deck ;
and towards midnight a dismasted vessel, rolling like a
log upon the water, could be distinguished with the aid
of a night-glass.

Captain Lucas now ordered guns to be fired and
lights burned, so as to intimate to the distressed mariners
that help was nigh at hand, and at the same time the
boats were made ready to proceed to the rescue if
necessary. Officers and men gazed anxiously at the
spot where the horizon was broken by the dark outline
of the stranger, and many of the older hands expressed



48 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

their doubts as to whether the Marathon would reach
her in time to save the hapless crew.

‘I fear we shall be too late,’ said Mr. Hartley, as he
examined her through his glass. ‘They have ceased
firing, and do not in any way acknowledge our signals.’

‘Is she a big ship, sir?’ inquired Nicholas, who was
standing beside him.

‘About the same tonnage as ourselves, I should
imagine, replied Hartley, lowering his glass.

‘A transport, very likely, observed Captain Lucas.
‘There was a Dutchman, with troops for Batavia, left
Table Bay the day before we did, and I should not be
surprised ’—

‘Halloa!’ broke in Nicholas, who had taken Mr.
Hartley’s glass to have a look at the stranger. ‘I beg
your pardon, sir, for interrupting you,’ he added, recol-
lecting himself ; ‘but I—I don’t see the ship any longer.
She has—yes, sir, she has disappeared !’

‘Disappeared!’ cried the captain; ‘impossible!
~ Here, give me the glass, lad!’

‘She’s gone! She’s gone!’ now cried several of the
officers and men who had been watching her attentively.

‘Yes,’ said Captain Lucas mournfully, ‘she has gone!
And I fear that her crew must have perished with her,

Alas, it was only too true!

The gallant ship that had endured the full fury of the
tempest, battling bravely with wind and wave, sank when
its wrath was spent; and nearly every soul on board
went down in her. The storm, no doubt, had shaken



“Sunk beneath the Waves !’ 49

her stout frame, and started many a timber; so that
from the first her crew must have known that it was
well-nigh hopeless that they could be saved. Yet it
seemed hard that they should have perished when help
was so near at hand!

‘It is possible that some of her crew have escaped in
the boats,’ said Captain Lucas presently. ‘If so, we
are pretty certain to fall in with them. Keep a sharp
look-out, Mr. Hartley, and burn blue lights, and fire a
gun at intervals.’

‘ Ay, ay, sir, replied the chief officer. ‘We're to hold
on the same course, I presume?’

‘Yes,’ rejoined the Captain, as he turned to go down
the companion-hatch, ‘and at daybreak, or as soon as
we come across any of the wreckage, we can send away
a couple of our boats. We imust stand by so long as
there is any chance of saving life,’





SSS Sa SII

= ~
a PIII SSIS SESS

zee eas SS
— SS
SSS Sa



CHAPTER IX.
The Rescue—Raoul Giraud—A Sad Story.

“BOUT an hour before daylight, the Marathon
Y fell in with a quantity of wreckage, which

DUS Captain Lucas felt certain must be the re-
mains of the ill-fated vessel he was in search of; he



therefore hove to, and at sunrise ordered three boats—
the starboard and larboard quarter-boats, and the whale
boat—to be piped away. Nicholas, to his great delight,
was placed in charge of the ‘ whaler.’

During the morning the boats rowed about in all
directions, but no appearance of a human being could
be seen. A large launch, floating bottom uppermost,
was discovered, and the name La Chevrette, painted on
her stern, went to show that the lost ship was probably
a Frenchman, and not the Dutch transport, as Captain
Lucas had supposed.

Towards noon, Nicholas, whose boat was. at the time
the farthest away from the Marathon, caught sight of a
mass of wreckage about a mile distant, which had some-
thing of the appearance of mast constructed raft.



The Rafe. 51

‘Look. yonder, Murphy,’ he cried to an Irish sailor,
who was perched up in the bow of the whaler, armed
with a long boat-hook. ‘ What’s that?’

Murphy stepped on to the bow thwart, and took a
long look in the direction indicated by his youthful
officer. .

‘There’s something bobbing about, sure enough,’ he
presently said.

‘Isn’t it a raft?’ asked Nicholas anxiously. ‘I wish
I’d brought my glass with me!’ he added. ‘I’m almost
certain ’—

‘By the powers!’ interrupted Murphy, ‘I b’lave you’re
right, Misther Brodribb. Come, bhoys, just send her
along, and we'll make sart’n shure! If there’s not some
poor crayture houlding on them spars yondher, may
I never see swate Ballycloran agen—and that’s a big
word !? ,

‘Give way, lads!’ shouted Nicholas, seizing the yoke-
lines. ‘Give way!’

The whaler’s crew needed no second bidding. They
did give way with a will, and in a few minutes brought
the boat alongside of the wreckage that had attracted

our hero’s attention. Some spars had been hastily
- lashed together, and on the raft thus formed lay a young
woman, with an infant tied round her body by a broad
sash ; and beside her was stretched the apparently life-
less form of a lad, attired in the uniform of an ‘ exsezgune
de vaisseau’—as the French style their middies.

Murphy jumped on to the raft, and proceeded to



52 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

examine the girl, and to sever the rope that bound
her.

‘The poor crayture’s dead, sorr,’ he presently called
out; ‘and so is the babby.’

‘Are ye sure of that, Pat?’ asked one of the crew.
‘Maybe she’s only insensible.’

‘Sart’n” was the reply; ‘they’re both of ’em quite
stiff and cowld. Here, mate, lend us a hand to get the
poor things into the boat.’

‘Will you take them in, sir?’ said the other sailor,
looking doubtfully at Nicholas ; ‘or shall we leave ’em on
the raft, and tow it to the ship?’

‘Oh, take ’em into the boat, Brown,’ replied Nicholas,
‘and let us get back as quickly as possible. There’s
a chance that the girl may still have a spark of life
left in her; if so, the doctor may be able to bring her
round.’

In the meanwhile, Murphy had taken a look at the
midshipman, and, to his surprise, found that there were
some indications of life remaining in him.

‘Bedad!’ he joyfully exclaimed, ‘this young chap’s
not dead, anyhow. Come, bear a hand, Bill Brown,’ he
added, raising the senseless middy in his arms.

‘Where’ll we put him, sir?’ asked the man Brown,
appealing to Nicholas.

‘ Here, in the stern-sheets,’ replied our hero, spreading
a cloak at the bottom of the boat. ‘Gently with the
poor fellow, my lads!“ They then laid the middy down,
and the mother and child beside him, covering them



Raoul Giraud. 53

over with jackets ; and, pushing off from the raft, pulled
back to the JZarathon with all possible speed.

When Nicholas reached the Indiaman, the two quarter-
boats had already returned, without having discovered
any survivors of the ill-fated La Chevrette.

On examining the young woman and her infant, the
surgeon of the Marathon declared that they had been
dead some hours,—the cause of death being, no doubt,
exhaustion and exposure,—so their remains were sewn
up in a hammock and reverently committed to the
deep, Captain Lucas reading a portion of the burial
service over them.

The midshipman, however, still breathed, and the
surgeon, assisted by Dr. Somers, used every means to
restore him. For some time their efforts were un-
successful ; indeed, more than once the surgeon declared
that the vital spark had fled; but Dr. Somers would
not give up so long as the slightest hope remained, and
at length his patience and skill met with their reward.
The patient began to show signs of reviving, and in
another twelve hours he had regained consciousness,
though it was a couple of days before the doctor would
allow him to be questioned.

The rescued middy was a tall, handsome lad of six-
teen. His name, he informed Captain Lucas, was Raoul

Giraud, and his father had commanded La Chevrette,a
French store-ship. That vessel was on her voyage to
the Isle of France when she met with the storm that
wrecked her. She might have weathered it, had it not



54 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

been for the misconduct of the greater number of her
crew; who, refusing to work at the pumps, broke into
the spirit-room, and drank themselves into a state of
insensibility. The officers of the ship and the few
sailors who stuck to their duty, assisted by a party of
soldiers,—artillerymen and sappers on their passage to
the Isle of France,—did their utmost to keep her afloat ;
working, spell about, until they were completely
exhausted, and could work no longer. The leaks then
gained slowly but surely upon them; the vessel showed
evident signs that she was settling down, and at last
officers and men gave themselves up to despair, and
allowed her to sink beneath their feet.

Shortly before La Chevrette went down, and when all
hope of saving her was abandoned, the officer com-
-manding the troops on board—a young commandant of
artillery, Lacroix by name—came to Captain Giraud
and Raoul, who were sitting apart from the rest, and
besought them to devise some means of saving his wife
and child.

The ship’s boats having all been either washed away
or damaged beyond repair,—though an attempt had been
made to patch up the launch,—Captain Giraud suggested
that they should form a light raft of spars, upon which
they might lash Madame Lacroix and her infant. He
was, however, too exhausted to render any assistance,
and Major Lacroix and Raoul set about the task by
themselves. There was no time to be lost, and only a
very frail structure could be put together, so that it was



Raoul Giraud. 55

but a forlorn hope; still the unhappy father had the
satisfaction of doing something for those he loved.

When the ship sank, the raft floated away with its
helpless burden, and, strange to say, did not capsize.
Raoul Giraud, after struggling some minutes in the
agitated waters, clinging to portions of the wreck,
managed to reach the raft, and, finding that it would
support his weight, scrambled on to it. He thus saved
his life, but poor Madame Lacroix and her child died
before morning, and so left him the sole survivor of the
wreck,





St

ESR PSII NEE RIPE: FEES SEE ,

on

i
K











CHAPTER X.

kelates how the ‘Marathon’ struck upon a Rock; and
how Nicholas and his Friends escaped from the
Wreck.

“SF TER her search for the survivors of the ship
Y La Chevrette, which ended, as we have seen,
in the rescue of Raoul Giraud, the Marathon
continued her voyage, steering E.N.E. Between the



young Frenchman and Nicholas an intimacy soon sprang
up; owing, probably, to the fact that the latter could
speak French well; and they were nearly always to-
gether. Major Pennefeather, too, took a liking for
Raoul, who was a quiet, gentlemanly youth, and very
intelligent, and he invited him to make use of his state-
room whenever he wished to be alone.

On the evening of the 19th July, Nicholas,—whose
watch it was below,—Major Pennefeather, and Raoul
Giraud, were all seated in the major’s stateroom,
looking through some portfolios of sketches. The
sky was somewhat cloudy, and there was a heavy

' sea running, and during dinner in the cabin Captain
56



Wreck of the ‘ Marathon.’ 57

Lucas had appeared uneasy and preoccupied; a cir-
cumstance that Major Pennefeather now mentioned to
Nicholas.

‘Yes,’ rejoined our hero, ‘the skipper has not been
himself for the last two or three days. I don’t think he
has ever quite recovered the fatigue he underwent during
the gale. He’s not a strong man, you know, sir,

‘So your surgeon was telling me,’ said Major Penne-
feather. ‘He had a sunstroke a year or two ago, I
believe. By the way, the captain and Mr. Hartley had
a slight difference of opinion this morning as to the
course we’re taking.’

‘Yes, major,’ answered Nicholas; ‘but I’d wager a
guinea that the skipper is right. He knows what’—

What might be Captain Lucas’s particular knowledge,
our hero did not then inform his friends; for, ere he
could finish his sentence, there came a terrible shock,
that pitched him off his seat into the major’s arms.

‘Merciful Heaven!’ exclaimed Major Pennefeather,
as a second shock, more severe than the first, quickly
followed ; ‘the ship must have struck! On deck, lads,
for your lives!’

Filled with consternation, they hurried on deck, and
then the extent of the calamity was only too plain.

The Marathon had indeed struck heavily on a sunken
rock, and already her jury-foremast had gone by the
board; the mainmast soon followed, crushing to death
several of the watch in its fall. The utmost terror and
confusion prevailed ; for several of the passengers had



58 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay,

rushed up on deck, and more than one was dashed over-
board by the violence of the sea rolling over them ; and
it was painfully evident that the ship—her timbers
strained and weakened by the shock she had received
during the storm—was breaking to pieces at every stroke
of the surge.

Crawling over to the larboard side of the deck, which
lay highest out of the water, Nicholas found the captain,
clinging to a portion of the standing rigging. His leg
was broken, and he appeared quite dazed. Presently
they were joined by Major Pennefeather, young Giraud
and Mr. Spicer, the second officer.

‘It’s all up with us, I fear,’ said the latter despondently.

‘Nonsense, man!’ retorted Major Pennefeather ; ‘while
there’s life, there’s hope.’

‘There'll be precious little life left in us by the
morning, growled the other, who appeared to have
been drinking. ‘What say you, sir?’ he shouted at
the captain.

But Captain Lucas made no reply, and shortly after-
wards a sea broke over and parted them, and Nicholas
saw no more of the poor skipper, who, together with Mr.
Spicer, was swept away and drowned.

Nicholas now managed, by dint of great exertion, to
reach the quarter-deck, the rest of the ship being com-
pletely under water, and pretty well shattered to pieces.

In this perilous situation, expecting every moment
must be his last, our hero remained for some time ; and
he had almost resigned himself to his fate, when he heard



The Escape. “ —- 89

the welcome cry of ‘Land!’ At the same instant, a sea
dashed over him with so much force that it not only tore
him from his hold, but actually stunned him. The effect
of the blow was such that he lay insensible until after
daybreak, and on recovering he found himself fixed to a
plank by a long nail that had been driven into the fleshy
part of his shoulder. The agony he now suffered from
this painful wound was intense, and, to add to his misery,
he was so benumbed by the cold that he could barely
move hand or foot.

He at length, however, managed to stagger to his fect,
and looking around him, he saw that several of the crew
and passengers had got upon some rocks close to the
ship ; and, to his great delight, he recognised amongst
them Major Pennefeather and Raoul Giraud. He called
to them as loud as he could, and presently the major,
Raoul, and Pat Murphy came to his assistance, and
between them they succeeded in getting him safely to
the shore.







CHAPTER XI.

Wreck of the ‘Marathon’— Twenty-one out of Two
Flundred !—The Desert Isle.



TE BS HE Marathon hid struck upon a reef within

A pistol shot of a low-lying, barren islet, situate
3928 —according to the last reckoning taken—
between 32° and 33° south latitude, and distant some
six or seven hundred miles from the Cape of Good
Hope.

To this islet there had escaped from the wreck twenty-
one persons, namely: of the crew—Hartley and Gar-
land, chief and second officers; Nicholas Brodribb,
midshipman; George Bacon, carpenter; and seven
foremast hands, including Patrick Murphy. Of the
passengers—Major Pennefeather; Doctor Somers, his
wife, and two other ladies; Raoul Giraud; and four
private soldiers of the Company’s Bengal European
Infantry.

These were the only survivors of two hundred souls
who were on board the Marathon when she struck ; for

so sudden was the disaster that no attempt was made to
60



The Desert Isle. 61

lower the boats, and it was next door to a miracle that
any of her crew or passengers should have reached the
shore in safety.

By an unanimous vote, Major Pennefeather was
elected leader of the little band of castaways, with
Mr. Hartley as his second in command; and one and
all solemnly promised to obey him as their chief, dro
tem., and to maintain a strict discipline—which, as the
major took care to point out, was even more necessary
under their present distressing circumstances than when
they were safe and sound on board the Marathon.

Now, Major Pennefeather felt a very natural sorrow
for the loss of Captain Lucas and so many others with
whom he had been on more or less intimate terms;
and, moreover, he was not a little despondent about the
present condition of himself and fellow-sufferers, for—
albeit he was deeply thankful that they had been
mercifully preserved from the sudden and violent death
that had overtaken their shipmates—he could not be
blind to the unpleasant fact that they were in imminent
danger of enduring the pangs of hunger and thirst, and
ultimately perishing from sheer exhaustion on the
barren rock upon which they had been cast. Neverthe-
less, being anxious to keep his companions from. dwell-
ing too much on the misery and peril of their position,
he assumed a cheerful demeanour, urging them to make
the very best they could of a bad job.

‘Consider, my friends,’ said he, after his little oration
anent the necessity of discipline, ‘fretfulness and des-



62 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

pondency never did good to any one! Let us face our
difficulties like men and Christians, and bear in mind
that “ Heaven helps those who help vaeniselyees If we
do our ’—

‘I ask your honour’s pardon,’ here broke in Patrick
Murphy ; ‘but, talkin’ of helpin’ oursilves—there’s a bit
of a cask rowling about, sorr, in the surf beyant there;
and I’m thinkin’ ’twould be well to lay hould of it’

‘An excellent idea, Mr. Murphy,’ rejoined the major,
laughing. ‘I see you’re a practical man, and believe in
deeds rather than words!’

‘Well, your honour, answered the Irishman, with an
expression half bashful, half comical, ‘shure ’tis not for
the loikes of me to be making remarks; but ’tis yersilf
knows, sorr, that words won’t put victuals into your
mouth — barrin’ ye’re a lawyer; for isn’t talkin’ and
arguin’ their livin’, and a moighty foine livin’, too, by
the same token !—whilst, if we set to work at wanst,
maybe ’tis a bit of a male we'll be able to pick up,
ounly just for the lookin’ for ’t.’

‘Murphy’s quite right, major, put in Mr. Hartley,
‘The poor old bark is breaking up fast, and no doubt
many things that we shall find “use for will be washed
ashore.’

‘Then the sooner we secure them the better,’ returned
the major; ‘so let us lose no time about it.’ 5

All hands then set to work to search for those neces-
saries without which their island would have afforded
them but a short respite from destruction (with the



The Morning's Work. . 63

exception of Nicholas and three others, who were so
severely bruised and knocked about that Doctor Somers
declared them to be unfit for any physical exertion) ;
and when, after a couple of hours’ incessant labour,
Major Pennefeather proposed a ‘spell ho !’ it was found
that the following articles had been saved from the
wreck :—A cask of fresh water; another of beer; a
barrel of flour (damaged); a box of wax candles; a
case of brandy ; several pieces of salt pork ; a small box
containing three or four gun-flints, a broken file, a flask
of gunpowder ; and two ship’s cutlasses.

‘Not a bad morning’s work,’ said Mr. Hartley, as he
surveyed the miscellaneous collection. ‘By the way,’
he added, looking round, ‘has any one seen Mr. Giraud
and Pat Murphy?’

‘They went off together after we got the cask of
water ashore’ answered Bacon, the carpenter. ‘I’ve
not seen ’em sincé then, sir.’ ,

‘No more haven’t I,’ chimed in one of the sailors,
‘T ’spects they’ve gone to have a look round th’ island’

‘They can’t be very far off, I reckon, said the
carpenter.

‘Give them a shout, lads, suggested Major Penne-
feather. ‘Now!—all together’ And presently, in
answer to their united call, there came a loud ‘whoo—
oop!’ followed by a shrill ola.

‘That’s Pat’s shout, I’ll lay a crown!’ exclaimed the
carpenter.

‘And the young Frenchman’s squeak,’ said a sailor,



64 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

‘Ay, and here they comes. But what a rum noise
they’re makin’ !’

As the man spoke, a great grunting and squealing
was heard, such as never could have proceeded from
human throats, and the next moment Raoul Giraud and
Pat Murphy came scrambling over the rocks, driving
before them three fine pigs which had succeeded in
swimming ashore without performing the proverbial
porcine aquatic feat of ‘cutting their own throats.’

A loud cheer greeted the arrival of this most welcome
addition to the island larder, and amidst much laughter
and confusion the pigs were secured.

‘The poor fellows are brightening up a bit, major,’
said Mr. Hartley, as they made their way back to the
spot where they had left the ladies and Doctor Somers
and his patients.

“Yes, and I’m thankful for it, was the rejoinder.
‘We must do our best to keep up their courage. But
tell me, Hartley, the major went on, ‘how came the
ship to run ashore?’

Mr. Hartley shrugged his shoulders, and after a pause
he answered, ‘I don’t like to cast a reflection upon the
memory of a dead shipmate, but poor Frank Spicer
was Officer of the watch, and I fear he’—

‘Was not exactly in a condition to keep it,’ said Major
Pennefeather, with a meaning look. ‘I thought as much.
Well, the poor fellow has paid dearly for his fault!’

‘That there was not a proper look-out kept, is only
too certain,’ chimed in Mr. Garland, the second officer.



Nick's Injuries. 65

‘At the same time, I must tell you that this island is
not laid down in any of the Admiralty charts,’

«That’s a question, Garland, said his brother officer.
‘For my part, I was doubtful about our course, and I
spoke to the skipper yesterday morning,’

‘And where do you suppose we are, Hartley?’ in-
quired Major Pennefeather.

‘Well, as near as I can judge, I should say we're
between two and three hundred miles east of Algoa
Bay, |

‘Then, if we had a boat sufficiently large to take us
all, we might reach the mainland ?’

‘We might, was the dubious reply. ‘But we haven't
a boat, major.’

‘Not at present,’ answered Major Pennefeather.
‘Ha! here are our friends. Well, doctor, how goes it
with your patients ?’

‘Oh, they’re all right,’ replied Dr. Somers. ‘Your
young friend Nick has an ugly wound, to be sure; but
he’s a healthy lad, and ’twill soon heal. Now tell me—
what luck have you had ?’

‘The best of luck, my dear fellow, said the major
gaily. ‘Ladies, we shall be able to serve you with a
late breakfast as soon as we can light a fire.’

With the aid of the gun-flints and powder, a fire was
soon made, and a meal of broiled salt pork prepared, of
which all hands partook heartily—for though it was
long past noon, none of the party had as yet broken
their fast. Their hunger satisfied, Major Pennefeather

E



66 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

proposed that some of their number should explore the
island, whilst the remainder continued to collect such
articles as might be washed ashore.

This was agreed to, and accordingly the major, Raoul
Giraud, and Pat Murphy set forth to spy out the land,
and select a suitable site for an encampment.

The island was even smaller than they had expected,
for it measured barely two miles in circumference, and,
save for a few stunted bushes and scanty patches of
coarse grass, was destitute of vegetation.

‘Shure a travelling tinker’s jackass couldn’t pick up a
livin’ here!’ was Pat Murphy’s observation, when from
the summit of a low hillock they surveyed the desolate
scene. ‘It’s a moighty poor place, bedad !’

‘But better than the bottom of the sea, Pat,’ rejoined
Major Pennefeather. ‘Let us be thankful that Provi-
dence has given us a chance for our lives, and not cut
us off in’—

‘Thrue for ye, sorr, interrupted Murphy, with a touch
of his forelock. ‘It’s ye’silf’s right ; and indade, for the
matther of that, I am thankful. Shure loife is swate,
and I’d rather live in this little island than die in the
best room in Dublin Castle!’

‘A very sententious remark, my good fellow,’ was the
major’s laughing rejoinder. ‘I don’t think we could do
better, he went on, ‘than fix our camp here, for it seems
to be the highest spot in the island, and, if not sheltered
from the winds, we shall at any rate be out of reach of
the waves should a gale spring up.’



Exploring the Island. 67

‘It’s purty nigh to our landing-place too, sorr, said
Patrick Murphy ; ‘and that’s another good rayson for
choosing it, because we'll not be having to rowl or carry
the casks and other things so tirrible far. Arrah, now,
but ’tis an iligant spot, when ye come to take stock of
it!’ he added, looking round him with a well-feigned air
of satisfaction. ‘A thrifle bare and cowld, and a tree or
two, or maybe a patch of praties, would make it more
home-loike, but still we might be a dale worse off; and,
as your honour was plased to remark, we must larn to
be contint, and take things as they’re sint us.’

‘That’s the way to look at it, Murphy,’ answered
Major Pennefeather. ‘What say you, Monsieur
Giraud ?’

But poor Raoul only shrugged his shoulders and
shook his head dolefully, for at that moment his
thoughts were far away in ‘La Belle France, and he
could not help making a mental comparison between his
home in Brittany and the barren rock upon which Fate
had cast him—scarcely to the advantage of the rock!

‘Well,’ said the major, with a compassionate glance
at the young Frenchman, ‘we'd best retrace our steps,
for it is getting late, and there’s but little twilight in
these latitudes.’

So they returned to their friends, and made a report
of what they had seen—or perhaps it would be nearer
the truth to say, of what they had ot seen! The few
hours that remained of daylight were spent in removing
all their possessions from the shore to the summit of the



68 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

hillock ; a task that they had hardly accomplished when
darkness set in. A large fire was then built up and
lighted, a couple of tents—a small one for the three
ladies, and a larger one for the rest of the party—were
quickly constructed of canvas, light spars, and cordage,
which Mr. Hartley and the carpenter had procured from
the wreck. By ten o’clock the ‘camp’ was ready, and
after a very frugal meal they all assembled to prayers,
when Major Pennefeather offered up a hearty thanks-
giving for their merciful preservation. Then all hands
retired to rest, except the ‘watch, who sat up to keep a
look-out and replenish the fire.







CHAPTER XIL

Relates the further Adventures and Experiences of our
Hero, and the other Survivors of the ‘ Marathon’—
A Sailor's Epitaph.

ANHE injury to Nicholas Brodribb’s shoulder
proved to be more serious than Doctor *
Somers hadimagined. Nicholas was certainly



blessed with an excellent constitution, and could stand
a good deal of knocking about; but the exposure he
suffered on the night of the loss of the Marathon was
rather more than he could endure ; on the third evening
after the wreck, fever set in, and for some thirty-six
hours he was in considerable danger.

The doctor and his wife, assisted by the other ladies,
—Mrs. Brydges and Miss Falcon,—nursed the poor lad
with the greatest tenderness, and in the end their care
and attention gained the day. The fever left him, and
he rapidly picked up strength, but a week elapsed before
he was able to take part in the daily work, which Major
Pennefeather and Mr. Hartley insisted should be shared

by all hands alike.
69



70 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

This work consisted of :—firstly, the securing of any
provisions and useful articles, including timber and spars,
that might be washed ashore from the wreck ; secondly,
the erection of wooden and canvas huts to take the place
of the makeshift tents, which afforded very poor shelter
from wind and weather ; thirdly, the construction of a
boat of sufficient size to transport the entire party to the
nearest port.

The work that the party got through, and the
principal articles they saved from the wreck, during
the week that Nicholas was kept ‘on the sick list,’ may
be thus briefly chronicled,

The Marathon, our readers will remember, was lost on
the night of Tuesday the 2oth of July.

On Wednesday, the 21st, the articles enumerated in the
previous chapter, together with two more casks of fresh
water and a quantity of timber, spars, canvas, etc., were se-
cured ; the island was explored ; and a temporary camp
was formed on the spot selected by Major Pennefather.

On Thursday, the 22nd, it blew heavily from the
north-east, from sunrise to sunset, and very little was
done beyond collecting some more timber, and drying
and stacking it for firewood. They spent a very
miserable day, and their spirits sank to zero. During
the evening Doctor Somers reported that Nicholas was
in a dangerous condition, and his report did not tend to
enliven them, for the boy was a great favourite.

On the following day (23rd) they met with better
luck, for they secured three butts of water; a cask of



Stores saved from the Wreck, 71

flour; a small cask of rum; and the Marathon’s dinghy,
which had been thrown up by the tide in a somewhat |
shattered condition. While sitting round the fire that
evening, Bacon, the carpenter, happened to observe that
if he only had a few tools, he might be able to repair the
dinghy, so that it could be used for fishing. It was
then suggested by one of the party, that if they only had
tools and. materials they might build a boat, large
enough and strong enough to convey them all to the
nearest port. The mere idea of the possibility of escap-
ing from the island was eagerly discussed by the sailors,
and though Major Pennefeather and the ship’s officers
did not in their hearts believe that anything would come
of the suggestion, they would not discourage the others
by throwing cold water on it.

On Saturday, the 24th, all hands were astir by day-
break ; for, as a prodigious surf had been rolling in
during the night, they had reason to expect that the
shore would be strewn with wreckage, and so they
determined to work ‘double tides. Nor were they
doomed. to disappointment, for by nightfall they had
added to their stores another butt of fresh water; a
cask of salt beef; five bags of biscuit (damaged) ; several
empty casks and barrels ; a large quantity of planking
and other timber ; and last, but by no means least in
importance, a seaman’s chest containing, besides cloth-
ing, the following articles: —a small axe, a hammer,
chisel, two files and a gimlet; a brace of pistols, with
powder-flask, bullet-mould, and a small screw-driver in



72 Lar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

an oak case ; a clasp-knife ; and four fishing lines, with
hooks, leads, etc., complete.. Great was their joy at the
finding of the chest,—which was recognised as having
belonged to the captain’s steward,—and that night it was
decided that the dinghy should be repaired, and a couple
of huts erected in lieu of the tents.

Sunday was voted a day of rest, and Major Penne-
feather read the morning service, the same as if they had
been on board ship. In the afternoon, while strolling
about at low tide, Raoul Giraud picked up a musket and
bayonet, and a shovel; and other articles, of more or
less use, were found by different members of the party.

On Monday (26) they all went to work again with
renewed vigour, but they now divided their labours;
Mr. Garland, Bacon, and the four soldiers seeing to
the erection of the huts, whilst the rest of the party
—Doctor Somers excepted—continued their search
amongst the rocks and along the shore. Doctor
Somers and the three ladies took charge of the com-
missariat department ; issued provisions, and attended
to the preparing of breakfast, dinner, and supper.

On Tuesday, the labours of the search party were
rewarded by the discovery of a capacious iron cooking-
pot—of which they stood greatly in need; a tin-lined
case containing a portion of the captain’s private sea-
stock, consisting of tea, coffee, cocoa, biscuits, pickles
and various condiments; a double-barrelled fowling-
piece belonging to Major Pennefeather ; and two casks
of tar and another of oil.



Nick's Recovery. 73

That same evening, too, the carpenter reported that
the huts were ready for occupation, and Doctor Somers
took his young patient Nicholas off the sick-list. Two
very important events, which Mr. Hartley did not fail
to chronicle in the log-book !

« The huts were constructed of planks and spars, roofed



in with canvas, and they were pronounced to be a grand
improvement on the tents. ‘

On the following day there was a discovery of a
painful nature, such as greatly marred the satisfaction:
the castaways felt at the success of their exertions to



74 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

render their situation on the desert island more tolerable,
and was moreover a sad reminder of the catastrophe of
which they were the sole survivors. Whilst searching
amongst the rocks on the north side of the island, Mr.
Hartley and two of the sailors came upon the body of
Captain Lucas, sadly bruised and disfigured, but not
beyond recognition. The remains of the kind-hearted
old man were reverently carried to the huts, and a grave
having been dug, they were laid in their last resting-
place; Mr. Hartley reading the burial service over them.
A number of stones and pieces of rock were then piled
upon the grave, and a cross was put up by the carpenter,
upon which were inscribed the deceased’s name and
age, and the date of the loss of the Marathon.

‘ The skipper was a little man, that’s sart’n” observed
one of the sailors, as he turned away from the grave,
‘but he was a gen’leman every inch o’ him, and had a
heart as big as a seventy-four.’

Three days after the recovery and burial of Captain
Lucas’s body, a heavy gale sprang up, and when it abated,
every vestige of the Marathon had disappeared. Strange
to say, after she went to pieces, very little of the wreckage
came ashore, and our friends now felt that they must no
longer count upon increasing their store of provisions,
etc., from that source,

Nevertheless, Major Pennefeather- and Mr. Hartley
insisted on the daily search being continued, for, as they
very wisely remarked, something useful might be picked



Breaking up of the Wreck. 75

up, and, anyhow, it was just as well for every one to be
employed.

They had now collected a very considerable quantity
of timber, planking, spars, etc., of which the best was
set aside as material out of which the projected boat
might be constructed, and the remainder was stacked
to be used for fuel and other purposes. But unfortu-
nately the carpenter could not commence operations,
owing to his want of proper tools, nails, etc; so that it
appeared more than probable that the laying of the
keel would have to be postponed until the ‘Eve of
Saint Tibb ’—that mythical festival which is said to fall
neither before nor after Christmas !







CHAPTER XIII.
A Lucky Find—Pat Murphy makes a Proposal.

@EG your pardon, Misther Brodribb, sorr, but
ist truth that the young Frinch gintleman

MS picked up a pair of ould bellows on the beach
yesterday ?’ asked Pat Murphy of our hero, one morn-
ing some three or four weeks after the events described



in the previous chapter.

‘I believe so, replied Nicholas, who was busily
engaged repairing his only jacket, or rather what -re-
mained of it, with a bit of canvas; for Nick had been
long enough at sea to have learnt how to use a needle—
after a fashion, that is to say! ‘I wasn’t with him at
the time, but I heard him telling Doctor Somers about
it?

‘And d’ye happen to know what he did with thim
same bellows ?’ was Pat’s next question.

‘Indeed I do not, answered Nick. ‘Why do you
ask?’

‘Becase, sorr, hearin’ tell of thim bellows set me

thinkin’? ©
76



Pat Murphy's Proposal. VE

‘Set you thinkin!’ repeated Nicholas, staring at-the
man.

‘Yes, sorr—set me thinkin.

‘What about, pray?’

‘About the toime before I took to the say, your
honour— when I lived at me own home in ould
Ireland.’

‘Then I suppose it was your job to light the fire?’
laughed Nicholas.

‘Well, sir, I did that same purty often,’ rejoined
Murphy good-humouredly; ‘but that’s not exactly
what I was thinkin’ of. It’s this way, your honour—I
used to work at a forge.’

‘Well?’ oe

‘And if it hadn’t been fora bit of a ruction I had
with ‘Mickey Doyle, the praste’s own man, sorr,’ con-
tinued Murphy, ‘why, I might have been a master:
smith at this moment, with a roarin’ trade and as nate
a little house as ye’d find in all Galway,’

‘And what was the ruction between Mr. Doyle and
yourself about?’ asked Nicholas, for the Irishman’s
talk always amused him, and he enjoyed drawing him
out. Se

‘Shure didn’t the big bla’g’ard try to make mischief
*twixt me and Norah Blake!’ said Pat wrathfully.
‘And thin, your honour, we met one foine mornin’ in
Ballymacragg market, and he got jeerin’ at me; and
at last, sorr, I lost me temper, and I just touched
Masther Mickey over the head with a bit of a twig I'd



78 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

got in me hand, and down he tumbled just as if he'd
bin ‘shot.’

‘It must have been a pretty big twig, Pat!’ laughed
Nicholas.

‘Well, sorr, maybe it was,’ admitted Murphy, with a
grin. ‘After that, your honour, he went on, ‘I’d no
pace at all, at all! Father Ryan was down upon me;
Misther Blake—Norah’s father—was down upon me,
and Norah hersilf gave me the cowld shouldher ; so I
jist left me home and went off to Galway to look for
work, and there I got picked up by a pressgang.’

‘ And you've been at sea ever since ?’

‘T have, sorr, worse luck !’ answered Murphy. ‘I was
five years on board of a man-o’-war, and thisis my third
voyage in an Indiaman. But ye’redhrivin’ thim blessed
bellows out of me head, he added. ‘Where did ye say
that young Mossoo put thim?’

‘I said I didn’t know,’ returned Nicholas. ‘But here
comes Monsieur Giraud, so you can ask him. Hold,
Raoul, mon cher!’ he called out, as the Frenchman
came up with Doctor Somers and Miss Falcon. ‘ This
good fellow wants to know what you did with the
bellows you picked up yesterday.’

‘ Comment 2’ said young Giraud, not quite understand-
ing him.

‘What did you do with those old bellows?’ repeated
Nick.

‘Oh, the bellows!’ chimed in Miss Falcon. ‘Why,
M’sieur Giraud gave them to me, and they’re in our



Pat and the Bellows. 79

‘hut. I thought I might be able to mend them, but
they’re past that, I’m afraid.’

‘Beg your pardon, miss,’ said Murphy, with a tug at
his forelock and a scrape of his leg; ‘might I make so
bould as to ask to see thim ?’

‘Certainly, Mr. Murphy. . I will fetch them in a
minute.’ And off ran the young lady, and presently she
returned with a very large and very much dilapidated
pair of bellows.

‘Whe-ew-ew !’ whistled Pat, when he saw their con-
dition. ‘There’s mighty little d/ow lift in them, I’m
thinkin’! But,’ he added, after a closer examination, ‘I
do b’lave I could patch thim up! ’Twould be a great
job if I could!’

‘We have done very well without. them, observed
Doctor Somers. ;

‘True for ye, docthor darlint, retorted Pat; ‘but
maybe we'll do adale betther wzd them! Listhen now
whilst I tell ye, sorr.’

‘Go ahead, my good man,’ said the doctor, shrugging
his shoulders ; ‘ only don’t be too long-winded over it,’

‘You'll observe,’ Murphy resumed, ‘that as I was jest
tellin’ Misther Brodribb, I’m by thrade a blacksmith.’

‘Umph!’ grunted the doctor; ‘pity you didn’t stick
to your trade. ’Twould have been better for you, my
man.

‘Indade, and ye may say that, sorr! But though I
didn’t stick to it, shure I’ve not forgotten it, and maybe
*twould be a good thing if I took’t up again!’ And



80 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

Patrick Murphy looked round at his companions with an
air of triumph. ‘What d’ye think of that, docthor ?’
he continued, after a pause. ‘If I can only mend these
ould bellows, what’s to prevint us buildin’ a bit of a
forge ; and wanst we've a forge, what’s to prevint me
makin’ all the tools and other things that Mr. Bacon
requires ?’

‘Do you mean this, Patrick Murphy?’ gasped the
doctor, almost breathless with astonishment.

‘Why wouldn’t I mane it, sorr? Shure it’s aisy
enough,’ replied the other. ‘I’m purty sart’n we can
mend the bellows, and the forge we can build without
much trouble. We've plenty of ould iron knockin’
about, and there’s the ring and nut of a bower-anchor
as’ll sarve me for ananvil at a pinch. I’ma good smith,
sorr,—though I say it as shouldn’t,—and I can turn out
all that we’re loikely to want for buildin’ the boat we’ve
been talkin’ about so long. Now, Docthor Somers,’ he
concluded, ‘what d’ye say to that?’

‘Say!’ exclaimed the doctor, wringing the honest
fellow’s hand. ‘Why, I say this, Patrick Murphy! If
you succeed in what you propose, you'll be the means
under Providence, of saving our lives ; and if you fail—
well, I’m sure it will not be your fault!’

‘Thank ye, sorr, said Murphy quietly, the tears
welling up into his eyes. ‘I'll do my best for ye all.’



SS
——

$ as a
< ae = —— 2, oy
[ SPQ SI t IBS NS OITAY EDC VAL



CHAPTER XIV.

The Building of the Boat—Hard Times—
A Narrow Escape.

\ATRICK MURPHY had not exaggerated his
skill as asmith. Under his superintendence




; a small forge was erected ; the bellows were
repaired ; and then Pat set manfully to work to furnish
the carpenter with such tools as he declared to be
indispensable, and also with a supply of nails and other
ironwork required in the construction of a boat—the iron
being easily obtained in sufficient quantity, by burning
it out of portions of the wreck.

Hard, indeed, did the honest ‘smith’ labour, and to such
good purpose, that on Thursday, 21st August, the tools,
nails, etc., were ready for use, and on the following morning
the keel of the boat was laid, amidst general rejoicing.

Mr. Hartley, Mr. Garland, and the carpenter had de-
signed the boat between them. Shewas to measure thirty-
six feet over all, with a thirty-two feet keel, and twelve feet
beam, half-decked, and rigged sliding-gunter fashion.

Though the carpenter and the three men who had
F



82 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

volunteered to assist him—they having more or less
knowledge of boat-building—laboured with indefatigable
diligence, the work proceeded very slowly; for the tools,
not being made of very good material, were constantly
getting out of order and often breaking, so Patrick
Murphy had his time pretty well occupied, repairing
sharpening, and replacing them.

Still, if slow, the progress made was sure, until the 5th
September, when the carpenter fell sick. Doctor Somers
looked very grave and shook his head; he had no
medicines whatever, and scarcely knew how to treat his
patient.

‘If poor Bacon had only broken his leg or his arm, or
injured himself so as to require a little surgical skill, I
shouldn’t have minded so much,’ the doctor lamented to
Major Pennefeather, after he had examined his patient ;
‘but I confess that I hardly know what is the matter with
the man, and if I dd know, I’ve no remedies to give him.’

‘It’s a precious bad job,’ observed Mr. Hartley dole-
fully. ‘Just as we were getting on so well with the
boat, too!’

‘Can’t Murphy and Harris go on with the building?’
asked Doctor Somers.

‘No, rejoined the chief officer; ‘they do very well
with Bacon looking after them, but they’re not up to the
work sufficiently to be able to go on without him.’

‘“This sickness doth infect the very life-blood of our
enterprise!”’ quoted Major Pennefeather, with a lame
attempt at cheerfulness. ‘You must do your best for



Lhe Carpenter falls sick. 83

the poor fellow, Somers,’ he added, ‘both for his sake and
ours.’

‘You needn’t tell me that, man, was the doctor’s
testy reply. ‘I always do my best!’

Great, indeed, was the dismay amongst the party
when the gravity of Bacon’s illness became known.
Their lives may be said to have been dependent on his
skill, and now that he was placed hors de combat, with
but slight chance of recovery, their hopes of escaping
from the island went down to zero. The stores saved
from the wreck were running short,—albeit great economy
had been exercised,—and Major Pennefeather, after con-
sulting with the doctor and Mr. Hartley, felt compelled
to reduce the daily allowance of food and water by one-
fourth.

His decision was received with dissatisfaction by three
or four of the sailors and soldiers, but the majority of the
party expressed their readiness to abide by it, and the
murmurings of the malcontents were quickly hushed.

To eke out their store of provisions they now had
recourse to various expedients. The northern and most
rocky side of the island was much frequented by gannets,
and these birds were not very difficult to knock over
with sticks or stones. Their flesh, however, had a rank,
fishy taste, and not even Dr. Somers’ culinary skill (he
was by no means a bad cook) could make it palatable,
but under their present circumstances, the castaways
were only too thankful to add to their daily meal
without drawing upon their stores; so a ‘hunting-party’



84 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

was instituted, and a day rarely passed without a number
of the sea-fowl being slain, cooked, and devoured. They
also on one occasion killed a seal, and cooked a portion of
it for dinner, but those who partook of it were seized with
violent sickness, and the experiment was not repeated.

Fishing was another means they possessed of pro-
curing food, though not in very large quantities - They
had several lines, and soon after the carpenter was taken
ill, Mr. Hartley and Murphy constructed a ‘catamaran’
or raft, just large enough to carry two persons, and this
was taken out every day when the weather permitted.

One day, Mr. Garland and Nicholas Brodribb, when
out on the raft, had a very narrow escape of being driven
out to sea. It was on the 19th September, and they had
been fishing with more than ordinary success since the
early morning, when towards four o’clock the wind
suddenly freshened from the westward ; they were then
about half-a-mile to the east of the island.

‘We must be off, Nick!’ exclaimed Mr. Garland,
hauling in his line. ‘Up with the anchor!’

The ‘anchor’—a somewhat curious-looking arrange-
ment, the handiwork of Patrick Murphy—was quickly
weighed, and, seizing their paddles, they made for the
shore. But they soon found that, instead of making way,
they could scarcely hold their own against the wind, and,
after plying their paddles with all their might and main
for twenty minutes or more, they saw to their dismay
that they were drifting away from the shore.

‘Nick,’ gasped Mr. Garland, nearly exhausted by his



An Awkward Situation. 85

exertions, ‘ what’s to be done? . We're just going leeward
like a haystack!’

‘Suppose we cast anchor again, sir?’ suggested our hero.

‘It will drag to a certainty,’ was the reply.

‘Anyhow, we shan’t drift faster than we’re doing at
present,’ rejoined Nicholas, ‘so over it goes!’ and, suiting
the action to the word, he dropped the anchor overboard.
‘ Now, Mr. Garland, he cried, seizing his paddle again,
‘pull like fury !’ =

Redoubling their exertions, they paddled away for
dear life, and, with the help of the anchor, succeeded in
checking the drifting of the raft.

In the meanwhile, their friends on the island, seeing
their peril, were trying to devise some means of assisting
them, and, after several plans had been suggested, briefly
discussed, and rejected, one of the sailors suddenly be-
thought him of the dinghy, which was then laid up near
the huts, awaiting repair,

‘If we could only get her afloat,’ said he, ‘we might
pull off to the raft and either tow it ashore or else bring
back Mr, Garland and Mr. Brodribb in the boat, and let
the raft go adrift.’

‘Tare an’ ages, man!’ interrupted Patrick Murphy,
who was in a state of anxious excitement owing to the
perilous position of his young favourite, ‘ Misther Nick,’
and would have swum out to his assistance had not his
companions restrained him ; ‘what's the use of talkin
loike that? How would we be gettin’ the dinghy afloat,



86 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

when she just leaks loike a sieve? Betther let me swim
out to thim, your honour,’ he added, appealing to Major
Pennefeather ; ‘shure I’d do’t in no time.’

‘Supposing you did, Murphy, replied the major
kindly, ‘what use would you be? The raft couldn’t bear
another passenger, you know. We should only have to
report the loss of three good friends instead of two!’

‘No, Pat, it won’t do, put in Mr. Hartley, laying his
hand on the man’s shoulder. ‘We can’t spare you.’

‘ The dinghy leaks a goodish bit, true enough, gentle-
men,’ said the-.sailor Harris—he who had been the
carpenter’s chief assistant in building the boat,— but.
give me twenty minutes, and I’ll undertake to patch her
up and make her tight enough for this job. Mr. Bacon
had aturn at her at odd times afore he went sick, and
she’s not so bad as Pat Murphy thinks,’

Mr. Hartley looked at the major. ‘Shall we try it ?’
said he doubtfully.

‘It appears to be the sole chance we have of saving
them,’ answered Major Pennefeather.

So, assuming from this reply that his project was
approved of, Harris started off to the huts, followed by
Patrick Murphy, and in a very few minutes they were
both hard at work patching up the dinghy.

In less than half an hour the dinghy was ready to put
off, and the question now arose, ‘Who was to go in her?’
—or we should rather say, ‘Who was of to go in her?’
for every man present was anxious to venture out to the
assistance of Mr. Garland and Nick; but Mr. Hartley,



Who ts to go? 87

well aware that it was a service of no little danger, ex-
pressed his intention of going himself. Now the worthy
chief officer was a gentleman of stalwart proportions,
and, even after a month’s ‘low diet, he weighed an
honest fourteen stone; whilst, in her present crazy con-
dition, the less weight the dinghy carried the more likely
was she to accomplish her perilous trip in safety, so his
decision was received with dismay by his companions.

‘I humbly beg your honour’s pardon,’ said Patrick
Murphy, after an awkward pause; ‘but don’t ye think
now, sort, that ye’d betther let me go?’

‘Why?’ asked Mr. Hartley, who had already begun
to divest himself of coat and vest.

‘Becase, your honour—becase, sorr,’ stammered Pat,
fidgeting with his cap, for he knew that Mr. Hartley was
rather ‘touchy’ about his size,—‘ becase, Misther Hartley,
—no offence meant, sorr!—ye’re just a trifle—the least
bit in the world, ye know—but still a trifle heavier than
I am, sorr, and’—

‘The less weight the dinghy has in her the better,
interposed Major Pennefeather. ‘That is what you
mean—eh, Murphy?’

‘Shure your honour’s just hit it!’ was the Irishman’s
reply.

‘You see, gentlemen,’ Harris struck in, ‘though we’ve
done our best to make the boat water-tight, still there’s
no doubt she'll make a goodish drop of water, so I’m
afeard two o’ us ’ll have to go in her—one to pull, t’other
to keep her afloat by baling; and, in course, it stands to



88 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

reason, we’d best send the lightest weights among us,
They'll be Pat Murphy and th’ young French gen’leman,
I’m thinkin’’

‘I understand, Harris,’ answered Mr. Hartley; add-
ing, ‘Why couldn’t Murphy have explained that at once,
instead of beating about the bush?’

‘You're willing to go, Raoul?’ asked Major Penne-
feather, turning to the Frenchman.

‘ Mais certainment, m’sieur,; replied Raoul, who was
just beginning to understand a little English.

The dinghy was then launched without further parley,
and Murphy and young Giraud jumped into her.

‘Hilloa!’ exclaimed Mr. Garland, when he saw the
dinghy put off from the shore. ‘What are they up to, I
wonder ?’

‘Coming off to our assistance, I suppose, sir,’ said
Nicholas. ‘But what they’re
it’s the old dinghy.’

‘It is indeed, rejoined his companion. ‘ How they’ll
keep her afloat is more than I can imagine. That fine



why, sir, I do believe

fellow Patrick Murphy is pulling her, and there appears
to be somebody else stooping down in the stern-sheets.
Can you see who it is?’

‘I think it’s Raoul Giraud, sir, replied Nicholas, after a
good look. ‘Yes—I’m sure itis. He’s baling out the boat’

‘Heaven protect them!’ ejaculated Mr. Garland.
‘They’re risking their lives to save ours. But keep
paddling, Nick my son, or we shall have the anchor



The Rescue. 89

dragging, and we mustn’t let those gallant fellows pull a
yard further than we can help.’

The wind being in his favour, Patrick Murphy soon
reached the raft, but, quick as they were, the dinghy
would have been half full of water if Raoul had stopped
baling. Mr. Garland and Nicholas were by this time
pretty well exhausted with their exertions in keeping the
raft from drifting ; for though the anchor Still held, it
certainly would have dragged had they not relieved the
strain upon it by paddling.

‘Thank you, Pat!’ cried Mr. Garland, when the dinghy
came alongside; ‘and you, too, Monsieur Giraud. We
shall owe you our lives if we get safe back to the shore.’

‘ Arrah, not at all, sorr!’ retorted Murphy ; ‘shure ’tis
a plisure to be of sarvice to you and Misther Nick.
Now, sorr, he went on, ‘shall we tow you ashore, or will
ye come into the boat?’

Mr. Garland looked doubtfully at the dinghy. ‘I’m
afraid,’ said he, ‘that our extra weight will sink you. It
seemed to be as much as you could manage to keep
afloat without us.’

‘Faix! an’ ye may say that, Misther Garland,’
answered Pat. ‘The young gintleman’s nivir stopped
baling for a blessed moment. Ye’d best remain on the
raft, and I’ll tow ye back as aisy as nothin’?

‘I think that will be the better plan, for the dinghy
would certainly not carry us all in her present condition,’
assented the other. ‘We shall have to stick to the



90 LTar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

paddles, though, Nick,’ he added, ‘or else this good fellow
can never make head against the wind.’

‘I’m ready, sir,’ rejoined Nicholas. ‘Shall I haul up
the anchor?’

‘Yes,’ answered Mr. Garland. ‘We must use our cable
as a tow-rope.’

The anchor was then hauled up and detached from
the ‘cable, which was passed twice or thrice round the
after thwart of the dinghy, and made fast—the slack of
the rope being carefully coiled down. Murphy bent to
his sculls, Mr. Garland and Nicholas once more plied
their paddles, and the return journey commenced.

It was a desperate hard pull, and the odds were heavy
against their ever reaching the shore.

Patrick Murphy rowed as surely never sailor rowed
before or since. Mr. Garland and our hero paddled and
paddled with all their might and main; whilst Raoul
Giraud never ceased baling for a moment. Slowly—
oh, how slowly !—they approached the island. Their
progress was watched with intense anxiety by their
comrades. ‘They’ll never do it!’ cried some. ‘Yes,
they will!’ exclaimed others. ‘ Pat will never give in!’

And Pat didn’t give in. On he pulled for dear life,
and at length his dogged courage triumphed, and he
brought both dinghy and raft safe to land.

‘A near squeak, sir, said Nicholas, as he and Mr.
Garland scrambled ashore.

‘Too near to be pleasant, retorted the officer. I
don’t think you'll catch me on that raft again?



SSS aan
PASE Ere POT A

SSN

Sra



N
BSS

i
ie

CHAPTER XV.

Relates how the Carpenter paid his Debt to Nature; and
how Major Pennefeather and his Friends quelled an
Attempt to Mutiny.

Mr. Garland and Nicholas Brodribb, Bacon
the carpenter died. From the first, Doctor
d despaired of the poor fellow’s recovery, and
had more than once expressed surprise at his lasting so
long ; nevertheless the announcement of his death came
quite as a shock to the rest of the party. It must be con-
fessed that they felt the loss of the carvfenter more than
they did the loss of the maz, for now they had no hope
of the boat that was to carry them back to civilisation
ever being finished, and there were amongst them ‘certain
fellows of the baser sort’ who chose to make this trouble
an excuse for open grumbling—grumbling that was, in
fact, next door to mutinous language. These men
began to complain noisily of what they were pleased
to term their miserable situation, and declared that they
would no longer accept sus: scanty rations.





92 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

‘It ain’t no manner o’ use starvin’ ourselves,’ said a
sailor, Jackson by name, who had constituted himself
ringleader of the malcontents, and had for some time
past been plotting against Major Pennefeather’s author-
ity. ‘We'll never get away from this place, so what I
say is—let’s go in for a short life and a merry un!’

‘Hear! hear!’ cried those of his companions who
were of a kindred spirit.

‘Them’s my sentiments, mates,’ continued Jackson,
encouraged by their applause. ‘Here we've got prog
and liquor enough to last us a month or more, eatin’
and drinkin’ as much as we pleases ; and I for one ’tend
eatin’ and drinkin’ as much as I pleases for the future!’

‘Good again !’ exclaimed his friends,

‘What I says is,’ Jackson went on, waxing bolder,
‘why shouldn’t us? Why should us knock under to
Major Pennefeather and them two mates?’

‘Ay, that’s the question!’ chimed in one of the
soldiers, a hangdog-looking rascal from the purlieus
of Westminster. ‘Why should us?’

‘We're the strongest party, shipmates, pursued
Jackson, ‘and I’m ready and willin’ to’—

‘H’sh, mate,’ interrupted a sailor, whose bump of
caution was rather more strongly developed than was
the redoubtable Jackson’s, ‘Here be Job Harris, and
ye knows he don’t agree with us,’

‘No, he doesn’t—sart’n sure!’ exclaimed Harris, who
had overheard the greater part of their conversation.
‘Not by no manner o’ means, Job Harris don’t agree

©



Serving out a Mutineer. 93

with you, nor ain’t likely to, neither! A precious lot
of rascals you be! So ye’re the strongest party, be
you?’ he added, addressing Jackson, and at the same
time turning up his shirt-sleeves. ‘Very good! Now
look ye, Tom Jackson, ye’ve had your say, now I’m a-
going to have mine; and, first and foremost, I’ll just
ask ye a question.’

‘Ask away, mate,’
returned Jackson,
with an uneasy laugh.

‘D’ye remember the
second night we lay in
Table Bay ?’ inquired
Harris, drawing closer
to him ; ‘ you, like the
coward that ye are,
struck one of the boys “
across the mouth—
you remember that?
Well, Tom Jackson, I
remember it too; but
to prewent that there
sarcumstance ’scapin’ from our mem’ries, why, I’m a-
goin’ to take the liberty of givin’ ye just such another
thrashin’ as I give ye that evenin’!’

And, without another word, Harris fell upon Jackson,
and pounded him until the wretched man went down
on his marrow-bones and roared for mercy. At first,
Jackson’s cronies seemed inclined to interfere in -his





94 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

behalf, but it happened that, at that moment, Major
Pennefeather, the two officers, and Nick, Raoul Giraud,
and Murphy, put in an appearance, so they slunk back,
and left their leader to his fate, thinking, no doubt, that
this was a case where discretion was the better part of
valour.

‘That'll do, Harris, at length said Major Pennefeather,
‘He’s had enough for the present. Which is the other
man you mentioned ?’

‘This be he, your honour—Private Sims,’ rejoined
Harris, giving Jackson a parting kick, and then collaring
the Westminster recruit: ‘He’s been a-grumblin’ these
three weeks, and shirkin’ work whenever he could.’

‘Now, Private Sims, you have been a soldier long
enough to know that discipline must be maintained,’
said the major; ‘and that, under all circumstances,
insubordination is severely punished, both in the army
and navy. I therefore take it upon myself—as a major
in His Majesty’s Marine Corps, and, consequently, your
superior officer—to order you two dozen lashes. Seize
him up, Harris!’

‘What’s my crime, if you please, sir?’ asked the now
trembling Sims.

‘Insubordinate language, and inciting others to
mutiny,’ was the reply.

‘But I ain’t in the King’s service, expostulated the
terrified wretch. ‘I’m a ’Onourable Company’s soldier,
I am; and you've no manner o’ bis’ness to flog me.’

‘No,’ interposed one of Mr. Sims’ comrades, ‘you ain’t



The Mutiny quelled, 95

got no right wotsumever to touch ‘im, major. You
ain’t our commanding officer !’

‘That’s a point we'll reserve for future discussion,’
coolly replied Major Pennefeather. ‘In the meanwhile,
understand that it is my intention to flog Private Sims ;
and as you, Private Williams, have thought fit to ques-
tion my authority, I now order you to administer the
punishment. Silence, sir! Not another word.’

Major Pennefeather’s determined attitude completely
cowed the would-be mutineers. Sims suffered himself
to be tied up to a post, and Williams, at the word of
command, administered two dozen lashes on his bare
back, with a rope’s end.

‘Cast him loose, Murphy, said the major, when the
punishment had been inflicted; ‘and, mark you, my
lads, if I hear any more of this nonsense, it will be the
worse for you!’

The severe punishment inflicted on Jackson and Sims
had the effect of putting a stop to all open grumbling,
but Major Pennefeather and Mr. Hartley thought it
better to be on their guard, so all the arms, ammunition,
and provisions were removed into the ladies’ hut, and
one of the ‘party of order’ was in future detailed every
day and every night to do ‘sentry-go’ over them.

Thus another month passed away, without anything
happening worthy of record, except that Harris and
Murphy set to and repaired the dinghy, making her
perfectly water-tight and seaworthy ; and, after that, she
was used, whenever the weather permitted, for fishing.









CHAPTER XVI.

Introduces William Ashcroft, A.B., and relates how he
confided the Story of his Life to our Hero.

Ay HERE was a man among those who escaped
to the island when the Marathon was wrecked,

<3 an able seaman, William Ashcroft by name,
who had joined the ship at Cape Town, in the place of
a quarter-master, lost overboard a few days before she
anchored in Table Bay.

During the brief period that he served on board the
Marathon—that is to say, from the day he engaged, until
her loss—though he proved himself to be a thorough
sailor, and one who never shirked work nor danger, Ash-.
croft did not very favourably impress those with whom
he was brought in contact. He was a middle-aged,
melancholy-looking man, of an unusually taciturn and
to all appearance surly disposition ; but it was remarked
by Mr. Hartley, and one or two others, that whenever
Ashcroft replied to a question, or had occasion to speak
to any officer or passenger, his language was superior to
that of the ordinary run of poucmast hands.





William Ashcroft. 97

Of William -Ashcroft’s antecedents very little was
known, beyond the fact that he had been a sailor from
his youth; that he had married a Cape Dutchwoman ;
had lived several years in South Africa; and that he
now took to a seafaring life again in consequence of his
wife’s death. When Jackson, Sims, and the other dis-
contented spirits showed a disposition to mutiny, Ash-
croft refused to have anything to do with them, but then
he did not side openly with the officers; he simply kept
aloof from both parties, and continued to perform his
share of the daily work, and accepted his daily allowance
of food and drink, without saying a word—good, bad, or
indifferent. It may, therefore, be easily understood that
this strange man was ‘boycotted’ by the malcontents,
and regarded with a certain amount of suspicion by the
rest of the little community.

Now it chanced one fine day, five or six weeks after
the ‘Jackson émeute, that it came to William Ashcroft’s
turn to go fishing in the dinghy, along with our young
friend Nicholas Brodribb—an arrangement that did not
particularly please Master Nick, who would have pre-
ferred a more sociable companion.

‘Pleasant sort of a chap to spend half-a-dozen hours
with!’ growled the boy, looking after Ashcroft, as he made
his way down to the beach. ‘He won't talk, and he won’t
listen, and as to getting a “yarn” out of him, why, you
might as well try to pump water out of a rock!’

‘Of whom are you speaking, Nick?’ inquired Dr.

Somers, overhearing his remarks.
G



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'1884996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNUX' 'sip-files00005.tif'
3aa6f69e24a3ca384915d3aae508e51e
b2170c92e0a22b4c28f0136e3787eaefd3892ab3
'2011-12-23T23:50:48-05:00'
describe
'53' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNUY' 'sip-files00005.txt'
ded016adb9ee38a628bab3853d4131fe
43e2875802ca5f04408f1551dc057e9e8eed5c0b
'2011-12-23T23:48:56-05:00'
describe
'10386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
e69719d35c760be5ca939c8fcd6d94ec
ccd4e21fe1cedba52837bf74ec84d44700b43e1f
'2011-12-23T23:47:46-05:00'
describe
'265479' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVA' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
aaf2e4d63067ebdbcc0f8ba924facbf5
b7764c81feac1908849855bd52c8ddd6ddaceec3
'2011-12-23T23:51:01-05:00'
describe
'229724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVB' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
3fc07ad2f2314352f5b31771d5e93044
8b904ae732721da486ea1d2e439a31b265ace348
'2011-12-23T23:49:41-05:00'
describe
'2900' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVC' 'sip-files00006.pro'
014f169fa8614dc28ed6a90e588dcecc
5699de33965a729c5ada1e7116f88f136137c345
'2011-12-23T23:49:11-05:00'
describe
'69855' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVD' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
e89d300f65c92f7866261d3b03bad396
d687243d11a13a9335db66ed68b0a839252b2a1f
'2011-12-23T23:44:05-05:00'
describe
'2139708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVE' 'sip-files00006.tif'
35f99ba3069d1a72028164aeab70c9d8
d1d7c1abd3359379e5b64fd934563f5be625680f
'2011-12-23T23:48:33-05:00'
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVF' 'sip-files00006.txt'
a9805d486b561a6683b608fc2f4c3ddb
af46ed7acc48b3a6693249a83dfcf334d8078b5d
'2011-12-23T23:44:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'27160' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVG' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
f4a08218ee6ef6e06592ffc80f61e322
ff3b9f13cc15847cbaf5b5800a5fb90ce0b7771d
'2011-12-23T23:45:17-05:00'
describe
'322809' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7ff5b50fefe89a776cdc7cb67e4ae21d
ab0274a548ff00c2f4c3683cc13ecdff895c5fb8
'2011-12-23T23:50:53-05:00'
describe
'81725' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVI' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
613953f0484fa9a7ea30e3e518d68648
cd7b4378eaaa2f55a748b7f7b10ad84cc8d3cf75
'2011-12-23T23:48:36-05:00'
describe
'9831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
2a4076d3e930791a6d81da19f6458bb5
a27e199b7fd8a05ea6fa8810802cda1580dcd669
'2011-12-23T23:50:14-05:00'
describe
'31368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVK' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
e435bde770807890459882e63298cb68
7a24a98db9f028efd5ba1c6aca796031d58f91a8
'2011-12-23T23:46:56-05:00'
describe
'2594332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
0047661e44dfd1702f2766bbfe7e5492
053d9fd1279aa023957d0cf72a4c7fde0b6161d4
'2011-12-23T23:50:02-05:00'
describe
'591' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVM' 'sip-files00007.txt'
e31b4b83132451ae162ae6c1c6387d2d
609f38f3e0b1ad0f46aad8544be5007e65ce357c
'2011-12-23T23:49:13-05:00'
describe
'16377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
91d1b658b376e9727bd46473c109f15e
0dc1169f52ec2ac30060d2df3290800a75e48c5f
'2011-12-23T23:46:36-05:00'
describe
'323015' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
5c89d1d1f75f219cceba816dedbb561c
0a9e0becdc6ac28a7c57f85550689738e50425a4
'2011-12-23T23:43:05-05:00'
describe
'48895' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ba2ee6abd28bcb52bd44544e732fdc6a
24f5f6c8926d088133056700c169696a3f052fec
'2011-12-23T23:44:00-05:00'
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
ed7b174736e8bcd0d62c33ddb112e613
86b07f3759571ecb8aa18f403551fb37e0733081
'2011-12-23T23:46:00-05:00'
describe
'15572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVR' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f14279bf6feba98e1e4bfb38485cc8ee
5a13270bb0c61ccbb42e839965e10d015befe7dd
'2011-12-23T23:50:44-05:00'
describe
'2593996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
3473862568976bac7da90877785ea8b7
68ec8f1813848a297148e9e62d4bf021672d1728
'2011-12-23T23:50:18-05:00'
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
2dabf25def88a95ce754c9d0617d6f88
f7af248a21405bdd738ffc98f12028ddcf70b39f
describe
'9949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
fc8bbb64e4454c03259b21460022d71a
e67bdd78ae53c1d08ff31fd0cc894369a87e8cb9
'2011-12-23T23:50:06-05:00'
describe
'323179' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
636e3d33efc01ce239975e4ccdcfd27b
34f88b3d7c359df91992e16871f15f5dcb38547a
'2011-12-23T23:50:21-05:00'
describe
'171170' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
416a34248a3742f701160e5679023989
8036357749e45f546ec5601de7a6b44242b2fbda
'2011-12-23T23:48:44-05:00'
describe
'44795' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVX' 'sip-files00009.pro'
11f0c155bb0996ebe1ea58e19f872ca9
655fb754f12d4c66d7550344803e81457778704b
'2011-12-23T23:44:27-05:00'
describe
'57816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVY' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
22c0015c9ee1db74e8dc02b20ea25e2a
693ddbacb6143f58e7868e901bdbfbec72a0ef0e
'2011-12-23T23:44:53-05:00'
describe
'2598696' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d5f212c4f89dccf2a6e449b5b74b13ca
de530284d25d2c8e2d154fcbdac1ac24b7dd3817
'2011-12-23T23:43:53-05:00'
describe
'2334' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWA' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b6d95e7a929d3718faeb8933fccc0526
c9239f527e17d67b16057af168a2cbbf34f3c720
'2011-12-23T23:46:58-05:00'
describe
'23937' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c8a491072fd992edf42b0a8fcf14b738
b2fdc485e527af09c37d1da7cf17c8876ae80e22
'2011-12-23T23:51:18-05:00'
describe
'323247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
76f4bcaca503ac992ccb6355d544f642
2bd78e63443747a92489f5f8e9b0a7de8b5df65f
'2011-12-23T23:48:10-05:00'
describe
'163101' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWD' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
bbf243f9d0061569af2fedefdca89639
6ef40f64a946c8b54968609ed7d3bf6bb7aef595
'2011-12-23T23:48:55-05:00'
describe
'55002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWE' 'sip-files00010.pro'
63ed2c521ded02663ff84bba822f877e
94deccbe72b668c028067c2520a479eb156f661a
'2011-12-23T23:48:27-05:00'
describe
'61385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
bccf3acba5844d982203b2dcfa2b50a5
e2a1e45aea114962da584a600a36211884815e85
'2011-12-23T23:48:37-05:00'
describe
'2598908' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
212333d0e0c3a9c22fff107c9d99f396
5e2e9bd047374c3afb550c9fe52b65ae7bae8292
'2011-12-23T23:49:24-05:00'
describe
'2830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWH' 'sip-files00010.txt'
7cd8ce5b1de9867deeb0725cd1ed96ce
ade532175b55544775e883b110da1b6bb3432c25
'2011-12-23T23:46:24-05:00'
describe
'25055' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWI' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
9b8eb2f920f5f0752e78db0086d161b9
813c52c55c5acf00e0395217171d39874613f619
'2011-12-23T23:47:10-05:00'
describe
'323237' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
4f0323ee67f2dec64cc4fa283063b7a7
e9708078014b2d3f14aa744e284026f2c8f9e207
'2011-12-23T23:49:21-05:00'
describe
'161999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
51a2354cd8b667835af94e849dabdb53
0794add92c69a32590aa94fc34ba6278f6955328
'2011-12-23T23:43:35-05:00'
describe
'21195' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
bf681d50fdf9b9c79d2c89ad544186cb
85d34827de4e02cae15fbae2fac2b7a42b5baf6e
'2011-12-23T23:44:06-05:00'
describe
'59178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c92324eea8053f2ee64747f5fae315a3
dfd755c366774154b14c4b0dfd3c167f292f9fce
'2011-12-23T23:44:38-05:00'
describe
'2598788' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2b4e8dad84de2594e65e321a5b3a0b0e
cdee34434549f4373fdfce76504b1eaa2bd9aefb
'2011-12-23T23:47:09-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f49af2f8036d434f4ccfd655463fd53b
c4b50ffaa657425100c6437ca0cd42f6388795ac
'2011-12-23T23:47:05-05:00'
describe
'23799' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f5c11f3bb64e5992377d7be2d4402396
ae06392680f001e8241921b1a94a76576e781427
'2011-12-23T23:51:10-05:00'
describe
'322959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3b668eef76c65ddc4dc66a15e78f6aae
0b4d3e518d0d28745b671a12f69ef5a443635a00
'2011-12-23T23:43:43-05:00'
describe
'190499' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWR' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
832ddfa5ae1d20850845ff9891148401
af3bde7a73f38e589d293df18d61a13b79cdb5be
'2011-12-23T23:50:55-05:00'
describe
'39707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWS' 'sip-files00012.pro'
21ad33b5b21e39a7afc5de8519d18b56
affad52197b3ccaa05e9d5de3a881524bfc91cf9
describe
'74799' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWT' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
8158a85b53bca3fa1295909ffbcdc252
1b72eb6b78e2c671c0d156a94b11161a052d3ce5
'2011-12-23T23:49:08-05:00'
describe
'2597688' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWU' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d7165f4bb7bd902cabf67e2075e6c36b
a91020b6db9ff390bf59758f289719f349ca0e7b
'2011-12-23T23:50:33-05:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWV' 'sip-files00012.txt'
e6f907d82ba47b664b04c7c2268eac0d
271c9e48534ed888864b21fd4537b4645fb898b5
'2011-12-23T23:50:12-05:00'
describe
'27796' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWW' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
f603eccdf31e5d03acd0c215c0051ad8
edeefc06f6a5a73bc9535449f5caaa894f32ee5a
'2011-12-23T23:51:16-05:00'
describe
'322911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWX' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
57f69a5fbecd2cd51eaa21bed9f74f23
17e5df9c214d302dfb260ba6221994fd42894412
'2011-12-23T23:48:35-05:00'
describe
'186894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWY' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
9123464646d1057ae9cbbbe75bbf00a2
b56163c53eefaa01fa8df5546b410accff5b59cf
'2011-12-23T23:49:25-05:00'
describe
'37122' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNWZ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
7307262876fc574f40f616866b43f25f
01f052f1f09c90d1d322b92fa5e94446518dcaf9
describe
'72177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXA' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c1abe99d308304362d5d25c749b16b74
415a038618d8e2c0754dbbfe9bdc437ef413938d
'2011-12-23T23:51:17-05:00'
describe
'2597896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXB' 'sip-files00013.tif'
32d7fe5a63293910c2c4e195f4e99bc1
daad2f212d60ec419fa7b3e88921bd1703c22586
'2011-12-23T23:51:21-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXC' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8feb35994fbc745c90f46aa89b536cfb
69ad159f52a5fff3a601e5fc6c6bdcff123f605d
'2011-12-23T23:43:47-05:00'
describe
'27589' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXD' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3e22026d5bff0674e17cd3b899fd44c6
9b9fdb09a80181b8b3a4d83976fcb6ed17ea779b
'2011-12-23T23:46:52-05:00'
describe
'322938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXE' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
38100b924307dd037f8be206be399914
f807f12a69a410909b6bdda6e4da045f8f0206f1
'2011-12-23T23:47:42-05:00'
describe
'183666' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXF' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
6728f6cc71a28d9701b0684d061f55ad
cc7a9ab3e1b4a10c1e5f2e99d393d6c96db3ad31
'2011-12-23T23:44:16-05:00'
describe
'37569' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXG' 'sip-files00014.pro'
971a6b660db763421f11f77e750031c0
ba745d93ed419edaf42286db96075d6a7fce943c
'2011-12-23T23:45:30-05:00'
describe
'69833' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXH' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
200252dfe300b0ce92d60aa6142e2834
1f2d6034454d1cbd8ff7a76bb821fe74de2018d6
'2011-12-23T23:44:17-05:00'
describe
'2597428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXI' 'sip-files00014.tif'
950b22a40b16d045e7bfdcb47333a38d
084b8d05de4f8e8834a9486fb8562ab9e2bac619
'2011-12-23T23:50:20-05:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
7d022473b36a65433ac394f8cf69a81b
3527963ab0557b8111b589c6b577360b22293e51
describe
'26857' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXK' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
df01d0adad01b5ad4291b43e2414bc91
cc2b03526f062197af10cd09b7e9f2502efc2ab3
'2011-12-23T23:50:41-05:00'
describe
'322998' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
cc1f9d880dd7de2e9d411cb028a1b5fe
1daf4d3290797026bf57e79145bcc591264e6492
'2011-12-23T23:48:07-05:00'
describe
'164951' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a5aa6031834f6e5273d3aa7ed0f1889d
a15f52a4d9c7a7c90ace44fb387142708b696c1b
'2011-12-23T23:43:16-05:00'
describe
'28112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
e823a326946cdf5e469f69c623b7f5c4
daa9338bcad3bfd8ebc5300f2f3561ba4ce28b70
'2011-12-23T23:44:22-05:00'
describe
'59605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ca00d6d1a8b0e2995c6241bf83c06af4
39fec0328c7478a23f5842ed1406be50a581f3bf
describe
'2596384' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXP' 'sip-files00015.tif'
405282c289f8ee40c945051313927a00
ea234b25952fc2884a104441891aec8460186dd5
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
0c71fd0f9e86dba19eff1e445c40a385
8820b839b69aa23085630d2f65908fda36628e7c
describe
'23805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXR' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ef59868769fe87b955bc4f91fd035afe
b922c14eb662db78c10b92d19d34c793377f6f95
'2011-12-23T23:43:10-05:00'
describe
'322936' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
5803382ce95fac3c67113a8d03ed1845
0c92e47c2edfd2e512dd1e00666c1c52cd23f556
describe
'167464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXT' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
d6e3b45bc0cc7500569824fd3ed1dac8
0ddba1785fbc80af001a70aec08858b0bda2a336
'2011-12-23T23:47:23-05:00'
describe
'25521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXU' 'sip-files00016.pro'
e9246044759f4e15ea2d6b0acef8d03c
3ca691354a8fe66c0ba212c85d4abb07ce001f87
'2011-12-23T23:48:19-05:00'
describe
'63491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXV' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
322b0f91c00c755f8dd0261e45ef4f42
0ffbcdbe4e1b379cf37838be2668dfc3cf93163d
'2011-12-23T23:48:12-05:00'
describe
'2596936' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXW' 'sip-files00016.tif'
4b92dc1ae6ff11f645a1462394e39e60
00e3881955ddbc0a8eea9e3120f11ed8eeb8a0e4
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXX' 'sip-files00016.txt'
bf966496a2e04d28331fcd8e228cb70d
10c3c64c26005ab95f12f508e248f36f7d5ff09b
'2011-12-23T23:51:27-05:00'
describe
'25082' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXY' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
eebf3a213fcacd5eb3fa251d380c6faf
ade640f3e9eb1aa7bcf7c3df55d3667172845256
'2011-12-23T23:43:58-05:00'
describe
'323220' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNXZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
df4948719ae90a71bb4af0d315f799de
7f82aeeed4cb343a0c3e8aa7de3007dfda1faa7e
'2011-12-23T23:48:21-05:00'
describe
'179619' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
a91fd636cc94f34ea394ec4c43bd4089
e0f0dbb8a310c158342ad19f384fbfa68f6c94ac
'2011-12-23T23:46:11-05:00'
describe
'37968' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e507c126d54ec6e02052c4d2c2117dd4
957d2709ae36c602333ab69d191206097d2d5b0a
describe
'70635' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYC' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0a16e171884c21f5316f0eaa73d274fd
909f9757ee619b6a0cb60ed8f09f212c20ac19cf
'2011-12-23T23:44:29-05:00'
describe
'2599492' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a61d989c1f31e1740b2d245e65f6e78d
720b430f4844282b4a719699ecc776730a173a16
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
8a16414d7d5720ff42bb31b44c7f80fc
f6f2d15b1063c143347fbff930d8dc64ecde55f8
'2011-12-23T23:48:02-05:00'
describe
'26839' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYF' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
21bf2361333d59693cad8f11a3c212c9
952a4efbef0bb5bd5f5d049e12a9c8d7ec0ed56e
'2011-12-23T23:51:33-05:00'
describe
'323175' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYG' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2c01b10e271bc19a4fcb0dbb35aa1242
8263db6e53ef628ca4d6f022adf6e9dcfa7f8627
'2011-12-23T23:46:19-05:00'
describe
'185549' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYH' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
ac8c2a9baad3b5ff1c2a5f1fbfc9856c
c227632ed85b19107854f8226a62db21338aef54
describe
'38590' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
22b5cff2be2b6f3525e46904c31a1944
aeadb3c1d5c62f794bcf66397a604778e500f499
'2011-12-23T23:50:08-05:00'
describe
'72370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYJ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
57b3c68b928e63d41d5c9d533deda2bc
82ccd84d3e76f8b094c496ad7bcfcf4b152f24c2
'2011-12-23T23:50:30-05:00'
describe
'2599504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYK' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4571f1e8f32b72eca6aa7ecdb308ac31
439498fdeb2575b86268fd10fd8b8068d3dc2963
'2011-12-23T23:44:39-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYL' 'sip-files00018.txt'
5cc98f2cf858498ee3925df879482197
1f68298810e9de8291d71bf69d8aeed6049f30c6
'2011-12-23T23:49:39-05:00'
describe
'27132' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYM' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5e2640a12aa319ff5a012bcc3740764f
cbf33f13d6a40d8f0f17f0baf6eff74c88a6db14
'2011-12-23T23:46:04-05:00'
describe
'322949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYN' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
6e00f685ebb5b57041ed0d9353fef261
686728f3b2d086df6c55e7e6a513b5c783cabea9
'2011-12-23T23:44:34-05:00'
describe
'179926' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
999d3391d87d8faef00864680b531b20
2f1986b0abf828786868ee61d50649b71a009453
'2011-12-23T23:44:33-05:00'
describe
'27129' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYP' 'sip-files00019.pro'
fe0cc7575f1aad9da335472bbb785d30
1745fc6a94fc609364dcf9c9cb77d985b3738f88
'2011-12-23T23:48:05-05:00'
describe
'69696' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYQ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2016a9ad6cf9fbb33cc646ceb549f66f
63d3eab59cc52e3e179d11dce018b2ae06ca6e35
'2011-12-23T23:49:55-05:00'
describe
'2608004' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYR' 'sip-files00019.tif'
fec3d1569f8f56718d10c9ae8a8dc9a7
25ee5f106dcc13789cf2bb499076af9e0036b0ae
'2011-12-23T23:48:20-05:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYS' 'sip-files00019.txt'
821843ed66f9955996c90de3b35ba5f6
0de15e6dadabe7b090fb1c67996f2736085ecac6
'2011-12-23T23:51:00-05:00'
describe
'33415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYT' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
77d777661291eeddcbd90e6d68dc06dd
38f26e189542a3a02e8a45ebb7897dc1217f4508
'2011-12-23T23:51:15-05:00'
describe
'322957' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYU' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
100d9304377a5c953d23cc330e5be536
0a452d4a8bf0587e3b0f7dcdbaee35be27c8338f
'2011-12-23T23:50:27-05:00'
describe
'172273' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYV' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
44bccc077e013f03988412bc5afa06d6
b845f3bf179d0ae02988a16c17a7a4b52404d7bc
'2011-12-23T23:49:05-05:00'
describe
'27254' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYW' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e0c00d615678833281e882fcee5bfce7
ed5591d0d2a754345653395d09d3c5c4e6b84802
describe
'66391' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYX' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0344d935b8f5252f34f5e74027a7a7be
4220024e5e668222c7fac577d71a34ec0dd7ea93
'2011-12-23T23:50:23-05:00'
describe
'2597256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYY' 'sip-files00020.tif'
b982067b5392e92d78fa3e2d9237e7ed
cd83e1d0aabb03f06b5d028cefeb013290cb26ab
'2011-12-23T23:49:12-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNYZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
84ced6b21ecf375ced2969b7518bf9ef
228cf0720503076a184f8f3d5e1327d70f2379c1
describe
'25804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
56800b167dcd3b5a61a8299de486feee
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'2011-12-23T23:43:36-05:00'
describe
'323212' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZB' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
8382041c31ed34e8f0a6c97feb9c8011
2aa16fd68c00ae1799992f34af4a49967d8752ec
'2011-12-23T23:46:13-05:00'
describe
'188656' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0873d193775fa0799f27f64dba1f4804
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describe
'42207' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZD' 'sip-files00021.pro'
39171afbee1ce2467e6309c1afb3ffef
621065eba80c5cf137d48ec2376e4f0547636c82
'2011-12-23T23:43:14-05:00'
describe
'73939' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZE' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d7391279cde996e614fb5e18739ee010
cc086915fffa9f7677d3fb14f62117482391dbc5
'2011-12-23T23:46:43-05:00'
describe
'2599400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
1e7304c75719df8413dee0b6b646a8f1
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describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZG' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5912d3375148116d827c160c0ce880de
3ef0a676dcd13bb9f769be040fe56cdbd8e5f0a6
'2011-12-23T23:45:55-05:00'
describe
'26867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
aead1f2f67e8124df1ff09671b9639b5
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'2011-12-23T23:47:55-05:00'
describe
'322982' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZI' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
12c8c41ebcfb0490c78cfb11953b7b24
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'2011-12-23T23:49:26-05:00'
describe
'192729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZJ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7f9e8fa5ac9ef9a8975cb538254203b2
fa1d7cd1b6d2099e0318ceecef2033b2ba86bf31
'2011-12-23T23:45:11-05:00'
describe
'41336' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZK' 'sip-files00022.pro'
73260a97421a3c183c4305a4b4780966
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'2011-12-23T23:43:49-05:00'
describe
'73389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZL' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
8fe43f314c903d1639d694f864c222f9
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'2011-12-23T23:48:47-05:00'
describe
'2597492' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e9b2f6f6ba115d70d5198856d58f7d86
b6a34d6b4ef988eab10f562f99523b7ccaf7d7a1
'2011-12-23T23:47:24-05:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZN' 'sip-files00022.txt'
3a78b8b0e34acae4df5c6f880a14644e
7c8b69091b38059de0528cdeda0e71c82a97a14a
describe
'27181' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZO' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
0c920d4b10cf0499e5c94bab4496d259
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describe
'323079' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZP' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bd02e9657802ab9b191cb477a4ae98ee
2fc1c848db7bd15c05f2d413655a3c1ac2cd26a5
'2011-12-23T23:46:40-05:00'
describe
'197722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZQ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
735443e419d2ecbdf03996614c39040e
83a2962a4cf69ca818418b1b689795dbda4b826d
describe
'39970' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZR' 'sip-files00023.pro'
37af429a58cf718dc52b0d335adcdd48
62f648271077dde4d495a32e43a6c0fddd98adce
'2011-12-23T23:48:11-05:00'
describe
'73350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZS' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a73df9d08d5ea505b0af175726499d4d
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describe
'2598280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZT' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5a71ab011653f5b4c12c9d8061097029
c6da0b069d5e0b3b34e3d109489b34bf46292381
'2011-12-23T23:47:44-05:00'
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZU' 'sip-files00023.txt'
60ea9b804f267c36464960369d9ef2cb
cce1cd448b3621075bae8d29eb1f6dc36d4bad16
describe
'26960' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZV' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
a6aabcd164abc64ecfe91eead9f47202
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describe
'323232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZW' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
12bdd7f19a809ad5d82a356f9aa69319
e6ba14dcd7efb2659a74330d37ad3921dbd212fe
describe
'178003' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZX' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
5709713adf59ecb17977f239cd5337b6
680d80ef9e1f51add0dd0a33ad44595b05e9cac0
'2011-12-23T23:50:51-05:00'
describe
'37823' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZY' 'sip-files00024.pro'
49124481775f31d05c6500bd444a0862
ac3900a323d0a015621ef513da4b5402f73e6d73
'2011-12-23T23:43:08-05:00'
describe
'69642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABNZZ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
0d4c8d8225a5aea201476ecbf4268daa
20c756362f51b3bc58c35eed9b66b207defc1313
'2011-12-23T23:47:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
52c8905b38aaca404be1682ac760173c
63423f9c2667f8f7eaddfb504d2e28cee5bf1e60
'2011-12-23T23:46:57-05:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAB' 'sip-files00024.txt'
5d3feea8c394cd5bf5a418b864e5d01f
ad0ec42dfb0257ba6dd30d2b36c865f88157f5a7
'2011-12-23T23:47:52-05:00'
describe
'26189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAC' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
24ad92a416a44e551e1267e62383a041
d73fb576a7907f545961ff198b9567f7aaf8ba36
'2011-12-23T23:44:13-05:00'
describe
'323161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAD' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8ac4b41b3c2df3e35704aa8e7c3bae47
df804166f274f8f21863363f98acad0ae4b73805
'2011-12-23T23:50:40-05:00'
describe
'196694' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAE' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
e6d2f439e4307b9dcb15c6d6465c1449
ead900c51ad6ecf93d344421800011ace56c4a5c
'2011-12-23T23:50:57-05:00'
describe
'40786' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAF' 'sip-files00025.pro'
ab8cb2e579217b49916afd5c6081af35
87806afa4f3e3a2351cfcb6c0e8a877cabeefc47
'2011-12-23T23:48:43-05:00'
describe
'73682' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
84a97c13057b5b86442dbc0057a92623
c94d8164eb61830cc1caa78198b3f5c44ac87f57
'2011-12-23T23:49:10-05:00'
describe
'2599292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAH' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c2bbfbe5c08578a8a5e77cc27c5819e6
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'2011-12-23T23:50:28-05:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAI' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d1c80890c7b147ec08da83ac66040755
52f0329a4958fabea700b17f23d6eed244d562f5
'2011-12-23T23:46:50-05:00'
describe
'26428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAJ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
af2a9535db636285249740d0739144d4
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'2011-12-23T23:46:46-05:00'
describe
'322960' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
99c8c11d00e3cfbdfdc6d94211c44ae1
01af84babdce8b97ec31aaa48d621a69b39fafda
'2011-12-23T23:43:23-05:00'
describe
'166997' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAL' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
63d5d1bb4dbc76c7cb440cc491a14c92
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'2011-12-23T23:43:44-05:00'
describe
'26178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAM' 'sip-files00026.pro'
89436b09e0d96a61ef1c84d30678ca77
cd7619e2e27a1fa6a7fbc441e151df373075da65
describe
'65642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAN' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
356316fe5a2bb6631626a2071bd38b46
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describe
'2597072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAO' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b1e3094bb2ea56b44c3a3dfe0b642180
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'2011-12-23T23:47:38-05:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAP' 'sip-files00026.txt'
98996f986bf0d945af75300de7d916f1
b1d27f3f7249175c2d30af64f39a6c6a7e4ae9b1
'2011-12-23T23:46:51-05:00'
describe
'25655' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAQ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
fdfb8dd33032118491584b765e28aa63
5c121c6a5d81f383773b6a25e37eca2ae717495d
'2011-12-23T23:47:15-05:00'
describe
'322988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAR' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a2e998bce7845cf2a55615bdb588c78d
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'2011-12-23T23:50:45-05:00'
describe
'186673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAS' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2427444748437c9eefb3589c7474466a
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describe
'38167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAT' 'sip-files00027.pro'
cfe67642edfbd125b432a6bd60f7e4fd
1c1c7c55dab208c311fef5c10828b238b0bd7d61
'2011-12-23T23:47:47-05:00'
describe
'70499' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e616671b1cd2a8fad24699d7f2a33c43
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'2011-12-23T23:45:26-05:00'
describe
'2597404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
9387890a8306cbdcd537595786466eb7
5ed2325e33ae7dce7067337233e2b107bfbf11ff
'2011-12-23T23:44:55-05:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
f550b4e9676002bb4c92cb9b336b80c5
109ab7fefd380de20ce94f36dbf6372b530ed34f
describe
'26847' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
108cc4a550898ee16ae397a8af58293f
2d830914217e58b926d63e787f0b7fb9f5553c7d
describe
'323249' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
08ff1eca0c02cb3041f9b3ff4b9223b8
7d630579ca3fc949addce52e1c29a3f5b6e249b6
'2011-12-23T23:47:39-05:00'
describe
'178582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOAZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
8cb607d008dda065d6cf83bc03a828a3
a9573b7fa7373b8c79a9ade6b92e02a497eb635d
'2011-12-23T23:43:11-05:00'
describe
'38355' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
17c3c04440ff31f2275ec7e842bcf2d0
63abd55eecff6bd54cc706eb78bd4a08a5ed1793
describe
'69573' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
aa452c77223377c568daddddc4054af7
904e821c50d052121e359beba4265befa8352677
describe
'2599420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBC' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f522cbbd73e934e4ac20440f36ea07a8
cecb9828a9e81033f8dec49027598dca0dbd2eb1
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
f80bffe9a01d90be9de5c053f31df6f1
2ff5d246faa415bd3b74aaa2032bf155eed38518
'2011-12-23T23:49:16-05:00'
describe
'26878' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBE' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
565f34ce6a93b46cbb32be5d8335b17c
0f5d739ad4f7ab1feeb4c93813500e85f86ac16b
describe
'322975' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
14f5fd3eb94532a276f6241e20b6d952
2cf755e604bdefc7e2142206e9a355d7dad4f13f
'2011-12-23T23:49:01-05:00'
describe
'201242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e086bb39587fe1c979930501344a3174
7f4d1a7cf819bb66086364829d1b115f39ca4200
'2011-12-23T23:47:07-05:00'
describe
'15080' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
63748c3fae1da2212096d91399ee2c85
07f2e44433a4c3e7eaf7d99a9def47ac47845afa
'2011-12-23T23:51:26-05:00'
describe
'65653' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBI' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
7f0f8d59fc05a977a02e57cb7745398c
40dff165d6648ee6b762b3ea92177384d32603f2
'2011-12-23T23:50:13-05:00'
describe
'2597020' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a1347e9a6120cef6f0d82cdff254267c
376d8b655b738279ef72611b5d521fa5c35e692c
'2011-12-23T23:50:16-05:00'
describe
'631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
f4d7869285619555538e78e9a96f749c
c6cbe36417778401f5331de7e0bc82b222098958
describe
'24972' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBL' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
591bef3630b59285d78ef86d9085aa63
3920734222f6144c24f4a32065e075ff0496f709
'2011-12-23T23:49:36-05:00'
describe
'323087' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0abe69f73cc5efc1569f8ac2d387dd43
ef99cde5c3663fdacdcf26ff0bb9eb612a9f8194
'2011-12-23T23:51:05-05:00'
describe
'186852' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
657f8bc4d45cf891c3ba20688ec97b1f
fcc80dacbddd99b14f470933ca3aa20df51fe9b1
'2011-12-23T23:44:32-05:00'
describe
'38402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBO' 'sip-files00030.pro'
a2d25fd541651e9f3b2978cb7bdcfabf
69cf8d5776694cc42ccac370187a2a41c317932b
describe
'72310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBP' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
23bb5a03e5e575e085f9a654e3b6a7f9
77c936542df13b2f57b5bb1f5b29177e0a4b5c2c
'2011-12-23T23:47:43-05:00'
describe
'2598544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBQ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
160eeb8d37fcc9adb1682bb359c9d304
a283fd598de1fac6a60f4f9545e7aaeb56d64dda
'2011-12-23T23:46:34-05:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBR' 'sip-files00030.txt'
50959c8a549890c5ac4ef69d8b4e99a2
358de36beb076821dc05b32df547dd1faeebaad6
'2011-12-23T23:49:38-05:00'
describe
'27297' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBS' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
8fe45c3b338d42d72ac085c4d51ba19a
5ec334a49cc1b7673b836676ef0f5ab121f4fb14
'2011-12-23T23:50:38-05:00'
describe
'322831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBT' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
11f98a85b1402974c803b2b892d8db5a
3b195855871a29f6f983964f5c49aa2af05a7615
'2011-12-23T23:48:50-05:00'
describe
'135709' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b30be5baa70df521536ec8ecc702edd6
cf5fb45916928db2b2dbcd5de3e662c06f8cd137
describe
'19188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f1f7284f7f91c787b869e1f9f46bab7e
148c382975bb2e6032a0cc0058b6b7cf84885bc0
'2011-12-23T23:42:53-05:00'
describe
'48300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBW' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
8951b107bd325370b6715662c5d561d1
51cab9080ca9d3aeb45e92bbf4692c02087f7a5e
'2011-12-23T23:46:01-05:00'
describe
'2594080' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBX' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e681deaf93e2e84a3889b1e0ad6d5f94
7ec3ecf6b2725c6b8a6aa59b286628e4fe168e41
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBY' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c26d03c6817342b9e818c8b02503a1da
26d115a6b933122fd435632492e317ddaab16f84
'2011-12-23T23:43:51-05:00'
describe
'20016' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOBZ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0ae088952a56ed108393bb65ce388686
54039e02ab9d4ac433ddc3cb1e5b9574330eb7d6
describe
'322762' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCA' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f610ed5d378be23172cc8100ba4505c2
5762c3b4fc2e6552bc2933d92b8422d6e34066bc
describe
'185316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
5790738f6fff303a3e35550e43f2ec17
a2a9b63ef7f267467017ef42e6ffebffc849f039
describe
'26820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
47c6ea981bda3726ca86daf23b1ad68d
a38515c71690bcbe9fed5a939885905451639daa
describe
'64689' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCD' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b26940623ca06431b2098cd634dc4ce8
03b2a762d30e67eafb151bdd020179a4ffcc3659
'2011-12-23T23:48:17-05:00'
describe
'2595760' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCE' 'sip-files00032.tif'
640db028c0713f89f6184ab13b77ef6c
9b08553164ec7f4acc8735f5f29c8386ba36de94
'2011-12-23T23:46:59-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCF' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c53dd3407d63981b9cee96d167f5f36c
78875f7537cc5b63fcf9e0e0b263ccfe7006fbdc
'2011-12-23T23:49:20-05:00'
describe
'25192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c2488224fac0c6734c9976d320b3737d
48b0f2edba3ec56a7da40d00c506e78ae4375f84
'2011-12-23T23:48:13-05:00'
describe
'322839' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCH' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
068000505b5f7229a4584b28bdb5cbcd
70e82012e54178e0001c7913e61c9c20c896c446
'2011-12-23T23:45:54-05:00'
describe
'203053' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCI' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3c56fd2db2bd3eb53e77d6c390297250
78c60816b598812b9dc6367c0a7fc9fc7b590a2e
'2011-12-23T23:43:13-05:00'
describe
'38892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2a10df99c5699a72c807c6fc854d2e2b
57c350b56529b1e92dcfbd5746034a48c80e8aa5
'2011-12-23T23:44:54-05:00'
describe
'73488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCK' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8ed7ccd05a78cdb5d91d8a4a3db39dc7
519091cc0325d174ccdf01d6396a63fa2a26acdd
'2011-12-23T23:44:14-05:00'
describe
'2596212' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
99b4566acc743718134f32a4dfd64eea
d2d16fd6b0cff01b2aadbf2629fcacb9f6e26b90
'2011-12-23T23:44:12-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
da230bc7d4003b8bcdc9b6174a909381
b2fa8dc73824cca7371d22ea28f3a3a5669d937d
'2011-12-23T23:49:40-05:00'
describe
'26805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCN' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
3b2015e06e27ee4e309fabb85b187f1f
b4a082ac32bd89640d72bc1b70020b64409ae42f
'2011-12-23T23:49:32-05:00'
describe
'323250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f43f41183bff8fbbb31c00c8a4742d02
2aac4e07b792773bb6df2c50af65e06e263f7731
'2011-12-23T23:45:31-05:00'
describe
'187822' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
8fe666d99ea17f5eee8cac5c656878af
c66fa0c7049e51065161c3487bcd17812574a408
'2011-12-23T23:49:18-05:00'
describe
'39605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
bc9ba7594c45ae3ed3bcdac3ee2b2591
44e198f105c5fe163e1f14ade6a8c52cd664de38
'2011-12-23T23:44:02-05:00'
describe
'73100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCR' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
d17789e955f208f715063be6a426f873
63574c29e093eec368b19e709bada7fa5e47b059
'2011-12-23T23:49:34-05:00'
describe
'2599592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fd8441eaf583619ae0e6fc098d2fcf93
8160d6c4c18aac6255291af91f49b40e886a9265
'2011-12-23T23:47:17-05:00'
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
f8c760144f89f2eb36218aa503e00a39
b5cf6bd0cc676468a91458bb7e429d2cadd114d0
'2011-12-23T23:43:01-05:00'
describe
'26928' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCU' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
5e4cae76ded616af077a1995a4d17fec
3be9c354bb4dafbdccda11e7c69ccb3e14dd7848
describe
'322990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCV' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c592d34e60ba38c856d1013c2de29606
f52cdc9c3460b1586c6fc026fc0931e194214071
'2011-12-23T23:48:42-05:00'
describe
'174553' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCW' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9e0e74048b29493561bc2cca66d3a4b9
d8fbdccb424b93e9daf98abd27bb47d416ded7a0
'2011-12-23T23:45:32-05:00'
describe
'37556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCX' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2809c8b5c423e408802d0179542902d4
1c6d016af8d8611c61e70adcfa9f640efc5dfdbe
'2011-12-23T23:48:16-05:00'
describe
'69649' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCY' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5219d746a7f16967c2d437ed60ad9506
888590277e2b07ea0f96cde4f0939d0a88d9ccba
describe
'2597240' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOCZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
7f6eabaa6843e7ca4f94c55aa41c73a2
a5ce5298a1ee208cd14544363f8dfc36b15d1f82
'2011-12-23T23:51:19-05:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODA' 'sip-files00035.txt'
799b97818bf799ef7f5cb4a2e97e839b
43c1108871c52e65b8279dd73691921a642d9c83
'2011-12-23T23:50:07-05:00'
describe
'26168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
2618eb72290b6d7abd9721bfde8c56eb
124e3df59f61b9731c11a404a8afd9cc36fffadc
describe
'322986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODC' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3f245e8c791622d7e21d1bf8e91ad514
3f6b4738eafa1f398161b8c5052b857d30b88383
describe
'159007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODD' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
f07befbe97e73f84c224e7b6cc73b8ae
05631918533085e4b056a2901e1920b186a64cd2
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODE' 'sip-files00036.pro'
6360b091ea42bd06750e5f4f0a279047
8989d942a19b1eec100699c122686a567498139f
describe
'62071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
500d7ea35a522d9b809dff17a7372f66
63d51c6d324c903ca520840114a7e494007465cc
'2011-12-23T23:49:45-05:00'
describe
'2596564' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODG' 'sip-files00036.tif'
a9a497063afa9b8084f9f33f68aab854
c09f84bdd9716ce5c6c1425e8e312135341e74b9
'2011-12-23T23:49:29-05:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODH' 'sip-files00036.txt'
68086226bcb2f94328b27a856d2c732b
2a67f9114d76f28c46f02ac9dcc4ba9760e2d89f
'2011-12-23T23:51:14-05:00'
describe
'24313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
5e068c63de518bde76d0445a98c2e5f4
3698f1fb13fffc330c7b3e4f648359e4d45efb60
'2011-12-23T23:49:00-05:00'
describe
'323203' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
311848b89e59a8286728fa1f299da31b
ab861969ea47c131b91979a28ab345d35fecdb94
'2011-12-23T23:48:26-05:00'
describe
'174406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODK' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
712f3f42fe98152f9df6085d910c38c0
a076b92b83abaecdd7d0236899127528cef27090
'2011-12-23T23:50:24-05:00'
describe
'24470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODL' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9d1763b7fffde662c62e606210379455
20825575bc9391e49c192351c31f699cfcdf995d
'2011-12-23T23:47:33-05:00'
describe
'62425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
acc7676f0be4207e3d7e642f00f9cd2f
d7900b6ee4c4422f575fcc0cdffe55c99b49dd6c
describe
'2598640' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODN' 'sip-files00037.tif'
7ecd93afd4070453db07a38312b4eb24
07e52edbbb5ce8905fd0f0c4a2151e4cc8ff60c9
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODO' 'sip-files00037.txt'
abe89087cd356e782c7fa25c17ba1e5d
09643294338c4ce6372ed3ed8103d4bbb9f903c8
'2011-12-23T23:50:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'24045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
fd2fff44618b621a7d85b1b825eff200
b65af372fb4c6fa533c3686e00c4dc85260837c7
describe
'322969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODQ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c3fa0690b79a6af24012d33bd0a4b64f
92f8f9087c7cc5795dd50504727902e9929f270e
'2011-12-23T23:45:53-05:00'
describe
'170781' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
fe53c046f24f80573f2d4c6c2fbdefb8
9f0792fb026cf564fb20407a1ff3ab0e1ca955a0
'2011-12-23T23:42:51-05:00'
describe
'37760' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODS' 'sip-files00038.pro'
047f04dc8d14536a43b91b96b5032751
b35c83a99151d012865cd30b1e068889bae45630
'2011-12-23T23:48:48-05:00'
describe
'67368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
83122806985dcb40dd2d6913a86b69eb
e40795613ad5bde1b5b3f63606bc0ef275e4dd89
'2011-12-23T23:44:47-05:00'
describe
'2597424' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODU' 'sip-files00038.tif'
84119719742b3fb84a7d72a41dff7dca
6a5d45456693614642e2e07ce9b74b96a55216fb
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODV' 'sip-files00038.txt'
b7b1f24feff00db9cf0a8e006e05e4f6
a963d39de91c55cc2c695c2d049c2d9ec655cbf6
describe
'26187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODW' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
edf7d00cc375eda69c414c5819788e69
187873a9b39ace930e65498de502f69a8c438f5f
'2011-12-23T23:45:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODX' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4f303ebb434ccc86d0ca9eac4d1e0129
49886aaeeedb93783d71a18ca129a54e49053432
'2011-12-23T23:50:22-05:00'
describe
'163930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODY' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
04c020342b930e0cee6049c1147cc551
027d142bb8af1613d161bc3218f51cba078f25cb
'2011-12-23T23:44:19-05:00'
describe
'34068' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABODZ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
66a958953178227bb621836cb9835a77
9d32b7cce1353e374b7c3b47424a6ab4b5a19aaf
'2011-12-23T23:44:03-05:00'
describe
'64974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEA' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
48e39f974b543dafe934a503154d71c4
2d9f8114bc4d25d869115b06a2469f1c007ca4e3
describe
'2597320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEB' 'sip-files00039.tif'
188b4ea2a002a3cfacf1fa37efe01001
1cd6c9e538790d929de30a16c6c4e5976ecd0f8b
'2011-12-23T23:49:35-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEC' 'sip-files00039.txt'
52f18a172eaf19fff2bcf236f0836fcf
ba1a65d77dddc5f38ee0d9158f4c38d112b131b8
'2011-12-23T23:49:54-05:00'
describe
'26243' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOED' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ec577ee12bf830a87f6d4e880562f60b
26306a730c5c0fb1cbca449db5a7700dda3824f9
describe
'322944' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEE' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d7ae84532b57d7893b89987644e11a0a
e7ad03f88be72fc6a152dd97c365504274d61346
'2011-12-23T23:45:14-05:00'
describe
'181960' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEF' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
515e3a9110e73701436395c747e9677c
d544984b456c3f061afeda257f07b85818353e16
describe
'36605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEG' 'sip-files00040.pro'
4d0a5807259ba85ee0a07ae623fbf533
dbea8e41f409565a77bdfe7436e2949203172310
'2011-12-23T23:43:00-05:00'
describe
'69167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEH' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
150e6d76855a698a6bb0f0c755d5acef
9c96a2a2ae925c6c569575a5a4c85c77e7aadd92
describe
'2597340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEI' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ad5e0b3f84fb3fb9c8d7240a8286f076
554ee06990f03f4baae51bf26fcb0e0157a19c74
'2011-12-23T23:50:03-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEJ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
5d847e5e337a30fdf3bef913e09dd70c
301a8e31c86931656801475588c97125a307d1ec
'2011-12-23T23:50:39-05:00'
describe
'26618' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEK' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
b96c4444d5675ee005c6bc9f10f273af
e6e91d4224f2c5226af44bebb0cd964da8de26f9
'2011-12-23T23:50:31-05:00'
describe
'322970' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8b3a8557f69e4badcfc410ab5528eb07
0483e7b96f941a4610c746a8e2e372d651cbb562
'2011-12-23T23:47:51-05:00'
describe
'196677' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4314ab15b79042a43d5b89cab3bec82a
0a97a41c7717bf3ef4e677ef0dd0f3b205115948
'2011-12-23T23:48:39-05:00'
describe
'39484' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
eb414fb309cd23f0c7711d9c360934a3
b581b52e44c46626902cdba0fa9da202dba0e38a
'2011-12-23T23:48:32-05:00'
describe
'74137' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d5281dbff7a840760fb111e933fb31b0
64d6bfa2103d27287b46a92fbc68f318ee80809b
'2011-12-23T23:46:32-05:00'
describe
'2597408' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
968a539caa0e4f4aacd08b1d0ea7c3c6
683bad133a2b18870e137b29984d2e977901a3d4
'2011-12-23T23:46:09-05:00'
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
5e292fc29bbc7be21520fac451a5b1a9
59ef89f0645acf5fce547a0b19a1f445df07e3a8
'2011-12-23T23:47:29-05:00'
describe
'27183' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOER' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
ab7f7dd8bb24b2e87a177a34b1e3ee63
d9450a7a28c2bc0e94f5a79a29c66a8e551de7d6
describe
'322974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOES' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
248ee0f5aafbf81faf88c5017421cc36
da597680f61498dff8c6633992677aa462c923c6
'2011-12-23T23:47:56-05:00'
describe
'180239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOET' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
140da2564896f7a714f6b6bf98d4650b
6ca08657c3b5dc82064e67de34ceda8701363a3d
describe
'38571' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEU' 'sip-files00042.pro'
51ab9ee155c70d9933ddf64eba9b9a6c
f80f909e5d4578eebb4ee18cef9f24a613ab6d5e
'2011-12-23T23:48:40-05:00'
describe
'70125' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
878fea6d8c8aa8664e92075981080a34
d57c354e6bfa459263ca7fc7d94c4e02d17bd73a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
ffdc4bb30ad3c5bc63bc2622a6e97235
7242c2be1e36e6eb66421831c21a9f1d1a796bb1
'2011-12-23T23:49:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEX' 'sip-files00042.txt'
9f03ef96190eb1bcd4b5218a9f994cc8
932bb48c803d5b78613afa23053567b7002d70e0
describe
'26888' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEY' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
9fffb76a4c8865f75137d5ca690e7232
3cda3805df86262acb8d80bb202f9ce685e922fc
describe
'322967' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOEZ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
74c7784b96adc8ff8d9c90722540365e
fbf590617c491776cff2f965a9a03b24ca8a6f63
'2011-12-23T23:50:50-05:00'
describe
'186926' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFA' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
1d3914a2a5950beccc3d278f6edb4a92
2f30973fa5254cac922a131a4a94e8ee9a1bd7ae
'2011-12-23T23:49:27-05:00'
describe
'38739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
15ebc129866fc1fcdf005ae1d641a1da
eaec94dbd3cd474ab5bb3f512c76ae5789f13683
'2011-12-23T23:46:39-05:00'
describe
'69790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
759c6eee430526473bb09ab5c0ed8568
37aa79110d0eca859734b5fd8d3f786350f52c43
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFD' 'sip-files00043.tif'
aba89268b4878f9c76af522c1f4c14c8
82b1f0ff7b99d56521b3ffaba11e6e3a557da931
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
41e2823ada9659e284623b2eec04ba8f
084725b36c500b48e0de663ea7ea6ffef0dd7402
describe
'26226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFF' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
44186bb77be6113bed2819f76d3e23e6
6dad3b3f32bc316b702bb0ccb212d837430b1e4d
describe
'323226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f6415f36e9473a4a8f7e52766dd48311
680f15e89d4e7288320b1a90cb0415855b2d655c
describe
'179529' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFH' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
34b441fb99297e4f65dc18d2b8f8d7ba
0739c960e68989e83a7663b644d6350c311dae36
'2011-12-23T23:48:29-05:00'
describe
'38716' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
dd065ac6f44cb4a5382046987caa871d
24c09213419242fdf0284a88198e2f6850226f1b
'2011-12-23T23:45:36-05:00'
describe
'69330' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFJ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
cea552d7dc4834a4cd185b7cc558d9b3
83711222abe58e9d1bb342876a3b31a30ec1246b
'2011-12-23T23:47:54-05:00'
describe
'2599208' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFK' 'sip-files00044.tif'
846815bb8ad8de54d0e0d8491db60720
c1cc2723e70a18d6248a6df8a8da1876aa3c670d
'2011-12-23T23:46:16-05:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
cf7243d8aee547808ffb44a928ad12ac
09b49d73fe684ee5e20d74b0d4c122490a518ee7
'2011-12-23T23:45:39-05:00'
describe
'26167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFM' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
cb2e06009f75d53e2ddb5c11df8b2044
0b847af14f01655d9ab92149e765ddd1fa2d662e
'2011-12-23T23:47:19-05:00'
describe
'323000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFN' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
e052fdf4b4da7c6ce29a44f3e2bb5a95
83cf11bcaaf051bf41c050388478827adb06dc39
describe
'167236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
cacf1c996ea7ffdfb6004520634718be
6ca0b02669d04d20d09afc2106c1838a32a58ac1
'2011-12-23T23:43:06-05:00'
describe
'35413' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9c5ab2489eadeb4c89e12d8660dc3494
4426c95ac5768ba5efbd49f82f634cac06b0c5f0
'2011-12-23T23:46:07-05:00'
describe
'64717' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFQ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
baee0b19ae9c0aa3fbaf688b9302c226
eddeb3b553545debb03d09c083411c0cbebc4b66
describe
'2596844' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFR' 'sip-files00045.tif'
912fd2da3065ff7e83f71b9633f945c0
e706235261adf37c0b02f3ae6cfab999d12a3800
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e6d4e00f5fe2c367e326e387972a69e1
87cc16c718433bbb9d88881e6ccab1cdb7bdeb7f
describe
'25045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFT' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
4addc823765d748bd0d01f6c34253bfd
2e5da2dabaaa6c0dc4df3974561642afdb5d1501
'2011-12-23T23:50:59-05:00'
describe
'322827' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFU' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ba390e2452044c9ae1d0ab9b582a96e4
f8698656d375deff0ffc87cf09506d0709fd696c
describe
'169490' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
cc45fee441689f220ced51cb1f979130
9532546eea9cd30970e5446a43c71dbe59ef5e99
'2011-12-23T23:48:41-05:00'
describe
'25707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFW' 'sip-files00046.pro'
8d17e4a2defc193ddb2c3a57d2c73de4
457616eab4656d50dc99a0b2d4b9da18b3aca75c
'2011-12-23T23:44:44-05:00'
describe
'62989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2f9541fe5c2728d4ffe845903be12b06
d04910b14bd61a89303191f23e345a672567ab5b
describe
'2597016' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
3b8d800754463dc8631cb2df401e703d
cd0a5b1b839dec7fa8cda203fef78a9fdb1ebed8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOFZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3f6dc5b3ca535ef19899e876565f0637
58ca14287cf419e43ff8f9dadea25feab6d876c8
describe
Invalid character
'24639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
43e68cae4301608217137e169cfd19aa
40b18c141b87329878268d96936abf4a4ecc1b1c
'2011-12-23T23:47:41-05:00'
describe
'322950' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e4c09b4fb5c36f3fc73ec36129124327
97a04766cf6ed6ea6c9fa327e82676b630402b20
'2011-12-23T23:47:50-05:00'
describe
'187415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
16a3fa45385f4712524cb8b2ee5c8059
ad62262b41eb011f59cfbea0279a5adef7462b1d
'2011-12-23T23:47:58-05:00'
describe
'39052' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGD' 'sip-files00047.pro'
16adbc242b717682854fab70c36e38a5
a383d59d38db4b42409f6851871a70de28efad96
describe
'70508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
f265ba3bc925657314d8c0473bc18904
78972458d05a368878f318c7f62d2ec1a36a35cf
describe
'2597188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
cb4a65ee308eb3af13898dd8a7a6ba93
734956211ea00330ab3a78f35288a6dda6e20579
'2011-12-23T23:45:43-05:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
e59a5969a1527f154000a2a10bf78f18
92717021c4c9b748b90bf6327398765f98ac74e2
'2011-12-23T23:48:18-05:00'
describe
'25931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
c3f2a12854d0f1febb8aa2439729d4f4
36b0c7a56a700ed038daa4e3aa6d2ab15999ad31
'2011-12-23T23:50:54-05:00'
describe
'323233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGI' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
763a844ae42dcdb566aef81cd497ff2c
02259b18455422dde1127bba0d54df92f74c93d0
'2011-12-23T23:49:31-05:00'
describe
'175211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b97ef6e90ad4010701529c857a1bf5a0
636af21aebe76feb3e1a16a576e8a3ef9b25abf9
'2011-12-23T23:50:19-05:00'
describe
'37761' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGK' 'sip-files00048.pro'
de6c18ac32d9dec0f38caaeed99a731b
ad9aeb332524cec0fadb523be52af7e1d36d915f
describe
'69191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGL' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8fe30ed73472bb0d7ae2e214957ce605
a78c82a38de58e011afaf498a18b9ba9d528f304
'2011-12-23T23:51:02-05:00'
describe
'2599444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ed9b1a67fac9c7b6771cd2f22283d649
fe10caa48b084a36de89f502525b8ac8c49d6cf8
'2011-12-23T23:51:34-05:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGN' 'sip-files00048.txt'
7af22037ea303bc4bff4a8c87b6703f1
9d233216da91bcc6e537c071b881c8d6b6d8fe67
'2011-12-23T23:44:51-05:00'
describe
'26991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
749470c0435d1d56ca4956107ec71d98
17da07609b75252a32cba88a314b14a9655b12cd
'2011-12-23T23:47:08-05:00'
describe
'323248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
b56d5b3e5dc21bfc6ea81e204fe927f2
4d200f22da456046cc3d807cd1e597f95d682810
describe
'116675' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
178de1b9a7a0656b0f63f9f930790c88
3ca1536c5ec51a66870b7d15d7df3d0b7977d42d
describe
'18430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGR' 'sip-files00049.pro'
d2c576edb77944ba1700b327c00e3065
1d44782311baa4810e04f6fb9f6463364e12a6d1
'2011-12-23T23:48:52-05:00'
describe
'43676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
92bb64e17247d0c712e27e96d963814f
469f7d5b1da3281e0470a589e1463a35dbc33e20
'2011-12-23T23:46:48-05:00'
describe
'2596816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGT' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d6cbff9cb3737cd29690669e5a5c5aaf
d7b7e5d6857f49197f847a0d399cf8ae4b22af85
'2011-12-23T23:47:53-05:00'
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0c5f45b2be3f8156bb2aef85a4b160f1
2d4f16fa2a62da2d28c862c2b0b301b97b00ec4c
describe
'18562' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGV' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1b358c3a663645165b4856abd847c2c5
b1f2e8d60baade9cde5a945d00af3f75a9277f43
describe
'323004' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
9ef41189ee2196c2262f0eaa458a9200
5c3e7d036586a48f528629e803c7b9bcdcf0054c
describe
'158141' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
4b94aa784f14e2c5495c6dfb215cb3ea
bdf7f6c162d4b7a79e59741de656dffc178877b0
describe
'25974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
f72b5b31627199fd4de84e5049b85804
91b01309da59fd224c2751252096b98ca7921a70
'2011-12-23T23:47:48-05:00'
describe
'61296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOGZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
270d0b9304b8d202f48d7f17e270acc9
a5239fbf437cefc8be7930d10ed68aa0c0a839ff
describe
'2596872' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
533003e2d1eaafde75cf26f7ac591c19
a8e19c6f3e3d4604ae36662daaf7ea1e364f7239
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHB' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fa9f0679aa68916ccd77a41561f23c89
95b082e38c293bb10a0782a38c2aad396ace938b
describe
'24694' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHC' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
ff5c05ab1e53053691ac69dc5d43d424
b189ea904e71034c6bd796dbd6a4585f4892155a
'2011-12-23T23:46:28-05:00'
describe
'323253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c3918a2f5cdba076a0fb5f9b8a63e2b5
1bf65bb81737b3fb2c1a0ea141b1f8767997926c
describe
'156100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ae4c62b70aaf632bb9684f50ce70ad21
051d8d870d073584e953453a6d1a3a4a6fa92b6b
describe
'34192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
9d20fde905cdf9fbebd9d8a974abf543
082e5ba7e2f637bbe11c2170bf02f6638d74b2dd
'2011-12-23T23:45:06-05:00'
describe
'63431' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
24abab1ae161f123602021177370e7eb
d18f81014bc63437cd48eecfd70c3b06656eb42c
'2011-12-23T23:44:59-05:00'
describe
'2599068' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
3c98c8a07275a53fdb299f88acb53fca
e6515226741b7c41697ef12c4e440805c163d07a
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
594fc6ef71f6f8aff5f2a8eb55eb50c7
7524a3b48ab322a41fb869dffc3e4e04538f8c11
'2011-12-23T23:46:23-05:00'
describe
'25276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
c913d74f7ad9eb017a7421e68bfbe69c
5449e787ee16fb987550fe21873754f013fb5f69
describe
'322886' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
149daa26a139594afca388b515cde68e
a57ce55af5c6e5230d2db25cdb43208d01ae27d2
'2011-12-23T23:43:54-05:00'
describe
'190483' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHL' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7c9927b8ce64a834999f666443046710
899bc8f9c20488e98b96548de4216f3359a3eb9f
describe
'36925' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHM' 'sip-files00052.pro'
9b9bd3c6e34cb3d0095fe0b4d8bcddae
c0d96f9fc9755bfcf91dac3cdd477ff3243ce421
'2011-12-23T23:45:28-05:00'
describe
'69677' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHN' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
deff89811069b41c6a6617291533af34
91268258b5b924307cf52871461b9022a879e678
describe
'2597316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHO' 'sip-files00052.tif'
23756549d5df4e10d86575421a514561
9412f95791bc21dc4097d8b0d8953cc53b814641
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHP' 'sip-files00052.txt'
3c4b6144409c7f861352d1de98ad7b66
4d982688c29677357bfa60c8d0bf3e66ff004c4a
'2011-12-23T23:49:28-05:00'
describe
'26542' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
77cf6bb08e4c4c2dcbbfbdc4d9077353
366fc1accb66aae93016f46adcb4364ce4e14d1c
describe
'323112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHR' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
189a702825eb8344f33401edc1ed1875
a425eb7cee68366b82b2fb92aa16a49b7b45e1d8
describe
'142099' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHS' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3bdccb61d235c5b1aa00cd0e61875e2a
f844eab732f2a4c536a06feecb057fed63a94bcc
'2011-12-23T23:51:06-05:00'
describe
'21719' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
cc47c9dc3787cef83ce8a15735953e38
ab5b5b8d82ddf75bfe00297396325079e8e337d8
'2011-12-23T23:47:14-05:00'
describe
'50415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e66bff3028f752c2c55892bd2bef8ce9
69beef502e10bd9c156c75d578e7912b49961634
describe
'2597568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
27e9e06c4d34d8d4e543f32c0a8ce581
27d4885824d72f5d8d51e1c058679de20143931a
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
af9992f70c48991a1d576314626a406b
aae2bfc16946b19d28b68999e9b6c6797fc53251
'2011-12-23T23:46:29-05:00'
describe
'20858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
457f8c0f13f3516a6e20a0c14b311400
b1af7af835fd017909694df1b1baa7e94f80beb1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3fa241858f4e92ac38a4abbeddeab5b5
eb220c4ed94f57f6ddb3e5e363ee7fbe1fa28c73
describe
'179669' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOHZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
87e43f73984552b407ddeffd20cbb4d9
a44b380d5b8108942c7852194f9ea6510d1b2c24
describe
'26529' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0c2d22be9e44b1a92d2edbc1294a2ab8
aacc56ba63c802fd87e7163d1553772dfb3b4f8b
describe
'63912' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
76bcd99ecc8556cc4fd762ad5adc6c12
532c4fe0e7d3773f296e52f2711748797b088e5e
describe
'2598928' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
87ac7460f9f4e4867963799d0672522b
5e43f62393b019911ffafd1a61a882037b2483b8
'2011-12-23T23:51:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOID' 'sip-files00054.txt'
bab5d74116bc35203104f25bf537d860
35475dde9aa72906a3f3bf5ad0d6c7d3d47a0b9d
describe
'24567' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIE' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
cf035a0e8ddb208d0969f8288193fd0c
5e0fe2fccd3606db554d85dc49cb42d70fe7e61a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b5b5b1be91552f856e13207cae7df778
08d034f914a85d1e0cc27e91f0404adf98a9c1e2
describe
'186288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIG' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
722d4c5ad1170ed4de84cd45ae398238
ec18d49dff02256df14852f7d96b0a4f99de368d
'2011-12-23T23:46:38-05:00'
describe
'34508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
dfb8907afbafdbf1df4cc9ddd5131023
cae386274e449503e596f5f9e7b35609d53fb159
describe
'68106' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOII' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
b08d8b53aca3feb8a67fd227fd0300b0
02cc4f7ea3121edf7a752ac8cc0360b7e74ab134
describe
'2599360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
6be85a98eec18245a19aa5a43a91982e
c1b6a33ee519e786371fc19159108d7fe94b9012
'2011-12-23T23:42:52-05:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
a33141f16f77165fd8df6d773861eaf0
dd0a995314ddb27fbc806a8c93188977a45f33a0
'2011-12-23T23:45:20-05:00'
describe
'26379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIL' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
7996f9dc7037a6c91a8fa67af7be0124
c9b92bd97f1dcefcd0d9ee3d718f8879957c8d56
describe
'323002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
184521bb25dfce4d497600423b415065
318df5845545a0699f8af4abbcfde34f9aeac65c
describe
'162803' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIN' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
692b1de22e1d41eebdb04a7993891040
40136aabe0c21b40df9c150bbad1393732380f07
'2011-12-23T23:44:07-05:00'
describe
'35174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
ccb455dd171af5796556982a5ac43f68
3c91a34f754a05e21bd491340884e8b99d5c2074
describe
'65041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
40aa0dabeaf299ce153972357d7ba8f3
97f17c0a7ae710409edfa45d032ceef883b204cd
'2011-12-23T23:44:31-05:00'
describe
'2597356' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIQ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b6187493f680310c460e4e2b6be401a3
1e24c8ffda3f5b7c0840063516d27ea2bb4b3dbe
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
5be8a3a56e2b24d91cb15e703856f7fd
a14fbe8f9c257066787398ffd92e09f4683e6630
'2011-12-23T23:48:53-05:00'
describe
'26156' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
f9e57a35e5e24797f827f09594d91757
d29a4d003658964541ff95e1fd0ae15918d08fd0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIT' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
64c9f6b88ffc518283a82b6c9a4676f3
462ae773e8fdd829fc6fb029e157c6c08e3983a6
'2011-12-23T23:43:28-05:00'
describe
'182114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIU' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b72f44a5e1dd6a32852a57b5310145a4
f2ae7c1e14891fd236cdc94f6da75fd7cf7be5df
describe
'38372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
41c33ecd61233b41e0d7fb79dcc77e4e
78bdb8a6a557fb3701a37342214cd568adfdbc67
'2011-12-23T23:48:57-05:00'
describe
'69717' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIW' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
16b0f974a3ce44d0438cc06ad2c7d48e
95d7142076ac4659c5df5dee53f8f1fa51cb53b3
describe
'2597348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIX' 'sip-files00057.tif'
cf2c9c6c6d9a7281e2615e384ac48b1d
cd259cef5a9bbd21b2a699d273173b6ca3741007
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIY' 'sip-files00057.txt'
7948010b732d342cccaaa023f4e2615e
60b22356963245266fb150609d384ceec8445d5b
'2011-12-23T23:50:49-05:00'
describe
'26270' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOIZ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
e99787916afd1186e2bf60c6b7736f0c
28d375fa83e413cce1a1712178a464ff50e35396
'2011-12-23T23:48:58-05:00'
describe
'322966' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
9bd0e5db586acef0695271ef6c66e419
ebda12bcdafe82ae48d77b0c5125f7fda40a2dfe
'2011-12-23T23:43:03-05:00'
describe
'172887' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
49595fbb464f6f3b780d68721f6bee09
58fe3024a9ffbe3a973896323eca5e7fc9c12441
'2011-12-23T23:46:21-05:00'
describe
'39614' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJC' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b7cca906ef09e575c53b951dc3bb0cdc
03edae982f14fa319c6c29d2cbef13b921051bd7
'2011-12-23T23:42:58-05:00'
describe
'70136' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
46000ec45ca40e003228f2f3a1a718bf
b42e19bc84a2c2e18a0327362a9ef7c3a64ed371
describe
'2597584' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJE' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ab9b240021db54e4b8bb3fe002c4d63b
f9c790d760ce38569dc9fdc8bb24d6d4058e7285
'2011-12-23T23:48:31-05:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJF' 'sip-files00058.txt'
fb13e3a7d7187c7ab0ba38c7cc147ab4
e30d95c137f0d66f7264a79ed9e8d1ec344cdcc2
describe
'26736' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJG' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c7348f5f6d82c86c96422f1c395c5991
43fae43191f52a0dfeb09ce2b22c64ada75f097f
'2011-12-23T23:49:02-05:00'
describe
'322623' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJH' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a84eaa8d91d63d89c9a3df3d9fa2e474
adc3d3548002037266320b610fdc54b2b5b40d5d
describe
'94714' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJI' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
708d211e2e98408ba103980a2babb92a
906b544f8949289b4cd4b44781d9d77c3e92edab
describe
'14823' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJJ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
26ff67bad1295dcd1ee7026ba443d156
0c043523dba258fb18699befcd4d14b9642297b5
'2011-12-23T23:47:16-05:00'
describe
'38044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJK' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
80dfe38615c7252e07866538d5cec621
b83514ff0b3c4bc8e19566b7f0c3cdcbfd5c1990
describe
'2594344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a2945c88e4e1f02b1bb2b96fbaa2f6f3
74072ac7c57abfefce47b3386a9a252ef4c59b2d
describe
'618' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
642bae12b6040ece3d5102bcfc7b6fd6
45511cf2249cca750d8e56dfb26d96376820d450
describe
'17185' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJN' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
a479511b358f34c35c60bb670ed90890
c24fe39ecbcb8b3a66e768c4a4b02a2978791a32
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
1d13974f1b0c1903195dfd0a7560b0c3
102686f1986f0118d73ae37a7fce6be866713bd5
'2011-12-23T23:50:36-05:00'
describe
'152699' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
c6453e8800176a2e9395196ebc636907
1c535e18d6a2e04207d40413b5b7991dda39bc5c
'2011-12-23T23:50:17-05:00'
describe
'25383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJQ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2f310549b59c5ce762fa03c716fc663c
af2b4c3ad28c00a3c60dfc3b35def357df740aa2
describe
'60823' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
203d0c47ff1a226d764715d94fe7b9f3
22b291f6f868cf0e4f6bf3a49231582b5ab6ed15
describe
'2596648' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJS' 'sip-files00060.tif'
36631b1f23cf0a64be55172fd3e404cf
4fe1c3e8a2503f64b5897618033a4feda7610d72
'2011-12-23T23:45:38-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d7e83d7401e911e30c6aeae8c7cf37fe
97f53321f012e42210a2bcd487a779ff7c2f93ac
'2011-12-23T23:49:15-05:00'
describe
'24137' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
e12c57fcd53623dab4c52f38eac27c21
d85b89811682f34d8386853782188efc1011f824
'2011-12-23T23:50:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
8110ade0acd9c0695c07f2baf6df2dab
ad7c070c8fb3200631815d6c1a3596a55a0b1481
describe
'166690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
cd091b0225f6a44673ed01fc2c2207dc
99515251ffbd4b037a6f3b941e4b1f539d7c659e
'2011-12-23T23:42:50-05:00'
describe
'37923' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a37e96243b45643330ed1ce2838bab81
ce608e0314c2f1308640e4c74bc46ddccef8b8d4
describe
'66623' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1848cc34baebe12032ea25b848290563
996bd632addfed57f5a61627fd60ecdeaa257575
'2011-12-23T23:50:43-05:00'
describe
'2599024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOJZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e706c18e177ecf0f6c5f1525e656e577
6c79e4df02765d5e47d969eacd28aaf129160cc3
'2011-12-23T23:47:25-05:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
c792d966d755cdc2bd63b034c43425b7
182980e581b003699ff0aacf7ccaef28576a78de
describe
'25923' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
63a54b5ddb1ea3fa467c5f16e4b4a189
590acb0c5cfaa44c5b291c37d281b8936ec4df3e
describe
'322776' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9f8e1a28fd3091c9e3660e59b8bced30
17375079d28918a41d118f1192c31fc183cca0f3
'2011-12-23T23:50:10-05:00'
describe
'165306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c0a74de4dde129ff1f1f8ae7282dda06
1e1e753370de7ff79293c6b1414ab5449b2fac82
'2011-12-23T23:48:04-05:00'
describe
'37840' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
ccddefd2189db2dad64ce6b7fe030e30
de090c2c132470ef9d08f565eb10d1661dca2be6
describe
'68630' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f8db3d3e76c5e88d625df6124ba54179
5ce16f916c0e3e100057c73b8858bc53190cae66
describe
'2595800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d0ea9931ea19134e16eef194f8db3bb8
2dc2de14a5d5c08370291c58f1899de16c7756d6
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
88a4ad7f6800676ee87b06f6f4f6495f
9580ea9b099c2e83e01fdd3d6a9950a88e395baf
describe
'25667' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
b0f9e369e5712507e6fbb6ce4b17954b
a5b7784641c9861165ca1b919cd205428b295c9a
'2011-12-23T23:49:33-05:00'
describe
'322843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1f7d9693e80399b271bb43073995077b
0651216bd3d04fa63a17f456e2f9bdad317dd0d6
describe
'130551' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
d5885b213f4b4598f63b64e83b1f8a19
8c4e15ba39f69138d1487ada4a7d914aea39c068
'2011-12-23T23:46:14-05:00'
describe
'25545' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
0e8b40bd24a77fb3308562f206577b23
4855d3c991e39778806d33f8f44c6ed0dd903350
'2011-12-23T23:48:34-05:00'
describe
'52764' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
78f05d4d10614614ca25dc031a6958d0
daffc90b5f6b34ec0a3d1f99d2c59f61da69da03
describe
'2594468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
601506445624051db9736d756639e304
60966e1d4d8015a726d170f122785027d8484131
'2011-12-23T23:50:32-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
927da4607ef694e245e6ce66a7560f5d
3587767d5920f2d8e26b86d23717e89b15c82d61
describe
'21428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
80cc740a2da37432f0936319c5b488c5
9f547e615cd52c2d7be59d4892e3c2e65f32e89e
'2011-12-23T23:44:50-05:00'
describe
'322808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
408c5ffb9694698d96e9f68fb179fe62
31c96d64eee0bd62ff6a6b16000be475eabb96f4
describe
'155679' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
1c3eb7aa28d68c656d63980cae0f31ee
46a009b2e29a302e10bb2a2e0b61add14eaa5c94
'2011-12-23T23:44:09-05:00'
describe
'23816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
cc359ca8e4e6f5e3f73410df71cb60e8
158e51b5df7a566aad92788d9318235cc5bcd005
describe
'59843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c5e588c2d159219bd2c3f05a50e0bfeb
d649b1d0e855468711c75ccf0112019068f93fe2
describe
'2595372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
1b6b6ac1fbcf432bb6f9710291ee57ee
cd61eb847eb4d25cdc6ac4e351b02e130579ee4f
'2011-12-23T23:48:24-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
00f909663fcddf04f84df2d50fcc7f84
29150f87432ae70568a7b0f63a8fc9b0a967662c
describe
'24279' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
708e19a275d90f99912d549ebe3a1649
eca4b36c49769f48cd7cc4b11694bb08695e771c
'2011-12-23T23:46:22-05:00'
describe
'323067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
363370fc5479fdb680d521fc051ce306
994a7c70b61830a60f8d65936dc10d8fcce13b68
describe
'187477' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
0e60e10b2812b3bd372decda9a7af1d1
1b564cf7469c272119c901b11baffaa3fa2fb4ed
'2011-12-23T23:43:20-05:00'
describe
'39429' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOKZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
9df4c27b088b445adb7dec9ac82f9b7a
bf12af03beee656b31608581407e0e137d80993c
describe
'70391' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
64016cf9bcc3932bb73408310e3ae00e
e12eafb490d7dcdd2f189f90c26c3a8d4ffe546f
'2011-12-23T23:43:46-05:00'
describe
'2598012' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
37dc79f81dfc59199791030c7dc4a418
4d524e9a77305cbc03eff0705c3b90bcb99bd6f8
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
476bee39c0b171d9eb7595f6179a73a3
49c9aedf57544c13dcac89b679349a9bb3dc95dd
describe
'26460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
d45c3026b3e2bb855e7227493f35158a
c996fb559807309f7edab338dd668af3dc4fc4bc
describe
'322837' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
b12bc933abcb990cf469e8ed0d3a0a55
f7c99ea91eaf4ebd093b80a0609f8158aec687ea
'2011-12-23T23:50:15-05:00'
describe
'178962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1fd1b184ff33160cb1b0109a4f9b9b8b
a839422de78db4c144ca6a147698ba0c7db8454c
'2011-12-23T23:47:28-05:00'
describe
'38029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f08bdcca804fdd1169358d5123d4074a
1b998461aae90dce56ef2b594b9a70856ee2d88a
describe
'69333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2085b4d86b4c8cde2e351698b4c87f91
9df79773773f51e4a8db4df4b44c4065d45c07fc
'2011-12-23T23:44:21-05:00'
describe
'2596052' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
dd00c4bdc7914ed89cec9f0b3a7ec02f
8e385c7feb5b1f675c47990d6dc185a076f4b9ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
5302ac9ccb488a704a8a8846766e6032
c75c7bb14468e265c7c50863c706b50feff2f220
describe
'26547' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
331d24609d9726f20f386a8819307e3b
7ff3ceba34535a048ecbec9dbc99556a1cd8212b
'2011-12-23T23:46:27-05:00'
describe
'322817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f70346f44bf90fbbc1a58ddcfee70b52
c2f725ba0cb53d1336f06ddc2716f60c6ba452e6
describe
'176198' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3e0c448f3aacf401cb001aa7065e029c
a8619e928b13c08a4c5b475c059b08375ebce7b4
'2011-12-23T23:48:23-05:00'
describe
'35999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
99adef988d16dbfe7d02f128d0cc27f3
a931c67805e375556ebc97e16dc9c3f158729f86
describe
'67877' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
63d1ff11e4ce1b2efc5af465d8bd06c2
8a61f71571e71ef197df409b4c0effa2ac13c76b
'2011-12-23T23:50:58-05:00'
describe
'2595984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4acdd8b66dfc63aae85a4ee99900c3e2
44c3d51fc70a9983c7ab8e8b0cd70ee3eece4255
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
38b6b9b9b7b6a020ac26962b580e53ab
08c3c824534a1153f5158e8d47924b6df9136a82
'2011-12-23T23:46:45-05:00'
describe
'26070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
00e445bea0355c87d9961246accac024
705af14bdcc1ca8c9cdeb204e39e97e577f7ca14
'2011-12-23T23:50:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
afaf423eb04f77b692f4c52d4dda71ce
cf11302312dd55d1e9e7f705ac6a8cb30e02d5f6
'2011-12-23T23:44:24-05:00'
describe
'161468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLT' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c2ab89c5875c60d18aaf79cd7d4c9454
f9d4e6cf55594c6e72203d215dbd2ad74d9767ac
describe
'37269' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
ce2caa89e514c228e5e971ee26383234
204a284bbc4a3827934f6a57915a885c97eedfa8
describe
'66760' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLV' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8dcad5e1c65890b05ead958d4d1371a8
9b7ee96d39e8951482984ed8ed27d9fac867ad1d
describe
'2597692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
41aafcb5887dcde190df5388b28edfae
edca01a7dcced3a737537c2271d34ede3e9ca3d6
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
5e662a1d23a4b477cd256df42c112f65
5b4b3acc773249b38664cffc47276166156d14fa
'2011-12-23T23:48:46-05:00'
describe
'25566' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLY' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
241aa4c7c5d0bf78a3f9d9047a5fac82
5b7d4982e4b97278d6343516aef594308cc4e2c7
describe
'322832' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOLZ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ebe96505613ef908dff557583c2a4c6a
5f310ea42e61408612205af8f43fa0f9fb79e79d
'2011-12-23T23:49:04-05:00'
describe
'153772' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
fcc6c9678766e70ed8e314f9295671f7
663ebc6c5df2a2828c02624d2bb417740301e98a
describe
'34951' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMB' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e326fdaa2323aeec70c7ffc375c91baf
9de5ff7caeb7312a88188a2ef6daa3ca9cd387bf
describe
'63969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMC' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
01926afefd008ec89917bc3dfe8e89f5
a45719832d3caf17a3d0d9ce69c4c61be6e4d335
describe
'2595952' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMD' 'sip-files00069.tif'
9d81b9516fc2d22ef99d26b7aed9f861
c2e54aaeacd63656c290e2e2fc78d1c9cf9b5836
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOME' 'sip-files00069.txt'
2dcb4bd6c8b1a2a56b6e7a929cde2965
548d3c597fb488f083b3bb506ff27819b20f5894
describe
'25398' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMF' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b6d566e42b1d93996f133661e3337c78
1e04f2678330a4fbc5a61820e92c37e11c4b405b
describe
'323090' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMG' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c72049a933c31bc1062e6e9d69712e0f
831d13cdc1ce8fb28171cd92099c2811dd720d3b
'2011-12-23T23:51:07-05:00'
describe
'183775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMH' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
395490838438f25db3d58a4238bb615b
eea5c2903387e2d9d35ccc0fb7dc0e0ef1c13400
describe
'38909' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e7b21d2517fc92749019cb14b740ea6d
f6986d0a37456191653fe71bfc6eea6e75e64bd7
describe
'70607' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMJ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
2cc26aaa02483ea4c5600e39d13ed998
18c3b978103e1424b56aed5581c1ad8e1e0f227a
describe
'2598340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMK' 'sip-files00070.tif'
203a1e41ce87812abbf43e7dfb461f59
6772e4fc36b66b26f94909401662c84c66cf8215
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOML' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4235219094d9b5f77c910f678b87f6a7
2cca8a9874d900ffed0ea2375b70c253ea3ef648
describe
'26643' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMM' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
29e80b5c5eb00140efe4ebb35c8ea14f
bb3cbe01fa842a7a7f1f1d927794bd28a20bb307
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMN' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
4b80a3a3e96ae3a8aab5b22c7c6ee14c
b9ed7d2b60055963c5d8f548092779fb70da7188
describe
'187433' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1c48430fdb1c9107c348e5a0c1ca7a25
a80f68866b362366e7290322cb7041dbea9c4497
describe
'38858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMP' 'sip-files00071.pro'
be7413be7f17a9ebf59cb500cf873694
305a971d5be399dac1fdf7f5d6becca725870d06
describe
'71447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMQ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
acd7260c148816a15c9c97cf6c363bda
f9ac258e0005dad21dae053bd25e0e12348ee70e
describe
'2596088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMR' 'sip-files00071.tif'
ce2b8263fe4ccc939bcb8729e239c059
b42d50ffc09bc5e218af7e101b2f7207a553fade
'2011-12-23T23:48:00-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
dabe44be1232ab56cbb1a965530e4ed5
48276eef15724b3344de7344ca33e3824d270515
describe
'26653' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMT' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2c74c07fe6e05e460dde68f57a58f9a7
922d921fcaeda7860b5342406c2907dd8e1618eb
'2011-12-23T23:47:30-05:00'
describe
'323206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMU' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
f2811ad0410d8882c15aae6a096362fb
1df2d5252c6ef2b642755bd6555759caf1e436ac
'2011-12-23T23:44:56-05:00'
describe
'116248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMV' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
62c4d8eed5ac75f81378f0178658541e
184d859909eeda9e4f0a0db10210b5817c8846c0
describe
'17481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMW' 'sip-files00072.pro'
2d956d04a734e97a9a8a5fcb654b108a
5f4ca27f75acecb4d2f12d33aed1575c006bbe64
describe
'44429' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
d89ad585fb162822eecd294d1df8696b
821366067eff4f37740d5ff89be2b1fdccfa5372
describe
'2597140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
81252d45bb397b5b11515fa7581333b7
f225118f01181ffa93bd7e799345848f4b372f41
'2011-12-23T23:44:30-05:00'
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOMZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
bf57738f0b2f963f9021aaef02d4f617
ddac3d2d1d4044188e663bd30f46e4b12c8036ed
'2011-12-23T23:47:13-05:00'
describe
'19001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9c272064d4b0a9608753c85015e73ff0
d66a224e38aab3fb240758d6d7bbc69356fa6e86
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4f54a860ae53eccc38a170895bc309b2
7945d73ee2ec3ffb5efb8d2c9da6aadf7b6ee0fb
describe
'169927' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
6c084fa692bd65025a56d52693cc0e87
95da0d2176d39b9a7bf2d839a8b2ea6acc48415e
'2011-12-23T23:50:37-05:00'
describe
'27453' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOND' 'sip-files00073.pro'
712efb5ad6233132bfc3d0e5159ba4c1
cead6e51cf14f5f3766941c462f3f032e1ef83bf
describe
'62694' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONE' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
857faa8b2100a6408e9199ce81b1c7a9
47381adeca4ef10b1be4df1eee74f0142d5d8ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONF' 'sip-files00073.tif'
9dc638f637401fcc70ec1dd9a8bcf122
fe74aa894ad38a7417f634c37ad2d4394cba467d
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
07b228151daa89a05adac302cd486eb2
95874a0611721b99c6205655fe46ef5ffa13d84b
'2011-12-23T23:49:07-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'24612' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONH' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
3cc0e7c3d5694c9ddd7c68ff2e849b04
6d889f8e5bb9bfd7cc07ffbab8526ec448bd2f07
'2011-12-23T23:49:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONI' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
634a67850bec855a73d212259b8380b9
d6f4c756659ed49d1db047e44f49d69d97798a7c
describe
'186055' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONJ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
18385427baac03d7cf4ed191b9d3a832
6618a72c622e32c1d075ee22861e75ae5a312b70
'2011-12-23T23:47:01-05:00'
describe
'39593' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONK' 'sip-files00074.pro'
115355f44d7e69611a8fde918a899de9
105fb0384e791d36d50f2321bddef04492caff61
'2011-12-23T23:44:40-05:00'
describe
'71014' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONL' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1cb202e1862d890f9db5ca2e56bb3652
839487fd54f051df5d342fea19807de05bc1a045
describe
'2597628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
4903adf174a629fd1e3dc9a4893d656c
8c10493454449a4b003b7d89bc6a0c5aa4f4c13a
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONN' 'sip-files00074.txt'
d0f38df9723963c962ba51c74087755c
1f9b9849e57668285bb2a35cd15002683b9d00fe
'2011-12-23T23:50:46-05:00'
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
0037a745bde5f8512e140c355c04eeb7
606bbb7e59b544e262c79a77e78dd015d34051de
describe
'322999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
9f9b84358e5b3e9c820cc70e6b14064c
3f399aad87f070f96f62653e80ec7f251f867f28
'2011-12-23T23:46:17-05:00'
describe
'198357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b7b047cc9e17d9ff908393525529a6ad
cba0ba7568db70f886576a6fffca1b7fca62fc11
describe
'41266' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
da8021677ba60e49fdd3ce4b42052dd4
41d0b68866dd631506f953437cc1799efb8a4b4d
describe
'74467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
56e909871f1940e6a8ebee9d296891e4
0f3bc828a327cb70d0dde77e628d1977a763cb60
describe
'2597508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONT' 'sip-files00075.tif'
709650f1964945b574d8e50b3d303fd8
9d98fd9342c4fe47b77bfc40ffa51d176a2fac23
'2011-12-23T23:45:52-05:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fbe19d6e2fd9505c6de11683636dec98
7628902635b1be6ec13f6cfe81d88ab375460d25
describe
'27455' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
430d543067820001acbffa78aa353617
1ebf9f431bfecc7fdf5e422ab7272270013da66b
'2011-12-23T23:47:59-05:00'
describe
'322876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e831fde7f0906cf65c6935fdb9be2feb
c49d2be97488dd84f096ed12170728c2e4b62899
'2011-12-23T23:45:03-05:00'
describe
'187772' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
8f204db5098736c9fe1e8a2768684953
b56395a38e0d12150392e106c847544921333b44
describe
'40097' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
eb868f598b7f4f8e15782d1054300c60
d0de4e738ff178d4d41f83d9768d0c9d4845ba75
describe
'71862' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABONZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b0f6ab0286928bb088290595c4b51ac0
0df3498601aca2100a91a9300a14bb39f18cec0e
describe
'2597304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2606616273473e6919510fc207d818b1
f0c4151043b9ea6b725c689f9fe16fc8cc9ae0b0
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
6c4ed09b83d6bae2277117b901b30ecb
908e1d4a2aa25000ecc44814c3f15748837090e8
describe
'26879' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
21dee53ce9d52f13bbedbd0443db6b41
deaf0de0da614b5329dec03ccc4330b8e2fa5c2d
'2011-12-23T23:49:57-05:00'
describe
'322918' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
0262bbf58383702452dfba50e5d6dab3
2102043a5d296c3167cf2daccbadc70629dee7bc
describe
'184605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
820c4b854321807c10a5c25cd0308f07
9a7b8cd395216846b036f3cbc49c52f08231f25d
'2011-12-23T23:50:11-05:00'
describe
'14997' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOF' 'sip-files00077.pro'
7e46e961e209e4d845cec52d0af580fc
7e293fa7435fb44e2ce0e6a84985e9fb758c8839
'2011-12-23T23:47:31-05:00'
describe
'61407' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOG' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
dbb010e721639f6bd6f777e8049f0526
c78d801c6a3bba2c5dce6e776fb2ebc568a39a94
describe
'2596804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
83b4460e716c2ff42def9ec94de0a5dc
ec313947fa312e130a4e285c98777bbb4291b089
describe
'625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOI' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ba5bba62073bf541f151a134fa5c251f
55e606cc253afec66029b6030af917413c4b6872
describe
'24421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
315d0f4f5083bebaf62cb1f0d025c6af
959227b45958e7f1e5afacfb44d1811316bbfdbe
'2011-12-23T23:51:20-05:00'
describe
'322993' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2b5f7f4ed02111f01c7785677e6de825
ceb907571fbdd411e8a0f7d97ec0a079b843ffaa
describe
'181470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
51f92fc461afa43f8b547d66ecee5c0d
cdcc0b0e55cb577fa2ea09d5363e11bc63b09433
describe
'39275' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOM' 'sip-files00078.pro'
49c3fcd9cb5e9958d36224e739da114e
37d8c588af2e2dc4b903eec904cfd4325276350b
describe
'72233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOON' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
125cf49376611cf17243dfa9a5966f5d
3df150e4e515d1f4c48d015b30bf7a463cf17c03
describe
'2597528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOO' 'sip-files00078.tif'
3d1b88bfd62b5dbe004af3c2a7afeb4b
1890e8c3d4792948b4f1e5d04c56bc95e20f08f9
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
430f170a07db80a346b1814a5e02455c
1b026887179ad6026e6a96026c9ba5d0b3282996
describe
'27224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
0ce99f72929248c06f088e6229a7a2bd
ec05d168f71e1ba560ee078bc74fe3960037cc00
describe
'322646' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOR' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
58778ef2e576fea7d128715aa9052716
85983a783d63f40b41ce487deee6a6d3419e441f
'2011-12-23T23:48:09-05:00'
describe
'122854' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOS' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
16ae09f3d915f57bae97d17808bbc14f
4d542783183ddacb65d5880cb67acc6d3d738b8d
describe
'17460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOT' 'sip-files00079.pro'
b7f266cf5d2d7d19fbe887b005e7b156
98557b8d683e999a31f724334899dfbd717f9908
describe
'46721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
bef22c537edccb63f09ebd225cf606e2
845e7088773cc9258c6817cc41869c3490d0b89c
'2011-12-23T23:49:03-05:00'
describe
'2593980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOV' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6c74c0ba6d89164c3d5c1dbb1056a51b
b693e50c02f8f0764232d4012ab1f63e556c5421
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
21e69f97bd4b2e310a4db75b573ac7c4
cc7552819ea20b3b15293253254b9e0cef5b2313
describe
'20079' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4365b0c70ca784bf89778cc961fa0d30
2d4561600da73d79b2387c11f4ce08eb19ff0f6a
describe
'323228' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
299e3b3a92e7db6bab705fabd798e048
48e5d10d78dd85fa3f0420d04caba2e7dc9cddf8
describe
'171588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOOZ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
51856dcf3eab84a23263a48c121d66c1
43fb47e306e7b4bebaa5d2e96c9981cf82c2e22a
describe
'22540' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPA' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ddbf80fc8a404660b13a81ab37e588bf
9bb56ad1aad6c1268bb36646b78726088c3bf334
describe
'60449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ead8ee70b10bd4b8bec7a15eea117514
b395a6bbb59818d5b3779de98b7b07d276f32c62
'2011-12-23T23:49:06-05:00'
describe
'2599008' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
028c7cf8949eec1f3e148dc072730888
c7454f55fc624c1f0bc304be7cc1c650a60671f2
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ce89d340f84b46dccbe32d827fbd7ca9
fef33e29ca78ef69ec68ebee4c3fb6a49d12003f
describe
'24572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPE' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
cb4b9a27666100f52d6c3c1a2fc1ebce
dd979b344f539964a2c4c851f7486856cd8cc8ee
'2011-12-23T23:42:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
66daed6d8854819d3d5f35108de10405
dd88cc19ca1838977635adb32f996b6775885f9b
'2011-12-23T23:43:27-05:00'
describe
'172046' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
2c01cab3368f2d46b34f7449d28a3593
5d2d3b3648eb792be49d7e9775835be9c2e5904d
'2011-12-23T23:43:42-05:00'
describe
'32029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a4316b8d008b776fbb1747f8ace1d016
21b4fdee989b3d0735db07cc87e8f9748a6edb3b
describe
'64464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
df331f93ea175a346b9aba497868f110
5981888aa85cf14bf1953603a27d36f44847733a
describe
'2596928' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
6f9a5df90ca0300096d787577aff542a
ac53f188e39e385b70eedd396fea3f218cf58f81
'2011-12-23T23:46:08-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
feba0bbb6b95a22802ed5f1355971619
1f6e5580c25cf70ec725d716221d4ebb26baac33
describe
'25022' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPL' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
717e4281c3fd69779a6a8ecbe45c2587
6aaa9715b56ef9f43db476ece24004574cb92b13
'2011-12-23T23:48:08-05:00'
describe
'323169' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPM' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
5e2fd41eb6cd2b5b00a86607a9f951f1
af4879ff85d19bb8fb64a4b0acea7319837f244f
'2011-12-23T23:45:56-05:00'
describe
'189470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPN' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
8c6a0f20d1b31c3ef5bae72ef8adc70a
7439bd859aeebc997030c4ff2a84e508acd6ef64
describe
'34102' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
dba635ca73f54f9129b44ad17e673743
12a2b782ab11a2dacb22f6cbacd59879cd5d50db
describe
'69029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPP' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f36ee27f351eb4f4b917663b1747325c
32f259463405e89979cd784cc508f5360ed136c8
describe
'2599544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
77236c99ee69c702a980610b30bf2a55
a1206e4d298682b482bcdb58c4b342eebf731a50
'2011-12-23T23:44:15-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
24343c76312f193be4285d6d4538fcee
06a4399e7bdefe8325bcf4f01580dcac06b8994e
'2011-12-23T23:48:45-05:00'
describe
'26945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPS' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
1cb28d77ad1f7de485662fff9d7e228e
a9552b24c7908c2cded3ff6629e8f32bc57573c2
'2011-12-23T23:45:05-05:00'
describe
'323221' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPT' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5b580b97e8e020dd5a473487005b457b
1fa8f320590fa1841daf5e956744c87979a91cdd
'2011-12-23T23:46:47-05:00'
describe
'192723' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPU' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
cfba87359420f7312899ced820eb378e
aedf07e1083c5a94daa7b4793a190b4f1bd25732
'2011-12-23T23:44:11-05:00'
describe
'34686' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
d37f1a643f17abac7c06b6b0394620d6
d0f239d56f854fd950c33496caafd45e99d1e21c
'2011-12-23T23:47:49-05:00'
describe
'68520' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPW' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
503ec5372403120188a51cd99a151b60
b7ff35b588c9a5e7e4734181c71b8308bce8e85f
describe
'2599448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPX' 'sip-files00083.tif'
fb562b2bc83c56c6ca26f967283f674d
ec5e08e3940eeee93e577613ade9706b22f5b2c2
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
b2c6ae0dea39d5678e2416ee53b109a1
015d0a6901151af9406ccae46fefd70c34db3f65
'2011-12-23T23:44:28-05:00'
describe
'26914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOPZ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fb4c1a01af05b09fd2d8c123bef7257f
929f7d53da614a6d19fdb08e0c751815c1d74dde
describe
'322996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQA' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
1b6198ed2f2c935ea985d457e7ff91ae
370e66e93c15be17f5d0d788712710969de04a83
describe
'200969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
5292e8e01758984be643e715279bc102
9e0a14e43e35a418b7a6b2a97a82cbaffe98ee08
describe
'35000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQC' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6652316e40028a953992b8222e127647
31a61a146f0f9e4bca90f681929b22c849c349c8
'2011-12-23T23:43:07-05:00'
describe
'69473' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
87f8dd38ab976518d0300816a7147769
3130bd75b97b1ccb2d8401ca5c9f9055e06bb142
describe
'2597124' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQE' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e5138e324dd7ba289f8c7b147c876aaa
7bd4c374af438bdef8ade3489668eb9113c01aae
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQF' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5d077f03a6c8ce07643cf5a8ebf977ca
8d167df1ffb3a59237baa0692fdad240e6934cca
describe
'25815' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
34b9bc6246a729ef03673dc595c586fe
9f1a34e82ef1930a4081fef5f7f969639af04174
'2011-12-23T23:46:06-05:00'
describe
'322987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQH' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
4e1cd6e87c802b02aacff37ff4cacbdb
f0662c4d27bfbed8ea0c3f2968acb6f78fb2fa89
'2011-12-23T23:48:25-05:00'
describe
'221368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQI' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
d64a9590bb4032c50fa6bfa78e882dee
97bbc9e90818d02809be7932d911ceb76a8d6b0c
'2011-12-23T23:49:58-05:00'
describe
'27182' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
87e2581c6df071c98fbd29f75b5d0123
2fc25ac1bc0dee2bea4e896fa79dd96d77e5e4af
describe
'69480' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
ea2af42f499ecd0a89b267b5fac6f002
b817305d9156c74a3502ca8808d10284291a637d
'2011-12-23T23:49:30-05:00'
describe
'2597048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
343bb6053dba6fd8dc349f355b170a0f
4959c8b9433326227bd0d24025e9bf3d495f706a
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
33608922261b6ae60f6358e6616b2874
9728fda57ff11ac01bd48ecc274e80f067a412f9
'2011-12-23T23:48:03-05:00'
describe
'25554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
093de9e8b54680153a1d0f36e044cd77
880859f8d3013f9284ddbebefb2e6d9d1256de60
describe
'323003' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0a884eb1f81213889740b03a98175928
b836af43bfd1e0479992df2ff0e38fab48e2d0a4
describe
'171404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a61336d841e275c6e55519bd853177d8
c30924fc97d445944f7f060ea65861c5a6a1a834
'2011-12-23T23:43:09-05:00'
describe
'38217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQQ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
93ba2817104b8e7ededd889c6ad2c9e1
53ca9cc93e05c0c0736d98fb41c34b9a6b3f5c5a
'2011-12-23T23:47:26-05:00'
describe
'68440' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQR' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9a616a239175563075b6417909c3e155
a139bd4606abdebf8ad00aa2a7c90421e7b156c2
describe
'2597288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0ae8a532b76c8e9861a6597d4b6f224c
5ef0d65a5c1be2ba00a2c5ae743d89337d878c38
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c91caf8042bb643a6399f92cd6a157ef
5927641cfe092b8721260111356943d0b9ded8e9
describe
'26560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQU' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8bfedc5ab178ef1779f6649b038503cf
9bb518909af6a50c56c4178374f87f2522d89a41
describe
'322954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
bfc0450ef161893a654286c5ba8538e4
36e677b8908d6f878838dc8695958223908705c9
'2011-12-23T23:42:49-05:00'
describe
'173419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQW' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
ff8e5a7070bbdf63006005e2421ec4b1
4359494cc9bac18144791ed91911363d369256ed
'2011-12-23T23:44:45-05:00'
describe
'38927' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQX' 'sip-files00087.pro'
54d56d03f920bb1471c982ba7c4bf76c
6ed3e55c945526f39ddf8ef301122ec5eb2e7962
describe
'70119' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2ea08c4fc4421b2f0503b2a13b621b91
4c069af8566a118400a526c768841a11ae77a49b
'2011-12-23T23:45:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOQZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
63718a225a82bb304ce5dc27519c426c
60bb17f7478cf3e16f90124ee4140a37cb60e6d4
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORA' 'sip-files00087.txt'
e461293365a01409ca2b609e02a29d6e
4efb86b882997ff87f0ab9907574f6f33be98e82
describe
'26668' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORB' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
ceb16e73f698f2b5d6f9d31e8124f689
b1a4c0a6c3c6597eed036c3bd1adcb9f5c417cef
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
29bdf246e6e36a1baf45ee5a04bfed60
12866393621895a876a4debfadc5f28ecdc14453
'2011-12-23T23:43:52-05:00'
describe
'179579' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORD' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
db0111f6a38a6ba70cc5ef087de3ede5
293d141596a90be0b4d3eb20bb07d09c8fc94194
describe
'41201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORE' 'sip-files00088.pro'
eb01f2c37110eb0d57e3bd2ee5a24167
293182f0229281fbe9d8cbd6108252c6364f3b4a
describe
'71937' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
f1ed2a04bb91507dd8229bc0a6e30266
8ca89ed4b4bcc97b7137b6b4ef29da98f7791991
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORG' 'sip-files00088.tif'
6a9828b261b9f54f95cf03ae6e25e7dc
d0dbcf32fd8483612b8430cf5080d24510880bbb
'2011-12-23T23:48:15-05:00'
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORH' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b3dfb34ff4517634348d1d61073fa978
39621e344e5b1c1dc3896263e21a0800aa5f5f6a
'2011-12-23T23:50:09-05:00'
describe
'27016' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2f8bb9d8106afb1ecacf87ed04b8de6e
4a688e248ee1717772e7d8d45805d9912878d52c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9c028e8335dacc4d5f0e3a1979fc04ae
7f9140e7484776f8b219446e0be804be350331c9
describe
'163218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
5276bce381f27d9197b8274fe9c9c90f
93c37df23d5178e14b39f2410756462e6d8269a1
'2011-12-23T23:43:22-05:00'
describe
'37055' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
473237e0e8751c41c85c084a7222e3de
70e26eee12b5571e353bae9eb2392644c978a20c
describe
'66991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
d01d5cdfe18a0f37500c4562634c9b20
10906377a11b17b969839b45bb8776d25c3f1589
describe
'2596040' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
1909a6023ef721cb30943d4468bf4c85
7774fca5721a1e6ff142f8f6cb367e36e828f216
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
51e8804b1f5966d0eda36585b98e8df0
7201cee41bd15975260cf40419d787fe443add95
'2011-12-23T23:45:07-05:00'
describe
'26607' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
92760385689005f4df822949b16955c8
ff4a3c34f3fcf9c8eafdb838d73f3b81d677654b
'2011-12-23T23:49:37-05:00'
describe
'322985' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
ca2eba8580a4033711119eb981b489a4
3863d91e1745761182ed3a7f04e008d8fc6bbdac
describe
'181704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c86ddba2be62a1b5f899f1c0d2ce6660
df384879d3b7f66d9fd26aa72f72ec4ff4ba5804
describe
'39225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0b14a2fa729c5fc83dafe2734452df3a
65cc70d7ed6f4ce50a4c9cdb3f85b94cdf7fdd47
describe
'71470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d4ed33676f7a525f3eb77cb242555070
01cdd147289e6608e437940c1d8eb079743b42e5
describe
'2597716' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
891e1668342909aa295645c8f5b61a69
9a18549bc3727df9b158d07dcf73e112d848b0ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
63a20e9bdcea7676b2d42c6206a29078
92f637062614a541fc9543983842ce19629cc28c
describe
'27356' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f2c045fbe209b6f430552a591d90acff
82062f7ae4709c7d0eb73ac4104e71abc82599f0
'2011-12-23T23:44:48-05:00'
describe
'322804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ea595bfa7a068abe68bc384dba6613bb
44c4efe5b7013040f6050bee98d354a9da9650d9
describe
'179138' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d1ed1fb798f1a1535ecb67567f829141
06dce5562c2962a90fd9941e541c1761b488027b
describe
'38013' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABORZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
3e67d61df8eb775ff5e71bbda8157ce5
d91dc810f848626fbab38aa83321bc5ea49219be
describe
'69568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8f743c96b2be1acf74f20bb6a86ce0ba
0a414a30aab9ac577b9a6184c1d90089b5574c5a
'2011-12-23T23:45:15-05:00'
describe
'2596200' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9f3fd25d8e4a9772ab37f39b3e50526e
6c418ed7280179317bed3c6e841782b45c359e42
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
6d5eb0f01c88d7c82a56507511800581
7da95184de2d05852ac81e0ae5e930ab8dabbd0f
describe
'26264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ae10848f33233dfa4d79bdd69aa11b63
46f032e2594b3feee9bab0c943b1b50fdf9f79f3
'2011-12-23T23:48:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4003b5c882c7683a1de1b98137acc1d1
2250c0cccc53edb4530564e96df5373d663b9e50
describe
'155946' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7462bd9fab8c0a4a31645bb74ed8e8f0
5fa7d8cf027d0172dcbc5c56ad2aae0741775dab
describe
'34659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d4a6aac15f14718382c31ea471354a00
aaa99fc60983b7757a651e39df2edb0051b0cde3
describe
'63925' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7d9363c5c7513e6a7d3ed2b9ea4c066d
32b3397a5cd494f909f580b864f52fef996262e1
describe
'2595832' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
1e052525d4c67dd096b9faa3f9e78245
dde985a0675c28c1af3ef9b9ea3bd9b35872928f
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSJ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
5cdab0b54afdd949697e32945b121378
ed01a013108ef2ee467f4ee9e586cc6ebed63b4c
describe
'25324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
175ab60fe5c22a65bbe75dff0b1d005c
5ea5f36cb19fa47909fbc4fd401203e0a1db6bfd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
af39b3a5b2bb2ec97aa3d38361a503c5
99d32fa8a318fb246e51207de3dfce2436725596
describe
'162145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
5dd7702effaafff4fc84a64f7dcb6592
68d2a6154e1302a39e4ecd4599929a1dabd3fd92
'2011-12-23T23:49:19-05:00'
describe
'36875' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
012317cc92a3fb7f4cbb2c051fada769
b022629b5824e54a70b5392408a57d6cbaf71a6c
'2011-12-23T23:45:35-05:00'
describe
'68161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
1f53b97a2d2db0e865812caa889b5498
2551743eabfbcb8631941ea500006d57193e7317
'2011-12-23T23:51:22-05:00'
describe
'2595876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2378bf2740c5e6de233e731ea840ae88
7975c152f96bee66297a3bae53abaa686f7c0a03
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f102fc4f4bb99fe5305da6aea9b26694
4470cbe149e5377833aaec8e37e95a8b783cb7f6
describe
'25945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
77ed214cc3f641d30eca80b144964cfa
d2f50e802ccfca8dbc3bdd265d883b885f37a43d
describe
'322929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
97ba2bb47da264097d89338c9de1509c
d8ca907c03207feba586d0024367ebb3b4958710
describe
'177831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOST' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
b80829df6321b0779ffec0b8e452167f
3b0f36ccadb22080c19fe9ae465e7b2a92d62d42
describe
'36806' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSU' 'sip-files00094.pro'
146f0b62a1b94e59eb68d909f3352dbc
b26f0126c062997efd6dcf2c743e9d1d22063968
'2011-12-23T23:46:02-05:00'
describe
'69521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSV' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
613589ea1dafa3552e45179035ffac4a
de04394751d735f6f81010b85ed05f8860ffa891
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
52dfc5394db5a55c251a491a63894834
fc50154c2adff9b29c5acac1db4d83afee7d3c3b
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
326993b82701043722000333bba9e9bf
4991893a655e40f557ec9e8e4dbf35b2f131bcde
describe
'27043' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d0dd7e5ac80b4ca2c9c3be87466c7def
fa22f0e94ca70885e38b3b6af10d1e513f234766
'2011-12-23T23:46:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOSZ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
dbc9efbaa9eb1d4cea01b0d38d0a7565
5f623869710ae283dad471fe10cba109ab725e73
describe
'181250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTA' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
8f7876d5d3c509739be312f6712a8528
f7d7f6a17f210b250803151ca1b553acb99fc0ed
'2011-12-23T23:49:14-05:00'
describe
'27236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
5e4d025343a39722dea8324622c9c0c9
7c245853c6d803b3315a0f1a60e1a430fdda2baa
describe
'64849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
339612223bb845639931ff983d2ebe92
d765a4ced334d806dc2e6f23af7aacd7abd93302
describe
'2597196' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
4a5176290a51f55fb079f43f26495129
b5a161e5e81aa530f72f91c8f44a214f07a51306
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
bd1a53deedf6ac7f910e15e1c8f2f0a5
9e33260d747520b3daccd644b82c31710b957ae6
describe
'25302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTF' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0d92e09f054ca7ec0e541eaf840a001e
fcb8a3711e8987c344dbdd8d450fe8414b383e4a
'2011-12-23T23:47:12-05:00'
describe
'322838' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTG' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
501f7fbefe572c32b1134adb3de9a490
9a3296c28d61e32b5e1796b5c1ca29b5d547e37a
describe
'169930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTH' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
4cabc924c6857b43528a934152ee4caa
af1473af2b8ca2f5a687690ae0a8c1fc2eba2997
describe
'37769' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5b24c939ca7827270856dc22a3cdb84b
844ba1a8e0f4e993cfe83aeb8cb8745fb131031a
describe
'68542' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTJ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
98f045c73472d8e395a89e62aef02e13
88c365d802d1f0a2e3ef36538972153a66cee4ba
describe
'2596132' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
00d677eb888302d018be60eea2762589
657e6108d27ddbebb12c9441b089b1b27672b5cc
'2011-12-23T23:45:27-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
12e84d6e1b3d2b06162d5e6dfde924fb
1524452636d924791dee2e9f3e7efa1604137963
describe
'26504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTM' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ceef249609dad0c8c6b0bf2583a77cca
bc550ef91e1ad2da96f11c7ff02c34da3ff14063
describe
'322797' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2aeac22e6c2ed626ae56fddfbfb59da7
62d54313c18df464a96a079985f9d8f8219ea69f
describe
'168378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
2669234f10cd2981743a5bfd42a3624a
20562a23f3b2152e37365966115f71dbe50f7dfe
describe
'27539' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
0c8e52b79fe557920b38670a27dae46f
ccc7c72b08b9358e0664c3690be7a470b22b4953
describe
'65480' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTQ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
373c900a84a6ee2a3d3397d8613b2b9d
f73a83daabe0c6caa923d7f841842378dbbd1c5a
describe
'2595884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
737abd5980aa5f51a3991dc11077da95
62cf15ff535e57ae7fe839fec4d63157e48dd8af
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a3ea70a675060bbfc0aa0fa50052796d
08d0291ec6a17c35b91946d57dd355aa06a6a1d0
describe
'25515' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTT' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
d32f55b70aa39d9e11a48e047679fc4a
eaad78fae175f061ee62db7023030dfb3a917c18
'2011-12-23T23:43:02-05:00'
describe
'322833' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
14b1949cefc6d1036d648c42909fdc2a
85afb897d6d965087bec6842f6a716eaf1ba3d9a
describe
'174841' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
ae8bb47e94a238088a744dffffcc7fcb
a197b9edf961d7d0ed0fa7a8802ccf1236777f58
describe
'36579' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
35aafc40c05dedc7fee0ae1715b2532c
4e19a19eb9302fc43cde821c55d189e974937f0a
describe
'67663' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
8fa6a2520b159d03ae5a48d22fee1511
3fe0b209e25777fbc526bda57db25f010f68fda5
describe
'2595996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
5b549c496814661baac29238b0bddd13
522ef0932e4c75ebd7aa5ca5dbfe705103c28727
'2011-12-23T23:50:47-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOTZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
7f8a4269529f7b5645518e00de63e01b
912913717e8cb03b09e8e0cdbd848fb87d392382
describe
'26511' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
d2cc7181f3eb1adb28662c6e61717085
511f346d818d9079bc43378d53eda76de558cb08
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
04850b03e1fbdde446b9a3bd7b45c92a
577a2cf00b1b7edf9e2a181c493d0c82df4f020a
describe
'186104' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
2b2d2e32b17e530d7e95ec21d1b33c99
8213812af0d00fe6bf15dedcd99a8066e5f7da8e
'2011-12-23T23:42:55-05:00'
describe
'38386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUD' 'sip-files00099.pro'
fa3a9a12072b4e80d2c0c5f008fe3a1b
2eac89afc27bf46408cd61f76deded4eb0e07998
describe
'70432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUE' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
6281cb9f667c661add08d9012a474ec0
7428566ddc9e9c63b7fdcbc202078d7ddf3b6a28
'2011-12-23T23:45:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4e9a8f596a47edc801ea8cb9b12768ca
18cb8f5901b5700d9098316aecac30daf2843f30
'2011-12-23T23:51:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
20f39a4ce5ce0b2ae282f91530fdc8c3
4e1e13c89d9855842fb48b775fac94210d39ce93
'2011-12-23T23:44:23-05:00'
describe
'27048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
945dc116246d02fb2c0eaa05e2603ce5
9f572fa7cb80c55fa165d24010dc68874b028674
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUI' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
fff9efadc2859917dbf05e542b6e5125
b02a82ff3fdfaa3251c1107aa0a6c2102ed80f44
describe
'158881' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUJ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5a890875be13ebba5f221a317d9e8f22
8803bfba52a84b9d560f6fd485b8e21de655cd88
describe
'26696' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUK' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ec5b656ba2af44b6630d2837c6d3b655
da52f6047cbfd67672d4dc0ad2d3369ea27cee85
describe
'62156' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUL' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
bf5b559b1e6efad1cf7fdd52eda146ab
fb860e6b4a3796c68fae068eac963302eff557a6
describe
'2595572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c3f72de3aa3db3c7631d1642199387e3
5dcda52ac198c19cf1556832b9e1305a0edefd38
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUN' 'sip-files00100.txt'
0f74a8e4a7d74c52d7937d4703b65dbd
35b59247c6f2651a71773cdef9bf66dc275b0dfe
describe
'24559' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUO' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
0ff249a947d72a4cb0a44497b2b76c52
419a6720f4e5f73ae9c13c6980dc7e6197b8be9d
'2011-12-23T23:47:03-05:00'
describe
'322780' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
cdc673336690fad427869d98e1fb5569
0947e1bd17c72036f9302f7cd13a203ec7be514c
'2011-12-23T23:46:12-05:00'
describe
'175817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUQ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
cc5d7793657c555f5129a201a96f2956
3b23cbcf6b180a6bb567f59379e6bbcc40e74ee4
describe
'40072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUR' 'sip-files00101.pro'
7380a4576dc996b4d91542cdd442c021
f4b878a049dd5a12c1ab2ec1475fc5d8276e7cf1
describe
'69625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUS' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c2d4aca7b75fadfd2e912798fc1e378f
7d8d9e346b82a070204b1e090f8c74f7c4b2e22c
describe
'2595748' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUT' 'sip-files00101.tif'
41c192ee340513d31950ba1c9815f717
e7be7e651e64d7c5262a672f450c96628c32b699
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUU' 'sip-files00101.txt'
e56aa277a913122e308d17f1a5521d5d
9d0e3432d063b84c8dfc56f47d3ce5c09f351884
describe
'25961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUV' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
55d5068759341ef5e3b65e4a3009de10
92b3524a9ee4057f234c8e5a98065a4878086bfa
describe
'323251' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUW' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
1aa99be571a567ccfef9fcfd8d4f504c
702007bbd660e108a942195842ffc60a8540ec65
describe
'180446' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUX' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
bbdccd3228dbca6e19f86a74e67e0bc4
4b7e974467a869ee7762bd8a8167cb66716267e9
'2011-12-23T23:50:42-05:00'
describe
'38318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUY' 'sip-files00102.pro'
e0728eddffe17cb1763fc44c58975f73
6db489569309bd3476da3772a172ddb781708834
describe
'67500' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOUZ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
096031a145ca6418ea14d4e54b43d63d
02a03e45bf57586bc4264be1007466a0107888bd
describe
'2599048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVA' 'sip-files00102.tif'
a55234598f713a9b1d02410255c0d606
aee322fe9fe5b92c8e5f0667e806303aa125bfa2
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVB' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9dc9f7574bbb14be9f0a1740531f2965
626b0155b0e6f51b2762028255bb6d1fb197ede9
describe
'25921' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVC' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
0fcfa2421a405ce59bebf1ceae3989e6
dab6938bdfe76854ec1c5845babd52bb7a3c9d13
describe
'322811' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVD' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
dcafff7d4f4fe95b2d65081ee7ed5ed9
02619dc024849bfd142b9a2511f3e1796b14248f
'2011-12-23T23:44:10-05:00'
describe
'180816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
fc47c30067d7598aea852953cf6d248f
aabccdb2d2c3d0faf369e7d89c7fe07b6c686286
'2011-12-23T23:49:46-05:00'
describe
'36582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVF' 'sip-files00103.pro'
f6cd10c89b385893a0cff784547c9a56
ed126a3e0e3a6e77dc8b081c19cb8deebbe8ed8c
describe
'67240' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVG' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
026dbdafed359e0062703485f2c0171e
fe13f59b3b3b8d6cecb7aec319ce1451b3e2fbc3
describe
'2597152' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVH' 'sip-files00103.tif'
280a93c01e300c99eb809a0bd54025ce
f2afb1caffd6f7d6cd25cff943435e11969a863c
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVI' 'sip-files00103.txt'
eabb759d9ccc0a1fedf9e0e7428f1f50
fb4d16b4ef05dbba700a39d1c6201fcd99a1d472
'2011-12-23T23:48:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'26056' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVJ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
2949931c8b5293547adc7c45db6b742a
9700c93ea8a34a4472a3b3d07798c259aa2dd72b
describe
'322984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVK' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
f2a5d0ec03cf5d020358e23bb60beca0
edaee14c27c728e135d66e0a5a3cf47289775d12
describe
'164761' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVL' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
f2c466403570b616d0d98803be456239
b4eb8cc801a6a67112e01be5d0f444c8fee8503f
describe
'37812' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVM' 'sip-files00104.pro'
29afd31afdb94c84cfa9abba240345c1
4a5a46789f02f003050d9151035e900b94d662bd
describe
'65383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVN' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
3c559a3d9cde733bce7cf21aef9206a9
c8694b9df65b3ad239ad31bbb563a873781f6774
describe
'2596932' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVO' 'sip-files00104.tif'
88c360c32c32bf959f2c52d39caa116a
87b0dfed460daabdbce8b26594a811095890caec
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVP' 'sip-files00104.txt'
33b2519cea8ca0d449a7672f55c8c5d3
ac9f553ddd0c2a0c294075ede033f9ce9d44e46a
describe
'25486' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVQ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
b0b4ad9901aaba8b9a7dbd6f6b9b80f4
f50792c566111580b25bfa1b47cabbbdecc20933
describe
'322927' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVR' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
810cde7aee7c85fc526d136a231821fe
a1ea9a8e4b22840ef5d2922e6c010a093d3df34a
describe
'159224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVS' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
e01a99c04352652d1db327767f10a4b0
2324abbdafb6b163e05907bb07bdf442911b2958
describe
'35428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVT' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d0ed76394e20c560835ba5a5bf403eb0
aea282819eddab1c589797405bdefa40fe3a7146
describe
'64251' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVU' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
428f28e45f850cd9b1b9ffb1c5d4761c
54c35391f892dfadf0eabb66fceb72ff04e3a5f9
'2011-12-23T23:45:19-05:00'
describe
'2596992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
bb2143a3988c4b95ac28c3f61152dc9c
d0a1cd7254d6cd75ae024ef524bdf2ebef78f651
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVW' 'sip-files00105.txt'
798c15b6220d16fe7ca6a6e4a00de09d
3ef2302175339890c1beebbc0b02253517649628
describe
'25331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVX' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
e78835066bc4f575c66a734de08305e0
22f2e69d840e569da848808716158aff5fa4fa94
describe
'322893' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVY' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
14f567a2775a22f3021e416bfc5ccdeb
0876de368efc672cb26d8220309d11eb17018570
describe
'171366' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOVZ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
74e1771d214daace1cd8a00ee00a7547
e7bcaa6c16946175716879159f9c4b890a48a045
'2011-12-23T23:43:17-05:00'
describe
'39048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWA' 'sip-files00106.pro'
a34c7d815cae527c5ec46ce957ea526c
a92c04455ec9bd2294d93925ca35f3048820a8df
describe
'69577' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWB' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
98a5f0bf06c93f495fd154bf98902248
15d2c1b47cde5cc01f0a8a1783ddc7bdb9ec0f78
describe
'2597220' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4d3d368f250d0553666d2c9586eb6118
3a0c34d395e494b87924efdefc085c0f7e0c2a4e
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWD' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5dc2ec8601060fb9863570580180989e
e84cae78a99982f13b8d0727a1f0e05d434c1096
describe
'26351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWE' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7489c582824916399f721461ff4c322b
3d56be3f00aa58cabff72c2c68738c2707ba82bb
describe
'323256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWF' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
a6c79aa15c547d3da4ad6846af67c035
79c763e1d26f811b0d4db8eec2a0cd5fb93db961
describe
'166806' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWG' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
3717554e9ee7bcc92bf4bb7aaecf5495
ff403ba74edefcc3a25727f86ede3e63a7a77703
'2011-12-23T23:44:43-05:00'
describe
'38554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWH' 'sip-files00107.pro'
eb0f05091d7c77006966b3788717b9cd
44f9bfe90f645cc35608e7dd46ac6dacf72f2eeb
describe
'67723' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWI' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
3b6906341bd2ef2c1354c8401444c31f
6f5f08676c2dd8d2ffc1e611b09c155b7e595683
describe
'2599112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWJ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e5046ddcd2458727cd6fd4bbae26ecd9
bf2f1211cf322d3c34b2772ed3cd88977c7fb7bd
'2011-12-23T23:47:21-05:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWK' 'sip-files00107.txt'
84ddcc81d9b272829e5095b51214621a
5901859601bdf1a7a569845b1a6de39f2a8f2183
describe
'26110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWL' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
21160469e455961712c7c81e450ee2eb
1c80838fef0d2d657d2f7503a5b1732ab513716e
'2011-12-23T23:49:17-05:00'
describe
'322890' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWM' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
34dbaa535b67b1c16011d2732901ec6d
c22c431e73f6f3e0f2c158f4af25be67584eba31
describe
'191582' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWN' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
798cfa40a0f31e1f57d49fa8d3e5b148
64c1dab7b2086ef55b0d3ce6b150df31c34d50df
'2011-12-23T23:48:22-05:00'
describe
'40679' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWO' 'sip-files00108.pro'
08d5f8818430d406177be8c37b14bdb9
1ede8444ff17f87b7f65f9af6f139c43f5c6c2ea
'2011-12-23T23:45:22-05:00'
describe
'72494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWP' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
176e7c709d88aae85ca89e1940a090f5
897330aca982d2383b87133d1e2f0dd22648a26c
'2011-12-23T23:46:15-05:00'
describe
'2597236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWQ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
f5b59694d57b3c07e879458ba7f95c51
7f153063ee84388b176adc4b3bb9105c6c2b5a70
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWR' 'sip-files00108.txt'
038cede2caf133f061dec5835560f192
71e8c2bd599f56ab6c1a91c60f94eea94a5737c8
describe
'26677' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWS' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
e24ef924dcf8d2671225e60daa0f99e4
f99bee47e162dbac535a38210b9c0fc6c6e94153
'2011-12-23T23:46:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWT' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
cd1bc2f9a9b2b4a2a3cd197efed1be47
5f82a90153bf1d28b5e8dd6a5fe0e25cafbedb06
'2011-12-23T23:45:48-05:00'
describe
'191468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWU' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5faef64229a1c814c0a406e17642d8ae
39f187911750a4ebb8bcf6e8de6572ecb341dffa
'2011-12-23T23:45:42-05:00'
describe
'39262' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
8a6f100e18365790c69220abf242b341
1de84c451e633919e531674201f604a00ea90a47
describe
'72369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWW' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
1486fca5f58d3f2940d7672afaa6a5b4
657c1a4d188fd51184e9dbff9e286ca014545ad2
describe
'2599180' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWX' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f3d0f74bd519e5285cb5fe6800f21f36
148b187705163da5a664ab850d4152dbefc4563f
'2011-12-23T23:43:41-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWY' 'sip-files00109.txt'
cd8fadb0b4503ff8b19ac5dc84542a58
5edbca3197af0625b9ae3a8190010be98e057a9a
describe
'26514' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOWZ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
cf14d7d415a1f0133b49921b3290385d
30e56c5e77ffb16970508ee0c6b57cdf3a5a8467
'2011-12-23T23:51:24-05:00'
describe
'323218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXA' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
771316c0cfc788636bd66262e64f0e1d
6ca5a1a13ade1110c1018a4e0f293cb2c84015b4
describe
'183356' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXB' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
99ae272b0c3394b01cb87232d2628c4c
f95b83c9e8385e5b8eee4ebfa6643d2adb9718f7
'2011-12-23T23:43:30-05:00'
describe
'37886' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXC' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0fc1e0f1de3f22dc4a79d69da316dda8
2b37ff50f4203c57f2fa99d0f2b614f2ea16dc98
describe
'69026' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXD' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
b60bee562eb635f3a458b2ce5ebfafa1
e9bfbb1141157246931a3376ca717b8a97f2e28f
describe
'2599116' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXE' 'sip-files00110.tif'
5356368eea49666305363df556b3c7b3
ff2b659046e7cb9a6c9c52eb20b193113b3393f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXF' 'sip-files00110.txt'
092cd5e17cf447b5272e0037f839ba27
f3702fbc0ea704753631fa64268ad38fb0586f80
'2011-12-23T23:44:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXG' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
638f9fba883c0c1559f469d569814415
382a06d9e2a175269b9a6d317272611d6c10bc94
describe
'322978' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXH' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5cf97b3969f8136e80b963a30650bcd3
c36a2169de972aa3466855c7a80a61b1f22f0a5c
describe
'135612' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXI' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c809bef891ebddb1476dade2ed439f3c
23cf7368b99fdde55a766cb66d4e0c62bfccd6cb
describe
'20034' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXJ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
bb1a2729977d0da93ab7d4239cf1901d
b4045665f010a8e6e744538c4ce78b9b1c4b7f5c
describe
'48930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXK' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
e2e83fb53db495cf63f0abadbb2c57b7
1e09281c7d5274e27cef23418ce710247ba90eda
describe
'2595308' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXL' 'sip-files00111.tif'
5148fc83af415c83cc18a987096654dc
8ee6eb4fbd521fe8b24f947877fbb4aad63fb5b2
'2011-12-23T23:50:29-05:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXM' 'sip-files00111.txt'
ea86c7b517490408fe1d2ef86ad7648b
961809932ae75daf6129166c15cb172eb142522a
describe
'20514' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXN' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
28db00ccae26019c4cd4124b91dc9cd5
aff484c82212404aa2afeea9c825547bccb39195
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXO' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
0449146ccbe4314b08f44a7edf7ec92a
a1f509197c9a2adc1a9d1051c15efb4c95eab3d2
describe
'145846' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXP' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
53ba4ae7f24cc92fca131f161a25756d
2741a0eee706772c02c390c53cbee6477464f24e
describe
'23100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXQ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
e6d175c356d26f0dc681356bb5ae4b77
1b254f3b9f77d7ed7a0ee405d560797993b3915c
describe
'57317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXR' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
e581119e38048fe1566073fcb71eb8dd
c9ae5e807296f0d5a158d998d40bb89b5dc0db88
describe
'2596324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXS' 'sip-files00112.tif'
5624e34870d6cc45155e9a10e3067dba
bb4ff8a62806553ff564fff53718e56732b698c4
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXT' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fa64f3d58b03238414b77c377d5adec8
97d5b294d0b9457117734353f992ed8ec75d326d
'2011-12-23T23:48:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXU' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
d5db75e40886f75d0f2fbfc92a8a3aa2
f9c7df6d67a02af443576f46bebd22966ba53499
describe
'323151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXV' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
49de2146691e896e72b942ceb46df532
6ef70e7f1ed202d0cadaabe3b05a1c2b6fcd7166
'2011-12-23T23:43:24-05:00'
describe
'172123' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXW' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
357067d23986243b030e99f5e99d8c04
30192e607466144e96573f14682aca0541f7e1bc
'2011-12-23T23:43:50-05:00'
describe
'37460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXX' 'sip-files00113.pro'
d5d52cc2c6ab0cd02adac145272d33ab
46618e490adccb1d48c46ab1473ef9d31ccff203
describe
'67724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXY' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
aa2b56afe44436c532f16dbab0774358
85157f65df27768c9e13a3374a448a690fdc725b
describe
'2599244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOXZ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8dfff443cf3f428c05a3321a3c7ef408
f18b9afbda8697bb7f899678b185506b6ec1d971
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYA' 'sip-files00113.txt'
69288a3d539175068f14217055485857
128c83598ec2430e7acc0cdb9ecd1dd43be8db9b
describe
'26184' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYB' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
ef592a44f285033f03d1fdbe4d3dec7b
66de27ae819b02e3bb2f2ea88026de528067e911
describe
'322989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYC' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
70413d5d30e2220664f4103428ac851d
bcae5b1444b17e05d9e74207cd1926ecd81e0549
describe
'156417' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYD' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c761ae49e5909c8a494405bac9866a25
118b91105eb984faf66a64f74b846fcf3c609e8a
'2011-12-23T23:46:53-05:00'
describe
'35644' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYE' 'sip-files00114.pro'
5f5634a5777a60cea7d9bfdae5a4a243
66a843960a1fb9687a7ba2f51687735073075d8f
'2011-12-23T23:49:53-05:00'
describe
'63338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
6bc4af5089ef6325b27fd395e19775c7
4d95421d7c3ffefd1434d9568bac963bf9b09132
describe
'2596896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYG' 'sip-files00114.tif'
bf05b7ef653f8c58860fd69612718898
de3f3275ac84790ff65950b2b71751a5b2bd326c
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYH' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ac0d1e9919ae37a7e001c95e46734b5f
7aed6d488e2a4960346d4981c2805ee0cbb700b5
describe
'25259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYI' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c3f485f51e78c217e98955c57e4c7580
dd7c9c621f4bb55174ca3e3ce8a59997550f3fa4
'2011-12-23T23:47:27-05:00'
describe
'323178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYJ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b78579e3f7dee51f558a4be4c59091d8
96c0bca1b3b5c4b4eb86294d458c4688c25566d6
describe
'168201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYK' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
adefdbbdead79494d09e30889a1d2553
fb9223dce83ed9df8f50ecd6a16dc4675e7e49b9
describe
'38182' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a83eb24a2e5f1f60535f3a40e66c0ddf
0c7e852f933de4c7ff7d49c8e756be2991c910d7
describe
'67824' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
5571cd0d094ddb45de7cf6432c2da2e6
0853b5b1bb5d22e115de26363052ac3f4f59817b
describe
'2598948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYN' 'sip-files00115.tif'
016723fc036f17aa7fb3890aa26d0315
7ed789656d54d14f0a5a523288a4fd22253e75bc
'2011-12-23T23:48:30-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
c1c0d6d02826a2f7557256e381cae229
e17d480aa0ee50b6924b81b8da8fa44a96003021
describe
'25958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYP' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
5c4c7c7e1a39e9d05c1039a667826186
8a840b273c17b94b5d89a690fa5857ee2811555a
describe
'322991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
63ed9533c10b3ceaeb358f7b4b2b2032
4db43d8567789b0057581026eb15f641f7ecde90
describe
'177306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYR' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
7cbd5668c86f6d86d51e8b697c2a6645
133a95e4485c2125021606caf7e2dded027338f0
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYS' 'sip-files00116.pro'
81ff03a61100184938085466a65ac045
6229661a1a27b211a3cd33380bbdd4825959d964
describe
'65239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYT' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
437e3bdef02df72161dbbe0ac0ec7a2b
5e4a33fbb87cb3d7707324d25e402e5863ea7510
'2011-12-23T23:43:40-05:00'
describe
'2596704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYU' 'sip-files00116.tif'
8a703585a8184107d406e8773f839fdc
8d73263df8d0bda1ebc62c77cf51e54959dee0ad
'2011-12-23T23:47:00-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYV' 'sip-files00116.txt'
f2c569021e794f2645feec0e9d01318d
355b6463c40270d160b5ed713be10ff88e745c03
describe
Invalid character
'24702' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYW' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
c05a15bdc1e09ac364f474998eb6489b
84aeb800e885550cb956d54f392fe744295cbdb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYX' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
9789687e9e9ac4afe5a220b9c0e80419
073dff84a6e1eb7b1dad813c4559bb5484bda342
describe
'178104' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYY' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
ab3c39c6316fcc3dda064c3b01a93426
20a70a9d1c6e318da38f02fbf9d8af43723b6e3e
'2011-12-23T23:45:41-05:00'
describe
'25442' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOYZ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5a20ced4ff5543ebdfdd169d14a9fe32
f826153be54b5bcae821fd888c1ca1ad1e091748
describe
'62597' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZA' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
8c2a2a7d409e14345982dd179498242e
817ae0c9f6ac1810b4f7213c8f29fb9b60b03c8c
'2011-12-23T23:42:56-05:00'
describe
'2598756' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZB' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6b9c8e64a77b0d44a64aa06931a64f08
e69494f7e77273e60747f7d31c6a972172454ad1
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZC' 'sip-files00117.txt'
bcf8b63effab7fde56b5f8a3e2bcc42e
b374ae55017136694cb94310a2ebcc0b991cf11f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZD' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
fc7a9f9a42c3f663218160ed7792472e
1221b8d810cc86b7df7e1e047a07125d25d16035
describe
'323234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZE' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
362354bfa45b7c3c301efcadf0a969d3
4b292bee3ec25fc2da6cb09e6d0f9bb0229e60a6
'2011-12-23T23:43:18-05:00'
describe
'169761' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZF' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
8f2854913b5fa39b3da4968ee5317571
7c8cd35f5ab74102dcf23aef639de1d2fe6fbfb0
'2011-12-23T23:47:20-05:00'
describe
'39300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZG' 'sip-files00118.pro'
7ae45323b91221f8de9a4c1eb6750046
0f3342b96b00b02673ec1433dd458c8779eadffc
'2011-12-23T23:51:28-05:00'
describe
'67916' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZH' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2bfcb99e42da75814b64c0060a9f8c3c
9e84d788ae57b370ad49e52f426c0f905d3fd494
'2011-12-23T23:51:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZI' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4642e6ef5f2b40eb190b44903ec2abc8
8fab00acc0c5117b989975c8c80963a7d2ac063b
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZJ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
c2872b5d6ca8f8ef7c37035df4a0feea
ed2f5212ecbd3d81c0670462410f0a7ef718e21c
'2011-12-23T23:43:59-05:00'
describe
'25871' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZK' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
609a16209f0575aa12925b06278cbf3a
2b077221bb4cac76e99f8ba1fb88bee41847d157
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZL' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
1f749b10723b8808546dc9539bfc8b1b
b7269e738f9f4b8f3e6654eb178bd9cba0c4e873
describe
'164560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZM' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
fb0222323c0a96dacb84f847e2cd9a74
968975e41df8bc23b1ab182be22de09f45b37289
describe
'37510' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZN' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c1803b4226e13abaec5a0bf71a3f3414
7f3e3941fbf3844c537a60bf85c0220b45f31133
describe
'66704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZO' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2678c25c41e632bd3b409d3c50bdd76d
fc3e32d792850d478ebe72d2bb760251aeeee1a0
describe
'2596912' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZP' 'sip-files00119.tif'
62f2d2b9e80b7300a3ad790d08758ea3
f6e3d7e47151c377c0113742cd9f09beb42e5989
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZQ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
37de3fcbca9e0bd557d08db561433a50
37c5cf6162265facc0a499d97a888c241d661442
describe
'25260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZR' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
f6dfd7b643998988ef329b18524e4b77
3f0d0adde33fa0952dffd3f706127ca9191751e5
describe
'322994' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
08d5f196a29ded1b5e79db84a67aa7a5
c234d2fe3c2686cc46f11f85ec24f39a14fc10cb
describe
'164650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZT' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
44494f9e32f289b0ce9b1745eebf534e
0ce6e22efb9d718479aeed9ebf7a31de3194464b
describe
'38253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZU' 'sip-files00120.pro'
8d13e5480f6cd5f82a8416e733157c57
17dd6b60627ce3cb92614ece2c074d3de585a27b
'2011-12-23T23:47:06-05:00'
describe
'66269' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZV' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
bc62fca830db6a013f6e1635524c8373
1e2315d90997a4fafdbcbe65ad95cd80a77376c8
describe
'2596964' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZW' 'sip-files00120.tif'
484bcbce264a73cdd7fb96f99c74ed85
55f703a9a1d7c3f6e8333a7aeb09fc57d9f6c65a
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZX' 'sip-files00120.txt'
e285b3768cb9201fd4a27855bcc975d0
a343691632218bee6adb7d527e10802c222b27de
'2011-12-23T23:48:51-05:00'
describe
'25941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZY' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
1373a433bd2cf03584dbead8a11e57ea
50f57b3684e4848e53e95576d2bf5f9fbb179a24
describe
'323210' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABOZZ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
9d03844f903b8992c7ede1ad70b5f087
522b23251383eef65b7bcd38bdfd84d1e3d06b01
describe
'159768' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAA' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
3419bdef3ca196ee4f2230bb66dce057
7e4b5b5a8861e77f1501bd9095289121373d54ab
describe
'35963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAB' 'sip-files00121.pro'
7072d2a305a96f1e35e189b5412c1742
e0324b90fc9c9f29c50f2f2536a5cd1b615e8cf9
describe
'65067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAC' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
0fe8960dfd34db8424d97083d782c037
d249161b564cbed7f56ff4b6603db506b9c06b71
describe
'2598932' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAD' 'sip-files00121.tif'
4bc9f1e2206658ad826f507adcd92e03
8a521a5e24b64f96d8ebc0b16f7f794e23a76665
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAE' 'sip-files00121.txt'
10b467095ff23ebfd82b48a0b19c4309
f93c7473ee553712a3a84b7363dacfa1bef08953
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAF' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
89fe3b69702a6eb280193187c25b1284
36e5378f04062503970f9b17646ebf4485616893
describe
'323150' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAG' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
22b1ed4f9fe88a2ce8521bb259e058e9
cea1c60f12dc89de750ea93b0e96aa7ffddc5fa1
describe
'194194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAH' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
4e754ddd56feb9069e468eb063e30e16
972549a20b2d15c690f54836aadc0bbb70096300
describe
'37562' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAI' 'sip-files00122.pro'
7360f103e0b98b2c1a4804223555f9ad
a871f2f12fb2cd6991a09249afadf4f568410934
describe
'69268' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAJ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
06c85a066b6f2a0295a34cfd4ffeb376
bcea87584cf025fa71ae64d04995dfba43d6afe3
describe
'2599064' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAK' 'sip-files00122.tif'
b57a334667f8c34e7bddb147432c2064
1a5b39d8da7a90c884218fe6e13129d22d69cc72
'2011-12-23T23:43:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAL' 'sip-files00122.txt'
c60d0242075832c67e25557967421417
3148123760a2939a5064c3fdd82cf34ccfd83aa3
describe
'26140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAM' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
5c2929f32024ba6423ebc63f95433b14
b674f8bd0cec36c2152c1a0435ea3995eb4e4ca9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a08a06f124ec4a89ef35d9b86cb1a8db
4e5bcef68cb2f6dd1caf71bb1b32bed4e9d1f9e4
describe
'164234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAO' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
fc1587038fa6360cde4abf5e42cbe06a
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describe
'25194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAP' 'sip-files00123.pro'
d739fa7be4447da600cf9599407a8223
ddb779b03af252673ddc0bdb5312b00f021d8931
describe
'54685' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAQ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
f69ea80efd621a262b671c13e3f72ff6
c578c01a07c07f67fca8e730eb21ebcf24a7241b
describe
'2595432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAR' 'sip-files00123.tif'
13394d3b46bb011bbc9e23a80b4828d8
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describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAS' 'sip-files00123.txt'
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20fdf05790c7c258ac9da1cc1fd51ae1585dd972
describe
'21072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAT' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
5e3dfcc56606795df6a68fbf3af09235
c52500bf95ebf3880886a7bf01167c0eda9c0882
'2011-12-23T23:47:34-05:00'
describe
'322945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAU' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
4ab4c8d9c7ca28b705fa7ff320ce7f22
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'2011-12-23T23:45:02-05:00'
describe
'196133' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAV' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
46b7dbace3cbfe8d2f831aaca9eeff95
d4fcc9a1c9ff3c084ff96f3b63d453ffaee21f85
describe
'25200' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAW' 'sip-files00124.pro'
0257ba5967c5421e2417c5722d6b1064
01496c654f0a9fe453c5976f16364845bb98dda3
describe
'63987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAX' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
9522c9486d1fd7cced905f4696db9da0
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describe
'2596744' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAY' 'sip-files00124.tif'
3278610d8b7d461bf29f021148a80591
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describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPAZ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
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b1b51474567808128e35f513ce90ed00638f00fd
describe
'24961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
573cc77873d4acd286f51bbc2226c480
9f749ce8307bf582c6a80f9396555d583a75a53e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBB' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e020995a839051fa24f826cf2b818ee7
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describe
'220343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
ad255e39185235f047af5c9b81882c61
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describe
'41787' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBD' 'sip-files00125.pro'
e960bc9e87d5f2597ef03de2576e402d
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describe
'76114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBE' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
3db93d36eabfac90b7d22ea71cb9e44d
d0eeb4e3ef647a4c3270982f93418fce0fb1890a
'2011-12-23T23:51:03-05:00'
describe
'2597616' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBF' 'sip-files00125.tif'
d5978510ed4d1877722ed2c1c68ff11c
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describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBG' 'sip-files00125.txt'
53fe7cc9addda24afdb95388dfe241f0
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describe
'27566' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBH' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
849781447e3a69bfc961182a1e11b029
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describe
'323180' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBI' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
8556e84f95d1d159b9edbd294b929db3
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describe
'177495' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBJ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
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describe
'35446' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBK' 'sip-files00126.pro'
4a2c8a3da1b2214d9c0a37fbd38bcbb4
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describe
'64976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBL' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
e84bb35b6b032c3808682eac075ed840
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describe
'2598984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBM' 'sip-files00126.tif'
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describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBN' 'sip-files00126.txt'
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describe
'25757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBO' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
094501618bf7953690182e5eb2816dba
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'2011-12-23T23:46:20-05:00'
describe
'323223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBP' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a6bfa1cdee55a516247cc9f0bbb2008b
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describe
'184354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBQ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
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describe
'37097' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBR' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3557357121f94d657cb18625fb26f61e
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describe
'67496' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBS' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
72771b93e31ac3cfbc3d7dbce23d6980
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describe
'2598924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBT' 'sip-files00127.tif'
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describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBU' 'sip-files00127.txt'
0f4ccb7f034b32d3d8baa8b275a996fb
92ff4196371fc36c841382dc176362ce57f5f9c5
'2011-12-23T23:48:54-05:00'
describe
'25367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBV' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
b90c62a343f30d50d2bd3ec6ab64c9c3
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'2011-12-23T23:44:36-05:00'
describe
'322979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBW' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
2807ddd3841beff54c4319979af34de8
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describe
'172454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBX' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
0df7b9f7b666f46f18078bf1b588cead
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'2011-12-23T23:50:34-05:00'
describe
'39896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBY' 'sip-files00128.pro'
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describe
'68794' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPBZ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5110ddddc649de781d67c6b7bd9c4c5d
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'2011-12-23T23:45:09-05:00'
describe
'2597108' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCA' 'sip-files00128.tif'
dd7c9dfaa615d27739dbbfbb03a4d4af
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCB' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1de57bb3898234b1a1680ba2940c3763
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describe
'25800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCC' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
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describe
'266814' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCD' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
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describe
'209292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
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describe
'61410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCF' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2148432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCG' 'sip-files00129.tif'
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describe
'24399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCH' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
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describe
'323028' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
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describe
'75668' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCJ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
b40b2775e664a5d1cb250605324f1641
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'2011-12-23T23:43:34-05:00'
describe
'18371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
21fc59094b9f3aa74d6aad0f8d47fdc4
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describe
'2593908' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
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describe
'10044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
3d84da0121b03de4b5e2df7af0f08a9c
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describe
'322997' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCN' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCO' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
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describe
'35060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCP' 'sip-files00131.pro'
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describe
'66952' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCQ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
f686668fe58bd3cac97b914020ebef6d
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'2011-12-23T23:49:43-05:00'
describe
'2597192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
13beddabd981b4ee309fd23d11c4d48c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCS' 'sip-files00131.txt'
b59371cf5afa0bce5464a9d3b2d217df
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describe
'26224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCT' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
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describe
'322963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCU' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
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describe
'212659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCV' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
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describe
'40891' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCW' 'sip-files00132.pro'
7702a9e6f3fd6b83d09c0c9f1bdfd66b
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'2011-12-23T23:47:18-05:00'
describe
'75054' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCX' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2597636' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCY' 'sip-files00132.tif'
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describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPCZ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
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describe
'27587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDA' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1c099accf3fbc25ea2e6f1b4e0b3fddf
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describe
'322865' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDB' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
28ddab65e740184b19fe96d01aca9d76
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'2011-12-23T23:47:36-05:00'
describe
'201471' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDC' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
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describe
'36245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDD' 'sip-files00133.pro'
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describe
'69757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDE' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2597052' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDF' 'sip-files00133.tif'
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describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDG' 'sip-files00133.txt'
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describe
'25691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDH' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
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describe
'322914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDI' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
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describe
'179445' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
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'2011-12-23T23:47:35-05:00'
describe
'23845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDK' 'sip-files00134.pro'
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describe
'63414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDL' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2596860' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDM' 'sip-files00134.tif'
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describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDN' 'sip-files00134.txt'
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describe
'24996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDO' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
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describe
'323239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
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describe
'194577' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDQ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
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'2011-12-23T23:43:31-05:00'
describe
'36713' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDR' 'sip-files00135.pro'
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describe
'70475' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDS' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2599312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDT' 'sip-files00135.tif'
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describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
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describe
'26330' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDV' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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describe
'322956' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDW' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
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describe
'204561' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDX' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
1497439e98ec9c61c659840acd0a5f3b
432fe6af079ae9d8f1c64b3a2555e6194626bf22
'2011-12-23T23:42:59-05:00'
describe
'37039' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDY' 'sip-files00136.pro'
44069967fb8f5466780a9c9399d6e9fd
4b2f3816c9573be6df9262aa54c91ff3eb1d9f2f
describe
'72345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPDZ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
6de4f5781a17a9fb7873239db45529b2
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describe
'2597548' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEA' 'sip-files00136.tif'
3092afb85c1084337723937b867a700b
f6fedbd521ed9cd8ab89f606de1483085872b87a
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEB' 'sip-files00136.txt'
7e3f0f860df155e05fdfe972b0b7e1b2
1158015465a2ecc8dc84ce9a682be0828b975c6f
describe
'27115' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEC' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
1dfa27d8d2fb50296d2b42c6f0f0b47d
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describe
'322931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPED' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
8f62370fa1d783fd232ecd67455fa41a
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describe
'164016' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEE' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
98880387b60f29eef446af4694ad3163
ef05004ede54c97272e89cefe3890db19a507f79
'2011-12-23T23:48:01-05:00'
describe
'17276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEF' 'sip-files00137.pro'
1f4cb5fc94a4f423d6095db47235daf6
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describe
'51055' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEG' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f681a55f742dcfbd9fa800d023818a5e
e1ba3a79d4b8375890536b81806301c92a93479f
describe
'2595072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEH' 'sip-files00137.tif'
3c03b6d5576d4cfe0e1da2cb3404b67d
2955ecba8448d0d2ed08c1daf962148b9046d926
'2011-12-23T23:45:23-05:00'
describe
'724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEI' 'sip-files00137.txt'
968373341848020810988191f9d44608
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describe
'19929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
4c0d9b1e87689195b2f328233d8433f1
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describe
'186524' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEL' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e5f35e7f3bfd4eb29b49101368f7f71f
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describe
'24990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEM' 'sip-files00138.pro'
07cc6f2b2c1edb1e168fbb970944541a
f110fae9a312da407805dad1c159d3553fa6c85e
describe
'63903' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEN' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
83200524be1fa731122ed83520175d57
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describe
'2596820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEO' 'sip-files00138.tif'
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describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
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describe
'24661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEQ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
db20e695fdc5f2bb8b134832e911dab3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPER' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
b9c32e328def0a378249e1130c302ca9
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describe
'203943' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPES' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
293bcbbe22dd34f6ad9c7c4c0a8c8ccf
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describe
'39430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPET' 'sip-files00139.pro'
744974d612c9022cd7c72044daceaa29
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describe
'70870' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEU' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
0ea3facbea16a2cce159598dff2d4cec
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describe
'2599220' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEV' 'sip-files00139.tif'
18d4a087c9b9ac5a206945b858133c7c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEW' 'sip-files00139.txt'
576de3c2c5f0d4d3c98ce03bd0d1cd27
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describe
'26558' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEX' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEY' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
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describe
'188746' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPEZ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
7a915f1b530b2b5a313f8f7494eb1992
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describe
'39791' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a649ca9ff2e641b04124005bb3187882
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describe
'72183' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFB' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
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describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFD' 'sip-files00140.txt'
4d2ad1e24ea20c9d8ef2af3dc0ed15cd
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describe
'27045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFE' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
baad51360ce3fea3b678a693d3e3e288
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
01e3965b4aad3ce8f9f6cb00d9ddf3d9
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describe
'191919' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFG' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
076b1359fb666f1800b8940a465c8353
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'2011-12-23T23:46:10-05:00'
describe
'39091' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFH' 'sip-files00141.pro'
a1698dd54ca302a2bfa52abf9f428905
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'2011-12-23T23:46:25-05:00'
describe
'71999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFI' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
368cb47dee5b381434b41a172754c47d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFJ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
fddcf51af6c5368cfdb179e16ac74af0
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
926ca6d1151c578dda8010a52bda173c
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describe
'27168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFL' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'322958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFM' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
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describe
'208816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFN' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
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describe
'37705' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFO' 'sip-files00142.pro'
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describe
'81121' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFP' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2606980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
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describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
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describe
'36253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFS' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
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describe
'323245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
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describe
'132753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
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describe
'13177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFV' 'sip-files00143.pro'
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describe
'42074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFW' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2596296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFX' 'sip-files00143.tif'
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describe
'560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFY' 'sip-files00143.txt'
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describe
'17415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPFZ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
0d8cb2e540cea429d286940eb36b9c86
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'2011-12-23T23:47:11-05:00'
describe
'323255' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGA' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
79f111c86c72a4626c29bd29ccb473c0
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'2011-12-23T23:50:56-05:00'
describe
'181157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGB' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
7e5fecc1544bce7bf9565b935a7aa730
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGC' 'sip-files00144.pro'
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describe
'66468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGD' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2598992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
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describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGF' 'sip-files00144.txt'
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describe
'25049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGG' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'322965' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
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describe
'188884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGI' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
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describe
'37558' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGJ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
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describe
'72383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGK' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2597432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGL' 'sip-files00145.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
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describe
'26763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGN' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGO' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
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describe
'171333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGP' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
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describe
'38389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGQ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
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describe
'68862' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2599372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGS' 'sip-files00146.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGT' 'sip-files00146.txt'
cb4251c1d19bda1c3285180799ba827d
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'2011-12-23T23:51:32-05:00'
describe
'26533' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGU' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
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describe
'323236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGV' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
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describe
'165003' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGW' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
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describe
'36885' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGX' 'sip-files00147.pro'
e2e80c6b5e980f27acaaa499ecdc4f62
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'2011-12-23T23:45:34-05:00'
describe
'67411' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGY' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2599500' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPGZ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
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describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHA' 'sip-files00147.txt'
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describe
'26107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHB' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'323153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHC' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
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describe
'196740' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHD' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
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'2011-12-23T23:43:33-05:00'
describe
'10109' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHE' 'sip-files00148.pro'
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describe
'57917' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHF' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHG' 'sip-files00148.tif'
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describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHH' 'sip-files00148.txt'
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describe
'22878' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHI' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHJ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
a9cee59017cceb4f4ca36478ba6e6c17
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describe
'179546' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHK' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a819ad5e60a98545ac59fb6376d368f0
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describe
'38613' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHL' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d60638169161bf66a2be75f374b65298
30dce358bfa479c8105857c1c9d257595fb2bb1a
'2011-12-23T23:46:49-05:00'
describe
'69415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHM' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
875ff44d62e4f72e8cc2f5f742857e3a
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describe
'2599224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHN' 'sip-files00149.tif'
f86d42a37f03e5b7d39b02f25a3a4ec2
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describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHO' 'sip-files00149.txt'
ce92f8a374590be31af1bdb75ac4e8af
e0720087665bc29e5bb572bd9ff64ddcdf3af6c0
describe
'25962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHP' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a7fdf2a949288c7d321ac8cacfc0c83b
3d35d82950447b3c740adf2538f00a04f0200509
'2011-12-23T23:46:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHQ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
d7b42dc53e7672aa4d0791f6e3fbc15a
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describe
'167892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHR' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
ba9303e2433375639de28e235b67b798
7f4f4ac0ccea9f61059d6e3b0aa56f87f5549a24
describe
'39148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHS' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d946e21c9ff2036cdf7819655dd72e50
d28ae2ac147216d190bbe80fb8e15a1ba4652fef
describe
'67929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHT' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
02e8370dd569261dff0182ac14d60dc1
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describe
'2597276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHU' 'sip-files00150.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHV' 'sip-files00150.txt'
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describe
'25973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHW' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
9d6725fd744891e3d142090a975f27c6
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describe
'322873' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
eef1a639689bdc84d18b51dfe71bbadf
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describe
'174810' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHY' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
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describe
'40088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPHZ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
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describe
'71779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIA' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2597216' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIB' 'sip-files00151.tif'
6a2733aa1b0b941f0d38063a27ed8fa1
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describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
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describe
'26486' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPID' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
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describe
'323235' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIE' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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describe
'167042' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIF' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
dbc38104bb397fb4b601a5c315ba5f07
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describe
'36327' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIG' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9b3c5f14cf6d627e80c8745f3a986c51
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describe
'66493' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIH' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
2f1a646a1f2d9cb95ef6a23aaaf382f2
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describe
'2599096' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPII' 'sip-files00152.tif'
14fd48c22e4b2bfade0365c128525200
9149508ceed191047bd5391fa30295737d944be2
'2011-12-23T23:45:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIJ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
4c0eb54d67e0f42ca58dacac38820065
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describe
'25763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIK' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
dde08ef441f6f3029517123fdbbaadb0
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describe
'322924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIL' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
bd1f8ecb0b66f00c4c35307ad02c6903
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describe
'181808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIM' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
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describe
'40605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIN' 'sip-files00153.pro'
7b20b1519acd76913f0800c9723eb9f7
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describe
'71910' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIO' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
265db024dfb5f941522458bd33b8c1ff
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describe
'2597308' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIP' 'sip-files00153.tif'
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describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIQ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
8ffb66c8b0ff5edcf6adc5c2703862f8
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describe
'26744' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIR' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
'323001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIS' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
ece85cfeef2806cef70c35c8482280de
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describe
'166283' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIT' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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describe
'24897' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIU' 'sip-files00154.pro'
1a5eb4fb2e99fa6afe399030055abaf2
1d4ad5aa81773b8cf26736229f4f40ec111e7be0
'2011-12-23T23:46:44-05:00'
describe
'61767' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIV' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
8b95d7fe9fa4507d895344d0839f11ea
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIW' 'sip-files00154.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIX' 'sip-files00154.txt'
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describe
'24625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIY' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPIZ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
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describe
'190025' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJA' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
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describe
'39159' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJB' 'sip-files00155.pro'
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describe
'71904' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJC' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
9f381915de6b0b6e93fcd8b885579b8e
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'2011-12-23T23:50:04-05:00'
describe
'2599232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJD' 'sip-files00155.tif'
35542b87929689ccbe26e5a71d937748
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'2011-12-23T23:45:24-05:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJE' 'sip-files00155.txt'
67e7fde1fb6820ccbc52677c79f31e22
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJF' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
8ab28c93f01a854afea9adc5cffc85af
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJG' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
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describe
'169840' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJH' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
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describe
'36481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJI' 'sip-files00156.pro'
a8edb0d58330ed7f49a75245908c84c3
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describe
'66611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJJ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2596976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJK' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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'2011-12-23T23:44:57-05:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJL' 'sip-files00156.txt'
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describe
'25684' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJN' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
'167370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJO' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJP' 'sip-files00157.pro'
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describe
'65247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJQ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2599128' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJS' 'sip-files00157.txt'
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describe
'25482' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJT' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'322796' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJU' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'181061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJV' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
'37250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJW' 'sip-files00158.pro'
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describe
'69445' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJX' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2597380' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJY' 'sip-files00158.tif'
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describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPJZ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
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describe
'26649' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKA' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
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describe
'323194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKB' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
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'2011-12-23T23:45:47-05:00'
describe
'185162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKC' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'37722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKD' 'sip-files00159.pro'
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describe
'71424' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKE' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
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'2011-12-23T23:46:37-05:00'
describe
'2599332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKF' 'sip-files00159.tif'
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describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKG' 'sip-files00159.txt'
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describe
'26276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKH' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKI' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
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describe
'185874' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKJ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
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'2011-12-23T23:48:28-05:00'
describe
'39540' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKK' 'sip-files00160.pro'
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describe
'70565' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKL' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKM' 'sip-files00160.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKN' 'sip-files00160.txt'
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'2011-12-23T23:51:25-05:00'
describe
'26538' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKO' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKP' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
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describe
'174242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKQ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
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describe
'26409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKR' 'sip-files00161.pro'
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describe
'62142' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKS' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2596600' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKT' 'sip-files00161.tif'
b5f52afb0c1684f5512e3585b4a91a18
654eb6618eae79afb6cd78125da257d95ed8b37a
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKU' 'sip-files00161.txt'
6b69d912cbe75e30d516012967f04372
f339a2dc532cd47e2ba8d0bdcd68eefc20f1168c
describe
'24225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKV' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
c7f0e8191f10ad5ec09722ed6bad6ba2
b3510635af265a32f2b2d134d940b3d8b158ddca
describe
'322885' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
52aba7d520c50b82a6f279a8d4653ed5
d5e862db95db50fc1960c2a24363018fee45446f
describe
'176665' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKX' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
b187b2a784fa51be6f44c82e2ddd3781
4f9a8bf5da7471b828f8a88fc47bc825f6b9e138
describe
'6734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKY' 'sip-files00162.pro'
5a190f5b29079b534ebdf48fec3cce25
fe67b9a23f480c04c9658dc6e99504e6d68cb135
describe
'52846' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPKZ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
9b59e689e1f662943c4658a895b95425
8331ae3403ce94c307e37bcc51958465628b1178
describe
'2595528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLA' 'sip-files00162.tif'
2b443b6a6cac7baad979c395fe10da2b
4ae4a055ef434ed0c9cb3c6294a47c13a98e96f6
describe
'304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLB' 'sip-files00162.txt'
c9a62cdc2530cb667bb468581dbdc228
56d0b8d29d7c0d7f04f07aa437880787dc36a160
describe
Invalid character
'20629' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLC' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
99239343391690ebbce797182c8c285d
55142e2b67e162daf46f3bc3d075af8f7a115d9f
describe
'323246' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLD' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
c2824532187fc99d6aaab15aa16de6f9
83e4aa1e3740c5fa8232ef323ac13af107e18716
describe
'173520' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLE' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
93296221341cbd8e8fc3ba05fcc76a86
b077afb1973e7b518ae93f116ce729ce8c110f7c
describe
'34125' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLF' 'sip-files00163.pro'
3b3afd2879bd9af9855ea2e45d6fefda
917d00aa11d742f50bdf81ce0e8d7070458551ee
describe
'65009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLG' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
4f22520c3174b429451f1a21427b6f79
e2d8d1f01da76cda2bfadbfd18a06a2cad207fa6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLH' 'sip-files00163.tif'
904df1d5449a415144001ba826e6e7af
3caf7a37f6fffee1c8ca2d665891cfed628ad5ea
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLI' 'sip-files00163.txt'
35522ae4f4b18388018ed8c07dce3ec7
86a1b87ea3b7427b9aed11fc0a7977c4bca4d370
describe
'25585' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLJ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a253e4e322aaa86a89fc4b02960c4fc2
f15aca5301af4c7f0da377a3cbb63d39048815bd
describe
'322923' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLK' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3f77d28e9c0f28ad05943a1a3a9bd27d
5a0fb148f083d826dbc6b24f3caa9ba0387a91f5
describe
'175300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLL' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
636e5a2991fe52b2530151cb7348674a
70e27e945fcf5f98937f7ca2fb40b45eb08d0545
'2011-12-23T23:50:52-05:00'
describe
'36041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLM' 'sip-files00164.pro'
aa0c6a2f326bc794e4017ead6f17a18e
da78c828a300bd7c73d0b94f9958b74d1f5453e7
describe
'67237' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLN' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
4256d6ef93e49a89bdbd9d5d9fa5100e
9039f033e8e5850d3debade2474448746dc99820
describe
'2596908' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLO' 'sip-files00164.tif'
1db3d2101d570c68dfeffb0f9782e431
513dc7f7be0a8616bb55c2081eb9108728bf1f27
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLP' 'sip-files00164.txt'
752c9036f7a697ce61bfa1703117eaa6
19eb25449ae6d50a516f7f20a3e0a7b5cfb90770
describe
'25742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLQ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e1197e7b02bbccc32c8252ea4870ee8c
c1ba1498c7433c2197b0cf5a95c7f1a172dae817
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLR' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
7e7fddbb7bc820aa1d062ea43abecfe5
6ca89dd9c8b156f610169f10e91a61db74272056
describe
'172794' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLS' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
7c5dafd2450b6cb24f74f2330eadbfe0
efb8c6bd14b64d625cc8266f9ee840e74c4c224c
describe
'35165' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLT' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6cd1b84a43be932278152e351101564c
999006f6127222cafe2927c60a04cb26208b0315
describe
'66487' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLU' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
76d6367661bba5bca0a58783aa6d68d1
6c62cf4bd8189fe34306bcea1f97f9cefbd6d8e4
'2011-12-23T23:51:08-05:00'
describe
'2597112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLV' 'sip-files00165.tif'
f4b53c40bdda741f873432e2d1b09337
809d858d12eb22e7bb45983a73edb41e26d0d15a
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLW' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6f84b6c75e79bd505186679100ad225d
922fe8d1d9b763246e509b6c4c845c805a3ecbe1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLX' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
f7cd697b6d842bca2f1b73f1b17c0eae
894be582a46fb8a9c3b85a16e4c594640f6cfd14
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLY' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
2efd6efa54f389d1f799444d08b36176
a8fbaef13f4e84f35b671c078bd818c5d75751e3
describe
'186070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPLZ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
27aae3b4c9e6ac0a152258867ebc00bf
7cefb2db159e397fd4537bd100083f101e7ceec8
describe
'38903' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMA' 'sip-files00166.pro'
57bb4ce054915144da1f607258387378
ce35ed4b5558bef90e26f8463e07813faa4707d7
describe
'71172' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMB' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
e9fbeda1bfaf6d1811b6de6051ed5a49
60c76c7470ad8f99505f4d15d5c978c55f478b8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMC' 'sip-files00166.tif'
c5835b44783a146bde9af3c52f53a646
69b117afdc294cebd1521102206648c896ec4bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMD' 'sip-files00166.txt'
4a9910f1bbe5efbe2b7c7f620bd48e5b
082837c54d0c2a488f239468decf84e47021bbf3
describe
'26532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPME' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
f9a936da17204e84e9568c8e445bb4b3
94c3616ba42a415a346c04b4b91f1a559b0d6534
describe
'245533' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMF' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
fae5ffbe48bd28b23b9b21fae7754557
3142c0fbe195b698769e69afffdee479bd459031
describe
'221223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMG' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
bfca56378401e72cd847aa86de2483d9
b48f9e7aec05733816d978c8d32b3e73ccf5d327
describe
'65638' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMH' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
81fc5f4ed6c92da8067d8200465b96b5
4ba09e2579e1f048278da13eab7a625933a0f52c
describe
'1979836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMI' 'sip-files00167.tif'
bd7781df1a1f066f6cb6c081f2f9cd4d
d8d2a424d925be659318782130f00a36c2d782a3
describe
'25938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMJ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
6c89d9b4f8790734072d87e151236e26
303118a4f7512c9ca5991e417aee7eaca9e569fb
'2011-12-23T23:45:08-05:00'
describe
'206970' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
8b96cc8d64ec89876eed033a9069c49e
6f9240212fe05716fc76dfd4ad6ddbdda650e5b6
describe
'17420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPML' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
9530c2a7ee4f21e2a2eaba6bc560212b
e77486a1665eeadc93e923e469e077aa500899a8
describe
'10365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMM' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
01a8afbb8aa0b0bd74df2a8cc626694a
ed64e3c79770475fff92e81592fb1f01e2875e13
describe
'2593732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
60490d542293562f06ebded3d3f2b263
a9d2bf10316bed5b6284e53336477a1c0eb08e80
describe
'8739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMO' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
aea6ed8bad457db53d14d0c37e9de28a
384326452890e8981488d1408ebd928d83679fc8
describe
'323193' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
2fcea72f92d1661ea697f97f8a8caea6
84157fcc20ced24fa48c7ab021f49abf658507b2
describe
'140770' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d994b39b28f380c11aada54095c137a7
1d7d03eaa720cf1f2a7d9c8966bffab2516a617a
describe
'31280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMR' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ea71eda4c61c315b10f735c6c69d1a97
882161ca4d0d594162951a178108e539b387ed1d
describe
'57592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
51ec3fdfc494ab1f783ff8ac30d40337
476fd1a9a2cb026c0c684f361f94f6dbc9498bd6
describe
'2598176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMT' 'sip-files00169.tif'
24e8cafacd62c97fd5d06a51002edb5f
0ca7943a07a7e8160db6aa39fd75e9af6bf4fed1
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
959d41a8bee0b9788271dd8b46089fc3
2f2a17b88b683860f14cce4ceb7c01c01a234bea
describe
'22992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
f2ae2e8972155439f3108799e8ff08df
ebf364ddb8083b3285dfc46d23198d05024bbe5b
describe
'322935' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMW' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
1f59e884990009e4eb940eebf509aa20
e7a1dfb05b8dc7105a4f7041c0a4f151b3fbd57b
'2011-12-23T23:46:18-05:00'
describe
'162792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
374f8450ded99a834e7f2d692f6fcfdb
b1afc39e28a9110638054c7ddc901f3e0fca2fa9
describe
'25559' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
7395c2d3b341f59513e10f3d90318806
e7fd06c5e2e78678e20735b0576704b62e118ccb
describe
'60469' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPMZ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
2291590e3ae2cfdea69b1070b369d5c6
692ac910ad37ed5f8f67e3067c8f5e4345ba904f
describe
'2596672' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNA' 'sip-files00170.tif'
2ef8d7ce6cc773eea2ee049df0097be9
8fef3c66b7281a71c3db9ccb0c5887eb6bd5967d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNB' 'sip-files00170.txt'
04187c794c7c50d5c3c30e6c4176f9a1
80ffacee6e20002f5bc53acb4d75af0844c6ce4f
describe
'24555' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNC' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
7aa5623226cd247f09bd8d51c3b7f3ff
e7d59550fc41128e1bff11ba0bcb03c568adb438
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPND' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
402c9423a09c4080750820d93f6c293b
f18a83ecc4e70670d23788f5e64a154f1ed19152
describe
'170707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNE' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
c2c23a054d7bb1bbcedf6c4f2bca60cf
266934f2bbd6d9d0a75c3756020db5a5bb39d4d5
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
2ba122088c08f2624d8c59349a612253
f058e4b852db8f6b00fa8c4a56083fca3ad954b3
describe
'65347' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
8ad4eaf77740c66d608c855ba7c753d3
29ea63705c5480299fead949999520d48756744c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNH' 'sip-files00171.tif'
fc27d0e19a9fde1a5c954c5b0892f04a
fbbc0e4fb6c3235b9dccc53c70da35212a6f08ef
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1cc3f0b5bafc41585a49bd54a7269e44
8e9aef6cf8c3b1111664fc7207ce096144cf9b09
describe
'25340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNJ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
19e6877468e46a9fe5f9bb5685587ea0
4923dfbf83f763185dfc60edb8c11491bdac703b
describe
'323229' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNK' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
3344d81991bb45b79eebbf734d324747
a7cfa98123ae14bcaab0d551551f793273eb5daa
describe
'169110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
d8c79bc4cd38ece26717af73cee08577
9b2675694ce1309cbea30f1d1ff779a375479963
describe
'38054' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNM' 'sip-files00172.pro'
984d1f3a77876ad092bab06bffe6289c
427bb409a19f05bc2197dabee2c296bd840b044d
describe
'67066' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNN' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
a570805c0cb3eadb75d1116197427e97
1a8e57fbdfe8e4b90597b5166ab2469c8f62283d
describe
'2599028' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
4b9abb60bc9862c549d7475742cc141b
5f33f391070a18147e28fdc87ee64d3469b2b391
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
7ed594edd5aaeb4b385e5a17c5047004
de44ee2cac5af023eb70718c14b50dbca99793f5
describe
'25703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
2f31cc94a134a5e83c3e2b66df52c546
9858a5230812d9b5df271c1d3103924795302b22
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNR' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
57e9e31e672c4cf54eb6b1340612b7b8
cd3ae9e7d63ad6abbb4497154938f99fae2fc867
describe
'174599' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
5624da0468cbaa0903eea881a9a884e1
ba9d5160aa45cf645e5d762b27f81d8661277421
describe
'39555' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNT' 'sip-files00173.pro'
93c1d90c9fe9e6b70fe4a34e85f4ca82
4c75361173ce777f1b1d1f758bf5d88aae18e7d7
describe
'69765' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNU' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
73a913bef2e0a81ab30e650fe1c47ff8
a3a8ac0798c48f19c84a2c7db5ad989a04329ead
describe
'2597176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNV' 'sip-files00173.tif'
47790a6c72e0e231928755fca33266ec
83fe01d0877a4eb9cf0f26988d36001bf192b80e
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
65efac8a61bcdf5294c8dbedba044b56
7d30b9b42c096af8f1388bcd381fe2879902c72d
describe
'26145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNX' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
efe8ec70215a687e84fb6f42ef991007
095c774ad2a25397b5fbc2c88cf81717e94ad48f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b89af46d7fa89940f226923173bd9fcd
cdb05670fe78e37e77e746aeb4f4fa01d67521f6
'2011-12-23T23:46:30-05:00'
describe
'160305' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPNZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
5e2c67851e82f74bb9641b4a578a993e
26247e7cdbaa196d1e42d50bf78da294b8becdca
describe
'26234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOA' 'sip-files00174.pro'
80504560414d5e3ce5252350386da2c9
cbc91757d13b69baab1d0afcb533379280465a9a
'2011-12-23T23:45:57-05:00'
describe
'61187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
4be2faa48d40b198087fc4960614d3e9
725fc15197e7ce9d8b51db3e84dfddc9a954b45d
describe
'2596560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOC' 'sip-files00174.tif'
e7bf110254a844ab745a541506390b9b
931236adf4da38f1601882f9e03aa38e1c82d35e
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
977259aa2230491d358c9521ae57e608
b1fb1a8dacf011dd83149c67b958af7c9ef84bdf
describe
'23947' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOE' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
79e701f98ec8f4ff529bd097d19576d1
21b04c931065eaed8c4bb97095acfd1796039801
describe
'322981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOF' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
397d275e89a6007b34e1fce0bc95088d
30ad878a6ddcb65bccd7903a706dd7d9d46955b0
describe
'157839' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOG' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
3a048b082de06f75bd9c7d9817a1a8c4
e161905c3ff59955ca04f6915fe0986808cf6c23
describe
'36226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOH' 'sip-files00175.pro'
8a464093e496f423dea6022715d99392
26b2b06f56be63d5a4b417e845701e716d16f39c
describe
'63816' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOI' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
9a20f241e5469ca7716a3e87a9485c35
1c23279fb1f2d19652f362d80b9e51ca01e88285
describe
'2596800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
25ff57e0f31f3af561dd223d070297f3
06a36b615c9425742357ae744197fa67b810fb43
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
6376a75019f7120ed2f46a7f1ef1d721
e14dc15cfe2ea930fc0648f3648fcac88cf404ec
describe
'25369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOL' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
4bedd3342c5dab99aa1b98fb80127e0a
ededfbe2feb919aab40516e65894b249440622a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b7dca7e30ff69ff372135e625c0e7e07
7920ab08d1e0dce30c1fc48dcf49f7a531680c9f
describe
'203422' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPON' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
b6e05b2a53420fe5f6b716e23ff45d6e
c4e522d82d2022edf5bbd1c01378a91a7a5a53ef
'2011-12-23T23:43:56-05:00'
describe
'38290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOO' 'sip-files00176.pro'
2d10e898e97e35bfe99308733cd206a8
daf111fe1561d17db08001c70fc89d25fcc5bfe2
describe
'72725' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOP' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
93f3e8864e9a187c2777197e1f85e38f
7d32ec0b83875f0f906eb2ca2b31db718d83c6b4
describe
'2597572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOQ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
45ae454a539b9ed8284395ac9323dbef
8767f27a960ba293c40031dcf5f861ca97e7f775
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOR' 'sip-files00176.txt'
497f345b01fc32b477e61aea64625edb
8eb21cd4f58715040d9a7dc8e31c2da38aa4218d
describe
'27172' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOS' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
389f211c706eb087e5ae1b4d3c1e3d4c
e45f1872dc5a36d0f4f5a597cdee0a7e26bf6481
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOT' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
0b6fb68a4f035d7e9e2c64f55be72050
a7961b88445392e7214c2aeaf66b5f3d8dc5d77d
describe
'185134' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOU' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
482c1d3b80b98d8227fd22cea557629b
b4ea5374d2735e874874a7001f04254f1856e25c
describe
'32494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOV' 'sip-files00177.pro'
2b7a880bc90547938630d16767114977
15881984c2bb98d52934c5927f632704be0f4c23
describe
'64609' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOW' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
795a6ebfb80efee1afb404f1dec4217b
8571208b05d1bf523d3e058831e86f95438034d1
describe
'2596656' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOX' 'sip-files00177.tif'
46d80762edcb40ba6e6d40f89fc32791
090dc64ffe4d1787b1237296046586a427b90a15
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOY' 'sip-files00177.txt'
ed5f34b0477f730d5a010738aec9b0cd
3327e686c375a946d675a95839cc957d95993d82
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPOZ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
585af067e5fe0a2f63a595cc05023ee0
292ec67ccab8c8b6656f5d0e76b4e9edebff2f06
describe
'322962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
0d166b7ce368e703bb77223d00659a73
7faa1afdd2e283cc4b4614b011871903b25f441c
describe
'177992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
68a5437e0bb0a38a39787e7fe5fa2f39
ca988610efeb5b6e200a375ff19d01aa8f9b9e93
describe
'27915' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPC' 'sip-files00178.pro'
816360868fa03ffda40964eef3bc1d7c
91d629e46fa352bdacb678103ddd6e8ef403cf09
describe
'63290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
e4721bfd6adc0e4f16d250bb317e3cb9
75bee527707e2cf61ea9264a69452f0984a09853
describe
'2596712' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPE' 'sip-files00178.tif'
1fa9cdf0978d0a8b48f10e33833055b6
67c38b668f2f04b0e50768ada7764fd10c662e20
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPF' 'sip-files00178.txt'
ab0c5e19bec27b4bb1c087028339cdf7
2cb3b7ac099f6ea4f40b2a570f21524ca69dd7d5
describe
'24492' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPG' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
cb88146f84bbf987f1cffa3b407a3f5e
11f7ba95356f6bd8e91f1f18dce49f1cbb0d529a
describe
'322946' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPH' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
807b6468003dc55119628bd75a731df2
674098cf6a3e39c0fbb4a1787dd6a297320b6c0f
describe
'204122' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPI' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
e05f39046a801732f7d8e649549a25b8
7396fd659b6b3e92f3036025612a563dcad02656
describe
'42616' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPJ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
c763980344dcfe7b1894c71232bd7639
e0f9a83110bc18a473187f22f38cd1f8b011bda1
describe
'75421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPK' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
8ef58bcb10c1aaadd5bef2ca6c813bbb
c1ae7e840395f93245b24b67b3f8e207da8a1051
'2011-12-23T23:45:50-05:00'
describe
'2597592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPL' 'sip-files00179.tif'
acaff316ffffd0df3200bffa6897d416
b111278c43739bd43727f7cfb138e54b917870bd
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPM' 'sip-files00179.txt'
f0bb87c61d92bc261b5dd843b5775858
f1047960ac05340aa1648a3dddab04948c28653d
describe
'27584' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPN' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
576d8af29d3978ea3bf50aee8f3dd4bc
0d52234d30a28eb88b1816f71ac0a9a343f353de
describe
'323157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPO' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
10e5e9b7b29d78049906115be34c8490
0e867d4b29dc959f5ab64a6979228b351b0db3b1
'2011-12-23T23:44:18-05:00'
describe
'175048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPP' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
2a6b75950309dd512d6aac1f0cf7494b
ae7f9a59e538c103ad5773e9a8516066d9f8b978
describe
'38377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPQ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b03279655b9ebd7760c32e09e607acb7
46e8ea59b176434647fbf418147c70fc3330c203
describe
'70276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPR' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
0ccde971f88b76aef7141759bb1b2440
1d7c40d131ab4b1fa36390a350c0e7c93b20c2b0
describe
'2599552' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPS' 'sip-files00180.tif'
b2e5d5d78c8b4a4b653cc4568e9f6815
86ccea65a88d6e24924ec9a7edb4d637aaa302e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPT' 'sip-files00180.txt'
9b993fd54e3c1f7c1ec7c81401a4a168
e4c6ca217ad875addc2fc2d22e196b845a4bfefa
describe
'26842' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
49a968f2a1a61ba01cae3d750b0d4fe3
5174e123650387ed15503f69c062180559d8ca40
describe
'322898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPV' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
fbbece74d595bdf3e0d4805905e4016f
942f3357040a7c66d0c242f8e5c02a259582fca7
describe
'169593' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPW' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
4a23162889d44e0b86cacad36067e296
0a3943dbb00b9e58e88df3a7128ca5763965f1ef
describe
'26378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPX' 'sip-files00181.pro'
74c9a306de3054fc97f2b63d5f844871
a7a01df6ba2214bdcc79943085b0e91a73a85b14
describe
'63057' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPY' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
524219262ff3a333cc20713fb97491ff
da2b5ad6203d473693016744b4a647811f3f71c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPPZ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
782c476eab09c674ea026095dd572ff4
cf31c63006e9e641ab3cef4590ad0ff3cdd837b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQA' 'sip-files00181.txt'
f72c83577a435dff855598d99921013a
d65e6f4f01bce712a25c83ee2727d229be4ca41d
describe
'25239' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQB' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
23839950dec7b2b96fdf83a1e476d397
2093f2c19a6f6c0c85b26e234c56dbcbfddf5c77
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ce1d8df8240a22a9cd0e3fa2efd1c6d4
e1af062a21c15ac8353205c0aeec2ae595750e40
describe
'185168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQD' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
30ee7e20c68fd3eff12e6756f03732f3
7ff28ac9817801d8f8adc9469b0f06910e17fc12
describe
'37192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQE' 'sip-files00182.pro'
406cbecf57067691e3d382f57c1b396e
14d7d47bdf1c3731cc507f98e2221e3124adb0e1
describe
'69727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQF' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
31f41a8f337b4f9737a035d1d99ec717
92be71142877c4e8623c811f43e8f622412e23ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQG' 'sip-files00182.tif'
38aba17a11e673258af872117f2870b1
3b74cdb74ea2a413a2ebe4464f7caa31b2110c75
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
7d5e6ec4813c9b9dffc98daf677a3c41
f01f1ec068253c2d736e8b32f578f0bcadf55589
describe
'26534' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQI' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
aad9462e7a0150e8f779613f8ae92e8d
c8db415d642fa55fe0f97c3a6e0a1beb3be385ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQJ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
6546e89fec22b7156b39f291b39ec1b5
a4b57c121e271580fc89caf374fec2458132d100
describe
'188062' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQK' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
eed1b4bc1040a2bc04eeb20099e7cb03
afc9953f63020a7201f880e008e5e9ce4fc5dbc1
describe
'37977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQL' 'sip-files00183.pro'
09350f67fdbc9c7f13948c2e62fbe356
c8bdf8f2dbbf524fca6e2f6dea84db9b6b1b7a92
describe
'70390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQM' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
c780877df6b291dd81d0be7ef7169458
de0657f8c9fb3a106a1a0ac32260310d37a54685
describe
'2599596' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQN' 'sip-files00183.tif'
11fbb2a2c863056cd7ea711d3b9d99fa
ef2af008e28ed0509ff4de05cff8413a36a51bf0
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQO' 'sip-files00183.txt'
356b3acae1e8b014ea08f88668862c7b
b3552ff61dad97ba5ec9315f8e8618cb5701501d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQP' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
42fb0b533accac8ee631831286578158
08d2f2a9ed058cf475ef6e9c0f03776fb830b88c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQQ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
f8d9b3aedd9e430c08de13a36628aac7
fb076e4c7cf7e053f0f312896eb26625d563602e
describe
'177740' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQR' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
f25e4c74dc9e171a278842646291c245
162bc00fde01557738df9381944ce78d43346bb0
describe
'35836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQS' 'sip-files00184.pro'
c5c357ebbb5caf44c8871dc0e3427529
5af7844fe2e5002a9a66f07dd4b9a52c41547a6c
describe
'66020' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQT' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
01ff76cdd79edc2de67802101d2e2bc7
fd30e0b76165ee26f194bcaa68ac34904b62cce6
describe
'2597328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQU' 'sip-files00184.tif'
fe1ccdea421c846ded88dbe16e5e33bb
f1eb9f52d8393d2a634841a9df7e856a3843378b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQV' 'sip-files00184.txt'
63edb037733f7b2245740068a50dc7f8
ce8b90a9cc524259d29f09845a82d5052d0bc251
describe
'26389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQW' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
a982f8090865fb26f2f743cf8faa25ee
4bce5a840c9e4908757442cdf5cf292f3b0c5be1
describe
'322674' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQX' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
8a1d4e2770f97afb38e54559f3a8511d
ed965a86bb40071aca39c94f1ba1d9a9eb112098
describe
'199465' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQY' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
dada20d6231bf17c2f57cb48aa43ccd4
298466d9a797dd4c6caf8c1507f72baba852f1dd
describe
'18803' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPQZ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
eae56bae91ff45b3028b9c71f4062c29
b2c7b2e31ce85861f0c5363c4bceba2a1210105d
describe
'67114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRA' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
36f0315cda8c3539c3cb24949836ab1c
1ac01c51560ea605ced3f5c2ef4573ada1fc65c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRB' 'sip-files00185.tif'
b9996b5832cf727d570e58cf1f4815e6
87f8ada3f685707673f3632108a1c5394f524f44
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRC' 'sip-files00185.txt'
b1b5187a6a45488100d72f5fade4f10d
a586820ad451c0907a9561b2b05b8a42b6b4d348
describe
'26071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRD' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
8e7967d1da56288aadb217a2a08c1192
8585e5ffda66e87452b26c149fb0d2f16f96586d
describe
'323166' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRE' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
ff16d1c470d89b9641e244dc48e967d0
24e5b4c55ffc393f61ee46194717fa1d363fcdcf
describe
'184476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRF' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
cdcfbe88e1e4bb7158595df8d85c6acf
1fb679fd9b75829af554af39591821ae39f9adc2
'2011-12-23T23:43:57-05:00'
describe
'35703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRG' 'sip-files00186.pro'
b8811cba67d7f978077504ff94e7b23b
161af51f382bbf6167f509d1f7fe66000bc5609c
describe
'68811' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRH' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
b56e639ee49f4ddf5a286200c65285cf
00e8d39d17f8889401ad56ac885555f360efb5e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRI' 'sip-files00186.tif'
631825dd44765871c2aa02772fbbd5d3
3845547b5c36cedf0a3fc8647025e55edcd4aee2
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRJ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
399ab78c41991edd16edc839574e36b7
b11a341cf6f57c389ad771814ce1684d3c8f6d1e
describe
'26138' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRK' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
8b33ac4d831014e9d8df8693a806feb3
11f1871814cbf923f5ad7578b465a5b2f2d3a4b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRL' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
fc17035341afe84866c17198bcc9d435
f08fd036cba9a0c2bb2703bb51c536dc82a3b8e7
describe
'183731' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRM' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
b46e13088579686adfb24796eaca4421
143f8d5312260abc88ac4619f41cfe6f3e75f389
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRN' 'sip-files00187.pro'
8cbccd405ec91e5bd3af5985a96c2bf2
b50d5fbba26473cb187495379fc31500e44657d2
describe
'64560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRO' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
f7f6b101e81e603aa219e01b061bc072
3679f9e12edd7269cf81dffcfac90a9400ee12f5
describe
'2598868' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRP' 'sip-files00187.tif'
3722bb5da0a3a34e88809405ad1a093a
022c777355b3da4f1b8b6361acdc7411f205e21b
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRQ' 'sip-files00187.txt'
3923dd440d4650b53e69517dfecb65cb
715a469f74f9f3aa21b6029990dda3f519610296
describe
'24828' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRR' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
0b0a4a40394c5028aee70c028cdc9486
fdfba880e6ccb48fc8f0b2a9232cf2e020a5d03d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRS' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
15beffb3dc5f79fd0576c19a5d18190b
1ba33590288bba0b0854f05ab754040793a17366
describe
'161584' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRT' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
196d81441374390cb796ebb342a42a02
308917696c02e5f684f2213b98d4ace9d7a03400
describe
'36599' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRU' 'sip-files00188.pro'
932e555fcd4a30984e27e541916fc01c
badb8e89a1f5414da6ece451281c6395c47ece23
describe
'64741' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRV' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
30b0f1805e4f2b84aa644c96d79903f0
dcb2124c6504b8bf1fab5a09cfc0185ac2c2f2ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
5be9950e9449cea9b25721c1fa87950e
3a8cb1c9d7018921a1abc988673bfda8cf92c635
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRX' 'sip-files00188.txt'
8cb7d7f7edd8a59b549b11b222355776
fbad04a700beffc21ce18d25c9b8ee180b5c05d6
describe
'25963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
cb50fb6aa621a5b733ebe74be5fdb5e3
128540d8504b9ccb77a4eec15849cc271a65065c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPRZ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
5ea9f9b3f56c03daf17ef54d66b03685
5e7396862ce763981fc59cff4dd65229e521654d
describe
'160157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSA' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
4653450e3e124c93082738b3088b10ab
682b06e61b9e6da5878d7d66caf26c950f527388
describe
'36698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSB' 'sip-files00189.pro'
b267611383106c593e2cd058cd4d1b2b
4f5ab5e0d6b873ad14eb3f12bf88a8e03ca79bbe
describe
'65010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSC' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
58f66461a2bedfccd5e7e28c5b16b14d
13e48befd4177130aedb5e0abe00b34da08aa3b8
'2011-12-23T23:44:58-05:00'
describe
'2599164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSD' 'sip-files00189.tif'
587197b0759d10b36307a2caeb973d5b
62918e95e2283f7c46d09de2ff4608739e8eb8e0
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSE' 'sip-files00189.txt'
bc29b87e2e82354246846a0bb84828bc
959a073748c2cd76f68bffa13ff31bd3fa4efe8c
describe
'25472' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSF' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
a1cc611c087eb4ae74c1a0c6f9b4aa18
664993abe4208fc440b6f3a02208843e37390c7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSG' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
f2551353ae9d323ea331dc6aff0c386e
cac258195f327d96e46db5c42ce8ee63703b6022
describe
'182334' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSH' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
65bb42d4ce36c90ccfad328294e1f19e
16d6ee677e19cd63f40bd5b52448462c6c8e02cb
describe
'37784' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSI' 'sip-files00190.pro'
d9ed4a0a930e04be00a520e91951c6f8
f4ed865793dc177939a79d832b7853bf4aec3761
describe
'70724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSJ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ad5e3cab30d2da7a54785aa88b714d4d
382db5470b9ee57a39177185c76f96f20fe82d85
describe
'2599700' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSK' 'sip-files00190.tif'
94340e6c0f09f42d117a317168967aad
43f6bee33859736681c9c9bbf09a0c1306dad324
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSL' 'sip-files00190.txt'
70fc760b46266c24c1be248236ca0fd3
58b921307edbb7889f2b4d13eccdfabb2a2e4299
describe
'27313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSM' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
146400e549e2375c0488fed5c6fdac76
7666bd909aa5813b2f51bc69ce253a84714de7f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSN' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
640b519a83b2ce14600115f555cebf0a
003e8ec0a3e21eeb01a7ca56d7e3bdd170eb13b9
describe
'178418' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSO' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
25d76f27fd24b70124deee09347b45bc
abb262362bf7ae5aad16c9ceabab9d1683b7d877
describe
'35789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSP' 'sip-files00191.pro'
d73536b154f0b0c7c81971bbec52dc15
3b771e1ab8ab201efb7d207ceb17bc6fe02baf0c
describe
'67716' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSQ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
50955177e55ee7481b7eebf0395d8884
f3b2522f4fd5691cc9c44a47b081e7f16f50913d
describe
'2597292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSR' 'sip-files00191.tif'
f0d77fa3211bbe97624c70bd963f403b
1c891a074d2f583ff15b6496e8ee94fc02054ccf
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSS' 'sip-files00191.txt'
8fcb09d5b4d124613316746f29600753
60400fb0dd80c56c8a2b156d4290bd7704af73ae
describe
'26286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPST' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
254c3e0d6b58c7e5b7b84d4e70c41ab9
0af728fdbdd200deb38f7ec355cff02aabee8724
describe
'322834' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSU' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
274e737ae6dde7fe4a2f118684bbb3c9
facdd5e0ba88a3c3ccd218a55a7524c3800a6105
describe
'72017' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSV' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
b5aa5900434d58a87499dff42161c9da
e5fab9ff9430e88060de172b6d5c227b2d234158
'2011-12-23T23:51:04-05:00'
describe
'11317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSW' 'sip-files00192.pro'
f99d39a84da79d19aafc1ab9aa751745
a03b7b2f2c91cea72aac5d6b498eb34b74cfb6ce
describe
'31358' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSX' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
6e86648f64d97e764942d7559f3a0293
452d5db1f781eb76692162f38d53d18cdcc236ac
describe
'2593860' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSY' 'sip-files00192.tif'
1b0772bf49235bf9121956dddc79b1e6
86ad7e5e35047807ddc755001787fc6593e093f0
describe
'460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPSZ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
1e1f55d1dd0f0bf2948d4f113362e7f4
2a86cfd5384d3d307a61b96518d376142a0bb485
describe
'15653' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTA' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
63c5423e91ff6f16707a3dbf247da2a6
3c2f6429e50ba32b3738d7cbe0e8ca1d388bbaeb
describe
'323222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTB' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
92e25aae5600f709a4c4f7d443ed9ce3
d737df8ef7b1d388b136b1315e375f33312b9813
describe
'166198' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTC' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
0693753adf4c0bb83d19434c66cc6a80
3ba2a60f9ebd41a2ef4dad9f4fcb51b57eae51ab
describe
'27289' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTD' 'sip-files00193.pro'
6fc39f9fb5679e816088fa3d9fc4d42e
1c4c3e47b833858b008148c108b600e7ab443c24
describe
'63147' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTE' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
0a7ed7f52af4e91a016b0768a8db6adc
183b02fcd111f0ec4f29ca70349c5a14d8be225b
describe
'2599132' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTF' 'sip-files00193.tif'
9496b4a20ddb5eb31ef1457065d5b1d2
915edc4529af16a6cc995b9c19bd660bdcf47332
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTG' 'sip-files00193.txt'
49bd30b85214cf58cf3704bea4f289eb
f418895174eec25c361c345989e932f0b8b92266
describe
'25245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTH' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
7b966487e1ce7f1fa4df3a1331378a83
2af0687cc4289d1a896d678783c95f59301335cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTI' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
f64140fd34c5ee329c8e56fb8a62771f
db888d064494fb3b623c66e85bcb540997831855
describe
'176427' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTJ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
438ee8c4dfd94e24cb71b1d53fa4e0c4
fc898e94c0204d6461b54e4cacf4bbca1bb1c0d3
describe
'38532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTK' 'sip-files00194.pro'
c7ddcb77ddcefa419e15a901e3c2da11
83b222b794905dc940e21e1e7acd5f4ea36b6561
describe
'69779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTL' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
78230416eb19b9f6cac896d7802dd705
f3869777872222e098cb767620a53b53dc3668b8
describe
'2599328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTM' 'sip-files00194.tif'
8ff37063d77e9af060c39fa1b4370711
e0b4ea8abd5e95c13066e42b84b4da46687f5dc0
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTN' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c1d57e2a9c949244233603bdfac1f829
705b421b5aeb5a004d13bd6df2675c0b5bd22810
describe
'26738' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTO' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
a088ccaa40b6b3dd96aca6a5e3b9b0a6
43bbe78eac9e1615d8f06d72250c493dcfde3c85
describe
'322977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTP' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
e4dad8b6ef54bbfcf4deb755f88db563
a986dc040825367fd8c6893836f6df371bdafbd1
describe
'182370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTQ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
10cd1868706fb6c39ad2fd8233b21c48
449495088bc2b6a7e90e0245344d748dd262fd32
describe
'24063' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTR' 'sip-files00195.pro'
0801385fb34160d5273829e56a30a54d
535f61b0b99df18ff4bccc6f10e697c87c33176d
describe
'65338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTS' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
321f3249ee0eaa9dc4fd6eb3834205e2
05dfc32260b90bfd26e0dcbcf4d30b3d405bab73
describe
'2597160' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTT' 'sip-files00195.tif'
e5995a83447b001b3aa7b0f1880fad4e
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describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTU' 'sip-files00195.txt'
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describe
'25753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTV' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
935ad64545dfef0d6575a28b4f7685f3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTW' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
6b93035e7dd0fa25401f042f33bf997f
18c08988702d4b923a40c32968470983d39ae6b9
describe
'94085' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTX' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
0e231b8d6fbaee5fa7cac961b0f06c4a
4c29ca0f8d07e5735676a09ec0c3f42d60380596
describe
'11263' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTY' 'sip-files00196.pro'
20648279990687d5f517cbfd75bfd106
f51e1c1f8195835f32254acb27b2cce7c4ba08c4
describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPTZ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
3953cecc01084942124e981680b7ab01
ccb01f4e0e1a23dfa026510f1049c847a76251f6
'2011-12-23T23:50:00-05:00'
describe
'2596408' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUA' 'sip-files00196.tif'
4d079bb2c6070be12c10aa424fcdf7a1
24fe1ebe20e23672d841efd8f57f5c85e98dbe55
describe
'459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUB' 'sip-files00196.txt'
a91654d4fd0d0a77c00812a06cec49d3
878e4ffcb5882bdd2cbd961230ade4a130fff4d3
describe
'17144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
c0924dd5f954395718079c399838fcb4
9628ae8ca044271bd9c195ad9e2b99c566d3d55f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUD' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
ea1d8044eb4bd7c036243bb7bedea79c
c491746e45e9454ec36b7a0a4f625b3e55061fe1
describe
'185879' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUE' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
2737a6a4ac9dd9c1aadccb9ad3320ad0
185cfe68ca84024166d3b13b1908e45276041915
describe
'25888' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUF' 'sip-files00197.pro'
b8cd1bea8a37f18f1e413013f8c596ab
c313bdfbc21d7a1258b56924997b179cc256f061
describe
'64245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
c5b2194a2cf2077bb10a2f485acc6d6e
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describe
'2596988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUH' 'sip-files00197.tif'
5326cc8197b66be82eac04c8214f27f1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUI' 'sip-files00197.txt'
c2437785df09aeb773d1e8124bfdb0fc
cbc5f41d7f27efb65fe7636e4902a750f8d926ae
describe
'25073' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUJ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
05d115af5c920e64ae129d9ad932dee3
dd4732385ec33604cd56e20cbdf912b31437d82a
describe
'323147' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUK' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
1f600dc8246a79463981d2126980514b
1823e943e997ba4b7aecd8664a14e47b0a3c9083
describe
'167501' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
9df3b6be296dc8dfcafbc286be0adfaf
cd68f7bdc6c2b75e65dd40d8278b6fd242fb6b9e
describe
'36923' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUM' 'sip-files00198.pro'
c10cd511c239b834598b9e0d6c2d9b5d
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describe
'67705' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUN' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
4d93da230a727a2cf2572b99d33bbfac
db53b36c780b575fd7b082dc19dce0ec18612842
describe
'2599148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUO' 'sip-files00198.tif'
6507be08d3178e8c9a2afceb1ba50991
1f292b734e4838da0ff9fee577be248a858faba8
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUP' 'sip-files00198.txt'
8581fce8b728b5097143d0e4ba7f0a8a
254b2e9b9d066f4dad180a4a8927de29c1307cb2
describe
'25532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUQ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUR' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
6e60259f1492fbec40a2dc39e4ad2666
dcbad5a286ba238e83a237c80cace6c11c27b081
describe
'176086' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUS' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8793776964126e8b7681e66bdab557d7
dd403d54f8ca806d110bd4a69733236a60744f4a
describe
'38692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUT' 'sip-files00199.pro'
44d912a7655a1a24e4ef2af60b9d4333
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describe
'70377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUU' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
b8f97324b6602345f0af9ac722387ec1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUV' 'sip-files00199.tif'
38e1c054568cf8aae761828692ae99fd
1aded0993fcc3246f4f873e683b730551a2d9b8c
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUW' 'sip-files00199.txt'
2ad49c86624fe9c7037008654ffe1662
5ede7fb8c6977afe8016732342899281c7e7ce94
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUX' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
613e2c69ca3db4c3dc50c7ca54819614
74bd49fb889d427528b1d8cdbff7fa540a71d915
describe
'323211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUY' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
5f83a75430124226a0d1f883c3271493
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describe
'149830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPUZ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
d10aeb51fbaa673f9e0cc8ca6468aa8a
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describe
'32041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVA' 'sip-files00200.pro'
0f0f75614bb96954591ca74f38defc6c
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describe
'58644' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVB' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
7eb3ef681a959b0c72b98777c86f0399
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describe
'2598592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVC' 'sip-files00200.tif'
429f4e838f6721a1a184c87774932cf0
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describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVD' 'sip-files00200.txt'
a645e99586f69d451ca992606e756ddc
5358c826c162c5d544734030067df44c58bb6adf
describe
'23995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVE' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
5170b0c2546f9196afca955e7da8159c
96f3733d4d4021cbe21923d26841a20d8ff6a9aa
describe
'322932' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVF' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
5b790dbe70b60e84a0e2dc05cce79e53
3ccb677249bb39c5964e748fd750286abea1b9ec
describe
'166510' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVG' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
3ab41f3bd2e9086d2aafe6e1b43af097
a49a08d51c63bba82afd7ed3adc1f8442e0eb267
describe
'25003' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVH' 'sip-files00201.pro'
92e78fcff49556a6d473a950c7a76bca
dbd7ca32a3089d88093190d587bc0685b2f90efc
describe
'63522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVI' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
72daf98479133c0b9e42c40ff3ee5765
565a5cdd984e849153ec24dadbfa7fcc1e9495f7
describe
'2596984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVJ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
59cb40ec6d7797c01ad6250695d681e3
1af902b3996a5092e1b816083919d72e12649996
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVK' 'sip-files00201.txt'
02ca67834edc51bc9ee0c76eff0e9729
4e9858d36d1ee74c67d3acd5539ce8cc49a98512
describe
'25011' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVL' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
ff96bfd0c21338f056b4ce33ee5bb737
9245cfd5135633d244826e2b91c9f24bfdfebe86
describe
'322899' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVM' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
e33fe920b7a7e2257a2d24986dfea969
90342049f2137fae5deb686b89b9de51ae38e3d8
describe
'213750' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVN' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
0057a94c02092677727d99aaf9ed3dce
a78de0d483a097460fd69d9173a117d0499d2965
describe
'40205' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVO' 'sip-files00202.pro'
8029e9685d2677eba485220db8e8ac60
af86519100ca7795362cc9c2b615e40dbc16c0f8
describe
'76434' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVP' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
bcde6f0c0ecfa5a0058c62fa5e514ec0
73e0e672ecab9b7dde7fafb57bc52ac5956a493e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVQ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
f6c7c7b8920f0ee423077ba3ab8d5917
1d3551e8840497d7160104e4fe0dd8eaa7800138
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVR' 'sip-files00202.txt'
79f68f77a4f80962ede5d0a38aa68cb8
3f4a67a7bcdf36a41cdbb595a31e80ed145c6e3b
describe
'27560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVS' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
0abcd467a10191d8c0e2b8511e9bdffc
65f2f9b323f82417930084ef0b16db9f6a0dd27b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVT' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
40c9e9e0e900ae5f561b0c5f43d22a8b
3850f7ecfab7a7737bc3765e575aa0d77ce452b1
describe
'202471' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVU' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
e7fa765fb67e2d775d156f4fcce0a76a
be4b4b345c070eaf7f18c8adcdfbf79a881dc475
describe
'36611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVV' 'sip-files00203.pro'
ef52fdebfb50434ae56c47dfed2cf191
25da0c744d467d8aab1e7cb19cf745e9e8e4a3b7
describe
'71893' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVW' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
78a8acd76427ba01a5af5d75768f584f
973d431d988a560da521f36c02eed00075ed1872
describe
'2597560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVX' 'sip-files00203.tif'
6831dbd5e6cb49b5596bf58ff29811fa
b59c8a6a6c5406d53f5be921a2bfd33abf8382b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVY' 'sip-files00203.txt'
70515a9107c48b91ae0ccbfca03d3ac5
aff6a68c7358d66d9da1bd78493f619fe7b036e7
describe
'27322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPVZ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
8cae8dd1b4ae96a1b58d9ddb1846df3b
2c813140d6e51a89034611ea96a9ea5b68b1c7cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWA' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
90071950a8cd4ee9d1e9445ffe760651
30d37a8d8b080110ef72110d8b462715300a91e1
describe
'183964' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWB' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
cc9828f0fbe8bd90235fa3cd48e9f4de
91e0dddfda6796a76c5f5834d28091095594dd6c
describe
'37693' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWC' 'sip-files00204.pro'
a054b3c8b49b563a11f8476f6d3be5a9
bb3cadc0134ba7d75680f8ca1982cc5d7b03076b
describe
'70040' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWD' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
9d543694c6b54c2c9d81879eac92f658
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describe
'2599272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWE' 'sip-files00204.tif'
ebaec90b902cd5be35bea957e6a3b913
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWF' 'sip-files00204.txt'
bbd75e26256c127d336c02504782624c
2dd9c812105d130357222d6f355a61751f7cf91e
describe
'26284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWG' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
0eb41d1d8e3cdee416e05795c9a8f638
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describe
'322891' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWH' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
16a87be36d9fc2f738de2f401bfd512b
9b824fbda1fdfd47b7c9f77aa5e4d71c60cbeab9
describe
'180914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWI' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
05688a30fed1fcbd8808bf2ddf0988e7
c37c8778e1a30b08492ad3b78c235d4a4f878e84
describe
'26880' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWJ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
7eb90ae017ae0daa715df88a7d7323fc
7bc95828215766f1b6db54c068b30deb4e039430
describe
'66747' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWK' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
02f0cc9929b2e2ce0ea3cf55580f8f84
eec9be7717373c01cb069920fc718b5e19686976
describe
'2597084' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWL' 'sip-files00205.tif'
800efdfc524c08a35b9fb8695264cd0f
f171e5bf50306868411a3cfdfa0556379a552b8d
'2011-12-23T23:45:12-05:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWM' 'sip-files00205.txt'
79fd4e712936f1ea3705e3df5f3851d6
0f5127ccdb13c4791cbb0a00ece9514b9bd49365
describe
Invalid character
'25546' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWN' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
57ac5032543c70ea887642d5b7c0dfd4
8fde44a95559abf30d4a14d2b9c2104b74434d7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWO' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
1c62a1ab171896d854ffca17456e7d82
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describe
'179102' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWP' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
3032b3a17e15f4200bc3dc8b5879d77a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWQ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
525cdc01173defb97627102fd292683c
277952ea305ffbe04c3a16fe242eeffaf2e10980
describe
'71724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWR' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
ada08d81c2630776e324f05139d66296
38929d870f199575164e9a37eb88fe565220c1a8
describe
'2597664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWS' 'sip-files00206.tif'
ef2025660183f705691b7e42dc499588
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWT' 'sip-files00206.txt'
7925053eb52ef3da5fb661122b0c6599
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describe
'27633' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWU' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
e106e00a092a66ef0e27d10a40827066
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWV' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
b949511a1b83c6e3041832fd995a1eef
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describe
'179640' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWW' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
af934bca8d6b83eda42894c9cbbd6c91
e457f39b9696d954c0cbdbc6be873b01e9ae8f56
describe
'38049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWX' 'sip-files00207.pro'
91d0755f70dfce166f9ba91adb4ae7d1
cd3b2e477067ba2e032fe58f1e112bed09521bb4
describe
'70562' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWY' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
4e92eaa91496db5ed79b655e41dd8264
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describe
'2597452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPWZ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
01deab7989c80de71c54ad83b43a1a64
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXA' 'sip-files00207.txt'
a4d7d1004f41982f31ac37e48b6ea71d
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describe
'26814' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXB' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
8413d5bfe0a9d36630c42ebf067dc27c
c8d4b9e0586668db3c8ca952cfec54f94a412402
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXC' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
b762683b5c5484605b21fe7034735548
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describe
'161218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXD' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
48e978060c33dfe82ab3d087e17c79ef
49fb1561242fcba53fbd903ab7c672f515a1b0f8
describe
'35474' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXE' 'sip-files00208.pro'
b41d2a5ce0904dc642cfdb1fd1df6f25
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describe
'65944' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXF' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
db1b502408f043fafbf1e6153b3ab1d5
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXG' 'sip-files00208.tif'
b5762949f024d3b59b2e7c2b247ec08b
0b35e702e5c83581cd06797f99553f748ceaf10f
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXH' 'sip-files00208.txt'
844c0222ef2025ba37f96b704f1ba7cb
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describe
'25697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXI' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXJ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
cf693e65943a78cb7612f2065101f221
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describe
'120730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXK' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
054c2391d45a3c25fb381f15e2e3f7f7
9c20b3b379e9b22671253f66491d4b3e15aef21d
describe
'23547' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXL' 'sip-files00209.pro'
9a7e480c54269d82422b081d27f7b0c4
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describe
'49786' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXM' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
55f7fb5199215195a18a925dcc0d6672
c31d687033544f66cb6fc80b30f062cd1eb9a81a
describe
'2597604' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXN' 'sip-files00209.tif'
eeabff15191cad972c3206afb77f9a2e
3a6ade6b5309dc26a292ccdc7559a4b2bed005d4
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXO' 'sip-files00209.txt'
99bdd1485fd0486fe9482024e8d75f01
d19b0f7af7a907c8bb24ee5a04400d4dbb46b688
describe
'21231' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXP' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
1a1df589aa4a7ea71aacbbc4f258eb1c
97acea96ab86f9c58d5ca276bd70bc2d42935987
'2011-12-23T23:43:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXQ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
6db7eb93be4407d58d984f74d1607187
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describe
'158721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXR' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
3303ad9d5654e4a7a39b40ba7ce79d04
ee63b8914314366b779264f5579488fee54e6b3f
describe
'23210' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXS' 'sip-files00210.pro'
d544a93e2c39e107ce6e7c5519803c19
0f1ff73d553cc2a5441888af4d0e4a7189c306cf
describe
'58185' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXT' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
c362b101cd2e73ad8fda18f20a38ed0e
e2f31f3aa42c2047d0e4d5226832876afc90ae8f
describe
'2598820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXU' 'sip-files00210.tif'
249d0241b5518de19483152cafb7cf76
05d879f5d6875dc394d23653df20cf748e7a934a
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXV' 'sip-files00210.txt'
80d85d25635f67450e638c33e579ed06
b4978385c472907c89b3ac0bd4b774c56a2b08c0
describe
'24301' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXW' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
808d5b009bfb0bb9ade8133e02c7b072
630e76e65974037fdf1b30950e471b152c29fa5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXX' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
66689278d50ddddbe34ec225cc64dd2a
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describe
'179801' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXY' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
fddc730e1b20ed5ed53642f39757f0ca
8dd34496193cca9c1f129979e2fc3c340b7df574
describe
'36615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPXZ' 'sip-files00211.pro'
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describe
'68758' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
b9cd68c0e915455f005b88729ad6bc44
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describe
'2597400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYB' 'sip-files00211.tif'
5c7195bbc5af66474386239256bdfff3
b3d4ec38bd48156c91a1dc0819b6e91be8465ea5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYC' 'sip-files00211.txt'
8dd129064169306d1b3274af2fcb4efe
c22af2b860580512ca540637428fe03f5e59df70
describe
'26281' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYD' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
eec033b065c49723e0be05ca3b776fc7
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describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYE' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
7a37ab05aed0f7aa7500a7079068bec1
1ba1414b2377b4c82b5832cdd2bbe31e62a68be0
describe
'161538' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYF' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
004d0c6316dcd2fa8294481d8ac44661
af169b915956bfc5bc098a7b063d6bedb0d0ed8a
describe
'35967' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYG' 'sip-files00212.pro'
02ecd0395977ad632e1a61e3931f95f9
fbc8f80512baebf5f0cecf2f42ef5ae13694b590
describe
'65763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYH' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
0738e2151f303ad55aa97905c4172068
56197ab83ca4cc9ef5fbc30de2b46bec7d8be8d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYI' 'sip-files00212.tif'
b8911443d4a55b88d7fe76d2851d0627
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describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYJ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
521027fa66c6e97848b247f1859c9335
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describe
'25479' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYK' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
17d55c2e75391f8f91d7dc527d30d2b7
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describe
'322964' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYL' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
4705814963b47108a23792e644ea41f7
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describe
'165176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
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describe
'38451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYN' 'sip-files00213.pro'
b0722f6a2fe74943a8f0bc0e25678982
a569ade0a6af2f5d57b798858c93b2e3f80b3200
describe
'68445' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYO' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
23a65fa4f88df6fe5029cd70148cceca
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describe
'2596944' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYP' 'sip-files00213.tif'
05b948c5d9bf4a2764bebb8732b99040
b1ce91729dfc680cc73f2e0168ed2b8685b9b75b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYQ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
a60537c25f66a8c25f4c0ce6902f3f51
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describe
'25789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYR' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
c81a4d3b5c40a903fcf4d49f2182826a
d22053f94446a5897c0bc99e360a3311173dfaf2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYS' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
13ef7a4108a8980a1290f4a19c02dc8d
47b2523013c502351183f910e91dc4ce3f806e84
describe
'183000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYT' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
068153da203dfab4cdc9e1fabaf51d7d
6e85a3b446193d2d72f1fd34903026bf2e77c268
describe
'37792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYU' 'sip-files00214.pro'
3c33edfe5ee6b5891ea8344b0135632e
db4cb9e556b8fcd45adae1c71c34047932b23e71
describe
'69519' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYV' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
689f5ce73718552ef923af938d4fe546
410c3bafba4e81b211ae5c92dea08e7e1dfd69b1
describe
'2597448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYW' 'sip-files00214.tif'
784066c1fa6f44a6c875b44e306e7790
17b87bd763dff82afe285aea48af09551c3073b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
74b5f3e60073164d77b7524a621be7f4
22b02a7bae8bdebe9d835232b102d9a229785706
describe
'26830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
1d6d554e0a60b06da6485f67f91cac66
bb3f2c717da8b70bdad592cd4921d7ae5c172599
describe
'249316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPYZ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
ff229496e88da26d64572af7268e6cc3
2b0a3caa6fbadddaa02698f5e5ac93b350dbffcb
describe
'229088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZA' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
b2ed65dd3e24393270deec1574b52207
5b9ced4f79954e551750b7a702e6f7c8fee2f57b
describe
'67671' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZB' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
49426b4929de7c4e5fe48659617c110b
a194de7c4fde8011d9e01de1526697bb8c1f36b7
describe
'2008868' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZC' 'sip-files00215.tif'
38bb77c857ba0aeec61ff9a600628f9d
a2ce6b6130bedc830113f680052b83b6f808d838
describe
'26007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZD' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
2319abe8616b3358713454c1c59bcde8
dc7ec962bb633bbcca849e9c467e004c036c87d4
'2011-12-23T23:43:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZE' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
bb05fc8e2ea81ccf2ad5bb4382ca81d8
bb223a3e6e225f975981817d389353662773d53d
'2011-12-23T23:44:42-05:00'
describe
'24414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZF' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
25a5129844f9350a12fdd4e863795e7a
4427c7ce8223b955117912af1762932f0a430d38
describe
'11218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZG' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
6846f4aa558a752534c428ae2b1656b9
c9311ec2790067cd575a427dec759855ef84b372
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZH' 'sip-files00216.tif'
38ec373f4b59fe2a5333bb41e26864cc
355197b702a8166b92acac55c409d9dd4dabc21d
describe
'8851' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZI' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
d16adb4d763c0bc12918094cd79d4502
e0f412583d7d1212e9f2bb9c23e15f34ea5ae05a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZJ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
54ac9b0d0d44714ebe6f942fe84a485a
be778864fdd34e44c604f24b43412a4794af6dac
describe
'167318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZK' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
e547045668b4925681968ce5c057791e
4012f2df3f46109145eeee8141deac0984233979
describe
'37503' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZL' 'sip-files00217.pro'
582f1245b5cc0d158bfe18487efd0656
fceddab3d3b97792b9e41825246b4001fc29a6f5
describe
'66191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZM' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
49ddfd7e83dae2873934fdcdd4a6b140
cdc25c3fa46317fa20fc1531355cd258133e7ac6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZN' 'sip-files00217.tif'
d4785b8ba4ce697da71517456b6ff341
07fbf552f9ea368f48dae4e3c93ee45896cca035
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZO' 'sip-files00217.txt'
567d5c070444ad91ed586e04e7a0f43b
a29827d9cf380c5c1f8902cc939b115773f72618
describe
'25553' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZP' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
98e3050b235802e58ab74924a34feac9
63870c46d4aeedb3398c82c374f4f7e05979c627
describe
'322992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZQ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
7d4624177e1c01f1523e481406d64249
308e19702bc44e575d8c511f662176c60f858513
describe
'171754' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZR' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
7a9a60c1feb5e3a97cc46f874dadaa5a
d9062eb8d866671ab2280dcf9f102b6511d40b60
'2011-12-23T23:46:33-05:00'
describe
'36676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZS' 'sip-files00218.pro'
61d6e9a5b26b86bd196f23216355e4b8
b1b90d30171d84d0b302a500a516196c5ad42f79
describe
'68248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZT' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
7aafb5e16cdb85162fe1906569ebea89
e739f8f7d2c5dd4c18a8bb52cd8537c15d8c5157
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZU' 'sip-files00218.tif'
457cbd9a7b4552c477ba09f50b459dec
279e79d3ddad5bcb96e6adffebec1de0fa646b55
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZV' 'sip-files00218.txt'
97e4ae31efdfdcbf3d3da8ab4dfc6108
219f55bdb9b32a95759b2b4b01ba04307703f540
describe
'26084' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZW' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
eb0936650c4a9e1579f7b20df89ebe9f
b0e258956f3bed76aff1fee760db6e007808b429
describe
'322937' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZX' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
6bbe263cfeafb149f4429552e407c14f
444789b5b57ad8ce38fa09b234af73b44afe997b
describe
'175748' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZY' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
770f4dce4145cbe71cc973c0b813879b
396f9ff0db5157c22d5b60e6fb5b1b7e12fa198c
describe
'37394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABPZZ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
1e024c484036eafed215fb30129cd024
1f4af9c98101faf5f615a241a5c5e89ee4976f06
describe
'67893' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAA' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
943eba29677058be762c18d5968edd58
9786d1c9ab96b8729f6503ec8fa38779d08bff1b
describe
'2596996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAB' 'sip-files00219.tif'
36b8dfbd1c3c27b8e3477f3a25919eb4
eee8d4d20741a970bb1d3c546a35e0b94ae8ee9c
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAC' 'sip-files00219.txt'
e366bab12a839b7c2684f5ee7b3097b2
e4880c6a0a25035afd9cad13dabbb10df687080e
describe
'25813' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAD' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
d8844e3332d584c7af6f3e12f45b6d01
9890be8fa3f49eb3a02859ec25ca016f8c2d8c40
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAE' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
51bae8781da4bee87fa7f7539c309d5e
b8bb63ce00debc0867d04f4d379ad91171633c11
describe
'166797' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAF' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
ecccaec07c22f962197bac80c17899ad
9dac6ac0017a302f88b4bf6609906b7daa90f68d
describe
'28963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAG' 'sip-files00220.pro'
10f1c806bb7726c0da44b6f4409da3cb
236f37382d0743a7bec4e5c24c0efed4c8e2b93d
describe
'63626' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAH' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
a74dd609012fa47d53ccbcca96dfb549
0316ff4d8c15dfa72786b90cf1d03e992aba5e1c
describe
'2597004' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAI' 'sip-files00220.tif'
40d39250f3be566261e4765c5e848e02
94a1ed4b65cf0f5cbf8eb14fc88248059b4dd598
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAJ' 'sip-files00220.txt'
be650234f07282955be498e8406b628b
8ccccd7940a60b440cd23efab5cbadf26f231520
describe
'24801' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAK' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
55b4736a11e87064be4a37c5d1e6481c
dcada56851005d8ddc88234e88a85558a95e113c
describe
'323135' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAL' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
0ddc83ac2eedb5e4596fbcca665483d9
76204eae113052c9efabf40c18b321ff03aa748d
describe
'189670' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAM' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
71d4c968ed5fa5caee1616a6482122a1
b32fcb68f28d403225c4121d1abaab041a858bf2
describe
'42631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAN' 'sip-files00221.pro'
7262298e0e0037e5f461ac221a7c83a4
0cb7ef9a82bd36e596e9277c5c2fbc5b6aa6bba5
describe
'75724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAO' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
38c6a975d1d0a73695ef3d61defa1670
c50ac1eda169cfd5b91b427ce456bf54b9d353af
describe
'2599708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAP' 'sip-files00221.tif'
dfbb60cd253dd69edd200e0184ef02f4
1a6d00211556f3d83782764549b0616f078e63bd
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAQ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
aebe0a09a1f4009ac3944291d251b133
985b37f37d04889a2decf18dee3c760509342393
describe
'28108' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAR' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
a1cb4e3376fe601067dd919c5f32eade
ba5ba9ddd81fa0113e6f177c92e90d00b6360c46
describe
'322980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAS' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
06c61048b9cb41831062771f236f9cc2
c167a43669f69edfbcbb1a4ca0768944b6728cac
describe
'174958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAT' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
f735c13b49aa256eb8232a00ee891077
772b191ba8b8973deda44e7c74cb27a266142acf
describe
'37790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAU' 'sip-files00222.pro'
0b8583dbdf27e476e71b09e9a6521c14
05c7dd4e48605c78307653793e0bb29cc1098849
describe
'69365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAV' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
aa5d5f2431bc648e8c6f5ad67d30c85b
714fb93921913ad29be23d939ec08da30e6c5487
describe
'2597600' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAW' 'sip-files00222.tif'
457b79f1028b1c47f95fbd044a1a3731
64e163a0a9fba22894c5c8ad375b942e69fe30b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAX' 'sip-files00222.txt'
59cda117425ba2702c7b07a11a8769f7
bcbda40ce649458a53432ef94ea0f6ecc9ac8f44
describe
'26631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAY' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
fda2f01ae62d17373eba158b1012c5a4
315c7e523a58359e387432f0e0c495fa65c25d4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQAZ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
c60fbe2a65280d2b81eb3ac9a6e3252c
40b349f1f0b5d4b9385748937593336fb8fadc9e
describe
'184244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBA' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
00b7744726b009ed103adcb91968bd60
ec5ddc19dda5caffedd5993ae2848b5ea7a85162
describe
'40302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBB' 'sip-files00223.pro'
206661db1b69e1c652820bf835a4468e
2847e93a593e95b14961bd350edecb32bc688dbc
describe
'72335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBC' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
5dbd5af039d6d89321c3815f3652f2b8
628389422444757fab0d1996cf0eaac25028d078
describe
'2597524' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBD' 'sip-files00223.tif'
1fa1933c845129263a1850c1b98b58c9
fa62f5434fab3e79bdca3e4747bf1fda33bf3516
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBE' 'sip-files00223.txt'
9fdf9f2909c27889239fba5fd21b9b58
b0f0fc03e5fdf717aeabac2cf671c48715756971
describe
'27214' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBF' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
585882a6890a3e8bb7c359dd3c310cf7
9d1f5ed0a493fbbf5e980dca7685f3436ed0d45f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBG' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
71eaaf10c6e36c798c0ef36e3e1fcd69
fb5cbdfe4d4d805008740d53e9f810c440c1f33a
describe
'180287' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBH' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
2e946e8c7be1345815ba945cddac28f1
ec5933788d32218f0dfa9e8acd7ed939b01494a3
describe
'38602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBI' 'sip-files00224.pro'
a63103728d55c06b7e5852cabf338563
b7f4eabcdcd4afe31faef48ea83e02b5ab7031fd
describe
'69836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBJ' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
32ce1e9f5ae34e95518e88d9de07aa91
da490d5b0f022593e3d599f34186d7b2724e45b7
describe
'2597360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBK' 'sip-files00224.tif'
49457fb878875d1c212c2e32186858fc
593f41eb9a3d5b45f0a1362eecf616dd84802c0e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBL' 'sip-files00224.txt'
c6782f261d2389e0f72d1ab37387eb64
f484a86d4c2212f875f09bc542f7aa913edb6524
describe
'26834' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBM' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
f6b73e266ead7eba960bc2b469829238
d8670c5e661ca19f972881b229018bb53ca3778d
describe
'323144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBN' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
dce385b5fcfd18aa40ddf7c5595faca4
7ece941f7c6ddbdc7f564afd584d363654ba81fc
describe
'196417' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBO' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
23c3d2fba8f5a6a8f931f37f9a7783aa
d2f707882752402768cb1235e500837d7ea3d687
describe
'41287' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBP' 'sip-files00225.pro'
1c65cd1d377c8cfe76c7e073c92bb77d
e46b2a9cbab7ec8dd97212f9fba3bac79fecc36c
describe
'74353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBQ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
c590f785153dc31c10240c5aee11ab72
03166a0417bd5743217a6a74e79bb3ec55fc2c99
describe
'2599664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBR' 'sip-files00225.tif'
f0c9b7401a7eb78d7fa8908de31cb679
1dd80c6af0ed712f41412aeed81da6704445f456
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBS' 'sip-files00225.txt'
8d2148baa15474d749d703f9bc132b6a
30a87f8f5208e69eff23dabd64608e1794b782c2
describe
'27386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBT' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
60985e91d5a7a93956ca105a28713143
7387829154b8bc91b611825b380c2619d1343d51
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBU' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
a18c62d7cc0ef4e6b3d95805420fa1c7
a8323f0714bd332ce94a363358efc093ee2f4dca
describe
'170522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBV' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
269977c82d4f963241d64f3de05e69e4
cbcefa312ef7dc851bd6e60348c4a2aae906e6bf
'2011-12-23T23:43:12-05:00'
describe
'37647' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBW' 'sip-files00226.pro'
9f2da4b99d61094c400bddccf466772f
2df72ac9fa6976c3dd1638418203f3beecd7f5a0
describe
'68775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBX' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
4ee07d72635d7aa22ad6d7c4efc09b77
db2eb4116c984a099cdd9e18dc0886c5450672f2
describe
'2599412' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBY' 'sip-files00226.tif'
50571cb9d3f9f7f764d259fa26c3fb58
71e6d4a6752a50bfce073e3781cb8558e261a9ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQBZ' 'sip-files00226.txt'
dfb8f979e524f2c55b246b8fe8f00016
def80b12ceccfa55390a6a0b3187904708edb8d2
describe
'26940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQCA' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
6fa283ee55517be14eadb062c236ccce
37c8c01cfafaf4d4a78e4844e31ce0138af77796
describe
'322995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQCB' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
8c23fa10e96ac4e350cac216b3880986
b88e05219529c6e9c3a314d29d3e7e5aa1082895
describe
'173078' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQCC' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
bd33184ae5b5cb4f172dbccec3287f5b
7a4775880729a036a35bca3eab85d5f9f08c1e15
describe
'38153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAAELfileF20081225_AABQCD' 'sip-files00227.pro'
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: punter HBO mein bern
The Baldwin Library

Rm B University |




Ts 7 7

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Ss A Ae iii MT ba
sO BS


TAR-BUCKET AND PIPE-CLAY


THE CAPTAIN CLINGING TO A PORTION OF THE STANDING
RIGGING.—Lage 58,
TAR-BUCKET
avd PT PE-CLAY

OR

The Life anu Adventures of Nicholas Brodribb

MIDDY AND MARINE

BY

Major J. PERCY GROVES, R.G.A.
(LATE XXVIItH INNISKILLINGS)

AUTHOR OF
FROM CADET TO CAPTAIN,’ ‘A SOLDIER BORN’ ‘REEFER AND RIFLEMAN?
‘ANCHOR AND LAUREL,’ ‘ON SERVICE,’ ‘WITH THE GREEN JACKETS’
ETC. ETC.

GRIFFITH FARRAN BROWNE & CO. LIMITED,
35 BOW STREET, COVENT GARDEN,
LONDON.
The Rights of Translation and Reproduction are Reserved,
CHAP.

CONTENTS.

—_~o——_

I. Introduces our Hero, and gives some Account of Me

II.

III.

IV

VIL

VII.

VIII.

IX.

XI.

XII.

XIII.
XIV.

XV.

XVI.

Parentage, . .

Relates how Mr. Jacob Brodribb took a Walk in the
Country, and how he fell in with a Ea, of French
Grenadiers, .

Shows how the French landed’ i in Temes, and oe our
Hero’s Father paid the Debt to Nature, .

Relates how young Nicholas Brodribb made his frst
Start in Life, a EY

. Gives some Account of the Tojaae of the Marathon

to Table Bay; introduces a Gentleman of the
Name of Pennefeather, and relates how he and our
Hero spent a Night ‘up in the Clouds,’ . .
A Night on Table Mountain—The Melons SIE ‘A
Fight with Bruin,’ . .
The Marathon proceeds on her Voyage—The ae
A Terrible Disaster, . . .

After the Storm —A Ship in Bae ve ‘peuath
the Waves !’

The Rescue—Raoul Giraud—A Sad Story,

» Relates how the Marathon struck upon a Rock, sha
how Nicholas and his Friends Secaee from the ”

Wreck, . .
Wreck of the Masai ioie = recany one out of Two
Hundred !—The Desert Isle, : .

Relates the further Adventures and Experiences of our
Hero and the other Sue of the Marathon—A
Sailor’s Epitaph, . .

A Lucky Find—Pat Murphy wales a prdposa

The Building of the Boat—Hard Times—A Narrow
Escape,
Relates how the eee paid his Debt to Nani a

how Major Pennefeather and his Breads quale an
Attempt to Mutiny, f .

Introduces William Ashcroft, A.B., on lies how he
confided the Story of his Life to our Hero, .
5

PAGE

12
16

22

28
33
42
46
50
56
60
69
76

81

9g!
CHAP.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX.

XX
XXI.

XXIL
XXIII.

XXIV.

XXV.

XXVI.

XXVII.

XXVIII.

XXIX.

XXX.
XXXI,

XXXII.

XXXIII.
XXXIV.

XXXV,

Contents.

Relates how Nicholas Brodribb, and Others of the
Shipwrecked Company, proceeded ona Voyage of

Discovery, . . .
Gives some Account of the Dinghy" s Vovase; said shows
how it ended, ‘ : ° ‘ F
Relates the further Adventures of Mr. Ashcroft, Raoul
Giraud, and our Hero, . . . ‘
A Friend in Need, ‘ : :
The Kraal—Our Friends prepare to return to ae iaaad
—Sailho! . . . .

Accounts for the Unexpected Circumstance slated at
the end of Chapter XXI., .

Homeward . Bound !—A as Pas area for
the Fight, - 3

Describes the Action between the Rattlesnake and. Le
Cerf, and shows how a certain Bullet found its
Billet,

Tells how the Corvette Le bot was ciiniel :

After the Action—A Scene of Horror—Arrival of the
Rattlesnake and. Prize at Plymouth, . .

Nicholas Brodribb dons the Red Jacket—The Major’s
Presentiment, - : . . .

Tells how Nicholas Brodribb visited his Father’s Native
Village,.and of the Adventure he met with on the

way, : :
Tells who was thie Young Lady hon our Flero had the
Good Fortune to rescue, . ‘ . e

Shows how -Nicholas was welcomed by his Father’s
Relatives, and how Major Pennefeather’s Presenti-
ment was fulfilled, . : é 5

Nicholas joins the Crescent, and sails for Guernsey—
Shows how Captain Sir James Saumarez saved his
Squadron from being captured by the French, .

Nicholas is appointed to the Hussar quae eee in
the Mediterranean, .

Relates how Captain Reynolds aud ee Officers Salas a
Visit to the Chateau Noirmont, and how they were
surprised by the French Dragoons, . .

Relates how Captain Reynolds and his Party retired from
the Chateau Noirmont, and how ‘ Old Soundings’
captured three French Soldiers, . . .

The Last of this ‘Eventful History,’ . ‘ .

PAGE

108

113

120
130

134
140
151
157
166
170

174

177

183

193

197

201

206
216










TAR-BUCKET AND PIPE-CLAY.

CHAPTER I.

Introduces our Hero, and gives some Account of his
Parentage.

GN one of the ponderous registers of the parish
‘church of Saint Peter’s Port, in the beautiful

Sart island of Guernsey, there is an almost illegible
entry testifying to the important fact that on the oth
day of September, in the year of grace 1778, an infant,
baptized Nicholas, first saw the light; and it is further
set forth that the said Nicholas was the offspring of
Jacob Brodribb and Amélie Judith, his wife.

Jacob Brodribb was a Hertfordshire man, a native
of F n, a. village near to Rickmansworth, where his
family had dwelt for many generations.

The Brodribbs had from time immemorial been
humble ‘sons of the soil,—honest, though ignorant
peasants, ever ready and a to do a fair day’s




8 LTar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

work for a fair day’s pay,—but the parents of Jacob

Brodribb, being thrifty folk and in constant employ,

were able to allow their sons to attend an endowed

school, established in the village by a former rector,

instead of sending them out to earn their living at an

early age, and thus gave them a far better education

than the children of an agricultural labourer usually

received in those fine old days when the Georges ruled ©
over Great Britain and Ireland.

Jacob Brodribb, who was the ‘Benjamin’ of the
family, showing greater aptitude for learning than his
brethren, was kept at his books until he attained his
sixteenth year, when Squire Oldacre, of F——n Manor,
put him into his land-steward’s office.

With the steward, Jacob remained five years, and he
would in all probability have succeeded to his lucrative
and respectable situation, had not an irrepressible desire
to see the world driven him one fine morning to Rick-
mansworth fair; where, falling in with that prince of
recruiters, the redoubtable but mendacious Sergeant
Kite, he was persuaded to accept the ‘King’s shilling,
and engage to serve His Most Gracious Majesty as a
trooper in the 17th Regiment of Light Dragoons.

The 17th were then stationed in Ireland, and to that
country Jacob Brodribb was shipped off before he was
many days older, in company with a score of young
_ men of all sorts and conditions, whom poverty or some

other pressing necessity had forced to seek the ‘bubble
reputation even at the cannon’s mouth,’
Jacob Broadribé. 9

There was great consternation amongst the good folk
of F. n when it became known that ‘old Nick Brod-
ribb’s Jacob’ had ‘gone for a sojer;’ and the village
Solomons shook their grey heads and declared that
the boy must be daft; but, for all their talk, young
Brodribb had no reason to regret the step he had taken,
for being a proper-built, well-conducted lad, and far
better educated than the majority of his comrades, he
received a corporal’s stripes as soon as he had passed
his drills.

After that, his promotion was very rapid, and when,
in the spring of 1775, the 17th Light Dragoons. were
sent across the Atlantic to take part in that most
lamentable struggle between England and her North
American colonies, Jacob found himself quarter-master
of the D troop, commanded by Captain Oliver de
Lancey.

The regiment disembarked at Boston towards the
end of May, 1775, and on the 17th of the following
June, Quarter-Master Jacob Brodribb received a severe
wound during the attack on the Americans’ position at
Bunker’s Hill; when a dismounted party of the 17th
Light Dragoons, under Captain de Lancey, proceeded

with a reinforcement sent out from Boston to support
' the troops engaged.

This misfortune terminated Jacob’s career in the
gallant 17th, for the authorities, judging that a one-
armed dragoon would not be very effective in the field,
sent him home. His services were, however, not for-


ro Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

gotten, and shortly after his arrival in England he was
gazetted ensign of an Independent Company of Invalids
stationed in the island of Guernsey.

In the autumn of 1777, Ensign Jacob Brodribb was
married to Mademoiselle Amélie Judith, daughter of
Monsieur Pierre Le Noury, a small shipowner of Saint
Peter’s Port, and their union was blessed with one child
—the boy Nicholas, whose birth is recorded at the
commencement of the chapter, and whom we now beg
leave to present to our readers as the hero of this
‘strange and eventful history.

Of Master Nicholas’s infancy we know nothing—no
doubt he was afflicted, in a greater or lesser degree, with
the numerous ailments peculiar to the very earliest days
of the human existence; it may likewise be fairly
assumed that he gave his mother about the same
amount of pleasure, trouble, and anxiety as the general
run of infants give ¢iecry mothers—so we will pass on
to his early childhood, when the poor little fellow
experienced a misfortune; one of the greatest that a
child can experience; he lost both his parents within
four-and-twenty hours.

Nicholas was between two and. thice years of age
when this melancholy event occurred. Madame Brod-
ribb had been ailing for.some weeks, and, as her malady
completely puzzled the entire faculty of Sarnia, her
husband proposed that he should take her to Jersey to
consult a certain physician, residing at Saint Heliers,
Death of Madame Brodribé. tt

who was held in no small repute by the Channel
Islanders.

The doctors in attendance on the poor woman making
no objection to his suggestion, Mr. Brodribb applied for
leave of absence, and on the 29th December, 1780, he,
his wife, and child sailed from Saint Peter’s Port in old
Pierre Le Noury’s sloop, L’l[utrepide. They arrived at
Saint Heliers the same evening, and Madame Brodribb
was carried ashore to the house of a friend. On the
following morning Doctor P n was called in. He
shook his head gravely the moment he saw the patient,



who was greatly exhausted and scarcely conscious.

‘It is too late, monsieur, he whispered to the anxious
husband. ‘I can do nothing for your wife, beyond,
perhaps, prolonging her life for a few days,’

“Do you mean that my Amélie is dying?’ asked Mr.
Brodribb. ee

‘I do, monsieur,’ was the sad reply. ‘It is my opinion
that the poor lady will not last another week.’

Unhappily the worthy physician’s opinion proved. only
too correct, for on the morning of the 5th January, 1781;
Madame Brodribb breathed her last.


8S SSDI IR DS DEEP
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By



a

DEEREL PP ECGE ER

CHAPTER IL

Relates how Mr. Jacob Brodribb took a Walk in the
Country, and how he fell in with a Party of French
Grenadiers.



ORACOB BRODRIBB’S grief at the death of his
ie beloved wife was extreme. For several hours,
Né\9 in spite of the entreaties and remonstrances
of his father-in-law and friends, he refused to quit the
room in which she died, but he sat by the bedside,
completely stupefied by the sorrow that had befallen
him—unexpectedly, because he had never fully realised
the gravity of her illness. Towards evening Dr, P n
happened to look in, and, being appealed to by Madame
Godefroy, the mistress of the house, he went up-stairs,
and kindly but firmly insisted that the bereaved husband
. should leave the death-chamber.

‘Remember that you are a soldier, monsieur, said the
doctor, ‘and endeavour to control your grief. It is
wrong—more than that, it is cowardly—to give way
like this.’

‘You are right, doctor, murmured Mr. Brodribb, rising
12


The Doctors Advice. . 13

from his seat, ‘I acknowledge that your reproof is
deserved.” And, casting one last look at the lifeless
form of his wife, he followed Dr. P. n from the room.

‘Come home with me, monsieur, said the kind-
hearted physician, as they passed down-stairs ; ‘ or, better
still, take a walk into the country. It is quite dark
now, and the fresh air will benefit you. You might
walk as far as the Grouville Redoubt, and by the time
you return, I shall have finished my evening rounds,
and will be at home to receive you.’

‘ Mats, M’sieur P nm!’ exclaimed Madame Gode-
froy, who was not a little scandalised by the doctor's
proposition, ‘ what will our neighbours think if’—

‘Madame, I care not what people think!’ he inter-
rupted. ‘I consider the living before the dead. It
cannot harm the poor lady who has gone to her rest
that her widower should pass the evening with me
instead of brooding over his sorrow by himself; it is
good for him that he should do so, therefore I say to
him, “Come!”’

Though by no means convinced by Dr. P——n’s
sensible argument, Madame Godefroy made no further
objections to Jacob Brodribb accompanying him; so
the two men passed out of the house into the road.

‘Now, my friend, said the doctor, as soon as they
were alone, ‘take my advice, and walk until you are
thoroughly fatigued. You will then, I trust, obtain a few
hours’ sleep, of which you stand greatly in need. You
know your way, I think?’






14 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

' £Yes, doctor,’ rejoined Jacob; ‘this is not my first
visit to Saint Heliers, and I am pretty well acquainted
with the neighbourhood.’

‘Bon! I shall be at home in a couple of hours;
until then, au revoir !’

Grouville was little more than three miles from Saint
Heliers, but, being determined to follow the doctor’s
advice, and, so to speak, walk himself to sleep, Mr-
Brodribb took a somewhat circuitous route, and thus
it was close upon eleven o’clock before he came within
sight of the redoubt commanding Grouville Bay.

He now thought it high time to return to Saint Heliers,
and he was debating which way he should take, when
he heard the measured tramp of marching men coming
from the direction of the redoubt, which was not more
than three hundred yards from the spot where he stood.

‘The patrol, I suppose,’ he muttered, drawing close
to the hedge, in order to avoid being seen, for in his
state of mind he did not care to meet anybody.
‘Judging by the sound, I should say they must be un-
usually strong to-night, thirty or forty files at least’

A few minutes later, a company of soldiers marched
down the road leading to the redoubt, and passed close
to Jacob Brodribb, who, to his intense surprise and
alarm, saw that they did not belong to any British
regiment, nor to the Jersey militia, but that they were
French grenadiers, completely armed and accoutred,
and evidently ‘on the war-path,’

‘They must have landed in the bay, and surprised
The Guard at Grouville surprised. = 15

the guard at Grouville, he said to himself, crouching
down right under the hedge, lest the Frenchmen should
catch sight of him. ‘ Well, there'll be warm work for all
of us who wear King George’s livery, and many a fine
fellow may never see another sun rise. Who knows but
that I and my poor Amélie may be reunited before
morning!’

But these thoughts did not keep Jacob Brodribb from
what was now his bounden duty, and, as soon as the
Frenchmen were well out of hearing, he crept from
beneath the hedge, looked cautiously around to make
sure that the coast was clear, and then set off at a
rapid pace for ‘Le Mont Patibulaire, where he knew
that some companies of the 78th Highlanders were
encamped.

While Ensign Brodribb is hastening to give the alarm
to the Highlanders, we will relate how it came to pass
that a company of French grenadiers should be making
a midnight march along the roads of Jersey, and, to do
that satisfactorily, we must needs borrow a chapter from
the history of the island.


SS

5 fe 4
SSS IN



CHAPTER III.

Shows how the French landed in Jersey, and how our
Hero's Father paid the Debt to Nature.

HE importance of the Channel Islands as naval
stations has ever been appreciated by the
rulers of ‘La Belle France,’ and, since the days

when Philip Augustus wrested the province of Normandy
from the English crown, many attempts have they made
to bring Jersey and Guernsey under their sovereignty—
attempts which the sturdy islanders have always success-
fully resisted.

The last of these petty invasions was undertaken by a
hot-headed, ambitious Frenchman, Monsieur le Baron de
Rullecourt, who, on the 5th of January, 1781, not only
effected a landing in Jersey at the head of a small body
of troops, but actually gained temporary possession of
the town of Saint Heliers before he met with any serious
opposition.

The force with which Monsieur de Rullecourt set out
on this hazardous expedition, consisted of some two
thousand volunteers from the regiment of the Chevalier
de Luxemburg and from other infantry corps stationed


De Rullecourt’s Expedition. 17

in the neighbourhood of Granville on the coast of Nor-
mandy. Having collected a sufficient number of vessels
in which to transport his small army, the impetuous
baron embarked his troops, and put to sea, regardless of
the state of the weather, and the immediate consequence
of his ill-advised haste was the dispersion of his flotilla
ten of the vessels, with nearly half his force on board,
being driven back to France, whilst he, with the
remainder, was forced to seek shelter at Chausey—a
small island, or rather cluster of islands, situated between
the coast of Normandy and Jersey.

Undeterred by this misfortune, and without waiting for
his scattered ships to rejoin him, De Rullecourt seized the
first opportunity of fair weather to pass over to Jersey ;
and, thanks to the skilful piloting of a treacherous Jersey-
man who had taken refuge in France to avoid arrest, he
succeeded in clearing all the dangerous rocks and currents.

Steering through the rocks of La Roque Platte, the
French flotilla came to an anchor in Grouville Bay, and
De Rullecourt landed his troops in the dark, at a spot
called Banc du Violet, some three miles from Saint
Heliers. The coast was, however, so dangerous, that a
privateer and four other craft went on the rocks, and a
number of men, sailors and soldiers, were drowned.

The redoubt commanding Grouville Bay was held, as
we have already seen, by a guard of the Jersey militia,
but, the sentries not being on the alert, the guard was
surprised by a party of French grenadiers; thus De

Rullecourt gained a footing in the island without any of
B
18 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

the inhabitants being the wiser, with the exception of
the captured militiamen and Mr. Jacob Brodribb.

- Leaving a small garrison in the Grouville Redoubt, De
Rullecourt marched to Saint Heliers, and was in posses-
sion of the town before the townsfolk had risen from
their beds; so at daybreak, they found, to their horror,
a hostile force drawn up in the market-place, and they
themselves prisoners of war. Fortunately, however, two
English officers, Captains Aylward and Mulcaster,
escaped from their quarters to Elizabeth Castle, and
gave the alarm to its garrison.

Havingestablished hisheadquartersinthe Court House,
General de Rullecourt caused Major Corbet, the lieutenant-
governor of Jersey, Major Hogge, the fort major, and
Messieurs Durell and La Cloche, the king’s procureur and
constable of Saint Heliers, to be brought before him ; and
to them he presented his terms of capitulation, demanding
their signatures with all the arrogance of aconqueringhero.

The terms were, that the island of Jersey should be
surrendered to the crown of France, and that the British
garrison should at once lay down their arms; and to
induce the lieutenant-governor’s immediate acceptance
of these terms,—for on their immediate acceptance all
his hopes of a permanent victory depended,—General de
Rullecourt declared that he had already disembarked
five thousand veteran troops, and that, if he met with
any resistance, he would destroy Saint Heliers, and put
the inhabitants to the sword. After much remonstrance

_and hesitation, Majors Corbet and Hogge signed the
The Taking of Saint Heliers. 19

capitulation, but Procureur Durell and Constable La
Cloche resolutely refused to do so, even when threatened
with immediate death.

De Rullecourt now flattered, himself that all his diffi-
culties were surmounted, and he proceeded to summon
Elizabeth Castle under the terms of the capitulation ; but
Aylward and Mulcaster had now got the garrison under
arms, and were prepared to resist, vi ef armis, so they
peremptorily refused to pay the slightest regard to the
capitulation, or to any orders issued by the lieutenant-
governor so long as he remained a prisoner of war.

Furious at being thus thwarted, Baron de Rullecourt
ordered an immediate attack to be made on the castle;
but the assaulting party met with such a warm reception
from the intrepid garrison that they quickly went to the
right-about, and doubled back to the town to seek
shelter from the storm of bullets that came rattling and
whistling about their ears.

Whilst all this was taking place in Saint Heliers, Mr.
Jacob Brodribb reached the camp of the 78th High-
landers, and informed their commanding officer of the
landing of the French. The alarm had already spread
to other parts of the island; the militia assembled at
their different rendezvous, and marched in a body on
the town, the greater number joining the 78th at Le
Mont Patibulaire ; the 83rd and 95th Regiments of the
line also got under arms: and in a short space of time a
very respectable force was brought together, of which
Major Pierson, of the 95th, assumed command.
20 LTar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

Pierson, who was a young officer of great promise,
formed his force on the heights near Saint Heliers, and
occupied a hill which had been overlooked by the
enemy.

Presently there arrived two French officers, accom-
panied by the unfortunate lieutenant -governor, to
summon Pierson to surrender; but the gallant major
replied that if within twenty minutes General de Rulle-
court and his troops had not laid down their arms, he
should most certainly attack them.

Major Pierson was punctual to his word, and made a
very masterly disposition of his forces; forming them
into columns of attack, of which the two principal ones
were each preceded by a howitzer.

The assaults were then made in all accessible places
with such impetuosity, that, notwithstanding the advan-
tage the Frenchmen derived from the possession of the
streets and houses, they were driven rapidly in upon
their centre, and soon were compelled to make their last
stand in the market-place. Here a sharp and almost
hand-to-hand fight ensued, in which our friend Jacob
Brodribb took a prominent part, using his one arm with
such good effect that more than one of De Rullecourt’s
veterans fell beneath his blows.

When De Rullecourt saw that the fight was going
against him, and that his men were wavering on all
sides, he called two of his grenadiers, and bade them
bring forth the luckless lieutenant-governor, swearing
that he should share his fate.
Death of Major Pierson. 21

His orders were immediately obeyed ; the lieutenant-
governor, who, to do him justice, bore himself under
these trying circumstances with coolness and dignified
courage, was led out of the Court House and placed ina
position where he was exposed to the fire of his own men,
De Rullecourt standing behind him holding his arm.

Seeing Major Corbet’s perilous position, Jacob Brod-
ribb rushed forward to his rescue, followed by two or
three of the 78th Highlanders, and a militia officer—
Captain Hemery, of the Saint Heliers Artillery Regiment.
The Frenchmen parted before their impetuous charge,
and Jacob was on the point of seizing the French
general, when a grenadier made a thrust at him, and
drove his bayonet deep into his chest. Jacob staggered
blindly forward, and, uttering a wild cry, fell to the
ground, dragging his assailant with him. Almost at the
same moment, De Rullecourt was hit by a musket ball,
which broke his jaw-bone, and he fell back in the hands
of Major Corbet, who thereupon half carried, half led him
into the Court House. But the Baron’s hour had come,
and in a few moments he expired in the arms of his pri-
soner, thus falling a victim to his own ‘vaulting ambition,’

By this time the French, unable to resist the impetuous
onslaught of the regulars and militia, gave way on all sides,
and the officer who had obtained command surrendered
to Major Corbet ; but, ere the firing could be stopped, one
more life was sacrificed, for the gallant Pierson was shot
through the heart at the very moment of victory !
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CHAPTER IV.

Relates how young Nicholas Brodribb made his first Start
in Life.

YOyeE have narrated in the previous chapters how
~ it came to pass that our hero was left an
orphan at a very early period: of his exist-
ence ; we must now use the bookmaker’s time-honoured
privilege, and, taking a flying leap over the hoary head
of Father Time, request the reader to accept the fact
that the world has waxen some ten years older since
Ensign Jacob Brodribb met with a soldier’s death in the
market-place of Saint Heliers.

Immediately after his parent’s funeral, Nicholas was
taken back to Guernsey, and during those ten years,
over which we have so lightly skipped, he remained
under the care of his maternal grandsire, Monsieur Le
Noury, who treated him with unvarying kindness, and
gave him the best instruction that the educational
resources of Saint Peter’s Port would admit of. Thus,
Nicko—as he was usually called—throve apace, and at
the age of thirteen was a proper-built, sturdy youngster ;


Nick's Early Life. 23

full of life and energy, and unmistakably possessed of
the same adventurous spirit that impelled Jacob Brod-
ribb to ‘go for a soldier, rather than settle down to an
uneventful existence in a Hertfordshire village.

That Nicholas had also inherited his father’s courage
was proved to all the good folk of Guernsey by the
following incident.

Amongst Nicholas’s schoolmates was an English boy,

Jackson by name, a distant connection of the lieutenant-
governor of the island. Between our hero and Harry
Jackson a close friendship existed ; they were kindred
spirits, and, out of school-hours, were seldom apart.
One fine morning, shortly after Nicholas had celebrated
his thirteenth birthday, young Jackson proposed a trip
over to Herm, in a small sailing-boat, which Monsieur
Le Noury had lately presented to his grandson; who,
even at that early age, could manage a boat with no mean
skill,
It was a holiday, and, the weather being propitious,
Nicko readily assented to his friend’s proposal; so,
having secured a small basket of. provisions, the two
lads raced down to the Salerie Battery, where the
Dragoon—as Nicko called his cockle-shell—was lying,
and got her afloat.

Herm was reached without mishap, and, after they had
wandered about the tiny island for some time, Harry
Jackson said he would have a bathe. To this Nicholas
objected, because the currents rendered bathing a
dangerous amusement, particularly at that hour of the
24 - Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

day ; but his companion would not be turned from his
purpose, and, throwing off his clothes, plunged into the
sea. Now Jackson was not a very strong swimmer, and
he unfortunately overrated his skill and endurance ; so
- presently Nicko, who was anxiously watching him,
noticed that he had begun to show symptoms of distress,
he being then between fifty and a hundred yards out.

‘Come back, Harry!’ he shouted at the top of his
voice ; ‘the current runs very strong, and you'll be
carried out.’

But Master Harry was obstinate, and, instead of
swimming straight ashore, he must needs make for a
point some two hundred yards from the spot where
Nicholas stood. Before Harry had swum twenty strokes,
he got into a strong current, against which he could
make no way, and he presently found himself in
imminent danger of being swept out to sea ; whereupon
he did what he should have done at first—struck out
direct for the shore. By dint of great exertion, he
succeeded in getting clear of the current, but then his
strength failed him, and, feeling himself sinking, he
uttered a despairing cry for help.

Happily for the drowning boy, help was already nigh
at hand, for the moment our hero perceived his friend’s
danger, he threw off coat and shoes, and swam boldly
out to his assistance; reaching him just as the water
was closing over his head.

By this time Harry Jackson was under the influence
of the unreasoning terror that so often seizes upon a

-
A Gallant Act. 25

drowning person, and he made a desperate clutch at
Nicholas, who, however, with great presence of mind
eluded his grasp, and then, swimming round him, caught
him by the hair, and with no slight difficulty managed
to tow him into shallow water.

‘Nicko!’ exclaimed young Jackson, when they were



once more on ¢erra firma,‘ you've saved my life! I'll
never forget you!’ And, wringing his friend’s hand, he
burst into tears.

Jackson was as good as his word, for he reported our
hero’s gallant conduct to the lieutenant-governor, who
26 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

immediately sent for him, and, hearing that his one
ambition was to be a soldier, promised to interest him-
self on his behalf. The result was, that the military
authorities put down Nicholas’s name for a commission,
which, however, he was not to receive until he attained
the age of sixteen.

Now, it unfortunately happened that, not many
months after the boys’ adventure at Herm, Monsieur Le
Noury sustained a heavy pecuniary loss, owing to the
foundering, with all hands, of a vessel of which he was
owner, when making the passage between Weymouth
and Guernsey ; and this sudden calamity so preyed
upon the old man’s mind, that he took to his bed, and
died within a week.

When his affairs came to be wound up, it was found
that he had left comparatively little property, for, after
all debts and other claims were paid, there remained
only some five hundred guineas to be divided between
eleven persons. Under these circumstances, Mr. Jack-
son, Harry’s father, who had lately returned from
Calcutta, where he held an appointment under ‘John
Company,’ advised Nicholas not to wait for the promised
commission, but to at once enter some profession, in
which he might have a chance of earning a decent com-
petency, and he offered to obtain for the boy a midship-
man’s berth on board one of the Honourable Company’s
Indiamen.

‘You will then have a fair start in the world, said Mr.
Jackson, ‘with every prospect of future promotion. If,
A Start in Life. . 27

after a year or two, you do not like the life, you can give
it up, and accept the commission in the army which has
-been promised you. Only remember, my boy, honour
and glory are very fine things in their way, but rupees
are better. It’s not of much account to wear a laced
jacket, if it covers an empty stomach !’

With considerable reluctance, for his heart was set
upon following in his father’s footsteps, Nicholas Brod-
ribb accepted this offer, and on the 19th day of April,
1792, he bade farewell to his friends and home, and
sailed for England, to join the Marathon East India-
man; which vessel was commanded by Captain Edmund
Lucas, to whose care he had been specially recommended
by Mr. Jackson, .




CHAPTER V.

Gives some Account of the Voyage of the ‘Marathon’ to
Table Bay ; introduces a Gentleman of the Name of
Pennefeather, and relates how he and our Hero spent
a Night ‘up in the Clouds.

India Company’s service towardsthe end of the

He last century, there were few finer or of higher
repute than the Marathon, of 800 tons burden. She had
made two long voyages with safety and success,and was, in
the spring of ’92, chosen by the directors to make a third.

According to custom, the Marathon completed her
lading and received her passengers on board at Graves-
end, and on the 8th May, 1792, she sailed through the
Downs in company with three other East Indiamen,
the Chive, Rajah, and Bombay Castle. The four ships
cleared the Channel on the sixth day after their
departure, when Captain Lucas, finding that the
Marathon had the heels of her consorts, and wishing



to take advantage of her superior sailing qualities, stood
on alone, and soon lost sight of them.
28
The ‘ Marathon, East Indiaman. 29

By this time our hero had pretty well shaken down
into his place as junior ‘guinea-pig’—the name by
which the Company’s middies were generally known—
of the Indiaman. His freedom from the terrible
mal-de-mer,—that appalling sickness which would
‘take it out’ of Old Neptune himself if he once
had a bout of it,—and the fact that he was not alto-
gether ignorant of things nautical, told greatly in his
favour, and gave him a certain standing amongst his
messmates, such as a ‘green hand’ does not usually
attain. Then, too, when Nicholas joined the ship,
Captain Lucas had received him with marked kind-
ness, complimenting him on his gallantry in saving
Harry Jackson’s life; so altogether the boy may be
said to have commenced his career under very favour-
able circumstances.

With weather somewhat variable, the Warathon made
good progress, until the 16th June, when she met with
a heavy gale, which, however, only served to prove how
well she could behave, and how ably she was commanded.
The gale blew itself out in a couple of days, and a fair
wind set in, which continued until the 21st, when the
Marathon anchored in Table Bay, after a smart run of
less than seven weeks’ duration.

Nicholas Brodribb was now well up in his various
duties, and the second officer, Mr. Thomas Garland, to
whose watch he belonged, reported very favourably of
his energy and attention; so when, on their arrival at
Cape Town, one of the passengers, Major Pennefeather,
30 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

invited Nicholas to accompany him ashore, he had no
difficulty in obtaining leave.

Major Jordan Pennefeather was an officer of the
Marine Corps, who, having been ‘lent’ by the Imperial
Government to ‘John Company,’ was proceeding to
Bombay to superintend the training of a number of
sepoys as marines. He had taken a great fancy to
our hero, and during the voyage imparted to him much
useful knowledge, and furthermore taught him how to
play single-stick, and use a small sword, he himself
being an accomplished swordsman, having been in-
structed by a French officer—a prisoner of war.

As the Marathon was to remain in Table Bay for
several days, Major Pennefeather and some of his
fellow-passengers determined to live on shore during
her detention, and Nicholas was invited to be their
guest as long as he could be spared from his duties.

On the third day after their arrival, the major and
three other gentlemen proposed to ascend the far-famed
Table Mountain, and Nicholas accompanied them, It
was late when the party set out, and scarcely had they
ascended half-way, when their guide, seeing that the
clouds were beginning to roll down from the summit of
the mountain, refused to go on; alleging that they would
soon be enveloped in a thick mist, so it would not only
be dangerous to proceed, but, even if they succeeded
in gaining the top, they could see nothing, as the mist
must inevitably confine their view to a very few yards.

Notwithstanding the guide’s remonstrances, Major
‘ Up in the Clouds.’ 31

Pennefeather and his companions persisted in continuing
the ascent, and they told the guide that he could go
back if he pleased, but that their motto was ‘ Excelsior!’

So on the party went, and the farther they proceeded,
the more difficult and dangerous became the track;
until at last they were ‘brought up all standing,’ it
being impossible for them to ascend any higher.

‘We have lost the path, I fear, said Major Penne-
feather, looking doubtfully at his panting companions.

‘We were fools not to take the guide’s advice,’
rejoined a short, stout gentleman, who had found the
climbing rather too much for him, but was too proud
to give in. ‘I’m soaked to the skin, and the mist is
thickening, so that in a short time we shall not be able
to see a yard before us.’

‘Pon my honour, you're right,’ said the major. ‘We
weve fools—great fools! However, my dear doctor,
experientia docet, and the next time ’—

‘Ugh!’ grunted the doctor, interrupting him. ‘Next
time indeed! If ever I attempt to ascend Table
Mountain again, may I be’—

‘Dosed with your own physic, interposed Major
Pennefeather, finishing the sentence for him. ‘But
there, doctor? he added, slapping the little gentleman's
shoulder, ‘don’t get testy. All we've got to do is to
right-about-face and go home.’

‘Qh, that’s all, is it?’ was the rejoinder. ‘Then the
sooner we're off the better, or we shall probably spend
the night here.’
32 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

So the party began to retrace their steps.

The dense mist having rendered the way extremely
slippery, they found it even more difficult and tedious
to descend than it had been to ascend. They could
only see some two or three yards around them, and
having passed several dreadful-looking precipices, they
proceeded with the utmost caution, and were frequently
obliged to turn about and descend backwards, laying
hold of the scrub and bushes to save themselves from
going down headlong.

Thus they went on for some considerable time, feeling
every foot of their way; until at length they found
themselves in a wood, or rather thicket.

‘Lost our path again, sir, said Nicholas, who was
next to his friend the major. ‘I don’t remember this
place.’

‘Neither do I, my boy,’ replied Major Pennefeather,
in an undertone. ‘I’m afraid we shall have to pass the
night on the mountain side. It is very dangerous
travelling under present circumstances,’

Such appeared to be the opinion of his companions,
for they all came to a halt together, and, after a brief
consultation, reluctantly came to the conclusion that
it would be sheer madness to proceed any farther; and
so they decided to bivouac in the thicket until the

morning.


CHAPTER VI.

A Night on Table Mountain—The Major's Story:
‘A Fight with Bruin’

& AVING made up their minds to remain where
they were until daybreak, Major Penne-
feather and his companions looked about for
a suitable place to bivouac for the night, and they
presently hit upon a spot beneath two trees, the branches
of which entwined, and so formed a sort of natural
shelter.

‘We must have a fire, major, said young Nicholas,
who looked on the whole affair as an excellent joke.
‘There’s plenty of brushwood about, and if it’s not too
damp, we shall have a rare blaze.’

‘Pray how are you going to 4gf¢t your fire, young
man?’ asked Doctor Somers, who did not by any
means see the joke, and was not in the best of humours.
‘I don’t suppose any one has a tinder-box or flint and
steel with them.’

‘I have a brace of pocket pistols, and four or five

charges,’ said the major; ‘so you may make your mind
' Cc



34 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

easy on that score. As Master Nicko says, welll have
a rare blaze in a few minutes. Come, doctor,’ he added
cheerfully, as the little sedico flopped himself down at
the foot of a tree, and gave vent to a dismal groan,
‘we might be worse off, you know.’

‘Curried szoek, a larded capon, a real mutton ham,
and etceteras, murmured Doctor Somers, with a long-
drawn sigh. ‘To think that I should have missed them
all!’

‘Missed what?’ inquired Major Pennefeather, pausing
in his task of converting a piece of brown paper into
touch-paper by rubbing it well with gunpowder.

‘Why, my supper, to be sure,’ rejoined the doctor
dolefully. ‘I was engaged to sup with old MacDougal
at eight this evening, and now, instead of enjoying an
excellent’—

A roar of laughter interrupted Doctor Somers’ lament,
in which, after a comical effort to appear annoyed, he
joined ; for he was really a good-natured, light-hearted
little man, only rather too fond of the luxuries of life,
more especially of the ‘ pleasures of the table.’

They now, one and all, set to work to collect brush-
wood to build up a fire, which was not only necessary
for their comfort, but for their safety, as in those days
there were many wild beasts to be met with on the
mountains in the vicinity of Cape Town.

‘How about lighting it?’ said one of the party, an
Irish gentleman, O’Connor by name.

‘That’s easily done, rejoined the major, drawing the
A Night on Table Mountain. 35

charge from one of his pistols. ‘Nicholas, give me the
moss you have gathered. Pick out the driest, my
boy.’

Nicko handed his friend a quantity of moss, which
the latter rolled up into a ball.

‘Now the touch-paper, said Major Pennefeather.
‘That’s right!’ He then fired the paper by the priming
of the pistol, from which he had drawn the charge, and,
placing it in the middle of the ball of moss, made a
bellows of his lips, and blew it into a flame. They then
set a light to the brushwood in three or four places at
once, and very soon had a bright fire.

‘Very good !’ exclaimed Doctor Somers approvingly,
as he squatted down and began to warm his hands.
‘The next question is—have we anything in the shape
of food or drink?’

‘There are some biscuits and cold meat and a small
flask of wine in my haversack,’ replied Major Penne-
feather.

‘Enough to go round?’ was the worthy doctor’s
anxious inquiry.

‘Well, that depends upon what you call enough,
rejoined the other, with a smile. ‘We shan’t /eas¢
doctor ; but I think we shall have sufficient to enable
us to hold out until breakfast time.’

‘Umph!’ grunted the doctor. ‘Suppose you produce
your supplies, my gallant warrior, and let us judge
for ourselves,’

‘Willingly,’ rejoined Major Pennefeather, emptying:
36 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

his haversack of its contents. ‘Remember, we share
and share alike.’,

So the biscuits, meat, and wine were fairly portioned
out, and our friends made a sufficient, if not a hearty
meal. ;

‘This’ll not be the first time you’ve spent a night in
the open?’ observed Mr. O’Connor to the major, when,
having satisfied their hunger, they drew closer to the
fire and prepared to make themselves as comfortable as
possible until morning.

‘No indeed,’ was the reply. ‘Since I was a boy no
bigger than our young friend Nicholas here, I have led
an adventurous life, and seen many strange sights.’

‘And passed through many dangers,’ put in Doctor
Somers, as he lighted his pipe. ‘Come, Pennefeather,
he went on, puffing out a volume of smoke, ‘suppose
you spin us a yarn.’

‘Hark to the doctor!’ cried O'Connor, slapping the
little »edico on the back. ‘Shure now, isn’t a yarn the
right thing under the circumstances?’

‘Well,’ said the major, after a moment’s consideration,
‘T’ll relate an adventure that befell me some ten or
twelve years ago, while I was on a visit to a relative in
Russian Lithuania. It is a story of a bear-hunt, and’—

‘Therefore will dear telling,’ interrupted Doctor
Somers, with a chuckle.

‘And will, I think, interest you,’ the major went on,
casting a withering look at the wretched punster. ‘I
must tell you,’ pursued he, ‘that my father’s only sister
The Major's Story. a7

is married to a Russian«merchant, Serge Stransky ; and
when, on. the reduction of the Marine Corps after the
Peace of ’83, I was placed on the half-pay list, I applied
for and obtained leave to pay my aunt a long-promised
visit.

‘At that time Monsieur Stransky resided at Mozyr,
a small town in Minsk, a province or government of
Russian Lithuania. Minsk is a level, well-wooded
district, watered by the Dnieper and its tributary the
Pripet, and in its vast forests bears, elk, wild oxen, and
many other wild animals abound. Monsieur Stransky
and his son Ivan—a young man some three or four
years my junior—were both of them ardent disciples of
Nimrod. The house was crowded with trophies of the
chase; bears’ heads decorated the walls; bear-skins
covered the floors, chairs, and couches; in fact, bear-
hunting was my uncle’s hobby, and many and wonderful
were the tales he could have told of his encounters with
“grim Bruin.” Ivan was a “chip of the old block,” and
longed to emulate his father’s deeds.

‘Now Monsieur Stransky had in his employ an old
Finn, who had been noted in his.own country as a most
successful bear-hunter. Stremidoff—for that was the
old fellow’s name—was an excellent servant; honest,
sober, and fairly clean in his person and habits; but he
had one serious fault in the eyes of my uncle and cousin
—he was given to boast that, whereas the Russian bear-
hunters were wont to attack Bruin with dogs and guns,
his countrymen would set forth for the chase armed only
38 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

with a spear, and, forcing their quarry from his lair, would
engage him, so to speak, in a hand-to hand combat.

‘He used to show a spear with which he declared he
had slain at least a score of bears, and he so worked
upon the imagination of my youthful cousin Ivan, that
the latter had resolved, at the first opportunity, to have
a tussle with Bruin @ /a Finnots.

‘Ivan broached the subject to me very shortly after
my arrival at Mozyr, and I agreed to accompany him
and Stremidoff to the forest of Grodek, which was not
more than a couple of miles from the house, and receive
a lesson in the use of the bear-spear.

‘We had some little difficulty in obtaining my uncle’s
consent to this expedition, but he at length gave the
required permission, on condition that Stremidoff carried
a gun, which, however, was only to be used in case of
dire necessity.

‘Early next morning we three started for the forest,
leaving the dogs at home. Stremidoff was armed with
a gun, Ivan and I with spears which had been specially
sharpened for the occasion; we also had long-bladed
hunting-knives stuck in our belts.

‘On reaching the village of Grodek, we learned that a
fine she-bear with cubs had been seen in the neighbour-
hood, and was supposed to have her den near a place
called “Blue Spring.”

‘Thither we bent our steps, and very soon perceived
traces that convinced my companions we were on the
right track. But now, to our great astonishment and
The Major's Story. 39

annoyance, old Stremidoff showed symptoms of trepida-
tion, and tried hard to persuade Ivan to abandon the
chase.

‘Ivan was very indignant, and upbraided his servant in
no measured terms, and they were engaged in hot argu-
ment, when suddenly a noise in our rear attracted my
attention, and, looking round, I perceived an enormous
bear playing with her cub not twenty feet from the spot
where we stood.

‘Stremidoff caught sight of the huge brute at the same
moment, and, pushing Ivan aside, he levelled his gun,
pulled the trigger, and shot the cub dead. In my own
mind I have not the slightest doubt that the poor old
Finn really aimed at the mother, with the intention of
shooting her, so as to prevent Ivan and me attacking her
with our spears; but, unhappily, his hand was not as
steady, nor his eye as keen as of yore, and thus he killed
the cub instead, which was just the most unfortunate
thing he could have done, as it raised the old she-bear
to a pitch of ungovernable fury.

‘Ivan was nearest to her when she. charged, and was
knocked down by her rush. I then brought my weapon
to the charge, and attempted to deliver point; but the
maddened brute, rearing herself on her hind legs, gave
me a fearful blow with her paw, knocking the spear from
my hand, and sending me head over heels. Before I
could regain my feet, the bear charged down upon
Stremidoff, and dashed him violently to the ground;
then she turned upon me again, and I found myself upon
40 - Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

my back, with the animal bestriding me! I made sure
that my last hour was come, and, offering up a prayer
for pardon, had resigned myself to my fate, when to my
amazement the bear reared up again, and stood on the
defensive. The next instant four large dogs sprang upon
her, and strove to drag her down.

‘T was badly bruised and half stunned, but managed
to seize my spear, and, staggering to my knees, thrust
the keen point into the bear’s side. She now tried to
escape, but the dogs had fastened upon her, and would
not be shaken off; whilst I pressed home the spear with
all my strength, driving it deeper and deeper into her
body, until at length the huge creature sank down ex-
hausted. I remember nothing more of the struggle,
because I fainted away.

‘When I came to myself, the bear lay stiff and stark
at my feet, and one of the dogs was stretched dead beside
her; the other three were crouching near my cousin’s
prostrate body, and I was not a little amazed when I
recognised them as his own hounds.

I struggled up and went up to Ivan; he was alive,
but insensible. I then looked at Stremidoff, and found
the poor old man quite dead ; his white locks crimsoned
with the blood that had flowed from an awful wound in
his head.

‘With the greatest difficulty I managed to crawl back
to Grodek, from whence I despatched a couple of peasants’
with a cart, to bring in Ivan, and poor old Stremidoff’s
corpse. I was then driven back to Mozyr, and for six
The Major's Story. 4I

weeks lay ill of a brain fever; whilst Ivan, though he
ultimately recovered, was brought very near to death’s
door, and it was more than a year before he recovered
from the effects of that terrible encounter.’

‘But how came the dogs on the scene?’ inquired
Nicholas, when the major had finished his ‘ yarn.’

‘Why, my uncle had them loosed shortly after we
started on our foolhardy expedition, and they, following
in our track, arrived just in time to save me from the
fangs of Madame Bruin,’

‘Bedad, sir” said Mr. O’Connor, ‘that’s a sort of ad-
venture I’d rather hear of than meet with! What say
you, doctor darlint ?’ :

But the little doctor had fallen asleep, and replied to
his friend’s question with a loud and prolonged snore;
which reminded the rest of the party that it was getting
late, and that they too might just as well have a few
hours’ rest. So, having replenished the fire, they stretched
themselves on the ground, and were very soon in the
‘Land of Nod,’

By dawn of day our friends were astir. The thick
clouds having dispersed, they could see the vessels lying
at anchor in Table Bay, so were able to shape their
homeward course, and they arrived safe and sound, but
very damp, at the house where they were staying, just
as breakfast was served—much to the joy of Dr. Somers,
who now made up for the loss of his supper.


CHAPTER VII.

The‘ Marathon’ proceeds on her Voyage—The Gale—
A Terrible Disaster.




(KRESH water and provisions having been re-
ceived on board, the Marathon, on the 5th
t July, once again stretched her snowy canvas
to the breeze, and with ‘a fair wind and a flowing sheet’
proceeded on her voyage.
On the second morning after her departure from Table
Bay, she encountered a stiffish gale, and Captain Lucas,
‘who was a very careful officer,—anticipating still
dirtier weather, gave orders that the necessary prepara-
tions should be made to meet it. Accordingly the top-
gallant yards were sent down on deck, and all the small
sails and lumber removed out of the tops; and a try-sail
was brought aft and bent, and the gaff lowered. The
Marathon was then steering due east, between latitudes
35° and 36°
Gradually, but surely, the gale increased in violence,
the seas rising higher and higher, whilst the dark storm-
laden clouds coursed rapidly across the skies, and the
The Gale. 43

Pe)

wind howled and whistled ominously through the rigging,
until by sundown it blew almost a hurricane. Top-sail
after top-sail had been furled, and the Marathon now
flew through the water under reefed fore-sail and storm-
staysail; whilst it was with the greatest difficulty that
three men at the wheel could keep the helm, such was
the terrific force of the blows which the ship received
from the heavy seas on her quarter.

Night came, and with it a darkness that could almost
be felt. Towards twelve o’clock the wind shifted a
little, and produced a still wilder commotion. Wave
after wave raged after the flying vessel, threatening to
engulf her, but, like a bird on the wing, she lifted gallantly
to the swell, and rushed down the steep abyss, tracking
her path with brilliancy and light.

There was not one seaman in the ship took advantage
of his watch below to sleep that night; the storm was
too dreadful !

At length day dawned, and with it came another shift’
of the wind, but the gale raged with unabated fury. The
wind being now dead against her, the Marathon was
hove-to under a close-reefed main-topsail, and orders
were given to furl the fore-sail.

A score of the smartest sailors in the ship sprang
aloft to execute the command. Already were they out
upon the yard gathering up the folds of the heavy canvas,
when a tremendous sea struck the vessel on the bows
and broke with appalling violence on the deck. There
was a crash, mingled with one wild, tumultuous yell, and
44 ‘Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

when the spray had cleared it was found that the fore-
mast had gone by the board, and every one of the brave
fellows on the foreyard were engulfed in the raging sea!
A few remained entangled in the rigging, but man after
man they were washed away.

The gale continued all that day and throughout the
night, but at daybreak on the following morning the
wind abated and the sea went down. Preparations were
now made for repairing damages, and it was with much
satisfaction that Captain Lucas heard the carpenter’s
report, that the ship herself had suffered no serious
injury.

‘I was afraid she might have strained herself and
sprung a leak,’ said the captain to Major Pennefeather,
who had come on deck and was standing with him beside
the companion-hatch.

‘Yes, indeed,’ rejoined the major. ‘I fully expected
to hear that we had started a timber or two, for it seemed
to me that the finest vessel afloat could not long have
withstood such shocks as she received yesterday. By
the way, Captain Lucas, I hope no harm has befallen my
young friend Nicholas?’

‘No, major, was the reply. ‘The boy was here just
now, but I sent him below to get something to eat, for
he looked quite worn out. He is a fine lad, sir, and
will make a prime seaman one of these days.’

‘If he doesn’t turn soldier, laughed Major Penne-
feather. ‘You know, I think his heart is with us, and
he’d prefer “ pipe-clay ” to the “ tar-bucket.”’
The Gale. 45

‘Well, there’s no accounting for tastes!’ retorted the
captain. ‘Anyhow, the boy will do credit to whatever
profession he may finally choose ; of that I’m certain!’

Orders were now given to get up a jury-foremast, and
all hands were soon busily engaged. Sailors are rarely
discouraged, and—if well commanded by officers in
whom they can put faith—will work until they drop.
The loss of so many of their shipmates, the wrecked
state of the vessel, and the fact that for more than forty-
eight hours they had been on duty, almost without
cessation, did not prevent the crew of the I/arathon from
exerting themselves to the utmost, and by evening the
ship was once’ more under sail.


SSE SSS DRT DEDSE TSEC Sy
2



Ne aS Se SSI e ISCULLA

CHAPTER VIII.

After the Storm—A Ship in Distress—
° Sunk beneath the Waves!

\ HE evening was closing in; those of the ship’s
company who were on ‘watch below’ were
3’ looking forward to a good ‘caulk’ after their
exertions, and the passengers to a quiet night’s rest,
free from the terrors and miseries of a storm at sea,
when the heavy report of a distant gun came booming
over the waters. Another and another followed in rapid
succession ; a lengthened pause, then a fourth and fifth
were heard by those on board the AZarathon.

‘Signals of distress!’ exclaimed Captain Lucas, who
had just sat down to a late meal, the first he had taken



below since the commencement of the gale. ‘Excuse
me, ladies and gentlemen ;’ and, rising from his seat,
he quitted the cabin.

‘Can you see anything of her, Mr. Hartley?’ said he
to his chief officer on reaching the deck.

‘No, sir, was the reply. ‘I’ve sent young Brodribb to
the maintop-masthead ; he has sharp eyes, and will
A Ship in Distress. 47

make her out if she’s in sight. Hark! There’s another
gun.

‘Masthead there!’ hailed the captain, placing his
hands to his mouth. ‘Do you see her?’

‘I thought I saw a flash, sir, replied Nicholas, at the
top of his voice.

‘Where away?’

‘About two points on the starboard bow, shouted
Nicholas.

‘That’s just about where the sound comes from, sir,’
said Mr. Hartley. ‘But I doubt whether the boy saw
the flash.’

‘Well, we'll stand towards her, returned the captain.

So the Marathon’s course was altered, and she steered
for the quarter from whence the signals proceeded. As
she approached nearer and nearer to the object of her
search, the reports of the guns became more and more
distinct, and ere long the flashes were unmistakably
visible—first from the masthead, then from the deck ;
and towards midnight a dismasted vessel, rolling like a
log upon the water, could be distinguished with the aid
of a night-glass.

Captain Lucas now ordered guns to be fired and
lights burned, so as to intimate to the distressed mariners
that help was nigh at hand, and at the same time the
boats were made ready to proceed to the rescue if
necessary. Officers and men gazed anxiously at the
spot where the horizon was broken by the dark outline
of the stranger, and many of the older hands expressed
48 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

their doubts as to whether the Marathon would reach
her in time to save the hapless crew.

‘I fear we shall be too late,’ said Mr. Hartley, as he
examined her through his glass. ‘They have ceased
firing, and do not in any way acknowledge our signals.’

‘Is she a big ship, sir?’ inquired Nicholas, who was
standing beside him.

‘About the same tonnage as ourselves, I should
imagine, replied Hartley, lowering his glass.

‘A transport, very likely, observed Captain Lucas.
‘There was a Dutchman, with troops for Batavia, left
Table Bay the day before we did, and I should not be
surprised ’—

‘Halloa!’ broke in Nicholas, who had taken Mr.
Hartley’s glass to have a look at the stranger. ‘I beg
your pardon, sir, for interrupting you,’ he added, recol-
lecting himself ; ‘but I—I don’t see the ship any longer.
She has—yes, sir, she has disappeared !’

‘Disappeared!’ cried the captain; ‘impossible!
~ Here, give me the glass, lad!’

‘She’s gone! She’s gone!’ now cried several of the
officers and men who had been watching her attentively.

‘Yes,’ said Captain Lucas mournfully, ‘she has gone!
And I fear that her crew must have perished with her,

Alas, it was only too true!

The gallant ship that had endured the full fury of the
tempest, battling bravely with wind and wave, sank when
its wrath was spent; and nearly every soul on board
went down in her. The storm, no doubt, had shaken
“Sunk beneath the Waves !’ 49

her stout frame, and started many a timber; so that
from the first her crew must have known that it was
well-nigh hopeless that they could be saved. Yet it
seemed hard that they should have perished when help
was so near at hand!

‘It is possible that some of her crew have escaped in
the boats,’ said Captain Lucas presently. ‘If so, we
are pretty certain to fall in with them. Keep a sharp
look-out, Mr. Hartley, and burn blue lights, and fire a
gun at intervals.’

‘ Ay, ay, sir, replied the chief officer. ‘We're to hold
on the same course, I presume?’

‘Yes,’ rejoined the Captain, as he turned to go down
the companion-hatch, ‘and at daybreak, or as soon as
we come across any of the wreckage, we can send away
a couple of our boats. We imust stand by so long as
there is any chance of saving life,’


SSS Sa SII

= ~
a PIII SSIS SESS

zee eas SS
— SS
SSS Sa



CHAPTER IX.
The Rescue—Raoul Giraud—A Sad Story.

“BOUT an hour before daylight, the Marathon
Y fell in with a quantity of wreckage, which

DUS Captain Lucas felt certain must be the re-
mains of the ill-fated vessel he was in search of; he



therefore hove to, and at sunrise ordered three boats—
the starboard and larboard quarter-boats, and the whale
boat—to be piped away. Nicholas, to his great delight,
was placed in charge of the ‘ whaler.’

During the morning the boats rowed about in all
directions, but no appearance of a human being could
be seen. A large launch, floating bottom uppermost,
was discovered, and the name La Chevrette, painted on
her stern, went to show that the lost ship was probably
a Frenchman, and not the Dutch transport, as Captain
Lucas had supposed.

Towards noon, Nicholas, whose boat was. at the time
the farthest away from the Marathon, caught sight of a
mass of wreckage about a mile distant, which had some-
thing of the appearance of mast constructed raft.
The Rafe. 51

‘Look. yonder, Murphy,’ he cried to an Irish sailor,
who was perched up in the bow of the whaler, armed
with a long boat-hook. ‘ What’s that?’

Murphy stepped on to the bow thwart, and took a
long look in the direction indicated by his youthful
officer. .

‘There’s something bobbing about, sure enough,’ he
presently said.

‘Isn’t it a raft?’ asked Nicholas anxiously. ‘I wish
I’d brought my glass with me!’ he added. ‘I’m almost
certain ’—

‘By the powers!’ interrupted Murphy, ‘I b’lave you’re
right, Misther Brodribb. Come, bhoys, just send her
along, and we'll make sart’n shure! If there’s not some
poor crayture houlding on them spars yondher, may
I never see swate Ballycloran agen—and that’s a big
word !? ,

‘Give way, lads!’ shouted Nicholas, seizing the yoke-
lines. ‘Give way!’

The whaler’s crew needed no second bidding. They
did give way with a will, and in a few minutes brought
the boat alongside of the wreckage that had attracted

our hero’s attention. Some spars had been hastily
- lashed together, and on the raft thus formed lay a young
woman, with an infant tied round her body by a broad
sash ; and beside her was stretched the apparently life-
less form of a lad, attired in the uniform of an ‘ exsezgune
de vaisseau’—as the French style their middies.

Murphy jumped on to the raft, and proceeded to
52 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

examine the girl, and to sever the rope that bound
her.

‘The poor crayture’s dead, sorr,’ he presently called
out; ‘and so is the babby.’

‘Are ye sure of that, Pat?’ asked one of the crew.
‘Maybe she’s only insensible.’

‘Sart’n” was the reply; ‘they’re both of ’em quite
stiff and cowld. Here, mate, lend us a hand to get the
poor things into the boat.’

‘Will you take them in, sir?’ said the other sailor,
looking doubtfully at Nicholas ; ‘or shall we leave ’em on
the raft, and tow it to the ship?’

‘Oh, take ’em into the boat, Brown,’ replied Nicholas,
‘and let us get back as quickly as possible. There’s
a chance that the girl may still have a spark of life
left in her; if so, the doctor may be able to bring her
round.’

In the meanwhile, Murphy had taken a look at the
midshipman, and, to his surprise, found that there were
some indications of life remaining in him.

‘Bedad!’ he joyfully exclaimed, ‘this young chap’s
not dead, anyhow. Come, bear a hand, Bill Brown,’ he
added, raising the senseless middy in his arms.

‘Where’ll we put him, sir?’ asked the man Brown,
appealing to Nicholas.

‘ Here, in the stern-sheets,’ replied our hero, spreading
a cloak at the bottom of the boat. ‘Gently with the
poor fellow, my lads!“ They then laid the middy down,
and the mother and child beside him, covering them
Raoul Giraud. 53

over with jackets ; and, pushing off from the raft, pulled
back to the JZarathon with all possible speed.

When Nicholas reached the Indiaman, the two quarter-
boats had already returned, without having discovered
any survivors of the ill-fated La Chevrette.

On examining the young woman and her infant, the
surgeon of the Marathon declared that they had been
dead some hours,—the cause of death being, no doubt,
exhaustion and exposure,—so their remains were sewn
up in a hammock and reverently committed to the
deep, Captain Lucas reading a portion of the burial
service over them.

The midshipman, however, still breathed, and the
surgeon, assisted by Dr. Somers, used every means to
restore him. For some time their efforts were un-
successful ; indeed, more than once the surgeon declared
that the vital spark had fled; but Dr. Somers would
not give up so long as the slightest hope remained, and
at length his patience and skill met with their reward.
The patient began to show signs of reviving, and in
another twelve hours he had regained consciousness,
though it was a couple of days before the doctor would
allow him to be questioned.

The rescued middy was a tall, handsome lad of six-
teen. His name, he informed Captain Lucas, was Raoul

Giraud, and his father had commanded La Chevrette,a
French store-ship. That vessel was on her voyage to
the Isle of France when she met with the storm that
wrecked her. She might have weathered it, had it not
54 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

been for the misconduct of the greater number of her
crew; who, refusing to work at the pumps, broke into
the spirit-room, and drank themselves into a state of
insensibility. The officers of the ship and the few
sailors who stuck to their duty, assisted by a party of
soldiers,—artillerymen and sappers on their passage to
the Isle of France,—did their utmost to keep her afloat ;
working, spell about, until they were completely
exhausted, and could work no longer. The leaks then
gained slowly but surely upon them; the vessel showed
evident signs that she was settling down, and at last
officers and men gave themselves up to despair, and
allowed her to sink beneath their feet.

Shortly before La Chevrette went down, and when all
hope of saving her was abandoned, the officer com-
-manding the troops on board—a young commandant of
artillery, Lacroix by name—came to Captain Giraud
and Raoul, who were sitting apart from the rest, and
besought them to devise some means of saving his wife
and child.

The ship’s boats having all been either washed away
or damaged beyond repair,—though an attempt had been
made to patch up the launch,—Captain Giraud suggested
that they should form a light raft of spars, upon which
they might lash Madame Lacroix and her infant. He
was, however, too exhausted to render any assistance,
and Major Lacroix and Raoul set about the task by
themselves. There was no time to be lost, and only a
very frail structure could be put together, so that it was
Raoul Giraud. 55

but a forlorn hope; still the unhappy father had the
satisfaction of doing something for those he loved.

When the ship sank, the raft floated away with its
helpless burden, and, strange to say, did not capsize.
Raoul Giraud, after struggling some minutes in the
agitated waters, clinging to portions of the wreck,
managed to reach the raft, and, finding that it would
support his weight, scrambled on to it. He thus saved
his life, but poor Madame Lacroix and her child died
before morning, and so left him the sole survivor of the
wreck,


St

ESR PSII NEE RIPE: FEES SEE ,

on

i
K











CHAPTER X.

kelates how the ‘Marathon’ struck upon a Rock; and
how Nicholas and his Friends escaped from the
Wreck.

“SF TER her search for the survivors of the ship
Y La Chevrette, which ended, as we have seen,
in the rescue of Raoul Giraud, the Marathon
continued her voyage, steering E.N.E. Between the



young Frenchman and Nicholas an intimacy soon sprang
up; owing, probably, to the fact that the latter could
speak French well; and they were nearly always to-
gether. Major Pennefeather, too, took a liking for
Raoul, who was a quiet, gentlemanly youth, and very
intelligent, and he invited him to make use of his state-
room whenever he wished to be alone.

On the evening of the 19th July, Nicholas,—whose
watch it was below,—Major Pennefeather, and Raoul
Giraud, were all seated in the major’s stateroom,
looking through some portfolios of sketches. The
sky was somewhat cloudy, and there was a heavy

' sea running, and during dinner in the cabin Captain
56
Wreck of the ‘ Marathon.’ 57

Lucas had appeared uneasy and preoccupied; a cir-
cumstance that Major Pennefeather now mentioned to
Nicholas.

‘Yes,’ rejoined our hero, ‘the skipper has not been
himself for the last two or three days. I don’t think he
has ever quite recovered the fatigue he underwent during
the gale. He’s not a strong man, you know, sir,

‘So your surgeon was telling me,’ said Major Penne-
feather. ‘He had a sunstroke a year or two ago, I
believe. By the way, the captain and Mr. Hartley had
a slight difference of opinion this morning as to the
course we’re taking.’

‘Yes, major,’ answered Nicholas; ‘but I’d wager a
guinea that the skipper is right. He knows what’—

What might be Captain Lucas’s particular knowledge,
our hero did not then inform his friends; for, ere he
could finish his sentence, there came a terrible shock,
that pitched him off his seat into the major’s arms.

‘Merciful Heaven!’ exclaimed Major Pennefeather,
as a second shock, more severe than the first, quickly
followed ; ‘the ship must have struck! On deck, lads,
for your lives!’

Filled with consternation, they hurried on deck, and
then the extent of the calamity was only too plain.

The Marathon had indeed struck heavily on a sunken
rock, and already her jury-foremast had gone by the
board; the mainmast soon followed, crushing to death
several of the watch in its fall. The utmost terror and
confusion prevailed ; for several of the passengers had
58 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay,

rushed up on deck, and more than one was dashed over-
board by the violence of the sea rolling over them ; and
it was painfully evident that the ship—her timbers
strained and weakened by the shock she had received
during the storm—was breaking to pieces at every stroke
of the surge.

Crawling over to the larboard side of the deck, which
lay highest out of the water, Nicholas found the captain,
clinging to a portion of the standing rigging. His leg
was broken, and he appeared quite dazed. Presently
they were joined by Major Pennefeather, young Giraud
and Mr. Spicer, the second officer.

‘It’s all up with us, I fear,’ said the latter despondently.

‘Nonsense, man!’ retorted Major Pennefeather ; ‘while
there’s life, there’s hope.’

‘There'll be precious little life left in us by the
morning, growled the other, who appeared to have
been drinking. ‘What say you, sir?’ he shouted at
the captain.

But Captain Lucas made no reply, and shortly after-
wards a sea broke over and parted them, and Nicholas
saw no more of the poor skipper, who, together with Mr.
Spicer, was swept away and drowned.

Nicholas now managed, by dint of great exertion, to
reach the quarter-deck, the rest of the ship being com-
pletely under water, and pretty well shattered to pieces.

In this perilous situation, expecting every moment
must be his last, our hero remained for some time ; and
he had almost resigned himself to his fate, when he heard
The Escape. “ —- 89

the welcome cry of ‘Land!’ At the same instant, a sea
dashed over him with so much force that it not only tore
him from his hold, but actually stunned him. The effect
of the blow was such that he lay insensible until after
daybreak, and on recovering he found himself fixed to a
plank by a long nail that had been driven into the fleshy
part of his shoulder. The agony he now suffered from
this painful wound was intense, and, to add to his misery,
he was so benumbed by the cold that he could barely
move hand or foot.

He at length, however, managed to stagger to his fect,
and looking around him, he saw that several of the crew
and passengers had got upon some rocks close to the
ship ; and, to his great delight, he recognised amongst
them Major Pennefeather and Raoul Giraud. He called
to them as loud as he could, and presently the major,
Raoul, and Pat Murphy came to his assistance, and
between them they succeeded in getting him safely to
the shore.




CHAPTER XI.

Wreck of the ‘Marathon’— Twenty-one out of Two
Flundred !—The Desert Isle.



TE BS HE Marathon hid struck upon a reef within

A pistol shot of a low-lying, barren islet, situate
3928 —according to the last reckoning taken—
between 32° and 33° south latitude, and distant some
six or seven hundred miles from the Cape of Good
Hope.

To this islet there had escaped from the wreck twenty-
one persons, namely: of the crew—Hartley and Gar-
land, chief and second officers; Nicholas Brodribb,
midshipman; George Bacon, carpenter; and seven
foremast hands, including Patrick Murphy. Of the
passengers—Major Pennefeather; Doctor Somers, his
wife, and two other ladies; Raoul Giraud; and four
private soldiers of the Company’s Bengal European
Infantry.

These were the only survivors of two hundred souls
who were on board the Marathon when she struck ; for

so sudden was the disaster that no attempt was made to
60
The Desert Isle. 61

lower the boats, and it was next door to a miracle that
any of her crew or passengers should have reached the
shore in safety.

By an unanimous vote, Major Pennefeather was
elected leader of the little band of castaways, with
Mr. Hartley as his second in command; and one and
all solemnly promised to obey him as their chief, dro
tem., and to maintain a strict discipline—which, as the
major took care to point out, was even more necessary
under their present distressing circumstances than when
they were safe and sound on board the Marathon.

Now, Major Pennefeather felt a very natural sorrow
for the loss of Captain Lucas and so many others with
whom he had been on more or less intimate terms;
and, moreover, he was not a little despondent about the
present condition of himself and fellow-sufferers, for—
albeit he was deeply thankful that they had been
mercifully preserved from the sudden and violent death
that had overtaken their shipmates—he could not be
blind to the unpleasant fact that they were in imminent
danger of enduring the pangs of hunger and thirst, and
ultimately perishing from sheer exhaustion on the
barren rock upon which they had been cast. Neverthe-
less, being anxious to keep his companions from. dwell-
ing too much on the misery and peril of their position,
he assumed a cheerful demeanour, urging them to make
the very best they could of a bad job.

‘Consider, my friends,’ said he, after his little oration
anent the necessity of discipline, ‘fretfulness and des-
62 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

pondency never did good to any one! Let us face our
difficulties like men and Christians, and bear in mind
that “ Heaven helps those who help vaeniselyees If we
do our ’—

‘I ask your honour’s pardon,’ here broke in Patrick
Murphy ; ‘but, talkin’ of helpin’ oursilves—there’s a bit
of a cask rowling about, sorr, in the surf beyant there;
and I’m thinkin’ ’twould be well to lay hould of it’

‘An excellent idea, Mr. Murphy,’ rejoined the major,
laughing. ‘I see you’re a practical man, and believe in
deeds rather than words!’

‘Well, your honour, answered the Irishman, with an
expression half bashful, half comical, ‘shure ’tis not for
the loikes of me to be making remarks; but ’tis yersilf
knows, sorr, that words won’t put victuals into your
mouth — barrin’ ye’re a lawyer; for isn’t talkin’ and
arguin’ their livin’, and a moighty foine livin’, too, by
the same token !—whilst, if we set to work at wanst,
maybe ’tis a bit of a male we'll be able to pick up,
ounly just for the lookin’ for ’t.’

‘Murphy’s quite right, major, put in Mr. Hartley,
‘The poor old bark is breaking up fast, and no doubt
many things that we shall find “use for will be washed
ashore.’

‘Then the sooner we secure them the better,’ returned
the major; ‘so let us lose no time about it.’ 5

All hands then set to work to search for those neces-
saries without which their island would have afforded
them but a short respite from destruction (with the
The Morning's Work. . 63

exception of Nicholas and three others, who were so
severely bruised and knocked about that Doctor Somers
declared them to be unfit for any physical exertion) ;
and when, after a couple of hours’ incessant labour,
Major Pennefeather proposed a ‘spell ho !’ it was found
that the following articles had been saved from the
wreck :—A cask of fresh water; another of beer; a
barrel of flour (damaged); a box of wax candles; a
case of brandy ; several pieces of salt pork ; a small box
containing three or four gun-flints, a broken file, a flask
of gunpowder ; and two ship’s cutlasses.

‘Not a bad morning’s work,’ said Mr. Hartley, as he
surveyed the miscellaneous collection. ‘By the way,’
he added, looking round, ‘has any one seen Mr. Giraud
and Pat Murphy?’

‘They went off together after we got the cask of
water ashore’ answered Bacon, the carpenter. ‘I’ve
not seen ’em sincé then, sir.’ ,

‘No more haven’t I,’ chimed in one of the sailors,
‘T ’spects they’ve gone to have a look round th’ island’

‘They can’t be very far off, I reckon, said the
carpenter.

‘Give them a shout, lads, suggested Major Penne-
feather. ‘Now!—all together’ And presently, in
answer to their united call, there came a loud ‘whoo—
oop!’ followed by a shrill ola.

‘That’s Pat’s shout, I’ll lay a crown!’ exclaimed the
carpenter.

‘And the young Frenchman’s squeak,’ said a sailor,
64 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

‘Ay, and here they comes. But what a rum noise
they’re makin’ !’

As the man spoke, a great grunting and squealing
was heard, such as never could have proceeded from
human throats, and the next moment Raoul Giraud and
Pat Murphy came scrambling over the rocks, driving
before them three fine pigs which had succeeded in
swimming ashore without performing the proverbial
porcine aquatic feat of ‘cutting their own throats.’

A loud cheer greeted the arrival of this most welcome
addition to the island larder, and amidst much laughter
and confusion the pigs were secured.

‘The poor fellows are brightening up a bit, major,’
said Mr. Hartley, as they made their way back to the
spot where they had left the ladies and Doctor Somers
and his patients.

“Yes, and I’m thankful for it, was the rejoinder.
‘We must do our best to keep up their courage. But
tell me, Hartley, the major went on, ‘how came the
ship to run ashore?’

Mr. Hartley shrugged his shoulders, and after a pause
he answered, ‘I don’t like to cast a reflection upon the
memory of a dead shipmate, but poor Frank Spicer
was Officer of the watch, and I fear he’—

‘Was not exactly in a condition to keep it,’ said Major
Pennefeather, with a meaning look. ‘I thought as much.
Well, the poor fellow has paid dearly for his fault!’

‘That there was not a proper look-out kept, is only
too certain,’ chimed in Mr. Garland, the second officer.
Nick's Injuries. 65

‘At the same time, I must tell you that this island is
not laid down in any of the Admiralty charts,’

«That’s a question, Garland, said his brother officer.
‘For my part, I was doubtful about our course, and I
spoke to the skipper yesterday morning,’

‘And where do you suppose we are, Hartley?’ in-
quired Major Pennefeather.

‘Well, as near as I can judge, I should say we're
between two and three hundred miles east of Algoa
Bay, |

‘Then, if we had a boat sufficiently large to take us
all, we might reach the mainland ?’

‘We might, was the dubious reply. ‘But we haven't
a boat, major.’

‘Not at present,’ answered Major Pennefeather.
‘Ha! here are our friends. Well, doctor, how goes it
with your patients ?’

‘Oh, they’re all right,’ replied Dr. Somers. ‘Your
young friend Nick has an ugly wound, to be sure; but
he’s a healthy lad, and ’twill soon heal. Now tell me—
what luck have you had ?’

‘The best of luck, my dear fellow, said the major
gaily. ‘Ladies, we shall be able to serve you with a
late breakfast as soon as we can light a fire.’

With the aid of the gun-flints and powder, a fire was
soon made, and a meal of broiled salt pork prepared, of
which all hands partook heartily—for though it was
long past noon, none of the party had as yet broken
their fast. Their hunger satisfied, Major Pennefeather

E
66 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

proposed that some of their number should explore the
island, whilst the remainder continued to collect such
articles as might be washed ashore.

This was agreed to, and accordingly the major, Raoul
Giraud, and Pat Murphy set forth to spy out the land,
and select a suitable site for an encampment.

The island was even smaller than they had expected,
for it measured barely two miles in circumference, and,
save for a few stunted bushes and scanty patches of
coarse grass, was destitute of vegetation.

‘Shure a travelling tinker’s jackass couldn’t pick up a
livin’ here!’ was Pat Murphy’s observation, when from
the summit of a low hillock they surveyed the desolate
scene. ‘It’s a moighty poor place, bedad !’

‘But better than the bottom of the sea, Pat,’ rejoined
Major Pennefeather. ‘Let us be thankful that Provi-
dence has given us a chance for our lives, and not cut
us off in’—

‘Thrue for ye, sorr, interrupted Murphy, with a touch
of his forelock. ‘It’s ye’silf’s right ; and indade, for the
matther of that, I am thankful. Shure loife is swate,
and I’d rather live in this little island than die in the
best room in Dublin Castle!’

‘A very sententious remark, my good fellow,’ was the
major’s laughing rejoinder. ‘I don’t think we could do
better, he went on, ‘than fix our camp here, for it seems
to be the highest spot in the island, and, if not sheltered
from the winds, we shall at any rate be out of reach of
the waves should a gale spring up.’
Exploring the Island. 67

‘It’s purty nigh to our landing-place too, sorr, said
Patrick Murphy ; ‘and that’s another good rayson for
choosing it, because we'll not be having to rowl or carry
the casks and other things so tirrible far. Arrah, now,
but ’tis an iligant spot, when ye come to take stock of
it!’ he added, looking round him with a well-feigned air
of satisfaction. ‘A thrifle bare and cowld, and a tree or
two, or maybe a patch of praties, would make it more
home-loike, but still we might be a dale worse off; and,
as your honour was plased to remark, we must larn to
be contint, and take things as they’re sint us.’

‘That’s the way to look at it, Murphy,’ answered
Major Pennefeather. ‘What say you, Monsieur
Giraud ?’

But poor Raoul only shrugged his shoulders and
shook his head dolefully, for at that moment his
thoughts were far away in ‘La Belle France, and he
could not help making a mental comparison between his
home in Brittany and the barren rock upon which Fate
had cast him—scarcely to the advantage of the rock!

‘Well,’ said the major, with a compassionate glance
at the young Frenchman, ‘we'd best retrace our steps,
for it is getting late, and there’s but little twilight in
these latitudes.’

So they returned to their friends, and made a report
of what they had seen—or perhaps it would be nearer
the truth to say, of what they had ot seen! The few
hours that remained of daylight were spent in removing
all their possessions from the shore to the summit of the
68 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

hillock ; a task that they had hardly accomplished when
darkness set in. A large fire was then built up and
lighted, a couple of tents—a small one for the three
ladies, and a larger one for the rest of the party—were
quickly constructed of canvas, light spars, and cordage,
which Mr. Hartley and the carpenter had procured from
the wreck. By ten o’clock the ‘camp’ was ready, and
after a very frugal meal they all assembled to prayers,
when Major Pennefeather offered up a hearty thanks-
giving for their merciful preservation. Then all hands
retired to rest, except the ‘watch, who sat up to keep a
look-out and replenish the fire.




CHAPTER XIL

Relates the further Adventures and Experiences of our
Hero, and the other Survivors of the ‘ Marathon’—
A Sailor's Epitaph.

ANHE injury to Nicholas Brodribb’s shoulder
proved to be more serious than Doctor *
Somers hadimagined. Nicholas was certainly



blessed with an excellent constitution, and could stand
a good deal of knocking about; but the exposure he
suffered on the night of the loss of the Marathon was
rather more than he could endure ; on the third evening
after the wreck, fever set in, and for some thirty-six
hours he was in considerable danger.

The doctor and his wife, assisted by the other ladies,
—Mrs. Brydges and Miss Falcon,—nursed the poor lad
with the greatest tenderness, and in the end their care
and attention gained the day. The fever left him, and
he rapidly picked up strength, but a week elapsed before
he was able to take part in the daily work, which Major
Pennefeather and Mr. Hartley insisted should be shared

by all hands alike.
69
70 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

This work consisted of :—firstly, the securing of any
provisions and useful articles, including timber and spars,
that might be washed ashore from the wreck ; secondly,
the erection of wooden and canvas huts to take the place
of the makeshift tents, which afforded very poor shelter
from wind and weather ; thirdly, the construction of a
boat of sufficient size to transport the entire party to the
nearest port.

The work that the party got through, and the
principal articles they saved from the wreck, during
the week that Nicholas was kept ‘on the sick list,’ may
be thus briefly chronicled,

The Marathon, our readers will remember, was lost on
the night of Tuesday the 2oth of July.

On Wednesday, the 21st, the articles enumerated in the
previous chapter, together with two more casks of fresh
water and a quantity of timber, spars, canvas, etc., were se-
cured ; the island was explored ; and a temporary camp
was formed on the spot selected by Major Pennefather.

On Thursday, the 22nd, it blew heavily from the
north-east, from sunrise to sunset, and very little was
done beyond collecting some more timber, and drying
and stacking it for firewood. They spent a very
miserable day, and their spirits sank to zero. During
the evening Doctor Somers reported that Nicholas was
in a dangerous condition, and his report did not tend to
enliven them, for the boy was a great favourite.

On the following day (23rd) they met with better
luck, for they secured three butts of water; a cask of
Stores saved from the Wreck, 71

flour; a small cask of rum; and the Marathon’s dinghy,
which had been thrown up by the tide in a somewhat |
shattered condition. While sitting round the fire that
evening, Bacon, the carpenter, happened to observe that
if he only had a few tools, he might be able to repair the
dinghy, so that it could be used for fishing. It was
then suggested by one of the party, that if they only had
tools and. materials they might build a boat, large
enough and strong enough to convey them all to the
nearest port. The mere idea of the possibility of escap-
ing from the island was eagerly discussed by the sailors,
and though Major Pennefeather and the ship’s officers
did not in their hearts believe that anything would come
of the suggestion, they would not discourage the others
by throwing cold water on it.

On Saturday, the 24th, all hands were astir by day-
break ; for, as a prodigious surf had been rolling in
during the night, they had reason to expect that the
shore would be strewn with wreckage, and so they
determined to work ‘double tides. Nor were they
doomed. to disappointment, for by nightfall they had
added to their stores another butt of fresh water; a
cask of salt beef; five bags of biscuit (damaged) ; several
empty casks and barrels ; a large quantity of planking
and other timber ; and last, but by no means least in
importance, a seaman’s chest containing, besides cloth-
ing, the following articles: —a small axe, a hammer,
chisel, two files and a gimlet; a brace of pistols, with
powder-flask, bullet-mould, and a small screw-driver in
72 Lar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

an oak case ; a clasp-knife ; and four fishing lines, with
hooks, leads, etc., complete.. Great was their joy at the
finding of the chest,—which was recognised as having
belonged to the captain’s steward,—and that night it was
decided that the dinghy should be repaired, and a couple
of huts erected in lieu of the tents.

Sunday was voted a day of rest, and Major Penne-
feather read the morning service, the same as if they had
been on board ship. In the afternoon, while strolling
about at low tide, Raoul Giraud picked up a musket and
bayonet, and a shovel; and other articles, of more or
less use, were found by different members of the party.

On Monday (26) they all went to work again with
renewed vigour, but they now divided their labours;
Mr. Garland, Bacon, and the four soldiers seeing to
the erection of the huts, whilst the rest of the party
—Doctor Somers excepted—continued their search
amongst the rocks and along the shore. Doctor
Somers and the three ladies took charge of the com-
missariat department ; issued provisions, and attended
to the preparing of breakfast, dinner, and supper.

On Tuesday, the labours of the search party were
rewarded by the discovery of a capacious iron cooking-
pot—of which they stood greatly in need; a tin-lined
case containing a portion of the captain’s private sea-
stock, consisting of tea, coffee, cocoa, biscuits, pickles
and various condiments; a double-barrelled fowling-
piece belonging to Major Pennefeather ; and two casks
of tar and another of oil.
Nick's Recovery. 73

That same evening, too, the carpenter reported that
the huts were ready for occupation, and Doctor Somers
took his young patient Nicholas off the sick-list. Two
very important events, which Mr. Hartley did not fail
to chronicle in the log-book !

« The huts were constructed of planks and spars, roofed



in with canvas, and they were pronounced to be a grand
improvement on the tents. ‘

On the following day there was a discovery of a
painful nature, such as greatly marred the satisfaction:
the castaways felt at the success of their exertions to
74 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

render their situation on the desert island more tolerable,
and was moreover a sad reminder of the catastrophe of
which they were the sole survivors. Whilst searching
amongst the rocks on the north side of the island, Mr.
Hartley and two of the sailors came upon the body of
Captain Lucas, sadly bruised and disfigured, but not
beyond recognition. The remains of the kind-hearted
old man were reverently carried to the huts, and a grave
having been dug, they were laid in their last resting-
place; Mr. Hartley reading the burial service over them.
A number of stones and pieces of rock were then piled
upon the grave, and a cross was put up by the carpenter,
upon which were inscribed the deceased’s name and
age, and the date of the loss of the Marathon.

‘ The skipper was a little man, that’s sart’n” observed
one of the sailors, as he turned away from the grave,
‘but he was a gen’leman every inch o’ him, and had a
heart as big as a seventy-four.’

Three days after the recovery and burial of Captain
Lucas’s body, a heavy gale sprang up, and when it abated,
every vestige of the Marathon had disappeared. Strange
to say, after she went to pieces, very little of the wreckage
came ashore, and our friends now felt that they must no
longer count upon increasing their store of provisions,
etc., from that source,

Nevertheless, Major Pennefeather- and Mr. Hartley
insisted on the daily search being continued, for, as they
very wisely remarked, something useful might be picked
Breaking up of the Wreck. 75

up, and, anyhow, it was just as well for every one to be
employed.

They had now collected a very considerable quantity
of timber, planking, spars, etc., of which the best was
set aside as material out of which the projected boat
might be constructed, and the remainder was stacked
to be used for fuel and other purposes. But unfortu-
nately the carpenter could not commence operations,
owing to his want of proper tools, nails, etc; so that it
appeared more than probable that the laying of the
keel would have to be postponed until the ‘Eve of
Saint Tibb ’—that mythical festival which is said to fall
neither before nor after Christmas !




CHAPTER XIII.
A Lucky Find—Pat Murphy makes a Proposal.

@EG your pardon, Misther Brodribb, sorr, but
ist truth that the young Frinch gintleman

MS picked up a pair of ould bellows on the beach
yesterday ?’ asked Pat Murphy of our hero, one morn-
ing some three or four weeks after the events described



in the previous chapter.

‘I believe so, replied Nicholas, who was busily
engaged repairing his only jacket, or rather what -re-
mained of it, with a bit of canvas; for Nick had been
long enough at sea to have learnt how to use a needle—
after a fashion, that is to say! ‘I wasn’t with him at
the time, but I heard him telling Doctor Somers about
it?

‘And d’ye happen to know what he did with thim
same bellows ?’ was Pat’s next question.

‘Indeed I do not, answered Nick. ‘Why do you
ask?’

‘Becase, sorr, hearin’ tell of thim bellows set me

thinkin’? ©
76
Pat Murphy's Proposal. VE

‘Set you thinkin!’ repeated Nicholas, staring at-the
man.

‘Yes, sorr—set me thinkin.

‘What about, pray?’

‘About the toime before I took to the say, your
honour— when I lived at me own home in ould
Ireland.’

‘Then I suppose it was your job to light the fire?’
laughed Nicholas.

‘Well, sir, I did that same purty often,’ rejoined
Murphy good-humouredly; ‘but that’s not exactly
what I was thinkin’ of. It’s this way, your honour—I
used to work at a forge.’

‘Well?’ oe

‘And if it hadn’t been fora bit of a ruction I had
with ‘Mickey Doyle, the praste’s own man, sorr,’ con-
tinued Murphy, ‘why, I might have been a master:
smith at this moment, with a roarin’ trade and as nate
a little house as ye’d find in all Galway,’

‘And what was the ruction between Mr. Doyle and
yourself about?’ asked Nicholas, for the Irishman’s
talk always amused him, and he enjoyed drawing him
out. Se

‘Shure didn’t the big bla’g’ard try to make mischief
*twixt me and Norah Blake!’ said Pat wrathfully.
‘And thin, your honour, we met one foine mornin’ in
Ballymacragg market, and he got jeerin’ at me; and
at last, sorr, I lost me temper, and I just touched
Masther Mickey over the head with a bit of a twig I'd
78 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

got in me hand, and down he tumbled just as if he'd
bin ‘shot.’

‘It must have been a pretty big twig, Pat!’ laughed
Nicholas.

‘Well, sorr, maybe it was,’ admitted Murphy, with a
grin. ‘After that, your honour, he went on, ‘I’d no
pace at all, at all! Father Ryan was down upon me;
Misther Blake—Norah’s father—was down upon me,
and Norah hersilf gave me the cowld shouldher ; so I
jist left me home and went off to Galway to look for
work, and there I got picked up by a pressgang.’

‘ And you've been at sea ever since ?’

‘T have, sorr, worse luck !’ answered Murphy. ‘I was
five years on board of a man-o’-war, and thisis my third
voyage in an Indiaman. But ye’redhrivin’ thim blessed
bellows out of me head, he added. ‘Where did ye say
that young Mossoo put thim?’

‘I said I didn’t know,’ returned Nicholas. ‘But here
comes Monsieur Giraud, so you can ask him. Hold,
Raoul, mon cher!’ he called out, as the Frenchman
came up with Doctor Somers and Miss Falcon. ‘ This
good fellow wants to know what you did with the
bellows you picked up yesterday.’

‘ Comment 2’ said young Giraud, not quite understand-
ing him.

‘What did you do with those old bellows?’ repeated
Nick.

‘Oh, the bellows!’ chimed in Miss Falcon. ‘Why,
M’sieur Giraud gave them to me, and they’re in our
Pat and the Bellows. 79

‘hut. I thought I might be able to mend them, but
they’re past that, I’m afraid.’

‘Beg your pardon, miss,’ said Murphy, with a tug at
his forelock and a scrape of his leg; ‘might I make so
bould as to ask to see thim ?’

‘Certainly, Mr. Murphy. . I will fetch them in a
minute.’ And off ran the young lady, and presently she
returned with a very large and very much dilapidated
pair of bellows.

‘Whe-ew-ew !’ whistled Pat, when he saw their con-
dition. ‘There’s mighty little d/ow lift in them, I’m
thinkin’! But,’ he added, after a closer examination, ‘I
do b’lave I could patch thim up! ’Twould be a great
job if I could!’

‘We have done very well without. them, observed
Doctor Somers. ;

‘True for ye, docthor darlint, retorted Pat; ‘but
maybe we'll do adale betther wzd them! Listhen now
whilst I tell ye, sorr.’

‘Go ahead, my good man,’ said the doctor, shrugging
his shoulders ; ‘ only don’t be too long-winded over it,’

‘You'll observe,’ Murphy resumed, ‘that as I was jest
tellin’ Misther Brodribb, I’m by thrade a blacksmith.’

‘Umph!’ grunted the doctor; ‘pity you didn’t stick
to your trade. ’Twould have been better for you, my
man.

‘Indade, and ye may say that, sorr! But though I
didn’t stick to it, shure I’ve not forgotten it, and maybe
*twould be a good thing if I took’t up again!’ And
80 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

Patrick Murphy looked round at his companions with an
air of triumph. ‘What d’ye think of that, docthor ?’
he continued, after a pause. ‘If I can only mend these
ould bellows, what’s to prevint us buildin’ a bit of a
forge ; and wanst we've a forge, what’s to prevint me
makin’ all the tools and other things that Mr. Bacon
requires ?’

‘Do you mean this, Patrick Murphy?’ gasped the
doctor, almost breathless with astonishment.

‘Why wouldn’t I mane it, sorr? Shure it’s aisy
enough,’ replied the other. ‘I’m purty sart’n we can
mend the bellows, and the forge we can build without
much trouble. We've plenty of ould iron knockin’
about, and there’s the ring and nut of a bower-anchor
as’ll sarve me for ananvil at a pinch. I’ma good smith,
sorr,—though I say it as shouldn’t,—and I can turn out
all that we’re loikely to want for buildin’ the boat we’ve
been talkin’ about so long. Now, Docthor Somers,’ he
concluded, ‘what d’ye say to that?’

‘Say!’ exclaimed the doctor, wringing the honest
fellow’s hand. ‘Why, I say this, Patrick Murphy! If
you succeed in what you propose, you'll be the means
under Providence, of saving our lives ; and if you fail—
well, I’m sure it will not be your fault!’

‘Thank ye, sorr, said Murphy quietly, the tears
welling up into his eyes. ‘I'll do my best for ye all.’
SS
——

$ as a
< ae = —— 2, oy
[ SPQ SI t IBS NS OITAY EDC VAL



CHAPTER XIV.

The Building of the Boat—Hard Times—
A Narrow Escape.

\ATRICK MURPHY had not exaggerated his
skill as asmith. Under his superintendence




; a small forge was erected ; the bellows were
repaired ; and then Pat set manfully to work to furnish
the carpenter with such tools as he declared to be
indispensable, and also with a supply of nails and other
ironwork required in the construction of a boat—the iron
being easily obtained in sufficient quantity, by burning
it out of portions of the wreck.

Hard, indeed, did the honest ‘smith’ labour, and to such
good purpose, that on Thursday, 21st August, the tools,
nails, etc., were ready for use, and on the following morning
the keel of the boat was laid, amidst general rejoicing.

Mr. Hartley, Mr. Garland, and the carpenter had de-
signed the boat between them. Shewas to measure thirty-
six feet over all, with a thirty-two feet keel, and twelve feet
beam, half-decked, and rigged sliding-gunter fashion.

Though the carpenter and the three men who had
F
82 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

volunteered to assist him—they having more or less
knowledge of boat-building—laboured with indefatigable
diligence, the work proceeded very slowly; for the tools,
not being made of very good material, were constantly
getting out of order and often breaking, so Patrick
Murphy had his time pretty well occupied, repairing
sharpening, and replacing them.

Still, if slow, the progress made was sure, until the 5th
September, when the carpenter fell sick. Doctor Somers
looked very grave and shook his head; he had no
medicines whatever, and scarcely knew how to treat his
patient.

‘If poor Bacon had only broken his leg or his arm, or
injured himself so as to require a little surgical skill, I
shouldn’t have minded so much,’ the doctor lamented to
Major Pennefeather, after he had examined his patient ;
‘but I confess that I hardly know what is the matter with
the man, and if I dd know, I’ve no remedies to give him.’

‘It’s a precious bad job,’ observed Mr. Hartley dole-
fully. ‘Just as we were getting on so well with the
boat, too!’

‘Can’t Murphy and Harris go on with the building?’
asked Doctor Somers.

‘No, rejoined the chief officer; ‘they do very well
with Bacon looking after them, but they’re not up to the
work sufficiently to be able to go on without him.’

‘“This sickness doth infect the very life-blood of our
enterprise!”’ quoted Major Pennefeather, with a lame
attempt at cheerfulness. ‘You must do your best for
Lhe Carpenter falls sick. 83

the poor fellow, Somers,’ he added, ‘both for his sake and
ours.’

‘You needn’t tell me that, man, was the doctor’s
testy reply. ‘I always do my best!’

Great, indeed, was the dismay amongst the party
when the gravity of Bacon’s illness became known.
Their lives may be said to have been dependent on his
skill, and now that he was placed hors de combat, with
but slight chance of recovery, their hopes of escaping
from the island went down to zero. The stores saved
from the wreck were running short,—albeit great economy
had been exercised,—and Major Pennefeather, after con-
sulting with the doctor and Mr. Hartley, felt compelled
to reduce the daily allowance of food and water by one-
fourth.

His decision was received with dissatisfaction by three
or four of the sailors and soldiers, but the majority of the
party expressed their readiness to abide by it, and the
murmurings of the malcontents were quickly hushed.

To eke out their store of provisions they now had
recourse to various expedients. The northern and most
rocky side of the island was much frequented by gannets,
and these birds were not very difficult to knock over
with sticks or stones. Their flesh, however, had a rank,
fishy taste, and not even Dr. Somers’ culinary skill (he
was by no means a bad cook) could make it palatable,
but under their present circumstances, the castaways
were only too thankful to add to their daily meal
without drawing upon their stores; so a ‘hunting-party’
84 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

was instituted, and a day rarely passed without a number
of the sea-fowl being slain, cooked, and devoured. They
also on one occasion killed a seal, and cooked a portion of
it for dinner, but those who partook of it were seized with
violent sickness, and the experiment was not repeated.

Fishing was another means they possessed of pro-
curing food, though not in very large quantities - They
had several lines, and soon after the carpenter was taken
ill, Mr. Hartley and Murphy constructed a ‘catamaran’
or raft, just large enough to carry two persons, and this
was taken out every day when the weather permitted.

One day, Mr. Garland and Nicholas Brodribb, when
out on the raft, had a very narrow escape of being driven
out to sea. It was on the 19th September, and they had
been fishing with more than ordinary success since the
early morning, when towards four o’clock the wind
suddenly freshened from the westward ; they were then
about half-a-mile to the east of the island.

‘We must be off, Nick!’ exclaimed Mr. Garland,
hauling in his line. ‘Up with the anchor!’

The ‘anchor’—a somewhat curious-looking arrange-
ment, the handiwork of Patrick Murphy—was quickly
weighed, and, seizing their paddles, they made for the
shore. But they soon found that, instead of making way,
they could scarcely hold their own against the wind, and,
after plying their paddles with all their might and main
for twenty minutes or more, they saw to their dismay
that they were drifting away from the shore.

‘Nick,’ gasped Mr. Garland, nearly exhausted by his
An Awkward Situation. 85

exertions, ‘ what’s to be done? . We're just going leeward
like a haystack!’

‘Suppose we cast anchor again, sir?’ suggested our hero.

‘It will drag to a certainty,’ was the reply.

‘Anyhow, we shan’t drift faster than we’re doing at
present,’ rejoined Nicholas, ‘so over it goes!’ and, suiting
the action to the word, he dropped the anchor overboard.
‘ Now, Mr. Garland, he cried, seizing his paddle again,
‘pull like fury !’ =

Redoubling their exertions, they paddled away for
dear life, and, with the help of the anchor, succeeded in
checking the drifting of the raft.

In the meanwhile, their friends on the island, seeing
their peril, were trying to devise some means of assisting
them, and, after several plans had been suggested, briefly
discussed, and rejected, one of the sailors suddenly be-
thought him of the dinghy, which was then laid up near
the huts, awaiting repair,

‘If we could only get her afloat,’ said he, ‘we might
pull off to the raft and either tow it ashore or else bring
back Mr, Garland and Mr. Brodribb in the boat, and let
the raft go adrift.’

‘Tare an’ ages, man!’ interrupted Patrick Murphy,
who was in a state of anxious excitement owing to the
perilous position of his young favourite, ‘ Misther Nick,’
and would have swum out to his assistance had not his
companions restrained him ; ‘what's the use of talkin
loike that? How would we be gettin’ the dinghy afloat,
86 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

when she just leaks loike a sieve? Betther let me swim
out to thim, your honour,’ he added, appealing to Major
Pennefeather ; ‘shure I’d do’t in no time.’

‘Supposing you did, Murphy, replied the major
kindly, ‘what use would you be? The raft couldn’t bear
another passenger, you know. We should only have to
report the loss of three good friends instead of two!’

‘No, Pat, it won’t do, put in Mr. Hartley, laying his
hand on the man’s shoulder. ‘We can’t spare you.’

‘ The dinghy leaks a goodish bit, true enough, gentle-
men,’ said the-.sailor Harris—he who had been the
carpenter’s chief assistant in building the boat,— but.
give me twenty minutes, and I’ll undertake to patch her
up and make her tight enough for this job. Mr. Bacon
had aturn at her at odd times afore he went sick, and
she’s not so bad as Pat Murphy thinks,’

Mr. Hartley looked at the major. ‘Shall we try it ?’
said he doubtfully.

‘It appears to be the sole chance we have of saving
them,’ answered Major Pennefeather.

So, assuming from this reply that his project was
approved of, Harris started off to the huts, followed by
Patrick Murphy, and in a very few minutes they were
both hard at work patching up the dinghy.

In less than half an hour the dinghy was ready to put
off, and the question now arose, ‘Who was to go in her?’
—or we should rather say, ‘Who was of to go in her?’
for every man present was anxious to venture out to the
assistance of Mr. Garland and Nick; but Mr. Hartley,
Who ts to go? 87

well aware that it was a service of no little danger, ex-
pressed his intention of going himself. Now the worthy
chief officer was a gentleman of stalwart proportions,
and, even after a month’s ‘low diet, he weighed an
honest fourteen stone; whilst, in her present crazy con-
dition, the less weight the dinghy carried the more likely
was she to accomplish her perilous trip in safety, so his
decision was received with dismay by his companions.

‘I humbly beg your honour’s pardon,’ said Patrick
Murphy, after an awkward pause; ‘but don’t ye think
now, sort, that ye’d betther let me go?’

‘Why?’ asked Mr. Hartley, who had already begun
to divest himself of coat and vest.

‘Becase, your honour—becase, sorr,’ stammered Pat,
fidgeting with his cap, for he knew that Mr. Hartley was
rather ‘touchy’ about his size,—‘ becase, Misther Hartley,
—no offence meant, sorr!—ye’re just a trifle—the least
bit in the world, ye know—but still a trifle heavier than
I am, sorr, and’—

‘The less weight the dinghy has in her the better,
interposed Major Pennefeather. ‘That is what you
mean—eh, Murphy?’

‘Shure your honour’s just hit it!’ was the Irishman’s
reply.

‘You see, gentlemen,’ Harris struck in, ‘though we’ve
done our best to make the boat water-tight, still there’s
no doubt she'll make a goodish drop of water, so I’m
afeard two o’ us ’ll have to go in her—one to pull, t’other
to keep her afloat by baling; and, in course, it stands to
88 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

reason, we’d best send the lightest weights among us,
They'll be Pat Murphy and th’ young French gen’leman,
I’m thinkin’’

‘I understand, Harris,’ answered Mr. Hartley; add-
ing, ‘Why couldn’t Murphy have explained that at once,
instead of beating about the bush?’

‘You're willing to go, Raoul?’ asked Major Penne-
feather, turning to the Frenchman.

‘ Mais certainment, m’sieur,; replied Raoul, who was
just beginning to understand a little English.

The dinghy was then launched without further parley,
and Murphy and young Giraud jumped into her.

‘Hilloa!’ exclaimed Mr. Garland, when he saw the
dinghy put off from the shore. ‘What are they up to, I
wonder ?’

‘Coming off to our assistance, I suppose, sir,’ said
Nicholas. ‘But what they’re
it’s the old dinghy.’

‘It is indeed, rejoined his companion. ‘ How they’ll
keep her afloat is more than I can imagine. That fine



why, sir, I do believe

fellow Patrick Murphy is pulling her, and there appears
to be somebody else stooping down in the stern-sheets.
Can you see who it is?’

‘I think it’s Raoul Giraud, sir, replied Nicholas, after a
good look. ‘Yes—I’m sure itis. He’s baling out the boat’

‘Heaven protect them!’ ejaculated Mr. Garland.
‘They’re risking their lives to save ours. But keep
paddling, Nick my son, or we shall have the anchor
The Rescue. 89

dragging, and we mustn’t let those gallant fellows pull a
yard further than we can help.’

The wind being in his favour, Patrick Murphy soon
reached the raft, but, quick as they were, the dinghy
would have been half full of water if Raoul had stopped
baling. Mr. Garland and Nicholas were by this time
pretty well exhausted with their exertions in keeping the
raft from drifting ; for though the anchor Still held, it
certainly would have dragged had they not relieved the
strain upon it by paddling.

‘Thank you, Pat!’ cried Mr. Garland, when the dinghy
came alongside; ‘and you, too, Monsieur Giraud. We
shall owe you our lives if we get safe back to the shore.’

‘ Arrah, not at all, sorr!’ retorted Murphy ; ‘shure ’tis
a plisure to be of sarvice to you and Misther Nick.
Now, sorr, he went on, ‘shall we tow you ashore, or will
ye come into the boat?’

Mr. Garland looked doubtfully at the dinghy. ‘I’m
afraid,’ said he, ‘that our extra weight will sink you. It
seemed to be as much as you could manage to keep
afloat without us.’

‘Faix! an’ ye may say that, Misther Garland,’
answered Pat. ‘The young gintleman’s nivir stopped
baling for a blessed moment. Ye’d best remain on the
raft, and I’ll tow ye back as aisy as nothin’?

‘I think that will be the better plan, for the dinghy
would certainly not carry us all in her present condition,’
assented the other. ‘We shall have to stick to the
90 LTar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

paddles, though, Nick,’ he added, ‘or else this good fellow
can never make head against the wind.’

‘I’m ready, sir,’ rejoined Nicholas. ‘Shall I haul up
the anchor?’

‘Yes,’ answered Mr. Garland. ‘We must use our cable
as a tow-rope.’

The anchor was then hauled up and detached from
the ‘cable, which was passed twice or thrice round the
after thwart of the dinghy, and made fast—the slack of
the rope being carefully coiled down. Murphy bent to
his sculls, Mr. Garland and Nicholas once more plied
their paddles, and the return journey commenced.

It was a desperate hard pull, and the odds were heavy
against their ever reaching the shore.

Patrick Murphy rowed as surely never sailor rowed
before or since. Mr. Garland and our hero paddled and
paddled with all their might and main; whilst Raoul
Giraud never ceased baling for a moment. Slowly—
oh, how slowly !—they approached the island. Their
progress was watched with intense anxiety by their
comrades. ‘They’ll never do it!’ cried some. ‘Yes,
they will!’ exclaimed others. ‘ Pat will never give in!’

And Pat didn’t give in. On he pulled for dear life,
and at length his dogged courage triumphed, and he
brought both dinghy and raft safe to land.

‘A near squeak, sir, said Nicholas, as he and Mr.
Garland scrambled ashore.

‘Too near to be pleasant, retorted the officer. I
don’t think you'll catch me on that raft again?
SSS aan
PASE Ere POT A

SSN

Sra



N
BSS

i
ie

CHAPTER XV.

Relates how the Carpenter paid his Debt to Nature; and
how Major Pennefeather and his Friends quelled an
Attempt to Mutiny.

Mr. Garland and Nicholas Brodribb, Bacon
the carpenter died. From the first, Doctor
d despaired of the poor fellow’s recovery, and
had more than once expressed surprise at his lasting so
long ; nevertheless the announcement of his death came
quite as a shock to the rest of the party. It must be con-
fessed that they felt the loss of the carvfenter more than
they did the loss of the maz, for now they had no hope
of the boat that was to carry them back to civilisation
ever being finished, and there were amongst them ‘certain
fellows of the baser sort’ who chose to make this trouble
an excuse for open grumbling—grumbling that was, in
fact, next door to mutinous language. These men
began to complain noisily of what they were pleased
to term their miserable situation, and declared that they
would no longer accept sus: scanty rations.


92 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

‘It ain’t no manner o’ use starvin’ ourselves,’ said a
sailor, Jackson by name, who had constituted himself
ringleader of the malcontents, and had for some time
past been plotting against Major Pennefeather’s author-
ity. ‘We'll never get away from this place, so what I
say is—let’s go in for a short life and a merry un!’

‘Hear! hear!’ cried those of his companions who
were of a kindred spirit.

‘Them’s my sentiments, mates,’ continued Jackson,
encouraged by their applause. ‘Here we've got prog
and liquor enough to last us a month or more, eatin’
and drinkin’ as much as we pleases ; and I for one ’tend
eatin’ and drinkin’ as much as I pleases for the future!’

‘Good again !’ exclaimed his friends,

‘What I says is,’ Jackson went on, waxing bolder,
‘why shouldn’t us? Why should us knock under to
Major Pennefeather and them two mates?’

‘Ay, that’s the question!’ chimed in one of the
soldiers, a hangdog-looking rascal from the purlieus
of Westminster. ‘Why should us?’

‘We're the strongest party, shipmates, pursued
Jackson, ‘and I’m ready and willin’ to’—

‘H’sh, mate,’ interrupted a sailor, whose bump of
caution was rather more strongly developed than was
the redoubtable Jackson’s, ‘Here be Job Harris, and
ye knows he don’t agree with us,’

‘No, he doesn’t—sart’n sure!’ exclaimed Harris, who
had overheard the greater part of their conversation.
‘Not by no manner o’ means, Job Harris don’t agree

©
Serving out a Mutineer. 93

with you, nor ain’t likely to, neither! A precious lot
of rascals you be! So ye’re the strongest party, be
you?’ he added, addressing Jackson, and at the same
time turning up his shirt-sleeves. ‘Very good! Now
look ye, Tom Jackson, ye’ve had your say, now I’m a-
going to have mine; and, first and foremost, I’ll just
ask ye a question.’

‘Ask away, mate,’
returned Jackson,
with an uneasy laugh.

‘D’ye remember the
second night we lay in
Table Bay ?’ inquired
Harris, drawing closer
to him ; ‘ you, like the
coward that ye are,
struck one of the boys “
across the mouth—
you remember that?
Well, Tom Jackson, I
remember it too; but
to prewent that there
sarcumstance ’scapin’ from our mem’ries, why, I’m a-
goin’ to take the liberty of givin’ ye just such another
thrashin’ as I give ye that evenin’!’

And, without another word, Harris fell upon Jackson,
and pounded him until the wretched man went down
on his marrow-bones and roared for mercy. At first,
Jackson’s cronies seemed inclined to interfere in -his


94 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

behalf, but it happened that, at that moment, Major
Pennefeather, the two officers, and Nick, Raoul Giraud,
and Murphy, put in an appearance, so they slunk back,
and left their leader to his fate, thinking, no doubt, that
this was a case where discretion was the better part of
valour.

‘That'll do, Harris, at length said Major Pennefeather,
‘He’s had enough for the present. Which is the other
man you mentioned ?’

‘This be he, your honour—Private Sims,’ rejoined
Harris, giving Jackson a parting kick, and then collaring
the Westminster recruit: ‘He’s been a-grumblin’ these
three weeks, and shirkin’ work whenever he could.’

‘Now, Private Sims, you have been a soldier long
enough to know that discipline must be maintained,’
said the major; ‘and that, under all circumstances,
insubordination is severely punished, both in the army
and navy. I therefore take it upon myself—as a major
in His Majesty’s Marine Corps, and, consequently, your
superior officer—to order you two dozen lashes. Seize
him up, Harris!’

‘What’s my crime, if you please, sir?’ asked the now
trembling Sims.

‘Insubordinate language, and inciting others to
mutiny,’ was the reply.

‘But I ain’t in the King’s service, expostulated the
terrified wretch. ‘I’m a ’Onourable Company’s soldier,
I am; and you've no manner o’ bis’ness to flog me.’

‘No,’ interposed one of Mr. Sims’ comrades, ‘you ain’t
The Mutiny quelled, 95

got no right wotsumever to touch ‘im, major. You
ain’t our commanding officer !’

‘That’s a point we'll reserve for future discussion,’
coolly replied Major Pennefeather. ‘In the meanwhile,
understand that it is my intention to flog Private Sims ;
and as you, Private Williams, have thought fit to ques-
tion my authority, I now order you to administer the
punishment. Silence, sir! Not another word.’

Major Pennefeather’s determined attitude completely
cowed the would-be mutineers. Sims suffered himself
to be tied up to a post, and Williams, at the word of
command, administered two dozen lashes on his bare
back, with a rope’s end.

‘Cast him loose, Murphy, said the major, when the
punishment had been inflicted; ‘and, mark you, my
lads, if I hear any more of this nonsense, it will be the
worse for you!’

The severe punishment inflicted on Jackson and Sims
had the effect of putting a stop to all open grumbling,
but Major Pennefeather and Mr. Hartley thought it
better to be on their guard, so all the arms, ammunition,
and provisions were removed into the ladies’ hut, and
one of the ‘party of order’ was in future detailed every
day and every night to do ‘sentry-go’ over them.

Thus another month passed away, without anything
happening worthy of record, except that Harris and
Murphy set to and repaired the dinghy, making her
perfectly water-tight and seaworthy ; and, after that, she
was used, whenever the weather permitted, for fishing.






CHAPTER XVI.

Introduces William Ashcroft, A.B., and relates how he
confided the Story of his Life to our Hero.

Ay HERE was a man among those who escaped
to the island when the Marathon was wrecked,

<3 an able seaman, William Ashcroft by name,
who had joined the ship at Cape Town, in the place of
a quarter-master, lost overboard a few days before she
anchored in Table Bay.

During the brief period that he served on board the
Marathon—that is to say, from the day he engaged, until
her loss—though he proved himself to be a thorough
sailor, and one who never shirked work nor danger, Ash-.
croft did not very favourably impress those with whom
he was brought in contact. He was a middle-aged,
melancholy-looking man, of an unusually taciturn and
to all appearance surly disposition ; but it was remarked
by Mr. Hartley, and one or two others, that whenever
Ashcroft replied to a question, or had occasion to speak
to any officer or passenger, his language was superior to
that of the ordinary run of poucmast hands.


William Ashcroft. 97

Of William -Ashcroft’s antecedents very little was
known, beyond the fact that he had been a sailor from
his youth; that he had married a Cape Dutchwoman ;
had lived several years in South Africa; and that he
now took to a seafaring life again in consequence of his
wife’s death. When Jackson, Sims, and the other dis-
contented spirits showed a disposition to mutiny, Ash-
croft refused to have anything to do with them, but then
he did not side openly with the officers; he simply kept
aloof from both parties, and continued to perform his
share of the daily work, and accepted his daily allowance
of food and drink, without saying a word—good, bad, or
indifferent. It may, therefore, be easily understood that
this strange man was ‘boycotted’ by the malcontents,
and regarded with a certain amount of suspicion by the
rest of the little community.

Now it chanced one fine day, five or six weeks after
the ‘Jackson émeute, that it came to William Ashcroft’s
turn to go fishing in the dinghy, along with our young
friend Nicholas Brodribb—an arrangement that did not
particularly please Master Nick, who would have pre-
ferred a more sociable companion.

‘Pleasant sort of a chap to spend half-a-dozen hours
with!’ growled the boy, looking after Ashcroft, as he made
his way down to the beach. ‘He won't talk, and he won’t
listen, and as to getting a “yarn” out of him, why, you
might as well try to pump water out of a rock!’

‘Of whom are you speaking, Nick?’ inquired Dr.

Somers, overhearing his remarks.
G
98 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

‘Of that queer chap Ashcroft, answered Nick. ‘I’ve
got to go fishing with him to-day. Pretty lively look-
out for me, isn’t it, doctor?’

‘There’s no harm in the man,’ returned Dr. Somers.
‘I have watched him carefully, and now feel sure that
we have misjudged him,’

‘But he never speaks,’ said Nick, in an injured tone.

‘Well, retorted the doctor, with a sly smile, ‘there are
many people who consider silence to be a virtue rather
than a fault. You mustn’t condemn a man because he
doesn’t give free play to his tongue, Master Nick.’

‘Then he wouldn’t show his colours when Jackson
and his crew kicked up a row,’ was our hero’s next
objection. ‘You can’t defend him for that, sir,’

“No, admitted the doctor; ‘I can’t, and I don’t
intend to. Still,” he added, ‘it is my opinion that
Ashcroft is a well-meaning man at heart, but that some
trouble—probably the death of his wife—has unhinged
his mind, and made him morose and averse to associat-
ing with any one. And now be off with you, Nick, and
try to make the best of the poor fellow.’

So Nick trotted down to the beach, and, having got
the dinghy afloat, he and Ashcroft pulled round to the
north side of the island, and dropped anchor some five
hundred yards from the shore. Then they got out their
lines, and fished away in silence for a couple of hours or
more, until Nicholas could stand it no longer.

‘I say, my good fellow, do you never talk?’ said he
at last, in desperation.
Nick's Conversation with Ashcroft. 99

‘Sometimes I do, young gentleman,’ replied Ashcroft,
with a sad smile; ‘that is, when I have anything to talk
about.’

‘Well, don’t you think that you might think of some-
thing to talk about now?’ returned Nicholas ; ‘for it is
precious slow work sitting in the boat like a couple of
mutes—at least J find it so! You must have seen a
good deal in your time, you know.’

‘Yes, Mr. Brodribb, I have seen a good deal, and
suffered a good deal too,’ answered his companion, with
a sigh.

‘Well, then, couldn’t you spin me a yarn, or tell me
something about the Cape?’ |

‘No, I cannot spin you a yarn—I have almost for-
gotten how! As for telling you about the Cape—well,
first let me ask you a question or two.’

‘Ask away, said our hero. ‘I’m ready to answer as
many questions as you please. Go ahead!’

‘Very good, Mr. Brodribb,’ rejoined Ashcroft, smiling
again, and this time his smile was rather more cheerful.
‘Perhaps you can tell me what is Mr. Hartley’s opinion
as to the situation of our island?’

‘Why, to tell the truth, Ashcroft, he’s a bit doubtful
on that point,’ Nicholas answered, ‘but he believes we’re
between 30° and 31° south and 35° and 36° east, and
something like four hundred miles south-east of the
Portuguese settlements at Delagoa Bay. That’s the
bay, you know, for which we should have shaped our
course had that blessed boat ever been built.’
100 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

‘T’can’t help thinking that Mr. Hartley is mistaken,’
said Ashcroft, after a few minutes’ reflection. ‘He may
be, and probably is, right as to the latitude, but his
longitude is wrong, for we cannot be nearly so far east
as 36°. In fact, it is my firm impression that we’re not
more than forty, or, at the outside, fifty miles from the
mainland.’

‘What makes you think so?’ inquired Nicholas, who
was not a little surprised—and, we may add, exultant—
at his success in ‘drawing out’ the taciturn Ashcroft.

‘Do you recollect that, a month or six weeks ago, we
noticed a heavy column of smoke right away to the
west’ard ?’

‘Yes, to be sure I do,’ Nick responded. ‘Mr. Hartley
thought it was a ship on fire, and no doubt it was.’

‘On the contrary, Mr. Brodribb, there can be no doubt,
it was mot a ship on fire! Since then I have thrice seen
smoke rising above the horizon, exactly in the same
direction, and it is against all common sense to suppose
that four different ships could have been burnt on, or
about, the same spot, within such short periods of one
another. No, my young friend ; that smoke arose from
a large fire lighted on some prominent point of the coast,
and, as we so clearly saw it, the coast cannot be more
than fifty miles distant’

‘By George! I shouldn’t wonder but what you're
right, exclaimed Nicholas, staring hard at his companion.
‘ Anyhow your notion about the fires seems to be pretty
correct.’
Ashcrofes S tory. IOI

‘T don’t think I’m far out in my reckoning,’ rejoined
Ashcroft. ‘We’re within fifty miles of the Caffrarian
_ coast, and I suspect that the nearest point of land
lies about half-way between Natal Bay and the St.
Christopher river.’

‘You know the coast well, then ?’

‘T have reason to, answered Ashcroft, his face cloud-
ing. ‘Come,’ he added, after a short pause, ‘now that I
have broken the ice, I may as well tell you my story—
that is, if you care to hear it’

‘Of course I do!’ responded Nick; ‘only don’t tell
me anything if it pains you. I—I shouldn’t like to—
to’

‘I understand you, my boy,’ interrupted Ashcroft,
laying his hand on Nick’s arm. ‘Mine zs a painful story,
but I think it will do me good to confide in you. In
fact, I feel that, in keeping aloof from you all, I have
acted wrongly—selfishly ; and no doubt have drawn
suspicion upon myself.’



‘That you certainly have, Ashcroft,’ was our hero’s
candid response. ‘I, for one, have always fought shy
of you.’

‘Well, I brought it upon myself, no doubt,’ said
Ashcroft. ‘But I will try and make amends in the
future. Now, go on with your fishing, and listen to my
story. In the first place,’ he began, ‘let me tell you
that twelve years ago I held a lieutenant’s commission
in the Honourable Company’s Bombay Navy, and
commanded the Raven sloop, mounting ten guns.. In
102 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

November ’81 I was severely wounded in an action with
three of Hyder Ali’s vessels off Mangalore, and on my
return to Bombay, the doctors pronounced me to be
unfit for further service, so they invalided me, and a free
passage to England was provided for me and for my
wife—to whom I had been lately married—in the
Grosvenor East Indiaman.

‘We sailed from Bombay early in June ’82, and had a
fairly prosperous voyage until we arrived off the South
African coast, when a violent storm arose, and the
Grosvenor, being dismasted and becoming unmanage-
able, was on the 4th August driven ashore near the river
St. Christopher—or the “Endless River,” as it is some-
times called.

‘Of the crew and passengers, about one hundred and
twenty persons, including my wife and myself, reached
the shore in safety ; the rest perished with the wreck.

‘We remained several days near the scene of the
disaster, without shelter of any description, and but very
little food. Hundreds of Caffres swarmed down to the
shore, and, seeing that we were almost defenceless, they
attempted to plunder us of the few things we had saved
from the wreck, and even tried to carry off some of the
women and children. We beat them back repeatedly,
but they became the more troublesome and daring, and
we soon saw that it would be impossible to hold our own
against the hordes which surrounded us.

‘It was then resolved that we should endeavour to
make our way on foot to the Dutch settlements at
Ashcroft's Story. 103

Mossel Bay,—an almost hopeless undertaking, but still,
just affording us a possibility of saving our lives and
liberty ; whereas, if we remained where we were, death
or captivity must assuredly be our lot. So early in
the morning we put the women and children in our
midst, and started off on our perilous journey. The
Caffres made one attempt to stop us, but they desisted
when we showed fight, and returned to the plundering
of the wreck.

‘I cannot describe to you the perils and hardships of
that terrible journey. Hardly a day passed but we had
to deplore the loss of one or more of our number ; and,
as our miseries increased, we the survivors almost envied
those who had found their last resting-place in the
trackless desert.

‘My poor wife was one of the first to succumb. She
died from sheer exhaustion on the fourth day of January,
and we buried her in the sand. Her untimely death
was a terrible shock to me; my mind became quite
unhinged ; it seemed as if my interest in life was gone
for ever; and, but for the watchfulness and devotion of
two of my companions, I should have remained behind.
to die beside the grave which contained the remains of
the wife I had loved so well.

‘For days and weeks, continued Ashcroft, after a
short pause, ‘we toiled onwards; beset by wild beasts,
by howling savages, by hunger and thirst, by the King
of Terrors in a hundred ghastly forms; until at length,
when almost at the last gasp, a remnant of our company
104 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

—a mere remnant, with no woman or child amongst us,
for they had all perished, or else had been carried off by
the Caffres—reached Ralfontein, a Dutch farm not many
miles from Mossel Bay. The owner of the farm, Piet
Van Ryn, was. a kind-hearted, liberal man, and he and
his family received us with great kindness, supplied our
immediate wants, and promised to send us on to Mossel
Bay in waggons.

‘Up to this time I had suffered less than my com-
panions from the hardships we had undergone, and was
to-all appearance the strongest and most healthy of the
party ; but now I broke down completely, and on the
morning after our arrival at Ralfontein, I was seized
with a violent fever, which quickly brought me to death’s
door. It was, of course, impossible that I could be
moved, so my companions set out for Mossel Bay with-
out me, and I was left to the care of the Van Ryns, who
nursed me as carefully as if I had been their own son.
Three months elapsed before I was in a fit condition to
think of quitting the farm, and when at last I proposed
doing so, Piet Van Ryn, his wife, sons, and daughters
pressed-me to take up my abode with them altogether.
Having no ties in England, and very little prospect of
obtaining any employment there, I thankfully accepted
my generous host’s offer of a home and a living; and at
the end of a twelvemonth I married his eldest daughter,
and so became one of the family. By settling amongst
the Dutch in South Africa, I forfeited my claims to
half-pay or pension; in fact, I have never once com-
Ashcroft's Story. 105

municated with my agents, or reported my existence to
the authorities, so in all probability I have long since
been considered as dead.

‘For eight years I and my family lived at the farm,
contented and happy ; then trouble came upon us like a
thunderbolt. It was in the autumn of ’90 that I went
down to Mossel Bay on business, my wife and one of
our children accompanying me. During our absence, a
band of Caffres attacked Ralfontein, killed my father-in-
law and his three sons, burnt the farm and buildings,
destroyed the crops, and carried off the rest of the family,
including my two other children, and all our cattle and
horses. An expedition was at once organised to pursue
the marauders, but they had too good a start of us, and,
after undergoing much hardship and encountering many
perils, we were compelled to return to Mossel Bay with-
out having accomplished our object, or even learned any
tidings of the lost ones.

‘After this calamity I went to live at Cape Town, and
for a time managed to earn just sufficient to keep my
wife and child respectably; but misfortune: dogged
my footsteps. I lost my situation through the death
of my employer, and, not having saved any money, we
were soon reduced almost to beggary. Then my child
sickened and died, and my poor wife only survived him
a few. months, I buried her the very day that the
Marathon anchored in Table Bay,’

‘Yours is indeed a sad story, Mr. Ashcroft,’ said
Nicholas, as his companion ceased speaking, and, over-
106 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

come with emotion, covered his face with his hands. ‘1
am sure that if the major and the other gentlemen heard
it, they would feel very differently towards you,

‘They shail hear it, rejoined William Ashcroft, re-
covering his composure. ‘I have acted foolishly in
concealing my former position, and keeping aloof from
the very persons who would, no doubt, have treated me
with every consideration; but when I engaged with
Captain Lucas, I was in a state of mind bordering on
insanity, and I had vowed to myself to’—

‘But what made you go before the mast?’ interposed
Nicholas; ‘surely you might have done better than
that.’

‘It was a sudden impulse,’ replied Ashcroft; ‘I
chanced to hear that the Marathon required a hand,
and so I got an acquaintance of mine to recommend
me. My chief object was to get away from Cape Town,
and all that reminded me of my recent sorrow. But
enough of this!’ he exclaimed. ‘I must now put aside
the past, and think of the future.’

‘It’s not a very lively future to think about, if we’re to
spend the remainder of our days on that blessed island,
grunted Nick.

_ ‘True, my lad, rejoined Ashcroft ; ‘but we must hope
for the best, and not despair. I shall to-night speak to
Major Pennefeather and Mr. Hartley, and endeavour to
convince them that we are much nearer the African
Coast than they have hitherto supposed. I shall also
suggest, he added, ‘that some of us take the dinghy and
Ashcroft's Story. 107

make for the mainland. It is quite possible that we
might fall in with a vessel that would take us off the
island, and anyway we shall be able to procure a small
supply of food.’ :

‘That’s a capital notion, Mr. Ashcroft, said Nick
approvingly,—‘an excellent notion! What a pity you
did not think of it before !’

‘Better late than never, returned Ashcroft, with
rather a shamefaced expression. ‘Up to the present I
have not done my duty by my companions in mis-
fortune ; I will now try to make up for it. Suppose we
“up anchor” and get back to the island?’

‘With all my heart, assented Nicholas. ‘We have
caught plenty of fish, and may as well return. I am
anxious to hear what Mr. Hartley and the major will
say to your proposal.’




CHAPTER XVII.

Relates how Nicholas Brodribb, and Others of the
Shipwrecked Company, proceeded on a Voyage of
Discovery.

Â¥9,T was the second evening after William Ash-
croft’s conversation with our hero, and Major
Pennefeather, Mr. Hartley, and the other
gentlemen of the company were seated in solemn
conclave.

That morning Ashcroft had made his officers ac-
quainted with his strange story, had expressed his opinion
as to the true situation of the island, and had suggested
the advisability of sending away the dinghy to the
mainland on the chance of obtaining assistance—
which suggestion had been very favourably received
by Mr. Hartley—and they were now discussing ways
and means.

‘Having settled that the boat is to be sent on a
voyage of discovery, the next question is, who shall go
in her?’ said Doctor Somers. ‘That, I take it, is a
most important question.’



108
The Proposed Voyage discussed. 1cQ

‘True, doctor, assented Major Pennefeather. ‘We
must divide our forces so as not to give Messieurs
Jackson and Company a majority, either in the dinghy
or on the island.’

‘And it is my humble opinion,’ said Mr. Hartley,
‘that the command of the dinghy should be given to
Mr. Ashcroft. He knows more about the coast than
any of us do, and therefore will be the right man in the
right place. What say you, Ashcroft ?’

An expression of satisfaction lighted up William
Ashcroft’s face at this proof of his officer’s confidence in
him, and he replied that he was ready to go, either in
comimand, or as one of the crew.

‘Then look ye here, my friends, broke in Doctor
Somers; ‘let Ashcroft take command, as Hartley
suggests, and send young Brodribb, Monsieur Giraud,
and that mutinous rascal Jackson with him.’

‘But why should we send Jackson, doctor?’ asked
Mr. Garland, in a tone of surprise.

‘Because, my very good friend, the fellow still exer-
cises a bad influence over his shipmates, and the sooner
we're rid of him; the better for them and for us, was
the reply. ‘While Jackson remains amongst the men,
there'll be discontent in the camp,—discontent that may
any day break into open mutiny, and lead to bloodshed,
—so it would be folly to miss such an opportunity of
getting him away for a time.’

‘You're. quite right, Doctor Somers,’ said William
Ashcroft approvingly. ‘The two lads and I can very
110 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

well keep Master Jackson in order; and once he’s out
of the island, depend upon it, the other men will haul
down their colours, and be thankful to be taken into
favour again.’

‘Very true, assented Mr. Hartley. ‘There can be no
doubt that they have been led away by him. He’s a
regular “sea-lawyer.”’

‘Then, gentlemen,’ continued Ashcroft, looking round
the little group; ‘do you decide to act upon Doctor
Somers’ suggestion ?’

‘Certainly, answered Major Pennefeather, speaking
for the rest. ‘That is, he added, with a smile, ‘if our
young friends, Monsieur Giraud and Nick, are willing
to go. What say you, boys?’

‘Of course I’ll go, sir,’ rejoined Nicholas; ‘and so
will Giraud—eh, Raoul?’

‘ Mais certainement !’ replied the young Frenchman.

‘Then that is settled, said Major Pennefeather.
‘Now, when do you propose to start, Mr. Ashcroft?’

‘Well, major, Ashcroft answered, ‘Harris and Pat
Murphy undertake to have the necessary alterations
and repairs to the dinghy completed by Thursday
night, and I don’t think we can do better than decide
to take advantage of the first fine morning after that.
Do you approve?’

‘Certainly I do, responded the major. ‘And I
should suggest,’ he added, ‘ that our intention of sending
Jackson as one of your crew be kept from him and his
companions until the morning of your departure. He
The Voyage of the Dinghy. III

is pretty sure to object, but we'll not give him the
chance of parading his grievance.’

This suggestion being unanimously approved of,
the meeting broke up.

The next three days were spent in making prepara-
tions. The dinghy was fitted with a mast and lugsail,
topsides were added to her, and a couple of empty
barricos were secured under the centre thwart to give
her buoyancy, and lessen the risk of her sinking should
she fill with water. A sufficient quantity of provisions
and water to last the crew ten days was stowed away,
and arms were also provided; a musket and a pair of
pistols, with six charges for each, and a cutlass and two
boarding pikes.

At daybreak on the third morning after the dinghy
was pronounced to be ready for the voyage, William
Ashcroft aroused his companions, and informed them
that the weather was in every way suitable to put to
sea; it being a glorious day, with a pleasant breeze
blowing from a most favourable quarter, the south-
west. By five o'clock the dinghy was ready for
launching, and as soon as they had finished breakfast,
Ashcroft, Nicholas, and the young Frenchman prepared
to start. Jackson was then informed that he was to
go with them, and Mr, Hartley allowed him twenty
-minutes to get ready. At first the ill- conditioned
fellow appeared inclined to refuse to obey orders, but
the ‘loyal party’ mustered in full force, and had
possessed themselves of all the arms, so he just picked
112 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

up a ragged pea-jacket, and swaggered off to the beach,
with an ill-feigned air of doing that which was in every
way agreeable to his feelings, and by no means com-
pulsory; whilst his comrades looked on with indif-
ference, evidently not caring one jot whether he went
away in the boat or remained on the island.

‘I thought as much, major, said Ashcroft in an
under-tone, as he took his place in the dinghy ; ‘ they’re
tired of that fellow, and glad to be rid of him! You'll
have no more trouble with them, I’ll warrant,

‘I don’t think we shall,’ rejoined Major Pennefeather,
shaking the ex-lieutenant’s hand. ‘Bon voyage, my
friends!’

‘Good luck go with you, cried Doctor Somers.
‘Give them three cheers, lads!’

Officers and men responded heartily to the doctor’s
suggestion ; after which the dinghy was shoved off, and
Nicholas and Jackson rowed her out four or five hundred
yards from the shore, when Ashcroft bade them lay in
their oars and hoist the sail. He then took the helm
and steered a north-westerly course, his intention being
to make the Natal river, where it was possible—if not
probable—that they might fall in with some Dutch
coasting vessel from the Cape or Mossel Bay, whose
skipper would be willing to return with them to the
island, and take off the shipwrecked company.


CHAPTER XVIII.

Gives some Account of the Dinghy’s Voyage, and shows
how it ended.

\PRNCARLY on the morning of Tuesday, sth
1S) j} December, 1792, Mr. William Ashcroft,
St Raoul Giraud, the sailor Jackson, and our
hero, set forth on their voyage in search of assistance
for themselves and fellow-castaways. That they were
bound on a somewhat dangerous venture, with but
slight chance of success, and a certainty of encounter-
ing more or less danger and hardship, they, one and
all, very well knew; nevertheless they were in excellent
spirits at the prospect of a change after nearly five
months’ imprisonment on the island, and felt by no
means inclined to look on the dark side of things.
Even the mutinous Jackson, now that he was fairly
started, showed by his manner, and readiness to obey
orders, that he was contented with his lot, and not bent
on giving trouble.

When well clear of the island, Mr. Ashcroft directed

his crew. to trim the boat, which they did by shifting
H


114 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

their positions, and also a portion of the stores. After
two or three trials, they got her trimmed to his liking ;
and she now sailed gaily over the water, showing her-
self to be stiff under canvas and perfectly seaworthy.

‘She does credit to old Harris and Pat Murphy,
observed Nicholas ; ‘if this breeze holds, we shall make
the coast before nightfall.’

‘Scarcely, my lad, rejoined Ashcroft. ‘I shall be
satisfied if we see land at daybreak. We mustn’t hope
for too much,’ he added, with a smile.

For several hours the dinghy made good progress ;
and her crew had every reason to be satisfied with the
tiny craft, which stood well up to her sail when the
breeze presently freshened, and shipped very little
water ; but towards evening the wind shifted, and the
weather began to look threatening, so that William
Ashcroft’s face grew graver and graver, and many an
anxious glance did he cast to windward.

As the sun went down, the wind increased, and the
sea ran fast. Still the little dinghy continued to behave
well, until it commenced blowing very hard; when she
took in so much water, that Ashcroft directed Nicholas
and Jackson to bale her out, whilst he stuck to the helm,
and Raoul Giraud tended the sail.

The sail was now close reefed, and everything made
as snug as possible; but the sea rising fast, and the
dinghy taking in more and more water, Ashcroft con-
sidered it absolutely necessary to lighten her, by
throwing overboard a keg of brandy and a quantity of
An Anvrious Time. II5

copper and iron hoops, bolts, nails, ete, which they
had brought with them to exchange with the Caffres
for provisions. This had a good effect, but they passed
an anxious night, expecting every moment to be
swamped or capsized.

Ashcroft, however, handled the boat with consummate
skill, and—a kind Providence watching over them—the
dawn of another day saw them still afloat, though in
sore peril and distress.

The bad weather continued for the next forty-eight
hours, and it was little short of a miracle that the dinghy
survived ; seeing how she was tossed about by the
foaming waves, which were enough to have engulfed a
far bigger craft; but on the morning of the 8th the
wind suddenly dropped, and shortly after twelve o’clock
the Caffrarian coast was plainly visible.

The fatigue and exposure they had suffered during
the storm had greatly exhausted Ashcroft and his
companions, and they had well-nigh abandoned them-
selves to despair; but this welcome sight acted like
magic upon them, instilling fresh courage into their
sinking hearts, and new vigour into their stiffened
limbs.

‘Land, land!’ they joyfully cried, as with one voice.

“And I don’t think,’ presently added Mr. Ashcroft,
mounting on a thwart so as to obtain a clearer view of
the distant coast; ‘I don’t think we’ve been driven so
very much out of our course. Now, lads!’ he went on
in cheery tones, ‘ we will “out oars,” and pull ashore as
116 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

fast as we're able. Nick, my son, you and I will take
the first turn. M)’sieur, will you go to the helm?’

_ So they got out the oars, and pulled for the shore with
a good steady stroke.

After three or four hours’ rowing,—taking spell and
spell about, —they approached a point having something
the appearance of a double point, which encouraged
them to hope that on rounding it they would find
themselves at the entrance of a land-locked bay, or the
mouth of a river, where it was possible some coasting
vessel might be lying; but they were doomed to dis-
appointment, for here there was not even a sign of a
native habitation, and, moreover, a heavy surf ran all
along the coast, rendering landing an extremely
hazardous operation.

‘I reckons we'll never get ashore anywheres ’bout
here, observed Jackson, who had now begun to show
his teeth again. ‘Such a miserable cockle-shell as this
of our’n, couldn’t live a moment in yonder surf’

‘T reckon that I am not such a fool as to put her to
the test,’ returned Mr. Ashcroft sharply.

‘Then look ye here, master, said Jackson, resting on
his oar, with an expression half-sulky, half-defiant ;
‘what d’ye mean for to do?’

‘Well, my man, for one thing, I’ll teach you to keep
a civil tongue in your head, if you’re not careful!’ Mr.
Ashcroft retorted with asperity, for he was both angered
and disgusted at the fellow’s insubordinate conduct.
You ought to be ashamed of. yourself, Jackson !’
Ln Search of a Landing-place. 117

pursued he. ‘How can we expect to get through this
if we don’t all pull together?’

‘Sulky dog!’ grunted Nicholas, with a grimace
expressive of dislike. ‘It would serve him right if we
pitched him overboard.’

‘Now just remember, Jackson,’ continued Ashcroft,
motioning to our hero to hold his tongue, ‘1’:] stand no
nonsense! You'll be good enough to obey orders and
speak respectfully.’ The sailor, who was an arrant
coward at heart, seeing that he had gone too far,
muttered something about ‘meaning no harm;’ and
Mr. Ashcroft, addressing himself to the two boys, said,
‘I think we had better look out for a safer landing-
place. It would be sheer madness to expose the dinghy
to such a surf. Suppose we try to the east’ard ?’

So they rowed along the coast for some considerable
distance, until, late in the afternoon, they came abreast
of a small bay, the shores of which were well-wooded,—
the trees and bush in some parts reaching down nearly
to the water’s edge,—but without sign of human habi-
tation.

‘We might venture to beach her here, I think,’ said
Mr. Ashcroft, seeing that the surf was less dangerous.

‘We may as well try, rejoined Nicholas. ‘Eh,
Raoul ?’

‘ Mats artainement, mon cher; said the Frenchman
cheerfully.

‘What say you?’ Mr. Ashcroft demanded of Jackson,
considering that—it being a matter of life and death—
118 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

it was only right the man should have a voice in th
decision. ‘Are you willing to run the risk?’

‘Why, for the matter o’ that, I guess it won’t reckon
much what J thinks, was the sulky rejoinder. ‘I’m
only acommon sailor, I am! Jy opinion ain't of any
account !’ ‘

‘That’s no answer to my question, fellow!’ exclaimed
Mr. Ashcroft, with an angry gesture. ‘Say at once—
are you willing to make the attempt?’ |

Jackson gave a growl of discontented assent ; adding,
as he clutched his oar, ‘Yes, master, I be willing ;—cos
why? I’das lief be drowned in yon surf, as clemmed
or starved to death in this here boat.’

‘Then give way, lads!’ cried Mr. Ashcroft, seizing
the tiller, ‘and just pull for your lives!’

So Jackson, Nicholas, and Raoul—the two latter
rowing ‘double-banked’ on the stroke thwart—pulled
lustily for the shore; but when they were in the midst
of the boiling surf, Raoul Giraud’s oar broke just above
the blade, and the dinghy, turning broadside on, im-
mediately capsized.

For a few moments her crew clung to the overturned
boat, and, had the sea been less rough, might have
managed to right her; but they were soon washed clear
of her, and the sailor Jackson—being a very poor
swimmer—was unfortunately drowned, in spite of the
gallant efforts made by his: companions to save him.
Regardless of their own peril, Mr. Ashcroft and the two
boys endeavoured to support the terrified man into
Safe on Terra Firma. 119

shallow water, until his struggles, rendering their efforts
futile, compelled them to let him go. In fact, they
themselves very nearly lost their lives, and were, all
three of them, completely exhausted when, after a fierce
battle with the surf, they got beyond its reach, and sank
bruised, bleeding, and half-insensible on the beach.

On recovering a little, Ashcroft and his companions
proceeded along the shore in the hopes of discovering
the dinghy, or; at least, some portion of their scanty
stores; but, though they walked until it was quite dark,
—first to the eastward and then to the westward,—their
search was not successful. So they gave it up for the
night, and, making for the wood, threw themselves down
at the foot of a tree; and, in spite of hunger, cold, and
the knowledge that many a danger threatened them in
their defenceless position, they were soon wrapped in the
death-like slumber that often follows utter exhaustion.






CHAPTER XIX.

Relates the further Adventures of Mr. Ashcroft,
Raoul Giraud, and our Hero.



ing, though lengthened slumber. He felt very
cold, and his limbs were stiff and sore. At first he could
not clearly recollect either what had befallen him, or
where he had got to, but, after a few minutes’ considera-
tion, he was able to call to. mind the events of the
previous day ; and then remembering that before they
fell asleep Mr. Ashcroft had strongly urged upon them
the necessity of resuming their search for the dinghy as
soon as it was light, he proceeded to arouse him and
Raoul Giraud. .

‘ Have you seen anything of the boat ?’ was Ashcroft’s
first question.

Nicholas shook his head, adding,—

‘But I haven’t been awake more than ten minutes
or so,’

‘Well, we’ve slept pretty soundly, I must say,’ observed
Ashcroft, as he staggered to. his feet ; ‘but I cannot in
Discovery of the Dinghy. 121

truth add that I feel any the better for it. However, we
must be thankful that we’re spared to see the light of
another day. Let us get down to the shore.’

They then walked, or rather limped, down to the
beach, where, the tide being out, they found amongst
the rocks plenty of limpets, mussels, and other shell-fish,
off which they were not sorry to make a meal; and,
having thus partially satisfied their hunger, they pro-
ceeded to look for the dinghy.

They had not walked very far along the shore, before
they came across the body of Jackson, and a few yards
further on Nicholas picked up an oar. With the oar
they managed to dig, or rather scrape, a hole in the
sand, in which they laid the remains of their unfortunate
shipmate, covering them over with stones and pieces of
rock. In their weakened condition this was no light
task, and they were compelled to take a rest.

After an hour or two they continued their walk, and
towards sunset Raoul, to their great joy, espied the
object of their search lying keel uppermost on the beach,
not fifty yards from where they stood.

On examining the dinghy, Mr. Ashcroft found that she
had suffered comparatively little damage, but her mast,
sail, and rudder were missing. Their stores, too, had
been lost, with the exception of a flask of red wine and a
small bag of biscuits, which were luckily stowed away in
a locker beneath the stern-sheets. ‘The cutlass, the two
boarding-pikes, and a pistol were also still in the boat.

‘Come, lads, we shall do well enough now,’ said
Mr. Ashcroft cheerfully. ‘We're a deal better off
122 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

than we might have been, taking everything into
consideration,’

‘You'll not put to sea, I suppose?’ inquired Nicholas,
‘Not to-night at least?’

‘No, indeed ; before venturing afloat again we must
recover our strength a bit, and repair damages,’ was the
reply.

‘True, assented Nick. ‘I, for one, feel as weak
as a rat, and Raoul here has scarcely a leg to stand
upon,’

‘ Parbleu, non!’ said the young Frenchman, with a
grimace and a shrug of his shoulders. ‘I am well
fatigued.’

‘There is another thing to be considered,’ continued
Mr. Ashcroft, who was pleased to find the boys so ready to
agree with him. ‘We have as yet done nothing towards
accomplishing the object of our expedition. If we do
not succeed in meeting with a coasting vessel, we must,
at least, endeavour to procure a supply of food. It
would not look well to return to our friends empty-
handed—would it, now?’

‘No, it wouldn’t, Nicholas replied. ‘But do you
think there’s any chance of our obtaining food, except-
ing shell-fish, on this outlandish coast? It appears to be
quite uninhabited.’

‘We shall fall in with some of the natives sooner or
later,’ Ashcroft rejoined; ‘and I fancy we shall find
them peaceable and well-disposed towards the white
man. And now, lads, he added, ‘suppose we make
ourselves snug for the night. Let us haul the dinghy
Footmarks. 123

farther up the beach, turn her keel uppermost, and take
shelter beneath her.’

This they did,—not without difficulty, for, as Nicho-
las had said, they were just as ‘weak as rats,—
and, after a meal of .biscuit and shell-fish, washed
down with a little wine, they crept under the boat
and went to sleep.

Wearied by their exertions, they slept soundly intl
dawn of day, when, peeping out from under the boat,
they observed several footmarks in the sand.

‘Are those the marks of a man’s foot?’ Nicholas
whispered.

‘Not a doubt about it, I should say, was Mr. Ashcroft’s
rejoinder. ‘You know that I told you we should see
something of the natives before long. Well, let us hope
we shall find them friendly.’

‘But it is possible those marks. were made by our own
feet, suggested Nicholas. ‘We were tramping about a
good bit.’ .

‘We can easily decide that question, answered Mr,
Ashcroft. ‘It should not be difficult for us to identify
the impressions of our own soles.’ And grasping the
cutlass, which he had placed beside him before going to
sleep, he crept from beneath the boat.

Nicholas and the young Frenchman followed him,
and, on rising to their feet, they beheld four men and a
boy standing at no great distance from the dinghy.
Three of the men were Caffres,—tall, fine-looking fellows,
armed with assegai and club,—but the fourth (albeit his
face and arms were tanned a deep brown, and his clothes
124 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

were of a very primitive description) was unmistakably
a white man. The boy was ‘off-coloured, and his gar-
ments were conspicuous by their absence—he being, as
the Irishman said, ‘clad in an iligant suit of nothing.’

When they perceived Ashcroft and his companions
rise so suddenly from beneath the dinghy, the natives
and the boy uttered a cry of dismay and fled precipitately
into the woods; but the white man, after a moment’s
hesitation, advanced towards the dinghy with friendly
gestures.

The stranger—a middle-sized, well-built man of five-
and-forty,. or thereabouts—was attired in a sort of
sleeveless blouse, reaching below the knee, and girt by
a seaman’s brass-buckled leather belt. His head was
covered by a broad-brimmed hat, evidently of native
manufacture ; his legs and feet were bare, and, like his
face, neck, and arms, were tanned a deep copper-colour.
He carried a rusty musket, which, it was easy to see,
had not been discharged for many a day, and in his belt
were stuck a hunting-knife and a small hatchet.

‘Halloa!’ exclaimed Nicholas in astonishment, as the
strange-looking person drew near. ‘A white man, by
all that’s wonderful!’

‘A Dutchman, probably,’ said Mr. Ashcroft. ‘Some
unforturlate deserter, or an escaped convict from the
Cape, who has sought a refuge amongst the natives,’

‘Well,’ rejoined Nicholas, lowering his voice, ‘he seems
inclined to be friendly, anyway ; and I don’t suppose we
need trouble our heads as to his past life, if he is willing
to assist us now.’




The Castaway. 127

‘Certainly not, laughed Mr. Ashcroft. ‘We're
scarcely in a position to be very particular.’

‘What cheer, shipmates!’ now cried the stranger,
advancing with outstretched hand. ‘We're fellow-
countrymen, unless I’m vastly out of my reckoning.’

‘Eh!’ ejaculated Mr. Ashcroft; ‘are you an English-
man, then ?’

‘To be sure I am, mate, rejoined the stranger.
‘Bristol born and bred, though you wouldn’t think it to
look at me.’

Mr. Ashcroft smiled, as he shook the man by the
hand, and said __

‘I supposed you to be a Dutchman, my friend. May
I ask how you came in these parts ?’

‘I was third mate of the Zogsy brig, which was
wrecked off this coast nigh upon thirteen years ago,
was the reply. ‘We was bound from Liverpool to
Malacca with an assorted cargo, and we struck on
a reef some forty leagues sou’-east of here. Me and
two hands got ashore on a rocky island close by the
scene of the wreck, but the rest o’ the crew was all
drownded.’

‘Why, my good fellow,’ cried Mr. Ashcroft, ‘we’re
companions in misfortune. Our ship was lost on that
very island, there can be little doubt about it’

And he proceeded to give the stranger a brief account
of the loss of the Marathon, also a description of the
island upon which he and his companions had been cast
away.

‘Ye’re right, master,’ said the man, when Mr. Ashcroft
128 LTar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

had finished. ‘That be our island sure enough— Bird
Island,” me and my mates called it. It ain’t laid down
in any chart as ever J see—more shame to them as has
the lookin’ after them things.’

‘But how did you get away from the island?’ in-
quired Nicholas.

‘Well, you see, continued the man, ‘me and my two
mates lived there nigh upon eighteen months ; we picked
up a few things as was washed ashore ftom time to time,
and so, with the birds we knocked over, we wasn’t so
badly off for food—we lived on that island nigh upon
eighteen months, during which we never once see’d a
sail o’ any sort, leastways not near enough to signal to,
until at last my mates sickened and died, and I was left
alone. I stood it for another month or two, and then I
got so miserable that I couldn’t bear’t any longer, and I
determined to get away anywhere—to the bottom o’
the sea even—rather than live by myself.

‘Having got this idea in my head, I couldn’t rest a
moment, a blessed moment, till I’d carried of it out ; so
I sets to work at once, and, with planks and spars and
empty casks, I builds a sort o’ catamaran big enough to
hold me, some provisions and a breaker o’ water, and
such articles as I’d a mind to take away with me—this
here old musket and a few cartridges amongst others.
I waits for a fine, calm morning, and then off I starts,
and, after paddling and drifting about for nigh a week,
I gets drove ashore on this coast.

‘My raft was knocked to pieces in the surf, and I lost
everything cept this musket and three cartridges, the

,
Sam Martin. 129

rest being all spiled. For three or four days I remained
about the shore, living on shell-fish, sorell-grass, and such
berries as I see’d the birds a-peckin’ at, and so guessed
couldn’t be p’ison, until I was pretty well starved, and I
then made bold to venture inland.

‘As I was walking along, wondering what’d become
of me,I heard a noise right ahead—a scuffling and
shouting, it was ; so I clapped on sail, and presently I
comes right on a native fellow struggling with a tiger.
The poor chap was a’most done, though he fought like
a good un; so I runs up, claps the muzzle of my musket,
which was loaded, to the savage brute’s side, pulls the
trigger, and blows a hole through un as you might
shove your arm in!

‘Well, to make a long story short, the native as I’d
rescued turned out to be headman of a Tambookee
village. He was very grateful, and he took me to his
home, and fed me, and made a lot o’ me; and the
upshot of it all was that I married his darter, and settled
down amongst his people. Here I’ve been ever since.
I’ve got several children—that boy yonder ’s my eldest
son ; and, as I’m perfectly happy and contented, here I
intends to stop for the rest o’ my days, .

‘And now,’ concluded the stranger, ‘when I’ve told
ye my name’s Martin—Samuel Martin,—I shall have
told ye all about myself that ye’ll care to know.’

1 A Cape tiger, or tree-leopard.
TEES

Zee
———s

= SS SS
JZEREL TFG COE MIRL STELIOS



CHAPTER XX.
A Friend in Need.

when the ex-mate of the Zofsy had brought
his narrative to a conclusion, ‘I’—

‘Nay, master, nay, nay!’ interposed the other, with a
deprecatory gesture; ‘that willn’t do! Don’t ye be
“mistering” of me, if ye please. I ain’t accustomed
to it, and somehow it don’t seem right—not natural,
you know! I be just plain Sam Martin, at. your
sarvice !’



Mr. Ashcroft laughed good-humouredly, and com
menced again. ‘Well, then, Sam Martin,—since you
prefer to be called so,—let me tell you that I consider
we're very fortunate in having fallen in with you; for I
am confident that we have found a man who will prove
both willing and able to render the assistance we seek.
Eh, my friend, is it not so?’ And he paused for a

reply.

_ © Ay, master, willing I be, answered Samuel Martin ;
‘willing sure enough ! Bur as to being ad/e to ’sist ye—
A Friend in Need. 131

well, now, ye must tell me what sort of ’sistance ye wants
afore I can say anything for sart’n.’

‘In the first place,’ rejoined Mr. Ashcroft, ‘we require
provisions ; as much food as we can safely stow away in
this boat.’

‘There'll be no trouble ’bout that, master,’ said Martin.
‘Food I can get ye in plenty—meat, grain, and fruit.
Water, too, if ye wants it.’

‘That’s a good job!’ cried Nicholas, rubbing his
hands. ‘He tells us there’s plenty of food to be had for
the asking, he added, turning to Raoul Giraud, who,
although he had by this time picked up a smattering of
English, evidently did not quite comprehend Martin’s
answers. ‘Food and water, too, my boy!’

‘Bon! bon!’ exclaimed the young Frenchman ; ‘dat
is ver goot!’”

‘Secondly, Martin, pursued Mr. Asheroft, ‘do you
know of any Dutch or Portuguese settlement, or trading
station, within a reasonable distance of here ?’

“Ye means ’long the coast, I reckon,’ Martin rejoined.
‘Some place as you might get to in your boat, and
mebbe come across a trader or craft of some sort ?” '

‘That’s it, my good fellow! We could, I fancy, make
it worth while for the skipper of a coaster to sail for
the island, rescue our companions, and then take us on
to Table Bay.’

Martin considered for a few moments; then shook
his head doubtfully, and said, ‘I’ve never heard nobody
tell of any such settlement, and I sart’nly don’t know of
132 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

none mysel’. But it’s this way, look ye, master: I ain’t
likely to know—’cos why? I never was on this African
coast afore I was wrecked on Bird Island. My voyages
has al’ays been to ’Merica and the West Indies.’

‘ But since you settled amongst the natives, began Mr.
Ashcroft, ‘have you never ’—

‘T hasn’t been ten mile away from our kraal,’ inter-
rupted Martin. ‘Ye see my people ain’t a seafaring
race ; they ain’t got even a “dug-out,” or mebbe I should
have took a trip ‘long the coast now and agen. As it is,
I just stops at home.’

‘But, my good fellow, what do you do with yourself
from one week’s end to another?’ Mr. Ashcroft asked.
‘You must find time hang pretty heavily, I should
think !”.

‘Well, it ain’t what ye might call very lively, admitted
Martin. ‘Still, I jogs along somehow or other: doing a
bit o’ gardening one day, a bit o’ carpentering another,
and soon. Then I wanders about with the boy yonder,
and tells him *bout home and such like. I’m pretty
satisfied, I am!’

‘And do ships never pass within sight of the coast?’
inquired Nicholas, in a rather despondent tone ; for he
could not help thinking that Martin’s fate might possibly
be theirs—that they might end their days amongst the
Caffres.

‘Yes, they does now and agen, was the reply. ‘Not
often though, for they seems to give us a wide berth.
It’s a nasty coast, as no doubt you very well knows.’
A Friend in Need. 133

Martin now suggested that they should accompany
him to the kraal, and on Mr. Ashcroft assenting, he
called his son,—who all this time had stood apart with
the Caffres, not venturing to approach the group,—and
bade him mount guard over the dinghy; observing,
‘My people aren’t a bad sort, ye see, only they’re such
arrant thieves ; so it’s best to keep an eye on ’em.’

‘But will your son be able to prevent them touching
the boat?’ said Nicholas. ‘He’s not a very big chap,
you know.’

‘He'll manage ’em right enough, don’t you fear!’ was
the confident rejoinder. ‘They’ll not steal so much as a
nail while little Sam’s by !’


CSS SSS SSE
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OPO PLA EIT,



CHAPTER XXI.

The Kraal—Our Friends prepare to return to the
Lsland—Sail ho!

- Martin now conducted our hero and his com-
2 panions, was between two and three miles

distant from the shore. Following a rough path, that
led up the wooded slopes of the hills to the high ground
overlooking the bay, they presently came out upon a
considerable tract of open country, partially cultivated,
in the centre of which stood a cluster of huts and cattle
enclosures.

‘Yon’s our kraal!’ Martin cried, pointing to the huts.

‘What?’ exclaimed Nicholas in astonishment; ‘you
don’t mean those beehive-looking hovels?’

‘Ay, but I do, lad!’ was the reply. ‘Them be the
huts. ‘Not much to look at, eh?’

‘Might be a good deal worse, said Mr. Ashcroft cheerily.
‘My young friend here is fresh from home—was on his
first voyage when we were wrecked—so he does not’—

‘Bless ye, masters, interrupted Martin, laughing, ‘I
134


The Kraal. 135

understands all ’bout that! They be hovels, no doubt ;
but they sarves the purpose of these poor ignorant
savages. I don’t live in one of ’em, mark ye,’ he went
on. ‘No, indeed! I built a bit o’ a cottage for myself
and family, and considerin’ as how I was precious short
o’ tools and materials, ’tain’t such a bad little shanty—as
ye shall see for ye’selves by’n by.’

Two of the Caffres who had been with Martin down
at the beach, had preceded them tothe kraal, to announce
their arrival to the chief, and that exalted potentate,
accompanied by a score of his warriors and a number of
women and children, now issued forth from the village,
and advanced in a sort of procession to bid welcome to
the ‘ white strangers.’

The chief, or, to give him his correct title, the ‘captain
of the kraal, was a tall man, spare but very muscular,
with a remarkably graceful carriage. His colour was a
deep brown rather than black} his hair short and curly ;
and the expression of his countenance, and more especi- -
ally of his eyes, pleasing. His attire consisted of a fine
leopard-skin kaross, thrown over the shoulders and
fastened in front ; a girdle, composed of strings of beads
and small pieces of brass and copper, was worn round
the loins ; and his arms were adorned with rings of ivory
and brass. He carried a bundle of assegais and a knob-
kiri, or Caffre club.

The men accompanying the chief resembled him both
in appearance and dress, excepting that their karosses
were of sheep or bullock skins.
136 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

The women were well-proportioned, and not bad-
looking ; and they appeared to have no less curiosity
and vanity in their compositions than have the generality
of their European sisters. The chief, whose name was
Tamboosie, welcomed our friends with kindness, and, on
hearing their story from Martin, promised to assist and
befriend them to the best of his power. After a few
compliments, and the presentation of some half-a-dozen
brass buttons, a brace of shoe-buckles, and other odds
and ends, to the highly gratified Tamboosie, the whole.
party entered the kraal in a sort of procession, and,
having made a tour round the huts, they proceeded to
Martin’s own cottage, which lay about half a mile beyond
the kraal.

Martin’s dwelling was a decided improvement on the
Caffre huts. It was situated in the centre of an acre or
so of well-cultivated land, enclosed by a high fence con-
structed of the stems and branches of the acacia. The
cottage itself was oblong in form, the height from the
ground to the eaves being some seven feet. The roof
was very neatly thatched with reeds, and the walls were
well plastered with clay. ‘There, gentlemen!’ exclaimed
Martin, with all the pride of ownership ; ‘ what think ye
of this? Beats old Robinson Crusoe, I reckon!’

‘Well, my friend, returned Mr. Ashcroft, smiling at
their host’s enthusiasm, ‘I can’t say anything about
Robinson Crusoe’s abode, but this little place certainly
does you credit.’

‘Ay, master,’ said the owner ; ‘and if I only had a
The Kraal. 137

few more tools, why I’d make a reg’lar palace of it—that
I would! And ye’re heartily welcome to stop with us
as long as ever it pleases ye—the longer, the better,’ he
added. ‘And as me and my family lives, so shall ye
live; I can’t say no fairer than that, can I, mates ?’

Now Mr. Ashcroft was desirous of returning to the
island as soon as possible,—on account of the anxiety
which he well knew their friends would suffer should
their absence be prolonged,—so, taking Martin apart, he
urged him to help them prepare for their return voyage
without delay. At first Martin demurred, and pressed
them to remain with him at least a week, but Mr.
Ashcroft was firm in his determination to hasten their
departure.

‘We must return at once, my good friend, said he
emphatically. ‘I cannot allow of an hour’s avoidable
delay. Do not press me, I pray you.’

‘Well, master, have it your own way,’ rejoined Martin,
shrugging his shoulders. ‘Ye’d have been heartily
welcome, that’s all.’

Accordingly, the next two days were busily spent in
preparing and stowing away provisions, in repairing the
dinghy, and the manufacture of a pair of oars and a mast ;
and whilst Mr. Ashcroft, the two boys, and Martin were
engaged in this work, ‘Madame Martin’ and two or three
native ladies busied themselves in making a small sail of
plaited grass to replace the lug-sail, lost when the dinghy
was capsized amongst the surf. But our friends might
have spared themselves the trouble of all this preparation
138 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

for their return voyage to the island, for, as it turned
out, they were not destined to make it!

Towards ‘noon, on the third day after‘their arrival at.”
the kraal,—the oars, mast, and sail being finished, and a
sufficient quantity of provisions prepared for stowing
away,—Mr. Ashcroft, Martin, and the two boys went
down to the beach to overhaul the dinghy and see what
repairs would be necessary before she could be pro-
nounced ready for the voyage. They were accompanied
by Martin’s son and heir, young Sam, and three or four
Caffres.

It was a blazing hot day, so Aslicroft and his com-
panions proceeded at a very leisurely pace; but young,
Sam, not caring a bit for the burning sun, ran on ahead;
and was soon out of sight.. The party had just entered
the path leading through the woods, when the boy came
bounding back, evidently in a state of great excitement.

‘ Halloa! what’s wrong, sonny?’ his father sang out.
‘ Nobody ain’t run away with the dinghy, I hope?’

‘No, no!’ cried the boy, as he pulled up short;
‘dinghy all right, but there great big ship in bay!’

‘A ship in the bay!’ shouted Mr. Ashcroft. ‘Come
on, lads! come on!’

And, regardless of the heat, they one and all set off
down the path at a run ; and when they presently cleared
the woods and came out on the beach, there, sure enough,
they beheld a fine brig lying at anchor within a mile
of the shore, and from her peak floated the British
ensign. :
Sail ho / 139

‘Hurrah!’ cried Nick, capering about and waving his
tattered cap for joy. ‘We're saved! we’re saved!’

‘Yes, thank Heaven!’ said. Mr. Ashcroft fervently.
‘She is a man-o’-war brig. And see, my boys, he
added, ‘they’re lowering a boat!’

It was true. A boat put off from the brig, and pulled
rapidly for the shore ; and, as she came near, our friends,
to their great astonishment, recognised Major Penne-
feather seated in the stern-sheets, by the side of the
officer in command.




Ll 4S

= 2
SSSSLSZEL SESE



CHAPTER XXII.

Accounts for the Unexpected Circumstance related at the
end of Chapter X XI.

x EAVING Mr. Ashcroft, Raoul Giraud, and our
hero for awhile, we must now ‘hark back,’
oS in order that we may see how it fared with
the other survivors of the good ship Marathon after
the departure of the dinghy on her hazardous voyage,
and also that we may satisfactorily account for the
unexpected presence of Major Jordan Pennefeather
in the gun-brig’s cutter.

The gale which the dinghy encountered on the first
night that she was at sea—and which, thanks to a
watchful Providence and the excellent seamanship of
William Ashcroft, she so stoutly weathered—had made
itself felt on the island, where it not only did consider-
able damage to the huts, but filled the little community
with alarm on account of their absent friends. No one
cared to retire to rest that night, for their hearts were
too full of sorrow and anxiety; officers and men, ladies

and gentlemen, huddled together round the fire, which
140


Despondent. 141

they with difficulty kept alight, listening to the howling
of the wind and the roaring of the waves, and speculat-
ing as to the probable fate of Ashcroft and his com-
panions.

At break of day, Major Pennefeather and Mr. Hartley
started off for the rocks at the north end of the island,
on the very remote chance of seeing something of the
dinghy ; for they deemed it just within the bounds of
possibility that Ashcroft, when he found the wind
change and the weather look so threatening, might have
endeavoured to return to the island.

The gale had by this time passed away, and the sea
was comparatively quiet, though there was still a stiffish
breeze blowing from the north-east.

‘I do not think it possible that the dinghy can have
lived through last night’s gale, said Mr. Hartley, as
he and the major clambered up to the highest. point
amongst the rocks, and stood gazing anxiously sea-
wards. ‘She’s such a cockle-shell !’

‘Let us hope for the best, Hartley, answered Major
Pennefeather, but there was more of despondency than
hope in his tones, ‘It is well to look on the bright
side, you know.’

‘When there’s a bright side to look upon,’ retorted
Hartley. ‘There’s none in this case, major.’

‘You think not?’

‘I’m sure of it, was the mournful reply. ‘The
dinghy’s lost, and our poor friends have perished, and
with them all hope of our getting away from this-
miserable place. We shall end our days on this barren
142 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

island; and, as for me, I care not how soon the: end
comes,’

‘Nonsense!’ cried the major, his courage and confid-
ence reviving as the others gave way. ‘Be a man,
Hartley, and pray don’t let our friends see you in this
sorry mood! Whilst there’s life there should be hope,
no matter how dark the future may look. Itis cowardly
to despair so long as life and strength remain.’

Mr. Hartley was abashed. He felt that he merited
the major’s rebuke, and, after a momentary hesitation,
he replied,— :

‘I was wrong, sir; I ought not to have given way to
despair even before you. You shall not have occasion
to rebuke me again, that I promise! But, he added,
with a half-stifled sob, ‘the thought that our poor friends
may have perished unmanned me.’

‘Say no more, my dear fellow,’ rejoined Major
Pennefeather kindly. ‘And, remember, ’tis always
darkest before dawn.’

‘True, major, assented the other. ‘If I could only
believe for one moment that there was a chance of Ash-
croft and the boys having escaped, I should not care.’

‘Well, they may have reached the mainland before
the gale came on,’ suggested Major Pennefeather. ‘It
did not begin to blow hard until after dark, and as up
to then they had the wind in their favour, surely there
was ample time for them to make the coast?’

‘Yes, said Hartley hesitatingly ; ‘there was time—
that is, if the coast is as near as poor Ashcroft supposed,
but of that I have my doubts. However, as you said
A Sail in Sight. 143

just now, let us hope for the best. And now, major,’
he added in more cheerful tones, ‘suppose we return
to the huts, and see what damage the gale has done to
us? It is no use remaining here.’

Major Pennefeather nodded assent, and commenced
descending the rock. Before following him, Mr. Hartley
once more looked out to the offing, and scanned the
horizon’; not, as he afterwards said, that he expected
to see anything, but almost from force of habit.
Suddenly he started, and uttered an exclamation of
mingled joy and surprise.

‘What is it, Hartley?’ inquired the major, turning
round. ‘Do you see anything?’

‘ Ay, my friend!’ cried Hartley. ‘A sail! a sail!’

‘Where?’ exclaimed his companion, clambering up
the rock again.

‘ Away to the east’ard, replied Hartley, pointing out
the direction. ‘How I wish we had a glass!’

‘ Here’s the telescope we found in the steward’s chest,
rejoined the major, pulling a small spyglass from out
of his pocket. ‘It is not of much account, I’m afraid,
still you may be able to see with it better than with the
naked eye.’

Hartley took the glass, and, resting it on the top of
the rock, adjusted the focus. It had never been a very
good glass, and now one of the lenses was cracked, but
it was better than nothing.

‘Can you make anything out with it?’ anxiously
inquired Maior Pennefeather.

‘Ye-es, yes, Hartley answered. with some hesitation:
144 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

‘I make her out to be a brig—under top-sails and top-
gallant sails,’
‘Is she steering towards the island, Hartley?’



‘Yes,’ answered the other, as he again caught the
vessel in the field of his telescope. ‘If she continues on
her present course, I should say that she will come
A Sail in Sight. 145

almost within hail; certainly within signalling dis-
tance.’

Elated at this reply, Major Pennefeather proposed
that they should at once make known the good news
to their companions, and prepare to signalise the brig,
but Mr. Hartley objected, pointing out that the stranger
might yet change her course, and pass out of sight; in
which case the disappointment would be terrible, and
might even give rise to another display of mutinous
feeling amongst the men.

‘A few hours will decide the question as to whether
yonder vessel will pass near enough to observe us,’ he
said. ‘ Until then, let us keep our own counsel, major,’

So they returned to the huts, and after breakfast
busied themselves with repairing the damage done by
the gale, taking care to keep all hands well employed;
though Mr. Hartley frequently slipped away in order
that he might observe the movements of the strange
vessel.

About ten o’clock he called Major Pennefeather aside,
and told him there was no longer any necessity for
concealment, as the brig was now within signalling
distance, and still keeping on the same course; that is
to say, steering steadily towards the island.

The joy with which the shipwrecked company received
the welcome intelligence may easily be imagined. Not
a moment was lost in making preparations to attract
the attention of those on board the stranger.

Selecting a long spar, they fixed it firmly in the
ground, and hoisted the only flag they possessed. And

K
146 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

in case the flag should escape notice, Mr. Hartley had
a huge bonfire built on the highest point of the island,
upon which, as soon as it was well alight, they poured a
quantity of water, thus causing a vast column of smoke
to rise, such as could be seen miles away. Then, when
the vessel came nearer, they fired several shots, and
shouted all together at the very top of their voices. At
length, to their intense satisfaction, they perceived that
their signals were noticed.

By 2 P.M. the brig had approached within a mile of
the island. She then hove-to, and sent a boat ashore.

An hour later the survivors of the wreck of the
Marathon were all safe on board.

The vessel, which had so opportunely arrived off the
island, proved to be H.M.S. Rattlesnake, a brig-corvette,
mounting 18 guns, commanded by Captain James
Reynolds, in whom Major Pennefeather recognised a
former shipmate, one, too, he had been on very intimate
terms with.

The Rattlesnake was homeward bound, after a four
years’ commission on the East India station.

Nothing could have exceeded the kindness with which
the captain and officers of the brig welcomed the ship-
wrecked company. The haggard, half-starved appear-
ance of the whole party, men and women, excited the
commiseration of the ‘Rattlesnakes ;’ fore and aft, in
fo’c’sle and cabin, there was an ardent desire to pay the
poor creatures every attention, and make up to them
for the hardships and privations they had so long
endured.
LMS. ‘ Rattlesnake.’ 147

The captain insisted on giving up one of his cabins
to Mrs. Somers and the other ladies; the ward-room
officers took possession of Major Pennefeather, the
Doctor, Hartley, and Garland; whilst the foremast
hands and the soldiers were comfortably berthed in
the forecastle. But it must not be supposed that, in
their joy at being rescued from the island, Major
Pennefeather and his companions were forgetful of their
absent friends. The major lost no time in informing
Captain Reynolds that four of their number were away
in the dinghy, and, as he was able to give a pretty fair
notion of the course Ashcroft had taken, he had little
difficulty in persuading the captain to go in search of
her; but, as there was a possibility of the brig missing
the dinghy, Mr. Garland, Pat Murphy, and Job Harris
volunteered to remain on the island, in case Ashcroft
and his companions should return, it being, of course,
well understood that, should the search be unsuccessful,
the Rattlesnake would come back to take them off.

‘I will cruise along the coast for a week,’ said Captain |
Reynolds, ‘and then return here. If your friends have
not turned up by that time, I must continue my
voyage.’ ;

So Mr. Garland, Murphy, and Harris were put on
shore again, with a plentiful supply of provisions, in case
of accidents, and the Rattlesnake made sail for the
Caffrarian coast.

For two days after her departure from the island,
the Rattlesnake met with unfavourable weather, which
compelled her to keep a good offing. On the third
148 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

morning, Captain Reynolds considered he might stand
in shore without endangering his ship, and for the next
fifty-six hours he ran along the coast under easy sail,
keeping a sharp look-out during the daytime, and lying-
to between sundown and sunrise.

On the morning of the 12th December (1792), the
Rattlesnake entered a bay, and the look-out man reported
that he could see a boat or canoe—he could not be
certain which—lying keel uppermost on the beach.

Captain Reynolds requested Mr. Hartley to go aloft
and examine the boat.

‘If it is your dinghy, you'll probably recognise her,
said he.

Hartley ascended the rigging, and, after a careful
look through a telescope, called out,—

‘It’s the dinghy, sure enough, sir,’

‘Then we'll send a boat ashore,’ said the captain.
‘Mr. Godfrey, pipe away the red cutter.’

‘ Ay, ay, sir!’ sang out the first lieutenant. And in
a very few minutes the cutter was lowered.

‘Have you any objection to my going in the boat,
Captain Reynolds?’ asked Major Pennefeather, who
had been eagerly scanning the shore. ‘I see some
people coming down to the beach, and I am almost
certain our friends are amongst them.’

‘Goby all means, my dear Pennefeather,’ replied the
captain.

So the. major went down the side, jumped into the
cutter, and sat himself down beside the officer in charge.

‘Shove off!’ cried the officer. And at his.command
Lflomeward Bound ! 149

the bowman pushed off, and the crew, bending to their
oars, sent the heavy boat through the water in fine style.

What William Ashcroft and the boys said to Major
Pennefeather, or what the major said to them, on the
occasion of this most unexpected meeting, need not be
recorded ; the satisfaction of all parties at so happy a
termination to their troubles may be readily imagined.

The officer in command of the cutter being anxious
to return without delay, our three friends bade their
kind entertainer, Samuel Martin, a hasty farewell,
thanked him heartily for his hospitality, and insisted
upon his accepting the dinghy and all that remained of
her stores and gear in payment of his services; then,
jumping into the cutter, they were rowed on board the
Rattlesnake.

When Captain Reynolds heard Ashcroft’s story, and
of the generous treatment he and his companions had
experienced, he declared that Martin and his dusky
friends should be well rewarded; so he sent the cutter
ashore again with presents for the captain of the kraal,
consisting of a variety of showy articles, such as delight
the eye of the ‘untutored savage.’ As for Martin, he
was made happy by the receipt of a ship’s musket, one
hundred rounds of ball cartridge, and a bag containing a
few useful tools and a quantity of nails, screws, etc.

As soon as the cutter returned, the Rattlesnake made
sail for the island, and, having taken off Mr. Garland
and the two sailors, she continued on her voyage, and

‘With a flowing sheet,
Went a-bounding for the island of the free.


CHAPTER XXIII.

Homeward Bound !—A Strange Sail—Preparations
Sor the Fight.

Â¥@T-was a fine March morning in the year of
grace 1793, and H.M.S. Rattlesnake was
Te traversing the broad waters of the North
Atlantic, standing her course close-hauled.

She had on board the survivors of the crew and
passengers of the ill-fated Indiaman Marathon, all of
whom were by this time entirely recovered from the
effects of the privations they had endured during their
dreary sojourn on the barren island, and were looking
forward with eager pleasure to setting foot once more on
British shores.

Had they been in a position to choose, no doubt
Major Pennefeather, Doctor and Mrs. Somers, and the
two ladies, Mrs. Brydges and Miss Falcon, would have
preferred to continue their interrupted voyage to
Bombay rather than return to England; nevertheless,
their very natural regrets at this total upset of their

plans—with the unavoidable expense and inconvenience
150


On Board the ‘ Rattlesnake.’ I51

attendant thereon—were more than balanced by their
thankfulness at having escaped, first, a watery grave,
and secondly, what might have proved a lifelong
imprisonment on a sea-girt rock. So they were well
content to console themselves with the belief that
‘what is, is best, and did not give way to lamentation
because the vessel which had rescued them was home-
ward, not outward bound.

As for the officers and men of the Marathon, they
were perfectly satisfied to return to England; and so
was the French midshipman, Raoul Giraud, for Captain
Reynolds had promised him that he should be sent over
to ‘La Belle France’ at the very first opportunity.

Well, as we have already stated, it was a fine March
morning in the year of grace 1793, and the Rattlesnake
was slipping through the water at the rate of four or
five knots an hour. The ship’s company had just been
piped to dinner; in the cabin and gun-room, luncheon
was over, and Captain Reynolds and several of his
officers and passengers—or perhaps we should call
them guests /—were gathered on the quarter-deck. This
was one of the pleasantest hours of the day, for the
strict etiquette of the quarter-deck was relaxed, and for
a while it became the scene of social intercourse: ladies
and gentlemen making it a point of honour—when-
ever the weather permitted—to congregate together to
indulge in lively conversation, and the discussion of
interesting topics,—

’ Promotion, mess debts, absent friends, and love }’
152 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

On this particular morning there was much speculation
as to the time when they might hope to drop anchor
at Spithead.

‘Should this breeze hold, we shall probably sight the
Ushant Lights about midnight, and Thursday will, I
trust, see us at the end of our voyage,’ said Captain
Reynolds, in reply to a question put to him by Mrs.
Somers.

‘That is, if no accident occurs, observed the little
doctor, with one of his favourite grunts. ‘The un-
expected always happens, my good sir!’

‘Come, come, doctor!’ laughed Captain Reynolds;
‘you are a regular Job’s comforter. You will alarm the
ladies!’

‘Then, my dear sir, they must be very easily alarmed,’
retorted Doctor Somers. ‘And that our fair friends are
easily alarmed, he added, turning to the ladies with a
courtly bow, ‘I beg leave to doubt.’

‘Thank you, doctor, for your good opinion,’ said Mrs.
Brydges, smiling. ‘After all that we have undergone
since we left England, I am sure our nerves ought to be
stronger than is usual with our sex. Don’t you agree
with me, Captain Reynolds?’

The good-natured captain laughed, and was about to
reply, when the look-out man stationed at the mast-
head reported a sail on the weather beam. All con-
versation ceased, and every soul on deck eagerly awaited
the report of the officer of the watch, who had already
hastened aloft with his spyglass to examine the stranger.
The Strange Sait. 153

‘Well, Mr. Simpson, what do you make of her?’
Captain Reynolds presently hailed, with some show of
impatience.

‘I take her to be an armed ship, sir, the officer sang
out ; ‘but what her force may be, she is too far off for
me to judge,’

‘You cannot make out her hull, I suppose?’ cried
Captain Reynolds.

‘Not yet, sir; but she rises fast, was the answer.
‘She is very taut, and her canvas appears to be foreign.’

On hearing this, the captain himself ascended the
rigging to the maintop-masthead, and was followed by
the first lieutenant.

‘What say you, Godfrey?’ asked Captain Reynolds,
when he and the lieutenant had carefully examined the
strange sail through their glasses.

‘I put her down as a French corvette, sir, the first
lieutenant replied. ‘She has altered her course, and is
standing towards us, so I suppose she has sighted us,
and wishes for acloser inspection. We're in fora brush,
depend upon it, sir.’

‘I agree with you,’ Captain Reynolds said, after he
had taken another careful look at the stranger. ‘She’s
a Frenchman all over, and we must either show her our
heels or prepare to fight. I prefer to’—

‘Fight!’ struck in the lieutenant.

‘Exactly so, my dear Godfrey. No doubt we shall
find her “a hard nut to crack,” and we must be careful
not to throw a single chance away ; still I flatter myself
154 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

we can take her, and I certainly mean to try. Sup-
posing her to be a 22-gun corvette, and I think that’s
about her force, the odds will not be so very great,
especially with such a ship’s company as we have.’

‘We may safely reckon that our fellows will fire two
shots to her one,’ said the other cheerfully, for he was
pleased at the prospect of an action with a vessel of
superior force, as a victory would ensure his promotion.
‘Shall I beat to quarters, sir?’

‘Let us get the ladies out of the way first,’ Captain

. Reynolds answered; adding, as they descended the
rigging together, ‘ This is the first time I have regretted
their presence on board the Rattlesnake.

Now the gallant ‘first luff’ was very much &rs with
pretty Miss Falcon, so this reminder of the danger to
which that young lady would be exposed in the event of
an action, somewhat cooled his ardour, and he replied in
less cheerful tones,—

‘Ha! I forgot the ladies for the moment. Dear me!
what are we to do with them, sir? Most unfortunate,
is it not?’

‘We must see that they are kept well out of harm’s
way, Godfrey, and I will request. Doctor Somers to
remain with them during the action. And that reminds
me! Major Pennefeather will, of course, wish to take
part in the engagement ;—but what of the men who
belonged to the Marathon? will they be ready to
help us?’

‘Mr. Ashcroft, the two mates, and young Brodribb
Clearing for Action. 155

are certain to volunteer their services, sir’ answered
Godfrey ; ‘and I should say that the foremast hands
will follow their example.’

‘Very good, said the Captain approvingly. ‘Ash-
croft, you know, was formerly in the Bombay Marine,
and I believe he was considered an excellent officer.
We shall find him of great assistance, no doubt.’

‘Then there are the four privates of the Company’s
Bombay European Infantry, continued Godfrey ; ‘ they
will be attached to the marines. By the way, sir,’ he
added, ‘what about the French middy, young Giraud?’

‘ Ask him to help Doctor Somers look after the ladies,’
replied Captain Reynolds, who had now descended to
the last ratline of the main rigging. ‘We couldn’t
expect him to fight against his own countrymen, though
I shrewdly suspect he would not object to have a slap
at the Tricolour! He has not much love for the
Republic, I fancy !’

As soon as the three ladies had been conducted toa
place of security below the water-line, Captain Reynolds
ordered the ship’s company aft.

‘My lads, said he, pointing to the stranger, ‘that, I
have little doubt, is a French corvette ; and she intends
to take a closer look at us. We must make her repent
her temerity, by placing the ‘Jack’ above the Tricolour!
I make it a rule never to despise an enemy, but I have
confidence enough in you, my lads, to expect the certain
capture of that corvette, although she is a bit bigger
156 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

than the Rattlesnake. Mr. Godfrey, beat to quarters,
if you please.’ — _

The order was promptly obeyed, and in a few minutes
they had cleared for action. Every gun was ready,
everything in its proper place, and every man on board
was eager for the fray. Captain Reynolds then visited
every part of the brig, and was loudly cheered as he
passed round the decks. He saw the signal books
collected and the weights put in the box,—so that they
might be sunk should the brig be taken,—and, having
satisfied himself as to all arrangements, both below and
aloft, he returned to the quarter-deck.

Mr. Godfrey was right in supposing that the ‘Marathons’
would wish to share the danger of the coming fight.
The moment it was announced that the strange vessel
would probably turn out to be an enemy, Mr. Hartley
and William Ashcroft went to the first lieutenant and
told him that they, their brother-officers, and men, were
anxious to volunteer their services, and requested to be
stationed where they could be of the greatest use,
regardless of their respective positions. Their offer was
cordially accepted, and they were at once told off to
their stations; our hero’s post being on the quarter-deck,
under the immediate orders of Major Pennefeather, who,
at his special request, was to command the brig’s marines.

So now we have the Rattlesnake prepared for action—

‘Her guns run out, her decks all cleared.’
How the action was fought, and how it terminated, must
be told in a separate chapter.




CHAPTER XXIV.

Describes the action between the ‘Rattlesnake’ and
‘Le Cerf ;’ and shows how a certain bullet found
ats billet.

WA TSNHE stranger came down with such rapidity

that, by the time the Ratilesnake had cleared
®- for action, she was barely two miles distant.
Onward she came, ‘walking the waters like a thing of
life ;? her snow-white canvas spread to the favouring
breeze ; but as yet she showed no colours, though there
was little doubt as to her nationality—for her rigging,
the cut of her sails, and the rake of her stern, bore
evidence that she had been launched at a French port.
Her approach was watched by Captain Reynolds and
his officers with interest and admiration.
‘She’s a beauty!’ exclaimed Mr. Wilson, the master.
‘A perfect picture !’ was the enthusiastic remark of the
second lieutenant. ‘There’s “in studding sails!”’ he
added, as the vessel shortened sail. ‘Smartly done, too!’
‘Very smartly done,’ assented Captain Reynolds.

As soon as she had reduced sail, the stranger rounded
157




158 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

to the wind, on the same tack as the Rattlesnake,
displaying her broadside.
She was a corvette, pierced for twenty-two guns,



besides her bridle ports, and she appeared to be crowded
with men,
‘Le Cerf. 159

‘Ha! cest Le Cerf!’ cried Raoul Giraud, who had
not yet gone below.

‘You know her, Monsieur Giraud ?’ inquired Captain
Reynolds.

‘Oui, m’sieur le capitaine; Raoul answered. ‘She was
commissioned at Brest, shortly before we’ sailed for the
Isle of France. My brother Alphonse was then her
second lieutenant.’

‘Does she carry heavy metal, monsieur?’ asked Mr.
Godfrey.

‘ Mais, m’sieur,; replied the young fellow, with a
deprecatory shrug of his shoulders, ‘how can I tell ?’

‘Certainly not, my boy,’ interposed Captain Reynolds
kindly. ‘Mr. Godfrey would not wish you to tell us.’

‘We shall find out for ourselves before we’re an hour
older, said the master. ‘Halloa! there go her colours.’

As he spoke, the French national flag flew out from
the corvette’s peak, and at the same time she fired a
gun to windward. 5

‘A challenge!’ cried Captain Reynolds, with anima-
tion. ‘Hoist our colours, Mr. Godfrey.’ Then, turning
to Raoul Giraud, who still lingered on deck, he said,
‘You had better go below, my boy. I should not like
you to be hurt by your fellow-country men.’

‘ Bien, m’sieur; rejoined the French middy, bowing
courteously ; and with manifest reluctance he turned
away, and went down the companion ladder.

The French captain now hailed the Ratélesnake, and
summoned her to surrender.
160 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

‘No, no, monsieur, replied Captain Reynolds, waving
his hand, ‘you do not expect us to do that.’

‘Parbleu, non!’ returned the Frenchman, who was
standing on the hammock nettings. ‘You English
have no prudence, you do not even know when you
are beaten. But, my good friend, I will try to teach
you to-day,’

‘Monsieur, Captain Reynolds retorted, ‘we are quite
ready to receive the lesson.’ Whereupon the French
commander lifted his hat, and, saluting his adversary
with the utmost politeness, disappeared from off the
hammock nettings.

The action commenced shortly before 3 P.M., the two
vessels being then almost within musket-shot of one
another. A sharp fight ensued, during which the
Rattlesnake was frequently hulled, and had her rigging
and spars a good deal cut up; but the corvette suffered
most, in spite of her superior weight of metal, for Captain
Reynolds manceuvred his ship with wonderful skill ;
whilst his men worked their guns with rapidity and with
telling effect, delivering two broadsides to the enemy’s
one, as Lieutenant Godfrey predicted they would do.
The loss in men on both sides was also considerable.

This ‘hammer and tongs’ sort of work continued for
the best part of an hour.

About four o’clock the French captain and his first
lieutenant were wounded by the same shot,—the former
mortally,—and were carried below.
Death of Wiliam Ashcroft. 161

The Rattlesnake, being on the weather quarter, now
edged off for the purpose of passing under her formidable
opponent’s stern; but the corvette’s second lieutenant,
who had succeeded to the command, dexterously throw-
ing her main-topsail aback, luffed close up, and so
frustrated this attempt, and at the same time gave the
brig a raking broadside which did considerable execution,
Amongst those who were killed by this broadside were
the Rattlesnake’s second lieutenant, Mr. Simpson, and
William Ashcroft.

At Captain Reynolds’ request, Ashcroft was performing
the duties of the master—that officer having been
severely hurt early in the fight—when he received his
death-wound. A grape-shot struck him full in the
breast, and with a wild cry he fell down on the quarter-
deck. Nicholas saw him fall, and went immediately to
his assistance, but Ashcroft was beyond human aid. |

The poor fellow had just life enough left in him to
press Nick’s hand, and to murmur, catching his breath
at each word,—

‘They've done for me! Good-bye, dear lad—I die
happy.’

Then his head dropped on his breast, the blood
gushed in a torrent from his mouth, and all was
over.

‘Who is that down, Nick?’ asked Major Pennefeather,
turning round.

© William Ashcroft; sorrowfully answered our hero,

the tears coming into his eyes.
L
162 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

‘Poor fellow!’ sighed the major. ‘Well, ’tis the
fortune of war, and our turn may come next.’

_ The failure of his manceuvre, and its somewhat disas-

trous result, by no means daunted Captain Reynolds.
He determined to make another attempt to accomplish
his object, and very soon an opportunity offered. A
lucky shot having carried away the corvette’s main-
topsail tie and preventer braces, in consequence of
which she fell off before the wind, Captain Reynolds
succeeded in passing under her stern, and, having raked
her most effectually, he ranged up on her starboard
quarter.

The most important result of this vigorous and well-
directed fire was that the corvette had her wheel-ropes
shot away, and, becoming unmanageable, she presently
exposed her stern for the second time to the Rattlesnake's
broadside, and consequently was again raked.

‘Do you strike, monsieur?’ now hailed Captain
Reynolds, seeing the helpless condition of his opponent,
and wishing to put a stop to further carnage.

‘Non! non!’ instantly replied the gallant commander
of Le Cerf, ‘we will fight to the death” A decision
that was received with a loud cheer by the survivors of
the corvette’s company, thus showing that the young
lieutenant and his men were of a like mind.

‘He’s a splendid fellow that!’ exclaimed Captain
Reynolds. ‘I trust that he may be spared. But,’ he
added, ‘have that corvette we must, cost what it may.’

‘We've paid dearly already, Reynolds, said Major
nS

Sat
ae

a



163

Nick Wounded. 165

Pennefeather, in an undertone, looking round the blood-
stained deck.

‘We have indeed,’ the captain answered. Then seeing
Nicholas standing beside the major, he said, ‘Mr.
Brodribb, be good enough to run down to the surgeon
and ask him for a report of the killed and wounded.’

Nick touched his cap, and was about to obey the
order, when he caught sight of a French marine taking
a deliberate aim at Captain Reynolds. There was no
time to warn the captain, so Nick sprang forward and
pushed him aside. At that very moment the French-
man pulled trigger, and the bullet that was intended
for the commander of the Rattlesnake found its billet
in the body of our hero.

‘That boy has saved my life, cried Captain Reynolds,
as Nicholas dropped at his feet.

‘At the cost of his own, I fear, rejoined Major
Pennefeather, in a voice choked with emotion. ‘Poor
lad! poor lad!’ And, stooping down, he lifted Nick’s
senseless form from the deck. ‘I will carry him below,
Reynolds,’ he said. ‘I shall not be away a minute.’

‘Do, my dear Pennefeather, was the reply. ‘And
look you—take him to my own cabin, and beg our
friend Somers to attend to him. His life must be saved
if possible.’






CHAPTER XXV.
Tells how the Corvette ‘Le Cerf’ was captured,

‘ HE two vessels now lay close to each other, and
the corvette being completely crippled and at
the mercy of her adversary, Captain Reynolds
tried once more to induce the French commander to
-haul down his flag, and so prevent further bloodshed.
‘Monsieur, you have had our answer,’ was the stubborn
reply. ‘We will not surrender as long as one man
remains alive on our decks!’



‘But why maintain a useless resistance, monsteur le
lieutenant ?’ expostulated Captain Reynolds. ‘You have
fought your ship right gallantly, and it is no disgrace
that the fortune of war is against you. Consider, I pray
you, that you will only sacrifice your own life and the
lives of your brave men.’

‘For my own life I care nothing, rejoined the lieu-
tenant. ‘As for the lives of my men—well, monsieur,
they shall answer for themselves. What say you, mes
enfants 2’ he went on, addressing his crew. ‘Shall we

surrender our ship?’
166
The Corvette Strikes. 167

Non, non!’ cried the gallant fellows, as if with one
voice. ‘Wewill not surrender. Vive la France! Vive
la Republique !?

‘You hear, monsieur le capitaine ?’ said the lieutenant
proudly.

‘T hear, monsieur ; and while I respect your bravery,
I regret your obstinacy. You have made a gallant
defence, you have done all you can do,’

‘ Pardon, monsieur, retorted the other, with a courteous
salute ; ‘we have not yet beaten you off’

Seeing that the Frenchmen were resolved to fight it
out.to the bitter end, and that it was mere waste of time
to argue any longer with their commander, Captain
Reynolds reluctantly gave the word to continue the
action,—for, during the brief parley, fire had ceased on
both sides,—and, desirous of bringing it to a speedy
termination, he determined to run the brig alongside
of the corvette and carry her by boarding.

In a few words he informed his men of his design, and
was about to put it into execution, when, to the astonish-
ment of the ‘ Rattlesnakes,’ the corvette hauled down her
colours, and an officer,—a young enseigne de vaisseau,—
springing up on her hammock nettings, called out that
she had surrendered.

Then there went up a cheer from the British crew
such as only British lungs can give.

‘How are we to account for this sudden change of
front?’ said Major Pennefeather.

‘I cannot say, rejoined the captain ; ‘but I do hope
168 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

no harm has happened to that gallant young lieutenant.
He was “a foeman worthy of our steel,” and I was
looking forward to complimenting him on his splendid
defence, and to returning him his sword. Godfrey,’ he
added, turning to the first lieutenant, ‘will you board
this prize and take possession ?’

‘Ay, ay, sir!’ answered Mr. Godfrey, who was in the
highest spirits.

‘Pipe the red cutter away, Mr. Thomas, he called out
. to the boatswain.

‘Red cutter’s knocked to pieces, sir, replied the boat-
swain, who had his arm in a sling, and a blood-stained
handkerchief bound round his head. ‘’Deed, sir, I am
a bit dubersome whether we've a boat as Il swim, barrin’
the jolly-boat. She's all right, I knows.’

‘Then I must board in the jolly-boat, said Mr.
Godfrey gaily. ‘Pipe her away, Mr. Thomas.’

While Lieutenant Godfrey is taking possession of the
corvette Le Cerf, we will explain how it came about
that her colours were struck almost immediately after
her defiant refusal to surrender.

Our readers will remember that pretty early in the day
the French captain and his first lieutenant were placed
hors decombat,and carried belowin an insensiblecondition.

The captain soon succumbed to his injuries, which

were of a very terrible nature ; but the lieutenant—whose
" name was Renouf—presently regained consciousness,

and, having had his wounds dressed, he insisted on
returning on deck in order that he might assume com-
Capture of the Corvette. 169

. mand of the ship. The surgeons objected, and did their
best to dissuade him, but all to no purpose; and a few
minutes after his gallant colleague so emphatically refused
to strike, Lieutenant Renouf made his appearance on deck.

Now Renouf was a brave man, but his bravery was
tempered with discretion; and when he saw the crippled
state of the corvette, that her rigging was cut to pieces
and her steering gear disabled ; that several of her guns
were dismounted, and her deck encumbered with dead
and dying men; that she was, in fact, completely at the
mercy of her adversary, he prudently declined to continue
the hopeless contest.

‘ Eugene, mon cher, we must surrender, said he sadly,
addressing his brother officer. ‘I cannot see the lives
of our brave fellows sacrificed to no purpose. It is my
duty to the Republic to preserve them, now that all hope
of beating off the enemy is lost.’

‘It is as monsieur pleases,’ was the cold rejoinder of
the second lieutenant.

Then, breaking his sword across his knee, he was about
to leave the deck, when he saw the pained expression
that came over Renouf’s face at this undeserved insult.
His better nature prevailed, and, seizing his friend’s hand,
he exclaimed, ‘ Pardon, mon ami, pardon, mon cher Pierre!
I confess that you are right; it is, without doubt, your
duty to surrender now that all hope is lost.

So the tricolour was hauled down, and the French
National corvette Le Cerf became the prize of his
Britannic Majesty’s brig Rattlesnake.






iN i
= ——— SASS 7 Na

VIZ ERG RRR IIS






CHAPTER XXVI.

After the Action—A Scene of Horror—Arrival of the
‘ Rattlesnake’ and Prize at Plymouth.

‘SAQHE sun had disappeared below the horizon,
‘4 and the shades of evening were fast setting

3 in, before Lieutenant Godfrey could take
formal possession of the prize. Though after such a



hotly - contested action it was only to be expected
that the damage and loss sustained by the contending
vessels would be severe, Mr. Godfrey was quite unpre-
pared for the scene of disorder and bloodshed that
presented itself to his gaze when he stepped on board
the corvette. Her hull appeared to be torn to pieces
by shot ; her deck was ripped up in places; bitts shot
away ; and several of her guns dismantled. But it was
not the damage done to the ship herself that shocked
him,—such damage could be made good by the carpenter
and his crew ; but who could restore life and animation
to the heap of ‘shattered humanity’ that encumbered
the blood-stained deck ?

‘Merciful Heaven!’ exclaimed Mr, Godfrey, as he
170 7




A Scene of [Horror. i

I

boas

surveyed the ghastly spectacle. ‘Never before have I
beheld such slaughter! The ship has the appearance of
a shambles.’

The French lieutenant, ‘ Citizen’ Renouf, was waiting
at the gangway to receive Mr. Godfrey. He both
understood and could speak English, and, hearing these
remarks, he said, in sad tones,—

‘ Hélas, monsieur /! you may well say that. We have
lost nearly half our crew. My captain is amongst the
slain, and I, Pierre Renouf, first lieutenant of this
vessel, now surrender the command to you. And,
taking his sword from its frog, he handed it to Mr.
Godfrey.

‘No, sir, said Godfrey, returning the weapon; ‘ Cap-
tain Reynolds desired me to request that you and your
brother officers will retain your sidearms. He knows
how to respect a brave enemy, and congratulates you
upon your defence.’

‘ Ha, monsteur, rejoined Renouf, his pale face flushing
with pride, ‘ it is my comrade, Second Lieutenant Eugene
Lamont, who merits your compliments. It is he who
fought our ship through the greater part of the action ;
for my captain and I were hors de combat early in the
day, and when I took command, my first order was to
strike our flag.’

It was not until the following morning that the loss
of the enemy could be ascertained. It was then made
known that, out of a complement of one-hundred-and-
ninety-five officers, seamen, and marines, the Cerf had
172 Lar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

fifty-one killed and thirty-one wounded—nearly half
her crew, as Lieutenant Renouf had said.

The Rattlesnakes casualty list showed that she had
lost her second lieutenant, her master, two midshipmen,
and thirteen seamen and marines killed ; her boatswain,
one midshipman, and nineteen seamen and marines
wounded. Besides these, Mr. Ashcroft and two of the
Marathon's seamen lost their lives, and Nicholas Brodribb
was dangerously wounded.

In a few days after the action, the Rattlesnake and
her prize reached Plymouth, Captain Reynolds having
considered it advisable to make for the nearest port,
instead of continuing his voyage to Portsmouth. At
Plymouth the survivors of the Marathon took leave of
one another, and went their several ways.

Dr. and Mrs, Somers started off tor London, accom-
panied by Mrs. Brydges and by Miss Falcon, who,
before she quitted the brig, had said ‘Yes’ to a certain
question put to her by Mr. Godfrey.

Hartley and Garland, and the seamen of the Marathon,
also went up to town, to report themselves and the loss
of their ship at the East India Company’s Office in
Leadenhall Street.

Major Pennefeather, who belonged to the Plymouth
Division of Marines, reported himself at headquarters ;
and, having obtained leave of absence until the authori-
ties had decided whether he was to sail again for
Bombay, or rejoin his division, he took lodgings: at
Stonehouse. Nicholas Brodribb was now out of danger,
Arrival at Plymouth. 173

but Dr. Somers left directions that for the present he
must keep to his bed, so he was carried to Major
Pennefeather’s lodging in a litter.

Before the Rattlesnake \eft Portsmouth, Captain
Reynolds paid Nicholas a visit, and, after conversing
with him for a short time, he said,—

‘Your friend Pennefeather tells me that you wish to
get a commission in the Marines. Now, I consider that,
under Providence, I owe my life to your presence of
mind and courage, and, my dear boy, you shall not find
me ungrateful. It was my intention to have offered
you a midshipman’s berth in my next ship, but, as you
prefer to wear a red coat to a blue jacket, I will instead
use my interest to get you appointed to the Marines.
The major does not think the authorities will grant you
a commission for a year or so, because you are under
age, but, rely upon it, I’ll do my very best for you.’

Nicholas was overjoyed, and warmly expressed his
thanks to the captain.

For by no means a short time did our hero remain in
these rather close but comfortable quarters, under the
care of his good friend Major Pennefeather and of Raoul
Giraud, whom the major had invited to take up his
abode with them until he could be sent over to France.
SSS
NEB SSS SSS

4 Mi
My
7]

4
iN

Pll



i
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SSsSss=

CHAPTER XXVII.

Nicholas Brodribb dons the‘ Red Jacket’—
The Major's Presentiment.

SHANKS to Captain Reynolds’s powerful
’ interest with their High and Mightinesses the
Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, Nich-
olas Brodribb obtained a commission in the corps of
Marines, many months sooner than his friend Major Jor-
dan Pennefeather had either expected or even hoped for.

It was the rule in those days—in order to prevent the
scandal of quite young persons, sometimes children not
quite out of the nursery, being appointed to regiments —
that no one should receive a commission in His Majesty’s
army or marine forces until he should have entered



upon his seventeenth year.

But it is proverbial that there never yet existed a rule
without an exception, and so, to his immense satisfac-
tion, our hero was gazetted to a second lieutenancy in

1 It was at one time no uncommon occurrence for an infant in arms to be
gazetted to a regiment. We have all heard of the baby major—a veritable
field-officer drawing pay and allowances—‘ greetin’ for his parritch’ !

174

\
Nicholas the Marine. 175

the Marines, on January 3, 1794; he being at that date
fifteen years and four months old,though, asthe major and
his other friends declared, he looked at least eighteen.

Major Pennefeather, as we have said before, belonged to
the Plymouth Division of Marines ; and to the Plymouth
Division ouryouthfulsubaltern was posted on appointment.

Determined to prove himself deserving of the recom-
mendation of his patron, and of the favour shown to
him, and anxious to win an honourable name as a
zealous and intelligent officer, Nicholas Brodribb set
manfully to work to learn his drill, and master all the
details of his new profession. This he soon succeeded
in doing, and at the end of two months the adjutant
declared him to be perfectly qualified ‘to do duty,’

But Nick had a harder task to perform than the
learning of the ‘goose-step,’ etc,; or the manifold duties
of a subaltern officer.

He was very young, and he now found himself thrown
amidst temptations such as he had never dreamt of (temp-
tations which have wrecked many bright, promising lads at
the commencement of their career), but, thanks to a natur-
ally good disposition, an innate dislike to dissipation and
other ‘crooked ways,’ and no less to the watchful care of
Major Pennefeather, our hero managed to steer clear of
trouble ; and by the time he was dismissed from drill,
he had gained the good-will of his brother officers, and
was pronounced a steady, well-conducted youngster, and
likely to do credit to his famous and honourable:corps.

Nicholas remained at the headquarters of his division
until May 12, 1794, when he had the good fortune to
176 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

be appointed ‘supernumerary marine officer’ on board
the Crescent, 36-gun frigate, commanded by Captain
James Saumarez.

‘Nick, said Major Pennefeather, when his young
friend informed him that he had been ordered on sea-
service, ‘why don’t you apply for a few days’ leave
before joining your ship ?’

‘Wherecould I goto, major?’ objected Nicholas. ‘There’s
no time for me to get to Guernsey and back ; besides, it is
quite likely the Crescent will be visiting the island shortly.’

‘Well, I have been thinking that you ought to hunt
up your father’s relatives, replied the major.

‘What! the Brodribbs, sir?’

‘Yes, Where did you tell me they lived ?’

‘Ata village called F n, near to Rickmansworth,
in Hertfordshire,’ answered Nicholas. ‘The address is
in my family Bible,’

‘Humph! it’s a long way. Still, I think you ought to go.’

‘But I have never seen, or even heard from any of
them. I don’t even know if there’s a Brodribb alive.
My grandfather must be dead, you know.’

‘Oh, a family doesn’t die out in twenty years, Nick,’ re-
joined Major Pennefeather. ‘Come, my boy, do as I tell
you. Putin forafortnight’s leave,and start off for F n.
I have a presentiment that good will come of it.’

‘Very well, major, laughed Nicholas. ‘After all, I
should rather like to visit my father’s native village.’

So he applied for and obtained leave, and in a few
days set out for London, em route for Hertfordshire,
whither we will follow him.




ISS
‘
CEES

OX

CIO



CHAPTER XXVIII.

Tells how Nicholas Brodribb visited his Father's Native
Village, and of the Adventure he met with on the way.

@\) FET was shortly after noonday, on May 26, 1794,
2, when the fast coach Harkaway, then running

oe between London and St, Albans, rattled
neougk the narrow streets of Rickmansworth, and
pulled up before the door of the Angel Inn.

‘Now, young gen’leman, said the purple-visaged
guard, addressing himself to Nicholas Brodribb, who was
seated beside him, ‘this be Rickmansworth, and that’—
pointing to the inn—‘be th’ Azge/, where ye'll al’ays
find good entertainment for man and beast. Thank ye
kindly, sir” he added, touching his hat, as Nick slipped
a coin into his ready palm. ‘This be your valise, I
think? Here, catch un, Sam! Good day t’ ye and
good luck! All right, Joe!’

And almost before the young traveller had fairly
alighted, the coachman gave the double thong to his
wheelers and a whistling hiss to his leaders, and the
Harkaway dashed down the High Street, the guard

M


178 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

announcing her advent to the inhabitants of the quiet
market-town by a loud and prolonged flourish on his
horn.

‘ Sharp work that, master!’ exclaimed the bow-legged
old fellow who performed the combined duties of ostler
and boots at the Agel, and who answered to the
name of Sam, as he gazed after the fast-receding coach,
admiration depicted on every feature of his rugged
countenance. ‘Sharp work, sir! The ’Avkaway used
to change here,’ he added, with a melancholy sigh, ‘ but
now, worse luck, she goes on to th’ Budl’s Mouth, right
tother end o’ th’ town. Hey! but ’tis many and many
a shillin’ out o’ my pocket, her not stoppin’ at th’ old
house! Be ye a-goin’ to stay here, master ?’

‘No, I think not,’ rejoined Nick, with some hesitation.
‘I want to get on to F n

‘Want to get on to F——n, do ye?’ repeated the ostler.

‘Yes, my man. How far do you call it from here?’

‘Betwixt four and foive mile by th’ road, master.
But if ye’ve a mind for to walk, why, there’s a short cut
through the fields. What part of F——n d’ye wish to
be goin’ to?’

‘Well, my good fellow,’ laughed the other, amused at
Sam’s loquacity, ‘I must answer that question by asking
you another. Can you tell me whether there’s a family
of the name of Brodribb still living at F
neighbourhood ?’

* Hey! to be sure there be, was the reply. ‘Theer’s
Joseph Brodribb o’ th’ Manor Farm; and theer’s the





n, or in the
Nicholas visits his Father's Home. 179

miller, Nic’las Brodribb—young Nick, as we used to call
him, when th’ old chap wur alive—he lives at the Mill
Cottage; and then theer’s Mrs, Dorothy Brodribb, who
keeps th’ school. Ah, they’ve done well for themselves,
have they Brodribbs, and they desarves their good luck,
that they does !’

‘I’m glad to hear it,’ was our hero’s Gioiite remark,

‘Glad to hear it, be ye?’ rejoined the ostler, with a
puzzled expression. ‘Bless me, sir, if, now I comes to
look at ye, I don’t b’lieve ye be a Brodribb ye’self.’

‘Indeed!’ said Nick, with a conscious smile. ‘Now,
my friend, please be good enough to tell me the nearest
road to Mr. Joseph Brodribb’s house.’

‘Sart’nly, master. Ye means to walk, don’t ye?’

‘Yes, I think so, answered Nicholas, ‘for I’m not a
little cramped after my long ride on the coach, so may
just as well stretch my legs. I’ll leave my valise here,
he added, ‘if there’s no objection. Perhaps you'll take
charge of it ?’

‘Very good, sir, rejoined the ostler, scenting a ‘tip.
‘Tl look a’ter it for ye.

He then proceeded to give our hero full, and, for a
wonder, plain, understandable directions how to find his
way across the fields to F n, and also how to recog-
nise the Manor Farm; and Nicholas, having bestowed
upon him the looked-for douceur, started off at a good
swinging pace,

“Now who in the world be that young chap?’ Sam
asked himself, as he pocketed the welcome coin. -‘ He’s


180 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

a Brodribb, Pll lay my Sunday hat agen half-a-pint o’
fourpenny. But which on’em, why, I’m blessed if I can
tell.’

Following the line of country described to him by the
old ostler, Nick proceeded on his way; through Rick-
mansworth, then by a bridle-path, across a wide extent
of grass and plough land stretching away to the left of
the St. Albans road, to the borders of a considerable
wood, on the further side of which lay the village of
F n. Skirting this wood was a narrow lane, which
the ostler had told him led direct to the Manor Farm.

Into the lane Nicholas turned; and he had walked
perhaps half-a-mile along it, when he was ‘brought up
all standing,’ by a shrill cry of distress.

‘Halloa!’ he exclaimed, as he stopped short to listen.
‘ There’s somebody come to grief! A woman, too, I do
believe.’

‘Help! oh, help me! repeated the same voice
piteously.

Then Nick heard the gruff tones of a man answering
the appeal for assistance with a savage oath, and ‘ Hold
thee tongue, wench, or I tell ’ee twill be th’ worse for
thee.’

Nick at once set off at a run, and, turning a sharp
corner, came suddenly upon a ruffianly-looking fellow
struggling with a young girl, who, the moment she
caught sight of our hero, uttered an exclamation of joy,
and, freeing herself from her assailant, rushed towards
him with outstretched arms, crying,—


Nicholas Adventure in the Lane. 181

‘Save me, sir! save me, or I shall be murdered !’

The man hesitated a moment before following his
victim, but, seeing
that Nicholas was
only a lad, not
half his weight, and
probably littlemore
than half his age,he
plucked upcourage,
and, advancing ina
threatening man-
ner, said,—

‘Now look ’ee
here, my young
cocksparrow, don’t
thee interfere ’twixt
this girl and me
’cos I tell ee if thee
do, I'll make it hot
for thee.’

Nicholas eyed
the fellow, and saw
at once that in
point of strength
he would certainly
be overmatched ;
but this did not
prevent his declaring his intention to protect the poor
girl at any cost, whereupon the man rushed upon him.


182 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

Now Nicholas carried a stout ash-plant, having a brass
ferule at one end, and a good big knob at the other;
and when his formidable assailant attempted to close
with him, he just stepped smartly back to avoid his grip;
then, using his stick as if it were a foil, he lunged out,
and caught the fellow full in the mouth, knocking half-a-
dozen teeth down his throat, and laying open his cheek
from the corner of the mouth almost to the ear.

With a yell of rage and pain, the man staggered back,
- and, before he could recover himself, Nicholas sprang
forward and dealt him a swashing blow between the
eyes with the knob end of his ash-plant, bringing him
heavily to the ground.

The man, in spite of the punishment he had received,
endeavoured to regain his feet, but Nicholas was not
slow to follow up the advantage he had gained, and,
raining blow after blow on his adversary’s head, knocked
the senses completely out of him.

‘I think I’ve settled the fellow,’ was Nick’s gleeful
exclamation, when the man could no longer ‘ come up to
time.’ ‘He’d have done tor me and the girl too, if I
hadn’t. Where zs the girl?’ he added, looking round
him.

And to his dismay he saw that she had swooned, and
was lying prostrate in the middle of the lane.

‘Whew-ew!’ whistled Nicholas. ‘This is a pretty
job! What on earth am I to do with the young
woman ?P






CHAPTER XXIX.

Tells who was the Young Lady whom our Hero had the
Good Fortune to rescue.

7G,N truth, Nicholas Brodribb had good reason to
consider his present situation as hardly a

SaaeAS pleasant one!

True,he had—by a display of dexterityand cool courage
remarkable in a lad of his age—overcome a powerful
and determined ruffian, thereby saving an innocent girl
from a violent death—for that the fellow intended to
murder her, Nick never doubted; but now the young lady,
instead of being able to take advantage of this timely
interference by making good her retreat, lay helpless on
the ground, and her cowardly assailant might at any
moment recover from the stunning effects of the blows
_ he had received, and renew the attack ; this time with
results less favourable to her and her youthful protector.

‘Bother!’ exclaimed Nicholas, eyeing the girl’s sense-
less form with a mingled expression of solicitude and
perplexity, ‘what on earth did she want to faint for? If

she had only managed to scuttle off, 1 might have made
183


184 Lar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

a running fight of it, keeping that fellow at bay until she
got clear away; but now, if he comes up to time again,
I shall have my work cut out to save her. I wonder if
there’s any one within hail? It’s a lonely spot, to be
sure. I’ve half a mind to give the brute another clip
over the head, just to make sure of his keeping quiet.
It’s no more than he deserves, but then—well, I’ll have
a look at him, anyhow.’

So, tightening his grasp of the ash-plant, Nicholas went
up to his prostrate foe, and, bending over him, saw at a
glance that the chances of his coming to his senses, at
any rate for the present, were exceedingly remote. The
man was alive, but quite senseless.

‘ That's a precious good job!’ said Master Nick, with
a sigh of relief. ‘I shouldn’t have liked to hit the fellow
again ; at least, not while he’s down.’

Meanwhile, the ‘young woman ’—who fortunately was
more frightened than injured—had recovered a little, and
was now staring about her as though half-dazed, as she
very well might be.

Seeing this, Nicholas ran up, and, raising her as gently
as he could, anxiously inquired whether she was much
hurt.

‘I’m afraid that cowardly fellow treated you roughly,’
he said. ,

‘Where—where am I?’ the poor girl asked, looking
at him in utter bewilderment.

‘Don’t be frightened ; it’s all right, I assure you!’
rejoined Nick soothingly. ‘You were attacked by some
Gipsy Ben. 185 -

rascal—a foot-pad, I suppose. Now, lean on me, please ;’
and with that he half led, half carried her to the side of
the lane, where she could rest on a strip of soft turf,
sloping down from the hedgerow.

The girl’s scattered senses were gradually returning,
and presently she looked up at Nicholas, and murmured
her thanks.

‘I am very glad I came up in time,’ rejoined Nick,
with a slight blush ; for he had just been thinking what
a pretty girl she was, and felt half afraid that she must
have caught him casting an admiring glance at her.
‘You're better now, aren’t you?’

‘Yes—yes. I think so, she replied, passing her hand
across her eyes. ‘I remember—it was “Gipsy Ben,”
who threatened to murder me. Has he gone away, sir?’
she asked, with a shudder.

‘He’s hardly in a condition to go away,’ was Nick’s
rejoinder. ‘Unless I’m much mistaken, “Gipsy Ben,” as
you call him, will require carrying. You see I was
obliged to hit the scoundrel rather hard.’

‘Ben Cooper is a dreadful man,’ the girl said, ‘and has
given my. father a deal of trouble. He married our
dairy-maid last fall, and for her sake we’ve kept him on,
but yesterday my father was obliged to turn him off the
farm, and to-day he said he would kill me in revenge.’

‘Cowardly ruffian!’ cried Nick, with righteous indigna-
tion. ‘I wish we had him on board ship for a month or
two.’

‘Then you're a sailor, sir?’
”

186 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

‘I was a sailor, Nicholas replied; adding proudly,
‘now I am an officer in the Marines. But, I say,’ he
went on, ‘we oughtn’t to sit chattering here. If youcan
manage to walk, I will escort you home ; and then, you
know, we can send some of your father’s men to secure
this fellow. It will never do to let him get away.’

‘Oh, I can manage to walk home,’ answered the girl,
rising with some little effort to her feet, ‘though I’m
afraid I shall have to go slowly. It’s not very far—about

.a mile, that’s all. I live at the Manor Farm,’

‘What?’ said Nicholas, looking curiously at her; ‘do
you mean the. Manor Farm at F. nP’

“Yes ; do you know my home, sir?’

‘No, I carfnot say I do, for this is my first visit to
Hertfordshire, replied Nicholas. ‘But, he added, with
a smile, ‘I was on my way to the Manor Farm when
I fell in with you. Will you tell me your name?’

‘Alice Brodribb,’ was the reply. ‘And yours, sir?’

‘I suppose you are Mr. Joseph Brodribb’s daughter ?’
returned Nick, disregarding her question.

‘Yes,’ Miss Alice answered ; ‘his only daughter—
indeed, his only child. But you haven’t told me your
name, sir, she added, with a demure look.

‘Did you ever hear your father speak of a relation
named Jacob?’

‘To be sure I have!’ cried Alice Brodribb. ‘His
youngest brother, you mean?—my Uncle Jacob, whom
Inever saw! He enlisted at Rickmansworth, and was
killed in America long before I was born. Poor Uncle


Nicholas discovers a Relation. 187

Jacob! my father often talks about him, for he was his
favourite brother.’

‘But Jacob Brodribb was not killed in America, Miss
Alice, said Nicholas, who felt pleased to hear that his
father had not been forgotten. ‘He lost his arm at the
battle of Bunker’s Hill, was sent home, received a com-
mission as ensign of an invalid company in Guernsey,
and was killed in Jersey in 1781.’

‘And pray, sir, how comes it that you know so much
about my Uncle Jacob?’ the girl asked.

There was a shade of suspicion in her voice and
manner which Nicholas was quick to detect, and he
laughingly replied, ‘Well, you see, Miss Alice, I
happen to be your Uncle Jacob’s son. We are cousins,
you and [!’

Alice Brodribb gave a cry of mingled pleasure and
surprise, as, seizing Nick’s hand, she said, ‘ How pleased
my father will be to see you! Let us get home at once,
Cousin Re

‘Nicholas, put in our hero; ‘Nicholas is my name;
Cousin Alice.’

‘Then you are called after our grandfather!’ she
rejoined. ‘But come along, Nicholas; let us be going.’

‘One moment, Alice,’ he replied. ‘I should like to
make sure of this fellow before we leave him. Can you
lend me a handkerchief ?—that scarf you wear round your
neck will do. I want to tie “Gipsy Ben’s” wrists and
ankles, so that he may not get away.’

Alice at once took the scarf from her neck, and with


188 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

that and a couple of handkerchiefs and his own cravat,
Nicholas securely fastened the unconscious ruffian’s
hands and feet.

‘There, said he, turning the fellow over on his back,
‘“Gipsy Ben” will be puzzled to cast those lashings
loose. Now I’m ready, Cousin Alice.’

So they started off, Nicholas giving his arm to Alice,
and in that ‘Darby and Joan’ fashion they presently
reached the farmhouse.




CHAPTER XXX.

Shows how Nicholas was welcomed by his Father's
Relatives, and how Major Pennefeather’s. Presenti-
ment was fulfilled,

ceived from Farmer Brodribb and his spouse.
The worthy couple would have been pleased to
see him under any circumstances, but when Alice toldthem
how their new-found nephew had rescued her from the
clutches of ‘Gipsy Ben,’ their gratitude knew no bounds.
‘My dear lad!’ cried the farmer, embracing him, ‘how
can we thank thee? Thou shalt be to us as a son!’
‘Ay, indeed!’ said Mrs. Brodribb, tears of joy cours-
ing down her cheeks. ‘But for thee, nephew, this would
have been a sorrowful day for my good man and me!’
‘I’m sure that I shall never forget you, Cousin Nicholas,’
Miss Alice chimed in, with a shy look. ‘But, daddy dear,
hadn’t we better send some of the men to see after Ben
Cooper?’ she added ; for, though barely fifteen years of
age, she was a very practical young lady, and had a good
deal to say to the ‘Management both of the house and


190 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

farm. ‘We left him lying insensible in Wood Lane, and
Nicholas tied him up so that he mightn’t get away.’

‘To be sure, my dear, Mr. Brodribb rejoined. ‘Job
Cross shall take a cart, and a couple of the farm hands,
and we'll send the rascal into Rickmansworth. By the
way, nephew, have you not brought a change of clothes
with you?’

‘T left my valise at the Ange/, at Rickmansworth.’

‘Then Job must call for it. Mother, look you after
_ the lad whilst I send off the cart.’

After supper that evening, Nicholas related to the
Brodribbs all.that he knew concerning his father, and
also gave them a brief account of his own adventures
and future prospects.

Joseph Brodribb was not a little pleased to hear that
Nicholas was an officer in His Majesty’s Service. He _
and his wife were a thrifty, industrious couple, and,
without being ambitious, were by no means disinclined
to rise in the world. Their daughter had received a
very good education, and was naturally a sensible, lady-
like girl; and, at the same time, both able and willing
. to assist her mother in managing their household.

‘I’m very glad I took the major’s advice!’ quoth
Master Nick, as he blew out his light and turned in for
the night. ‘Uncle Joseph and his wife are very kind ;
and as to Alice—well, she’s the nicest and prettiest girl
fever met! Why, Miss Falcon couldn’t hold a candle
to her, and she was good-looking enough!’

Nicholas remained three days at the Manor Farm
Joseph Brodribb and Nicholas. IQI

and then set out on his return journey to Plymouth;
for his leave was up on the 4th June, and he was to join
the Crescent on the 5th.

On the morning of his departure, Mr. Brodribb took
him aside, and, placing ten pounds in his hands, said,—

‘Take that, my lad; and remember that every month
so long as I continue to prosper, as, thank God! I’m
prospering now, I'll
sendtheealikesum.
Nay,nephew! don’t
refuse me; I can
wellaffordit,and’tis
a real pleasure for
me to give it thee!
And hark ye, Nic-
holas, the worthy
farmer wenton,with
a pleasant smile;
‘the Manor Farm
will al’ays be your
home; and if ever
thee and my dear
lass are minded to
make a match o’ it





—as my old woman seems to think ye will—ye'll have my
cordial consent. God bless and protect thee, lad; and
may He bring thee safe home again from foreign parts!’

Well, Nick? said Major Pennefeather, when, on his
192 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

return to Plymouth, our hero gave him a full account
of his adventures and of his uncle’s generosity, ‘didn’t
I tell you that good would come of your visit to Rick-
mansworth ?’

‘You did, sir? laughed Nicholas; ‘but you never
thought I should fall on my legs as I have done,’
' ‘No, I certainly did not, the major admitted. ‘Here’s
your health, my boy, and a pleasant commission in the
Crescent !?




CHAPTER XXXI.

Nicholas joins the ‘Crescent; and sails for Guernsey—
Shows how Captain Sir James Saumarez saved his
Squadron from being captured by the French.

ZUR young lieutenant joined the Crescent on the
E 5th June, and was very kindly received by
Captain Saumarez, who had heard the boy
well spoken of, though he was not personally acquainted
with him. There was one other marine officer on board,
a Lieutenant Henry Hodge, whom Nicholas had met
once or twice at the Marine mess.

The Crescent had only a few days before returned to
Plymouth from a cruise off the coast of France adjacent
to the Channel Islands; and on the morning after
Nicholas joined her, Captain Saumarez received the
following order from the port-admiral :—



“You are hereby required and directed to take under
your command His Majesty’s ships, luggers, and cutters
named in the margin,! and proceed first with them to

1 Druid, 36-gun frigate ; Valiant, Dolphin, Cockchafer, Active, Prest-

wood, luggers and cutters,
N
194 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

Guernsey and Jersey, and then endeavour to ascertain
the force the enemy may have in Cancath Bay and St.
Malo’s, and then return to Cawsand Bay, leaving the
Prestwood cutter with Captain Ball, of H.M.S. Pury.
(Signed) ‘JOHN M‘BRIDE, Admiral.’

In accordance with this order, Sir James Saumarez
weighed anchor on the 7th June, and sailed for Guernsey,
having with him, besides the little squadron named in
the admiral’s letter, the 24-gun frigate Eurydice, Captain
Francis Cole.

On the morning of the 8th June, the look-out man
stationed at the Cvescent masthead reported four ships
and a cutter away to windward. The Crescent and her
consorts were then on the larboard tack, some twelve
leagues to the north of Guernsey, with a fresh breeze
blowing from the north-east.

Captain Saumarez did not at first consider that the
strange sail were French ships, and he signalled to the
Valiant lugger to reconnoitre them; whereupon they
hoisted the tricolour, and opened fire on the lugger.

It was now seen that the enemy’s squadron consisted
of two s0-gun ships (Le Scevola and Brutus), two 36-
gun frigates, and a 12-gun brig (Dande, Felicité, and
Terreur)—a force so superior in numbers and weight of
metal, that Sir James did not consider himself justified
in coming to an engagement, especially as the Eurydice
was a notoriously bad sailer.

He accordingly ordered Captain Cole to make the
Escape of the ‘ Crescent.’ 195

best of his way to Guernsey, whilst the Crescent and
Druid kept under easy sail, in order to cover their slow-
sailing consort’s retreat.

The Frenchmen immediately gave chase, and for a
time were distantly engaged by the Crescent and Druid,
until the Eurydice was so far in-shore as to render her
escape a certainty. Sir James Saumarez then made
sail, but seeing that the Frenchmen were coming up
hand-over-hand, and that the Druid would probably be
captured, he tacked and closed with them, actually
passing along their line. This gave the Druid an
opportunity of escaping, and she and the Eurydice were
soon safe in Guernsey roads. The capture or destruc-
tion of the Crescent now appeared to be inevitable—it
seemed impossible that she could escape from her five
powerful pursuers, The action was watched by hundreds
of Guernsey folk, among them many of Sir James’s own
kith and kin, who had assembled on the shore, and loud
were their lamentations at their inability ‘to render aid
to their gallant compatriot.

But Sir James knew well what he was about, and had
already conceived a scheme for the preservation of his
ship. He was himself thoroughly acquainted with the
coast; and, moreover, he had on board his frigate a
trusty pilot—honest John Breton, from the CAtel (Sir
James’s own) parish.

As soon, therefore, as the Eurydice and Druid had
made good their escape, Captain Saumarez bore up as
though he would run the Cvescent on the rocks, in order
196 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

to avoid capture ; but his real intention was to take her
through a narrow channel, which had never before been
attempted by a vessel of her size, and, accordingly, he
sent John Breton to the wheel.

‘Can you see the marks for running through, Jean?’
inquired Sir James, addressing the pilot in Guernsey-
French, when they were passing the most hazardous
part of the channel. ‘Are you sure of them?’

‘Ma fot, m’sieur !’ responded John Breton, ‘but I am
quite sure, See, then, there is your house, and there is
my own!’

Sir James’s skilful manceuvre was crowned with
success, for, in a short time, the Crescent reached her
anchorage in safety, to the surprise and mortification of
the French commanders, who, after sending several shots
over the rocks in the vain hope of crippling the British
frigate, gave up the contest, and made all possible haste
to get clear of the fire of the shore-batteries, which now
opened upon them.

‘IT say! that was a close thing, observed Nicholas,
who had been on tenter-hooks all the time, for he knew
the dangers of the coast.

‘Yes, indeed,’ replied his brother-officer, Mr. Hodge:
‘You're lucky, my boy, in seeing your first “sea-service”
under such a captain !
aN
: SS SS

WHE CERES ESS ISO BETO URE



CHAPTER XXXII.

Nicholas is appointed to the ‘ Hussar’ Frigate—
Service in the Mediterranean.

Qs ICHOLAS remained on board the Crescent, as

k supernumerary marine officer, until the spring
of ’95, when Sir James Saumarez was, at
his own request, removed to the Orion, 74; to which
ship the ‘Crescents’ volunteered, and — with a few
exceptions— were permitted to follow him. Of the
exceptions, Nicholas was one, for, being a super-
numerary, he was ordered to rejoin the headquarters
of the Plymouth Division. He did not, however,
have a very long spell ashore, for early in the year
1796 he received a letter from his good friend,
Captain Reynolds, — who had just been appointed
to the command of the Hussar, 44 - gun frigate, —
asking him whether he would like to go to sea with
him.

Colonel Pennefeather strongly advised Nick to accept
the offer, and accordingly, thanks to Captain Reynolds’
influence, he was appotated: junior marine officer of the


198 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

Hussar, the senior being a captain-lieutenant of the
Chatham Division, Francis Selby by name.

The. Hussar was quite a new ship, and one of the
finest of her class in the British navy. Her model was
beautiful,and she measured nearly 1400 tons. Her arma-
ment consisted of thirty-two 18-pounders on the main
deck, and twelve 32-pounder carronades and six ‘long
nines’ on her quarter-deck and forecastle. Her crew
numbered 410, all told, officers, sailors, and marines,

The Hussar’s destination was the Mediterranean ; and
on that station, under such an enterprising commander,
all hands looked forward to a stirring commission, and
began to reckon up their prize-money in anticipation.

Nick soon found himself at home in the frigate’s ward-
room. Amongst his new messmates were two young
men who had been with Captain Reynolds in the Rattle-
snake, namely, the third lieutenant, James Sidney, and
the- surgeon, Doctor Macan, who were respectively
midshipman and assistant-surgeon of the brig when
she engaged the corvette Le Cerf. These gentlemen
welcomed our hero as an old friend, and expressed them-
selves as greatly pleased at having him for a shipmate.

There was another ward-room officer with whom
Nick could claim some acquaintance. This was the
master, Mr. Joseph Le Patourel, a Guernseyman, who
had ‘come in at the hawse-holes’—that is to say, he
had, after forty-five years’ sea service, in almost every
description of vessel afloat, won his way up from fisher-
boy to master of a fine frigate.
A Son of Sarnia. 199

‘Old Soundings,’ as the master was usually. styled,
was a great favourite with Captain Reynolds, who well
knew his sterling worth, and had used his influence
to get him appointed to the Hussar. He was an
immensely stout man, and must have weighed close on
twenty stone; his girth was enormous ; indeed, it might
have been said of him that—

‘For beef on the rib, no Leicestershire bullock was rounder,’

With this fine old ‘son of Sarnia,’ Nick became very
intimate, for Guernseymen are clannish, and always
stick to one another, though, as a matter of fact, Mr. Le
Patourel had not set foot in the island for more than
thirty years, and had quite forgotten his native patois.

The other ward-room officers—the first and second
‘luffs” the purser, and the chaplain— were pleasant
fellows enough, and there seemed every prospect of the
Hussar being a happy ship.

The Hussar sailed from Spithead on the 23rd
February, 1796, and made a quick run to Gibraltar.
After a short stay at ‘Gib, Captain Reynolds received
a sort of ‘roving commission’ from the admiral to
cruise between Perpignan and Marseilles, his instruc-
tions being to harass the Republicans as much as
possible, and to render any aid in his power to the
French Royalists on that coast; for, albeit those
monsters, the Jacobins, had perished on the same
scaffold which they had inundated with the blood of so
200 — Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

many of their compatriots, and scenes of indiscriminate
slaughter no longer disgraced France, a Frenchman who
favoured the exiled Bourbons, and might be suspected
of plotting against the Republic, lived with a sword
hanging over his head, and never knew the day or hour
when he might be compelled to fly the country.

To these devoted people it was a great boon to have
a friendly ship at hand, whose captain was always
ready to receive them on board, or assist them in their
scheme for the re-establishment of the anczen régime.

The Hussar soon made her presence felt in those
waters. .

Captain Reynolds kept the coast in a continual state
of alarm, and not a French vessel dared show her nose
out of port. Batteries the ‘Hussars’ laughed at, for
they either silenced them with their long 18-pounders
or landed and blew them up; and the Republican
troops and coastguards- were kept on the perpetual
gui vive, and must have denounced the ‘perfidious
English’ in terms more strong than polite.

This sort of work thoroughly suited our hero; he
distinguished himself on more than one occasion, and
his knowledge of the French language proved of great
assistance in carrying on a correspondence with the
Royalists. He was thus constantly employed, and
gained the approbation of Captain Reynolds, who
promised to recommend him to the admiral as a ‘ most
zealous young officer, one in every way worthy of his
patronage.’ ‘
Fe SE OI
pe a EI Sn RE IE A ee



CHAPTER XXXIII.

Relates how Captain Reynolds and his Officers paid a
- visit to the Chdteau Noirmont, and how they were
surprised by the French Dragoons.

\G NE of the most devoted, and at the same
J time most prudent, of the Bourbonists with
5 whom Captain Reynolds held constant
communication, was a certain Monsieur de Marcy,
Count de Noirmont. This gentleman, by his prudence
and sagacity, had succeeded in throwing dust in the
eyes of the Republican authorities of the neighbourhood,
and they, so far from suspecting him of Bourbonistic
proclivities, regarded him with considerable favour, and
had even used their influence to enable him to regain
possession of the Chateau de Noirmont and of a con-
siderable portion of his estates, of which he had been
deprived at the outbreak of the Revolution. The
count had, however, wisely dropped his title for
the more unassuming designation of ‘Citizen Marcy.’
The Hussar had been scouring the coast some six

weeks or more, when one fine day Captain Reynolds
201


202 Tar-bucket and Prpe-clay.

received a letter from ‘Citizen Marcy,’ stating that all
the Republican troops had departed from the neigh-
bourhood of Noirmont, and that he would be pleased to
entertain him at the chateau. At the same time, the
count suggested that it would be well for ‘Monsieur
le Capitaine’ to pay his visit ‘in force, so that he
(the count) might not be suspected of entertaining or
holding communication with the enemies of ‘La Belle
France.’

Captain Reynolds had no objection to a run on shore,
and, perceiving the wisdom of his correspondent’s sug-
gestions, he ordered the launch and large cutter to be
hoisted out and manned by their ‘fighting crews. He
also invited several of the officers to accompany him,
amongst others our hero and Mr. Le Patourel, the -
corpulent master.

At first Mr. Le Patourel strongly objected to leave
the frigate, which he declared ‘wouldn’t be safe without
him ;’ but the captain overcame his scruples, and the
worthy old fellow reluctantly consented to make one of
the party.

The crews of the launch and first and second cutters
were piped away shortly after breakfast; and, Captain
Reynolds and the officers who were to accompany him
having taken their places, the boats shoved off from the
frigate, and: pulled for the shore.

On landing, Captain Reynolds ordered half the crews
and all the marines to march with him to the chateau,
in order to keep up the notion that Monsieur de Marcy
The Chéteau Notrmont. 203

“was the victim of a raid, the remainder ot , the party
being left in charge of the boats.

The Chateau Noirmont was situated about a mile-
and-a-half from the beach, on rising ground that
commanded an extensive view of the neighbouring
country. A wild, romantic spot it ‘was; rocks piled
upon rocks, yet clothed with verdure; to the left, a
dark forest; to the right, a tract of undulating land,
well-cultivated, and reaching down almost to the water’s
edge, with the pretty village of Noirmont nestling in a
well-wooded valley.

Some of the country people witnessed the landing of
the ‘Hussars,’ and fled before them as they advanced
towards the chateau; whereupon Captain Reynolds
ordered the marines to fire a few shot over their heads,
but to take care not to hit any one; so the good folk of
Noirmont believed fully that the perfidious English
were ‘on the war-path,’ and one or two of their number
hurried off to the chateau with the startling news,
which was received by the ‘Citizen Marcy’ with well-
feigned dismay.

‘ Hélas, mes enfants !’ he cried ; ‘ would that our brave
soldiers were here! But resistance is in vain! we must
try to propitiate these terrible islanders.’ So he ordered
his household to prepare a sumptuous feast, declaring
that the shortest way to reach the “earts of the canaille
was through their stomachs.

The. preparations for their reception were hardly
completed before Captain Reynolds and his party
204 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

arrived at the chateau, and demanded admittance.
‘Citizen Marcy’ played his part well, and no one, not
in the secret, would have imagined that he was receiving
welcome guests; indeed, the count protested, gesticu-
lated, and expostulated in so realistic a manner, that
Captain Reynolds was astonished, and began to wonder
whether his host could possibly have been converted
during the night from an ardent Royalist into a red-hot
Republican.

However, in spite of the ‘Citizen’s’ protestations, the
chateau was occupied, and the ‘Count’ prepared to
entertain his guests.

‘Well, master, said Captain Reynolds, as they sat
at the well-covered table, doing ample justice to the
good fare provided for them, ‘how have you enjoyed
your walk?’

‘Very much, sir,” rejoined the old gentleman, who
was playing a capital knife and fork; ‘and Mossoo’s
provisions still more. But, he added, casting an uneasy
glance seawards, ‘I do fear that Mr. Sidney will be
gettin’ the ship too close in! I’m almost sorry I left
her.’

‘Never mind the ship, master,’ laughed the captain.
‘ They'll keep her afloat, never fear! Come, gentlemen,’
he went on, ‘fill your glasses, I have a toast to propose.
May the French king soon enjoy his own again !’

‘Ha, m’sieur le capitaine!’ said ‘Citizen Marcy,’
shrugging his shoulders with a well-feigned air of
Onwelcome Intelligence. 205

remonstrance; ‘you do not expect me to drink that
toast?’ But a close observer might have detected a
tear in the count’s eye, and, clever actor though he was,
he could not quite suppress an expression of satisfaction
at the enthusiastic manner in which the toast was drunk
by his guests.

The poor count’s pleasure was, however, of short
duration, for at this moment a servant entered the hall,
and whispered in his ear.

‘What is the matter, m’sieur?’ inquired Captain
Reynolds anxiously, seeing that his host turned deadly
pale.

‘Mon ami, whispered the count, ‘I have received
information that a regiment of dragoons is marching
against you with all possible speed. You must hasten
away, or I shall be undone!’

‘You are right, count, rejoined Captain Reynolds,
after a moment’s reflection. ‘We must not compromise
you. I will give orders for our party to retire at once.’


2S









%
P

ROKER



CHAPTER XXXIV.

Relates how Captain Reynolds and his party retired from
the Chiéteau Notrmont, and how ‘ Old Soundings,
captured three French Soldiers.




ARS

HIS most unexpected and unwelcome intelli-
/ gence—
‘broke the good meeting
With most admired disorder !’

The poor count, and those members of his household
who were in his confidence, were speechless with con-
sternation, whilst Captain Reynolds and his companions
were for the moment completely taken aback.

But the captain soon recovered his self-possession,
and his first thought was to ensure the safety of the
count and his family.

‘Mr. Brodribb, he said, addressing our hero, ‘call in
the marine guard.’

In a couple of minutes a sergeant and three files of
marines, who had been posted as a guard in the entrance
hall of the chateau, made their appearance; whereupon
Captain Reynolds ordered Nicholas to escort ‘ Citizen
A Run for Liberty. 207

Marcy’ and his family to one of the uppermost rooms,
and there confine them.

‘Your countrymen, finding you under lock and key, will
not suspect the truth,’ he whispered to his terrified host.
‘You can tell your own story. Au revoir, mon cher ami!’

Whilst Nicholas and the marines were placing the
inmates of the chateau in ‘durance vile, Captain Rey-
nolds held a brief consultation with his officers, and they
decided to make their way to the boats with all possible
speed.

But here a difficulty arose.

What was to become of their corpulent master? To
expect the old gentleman to vuz was absurd; a slow
march was his quickest pace. Two stalwart young top-
men, however, solved the problem, by volunteering to
carry Mr. Le Patourel.

‘We'll run the master down in no time, your honour,’
said one of these gallant fellows. ‘Only give us a bit ~
of a start, and let the “ jollies” cover our retreat.’

‘What say you, master?’ asked Captain Reynolds,
who, in spite of the gravity of the situation, could hardly
help smiling at the old gentleman’s expression of disgust.

‘Ugh—ugh !’ grunted ‘Old Soundings,’ resigning him-
self to his bearers. ‘Needs must, I suppose ; but cotch
me ever comin’ ’—

The rest of the sentence was lost in a groan of dismay,
as the topmen hoisted him on their shoulders, without
‘with your leave or by your leave,’ and started off at a
good round trot.
208 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

The rest of the party followed, Nicholas and his
marines bringing up the rear.

As soon as they were clear of the chateau grounds,
they caught sight of a strong body of caveny, riding
towards them at full speed.

‘Ha!’ exclaimed Captain Reynolds; ‘we've none too
much of a start ; those fellows will-quickly overhaul us.’

‘Shall-I give them a volley, sir?’ asked Nicholas. ‘I
think they’re within range of our muskets.’

‘No, no!’ rejoined the captain; ‘we mustn’t stop for
that. Get on, my lads, get on!’

Away went the whole party full speed, making straight
for the boats, which were just over the brow of a hill,
and so not yet in sight, The French dragoons raced
after them, and came up hand-over-hand. Z

‘We must check them a bit,’ presently observed the
captain, who was running beside Nicholas. ‘Let your
men give them a volley, Brodribb,’

The marines at once halted, and faced about, as coolly
as though on parade.

‘Fire into the thick of them, my lads !’ cried Nicholas,
as his men came to the present.

The ‘Brown Besses’ rang out, and half-a-dozen of the
Frenchmen rolled over.

‘Very good, marines!’ said Captain Reynolds approv-
ingly. ‘Don’t stop to reload. We shall be in sight of
the boats in another minute. Press on, my lads.’

By this time the dragoons were close on the heels of
the British, and some of them, reining in their horses,
A Stern Chase. 209

emptied their carbines. at the hindermost, fortunately
without effect.

There was now only a cornfield between the fugitives
and the descent to the boats. Up to this, the sailors
who were carrying the master had kept well up with the
rest of the party, but now they began to feel the weight
of their burden. Still on they staggered, determined to
save the old gentleman if possible, and right into the corn-
field they plunged. Mr. Le Patourel encouraged them,
both by word and gesture, and was now lugging out his
pistols to salute the enemy, if they came alongside of him.

‘Keep steady, sir! keep steady!’ cried his bearers,
with one voice ; ‘you'll capsize us !’ and the words were
hardly out of their mouths when over they went, sprawl-
ing amongst the corn.

Up they sprang again in an instant, but it was too
late to remount the master, for the dragoons were almost
upon them.

‘Save yourselves, my boys!’ gasped ‘Old Sound-
ings, seeing that they hesitated to leave him; and,
scrambling to his feet, he began to retire slowly, un-
daunted and resolute, with his face to the foe.

Again a few of the Frenchmen halted and fired, and the
poor old master fell backwards amidst the waving corn.

It was now a case of sauve gui peut! None of the
‘ Hussars’ wished to pay a visit to Verdun, and away they
went helter-skelter, officers, sailors, and marines. Every
man put his best foot foremost, and in another minute

they were tumbling into the boats,
oO
210 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

‘Shove off!’ cried the captain, when the last of his
men were safe on board.

Now the officer left in charge of the boats had guessed
that something was wrong directly he heard the firing ;
and so he had the carronades in the launch and big
cutter loaded with musket balls.

‘The guns are loaded, sir,’ said he to Captain Reynolds,
as the boats shot away from the beach. ‘Shall we give
those fellows a dose?’ and he pointed to the dragoons,
who had reached the brow of the hill, and afforded an
excellent mark.

‘ By all means, Jackson,’ responded the captain. ‘ Pull
round, lads, and we'll teach the crapauds a lesson.’

Cheering heartily, the ‘ Hussars’ pulled the boat round,
and the carronades were laid on the enemy.

Bang! bang! a storm of shots swept through the ranks
of the dragoons, doing considerable execution, and send-
ing them quickly to the rightabout.

* In the meanwhile, those on board the frigate had been
spectators of the whole scene; and directly they could
bring their guns to bear on the French horsemen, with-
out fear of injuring their own people, they opened a hot
fire of round and grape, which completed their confusion.

Away they went, right across country, at racing
speed ; officers and troopers urging their steeds to the
utmost, in order to escape from the destructive fire of
the Hussar. >

And now that the scrimmage was over, and the
discomfited Frenchmen were in full retreat, Captain








Where ts the Master ? 213

Reynolds bethought him of the poor old master, who, he
never doubted, was lying dead amongst the corn.

‘Which ‘of you lads saw Mr. Patourel last?’ he
asked, standing up in the stern-sheets of the launch.

‘I did, your honour,’ replied one of the topmen who
carried the old gentleman. ‘We’d got him ’bout half
ways through the corn, when we capsizes—all along o’
havin’ too much top hamper, d’ye see, sir. But the
master righted hisself agen, and we was a-goin’ to give
him another h’ist, when down came the Frenchmen and
give us a broadside. Mr. Le Patourel, he was knocked
over, and so me and Tom Brace made all sail for the
boats ; seeing as how it wasn’t no manner o’ use stoppin’
to be made pris’ners of!’

‘Did.you see the master after he fell?’ asked Captain
Reynolds.

' ‘No, sir,’ answered the man; ‘’cause why? the old
gen’leman was buried among the corn, for there be
a deep sort o’ hollow just where he fell, and I thinks he
rolled into it.

‘Poor old man!’ sighed sti captain, his eyes moisten-
ing as he spoke. ‘He is gone, no doubt.’

‘But we might recover his body, sir, » suggested Mr.
Bramwell, the second lieutenant.

‘T was thinking of that,’ rejoined the captain musingly.
‘I should like to give our old shipmate a seaman’s grave.’

There was a murmur of approval amongst the men,
for ‘Old Soundings’ was much respected by the ship’s
company; indeed, every soul, fore and aft, from the
214 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

skipper to the midshipmen’s boy, regarded him as a
friend ; and Captain Reynolds continued,—‘I will land
again with a dozen sailors and the marines; and you,
Bramwell, must remain in charge of the boats, ready to
support us should the Frenchmen return. Gentlemen,
he added, turning to the other officers who had accom-
panied him to the chateau, ‘you will, I am sure, wish to:
come with me.’ .

‘Ay, ay, sir,’ was the immediate response from all,
"including Mr, Lyle, the chaplain, who was one of the
party.

‘Then we'll lose no time, said the captain. ‘Give
way,’ my lads!’ In another minute the boats’ keels
grated on the beach, and Captain Reynolds, followed by
his officers, twelve of the seamen, and the marines from
the launch and cutters, sprang ashore.

The party drew up on the beach; Nicholas éxtended
his marines in skirmishing order, and the captain gave
the word. to advance. Up the ascent they went at a
sharp run, and had almost reached the summit, when
they heard a loud shout.

‘Forge ahead, ye lubbers! forge ahead!’ roared a
voice which there was no mistaking. ‘AJ/ong,I tell ye!
Allong plus vite I?

The master himself, by all that’s glorious!’ cried
Captain Reynolds, dashing forward, and the next
moment three French dragoons, dismounted and dis-
armed, appeared over the brow of the hill, whilst close
behind them, with a pistol in each hand, came ‘Old
The Biters bit. 215

Soundings,’ puffing and blowing with the unwonted
exertion, but otherwise sound as a roach.

A ringing cheer greeted his appearance. Captain
Reynolds seized his hand and shook it heartily, ex-
claiming,—

‘Thank Heaven, master, you’re safe!’

“Ay, ay,’ rejoined the old fellow, laughing; ‘that’s all
very well. But now aren’t ye a nice lot to leave a ship
in distress? Run, eh! fine clean-going craft like you
run! and allow a crazy, weather-beaten old hulk like me
to battle the watch with a whole fleet! But there, I don’t
bear malice, d’ye mind; for I’ve taken three prisoners
and ain’t that a feather in old Joseph’s cap? And now,
my sons, lend me a hand down to the boat, for I am
reg’larly stranded,’

As they walked down to the boat, the master explained

,

how he came not only to escape from, but to capture
three of the enemy. It appeared that he had tumbled
backwards into a hollow, where, being completely hidden
by the corn, he was not noticed by the dragoons, though
they passed over him. After they had retreated, finding
all quiet, the old boy crawled out ; and, suddenly coming
upon three dismounted dragoons, he promptly presented
his pistols at their heads, and compelled them to throw
down their arms and surrender.

With light hearts the boats were once more shoved
off from the beach; and that evening at dinner in the
captain’s cabin, ‘Old Soundings’’ health was drunk:
with ‘three times three,
sy







CHAPTER XXXV.
The Last of this ‘ Eventful History,



‘ENO follow the fortunes of an officer of marines,
/ actively employed, during the last decade of
» the eighteenth and the first decade of the
present century, would require far more space than can
here be accorded us; moreover, what would be little
else than a continuous record of that which ‘pertains
to feats of broil and battle, might prove wearisome
rather than entertaining. We will therefore pass over
in silence a considerable portion of our hero’s career,
and request our readers to imagine that some half-a-
dozen years have elapsed since the events narrated in
the previous chapter.

Between the autumn of 1796 and the spring of 1802,
Nicholas Brodribb saw more than enough of ‘grim-visag’d
war’ to sicken him of its horrors. During that stirring
period he fought in many actions ashore and afloat, and
won for himself fame, if not rank and fortune; but he lost,
too, many dear friends and comrades,—amongst others,
the gallant Captain Reynolds, who fell on his own quarter-
deck when engaged with a French ship of greatly superior

2
The Last of this ‘Eventful History’ 217

force; and the good-hearted Pennefather, his ‘second
father, who was killed at the defence of St. Jean d’Acre
in ’99—and right thankful was Nick when the Treaty of
Amiens (27th March 1802) brought peace to Europe.

He had not then long returned from a cruise in the
West Indies, and was spending a well-earned leave at the
Manor Farm, when he received orders to take charge of
a detachment of marines, serving on board the Courser,
28-gun frigate, a Channel cruiser employed principally
in the suppression of smuggling,

Nicholas was not best pleased at having his leave cut
short, for he was very happy in the society of his
relatives, more particularly in that of his pretty cousin
Alice, to whom he was engaged; besides, the idea of
smuggler-hunting in a ‘jackass’ frigate was not quite
to his liking ; but there was nothing for it but to obey
orders, and so, the morning after he received them, he
bade farewell to his uncle, aunt, and fiancée, and started
off for Rickmansworth to catch the London coach.

‘Now look ye, my boy,’ said his uncle at parting,
‘this must be your last cruise! The old lady and I are
getting on in years, and we want to see you and Alice
married before we're carried over yonder. You'll have
plenty to live on after we’re gone, and the farm will give
you occupation. Besides, he added, with a warning
shake of the head, ‘“the pitcher that goes to the well
too often comes to be broken!” You've escaped so far,
nephew, but you can’t expect to escape always.’

‘Well, my dear uncle, rejoined Nick, ‘Alice and I
have been talking matters over, and we have decided
218 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

that I shall give up the service at the end of the year.
I am rather. tired of knocking about, and shall be
thankful to settle down to a quiet country life.’

‘That’s right, nephew,’ cried the oldfarmer. ‘We'll have
a wedding at Christmas, if we’re all spared until then.’

' It was about eight o’clock in the evening of the 23rd
May, 1802, and H.M.S. Courser was slipping quietly
through the water off the coast of Devon, with a light
breeze from the westward.

‘Mr. Brodribb, said the quartermaster, entering the
ward-room, where our hero was busy inditing a letter to
Miss Alice, ‘the captain wants you in his cabin’

‘Halloa, Nick!’ cried the second lieutenant, ‘ what’s in
the wind now?’ ,

‘You're going to catch it, Brodribb, said the master,
who had just come off deck. ‘“Old Growler” is in one
of his tantrums,—got a touch of gout, I suppose!—
and has been abusing every man jack of us, fore and aft.
Swears thére’s not an officer or seaman in the ship that
knows his duty !°

‘So he is going to try what the marines can do,’
laughed the second lieutenant.

‘He couldn’t do better, my friend, retorted Nick, as
he left the ward-room.

Captain ‘Barlow of the Courser—or. ‘Old Growler, as
he was called behind his back—was one of the most un-
popular commanders in His Majesty’s Navy. For ever
finding fault, he was at constant variance with his officers,
who could do nothing to please him. He had, however,
The Last of this ‘Eventful History. 219

one virtue—he was not cruel to the men, and the ‘cat’
was rarely, if ever, used on board the Courser,

‘Humph, Mr. Brodribb,’ growled this old tiger, when
Nicholas presented himself before him. ‘You've the
reputation of being a smart officer, I believe! Very
good—I’m going to see whether you're worth your salt !
D’ye understand ?’

Our hero bowed ; he could not trust himself to reply ;
and the captain went on :—

‘T’ve received information that the Sa//y, a large smug-
gling lugger, is expected to cross, and either run, or sink
and anchor her cargo after dark. Now, the breeze is too
light for the frigate to chase such a sneaking clipper as
this Sa//y, so I intend to bring up in Torbay for the
night,—as if I suspected nothing,—but to leave a boat
behind me to capture the lugger. You, sir, are to com-
mand that boat.’

‘I, sir?’ exclaimed Nicholas in astonishment.

‘Yes—you, sir, repeated Captain Barlow. ‘I know
it’s not customary to send away a marine officer on
such an errand, but I don’t care one jot about customs.
My ward-room officers are not worth their salt, the
warrant officers are no better, and as for the midship-
men, there is not one in the berth that I could trust
with a washing-tub; so, Mr. Brodribb, I intend that
you should go, At one bell, you'll man and arm the
double-banked twelve-oared cutter; take six of your
men with you, and a mate to bring the boat back in
case you get killed; and just hang about this part of
the coast, keeping close in-shore, until you see a sky-
220 Tar-bucket and Pripe-clay,

rocket, then keep your eyes open and look out for the
smuggler. _That’ll do—good evening !’

Nicholas was speechless with indignation and amaze-
ment, and for a moment he felt inclined to give the old
beara piece of his mind, and absolutely refuse to take
command of the boat, which was certainly not his duty.
But on second thoughts he decided to obey orders, and,
bowing stiffly, he quitted the cabin.

The ward-room officers were more amused than
angry when Nicholas told them what had passed.

‘For once, I feel obliged to the old man,’ said the
first lieutenant, ‘for it’s a thankless task he’s sending
you on; and, unless I’m much mistaken, we’re going to
have a roughish night.’

The other officers were equally pleased at having been
passed over, or at any rate pretended to be so.

At the appointed hour, the cutter was piped away,
and her crew and the six marines having taken their
places, she shoved off, leaving the frigate to pursue her
course to Torbay.

The breeze was light, but a nasty swell was rapidly
getting up; and ere the cutter had parted from the
Courser an hour, the rain began to fall in torrents, the
lightning flashed around, and heavy peals of thunder
rolled continually over their heads.

‘Pleasant sort of night to spend in a boat,’ growled
the mate, who had accompanied our hero, ‘Nice
service, too! he added. ‘Hard knocks, little profit,
and no thanks! Just my luck !’

‘We must do our best, Sandys, rejoined Nick;
Lhe Last of this ‘Eventful History’ 221

‘though, I confess, I’d rather be on board the frigate.
Keep your eyes open for the rocket.’

No rocket, however, did they see ; but suddenly, whilst
they were paddling silentlyalong,Sandys heard the words,
‘Let go!’ followed by the sound of a splash on the surface,

‘That’s the Sally /’ said he under his breath.

‘I think so, answered*Nicholas in the same low tone.
‘Give way, men—softly and altogether, now—give way !

The lugger—for it was the Sadly, as it unfortunately
turned out—lay to leeward of the boat, and therefore it
‘was necessary to approach her with great caution, lest
the smugglers should hear them.

As ill luck would have it, there was a dog on board,
and the brute, scenting danger in the wind, gave tongue.

In a moment the smugglers were on the alert, and,
seizing their arms, prepared to give the King’s boat a
warm reception ; for they were a desperate crew, fighting
with halters round their necks,

Further concealment was impossible, and so Nicholas
shouted to his men to give way with a will.

With a loud cheer they dashed on, but, ere they had
pulled a dozen strokes, a sheet of flame belched forth from
the lugger; there was a splitting crash, and a bubbling
sound of water, and the shattered cutter sank, amidst
the groans and smothered shrieks of her drowning crew.
' Nick was badly hit in the shoulder and arm, but he
managed to cling to an oar, and just as his senses were
leaving him, he was hauled on board the lugger—the
sole survivor of the twenty souls who had left the Courser
scarcely three hours before!
222 Tar-bucket and Pipe-clay.

When Nick recovered his senses he found himself in
a narrow standing cot, in a stuffy, evil-smelling cabin.
His right arm was bound up, and round his aching head
was a blood-stained cloth. Seated beside the cot, ona
box turned upside down, was a stout-built, middle-aged
seaman, who watched Nick anxiously, and seemed not
a little relieved when our hero opened his eyes and
inquired in faint tones where he was.

‘Shure, that’s what folk mostly asks, when they find
- thimselves where they don’t expect to be!’ was the
sententious observation of the sailor. ‘Well, Pll be
tellin’ ye, Mister Brodribb, he continued, with a tug
of his forelock, ‘Or maybe ’tis capt’n I ought to be
callin’ ye?’

‘What!’ Nicholas exclaimed in astonishment. ‘Do
you know me?’

‘Know ye,sorr! To be shure I do, was the rejoinder.
‘Why wouldn’t 1? And you, Mister Nicholas—have ye
forgotten Pat Murphy ?’

‘Pat Murphy!’ repeated our hero, with a bewildered
look.

‘Ay, to be shure, sir, the sailor said somewhat
brusquely.. ‘Pat Murphy, late A.B. of the Marathon, East
Indiaman. Does that call me to your mind, Mister Nick?’

‘Yes, indeed, exclaimed Nicholas. ‘I’ve never for-
gotten you, Pat, though ’tis years since we last met.
But, he added, with a smile, ‘I shouldn’t have expected
to meet my old shipmate on board a smuggling craft—
for I suppose this is the Sally ?’

‘Well, sir, | shouldn’t have thought it of myself, two
The Last of this ‘Eventful Fistory. 223

years back,’ rejoined Murphy. ‘But force of sarcum-
stances, Mister Brodribb, brought me aboard, and
aboard of the Sal I’ve stopped. I’m-glad of it now,
sir, he went on, ‘for if I Aadn’t been aboard, you would
have been in Davy Jones’ locker.’

-*T can believe that, Pat,’ returned our hero warmly.
‘It’s not the first time you have saved my life. And
now tell me, how came you turn smuggler?’

‘It was this way, sir. I was taken prisoner by a
French privateer, and carried to a French port. I
managed to escape, thanks to my being a Freemason,
and was smuggled aboard this craft. They treated me
very well, and the end of it was I entered as bo’s’un.’

‘And now, Pat, you must leave her, said Nicholas
gravely. ‘I promise you shall not want as long as I
live.’

‘Well, Mister Brodribb, we'll talk that over by and
by. The skipper has promised me to put you ashore
to-morrow night, and maybe I’ll accompany you.’

The skipper of the Sally kept his word. On the
following night Nicholas was landed at a small fishing-
village on the Cornish coast, and Pat accompanied him, to
look after him, he being still in a very weak condition.

In fact, his arm had to be amputated, and it was
nearly a fortnight before Nicholas could be moved to
the headquarters of his division ; from whence he pre-
sently proceeded to the Manor Farm on sick leave,
where, nursed by his good aunt and pretty cousin, he
gradually recovered his health.
224 Tar-bucket and Pupe-clay.

LENVOL.

On the 23rd December, 1802, the bells of F——n
Church rang a merry peal. The village seemed in a
state of excitement, and every one was crowding to
the church porch.

Presently there issued forth a fair girl in bridal attire,
leaning on the.arm of a young officer, whose left sleeve
was pinned across the breast cf his scarlet coatee.

_ The girl was Alice, and her companion was Captain
Nicholas Brodribb of the Royal Marines, who had that
morning made her his wife.



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