Citation
Tony Drum

Material Information

Title:
Tony Drum a cockney boy
Creator:
Pugh, Edwin, 1874-1930
Henry Holt and Company ( Publisher )
Mershon Company Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Company
Manufacturer:
Mershon Company Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 225, [6] p., [10] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
City and town life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Youth -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- New Jersey -- Rahway
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements precede and follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Edwin Pugh ; with ten illustrations by William Nicholson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026926874 ( ALEPH )
ALH6811 ( NOTIS )
04512165 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library





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TONY DRUM

A COCKNEY BOY







By EDWIN PUGH
king Circumstance

r2mo, $1.25.

CONTENTS.—The Story of Hannah Wray—Eurus, an
Episode—The Undoing of Matty White—The
Rie CC nae ab Cone a eey Martyrdom_of
the Mouse—The Liar—The Man of Silence—The
Poor Idealist—Bettles, a Cockney Ishmael—The
Little Lady, an Inconsequence — A Singer of
Dreams— The Anterior Time —The Inevitable
Thing — Consolation —Crazy Madge—The First
Stone—Blind Peter.

“A volume of short stories, each of which has its
own strong, peculiar vein of interest and reality. . .
Each story is in itself strikingly complete. . . The
writer of these short stories displays decided talent.”
—Boston Transcript.

“In his lighter vein, as in his moods of indignation
and rebellion, Mr. Pugh is a realist of the best stamp.
. . . He sees—and can show forth the pathos and the
tenderness that abide in things as they are.”—7he
Academy (London).

“They have right feeling, some knowledge of the
eS and touch life at many points.”—T7he
utlook.

“Mr. Edwin Pugh ... is a shrewd observer, and
the dramatic value of a situation is never lost upon
him.”— The Citizen.

““Edwin Pugh is one of the younger English writers
of fiction .. . many readers are likely to make a par-
ticularly agreeable acquaintance with him in ‘King
Circumstance.’ ’—Philadelphia Press.

“His stories... are often witty and of original
construction. His title is a very good one, and gives
the key to the tone of the book—which is not far
so Me Thomas Hardy’s philosophy.”—Aartjord

ourant.

HENRY HOLT & CO. - - NEW YORK





TONY DRUM

A COCKNEY BOY

BY

EDWIN PUGH

With ten illustrations

BY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON

“A child ts known by hts dotngs”



NEW YORK

HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY
1898





This book ts not for sale outside of the United States and Canada.

COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY
HENRY HOLT & CO.

THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE
I. His Fatuer, . 2 : : . a : : I

II. His PRENATAL EXPERIENCES, . : : 5 9
III. He Asks anp ANSWERS QUESTIONS, . é ei gpe29)
IV. He Rises To Occasions, . ‘ : 5 ‘ 44
V. He Makes A FRIEND, . i c : i Be O)
VI. He Faces THE INEVITABLE, . c : ; 63
VII. He Gors on A Jaunt, . ei 2 5 : - 80
VIII. He Enterrains 4 DEMon, a : 2 98
IX. His Fyanxy, . : 3 ; : ; : 5 Sealy
X. He Prays ar Kiss-In-THE-RING, ‘ : : 130

XI. He Catcues GLIMpsEs OF THE FEMININE Heart, 150

XII. He Runs AwAy FROM THE INEVITABLE, - 164
XIII. He Strikes an ATTITUDE, : 5 A . 188
XIV. He Surrers Loss, . : A : . . . 194

XV. : He Writes Letters, 5 : : 5 : 212
XVI. He Fats AsLeep, . y , : - 223











LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Tony’s FATHER, 2 : : : : 3 Frontispiece
Tony’s MotTHER, : 3 A : § x . 10
Tony Drum, . : , i 3 : 4 i 29
Mrs. Drum Leaves ‘‘ THE JoLLy ANGLERs,” ‘ - 56
Tue Drums Go on A JAUNT, : 3 : ; ; 82
Mrs. Drum Witt Take “A Mite oF WARM Guy,” EST
Tony’s GRANDFATHER, . ‘i 5 j A : ‘ IIo
Tony’s Fyanky, : a 2 i : ‘ : . 128
Honor Drum anp Her SwEETHEART, 4 i i 150

MicHArt Drum Fitts His Pirg, i 5 : : - 225

vii











TONY DRUM.



CHAPTER I.

HIS FATHER.

Tony DRuM was born in Garden Row, a street
on the left bank of the river Thames. Garden
Row is a narrow, crooked by-way, with pavements
less than a yard wide and many iron posts marking
the steep curbs. The houses in Garden Row are
old and big and have beetling roofs; the windows
are small and deep-set, but the doors are wide and
heavy. At one corner of the street is an inn called
“The Jolly Anglers,” where many strange charac-
ters of the waterside—bargees, lightermen, wharf-
ingers, and others—foregather nightly. There
are a few. fusty shops modestly hiding their wares
behind dirty windows, and an evil-smelling mews.

The people who live in Garden Row are mostly



2 TONY DRUM.

connected, more or less closely, with river business.
They work, live, and die, hard.

Tony’s parents were poor. His mother had
been a domestic servant. His father was a musi-
cian and philosopher. But philosophy having no
marketable value, Michael Drum was forced to use
his talent of music. He blew a flute in the gusty
streets for a meager livelihood. The flute is a thin,
shrewish instrument, without body or soul, but he
played it better than most men. Had he set his
mind to the task, he might have found means to
earn a less precarious subsistence than is to be got
in the gutters and outside tavern doors; but, being
a philosopher, he lacked ambition. There were
many ways of improving his condition; he shunned
them because they were unalluring to his vagabond
temperament.

“A man can die but once in the ordinary
course,” he was wont to remark. “ But he is dead
all his life if he works too hard.”

He was none of your showy rascals. He was a
man, middle-aged, commonplace, of spare figure

and faltering gait. Exposure to wind and rain and



HIS FATHER. 3

sun had mottled his long, thin face; his cheeks
bulged a little from continued distention; his lips
were shapeless and puckered into a grotesque prim-
ness; his eyes were bulging and watery. He had
lank hands with big blue knuckles, and a hairy,
sinewy neck. In his youth he may have been
picturesque enough. He was a Penrith man.
During his romantic years he had tended sheep on
the hill slopes for an inexorable father. The life
was ill-suited to his ardent nature, and he grew to
hate it. He longed to taste London—just as many
a heady boy in a tainted office longs to be an Et-
trick shepherd. The clerk knows nothing of
sheep-ticks; Michael knew nothing of London
except that it was big and very fine. He blew
his flute at fairs and dances with a heart full of
Splendid gloom. He had not learned philosophy
then. Hehad ambitions. His flute was a possible
scepter.

Of course, he found a woman to believe in him;
one woman’s heart is every dreamer’s kingdom.
His own sisters mocked him. His mother smiled

on him fondly, but foolishly. His father, the



4 TONY DRUM.

sturdy Dalesman, frowned and swore. He was
without honor in his own country. So, at the end
of each day, it was with a lightening heart he
leaped the low stone walls between the fields to
meet his Agatha upon the steaming uplands. Her
sympathetic little ear was ever open to the tale of
his young hopes. He walked, protecting her with
his arm, toward the sunset light; and she, listening
and loving, gave him new courage and new food
for visions.

He had lived twenty-five years, but was much
younger than that, when he left her weeping at the
crossroads one red spring morning, and set his
face resolutely toward the end of his desires. A
finger-post pointed him on—‘ To London.” His
sweetheart dried her tears upon her apron and re-
turned to her unending round of little duties; he,
with a stiff lip and a bouncing heart, strode val-
iantly along the white road, southward.

He passed through many mighty towns, and saw
much that kindled his wonder; but he would not
loiter on the way, though his boots shredded from

his feet, and the hot sun, beating on him, rotted



HIS FATHER, 5

the clothes from his lusty limbs. With his stout
staff swinging in his hand, he tramped forward,
meeting the sun at each recurring noon, lying
down at night with his face turned to the winking
Stars.

He entered London on a sweltering day in early
June. The sky, between the housetops, was blue
as the bosom of his own lakes; the streets were
paved with gold. In parks and squares and trim,
gray-walled gardens, tall trees drooped under their
burden of leaves. There had been no rain for
many days, but the dun roads were sweet with
moisture. Beautiful women, gloriously arrayed,
passed near him on the pavement, or sped by under
gay parasols, in shining carriages. Even the fine
gentlemen, afoot or on horseback, who did not
look at him or anything—so lofty were they in
their patrician polarity!—compelled his unwilling
admiration. He had no eyes for the meaner
sights, no mind 1o penetrate beneath the sleek ex-
terior of the city; his rustic soul was stirred to
dumb amazement. He wandered on, reveling in

sensations, until nightfall.



6 TONY DRUM.

And then the darkness fell on him.

He was without plans, without resources. He
had dreamed only of the far future—the period of
his fame; the intermediate stages he had over-
looked. Accustomed to the hearty hospitality of
the countryside, he had not reckoned with inhos-
pitable Death on the cold stones of this southern
city. -He had tootled his way to London, winning
here and there a bed or a meal or a lift in a jolting-
cart, or even a handful of halfpence. But now, in
this great town of growing gloom, there was none
to listen to his music. He loitered at the Marble
Arch, watching the press of people through his
tears. A policeman threatened him with vague
“menaces, and Michael perceived by the flashlight
of his anger that London was not so big after all,
but only a big collection of little things. His
blithe, wandering spirit restéd on despair. Wearied
with the adventures of the day, footsore and heart-
sore, he sought a dark corner in a noisome court
and lay down to sleep. His prayer that night was
for the decent shelter of one kind, natural tree.

The real Michael Drum awoke no more. He





HIS FATHER. 7

was more truly dead than if he had ceased to
breathe. It was another man that stretched his
limbs in the dawn and rose up from the spot where
Michael Drum had lain down. This man went
along in the early morning shadow asking alms.
That day he took his first lesson from Hunger in
the School of the World, and was evermore the
worse for his experience. The well-fed have set it
on record that hunger is a good sauce; Michael
Drum found it a bad diet, as others have done.
He lost his youth in the struggle for bread, and
with his youth all that had made him a little higher
than the ruck. He went down into the deeps, and
the scum hid him.

For some years he disappeared.

At last we find him again—a husband and rate-
payer, lodging in two rooms in Garden Row. He
is now the philosopher, and plays his flute in a
jaunty key. “The goods of life are very good,”
he says, and drinks a little whisky o’ nights at “ The
Jolly Anglers ” for sweet fellowship’s sake. Being
an artist, he wears his hair long for the honor of

tradition. His wife is about to become a mother



8 TONY DRUM.

for the second time. ‘It will be a girl,’ he says,
“ because we want a boy this time, and there are
too many women already.” The child is a boy.
“ Every birth of a child is the death of an illusion,”
he remarks. ‘“ We will call him Tony, because
there has never been one of that name in our

1

family



CHAPTER II.
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES.

Mrs. Drum’s first child was a girl, whom she
had named Honor. Honor was four years old
when Tony was born. At five years she accepted
him as her first responsibility. She dragged him
up the stairs and down and about the street, ex-
pounding the world to him. She judged the world
from what she knew of it (as we all do); and, as she
had never journeyed beyond Garden Row, thought
it a shabby affair, no doubt. She sometimes
longed to be one of the soaring gulls above the
wintry river, that she might take a loftier view of
things. She asked her mother if all the world were
‘like Garden Row, and Mrs. Drum said “ God for-
bid! ” She asked her father, and Michael Drum
replied in bitter words which the child did not
understand—nor the man either, for that matter.

But hardship quickly blunted the edge of her

9



10 TONY DRUM.

desire for knowledge. At nine years she was
already a little woman, with many responsibilities
to sober her and many harsh experiences upon
which to found a theory of life. Yet she played
still.

Tony was now a tiny, deformed miracle of five.
He had a great shock head, obliquely set between
high, pointed shoulders; a thick, humped body, and
rickety legs. His face was white and wistful, with
a wonderful breadth of brow, but tapering sharply
to an elfin chin. His eyes were smoke-colored,
large, deep, questioning. His mouth was pinched
and wry. He could not walk upright, but shuffled
onward, with his long arms dangling limply and
his face to the ground. His sister watched over |
him, protected him, and loved him always. They
‘were rarely apart; he never appeared in the streets
without her.

It was known throughout the Row that Tony
was foredoomed to early death: that was the one’
happy fact of his existence. He alone did not.
know it. In another sphere he might have thrived

. and flourished, his life might have borne noble













Tony's Mother.



HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES, Il

fruit, perhaps; as it was, grown to his full strength,
he could have done little good in his small corner
of the world, but infinite harm.

He was the pet of the Garden Row Mission Hall.
He attended all the services held there, led the
children’s singing, and was cock of his class in the
Sunday-school. He was very devout, and would
listen to the longest homilies with the rapt face of
an angel, whilst Honor, his sister, slumbered peace-
fully beside him. Yet Honor had the larger stock
of faith.

Once he asked his sister, ““ Honor, where did I
come from?”

She replied, as in duty bound, “ God sent you,
Tony.”

He pondered the reply with a little puzzled knot
of puckers on his brow.

“ God lives in heaven, don’t He?” he said, at
last.

“He does when He’s at home,” Honor said,
striving to cope with the great demands of the sub-
ject. “ But generally He’s out and about, doing

good.”



12 TONY DRUM.

“Oh!” gasped Tony.

“ He’s everywhere, like, you see,” said Honor.

“T see,” said Tony. He dragged himself along
beside her for a hundred yards, and then he asked,
“Ts He in Garden Row ever, Honor? ”

“Yes,” she replied.

“ Are you certain sure? ” he asked incredulously.

“ Of course,” she said.

“Well,” he drawled, speaking a whit peevishly;
“T aint never noticed Him there.”

Of course, the only meaning in his words was
the obvious, childish one. But the men and
women of the Row supplied another.

A day or two later, as Tony and Honor were
sitting together under a cart in the mews, he asked
her:

“ Did you come from heaven too, Honor?”

“Yes,” she said.

He turned his eyes toward her and scanned her
face keenly. Then he fitted his chin into the
palms of his two bony hands, and, looking aside at
the flying rain, said softly:

“T didn’t see you there, Honor!”





HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 13

She stared at him, her mouth agape.

“What did you say?” she cried.

He replied, somewhat impatiently, ‘I didn’t see
you there, in heaven, Honor.” And he added,
“Whereabouts was you?”

She shook her head in dumb amazement at his
words. He seemed not to notice her extreme sur-
prise, but continued calmly:

“ Was you anywhere near God’s throne, Honor?
I was quite close to it.”

“Oh, Tony!” she gasped out, between fear and
admiration.

He narrowed his eyes and looked at her for signs
of doubt. She dissembled.

“T had a gold crown on,” said Tony. “So
p’r’aps you wouldn’t hardly know me. And I

wore a white robe. Do you know what a robe is,

Honor? ”
“No,” she said.
“Tt’s in the hymn, you know,” he said. “It’s

a sort of beautiful pinafore—all red and blue and
green, with diamond buttons on, and velvet bows.”

“ And did you have one?” asked Honor.



14 TONY DRUM.

“T had two,” said Tony, nodding; “ one for Sun-
days and one for weekdays, like Miss MacMann at
_ the sweetstuff shop. The one for Sundays was the
one with the diamond buttons on; the weekday
one had only got pearlies on, but bigger’n you ever
see!”

“What else did you have?” asked Honor
eagerly.

For Tony had the true artist’s knack of com-
pelling belief even in the very teeth of probability.

“ Oh!” he said, “ I had a golden harp anda palm
of victory.”

“What's a‘ palm of victory ’?” asked Honor.

“Don’t you know?” he cried. “It’s in the
hymn.”

“T don’t know what it is,” she said humbly.

“Tt’s a sort of Bath bun, but better than that,
and you can’t never eat it up,” he said.

“Why not?”

“ Because it’s everlasting. As soon as you bite
one bit off another bit grows.”

Here Honor asserted herself, and exclaimed:

“ Garn! ”



HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 15

He was in nowise disconcerted.

“ Straight!” he said.

Honor stared at him with troubled eyes. At
last she asked:

“ What is God like, Tony?”

“Oh, He is ever so old,” Tony replied.

“Ts He kind?” she asked.

“ He is like the superintendent,” said Tony, with
an air of explanation.

“T always thought God was like him somehow,”
said Honor.

“ He’s awful like him,” Tony replied, his eyes
bulging. “ Only bigger and older, of course. He
is like the superintendent in other ways, too, you
know—a bit strict, but wonderful kind, really, if
you’re good.”

“And was you good, Tony?” asked Honor,
yielding herself. wholly to the fascinations of the
subject.

“Of course I was,” he said. “ Everybody is
good in heaven. But even when I was bad Jesus
was kind to me. Poor Jesus!”

“ Oh!” cried Honor in an awed whisper.



16 TONY DRUM.

“IT see where they stuck the nails in,” said Tony,
and he began to cry.

“ He’s happy now, though,” said Honor in tones
of consolation.

“He seemed a bit sad like, Honor,” said Tony.
“ Of course, He can’t help remembering.”

“No, of course not,” she agreed.

Tony said no more on the subject just then, but
lapsed into heavy thought. Honor watched him
-with new interest. Slowly she brought her mind
to believe what Tony had said; it made plain many
things in him which she had never understood.
She grew hungry for further details of the other
world, and tried by hints to draw them from her ;
brother. But he was coyly silent.

At last he spoke again.

It was on a fair spring morning, and the Row
was ariot of children. The air was warm and still,
and games were in fevered progress. Honor was
playing “gobs” with one Lucy Anders on the
doorstep of the local sweep. Tony sat squatly on
the pavement at her elbow. Suddenly he ad-
dressed Lucy Anders.



HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 17

“Lucy,” he said, “do you know where babies
come from?”

Lucy Anders was ten, and the question put her
to the blush. She dug her forefinger into Honor’s
ribs and giggled. Honor blushed too. She struck
away Lucy’s hand half angrily.

“ Don’t let on as you know,” she whispered.

Lucy gave an understanding nod.

“It’s very awkward though, aint it, when they
begin to ask questions?” she whispered back.
Then she turned to Tony, and said, smiling blankly,
“No. Where do they come from, Tony?”

“They come from heaven,” Tony answered.

“ Oh, of course,” Lucy said, winking at Honor.
“ But how do you know?”

“T remember,” he said.

Lucy opened her eyes wide.

“Don’t tell lies!” she said tartly.

“Tt aint lies,’ Tony said, becoming tearful with
rage. “I won’t tell you now, see if I do.”

And he snapped his jaws together.

But presently other children came round and one

of them, Billy Aggs, was sucking a toffee-apple.







18 TONY DRUM.

“ Give us a bit, Billy,” said Tony.

“ Shan’t,” said Billy.

“ All right, greedy guts,” said Tony.

For a while he was moodily silent.

“You ought to see the toffee-apples they have
in heaven,” he said at last, unable to restrain him-
self longer. “ Ever so big. And nothink to pay
for ’em!”

““ Garn!” said Billy.

“ See my finger wet,” Tony said.

“What! nothink to pay?” cried Billy.

“ Nothink,” replied Tony. “ You jest walk into
the shops and take what you bloomin’ well like—
toffee-apples, stickjaw, Jumbo-chains, everythink,
and there’s other sweets you aint never heard of.
I see some like ’em once in the big shops in the big
street when I was out with Honor and got lost a
time ago, but the ones in heaven was bigger’n
them.”

“Ts they cakes there, too?” asked Mrs. Mellar’s
Agnes.

“Millions on ’em!” answered Tony. “ And

jam tarts and jumbles and fairy turnovers! ”



HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 19

“ Oh!” cried the children.

“Ts they fruit there? ” said Billy Aggs.

“Fruit!” Tony laughed scornfully. “I should
think there was! All a-growing on the trees as
thick as thick, like leaves. Apples and pears and
strawberries and cherries and grapes and plums and
everythink. And flowers, too!”

The children heaved a sigh of longing. Lucy
Anders, the unbeliever, was seen to smack her lips
and become preoccupied. The circle closed on
Tony, and a stream of questions poured in upon
him. He looked triumphantly from face to face,
smiled, and refused to speak further.

?

“Go on, Tony,” said Mrs. Mellar’s Agnes
breathlessly. ‘‘ Tell us some more about it.”

He shook his head, sadly but firmly.

“Tl give you a button,” said Billy Aggs. “Id
give you a suck o’ my toffee-apple, but it’s all gone
now.”

Tony: turned on him in great distress.

“T caw’t tell you any more,” he wailed shrilly.
“Tt won’t—won’t come.”

They eyed each other askance.



20 TONY DRUM.

“Tm tired, Honor,” Tony said. “I want to be
taken home. I want to go to sleep.”

Honor rose at once, relinquishing a certain vic-
tory over Lucy Anders, and led him away. The
children gazed after Tony with regretful faces, and
when he had gone a few yards they followed him
slowly. To them it seemed that the street was
grown darker and narrower, the sky seemed very
far away, and there was little sense in starting fresh
games before bed.

Thenceforward Tony was never surprised. It
mattered not what was shown to him, he had
always seen a better one in heaven. By virtue of
the fact of his previous exalted existence, he be-
came an object of envy in the Row. He held a
court of wide-eyed children every evening, and
tribute to his genius was liberally rendered.

One gusty, rainy night an oil-shop, two streets
distant from the Row, burst into sudden flame.
The sky was flushed red and ribbed with rolling
smoke. The house-roofs, with their tall, twisted
chimneys, stood out stark and black against the

glare.





HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 21

Tony and Honor, sleeping on their rag bed, with
interlocked arms, cheek to cheek, were aroused by
the roar and tumult in the street, and, starting up,
saw the bright sky.

“It’s a fire,” said Honor, darting to the door.
“T expect mother and father’s gone,” she added,
looking round the room. “I’m going too.”

“ Hooray!” cried Tony, capering and clapping
his hands. “ Take me, Honor,” he said.

“T can’t,” said Honor; “it’s such a night, and
there’ll be a ’orful crowd, and you’d get hurt.”

“No, I wouldn’t,” he cried, trembling in his
eagerness. ‘‘ Let me come, Honor.”

“No,” she said, pushing him away.

“Yes, let me,” he pleaded, weeping now. }

But she ran from the room and locked him in.
As she sped downstairs she could hear his furious
blows upon the door and his voice crying out
hoarsely, “ Honor, Honor!”

His voice pursued her to the scene of the fire,
and rang in her ears above the clamor of the crowd,
the roar of the flames, and hiss of spouting water.

Her enjoyment of the wild spectacle was marred.



22 i TONY DRUM.

Compunction stabbed her. She waited until the
roof fell in with a thunderous crash in a cascade of
sparks, then returned slowly homeward, shudder-
ing in anticipation of her brother’s reproaches.

But Tony was ever unexpected. She found him
sitting calmly before the fire, with his back to the
window, scornful of the murmurous crowd in the
Row and the resplendent, sensational sky. He
had lighted a tiny oil-lamp, and was going through
a fragment of an old Bible, looking for words
which he could spell. It was his favorite amuse-
ment on wet evenings. Honor noted his red eye-
lids and unsteady mouth. He greeted her with a
wavering smile. :

“ Hullo!” he said slowly. “ Been to the fire? ”

“Yes,” said Honor, drooping her head.

He spelt out with his finger “ W—h—e—n,
when.”

“Tt wasn’t much of a fire, after all,’”’ Honor said
to comfort him.

“ Ah!” he said, looking hard at her, “ you ought
to see hell.”

She started back aghast.



AIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 23

“ Hell!” she cried.

He nodded “ Yes” with gloomy self-possession.

“You aint never seen hell, have you, Tony?”
cried Honor in an awestruck whisper. She looked
up at the luridly suggestive sky.

He nodded again, very gravely.

“Yes, I have,” he said, throwing a startled
glance into the darker corners of the room. “ Aint
you never heard tell of the ‘ great gulf’ as is fixed
between heaven and hell—the one as Lazarus
looked through when the rich man was in tor-
ment?”

“Yes,” said Honor breathlessly. “ But what’s
it like?”

“The great gulf?”

BeeNeSes

Tony frowned. He seemed to be reflecting.

“Tt’s a sort o’ grating, for all the world like a
tremenjous big sewer-sink,” he said at length.

“Oh!” gasped Honor.

Her frightened gaze followed his about the
room.

“TI was playing one morning in the golden



24 TONY DRUM.

streets,” he said, solemnly and with restraint,
“when we went round a corner, and then we
see it.” ,

“The great gulf?”

“Yes. It was just agin the curb, but ever so
big, and a sort o’ red light was coming up out of it,
like the steam do sometimes when it’s perishing
cold.”

He paused.

“Yes, go on,” said Honor.

“ The other boys was frightened, and run away,”
Tony said; “ but I never. I kneeled down on the
curb and peeped through the grating. And then
‘I see it.”

Honor uttered a tiny shriek.

“Hell?” she said again, craning her head for-
ward and looking up into his face.

“Hell,” he answered, staring fixedly at her.
“You never see such a sight. There was the—the
devil—all red—a-hopping about in the fire. And
there was all the wicked people a-crying and
a-moaning—a-weeping and a-wailing and a-gnash-

ing of their teeth. And there was the fire roaring



HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 25
that loud, and running after the wicked people in
little streams like red-hot water, and a-burning
them like anythink. There was all sorts o’ ugly
faces in the fire—oh, such ugly ones! They’d ha’
frightened a girl out of her senses. And every
time they breathed, little flames, all colored, come
out of their mouths, and their eyes was like Chinese
lanterns in a garden on Guy Fox day.”

“Wasn't you awful afraid?” said Honor.
said Tony. ‘“’Cos the wicked

,

“TI was, rather,’
people—some of ’em was murderers and covered
with blood—they kept a-jumping up at me and
a-shouting out, ‘Gimme a drop o’ water, Tony
Drum! Oh, gimme a drop o’ water!’ I couldn’t
abear to see ’em, so I got up mighty quick, and cut
off as fast as I could go. And I never went back
to that street no more.”

He turned from her and sighed. She stood,
dazed with wonder, looking at the floor and shud-
dering. ~

“ Now, that was something like a fire, that was,
Honor,” Tony said, eying her over his shoulder.

She stood transfixed.



26 TONY DRUM,

His unique prenatal experiences safeguarded
Tony against the remotest possibility of disap-
pointment.

The children of the Sunday-school were taken
once a year to Chingford for a happy day amid the
dog-roses and donkeys. Tony could not go be-
cause of his infirmities. The brakes filled at the
corner of the Row, and he stood watching them
with the self-denying Honor by his side. His lip
was curled in scorn, and, as the children were borne
away in a happy uproar, he turned to his weeping
sister, and said:

“T bet Chingford aint half as good as heaven!”

“But I aint been to heaven, you see,” sobbed
Honor.

He continued, ignoring her: “ It’s all very well
for them. what don’t remember where they come
from ’fore they was born, but Ido. Chingford! I
wouldn’t give a farden to go to no Chingford! ”

And in the evening, when the children returned
and told him of the manifold joys of the day, he
listened with obvious effort. But that night,

Honor, startled from her sleep, caught the sound



HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 27

of his weeping. She sat up and asked compas-
sionately:

“‘ What are you crying for, Tony?”

“T aint a-crying, fathead,” he said. “I’m only
a-breathing hard.” And he kicked her sav-
agely.

“Yes you are a-crying,” said Honor.

He spluttered angrily fora moment. Then he —
broke down utterly, and clasped her about the
neck, pressing his face against her breast. She
soothed him in her arms.

“ There, there, Tony, don’t cry,” she said.

“T aint a-crying ’cos I never went to the treat,”
he said jerkily.

“ Aint you, Tony?” she said. “I thought you
was.”

“No,” he said, with an emphatic shake of the
head; “ I was jest wishin’ I hadn’t never been born,
that’s all. It’s so much nicer up above the sky
than what it is down here.”

And he talked to her of heavenly bliss until the
morning.

One day Billy Aggs asked him:



28 TONY DRUM.

“And could you fly, Tony, when you was in
heaven?”

“1 should think I could,” Tony said; “ and run,
and jump.”

“Wasn’t you humpy neither?” asked Billy
Aggs.

“Me!” cried Tony, in high surprise. “No
fear! I could beat anybody at games, I could—
when I was in heaven! ”

“I wonder as you ever left heaven to come down
here,” said Lucy Anders.

“T never wanted to, I can tell you,” Tony said.
“But you all have to be born, sooner or later—
worse luck! You go to sleep one night, and when
you wake up you're here.”

“Paps you hurt your back a-coming down,
Tony,” said Billy Aggs.

Tony looked at him with his head held askew.

“Ves, that was it,” he said.







CHAPTER III.

HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS.

ONE day, when Tony was six years old, he was
taken by his parents into the country. They trav-
eled a great way northward on the roof of a tram-
car into a region of wide green fields. Tony had
seen trees and grass before in the waste spaces near
his home, but not hills rising to the sky and flowers
at his feet that he might pluck. He wearied his
parents with numberless questions, and exhausted
his childish imagination in frenzied conjecture.
They ate tea in a fairy bower beside a pond, and
afterward climbed a great mountain, and emerged
from the breathless ascent on a wide, wind-swept
road: overlooking the whole earth. Tony could
have stayed on the magic road all night, but his
mother jerked him away by the arm, and they went
into a hot, evil-smelling little public-house. There

they stayed for many hours, though the smoke

a9



3° TONY DRUM.

made Honor sick, and Tony fell asleep against her
shoulder. At last they left the place and descended
the mountain. It was now almost dark, and the
wind was singing. Tony saw a line of dull red low
down on the western sky-line, and thought that the
world was afire. He told the thought to his
father, who said:

“ Aye, it’s afire right enough! ”

And under that depressing belief Tony began
the homeward journey. Crossing the fields to the
place where the tram-cars started, the party over-
took a poor Italian with a monkey and an organ.

“Damme! give us a tune,” said Michael Drum
boisterously.

The Italian shrugged his shoulders and shook
his head.

“Too ver’ tired,” he said, smiling amiably upon

Tony.
ae Give us a tune, I say!” cried Michael Drum.

The Italian was troubled, but smiled on. The
monkey sprang upon his shoulder, chattering and
scowling like an evil old man.

“ Jacko!—he too ver’ tired!” said the Italian.



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 31

Tony and Honor gazed at the monkey, fasci-
nated. Tony had crossed the fields in a stupor of
sleep, crying persistently to be carried in his
mother’s arms; but now he was thoroughly
aroused. Honor explained to him gravely that
the monkey was a child of the Italian. And, in-
deed, there was some likeness between them; both
had withered, yellow faces, and white teeth, and
stiff black hair growing low on the forehead.

“Come, play up!” cried Michael Drum.

“Yes, give us a tune,” said his wife.

“ Ah—no!” pleaded the Italian, whose belly was
clamoring for supper. But he swung the organ
over his shoulder and propped it on his stick before
him.

“Tt is too ver’ bad!” he said.

He ground out a popular waltz. The monkey
leaped down upon the ground, and doffed his tiny
fez and made a jerky bow. Mrs. Drum sprang
back with a scream, and the Italian grinned
broadly.

“ Bite!” said he with much significance.

The ground was dry and the grass smooth. The



32 TONY DRUM.

spirits she had imbibed at the inn worked furiously
in Mrs. Drum, and she lifted a tentative leg, laugh-
ing, under the brim of her hat, at Michael. He
put his hands to his sides and roared out:

“Ha, ha! Goon. Give usa step, old gal!”

Thus encouraged Mrs. Drum flung decorum to
the winds and danced. The monkey sprang back
upon his master’s shoulder, spitting angrily.

“Bad Jacko!” gurgled the Italian.

Tony and Honor stood looking on. The coun-
try wore a gray mantle of twilight. There was no
moon yet, and the sky spread above them darkly.
The blurred trees loomed black and formless, the
grass gleamed silver through a ground-mist. Mrs.
Drum danced on until the weary Italian stopped
playing.

“No, no; go on,” she cried when the music
ceased.

“Ah, no,” he murmured, preparing to obey,
nevertheless.

The monkey leaped down upon the ground again
and snatched at some wild flowers in Tony’s hand.

Tony screamed aloud in his terror, and Mrs. Drum



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 33

struck the monkey hard across the head with her
umbrella. The fixed smile faded from the face of
the Italian.

“T play no more for you—peegs! ” he said, hug-
ging his ugly pet in his arms.

He glared at them vindictively, swung the organ
on his back again, and trudged away across the
fields. Tony listened in an agony of vague,
childish shame, whilst his mother hurled abuse
after the patient, plodding figure of the poor
Italian.

“What a clucking hen you are, mother!” said
Michael Drum, laughing.

The events of the day had impressed Tony -
deeply.

“Father,” he asked, “ why did the organ-man
talk so funny, eh? ”

“ Because he is a foreigner, my son.”

“Do all foreigners talk like that? ”

“ More or less.”

“And do they all have babies like the organ-
man?”

“ Babies! ”



34 TONY DRUM.

“Honor said it was his baby.”

“She was aptly named,” said Michael Drum,
looking wryly at his daughter.

“T only said it for a lark, Tony,” said Honor.

“Tsn’t it his baby, then?”

“Far from it,” said Michael Drum. “In fact,
it is one of the organ-man’s fathers.”

“ How many fathers do organ-men have? zB

“They would want a dozen to answer their ques-
tions if they were all like you.”

“ But, father, what is a foreigner?”

“ Foreigners are men who don’t live in their own
country. I don’t think I can make it plainer than
that.”

“What isa country?”

“ A country is a big piece of dirt that everybody
who is born on it is expected to feel sentimental
about.”

“ What is ‘ sentimental ’? ”

“Two red noses touching one another on a
starry night.”

“ How many countries are there, father?”

“ One—and some others.”



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 35

“Don’t ask so many questions, Tony,” said his
mother.

“Why not?” asked Tony. “There are so
many things to ask questions about.”

Michael Drum laughed. “We must send the
boy to school,” he said.

So on a sultry day in late September Tony was
taken to school. He went, holding his mother’s
hand, with a heart of fear. The school was St.
Anselm’s, a one-storied building of red brick stand-
ing in a field against the railway, and separated
from the road by high tarred palings. A great
gray church overshadowed the school, and in the
churchyard were many gaunt trees, the ancestral
home of a colony of rooks. A bell was pealing as
Tony and his mother arrived at the school, and the
children were pouring in through the iron gates in
a wild, disordered stream. Tony scanned his
future companions with eager, nervous curiosity,
and his warm clasp tightened on his mother’s hand.
There were boys and girls of all sizes and sorts, a
noisy, jostling mob, who returned his timid

scrutiny with a bold, appalling gaze. He had im-



36 TONY DRUM.

bibed an awful idea of the mysteries of education,
in which the dread image of the birch prevailed,
and he felt a great reverence for these initiated
ones. They seemed to bear their sorrows lightly,
and he was reassured.

His mother led him across the playground to a
little wooden door, decorated with devices in iron.
The door stood ajar, and a great babble of noises
issued forth from within. Mrs. Drum knocked,
and a white-haired dame appeared. She surveyed
Tony in brisk, business fashion—as a butcher
might survey a calf ere buying it for the slaughter
—and began to talk with his mother. Onlv a few
sentences passed, and Mrs. Drum turned to de-
part.

“ Be a good boy, Tony,” she said, stooping to
kiss him.

He faltered, ‘‘ Yes, mother.”

Then she hurried away, and he was left alone.

“Come, Tony Drum,” said the white-haired
lady, who proved to be the infant schoolmistress,
and she took his hand.

“J will be good, ma’am,” said Tony.



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 37

“That’s right, Tony Drum,’ she responded
cheerily, and led him into school.

He took his seat at the end of a long form, be-
side a chubby girl in a red flannel frock and white
pinafore. The chubby girl had beautiful yellow
hair of silky texture, and a haughty little profile;
she did not look at Tony, but sat with her arms
folded on her slate, and he thought how different
she was from Honor. He was very lonely in that
crowd of restless babes. He looked through the
windows at the sky and the trees, and felt like a
bird in a cage. The schoolmistress had betaken
herself to the further end of the room to awe a class
of bigger children with her white-haired presence;
the class in which Tony had been placed was pre-
sided over by a lank damsel in skirts that were
neither long nor short, but something between the
two, as, indeed, she herself was something between
child and woman. She was manipulating an
abacus, and at signs from her, unintelligible to
Tony, the children made mysterious noises. He
mouthed silently when the children shouted, and

felt that he was being educated at a great pace.



38 TONY DRUM.

Later, the wonders of the alphabet were revealed
to him. And so the first morning passed.

He sped homeward, glad to be in the free air
- again, and flooded his mother with the tale of his
experiences. Honor laughed harshly at his loud
enthusiasm. After the midday meal Mrs. Drum
gave him a farthing and a handful of plums, and he
went back.to school again happy enough.

Thus his education was begun.

Life was easy and slow in the infant school of St.
Anselm’s. Learning was administered in wee sips,
and the discipline was lax. Often, on a summer
afternoon, when the gray floor was a mosaic of sun-
shine, half the tiny scholars would be asleep, and
the teacher herself in a state of great drowsiness,
so that her voice dwindled to a low drone, very
soothing to the dulled senses of the children. And
in the winter, when the window panes were starred
with frost and the attendance was meager, the
scholars would crowd about the glowing stove and
watch the snow, as it clicked on the glass, whilst
the white-haired schoolmistress read fairy tales

from Andersen or Grimm. Often, a rusty rook,



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 39

perched on a lower bough, would peep in at the
fire as if it longed to steal a little warmth to carry
back to its bleak eyrie in the treetop. Once a
week a brisk young curate told them true stories
from the Bible, of the Creation and the Flood, of
_ the Patriarchs and Judges of Israel, of infant
Samuel and the mighty David. He told them of
the Christ too, and with enough dramatic power to
raise in Tony’s breast a storm of love and indigna-
tion. Tony thought that Christ must have been
wonderfully like the brisk young curate.

One morning a messenger from the big girls’
section of the school entered the infants’ room and
crossed to the mistress’ desk. After some whis-
pered talk, the mistress stood up and called out,
“Tony Drum!”

Tony rose from his place, and answered shrilly,
“Yes, ma’am.”

“Come here, Tony,” said the mistress.

Tony left his seat and advanced timidly into the
middle of the room. A guilty conscience, heavy-
laden with secret crime, upbraided him, and he was

full of dire misgiving.



qo TONY DRUM.

“Tony,” said the mistress, “I have just heard
very sad news of your sister.”

Tony was relieved to find that he had not been
called out for punishment. A healthy, working
conscience is an awkward possession for a boy!
He heaved a sigh of relief.

“Very sad news!” repeated the mistress.

He now began to feel alarm, and his eyes
widened.

“Why, ma’am,” he cried, “she wasn’t even ill
this morning, ma’am.”

“T don’t mean that she is ill.”

“She can’t never be dead?”

“What a very morbid child!” said the mistress.
“T have not said that she is ill or dead, Tony. She
is quite well, but very, very naughty.”

“ You're a liar,” said Tony, quietly but with con-
viction. ‘She aint nothink o’ the sort. She’s
quite good, Honor is.”

“You must not call me a liar. It is very
rude.”

“You must not tell lies. It is very wicked.”

“ Be silent.”



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 41

“Yes, ma’am.”

“ Now you go with this little girl and do as you
are told.”

“Yes, ma’am.”

He followed the girl out of the room, along a
narrow passage, into the big girls’ section. In one
of the classrooms he found Honor.

She was lying on her back in the middle of the
floor, kicking and screaming in a fit of puny hys-
terics. A haggard young mistress was bending
over her in angry despair.

“Is this her brother, Amy?” asked the young
mistress.

“Yes, ma’am,” said Amy.

Tony stood looking at his sister, and he was filled
with sudden shame.

“What is your name, little boy?” asked the
mistress.

He faltered a moment, then replied, “ William
Smith, ma’am.”

She stared at him and from him to Amy.

“This is the wrong boy surely?”

“No, ma’am, it isn’t,” said Amy.



42 TONY DRUM.

“ But he says his name is Smith.”

“It might easily be Ananias, ma’am, but it aint
Smith,” said Amy pertly. She was in the seventh
standard and knew the Scriptures. ‘“ J know him
well enough.”

“She aimt my sister,’ said Tony, blazing
into sudden fury. “She aint—she aint—she
aint!”

Honor stopped screaming to listen.

“ My sister’s a carroty-headed gal, and she don’t
go to this here school at all, she don’t,” cried
Tony.

Honor sat up suddenly.

“Oh, Tony!” she exclaimed.

“You aint my sister—you know you aint,” said
Tony. “I wouldn’t own you for no bloomin’
sister!”

A grin overspread Honor’s face.

“Dear me, this is very extraordinary!” said the
young mistress, growing more haggard.

“Take me back to the infants’,” screamed Tony.
a I don’t want to stick here, I don’t.” .

There was nothing else to do, so they. took him



HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 43.

back, and the infant mistress told him about
George Washington. He was not greatly inter-
ested. He went to his seat in silence, with a dark
scowl upon his thin, wistful face.

He felt terribly ashamed of his family.



CHAPTER IV.

HE RISES TO OCCASIONS.

In a little while Tony passed from the infants’
to the boys’ school. He wept bitterly at parting
from his old schoolmistress, and she, touched by
this token of a good heart, gave him many words
of kind advice and four new farthings.

“What will you do with it?” she asked him.
“T mean the money. I know what will happen to
the advice.”

“T shall buy a present for my dear mother,” he
said proudly.

“Good boy!” said she.

He went out and bought a mouth-organ. He
took it home and threw it in his mother’s lap.

“ What is this?” asked Mrs. Drum.

“A present—for you,” he replied.

She laughed.

“Tt aint any good to me,” she said. “TI can’t
44













HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 45

play it.” He was silent, so she added: “ But it was
real kind of you to buy it for me, Tony.”

“Yes, wasn’t it!” he said. “I think ’ma very
kind boy, mum, don’t you?”

“F?’m!” she murmured doubtfully.

He picked up the mouth-organ.

“You must learn to play it, mum,” he said.

“But there aint nobody to teach me.”

“T will teach you,” he said.

“Can you play it, then, Tony?”

“Not yet,” he answered. “ But I’ll learn, and
then [ll teach you. See?”

“T see,’ nodded Mrs. Drum.

He went out and sat on the doorstep. He be-
gan to play the mouth-organ, and presently some
children came round him.

“ Let’s have a go at it, Tony,” said Billy Aggs.

-“T would let you, but it aint mine,” said Tony.

“Whose is it, then? ”

“My mother’s. I bought it for her. She says
Tam the kindest boy out.”

And he played on.

There was much trouble awaiting Tony in the



46 TONY DRUM.

boys’ school. On the first morning he was placed
next to a freckled boy named Simmy Angus.

“You'll find him a very nice lad,” said the mas-
ter reassuringly, seeing that Tony trembled.

Tony said to the boy:

“ Are you really nice?”

“What?” growled Simmy.

“Are you really nice? ”

“Tl break your jaw if you talk to me, you
cheeky young swine! ” said Simmy.

“T knew you wasn’t,” sighed Tony. He sat in
great fear.

“Hi, you, what’s your name?” whispered
Simmy.

“Tony Drum.”

“Can you fight? ”

Tony shook his head doubtfully.

“ Not a bit?”

“NO!

Simmy grinned.

“T shall call you ‘ Humpy,’ then,” he said.

“Please don’t call me that,” said Tony.

“ Yuss, 1 shall.”



HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 47

“Tt ‘ll hurt my feelings so.”

“Your feelings be blow’d! Aint I got feelings,
eh? And don’t everybody call me ‘The Spotted
Worm’? How’d you like to be called a spotted
worm?”

“T shouldn’t like it a bit,’ Tony confessed.
“ But then, I aint spotted, and you are.”

“ Bli’ me!” cried Simmy. “I won’t half give
you somethink for that when I get you
out.”

“Oh, don’t hit me,” pleaded Tony. ‘“ Look
here, I’ll let you have a go on my mother’s mouth-
organ.”

“ Have you got it with you?”

s1Â¥es.y

“ Show.”

Tony produced the mouth-organ.

“ Allright,” said Simmy. “ You give it me, and
I won’t hit you.”

“It’s my mother’s, or else I would.”

“ Well, let’s hold it a minute.”

“ Don’t keep it, will you?”

“Taint no bloomin’ thief!”



48 | TONY DRUM.

_ Tony handed over the mouth-organ, and Simmy

Angus promptly slipped it into his pocket.

“ Thank you,” he said, chuckling.

“You aint a-going to keep it?”

“Aint I? I thought I was.”

“ Give it back!”

“ Not me.”

“You're a thief!”

“ And you're a liar! You said it was your
mother’s mouth-organ.”

“So itis. I bought it for her.”

“Don’t try to stuff me up. I know better.
What do your mother want with a penny mouth-
organ?”

“ Oh, give it me back.”

eshanitl 7

Tony pleaded no more.

When morning lessons were over and the school
was dismissed, a crowd of urchins, led by Simmy
Angus, gathered about Tony, and followea him
through the playground into the street. They
cried out at him:

“Yah, Humpy! Yah, Humpy! Who cried











EOE ee



ee ee ODS

HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 49

’cos he’d got his belly in the wrong place? Yah,
Humpy, yah!”

They hustled him and buffeted him. They spat
on his clothes and pelted him with mud and the
refuse of the gutters.

He shuffled along as fast as his weak legs
allowed, but his persecutors easily kept pace
with him. At last he stood at bay against a
wall.

“Oh, you poor miserable sinners!” he cried.
“ Oh, you wicked, miserable sinners! Oh, aint I
sorry for you all!”

They shouted in derisive chorus.

“Tt’s all very fine for you to knock me about
now,” Tony said solemnly; “ but jest you wait till
you’re dead. Won’t God pay you out then! Oh,
my! won’t he jest!”

“ Look at him a-crying!” jeered Simmy Angus.
“ Look at Old Humpy a-crying!”

Tony lifted his head and faced his tormentors
boldly.

“Me a-crying! ” he said. “Garn wi’ you! I

aint the sort o’ boy what cries. You couldn’t



“50 TONY DRUM.

never make me cry, none of you, not if you was to
hit me ever so—me bein’ humpy an’ all!”

A shower of blows fell upon him.

“Go on, then!” he shouted. “Hit me! hit
me!”

They responded to the invitation with a will, and
Tony laughed at them.

Suddenly a lank, frocked figure, all knees and
elbows and flying hair, burst into the little group.

“ Honor!” screamed Tony.

“T’ll show ’em!”’ she cried.

She caught Simmy Angus by the neck, and flung
him on his back in the muddy road.

“ You'll hit my little brother, will you, an’ him a
cripple!” she yelled, weeping profusely, as she
bumped two sleek back heads together. “I'll put
the ten commandments on every one of your ugly
faces, I will, and quicker’n you can think! ”

“Honor!” said Tony, leveling an accusing fin-
ger at Simmy Angus; “ that boy has got mother’s
mouth-organ.”

“Fork it out, Funny Face!” commanded

Honor, turning again on the downfallen Simmy.



Oe ee ee ee ee a a OTT ee ee

HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 51

He hastily dropped the mouth-organ at her feet,
and fled.

“Oh, Tony!” cried Honor, kneeling down to
hug him tenderly; “’ave they hurt you much,
Tony?”

“Only in my feelings, Honor,” he replied.
“ The thumps an’ pinches aint nothing at all. But
they called me—they called me names.”

“Let ’em do it again, that’s all,” said Honor,
white and quivering with rage. ‘‘ Let me catch
’em at it! Dll show ’em! T’ll teach ’em how it
feels to be hurt, I will. The nasty, spiteful little
toads!”

“Well, you needn’t cuddle me, Honor!” said
Tony in an aggrieved tone. '

“That’s my love, dear,” she said timidly.

“Yes, I know,” he said; “ but it makes a fellow
look such a fool!”

She loosed her embrace, and they walked se-
dately home. But Tony did not return to school
that day, because he was suddenly struck down by
sickness. _

He lay for a dark month on the verge of death,



52 TONY DRUM.

and the jaded dispensary doctor shook his. bald
head helplessly at each visit, saying always:

?

“Well, I will look in to-morrow, but ,



Yet Tony rallied, and in a little while was back

again at school.
' He was bullied, of course; but only at first, and
not so badly. He had pluck to commend him to
his mates, and if he could not give a blow he could
take a dozen without wincing. He speedily made
friends. His lessons gave him little trouble, for he
was apt above his fellows, and as for the cane,
after tasting it a few times, he scorned it alto-
gether.

A dull year passed, and then, in his tenth year,
Tony had an aging experience.

Returning from school one chill evening in
March, he came upon a crowd at a little distance
from hishome. He pushed into it, and found that
the cause of the commotion was a drunken woman.
She lay in a degraded heap, outstretched, face
downward, upon the pavement. There was a thin
rain falling and the ground was sloppy. The

woman’s dress was stained with the mire. Her



HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 53

hair was loose, and strayed about her head in wet,
clotted strands. Her tawdry bonnet was crushed
under her forehead; through her broken boots her
stockings. protruded in soiled white puckers.
There were many boys of Tony’s acquaintance in
the crowd. They jested rudely upon the fallen
woman, and Tony, though his heart shrank from it,
joined them from a boyish feeling of emulation.
His wit was keener than theirs, and his sallies pro-
voked the loudest laughter.

“Come, old Mother Mud!” he cried. “Vl run
you for a stiver!”

The woman stirred at the sound of his voice and
moaned. She had laid still hitherto, with her head
in a trickle of blood, as if stunned. Now she raised
herself on her hands and turned her face to them.
Tony cried out in a stricken voice and fell on his
knees beside her.

The drunken woman was his mother!

His heart seemed to snap apart within him. The
faces about him were the faces of leering devils; he
heard the whisperings and brutal laughter of the

crowd, and he was frozen with shame. He sobbed,



54 TONY DRUM.

“Oh, mother, mother! ” and put his arm about her
neck and tried to raise her up.

“ Bli’ me! if it aint Tony’s old woman!” he heard
one of his schoolmates say. ‘‘ Oh, Lord!”

Tony sprang up, seething with rage, and struck
blindly at the boy’s face.

“Ere, Tony boy, gimme a hand!” his mother
mumbled.

She clung to him, trying to rise. He looked at
her, his mother, and the tears rose in his eyes to
blot out the sight of her shame.

“ Oh, mother, mother!” he cried again.

She got upon her feet and clung to him, but he
was too weak to bear her weight, and she sank to
the ground once more.

“ Nobody loves me!” she whimpered.

Tony crouched beside her in the rain, looking
from face to face in the crowd. A bow-legged
workman, with his bag of tools over his shoulder,
stepped from the ranks.

“Ts it your mother?”

Tony made the sad admission.

“ D’ye live fur off?”



HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 55

“Tn the next street.”

“Ere,” said Bow Legs. “’Old my bag, boy.
Now then, one o’ yer, gimme a hand.”

He found one to help him, and between them
they raised up Mrs. Drum and bore her along.
Tony, bending under the bag, followed them at a
trot. His mother, feeling herself in motion, be-
gan to sing, and the crowd jeered. She gave them
shout for shout, and kicked her limp legs in a bone-
less sort of dance. Thus they made the journey

home.



CHAPTER V.

HE MAKES A FRIEND.

IT was at this period that the prosperity of the
Drums began to decline. Michael’s health some-
times failed now, and when it happened that he
could not follow his itinerant calling the family was
sorely straitened in means. Mrs. Drum had
hitherto preserved much of her youthful comeliness
and high spirits, but under the growing burden of
her household cares she became quickly old and
peevish. Every day she had more frequent re-
course to the bottle. She began to tipple on her
errands, and usually was too much occupied with a
new circle of acquaintance at “ The Jolly Anglers ”
to keep her home clean or her person tidy. She
became a bit of a shrew, and faded and shapeless.
As her husband once remarked to her in their bick-
erings, he had to look into the parlor album to find

the woman he married. Tony early bore a share
56



Jolly An glers.





HE MAKES A FRIEND. 57

of the family responsibilities. Mrs. Drum con-
fided much to him that she kept secret from her
husband. Every Saturday, when Michael handed
over her weekly stipend, Tony went with her to
the pawnshop to redeem his Sunday suit, or
Honor’s silk frock, or maybe a blanket or a table-
cloth. Mrs. Drum herself had no clothes left that
a pawnbroker would lend a sixpence on. She
seemed to feel no shame in these miserable dealings:
after a while, but made one of a party of slatterns
like unto herself, and the business was always an
excuse for a social dram. Tony ate many Banbury
cakes in private bars with the gossips on these ex-
_ peditions; nevertheless, he hated them.

He now, for the first time, perceived the right-
eousness of pride.

“Mum,” he said one day, “ why don’t you take
Honor to the pawnshop sometimes, instead 0’
me?”

“God forbid that a daughter 0’ mine should
ever know anythink o’ such places,” said Mrs.
Drum earnestly. “Tt would be a nice thing to

have your own gal, after she was married, bringing



58 TONY DRUM.

up as her own mother was the first one to intro-
duce her to our common uncle.”

“ Will Honor get married some day, then?”

“T hope so,” said his mother. ‘ She will if she
plays her cards as wellasI did.”

At breakfast on the following day Tony asked ©
his sister:

“ Say, Honor, do you want to get married? ”

“Me!” cried Honor. ‘ Lord! what makes you
start on that, Tony? I’m only fourteen as yet.”

“ But I mean when you grow up.”

“No,” said Honor, “I don’t want to get
married—to tie myself down and be one bloke’s
slave for life!”

““ Nonsense, Honor!” said her mother.

“It’s a curious thing,” said Michael Drum, look-
ing up from his newspaper; “all maids, when they
‘are fourteen or so, say they will never get married.
And when they are thirty they begin to fear that
they have told the truth.”

“TI do hate them nasty sneering remarks 0’
yourn,” said Mrs. Drum, rubbing her nose.

“No flattery, please,” said Michael.



HE MAKES A FRIEND. 59

Honor rose and went forth to her work. She
had just left school, and was now engaged from
eight to eight in a button factory.

When Tony was in the fifth standard it was dis-
covered that he had a tuneful voice and a good ear,
so he was made a member of the church choir.

Music was a great delight to him. His happiest
hours were spent in St. Anselm’s Church. It was
a very beautiful church and very old. On practice
nights when the interior was unlighted save for one
blue glimmer of gas in the organ-loft, Tony would
look down upon the dark stillness of the church
and see white spirits flitting through the aisles.
Their passing was as the passing of the wind. He
could hear the soft sough of their ghostly robes
trailing over the smooth stones, though the organ
crashed out its music above his head and twenty
lusty boys were singing in his ears. When there
was a moon the painted windows were glorified,
and on the’ white stones about the font and altar
there fell a mysterious moving radiance. The
polished oak rails of the pews shone like bars of

silver; every brass tablet on the towering walls was



60 TONY DRUM.

a hole of light in the stone. In that place of splen-
did unrealities it was easy enough to forget the
squalid life of home.

The blind organist, Paul Hands, had a strong
liking for Tony. He would invite the boy to his
house, and play to him on the violin. To Tony
the music that he made was more wonderful than
aught else in the world; but the organist would cry,
in his despair:

“T am like a child building a mountain! ”

Two sisters of the organist lived with him, pale-
faced women with patient eyes and soft voices.
They played, too, when their brother permitted,
but usually their playing made him rage.

“How you mince!” he would cry. “One
would think that music was asleep, and you were
afraid of waking it! See here!”

He would snatch the violin, and prance blindly
up the room, drawing out horrid skirls of sound.

“That is you,” he would say, and laugh.

But he had softer moods in which he would play
and sing entrancingly. At such times he was

transfigured. Tony, watching him with fascinated





HE MAKES A FRIEND. 61
eyes, would think of him as of some sweet being of
dreams.

“You pity me because I’m blind, don’t you,
boy?” he once said to Tony. “ Well, you need
not. It is I who have the advantage, for I see
what I please.”

Nevertheless, he could be bitter on the subject
of his affliction.

“ What is the use of sight to half the world?” he
asked his sisters. ‘“‘ They see with their opinions.
They are color-blinded by prejudice! ”

“Hush, Paul!” his sisters whispered.

One added: “ The child is here.”

“Tt was a child who spoke,” he murmured, with
a wintry smile.

Tony was growing old before his time, but Paul
Hands lent him books to keep him young. Life
swung back and Tony walked yet in childland—
that blessed land of moments, where things are not
grimly relative, but lonely happenings of joy or ter-
ror. He stayed on the Hills of Faéry whilst his.
family groped in the Valley of Dry Bones. He

towered above them. They had only facts to live



62 TONY DRUM.

with. He could fit his surroundings to his liking.
The highest building erected by men’s hands has
little power against a child’s dream. Tony’s world
melted and was merged in the a substance of his

changing fancies.



CHAPTER VI.
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE.

BuT the awakening came.

One night, when Tony returned home, he found
his parents in close council before the fire, and from
the silence which greeted him he gathered ‘that he
had been the subject of their talk.

“Tony, my lad,” said the father, “there’s been
a bit of luck for you to-day.” He looked across
the hearth at his wife; Mrs. Drum nodded encour-
agement, and he went on. “ Perhaps you know
things haven’t gone too well with us lately. My
health isn’t what it was, there is foreign competi-
tion, and the national taste for sound music is
showing sad signs of wear and tear.” He
- chuckled; then perceiving that his wit was wasted,
became suddenly gloomy. “So we’re hard up.
Your mother knocks off a penny here and a penny

there—we live on the fat o’ the land instead o’ the
63



64 TONY DRUM.

lean, because it’s cheaper—and still we get worse
off every day. Now, Tony, don’t you think that’s
a sad thing?”

“Yes, father,” said Tony.

“Ah, now the Fifth Commandment’s talking,”
“cried Michael Drum. “ And that’s a thing I like
to hear. Always honor your father and your
mother, Tony, and do your utter to keep them out
of the home for decayed parents, by which I mean,
of course, the workhouse! ”

“ Yes, father.”

“Now we come to it,” said Michael Drum.
“To-day a gentleman has been here asking after
you. He’s a sort of cousin of your mother’s, and
he dabbles in pork.”

aA pork butcher,” explained Mrs. Drum.
“And he wants a boy to help him on Saturdays,
and he thought you’d do.”

“A pork butcher!” faltered Tony.

“Tt isn’t exactly a genteel calling,” Michael
Drum conceded, “but it’s honest enough and
profitable, I believe. You might do worse, my

3?

son.





HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 65

“And you'll start to-morrow morning at half-
past seven,” said Mrs. Drum. “ He’s going to
give you eighteenpence and your meals. I call
that good for a day’s work, and I think you ought
to be very grateful.’

Tony sat down with bowed head, fumbling his
cap nervously.

“ But, mother,” he began.

“You don’t seem very glad about it,” Mrs.
Drum remarked. “I suppose you think you never
ought to go to work. And it isn’t as if it’d inter-
fere with your schooling, either. The blessed old
School Board takes jolly good care of children
nowadays. In my time boys was earning their liv-
ing at ten.”

“T think the School Board would do a lot of
harm if it could,” said Michael Drum. “It would
do away altogether with the national stock of fools
first of all, and then, think how unhappy we should
be. There’s precious little laughter about now—
people have got to be so wise and miserable.
When there are no fools left at all, it will be a close

season for wit, I’m afraid. - I can tell you of a man”



66 TONY DRUM.

—he paused. “TI beg your pardon, I can tell you
nothing, for you are both sleepy. Give me a
candle, mother, I’ll go to roost. There’s nothing
in the jug. I hope I may dream a little beer.”

He went off to bed, grinning amiably.

“ Good-night, Tony,” said Mrs. Drum, prepar-
ing to follow her husband. “ Don’t wake Honor,
she’s got a faceache.” She kissed him and went
from the room.

Tony undressed with a sad heart, said his even-
ing prayer, and slipped into bed beside his sister.
Half the night he lay awake brooding, and the
shadow of his trouble darkened his dreams.

On the morrow, seeing there was no appeal from
his fate, he contrived to put a bright face on the
matter and trudged manfully off to his work, up-
held by a sense of duty. His first employer was a
rough, ruddy-faced man, of blunt speech and vio-
lent manners. He set Tony to scraping a meat
block at once; and when Tony cut his finger told
him not to “ mind a little blood,” but “to suck it
up to prevent waste and get along with the job.”

Tony’s finger continued to dribble blood all the



HE FACES.THE INEVITABLE. 67

morning, and as there was much rock-salt about—
used in the pickling of pork—the pain of his wound
was considerable. For hours he was at the point
of tears, and at last a harsh word from the butcher
made him cry outright.

“Damme!” cried the man. ‘“ What a baby it is!
Here, Baby, quit that and take this leg to Mrs.
Marser’s—you know the place.”

Tony shouldered the wooden tray and trotted
off down the street, glad to be away from his mas-
ter. At the corner he ran into a party of two ladies
and a gentleman. One of the ladies cried out,
“Tony!” as he passed, and turning he recognized
Harriet Hands. Hannah and Paul were with
her.

“Why, Tony!” cried Harriet Hands. “ What-
ever are you doing?”

“T’m a pork butcher’s errand-boy now, miss,”
said Tony.

“What?” cried the organist loudly, “ what does
he say he is? ”

abuts surely you haven’t left school just as you

were getting on so nicely?” said Harriet Hands.



68 TONY DRUM.

“ Oh, no! this is only a Saturday job,” Tony ex-
plained.

“And do you like it? ”

- “Tt aint so bad,” said Tony stoutly.

She regarded him closely.

“You hand is bleeding! ” she exclaimed.

“Yes,” said Tony, looking at his injured finger.
“T cut it with the cleaver. But it aint much.”

i: Tony,” interposed the organist, “you’re no
pork butcher. Cut away home.”

“I can’t do that, sir,” said Tony. “I’ve got to
take this leg somewhere.”

“ Throw the damned thing into the gutter,” said
the blind man angrily. “How dare they make a
pork butcher of you?”

“S’sh!” whispered his younger sister.

“You must have your finger doctored,” said
Harriet Hands.

She took Tony into a chemist’s shop hard by,
where his wound was dressed and bandaged. The
blind organist and his younger sister conferred ear-
nestly on the pavement. |

“We think you had better go on with this work



HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 69

just for to-day,” said Hannah Hands to Tony.
“But we'll try to find you something better next
_ week.”

They bade him a friendly “ Good-by,” and he
pursued his errand with a fortified heart.

“Hullo, Baby!” cried the butcher on Tony’s
return. “ You’ve been gone a precious long time.
What’s that round your finger? ”’

Tony explained.

“God’s truth!” cried the butcher. “A little
blood and salt wouldn’t hurt you! A niminy-
piminy lot of millinery props!”

He was very merry at Tony’s expense, address-
ing him as “ Baby,” and imploring him to be care-
ful of his precious life. Next door was a grocer’s
shop, outside which stood a tow-headed youth,
distributing handbills. Soon this youth took up
the butcher’s cry, and between them Tony had a
cruel time.

“Yaht” howled Tow-head. “ Who cried ’cos
he cut his finger! ”

His jeers provoking no rejoinder, he was in-

spired to throw a decayed potato at Tony. Tony



70 TONY DRUM.

caught it in his hand and stood to return the
missile. Tow-head fled into the shop. But the
potato overtook him like an ordinance of judg-
ment, smashing on the nape of his neck. This
triumphant passage of arms cheered Tony greatly.
Tow-head molested him no more.

But toward evening the rain began. The wind
freshened. Tony stood under the canvas cover,
shivering in the cold.

“Come, Baby, take your hands out o’ your
pockets,” the butcher would cry. “I don’t pay
babies for idling.”

The butcher’s wife brought out some hot coffee
and bread and butter to Tony. He was grateful
for the meal. For dinner he had had the half of a
sheep’s head; but the topography of a sheep’s head
is somewhat difficult, and Tony fared ill. The
coffee put new life into him, and, the rain stopping
just then, he began to hope that he would com-
fortably survive the evening. As it grew dark the
gas was lighted, and the street assumed a cheerier
aspect. The crowd thickened on the pavement,
the hubbub increased.



HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 71

“See nobody don’t prig any o’ that tripe, Baby,”
said the butcher.

“Yes, sir,” answered Tony.

He was growing tired. Every moment his
weariness increased. It was impossible to
stand alone; he leaned against a meat
block. .

“Now then, Baby!” roared the butcher. ‘Don’t
go to sleep. I don’t pay babies to go to sleep.
Slip about. Be live-ly!”

Tony shook himself, shuddering with drowsi-
ness. He found his legs were grown terribly stiff;
his feet were wet and sore; he had an aching in his
back. A few paces to and fro relaxed his limbs a
little and eased his joints, but he could not keep
pacing to and fro forever. He glanced at the
moon-faced clock upon the wall behind the shop
counter. Ten minutes to eight. Another three
hours or perhaps four.

“Buy, buy, buy, buy!” yelled the butcher in his
ear. “ Now, Baby, you do a bit o’ shouting. I
notice you aint overworking yourself.”

Tony chirped feebly, “ Buy, buy, buy, buy!”



72 TONY DRUM.

At the sound of his own voice his ears tingled and
his face glowed.

“God, there’s a twitter!” cried the butcher.
rk Louder, Baby, louder! Chuck it off your chest!
I thought yer mummy said you was in the choir.
You in the choir. Wy that voice! Bli’ me, I pity
the congregation, I do. You won’t find me in
your church, Baby!”

Evidently this was wit, for the mob of women
about the butcher sniggered applause. Tony was
filled with anger and shame.

“ Blushing he is, too!” shouted the butcher.
* Bless you, ladies, he’s no common kid. Why,
it’s worth a ha’penny on the pound to look at him!
Show ’em your face, Baby. See how proud ’e is!
He aint doing this for money. Not him. It’s all
on account of a little wager with my Lord Tom
Noddy.”

By and by, when the butcher grew tired of jest-
ing, he became churlish, and railed at Tony. But
his anger was more tolerable than his wit.

Nine o’clock struck. Tony, in his weariness,

leaned again upon the meat block.



HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 73

“None o’ that lolling about, Baby. I won’t
have it,” cried the butcher.

“I’m so tired, sir,” pleaded Tony.

“Tired, are you! Well, it’s healthy to be tired.
An’ you'll be worse ’fore you’re done. There’s
another three hours yet.”

Tony had been hoping that the shop closed at
eleven. He felt he should never be able to stand
upright for three more hours. Every minute
-seemed endless. He could have whimpered in his
despair, but he was too much a man. The meat
stank in his nostrils. The buzzing of the gas deaf-
ened him. Every passer-by who jostled him he
hated from his heart. To see the misery of some
filled him with vindictive glee; the gayety of others
stirred his bile. How his head throbbed and
swam! The wound in his hand burned and itched;
he tickled the outside of the bandage with his
finger, but that afforded him no relief. He felt he
must go mad of his weariness.

What should he do to beguile the minutes? He
would count each second, counting it a little slower

than the clock. It was three minutes past nine



74 TONY DRUM.

now. He would count four hundred, then it would
be ten minutes past nine. He counted one hun-
dred, and paused to reflect that he was counting
very slowly. So much the better. He counted
the next hundred slower still. Two hundred.
How weary he was! Another hundred—slower
still this time. His heart lightened; this was a
famous way to cheat Time. It must be quite ten
minutes past nine already. But he would not
look. He would count the other hundred—very,
very slowly. What joy would be his if the clock
pointed to the quarter! He got through the last
hundred and drew a deep breath of satisfaction.

“Buy, buy, buy, buy!” shouted the butcher.
“°Ere’s a nobby bit o’ pork for you, ladies! ”

Tony turned and looked at the clock. It was
six minutes past nine! He looked again and
rubbed his eyes. Six minutes past! He was
furious at Time’s tardiness, and sick to his very
heart.

“Go on, look at it!” cried the butcher. “ All
the lookin’ in the world won’t make a clock go

faster!”



HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 75

Tony could have wept. He caught his breath
and turned away. All that weary while and only
three minutes gone! He looked vacantly up at
the windows of the opposite houses, where bright
lights shone and within were rest and ease.

“Ere, take this to ‘The Mowin’ Head,’ Baby,
an’ lively.”

The butcher balanced the wooden tray upon
Tony’s shoulder, and he tottered away down the
street. It was raining again, and the pavements
shone wet. Heavily laden pedestrians bumped
and jostled him. Urchins crossed his path. .
Refuse of paper and straw and vegetables tripped
up his steps. Everything was an aggravation; he
fumed at each new hindrance. Sometimes, groups
of idlers blocked the pavement, and he had to step
into the road. A boy snatched off his cap and
flung it to the wind. Secure in the darkness of a
narrow by-way, Tony wept freely.

He came at last to “ The Mowing Head,” and
delivered his burden to a servant-maid at the side
door.

““ Where’s the chops? ” she asked.



76 TONY DRUM.

“ The what, ma’am? ” he stammered.

“Don’t ma’am me!” cried the servant tartly;
“and you know very well what I said.”

“T don’t know where your bloomin’ chops are,”
snarled the incensed Tony. ‘Go and look for
’em.”

“Tl tell your master of this, you saucy imp!”
the girl cried.

“Saucy yourself!” muttered Tony, and strode
haughtily away.

He sat down in a doorway to rest. The stone
was wet, but it mattered not. The burden had
been a heavy one, and he was hot under his damp
clothes. The cold wind was pleasant on his burn-
ing head. The pitiless rain was powerless to harm
him now; he felt it running through his hair, eas-
ing the fever of his brain. He leaned his back
against the door and closed his smarting eyes.
Sleep came to him and the world was blotted out.

The sound of a heavy thud awoke him. The
door supporting his back had opened, and he lay
sprawling on a bristling mat with the form of a

woman towering over him.





HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 77

“What are you doin’ on my doorstep?” she
cried, touching him with her foot. “Come, get
out of it.”

He stammered out an apology, picked up his
wooden tray, and walked off. He was still half-
dazed with slumber. As his full senses returned,
he wondered how long he had been sitting there,
and glanced at a clock. It was nearly eleven. He
shuddered to think of the butcher’s wrath, and
broke into a shambling trot.

Perhaps the butcher was not used to overmuch
conscientiousness in boys. He growled out a few
angry sneers in response to Tony’s feeble excuses,
and bade him take up his old position.

The last hour Tony spent between sleeping and
waking. He could not sit down, but he leaned
on the meat block whenever opportunity offered,
and thus contrived to snatch a few brief, refresh-
ing naps. At twelve o’clock the shop was closed;
the butcher handed him his wage, and he was free
to go. It seemed incredible good fortune. He
walked home through the now deserted streets,

rejoicing in his liberty.



78 TONY DRUM.

Michael Drum awaited him before a dwindling
fire. Mrs. Drum was already gone to bed. There
was a supper of potted salmon upon the table.

“Ah, Tony!” said his father.

Tony put down his wages.

“No, no,” cried Michael Drum, sweeping the
money aside with a lordly gesture. “It is yours.
You have earned it.” He peered at the silver.
“How much? Eighteenpence? I hope it may
prove to be the nucleus of a considerable fortune,
my son!”

Tony perceived that his father was drunk. He
picked up the money and tied it slowly in a corner
of his handkerchief.

“Eat, my son,” said Michael Drum.

“Tt isn’t for me, is it, father? ”

“Yes, yes.”

“ Salmon!—for me? ”

“Yes, yes.”

Tony fell to with a will.

“We have had visitors,” said Michael Drum.
“Paul Hands, Esquire—the Misses Hands..
Charming fellow! Charming girls! Paul—



HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 79

damme! it hardly seems a liberty!—he spoke of

”?



you Michael Drum rose unsteadily and lit
acigar. “ Tony, my son,” he said, with slow im-
pressiveness; “ we are not going to make a pork

1?

butcher of you, after all



CHAPTER VII.

HE GOES ON A JAUNT.

THE morrow was Sunday, and the Drums, fol-
lowing an immemorial custom, lay abed till noon.
At nine o’clock there came a thundering at the
street door, and Michael Drum stumbled down-
stairs in his trousers and shirt to take in the Sun-
day newspaper. Tony, roused by the clamor,
heard the pit-pat of his father’s bare feet on the
oilcloth and his shuddering breaths as he traveled
swiftly back to bed. Silence descended again, and
Tony returned to his broken dreams.

At late breakfast Michael Drum showed a mood
of great cheerfulness. He sat jingling his money
with beaming eyes and smiling lips, whilst the
bacon frizzled in the pan, and Honor, proud to be
useful, set out the teacups and saucers. During
the meal the conversation turned on Mr. Paul
Hands.



Hk GOES ON A JAUNT. 81

“A good, kind gentleman, though blind, poor
fellow!” said Mrs. Drum. |

“A brother artist!” cried Michael. “ Just that.
“You'll be putting me under an obligation,’ says he,
“which, however, I am not too proud to incur.’
Ha! ha! We understood one another at once—
that’s the freemasonry of art. Damme, I’d do as
much for him if our positions were reversed, and
he knows it. ‘That boy, your son, a pork
butcher! No, no.’ ‘We are poor,’ I said. ‘We
can’t afford the luxury of pride.’ ‘Poor!’ he cried.
“No man is poor who retains his self-respect.’ It
was like going to Sunday-school again. I felt
positively moral, mother—‘ poor, but honest,’ in-
stead of ‘poor because honest,’ like I’ve felt
before.”

“Ah!” murmured Mrs. Drum. “ Poverty is no
disgrace.”

“Poverty is a disgrace—to the rich,” said
Michael. “ But we won't talk about poverty
to-day. What say to a jaunt?”

“Ah!” breathed Mrs. Drum.

“Let’s hire a gig and drive out somewhere.



82 TONY DRUM.
Kew—Epping—or shall we keep it vague? Yes,
we'll keep it vague.” -

At four o’clock, after an earlier dinner than
usual, they chartered a gig from the greengrocer’s
at the corner and drove away past St. Anselm’s
School, shut and silent, into the wide, rolling
country.

There was a pleasant autumn crispness in the
air. The grass was vividly green after the rains.
The sun shone faintly in the hazy sky, drawing
scarce a sparkle from the wet hedgerows, casting
pale, indefinite shadows. The ditches overflowed
with turbid water; the road was heavy with brown
mud.

Michael drove, with his wife perched beside him
on the box seat, Tony and Honor huddled in the
body of the gig.

“This is proper!” cried Honor, her pale face
kindling. “See the blackberries, Tony?”

“ An’ the hip-se-haws!” cried Tony. “ Why,
the hedges is as red as red with em! That means
a hard winter, don’t it, father? Wow, there’s a

swallow! See its white belly? Can’t they fly! eh?





t.

jeu

The Drums go ona



HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 83
They’re not gone yet, so it’s still summer. Father,
_ how far can a swallow fly without stopping?
Once, Nick Tolmers an’ me found a martin’s nest
on the sand pits. They’re a kind o’ swallow,
£008 i ||

“Hark to the national schoolboy!” laughed
Michael.

Tony sank into abashed silence. The gray mare
trotted on. They crossed a bridge spanning a
sluggish stream; an old man, in a great straw hat,
was fishing from the puddled bank; some boys
were tempting death among the reeds; in the dis-
tance was a moored barge, gaudy with red paint,
from which arose spirals of blue smoke. Skirting
the stream was a belt of wood, and for a while they °
journeyed in the shade of trees. A low bough
took off Michael’s hat and tore a plume from Mrs.
Drum’s bonnet. Michael cried “ Whoa!” lustily ;
but Tony, having caught the hat in its flight,
handed it up with an air of achievement, and the
mare jogged on. They emerged from the wood
and entered the hilly High Street of a little town.

- A Sabbath calm was here. The mare’s hoofs



84 TONY DRUM.

rattled on the cobbles, bringing sleepy faces to the
windows, startling a brood of chickens.

“We'll stop here,” said Michael Drum, pulling
up at the sign of a Red Lion.

A squat-bodied ostler came forth yawning from
the stables, and held the mare whilst they dis-
mounted.

“Tea?” asked the ostler.

* Ah!” said Michael Drum, nodding.

The ostler’s face became suddenly the mere rim
of a black hole as he shouted “ Ma’am!”

A mellow-faced woman ambled out toward
them, with head insinuatingly cocked aside and
cheeks dimpling. The party followed her into the
inn and up a flight of stairs to a large, light room -
overlooking a trim garden. In the room were two
tables, spread with white cloths, a piano on a little
plaform, various seats, and a great number of
stuffed birds in glass cases. Michael Drum led the
way to the table nearest the window, and they all
sat down. The mellow-faced woman, having
taken their order, had disappeared into the kitchen,

from whence a pleasing clatter of crockery now



HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 85

proceeded. Mrs. Drum remarked in a whisper
that it was a pretty outlook. Tony and Honor
shifted on their seats in restless constraint. Even
Michael Drum was oppressed by the splendor of
their proceedings, though he affected to be quite
at ease. He had risen to examine a stuffed par-
tridge; the handle of the door rattled, and he sped
back to his seat, flushing guiltily, like a schoolboy
caught at mischief. .

A maid of comfortable proportions brought in
the tea on a wide tray, and they at once fell to with
gusto. After the meal they sat at the window,
chatting and laughing. The sun had gone down,
the blue of the sky deepened, and a few pale stars
shone out. From churches, scattered far and wide
over the green country, bells were pealing a sum-
mons to evensong. Mrs. Drum threw up the win-
dow, and a fruity scent was wafted in.

Some roysterers had gathered on the benches in
the inn yard, and were waxing very merry over
their beer. Tony, looking down on them, and
marking their large recklessness of speech and

manners, thought it must be fine to be a man.



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describe
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'2011-12-23T21:59:18-05:00'
redup
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-23T22:00:14-05:00'
describe
'148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e40359ec4150bd899f3b4e0887a41d4f
5dc1929d561d79c664d661910953f90b3bde96f2
'2011-12-23T21:59:52-05:00'
describe
'2194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1b5a03cca2696f957057223df533d2ea
315f70a872e6582b42d695d7c790c330b7b0d47f
'2011-12-23T22:07:50-05:00'
describe
'373349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e9d99236b550bfce52d3c5e72ddee039
9b8ced2536be32f93bf2ae0b6ef7f31983d5166d
describe
'64153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6da74d7e18c9cbd47327e19186f33e78
c12e3bf0221d7b115affbf4e2dacdd9edb9ecc72
'2011-12-23T22:02:56-05:00'
describe
'16344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNX' 'sip-files00009.pro'
cba5b2477ef1d5384179e4fc734942d9
6f892beabb105b617c00652e2220b041c064e0d6
'2011-12-23T22:02:10-05:00'
describe
'20905' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNY' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
6f3df4bf6372e4b2e41e6d9562c8bf01
2611713bacde39cf49a08bdd75605b2e92cd3aeb
'2011-12-23T22:01:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
6080da0a563b9e21f459db4fb36672e0
e4c4f585aa41ced315c1956e1853834cbc67c88f
'2011-12-23T21:59:36-05:00'
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOA' 'sip-files00009.txt'
77ec859c0ca9ea0004fafb850c432c27
3770c085445324e5ec4b3f4e277abd11b958adc9
'2011-12-23T22:04:58-05:00'
describe
'5400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
a85e36ede76314893788bbf190713f40
bdee471a5e5283953f87471386b6e4cc8627928e
'2011-12-23T22:01:59-05:00'
describe
'373314' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
fb3d2c0ef273add78aa2bbed54836526
c0a9e5d8edeccf9c620d64ce765159cc11369657
'2011-12-23T22:03:35-05:00'
describe
'20489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOD' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
6467e500dc9fd6b6893c188f7c0b5aa0
8bd7008ae04f9fdb7ca77f4d725cce0bef83f76b
'2011-12-23T22:03:23-05:00'
describe
'4601' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOE' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
b309ad72f9caff505b085e8958ffc324
b9e8d6f2ebef0aa628607979bc4f34334d6e93c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
bbade293f5ddaa14305e57dfd8b016c8
a12337718964f6fe3936e81a7b481e2fa10d70fb
'2011-12-23T22:09:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-23T22:01:55-05:00'
describe
Zero-length file
Zero-length file
Zero-length file
'1327' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
7a90baf70425a95e74402b425ef680ed
04f62b12be0dd6cc42075aa1174593cf6556776b
'2011-12-23T22:02:06-05:00'
describe
'373126' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
dfa51ec73586e39cb0a739baf2ef17da
bf48354973089d768bb73627363bf90146c310ce
'2011-12-23T22:00:10-05:00'
describe
'46293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
0cb1bec42aea427c4d4b682bea9fe5d2
c2ec4371975905111aee4e6a1838eaa37314fbcf
'2011-12-23T22:02:05-05:00'
describe
'12105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
dde0cf193c1970f0b77fdb4133b7d97d
6e000fce0eb4d2f586a62c51d2e4e96da6bd527a
'2011-12-23T22:04:53-05:00'
describe
'14017' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
08b70f16af84ab5fcaf1e722ad95e876
f29212f09fab66f6d73fd42ba5a48fc4a33b22bc
'2011-12-23T22:00:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
8c4dcfe30fa7edd70b911d52aad3b165
55435ce03c451c7aa2aed12be3bd6ee1ddb9bbf3
'2011-12-23T22:09:20-05:00'
describe
'415' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNON' 'sip-files00011.txt'
5260260db7ec7cd2c3a7889e6721a1a1
9ac238905ba65fec6ed9a7d4c26cf0d3ff9daeab
'2011-12-23T22:05:51-05:00'
describe
'4253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
ed41514d46d57b1501edafc6cfad728e
8cbcf5319c6886b11a30479e32ea55bfcbcfd7cf
'2011-12-23T22:04:31-05:00'
describe
'373325' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a46f1ece50299401ced6194e078a7c77
1b9f15bfb5f7e3bc94330b430664f1124e241a79
'2011-12-23T22:05:16-05:00'
describe
'18220' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
01f7ab600740e7469811e58bfb5e9926
c08d9163eb7fee362b691ba6fe915b19c5785be9
'2011-12-23T22:04:15-05:00'
describe
'3717' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOR' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a70da8301d911fa3a66286fff86b96cd
ca9fa20bdde7c091ce97989ce2f7c3c7545a02e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOS' 'sip-files00012.tif'
fb8b1f757a5ac158a25f59e54b98ed74
5851b7f45a611558c2c8feb1fcdb3e8f111a8de9
'2011-12-23T22:03:33-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
389c7104df9c482a32896d9d31b35b7b
ab1f0d463fb24f178e9028246c2b6914d62e8409
'2011-12-23T22:04:41-05:00'
describe
'365401' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7ecb7c444fc291363eab0ad22f38650c
4e25edf0eed0dd247f272dd9b3e8ce9ce4125576
'2011-12-23T22:01:08-05:00'
describe
'78544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
cb1f334801037ae1ef36a9dad6f3b73e
135a34513caa37d927fa9c333e2c31829f488dd1
'2011-12-23T22:06:28-05:00'
describe
'18652' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5fa8bc67530b1fbdde3fa88303b32111
b88e22a623525765ecaf6df900a9eaf566b4e8b1
'2011-12-23T22:07:47-05:00'
describe
'24870' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c3b044fcd45a805f338fb4d0da203af2
dc7c54191ee80824e7f045fcf9fcb7d4bf6d9bdd
'2011-12-23T22:07:15-05:00'
describe
'2940448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b66f329913b85cccfdc1198158c825ed
92053c0b2a744c5978952f445ccb6b045060f0c8
'2011-12-23T22:06:46-05:00'
describe
'710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
becd036b5388d782157f8cd409debef6
72411100efe7cc61fb4f740a8d59248de15a1169
'2011-12-23T22:06:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6879' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
97e2ad83c920f17666d6fe85652d68f2
6925931242f00beda6cba55a71b079876a8620a2
'2011-12-23T22:08:57-05:00'
describe
'373121' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
10d4f8b1aaf92415a069390b698a251b
806304decf7c802c24caa4da0019e39535ccc2e6
'2011-12-23T22:01:16-05:00'
describe
'102697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7250d6cab63ceea46825e964f56b75b9
ab67c7702e41200d2d93596e45c58b974509487b
'2011-12-23T22:08:18-05:00'
describe
'28105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
de9823e01e5068818951b018b60689b5
99e463a4d49b1a3493b03a9387e30947ecf48349
'2011-12-23T22:01:06-05:00'
describe
'30406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5b93dc4886fbf2b43c474d60e1ab0b13
60ddd2000d56d059ea704c3fac67fd23c9f8f4ac
'2011-12-23T22:08:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e01572946e04bb62297bb39ef8aee0d3
05b9f90e94920854691d5c3a181622adbc3f2e6e
'2011-12-23T22:08:33-05:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
91a7bb48b09200df34603fe6dbe9578c
7628e9981dd269d87dc08f32f28c6bd0b896f702
'2011-12-23T22:01:10-05:00'
describe
'8985' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
674b4865b5f15e1cd6681d677b779f64
911daf7cdd1a3dd15129860eef46171049422c18
'2011-12-23T22:02:13-05:00'
describe
'363602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
cb4b25d2ea535e72a5581b86c4cf6fbb
35b6e3ac4b17efa2c27697ff924d91dc8d6856db
'2011-12-23T22:09:45-05:00'
describe
'107420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a13006d106176436a4343b8faa7a7a03
ff63d08db052ba9aed6dc446310c0cd8c2b90514
'2011-12-23T22:07:59-05:00'
describe
'28185' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
57b2f7fe3042103701616901f76101e2
9edf3655af199c1dd7b8f4dc909b0eb52ace8317
'2011-12-23T22:08:10-05:00'
describe
'35236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
b0c163199080d13d322385a27366073b
880b0f95d350300fa9d1139aaa6e92934c11141d
describe
'2927724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
bf72051199ab8c5d5e1712978e0b9b23
bd77ba053ccd45829008d5b118ccde2e318b6483
'2011-12-23T22:00:46-05:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
193097c118005a14da1cf037d0ec14b3
d1aa369d734fbbf603525b1ef567ae4c0ad67394
'2011-12-23T22:01:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9388' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c9d2a1b12157b55d842e9b316f7d0e33
96b77ec548da779746d69948da3b750b9f087974
'2011-12-23T22:05:50-05:00'
describe
'373392' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
65d59a1f8e7399333caf33fc844fc03e
295fcbce544e46974e1f298d336367a0d9cd8519
'2011-12-23T22:09:22-05:00'
describe
'100241' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
62fbd1d5ed483698eb0080ee9665b5b6
f2dd11d1d3ff809d5f318f6aa51e0b67fb2678f1
'2011-12-23T22:09:35-05:00'
describe
'28613' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPR' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3329b8700602ab6f2036a4b74ae19865
10e9b7facbe2a8a548eb5d810a2a01531109c496
'2011-12-23T22:00:13-05:00'
describe
'34990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bd11b38cf6da537787237baa236e9bcf
f315ba055810166583b37b9d761a1462e3196717
'2011-12-23T22:03:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2199517e27c3a466bd21467b6b8881bd
759d39930cbee85e09ff5326bb6835aa36d16986
'2011-12-23T21:59:53-05:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4763c0b5b02e43b01b13e463f4ce28f2
bb253186059839199312c0c0b3079d3ee9688c16
'2011-12-23T22:09:27-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4408d3197317467979964af202718b86
6a0768948e0806ab99a781c6b153aef2053daf3d
'2011-12-23T22:01:09-05:00'
describe
'373401' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
ed74c85277303874fb521807e99de4a9
4d6e4738557363081839ad0d965c6948e3fe20ff
'2011-12-23T22:02:54-05:00'
describe
'102770' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b20be3c3f94db8358f036cdd5c57a13b
9ac1938159f05546aa3b688ebca8affc838004d3
'2011-12-23T22:02:29-05:00'
describe
'27831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
cb4c646a617187d2c4ab7c5cc48a8956
3011aef98c58a3f8caa2ee29bd5d902862ac69a8
'2011-12-23T22:06:49-05:00'
describe
'35596' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b1922332abc09a389468f53718cb4fbd
b8b0c722408d3b440b8099d66f9b04627eb875b7
'2011-12-23T21:59:22-05:00'
describe
'3004072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
423a0f6a2bfb800b1a741f9f2f0d2028
95dad8da3e8c11f782587631754418786299352a
'2011-12-23T22:05:36-05:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
5d9d8e2a6b26e2c2872a31d18bdf20d4
7227df63c948d3864ff071a705f50d922e18063f
'2011-12-23T22:06:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
81d885c2a99198567599d9bc3154538d
23396897a33782001df308c1c289bfdb43272300
'2011-12-23T22:07:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a7366ae2835bd82084075015a96ff12b
e499566cfe8074cc5f3dc422db1d498ee04ed9fd
'2011-12-23T22:04:54-05:00'
describe
'109892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2844c16112cdcb27a60186c95884f46c
168794decaed669b044000eb05f3a64de65206fa
'2011-12-23T22:00:28-05:00'
describe
'29661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
7dc5fc675decce3d05f0aff82800a406
d3608fb1a153264d006ee654ec1300ebf0c16a16
describe
'34217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
6beb92c5fcc5db13f48d67f9943a28ee
91eabae17d4dfb72115eef1716100b3e92dcda9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
010a01557d72b5c67af224492b0dbb2e
237f88a8c3d0cb07376c812957be70722408c0f4
'2011-12-23T22:02:16-05:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
bc98c97279e7fe69b1db6fb014ccd3be
772c2bcf940a683520f01fa8daa973ddb637ffca
'2011-12-23T22:10:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
4109f3e005504500954a54e869a419d9
d0b183188f57b280e83853c7d05dd555b58b2585
describe
'370191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
2b111fccc520e1b3e4a031d039e5539b
4d2544a97c3ceed74781cdc825b57fd843be584b
'2011-12-23T22:08:01-05:00'
describe
'115576' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
0ec9c50490b6f6f7be485e9e75a7c574
4bf54fb8b289ddc5feb4158dbdd3017163a12af0
describe
'28336' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ab85f55e6c97d3d9df39af3afabd37ca
6e76b5f0e48fc48e8416431616accedca1201cd4
'2011-12-23T22:02:14-05:00'
describe
'34934' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQN' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d32ec3296db1d9bb0d819afec4905558
d7b258ed41da5e32968f4c65294cf3d57ef5e15b
'2011-12-23T22:09:19-05:00'
describe
'2978628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
4a5f0fd79cdb282b9a7f66935a09d488
aa25501fcfbda179d53378eb6b1344f641a860e5
'2011-12-23T22:01:30-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
9b25d7fa10bb5dc871881f7f77e71321
9c6f82a86ac719cdd14f80df1bb898febaad6b46
'2011-12-23T22:00:54-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9597' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
e0435b6e3158e28e1ab2ba05eb42f259
11311b22f4c1a855e9c6ac6a52601a06444f4fcc
'2011-12-23T22:08:56-05:00'
describe
'360353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4e4bfd03660062377c05705a80e47326
21c7df017328ff41c1171d1c582ff1033466d7f4
'2011-12-23T22:09:38-05:00'
describe
'42209' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c7b2e60c6e3847ec654ad2dfe3d665c0
b07e6b6191a06e0f84eb7ab94dce4f9d057a3aaf
'2011-12-23T22:01:56-05:00'
describe
'8544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
8959ea9f0e0687ffe59e3ad579e05694
9b53e55fb0ede98cb991239bc08050d34dec68f7
'2011-12-23T22:01:25-05:00'
describe
'11999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
16aacaf34f2a1d12078c485cc338fbfa
7527071984aaba731a8b59821d045cd02c02aa9b
'2011-12-23T22:01:43-05:00'
describe
'2902272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
91d2f333fe4da1ec19ad124aa367e667
8d574bec931123312041e8be7dc9545e35ebed8c
'2011-12-23T22:02:49-05:00'
describe
'299' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
192bb7c4c82ecf9e14f42b8f29cc8177
ebb15ad552e919e1a39deee8987941e2cfa92c82
'2011-12-23T21:59:38-05:00'
describe
'3513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5829d24e48e9e80eb22042c7113285e3
fdc8d20e573e5080ef592c0b8a09e342b72c0969
'2011-12-23T22:01:40-05:00'
describe
'357978' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
c76d9a53fdcab050845a7d9b3c892bbf
e79cead082032c542661cbfb2d0f53927409ad6e
'2011-12-23T22:05:10-05:00'
describe
'91379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
935989832c5ed069ea4d95f4c7861c0a
f6c99401a46cb46b6da8c17ea830bf86a0b8eaea
'2011-12-23T22:00:27-05:00'
describe
'22305' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
9101daf843f59bae8dbd3c2efca496be
ac99babf1ac8650ecafa63e82573e6cb1383958e
describe
'28831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
656fbac7637e40dc0be83c42d130c67f
aa35828552e7c8fe422b3becbd4bb80ed9a9ca59
describe
'2881060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
2c3cb7e4560983de6225736386f72c4a
ef089b598bfc80d9be84b17d21add3bc89f8a7bf
'2011-12-23T22:00:18-05:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRD' 'sip-files00021.txt'
621b72af87fa5d126498e696e623251f
47aa344db03e0882d1aa35626be2a052c7fca4a6
'2011-12-23T22:08:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8123' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRE' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b98c0e78745c9e1a1c81a3c374a60b6f
356ab3370e502563df31e2da1102f702fcbe58d9
'2011-12-23T22:01:57-05:00'
describe
'373263' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0e3e2521da6f840eb864f80562f53fe9
fd0a8a599d5b86c8e4238a04776a33a45b46e3f0
'2011-12-23T22:03:24-05:00'
describe
'117661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRG' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
683b81e49b25427f8b5fd931d9153e1f
4a35bbda44e1230313c1de47d4e4ca1eaa92f08d
'2011-12-23T22:09:32-05:00'
describe
'27615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
172696eae8e923193f18fdcb221a2258
82e93b647ed4a50bc6dd91564ad444fb34dab0ab
'2011-12-23T22:05:44-05:00'
describe
'35302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
a6feb69138c26c655a0575ca17a13020
54bc80b428c1355d5b364657c8211130d216063c
'2011-12-23T22:09:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0b4cfe97e33e89dfd1f6d15e0653fc5b
14fa77ca29c6bd2afa3c4d8dd1207cca03c0973c
'2011-12-23T22:04:22-05:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
3cb380c3f8b3c225c5e05bad50ce6754
a1b26d05a0aab0806721e90b965e02b9f985a7e9
'2011-12-23T22:03:12-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
87d9f8b5dedb77b7a9f0e9a7906c7adf
10df6a549a00932c225adfa08677a2a6cb9d626c
'2011-12-23T22:01:34-05:00'
describe
'373353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8239f06e8a8b75cf676485855ebbd84b
b6359048708a54022a2a1f6709a790ba02a7fbde
describe
'168168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
298833d0f82701b8fa6f3778bbd55085
96b6230feacff9ff96b48d9947fb671152859d9b
'2011-12-23T22:03:01-05:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
df68f51cec3681ccdbd9dcf20da5dac2
5c508d670a9f93e254e3a999fa7aba0380834525
describe
'37232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
46d291e4ab74d9b2bc54cf7b5232c68c
05f549f16901325d79458e367ea49183f688a5fc
'2011-12-23T22:06:10-05:00'
describe
'8977104' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
8963d3eb59c518d58e9614d9e63bd7d3
5bb3098c0b78c156dd69678a528547f87ce6b15c
describe
'8988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
caa650fa79961dc9f43b1873db33e70c
bb07d78564e0c7e072288a56592b6f03e121535f
describe
'373388' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
86a93d9ea4ee0e4a99d980d2983f3c7a
afff75ab4bcf3c0faa92b908643bcc5293385691
'2011-12-23T22:02:01-05:00'
describe
'86052' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
94e8134b587a7a7a1e3809ee06ff72b7
7916cd5b63177fd90a7c00b6756d174074828d4b
'2011-12-23T22:08:17-05:00'
describe
'23892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
1aa7208ec26edbd2030c7d518e736cd6
514ba901101112663917246126b78fe85560300c
'2011-12-23T21:59:32-05:00'
describe
'27818' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d00c0d2a2a08f2649824bf3e89bdb44e
474218a9dad043b1ca139d1829b147cd82a13cb6
'2011-12-23T22:09:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c2fcfd2ce47ea7d31c9799f1f0f6bd42
28e1840dda84767882498884aec3be0b533ff354
describe
'888' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7f1af49d61befb05c210c672c5528d02
cd60e51424c8c59f006dda9accb0821a235173b0
'2011-12-23T22:07:40-05:00'
describe
'8044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ac55780bcfaf27a8d1144efde6e50200
85306b6e5a6905dc9d21704dc50908565fe9c548
describe
'373398' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
08d1316a59c2f9d7aa182783da7b91d5
283cb5aca2440ddcc0a4c4d14b85e83dde7088ca
'2011-12-23T22:01:15-05:00'
describe
'87366' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
e58cd66daa897404997845f02a6dbeb7
642a17640184c8eef0ff2eec7f209c8076952838
'2011-12-23T22:06:47-05:00'
describe
'23447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
512de08e7ade9b9164773bb176e6b00c
e3da0cc8048babca123b2ed776fc198cf2d7b6d9
'2011-12-23T22:05:21-05:00'
describe
'30234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
97e34d8c75e897ca8306cdf11847f5e5
44d63aa48bffcbc8ef76f0e122ee13498ed62e86
'2011-12-23T22:03:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f2550231c26368c907db29170eaa8967
6beeeedf789bbafb93add1db269c76d79d941b43
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
1003c061722b3273b38138e0670ff4ce
44541b7b46fec944d1add78159a7847d960d0bc2
'2011-12-23T21:59:49-05:00'
describe
'8137' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSF' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
b099a55ad716caa998071ac64aebb979
5f95dbb6ad97d6981d7084b79484c31c26a7e196
'2011-12-23T22:03:13-05:00'
describe
'373364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bfa8696e576695c10f83e320b5077ffe
5f54d25d8159ba6b253e4c09351c88ab0059c8d6
'2011-12-23T22:04:20-05:00'
describe
'88267' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
881693ba4b7ab199b9af96193b577a6f
43918b9d0c87225edf97ff3ab771078283158fe4
'2011-12-23T22:05:39-05:00'
describe
'23073' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
019a0b10429d5bf2cfd54ba98195736c
10bf3e1ce2e654f2b764b622488dd48d8a4324e3
'2011-12-23T22:09:10-05:00'
describe
'30969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e65f0c4eacf6ccea5cb8ef0a1d0dda06
96051d5267bb69ea9d449cddbcf458134ebce7e6
'2011-12-23T22:03:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c866041c1a3615bc93ae0511f49805b5
82d80cf146f0a6d7e83c18f490b6a1b606a85496
'2011-12-23T22:06:09-05:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
8486c5b360587265f33c8a2e6f63c926
52c30bff9dce52fb9250f91cc2197364f935dae4
'2011-12-23T22:03:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7887' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
0687f7bd1ee7336d52769f757bac3524
b30ced7f60e97702cc116ce36163473f8eb575ca
describe
'373404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a5ba7c9bc71bea768d546baa6259a8b5
4aba0e78f2c059475129b55ce30f9fa85074d9b1
describe
'82185' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
4b044bde8466fb72af0af9374849b7a7
1bfb0144979a5f1bc5e825d594bb52c07d89ffae
'2011-12-23T22:09:55-05:00'
describe
'22723' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
21f59410b0313a46b276971efbb18e48
e3f210bdc130ae969a1febf41aba0660abab2d77
describe
'25364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
37ad0d2cd02bee3fedfa78923d6d515f
a23f5b6109b3502c710eaa20117420a3fb1bf799
'2011-12-23T22:06:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
aeeb88c468705b18299d121a61f6367a
2ce50f616db3cd0d8af8b764884e56903ea10ba9
'2011-12-23T22:04:35-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ac2e698f52b754fb8873dcb1db8b3623
405d4add621d72e942aa5b82d2e5daaccd34e221
'2011-12-23T22:09:14-05:00'
describe
'7632' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNST' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5a712f0f12e2a6e85645b223db5882d3
801322b88187de121767df58e6b2fa8ad59f3016
'2011-12-23T22:04:13-05:00'
describe
'373368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
6d16a52384859bbe7080944e5495af0c
99ee2fbb59a3e9467e333073b852eec7c45679b8
'2011-12-23T22:01:29-05:00'
describe
'83159' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3b33cadcce1b412a087a0532f874a976
65fc2e951d3434e1e96572fc70d4995a7dfb219e
'2011-12-23T22:01:48-05:00'
describe
'21886' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
2e0e06ec4845cb38a3d21cb835c3c406
48d241eaab044eb44d6f6013c92ae6dd2909bbb3
describe
'26717' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
cb43c17dbb944108ebe894005cbec708
e34cc20a9be5a83e3caef3bacce092ea4909868b
'2011-12-23T22:09:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
185bbd869bb5b024436edac81126bb47
b091d5faefe3814928e550fc1dd0ddf664536d99
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
2102da86101101b31956243edae257b6
e3f4bfe2a34b44c22f9ac7ffcbd673130c9df781
'2011-12-23T22:06:33-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
e5ca8a7968b0e43e16f062d4269119ef
4d26bad6fa3b31baaf625e6e3d211a3b092d1072
'2011-12-23T22:05:59-05:00'
describe
'373334' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0403c93426beeb265f5d74d2fc19155b
56cf662e6431a3fabb353006ca02ed041e68577c
'2011-12-23T22:08:40-05:00'
describe
'91809' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
f04cc30e5cead1e6aa5fda7e37ba6633
2063066ff6d8e133ecc05b5cd5fe9b422b05161a
'2011-12-23T22:01:54-05:00'
describe
'25578' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2bec776470524f0c087329837cd8fad3
df91d9b3b6ac2a7ef7f6f18439381cba170145d9
describe
'31226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
181133e3a4672c996a725d0944a1fe28
79149ce90d89b71809b1f38adc183d9e9ec21b14
'2011-12-23T22:04:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
fd39a8e766ba7c53fb779da49b37fc48
39dac65d86a59d9301798be3a4225216b6c49326
'2011-12-23T22:08:53-05:00'
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8b7632f68f449bb2ae834b2992b7fa2e
9b4729a10398171142d940f7f6ff43f22d928c51
'2011-12-23T22:06:25-05:00'
describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f6942754d4e9e9f7777ae59b5644e8db
1e10e46eabf1656cae1b73206d29a2b5554a32c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6ff440d8d9e289e5ed5c478f35e40c99
02250367312256f6ae833e6f29ded1946d4f78f1
'2011-12-23T22:09:36-05:00'
describe
'91930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2f36adc08bfbcf38509316e95e4ba46b
5057a95a0e6f76c371628ee4fb70e92ca0ab3768
'2011-12-23T22:07:04-05:00'
describe
'24965' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
cd5d6f7986147342cc4b0f697c58e0be
8e20a404b11cac0c7831e08738a36b6643329d32
'2011-12-23T22:00:50-05:00'
describe
'28039' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
70bce06dcbcb4407186f3d98cf95e828
ea8ea5553429d3dc9eb957283d529411f88a9abb
'2011-12-23T22:05:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7536a080d63887e2091015b28ab0eb82
0359f7413945e4cfcbf92185e8269fee81fc29c9
'2011-12-23T22:08:13-05:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTN' 'sip-files00031.txt'
95bd0ff108d4217c95120f54738fc66e
30b957b117dc811a942c6f7ced1b9e4fda15e88c
'2011-12-23T22:02:27-05:00'
describe
'8053' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1cfb030c909f994771eb3afad5e1d625
f74c702fcc7d0e2538e6f9d394d4d5d7080b1121
'2011-12-23T22:03:52-05:00'
describe
'373378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
952ee57a6d45a4af231752525849f164
b90fc0b003c62c65b07d3aebe573d06e537d88c7
describe
'85419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e10159d966388d17abb47979de37d59a
c60025179a6b45fd3ff548551d6f1776e54ef180
'2011-12-23T22:05:57-05:00'
describe
'23708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
03a7fec827931f95afaf7a259799f8bc
fdce62fa6ee291c20bd67b9e92845b7dfc56842c
'2011-12-23T22:02:25-05:00'
describe
'29275' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d96e6842d218483c9c5f86a3a7f8420a
fe96f2c87a2d4715f1d3db7d8def8cb45575270f
'2011-12-23T22:09:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
3a257109d80caf435cd1fe9b3684d494
7d1bbde20c63e7f04abdaf0eee31f6772d054132
'2011-12-23T22:05:47-05:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
1402e962be5404a3788f0906f7a0c7b7
9205e88cde2887119710d314bc72cc6bbdd4e3cb
'2011-12-23T22:05:13-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7614' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
3474509610c7eb18f9a7681ea90203c5
881778094b7df966800f38d18784beee5fed032c
describe
'373399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
567f840bc53f8fb75cc96a78410e3e4c
c28af523752190f4937cdf26990a5dae9a83438f
'2011-12-23T22:08:00-05:00'
describe
'91179' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0f758250165c0c0b528ee94bf5ea752b
70cb90096ffddf4645a1f4569a56ac693525623f
'2011-12-23T21:59:26-05:00'
describe
'25649' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a2819f6cff78669adac1484398d936ff
30354037ba3cee6741530546a59a896f3c77ab9c
'2011-12-23T22:03:55-05:00'
describe
'31450' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNTZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
be32ccb83f6e95227cdb94e7f8d6ee5b
aa23fa00e4eebd8bada1382928528838928cef37
'2011-12-23T22:02:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
554594ca82846a980f146e72b433d756
dfc09d2b324a761da14f2edfc1c622965acfdf43
'2011-12-23T22:04:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
794451f414d5974cbac47167f96d8f1d
a4f49a79be466ca9f8b7a34f413d5f2427110e1b
describe
Invalid character
'8041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
335e6914149e24634f086252e19659f9
fdc8f9564eccf535b94ca1b61257b8d0af6709fa
describe
'373394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
9035ace2bc0acfe8e2fb321f51d12fa0
c0d939b371d531f6f430802707b8fcd235cdec96
'2011-12-23T22:05:01-05:00'
describe
'98828' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
50d96a1e6cb1a2ede4fab34b45cf5618
9800e722d89312852d74c7ee0c4c1f16cf36f011
'2011-12-23T22:03:56-05:00'
describe
'27292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
b62b3ce87cae7404c8022d389a3373d6
bf1b518d17d051727d7ec4846bfd88ed4fe8a992
'2011-12-23T22:08:38-05:00'
describe
'35662' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
c59880f9b72f65ef2ff90378fb3c1ae6
2361ec57a9a3c1128d8d64ea95689e12970fbe21
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
54e0f761fb8e341057420b6f6b816b4d
d389644311de23e6b3f01d563cbf22a71c2afc33
'2011-12-23T22:05:40-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
1f66470330c142827f8de9fb64e6ebb5
4a1db9d634d31cf4c04cd3d828847c3a174092b9
'2011-12-23T22:02:46-05:00'
describe
'8969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
968667f795135a69b37dda8157f479d8
7e7a6765a9514b8fc60b692f96b137f33a51a0a6
'2011-12-23T22:06:52-05:00'
describe
'373390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
97f923fe93a12b14681a3d00df078d71
81f4a129adce4af2ad8eca9471711b85554ba546
'2011-12-23T22:09:59-05:00'
describe
'99155' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
70a0c8e02ac6f661dc47223950dc2dd2
5f98a13b0af1e262f98c546568da9b6a9124cf4d
'2011-12-23T22:09:31-05:00'
describe
'27554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1ad7f2573babe8d8b3c2116565150cc4
98712b6283ddf70f5ab2e8a616014ebe66a2240b
describe
'32105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1c3ab144cfd57359ae3b918b372c8e32
1180c19b15b4bce3c9f3edeade43e902afa6fbd6
'2011-12-23T22:08:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
690680b638cf0ca4f3fa855950ff23e3
c4c88083d8be001f7b2b35bd14c767c06d886eaf
'2011-12-23T22:00:38-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
77b869175a15d11143af5903a14a8853
1ac3e6e52c5316d2b0aad718ab76968ad16c5e77
'2011-12-23T22:09:48-05:00'
describe
'8634' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
21163c6814b94211d5e947189816aa78
21d4ed0b8d4cfcd2836b6cad301febc74925d358
'2011-12-23T22:05:53-05:00'
describe
'373407' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
2ccfbb80cb87629ac666de00de7797c2
c8d65f2cf1c37b599405a1a6f1928b83f5e044bb
'2011-12-23T22:09:08-05:00'
describe
'90223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
90552384ba1a2f176a592ddac8e3051c
685cdd20be04856b69c1aed48831d02bb7ed23b8
describe
'24973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
df91100a2f527c6e5e169b0be86ca75b
3579de87fea2550d4b75e301c1d86496f5ceff5b
'2011-12-23T22:02:51-05:00'
describe
'28334' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f5d0afcb3e24818b6250c751cf35983d
1534ce5e3a8df607f1dc298e11e25678163596d0
'2011-12-23T22:03:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
dd11517242f94b0210d446fc819b3477
eca2c677e445fc5fee7ae11a9b2f7366d01be87b
'2011-12-23T22:03:39-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6fdf99ac05b1a4bb4a5c524118406b53
b6e66369b1c723f42c932c8c506eb33b7c419af4
'2011-12-23T22:03:25-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
8cb4b4e730de2523a94c441a79c75589
b1297b5d30f6a82c6d6de9378901e08cf1026215
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3ee8746a2b343ae1e410c743cb81a7f3
f545829796cfade820426d7709ff18dc647c5563
'2011-12-23T22:05:11-05:00'
describe
'82457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
3f195ea68399b8a309f90392e8d86c23
6abd26c9ca1848534f88909e5d38c12107771c04
describe
'22056' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
3d10afba21965c0c799c4c31e9207072
25a305c71dd217c8251a5604c20b69dfab94cdfe
'2011-12-23T22:03:48-05:00'
describe
'26605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
20abefdaa95725b35bf69fe5bd203805
6b4d405e9b3e8e5681c95bd7416533e4e6ab345c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1e33c2b89322243414b5c52e984b03d2
8afb0f9ec352c0b21918e47a3aa57c764ce1131c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b996787b0a0ac77d0f7ad8fd921496f7
501b656955c95408b293b6454f086c6da962fb30
'2011-12-23T21:59:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7066' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVE' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
4ceba817eac28822428ea56dcc05fa32
b7d35059495670a0dc8b1a7458a87824a058a410
'2011-12-23T22:05:25-05:00'
describe
'373360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9a6d6673c40910f59590397abab2c72e
0d5da45e2270caacb6d7c259a132bb279aa4b0b7
'2011-12-23T22:04:46-05:00'
describe
'82737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3cba82dcc5ddf1cf386ca2acec497d3b
be7e5055de45f7f0db8a7f70e2863b7eee1e721e
'2011-12-23T22:05:05-05:00'
describe
'23079' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6e8f98ff90ade44cf33e8935abde9ada
7d19c689055353d18fa1565d688876b7d8d8cb0f
describe
'26818' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
1b9d44a473a50f2c0573b74916dd83b2
4706d2c973c1bec29c4d6fd1440909f2d7cfc59a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
6f9ae2c42a94c1b1248e35de329f6a48
a884f99f6949c1cf09d99d0a288cfb42b71cdb1a
'2011-12-23T22:01:44-05:00'
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ec5318ff8686d90551814f9d314fb9e2
5876662198c9c0883027a9347690f15463eb36dd
'2011-12-23T22:01:28-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
2eba21ca4e77c7f717592d3f58581309
f5be84cec533e68d29b956551a8279988a4b7d90
'2011-12-23T22:08:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
6468bff1e8095a8a5570b178b2b92a4d
9d2890da2ff2014e1a17a46c2ba6ed85e40659c3
describe
'97742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
577c1ecfba4907b8a358c8135457d151
98017930d83107c412a975bfce5f8becb75b7337
'2011-12-23T22:06:43-05:00'
describe
'27141' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
03d1991242dbf0eb9a3edbd4c752b182
44562453aaa91a88d924bbabd4a09b28eb6f7150
describe
'29951' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
81739ed559396c399aae69b2fca6bfbe
126ac2c74de9d54139871f0dffdced430151b1ba
'2011-12-23T22:02:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
32780f8fff368fc516743a40df0a3558
580db7bffc51fbf8950bb1a102840ec244744ae6
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f88b987fb327f310936a8d11859f7299
041eec761fae6833125fb9cd2625b54ce5129332
'2011-12-23T22:08:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
b0bcc2311865eea163c3469f2ad6b516
c8bbc5d26c1318850c22142718452e9bbb33c845
'2011-12-23T22:07:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
fdd150ba4f5e266cc7f6f1a3a5a70d15
7f57046bd17481f5d81e05173df0882dcc4b65b8
describe
'98954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
fe1d75bffeb2f242054b614f15ce14ca
e7cdaafeb713e8009804f715ff06e5d5afa53033
'2011-12-23T22:04:00-05:00'
describe
'26688' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
332e04c331db94eed5b89a95810825b7
053357fdd66a5edd79bc0b2ca6b6780cc6ad84be
'2011-12-23T22:00:16-05:00'
describe
'30402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
061de94c395dfeff186e7df8142a0d14
6c97467c8898eb28f1fc043140fc3036bb4eee37
'2011-12-23T22:06:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
0a5daaa7dc32d0a77f20a9898bbe71cd
88bd0305e3a3b7923f66b35d732a613e12575706
'2011-12-23T22:10:02-05:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
cee5c0f892a983fbafb91caff8a8dd3b
3cff833f179145712dc7104affd58dcbd9c83583
'2011-12-23T22:08:26-05:00'
describe
'8394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8abc2de3823b3d9996e905b655ddbd44
9817b26f1cd43f0eeb459310296a361009401e6f
describe
'373395' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1973ea814b5feb4baf114310dbf1303c
d8777b595582d6a613e33ba69a969b4c56697aaa
'2011-12-23T22:07:57-05:00'
describe
'89806' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
bb011ec3876224f759c5556f1e449d03
738399e28261d010cd721953d685ff31a758b554
'2011-12-23T22:03:27-05:00'
describe
'22112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
dc4db74c635a5814c3c67b0ff25a7ab8
a9793e3a88d886ee3f65c9d14db620434d4686c6
describe
'28480' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWD' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
26bf294345a252af1300b043e470496b
cf346e563690537ca452fe80a948e0a50a0f057c
'2011-12-23T22:04:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
63361a55f8b5983d32bbf288064d5aac
f3867ababb9d5028a68987216fffdda9840b77e3
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWF' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4f84630821ae1483f77a45aad7bd7cc4
5f3f0adafec1dab55796c998def0689c3bf185b4
'2011-12-23T22:02:52-05:00'
describe
'7720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWG' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
f0040b315f12cb5e4f7ec31f25ca26f7
6165d85bc32dcdeb2629dca40336fce24c8c7b1e
'2011-12-23T22:05:35-05:00'
describe
'373365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a41a33b9c16d19323a0726018d4f0e4a
0fcf0635345291a4201f30b1de9422f2a77d0e94
'2011-12-23T22:07:49-05:00'
describe
'96547' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6fe848720866d3c7ccfae4ed8b9adb98
96f9eefbd1f31445ed557a12ecfb4757682388f1
'2011-12-23T22:00:01-05:00'
describe
'17976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
04563997d0776474eda6941aa1dfc424
121852b3a38da6d3aab0ac128f38edfaf501a194
'2011-12-23T22:04:33-05:00'
describe
'29484' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fb422e72f1df45c506368fccb98470c0
d927b471205237b010724af3ddc0111069484514
'2011-12-23T22:04:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
e48f0710d381484d161ff078be95f060
c3271941d48f73a631eda72d50ec05c210000cb5
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4c984c1bbe8c2775264f510d2dc2f6c2
8024b335e84083b448b96997c8f0bfea68559ecb
'2011-12-23T22:00:41-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8149' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWN' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
26b21c881f868f33d279baf42b17fdcb
49b7d9b2568e7b5cbe35c4945eb28a3ce4f4779a
'2011-12-23T22:03:44-05:00'
describe
'373355' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8d649b82ce9c6a2067eb4238effc6d13
aaff432279c8601ad47a609355c3c5161c85fc27
'2011-12-23T22:07:46-05:00'
describe
'190056' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWP' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
922d72589e64749de1e34585dd470b3c
2fc2d9573e3aee016240ebc6d0139ac2a7462649
'2011-12-23T22:07:44-05:00'
describe
'3638' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
44f9ff076a742292f39e1271c7025458
8359c12101f8e20c2c1c53f978e0f0109311460f
'2011-12-23T22:09:17-05:00'
describe
'41763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
bb5a505e5ef247db92858c980f4238bb
20cc50d16f88f9b1546dfd1cf621602bfeb543aa
'2011-12-23T22:06:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
24871b9e4819bb57bf88d992e883c53b
e5fd2c0e0ccdca0ea734761faefecf4c998fa790
'2011-12-23T22:02:53-05:00'
describe
'9756' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a373c0cbde6a0fc5969812033533ef4f
2a27cfab1a7a35e6673e96f5d853db8295977159
'2011-12-23T22:06:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWU' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7eceac1571b87c7a4eac611b6c389d0a
6847c32462432a7dff4c79afd8d38f69cfe58f36
describe
'87486' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a26a26e6c6d309cc1e4f347879ee1af7
cd4738e1247dd6a81b03ffa7436a8b8fcc66b728
'2011-12-23T22:05:19-05:00'
describe
'23167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWW' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3a62c0319742e50b923363b36daa97a9
89f082b81cfde30cc41de880da76b2fe79a19ab1
'2011-12-23T22:01:18-05:00'
describe
'32300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ecdf522f0f38fa87f906beeffb139ae2
6d2159102eda273b1966b9dcf168e6a8e5dabb92
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e80587deeb158157d500a9fe54c26feb
5c4d1b42b676e818086cb9d981827e6859ed36de
'2011-12-23T22:02:24-05:00'
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNWZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
fa14b4b4d3c983fd677edd7c364c9f3e
4feea1e434cfcf56cccb143b12abd0083e0dbde4
'2011-12-23T22:04:28-05:00'
describe
'7788' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a06aefde9b5b24daefe9e08c6b50ba49
3f36f1d283666ef43c33840048a6c5de1b475d48
'2011-12-23T22:05:42-05:00'
describe
'373377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5a3145f98fbeda8602cf2c7cc4a7cb3b
59efe4c6d9ae5fc7559e9ac0fcbcdaba013da5ab
describe
'91591' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXC' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
b24afe5c38630b45bca11f3d0a2fb4a7
56c4e2560a109188c062915007496e3a4bdd9fc1
'2011-12-23T22:02:09-05:00'
describe
'25018' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXD' 'sip-files00046.pro'
41538c08d86506836ca52f8f40cc7633
2cd1edc40068aaee40f4f36d763e8ecaabc02944
'2011-12-23T22:03:47-05:00'
describe
'28498' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
670ba2500213e296dad65ec3a58ce893
ab2c6134a3c7b267825ed5da2b51510fa3bf217b
'2011-12-23T22:08:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c434a30fdd6ea48286152d0c3d3f1e30
9540ee9e268e3fed5b03ede522d10af52c4c9247
'2011-12-23T22:08:46-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXG' 'sip-files00046.txt'
41eb9e292c081acc18b5b0e673b56fb1
d8c4b1544eaa2370a2f999b50d0a879d717cc793
describe
Invalid character
'8205' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
72f3fffad04c2b5a918466d2a76a9480
dd08673e793f8d1c6b125e2314789d442cc5dcea
'2011-12-23T22:01:45-05:00'
describe
'373389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXI' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
c058853eae988dfa3f034c12b0fe19dd
e843642b4f0a2e85d578b4f4c2b6c8cc04e47ba7
'2011-12-23T22:01:03-05:00'
describe
'98182' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
072313ac38d438e081ca661c774da93d
2b89bf98aff8d0f0e57fc32d60ce316b31b4577b
'2011-12-23T22:09:51-05:00'
describe
'26057' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXK' 'sip-files00047.pro'
02cf8988380a0112478d604ef7973b38
24e261f527b41b0c6a858b85f339535005b7cdef
'2011-12-23T22:01:35-05:00'
describe
'30321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXL' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
43dad8fcacd5af21e88a002dfacc541d
54447cc3a8a8ade9ce62f812bedf9a30842b23c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXM' 'sip-files00047.tif'
93259fbd6ca138e80cf7ac55305ec403
1e89f2c5f96237d1facdadbba32c8759f4d0a242
'2011-12-23T22:08:31-05:00'
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXN' 'sip-files00047.txt'
88f53d92b9b93f18282dce580ec8e952
c641b1789a00296a81c102aaf32ed09aa8cf87b6
'2011-12-23T22:00:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8686' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXO' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e02d89a2c18a50adf670884f21e84d74
9e87f672ffea7e8b9af4a1c6ed26a3afdbcaa7af
'2011-12-23T22:03:19-05:00'
describe
'373382' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXP' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
48d8271015431f17a1ade4c16799f27c
0535a877acc71e5b1dc1483dce8d54a43029c9f1
'2011-12-23T22:06:37-05:00'
describe
'95891' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXQ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f831220316de7386e9a1c2bd9cf184fd
194778eed69b5f1be75f47962b4c81eaba00deee
describe
'25568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXR' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8b62ac827809a899180111873c842fb9
511a975f174df0a66942a8f86de499f661c77222
describe
'29631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXS' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
9e7f359e91569033bf2468b4264788ef
f09131da7ae9004db9107e7f125a61d4e52b9dea
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXT' 'sip-files00048.tif'
56a70607b2a664ea9a73ee6c485f3d39
2c9135a4367c3ad4bb4dc533f854279b682a86fc
'2011-12-23T21:59:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXU' 'sip-files00048.txt'
338f0f0d1e84558aadf197bc9f77f77c
89c04344597976cb6cb91d865a6df0f2d7cd55d3
'2011-12-23T22:04:24-05:00'
describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXV' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
0f3541386e8ead0f7578ffad4ae00bc3
d9a20b0c9cc8599e913497e681e165583037c167
'2011-12-23T22:02:59-05:00'
describe
'373313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXW' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a4da4726aa4b89dfb579409bec512823
776f7fce2179d4ac31128a04c947a11dec70904e
describe
'81528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXX' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
20866d2b331293ee239994b79204b398
0f8f62f3a1a90ecc3a3c7bdb97079124383bfab3
'2011-12-23T21:59:23-05:00'
describe
'21112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXY' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5bc70cc070ffc1b50f1c0bdf2aed6d43
db58c2b6c83111a1d038d298a2bf307cb3aba8c9
describe
'25628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNXZ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
07d308cb4d3083a5616846c7ed1d8e3c
e65e842927658bb8e3dc6686c1ad1872f463ece6
'2011-12-23T22:02:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYA' 'sip-files00049.tif'
99b96261f3c288d7d4b09569f9db2427
77de7e687f5e308efbdd76b9548064ace2f83ec1
'2011-12-23T22:09:01-05:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYB' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4ce7118d25facf8ee8bcc96eafd93748
e8b1daa3565a9c70b98972d899746544f2f41d75
'2011-12-23T22:04:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYC' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
7698c68d7a4b3f4f4bcd9841ca50aeb0
34852e47ad6b8d3b56ee70f5074fc14974d1243f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYD' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
cf9417f8862cea7924baa09ee3620a65
115a3edf8a035262712780597fdd69b4794453f1
describe
'82067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYE' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
5453db05b45072962ba3fc7aaff8d46c
018ad7ae6e0da38605a573de9b5ae54bf38de559
describe
'21861' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYF' 'sip-files00050.pro'
7c8b14ac63af5a625d2445c15a1d20b0
45c41fa7000cfd9adfbdde4f62d43eb576b4e5b9
'2011-12-23T22:05:07-05:00'
describe
'25380' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYG' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e8d3bb06f67749c44e7d3a316a5e9749
e87cde640059c83df09ee8e959fcf78c41a886ce
'2011-12-23T22:06:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYH' 'sip-files00050.tif'
3ddf14460a1e24f530098f1bad41685b
d249ad1958916b157cf884d2f538b14100ebac29
'2011-12-23T22:01:12-05:00'
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYI' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ea85e4a2965b09897cbef2b166981bd8
290b70081ebb244819ce8d9d2fdbeac6825e8571
'2011-12-23T22:05:45-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYJ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
99cdd04ee3f90d9bc39bef0fdb57d2c1
ae99c511416976f5f565ab15f94c5b8feeddbb2e
describe
'373358' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYK' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
0091350bc78100b261412319cebb659e
f088da06b6c9f458a24f2b2fd016885728c43ae6
describe
'102036' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYL' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8a119818754ea6674904f3c287a688ae
8e9a1c9f7cad9f4f632c36fd526cade9df9678ea
'2011-12-23T22:07:22-05:00'
describe
'27719' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYM' 'sip-files00051.pro'
7a2757ff7d5492eabfff838c385b052b
923ff46c14051017ba1c3637525ac95e5b770370
'2011-12-23T22:03:10-05:00'
describe
'32670' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYN' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1ec916070260aca315eff59d9f7f58f7
725828b0c32fba734b3d38d0620d1a54cbb38cba
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYO' 'sip-files00051.tif'
38956c3c8e15e2665533a636c501cde2
c3d9c7d3d8de5d997589dd2975f275baaf583848
'2011-12-23T22:09:41-05:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYP' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1c4f50471852a52cbcdcb7844fe382bd
8b27273c7d3504db93a9b6a633c71b7344e2e785
describe
'8900' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYQ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
948d2fcd18b7535402beff2e54b71bab
f69c2268cf596b377f0b96dc07c5edd8d3127068
describe
'373386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYR' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
d80b250f67cbb590382dc6f630b7d559
dd67307490cf603fedf8e1f2f53833a9b2653a47
describe
'92046' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYS' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
48b14244900a9bac86ee0eba623cdf5c
76c14b67fe1f02479b18ce91b0b527eaa930a679
'2011-12-23T22:02:45-05:00'
describe
'25304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYT' 'sip-files00052.pro'
8efe1300d9444a1a9c412cc4bf8ca2a3
4a61a2388f823b413cfb3deb007a3e699976882a
'2011-12-23T22:09:26-05:00'
describe
'31535' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYU' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
07bb283c88a63a18343bbb287f2ed6a2
a9514546086f3a0f1306f013624b29c3ba05f270
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYV' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0563e388307570d465bd284d87c44afe
35168e8f02b9349ddd58c2ee222f2a78356edef4
'2011-12-23T22:03:20-05:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYW' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8149a4dbc37ade2180df6519d446a076
cbf86728734ff21f7ea440907b9c956b1b75dc66
describe
Invalid character
'8502' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYX' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
92e2508d1ea6689a2478d79c429d01d7
b138aa7d9de550564200a3adf2b5aed8e260732e
'2011-12-23T22:09:47-05:00'
describe
'373403' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYY' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5f55b004eb70cf5555e20b7421a6ba8f
01a963db9c192f9f49029598cf37e09e7a525256
describe
'105876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNYZ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
945e7e74fccb26843940b9293adb304f
8b6830f3fac53180671f5cbbc4245d7b0178597b
describe
'29832' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZA' 'sip-files00053.pro'
0fc5e0f088f77bb2a252d5a912b147c0
a557039dbcfd5eea72a6bf2385450ac0078f6590
'2011-12-23T22:08:25-05:00'
describe
'34162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZB' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
af0e6b672937bf34f989c6a3f7756691
e1c45a492170c14e1565809f4d25ed6cc8737f4a
'2011-12-23T22:07:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZC' 'sip-files00053.tif'
21922b3f4f83e39e1453c550221e0952
5d182f21a914b4c5f44c1fe1b5c0f0fc414569c2
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZD' 'sip-files00053.txt'
2fd47babf763d37e92c621e9823a7ebb
0d3b93c453895fc72b2d06ffa9f0ffd39bc901bf
'2011-12-23T22:02:02-05:00'
describe
'9662' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZE' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
0c2bd2d8bb62734ea4392df21b8ca228
3c1c4ad766297d98c7ec0617a74d605c977e67a0
'2011-12-23T21:59:55-05:00'
describe
'373405' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZF' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
30177fecca197439a40d3d3678d003e5
915bcdcf1e45b95cbacc747af9d97ed640477f07
describe
'103934' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZG' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ca942c334a70e977912b5d770d4f20d4
d5c1c02b66927533fe6d2dc60ab824d491b06f0d
describe
'29195' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZH' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5f8a9d72e861c5ae34ecb62766a3cba3
0887a35d040cf1860b801375e712f107a4ab8888
'2011-12-23T22:09:24-05:00'
describe
'36586' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZI' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a46e39da34f6d0752c50320ce156faad
e51bea29d35c594bbe164da458de93ee09c0b023
'2011-12-23T22:07:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZJ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ca92a4429dc56c98a35e8ed53953ac2c
be391d42c3011b97791262500e5738ea386ce733
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZK' 'sip-files00054.txt'
e7feb00558bd36ed518f183f0425f8fd
7a3f10fe9f2544d19990d9fc80737a6e97c88a8f
'2011-12-23T22:08:20-05:00'
describe
'8941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZL' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
31b142e0de325d36b91892ca3df5d791
39adb6298d0b5632bed20914dd2270434c56b289
describe
'373387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZM' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
a552d5f163466f06812580c70ce1937f
1ff4e5bebbea425976ccb499fe1a94a3615bd257
'2011-12-23T22:09:52-05:00'
describe
'99183' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZN' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
50bec7bcb8eb899b52355fd588b1c573
2c62aaad32df182260fe2fbcd083a672f85d6b87
describe
'27397' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZO' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8956caf54a247aa53306d2221eaaceea
295be419bf43bc81ff918b497c3a3ca25d1474cd
'2011-12-23T22:08:47-05:00'
describe
'31504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZP' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3f90a086973d8e148310bd3f31b47b1e
47e5fdda81a3fac4c082c58301db2e7d28f814b4
'2011-12-23T22:02:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZQ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ef98462f5f154501235b9d059ca229fe
4b12ff2862e83b6efcd03a511881a539e25920ad
'2011-12-23T22:04:26-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZR' 'sip-files00055.txt'
02b2864b585e6b2bcab4cb153f627381
216aab94a771d09eed597be340a433a9470b780f
'2011-12-23T22:00:06-05:00'
describe
'8827' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
786ff1b61f6d11b1b18049d349587675
b5cb4da6599382a7fc7b9dc6a745c12c38ed7d8b
'2011-12-23T22:01:39-05:00'
describe
'373391' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZT' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
47d911d39ee4c2777d9b3cc0ce607c0b
f28a8eba8ba4dac7795886632e5678fe71fec78c
describe
'81588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZU' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
371d5f8f874590aa109f03c186820441
5a360c64612c55e68c2876db031ac49c951decb5
describe
'22664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
fd79b2734b253f855f8bc21647a829ca
be0c2d0cb074847ff79459729e48dc35f437beb4
'2011-12-23T22:09:28-05:00'
describe
'26886' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
1add40261af9216e32b406967180a0e4
0f9db7fc7fab918950a4727d4c1676f49bdcaca9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6915be4011b23829b28a61a21074a184
acde28659f665b3fb0e221312935798561604548
'2011-12-23T21:59:28-05:00'
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZY' 'sip-files00056.txt'
34c9c65d4b3a866b237aeb5845c177a3
094201ed35f47d82041496608c65a6b35a6860a8
describe
'7353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABNZZ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
9249fbcd24c4bc6ca5776ee0cae992e9
f3b3b6e7c67e8484cf5edb8792228e4fcd621b15
'2011-12-23T22:09:54-05:00'
describe
'373385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAA' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
cab40a948f3da61002a7c8fc4f5cbc57
680b062ef7551fa2026422efb2fb1778a4aedba9
'2011-12-23T22:09:58-05:00'
describe
'82352' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAB' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
606172c6cfbde635e10b8a52a2eba9aa
e8049097f6896c6d433a194c4ec7064aa7f9a3b1
'2011-12-23T21:59:37-05:00'
describe
'21051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAC' 'sip-files00057.pro'
0846fb21ce4eb12ac9688bb85fc56ac6
1ac2f5bdd7d0af97bcceb687dac3edd50aa0916f
'2011-12-23T22:07:25-05:00'
describe
'24851' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAD' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a33c57500bac28f327829a832821871b
8d33c4a8e4bc045dbcf4035a08a88488fbe5af15
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAE' 'sip-files00057.tif'
13ab51841962f9b3da3c167b8e637bda
5e0d4d1a844b1b557e5fe21d3d54257fcf9c1a3d
'2011-12-23T22:00:55-05:00'
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAF' 'sip-files00057.txt'
acfbde9cc21d5f1c028f5c4585975391
4653f82880c19cc62eb2eadb4aeb050e9823de2f
describe
'7491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAG' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
2cd027d593d06df4cb4ae3c7b2e3cae2
6a865c683ddff2bcbbd873376e9e0716cd2089c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAH' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b2f0749e11d139bfae0785253979b447
25833e74af1177e8a83a9e4e40e93d663914d8fd
'2011-12-23T22:01:47-05:00'
describe
'85719' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAI' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
3f3fc26a5b032c71316d768984784749
247fcfbbe784bc553cf622779c877910f2ba8542
'2011-12-23T22:04:16-05:00'
describe
'22588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAJ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
4eead18963ec66d9b5318bc9c0c9528f
151c2f6fd985def20e73df9edf888d0b290a0de8
describe
'28099' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAK' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
71a5cb4c30214cdd43089fb4afce7b39
d2c6d7bf0d05ef0f75f43af81c30ab1c0813f040
'2011-12-23T21:59:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAL' 'sip-files00058.tif'
31fdd1bbc2960a64a173a7e545219c3b
417ce16f83255867fbe7eaccb3cb76191dd9994c
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAM' 'sip-files00058.txt'
55943c747c8a3b9384415fa9d6cbca06
24126faf3f0313cc11267297f745cd03bf7a0e02
'2011-12-23T22:08:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAN' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
6e369748da3942254d7aa462bf868a44
aee9e178264314be5defe652083f0d0e54487025
describe
'373406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
ed8a85b86718e2170be255b468f2ed4c
7ad40b9b9b3ddfa7291be8deb63beb8c5f78c3a6
'2011-12-23T22:08:23-05:00'
describe
'40544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAP' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
0a234a1f0dde18ff5649137cdffaf23d
d8a6c46e1cab5000a876e32d40e93f1ae162a626
describe
'6710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAQ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
f67902994a2727e1a359c819cb0b9a5b
6b87f78e7272dd6aa9b38023ee764cf1ce993cd2
describe
'11115' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAR' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
db0215cffacd5497e0ab16e8aee8ba73
554e9f7b54f514653e4275edec7d2413d2651612
'2011-12-23T22:02:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
68782e8974c5aba55c69b967fc337b67
5f2cb1399e835d2ecb04442a870639b06fd7ab43
'2011-12-23T22:04:36-05:00'
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAT' 'sip-files00059.txt'
ee97754cb674774b18ca0ba1c3f55202
08bd1a4ea61be15c7f21a0bdafe8021c0449d6aa
describe
'3178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAU' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
459c37c99a1c82bbbee61144f74bb06e
80194a57541418ab530e1be8a7798e2f498eb20c
'2011-12-23T22:06:51-05:00'
describe
'373306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAV' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
e5a996404a53ef6aafef0206a0f55f99
5149c268cdf0cf45b68715c1de4733fd664ba175
'2011-12-23T22:02:40-05:00'
describe
'72623' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
df06013b68c76f84f8aa2e331c4e26a2
3d1247fb230b2e2bce83235584d76b1ee44b2dee
describe
'18035' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAX' 'sip-files00060.pro'
09ede64964c1d54bd01d331da1c0b488
ea9f3f777ea8feadccb6ba767e5df71008a6d994
'2011-12-23T22:03:43-05:00'
describe
'22354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c2534180b92e96f563d2a10c4ca985b0
2e787c3c8ba475a89f6ed8fea08fbcc9626c90d9
'2011-12-23T21:59:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOAZ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f31bbdcb9fc421ea8e0250704a1028bf
d3b2046d0cb2568bdb77ae2bc7b40aba6382c606
'2011-12-23T22:09:34-05:00'
describe
'693' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBA' 'sip-files00060.txt'
67f4887b8512e3e65e2a1315bda75882
bd137743487c1437cf68d3be0fd83817105b7821
describe
Invalid character
'6786' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBB' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
be892ce4ffda7e4b8b3ee2fff7951d4f
f55e6b81e84365861eec69a58dcfe4333c8d2ec6
describe
'373383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBC' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
a80369e7db25f8776eab9b6204cf3b13
d478c09f323244ebf602943c390185149f631dc4
describe
'86245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBD' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b0883dc7e0bf2dd58f3430162dc0bcae
1c8193a9710f546196742ee8d445884e0c5c2da3
describe
'23114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBE' 'sip-files00061.pro'
6d4f1e2db7428bea3da04c890fbb722f
c7cd9798bba37b6c48fd06a46d6bcdb8761f9c4c
describe
'27462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d54d728d21062a31c9a26506ce6c14d8
924855726a14e4f90ecec8eff7e429303a543b58
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
85e97240af68de08b4eeda06d5bf40f2
c154462045accc7c2a0c6f60550b5eaf4a30fd86
'2011-12-23T22:02:58-05:00'
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBH' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a7f80d6c1b383bc9ef3b33b21116fed4
0a7d566c582d4473d266ee181462c3d4938a529c
describe
'7739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBI' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
556e21017da52cc19d63c2ab729490d1
34ecdc0f6bf6cf627e221b27157df99246352da7
'2011-12-23T22:02:48-05:00'
describe
'373361' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBJ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
b4630d37e08ff593c592625773ae7b02
bc75d50245abd04a4c765a1dada1afc4459f6e46
'2011-12-23T22:03:11-05:00'
describe
'69712' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBK' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
839e9934f011d674f7e1a12901f8a593
c36786dd04985b4c0b2e288f5f597c4be3f1d9eb
'2011-12-23T22:09:06-05:00'
describe
'18099' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBL' 'sip-files00062.pro'
ef09a2c1b58f7addd85b5ae3f059f150
1b18f46233dce3ffe51d41f444151457b63e2558
describe
'23002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBM' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
88bdc970f4fa21f81adabbbc4f289092
69943236935ef103a2cd4a18d183ed27a7d37f7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3b336f37e98dcca8e731bfbeb3e08cf0
fbc637e9e26fde8a46dc3f9c3352b515b2c8ef79
'2011-12-23T22:06:08-05:00'
describe
'684' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8babb2da4325976beb64fd043ab0e6cd
441fcebe1bb3d3c9bea552fc19b783e73cdd4fa3
'2011-12-23T22:09:44-05:00'
describe
'6329' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBP' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
f44b3f038aef70620345149f16cef929
94c74170421e9d01cd03ef69065915d0b4f39393
'2011-12-23T22:05:55-05:00'
describe
'373213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBQ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
0e0359b18614798233884e9fd4129656
2606cf3c9ea3fb7cdb45c2e12177fee0f4bf201b
'2011-12-23T22:00:51-05:00'
describe
'76047' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBR' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6a1e994819a520d68b3047a2d6a2eaa3
c47d48bcd8cf3dc123db5411af4084611021b708
'2011-12-23T22:06:41-05:00'
describe
'19792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBS' 'sip-files00063.pro'
8135165cec9c79101e2a80d0359e5089
7d4fea07e1e3153ecf307d5454fb07588af3a346
'2011-12-23T22:01:24-05:00'
describe
'24222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBT' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
bb3a9dd5d6346fee7e01d0dc511503d5
3ae0ae7db8ecc4a05e93cc131cbfde19b1938bd2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBU' 'sip-files00063.tif'
af86c362200d1d2858516ce3907ec750
0ff76c5cc32aa3defebfa7b2e55acb92b6032259
'2011-12-23T22:04:23-05:00'
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBV' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4c80ff7761ebd20a64b80579d246d390
01fb6745da31c62c71df28a4e19841874d9a74c2
describe
'7174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBW' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
9daf98242d48e94aade59f418e8e31e0
188bbdbc8d8263ade3c5a2a517f1d7fda9a0c89e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBX' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5531630d81f984e3ccd12d0df52b5e09
51f8c0e664127959134191a0241b8a05fd25da7f
'2011-12-23T21:59:51-05:00'
describe
'75340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBY' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d12942b4fb2d906aa319d5083201c1ab
9b97429263ecc4c62c636b6ea4617f66951c7068
'2011-12-23T22:04:59-05:00'
describe
'19494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOBZ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
45615f24b45d4a035d10452914492edb
2b362bc245869b794c8977dfcfb7e9b737611f28
describe
'25211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCA' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c5958ac614df1b33c84a704b0592c056
01c64dfd81f4c1494677071a0698cbddb4c1fa1b
'2011-12-23T22:02:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
39e27e2727072de0ee4c1d98af0fc44f
f99f93d3c61b7cbc105bf40c3b6ee2d85cdb5c73
'2011-12-23T22:05:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCC' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b763dd8808bd5ccbff416b53d25705a0
ef33ec99280390effc6df80955a3fe9e52d65e47
'2011-12-23T22:04:27-05:00'
describe
'6894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCD' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e632f8c73c2a435b98783ce76def6d59
fd09989d87735ddb64c6f0649d71d18d607d2912
'2011-12-23T22:05:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCE' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
cca3c3bf42cb6d479b88819643dfe54d
ffd4b9706431cdf720b5e01373c6fd6f791cb408
'2011-12-23T22:00:08-05:00'
describe
'88459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCF' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
7ade55449c51c512afaba78ed733ef21
01b6c30e208e9ee9d46cc82790cd2a1cf972ff80
describe
'22984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCG' 'sip-files00065.pro'
689fba0bc903c7588ee20107e58bdbd4
1eab540864fb935afa76ffcb1dd235833079bd21
'2011-12-23T22:07:30-05:00'
describe
'29977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCH' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
233528b98e5e3b2b06be602422a8d95b
4df1559d37a445bc876ff8df513cdf8fca3482e3
'2011-12-23T22:02:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCI' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c68a530e604b32ab35c2487be7c25adc
154fd6b9935206958a5de7789f49cf3b071c7c44
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCJ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
61f206b0b39aae3b98b7010383869818
d88e8fe2769158a990884a2b8559b29d061e5e6b
'2011-12-23T22:05:54-05:00'
describe
'8574' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCK' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8ac6a0e54aa51c1b4d929d9c17efe9c9
ff600330eb5ae100c6fdd3bc662d32af1f342ecb
describe
'367025' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0cb547673866ce1957754227bbd8af28
6083397f0de0ad3a6644a9c679585dde65d03d07
describe
'93265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCM' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
61b5f232919a8e28b3d7cf5f6187c404
b0d509cc2530e87fa2ef4138d84915d087aa1f12
'2011-12-23T22:04:01-05:00'
describe
'24569' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCN' 'sip-files00066.pro'
2af8f0d1d37c5a38d06fec2034ab54c8
5ae66b378a441714d87e812b4f1f75922c20dac7
describe
'30393' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCO' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e2f730b22159607a58d05974c3e517a7
dbcb217fd0b5656f46fcaa1e4dc45796b8301034
'2011-12-23T22:01:05-05:00'
describe
'2953176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCP' 'sip-files00066.tif'
d14591bf8a66adb965346a59988c4596
f09f6461bc097ef1f1015df42696cc42c3847174
'2011-12-23T22:05:24-05:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCQ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2c0877a774a004fa7010d608ae5a7738
b3d20df586bd2dd68294f87b3a1889ae9d2b10eb
describe
Invalid character
'8296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCR' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5a3e4cfcd26a6e235c139eb6a7c4aa6e
5879674909aaa3ead1e3966f26077d462cce0406
'2011-12-23T22:07:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCS' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
05ef8ddfb699466d84a7825b892884ac
f52c6b5e18edbb3f86722c3477a6f7926b2a4b93
'2011-12-23T21:59:34-05:00'
describe
'91205' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCT' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8d9f39188bd977ddc568a27aecbd25a2
28c6b4afda1d0d295b4a08fd75ca8cdbdf7134ef
'2011-12-23T22:01:00-05:00'
describe
'23632' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCU' 'sip-files00067.pro'
5642b1c99e1e74a760431d0ca65ce61b
20bec70626d5949cd4de888cb2bb6fdccc1804e2
'2011-12-23T22:02:26-05:00'
describe
'29428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCV' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
ca2ce33d55fc6b83dfab7337a7eecb6b
495b7e6edadb4af5b498089421efe5c288289005
'2011-12-23T22:01:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCW' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c78503666fd9e7af5892531c3d7b34ec
bfa8a11384a9ff0d61e636d5ee7afdbe707bc0cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCX' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2fef0d01ae6d181f0b944c20b131b08c
deccaea3a89c4747153e96984b2c88ca1f936066
'2011-12-23T22:08:06-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8584' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCY' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5f1ea692e3de570089d7dbd10fc8f7ea
5dbd826ee7501bfe79452e95da7e21c5cac18966
'2011-12-23T22:00:22-05:00'
describe
'373341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOCZ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
270ede4917e4bf66f0f8fd66482212ac
b7039d9aab2d8686b46569d53a275642bc6fd223
'2011-12-23T22:01:22-05:00'
describe
'96447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODA' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
abf1b4b05e7ffe41c8ad734b9627bd18
51fed539b0895df6744bfd8726618b4a2391b3f4
'2011-12-23T22:04:50-05:00'
describe
'27007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODB' 'sip-files00068.pro'
197555ca71ee9b51188f94ad7ab27b79
da7d6311ca79918ff0f723815e2b93d63d74cf28
describe
'32464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODC' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
918887a97911425a54d833a2ab27e8cc
5320cd2ad624c594ef3fe146cd7bc25a290082a3
'2011-12-23T22:10:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODD' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b0adcd24c76ec253f70e729807f523dc
91432cc51cf8722ea0cfcafbf079c9bee082d22b
'2011-12-23T22:00:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODE' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a8aee1bcb23a1239cadd18ddfe972e60
7bc2250d5cd66e79981c24e2bccf49d915b8cfee
describe
'8632' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODF' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
566be2421617b6677616aa19025c3164
6201da191c8d5a9f3a47127a88e5cc9d7077c729
'2011-12-23T22:01:38-05:00'
describe
'373375' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODG' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d9a4bddddd45a691e3f035eb014da934
a489a9615b041f6145315890d6a36710b11b843b
'2011-12-23T22:00:59-05:00'
describe
'101445' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODH' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
c6b235dfa23aed0e1b1abfd8b1717ba6
21bf385cc254cd53bcc733ffe5d82576a3b6d297
'2011-12-23T22:09:33-05:00'
describe
'27728' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
d3ae01396dd12aae7737b81ff88bdcf1
99acf05f0489c8cb92b19ff0aa57c07846f561e8
'2011-12-23T22:04:09-05:00'
describe
'32154' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODJ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
fd77dabd97b2718ec0e03e0028f45823
5caff97248545d3492beea6e07fe498a89c76e27
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
69e358e914509d1462a839b58edb6f17
189ba657687540b7cdbb1c9587687a48da4751a8
'2011-12-23T22:06:29-05:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODL' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d2c0f553e134161429b446ba7ce9adff
14ec2711f94b3cd91f2b681083f774c8d7405a04
describe
'9244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODM' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ad35fd76fced0d5fa3a04257a371a885
dca19a869d0eb98b1b787050f932991d3913ae61
'2011-12-23T22:02:32-05:00'
describe
'368626' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODN' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
a1b46c3986f3c6c780655ce85caa7d90
158ab22acc812e50b9c12f17f238e1d66a682251
describe
'89222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODO' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
584f5c4aae09fc220dc2853a92e64177
bcd81b6a0aad18a3dda20a0af5a2d60629555aee
describe
'23556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODP' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a37178a183e8a574a31656b4039b1d91
62610f459312178cfffae6fcbfd6f24cc8f476ae
'2011-12-23T22:09:11-05:00'
describe
'28641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
37ba2e8a2daf922ae7a8496e3e95ebce
d966e12ca1cb82615c356934b31cf07b04bc616b
describe
'2965900' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODR' 'sip-files00070.tif'
0f0599fbb619d0d18b2abb30109373a1
c0acef9dba8d9c3c62d976f6f0f14a6904e7aef9
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODS' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a2fe1e373ca656b4c41cafe332399aab
c2203a2e1e3ba36317e96a8480eacba4bdec5107
describe
'7984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1c9a946c239cb826616cfbf1405b54e0
ebaef26c59eff0dcbbb56a15ede6d974f1c86540
describe
'373357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
7950c880d04b647ed90fef60ef1039fc
1ad400bbc1bb984b5a357d417f7edba796f5dd45
describe
'59513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
b7ed5e7fd89aac7c8e365d9bd1b8ea96
1da24d309b28249429023219ce9823acd917951f
describe
'12478' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
022bbec10cd12e2e92febf8aadd653ec
48a2d075df5a4b7f57358c03139eddae42cd0e9e
'2011-12-23T22:00:17-05:00'
describe
'17177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a68c5d77f118fce0e950b32c8ea56791
cbf44af513ba7f393c360ebe575add6233448d59
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b037c1287c0442b1f20471a3c55c141f
bcc68be6b64140b7e1ebe32a687bbb26afc46b28
'2011-12-23T22:08:03-05:00'
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABODZ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
65d39c15c9e06a711904908ae8c79e7f
213c77a4f6145fe91a9e0ef8f27da074d65e2726
'2011-12-23T22:01:42-05:00'
describe
'4939' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
05076e7ee4c90a89dc4d608e24f392b8
c4826133c79d52b720981b1ef7835db101db9fc7
'2011-12-23T22:00:09-05:00'
describe
'368591' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
6dabd98edebba8c318f4915f7e12163b
6ecf59d4828c78edaaa11d3ec09d03fc9873adf1
describe
'104718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c162f398afc531858b2120cc042ed8cb
1bc01b46001a400216ed2d442c5471f3ac437ddd
describe
'22974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOED' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ed47944f4d342d21ca04398b32f3de28
2f1d111952e216836d5805fc97e2265ac0bddb49
describe
'32847' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a89d367b1661d989340d721a19e730da
64b14f850cd0d00ba7eb852699b967e70f28fa6f
describe
'2966876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a85c0a5213e8386255701b0579895445
e71d58e3cf88cec82578fd9c5baa4fb602a7cd69
'2011-12-23T22:01:51-05:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEG' 'sip-files00072.txt'
f4a18491dd806621ec936ab8f1429efc
dc96643dcd4511ec1680dcd3c3dadb3646de10de
'2011-12-23T22:03:53-05:00'
describe
'9148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
cb86aae19fbbc75ddef50191e41435ee
82c3ed4282268e18bd8426b3ce65b248d7538b65
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2607ac5e6a4f613c8227f99d10fc6e29
4db8e03ea8b864cee55293a73254913550f9ebe3
describe
'181604' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
8676f2c510f3f70e0e13871d7f2285e9
be78a588f16779124d29a08898002e96ac7b3c73
'2011-12-23T22:04:17-05:00'
describe
'1941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a03f8c9017f8b6ba168a6bf0a2a97b55
195681886913618fba2da667fbc53c13525a964b
'2011-12-23T22:04:14-05:00'
describe
'39631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
6ffc3f0fb937abbbcf21d0bc2a6e5e4f
325a0498a6d3da3ed48916f639643e254dc8e302
'2011-12-23T22:05:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEM' 'sip-files00073.tif'
fc3d0a0608a7b9f7295c92e16aab4460
49e402a74304dd622818872e6e85511f77bbe4f9
'2011-12-23T22:08:42-05:00'
describe
'9290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEN' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
28ff128c3b5a84c96d7b1290c848994d
0aefc9cf65b7dcff468d4a6ef324f4291f8df61d
'2011-12-23T22:09:21-05:00'
describe
'373305' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEO' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
cfff5abf363e790617a19001bcaaad48
8b4f6833e4cc229357180f6f811a1bb75d51813e
describe
'102246' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEP' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
e8625c74b3c617ea80e30d85c895eb54
1f04fe3d276533b295f335a30a4a6fb59144f36e
'2011-12-23T22:06:45-05:00'
describe
'27463' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
65d3c193a848381bd919c947199accd4
1f1ea091580829cdb1f505dc751a2b39ce74547e
'2011-12-23T22:05:23-05:00'
describe
'32265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOER' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
d934637c2456f47344d876e5583f4fb4
5f24074f07980315576c4f3dfb2206d2dc29030b
'2011-12-23T22:09:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOES' 'sip-files00075.tif'
3483cb213f70e7e7551916e105f38abb
e57222f22058bc3138f1ed99b0cbde768ac02be5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOET' 'sip-files00075.txt'
786f3a71425c8fcf6b6c28369d1d6b94
e12a4aa4322266b8dba995a54d59ebc01b8df1a4
describe
'9250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEU' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
63f47056442b764d6e272a03ee6212a4
d02f185da7b868db57a9b5ecc893f84814de83b4
describe
'373144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
859269bb5114eea0fc8ace47c9bfdbad
79d71fac3ef192a2f3e2b25589d793445565409a
describe
'87293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEW' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d686675af7f6f66fea1cf74fe5832aef
64b10292b0ee02cff844d80ff420552eedf4ac11
describe
'25106' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEX' 'sip-files00076.pro'
9817454795d7aaef92fc50d194c20c29
9797fc667bd2fc4fde7c7d48a128b2be16063e78
describe
'27600' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEY' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
af10d1842bfa9d8d05ab76bb38069eba
8fa1d3a181f0d14b69cf8a04a412153e6087402d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOEZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
fcc59191eac4dd3e40b7fb1b0b3ac855
fe30f9a820842ccf1589b1bd024cf1faf19cbc6f
'2011-12-23T22:07:58-05:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
847873b5026cb88a3137716fd743b3a1
ab935cef7693650161c55c2a5735ea9e7a0c0f0b
'2011-12-23T22:02:37-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFB' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
67a2d833f6f20ecf0d7ebf2a3687fc61
b146d989daafd58a268e6b3611c893ef3c87189f
'2011-12-23T22:04:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFC' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
253acdfa209a48a15eee01441ce321b1
bca6c4fca969a3bb61cb04030e52d2fb3ba0567a
describe
'104876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFD' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
7c3801440fcfe4327282675bf920c677
c73c782dd2ddf94eaed70b7d8a6a4af61c613142
'2011-12-23T22:06:17-05:00'
describe
'29721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFE' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b5a03509ebfac20ab2523da63eab3dec
8ead2034413509c8d038fda453c6fa615fc7be8c
describe
'35448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFF' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
dcd294c0f22ee043332d98832ae00a35
0cb6835e6ae28f2259af6c78ec17ddf54bc98495
'2011-12-23T22:08:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFG' 'sip-files00077.tif'
cfb63d375aedca186b8ddda054549797
09a402e542f6a15b4992d193afec12637f8c0874
'2011-12-23T22:03:15-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFH' 'sip-files00077.txt'
950184c723be5777eda120c1029fdd70
3fd24e357ab0476c870da4dd921c15a05ae95346
'2011-12-23T22:04:07-05:00'
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFI' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
6862eb2e1666115ae299609117944b3c
24bbef185e86070ed9030bba57fbbcd8ba0537e0
'2011-12-23T22:05:43-05:00'
describe
'363858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
afcaf760a3bb24af304aec77b4d1f9c2
44d6bd36f8eea836442bf8d70db57e37a45a759c
'2011-12-23T22:04:45-05:00'
describe
'106264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFK' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b6c0b3c5755f7c51f16b522f662ab759
e7eb1ef61d70ddf11567ab517667c0b2cb9941e5
'2011-12-23T22:03:51-05:00'
describe
'26868' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFL' 'sip-files00078.pro'
3ac7a2ccc8e163e62e026dd36f66296b
b066ea33ebce324e58c0f09647eafd22b1b0a4a4
'2011-12-23T22:09:39-05:00'
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFM' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
58a49303f06ba234ee71e27f2756c1e5
025bc065127faefba7cad6429ccba80472056c91
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFN' 'sip-files00078.tif'
2fdec5c6074329d15e3b7346acf19067
ff11c25163d4ec55a16450055d0f18f5078954ba
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFO' 'sip-files00078.txt'
0076c3ba4e88b5d4933a7a5d43f7d8de
c389ab8116ed4bf70866d8c8402af84a3389b8b1
describe
'9399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFP' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
96aa3b7b9a36af67f78b022e311b6239
eb0228d22feb1ceeaa0923db0e527c8150a31e6a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b394d80e0d9ab22d75e90c11b366641b
ffb8bc2f54e8e3efbab7c7563ccccf7e7ce4da58
'2011-12-23T21:59:46-05:00'
describe
'98376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFR' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
942dd5896182baf2e05b433a470156c3
da806f7cef96b8e7b0c8aeba809d40a1fe179e2e
describe
'25119' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFS' 'sip-files00079.pro'
efe195dfc57f85b5481ccbd5c708c81b
d471508e8e569f84c6d93f78343f93e24eaf5b05
describe
'31953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
56a8987d1f06c31b58dcb07cfd8007fe
17612ef22cf38d2935a6608cf09652996655f37c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
50b30c3a738a1a20d878cf7ded7e3554
80fb16694cb316f599739ef16f03586406b36de7
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFV' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b54d665b1f6ae6ecaa9e74785c7ac8f8
4cdd3124736e19129b39e6643ed041417fd190cd
'2011-12-23T22:00:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8541' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFW' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
7d84d8d20a1ccd5bee86c0f1db7ff3a2
bf128d38d41f728c4cb04802d18e529a07666dcb
'2011-12-23T22:04:56-05:00'
describe
'373372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFX' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bda091a41a942a083a4ec401fcb3600b
346a7e7954a65cee805a42cb2591d0c1277bb974
describe
'33136' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFY' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
9cf18dc5d178638076d374206015d5e3
ed446362f9506a29f085de9e673e170c74789062
describe
'6517' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOFZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
20bb06838e30840184ec80b192700edf
766a234a6000a9596253fb5c92eab286bebdaeb9
describe
'9147' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGA' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
fc6a675ac154bb924f44b276be3b3726
44cb0d76ed1fc4fcfc3e6072a476da21bf3ac014
'2011-12-23T22:01:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
67f88e4cf4ce063d4257c343fb35e541
79b052754945be96e15b34bab631da22324a244f
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGC' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a103619d5a559d74a8d0878d7bd0b970
2b152b880a80cbb858d9e84a9e8173cdeca674b8
describe
'2843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGD' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
97317f1a5106b4388b29f6eb6c7d6c9d
2dfd8045c50171365c937ee66d7955b26754998b
describe
'373244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGE' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
2f66a9c52738971cac3d6e2b2f4a0319
d060181a807d038efc9b0f0f77e2975daa8b5fcc
describe
'81188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGF' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
b5168877ff5c23a5344cdc8d23636bbb
04800cfb65e337cc5c90bfbd9830d5aca12507c8
'2011-12-23T22:00:11-05:00'
describe
'21707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGG' 'sip-files00081.pro'
77dca67ca4979c887fd455110dc98f7c
865680e5bc0d0d67577a80d829650acf62b5053e
describe
'24960' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGH' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4ca8bf69fcf7b8ec35304d399f59f370
61def7fb639e38bb9b2f914b288fe1732e608dce
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGI' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e33cd223c8adaeebdd4e3cf498542c0b
e5760d8d5ced58bdd8ec582ace21aa0751ef0094
'2011-12-23T22:01:26-05:00'
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGJ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
3cb171a4c119492b4f18b7b84f8a6f89
037de75711fc646fc5e7c598946368946777a495
describe
Invalid character
'7572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGK' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
7c2846fcb4996a529bdf8312219f2ee0
d7c0920401fd8f63e5d0f0979a814c03b81d394a
'2011-12-23T22:03:38-05:00'
describe
'373309' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c751c3f006608ed4871492255e099170
834b47d9bde257dcf000515753f2969ec1fddb4f
'2011-12-23T22:00:56-05:00'
describe
'90230' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
1f910ae467377473634510c47e039a01
6ffa8c9489e7a30b0f6357abd549918d47c84888
describe
'23238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGN' 'sip-files00082.pro'
00d4b24ea2fe60b34e0f70b1a3424492
8a2b3a2cd8c69a07eee98391a8c873aeab95e53f
'2011-12-23T22:03:37-05:00'
describe
'30644' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGO' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
e6e7159f8f709cebd23e3c7885b1205b
690241effad67dec0ceed7d05111b8044720d6de
'2011-12-23T22:02:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
edddb75074100d14c5c9335d0952470f
b2e2f3f57bf7e3db4611ecdc4da7f1f343310a9a
'2011-12-23T22:09:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGQ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
c14a3ce4f002bdf76c331733b59b111c
20555fb4bce82bc976b4a73f7d79614a9d43b345
describe
Invalid character
'8294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGR' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d7e76fca8f598d94494d29b62088d56d
98a1719849e8e56a2078a079095793b404a3bdcf
describe
'373337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGS' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
fefac7f8d90b652b9e2b666ffa746e49
a0c773e439eb0df6e13acfeac0a717e2abf77e2e
describe
'100295' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c58154ce3690327bcc03d45987fed9e2
399bb3646a1599019ea6efa9e8abcda2acbbcdb7
describe
'26843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGU' 'sip-files00083.pro'
885df04cabe2ce21315eca1291e0b2c1
6cfe1d076dcda176491a07d2dc0a75d6aea35545
describe
'32962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
243ac3e0affcadfe20e1c2e1de1a27fe
6e75b35e4e8f86afbfcc01e8674643677147bf29
'2011-12-23T22:02:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGW' 'sip-files00083.tif'
cf71f633970ffb1de97caf68c779c2bc
6fd44289cce01287f09c792d6f92baec2811ba0b
'2011-12-23T22:02:50-05:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGX' 'sip-files00083.txt'
596635984fd177784b4222c151bb058b
dba06746e7dfecda264c5a28d0be6671f1a39eb4
describe
Invalid character
'8804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGY' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
688c4e92fa6923658dc2e4ca00413e80
6f2f2bd0e96847fa3812f65bff0697807677a108
'2011-12-23T22:01:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOGZ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
aab33805c71b9a099e27faa4ffd60a7c
792382c4977c85f5c3ba833cda0adf5418356545
'2011-12-23T22:00:36-05:00'
describe
'99337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
bea52d6043dcb271a99451a4ea10c0d6
1c453ea5512deae8d1c03873bb7aa8bd79b1a0be
describe
'28487' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHB' 'sip-files00084.pro'
66679d087b48137d788abb35d137c0cf
24ab1ad72d4df8ac6b91cbe28536f62b4a53366d
describe
'33238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
454bfded6c8c745c22b5d747d6850044
8121e1dbf5839ca862ade2668aece6b422720e3d
'2011-12-23T22:09:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
38b79f28fe6192c9228390aaccddcdce
cd9cda8ffb10ace7966490bd0a05965190f5eb22
'2011-12-23T22:02:28-05:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHE' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5a855e2770a47c8e30ab512786985915
9c3498aae7f0f5b8bb79d71035ace1a39b1abc52
describe
Invalid character
'8862' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHF' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a9fdbaa7dd0e5d12af6676c9806040e6
22c2ffccfe3be36261f4f46d1a0a3370642b9823
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHG' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b6ca1348bca8755ee6032f5dabd9aba2
89985329a58d01e49c2af9d94f862357b4b6675c
describe
'91495' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
8bf25433f7dacffd63a4aa347c8d379a
84fc35db4ca5a86cffbbad2b531b650622d9fe57
describe
'24912' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHI' 'sip-files00085.pro'
1de56e0ad22ecfd3295b9b3fc822940e
cc4b230c02c599269a2758bb11e77a9bc212656f
describe
'29634' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHJ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d486cc7f280013bbd64e82104dc0a36b
60acc33b6899f153a4460a3974b2fb5390d32f12
'2011-12-23T22:02:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHK' 'sip-files00085.tif'
23405a45053577d9aef01600a499165a
7070837116302341a3988c22035bbf34abbc0f8c
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHL' 'sip-files00085.txt'
869ffe5b42b95075623ebaf0e07e94b5
eeb25d6bfa6fe186f4d7414e8cee546357ee9d41
'2011-12-23T22:08:19-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8622' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHM' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
19c04ad600f562cb5f388f482a0dab65
127dea16bc095647999f1e645ec6028b13e47295
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
19d6942b2b4c5f15908d0c512cb5fd17
7d9833c82ddcd694bf57ae312ba722269692be5d
describe
'87074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHO' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
c0cff92b286e440c1a6f228b82855dcd
bcd0ab2d80aa0cbdcf97220635929d5dfa8f82d2
describe
'23343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5b20d97cba6315b8a2b2ce24dbffb167
e5ee15a5c81b8a741747f2b298f414e9e182f015
'2011-12-23T22:01:52-05:00'
describe
'28033' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHQ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
80491c3bc5a3595f42b92fdc2208c8be
c27f2e367b6aad7a08ba259f5edb58c3b41b5468
'2011-12-23T22:07:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHR' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0fa7da96a924da29aa2711b645c8ab71
d8295f58cd2c39a154aaccebf01fe6ace4fd54be
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHS' 'sip-files00086.txt'
3eccb8afc8eed0cb077180f82809ac76
bc1e74fbc68f1d245631c0b001ec1fc99f934ddc
describe
'7660' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
7f96564effcc636064b0cb141a1181e3
585569bd68ce8e519e937ba8f3e233529c45dad7
'2011-12-23T22:07:05-05:00'
describe
'373363' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHU' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3c94afbc620475bd7390c41c93c82e93
d5b25215adcebd5c4a2138c9cd7b73f52fe91fbc
describe
'94351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHV' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
595b5ca1dcb1b2c9506c700779d940eb
1f1ad2b58c6d26d3eb8c3e43f4a63123349a3cbc
'2011-12-23T22:03:58-05:00'
describe
'24617' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
84fe44a6fdcd22f7137e5880975140c3
ee7328aaad2d15b3e39852da705564cf05b4b541
'2011-12-23T22:00:37-05:00'
describe
'31485' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b25c5a5d6f26927e66cb10cdf428a07c
4aed785b4c5c3e029037bc66ac871ae92d8f1d2e
'2011-12-23T21:59:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
df06b50cde0de95377d6ae53bd4406a2
a0ef28c5fd87dc68b27cf3337b049066e5710858
'2011-12-23T22:03:34-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOHZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f2d49f4f3b6fd12510907f18130b5205
a3b96920551b8335da3fa1f4b84c5756c550c56d
describe
'8504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIA' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3c6bd67a760f04af83b516d1d36cdfce
ec89a0c16bcd574a6be7cc07fe45e1f5982cc794
describe
'373319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
372f0635fe59e62667d776b8df51972e
36b8ff9985635ecb86465ad75286c0473edd7ed2
'2011-12-23T22:09:56-05:00'
describe
'95612' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
705cac51bebfb2401334928b6b54b6e6
81744d02ecb97d144f80da225c6a318b927144c2
'2011-12-23T22:07:06-05:00'
describe
'26709' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOID' 'sip-files00088.pro'
4cd9c92286e25b407b9d732e6d244089
97c41a09c6c636babfbd358c39e270ac9bf0c000
'2011-12-23T22:06:03-05:00'
describe
'32360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
f375aa2f36cbcea5b2f4eb1946a6d812
5908a654f89ba6c8efe2a20db141c05bca953cd2
'2011-12-23T22:03:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
0bff4d305cd1a6fc124b679d398ac833
ef233144886deab0ce3c8a3adf978eba000ad941
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
09754059cf3ee58b5257b31e9bb76e78
7579193f8cedc02d361b6c5fe55d71acde61763c
describe
'8402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIH' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
1112f8bcfcea907722bf0f4f74631cee
b2113bec0e551d021576dffffe3854fb016fe2a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOII' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
50cd6c011fb8830b5ecba1af01c82a7f
9844fdf5dd7360e2f64c50d3be15e23979fa1eb2
'2011-12-23T22:07:17-05:00'
describe
'92064' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIJ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
dc70997557caf0195e750d42b77d3bc7
f4c932873138a14a7863e9fcc4d6a7c798a19c92
describe
'25332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIK' 'sip-files00089.pro'
ba32a62c7ac23aa88f89fabe6eb0c81e
85e94acd7c7948452863bdd7d0a7b2e8365bf613
'2011-12-23T22:02:03-05:00'
describe
'28628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIL' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
fbb778a54bcc9699bab587d5173f13b1
67c02925e1e065a0b81d288970b4dd1f78e8d99e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIM' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2c270a4f7f8739b837d19e04e8ccc19a
36455404cd1c5be184c70d939637761f5cb6d98a
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIN' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9b0b87fb0ec59d2d8e6057fa0c7bbb83
7fd1d2a7d33587405062daed0b8bf542c9df6030
'2011-12-23T22:09:12-05:00'
describe
'8521' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIO' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
83c98e7152fa9924e8d1e392019fbee7
b8dff5059c2b209212fbdad542e544298f886229
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
3cd1cb1c84b63d06c89eee5e0c58a5ba
d34c415db44dbc6d50118c323df34e7f9996479a
'2011-12-23T22:05:14-05:00'
describe
'95447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
3eeaa22359f4773291fcd48c648481cf
0c7bfd1fad182a43dd71d02fefb19788e8340944
'2011-12-23T22:03:02-05:00'
describe
'25658' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c79ae510eb6bc641df87e23d1024e8dd
5ff50c7840c99e9ab7e4f8f5647c54034a6d86dc
describe
'32221' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
0b161fd07740c49ff053035ed624cdf2
ddcc3c10aac71f88032576a1d56d2136fb0c1093
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f796727d5de9d57dd6abaa3e70115da3
46876e13da9acfba0fddac3a499ff2002fb3c812
'2011-12-23T22:04:25-05:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c07cd40a81d57aa9c1765ada45f39598
9992ad8306b569236b57594e0bfb85b666d14a98
'2011-12-23T22:03:08-05:00'
describe
'8604' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
db3762e758f452f2549f1db9efe933d2
999cbb1ab46bb51543fdad9a6ba076445aa3491a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIW' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2742ea31f797312f849651e439f51dd2
2dd8007ecbb6b12888aadee4763552a8404320b9
describe
'101118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIX' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8a8d11e1ed54a7cd2f1c3519d4a03bfc
66e78c1e99631dc395aba34423aca62eb257e6c3
describe
'27802' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIY' 'sip-files00091.pro'
daca54170547c55d3da452a186bea7ac
a313538e0db0b506669a5336f2525adc3b51d2e3
describe
'34706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOIZ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
33b9e3454222847fca9bbe8d8fd11c56
18f84aea438047fe921396527598137c858c6875
'2011-12-23T22:07:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJA' 'sip-files00091.tif'
17b08dd03ea8dfc72d44175ab8ad364c
50a670897e9b76f6f2b47e6eb92ee479b9d44ef0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
d43ec5dd1cf0199e0e08021c54bbd384
03f314b3b6226376d1c221aedb10f06c6bd770e2
'2011-12-23T22:08:22-05:00'
describe
'8922' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJC' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
11facca4b74a6b226bd94d9b9acfec64
70f22d532e4f685a27357c871f9918bb173691a3
'2011-12-23T22:08:28-05:00'
describe
'373367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJD' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b032dc35bca9b20632a20fe122520fe8
2500bb3a8562bdb6048ab464499f6242b5113cc9
'2011-12-23T22:01:27-05:00'
describe
'99023' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJE' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
c5e40109006aa2af9d2c1a907f05eb98
2fccf902e54f891a0b9136a946c90138c21ce384
'2011-12-23T22:05:17-05:00'
describe
'26379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
b27ddd7f959f4d358cf822370858ccb8
69eef592cf95f5b7f04cfce42cd00fa4b9c37075
describe
'33712' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
47eaef3ad52cc44ea0b0c4f17469ca0e
cf70d072b543b3ebfae907982c648b1dc990d724
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
6d566bfea74e41557e45447bd988b698
035733e4c242c7c4efc76be7a96295c85075dcf8
'2011-12-23T22:03:28-05:00'
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJI' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7849a0ed8004e3f6991749b174e7f567
0f79cb81077acf2fa366e4e9cf808263b5d24964
'2011-12-23T22:01:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
c1347a62f951dd0feabd44c662cde01f
917cc53684f809bc410ed244aaceae172e45aa01
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
61c40ac4a8f149089db11c1572d31064
58f56106892983156306144b84596e0d03c8f9e0
describe
'104910' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJL' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
9f5f5837b086657bdf98f24bba3d6df5
6f9253e0a87f9760ba51e6c7c36356e0cf20812e
describe
'26162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
ae6238c2bff3e81f36dde4d009c93191
aa68278ae32714ffc5adcb2bc40a759889ae44a1
'2011-12-23T22:09:23-05:00'
describe
'33234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
8e1bd132515df60021b8990556ac2be7
9e91a1700d84e90f26c4f2ce50fa685eddd9145a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f95133f6668dab5a5dcd7e97929436bd
804c842ebe1fbbf6f13625c15077e91b3b76a0af
'2011-12-23T22:08:43-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
e2ccd1722c4238a3f4f91dbd9d8c5e95
2bcfcb9546c78e5ae5ae370f97e48c4b66b4d002
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
3e43ee70ead55fb911dd26fa55907558
f320ae572e513a465beadd1504b62f844e9f4ac3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e2c28e446b99e2f5e5ff652796d3c174
e91f5fbf29419adfeddbbb6d28b9ac1f2da23781
'2011-12-23T22:06:50-05:00'
describe
'98425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
70437dd9269f75da97c857f3ce655a5c
50e51dc8474e275becb72442cb8bc8fb406d2404
'2011-12-23T22:05:20-05:00'
describe
'25068' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJT' 'sip-files00094.pro'
6b91b5b660b187022e13c117ff0adfa2
552fa9e6a8f448232dde4ecc9efe78c428a603f6
'2011-12-23T22:05:02-05:00'
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
be8ed8c314be6232b906d7c4512a7843
f28d056f85cec74afceee73b70fa87ef1def61bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ab0dd1061e57d67476e6879f47f4a7a8
26bcc254b7f2ef92fec34323a4a619a88710acf1
'2011-12-23T22:01:41-05:00'
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJW' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5d41c1a922aa095b5e46c4faa29e9539
6e7ac9bd6e48e9840b0c81c15db509afbd5272d8
'2011-12-23T22:07:54-05:00'
describe
'9014' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
437c10d9591b6572c97761da260482fe
87f2d1f4aa487f9b5b3c4f09e515c05273246eeb
'2011-12-23T22:03:00-05:00'
describe
'373326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
83aa716183d1eb3a21e063772a22a6f6
da08c0fe760d6ca57e35b1d1f336d24424ad800f
describe
'105901' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOJZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
570d28607ca8be8a9bba3d4fcf9836fc
a2dda697c66c09af1560fc9c04c4dfcb5def888c
'2011-12-23T22:00:07-05:00'
describe
'27237' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKA' 'sip-files00095.pro'
e8ff82a18e6fa5ce7739955a1bb23d77
0027c12b7cf7f292be13fbeb5a1d78048d41e7f3
'2011-12-23T22:09:13-05:00'
describe
'33637' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
74e70041a7751a2f38ccf070b6ab8af5
e626c57268e170d7c1e90f994ca3bed9726f9215
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKC' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0f46737f8c951500b7df3d8613f45862
6f40aad9d1683bc18eeb16bb57ef481a5d8bb6b5
'2011-12-23T22:05:37-05:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKD' 'sip-files00095.txt'
d0eed662544a973c7c5b1cf49e974dfc
dc57722506422376f153e4ef9792bcc26a7d3bfa
describe
'8979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKE' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
8b3ad32144b178ef49144e6cf0e56dab
26d4a5430be34f07cba4783fe6acc1c63a32ec20
describe
'373300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKF' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
154355b407670c1960292a3c793ddd4c
e89a40ad22ca4723c5b94d644b9e7e952f00ba1e
describe
'81762' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
dc9b25eafb38a55621c867bb4e65bfb8
4cf2915ff06db53a739ff3318e7a1c5b2bb5820a
'2011-12-23T22:07:21-05:00'
describe
'22061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKH' 'sip-files00096.pro'
2b2d4c8ec2eceb6e4da3638fcd209151
31b5f819d146c8a85455ec5ffbba22702a41ddd4
describe
'27502' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKI' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
ba6933f952d2215a706d95cd59885616
9c80dc9f6f63bbe958548eb27ebd7389551942b6
'2011-12-23T22:08:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKJ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b513f0c2d0b3744de881f18a11a51e95
4486a8e900325079f39379d8303f78b92a789318
'2011-12-23T22:06:35-05:00'
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKK' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a66fdfd35efbd49779c965c52e81732d
a0ca14ddf3eb116c62465670c8d6545c22050591
describe
Invalid character
'7533' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKL' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
9a2d58a16b54f8da5aefc8f143ba3d5b
dbf33c50b0e7514fa93efb50f1bfdeb5afa603dc
describe
'373332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKM' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ab04b6187147f404b1bfb7c729274baf
ed87e09dfcecde125c1b462c469b9e2f1183bf8f
'2011-12-23T22:07:11-05:00'
describe
'36616' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKN' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
69dfd43b4e3f0c303bdf0f8c5c3b4fd6
b727bb2e505a86c71fb36765ec9d30414d72ecd5
'2011-12-23T22:08:11-05:00'
describe
'6607' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKO' 'sip-files00097.pro'
92ee55fb29f4c1eeb5e84b9e8a1f52cc
9690fc8799b268f526f70702d225f1591070887b
describe
'10126' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKP' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d329288b9dd92eb4dccceb009d69eb9d
9d52138cd858039e95e3cda6f3781f9773883aae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7aa907579cf9475fcf7b58e4ab9660a7
4dd62f5825db487ac8d1d3e1b07eae108e43dc07
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
ae4960f932d3f1f068d62a40f8b427a6
2180c889e2c302f83f840605358802978a767207
'2011-12-23T22:09:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a19eceb6ec0fa2a50d33938c3a9d08b6
6981523dd0bcef3cb7e297315d0c2b140eada5e4
describe
'373163' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKT' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
06d407826a940da785240e95b450eb4b
efc3a35dace9db6ee77cba56fb72f86985a60027
describe
'81277' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
45fdd2fbd2e1c10ff2f93fda110d1414
737a6e4e5c1cf4e881fafd0ddb4ad6c2ad554627
describe
'21115' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKV' 'sip-files00098.pro'
47b724bc51920814d1eefa9e734fc32f
0e89abff7ba5c3003e609d37fbee13e35cbb0312
describe
'24909' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKW' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b8d626fc8a01b3c36f496ae02d938aab
5ede1545f0994353a92536c75172e972f5831f4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKX' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9725941d7c764b6a81d93e3962aef27a
7ebf218e1da65ab11a242f85b1c03df579e882b4
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKY' 'sip-files00098.txt'
336a3c5edd29ff8308e609705472baaf
c4547d38b3f5d4a2f0a8e1c1770d60b9b8baec32
'2011-12-23T22:02:04-05:00'
describe
'7065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOKZ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
e8ef5c26e036f5522d548e76796af779
8ff28cb07ced5d1270233739d749daffbae79cb4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLA' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
44b15a6421d9197b986473385ae8ce78
9847822d39f6442ab0a9c512e5101fd5554a6e52
describe
'93405' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLB' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
df3d52f155dbc7c0f6e817ccf75dc3c6
af77d3bde6000f6f43489552a78439717cb6e4ca
describe
'25531' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLC' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4bb66dea58d653f88ec04b0402c622ee
967e2a126e9f803b107c2f9ae583a5b0bab0ee65
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLD' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2a921b49ea3ef7508997ecc8dd12f373
2dcecd9d5fe54efa796c73fd637a51c9098195e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLE' 'sip-files00099.tif'
fa7c75c037417e96886287f810aa9b13
4e582c67ded7206f1fda608b9c7025fa05fe5531
'2011-12-23T22:00:39-05:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLF' 'sip-files00099.txt'
12d36a98f864146b532b596e73a1fef0
90cc40548b4bd68f2d466703752d453580000499
'2011-12-23T21:59:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8551' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLG' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5f79fc303bf64d59ac510e666fbce21c
7b981c0b793c0782383df60c83742f43c3790c78
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLH' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2628bc95e0a677e40ec9aa142c98329e
69827c78d89af0a7dbd82605c875ebf4c08d85f6
describe
'136252' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLI' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5a8f647b21d1468de65593bf8f02c6ce
40adc975007387a5aec4d56e2f6fe4b58e433069
describe
'25710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
fb0d3fbef1694517a621ddd514ca5805
c6d29f09e47096070e7ae75066eaadbb1994e530
'2011-12-23T22:02:31-05:00'
describe
'39142' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLK' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ae333c6fcb2b5aad040befe078d64abb
2b3a022d502337eac544e8fa8ea7bbb9633ea570
describe
'3005052' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b9dafbda06e2906b5facf8709b52354d
08aa5734a5eb3118ee92ecba6091c1d801f08960
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5554319ba49e3354ba554f13c1021c49
391b67e97f12da76e2f04a1fefa8d723cb9ca084
describe
Invalid character
'10732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
4abb1926b5e94ee427ed5eb500e32cd6
84aaefe2eef4b52bec9d70eb9f41d37dddfb7ef8
describe
'373174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLO' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
3d5264eeec177e536a43aa6d6234a18e
5419e26f7acbdf70815e6e495f1247f3bb1e7701
describe
'190739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7401939f6bd468dcc5b706b3d151f268
b912dd63234d6c84f360bef49a15af59c1852c39
describe
'1884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLQ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d09f0156a992dda52dd252e7db1f8582
b3ba949b84692edcfe965060232b4f939c41184a
'2011-12-23T22:07:56-05:00'
describe
'42466' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLR' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9c52043467941370e2949d7c28dafc26
27dc3a5d234d44020c57ae65313b069bddef4d9f
describe
'8977096' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d47ea8e916861c32f53fec52ac33464c
20c872336523af5fbf78c29d1ff5fb1e3ab072a9
describe
'10130' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
67ef59a6e63bf6bf1e60e298f9d083fe
ccfe5786f01e5e4143b8e9d0bff714110400026c
'2011-12-23T22:09:00-05:00'
describe
'373350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLU' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
541d3edc289ba0fabb691d54dc437f70
677619eb42dfa61fe93579ea9bb866741eca6642
describe
'109466' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLV' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
6e5318ddb288d110ac395e5976dbc0d7
546d6d5f08ec2a3227abcc3bde3c58a45ef40821
'2011-12-23T22:03:07-05:00'
describe
'27278' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLW' 'sip-files00103.pro'
4b1a6e0bc56e8198b2400fb066cee68a
49258cfe2cfba6c086938369b6103d55c64f24e5
describe
'35918' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLX' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ec0fc158b25c5e914729389b02844ea3
21e2104bfaa8a5fd41e64012fc86c307dabdb825
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLY' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3ef207c9d3e63b253ee4682dd0ee1848
cec168624a3cc78958d543cdc3dd347f3f461a97
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOLZ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
4e17243bf91a9eccbd57086810a20345
9e60c0d0738d3f85fa30f6a7c8f799eaf766cb03
describe
'9230' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMA' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
979c0585eaafded3d6cf7b12a8904d2f
043420cf41e952a95848f8f13e076eef5f9042ab
'2011-12-23T22:07:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMB' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2db785394c94a8c7af026842eda595cf
ea0c187ee8eadf3d7993640d0fb63ef79eb52a8a
'2011-12-23T22:07:01-05:00'
describe
'97140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMC' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
204ba966ed7ba39224bcca4cd697dbd9
70e04bd4281ab0aeba22d17ac65e79481759cff8
describe
'26929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMD' 'sip-files00104.pro'
eefd464b3c571a34f1c620d1197eddbf
7a71ff49ff79788c8fa667eb9565dfd0b3c2cdf1
describe
'32998' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOME' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
227c18415e3c5e4fc6586f9e324b80b2
e8d504ea7805ea2e2393d84c3e087394c85f4e62
'2011-12-23T21:59:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMF' 'sip-files00104.tif'
9f04b717e4bb531b6055afe9a317d440
62b632dfc8fffdfa4f6b56ffa16f64c091c62139
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMG' 'sip-files00104.txt'
057b34059c3951d9a7483c4e92320a08
6ac2ca5ae4423da7cf8eda5c28bf2fbb70858be0
'2011-12-23T22:08:12-05:00'
describe
'8467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMH' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
ca57d603b389bc073c5816d08c44870d
f26d8e6313234a8c721fa12e70dae75e96a352aa
'2011-12-23T22:00:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMI' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
58accc8950ff251bd3fc09b9706dc5e4
339837c076588cdc2a2acb8a51ead7195ae60bdb
describe
'103598' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMJ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
344d075ee886eefb0cfd0439a0a0b55c
c2c88ac2a63a53e89235d23c59017364a81895fc
describe
'28708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMK' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8dcc4067533c5d4375cd5ddcc18f3036
296690d009e44f13f19cdbc4c05f160536ee36af
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOML' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9b0ba76d83911bfed37d8644933d55d8
ef2ae1817e9911778731579f29ed9887827f8666
'2011-12-23T22:08:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMM' 'sip-files00105.tif'
511894324fdf19b4810a7e805f278bd4
0ad33f0ebda0a9816ef19d0a60ceeca08a14393c
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMN' 'sip-files00105.txt'
98787514125ddba7b453a407d0457af3
438b0c77f3d2b246e675b9ccd7424a7ae8932b5e
'2011-12-23T22:08:48-05:00'
describe
'9027' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
820af3980c0b7f95e46da3fdaa831a3f
4a7e4922c0894dc194b7e20d54f2b98bce01323b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMP' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
aadddd00946f83a6ad7fbbd1c68fdd81
e05d18fc908f7375cc3ac8c55bdba0214dbddd23
'2011-12-23T22:00:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMQ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
34d0b9fe2b9c3ae57a9f0d068291d73c
81a6634996560aa5232fb2193c5eb95926af768f
describe
'21621' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMR' 'sip-files00106.pro'
5588358f53e8f0707f9393d8c65228be
9f1e1fe07b5585cd74ebf3c4031904048d349dbd
'2011-12-23T22:04:11-05:00'
describe
'27845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMS' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ebd417810a3379cb6b18180d105e9ece
48e44d62bd303d783151656c76a4a3421cba5fdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c9c07fe014328c8f1fb97a6974abcb08
dfbd1d57e3865fb8eb72ccfc7bd383c430d08965
'2011-12-23T22:03:36-05:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMU' 'sip-files00106.txt'
03b7a75f9d8f2c2d2c706de7638b107b
dfd1a27e9b962d23f39d1783f0b0b194f0dc4e1c
describe
'8834' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMV' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
84ac3dbdb27313e8a360b94ef05c299e
97ee61e13210ca45321d6de0ae5d010039e72cc1
'2011-12-23T22:05:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMW' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d4c2b987129a6e5435eaa011f8c4c47c
579a0de50cb4aa37789bce24d6ca79613ec696ec
'2011-12-23T22:04:55-05:00'
describe
'182728' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMX' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9d2a564f81fb9d5ca2f3dc8822d75f07
b7f7bd6ddb5f479a0855420c18d92c7f7b5bb9b7
'2011-12-23T22:06:58-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMY' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e1828b43149d89ee8ceaf8ec0aecad6c
a06ee5435dfcf1299c3d697080eaf787a5230dd0
'2011-12-23T22:02:34-05:00'
describe
'40067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOMZ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
c4e29b9b0d51555a433724cbbca43230
f0d7377271bf47e2e523787837107cea9e3b03a5
'2011-12-23T22:05:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7bcd07cb1c6de37b14f3b8d565c623d4
cb93ae12cb37d55cf4b96939b02d53ee19545713
'2011-12-23T22:08:29-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONB' 'sip-files00107.txt'
9af3a6de4a7178ea3d3d282d334e747d
f959f0787a2d9c10f09ca0278edb4c95f5437646
'2011-12-23T22:08:08-05:00'
describe
'9426' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONC' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
702170e78e6c29f8382782e7a27ef043
7733ed14a2db4099ccf4dc5323c217301f8fdad2
'2011-12-23T22:03:42-05:00'
describe
'373373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOND' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2320dca357eb70a42a40594a27ff1dad
4bb44bdb92849a68c6261159a136132bdc80013b
'2011-12-23T22:07:41-05:00'
describe
'85722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONE' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
2d53d134ab72eaaba87cc0dee9bb75d9
2f04ab528fec1d15b0d2919b68470879fa2a745a
'2011-12-23T22:03:17-05:00'
describe
'22986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONF' 'sip-files00109.pro'
073589a1381116bab76f5cb89fe606b6
3f10efb77cf0ea04ede98b4e079014548dadb022
describe
'28199' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONG' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
d9964751d935a1d26c61e68dfd39276b
31da8113e274673688a67cecbf5fab0c0e158329
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONH' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8b41b1e357592e85aa6d478cecea5bb1
9b8081ec38d6f51cace3910c5f997a5e70fa1c5c
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONI' 'sip-files00109.txt'
522b0ba37a8120221b2852fe9de1af93
8cffbed99f282a72246fa8d7f980bd8eef144f8d
'2011-12-23T22:00:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONJ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
13298ddc6bbd79e2c9d5e1c227feceba
7707fd683ef34bf8301f6d48fe3b9c66271c36d9
describe
'373374' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONK' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
c377dd4e2225f1c235ab142d661398d1
77dfdbcd723d06361a1ed100a7e1c42ac2588482
describe
'106974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONL' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
601dcd6a676fbea86ccdccf047fdceb3
f616403e45f5d970d778431661c79d7008e7fdc8
'2011-12-23T22:00:20-05:00'
describe
'25785' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONM' 'sip-files00110.pro'
3aeac2cc0a3ad20ec18ca00777595582
dd5406a924a5edb21a241f15de10a3e2531758c2
describe
'31655' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONN' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
95563b0815cbe8205399ed66e4ec9e97
3830fe0c64260a103b301e3bbb920276755770ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONO' 'sip-files00110.tif'
7814ebb81eeec5f0bc05fed6c6d71909
2489026ae6a7feab74eccb85861dfbebbcbf27dd
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONP' 'sip-files00110.txt'
5d693475b7ef2da61ababc5d82bdd12b
4e7f8c1af6b6dcb885fa80dafc21a142cf97febe
describe
'8814' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONQ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
08449f0a3acd7070165af5ca93c777d4
d04eac1eabce7035624e38366a52c1be7824bf07
describe
'373393' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONR' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
f7cf1e8196f297289d1361821dec01c7
418ac7052642e38f04cbee913941c2169231b535
describe
'117698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONS' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
550e78522f232db28ae0da0fb285690b
8986ac4750689bd61a067e59581895fcf6893d6f
describe
'26271' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONT' 'sip-files00111.pro'
4cb803625ede18012c80ec3d39235374
b31d7daa8e664500656b60616db58fa843657a1d
describe
'34730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONU' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
48bb4d3ad1e2804ff317b1d7f050d743
c5ce74c7440c6bd9affb118cc2aae99b92803c68
'2011-12-23T21:59:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONV' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8caf8a0d14851c8d553ffb952edc5ee3
1aa351b3fcd5082df9987b3df75f1069ec536d7b
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONW' 'sip-files00111.txt'
520866254f4d8fba81164bba68d33d2c
5e6b256c6c2bd200fd418803d3985d577a750b2b
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONX' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
ea50275945104f9e8472171d90cba2fa
8e6c9122403d4766b3abd8244266deb1a8867641
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONY' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
59b4a9a7aae0c94ae1cb7ae7da7438f5
fac581bedef2864bcd81dcfd12550bf807de3044
'2011-12-23T22:04:47-05:00'
describe
'95462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABONZ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cf36fd469efd6733013569d863cc72d0
ad88ea7ad7a52c1e35209c4507b8dcf70a4d659e
describe
'26957' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOA' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a709ae0a2f312b3e3acfd9c540b012ce
30a0055517ec19800ab9b42e8421c2d5ebe1e91c
describe
'29373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOB' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
ff7c4ffe76a87fa7d1edbae91e368174
87d93ada8a4aeda7d93528d3da39215b2caf728b
'2011-12-23T22:08:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOC' 'sip-files00112.tif'
274d4570ca1e1a219430b774b28c4d3d
3ae5b436ffe52594e12dee24d0f37562f01b6bb4
'2011-12-23T22:06:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOD' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fdb271a0eaf72aa253e2ee7fc4d49b96
326a8456f4006177ffb683fe749ce5ecee04b65e
'2011-12-23T22:04:40-05:00'
describe
'8371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOE' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
18cb966db89ca25bdec123ddef54f5e6
f45300b923e1e8f6d93b5d2c6f4d4c45cdca673d
describe
'373384' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOF' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2c791101304f17a83f16959223ee8b18
50a6ed5426f5fde40b13d2cf1a09057f9c2d8435
'2011-12-23T22:07:55-05:00'
describe
'85505' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOG' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
df9a11259185fcd226f4f1315b8d4999
00c9dafe2694e712e49296baf95113428dc353fe
describe
'24256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOH' 'sip-files00113.pro'
bbf848d11604f12555873f073defc26e
e760fad0c213ab44e46ea5920640213d154464a6
describe
'27301' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOI' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
a1d62a2c285913441ce847cc73b7d5f1
03410b503fc98e6f61dbc4c3e7b0ddaada2e3cbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOJ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
4ce8453b21c3ebca6812531b28818c22
af45ee82b16dfba08a70bae11c0e10fe5d666c80
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOK' 'sip-files00113.txt'
96a0e245199619ea0db1704e0466059a
b60cac9d6afbc6a2b9d880255073d42d054f1ebb
describe
'7698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOL' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
6b9fae2d22edcca1dc1653e971aa1a4c
ee139f0ea231266e7d40792e71901b3b98ee33a1
describe
'373376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOM' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
d6c2273e404949d041c1eed3701c3c9c
4abcc0ca4585e05eebabf302e4f93f82a408e861
describe
'96902' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOON' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4eaac555edcbbde93f6fa23cff3d141e
66c3c0663a099b696048c3e8ecd1f0cab9464149
describe
'26502' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOO' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9abace96b9aa0e79a2ec1527fa905549
ff59b00e3fd11bd06e9aba71be2a7416acab2696
describe
'33013' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOP' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
544df39dc4728400ba8d36b74d392c5f
c1312c4ff6b2bb8f3cb617e415fefcc9a7008135
'2011-12-23T22:05:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOQ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
558be47fc05695e9e782b26ef00e88f8
22dc1987bf89c601411671547118414edc5e54c3
'2011-12-23T22:07:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOR' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d9a2197ac930a400df71599b8e5d8713
b260ff27621d213922517aeb0b5c5f726246bbe6
describe
'9144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOS' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
0d55403b4c93b08bfadc15c356081ddd
627f2184332510f0613ca0b72bd3b31d4409e48e
describe
'373317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOT' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
97f24817e826e66f8d3497e3f5318986
67fa863d2a4e92ac45bef17a588903adeaeba007
describe
'95721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOU' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
331f5c5396f689a0269bc04c3608c3bc
49966ee2b0bf22c68aa43907230e7b89e8e3abf5
'2011-12-23T22:09:16-05:00'
describe
'27144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOV' 'sip-files00115.pro'
ac3e5a8c84cad6202f24f8ba84437725
b9313cb5331cef542dc0dc082d35dbef53b4e711
describe
'30712' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOW' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
1adbd67965a23c4cb64007680e8fbf23
baf2cc2aaeada1dd97c54ee45e46fc77e6ad92f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOX' 'sip-files00115.tif'
3afdc6d265d08e0fde30f257419f3908
0d564bce7fcf3314c004deb1781d4cc15bb00064
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOY' 'sip-files00115.txt'
90f0d1e369dff91677a35a4ad584d0ae
a072875f8c7d92ae726d10aa2fa3e0822db0ee45
'2011-12-23T22:01:31-05:00'
describe
'8461' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOOZ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
3bfc682e206764524ca6cd23f169e100
6cac618ef070961503005ab540445b906f699852
describe
'373318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPA' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9ab451d5e374f219b14dfca921254039
dd0e32a29c0a7a5f3aeb54954420ce88e491d181
describe
'83930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPB' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
98a1ef19f9d8c17e0e5a19b860ca5e7c
41d21913a8a09763d0981cb3398f6bd32a6b74f7
describe
'23425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPC' 'sip-files00116.pro'
e9f5b9aeaf4282e55e56c3fd978b1c4a
bd887c1e474ee16c00067c2ef2030c1ecb3b870f
describe
'29000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPD' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
6a52df764cdde9b1d25b434e1d92eefc
1dc0fc55f48d6ec99aaaa2dea87766ebf357b459
'2011-12-23T22:04:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPE' 'sip-files00116.tif'
777409eb8fbafa29a6a32503dbfdad57
3f48161540fee59ff0fe8da3938f3423a56ab399
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPF' 'sip-files00116.txt'
4ea53909ae742ef302a3763c7ba59015
2150f17c91f242c2a6788ea8628b8550b9eabdc6
describe
'7773' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPG' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
545cbe7714a7c7f6945a0a49d66e54b3
ff003490755a63044883cf771e424092566a4220
'2011-12-23T22:01:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
11856539a1738e46d1e23fd4c1882876
61f03a2f2f9cf416b7c3ded0e860a12ebfa3a0f1
describe
'96574' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPI' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e9692a597af3d2dad0f3795612a320a2
0f80e5595a7b677d26300814d9becb24be6fd3c6
describe
'25902' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPJ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ef5400f1e8730aaee7bd143cd4f8d8cb
028b43845479cc2c9759806e822bd88f31cc3b34
'2011-12-23T22:03:50-05:00'
describe
'30666' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPK' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
5dfa4d3ded0b509fafef726283d22f64
e4343ee2277ca740c9222729334e81da93c0a5ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPL' 'sip-files00117.tif'
9efc3f8f99deef59f4c58e487dd19cb5
5113d19ab039144a65611dcdcb894a99924f7104
'2011-12-23T22:07:53-05:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPM' 'sip-files00117.txt'
3811948cc4d48737871f7cc46c7748b1
063d01c389f248ee848b7c6c88a3d97a1acb3374
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPN' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
da450f02a6415724aa805311bcd5f046
d3ac2e9098dfd07aa91c118d345f18939433a229
describe
'373347' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPO' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
3a662b487d12c3ada6454d5333685407
773bb452aeb3d982e7c36c45db765a1f45c3fba6
'2011-12-23T22:08:59-05:00'
describe
'99444' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPP' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
1e1d214c9dda5dd087fbf62dc760a50b
cde286d29a0a20646abeb49a51da621f59bb6f57
describe
'26830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPQ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
23c578ae89019a6e513e3843d319bab4
b51a054baf418f0e9d67975b5d654a0e6ce5a5ec
'2011-12-23T22:09:18-05:00'
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPR' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
c2c6cd36aeccfc3d2839e3c39fca8da6
c290eed098d55b4408c00c01a02014ddb4cbc211
'2011-12-23T22:03:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPS' 'sip-files00118.tif'
27333b790c2375489060193245c828dc
d93df358936b448a0c09b19683e1c4b180d1274f
'2011-12-23T22:00:58-05:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPT' 'sip-files00118.txt'
23e0f76c5f58e615dc7c7d37480f8c9a
acd6e9284b987985fe44210b6d087e78e7315241
describe
Invalid character
'8529' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPU' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
bb5d2d40a7709745acbf4934862a4b77
23022c309e134cec77ef04657a063e522da6262e
'2011-12-23T22:00:15-05:00'
describe
'373206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPV' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
d47b9c69c24b20b2bbf7e6a142de4471
92f8be0b2da1c27be848eab97c0bb16419499ac0
'2011-12-23T22:04:49-05:00'
describe
'50800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPW' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
369ffb5e39e59f13edfe6ccd6918c251
03f172295aa22f5f132489e9b165eace1d19f13b
describe
'9871' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPX' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c72badff6e19b83d2f3a0232ecd6bdd1
980ba3240004aea0bf17bdeec3d840561e8666e2
describe
'14762' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPY' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
699c1a4ed1f34dc84e85240ea84ec198
c047a934c91a49bcd759f43ec16bae4b7aee6f17
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOPZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3541c0f160456ce30595f36e5f8c4cde
2cc73a88110d7c406fd7a01bf1d1a9a410a2c5ab
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQA' 'sip-files00119.txt'
8c29daa30fdac41755a47828f014b112
10c27f41ade878e8aab04877772ddaebf935bcef
describe
'4142' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQB' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
6f2195c246a3d9ad1126065adaf798ea
b55798ce9e14413b842b3c94b1d717ead1b62e52
describe
'373340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQC' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
67c254c122ba3eda153a59d07c7aeee0
4e9425d930c91db84bb5af7ef9edd10de340c35d
describe
'82238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQD' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
0404a158813e925b00ea8a855a83aeec
c4b988c42292afb1fa80918a789e3b0b53f4b3c7
describe
'21807' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQE' 'sip-files00120.pro'
c01c8bff140b7622cf6dc0dd5bc11d66
e765ca7319ed2e308939883a5cde25289fb3b84d
describe
'28840' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQF' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
32ea88fd879121114087b095a45bec67
4460eb42b9c1f0a65789662f3a5d7f9fcb4f030f
'2011-12-23T22:07:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQG' 'sip-files00120.tif'
4e8a4f571ecaf1e3fc4707beda18b4df
fa73377168c674a8f6a1238016d3a41262bf81b6
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQH' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8f8bdf65821c6795605daec50a78da83
a250450e6a901c0c13dc2e973063e0ac8623d22e
describe
'7354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQI' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
765990a7de228f13a8798e5e95689d91
617213aa5ca3d33a0d9d3ff6f81e9391f8235528
'2011-12-23T22:06:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQJ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c195f1f921f624ef4e0f56eef2681f4b
da172effba0abc6bc1ddc1e8f738cf92d48f834b
describe
'104510' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQK' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
697c3723a7e2a616c4c93cb7b72aad21
75beea7ec75af701c6b3c4f8fe6ac6714d61bdbb
'2011-12-23T22:03:45-05:00'
describe
'28542' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQL' 'sip-files00121.pro'
7a1da7d5fba8fbeadaf5867c5091faff
cc83571c6d204fe20c907c1de96929dc08e62078
describe
'34703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQM' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b821338ade27a9d401e54ca6ee98f26b
44c85eec37b705de9aeaff4bd395f53aa7792e48
'2011-12-23T22:05:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQN' 'sip-files00121.tif'
39fc2100574abc9b2fee7e915c63ab0b
c2d0dea2d5e0d3bb60740510a7d284741407cc1b
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQO' 'sip-files00121.txt'
22612de012253bc0f8f975f6c9abfcd8
f5c3a7dd951c60c52c0ba1b7690149f5e91a9f41
describe
Invalid character
'9100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQP' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
15d28e5a3d3d70fd420fd37883167619
c9f54d799062bab7845ceeff6b892ccb279c4502
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQQ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
9d0964fb4d1619f7619ef56dcf4609ba
cc05cf471e9cfb1da6ae404b7e1cfd210cd47bf4
'2011-12-23T22:08:15-05:00'
describe
'102177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQR' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
f1f54b87966abf0218cbd7fa2e926aa0
fcafd75895a676413feb1af02c960219b8fb38b6
'2011-12-23T22:04:32-05:00'
describe
'29476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQS' 'sip-files00122.pro'
3c32937317b1740ec573ac30dc895902
5ecfce29f0a9a723013ee8bb801041ce84b8a2ca
describe
'34420' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQT' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
7db2fbe5cb779fd27eb6f94363003cf0
0bd0e9aec23d3b850f15106cdb199578827e5759
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQU' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6922ee9721838c44d33b2270e3453d87
fd1fdc683b2c7fe77141d0125a13f357f90ec913
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQV' 'sip-files00122.txt'
7b820bd2e58259d1c1a39fafbdd3505e
a4411499f249e2d22726ee0e7e444293dace02e3
describe
Invalid character
'8990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
2a76ecc1628b77e4203a25200a99f904
b5f7d133aff11195a67ccdb97a5b95c475886d65
'2011-12-23T22:03:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQX' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
61e5520d51dc9962ccd0df798e70e2d8
4ca86af64ed92336af81879c878a7b1710f75ab4
describe
'104905' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQY' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
c19fadd1ce7826e93ecdd8e819936e72
2c6dbd1abe811483aa1cfee5f0b7104ff23d45d7
describe
'28590' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOQZ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
1e70704d76321c74bbb5df0e974b1350
893de73abd71f565a4e138ef25a26d0f761e034b
'2011-12-23T22:04:06-05:00'
describe
'33765' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORA' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
dfa888c2452552e96bbe4d85868975a9
116ef56e9f0c77e26e477d39015175fc696375b0
'2011-12-23T21:59:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORB' 'sip-files00123.tif'
7019f1b0531fb1356ad18272ba553935
51720a9e6392285443c1fc1250ebec9ea5b44e45
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORC' 'sip-files00123.txt'
f7a69b884c5e130854f519627161c76d
2bec12b48d2c992f3811ff0803a09e17b2d4f084
'2011-12-23T22:06:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9095' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
07404a9afad43f263120f8541fdab09b
a027e840aff3921defb8a0adf264662721022e84
describe
'373051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORE' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0e8bcd34b6c63c3d6a3a8a7848eadade
d8c34889eaaccfc8bf01d67dbe753bfe4929fc04
'2011-12-23T22:05:29-05:00'
describe
'107720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORF' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
cb2a47a8d6ed1a89aea8ce2b0c7add47
9080f0dbda1a209be3da7e04c64d6efd40d318bf
'2011-12-23T22:02:20-05:00'
describe
'29486' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORG' 'sip-files00124.pro'
3c32c23e6a8e4916bfaa5db309c313d5
10c447b0e20f8a4cb61194f053a7482caff23848
describe
'37258' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORH' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
c59804babbb8b3ca5daa65fe986587e2
7a47ea02dbd865bf9c8c44d29f29965387a1d12c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORI' 'sip-files00124.tif'
52e6eeafcc24d000eb9b7d34bd8ffe81
c510c89e7c5495cba0b730d9c54f4dbca4602dc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORJ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
8cd97039b9d24b494ec5bae51c3dba5d
8805636470169fe813ee814d6bdcd635b7f5cdb2
describe
Invalid character
'9107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORK' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
356c296282f9d6a17234e5a7a849f2c1
3bd99fa322dcb4f5976eae4769c385a30c5bd489
'2011-12-23T22:00:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORL' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
ddbfad775c299f5bd8bed3151e071fca
a197284732c7c117cb12b70f7040bf19806a280c
describe
'101852' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b7a0a599513b2255fb6634eb45c1760d
ab6aba1c4769a740f5ce8b453d9ca682230b6fbd
describe
'26907' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORN' 'sip-files00125.pro'
cc4b74058f89c61c425136bee372be53
a80a533792decba7d8f015fcdad3b11fe16c91f9
describe
'32118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORO' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
4ed760e9523561b27471a1775fc400f6
aa5a7f18fae06ab27cc7da866faab1c1a90d439b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORP' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3dae07d93c8fc3c301123c5cded36558
299ded851c772796c5ba9667a5d1e6da3152e5fe
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
d4fd9835393d357a3790392e7d3158ff
408e8776703f015f154967e04cd62086f5b27928
describe
'9019' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORR' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
fd805feb36925863db0fa94d4632dee2
a7088866726bdd1769c4b884b400988d4638a6b7
describe
'373402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
8e5dd1db0b278316c9b77b94cd9a183c
30ecae42011db3aa7c0a6eaabf2fb9173e6ddc4f
describe
'109219' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORT' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
c07523824931f5ac373ce457de69a84b
cc1399686c996d1ba0828bc94d7c806b6b541ad1
describe
'27953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
cc433831b196d61d5c99b08ae5c27dc6
3e918c9fa46b5b74f82d9ea57dda45a5bb514352
describe
'32902' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
461ced937913f0e4734ef5048866b9fb
afa393035baa090fac138ef867a974b27c3f6a65
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORW' 'sip-files00126.tif'
3dce84e59f67f4dd8058068a2a3e5542
f2230581fc504b4d353abe6932dfb1a8c6d9ba6b
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORX' 'sip-files00126.txt'
3e3c65aa95a9a260210a0d2354f0e383
f137ab29c32ca7b19e5a5240e71ceae43b0f8dac
describe
'9216' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORY' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1986c4da5eab10699eacd7344ab38f47
688ff8325c3a618a1b20390eb88c012b66f1dadf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABORZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f9f50802b25b85972301d5fa2f9b9a79
d5c196fad87263a4861320407e7d9b48f07cf0ca
describe
'115046' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSA' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b92da2b3e56a10704b069a19ba85b4af
947c05448ab458a9a03e89e7854951396c34dc93
'2011-12-23T22:02:38-05:00'
describe
'29561' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSB' 'sip-files00127.pro'
d7448cd5fb809693fc8e88b8cd3005b6
666375206b53bf8b3a42f7ff54814cad407b4484
describe
'36743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSC' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
192025fcb37bc907aab2d9c17bf8e917
3990ae70ca63e5707dd4a7725a143cf6a0abf144
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSD' 'sip-files00127.tif'
4565be7925e7cb71853655878c00960e
dbe255cfca6470d848c9b0be7592c765126d50a1
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
dbabba46e77c0125a38ac17bcbf26cd3
91865643814337d252f0ff8f26332ed605c8dafb
describe
'9458' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSF' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
d74bada8eac1cfa8d5f8347aa5ce2cd2
713399bb510f52a4aebda5e7c9c90d5a2717bb8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
db7ba58e1a57e86dc34f402dd42272b0
6a4fe407a648efe4b59085b5380858be5c4b8fae
describe
'91037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSH' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
3572885a1eab112ffd4bfb5c98e979dd
6626b418f4f440710d8109edd1a05b374890236f
'2011-12-23T22:08:16-05:00'
describe
'24755' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSI' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d986322058c4075f011854b511fe700e
f6561a6a71bf5e4209a72b43d53ff3f6b34c26d9
describe
'28617' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSJ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4171a081e3e3d1515f155a1efc107a3c
a8552b71322818858379e7de373f10bb1ea55bc8
'2011-12-23T22:04:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSK' 'sip-files00128.tif'
4c28bdd8a0419823155dafa529d374ca
f58fc14923db7a0d9d49302dfee173d438fce9ee
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSL' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2baea6c837e0c2177215ecc508dd92d8
d19c90e2d3df1829fb04f763cdbdb658600acfd8
'2011-12-23T22:04:21-05:00'
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSM' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
91390f0d391523dadf9032d0662b5173
de295d4b02835b14802d2f3024c6d17bc311fa1d
describe
'373208' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSN' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
a07d6bd1ddf0f0a6eea97f6042f2e512
6ffd59b18911e0cdbcbcce5b410a7b8986643534
describe
'106520' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSO' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
7863aaa00e4f55d560bcb8e3ae7a98fd
bfa7b0a7070b5b33fefece9297c55255a43fdd13
describe
'28974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
9a9a8d210c3dfab286ded70fbf9dc939
a875ab984ed12ea08e4f478f077739ae7dcdc4c3
describe
'35059' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSQ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a9c8df9197ebd0bfe851b64f0ecc630b
ec3bd31e491589c10d5d377a449797971e018d92
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSR' 'sip-files00129.tif'
f82913bcfe261859e65a98ff1dc74595
22dfdc91d6559af1f4fa6aac5109680574e2e307
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
a8dbf0cb5fb2fa2ad6e116ebc852637b
f325bdbe1f783da388f885cd383e2a46c4bd8a76
describe
Invalid character
'9329' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOST' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
f54eafe1a9e15cfe59ea8bf20f2fe6ef
ba9491446f3a67d5e7798bdfcbd6e743b6126040
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
753e0a109146badea0108692aad66f3e
6d93e836e562b9a0a74d40ca8aadc8afa95d4404
describe
'98237' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSV' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
686e9a2b7ab44f51140490e3b9ba6319
fc995dca5dde858e800dd93e15b6fd6fc6439252
describe
'27841' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSW' 'sip-files00130.pro'
28bec6b44f18217c519b1a0c5a1a4858
b66e92897f31d40b979ed1e1810348f570358b1f
describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSX' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
4919daa1366e88b537081055c96c22cf
d2c4f89bca3d8c33f095287e544e425281342338
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSY' 'sip-files00130.tif'
e105c4ba31959942d34c6ed0b2541ecb
c3a11fdf224a315e27c044c4bc7a8cf67e6c6f6f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOSZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
1df59ad654a41c11ea5df362366fadd2
41a680e21dbd9f3a05691b3ca7fc6b7b8d5e4884
describe
Invalid character
'8729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTA' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
aabd9a2f25bfae5d9e039eef96ba3b74
4148ab81abfe17f44891c7ec74b3c2ce6a960e53
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTB' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
2c4520fc4798fdb11d9f3b4b99322c27
c1c9180a32ab59c4a7a0672fabed2cb6e389ba29
describe
'95732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
c31e599a4a63b19d3bc5ecff860a9dca
3a7fdfff9f40e8804fb502f6c29c9afba5d583b6
describe
'27020' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTD' 'sip-files00131.pro'
604eb6e27e47b7029093f8f034565bd6
41c6351b4377b35998ddf40ec5e2907831afa32a
describe
'30928' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
1e233d0261c18c6721e26584e1743c90
1b9378f9062c5a6063d92d22c8e18b7ef6108bac
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
2facf891c987e63f51e5584d670167bb
8a7255823cd91e2e1613f801d3766c18282097f6
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
5a9feca40733e7f8cf65f52ead8e1ac2
375ab4b360f404894663987e7b27180b12e81443
describe
Invalid character
'8447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTH' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
b91f3b858e64510a381d347c683f43bf
d7fe2fc2835ed5c9796c55915664b8676492eeeb
describe
'373381' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTI' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
3f5c68cac9dc17d23b0f6d09dcc5bf93
15a836658e2930bf7de1ed7fb4775ccf1bc70785
describe
'96630' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTJ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
533d74c0ba948b4d897c9f997e2186cf
5b867c5643ba68ab950b5697adebe636dede9c2c
describe
'21151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTK' 'sip-files00132.pro'
db906bbc809f945f5f640ba7e53ce444
0b5cf40bf6285509f05f8f9db33ce5809a36e15b
'2011-12-23T22:03:32-05:00'
describe
'29931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTL' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
3b7d9d0cc14a526b438e0664bd1375a3
48f50828319d0bf4b565f35a907a538a1b418bec
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTM' 'sip-files00132.tif'
0857064c8dc4758c5946aeadf7256f3e
b1ee59c2b7b1b6780f6aa860007244514b87fbe7
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTN' 'sip-files00132.txt'
5b4cf20c556f1f2379fed19abe10e6f2
8b08d932b5104ca7c48889d024f54cff5a45db27
describe
Invalid character
'8981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
aec268377bad234bde5ea59ba22291f5
05ccd7977070aa0edfb60720389399489f46a824
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTP' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
bc5aaae709c057728e63783201cf157a
bd91cc52074845e402b61e19c0c96bcca3c5fbed
describe
'186249' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTQ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c4f0826f395d0864ab9b6020882aa353
0cdaac85a7d94674d0e9abb9948e26989c7ae4de
'2011-12-23T22:02:41-05:00'
describe
'2040' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTR' 'sip-files00133.pro'
bbca8810f62a151fd3c6da6b435012e6
eb5fab3dc09fe589f0aee07ef73c6801dfae749e
describe
'40532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTS' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
85947df0d7aa6cdabf8aa2bad92b96db
7fa30929235603c9e719afc8e13ef79569dd2cbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
2fbe0e3abe39b6d425b93363fed9d56a
272341fbff3d674c1f80642832b31e34f1b82b42
'2011-12-23T22:00:24-05:00'
describe
'18' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTU' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ba573d73e044b6683838ed4b5025a708
4a5c4c2e3ee84594b0bd38aff3a3c24fa04233c5
describe
'9584' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTV' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
0c7b3af31b27e8484e9c2984921bda20
bf250ff2d1808c0167f83bacf3ed10dcc387a20a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
5a9ae8447ab0003d2368dab208784c54
fbb96523833ca5dd14aa8f46cff4d7133036e99e
describe
'85747' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
954ff096e8f816821d365a5067378683
d174612291898d61bcd766f1132be9c555dce6a6
describe
'22829' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
e52db11143b549901323be1ca7cc34e8
272c4d0d2690807ceae57936c2a05c3cc96ce2c8
describe
'27316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOTZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
1e1fbeca2576a0627bca5a5f1bc7f3b2
39c3290fd75b5c4494a37dd09ba20bb4135353d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
cc658ba9dc0dabcb60888b1fee547aaa
57891d18109c5d3f8c56231b852d5c8bb07ce261
'2011-12-23T22:06:21-05:00'
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0c53d6eb5b58d1eed1efa1766fb0c919
9bd1bd163d0c9026f925a12003838e08e18ff25f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
508fe21a24b11744ba9d94cf956e002b
fd4927b1b077d029dfefccdd25f6b5f0a8795758
'2011-12-23T22:06:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUD' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
642fd94beddb3e0d9360b1d1f9272d53
fce799e4f9867b877914a49cd193ee8f6c929b3a
describe
'99450' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
58faa337d2dc7c082fe73dcdcbe5204a
69be3a87975781c28bd3b25b6c91606a96cdc8e4
describe
'28193' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUF' 'sip-files00136.pro'
32cb5786b20f03955a904f78126d8c26
b7f4210286158628e3ce71becab6294b7332bad4
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
38e11cc916a76130af5d589a2af022e9
0c85be31c2b40377d977b2c44e18b9bafbd25ac1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a9414c6b8d94ee4c77e242385871f12e
422471a523d8145cdcff5c4fcdb7af744b3f3875
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUI' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ae1cbe17302b5ff6686517dc168fc047
2c636d8f89829091d4fc75c05dcb72d128057cd9
'2011-12-23T22:02:36-05:00'
describe
'9037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
2fe7ee637581bdf18a8ea5b261ace39f
b70337377dccf2c7974818287d12b881f064e342
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
396c2e533502e1664185e46e50308c16
191150796a22d4b0eaac0e65b5965354ef6defd7
'2011-12-23T22:00:44-05:00'
describe
'93391' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
81ea4c8acfc0ab52d629b5adad86e9e1
cf521ffefae7191c45009c28179c99a56f9883cd
describe
'25741' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUM' 'sip-files00137.pro'
c30d3b8eb7f6d2c6b897e3ba1edfe0cb
bf36076c6d5441744341890ec13fe0e4f220ac5f
describe
'30351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUN' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
7d349e2f3b396a0d6c9843ffc0fbe5e9
20f8f65ea27f94108e632bd8ec1498db5c58c375
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
f666f09aff8d35a24c0f6843ba616b2b
fc9c124b1667f736c00cbb8f418a27679ddaff71
'2011-12-23T22:05:27-05:00'
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUP' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1a2100863a298c649b7c46476153c9bb
039b65fafe3c80d68eca28728f42dc0ec47eb004
describe
'8413' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUQ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
288e0b8766e8e3abd5f91641ed1674ca
3ca49e6759958776f714d95dac2eac8593111620
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUR' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
9431be41541c016c06ed17f700d5d4cf
687820a5100fbfd456665f6a5043c68543d32c50
describe
'93581' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
61cbe1e6fc317feb82c38990acdea739
6494e2e39b38b9fa311bc1ede213f508589e7719
describe
'26145' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUT' 'sip-files00138.pro'
7b3be81df871ce2aa472d84e242560ba
5497d3e758fa2a5af4c6d25907ce5e55a0ee060b
describe
'31629' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
150f4b911e4c78664c706631456746d2
b234f036adafb143c8e0fa7459db9a86ef301df3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
bd5e1d69b4ecbef954221c1a2ed0a5d3
7a02c902655833f7f26fe5584b6c67f573ad9ae1
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d60f5fbc41a2677641931f173a067603
bc5ce06983850fccc8e67aac0f299cb4cf303439
describe
Invalid character
'8326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUX' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
234f77b7f84de1583eb965535b40b26d
7f7e70bc3c9d4efe903041aaa7a6099c58c2bcf3
describe
'373397' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
0f8dee28c1884d2f0f456ccc4ee5c06c
384a77b3325b6d07b7a0c8822b3a2282351f85a0
describe
'104704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOUZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
a9b69c80da3fa93fd84adf78d13ecc42
7918609f2eb9461679d8fe56c913b9f35c51022b
'2011-12-23T22:02:39-05:00'
describe
'28899' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
0f831acd47bae493bc634d98ac038390
1b071157ed42a5a474b483c6f1116dd23448f8ff
'2011-12-23T22:05:18-05:00'
describe
'35699' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
f07b6ef78c9b36d28fbf5721618ee002
e90860e1158e4ffcac215ed09786ff563dfd5b62
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
bcecaf2d5a616b2805acba178d2c0038
f2ef56d41ed1ce1a5dfa618b5ab05a6b83c9cfdb
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
5bdfe01a37fa211f6a8185ed4640f53e
79a753a58b8098760b5034b4c12d95178c274cdf
describe
'9274' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
782e584a296a8fbb610feb25553fd6f7
27b36fa088d45e4832481bd664f91439a0ee0e31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
87cd1e331767a886d02ad74bf6da9976
3317d00d82f57a8b0dfc250abace31075f882682
describe
'57902' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVG' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d088c1ae63b312ae1aac157def66d153
c14fe1bde6f0bb64c6191d182915c14668f17af6
'2011-12-23T22:06:18-05:00'
describe
'12661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3efd77647e0917928ff5a46144d1480d
13b31e9f3d1bf17b8ced114a2c23507632e5c3cd
describe
'18383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVI' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
3398a7995121ae402a2fe2ad4c804748
c50d07211dd9eb9cd210b43009e3040454805549
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVJ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
7adffccd2a08bdef68fd84f9009320bc
4cea87b7e3af38540695ea50e3cbe6d3984d0c94
'2011-12-23T22:06:00-05:00'
describe
'458' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVK' 'sip-files00140.txt'
170232b9387402105ecc4c7fcdb7a5ed
856b910762798dfadee364ff6c87cb6d7682c654
describe
Invalid character
'4963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVL' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
e957d1e4e749d448644e29ee9e39560f
491dcb16bed10930f4b23e22814672b0bda41681
describe
'373344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVM' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
b02628f982d24388127a37e199a44441
1915c682e5c69120b96442065e0e9f443cc307b9
'2011-12-23T22:05:28-05:00'
describe
'73787' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVN' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
31959529f27b7a23771bcbcf45f5a75d
ccdd1227cbe1732db5c5a94547c8cbe718b75741
describe
'17343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVO' 'sip-files00141.pro'
61bdc3f1143566b8d756bdb70cdd1630
406ead372b3251598ddea8cafcfd0d498dbf51eb
describe
'23722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVP' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
372ecfd328575bb7b07b2102fc19b297
23f960c16de57f5aa7d5f369343e61b7187b0a31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVQ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
7aa559154dc9e4c2436094ef4be350d5
e608f88b460e662092c9fa880d104edd47d98295
describe
'661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVR' 'sip-files00141.txt'
786cc9283e204be099ca3ae7590fd3e0
c1e621fd73fba8430757c8c0646ff7c76ebd44f5
describe
'6833' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVS' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
3da37d0254edbecc9805a84e8d6ab4b2
4c86d1174d8d83898a11e3c164c697810907db74
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVT' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
a82409c840e426e2dffca30a481a56f3
3c3854647ffe4e326c10ca68343d736c9771390b
describe
'94974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVU' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
1e1b281d02d5dd77994d22a4cd3de97c
b0dbbbdfc64075260bbaf43b86669974079b5b85
describe
'25614' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVV' 'sip-files00142.pro'
5d286de3b607a178b8b209c9d41dc983
1070d1fc360f21b4bddd555665fcdcf8b9467e03
describe
'30668' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVW' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
80d8dd43998d3f0817549f29e178c247
c5885d5b839354414b1996002de753736d2fd43f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVX' 'sip-files00142.tif'
3e05e309ae78a521e3e0424deac676a0
ca9c7ee5fa3367615d8f37ca217322e7fa1ff05f
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVY' 'sip-files00142.txt'
f288d53972a6d81941f0a64c04d059de
4ab4f28a4a438eea9f028d0f8ae213ebefd570f4
describe
'8211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOVZ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
2c6806c64d346d39b45018186100f2e0
9e3f58f110e5cd8e6ac9ed7e6cc23290b815e29d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWA' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
9937248c953dba389676394972497997
3403f9482a9b4b997557e70893d64d3c8317be2d
describe
'104924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWB' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
ec550ed279d3141fdcb1f227c5ec784c
6de490ffd56d710d75747d0901a28fc028fe5471
describe
'28501' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWC' 'sip-files00143.pro'
f75197fb3f79aabc5b68bd8eb84965a0
cb4938fe13490a09cacb34dd0d412409f470a554
'2011-12-23T22:03:46-05:00'
describe
'33224' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWD' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
bec2230ee4e5b5fc7778bb11cbc22169
072da4b49e0a56dff223c0f076d4453a7306bdfc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
7f4a5b1a0e4bb6ed6c54cedf7ceda4c2
5fbd1d64702d227c3579ff695206a225d9625e72
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWF' 'sip-files00143.txt'
fc5515744492bec2257c3b6cc1df28d1
a3c34fd3805a0acb9c0102c157597c0507dd6fcd
describe
'9069' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWG' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
8d357130582ec8a41db429fd8e4e362f
fab03c8c0d255e8eda13a7559a48ad41bef972a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWH' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
e784a7231e859825e4183a1e837a1ffa
d44275238e042efbfae08329eae436546a6954d9
describe
'95062' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWI' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
51bb225e68eb9f4cc967509a5fb7ff00
17adcecf34654bc13cc8000ef9a3719d43a47230
describe
'26518' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWJ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
d69c3f9ca64eefc42eb7c1f03b03f9dd
797708034f32b6d0c3febe0385152746a2739eb2
describe
'32110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWK' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e0933a248318dbcb2871408db1c3e70b
2e0e4fa99ef7b60a599f28e135a938185a6b7d89
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
567b6de0b06a643fe9ae978c29fcc6b1
34f3759c554776d35045d00a1d6490fd3cee10ee
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWM' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e17cb0b4b5e4c001d02ace3cf3d48616
ce0631d7ded2ad496f980e1df1b58dde2b5e68c4
'2011-12-23T22:09:02-05:00'
describe
'8485' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWN' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
cc5ebdea8e9f430715a45fe8417e6291
3c43c9770289bd52958c60c6fff9f24add1852d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
0841bb2e55a8b3f165c60bd2fe6970cd
6a887ff78d610ce9870c01d6175118917095ed33
describe
'79747' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
a83fd301399f77252554d0905b878ca8
7bcd17d324cee1650473021cd643fbaa17e3102b
describe
'21749' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWQ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
2c16a336050cb6682df1e129cdcfe3aa
1ec133ad876432d72a0a253670cb765a7e977405
describe
'24938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWR' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
656181f2de528cd473c88f90dc26c5fb
85b1f6cca4f8356d5fa9afe83af8795dbc6e98dc
'2011-12-23T22:00:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWS' 'sip-files00145.tif'
6ee561948548216340156ba69d22f5af
6f7f97ec1792c2bf032593bd2796de8b6c832e39
'2011-12-23T22:06:40-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWT' 'sip-files00145.txt'
3177891ab52fc513de980e9c20f5c10f
57306e7215ccc1f8e782a86e0f61334d9acdb96c
describe
'7413' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWU' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
2f757b2129db94696fec14a1a10e6317
b150396649b984d95789c31f19ee4b7a6536e550
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWV' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
d4ea44c33400b006921f1e582856d32b
89b84a0e3d09c79e5867661fdc9dd1be2a9564e4
describe
'89067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWW' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
3a57c86366bfafc207ec69e06ea12d11
d117745100134f7f12c29264ac5797eee2a51486
'2011-12-23T22:04:08-05:00'
describe
'24110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWX' 'sip-files00146.pro'
93e1d5952a03f2b6d394fdd2bbcea184
745434f6a4a095b341efc8073c458e24cd72f1d4
describe
'26940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWY' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
594d4421b8bc88b7e4238c79d99c244a
0f020494693c05f61d9e5af9ae6a32e1ab6e8412
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOWZ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
60a9d5125206117bb8a0f9b5ba2d0feb
979b526d0452020a27a2f4cf74b29508491f0133
'2011-12-23T22:09:46-05:00'
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXA' 'sip-files00146.txt'
8a5779e3b0922fc6e47a7ecc2390bca0
18dfb7268990d6a7c4655c447c391be4458871d3
describe
'7703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXB' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6b23c93397461fc075fab9c665b4e37c
fd0f21f3c325757796e478a966f45df7c63c58ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXC' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
91cf07a724f8bbc90279872294b39e20
c77e122ce82e85ff2d81a2611f76d46c9f952478
describe
'86311' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXD' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
c9d27ee12a4914e2b1c67b9b3610edd4
ceaf1022f293ab1607e4ccb561878c4cac2e1e09
describe
'21878' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXE' 'sip-files00147.pro'
778f6f93e6c16f7ab72d65ad0da01ea5
d4deddb4f8cd85c9a09f1d6b9ebe25a351c78ed1
describe
'27949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXF' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
aa155ac50976f064008d0f8aac12d72c
839263f76b29945b2028b10d10cd67b1e38a772e
'2011-12-23T22:06:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
2aba0f3b2243b1ad241a8df7dca8e5ba
f0d0f7492f13cd21d2c0288ca0c46bd6e582c9ff
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
0c95f4b10271894fa81d7600f5145d87
1d969d210b283bcb7de3b8972223d2dfa23bd8e5
'2011-12-23T22:05:33-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXI' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
950bf100be7dd56ae1af1eec2159c071
3a28148b3315e51720e0b783e72cbbbfdec89d46
describe
'373286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
44e61cb52c7cc81120f25a73aff670c6
d53fd98a7064d3901b7cae858ab277f7cfe73b4d
describe
'89138' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXK' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
07921fec24ce07ee589e81dfed35d2fd
2960debab4c141af089b811f96a049c895d2f139
describe
'24507' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXL' 'sip-files00148.pro'
e779864270a0dc3733369925473318b7
f0140ae0a0900bab43713d4ad3289a79242416b8
describe
'30448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXM' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
7b354052770134f3a24348656923c2f7
04c0a5c278cc02087519203730d34fa61fc994c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
54d156e4b6c025c6feb8f532f4002673
475fe7738aef06e416748acf9d166cfc0d6d8339
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXO' 'sip-files00148.txt'
de2241f7b18478273ae05bb868b5ae6e
afc735f5210b97de591c3939b6157b0ea4925fdb
describe
Invalid character
'8406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXP' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
b77180c67fb7baa585fa5299280ed07e
9b643eb6176ebff7a635e5c58be8480d2501ea9c
'2011-12-23T22:03:57-05:00'
describe
'373312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXQ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
9bc406dbca08199f5bfadb77fd72f765
9cfddef854e875d976f10a5dc5b17cf4013fc722
describe
'78628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXR' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
bd56090427e3a01c0c006529889c7fea
eb1a13395a434245c0ecd1ca012e16946e6bb47f
describe
'20639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXS' 'sip-files00149.pro'
6d50703ff662f40705a5c8b99ea51c23
7a81e35672cc3855d2a9ce8ca4adc8abfc72db4d
describe
'25698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXT' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
f783723194f08dd14274eb7d47ba4c20
50fb3c2870f9287b839f9d71b2e522b335628a56
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXU' 'sip-files00149.tif'
c62e5e38f949e9399989149125c1489c
d496fa24a516a49d5bbdc82370ada1c868c40a99
'2011-12-23T22:04:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXV' 'sip-files00149.txt'
14372815a63ef10537e95308e27c5aa5
a14b1cd7ab26e1b88bc62c5b8f506e892d45842b
'2011-12-23T22:07:12-05:00'
describe
'7294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXW' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d7052263c4f7828257960aee2baa2ff5
bea8570fe31ff0a1b87e7a0a9031808685873998
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXX' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
c014eb11b48fb6f4b323e6ee6a0959f0
60a581a3065c1c9e6716cd4b927d5892252acd95
'2011-12-23T22:06:31-05:00'
describe
'80167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXY' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
2738ae1a6de10fcc66ff0df02a065971
66e67d9eea292a9f11ef18d5ea34f52c0df08e35
describe
'21779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOXZ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
9d3f16882d0e8db51644ab6aff4fd2d2
44a38830616bcca97368e2a45cb11b46e5c0cd80
describe
'26281' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYA' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
8bf044616d3389244c3eb762e457f9b6
b70446113a0b26280293cbbc814c835f77688ffc
'2011-12-23T22:00:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYB' 'sip-files00150.tif'
682f32dbec3891d9618fc44ec73e3d19
2bc777a845ab496660c65bc3db217fcf2dafa71c
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYC' 'sip-files00150.txt'
33b6ec6911822ab82230a0160d6cccd6
f93c41c893eb7af9484288c1009d99cb0b046f60
describe
'7286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYD' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
06d68c2d22176c44a99e30d63fc6f404
e4d492e5f9f662d3368c67d83c96123f54f2ac76
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYE' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
28d366ea38309a66b374d5de14e7fe9f
a58f9f394d207cfeef79cb8bd083631b0a490845
describe
'89755' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYF' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
96cbb5f6abeda62b3d58d2457c74e101
e3b8d0c66567cc3a262d87b9b01eb6312108a6a7
describe
'23779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYG' 'sip-files00151.pro'
0d01007b392831f7d1da64e3a7361ae1
6abcfd50655853a60b63d2303eee32a0727dafab
describe
'27348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYH' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
bb3b05494b8b5675752dbfc0ee7893c9
a277f77ecf63bcbb5380a3e88b13572b8cbc7bbf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYI' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f4f41ca42cc4a0a1678878f2b6cfa956
fca9972e3f09be95efa1f7960a911a23f4875de2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYJ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
b65bb11d762ea8af0385756a8931dfef
9b9a9b0034573c1ab78cf5b4875a4c8961248ed5
describe
'8075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYK' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
ca8124ec72cd45d25228b7cfe23ad884
3e8ed6076c75ce8e26dfb54de5b1cc4b45913a35
describe
'373158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYL' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
8c8f0d608ab68faee0a39fbfd24f5729
bf110a70cb369724e20847cccf83ccadb7edf0bb
describe
'88906' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYM' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
acc197219bf8cd7ca34da9f3bccb0e48
57675e0d89e0b92cd19f3362575307077aa2b133
describe
'18176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYN' 'sip-files00152.pro'
a961ded8b488f6026c1c1b58e53e4819
89abcdbf732a309cdd239c8771dd7233ee7593d9
describe
'27058' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYO' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
e7d3fa28fa109d987d791bad6e3418db
5da286e92b89d7297cb44d82ec0cbeaada2a18e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYP' 'sip-files00152.tif'
9cbe8e55d417e4aaef806577ddd9c06e
cf012bd2d95e455024e969ee4f16a4b261e4e0cb
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYQ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
afe5edb5b8ad1540e9c640254e78bdf1
c4e8fa4ddff515183b2a4ba9dc4917f919ab855f
'2011-12-23T22:04:39-05:00'
describe
'7770' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYR' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
fd92d4de046d16bf2e9ec539bfbe4bc1
34d304279a74f6e24707a2484a560efb32ab779d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYS' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3ad8f39f345e5602ac6464b7227cbdb4
c7566f875a52d20978b4cb1fe6987a79bf6704e8
'2011-12-23T22:05:22-05:00'
describe
'191500' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYT' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
52ee5307304733fe072d501e3f1c717e
518c59f009edd3bcea41dfb3af2793a85ad0e69e
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYU' 'sip-files00153.pro'
977b0be308c1c3709b25b216f05f5b50
72f8a6184b8664a93fa98222be0ff8d70fa9f955
describe
'43448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYV' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
fd0ade94f4628a673d432a89c05b09d1
4a94cd4166f59148ce5c1419c731e2e874d900a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYW' 'sip-files00153.tif'
d906dc392b4af2b7038a48e2c399ae70
75b0484f21651e0470cff57f23e4b6204d0c8010
describe
'10509' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYX' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
44031468513b7fc96d35b442e63f51e6
3ec85673d444f0aa54cee64e2cffbb316af5c75f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYY' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9af7610df8870e5a5b8b2d0cbe8ab3b8
42b62c7f2f53a20f1dece29d2364bb969a919a04
describe
'37265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOYZ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
6b483d6b47dc5032ab0b05de031a9737
0c119b8c96fe2dbec25c2e634e772e4a450e7a72
'2011-12-23T22:06:13-05:00'
describe
'7587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZA' 'sip-files00155.pro'
822834b8b24b27049914d2a99e29c41f
c1919b63b5c6afadf239830437cb677d445c173a
describe
'10290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZB' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
acb9dc95fbc70c4e2655059e42467a6c
c7f92795ef1e2865aa930396f575a8609e9e6d5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZC' 'sip-files00155.tif'
a2072204471616ac1d2aff3f1bfa8ea5
a11acdff1d7e93ab0be3b6cf522e31fc0004120e
describe
'261' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZD' 'sip-files00155.txt'
6cd77e1be821e1573325f0fe0187a9c2
65812c91b1d36b8fae8b1147d68402418255a13f
'2011-12-23T22:08:02-05:00'
describe
'3175' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZE' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
4160d627d12c3affd6c9d4ee33941300
74e2b478dbf164261dc07af71feef52507693e8e
'2011-12-23T22:08:37-05:00'
describe
'373323' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZF' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
87ba571744bb000e3455f5fbccdbf383
10b5e7909a86460b8ae13817414a70623eea9390
describe
'88477' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZG' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
40fd5f5566dabbb37f1a5cc6d267e281
3c70e1ec1b63d6cabdb2029dc9cf8bf9807319eb
'2011-12-23T22:00:45-05:00'
describe
'22340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
bf480bb7e4d6db77cfdf04903713371a
671fc74b6ba5155f5d3018f3d66f02c615a348ae
describe
'25648' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
4e0a3a171bdc482ae14a3658ed922586
a11fbfae317440f9d1a7b5e10b249214fe9cc4e6
describe
'3004076' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZJ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
f3a5211f979107cb0fae0e507401f414
967a186cef7ed329a4ae4fa17a41e75a327beae6
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZK' 'sip-files00156.txt'
c9ddd9c2efe86f7c39435794a22f3cce
513115f88049c739c9c44359e7858ea3062c60b3
describe
'7751' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZL' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
3b7de5eb442949d7d853d33974dccdf7
64a756442787b94072ab592f1e41ed1d242cf8d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZM' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
c57c6be6a743a4bf1f0ee4a088bc9624
528ec28d73cc67e9e30e5ffbc1aff0594fecdc66
describe
'92973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZN' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
0dad568e6cbe677947074030cd4d460d
8f2b584d341073973e93f76728ed4bbdbdbf260a
'2011-12-23T22:04:18-05:00'
describe
'22247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZO' 'sip-files00157.pro'
82a2ae5853533f044d74b85a8a6c6a8c
27f1bfabb9dd56cfc39952026d0dfd74e0e037d2
describe
'27150' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZP' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
302550c61b96fe14908c49d3123d3570
36ad1a6cd22deb2dad43a1fde0c9fb6e54e4e1d9
'2011-12-23T22:02:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZQ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
3aea337bde0e56f9b9114118fdbe8314
92048856401a0012a6c9f9bd4d8b5b78d33850c4
describe
'825' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
269cd8871d9c3e958bd5adc6f1d7b371
a8bfcfe56938d7bbf5be47051aaca3f8a84522cc
describe
Invalid character
'7855' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZS' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
9722fab3247ddc5321c3b1bddf21f5de
1e431e4c68f1864c2c46edf0ad95b64d32409dbf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZT' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b86292c35915b90ba4ab3bf2bfba23c5
71e9ddd9ef51aded37f7b1919728ef7be3073356
describe
'87086' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZU' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
b54240a2f4f483c904a5025abbc8000e
db11c415d262dc0aabad64f98f4f5f2dc92b97cb
describe
'22654' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZV' 'sip-files00158.pro'
0a8b55fb263a43cea8416208f966a8fe
edf957c5a8dd7a10b46d8f973ebc06ed1d86cdca
describe
'28723' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZW' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
3d8c13ebd2ec1fc7931be773214f9c3e
d3639e9078085589984ed46f9257a71ba594509d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZX' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4a20460f535c50cedae2271b7932c5f2
42b654a251743136227fa8fd871623479518a49f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZY' 'sip-files00158.txt'
74b93581a8e54e6f3b03bfb7277ec914
abfe7142ca82a85050941cf23314732e9928ab0c
describe
Invalid character
'7795' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABOZZ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
84e8bc6a38e1924d733b0e3bbcdaf364
43c27e88a17bf5845ef6dd1d1be2ce051b3eb983
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAA' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
4a60e2ab2726721f7518488d8ecd800b
c3314728f07d1d4f35b7ae8f0bf4ba53e424f347
describe
'95971' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAB' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
a279af712d53a5ec072a5f079871a338
3fa4d8324001cf1363e6f081fccb840569139b34
describe
'23214' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAC' 'sip-files00159.pro'
0c6a9146c83641169c837b76bd135265
8e0b89dde74d0545d49f62defbf84442cd588e91
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAD' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
260145bb9291a00d88f317041a21ebe2
3026835d86249147cc1b9088f0a84ab16e6c1d09
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAE' 'sip-files00159.tif'
cb5142cc0a9e48606dbb55cc0fde8efe
76c1a27152475c0646f74bee0235c7fd9543e9f8
'2011-12-23T21:59:41-05:00'
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAF' 'sip-files00159.txt'
a806bc76e0eaac70b356bd7e8f77df90
3ef1890ab2cb01d56627c1b3fe12fa9c6b110014
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAG' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
9cd76d502bb4c657a410ab3b3620ab05
601b486156a5262bf7fd18508bd8fe76047dc4ef
'2011-12-23T22:07:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAH' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
54df8bcc909c8e3af6d60d554276f927
447503048f73a92e966edad0b9611cbbf925e39f
describe
'96807' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAI' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
dd01f899321a4a1ab39aaa69816f8696
5f71da1a714ba2967e6eb020bed5c3da1787143e
describe
'26150' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAJ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
a8fc7a9c429718ecf5b7da66063cc14c
7a21830a05e782e987a3f18524e0f3d8d57fd6d9
describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAK' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
3dc8d509e240d610b947784193401ffc
de947a269d020fe79de8957caa00ed4dceb43b4e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAL' 'sip-files00160.tif'
08355c19103e55afb010350c1aed3237
01a2f81a83d7bcf93c76a19cb5a21c218e0d6028
'2011-12-23T22:06:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAM' 'sip-files00160.txt'
53a7214133395fe582d8f7f052a4650f
8d1910b5cfb6e07486a948285a79f7c26970e1d3
describe
'8610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAN' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
5ff88d30875e3d0df2d5e7f9a300ba44
105a5cd061413ebfba4817e209cced65f31d7a17
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAO' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
1c5e5e31942aca5f4eabfb81f7f0d129
402ebc9ae1ca11031cbd434a80b3253eaba2deb1
describe
'94845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAP' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
f29323632619ffe8bd776939260ea5d1
a90d56b92ab9d4b73e978b0320a1b99a451f2aba
describe
'28168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAQ' 'sip-files00161.pro'
14924714d0dfd00f30bad4c20424c647
8e8d9e4ad4851ff338a03831a282e5378cdbb72c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAR' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
454a4ee0d5237db41631a0c5a815f647
48f2475616bf30b20194f950501790097af9f649
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAS' 'sip-files00161.tif'
541c8adf84622088b13571ffe74e4055
d4aacc665af1fbae22cfd61c7ebb0d32a88256ed
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAT' 'sip-files00161.txt'
d16aa278b51465972302ba15e5c764e0
372e3e54465b1cbf83e166d6a90792843d43e979
'2011-12-23T22:02:15-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAU' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
4dd2e67ccf8036961567808e884a9a0f
491bc780d2b7cc033dc82d44222ce0e6a0e21f23
describe
'373193' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAV' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
f7b8b8b5182980549b2299fa4d5c54ac
48d586c341d3b2d32ce26e5861a0e0ce4d7810a4
describe
'82797' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAW' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
affc6295ede122952873f3e08c7d20c6
308a2816efd8f82b65906720d8342f62d4d412dc
'2011-12-23T22:06:59-05:00'
describe
'22428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAX' 'sip-files00162.pro'
f353d30ba184ca9e8b3220873a10a333
4d7cacf7871918cdbf39075302f5902e428cc29c
describe
'27975' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAY' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
c2d7eb1b4491f7877bd4e6b1e7b377b5
de34c2ef09d88003431ea53b3e8955bc494f88e3
'2011-12-23T22:06:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPAZ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
5f87106779fcccacb5d509a4cc104cf9
2d214314eff50a393298f0c6651e4fe848c275ab
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBA' 'sip-files00162.txt'
4aeff026a21d262ef564bbaec5757f49
f71bd927edeb92fd8809db84aa9683af932d3d41
describe
Invalid character
'7683' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBB' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
c333c466eaded4e636ce8c1ee2ea0b56
b212c4afc3f6c64e73f3ca6eb2f366009771d071
'2011-12-23T22:00:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBC' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e611d1510b07245279c9b93a1a0faa1c
d6093f97b96fac64e7d4bd8f93d9ac08f10ac754
describe
'81632' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBD' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
6b4cd8a4dfa96c5bc1e7465f722624b9
0cc3b2a010d615fb1ec22d322bb6b431266d1b2e
describe
'23294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBE' 'sip-files00163.pro'
094963873afa9423c4e35a8a4e5133ee
4a3094d741d7a066365dec389ac42359cd9bd371
describe
'26693' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBF' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
125625a4f859aaa1f92f63d051295dba
b36563371c605d9e7dd7bcbda0879cee16a874ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBG' 'sip-files00163.tif'
0a21a8f3ec7baa38922ca28aaa8ef78d
58f73dbc75d6daea17224af5162f3cff38c29d6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBH' 'sip-files00163.txt'
4fd989ce2ad93f23fd2fde09b98a951a
d6ab80f99bb1621666d32b1e52cd26429d95af91
describe
Invalid character
'7321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBI' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
5dc7264ebedc3499cbfbc7cbe846f671
d6987a82656461add4e032ff919983b9d3960fc8
'2011-12-23T22:00:32-05:00'
describe
'373338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBJ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
ea73dab381ad339a8792ff13ecc9e522
ff7edf803e5edb2a535954654bcaffa49335f7ff
describe
'98614' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBK' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
aa09c4b084bcd9a740c36a7c856d3c2c
8a7f0e71f65b38a849d9d3f8a8f8dbaa99f3c728
'2011-12-23T21:59:40-05:00'
describe
'27407' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBL' 'sip-files00164.pro'
3551a0583bfe2f57cd2e1a7728a0989a
c8e9de1803792c804d9bc6418f03758e372f9540
describe
'33048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBM' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
09f1886ba6e9c4758b7951ee6d068711
fd7642715f0f168e39962a889bf5de0500b0ebd5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBN' 'sip-files00164.tif'
2124df75f19a156ec66a57a6b8cc1ed9
c0f5268f207bb8cbbba94180d062e1eb4d8e0c65
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBO' 'sip-files00164.txt'
75b8f848f7eebb6fef3ba0a8b01719c1
33c627487817e4890818845b7ad92354376519ce
describe
'8568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBP' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
42b60528ff57b0eeb14e827755afcd90
87edc0d590e9aa4aef0b4f0b28abd7c11742c2c5
'2011-12-23T21:59:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBQ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
28b569416586ec64655a0212ecb8343f
b39bac769dd907d2809bb638ee433c56481a7021
'2011-12-23T22:04:03-05:00'
describe
'109210' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBR' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
9b40d1627f968ded46b6f8c024bd4433
17c1e292c7c3563ca9373e7d1914cc0da97e299c
describe
'29418' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBS' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b0ad584434afd3c7df4d4059d065102b
1e996ca3c02c517ba53c3a77bd5844efaba04053
describe
'37405' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBT' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
51c17f2672724a82377ad00d3c9a12c2
cb9815bde51be9677aef49cfaa4285c0e18f1c4e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBU' 'sip-files00165.tif'
45b02d54ba3de5f91e360bb07f01a189
7fe2a024e8822a2d1c6498d3e52b11a9124a2996
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBV' 'sip-files00165.txt'
046ba45382879750f1b97c4c39aeaca9
a7bf04253514d9edbef20b886418d55805ba00ab
describe
'9476' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBW' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
8274a0201d1510a2264f9f1ce367450e
efde2a69c3cb41450e999ca47f9a01fbd444a57a
describe
'373247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBX' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
b62c3bbb68b727a48a17cec3eef410cf
9f71f0cb5ab64ed8802315f8c4203b7a6e95fe21
describe
'85676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBY' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
f7fee400f92d60a357f48e91cee41584
6cd7234ab754a1c72aa9cd431510a7f6d2909249
'2011-12-23T22:02:19-05:00'
describe
'24174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPBZ' 'sip-files00166.pro'
5606e81ccc40c0c6725016421de49846
4a6c12a6830d2a458c1107e62e5b53294ca1a8fa
'2011-12-23T22:02:18-05:00'
describe
'27772' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCA' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
0a0f079d9f886d20f8aa014abbb0a69c
52c41cf2f6e2988cde8ede6a6194df96ffd76858
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCB' 'sip-files00166.tif'
823b301b5ba95111bcf6f0630dbcb892
8e86236d363476546f21cabf6b496ebc395d2be4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCC' 'sip-files00166.txt'
00f91e4ba38b7a7b1c5c24949b8cd44c
891a10d3e479efb4fcf074953ff78955fa3f03e8
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCD' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
c1854bf347800c88aeba22a2c90e83eb
2dab0219f971a42ffc9f4617b57b291649dea8a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCE' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
1ae52704c212efa8ba4e34922775e8c4
d9351f955cb481a4e7ce95a87d109a86dfd6c69f
'2011-12-23T22:04:37-05:00'
describe
'86376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCF' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
4cef157566996251ef294e816fc3564a
356de350416c46f389b02476f9feb4631665e447
'2011-12-23T22:06:12-05:00'
describe
'22807' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCG' 'sip-files00167.pro'
8e4fc420179834809ba65d4078c7dccb
6e20e5396201026ea4324d2c0c31e652802244aa
describe
'28704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCH' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
3d6c4384d82c82b695c7462f26a6c3fe
8616c7146c41ebe098171f4987da305e4b1ea621
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCI' 'sip-files00167.tif'
8bcd2e855914e29b592a7cfb64852c74
0cdc6fda772f8f7e49e3c22e52883670c28529e3
'2011-12-23T22:09:37-05:00'
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCJ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
0fbf63f955e8a52ce71b6088030b8f34
87b9aa595bc1e1ec624c010364c8e776911fad57
describe
Invalid character
'7945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCK' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
19240d6e6e7ddf2d0ab945c325e9431f
69058f7b751dd6ae6a652b02a0bb740a83f28554
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCL' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
4f58ff0938b3ca2cffac5982a5f741e0
74534d168ff9d8bf1313b5bc3071e43d09aec53d
describe
'79544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCM' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
67bab5e44ccf5a658ace3407e543fafc
f0b98454a04388cd0e4131a619720861a7d0f1cf
describe
'19497' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCN' 'sip-files00168.pro'
d3f7b991ab35fcedbf7a78d1acb7ce62
9e466b4a4a0960a48e61853f9680306e9dcf0772
describe
'24169' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCO' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
cecfd8d08a08701633627c08d636a089
da878b7719e6f95757e37152db79db6cf205586e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCP' 'sip-files00168.tif'
8fa22f86cb0560a00e2748b94826de80
2b4951020ab3f3ac671dfda908fee474dcdabf40
describe
'737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCQ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
00142a4e1e86f62a6a1e63d84d6db22b
aa0c33f289e103942390fbecd3262ffc06181138
describe
Invalid character
'7127' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCR' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
67326000b4f915c779992129e2f264ef
484e7f2a69a6122e4ba694db366dfd4a81a919fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCS' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
a6787ef5f464181d22293c16d9b51ba1
8c3b6a02c31afdc5f64d05b2cc8bc60b4759e882
describe
'100768' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCT' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d9210ed1dade4e629f808471761fb5f8
1dfc0ffc736280c9aff53fa1e96a366fe1619de1
describe
'25261' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCU' 'sip-files00169.pro'
c5846ada166296bf8ed35b2fc9b3f416
69223808222a982d73ef812ea4e4f27abcaba1d0
describe
'30615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCV' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
120bdb38f3e8de4e298edb2c22650b6b
9fb69895c752cfee97ab1c9dac2c2ad98e153b4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCW' 'sip-files00169.tif'
a2a084cc5f23e539d04e30c498ee2dd3
d44aca41381c4473bd83841e417d7b02b27582ee
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCX' 'sip-files00169.txt'
cafe98babad91b3ed98961a8923fcc80
3bafec73cc337377ae92517e065494bd10adaecd
describe
'8468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCY' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
08b2eb986d8d0f014c1e1b99a451ec31
22ca210a2f412456c39534bb8d6ad0924bcf65ee
describe
'373191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPCZ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
4484d266b110eab1d81663c7b73fcbf2
2d542a087a3625e7656c11473267b9e411558db4
describe
'95757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDA' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
480dd1643fed711cf22e34308c0f1130
5731b68c6cdea6ae9724f8606881fb8921a6270f
describe
'25326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDB' 'sip-files00170.pro'
05c25e0128c89c9f6dbab1857e30d413
e5ddefe52c6600f393560c4cc437652657426d76
describe
'31464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDC' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
486fab83dd8ea2f84dcae2cf9af22f31
8c796202dc5efae47aeeea5d70f7fac5cc137cd0
'2011-12-23T22:07:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDD' 'sip-files00170.tif'
d405c1d8648d01dc581e17030ea33358
2279ab7f2ea11cb88a631e3caa40ca850612cfe0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDE' 'sip-files00170.txt'
3ba9b58234fd8ae4d622530009bed3d5
6a7e764a7e402b9321cf2277c38574821a3e0604
describe
Invalid character
'8601' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDF' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b8f8207df0d89a9bda2f4b69f6c75976
5f6fac874b0b61eed2e8ae1f0ede286bf6d72972
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDG' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
57f3c48036537b9102f390ebf2e9d65b
a16a26e25d59d6d2d4f7c05b0f9a97a23969181e
describe
'89179' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDH' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
8af9de2b839e7e90278f38ebcbbf86c6
61e0674df30ab24330926fe03673ad05018d44f0
'2011-12-23T22:05:04-05:00'
describe
'21268' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDI' 'sip-files00171.pro'
f0d2c9171cb7c7372d64d399661de0d4
cf894be3f2f5743407a21c3694661001c5815936
describe
'27330' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDJ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
5aee399b84798803b7713a012ab4b361
0194a403302c51dfbcd7f05b3bb2e9e7034b1365
'2011-12-23T22:07:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDK' 'sip-files00171.tif'
cb8b2bb6abdc438c56133a5e6778bd89
1dd2387f2c2ea6a6d96e25feb2fc359144e8d245
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDL' 'sip-files00171.txt'
152f962b62fb053e63336a04303d70f2
71c1b74798c3612dde2370e64600dc2d77b61de3
describe
Invalid character
'7898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDM' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
12540e2b6e9d2d33f7c02dc6b959fe2b
f0b000065e5e82f54150454c0e10b948f057a275
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDN' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
60807e4248fbcdca8b2ad64a39ae7ac9
09f7c423412a21816fc19afcb8fd5db9e0f1a115
describe
'80995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDO' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
33683b3b6ed62e209b2f22c092bf5fa9
af9b01d668e083a8d785cc411d634022fdecdb96
describe
'21087' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDP' 'sip-files00172.pro'
887b9d771858db964d7ba712045d1876
cbf6e87eb210a10518289f56f0f550b5cf731966
describe
'26687' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDQ' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
38716e03fe2d049e619f3439846159c2
c5fd9c4012620473e71cb4168924170e8ed544b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDR' 'sip-files00172.tif'
94f8a49a01a923b4eb38d3029f031ffc
acccd0adaa6d64b9edec7754f8674a82cb147f6b
'2011-12-23T22:09:57-05:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDS' 'sip-files00172.txt'
7ca3aea2bc0f5116e02a6a2ff67d78b3
e05a66fa7502ef3b7ab16311372e219d19589546
'2011-12-23T22:03:40-05:00'
describe
'7603' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDT' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
347b717ec03bc61ccc7c48c6ce06e719
1ca9a737de3dd4b7a72b42985eeb58c9c3b390b4
describe
'373379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDU' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
b98f7200adaeed0dd2403d6eeb3a45a9
f61ae35410c4be06a4192ca418ca205a14e841db
describe
'96787' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDV' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
38ad9dd8482f4bc5ece5d19a69f4521a
6c1930ac48e138d93a7c1e977c7650f24ef7aceb
describe
'25498' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDW' 'sip-files00173.pro'
06e95712e842e9fa125ec36be81d019d
537dcb0b18697dff38c9e36028dbfb2a27d8bfd0
'2011-12-23T21:59:25-05:00'
describe
'33805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDX' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
50a7aa89a1f29624270193cf8fd2db51
f91ada5db6fba33bd8443aab51b5347e299c81a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDY' 'sip-files00173.tif'
0fc13c14901e528ddf11b681c0bc2468
26542d1408a1fbd50184d49684aae092951c03e8
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPDZ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
69747d2c3f66d07e61729f6adf035019
6644594ed2b0861aa95d566a50289f70c1c62071
describe
'9152' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEA' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
41fe30ac7bed0402b0d66da2c914e9fd
9d3735fdcee49243610c17f47c2f4d5dbf737cf0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEB' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
64d900d55e8fad70128797a739e1a5fb
e6c09f643b780ff5cc98ee6eb1d44d55cd8a8072
'2011-12-23T22:06:48-05:00'
describe
'92510' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEC' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
41491c429ca56d85d05437f7dfd225d6
d1f1995195b26ec5959af6cc1b8b64ce3b0c185f
'2011-12-23T22:07:32-05:00'
describe
'25154' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPED' 'sip-files00174.pro'
0179d1aa48287936ee06e563982c2ea0
f2be2da3449ff5afd1665c35c451de66ca3e4e08
describe
'31879' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEE' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
f475f010c47856bd7b6719b52f7a3af1
c606d3368d805a86888f6eb7b1a216ade3021d67
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEF' 'sip-files00174.tif'
250c8e80445fe6c0831bff40276ff132
ba7bc3b76820c099ee0d4ec03996bd2ef520ea94
'2011-12-23T22:04:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEG' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3b71b21849cfe06fba3dc938abe430c0
98dc061220221d0a8fe3ab902f4965a7576a9daa
describe
'8853' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEH' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f278999a8248160ff2fa129c12641ac4
c03cc0e8edaac749c576c4394397ea4769c68c4d
describe
'373217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEI' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
090a27a32888b8cbe319c9975d74d96f
47a2b64600a14cada5ed61d125710a31e99a3bf2
describe
'78326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEJ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
d5e7e4cece4f195a2938ef6f182af8df
42c80fff9c950a69424dc66a7669daa05a4c700b
'2011-12-23T22:04:29-05:00'
describe
'19478' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEK' 'sip-files00175.pro'
0c78e5464b1849bd358a1e780dd59eca
e8909755e15d78ce874882732e400f67c18de1d4
describe
'24148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEL' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
70ca06ff60629e17748d6e97dab5fcd8
1c195ae7c21d3528d96ddb0294c1c4e71daa44aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEM' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4b71372ba4030a46ee118b7ebac5274f
fbf3358ef9d2c7ad465f2b6136645d36b884690f
'2011-12-23T22:08:27-05:00'
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEN' 'sip-files00175.txt'
e39ebce0bbb2bfedd27d32f178615192
acf6f7345dddedd3332ecefea69e2329bac0f284
describe
'6981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEO' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
107f817b2f42b69c3ede1bf6b90e9404
69de8957002de6cabff1375942e2d37fb6775cc8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEP' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
328a87374c372ecb72ff0ace3174727d
1ab2e851f6011b3e8e00b936177f6a023ffc8768
describe
'92410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEQ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
c4c07404b32c69230744e1654c105f0a
24b2bf43e1ea88633500b2dc46b6143d31f304e3
'2011-12-23T22:03:04-05:00'
describe
'20753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPER' 'sip-files00176.pro'
2c52b3be32dc7c82ae9a6941cc6fd172
2aa5a510f6645f325e05719b1d5ed5f8cd817ec0
describe
'27321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPES' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ed2ebb6f50b352c7a466d0608eb62cf5
c109aa2c20d234f498868434eb28470d19b0f578
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPET' 'sip-files00176.tif'
ddbc00d071b620fff1c769ecc588c55a
d5c6ae4516abf0219148bffeba9fe7c9728c625f
'2011-12-23T22:01:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEU' 'sip-files00176.txt'
46d288ae0044407d7c97ef7f04e128cd
28ec0ef381b47faac9b73977a53e5b46f2251a1f
describe
'8820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEV' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
cd2a390ec7eeb163e1bee89c683ad0ff
a2b0e8f1638d0e9385521b1d843eee1e866018a7
'2011-12-23T22:07:08-05:00'
describe
'373369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEW' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
30732311f756eb0cbaf9a83935186adf
863205cfdc8d8d522c10d61c937fb1edc1306b98
describe
'184125' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEX' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
e3823748526094d488140e55d3ee2cb5
a9ffa2e91e6e97a92fa365c5678793b59e84bf78
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEY' 'sip-files00177.pro'
bf1e8c5611b8ac9353121ff80a1134a2
9eb1a6f4bd172eab2d74e6a5073c5c28dbaacce9
describe
'42746' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPEZ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
235cba54c392d7cf6c33894d1fe8c89c
695b9c4a1fc6b152e8f916f224cb621dc3bbcc48
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFA' 'sip-files00177.tif'
42d04e56712fa512ab08e2c6c1da6803
0d53c6d6c122c1660d1f188887a478d767234f36
describe
'35' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFB' 'sip-files00177.txt'
16e09035df1a97df7a891adb3737d66e
914fe50ca45b6bb86ed25d6145e06884fee627d7
describe
'10371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
dee1c212f1d12e8add54a12159fe3e92
aaa5ff34a4fdf8686809976793a830215a308db8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFD' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
301707ec4535dd46262f076af1099fd5
0b9777d98632a8a28720fb182d3aaeb1db0cea5b
describe
'96509' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFE' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
84c717df3644653c9b652b811b3fcc3c
e70b60e9fac28ad8c13d5c3b8dbd0cece0f03b9c
describe
'25532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFF' 'sip-files00179.pro'
ec81a80e1e3a8e95afa13dcbf5ad2f0c
f692990b3121723022e8bf6b9b834e79a3b08021
describe
'30233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFG' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
dc2965126d0d7a235d77cb0da236b9ce
fdc2a5d7750ca7793962b4f61156cda18db9d96c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFH' 'sip-files00179.tif'
9d6284cdfb846dedc4da065261fbbcdf
e9b5630975bbf29f5d3ad37cdb7ea92664d7c195
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFI' 'sip-files00179.txt'
fbe062f503c9fde1cb1c32157815c455
390776dcce6f9895daae061969d4d07393cfda0d
describe
Invalid character
'8687' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFJ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
a0f6c3737bf554637a00c301d471f193
9602aa0944300a4edcf1dcd6d1c48cedbbd3fc50
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFK' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
efd96a7d5ad3658531754f98ed6996b6
4e2cb689978701c8e4d2a30cdf03bb650fdfe855
describe
'92991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFL' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
5cb46baaebeb78c4b35e767e3f40de14
a41bf39d8e7251b448a09dbfc31258e9be31ce90
describe
'22705' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFM' 'sip-files00180.pro'
843f3cbd0a1ff9cade9df125cf4252da
6dcee377d1f6dadaa7ffe9789233ede39cb4f215
'2011-12-23T21:59:24-05:00'
describe
'29645' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFN' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
317dbf1ccb34b83bafb5f8acba3ebfa6
815352b39a3491b52479da5da175af9637f50371
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
badd9ac6f1456c62ca1e8ce884a9762a
a8553dd9b0bcee13168f19548b9a61076ee61212
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFP' 'sip-files00180.txt'
5a31aa5b1fd15f09602932cb784af434
a87d481e04615ac874240d9cd76e04219c736fa7
describe
Invalid character
'8268' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFQ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
b00b51ad3f751c0cdc698b7ce4be655e
d63f086fb513aa2b9977bed7d2d74f96f2d0a278
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFR' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
4517e796469ded91f79f3698112e7ee7
d8a85449c475396421e65a9a7052dd308507f2a2
'2011-12-23T22:07:52-05:00'
describe
'105805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFS' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
be6a23e9b384aeea8b450a0773481c60
5572a92c70b21eec4fa80c51ece85df0ec925f64
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFT' 'sip-files00181.pro'
a82627c5c3add1cdae12274d04be102c
f6b4a5c4ece38ecb98308f12b8b1bb6adbc4d1e8
describe
'33449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFU' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
2eb25e1e9d95be5768312fbb61257b1d
0375fc3531bd9421f12fdd5f737340c196a4ee18
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFV' 'sip-files00181.tif'
9b951d6f25155f4f277078e0e209fe09
7ab1ff8715e9f583835cd547a2bb449ff18a6ac3
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFW' 'sip-files00181.txt'
53e1421960eafb452ce7472f9e52912e
31f8d3ef87f93a25bdd0375fde1654b560c48366
describe
Invalid character
'8906' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFX' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
46f3c6f50a96c2b6475e4e077bda9cf6
bf42d3c70750b041f06d4743932fe12c9e070e39
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFY' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
0525a8a4306a9f3b5ee0926f6d7ab92e
31d5ae452c3f8b791f7e8730af856aee88a9e00a
describe
'93692' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPFZ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
141ee090bd67ff7f6b2b748dab4cb74c
569348b98e73cdb654f08e1b129ed4532a2b0ebe
describe
'28002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGA' 'sip-files00182.pro'
6fea5ce3b6a23c81c7ed6f02895a092f
3cd377901684042cd299877e1b2f7c8224ee1e1c
describe
'29664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGB' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
2477f31b0bdbcf21b4dae7bbcba8128e
eab4b41791021eb014d4e2072e09f0c455c8bfab
'2011-12-23T21:59:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGC' 'sip-files00182.tif'
4ad705b04c67b2478d01e99af6c38eee
4f610f861396bb9365a45a8836ed162d2748ea3b
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGD' 'sip-files00182.txt'
eb5ccb76bbec6e235da4e7a385a63d6a
01d28b93e29ce87f19a61d6e85248c42771802c1
describe
Invalid character
'8448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGE' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0ee4cab4f5831cb000676af8d2ca0a9c
19a8b59a11d30ac7a9f96e07b01a4c4763bb5d41
describe
'373371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGF' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
50fffa979bdb9492903d7091533b1570
0fd487f655b014d569338c4b823e296b9e0a7bbb
describe
'95256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGG' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
0365692c7f4497065c4c66ff79990a03
cec3f2ddcae450d0f54dcd96aef9b4a3a7ba2a3e
'2011-12-23T22:03:03-05:00'
describe
'25624' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGH' 'sip-files00183.pro'
b20da2dc3eb5fea8ca8b48da8c04f1d6
de4086c78cf3cecefc8442727d28df86d8ee4ef8
describe
'28803' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGI' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
12012ca5d75638699afc028997fd72b8
0cfb2f6f8246ebb0b02d05333929ebfca9ee9bbb
'2011-12-23T22:07:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGJ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
473e652a3dfdeaa91024226e193ea250
a865446930f58550f4cca176fa291514d4b89570
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGK' 'sip-files00183.txt'
ff6a2d576a2c76bce974e1376be4acca
dcaffccc8d0bc3707d110d4b8f23a2d88ef3da94
describe
'8587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGL' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b880279a2336adb664b12b7460e3c2e5
0fd61c130c04af4ca43a51ee730b00c6a7c4e7d1
describe
'373294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGM' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
edf09c8a97d3338e8f23880de523b033
8d321cdca1b1648005a1fa519b07a1b4831e6459
describe
'72549' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGN' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
20cb73ab0375857ae31f6a08b8fc21be
ac44240ff28f96f67d5af23129a1a9f6a45f8706
describe
'18745' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGO' 'sip-files00184.pro'
53fa64ae004f8f297e6d3df1adbb311d
c3afbc346700c766a1cb78db2150d49b4ad401ec
describe
'24107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
9331de9e263a3f0eb79ed4e571c5af2f
39601f750b2b856fe4b4de9180c9ace8a8139b6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGQ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
85bc4d0807fa5e3e1048cb055e15aab9
266e0c30bcbe34d6d4fd8eaf3fc4ff62638f227e
'2011-12-23T22:00:19-05:00'
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGR' 'sip-files00184.txt'
27b723219156d0daea39b24fec5e0a1c
73187853a6b7e2c6661c0c32d06b95be233683a1
describe
Invalid character
'6901' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGS' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
6c5c4c4d57037ef5bccd870a299d0848
54e79605fa9d48a3164041e7adc8eed7d1e2ed0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGT' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
55c4ccf29e3062e35264a2694c928911
5442338f1eb1ce5843cd2bf459189f4ff8db88fc
describe
'85168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGU' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
0576170d7855779613df2b9473d552f5
977f234be52ef7c92f25ea75360ff972b1705eda
describe
'21347' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGV' 'sip-files00185.pro'
cd721a37ac9f1470128bc905e9e7a2bf
703a727a9db487573e7aa0cdb75701a9c77101f2
describe
'26174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGW' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
afa59ec77b68a339a6972f2ad6ad9597
a76a793fcb39584fd1d39bcb31b5f1693084602e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGX' 'sip-files00185.tif'
bf19129f724b46d22e85346c589f1dbb
d9764f1e98b16ba2904649c4aaee26a7a4ce0772
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGY' 'sip-files00185.txt'
1dd30444b98c61876eb6f3f962cea05f
dfff2d1e4fe4842788d07cc1398a2f65199ecd7a
describe
'7938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPGZ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
a2b68cedcd77a09a7f69e653ca651dda
f3dc279452f94f5735c5082080d599274317616f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHA' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
aa09a70bd39cf316fbcd2cd14cb56b95
8b5efb08c8e214cc4bcb2af73f4c3dd8ba5a8da9
'2011-12-23T22:03:41-05:00'
describe
'100967' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHB' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
a53569a92f59e83a720c09a1074b6fd6
514fcbf695a19dcaecdcf09f39596401f4075452
describe
'29252' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHC' 'sip-files00186.pro'
799f4cb49683255aeddafff73bd0d826
e5c0d258f2ae019c95513c0e1ebc08a96a92c2ff
describe
'33028' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHD' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
c36b83b01791f8c93033c99c688364bb
240f35e154c4fc7f2863dbbfbdbc473abbfed035
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHE' 'sip-files00186.tif'
869d76442c728d48cdaeb3f62d6e6b05
b85efe6e4f51b09e15c85aaed37e099c73adea79
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHF' 'sip-files00186.txt'
f4b2f3acc620ed445368706ea5974309
feca83e9274e9d678c3b133bc7a26f4d342e3e52
describe
'8779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHG' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
12f98d52b8bbc97bf60b3fc3aad426bb
d977bedfa0861bda7ee156f3c1cceb226ef869ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHH' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
40dd817b1b201b12f7ed64b5f0d7f835
df56d5c55c6742114686535d9f8adda865bd6164
describe
'85682' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHI' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
9a00d28efa1fa8cc7dda2b0dfcbd20e0
8203ef01806ddbfdd91c57f41c94fa1d0ff28b67
'2011-12-23T22:08:07-05:00'
describe
'23165' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHJ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
4d3ffcbfef3fee844f0e489dd56668c8
3f8efd61702886e6153ee9ad7b48d0af3da06ade
'2011-12-23T22:01:23-05:00'
describe
'29754' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHK' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
cb1d7fc1860c8ba1535b2f28c4523687
5d4a4ac075972ff4d4b50a0fa10c63b3d48f7d20
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHL' 'sip-files00187.tif'
c0c1a8af928e58062760a2108c28b3c1
b4332ffa59818bfec6419b97c954999e681204c6
'2011-12-23T22:03:14-05:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHM' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b2bdcb9c55afaa4f1010dd0aee795e65
3092a9397144f746ce50f6024ccc7e650c20a911
describe
'7727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHN' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
c8e82fcc5b4196d8920440fd6bb3f1d0
bd5de64b5b84e9051d44c801e0d48f076208a315
describe
'370178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHO' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
f9d8d5bbc7838cabbba89cd6f1918f8e
820fbe36778bdd96c7f37b0f467abce197fa3a90
'2011-12-23T21:59:27-05:00'
describe
'86641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHP' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
81f60fb32db2a9f43214e1256183d991
cec600feed829486d2cfa16118a82994e689124b
describe
'21917' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHQ' 'sip-files00188.pro'
7dacc5f91c6bb3b17bab11cc07ce302d
304dc14a68b12c3cdf551ae4b09fd8d685cbeeb5
describe
'28308' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHR' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
01adcf296dac8e0b782ad4aeaaea4c5a
29e3b70a179833e38d52d4c155c6106533003071
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHS' 'sip-files00188.tif'
8f0e7cd587001444521cd27cab5101b1
8f54e56073e6954e7dba9b394ca500ffd28e1689
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHT' 'sip-files00188.txt'
58261f341931769a05a386d28543280f
465732537a1bc84c45017793c36a0cb96fe595d2
describe
Invalid character
'7975' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHU' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
2dedb9400b0b6b9b04db858051258544
a6bb2704071845c9bdbdcb5e7c44ad03381ad4eb
describe
'373157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHV' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
e5979880624aba75e0195840dac65036
3fbf8211bb2b56f3297cb999a0b2d92786a7db72
describe
'98738' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHW' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
6fd622f6e00fbb39beb739d60f405fad
7774e23384b3ca39d42e6ef81089e054ed2db7b1
describe
'25438' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHX' 'sip-files00189.pro'
f891078c5ea407c483310bdf9ddc721b
925f8835ce6679e15688025ed44336b823796d6b
describe
'31156' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHY' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
cd8ff640d63822e7d0058b1821ebe943
ef48e0c2550319b6cb361de0656ec9bd304f21e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPHZ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
67f511623f1f4e9c35e9e704a045a411
d1d45beb0e57cb37555e3b9cf977415ff89ff9ca
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIA' 'sip-files00189.txt'
d00220bbfb828340c4291f2108a62697
2286ddeff23c9648230a97bbc14cb6972097b91a
'2011-12-23T22:07:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIB' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3bf2cef252089092c7ef47da91d714de
08058a9d2ef8e9d6edf514ab4c5118c869d8a423
describe
'373354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIC' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
0cbeaab094a694d72ddfbdd2da6aff3d
456485c49f92ac490f9bd7f65fba78b24a57657c
describe
'105617' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPID' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
18c1235504297c70023ba1fbc83abd8a
a403e9eac5db388fff12e3c584cee7e56ba04d20
describe
'23081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIE' 'sip-files00190.pro'
93d65a324d58364699f74304570eb055
0f11f08a81342f900f96bad9d1d62ce2e9a8fb37
describe
'31727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIF' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
d688c70695752e7ba3c89d669bdb9dc3
18d1970a5da557b807027461c05f41a59aee6ca1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIG' 'sip-files00190.tif'
14117bde0daddb95f18eccfe931e69b4
0b4d1fdf3f0cb8b2f50e987ae45e1d3f7f2de727
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIH' 'sip-files00190.txt'
aecbbc3dc7f819a46d9b6b6db95fc863
eb7cd5634a4749a538055c0e48f3819331092b7b
describe
'8281' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPII' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
e2d2353fc90002611e499ba5c5b3181d
8556ac98f6c54c3d230b7ba3bcc6b2d9244e0b4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIJ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e16871b1fbaa6f3e0fea56ef403962f5
fd3f6befd4741000cbe32c79e95d0e84651f37e7
describe
'97462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIK' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
1d724403761b06289d89474f76d52049
09e60eafbb2cdd6d488a025f9d300d40aa65b930
describe
'19139' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIL' 'sip-files00191.pro'
0e628e405074b29fafcc8baacf6e79db
7c1b2999d778772470992a73c7e53ad97e145055
describe
'29485' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIM' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
c858c13ad0b5cfaf15612ac251ceeee9
97620b07f3ca3462eddbdfc9da8c237189687578
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIN' 'sip-files00191.tif'
898f794c993737aac7fc5429485a3273
9e96f82366ef47d76dd5f5c90ea2b5263d702f47
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIO' 'sip-files00191.txt'
59c3d5e89ca84d60bd95c693de7c2ece
1f800f1c0f0b0d4cf49439574ff60486da14d5da
describe
'7443' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIP' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
8fb282ab4396bd8b0a0e8ede4b493e83
ec599b15e9e26e33bc681bf4dc99127f1fe22386
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIQ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
e3cb56520eed1c2b7f2367ff6af1c39b
7e6b20cd2611e2fae7f1a67f5f27f7a9745443b1
'2011-12-23T22:07:45-05:00'
describe
'75990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIR' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
7a4a62c2d9e4edc51f7c4b05ec9677db
20b6b1dac51825b8223dd0b4252d70671ef4a28a
describe
'20922' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIS' 'sip-files00192.pro'
cd76b3cf3efc65ebd3e4db54a89eeb4d
45ded7aaf5feeadf4a8ca9e5cd672d19bbb1825d
'2011-12-23T22:00:04-05:00'
describe
'22765' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIT' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
c9b747ca2c6ac2c88aaf105be6644519
f4c6da251f0e175ad42710f1b03f10311c728dfc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIU' 'sip-files00192.tif'
cde378f517122391d2997ec6819ec7e9
0833367196d5a412a4c0ff67ac938d28ec0de611
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIV' 'sip-files00192.txt'
233c76b6e304ddd13193586f88582382
4185fe26bdc70d12c77c0460a74c00b57c5a1cb8
describe
Invalid character
'6480' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIW' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
7bea01eb1e81a281510a868a7845820e
9228ffbf3c7c1cbf15e3b9f7be169f441b5a5f1a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIX' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
34cbf95d353d04b6eda8f82cef07ffe1
0de6a6230292d683414c17525cf98782ef75c25f
describe
'89915' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIY' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
915139878e2f0596f0f071f506cb3bb2
1f6cdd871dc40fbdfc5ef9034883837518484cc6
describe
'22394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPIZ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
f9f5354a7b2c6e822db7dccae21e1c4d
18799a5aac19a2b26b3b6ad5b6bf319da6fc2a4d
describe
'30063' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJA' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
61bfc2d75b5790f06290e3cabac5fc61
c47916a7f81d92cee51ec0353c63a995636fe43f
'2011-12-23T22:04:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJB' 'sip-files00193.tif'
6e59197468c8530f8b75a7ee1a0c40b4
39f8676cd942839fe5f04ea8bae783b2119a3b7e
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJC' 'sip-files00193.txt'
2a6b2f6c7436fafeb92b9b0540c17db2
d11052b591df7c96afd35b62aa49858ce606e511
'2011-12-23T22:00:29-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJD' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
caabe6d09d17f41c164f29d42fa379eb
b351c49993ab4b02c83643fd01cbd1639a0eda0d
describe
'365305' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJE' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
ebdfaae2f521156608dab358f811d3d1
9ce9339f2a779c6d6af70386a4ba5e02c1673a9a
describe
'76260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJF' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
ba5734023688997608e2c8235453d9dd
20aaf0d562ea49a508848944bf01244e2ec4d4a0
describe
'21416' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJG' 'sip-files00194.pro'
870057fb57f9bd0507daa1de95bc47f3
6bf3ba9958f849226f5cd9819968fc9e6e2ee069
describe
'24185' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJH' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
59aaf218fa89e7a3f3549601bcec0c38
971d187e86b387057b9674570b2ccd417f3b1b92
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJI' 'sip-files00194.tif'
d866f049eb76f83f336c37a05325cba2
e9afe2fd3e3b0d496bd67f78b8662a89c10542fc
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJJ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
ae1d572686e69763c09fb88da100c6c3
60a200facce16d0d910c00f1bf84d8403e8ca021
'2011-12-23T22:08:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6601' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJK' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
7da955c99c935f53d862741069966a5b
169a7071c80f7e4e7d4df93314d3f3ae930e3951
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJL' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
ba996cca1474e96a6d7fd98a388ab0e2
34d2f3dac3d5300b8e27793381a2c2375530d3e6
describe
'87322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJM' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
425e3c8fa4354a9535f092944290dc6d
d91fff85ef1b8a7d6dbf259d8aaff41b74dbae0b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJN' 'sip-files00195.pro'
db77dd5d217e0e2f8a804edd5c99e843
1b0bbd640d02bda38ac96c5bbe4544ddf4e6a790
describe
'26921' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJO' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
29d3031a0140ce8f2b10d0f47d2d9c24
45ffb069762983ec78ba6d6b89a042982a21151d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJP' 'sip-files00195.tif'
c7504121894679ecff6773cd421286b8
f7546db7a47b16984cdfd6a0a1c471bad4ec9b3b
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJQ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
8da4874922a1a559a8297f6d5bc70103
9066366bf739165f4f0d51362f6f070478ecc131
describe
Invalid character
'7697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJR' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
935ba7d903859a07278bb9ad2b0b6baf
6821eb9c9138a5c578b99cafc0d45cad1f6b2aae
describe
'363824' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJS' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
25949f91c774f19480abc5a5a4ef5df0
49cc239c466b1585fc903b49cf9a74e04973b05b
describe
'106379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJT' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
6ac398578ad399b31859142198cd87fd
0e2b54132b14e6fc78e61cfd95bdae1fd7c3d46c
describe
'28834' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJU' 'sip-files00196.pro'
81aa176f1aa53009d6c8d37dc3b38aa4
484f24783b6f67b514f253fd217668a76d9edd7a
describe
'34389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJV' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
8088fc403d713e47d5ef56c8fdf03c08
8b1bc66593866fea08322b49d755b08badc8d45b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJW' 'sip-files00196.tif'
2f63f96f911c8de318f33a2cc62807d1
ef847092b0b426bb364d42a43175e9cd2fbf42de
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJX' 'sip-files00196.txt'
d5baded775b08da0a4b85dd18dff1d30
b6600a7e06349dc9933bc5da664fd8ac44252eda
describe
Invalid character
'9392' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJY' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
30c545c46fe5a2bfa133394e21f7d9b4
02fd67cb88f6fffd6f0df2d036fe385c0bbf7d1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPJZ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
6fc5df237a833e2889843fd525b0a156
99a632949b9430cd23206148493ad9fd9204d806
'2011-12-23T22:07:36-05:00'
describe
'92736' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKA' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
c73699945845964139e6173c4e92e4ef
a65a4f1274e623411eda3b816017a5d43102909a
describe
'24718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKB' 'sip-files00197.pro'
a2a93482c197480b7b247c2c265e31a8
70d6af09ac8c3efc1b4ef1fee697b577eea8a27f
describe
'31470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKC' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
760f2a5b86d46494fadbf262f76d517a
4f0d07a5765f13b8e039a15a8ea9dd9679f6d5f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKD' 'sip-files00197.tif'
1ee9a21cf474cb3aaefbb3b8b7965cd1
f5aa035597c15ebc2990027b076e3b018517a3e2
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKE' 'sip-files00197.txt'
733de3ada6acd4b3e62b15bd1704b6d5
e43cbd0b6101ffa12d709cfec4405d1cd968118b
describe
'8556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKF' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
137c505456abe7c40ec5487d62d91617
de2bee05b724dbafd140e8a4fdff9135dd25955e
describe
'365451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKG' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
9b1707864d510a75c498cba77365863a
0c387491544427fc0d4f18e0715b7a20f003e92e
describe
'88658' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKH' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
cc7ce4349d60a96f4192e3a307f67feb
af8e269f2d27a4c89e14cf4703c187819a9d1b5e
describe
'23335' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKI' 'sip-files00198.pro'
62ec8416fa3b7d653cfd7d140eb9b767
89db8d70b99f213d7d3c370fcbc0a6f483f177f5
describe
'29074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKJ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
16a8b72f26ec1002a06ef32f5eafb49c
99aa78684a385756d7d6a62d0904ad91e7780f7b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKK' 'sip-files00198.tif'
4e2ec4faf65de6a803c9e305afeb88f7
433cde2c83db9ba15743940cfdb75a6b841667ad
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKL' 'sip-files00198.txt'
1494c53f1236dfaa4c9986350f705ebd
4df11164675cf08c7982938bfbee505f1d6efdd9
describe
Invalid character
'7794' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKM' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
f2e3c6443ef2bff32b4bfda019654943
77770e1ff127f465196b90c211cba2c1ee6e6893
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKN' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
b5735e118ec013372d56830a2f9920b5
c91c261c3e55f7689a527b907fa14f3422933985
describe
'98005' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKO' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
f11c042f8a31ec382d7ce8cafde812e7
b698355e0517a13a9e09234bed505737e20cfb2b
describe
'25217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKP' 'sip-files00199.pro'
271d56c59a234278531cea063233272f
2f840de850600be243f6f61bf918ca7c474ccaf1
describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKQ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
07e198cec726368a4870d70d79a74bca
929212b4bcf32ed91f809aba951c5d40114da941
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKR' 'sip-files00199.tif'
7172c7dfb42ca0641556a5523cec8f4d
e353b293d6319fc7713b5eb2c222797d7783734b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKS' 'sip-files00199.txt'
bed4aa8bee81c2658dcdc90721e3a708
be18aa1e4ed072a2362464af16ab403ca3827954
describe
'8449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKT' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
cb0edc8f7b859fb15da129d86e4dae61
a51af0c76f43e90f7d4827ced837319781489241
describe
'365442' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKU' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
2df45aefc2a27f713ffaf6c01d80c36c
b9474416b95006d5dc8c108017e80fb354466f07
describe
'85383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKV' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
a7b488082971c388146d2ee6ddda7ebb
4f8abb450ff78a897588ea13422173e72adf8c1a
describe
'23201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKW' 'sip-files00200.pro'
56c5432212dbfead1a24e03b0b4c6bef
0fa1fb8022764bb71ea5f207650110b9f3bcd5be
describe
'26852' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKX' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
7236590d591080a1b2836234222a1eb9
c24d3b9111b308695bee2990f50994b96485fd7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKY' 'sip-files00200.tif'
a4353601f7ccb9ec24a35b213aee58b2
8a52349044d3060f995b17e85058d0a1f9b4482a
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPKZ' 'sip-files00200.txt'
690d3b2c0784396da0019f1b1acac95c
dd8043a30f0b25a9e81f701fdcd66d922addb45b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLA' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
bc45a7489090a2b7334cbfa6c4d87d1b
dfdea1b1394e6292be8383f82fccaa6cdbd6a916
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLB' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
add70a8bdec56d2e135e6857d88454b7
6ee2d5285a952cd66a21eabd6903d4b4bc02c404
describe
'91170' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLC' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
2dc7d8f5e8a0cc8ca5fd64bbff85d869
5149e4ceb97cdd85c7cbf51f9061b663a1c96d64
describe
'24024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLD' 'sip-files00201.pro'
02ec9a2b702b22ce5158f9bee575f1de
951cec5ac03f87bddb45296b50444d3f6c7210aa
describe
'29827' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLE' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
d366fdfd53f4ba037616acb9862e1cb5
cf7804e0d5526091458c7c03a841b8712c119f80
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLF' 'sip-files00201.tif'
8b35271535720b1bd176fc5840086f9a
63fe79c47ad02d1fa4f5f02fb055798ed1464894
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLG' 'sip-files00201.txt'
6b152fafec5afa3cc35c7c13a3fd22a9
b1b2583aeebcebd8a981da1bd2b0349ab7e3e90d
describe
Invalid character
'8201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLH' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
fabe62759feb69c39c6b23d9f62b8fc0
9c9a8a404506f3d3d5e94f41105661bd21b48f4d
describe
'360680' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLI' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
59316cd912073cd7c0a8e3f0a0543e1c
8c74b67741b1e0f5430995f8a83bec7dbaeb6328
describe
'92980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLJ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
1647cd73311d08c6f88e97f053e6fcda
27852f322d9fb9e9c43a43ace3c0f548dbebaa90
describe
'23105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLK' 'sip-files00202.pro'
8f810f14853999bd5045a200bc556b87
49d8657ef85330ae270dfaa6c3f66505eacd96eb
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLL' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
d2786524fe0866bd6f79d748c6477d41
67b23a47a7c2964bdea1c5b94cf0042338b93bfc
'2011-12-23T22:01:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLM' 'sip-files00202.tif'
b2de1746e3ee9e942e55d3145a874670
e9629291a0aa87399a8319f79edd65d6eca531af
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLN' 'sip-files00202.txt'
8c8f7e7072f8510645725cce6f7bf8f2
c3621b02451aa5dce51bcc14da21dab086a3f104
describe
'8304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLO' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
eaf2e4a45368209a2ae3db574644d87a
2cd3c227e250385f97dd700cd6313509dcae653f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLP' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
534c7d9ffae4a4b931430b0b238075c1
8cec8354825b6316c18b935fb4e8f59352966912
describe
'102078' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLQ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
07ce422ca7b9f3831b04cbc4051d3d03
1189f7b19cbd6d8629dc0adca8d4722dd068b34c
'2011-12-23T22:01:04-05:00'
describe
'25422' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLR' 'sip-files00203.pro'
cd388a4fccf6e7cddc9fcf4d15f16c91
05196e327bb00118411172830a30c7cea96bacc7
describe
'32909' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLS' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
888b89fb506107d7fdc9e8a4c94b8e1d
32daa1414460132bd85813ddea4b3947fb195c36
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLT' 'sip-files00203.tif'
e4e10420128f9b4371a373960b74fff4
acdc6aefa81565f92b35751bb6f9868e0b8cac60
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLU' 'sip-files00203.txt'
9899de7a3d9bc4215d457ca165f22a83
ad15e2d277acff9621a222b598904c15292c6348
describe
'8578' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLV' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
eb292ec9f3092f24ce866e3ddaa1a328
5cbf386956db49b6c4085ace59b2a19b058923f1
describe
'360657' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLW' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
198b432ee810b52b0c47c7f70a6f3b24
280255f51654496e109c2ea1a2ee63e9ee65462b
describe
'83250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLX' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
f9d6c8500ef5494e3c069a395caac3b5
71ea4154a1b7dabe8c8a3c761c3f03e75ba2fd3a
describe
'21971' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLY' 'sip-files00204.pro'
adf0f0928eb6dffbe22e28b987aadd5d
e1ad205ac3c359e042f9d1dedbdc71a58594b5e9
describe
'26507' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPLZ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
db85c76dcf86fffb7d8fc4118b697342
f25a9030162c4e793e5ce4c6884fb98b0c786faa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMA' 'sip-files00204.tif'
dfafc2854eb81f174ffcb8ed26ae6a71
6840d4c489f65e1d7cbfce75dccc1ffc6a3004c3
'2011-12-23T22:04:19-05:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMB' 'sip-files00204.txt'
5c5b13b2143461358794394ae5994053
a0be5544519125f799ea1f2f1f28b091ed3bf083
describe
Invalid character
'7568' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMC' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
2f6cdeb1e6a63f8b64fc79cc6c1d9d3b
252b2aa7f2b40dd75c800f872913a99817ae0a1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMD' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
52990909e28e1b8b698baff4b51b161c
65b90f1f38a7f1d360f46945c1f561c725d6b0af
describe
'97143' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPME' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
5f99901cff596d71a58ab70e8875d8f0
40edb0edef65a79ac61647fa157f5b1d6eb9316e
describe
'26111' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMF' 'sip-files00205.pro'
e818efbb49063c8dc8533acc7d7730f0
4c9179f7a7cab5dd9df0af819c35bd6dac601ec9
describe
'30958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMG' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
db6939e9de8c16f069f13a041bdde2e2
938bf70b3653b36ea8de82220d1897d61e848561
'2011-12-23T22:01:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMH' 'sip-files00205.tif'
bd581008fad6287c37585cbaddc0374e
cdae9134328d4d9ed84b1f4c8fec4e399568cab3
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMI' 'sip-files00205.txt'
e4b29908169d863278bf7bcf7314c045
8fe5614e55296e0d70f2a35aaaa427be1483f371
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMJ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
3adec08fe067d7e9885b1a8aa6afe5ae
94d6ee46d97ae4456e069774b323fd1db5eeb8aa
describe
'362004' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMK' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
059daa188c7f9170e2d96b136d037b91
208c904ef958999bfbda4fac748b716a42f9eb55
describe
'85456' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPML' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
2de26ef6ebed980365ba744f7cace511
49b6391ea79efd60519278746b0dcdedae6c890b
describe
'22924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMM' 'sip-files00206.pro'
2a59aa5d0b88836acf7bab32204f53a0
ec7ac72f925ca132de311a0478299f063b46653d
describe
'28558' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMN' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
6695c6ed2d64a20114e3d325a3b665ec
5b74da62d7ef8335e5938ef7e78a0dfae80a6a13
describe
'2914996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMO' 'sip-files00206.tif'
51ebfcb32e675fab939209ed43fb9642
eda7ee34dd1b2267384cbc8aebc6b672dda3ada6
'2011-12-23T22:07:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMP' 'sip-files00206.txt'
05bc9a8add188d61af6f36fb0bee81f3
1e984a5e8fffeee3e8ada0423419ff569fa45d4f
'2011-12-23T21:59:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMQ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
7f5079022edd2e36d9ffa4905f4a545b
91fea815ad8d0e92aad6d2e35fef9ed2280ce9eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMR' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
ecfca607a63ce27c674d286bae710e83
f990f48b5ccf544599d6881f5851700c52637e07
describe
'85478' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMS' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
2976d25a558126ccc5b8dce31776adb1
6d04c71d35dd7fa98ecf37f4a28f62b24df55d22
describe
'22745' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMT' 'sip-files00207.pro'
1b57cdf82a810eb5cbbfcd57a5f71c87
96e53c53b0142004096ad7af4f43b4c4ac4fc3a1
describe
'29701' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMU' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
8b731baf161178d3112bd671cf155501
14d4509e0b0d9f6d3e0bdc09de665b3b9db05e05
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMV' 'sip-files00207.tif'
07f56ea5b75b2f640bf7ead06c941a48
46311ffa38073ba7e408891ec1029b8cb28445dc
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMW' 'sip-files00207.txt'
60cfc5bf1efb4e898109591f910ea7b8
400e87eaf225b999d36a4344a36f06eac8fd07be
describe
'7665' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMX' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
a20e880c99b31c7e299d43eabace81c3
9dd457c5eb1ff440c4cce00650af4b131319fb5c
describe
'363767' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMY' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
299441c7b7bffce96f26a10039ea7c01
904c066f736c1a4b830973e7a6bb5b2e82f48f06
describe
'84196' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPMZ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
9d2cfb5006ba02b789d35d28c8afb9ee
c140aa8d74d73cc56d0160b4c2ed6b4e6be85238
describe
'23135' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNA' 'sip-files00208.pro'
28cd7ca8b84b5b070c40336856f92e1e
1fd977ef142023c6fccea5cef2cb403922d72cdf
describe
'27643' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNB' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
aeb57cede3558958fa829d63b570fc05
72d25939c14c587ec6d03d9a457a2dc22e0befe2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNC' 'sip-files00208.tif'
e49e1dbd7b77a594344b6207c9206b8d
321fe5d80773b17753bcca0b2b446010d00b090e
'2011-12-23T22:07:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPND' 'sip-files00208.txt'
0d08a05b0bbecea1ff2c1a1c4e15645c
59c97b57301721216c22ea6670c5713fe2136c0a
describe
'8065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNE' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
99638cb3c9fc9ee65d0598a9c7976402
6ed1f5c4d8c1587bae9ec66433b7b571596b84ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNF' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
499c1861b1d4a7c12bb5daf3d152e255
317ea9db721ca85b224dbaf1034e73bb65227a7c
'2011-12-23T22:06:42-05:00'
describe
'92429' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNG' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
d832cc0adfeea81eeb07075b6628a9dc
cfe7a928e280446bc673c9691d89e0b6e794199b
describe
'25033' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNH' 'sip-files00209.pro'
aedfa699f9999acb57093ca4d68c5b27
2e45d5003c2a4ed7308ef3b4313ac183e51d9a72
describe
'30799' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNI' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
fd3746a7a655d598a42b061cf874b7bc
eb520373cf78ce7abba501c9ea44ec65476890c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNJ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
6158f7f28134f6e5fd5a59be2204e708
88f849bc8adc6509b2aad8f0857c353f0d9c2629
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNK' 'sip-files00209.txt'
8c3e8db1b5f6b8045838a06db21056d1
67a2a249dad61cff0d9feaaa564637f342e83c39
describe
'8273' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNL' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
fa8f10060ade31ba4d2c0fabf9c13d32
4571581e2d2f17e3b83d7df242341b05645b1581
describe
'357484' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNM' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
a6d56de8a5d189ef32f2d9be7fbb71aa
c1ac700ce08df94b607f8c60ff817bac6f3b7d8b
describe
'97706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNN' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
028c069a0f35e3936f51b7420640c5c9
6782fc92e2570a46cf0bef49e9aa2ebe1ef6065d
describe
'25834' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNO' 'sip-files00210.pro'
23efdc8aac72f63e11c6b380e118807f
1ba34941de3a1b9917158e74ecf5b6da84ab6a84
describe
'32120' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNP' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
d118adf880d1d8452cd7dfb636d8dc59
d84fd1ed2de796866e68a23bd9ca6824fe7fd6c8
describe
'2876820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNQ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
34eebb5ed9359631476ad8f3944bef6c
b94635b18ff20fa5df7a090f5bbf0673c172ee28
'2011-12-23T22:05:08-05:00'
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNR' 'sip-files00210.txt'
d7de1f11b088d0d622668146ba3cadb8
78821be23ed4090890b862ec8c73fc173ccd739e
describe
'8741' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNS' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
8875dfa95eac7191fa73af66159bd7c0
bb3b63e3323e3a2e1f3b9d3f57c21aac01f057b3
describe
'373339' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNT' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
d4d44ba585a6eced79447136e6357289
ff77aa03c9b80a1439bdaa9bbd6a04f604b42ebb
describe
'82387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNU' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
57783e237b7cde0aae034ae6e80d4c10
43c243501437d66bcd1f60e2764b1c27c930c2c7
describe
'20488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNV' 'sip-files00211.pro'
7a2a3dc869c98010cc02e4efc67ceee6
640ffadc858c307292a05b9f0624c1c9e666df52
describe
'26390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNW' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
755c017c4f49920a7bd8512d0392d89b
a3fb1ea67a94d2d091ef01755e1af0dfe19a0ab7
'2011-12-23T22:05:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNX' 'sip-files00211.tif'
5dca4fc7885c20707e4e1eb6bee2ce1f
62393c50b50de1cebe1d680ef87e6345edabfb47
describe
'759' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNY' 'sip-files00211.txt'
7545e668a6c68cc22fd3af60b4afdfa0
f3dfbb4ad6e39144ba511edf3542b62bb61d51c5
describe
'7284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPNZ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
eecb19d4894e7ff3d66b05f5705ea6a4
5c120aacce6ba057e04b290e3c540104ec91a5d1
describe
'360598' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOA' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
358030081c27a036ec48d01fdf6194d2
7317c470ffc085712d7071eeee71520cedb0a0e2
describe
'98889' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOB' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
ed5e67445902c20910bb6944d59cefd2
16f978a890d246c41f8a022e9403949c99f49238
describe
'25393' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOC' 'sip-files00212.pro'
34be1bd0b8b22f3d7e018a0ce24a6d09
202dbc7d9949487066d3c156eb25f2f7cde52347
describe
'32883' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOD' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
80cc74602101edf513066eca5e75d9fb
d12bea9e23f765ffb84ce162d6b2b88a33218a2b
'2011-12-23T22:00:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOE' 'sip-files00212.tif'
47ba6ea310b77fbe0bfe232fd8484541
5b2aaaf1fa8e40ec60b7607fed9f106162d6fd3e
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOF' 'sip-files00212.txt'
264690b7c5ec0a5b5456a09fa87187ed
d2b5ab2e4eaf0ebbf009f9274048a2eff93ba305
describe
'9116' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOG' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
a1f12f2124db264b8b4dfc6fb87ac913
4195a65e20401d4830407232942473d55f721aa9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOH' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
77ead8c7e9a2a19e82958f134241796e
27889bd41929173d716231558c82e743c6b7406a
describe
'95865' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOI' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
25fb5dbc07a030a7468b3faed89fac75
f81024e5e50055c8c4176d36217837f9c1aa96a1
describe
'23305' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOJ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
89abe8f8bc1833a3e54cf6b23ce4f1b6
95523d1540903e85dadb24fc976f15f73232af0c
describe
'31182' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOK' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
b773422c107d34626f08ac51f76b688e
75c87968607a5b4808f3b06dea5577600bef3a31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOL' 'sip-files00213.tif'
5e6c85cf037323553a13aa0409dcb4b9
e5ebd1220ea526539566ab3db0150ab2d0f51cc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOM' 'sip-files00213.txt'
987a35eb06d1d21d169e5562bb4d2658
893d4181fbf6dc0d2b36d8b85dfa6c1cbddf0338
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPON' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
a492d9d8f730c5ee7f161685ad972066
3c34355c9f26c8274b890a81c0f0f54fdd0a42bc
describe
'363665' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOO' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
9fe34efd6c925f4afd93470181e3deae
f273461388941d8d47ed8f97d57e18b2bc9257f7
describe
'86317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOP' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
24b0a1688cee7799b4395f13419f46c6
9ff8062dcd5d511e41539c52adedaa88e4af2f31
describe
'23617' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOQ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
f596fc8b57609b54eb7c873e62265374
bf224fae248a26302aef7b50f8edcf255a46b405
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOR' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
3d5f7c833b921279019ca3407edf77c1
9fc50fe1d423a617aaaa95def682885e0d2f2b16
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOS' 'sip-files00214.tif'
00575e5de71af1138f981a0e71eb4086
cc582d9c3b09cebefcd0c6172662f48586e77a55
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOT' 'sip-files00214.txt'
84c1098abfa7fb7c95656db4b119d15c
08c9a93d1c9f2fdd9c8be851712e59a727887afb
describe
'7645' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOU' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
8c94565f114143b2aa20c2cdb5221b17
510a78eb77cdb6f26d36c5c19e3940dd98776e05
describe
'366984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOV' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
b34848ba8d1ec05adc02908c2ab5e1a3
e4f0cc979b5e2461f215a00c93f5c84a922418f1
'2011-12-23T22:03:16-05:00'
describe
'95756' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOW' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
d1f71190ff70035f258e00a78c785bbb
94a7c68a3b7211493da8771a9b6d3cc3d27060a0
describe
'25350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOX' 'sip-files00215.pro'
7d3fcd74498e329142c1d1daf7dbbf99
1e7b1f2f7c294f4e60268bf594cbfcab539d1fae
describe
'33304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOY' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
7154644baa0244fdca473efb1d709e69
3cc91cf00a39be981434ec0a0b8d8be6dab409f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPOZ' 'sip-files00215.tif'
68d4bb604f66fda9f9a8d972c6943602
3166d999a51ceaafa8e215b82ab541a909ce49a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPA' 'sip-files00215.txt'
2772b36121be9d4d49ec9cc4f15ce8c0
e50d4f075917605738e4235b7cb85adc6f646c84
'2011-12-23T22:07:27-05:00'
describe
'8875' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPB' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
c12729da938481568ffa3ffc825ecf57
cad48a69128aef4dba75ba5a6996ad1d110cb8b3
describe
'362206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPC' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
e79862bfbbc03ace9e63de063f66c8c3
4c544c25bc0cd7aae6799c79dd6b1d4c14765c42
describe
'91425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPD' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
0adcbc9a169bf115e4e9f5d934c8c211
a413df224c1ac4874ac476eb4841002a94c0ff04
describe
'23644' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPE' 'sip-files00216.pro'
b4462ba40018a723d2d05d600d3e052c
82e0d187009971fc4c382e651cb493bde8258be7
describe
'29383' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPF' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
699003646da26959443bed958f031735
56f0fcdf15979105e6eebf3104f57a156938d34d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPG' 'sip-files00216.tif'
9696ea81e8bce90831ab166cfd327e11
fe614cfdb70ec5392b65c3d6562994cc820bca6f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPH' 'sip-files00216.txt'
7a854c08aa1a2ca517f140ed376b92d2
84f01fccf89890dfc62d09516a1f6dec00fd31ae
describe
'8060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPI' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
1231277380f4d2b8758cff9dacb65d9c
7d036417e0f3c7e2463595787f690a7ba1400327
describe
'367044' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPJ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
f78bf083d8857557322f42b1b8eded74
a327009fb38f34f822d3f531a0e6622177212366
describe
'99148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPK' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
c96a2c35d2e78782d6bf511809a68635
f60ce94a99a07db211ccf0d8fb237af6580abc2e
describe
'25592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPL' 'sip-files00217.pro'
f7078755bad64dbed5c8503b8432984e
231155bda1e84a5c88a392895add13dfa755fd41
describe
'31981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPM' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
42d026b3a397be6a9126844abddfb308
3ee83345f6e6c8ffae7898b812092e41b85d504f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPN' 'sip-files00217.tif'
320837f444276f82cdeee48589bf57d9
f96ed3d6690ebfcd2d6ed9746588dd7b2cf0b878
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPO' 'sip-files00217.txt'
97cdee5ffd1b9fdaaa95df3737cc869a
0ee6922becd573fc98cad03752558d560f495c9e
describe
'9041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPP' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
48a08827a5a9978af34c2e8baf83063d
7b59230e6790fb95e5e47b99a22a1d4106a6a080
describe
'357343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPQ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
cb5b9a0e4a00da0b2c9042aaf7dfb903
6214d421fee9c25e20f38ebba876238423e83f8a
describe
'82061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPR' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
0c364d415375461c1ca4a3a807855a26
b5eaa96553a643cf3329262f1ecbdeeea8f32296
describe
'21289' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPS' 'sip-files00218.pro'
857c6d0def895254854ffbd5d8385581
51e65f3a5b236f8b8da7c5ded891dc67da97304f
describe
'26854' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPT' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
c353a2d0f6884012fd3d84d774418c80
9e9ca4d465f46c9fbd1ab64ba0ce6756d9bfa741
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPU' 'sip-files00218.tif'
a28da737eb44b954bf68a3a33ea4d16c
5e0ef221ccc12aad3f301a471f1f80a79fae0cea
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPV' 'sip-files00218.txt'
002571776aeb4cb1c76d05c1eadbcd95
9197b71f5eb0858e714a32479c3e1154fba78f69
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPW' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
af7ed5100fcf1d5a694fd957e8e0587d
9ba9ebeb5a35064d684348df449549d5f43bf5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPX' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
837c56cd582881140cd4081ae4c92b99
a0cf99b97de2e59a46a7304aa9f28117fb0eee38
describe
'92954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPY' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
4e4c7c4ec88ca240499f4778f8cc525b
46b17674409c75747eada2469eba22a0a02f02f5
describe
'25681' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPPZ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
cd5223ae74173577bff98a891a81215b
e1aea9b42cdd04571aac0d3ddf4fa85d73bd1160
'2011-12-23T22:06:56-05:00'
describe
'29569' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQA' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
9042603d74ff2d4b66374c43f6564d7e
2cb6ca44f2b864c4add103bcf724ac4afce02408
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQB' 'sip-files00219.tif'
b6c4cc45a4248b24ac2b609570e926ef
0c9a02c51ef2eb17b1f06fcbbf74512a6882ec1e
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQC' 'sip-files00219.txt'
f290605f04ccc966b1eea3bc1b663eea
d8c4b7a6d5d6858585f81f62f888a63982462a6e
describe
'8438' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQD' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
30a329bd859f4ca8536c481ec898c481
9c1f85adb01d223a56fd2f7f12a47d8a3f8a26b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQE' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
9a83e6a82f72b33384cc1886ce8b2281
a0db9a32feba9337d187e932bc8d8babd042ef33
describe
'91206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQF' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
cc85561f020732b6fe2c0002162b7ba7
ea24dc894c760a84a170e27b43c37242ee70a4bf
describe
'24255' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQG' 'sip-files00220.pro'
7054a829857803c4d486820f9ceaebaa
dbcb813b3f7ac214f77c89af3da3c239ec830590
describe
'28612' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQH' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
dffde00ff4ea61a265e3f94b7a12d121
feb51c6e3f5af18e64752da2989affee88c4a24b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQI' 'sip-files00220.tif'
5da2b6c66f242a18d0fac0ecf2d0cf46
e505a233f7b5709ad7b479b20b23fa9ae63f382e
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQJ' 'sip-files00220.txt'
4714233452353968c57b5850cfb80ee9
db5e911e82f77b7e383c754848daac20bef18dd5
describe
'8353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQK' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
89fe1408c5ec385c27b511b373666889
eb64326872e2bbffee91e211373db3e0bb229a72
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQL' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
3c37c1c27a9475e127c324f517916b5d
736cf55c736d81219fcab65ee09e0f290afa531c
describe
'36071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQM' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
1df842629cf70de8fb480da9977c98be
ddb952343f3df2a8b40ec3ee6c94c15fb8439fd6
describe
'4904' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQN' 'sip-files00221.pro'
45a912438d391116b8ca07408f05240a
d8009fd881fc6fea7d1a5c2be40424669ce4c12f
describe
'10758' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQO' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
bb6c63b00d452992b3d3c26987164c3c
34d91ff410219a083b4dd7821ad1a592a5d828eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQP' 'sip-files00221.tif'
4e4a16e719d26611e91272b9cda1fd5a
399ff5260c7ef054b0d13daed36b6298b4411921
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQQ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
12fb36ccfb68b8547fe1624b2d10b68c
d1b9bd3a27f44667619dd46b1d3346dd6613906d
describe
'2992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQR' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
a8e0e090aecc4bdbdc43717c14ec2388
670627d504c41daf6f18b23ce80f6921986d0573
describe
'367041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQS' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
ed5235ede9df0392755eaf9d5232eedf
78b0eb839019db7c8a726edfa26539b7cdd27bf6
describe
'72353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQT' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
59089949bad200c26053629c4dcf0e78
ff0154a90b2deae3275e0ff0d02b0ade4190cc36
describe
'19272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQU' 'sip-files00222.pro'
17cc428f01f2703c902ecfa46c9b9ca9
66a82386a1db3030ad9494a1235b1d13782181e2
describe
'24227' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQV' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
3f18fa8c09c015c3fafbac8a4d13b647
2cbd0b67f165a3454325d2bfb1758e47b0914532
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQW' 'sip-files00222.tif'
54b65fbcbdbcf76f8a6636c233abae33
b5d3c61552d7473bf185daf71aaefa5fbe434f8c
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQX' 'sip-files00222.txt'
b3b7402a1217ae0ccb34cb7283620f87
8e56e27edc19d357399284eddcf373b3340de78d
describe
'6520' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQY' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
6e20ff239288f5b4a707806d2016863e
b79131c9fb1743f374868a5c0e77c01658feb23b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPQZ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
51fcb8ca6348bccc307a436abfe914d4
6f68519402f58415059ce7cc76b89c7f0684d63c
describe
'87263' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRA' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
48c997cb9ba32213b37b24304aac1196
a2ac684a89200f102f36f0e91acecb910a156736
describe
'24140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRB' 'sip-files00223.pro'
db9ab526405bb4b67b56b581d1d41ba0
16120c6a91142c7d6c56997391fcd2afa309e1f1
describe
'29615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRC' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
7f6a18006188bc2f517e75724100e799
09cad31f61ccbb848dd51480d178b0e7e132bf3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRD' 'sip-files00223.tif'
f7a98900ad45dc1afb78fbfd34ffb6f4
5c21a0e89f200f20352042dcf45a7cd4a1ec8e54
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRE' 'sip-files00223.txt'
872d41486e8da914b1774f0bddabf647
d053656ae8b159e37cc41b6e85a5226161b3f824
describe
'7903' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRF' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
d4496c53128fcad4924eb87f0ee4e9fa
3834f7ee93be5c3f54d3e3de7f62b0db6750592c
describe
'363841' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRG' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
c113183503458ffe3ede44bd79dcefb1
f1a3611cc835f73d201acad70520f9231d56f675
describe
'85175' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRH' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
6366964883fe7122d0ecc1b910701f17
53c2b6316ec7fe12c4333268b161fc9a62ab3269
describe
'22296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRI' 'sip-files00224.pro'
ebc431bf653e54d00c01aa8d2dfd7e30
4685d652cf93011560c9393371fc161bbbd0461a
describe
'27976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRJ' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
d73836831c8fe2b23f4233448ef4b0af
cff34d3f9927ddd2524da6a3ebac792ae02a368c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRK' 'sip-files00224.tif'
7ac36ada7da3596d776cdae017f8743b
49012f9e29bd4bb093212fa3a3ee6f10c461618a
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRL' 'sip-files00224.txt'
2eccf95b3f03771128f1083c1bcbb2b1
9d775b76a3fbc78686e5a1dd6ab93267037d2f6e
describe
'8034' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRM' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
0604e35eba0be9eb054d1bf5e1fcece7
4086e5cc6ebb6fdd78e8a4738cd2af10551a0c47
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRN' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
6e1e43be511b5ef3269efba3c92a18e3
2f2a73850826ee19cff984dc9da4670b1519a4e1
describe
'85546' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRO' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
d21ddcf608b8b40bae72c83cb492e478
a885929d81a76d4ed96d5dd246a6ce2d3435adb2
describe
'22143' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRP' 'sip-files00225.pro'
b97a5627e896a901e8cd3c241251f11e
e031fcd4ae352bf94a7ca79d388265dfc969ad1f
describe
'26708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRQ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
1ced7ea39318ef9171c3f0581d0557b0
54ff9b37d7e2be8010cf1161ada33decfd48c762
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRR' 'sip-files00225.tif'
b5418d16879026d9a01b5fbdd4d58f13
9b6aeba179388d92ad429f7e948353d36bb46609
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRS' 'sip-files00225.txt'
b648f8b596748afc862ac79019cad1ee
50cbc36700f8712e517746d74ca85c35ee0bf18f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRT' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
24f07e2a8721014bf4ff7cc84c1fc829
1152ae673d3e7ad9c72b373cf51bef61854561cd
describe
'362265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRU' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
be86c9ef0228e6221c86e8ca1f8b0c5e
0e802492cceacedda424bc810edd68072899bbc2
describe
'89432' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRV' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
eda16b9a2a0ae9c26be1851b495eba66
d4ff7341a848d2e9ee4676e2d9d872a3cfb2ffd2
describe
'24638' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRW' 'sip-files00226.pro'
7377fc5c4325dfcd0fa327fb7d1adcda
b5dce062f3e094d121911da9eebfd58e9d5dca1d
describe
'29805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRX' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
f43a0be503da9f77a0db1e9810c363b1
5d65d0fb44bb0d6492ed60f51b8fe9afda56d712
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRY' 'sip-files00226.tif'
99ba1d827e29129bbde06e639fe46bf5
13ba0630b6eb9c013a125b0ac657e394b2b6013e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPRZ' 'sip-files00226.txt'
f7427e8a30eff0d1ac867499bb05b418
74baad9cb651d884d98238e787cfe67484c8a4fe
describe
Invalid character
'8155' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSA' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
6f88c3404e1b78fc4e1fe2de939cd23f
2a2e1e5ebe4d980410c54b85d41bec5c3e816867
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSB' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
6938abcc96c8bcd93ad0393c15b02bbe
8d933a2202d1c3f5fccf2d6ec54a8817929031f4
describe
'100528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSC' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
fdbfce609b81a7475d2517817979e6b6
a44cc2b5ecce8d9d14f7f81f0ac771755f458515
describe
'28313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSD' 'sip-files00227.pro'
894b02821e8e91df4172621b2ab7bd51
159f4159329e9791b56f518bf3d00a3a21845de3
describe
'32731' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSE' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
ce099e7097a7db26dba5c68e5cadecf8
1b86a417672b1c34974523d97f93c207ef402bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSF' 'sip-files00227.tif'
7d2dc34c3deaab1f7e749daf8a88dca9
14b62d6394cedcda750364f4f6f7295e2b11b438
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSG' 'sip-files00227.txt'
f7b6fdf990c2ca7826b2e856644c4c76
dcada55368666db26fb1c7e708dc91eac30eefb3
describe
Invalid character
'8802' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSH' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
50d297edbcdecf01c3573b36b59aead9
0e3a2e7257bb33dac2d607124644af4ca061415a
describe
'355836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSI' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
43898f4526819c9ad5c28a4fb496ec03
e9303d671c469b9746e1ced81a9404c22f83a55f
describe
'99622' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSJ' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
22fc651a73b3ed95b539dc94414f0260
c9a3186cacac7fcf9152932fdd2fec1ee63690a7
describe
'27117' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSK' 'sip-files00228.pro'
1c9c00f7ea182e7f72e80211a1e3b2cf
4113daf0d3f1497d77bd57e9f644df50086901b7
describe
'33528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSL' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
7244547baac014b7bf63447f1bfdef3b
f589447d913f71631ed2cc636c3a52498f578b05
describe
'2864092' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSM' 'sip-files00228.tif'
fa231aa6f7e34ade1276dcb828e43af3
87a7af36867b7ae954a9dc6bdf88c68ae1dc786c
'2011-12-23T22:06:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSN' 'sip-files00228.txt'
8bddc9572be373bf0157d54b96af1d9d
37f11cd4b40a5ce8d504f705fc4b8b20c50109ac
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSO' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
50efe005b3b92b9bff49a7e1c816315e
63a4aa19253363971ea66f6563f4f03a819babd0
describe
'362257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSP' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
18c00e64f6a2fd9bfb2f25c92c97e96a
3b7abd0ab516594cf75feee7f958842d3789e306
describe
'95193' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSQ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
4645bf8ee336dd6abbe5deac45286ec9
b47316cb7c1f488c225ab47148d94afcf889ad28
describe
'24893' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSR' 'sip-files00229.pro'
146389dfadeb82c7ae9a9254128b5c95
ec14215be1f7c47b3662cc0f27dac17e6f6a9d90
describe
'30849' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSS' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
54f88d8882b0c90895a7ec3efd5f136f
15e4717cd246a3eef65dfcceae80e959ac511464
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPST' 'sip-files00229.tif'
9e6629aae42bf5973a7dfb8f4408bbe8
8f7101e7f23e5120b5e007f1dcafcec0779d6d80
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSU' 'sip-files00229.txt'
b7ab0749d92a249348fa282b24dd223e
76d21483df26434be23187fe28df387dc934d3f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSV' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
d1adb93e24c5d9e2397be7dfc48a22de
556c132fb547854623ad10fc5014dade39416ea3
describe
'349522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSW' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
6c7e46725cfc61560aa60920334c6e64
430c6e336ce4ab8d9f4152ae78137dd50b27ca8d
describe
'93897' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSX' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
475d4ab8ce5be1335d4138e5d8b7572d
f8bd6cd9deac10af60e613710fc8a94e35db9320
describe
'24642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSY' 'sip-files00230.pro'
2909d7cb92c46e817e68083538572537
b2c2113438fcf5d45db40a677875174568ae0ed8
describe
'31195' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPSZ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
c537d3c8f6939008884e55bc9de1016e
92f1df5eb7a94363035691e254a5dcf5f5954291
describe
'2813188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTA' 'sip-files00230.tif'
a826b0e12300c93cb02b45b2c2642efc
ab88c8fc783b324f13e1b3d6f9225612700bbfb5
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTB' 'sip-files00230.txt'
cdade16157da4c7952081faf9dd98c3b
960280d2d860dc0d63229a6ef9f3a5c283162a48
describe
'9085' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTC' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
e9f98ab4a2242759233452c57352de07
1f3e52e5dbf7be9d2fd8a71fbd684f1b40943a8d
describe
'365426' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTD' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
0a153119b26d21fcdeb4615e118f66be
a10528c54764e1d20c5201fe442cdd0b4272008d
describe
'90931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTE' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
fab0a4b9c63ca4f0349659e93deab312
ad59bf1d34d7f576b3c3a6fe5c2ab00585f97235
describe
'23775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTF' 'sip-files00231.pro'
5d2bd08eaeae4026f3585ece3192139e
54a1c5ed0fc494b7c969ef9608720bbb8c30c01f
describe
'29228' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTG' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
e1ddbdc1fef451030a5786dac36491f7
5a90f31978c58a826b81c18a7f9f16963d84a778
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTH' 'sip-files00231.tif'
4ed004a0889b2731ba62dae4c7a51b82
742257139d35b31f574c3cb0c30f9e0862840e1a
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTI' 'sip-files00231.txt'
82e397998a553f82189df06294d011b1
c96eabea37aa2ab28823e02dadf166305e58a5ff
describe
'8244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTJ' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
6c0db195021a2fd31f2aa8d98b43d8c9
e38df2be0080458f53026e1eb236e704dcf66233
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTK' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
ff8a1d003bb9bef186a079c7e89d25a2
692d390ada8e60737d9d85514b5d6daf096c256c
describe
'82931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTL' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
9a5e2409eb95e52c7851496ebaed0a03
37dcd06eaf7de989db29cb4ccf194583bb366e75
describe
'20783' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTM' 'sip-files00232.pro'
0c9eb3ee0adee0667e1344c1b707d234
dbc3c54fa3077d874dfb3e28e04e998fa3e7f631
describe
'26472' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTN' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
fd1235e5c0720b299807ac5b0b804879
5d47c28afefecdb9c87ae4f936198b07586fdb1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTO' 'sip-files00232.tif'
7cd882205b89d07c381cb112e668b17d
577e7a7dacb4f569ba125aab842daba8ff756ed4
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTP' 'sip-files00232.txt'
01f0d402704b641e42b17b0fd94966c5
7979ee187e760d961409c63b62d0d8964365a0d4
describe
Invalid character
'8366' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTQ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
7b261070d7ba77068e5a21a53c183f0c
397be841993fcdb606df29c531b98c0d562db73a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTR' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
a33912d70e18f8940ef424f0e4867f63
8effd4d2cb0fb4d8aac1d550b0d549ed84ad56e1
describe
'84059' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTS' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
4fccfccdbf6bc9ea0f150efaa77e5a78
7dd02574aba2a7b55a8b252cd0016e7cf7542d77
describe
'21197' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTT' 'sip-files00233.pro'
6f2148f68fcece4c7cea1299735ddaad
3b05b2d17ea406acd7a7d185da7e8fddaba4d67c
describe
'27424' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTU' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
d9fa84924f0da2c56251fd03942f8429
df206be41b9157ad4de381e0ca114284827c2c24
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTV' 'sip-files00233.tif'
72f1e16a735edd99ad5da4bc31e22644
bc3e70af98310d2c0470fdc661643a417ab1ff1a
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTW' 'sip-files00233.txt'
38122f4fde0a1c7c53cb466d060052a1
78c186419e45380abc7ffba2f34b535631bde949
describe
'7371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTX' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
56e2fc5e5d4aef41dd754ed82efbe6a1
3ae7f0f97e1c70c37e24edf48baa9a3c49a199ac
'2011-12-23T22:00:02-05:00'
describe
'363829' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTY' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
0258330733aa1d0570f3fd2676cb93e1
8e0c063a5adc3e57ce2dd71c17176abcb8ce0fe5
describe
'89043' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPTZ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
5e45bdee8d76fa0ae75130c5026a2e9c
ecbd5e8d297b480cf235c4108323f0366fd75004
describe
'24373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUA' 'sip-files00234.pro'
38e0e093bd0f4587f47881fa015e19b7
1495f1e5c91f47db5bb408770cd33a8d2da0bc58
describe
'29095' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUB' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
d937c24ee23b3a7d31082507b636c274
ae0939eeee724936c9c2abcd115dde43aeb3ae84
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUC' 'sip-files00234.tif'
f0ed11adcfa91f58c2e25f23e55da721
12b158c8146eb9cb65ea805eb19750cd8d90335d
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUD' 'sip-files00234.txt'
33e3b28cd54f751cd188deeea737fa79
11bdee855c62175537e8eca7819a05c9204fd8e9
describe
Invalid character
'7989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUE' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
b39be4a3127221ffa5b5951481a6b21a
b0a304c6c363835034af061d60eccab1a0dde85f
describe
'373327' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUF' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
0bf5e356f69a61bcf14bd0fc70e5b6b0
aada59dce0c99ef2071695b6091d95e6c0b8c462
describe
'94877' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUG' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
a47b7785921ffa6fc785982bd68d59d8
3d9e5d4b7a87e7a74c1deecab9d8212aba936770
describe
'25053' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUH' 'sip-files00235.pro'
28053deeb42c49c5fb14291a5397819a
edfacd68f92e2b0d092047a5a2d2f440d5de3f2e
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUI' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
cd484b59dab59997c23a0a05997409a3
8213c6d57878051ed467d4bfc8ab168fa7f547f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUJ' 'sip-files00235.tif'
8095e47453f1bcf2b132d32f66769ca4
ec8cc31e7f422dda028b9dfc6385aa56a731e28e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUK' 'sip-files00235.txt'
aba06270b8117b4abf4844938d7f2fbd
20637547611126c8a293c138dbdead558ee44e7d
describe
Invalid character
'8400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUL' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
7523696b68e038439b8abc60ffb4e9cf
969d670b2eb6d981617d01e3e741969c88528b4a
describe
'365437' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUM' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
6a679293dd5280ed2d59df23b40f1803
7b2d1d5e06660c0da8eeaa5fec1b03547efd896c
describe
'99705' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUN' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
e995de4b310626dfe77dc0bcb07b57ac
0ed1c1a24ffeadbf2e28b2b4ed264a9ae0012fa0
describe
'26529' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUO' 'sip-files00236.pro'
aaa3cbf23fcf9f46d34eadaed9dfb22c
0d6c4e6d0be1795e9fb0c1514e689880fe0941ed
describe
'32255' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUP' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
e0fcaa12e61b9c8815ab12c8b43520d3
0bc8238c4e92d472a0888f6a7d3e50b4dda62d42
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUQ' 'sip-files00236.tif'
edffa751d6652071992bb8110eaa77cc
2a443190c91f57838d1a434af4f02c383b49e742
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUR' 'sip-files00236.txt'
d81b65d47b3e97cd77f986746bc8fb25
ab44e3625977b9c38f8926d9a5868bd428a46940
describe
'8690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUS' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
5deea98b9f6461c79548a3f175453b46
91b36098bd116acd90c87d120c070d833d3e8799
'2011-12-23T22:05:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUT' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
d6de4f2027d1e43f74873bdbdd360205
cded06c05ef8c60016df5396962cc052dcf932db
describe
'94910' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUU' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
7f6ea006f6cb3357ccfb7fe7d2631e23
d45502121ad1c2d5000f8a4b26e644db539bb3b9
describe
'24354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUV' 'sip-files00237.pro'
8c8758c19db92a407a8372f0e3df4c62
889bdfb4223bcc9a3edc15ca141dd97f5d74a626
describe
'27705' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUW' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
3600ca080b15630d61b08cf9729c12ac
7c533ee044c6e7bcead5dd83de225bac168ba76c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUX' 'sip-files00237.tif'
72f4d570703bea8fc1172148a82e493a
cdaa4e873a0dd3fbff4ab5e4765be3381b4a60ca
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUY' 'sip-files00237.txt'
c88484247ffe6e8a0496c783729bc4c7
7672f7797ae50a2265c22c8ee49a0e5414e1d715
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPUZ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
11813dbb86a402244c7a25e222c23c4e
e5d68f4134c6114f263d512847e1eea8fa75e013
describe
'362070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVA' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
1d51e19926bc51c8853567448e3c9d1d
2f2b3d206b52f429130a16646d343c943b33c249
'2011-12-23T22:05:32-05:00'
describe
'84007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVB' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
ab5f144066a704a7af33b12832e2a841
1c5f784dac5918ea2555c24846a93e457eaa3efd
describe
'22385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVC' 'sip-files00238.pro'
5b57d446224a735c6d91165e3e0ee069
a2cb70dbf1c52eeac387f7234c492d170102b920
describe
'26427' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVD' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
33967c7539b2e200240198c9a412f935
86d4299dc9c62bdaded8ba85e67dd0ea580bb246
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVE' 'sip-files00238.tif'
9adad1d306433f4655b4dfbb3ed1f8bc
a7f2b0d788370891cb7690aac3b3651d8040d8c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVF' 'sip-files00238.txt'
dc60d55f8001d5e4f7c4248ae8197801
ac578117028bec8b146aed0dc82299eb877e0c8d
describe
'7960' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVG' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
1e041fa8e1851de7bf295192d6abea1e
ffaaa62b8acc6ecec856cf503268fd08c0351fae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVH' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
741da492cd2a7ef2c07207d809d7d2ca
2843b50aeadb5034819424ed9bc4cd0a3a08c90c
describe
'84481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVI' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
a318ca968df0f6fe7b309dcd943c7b67
424bb016ae89531c849931d7c696bce497b784f2
describe
'22089' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVJ' 'sip-files00239.pro'
4e635c8a119e857ae825e422b84da807
9f98951080debfdca12d6b7e0f38b2f5440d33ee
describe
'25441' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVK' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
a1c5661a21f4d0f1aec24661901b18f2
ad56d6232aa0b17e441aa9462d70e9cb67077b8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVL' 'sip-files00239.tif'
0b2b3e7cdbbb0c8b5744fd182366bae5
c3b07a892a34ed62fb1df6fb8a6cc21b90d9f5b4
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVM' 'sip-files00239.txt'
342bb16041a00665386d2ae90815f4df
bc8f8c964ee25f499f71269b96957ca81d45b5cf
describe
Invalid character
'7588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVN' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
202bb6b3e6e9e1ee7a84200eb74c04d5
355230f47c4d1b09f6596428006b4051f52fa9f4
describe
'362120' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVO' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
28c8345fe5abb4772fe72337e140203c
cefebc9a3f5e51ed0a5ba4aac9be064acb516e17
describe
'81942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVP' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
40c50492d5759e24726b1f35bc463217
22a3938bad9f60d98c62a7af4589dc961d0c3093
describe
'21267' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVQ' 'sip-files00240.pro'
8a494a849ff4d4dacc4f3bef5855caa2
8eaab3a1e90b9d14a1fb68db59a6a720e4dfa3e4
describe
'26947' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVR' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
67cd44afd9770b183b3daaa586da3c28
fdeb826968ab21792a9e5d682d87323a3126f002
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVS' 'sip-files00240.tif'
8f3be1075019e4de2c12785953f68a0f
b790ec041053149d3ac4078974a0db96abeab129
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVT' 'sip-files00240.txt'
c93f49ecf1214fa9081e510c2e424d57
cec94a5196ad6cdb5af8063c33136cbf3b2ab26f
describe
'7311' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVU' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
bc3e40062346badb93b8fed5222291b8
53eeab6697c98b2e888be7b0f65963b54a1402ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVV' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
03f4bef09d59baafc498e2356d1e629d
e86148914f6fc822b783b9fcd09fff5681e3a5c1
describe
'95814' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVW' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
4cb556dd7d198bfd3ca9b0afb2adcd2a
7072fd20893cf552951be6af4af66e98e3afbc4b
describe
'25857' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVX' 'sip-files00241.pro'
66232bfb5f4ab8aa776aa1fe4ca728d0
ab8808a0a02e5d6c04226d7dc88c1caf715e29ec
describe
'29812' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVY' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
0f78837688180ae94728d838524430eb
827db998c2349a12cbd76a0d5cf7d7539b0db0a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPVZ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
b078cefd668d6bd344abc07a3ec3224d
3085de825e43d28ce3a3eb3e8f505b14cec0982e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWA' 'sip-files00241.txt'
6264576e477d510eb90c20f7b7ce5562
eec152891c3fdac772a18d6ea70b14c340e10320
describe
'8776' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWB' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
27c7a43c2071cb40eac136394a3d6fb0
3285ee84acb5713fbf65f72f1a3e156b78629e0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWC' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
e106e639ca71721cf19277a515fc07db
44b930c21eb288355a2cdc29733310981aa26739
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWD' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
01bc53d7346e87707b6d9e474ea76b62
9b5a4f3fa1eccca542e91d2d8c96ba997721362e
describe
'29344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWE' 'sip-files00242.pro'
0aec7ccdbcdb4749a628ae43a18e5bb4
5877e723cbdbd11e1bc5cb22a45b0ba8bed30bed
describe
'34368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWF' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
89fe02a225b5d4b798cdbd2cd9014675
91904d595070087230322aae42ba252f05980360
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWG' 'sip-files00242.tif'
433a48fb4360cb2c6db6d70d3a2827c2
fa33747b1f4cb3aaaca079ee2c49befbec40d203
'2011-12-23T22:07:09-05:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWH' 'sip-files00242.txt'
27a8c38bd433c762e3f203ae2ae4f5a8
24f6f16934445d9232e2b868acbe79e1e9901a13
describe
Invalid character
'9300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWI' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
9edb6c3516cb8995e2685c74429f9279
4d5d6e94de025b20d7e17d35a507bc6ee87dfc8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWJ' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
63955d8b401003536a264d9fb00fc226
3f64b054b83b6021e325a0a155f7fa4829fdd362
describe
'103786' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWK' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
3edd56eb58d9cefe38bf94f2f48c4bb0
ef5e9ed0f545626b4e09080733a7e9ea5ba9f49a
describe
'28421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWL' 'sip-files00243.pro'
e8a33757b9b1b8ca2b4ddc4019aa6ae8
4dfdcaf741586559f2a3b5e04b5672edb1f90e25
describe
'36399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWM' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
34c5bb32c2d81a0d28789ca5bdddedb3
e8ff52c80221bb99ea62ba625a730119225aa4c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWN' 'sip-files00243.tif'
ec278fe307bf55ac5db44d49d7dca1dc
9a127458797a04a30232d95f186fa38af1174543
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWO' 'sip-files00243.txt'
16fd1b68c4fbbb8581e4fb2c21203946
8af66097290dc35b95b84fed95c59e2775e7dd16
describe
Invalid character
'9260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWP' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
aae95c54a29f43bf7c58a1a68b09cc04
607939255871bf5c14dc74b224bc80e2890fd5c8
describe
'363862' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWQ' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
5b26e0df472f15a2b3bcfe48f2a3ef89
977d007be11b4b52dc385a82fe24ed5e632adf1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWR' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
ad6fec12ed90e6a913c8b796f9ef2e3b
abf9f01de3525247f85b2c04b701c2e23521c51e
describe
'25345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWS' 'sip-files00244.pro'
c25337618eafdb5e88daa4a286f9a1c5
9c0cf5331260ecc45a82148cf2e472c0a08063cf
describe
'30410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWT' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
d4e6c48060275713cea927d450d67448
5795ed882a40bbb2df9b5f46fc9f64c03990cb42
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWU' 'sip-files00244.tif'
fbdf57e91108b9c314ff313462c00bb4
31530be0787aa2bd0c3d03aff813fe06e2541a90
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWV' 'sip-files00244.txt'
0aa90bdaf10a3aed1eba6645a31156ce
b2f212a292fc4bb396c8ca16c0e63b41db715752
describe
Invalid character
'8423' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWW' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
6058be35b6613224ca0771eb3c6003cf
81361f462772abb34f45135999555966f67df30f
'2011-12-23T22:06:20-05:00'
describe
'373331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWX' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
160e38f6a050226fcf7dc8936d171afa
4a480b194823d780682b5db8ac1d797c350b86d8
'2011-12-23T22:09:07-05:00'
describe
'104259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWY' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
aa705294b262852e9165f812357da974
a8b213d3662d7cba7e392581bfa6e6d94681dfc1
describe
'28448' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPWZ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
afbc00f203f3fcaf086692627d004548
e2329c53f2c3f8438b420e1b9af5ce7264b3aca7
describe
'37291' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXA' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
73c57f2d424f3a8030edb4a818a8cb25
47d111a2eec0158b1182bf6ba1f5f37fc6f3ef95
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXB' 'sip-files00245.tif'
4d7d88f4327e42059b7d96ede6f6828d
57a8d07d4e9acc7ab22303ad2a30f5c5df20fb36
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXC' 'sip-files00245.txt'
c3a5149c09c03745df542bcfeddb196c
81c03edf59586dc0112c61f611c97823681d8c10
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXD' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
21af94eb1d2ece84f05fa100a36b02e5
ec404113721b8d8c36c606f5fd2a7a414b394416
describe
'367029' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXE' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
147abce04fa818e68250a9ef400aa533
c96999b4d07fa7b7d0aae783fdaf84f4eb72329f
describe
'100027' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXF' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
9ec454fbff9c947ca23481b56c3a9fce
b647be80db1bf8d9665feb7d5215d6f92047057a
describe
'28086' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXG' 'sip-files00246.pro'
377b5b55a8623253f17bd370096702b1
8ff18cb6cc2aea26f459baf9709e5f0e1d50196f
describe
'32378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXH' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
8e7ddbba2e8e72cceabe39ddd4fd51df
466c01a59415b3938a6bbffce084d7d9f38a8333
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXI' 'sip-files00246.tif'
0ac8db4f43699430d2d41c165292db31
8e405d4b447ebd24b28536ac54d5ade055b8f95d
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXJ' 'sip-files00246.txt'
1cbc868c433345325623103088c40e8e
924ed8c074569cd2599503daa4cf260f7f808e3a
describe
'8628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXK' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
b54f558d2ebf2145e429bb3493aa9e1f
b78ccbf0e696fb96241aea56934f0eecf656b70e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXL' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
edc627eed58b1e18ecfad06966feaa80
ff86c5f78b0242f8ddbc0d5dda166a23b0923319
describe
'103419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXM' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
de38d9227975e65a36b7f0be685263dc
dc4d5fa80d8d82ad78f7cf95bc2bfc30ee26bd51
describe
'29300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXN' 'sip-files00247.pro'
8ba6339c1a2b5669f4f04d5d06c967b0
1d7b010722e8959d3f4b50520bf65f93181c5437
'2011-12-23T22:06:11-05:00'
describe
'36831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXO' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
b437f14db03c6ce665b9256e1a380e71
aa92e2bfb6c55d17f1ce1e7f738f5ad2e54d0e4e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXP' 'sip-files00247.tif'
6d06ea7547bc16b685eff21424ee85c7
6553397f3a6fb060c0c269a68433f2e654d62b98
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXQ' 'sip-files00247.txt'
01c280a423b8116bd509040b4b833b59
1e45f0ce13557dd527ed36aa3c9495617b259aec
describe
'9322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXR' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
fc3c1816915015161579411e20c65a0c
e08a23a2e58c7498c65c69a7942e132251ab7c0b
describe
'363820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXS' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
ecf2da3766600b5a90f2076c7d9d73b4
431e7a83a25835f852db7ddb2267aad91b783e9c
describe
'106358' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXT' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
588af46365181fd93567161a51b25bff
0798a1f8c2362777eda5e5ff85eb88289d784f78
describe
'30468' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXU' 'sip-files00248.pro'
0b3a0433426ad8866c3b5430b89d7ecf
87ca6f081de70977624708ca893a8855cdc378ce
describe
'34207' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXV' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
2c5f46e25d1a8bf9e654f1ba4c5fd92a
d18dfacfb55f84b0490d9c8a9f7b6b4eb06304c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXW' 'sip-files00248.tif'
e9a22e777b285fee6352a18fca64ca2f
cb565e9f368cf7765d774636228746e74dbe1136
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXX' 'sip-files00248.txt'
43c5ec6af12bb4dc578cbd250743c59e
acd94661a2f89955326bd532407bc83bbd9770bf
describe
'9177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXY' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
92badfe43bec66cc2285cb1d829ed773
e94ead5bcb4562354bbfdf3caf540b970170cd02
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPXZ' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
89e362e1c1881939eeba520d59cfd550
57f35353ad91a0142383700bc3a7e8d77883a7ec
describe
'97965' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYA' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
bcce6a79ed8f777d252d24964945dfa5
796c96d676d8bf620058d32568d4675a6f17c85c
describe
'28264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYB' 'sip-files00249.pro'
e271fe24679a7bb674388e2b4d3bd20a
adc8c5dfccdeb55f4d2a810e45e5cc371f2532d1
describe
'33365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYC' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
415f8833356e630005483485e6a0aeea
75ab3a156428abd1b6a14b52c57de1c71faa2aff
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYD' 'sip-files00249.tif'
a7aef56b435a1ae8c55c59bd3c8af6ea
c5be09335992a5625363f010ba8f49abf9383cc0
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYE' 'sip-files00249.txt'
d2e313943748c25e04ff8361752f1862
be007772602a2f0d51bd4182b7577b9578092af9
describe
'8492' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYF' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
76cad2902cb1b896537ab9f5fdcd9a0d
6cb5d333cbb5f722a07b50bf5233bf360ee4367a
describe
'366986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYG' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
ff2f20dfea67fe8b69ed2cb38c8e1d1a
053361ce65af78e6080ea31378a0e0b8018fa651
describe
'49141' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYH' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
5a03fc41668cfa34ee2069cb743aa242
81b16f2f6dc7619afd42403ff72cbdf605d624e0
describe
'11971' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYI' 'sip-files00250.pro'
b927fd8cbc923db214ca6530dfa301ac
fe388f6fecc7153d337f2d90ba1c6937bc3d09c2
describe
'14721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYJ' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
1cc2c7bd7b977d5a85693f3ec0dcef71
e3e22dfe00852ce83f59fcdf01a58d590bdee34e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYK' 'sip-files00250.tif'
be1d4d0cb57217d76133e774a134956b
a3bfce7fb5ae13676b578d6dffff57d105c93cd5
describe
'430' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYL' 'sip-files00250.txt'
4155fc96155d514da3d03ab4ddab5ea0
285ffbd8868281d2a2d772627e43a77085a5b1e3
describe
'4310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYM' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
b053cec33cf6dd2cf9a4c1aede7681fa
d22ab74da3395fb865e2228c29dd4fa28d804633
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYN' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
a84ed75fa2863830f650a6e267dfc821
56e491dabf04775d66a7f27ee8ff12f10571e6aa
describe
'69236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYO' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
1185412f59238564a3bba8b132b0b0bd
70702505ae55496b9eb7220cd1a4e6e6351e9e92
describe
'18496' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYP' 'sip-files00251.pro'
e8194c35761a74bc84612d9ffc092f28
cfc59940bc4c407fe376eecae67dd015f19db4b9
describe
'24446' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYQ' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
77e2703731222f0f4ab2965f2a2fd37f
50115e0fe4b031bd81d3fff7a3eee032804551ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYR' 'sip-files00251.tif'
5a60227fcce91b43569899a4181aa954
984903d01425e9bce3058f55b5099601df2507ae
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYS' 'sip-files00251.txt'
85f3eade5663a9094eadb56aa6d61397
e28266e74371200f9f38ae9d1080acbac5a5fba2
describe
'6276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYT' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
65ecdd241d4ddc22e230503c77fd7cdb
4583181fba3fb8f61768764ac1b32bea80185cff
describe
'367024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYU' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
c82b8b53e9228bcdcfa242941fa21bf0
7b51207858499ac72ef6e0b2b10501916060abf3
describe
'109112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYV' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
cbc0d5644a3a796bfcb5430f56d01c5d
b6789b17228097098e1fee32ff8886a26165c5c8
describe
'23442' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYW' 'sip-files00252.pro'
1445d9e601965162e2fa1d0e38852a3b
35dbe718bfed95f3fce767587fb1e4cc1ce68d9d
'2011-12-23T22:06:30-05:00'
describe
'32850' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYX' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
be83542b84310ac2c1bcc3e1b1e54025
fe4b57e490e3861b12884ad96338b68e3a667736
describe
'2954152' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYY' 'sip-files00252.tif'
3272344b443cad86d66992dfa82f57bf
03ab9f4727bd61837698d052741933db6ba25280
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPYZ' 'sip-files00252.txt'
23e8fe9bb898985895b16c943ac9491a
fd9ab6bbcb36c79188b51beead9c52bc4c0d996e
describe
'9425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZA' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
ec91151811ffe2e5383e0537b858ef72
1e94d0498f39d13d5e9f4c3d53e718d01210a724
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZB' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
83da1bf09f3f6fd0f33bf413fd52730a
ae54751cdee88e024d742f22d0f8de7c62789599
describe
'176655' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZC' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
a8f79dc0d848245202d424f22c7c4d9b
fca707a2d0bca05c7876bd676a3cc82b84866969
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZD' 'sip-files00253.pro'
30bad7b0dd95ee0f8431ab03566f2482
75a0a062a6b57c6616f1dff976b19fbd18a8dee6
'2011-12-23T22:07:13-05:00'
describe
'39342' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZE' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
21b02823d69b84ed5a5959c4e9c66fec
977f4bf818477873b3e709316e7e66b52c713781
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZF' 'sip-files00253.tif'
48b341d801bde3d88d56ea16ce7d8fce
929a36585299dbd9ce57138a1ed8482889b0e7fa
describe
'9577' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZG' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
b0e1d3c8eeb0144e2daa964ab0caa739
3830195fec11fcf48256fd134960083410182f7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZH' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
3f27b2e682a22d34989f7a8aedf660d0
bfe2aea4bd9edc44ccb10376c6f9aac2da35844a
describe
'47370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZI' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
69caaeff44c476551f8cc8c2b0e60dda
fbd46d5f5a49533aa6b2416db1e735c59ed7e22e
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZJ' 'sip-files00255.pro'
39c2d7cf40d9b6af4060d70e549e410b
3e9fd59f4528f98e6c43c7da0741e62c63ef80e0
describe
'12286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZK' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
3ddbdb0a0eeeb2ade914b226e5e41c27
6bfb4970279ac32dea4e43b5942d7f749a0bef33
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZL' 'sip-files00255.tif'
a2b2e51d291d83c9d8c18614264c412e
732edecd29f26bc680e7fd8723941a74c5ba5c9d
describe
'321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZM' 'sip-files00255.txt'
d14683304d6c226376808b9cee0d9af6
e5236361bc48b4a6eee11b845df048af91ee6dc0
describe
'3313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZN' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
77c9054345459739ed8b50e9b4f43be1
b159cac90d7dffb3795af80c799cf965e254f6b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZO' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
9061ad421df6d47879061c9276a3329f
f3db132ccbc4acce1fa8ac96081af6d1f82089a4
describe
'16233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZP' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
04763f956d59a7516fab75233087d727
771e4f28b725bb4e190e76dcda3a20fa08b3b69c
describe
'3446' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZQ' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
71ae541396a676bd73b5ca9ced79a0e8
d042330812699252fbd0978446113335331e6965
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZR' 'sip-files00256.tif'
67f567a24792f746a13e308dab21fe4b
ba0373faeeb16d8e36ab5af464becb9bc563eeab
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZS' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
d7c502ae4a14ae9ed0abdd12ba324533
8447dfd8da0059a385947d82e37798c25ed77f7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZT' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
d19a4474fe9a7318d34f2e1ffb6d04c3
02e90ead6a9e1cde11378732cf3d74ecacd3a24b
'2011-12-23T22:04:04-05:00'
describe
'128817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZU' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
737418662f15f7b69313a418a5839012
89dfa1c836fcc194d1f01d6d9764eea1882dbc76
describe
'59702' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZV' 'sip-files00257.pro'
bfc593a9556226e72f80cf569766ecc6
6b69f4aee05e886ffba112b01d6a0c193405570a
describe
'33758' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZW' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
bc94a2b48ecd7111f26a099c4fb777e3
7b74ac0a0c09d8a46ecef2a2a3a53e901fa59c0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZX' 'sip-files00257.tif'
1a714cee2465247256edbe2388bd3486
fd74fec5602292987e25e0d0a422562b173c98e3
describe
'2319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZY' 'sip-files00257.txt'
73fc3fa0b283cc7d1647691cb3e14243
222fdbb7436bbeaead5860b9de6d824968be4fad
describe
'8265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABPZZ' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
dab4f6c00ca4482b82c70f0d982d1360
c858b89cddf44403c66aafd83a107fd041f16c5d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAA' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
35b88bd842a1c36e990fe7f11964a801
e69722e24f53af02f23ee0b530908c8f05092f01
describe
'124594' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAB' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
ec28708de35d53d61699d311644ee5b8
85f8f9c05348e099171fca8311ba1bbd8bc09f07
describe
'51896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAC' 'sip-files00258.pro'
b9e40e75330fb74126e01b26d90ee1c5
b3c216f6785eff513830e2a1c884235834d75a60
describe
'35279' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAD' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
3428864768be05dcd076d78c21811bab
6b7130d3aa189a0b3fc5bdad65b44a4f676134f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAE' 'sip-files00258.tif'
e19c8f6461dae1da2c0243f40477a7ca
b2624c75fdb9a0aea35424b0b52b9b0c730c2830
describe
'1987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAF' 'sip-files00258.txt'
1503128918a2c31ddc5e97b660734c7e
2fc775c256ab46113cf5be9a90cbba7a82ebc861
describe
'8725' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAG' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
7a533baea4828fa5a3e496f368ce9d25
39fb831f4fea5091d7441e76108ae2e588ba991d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAH' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
11d5908adf4f4d8367b4f8f0a68b2f35
aa51fa4f24dd3406005618118384db0958c0e41a
describe
'131959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAI' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
a4531bec1be5038738d1aee522729f0b
6810a68830c136c981da656649034cf8fb10b93b
describe
'65017' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAJ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
2aa4ecd71c24e67f1901020e897438cf
7e7297e7fc0009c4d257b33058a1f0da29201a5f
describe
'34817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAK' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
69905dff56fe61ded2bc832ab6227c74
d301cf78029addfe15cf41bfa7b1807bf8aabd0b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAL' 'sip-files00259.tif'
780b4dbcde0ea2598160386af02660b8
d2e2100137935dec470d12ffe593280d40a027f2
describe
'2595' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAM' 'sip-files00259.txt'
8e05be8d0ec0b2928ed4456afb3156be
198de5b7b2467929b27c3e9755668fc02724adf1
describe
'8317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAN' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
7e42d70bd43cae91a7eab61f6948d78c
4062ec749de0313ad773332cb17e6858b0bd2290
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAO' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
f9b260b11c77b16840ea42e860e0100d
d178398433d402822b86be87675ebf4b5ce3ec95
describe
'117394' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAP' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
184e922fa007708942122eb4296e90db
6bde556342ff53aff6d7967741854131de076e3a
describe
'48246' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAQ' 'sip-files00260.pro'
ce01a477d9273997395a6b5ed7c847ee
4814999bddbc5e149e75b74da7d1dd9b53cd506b
describe
'33075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAR' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
728867c20d445246f851fa995ffd04d3
30117fed2df56bc216a8ef5c9dd0532238bdfe05
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAS' 'sip-files00260.tif'
11b99cc4f0c05a0abbfb1a264e8ee201
885c10c37c0ecf20eb0082628d1c3baa08f1444f
describe
'1921' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAT' 'sip-files00260.txt'
ae8744ebf8970244b09e47853cb70117
61309410df643840764215e733f7c9938e60835c
describe
'8616' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADBfileF20081224_AABQAU' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
7c80d05cbdf9101bd061fbeb28cf331e
96caad9c5d3817d5bf96e058113ca3e56f539d51
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The Baldwin Library


Doig i acticch) if
wage, Tadtscch) Sodfee

Ss Cie

Cf FT P=

ee


TONY DRUM

A COCKNEY BOY




By EDWIN PUGH
king Circumstance

r2mo, $1.25.

CONTENTS.—The Story of Hannah Wray—Eurus, an
Episode—The Undoing of Matty White—The
Rie CC nae ab Cone a eey Martyrdom_of
the Mouse—The Liar—The Man of Silence—The
Poor Idealist—Bettles, a Cockney Ishmael—The
Little Lady, an Inconsequence — A Singer of
Dreams— The Anterior Time —The Inevitable
Thing — Consolation —Crazy Madge—The First
Stone—Blind Peter.

“A volume of short stories, each of which has its
own strong, peculiar vein of interest and reality. . .
Each story is in itself strikingly complete. . . The
writer of these short stories displays decided talent.”
—Boston Transcript.

“In his lighter vein, as in his moods of indignation
and rebellion, Mr. Pugh is a realist of the best stamp.
. . . He sees—and can show forth the pathos and the
tenderness that abide in things as they are.”—7he
Academy (London).

“They have right feeling, some knowledge of the
eS and touch life at many points.”—T7he
utlook.

“Mr. Edwin Pugh ... is a shrewd observer, and
the dramatic value of a situation is never lost upon
him.”— The Citizen.

““Edwin Pugh is one of the younger English writers
of fiction .. . many readers are likely to make a par-
ticularly agreeable acquaintance with him in ‘King
Circumstance.’ ’—Philadelphia Press.

“His stories... are often witty and of original
construction. His title is a very good one, and gives
the key to the tone of the book—which is not far
so Me Thomas Hardy’s philosophy.”—Aartjord

ourant.

HENRY HOLT & CO. - - NEW YORK


TONY DRUM

A COCKNEY BOY

BY

EDWIN PUGH

With ten illustrations

BY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON

“A child ts known by hts dotngs”



NEW YORK

HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY
1898


This book ts not for sale outside of the United States and Canada.

COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY
HENRY HOLT & CO.

THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE
I. His Fatuer, . 2 : : . a : : I

II. His PRENATAL EXPERIENCES, . : : 5 9
III. He Asks anp ANSWERS QUESTIONS, . é ei gpe29)
IV. He Rises To Occasions, . ‘ : 5 ‘ 44
V. He Makes A FRIEND, . i c : i Be O)
VI. He Faces THE INEVITABLE, . c : ; 63
VII. He Gors on A Jaunt, . ei 2 5 : - 80
VIII. He Enterrains 4 DEMon, a : 2 98
IX. His Fyanxy, . : 3 ; : ; : 5 Sealy
X. He Prays ar Kiss-In-THE-RING, ‘ : : 130

XI. He Catcues GLIMpsEs OF THE FEMININE Heart, 150

XII. He Runs AwAy FROM THE INEVITABLE, - 164
XIII. He Strikes an ATTITUDE, : 5 A . 188
XIV. He Surrers Loss, . : A : . . . 194

XV. : He Writes Letters, 5 : : 5 : 212
XVI. He Fats AsLeep, . y , : - 223





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Tony’s FATHER, 2 : : : : 3 Frontispiece
Tony’s MotTHER, : 3 A : § x . 10
Tony Drum, . : , i 3 : 4 i 29
Mrs. Drum Leaves ‘‘ THE JoLLy ANGLERs,” ‘ - 56
Tue Drums Go on A JAUNT, : 3 : ; ; 82
Mrs. Drum Witt Take “A Mite oF WARM Guy,” EST
Tony’s GRANDFATHER, . ‘i 5 j A : ‘ IIo
Tony’s Fyanky, : a 2 i : ‘ : . 128
Honor Drum anp Her SwEETHEART, 4 i i 150

MicHArt Drum Fitts His Pirg, i 5 : : - 225

vii





TONY DRUM.



CHAPTER I.

HIS FATHER.

Tony DRuM was born in Garden Row, a street
on the left bank of the river Thames. Garden
Row is a narrow, crooked by-way, with pavements
less than a yard wide and many iron posts marking
the steep curbs. The houses in Garden Row are
old and big and have beetling roofs; the windows
are small and deep-set, but the doors are wide and
heavy. At one corner of the street is an inn called
“The Jolly Anglers,” where many strange charac-
ters of the waterside—bargees, lightermen, wharf-
ingers, and others—foregather nightly. There
are a few. fusty shops modestly hiding their wares
behind dirty windows, and an evil-smelling mews.

The people who live in Garden Row are mostly
2 TONY DRUM.

connected, more or less closely, with river business.
They work, live, and die, hard.

Tony’s parents were poor. His mother had
been a domestic servant. His father was a musi-
cian and philosopher. But philosophy having no
marketable value, Michael Drum was forced to use
his talent of music. He blew a flute in the gusty
streets for a meager livelihood. The flute is a thin,
shrewish instrument, without body or soul, but he
played it better than most men. Had he set his
mind to the task, he might have found means to
earn a less precarious subsistence than is to be got
in the gutters and outside tavern doors; but, being
a philosopher, he lacked ambition. There were
many ways of improving his condition; he shunned
them because they were unalluring to his vagabond
temperament.

“A man can die but once in the ordinary
course,” he was wont to remark. “ But he is dead
all his life if he works too hard.”

He was none of your showy rascals. He was a
man, middle-aged, commonplace, of spare figure

and faltering gait. Exposure to wind and rain and
HIS FATHER. 3

sun had mottled his long, thin face; his cheeks
bulged a little from continued distention; his lips
were shapeless and puckered into a grotesque prim-
ness; his eyes were bulging and watery. He had
lank hands with big blue knuckles, and a hairy,
sinewy neck. In his youth he may have been
picturesque enough. He was a Penrith man.
During his romantic years he had tended sheep on
the hill slopes for an inexorable father. The life
was ill-suited to his ardent nature, and he grew to
hate it. He longed to taste London—just as many
a heady boy in a tainted office longs to be an Et-
trick shepherd. The clerk knows nothing of
sheep-ticks; Michael knew nothing of London
except that it was big and very fine. He blew
his flute at fairs and dances with a heart full of
Splendid gloom. He had not learned philosophy
then. Hehad ambitions. His flute was a possible
scepter.

Of course, he found a woman to believe in him;
one woman’s heart is every dreamer’s kingdom.
His own sisters mocked him. His mother smiled

on him fondly, but foolishly. His father, the
4 TONY DRUM.

sturdy Dalesman, frowned and swore. He was
without honor in his own country. So, at the end
of each day, it was with a lightening heart he
leaped the low stone walls between the fields to
meet his Agatha upon the steaming uplands. Her
sympathetic little ear was ever open to the tale of
his young hopes. He walked, protecting her with
his arm, toward the sunset light; and she, listening
and loving, gave him new courage and new food
for visions.

He had lived twenty-five years, but was much
younger than that, when he left her weeping at the
crossroads one red spring morning, and set his
face resolutely toward the end of his desires. A
finger-post pointed him on—‘ To London.” His
sweetheart dried her tears upon her apron and re-
turned to her unending round of little duties; he,
with a stiff lip and a bouncing heart, strode val-
iantly along the white road, southward.

He passed through many mighty towns, and saw
much that kindled his wonder; but he would not
loiter on the way, though his boots shredded from

his feet, and the hot sun, beating on him, rotted
HIS FATHER, 5

the clothes from his lusty limbs. With his stout
staff swinging in his hand, he tramped forward,
meeting the sun at each recurring noon, lying
down at night with his face turned to the winking
Stars.

He entered London on a sweltering day in early
June. The sky, between the housetops, was blue
as the bosom of his own lakes; the streets were
paved with gold. In parks and squares and trim,
gray-walled gardens, tall trees drooped under their
burden of leaves. There had been no rain for
many days, but the dun roads were sweet with
moisture. Beautiful women, gloriously arrayed,
passed near him on the pavement, or sped by under
gay parasols, in shining carriages. Even the fine
gentlemen, afoot or on horseback, who did not
look at him or anything—so lofty were they in
their patrician polarity!—compelled his unwilling
admiration. He had no eyes for the meaner
sights, no mind 1o penetrate beneath the sleek ex-
terior of the city; his rustic soul was stirred to
dumb amazement. He wandered on, reveling in

sensations, until nightfall.
6 TONY DRUM.

And then the darkness fell on him.

He was without plans, without resources. He
had dreamed only of the far future—the period of
his fame; the intermediate stages he had over-
looked. Accustomed to the hearty hospitality of
the countryside, he had not reckoned with inhos-
pitable Death on the cold stones of this southern
city. -He had tootled his way to London, winning
here and there a bed or a meal or a lift in a jolting-
cart, or even a handful of halfpence. But now, in
this great town of growing gloom, there was none
to listen to his music. He loitered at the Marble
Arch, watching the press of people through his
tears. A policeman threatened him with vague
“menaces, and Michael perceived by the flashlight
of his anger that London was not so big after all,
but only a big collection of little things. His
blithe, wandering spirit restéd on despair. Wearied
with the adventures of the day, footsore and heart-
sore, he sought a dark corner in a noisome court
and lay down to sleep. His prayer that night was
for the decent shelter of one kind, natural tree.

The real Michael Drum awoke no more. He


HIS FATHER. 7

was more truly dead than if he had ceased to
breathe. It was another man that stretched his
limbs in the dawn and rose up from the spot where
Michael Drum had lain down. This man went
along in the early morning shadow asking alms.
That day he took his first lesson from Hunger in
the School of the World, and was evermore the
worse for his experience. The well-fed have set it
on record that hunger is a good sauce; Michael
Drum found it a bad diet, as others have done.
He lost his youth in the struggle for bread, and
with his youth all that had made him a little higher
than the ruck. He went down into the deeps, and
the scum hid him.

For some years he disappeared.

At last we find him again—a husband and rate-
payer, lodging in two rooms in Garden Row. He
is now the philosopher, and plays his flute in a
jaunty key. “The goods of life are very good,”
he says, and drinks a little whisky o’ nights at “ The
Jolly Anglers ” for sweet fellowship’s sake. Being
an artist, he wears his hair long for the honor of

tradition. His wife is about to become a mother
8 TONY DRUM.

for the second time. ‘It will be a girl,’ he says,
“ because we want a boy this time, and there are
too many women already.” The child is a boy.
“ Every birth of a child is the death of an illusion,”
he remarks. ‘“ We will call him Tony, because
there has never been one of that name in our

1

family
CHAPTER II.
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES.

Mrs. Drum’s first child was a girl, whom she
had named Honor. Honor was four years old
when Tony was born. At five years she accepted
him as her first responsibility. She dragged him
up the stairs and down and about the street, ex-
pounding the world to him. She judged the world
from what she knew of it (as we all do); and, as she
had never journeyed beyond Garden Row, thought
it a shabby affair, no doubt. She sometimes
longed to be one of the soaring gulls above the
wintry river, that she might take a loftier view of
things. She asked her mother if all the world were
‘like Garden Row, and Mrs. Drum said “ God for-
bid! ” She asked her father, and Michael Drum
replied in bitter words which the child did not
understand—nor the man either, for that matter.

But hardship quickly blunted the edge of her

9
10 TONY DRUM.

desire for knowledge. At nine years she was
already a little woman, with many responsibilities
to sober her and many harsh experiences upon
which to found a theory of life. Yet she played
still.

Tony was now a tiny, deformed miracle of five.
He had a great shock head, obliquely set between
high, pointed shoulders; a thick, humped body, and
rickety legs. His face was white and wistful, with
a wonderful breadth of brow, but tapering sharply
to an elfin chin. His eyes were smoke-colored,
large, deep, questioning. His mouth was pinched
and wry. He could not walk upright, but shuffled
onward, with his long arms dangling limply and
his face to the ground. His sister watched over |
him, protected him, and loved him always. They
‘were rarely apart; he never appeared in the streets
without her.

It was known throughout the Row that Tony
was foredoomed to early death: that was the one’
happy fact of his existence. He alone did not.
know it. In another sphere he might have thrived

. and flourished, his life might have borne noble










Tony's Mother.
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES, Il

fruit, perhaps; as it was, grown to his full strength,
he could have done little good in his small corner
of the world, but infinite harm.

He was the pet of the Garden Row Mission Hall.
He attended all the services held there, led the
children’s singing, and was cock of his class in the
Sunday-school. He was very devout, and would
listen to the longest homilies with the rapt face of
an angel, whilst Honor, his sister, slumbered peace-
fully beside him. Yet Honor had the larger stock
of faith.

Once he asked his sister, ““ Honor, where did I
come from?”

She replied, as in duty bound, “ God sent you,
Tony.”

He pondered the reply with a little puzzled knot
of puckers on his brow.

“ God lives in heaven, don’t He?” he said, at
last.

“He does when He’s at home,” Honor said,
striving to cope with the great demands of the sub-
ject. “ But generally He’s out and about, doing

good.”
12 TONY DRUM.

“Oh!” gasped Tony.

“ He’s everywhere, like, you see,” said Honor.

“T see,” said Tony. He dragged himself along
beside her for a hundred yards, and then he asked,
“Ts He in Garden Row ever, Honor? ”

“Yes,” she replied.

“ Are you certain sure? ” he asked incredulously.

“ Of course,” she said.

“Well,” he drawled, speaking a whit peevishly;
“T aint never noticed Him there.”

Of course, the only meaning in his words was
the obvious, childish one. But the men and
women of the Row supplied another.

A day or two later, as Tony and Honor were
sitting together under a cart in the mews, he asked
her:

“ Did you come from heaven too, Honor?”

“Yes,” she said.

He turned his eyes toward her and scanned her
face keenly. Then he fitted his chin into the
palms of his two bony hands, and, looking aside at
the flying rain, said softly:

“T didn’t see you there, Honor!”


HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 13

She stared at him, her mouth agape.

“What did you say?” she cried.

He replied, somewhat impatiently, ‘I didn’t see
you there, in heaven, Honor.” And he added,
“Whereabouts was you?”

She shook her head in dumb amazement at his
words. He seemed not to notice her extreme sur-
prise, but continued calmly:

“ Was you anywhere near God’s throne, Honor?
I was quite close to it.”

“Oh, Tony!” she gasped out, between fear and
admiration.

He narrowed his eyes and looked at her for signs
of doubt. She dissembled.

“T had a gold crown on,” said Tony. “So
p’r’aps you wouldn’t hardly know me. And I

wore a white robe. Do you know what a robe is,

Honor? ”
“No,” she said.
“Tt’s in the hymn, you know,” he said. “It’s

a sort of beautiful pinafore—all red and blue and
green, with diamond buttons on, and velvet bows.”

“ And did you have one?” asked Honor.
14 TONY DRUM.

“T had two,” said Tony, nodding; “ one for Sun-
days and one for weekdays, like Miss MacMann at
_ the sweetstuff shop. The one for Sundays was the
one with the diamond buttons on; the weekday
one had only got pearlies on, but bigger’n you ever
see!”

“What else did you have?” asked Honor
eagerly.

For Tony had the true artist’s knack of com-
pelling belief even in the very teeth of probability.

“ Oh!” he said, “ I had a golden harp anda palm
of victory.”

“What's a‘ palm of victory ’?” asked Honor.

“Don’t you know?” he cried. “It’s in the
hymn.”

“T don’t know what it is,” she said humbly.

“Tt’s a sort of Bath bun, but better than that,
and you can’t never eat it up,” he said.

“Why not?”

“ Because it’s everlasting. As soon as you bite
one bit off another bit grows.”

Here Honor asserted herself, and exclaimed:

“ Garn! ”
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 15

He was in nowise disconcerted.

“ Straight!” he said.

Honor stared at him with troubled eyes. At
last she asked:

“ What is God like, Tony?”

“Oh, He is ever so old,” Tony replied.

“Ts He kind?” she asked.

“ He is like the superintendent,” said Tony, with
an air of explanation.

“T always thought God was like him somehow,”
said Honor.

“ He’s awful like him,” Tony replied, his eyes
bulging. “ Only bigger and older, of course. He
is like the superintendent in other ways, too, you
know—a bit strict, but wonderful kind, really, if
you’re good.”

“And was you good, Tony?” asked Honor,
yielding herself. wholly to the fascinations of the
subject.

“Of course I was,” he said. “ Everybody is
good in heaven. But even when I was bad Jesus
was kind to me. Poor Jesus!”

“ Oh!” cried Honor in an awed whisper.
16 TONY DRUM.

“IT see where they stuck the nails in,” said Tony,
and he began to cry.

“ He’s happy now, though,” said Honor in tones
of consolation.

“He seemed a bit sad like, Honor,” said Tony.
“ Of course, He can’t help remembering.”

“No, of course not,” she agreed.

Tony said no more on the subject just then, but
lapsed into heavy thought. Honor watched him
-with new interest. Slowly she brought her mind
to believe what Tony had said; it made plain many
things in him which she had never understood.
She grew hungry for further details of the other
world, and tried by hints to draw them from her ;
brother. But he was coyly silent.

At last he spoke again.

It was on a fair spring morning, and the Row
was ariot of children. The air was warm and still,
and games were in fevered progress. Honor was
playing “gobs” with one Lucy Anders on the
doorstep of the local sweep. Tony sat squatly on
the pavement at her elbow. Suddenly he ad-
dressed Lucy Anders.
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 17

“Lucy,” he said, “do you know where babies
come from?”

Lucy Anders was ten, and the question put her
to the blush. She dug her forefinger into Honor’s
ribs and giggled. Honor blushed too. She struck
away Lucy’s hand half angrily.

“ Don’t let on as you know,” she whispered.

Lucy gave an understanding nod.

“It’s very awkward though, aint it, when they
begin to ask questions?” she whispered back.
Then she turned to Tony, and said, smiling blankly,
“No. Where do they come from, Tony?”

“They come from heaven,” Tony answered.

“ Oh, of course,” Lucy said, winking at Honor.
“ But how do you know?”

“T remember,” he said.

Lucy opened her eyes wide.

“Don’t tell lies!” she said tartly.

“Tt aint lies,’ Tony said, becoming tearful with
rage. “I won’t tell you now, see if I do.”

And he snapped his jaws together.

But presently other children came round and one

of them, Billy Aggs, was sucking a toffee-apple.




18 TONY DRUM.

“ Give us a bit, Billy,” said Tony.

“ Shan’t,” said Billy.

“ All right, greedy guts,” said Tony.

For a while he was moodily silent.

“You ought to see the toffee-apples they have
in heaven,” he said at last, unable to restrain him-
self longer. “ Ever so big. And nothink to pay
for ’em!”

““ Garn!” said Billy.

“ See my finger wet,” Tony said.

“What! nothink to pay?” cried Billy.

“ Nothink,” replied Tony. “ You jest walk into
the shops and take what you bloomin’ well like—
toffee-apples, stickjaw, Jumbo-chains, everythink,
and there’s other sweets you aint never heard of.
I see some like ’em once in the big shops in the big
street when I was out with Honor and got lost a
time ago, but the ones in heaven was bigger’n
them.”

“Ts they cakes there, too?” asked Mrs. Mellar’s
Agnes.

“Millions on ’em!” answered Tony. “ And

jam tarts and jumbles and fairy turnovers! ”
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 19

“ Oh!” cried the children.

“Ts they fruit there? ” said Billy Aggs.

“Fruit!” Tony laughed scornfully. “I should
think there was! All a-growing on the trees as
thick as thick, like leaves. Apples and pears and
strawberries and cherries and grapes and plums and
everythink. And flowers, too!”

The children heaved a sigh of longing. Lucy
Anders, the unbeliever, was seen to smack her lips
and become preoccupied. The circle closed on
Tony, and a stream of questions poured in upon
him. He looked triumphantly from face to face,
smiled, and refused to speak further.

?

“Go on, Tony,” said Mrs. Mellar’s Agnes
breathlessly. ‘‘ Tell us some more about it.”

He shook his head, sadly but firmly.

“Tl give you a button,” said Billy Aggs. “Id
give you a suck o’ my toffee-apple, but it’s all gone
now.”

Tony: turned on him in great distress.

“T caw’t tell you any more,” he wailed shrilly.
“Tt won’t—won’t come.”

They eyed each other askance.
20 TONY DRUM.

“Tm tired, Honor,” Tony said. “I want to be
taken home. I want to go to sleep.”

Honor rose at once, relinquishing a certain vic-
tory over Lucy Anders, and led him away. The
children gazed after Tony with regretful faces, and
when he had gone a few yards they followed him
slowly. To them it seemed that the street was
grown darker and narrower, the sky seemed very
far away, and there was little sense in starting fresh
games before bed.

Thenceforward Tony was never surprised. It
mattered not what was shown to him, he had
always seen a better one in heaven. By virtue of
the fact of his previous exalted existence, he be-
came an object of envy in the Row. He held a
court of wide-eyed children every evening, and
tribute to his genius was liberally rendered.

One gusty, rainy night an oil-shop, two streets
distant from the Row, burst into sudden flame.
The sky was flushed red and ribbed with rolling
smoke. The house-roofs, with their tall, twisted
chimneys, stood out stark and black against the

glare.


HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 21

Tony and Honor, sleeping on their rag bed, with
interlocked arms, cheek to cheek, were aroused by
the roar and tumult in the street, and, starting up,
saw the bright sky.

“It’s a fire,” said Honor, darting to the door.
“T expect mother and father’s gone,” she added,
looking round the room. “I’m going too.”

“ Hooray!” cried Tony, capering and clapping
his hands. “ Take me, Honor,” he said.

“T can’t,” said Honor; “it’s such a night, and
there’ll be a ’orful crowd, and you’d get hurt.”

“No, I wouldn’t,” he cried, trembling in his
eagerness. ‘‘ Let me come, Honor.”

“No,” she said, pushing him away.

“Yes, let me,” he pleaded, weeping now. }

But she ran from the room and locked him in.
As she sped downstairs she could hear his furious
blows upon the door and his voice crying out
hoarsely, “ Honor, Honor!”

His voice pursued her to the scene of the fire,
and rang in her ears above the clamor of the crowd,
the roar of the flames, and hiss of spouting water.

Her enjoyment of the wild spectacle was marred.
22 i TONY DRUM.

Compunction stabbed her. She waited until the
roof fell in with a thunderous crash in a cascade of
sparks, then returned slowly homeward, shudder-
ing in anticipation of her brother’s reproaches.

But Tony was ever unexpected. She found him
sitting calmly before the fire, with his back to the
window, scornful of the murmurous crowd in the
Row and the resplendent, sensational sky. He
had lighted a tiny oil-lamp, and was going through
a fragment of an old Bible, looking for words
which he could spell. It was his favorite amuse-
ment on wet evenings. Honor noted his red eye-
lids and unsteady mouth. He greeted her with a
wavering smile. :

“ Hullo!” he said slowly. “ Been to the fire? ”

“Yes,” said Honor, drooping her head.

He spelt out with his finger “ W—h—e—n,
when.”

“Tt wasn’t much of a fire, after all,’”’ Honor said
to comfort him.

“ Ah!” he said, looking hard at her, “ you ought
to see hell.”

She started back aghast.
AIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 23

“ Hell!” she cried.

He nodded “ Yes” with gloomy self-possession.

“You aint never seen hell, have you, Tony?”
cried Honor in an awestruck whisper. She looked
up at the luridly suggestive sky.

He nodded again, very gravely.

“Yes, I have,” he said, throwing a startled
glance into the darker corners of the room. “ Aint
you never heard tell of the ‘ great gulf’ as is fixed
between heaven and hell—the one as Lazarus
looked through when the rich man was in tor-
ment?”

“Yes,” said Honor breathlessly. “ But what’s
it like?”

“The great gulf?”

BeeNeSes

Tony frowned. He seemed to be reflecting.

“Tt’s a sort o’ grating, for all the world like a
tremenjous big sewer-sink,” he said at length.

“Oh!” gasped Honor.

Her frightened gaze followed his about the
room.

“TI was playing one morning in the golden
24 TONY DRUM.

streets,” he said, solemnly and with restraint,
“when we went round a corner, and then we
see it.” ,

“The great gulf?”

“Yes. It was just agin the curb, but ever so
big, and a sort o’ red light was coming up out of it,
like the steam do sometimes when it’s perishing
cold.”

He paused.

“Yes, go on,” said Honor.

“ The other boys was frightened, and run away,”
Tony said; “ but I never. I kneeled down on the
curb and peeped through the grating. And then
‘I see it.”

Honor uttered a tiny shriek.

“Hell?” she said again, craning her head for-
ward and looking up into his face.

“Hell,” he answered, staring fixedly at her.
“You never see such a sight. There was the—the
devil—all red—a-hopping about in the fire. And
there was all the wicked people a-crying and
a-moaning—a-weeping and a-wailing and a-gnash-

ing of their teeth. And there was the fire roaring
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 25
that loud, and running after the wicked people in
little streams like red-hot water, and a-burning
them like anythink. There was all sorts o’ ugly
faces in the fire—oh, such ugly ones! They’d ha’
frightened a girl out of her senses. And every
time they breathed, little flames, all colored, come
out of their mouths, and their eyes was like Chinese
lanterns in a garden on Guy Fox day.”

“Wasn't you awful afraid?” said Honor.
said Tony. ‘“’Cos the wicked

,

“TI was, rather,’
people—some of ’em was murderers and covered
with blood—they kept a-jumping up at me and
a-shouting out, ‘Gimme a drop o’ water, Tony
Drum! Oh, gimme a drop o’ water!’ I couldn’t
abear to see ’em, so I got up mighty quick, and cut
off as fast as I could go. And I never went back
to that street no more.”

He turned from her and sighed. She stood,
dazed with wonder, looking at the floor and shud-
dering. ~

“ Now, that was something like a fire, that was,
Honor,” Tony said, eying her over his shoulder.

She stood transfixed.
26 TONY DRUM,

His unique prenatal experiences safeguarded
Tony against the remotest possibility of disap-
pointment.

The children of the Sunday-school were taken
once a year to Chingford for a happy day amid the
dog-roses and donkeys. Tony could not go be-
cause of his infirmities. The brakes filled at the
corner of the Row, and he stood watching them
with the self-denying Honor by his side. His lip
was curled in scorn, and, as the children were borne
away in a happy uproar, he turned to his weeping
sister, and said:

“T bet Chingford aint half as good as heaven!”

“But I aint been to heaven, you see,” sobbed
Honor.

He continued, ignoring her: “ It’s all very well
for them. what don’t remember where they come
from ’fore they was born, but Ido. Chingford! I
wouldn’t give a farden to go to no Chingford! ”

And in the evening, when the children returned
and told him of the manifold joys of the day, he
listened with obvious effort. But that night,

Honor, startled from her sleep, caught the sound
HIS PRENATAL EXPERIENCES. 27

of his weeping. She sat up and asked compas-
sionately:

“‘ What are you crying for, Tony?”

“T aint a-crying, fathead,” he said. “I’m only
a-breathing hard.” And he kicked her sav-
agely.

“Yes you are a-crying,” said Honor.

He spluttered angrily fora moment. Then he —
broke down utterly, and clasped her about the
neck, pressing his face against her breast. She
soothed him in her arms.

“ There, there, Tony, don’t cry,” she said.

“T aint a-crying ’cos I never went to the treat,”
he said jerkily.

“ Aint you, Tony?” she said. “I thought you
was.”

“No,” he said, with an emphatic shake of the
head; “ I was jest wishin’ I hadn’t never been born,
that’s all. It’s so much nicer up above the sky
than what it is down here.”

And he talked to her of heavenly bliss until the
morning.

One day Billy Aggs asked him:
28 TONY DRUM.

“And could you fly, Tony, when you was in
heaven?”

“1 should think I could,” Tony said; “ and run,
and jump.”

“Wasn’t you humpy neither?” asked Billy
Aggs.

“Me!” cried Tony, in high surprise. “No
fear! I could beat anybody at games, I could—
when I was in heaven! ”

“I wonder as you ever left heaven to come down
here,” said Lucy Anders.

“T never wanted to, I can tell you,” Tony said.
“But you all have to be born, sooner or later—
worse luck! You go to sleep one night, and when
you wake up you're here.”

“Paps you hurt your back a-coming down,
Tony,” said Billy Aggs.

Tony looked at him with his head held askew.

“Ves, that was it,” he said.

CHAPTER III.

HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS.

ONE day, when Tony was six years old, he was
taken by his parents into the country. They trav-
eled a great way northward on the roof of a tram-
car into a region of wide green fields. Tony had
seen trees and grass before in the waste spaces near
his home, but not hills rising to the sky and flowers
at his feet that he might pluck. He wearied his
parents with numberless questions, and exhausted
his childish imagination in frenzied conjecture.
They ate tea in a fairy bower beside a pond, and
afterward climbed a great mountain, and emerged
from the breathless ascent on a wide, wind-swept
road: overlooking the whole earth. Tony could
have stayed on the magic road all night, but his
mother jerked him away by the arm, and they went
into a hot, evil-smelling little public-house. There

they stayed for many hours, though the smoke

a9
3° TONY DRUM.

made Honor sick, and Tony fell asleep against her
shoulder. At last they left the place and descended
the mountain. It was now almost dark, and the
wind was singing. Tony saw a line of dull red low
down on the western sky-line, and thought that the
world was afire. He told the thought to his
father, who said:

“ Aye, it’s afire right enough! ”

And under that depressing belief Tony began
the homeward journey. Crossing the fields to the
place where the tram-cars started, the party over-
took a poor Italian with a monkey and an organ.

“Damme! give us a tune,” said Michael Drum
boisterously.

The Italian shrugged his shoulders and shook
his head.

“Too ver’ tired,” he said, smiling amiably upon

Tony.
ae Give us a tune, I say!” cried Michael Drum.

The Italian was troubled, but smiled on. The
monkey sprang upon his shoulder, chattering and
scowling like an evil old man.

“ Jacko!—he too ver’ tired!” said the Italian.
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 31

Tony and Honor gazed at the monkey, fasci-
nated. Tony had crossed the fields in a stupor of
sleep, crying persistently to be carried in his
mother’s arms; but now he was thoroughly
aroused. Honor explained to him gravely that
the monkey was a child of the Italian. And, in-
deed, there was some likeness between them; both
had withered, yellow faces, and white teeth, and
stiff black hair growing low on the forehead.

“Come, play up!” cried Michael Drum.

“Yes, give us a tune,” said his wife.

“ Ah—no!” pleaded the Italian, whose belly was
clamoring for supper. But he swung the organ
over his shoulder and propped it on his stick before
him.

“Tt is too ver’ bad!” he said.

He ground out a popular waltz. The monkey
leaped down upon the ground, and doffed his tiny
fez and made a jerky bow. Mrs. Drum sprang
back with a scream, and the Italian grinned
broadly.

“ Bite!” said he with much significance.

The ground was dry and the grass smooth. The
32 TONY DRUM.

spirits she had imbibed at the inn worked furiously
in Mrs. Drum, and she lifted a tentative leg, laugh-
ing, under the brim of her hat, at Michael. He
put his hands to his sides and roared out:

“Ha, ha! Goon. Give usa step, old gal!”

Thus encouraged Mrs. Drum flung decorum to
the winds and danced. The monkey sprang back
upon his master’s shoulder, spitting angrily.

“Bad Jacko!” gurgled the Italian.

Tony and Honor stood looking on. The coun-
try wore a gray mantle of twilight. There was no
moon yet, and the sky spread above them darkly.
The blurred trees loomed black and formless, the
grass gleamed silver through a ground-mist. Mrs.
Drum danced on until the weary Italian stopped
playing.

“No, no; go on,” she cried when the music
ceased.

“Ah, no,” he murmured, preparing to obey,
nevertheless.

The monkey leaped down upon the ground again
and snatched at some wild flowers in Tony’s hand.

Tony screamed aloud in his terror, and Mrs. Drum
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 33

struck the monkey hard across the head with her
umbrella. The fixed smile faded from the face of
the Italian.

“T play no more for you—peegs! ” he said, hug-
ging his ugly pet in his arms.

He glared at them vindictively, swung the organ
on his back again, and trudged away across the
fields. Tony listened in an agony of vague,
childish shame, whilst his mother hurled abuse
after the patient, plodding figure of the poor
Italian.

“What a clucking hen you are, mother!” said
Michael Drum, laughing.

The events of the day had impressed Tony -
deeply.

“Father,” he asked, “ why did the organ-man
talk so funny, eh? ”

“ Because he is a foreigner, my son.”

“Do all foreigners talk like that? ”

“ More or less.”

“And do they all have babies like the organ-
man?”

“ Babies! ”
34 TONY DRUM.

“Honor said it was his baby.”

“She was aptly named,” said Michael Drum,
looking wryly at his daughter.

“T only said it for a lark, Tony,” said Honor.

“Tsn’t it his baby, then?”

“Far from it,” said Michael Drum. “In fact,
it is one of the organ-man’s fathers.”

“ How many fathers do organ-men have? zB

“They would want a dozen to answer their ques-
tions if they were all like you.”

“ But, father, what is a foreigner?”

“ Foreigners are men who don’t live in their own
country. I don’t think I can make it plainer than
that.”

“What isa country?”

“ A country is a big piece of dirt that everybody
who is born on it is expected to feel sentimental
about.”

“ What is ‘ sentimental ’? ”

“Two red noses touching one another on a
starry night.”

“ How many countries are there, father?”

“ One—and some others.”
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 35

“Don’t ask so many questions, Tony,” said his
mother.

“Why not?” asked Tony. “There are so
many things to ask questions about.”

Michael Drum laughed. “We must send the
boy to school,” he said.

So on a sultry day in late September Tony was
taken to school. He went, holding his mother’s
hand, with a heart of fear. The school was St.
Anselm’s, a one-storied building of red brick stand-
ing in a field against the railway, and separated
from the road by high tarred palings. A great
gray church overshadowed the school, and in the
churchyard were many gaunt trees, the ancestral
home of a colony of rooks. A bell was pealing as
Tony and his mother arrived at the school, and the
children were pouring in through the iron gates in
a wild, disordered stream. Tony scanned his
future companions with eager, nervous curiosity,
and his warm clasp tightened on his mother’s hand.
There were boys and girls of all sizes and sorts, a
noisy, jostling mob, who returned his timid

scrutiny with a bold, appalling gaze. He had im-
36 TONY DRUM.

bibed an awful idea of the mysteries of education,
in which the dread image of the birch prevailed,
and he felt a great reverence for these initiated
ones. They seemed to bear their sorrows lightly,
and he was reassured.

His mother led him across the playground to a
little wooden door, decorated with devices in iron.
The door stood ajar, and a great babble of noises
issued forth from within. Mrs. Drum knocked,
and a white-haired dame appeared. She surveyed
Tony in brisk, business fashion—as a butcher
might survey a calf ere buying it for the slaughter
—and began to talk with his mother. Onlv a few
sentences passed, and Mrs. Drum turned to de-
part.

“ Be a good boy, Tony,” she said, stooping to
kiss him.

He faltered, ‘‘ Yes, mother.”

Then she hurried away, and he was left alone.

“Come, Tony Drum,” said the white-haired
lady, who proved to be the infant schoolmistress,
and she took his hand.

“J will be good, ma’am,” said Tony.
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 37

“That’s right, Tony Drum,’ she responded
cheerily, and led him into school.

He took his seat at the end of a long form, be-
side a chubby girl in a red flannel frock and white
pinafore. The chubby girl had beautiful yellow
hair of silky texture, and a haughty little profile;
she did not look at Tony, but sat with her arms
folded on her slate, and he thought how different
she was from Honor. He was very lonely in that
crowd of restless babes. He looked through the
windows at the sky and the trees, and felt like a
bird in a cage. The schoolmistress had betaken
herself to the further end of the room to awe a class
of bigger children with her white-haired presence;
the class in which Tony had been placed was pre-
sided over by a lank damsel in skirts that were
neither long nor short, but something between the
two, as, indeed, she herself was something between
child and woman. She was manipulating an
abacus, and at signs from her, unintelligible to
Tony, the children made mysterious noises. He
mouthed silently when the children shouted, and

felt that he was being educated at a great pace.
38 TONY DRUM.

Later, the wonders of the alphabet were revealed
to him. And so the first morning passed.

He sped homeward, glad to be in the free air
- again, and flooded his mother with the tale of his
experiences. Honor laughed harshly at his loud
enthusiasm. After the midday meal Mrs. Drum
gave him a farthing and a handful of plums, and he
went back.to school again happy enough.

Thus his education was begun.

Life was easy and slow in the infant school of St.
Anselm’s. Learning was administered in wee sips,
and the discipline was lax. Often, on a summer
afternoon, when the gray floor was a mosaic of sun-
shine, half the tiny scholars would be asleep, and
the teacher herself in a state of great drowsiness,
so that her voice dwindled to a low drone, very
soothing to the dulled senses of the children. And
in the winter, when the window panes were starred
with frost and the attendance was meager, the
scholars would crowd about the glowing stove and
watch the snow, as it clicked on the glass, whilst
the white-haired schoolmistress read fairy tales

from Andersen or Grimm. Often, a rusty rook,
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 39

perched on a lower bough, would peep in at the
fire as if it longed to steal a little warmth to carry
back to its bleak eyrie in the treetop. Once a
week a brisk young curate told them true stories
from the Bible, of the Creation and the Flood, of
_ the Patriarchs and Judges of Israel, of infant
Samuel and the mighty David. He told them of
the Christ too, and with enough dramatic power to
raise in Tony’s breast a storm of love and indigna-
tion. Tony thought that Christ must have been
wonderfully like the brisk young curate.

One morning a messenger from the big girls’
section of the school entered the infants’ room and
crossed to the mistress’ desk. After some whis-
pered talk, the mistress stood up and called out,
“Tony Drum!”

Tony rose from his place, and answered shrilly,
“Yes, ma’am.”

“Come here, Tony,” said the mistress.

Tony left his seat and advanced timidly into the
middle of the room. A guilty conscience, heavy-
laden with secret crime, upbraided him, and he was

full of dire misgiving.
qo TONY DRUM.

“Tony,” said the mistress, “I have just heard
very sad news of your sister.”

Tony was relieved to find that he had not been
called out for punishment. A healthy, working
conscience is an awkward possession for a boy!
He heaved a sigh of relief.

“Very sad news!” repeated the mistress.

He now began to feel alarm, and his eyes
widened.

“Why, ma’am,” he cried, “she wasn’t even ill
this morning, ma’am.”

“T don’t mean that she is ill.”

“She can’t never be dead?”

“What a very morbid child!” said the mistress.
“T have not said that she is ill or dead, Tony. She
is quite well, but very, very naughty.”

“ You're a liar,” said Tony, quietly but with con-
viction. ‘She aint nothink o’ the sort. She’s
quite good, Honor is.”

“You must not call me a liar. It is very
rude.”

“You must not tell lies. It is very wicked.”

“ Be silent.”
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 41

“Yes, ma’am.”

“ Now you go with this little girl and do as you
are told.”

“Yes, ma’am.”

He followed the girl out of the room, along a
narrow passage, into the big girls’ section. In one
of the classrooms he found Honor.

She was lying on her back in the middle of the
floor, kicking and screaming in a fit of puny hys-
terics. A haggard young mistress was bending
over her in angry despair.

“Is this her brother, Amy?” asked the young
mistress.

“Yes, ma’am,” said Amy.

Tony stood looking at his sister, and he was filled
with sudden shame.

“What is your name, little boy?” asked the
mistress.

He faltered a moment, then replied, “ William
Smith, ma’am.”

She stared at him and from him to Amy.

“This is the wrong boy surely?”

“No, ma’am, it isn’t,” said Amy.
42 TONY DRUM.

“ But he says his name is Smith.”

“It might easily be Ananias, ma’am, but it aint
Smith,” said Amy pertly. She was in the seventh
standard and knew the Scriptures. ‘“ J know him
well enough.”

“She aimt my sister,’ said Tony, blazing
into sudden fury. “She aint—she aint—she
aint!”

Honor stopped screaming to listen.

“ My sister’s a carroty-headed gal, and she don’t
go to this here school at all, she don’t,” cried
Tony.

Honor sat up suddenly.

“Oh, Tony!” she exclaimed.

“You aint my sister—you know you aint,” said
Tony. “I wouldn’t own you for no bloomin’
sister!”

A grin overspread Honor’s face.

“Dear me, this is very extraordinary!” said the
young mistress, growing more haggard.

“Take me back to the infants’,” screamed Tony.
a I don’t want to stick here, I don’t.” .

There was nothing else to do, so they. took him
HE ASKS AND ANSWERS QUESTIONS. 43.

back, and the infant mistress told him about
George Washington. He was not greatly inter-
ested. He went to his seat in silence, with a dark
scowl upon his thin, wistful face.

He felt terribly ashamed of his family.
CHAPTER IV.

HE RISES TO OCCASIONS.

In a little while Tony passed from the infants’
to the boys’ school. He wept bitterly at parting
from his old schoolmistress, and she, touched by
this token of a good heart, gave him many words
of kind advice and four new farthings.

“What will you do with it?” she asked him.
“T mean the money. I know what will happen to
the advice.”

“T shall buy a present for my dear mother,” he
said proudly.

“Good boy!” said she.

He went out and bought a mouth-organ. He
took it home and threw it in his mother’s lap.

“ What is this?” asked Mrs. Drum.

“A present—for you,” he replied.

She laughed.

“Tt aint any good to me,” she said. “TI can’t
44










HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 45

play it.” He was silent, so she added: “ But it was
real kind of you to buy it for me, Tony.”

“Yes, wasn’t it!” he said. “I think ’ma very
kind boy, mum, don’t you?”

“F?’m!” she murmured doubtfully.

He picked up the mouth-organ.

“You must learn to play it, mum,” he said.

“But there aint nobody to teach me.”

“T will teach you,” he said.

“Can you play it, then, Tony?”

“Not yet,” he answered. “ But I’ll learn, and
then [ll teach you. See?”

“T see,’ nodded Mrs. Drum.

He went out and sat on the doorstep. He be-
gan to play the mouth-organ, and presently some
children came round him.

“ Let’s have a go at it, Tony,” said Billy Aggs.

-“T would let you, but it aint mine,” said Tony.

“Whose is it, then? ”

“My mother’s. I bought it for her. She says
Tam the kindest boy out.”

And he played on.

There was much trouble awaiting Tony in the
46 TONY DRUM.

boys’ school. On the first morning he was placed
next to a freckled boy named Simmy Angus.

“You'll find him a very nice lad,” said the mas-
ter reassuringly, seeing that Tony trembled.

Tony said to the boy:

“ Are you really nice?”

“What?” growled Simmy.

“Are you really nice? ”

“Tl break your jaw if you talk to me, you
cheeky young swine! ” said Simmy.

“T knew you wasn’t,” sighed Tony. He sat in
great fear.

“Hi, you, what’s your name?” whispered
Simmy.

“Tony Drum.”

“Can you fight? ”

Tony shook his head doubtfully.

“ Not a bit?”

“NO!

Simmy grinned.

“T shall call you ‘ Humpy,’ then,” he said.

“Please don’t call me that,” said Tony.

“ Yuss, 1 shall.”
HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 47

“Tt ‘ll hurt my feelings so.”

“Your feelings be blow’d! Aint I got feelings,
eh? And don’t everybody call me ‘The Spotted
Worm’? How’d you like to be called a spotted
worm?”

“T shouldn’t like it a bit,’ Tony confessed.
“ But then, I aint spotted, and you are.”

“ Bli’ me!” cried Simmy. “I won’t half give
you somethink for that when I get you
out.”

“Oh, don’t hit me,” pleaded Tony. ‘“ Look
here, I’ll let you have a go on my mother’s mouth-
organ.”

“ Have you got it with you?”

s1Â¥es.y

“ Show.”

Tony produced the mouth-organ.

“ Allright,” said Simmy. “ You give it me, and
I won’t hit you.”

“It’s my mother’s, or else I would.”

“ Well, let’s hold it a minute.”

“ Don’t keep it, will you?”

“Taint no bloomin’ thief!”
48 | TONY DRUM.

_ Tony handed over the mouth-organ, and Simmy

Angus promptly slipped it into his pocket.

“ Thank you,” he said, chuckling.

“You aint a-going to keep it?”

“Aint I? I thought I was.”

“ Give it back!”

“ Not me.”

“You're a thief!”

“ And you're a liar! You said it was your
mother’s mouth-organ.”

“So itis. I bought it for her.”

“Don’t try to stuff me up. I know better.
What do your mother want with a penny mouth-
organ?”

“ Oh, give it me back.”

eshanitl 7

Tony pleaded no more.

When morning lessons were over and the school
was dismissed, a crowd of urchins, led by Simmy
Angus, gathered about Tony, and followea him
through the playground into the street. They
cried out at him:

“Yah, Humpy! Yah, Humpy! Who cried








EOE ee



ee ee ODS

HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 49

’cos he’d got his belly in the wrong place? Yah,
Humpy, yah!”

They hustled him and buffeted him. They spat
on his clothes and pelted him with mud and the
refuse of the gutters.

He shuffled along as fast as his weak legs
allowed, but his persecutors easily kept pace
with him. At last he stood at bay against a
wall.

“Oh, you poor miserable sinners!” he cried.
“ Oh, you wicked, miserable sinners! Oh, aint I
sorry for you all!”

They shouted in derisive chorus.

“Tt’s all very fine for you to knock me about
now,” Tony said solemnly; “ but jest you wait till
you’re dead. Won’t God pay you out then! Oh,
my! won’t he jest!”

“ Look at him a-crying!” jeered Simmy Angus.
“ Look at Old Humpy a-crying!”

Tony lifted his head and faced his tormentors
boldly.

“Me a-crying! ” he said. “Garn wi’ you! I

aint the sort o’ boy what cries. You couldn’t
“50 TONY DRUM.

never make me cry, none of you, not if you was to
hit me ever so—me bein’ humpy an’ all!”

A shower of blows fell upon him.

“Go on, then!” he shouted. “Hit me! hit
me!”

They responded to the invitation with a will, and
Tony laughed at them.

Suddenly a lank, frocked figure, all knees and
elbows and flying hair, burst into the little group.

“ Honor!” screamed Tony.

“T’ll show ’em!”’ she cried.

She caught Simmy Angus by the neck, and flung
him on his back in the muddy road.

“ You'll hit my little brother, will you, an’ him a
cripple!” she yelled, weeping profusely, as she
bumped two sleek back heads together. “I'll put
the ten commandments on every one of your ugly
faces, I will, and quicker’n you can think! ”

“Honor!” said Tony, leveling an accusing fin-
ger at Simmy Angus; “ that boy has got mother’s
mouth-organ.”

“Fork it out, Funny Face!” commanded

Honor, turning again on the downfallen Simmy.
Oe ee ee ee ee a a OTT ee ee

HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 51

He hastily dropped the mouth-organ at her feet,
and fled.

“Oh, Tony!” cried Honor, kneeling down to
hug him tenderly; “’ave they hurt you much,
Tony?”

“Only in my feelings, Honor,” he replied.
“ The thumps an’ pinches aint nothing at all. But
they called me—they called me names.”

“Let ’em do it again, that’s all,” said Honor,
white and quivering with rage. ‘‘ Let me catch
’em at it! Dll show ’em! T’ll teach ’em how it
feels to be hurt, I will. The nasty, spiteful little
toads!”

“Well, you needn’t cuddle me, Honor!” said
Tony in an aggrieved tone. '

“That’s my love, dear,” she said timidly.

“Yes, I know,” he said; “ but it makes a fellow
look such a fool!”

She loosed her embrace, and they walked se-
dately home. But Tony did not return to school
that day, because he was suddenly struck down by
sickness. _

He lay for a dark month on the verge of death,
52 TONY DRUM.

and the jaded dispensary doctor shook his. bald
head helplessly at each visit, saying always:

?

“Well, I will look in to-morrow, but ,



Yet Tony rallied, and in a little while was back

again at school.
' He was bullied, of course; but only at first, and
not so badly. He had pluck to commend him to
his mates, and if he could not give a blow he could
take a dozen without wincing. He speedily made
friends. His lessons gave him little trouble, for he
was apt above his fellows, and as for the cane,
after tasting it a few times, he scorned it alto-
gether.

A dull year passed, and then, in his tenth year,
Tony had an aging experience.

Returning from school one chill evening in
March, he came upon a crowd at a little distance
from hishome. He pushed into it, and found that
the cause of the commotion was a drunken woman.
She lay in a degraded heap, outstretched, face
downward, upon the pavement. There was a thin
rain falling and the ground was sloppy. The

woman’s dress was stained with the mire. Her
HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 53

hair was loose, and strayed about her head in wet,
clotted strands. Her tawdry bonnet was crushed
under her forehead; through her broken boots her
stockings. protruded in soiled white puckers.
There were many boys of Tony’s acquaintance in
the crowd. They jested rudely upon the fallen
woman, and Tony, though his heart shrank from it,
joined them from a boyish feeling of emulation.
His wit was keener than theirs, and his sallies pro-
voked the loudest laughter.

“Come, old Mother Mud!” he cried. “Vl run
you for a stiver!”

The woman stirred at the sound of his voice and
moaned. She had laid still hitherto, with her head
in a trickle of blood, as if stunned. Now she raised
herself on her hands and turned her face to them.
Tony cried out in a stricken voice and fell on his
knees beside her.

The drunken woman was his mother!

His heart seemed to snap apart within him. The
faces about him were the faces of leering devils; he
heard the whisperings and brutal laughter of the

crowd, and he was frozen with shame. He sobbed,
54 TONY DRUM.

“Oh, mother, mother! ” and put his arm about her
neck and tried to raise her up.

“ Bli’ me! if it aint Tony’s old woman!” he heard
one of his schoolmates say. ‘‘ Oh, Lord!”

Tony sprang up, seething with rage, and struck
blindly at the boy’s face.

“Ere, Tony boy, gimme a hand!” his mother
mumbled.

She clung to him, trying to rise. He looked at
her, his mother, and the tears rose in his eyes to
blot out the sight of her shame.

“ Oh, mother, mother!” he cried again.

She got upon her feet and clung to him, but he
was too weak to bear her weight, and she sank to
the ground once more.

“ Nobody loves me!” she whimpered.

Tony crouched beside her in the rain, looking
from face to face in the crowd. A bow-legged
workman, with his bag of tools over his shoulder,
stepped from the ranks.

“Ts it your mother?”

Tony made the sad admission.

“ D’ye live fur off?”
HE RISES TO OCCASIONS. 55

“Tn the next street.”

“Ere,” said Bow Legs. “’Old my bag, boy.
Now then, one o’ yer, gimme a hand.”

He found one to help him, and between them
they raised up Mrs. Drum and bore her along.
Tony, bending under the bag, followed them at a
trot. His mother, feeling herself in motion, be-
gan to sing, and the crowd jeered. She gave them
shout for shout, and kicked her limp legs in a bone-
less sort of dance. Thus they made the journey

home.
CHAPTER V.

HE MAKES A FRIEND.

IT was at this period that the prosperity of the
Drums began to decline. Michael’s health some-
times failed now, and when it happened that he
could not follow his itinerant calling the family was
sorely straitened in means. Mrs. Drum had
hitherto preserved much of her youthful comeliness
and high spirits, but under the growing burden of
her household cares she became quickly old and
peevish. Every day she had more frequent re-
course to the bottle. She began to tipple on her
errands, and usually was too much occupied with a
new circle of acquaintance at “ The Jolly Anglers ”
to keep her home clean or her person tidy. She
became a bit of a shrew, and faded and shapeless.
As her husband once remarked to her in their bick-
erings, he had to look into the parlor album to find

the woman he married. Tony early bore a share
56
Jolly An glers.


HE MAKES A FRIEND. 57

of the family responsibilities. Mrs. Drum con-
fided much to him that she kept secret from her
husband. Every Saturday, when Michael handed
over her weekly stipend, Tony went with her to
the pawnshop to redeem his Sunday suit, or
Honor’s silk frock, or maybe a blanket or a table-
cloth. Mrs. Drum herself had no clothes left that
a pawnbroker would lend a sixpence on. She
seemed to feel no shame in these miserable dealings:
after a while, but made one of a party of slatterns
like unto herself, and the business was always an
excuse for a social dram. Tony ate many Banbury
cakes in private bars with the gossips on these ex-
_ peditions; nevertheless, he hated them.

He now, for the first time, perceived the right-
eousness of pride.

“Mum,” he said one day, “ why don’t you take
Honor to the pawnshop sometimes, instead 0’
me?”

“God forbid that a daughter 0’ mine should
ever know anythink o’ such places,” said Mrs.
Drum earnestly. “Tt would be a nice thing to

have your own gal, after she was married, bringing
58 TONY DRUM.

up as her own mother was the first one to intro-
duce her to our common uncle.”

“ Will Honor get married some day, then?”

“T hope so,” said his mother. ‘ She will if she
plays her cards as wellasI did.”

At breakfast on the following day Tony asked ©
his sister:

“ Say, Honor, do you want to get married? ”

“Me!” cried Honor. ‘ Lord! what makes you
start on that, Tony? I’m only fourteen as yet.”

“ But I mean when you grow up.”

“No,” said Honor, “I don’t want to get
married—to tie myself down and be one bloke’s
slave for life!”

““ Nonsense, Honor!” said her mother.

“It’s a curious thing,” said Michael Drum, look-
ing up from his newspaper; “all maids, when they
‘are fourteen or so, say they will never get married.
And when they are thirty they begin to fear that
they have told the truth.”

“TI do hate them nasty sneering remarks 0’
yourn,” said Mrs. Drum, rubbing her nose.

“No flattery, please,” said Michael.
HE MAKES A FRIEND. 59

Honor rose and went forth to her work. She
had just left school, and was now engaged from
eight to eight in a button factory.

When Tony was in the fifth standard it was dis-
covered that he had a tuneful voice and a good ear,
so he was made a member of the church choir.

Music was a great delight to him. His happiest
hours were spent in St. Anselm’s Church. It was
a very beautiful church and very old. On practice
nights when the interior was unlighted save for one
blue glimmer of gas in the organ-loft, Tony would
look down upon the dark stillness of the church
and see white spirits flitting through the aisles.
Their passing was as the passing of the wind. He
could hear the soft sough of their ghostly robes
trailing over the smooth stones, though the organ
crashed out its music above his head and twenty
lusty boys were singing in his ears. When there
was a moon the painted windows were glorified,
and on the’ white stones about the font and altar
there fell a mysterious moving radiance. The
polished oak rails of the pews shone like bars of

silver; every brass tablet on the towering walls was
60 TONY DRUM.

a hole of light in the stone. In that place of splen-
did unrealities it was easy enough to forget the
squalid life of home.

The blind organist, Paul Hands, had a strong
liking for Tony. He would invite the boy to his
house, and play to him on the violin. To Tony
the music that he made was more wonderful than
aught else in the world; but the organist would cry,
in his despair:

“T am like a child building a mountain! ”

Two sisters of the organist lived with him, pale-
faced women with patient eyes and soft voices.
They played, too, when their brother permitted,
but usually their playing made him rage.

“How you mince!” he would cry. “One
would think that music was asleep, and you were
afraid of waking it! See here!”

He would snatch the violin, and prance blindly
up the room, drawing out horrid skirls of sound.

“That is you,” he would say, and laugh.

But he had softer moods in which he would play
and sing entrancingly. At such times he was

transfigured. Tony, watching him with fascinated


HE MAKES A FRIEND. 61
eyes, would think of him as of some sweet being of
dreams.

“You pity me because I’m blind, don’t you,
boy?” he once said to Tony. “ Well, you need
not. It is I who have the advantage, for I see
what I please.”

Nevertheless, he could be bitter on the subject
of his affliction.

“ What is the use of sight to half the world?” he
asked his sisters. ‘“‘ They see with their opinions.
They are color-blinded by prejudice! ”

“Hush, Paul!” his sisters whispered.

One added: “ The child is here.”

“Tt was a child who spoke,” he murmured, with
a wintry smile.

Tony was growing old before his time, but Paul
Hands lent him books to keep him young. Life
swung back and Tony walked yet in childland—
that blessed land of moments, where things are not
grimly relative, but lonely happenings of joy or ter-
ror. He stayed on the Hills of Faéry whilst his.
family groped in the Valley of Dry Bones. He

towered above them. They had only facts to live
62 TONY DRUM.

with. He could fit his surroundings to his liking.
The highest building erected by men’s hands has
little power against a child’s dream. Tony’s world
melted and was merged in the a substance of his

changing fancies.
CHAPTER VI.
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE.

BuT the awakening came.

One night, when Tony returned home, he found
his parents in close council before the fire, and from
the silence which greeted him he gathered ‘that he
had been the subject of their talk.

“Tony, my lad,” said the father, “there’s been
a bit of luck for you to-day.” He looked across
the hearth at his wife; Mrs. Drum nodded encour-
agement, and he went on. “ Perhaps you know
things haven’t gone too well with us lately. My
health isn’t what it was, there is foreign competi-
tion, and the national taste for sound music is
showing sad signs of wear and tear.” He
- chuckled; then perceiving that his wit was wasted,
became suddenly gloomy. “So we’re hard up.
Your mother knocks off a penny here and a penny

there—we live on the fat o’ the land instead o’ the
63
64 TONY DRUM.

lean, because it’s cheaper—and still we get worse
off every day. Now, Tony, don’t you think that’s
a sad thing?”

“Yes, father,” said Tony.

“Ah, now the Fifth Commandment’s talking,”
“cried Michael Drum. “ And that’s a thing I like
to hear. Always honor your father and your
mother, Tony, and do your utter to keep them out
of the home for decayed parents, by which I mean,
of course, the workhouse! ”

“ Yes, father.”

“Now we come to it,” said Michael Drum.
“To-day a gentleman has been here asking after
you. He’s a sort of cousin of your mother’s, and
he dabbles in pork.”

aA pork butcher,” explained Mrs. Drum.
“And he wants a boy to help him on Saturdays,
and he thought you’d do.”

“A pork butcher!” faltered Tony.

“Tt isn’t exactly a genteel calling,” Michael
Drum conceded, “but it’s honest enough and
profitable, I believe. You might do worse, my

3?

son.


HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 65

“And you'll start to-morrow morning at half-
past seven,” said Mrs. Drum. “ He’s going to
give you eighteenpence and your meals. I call
that good for a day’s work, and I think you ought
to be very grateful.’

Tony sat down with bowed head, fumbling his
cap nervously.

“ But, mother,” he began.

“You don’t seem very glad about it,” Mrs.
Drum remarked. “I suppose you think you never
ought to go to work. And it isn’t as if it’d inter-
fere with your schooling, either. The blessed old
School Board takes jolly good care of children
nowadays. In my time boys was earning their liv-
ing at ten.”

“T think the School Board would do a lot of
harm if it could,” said Michael Drum. “It would
do away altogether with the national stock of fools
first of all, and then, think how unhappy we should
be. There’s precious little laughter about now—
people have got to be so wise and miserable.
When there are no fools left at all, it will be a close

season for wit, I’m afraid. - I can tell you of a man”
66 TONY DRUM.

—he paused. “TI beg your pardon, I can tell you
nothing, for you are both sleepy. Give me a
candle, mother, I’ll go to roost. There’s nothing
in the jug. I hope I may dream a little beer.”

He went off to bed, grinning amiably.

“ Good-night, Tony,” said Mrs. Drum, prepar-
ing to follow her husband. “ Don’t wake Honor,
she’s got a faceache.” She kissed him and went
from the room.

Tony undressed with a sad heart, said his even-
ing prayer, and slipped into bed beside his sister.
Half the night he lay awake brooding, and the
shadow of his trouble darkened his dreams.

On the morrow, seeing there was no appeal from
his fate, he contrived to put a bright face on the
matter and trudged manfully off to his work, up-
held by a sense of duty. His first employer was a
rough, ruddy-faced man, of blunt speech and vio-
lent manners. He set Tony to scraping a meat
block at once; and when Tony cut his finger told
him not to “ mind a little blood,” but “to suck it
up to prevent waste and get along with the job.”

Tony’s finger continued to dribble blood all the
HE FACES.THE INEVITABLE. 67

morning, and as there was much rock-salt about—
used in the pickling of pork—the pain of his wound
was considerable. For hours he was at the point
of tears, and at last a harsh word from the butcher
made him cry outright.

“Damme!” cried the man. ‘“ What a baby it is!
Here, Baby, quit that and take this leg to Mrs.
Marser’s—you know the place.”

Tony shouldered the wooden tray and trotted
off down the street, glad to be away from his mas-
ter. At the corner he ran into a party of two ladies
and a gentleman. One of the ladies cried out,
“Tony!” as he passed, and turning he recognized
Harriet Hands. Hannah and Paul were with
her.

“Why, Tony!” cried Harriet Hands. “ What-
ever are you doing?”

“T’m a pork butcher’s errand-boy now, miss,”
said Tony.

“What?” cried the organist loudly, “ what does
he say he is? ”

abuts surely you haven’t left school just as you

were getting on so nicely?” said Harriet Hands.
68 TONY DRUM.

“ Oh, no! this is only a Saturday job,” Tony ex-
plained.

“And do you like it? ”

- “Tt aint so bad,” said Tony stoutly.

She regarded him closely.

“You hand is bleeding! ” she exclaimed.

“Yes,” said Tony, looking at his injured finger.
“T cut it with the cleaver. But it aint much.”

i: Tony,” interposed the organist, “you’re no
pork butcher. Cut away home.”

“I can’t do that, sir,” said Tony. “I’ve got to
take this leg somewhere.”

“ Throw the damned thing into the gutter,” said
the blind man angrily. “How dare they make a
pork butcher of you?”

“S’sh!” whispered his younger sister.

“You must have your finger doctored,” said
Harriet Hands.

She took Tony into a chemist’s shop hard by,
where his wound was dressed and bandaged. The
blind organist and his younger sister conferred ear-
nestly on the pavement. |

“We think you had better go on with this work
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 69

just for to-day,” said Hannah Hands to Tony.
“But we'll try to find you something better next
_ week.”

They bade him a friendly “ Good-by,” and he
pursued his errand with a fortified heart.

“Hullo, Baby!” cried the butcher on Tony’s
return. “ You’ve been gone a precious long time.
What’s that round your finger? ”’

Tony explained.

“God’s truth!” cried the butcher. “A little
blood and salt wouldn’t hurt you! A niminy-
piminy lot of millinery props!”

He was very merry at Tony’s expense, address-
ing him as “ Baby,” and imploring him to be care-
ful of his precious life. Next door was a grocer’s
shop, outside which stood a tow-headed youth,
distributing handbills. Soon this youth took up
the butcher’s cry, and between them Tony had a
cruel time.

“Yaht” howled Tow-head. “ Who cried ’cos
he cut his finger! ”

His jeers provoking no rejoinder, he was in-

spired to throw a decayed potato at Tony. Tony
70 TONY DRUM.

caught it in his hand and stood to return the
missile. Tow-head fled into the shop. But the
potato overtook him like an ordinance of judg-
ment, smashing on the nape of his neck. This
triumphant passage of arms cheered Tony greatly.
Tow-head molested him no more.

But toward evening the rain began. The wind
freshened. Tony stood under the canvas cover,
shivering in the cold.

“Come, Baby, take your hands out o’ your
pockets,” the butcher would cry. “I don’t pay
babies for idling.”

The butcher’s wife brought out some hot coffee
and bread and butter to Tony. He was grateful
for the meal. For dinner he had had the half of a
sheep’s head; but the topography of a sheep’s head
is somewhat difficult, and Tony fared ill. The
coffee put new life into him, and, the rain stopping
just then, he began to hope that he would com-
fortably survive the evening. As it grew dark the
gas was lighted, and the street assumed a cheerier
aspect. The crowd thickened on the pavement,
the hubbub increased.
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 71

“See nobody don’t prig any o’ that tripe, Baby,”
said the butcher.

“Yes, sir,” answered Tony.

He was growing tired. Every moment his
weariness increased. It was impossible to
stand alone; he leaned against a meat
block. .

“Now then, Baby!” roared the butcher. ‘Don’t
go to sleep. I don’t pay babies to go to sleep.
Slip about. Be live-ly!”

Tony shook himself, shuddering with drowsi-
ness. He found his legs were grown terribly stiff;
his feet were wet and sore; he had an aching in his
back. A few paces to and fro relaxed his limbs a
little and eased his joints, but he could not keep
pacing to and fro forever. He glanced at the
moon-faced clock upon the wall behind the shop
counter. Ten minutes to eight. Another three
hours or perhaps four.

“Buy, buy, buy, buy!” yelled the butcher in his
ear. “ Now, Baby, you do a bit o’ shouting. I
notice you aint overworking yourself.”

Tony chirped feebly, “ Buy, buy, buy, buy!”
72 TONY DRUM.

At the sound of his own voice his ears tingled and
his face glowed.

“God, there’s a twitter!” cried the butcher.
rk Louder, Baby, louder! Chuck it off your chest!
I thought yer mummy said you was in the choir.
You in the choir. Wy that voice! Bli’ me, I pity
the congregation, I do. You won’t find me in
your church, Baby!”

Evidently this was wit, for the mob of women
about the butcher sniggered applause. Tony was
filled with anger and shame.

“ Blushing he is, too!” shouted the butcher.
* Bless you, ladies, he’s no common kid. Why,
it’s worth a ha’penny on the pound to look at him!
Show ’em your face, Baby. See how proud ’e is!
He aint doing this for money. Not him. It’s all
on account of a little wager with my Lord Tom
Noddy.”

By and by, when the butcher grew tired of jest-
ing, he became churlish, and railed at Tony. But
his anger was more tolerable than his wit.

Nine o’clock struck. Tony, in his weariness,

leaned again upon the meat block.
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 73

“None o’ that lolling about, Baby. I won’t
have it,” cried the butcher.

“I’m so tired, sir,” pleaded Tony.

“Tired, are you! Well, it’s healthy to be tired.
An’ you'll be worse ’fore you’re done. There’s
another three hours yet.”

Tony had been hoping that the shop closed at
eleven. He felt he should never be able to stand
upright for three more hours. Every minute
-seemed endless. He could have whimpered in his
despair, but he was too much a man. The meat
stank in his nostrils. The buzzing of the gas deaf-
ened him. Every passer-by who jostled him he
hated from his heart. To see the misery of some
filled him with vindictive glee; the gayety of others
stirred his bile. How his head throbbed and
swam! The wound in his hand burned and itched;
he tickled the outside of the bandage with his
finger, but that afforded him no relief. He felt he
must go mad of his weariness.

What should he do to beguile the minutes? He
would count each second, counting it a little slower

than the clock. It was three minutes past nine
74 TONY DRUM.

now. He would count four hundred, then it would
be ten minutes past nine. He counted one hun-
dred, and paused to reflect that he was counting
very slowly. So much the better. He counted
the next hundred slower still. Two hundred.
How weary he was! Another hundred—slower
still this time. His heart lightened; this was a
famous way to cheat Time. It must be quite ten
minutes past nine already. But he would not
look. He would count the other hundred—very,
very slowly. What joy would be his if the clock
pointed to the quarter! He got through the last
hundred and drew a deep breath of satisfaction.

“Buy, buy, buy, buy!” shouted the butcher.
“°Ere’s a nobby bit o’ pork for you, ladies! ”

Tony turned and looked at the clock. It was
six minutes past nine! He looked again and
rubbed his eyes. Six minutes past! He was
furious at Time’s tardiness, and sick to his very
heart.

“Go on, look at it!” cried the butcher. “ All
the lookin’ in the world won’t make a clock go

faster!”
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 75

Tony could have wept. He caught his breath
and turned away. All that weary while and only
three minutes gone! He looked vacantly up at
the windows of the opposite houses, where bright
lights shone and within were rest and ease.

“Ere, take this to ‘The Mowin’ Head,’ Baby,
an’ lively.”

The butcher balanced the wooden tray upon
Tony’s shoulder, and he tottered away down the
street. It was raining again, and the pavements
shone wet. Heavily laden pedestrians bumped
and jostled him. Urchins crossed his path. .
Refuse of paper and straw and vegetables tripped
up his steps. Everything was an aggravation; he
fumed at each new hindrance. Sometimes, groups
of idlers blocked the pavement, and he had to step
into the road. A boy snatched off his cap and
flung it to the wind. Secure in the darkness of a
narrow by-way, Tony wept freely.

He came at last to “ The Mowing Head,” and
delivered his burden to a servant-maid at the side
door.

““ Where’s the chops? ” she asked.
76 TONY DRUM.

“ The what, ma’am? ” he stammered.

“Don’t ma’am me!” cried the servant tartly;
“and you know very well what I said.”

“T don’t know where your bloomin’ chops are,”
snarled the incensed Tony. ‘Go and look for
’em.”

“Tl tell your master of this, you saucy imp!”
the girl cried.

“Saucy yourself!” muttered Tony, and strode
haughtily away.

He sat down in a doorway to rest. The stone
was wet, but it mattered not. The burden had
been a heavy one, and he was hot under his damp
clothes. The cold wind was pleasant on his burn-
ing head. The pitiless rain was powerless to harm
him now; he felt it running through his hair, eas-
ing the fever of his brain. He leaned his back
against the door and closed his smarting eyes.
Sleep came to him and the world was blotted out.

The sound of a heavy thud awoke him. The
door supporting his back had opened, and he lay
sprawling on a bristling mat with the form of a

woman towering over him.


HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 77

“What are you doin’ on my doorstep?” she
cried, touching him with her foot. “Come, get
out of it.”

He stammered out an apology, picked up his
wooden tray, and walked off. He was still half-
dazed with slumber. As his full senses returned,
he wondered how long he had been sitting there,
and glanced at a clock. It was nearly eleven. He
shuddered to think of the butcher’s wrath, and
broke into a shambling trot.

Perhaps the butcher was not used to overmuch
conscientiousness in boys. He growled out a few
angry sneers in response to Tony’s feeble excuses,
and bade him take up his old position.

The last hour Tony spent between sleeping and
waking. He could not sit down, but he leaned
on the meat block whenever opportunity offered,
and thus contrived to snatch a few brief, refresh-
ing naps. At twelve o’clock the shop was closed;
the butcher handed him his wage, and he was free
to go. It seemed incredible good fortune. He
walked home through the now deserted streets,

rejoicing in his liberty.
78 TONY DRUM.

Michael Drum awaited him before a dwindling
fire. Mrs. Drum was already gone to bed. There
was a supper of potted salmon upon the table.

“Ah, Tony!” said his father.

Tony put down his wages.

“No, no,” cried Michael Drum, sweeping the
money aside with a lordly gesture. “It is yours.
You have earned it.” He peered at the silver.
“How much? Eighteenpence? I hope it may
prove to be the nucleus of a considerable fortune,
my son!”

Tony perceived that his father was drunk. He
picked up the money and tied it slowly in a corner
of his handkerchief.

“Eat, my son,” said Michael Drum.

“Tt isn’t for me, is it, father? ”

“Yes, yes.”

“ Salmon!—for me? ”

“Yes, yes.”

Tony fell to with a will.

“We have had visitors,” said Michael Drum.
“Paul Hands, Esquire—the Misses Hands..
Charming fellow! Charming girls! Paul—
HE FACES THE INEVITABLE. 79

damme! it hardly seems a liberty!—he spoke of

”?



you Michael Drum rose unsteadily and lit
acigar. “ Tony, my son,” he said, with slow im-
pressiveness; “ we are not going to make a pork

1?

butcher of you, after all
CHAPTER VII.

HE GOES ON A JAUNT.

THE morrow was Sunday, and the Drums, fol-
lowing an immemorial custom, lay abed till noon.
At nine o’clock there came a thundering at the
street door, and Michael Drum stumbled down-
stairs in his trousers and shirt to take in the Sun-
day newspaper. Tony, roused by the clamor,
heard the pit-pat of his father’s bare feet on the
oilcloth and his shuddering breaths as he traveled
swiftly back to bed. Silence descended again, and
Tony returned to his broken dreams.

At late breakfast Michael Drum showed a mood
of great cheerfulness. He sat jingling his money
with beaming eyes and smiling lips, whilst the
bacon frizzled in the pan, and Honor, proud to be
useful, set out the teacups and saucers. During
the meal the conversation turned on Mr. Paul
Hands.
Hk GOES ON A JAUNT. 81

“A good, kind gentleman, though blind, poor
fellow!” said Mrs. Drum. |

“A brother artist!” cried Michael. “ Just that.
“You'll be putting me under an obligation,’ says he,
“which, however, I am not too proud to incur.’
Ha! ha! We understood one another at once—
that’s the freemasonry of art. Damme, I’d do as
much for him if our positions were reversed, and
he knows it. ‘That boy, your son, a pork
butcher! No, no.’ ‘We are poor,’ I said. ‘We
can’t afford the luxury of pride.’ ‘Poor!’ he cried.
“No man is poor who retains his self-respect.’ It
was like going to Sunday-school again. I felt
positively moral, mother—‘ poor, but honest,’ in-
stead of ‘poor because honest,’ like I’ve felt
before.”

“Ah!” murmured Mrs. Drum. “ Poverty is no
disgrace.”

“Poverty is a disgrace—to the rich,” said
Michael. “ But we won't talk about poverty
to-day. What say to a jaunt?”

“Ah!” breathed Mrs. Drum.

“Let’s hire a gig and drive out somewhere.
82 TONY DRUM.
Kew—Epping—or shall we keep it vague? Yes,
we'll keep it vague.” -

At four o’clock, after an earlier dinner than
usual, they chartered a gig from the greengrocer’s
at the corner and drove away past St. Anselm’s
School, shut and silent, into the wide, rolling
country.

There was a pleasant autumn crispness in the
air. The grass was vividly green after the rains.
The sun shone faintly in the hazy sky, drawing
scarce a sparkle from the wet hedgerows, casting
pale, indefinite shadows. The ditches overflowed
with turbid water; the road was heavy with brown
mud.

Michael drove, with his wife perched beside him
on the box seat, Tony and Honor huddled in the
body of the gig.

“This is proper!” cried Honor, her pale face
kindling. “See the blackberries, Tony?”

“ An’ the hip-se-haws!” cried Tony. “ Why,
the hedges is as red as red with em! That means
a hard winter, don’t it, father? Wow, there’s a

swallow! See its white belly? Can’t they fly! eh?


t.

jeu

The Drums go ona
HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 83
They’re not gone yet, so it’s still summer. Father,
_ how far can a swallow fly without stopping?
Once, Nick Tolmers an’ me found a martin’s nest
on the sand pits. They’re a kind o’ swallow,
£008 i ||

“Hark to the national schoolboy!” laughed
Michael.

Tony sank into abashed silence. The gray mare
trotted on. They crossed a bridge spanning a
sluggish stream; an old man, in a great straw hat,
was fishing from the puddled bank; some boys
were tempting death among the reeds; in the dis-
tance was a moored barge, gaudy with red paint,
from which arose spirals of blue smoke. Skirting
the stream was a belt of wood, and for a while they °
journeyed in the shade of trees. A low bough
took off Michael’s hat and tore a plume from Mrs.
Drum’s bonnet. Michael cried “ Whoa!” lustily ;
but Tony, having caught the hat in its flight,
handed it up with an air of achievement, and the
mare jogged on. They emerged from the wood
and entered the hilly High Street of a little town.

- A Sabbath calm was here. The mare’s hoofs
84 TONY DRUM.

rattled on the cobbles, bringing sleepy faces to the
windows, startling a brood of chickens.

“We'll stop here,” said Michael Drum, pulling
up at the sign of a Red Lion.

A squat-bodied ostler came forth yawning from
the stables, and held the mare whilst they dis-
mounted.

“Tea?” asked the ostler.

* Ah!” said Michael Drum, nodding.

The ostler’s face became suddenly the mere rim
of a black hole as he shouted “ Ma’am!”

A mellow-faced woman ambled out toward
them, with head insinuatingly cocked aside and
cheeks dimpling. The party followed her into the
inn and up a flight of stairs to a large, light room -
overlooking a trim garden. In the room were two
tables, spread with white cloths, a piano on a little
plaform, various seats, and a great number of
stuffed birds in glass cases. Michael Drum led the
way to the table nearest the window, and they all
sat down. The mellow-faced woman, having
taken their order, had disappeared into the kitchen,

from whence a pleasing clatter of crockery now
HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 85

proceeded. Mrs. Drum remarked in a whisper
that it was a pretty outlook. Tony and Honor
shifted on their seats in restless constraint. Even
Michael Drum was oppressed by the splendor of
their proceedings, though he affected to be quite
at ease. He had risen to examine a stuffed par-
tridge; the handle of the door rattled, and he sped
back to his seat, flushing guiltily, like a schoolboy
caught at mischief. .

A maid of comfortable proportions brought in
the tea on a wide tray, and they at once fell to with
gusto. After the meal they sat at the window,
chatting and laughing. The sun had gone down,
the blue of the sky deepened, and a few pale stars
shone out. From churches, scattered far and wide
over the green country, bells were pealing a sum-
mons to evensong. Mrs. Drum threw up the win-
dow, and a fruity scent was wafted in.

Some roysterers had gathered on the benches in
the inn yard, and were waxing very merry over
their beer. Tony, looking down on them, and
marking their large recklessness of speech and

manners, thought it must be fine to be a man.
86 TONY DRUM.

They rose at last and filed downstairs. In the
bar two laborers in clay-soiled corduroys were
arguing a point of honor.

“Say, mister,” said one, addressing Michael.
“What would ye think, now, of a man who broke
his promise? ”

“Tt was a rash promise, mind. ye,” said the
other.

Michael pondered, smiling sagely.

_ “ Why appeal to me?” he asked.

“ Oh, don’t have nothing to do with ’em,” whis-
pered Mrs. Drum, tugging his sleeve.

“ Go on, mother; don’t fuss,” said Michael. He
turned again to the laborers. “I think a man isa
fool to make a rash promise,” he said.

“ There y’are, Bill!”

“ But he is a double fool if he keeps it,” Michael
Drum concluded.

“ There you are, Sam!” said Bill. “I’m obliged
to you, mister.”

“ No, no.”

“ Now, won’t you have a wet wi’ me?”

“ Don’t,” whispered Mrs. Drum. .
e

gine

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at
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Mys Drum w


HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 87

“Well,” said Michael, “ since you’re so kind—a
little mild and bitter.’

“ An’ the lady, now,” said Bill, with a leer.
“Will she a

“No, really,” murmured Mrs. Drum, simpering.



“Don’t say that, ma’am.”

“He, he! Well, a mite of warm gin.”

The other laborer, Sam, had retired disgusted to
a corner. i

“Come, mate, no animosity,” said Bill.

“You be dom’d!” said Sam. “T’ll have no
truck wi’ promise-breakers. I can pay for my own
lotion. ’AIf 0’ ale, miss.”

He strode to the bar and banged down his pot in
a great rage.

Bill laughed.

“He'll be all right in a minute,” he informed
Michael Drum. “It’s just touch an’ go with him.”

“No it aint, then,” said Sam.

“Come in here away from him for a bit,” said
Bill, sniggering in his mate’s face; and he turned
toward an open door leading to the tap-room.

“T’m comin’ too,” said Sam, following them.
88 TONY DRUM.

“T’m not soap, to be shunned by you, or ole moldy
long-crop either, wi’ his woman an’ brats.”

“Why, I’m ashamed o’ you, I am,” cried Bill.
“The gen’l’man acted fair enough!”

“ Him!” exclaimed Sam with great scorn.

“Oh, let’s come away,” whispered Mrs. Drum.

“Nonsense!” said Michael, sitting down at the
long bench with studied grace.

Mrs. Drum, with the children clinging to her,
stood imploring him with her eyes. The roys-
terers from the inn yard, scenting trouble, came
tumbling about the doorway. .

“What’s up, Sam?” cried one. “Did the
gen’l’man’s hair get in your beer? ”

But now the landlord interposed.

“Sam,” he said; “I won’t have it. Clear out.
This aint the fust time you’ve insulted customers 0’
mine. Goan’ cool your temper under the pump.”

“Til go right enough,” said Sam, “I don’t want
any to-do wi’ this scurvy lot.” And he strolled
out.

Mrs. Drum sighed and laughed; the children

went to their father and leaned upon him fondly.
HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 89

“T’m sorry for this, mister,” said Bill’ “I ought
to ha’ known what he was.” :

They chatted together for half an hour. The
potman came and went with mugs of beer.

At last Michael Drum lit a fresh pipe and rose to
depart. He stood in the bar whilst the mare was
harnessed to the gig. Mrs. Drum went out into
the inn yard to look for signs of the cantankerous
Sam; but he had gone.

“Father would soon lick him, wouldn’t he,
mother?” asked Tony.

“Father wouldn’t be so low as to fight,” said
Honor. ‘“ And such a common man as him, too.”

Michael Drum now came shambling out. They
climbed into the gig. “ Right!” shouted the big-
mouthed ostler; the mare swung round, and they
were off. The bright windows of the inn flashed
past them as they entered the open road, there was
a final rattle of the wheels on the cobbles of the
yard, and away they scudded down the darkling
High Street, to the music of the good mare’s
pounding hoofs.

It was now night and very dark. There was no ©
go TONY DRUM.

moon. ‘Tony glanced up‘at the sky and saw black
clouds sailing up in fast array from the west.
There was a mutter of thunder and a blue thread of
light glimmered on the hills. The gig shot into
the shadow of the wood. Tony was stricken with
fear at the sudden darkness, and felt for Honor’s
hand to clasp it. She clung to him whimpering,
and his courage returned. He stood up, clinging
to the side of the gig, and peered over his mother’s
shoulder. Ahead was a pale gleam of water and
beyond an infinity of blackness. He could see the
mare’s gray back in the light of the gig lamps, ris-
ing and falling, and the green hedges on either side
with moths fluttering ghost-like above the running
ditches.

“There’s going to be a storm,” said Michael
Drum, and he clicked in his cheek and put the whip
across the broad flanks of the mare. “It’s a night
for a song,” he said. “ Mother, sing!”

Mrs. Drum shivered.

“T feel more like prayin’,” she said. ‘It’s
mortal dark, Michael. When ‘ll the moon
be up?”
HE GOES ON A JAUNT. gt

But Michael heeded her not. He lifted his voice
and sang:

“The westlin’ wind blows loud and shrill ;
The night’s baith mirk and rainy, O!
But Ill get my plaid and out I'll steal,
An’ owre the hills to Nannie, 0!”

“Oh, hush, hush!” cried Mrs. Drum. “It
seems like temptin’ Providence!”

“Ha, ha!” laughed Michael Drum. “ Why,
what a bundle of tremors it is! I like this. It
’minds me o’ herdin’ nights on Snaefell, when I was
a boy, forbye! There’s a rare taste in the air.
Gee-whoop! Now comes the rain!”

They were still in the shelter of the wood.

“Pull up under the trees a while,” said Mrs.
Drum.

“ The rain won’t hurt us,” cried Michael.

“Pull up!” she said. “I won’t go on in this
storm. I’m scared out o’ my life a’ready. An’.
how about the children? D’ye want to kill *em
outright?”

Michael reined in the mare.

“ Shall we go back?” he asked. “It’s a famous

brew on tap there.”
92 TONY DRUM.

“No,” she said. ‘Don’t think o’ that. The
storm ‘Il pass. But I wish we hadn’t come.”

Great drops were pattering on the branches.
The tall trees swayed in the hooting wind, nodding |
their heads and whispering, and the leaves came
swirling down.

Tony and Honor crawled over the box seat and
huddled at their parents’ feet.

Suddenly a man started up from under the
mare’s head. His face was in the circle of the gig
lamps’ light. Mrs. Drum recognized the can-
tankerous laborer, Sam, and cried out shrilly.

“Hush, mother!” muttered Michael, gathering
up the reins and poising his whip. “ What are
you after, now?” he asked the man.

“You step down here, Long-crop!” cried the
laborer. “ T’ll show you what I’m after.”

“Don’t be a fool, man,” cried Michael.

“You'll come between mates, will you, and get
me chucked out o’ the ‘ Lion.’ Come down!”

Michael Drum laughed in boisterous derision.

“Laugh, will ye!” cried the laborer. “I'll
make ye laugh t’other side 0’ your mouth, you bit


HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 93

o’ London muck. Come down, or [ll pull you
down! Come out from behind that woman an’
put ’em up.. Come on, now!”

“Help!” shrieked Mrs. Drum. “ Oh, sir, my
’usband is truly sorry!”

“ Get out of it!” cried Michael, “ or Pll cut your
face to ribbons with the whip.”

“Cut me wi’ the whip, will ye!” cried the
laborer, laying his hand on the horse’s head.

Michael set his teeth grimly, cried to his wife,
“ Hold fast!” and gave the mare the word. Tony,
with one hand holding Honor and the other
clutching the brass rail of the splash-board, leaned
forward, whooping wildly, as the mare started.
He saw the grim, square face of the laborer, up-
turned an instant in the light; the gig swerved and
the face was lost; for an instant the whip played
about a red, knotted hand and gray sleeve; then
the mare lowered her freed head, and they were fly-
ing before the storm.

“ Gee-whoop!” cried Michael. “ Now we go!”

They were near the end of the wood; they could

see the water of the little stream and the shining
94 TONY DRUM.

black arch of the bridge. The branches thinned
over them, and the wind and rain grew stronger.

“ Hold fast!”

The mare struck a big stone and stumbled, the
frail gig swayed.

“This is death!” moaned Mrs. Drum.

They thundered across the little bridge and were
out on a stretch of common. But naught could
they see in the blinding rain. The lights in the
lamps guttered down and at last went out.

“Oh, stop, stop!” cried Mrs. Drum. “We
can’t go on like this!”

Tony looked into his father’s face, and saw that
it was set and gray with fear. He gasped out,
“Oh, father! ”

“S’sh!” cried Michael, fiercely straining at the
reins.

Tony caught his breath and cowered down be-
side Honor, who was miserably weeping.

“Oh, Michael, stop!” cried Mrs. Drum.

As she sat, she could not see his face and knew
nothing of his fear. She sat clasping her hands

and wailing.
HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 95

“This is a judgment on our Sabbath-breaking! ”
she cried. “ Oh, my God!”

The thunder rolled above them and the light-
ning spat. The country side was lighted up—
ragged bramble, bubbling ditch, winding wisp of
road, wild sky, and shuddering trees. Tony saw
the gray mare rear and plunge against the blazing
heavens. Then the darkness fell once more and he
was flung into the road.

He lay in the mire, half stunned, with the wind
and the rain upon him. He could hear the mare
plunging wildly; there was a sound of smashing
wood and flying stones. A shower of sand and
gravel struck his face. Honot’s voice, calling out
shrilly, came to him.

He sat up, wiping the mud from his eyes, and
looked. Through the hurtling gloom he could
see faintly a muddled black heap outspread over
the road, and, three yards away, the gray outline of
the falleri mare heaving convulsively.

“ Mother—Dad!” he screamed.

Oli Tony! ‘

Honor fell upon him, clasping his neck with her
96 TONY DRUM.

wet hands. He rose hastily, clutching her sopped
white dress, and dragged her into the hedge.

“T thought you was killed, Tony,” whimpered
Honor.

“ But father—mother?” he wailed.

The lightning shot through the trees again, mak-
ing the road plain. Tony saw the mare free herself
with a last mighty effort, and spring away across

the common, the reins trailing after her.

The mare, following a devious course, came
back at last, lame and dispirited, to the inn where
she had been stabled an hour since. An alarmed
crowd, including Bill, the laborer, the mellow-
faced woman, and the sturdy host, met her in the
yard, and, the storm having by this time abated
somewhat, a party of men were got together and
started off, with lanterns, down the swimming road
to the relief of the wrecked ones. The moon
peeped out from the scattering clouds to light
them on their way. They crossed the swollen
stream, sluggish no more, and entered on the level

common, hallooing loudly, their lanterns swinging
HE GOES ON A JAUNT. 97

a foot above the soil, like witch-lights. As they
approached the end of the common, two children
started up out of the blue mist and ran toward
them, whimpering feebly.

“Thank God!” cried the sturdy host.

They came to the shattered remains of the gay
little gig, and found, among the splintered frag-

ments, one dead woman and a broken man.
CHAPTER VIII.

HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON.

Tony seemed to see Hope riding away on the
gray mare. Hesank down upon the ground, over-
come by the dread influences of the storm, and
yielded himself a prey to despair and terror.

The rain beat on his face, washing away his tears.
He heard the harsh voice of the tempest. Pres-
ently he felt the soft, frenzied hands of his weeping
sister clasped about his neck. That awoke the
manhood of the boy, and kindled his courage. He
shook off the dead weight of his fears, and stood up
proudly.

The bleak common lay bare and black under a
veil of lightning. A plunging horse stood out in
bold relief against the shining sky, above the torn,
wild bracken and the low thorn bushes. Then
darkness, like a curtain, fell once more, and the

world was void and black. Down rushed the rain
98
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON, 99

on the riddled, smoking earth; the wind swept by.
There was a sound of moaning in the air—maybe,
of a stricken parent in dying pain; maybe, but the
voice of the storm. He crouched low in new ter-
ror whilst the tumult raged, dumb and helpless.
Honor was silent, too, as she trembled against his
heart. They two were alone in the striving dark-
ness. There was a lull. The swish of the rain
grew fainter; the wind ebbed. Tony called aloud:
“ Father, father!”

But there was no answer. Then: ‘“ Mother!”

But his voice beat vainly against the night.

The minutes passed, and he dared not to move.
Slowly the darkness lifted, and a watery moon ray
shone. The trees loomed up before him; the
stretch of empty heath rolled out under his gaze.
In the road was a tumbled black heap, and far away
a flying specter. Again he cried aloud, and there
was no answer. Bidding his sister to lie still and
be brave, he crawled out into the road, and groped
among the broken fragments of the gig. His
hand fell on a cold, dead face.

Dancing yellow lights advanced along the road.
100 TONY DRUM.

A hail reached him. He tried to answer, but his
mouth was dry and hard. He took Honor’s hand,
and together they moved over the wet earth to-:
ward the lights. As they approached nearer, he
espied kindly human faces, and his heart warmed.
The men gathered about him. They went back
hurriedly in a body. One in advance put out an
arm to bar their path, and lowered his lantern to
the ground. Tony saw the face of his mother,
blue and stark, pillowed on a tangle of hair; and,
beyond, his father, outstretched, face downward,
in the attitude of one crucified. But he could not
weep, or even feel; he was stupefied with horror,
and suffered himself to be drawn hastily away, and
lifted up and borne along. Presently, a trampling
of men came after him, and followed—through the
gloomy wood, along the High Street, twinkling
with lights, to the door of the inn.

There was at once a wild confusion of tongues
and a scurrying of feet. He was taken into an old
whitewashed kitchen, and placed beside Honor on
a wide settle before a mighty fire. The maid of

comfortable proportions wrapped him about in a
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. Iol

shawl, and fed him from a basin of hot porridge
with a large spoon. She appeared strangely more
human in that genial atmosphere, and wept copi-
ously into the basin. She kissed him after the last
spoonful, and carried him away to bed. He
slipped into the grateful warmth of the blankets
with a sigh of sweet content, and hugging Honor,
fell asleep.

In the morning he awoke with the old terror
upon him, and, for a while, could not divine its
cause. The sunshine was pouring down upon him
through the white window curtains. There were
birds singing and human voices talking. A horse
whinnied; some hens were clucking in proud
rivalry. He looked about—at the blue walls hung
with painted texts, at the water-stain on the low ©
ceiling. Beside him Honor lay, breathing softly
in sleep. He rose and knelt beside the bed to say
his morning prayer. Hitherto, morning prayer
had been but a habit to be punctually performed,
like dressing; now, on a sudden, it became some-
thing more. Tony’s mind fumbled with the idea

of a living God. He pictured a God of Storm and
102 TONY DRUM.

was afraid to approach sucha one. He opened his
eyes and started up. The bed was yellow with
sunshine: his sister’s blind face and tossed hair were
lit up and glorified. He wondered—were there
two gods: a God of Sunshine and a God of Storm?
The sunshine made him think of the wounded
Christ; God the Father caused the storm. Then
there was that other God—the Holy Ghost, a pale
spirit without form, who brooded on the dark
waters. Tony could not understand it. He was
mortally afraid and shut his eyes once more. He
must just pray. He was but a child; these were
matters beyond his comprehension. He repeated
resolutely the familiar words: ‘“ Our Father, which
art in Heaven,” and stopped. His awakened rea-
son rebelled. He would not pray to the awful God
of Storm; he could not. He was once more afraid
and trembling, with his morning prayer unsaid.
He must learn the truth of this matter. Confront-
ing him was a text: “ God is a Spirit, and they that
worship Him must worship Him in spirit and in
truth.” He gazed long and pondered, read the

words again and again, but could make no sense
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. 103

out of them. In his misery of awful doubt he felt
himself cut off forever from the joy of life. How
could he laugh and be glad in the shadow of this
great mystery? He felt that he was alone, and his
loneliness filled him with panic. He clutched
Honor’s shoulder and aroused her rudely from her
sleep.

She started up, rubbing her eyes and asked,
yawning: “ What is it, Tony?” |

He felt suddenly ashamed of his fears and could
not answer. She nestled down in the pillows
again, and he dressed slowly.

He went to the window and looked out. The
morning was very fair. God was a beneficent God.
His soul was lulled to rest, and a great peace fell
upon him. Nevertheless, he would have liked to
ask the old, worn man, hedger and ditcher, sitting
astride a heap of stones by the wayside, what he

thought of God. Such an old man must have
found out everything long ago, or how could he
smile so idly when a gaggle of geese passed? How
could he wear such a sunny face and be doubtfil of

the Creator’s goodness?
‘104 TONY DRUM.

A murmur of familiar words came to Tony’s ear.
He turned. Honor had arisen and with face
buried in the gray coverlet of the bed was saying
her morning prayers. Her glibness seemed ex-
traordinary to Tony.

They were both standing at the window fully
dressed, awaiting the summons to breakfast, when
the mellow-faced woman entered. She kissed

¢

them “ good-morning ” with rare tenderness and
drew them to her knee. They looked at her and
she cried. She told them in broken words that
their mother was dead. At first it was hard to
understand. Tony could not fix his mind on the
sad tidings. Suddenly Honor flung herself upon
the woman’s broad bosom and cried huskily to be
taken to her poor, poor father. The woman told
them that their father was very ill.

They went down to the kitchen dazed with won-
der and grief. The house was very still; a hush
was upon it. The men came and went with slow,
silent steps; their faces were stony and blank. The
women cried at sight of Tony and Honor, sitting

forlornly side by side on the broad settle. In the
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON, | | 105

evening they were taken to a dark Foor where |
their father lay, his face showing sallow and coarse
beneath the white bandages. He smiled wanly at
them and they were lifted up to kiss his lips. Then
they went out, hand-in-hand, and huddled together
in the garden, mingling their tears. But Tony
felt little sorrow; it was all so new and strange; and
he had but a small experience of the tragic. He
was struck with surprise that calamity so dire
should touch him. He was ashamed of his hard-
ness, and feared lest something should happen
upon him in consequence. The vague trouble of
the morning hung over him still: God was a worse
mystery now that his mother was cruelly dead.
Bedtime came again and he went upstairs with
Honor to the little blue room. The mellow-faced
woman followed with a candle; dancing shadows
went before. The room was very cold and dark.
Through the black window was a strange medley
of ghostly trees and filmy faces. There was his
own face, wearing a look of age; there was Honor’s
face with the fern-like leaf of a mountain ash

trailed across it; the flaccid features and narrow
106 TONY DRUM.

eyes of the mellow-faced woman were there, too,
hovering above the smoky flame of the candle.
The blind was drawn and the phantoms shut out.
Still, Tony imagined them fluttering in the black-
ness behind the faded chintz.

“ Good-night, and don’t forget your prayers, my
dears,” said the mellow-faced woman as she de-
parted. The lock clicked sharply and they were
alone. |

Honor knelt down, stumbled hurriedly through
her accustomed devotions, sloughed her clothes
and scrambled into bed. Tony slowly unlaced his
boots.

“Don’t be long,” said Honor drowsily. “I
want to cuddle up to you. The sheets is cold
to-night.”

A moment later she was asleep. He looked at
her and about the room. He trembled: for the
horror of the morning was again upon him.

“Oh, God, teach me to pray,” he breathed, and
waited and listened for a sign.

A wayfarer went tramping up the road outside

and a smothered burst of laughter ascended from
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. 107

the taproom below. The sounds were a rude in-
trusion upon the silence. Tony felt that God was
a great way off to-night. He went to the window,
pushed aside the blind, and looked out. There
was nothing moving save the shadows of the trees.
The world lay still and dead. On high the moon
sat throned among the clouds—a sinister, blood-
less queen of mockery. There was no comfort in
all the cold, remote heavens. Tony dropped the
blind and turned away repelled. He did not go
upon his knees; he could not pray that night.

He lay under the sheets and shuddered to reflect
that he had wandered a whole day’s journey from
God. He was panic-stricken with fear and grew
hot and tearful. He could not sleep, but tossed
restlessly in agony of spirit.

Presently the mellow-faced woman pushed open
the door and came to the bedside. Tony feigned
sleep. He heard “ Poor little dears!’ murmured
above him, felt a soft bosom pressed upon his arm
and warm wet lips upon his cheek. Then the light
moved swiftly out, and he opened his eyes on the

darkness. But that touch of human kindness had
108 TONY DRUM.

shown him the place where God abides. He
slipped from the bed and prayed heartily. And
then he had no need to go in quest of sleep, for
sleep came smiling to him.

On the morrow, after a morning of listless wan-
dering in the High Street and over the kitchen
garden at the back of the inn, Tony was summoned
to his father’s bedside. The mellow-faced woman
withdrew reluctantly, after a spell of fussing about
the sick man’s bed, and Michael addressed his son
from among the pillows.

“Shut that door. Come here—quite close.
Tony, your mother’s dead; that you know. And
here am I, stretched like a shot rabbit on a stick.
But I'll be up in a day or two. Meantime, we are
in trouble. (I don’t mean your mother.) We
haven’t got more’n a pound or two, and that we
owe to your blind organ-playing friend. Well,
here am I landed in a heap of expense. There’s
the gig to pay for. There’s the doctor and the
undertaker and these innkeepers. Then, I doubt
if I shall be able to blow a flute for a little while

yet, and we’ve got to live somehow.”
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. 109

He groaned heavily. Tony’s eyes had widened
at each new item in the tale of misfortunes.

“Yes, father,” he faltered.

“Ah!” sighed the sick man. ‘“ Well, Tony,
you’ve heard me speak of your grandfather—my
father? Yes. He’s not such a poor man. If I
hadn’t been a cursed young fool, I needn’t ha’ been
so poor either. And I suppose you wouldn’t ha’
been alive at all. (But that’s a mystery we needn’t
gointo.) Well, I haven’t troubled him much since
I ran away with his responsibilities in my calf-
hood, and, considering what I’ve spared him, I
think he should be grateful. But that’s shaky
reckoning; you can’t count on probabilities.”

He stirred feverishly.

“T can’t fix my mind at all,” he continued after
a pause. “ But this is what I want you todo. I
want you to write a letter to your grandfather for
me. He’s the only one to help us, and he'll do it.
I want you to tell him just who you are, and what
has happened to me, and so on. Tell him how
we're stuck for money. Can you?”

“ Yes, father.”
IIo TONY DRUM:

“Sit down, then, at that table and do it. Ask
me anything you want to know.”

“Yes, father.”

Tony sat down and took pen in hand and wrote:

“My dear Grandfather, I am writing this
letter. 4



“ Read it out as you go,” said Michael.



“This letter for my father: -

ie Poor father! Haint you got any natural
affection? ”

“For my poor father, who is very ill with an
accident in a gig.”

“You're muddling it finely! ”

“ My mother. a



“ She was your dear mother, you little heathen—
poor lass!”

“ My dear mother was killed with the same acci-
dent, and we are in great trouble. Father has not
got any money and he will have to pay for the gig,
and the doctor, and the undertaker, and e



“That’s consequential enough! ”
“He won’t be able to do any work for a long

9

time, he says




Tony’s Grandfather.
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. I1l

“T don’t say so. You can see that for yourself.
I don’t want him to think I’m playing idle after all

these years!”

”



“ So please, dear grandfather, will you very

“ Two ‘ verys’!”

3?



“Very kindly send us a little help

“ As if you don’t we shall all have to go into the
workhouse. And that’s a fact!”

“ As if you don’t we shall all have to go into the

3?

workhouse and that



“ No, no; full stop at workhouse. He will know
it’s a fact right enough. It’s too ugly not to be
true.”

“ Father would write himself, but he is too ill.
And now I must conclude, hoping you are quite
well as it leaves me, your affectionate grandson,
Tony Drum.”

Tony looked up proudly and laid aside the pen.
He had never before written a real letter to a real
person. ©

“Have you made it. plain about the money?
That’s the main thing,” sighed Michael.

“ Yes, father.”
1l2 ; TONY DRUM.

“Let me see it. Ah, yes; it looks virgin enough,
not at all inspired. Do it up in the envelope.
Now write, ‘ Mr. Stephen Drum, The Long Farm,
near Penrith.’ God, I’d like a whiff o’ the hills
now. It’s better than the coroner to look forward
to. Where’s Honor? Keep her away from me.
Perhaps we'll go home to-morrow.”

But a week passed before Michael Drum was
strong enough to journey to London. He was out
of bed on the day of the inquest, and gave his sad
evidence. It was a dingy day. The country was
obscure with fog; the invisible sky dropped tears.
Tony and Honor sat in the warm kitchen, and the
mellow-faced woman talked to them with hollow
cheerfulness across the leaping fire. Through the
windows could be seen the night-in-day, the vague
trees looming ghostly against the rolling darkness.
‘ There was a misty halo round each jet of gas; and
when the garden door opened a cloud filtered in.
Honor started from a long reverie to remark to the
woman:

“T should ha’ liked to see poor mamma.”

The mellow face quivered and reddened. The
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. 113

corpse of Mrs. Drum was a hideous spectacle, and
the children had been mercifully kept from seeing
it. Tony started guiltily; he had had no desire to
gaze upon his dead mother. He looked at Honor,
surprised that she should be in advance of him.

“What for?” he asked.

“T should ha’ liked it,” said Honor.

“That you wouldn’t, my dear,” cried Mistress
Mellow-Face. “It’s no sight for children, death
isn’t.”

Honor was silent for a while; then she said, with
trenchant emphasis:

“T don’t like death! ”

Mistress Mellow-Face shook her head and was
gravely silent.

The next day was the day of the funeral. The
children did not attend because the weather was
bad; the fog had lightened a little, but it rained
hard. Michael Drum went, hobbling on a stick,
and returned in the gloomy evening, a blue-nosed,
red-eyed bundle of shivers. He was sad and meek
over the supper, and accepted the sympathy of the

mellow-faced woman very humbly. He kissed his
114 TONY DRUM.

children when they parted at night; and this un-
usual mark of tenderness strangely moved Tony.
He wept upon his pillow, and could not be com-

forted. When he was alone with Honor he said:

“It aint ’cos I’m sorry so much, though I am a

that. It’s because mother is all over. I can’t bear
to think that she is all over. That’s why I aint
cried before, Honor. I haven’t taken it in that she
won’t come back—that she’s all over for ever and
ever.”

And Honor murmured through a mist of sleep,
“ Amen.”

Tony was reminded of his prayers, and repeated
them almost passionately in the exuberant newness
of his faith. In the night he awoke and started up,
feeling a presence in the room. _ He saw his father,
monstrously tall and big in the glimmer of candle-
light, standing by his bedside.

“Father!” he murmured, with a strange, fierce
throb of his heart, and he extended his arms. His
father embraced him. “I had a dream. Good-
night, my boy!” said Michael Drum, and went
slowly out.
HE ENTERTAINS A DEMON. 1I5

On the morrow they returned to town. Lon-
don was a sad sight to Tony after his experience of
the country; its grimness, its dirtiness, its heartless-
ness, were as weights on his soul. Home had
grown smaller, meaner; the absence of Mrs. Drum
made a horrid gap at table. Michael presided
clumsily. He was more liberal in matters of butter
and sugar and jam; but the children sighed for their
mother, notwithstanding. And yet, despite the
real burden of his grief, Tony felt that he would
not willingly have changed places with any other
being in the world. His grief was his privilege as
well as his pain; he felt exalted above the ruck of
happy mortals. And this, his first faint perception
of a pride of sorrow, formed the crowning mystery
of that bewildering time.

In the evening a letter came; Michael Drum
opened it with feverish fingers, and drew out a roll
of crackling notes. He could scarce contain his
joy, though the shadow of death hung over him.
He strode about the room with a flushed face, toss-
ing his hair.

“This is from your grandfather,” he said. “A
116 TONY DRUM.

letter from the old man’s very hand. Ha, ha! to
think I should have held him in unkind memory
all these years. He is coming to London with the
New Year, too. We shall see him. Tony—
Honor—you’ll see your grandfather! ”

The children stared, and strove to catch a little
of their father’s warmth, but their stony aspect
vexed Michael oddly, and he sent them away to
bed. When they were gone he sat down, with

bowed head, and started out on a long journey. -
CHAPTER IX.
HIS FYANKY.

TONY, recovering from one of his periodical
bouts of sickness, learned that he was to go to
school no more.

“ But the Board, father? ’”’ he faltered.

“The doctor has attended to that,” said Michael
Drum. “The Board let you off on account of
your bad health.”

Tony knew not whether to be glad or sorry.

“T shall grow up dreadful ignorant, father,” he
sighed.

“No, you won’t, my boy,” answered Michael.
He added quickly, fearing that Tony might per-
ceive the inner meaning of his words: “ They don’t
teach wisdom in schools.”

“Don’t they, father?” cried Tony, much sur-
prised.

“No,” said Michael, shaking his head. ‘“ You

117
118 TONY DRUM.

get knowledge there of a sort, but not wisdom.
Knowledge, my boy, is a big, heavy stone; wisdom
is the rollers it moves on.”

“You are very wise, aint you, father? ”

Michael Drum smiled.

“ Aint you, father? ”

“T am wise enough not to think so,” said
Michael Drum.

“T wonder if

”



mused Tony, and, wonder-
ing, fell asleep.

When he was well enough he crept downstairs
every morning, and sat upon the doorstep in the
sunshine all day long. Usually he had one of Paul
Hand’s books on his knee, but he read little. He
preferred to watch the small, important life of the
street. He grew to know strangers intimately;
people who passed along that byway every day at
a certain or uncertain hour. He pondered on the
wherefore of their coming and going. He built up
stories around them. Sometimes he would tell a
version of these stories to the younger children
who clustered about him in the evening, and would

draw from their rapt faces the sweet reward of his
HIS FYANKY. 119g

artistry. He loved the babies best, for they were
loyal; the elder children sometimes trampled with
rude feet on the tender flowers of his imagination.
Once, Tony wrote out the best of all the stories
that he had made, printing each word separately in
an elegant little book made of playbills; but
when he read the book he wept with disap-
pointment. He destroyed the book and wrote
no more.

He became a spectator of life. He saw much
that puzzled him, and could arrive at few conclu-
sions. But of one thing he was certain, the world
was very kind. Everyone was good to him; even
the elder children, who scoffed at his stories, would
play their games under his eye to amuse him.
They gave him sucks of toffee and nibbles of cake
and bites of apples. The grown-up men and
women, too, were wonderful. Great horny, hairy
sons of the river, bulging with beer, fierce-eyed and
heavy-handed, tumbled his cap as they passed, and
dropped pennies at his feet. One Shagger Day, a
fancy lad, at sight of whose frown the bullies

trembled to a man, knelt on the pavement, and in
120 TONY DRUM.

the friendliest manner invited Tony to black his
eye.

“ Hit hard and spare not,” said Shagger. “It’s
more blessed to give than to receive. I’m a Bible
character, I am. Now!”

And he held his face forward.

“No,” said Tony; “I might hurt you.”

Whereat Shagger shook with merriment.

But the women were too tender with Tony.
They forgot that he would be a man. He often
crept into the passage to escape their caresses.

There was one woman whom he liked. She was
young, but lank and unprepossessing. She worked
hard in a laundry to support an ailing mother.
She had no new clothes, no young man, nothing
that made joy in life for other girls. Her name
was Hannah Hart, and the folk called her “ Silly
H.,” because she laughed when she might have
wept. Tony liked her because she never kissed
him without first asking his permission.

Their friendship began on a certain dull evening
in the late spring months. Tony was sitting on

the doorstep, torn between a desire to read and the
HIS FYANKY. 121

fascinations of ‘‘ Horny Winkle’s horses,” at that
moment being played out before him by the youth
of the neighborhood. “Gil Blas” lay open upon
his knee; but Gil Blas had lately taken to avarice
and Tony was somewhat tired of him.

“I wish I was a robber in a cave,” sighed Tony.

At that moment the shadow of Silly H. fell
athwart him. He looked up impatiently.

“Hullo!” she sniggered.

“ Hullo, Silly H.,” he said.

She gazed at him for a moment with her mouth
agape.

“Say, Tony,” said she, “ how is it you aint read-
ing your book? ”

“How can I when you're a-talking to me?” he
said. “It wouldn’t be manners.”

“TI been watching you for ever so long, an’ you
aint read once. Don’t you like the book?”

“You see,” said Tony, “ Gill aint the man he
was.”

“Who's Gill? ”

“ He’s in the book.”

= Oh! 2
122 TONY DRUM.

There was a heavy pause.

“ T’ve got some fine books, I have,” said Silly H.
suddenly. “ Real interestin’ ones. TIl lend you
some of ’em if you like.”

“T dunno. What are they about?”

“ All sorts o’ things. All sorts 0’ people. Dooks
and duchesses down to common folk like us.”

“ We wouldn’t be no good in a book,” said Tony
scornfully. “Everybody knows about us. Not
but what I’d like to be in a book myself,” he added.

“ Well, shall I lend you some o’ mine?”

“Tf you like,” said Tony, politely anxious to be
rid of her. “ But, mind you, I don’t promise to
read ’em.”

“ All right,” said Silly H.

She went off giggling, to return presently with
three gaudily bound volumes.

“Pretty covers,’ said Tony critically, as she
dumped them down in his lap.

“ There’s prettier stuff inside ’em,” said Silly H.

Tony fluttered the leaves. Silly H. stood watch-
ing him.

“ Good-night,” said Tony.
HIS FYANKY. 123

“ Let me see you start on ’em,” said Silly H.

“ Good-night,” said Tony firmly.

“ The red one is the best.”

Tony said once more, “ Good-night,” and Silly
H. shuffled away.

He read the books and found them enthralling.
They were novels of a common type, plotty and
passionate, but gilt-edged with the proprieties.

“ How do you like ’em?” asked Silly H.

“They’re good,” said Tony, with the decision of
extreme youth. “ Gill was not so bad, but I never
felt, somehow, as if he might be me. But in these
’ere I feel it strong.”

“Yes,” nodded Silly H. “ That’s the beauty of
’em.””

They discussed the novels.

“ Good-night,” said Tony suddenly.

Silly H., who had been very glib, now became
silent and abashed.

““Good-night,” said Tony, rising. “Thank you
for the books, Silly H.”

“ Might I ” faltered she.

“ What? ”


124 TONY DRUM.

“A chaste saloot, Tony—you know.”

“Oh, ah,” said Tony, blushing. He looked up
and down the street. “If you like, only do it
quick.”

She did it timidly, in the shadow of the door, and
ran off as if she were afraid of him.

“Til shut my eyes nex’ time,” thought Tony, as
he crept upstairs. ‘Then, perhaps, I’ll feel like
Oswald Vavasour.”

Silly H. lent Tony many more books, and he
learned much from them. Many things that had
been obscure to him were made plain; many things
that had been plain were made obscure. Among
other matters, he discovered a new powerful factor
of life called Love. Everybody in the books
knew what love was, but nobody in Garden Row
knew.

He asked Honor, ‘‘ What is love? ”

Honor was now on the verge of womanhood,
and walked o’ nights with simpering boys. She
blushed at the question.

“What do you want to know for? ” she inquired.

“T just want to know, that’s all,” Tony replied.
HIS FYANKY. 125

“You're too young to worry about such things,”
said Honor.

“But I do worry about ’em,” retorted Tony.

“You'll find out all about it soon enough,” said
Honor.

“T wonder,” he murmured. ‘“ Do you love any-
body, Honor? ” he asked.

“T dunno,” she replied.

Tony explained to her that she was eminently
foolish, and the subject dropped.

He asked his father, ‘‘ What is love? ”

“You must ask a younger man,” said Michael
Drum.

So Tony asked Billy Aggs, who sniggered fool-
ishly, said “ Garn!”’ and became suddenly knock-
kneed.

Then Tony asked Silly H.

“T ought to know,” she said mysteriously.

“Why ought you?” asked Tony.

“Cos ’'ma love-child,” she replied.

Tony looked at her with new interest.

“ What’s that?” he said, startled.

“My mother knows,” she whispered.
126 TONY DRUM.

“ Ask her,” said Tony.

“T dussent,” said Silly H. “It makes her cry.”

Next day Tony slipped into the house where
Silly H. lived, and stole upstairs to her mother’s
room. He knocked softly at the door.

“Come in, Mrs. Jones,” said a weak voice.

Tony pushed open the door. He saw a neat
little room with a big bed in it, and a woman upon
the bed. The woman turned a thin face toward
him.

“Who are you?” she asked.

“Tam Tony Drum.”

“Sit down, Tony,” said she. ‘I’ve heard of
you.”

He looked at her half-fearfully. She was yellow
and ghastly.

“What do you want, Tony?”

“T want to know what love is?”

The sunken eye of the woman flashed. She
raised herself painfully upon her elbow and looked
at him. Someone laughed in the street.

“T don’t mean ordinary love,” explained Tony.

““T mean love in books.”
HIS FYANKY. 127

She sank back among the pillows and cackled
mirthlessly.

“You oddity!” she said.

“ But what is love?’ asked Tony.

“Men know,” she said. “ But they won’t tell
you, Tony Drum. They only tell women.”

Tony stared. The woman lay shaking on the
bed. A great fear of her flooded his soul.

“ Good-afternoon, ma’am,” he said, and fled the
room.

It made him feverish to have the questionings of
his mind unanswered. He turned to the novels
again, hoping to find new light in them.

One evening he startled Silly H. with a strange
question. He met her on the low shore of the
river as the sun was going down. The clouds were
piled in rugged masses of gold quartz above the
Surrey smoke. He stood before her, pale-faced
and earnest. She marked the intenseness of his
manner and giggled nervously.

“What’s up, Tony? ” she asked.

He did not speak at once, but looked away

toward the restless river.
128 TONY DRUM.

“What’s up?” she repeated.

“Silly H.,” he blurted forth, “ will you be my
fyanky?”

“What?”

“ My fyanky.”

She pondered.

“Your sweetheart? ”

He nodded.

The idea made her grave.

“T aint never been one,” she said doubtfully.

“All the better,” he rejoined.

“Tt seems silly,” she faltered. “ You're only a
kid.”

“No, I aint,” he said indignantly. “I am young, ©
but I aint a kid!”

They were very serious.

“Will you? ” he asked. —

“If you like,” she answered, still doubtfully.
“ But keep it dark, Tony.”

“ That’s what I want,” he said.

They could say no more just then, but parted
suddenly. From that moment the old intimacy

between them weakened. When they met they


ny’s Fyanky.

To
AIS FYANKY. 129

were shy and silent. In a little while they began
to avoid each other. At last Tony left the books
which Silly H. had lent him at the door of her
house with a note, which said:

“T release you from our engagement.”

And then things were again as they had been.
CHAPTER X.
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING.

A WHILE later, on a desolate evening, Tony was
returning slowly homeward by way of the half
frozen river. With him was a boy named Nick
Tolmers. They had been to watch the skaters in
a park. Nick had cut out a slide on the ice and
disported himself thereon for two long hours, leav-
ing Tony to watch him enviously from the bank.
Nick was now in the highest spirits; his cheeks
were red and glowing; he ran and shouted and
capered gleefully. Tony was blue-faced, shiver-
ing, and miserable. The wintry evening light was
failing; the land lay black and scarred under the
blight of frost. The sky was coldly blue and
studded with crisply twinkling stars.

They were within a few hundred yards of Gar-
den Row when they passed a little, quick-stepping

maid to whom Nick said, “ Good-evening, miss.”

130
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 131

The maid looked roguishly at him from under the
brim of her wide straw hat, murmured “ Impu-
dence!” and passed on laughing.

““Who’s that?” asked Tony.

“Dunno!” said Nick. He enjoyed Tony’s
astonishment for a minute or two, then he added:
“Tt’s only a way I’ve got with ’em. I always do
it if they take my eye. It don’t cost nothink, and
it sometimes leads to lots o’ fun.”

“ Do they always like it?” asked Tony.

“ Always,” answered Nick.

Tony was ‘silent. His brain worked busily.
They walked on.

Presently Nick Tolmers asked, with bewildering
suddenness, “Do you go in for gals much,
Tony?”

Tony shook his head, half ashamed.

“T do,” said Nick, smoothing his chin.

Tony glanced aside at him.

“You're a bit shy, aint you, Tony?”

“ Not exactly that,” faltered Tony.

“You can’t get on with ’em?”

ce N—no.”’
132 TONY DRUM.

“TI can,” said Nick, with a triumphant nod.
“It’s easy enough, really.”

“T suppose it is,” murmured Tony.

“ An’ not so easy neither,” Nick added, “ until
you know the way. You don’t know the way, you
see.”

“No,” Tony faltered again.

“ Ah!” cried Nick, “J do.”

Tony looked wistfully at him.

“The way with gals is this,” said Nick. “ You
mustn’t make yourself cheap. You must be a bit
—a bit ’orty with ’em. That’s how I do.” He
chuckled. “ Why don’t you get a gal, Tony?” he
asked.

“Me!” cried Tony.

“T don’t see why you shouldn’t. You're a bit
humpy, to be sure, but then gals aint always par-
tickler. You see, there’s so many on ’em knock-
ing about nowadays, they can’t all get mated.”

5 “Oh, I don’t care about it, somehow,” said
Tony insincerely.
“ Of course, if you don’t care about it, there’s no

more to be said,” murmured Nick.


HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 133

They walked on a few paces.

“ But how could I get a girl?’ Tony burst forth.

“ Ask her.”

“ Ask her what?”

“Oh, you know,” Nick winked. “Or she
might ask you,” he said. “They do sometimes.”

“ How do you know? ”

Nick bent his head, and kicked a stone along the
road.

“Oh! ” faltered Tony, overcome by this token of
a delicate mind.

Nick smiled shrewdly.

They parted at the school gates, and Tony, with
a buzzing head, walked slowly homeward.

All that night he wandered in illimitable wilder-
nesses of romance.

‘It was a shock to awake next morning in the

land of drab, and, as he dressed, Tony dropped a
tear to the memory of more than one fair being of
his dreams. Honor had gone off to her factory,
or he would have liked to talk to her, though she
was no longer the old sympathetic Honor of his

babyhood. Michael Drum was in a silent humor,
134 TONY DRUM.

and, though Tony pelted him with leading ques-
tions across the breakfast table, he would not be
drawn into conversation. He replied gruffly and
at random, and, when the meal was over, went out
suddenly, uttering gay curses on the bleakness
of the weather. Tony crept downstairs after
him.

The road was being mended; there was a glow-
ing brazier on the curb. He sat down in the
warmth of it.

It was holiday time, and the street was filled with
children. The little ones gathered about Tony,
pleading for a story. He waved them aside impa-
tiently. Not far away some boys and girls were
playing “ Ring-o’-Roses”’ in the roadway. He
watched them, and his heart was hungry, but what
it hungered for he could not tell. The boys
handled the girls roughly, and Tony felt that it was
a desecration. He rose suddenly, and went in-
doors.

He sat down near to the window in the little
front room and began to read resolutely, but his

mind wandered out into the street in spite of him.
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 135

He put down his book and listened. The voices
of the children rang in shrill chorus:

“ Ring-a-ring 0’ roses,
Pocket full 0’ posies,
Houp la! Houp la!
We all fall down!”

Again and again the blithe senseless words were
repeated. Then came a pause, and the strain
changed. Tony heard:

“Poor Jenny is a-weeping, a-weeping, a-weeping,
Poor Jenny is a-weeping
On a bright summer’s day.
On the carpet she shall kneel
While the grass grows in the field—
Stand up, stand up, upon your feet,
Choose the one you love so sweet.
Choose once—choose twice—choose three times over!”

There came another pause. Tony looked out of
the window and saw a boy and girl standing de-
murely, with linked hands, in the middle of a ring
of dancing children. They circled round, singing:

“Now you're married I wish you joy,
First a girl and then a boy—
Seven years after, son and daughter,
Pray and cuddle and kiss together !
Kiss her once, kiss her twice, kiss her three times over.”

The boy and girl embraced shyly. A hot thrill
coursed through Tony’s whole being. He caught
136 TONY DRUM.

up his cap and hastened into the street. He ran
up to the little group, crying out:

“Let me play! Oh, let me play, too!”

“Oh, come on then,” they said, smiling at his
eagerness.

He joined in the ring, and they went round
giddily. He had much ado to keep his feet; the
other children were so big and strong and bois-
terous; he was so little and weak and slow. The
tune was again changed. They sang a song
of a dog, but it was the Song of the Goat to
Tony!

“‘ There was a butcher had a dog,
And Bingo was his name—Oh!
B—i—n—g—o!
B—-i—n—g—o!
B—i—n—g—o !
And Bingo was his name—Oh !
Kiss me quick and go!
Kiss me quick and go!

’Tis a starry night, the moon shines bright,
Kiss me quick and go!”

The children came and went in the middle of the
ring. All had a share in the kissing except Tony.

No one chose him. His face grew bitter. He





|


HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 137

played on, hoping desperately that his turn would
come.

The ring widened. A newcomer, in the person
of a flaxen-haired maid, slipped in beside Tony.
Soon she was led out by an ardent boy and kissed.
The boy retired into the obscurity of the ring, leav-
ing Flaxen Hair to stand alone whilst the rest
danced round her.

“ Let’s have a different tune now,” said one.

And Tony felt that it was a fitting tribute to the
radiant face of Flaxen Hair.

There was some whispering among the girls, and
they began:

“ Up and down Garden Row
The windows are made of glass.
Call at Number Forty-four and there you'll find a lass,
Her name is Carrie Green ;
Catch her if you can—
She’s after Tony Drum
Before he is a man!

He huddles her and cuddles her and sets her on his knee
An’ says, ‘ My dear, do you love me ?’”

The little girl answered:

“T love you.
Do you love me?”
138 TONY DRUM.

And as Tony stepped into the ring the chorus
rose:

“ To-morrow, to-morrow, the wedding shall be!”

Carrie Green shook her flaxen hair and simpered
shyly as Tony took her hand. He held up his face,
and she stooped to receive his kiss. Her cheek
was cold and faintly sweet. Tony saw himself re-
flected in her bright eyes, and reeled under a hot
tempest of emotion. He was overcome with sud-
den shame. He broke through the ring and
scuttled home. As he crept upstairs he could hear
the game proceeding.

In the afternoon he went out again. It was
very cold and dull, and the children were all gone
indoors. The sky hung like a gray pall over Gar-
den Row; the song of the river sounded monoto-
nously mournful. A muffin-man, with doleful bell,
walked briskly past, his clogs ringing loudly on the
frosty flags. He might have been a being from the
shades, crying the requiem of Hope.

Tony wandered slowly down the street. The
cold seemed to freeze his heart into stone; his

hands swung at his sides like leaden weights. The
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING, 139

lamps were kindling, and the lights gleamed sickly
yellow in the blue dusk. He turned a corner and
came stiddenly upon the river.

He stood for a while to watch the barges drift-
ing slowly down, and to wonder what that sea was
like toward which they were going. Gold-tinted
smoke puffed up from the chimneys of the little
cabins, and the tiny curtained windows glowed
richly red, like wine. Over on the right bank a
chain of wharves and warehouses showed black be-
yond the stark, shining piles; above, the sky was
luminously gray. The usual crowd of ruminative
idlers was scattered along the waterside. Tony
turned from contemplating the river to look at
them. They were gnarled creatures, slow and
ponderous, with the weight of many hard years
sitting heavily, upon their shoulders. Tony re-
flected that they must have probed life to its veriest
depths, and found out all things. He wondered
what the tragedy of each man might be and how
he had stood up under it. He wished that he, too,
were safely through the troubled waters, at anchor

in the harbor, under the lights of home. Two of
140 TONY DRUM.

the men were talking near to him. He sauntered
up to them and listened. Perhaps he would learn a
guiding principle of conduct from them. This was
their conversation:

“__with a stiff, creamy fat on it, and the lean
solid, so as you can cut and come again. An’ a
pound or so o’ floury taters, an’ p’r’aps a bit QO
cauliflower or, say, Brussels sprouts.”

“Oh, an’ a comfortable bed to follow, in a
proper house, wi’ land under you, and a sure break-
fast ahead.”

“ And a supper for anchor.”

“That’s as said. I’m a teasin’ of my appetite
now, so as I can enjoy a bite or two afore I turn in.”

“For myself, I never play them tricks; I don’t
need to. I let Nature take her course wi’ me.”

“T dussent.”

“You dussent?”

“T aint one o’ Nature’s favorites, you see. She
rucks on me cruel sometimes.”

“You been taking liberties with her, man.”

“ Mebbe, mebbe. Asa young man a
“ Oh, as for that——”


‘HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 141

“S-sh! The kid! We'll go up, eh?”

They looked at Tony and walked off. He gazed
after them and sighed for a lost illusion.

He was shivering. He left the river and entered
Garden Row again.

He was within sight of home when he saw a
maid coming toward him whom he at once recog-_
nized as Carrie Green. His heart leaped wildly.
He was suddenly overcome with bashfulness and
thought of flight. Carrie drew nearer. He con-
trolled himself and advanced toward her.

At a distance of some three paces from him she
stopped and smiled.

“Hullo, Tony Drum,” she said. “What are
you staring at?”

He halted and said “ Hullo!” huskily.

She laughed in his face, outright.

“T see you first,” she said.

“T know you never,” he cried hotly. “I see
you ever such a way off.”

“And I see you—mooning along. I wouldn’t
be a moony.”

“T aint a moony!”
142 TONY DRUM.

He became flushed with earnestness.

“Yah, you’re blushing,” she‘ cried. “ You're
shy. I always knew you was shy.”

“T aint shy,” he cried.

She provoked him with her smiles.

“T say,” said she, becoming grave, “ why don’t
you go to school now, as you used? You was ever
such a good scholar, wasn’t you? ”

Tony nodded.

“T’ve heard say you was. What standard was
you in when you left? ”

“ Fifth.”

“Tm in the sixth. I’m twelve. How old are
your”

“T’m twelve, too.”

“Fancy!”

Their breathing grew labored.

To make talk Carrie said, “I aint got any
brothers—don’t want ’em. I hate boys.”

“Oh!” said Tony.

“ D’you remember that first day at school—in
the infants’—when I sat next to you? Wasn’t we
awful kids then? ”
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 143

Tony stared. At her words his mind had run
back over the past. He saw himself a forlorn babe
again in the infants’ room, seated beside a chubby
little damsel of haughty mien and reserved manner.
Surely, Carrie was this chubby little damsel, grown
now into a bouncing girl. He looked on her with
kindling eyes. This was a new link to bind them.
She no longer wore a red flannel frock; she was less
chubby; her silky hair had lengthened on her
shoulders; but nevertheless she was little changed.

“ Was that you?” he gasped foolishly.

“Who else?” she said. “ Oh, wasn’t we awful
kids!”

“ Awful!”

“T’ve always noticed you ever since,” said Carrie.
“ You aint noticed me, though.”

Tony, prompted by some dim instinct, said,
“Ves, I have then.”

“ Have you, straight?”

He nodded and murmured with raised eyebrows.
“°M! IT have, straight.”

She surveyed him from head to foot. Her eyes

mocked him. He felt keenly his inferiority. His.
144 TONY DRUM.

clothes were stained and old; his hands were dirty;
his hair rumpled on his forehead. She was gayly
attired in a blue stuff dress, edged with plush; there
was lace about her neck and a fabric of flowers and
ribbons on her dainty head. Tony stooped and
pulled up his stockings.

“ Aint you got any garters? ” asked she.

“Tl make some wi’ string,” he said.

“ My garters are made o’ ’lastic. I got a hand-
kerchief. You aint.”

“T lost mine scrumpin’,” he confessed ruefully.
“T tied some apples up in it, and a boy nicked
’em.”

“That must ha’ been a long time ago,” she said.
“Aint you never had one since. I’ve got six—a
birthday present.” os

Tony felt hopelessly deficient. He. hung his
head. “It don’t matter wi’ boys,” he pleaded;
“ girls is different.”

She laughed. “ Well,” she cried, “I can’t stop
here talking to you all night, Tony Drum.”

He looked at her regretfully. He could not

bear to lose her just yet, though her mere proximity
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 145
was a heavy embarrassment to him. “Don’t go,”
he said.

She shook her curls inexorably. Yet she lin-
gered.

“You are a moony!” she exclaimed at length,
with sudden petulance.

He stared at her, bewildered.

“Why?” he gasped.

“ Because you are—see!” she said, and turned
disdainfully away.

He swung moodily on his heel and broke into a
halting trot. Instantly he heard his name called.
He stopped, looked back. Carrie was beckoning
to him. He ran to her with a gladdening face.

“What you want? ” he asked.

“ Wouldn’ t you like to come wi’ me?” she said.

“O’ course I would.”

“Well, you can if you like. I got some errands
to do for my mother.”

Tony walked along beside her.

“Say,” she said presently. “Do you like my
name—Carrie? ”

“It’s all right, I suppose,” said Tony.
146 TONY DRUM.

“All right! You suppose!” she cried in high
scorn.

Tony, in his innocence, could do naught but
gasp and wonder.

“Your mother’s dead, aint she?” asked Carrie,
after a little pause.

“Yes,” said Tony sadly.

“My mother aint, but my father is. My father
was a soldier. What’s yours?”

Tony hesitated. His father’s calling was the
shame of his life and had exposed him already to
much bitter ridicule from the offspring of reputable
craftsmen. He felt he could not tell the truth
to Carrie. He answered slowly, “ He’s a musi-
cian.” .

“Oh,” said Carrie. “ But how do you mean?”

“ He plays the flute.”

“Tn a band?”

“ 'Ye-es.”

“ How funny!” said Carrie. She started. “ Oh,
I say, come round this corner. There’s somebody
that lives in our house. If she sees you she’ll tell

my mother.”
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 147

They scudded down a dark street. Carrie
looked back, straightening her hat.

“Tt’s all right,” she panted. “She never see
me. Now I'll go and get them bothering errands.
It’s only to the grocer’s. Come?”

Tony followed her obediently. He waited for
her in the gutter outside the shop. The shop-
keeper sent out a man to order him away. The
man tweaked Tony’s ear, and Tony ran fuming into
the road, a raging victim of unspeakable humilia-
tion. Happily Carrie did not witness this shame-
ful incident. She came out and poured the balm
of her smiles on Tony’s wounded dignity.

“You must ha’ been pretty cold,” said she.

“No,” he said. And, indeed, he spoke truly, for
his anger had warmed him.

“Have a peppermint?” said she. “The shop-
keeper gave me two.”

“The shopkeeper!” he cried tragically. “No!”
ees All the more for me,” she said calmly, and
crunched them up.

“T don’t think I shall eat any more pepper-

mints,” he said gloomily.
148 TONY DRUM.

“There aint any more to eat,” said she.

“T mean never in my life,” he explained.

“Oh!” said she, licking her lips. “ Well,” she
continued, after a pause, “I suppose I shall have
to go home now. I’m in for a row, as it is,
through being out so long. You'd better only
come to the corner, in case my mother sees me.
She’d be cross.”

At the corner Tony was emboldened to say:

“T suppose I shall see you again soon?”

“You could ha’ seen me any day if you’d like
to look,” she replied. “I was always seeing
you.” :

Tony marveled at his past blindness.

“ Well, good-night, Carrie,” he said shyly.

“ Good-night,” said Carrie, with immutable self-
possession.

The corner was a dark one. They stood con-
fronting each other in the shadow of a high wall.
Tony, to prove that he was quite at ease, stood on
one leg and whistled. Carrie leaned her back
against the wall. After that mutual “ Good-

night ” there was a silence. Tony did not go
HE PLAYS AT KISS-IN-THE-RING. 149

away. He hopped on the pavement and stared
sheepishly at Carrie. She smiled complacently.
she cried suddenly. “ What’s

that on your coat?”

>

& Say, lony,.

He squinted down his length of jacket.

“Where?” he asked.

She drew him by his sleeve toward her and
peered closely at his shoulder. For an instant her
cheek touched his, her soft curls tickled his face.
His bosom was stirred.

“Tt’s nothing,” she said. “I dunno what I
thought it was now.”

She did not release him at once. He touched
her hand timidly with his fingers. She laughed
softly, and, bending forward, kissed him suddenly
full upon the lips. Then she broke away and made
off along the pavement. Tony stood watching her

flight with a mind bemused.
CHAPTER XI.

HE CATCHES GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART.

WueENn Tony reached home it was quite dark.
He found his sister Honor and a lank boy standing
together on the doorstep in affectionate attitudes.
They started apart at his approach, and the lank
boy swore. ,

“ Hush, Tom, it’s only my little brother,” said
Honor.

“Ts that all?” cried Tom, relieved. ‘‘ Well, I
dare say Gawd won’t damn his eyes this time, see-
ing it wasa mistake. How de do, kid?”

Tony resented the tone of this inquiry,and strode
into the house without speaking. He found his
father sitting limply over the fire in the front room.
A bottle and a glass were on the table. The air
was heavy and dark with tobacco smoke.

“Where have you been, Tony?” asked Michael
Drum.

“ For a walk, father,”’ answered Tony.

150


Honor Drum and her Sweetheart .
GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 151

“ Seen anything o’ Honor?”

“She’s downstairs on the doorstep.”

“ What a-doing?”

“ There’s that green-looking bloke with her.”

Michael Drum laughed.

“The sap’s a-rising,” he remarked. “ We'll all
be full-blown soon, I suppose. How is it you aint
'mated yet, my.son? You’re very slow. But
youre handicapped, you poor little thing. The
women like ’em straight and strong.”

Tony blushed and glowed with delicious self-
consciousness. He smiled at the ground scorn-
fully.

“It’s a shame that girl aint got more dutiful
feeling,” said Michael; “ but it’s only parents who
ever get the true idea of a child’s obligations.
Now, here’s the place a perfect pigsty, and her
a-gallivanting out every night, instead o’ redding ©
it up a bit. And, ’pon my soul! I don’t know
what I’m to do to assert myself. I can’t take to
drink—I’ve taken to that already. And there’s
nothing else. Heigho! Here, put that bottle on
the shelf, and I’ll get supper.”
152 TONY DRUM.

He rose stiffly and went to the cupboard, sing-
ing a husky song as he rummaged among the
shelves.’

“ “Gwine to ride all night "there aint a cloth,
but the ‘ second extry ’ willdo. * Gwine to ride all
day ’—plates and knives and forks. Oh! here’s
the bread. ‘I bet my money on the bob-tailed
nag.’ I wish I could find a ten-to-one chance.
We'd have better pickles than these moldy mys-
teries. ‘Somebody bet on the bay, oh, doo-dah-
deh!’ Stir about, my son, and hand up the cheese.
Hark!

“«« Who goes there ?
Stranger, quickly tell.
A friend!
The word ?
Good-night !
All—all’s well!’

I thought—I hoped it was Honor. But no! I
suppose she’s too busy chewing sweet lies to come
up yet. Sit down and eat, Tony boy.”

They drew up chairs to the table.

“Don’t frown so owlishly, my son,” said Michael.

“Don’t be cross with your poor old father because




GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 153

he rattles the peas in the bladder now and then.
He, he! He is very pleased with himself to-night,
your father is. He wants exceedingly to rejoice.
He, he! Oh, doo-dah-deh! ”

Tony forced a smile.

“ That’s right,” said Michael Drum. “ Concede
something to me out of the austerity of your heart,
for I am full of joy to-night, and blown out with
great thoughts. I could spit pearls of wisdom, if I
had a mind. Incidentally, Iam drunk. You are
too polite to look as if I were, so I confess it
gladly.”

Tony munched his bread and cheese.

“To-night,” said Michael Drum, holding aloft a
hunk of bread; “to-night I rise above myself. I
run past myself. I trip over my own shadow. I
am not modest to-night. Why should I be?
Modesty is just a handy cloak for fools! I don’t
need it.”

He leaned across the table.

“Tony, I have been drinking deeply, and think-
ing out an idea—an idea for a guide to the art of

living joyously.
TS4\. TONY DRUM.
“ «Merry maid and little man,

Life is but a tiny span.

Show your dimples all you can!

Merry maid and little man !’
Listen. Here are some points to hang the misty
draperies of my theory on. You won’t under-
stand; but I throw this out to ease myself. There
are too many pebbles of wisdom in my gizzard.
My body is overloaded. Pass the bottle down!”

He drank and continued:

“ We all live, or should live, to an end o’ some
sort. We’ll say that end is happiness—our own, of
course! Happiness is just a little butterfly, purple
spotted; about the only one that has not been
netted and stuck on a card, I fancy. We are all
after the butterfly. It’s a wild-goose chase, and
we scramble about in very undignified attitudes at
times. Sometimes the butterfly is after us; but we
don’t know, and we dodge it, as likely as not.
Such a shy little insect you never saw! You meet
it quite haphazard, if you’re lucky, now and then;
you take it by surprise sometimes; but. the best
walking-boots won’t help you to overtake it on the

high, straight road.”




GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 155

Tony rose, yawning hugely. His father looked
at him reproachfully for a moment, then pityingly.

“Tam sorry for you, Tony,” he said. ‘I could
drink your health in tears. Three o’ tears warm,
miss, please, with sugar. He, he! You are so
frightful wise. You must bore yourself to death.
Perhaps that is your real complaint. Ah, Tony,
you're a dangerous companion for yourself. You
think too much, and too well, of Tony Drum. Re-
member, my son, the only flattery we have to fear
is Our own opinion of ourselves. Now go to
bed!”

Tony said “ Good-night, father,’ and left the
room. As he undressed he could hear his father
talking to the silence. He crept into bed and be-
gan to dream of Carrie.

In the morning when he awoke it was yet dark.
A little oil lamp was burning on the mantelpiece.
Honor, shivering with cold, was rolling up her
hair before the glass.

“ Honor,” whispered Tony.

“Well,” she said peevishly.

“T see you last night.”
156 - TONY DRUM.

‘“T know.”

“Tam so glad.”

“What about? ”

“ About your having a sweetheart.”

‘“*What’s it matter to you?”

“Tt matters a lot.”

“ How do you mean?”

“TI dunno exacly. P’r’aps it’s becos I’ve got a
sweetheart too.”

“You!”

“Yes; we’re both alike, you see. Aint you very
happy, Honor? Iam.”

“Don’t be a little fool!” said Honor testily.
“ As if you undersood.”

“Tdo understand,” he said coldly. “I’ve gota
sweetheart same as you.”

She seemed greatly irritated.

“ You’re but a kid,” she said; “ I am grown up.
Yours is only play.”

“?Taint, then,” said Tony; “it’s real serious.”

Honor looked at him scornfully.

“What little gal is it?”

“She aint little. She’s as tall as you.”




GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 157

“ What’s her name? ”

“T aint a-going to tell you.”

“ Please yourself,” said Honor.

Tony brooded a while.

“Your bloke does look a soft,” he said presently.

“You silly kid! You’re jealous!” said Honor,
laughing.

“ Jealous!” sneered Tony. “I wouldn’t be
jealous of a fathead like him.”

Honor became suddenly grave.

“Tony,” she said, “ I never thought it of you.”

He was smitten with remorse.

“JT never meant it, only you were so nasty,” he
said.

2

“So I was,” she admitted, sitting down on the
edge of the bed. “ Poor little Tony.”

She stooped and kissed him passionately. He
was much surprised, for she had not kissed him
since he was almost a babe.

“We'll be ever such good friends, Tony,” she
whispered. —

“Rather!” he said chokily.

But he was very happy. As he sat at breakfast
158 TONY DRUM.

with his father, an hour later, he could hear the
voices of the children singing “ Ring-a-ring o’
roses ” in the street. It was a fine morning. The
sun had begun his day’s work in an ill humor, but
now the day was breaking into a smile. Through
the window he could see the roofs of the city
bathed in a flood of yellow light. The red chim-
neys and gray spires shone gayly under the bright
sky. The season was winter, but it was a spring
day, full of hope and promise. The year seemed
to be taking breath before beginning on her spring
labors. The joyous river was singing an aubade to
the drowsy town.

When his father had gone out Tony ran into the
street and joined the other children at their play.
Carrie was among them, and met his glances shyly.
Tony pitied the other children, because they had
no delicious secret as he had. He did not despise
them, however; he told himself so, often, and
always with great self-satisfaction. It was rather
trying to see other boys kissing Carrie, but she
always chose him when her turn came, and he

always chose her when he could. It wasa cardinal
GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 159

fault of the game that each chosen one had to kiss
two others of the opposite sex.

He contrived to whisper to her, “ Meet me
round the corner afterwards,” and she answered
him with a squeeze of the hand. They met, and
walked along beside the river.

“T say,” said Carrie, “don’t go telling every-
body that I’m your sweetheart, will you?”

“ ©’ course not,” he said. “ As if I should!”

“ That’s all right, then,” she rejoined.

“ But why not?” he said presently.

“Oh, I don’t want everybody to know,” she
answered.

“ That aint any reason,” he said.

“T don’t like to tell you why,” she faltered.

He stared at her. “‘ Yes, tell me,” he entreated.

“You mightn’t like it.”

“ Oh, yes, I shall.”

“T don’t think you will.”

“ Tell me.”

She hesitated a while, then she said slowly, “ You
know I like you very much, don’t you, Tony?”

“Yes,” he said.


160 TONY DRUM.

“Tf I didn’t, I shouldn’t be your sweetheart,
should I?”

“QO” course not.”

“Well, then, you won’t think me nasty, will
you?”

“Taint likely, Carrie.”

“It’s like this,” she began. ‘“ You see, lots 0’
gals wouldn’t have you at all.”

He was chilled to the heart.

“ Wouldn’t they?” he whispered.

“No,” she said. “ You see, you’re—you aint
quite strong and all that like other boys. An’ you
aint partickler handsome, either.”

“ Aint I?” cried Tony forlornly.

“You've got the loveliest eyes though,” she
cried. ‘“ An’ that’s all I look at really. I aint like
other gals, you see. I liked you so ’cos you was
always ill, an’ it seemed so sad, an’ I was so sorry,
an’ I knew none o’ them other girls wouldn’t never
have you.”

“T wouldn’t never have them,” said Tony
sturdily.

“They aint up to much, I must say,” Carrie


GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 161

admitted, with a sniff. “‘ But it’s because o’ them
I don’t want you to let on as I’m your sweetheart.”

“ What harm would it do?”

“Tt wouldn’t do no harm really. But they'd
laugh at me for having you. ‘ Oh, bli’ me!’ they’d
say. ‘I wouldn’t never have Tony Drum for a
bloke. You must be hard up!’ they’d say. But I
aint hard up. There’s half a dozen I could have,
besides you.”

Tony’s face had grown white and stern.

“ VYou’re ashamed o’ me,” he said.

“Taint. Oh, Tony!” cried she.

“You are,” he said bitterly.

“ But I like you ever so,” she faltered.

“You ought to be proud o’ me then, not
ashamed o’ me,” he said.

“ Well, you see, Tony,” she said, “there aint
nothink about you to be proud of.”

“ Aint there!” he cried indignantly. ‘“ That’s
all you know. Why, look here! In the first place,
I aint common. I aint an ordinary boy. There’s
millions o’ ordinary boys knocking about, but there

aint another boy like me—not in the Row. I
162 TONY DRUM.

wouldn’t give a farden, I wouldn’t, to have no ordi-
nary boy if I wasa gal. I’d look out for a humpy
boy or somethink, I would. And _ besides, Tm
clever, lam. You ought to hear the stories I can
make up out o’ my own head, all myself. I writ
a book once, I did. An’ I was a regular marvel at
school. Everybody said so!”

“T know you was,” said Carrie humbly.

“Well then,” he cried. “ Why aint you proud
oO’ me?”

“T don’t know why it is,” she said miserably;
“but Taint. I should hate for them other gals to
know as I was going out wi’ you.”

Tony was silent a while. Bitterness surged in
his breast. At last he spoke.

“ Then I renounce you! ” he said.

“What’s that?” ;

“T give you up.”

“Oh, don’t, Tony.”

“Yes,” he said fiercely. “I give you up.
Good-by for ever, Carrie Green.”

“ Oh, you are unkind,” she said.

“IT don’t want nothink more to do wi’ you.”
GLIMPSES OF THE FEMININE HEART. 163

“Well, well,” she said; “p’r’aps, after all, it
would be better.” She sighed. “I can’t give you

>

a kiss, ’cos ?



“Tt don’t matter,” said Tony gloomily.

“’Cos it’s so light.”

They shook hands, and she walked slowly away.

Tony stood gazing after her. The houses began
to shake before him, and the roads to tremble.
His world was toppling. A hot salt tear rolled
down his cheek. He struck it away. Suddenly
he cried out:

“ Carrie! Carrie!”

She turned at once and came running back to
him,

“T can’t give you up, Carrie,” said Tony.

“Oh, I am so glad!” Carrie answered. “ After
all, I don’t care much if the gals do know.” She
paused. ‘‘ But I’d rather they didn’t,” she added
thoughtfully.
CHAPTER XII.

HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE.

THE clatter of Honor’s hairless broom mingled
with the sound of Tony’s singing. She rested for
a moment from her labors to observe to her father:

“What a sweet voice he has, dad! ”

Michael replied from his corner:

“ T’ve often noticed it, Honor.”

The sweeping and the singing continued.
Michael Drum rose and opened the door between
the two rooms. Tony’s song—a school catch—

swept boldly in:

“ A southerly wind and a cloudy sky
Proclaimeth a hunting morning.
Before the sun rises away we will fly,

Dull sleep in a drowsy bed scorning.
To horse, my brave boys, and away !
Bright fevers the hills is adorning !
The face of all nature looks gay !
’Tis a beautiful hunting morning !
Then hark, hark! forward!
Tally ho! tally ho! tally ho!”

164




HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 165

Michael Drum burst forth into loud laughter.
Honor sniggered from sympathy, then looked
ashamed.

“Oh don’t!” she cried. “ You’ve spoilt it
all!”

Tony’s song was abruptly ended. Michael
Drum called out loudly:

“ Hi, Tony, come here.”

Then he chuckled under his breath: “ Fevers!
Fevers! Ha,ha! Ha, ha!”

Tony entered shyly.

“Why, you ninny!” cried Michael. “It isn’t
fevers that adorn the hills; it’s Phoebus—the sun,
y’ know. Oh, why did I spend a penny a week on
your education! ”

He dismissed him, and said to Honor: “ Igno-
rance is like your tongue—you can’t open you
mouth without showing it!”

In the evening, when the trouble of cleaning was
over, Michael Drum called Tony to the parental
knee, and began to banter him. But behind his
banter was a purpose.

“So you’re a bit of a singer, Tony,” he began.
yi a SIN My g
166 TONY DRUM.

Honor interposed eagerly: ‘I am too, father,
you know.”

“We're a musical family, then,” Michael re-
marked. “ That looks well for harmony of feeling.
Now, Tony, my son, do you think you could learn
a song?”

“Of course I could, father,” said Tony.

“Sing this after me, then. It’s one o’ Bobbie
Burns’—a rare song for a cold night!”” Michael
sang in a quavering voice:

“O, Willie brewed a peck o’ maut,
And Rob and Allan cam’ to see——’

He beat time with his hand. Tony sang the words
lustily, and Honor joined in with her shriller treble.

“Good!” said Michael. “ What a pitiful con-
trast my voice makes against yours though, Tony.

Now:

“ Three blither hearts that lee lang night
Ye wad na find in Christendie!”

Tony sang:

“ Three blither hearts that lee lang night
Ye wad na find in Christendie!”’
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 167

“Bravo!” Michael Drum stood up to the

chorus, beating the air with his hand.

“ «We are na fou, we’re na that fou,
But just a drappie in our e’e;
The cock may craw, the day may daw’,
And aye we'll taste the barley bree!’

“Tt ll stir the heart of every Scotsman in Lon-
don, and bang! open comes his pocket. I wonder
if a plaid—no, it’s against dignity and art. Now,
Tony!”

Tony put his hands behind his back and
stumbled gallantly through the chorus. They had

the next verse, beginning:

“Here are we met, three merry boys,”

and so onto the end. It was a very gay hour.

Michael Drum drew his flute from his pocket
and fitted the pieces together.

“ Now, sing to my playing,” he said. “ Come,
with a ‘O Willie a

Tony, with his thumbs still locked behind his



back, began. Honor chimed in.
“No, no,” cried Michael, “ Tony solus.”

Honor subsided into pouting silence. But when
168 TONY DRUM.

Tony began to sing, she forgot her ill-temper, and
her face broke out in smiles. Daintily she caught
up the hem of her frock and danced, mouthing
silently the words of the song. Michael, with his
eyes fixed seriously on Tony’s face, played the
flute. A flicker of pale flame shot up among the
black coals in the shining grate, lighting the room.
A hundred strange and trivial things, hitherto un-
seen, or seen only dimly, sprang into sudden promi-
nence—the hoar on Michael’s chin and his humid
eyes; Honor’s burst shoes, rising and falling, and
soiled hands, tightly clenched; the blank, strained
face of Tony; a battered teapot in the fender; an
oleograph upon the wall, with one torn, drooping
corner. At last the song came to an end. The
piping of the flute ceased after a few final flourishes.
Tony bowed his head modestly in anticipation of
praise, and ambled toward a chair. Honor sank
down, laughing and panting, on the shabby couch.

“ That’s the way to dance,” she said, with con-
viction.

Michael Drum unscrewed the pieces of his flute

and laid them tenderly aside.
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE, 169

“Now for a little serious talk, my son,” he
said.

“ But how did I do, father?” cried Tony, anx-
ious to be praised.

“You are a very good singer, indeed,” said
Michael, with a twinkling eye. “It only remains
to be seen if you are as good a son.”

Tony stared, and glanced at the clock. It
pointed to ten minutes past eight. At half-past
eight he must go to a choir practice in the church.
He said “ Yes, father,” and waited.

Michael screwed up his eyes. ‘“ Now, how
would you like to have another go at pork-butcher-
ing, Tony?” he asked.

Tony stammered, “ Oh, father! ”

“You wouldn’t like it. Well, don’t be afraid.
I haven’t any idea of that sort in my mind. I’m
going to suggest something higher to you.”

“Yes, father.”

“ But, first of all, I'd like to hear what is your
strongest ambition. You’re young enough to
have ambitions, and old enough, I hope, to put

reason into ’em. Now, out with it.”
170 TONY DRUM.

“T don’t quite understand.”

“Phew! What do you want to be? Soldier,
sailor, tinker, tailor, plowboy, apothecary, thief?
Though it’s a poor list.”

“T haven’t made up my mind yet, father,”. said
Tony.

“You’re very slow!” cried Michael. “ Would
you care to be a musician like me, now?”

Tony slowly shook his head.

“Why not? It’s a very fine calling—artistic,
Bohemian—and might be made profitable by any
man except a philosopher, I dare say. It’s a chas-
_tening profession too, yet independent. Damme!
I shall begin to love it, if I go on. What do you
say, Tony?”

“Td rather not be it—what you are, father,
please,” said the boy.

Michael frowned. “You're all whimsies,” he
said. “I give you the opportunity to be filial.
You don’t accept it. Very well. Now I exert
my parental authority. To-morrow, being Satur-
day, you’ll come with me.”

“With you, father? ”
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 171

“You'll come with me on my rounds, to sing to
my playing, and go about with the hat.”

Tony’s face blanched; he was stonily silent.

“You understand? ” said Michael.

“Yes, father.”

Tony nodded and turned away. He sat down
against the window and rested his head on the
glass. Michael stole a glance at him and met his
dull, imploring eyes. He looked from Tony to
Honor. Honor was watching him also; on her
face was an expression of angry scorn. Michael
Drum felt the need of his philosophy. He rose
and groped on the mantel for the matches. He
heard Honor stir at his feet and cross the room to
her brother.

_“ Never mind, Tony,” said Honor, and there was’
a sound of kissing.

Michael Drum turned.

“What's that?” he cried, frowning impatiently.

“ Here’s your psalter, Tony,” said Honor.

Michael laughed. Tony tucked the psalter
under his arm, caught up his cap, and stole from

the room. Michael went after him to the landing.
172 TONY DRUM.

Tony clattered downstairs. Halfway he stopped
and looked up. His father, with a sardonic face,
was surveying him over the banisters.

“Tf you please, father,” stammered Tony.

“Well?” said Michael.

“Tf you please, I’d rather not.”

“What!”

“Td much rather not, father.”

Michael spluttered contemptuously.

“The boys ’Il jeer at me, father,” Tony pleaded,
emboldened by the distance between them.

“Jeers are the ushers of applause, my son.”

This Tony did not understand. He shot one
more upward imploring glance.

“JT wish you’d let me off, father,” he murmured.

“Nonsense! Think what an artistic calling it
is. Would you rather be a coal-heaver? ”

“ But, father,” pleaded Tony, “ I’m too delicate.
It ll make me ill.”

“Oh, no, it won’t,” said Michael, slightly winc-
ing. “You shall only go if it’s fine. A walk
won't hurt you.”

Tony hesitated.
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 173

“It’s like—it’s like begging, father,” he faltered
at last.

“The devil!” cried Michael Drum, in a great
rage. He stooped, pulled off his slipper, and
hurled it at Tony. “ Be off with you, you unduti-
ful jack-a-dandy!” he cried. Tony ducked, leaped
forward, and sped away through the open door
into the street.

But he carried a heart of stone to the church.
In the porch he met Nick Tolmers.

“What’s up?” asked Nick.

Tony answered: “ Nothing.”

“Your face is long enough, anyhow.”

“Nick!” cried Tony, “don’t you think every-
thing’s awful rot?”
But Nick Tolmers demurred from this view.

“Everything!” he said. “ Oh, come now! some
things aint so bad—look at gals, for instance.”

Tony started.

“Oh, I know!” chuckled Nick, winking.
“ Carrie Green don’t live in my house for nothing!”

Tony’s vanity awoke. He smiled consciously.

“Shut it, Nick,” he said, kicking his heels,
174 : TONY DRUM.

“T’m glad to see you took my advice,” said Nick
seriously. “TI told you it was easy enough. But
what do you think? ”

Tony shook his head. Much of his gloom had
departed.

| Whate?/

“T got a letter from her.”

“From Carrie? ” Tony cried.

Nick said “ Um!” and nodded.

“ Give us it.”

The precious letter passed: it was not less
precious because written on the back of a handbill.
Tony read it and smiled with gratification.

“T will be outside the church at 4 past 9. You
be there too. Yr lovg. sweetheart, Carrie,” was
what she wrote. But in the corner were two tiny
kisses. Tony looked at Nick and grinned. The
shadow of the morrow had lifted.

“ She spells ‘ to’ with two o’s,” murmured Nick.

“You are a fool!” said Tony scornfully. His
surprise at Nick’s extreme folly was intense enough
to be almost flattering.

Nick said nothing in reply, and they walked


HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 175

together up the aisle. In the vestry a new thought
awoke in Tony. He drew Nick aside and asked
him indignantly:

“What do you want to go and read my letters
for?”

“ Gawd!” gasped Nick; “ d’you think ’'m going
to fetch and carry for the likes o’ you for nothink? ”

Tony was angrily silent.

A short service preceded the practice. During
the sermon Tony once more thought of the im-
pending morrow, and the vista of his future dark-
ened. His glimpses of the blind organist, Paul
Hands, behind the curtain in the organ-loft, moved
him to a sudden resolve. When the practice was
over and the other boys had departed, he lingered
behind. The music of the organ still rolled forth
like a sea. Tony stole to the rapt musician’s side.

“Mr. Hands,” he whispered.

The blind man’s busy fingers stopped. He
turned his sfghtless eyes toward Tony.

“Ts it Hannah?” he asked.

He had a snarling mouth and puckered brows.

Tony felt somewhat abashed.
176 TONY DRUM.

“ No, sir,” he faltered; “ it’s me.”

“ Tony—ah! - Well, Tony?”

The kindness of his voice was in odd contrast to
the harshness of his face.

“Do they want to make a pork-butcher of you
still?” the blind man asked, pursing his mouth in
a wry smile.

_ “No, sir,” said Tony. “Father wants me to
go begging in the streets with him—leastways, it
aint exactly begging, sir.”

“Tell me all about it.”

Tony confided his whole trouble. Paul Hands
was silent a while.

“ Well, Tony,” he said at last, “ I’m afraid I can’t
help you this time.”

“ Oh, sir!”

Tony felt that he was now finally delivered over
to despair.

“ Don’t whimper,” said the blind man peevishly,
“it irritates me so. I can’t help you, because I’m
going away to-morrow.”

“Going away!” cried Tony. “For good?”

“For the good of this church, the vicar
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 177

says. Tony, do you know what. intolerance
iste

“No, sir,” faltered Tony.

“It’s faith in blinkers. There, there! What
was that you said? Look here, Tony, I’ll give you
the address of the place I’m going to. You can
write to me, or come to me, you know. I'll always
help you, if I can. Put up with a little hardship
just at first. It won’t hurt you. And if things get
too bad, let me know.”

“Thank you, sir,” said Tony despairingly.

“How you whine!” snapped the blind man.
“ Have a little pluck, boy! There, you poor child!
Now, go away: Shake hands. Here’s the ad-
dress. Think of me sometimes. Good-by!”

He turned again to the organ, and Tony Drum
walked away with his trouble.

Outside, Carrie waited for him in the shelter of
the porch. At sight of the comely little maid,
Tony felt his trouble roll off him, like Christian’s
bundle at the Mercy Gate. They strolled along,
with arms interlocked, two palpitating morsels of

sentiment in a desert of prose,
178 TONY DRUM.

“You got my note,” said Carrie.

Tony tapped his breast-pocket.

“Did you see what I put in the corner?” she
asked, with her face dimpling.

Tony answered mysteriously: “TPIl tell you
under the trees.”

The trees grew behind the somber wall of a tall
mansion that had stood empty and lifeless for half
a century under the Chancery blight; their
branches overhung the pavement. What Tony
told Carrie in the leafless shadow of those trees can
never transpire.

It was an idyllic interlude between the day and
the morrow.

“Youre my first real sweetheart,” said
Carrie.

“ Am I, straight?” cried the delighted Tony.

Carrie looked at him with serious eyes.

“Well,” she said, ‘there was Tom Moss, of
course. But I never properly liked him, you
know—only went with him.”

For a moment the shadow of Tom Moss out-.

shadowed the shadow of the morrow.
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 179

“You never told me about him,” said Tony re-'
proachfully.

“Oh, he was nobody!”

“Bu ”

“ Have you seen my necklace?”



Conversation being thus adroitly diverted, the
idyl continued unbroken to its conclusion.

But wriggle as he might, evade thought of it as
he would, Tony could not escape the morrow. He
went to bed happily oblivious, steeped in love of
Carrie. He dreamed of her all night, and awoke
with her image smiling in his brain. The dawn
lowered grim. The gray light, filling his bedroom,
was heavy with menace. He lay contemplating
his melancholy fate. Honor stirred beside him and
slipped her hand into his. He had thought her
asleep.

“T say, Tony, I wouldn’t go if I were you,” she
said.

meal must,” he answered.

“Tt’s awful!” she said. ‘Supposing some o’
the girls see you. They'll make it nice and hot for

me.”
180 TONY DRUM.

“Why, you’re only thinking of yourself!” he
cried. ‘“‘ How about me?”

“Oh, boys don’t care,” said Honor.

Tony smiled bitterly.

“You'd better shut up,” he said, “or learn to
talk sense.”

Honor jerked her hand away indignantly, and a
wall of silence rose up between them.

At the breakfast table Michael Drum affected a
cheerful manner, though he could not fail to mark
the glum faces of his rebellious offspring.

“ You'd better put on your best clothes, Tony,”
he said, “and a clean collar and a bow. Rags are
quite played out now; the card is respectable pov-
erty.”

Tony munched on in ferocious silence; but
Honor cried out:

“I say, father, what do you want to take Tony
with you for?”

Michael Drum put down his knife and fork and
surveyed her steadily.

“Go on with your breakfast, my lass,” he said.
“Your father knows best. Perhaps, if he didn’t,


HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE, 181

you wouldn’t have any breakfast to go on
with.”

““T don’t see any sense in it,” grumbled Honor,
rising from the table.

Michael Drum chuckled.

Honor helped to dress Tony for the sacrifice.
Weeping angrily, she pinned his collar and ar-
ranged his bow. The sight of her tears distressed
him greatly. He went out with a white face,
clasping his father’s hand.

It had lately rained; the pavements were
mottled, brown and gray. A strong wind was
blowing. Michael Drum shivered slightly at first
contact with the sweet, cold air.

_ “There’s an edge on the day,” he said.

As they walked he expounded a little of his phi-.
losophy to Tony.

“My son,” said he, “beware of undue pride.
They say it’s an armor; but what a man chiefly
wants is protection from himself. And it isn’t a
good armor, either; anything hurts through it.
There’s a dignity about it, perhaps. Well, stand-

ing on his dignity never made a little man tall!
182 TONY DRUM.

Humble pie is a wholesome dish for the young.
You have to eat a lot o’ dirt with life. It’s a sort
of seasoning. There are some people who feed on
nothing else, but that’s bad. Troubles are like
shadows of yourself, big on the ground; stoop to
examine them, and they grow wonderfully small.
Money is a good cement for broken hearts. Every
man is labeled somewhere, if you can only find the
label. It is better to draw a truck well than a
picture badly. Here’s a place we'll go into, I
think. I always start the day ona glass of ale. It
seems to color the outlook!”

Tony was led into a dingy public-house, redo-
lent of yesterday’s heel-taps. A stout lady, with
indeterminate features on a purple face, leaned over
the bar and stared from father to son with a wall-
eyed intensity very distressing to Tony.

“Your son, Mr. Drum? ” asked the lady.

“My son.”

“He favors you. How old are you, my pretty
boy?”

“ Twelve,” Tony answered scornfully.

“ Have a cake.”
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 183

“No, thank you, ma’am.”
“Go on, Tony, take it,” said his father.
Tony accepted the cake.

“Tm taking him with me this morning,” said

BB)



Michael, ‘ to sin

“ Sing, does he? ”

“And go round wi’ the hat.”

Tony choked. Why would his father thus ad-
vertise their shame?

“ He’s rather shy, I’m afraid, aint he?” said the
lady.
_ “Not he,” answered Michael.

“Will he sing to me now?”

“Not now,” said Michael hastily. ‘“ To-night
he will, when I do the pub doors.”

“T shall look out for you, my little boy.”

“Yes, ma’am,” said Tony..

He was glad to breathe the fresher air of the
streets again.

“We'll start soon,” said Michael Drum.

“Oh, no,” cried Tony, “ let’s get further away.”

His father frowned and jerked him forward by

the arm angrily.
184 TONY DRUM.

“Haven't I got my regular round?” he said.
“Do you think I’m going to alter everything to
please you? Let me have no more of it.”

They walked on a little further and turned into
a quiet, staid byway where the houses were tall and
precise and semi-detached. Michael Drum fitted
the pieces of his flute together and stepped into the
road, telling Tony to keep at his side.

“Tl play a tune first by myself,” said he.

Tony breathed easier for the respite. Michael
Drum played “The Mermaid’s Song” from
Oberon, moving down the center of the road at a
snail’s pace as he played, and casting his eyes up-
ward and from side to side. A penny rolled in the
dust. Michael Drum removed his lips from the
flute to say, “Pick ’em up and bow to the
windows.”

“Oh, father!” cried Tony, smitten with new
shame.

Michael Drum played on, inexorably; perhaps
he remembered his own father and the sheep.
No man can resist a glow at getting even with

fate.
HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE. 185

Tony was shaken by a tempest of contending
emotions. Other pennies were rolling in the dust.
He bent and picked them up one by one. Re-
membering his father’s injunction, he stooped, be-
tween the pennies, to jerk his body toward the
windows. He would have liked to hurl a stone at
any one of the faces smiling kindly down.

“ How much?” asked Michael Drum.

Tony turned over the money in his palm.

“Sixpence ha’penny.”

“Good! Now we'll have ‘ Willie brewed a peck
o’ maut.’ ”

“ Please, father—no! ”

“Tm smiling at you,” said Michael, “ because if
the people saw me frown it would injure the re-
ceipts. But if you don’t sing I’ll give you your
first real thrashing when you get home. Come
now.”

The sweat stood on Tony’s brow.

“Come now,” said his father. He blew a note
palpitating with anger.

“T can’t, father.”

Michael Drum spluttered with rage.
186 TONY DRUM.

“You're making a fool of me,” he said,
“Where’s your duty? Sing.”

Tony nerved himself to the effort and began to
sing. Nervousness made him hoarse at the out-
set, and even when that passed his voice wobbled
pitifully.

“ Bravo!” whispered Michael Drum at the end
of the first verse. “That’s right. Goon. Take
it easy. Don’t flurry yourself.”

The second verse was gone through with better
success.

“You shall have threepence to spend,” said
Michael Drum; “ you’re doing well.’’

Tony was halfway through the third verse when
he saw, turning the corner abreast, a portly dame
of middle age, bearing a market basket on her arm,
and a slim maid, in a wide chip hat, short skirts,
and brown stockings. Tony knew the wide chip
hat and the little face it shaded. The song died
on his lips.

“Go on,” his father muttered angrily.

Tony said “ Carrie!” with his eyes on the slim

maid.


HE RUNS AWAY FROM THE INEVITABLE, 187

Carrie heard the whisper of her name, and
looked at him. He saw that part of her neck
which the sunlight touched turn from creamy
white to blush pink; he saw her head jerked
haughtily aside, and marked her quickened pace.
His disgrace overwhelmed him; his wits were scat-
tered abroad. He gave his father one glance,
lifted his heels, and fled as fast as his infirmities
allowed from the scene of his dark humiliation.

His father hobbled after him, shouting, “ Tony!
Tony!”

But Tony heeded him not.

Michael Drum, having run a hundred yards,
stopped, panting, and leaned against some area
railings to recover breath. Tony, the arch snob,
was gone from view. The father smiled and
sighed as he wiped his brow.

“The boy is me over again,” he reflected.

He could not withhold his natural admiration.
With a painful effort he adjusted his philosophy to
cover his disappointment. .

He stepped into the road, and played his flute

alone.
CHAPTER XIII.
HE STRIKES AN ATTITUDE.

Tony ran on blindly until he was exhausted;
then, coming upon an iron seat in a quiet byway,
he sat down, panting, to recover himself. He
found that his face was wet with tears; his limbs
trembled; his brain was awhirl. He looked
vacantly before him. Slowly, as he recovered
breath, his heart changed from a violent pumping
engine to a heavy, cold stone. He felt empty of
all feeling save loneliness. For a great while he
sat there, idly watching the passers-by and wonder-
ing why he alone of all the world should be un-
happy. Every now and then an involuntary whim-
per was wrung out of him. At last he rose, shiver-
ing, and shambled slowly away.

Throughout the long drear afternoon he wan-
dered aimlessly about the streets, with lagging feet
and a sick mind. Toward evening he found him-

self near to his home again, on a steep hill away
188
HE STRIKES AN ATTITUDE. 189

from the river. He was worn-out, hungry, and
thirsty. He went to a little fountain to get a drink
of water.

Footsteps passed along behind him down the
road. They stopped and he heard a laugh. He
turned quickly and saw Carrie. The cold stone in
his breast suddenly melted into liquid fire that ran
and tingled in his veins. The tin cup fell from his
hands and swung dangling on the chain; the icy
water splashed on his legs, wetting him through
his stockings.

Carrie was not alone. Tony saw that at once,

but at first he could not tell who was her com-

_panion, because a mist had risen before his eyes.

The mist cleared away and he perceived the grin-
ning face of Nick Tolmers.

Carrie laughed again.

Tony stepped into the road and confronted her.
Nick Tolmers he ignored. He said quietly,
“ Carrie,” and then stood watching her face. She
blushed slightly and giggled.

“T don’t want to have nothink more to do with

you, Tony Drum,” she said.
Igo TONY DRUM.

“ An’ quite right too!” interposed Nick.

“You shut up an’ go away, Nick Tolmers,” said
Tony, with dignity. “ Nobody arst you to put
your spoke in. You aint got nothink to do
with it.”

“Oh, aint I!” said Nick. “ We’ll soon see
about that, Tony Drum.”

Tony turned on him fiercely.

“What are you doing out wi’ my gal?” he de-
manded.

“Who’s she?” asked Nick.

“As if you wanted to have anythink to do with
his gal, Nick!” cried Carrie.

Tony breathed hard.

“ Nicholas Tolmers,” he said sternly, “ prepare
to defend yourself!”

“Don’t be a red and ruddy fool, Tony,” said
Nick. “ You know I can lick you into tatters.”

SeYoue.”

“You know I wouldn’t never lower myself to
fight you. You’re only gassing.”

“You'll have to fight me, though,” said Tony.

“T don’t want to fight a cripple.”


HE STRIKES AN ATTITUDE. 19t

“Tf lama cripple,” said Tony, “I can give you
a pastin’, and quick!”

“Tony, go home,” said Carrie.

“ T wish to hold no conversation with you, Caro-
line Green!” said Tony haughtily.

“Oh, drop it!” cried Nick. “TI shall have to
pull your nose as long as your father’s, if you don’t.
Why can’t you behave sensible, and go away?”

Tony laughed bitterly. He threw down his cap
and struck a fighting attitude. Carrie hastily
interposed between the two boys.

“ Oh, don’t fight,” she said.

Tony pushed her aside and sparred up to Nick.
He began to aim blows thick and fast at Nick’s
head. Nick warded them off with his elbows,
good-humoredly at first, but soon with growing
irritation.

“Drop it, Tony, drop it!” he yelled. “ Don’t
be such a blighted fathead! ’Taint my fault as she
prefers me to you. Drop it, can’t you! D’y’ear,
drop it! I shall have to fetch you a fourpenny
one in a minute!”

“ There’s your coward’s blow!” cried Tony, as
192 TONY DRUM.

he at last succeeded in planting his fist on Nick’s
mouth. “ Now will you fight? ”

Nick, smarting from the blow, lunged out sav-
agely, and Tony fell.

“Oh, please don’t hurt him!” screamed Carrie.
“ Poor little fellow! ”

Her words stung Tony as no blows could have
done. He jumped up, seething with rage, and
attacked Nick furiously.

There was a quick, short round, and then Tony
reeled down again, half stunned, the blood trickling
from his nose.

“Come away, come away!” cried Nick, snatch-
ing at Carrie’s hand. “ Let’s run.”

“ Coward!” Tony spluttered, rising painfully.

“I don’t care what you call me,” said Nick.
“Td rather run away than fight a cripple. Come,
Carrie, come! ”

He dragged her away. Tony pursued them, but
they were too fleet for him, and he was forced to
relinquish the chase.

A woman said to him, with the light of an intol-

erable pity shining in her soft eyes:


HE STRIKES AN ATTITUDE. 193

“ Oh, you poor little boy! What have you done
to your face?”

He glared at her resentfully.

“You can go to hell, that’s what you can do!”

he replied.
CHAPTER XIV.

HE SUFFERS LOSS.

THE night closed in dark and chill. Honor
rose from the couch yawning. Her loneliness had
overpowered her, and she had fallen into an uncom-
fortable doze. A street lamp threw a square of
mottled yellow light upon the ceiling. A thin
rain beat upon the windows. She listened. There
was a step on the stairs.

“Tony!” she cried.

He entered the room whistling, with his hands
deep in his pockets and his cap obscuring one eye.
There was a bloody streak across his face; his
clothes were torn and bespattered with mud.

“ Hullo, Honor,” he said gruffly, regarding her
fixedly with his visible eye. ‘“ Father come home
yet?”

Honor rose, clutched his sleeve, and twisted his

face to the light.
194
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 195

“Why, what have you been doing, Tony?” she
gasped.

He frowned and sniggered.

“ Nothink,” he answered. “ How d’you mean? ”

Honor released him. He crossed to the fire and
lita candle. This he carried to a scrap of looking-
glass against the wall. For a great while he stood
viewing his reflection. At last he turned, with
clumsy carelessness, and said:

“Oh, you mean my nose. Yes, it’s been bleed-
ing. I knocked it.”

He spat upon his handkerchief and wiped his
face.

“T fell down,” he said, speaking slowly as he
sternly regarded his sister. “Slipped on some
orange peel, or something. It’s a wonder I didn’t
bust my crust.” He paused and glared angrily at
her. “ What are you looking at me like that for? ”
he demanded. “ Can’t you believe a fellow? ”

Honor averted her eyes from his face.

“ How is it tea aint ready?” he growled. “ And
where’s father? ”

“He hasn’t come home yet,” said Honor.
196 TONY DRUM.

“Oh, hasn’t he? ”

She hesitated, and then burst forth:

“T say, Tony, how is it you’re not with
him?”

He winked his solitary eye and whistled softly,
“ Not for Joe!”

“ But won’t you get into an awful row?”

“T don’t care if I do,” he said. But his brows
were knit, and his eyes were dark with trouble.

He turned to the window and drummed with
his fingers on the glass nervously. His casual
manner did not deceive Honor. She stood watch-
ing him for a while, then went to him and put her
hands upon his shoulders. He tried to shake her
off.

“ Go away, can’t you?” he said brokenly.

“Oh, Tony, you’re crying,’ Honor exclaimed.

He turned and confronted her.

“What if lam?” he growled. “So would you
cry if you’d hurt your nose.”

| Twain thats’

He turned to the window again.

“No, it aint that,” he confessed. “TI say,


HE SUFFERS LOSS. 197

Honor; if I tell you something, promise me you
won’t make fun.”
“Of course I won’t.”
There was along pause. At last Tony asked:
“You know Carrie? ”
Honor nodded.
“Of course! Why, aint she 2



Tony lowered his eyes.

“This morning,” said he, interrupting her,
“when I was with dad, singing, she see me.” He
stopped, choking. -

“Oh, Tony, she’ll go and tell everybody,”
wailed Honor, starting up affrighted at the
thought. “It ’Il get all over the place, and Tom “Il
hear. He’s so partickler, too; an’ I aint never told
him what father is!”

“ A fat lot I care about him!” said Tony.



“Tt’s all very well for you, but mf

Ss ohuteup! ‘cried Pony, angrily. “You're a
bloomin’ selfish beast. And I won’t tell you an-
other word.” —

“Yes, tell me,” pleaded Honor contritely.

“JT never saw sech a gal; but gals are all alike,”
198 TONY DRUM.

said Tony, somewhat inconsequently. “I am jolly
glad I was born a boy, an’ not a gal,” he went on.
“I'd rather have a terrier than a sweetheart any
day. I can’t make out why men ever marry
women. I know I shan’t be such a fool!”

“ You might as well tell me about Carrie, Tony.”

“T shan’t tell you now—see! ”

“Oh, you might as well!”

“T shan’t, then! ”

“Idon’t care. I’m not going to bemean myself
to a kid,” said Honor, recovering her dignity. “TI
can find out for myself, I dessay. I s’pose she’s
jacked you up, eh?”

She withdrew from her brother. He continued
to drum upon the window.

“ All right,” he said at length; “T’ll tell you.”

She cried “ Oh, do!” and dumped down on a
stool at his feet.

Tony began:

“As soon as I see it was her, I cut. I couldn’t
stand it. I started on the mouch, and mooned
about all over the shop for ever such atime. T felt

pretty rotten, I can tell you. An’ I kep’ on get-


6
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 199

ting hungrier an’ hungrier every minute. So at
last I thought I’d better strike for home and chance
it. I went to have some water from the founting
on the hill, an’ while I was a-drinking it, I heard
somebody a-gassing behind me, and I turned
round, and who should it be but Nick Tolmers and
—and,” Tony choked, “and Carrie!”

“ Oh,” cried Honor, “ there’s deceitfulness! ”

“T stared at ’em like anythink, an’ they stared
back. Nick, he tried to laugh, an’ carry it off that
way. He’s a fine sort 0’ mate, he is! I went up
to him, an’ I said, ‘ What are you a-doin’ out wi’
my gal?’ ‘Who’s she?’ he said. He’s got
enough gyver on him, he has, to float a barge.
An’ Carrie—I couldn’t never have believed it,
Honor! Carrie, she said, ‘As if you wanted to
have anythink to do with his gal, Nick!’ Well, I
couldn’t say nothink to her, but I give Nick his
coward’s blow in half a jiff.”

It was at this point that Tony began to wander
from the path of truth.

“¢T wouldn’t let him hit me,’ Carrie said, ‘ even

if he is a good fighter!’ ‘I aint a-going to, so
200 TONY DRUM.

don’t you think it,’ Nick said, though he was as
frightened as a chicken on the lines. So we hada
scrap up.” Tony rubbed his swollen nose. “ An’
I beat,” he said slowly; “he’ll have ever such a
black eye in the morning, I lay. He give me best.
Carrie said to him, ‘ You’re a coward, Nick!’ An’
then he started blubbering. The great kid!
Carrie wanted to make it up wi’ me after that, but
I said I’d see her blowed first! ”

“ Serve her right!” cried Honor. ‘“ Oh, she is
a cat!”

“ Ah,” said Tony, sighing for another lost illu-
sion. “ But I never thought gals was like that!”

An uncomfortable silence fell when Tony had
told his garbled story. Honor tried hard to look
as if she believed it, but with ill-success. Tony
fought desperately with a new access of rage and
grief and shame. He went over to the hearth and
gazed through water at the fire.

A step was heard on the stairs. Honor clutched
Tony’s arm, and stood listening.

“Tt’s father,’ she whispered. ‘‘ You’d better
get out of the way, Tony.”
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 201

But Tony was in a fatalistic mood. “ What’s
the use?” he.mumbled. ‘“ The licking’s bound to
come some time.”

Michael Drum appeared. He closed the door
softly and advanced toward Tony.

“So you’re here, my son, are you?” he cried,
pointing a finger at the boy. “ Lolling in the lap
of luxury while your poor father trudges the
streets, catching his death. Oh, you bloated aris-
tocrat! What is the latest news from Court, my
lord? How was her Majesty when you see her
last?”

The ferocity of his father’s humor frightened
Tony into a corner; he stood against the wall with
his arm raised across his face.

“Tm very sorry, father,” he said.

“You are indeed a sorry son,” said «Michael.
“And in five minutes you'll be sorrier still.” He
tweaked Tony’s ear.

Honor looked on in an agony of apprehension.
“Don’t hurt him, father,” she pleaded.

Michael Drum laughed scornfully. He had un-
duly colored the outlook that day, and so
202 TONY DRUM.

his perception of the humorous was bitterly
acute.

“No,” he said reflectively, “it would be a pity
to hurt him, wouldn’t it? Such a tender skin he
has! Ha, ha! And he would run away from the
inevitable, would he? ”

“ How dare he run away!” cried a far-off, mock-
ing voice.

Michael Drum stood transfixed. His loose eyes
rolled. His hand wandered up to his chin and
played about his lips. Tony and Honor stared
blankly at one another.

“How dare he run away!” cried the voice
again.

Then the door was pushed open and an old man
entered the room. He was tall and broad: a hale
old man, wonderfully erect. His clean-shaven
face, brown as a new walnut, was puckered in a
grim smile. He had keen, glancing eyes and
squarely cut features. On his white close-cropped
head he wore a tall, shiny hat with an extravagant
brim, sweetly curled. A rough frieze coat swathed

him from olive-green stock to cowhide boots. He
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 203

stood, leaning forward on his mighty staff, with
his shrewd gaze full on Michael’s face.

There was a long pause. At length Michael
shook himself, as one recovering from a stunning
thwack, and whispered: “Father! Father! Is
it really father?”

The old man sat down.

“We have both altered,” he said.

Michael sniggered foolishly. He stood awk-
wardly rubbing his hands. Tony looked, and it
seemed to him that his father was suddenly become
a grotesque child. He looked at the wonderful old
man, and was abashed when he found the old man’s
eyes upon him.

“Come here, boy,” said the old man.

Tony went to him.

“ What is your name?”

Tony licked his lips, but did not answer. He
had conceived a violent dislike of his grandfather.
He felt keenly that he was despised for his weak-
ness, and his whole nature rose in passionate, proud
resentment.

“ What is your name? ” the old man asked again.
204, TONY DRUM.

Still Tony did not answer—would not.

“Ts he dumb as well as crippled?” asked the
old man of Michael.

“No,” said Michael. “He is merely fright-
ened.”

“Tam not frightened,” said Tony, and suddenly
finding voice: “I am never frightened. But you
are cruel to let on about me being humpy, and I
hate you. I hate everybody. I——” He burst
suddenly into tears and ran from the room.

The old man gazed sourly at Michael.

“Ts that your other child?” he asked, pointing
with his stick at Honor.

“Yes,” said Michael. “ Shake hands with your
grandfather, Honor.”

“Tm no pump,” he growled. “Come here, my
lass.””

She walked up to him boldly.

“What is your name?”

“ Honor Drum.”

“Honor! H’m. It’s an ambitious name. Do
you live up to it?”

Honor faltered, “ I don’t know.”
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 205

“ Does she, Mike?”

“ How can I tell you, father?”

“Go away, lass. Go and wipe your brother’s
eyes.”

Honor tossed her head disdainfully, and left the
room.

“Well, Mike,” said old Drum. ‘And so your
boy would run away from you? ”

“ Tt’s in the blood,” said Michael.

“Tt never was in mine, thank God!” snapped the
old man. He looked about him keenly. “So this
is what you have soared to, Mike?” he said.

Michael Drum was silent.

“What tunes do you play on the pipe now,
Mike?”

Still Michael Drum was silent.

The old man laughed dryly, and rose.

“Vou are not going, father?” cried Michael.
“We have not even shaken hands yet!”

“Ves, I’m going,” said the old man. “TI only
wanted to see if you had changed. You have not.”

“ Vou will come again to see me, father?”

“No.”
206 TONY DRUM.

“ Father, you must.”

“No, I will not. The air of this place takes me
by the throat and shakes me. But you may come
and see me if you like. I am staying at Epping
for a few days—at the ‘ Blue Boar.’ ”

“T will come,” said Michael. “ That is, I will
come if I don’t wake up very soon.”

“You're not dreaming now, Mike,” said the old
man, with a wintry smile. ‘“ You woke up some
years ago. Ah, Mike, if you had only walked to
London and back you would ha’ been a man by
now.”

They went downstairs together. At the open-
ing of the outer door the noises of the street swept
in tumultuously.

“T don’t like this London of yours,” said the old
man. “ There is not a corner in it that a wounded
dog could go and die in quietly.”

“T could not leave it now,” said Michael quickly.

“T have not asked you to leave it,” snarled the
old man.

“P’r’aps, when I am very ill some day, I may

want to crawl back home.”
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 207

“Sick men are never welcome. Mark ye, Mike,
neither o’ the bairns when you come to see me at
Epping. The lass—well, I may do something for
her, but the boy is your own child.”

And he strode away suddenly, his great staff tap-
tapping on the flags. Michael stood gazing after
him in dazed bewilderment.

“ He is gone,” he sighed.

Yes, he was gone. He had come and passed like
a strong spring wind, and was no more seen. But
he left a trace, as the winds will now and then.

That night Tony was struck down by sickness,
and the dispensary doctor had to be called in. He
shook his head in his wonted manner and departed,
leaving a prescription.

“Ts this the last?’ asked Michael Drum, hag-

gard with the memory of his recent unkindness to

Tony.

“ He’s a tender plant,’ murmured the doctor,
evading Michael’s eyes. “Keep him warm and
- quiet.”

So Tony lay in bed for a week, only dimly con-

scious of his own existence. His mind was ever
208 TONY DRUM.

busy with visions in which a certain boy, once
crippled and small, bulked large and gloriously.
The boy led forlorn hopes upon the battlefield, res-
cued innumerable Carries from perils of fire and
water, and sometimes died with a smiling face up-
turned to approving heaven.

One evening Tony awoke from his stupor to
hear his father and Honor talking. Their voices
came to him through a haze, in which the pale gilt
figures of his dream still flitted, shadowy and dim.

Honor was speaking.

“Tt’s all very well to sneer,” she said; “ but I’m
nearly a woman.”

“So you are,” said Michael in a surprised voice.

“T had not noticed it.”



“But Pil go, because She wept. “ Oh,

17

I hate men!” she cried.

“Tt will be a good thing for you,” said the voice
of Michael Drum, coming to Tony through a liquid
gurgle. “ You will see the big hills and taste the
sweet air. I wish I were going with you.”

A vision of big hills absorbed Tony, and he lis-

tened no longer. Presently he heard his name


HE SUFFERS LOSS. 209

whispered, and he wandered off a winding moun-
tain-path to receive a Kiss.

“Ts it you?” he cried, opening his eyes.

“Oh, Tony, Tony!” said Honor.

He groaned impatiently and buried his face in
the pillows.

A week later he was out of bed again, greatly to
the dispensary doctor’s surprise.

He sat alone in the little front room. His father
and Honor had gone out earlier that day. It was
now evening. The streets were filled with gray
twilight. The sky above the housetops was yel-
low with the reflected glare of a neighboring
market-place. The hubbub of the noisy trafficking
came faintly to Tony.

He shivered as he sat. The fire had gone out
and there was no more fuel. He rose feebly and
lit an end of candle. It spluttered angrily, and
Tony was whimsically reminded of old Stephen
Drum. In such wise had the sturdy Dalesman
been kindled to speech.

Tony sighed. He was full of vague regrets this

evening.
210 TONY DRUM.

The candle guttered fast. Tony had risen to
search for a new candle, when Michael Drum ap-
peared in the doorway. Tony looked hard at his
father and beyond him, and then stammered out:

“Where’s Honor? ”

“Sit down,” said Michael gruffy. “I'll tell
you.”

At that moment the candle flame leaped, flick-
ered, and expired.

“Damn the light!” cried Michael savagely.

He struck a match and went to the mantelpiece,
where stood a tin lamp.

“There’s no oil in it, father,” said Tony.

Michael stood with the lamp glass in one hand
and the flaming match in the other. He stared
stonily at Tony over the glare until he scorched his
fingers.

“No oil in it!” he cried. “ Then damn every-
thing! ”

And he hurled the glass with a mighty crash into
the fender.

“Never mind about it being dark,” said Tony.
“Where’s Honor, father?”
HE SUFFERS LOSS. 2I1

“Tf you must know,” said Michael, “ Honor has
gone away.”

“Gone away!” repeated Tony dully.

“Gone with your grandfather to Cumberland.
We thought you’d better be kept in the dark to
save a fuss, as you were so ill. She’s to be made a
lady!”

Tony echoed, “A lady!”

“Ah,” said Michael, “it’s only a matter of
aitches and dress.”

“ But did she want to go?” asked Tony.

“ She was rarely set upon it, you may be sure,”
said Michael Drum. “ But, of course, it made her
cry to part from herself.”

“ And me!” said Tony.

“ And you—yes,” said Michael; “and me, per-
haps. Who knows? It’s a ridiculous world!”

Tony sat quite still, gazing fixedly at his father’s
face.

“Oh, Honor, Honor!” he cried suddenly.
“How could you? How could you? An’ not
even to wish me good-by!”’

He bowed his head in the darkness and wept.
CHAPTER XV.

HE WRITES LETTERS.

IN a few days a letter came from Honor.

“DEAR Tony [she wrote], I send you these
few lines, hopping you are quite well as it leaves
me at present. I know you must think me very
unkind for not saying good-by to you but they
wooden let me tho I wanted to ever so much gran-
father is very nice rely and this place is very nice
and you know commons hill it ant nothing to these
ones here but I wish you was here it would be very
nice rely then theres a big dog barks at me his
name toser and I am so afraid off him last night
they killed to pigs and they swkeeked ever so you
won't believe I send you my love so no more at
present from loveing sister HONOR DRuM ps I
send my love to father please write me a nice long

letter like this one Forgive mistakes as I ant never

2I2
HE WRITES LETTERS. 213

wrote a letter before and I ant clever like you Tony
but the dairymaid helped me her name is rose and
she is ever so kind she showed me how to make

butter.”

Tony dropped a tear upon the blotted sheet, and
at once forgave his sister.

He replied:

“DEAR Honor, I forgive you freely. I know
it was not your fault, but father’s. I miss you very
much, but I am glad for your sake you are gone
away, because I know it will be a good thing for
you inthe long run. Learn all you can, that is the
way to get clever, and clever people can do any-
thing almost. Father thinks he is clever, but he
makes a mistake. He thinks it was clever to de-
ceive me about you. It was only mean. Grown-
up people are always mean and conceited. They
think children are fools. Iamnotafool. I know
as well as anything that grown-up people are
frauds. They pretend to know such a lot more
than we do, but it is all rot. Look how you can

stuff them up if you like. I hate the way they
214 TONY DRUM.

patromze us. If we only had their chances we
would soon show them whether we was fools or
not. It does not seem as if grown-up people could
ever have been children like us, but I suppose as
you grow up you change and get silly. I should
like to see a mountain—a real one. Scafell is near
where you are. It is the highest mountain in Eng-
land, 3208 feet; but there is one in Wales, Snow-
don, higher still. I suppose Windermere is pretty
near you too. It is the biggest lake in England,
14 miles long. The biggest lake in the world is
the Caspian Sea, between Europe and Asia, but
that is salt. But you will say I am worse than
school. I think I shall be a teacher when I grow
up, if only they will let me go to school again.
That seems about the best thing. Teachers have
to be very clever; but I am clever, and I cannot say
I am not, for that would be a lie. I am glad you
like grandfather. I should have thought you
wooden. You do spell awful, Honor. Anybody
would think you was 10, not sixteen. But I-sup-
pose you will learn composition now. Mind your

stops. I do hope you will be happy.
HE WRITES LETTERS. 215

“Tt was such a treat to get your letter, but do
not ever begin with ‘I send you these few lines
hopping you are quite well as it leaves me at pres-

>

ent.’ It is a very ignorant thing to do. And do
not ask the dairymaid about your spelling and
composition. Dairymaids are not educated. Ask
somebody who is clever. But now you are going
to be educated you will soon learn for yourself how
to write letters. I should like to go to.a boarding-
school, and learn Latin and Greek and everything.

“ Dear Honor, father is very poorly. He has
been unwell ever since you went away and not
done one proper day. I wish he would be a tee-
totaler. His nose is getting redder and redder.
Drink is a curse. I did an essay about ‘ Local
Option’ last week for the Band of Hope (though
I could not go, I heard of it) and the vicar says it
is very clever.

“ Dear Honor, I miss you ever so. It seems so
funny—I do-not mean amusing, quite the reverse
—not having you in bed with me. I used to
grumble about you sneaking all the clothes. I

should not grumble now though. I suppose it is
216 TONY DRUM.

wicked (everything that you cannot help is wicked)
but I do envy you out of it all. I wish I was out
of it too. I feel almost tired of being alive some-
times, as I lay here on this everlasting bed—I often
see Carrie Green now when she passes, or if I am
well enough to go out, but I never speak to her.
She pretends not to care, but I know. I have
made it up with Nick and we both say we will not
have any more truck with females. Dear Honor,
of course I know you are a female, but you are dif-
ferent and I do not mean you. You might like to
know that the minerals found in Cumberland are
many and various. They include coal, iron (in
small quantities), lead, zinc, and slate.
“Your affectionate brother,
“Tony Drum.

“P. S. Have you seen the sea yet? I should
like to see the sea.

“P. P. S. Of course I know that Penrith is not

near the sea.”

This letter occupied Tony many days; he never

tired of polishing and re-polishing his sentences.


HE WRITES LETTERS. 217

The rough draft was scribbled on the backs of
handbills, but the fair copy was neatly written out
on proper note paper, which he bought with a
treasured halfpenny. When the letter was posted
Tony’s life seemed very empty. Honor’s absence
made a hideous gap in it that nothing could fill.
His heart was starved and desolate. All day he
lay upon his bed, gloomily brooding. Sometimes
a playmate came to see him, and he would be roused
from his apathy for a little while, but only to sink
deeper into it again. As the season advanced and
the weather grew warmer, he was allowed to go
out into the streets, but he was now too weak to
play and the consciousness of his unhappy state
embittered his soul.

Every day he looked in vain for a word from
Honor, but none came. He began to think his
sister had forgotten him. But she had not. The
truth was when Honor read his letter—that
strange exercise in priggishness—she thought her
brother the most wonderful being in the world, and
was so overcome by a sense of her hopeless inferi-

ority that she could not reply to it.
218 TONY DRUM.

At last, having a great matter to impart, Tony

wrote again:

“DEAR Honor: I am not surprised to find you
have forgotten me so soon; females always forget
very easy; but Iam a good deal hurt, and I do not
mind owning it. I suppose you are too happy to’
want to think about miserable things like hump-
backed brothers. That would not be my style,
but then Iam not afemale. I forgive you freely,
which is only a brother’s duty to a sister, but if you
were a black heathen, and no relation, I should for-
give you just the same. Somehow I always for-
give people, even Carrie Green and Nick Tolmers.
I thought I never should do that once upon a time,
but somehow my spite could not last, and if I hada
chance of putting them both together into boiling
lead I should not do so. I see Carrie sometimes
now, but, of course, everything is different to what
it was, and you would not know by our conversa-
tion that there had ever been anything really seri-
ous between us. Nick Tolmers has gone to work

at my old place at the pork butcher’s, and he is


HE WRITES LETTERS. 219

getting on fine. I saw him last night, and he
seemed quite happy. Being happy is a knack,
like whistling through your fingers. He is a very
nice fellow really, though not my sort. He says,
if he gets on well, he will be a slaughterman some
day, and he wants to be one ever so. He has seen
a pig killed, which, as far as I can make out, they
slit its throat, and skin it while it’s warm on a
board. I would not be a slaughterman for one
hundred thousand million pound a week. I often
wonder what I shall be when I grow up. I wish I
could get better quicker. Of course me being
hump-backed is dead against me, but I am not very
hump-backed. I often look at myself in the glass,
and I find that when I stand in a certain position,
with my head back, it hardly notices at all. I still
think I should like to be a teacher better than any-
thing else, but I am so afraid I am getting too old.
I seem to remember that there is what they call
‘an age limit.’

“ Dear Honor, I have got some wonderful news
to tell you. You remember I said in my last letter

I should like to see the sea. Well, I am really
220 TONY DRUM.

going to see it at last! I will tell you how it all
happened. The other day Mr. Paul Hands and
his sister, Miss Hannah, came to see me. We got
talking about things, and he asked me what I
would like best in all the world. I was on that
like a bird, and I said I should like. to see the sea
best. So he said I should see it, and he has ar-
ranged it with father, and I am to go in three days’
time. The place I am going to is Bournemouth,
_ which they call the Town of Purple Hills. Oh,
Honor, it will be fine! Shall I not have a spiffin
time there! I shall see the great waves rolling and
the ships sailing and the golden eagles flying and
the great fishes in the deep, deep water. Perhaps
I shall go out in a boat, and a storm might come
on, and I might be wrecked and have to cling to a
broken mast. I would not be a bit afraid. The
thing to do is to keep cool, and just let the waves
wash you on shore like Robinson Crusoe did. Of
course there is not any desert islands in England,
and that happened ever so long ago in the Carib-
bean Sea. The only unexplored parts of the world
now is the North Pole and the South Pole and the
HE WRITES LETTERS. 221

middle of Australia and Africa. If I cannot be a
teacher, I think I should like to be an explorer
better than anything else. It would be fine to be
able to tell people about things nobody knew but
you.

“Sometimes I have a very funny feeling lately.
I do not suppose you will understand what I mean.
I do not hardly understand it myself, though it is
my feeling, and J dare say no other boy ever felt the
same. It is a sort of fatherly feeling. All the
people in Garden Row, though they are grown up
and big and old, are such children. Look at the
things they laugh at, and look how they enjoy
themselves, and look how happy they are as a rule,
though there is nothing at all to be happy about.
It puts me in a rage to see them all so contented.
It makes me think what fools they must be; and
yet, if you come to think of it, it is wiser to be a
happy fool than an unhappy sage. But there, I
dare say you will not understand me; for though
you are a lot older than me, you are not near so
clever, and I should be telling a lie if I said you

was.
222 TONY DRUM.

“ Dear Honor, I cannot write to you any more,
as it is getting dark, and I am so tired I do not
know what Iam doing. But please do write back
and tell me all about what you do and what you
think. Never mind if your spelling is wrong.
After all, spelling is a gift, and we have not all got
it. With love and kisses from your affectionate

brother,
“Tony Drum.

“P.S. Do not forget. Write back as soon as

you have read this.”
CHAPTER XVI.

HE FALLS ASLEEP.

In life Tony Drum was very intimate with
Death, and when his time came Death called to
him with the voice of a friend.

He never saw the sea. Saturday was the day
fixed for his departure from London; on Friday he
died. Excitement had made him very ill, and all
day he lay in a fevered stupor, watching the cloud
armies of the sky. His father left him at midday
and did not return until late in the evening. Tony
was wandering in the magic borderland of sleep
when Michael’s blundering footstep sounded on
the stairs. He started up with senses suddenly
quickened.,

“Ts it you, dad?” he cried shrilly.

“Tt is your poor old father,” Michael replied,

entering the room.
224 TONY DRUM.

He had lately added self-pity to the list of his
vices.

“I’m so glad you’ve come back, dad,” said Tony.
“T was getting so tired o’ the dark. I always think
the dark makes you colder and lonelier.”

“Never be lonely, my son,” said Michael.
“The wise man is never lonely. He has always
his own great thoughts for company.” .

“Yes, father. Father, would you light the
lamp, please? ”

“The wise man, my son, needs no lamp so long
as he has the light of his intellect to guide him.”

“It’s so dark, and I am tired o’ the dark.”

“The wise man is never tired, for he does no
work. But I’ll light the lamp.”

He staggered across the room and struck a
match.

“That’s better,” said Tony. “ Now I can see.”

He sighed, and the sigh rattled in his throat.

“ Good-night, father,” he said, turning on his

side. “I shall be awake very early in the morn-

99

ing. :
And he fell asleep.
eset epee ate

Michael Drum fills his pipe.


HE FALLS ASLEEP. 225

“ Good-night, my son,” said Michael.
He lit the lamp and set it down unsteadily upon
the table, singing softly:

“In the morning, in the morning !
In the morning by the bright light !
When Gabriel blows his trumpet in the morn!”

He dropped into a chair and began to fill his
pipe slowly.

THE END.



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