Citation
My nightingale, or The story of little Holger

Material Information

Title:
My nightingale, or The story of little Holger
Alternate Title:
Story of little Holger
Creator:
Woolf, Bella Sidney ( Author, Primary )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
64 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's literature ( fast )
short stories ( aat )
Children's literature ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes added t.p. with vignette.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Bella Sidney Woolf.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002240056 ( ALEPH )
ALJ0599 ( NOTIS )
190790655 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




z
4
3
a
A

RmB









MY NIGHTINGALE



“He sat on the old wharf till it was

Page 13,





Vi ING tT NIG See



A WELCOME VISITOR

Page 30

T. NELSON AND SONS

London, Edinburgh, and New York



- MY NIGHTINGALE

OR

The Story ot Little tbolger.

BY

BELLA SIDNEY WOOLF



T NELSON AND SONS
\ London, Edinburgh, and New York



1898



CONTENTS.



MY NIGHTINGALE,
THE STORY OF PAULINE,

LITTLE SUNSHINE,

33

60



MY NIGHTINGALE.



OLGER JESPERSEN and his

mother lived in a small street in
the quaint old city of Copenhagen—a
very small street indeed, down by Chris-
tian’s Harbour. They had one room at
the top of a big tumble-down house in
which numbers of other people lived,
many of them rough and all of them
poor. The street was called Liljegade,
(Lily Street), and it almost seemed as if
it had been named thus as a kind of sad.
joke, because it was just the opposite of
all that a lily should be. The houses



i0 |. MY NIGHTINGALE.

were black and ugly and old, and many
of the windows were broken, and had rags |
stuffed in to keep out the cold. The
basements were occupied by small shops,
and you had to go down two or three
steps to them. Most of them sold fittings
for ships or seamen’s clothes, for you see
they were close to the harbour.

Holger’s father had been dead many
years, and. his mother earned bread for
herself and her little son by sewing. She
worked early and late, but still they
were very poor. Yet they were so fond
of each other that as long as they were
together life seemed pleasant enough.
Holger had no playmates of his own age,
for the children in Liljegade were mostly
rough and rude, and his mother did not
wish her boy to grow like them. When
Holger’s father was alive, they had been
quite well off, and had kept a nice grocer’s
shop; but soon after he died they found



MY NIGHTINGALE. 11

that the man whom he had asked to
manage things for his wife had run away
with all the money. So Holger and his
mother had hardly anything left in the
wide world, and had to leave their pretty
little home and live in Liljegade. Frue
_ despersen (rue means Mrs. in Danish)
-was too proud to ask her friends for help,
and perhaps she carried this feeling a
little too far, for she would not let any
one know where she lived, and con-
sequently was soon forgotten.

‘The years went by, and Holger was
seven years old, and was to go to school.
He was rather pale but tall for his age,
with blue eyes and fair hair—so fair as to
be almost white. He was a quiet and
thoughtful boy, old-fashioned and dreamy.
His great pleasure was to sit on the edge
of the wharf near by and gaze at the green
water playing in and out of the wooden
piles. Sometimes it was quiet there,



1 MY NIGHTINGALE.

except for the great steamers travelling
up and down and the small boats shooting
in between. That was towards evening,
when the sun lit up the windows of the .
old warehouses opposite, and made them
shine like sheets of red fire. The harbour
looked very pretty then with the soft pink
of evening over it. In the daytime it
was all life and bustle though, for the
great ships came in with their cargoes,
which had to be unloaded by the brown-
faced sailors in their blue jerseys. Holger
sat there for hours watching them pile up
the bales, and he loved to hear their
strong voices and catch the fragments of
songs they sang to make the hard work
easier. I think it was from sitting so
much by himself, while his mother stitched
away for the ladies who employed her,
that Holger began to make stories to
himself—stories so marvellous that some-
times he did not notice the evening



MY NIGHTINGALE. 13

coming on, and sat out on the old wharf
till it was quite dark, and the lights began
to shine out from houses and ships and
twinkle in the black water. Even then
he was always home before his mother,
for the house was but a stone’s-throw
from the wharf, and she had often some
way to walk after she left the houses
where she worked. Then they would
have supper together in their tiny room—
generally a dish of smoking rice and black
bread, or on grand occasions plum soup,
which I do not think many English little
girls and boys would have liked. After
supper his mother, if she were not too
tired; would read to him. out of the one
story-book he possessed, and which he
almost knew by heart now; but Holger
did not care for games, and was quite con-
tent to listen to the well-known stories.
Sometimes Holger would tell his mother
some of the stories he made up as he

a



14 MY NIGHTINGALE.

* gat by the water of Christian’s Harbour,
and she was often surprised that so small
a boy should have such sweet thoughts.
Now, as I told you before, at the time
my story begins Holger was seven years

old, and his mother was obliged to decide

to send him to school. She would dearly
have liked to teach him herself, but she
had no time to do so, and consequently
Holger only knew his letters. In a
week’s time from the opening of my
story, the school was to be reopened, and
Holger was looking forward with mingled
fear and pleasure to his school life. Frue
Jespersen would have sent him before,
only he was such a frail little fellow that
she could not bear to think of him
amongst the rough children of the Free
School. She knew that he could come
to no harm on the wharf, for he was well
known there ; and though the sailors were
rough men, they were good hearted and



MY NIGHTINGALE. 15

fond of the little fair boy. But at school
she feared his stronger companions might
bully him, and it was with a sad heart,
though with a cheerful face, that she hung
his little satchel over his shoulders when
the week had passed and the first day
of school dawned. She knew that he
would learn quickly, for he was most in-
telligent and very eager to learn to read.
She took him to the school-house door.

“Good-bye, my darling Holger,” she
said; “be a good boy and obey thy
teachers, my little one.”

“Good-bye, sweet little mother,” said
Holger, lifting his face for a kiss. “Yes, —
I will be good. I don’t mind going so
mouch, because they will teach me to read
every book in the world.”

So his mother smiled and kissed him
many times and at last went away, while
Holger passed into the school with a

number of other children.



16 MY NIGHTINGALE.

Frue Jespersen could see from Holger’s
happy face when he came back from his
first day at school that her boy’s school
life had started pleasantly. Holger was
delighted with his teacher, and ambitious
to learn to read as quickly as possible.

‘She said I would soon learn, mother,”
. he said, as they sat at supper. “I shall
try to win a prize too.”

“And what are the other children
like?” asked Frue Jespersen.

“Oh, I don’t know,” said Holger, and
a shade of annoyance crossed his face.
“They wanted me to play, but I said I
would rather learn some spelling. I don’t
think they like me much, but I don’t
mind as long as the teacher does. You
see, I don’t care for games,” he continued,
looking up to his mother’s face with his
brow puckered. 7

This was the only thorn in Holger’s

school life. Many a time he came home
~ @



MY NIGHTINGALE. 17

with traces of tears on his face, which °
only vanished under his mother’s caresses.
“Canst thou not be one of them?”
asked his mother, for it grieved her to
think that her boy was differ ent from
other children.
“You see, mother,” he would say, “T-
can’t join in their games, and they don’t
like that, so they tease me. But it
doesn’t matter, for I shall soon know how
to read, and that is all I care for. Don’t
worry, mother dear.”

And a kiss on his mother’s thin cheek
would end the matter.

The teacher, as she watched Holger’s
earnest face, and marked how quickly
and eagerly he learned, thought to herself,
“He will be a great man some day.”

' At the end of the term Holger came
home radiant with pleasure, and throwing
himself into his mother’s arms, cried, half
laughing and half sobbing, “My best,
1) 2



18 MY NIGHTINGALE.

sweet mother, I have gained a prize, and
can read it too. See here!”
“Thou, Holger,”.she said, and her face
lit up. “ Nay, it cannot be true.” |
“Yes, here it is, little mother,” and
Holger hastily took from its wrappings a
handsome book, bound in red, and con-
taining the most beautiful stories which
have ever been written—the Fairy Tales
(or the Aeventyr, as they call them in
Denmark), of Hans Christian Andersen.
Ah! how happy were two hearts that
evening in that little room in Liljegade.
From the day that Holger received his
prize, a new and beautiful radiance was
east over his life like the pink glow of
the sunset over Christian’s Harbour.
The stories of Hans Andersen smoothed
every little rough bit which lay in his
path. He no longer minded the teasing
of the children in the play-ground, but sat
with the dearly-loved book, forgetful of



MY NIGHTINGALE. 19

all around him. And at night he would
tell the stories to his mother, and his eyes
would glisten and his cheeks flush from
pure delight.

“Oh, if I could but write such a
story!” he said hundreds of times.

Although he was only a small boy, |
yet his whole soul was in the story; and
he made the words so living, as it were,
that his mother would sit and listen, for-
getful of all else. When she noticed this,
she left off grieving that he was not like
other children, and she saw that her boy
was to be something different from the
rest. She wisely encouraged his love for
the stories, for she knew that none sweeter
had been set down on paper. And Hol-
ger’s favourite story was that of ‘The
Nightingale,” which no doubt most of you
know. It tells how the Emperor of
China suddenly discovered that he pos-
sessed a treasure he had never heard of



20 MY NIGHTINGALE.

before—a nightingale, So he sent his
courtiers to ask the nightingale to sing to
him, and when he heard the bird he was
so enchanted that he showed it all pos-
sible honour, and no one in China talked
of anything else but this songster of the |
woods. In fact, when the nightingale
sang, tears stood in the emperor’s eyes;
and what more could a bird desire? But
one day an artificial nightingale, studded
with jewels, was sent to the emperor,
which, when wound up, could sing a
tune. And the emperor was so delighted
that he forgot his old favourite and
banished the bird from the country, while
the artificial bird took its place in the
emperor's and every one’s heart. Oh, how
sad it was! The artificial bird could only
sing one tune, but no one wearied of it,
till at last one day something went wrong
inside it, and it broke. They repaired it
as well as possible, but it was only allowed



MY NIGHTINGALE. 21

to sing’ once a year. That was a great
grief to the people of China, but a still
greater one was to befall them. Their
emperor, of whom they were very fond,
fell ill, and all thought he would die. He
lay cold and stiff on his bed, and every-
’ thing he had done in his life, both good
and evil, rose up before him, and weighed
like lead on his heart. He longed for
music to drive all the dreadful thoughts
away, so he begged the artificial bird to
sing to him.’ But the bird was dumb, for
there was no one to wind it up. The
whole court believed the emperor was
dead, and had already gone to make their
bow to the new ruler.

So the emperor lay quite alone and
suffering. Suddenly the most glorious
song sounded outside the window. It was
the real nightingale. |

The horrible thoughts vanished from
the emperor’s brain, and the blood ran



22 MY NIGHTINGALE. |

warm in his veins, and when the nightin-
gale finished he was once more well.
He thanked the little bird which had
come to him in his hour of need, although
it had been treated so badly, and he asked
the bird what reward it wished. But the
nightingale said that the tears it had
drawn from the emperor's eyes, when it
sang the first time, were sufficient reward.
Then the bird promised to sing to him of
everything it had seen in its flight.
“But,” said he, “tell no one that you
have a bird which tells you everything.”
When the servants came to look at the
dead emperor they found him in his impe-
rial robes, and he said, “ Good-morning.”
I have told this story for those who do
not know it, but I wish they would read
it in the words of Andersen himself, for
what are my words compared with his?
Holger never wearied of this story, and
he knew it almost by heart.



MY NIGHTINGALE. 23

Now one day when Holger came home
from school his mother noticed that his
eyes were unusually bright and his cheeks
very red. But she said nothing.

Whilst they sat at supper, Holger said,
“Six -of the children did not come to
school to-day; I suppose they are ill.
The teacher has sent to inquire. O
mother,” he continued, after a moment’s
pause, “I feel so queer.” And he held
the back of his chair for support.

His mother was by his side in a mo-
ment, and before long Holger lay in his
little bed tossing in high fever. The
doctor was called in, and pronounced it
influenza, in a very bad form. Next day
he was worse and quite delirious, talking
incessantly of Andersen and the well-
loved fairy tales. The poor mother was
nearly mad with grief as she sat by his
bed and listened to the disjointed sen-
tences which fell from his lips.



24 MY NIGHTINGALE.

“The nightingale,” he murmured, “how
sweetly it sings—it is like the water in
Christian’s Harbour—I am so hot—do
let the nightingale sing—don’t you see
the emperor—he has sent the real night-
ingale away—J would not have done it.
Oy pee is Andersen ?—do let him
come.” And so on all that day.

“Tf the fever would leave him, and if
he could sleep,” said the doctor, “he
might recover. As it is, he is so excited
that he is losing all his strength.”

“ Andersen, Andersen!” cried Holger.

Now I must tell you that Andersen
was living in Copenhagen at the time of
my story. Holger’s greatest wish was to
see him, but he had never had the good
fortune. He had consoled himself by
saving up the five-dre (halfpenny) pieces
which his mother occasionally gave him,
and buying a photograph of Andersen.
This was his greatest treasure, next to



MY NIGHTINGALE. 25.

the book itself, and he looked at it morn-
ing and evening and kissed it. He had
- decided to write to Andersen on the great
writer’s birthday, for, after discussing it
with his mother, they decided that it was
better than sending a present, as he could
not afford to buy anything worth giving.
The letter had already been written when
Holger was seized with influenza, for,
although Andersen’s birthday was-not for
a week or two, Holger’s excitement was
so great that he could not wait any longer.
He had bought. a sheet of note-paper
with a border of rosebuds and gilt edges,
and the letter now lay on the bureau,
addressed and stamped.

“T will take the letter up to Andersen
himself,” she thought, her heart beating,
“and ask him to come. I know it will :
save my boy’s life.”

On the floor beneath lived another
needlewoman whom Frue Jespersen knew



26 MY NIGHTINGALE.

and liked. She willingly agreed to watch
by Holger for half an hour. Then the
poor mother hastily put on her bonnet
and shawl, and hurried through the dimly-
_ lighted streets towards Havnsgade, where
_ Andersen lived. She clasped the little
letter to her heart, but her courage almost
failed her as she neared her destination.
She was a timid little woman, and she
feared troubling the great man.

“For Holger’s sake,” she repeated over
_and over again with trembling lips, as she
rang the bell.

The servant who answered it seemed
surprised at her request to see her master,
and was half inclined to refuse. But Frue
Jespersen’s haggard face and piteous eyes
moved her to pity.

“Tt is a matter of life or death,” said
the poor woman, leaning against the door
for support.

She was shown into a sitting-room, but



MY NIGHTINGALE. 27

in less than a minute the door opened and
she rose to her feet. Andersen stood be-
fore her. It was a tall, ungainly figure
that of the writer of the sweetest fairy- |
tales in the world; the face was thin and
clean shaven and the nose long. He was >
not handsome, but the eyes were kind and
helped to reassure Frue Jespersen.

She told the story simply, and the
writer's heart was touched. Tears stood
in his eyes as he read the letter, for this
is how it ran :— ;

“Dear, pear Herr Anpersen,—I am a
little boy called Holger, and I am nearly
eight, but I love you so that I hope you
will forgive me for writing. I kiss your
portrait every morning and every even-
ing. Once I loved mother and smor-
rekage (butter-cake) better than anything
else in the world, but now I love mother
and your stories best. I wish you a’
happy birthday and lots of presents. I



28 MY NIGHTINGALE.

would send you one, but I have only ten
dre (one penny). Of all your stories, I
love ‘The Nightingale’ best ; when I read
_ it, it seems like music and flowers. When
I grow up:I shall try to write stories ;
mother thinks I may, if I work hard at
school.

“ Dear, dear Herr Andersen, best love
from ~ ‘Horerr.”

The spelling was somewhat faulty, and
the writing cramped and childish, and yet
it had drawn tears from Andersen’s eyes.

“Tt may save my boy’s life, if you
come, Herr Andersen,” Frue Jespersen
pleaded tearfully.

He expected some friends that evening,
but what were they when compared to the
good deed which it lay in his power to do?

“Take me to your little son,” he said,
with such a look of sympathy that Frue
Jespersen caught his hand and kissed it.
They were soon in the street—he the



MY NIGHTINGALE. 29

greatest writer of his day, whom kings |
and queens honoured, and whose name
was known over the whole world, and the
poor needlewoman of Liljegade. An-
dersen hailed a passing cab, and as they
_ drove he drew from her the story of her
life, and the struggles to earn her bread,
as well as of Holger’s marvellous quick-
ness at learning, and the stories he made
and told her. The cab soon brought
them to Liljegade; they hurried up the
dark, rickety stairs, and quietly. eo
the sick-room.

Holger was still tossing on his pillow,
his eyes closed, his cheeks flushed a deep
rose-red, his thin little hands clasping the
fairy-tales.

And still he moaned, “ Andersen—An-
dersen—‘ The Nightingale’—read me
‘The Nightingale.’”

Andersen with one glance took in the
small room with its neatness and poverty.



30 MY NIGHTINGALE.

He stepped forward to the bed, and as
the light of the candle fell on his features
Holger’s blue eyes opened; a glad sur-
prise dawned in them, and with a cry of |
“ Andersen, you have come!” he raised
himself in bed.
The writer tenderly laid him back on
the pillows, and taking the book from the
hot hands, opened it at “The Nightingale,”
and sitting by the bed, commenced read-
ing the story in a sweet, clear voice.
After the first few sentences, a quiet
expression stole over Holger’s face; his
eyes were fixed on the reader, and as the
last sentence fell from his lips, Holger
murmured, “You are my nightingale,”
and sank into a refreshing sleep.
Andersen sat by the little bed till the
blue daylight came creeping in at the
window. He had made the poor worn-
out mother lie down to rest for a while.
At last Holger stirred and opened his



MY NIGHTINGALE. bl

eyes. He looked in bewilderment at the
figure by the bed.

“ Mother,” he cried, “it is a dreams;
Andersen is here!”

At the sound of his voice Frue Jesper-
sen came to his bed-side, and saw that
the fever had gone and her boy was saved.
Her heart was too full for speech

“Tt is no dream,” said Andersen, tak-
ing the little boy’s hand; “TI heard you
were ill, and came to see you. We are
going to be great friends now.”

Holger was too weak to do anything
but smile contentedly.

Andersen proved himself indeed a frend
to little Holger and his mother. As soon
as the boy was better, he sent them to
the country ; and when they returned, it
was not to Liljegade and its poverty, but
to a pretty little flat in a suburb of the
town. Through him Frue Jespersen ob-
tained almost more work than she could



32 MY NIGHTINGALE.

do, and at last she set up a little shop for
herself. Holger went to a good school
and worked hard, so that he might report
good progress to Andersen. For him
the world contained but two people—his
mother and Andersen.

Holger is grown up now, and the great
writer is dead, yet his love for Andersen
will last for ever. He still kisses the
portrait both morning and evening; and
Holger himself writes such beautiful
poems that those who read them some-
times weep for joy.

And do you know what Holger always
calls Andersen? “ My nightingale.”



THE

STORY: OF PAULINE



I

“FTEANETTE! Jeanette! Please
change my frock, quick,” cried a
little girl. The aged woman whom

she addressed laid aside her work, and

taking up a white muslin dress, said,

“What is the hurry, Miss Pauline ?”

“Why, nurse,” she said, “don’t you
know all the people will soon be here,
and: papa wished to see me dressed
first ?”

Jeanette took the little girl on her
knee, and it was not long before she

@) 3



34 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

put her down again in her pretty, white
frock, as beautiful a picture as any fond
father ever looked upon. Just then a man
‘came into the room. It was Jeanette’s
son, Henri. He was of about middle
age, dressed in a workman’s blouse, and
there was much about him that told how
hard a struggle life was to him, as to
many others in that beautiful city of
Paris.

He looked at the merry child, and say-
ing, “ You are well, little lady,” he added,
with a groan, as he seated himself at the
window, “ This world is ill divided.”

“Nay, Henri,” said Jeanette, “if you
have nothing better to tell me than that,
i don’t thank you for coming here to-
night.”

“T say,” retorted the man, “this world
is ill divided ; but there is a time coming
when we will have our rights, or die in
the getting of them.”



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 385

“Henri! Henri!” replied Jeanette, “TI
fear to hear words like these. ‘Who
maketh thee to differ?’ You speak as
if there were no heaven above us, and no
God ruling over all.”

“You see God’s doings, mother, where
IT don’t,” said Henri. “Look at that
little one—there’s more lace on her little
dress than would feed and clothe my
child for a month ; and my Marie starves,
while she flits about like a fairy, as
she is,” he added, as he looked again at
her sparkling eyes and golden curls
with an admiration which he could not
restrain.

Pauline drew near him. Children like
to be admired as surely as older people.

“Ts Marie like a fairy ?” she asked.

The man covered his face with his.
hands and did not answer.

“Ts Marie pretty, like me?” perisied
Pauline.



36 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

“No, no, little miss,” he answered
angrily ; “she is not at all like you.”

‘And Pauline, frightened by the tone —
of his voice, would have cried, had not
the sound of approaching wheels changed
the current of her thoughts.

“They are coming; brush my hair,
quick, quick, nurse!” she cried. And then
with a light bound she went singing down
the stairs. |

When she was gone, Henri began to .
pace up and down the room, uttering
many impatient words as carriage after
carriage rolled up to the door..

“ Henri,” said his mother, “it is not
-man but God you are fighting against.
Who set my master in high places, and
you in low, but God Himself?”

“God never meant the rich to grind
the poor as they do, and He never meant
us to let them do it,” said Henri, “and
we are the more fools that we do.”



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 387

“OQ my son,” replied the patient old
woman, “God reigns. Man can only
wrong us so far as He permits it. Take
everything from Him, Henri, the bitter
as well as the sweet, and all will work
together for good to you. Why is it
that you, with health and strength, are
miserable, and your little suffering child
is happy all the day? Is it not because
she takes all her trouble from the Lord’s
hands, and you are always growling about
the sins of the rich, instead of mourning
over your own? I can tell you—and I
have seen more of them than you—that
the rich have not their sorrows.to seek
either, and have their burdens to bear
too, Henri. I learned that long ago.
It was when my Amy died, and the
little one here too. I thought it hard,
the day after our baby was laid in the
churchyard, to have to begin and toil at
my work as if there had been no change



38 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

among us, when my heart yearned for
time to weep over the little darling’s
grave. Then my lady sent for me to
speak to her; and I remember, as I
walked for the first time up the great
staircase and through these long corridors
filled with beautiful things, I wondered.
what either death or I had to do coming
in there. But, O Henri, when I saw
the poor marchioness struggling alone
with her grief—the children away in the
nursery, and the marquis at court, and
she all day weeping for her lost baby—
then I thanked God that I had my hus-
band and children to work for. O
Henri, Henri, a gilded sorrow is hard to
bear !”

“That may be,” said her son, “ but
there is precious little gilding on mine,
I know.”

As he spoke Pauline danced in at the
door, holding out to him a large bag of



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 39

grapes. and biscuits. “These are fer
Marie,” she said in her sweetest tones,
and ran away again. |

“The dogs eat of the crumbs!” said
Henri; “but,” he added in a softened
voice, ‘it was kind of the child.”

When Henri Durant returned home,
it was to find his patient wife and his
little deformed daughter stitching as
usual by a very dim and uncertain light
indeed. Everything in the -house was
scrupulously clean, and there was even
a something of elegance in the arrange-
ment of the little room that showed an
amount of refinement and taste not com-
mon among the working poor. Elegance
implies leisure also, and Marie, being
debarred from the usual amusements of
children, had many spare moments, which
she spent in devising ways and means
of beautifying their little home. There
were few Protestant families also in the -



40 THE STORY OF PAULINE,

Faubourg St. Antoine, where they lived,
so that though Durant associated with
his fellow-workmen, Marie and her mother
remained nearly as solitary as Mrs. Durant
had been in the Swiss valley where she
was born and had lived until her marriage.

The mystery of such a blighted life as
little Marie’s is perhaps a problem which
it is harder for the parent than the child
to solve.

Marie had taken up her cross simply
as the will of God for her, and had found
such sweet rest in doing so, that many
a favoured child of fortune might have
envied her.

She was enchanted with her little
present, and as she obliged her mother to
eat some of the tempting fruit, she asked
the minutest questions about Pauline.

“How beautiful she must be, father,
and how kind! I wish I could see her,”
' she exclaimed, —



THE STORY OF PAULINE. . AL

“Why, what would she do coming to a
place like this, or speaking to a child like,
you? I tell you, child, the world is ill |
divided.”

Marie sighed. “Poor young lady,” she
said softly, “‘ poor young lady.”

“Why do you say that?” demanded
her father. ne

“Because she has no mother!” said
Marie; and throwing her arms passion.
ately round her mother’s neck, she cried,
“T would not give you, mother dear, for
thousands of gold and silver !”

-Her mother held her in a fond em-
brace, and whispered very softly, “A
little while, my child, and then we shall
understand it all.”

And even the dark and sullen man,
who was looking on them, that moment
caught a passing glimpse of the mighty
law of compensation which so equalizes
life on earth.



4 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

II.

It was not long before Marie’s wish
of seeing the little lady of the castle
was gratified. Pauline had asked many
questions about Jeanette’s grandchild.

« Always sick and always happy, nurse ;
how can that be?” she said; “when I am
sick I am not happy at all.”

“Ah, Miss Pauline,” replied Jeanette,
“Marie knows the secret of happiness.
Do you remember, my dear, how happy
you were the day before yours cousins
came, last year?”

“Oh yes, nurse,” said Pauline, “that.
IT do; and don’t you remember what
- pleasure I had, though it was such a
bad day, putting up the new pictures
on the wall, and preparing everything
for them ?”

“My dear,” said Jeanette, “ you were
happy preparing for their coming be-



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 43°

cause you loved them. Marie loves the
Lord Jesus Christ, and she knows that
He is coming soon. It is a bad enough
day with her now, poor dear, but she is
happy because she is preparing for His
coming.”

Pauline looked very thoughtful. “TI
love the Lord Jesus a little too, I think,
nurse,” she said at last; “but I do not
like to think much about heaven. This
world is a very happy place. It is so
beautiful to me, I do not think I would
like to leave it. Is it very wrong, nurse?”

‘Bless you, my darling !” said Jeanette.
“This world cannot but look different to
you from what it does to an old woman
like me, or to my poor Marie; but God
will take his own way of weaning you
from it; and now, child, what He is say-
ing to you is, ‘In the day of prosperity
be joyful,’ but ‘rejoice in the Lord.’”

The marquis seldom refused any re-



4A THE STORY OF PAULINE.

quest of Pauline’s, and though he did
refuse to allow her to go to the Fau-
bourg where the Durants lived, he sent
a carriage there to bring Marie to their
chateau. It was a few miles to the
east of Paris, and Marie had never seen
or fancied anything so beautiful.

These two little girls soon became
fast friends. Many might have thought
the gain all on the side of the poor
man’s child; but there were others who
thought differently, when they saw the
influence of her simple, holy life upon
the character of Pauline. Her gaiety
~ and cheerfulness remained, but there was
now a constant though childlike struggle
maintained against the vanity and pride
which everything around her seemed
made to foster.

“ Tt is nice to be pretty, Marie,” she said
one day, “but I often wish I were not; it
makes it so difficult to be good, I think.”



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 45

(322.

“ How strange!” replied Marie, “and
I have so often thought that beauty must
make it easy to be good. You will never
envy any one, Miss Pauline.”

“Q Marie,” she cried, “I am glad
you know, too, what it is to have bad
thoughts ; but what do you do then?”

“T try to say, ‘Get thee behind me,
Satan,” said Marie; “and it is that
which makes the thought of heaven so
“sweet. There will be no more sin, nor
sorrow, nor pain there.”

Pauline said no more when her friend
spoke of heaven; it awoke no joyful chord
in her heart, earth was still so fair to her.

While Pauline and Marie were thus
becoming yearly more attached to each
other, the angry feelings which had been’
roused in so many of the over-wrought
and over-taxed poor in Paris against the
higher classes were yearly increasing in
bitterness.



46 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

Under the iron but wise grasp of
Napoleon the people learned to respect
themselves, and it was too late for the
Bourbons to attempt again to reign as
_ despotic sovereigns over a nation of serfs.

When Louis the Eighteenth was suc-
ceeded by the weak and obstinate Charles
the Tenth, the struggle between arbitrary
and real power soon came to a close.

Two years after my story begins,
Pauline and Marie were seated one
sultry July evening under the shade of
some chestnut trees.

“Miss Pauline,” said Marie, “does the
marquis ever speak to you of the things
that are coming, as my father does?”

“What things? I do not know what
you mean,” said Pauline.

“ My father says,” replied Marie, “that
another revolution is at hand, and that,
soon our poor little home will be a safer
place for you than this great castle.”



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 47.

“T do not know what you mean,”
repeated Pauline.

“T scarcely know either,” replied Marie,
“but my father says the king and the
nobles and the priests are determined to
' take away the charter of our rights, and
make us all little better than slaves, and
that it is time for us to resist and fight
for freedom. Perhaps it is true, but, O
Miss Pauline, war must be a terrible
thing, and I wish it had pleased God to
take me safe to heaven first, and you
too;” and the little girl burst into a
flood of tears. 2
. Pauline gave her what comfort she
could, but poor Marie was sent home far
sadder than her wont that night. Her
father returned earlier than he had done
for many weeks, but his brow was even
more clouded than usual. With an at-
tempt at mirth, he threw a handful of
silver on the table.



48 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

“There, wife,’ he said—‘ there is our
fortune ; make what you can of it, for it.
is not likely that a second will come our
way.” Then, as if answering the speech-
less terror of his wife, he added, “I mean,
Lotta, that M. Fernaux has paid us all -
off, and there is no more work in Paris’
for any honest man left.” Fat

' Waiting no answer, he left the house,
and did not return that night.

Soon after Marie had left the castle,
the marquis called for Pauline, and said,
“My child, tell Jeanette to pack such
things as you may need, for I intend
that we should go to-morrow to my
hotel in Paris.”

“Why, papa, why ?” asked Pauline.

“ Because,” said the marquis, ‘‘I wish
it. This is a lonely place, and I must
have you under my own care in such
times as these.”

Pauline thought of what Marie had

*



THE STORY OF. PAULINE. 49

told her, and did not wonder so much
as she would otherwise have done at this
sudden resolution.

_ $o, on the morning of July 27, 1830,
the household moved to the marquis’s
hotel, near the Tuileries—just the day
-on which the Revolution, which had been
so long pending, broke over the city.

When the marquis and his family
reached Paris, it was easy to see that
the ordinary state of things was at an
end. In all the thoroughfares knots, in
~some places crowds, of sullen, angry men
were gathered together; and as the mar-
quis’s equipage drove past, shouts of
“Vive la charte! Vive la charte!” were
raised every now and then.

“T doubt,” said the marquis, “if it
has been wise to return here at all; and
I cannot even stay with you to-day, my
child, for His Majesty has ordered my
attendance at court this morning. I

() 4



50 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

shall, however, return in the evening.—
And, Jeanette, you will go at once and
tell your son to come and speak to me
then. He will understand what these
people mean, and I shall be guided by
his advice.”

Pauline listened in silent wonder. That
her proud father should ask advice from
Jeanette’s son made her feel as if the
very end of the world had come.

When they reached their hotel, the
marquis, taking one of the outrider’s
horses, started at once for the court, as
if he had quite forgotten the usual eti-
quettes of ceremonial altogether; and
again Pauline’s heart died within her.

“O Jeanette, take the carriage and be
quick,” she said, “and do bring Marie
with you. I shall be so frightened till
you come back.”

“Never fear, my lamb,” said Jeanette,
“no one will harm you here; and as for



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 51

the carriage, it seems to me that I will
_ be safer without it, for no one will take
notice of an old woman like me, unless
I am in a fine carriage.”

IIl.

Iv was with great difficulty that Jeanette
threaded her way through many of the
streets; not that any one would have
wished to harm her, but the crowds in
many places quite blocked up the way
‘ to foot-passengers. At last she reached
the Faubourg St. Antoine. “ You here,
mother!” exclaimed her son’s voice, be-
fore she had entered the house; “ what
in the name of wonder brings you here
to-day ?”

Jeanette hastily gave her master’s
message, and then would have returned,
but Henri said, “No, no, mother; you
‘have come unasked, but no woman leaves
this house to-day. Do not be afraid for



52 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

the little lady; I will soon bring her to
you, and both you and she will be safer
in this poor place than at home.”

So saying, he locked the door and
hastened down the street.

“O grandmother,” said Marie, “how
terrible this is! and how afraid poor
Miss Pauline will be when both her
father and you are away! Do you hear
that dreadful noise 2”

It was dreadful indeed, for the troops -
had begun to fire upon the enraged mul-
titude. They listened in silent terror,
till at last the old woman, taking refuge,
in the great stronghold of her faith,
murmured, “God reigneth!” and Marie
gently added, “ Blesséd for ever !”

Henri had truly meant to bring Jean-
_ette her young charge without delay, but
once out in the excited whirlpool of the
riot, all thought of her was driven from
his mind, and he was one of the busiest



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 53

in rearing barricades in’ the principal
thoroughfares to arrest the progress of
the military.

How long that day seemed to poor’
forsaken Pauline! She looked out at
the windows for hours, hoping to see
her father or Jeanette, but it was all in
vain; and as the noise grew more alarm-
ing, it was only occasionally that she had
courage to go to the window at all.

At last she became sensible that while
the noise out of doors increased every
moment, the stillness and silence in the
house was becoming greater. She rang
the bell, but no one answered. Going
into the principal corridor, she called
each servant by name, and received no
answer. One by one, during the day,
the servants had dropped away, some
only to see what was doing, others to
join heart and hand with the insurgents ;
and so, as night began to close in, the



54 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

poor little girl realized that she was all
alone. “What shall I do? what shall
I do?” she sobbed, forgetting that there
was none to hear. Then falling on her
knees, she prayed to God to take care of
a little, lonely child, for Jesus’ sake; and
the very act of doing this helped to
comfort her.

When it became very dark, she rolled
herself in a rug and lay quietly down
upon a sofa.

It was then that the holy lessons of old
Jeanette and Marie came to her mind,
and one favourite couplet of Marie’s was
as a sweet refrain to her all through this
long night,—

‘Quite alone, and yet not lonely,
Tl converse with God my Friend.”

When the morning came, and the warm
July sun shone into the room, she never
thought of moving, but lay quite ex-.
hausted with fear, fatigue, and hunger. —



THE STORY OF PAULINE. “55

At last she was roused by heavy foot-
steps on the stair, and she heard Henri
Durant’s voice calling, “Miss Pauline,
Miss Pauline, where are you ?”

She ran to meet him; and telling her
she must come at once with him, he
_ hastened her away. He could give her
no tidings of her father. Pauline had
always felt in some degree of awe of
Durant, and as he dragged her along she
did not dare to tell him how ill she was.

Every now and then they came. to
great barricades formed of overturned
omnibuses and carriages of every descrip-
tion. At another time a mob would
close round them, and they would be
constrained to go with it quite out of
their way. At last Henri, seeing that
his little charge could scarcely get along
at all, took her up in his arms; but the
moment he chose to do so was an un-
fortunate one. The crowd was great,



56 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

and a tall man coming to meet it threw
a heavy burden which he was bearing
into the heart of it. It was the dead
body of a woman who had been shot
by the soldiery! Pauline shrieked with
terror at the ghastly spectacle. Changed
as the features were, she recognized old
Madeleine, a washerwoman of some re-
pute, whom she had often seen coming
for her muslin dresses.

“OQ Henri!” she cried, “surely it is
Madeleine.”

“Yes, miss,” he answered, “yes; but
she’s better off now; it was harder for
Madeleine to live than to die.”

This was Pauline’s first sight of death,
but before reaching their destination they
had to pass many of the dead, and, what
was worse, of the wounded, whom it was
impossible to help. It seemed as if they
were never to get to the Faubourg St.
Antoine ; and when at last placed in the



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 57

arms of her faithful old nurse, it was long
before she could answer her or Marie
further than by sobs.

“QO Jeanette! Jeanette!” she cried,
“JT have seen such horrible things, such
horrible things; I wish that I could
die!” :

They laid her on Marie’s little bed,
and did what their simple skill could
suggest to arrest the fever which it was
evident had laid hold on her.

One day more was sufficient to end
the brief Revolution and to establish the
just claims of the people, but for weeks
the little sufferer lay nearly unconscious
of all around her, only often repeating,
“Let me die! oh, let me die! I have
seen such terrible things!” And thus it
was that the love of life was taken away
from poor Pauline.
~ As rough handling soon rubs, the
beautiful down from the peach, so these



58 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

terrible days had for ever robbed earth
of its glory to her.

Do not think that she was thus a
loser. Truth is better than falsehood.
Earth is not heaven; and the sooner
we find this out the better.

Pauline did not die, but all things
seemed different to her now. She saw
that life was not, as it had once seemed,
a sort of walk through fairy-land, but
an earnest and often toilsome pilgrimage
towards a paradise fairer than the heart
_ of man can dream of.

Marie was before very long called to
lay down the cross which she had borne
so meekly, but Pauline’s lot was a very
chequered one. Much of the marquis’s
property had. been destroyed during the
Revolution ; and as he died soon after, and
his estates were inherited by a nephew,
_ only a very small portion of worldly goods
remained to Pauline.



THE STORY OF PAULINE. 59

Like most women in France, she mar-
ried early; and she lived to follow her
husband and children to the grave. Then
leaving the city where she had suffered
so much, she retired to a small property
of her husband’s in Auvergne, attended
by Mrs. Durant, who was then, like her- |
self, a widow and childless. :
_ There she lived as a shining light in
a dark place, until, her work on earth
being finished, she entered that holy,
- happy land, where “the former troubles
are forgotten,” where “there shall be no
more death, neither sorrow nor crying,
neither shall there be any more pain, for
the former things are passed away.”



Litieet SUNSTEIN E.



POOR old man with a bent back
was wheeling home a basket full
of linen which his wife had washed.

“You've no business on the footway,”
said a well-dressed woman whom he met.
“The place for barrows is the road.”

The path was just a little bit narrow
there, and she had had to move aside to
make way for him; but the road was full
of great rough stones.

“Tve as much right on the path as -
you,” he answered angrily, as he wheeled
by. “I wish her back might ache like



- LITTLE SUNSHINE. 61

mine,” he muttered; and he went his
way, his brow hard knit and his mouth
hard set, thinking many a hard thought.

It was a lovely morning, bright and
sunny, and the larks were singing’ blithely
all around. But the old man did not
hear the larks, nor did he see how blue
the sky was overhead. He only saw the
great, rough stones, and heard the echo
of his angry thoveht I wish her back
might ache like mine.’

Just then he came in sight of a oe
through which he had to pass. A-gentle-
man was going through, but he never so
much as took a thought for the poor
man; and the gate swung to again before
the poor old fellow could get up to it.

“Why couldn’t he ha’ fixed it open?”
he muttered angrily; and stopping his
barrow, he went round and threw it open.
with an angry swing.

Now it is never of much use being



62 LITTLE .SUNSHINE. |

anery with a gate. It only shivered for
a, minute, as if it had half a mind to drop
to pieces, then gently swung to. Before
the old man could get back to the handles
and wheel up, it was close shut.

- He went round again, and flung it wide
a second time—harder even than before.
But it only bounded back the quicker,
and shut to in his face again.

Then he stamped upon the ground and
spoke crossly.

“T wouldn’t lose my temper, my good
fellow,” exclaimed a voice behind him;
“it can do no good,” and a comfortable-
looking man slipped through the gate.
“Why not try a little gentleness?” he
added over his shoulder, with a half smile
as he went. “Gates want coaxing like
the rest. of us.”

The old man ground his teeth and
muttered. If only he had held the gate
open instead of reproving !



LITTLE SUNSHINE. 63

Just then a little fair-haired girl came
dancing along, her school-satchel on her
arm.

“Wait a minute,” cried she, seeing
what a worry he was in; and she held
the gate wide open for him, whilst he
wheeled his barrow through.

“T’m so glad I chanced to come this ©
way, cried she. ‘This gate zs tiresome,
and that’s such a heavy load for you.
When it’s wet I have to go round by the
‘road, you know; but it’s so fine to-day.”
And she danced along beside him as he
wheeled. “Do listen to that lark too,”
cried she. “There he is—look, right up
there.”

And the old man actually stopped and
set his barrow down; and up went one
hand to his eyes to shade them, so that
he might find the little black speck mak-
ing all that music in the sky. And all at
once he quite forgot the gate that would



64 LITTLE SUNSHINE.

swing to, and the man that jeered but did
not stop to help, and the selfish woman on
the footway farther back; and he only
saw the bright blue sky that told him
winter was quite gone, and only heard the
little bird that sang for very joy of heart
as it flew upward toward the sun.

Then he looked down at the happy
little face that smiled up into his.

“God bless you, little lady! God bless

you!” said he.
“ But I must run on; I’m afraid I shall -
be late for school,” cried she. “I am so

glad, though, that I came this way.”
“God bless her, Little Sunshine!” said

the old man, as he watched her trip away.
And the barrow seemed so light.

THE END.















Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081204_AAADCU' PACKAGE 'UF00086852_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-12-07T22:09:41-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:40:15-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299325; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T06:51:00-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00077.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-12-21T23:01:46-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-12-21T23:00:10-05:00'
redup
'318511' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADMV' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
06fa6b3ba509af0d39055d9725b3c956
065dee84c16041312a66fcbcf4ceacd02c08f43d
'2011-12-21T23:01:26-05:00'
describe
'149511' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADMW' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
7a4423cefc3a6d39456a6a02443687c3
fc907acccbc9d7414af80d9988c549ca9d195e9d
'2011-12-21T23:01:17-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADMX' 'sip-files00001.pro'
1e05bdbf2cd4b1fb561fa4d34fc4e7de
a2fdcf5a8b866617caa90aa13f7fcc398eabe707
'2011-12-21T23:01:48-05:00'
describe
'35242' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADMY' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
7541a39edb886d927a5f0b1738eec1c2
5ef327e6739080b8b036558852914b0c1f61e6ed
'2011-12-21T23:00:15-05:00'
describe
'7654096' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADMZ' 'sip-files00001.tif'
177d06d13a1e39b9a576b13b9b3c95c8
8f3cf29b090dedc63c82cad1e0c074f09739fe1b
'2011-12-21T23:00:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNA' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-21T23:01:34-05:00'
describe
'8656' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
47046fb1b7193c7cd8874f960c353187
bbf92fa90a1cb2e05dd303508bf60eb3958c22f8
'2011-12-21T23:00:50-05:00'
describe
'318768' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
00ecebc8525aabe20476ae6805937dd1
ebf7f65025034e3e4538b27f3a957c5176d5bc50
'2011-12-21T23:01:11-05:00'
describe
'70820' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADND' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
0c20a0dd85e52c973dd1ba91ae4f0a73
52a846bef1f4f4c24553bb5bcf619c89ae72c5d6
'2011-12-21T23:00:14-05:00'
describe
'2192' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNE' 'sip-files00002.pro'
852e5a85fa3fc8cb8249a2ebb341f62a
5d165aa435de14b977c1b7bc2cdc79ad885211f3
describe
'16525' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNF' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
6ff87b060ac78787b494f684cc45f75e
ba904491ff5f562f26f790aa680d8401acbe1495
'2011-12-21T23:01:50-05:00'
describe
'7656436' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
90f23fede9cd65f355ea490ba74101a6
f17fd0cdb39935a9c717481eec73281c38ba68eb
'2011-12-21T23:00:25-05:00'
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNH' 'sip-files00002.txt'
8adfb0e2b5d24e066dc234abfb3a3f72
e794e83a8622875ac7f8fdd82dece87041ba0348
'2011-12-21T23:00:33-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4687' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNI' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c670db08abedfb9ede2ea3485542e522
c8a24c8fb9e2a1dfbef5e5618123306c24fadfca
'2011-12-21T23:02:01-05:00'
describe
'265067' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNJ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
f6062284347da952508e7f8b05638733
5ca5f9f82d1d58d2ac0547bbfa2b351dae6df562
'2011-12-21T23:02:07-05:00'
describe
'84553' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNK' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
64df1125f5d08fcf7a39c2b76cbecab5
8cf5a1b6ea9e4d262fbd5072e536dbb97cc19ef3
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNL' 'sip-files00003.pro'
6ec4eff40a9ab3f8a29be158cd1d41d7
6d50c94f4bb03a867a1eb2440b72280878cf52b8
'2011-12-21T23:01:31-05:00'
describe
'17588' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNM' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
82c11e29bc90a59f6ba258b64121c1e8
0165270664baa0f502de16e1aa72bbcb4ddd5d74
'2011-12-21T23:01:45-05:00'
describe
'2128768' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNN' 'sip-files00003.tif'
a921468e907626b1b7746fec6b65de8a
42266aff9864861d7c2d461fca8ebe07c93959bd
'2011-12-21T23:01:20-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNO' 'sip-files00003.txt'
c094728088ce6f64ea7f9484bcfc2004
f6c6532df2eddbf28cfb24ca3dfe65b9fe2acf27
'2011-12-21T23:01:42-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3898' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNP' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
c03f5a3992eb47737754f9736ea9f34d
b7334fcd5763abf01dc84565069b6bcd2c9561bb
'2011-12-21T23:01:08-05:00'
describe
'265155' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNQ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
dbaa09fd021412c3792f33c77ab601d6
9719dc034acd317062125c8be9aed17214475442
describe
'34408' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNR' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
3cbfe47b15b89cf2d49471f6d2763fff
acb4dca1d375649d67967897fa8466e85c7f476f
'2011-12-21T23:01:32-05:00'
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNS' 'sip-files00007.pro'
d534809ab45199a8a5b421fa34588b28
c291104a27b7bb92cd5f197bc29bd4661afbcae2
'2011-12-21T23:01:05-05:00'
describe
'7083' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNT' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
3f31f729d4c68430e3607d9936b97dfe
b47c7a8e6f25405ba007dae7cc6676d5c482bf3d
describe
'2138392' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNU' 'sip-files00007.tif'
5e80acc6c7fd888a84b2be004905959f
e922ce1ac8ee224315337a266c1686d9c016a07a
'2011-12-21T23:01:03-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNV' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f928fed58170e66404f4cec25e776e04
0c146acd3bf60933f6e24caf78492755780bcb78
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNW' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
55d460570ed7ecd02fb3105fef6bb8df
bdd70553573aff09dab748afc5bff467477d90d9
'2011-12-21T23:02:08-05:00'
describe
'265413' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNX' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
04483b8be96386ebc194f7c7e5b66094
506b2a31234e69b6b52b1fc31639e0bed29e623d
describe
'160753' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNY' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
648f70dfc36a2b163759135605617353
4f2e93796c40f88a7892eb9e99a3e6b4c1ff34b6
'2011-12-21T23:01:29-05:00'
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADNZ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c4cb88f2aeb46cf172b3c73dd6375bdb
ca98bd4787804c3670b1f44224b8601bff41bb6a
'2011-12-21T23:01:10-05:00'
describe
'34719' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOA' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
75c3b929380e6eae707a0b9979e89d5a
28ea942403ccaec493d6f15fbe2263be81f1128d
describe
'2145016' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOB' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c419d69936436ac771a41e266550c6ea
b746dae2ce28595ddb8329745953bc4123f0484b
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOC' 'sip-files00010.txt'
cb47bba012b2546d6c19d81f62d8751b
dfece384723db693bff96af70da7e69679cd87d0
'2011-12-21T23:01:15-05:00'
describe
'7855' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOD' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
bcbad18a18f8686d5c9aab44e3b02a0e
26e61e93626a476e59fe1526076f338eef6416cd
describe
'265174' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOE' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5134bb0d41c4035fa470be5bbf58e8bb
9326106b00ec1d0e14f1ba45fa234e66dc4d435b
'2011-12-21T23:00:17-05:00'
describe
'122021' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOF' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
f0a5b992eb7df1134f99afb567a04095
446160d3cd8bdd7f52c99319016fcf7b63e0d4a1
'2011-12-21T23:01:54-05:00'
describe
'3252' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOG' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cb3d24a8f78391f59a980221c1f5b92f
c1b17949c3091374fd985d6efc0653a6a059823b
'2011-12-21T23:00:19-05:00'
describe
'26886' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
16bde9be5e21054ff90168e0c8cc0541
31dcd8b01788d3218825ae111f064a654d4f5ed4
describe
'2142464' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOI' 'sip-files00011.tif'
8871843540324c7e79685314039f6f4e
75ff64cb13f7db8cbed6552597843c8f2db29f53
describe
'143' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOJ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
db8babce8350a1d08ae2392607724acd
9cd9ca9357f914f52118b765e31e241a7c7342bd
'2011-12-21T23:00:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6503' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOK' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
94fcff322e5e6e3f8dcb87aedfb1a455
7632592d184159c1cc10cfc302134f6a32ce87ed
'2011-12-21T23:00:49-05:00'
describe
'265085' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
fa95a8430d58c3f0fb97edd497c4b4b3
b22f4544c0d63a401c4096bb8a9601a0cb087e9d
'2011-12-21T23:01:28-05:00'
describe
'53920' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOM' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8455a0e941f3fe71a112f2379201877b
4a193ded3ac0c56f8b631daca94b07862ef3239c
'2011-12-21T23:01:55-05:00'
describe
'3765' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADON' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2971ea6cc13267549fbdeab39c3efa4d
9e728330f9badc28e6ce25722f108714178f2d5c
'2011-12-21T23:02:02-05:00'
describe
'13459' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
b8773407f40c1e73113bc549afefc8fc
c8e361f8d91a440633a677566d5b1700d7215e4f
'2011-12-21T23:00:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3a91838e6a57c4ca3a298313f92745a3
ef8e6ee54ada1457cfa4fb4bad01566b2d7c6bb3
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
903b76fd23dae3bcbb5f67bcc4a0fca9
deedb3e33d88b1a8b83c8f13b922291c423c9219
'2011-12-21T23:00:20-05:00'
describe
'3831' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
39a5a26dd63a760000d0639f86ac51f9
64d35b00e978f7a96a04c22e2d0f200d6c3594d2
'2011-12-21T23:00:32-05:00'
describe
'265036' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOS' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2e9c6f8cfdee056c6ca9ffd208696ac9
8084794738766e58b951994d1f8d1cf3c6bc2e26
describe
'39514' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
692b1a14612ff47e836a220005e4c888
4eeecad22607ac593bb579f46b70f6c857e1107f
'2011-12-21T23:00:12-05:00'
describe
'3011' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOU' 'sip-files00015.pro'
e2523bebf0397659a31841ca77b1a140
7495c1f52fa9cd32291f6e122b939682f09434f0
describe
'8823' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOV' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7be3df68fe26a951c2cd3327e9b2f6dc
d7840bb33ba8eb4840923e3487d62b4d3d4ef83d
'2011-12-21T23:02:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOW' 'sip-files00015.tif'
63ab5402a8e612c791bd5481682c5100
d97b9898217d8b877f5abc66a1e2fb7e1f5d5e02
'2011-12-21T23:01:37-05:00'
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOX' 'sip-files00015.txt'
d34651b037c8e02f352913711ac93bad
2cc7f265c7dee3c349f93432dc149cb40311ce1d
'2011-12-21T23:01:33-05:00'
describe
'2297' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOY' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
dbf26982f61f5079a3aa3240c03e9f3e
138ef881ce440c6977d19e57598a638d7478ef1b
describe
'265179' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
d41892e1b0be1111582f19ebe57e09f1
fc68ddf8672810a9c35ac7dc662cf937d844f9b8
'2011-12-21T23:01:02-05:00'
describe
'95275' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7d3586559e6b398c35d5a6f1b3e7300a
b7519bdcfdb7812e3bbd1c7ec6cf2e1389e8d793
'2011-12-21T23:00:54-05:00'
describe
'13370' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6bcd02117fc14a6a912338385c1693fd
afc1564e8678f7a9291c1c10055399fc6a4c29ff
'2011-12-21T23:00:38-05:00'
describe
'28475' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPC' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
42ab5f4a40dc850440e5698dc0a8f654
0f7957a6e726fea7b8e575574667553638623f31
'2011-12-21T23:01:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9d9524d045dcf4cf20afef5ab69f9fa5
a9888e2c119d4aad288bce3f828130c3ffc36acc
'2011-12-21T23:01:09-05:00'
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
604d69029b90ad84f44897008d41d30d
59633a4bdf86d55f8043c6002b0c7e8bbefa46df
'2011-12-21T23:01:58-05:00'
describe
'7514' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPF' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c31ffd87e86f72f66f536e24b89a8d06
efe548edf3c782d1f94fcbadd1ddc2b41f8a24c4
'2011-12-21T23:01:27-05:00'
describe
'265149' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPG' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b3cae6575c35e40442eecce1112e3683
cefe452ae630b77fc7f61223289733c3c66d00f0
'2011-12-21T23:01:22-05:00'
describe
'127011' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPH' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
45bda1874feeecdbc9bdbfc03366a466
e836a99fa4731a1e8f9952835e2f871459709c8f
describe
'23278' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b3cee4aa2fdf359df6af79ec3184a205
7fe1ec9c8c4b49d1adfbea196a9a2d9e5c3e65fb
describe
'40842' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5cd499d3fac09411d18b93fa7953c280
e70a7b3149506d9293273e6be9b8343428635734
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPK' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5fdf087dad436b453861df8dd203b6cf
8ac17525f5eb245812ed4337ecd4b367ef130df4
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPL' 'sip-files00018.txt'
8d474cc8de4cf64c9b0d556da750b547
b47815cf76c662ce1abe73dbf30d99f8db6991e5
'2011-12-21T23:00:56-05:00'
describe
'10329' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPM' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
971f5a23cff828c2dfbd453085016804
f4a37f98539fbe7a0d978a0ede363debc10069af
'2011-12-21T23:00:21-05:00'
describe
'265191' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPN' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
2b09b39d784fe8b809700008f91900d7
650d0609f1fbf17ab6e4a69a176284a554e4459e
describe
'128369' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
5932fa8a84fa0439de80dc070f9b4632
72fe9b52c9c033448bb348556cd0e3ae6fdc47ae
describe
'23051' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPP' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e7c48cd23223e0860c7f34da8480f514
8bc7c3a53ff3b736c5a23287adc211d7670520f0
describe
'40224' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
31a99558ce034782c449b88205ed7d7b
1182c29c09d15078c7b94c92aa59101f25f25842
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPR' 'sip-files00019.tif'
682d3e29bb3f8fe5881f7d05a9fca551
00af46be925dcce67a4bda9f34a41bd91b414ffc
'2011-12-21T23:00:34-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPS' 'sip-files00019.txt'
92b5bfce97a908a643f4caa774b51ba3
2ac6265278f22089cf1842dc9cc1c0f891d4caae
'2011-12-21T23:02:05-05:00'
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPT' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
46ff3d5e83ad2dedf43b2c63c953909c
a52feabf7d924e5dd13639f691a18b698147bbda
describe
'265027' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPU' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a2c8742e31b2b64fa7f76332f55f1612
5ea5973219620cc725f52fcb34ebeb3df1c013c5
describe
'131605' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPV' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
44a9f9e450c2c6214c8132427ff44a1b
1bd13f7cd2aec86af7d36818c31c1e9c75fa1f02
'2011-12-21T23:00:57-05:00'
describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPW' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b81b273ba70085a72755a88fb7ad56e5
dd04666be5b6a53b57cdcc456b9d9779578dc08f
'2011-12-21T23:01:43-05:00'
describe
'41522' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPX' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
370ac38476f79db08661030f8f653d0f
176c6ceb61b5b113a0720daeb521dc90593250e2
describe
'2137220' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPY' 'sip-files00020.tif'
20707eb0c269ef729bd12c97735a9171
388be1cdf4f15e8f33e6e4b233d674285db8bf66
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
946f39ade6f727da8a2c6f11d6794279
bf8562f3ce263a026859b9d8fd66dae066d392cf
describe
'10742' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
fa2c423063ea0da4616fdf7a55524107
ada2fd99270b385d061106f085101fd8c38cee05
describe
'265138' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQB' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e4d16575b0e22d0ee0851e9d3a467ead
756e51475bdeea9b58de667597caa99f0cc775bb
'2011-12-21T23:01:40-05:00'
describe
'131458' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
4e705b83a22710735048e4e8bae97687
20418619beceabd9b37d72ead22dd593136fa5c5
'2011-12-21T23:00:55-05:00'
describe
'23330' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQD' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e3385e3531dada648dfd70321c851870
d38a28597c4a52f6455b6f682193609076fa169d
'2011-12-21T23:00:29-05:00'
describe
'41840' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQE' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
5610aece61f954bb27fc0a3a4d36206a
b745cfb70102f8a1a94da07e80c32dce292ddd4a
'2011-12-21T23:01:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
bcb3f5cb753ecd29d14d53e4bbc1c5ed
9f2f5fa8186568f08aaa8e763bb02d087dc8075f
'2011-12-21T23:01:39-05:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQG' 'sip-files00021.txt'
58be9cee9b11825f67c9fa07e0255093
6c6b98f204d671be99cd27bb0c56b7c2ac0256f6
'2011-12-21T23:01:51-05:00'
describe
'10949' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
8f51d1f5ce24e141a65dab062369814e
4d9eb975388b5b4910075550c8b42904a0062f05
describe
'265348' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQI' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6ca8fca857ad56e27c804536cca3b3e7
228359727856ccd3bfdff8dc253d7dbd0cc5b582
'2011-12-21T23:00:28-05:00'
describe
'128620' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
eb139f4f034f754578124dce88f2a4d4
9da25b5146cf9133bac5a826929d1cd4aa7f6373
describe
'23394' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQK' 'sip-files00022.pro'
5530d5188cac711a397fbe9a5e800ff1
7d79b35afbfba489eb1ddae813b6199e6261b8a1
'2011-12-21T23:00:39-05:00'
describe
'41232' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQL' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
23dab87172d89c4d7184ab7b9d18ede1
7acd7a14058c870a58fa285c27c721c5450c9b71
describe
'2140204' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ffbed2a2ad06114082094c6e32cd3b67
a9ac6e750eb8f7f6882055553827cd74819dc2fb
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQN' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ce6add7ece383c4d75f7734527954edd
72795f9cef691be3a5c074d8042d1eecab9bc6a9
'2011-12-21T23:01:56-05:00'
describe
'10662' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQO' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f839a4e9a24e9fcbdafd3cdbfa3f8534
b409a93aca4ec7b00965704b2c9bfaa94bf365d1
'2011-12-21T23:00:48-05:00'
describe
'265399' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQP' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1a15c422bf87f1463f3f634f09e8cdee
c4fcd983dbc30731fae5ec53dd389c932a5817e9
'2011-12-21T23:00:23-05:00'
describe
'124398' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0b7b28768551c3f1f5cfeee7dbc30956
67c96d8f305ee5bbb1cefae67999f686aef1c855
describe
'22312' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQR' 'sip-files00023.pro'
ac973a2cc105a3c18579456f60ef06c4
1aa7cceab692360922138ed5dd4c2b0b1240c3dc
'2011-12-21T23:01:57-05:00'
describe
'38628' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQS' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b917883481ffb25cbe30ec5585ef3268
a969d7b3624e6cebaf5ac49c9cebed00914ab952
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQT' 'sip-files00023.tif'
b9b3f792b3d9bbdde93d5626c88aca9b
e0a0360d65405c0858a3671007ef414742ce83d8
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQU' 'sip-files00023.txt'
938c07758ecdeb87c35d3fb6f512ac68
d5757a5af8d352275f3eae57396d60b4c5df76de
describe
'10142' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQV' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
accfcce2ad0644c2c6c75340903f7616
a9a6bff337074f681168e940a7623cb081984ac8
'2011-12-21T23:02:09-05:00'
describe
'265148' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQW' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
711d15fdc2b56bbb2bed588599c8dbb3
ec541d60316d025d6e96f35f90707ea69c4ca6d8
describe
'123402' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQX' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
86ff1e5104c389053bae8a06f91bece5
36ca0ae0e191c482d0b960f96ed73f2ff0449df9
describe
'22013' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQY' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e7cd8b4416c4b73faef5041ea7ad0045
fa90a6373c46d4ef3d08d9cbd74f0de174a17116
'2011-12-21T23:00:59-05:00'
describe
'39285' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d9d0c15fa6354d2474347a0d4baa29ff
8dec8754e2fa8cb0b95bd33a78f4b99475c817f9
'2011-12-21T23:01:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
6b21fa43651674fea23331fd49d639ab
3d64c78365773e5cfcd44513dab78380cd0f0a92
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRB' 'sip-files00024.txt'
01e7cf69abcacf613bdd1728facf741e
7b067fd66664c19fd6d6613c09cd6477818de421
describe
'10334' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRC' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ca79d0ce3a7647f19797685a36d758fb
f976af6e33fa185bfb87fb006170248170be7ab7
'2011-12-21T23:01:52-05:00'
describe
'265115' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRD' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a5e456583c1e3e8ddccce99e01637780
e429b052edcbe228de457c89b824a5bc071adcbc
describe
'123314' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRE' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
989fe26dfe48dec634b80814699e3aea
c26e015dd75a3abc6562f28bb5509f655e31fa2b
describe
'21623' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRF' 'sip-files00025.pro'
94f19bef266932776174119b11ddb545
75e8f0ad450ac12bb91c31626e50b2a69df16571
describe
'39019' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2ed4b889423c6d74ee0ed33008dda299
75b8e5154e9eba8864094231df60e3354bcb9a8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRH' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f36cfd4a55612c8e418c85fac6d43f82
18799df4a01ad8c703bf19ca9b44f4b19609ba35
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRI' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fe92674712dd236d4a655198f9b24fb7
a7841aeeada09173cfa6295ea486456d22a3075e
describe
'10756' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
3c27105de1085cf196d5c61c1820b412
28024e3267f791de3c026707b3ff65bed0ddbaa2
'2011-12-21T23:00:37-05:00'
describe
'264981' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
32bd835ec3c1234d677eed12ffb36eae
bc9631e6da94f01ba6cebd85e9b7dffa564fe914
'2011-12-21T23:00:35-05:00'
describe
'125990' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRL' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1c9ad6a81d1f22f1dc54fa03a0e8ff77
948b7cd146088c5301a1b79463bf2b70e7ad1b39
describe
'23013' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRM' 'sip-files00026.pro'
fb52614e43099e4878b3ae187e6354cc
3f61e402f64d16c1d918f13eed3c60458640a978
'2011-12-21T23:01:04-05:00'
describe
'40392' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRN' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d12210b68eac5ed2f85467ca7c0f3fce
4e0ea6b7a6bcd760077faf32dee9572570d9a914
'2011-12-21T23:00:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRO' 'sip-files00026.tif'
d15f582d89574afd696c29ed49858e9e
5fe09ebf7e1745657137912623386267515a3aa7
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRP' 'sip-files00026.txt'
284cf589806dc5dc1eda57794e3fb52b
4f9b0444d5d5ea3b55025575dabb74bdd68d62c9
'2011-12-21T23:00:51-05:00'
describe
'10110' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d7e666277b5010f9ebfa344db4c460be
bc7b81ad09058466f751aeb31826955f86480756
'2011-12-21T23:00:13-05:00'
describe
'265397' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRR' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
57b855c05d1948f083a805fe09dd2d8a
7c561183d5fb02abf8eaa081fefab60d302dd911
describe
'122904' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRS' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
567fcac7e35964be17f87331b3eaea5d
159dd481f860d04ccfd6c84dbd3c8006609291f8
'2011-12-21T23:00:44-05:00'
describe
'22783' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRT' 'sip-files00027.pro'
770dd3625af59d80276cdeca46008aad
3c88176c21681c23178eae28d6c0e7db99e91408
describe
'40013' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
6a88d8507dd000cff4220ff3ba7cfcff
0819e0fafd21d4199215ddcb5231b1bd1accaf65
'2011-12-21T23:00:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
93ffae4625fc1894f9dd015f74c73f43
c26de97c94f19c561b486cd46b3f15475bec6f4c
'2011-12-21T23:00:27-05:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1bd4e86477c965b4c5a92a0725e3edc6
54a174ad7d658ec63240f46874f747f4a4ada7f1
describe
'10302' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
192bfb606f4a4a70ce019f81de073b12
2d8afa4b4de859e58d5a824f7d8390de949d0496
'2011-12-21T23:01:30-05:00'
describe
'265178' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
60477ae5c99dfa231ead180688436167
10435bfe1be798c539b21b8f55de06acd23a5ab1
describe
'128526' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
bde435dafe85268ff266d30865274ca6
638fff08bc118d02ec0fa5e2ed8c173e8c6ca534
'2011-12-21T23:01:41-05:00'
describe
'24005' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
259c0ee9ae06027d761a95f84c409d18
0e3c8ce3c33240ee01f8361b570e63f8530ab98a
describe
'41476' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c2e51b6f024d6707b6c4c613cb98e7ff
8490115be453594482102de27714c4e5b9c84574
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSC' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ac2c3162a6a67d17eb22a7a2428cce12
b31e90ed76b6a4a0cc785c41b6c1ed3cf1f95820
'2011-12-21T23:00:45-05:00'
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
2c2cee4e7d2fc6c36b1a4326e1e96a62
e51ac9bb7b270b734b805fbc45256216b8a23e98
describe
'10888' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSE' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6f4dc85ddf241277c89a218e911d099a
6e82bb69a3fe0bc9bf27fb9b284446f6a5bf19d3
describe
'265010' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d7386d925a3ade94f2b36b0e910809f7
daf4f39a561014863b4c8525d90203a8d41f453f
describe
'123487' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
41981d5cff6ab27ac0756c380061f4de
89cbcd3f1eee7e5b359c216f474a32e535ac9805
'2011-12-21T23:00:41-05:00'
describe
'22440' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
762b6abf4f924cd153c2d985c1360dc7
98ef4e574b073f85dbe6b745e28006341ec47fb6
describe
'39346' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSI' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
975d69cb9106c2e908b3ab1a5873f886
9e7a7bce4ed4b9c2baf6e9f2f1af9d63f0ee5595
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
20cd7f6334e74091da9a0e56f9aa3349
c2cd1978c9581a996ef88315cee679de8c53e412
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
707ffb860359284fa71ea4d95e5559be
0a70c8ae31337b07531f97ac6f9a6a061c9503a4
'2011-12-21T23:01:00-05:00'
describe
'10362' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSL' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d20db0cd988f19fcdfd3a3880807a747
a28abc0f78e3a4109a73edcfa3c3769389530d86
'2011-12-21T23:01:16-05:00'
describe
'265152' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
7bbe7f94f3fc6a9c53aa055d334e875d
6277b53ba6228d0c07bb39bc4cacdc1c6ff5d0ad
describe
'125591' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
f799af560250d0971593f38b07157083
1b2c6c97977759f70619100bfcd7f958e1d3dfa7
'2011-12-21T23:00:24-05:00'
describe
'23355' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSO' 'sip-files00030.pro'
eb752dcc5c95e3c18ee3203432fe739d
f44ff397da19bebc0c72e0df98e8c4d4e0ea59a6
'2011-12-21T23:01:24-05:00'
describe
'40749' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSP' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1de6d04c8ed9fe9defb5946d78216312
cd4b08b5baa146fcd9bb9bf59945c3e77a0bf877
'2011-12-21T23:01:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b585976991e681d279da1810fbbaa196
ff9be277589546b3c6a1e9bc4a8e0a4aa1537699
'2011-12-21T23:00:46-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSR' 'sip-files00030.txt'
917cd70d524b833416fa93c9347e49ce
ba1ad29912eb92935bf418ae52c118196b79b7f9
describe
'10347' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSS' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
011243e1bda35bb17fbd0a0e3bcf7f8c
60740027c208aaba4ef6a1d40a0f0e143273b3aa
describe
'265124' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADST' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
0e7eb1661d478e279ac2fcdb77cbff8f
1648c26747fe55d8573688395576fb6b631e2e2d
'2011-12-21T23:00:11-05:00'
describe
'124473' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
51e7c2e8342f552e50b01323d0ccb4df
4d6c87d600ab3198edc9011dc92559268b87f30f
describe
'22619' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
16d03359fe56e4f0b2fb7fde49084281
efe21306110aa6280d263bf16906bf7419111424
describe
'39696' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSW' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3b45982e85754564b197bd49a0e8c650
727d0b3bc81b79bce632811b713e654d46597e4d
'2011-12-21T23:01:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSX' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9c82a76f4e3eb5911b22e9af24c8ada2
aa4e152397a2a92373b002ac657983062e4e5236
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSY' 'sip-files00031.txt'
939209fa7fa680c91ec8e7968c470c4b
2ce31666b8e87fe5dfb00f75b34129731218c3e1
describe
'10213' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
cb5328bdb1892147ed81ac12104e52f4
612cdb0df3401aac8c81f8a22c2602fd2b90a2cf
'2011-12-21T23:01:01-05:00'
describe
'265186' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTA' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f55cb2eaf87b2f75c36011a0ba08dc3e
0078f38ba9967d2aa42b4f7a75c2706ceb885566
describe
'125509' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
6be3a28583904031f2509647b2626fb0
c4cb061230d33a2a63c2482b8a5f9108054ae520
'2011-12-21T23:01:59-05:00'
describe
'22546' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
66318968781d7bbf492453d5f94aef92
7528bb94f85573adea6d1937e9318e1cdd55605b
describe
'40494' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTD' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
469737f36cfba8dd5efa53583cb78d7a
8477e8e0647a4344acf4815208e994fad9f9039a
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTE' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d817576dca4e3fd549b4bb44f5240c4d
e8eec9552bb1f0dd3286779baffa4ac897621921
'2011-12-21T23:01:36-05:00'
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTF' 'sip-files00032.txt'
55c3d0d537cd058293e3f3388f26036b
58be53b42e4de9a3ea83cadf467c09ee111e63e5
'2011-12-21T23:02:10-05:00'
describe
'10535' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
cda9fa3d6b2768b051191a7bbd0a630c
4f1dcdbf0312886cb5ea2e033b3a7b31e6b4819d
'2011-12-21T23:00:22-05:00'
describe
'265194' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTH' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
357ee0664108a6c331a75bf8fe2223da
5d5c60935722f7f255bb7902b076dc471f3860ba
describe
'127550' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTI' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f2438741482160ae520eebcb1c7e6889
351feedc002a5e0ba35f4c6c26feb642b76fead9
describe
'22738' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8178cba19b814f128c8a791b8959302b
b03abf62eb9a5b8eec306ebcaa72901453feb3a0
describe
'40347' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTK' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a79196fba23242ef9160b058b6e74bb7
6bec400a1534437a96dbe2500a567ad346a1138f
'2011-12-21T23:00:58-05:00'
describe
'2138388' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c841225ed722c90c797ab26016f706f0
82c166e653559ff674bfc3ad214f49a516aa376b
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
79aad026c1550f9c9f5a4eb16d1c19f5
38b1889d0b24cf202fe11108b2efe71a096c8e21
'2011-12-21T23:01:38-05:00'
describe
'10854' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTN' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
2e1a2ab6edbbd2e1dc5b3b585dfd55b1
600ff20ea7cc2b1178ae238e1deb7f22d57c2274
describe
'265034' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
56ef6b461962bd183dc45afeea07a486
e6ddda7a20e50819b068f7843445a872e887f6cc
'2011-12-21T23:02:03-05:00'
describe
'122399' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3a2eef181fc52c1aa53a2331529193e9
74fff3f409c0108353892950af76575cfb592535
describe
'21724' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
046f9e3a65fc180bb4aa134c5c347129
a3861dde76ce42dc69370e0557102d9819da38ea
describe
'37777' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTR' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f0966331f6cb63827c78cb2d3c371f5e
4fd36af87e2cf15f3dd57f6d4ec2dae4b08d3519
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0700105cb54b3ba29e149ef42b2410dc
4068353f7d1efa9f6fe818fa0d4ec6357a807fb1
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3f0572bbbf156ca043d17bf7c7ef7cb6
2939b012242421c9d0661ecdc78c9f21abc3e596
'2011-12-21T23:01:44-05:00'
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTU' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
ba7c08b5c52771174b450eae266c40e0
64961f171944ad6b0d356a2c1201e789acff66bc
'2011-12-21T23:00:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTV' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1e96092a8a51013081def52f069a54a1
5afb815d648654dd79f74620da2ab353ff5f9dc2
describe
'125389' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTW' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
22f2aa570555f0d8753f67e4678bd1af
c3d417b8fe39fe23e14f4854548699b1762dbaa7
describe
'22842' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTX' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2975da2952950917ebef20f815ecc398
390a0e3a4c538ef6062bd08eaac54f72cbd69371
describe
'39199' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTY' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
610a8ad28c3013591e238ff05d9256e0
4dcdc0098f6ce563b008f19e4f7a5891d41ac0df
'2011-12-21T23:02:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADTZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3390e912d371150926a55a8657e68416
21796232e6b0ded3475eac7c51a3a8ab4a47d94d
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUA' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5973291e2b00e1cbd67dc039b7647df4
79376534a229ccbc8e92374aee42f46f4a45ea56
'2011-12-21T23:02:04-05:00'
describe
'9957' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
8f2f9bbc373b81554f5ff7eaf8d96f23
a263ce0dcb639ff71b27d36ec71f0445fc772c19
describe
'265188' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUC' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
abc5a022b9222d2aaee4cb8f513ae860
9f97be659050cd6b8248e38ca65824f8becf5338
'2011-12-21T23:01:18-05:00'
describe
'121767' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUD' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
55541e1cecfbafd3e3d4819bda5184dd
1efecb39e74f43bccf624de41e82149ee85f1b8f
describe
'21628' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUE' 'sip-files00036.pro'
799841f75ef17986f866d16be34d55d4
940235776b20d622487c3d1356336e00de59b414
describe
'38065' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
2edb1928cd161c062aa0fca2b9f2eb0d
9c9446b5fbaf2f62b0e20c6a5c7cd62b06ce9686
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUG' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ab134cc789ce7daeb10aa0b048fa30eb
769f8321d998ff05ceba8a6d49d1564d9010151a
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUH' 'sip-files00036.txt'
e4379a345f2f8898d2f54b86f4b82b7f
ff850b869241d00454c5a0d1c94ce473b424d21b
describe
'10320' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
87d5627d26868c0ec79ebea851aa2b90
64c70dbc434448b49c57ea751c71c89deb96b5c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c2225e02f8b9e45a908e233041f9f7b7
1287bf838fa561d6e72be4b05e5a1c378db280a5
describe
'123875' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUK' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
849ff92d2519c2ddf5e58d0329386ea0
69c8bd193eccc8cbb74dbc28c8195477f019fa28
'2011-12-21T23:01:14-05:00'
describe
'21625' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUL' 'sip-files00037.pro'
5bcafa61ac8bf020b34c922a513bc5c3
d66f5bd6114920d58b3357bb897d0eb2b7ab8849
describe
'39238' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b2c6c2aa9862ffa78087004c4c17ceab
d6196672e7104ccd7da404343827568c2092e26e
'2011-12-21T23:01:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUN' 'sip-files00037.tif'
787f0b393a4fe8e498507e925015ae1e
04484771cbb4967e5779c28cd2f89fb035146058
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUO' 'sip-files00037.txt'
12563c82e81d625a90aa4a31f44573fd
cc9a1cd71fcfd9898e36354ae78804f7f8878d87
describe
'10693' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3d4cf2759cca22c62619c82e2218d1d3
fff9242314cae7abc6238ab731bf6c463415d607
describe
'265170' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUQ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0164629bd1b7f98a44498e08c4ce11fe
98ce4077121e56b2e95ffd9806febb83c6f11a72
describe
'123878' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f08842adbc4b5e7f29acbe1621575e5a
fd626073442d092c491e783918321ffd271f3803
describe
'22668' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUS' 'sip-files00038.pro'
39b96d730c061d7fb1ed0f180b854879
5ffcf7121b00447d3b4ea72742d99bd0d25d8069
describe
'39116' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2f4ee27476e3f2d93c11d817f1770a86
6409e43920de7fe5405dd2297df569eec76c5a20
'2011-12-21T23:01:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUU' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5462ef23851c23450f94ba79f5b7a1fd
cd6e806b34b89f4db3a5b36d09c505b59a090568
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUV' 'sip-files00038.txt'
82c89f413699fd107787b9c9771e63b5
7c3299bebe5fb2b882614cf12356d883a4c76b0b
describe
'10253' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUW' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
6adc28288b7056c25d5357a3ca4d7036
edbc80b93d537d31bdb0d73d3427642208b3e9f5
describe
'265071' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUX' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2e76bb2b73ab1ba19200cebfef2f168b
c6aa187a197f57b14490ad1c333055061f826d96
describe
'120479' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUY' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
56103d405fe3e54886161e0520b94ead
171e6399064737bc9fe4e2aa2285c5fbaad03dfa
describe
'21452' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADUZ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
4c8612944f94dd4c736b8e9cefd309ea
402f6ddf604ea39038f7b22e745d74174e5bb1ef
describe
'37350' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVA' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
87aae23967137c0d5ab8fcac30fe89f8
121fe75d5107c23d7dc701d7eda90e0b5591991e
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVB' 'sip-files00039.tif'
6caf484d9bdd89c40b9e0a1e58115a3e
98bf3cf59246ecce79accb54016b16dc895e76ad
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVC' 'sip-files00039.txt'
2fe3e5c30e6d9c15d13a19ed8108df54
606fd0a5c8e5484c92b89a83b0ea5cd75a9cbc68
describe
'10141' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVD' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
0aa946e1e337d05c22284187ec34ef55
258d2ae33f3cea3f483684d1c62553292aee91fb
'2011-12-21T23:00:47-05:00'
describe
'265184' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVE' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
09b26a2ec35947c4e9dc57c0dc35c142
32454657f15bafadd4361582ed2fff0c67b6b3bf
describe
'94462' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVF' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b8e83068ec97f5dff9b03e1afc63c9cf
2380da484756a8294c096ba45b485b5ec2bcc876
describe
'14857' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVG' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7b2dcc995c2677dfc2fc14c3065aae97
16ead5b833d59e3697759403d53fd028362ec4d7
describe
'28543' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVH' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0218a1455f0250fcb213e8fb11f689b2
6752d552233d189681eb04752a1bcadcada78f66
'2011-12-21T23:01:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVI' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d966ce247d7a56dab8b9032109ee535f
a3a1643bbd88744e7a79926e9c8b4216a58bb405
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVJ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
7b7eeb02fb9cd272aef397cc4b8ffe75
10b176d5ecb634f952ffba6b5e1aa5026fee2539
describe
'7707' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVK' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
e0ef76696dea2ad9d3066197de765aa0
4b5b5ac75cc705b0b8227cfae94c823560b9bec8
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6524bd5ebcedbe9a4551b6a373eadc20
6ad34b4c6b22ff2fe27394d1435628d15aaa05db
describe
'85436' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
95c6cd771f6e6ce6466d37b2d51ffd1b
438199c831b41b9ada0515730674a20a3c2f8b22
'2011-12-21T23:00:42-05:00'
describe
'11436' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
066b17f98a189562163636acc1a2ae32
f64e21307fc1cc2b2fe04998377c38253928049a
describe
'25852' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d29b7273f3dd158e0164d177ce55ea63
638dcea76c0f7ec2535a732c98d570ffb7ac686b
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
cc9ccd3ce426cc2ca947751349ed62e5
a64553399b56562846c63f2a4cb1bba98620d80b
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e17822524c69e923fc9ef254aa6d1089
a2f3d352c71825814898a78b35279ce0b01aa5d0
describe
'7179' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVR' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
1f7ceb799825e0981b22910c31c8429a
5301ba728bf4c3e10c3a979014fcb7b00c2e86a7
describe
'265081' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
39ca6ee3b5f89b2f4dd8192eb726ddae
4a77df655884d3e3e2dff5d550d8c546963f99c8
describe
'118781' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVT' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
428a446ddd580ba0b3f0d817734ad5f8
7d896d7dae71d8830191c23e0b0a360a63f4dcb9
describe
'21719' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVU' 'sip-files00042.pro'
459f971d85f6abbcd8bb309362f29307
0ffe2e566fe922e55ac9b0cede0f765d6aa71c72
describe
'37517' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
b31176d2ffbc093d118f75e2c1052b54
8888d7c143a6d848aef6518ff2ab6717d5f0cbad
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
624b8cfdaa5e719210c3b3fea0dda05b
46eb8c9e63141d88df76283c9ea5a0fe04e06d00
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVX' 'sip-files00042.txt'
cb054549a06b007aa7fc0de6abc0dff4
8d324c0d313e5c0fa4143f44050406ec99f2c383
describe
'9454' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVY' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
4b8a4806a22bbb877a47bc1188aee063
58bfe12d49dec045772d4b2d238bfb715cbcce1b
describe
'265080' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADVZ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
51c0847ce69b538e50aeaf02fee2277d
921f02a81aa2769a52f4daf5a9098a79f3befc92
describe
'114855' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWA' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
2d4be5b385a7337c20316c9066a9c72c
db5763a48331468068fb04565a07a5b61d8f68d6
'2011-12-21T23:00:16-05:00'
describe
'20776' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
78f410b5495b8383fb739781b20de2ee
47d6db9999a74e5f0d3184f67f14cca9ccea913e
describe
'35315' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
da26d311ec865d85064c91ba3ee8ba58
6da31c0cefd69ae5ecb1f112e12aa62cc2024bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWD' 'sip-files00043.tif'
a46f99c3129bb04ad306c4de34af397a
b22f1e28e7b28b2a64941113905c41211a931826
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5b1821f19dc46598d614e2eb2a41271a
a431de442a2e7fc81bd96311c77a8e4584d5b30d
describe
'9247' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWF' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
2a1ad67919f0979d25fdca4575fffb68
7c6ff3a911957de7a0724869761e24192517aa61
describe
'265075' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b1ee76840459036eb1493bc400956df9
2710f235ae4f47c0e073defb8ff12c7a8cbbcb39
describe
'121972' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWH' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
60acc9dcc7532c53383ef887fe98abed
feea131503b9c48ede007dc5ca94c5075a345e70
describe
'21435' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
1b34a9df2ad06ef7a1af9656e2773c2b
0e81f3a6cffdcc36caf9603e67f8cfe1dcb51de7
describe
'38262' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWJ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
bea8920c7a09c340d6ccd6c822277d42
428990c1e6889a2276d4f5f81ee46ff30bc697bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWK' 'sip-files00044.tif'
713fbd0922750f28cb5d99e42caf0ece
da7a4b36ff6563422b1e63e92f1923407555b1e3
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f420d4dd826c4e8226be6e9e593bb25c
5577872399960b156d6b45d9dfcd0f846803efd1
describe
'9910' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWM' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3b3e7d1e7b5a8d9c5f89128922977347
41063af8278ca3d30159677e6f83b97479ea8320
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWN' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
834ffecbd21348105328a363bbaa4ca1
916fb921a9925830bc5f007cc19afe9df2d2be87
describe
'130721' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
fe2e8b2ce015b530d593fd10bd8335f1
c33864448f4c9dc79d9e14fdad6f4392158b5185
describe
'23229' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
86c6b1433897e7a39086b0a4981ebb14
648ca5de6347a4fd834d1476344699216a83317c
'2011-12-21T23:00:31-05:00'
describe
'42357' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWQ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
cd2d94c72ded5c918c1d5bc0d0727165
d3b33bc830c7dd25780ac7175f7fab6fef42f19c
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWR' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e28e4580a6413615ba344d86f86b4b98
8cb1134ecf846303b44d759fa247e09a4c992373
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
608246c24c591f3a0196dba1219f35b3
56d294424d0a12b0928ad9e434e486877fd8ce00
describe
'10929' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWT' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
afa421bab14aab022f6a002702b6a871
4fc4f1176598c7feb097b681377d114a3449c853
describe
'265163' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWU' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
779d0b4ea278eb52ba17f6e4b74c2e74
d555ce89f2b27c9fc2f4c6d1e0bda0887758d297
describe
'119009' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
58ba60d1ae574be2973cb3927705b7ae
dfcee4715f05ded39e8611a117d43251cec4d541
describe
'21504' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWW' 'sip-files00046.pro'
dd3cc736b91873e4e916b00ee524276f
8a47a8abeb58c2914726a5c5e0703355515c9723
describe
'37207' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
76c01b28317e4ab7c030cea47d3930e6
a66a978789b21d5b7679f9592aa003a209707de2
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
16b6abf3db8d50eb948a8ba1fe1f6578
4cf9555c12fef51fc8e0d83a99ce71e8bcb72ff5
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADWZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f4a7dfe4dbf0c60666c7777e746b8e64
ac654ba85a4a773f27daded55b3ec4f493dc1e88
describe
'10093' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ce959874152e228cecf202118bbc6e23
f84f3247305e84c0f171e0912c6fd9f2c496f1ed
describe
'265407' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3dd0733c6f9f738c023bf551f1420613
aeae1a91b601150b6c79d0e2662b458527577aee
describe
'125194' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
d115bdd9693080cb8da1543dda2c040c
6b79d82241ecc4f516fb8142bf83a6f3917e7540
describe
'22354' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXD' 'sip-files00047.pro'
fc3563ff97b9256fbb27727832d4acb3
12ea6e208b814bf9a84a5e0f8462bd719f8aca66
describe
'38618' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c4dc7447fa006d3d8040318ec5962799
7024269bd0fdb241494f36e847fc3d9193afefa3
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9d4e25af3d7bb48a31af2e172691c63a
9a5d9d1182b6b0ab3d5419f53e2b3ef4aed6bad4
'2011-12-21T23:01:23-05:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0b5b271ee14d6a9f1012a7a7c60ed4fd
f9745ba566379e69acfe79a1f8b6f31bd4cc5122
describe
'10587' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
25f8b344b57cc3558418c816629bbc1c
65f9ca3938726bf9873eac2f421e1f5a3d130bc1
describe
'265125' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXI' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
bb3a0b7bba1cb47f6e0846b953fecee3
cc5e07e6523f7404f5d6f3477fd39e7a16e9fe6f
describe
'125020' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e66c9a559049434838db88071545bff3
428296b47adb4a1686e86c7ba02560eca83eda78
describe
'21629' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXK' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8ed89b1017e12c52811fa9cf9f06454f
4447c3bd5e38c6a268881d3d228a92aa6b5ad999
describe
'39482' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXL' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
5edeab90f17b0c2af5cca42cb148f2d0
810f693e6ce459b1c6e6a51b7179089caecc486e
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
924e61b207ce6aba48607db1c8ea66c3
808ecf893e1ba40e6800c3a5e91b6c735c27e804
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXN' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b8c8f8d416f68a4073399b33eee39f3d
f68521fe7117d2a32b2f6997aec4b6b7f2bcaa5c
describe
'9872' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
2349ab71cd3db9f62a837b623e907f03
38b7b6cc06b542ed425042117e6fbd7cf8bb8133
describe
'264935' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
34e77324273e63acf54c0704243f3ea9
106414dbc35dcbb778b33de4721e01a7be374a29
describe
'118853' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
f1d153d7ec536ba08c1eb4eb7bdff630
fe1c130c74d5b549f3f2231963f7e9657d847d9e
describe
'19853' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXR' 'sip-files00049.pro'
2e6f37c3d19db675cc41c20275bcb34f
768800093c6b025a23f72c1b178244318b2615db
describe
'36910' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
22ca434f706947a202344ab589f03f82
d1a8c1c100040c261426f425bc44f5e3fa1b1edb
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXT' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5db1271a448301483822c65f28111077
f0bf162d3843510fce5f8ebce5042919120e22d4
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f427ff9cc1f0417276ebaff21e0b7274
aa8d122635bcb18d933253de3619bb8164e8052b
describe
'10111' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXV' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
cc694628c75b5d627c8595972e5a5812
3dbce5589c7ed3d0e3495211794625aa84865a2c
describe
'265037' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f2072a21fea82b2651d1c3f3bff56ad9
3b2c07c99342837560e1f3f24999156117badca4
describe
'111006' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
4090687a45abc5672a5c95c3b1b17e32
0924feb880640c01eb404a379efb982714024734
describe
'19487' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
a5d78e275cb2c5edc63a8a891138a171
4407288cacaa5fcbfac3490137cda0818a2e5f7a
'2011-12-21T23:01:53-05:00'
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADXZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
cd4addd6625c443f83b5d0e3436aa691
b860029b24ee86be4fd010bbf28d5f9ad6572388
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e092395658df219c7f1fa00de6c3e0e9
c5dfc12220d9d47b57c7fb473536a4700d0227c0
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYB' 'sip-files00050.txt'
16f34b486d62d1532ecaef6dc0b83c3a
21135c9bba1a825ce54a6d3f8920b9142f84e274
describe
'9585' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYC' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b2789a9b6cb7443198154870e00e3ce8
933810606e94aafa20555128bad64bb3a8234aeb
describe
'265182' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
2a239df1552ff4d8c28a0a35882d7a02
144aa3ae88ec333f7b0d1ff558a5aceca9a0b8e3
describe
'122738' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6e90a57a3c072d42c208720c35a2d1e9
feee969623712ba8b0e16069a3adbcc87721c824
describe
'22612' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
02f8bd4d92ae944a63cac8389a9e0fd6
399501b4ae1b62db9bd50fb7b06c24ca0f672b0c
describe
'39165' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
5416f0400ab2474a35f90014dd06944e
6dee905c5e0b118dcb7956d99fb346f42fa5770c
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
fa5dd407d1809bdb71a23d7999281dc9
4af22309c67c8cf07081b53eedd9e3ed76ee8e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1863bd54a7c5d030a1a76c08c367e85d
ce2e48c814a3e7d180b9c9b7642f81195b806c38
describe
'10198' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
641db0e1f742dd74be097e9bc4eed5ed
7638d6fc44c59b1ba544046a9e09204195852d2c
describe
'265320' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
345855fc423f99648691cf76fa89b9bd
4cbcd1c0df93c9a6faef349dc3e2d364a1b53e3f
describe
'133123' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYL' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1ecc6797ad15dcb1ebffb5bc3aad188c
288a04b31065689aa5708d3643f441a4044a3471
describe
'22767' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYM' 'sip-files00052.pro'
606e62bd9cbfef26b82e58eb29f71696
68277d850ee0321047d42e3617fa453028925fb3
describe
'41453' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYN' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
742f75d7dd524e5fe1967a10e233fdc6
1feccb406d2df71595beea3ba846b5d93f0ca52e
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYO' 'sip-files00052.tif'
1521715a52dd0bc1e010a494cd3d39ee
227d3170777c1ed302a4095e08731633c4595d7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYP' 'sip-files00052.txt'
954330a68e0c1489bdac6a79f9b2bb25
7d277b6c696d96e582b8ed77c96eed1a02eb9840
describe
'10401' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a46dc80585cfc320871555f0653b980a
8d3fc2aa3b8aa88ba635e537384dae22174b0774
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYR' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
686f108348e37bb7160d246c60f276cb
22e55fa4e5489f00858150431ad44727b193e514
'2011-12-21T23:01:19-05:00'
describe
'128991' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYS' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dacf1d0da61c555110860ad8edbd4971
3827b1af2db1c72e3ba1c6fc5b1e30953a971803
describe
'21766' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1f28eefa6792a576a096148822a122e1
d5b35a4b1016bb2c661692025f97d7daea5a2c14
describe
'39245' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c7e4d85e2ce8e092dd2fb63deb1c39b0
5d503f53a23550b9434a81d89f652c0a56cccb3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
92769c6c3e98393f95ccfc6a28128906
100eec205244725814edbfef5a3fcdfe5a1bcd1f
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
e89dfafdac9cd4f389ecbb859b759a30
9ab59033456de5ea6d646c910db5951987e6d2be
describe
'10099' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1b6d8dcef5c81007a711fc2e72f3ebf4
d3feb5eaca65553ce2804fd79e111b98cdb1691b
describe
'265196' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
31f22915c3db966756732c148310f240
1f96937397d5b290af698fc4c89cefd34907de4c
describe
'120384' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADYZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
72318efabf7e0bea23049c75e7f7319e
1ec30285d04ac607abdb6a35e87f695f69724a84
describe
'22406' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
dfed77465a2cef5b3a72301c2173cd64
c399f98c0211a905a09396a2f36949acf5dc62e2
describe
'38568' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7e3b5f99491f539124c93a034cc00eb7
889a21abff0b2c64e15ba6f7fdddbccf31c323f3
'2011-12-21T23:00:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3cb3dc6c4f8c02899d2986a731abf4cf
11aefd6b1ecb6a7857c2f78df0feefd13613a754
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZD' 'sip-files00054.txt'
4a9deb12036d2b4f1490bc6d42d890e6
7f2e1fa4f73dda18b78beea1fda794f8bc96dab3
describe
'9791' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZE' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
efd8c44cf6768fdfa11fcc59979cf578
33c5bdad96af1a1112811f551f4c68e7937d87ca
describe
'265345' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
4b39ea066120653844771e9fb101e892
8b66fd3865a59a8f7da0fb282a61e31237075cb0
describe
'117794' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZG' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1d4e9bf3bb4b7068c3b162e410a67159
1e231edf00050009c3cde7cafbf82ce24912a1f8
describe
'21484' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
9d648c47cdd1dd77aaf40f8b0bd3d031
2141b5c5f63166366a091979a8fcce5575837455
describe
'37730' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZI' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
236a50d009d40782eefd12f91762e3c9
b95bbed7f10843290314fa52472866b5fad7fa07
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
96a54680821ac3e6af02196a7e688e3f
a5671ed5eae49f84af40cc3cff0c03ac99e181e7
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c9fd92a63d7c2d41d21d38526ffd1178
c68c38205c87fce015a01ed044b0dd6222d4f417
describe
'9754' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZL' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
306e8d9bb4adeec0cf8fc70a97a42d5a
4188cfc7232535242db3c8a633683928a6e2045e
describe
'265403' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
c1e576e6214151bd3d8d9157d6808391
31bf308a1d7326f0715f3afbd42b60f019421bf0
describe
'118444' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZN' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c8144bd7a27e3aa04db68624ca50ddaa
e9a5cbefdb2f192352ddccca0cf3e31307fa0303
describe
'21465' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
4816db7b0983391fc58e1dc2e65119c1
7caafc7c7c31a0cef736eb7f83eda08b8e45be39
describe
'38420' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6426ade4ba0b604cf4def7eec4aa6c51
de4d2525ba0a14baaca8939eab50cdcc55d2938b
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZQ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
e3d36812b2b39f7fe6164ed8d5ec6ce4
5e111aa700b20a96efdbc194e920f2136f4776bc
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
43c7969165069403ee57ab0a51a612c0
de9de15ad338db0f82b63ae1c602e07537dce8fa
describe
'10000' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ac7f716da537d9a5f2b27c82472498f4
e5b12e01c648f88f815774735b3527488fb8112e
describe
'265168' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZT' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b5f7a6544cadba75e9b3b27ef147c2d7
e186c589ca05022da043a6caeedb5c1a2bc69067
describe
'123451' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZU' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6e8fb5d3022d2909da9f8511c12ea4ed
1d30170514d0a0c9f30a524fa7779362badd786b
describe
'22148' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
1c31ce0e5f7bff4f9abbfcb74d5b72dd
083185ee7109743932044f211e144c60f28d49bc
describe
'39718' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZW' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
1f3ae449702fedb3d9015f8f957439bd
ba0481f199e9ba9d7817a0280cc1b14f91747486
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZX' 'sip-files00057.tif'
74b77c8f00c891589dd4e52774bf17f7
2a65e3fc1be7c04a949ff8326d09d1973cb70cda
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZY' 'sip-files00057.txt'
df13ac5156bbce40e707bf51263564cb
09f0added206f0f66f8aaa7677db87efb5fe2f7c
describe
'10643' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAADZZ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
effd2cc9d4fb89ec1e2f947b57778663
3f785cac37089f4e981098be7847bbc9c26d2566
describe
'265150' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
128ddd256001bffe4a26622221a3edf9
5d06304b2d27f2c1ee272f77d8bd3499de70b8f8
describe
'116786' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
df66b9240e12d05fe937c92057df7a20
7b5695e05ae8e443f8c35da987e16addbf327cf1
describe
'21938' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAC' 'sip-files00058.pro'
61ee2f8fa9c688df5049e1303b0d3f2c
24bcf9760c3ac431271b977c663bd1dba48ba23e
describe
'38367' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
96dc90de5c486c8397d335ee2106e4b9
1e3422eeef8afaa2af0b570576a999559e40dc27
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAE' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a521248547052412858f748b28d3e4f6
5388ebe4d5c2d187312a41729744637ec94dfe15
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAF' 'sip-files00058.txt'
2e8c4748c258bd32aa546e4e1c296c2a
f114effc0b1517747a801c92c6e7b18604545bfc
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAG' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
9945309a44020fc35bf14231f39a98f3
70073ce039231078180052059cafe47fbcdf8d2d
describe
'265133' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAH' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
631fc2b8a7340e00bb7d3511f110694f
348d884dabb756664977eabed31a26175278c29f
describe
'110310' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAI' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
b988524c5d48a8caa1b334a312933a28
fd9c7c62409484aa0c651e265bf5acd7c13ed847
describe
'20121' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAJ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2cdd99136ad9bf772984a19908cd24ce
d44807decbb0e3e15c7f6d026ad7ea00e200d9ef
describe
'36219' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAK' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
f91257e74a8722fb4bffc589420698fd
fec96678d1a8d125dcd8001a59d9cc47be62bf1d
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d27ebcbb881e145a9520ae24e845ab45
c0063c546d4b09084844afb61e71e8d0fc47a688
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b97794e7d9c308025f21e0a553ed6daf
ec3b28173f5f10f99c18e24f6ef6355a87ad979e
describe
'9465' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAN' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
bae944f702401b8ab05a99fff537458e
164136d9721dce4a3306885c08cac17e6ae55b3b
describe
'265109' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
0061bdd27d09c97b18dade26fc6dad86
6bc1411f44916c3011b2c8491080e60b9ab33e3e
describe
'121743' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b1b322efa7cfe6ff0cb5df152226111f
0a4fd30ed89eb9d193676c210c379290f6fbd64e
describe
'22324' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAQ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7ed96de9d6f65ee51305c97bd68721a7
e10ae46bd10e417417870ff2c936d18ebd049027
describe
'39658' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f63d904d81990583e3d24fd209891e0f
530ffba82f9d9055cc8f4087bb45fbacc340a8b4
describe
'2139032' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAS' 'sip-files00060.tif'
cf737764386166ef548ea6b7916e73ce
b881fd64d1d61b25d711913a697cb213c3ab881a
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
dec463d5f870d8f57c4b36f92d3fad06
fd64b1e8c4d5f8837363543155efb32bdd36eb22
describe
'9976' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a379642b79826525998ca9699bf1b712
3afd0a7e9abf43d2d6b6de90b7c0e06ba7eefb25
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
18e6c83ad1f17487de63dc286fb0acd8
f1231de42b52e87d46f1fe2987810732e223113c
describe
'122013' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
1cd1a65971d6711553c239469edeacb7
1583edf302bfe79d210aeb99968c28e2b0be9d99
describe
'22378' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
53db8ea576e0e74246d2b1e8b7342ed2
fe9737707a116fa404c53dbcf7ddbc00943b935c
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3c9da193df3ed5021bdda618c8246fa0
b16105303547063fbc8f49f06e12d866ca6d74cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEAZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
4ec3e4ed5bfb8146d6a95b4749d21ec4
31b451769f85b31a2be84107aaf51b8853f22444
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
7329bac4767f16fe5ff6713bfe848844
c3d282086747f33c43745e64559ddde0575b8ed7
describe
'10223' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0755cfec7a01dcde15cb760d91b0dfd4
328996965f27ff6ecd1309c3bcc57e65d31152d1
describe
'265143' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
74e0a5533c51fa020b8e7e499818c6af
cafb50fc5fa722f0890708c33441f0e12a454edf
describe
'112182' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
dce462ec179c77d3aa2ad56ce525d9f0
55cca25ee39a5115d377ac4bbc7397a3ea6defbc
describe
'21376' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
772e72944c7cc55d11329d2269443117
7e344c1923ed74734f3477d70a02e9852259bdad
describe
'36663' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
55af442028c9a1dd902c0a6ca0882f59
0be156664f707c3df592fe621f65b552205d0025
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
79047fd1e58f74b4c84fe85bc79983be
3fd5c6e5868b6d1571b82c84c704908e09f4c83c
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
fd3225ff4bfb1e2f3536d9f5d3ba3a18
f80542cbb10d129b005bc606983faf1ff12e2c0b
describe
'9270' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3a324de02896feccaaf2cae2279d8d6c
8c53ce7fa665bad969c1e43e568ebeaad3b78a79
describe
'265165' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
c57250d0968c511821f0fa4b049b29e1
689f79b34111d416ae56d338328e0c5545e512d8
describe
'121777' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
9eb64ddfab0cebdb3015cfdf4831d78e
8dd097edd23926724ab9d36d17d9f93dd7e2110a
describe
'22614' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e4af081f00d3c6cec9f8fd6c6418d8a6
8874cafde7717440fef19b7ddbb4bb6000d23930
describe
'39991' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
4e3bdfc8d72f9bde25663ab551d7a2fb
d5b3fcb9619fe04a6ae46e9a118cb8bde84d97b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
f166ffd58726674ce1028cd88b9fd17f
f10aa0d045c4979ece0660e8cbe19945e1eb7bb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
c3a7dc2c2d6eaf5d0ebb07a090d5eab0
0b465f6e07dd01ee3e9b06fee1232986908fe6a2
describe
'10263' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
cbd837acb8d89bea28c96530d13c79e3
800208de9eb3ca5983fff8ec55e74dddfa0b5b63
describe
'265045' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
17cf67dd123e196880c0b3567c544f9e
edc217d8ea9021746c9b77cb710ea4ca347f2f0e
describe
'119882' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
bbf20f2e2e6144cbda8b303f96c651df
dbe409dc0f8b9850128d8f5529237f537e5b5362
describe
'22004' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0ef7ee9a5ade8539bd8b44c3d4bc2f6b
56e9fe272cd0a0ee1cc3772b27b06f6c590e3652
describe
'39937' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
624c894ab5680a59bc3d9929c4db8ce8
1cfa1d751f82a05db4851a01cd60ae557f4714d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
8488501b97f7b1b891f70d825b43f64c
da4a983eaf3338d9e4f7d0782890f45dfee17eaa
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c19c2e76c2402243754137819880b446
b21c7187912242586c77187a13d361af11184309
describe
'10069' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
a7bcab28321ee26c45933334434c0d05
3a2bbbda993e963697dad8e2ae419744142ca333
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c864171c7e73611c7f421563f32c97fc
559fb13cfa76fa623b668236f2bae0eb7d4b05f8
describe
'116763' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
1ffcdc6b4815e3d6dd657d805e5eaaef
e5179eac1e2b036e00c7226f705062ecbdbca104
describe
'21312' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEBZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
95803e2e7045f9ffcb2fc37c46d604c4
b4e449f31b0855b8b1fe9632d120b93a60f3f4dc
describe
'38013' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
be9d2ec8e024809bbc548797a3ae813b
cf324bc99a759154a8442cf659cbc7c08ea18aa9
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3bea3d4e4990d6b42d7bf6218752c8b9
045f58878742aefbdcc7b569693e7856a45d8644
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
eb3a4db76e486e4d8caf1ed71a696f89
3854761889da66c3cc0b533d03859ea58fd3f62d
describe
'9934' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5ca199fd2face4a032255ad5053a7d83
0cb61d25cbbe2c256fee53f4908a64af0ab09e79
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0add24e92038cd78b6321cc9c3e22717
2459b5eea8159b5aa96a870efa431fafc6d08d29
describe
'118326' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
964f568e660f3dc38c303658987b4007
9bd1d93935f94d349a36bde409a1211516edc7ee
describe
'21798' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
6760b0789abbd21cf6443c5fb5341118
ebcfaa55dc9b950e6cb2a446c9694abd78d28a79
describe
'37982' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
4cb447d48db3a3da609a59eba416943e
7be3f843334e635a35e02e965b9c4da26c5d610c
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
78c16377ff0580e20a434ce3dc9a947a
5b5acd321829b0b3d5090b341d7fb801236292a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
0a018c4dc7b5533d1a29893f26ffcb27
47a45b5bbe10f8aa27b8642b11789c335300a5ea
describe
'9855' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
9325075d118e3b66904c57adf4780b1d
16dd53da8eab5d00247a70b3c5ab9b15462c8232
describe
'265145' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
eb0700222ef045cceaaa637df8702e0d
040dc88a16e9d0b140ea9cdcded22406ae21ce7e
describe
'97104' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9abb15523e44760456ddf9a9d3782152
9a82aa28c9421b5977b89d1212b44238a3350b85
describe
'16903' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
efafe0755a40a6c2ac43309ef45024ec
32769a11648668fece03d75891b2a9badd0f110c
describe
'30419' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6320747b6c8653d0a3cd01baf4398dee
8f94fa36c0a3841f5f565bd99731482a43029e74
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
6376d2412b067b5ff8626684bd3328ba
f36992cbae55415da942f779bb0c183fff4178d6
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
03b573aaca523301b2a2216af4e962f6
d529ce67b749796e9e161c73568ce7d04b6f06a8
describe
'7759' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e1a47e43676d086aed11ffe243aa3868
c83bf39264558d2986914c56dafdc8a579d26ee6
describe
'265038' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
4ecdd77c8681a817b40b91cabe0804f2
3742225dada7fadccd2f667fdd4fb367a5d33d78
describe
'86447' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECT' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
27dc8425f66f21a2a46a7aaedaa94f29
aa8dba3d47666e46b95473ca37d4a7a8c55b7e29
describe
'12956' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
79de13753a5b6497607b4ec81f2226bf
5f17dd49cd8e471ae740c62ad18a96de9835a760
describe
'27183' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECV' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
36e20b5faaf994684b652eb6e95c721a
d68a2d3eb3af38d1892b0546304e564a83894198
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b026044bfa8d2e315bd7874451268917
3eab2d42da2489bc8ac922e06b8820aea0e2f0db
describe
'539' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8812fed253d4867a34d7e9b08d738f2e
56da2d453a2ce80e1f8a09035d690de1d9a85f87
describe
'7318' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECY' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2243aa2dde3b3eaba8d971e3aeca90c0
c939ffa06c7de9561f825301eb32fa3938ff40a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAECZ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
b4c884abcc950629a9c251553f771168
9afc45d497b1acc6ca78449302e9af03274eaa15
describe
'123221' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a40fb9002b32317bde863e685a450a78
ba4c6543a01a3940f463cab044de36e93d02e0a7
describe
'21867' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDB' 'sip-files00069.pro'
3aaf4bf12340a391a72813f44a353587
8a79fd70baec257e366e40ffa5ae3e644ed069b3
describe
'38827' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDC' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
565557e33c97cc1b0496647d1c3cfaa5
95694a70fca168d0e7876a737ae14fc3ffe94c0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDD' 'sip-files00069.tif'
5c84393b11aa42335e09e7beffa4aab1
9891cbdf22ae1c1855934cad28cf25d982aa01a3
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
7383ddbc4301cf088044a55446e034a2
e2643d1adb02bb353921650d7e5ae942066c5d90
describe
'10364' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDF' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
348f9c188d94151858894c0e3ecc3e11
4e6af48d4be5ed8364aae5ba41ec2befc3c9fcd0
describe
'265062' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDG' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7326d1f9ac2667acb1568372b5757b01
c5a2ba86d5c5ab68672a624fc6b62d8e7bb1303c
describe
'123071' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDH' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
807108dd388155fcd06affc76beed94a
ebbf8ebb36364ee6d3bf7e253cc9f83063d92213
describe
'21213' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
65557bb2c0736eae0960be34754323aa
c09e5aecbe5d902b8f8099ae8adf29ce355c5878
describe
'38462' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDJ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
658abc9fdc3ccd720769a61ad5424ad4
3efb0120de154e011009c108b9855778bb2ca4e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDK' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c4b2491041946880f6d3d88e8378325d
7a4a4337a17c5fcead9fb2d59f649cba1c10f2e7
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDL' 'sip-files00070.txt'
2f1860451b22a8e86ee2a3411821edbf
921fefbbd13b67214bd995214972c77e2bc795d4
describe
'9518' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDM' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
72ee9b0fa0185cee5ba0bbd3c1d5ddfe
8b2faa142d3040180933ac74e2d3b8b48cdb8594
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDN' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
7d7cbdcadd8941c55eef153f694a7718
fa24050e361b69de103e1a64946f06a89a38dcd6
describe
'123827' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
afbb386d3f19451daf370fa538a99b6c
7c953091dfb11e576f1656596d5bb5330222fb7c
describe
'21204' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDP' 'sip-files00071.pro'
28327725b360ad0b74f058689dae95fd
f6e6c68b08bb26f38fc83acaef9200bd26661b24
describe
'38105' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDQ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bb02df7b749bb230098e5e59ea071aff
584b44a1c4a110091b51222f2c4fbd0f9d24b3ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDR' 'sip-files00071.tif'
64c1eea8774707727e15ef2351737a65
75c057732e02739158291879ea63b904eccf0186
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
afba964b7d9925193af9c79e06744741
c6577f3d890013dee607cbc5cad80f60b8df3837
describe
'9807' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDT' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
63267f281a3347e1d30db164bacc1e4e
d048c9b56dd08f7ff08218f90d31ee9d3a85dc9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDU' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
f8ea33b975c07d75e22c44ae2ffa735d
884834ff43efd7dcec7288b3a202f6d8d775cbdd
'2011-12-21T23:00:43-05:00'
describe
'108854' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDV' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
d6e528ba13890150c747a9e804984b30
9aa35702cc567140efc84741ca34e0d321ecf503
'2011-12-21T23:01:47-05:00'
describe
'17681' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDW' 'sip-files00072.pro'
a43aefa9b44d4ad00f00dd633e55af1f
8eaf906597b305be1f37cc5eb8bdf4495a9fc5b7
describe
'31834' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5b3b8f721fccdc157e3d3205a4d7866a
7fbaaca58cf3a466aeff763b468fcc5cbe1151cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
4d6a1a5f138418b33ad093772890cc5b
7b0ea70396b0cb5e70c6ae235d492434de811851
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEDZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
fc80be935d61d5a1814694d100a557f0
4717340bbc61e7ba341645ca54aa90aec3e0e024
describe
'8553' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
308d34aec9c4753fa619ec4f7e8fd625
dc98f035dbe5b7fdeb720c4ae347ff5c8563d8f0
describe
'319430' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEB' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
bf36ff81207546816a544095e1dafd28
7a84c8e1794908d27b37b8767cb21c09cb19ec65
describe
'66366' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEC' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f3a2492ec0196ca5828a00988afadef1
b2445793e36d8b771f82c3514eccd61ed2b25ab9
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEED' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e4469c846a23522d7c76de2797234cfa
c3b2f75fa2074fd935cdafcd7c4a520a0d729fd4
describe
'14396' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEE' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
88ef99f48e28a8a5e2868cff605d6733
263395c17f2907bd661a8b861b882409124fc315
describe
'7673840' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEF' 'sip-files00075.tif'
ade03712286b775a495c23ff82796292
54aaf8dbbe2f0220ce88f3ec909ba7f2459304d9
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEG' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c460ec2c8d3fb39143c707754f64c1f8
b7b7d7d207f97866d80e0f5ebc32e55246ff7bf3
describe
Invalid character
'3892' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEH' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
eaa887695a5906822adb20228ebc456c
9a7f1fd3adac625ea26f270d83731f8372b73b13
describe
'290694' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEI' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
860b5705498cf1f9b231897011719546
5e67e5e1d885787c72d410f34853d95c0958aa27
describe
'115093' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEJ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
06ded44c4bc3498088f8cdfcf980f820
0d8feeea451c9abf6baa1a9ca82aa85e2b4c13c4
describe
'20321' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
c924e5a60bbf04352dc02909fd5c94e4
ff016fbfde624d68d0bb55fe200a94b69a9567cb
describe
'6987088' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
57941d88e36deeaa27a78afaf1eaa7be
b641805598424d08f32f11549625c822d2453586
describe
'4273' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
6653bfe32c25ee094dfaafb0527bbb4c
1b9e630464d1cacc0fde62982ac948cce156bcde
describe
'34552' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEN' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
74326d409dbadcef25f94dbcad98e4dd
ba8eb75080722296cf8759426a1a0504f5097e9b
describe
'8807' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEO' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ab4974bc0811791e23cab12e3fa92b40
4a131f2789b34ba8e9bc4db9e7e1a6ddb4d90b14
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
f7ab879fe7d06e6eb7caac6383d06cbf
7800e2f89c827bdfbafcc689e2830677c0379a64
describe
'2557' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEQ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
57ca1c43d33caeacde5c7ec6b217fe02
c6289b5cc555e8eb6f910d1cb523aaf216fe2cad
describe
'846732' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEER' 'sip-files00077.tif'
2ea1f8530f2c373a0e08ebfd8c351adf
4baa41769bfb64d996e78e3c34753465b76c8a14
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEES' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
269c744ea6f75d17f3952c8708431db0
9d2be2eef26b1803fc22c85c4c6afae736a34015
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEET' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
fe480b8a08cdc28e24298402ef2410e2
ad22cb7848e4879032a9a84a50d81033c4101023
describe
'115970' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEU' 'sip-filesUF00086852_00001.mets'
6a792ac1960fc55d8af93058f2503afc
34ecf08a25460716ae6b19fd657bf8e8d9ccb090
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T06:48:21-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'147410' 'info:fdaE20081204_AAADCUfileF20081208_AAAEEX' 'sip-filesUF00086852_00001.xml'
2c9758bb8e49613871ea2a39b8f7ab00
6d725b62684431550634f1a2847966014e6c1934
describe
'2013-12-14T06:48:20-05:00'
xml resolution



z
4
3
a
A

RmB



MY NIGHTINGALE
“He sat on the old wharf till it was

Page 13,


Vi ING tT NIG See



A WELCOME VISITOR

Page 30

T. NELSON AND SONS

London, Edinburgh, and New York
- MY NIGHTINGALE

OR

The Story ot Little tbolger.

BY

BELLA SIDNEY WOOLF



T NELSON AND SONS
\ London, Edinburgh, and New York



1898
CONTENTS.



MY NIGHTINGALE,
THE STORY OF PAULINE,

LITTLE SUNSHINE,

33

60
MY NIGHTINGALE.



OLGER JESPERSEN and his

mother lived in a small street in
the quaint old city of Copenhagen—a
very small street indeed, down by Chris-
tian’s Harbour. They had one room at
the top of a big tumble-down house in
which numbers of other people lived,
many of them rough and all of them
poor. The street was called Liljegade,
(Lily Street), and it almost seemed as if
it had been named thus as a kind of sad.
joke, because it was just the opposite of
all that a lily should be. The houses
i0 |. MY NIGHTINGALE.

were black and ugly and old, and many
of the windows were broken, and had rags |
stuffed in to keep out the cold. The
basements were occupied by small shops,
and you had to go down two or three
steps to them. Most of them sold fittings
for ships or seamen’s clothes, for you see
they were close to the harbour.

Holger’s father had been dead many
years, and. his mother earned bread for
herself and her little son by sewing. She
worked early and late, but still they
were very poor. Yet they were so fond
of each other that as long as they were
together life seemed pleasant enough.
Holger had no playmates of his own age,
for the children in Liljegade were mostly
rough and rude, and his mother did not
wish her boy to grow like them. When
Holger’s father was alive, they had been
quite well off, and had kept a nice grocer’s
shop; but soon after he died they found
MY NIGHTINGALE. 11

that the man whom he had asked to
manage things for his wife had run away
with all the money. So Holger and his
mother had hardly anything left in the
wide world, and had to leave their pretty
little home and live in Liljegade. Frue
_ despersen (rue means Mrs. in Danish)
-was too proud to ask her friends for help,
and perhaps she carried this feeling a
little too far, for she would not let any
one know where she lived, and con-
sequently was soon forgotten.

‘The years went by, and Holger was
seven years old, and was to go to school.
He was rather pale but tall for his age,
with blue eyes and fair hair—so fair as to
be almost white. He was a quiet and
thoughtful boy, old-fashioned and dreamy.
His great pleasure was to sit on the edge
of the wharf near by and gaze at the green
water playing in and out of the wooden
piles. Sometimes it was quiet there,
1 MY NIGHTINGALE.

except for the great steamers travelling
up and down and the small boats shooting
in between. That was towards evening,
when the sun lit up the windows of the .
old warehouses opposite, and made them
shine like sheets of red fire. The harbour
looked very pretty then with the soft pink
of evening over it. In the daytime it
was all life and bustle though, for the
great ships came in with their cargoes,
which had to be unloaded by the brown-
faced sailors in their blue jerseys. Holger
sat there for hours watching them pile up
the bales, and he loved to hear their
strong voices and catch the fragments of
songs they sang to make the hard work
easier. I think it was from sitting so
much by himself, while his mother stitched
away for the ladies who employed her,
that Holger began to make stories to
himself—stories so marvellous that some-
times he did not notice the evening
MY NIGHTINGALE. 13

coming on, and sat out on the old wharf
till it was quite dark, and the lights began
to shine out from houses and ships and
twinkle in the black water. Even then
he was always home before his mother,
for the house was but a stone’s-throw
from the wharf, and she had often some
way to walk after she left the houses
where she worked. Then they would
have supper together in their tiny room—
generally a dish of smoking rice and black
bread, or on grand occasions plum soup,
which I do not think many English little
girls and boys would have liked. After
supper his mother, if she were not too
tired; would read to him. out of the one
story-book he possessed, and which he
almost knew by heart now; but Holger
did not care for games, and was quite con-
tent to listen to the well-known stories.
Sometimes Holger would tell his mother
some of the stories he made up as he

a
14 MY NIGHTINGALE.

* gat by the water of Christian’s Harbour,
and she was often surprised that so small
a boy should have such sweet thoughts.
Now, as I told you before, at the time
my story begins Holger was seven years

old, and his mother was obliged to decide

to send him to school. She would dearly
have liked to teach him herself, but she
had no time to do so, and consequently
Holger only knew his letters. In a
week’s time from the opening of my
story, the school was to be reopened, and
Holger was looking forward with mingled
fear and pleasure to his school life. Frue
Jespersen would have sent him before,
only he was such a frail little fellow that
she could not bear to think of him
amongst the rough children of the Free
School. She knew that he could come
to no harm on the wharf, for he was well
known there ; and though the sailors were
rough men, they were good hearted and
MY NIGHTINGALE. 15

fond of the little fair boy. But at school
she feared his stronger companions might
bully him, and it was with a sad heart,
though with a cheerful face, that she hung
his little satchel over his shoulders when
the week had passed and the first day
of school dawned. She knew that he
would learn quickly, for he was most in-
telligent and very eager to learn to read.
She took him to the school-house door.

“Good-bye, my darling Holger,” she
said; “be a good boy and obey thy
teachers, my little one.”

“Good-bye, sweet little mother,” said
Holger, lifting his face for a kiss. “Yes, —
I will be good. I don’t mind going so
mouch, because they will teach me to read
every book in the world.”

So his mother smiled and kissed him
many times and at last went away, while
Holger passed into the school with a

number of other children.
16 MY NIGHTINGALE.

Frue Jespersen could see from Holger’s
happy face when he came back from his
first day at school that her boy’s school
life had started pleasantly. Holger was
delighted with his teacher, and ambitious
to learn to read as quickly as possible.

‘She said I would soon learn, mother,”
. he said, as they sat at supper. “I shall
try to win a prize too.”

“And what are the other children
like?” asked Frue Jespersen.

“Oh, I don’t know,” said Holger, and
a shade of annoyance crossed his face.
“They wanted me to play, but I said I
would rather learn some spelling. I don’t
think they like me much, but I don’t
mind as long as the teacher does. You
see, I don’t care for games,” he continued,
looking up to his mother’s face with his
brow puckered. 7

This was the only thorn in Holger’s

school life. Many a time he came home
~ @
MY NIGHTINGALE. 17

with traces of tears on his face, which °
only vanished under his mother’s caresses.
“Canst thou not be one of them?”
asked his mother, for it grieved her to
think that her boy was differ ent from
other children.
“You see, mother,” he would say, “T-
can’t join in their games, and they don’t
like that, so they tease me. But it
doesn’t matter, for I shall soon know how
to read, and that is all I care for. Don’t
worry, mother dear.”

And a kiss on his mother’s thin cheek
would end the matter.

The teacher, as she watched Holger’s
earnest face, and marked how quickly
and eagerly he learned, thought to herself,
“He will be a great man some day.”

' At the end of the term Holger came
home radiant with pleasure, and throwing
himself into his mother’s arms, cried, half
laughing and half sobbing, “My best,
1) 2
18 MY NIGHTINGALE.

sweet mother, I have gained a prize, and
can read it too. See here!”
“Thou, Holger,”.she said, and her face
lit up. “ Nay, it cannot be true.” |
“Yes, here it is, little mother,” and
Holger hastily took from its wrappings a
handsome book, bound in red, and con-
taining the most beautiful stories which
have ever been written—the Fairy Tales
(or the Aeventyr, as they call them in
Denmark), of Hans Christian Andersen.
Ah! how happy were two hearts that
evening in that little room in Liljegade.
From the day that Holger received his
prize, a new and beautiful radiance was
east over his life like the pink glow of
the sunset over Christian’s Harbour.
The stories of Hans Andersen smoothed
every little rough bit which lay in his
path. He no longer minded the teasing
of the children in the play-ground, but sat
with the dearly-loved book, forgetful of
MY NIGHTINGALE. 19

all around him. And at night he would
tell the stories to his mother, and his eyes
would glisten and his cheeks flush from
pure delight.

“Oh, if I could but write such a
story!” he said hundreds of times.

Although he was only a small boy, |
yet his whole soul was in the story; and
he made the words so living, as it were,
that his mother would sit and listen, for-
getful of all else. When she noticed this,
she left off grieving that he was not like
other children, and she saw that her boy
was to be something different from the
rest. She wisely encouraged his love for
the stories, for she knew that none sweeter
had been set down on paper. And Hol-
ger’s favourite story was that of ‘The
Nightingale,” which no doubt most of you
know. It tells how the Emperor of
China suddenly discovered that he pos-
sessed a treasure he had never heard of
20 MY NIGHTINGALE.

before—a nightingale, So he sent his
courtiers to ask the nightingale to sing to
him, and when he heard the bird he was
so enchanted that he showed it all pos-
sible honour, and no one in China talked
of anything else but this songster of the |
woods. In fact, when the nightingale
sang, tears stood in the emperor’s eyes;
and what more could a bird desire? But
one day an artificial nightingale, studded
with jewels, was sent to the emperor,
which, when wound up, could sing a
tune. And the emperor was so delighted
that he forgot his old favourite and
banished the bird from the country, while
the artificial bird took its place in the
emperor's and every one’s heart. Oh, how
sad it was! The artificial bird could only
sing one tune, but no one wearied of it,
till at last one day something went wrong
inside it, and it broke. They repaired it
as well as possible, but it was only allowed
MY NIGHTINGALE. 21

to sing’ once a year. That was a great
grief to the people of China, but a still
greater one was to befall them. Their
emperor, of whom they were very fond,
fell ill, and all thought he would die. He
lay cold and stiff on his bed, and every-
’ thing he had done in his life, both good
and evil, rose up before him, and weighed
like lead on his heart. He longed for
music to drive all the dreadful thoughts
away, so he begged the artificial bird to
sing to him.’ But the bird was dumb, for
there was no one to wind it up. The
whole court believed the emperor was
dead, and had already gone to make their
bow to the new ruler.

So the emperor lay quite alone and
suffering. Suddenly the most glorious
song sounded outside the window. It was
the real nightingale. |

The horrible thoughts vanished from
the emperor’s brain, and the blood ran
22 MY NIGHTINGALE. |

warm in his veins, and when the nightin-
gale finished he was once more well.
He thanked the little bird which had
come to him in his hour of need, although
it had been treated so badly, and he asked
the bird what reward it wished. But the
nightingale said that the tears it had
drawn from the emperor's eyes, when it
sang the first time, were sufficient reward.
Then the bird promised to sing to him of
everything it had seen in its flight.
“But,” said he, “tell no one that you
have a bird which tells you everything.”
When the servants came to look at the
dead emperor they found him in his impe-
rial robes, and he said, “ Good-morning.”
I have told this story for those who do
not know it, but I wish they would read
it in the words of Andersen himself, for
what are my words compared with his?
Holger never wearied of this story, and
he knew it almost by heart.
MY NIGHTINGALE. 23

Now one day when Holger came home
from school his mother noticed that his
eyes were unusually bright and his cheeks
very red. But she said nothing.

Whilst they sat at supper, Holger said,
“Six -of the children did not come to
school to-day; I suppose they are ill.
The teacher has sent to inquire. O
mother,” he continued, after a moment’s
pause, “I feel so queer.” And he held
the back of his chair for support.

His mother was by his side in a mo-
ment, and before long Holger lay in his
little bed tossing in high fever. The
doctor was called in, and pronounced it
influenza, in a very bad form. Next day
he was worse and quite delirious, talking
incessantly of Andersen and the well-
loved fairy tales. The poor mother was
nearly mad with grief as she sat by his
bed and listened to the disjointed sen-
tences which fell from his lips.
24 MY NIGHTINGALE.

“The nightingale,” he murmured, “how
sweetly it sings—it is like the water in
Christian’s Harbour—I am so hot—do
let the nightingale sing—don’t you see
the emperor—he has sent the real night-
ingale away—J would not have done it.
Oy pee is Andersen ?—do let him
come.” And so on all that day.

“Tf the fever would leave him, and if
he could sleep,” said the doctor, “he
might recover. As it is, he is so excited
that he is losing all his strength.”

“ Andersen, Andersen!” cried Holger.

Now I must tell you that Andersen
was living in Copenhagen at the time of
my story. Holger’s greatest wish was to
see him, but he had never had the good
fortune. He had consoled himself by
saving up the five-dre (halfpenny) pieces
which his mother occasionally gave him,
and buying a photograph of Andersen.
This was his greatest treasure, next to
MY NIGHTINGALE. 25.

the book itself, and he looked at it morn-
ing and evening and kissed it. He had
- decided to write to Andersen on the great
writer’s birthday, for, after discussing it
with his mother, they decided that it was
better than sending a present, as he could
not afford to buy anything worth giving.
The letter had already been written when
Holger was seized with influenza, for,
although Andersen’s birthday was-not for
a week or two, Holger’s excitement was
so great that he could not wait any longer.
He had bought. a sheet of note-paper
with a border of rosebuds and gilt edges,
and the letter now lay on the bureau,
addressed and stamped.

“T will take the letter up to Andersen
himself,” she thought, her heart beating,
“and ask him to come. I know it will :
save my boy’s life.”

On the floor beneath lived another
needlewoman whom Frue Jespersen knew
26 MY NIGHTINGALE.

and liked. She willingly agreed to watch
by Holger for half an hour. Then the
poor mother hastily put on her bonnet
and shawl, and hurried through the dimly-
_ lighted streets towards Havnsgade, where
_ Andersen lived. She clasped the little
letter to her heart, but her courage almost
failed her as she neared her destination.
She was a timid little woman, and she
feared troubling the great man.

“For Holger’s sake,” she repeated over
_and over again with trembling lips, as she
rang the bell.

The servant who answered it seemed
surprised at her request to see her master,
and was half inclined to refuse. But Frue
Jespersen’s haggard face and piteous eyes
moved her to pity.

“Tt is a matter of life or death,” said
the poor woman, leaning against the door
for support.

She was shown into a sitting-room, but
MY NIGHTINGALE. 27

in less than a minute the door opened and
she rose to her feet. Andersen stood be-
fore her. It was a tall, ungainly figure
that of the writer of the sweetest fairy- |
tales in the world; the face was thin and
clean shaven and the nose long. He was >
not handsome, but the eyes were kind and
helped to reassure Frue Jespersen.

She told the story simply, and the
writer's heart was touched. Tears stood
in his eyes as he read the letter, for this
is how it ran :— ;

“Dear, pear Herr Anpersen,—I am a
little boy called Holger, and I am nearly
eight, but I love you so that I hope you
will forgive me for writing. I kiss your
portrait every morning and every even-
ing. Once I loved mother and smor-
rekage (butter-cake) better than anything
else in the world, but now I love mother
and your stories best. I wish you a’
happy birthday and lots of presents. I
28 MY NIGHTINGALE.

would send you one, but I have only ten
dre (one penny). Of all your stories, I
love ‘The Nightingale’ best ; when I read
_ it, it seems like music and flowers. When
I grow up:I shall try to write stories ;
mother thinks I may, if I work hard at
school.

“ Dear, dear Herr Andersen, best love
from ~ ‘Horerr.”

The spelling was somewhat faulty, and
the writing cramped and childish, and yet
it had drawn tears from Andersen’s eyes.

“Tt may save my boy’s life, if you
come, Herr Andersen,” Frue Jespersen
pleaded tearfully.

He expected some friends that evening,
but what were they when compared to the
good deed which it lay in his power to do?

“Take me to your little son,” he said,
with such a look of sympathy that Frue
Jespersen caught his hand and kissed it.
They were soon in the street—he the
MY NIGHTINGALE. 29

greatest writer of his day, whom kings |
and queens honoured, and whose name
was known over the whole world, and the
poor needlewoman of Liljegade. An-
dersen hailed a passing cab, and as they
_ drove he drew from her the story of her
life, and the struggles to earn her bread,
as well as of Holger’s marvellous quick-
ness at learning, and the stories he made
and told her. The cab soon brought
them to Liljegade; they hurried up the
dark, rickety stairs, and quietly. eo
the sick-room.

Holger was still tossing on his pillow,
his eyes closed, his cheeks flushed a deep
rose-red, his thin little hands clasping the
fairy-tales.

And still he moaned, “ Andersen—An-
dersen—‘ The Nightingale’—read me
‘The Nightingale.’”

Andersen with one glance took in the
small room with its neatness and poverty.
30 MY NIGHTINGALE.

He stepped forward to the bed, and as
the light of the candle fell on his features
Holger’s blue eyes opened; a glad sur-
prise dawned in them, and with a cry of |
“ Andersen, you have come!” he raised
himself in bed.
The writer tenderly laid him back on
the pillows, and taking the book from the
hot hands, opened it at “The Nightingale,”
and sitting by the bed, commenced read-
ing the story in a sweet, clear voice.
After the first few sentences, a quiet
expression stole over Holger’s face; his
eyes were fixed on the reader, and as the
last sentence fell from his lips, Holger
murmured, “You are my nightingale,”
and sank into a refreshing sleep.
Andersen sat by the little bed till the
blue daylight came creeping in at the
window. He had made the poor worn-
out mother lie down to rest for a while.
At last Holger stirred and opened his
MY NIGHTINGALE. bl

eyes. He looked in bewilderment at the
figure by the bed.

“ Mother,” he cried, “it is a dreams;
Andersen is here!”

At the sound of his voice Frue Jesper-
sen came to his bed-side, and saw that
the fever had gone and her boy was saved.
Her heart was too full for speech

“Tt is no dream,” said Andersen, tak-
ing the little boy’s hand; “TI heard you
were ill, and came to see you. We are
going to be great friends now.”

Holger was too weak to do anything
but smile contentedly.

Andersen proved himself indeed a frend
to little Holger and his mother. As soon
as the boy was better, he sent them to
the country ; and when they returned, it
was not to Liljegade and its poverty, but
to a pretty little flat in a suburb of the
town. Through him Frue Jespersen ob-
tained almost more work than she could
32 MY NIGHTINGALE.

do, and at last she set up a little shop for
herself. Holger went to a good school
and worked hard, so that he might report
good progress to Andersen. For him
the world contained but two people—his
mother and Andersen.

Holger is grown up now, and the great
writer is dead, yet his love for Andersen
will last for ever. He still kisses the
portrait both morning and evening; and
Holger himself writes such beautiful
poems that those who read them some-
times weep for joy.

And do you know what Holger always
calls Andersen? “ My nightingale.”
THE

STORY: OF PAULINE



I

“FTEANETTE! Jeanette! Please
change my frock, quick,” cried a
little girl. The aged woman whom

she addressed laid aside her work, and

taking up a white muslin dress, said,

“What is the hurry, Miss Pauline ?”

“Why, nurse,” she said, “don’t you
know all the people will soon be here,
and: papa wished to see me dressed
first ?”

Jeanette took the little girl on her
knee, and it was not long before she

@) 3
34 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

put her down again in her pretty, white
frock, as beautiful a picture as any fond
father ever looked upon. Just then a man
‘came into the room. It was Jeanette’s
son, Henri. He was of about middle
age, dressed in a workman’s blouse, and
there was much about him that told how
hard a struggle life was to him, as to
many others in that beautiful city of
Paris.

He looked at the merry child, and say-
ing, “ You are well, little lady,” he added,
with a groan, as he seated himself at the
window, “ This world is ill divided.”

“Nay, Henri,” said Jeanette, “if you
have nothing better to tell me than that,
i don’t thank you for coming here to-
night.”

“T say,” retorted the man, “this world
is ill divided ; but there is a time coming
when we will have our rights, or die in
the getting of them.”
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 385

“Henri! Henri!” replied Jeanette, “TI
fear to hear words like these. ‘Who
maketh thee to differ?’ You speak as
if there were no heaven above us, and no
God ruling over all.”

“You see God’s doings, mother, where
IT don’t,” said Henri. “Look at that
little one—there’s more lace on her little
dress than would feed and clothe my
child for a month ; and my Marie starves,
while she flits about like a fairy, as
she is,” he added, as he looked again at
her sparkling eyes and golden curls
with an admiration which he could not
restrain.

Pauline drew near him. Children like
to be admired as surely as older people.

“Ts Marie like a fairy ?” she asked.

The man covered his face with his.
hands and did not answer.

“Ts Marie pretty, like me?” perisied
Pauline.
36 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

“No, no, little miss,” he answered
angrily ; “she is not at all like you.”

‘And Pauline, frightened by the tone —
of his voice, would have cried, had not
the sound of approaching wheels changed
the current of her thoughts.

“They are coming; brush my hair,
quick, quick, nurse!” she cried. And then
with a light bound she went singing down
the stairs. |

When she was gone, Henri began to .
pace up and down the room, uttering
many impatient words as carriage after
carriage rolled up to the door..

“ Henri,” said his mother, “it is not
-man but God you are fighting against.
Who set my master in high places, and
you in low, but God Himself?”

“God never meant the rich to grind
the poor as they do, and He never meant
us to let them do it,” said Henri, “and
we are the more fools that we do.”
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 387

“OQ my son,” replied the patient old
woman, “God reigns. Man can only
wrong us so far as He permits it. Take
everything from Him, Henri, the bitter
as well as the sweet, and all will work
together for good to you. Why is it
that you, with health and strength, are
miserable, and your little suffering child
is happy all the day? Is it not because
she takes all her trouble from the Lord’s
hands, and you are always growling about
the sins of the rich, instead of mourning
over your own? I can tell you—and I
have seen more of them than you—that
the rich have not their sorrows.to seek
either, and have their burdens to bear
too, Henri. I learned that long ago.
It was when my Amy died, and the
little one here too. I thought it hard,
the day after our baby was laid in the
churchyard, to have to begin and toil at
my work as if there had been no change
38 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

among us, when my heart yearned for
time to weep over the little darling’s
grave. Then my lady sent for me to
speak to her; and I remember, as I
walked for the first time up the great
staircase and through these long corridors
filled with beautiful things, I wondered.
what either death or I had to do coming
in there. But, O Henri, when I saw
the poor marchioness struggling alone
with her grief—the children away in the
nursery, and the marquis at court, and
she all day weeping for her lost baby—
then I thanked God that I had my hus-
band and children to work for. O
Henri, Henri, a gilded sorrow is hard to
bear !”

“That may be,” said her son, “ but
there is precious little gilding on mine,
I know.”

As he spoke Pauline danced in at the
door, holding out to him a large bag of
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 39

grapes. and biscuits. “These are fer
Marie,” she said in her sweetest tones,
and ran away again. |

“The dogs eat of the crumbs!” said
Henri; “but,” he added in a softened
voice, ‘it was kind of the child.”

When Henri Durant returned home,
it was to find his patient wife and his
little deformed daughter stitching as
usual by a very dim and uncertain light
indeed. Everything in the -house was
scrupulously clean, and there was even
a something of elegance in the arrange-
ment of the little room that showed an
amount of refinement and taste not com-
mon among the working poor. Elegance
implies leisure also, and Marie, being
debarred from the usual amusements of
children, had many spare moments, which
she spent in devising ways and means
of beautifying their little home. There
were few Protestant families also in the -
40 THE STORY OF PAULINE,

Faubourg St. Antoine, where they lived,
so that though Durant associated with
his fellow-workmen, Marie and her mother
remained nearly as solitary as Mrs. Durant
had been in the Swiss valley where she
was born and had lived until her marriage.

The mystery of such a blighted life as
little Marie’s is perhaps a problem which
it is harder for the parent than the child
to solve.

Marie had taken up her cross simply
as the will of God for her, and had found
such sweet rest in doing so, that many
a favoured child of fortune might have
envied her.

She was enchanted with her little
present, and as she obliged her mother to
eat some of the tempting fruit, she asked
the minutest questions about Pauline.

“How beautiful she must be, father,
and how kind! I wish I could see her,”
' she exclaimed, —
THE STORY OF PAULINE. . AL

“Why, what would she do coming to a
place like this, or speaking to a child like,
you? I tell you, child, the world is ill |
divided.”

Marie sighed. “Poor young lady,” she
said softly, “‘ poor young lady.”

“Why do you say that?” demanded
her father. ne

“Because she has no mother!” said
Marie; and throwing her arms passion.
ately round her mother’s neck, she cried,
“T would not give you, mother dear, for
thousands of gold and silver !”

-Her mother held her in a fond em-
brace, and whispered very softly, “A
little while, my child, and then we shall
understand it all.”

And even the dark and sullen man,
who was looking on them, that moment
caught a passing glimpse of the mighty
law of compensation which so equalizes
life on earth.
4 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

II.

It was not long before Marie’s wish
of seeing the little lady of the castle
was gratified. Pauline had asked many
questions about Jeanette’s grandchild.

« Always sick and always happy, nurse ;
how can that be?” she said; “when I am
sick I am not happy at all.”

“Ah, Miss Pauline,” replied Jeanette,
“Marie knows the secret of happiness.
Do you remember, my dear, how happy
you were the day before yours cousins
came, last year?”

“Oh yes, nurse,” said Pauline, “that.
IT do; and don’t you remember what
- pleasure I had, though it was such a
bad day, putting up the new pictures
on the wall, and preparing everything
for them ?”

“My dear,” said Jeanette, “ you were
happy preparing for their coming be-
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 43°

cause you loved them. Marie loves the
Lord Jesus Christ, and she knows that
He is coming soon. It is a bad enough
day with her now, poor dear, but she is
happy because she is preparing for His
coming.”

Pauline looked very thoughtful. “TI
love the Lord Jesus a little too, I think,
nurse,” she said at last; “but I do not
like to think much about heaven. This
world is a very happy place. It is so
beautiful to me, I do not think I would
like to leave it. Is it very wrong, nurse?”

‘Bless you, my darling !” said Jeanette.
“This world cannot but look different to
you from what it does to an old woman
like me, or to my poor Marie; but God
will take his own way of weaning you
from it; and now, child, what He is say-
ing to you is, ‘In the day of prosperity
be joyful,’ but ‘rejoice in the Lord.’”

The marquis seldom refused any re-
4A THE STORY OF PAULINE.

quest of Pauline’s, and though he did
refuse to allow her to go to the Fau-
bourg where the Durants lived, he sent
a carriage there to bring Marie to their
chateau. It was a few miles to the
east of Paris, and Marie had never seen
or fancied anything so beautiful.

These two little girls soon became
fast friends. Many might have thought
the gain all on the side of the poor
man’s child; but there were others who
thought differently, when they saw the
influence of her simple, holy life upon
the character of Pauline. Her gaiety
~ and cheerfulness remained, but there was
now a constant though childlike struggle
maintained against the vanity and pride
which everything around her seemed
made to foster.

“ Tt is nice to be pretty, Marie,” she said
one day, “but I often wish I were not; it
makes it so difficult to be good, I think.”
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 45

(322.

“ How strange!” replied Marie, “and
I have so often thought that beauty must
make it easy to be good. You will never
envy any one, Miss Pauline.”

“Q Marie,” she cried, “I am glad
you know, too, what it is to have bad
thoughts ; but what do you do then?”

“T try to say, ‘Get thee behind me,
Satan,” said Marie; “and it is that
which makes the thought of heaven so
“sweet. There will be no more sin, nor
sorrow, nor pain there.”

Pauline said no more when her friend
spoke of heaven; it awoke no joyful chord
in her heart, earth was still so fair to her.

While Pauline and Marie were thus
becoming yearly more attached to each
other, the angry feelings which had been’
roused in so many of the over-wrought
and over-taxed poor in Paris against the
higher classes were yearly increasing in
bitterness.
46 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

Under the iron but wise grasp of
Napoleon the people learned to respect
themselves, and it was too late for the
Bourbons to attempt again to reign as
_ despotic sovereigns over a nation of serfs.

When Louis the Eighteenth was suc-
ceeded by the weak and obstinate Charles
the Tenth, the struggle between arbitrary
and real power soon came to a close.

Two years after my story begins,
Pauline and Marie were seated one
sultry July evening under the shade of
some chestnut trees.

“Miss Pauline,” said Marie, “does the
marquis ever speak to you of the things
that are coming, as my father does?”

“What things? I do not know what
you mean,” said Pauline.

“ My father says,” replied Marie, “that
another revolution is at hand, and that,
soon our poor little home will be a safer
place for you than this great castle.”
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 47.

“T do not know what you mean,”
repeated Pauline.

“T scarcely know either,” replied Marie,
“but my father says the king and the
nobles and the priests are determined to
' take away the charter of our rights, and
make us all little better than slaves, and
that it is time for us to resist and fight
for freedom. Perhaps it is true, but, O
Miss Pauline, war must be a terrible
thing, and I wish it had pleased God to
take me safe to heaven first, and you
too;” and the little girl burst into a
flood of tears. 2
. Pauline gave her what comfort she
could, but poor Marie was sent home far
sadder than her wont that night. Her
father returned earlier than he had done
for many weeks, but his brow was even
more clouded than usual. With an at-
tempt at mirth, he threw a handful of
silver on the table.
48 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

“There, wife,’ he said—‘ there is our
fortune ; make what you can of it, for it.
is not likely that a second will come our
way.” Then, as if answering the speech-
less terror of his wife, he added, “I mean,
Lotta, that M. Fernaux has paid us all -
off, and there is no more work in Paris’
for any honest man left.” Fat

' Waiting no answer, he left the house,
and did not return that night.

Soon after Marie had left the castle,
the marquis called for Pauline, and said,
“My child, tell Jeanette to pack such
things as you may need, for I intend
that we should go to-morrow to my
hotel in Paris.”

“Why, papa, why ?” asked Pauline.

“ Because,” said the marquis, ‘‘I wish
it. This is a lonely place, and I must
have you under my own care in such
times as these.”

Pauline thought of what Marie had

*
THE STORY OF. PAULINE. 49

told her, and did not wonder so much
as she would otherwise have done at this
sudden resolution.

_ $o, on the morning of July 27, 1830,
the household moved to the marquis’s
hotel, near the Tuileries—just the day
-on which the Revolution, which had been
so long pending, broke over the city.

When the marquis and his family
reached Paris, it was easy to see that
the ordinary state of things was at an
end. In all the thoroughfares knots, in
~some places crowds, of sullen, angry men
were gathered together; and as the mar-
quis’s equipage drove past, shouts of
“Vive la charte! Vive la charte!” were
raised every now and then.

“T doubt,” said the marquis, “if it
has been wise to return here at all; and
I cannot even stay with you to-day, my
child, for His Majesty has ordered my
attendance at court this morning. I

() 4
50 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

shall, however, return in the evening.—
And, Jeanette, you will go at once and
tell your son to come and speak to me
then. He will understand what these
people mean, and I shall be guided by
his advice.”

Pauline listened in silent wonder. That
her proud father should ask advice from
Jeanette’s son made her feel as if the
very end of the world had come.

When they reached their hotel, the
marquis, taking one of the outrider’s
horses, started at once for the court, as
if he had quite forgotten the usual eti-
quettes of ceremonial altogether; and
again Pauline’s heart died within her.

“O Jeanette, take the carriage and be
quick,” she said, “and do bring Marie
with you. I shall be so frightened till
you come back.”

“Never fear, my lamb,” said Jeanette,
“no one will harm you here; and as for
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 51

the carriage, it seems to me that I will
_ be safer without it, for no one will take
notice of an old woman like me, unless
I am in a fine carriage.”

IIl.

Iv was with great difficulty that Jeanette
threaded her way through many of the
streets; not that any one would have
wished to harm her, but the crowds in
many places quite blocked up the way
‘ to foot-passengers. At last she reached
the Faubourg St. Antoine. “ You here,
mother!” exclaimed her son’s voice, be-
fore she had entered the house; “ what
in the name of wonder brings you here
to-day ?”

Jeanette hastily gave her master’s
message, and then would have returned,
but Henri said, “No, no, mother; you
‘have come unasked, but no woman leaves
this house to-day. Do not be afraid for
52 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

the little lady; I will soon bring her to
you, and both you and she will be safer
in this poor place than at home.”

So saying, he locked the door and
hastened down the street.

“O grandmother,” said Marie, “how
terrible this is! and how afraid poor
Miss Pauline will be when both her
father and you are away! Do you hear
that dreadful noise 2”

It was dreadful indeed, for the troops -
had begun to fire upon the enraged mul-
titude. They listened in silent terror,
till at last the old woman, taking refuge,
in the great stronghold of her faith,
murmured, “God reigneth!” and Marie
gently added, “ Blesséd for ever !”

Henri had truly meant to bring Jean-
_ette her young charge without delay, but
once out in the excited whirlpool of the
riot, all thought of her was driven from
his mind, and he was one of the busiest
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 53

in rearing barricades in’ the principal
thoroughfares to arrest the progress of
the military.

How long that day seemed to poor’
forsaken Pauline! She looked out at
the windows for hours, hoping to see
her father or Jeanette, but it was all in
vain; and as the noise grew more alarm-
ing, it was only occasionally that she had
courage to go to the window at all.

At last she became sensible that while
the noise out of doors increased every
moment, the stillness and silence in the
house was becoming greater. She rang
the bell, but no one answered. Going
into the principal corridor, she called
each servant by name, and received no
answer. One by one, during the day,
the servants had dropped away, some
only to see what was doing, others to
join heart and hand with the insurgents ;
and so, as night began to close in, the
54 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

poor little girl realized that she was all
alone. “What shall I do? what shall
I do?” she sobbed, forgetting that there
was none to hear. Then falling on her
knees, she prayed to God to take care of
a little, lonely child, for Jesus’ sake; and
the very act of doing this helped to
comfort her.

When it became very dark, she rolled
herself in a rug and lay quietly down
upon a sofa.

It was then that the holy lessons of old
Jeanette and Marie came to her mind,
and one favourite couplet of Marie’s was
as a sweet refrain to her all through this
long night,—

‘Quite alone, and yet not lonely,
Tl converse with God my Friend.”

When the morning came, and the warm
July sun shone into the room, she never
thought of moving, but lay quite ex-.
hausted with fear, fatigue, and hunger. —
THE STORY OF PAULINE. “55

At last she was roused by heavy foot-
steps on the stair, and she heard Henri
Durant’s voice calling, “Miss Pauline,
Miss Pauline, where are you ?”

She ran to meet him; and telling her
she must come at once with him, he
_ hastened her away. He could give her
no tidings of her father. Pauline had
always felt in some degree of awe of
Durant, and as he dragged her along she
did not dare to tell him how ill she was.

Every now and then they came. to
great barricades formed of overturned
omnibuses and carriages of every descrip-
tion. At another time a mob would
close round them, and they would be
constrained to go with it quite out of
their way. At last Henri, seeing that
his little charge could scarcely get along
at all, took her up in his arms; but the
moment he chose to do so was an un-
fortunate one. The crowd was great,
56 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

and a tall man coming to meet it threw
a heavy burden which he was bearing
into the heart of it. It was the dead
body of a woman who had been shot
by the soldiery! Pauline shrieked with
terror at the ghastly spectacle. Changed
as the features were, she recognized old
Madeleine, a washerwoman of some re-
pute, whom she had often seen coming
for her muslin dresses.

“OQ Henri!” she cried, “surely it is
Madeleine.”

“Yes, miss,” he answered, “yes; but
she’s better off now; it was harder for
Madeleine to live than to die.”

This was Pauline’s first sight of death,
but before reaching their destination they
had to pass many of the dead, and, what
was worse, of the wounded, whom it was
impossible to help. It seemed as if they
were never to get to the Faubourg St.
Antoine ; and when at last placed in the
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 57

arms of her faithful old nurse, it was long
before she could answer her or Marie
further than by sobs.

“QO Jeanette! Jeanette!” she cried,
“JT have seen such horrible things, such
horrible things; I wish that I could
die!” :

They laid her on Marie’s little bed,
and did what their simple skill could
suggest to arrest the fever which it was
evident had laid hold on her.

One day more was sufficient to end
the brief Revolution and to establish the
just claims of the people, but for weeks
the little sufferer lay nearly unconscious
of all around her, only often repeating,
“Let me die! oh, let me die! I have
seen such terrible things!” And thus it
was that the love of life was taken away
from poor Pauline.
~ As rough handling soon rubs, the
beautiful down from the peach, so these
58 THE STORY OF PAULINE.

terrible days had for ever robbed earth
of its glory to her.

Do not think that she was thus a
loser. Truth is better than falsehood.
Earth is not heaven; and the sooner
we find this out the better.

Pauline did not die, but all things
seemed different to her now. She saw
that life was not, as it had once seemed,
a sort of walk through fairy-land, but
an earnest and often toilsome pilgrimage
towards a paradise fairer than the heart
_ of man can dream of.

Marie was before very long called to
lay down the cross which she had borne
so meekly, but Pauline’s lot was a very
chequered one. Much of the marquis’s
property had. been destroyed during the
Revolution ; and as he died soon after, and
his estates were inherited by a nephew,
_ only a very small portion of worldly goods
remained to Pauline.
THE STORY OF PAULINE. 59

Like most women in France, she mar-
ried early; and she lived to follow her
husband and children to the grave. Then
leaving the city where she had suffered
so much, she retired to a small property
of her husband’s in Auvergne, attended
by Mrs. Durant, who was then, like her- |
self, a widow and childless. :
_ There she lived as a shining light in
a dark place, until, her work on earth
being finished, she entered that holy,
- happy land, where “the former troubles
are forgotten,” where “there shall be no
more death, neither sorrow nor crying,
neither shall there be any more pain, for
the former things are passed away.”
Litieet SUNSTEIN E.



POOR old man with a bent back
was wheeling home a basket full
of linen which his wife had washed.

“You've no business on the footway,”
said a well-dressed woman whom he met.
“The place for barrows is the road.”

The path was just a little bit narrow
there, and she had had to move aside to
make way for him; but the road was full
of great rough stones.

“Tve as much right on the path as -
you,” he answered angrily, as he wheeled
by. “I wish her back might ache like
- LITTLE SUNSHINE. 61

mine,” he muttered; and he went his
way, his brow hard knit and his mouth
hard set, thinking many a hard thought.

It was a lovely morning, bright and
sunny, and the larks were singing’ blithely
all around. But the old man did not
hear the larks, nor did he see how blue
the sky was overhead. He only saw the
great, rough stones, and heard the echo
of his angry thoveht I wish her back
might ache like mine.’

Just then he came in sight of a oe
through which he had to pass. A-gentle-
man was going through, but he never so
much as took a thought for the poor
man; and the gate swung to again before
the poor old fellow could get up to it.

“Why couldn’t he ha’ fixed it open?”
he muttered angrily; and stopping his
barrow, he went round and threw it open.
with an angry swing.

Now it is never of much use being
62 LITTLE .SUNSHINE. |

anery with a gate. It only shivered for
a, minute, as if it had half a mind to drop
to pieces, then gently swung to. Before
the old man could get back to the handles
and wheel up, it was close shut.

- He went round again, and flung it wide
a second time—harder even than before.
But it only bounded back the quicker,
and shut to in his face again.

Then he stamped upon the ground and
spoke crossly.

“T wouldn’t lose my temper, my good
fellow,” exclaimed a voice behind him;
“it can do no good,” and a comfortable-
looking man slipped through the gate.
“Why not try a little gentleness?” he
added over his shoulder, with a half smile
as he went. “Gates want coaxing like
the rest. of us.”

The old man ground his teeth and
muttered. If only he had held the gate
open instead of reproving !
LITTLE SUNSHINE. 63

Just then a little fair-haired girl came
dancing along, her school-satchel on her
arm.

“Wait a minute,” cried she, seeing
what a worry he was in; and she held
the gate wide open for him, whilst he
wheeled his barrow through.

“T’m so glad I chanced to come this ©
way, cried she. ‘This gate zs tiresome,
and that’s such a heavy load for you.
When it’s wet I have to go round by the
‘road, you know; but it’s so fine to-day.”
And she danced along beside him as he
wheeled. “Do listen to that lark too,”
cried she. “There he is—look, right up
there.”

And the old man actually stopped and
set his barrow down; and up went one
hand to his eyes to shade them, so that
he might find the little black speck mak-
ing all that music in the sky. And all at
once he quite forgot the gate that would
64 LITTLE SUNSHINE.

swing to, and the man that jeered but did
not stop to help, and the selfish woman on
the footway farther back; and he only
saw the bright blue sky that told him
winter was quite gone, and only heard the
little bird that sang for very joy of heart
as it flew upward toward the sun.

Then he looked down at the happy
little face that smiled up into his.

“God bless you, little lady! God bless

you!” said he.
“ But I must run on; I’m afraid I shall -
be late for school,” cried she. “I am so

glad, though, that I came this way.”
“God bless her, Little Sunshine!” said

the old man, as he watched her trip away.
And the barrow seemed so light.

THE END.