Citation
Little stories of famous places at home and abroad

Material Information

Title:
Little stories of famous places at home and abroad
Added title page title:
Little stories of famous of famous places with numerous illustrations
Added title page title:
Famous places
Creator:
Sunshine, Mercie ( Author, Primary )
Ward, Lock, and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
Ward, Lock and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[1], iv, 74 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Historic sites -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Historic buildings -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Civilization, Ancient -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Love -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Queens -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Castles -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Ships -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain ( lcsh )
History -- Siege, 1779-1783 -- Juvenile literature -- Gibraltar ( lcsh )
History -- Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- Jerusalem ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1898
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Pictorial cover.
General Note:
Illustrated title page.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mercie Sunshine.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026978526 ( ALEPH )
ALH8709 ( NOTIS )
252676445 ( OCLC )

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ah Mt Ne ie

Aue oaNi in ie



Windsor Castle from the Home Park.



PIPES SlONIES

OF

PAM@W Ss tiers

AT HOME AND ABROAD.

BY

MERCIL SUNSHINE.





WARD, LOCK AND CO.

LONDON: WARWICK HOUSE, SALISBURY SQUARE, E.C,
NEW YORK: BOND STREET,





T is only a very few people who do not care
about travelling and seeing new places, All

over the world there are so many objects of in-
terest, that it would take a whole lifstime to visit
every spot that has become famous, either from the
people who havelived, orevents that have happened
there. Ifeel sure that most of my young friends
would very much like to travel and see the world,
and I hope the wish may be gratified in time. But
you must remember that we cannot enjoy seeing
a celebrated place half so much if we know nothing
about it beforehand; and the reason why these
little stories are written is that young people may



iv PREFACE.

learn a few particulars about different objects of
historical interest before the time arrives for them
to travel and see the places with their own eyes.
And even if they are not fortunate enough to go
to all the different countries, I hope they will still
be glad to read about them, and make a sort of
picture in their own minds as to what they must

be like.





LITTLE STORIES

OF

FAMOUS PLACES.



WINDSOR CASTLE.

HE train bumps over the noisy turn-tables,

and we alight at Windsor on a fine October

day. A bright, clear autumn air, a few fleecy
clouds, and a warm sun tempering a chilly wind
from the north-east. No better day could be had
for the view from the Round Tower. The flag-staff
stands up bare to-day. The Queen is at Balmoral.
We did not come to see the Queen, so were not
disappointed. We came to see the fine old pile
standing so boldly upon the Berkshire hill, and
smiling, not frowning, down upon the Thames, do-
minating the streets of Windsor town, and peeping

_ into Eton over the water. As we climb up the steep
“hill to the Castle gate, we think of all the English
Sovereigns who have at times inhabited the Castle.
In going back to Edward the Confesser, we find
that he granted the site of the Castle to the Abbey
of St. Peter’s, Westminster, now known more
familiarly as Westminster Abbey, and it remained



2 OLD WINDSOR.

in possession of the good monks until William the
Conqueror managed to effect an exchange, for he
wanted to build a fortress on the hill of ‘* Winde-
sore,”—or “ Wyndleshora” in Saxon language.

In veryearly days the hill upon which the Castle—
the collected work of eight centuries—now stands,
was the site of a primitive fort, which was protected
by marshy ground and rude fortifications. But the

’ Romans do not appear to have made use of the
position as a defensive post. Traces of tombs have,
however, been discovered near, and it is possible
that some portion of Edward the Confessor’s build-
ings occupied ground now covered by the Castle;
his own palace, however, was at Old Windsor.

With the Normans, the actual existence of Wind-
sor Castle may be said to have commenced. The
great mound upon which the Round Tower stands
is decidedly a Norman work, and is pronounced to be
so by Her Majesty’s late librarian at Windsor; and
William the Conqueror having given the monks
of St. Peter some land in Essex in exchange for
the site, erected a fortification upon the hill. This
building was considerably enlarged by Henry the
First, who added the chapel in which he was sub-
sequently married.

It would be necessary to follow some of the
principal events in English history from Henry the
First to Edward the Third if we desired to write



Ou ee Wain i d i :

Mitt)
: .





a h q
e a uf cl i
NS 4



King Jobn and Magna Charta. °















i oll

Vie i ; i











a

















ee MAGNA CHARTA.

a full account of Windsor Castle. It was there
that King John received the demands of the angry
Barons, and sent word from his stronghold that he
would meet them at Runnymede on a certain day.
From Windsor the great cavalcade wound out
through the Forest to the Thames, and there, on an
island, within sight of his proudly-waving standard
on the battlement, in the presence and at the de-
. mmand of his subjects, King John, the coward and
bully, had to sign the Great Charter,—the bulwark
of English liberty,—the grant of a Parliament. So
the Sovereign’s absolute power was ended.
Subsequently, during the reign of Henry the
Third, the old Castle had its battles and sieges to
relate, for it was taken and retaken by the barons
and the Royalists. The Prince (Edward) had taken
it and had gone to Windsor, whither the Queen
(Eleanor) attempted to follow by water, but was
urned back by the citizens, who saluted her as a
“witch.” In the following reigns the kings lived
requently at the Castle, but the pile, as we know
it, principally came into existence in the reign of
Edward the Third. Edward the Second had kept his
Christmas at Windsor Castle, and his son was born
in the Castle on Monday, 28rd November, 1312.
The following Thursday the young prince was
christened in his namesake’s (St. Edward’s) chapel.
You all remember this great King, who conquered



WILLIAM OF WYKEHAM. 5

so large a portion of France, and nearly hanged all
the Calais burghers. In his reign there was a
certain priest called William of Wykeham, whs was
also appointed “chief keeper and surveyor of the
castles of the King at Windsor, Leeds, Dover, and
Hadlee.” He founded Winchester College, and also





































































































































































































































































































































































































































St. George's Chapel, Windsor.

“New ” College at Oxford, and that is why students
and Winchester boys are called Wykehamists.

This personage was the architect of the extended
works of Windsor Castle. He built the Banqueting
Hall, the Winchester and Round towers, which
latter was erected to serve as a proper seat or

“



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































Windsor Castle,"time of Edward [II



THE GARTER. 7

place of reception for his new Order of the Garter,
just instituted at Windsor. This great tower had
only one storey, which was laid on timbers running
all round, and opening down to the ground in the
centre. On this stage, says the chronicler, the
Round Table of the Knights was placed. In this
hall the banquets took place, and the King built (or
rebuilt) the chapel in the lower ward, and called it
St. George’s Chapel, as St. George was England’s,
and the Order’s, patron saint. He also built his
palace in the Upper Ward, and relinquished
Ilenry’s palace to the knights. This portion of
the Castle was occupied by successive Sovereigns
until the time of George the Fourth, and are the
rooms now known as the State Apartments.

But in the days of Edward the Third the sight-
seekers did not come all the way to Windsor to
stare at furniture and pictures. In those great days
of tilting all the people crowded to the Castle lists to
see the foreign and British knights engage in mimic
warfare, and sometimes in encounters to the death
—or @ outrance. In the former case the spears were
tipped-with flat pieces of wood, and so were com-
paratively harmless; but when d ouérance was pro-
claimed, the points were bare and sharp, and death
or disablement was the result.

It will not be uninteresting to speak somewhat in
detail respecting the origin and institution of the ce-



8 TIE GARTER.

lebrated Order of the Garter, which is as indissolubly
connected with Windsor Castle as Herne’s Oak is
with the Park. We do not appear to have any mention
of the Garter till after Edward’s great victory at
Créci in 1846; and in the “ Wardrobe Accounts,”
which may be inspected, due permission being ob-
tained, we shall find an entry as follows :—

“ For making a bed of blue taffcta for the King, powdered
with garters containing the motto—

Mont soit qui mal p penge;”’
and—

‘For making twelve blue garters embroidered with gold
and silk, each having the motto—‘Honi soit qui mal y
pense;’ and for making other things for the King’s habi-
tude at Eltham.”

So, according to “Observations of the Order of
the Garter,” the King merely seized upon the
episode of the dropping of the lady’s garter at the
Windsor revels, to name his newly-organized
Order of Knighthood, and that the motto (which
by the way is generally translated falxely as ‘“ Evil
be to him who evil thinks,” is in fact “Shame to
him who thinks evil of it,” the French “y” being
usually ignored) was already upon the Garter-
badge of the Knights, and the opportune incident
gave the name of the Garrsr to the Order which
had already been instituted.



“ HONT SOIT QUI MAL Y¥ PENSE %

There is no sufficient reason for endeavouring to
explain away the incident, though who the lady
was is uncertain. The heroine has been variously
named, and the story is as old as the Seventh Henry
at least.

William of Wykeham built the Castle up, and was
created the Surveyor of the Works, but this post
he resigned in 1858, and it was in that ycar
that the great tournament was held in honour of
the captive French King and his nobles. The
great feast of St. George was also held in that
year on the 23rd April. There was really a
splendid tournament, for knights came from all
parts of the country to it, and not only from all
parts of Great Britain, but from France and other
countries; which you will think curious when
you remember that the English and French were
enemies then, and the French King was act-
ually a prisoner at Windsor. But Edward was
a very brave and chivalrous monarch. He granted
“ permits” to all foreign knights and gentlemen
desirous to try their skill at the tournament, and
a great and noble company assembled at’ Windsor.
The King and Queen of Scotland came, and the
armour worn on that occasion by the Kings of
France and Scotland is still to be seen.

This tournament must have been a grand sight.
The fine dresses of the ladies in the balconies, the



King Kdward and his Queen at Windsor.





&





THE ORDER OF THE GARTER, 11

elittering armour of the knights, the clash of steel,
the braying of trumpets, and the cheers of the
spectators who crowded to view the pageant, must
have made up a scene not often equalled in those
days, and impossible now, except upon the stage.
It was after such a scene as this that the dance
took place at which the lady dropped her garter,
and gave the title to the members of the Order, as
already explained.

But the name of the Order once fixed, there
was more to-do. A chapel was built, and called
St. George’s Chapel, for, as you may remember,
St. George is the patron saint of the Order of the
Garter. There was then a list of “poor knights”
made out—knights who would be assisted by the
more wealthy, and to whom residence was given.
The “ Poor Knights” are now meritorious officers
who deserve recognition, and the chapel of St.
George is the Royal Chapel, where the Prince
was lately married, and where you. can hear
the service chanted, and see the swaying banners
of the Knights of the Garter who are prayed for
specially.

Tt is a grand thing to think of, this old order of
chivalry. Six hundred years has it been handed
down to us, and the ribbon of the Garter, after all
this time, is as highly valued as it was on the first
institution of the Order. It is this clinging to and

B



12 QUEEN PHILIPPA.

remembrance of our old English institutions that
makes Englishmen so proud. When we think of
those times,— the good old times,” as we say—we
feel a thrill of pleasure as we recall the deeds
of derring do, and the manly chivalry of that period.
We forget that many nobles and ladies could not
read or write; that society, so to speak, was dis-
turbed; and that battle and murder stalked hand in
hand with glory and pleasure. We forget the dis-

“advantages of existence, and the oppression that
existed, in the memories of glorious deeds of arms
that were done by Englishmen then, and which I
believe Englishmen are ready to do again, if called
upon, even now.

On the 17th August, 1369, Queen Philippa died
at Windsor. An old chronicler describes her death
in a most touching manner. She felt herself dying
and sent for the King, her husband. The narrative
says i—

‘““ When he was before her she put out of bed
her right hand and took the King by the right
hand and said, ‘ Sir, we have, in peace and joy and
great prosperity, used all our time together. Sir, I
pray you now grant me three desires.’ The King,
right. sorrowfully weeping, said, ‘ Madam, desire
what you will, I grant it!’ ‘Sir, said she, ‘I
require you first to pay all I owe te all such people



THE QUEEN'S s.AST WURDS. 13

as I have dealt with this side of the sea or beyond.
‘Secondly, all such ordinances or promises as I have
made to the Churches, that it may please you to
fulfil or to accomplish the same. Thirdly, that it
may please you to take none other sepulture, when-
soever it shall please God to call you out of this
transitory life, but beside me at Westminster.’
The King, all weeping, said, ‘Madam, I grant all
your desire.’ Then the good lady and Queen com-
mended her husband to God, and anon yielded up
her spirit, which I believe some of the holy angels
received with great joy up to heaven; for in all
her life she did neither in thought nor deed things
whereby to lose her soul, as far as any creature
could know.”

The quaint old chronicler is very touching in his
phrase with all his quaintness. We can imagine
the scene, and no comment is needed upon that
last parting of the royal husband and wife.

One very interesting and romantic episode con-
nected with the Castle was the captivity of the
young Prince James (afterwards James I. of
Scotland), who had been captured while on his way
to France, whither he was being carried to be edu-
cated. He was lodged in the Tower of London at
first, but when “lenry V. came to the throne he had
pity on the young man. Young himself, he did
not like the Scotch King (for he was a king then)



14 A CAPTIVE PRINCE.

to languish in the old gloomy Tower, particularly
as he had never done any harm; so Henry called |
him to Windsor Castle, and though the Prince was
still a State prisoner he had nicer lodgings and '
_plenty of money, and could move about more
freely. He accompanied Henry to France and
fought valiantly there.

When he returned to his turret-room at Windsor,
. you may imagine he was very melancholy. He
wrote plenty of verses, som very pretty verses too,
up in that tower near the gateway of the Castle.
But one morning he looked out and saw a beautiful
young lady walking along the lawn. IIe at first
thought her a fairy, perhaps. Ile wrote about
her—

“ O sweet, are ye a worldly creature,
Or heavenly thing in likeness of nature?”

The lady was beautifully dressed, and decked with
rubies and pearls. This lovely vision was the niece
of the last king—the Lady Jane, as she was called
—and of royal blood. James fell deeply in love
with this beautiful lady, and I am happy to tell you
that she reciprocated his affection. When he was
released from his imprisonment in 1424, he was
married to the Lady Jane, who became Queen of
Scotland, where for twelve years hor husband reigned
an upright and patriotic prince,

















































































































































































































































































































Bu. Ceurge’s Chapel, Windsor



16 a ae ROYAL LOVERS.

Alas! uprightness and devotion do not save even
kings. One night in February a crowd of rebel
Scotch broke into the palace. Aided by traitors
who had removed the heavy bars, they rushed up to
the King’s room, where he was seated over the fire
with his wife and attendants. One of the ladies-
in-waiting— Catherine Douglas—attempted to fasten
the door; the bolt had been taken away, but

_nothing daunted, she pushed her hand and arm
through the staple and tried to hold the door.
But her strength was soon overcome. The King,
unarmed, could make no resistance, and poor
James I. was killed before his wife’s eyes. The
“ beautiful vision” he had seen at Windsor, and
with whom he had lived—to use his own sweet
words—‘ in perfeet joy that never may remove,”
passed away before his dying gaze.

We should take up too much space were we to
go separately through all the incidents recorded
as relating to Windsor; but there is one event
we must chronicle before we pass on, and that
is the birth of Heury the Sixth of England, who
was born at the Castle and known as Henry
of Windsor. He was a quiet and inoffensive child,
as unlike his valiant, warlike fatheras possible. In
those days a king was obliged to rule for himself. He
had advisers and friends, but he had to show himself
to the people even as a child; for we read that young



HENRY OF WINDSOR. M7

Henry was carried up to London when quite a baby
to open Parliament. The Queen had, of course, to
- drive up with him, and the baby having got as far
as Staines on Saturday night, would not go on on
Sunday. He cried and screamed tremendously,
and the attendants were obliged to carry him back
to the inn again. So the party remained at Staines
all that Sunday, as the baby would not go on; and
who could withstand the King? Next day, how-
ever, he was more amiable, and accordingly the
horses were harnessed, and the child was carried
as far as Kingston-on-Thames, and then on Tues-
day to Kensington, then a small village, and so to
London, where the Baby-King opened Parliament.
There was one very curious Act of Parliament
made about this time, which concerned Henry of
Windsor very much. This was neither more nor
less than an Act to empower the King’s guardian—
the Earl of Warwick—to whip His Majesty, “from
time to time according to his discretion,” as other
boys of that period were chastised. Had Henry
the Prince lived later he might have had the
luxury of a “whipping lad,” who would have had
the honour of being beaten when his Sovereign did
wrong. We hope any prince felt it as much as he
“was supposed to do, but if he were a good-hearted
prince he would be careful not to get punished, by
deputy especially.



























































































































































































































































































' ETON COLLEGE. 19

Henry the Sixth spent much of his boyhood at
Windsor, and while he was studying for his tutors,
the idea of building a school came into his head.
Where should he erect this school? As he looked
from the Castle windows his eyes rested upon the
quaint little village opposite across the water,
which was and is called Eton. There shall the
school be, thought the young King; and so it was
carried out. But how was it carried out? You
must not think that the King sent for masons and
carpenters and said, ‘ Build me a school yonder.”
No. The first thing to do—and it could not be
done in a hurry—was to get possession of the
church and the priests, for they were, so to speak,
the “corner stone” of the whole foundation.
Everything as regarded education in those days
was set on foot or carried through by the priests ;
and so Henry applied to the grave and solemn
ecclesiastics, who undertook to teach a certain
number of children “the rudiments and rules of
yrammar” at the King’s expense. You will per-
ceive how the whole school was dependent, so
_ to speak, upon God’s Church, as it was to His
glory and for the keeping up of His worship,
“without fail,” that Eton Chapel and its clergy
were appointed. Then the poor and indigent
scholars were instructed, and there was also a
home for a certain number of poor men. Seventy



20 - = “§7TIS BONI PUERI”

poor pupils and one master to teach them, “ es-
pecially in the art of grammar,” gratuitously,
and in the “knowledge of letters.” This was the
foundation from which our great publie school of
one thousand boys and a number of masters has
sprung. And it is recorded that in after years,
whenever the King encountered any of his “ boys”
at Windsor, he would “give them money to win
their goodwill” (they would call this by a very
short name now), and tell them in Latin to be
good and serve God,—“ Sitis boni pueri—mites et
decibiles—et servi Domini.”

May we not now say the same as quiét, un-
assuming King Henry the Sixth.

Henry the Seventh did not pass much of his
time at Windsor, but bluff King Hal, his successor,
had many a grand hunting party in the Park, and
kept up the entertainments upon a right royal
scale. He came down to Windsor very soon after
he became king, and erected the present gateway
to the Castle, as you may guess from the name.
He was fond of all manly sports, such as hunting,
hawking, and shoot’ng. The young Earl of Surrey
was imprisoned Ly Henry the Highth in Windsor
Castle, and there is a very romantic tale of his love
for the fai. Geraldine.

But there is one improvement that Henry the
Seventh began, and which Wolsey finished in the











































ai A
TIN
AS aN

TN

The Round Tower, Windsor.







22 CIARLES THE FIRST,

next reign, and that is the present Albert Memorial
Chapel. Wolsey hoped to lie here, but it was
deerced by a higher power than a cardinal’s or a
kino’s, that the ambitious Churchman should not be
laid in Windsor Castle. Cardinal Wolsey died, as
your history will tell you, at Leicester.

We may pass over Mary’s reign, and come to
notice Elizabeth, but only very briefly, for space is
limited, and we must not occupy too much. “ Good
@ueen Bess” was fond of Windsor, and passed
much time there, in reading and studying, as well as
in hunting in the Forest,—an amusement in which
she delighted. We are indebted to her for the
terrace which overlooks the valley of the Thames,
and for the gallery which bears her name.

James succeeded to the crown, and his heir,
Charles, was frequently at Windsor with his friends
and-favourites. But after he became a king how
changed it all must have seemed. Here he was
lodged before his trial, and after Oliver Cromwell
had taken away the Royal Arms from the gates,
the poor weak King rode into Windsor surrounded
by soldiers, but even then received with cheers by
the people, who cried “ God bless Your Majesty!”
This was about Christmas time, anc a very sad
Christmas it was for the King. He was afterwards
carried to London, tried, and beheaded on the 30th
January, 1649. At Windsor the poor headless



THE KINGS BURIAL, 23

body was buried, by four faithful knights, in St.
George’s Chapel, now so different and so dis-
mantled. No service was permitted. The grim
Puritan who was in command refused this last
solemnity, though Bishop Juxon was there, true to
the last, to perform the Burial Service. The snow
fell fast upon the pall as all that was mortal of the
late King was carried into the dismal chapel, there
to remain till the last trump shall sound, and the
grave give up its dead. It was a sad and mournful
ending as the faithful four lowered their King into
the hastily made vault, and London’s Bishop stood
by, weeping; the stern commander also waiting to
see his orders were obeyed. And then the door was
locked and all was over; the King was dead, and ©
the Protector ruled the land.

Charles the Second came, and Windsor was once
more bright and cheerful. There have been many
grand doings since then, and were we to chronicle
all the events, we should have to write a small
history of the English Court. This is, of course,
impossible. Windsor has seen many bright days
and many mournful episodes since then. Some of
her happiest days, and the most miserable period of
Queen Victoria’s life, have been passed at Windsor.
There she saw her children round her, there she
witnessed her noble husband’s last moments, and
there again, quite recently, she was honoured two



24 NEW WINDSOR.

Royal weddings with her presence. Victoria’s
standard is floating from the Round Tower as we
write, and we cannot do better than conclude with
a sincere wish that it may long be seen there.
‘God save our gracious Queen.”























GIBRALTAR.

ITS PAST.

IBRALTAR, or “Gib,” as it is more fre-
quently termed, is invested with more varied
interest than most of the British possessions. Its
military history alone would fill many goodly
volumes, its classic associations and legendary lore
embrace a period from the earliest historic times to
the present age. It is the key of the Mediter-
ranean, and the natural features of its surroundings,
as of the old Rock itself, are peculiarly interesting
to all English people. The whole coast teems with
old and glorious associations. Not far distant, Capes
St. Vincent and famed Trafalgar rise out of the
blue waters, the never-dying monuments of Jervis’
and Nelson’s glorious victories, while far inland
loom the Moorish hills with their wondrous record
of the old conquerors of “Gib.” It is now our
business td go back over the waste of ages, and en-
deavour to tell our young friends something of the
Pillar of Hereules, the ‘Rock of Taric ” the Moor.
Gibraltar—named from Gibel, rock; and Tarie, the



26 ' OLD GIBRALTAR,

Moor, just mentioned—has in its time been held by
Pheenicians, Carthaginians, Romans, Goths, Vandals,
Moors, and Spaniards, before the British took it.
So we have a tolerably long list of owners to refer
to. The Moors, who came across from Barbary in
or about A.D. 711, were the first people who really
valued Gibraltar as.a fortress, and built upon it with
the object of defending it.

Taric, however, made good use of his time, and
‘his successors, taking example from him, managed
to retain the Rock in the hands of the dusky Moors
for six hundred years, when the Spaniards laid
siege to it in 1309. This was the forerunner of a
series of sieges in which the inhabitants suffered
very considerably. In the celebrated siege—the
fourteenth—in 1779, the ‘‘Straits” of Gibraltar
were by no means confined to the Mediterranean.
But we are anticipating.

The Spaniards retained possession of Gibraltar
for only twenty-two years, but they had had a
severe fight to obtain it. The first siege in 1309
was led by Guzman, and the grand rock was sur-
rounded and attacked on all sides at once. The
brave Moors fought bravely from crag to crag, but
were at last reduced toa mere handful. The eleven
hundred “barbarians” then capitulated on condi-
tions of being sent. in safety across the “ silver
streak” to Africa. So the Spaniards came into



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































The Signal Station.

ee









28 THE MOORE.

possession, but, as stated, did not long retain it.
A second siege in 1815 failed, but in 1333 the for-
tress was again invested by the Moors, and this
time they were successful. The leader on this
oceasion was Mahommed the Fourth, the son of Ben
Feraz, the late king, who had been stabbed by a
young prince Ismail. Between 1833 and 1462
no less than seven times did Gibraltar submit to
siege; but the Spanish power was not sufficient
‘to conquer the Moors till the latter year, when the
Duke of Medina-Sidonia, the head of the Guzman
family, succeeded in taking it.

The Moorish power now declined, and Gibraltar
remained in undisturbed possession of the King of
Spain, and afterwards in the hands of the Guzman
family, until the great Isabella came to the throne,
and she enjoined her successors to keep Gibraltar
in possession of the crown of Spain for ever. But
after various fortune, the Rock was captured by
the English during the War of Succession, in
1704.

This war, we may remind our young readers,
was brought on by the disputed claims to the
Spanish throne after the death of Charles the
Second. That monarch left his crown to Philip
of Anjou, but the German Archduke, Charles, also’
preferred a claim. England and Holland proposed
that the Archduke should succeed, and they ac-



THE CAPTURE OF GIBRALTAR. 29

cordingly declared war against the French and
Spanish adherents. It was resolved to attack
Gibraltar, and the allied fleets at’ once invested the
fortress with about sixty vessels. The garrison
was very feeble, comprising at that time a force of
three hundred men or less. Gibraltar was captured
in the name and ostensibly for Charles the Third
of Spain, but Sir George Rooke, the English com-
mander, saw the matter in a very different light.
He and his allies, the Germans and Dutch, were
now in possession, and the Archducal banner was
floating over the celebrated Rock. This was not
quite in accordance with British ideas, however,
and the English commander boldly hauled down
the German flag, and raised the Royal Standard
of England in its place, and so took absolute
possession of Gibraltar. Might was right in those
days. So the English came into possession, and
this was confirmed by the Treaty of Utrecht.

Since that time the famous fortress nas been
besieged three times, but of all the fourteen attacks
to which “Gib” has been subjected, none have
ever approached in vigour and severity the great
siege of 1779. At that time General Eliott was
Commander or Governor of Gibraltar, and the
determination of the besiegers lasted for three
years. This is one of the most memorable defences
in history, and well worthy of description in detail,



80 THE GREAT SIEGE.

but unfortunately our space will not admit of such
lengthened record.

On the 21st June, 1779, all communication with
Spain was cut off, and the Spanish fleet blockaded
the port. They had endeavoured to surprise the
English garrison, but a Swedish vessel gave the
alarm, and General Eliott was able to make a few
preparations. He had about five thousand men
and a very small supply of provisions. As may be
imagined, famine soon appeared upon the Rock.
The stores diminished rapidly. A loaf was luxury.
Meat turned Lad, biscuits became little more than
residences for “weevils” or maggots. A bunch
of cabbage-leaves cost sixpence, thistles and weeds
were eagerly gathered and eaten, biscuit crumbs
were sold at one shilling a pound, milk and water
at fifteen pence a pint, and when a convoy arrived
with bread, the joy was unbounded, as may be
imagined. Even the bombardment was disregarded
in a measure, though a shot or shell has a very
unpleasant way of forcing itself into notice.

The Spaniards began the bombardment in
January, and a camp was formed at San Roque so
as to starve out the garrison, when the besieged
retaliated and opened fire—a lady discharging the
first cannon; and after a while Admiral Rodney
made a raid upon the Spanish ships. He threw
reinforcements into the garrison, took away all the



THE CONDITION OF GIBRALTAR. 31

wounded and helpless, and gave the besieged a
supply of provisions. This was a welcome relief,
for the troops had been fearfully reduced, and a
few ounces of rice a day was all the Governor
allowed himself.

But though Admiral Rodney had managed to
assist, he could do no more. The Spaniards again
blockaded the Rock. Scurvy broke out amid the
besieged, the Bey of Morocco declined to harbour
British ships on the opposite coasts, and the enemy
crept up. Still from time to time some little assist-
ance was sent, and the British managed to hold
out. The bombardment was tremendous. Scarcely
a house was left standing; shot and shell tore
through the town, and to add to the misery, some
of the troops mutinied and began to plunder.
These were quickly shot, and peace reigned within
the walls; but the terrible cannonade from one
hundred and fourteen guns and fifty mortars still
rained death and destruction upoe the place from
outside.

The advanced lines of the Spanish troops were
now pushed nearer, and they began to count upon
success. But they reckoned without the British
host. One November night, a desperate sally wus
made from the Rock, the English troops poured out
and succeeded in blowing up a large magazine, and
in destroying several batteries, and part of the



tf
EEE

eS
aes

e ow

MAT



The Strange Ships.



THE “STRAITS OF GIBRALTAR.” 33

foremost approaches. This great success. embold-
ened the defenders as much as it depressed the
besiegers, particularly as the loss to the English
was trifling.

For some days after this, the Spaniards ceased
firing into Gibraltar, but they had by no means
abandoned the siege. For nearly eight months the
bombardment had continued, and still the handful
of men (comparatively speaking) who occupied
“Gib,” were as far as ever from surrender. But
the greatest trial of all was to come. A large force
was prepared. Vessels deemed to be invulnerable to
shot were built and were covered by shell-proof
sloping roofs. The Rock was actually surrounded
by a girdle of fire. In the Straits, the mortar ships,
the Spanish and French fleets, about fifty vessels,
opened a destructive cannonade. From the land
about two hundred guns were brought to bear

upon the fortress, and from the 8th till the 12th of
. September all these engines of war were concen-
trated upon Gibraltar.

At length Governor Eliott thought of using hot
shot against the ships. He had poured shot and
shell upon them with no visible effect, but now the
redhot iron was tried, and successfully. After
hours of fire, the hoped-for result was obtained ;
one by one the great Noah’s Ark-roofed ships
caught. fire, and all were eventually destroyed. The.



34 COURTEOUS FOES.

cowardly crews quitted their wounded and dying
companions, as the flames gained ground, the
cries were dreadful, and even moved the pity of
their British enemies, who, led by Colonel Curtis,
actually saved numbers of the poor Spaniards from
a horrible death, the English courting almost certain
destruction in their humane and noble efforts.

But this partial success did not help them much.
No succour arrived. The English nation apparently
did not trouble about such a place as Gibraltar,
which was so gallantly defended. The great effort
we have mentioned was made on the 138th
September, 1782, when the Rock had been quite
three years invested. But its trials were not even
then over. During the winter months the Span-
iards poured in a cruel fire upon the town, now
reduced to a heap of ruins. The most terrible
scenes took place, the suffering was awful, but still
the English would not surrender, and January
came, but brought with it no relief.

At last on the 2nd February an unusual stir
was visible in the Spanish camp. The commander
had something to communicate. This was no less
important news than that peace had been arranged
and the siege was over. It had been carried on
with great gallantry on both sides, and not with-
out some acts of courtesy between the besiegers and
the besieged. For instance, the Spanish commander



END OF THE SIEGE. 35

had presented, under a flag of truce, a consignment
of ice, fruit, and vegetables, to his gallant foe, Eliott,
and some game was subsequently added. The
letters which were exchanged between the brave
foes are extremely interesting, and very compli-
mentary, but too long for insertion in this article.

So ended the siege of Gibraltar. Since that
period (1783) the fortified hill has been undisturbed,
and remains, more formidable than ever, in out
hands. —

We shall take another opportunity to describe
Cibraltar-as it is at the present day; for we now
must bring our retrospect to a conclusion.





































































































































GIBRALTAR.

ITS PRESENT.

Ee the last chapter we gave a brief account
of the numerous sieges of Gibraltar,—The
Rock of Taric, The Pillar of Hercules,—and now
we may look at it for a moment, as it stands,
rising to its rugged height of fifteen hundred feet
above the blue waters of the Mediterranean.
Leaving Tarifa behind us, we come upon the
grand old Rock, and we can discern upon the
Spanish voast the historical capes St. Vincent and
Trafalgar. Opposite lie Tangier and Ceuta, the twin
Pillar of Hercules. The contrast between the shores
of the Mediterranean is very great. The Spanish
shore, green and smiling; the Moorish coast, bleak
and barren, dreary and apparently forsaken. Gibral-
tar is a fortress in every sense of the term. It is full
of galleries bristling with cannon. Round the base
of the Rock, which is surmounted by a flag-staff, is
a line of batteries. The Alameda, which is a
public park, separates these galleries from the



THE ROCK. 87

town. In the Alameda are cool grots, and lawns,
and gardens, where the bands play, and where the
troops parade. Geraniums, olives, orange and
lemon trees, and vine-clad terraces invite the
stranger to saunter and gaze upon the beautiful
scene around him, |

First let us glance at the Rock. Its length is
about two miles, its width about one-half its length.
On two sides it is precipitous, the fall being more
than nine hundred feet in, at least, one place. But
towards Africa and the ocean the slopes are less
inclined, and one can on these faces ascend to the
summit, or summits; for there are three,—the
Watch Tower, the Signal Station in the middle, and
the North Pinnacle. The South Point is also called
O’Hara’s Folly, for the following reason :—

Once upon a time, a governor of that name said
he could signal to Cadiz from thence, and built a
tower for that purpose. The tower would have
been useful could Cadiz have been seen from it;
but as it could not, in consequence of the hills
intervening, Governor O’Hara was disappointed.
This Watch Tower was afterwards struck by light-
ning and ruined.

Gibraltar, both by nature and art, is wonderfully
suited for defence. Let us try to enter this great
rock through an iron gate which we reach by
passing the parade and pleasure-gardens just men-

































































































































































































































































































































































Gibraltar,



THE BATTERIES. 39

tioned, and enter a long series of tunnels and
galleries hewn out of the rock. High above the
bright rippling Mediterranean, these long galleries
ascend, tier by tier, in spirals and zigzags. Up, up,
up we go, till our limbs ache, and by the time we
wonder whether we are at the top we find we have
only reached St. George’s Hall, a great rock-
hewn chamber. All round, seaward, great open-
mouthed and loud-voiced cannon look out from
embrasures across the sea. Peep out and you will
feel quite giddy, for the sea is far beneath, and at
every corner, and above and below, as you go round
this chamber and look out, you can see the grim
mouth of a great gun pointed. Look up, if you
can, and you will still see cannon bristling from
their rocky dens, ready to fire at any foe that comes
into the Straits. It is an unique and curious sight.
But by this time we have gained breath for our
final ascent, and up we go again until we find our-
selves standing by the Signal Station,—the topmost
summit of the great Rock,—the centre of the mass.
From hence, we can look round in all directions
and obtain a beautiful view of the Mediter-
ranean sea and the lofty Moorish mountains.
Soldiers, cannon and cannon-balls are everywhere,
and you will wonder how long it takes to carry so
many shot up such a great distance,

At the back of the Rock is a space of land



40 THE NEUTRAL GROUND.

called the Neutral Ground, which divides Gibraltar
from Spain. The regulations of getting in and
out of Gibraltar are strict. After gun-fire, you
must remain out, if beyond the lines; and even
within the garrison, unless you are aware of the
counter-sign, you will be carried off to the guard-
house.

There are soldiers everywhere, and when once
you enter Gibraltar you feel as if under martial
law. The variety of inhabitants, too, makes a very
interesting study; and it is amusing to watch the
English soldiers in uniform of almost all descrip-
tions,— Artillery, Engineers, Line Regiments, High-
landers, or other corps, all mingled with bronzed
and swarthy Moors, wearing turbans and loose
robes and slippers; Jews and Spaniards, very
likely smugglers, Genoese and Spanish women in
scarlet cloaks, and the latter wearing black lace
veils and mantillas. British sailors from the port
and Moors from Barbary jostle each other in the
narrow, rocky streets, and on the steps leading to
other streets.

The fortress is always provisioned for some
months, so that in the event of war the inhabitants
should not be reduced to the straits they formerly
were. Now our fleet could relieve the Rock in
a few weeks, so no blockade would be of any use.
Our occupation is, no doubt, a very thorn in the side



THE KEY OF THE STRAITS, 4l

' of the Spaniards; but Gibraltar is the key of the
Mediterranean, and did we relinquish it we should
find ourselves locked out some day. As it is, we
possess a most formidable fortress as strong as it is
interesting.

































JOPPA.

FROM JOPPA TO ARIMATHEA.

HE name of the ancient city which we have

chosen to be the subject of this paper must

be familiar to all children, and we will proceed to

describe it as well as we can with the assistance

of the Bible, for it will be chiefly with reference

to the incidents recorded in Holy Writ that our
narrative will have to do.

Joppa, or Japho, now known to the traveller as
Jaffa, signifies “the beautiful,” and in former days
it deserved its title. Jaffa, to use its more modern
name, is one of the oldest cities in the world.
It is by some writers supposed to have been origi-
nally built by Japhet, the son of Noah. There are
many mythical as well as real events associated
with the city, one of the former of which, viz.,
‘ the deliverance of Andromeda from the Monster,
is known to most boys.

We learn from the Bible that Joppa was in the
inheritance of the tribe of Dan (Joshua xix. 46). In
the days of Solomon it became the port of Jerusalem,



AN ANCIENT CITY, 43

from which city it is distant about thity-five miles.
You will rememker that Hiram, King of Tyre, sent
down tke timber from Lebanon to Joppa in rafts,
and it was floated thus to Joppa, whence it was
carried to Jerusalem. King Solomon wrote to
Hiram requesting him to send his subjects with
his own to cut down the timber from Mount
Letanon, and Hiram replied that he would do
so, and make floats of them to sail to whatever
port King Solomon desired. Joppa was decided
upon. Five hundred years later, Zerublabel, who
had pleased King Darius by his superior wisdem
in answering problems, obtained the faycur to re-
build the Temple in Jerusalem. fo the work was
begun, and we read that “the Sidonians were also
very ready and willing to bring the cedar-trees
from Likanus, to bind them together, and to make
a united float of them, and to bring them to the
port of Joppa, for that was what Cyrus had com-
manded at first, and what was now done at the
command of Darius.”

But one of the most remarkable incidents that
took place im connection with ancient Joppa is
that relating to the prophet Jonah. We may say
something of this remarkable man before proceeding
with our notice of Joppa, with which place he is
indissolubly connected. Jonah is traditionally sup-
posed to be identical with the son of the widow

D

2



44 JOPPA.

raised by Elijab, and with the young man who
hurried at the command of Elisha to anoint Jehu.
But this must be mere conjecture. We know that
he was of the town of Gath-hephur, in Galilec, and
the other reliable information respecting him will
be found in the book bearing his name. He lived
about the time of Jeroboam II., 3B.c. 825-789.
To compare him with contemporaries, we should
find that the Spartan Lycurgus was one, and
Homer must have been quite an old man when
Jonah wasa child. The King of Nineveh was either
Pul or Adrammelech, and to him and his people
Jonah was sent.

We read that Jonah was bidden by God to go to
Nineveh, the splendid capital of the Assyrian Em-
pire. This was a most magnificent city, nearly sixty
miles in circumference, and containing about two
millions of inhabitants. Jonah was sent by God to
reprove them for their wickedness, but the prophet
was afraid, and hastened to Joppa, where he found
a ship sailing for Tarshish (but according to
Josephus, Tarsus in Cilicia). Tarshish was in the
south of Spain, but there must have been another
Tarshish, because we read that ships came from
such a place bringing “gold, silver, ivory, apes,
and peacocks” (1 Kings x. 22), so, as we know pea-
cocks are only to be had in India and its islands,
there must have been another Tarshish. (2 Chron.

te,



JONAH AT JOPPA, 45

ix, 21, etc.) However, Jonah set sail from Joppa,
and the result of his journey we all know. The
“¢ oreat fish ” was prepared for him, and after three
days he rose again, so to speak (a type of our
Saviour), was cast ashore by the fish at a spot
now marked by a building which some say is
Jonah’s tomb.

This wonderful miracle, to which our Saviour
afterwards referred, cannot be explained by any
human intellect. Jonah went on his mission. The
men of Nineveh repented at his preaching. Not
one hundred years later Nahum foretold their de-
struction, which was surely fulfilled, and not a trace
was left of the proud city. Now let us return to
Joppa.

Joppa was besieged by Herod. He marched
through Galilee to raise the seige of Masada, where
his relatives were immured. But we learn that
Joppa was in his way. Itbecame necessary to take
it first, for it would have been absurd to leave such
a place-behind him. So he laid siege to Joppa and
took it, and then marched on to Masada. The
Romans also took Joppa when Cestius was in com-
mand, Great slaughter ensued; as many as eight
thousand four hundred were killed, and the city
was plundered and burnt. Vespasian, Omar, Sala-
din, Richard Coeur de Lion, and the First Napo-
leon, all have since laid siege to Joppa. We need



46 ei SE PLiLe Aa? soPPA,

not, however, go into details of these various con-
quests. Let us return to some of the biblical
scenes connected with it.-

One of the most interesting events connected
with Joppa is the visit of Peter. Ie was, as you
will remember, at Lydda, which is still existent as
Ludd, close to Joppa, which is encircled by the
plain of Sharon (or Saron). At Joppa in St.
Peter’s days was a certain: disciple named Tabitha,
or Doreas, as the Greek term is,—a woman remark-
able for good works, and bore a name even now
honoured in connection with societies for well
doing. Peter was sent for, and immediately came
to Joppa, and by the power of Jesus raised the
dead woman to life again. The immediate result
was the conversion of many in the city, and Peter
determined to remain to strengthen their faith.
But. he did not stay in the house of the well-
to-do woman he had raised from the dead. In his
humility he went and abode in the house of a
tanner, one Simon, who dwelt by the seaside, and
whose house is still pomted out to the traveller at
Jatfa.

While Peter was at Joppa, praying one day upon
the housetop (which is a very usual place in the
East for people to sit or sleep or pray, and is
protected by a parapet from impertinent gazers at
a lower level), the messengers from Cornelius found















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a

ine
us





Joppa from the Sea,



48 THE CRUSADES.

him, and Peter returned with them, as related in
the Acts of the Apostles.

Since the Christian era Joppa has suffered much,
as we have said, and during the Crusades it played
an important part in history. But within the last
fifty years it has heen greatly improved, and is still
improving. A German colony has settled there, and
is employed in cultivating the wondrous growth of
orange and lemon trees. A railroad is projected
thence to Jerusalem. The town of Jaffa, where
most visitors to the Holy Land disembark, is built on
the slope of a hill, rising in the form of an amphi-
theatre, and from the sea it has a very excellent
effect. But although fair to look upon, it is full ofall
uncleanness within. The streets are narrow, crooked,
andreeking with filth. Its-surroundings are beautiful,
and the groves of fragrant fruit trees make the air
sweet with perfume. Joppa has been almost con-
tinually before the world. Even putting aside the
tradition that Noah built the ark there, we have
. the town on record since the time of Joshua, and
continually playing a prominent part in history
since the days of Jonah the prophet. Its commerce
is inereasing, and its prosperity is likely to increase
still farther.

From Jaffa to Jerusalem is nearly forty miles, and
as we shall shortly visit that city, we will go along
the route as far as Ramleh at once, for the infor-



THE LOAD TO JERUSALEZL, 49

mation of our young readers. The Holy City is
twelve hours from Jaffa, and the journey occupies
two days. The first stage is as far as Ramleh, the
ancient Arimathea, the dwelling-place of Joseph
the Councillor, about four hours or fourteen miles
distant from Jaffa. The country of the Philis-
tines is not far off, on our right hand. Gaza,
Azotus, Ekron, and other well-known places, re-
mind us of Samson and the stirring events of Old
Testament history. The road is good, and it is
a pleasant ride through the fields of grain and
through meadows where flocks and herds graze,
attended by white-turbaned Arabs clad in camels’-
hair garments. At Ramleh is an hotel, besides the
Russian and Latin convents, which will entertain
travellers. Here a night’s rest is desirable, for the
next day’s ride to Jerusalem is a matter of eight
hours in the saddle, and partly over rough ground.
We hope to resume our journey in a subsequent

paper.











JERUSALEM.

I.—THE CITY AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

_ ( \UB last paper left our caravan on the way to
the Holy City from Joppa. We had reached
Ramleh, the ancient Arimathea, whence it is a long
day’s journey to Jerusalem. An early start is most
desirable. Luncheon ‘may be had at a place known
as Bab-el-Waud—‘“the gateway of the plain.”
From that place to Jerusalem is the hardest part
of the journey, for the hills of Judea have to be
ascended, and the road winds in and about the
mountain sides. In some places the deep ravines
are protected by parapets, and occasionally a higher
point than usual will reveal a glimpse of the blue
Mediterranean to the northward. Pursuing our
course into the valley we cross a brook, which is,
traditionally, the scene_of David’s defeat of Goliath.
The true brook, however, is in the Valley of Elah,
fourteen miles south-west of Jerusalem, where are
pebbles in abundance in the bed of the torrent.
Climbing up the hills, the road winds in and
out, and at last the traveller reaches an eminence

©



VIEW OF JERUSALEM, 51

from which the Holy City is visible, about two miles
distant.

From this elevation, called the Heights of Em-
maus, on the 29th May, 1099, Godfrey de Bouillon
and his army came in view of Jerusalem. “ Jeru-
salem!” shouted all the knights as they uncovered
their heads. The horsemen leaped from their
saddles. Some prostrated themselves upon the
ground and kissed it. Others walled barefoot, as
if the command to Moses had sounded in their ears
—* Put off thy shoes, for the place whereon thou
standest is holy.”

We have now reached Jerusalem—the goal, the
aim of so many conquerors and so many armies
since it became a city. From our earliest childhood
Jerusalem has been to us a reality. It is no place
to be found on a map and forgotten. Jerusalem
meets us at every turn. In our history lesson, in
our Bible class, in our Sunday Schools, in church,
or at home, Jerusalem, the Holy City, is presented
to our minds, “Has it never occurred to any of us
to look back upon the great and stirring events
which are associated with it—events which have no
parallel in any other occurrences, in the magnitude
of their results, and in the terrors of their fulfil-
ment of prophecy ?

Jerusalem, once “the favoured home of God on
earth,” in what state do we findit? How fallen







f ae |
NM lti
AAT
| a



























































































































































































































Godfrey de Bouillon at the Holy Sepulchre.



THE FOUNDATION OF PEACH. 53

from its high estate! Now in the power of the
infidel, Christians are merely tolerated in the city
where their great Master preached and taught and
suffered; Jerusalem wears, indeed, a departed glory;
but the radiance of the after-glow of her day can
never fade from those city walls; yet, ‘“ Behold,
your house is left unto you desolate.”

Jerusalem means “‘ The foundation of Peace.” Jt
is not built on a level; it crowns and occupies the
slopes of the hills. We read of the hills about
Jerusalem, the mountain city, and “so standeth the
Lord about His people.” The impression so given
is not intended to represent to the reader’s mind a
city set in a hollow on a hill, and surrounded by
loftier mountains, for thisisnotso. If we compare
Jerusalem with its surroundings, the city is not
elevated. Itis built upon hills certainly, but the
deep valleys or “ wadys” which surround it make
these elevations look higher than they actually are.
The city is divided into quarters, each of which is
built upon a hill, aswe may say. ‘he four hills are
—Mount Moriah, on the south-east; Mount Zion, on
the sout-west ; and Akra and Bezetha on the oppo-
site points, north-west and north-east respectively.

Before we give a history of Jerusalem, we will
dwell a little upon its surroundings, because we
wish our young readers to realize the places and the
position of the city before we describe it. On the



54 SURROUNDINGS OF THE CITY.

eastern side, between the Mount of Olives and the
city, runs the famous “ Valley of Jehoshaphat,” the
“Iidron” of the Bible, which was crossed by King
David in his flight, and by our Lord when going to
the Garden of Gethsemane. The Valley of Jeho-
shaphat is only mentioned by Joel as the place
where the final judgement will take place. Out of
this ravine or “ wady” the Mount of Olives rises up,
and.over it are three roads to Bethany. In the
valley is Absalom’s tomb, or pillar, and other tombs.
One slope is a Turkish, the other a Jewish burying-
ground, and here the dead face each other, waiting
for the final sammons to judgment, of which they
believe the valley will be the scene. The “ Brook
Kidron” does not necessarily imply that there was
water in the ravine. We hear of Elijah hiding him-
self in the Brook Cherith. This means, he con-
cealed himself in the water-course or “ wady,” not
in the water, for the stream must have bzen then
nearly dry.

Along the opposite, the western side of Jerusalem,
is the Valley of Gihon, which is, on the south, termed
Hinnom, or Gehenna. On the south slope is a
large opening called “The Potters’ Field,” where,
according to tradition, Judas Iscariot is buried.
The valley dividing the city between the south of
Moriah and Mount Zion, called the Cheesemongers’
Valley by Josephus, is now known as the Tyropzon.














































































































































































































































































































































































= mma
a i i
ears MO



































View of Modern Jerusalem



56 THE CITY GATES

This valley unites with the Valley of Jehoshaphat,
and just at the corner of the promontory is the
Pool of Siloam. Hereabouts was “The King’s
. Garden” of Solomon, and the fountain of Job still
exists. To the north and north-west of Jerusalem
the ground slopes gently, and. there is abundant
evidence that the city extended far beyond its pre-
sent limit. Much of ancient Jerusalem is under-
ground, and the explorations of the Palestine Fund
Explorers are bringing much that is interesting to
light. We have not space to enumerate these dis-
coveries, but we may mention that in digging down
by the wall some of the blocks at the base were
found marked in Phoenician characters, and are
those laid by the workmen employed by Solomon.
In thevall of the Temple they found a long and
beautifully-finished passage, with a small channe]
cut in the pavement in which the blood of the
animals sacrificed was carried to the Brook “Ki-
dron” from the altar. Many other most interesting
discoveries have been made, and will be found
recorded in “Underground Jerusalem.”

There are five gates to the city. The Damascus
Gate on the north, the Jaffa Gate on the west,
St. Stephen’s Gate on the east, and the Zion and
Dung Gates on the south. It is outside the Jaffa
Gate, through which most of the traffic flows, that
- lepers sit. Their place of residence is just inside

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‘une Golden Gates



58 MOUNT OLIVET

the Zion Gate. St. Stephen’s Gate, by the Pool of
Bethesda, opens into the Valley of Jehoshaphat,
near the Mosque of Omar. The Golden Gate is
built up, but were it. open, it would admit into the
enclosure of the Mosque of Omar, which occupies
the Temple site. The Citadel of David is close to
the Jaffa Gate. The Tower of Hippicus, built by
Herod, is here also. Not far off is the Pool of
Hezekiah. Between Moriah and Zion is the Jews’
Wailing Place—a wall of massive stone. Against
these stones the Jews press their foreheads in the
intervals of reading the Scriptures.

Jerusalem is intersected by a principal street
called Damascus-Street, running north and south
from the Damascus to the Zion Gates. Nearly all
the other streets run at right angles out of this main
road. One of these is the celebrated Via Dolorosa, in
which is the Roman archway, termed ‘ Eece Homo.”
Along this street our Saviour must have passed. The
streets are narrow and dirty, and paved very roughly.

We have already mentioned Mount Olivet to
the eastward, and besides this celebrated hill there
are the Hill of Corruption, and the Hill of Evil
Counsel, where the chief priests took counsel to put
Jesus to death. The mountains of Moab are visible
in the distance. We have now given our readers
some idea of the situation and surroundings of the
city. We shall now attempt to set forth its history.































II.—THE HISTORY OF THE HOLY CITY FROM ITS
FOUNDATION TO THE DEATH OF OUR SAVIOUR.

Ce first mention of Jerusalem is made during
the life of Abraham. We read in Gen. xiv.
18, that Melchizedek, King of Salem, brought forth
bread and wine to Abram. Some copies of Josephus
call the city Hierosolyma, or Jerusalem, so there
need be no doubt of the antiquity of Salem; but
Jerusalem appears first in the Bible in Joshua x. 1,
when the ruler of Israel encountered Adonizedek,
King of Jerusalem.* The history of this city,
the holy abode of the Prince of Peace, has ever
since its foundation been the cause of continual
fighting. Even in the remote days of Joshua it
was a “bone of contention.” The children of Israel
could not wrest the upper city from the strangers,
—the Jebusites,—and in their hands it remained
for a space of five hundred years. Saul made

* Some say Salem was the lower city, and Jebus the
upper ; and the combination of these names gave the name

Jerusalem to the entire town.
E



60 THE CITY OF DAVID.

no attempt to take Jerusalem, and it was not till
David came to the throne, and became king over
Israel, that it was rescued from the strangers.

We read that David laid siege to Zion,—now for

the first time mentioned,— and with an army of two
hundred thousand men marched to the attack. But
the Jebusites mocked the king, and put their cripples
and blind people on the walls, to intimate to David
that the city could not be taken. The king in bis
_anger promised the chief command in his army to
the man who first stormed the citadel. This feat
was performed by his nephew Joab, and Jebus was
taken. David now called the place by his own
name, “The City of David,” and established it as
his capital.

This was in 1046 3.c, David now began to build
his palace, and to Jerusalem was brought the Ark
of the Covenant. The king, we know, was very
anxious to build a temple for its reception, but the
prophet warned him that this honour God intended
for his son Solomon, in whose reign the city reached
its greatest height of splendour, the inheritance of
the vast riches and fruits of the conquests of David.
With these immense riches, and possessing territory
extending from Egypt to Assyria, with a reputation
for wisdom and wealth so great that the mighty
Queen of Sheba was incited by curiosity to see a

“man whose wealth was so fabulous, and the reality



PHHE TEMPLE. 61

of which far exceeded the unparalleled report. of
its extent, Solomon began to beautily and adorn
Jerusalem. .

The greatest act of his reign was the erection of
the temple upon Mount Moriah, the foundations
of which remain to this day. We need not describe
this magnificent edifice, brilliant with gold, anl
_ cedar, and hewn stone. Solomon built a palace on
Mount Zion, another for Pharaoh’s daughter. An
immensé bridge (traces of which still remain, and
have lately been brought to light) spanned the
valley between Zion and Moriah. The city walls
were extended and fortified. Wells and spring:
were conducted by underground conduits; cisterns
(still remaining) were made and known as Solomon's
Pools. Some of these hidden supplies are being
unearthed, and they must have been very useful
during a siege. The “King’s Gardens” in the
valley were laid out in a splendid manner, recalling
the beauties of Paradise; and in Jerusalem “ silver
was as stones,” and cedars as the sycamore in the
valley for abundance.

But after the death of. Solomon, Jerusalem, as
the capital of the two remaining tribes after the
disunion, did not long survive in splendour.
Rehoboam, who sinned grievously, provoked the
Lord to auger, and in consequence the King of
Egypt, Shishak, invaded the Jand, and with but



63 HEZERIAH'S FAITH.

very little resistanse pushed on to Jerusalem, whence
he carried away an immense quantity of treasure.
Subsequently the Philistines and the Arabians plun
dered Jerusalem. Joash, King of the Ten Tribes,
took it. Ahaz disgraced the city and the temple
by his idolatry. In his son Hezekiah’s reign the
King of Assyria came up against Jerusalem, and
was apparently bought off by a heavy ransom; but
in his treachery, though he himself departed, Sen-
nacherib left his generals, Rabshakeh, Tartan, and
Rabsaris, to continue the siege of Jerusalem.

Then all the grand qualities of Hezekiah’s cha-
racter came out. Having heard the defiance of
Rabshakeh, the king went and humbled. himself
before God, and sent to Isaiah the prophet for
counsel and assistance. But he nevertheless did
not relax his vigilance. The city was fortified, the
water-courses were diverted, and every human pre-
caution was taken. Hezekiah’s faith and patience
were amply justified and rewarded. The destroying
angel of pestilence went forth, and in the Assyrian
camp there perished, in one night, one hundred
and eighty-five thousand men. This terrible and
awful visitation so affrighted Rabshakeh, that he
withdrew the remnant of his immense army, and
Jerusalem was saved.

We have not space to follow the fortunes of the
Tloly City step by step. We must pass on to the
year 588 B.c., when Nebuchadnezzar came up















The Jews carried into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar.



64 THE CAPTIVITY.

against Jerusalem. In his second expedition he laid
siege to the city for eighteen months. The prophet
Jeremiah, then in prison, exhorted the people to
open the gates, else they would all surely peri.h
by famine and sword, but the siege went on, until

at-last Jerusalem fell. Nebuzaradan was sent to
pillage the temple, and he did so. The vessels of
gold were carried away, the laver, the tables, and
the candlesticks, the palace was burnt, and the city
was overthrown. All the people were taken pri-
soners, the King Zedekiah was blinded, and he and
his people were carried by Nebuchadnezzar to
Babylon, where Zedekiah died, and was buried with
great pomp. ‘‘ The people,” says Josephus, “ were
planted in the country of Babylon, but the high-
priest was freed from his bonds.”

After a captivity of seventy years, as foretold,
Cyrus, the Persian, gave the Jews leave to return
and build their temple in Jerusalem, and the people
came out cf captivity to the number of forty-two
thousa:d four hundred and sixty-two. Until the
time of Ezra and Nehemiah, Jerusalem, as a city,
made little progress, but then the wal!s were rebuilt,
and the Holy City was re-established. Subsequently
Alexander the Great marched against Jerusalem,
and his approach was so dreaded that all the
priests went out to meet him, acsompanied by the
people in white garments, “to a place called Spaha,” °



THE PILLAGE OF JERUSALEM. 65

and meaniug a prospect, probably the hill we have
already noticed, from whence a view of the city
and the temple could be obtained. Alexander
was so struck by the grandeur and humility of the
procession, that he adored the name of God written
upon the mitre of the high-priest, and subsequently
offered sacrifice in the temple, and granted privi-
leges to the Jews. After Alexander’s empire had
been divided, Ptolemy, son of Lagus, took Jerusalem
on the Sabbath, when the Jews would not fight
even in self-defence. Multitudes were carried into
Egypt. Antiochus Epiphanes took and retook
Jerusalem also, plundering and polluting the tem-
ple, and inflicting terrible cruelties on the people.
Simon, the high-priest, delivered the Jews from
their enemies, and threw down the citadel Baris in
Jerusalem (which had been a standing-point of
vantage over the temple), and slew the garrison.
In the year 63 B.c., Ptolemy also on the Sabbath
Day took Jerusalem, though he spared the treasures
of the temple, which were not of much use, for
Crassus came, on his way against the Parthians, and
carried off all the money—two thousand talents—
and all the gold in the temple, which was of immense
value.

But Cesar permitted the re-erection of the walls
of Jerusalem (8.0. 48), and Herod the Great, son of
Antipater, beautified the city. He rebuilt the temple



66 THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED.

on a most magnificent scale. This work occupied
forty-six years, and Jerusalem was then the capital
of Herod’s kingdom. This was the temple which
existed in the time of our Saviour, and of which He
foretold the utter and terrible destruction. Jesus,
gazing upon the splendour of the city in which the
magnificent temple was the most prominent object,
wept over it,—wept over one of the wonders of
the then known world, and sorrowed for its approach-
ing downfall.

“For the days shall come upon thee, that thine
enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and com-
pass thee round, and keep thee in on every side,
and shall lay thee even with the ground, and
thy children within thee; and they shall not
leave in thee one stone upon another, because thou
knewest not the time of thy visitation” (Luke
xix. 43, 44).

This prophecy was literally fulfilled within forty
years. ive days after it was uttered, Jesus
suffered the terrible death upon the cross for us.
But His words remained to ring in the ears of His
disciples and of the unbelieving Jews when the
Roman army advanced upon Jerusalem. The his-
tory of this memorable siege will furnish the matter
for our concluding article,





































TfI.—ITS SIEGE BY THE ROMANS,

LTHOUGH our Saviour visited Jerusalem
only at intervals, and never for any great
length of time, the city is identified-with His life
and ministry more than any other place. Here He
proclaimed Himself the Son of God. Here arose
the antagonism which cost Him His life. In Jerusa-
lem He was betrayed, condemned, and crucified.
He was Jaid in a new tomb in Jerusalem. Here
He rose again, and ascended into heaven from the
Mount of Olives, and yet scarcely a spot can be
exactly ascertained. We can conjecture and indi-
cate certain places, but the exact localities in which
some of the most important events of Scripture
history occurred, cannot be identified.

The destruction of Jerusalem, foretold by the
Saviour, received curious confirmation some years
afterwards. The city was enjoying a period of
extraordinary peace and prosperity at the time of
the Feast of Tabernacles. At that feast the city -
was filled with a great multitude, and one day the



68 WOE TO JERUSALEM.

crowd in the temple courts was astonished and
alarmed at the appearance of a wild-looking man,
who standing prominently amongst the worshippers

cried out in startling tones, “A voice from the
east, a voice from the west, a voice from the four
winds; a voice against Jerusalem and the holy
house; a voice against the bridegrooms and the
brices; and a voice against this whole people.”
This was his cry. Day and night he roamed about,
-and with this terrible warning endeavoured to pre-
pare the people. The leaders of the populace were
very angry, and brought the man to the Roman
procurator, who had the poor wretch scourged in
a most inhuman manner, but still his only answer
was, ‘* Woe, woe to Jerusalem.” He was dismissed
as a madman, but day by day for years, unheeding
the punishments inflicted, and the ill-treatment he
usually received, he continued to cry, “ Woe, woe
to Jerusalem.” Nor was this the only warning
that the inhabitants of that devoted city received.
Josephus—to whom we are indebted for particulars
of the siege and -capture of Jerusalem, of which he
was a witness—tells us that a star like a sword
stood over the city, and a comet continued for a-
year. On one occasion a great light shone round
the altar and the holy house.. The great gate opened
of its own accord. Forms of chariots and soldiers
were perceived in the sky at sunset encircling the



INVASION OF THE ROMANS. "69

city. A cry was heard in the temple, “Let us
remove hence,” and other forebodings were not
wanting. Jerusalem was doomed.

The Word of the Lord had gone forth, a
nothing could save the city. The Jews hurried
themselves to destruction. Driven ‘to madness by
the slaughter of their countrymen, the Jewish
people rallied, and attacking the Romans under
Cestius, defeated them with immense slaughter,
and thus put themselves in opposition to the power
of Rome, and the world she ruled. Then destruc-
tion advanced against the nation with rapid strides.
The legions of Rome, led by Vespasian and Titus,
swept down upon Judea. Gadara and Jatopaty
were captured after long sieges, in which Jewish
valour was conspicuous. In the latter encounter
Josephus, the historian, distinguished himself. Joppa
and Tiberius fell. Tarichee also surrendered.
Gamala held out for a long time, but gave in at
last, and soon all Galilee was taken. Then in the
spring of the year of our Lord 70, at the time of
the Feast of the Passover, Titus drew up his army
before Jerusalem, and cnmaiied on the Mount of
Olives.

The condition of the city was most distressing.
Torn by factions and crowded with strangers, no
harmony was possible. Every man’s hand was
ugainst his neighbour, Provisions were wasted or



70 THE SIEGE IS BEGUN.

destroyed, and thus, at the beginning of the siege
the people were actually hastening their own de
struction.

The misery endured by the people even before
the siege began was very great. John of Giscala,
Simon, and Eleazar, were each fighting against the
other. ‘Titus soon appeared, and rode out from
his army to view the city. He had a very narrow
escape from capture on this occasion. Towers werc
‘erected by the Romans afterwards, and on thc
fifteenth day of the siege a suburb was captured,
and one wall of the three was taken. Then the
same scenes were renewed—desperate sallies and
great slaughter for days, until the second wall was
carried. Titus, wishing to be merciful, entered the
breach with only a thousand men, hoping that he
could induce the Jews to surrender. But they
would not hear of it. They resisted foot by foot,
and the Romans had to retire. Titus then attacked
the enemy, demolished the wall, and took possession
of a portion of the city. The third wall now re-
mained, and inside this were the Temple, the Tower
of Antonia, and the Upper City. The siege had
now lasted many months, during which horrors
were multiplied. The Jews sallied out and burned
the Roman engines of war, and undermined their
approaches.

Famine now began to add to the terrors of the



PROGRESS OF THE SIEGE. it
siege, and the unfortunate Jews crept out of the
city to pick up any refuse they could find to eat.
Numbers were taken and crucified in front of the
walls, where they died in horrible torture under
the burning sun. The punishment the people had
awarded to the Saviour now fell upon their children
with a terrible weight. To prevent escape, Titus
dug a deep trench round the city, and the prophecy
was now literally fulfilled. We need not, and can-
not dwell upon the fearful misery that ensued—
the terrible slaughter and the dreadful deaths from
famine. We only mention them to point the
moral that those who reject Jesus and His Word
will surely suffer, as predicted. From street to
street the Romans carried the sword. Titus would
have preserved the temple, but a soldier threw a
burning torch into one of the windows, and the
magnificent edifice was soon in a blaze. The
‘slaughter did not cease, however; the infatuated
Jews would not surrender, and thousands were
slain. The number of those who died in this fear-
ful siege mist have been nearly a million. The
treasures of the temple wero carried away, the
people were sold for slaves, and on the Arch of
Titus are still to be seen the representations of his
triumph.

After a while Jerusalem began to rise from its
‘shes, and the Jews returned; but breaking out in

A





















































































































































































































































































































































































































View of Modein Jerusalem.



THE DOOM OF THE CITY. 738

revolt once again, they were subdued, and at last”
the Emperor Adrian built a heathen city on the
site, and excluded the Jews entirely. When the
empire became Christian Jerusalem resumed its
ancient name, and churches were erected within
the walls. Julian, the Apostate, endeavoured to
etect the temple, but fire repeatedly destroyed the
work, and it was abandoned. Jerusalem then
remained unmolested. Chosroes II. took it at last
in ap. 614, and after that time it sustained
many sieges till the Crusaders stormed it, -and
Godfrey de Bouillon was elected king in 1099.
It was captured by Saladin in 1187, by Selim I.
in 1517. His son erected the present walls.
Mehemet Ali took it for the Egyptians in 1832,
but in 1840 it was restored to the Turks, who still
hold it.

Our Saviour said that ‘Jerusalem shall be trod-
den down of the Gentiles till the times of the
Gentiles be fulfilled.” That Jerusalem shall rise
again many people believe, and, looking at the
marvellous changes that are taking place, that “all
Israel will yet be saved.” That some great pur-
pose is still preserving the Jews we cannot doubt.
The nation is being surely converted to Chris-
tianity. They have no country of their own; they
are a most powerful race, and they are returning
to Palestine rapidly. We cannot pretend, nor



74 THE FULURE OF JERUSALEM.

would it be right to pretend, to forecast the future.
The times of the Gentiles is not yet fulfilled, but
we may believe that when that time shall have come,
Jerusalem will be once more Jewish, and shall be
exalted in the earth. :

The Jerusalem of the present day is far from an
inviting place. Narrow and dirty streets, and the
presence of robbers, render it and the neighbour-
hood objectionable. But we can never dissociate
it from the grand triumphs of the Gospel, and it
' will always remain The Holy City.

The foregoing narrative is necessarily much con-
densed, but we think we have said enough on the
subject to indicate to even the more casual student
of Holy Writ that the prophecy regarding the City
has been literally fulfilled. Our young readers may,
as they grow older; see even more startling changes,
for the fulfilment of the time will come, and
Jerusalem must sooner. or later lift up her head.
That time is hidden from us; but so surely as the
destruction fell upon the City so surely will “the
times of the Gentiles be fulfilled.”

THE END



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describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
ead22a0cea32537ef652e1d1732a33bb
9bb364a80f429a911344c891ba5ec46a2e9bc95d
'2011-12-22T12:49:26-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'5034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZJ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
db1b64d247f066498ac0234b3544417e
05d5492ed34357a22abb52caace69f43f41be79e
'2011-12-22T12:49:25-05:00'
describe
'226156' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZK' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
e6a22353806a33c29a8b348031e389be
731ccedf9de7704d55fd63d910ea7092cab056f8
'2011-12-22T12:50:59-05:00'
describe
'101072' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZL' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
af09b6caf34b95d831dec215e560b96e
c03379a2508b8950633376ea8d5d8caab7192510
'2011-12-22T12:51:05-05:00'
describe
'1930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZM' 'sip-files00006.pro'
36493c6106185bedef78e0291c719b12
f5a071a00fb649c12a78d8aeddf35feba0208680
'2011-12-22T12:50:21-05:00'
describe
'22677' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZN' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
5d7b8501d49959c25337010b7f58c53e
67c6536707ef78fc8043b579d2322504fda8c45e
'2011-12-22T12:50:02-05:00'
describe
'1826788' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZO' 'sip-files00006.tif'
759aff0d2c1c2db17e7d44e61b7d47da
47a8eee04990f20f17d9bd4d1736f897093358f5
'2011-12-22T12:50:36-05:00'
describe
'111' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZP' 'sip-files00006.txt'
8099f11fc67501da74f59eb02cae918b
b30923a4dd8a28ec435d1672a5908b8ea857eb25
'2011-12-22T12:51:09-05:00'
describe
'5491' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZQ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
4b5d713c2d954f0cbb71ab1924c53477
c34fa8dc6d00a7c81973d87980cf7a2a480f571c
'2011-12-22T12:49:20-05:00'
describe
'226080' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZR' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
26222de296f5885ffc3516efc6af8c58
c7f90eefa7a368f3650dd64e2eda08ea66b1d200
'2011-12-22T12:49:29-05:00'
describe
'85820' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZS' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
78e1fa09033ca283e6ec32b5cb1a08b6
c3db8428590ac4755d00387fccbd048a8dc5894f
'2011-12-22T12:49:16-05:00'
describe
'4637' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZT' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7657a69bcb54450640f1bda8721cda61
319162877eb92a29a36abd4533707d3bba5bbc74
'2011-12-22T12:49:45-05:00'
describe
'22906' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZU' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
8408c808f8ce66430b2d983e36b8a776
4e251cf4f77937741970785af4a80ebcea435c8f
'2011-12-22T12:48:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZV' 'sip-files00007.tif'
f784d31edef3ecfc389fb99f4533f73f
c8998dd3397c78940f17131f00cbedc2a57fb496
'2011-12-22T12:49:23-05:00'
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZW' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f1dfb98b616224c295f3da0a8754e8c7
0946bbf5d8ed4dac2b9a5aa5e83f9bc250a690d6
'2011-12-22T12:49:55-05:00'
describe
'6420' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZX' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
71e3c7136791adb76b61cfcc31d079c9
8a20fcfec558e39cb2d3c9d1090f95988669a4d5
'2011-12-22T12:49:57-05:00'
describe
'226226' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZY' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e054223bfe220900c4356dd84870a588
b571e46a0fbd5add6a413468a13cb4d263de723b
'2011-12-22T12:51:12-05:00'
describe
'122080' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAANZZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
b473bcbb30b39ab434211ec98772c299
50afa49c61611eed7373ebb03779e2231ded9f57
'2011-12-22T12:50:19-05:00'
describe
'16088' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
f374d7fab343fc4b87847b4b2caf7295
b5f71f54e2c1adf8632fcf34835bb55b06d091f3
'2011-12-22T12:49:09-05:00'
describe
'36876' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
4e66ea6afa689f70f66261c37de2c3c8
2813cd0d7025e89515decb3fbead626a799509b7
'2011-12-22T12:48:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
2bc6de872899b52aa1fa18aec97f7156
d955e72fe830d6e8f0a38fa5c7a25539a5b6e919
'2011-12-22T12:48:47-05:00'
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAD' 'sip-files00009.txt'
30440a01ddad68aadad21939aa081e32
8de4dbfd7f2e1855579ec20fca5ecd317ae7237f
'2011-12-22T12:50:56-05:00'
describe
'9945' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
db7c3051a412ca7dd2301c1ca9a8ddd0
ce1896acb7e1216a44a26bad8cfe212df90c1185
describe
'226365' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAF' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
eecc9b5ced6e4b7fce80d6c2e1c87fc3
207301a8682df0cbb791f25ae47a92d61759618f
'2011-12-22T12:48:57-05:00'
describe
'78240' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAG' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
62454a921d645497f01f52bc3015852d
42329afaabe0ef94d15ac3b8727b9b54c84e6eb8
'2011-12-22T12:51:06-05:00'
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f3678df88535ec658de28beacef4d4a6
23dcca21777fa9ac79a3c4051a7c8e60fbf04d2c
'2011-12-22T12:50:42-05:00'
describe
'21165' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
fe49f404071e930c771a4afdb85bcf84
db991c069c89c8129d232ad973d36958c71e5025
describe
'1827864' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAJ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
20b21213047ad391fbd7be0fd5472a07
d9c2c2f947d34d4a711a7a95f9ea7d0eb024daf7
'2011-12-22T12:50:53-05:00'
describe
'408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAK' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d8c046e4484ee58c4db546a1b8a92458
ddbda3fe41effa2c466e59e635b6e581bfdac869
'2011-12-22T12:51:04-05:00'
describe
'5702' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
f851dd67295bac26adb0937478c3b334
7c3553256b784275d73d66505296713a735c7000
describe
'226268' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAM' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
9f37d761c810f931ac7394ee09e4c64f
cf9629d61102204f8c967061035a4997ee1df967
'2011-12-22T12:50:12-05:00'
describe
'123911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAN' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a9178df1da240be96454f5eb36ed4b44
dd4c193728c4c578cbc1a38e7871a4dee6a91178
'2011-12-22T12:49:00-05:00'
describe
'25346' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
e92673aa64977d511e73dbde458f22bf
a1d23086f9acea65f73e32f52a75fc2aa43851ae
'2011-12-22T12:49:35-05:00'
describe
'39226' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
bc415843f95c784c71e88e6879b9c0c6
00dca071a206e48784c55c25304c833b666d5a31
'2011-12-22T12:51:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b128c563a518e9a464b91f4100aeeb02
a8d9d98658b85310881074b7e2a06b2ec6719f41
'2011-12-22T12:50:07-05:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b12c11debf61a56274d27dcc2d9174f3
d6e57893a8e9ff4c3d25e6e7db172b6b94881568
'2011-12-22T12:50:44-05:00'
describe
'9883' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5e8c064f3d0d5c1a885123df1a6578b6
2aea959cadf717d5b4a765ef4927289556b85267
'2011-12-22T12:50:11-05:00'
describe
'226367' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b3421d516980614bb7060fa98d388b85
7ed676af9fec93299b26f51acde322c3724ab090
'2011-12-22T12:51:03-05:00'
describe
'152286' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e02e50aecdcfb6cf46bb6d931c251093
f879429c36a3a0cac39805b7b93addbd1fd7bca4
describe
'34275' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
3480e4de8dfe86cedcf8ebbf252f2e8b
b61dbddbefb7e3b9083d765b13edefed4dceee36
describe
'48925' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d8043c297f1fcf5fad7707e8923c9cc8
6a4c1b825333339107c16dd4b01178abad0c4efc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2128cbed795b51a4c4c39d8518b6f71b
8aaaaa3479ccd3f7f09428c74dda6fe4066083a1
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
067d7aa23ec2a36182eafc1a4d29956b
9a8c854393c0e5f267cfde48b03b365bcbe8d434
'2011-12-22T12:50:27-05:00'
describe
'11762' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOAZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
3e0f1470a8bb67916065e0949ee1319e
a22408794cc4618b1580b30a903f17eda4284b8e
describe
'226078' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
10ae543f8c226933ff0ec4eaf8d6b1a0
2aea52890126ddb181d01fde55141d31b373011e
'2011-12-22T12:50:15-05:00'
describe
'110186' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
48b625ab004375619094ff908d76c472
19dbbab88ac9401152973c3f7a0df22b2fb35a3a
'2011-12-22T12:51:17-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
aadc8370e982f554ccb3a2ff7edfabf6
60e143dbb40124b14026a5b23b45e81dac8a2fb2
'2011-12-22T12:50:09-05:00'
describe
'25668' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6e404ecfa3c914bbc4d1a0cc39c2f430
20b90f5f26ca0b2f6bf18782c395a2cb8400e4ef
describe
'1826176' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
0b8bcbce4cae6c36a1146d4725fc42c9
e33342c903326ac390a35afbd58944b06ba83c83
'2011-12-22T12:48:55-05:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ef6cf69d745bff3d39c9843199d36498
58d5fc0769bbe117c0246724541c3196ffcc7260
'2011-12-22T12:49:41-05:00'
describe
'5823' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
743f5d44266c497db24d1bbeb9ed55e1
074ad0599b979cb91998f24e6329189d47f55d00
'2011-12-22T12:48:58-05:00'
describe
'226358' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
2c66437d86901bca49da3e91cf7243ff
9b88537648237b4bcdb125820984a1181f3114a0
'2011-12-22T12:49:18-05:00'
describe
'154686' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e5352d4d02e904c0fcbf450c9413b738
5b4f6ab9dbb52217b7a84b9237bddfd0c4bedaf2
describe
'34720' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
52bc403eaf66f46de53f9fbdeca8ae91
01a91fae84542da7e0ad9b4cfcee1d5c36de83be
describe
'49155' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
985ca79ec4c714e501cf32763ab3b1b9
37508ef2ba29f07ad18bddc6fac9fa37ad7a45df
'2011-12-22T12:48:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d3b967042bb27f887f7e32559d75325a
b336ad5a9e6b3a64e196bd2ba26bbc94ac11cc3c
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
e6784020b36f386f2e8e8c2b091f2a1c
651b04a257d5050ef27c0fcc54a41f1cd1cfef0c
'2011-12-22T12:50:48-05:00'
describe
'11540' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
77a0a707e7d399c63f734d3be6b43453
8598e6a6124d76cccceb4fc8d76f4f5c5b13b1e1
'2011-12-22T12:48:59-05:00'
describe
'226107' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5fc7d52cf8d70557f5dff8fa42e4b3ce
c81df06b26fec6eb2b818968cfef2555248d981b
'2011-12-22T12:50:23-05:00'
describe
'175717' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
56d1706752773184fd0c88941ee50f88
df1456932ae6ec48b8a94c26072254e0249e153f
'2011-12-22T12:51:07-05:00'
describe
'16126' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBQ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
52820ac231a51d08b057a4d5d7038652
c5b68a3b89de639459d2e1d69b1a2288cbd233ba
'2011-12-22T12:48:40-05:00'
describe
'48582' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
61f108fd22a4cb70b984c6d0787e9793
8260b197cde26ddab14c47833364477173f1ef3c
'2011-12-22T12:50:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b6fc268bdd5e014b8fca43ca62617f5f
d804cb146cb588a305473271dbe721ab62fe4f99
'2011-12-22T12:50:46-05:00'
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
3ce7b683c9ed024dcd502bd9e0c4e7a8
2af33e94d4c65058c7923a1d0c827150f622f958
'2011-12-22T12:50:14-05:00'
describe
'11620' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
8680c74a1423c6ea1c7fb5f57804833b
060c64cf4270b5cb1c728bd51b627293ff3a3b18
'2011-12-22T12:49:30-05:00'
describe
'226122' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
4d17ad2cf982550592b389372201149b
46d576d3a29ae94826c7e1b77b0ade6fbbc418fa
describe
'100072' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
aa2d43c98a0a96560cc4ca710abbbe6a
b69c00231cf3fc1f2da01a984db11f4954b26ce6
describe
'6342' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
886785d05979c93eff4c7f30524ad4dc
4be856240c5af1f62b7f9bbec9071a85ba28efb3
describe
'23784' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e00c342119f9e160cd138c0bf8ea1681
01ed6affe140d53cb646c0f2a8141e35b2d3cc9e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOBZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
68f962badc2c61adea9950c7124738b4
228814a1f58537df0abefae3a5481cc93659ad93
'2011-12-22T12:50:00-05:00'
describe
'329' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d94a54dcfdbd3a02322ea2c9fb3a2db1
c6d9da787fa9e20bc0d4d4ee9bae8f28269575c4
'2011-12-22T12:50:01-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5708' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d4fda5c5a19519a09cde506cf3ec7cab
06b514fdfda6cc019ec21e36ae0947df0555214a
describe
'226230' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
324a53edc30fc995f826132b155b058c
a5edac7d998be5966bf21a2d14a3f7c8ca325c20
'2011-12-22T12:49:36-05:00'
describe
'158096' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
71232b60624eb91202f98fc7f6862cc6
7269ecd84b2f5c482e689a0f6f3167c5eac2fe01
'2011-12-22T12:50:18-05:00'
describe
'36594' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
41d521d1400712214f3c2913ea519448
3525e451e4a19384fadbee0b327cbdf20b719417
describe
'50058' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
607956b6438acc756ae8b82332da3729
83d25de2318b62acebe7c6522053ef5ec8d03dcc
'2011-12-22T12:49:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
777990cf694b3b5afd1e79bc85cfdf01
0101fd6da26d4233c9847d38c17694d651f68ff8
'2011-12-22T12:49:38-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
991169e22460d0e5cc15b664edda65b0
4b228dabc8975f472a880d3e750618de1c76dd8c
describe
'11768' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCI' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f511beb0bbfef364d71929b06f291cb8
75fe3ee9e2a7ae397ec21d03f4ab94b0a391fe41
describe
'226345' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
d85f9c1cca58733355e495f499d42067
1f1e7a8129b64dfb99224c82b4fe75371baab47b
'2011-12-22T12:50:16-05:00'
describe
'136412' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
387242052caa6afd0c2fe8599f97c424
b7a3fbc3e57f1a02eae287fb92b12e4a20e10393
describe
'31243' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9052243fd14e5f4ced0ca564004556e7
3f73d47f2158773fd6a16fe349ae06786244c88f
'2011-12-22T12:49:06-05:00'
describe
'43799' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
6f68c0163cd2bba47f2dfca0581abdcd
740d8bfa12cfb9166d2f96f4f203f55faba7ef58
'2011-12-22T12:51:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7465cf53577952ea3e93be88ebf88a7d
1e45ac33f18bf97fd9d5c75b5b0364747247ba5b
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
d3957473370e5efb50f04aa5aa1fd5be
e33b3e538d6e11c7994b8b19725ae728b64a12bf
'2011-12-22T12:50:39-05:00'
describe
'10507' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e6f844ac27e9a89ad5596a240930799c
1e37e225e3b3fb77c0d73921d692fdf667546746
'2011-12-22T12:51:18-05:00'
describe
'226225' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
cb9903399f6b596da82a0c1f6c93c40f
5b6f20a937060026d18805bf5a25bcee8f431888
'2011-12-22T12:51:10-05:00'
describe
'148249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d7642f438189485566fa639702b98f13
34806b7a03d77f2e978aba9ebc4d0bb52661cc86
'2011-12-22T12:48:43-05:00'
describe
'33214' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCS' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a15e9aad2c8dcdb969fcd40d08442e1a
b8498c11973de0a995157de346cbf7d25863faec
'2011-12-22T12:49:50-05:00'
describe
'47534' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCT' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
dbdaba9c38df67da45b71f2fc68f3a9a
6afc4c04a63d97547db87d8aed96f218a60aee48
'2011-12-22T12:50:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
985d020d6d74830505658a05bc610b79
577253358d7606d344f5b408f958fe7b5e19e383
'2011-12-22T12:48:45-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
76348df31bc2d9a0b4d80c3edeb181ae
0334a634fedfcb6d8c0463df23320d9a1ef400b1
'2011-12-22T12:50:51-05:00'
describe
'11580' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
64df2e7702a49204cfc8a023eb3bc8af
9affc3af7bb4d2b4bb7da810f3409a50e7b68e69
'2011-12-22T12:50:43-05:00'
describe
'226132' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
39a21200e91ad91466d7035bf05c1adc
fea3dbcd1b7ece37a28321bb36fa732f3bbc9f5e
'2011-12-22T12:49:14-05:00'
describe
'85121' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4c9bbd933b06c38f04bbd124216896e0
d4272e216a814abe700498b22e9c7997fcee6d53
'2011-12-22T12:50:38-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOCZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
241cebcdac2a88d5355a8c63a19bd286
afe5239e123a03142b4f03b0ea7ef02ef7e805f8
describe
'20473' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f1f497af979946e12fa5ba9d9cefec08
de472dac60721bfc75c72a5cf4355866c39e0bf9
'2011-12-22T12:50:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e948a081b8146c3a5168a22224df11e9
1e3b142e1dcd89ec67c808985c3935de1ad4bfe5
'2011-12-22T12:48:49-05:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
f49b01a1acc52748d493d545b30876d3
6bdff9233aacb97bb25539122d4f35734c5c4f57
describe
'5156' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
4f73edb4b4fd5897b33a22f9247bb20b
377c0c36e973a6a7ef981b395508b7c08f13aa6d
'2011-12-22T12:50:24-05:00'
describe
'226210' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
98301bd2dbc88efc55cf393c99e41900
4a9ec6ad866751f6f37ccf01f3f7231732bed957
describe
'145267' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
076902c4800a3f6fa8a6b9b4ae914a71
ccc3bba98383603463a34ddd5ddf6dd72bedb1fa
'2011-12-22T12:51:19-05:00'
describe
'33560' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5c6b66bdb2b926a4793802344797e567
4780fc14780f92cc65acd918c56ef194b266421d
describe
'45709' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8f6bdec16b0851ae9a219bd75766b829
5d385d4b16fd4252adb1105a5a87fb69babc244e
'2011-12-22T12:49:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ad66b5cc004f54e7706d18d5e6d13993
9f523801768a2cb74c605bde2dc949647de2ba59
'2011-12-22T12:49:05-05:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
44c137b8eb095d9328dfd162a402dd74
7257560b711292a71d909ed6418d2690cf15c855
'2011-12-22T12:49:10-05:00'
describe
'11174' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
61136cbba993f673b30e74d229a3e303
30c07282ce342e8f0638733fa4accead849fa339
'2011-12-22T12:48:53-05:00'
describe
'226321' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3d9f0cf1e155695f677b166bfeb2c748
d01588ea4127d4036f43f133096bb5e09079e6a0
describe
'145911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
78f220f4c72210bc6b6247d2ff9672e3
b53ec3b71ff3af6707c49a443cdbbe176596fd76
'2011-12-22T12:49:59-05:00'
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
321b4d09e5a6b956a4e6cae81a8278ca
1d5f2f68684f30d075d607823279dab4d1bbbaea
describe
'46054' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
20ae06cfa8e719b2b6e27f85c031ac7c
7dfab6d935372d746e63c14dc8184ecf474e6b0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
afe9bbb3afbb8e903e976ffd3c11ade5
25353086c55cba51c2767280f50f9e6aea8ef9cf
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
fc6cf8be13627fafc66bae69b3c7e07f
610f8b4cfe5efe708fbb4b8d8c1ae370a2306bd1
describe
'10842' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
5817addc9d28c05e46e7119aef2c902c
7def868b2a4661a775f93f656780e9baba9aff11
'2011-12-22T12:49:56-05:00'
describe
'226362' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3f6cb057c4f51c7ec3eeb500f2ca5bb4
2008609e71602e77a134786d625b8e2da2f8b4e0
'2011-12-22T12:50:03-05:00'
describe
'153400' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a9b02e2d99964dcf2af8fee494d2cc6d
bf930cf9f00656400dc537bd9fae806245e6474f
'2011-12-22T12:50:25-05:00'
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d46adfa04677298e01030668803d5793
b3c469c40e7d54462a723374e9d134c539db32b3
'2011-12-22T12:49:47-05:00'
describe
'48281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
1f4210b7215f773168f62bd9a24a6311
16ba92212258d771b8f97bdb3af89cc4452a8ca7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
01565aed8db70cc7843ba82d13cddff8
21ab55f397705685edb8ed377d2fdf1acec267b5
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
cd32f20fe90ff7ab5c30aea85a49a59b
37fb1e84f04fa75d1f9da36749fdd49e41647145
'2011-12-22T12:51:02-05:00'
describe
'11457' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
62cc3dad065df13efee5ef1802874846
f40d7bf893dcf49d8220445379054f06d79ee39f
'2011-12-22T12:49:24-05:00'
describe
'226235' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAODZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a6a881b219cd6db02fb9a35c88204a63
00ebe60a991f65a259fcc12a3ad5e5293e058d83
describe
'137732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6ddc4bb154a01072730d060242125725
bbc83b3e5b41b69285e55f23d7b11970dcce2772
describe
'30959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
cd6dca7fbabf2fc1ea44c6d71b7bb5f5
5defcbb05289fbc7deced458933d4bf84d865883
'2011-12-22T12:49:19-05:00'
describe
'42691' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
15e175a2a313be237f9f39a2e0e66166
f8f2fe9b7b943a0cd07d77076f1df0aec8c50d36
'2011-12-22T12:49:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOED' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a99a9b77f76f71cde58d39a81e6eb1b8
0e5c8203ef5c5c47cc1a61896aa3cc81b333d6ad
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
a7907a6e9703a07e0820d245b18c5dae
88e3714cf2f1a009f6f676348ab364016c197703
describe
'10529' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
697dca10462130e78d232ccf6a00792e
e1a34a44d2f6df2d4b4a5a0a18162b5f81f2c828
'2011-12-22T12:49:21-05:00'
describe
'226216' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
28d7dd9de35235dc32cde10833a2a6df
03884c4324264437bccd3e8c66b16e95dd167dc9
'2011-12-22T12:49:53-05:00'
describe
'208119' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5f5da513daef38217b66b4499b302c0f
63d4160ac13075936aeb1ea1583e018a31c18b22
describe
'1998' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b15b72a12b66fd0f1400e72c6702cfa8
f9942ed66f075a9187259267ee2472bb57ebd651
'2011-12-22T12:51:08-05:00'
describe
'51688' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
356c594bbd927b2fb717fdd590255867
ddb40689ae1cf72eecef6dcf44b2e31f6be88006
'2011-12-22T12:50:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
081c7db04f985644a47062d45f5727ab
38e059c941e6adc0d7aaac1c3dbb18fc925fa70b
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a014b1c1b0b59ce7f9b2fffdc7104259
217efdff269534027ce89d2178fece86fdcc13b6
describe
Invalid character
'11634' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
06f63405775cf02e940e4db4de3b4ce7
81d1fbcc02245f74224fa8e893b196d2395b078e
'2011-12-22T12:50:13-05:00'
describe
'226331' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
5479cde9945279745919427a1353e0b0
b8bce13fd173cd6cfe64f8f5719ddc360efc7a23
describe
'153041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
171bc86bc7c6341f1f4d3f4c8287aeae
d5166f21ab6304c2b27d96b6281442d58c80a8f4
'2011-12-22T12:49:48-05:00'
describe
'35144' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
dc8575ac3a26ad3db7eb470e8031a501
20596eae9f89142b79061b4b9dedffee6deeef07
'2011-12-22T12:51:13-05:00'
describe
'49262' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
9a2cd39cfe230e120fdc31241591247b
6b1bbee2fc52a484636b791fc251835a0ac92db2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOER' 'sip-files00026.tif'
6b434fd2cf1838e373d45ff7b2da7f17
fe78b3ae325911b5423b9cf93e077edfa5bf2aa1
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOES' 'sip-files00026.txt'
eb32d8c12b397d97b2627468aeae9434
31b615ffa4c28a4df278baf6d46d3fc83a34ed39
describe
'11876' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOET' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6b1a142977c9a145cafc058a171a0574
582fe5b37892f14e9d3687110101d1bbbedf7d2d
describe
'225971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bef3ff46e5a183917e322ea5f3843160
12b263cc29db2757eddc1a896d130b9434f11496
'2011-12-22T12:49:28-05:00'
describe
'156362' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
21e51c20e2b83e213b2ef12817b52dad
c594307db3bdc21c9da3d63fd026982ca93f775b
describe
'35052' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5a4add61c32dcbdf39ce5817bc7a87de
a681308a2ab99528cb7f5d60d4a6c1ff9a11ec0e
'2011-12-22T12:50:10-05:00'
describe
'49415' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d59d6504941fb6a3241742f033ab1dce
506b02f99492c76bb6be2e21c22afdd35b292e98
describe
'1825104' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
22c66ffd3a92b6f5149c08187f2e26d4
6b3b32dc0db0fc5f6d9557c33d64fef74585a446
'2011-12-22T12:50:52-05:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOEZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
69375f150941b227d6fc15e3eea39ecd
173336c9b7645d12ef8fb9d428df385048df2b6b
'2011-12-22T12:51:16-05:00'
describe
'11862' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a4b210ae680ea6c40931fc112718dc3a
614f18818dea06521f2311e7211c5dfdf1bda5d3
'2011-12-22T12:48:48-05:00'
describe
'226233' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
573bd8d8655c5b246bd420d1232b71e0
429e2043b0248a166ca75d351f9627437eec9130
describe
'222284' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
53600f0c7da98e47e57ce9ce962eb904
1418baf594c3a9a90b56a903e86a0f2c0d18f84d
describe
'2541' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0c5a7a9e577154b9a21e22257e0da1c4
fd60e1697bbe6ff782cd6a07b9c7a6f07ab88e49
'2011-12-22T12:49:43-05:00'
describe
'54157' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
afb43b44f1a8182d51e60fa17887dc4c
5b87e876d1491579b8a92a0a3aec679ecdbfcd67
'2011-12-22T12:49:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
4ed80d8377381be264756e4e1881b524
112604335fead26df5eb9e63b7b1c290112517bc
describe
'326' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ff9182278aac01dc27ed9bbcfae9c269
7be60fc4ef63faf1e758654c820fd494fe0c25f9
describe
Invalid character
'12221' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
0d6892140c2ff35196c21cdccfbd1f90
04d30bb767c683b90b5690137bda2e0d30dc9c79
describe
'226379' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
96ba73b36baa390d8ec83affe9bf0980
fc23d793e5de7e0b727cce575981047ca11d9e88
'2011-12-22T12:48:46-05:00'
describe
'149232' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
4e93985d42436aed98378f87793c5fcf
7e7f1d8f42459b3536e03d6f3888155371931661
'2011-12-22T12:50:47-05:00'
describe
'33922' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
26bdc3a6e31c5a574adb17eb8f0606a0
3d16e6b7becf608ae5034cbd73917ea5a9a6327d
describe
'47586' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ba322f255a658092d1e813de5f39e3c9
53f17b4ab572b3310bf56b29e9772d4ebcb59709
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e6f3d33b69bc598fffc395eff4c37694
7f2a768c53ac67917ffb0fc5f40caa5f84b8716c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4077e3ef7fa4ea846cbb2853634da55d
ab0e97b25c823cc3ff6675d0bd06c5e463524798
describe
'11559' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
5787ce8948733d6244fee09787818637
68cf5613dea9e16b4bbe3027f3b5177821c5a053
'2011-12-22T12:48:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
62c52973b7342da66f45def4ce3e93fc
a24ab4b4df03c19a607c97561d5fb045e45fb61d
describe
'148824' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
e5a94d4fb3ea8a8331412b32c970d232
9ad86a83cd2c92d3e8fd4d41feec7d42a87c780c
describe
'32855' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
60fdfadf638758b0d0f548dad38efcf3
b0ef2541154d2ea13f7c72829c4539f2473d91fc
'2011-12-22T12:49:49-05:00'
describe
'46722' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ab7270ae1225e3c2efcbd18482df25c2
8c7630f574b417cd4cce1d211e2b1c9f7cba5685
'2011-12-22T12:49:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
1f73368b280249360f599308b694d4f0
0f1f18dcddd23d7f8ffebc08dd7aafa06f5d49bd
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ed7864849eb0e40ff6f8250ae2682bc8
53a1c2dfb46a4d1fd0bae4ad175651df892a3994
describe
'11354' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0c400337b2bc090d85d2ddb8b6b48911
ab3636d507285474b304bd77e4c03f63596f05d6
describe
'226169' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e7c3323805322ed41989045b20dfe2f2
adfac8367651a9c4b443a3aeb433ac579cad024b
describe
'83195' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
38c9bfcfb9081ab803fc8aefbee58125
9c33ce00bf4b8889e3ff163d9af8ff89854d7353
'2011-12-22T12:50:55-05:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
03289eeb570c3d1a3b407f1883d935cc
d369ef026e8b77d74c330d156d3ed07f846f6168
describe
'19473' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOFZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
396adb17b671ca0eff37921bdba30d4b
fd394f1d837e403e06417367ba055ecd718d694a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e3fef5eeaf2849daeeb03dfb09bfb620
b68e41c68a0ddeeec2e0345fc398eb261b86c94f
'2011-12-22T12:48:51-05:00'
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4a22568fede2cdf7f8358de5bee9ef73
52cba8d7943fe354ca17eb2658bb5d240d3dc01e
describe
'4695' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
bb9a86f76b990f63a3ee7fc2a925cdf3
c7d72ee3ef29f9934fd2ff256234c7b3c66bd911
describe
'226127' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9ca0ddd7f9a6ca1cf331ea91e5feed70
41fa3c8285a50f7c10e90fcb3382c8333942c6f3
describe
'148275' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGE' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
ea24b554d66f892f60514338fc6c5ff8
97184cb9e3d709830e95daadf2c13133a4cd2ec6
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
d94fa949f1222a7f5669e0d53471f9e1
decaacefb403ce9e83136f1051bab4985af60fd8
describe
'46735' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d110cddfcf39b08435dd0582a6f66a5b
af3ef66d2746013fb5a55e1dd02b7f8914411249
'2011-12-22T12:51:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e4305d5eaa5c11ea869bf15922490697
cd272c2375d0a5700711a9934b5b22c994dbe796
'2011-12-22T12:49:02-05:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
fc1f38c8c6b66dab02a027064601a40b
1675c969517409657b75ae12671f5ec23af4bf48
'2011-12-22T12:49:33-05:00'
describe
'11404' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
acacfc454c8ce1b298e2459a1b26a6f0
7de656aa159947884f9655a1c862f93ddb7257b6
describe
'226313' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
0c99dc256c8c1503cdf7708b412e7341
cf3c1d1ba9ffb7cb2dc8a294ccf3e8d53c9989d0
describe
'152917' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
c8137e6719c6448ccd438775634e57c6
d9443631d5c1fe5840ac9a060d59db83ca24efd6
describe
'34767' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
f20edc0319469d8139eb7e020cb8b8cf
cef3af7d66ac82a2a358003c297764b056993776
describe
'48012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGN' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
c639ba3338314b5c206613c58104e50b
e427b413508d14d481d780bdc774d9e81a062b49
'2011-12-22T12:50:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
3591ad949e35aa885ef4c01c9c922357
9bc5234fa6d9518b9d9dd3b6cbcc905db6fe1158
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
885305dfe2455666d7a10ba2b83ae0af
c4bcfc0667d38275a2cb4db04cddc31f0cccca99
describe
'11497' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
a7107992d1a912841e0c20d9201d67c4
091da8618a3076fc94ba48db7f79ecc6414f746c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
a80af9e6f766b14842c67a2701a18755
7c1896d4a22b0d88b9bf27c0cef61a449a07e060
describe
'86714' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
230852f1746b156ba3bba588be9c6172
13c7d7e1fad73fe9cc554317ebca94f47aec0f39
describe
'7217' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f2ed04df7b5a9ed485aaa0402b5add2a
5bd1d7b332e3e66059f0e3335eb0db7054a52ae8
describe
'21769' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f5632eaeccd4fa0fd23221ad0aa20bb2
75e826f182814bf4ce8daf2bbc897720a6ac228d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
835342d16bb64be5f653336cd5e69714
8a04d081d1bc52159772fd7305ae9bd8021f09b4
describe
'399' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
317f41687c0a7fde7b8b69299a092b29
b3f8fdae9d4996cae2dcf3b5173bd115556413e0
describe
Invalid character
'5177' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
12eb4f5969b7e912d1e4a2ed133d249e
090da9769a2b703c9d3919283a65d72dde516cc7
describe
'226023' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c997681808a536b82be48c04066af9ee
9250140c1848d950de1cf9c7f1043e79bf4695df
describe
'163509' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOGZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
3f0f717bdd28522942244c53e3b0a66e
97cc3b053516356a901322a23d4fca89f65de21c
describe
'25941' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
159d8e3de53811fd8b2c80e122f15332
d3bbc9c55a234c896efb841a938922957bab3bdb
describe
'47472' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
af6075f0e2b0659db6ed5f3596f91d0c
20ca8e45649df17a257902d8bea948b858a56970
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b1fa9b0fa0cbca402c17dfce7d01ef40
674f493a800095cf9360384b725e0b20f8a8b529
'2011-12-22T12:49:42-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHD' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ab71f18d459e93009143b4486a5094c8
5e3e4cd4bd24fbbbe7cc1e467d9d131d9fb87b3d
'2011-12-22T12:49:13-05:00'
describe
'11235' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b960ea69717826af265df284649fcf15
efd2ce7edc6eb2412f8f2858b2903d520bdb8fff
describe
'226010' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
493cb07a0b6fc1492078bd4fcaf2bec6
3c6729389bc1c8e3147c08cb1d4a3bce359c2726
'2011-12-22T12:50:33-05:00'
describe
'148086' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
09aa1307f854cafe7db0d4ce753aa4a6
b72af2f64d42fc3a5c08553ce2323fce0364ce5d
describe
'34029' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ee67396a2572a82217013fc6e52fda2c
4b748f3aaae9ccf4ce1893bfeaa50fda56b56ae9
describe
'46188' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a723d045179a174c1f6dd49755f8eec2
54024a81a2f58629c4853bf3e13b423f19fe2e87
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
34abbfcf269b49674d564dde88f3bb02
3f8afe65271d07f1b3ea179be57abcc10ed382da
'2011-12-22T12:49:08-05:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
e23f20ef7965844ee1650aeee0617c87
62f16cb105bb29e8d23d0a0f62610953aaa20169
'2011-12-22T12:51:15-05:00'
describe
'11160' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d71281705d22ce6f6679597f0cdbc1ba
94ddb873b447db21b86f3463e9a9cdff8ee82e56
'2011-12-22T12:49:39-05:00'
describe
'226373' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
1594fa68066c3b4ece05176e4061b307
b065a02e8e9886c0f45d2221bc6c8d27010e35c4
describe
'198888' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
caa7ae0685783d8bd166c7895b9f8b97
7c7195a1b310d2209c56c943bcc0325cc46f5758
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
232a22fe455db87b8d66221c4326a1d4
1559c36fe8f228755d76c73c3a4a67d56c9e85a6
describe
'48797' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
260ede90a9d080a4c1c7e64b0dd9ad8e
bbe0a250165b6ee463bcde198d0a78ce5765b450
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ebe1c98c49406725cb1775d12e490b71
7497f1298b1f5e0ebf3fb69216f83c1cc0ef1767
'2011-12-22T12:48:56-05:00'
describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
20cdf11c35bc729242193ef0cb1379fc
c4132818a8c94436b533f98ac43a9cd1c9791fef
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
290498acbfacad1bf0d75a679ca871a0
ea87a1d8a11a4e85564786165d8f4601cca9a6dc
describe
'226027' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0de12fb955c0eebd5fd1f691e21be1c2
03c9adb7611c7e08bc79b81c784d5b9979a0134f
describe
'151878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
7b76077268ca84cbb63cf62fcd23a38c
998f4a7428efdff5882bc594eef8513a674f1aad
'2011-12-22T12:48:41-05:00'
describe
'32724' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
b2014bddced20eba59e9d885a42220f8
f36feee95909cadd166248f719173f0a3796d6e5
describe
'48157' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
76290d49ecfd6ef9167bd62a96512c04
2772dc11a979bd21f3db87d4fc236d5a500973ff
describe
'1825096' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c0237c405e1be288c6a07181b7fb2b09
734c84466098d826e0a7dcc008240789084a2f5b
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3c66826880867143b036d29eb855565e
13b4ebb8f23a75e50f8dd96bb157f6636cfe3bd6
describe
'11702' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOHZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f3a77164199bf1ba48f20d08bfe75508
8855bd1240f1a996d8d872d056e50664f382be3b
'2011-12-22T12:50:58-05:00'
describe
'226377' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
02332efb630791b9d5d3cd052d2ce38a
c32ffec27a67d5a86d95ea758fdffa69958c0501
describe
'157733' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e82159c17b95a06b5d6bb7656dc6a941
55c62bdea54ca79b4613bb0f1a9ede6ff7bff33d
describe
'34954' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
7b22895ee055c130ac654369fb7941d2
0dc95af7ace258e62c892cc8af793e3b3495d4b3
describe
'50640' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOID' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
617471f2615acd3c5a7c02d21412cd48
04db4376bb5fc4195ea6bdabfeb371dc970c34f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
77e2c3ae804b59ff820ffaa1f7a3b0f8
46a31ef866989ae2c05ca9f5c37c80c1e74a91e7
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9bb1c1ea5d0caa0f2e05aaccb9b4e939
5c28950602d49850092c8bbeff69ba8c7ffb76f4
'2011-12-22T12:49:51-05:00'
describe
'12341' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3cea59d140924e49394bdf2ed4264c08
bd6e1e3a200be0e602ac8d794111cd83c1f43d31
describe
'226232' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ddebfbdac99ef2a95a2c387f4b8cbacc
ac671d294ad0e9ad05f9606418b46d488b553b02
describe
'150579' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOII' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
a2834f158c207891d103799df1f6c3dd
a422303b8cbfb2a21ca788a9ee3634032f3a1503
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
97b40d6bf2dde7bcb3a4c63c8199dfaa
17f456e56383fe0da0cd59943befcc809dc22fa4
describe
'48013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
3f88258a3eb5bf5e7acd06c7887f656b
060c98f6d2ed54dff3c3bcf439166cc8763f0497
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
81b0689fc33f73868ba8581cc6b9fb9f
fa26fd21e0a27d05ca97564890b7bd02bb188532
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
5dc97554615860101e2267139733e5e2
6f398edb8244f3ccbf18d7537d97146fa1487773
describe
'11721' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
81128759643a6bc81abe31bfc9161590
ed3d4776db1c3eb372493197b97277c91145ea76
'2011-12-22T12:51:21-05:00'
describe
'226339' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c45c6c2958ffb9861ec2ed44c1e8b178
80091c5f3c136c809d22896fbd21d8679cb3e8e3
describe
'150234' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4b9fa8a97b5396c6a0f2567b1c81caac
30bca7deccfcf742ee2ced060d7d7de655a94211
describe
'32942' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f94b59f649f8f73693d298c647ea2f64
88b2585d1e5fd8234aa892ea64f91081c619d468
describe
'48494' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIR' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
e7cb38c411892ca32d035dae206bf6bc
eac27828f60f4b50fb9e70e818dee9d649b60d8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIS' 'sip-files00041.tif'
67faeef3fc9daf9d66656f217972f6a4
2da06bd1712ff3fbd0004461a9b9c56029e1ed5d
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
5e5821b0f4af6ada9c0a1cde2d9da0bc
aba5f7781aa6cf057030892bce215caab596629b
describe
'11718' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
5f6f6ca50b6d95243abab9fa4c072523
92fbf4780dbe7584814c341d70456a7b1d984c7f
describe
'226360' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f207b1ebebf93e6995c5e198bc203673
3261af974e740fc1bf08882d95ee602a3a461778
describe
'86114' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIW' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
63154debb5f6972fd01a4316d4c8fb07
afd9d6677eac1155a3623055c21bd09e6f4b8d62
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
07b413f0a7d0b0c4c36483ffa7867ce8
fd45f189e2e7d3ab66d79eb4b24ac9f58ba8611c
'2011-12-22T12:49:32-05:00'
describe
'22532' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
29d64ec8b8ef15ce837e4f11bd2773f0
6268cbda83f13784786d2f4f85998ca87080d672
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOIZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c06e538ef7c32e5ef4318778859c4fc6
8445e90f246f97ad75c7174dfe4c3b67c51c60c2
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
fa69de7eed19e775642800fb8e3fff6f
7f3c333052717d21227ac39712b03df2bed369c2
describe
'5619' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
31d16d39a923a6346085547834301857
bd7ffc6c1197bc9954d4a9b1902cf7da794f390e
'2011-12-22T12:51:01-05:00'
describe
'226201' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
0c49c8ea294c1a77c890c05c8d6bf71c
896693b085e6f26d679c8eb66a654a2a88f827eb
'2011-12-22T12:49:01-05:00'
describe
'154658' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ded1e2a59c8a9cf128be91b00d6fc51f
ebc000415092030fb6fb8c22bfc57bc0214dd160
'2011-12-22T12:49:04-05:00'
describe
'34847' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
202ff03d109f03566719d124b710a9f0
0a4320ee69e786e81d79cd40ac1c3e54e325fa1c
'2011-12-22T12:49:52-05:00'
describe
'49478' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
3be0db3617fff2fa4915958789d7d625
0b4d6471207be72701f6392bbd2c6fdfa5d7b4ff
'2011-12-22T12:50:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ac81cfabfca9764f39e08c09e233f294
d9a9925bd82047b5daef19e64cfe4b4e35322851
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b2f57cc6444696008463be0afa1c8012
4fb877b0a73f0514d2606604c71c347408456a50
'2011-12-22T12:50:04-05:00'
describe
'11940' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
273b1e657ef96a2ba9663222a7585a78
2f73fd6dd9b6b2a315d941d9400fe0505a17fd8a
describe
'226029' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
bd9fbe5b40a39960694c3ce310a7dcf7
13e1e124df7decd37e1f5d72970dc89b8f756254
describe
'153530' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
ba45b8819fc3b291db373e74f2627bf2
a96f6e494bef2e1ea0099e5cc74c342eed87c53b
describe
'34195' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
0bbe302182c1f02f120557ad1ce39d7b
ced43ba415ab4b03cdfe423324f8e1ec41cd5038
describe
'48705' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJM' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e71ed4da042952d515fe63a52c34a520
a6d3513fccaef533a06fe53e5228651bad3b98ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00044.tif'
32cd086d85e1d731a530cb2650092619
1cf2d921a06ebe05ad5ce246a8faafedf298b2fa
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ddb5c6de52b771511c941c3956668ac6
e3ce194ac24bd6ad43cdeba262e894a38bddd7bf
describe
'11400' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
e9a1c5b28ae24fe0ecddbf1ddf626825
1c421816e17e077280bc4c09c5eea556b6391a25
describe
'226012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
feb275ff56580d24d07c1b215f6e43e8
19e91e8ed2309a83687f8a6d9f51323dd793641b
describe
'109986' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
277a04aeadb3116c04902bbd18125d88
1474f1a9f8fa488d66bbc284de0306976bf3937f
'2011-12-22T12:51:20-05:00'
describe
'16755' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4c08c004d1dbfd49cb62241870d539c3
a3652ed0711d86b3901db3b02409e92c14cbde0a
describe
'30481' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
8b0f031f12e0dad9f488bf97d3b9818c
a42ddbbdc8992b5dbc2641f0984083b5a0f1b73a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
71d30c5c267b85bf1e4f02ace6ebcd78
68a9859b63d768504ae9bea1bdb3b73751758770
'2011-12-22T12:50:20-05:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00045.txt'
800a640face91ff4d8002051f540b7ac
9d7697b7cc2286c8fa09ebf044f260ffa13c6332
'2011-12-22T12:50:29-05:00'
describe
'7656' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e78bc99581b3e2474d69c2156e67ea94
12794cc3ae7b6bdd204e6e459e7ef68a63455d12
describe
'226003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
1355b341bf27326c9fc6b26b0c512c16
a45d518e1440037245449f022449d2def8835c38
'2011-12-22T12:49:34-05:00'
describe
'142386' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
d7a6f87b677f17e960cfc1a889b7ec9c
9c7f3c4043dda5a134a2a003d36e3aa41c83c088
describe
'24889' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
0a3f9f668b05101e4d412e45bdc1922a
0c380d2e97d589e5e60cb42c4701f033877e861d
describe
'43433' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
23d662b8d88aad55d5c10ee55aa3e19c
b20cfdb01bad21778ac048e40712475b57b61ddd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
021c949066c8582e25ea580ea98008d0
db0d152ad79abc9b5185c571b6ba91d7242de695
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00046.txt'
b42c35805e499537919ee236a3c1125d
f82907bb0549c358478fbddc7308d809943a156c
'2011-12-22T12:48:44-05:00'
describe
'10908' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7ffad922facbecf7338ba7222adcadee
196f2a2877e326779a5b6ce89020d575ee8dbd29
describe
'226011' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
118daf749df35332dfbea09e9d2c4875
774400b934bed8058d84c52518280a8b1c2dab28
describe
'148092' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
146aa8d205933f9d988dc81b63f2fbcc
f8d759aee320858af5adbf9216482d52399fc7fa
describe
'34267' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00047.pro'
90fd6ff9c03f749ea5ac52738fc2c11c
2e82b7a7621643e9acda117dae34c2efdbe88b04
describe
'48349' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6da63f65328981cb9657bb4109be08a1
3c4a9a98ff554dbc0acb19d7330eec00bfc8ea3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00047.tif'
03d904b36e6d1d8780a328debc78f1e1
3749574b0d5d6155dc7e427742189001ddab8bc6
'2011-12-22T12:49:54-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
98bd067d467886c42d59996b5ebf7c82
4ad827a786f62884ee6821dc419a960c6dac88fa
describe
'11732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9303d8903f484588e8de84a5c8d17241
d0567b5ef8e3adc427d35a5fc33129c6954a5d75
describe
'226237' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
96525acfa8e670de79b391e0dd959cba
7ffefce311e960647229b7454250f230b6a28d93
describe
'105146' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
30cbcbdee544e98c5b31e037a0b26bc2
dd6791f132e3ee33376250d61a0ed25fb311c173
describe
'517' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00048.pro'
5c47b17183d850154c1302157f09a7da
e8233d94fa335a63c3ffaf2b0d7d7680afee3475
'2011-12-22T12:49:40-05:00'
describe
'24486' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
5f8125d407145a92e2fbe166a7d48521
f1763b0f7dcd531423f96576b4e13663e4b5d415
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d4572767b8a08cc034928f3d761b8cf9
f113f99d7fa1d7dc12227c7a142a233436828876
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
66a55463d27e4677fefc985ca195254a
7729a83fc2f71b202c55cfd8d413cf62df1f765f
describe
'5809' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4fafc6eaf4b1ec6d16f7111325a63854
8d7a8ee78f98b93ee0ee552d3578a261ea4509f9
describe
'225980' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e9d236f2e47713df9de035b53d1ad5e6
48195c4242b94952b2648b3d318742724de74f10
describe
'151416' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
150343d27d5e170e132be7ef3ad2ddfc
ae343ab16eec96f2004d2cc5308e55d1bf0e104c
'2011-12-22T12:50:57-05:00'
describe
'34350' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
b475c98b2c5cb856dff9f30396c7dfed
82b32d00fff427cc80d394ac497c91a2d2cf31f8
describe
'48249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
5e1a680256cd4fb80397c7273ab5c124
b84e474904d0f2baf9df835b62253a479536cc6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9406c340b89b2d015a67067c45237de7
1247684cf9d30ba790649a24745041e482deb05c
'2011-12-22T12:50:37-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
c3a7da80b890e7b79e36ca597aa457f7
b91c738ebf00adea97bae1ca4a8b89f3b956fd0f
describe
'11819' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a39e59760f985674c7b014f16818817b
9780bea5202587d111950c143e6d973cc446a2b6
describe
'226244' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
ea1c978099f48ea23288c9da3324bd7d
fb28312837ece39a8a43333ed133c6f4bd7f5cc0
describe
'149556' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
309f68a803ae4e52ddb40ed841184bbf
b8358b6bc2cc0d8f2037db961dfeb44a6f6974d9
describe
'34517' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d3783a5059d6874812ef8e57bb86c892
dd94c058f72e61f59b8f8c7fa473607e7ef15c5d
describe
'48431' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
11f42541b08b24637eb6e65ba639b21d
7880e4b7916ed0cb126e195688fffe8c1e10720a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2e153fe9c2cef7403097279abfdd2977
9e95eaa9402197ffa2c1c646577424104a72b655
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
15a3a7da14bcdd958ae2dc03c539876b
b24522651e40994d6aa4e0f096a2940451d96c8e
describe
'11393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
912bbcbb8046cc02746b976c3fa71b3d
933053a73621e8cb1efee20cc21f3f3378bdea43
describe
'226159' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
3787dd2dbecaf4cc4e18fb2b38858a42
0713f10e23dbcc0faa0be0fc2c3322cfca73913c
describe
'74977' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ba321401d06326f794bfebff3e0be8d1
0d81649d99e5a0d3de4d81ffbe8d09ee60d72cb5
describe
'6604' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00051.pro'
e6c72496dc26a397d08ffb91ceba2c85
8b7cebdb63af4bfcd68e2a2ec5bcbc6dcee61c9a
describe
'18988' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
dcee3f83cc0bc0bebb622cb13b24ff30
e49f56c87edc93c08a86ce9a88efedbfef16cf73
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e4a2cfb6b1efdabd231b09b779c6618c
751f04cee27af3ca738ff24fab802a4349c44bfc
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
65b4526dcf04d7b5a98b8b093cdb7121
ea73a452714fc35913d35090b52debf434217bbc
describe
'4778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cd474678a753b363dc000d44908dab2c
7867fe52802b385f84b3e0368a599412ffd9baa6
describe
'226243' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c8cde897a6b6dd2c6427bba30ecf32d9
39154b8577278e38eaabe546cb75b540a9d636b7
describe
'155692' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7e9e57882b30d53770bdb64b2b62c548
2963a42a594613d457c4bb21dcae2e87ee4dc999
describe
'24846' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLP' 'sip-files00052.pro'
445de8d57e7ee6499833556724521206
cb136d1fcf15bdf5952121abe10fa61e81ce7bca
'2011-12-22T12:50:22-05:00'
describe
'45878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
718c788b4cf78ff62ee07fd69c34f127
bc4771560c55dd646b0f7068d492ee2c7e2bb2b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLR' 'sip-files00052.tif'
4e35da58c0b6041c37d0973708a180d8
dd8e35cee8fc434499f8a0fc4d4f261a3a95a713
'2011-12-22T12:50:45-05:00'
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLS' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e11612ab3e741606db5a4dfc807d4917
2ed523abcaea1d2f55c53ff3b39e06484a62d57f
describe
'11084' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a467b57696e63db56efb90df294acfdc
509ded6fc7b0854001f4a3a8da51bfb7c717975a
describe
'226008' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLU' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5debaf14c4606405f0e3613811a50103
fc808595dbccfaf7f71f869f487a256dfb36fad2
describe
'148692' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
5cee1be46dca42f70cf4d986a5a3416e
47cb6976d9f76e2028ecc1ffe05ad79364bc4099
describe
'33841' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1e4c88a96a44b9ec46067b2eedae8c68
4614f73ab32ba91a138fba7f8f8cffd9b816209a
describe
'46797' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
aa02dec7b242203bb4b06d3e07edd364
db1d28e6f56cad9ffb3d7ed16554b59728a6ad8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLY' 'sip-files00053.tif'
f31c77f809a52bb13195aa6fc25cc384
cf6e92b31f0f1cf83af157a26e65c4cc3d8c0095
'2011-12-22T12:50:26-05:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOLZ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
dc37d36f09324d3e7899e5e516d7d755
f7a7bd5f27c180cac7fac967d0f25362c16fd544
describe
'11558' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMA' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
61947629448e954ea1f89ed12908616d
1401ffeeed3195801993c70042dac70530ac1a2d
describe
'226217' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
235175da685e16d6dfb75e583532311c
0193e534f92d470428a06cb98500dd9308255e64
'2011-12-22T12:50:50-05:00'
describe
'149449' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMC' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
f329f584d22ddc4a1681443d7be86a99
28c302ed5a99feca8db5a12e215171d046452163
describe
'33588' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMD' 'sip-files00054.pro'
d0f3aa17211f069884a9b4fbb88ebedb
27963f983e68451fe02752e5a3cca3e1e01d1a96
describe
'47204' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOME' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5f393854da6352d08dd11c655cff0ba0
dca03b1c195b452bac6b9d7cc5e9d73e2c9647c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
939cc50909ad41abd2aa407c7d9d04af
16e6f105a1fff8ca81133503ce9041ee163aba5a
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
cc02af435783de2d1edb46fee6e23687
ee12be5ceacdc908af11390ced97c5dd765593fc
describe
'11059' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMH' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
df1fa32c1fbdb3fd5a90520f037454b7
1d081739d406b8cbeb14788894c651b2056e26cd
describe
'226022' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMI' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
2525a99649b4e63c30b9b8593670b744
5f9e411eae169e661f6d494dc11656e934445d2e
describe
'147024' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMJ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
cb77a44ac016c4ec944da08f6bb6a460
f4590e177ac8757bb79acf83f5b6728cefc037c4
describe
'32600' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMK' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f6c4f4651efee47098283081fdf4d7cf
fd90dd175974118b5f2d3a8c98aaf64585d8ce59
describe
'46772' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOML' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fa80fc8e9ae1fd0fc096618a61601eba
824d8729506f795b31a86950f39ff22e72d86ced
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMM' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2fc833e2dcd921683f518420b14117f0
dbd978f20e0efbdad3c0a22f783c89838a2b8f2d
'2011-12-22T12:51:22-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMN' 'sip-files00055.txt'
d50cd25265b6f2f356bbdf129777347b
e24072791980a579119b215ba85e24e537ca4d64
describe
'10940' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMO' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
ee7f867edf325d51afa1f79444fc93a6
f69e8986b0e8ae3b86443b57d2f5a209b3c18834
describe
'226353' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMP' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
7ea90039f2cf8f4dd4895331945f14dc
f0f43d9308a0541682abcaa0b7670de96796fdd7
describe
'142858' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e36b5883edd2d52ffece17dc360736da
e94c0d6ee01a4541e7302060ed9274ae418c64dc
describe
'33028' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMR' 'sip-files00056.pro'
78a9593c61065da1835749bf09ccb1af
667c48597ad4d5adfd9ab76fff88c8880ea77c4e
describe
'45249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMS' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
43e3cf7bd7c70631c886693d0164a809
730f44a9862482f152430c73249a2e902fcd2187
'2011-12-22T12:49:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
87e046fa96592f58d9c4fe3ea8edd0fc
f9caa481af96a10ba953b94955b94c9decb86c67
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMU' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7749ca68a26ce09366fac223a2ce7dc5
2a90db76adeee6ea236aed51469f399608e4d200
describe
'10767' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMV' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
9db762eafb779e2df5d7d91d453a6e35
58311ea41cf5829e0e9dfb9b7b9bb6930ac5e6ad
describe
'226052' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
8403baad9bbf2e237ee9f6d5d568ab85
45c0dc8f3fe13a317d210ef1301f6177c3a967bc
describe
'96264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8b4b405f80c4d8b2502e99803e5381f8
eea3e58f996eed470437eb3d13b17d4acfb0f3b9
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f6b20d65f340cb606f2f722cc2e0cb1b
bcaa2890c3e757a63a958e8e19c634c233946736
describe
'22622' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOMZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
674be43bccea533107939c5ba50b6145
c8d955c45f07a96c93fa48fd3259fd151e2d17be
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
af31cd72a0b4030dda530dd2a4afcd97
f47062172e3b2208937d92bdad648fd495032854
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1d0c01cd603c7eeb3d3337f97bb8ccd2
dc767db24bf7d6bdea73b8d600ac365e338932d4
describe
'5431' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONC' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c5e5bbc74020c2c815eb3a0b18e702d4
edfd89f4b2bee89a6f00bb3fa6475f35c5d76116
describe
'226368' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOND' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
0595ae64cfa32b84591376ad022121c8
35214b10c5e8a5fc57846ab0f6aa8b8334471fd8
describe
'148670' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONE' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
2aa1ec72fe7d9317bb140d7c369a8076
da53112d8e6a6221f3708a896a794be3a286dd18
describe
'34742' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONF' 'sip-files00058.pro'
dc422de874f6e2a3c216efc241d10f57
514c054883f59f2c0228f7b9cfb366f5384e6c0e
describe
'47440' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
21bea28f8f5139811656b29a4e51d252
8958b132dd5f80c4e0ea0333ec8126559cbbb35f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
8507fe2dcb1a48bc73caf0d7d4651bd8
c8cad52b0b604701b2b62c238805c67422e2c9c2
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
87ff9f57327f1e6f745acd6e5635ff14
702646fb8e2ae9996f25995534997beb790acbf4
describe
'11593' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONJ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3900cb2e9088749b00bc1a3d88ae6d1d
40673aad6497c18f006d14dc65010680c201eb98
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
01a490f4901f18c0da75e7e681cbbb1a
09cc97aa3c994d8724521a2e80af8078543aa9c0
describe
'136997' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONL' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c032b7afc44154b495b2c056849da66c
42cd50ad58fa69fcd22d137cd406e8fc666a9cd6
describe
'24375' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONM' 'sip-files00059.pro'
da9e429ac13e72cb0c970e17bef1b817
d673a2f6dfb863ec59222685e32ea5183cc02002
describe
'41460' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONN' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
2bb87392ae1622206fe66d0f1326f895
b143bb9d7a16a041b0808bd4cb51edb4035747f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONO' 'sip-files00059.tif'
39b87a08035af5a239699a4429fb7dca
8019dc55516aa49712584dfa710bd05cb453fb32
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONP' 'sip-files00059.txt'
7ce2fc0e08303e9c435cad87b1f402c2
f6e9bf7e286916f8af9d9ce93530dea6b3c01471
describe
'9951' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONQ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
8fade384104ed475da36b97b1dfaac50
c78f95033327f16f49824b8fa68d55e5b9cb8727
'2011-12-22T12:50:05-05:00'
describe
'225986' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONR' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2c8a0499bdcf6353564f8c419caaec90
3ce709663420f1bb2de77dc9a715d4c7d8692a8b
describe
'165809' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONS' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
aecc1103099429f71c186b4241ce80b4
2462e54bb073004d58411816a4b9f2bef4fd08d8
describe
'25778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONT' 'sip-files00060.pro'
c6ffb085ff1bbcef26ba8aab5b61d259
5cf161d6828c3a0e67192c774f62cbe95bedabfd
describe
'48980' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONU' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
4be35fc50a768fd8b024d07d872db5e8
1203c6828d0a8904303995ee338e3cbd0e54f87c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
68b9d1661fcaea1f55dd0bcd57513cc8
75be42f7f921832bb9fcf15a2775f75d2c154167
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONW' 'sip-files00060.txt'
331ca625f6ad39d4639735742160bbad
edbf6c4521bb608c61f38fae1aa42d030d2ace0d
describe
'11803' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONX' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
9ecf583ef03418258a7be389ea2ff680
7763e9d2b994526e20905f4348cd5af09d8676fa
describe
'226160' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONY' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
018f68b3cf8aebbd1935290f0b4bc19b
f9155cb10851f5f7acce28ea32a0dfeea2b21f28
describe
'146199' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAONZ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3303f38bb4d986c7055ba89b94b9108d
16e14be7ec0e4f29f796ea57f29cd6efc07a1529
describe
'32528' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOA' 'sip-files00061.pro'
15199329131dd96fc6291f5342479cd5
5fb57f7c2ef0ef711138971c6a5e8b8cd37bd93a
describe
'44687' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOB' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
aa77d35ceafa727566ecebb6fe2e5cfa
e13cdf7da49d9404ee618e81f991504fc33ceddf
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOC' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f3ba2b82d09a071d864474c6ce943a88
1085329e0aa2ddf2a8b2c69e467258185fcd0513
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOD' 'sip-files00061.txt'
ceaf8bc269296c73a4c973a060f17aee
f27a98d3ffd307ff53bb4e0354fb6801ee551d69
describe
'10763' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOE' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
83be442d2d0b2d9541b49830368a8f49
a3e7b776403d310cc4ee193d7b9367414afe7806
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOF' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
943ea6b109bc9333d3b697fc51cbb9c3
56cc379b8346a2f1d3be94a3593db204daf2011b
describe
'275222' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOG' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
42a407c540117ab689e42163339112ef
37cf442e129ab05b624be721132f561735fc1f29
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOH' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a06a3bf3b41ab4ee60dd8f2e6673e01f
6f7bf247c9ce0363c1351af5a39d72b246a90626
describe
'67010' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOI' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a85081d5da784cef08f47c248a342973
e415e1de1af07013bfa5de3dc0239b7267da8c72
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOJ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b7c7e79a1fd4fbe14874a93f26838502
91d30d96c2e63043c608a5a4e0a253b1fb5e252b
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOK' 'sip-files00062.txt'
cf66a80b8fd7d78ac70b357dd7ba1c4e
93dccfd92e8492a4fff05eb560b04dd1d49544e1
describe
'14654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
4ab8780c10ea09e52a5e253d7b826fc0
8cba7a3319f7c67a05ea1d7766ee2ed1c0017f39
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
14b51b2a47957780917a0ca7fc8ecc0b
2b608b69858deebc097805942b067a54a2a4edb2
describe
'160535' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOON' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
821c8c3f0fdadeb6d98cf1f3e42f38b9
bb381afd1d864748a75d55294064e8730ec53ffe
describe
'35764' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOO' 'sip-files00063.pro'
c916e66ec61de40c45311676858739cd
28d183d42e1222531c528ed0f587d741c869602a
describe
'49857' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOP' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
3636aafb99dc758d9336648aee942d81
5b23f8bf155b0eeefeba51e90b2a2616f676b007
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
da465aaac88f0920283ecbc75a3b2ec7
a722dba4f201af3150090e98b0d203aa0cdf73c3
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOR' 'sip-files00063.txt'
46134dabd770208403dc1d43e6dc0247
5d5526a66c0265cc1883c0bef9f3ab346352fbe7
describe
'11823' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOS' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
da6f1497f7fc30e9f8db438cc5de3702
04959d82fad964310f66ebab4feefef49826977b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
c3471cdf3c883ac6f030164dd1be4b56
b8e67cc901dc7c5d08bf32465f712ccaa0ddff31
describe
'154109' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOU' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a625bb7c5496581d4d7b71bf23bebdfb
aa8b065b2c42476b073eeb8a190147d11ef04c6c
describe
'34848' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOV' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6ec05707f881229eca516710a0227d54
c5468ea9b92eec37281c95d823deba5b2365b1bf
describe
'46706' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOW' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
90508853b7efdfe56ef35358842566dc
bcfc5fd3749590bbc6e9db18051cc6e8abe440ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
06825227295277afea104b295fa24bdc
434d56c080b197a6c5c44c660fdc06e5c87088b7
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOY' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b47c646618e5d4ad5c4b2ef24f0062c5
e8547de9dfa7eb9e6327e2282684956c3d0e2add
describe
'11435' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOOZ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
a6a871e688401f0f3b32caf9b01c82b3
87835ad742956c9a92551a3fbed0cdddb8ca97f2
describe
'226013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPA' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0714172dd13feadeca7f904b59417252
4883d2bb719b7c462bf8f9efc1a8de6b59081bc1
describe
'102524' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPB' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
59d91279e2f045337ba0008018594484
2b0b477afb68e26d9df945337fd406d0d3a5523a
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPC' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d4149e6b9e7930ae6c53e8a63ca93d29
5d2fb59a31f7fd594bbdf40bcb68096bebfa5075
describe
'23960' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPD' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
c60f756a904110f1c88ed914c298e3ec
9eacc0b3a0edef2b3b1d7d1b6fa8cf6388dd3a08
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPE' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6ee54e784bef1f0414fa92db83fadc18
fefb9e14b7f242b77b6129838e20a42a9e61b21a
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPF' 'sip-files00065.txt'
4c9832e93fff62220abf6afd63622d03
4b2891e11478ac8b21a2920ad83821a9b6b0c74e
describe
'5698' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPG' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
62a83e769b2ac5aedff921b7c7761804
139d6560e094d5c50b8cef71d77aaca15975a5b1
describe
'226317' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPH' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c7af862ecc1b58acee2af66a92aa5fb5
726c2ec2683951f102666f41d5a83c703fb54080
describe
'159585' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPI' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ea5bdb0ac65661967323cf1d92729b43
881d09c519c4f00a159b64311bac5faf6a33d6dc
describe
'34418' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPJ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
9173dbc13b9d60a6d4eac47c7df55920
2e705620637c8ac213f489b355391c66a3df8b09
describe
'49310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPK' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8c007e096d3af3a0f180a18197cbe981
65aa5679ddd72af02bd03613b56f71257c8937ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPL' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2c630d7d15525de501477af4a5f7394e
cc7e7855017a019507c6acd9646f112e580bc229
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPM' 'sip-files00066.txt'
9b4edfacd05032322de112fbf7b21c15
a773e1803268587d64cd08abd471922e4fad8522
describe
'11954' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPN' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d43356c2c6d31ae5ae6d87c4d972bcb3
9adc31817cf3033d2d8b03db3c9eb51e27e043f0
describe
'226181' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPO' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
1f475e08838c00b3c609619629876987
54df9f37397b97b936ef95e12ee453a3998f4320
describe
'224514' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPP' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
0eecf5152e9b74223ab6ba2a5fd4989b
6b6ed8c986c6666e8e696800f3fe5c55cfcf132d
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPQ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6569f0d59d5985c063dedd28a6c57ea0
aba0e7e702dbd6189b05868dbdc25fa9ef855168
describe
'54846' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPR' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
4f83d7d6b0cf67d296bbcea166bfb9b3
90b9ffaeb06f0ce7b1109d5dee5dd632ad3e7391
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPS' 'sip-files00067.tif'
a5ada05db2317d93f82e30c5f64d690d
6ac5a7c27c5f6202bf101c3668bdce49c1469f5f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPT' 'sip-files00067.txt'
bea2def5ca7b9e631c2ca869afe14200
5537bfc9de4698b5180ee1618908d837c85154cc
describe
Invalid character
'12293' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPU' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
c5ae915a26de6f0987dadadab8e2bde3
b09f159831d20dbc16c5920b6f1a43dc0c96c77f
describe
'226223' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPV' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
802cea9e46a5698388ea90ba7d26c586
f8fee5e7db2b74fe0903eb1ae6a894f95829e064
describe
'158535' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPW' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
03ef720e2ab70e27ae9b346f479059d5
317b72d79c2654c3f024e08f204a968a993834e1
describe
'34965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPX' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9b880dad75e1f4a05f82f6c3c94f4c80
ef12864df0c4d0308e21a3a50f09f4c8daf2dedd
describe
'48912' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPY' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c5932f07b1969d33a7db9f7a420aac69
8e9ea0b44a75465684b815f98cf37461b242ca21
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOPZ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
1403a526471324f5b9aa78dc1ae9b479
81ae62b676d86952631afa222047a2635680c0e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQA' 'sip-files00068.txt'
2549d449622f3f783405af9bb8357194
64293b6704fc81d583d93eb3fa649850461dfe6c
describe
'11309' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQB' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
aa8ec8ba7f57164c6fa1203985cabb62
7549ccd5e441d9679de92ff9ca9b357797a39c09
'2011-12-22T12:49:12-05:00'
describe
'226042' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
92017739391ccbb0c4c957c9b8673526
c414c23a39e0474fbdfa058f92e4ff3bd8d61aa7
describe
'161893' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQD' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9ae4a090537a9f723fdd5d729527ba39
c1f7e463ce82b7a68345da453431d14b5bc935d1
describe
'26907' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
31b31b93fd91c83ad5e247b733662418
b85501c464a964177e936045a7016efeee2427a9
describe
'47482' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b2566872a99c4582de94eec4f39e894d
24db7f074189f5b771deeb58e25600991ea01d41
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
5707b769ad4f64d74bed19c6dcaf9753
a279e69917541e5bd51b587d2b0e74842d2c65ed
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQH' 'sip-files00069.txt'
65231578498bfaeeccfd31f9bbb18a78
4e7739da69773a99ba7bcc87caf5786725761396
describe
Invalid character
'11769' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQI' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
2db0930c6176a61626877b37394ea42e
8edabc83eefdc16d17bf708735b84de009e32c5b
describe
'226120' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
6149c706415d7fa6b0eda425e56076cd
1062a47e2736a482071f919cd36ebc3e03226198
describe
'158539' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
1c580a9d95c9aec2b8257da5f6a15927
7f3b4cf82378d25220226d016d7dfe852d071b0e
describe
'34424' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
82f4ba190697699c37bfc9bf588914a6
64360279d42e33ba3a0eb5bf45a8f0b70b4109f6
describe
'49158' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQM' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d1af8b1d123a74429b0f0cce79700d4d
b1eb1fc98ce06215b5112f3676332f5f206aab36
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
82bb03f0e85cdd327cafef7a3f133cb2
14bd358761c4471a09fe532a0b2cd81200496469
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQO' 'sip-files00070.txt'
914b4a225f1af079df43dd688d35088e
a67433be1485292b8204c6ff3d286d5488b13f70
describe
'11748' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQP' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
0ddf9330b68b27efae9b5d2a19837cb3
0a3dbb8129069c1c4a8260c4985ce8a578d4b385
describe
'226238' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQQ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b687e2c58d1029de8108ee84729e7fdf
109116630d78410cae058a035a6add681e6ca680
describe
'151034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQR' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
cb7fefae4248415ee852be3ce0561032
d9d3ba12da4c07e631932df59cef81541199a646
describe
'33004' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
5c45f8c157cde468e552ebbd44e14557
2a6d7182b4770d270216886f62efbcb86d08ca63
describe
'46736' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQT' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f127d0630a315fdc00429dbd0e7ba577
8e7f3373db979a35c2d06b592e8ebf24b10588bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQU' 'sip-files00071.tif'
270b95ec6c9d70a1f32f64df1d19539e
dbaaf6397b1f5987e1b127b755dfff24dd9a8ef0
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQV' 'sip-files00071.txt'
c285774ee8212f1c13984ab783bfaeb0
d06eef3d1dcc80c2f0bc22a0af2283fb42d37a4d
describe
'11422' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQW' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
70e6fa6a2ec992b15fdc27b6f0827a01
e15c4dec218a81e9490412bd0b1864deb423ed4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQX' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
4cfe9cb2e058f784996c0f6ef713a00e
49873ab9172bfec42e40c1976c5e7f293879a689
describe
'158800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQY' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
27ac996459fd474641b9503a3df3a852
32908c716dc380aa702a33334a03fce184166def
describe
'35087' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOQZ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b566bd524cabb6addf9f5cc9ad745965
d3f60368cd63654a07c1730e6d684a1833a68fe8
describe
'49446' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORA' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8d6e1f815d7da71e1783530dabeac911
32fc38d541052a07b64e5fe0d1df5dd9a6e6bdc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORB' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8f6a7832bc068c54ef615ef4bb9681e9
f5c33fb4542c1a3475517825ee87d3ba4d05ab1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORC' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9eb9ae234bd681238ccb119a06ffa9ad
e41a4e899b8586f2308eacb343aa22e140c9be33
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORD' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ae3394a36da6c5f1fd5b44b5f55b22e5
f2c431caa20afbbad8713861b32e6cb13f678763
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b87456d13da2369cd0a34cedd6706fa2
3c7793ed9998d9a762cc575745b1c457aa05886b
describe
'223999' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ab30e7d1924df97d8ad9ef792c3f28bb
57d45ef59376aa2bc1649bb05fe514c333dd77eb
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1252a5a569dd05079219cfa4d93bf347
d5fc9fc60f801522f6113cd9b336c8b95bc0fb91
describe
'54124' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
09e4aed0bfa39f2f22475481af33cf4a
38cbadf9fbb9caf6706d425293f2326348503454
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORI' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c7100194430ed6beb85847e0f6df4e11
7d7e98ab4466899d9871ba0fe1fda610c7338cc7
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORJ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a0e508d64ce086e3fd6598a87927bf79
57195ca973bcd4f92ef886c75101899eb4baa43a
describe
'12474' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6548c779010093e15cf1096f731dfaa2
3edb5818462e487cf6bdf63afd4ea5ba4bf4e203
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6edc16892da07cffdc97264583aa28ec
5cd85c0e963bbe028532480bed4d97b5d7004415
describe
'157784' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORM' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
720de5a09b0152e98a3c881a6a3157d8
c46a0f5426e5ba8bf32e4747f5131d2d4cef8eaf
describe
'34900' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
c99c44c0e59e5b9d6f04ec7ed6161555
2ce10ba2c77006c5e5a2987079c991c710535a30
describe
'49469' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
451a0f0ddbfa9dc631091b3da3866c59
cc518b18fdc3b72c67d5ff115efdf76fde3bc76b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b202bcc10dc44097cc891e177f9bb498
b679128a1d8780e98be1e5e2d8f6130c25d644d4
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
be9ef95ff2731a3b1f18156ba8d46a61
f2b24657e14afed67c6b70a6e7b9127b24a97653
describe
'11849' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORR' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
502bfa9564fb6057ef745b2182a19efd
c48cdb5c2d3bcd951f690c83e656832534867dce
describe
'226128' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORS' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b9304cb759fbd7741035695f27130c7a
ae88ae99f02dacd80c9d3b658d91a34322d6704d
describe
'161940' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORT' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
d8753475bf7b178d99f6f0e5e5e3b485
115b084e6211cfaa5f45c9e0350aff7f3db0502d
describe
'34485' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
30c1efa5ed5f4b24a54705f1ce0fd9a1
0265d50bf6b8c56dd9f8e640f8b4fab557eac4ed
describe
'49419' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORV' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
1afb50a29d05dd12e3c361344c8dfe6d
ec3872bff7e719d892ef4fbc7fc0cccca242ebff
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORW' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1436d28b28e3c6830195dd16c2f83332
0a4505e8f27ca9361366930bc06c7a28ca903fbe
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORX' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b0fce1d6779eeb4bcd703caededbf62f
2a8efa774173fff6c7581ff2559d6fcf323c4879
describe
'11786' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORY' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
6688528ae2751dd0395ed83b97a95e1c
456909f846e6ddd5909ed44ca6ab121c73eb5027
describe
'226072' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAORZ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
33c27085d76f8163f2fcceffb175baa0
066255a5135e50fa104144ad074b3ad0d9284312
describe
'142048' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSA' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c3af010b52ae0c2db7e29f494a5b7cbf
84d2c8245b034f78e19e8152186c50a643fe443a
describe
'30348' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSB' 'sip-files00076.pro'
342d1f22d24d4bdec9babb48241cab74
ab2803bdc97077d753efa7d864cd91c82a1e7a6a
describe
'43038' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSC' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
2d565abd5f21ec35b2da9c2e9ab093a1
7b4e086a42dc9593b18dcd76e42d282ccae46c21
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
1e71e44202377401647c00a556435eed
b6f764c638e210ce3d626950f0fc9db56c95130e
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSE' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e45afb66242656e5cbf2007796be1316
0a8aabba6f0bb33b32c0459506dca9868bae521d
describe
'10269' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSF' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
322d366b0006d3f70c2ffc4face6cfaf
3ac833e050f4f9aac7afced4fdbfe266baa5fe12
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
c00c57ebbd72fed7e49403adf1e7ed50
dd9f58d4683b6cd232b93404386d08452bef1f64
describe
'161779' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
3846a2abd187637d00a86902e303db4c
6b93dd28461ac995c9dbf6fa9a668da9d8c8028a
'2011-12-22T12:50:41-05:00'
describe
'25042' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSI' 'sip-files00077.pro'
bb17d201c261b510ac69d41d03ba0f81
044ee58140874b9dba7e2ad2881d74f652c15617
describe
'47980' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSJ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
0a9b5630f7288febd3d3864a9455d74a
519fad7469cf17a47c1b82d3b8544cbf85601e94
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7cfc3ea57d61efe078a12a271a4cf8cd
2d818530db01f8dd7ec678b55e9823a4497f24eb
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSL' 'sip-files00077.txt'
f1d7fbcce7bb1537a3efe34a151c1ae1
41f5abe1ee221501fcee9618a6e6f7c96782f17a
describe
'11934' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSM' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8c4908474bfed07913f93ed027e87821
65cb8645e501c9e509761217f10b502662e8aba1
describe
'226234' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSN' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6e807059f015ec756c22ac8c5aee362f
c35e04f21a44a70b7956e5d9cd3a6a9a7d122ece
describe
'161155' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSO' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b611520c34538f44d772ca174cc08b50
2898eddc071281eeb19fdfd706ffa95a6ab77953
describe
'35139' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSP' 'sip-files00078.pro'
8c9fa2fef5367e2dd15eb11fd0f48864
09fc98c93bba59155cb0724da2ad7718e297ff32
describe
'50036' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSQ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e03e16d4da451637c718eb63fb73d670
3fa20c9165bf27fb3c6a118acfc561ddeb39d5c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSR' 'sip-files00078.tif'
5557dfcbe9acf925e83457e5e642394c
ccf9c533693728e366747acf38d9351dac586495
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSS' 'sip-files00078.txt'
726277301475326c06fe6fa345bc1f3f
feb7b962d7fd288a8db3edb7774958aabcb3b762
describe
'11751' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOST' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
0085263f621c1d5d5a82c701f1ebcf66
14345192eae982c0585067bfe380124c1bd6f3c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSU' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
792b1ede592388ee1f9e6719f8d5c968
dac6ea8cc89e635e39987d7eb21e667cb31f28bc
describe
'155155' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSV' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
0b63c1c9a798c13197c18e9cfde35305
45e322d49a3054a4190f61f3fc40d04699ff1168
describe
'32927' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSW' 'sip-files00079.pro'
6758dca98d07d86958b7b1217a33a0b8
4ef13e07065916577c0f06b855727edcaa4b4c82
describe
'47200' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSX' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e226d7ee99a37275e48b35d4bd9fd18e
a31c7b5c1c685118ea3b05fee16226c8f6036470
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
563353ee832f94dbbea8a3d76ef7af7c
f289d727b15e27d2d9148ae28f1fd39c5a549400
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOSZ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
31cdb6d46ed5f57a2231ff8e359ad9a1
b7efb4423c04cd800e55e520d3745ba45b1c0838
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTA' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
773ff585c2cc515c3dd28acdae918961
ed3eb39f3b18b5379493f62fedea9965ad6c68e4
describe
'226245' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
456be4bf53dcc5b667215e97a68e5f3a
2d3dec0ef83166edb5f9401aaec3b43e31986e5d
describe
'152191' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTC' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
abd89e91b9a9534d6bec8a220cd59024
edae71390a4d4a5c55d63eca1b52c2775928443c
describe
'32917' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTD' 'sip-files00080.pro'
8f46b73799fc19c194982e5ad6be7317
e03b1bb466be95c1ae268f827b4b64ae603e939e
describe
'47671' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTE' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
2be3454dcabfd7e953b695dc7ba8aae0
f9c85215446bfbba3614f72c0d866eb3f7d3bf01
describe
'1826784' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTF' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4ba690276d2b62296d231af3658129a1
8ca01eef52a63d63916df7ea6ae9bbe078cea52f
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTG' 'sip-files00080.txt'
6a5144dc679f2658e192f026015c8a65
ce68301ad031c936ba955d0287b750ff764f9994
describe
'11428' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTH' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
90b7198db5ff8d3551fb6ae0923f6490
b915706dcf89b63a58c88cda1b7d45f1879ab616
describe
'226326' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOMfileF20081215_AAAOTI' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
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Invalid character
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Invalid character
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Invalid character
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Invalid character
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Invalid character
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T05:13:40-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
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http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
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TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
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describe
'2013-12-14T05:13:38-05:00'
xml resolution










.



WRN





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ah Mt Ne ie

Aue oaNi in ie



Windsor Castle from the Home Park.
PIPES SlONIES

OF

PAM@W Ss tiers

AT HOME AND ABROAD.

BY

MERCIL SUNSHINE.





WARD, LOCK AND CO.

LONDON: WARWICK HOUSE, SALISBURY SQUARE, E.C,
NEW YORK: BOND STREET,


T is only a very few people who do not care
about travelling and seeing new places, All

over the world there are so many objects of in-
terest, that it would take a whole lifstime to visit
every spot that has become famous, either from the
people who havelived, orevents that have happened
there. Ifeel sure that most of my young friends
would very much like to travel and see the world,
and I hope the wish may be gratified in time. But
you must remember that we cannot enjoy seeing
a celebrated place half so much if we know nothing
about it beforehand; and the reason why these
little stories are written is that young people may
iv PREFACE.

learn a few particulars about different objects of
historical interest before the time arrives for them
to travel and see the places with their own eyes.
And even if they are not fortunate enough to go
to all the different countries, I hope they will still
be glad to read about them, and make a sort of
picture in their own minds as to what they must

be like.


LITTLE STORIES

OF

FAMOUS PLACES.



WINDSOR CASTLE.

HE train bumps over the noisy turn-tables,

and we alight at Windsor on a fine October

day. A bright, clear autumn air, a few fleecy
clouds, and a warm sun tempering a chilly wind
from the north-east. No better day could be had
for the view from the Round Tower. The flag-staff
stands up bare to-day. The Queen is at Balmoral.
We did not come to see the Queen, so were not
disappointed. We came to see the fine old pile
standing so boldly upon the Berkshire hill, and
smiling, not frowning, down upon the Thames, do-
minating the streets of Windsor town, and peeping

_ into Eton over the water. As we climb up the steep
“hill to the Castle gate, we think of all the English
Sovereigns who have at times inhabited the Castle.
In going back to Edward the Confesser, we find
that he granted the site of the Castle to the Abbey
of St. Peter’s, Westminster, now known more
familiarly as Westminster Abbey, and it remained
2 OLD WINDSOR.

in possession of the good monks until William the
Conqueror managed to effect an exchange, for he
wanted to build a fortress on the hill of ‘* Winde-
sore,”—or “ Wyndleshora” in Saxon language.

In veryearly days the hill upon which the Castle—
the collected work of eight centuries—now stands,
was the site of a primitive fort, which was protected
by marshy ground and rude fortifications. But the

’ Romans do not appear to have made use of the
position as a defensive post. Traces of tombs have,
however, been discovered near, and it is possible
that some portion of Edward the Confessor’s build-
ings occupied ground now covered by the Castle;
his own palace, however, was at Old Windsor.

With the Normans, the actual existence of Wind-
sor Castle may be said to have commenced. The
great mound upon which the Round Tower stands
is decidedly a Norman work, and is pronounced to be
so by Her Majesty’s late librarian at Windsor; and
William the Conqueror having given the monks
of St. Peter some land in Essex in exchange for
the site, erected a fortification upon the hill. This
building was considerably enlarged by Henry the
First, who added the chapel in which he was sub-
sequently married.

It would be necessary to follow some of the
principal events in English history from Henry the
First to Edward the Third if we desired to write
Ou ee Wain i d i :

Mitt)
: .





a h q
e a uf cl i
NS 4



King Jobn and Magna Charta. °















i oll

Vie i ; i











a














ee MAGNA CHARTA.

a full account of Windsor Castle. It was there
that King John received the demands of the angry
Barons, and sent word from his stronghold that he
would meet them at Runnymede on a certain day.
From Windsor the great cavalcade wound out
through the Forest to the Thames, and there, on an
island, within sight of his proudly-waving standard
on the battlement, in the presence and at the de-
. mmand of his subjects, King John, the coward and
bully, had to sign the Great Charter,—the bulwark
of English liberty,—the grant of a Parliament. So
the Sovereign’s absolute power was ended.
Subsequently, during the reign of Henry the
Third, the old Castle had its battles and sieges to
relate, for it was taken and retaken by the barons
and the Royalists. The Prince (Edward) had taken
it and had gone to Windsor, whither the Queen
(Eleanor) attempted to follow by water, but was
urned back by the citizens, who saluted her as a
“witch.” In the following reigns the kings lived
requently at the Castle, but the pile, as we know
it, principally came into existence in the reign of
Edward the Third. Edward the Second had kept his
Christmas at Windsor Castle, and his son was born
in the Castle on Monday, 28rd November, 1312.
The following Thursday the young prince was
christened in his namesake’s (St. Edward’s) chapel.
You all remember this great King, who conquered
WILLIAM OF WYKEHAM. 5

so large a portion of France, and nearly hanged all
the Calais burghers. In his reign there was a
certain priest called William of Wykeham, whs was
also appointed “chief keeper and surveyor of the
castles of the King at Windsor, Leeds, Dover, and
Hadlee.” He founded Winchester College, and also





































































































































































































































































































































































































































St. George's Chapel, Windsor.

“New ” College at Oxford, and that is why students
and Winchester boys are called Wykehamists.

This personage was the architect of the extended
works of Windsor Castle. He built the Banqueting
Hall, the Winchester and Round towers, which
latter was erected to serve as a proper seat or

“
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































Windsor Castle,"time of Edward [II
THE GARTER. 7

place of reception for his new Order of the Garter,
just instituted at Windsor. This great tower had
only one storey, which was laid on timbers running
all round, and opening down to the ground in the
centre. On this stage, says the chronicler, the
Round Table of the Knights was placed. In this
hall the banquets took place, and the King built (or
rebuilt) the chapel in the lower ward, and called it
St. George’s Chapel, as St. George was England’s,
and the Order’s, patron saint. He also built his
palace in the Upper Ward, and relinquished
Ilenry’s palace to the knights. This portion of
the Castle was occupied by successive Sovereigns
until the time of George the Fourth, and are the
rooms now known as the State Apartments.

But in the days of Edward the Third the sight-
seekers did not come all the way to Windsor to
stare at furniture and pictures. In those great days
of tilting all the people crowded to the Castle lists to
see the foreign and British knights engage in mimic
warfare, and sometimes in encounters to the death
—or @ outrance. In the former case the spears were
tipped-with flat pieces of wood, and so were com-
paratively harmless; but when d ouérance was pro-
claimed, the points were bare and sharp, and death
or disablement was the result.

It will not be uninteresting to speak somewhat in
detail respecting the origin and institution of the ce-
8 TIE GARTER.

lebrated Order of the Garter, which is as indissolubly
connected with Windsor Castle as Herne’s Oak is
with the Park. We do not appear to have any mention
of the Garter till after Edward’s great victory at
Créci in 1846; and in the “ Wardrobe Accounts,”
which may be inspected, due permission being ob-
tained, we shall find an entry as follows :—

“ For making a bed of blue taffcta for the King, powdered
with garters containing the motto—

Mont soit qui mal p penge;”’
and—

‘For making twelve blue garters embroidered with gold
and silk, each having the motto—‘Honi soit qui mal y
pense;’ and for making other things for the King’s habi-
tude at Eltham.”

So, according to “Observations of the Order of
the Garter,” the King merely seized upon the
episode of the dropping of the lady’s garter at the
Windsor revels, to name his newly-organized
Order of Knighthood, and that the motto (which
by the way is generally translated falxely as ‘“ Evil
be to him who evil thinks,” is in fact “Shame to
him who thinks evil of it,” the French “y” being
usually ignored) was already upon the Garter-
badge of the Knights, and the opportune incident
gave the name of the Garrsr to the Order which
had already been instituted.
“ HONT SOIT QUI MAL Y¥ PENSE %

There is no sufficient reason for endeavouring to
explain away the incident, though who the lady
was is uncertain. The heroine has been variously
named, and the story is as old as the Seventh Henry
at least.

William of Wykeham built the Castle up, and was
created the Surveyor of the Works, but this post
he resigned in 1858, and it was in that ycar
that the great tournament was held in honour of
the captive French King and his nobles. The
great feast of St. George was also held in that
year on the 23rd April. There was really a
splendid tournament, for knights came from all
parts of the country to it, and not only from all
parts of Great Britain, but from France and other
countries; which you will think curious when
you remember that the English and French were
enemies then, and the French King was act-
ually a prisoner at Windsor. But Edward was
a very brave and chivalrous monarch. He granted
“ permits” to all foreign knights and gentlemen
desirous to try their skill at the tournament, and
a great and noble company assembled at’ Windsor.
The King and Queen of Scotland came, and the
armour worn on that occasion by the Kings of
France and Scotland is still to be seen.

This tournament must have been a grand sight.
The fine dresses of the ladies in the balconies, the
King Kdward and his Queen at Windsor.





&


THE ORDER OF THE GARTER, 11

elittering armour of the knights, the clash of steel,
the braying of trumpets, and the cheers of the
spectators who crowded to view the pageant, must
have made up a scene not often equalled in those
days, and impossible now, except upon the stage.
It was after such a scene as this that the dance
took place at which the lady dropped her garter,
and gave the title to the members of the Order, as
already explained.

But the name of the Order once fixed, there
was more to-do. A chapel was built, and called
St. George’s Chapel, for, as you may remember,
St. George is the patron saint of the Order of the
Garter. There was then a list of “poor knights”
made out—knights who would be assisted by the
more wealthy, and to whom residence was given.
The “ Poor Knights” are now meritorious officers
who deserve recognition, and the chapel of St.
George is the Royal Chapel, where the Prince
was lately married, and where you. can hear
the service chanted, and see the swaying banners
of the Knights of the Garter who are prayed for
specially.

Tt is a grand thing to think of, this old order of
chivalry. Six hundred years has it been handed
down to us, and the ribbon of the Garter, after all
this time, is as highly valued as it was on the first
institution of the Order. It is this clinging to and

B
12 QUEEN PHILIPPA.

remembrance of our old English institutions that
makes Englishmen so proud. When we think of
those times,— the good old times,” as we say—we
feel a thrill of pleasure as we recall the deeds
of derring do, and the manly chivalry of that period.
We forget that many nobles and ladies could not
read or write; that society, so to speak, was dis-
turbed; and that battle and murder stalked hand in
hand with glory and pleasure. We forget the dis-

“advantages of existence, and the oppression that
existed, in the memories of glorious deeds of arms
that were done by Englishmen then, and which I
believe Englishmen are ready to do again, if called
upon, even now.

On the 17th August, 1369, Queen Philippa died
at Windsor. An old chronicler describes her death
in a most touching manner. She felt herself dying
and sent for the King, her husband. The narrative
says i—

‘““ When he was before her she put out of bed
her right hand and took the King by the right
hand and said, ‘ Sir, we have, in peace and joy and
great prosperity, used all our time together. Sir, I
pray you now grant me three desires.’ The King,
right. sorrowfully weeping, said, ‘ Madam, desire
what you will, I grant it!’ ‘Sir, said she, ‘I
require you first to pay all I owe te all such people
THE QUEEN'S s.AST WURDS. 13

as I have dealt with this side of the sea or beyond.
‘Secondly, all such ordinances or promises as I have
made to the Churches, that it may please you to
fulfil or to accomplish the same. Thirdly, that it
may please you to take none other sepulture, when-
soever it shall please God to call you out of this
transitory life, but beside me at Westminster.’
The King, all weeping, said, ‘Madam, I grant all
your desire.’ Then the good lady and Queen com-
mended her husband to God, and anon yielded up
her spirit, which I believe some of the holy angels
received with great joy up to heaven; for in all
her life she did neither in thought nor deed things
whereby to lose her soul, as far as any creature
could know.”

The quaint old chronicler is very touching in his
phrase with all his quaintness. We can imagine
the scene, and no comment is needed upon that
last parting of the royal husband and wife.

One very interesting and romantic episode con-
nected with the Castle was the captivity of the
young Prince James (afterwards James I. of
Scotland), who had been captured while on his way
to France, whither he was being carried to be edu-
cated. He was lodged in the Tower of London at
first, but when “lenry V. came to the throne he had
pity on the young man. Young himself, he did
not like the Scotch King (for he was a king then)
14 A CAPTIVE PRINCE.

to languish in the old gloomy Tower, particularly
as he had never done any harm; so Henry called |
him to Windsor Castle, and though the Prince was
still a State prisoner he had nicer lodgings and '
_plenty of money, and could move about more
freely. He accompanied Henry to France and
fought valiantly there.

When he returned to his turret-room at Windsor,
. you may imagine he was very melancholy. He
wrote plenty of verses, som very pretty verses too,
up in that tower near the gateway of the Castle.
But one morning he looked out and saw a beautiful
young lady walking along the lawn. IIe at first
thought her a fairy, perhaps. Ile wrote about
her—

“ O sweet, are ye a worldly creature,
Or heavenly thing in likeness of nature?”

The lady was beautifully dressed, and decked with
rubies and pearls. This lovely vision was the niece
of the last king—the Lady Jane, as she was called
—and of royal blood. James fell deeply in love
with this beautiful lady, and I am happy to tell you
that she reciprocated his affection. When he was
released from his imprisonment in 1424, he was
married to the Lady Jane, who became Queen of
Scotland, where for twelve years hor husband reigned
an upright and patriotic prince,














































































































































































































































































































Bu. Ceurge’s Chapel, Windsor
16 a ae ROYAL LOVERS.

Alas! uprightness and devotion do not save even
kings. One night in February a crowd of rebel
Scotch broke into the palace. Aided by traitors
who had removed the heavy bars, they rushed up to
the King’s room, where he was seated over the fire
with his wife and attendants. One of the ladies-
in-waiting— Catherine Douglas—attempted to fasten
the door; the bolt had been taken away, but

_nothing daunted, she pushed her hand and arm
through the staple and tried to hold the door.
But her strength was soon overcome. The King,
unarmed, could make no resistance, and poor
James I. was killed before his wife’s eyes. The
“ beautiful vision” he had seen at Windsor, and
with whom he had lived—to use his own sweet
words—‘ in perfeet joy that never may remove,”
passed away before his dying gaze.

We should take up too much space were we to
go separately through all the incidents recorded
as relating to Windsor; but there is one event
we must chronicle before we pass on, and that
is the birth of Heury the Sixth of England, who
was born at the Castle and known as Henry
of Windsor. He was a quiet and inoffensive child,
as unlike his valiant, warlike fatheras possible. In
those days a king was obliged to rule for himself. He
had advisers and friends, but he had to show himself
to the people even as a child; for we read that young
HENRY OF WINDSOR. M7

Henry was carried up to London when quite a baby
to open Parliament. The Queen had, of course, to
- drive up with him, and the baby having got as far
as Staines on Saturday night, would not go on on
Sunday. He cried and screamed tremendously,
and the attendants were obliged to carry him back
to the inn again. So the party remained at Staines
all that Sunday, as the baby would not go on; and
who could withstand the King? Next day, how-
ever, he was more amiable, and accordingly the
horses were harnessed, and the child was carried
as far as Kingston-on-Thames, and then on Tues-
day to Kensington, then a small village, and so to
London, where the Baby-King opened Parliament.
There was one very curious Act of Parliament
made about this time, which concerned Henry of
Windsor very much. This was neither more nor
less than an Act to empower the King’s guardian—
the Earl of Warwick—to whip His Majesty, “from
time to time according to his discretion,” as other
boys of that period were chastised. Had Henry
the Prince lived later he might have had the
luxury of a “whipping lad,” who would have had
the honour of being beaten when his Sovereign did
wrong. We hope any prince felt it as much as he
“was supposed to do, but if he were a good-hearted
prince he would be careful not to get punished, by
deputy especially.





















































































































































































































































































' ETON COLLEGE. 19

Henry the Sixth spent much of his boyhood at
Windsor, and while he was studying for his tutors,
the idea of building a school came into his head.
Where should he erect this school? As he looked
from the Castle windows his eyes rested upon the
quaint little village opposite across the water,
which was and is called Eton. There shall the
school be, thought the young King; and so it was
carried out. But how was it carried out? You
must not think that the King sent for masons and
carpenters and said, ‘ Build me a school yonder.”
No. The first thing to do—and it could not be
done in a hurry—was to get possession of the
church and the priests, for they were, so to speak,
the “corner stone” of the whole foundation.
Everything as regarded education in those days
was set on foot or carried through by the priests ;
and so Henry applied to the grave and solemn
ecclesiastics, who undertook to teach a certain
number of children “the rudiments and rules of
yrammar” at the King’s expense. You will per-
ceive how the whole school was dependent, so
_ to speak, upon God’s Church, as it was to His
glory and for the keeping up of His worship,
“without fail,” that Eton Chapel and its clergy
were appointed. Then the poor and indigent
scholars were instructed, and there was also a
home for a certain number of poor men. Seventy
20 - = “§7TIS BONI PUERI”

poor pupils and one master to teach them, “ es-
pecially in the art of grammar,” gratuitously,
and in the “knowledge of letters.” This was the
foundation from which our great publie school of
one thousand boys and a number of masters has
sprung. And it is recorded that in after years,
whenever the King encountered any of his “ boys”
at Windsor, he would “give them money to win
their goodwill” (they would call this by a very
short name now), and tell them in Latin to be
good and serve God,—“ Sitis boni pueri—mites et
decibiles—et servi Domini.”

May we not now say the same as quiét, un-
assuming King Henry the Sixth.

Henry the Seventh did not pass much of his
time at Windsor, but bluff King Hal, his successor,
had many a grand hunting party in the Park, and
kept up the entertainments upon a right royal
scale. He came down to Windsor very soon after
he became king, and erected the present gateway
to the Castle, as you may guess from the name.
He was fond of all manly sports, such as hunting,
hawking, and shoot’ng. The young Earl of Surrey
was imprisoned Ly Henry the Highth in Windsor
Castle, and there is a very romantic tale of his love
for the fai. Geraldine.

But there is one improvement that Henry the
Seventh began, and which Wolsey finished in the








































ai A
TIN
AS aN

TN

The Round Tower, Windsor.




22 CIARLES THE FIRST,

next reign, and that is the present Albert Memorial
Chapel. Wolsey hoped to lie here, but it was
deerced by a higher power than a cardinal’s or a
kino’s, that the ambitious Churchman should not be
laid in Windsor Castle. Cardinal Wolsey died, as
your history will tell you, at Leicester.

We may pass over Mary’s reign, and come to
notice Elizabeth, but only very briefly, for space is
limited, and we must not occupy too much. “ Good
@ueen Bess” was fond of Windsor, and passed
much time there, in reading and studying, as well as
in hunting in the Forest,—an amusement in which
she delighted. We are indebted to her for the
terrace which overlooks the valley of the Thames,
and for the gallery which bears her name.

James succeeded to the crown, and his heir,
Charles, was frequently at Windsor with his friends
and-favourites. But after he became a king how
changed it all must have seemed. Here he was
lodged before his trial, and after Oliver Cromwell
had taken away the Royal Arms from the gates,
the poor weak King rode into Windsor surrounded
by soldiers, but even then received with cheers by
the people, who cried “ God bless Your Majesty!”
This was about Christmas time, anc a very sad
Christmas it was for the King. He was afterwards
carried to London, tried, and beheaded on the 30th
January, 1649. At Windsor the poor headless
THE KINGS BURIAL, 23

body was buried, by four faithful knights, in St.
George’s Chapel, now so different and so dis-
mantled. No service was permitted. The grim
Puritan who was in command refused this last
solemnity, though Bishop Juxon was there, true to
the last, to perform the Burial Service. The snow
fell fast upon the pall as all that was mortal of the
late King was carried into the dismal chapel, there
to remain till the last trump shall sound, and the
grave give up its dead. It was a sad and mournful
ending as the faithful four lowered their King into
the hastily made vault, and London’s Bishop stood
by, weeping; the stern commander also waiting to
see his orders were obeyed. And then the door was
locked and all was over; the King was dead, and ©
the Protector ruled the land.

Charles the Second came, and Windsor was once
more bright and cheerful. There have been many
grand doings since then, and were we to chronicle
all the events, we should have to write a small
history of the English Court. This is, of course,
impossible. Windsor has seen many bright days
and many mournful episodes since then. Some of
her happiest days, and the most miserable period of
Queen Victoria’s life, have been passed at Windsor.
There she saw her children round her, there she
witnessed her noble husband’s last moments, and
there again, quite recently, she was honoured two
24 NEW WINDSOR.

Royal weddings with her presence. Victoria’s
standard is floating from the Round Tower as we
write, and we cannot do better than conclude with
a sincere wish that it may long be seen there.
‘God save our gracious Queen.”




















GIBRALTAR.

ITS PAST.

IBRALTAR, or “Gib,” as it is more fre-
quently termed, is invested with more varied
interest than most of the British possessions. Its
military history alone would fill many goodly
volumes, its classic associations and legendary lore
embrace a period from the earliest historic times to
the present age. It is the key of the Mediter-
ranean, and the natural features of its surroundings,
as of the old Rock itself, are peculiarly interesting
to all English people. The whole coast teems with
old and glorious associations. Not far distant, Capes
St. Vincent and famed Trafalgar rise out of the
blue waters, the never-dying monuments of Jervis’
and Nelson’s glorious victories, while far inland
loom the Moorish hills with their wondrous record
of the old conquerors of “Gib.” It is now our
business td go back over the waste of ages, and en-
deavour to tell our young friends something of the
Pillar of Hereules, the ‘Rock of Taric ” the Moor.
Gibraltar—named from Gibel, rock; and Tarie, the
26 ' OLD GIBRALTAR,

Moor, just mentioned—has in its time been held by
Pheenicians, Carthaginians, Romans, Goths, Vandals,
Moors, and Spaniards, before the British took it.
So we have a tolerably long list of owners to refer
to. The Moors, who came across from Barbary in
or about A.D. 711, were the first people who really
valued Gibraltar as.a fortress, and built upon it with
the object of defending it.

Taric, however, made good use of his time, and
‘his successors, taking example from him, managed
to retain the Rock in the hands of the dusky Moors
for six hundred years, when the Spaniards laid
siege to it in 1309. This was the forerunner of a
series of sieges in which the inhabitants suffered
very considerably. In the celebrated siege—the
fourteenth—in 1779, the ‘‘Straits” of Gibraltar
were by no means confined to the Mediterranean.
But we are anticipating.

The Spaniards retained possession of Gibraltar
for only twenty-two years, but they had had a
severe fight to obtain it. The first siege in 1309
was led by Guzman, and the grand rock was sur-
rounded and attacked on all sides at once. The
brave Moors fought bravely from crag to crag, but
were at last reduced toa mere handful. The eleven
hundred “barbarians” then capitulated on condi-
tions of being sent. in safety across the “ silver
streak” to Africa. So the Spaniards came into
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































The Signal Station.

ee






28 THE MOORE.

possession, but, as stated, did not long retain it.
A second siege in 1815 failed, but in 1333 the for-
tress was again invested by the Moors, and this
time they were successful. The leader on this
oceasion was Mahommed the Fourth, the son of Ben
Feraz, the late king, who had been stabbed by a
young prince Ismail. Between 1833 and 1462
no less than seven times did Gibraltar submit to
siege; but the Spanish power was not sufficient
‘to conquer the Moors till the latter year, when the
Duke of Medina-Sidonia, the head of the Guzman
family, succeeded in taking it.

The Moorish power now declined, and Gibraltar
remained in undisturbed possession of the King of
Spain, and afterwards in the hands of the Guzman
family, until the great Isabella came to the throne,
and she enjoined her successors to keep Gibraltar
in possession of the crown of Spain for ever. But
after various fortune, the Rock was captured by
the English during the War of Succession, in
1704.

This war, we may remind our young readers,
was brought on by the disputed claims to the
Spanish throne after the death of Charles the
Second. That monarch left his crown to Philip
of Anjou, but the German Archduke, Charles, also’
preferred a claim. England and Holland proposed
that the Archduke should succeed, and they ac-
THE CAPTURE OF GIBRALTAR. 29

cordingly declared war against the French and
Spanish adherents. It was resolved to attack
Gibraltar, and the allied fleets at’ once invested the
fortress with about sixty vessels. The garrison
was very feeble, comprising at that time a force of
three hundred men or less. Gibraltar was captured
in the name and ostensibly for Charles the Third
of Spain, but Sir George Rooke, the English com-
mander, saw the matter in a very different light.
He and his allies, the Germans and Dutch, were
now in possession, and the Archducal banner was
floating over the celebrated Rock. This was not
quite in accordance with British ideas, however,
and the English commander boldly hauled down
the German flag, and raised the Royal Standard
of England in its place, and so took absolute
possession of Gibraltar. Might was right in those
days. So the English came into possession, and
this was confirmed by the Treaty of Utrecht.

Since that time the famous fortress nas been
besieged three times, but of all the fourteen attacks
to which “Gib” has been subjected, none have
ever approached in vigour and severity the great
siege of 1779. At that time General Eliott was
Commander or Governor of Gibraltar, and the
determination of the besiegers lasted for three
years. This is one of the most memorable defences
in history, and well worthy of description in detail,
80 THE GREAT SIEGE.

but unfortunately our space will not admit of such
lengthened record.

On the 21st June, 1779, all communication with
Spain was cut off, and the Spanish fleet blockaded
the port. They had endeavoured to surprise the
English garrison, but a Swedish vessel gave the
alarm, and General Eliott was able to make a few
preparations. He had about five thousand men
and a very small supply of provisions. As may be
imagined, famine soon appeared upon the Rock.
The stores diminished rapidly. A loaf was luxury.
Meat turned Lad, biscuits became little more than
residences for “weevils” or maggots. A bunch
of cabbage-leaves cost sixpence, thistles and weeds
were eagerly gathered and eaten, biscuit crumbs
were sold at one shilling a pound, milk and water
at fifteen pence a pint, and when a convoy arrived
with bread, the joy was unbounded, as may be
imagined. Even the bombardment was disregarded
in a measure, though a shot or shell has a very
unpleasant way of forcing itself into notice.

The Spaniards began the bombardment in
January, and a camp was formed at San Roque so
as to starve out the garrison, when the besieged
retaliated and opened fire—a lady discharging the
first cannon; and after a while Admiral Rodney
made a raid upon the Spanish ships. He threw
reinforcements into the garrison, took away all the
THE CONDITION OF GIBRALTAR. 31

wounded and helpless, and gave the besieged a
supply of provisions. This was a welcome relief,
for the troops had been fearfully reduced, and a
few ounces of rice a day was all the Governor
allowed himself.

But though Admiral Rodney had managed to
assist, he could do no more. The Spaniards again
blockaded the Rock. Scurvy broke out amid the
besieged, the Bey of Morocco declined to harbour
British ships on the opposite coasts, and the enemy
crept up. Still from time to time some little assist-
ance was sent, and the British managed to hold
out. The bombardment was tremendous. Scarcely
a house was left standing; shot and shell tore
through the town, and to add to the misery, some
of the troops mutinied and began to plunder.
These were quickly shot, and peace reigned within
the walls; but the terrible cannonade from one
hundred and fourteen guns and fifty mortars still
rained death and destruction upoe the place from
outside.

The advanced lines of the Spanish troops were
now pushed nearer, and they began to count upon
success. But they reckoned without the British
host. One November night, a desperate sally wus
made from the Rock, the English troops poured out
and succeeded in blowing up a large magazine, and
in destroying several batteries, and part of the
tf
EEE

eS
aes

e ow

MAT



The Strange Ships.
THE “STRAITS OF GIBRALTAR.” 33

foremost approaches. This great success. embold-
ened the defenders as much as it depressed the
besiegers, particularly as the loss to the English
was trifling.

For some days after this, the Spaniards ceased
firing into Gibraltar, but they had by no means
abandoned the siege. For nearly eight months the
bombardment had continued, and still the handful
of men (comparatively speaking) who occupied
“Gib,” were as far as ever from surrender. But
the greatest trial of all was to come. A large force
was prepared. Vessels deemed to be invulnerable to
shot were built and were covered by shell-proof
sloping roofs. The Rock was actually surrounded
by a girdle of fire. In the Straits, the mortar ships,
the Spanish and French fleets, about fifty vessels,
opened a destructive cannonade. From the land
about two hundred guns were brought to bear

upon the fortress, and from the 8th till the 12th of
. September all these engines of war were concen-
trated upon Gibraltar.

At length Governor Eliott thought of using hot
shot against the ships. He had poured shot and
shell upon them with no visible effect, but now the
redhot iron was tried, and successfully. After
hours of fire, the hoped-for result was obtained ;
one by one the great Noah’s Ark-roofed ships
caught. fire, and all were eventually destroyed. The.
34 COURTEOUS FOES.

cowardly crews quitted their wounded and dying
companions, as the flames gained ground, the
cries were dreadful, and even moved the pity of
their British enemies, who, led by Colonel Curtis,
actually saved numbers of the poor Spaniards from
a horrible death, the English courting almost certain
destruction in their humane and noble efforts.

But this partial success did not help them much.
No succour arrived. The English nation apparently
did not trouble about such a place as Gibraltar,
which was so gallantly defended. The great effort
we have mentioned was made on the 138th
September, 1782, when the Rock had been quite
three years invested. But its trials were not even
then over. During the winter months the Span-
iards poured in a cruel fire upon the town, now
reduced to a heap of ruins. The most terrible
scenes took place, the suffering was awful, but still
the English would not surrender, and January
came, but brought with it no relief.

At last on the 2nd February an unusual stir
was visible in the Spanish camp. The commander
had something to communicate. This was no less
important news than that peace had been arranged
and the siege was over. It had been carried on
with great gallantry on both sides, and not with-
out some acts of courtesy between the besiegers and
the besieged. For instance, the Spanish commander
END OF THE SIEGE. 35

had presented, under a flag of truce, a consignment
of ice, fruit, and vegetables, to his gallant foe, Eliott,
and some game was subsequently added. The
letters which were exchanged between the brave
foes are extremely interesting, and very compli-
mentary, but too long for insertion in this article.

So ended the siege of Gibraltar. Since that
period (1783) the fortified hill has been undisturbed,
and remains, more formidable than ever, in out
hands. —

We shall take another opportunity to describe
Cibraltar-as it is at the present day; for we now
must bring our retrospect to a conclusion.


































































































































GIBRALTAR.

ITS PRESENT.

Ee the last chapter we gave a brief account
of the numerous sieges of Gibraltar,—The
Rock of Taric, The Pillar of Hercules,—and now
we may look at it for a moment, as it stands,
rising to its rugged height of fifteen hundred feet
above the blue waters of the Mediterranean.
Leaving Tarifa behind us, we come upon the
grand old Rock, and we can discern upon the
Spanish voast the historical capes St. Vincent and
Trafalgar. Opposite lie Tangier and Ceuta, the twin
Pillar of Hercules. The contrast between the shores
of the Mediterranean is very great. The Spanish
shore, green and smiling; the Moorish coast, bleak
and barren, dreary and apparently forsaken. Gibral-
tar is a fortress in every sense of the term. It is full
of galleries bristling with cannon. Round the base
of the Rock, which is surmounted by a flag-staff, is
a line of batteries. The Alameda, which is a
public park, separates these galleries from the
THE ROCK. 87

town. In the Alameda are cool grots, and lawns,
and gardens, where the bands play, and where the
troops parade. Geraniums, olives, orange and
lemon trees, and vine-clad terraces invite the
stranger to saunter and gaze upon the beautiful
scene around him, |

First let us glance at the Rock. Its length is
about two miles, its width about one-half its length.
On two sides it is precipitous, the fall being more
than nine hundred feet in, at least, one place. But
towards Africa and the ocean the slopes are less
inclined, and one can on these faces ascend to the
summit, or summits; for there are three,—the
Watch Tower, the Signal Station in the middle, and
the North Pinnacle. The South Point is also called
O’Hara’s Folly, for the following reason :—

Once upon a time, a governor of that name said
he could signal to Cadiz from thence, and built a
tower for that purpose. The tower would have
been useful could Cadiz have been seen from it;
but as it could not, in consequence of the hills
intervening, Governor O’Hara was disappointed.
This Watch Tower was afterwards struck by light-
ning and ruined.

Gibraltar, both by nature and art, is wonderfully
suited for defence. Let us try to enter this great
rock through an iron gate which we reach by
passing the parade and pleasure-gardens just men-






























































































































































































































































































































































Gibraltar,
THE BATTERIES. 39

tioned, and enter a long series of tunnels and
galleries hewn out of the rock. High above the
bright rippling Mediterranean, these long galleries
ascend, tier by tier, in spirals and zigzags. Up, up,
up we go, till our limbs ache, and by the time we
wonder whether we are at the top we find we have
only reached St. George’s Hall, a great rock-
hewn chamber. All round, seaward, great open-
mouthed and loud-voiced cannon look out from
embrasures across the sea. Peep out and you will
feel quite giddy, for the sea is far beneath, and at
every corner, and above and below, as you go round
this chamber and look out, you can see the grim
mouth of a great gun pointed. Look up, if you
can, and you will still see cannon bristling from
their rocky dens, ready to fire at any foe that comes
into the Straits. It is an unique and curious sight.
But by this time we have gained breath for our
final ascent, and up we go again until we find our-
selves standing by the Signal Station,—the topmost
summit of the great Rock,—the centre of the mass.
From hence, we can look round in all directions
and obtain a beautiful view of the Mediter-
ranean sea and the lofty Moorish mountains.
Soldiers, cannon and cannon-balls are everywhere,
and you will wonder how long it takes to carry so
many shot up such a great distance,

At the back of the Rock is a space of land
40 THE NEUTRAL GROUND.

called the Neutral Ground, which divides Gibraltar
from Spain. The regulations of getting in and
out of Gibraltar are strict. After gun-fire, you
must remain out, if beyond the lines; and even
within the garrison, unless you are aware of the
counter-sign, you will be carried off to the guard-
house.

There are soldiers everywhere, and when once
you enter Gibraltar you feel as if under martial
law. The variety of inhabitants, too, makes a very
interesting study; and it is amusing to watch the
English soldiers in uniform of almost all descrip-
tions,— Artillery, Engineers, Line Regiments, High-
landers, or other corps, all mingled with bronzed
and swarthy Moors, wearing turbans and loose
robes and slippers; Jews and Spaniards, very
likely smugglers, Genoese and Spanish women in
scarlet cloaks, and the latter wearing black lace
veils and mantillas. British sailors from the port
and Moors from Barbary jostle each other in the
narrow, rocky streets, and on the steps leading to
other streets.

The fortress is always provisioned for some
months, so that in the event of war the inhabitants
should not be reduced to the straits they formerly
were. Now our fleet could relieve the Rock in
a few weeks, so no blockade would be of any use.
Our occupation is, no doubt, a very thorn in the side
THE KEY OF THE STRAITS, 4l

' of the Spaniards; but Gibraltar is the key of the
Mediterranean, and did we relinquish it we should
find ourselves locked out some day. As it is, we
possess a most formidable fortress as strong as it is
interesting.






























JOPPA.

FROM JOPPA TO ARIMATHEA.

HE name of the ancient city which we have

chosen to be the subject of this paper must

be familiar to all children, and we will proceed to

describe it as well as we can with the assistance

of the Bible, for it will be chiefly with reference

to the incidents recorded in Holy Writ that our
narrative will have to do.

Joppa, or Japho, now known to the traveller as
Jaffa, signifies “the beautiful,” and in former days
it deserved its title. Jaffa, to use its more modern
name, is one of the oldest cities in the world.
It is by some writers supposed to have been origi-
nally built by Japhet, the son of Noah. There are
many mythical as well as real events associated
with the city, one of the former of which, viz.,
‘ the deliverance of Andromeda from the Monster,
is known to most boys.

We learn from the Bible that Joppa was in the
inheritance of the tribe of Dan (Joshua xix. 46). In
the days of Solomon it became the port of Jerusalem,
AN ANCIENT CITY, 43

from which city it is distant about thity-five miles.
You will rememker that Hiram, King of Tyre, sent
down tke timber from Lebanon to Joppa in rafts,
and it was floated thus to Joppa, whence it was
carried to Jerusalem. King Solomon wrote to
Hiram requesting him to send his subjects with
his own to cut down the timber from Mount
Letanon, and Hiram replied that he would do
so, and make floats of them to sail to whatever
port King Solomon desired. Joppa was decided
upon. Five hundred years later, Zerublabel, who
had pleased King Darius by his superior wisdem
in answering problems, obtained the faycur to re-
build the Temple in Jerusalem. fo the work was
begun, and we read that “the Sidonians were also
very ready and willing to bring the cedar-trees
from Likanus, to bind them together, and to make
a united float of them, and to bring them to the
port of Joppa, for that was what Cyrus had com-
manded at first, and what was now done at the
command of Darius.”

But one of the most remarkable incidents that
took place im connection with ancient Joppa is
that relating to the prophet Jonah. We may say
something of this remarkable man before proceeding
with our notice of Joppa, with which place he is
indissolubly connected. Jonah is traditionally sup-
posed to be identical with the son of the widow

D

2
44 JOPPA.

raised by Elijab, and with the young man who
hurried at the command of Elisha to anoint Jehu.
But this must be mere conjecture. We know that
he was of the town of Gath-hephur, in Galilec, and
the other reliable information respecting him will
be found in the book bearing his name. He lived
about the time of Jeroboam II., 3B.c. 825-789.
To compare him with contemporaries, we should
find that the Spartan Lycurgus was one, and
Homer must have been quite an old man when
Jonah wasa child. The King of Nineveh was either
Pul or Adrammelech, and to him and his people
Jonah was sent.

We read that Jonah was bidden by God to go to
Nineveh, the splendid capital of the Assyrian Em-
pire. This was a most magnificent city, nearly sixty
miles in circumference, and containing about two
millions of inhabitants. Jonah was sent by God to
reprove them for their wickedness, but the prophet
was afraid, and hastened to Joppa, where he found
a ship sailing for Tarshish (but according to
Josephus, Tarsus in Cilicia). Tarshish was in the
south of Spain, but there must have been another
Tarshish, because we read that ships came from
such a place bringing “gold, silver, ivory, apes,
and peacocks” (1 Kings x. 22), so, as we know pea-
cocks are only to be had in India and its islands,
there must have been another Tarshish. (2 Chron.

te,
JONAH AT JOPPA, 45

ix, 21, etc.) However, Jonah set sail from Joppa,
and the result of his journey we all know. The
“¢ oreat fish ” was prepared for him, and after three
days he rose again, so to speak (a type of our
Saviour), was cast ashore by the fish at a spot
now marked by a building which some say is
Jonah’s tomb.

This wonderful miracle, to which our Saviour
afterwards referred, cannot be explained by any
human intellect. Jonah went on his mission. The
men of Nineveh repented at his preaching. Not
one hundred years later Nahum foretold their de-
struction, which was surely fulfilled, and not a trace
was left of the proud city. Now let us return to
Joppa.

Joppa was besieged by Herod. He marched
through Galilee to raise the seige of Masada, where
his relatives were immured. But we learn that
Joppa was in his way. Itbecame necessary to take
it first, for it would have been absurd to leave such
a place-behind him. So he laid siege to Joppa and
took it, and then marched on to Masada. The
Romans also took Joppa when Cestius was in com-
mand, Great slaughter ensued; as many as eight
thousand four hundred were killed, and the city
was plundered and burnt. Vespasian, Omar, Sala-
din, Richard Coeur de Lion, and the First Napo-
leon, all have since laid siege to Joppa. We need
46 ei SE PLiLe Aa? soPPA,

not, however, go into details of these various con-
quests. Let us return to some of the biblical
scenes connected with it.-

One of the most interesting events connected
with Joppa is the visit of Peter. Ie was, as you
will remember, at Lydda, which is still existent as
Ludd, close to Joppa, which is encircled by the
plain of Sharon (or Saron). At Joppa in St.
Peter’s days was a certain: disciple named Tabitha,
or Doreas, as the Greek term is,—a woman remark-
able for good works, and bore a name even now
honoured in connection with societies for well
doing. Peter was sent for, and immediately came
to Joppa, and by the power of Jesus raised the
dead woman to life again. The immediate result
was the conversion of many in the city, and Peter
determined to remain to strengthen their faith.
But. he did not stay in the house of the well-
to-do woman he had raised from the dead. In his
humility he went and abode in the house of a
tanner, one Simon, who dwelt by the seaside, and
whose house is still pomted out to the traveller at
Jatfa.

While Peter was at Joppa, praying one day upon
the housetop (which is a very usual place in the
East for people to sit or sleep or pray, and is
protected by a parapet from impertinent gazers at
a lower level), the messengers from Cornelius found












































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a

ine
us





Joppa from the Sea,
48 THE CRUSADES.

him, and Peter returned with them, as related in
the Acts of the Apostles.

Since the Christian era Joppa has suffered much,
as we have said, and during the Crusades it played
an important part in history. But within the last
fifty years it has heen greatly improved, and is still
improving. A German colony has settled there, and
is employed in cultivating the wondrous growth of
orange and lemon trees. A railroad is projected
thence to Jerusalem. The town of Jaffa, where
most visitors to the Holy Land disembark, is built on
the slope of a hill, rising in the form of an amphi-
theatre, and from the sea it has a very excellent
effect. But although fair to look upon, it is full ofall
uncleanness within. The streets are narrow, crooked,
andreeking with filth. Its-surroundings are beautiful,
and the groves of fragrant fruit trees make the air
sweet with perfume. Joppa has been almost con-
tinually before the world. Even putting aside the
tradition that Noah built the ark there, we have
. the town on record since the time of Joshua, and
continually playing a prominent part in history
since the days of Jonah the prophet. Its commerce
is inereasing, and its prosperity is likely to increase
still farther.

From Jaffa to Jerusalem is nearly forty miles, and
as we shall shortly visit that city, we will go along
the route as far as Ramleh at once, for the infor-
THE LOAD TO JERUSALEZL, 49

mation of our young readers. The Holy City is
twelve hours from Jaffa, and the journey occupies
two days. The first stage is as far as Ramleh, the
ancient Arimathea, the dwelling-place of Joseph
the Councillor, about four hours or fourteen miles
distant from Jaffa. The country of the Philis-
tines is not far off, on our right hand. Gaza,
Azotus, Ekron, and other well-known places, re-
mind us of Samson and the stirring events of Old
Testament history. The road is good, and it is
a pleasant ride through the fields of grain and
through meadows where flocks and herds graze,
attended by white-turbaned Arabs clad in camels’-
hair garments. At Ramleh is an hotel, besides the
Russian and Latin convents, which will entertain
travellers. Here a night’s rest is desirable, for the
next day’s ride to Jerusalem is a matter of eight
hours in the saddle, and partly over rough ground.
We hope to resume our journey in a subsequent

paper.








JERUSALEM.

I.—THE CITY AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

_ ( \UB last paper left our caravan on the way to
the Holy City from Joppa. We had reached
Ramleh, the ancient Arimathea, whence it is a long
day’s journey to Jerusalem. An early start is most
desirable. Luncheon ‘may be had at a place known
as Bab-el-Waud—‘“the gateway of the plain.”
From that place to Jerusalem is the hardest part
of the journey, for the hills of Judea have to be
ascended, and the road winds in and about the
mountain sides. In some places the deep ravines
are protected by parapets, and occasionally a higher
point than usual will reveal a glimpse of the blue
Mediterranean to the northward. Pursuing our
course into the valley we cross a brook, which is,
traditionally, the scene_of David’s defeat of Goliath.
The true brook, however, is in the Valley of Elah,
fourteen miles south-west of Jerusalem, where are
pebbles in abundance in the bed of the torrent.
Climbing up the hills, the road winds in and
out, and at last the traveller reaches an eminence

©
VIEW OF JERUSALEM, 51

from which the Holy City is visible, about two miles
distant.

From this elevation, called the Heights of Em-
maus, on the 29th May, 1099, Godfrey de Bouillon
and his army came in view of Jerusalem. “ Jeru-
salem!” shouted all the knights as they uncovered
their heads. The horsemen leaped from their
saddles. Some prostrated themselves upon the
ground and kissed it. Others walled barefoot, as
if the command to Moses had sounded in their ears
—* Put off thy shoes, for the place whereon thou
standest is holy.”

We have now reached Jerusalem—the goal, the
aim of so many conquerors and so many armies
since it became a city. From our earliest childhood
Jerusalem has been to us a reality. It is no place
to be found on a map and forgotten. Jerusalem
meets us at every turn. In our history lesson, in
our Bible class, in our Sunday Schools, in church,
or at home, Jerusalem, the Holy City, is presented
to our minds, “Has it never occurred to any of us
to look back upon the great and stirring events
which are associated with it—events which have no
parallel in any other occurrences, in the magnitude
of their results, and in the terrors of their fulfil-
ment of prophecy ?

Jerusalem, once “the favoured home of God on
earth,” in what state do we findit? How fallen




f ae |
NM lti
AAT
| a



























































































































































































































Godfrey de Bouillon at the Holy Sepulchre.
THE FOUNDATION OF PEACH. 53

from its high estate! Now in the power of the
infidel, Christians are merely tolerated in the city
where their great Master preached and taught and
suffered; Jerusalem wears, indeed, a departed glory;
but the radiance of the after-glow of her day can
never fade from those city walls; yet, ‘“ Behold,
your house is left unto you desolate.”

Jerusalem means “‘ The foundation of Peace.” Jt
is not built on a level; it crowns and occupies the
slopes of the hills. We read of the hills about
Jerusalem, the mountain city, and “so standeth the
Lord about His people.” The impression so given
is not intended to represent to the reader’s mind a
city set in a hollow on a hill, and surrounded by
loftier mountains, for thisisnotso. If we compare
Jerusalem with its surroundings, the city is not
elevated. Itis built upon hills certainly, but the
deep valleys or “ wadys” which surround it make
these elevations look higher than they actually are.
The city is divided into quarters, each of which is
built upon a hill, aswe may say. ‘he four hills are
—Mount Moriah, on the south-east; Mount Zion, on
the sout-west ; and Akra and Bezetha on the oppo-
site points, north-west and north-east respectively.

Before we give a history of Jerusalem, we will
dwell a little upon its surroundings, because we
wish our young readers to realize the places and the
position of the city before we describe it. On the
54 SURROUNDINGS OF THE CITY.

eastern side, between the Mount of Olives and the
city, runs the famous “ Valley of Jehoshaphat,” the
“Iidron” of the Bible, which was crossed by King
David in his flight, and by our Lord when going to
the Garden of Gethsemane. The Valley of Jeho-
shaphat is only mentioned by Joel as the place
where the final judgement will take place. Out of
this ravine or “ wady” the Mount of Olives rises up,
and.over it are three roads to Bethany. In the
valley is Absalom’s tomb, or pillar, and other tombs.
One slope is a Turkish, the other a Jewish burying-
ground, and here the dead face each other, waiting
for the final sammons to judgment, of which they
believe the valley will be the scene. The “ Brook
Kidron” does not necessarily imply that there was
water in the ravine. We hear of Elijah hiding him-
self in the Brook Cherith. This means, he con-
cealed himself in the water-course or “ wady,” not
in the water, for the stream must have bzen then
nearly dry.

Along the opposite, the western side of Jerusalem,
is the Valley of Gihon, which is, on the south, termed
Hinnom, or Gehenna. On the south slope is a
large opening called “The Potters’ Field,” where,
according to tradition, Judas Iscariot is buried.
The valley dividing the city between the south of
Moriah and Mount Zion, called the Cheesemongers’
Valley by Josephus, is now known as the Tyropzon.











































































































































































































































































































































































= mma
a i i
ears MO



































View of Modern Jerusalem
56 THE CITY GATES

This valley unites with the Valley of Jehoshaphat,
and just at the corner of the promontory is the
Pool of Siloam. Hereabouts was “The King’s
. Garden” of Solomon, and the fountain of Job still
exists. To the north and north-west of Jerusalem
the ground slopes gently, and. there is abundant
evidence that the city extended far beyond its pre-
sent limit. Much of ancient Jerusalem is under-
ground, and the explorations of the Palestine Fund
Explorers are bringing much that is interesting to
light. We have not space to enumerate these dis-
coveries, but we may mention that in digging down
by the wall some of the blocks at the base were
found marked in Phoenician characters, and are
those laid by the workmen employed by Solomon.
In thevall of the Temple they found a long and
beautifully-finished passage, with a small channe]
cut in the pavement in which the blood of the
animals sacrificed was carried to the Brook “Ki-
dron” from the altar. Many other most interesting
discoveries have been made, and will be found
recorded in “Underground Jerusalem.”

There are five gates to the city. The Damascus
Gate on the north, the Jaffa Gate on the west,
St. Stephen’s Gate on the east, and the Zion and
Dung Gates on the south. It is outside the Jaffa
Gate, through which most of the traffic flows, that
- lepers sit. Their place of residence is just inside

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‘une Golden Gates
58 MOUNT OLIVET

the Zion Gate. St. Stephen’s Gate, by the Pool of
Bethesda, opens into the Valley of Jehoshaphat,
near the Mosque of Omar. The Golden Gate is
built up, but were it. open, it would admit into the
enclosure of the Mosque of Omar, which occupies
the Temple site. The Citadel of David is close to
the Jaffa Gate. The Tower of Hippicus, built by
Herod, is here also. Not far off is the Pool of
Hezekiah. Between Moriah and Zion is the Jews’
Wailing Place—a wall of massive stone. Against
these stones the Jews press their foreheads in the
intervals of reading the Scriptures.

Jerusalem is intersected by a principal street
called Damascus-Street, running north and south
from the Damascus to the Zion Gates. Nearly all
the other streets run at right angles out of this main
road. One of these is the celebrated Via Dolorosa, in
which is the Roman archway, termed ‘ Eece Homo.”
Along this street our Saviour must have passed. The
streets are narrow and dirty, and paved very roughly.

We have already mentioned Mount Olivet to
the eastward, and besides this celebrated hill there
are the Hill of Corruption, and the Hill of Evil
Counsel, where the chief priests took counsel to put
Jesus to death. The mountains of Moab are visible
in the distance. We have now given our readers
some idea of the situation and surroundings of the
city. We shall now attempt to set forth its history.




























II.—THE HISTORY OF THE HOLY CITY FROM ITS
FOUNDATION TO THE DEATH OF OUR SAVIOUR.

Ce first mention of Jerusalem is made during
the life of Abraham. We read in Gen. xiv.
18, that Melchizedek, King of Salem, brought forth
bread and wine to Abram. Some copies of Josephus
call the city Hierosolyma, or Jerusalem, so there
need be no doubt of the antiquity of Salem; but
Jerusalem appears first in the Bible in Joshua x. 1,
when the ruler of Israel encountered Adonizedek,
King of Jerusalem.* The history of this city,
the holy abode of the Prince of Peace, has ever
since its foundation been the cause of continual
fighting. Even in the remote days of Joshua it
was a “bone of contention.” The children of Israel
could not wrest the upper city from the strangers,
—the Jebusites,—and in their hands it remained
for a space of five hundred years. Saul made

* Some say Salem was the lower city, and Jebus the
upper ; and the combination of these names gave the name

Jerusalem to the entire town.
E
60 THE CITY OF DAVID.

no attempt to take Jerusalem, and it was not till
David came to the throne, and became king over
Israel, that it was rescued from the strangers.

We read that David laid siege to Zion,—now for

the first time mentioned,— and with an army of two
hundred thousand men marched to the attack. But
the Jebusites mocked the king, and put their cripples
and blind people on the walls, to intimate to David
that the city could not be taken. The king in bis
_anger promised the chief command in his army to
the man who first stormed the citadel. This feat
was performed by his nephew Joab, and Jebus was
taken. David now called the place by his own
name, “The City of David,” and established it as
his capital.

This was in 1046 3.c, David now began to build
his palace, and to Jerusalem was brought the Ark
of the Covenant. The king, we know, was very
anxious to build a temple for its reception, but the
prophet warned him that this honour God intended
for his son Solomon, in whose reign the city reached
its greatest height of splendour, the inheritance of
the vast riches and fruits of the conquests of David.
With these immense riches, and possessing territory
extending from Egypt to Assyria, with a reputation
for wisdom and wealth so great that the mighty
Queen of Sheba was incited by curiosity to see a

“man whose wealth was so fabulous, and the reality
PHHE TEMPLE. 61

of which far exceeded the unparalleled report. of
its extent, Solomon began to beautily and adorn
Jerusalem. .

The greatest act of his reign was the erection of
the temple upon Mount Moriah, the foundations
of which remain to this day. We need not describe
this magnificent edifice, brilliant with gold, anl
_ cedar, and hewn stone. Solomon built a palace on
Mount Zion, another for Pharaoh’s daughter. An
immensé bridge (traces of which still remain, and
have lately been brought to light) spanned the
valley between Zion and Moriah. The city walls
were extended and fortified. Wells and spring:
were conducted by underground conduits; cisterns
(still remaining) were made and known as Solomon's
Pools. Some of these hidden supplies are being
unearthed, and they must have been very useful
during a siege. The “King’s Gardens” in the
valley were laid out in a splendid manner, recalling
the beauties of Paradise; and in Jerusalem “ silver
was as stones,” and cedars as the sycamore in the
valley for abundance.

But after the death of. Solomon, Jerusalem, as
the capital of the two remaining tribes after the
disunion, did not long survive in splendour.
Rehoboam, who sinned grievously, provoked the
Lord to auger, and in consequence the King of
Egypt, Shishak, invaded the Jand, and with but
63 HEZERIAH'S FAITH.

very little resistanse pushed on to Jerusalem, whence
he carried away an immense quantity of treasure.
Subsequently the Philistines and the Arabians plun
dered Jerusalem. Joash, King of the Ten Tribes,
took it. Ahaz disgraced the city and the temple
by his idolatry. In his son Hezekiah’s reign the
King of Assyria came up against Jerusalem, and
was apparently bought off by a heavy ransom; but
in his treachery, though he himself departed, Sen-
nacherib left his generals, Rabshakeh, Tartan, and
Rabsaris, to continue the siege of Jerusalem.

Then all the grand qualities of Hezekiah’s cha-
racter came out. Having heard the defiance of
Rabshakeh, the king went and humbled. himself
before God, and sent to Isaiah the prophet for
counsel and assistance. But he nevertheless did
not relax his vigilance. The city was fortified, the
water-courses were diverted, and every human pre-
caution was taken. Hezekiah’s faith and patience
were amply justified and rewarded. The destroying
angel of pestilence went forth, and in the Assyrian
camp there perished, in one night, one hundred
and eighty-five thousand men. This terrible and
awful visitation so affrighted Rabshakeh, that he
withdrew the remnant of his immense army, and
Jerusalem was saved.

We have not space to follow the fortunes of the
Tloly City step by step. We must pass on to the
year 588 B.c., when Nebuchadnezzar came up












The Jews carried into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar.
64 THE CAPTIVITY.

against Jerusalem. In his second expedition he laid
siege to the city for eighteen months. The prophet
Jeremiah, then in prison, exhorted the people to
open the gates, else they would all surely peri.h
by famine and sword, but the siege went on, until

at-last Jerusalem fell. Nebuzaradan was sent to
pillage the temple, and he did so. The vessels of
gold were carried away, the laver, the tables, and
the candlesticks, the palace was burnt, and the city
was overthrown. All the people were taken pri-
soners, the King Zedekiah was blinded, and he and
his people were carried by Nebuchadnezzar to
Babylon, where Zedekiah died, and was buried with
great pomp. ‘‘ The people,” says Josephus, “ were
planted in the country of Babylon, but the high-
priest was freed from his bonds.”

After a captivity of seventy years, as foretold,
Cyrus, the Persian, gave the Jews leave to return
and build their temple in Jerusalem, and the people
came out cf captivity to the number of forty-two
thousa:d four hundred and sixty-two. Until the
time of Ezra and Nehemiah, Jerusalem, as a city,
made little progress, but then the wal!s were rebuilt,
and the Holy City was re-established. Subsequently
Alexander the Great marched against Jerusalem,
and his approach was so dreaded that all the
priests went out to meet him, acsompanied by the
people in white garments, “to a place called Spaha,” °
THE PILLAGE OF JERUSALEM. 65

and meaniug a prospect, probably the hill we have
already noticed, from whence a view of the city
and the temple could be obtained. Alexander
was so struck by the grandeur and humility of the
procession, that he adored the name of God written
upon the mitre of the high-priest, and subsequently
offered sacrifice in the temple, and granted privi-
leges to the Jews. After Alexander’s empire had
been divided, Ptolemy, son of Lagus, took Jerusalem
on the Sabbath, when the Jews would not fight
even in self-defence. Multitudes were carried into
Egypt. Antiochus Epiphanes took and retook
Jerusalem also, plundering and polluting the tem-
ple, and inflicting terrible cruelties on the people.
Simon, the high-priest, delivered the Jews from
their enemies, and threw down the citadel Baris in
Jerusalem (which had been a standing-point of
vantage over the temple), and slew the garrison.
In the year 63 B.c., Ptolemy also on the Sabbath
Day took Jerusalem, though he spared the treasures
of the temple, which were not of much use, for
Crassus came, on his way against the Parthians, and
carried off all the money—two thousand talents—
and all the gold in the temple, which was of immense
value.

But Cesar permitted the re-erection of the walls
of Jerusalem (8.0. 48), and Herod the Great, son of
Antipater, beautified the city. He rebuilt the temple
66 THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED.

on a most magnificent scale. This work occupied
forty-six years, and Jerusalem was then the capital
of Herod’s kingdom. This was the temple which
existed in the time of our Saviour, and of which He
foretold the utter and terrible destruction. Jesus,
gazing upon the splendour of the city in which the
magnificent temple was the most prominent object,
wept over it,—wept over one of the wonders of
the then known world, and sorrowed for its approach-
ing downfall.

“For the days shall come upon thee, that thine
enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and com-
pass thee round, and keep thee in on every side,
and shall lay thee even with the ground, and
thy children within thee; and they shall not
leave in thee one stone upon another, because thou
knewest not the time of thy visitation” (Luke
xix. 43, 44).

This prophecy was literally fulfilled within forty
years. ive days after it was uttered, Jesus
suffered the terrible death upon the cross for us.
But His words remained to ring in the ears of His
disciples and of the unbelieving Jews when the
Roman army advanced upon Jerusalem. The his-
tory of this memorable siege will furnish the matter
for our concluding article,


































TfI.—ITS SIEGE BY THE ROMANS,

LTHOUGH our Saviour visited Jerusalem
only at intervals, and never for any great
length of time, the city is identified-with His life
and ministry more than any other place. Here He
proclaimed Himself the Son of God. Here arose
the antagonism which cost Him His life. In Jerusa-
lem He was betrayed, condemned, and crucified.
He was Jaid in a new tomb in Jerusalem. Here
He rose again, and ascended into heaven from the
Mount of Olives, and yet scarcely a spot can be
exactly ascertained. We can conjecture and indi-
cate certain places, but the exact localities in which
some of the most important events of Scripture
history occurred, cannot be identified.

The destruction of Jerusalem, foretold by the
Saviour, received curious confirmation some years
afterwards. The city was enjoying a period of
extraordinary peace and prosperity at the time of
the Feast of Tabernacles. At that feast the city -
was filled with a great multitude, and one day the
68 WOE TO JERUSALEM.

crowd in the temple courts was astonished and
alarmed at the appearance of a wild-looking man,
who standing prominently amongst the worshippers

cried out in startling tones, “A voice from the
east, a voice from the west, a voice from the four
winds; a voice against Jerusalem and the holy
house; a voice against the bridegrooms and the
brices; and a voice against this whole people.”
This was his cry. Day and night he roamed about,
-and with this terrible warning endeavoured to pre-
pare the people. The leaders of the populace were
very angry, and brought the man to the Roman
procurator, who had the poor wretch scourged in
a most inhuman manner, but still his only answer
was, ‘* Woe, woe to Jerusalem.” He was dismissed
as a madman, but day by day for years, unheeding
the punishments inflicted, and the ill-treatment he
usually received, he continued to cry, “ Woe, woe
to Jerusalem.” Nor was this the only warning
that the inhabitants of that devoted city received.
Josephus—to whom we are indebted for particulars
of the siege and -capture of Jerusalem, of which he
was a witness—tells us that a star like a sword
stood over the city, and a comet continued for a-
year. On one occasion a great light shone round
the altar and the holy house.. The great gate opened
of its own accord. Forms of chariots and soldiers
were perceived in the sky at sunset encircling the
INVASION OF THE ROMANS. "69

city. A cry was heard in the temple, “Let us
remove hence,” and other forebodings were not
wanting. Jerusalem was doomed.

The Word of the Lord had gone forth, a
nothing could save the city. The Jews hurried
themselves to destruction. Driven ‘to madness by
the slaughter of their countrymen, the Jewish
people rallied, and attacking the Romans under
Cestius, defeated them with immense slaughter,
and thus put themselves in opposition to the power
of Rome, and the world she ruled. Then destruc-
tion advanced against the nation with rapid strides.
The legions of Rome, led by Vespasian and Titus,
swept down upon Judea. Gadara and Jatopaty
were captured after long sieges, in which Jewish
valour was conspicuous. In the latter encounter
Josephus, the historian, distinguished himself. Joppa
and Tiberius fell. Tarichee also surrendered.
Gamala held out for a long time, but gave in at
last, and soon all Galilee was taken. Then in the
spring of the year of our Lord 70, at the time of
the Feast of the Passover, Titus drew up his army
before Jerusalem, and cnmaiied on the Mount of
Olives.

The condition of the city was most distressing.
Torn by factions and crowded with strangers, no
harmony was possible. Every man’s hand was
ugainst his neighbour, Provisions were wasted or
70 THE SIEGE IS BEGUN.

destroyed, and thus, at the beginning of the siege
the people were actually hastening their own de
struction.

The misery endured by the people even before
the siege began was very great. John of Giscala,
Simon, and Eleazar, were each fighting against the
other. ‘Titus soon appeared, and rode out from
his army to view the city. He had a very narrow
escape from capture on this occasion. Towers werc
‘erected by the Romans afterwards, and on thc
fifteenth day of the siege a suburb was captured,
and one wall of the three was taken. Then the
same scenes were renewed—desperate sallies and
great slaughter for days, until the second wall was
carried. Titus, wishing to be merciful, entered the
breach with only a thousand men, hoping that he
could induce the Jews to surrender. But they
would not hear of it. They resisted foot by foot,
and the Romans had to retire. Titus then attacked
the enemy, demolished the wall, and took possession
of a portion of the city. The third wall now re-
mained, and inside this were the Temple, the Tower
of Antonia, and the Upper City. The siege had
now lasted many months, during which horrors
were multiplied. The Jews sallied out and burned
the Roman engines of war, and undermined their
approaches.

Famine now began to add to the terrors of the
PROGRESS OF THE SIEGE. it
siege, and the unfortunate Jews crept out of the
city to pick up any refuse they could find to eat.
Numbers were taken and crucified in front of the
walls, where they died in horrible torture under
the burning sun. The punishment the people had
awarded to the Saviour now fell upon their children
with a terrible weight. To prevent escape, Titus
dug a deep trench round the city, and the prophecy
was now literally fulfilled. We need not, and can-
not dwell upon the fearful misery that ensued—
the terrible slaughter and the dreadful deaths from
famine. We only mention them to point the
moral that those who reject Jesus and His Word
will surely suffer, as predicted. From street to
street the Romans carried the sword. Titus would
have preserved the temple, but a soldier threw a
burning torch into one of the windows, and the
magnificent edifice was soon in a blaze. The
‘slaughter did not cease, however; the infatuated
Jews would not surrender, and thousands were
slain. The number of those who died in this fear-
ful siege mist have been nearly a million. The
treasures of the temple wero carried away, the
people were sold for slaves, and on the Arch of
Titus are still to be seen the representations of his
triumph.

After a while Jerusalem began to rise from its
‘shes, and the Jews returned; but breaking out in

A


















































































































































































































































































































































































































View of Modein Jerusalem.
THE DOOM OF THE CITY. 738

revolt once again, they were subdued, and at last”
the Emperor Adrian built a heathen city on the
site, and excluded the Jews entirely. When the
empire became Christian Jerusalem resumed its
ancient name, and churches were erected within
the walls. Julian, the Apostate, endeavoured to
etect the temple, but fire repeatedly destroyed the
work, and it was abandoned. Jerusalem then
remained unmolested. Chosroes II. took it at last
in ap. 614, and after that time it sustained
many sieges till the Crusaders stormed it, -and
Godfrey de Bouillon was elected king in 1099.
It was captured by Saladin in 1187, by Selim I.
in 1517. His son erected the present walls.
Mehemet Ali took it for the Egyptians in 1832,
but in 1840 it was restored to the Turks, who still
hold it.

Our Saviour said that ‘Jerusalem shall be trod-
den down of the Gentiles till the times of the
Gentiles be fulfilled.” That Jerusalem shall rise
again many people believe, and, looking at the
marvellous changes that are taking place, that “all
Israel will yet be saved.” That some great pur-
pose is still preserving the Jews we cannot doubt.
The nation is being surely converted to Chris-
tianity. They have no country of their own; they
are a most powerful race, and they are returning
to Palestine rapidly. We cannot pretend, nor
74 THE FULURE OF JERUSALEM.

would it be right to pretend, to forecast the future.
The times of the Gentiles is not yet fulfilled, but
we may believe that when that time shall have come,
Jerusalem will be once more Jewish, and shall be
exalted in the earth. :

The Jerusalem of the present day is far from an
inviting place. Narrow and dirty streets, and the
presence of robbers, render it and the neighbour-
hood objectionable. But we can never dissociate
it from the grand triumphs of the Gospel, and it
' will always remain The Holy City.

The foregoing narrative is necessarily much con-
densed, but we think we have said enough on the
subject to indicate to even the more casual student
of Holy Writ that the prophecy regarding the City
has been literally fulfilled. Our young readers may,
as they grow older; see even more startling changes,
for the fulfilment of the time will come, and
Jerusalem must sooner. or later lift up her head.
That time is hidden from us; but so surely as the
destruction fell upon the City so surely will “the
times of the Gentiles be fulfilled.”

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