Citation
Reuben's hindrances and how he made them helps toward progress

Material Information

Title:
Reuben's hindrances and how he made them helps toward progress a story for boys
Series Title:
Pansy books
Creator:
Pansy, 1841-1930
Barnes, Hiram P ( Hiram Putnam ) ( Illustrator )
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lothrop Publishing Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
292, [2] p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poor youth -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Child labor -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Theft -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dust jackets (Binding) -- 1898 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Dust jackets ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication on t.p. verso.
General Note:
Some illustrations signed H.P.B.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Pansy (Mrs. G.R. Alden) ; illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026901635 ( ALEPH )
ALH5820 ( NOTIS )
02132202 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Ttiett

bathed

AN





The Baldwin Library

University
RmB wc
Florida



















































es gn









HE FELT THE JUDGE’S



STERN EYES FIXED UPON HIM. (See paee 68.)



REUBEN’S HINDRANCES

AND .

HOW HE MADE THEM HELPS TOWARD
PROGRESS

Q Story for Bovs

CLANS S eve w

(Mrs. G. R. ALDEN)

AUTHOR OF “ESTER RIED,” ‘ WANTED,” “OVERRULED,”
“THE PRINCE OF PEACE,’? ETC.

ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY



COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY

LoTHRoP PUBLISHING COMPANY.

All rights reserved.

PANSY.

TRADE-MaRK REGISTERED JUNE 4, 1895,



CHAPTER

I.

II.
Til.
IV.
Vv.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.

CONS NaS:

PAGE
HINDERED BY FIRE .- 0. 3 0. 3 oss ee 9
IAS EOSTS SUPRPE Reactive aioe ir ool or ee ee
“ONs0UP Omen ioe oo quo: bo dno. Gg oh Son Y/
ACBEWILDEREDSROV eo) r= ee ee
CROSS“OQUESTIONED = eee ee 00
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. . .. =... + 778
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. . . . . - + « 92
FLOWERS AND THORNS . . . . . «© + + + 107
‘© WHAT MAKES THINGS HappEN?’? . . . . 118
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. ... . .- + « « I31
IX GG CleU NCE Gg GG co os Oo oo
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. . . . . . + « 154
PAWSIN IS Wee WV ORiGD teeeteoeeseete stearate eve cars Orel OA:
MRIVMPHSWAND a PUZZIEES soe. oie een ores A)
THE Way GROWS PLEASANTER . . . . . « 183
GHRISTMASUREANS#. 6 teniuset eeu (entare tccu meu fe TOS
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. . « « « «© « + 205
6s A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!”? . . . 2...» 217

5



6 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE
OTN CS2SIRATIN GT IME oes yt ols cs iiursgg sei tera) ol 227,
XX. ‘*CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS”? . . . . . « 239
XOX NAN CYS = CHANGE Gy Gage cette Sedans ier ee 24

SXSXMT AINE Wis WORLD ass a rot in tenor oll on eet gst ZOO

XOXTM Ts SAR ROUGH MRAM Haase cag sired Hel ee ona ee tenuate 2/70

OMIT ZR IDS aig Boe gan ao oa ace 6 hw



List OF ALEUSPRANIONS:

He FELT THE JUDGE’s STERN EYES FIXED UPON HIM,

frontispiece

PAGE

REUBEN CAME TO A SUDDEN HALT. . ...... 15
Nancy HARDMAN WAS OUT ON THE PORCH. . . . . 43

WHILE REUBEN WAITED, HE TOOK UP A BOOK AND

PREWAN Mga rot ese ott gehen ee een OS
(©) NegIETITIS VPA ic tector otecn ree epee techie ee eect sree GT

“ WE ARE GOING PAST YouR OLD Hog,” saip ALIcE, 189

REUBEN STOOD STILL IN THE ROAD . .... . . 209
GMEAgeS By Wb ae i209 VND Gs 8 ol suctos og 6 ol ol oY)
He BURIED His Fack In His HANDS. . . ... . 279







REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER I.
HINDERED BY FIRE.

T was November, but the weather wouldn’t have
told you so; the grass was green, and the
roses and tulips and all manner of bright flowers
were in bloom; and there was sunshine every-
where. Groups of girls in white dresses and no
wraps walked leisurely along the streets ; occasion-
ally one fanned herself with her broad-brimmed
hat, and said, “ How hot it is!” Yet it was almost
Thanksgiving Day.

Oh! it snowed in some parts of the world that
day ; the papers told about an unusually heavy fall
of snow, —about sleet, and drifts, and sharp, cutting
winds. The girls in white would have laughed at
the thought of such athing ; they could not imagine
frost and snow anywhere; they lived in Florida
— away down on the peninsula, where snow never
comes, and even the frost just touches the flowers

9



Io REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

once ina while; almost like a kiss, for lightness, is
his touch in that part of the world — and the girls
may wear white. dresses and flower-wreaths at
Christmas as well as at Thanksgiving, and are lia-
ble at any time through the year to be complaining
of the heat.

Out inthe country, at least two miles away from
the groups of merry young people in their white
dresses and flower-trimmed hats, was Reuben Stein,
hurrying along as fast as tired feet would take him.
A hurried boy was Reuben, nearly always. He
worked for his beard and clothes at Mr. Hard-
man’s; and though the board was so poor that
Reuben often went hungry, and his clothes were
of the poorest, and worn until he felt ashamed to
be seen on the street by daylight, they seemed to
cost a great deal; for work as he might all day and
every day, he was constantly told that he was not
worth the salt which it took to season his food.
When Reuben was younger, he might have sea-
soned his food with his tears, had they been shed
at the right time, and not saved up until he was safe
in his bed for the night ; but as he grew older, and
reached the age of fourteen, he made up his mind
that tears did no good — only unfitted him for his
work the next day, and that he would brave it out
and do the best he could; one of these days he
would be old enough to run away, and then the



HINDERED BY FIRE. II

Hardmans would never see him again. Just how
old he would have to be before he ran away, he had
never quite decided—nor how he was going to
manage it, since he had long before settled it that
he would never be a tramp ; but when he ran, would
wear good clothes and have enough money in his
pocket to pay for his food, and a decent place in
which to sleep. A respectable, gentlemanly sort
of runaway Reuben meant to be.

It would not, however, be right to leave you to
suppose that Mr. Hardman was cruel, or that he
intended to half starve Reuben. The truth is, the
Hardmans were very poor, and had a trying time
themselves ; they worked hard every day of their
lives, not excepting Sundays. Often it was as much
as they could do to get themselves enough to eat.
Often the older children went hungry, too, though
it was Reuben’s turn oftener than it was the others’.
Perhaps that was but natural; Reuben felt this
himself, and would not have minded the hunger,
or the ragged clothes, half so much if he had not
been scolded and grumbled at every day of his life.
Still, in their way, the Hardmans had been good to
Reuben Stein; they thought they had been very
good. When his father and mother died, both in
the same week, during that awful yellow fever year,
were they not the ones who came forward and of-
fered him a home until he could do better? And



12 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

while they had grown poorer each year, had Reu-
ben ever been able to do better?

Reuben, as he hurried along on this November
afternoon, went over the story of the years, as he
so often did, and wondered if there would ever be
a way out. While he owned to himself that the
Hardmans had been as good to him as perhaps
people like them could be, and told himself for the
hundredth time that when he got to be a man, and
had a home, and money, he would be sure to re-
member them — nevertheless, he told himself, also,
that he did not believe he could stand it much
longer; and that if he did not get this place in
view, he believed he should die. He felt the more
sure of this because he had strong hope of secur-
ing the place. Only the night before, hé had seen
in the village paper the advertisement of a North-
ern gentleman who was boarding at a farm-house
three miles out. He wanted a strong boy of twelve
or fourteen to go North with him as an attendant
and caretaker of a little invalid lad who needed
somebody with him all day. One who applied must
know how to read and write, and must be willing
to give his whole time during the day to his charge.

Now, it happened that Reuben was what is called
a natural reader; though really I do not think there
was any “happen” about it. His mother had been
a good reader, and had taught him when quite



HINDERED BY FIRE. 13

young to read carefully and with expression. Since
he had been left alone in the world he had had very
little to read; the Hardmans were not people who
cared much for any sort of reading, and besides
had no money to spend for even a weekly paper.
The consequence was, that Reuben read and re-
read the few books and magazines that had been
given to him when the home was broken up; and
because they were well worth reading, he learned
more, perhaps, than he would if he had had plenty
of books and papers. When the advertisement
called for somebody who knew how to read, his
heart beat faster over the hope that here was his
chance. What more reasonable than to suppose
that part of the duties of the place would be to
read to the invalid boy? Of course books would
be provided, and it was possible that among them
might be some of the very ones about which his
mother had talked, and which he had so longed to
read. Whether they were or-not, Reuben was sure
to like whatever was to be read; so fond of it was
he that he enjoyed reading the very advertisements
as he went along the village streets. As for the
writing, he chuckled to himself as he remembered
how his mother had prided herself on the clear,
round hand which he wrote, and told him that per-
haps it would make his fortune some day. What
if the time had come for his fortune to begin? As



14. REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

he hurried over the road he told himself that he
had been very “lucky” to get hold of that paper
last night, and see that advertisement. If it had
not been for his having to trudge back to the gro-
cery after the saleratus that Nancy forgot to tell
him about when he went for the meal, he shouldn’t
have seen it; and he also told himself that he would
never grumble again about having things go wrong,
as he did all the way back to the grocery. At this
point he came to a sudden halt. He was passing
a young orange-grove, whose small, straight trees
were leaved in lovely green. It was not the trees
which arrested his steps, but the fence, or rather,
what was going on at the foot of the fence. Ac-
tually a fire! and looking for all the world as though
it had been set; for there was a little pile of pine
boughs near by, as though they had been brought
there to feed the fire. It was burning briskly now,
and as the fence was largely made of pine, would
be likely to burn briskly. “It will go all around
the grove!’’ said Reuben to himself, “and worse
than that, it will creep along the bushes to the
young trees and ruin them. Why, it might even
reach the house and burn it. I must put it out.”
Suiting the action to the thought, he began to pull
away the wood from around the fire, and to separate
the parts which were then burning, and smothered
the blaze, It was still a small fire, having evidently







































REUBEN CAME TO A SUDDEN HALT.







HINDERED BY FIRE. 17

been started but a few minutes. A little vigorous
pulling and beating left only smoking embers, which
Reuben separated so far from each other that they
could not act as feeders. He would have been bet-
ter satisfied with his work if he could have poured
a few pails of water on it, but the house for which
he had had fears was far back in the grove, and had
the appearance of being shut up. “The folks are
not at home,” said Reuben, still talking to himself,
as he strode through the grove and looked carefully
at the closed blinds. ‘I don’t believe I could get
in to get any water ; and I don’t believe it is neces-
sary. I guess I have put it all out; and I’ve got
to hurry if I get there before four o’clock. ‘Apply
at the Portland farm before four o’clock on Tues-
day ;’ that is what it said. I’m pretty near a mile
from there this minute, and by the looks of the sun
it isn’t far from four o’clock. What if I should be
too late!”

The thought lent wings to his feet ; although at
the same time he really had little fear of being too
late. He knew the neighborhood pretty well, and
did not think of another boy besides himself —
who would be likely to care for such a chance as
that — who could meet the requirements. There
was Vick Brasier who wanted a place, and who
had been threatening all summer to run away if
nothing opened; but Vick was a horrid reader, and



18 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

as for writing, he could not write his own name
so he could be sure of it himself an hour after-
wards. There was little to be feared from that
source. Still, the Portland farm was only four
miles away from the next village, and there might
be boys there whom he did not know. Anyhow, it
would not do to be late. He was speeding over the
ground again, having decided that his fire was safe,
when, as he turned the corner to reach the road
which led directly to the Portland farm, he made
another full stop. Those scamps, whoever they
-were, had started another fire around this side. It
had failed them, to be sure, but not before it had
done a little harm, and some of the embers still
-had a good deal of life in them; and there was
more danger on this side than on the other, for the
breeze which was already sprung up, always came
from this way, and might fan those embers into
flames. Reuben looked at the sun and felt sure _
it was almost four o’clock. He had tried to get an
earlier start, but it seemed as though Nancy Hard-
man wanted more things done for her that after-
noon than ever before. He looked toward the
house in the distance; it was as much shut up on
this side as on the other, and besides, he had seen
Mr. Fenning’s carriage pass early in the afternoon
with Mr. Fenning himself and three ladies in it.
And Ann Jones, who lived next door to their house,



HINDERED BY FIRE. 19

told Nancy, in the morning, that she and Mrs. Fen-
ning’s cook were going to the circus that after-
noon. He felt sure there was nobody at home,
but he would run up there and knock. The boy
who did chores might be around somewhere. So
he ran with all speed, and knocked hard, and re-
ceived no answer. He came back and looked at
the fire. Should he go on and leave it to take care
of itself? No, there was really danger here ; those
embers had more life in them than he had sup-
posed ; one had broken into a blaze while he was
gone; and all along was a trail of pine boughs
which contained a good deal of pitch. Moreover,
half-burned bits were scattered along close to the
fence; it was very dry, and there was no telling
how soon they might blaze ; in fact, some of them
were blazing now. There was no help for it; he
must make it safe for the people who lived in that
house before he took another step. It was harder
work than before; the fire would break out in an-
other place after he thought he had entirely con-
quered it. If there was only some way to get
water! But that was not to be had without get-
ting into the locked house; he must depend on
sand and beating. At last, after a full hour of
busy work, during which all the dangerous-looking
bits of pine were gathered and carried to a safe
place, Reuben felt that he could go on with a clear



20 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

conscience. He took the precaution to run around
the grove this time to make sure there were no
more attempts at setting it on fire, and then made
what speed he could-to the Portland farm, much
troubled all the way by two thoughts: First, would
he be too late to have his trip do any good? Sec-
ondly, what would Mr. Hardman say to him for
being gone so long? Of course it would never do
to say anything about the Portland farm to Mr.
Hardman ; he believed that Reuben’s only errand
this afternoon was to see if the Sedgwick boys
could come with their team and help Mr. Hardman
plough his grove the next day. Now, the Sedgwick
boys lived a half a mile this side of the Fenning
place. What kind of a story could he tell Mr.
Hardman? If he explained about the fire, which
was really what had delayed him,—for by run-
ning every step of the way, he had calculated that
he could get back from the Portland farm in about
the time that he would be expected to take, — he
would of course be asked what he was doing near
the Fenning place. There is no denying that
matters looked gloomy to Reuben Stein. Never-
theless, he meant to visit the Portland farm before
he went home that night.

It was a very pleasant farm-house, with long,
wide piazzas running all around. The house itself
was set in an orange-grove, whose beautiful dark



HINDERED BY FIRE. 21

foliage made a dense shade. On the south piazza
was a wheel-chair of a peculiar shape, and lying
back among its cushions was a fair-faced boy of
about Reuben’s age, though he was so slight and
pale that he looked to Reuben much younger.
Beside him, in an arm-chair, sat a middle-aged man
with an open book in his lap, from which he had
evidently just been reading; though he laid it
down to watch Reuben as he hurried, out of breath,
up the long carriage-drive.

“ Only see how fast he can walk,” said the sick
boy, watching Reuben with keen interest.

“Yes,” said the man cheerily, “that is the way
you will be walking through the world when you
get well and strong again.”

The boy’s only answer was a faint smile; he
did not believe in his heart that he would ever
walk in that way or any other, again; but he did
not tell his father so.

“Is this Mr. Oliver?” asked Reuben ; and then,
all but breathless with the haste he had made, as
well as with anxiety, he told his errand.

“TI am sorry, my boy,” said Mr. Oliver; “but
you are—let me see,” and he drew a- handsome
gold watch from its pocket, “yes, you are exactly
fifteen minutes too late. It is just that length of
time since the boy whom we have decided to try,
went from the door. He wasn’t in all respects



22 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

satisfactory ; but as this is the third time we have
advertised, and we could not delay our journey
longer, we decided to try him.”

“© father!” exclaimed the invalid, a little pink
flushing into his cheeks.

His father turned and looked at him inquiringly.
“You like the looks of this boy better than the
other, Charlie? To tell the truth, so do I. But
we promised to try him, you know; we must keep
our word, must we not?”

“T suppose so, sir,” said Charlie wearily.

“TJ am really very sorry,” said Mr. Oliver ; “if
you had only been fifteen minutes earlier.”

There was no occasion for staying longer; yet
Reuben lingered, partly because it seemed to him
that he could not go back home. He found, now
that it was all over, that he had built very strong
hopes on this chance. If it had not been for that
fire he would have been in time. Mr. Oliver
seemed much interested in him, asked many ques-
tions, and so did Charlie. In fact, they were so
sympathetic that he found himself telling about
the fire, and the trouble he had putting it out.
« And I put myself out by the means, it seems,”
he said mournfully.

“Well,” said Mr. Oliver, “I'll tell you what,
my boy; we will take your name and address, and
keep you in mind; something might occur very



HINDERED BY FIRE. 23

soon which would make it desirable for us to make
a change. Who knows? We are sorry not to
have seen you earlier, but at the same time I can-
not be sorry that you stopped to put out the fire.
Nobody loses anything in the end by doing right.
That is my doctrine.”



24 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Cla Ath sly eeen le
A LOST SUPPER.

S soon as Reuben was far enough down the

road to make it safe to appear, two boys

dodged out of the woods where they had evidently
been hiding, and looked about them.

« Yes, sir, he’s done it!”’ exclaimed one of them
in an excited tone as he stooped and examined the
remains of the fire. “Put it all out ; every spark!
there isn’t the ghost of a chance to start it again
without matches, and I haven’t got a single one
left. The mean little coot! What right had he
to interfere with us, I’d like to know. I'll pay him
for this, see if I don’t.”

“ He didn’t know it was us,’ ventured his com-
panion.

“Well, what if he didn’t! He knew it was
somebody — and he hadn’t any cause to interfere.
What are you saying that for?” he added in an
angry tone; “are you trying to stand up for
him?”

“No, I ain’t,” said the other, looking injured.



A LOST SUPPER. 25

“T’m only thinking you better be careful, talking
as if he knew it was us. And you can’t pay him
off without being found out; that’s what I’m
thinking of.”

“Trust me for that. I’m not green, I guess —
your business is to do as I tell you, and let me take
care of the rest. What I say is, that fellow has
spoiled our plan, and he shall pay for it, or my
name ain’t Joel Potter.” :

That his name was Joel Potter the teacher in
his ward of the public school could have testified
to her sorrow. Nobody knew any good of him,
nor, indeed, of any one of his name. What excuse
a boy has for going wrong, Joel Potter could plead.
His father had been out of the penitentiary but
six months, and those who knew him best proph-
esied that he would soon be back there.

His mother was a broken-spirited woman, who
kept her house in filth, and her children in rags,
and cared little where they were, so they did not
“bother” her.

Joel inherited from his father, among other evil
things, a revengeful spirit ; if a person was so un-
fortunate as to excite his anger in any way, he
could not rest until he had, as he said, “ paid him
off.” The last person who had crossed his path
was Judge Fenning.

The Judge had come upon him at the school-



26 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

house door one morning when he was in the act of
setting a snare for the unsuspecting feet of his
teacher, which would be likely to trip her up the
moment she attempted to cross the threshold. It
is an old trick, I know, but Joel made no pretence
at smartness. Old tricks, so that they were mean
enough, suited him perfectly. And he chuckled
at the thought of Miss Benson “sprawling flat on
the ground ” — which was the refined way in which
he pictured the scene to himself.

Judge Fenning, who was a trustee of the build-
ing, had been examining one of the rooms that
needed repairing, and came in contact with Joel on
his way out. He discovered the fine wire just in
time to save himself from a fall; and his words to
Joel were sharp and to the point. He not only
ordered the wire up, but waited to see his order
obeyed — and went away presently, with the wire
in his pocket, and a threat to Joel to give him what
he deserved if he ever heard of such pranks being
played.

It was for this reason that Joel, whose wrath
rose steadily the longer he nursed it, contrived the
plan of firing Judge Fenning’s fence. I should
not say he contrived the plan; the truth is, he got
it out of a wretched dime novel which he had been
reading. It was especially unfortunate for Joel to
get hold of a book with anything evil in it, because



A LOST SUPPER. 27

he was one of those boys who always copied the
bad and let the good alone. One thing ought to
be said for him ; he was too ignorant to know, and
too heedless to think, whether or not the fire would
do other damage than that of burning down the
fence ; that was as far as his intention went. Pos-
sibly he might even have planned some other way
of being revenged if he had thought of the house
burning down, for instance; but that he did not
think of it when the idea occurred to Reuben Stein
the minute he saw the fire, shows what sort of a
boy he was in that respect. As for his compan-
ion, he was one of those hopelessly weak boys who
seem compelled to follow the example of those
with whom they are for the moment. If Bennie
Wilcox could have been fastened all his life to a
good and true boy, he might really have made
somebody, for he was willing to copy good as
well as bad examples. What a pity that the bad
ones were so much more easy to find than the
good! What a pity, also, that the good boys who
might have helped him were so thoughtless and
indifferent ; often passing him by with a good-na-
tured, half-contemptuous “hello,” and leaving him
in the very midst of temptation, when a few words
from them, and a few minutes spent in winning
him, might have saved him. Such boys will have
a great deal to answer for, one of these days. Yet



28 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

after all, I confess to having very little patience
with Bennie Wilcox. Hadn’t he a mother at home
who cried over his wrong-doings, and begged him
each morning, when he left her, to be a good boy
that day? And hadn’t he promised his father
when he lay dying, that he would try to grow up
to take his place, and always be good to his mother?
Why need a boy who had made such a promise
allow himself to become the tool of a fellow like
Joel Potter?

«Yes, sir,” said Joel, walking around the scene
of his late fire, “that fellow has upset the whole
of it; we won’t have time — hello! I don’t know
but we will if you will lick it around the corner to
Colonel Payton’s and borrow some matches, we
might get the thing to going again before old
Fenning gets back.”

“Oh, no!” said Bennie, who was already tired of
his part of the work, which had been to wait on
Joel without the prospect of getting any fun out of
it; they couldn’t even stand around and see the fire
burn, lest they should be caught and suspected.
«There wouldn't be time; it is getting late now;
let's let it go till another time. I say, Joe,” in a
changed and excited tone, “ what if that should be
Judge Fenning coming down the road !—TI hear
horses coming.”

Sure enough ; Joel had just time to turn and look,



A LOST SUPPER. 29

and then to run for the woods without waiting for
another word. Judge Fenning’s horses were com-
ing at a rapid rate. Bennie, with shorter legs and
stouter body, ran as fast as he could, but was not
sure that the friendly trees hid him in time for
Judge Fenning’s keen eyes to escape him.

«We ’most got caught,” he said, dropping into a
little heap and panting for breath; “I dunno but
he saw us after all.”

« We!” said Joel, with exasperating calmness ;
“speak for yourself, little chap. He didn’t see
me; and if he did, what of it! Haven't I as good
a right to be rambling through the woods as the
next one? Don’t besuchaninny! Somebody has
been firing Judge Fenning’s fence, and we stopped
to look at the damages ; that was all.”

Bennie regarded him with open-mouthed wonder,
and then laughed. He actually thought that this
was a sign of smartness in Joel. It had not oc-
curred to him until that minute that he could tell
a lie, and so escape being blamed for the fire.
Poor, weak Bennie! It is very sad to think what
an apt pupil he was.

«What in the world has been going on here!”
said Judge Fenning, looking about him in surprise
as the burned fence caught his eye. “Hold on,
Caleb, look at the fence.”

Caleb was looking, making his eyes large with



30 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

astonishment. “What do you make out of that?”
asked his master at last. ‘ Has some stray spark
from a careless cigar set it on fire?”

“Tt is my opinion, Judge,” said Caleb, with the
gravity of a judge on the bench, “ that that there
ain't got no accident about it. It have been set afire,
or my name ain’t Caleb Joshua Abram Peters.”

“Oh! please drive on,” said Mrs. Fenning, put-
ting her head out of the carriage window; “I’m
so afraid Alice will reach home before us. The
child would not know what to think at finding us
all gone.”

« Alice is all right,” said Judge Fenning ; “ but
look at the fence, Fanny.” Nevertheless, he gave
the order to drive on up the avenue. As soon
as the ladies were helped out and had vanished
inside the door, he returned with Caleb to the
burned fence. They drove slowly around the
grove, and discovered evidences of fire on the
south side, also, and noted the fact that some
effort had been made to clear a space. Caleb
called attention to this. “Somebody has done
took away a heap of brush, Judge, since morning.
I was noticing it when I was down this way.
‘Pete, says I, ‘there’s a heap of stuff on the
south side that would feed a fire this dry weather,
first rate.’ Says I, ‘it ought to be took away,’
but Pete he allowed that he couldn’t do it to-day



A LOST SUPPER. 31

nohow, ’cause he must plough around them trees
at the other grove; but somebody done took it
away.”

«J wonder who?” said the judge thoughtfully ;
«and I wonder who could have started a fire here
in the first place — always supposing it was started
intentionally. I have no enemies that I know of.”

«Dar ain’t no accident, ‘pend upon that!” said
Caleb again with marked earnestness ; “accidents
don’t start up just alike twice in one afternoon ;
two sparks from cigars don’t start in two places
on the same fence, nohow; accidents don’t go that
way.”

Judge Fenning admitted to himself the force of
this; and then something happened which put all
idea of the fire out of his mind. Miss Geraldine
Carleton, who was visiting at the Fennings, and
had been to town with them, now came running
down from the house, calling eagerly : “Oh! Mr.
Fenning, Alice has fallen down the back stairs and
hurt herself dreadfully, we are afraid. Mrs. Fen-
ning wants you to come as quick as you can, and
send Caleb for the doctor.”

Whereupon Judge Fenning gave the order in
quick, sharp tones, and then went with all speed to
the house.

Not long afterwards, Reuben Stein made his
way rapidly down the road toward the Hardmans.



32 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

He glanced at the sun anxiously as he walked.
Mr. Hardman would be sure to question him as to
this afternoon’s work; for he was certainly late.
If it had not been for that fire, he could not only
have secured the situation, but have got back in
time to have had his absence unnoticed, but what-
ever he said must be truth. He had not decided
what to say. Mr. Hardman, without being what
could be called cruel, was often severe. If he
should send Reuben to bed without his supper,
the boy half believed he should starve ; his dinner
had been none too hearty.

“T never saw a fellow with such luck as mine,”
he murmured, although it was not two hours since
he had determined never again to grumble at his
luck.

Arrived at the Hardman home, what was his
surprise to find it in silence and darkness.

Not even a light in the out-kitchen, where
Nancy was generally at work at this hour of the
day. It was gude dark, for they have no twilight
in that part of the country ; almost as soon as the
sun disappears from the sky, unless the moon has
taken his place, darkness settles over the earth;
and it seems to come ina moment of time. When
Reuben passed the Fenning place the sun was still
shining ; he remembered it, because, hurried as he
was, he had paused and given a careful look about



A LOST SUPPER. 33

to make sure that no further harm had come from
the fire. Yet when he reached home, he stumbled
through the dark kitchen, and had much trouble in
finding matches and lamp. What could have be-
come of all the folks? It did not seem possible
that they could have gone to bed so early as this,
although they were given to early hours. Having
nothing to read, and but little sewing to do, time
hung heavily on the hands of even Nancy, after
dark. Having lighted the smoky little lamp, Reu-
ben held it high and gazed about him. No signs
of supper, unless a hump on the corner of the
kitchen table with a tin basin turned over it might
stand for something to eat. Wait; what was that
pinned to the wall near where his own small lamp
stood, with just oil enough in it to get him to bed,
if he made all speed after it was lighted. A piece
of paper with some writing on it; Nancy’s square,
business-like hand. It must be intended for him
to read. He unfolded it with a curious feeling tug-
ging at his heart. Something must have hap-
pened. He was not in the habit of having notes
written to him. Holding the paper to the dim
light, he read : —

“You've got paid for your laziness, for once! Uncle
Kastor has come for us all to go there to supper and toa
merry-making in the evening. We sha’n’t be at home till
late. You'll find your supper under the tin on the table, if



34 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

you get home in time to eat any. Uncle Kastor asked for
you, and offered to wait a spell for you, but father told
him you had been gone long enough to be back three times
over, and it served you right. Take care of the lamp, and
don’t'do any mischief of any sort; just eat your supper and
leave the matches where we can find them, and get yourself
off to bed as quick as you can.”

The note was not signed, and needed no sign-
ing; Reuben would have known Nancy’s style
anywhere. He folded the paper, and stood like
one stunned. How persistently his luck had fol-
lowed him. “Uncle Kastor” was his one friend
in all this world. A jolly, warm-hearted man ;
Mrs. Hardman’s own brother, and as unlike her
husband as a man could well be. Poor he was,
but with a different sort of poverty from that of
his brother-in-law. Some way or other, his large
family always managed to have enough to eat ;
and they all, from the father down to the youngest,
contrived to have good times. Money was almost
as scarce there as it was at Mr. Hardman’s, so Un-
cle Kastor, with the best intentions in the world,
could never help his sister’s family in that way ;
but he had a fashion of swooping down upon them
once in two or three months, and carrying them all
off to supper in his log cabin, three miles away
through the woods. And what a jolly supper it
always was! Wild turkey, which one of the boys



A LOST SUPPER. 35

“had the luck to shoot the other day;” fish, that
another of them “happened to catch ;” sweet po-
tatoes, cooked as only Uncle Kastor’s wife knew
how to cook them; and better than all, to Reuben’s
hungry heart, merry faces, and much laughing, and
hearty, kindly words, for him as well as for the
others. In fact, Uncle Kastor, having only words
to offer, bestowed them with special care on Reu-
ben, seeming to have a dim realization of his lone-
liness and homesickness. Next to the misery of
having lost his one chance of getting away out
of the country, no bitterer trial could have come
to him than to have lost this evening at Uncle
Kastor’s. If it had not been for that fire, he
could have reached home in ample time. No
doubt Uncle Kastor waited for him as long as he
could; he knew his kind heart. And now they
were probably just sitting down to the table, with
everything smoking hot, and smelling, oh so deli-
cious! and a place left vacant where he would have
been tucked in. Uncle Kastor always contrived
to have the table large enough for him to sit down
with the rest. Despite his fourteen years, and his
determination to be manly, Reubén put up his
smoke-begrimed hand and brushed away great hot
tears. By and by, he went toward the tin basin ;
he was very hungry. Two biscuits, large and
heavy, and yellow with soda, lay waiting for him,



36 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

and beside them, half of a cold sweet potato.
This was all. There are boys who would have -
scorned to touch such a supper. But Reuben was
too hungry for that. Besides, he had sense enough
to know that Nancy had done the best she could
for him. They lived in a country where milk was
a luxury, and butter hardly less so. And Nancy
did not know how to make biscuits. Reuben ate
every crumb; he even looked hungrily about him,
and wished that he had another; but not for any-
thing would he have opened the pantry door and
tried to find more. After that, there was nothing
to be done but to follow Nancy’s advice, and get
himself off to bed. And his pillow, if he had had
one, would have been wet that night with tears.



THAT OTHER BOY. 37

CHAPTER III.
THAT OTHER BOY.

HE week following Reuben’s disappointment
was a hard one for him. It seemed impos-
sible for him to forget that he had been so near to
good fortune and lost it. “As the days passed,
this feeling seemed to grow stronger, rather than
lessen, as he hoped it would. He made himself
miserable by asking over and over again why it
had to be as it was. Why, for instance, need that
fence around the orange-grove have taken fire just
when it did? Or, if it must needs burn, why did
he have to see it and stop, and be hinderéd long
enough to lose his chance? Not only that, but he
must lose his chance of a visit at Uncle Kastor’s.
And not only that, but both of these losses were
connected with another.

When the Hardman family came home, which
was not until the next day, Uncle Kastor brought
them; and from him Reuben learned that a man
whom he called “well to do,” had been looking for
a boy to spend the winter with him, and do chores



38 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

-and go to school; Uncle Kastor had thought at
once of Reuben, and been resolved to give him
the chance. “I didn't say anything about it,” he
explained, “ because it would look like trying to
get you away from my brother's folks, don’t you
see? but all the same I knew you hankered after
school, and it seemed to me that you ought to have
the chance; and I told the man I would bring you
along down with me, and he could see what a likely
chap you were. And I knew he would take a no-
tion to you, and make you an offer. That is the
very reason I swooped down on the folks that
day ; and lo and behold, you weren’t home at all!
I tried my level best to have them wait till you
came, but they felt sure you wasn’t coming back till
after dark, since you'd staid so long; and I didn’t
think Mr. Peters would wait much after dark.
And I couldn’t explain things, you know, so there
was nothing for it but to drive off without you ;
but I tell you I kind of hoped all the way that you
would get back just after we started, and run on
and overtake us, and I drove as slow as I could —
and Peters, he waited till the moon came up, to see
you. I guess I could have got him to wait till to-
day, if a shack of a boy hadn’t come along within
an hour after we got home, looking for a place;
and Peters, who always likes to do things up in a
hurry, took him.”



THAT OTHER BOY. 39

This story had been very hard for Reuben to
listen to, It did seem discouraging, that a second
time in one day he should be so near the end of
his ambition and yet should fail. All this because
some wicked man, or boy, chose to set fire toa
fence. “If I only knew what rascal did it!” said
Reuben to himself, setting his lips firmly the while,
«T’d like to choke him ; mean old wretch! Spoil-
ing all my chances in life just for the sake of hav-
ing a little fun!” Work at Mr. Hardman’s never
seemed so hard as it did during those trying days.
It was almost more than he could do to get through
the weary round that he hated, not so much be-
cause it was hard, as because it seemed as though
he accomplished almost nothing, and because it
was always accompanied with sharp, or at least
cross words.

One evening, nearly a week after his trip to the
Portland Farm, he sat in the kitchen before his
untasted supper; it was only a piece of corn-bread
and a dish of molasses —and his appetite seemed
to have deserted him. He had been late in getting
home that evening, through no fault of his. Old
Dingle, the sorrowfullooking cow which the Hard-
mans kept, had seen fit to stray much farther away
than usual, and had led him a long, tiresome walk
through sand and across patches of woods. When
at last, very tired, he succeeded in bringing her



40 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

safely home, Mr. Hardman had scolded as though
it had been Reuben who had run away, instead of
the cow — even going so far as to give him a box
on the ear, which tingled with the blow, but not so
much as his nerves did over the thought of it. His
mother had never boxed his ears, and it was a form
of correction that he hated ; while Mr. Hardman
apparently enjoyed administering it. Of course
it did not make matters any cheerier for Reuben
to reflect that he had done nothing that called for
punishment of any sort ; on the contrary, he had
stoutly resisted the inclination to come back with-
out Dingle, and declare that he could not find her ;
and had gone on and on, until it seemed that his
feet could carry him no farther, before he caught
the sound of her bell in the distance.

I said it was harder for Reuben because he did
not deserve blame; but, after all, I cannot see why
a sensible boy could not have got comfort out of
that thought. If one could only realize how much
better it is to be blamed for nothing than for some-
thing, one could take such things better. Reuben,
however, realized nothing of the kind; his heart .
was swelling with indignation, and there was such
a lump in his throat that it seemed to him he would
have choked if he had tried to swallow a mouthful.
He had torn his blouse in a scramble through some
of the low bushes. He had stepped on the sand



THAT OTHER BOY. Al

spurs with bare feet until they felt full of thorns,
and he was so tired that even the effort of carrying
the corn-cake to his mouth seemed too much for
him. He leaned his elbow on the corner of the
kitchen table which was free from dishes, leaned
his head on his hand, and let one or two great tears
roll slowly down his sunburned, dusty cheek. You
will remember that he did not often cry in these
days ; that he did so this evening was a proof of how
utterly tired and discouraged he was. He had just
been telling himself that he hadn’t a friend in the
world.

It did seem sad and strange that in all this great
world there was not only no one to help him, but
no one to care whether he ever found any better
life than this.

Nancy Hardman was out on the porch, looking
at nothing in particular, and waiting for Reuben
to finish his supper, so she could put away the
things.

“Come, hurry up!” she said sharply. “ You
are going to be as long eating your supper as you
were getting home.” She turned as she finished
the sentence, and was in time to see those two
tears, and to note the utterly discouraged look on
the boy’s face. Nancy, although she had a habit
of speaking sharp, harsh words, and was always
dashing around and making others uncomfortable,



42 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

had not an ugly heart ; there were times when she
actually felt sorry for Reuben —when her father
was especially hard on him — though no one would
have been more astonished than Reuben himself
to have known this. She felt sorry for him at this
moment ; she knew he was probably not to blame
for being late, but she had a strange way of show-
ing sympathy.

«What are you crying about?” she asked se-
verely, coming in at the door as she spoke, and
standing in front of Reuben, so that he could not
even brush away the tears without being seen.
“Before I would spend my time in crying like a
baby, such a great boy as you are! You ought to be
too old to cry, especially when you ain't got nothing
to cry for. If you had real trouble, now, you might
talk ; there’s lots of trouble in this world, Reuben
Stein, and you'd better be glad that it doesn’t come
to you— instead of growling and snivelling because
you have to work for your living. Who doesn’t, I
should like to know! All the folks around here —
unless it is the Fennings and a few such — have a
hard time to keep soul and body together; I am
sure of that.”

It was such a new thing to hear Nancy Hard-
man moralize that Reuben, in spite of himself, was
" somewhat interested. He shaded his eyes with one
hand, and looked through it at the hard-featured











































































































NANCY HARDMAN WAS OUT ON THE PORCH.







THAT OTHER BOY. 45

girl; there was nothing comforting in her tone, and
her words were certainly not very sympathetic, but
for some reason they made him feel more as though
he had to do with human beings than he generally
felt with Nancy.

She busied herself about some work, occasion-
ally glancing at the boy as if to see what effect
her words were having on him. “Lots of trouble,”
she repeated after a moment’s silence. “People
who have beds to sleep in and things to eat, better
not grumble. There’s been an awful accident on
the railroad, and ever so many killed outright —
to say nothing of the folks that have lost legs
and arms. I don’t know but I'd rather be killed
than to lose my legs, for instance, so I couldn’t go
around. My! what would become of this family,
then?”

« When was the accident ?”’ asked Reuben drear-
ily ; he had not much interest even in this — peo-
ple lived, and travelled, and died, and he knew
nothing about it. What did it matter that some
of them were killed? they were nothing to him;
he had not been to the village for seven days, so
had heard no news.

- “Tt was last Thursday night ; the express ran
into a freight-train, and smashed two of its sleep-
ing-cars all to bits. Well! what’s the matter with
you now?” for Reuben’s hand had been suddenly



46 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

withdrawn from his face, and he sat up straight,
his eyes full of anxious interest.

“Last Thursday night,’ he repeated. “O
Nancy! are you sure?”

“Why, of course I am; you don’t suppose I’ve
been making it up, do you? Where have your ears
been that you haven’t heard it? Everybody is talk-
ing about it. Why, what makes you interested all
of a sudden?”

“Did you ever see the people that boarded at
the Portland.Farm, Nancy? There was a lame boy
and his father. They went North last Thursday
night. Oh! I wonder if’ —

“Yes, I saw him out riding one day with his
boy ; but they won't go out riding any more ; they
were both killed!”

«“O Nancy! are you sure?” Reuben’s tone was
so full of pain that Nancy forgot to be vexed with
him for questioning the truth of her news.

«Why yes, I am; I heard Mr. Fenning telling
Uncle Kastor all about it; he stopped here this
morning while you were up in the swamp-lot. He
said that man and his boy were both killed out-
right, and” —

“ Nancy,” interrupted Reuben, his face pale with
excitement ; “there was a boy went North with
them; he was from Weymouth, down below here,
you know ; did you hear anything about him?”



THAT OTHER BOY. 47

Nancy nodded her head. “He was killed too;
and his folks are going to have him taken to his
uncle’s in the North, because they can’t afford to
have him brought back here. How came you to
know so much about these folks?” she asked with
sudden sharpness. ‘“ How did you know they took
a boy North with them? did you know the boy?”

«“ T heard about it,” said Reuben evasively. “No,
I didn’t know him; but it seems strange to think
that he is dead.”

«Well, he is,” said Nancy, speaking almost as
though she enjoyed the news. The truth is, she
lived such a starved, lonely life that excitement of
any sort, even though connected with a railroad
accident, was in a sense a relief.

Reuben finished his supper like a person dazed.
Nancy, dashing around washing and putting away
the plate and saucer which he had hardly used, went
on with her story, telling all the particulars she
knew, and making comments that were meant to be
impressive. It was very new business for Nancy
to talk to Reuben, but she had so much news to-
night that it seemed as though she must tell some-
body. He became a very unsatisfactory listener ;
he had no comments to make, no exclamations even
over the harrowing parts. She grew provoked at
last, and, forgetting her momentary astonishment
over his excitement, said, —



48 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“You take it cool, I must say! one would think
you had been mixed up with railroad accidents all
your life; I'd show a little more feeling —as if I
wasn’t made of wood. You can sit and cry over
yourself, with nothing in the world to cry for, and
you haven't even a sigh for the folks that are in
such trouble to-night. Think of that woman who
won't ever see her boy again, and he was all she had,
too. He wasn’t much comfort to her, I s’pose —
boys never are; but then I dare say she will miss
him.”

“Yes,” said Reuben; the lump in his throat had
grown so large that he could not say another word.
He said that in such a way that Nancy thought he
did not care. She went into the other room, and
told her father that she didn’t believe Reuben was
more than half-witted ; he had no more feeling than
a stone.

“He's ‘witted’ enough,” said her father signifi-
cantly. “He has himself to think about, and it
takes all his time.”

Reuben went up to bed—there was nothing
more to be done that night, and he would not for
anything have stayed down-stairs and run the risk
of being spoken to about the accident, or of hear-
ing more about it. He had heard enough —too
much. He never felt so strangely in his life.
How very near he had been to death! What if



THAT OTHER BOY. 49

that fence around the orange grove had not been
set on fire that day, and he had reached the Port-
land Farm in time! Mr. Oliver would have been
sure to have engaged him, for didn’t he and the
lame boy both say that they liked his looks, and
were sorry he was too late?) Then he would have
been the one to be buried somewhere in the cold
North, instead of that boy whom he had been al-
most hating because he had been ahead of him ;
now he was dead! How did it seem to be dead!
Reuben shivered at the thought. He felt of the
pulse at his wrist ; he laid his hand on his steadily
beating heart, and wondered what it would be like
to have it still. He did not want to be dead, al-
though he had wished himself so a great many
times; it was one thing to make the wish when
every nerve in his body was quivering with life,
and quite another to think of it with death almost,
at the door. “There is but a step between us
and death’ — somewhere, sometime, Reuben had
heard that verse; he knew it was in the Bible, but
he could not remember where or when he had
heard it. It seemed to repeat itself to him now in
slow, solemn tones. What if he were being buried
now, to-night — and the Hardmans were sitting in
the room down-stairs talking about him. Nancy
would tell all the particulars just as she did about
that other boy; she could tell more about him ;



50 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

she would go over that last day before he went
away, and tell what he had said and done. Then
the excited and nervous boy tried to remember all
the things he had said and done that day when the
Olivers went North. Would the words sound well,
repeated? He slammed the door, he remembered,
when Nancy sent him the third time after wood,
which was not to be found, and she had told him
to take the door along with him the next time,
hinges and all; would she tell her part, he won-
dered, if she were going over those last things
about him? and where would he be if it really
were he? Was it possible that he might be where
he could overhear all the talk ? Would he like to
have them go over his past, and remember the
things he had done and left undone? No, he
couldn’t hear it; he would be buried under the
ground— but then, there was the soul — they
didn’t bury souls; what became of them? Good
people went to heaven—but he was not good.
Oh! he was by no means ready to die; he would
never wish himself dead any more —he had not
realized what it was before. Suppose God should
take him at his wish, and make him dead that very
night. People died who were not on the cars — he
must not die; he could not! And here poor Reu-
ben buried his head under the clothes ; not to cry,
but to shiver and tremble, and feel hot and cold



THAT OTHER BOY. SI

by turns. It seemed to him that he had never
come so near to death — not even when his mother
died; he was such a little boy then and had not
realized it ; but that boy of about his age whom he
had envied —it was so strange—so terrible to
think of him being gone out of the world!

By and by he grew calmer, and ceased to trem-
ble, but he was very wide awake, and found himself
unable to get away from his thoughts; unable to
think of anything but the accident and his narrow
escape. Gradually his thoughts took form about
one idea. He wished that he did not care so
much about dying —no, not that, exactly. He
was a sensible boy, and realized that so great a
change one, not an idiot, must care about. What
he meant was, that he wished he did not care
about it in such a frightened, awful way. There
was such a thing as being ready to die, and think-
ing and talking about it calmly, even though you
thought it very near. The last time he had visited
at Uncle Kastor’s he remembered hearing him tell
about a neighbor who was very sick and going to
die; how he said that night when Uncle Kastor
called to see how he was : —

“Well, neighbor, tell the friends that I’m almost
home, and feel very safe and glad.”

For the first time in his life, Reuben coveted
such a feeling, and wondered how it was secured.



52 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

The last thing he remembered on that eventful
night was a determination to find out for himself
—and if it was a possible thing make himself
ready for any possible accident that could come to
him.



A BEWILDERED BOY. 53

CHAPTER IV.
A BEWILDERED BOY.

EUBEN was splitting wood the next morning
when Mr. Fenning’s carriage drew up before
their door; the pine stump had to wait a few min-
utes while Reuben admired the silken coats of the
span of horses, and watched to see how they curved
their necks, and took dainty steps in the sand, even
while they waited; for Mr. Fenning, after discover-
ing that Mr. Hardman was at home, had gone into
the family sitting-room—thereby putting Nancy
Hardman into a state of consternation. There was
not a chair in the house which she thought fit to
offer to such a great man. Horses like his were
not seen often in that part of the world; most of
them had as much as they could do to plod through
the sand with slow, discouraged steps and heads
bowed, and had no strength to waste in restless
steppings about when they were left to stand.
“JT wonder what he came for?” said Reuben to
himself as he watched the horses. “What if he
wanted to take me out riding!” and he chuckled



54 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

over the folly of his thoughts. “Td like it first-
rate to ride in such a rig as that; but I don’t
believe I could go this morning —I haven't got
time!”

If he could have heard what was going on in
the Hardmans’ front room, what would he have
thought? Nancy, in the bedroom which opened
from it, with the door ajar, lost the first of the talk,
though she tried her best to hear. Mr. Fenning
seemed to think it necessary to speak very low.
Her father’s. reply was plain enough.

“JT shouldn’t wonder at all—boys are always
getting into scrapes—and this one is no better
than he should be. What has happened, Mr. Fen-
ning?”

Once more Mr. Fenning’s words were so low
that Nancy only caught one now and then, and
could make nothing of it. “I want to know!” said
her father. “It doesn’t seem possible that Reuben
would do such a thing. How do you say you
found out that he was the one?”

This time Nancy fixed the door so she could
hear.

“JT am not sure of it, of course, Mr. Hardman ;
one ought to have very good evidence to accuse
a boy of a thing like that. My informant is not
altogether trustworthy. You know the Potters, I
presume ?—their boy Joel came to me of his own



A BEWILDERED BOY. 55

accord to give information. That in itself looks
badly — or would in another boy. Iam not sure
but that it is so much Joel’s nature to try to
get other people into trouble that he watches for
chances. He came to me the morning after the
fire, and wanted to know what I would give him to
tell me all about it. I was vexed with the fellow,
and told him I would arrest him as an accomplice
in mischief ; which would doubtless give him what
he deserved. Over that, he looked injured; said
he didn’t want anything, of course, but had come
because he thought he ought to tell, seeing he hap-
pened to know all about it. Then he told some-
thing like a straightforward story about being in
the woods with another boy, hunting for a certain
kind of air-plant which a man stopping near them
wanted — and he saw your Reuben come down the
road. He said he was going slowly, and looking
about him as if afraid of being seen; and his man-
ner attracted the two boys, so they determined to
watch him. According to them, he gathered brush,
and pine-knots, and everything he could find of
that character — heaped it against the fence and
set fire to it. Not content with that, he went
round to the other side, where the wind was more
brisk, and set still another fire close to the fence —
planning it so skilfully that there was soon a big
blaze ; and as soon as he was safely away, they



56 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

came out of their hiding-place and worked like
beavers, scattering the fire, and stamping out the
sparks. Now, of course, I don’t know that there
is a word of truth in this; I only know that my
fence was on fire that day, and burned quite briskly
for a few minutes, and must have been started by
some one, because —as my man observed —an
accidental fire doesn’t generally choose two places
on different sides of the same ground on the same
afternoon. And it was evidently put out by some-
body who took a good deal of pains to do it; for
the brush, of which there was some lying around
loose, had all been carried to a safe distance. And
there were other evidences of somebody being at
work there. These boys came to me with their
story, the morning after the fire, as I said, and I
promised to look into it; but my little daughter;
who had a fall that same day, occupied so much of
my attention at first, as to put other things out of
my mind; then I was called away by business, and
have only recently returned. But I mean to find
out the truth of this if possible; for a boy with
such tendencies is hardly safe to have around us.”

“T should think not!” said Mr. Hardman ex-
citedly ; “he ought to be flogged within an inch of
his life; and if you don’t do it, Judge Fenning, I
shall. For that matter, I shall anyhow. To think
of my feeding and clothing such a scamp as that!”



A BEWILDERED BOY. 57

At that moment the bedroom door was thrown
wide open, and Nancy Hardman came into view.

“ Father,” she said, “I don’t believe a word of
that story. Reuben is.aggravating enough —all
boys are; but he ain’t of that sort, and I should
think you would know it. He doesn’t do things
for mischief, if he does blunder a good deal, because
his wits are somewhere else instead of on his work;
but when he can keep his mind to it, I do say for
him that I think he does the best he knows how.
As for setting anything afire on purpose, to spoil
other folks’ things, it ain’t in him.”

Judge Fenning turned toward the excited girl
with a pleasant smile on his face. “I am glad to ~
hear you say so,” he said. “I never heard any-
thing ill of the boy before —and I am slow to be-
lieve this. It seems so utterly uncalled for; so
far as I know he can have nothing against me; I
never spoke to him that I can remember; but for
the boy’s sake as well as my own, I mean to look
into it very thoroughly, and to find the guilty one
if possible.”

“ Of course, of course!” said Mr. Hardman,
“he ought to be found; and if it proves to be
Reuben, he will have reason to remember it before
I get through with him. I won’t stand any non-
sense like that, Judge Fenning, you may well be-
lieve. Nancy seems to think he couldn’t have



58 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

done it—and it doesn’t sound like him, I think
myself ; but then somebody did it, and what would
that boy have told such a story for, if there wasn’t
any truth in it? Nancy, do you know what Reu-
ben was about the day it happened ?”’

“Yes,” said Judge Fenning ; “if we could prove
that Reuben was quietly at home that afternoon it
would go a great way toward establishing his inno-
Cence:y.

“T should think it would,” said Nancy. «Well,
when did it happen? I can count back — most
days ; there’s always something to mark the time.”

«The fire must have been started last week, on
Thursday afternoon between the hours of two and
five; I was at home just before two; and back
again about five. The fence was all right when I
left, and burned when I returned.”

“Last week, Thursday,” repeated Nancy, and
her face grew gloomy.

“Can you think, Nancy, where the boy was that
afternoon ?” asked her father.

“Yes, I can. That was the day Uncle Kastor
came for us and we all went up to his house and
stayed to supper.”

“And did Reuben go along?” asked Judge Fen-
ning in a tone which said, “I should be only too
glad if it should prove that he was miles away at
the time.”



A BEWILDERED BOY. 59

«No, he didn’t,” said Nancy sharply. She felt
vexed and disappointed over what she must now
own. “He wasn’t at home, and he didn’t come
home until—we don’t know when. We waited
awhile for him, and then father wouldn’t wait any
longer, and we went off.”

“TI remember,” said Mr. Hardman. “That
doesn’t look very well for the scamp, Nancy, after
all you have said. He was out that way as sure as
fate, Judge Fenning; at least, he was out to the
Sedgewick place; I sent him there on an errand,
and he was gone long enough to go there and come
back twice over. I remember it well, for Uncle
Kastor wanted to wait for him —he has taken a
kind of notion to the boy; I don’t know why, I’m
sure, though I never thought he was much worse
than other boys. But Uncle Kastor wanted to
wait and take him; and we did, for a spell—until I
said they needn’t wait any longer on his account,
because he shouldn’t go if he came, to pay him
for being so long doing an errand. What he was
about all that time is more than I know. I tried
to get something out of him the next morning, but
I remember now he had very little to say for him-
self.”

Judge Fenning sighed. “I am afraid some-
thing tempted him to indulge in this piece of mis-
chief,” he said gravely.



60 REOUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“IT don’t see why you should say that!” put in
Nancy sharply. “Because a boy was gone on an
errand longer than he ought to have been, it does
not follow that he was at work setting fences on
fire ; there are other things he might have done.”

Judge Fenning smiled again. “That is true.
Well, trust me to see that only the truth is dis-
covered. I’m glad the boy has a good friend in
your daughter.”

How astonished Reuben would have been if he
had heard that Nancy Hardman was his friend !

“What I suggest is,’ continued the judge,
“that you allow me to take him away with me
now, to my house, for a quiet talk. I should like
to see him entirely alone, and have a first word
with him before he has a chance to hear of the
suspicion from any other person. You are willing,
I suppose, to trust him tome?” ~

“ Of course, of course,” said Mr. Hardman. «I
know you will do the right thing, Judge Fenning.”
Nor did either gentleman heed Nancy’s muttered
protest that it was taking a mean advantage of a
boy to carry him off like a prisoner before he had
heard anything about it. They went out together
to the yard where Reuben was struggling with the
. pine-stump.

“ Good-morning, my boy,” said Judge Fenning
kindly. “You have a tough job before you, haven’t



A BEWILDERED BOY. 61

you? I wonder if you would be willing to leave
it for a while and take a ride with me?”

This question so astonished Reuben, coming as
it did after the thoughts he had had on the sub-
ject, that all he could do was to stare, until re-
called to his senses by Mr. Hardman’s sharp voice.
“Why do you stand there staring like an idiot,
and keeping the judge waiting! Don’t you know
enough to get into a carriage when you get a
chance?”

“Yes, sir,” said Reuben; and dropping the axe,
he took long strides toward the carriage which was
waiting at the gate, opened the door and sprang in.
If this was all a huge joke, the point of which he
could not understand, at least he would have the
pleasure of seeing how those great plump cushions
felt. He had often wondered, and never expected
to know.

Judge Fenning smiled gravely; and, lifting his
hat to Mr. Hardman as though he had been the
first gentleman in the land, followed Reuben with-
out more words, and Caleb drove away; Nancy .
watching from the window, a curious, choking sen-
sation in her throat, and a feeling of indignation at
both Judge Fenning and her father in her heart.
Why had not her father spoken up for Reuben,
and told the great man that somebody else fired
his fence? Why had not the man sense enough to



62 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

see that Reuben was not one of that sort? Above
all, why did she care so much about it all? Was
she really fond of Reuben Stein? She had not
suspected it.

The judge tried to enter into conversation with
his companion ; asked several questions about his
work and his plans. But Reuben, who under al-
most any other circumstances would have been
only too glad of a chance to tell Judge Fenning
his plans, so far as he could be said to have any,
in the hope of getting some help from him, was ~
now so overcome by the strangeness of his posi-
tion as to be unable to do other than to answer
with the briefest “yes sir,” and “no sir;” his mind
full meantime with the question — “What did it
all mean?” Why was he being taken at such
speed over the road? Where were they going?
Was it possible that the judge wanted some work
done that he could do, and had asked Mr. Hard-
man to lend him? But that was nonsense—
gentlemen did not come after their workmen in
a carriage ; still it was positively the only explana-
tion he could think of. At last he ventured a
question,

“Has Mr. Hardman hired me out to work for
you, Judge Fenning?”

“Qh, no,” said the judge, smiling at the idea.
Then he glanced at Caleb, who was so short a dis-



A BEWILDERED BOY. 63

tance in front of them, with all the carriage win-
dows open. Caleb had remarkably sharp ears, and
had been much tried by his master’s slowness
in looking into the matter of the burned fence.
Judge Fenning did not know whether or not Caleb
had heard the Potter boy’s story ; he took care to
say nothing about it himself, and he meant not to
prejudice Caleb against Reuben if he could help
it. “Oh, no!” he said again after this moment of
thought, “I wanted to have a little talk with you
about some matters, quite alone ; and I asked Mr.
Hardman to let you ride home with me, to give
me a chance.” And then Judge Fenning knew by
the swift glance which Caleb gave them that he
had heard the Potter story.

“Yes, sir,’ said Reuben, wondering still more.

“Do you go to school?” asked the judge; and
Reuben explained —his face red the while, that
he used to go, but he couldn’t manage it very
well.

“That is unfortunate,” said the judge. “We
have a better school here this fall than ever before ;
a new teacher, you know. Have you seen him?”

No; Reuben had not even seen him, except on
the street —at a distance. “We live out quite a
stretch, you know,” he explained ; “and folks don’t
generally come that way.”

“And you are too busy to spare time for school?



64 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

I shouldn’t think Mr. Hardman would have enough
work to keep a boy of your age busy all the time.
He has no orange-grove, he tells me.”

«“ No, sir —it isn’t that,” said Reuben, his face
growing redder. It seemed a disgrace to have to
explain what it was — but there was no help for it.
“The fact is, sir, my clothes gave out, and it was,
a hard season, you know, and we couldn’t manage
to get any more.”

“Is that it?” and Judge Fenning gave him a
swift glance. His clothes were patched and were
too short in the sleeves, and too narrow on the
shoulders. Yes, he did look rather shabby ; still,
there were boys in school who looked worse. Was
this an excuse for a fellow who was glad to get rid
of the restraints of school, or was it the self-re-
spect of a boy who had been used to better things ?
Judge Fenning was much away from his South-
ern home, and knew little of what was going on
in the neighborhood. He dimly remembered hav-
ing heard about the boy who lived at Hardman’s,
but could not now recall whether what he had
heard was good or bad.

Reuben struggled with his pride, and resolved
to explain. It was dreadful to have a man like
Judge Fenning think that he didn’t want to go to
school. “I tried every way I could think of to
earn some money this summer, so I could buy



A BEWILDERED Boy. 65

some decent clothes, but I couldn’t. Then I tried
to get a chance to go North, and had one, almost
— but it failed.”

“ Did you, indeed? What made you want to go
North?”

“Well,” said Reuben, hesitating — «I don’t quite
-know, unless it was because we came from there,
and I seemed to think if I could get back I could
earn enough to get an education; people in the
North seem to go to school.”

“Not all of them,” said the judge, smiling.
«So you want an education. Did you ever hear
the old proverb —‘ Where there’s a will there’s a
way’ ?”

«Yes, sir,” said Reuben gravely. “ Mother used
to say so; but I haven’t found any way yet —
maybe I will.”



66 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER V.
CROSS—QUESTIONED.

HEY had been making swift time over the

road while this conversation was going on,

and with Reuben’s last word Caleb drew up before

the Fenning gateway. Before he knew what was

being done, Reuben was out like a cat, and swung
the gate open.

«Well done,” said the judge, smiling ; while Caleb
showed all his white teeth in thanks.

« You are quick-motioned, I see. Will you climb
in again, or walk to the house?”

Reuben chose the latter; and taking the short
road, was standing by the steps when the carriage
wound around the avenue. He had often won-
dered how that handsome house looked inside —
now he would have a chance to see. Perhaps,
though, the judge would take him to the carriage-
house, or the stable, for his talk.

No; he took him to his own handsome library,
and seated him on one of the elegant leather-
covered chairs. “Now,” he said, taking the great



CROSS-QUESTIONED. 67

arm-chair, ‘we are comfortable, and can have our
little talk. So you are from the North?”

Reuben could not help staring in reply. Had
Judge Fenning brought him in his carriage away
out here merely to ask such questions as that?
There seemed to be no reply to make, as he had
already answered the question ; but the judge had
others.

In the course of the next few minutes he learned
all that Reuben knew himself about his journey
down there in search of health for his mother ; and
how both father and mother were, only a year after
their coming, victims of yellow-fever—and the
Hardmans took him home with them because Mrs.
Hardman’s mother had known them in the North.
Reuben grew so interested in going over the old
times to somebody who was listening and seeming
interested, that he almost forgot the strangeness of
his present position, until suddenly brought back
to it by a question.

“Now, Reuben, you seem to have a very good
memory — can you tell me where you were, and
what you were about, two weeks ago to-day — say
between two o’clock and five?”

Then Reuben’s face flamed red, up to his very
temples. Why, he could not have told, save that
he knew at once that it was the day on which he
made his visit to the Portland Farm and planned



68 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

his desperate effort to get North once more.. Ina
flash of thought it came to him that Mr. Hardman
must have heard of his attempt and been angry
about it, and appealed to Judge Fenning to have
him punished; perhaps it was against the law for
a boy who had been fed and clothed by a family for
three years to try to get away from them — and
Judge Fenning was a great lawyer. Reuben knew
very little about law, just enough to fill him with
awe of it. He felt himself trembling from head
to foot, and his anxiety and actual terror grew
stronger as he felt the judge’s stern eyes fixed
upon him. Yes, the eyes of the judge were grow-
ing stern. “This boy has been deceiving me; he
talked like an honest, outspoken, well-meaning boy
who wanted to make something of himself, but
directly I mention that afternoon, he turns crimson
and trembles like a culprit. He thought he was not
found out, and now he thinks he is. What could
have been his motive?” These were some of the
thoughts which filled the mind of the judge.
“Well,” he said, while Rebuen tried to speak,
and felt that his voice trembled so that he did not .
dare trust it ; “has your memory played you false
at last? Perhaps I could help you. Were you
over in this direction ? — Yes,” he said to himself,
“he undoubtedly did it.”’ For Reuben had opened
his lips, and stammered something not understood



CROSS-QUES TIONED. 69

—then closed them again ; he certainly acted like
one afraid to speak. It may seem strange to you
that a boy of fourteen could get into such a state
of terror for so slight a reason, but you must re-
member that Reuben was very much alone in the
world, and about some things as ignorant as a child ;
then, too, his nerves had been unsettled by the rail-
road accident, and his narrow escape from death.
There were times when he told himself that it must
have been very wicked for him to try to steal away
from the Hardmans, and that God meant to punish
him for it. However, as a rule he was a boy of a
good deal of courage; if he had not been utterly
taken by surprise with Judge Fenning’s question,
he would not have shown such fear. As it was, he
soon got control of himself. He decided that he
certainly had not intended wrong ; the Hardmans
had told him more than once that they kept him out
of charity, and he knew they were too poor to do
it ; he had honestly meant to relieve them, as well
as himself, although he knew that in some things
it would be harder for them if he were away. He
decided that the thing for him to do was to tell a
plain story of where he was, and exactly what he
was about —and frankly say that he meant no
wrong. |

« Yes, sir,” he said suddenly; “I was by here.
I went to the Portland Farm; there ‘was a man



7O REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

boarding there named Oliver, and I saw in the
paper that he wanted a boy to go North with him,
and I went for the place; that is what I meant
when I told you I tried to go North once, and
didn’t succeed ; I was fifteen minutes too late, and
another boy got the place. Ididn’t want to say any-
thing about it, because I didn’t tell the Hardmans
—the fact is, sir, I meant to run away.” Here
Reuben unconsciously lowered his voice, as though
he were telling a great secret. “Perhaps I ought
not to have done so, but I did not know it was
against the law. They are really nothing to me,
and they have fed me for three years; and, while
I work as well as I can, they have often told me
they could not afford to keep me, and I don’t think
they can. If I did wrong I am very sorry — but
it didn’t amount to anything, you see, sir; and I
am ready to promise not to do it again, if it is
against the law.”

Was this acting? Had the boy really no knowl-
edge of the burned fence? Judge Fenning felt
very much puzzled. He found himself wondering
if Reuben had been near the Portland Farm that
afternoon; perhaps he had heard of the railroad
accident, and knowing that Mr. Oliver and his boy
were both killed, it had occurred to him that no-
body could dispute such a story —he would tell it
and account for his time in that way.



CROSS-QUESTIONED. 71

“Do you know where Mr. Oliver is now?” he
asked gravely.

“Oh, yes, sir! — or I mean I know he is dead;
he was killed that very night — and the boy who
got the place was killed too; and I should have
been if I had gone. That was one of the things
that made me think perhaps it was wrong to do
Lt

Judge Fenning could not help smiling over such
queer logic; the boy seemed to be a curious mix-
ture of man and child. He did not know what to
say next.

“ How came you to be late that day?” he asked,
more to gain time than because he thought it made
any difference why he was late.

A sudden light broke over Reuben’s face; curi-
ously enough this was the first time he had thought
of the burned fence since the questions began.
What he considered the graver matter had driven
the other out of his mind.

“Oh! aevery strange thing hindered me,” he
said eagerly. ‘“Haven’t you noticed a piece of
your fence burned, Judge Fenning? It was burn-
ing when I passed here on my way to the farm —
at least it had been burning, and had kind of died
out; but I was afraid it would get started again,
and there was lots of brush, and leaves, and things
around it, so I had to stop and clear them away.



72 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Then.I ran around to the other side, and found
it on fire too, and it looked worse than it did in
front; it took quite a little time to get all the
knots and brush away, and to stamp out every
spark ; it took more than fifteen minutes, sir —
and that is the reason I was late.”

The judge studied his face thoughtfully. “Who
helped you in putting out this fire?” he asked.

“ Nobody helped me, sir. There wasn’t a person
around; not even any one passing by—if there
had been, I. should have run away and left them to
do it, for I was in an awful hurry.”

“ But I should suppose it would have been the
most natural thing in the world to have run to the
house for help.”

“Oh, I did! and knocked and knocked, but there
was nobody to answer; I made up my mind you
were all away.”

«What is your opinion about that fire, Reuben ?
How came it to be on fire?”

«Why, I’m sure I don’t know, sir; I thought
perhaps somebody with a cigar had been careless,
but I don’t know.”

“Did it strike you that there was more brush
lying about than there would have been on a well-
kept place ?”’

“JT don’t know, sir; I didn’t think much about
it. You see, I was in such a hurry that all I



CROSS-QUESTIONED. 73

thought of was to get it where I could leave it as
soon as possible.”

«“ Why didn’t you leave it, and go on?” i

« Sir?” said Reuben, looking bewildered.

«T mean, how came you to take so much trouble?
It wouldn’t have been your fault if the fence had
burned down.”

« Why, it would if I could have helped it, I sup-
pose; and it wasn’t only the fence, sir ; the wind was
blowing just in the right direction, and I was afraid
for the house —I thought I ought to see to it —
I mean I thought that was the right thing to do.”

« And you always try to do right, do you?”

«No, sir,’ said Reuben, his face crimsoning.
There came to him suddenly the memory of times
when he had shirked work which Nancy Hardman
wanted done; to be sure, many of her wants
seemed unreasonable to him, but he knew very
well that he ought to have obeyed her. “No, sir,
I don’t always; but I tried to, that day.”

“Well, Reuben,” said Judge Fenning, after what
seemed to the boy a long silence — “to tell you
the plain truth, I brought you out here to-day to
hear your story of the fire. Perhaps it is only fair
to tell you that I have heard another which doesn’t
match with yours at all.’ He looked steadily at
Reuben as he spoke, but the boy returned the
look only with one of interest.



7A REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

«J don’t see what it could be,” he said, “ because
there wasn’t a living soul within sight or hearing.
I called two or three times as loud as I could
shout, in the hope that I could make somebody
hear, and come and help me. And if anybody
knows how it got started, I should think he would
have tried to be there to put it out.”

“ Reuben, did it occur to you at all, that perhaps
the fire had been started on -purpose?” asked
Judge Fenning, his keen eyes watching the boy as
though they would read his very thoughts.

« Ves, sir,’ said Reuben, “that was the first
thought I had ; things were so kind of heaped up,
‘as though they had been fixed on purpose; but
after I came to think it over, it didn’t seem sen-
sible, and I decided that it might have been a
cigar —as I told you — or I thought maybe some
very little boys had been playing with matches —
though I don’t know of any boys around here who
are little enough not to know better than to start
a bonfire right by a fence.”

Judge Fenning became silent again, and this
time considered so long that it gave Reuben a
chance to look about him and admire some of the
wonders of the beautiful room.

“Well,” he said at last, and this time he arose
from his great leather chair, “I think I will let
Caleb drive you home—and come again to-morrow



CROSS-QUES TIONED. ns

to see me. At that time I will try to have here
the persons who have told me the other story. I
want you and them to put the two stories together
to make them match. How should you like that?”

“T should like it first-rate,” said Reuben, with-
out the least hesitation. “I have thought a good
many times that Pd like to know just how that
fire commenced, and all about it. But I can walk
home, Judge Fenning — Caleb mustn’t go back for
just me.”

Judge Fenning smiled. “Caleb has to go to
the village on an errand for me,” he said, “and it
will take him but a few minutes to set you down at
home; if you don’t like a ride with a couple of fast
horses better than a walk through the sand, you
are different from any boy I ever saw.”

«Oh, I like it!” said Reuben, his eyes twin-
kling; “I’ve often wondered how those cushions of
yours felt, and to-day I had a chance to find out.”

“Very well, you may try them again. I will send
a note to Mr. Hardman, making arrangements with
him to have you call here to-morrow at twelve
o'clock. And now I have a request to make of
you. I should be very glad if you would promise
not to talk to any person about the burned fence,
between this time and to-morrow morning when we
meet here. Not only that, but I would rather you
would not talk about this interview we have had,



76 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

nor explain in any way what was wanted of you.
Are you willing to promise?”

“TI don’t know,” said Reuben. “Iam willing to
promise not to talk about it more than I can help;
but Mr. Hardman and Nancy Hardman will ask
ever sO many questions, and I don’t see how I am
going to help telling them what you wanted of me.”

“What did I want of you?” asked the judge;
and his face was so kind that Reuben, to his own
after astonishment, laughed outright as he said, “I
don’t know, sir, ’'m sure, unless it was to give me
a nice time.”

“Then you wouldn’t have a very clear story to
tell, after all, would you? But what I mean is, that
I ask you not to talk about this matter more than
you can help. If direct questions are asked, which
you feel it your duty to answer, of course your
promise will not bind you.”

“Oh! I can promise that,” said Reuben promptly.
“J will not talk more than I can help.”

Five minutes afterwards he wondered if Judge
Fenning knew what a talker his coachman was.
During that swift drive homeward, Caleb used his
utmost skill to discover just how much Reuben
knew about the burned fence. He began as they
were driving down the avenue.

«See that hole in the fence? We don’t com-
monly have no such holes around our place.”



CROSS—QUESTIONED. 77

“No,” said Reuben, “I suppose not.”

«How do you suppose that hole got there?”

«Holes are sometimes broken in fences,” said
Reuben, with the air of a sage.

«Yes, and holes are sometimes burned,” said
Caleb, fixing his large, solemn eyes on the boy,
who wanted to laugh but didn’t. “That there hole
was burned just two weeks ago to-day; I reckon
you ain’t heard of that before?”

“T saw it,’ said Reuben, “as we thane in,’

“Oh, you did! Well, I reckon you don’ know
nothing about how it happened, nor why?”

Reuben, not knowing how to answer this after
his promise to Judge Fenning, decided to say
nothing. Caleb eyed him suspiciously, and con-
tinued to talk about the fire and the fence, and the
boys, and mean people, in what he thought was a
most expressive way. And Reuben listened and
smiled, and sometimes looked grave, and wondered
what the fellow meant.



78 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER VI.
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS.

“CHO!” said Caleb at last, “there’s no use talk-
ing to poor white trash —they don’t know
even enough to answer when they are spoken to.”
Two hours later, Caleb, who had just finished
giving his master an account of his errands, added:
“Tt’s my opinion, Judge Fenning, that I had the
pleasure of taking the boy who burned the fences
a ride in the carriage this very morning.”

“Indeed!” said Judge Fenning, “what leads you
to suppose so?”

«Well, Judge Fenning, my knowledge of boys is
consid’able ; and in my opinion that boy acts like
the very one.”

« How does he act?”

«Why, Judge, he hasn’t got nothing to say for
himself. Won’t talk, you know—not about the
fences nor the fire. I gave him mo’ than a dozen
chances, and he was just mum. Didn’t even have
no curiosity to know how such a thing happened.
It looks bad, Judge ; it does, so!”



AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 79

The judge smiled. So far, at least, Reuben had
followed his instructions.

There was a second sensation that day at the
Hardmans’, when Reuben was brought home in the
carriage.

“Well,” said Mr. Hardman, almost before the
boy had sprung out like a deer, and hurried up the
walk, “seems like you go and come in style! You
don’t feel quite so fine as when you went away,
I reckon? I wonder-that he let you come back.
I would have locked you up, if I had been he. I
don’t want to harbor no such around me, I can tell
you. And when he gets through with you, I want
you to understand that you'll have to answer to
me.”

“What do you mean, sir?” asked Reuben, his
face flushing a dark red. “What can you suppose
I have been doing ?”’

“Oh! dear me, how innocent you are! You
can’t come no such tricks on me, and you needn’t
try. They may go down with Judge Fenning, and
even Nancy —but I’m too old to be caught that
way.”

“TJ am sure I do not know what you are talking
about,” said Reuben, with severe dignity. “Here
is a note which Judge Fenning wished me to bring
you. Now shall I go on with the wood?”

Mr. Hardman had no answer ready; he was



80 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

already devouring the note. A letter for his eye
alone, from Judge Fenning, was certainly distinc-
tion; but he did not find it quite to his mind.

“How lofty he can be!” he said in a discon-
tented tone; “I'll talk as much as I please; my
tongue’s my own, I guess. What do you stand
there staring for? Why don’t you go to work?
Isn’t it enough that you have wasted the whole
morning ?”’

Reuben waited for no further orders, but con-
cluded that the pine-stumps must be his work, and
went at them with a will.

Just then Nancy appeared. “ What have you
got, father?” she asked; “what does Reuben
say?”

« He says nothing, just as he usually does when —
he ought to speak,” said. Mr. Hardman crossly.
«And Judge Fenning has laid down his orders to
us as though we were slaves, and he owned us.
We are not to question the boy, if we ‘please,’
until after he sees him again. What if I don’t
‘please’ — what right has he to order me?”

“J don’t see but the note is nice enough;”’ said
Nancy, glancing it through. “He says ‘ Dear sir,’
and ‘yours truly,’ just as gentlemen do to each
other; and I wouldn’t ask questions if I were you,
so long as he don’t want you to. There’s likely
some reason. There’s no use quarrelling with a



AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 8I

man because he’s rich and drives around in his
carriage. I sha’n’t say a word to Reuben, though
I am dying to know what happened.”

Mr. Hardman, though he grumbled more or
less, apparently came to a like conclusion. The
day passed, and Reuben was asked no questions.
However, both father and daughter had said
enough. Some of Nancy’s words floated back to
Reuben between the blows of the axe, and added
to those which Mr. Hardman had spoken, made
his face grow troubled and puzzled, and then finally
gather into a frown, as for the first time it dawned
upon him that not only the Hardmans, but Judge
Fenning, actually believed that he set the fence on
fire —or helped it along in some way! No such
thought had occurred to him while talking with the
judge, or even with Caleb. Secure in conscious
innocence, he had been slow to take the hints
which Caleb’s words might have conveyed. But
the more he thought about it, the more he realized
that herein lay the explanation of some things that
Judge Fenning said. Probably that was the “en-
tirely different story”? which he had heard. From
whom? Who could suppose for a moment that
he would do such a thing? Why should he do it?
and why should anybody think he would? Was
hea boy to amuse himself with mischief? Had he
ever gone prowling around seeing what he could



82 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

do to trouble others, as some boys he knew of did?
Had he not during all the years he had spent in
this part of the world — and they seemed to Reu-
ben many and long—been faithful to his work,
and honest in his ways? What right had Judge
Fenning to suppose for a moment that he would
be guilty of such an act? As for Mr. Hardman,
of course he would believe the worst of him. “And
be glad of the chance, I suppose,” said Reuben to
himself, with a swelling heart; “it is hard, I de-
clare, that a fellow who has done his best to make
something of himself, should not only have no
chances, but be hindered all the time by things
which he can’t help, and then be told lies about in
the bargain. I might as well give up and be the
sort of fellow they think Iam. But I never will,”
he added after a few minutes of bitter thought ;
«T’ll be somebody yet, in spite of them all.”

Nevertheless, it was a very hard day. Reuben
always looked back to it afterwards as one of the
hardest he remembered. Mr. Hardman did not
ask any questions, but he did worse.

“Let the matches alone!” he said roughly to
Reuben, when in the course of the afternoon he
came for some to light the kitchen fire. ‘The less
you meddle with matches, the better. We don’t
want to be burned out of house and home, either
from carelessness or wickedness.”



AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 83

‘Reuben’s face was white with anger; but he
turned away without a word, and went off to the
kitchen.

“Well,” said Nancy, who was waiting for the
matches, “ did you stop to make them ?”

“No; your father told me to let them alone.
He seems to have grown suddenly afraid to trust
me with matches.”

Nancy uttered an exclamation which he did not
catch, and rushed after them herself. “ Father,”
he heard her say, “seems to me I wouldn’t be a
goose, if I could help it. Reuben didn’t set that
fence on fire any more than I did; and I don’t be-
lieve in treating him as if he did. That isn’t the
way Judge Fenning would want you to do, I can
tell from his note.”

“I’m not Judge Fenning’s slave, nor yours
either,” said Mr. Hardman, who was in unusual ill-
humor that day, for several reasons. In the first
place, several plans of his own had gone wrong ;
and in the second place he had been drinking hard
cider — more of it than usual — and it had the ef-
fect which hard cider has on some brains; it made
him cross without reason. But for the first time
in his life the voice of Nancy Hardman sounded
like music in Reuben’s ears. Here was one who
believed in him in the face of all suspicion. And
he admitted to himself that since Judge Fenning



84 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

could suspect him, it was not unreasonable, per-
haps, for the Hardmans to do so. He must have
told them some story in the morning to base sus-
picion on; but despite it all, Nancy Hardman be-
lieved in him! A few days before, Reuben would
have laughed at the idea that it made much differ-
ence to him what Nancy Hardman thought about
anything. “I'll always remember it of her,” he said
to himself gratefully. ‘After this, I'll fill her tubs, -
and bring her pine-knots, and split her kindling-
wood without having to be told, and I’ll do every-
thing I can to help her. To think that she should
speak up for me in that way — I can hardly believe
my ears!’’ The memory of it softened the rest
of the day for him. On the whole, he bore Mr.
Hardman’s unreasonableness much better than he
had feared he should. But he looked forward to
the next morning with mingled feelings of anxiety
and indifference, while he worked hard with his
hands, and spent hours of thought trying to puzzle
out who could have gotten up the story about him.
Was it possible that somebody had seen him work-
ing hard to put the fire out, and had supposed that
he was, instead, trying to build it? “But nobody
passed,” said the poor fellow —‘“not a soul. I
was too anxious to have help to let anybody escape
Tee oe

Meanwhile Judge Fenning, though a very busy



AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 85

man, gave a good deal of thought to the honest-
faced boy whom he had questioned that morning,
and at the tea-table made known his perplexities.
«Tm a good deal puzzled just how to manage the
callers whom I expect to-morrow.”

“Callers?” said Mrs. Fenning inquiringly ; and
Alice looked up from the orange she was sipping,
to ask, “ Who are they to be, papa?”

“Three boys,” said the judge; “and I fancy
they will not care to meet. The more I think
about that manly-looking fellow who was with
me to-day, the more sure I feel that he told
the truth.”

Alice was interested at once. ‘“O papa!” she
said, “did you have a trial right here in your
study ? How nice! tell me about it — please,
papa.”

«“ Why, it was about the fence that was burned,”
said the judge. Then he looked. up suddenly at
his wife, remembering that they had agreed not to
_ say anything about that before Alice until she was
quite strong again. Mrs. Fenning laughed at his
startled look. <‘‘ Never mind,” she said, “Alice is
well enough now, I think, to hear about the-fire.
It happened the day you were hurt, darling,” she
continued ; ‘the fence around the grove took fire
in some way, and quite a-hole was burned. We
did not mention it before you, lest it might excite



86 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

you when you were weak, as it happened the very
day you were hurt.”

Alice looked excited now; her cheeks glowed,
and her voice was eager. ‘“O papa! I know about
the fire; it was that which made me go up those
ugly back stairs in the dark—so they could not
find me if they got into the house—and I was
coming down again when I fell. Why! isn’t it
strange that I forgot all about it?”

No, they did not think it very strange. In the
fall she had hurt her head, and had been burning
with fever and delirium for several days; then, as
she grew better, the doctor would not allow her to
be questioned about the accident, lest it might ex-
cite her ; and for the same reason the accident to
the fence had not been mentioned in her presence.

“Never mind,” said Judge Fenning anxiously,
when he saw her glowing cheeks. And he asked
himself how he could have been such an _ idiot
as to mention the boys in her hearing. “ Never
mind, the fire was over so long ago it is no
wonder you forgot it ; and it wasn’t much of a fire,
anyway.”

“Oh! but, papa, I know all about it. Let me
tell you ; it won’t make me excited. I was silly to
be afraid then —I can’t think how I happened to
be such a dunce! but it seemed queer to be in the
house alone, you know; and then to see those boys



AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 87

burning sticks and things, and setting fire to them
right close to the fence, did look dreadful. I
thought perhaps the kitchen door was unlocked —
I had not thought to look — and that they might
come in and try to steal things ; so I locked all the
doors in the front part of the house, and took the
keys, and ran away up those back stairs where I
was sure they couldn’t find me. How silly I was,
wasn’t 1? How could they have got to me in any
of the rooms after I had locked the doors? but I
seemed to want to get as far away from them as
possible.”

Poor little girl! the utmost they had thought
was that a desire to rummage in some of the boxes
in the back attic had come to her; and here she
had been frightened into making the journey! No
wonder she had been delirious all night, —and for
two or three nights, indeed, — and imagined that all
sorts of people and things were coming after her!
Judge Fenning began to look not only grave, but
stern. The boys who had by their wickedness per-
illed the life of his darling would not have fared
very well at his hands just then. But Alice was
quite herself again, and it could do no harm to ask
her a few questions.

“Were there two boys, daughter?” he began
quietly.

“Oh! yes, sir. One was a good deal smaller



88 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

than the other. They worked hard for quite a
while — at least it seemed a long while to me —
getting ready for the fire. I could not think what
they were about. I had a mind to run down and
tell them they must go away — that my father did
not like to have boys playing around there. But
when they made a blaze, it frightened me so that
I thought of nothing but thieves. Papa, I had
read a story only a few days before about some
men who set fire to a house, and burned it down
so they could steal things. Wasn't it strange that
I should have read about it just before it seemed
to be going to happen ?”

“T don’t wonder that you were frightened,” said
her mother gravely.

«Yes ; but then it was silly to run up those old
back stairs. Oh! well, I had another reason for
going ; don’t you know, papa, from that back attic
window you can see away down the road? I
thought I could keep watch what they did next,
and could see the first glimpse of the carriage
when it turned the corner; oh! but wasn’t I glad
to see it? Just the minute it turned the corner, |
started to run down; and then my feet caught and
I fell —and that is the last I know.”

«Were the boys there all the time you stayed
"up in the attic?” asked her father.

«Oh! no, sir. Why, there is ever so much more





AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 89

to tell. They went off into the woods, and there
came another boy along ; he was going by real fast,
as though he was in a hurry, but when he saw the’
fire burning, he stopped and looked at it a minute,
then he began to pull the sticks away and stamp
on them, and I knew he was going to put out the
fire. After that I didn’t feel half so much afraid:
I thought of starting down to tell him how it got
afire, and to ask him if he knew who those boys
could be; but while I was deciding whether I dared
go and talk to him, he ran around to the south side
where I couldn’t see him, and very soon after-
wards you came.”

“Well,” said Judge Fenning, after a thoughtful
silence, during which Mrs. Fenning questioned
Alice as to some other particulars which she had
wondered over during her illness ; “well, I begin to
understand. Alice, do you think you would know
those boys again if you should see them?”

“ T think I should, papa. You see, I sat up there
and watched them quite a while; and the big boy
especially, who put out the fire. I’m most sure I
should know him again; I felt so grateful to him,
you know, I wanted to run down and tell him how
glad I was that he came along just then; oh! I’m
most sure I should know him.”

“ Mamma,” said Judge Fenning, “do you think
it would hurt Alice to come into my office to-mor-



go REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

row morning for a few minutes, and see if she will
recognize the boy?”

«QO papa! did the boy come to see you who
said he put out the fire? How nice! I wish I
had seen him to-day. Did you give him some-
thing nice, papa?”

“No,” said her father, with a grave smile, “I
asked him to come again and see me to-morrow ;
if mamma is willing, you and I will have a little
talk with him.”

After that, Judge Fenning felt almost certain
that Reuben had told the exact truth. Several
little words which Alice had let slip confirmed his
story. For instance, “that tall boy,” she had
called him; and he remembered with satisfaction
that Reuben must be considerably taller than the
Potter boy. But what could have been that Potter
boy’s motive for such conduct ? If it were pure
mischief — the desire to harm something that be-
longed to others—a desire which some boys
seemed to have born with them — surely he need
not have carried it to such an extent as to come
of his own accord to accuse an innocent person.
«But that might have been in self-defence,’ he
added, continuing, after the manner of a lawyer, to
think the case out carefully on both sides ; “if his
guilty fears troubled him, he might have thought
to forestall all inquiries by furnishing the boy who



AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. gI

had done the mischief. If this proves to be the
case, Joel Potter is a dangerous character to have in
the neighborhood; he had better be sent away to
a reform school, or something of that sort, before
he grows too old to be reformed. Well, we shall
see what they will say to-morrow.”



92 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

VIL.
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD.

ROMPTLY at ten o'clock Reuben Stein was

at Judge Fenning’s piazza door. Caleb eyed

him in no friendly way, and said in a discontented

tone, “ What do you want now? ’Pears to me if

I had a safe place to stay in, I would stay there

if I were you, and not come prowling around here
so much.”

“ Judge Fenning directed me to be here at ten
o'clock,” said Reuben stiffly. He began to under-
stand that Caleb didn’t believe in him. Reuben’s
heart was very sorrowful this morning. Mr. Hard-
man had not got over his ill-humor. The truth is,
it irritated him to think of Reuben being mixed up
with a secret which he was not at liberty to talk to
him about ; he had grumbled over it a good deal
the evening before.

“ Like as not the fellow will get me into trouble!”
he said crossly to Nancy. “If there is a trial, as
of course there will be, I shall be dragged in as a
witness and have to answer all sorts of questions,



&

HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 93

and go to nobody knows how much expense. I
wish we had let him go to the poor-house, instead
of getting ourselves mixed up with him.”

“Oh! now, father,’ Nancy had said, “what is
the use of borrowing trouble? we have enough and
to spare, I think, without borrowing any. I don’t
believe there will be any kind of a trial; if Judge
Fenning isn’t smart enough to find out the truth
from an honest boy like Reuben, he isn’t fit to be
a judge. As for being a witness, I’d like the
chance myself; I’d like to witness to the fact that
Reuben Stein is as honest and above-board as the
sun is at noon. ‘There isn’t a deceiving streak in
him. Why, father, you know we've always been
able to trust to Reuben’s word.”

The only reply Mr. Hardman could make was to
say: “You never can tell what turn a boy like
him will take; he’s smart enough to tell any sort
of story if he took a notion.” His distrust in, and
annoyance with Reuben showed in every word that
he spoke to him. And the boy had hard work to
keep from making disrespectful replies, and was
relieved rather than otherwise when the time came
for him to start for Judge Fenning’s. It was hard
to be looked upon with suspicion. He had thought
of his mother oftener than usual since these troubles
came upon him. How sure she would be to know
that he spoke the truth —and perhaps it would



94 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

not be possible for him to convince Judge Fen-
ning that he did. If Mr. Hardman, who had
known him well for years, could so easily give up
all belief in him, what was to be expected of a
stranger?

It was not Caleb’s business to answer the door-
bell. A trim mulatto girl did that, who smiled on
him and asked: “Is your name ‘Reuben’? If it
is, you are to go into that little room there, where
the door is open, and wait until Judge Fenning
sends for you.”

Into the “little room” he went. Such a pretty
room! There was white matting on the floor, and
in the centre a thick green rug; there was a soft
couch in one corner, covered with some puffy green
stuff which looked to Reuben’s eyes like velvet ;
then there was an easy-chair or two, and in the
low, wide window-seats, half-hidden by long white
curtains, vases of flowers were standing. The ta-
ble in the middle of the room was strewn with
papers and books, and the walls were lined with
shelves reaching half-way up the ceiling and filled
with books. Troubled as Reuben’s heart was, he
could not keep the brightness from his eyes at the
sight of so many books; and venturing to take
up one while he waited, he soon became so inte-
rested in it as to almost forget where he was and
for what he was waiting. Just the other side of



WHILE REUBEN WAITED HE TOOK UP A BOOK READ,











HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 97

the hall, in the large library, sat Judge Fenning in
his leather-covered arm-chair ; and three feet away
from him, seated on chairs which had been placed
for them, were Joel Potter and Bennie Wilcox.

«“ Now, Joel,” said the judge, “I want you to be-
gin at the beginning, and tell me the exact truth
about the burned fence; put in every detail as
nearly as possible, and give me the whole story
without being questioned.”

« Why,” said Joel, looking injured, «I told you
the exact truth the other day, Judge; what is the
use of going over it again?”

« But if I want to hear it, you have no objection
to going over it, have you? If your story is true,
it cannot be much trouble to tell it.”

“Oh, no!” said Joel, returning to the saucy air
which was habitual; “if you want to hear it again,
I suppose I can tell it.” And he went over with
great apparent care the account of his discovery of
the fire, and his effort to put it out. The judge,
who had made a shorthand report of the same story
as given a few days before, glanced from time to
time at the paper which lay near him, and noted
that in several particulars the two accounts contra-
dicted each other. Once he called the boy’s at-
tention to it. “Look here, Joel, didn’t you tell me
the other day that you didn’t notice the fire on the
south side of the grove until you had put out the



98 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

other? And to-day you say that you saw the fire
on the south side.”

“Oh! no,” said Joel glibly, “I didn’t say that ;
you have mixed me up with somebody else; of
course I saw the fire around on the south side first
—that is where I had the hardest time getting it
out.”

“ Indeed,” said the judge, looking all the while
at his paper where the former story was written,
not in the least like this. Joel, who was looking
at it too, made sure that there was no writing on
it, and repeated his statement very confidently.
He hadn’t an idea that those queer little dots and
marks were writing. When Judge Fenning was
satisfied that Joel did not mean to tell the truth,
and that the little fellow by his side was too much
under his power to do other than agree to all he
said, he directed the boys to wait there a moment,
and crossed the hall to speak to Reuben. It
seemed to give him pleasure to find Reuben so
busy reading that he did not hear a footfall. «That
does not look like guilt,” said the judge to himself;
then he spoke : —

“Good-morning! you have found something that
interests you, I see.”

«Yes, sir,’ said Reuben, dropping the book and
springing to his feet ; “ I found something about a
meeting in New York, and it felt like home. I



HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 99

have been in the hall where it was held, and I’ve
seen the man who made the speech; he used to
come to our Sunday-school quite often and talk to
us.” Then there seemed to come suddenly the
remembrance of why he was there, and his face
grew red. “Perhaps I ought not to have touched
the book, sir,” he said; “but I saw the picture,
and took it up without thinking.”

“That is all right,” said the judge heartily. “I
am glad you enjoyed it; that is a picture of a good
man whom we all honor. Now are you ready to
hear that other story I told you of?”

“ Yes, sir, as ready as I can be,” said Reuben
with a very faint smile. “I can’t imagine who
knows anything about it besides myself; because
if there had been anybody within sight or hear-
ing, they must have heard me call for help.”

“ Before we go in,” said the judge, glancing at
the small note-book he held in his hand, “let me
ask you again about the fire, that I may have your
story freshly before me.” Then he questioned him
as he had done Joel, keeping his eye on the note-
book as Reuben answered, The two stories agreed
in all important points. Once Reuben hesitated.

“T don’t know,” he said; “I can’t think whether
that was before or after I went around on the
south side.”

“ Never mind,” said the judge, smiling ; “it is of



Full Text


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EVENT '2011-12-29T21:29:45-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-12-29T21:20:52-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile1' 'sip-files00012.txt
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'2011-12-29T21:27:24-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:20:56-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile10' 'sip-files00288.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
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'2011-12-29T21:26:28-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:36-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile11' 'sip-files00306a.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:28:08-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:41-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile12' 'sip-files00308.txt'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:31:43-05:00'
describe
Zero-length file
'2011-12-29T21:21:45-05:00'
redup
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Zero-length file
Zero-length file
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile2' 'sip-files00022.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:24:46-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:01-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile3' 'sip-files00050.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:23:36-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:05-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile4' 'sip-files00102.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:27:09-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:09-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile5' 'sip-files00160.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:27:25-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:14-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile6' 'sip-files00198.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:28:09-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:18-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile7' 'sip-files00218.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:30:22-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:23-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile8' 'sip-files00241.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:31:15-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:27-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfile9' 'sip-files00242.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:27:15-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-29T21:21:32-05:00'
redup
'398617' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWR' 'sip-files00001a.jp2'
4c731ae1e1b3222344f5b1933ce9b291
4247ab1dd21f54983589412dec67449d7160c9cc
'2011-12-29T21:31:46-05:00'
describe
'159337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWS' 'sip-files00001a.jpg'
7a624e7a039e67882c8e0c257fd3109d
d4418303b7e73c14c8cbd137214502339ff0fe31
'2011-12-29T21:27:08-05:00'
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWT' 'sip-files00001a.pro'
b7f7fecf157c32a9b2a57ce85eefa9ee
8c231b23f9d5ddc4e9f17f47e9d3bda30bd0495b
'2011-12-29T21:31:16-05:00'
describe
'37390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWU' 'sip-files00001a.QC.jpg'
3711a013be5dc08020e689238918cabd
7735b9459d16beee111b02495da997ee22ae8407
'2011-12-29T21:29:25-05:00'
describe
'9596460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWV' 'sip-files00001a.tif'
1bf9cd2439e2a8fe9be0f273d99748cc
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'2011-12-29T21:28:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWW' 'sip-files00001a.txt'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
'2011-12-29T21:23:04-05:00'
describe
Zero-length file
Zero-length file
Zero-length file
'11652' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZWX' 'sip-files00001athm.jpg'
c19a0debe642df65bc98633fd266ab9c
3e00b3022dede56eba5a57dbc757463c4da2213b
'2011-12-29T21:24:05-05:00'
describe
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790087e569118a565183c2e43eae344c
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'2011-12-29T21:22:55-05:00'
describe
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37a8068909c46877a4eb2e013550ea1a
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'2011-12-29T21:23:19-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXA' 'sip-files00002a.pro'
3450ecc0a4efd0e3f69e2aca0f7f8124
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'2011-12-29T21:30:12-05:00'
describe
'13315' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXB' 'sip-files00002a.QC.jpg'
13c9a085128642b0458e705840f52fa1
743e24fdb618bed3dda886d096f786ed76721243
'2011-12-29T21:23:29-05:00'
describe
'9765356' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXC' 'sip-files00002a.tif'
8e20e4106285a894fbd5044ab15b9599
daa3c6da3df3876041a4be5942edae8edba9a9ff
'2011-12-29T21:26:11-05:00'
describe
'6443' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXD' 'sip-files00002athm.jpg'
f00722536e89ac0a2839c4f0856fd7fc
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'2011-12-29T21:27:12-05:00'
describe
'342666' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXE' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b9bb9568fa1ea9bbb125e0efb340b547
31075e4bd686fec7a4cf58fd895c108d909a3c5f
'2011-12-29T21:22:11-05:00'
describe
'69825' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXF' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
9490fe93dff05303c9b6f61647ab02a8
a35c3177df9f786b012c5ad7b7895d4648459350
'2011-12-29T21:25:35-05:00'
describe
'2058' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXG' 'sip-files00006.pro'
6936cc7e5d82c13fa990a63965091317
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'2011-12-29T21:27:22-05:00'
describe
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0bae003646658ead00a532cccaadb6b8
6be72aeab00ff196119d5cedb1bd749a1c8b89a4
'2011-12-29T21:31:29-05:00'
describe
'2758512' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXI' 'sip-files00006.tif'
f4201b8b1ae50c399335bf95b3b87039
1d6508805ba54c56bee0feeaea7330d0f39e438d
'2011-12-29T21:30:19-05:00'
describe
'46' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXJ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
bd371fd4a1fa53654bf7def1cbc124d2
04133aa9ddd1dd5c38950d897ff0966d7e556544
'2011-12-29T21:23:28-05:00'
describe
'4587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXK' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
cdcdb627f3f0eca58fa8f9908ec19167
ff4bf39e4b46d96079b19629417cc195f9645180
'2011-12-29T21:22:18-05:00'
describe
'342512' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXL' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
15b2b6e4a9f96a3f1260191d91339b98
5862277486dc4fae93813302d582914bf2313a12
'2011-12-29T21:23:20-05:00'
describe
'40703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
556775cf281ab2934a0453c352caf0ef
da4fd96b20ec4f71946bac41ecbba6a62a3d1948
'2011-12-29T21:31:35-05:00'
describe
'6431' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXN' 'sip-files00007.pro'
6cb5b62272f02fb46405e1b5dcccca35
ce0d6432e08445a6074af896a486e047c12ea109
'2011-12-29T21:23:53-05:00'
describe
'10730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXO' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
41b9ff2c8a515d8b001e449990e3033e
fc09b2cb4920f611e0a5369453b7130ab985116f
'2011-12-29T21:31:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXP' 'sip-files00007.tif'
fa61c392f31ab80eba2e228988ea2e6a
548638f1954063b2daef217b27ff5ee92e3cf05a
'2011-12-29T21:23:09-05:00'
describe
'248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXQ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
79079de69b42172639e0c250d152f5bb
d96dc6641294e303498429c5589d9bcfddad5685
'2011-12-29T21:29:28-05:00'
describe
'3610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
221f2498ac038b56586d4e467689168a
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'2011-12-29T21:30:21-05:00'
describe
'342757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
6ae962e17f5045f2c25d3c91ae602030
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'2011-12-29T21:27:19-05:00'
describe
'27267' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f70fe131219177c65c3d42f20642089e
d07a629bda32075126bb874476027493f034dfec
describe
'3189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXU' 'sip-files00008.pro'
06b99b047292739d84f5d1d88a9c86ba
37f4a6f8130723d705a99b91dbb10e9f40267f45
'2011-12-29T21:25:03-05:00'
describe
'5861' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
05ce0cf71744c28d445c2ed9db738804
33fbf0493fd0e777291b03931494a02373f29048
'2011-12-29T21:22:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXW' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1954f681d714cb2fb479fa5b47468e15
4fd9537e5d53b4756e71244ffcd64c75ae83be38
'2011-12-29T21:26:15-05:00'
describe
'116' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
8911c7b0d900f813ae966b50403cfc00
de5a506165aaf91271cd92f45f57e88fdad268ca
'2011-12-29T21:29:57-05:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
c5be9f3ee1935274655f6c9207ac1b9c
02c46593ae153c2fb4c23c22ac954a9e046f23f3
'2011-12-29T21:23:48-05:00'
describe
'342569' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZXZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
653d02d65ff0373706d8d47148133e13
3d061b876872a2cb446c40304cc7261eb0d17bc2
'2011-12-29T21:26:46-05:00'
describe
'58722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
b18db89ed583be449d96e26989659566
bd896cc69608e777394c4becca89a25195abbd8d
'2011-12-29T21:26:32-05:00'
describe
'22610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e9192f4ddace235adb3c8de1f54dca00
0e0fa3a69ddcfeef11f041a22a50f8d96196b295
'2011-12-29T21:24:43-05:00'
describe
'19624' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
79a759551f05b2c9948f78f03780747c
a84174a2aaed85729efea06b3d6ee945a2d26099
'2011-12-29T21:27:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c48e11621ab3c68d293552a33d275564
2571453a5b6dea5c999af39fdeffcea1863b2961
'2011-12-29T21:23:02-05:00'
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
4e0a476d7a590f0136759a45947162af
9d108359079c938f72f02382e5a222a4419aa783
'2011-12-29T21:25:18-05:00'
describe
'5511' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYF' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
7218a05758fead694dbc132e6c5fb1ad
f01c43dd8b8a48434789772327153082c41c29f1
'2011-12-29T21:28:42-05:00'
describe
'342550' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYG' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
dc786134db59b755f4b732504f52f7d4
e180fd5a52b61859ee8c98c7d7579eaeece68430
'2011-12-29T21:24:55-05:00'
describe
'33794' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYH' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b9d5579fbf38093dcc429211c01de47b
d4934ea54b244f2ea93b8e3406f2db535900e8c9
'2011-12-29T21:31:09-05:00'
describe
'8376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2572bf46f8d67da4201da139f3e3dafd
6c30e8f7d432661ba00475288a34887aede0d242
'2011-12-29T21:30:17-05:00'
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
aa8da4031ca9dd2007c1b49bfa9aa723
2df74d66ad363db760c652cbf05099556885f4a1
'2011-12-29T21:30:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f43dc1879c4ea55f823b52c5dde09ac9
1dd84582e09861067e48f3fa22d605df1583b353
'2011-12-29T21:22:14-05:00'
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYL' 'sip-files00010.txt'
9d7f2bfbde82fdd671c8e298576d18b3
eb93cea94c74d8840f1899e7f60243ca3e92162c
'2011-12-29T21:22:00-05:00'
describe
'2739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYM' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
8a1368ba716eb595d25af84e01ae2f90
552feb52e527fee770fc2d6369b82ebacbc7d136
'2011-12-29T21:27:14-05:00'
describe
'342750' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
314eef5b55ac509189efc2f71dcf2459
7c8ee0ebe48e885e50c66a4ab3a9a9b2902ec778
'2011-12-29T21:26:17-05:00'
describe
'44472' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
fd98e79b823393b7ce5de0374e3ecfb3
d494bc3d1a0da505435338658873e584618b860f
'2011-12-29T21:22:26-05:00'
describe
'13187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f2ce695579553da65d84aa43a3f5b01c
7324ac5b5ba7cba53f62292dedb30bc201a2c333
'2011-12-29T21:29:08-05:00'
describe
'14294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1a59744fb900d6707d359f878eb80029
f391191199f60fb9bdbff4f9600129b466e78f51
'2011-12-29T21:24:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
59875372089561a6b17b5a8c27051f29
13a6e032d175f8d55848774ec78c187d36a768b5
'2011-12-29T21:22:27-05:00'
describe
'457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
25735a80f75ff096c65b46ac52361044
1e385be59b5696c676b1b2603c12dfe50f20ac96
'2011-12-29T21:22:58-05:00'
describe
'4416' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4491d09e665c4c97cf34c457bee6143f
7960ff62cca2874c25feeb0261ea9f6a11eea2fd
'2011-12-29T21:29:44-05:00'
describe
'342732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
e3eea3fb6a3982cbd588961676d46ff8
a8a27fe79db43a12d01e7524db02da58393187ba
'2011-12-29T21:25:39-05:00'
describe
'22242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
ce81d70b9f12648bc9d6b3fff879657b
82ccfc947ceb5ebeae6488f039f07cde3fd70145
'2011-12-29T21:28:07-05:00'
describe
'3991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5a4ade405229b9bf5fd08f0e7410d3f9
2c46fd52a9b48055222aef0aa3e3dc4cd2de57d0
'2011-12-29T21:22:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
fa0f40b00b8db471d589216ed2f59e8d
16e06ce399ee68f0455b6a42ab0ee7a0caeb11d2
'2011-12-29T21:29:17-05:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYY' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
89ffcec4e2c096bf68af9d73ef42c81d
08daa9a7fd58ee8cc7df5d4bed82e9954e482d80
'2011-12-29T21:31:49-05:00'
describe
'342639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZYZ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b655fde2f3a94704a8b399150ed5d9a3
fa6f6ab20d3e9d77effd83515bb5887f8fd20ef7
'2011-12-29T21:22:29-05:00'
describe
'87193' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZA' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
629560b7edc72953f8e6ea2d508912bc
7b4cab2ce06aa6de4cd52a5f694ca2ae38d6eeb9
'2011-12-29T21:28:13-05:00'
describe
'22431' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
0d78ddb2304b99eb5388b75ba9863085
934fe52954ed768091bf2a7a739c3a7f8fc4cc84
'2011-12-29T21:30:41-05:00'
describe
'25933' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZC' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
55de668aa551949e7c60965d29875ead
78a8c0813f771e97aee5a67f6888ea007d7258d4
'2011-12-29T21:26:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
59a3a1c05d4e4c6614ea79051a99383c
4faea190ebe211832a36558b16a70490234dc77a
'2011-12-29T21:23:17-05:00'
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZE' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1ef10d6ceb70f119cf7dc65635ebc4b3
87a533ae36c84182780157e9e81a4520e6971db4
'2011-12-29T21:29:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZF' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
d1f36fd43c8fc4b7f315c2445f2e7b42
c392caddc33b41c469c159827d2a3c3f78efc589
'2011-12-29T21:24:45-05:00'
describe
'342775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZG' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
0a38cad0dccd10955375da9afda3bbe5
4a745253fbaccab74f4abe8fc3f0daf98d427431
'2011-12-29T21:24:59-05:00'
describe
'117186' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZH' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a713e57c1c3a758513aabd214acc3235
2ba19622d31a45ba072956bdb36e9e07f2d5c9a8
'2011-12-29T21:27:38-05:00'
describe
'35972' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZI' 'sip-files00014.pro'
d0132e1b39910e38c4f00574fa22e259
45cc448076f7841b24e4b2e5460f5d0c99d5e718
describe
'36529' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZJ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a6211657e6453d63123b71c514190a86
f8b4dfd904e55ce6318c32cd8d68c590dde462a6
'2011-12-29T21:31:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZK' 'sip-files00014.tif'
0b04b33ba5123b5ec2bf6e5f56c8f970
6920ed34a737787b53e8055a784e41b1945efbab
'2011-12-29T21:22:31-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZL' 'sip-files00014.txt'
7158adbae94a84e3e21992f1438435de
e3a9da7200b3cf1ec4865012314e36beb4d9e066
'2011-12-29T21:30:15-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9063' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZM' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ef7502bfad2cf42c9ecd9e5c69a1657d
1cc304b6744891ca79fcee445d9865f419b07646
'2011-12-29T21:23:54-05:00'
describe
'342575' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZN' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
b589a02a0274c5e9304c3a96f6533a37
9c5f180c53a3aaf05b0a54fa422ecbf2638305ec
describe
'123024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZO' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d401ebf966f6f5b77818ba2191106ca3
b898c9f5d21721f775419b96054cc4b654dc8a5d
'2011-12-29T21:23:45-05:00'
describe
'36016' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZP' 'sip-files00015.pro'
bb6d993a54475603b52c75ec6e37b0c4
6d8d051b7175712904c1fc87b3bddc604c63848f
'2011-12-29T21:30:57-05:00'
describe
'38779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
327f49ced309d4ecf10789d66170c670
c35444ec8806f479b3f24738dfa06f1536c2bfee
'2011-12-29T21:23:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d37000120c8db8aec49ac3f7b6b504f2
54af3ab41f20f0f59ee508d7e0d5adade1dffc95
'2011-12-29T21:22:40-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e7707742983ea5d59d591e6ef9ede5e2
c9c71eab3e5ed0fe3f14a2aefa9a4d8006720d2c
'2011-12-29T21:24:41-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZT' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
0dc87e652fd546f32ec0d148698292b4
9a1fffc361b6771774c7f09ef99a1f2af21994fb
'2011-12-29T21:22:01-05:00'
describe
'342771' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
762364953068ba9eabaa8a270e105622
f356325b1da10b262521ac3eacfd5421247be2ba
'2011-12-29T21:30:37-05:00'
describe
'120995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZV' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
df72d08282bfccf4052da0a2a9d4d3b9
44cadb3a9752fde14fe83a44a7651f4bbebb47ea
'2011-12-29T21:31:20-05:00'
describe
'36213' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZW' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9ae1203a95a27ffe6f146783c2bfff15
8c9fa111c9986e9756a7feb6e14046c5c985a3d5
describe
'37295' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZX' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
0a2cc0364b7544f6d094722ec0774e76
9f55ecf4be0209042f7354664e3745b71f609c46
'2011-12-29T21:27:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZY' 'sip-files00018.tif'
33e18d8b21f80c374ad6ad9ac7ccd35b
393d4130b897acbb19889b2aef66aa4656971c1b
'2011-12-29T21:25:59-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AABZZZ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
639cde8db07b8e412d756d880744d322
fd4e94fde068942a7a8fe9811ce3061475f3ad96
'2011-12-29T21:22:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9311' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAA' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3f884ef1275a41ec46a98c2cdc8fa567
5497e1204f01c20c1e762635afb63adb5ac52ceb
'2011-12-29T21:29:27-05:00'
describe
'342753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAB' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
c805a95e8f6dd5fd8ed320aa0a8c04b0
61efec2c7568e60256053fcee6d66bce583b2102
'2011-12-29T21:23:43-05:00'
describe
'124447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAC' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
869d25aecb9347eb6aecb3ce10063acc
1a35579c0633d3de92635c6bb4173c15cc43b349
'2011-12-29T21:27:27-05:00'
describe
'35935' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAD' 'sip-files00019.pro'
025092b70a2b6583e298909223cb7932
9f79977fd4d7c5a0a10070feb1d478593eda287f
'2011-12-29T21:26:42-05:00'
describe
'37976' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAE' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e8458fad3478620a1ddce1d9fa2dd369
3adbe7e7faa1e18a1b2098d53c30e9d459a3f9e0
'2011-12-29T21:27:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAF' 'sip-files00019.tif'
01f983b438d1841dc619d196644e6668
70c6bbea2522c86b48d955b1a51d45c893d9c0a0
'2011-12-29T21:21:51-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAG' 'sip-files00019.txt'
6353c5f1cbb3b3e7ef323754ba435727
61e02429e6301c41df2ffaab1464337cef75bba3
describe
'9458' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAH' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
0d0f030ca52d63b7311448906422b1e1
60e8de52180febcf71f325f5519817f53bfed2f3
'2011-12-29T21:31:28-05:00'
describe
'342562' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
9e62fd814ae71263d1616bb08a49669f
aa3b3051c23ca7df39a814c978625bc3b512e7c3
'2011-12-29T21:27:54-05:00'
describe
'136354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
557a013049287d15a1596cabd802811b
877169188071d52db86dc1f0c9d0b78ca76d2637
'2011-12-29T21:23:14-05:00'
describe
'37656' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
899c092a5c7e086358d7280475509ed0
c5657aba025b660b4bbe00f7e8160355151e6fd6
describe
'41836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
5abc20a761fec866973286ab276ac9ab
fce966e6d338d1cbeb6d554b928b4c79cd3c9090
'2011-12-29T21:23:59-05:00'
describe
'2759488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAM' 'sip-files00020.tif'
bf5e74d5223b40ee6cbb04b390ed4758
7222d36f382d3b31d17f3d1f46c0c7b9b307100b
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
711a84ab85bb64e32518ac41178d2374
a3f1395a78c992c52c487c94f2b0e3eb599cc172
'2011-12-29T21:25:40-05:00'
describe
'10615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAO' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
6e53af8a931426319289ccac81beaa76
fb8a94e3efe0837669e00d0b3065a0a5474cf990
'2011-12-29T21:26:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9d1c2e99e7c6a9beb5513edd95b7ad9c
40bbbb7d4bf352498bf75aff768ebcee23402430
'2011-12-29T21:30:33-05:00'
describe
'70554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0b8c101bd58feec51f3442be5fdf78ab
e09f08a095d0be5d4d494dfdc6b72904d3128b57
'2011-12-29T21:25:07-05:00'
describe
'2242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAR' 'sip-files00021.pro'
84b094829c724523b7f9c3a8076697c1
3ee04d3293ad9060cace6673ab8577519ba11228
'2011-12-29T21:26:31-05:00'
describe
'17959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAS' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0ed8e6c8448c52a097f2470343799c2a
857c94c1dbaa353348bf5aaa3dd896a1a32003c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAT' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e8b0e3833f0194764fefdf2455a6fd95
529c70c0d00a21373d1dffd5bd7352f50e6428e3
'2011-12-29T21:29:07-05:00'
describe
'29' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAU' 'sip-files00021.txt'
499633bc7384325446ebf84f4d293c44
615ca4946731e70ab909222350b51f052bf8da91
'2011-12-29T21:27:40-05:00'
describe
'5419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAV' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
2171712bd8f8ccd3970f3630693d4ecb
cf134b634703898d59a42bc1bacf86ecd0100aeb
'2011-12-29T21:23:03-05:00'
describe
'342500' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAW' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d05ae35dcd9930600b08806211e0e572
19373d16ae0d19469777b12c98c2ff36e12c04d1
'2011-12-29T21:23:12-05:00'
describe
'17105' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAX' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
00c9bb0e11ecc11066aef3b3e310b34a
b9da9b83d1e7fd729175f45945d87d851ae0b52a
'2011-12-29T21:24:29-05:00'
describe
'3284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAY' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
0d156e27ad9bd0419689abab84760396
f2562c9af6eda5c741a4006ea5e916170ab87fb7
'2011-12-29T21:30:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAAZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f615bb6fd861611c8f16681f64780789
94ad963c1f3139e973072e73c4242bbc36e0cd23
'2011-12-29T21:26:06-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABA' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
868d21d36a5e87f57943fb2715dd876a
bc38994c367b06322f4d3a0fea9268ace45afc86
'2011-12-29T21:26:47-05:00'
describe
'342767' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABB' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3c79e5ebee87669495ad5d2cb610dbfc
b1818924b32e03a991d2ceb457878c6a9ab01e17
describe
'123576' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b4171dfbf6a0d0ae6ab9dfd8c3a2cc79
41944df368b4f506fabd2e73088045f312d62720
'2011-12-29T21:24:04-05:00'
describe
'36302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABD' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5e6732b10c18c9f4e2eadd8bfe78bb62
a1b0e342e32573a4005328011a141467574d5f75
'2011-12-29T21:27:03-05:00'
describe
'38615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABE' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
493b001bf15219e132ef242a229a93c0
06fc8781b3139697340c9fd6fceec000b6d7d93a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABF' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5d8dc52227b3063829f1611bc87f7afe
a63cd58ea6359bb508c1414487e82a71063eb810
'2011-12-29T21:23:32-05:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABG' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c4a04bceee59605afd7d918786baf647
7fbf096bbfa579c585fd4bc0f7de15540af1ff78
'2011-12-29T21:28:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9428' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABH' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
7612a8fa1b7ee220941ff013ab19d7af
9cd71161835180120055264688005a98abafc5a8
'2011-12-29T21:24:42-05:00'
describe
'342738' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABI' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
97f0058a8633253afb247d78dacba2f1
af5b59bace57f852579f5bf7251b04c0aa2f90f0
describe
'123409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABJ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
8897550462cee2647b73250da0fc9b0a
b65f54c6dbebe620a79fb4f42255a63b15d86d46
describe
'36785' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABK' 'sip-files00024.pro'
27c19f91dd810d01ba2a73537c44e6f7
c245841edc98242a48cb0f0962da19f65f523817
'2011-12-29T21:26:02-05:00'
describe
'38295' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABL' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9a249275e82051555da38a1bc547f7ee
fc3a2331ee9947eaa8e9b17c303ac06ab1c5a90e
'2011-12-29T21:31:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABM' 'sip-files00024.tif'
237cc66b3200f1f4efc2d6e263bc88ae
d1ccb140bb0facfcf1a74ef43292c582175969e4
'2011-12-29T21:24:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABN' 'sip-files00024.txt'
665783d30096fbfd632e05ef91398222
b876049847565b5f75ea455845b340ae638aa2e0
'2011-12-29T21:22:13-05:00'
describe
'9388' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABO' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3da8bed82eda351ce046fb9ff5efdad1
20d2b839e9f8787b59195d3608c1ce1f4150d731
describe
'342779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABP' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6bee8a8863054cdec891d8794f117045
f8b5863b728eb05d85779040be49fee092e6f430
'2011-12-29T21:30:54-05:00'
describe
'123854' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABQ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
e15b2d5465e2de58d84db93e034689b2
c6747a15b574fd47df0b5697e2908bc5c8423450
'2011-12-29T21:28:15-05:00'
describe
'36208' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABR' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cbf221be6f0bdb66dd798e4497b75e8b
aed34b994492eed063bcf9add70656f8d181f3d0
'2011-12-29T21:26:26-05:00'
describe
'38378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
9c20edd0b6f783489327f16b752d76e6
9a71b7fcaace88bfdd06b097eba7674b9aaa39d8
'2011-12-29T21:22:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABT' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c89caa7745a038b612379ede7380ccc8
65f64c1da360183c694f9e9b06604b7ef5f3e437
'2011-12-29T21:24:34-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABU' 'sip-files00025.txt'
22ebd806fda3e076244fb6940345b452
d347997d51bbda510e64cdf855cf29cc16bb6a76
'2011-12-29T21:27:21-05:00'
describe
'9020' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABV' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
4a112236bfe1b5b1122ae600beb06014
896d67f332e14d4c2cc045fa8daf1c7689a8a627
'2011-12-29T21:23:41-05:00'
describe
'342663' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABW' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d55987986385b6dc99171b2a7f75f057
95edcbcec764ffa1eb7c8f077fab2578b76649fb
'2011-12-29T21:26:57-05:00'
describe
'120884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABX' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
17ac2cbf52aec029fa44265f2cc0623d
e71c01f67e59e37029a155eee9ce5c1027630557
'2011-12-29T21:27:58-05:00'
describe
'35572' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
05b7b7aee3181a6946c0a9b9da826ab1
1623040272826bbc9a329400b1c7662b9643a616
'2011-12-29T21:24:08-05:00'
describe
'38465' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACABZ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
bf54943054e6dc54273eee5075377645
540d8f838d6f69401083eb326ad84582772ff068
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACA' 'sip-files00026.tif'
d06cc266f31e390cb6886b9e724cde12
4d16985d88cf78efd345e4e3a11a932c6d952683
'2011-12-29T21:25:06-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a5e5229e8c66e36619331e06c4e5eabf
0b5536fb398b250e20281017b97b856565b67071
'2011-12-29T21:23:06-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9535' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACC' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
08d7034dbc76f94a51ae5d2104fa9824
9cdcaec22d104a074e7a3ae7ecf2e90ecb9af316
'2011-12-29T21:23:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d62da4d5d763f4c18156abed26b5b4b9
1ae745d8543392fbd419c555dc548d497905b220
'2011-12-29T21:25:12-05:00'
describe
'116732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACE' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b84d5e494528be168488b0bc89ae9a24
bda30963f6103302b8a44e69965bbdad3d612e6e
'2011-12-29T21:24:23-05:00'
describe
'33538' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACF' 'sip-files00027.pro'
82580e18d2308b8e879d0a3abe1489ac
7abfe3dd8b9b588069fa82ff167195f65f39b69d
describe
'35978' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACG' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c227ccbcbdc20566d5734970c982447a
76d0393bf60497d1a8b9922a07e23308792488bb
'2011-12-29T21:27:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACH' 'sip-files00027.tif'
72265855b14ae379721e74e997f98f79
1cc67eb94a5905c798a4da8ae1a22ff00f2cfe43
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
42837329eee71d1cfde746426d571e6a
3990fd5939205ffa4a2c254b041b1c0a5233a9e7
'2011-12-29T21:30:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8982' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACJ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
2db11279d0480a0b33ef29eaf771c86a
b5196c12e3244c62680fc77362c88d5fca45f0d7
describe
'342588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACK' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
5013a3ee11ae938c46d93810e38189b4
c07e15f0b824763322485d388263c65eba519562
describe
'112869' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACL' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
cf1922afa6f0fe93ed23c8d5ecbbf53a
b7a1b3195293969a1688b5dd7a5ad805f031db6a
'2011-12-29T21:24:40-05:00'
describe
'33544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACM' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1ec1435c6cf164c63ed2a1a08477bc85
7376e8755f4257f5774c417c879276accbfe2a37
'2011-12-29T21:28:24-05:00'
describe
'35642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACN' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
636c4a6a11e5871bd4062adc22b42051
0d19fa3436bd231ed99bb83e4708345288b4cf82
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACO' 'sip-files00028.tif'
292f9dc4011c84cd8301b8881f585908
e4d004c2dfd1866f265ae502c90de82d426302db
'2011-12-29T21:26:35-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACP' 'sip-files00028.txt'
874cc9e3492352c07e64789439e4c19e
42fbc5a5238ca61438329efa3060f17cebd22201
'2011-12-29T21:30:00-05:00'
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
514caf54099471b53a34b6ca83cb2863
4086c0275a1cbfabacd3e3b787794ca269bcbf5e
'2011-12-29T21:22:51-05:00'
describe
'342659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACR' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d8537b9e63a9c779f03eb61216c37961
34d5a0d6ab4c0ec39a287e6b51221bacdb5331f8
'2011-12-29T21:24:15-05:00'
describe
'42795' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
b5315fe411aa1e1ac6ba80361e6463f6
f601bd5aa9e8daaa1201aab08d4ee8d1c9708f1a
'2011-12-29T21:28:27-05:00'
describe
'7755' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ab429d3cc00ab1082b5df70662500a8a
49e30be6909b3968cf031fcf63b4c1e08eb2914d
describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACU' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
12185bab8f5b32b8487bdb76c8f8677e
28c8182b106ca7e34409ffccaadb7d2d9f62a8ac
'2011-12-29T21:25:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACV' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0b28d6f78e952b64ce2548950c597820
2c2cab81e159c62a8b452410371986a12a1756b2
'2011-12-29T21:31:41-05:00'
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACW' 'sip-files00029.txt'
e0433acad0a8f476743dff992ebd156a
385bb703e119260c7a097c707d84a0529c3b9300
'2011-12-29T21:25:29-05:00'
describe
'3072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
6fcad9d49f37bfe3c7e0f00006880be6
c7cd6ef347d27790871622f65f44e70776fd6eb4
'2011-12-29T21:29:14-05:00'
describe
'342770' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACY' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
43958b409adda3a3919417fad69a2a11
f36fbedf46eff5a75c1ecf9e7c5855eaba996c10
'2011-12-29T21:29:50-05:00'
describe
'91440' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACACZ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d140c55fc6afcedcb0615e45f16a6dc5
d6e351a26a5fc8c3e8d54ee113ded0b6703b78ac
'2011-12-29T21:30:39-05:00'
describe
'23385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADA' 'sip-files00030.pro'
ecb82d5ababd1f6da4cc3d13b739cb4a
51db171e0ac935b51d8e5a9ec06e287e6f3b0901
'2011-12-29T21:30:11-05:00'
describe
'26928' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADB' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3c5a4ca2bae33450b6e53caf1dac7cac
79c471d6ebccf03ff9b404eb1c2c89da0a830ed2
'2011-12-29T21:27:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADC' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c0cff656dae56b545305d8c9a89cdf3f
6a11f70b25a340cd5edbe7f1b59e3acc0a2bf9b6
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADD' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8de0229ee307b3e79bef868a3aa76385
df6a7307e9dcecdc32db482dbd22488bc374c749
'2011-12-29T21:22:28-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
ba2a85ee309b7f6d9c9c18e435f87973
6388c1979cd9457c04bad68074d383064abff838
'2011-12-29T21:27:11-05:00'
describe
'342743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADF' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ddba8864bffad638d6ac2fdfdb4090b6
58d268305c4c63d052c63983a969f393a6824025
'2011-12-29T21:28:36-05:00'
describe
'118006' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
87a05e6bda2bdff383a0a2ac86dc4a63
04313e5472c2e8dfed84e9d6718500c953591bfd
'2011-12-29T21:24:03-05:00'
describe
'32600' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADH' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a9f1cadae8f56ea7fd5b61e23e577dba
e6a94259052c75b0d2c9005858f69c2533f56d13
'2011-12-29T21:30:51-05:00'
describe
'36217' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e2382a300a4578f574e6783415d2d5cb
bbe9595c97d0fe3c2b39b5fa869ae0cfaee61a1d
'2011-12-29T21:24:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADJ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
a72aba5db04f7e3f4aceea598b5f0a8c
daedd632b95fd46e6ff0e943924c1b832b55b110
'2011-12-29T21:24:13-05:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7398ff50bf19a4f8054adde7c549ee40
1dbfea20ca4eb06e306d0eceed51592a45433eae
'2011-12-29T21:25:13-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9062' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADL' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
35b78e661f73b77d2a151c5a103664ae
a60de7d630cd315180f55f9a6147dc6dc2b323b5
describe
'342778' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
fba36a35f1fb45f9b29c433a36abc3b9
3db185544cdcdc6b703e19ed478579aa0998b72c
'2011-12-29T21:21:53-05:00'
describe
'120817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADN' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
c318072ae443608db9eee1f71974ef2f
7a5b007d7ae56677401748da049f4595e6c70314
'2011-12-29T21:24:48-05:00'
describe
'35474' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
18c8830f2289ef8884cf8f2cf8f71a71
3e91d68bbd0f9dc4c12c64a4388fd3b0dcbfc707
'2011-12-29T21:22:47-05:00'
describe
'38038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADP' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
2cc6fd8cf224269fbf05e95e2f14ffa5
0bde17c541c63cd12f3171753b984160aee82d39
'2011-12-29T21:27:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
bf38281a50e6bc0c76f124d302d2c209
80d8e2ce107bc37d5a66e717f0deed15377ec6fc
'2011-12-29T21:29:54-05:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
4610fbbe884d5903ae05539a2e776483
52d69708e1106924abb5393725b53114b90e8101
'2011-12-29T21:24:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9119' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
18129217dde94b05d1aa059db19c9740
8cb20ccb0bb2e7e63507e14cd1206e8f29d04cba
'2011-12-29T21:24:21-05:00'
describe
'342780' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADT' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9965a88ca3cca660f503b8b472633128
8e0f1feec5c02046b0bdcf3a8ebc9753e732dbf6
'2011-12-29T21:22:17-05:00'
describe
'126627' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADU' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3c2551e6e080b1d1c7bc9b6ef812fdfb
32ac5f0bd16a890e0fbf0b0cf14638423be5f8f0
'2011-12-29T21:23:57-05:00'
describe
'35739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
763caa03b61df80947795dca4b66ff42
c1d8f1ecbe1d5a8a0628dae1cc7f79ad32734448
'2011-12-29T21:23:23-05:00'
describe
'39757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
b8e5382c1667d3eb496ec3fafdadd54c
8add12ff9a583716ea4b0ebdf9732ecce0f11d7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f643d017c9674ac28b8112db653a7f05
28e603fe29ecf7b19182c2fec45fbc35ed5c0ab3
'2011-12-29T21:26:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADY' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0f9c648522333a7f0927bf7c4d1d5fbc
8cf4689e9bf9713a78e9ab030c4b471facb24eab
'2011-12-29T21:31:48-05:00'
describe
'9707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACADZ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
04ac5f576904f0e41aeb615108374044
5232f29919bda5ab4b3d452df66d8342991e586b
describe
'342769' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEA' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
48c79eee644a246d64e6c7aa81a110d5
cdc807703227da47de3b5cc0dfa1ca35823a7728
'2011-12-29T21:25:09-05:00'
describe
'117970' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEB' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
17957f6bffe191f47097b8c1d0752ea8
8a7a00c51dfd3354abb7aa79e1e1d24e62a6d143
'2011-12-29T21:24:38-05:00'
describe
'34263' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEC' 'sip-files00034.pro'
35369dd8380a6cafb3c2b3f06541d66e
dec427a06a673d05badadd78776fb53f15116ad5
'2011-12-29T21:27:17-05:00'
describe
'35452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAED' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
704c09699c258cf8da901eb2f276e18d
dfcb41d0d68530728ee85e1140675a12135c59a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEE' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c77c42d5af58472a33f24b0c7f8583f1
093a9876b3d0b9d64550c8d77811b00e3cf71e51
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEF' 'sip-files00034.txt'
9d83ee1604f5e95c5a677c1bf5d9bf5c
b3461549ca83d0d73dfd8f43e866000961ef20d7
describe
Invalid character
'8773' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
30f09ce97230444be88737ffddb54ada
8e7316b55d3211117b5ca7884e520416d4fd29db
'2011-12-29T21:28:11-05:00'
describe
'342777' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8c716e5684e034d6024e09e0ae2f2b2e
f8d8eba5f589b31918e99299cde2f084baa38191
'2011-12-29T21:26:55-05:00'
describe
'117265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e92a25878541cde887a184f7db5c983b
25c8c30f0269a6faedb58bf5675c340468f29711
'2011-12-29T21:28:43-05:00'
describe
'33708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEJ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
85b55d24a443e315ed4c6e0a16c91721
760b5a263886d8231870aee436f786bdfe881099
'2011-12-29T21:28:19-05:00'
describe
'35877' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5bdb1e0c5320bb2b9b041abbc75d56c7
0491879c2fd18ef36f41da4b8673210aa0145afe
'2011-12-29T21:25:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
c15a5fec6c602c71985574d896243aac
9d737eff6fda66d8b3fbad2be928dd31fc0803f9
'2011-12-29T21:28:41-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
155f7c79ab1e6f31a85169d4bdf0f5f7
2027897472f7f97297c67be36c413e82767bc120
describe
'9179' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEN' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
556e1b4aecc8e03818c5dfa88fea7fb5
9f7f08f173c1b457e87adc6ce237e6b1a2fa30cf
'2011-12-29T21:22:20-05:00'
describe
'342702' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEO' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c5d5f7708ca257ce7afff32963601413
35d1a7dd906a1b74e4fe9e79a1168f396e61725e
'2011-12-29T21:30:31-05:00'
describe
'115377' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d00c52810af939f321c0be271eda4fa1
4d57d4182390b7f03cbce5cb820ec9c6fd79c591
'2011-12-29T21:26:44-05:00'
describe
'34682' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEQ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
b91ddc6f12763636fa770b63854658a9
39e7613c78ea187dcdacb32916c636e948b2adf0
'2011-12-29T21:29:51-05:00'
describe
'36426' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAER' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
fb6127b5b10a17dd7630e60bcbba06d3
01c1eaaadf81285a7a9eb91eef8879cd31b07a52
'2011-12-29T21:26:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAES' 'sip-files00036.tif'
cb561673955505f1a0e14559f3fab632
3654110e15a6d64f87078afbd99d498df24ec642
'2011-12-29T21:28:02-05:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAET' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6ffa369fb9ab532fcb6e744e7e51eb0d
67678b12a8a90963634dbab4df1c76ee117ffe1d
'2011-12-29T21:28:04-05:00'
describe
'9219' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEU' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
de3fee1bbe7f30da23d05423d7ea2052
bb196c13108697ba21f2d3164f5bcf8939f80917
'2011-12-29T21:27:07-05:00'
describe
'342499' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
52481f286e46412b7417aa70fc608004
99cd9d866e043fcdcd193cc1ccb0d08f0c0a9e48
'2011-12-29T21:29:18-05:00'
describe
'112730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEW' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
df1ba0f9b4fedb76a6c6fd193b1249a6
04ec59f324e3b1b457edf4514b3d3c9de6eeed3c
'2011-12-29T21:28:03-05:00'
describe
'32118' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEX' 'sip-files00037.pro'
78373ee9adffa839a4e9ba892aa3794c
397401f11f88c49f313d6e7ba85fa88e49faff05
describe
'34916' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEY' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a7038916974fe87ef452bd163d6ede27
7967b4505f83f1d7864361bb232cb740a6a75b52
'2011-12-29T21:22:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAEZ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a2f69af2aec656d201f7fbcc49fa07c5
377b776162fa07d29200eeb149ef1934801bd328
'2011-12-29T21:26:48-05:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFA' 'sip-files00037.txt'
288a1ff6d0a41da6670545c9151dc7d5
3c058e5899dd89dad526c2f0816b579bf946023b
'2011-12-29T21:24:54-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFB' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6aee3a1489f6428f934b1fc66b4e3c7f
4eb671834de59098cc6d0552ffed3db3160adcf8
'2011-12-29T21:28:14-05:00'
describe
'342745' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFC' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
13964224d4c762b13e0f688d89f0751b
1391362a21527fcecb70926fafd312e8ded426bc
describe
'118979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFD' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
37f5e0c5e68078858601c084b3cb5a38
71a1fe3eac99398f991caa4562c18b949b775092
'2011-12-29T21:26:12-05:00'
describe
'34359' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFE' 'sip-files00038.pro'
08899dbc2f71954abc7ba7aa3a530252
0dcd201e13aaf9474f05f325fda427c931c44c51
'2011-12-29T21:30:36-05:00'
describe
'37365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFF' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0fc34646f27e12f30ea2fd5c94cfd8ec
740cfc4f7fb3b0645c453267f77220ad6b4a16ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFG' 'sip-files00038.tif'
1f48d8f44f3a1521263d5275d7bd3785
71a45620d2fa913f710cb987b953a43b2fa66b57
'2011-12-29T21:29:31-05:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFH' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e76cb740c45edc2180bae109e7cae7cb
ed72dc1fbc248624997a80fca97207160486b307
'2011-12-29T21:29:30-05:00'
describe
'9171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFI' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d320d675af450bbf065d2dd956daae4b
a596f5f270185187aeb38f80b9d039537fbd78b3
'2011-12-29T21:31:40-05:00'
describe
'342782' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFJ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
0901408599d6ad858d69f05a6240b13f
39ec15cd04af282026d7078a516aa4974fcf1fe1
'2011-12-29T21:28:48-05:00'
describe
'120819' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFK' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b50eb7c1f7e178456ffd394d8492db4d
2d81c59267d271b2053024253c46f1103adc17cb
describe
'36013' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFL' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d92781a4dd76a807e03342cf35d09e4a
d60825b55b76f524edba888f056d7ab43ef2a01a
describe
'37236' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1d2c23feb7de2c394ca990c31463e07d
5364d99f792ca8d855840c64612cbf2685140399
'2011-12-29T21:28:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d82d47390ec8b171d5631b37d13c654a
b8c89366b31849163c0d17e11be09058c540c655
'2011-12-29T21:22:41-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFO' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b78e7e8a55bccfd3f1234b74c518cd8b
16981e2a65fa8a0d8eab776c810e9a8ec2bb1296
'2011-12-29T21:21:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8937' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFP' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
11b97ac4ee13bdbc093e93c9b3e4c7c6
1fd402713db609bcb8453078e14409706b92b30e
'2011-12-29T21:30:35-05:00'
describe
'342748' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d664c2c7a13c922aa4e6bcfe06fc91f6
4bf4a66104603d52ccb7339f3f6640c823f3ac72
'2011-12-29T21:27:28-05:00'
describe
'120258' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3c93908c17ff56bd58f00057bd89c0bb
84e427628a9b4c84b5db573adab3b16d2f1db43b
describe
'36548' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFS' 'sip-files00040.pro'
c3b2af28a868e8c0327edcf2085f161f
e2c912126b142137a109b181bcff56c17fff6fc5
'2011-12-29T21:31:36-05:00'
describe
'36948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
200255dc26e9584afb6c8e4e37dde0b0
98639a21653636eeb66111b2b9e1c0e6476bd8b7
'2011-12-29T21:29:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
cb5abcad3a3fd5c6441c56e9dc25b70f
bf9882d9be7c070cc49a2ad71f94cfef32bd0108
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFV' 'sip-files00040.txt'
4c8ba3b07aa393da812c9e781eb33922
868dac2f28676d4d0adc10f1603ffca48cde06cd
describe
Invalid character
'9074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFW' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
6b4a5d7be7f7c2a7416747140d5b6877
8c2791eec782e002650eaa0c9f7e6fffda08820b
'2011-12-29T21:23:38-05:00'
describe
'342727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFX' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
465dc8107140d93ad3a4e0d616564191
4ed2f08b17e4091bb162b0a8830cb33b331e8ed3
'2011-12-29T21:31:11-05:00'
describe
'122109' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFY' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
24c0a84c3aec456bf2cd310caeb057ca
2488b63b02471f69a8a02fb31cda46e90fce9bc7
'2011-12-29T21:24:32-05:00'
describe
'35923' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAFZ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
28b8e3afe343bc7e8be5380a2637b39c
56b1cd6ac3e7145cfbc4ae5a9f6e36ba35cda822
describe
'37540' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGA' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
b68fac406204e2906f3d67be147a4197
2497ff96d96e7272b817b480bb4367f2e079f620
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGB' 'sip-files00041.tif'
5c2bfbd658a62f747c0e431e860df764
82d155ca457a0991458191196cf3a70e7a55291d
'2011-12-29T21:22:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
cf1728fdcf2fc230e1a5440eda74ae22
0369d3e7fd073133250752a3e3c85c39b81bfc8d
'2011-12-29T21:25:05-05:00'
describe
'9040' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGD' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a128efcf7194adf9676e9516182670ba
43949ff19da0004dad4399e1a723d195938121ed
'2011-12-29T21:26:10-05:00'
describe
'342772' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGE' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5a689d5297955eaa03c48fb30c92b9c3
8840ef0647110630f27aa74a96f3691af223b02a
describe
'75321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGF' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
da9bb329828f479fa9c4481fd3c180cd
d8ad13cab46b4a8d5ae497e55668338ec57d10a8
'2011-12-29T21:23:33-05:00'
describe
'18919' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
8c9f5fd9a0881859fbb3bbfa61f03fc2
939e3aa5b58834eb9c6ee8384ce680b02ff11765
describe
'21701' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGH' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
cd1dcb2ba52b46106ea88474c0e7ddc1
b63d362dfc93df214e967210af66663c92e65747
'2011-12-29T21:23:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGI' 'sip-files00042.tif'
ffa0176e18c6350df79a34efdc4872cd
00e7988622e42ec0e1c53281c674dc70efc5b233
'2011-12-29T21:24:24-05:00'
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGJ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
9289f84ace9e36ec74a343f3dbda19d0
ebf5ea397062bbd7fd8df9f0ff38a46e431f52a8
'2011-12-29T21:30:03-05:00'
describe
'5560' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGK' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e82bbad9858c71df3ce7d043b2bca4a3
b17e01c85e033ce01f2afa32bbde7a751dbe0025
'2011-12-29T21:25:14-05:00'
describe
'342696' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGL' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
979b14fbf903083fe1092914efe29909
540d988d1c50aeb230e99dfc30c2e663621a7c69
'2011-12-29T21:27:34-05:00'
describe
'93763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGM' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
4f42cfdda0abcc974399fd7455ed8cd9
8e45f3dcea573780256287a68f29da3740f44bc8
'2011-12-29T21:25:31-05:00'
describe
'25823' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGN' 'sip-files00043.pro'
a526d3d6629f1d93edd966a1e1d40435
a74393ac88355938d3a3a44737df7062715f1d2b
'2011-12-29T21:24:27-05:00'
describe
'29402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGO' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
19ecff3261ea20ec3c067d269847c830
aedd72774caffd9674dc507027927b09f800aa5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGP' 'sip-files00043.tif'
656e76033147bb86caaef14b7d0d0382
cc8f2cef06e1b25b7fc8b366ca1197affe284102
'2011-12-29T21:29:02-05:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGQ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
1eaaa7ec63926af6aa242f4462bbea56
fede4b35529630e71f830a9b090278988b41c4cf
describe
'7315' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGR' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b62fefceade6ae5cacc4ba586638dc68
7ad2b4746da6a47ced11f0d581f1fc15310f1872
'2011-12-29T21:24:33-05:00'
describe
'342781' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGS' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1cdd8ab1f052973148fb4d84170f3bbe
7068bccbb1d7594e88bc6b302f3bfe9eefbc0f3f
'2011-12-29T21:25:24-05:00'
describe
'120502' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGT' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
bbf23f86540cf546c43099ebe2e8809d
b47ddc83ef1bafdf9765e3640faa393cfc1f10f4
'2011-12-29T21:22:06-05:00'
describe
'36000' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGU' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b59fad7612e443dfa07e6c391d86353a
367cad7f625d9355582730cd65682e895406edb6
'2011-12-29T21:23:11-05:00'
describe
'37280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
64c39d40a18e9a9124e26b069561c71f
e9067a2ed83bfb704e857bdc59e061275b7a80e2
'2011-12-29T21:26:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGW' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a30956524af4604c800f829002b65ce6
8593ffa1da55866a8ef3353ca7f94022de6857e6
'2011-12-29T21:21:57-05:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGX' 'sip-files00044.txt'
15689a75acf782fbde9fedcd16a2114e
01ae7b39eca73af4485db93cfb7f0b502f6dfae2
'2011-12-29T21:25:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8950' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGY' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9e69ecc9641d8f1a0ce8371f751894f4
3cf486c636f7f89b5e54bddd5610d2fe216936d6
'2011-12-29T21:27:00-05:00'
describe
'342719' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAGZ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
68d6843f74bc3575754478ae72430d93
4aaa834c70c9fa5a49e12c451758239f78ec1eb0
'2011-12-29T21:24:07-05:00'
describe
'123719' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHA' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6d0080d891e424cd02cec5baf28bba81
a8e15393eb525cf2c0f934aa5bd18504627330b3
'2011-12-29T21:22:56-05:00'
describe
'35743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHB' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4ddbf9fb95058c11f8be0d3eef4c9f1b
8071c72611f4d331b86ffe25d14eb72cc9592720
describe
'38010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
c616301c3b67f3c9da29481ffaf21167
d033f19b170259dd807e78571de3b16115ae6863
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHD' 'sip-files00045.tif'
67e9364e16203fc9ad1d1910fb8ad9eb
c235cf00ad8176bf04214d78bf89328d5caf7cbd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHE' 'sip-files00045.txt'
738a928f1bf43ee878f7daf7b3eaef43
38c23d954f9b64fe7ea45c61f4dd43c98d316316
'2011-12-29T21:30:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHF' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f33a243a70d3a224d68824943be335c8
69c07927c68e7a20636179369c693093b5771a16
'2011-12-29T21:29:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHG' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
36b2846702aa434307370a9b9b1a0c44
5d48e1e5af60704bdac5dad4baf34b683ece7b0d
describe
'123419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
996a78d2e86a06bc36e9e210faa99a13
56049b1f3f11b70fdf87d58ac4bd6cf42a99ae39
'2011-12-29T21:27:48-05:00'
describe
'36922' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHI' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e8a6d057ef2207ec5986e32fc8da5cf9
5cff7e1c668399ee111f2a0703c8484007181c39
describe
'38157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHJ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2977f45d1467166330f08ee7b2de34e1
30d0cbcd6206a44ead6c23883756573e6beac657
'2011-12-29T21:28:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
154bf2dbe2c43f62be3714357d22a3d4
28734894feee2de319f9ff557b97a520f77e0563
'2011-12-29T21:23:46-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHL' 'sip-files00046.txt'
365d43d119f06e28793ef8020c11b1c7
a2c2908e7a100f15b78c3407691a98095f0f06a8
'2011-12-29T21:24:25-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9491' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHM' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bacfdbd965c55c6842b6c7dafecaff23
4909071fffb6efa9cf5a750a51abd847b34bc2e0
describe
'342674' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHN' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3c8455dec35f5aa3ab84aaab0dd6a2b2
43232248c645f80b4f68e4286c2c0750f887b76c
describe
'116269' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHO' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
9fcd6ae8b13649b0ad0ad8feda0a9373
6acb153a8d88956a6015ac6644a0ceb927d1cd8a
'2011-12-29T21:31:22-05:00'
describe
'33285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHP' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0a782b86c82a0e3d149bf86c2698c225
0a37ce4ce12a45976b27bbfae941ae816ecf1fae
'2011-12-29T21:25:26-05:00'
describe
'37034' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b8eefd462c6c05db9a3166ddea29eb84
1b9d047d595ddc70492b3b8de613f72c049961f1
'2011-12-29T21:25:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHR' 'sip-files00047.tif'
df9e6a5e45c0f1af2bdff6c769043d58
2397811e9419775b493ee43fbdb112881b5e1d36
'2011-12-29T21:22:46-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHS' 'sip-files00047.txt'
43d09a49dd7f352245962a1dbcda2f94
33589cfd6cbfebaa41495cc8cf6de7f6eda0d802
describe
'9133' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHT' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
8d0990b1aba23cba94935c1461c8fbd6
e98e53548586af367509542f5f6ce93c4737011d
'2011-12-29T21:23:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
53947cfdfa00d4584d90ff577495c5d1
9f03d5d8ccefa45c235bfb2215ffae178688bad9
'2011-12-29T21:27:52-05:00'
describe
'132588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHV' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
885071041f866a2e27dfa1c23c4ee44b
0c2d1cf176338715b7aa293e4c51f47d4abd978a
'2011-12-29T21:29:52-05:00'
describe
'34923' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
90eea5f914d70deceffc34c6db6f748e
0721b5231e6dc9c55120259156d36372ad8ada19
'2011-12-29T21:23:58-05:00'
describe
'40545' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHX' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
22834f6821a1ec89f94e403955e866d6
00f92937b211bae5cceec5b1022cd4fe24a9a96d
'2011-12-29T21:26:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
141f7f9256b90b757909578b70194ff3
84bf733e649cb06bc5e82a15628f6f9a6dcb8806
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAHZ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
9d643178f2b1463bbe09436f3c329d93
bf97962165719e589d44ed0692da23e51d94cd38
describe
Invalid character
'10373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIA' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
f6145a1347053a2e61a9477b747b8fbe
67d7b9772e3acac53677c99cea3d59745858dd10
'2011-12-29T21:30:27-05:00'
describe
'342713' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIB' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c1b20b5083dcc3c5631902444b5dea33
c0a826817f3b6b2e53b13049310257a410ed0059
describe
'198664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2163d9f2557a83612682fb0e58818c59
524d9c2adc8c1ace2df5e2d4ce9e3c6ca3fddd91
'2011-12-29T21:29:09-05:00'
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAID' 'sip-files00049.pro'
bdb176000907dee20cf928392547ec64
0568d50a8a72babc26aa066a8e7fc41c62c6aa27
'2011-12-29T21:27:36-05:00'
describe
'43671' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIE' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
db2b417c19a1281d7e082da0aeed63e1
7784c8facd10bfa3becf761a4894c1262c952f0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIF' 'sip-files00049.tif'
46b5d27065c1240d0c9d4413fd0dfd01
1f265e555581792db7fdc86ce5aa42d50d499c6f
'2011-12-29T21:23:05-05:00'
describe
'35' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIG' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e0757566ea65190b81c4c3faa0351b04
ad3f87752957b0f73df17f794f0f39bdb628d62e
'2011-12-29T21:25:48-05:00'
describe
'11389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIH' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
7a9b5a7fd2971881a4f53945248eb7f0
34813e0e0eeb6ae17ae73893c57ac0345a67a9f8
'2011-12-29T21:23:42-05:00'
describe
'342594' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAII' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
a176e180ca21fe1cfdd4ba095b205693
d7ed507f6bfe2d822ec6312c4600f54b60582d98
describe
'16819' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIJ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
6fbab67f7015341751b8c34044591f94
5ccf590692fe288b78f4d4ca9e53b7f6680cc939
'2011-12-29T21:31:08-05:00'
describe
'3248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
65805c9c008b1c8c5887df65358ff900
205f03e7da4d6cc406652c4706b9f5f13dab30e4
'2011-12-29T21:28:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
53a72a33b76826617bd6d2dd765b2c95
720aa074c6db242ed3496d5b8065669249a80cb8
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIM' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
fd6bb28dc21a4171a7658f0789d5acc6
84278712c9acd07d44659313e0c70e873c8a674b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIN' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
48dabdfa7ee59e02f647df29f7e6d016
39c689118f32a1f0adae1d21aaf973343e11e22e
describe
'115433' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIO' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9e53be50e0b6a0dced9405823857a83f
0ad92af698982b205680bfa632161006355408d5
describe
'33592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
2d66f59c549ab7e50299ec0ab55da70c
5e7c001202f854f2c5b06a8b85b9904680466c79
'2011-12-29T21:29:48-05:00'
describe
'36066' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIQ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3bfeff02f6ac4cc92c95c8100ddbda43
30765bcba10eac132b04f8a9460d4ef5834852fc
'2011-12-29T21:22:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIR' 'sip-files00051.tif'
5e4cda6dbc3e5e73d1ee21846f4c5fff
22b7a5387f0f65a4e829d2814a47f11338fcfee7
'2011-12-29T21:24:56-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIS' 'sip-files00051.txt'
b244c4bb818c8ea669a985880b7b9c57
3368bc417f1a258f05187415be960affbaa2c7e4
describe
Invalid character
'8949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIT' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
931ccc74834296e263a7b14fe157cfdb
169431bf23cb32dd2ae4cddfa199c31b746a5b13
'2011-12-29T21:26:56-05:00'
describe
'342656' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIU' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
cc49cfebb7ac418c95f6437ccc9d8608
b94018dbb93ebe6a183d3f5589f735332e42be19
describe
'109304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIV' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
31388982ab00d30f7493cd3460ae26c9
0299dd5e5da3eb5dd7a856acb2a901e5a3b32bfd
describe
'31247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIW' 'sip-files00052.pro'
f20cdd1c25587908b1bd5dd0cf4a90c0
4f378fee0c72edac1717994739ca7313102ccac7
'2011-12-29T21:23:18-05:00'
describe
'33639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIX' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
81b4c5130cf3294789d743a59197446a
fdcba8fe13c20a40f9fca914ed4c0ad1564efeff
'2011-12-29T21:26:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIY' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0612942450ec4ee80cdf493f85448c3d
a992372f9930a7ef725ef61cf30cffdbcea4afe6
'2011-12-29T21:22:07-05:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAIZ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
50e13e2d626d5f1690eebaa87ea3bb9c
05b31c1d6191dc53ccc8c70dbb29966d62c92526
'2011-12-29T21:22:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8767' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJA' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f6fccef4b02fc4b4a8d2a4c301c36796
8ea3dd819a09e63afeebef5c45532458547adb68
'2011-12-29T21:21:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
20c576c4087a19ee8d916e3856c4fc67
3e235bf240e3b9e3cac5272eb084ac80fc901233
'2011-12-29T21:22:33-05:00'
describe
'119629' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f5cbea9d6f399c0a218b6d07a40330bb
ce6f44dbe28ba56137907ac6ebdc91b48c4b811d
describe
'34378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8c247013ceaa522fb4364433f68abd97
da46a478c4fd1691a7796b8da5dc500f537f3c54
'2011-12-29T21:29:40-05:00'
describe
'37602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ff7a08b79204308b74151d029ea171d1
92292aea2a16572790d95a0900b5dce61eff67db
'2011-12-29T21:29:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
f13207f16d273ebd0956263db654d2fb
0cc5ddecb1e3e7115a7e6458a0ec86870b276cf6
'2011-12-29T21:28:00-05:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
ab38f5a6e3c60592184dae9eb1057a6d
04f71ed3bc6aa4b76aa51789635e1128ba713026
describe
Invalid character
'9293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJH' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f9e1e7ed3f86e59882ca67cfd2734c63
0700a8b21bc3a6a4dabf6964773b7d9f3edce7ee
describe
'342773' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJI' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
4469be0d3af690b7fd3c6322c7252068
70cb3d531ce37595898b7f3944d2371011713737
'2011-12-29T21:30:04-05:00'
describe
'118691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
16cd45fc9d5b7d28d9ae445a6debd81e
836ffd17d3c9c0e04f9318be3446bb2c28d4c349
'2011-12-29T21:28:59-05:00'
describe
'33517' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJK' 'sip-files00054.pro'
436dbe14e5d5c41728a5c8c084585d6e
c8f885ca9b2e0aaa700d978438fef72d034cc69b
'2011-12-29T21:30:06-05:00'
describe
'35800' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7d03d168210e4bc7b3763e1d927a9f7a
35b70d99c13332bdea81a68f1768aa0f7727eb20
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJM' 'sip-files00054.tif'
f3455cd47bb4b02ea33d961a83522926
e4036606d64f762023f69be8b88100eb7e30327c
'2011-12-29T21:22:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
61773935edf1dfe23c40a5de310db534
2009cd1126b84c4a17f69fd98b8292316abf8b1e
describe
Invalid character
'9127' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
1e84d8e9f990bfd50916cb8b83e20e93
69ff1f21c8ae2989363a1a879a81f29fb4b90afc
'2011-12-29T21:27:18-05:00'
describe
'342760' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJP' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9faa2e9a7cf29d2bfcc7312ab267f0b2
f5633409a968bb8ba376bb7e734a23156e88da93
describe
'127741' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJQ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
532d2a71d230f1e5a7d5852cee2df647
803e0beba4abe3237d4efb73f9941975c92ba95e
'2011-12-29T21:25:10-05:00'
describe
'35775' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJR' 'sip-files00055.pro'
b0b8c46eac43564016d13f64f5e4ed75
0c16180dc64975e4d8eac2f757a6dddd46e62128
'2011-12-29T21:27:01-05:00'
describe
'39477' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJS' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
ff3557d8e088d26961d5464d4c75f693
80caae67f369348f2e2d4949a4129afade6495ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
5b93801cd8adc923d9916bd2b1d97373
56db54e80c521d46c8a0295fcb0808b284c21f05
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1bc58681c35d2f876a5278ec9aa5fdcb
1dc18597beb437754002a2384747d96435454286
'2011-12-29T21:23:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJV' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
ff224d658ee33c04a1fe508a7ba2fa96
1853da300b0e109e0df587013f7fd87bc52a905a
'2011-12-29T21:22:52-05:00'
describe
'342765' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJW' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
c121de7de382ae09b1390c095b624a3b
55a093d7303a9a7b6054d14b2848e877296d12ac
describe
'122544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJX' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
bf8fd256601debaf05ed120e1251c085
88568186b6f25e91e6e6eb059f0c53683d699f1a
'2011-12-29T21:28:21-05:00'
describe
'35513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJY' 'sip-files00056.pro'
7961e3680637f7111285e1ba02484329
d9c757f569b864ebfbe52eb5928a650cc9dbea0e
'2011-12-29T21:29:24-05:00'
describe
'38191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAJZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
2647c87aad66f3de67c3caa8fe93cc9b
31fdf4beb24fa2642d3ecb8debe76606e3022af5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKA' 'sip-files00056.tif'
138f2e965b5e5ba173433e98c2577484
1f7fac5b38f58d482c521cbe98b80b148a6be1af
'2011-12-29T21:24:14-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
fd3187149cdc48b74a09f37636f8f94b
dc3266c9c3794472cf832b69fde22ccab24d503b
describe
Invalid character
'9563' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKC' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
6e449ac3d83a60433c41eb7b14cf3e86
1f9626c724b9a7aedfe7ae844c2667cd61c68078
'2011-12-29T21:25:11-05:00'
describe
'342761' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKD' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
502487aa1c1ccb78dd4723848e14030e
4aef0db521f8b7e152e94b75be2d569adad09ab9
describe
'120004' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKE' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
c17d680eb12e910d8ded9d57197903b0
57b453ac60ce7c150106892536cc33aab5067c27
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKF' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f4a27366468f2e81c1e65a4c834e53b3
c3c9b229abb492203ea28237309c27ce55fadafe
'2011-12-29T21:27:35-05:00'
describe
'37855' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKG' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
be72e3a01f19943a318ec7f627a7c4e2
55fe9a7637a5b12c3d37c24f4282ac3f4683ab80
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKH' 'sip-files00057.tif'
ee49ee9002bddd856d6bcd2be8bd19d6
890cba87a0db89b73c31034a5e6dd0698d68f41a
'2011-12-29T21:24:20-05:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKI' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1029b321b176492e0d0a82a5ce229f3d
e3bc2352a462489d44de7a9632f05154e229953e
'2011-12-29T21:26:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9123' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKJ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
fed3a28812de56212a38c5980bd13815
80f4ff35312b3a45d4ee4fe47b9026be52e5e72e
'2011-12-29T21:27:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKK' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
494a20db729083ebad3f7737c1c1b90e
f68418ad8e47da0b9a3f3881eddb432e7cb6ff3f
describe
'41918' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKL' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
53466fe63240a45a59b17627c7b80eb5
c190746c157742892d858bdedb39b255a0017b21
'2011-12-29T21:25:38-05:00'
describe
'6098' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKM' 'sip-files00058.pro'
ae096124a0c30a0b0f3d44767cf8d706
2e55020d3962f76f7eb78e99fc4d617ef24199bb
describe
'10298' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKN' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8b675f5e094cf0e053a7bb0324f74af5
b149b3a08e961d7056ebc120608e12399873937e
'2011-12-29T21:22:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKO' 'sip-files00058.tif'
0e41289ceead331a86ee47e8059dc0cd
36ad7c91f14923ff2d3850111ed3805a8010cd69
'2011-12-29T21:27:41-05:00'
describe
'199' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKP' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4f9656257ec530c5406fcd3c525b3a9d
32171faeb22f3d1d7b61f8f92475eea7b30c8e81
'2011-12-29T21:29:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2590' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKQ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
cb76e170b799ad279b1472fe8fe7ec17
6ccfb89f7f0e76137ea8a314cc79c03a9f2cc24f
'2011-12-29T21:29:41-05:00'
describe
'342628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKR' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f77f2163689d1714b38610a08b855ad1
3e2a226ceb92b86dcea0b5862724d582ea3c3048
describe
'101637' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKS' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
38f2a8ec97e6f699472d7efebac53bbe
0d92b702648b893a32ed586f98c7f013bb39b8dc
describe
'26652' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKT' 'sip-files00059.pro'
25f8052112d7a82f6bf762a79db99abe
64dbb69bc56d9b9809528219fbe507ab97486f20
describe
'30643' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKU' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
b6a82540bbab3727ae2c8a8f74ad0d1c
d9017041ef21934de762b2237d43eca32b20508e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKV' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b25e4cdfdcf82f06fd32fd2a92a36fbc
f3246a16c4a991750f5f5f33edbe0a848dd0a329
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKW' 'sip-files00059.txt'
841ac732c5c1b09e6533a376e7cd108b
0f0a256ebdeb2059280b2d03a406918711a7910d
'2011-12-29T21:31:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKX' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
18329cebfcece2c5767977233eee4f2d
cdc0ed7606b9c57b1418386ea6f435c41d165ceb
'2011-12-29T21:24:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKY' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
98a4b46bfa1491d6783918ed157eeb4e
abb28079d6f7d75c95cc634dc4b1126b578d9ac9
'2011-12-29T21:30:38-05:00'
describe
'110302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAKZ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
aa46a9a82b22d43ec1ee1ba274f31133
f6a980306c0df94deedcbf4d3c43af4002e2a03d
'2011-12-29T21:30:24-05:00'
describe
'31696' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2fd6c9351dd19b2f27a267ca4e8ade7f
62f57d8a8434abd2d5fe1a95e7906be9d5b93a77
describe
'34303' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALB' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
da31a7b7a6494798c709cbe94247bf7c
72e9fcfe9a25cb9746ba817c92dcd2d94cf8064c
'2011-12-29T21:24:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALC' 'sip-files00060.tif'
47fe3a3f7ac80531f0d4e6039d6fa83f
bf38fb9ee29a6e1efe5ed08f14b4f55dccee1d95
'2011-12-29T21:29:36-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
94c665bebfd62d4da85899be5b036580
a192f0f8e1c2ca56d55acf494004a06b1967f9d4
'2011-12-29T21:26:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8640' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALE' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
34d259f186d91e8eaab9d587955b8756
05fe0512412837cade579f478fe50b91262799c1
'2011-12-29T21:28:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALF' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6774d3e7f139081e3f9dbe506b6d056e
c0a24e032e53c6915fdbf602afc5660699dce0ad
describe
'123441' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALG' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
ff7a3230886892bcfdde85850fca12f6
8ebee6b74df8353aac0682ccd5a55a7674aac979
describe
'36462' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALH' 'sip-files00061.pro'
e27a5f7469fd2300259296849b844e9c
3cfd1f4f9f28ebc2277d90fbd5454960018942b0
'2011-12-29T21:22:34-05:00'
describe
'37883' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALI' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
bc874ab782b04784e796abf925d5cfd5
ea6a839b27335e1d8bd4960903638e1e94c4d1fb
'2011-12-29T21:23:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALJ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
b6038cb1d8805d157a2a1b873bb7b97f
6dc8c7895150ec5ae053c21ae5f9e641bc5faab8
'2011-12-29T21:25:45-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALK' 'sip-files00061.txt'
efeb236065ae2dc82e8ce28d872d56fb
46ee7e49c139147296dd6c70d8712b85181858f6
'2011-12-29T21:26:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALL' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3df3c538e236428019572ba3342f2df5
15a1b981096f8c74b2e9171e85dc2582f71caef9
'2011-12-29T21:25:47-05:00'
describe
'342774' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
b85b230daa0d09bb5d79b907db18f4fa
6fa26de5b41bd2d2df50339766ef90d245c6d1a7
'2011-12-29T21:26:07-05:00'
describe
'123164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALN' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
aa1c1b8345a5c61ef9386ef345607b78
949a2d1fb6eeb0f580007a6345466a1765d61f00
describe
'37057' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALO' 'sip-files00062.pro'
98837f6d54fbe34bcc623e938f82bc9f
66acaab1d44c1aa3bf0b9c653ba851af97cccac1
describe
'38624' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALP' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
fc95bac3988824fb103091dd62fdb738
18513238ed5430b3fe4ef28a17b6e4eae26d3314
'2011-12-29T21:24:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALQ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
4a8059d49cccade0403079f0b03cecee
1930a8407a7c51f4f96c790973e7adfade480e10
'2011-12-29T21:27:33-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALR' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f3dfd57aff37bee3aaa4575c12419280
3a7efdec4aeda40455531beb3d391b5598c76200
'2011-12-29T21:28:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALS' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
a426040999223b8200938d177b07a809
4846fa5b134c9a14fdfdfcc57b62ea1fc9c50d25
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALT' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e44f56d8cae2d9de45ea80f6420a6bf0
75f9f6bc81fc3173e643dc1dec86c8dcdc9a2fe3
'2011-12-29T21:22:22-05:00'
describe
'119804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALU' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
21238195a431cd62a159fbb193610afb
ad95089e14173d2d84f77e79aaaec224c3510957
'2011-12-29T21:29:04-05:00'
describe
'34660' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALV' 'sip-files00063.pro'
14f74b54641c82aeab042d7cd2d73105
95a563eac1a896ea38586b5171422e533930c038
'2011-12-29T21:29:43-05:00'
describe
'37178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALW' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a8ec80ac655a5146f85e21b229662fbe
79a356c471ceffaaa56ba2e47bc370940d7eac9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALX' 'sip-files00063.tif'
4a42613754995ea7d9a767b199d9e26a
9fd429d64facf38b3b25f403d79f735ebad70cd4
'2011-12-29T21:31:45-05:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALY' 'sip-files00063.txt'
27568c735071a7f695da33fc771a417f
1f8d522b7407c94c3f3bb3efed38c871785a9e27
'2011-12-29T21:28:06-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9207' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACALZ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
7043792e533f84fe1df04f34c71580f6
9dabc3c9343e2fe2ad681efa9d2dda624f6454a8
'2011-12-29T21:30:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMA' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3176d7b40c3e563a0bfba770540d6daf
2bc7e3fae42f4632c60c50d519515381ce3dd544
describe
'110836' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMB' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3fc20210b3556a2ad85da67bccf68bfc
8e4a1e2db8eb18b02d9db1d9d2f3f1b2bc4a161f
describe
'31232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e5d8dae1ff7b94eb875ea2897be7a1c3
1682ed7a70c93d39e820d322bbdb5a99ee1db435
describe
'34257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMD' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
6eafa35a543b029d9383255f61efd1fa
55a860337a3b0d83469d6c7f4156f9ec51f9784d
'2011-12-29T21:30:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAME' 'sip-files00064.tif'
e5a64066bf5e8ec20ae9b432d1af31c3
a2219cffdae57506271c4b394cb91e0c885ddc2d
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMF' 'sip-files00064.txt'
95c754bcb9d5f3dbd21771a85ab7b5c1
b522271f4e2f7589b50dcf663825e6f913eb5b8b
describe
Invalid character
'8630' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMG' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
f85a9142ddfe9f8f4a30f8c30ca60889
ad5f4485b8a7718580955703ba973773635460ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMH' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
66d8ac80cadf6771f145929d4cefa6c9
f8f1b9a4d82cfe91515e0976223704bef400a6b7
describe
'117458' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMI' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
1189b9902d9bc9b717b45409ef302557
a42d830d5d9773097cb717047d535445b33853b8
'2011-12-29T21:22:45-05:00'
describe
'33228' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMJ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
2c892ad6e84293fe95e0ddbd939ce516
1db7f20129958a507e91aa62ae356426f9d3c989
describe
'35981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMK' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
25d6aa1af57b25c22848dd80b4ac1e61
444b991e43c70e80343730e38c6384c6287fbc1c
'2011-12-29T21:28:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAML' 'sip-files00065.tif'
be7b8444ac6906ed9f64f16a34707255
b70ea2bbc80313a2e89c1c4ed89d5ff73e799e1c
'2011-12-29T21:22:04-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMM' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ffccfb7a2ff6c12199a7fea8f4c285b1
3c0108eabc5fea4fb8a4f031f6dcd35ff8ab75b6
'2011-12-29T21:29:42-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5b513978f606901f8f4f5835308edca3
c40a4ef3d608ba91e97e16eb2a671ed04684985d
'2011-12-29T21:29:46-05:00'
describe
'342764' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMO' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
85d00be8d27b331c4c4a7f655bebc6c0
435f15001d22e217acc665944179c1fb362b3d02
describe
'118149' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
50b9d41b25589be48d5acfecce681ffc
a3e67c1f895a8c45154193e4edfaafdb731b59a2
'2011-12-29T21:22:37-05:00'
describe
'33496' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMQ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
0133b165b568c9a57042351f16416167
b64d31eba379fd46e758a58bdfd820600f4fee02
describe
'36361' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMR' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
7a52b1541ac924814c9762f9c858f821
2ca3c41b002243557fd10bf3197ffff66b9212fc
'2011-12-29T21:23:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMS' 'sip-files00066.tif'
50b8b3169048be671148005dc22fa988
cd1d7508b4ff6f73cd3dc754b1bc17a8f314dcdf
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMT' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7ebe4ecc8d7154ed43b26a120c3c024e
9924d2a45ee4d19c7a06a3e1c78f2c0e6abbea07
describe
'9178' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMU' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
97f124aad49e60e36966fdff23105d5c
23979fc987d01cb2538264f3b7a6259064a1e636
'2011-12-29T21:30:49-05:00'
describe
'342724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
73659722dcfcb5e60017ba45090aac3a
de4bb55d06bdcaa055bf5a5c108e11d9cae2c788
'2011-12-29T21:26:14-05:00'
describe
'119914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMW' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
ee97219d120b3b5406f67911a603a0f9
6f58bb4b3882b8709fb6865e4618c7f2cb339157
describe
'33935' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMX' 'sip-files00067.pro'
06e9d783a26adab16ef6718a981d67b7
4ae8ddd73f12761da2b4fe4ab698723f5d109433
describe
'35820' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
f782510b4c01bf23a270b58ce9ac3214
56827e1c79f5233b8f7cf69afe307694e1aaffbc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAMZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
3d4f7f8c048f82de4531dc6136e2dc2c
8326f14125a618a03206c28d7918696312a3667a
'2011-12-29T21:29:10-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANA' 'sip-files00067.txt'
5c30186e380e310238030f7280563de0
1111ad57f6eaeaf5633fe0366ca5cae9d9b027d3
describe
'8757' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANB' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
86c3787956b44031208a09f8e6a772b8
6b44c39b845220dc63daff7310379895c3d7fbf8
'2011-12-29T21:31:39-05:00'
describe
'342729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANC' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b0338705dd349023757ce621e8a4f689
8c620f11dfa334bd6d6ece987dbac44d3a22f18b
'2011-12-29T21:25:41-05:00'
describe
'119401' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAND' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
cd43166deb46173e5fdf54b895ed8cc7
4603b8778bb561137ed1c66331920f9637444c0e
describe
'33022' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANE' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5148ab6ce3a21b6f827d7ec8857f0fa3
42c2ac26f76489d3dd1a4fad78906679d0e704b6
describe
'35898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANF' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
3b18c9f1a776df710f432f1a5c7d3dc7
b58175cf6cf14aa8f44cd89e71eead8f69d0d547
'2011-12-29T21:30:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANG' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d7f76a999ad2db0e1b22300a84b0056d
9dce603c90466457efb8aaf2e08a94a63a5440e0
'2011-12-29T21:22:19-05:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
0832fd1b625ce0cfdd3d59d734771840
9dff3750917e1c2b9dc84980c1d55b9aaa9b21d7
'2011-12-29T21:31:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANI' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
ecbf454458ed84d324e26dc834b59fdd
be492ee7f7056006de86b9abcc941fe7879bf354
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANJ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e14b3aa63b53c71441645867c9a63111
a43f9b1aafb92ff049480858de2dd13e5744dc0a
'2011-12-29T21:28:33-05:00'
describe
'123618' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANK' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f36c1b17fbdd7431638026bb94805a3c
0b8a13d94f7c926c57cdc349a72e5f7ed5394879
describe
'33527' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANL' 'sip-files00069.pro'
117234659771a9c6051041907bd4ebc2
98ab675ca18f75c59193cef05645c0eb7ff0d0c8
describe
'37776' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ed56f9f6310fd538855bbaa6f14a1fa6
cedd8e6377d1ee21ad5c02e37dd064b2e69ec287
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANN' 'sip-files00069.tif'
49da329ffa8b5049a9c2208b565c238e
fb16615d1d4703226ac3ac5a5c017ea6a0a0d4a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANO' 'sip-files00069.txt'
2b79cd07272a1bb34fc2279b3a47f378
08fd2e8ea4a283fbcf9d4c53c6c8bb1c3d59398a
'2011-12-29T21:25:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANP' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7620c3e4f6b4bd0aba261ed73d5ab12f
bde7fe956c15fe013c2c275cf4261b496940c961
'2011-12-29T21:30:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANQ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c1eb48bbc3b478c625eb81bf1ec9e749
217b62b1378c86c03eeecf8a3171fb540a190b40
describe
'117779' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANR' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
bbf0a5a1ef89645bce0a9278753da015
8fd8850bb959ffcfff41656e4719b30507d21c8d
'2011-12-29T21:24:22-05:00'
describe
'34431' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANS' 'sip-files00070.pro'
fb75cfbfeec96de0952196029a9bb7b5
1dd385e43b7fed56b2cc248cc6019da73f09734d
'2011-12-29T21:23:50-05:00'
describe
'36481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANT' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
da560fdaa06b35e947e54670a2d777fe
23087646f31c04b702bef357b6b1f157b0490b9b
'2011-12-29T21:31:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANU' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b3120171b2cbcdc7696d87c3fad8c8b9
ab31a8d9cd857c921a64ef6e3275eb030212745e
'2011-12-29T21:24:51-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANV' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5f6cb4d0d70e904e41f9fc2ea0854bd2
7d1ee1dbe60de23b2f6bbc4878dc50a1b9df4d9e
describe
Invalid character
'9146' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANW' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ab004a4c4c3fa9ee280c4735db9bac5a
1a8e02b618991eefe5917695a6e02697d7c72fb4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANX' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c30d4a9f1b0be1a31b2d622a88bbc3a6
0793d650e1804bf36cf7cc413209bfd74b0432c1
'2011-12-29T21:24:28-05:00'
describe
'72726' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANY' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
460b5ab907f5a97a454260de9d88f4d9
79d6a2cd8e424aacd9f2a5d51e6e946d7ed05dd3
'2011-12-29T21:25:55-05:00'
describe
'17615' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACANZ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
18bb266da1c65e497e312c5866523d26
c7208f0775dcdbdb202493c7469ec4a134431e76
'2011-12-29T21:25:20-05:00'
describe
'21234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOA' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
77855b366ad067ce8c1955e011131534
573d3d8af3077308066e52e25dd20b62c1736507
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOB' 'sip-files00071.tif'
60bb0796ac56a48b0b4793cac54ca9c2
e9a59e85bb361716fd3c5dc02368946ec54df082
describe
'661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOC' 'sip-files00071.txt'
80231953b6f4cd98184209620d72a720
0c1d80e9999f363029af6eed66854ef3538009d1
describe
Invalid character
'5642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOD' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
f4c3077c0bec4afad63f0b15a57e82dc
0517c02365ddc5a8c8c6e03c0fff9035e793abd5
'2011-12-29T21:31:33-05:00'
describe
'342660' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOE' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
fcdd155e5471803abe665baf9624881e
70c3e66561566478b7b72b5c927020236ea48443
describe
'88690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOF' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c913ccecc7809ee5e1a8b2dfcc996f5b
0c2461922b8799bf0318d017d54143b015c40fdf
describe
'24354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOG' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6350e130fb0fc3227377cb707d1ffc3e
466aa7bf7762554c23ffe87cea5823e9bf569fbc
'2011-12-29T21:22:08-05:00'
describe
'27713' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOH' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5dc190a9ccb098d0e1035c96bb6d624f
997455da030d6cf2e95546dc6dbde3f15c7b433c
'2011-12-29T21:25:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOI' 'sip-files00072.tif'
c33c12cbaaca9e75201adca40b74ebfc
4552c97d3f533b1304d2fd745752c80d21024b15
'2011-12-29T21:25:16-05:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOJ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
733f5052202d7cbcd4df76ddd2e3b370
5a9a162c6fdeca5c8b70be9eb3290fd5a83112f9
describe
Invalid character
'7204' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOK' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
36a92fc82600900973338545e4f42063
6819f355960cc5bcc6cc669bdaa487d7e8945f53
describe
'342737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOL' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
bba1c24979607613d6e6df5be3c8fb59
defb9547dcb85ca931b750a48da895ef2654d830
describe
'115885' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOM' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
54437bea055138674c6352896cb533f8
2c6c6849d018c8140580c592c139d161be38a407
describe
'33234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAON' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c99001a7355e6235d7aa5e69706af8d2
74936cbbe55b8b1336ecb49335e6e5cf5aa5d704
describe
'36037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOO' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c6212f6f5084704221c2e5f49ea42638
793001c5236a7964821684bd48724cef8da659ac
'2011-12-29T21:26:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOP' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8f905e1e7658fa0f2cc7f7a72fdcc71b
8027350d032335bb0b74d25c75fadc4c3dfe0195
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOQ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
cdda78c9acf1b717ee37844070d92a4f
a80a5d0e235ff36a43fc452f1fd5236b4302bd65
describe
Invalid character
'9155' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOR' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d8efd235eb5fad1c4db3baf0a9295813
a51b8ce54070a90244b19e27523ae35f9b4e8302
'2011-12-29T21:27:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOS' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f11ae2ff552dda26200583ad981f01f9
9c1cb46db9c73b8907eda9bc47782a54125a143e
describe
'124942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOT' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
72406edc1687d0ed519896573a01a886
230b488464608754e3476b1b29c1e0ae51c16135
'2011-12-29T21:28:52-05:00'
describe
'36288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOU' 'sip-files00074.pro'
6e1e32d275a3c8cd6e03d0b18b921e45
d3826df524dbfb548ff8a52d14c3475791fb8f58
'2011-12-29T21:30:56-05:00'
describe
'38232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOV' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
2a088512b9a18c9688282e88be7f4178
f9d1738312ab9e9a06fff562ca24507d5ec9aaef
'2011-12-29T21:24:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOW' 'sip-files00074.tif'
30809fe94511f6523ae74e6c86dbf800
a394a0a65bd513c1b5f48993f5d1254b6077f378
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOX' 'sip-files00074.txt'
8c37543f391ad25a5efef64b13fe3e3b
cc65d136e2e3ad49dcd20d9da52d9e59cd183c80
'2011-12-29T21:31:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOY' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
705cbd1c4637504b2d2ae992880d70c0
2e5dc85592d203f046cebe9a14d7a318afd4c368
'2011-12-29T21:25:04-05:00'
describe
'342739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAOZ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
75bd7db8b644f351474ff2efaa6064ed
7499eaae4d341d16bf5a3953d94e1a8cdc4994c5
'2011-12-29T21:31:12-05:00'
describe
'121749' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPA' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
890f09d0a2c791624b64c4bb110d6991
d2fd65c6761863ee1d87bcaeb35a04fbe2550917
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPB' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d056c2b3715bc4795aaffc671a562d1f
bd92a9e04c6a4fea66c0849be2cd06f1baed7330
'2011-12-29T21:28:26-05:00'
describe
'37395' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPC' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a7bc1aa9437713bf40d49494c1188c04
f552e30cc3faf15f2535b2eb3d87f19077877383
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPD' 'sip-files00075.tif'
7a3bf0d708c098c25b0dcf1efc77be98
615f0f2b4ef510cd9264484050902ec14d0d3e41
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPE' 'sip-files00075.txt'
dd111c2866063fab3a321b1ef3f278c6
fce479f7d3f8de2b60658bc49a60a7fa0b7b4967
describe
Invalid character
'8957' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPF' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
8f8b6f5d9cccaa0714b7bb146033d0da
201163b8c047f4d05dce6b0f11828bdaadf4d08c
'2011-12-29T21:27:46-05:00'
describe
'342736' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPG' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2117ab024c97b905a3fcd480898928ad
400245529512a6a67f4dde3ccd6c580ba6bd6680
describe
'118512' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPH' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
170bf5c51b218763c5aca28d7d866c9e
040d10208fdc8d8a0d5bd6c2a90559c6005006c5
'2011-12-29T21:23:16-05:00'
describe
'35397' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPI' 'sip-files00076.pro'
5a83cbe55b7655c8eda825179c9738e1
088feeef88f91de951359b476f5ff1f02c4d4275
describe
'37130' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPJ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
74b044b171a2a2e715a297ab78ca64bf
f0b92447658b57b5a6dde359a66e3ab8c464b13b
'2011-12-29T21:22:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPK' 'sip-files00076.tif'
735cd84f712fd3ff2c1aed47f685e6bb
f5cd644915c1cf25fb0ee408d7e17d1e8058cce7
'2011-12-29T21:29:21-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPL' 'sip-files00076.txt'
daec76f520fd3eb642a5e0b8cc49efda
1baa90d510e7467eb889be278718e48a0680fe5a
'2011-12-29T21:23:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9083' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
f1222beac27c42ff18f5a389987ab4c2
4448db0c49e5ac02ae6ac4ad2df07baa25ad23c5
'2011-12-29T21:28:47-05:00'
describe
'342527' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPN' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
79937e83fc8fa18bac5032b885352786
468dc2d2a8613efe90e305d26185a9d923122a91
'2011-12-29T21:22:38-05:00'
describe
'110241' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPO' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
8e570472084cb121c71222d935a48c7b
b07401fe5d0702f585a754d15cc5101e17b39083
'2011-12-29T21:26:19-05:00'
describe
'31789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
fe6b4cef737a8593eee24f39bf070fba
003fc1829fd3f701e37e4a4e845ea773a65ec21f
'2011-12-29T21:31:23-05:00'
describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPQ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
8b0d89d3041e48ef50ed3e107823af0d
9f21857012e4e906f5e93a8b87425d0ae4c1acc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPR' 'sip-files00077.tif'
707cc1e6fb9f1e214e8044581598dfdb
c501aa77d2d7988a528c9d02bf31d4bb9a980db2
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPS' 'sip-files00077.txt'
fe83a01346061e04563b40b4c55c180a
9c5cf2732d947ecd2a79101e5dbde216f100e52e
describe
Invalid character
'8734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPT' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
014c74d586ebacd796c63034e140499c
c305ea32c9f5e78f39579676d8d4bec614b3dc31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPU' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1432bdf9d9398ee0a39963b751e452e9
8490ecd3b2c2654a7e122ccc1d66c9a16552a885
describe
'109111' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a08eaee068de3571042ddce517f82e37
c0279e7f81d5ab47eeba51c327f516e6cfbbb792
describe
'31520' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPW' 'sip-files00078.pro'
58b6f89ebe34c14ed2354e1e784e6f80
f50f235bcd780d3f6d74966a7b85ea3238dfb119
describe
'34881' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPX' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e23e9389c7f420ef07390149083e1a2a
d428b77161daa371d214f998c3f4e64a5cfd44f4
'2011-12-29T21:24:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPY' 'sip-files00078.tif'
aad9c3d94aeb576bb32abe1d3fcdd7ea
537215107b0e187e373ab613771bcdb9f98b5fe5
'2011-12-29T21:27:31-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAPZ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
dc4455f762b443ddf897244f337af770
d77b2cbfc75d9452180816fa02cfb8f6d87476a2
'2011-12-29T21:23:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8875' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQA' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
9b9214116081b4f4afa004e261d4cd33
abc60a79ff899c621ab99cf58047ad9aa5d57671
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ca94d5512a2ede703fba54eaab9c2cff
b785d54d0320af43713dcb704cb86c9e342037c5
describe
'115709' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQC' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
b2b34dd66966b17d2433d61b83f4ee21
6c0a96eab80c448246a14e9ca8f545dde7a6b8fd
'2011-12-29T21:21:52-05:00'
describe
'33668' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQD' 'sip-files00079.pro'
0a167a4e7bbbf854d000c09faed25bd7
8faae9298d54646dbbfbe571c1c61517f408c08c
'2011-12-29T21:29:38-05:00'
describe
'35992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQE' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
c9bb722eae60f436f03c1cad11dd3093
1b3e3c6567a51eb805bc03235f7d60232764e499
'2011-12-29T21:25:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQF' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7096fd1591b449fc7a209bd72039b133
746d95a46c48a4b7482fa401d1ca9d0911990374
'2011-12-29T21:23:30-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
d22dbb0818ebe650f48798c162be1782
fbffedd7f88c0eead37cde996c60896d2685e8c1
describe
Invalid character
'8718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQH' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2dbd5eec6d90bf14acb4bfa442afe4d8
1971a096375eecb8998ceb362454460036778890
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQI' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8ce4f35a3f0520fa9fcf61831fa662be
ecb912d7d05effc549454cbcd1c408a37ca41ea5
'2011-12-29T21:25:33-05:00'
describe
'115206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQJ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
34bf666b58d2721d5e20aada18ab82ce
eac77ef2ee60b44046655af55c48d3e989a374c2
'2011-12-29T21:24:30-05:00'
describe
'34721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQK' 'sip-files00080.pro'
764c07bf08bdde97b8ff0b1c00de76c2
66d3b82d85e0d232a3efd8fbfdf1a5d7b472b04b
'2011-12-29T21:30:50-05:00'
describe
'36524' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQL' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
59395cba4acc0184558a69ee3ba58def
f7c726adb31a54d2d35309af24054c0af5f82499
'2011-12-29T21:25:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQM' 'sip-files00080.tif'
dd9314a664d062fb88a403d4306ce371
5a609e3656b34d5b27a5ee4098805b6c4349455c
'2011-12-29T21:26:37-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQN' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ef106c5ce72fe5d5438a3fd766d53194
6c671a8a202ce868fde6963199b308e50135101c
'2011-12-29T21:24:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQO' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
9127200bad4fe676c94d2b3a384833be
5badeebcdf6da275a3f48cee8f1104f5871eeb71
'2011-12-29T21:22:09-05:00'
describe
'342783' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQP' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7d23b739331cdc5e3b5c902e6ce7990d
69cb1d12b160c5e1e4026ebccc71c734105d6ca4
describe
'115815' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQQ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
0686273c3ee22c76d14f3e0b4db9f09e
e1a3edc73e778e83df801de252357b4b11dfeb27
describe
'35028' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQR' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e2d460d1d92a51d111d2d817487bab45
fa88d8243bf921a7b84881be85a79cdf3efaf6cb
'2011-12-29T21:25:37-05:00'
describe
'35940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQS' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
eee7a6ebe2e94d4461e92b72bf206d1d
6565cf77634ab99264eb4c66019c89c62f1c29c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQT' 'sip-files00081.tif'
eac995c88d548897c7989dd5566107e7
c2a58f618b034f39595c52c4dd35f4af375d7f97
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQU' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a5352d161dcad3b00785c32b27d05b38
533e2fc572a190d4bba95bafd670e39729ce99d6
describe
Invalid character
'8922' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQV' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
2d4d1a4a37f41e04c2b3804c6da56ab6
9137e9675f3d23fe0be0ad6635dd1ff5e77a5716
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQW' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
da4a5ba6b4b6b8c92ea64c36b1852806
d12c7399dad5276fb9008da7d69e8f175fbcb2b0
describe
'114337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQX' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c9edcdeb41209c486a3aedbec5fa05be
c335fa44d1a2436769afd35849ed43151b7399ae
'2011-12-29T21:22:57-05:00'
describe
'33374' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQY' 'sip-files00082.pro'
c7348471f416cfdae651476e1d14c325
20301f66f617777e0e4a334c429bbdc442e8bdf4
describe
'35364' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAQZ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
bca6cf1449ac22e321e69a7f8ae1889a
28ec35264d77ea3deea4140738d39578fc43309c
'2011-12-29T21:27:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARA' 'sip-files00082.tif'
384217ba0063ab58aeffe3f3ad95e9a1
59aa538d6f24315ed8d33a58ec5970a241b6ff9e
'2011-12-29T21:23:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARB' 'sip-files00082.txt'
fa0962f61e6cca40de566cc7c11f884d
7c1a531b80c7700345b735d6f610fb71dd5e5210
describe
'8662' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARC' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
f90c665252116e121cf5182792fb8359
9331bab31bae2be8524491c789787319c82b4250
'2011-12-29T21:25:25-05:00'
describe
'342747' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARD' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
ff1d03a25a7478048624e26c98f2e9cb
afff58ba1bb9ef58a0d162747053f33bf8986be2
'2011-12-29T21:30:53-05:00'
describe
'88423' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARE' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
75a0bc08b30e84e1d5c712fb8c48bc77
7a02fa60798a5163c57d9faa1e839a5553bdcdd2
'2011-12-29T21:31:06-05:00'
describe
'23231' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
aece6bc0ec229efd1fd7d4650765d351
c8a6c7672e7b2c0f9fc4f17f0e059011dcc414c4
describe
'26654' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARG' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0ab37048200026253f03d09917fbed23
ffcc06f04335a212738431abd6081493b1f3dabc
'2011-12-29T21:27:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARH' 'sip-files00083.tif'
7ffd2b972f64faaff9f3a846bdb7f4aa
109528d6e1dce9b5954fc416e17c3f232266359b
'2011-12-29T21:25:17-05:00'
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARI' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d5a999b60cb8ce446bf9526656cda133
fd3bbc0145fe1ae11fb24d42f13ccabcbd329c00
describe
'6592' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARJ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
38142c69e10ebfce926958f9f84f9f91
af92d181f6d6be4f6f83115eb098b51e908ef91e
'2011-12-29T21:31:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARK' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ac0dfe766f2ad0f289b7e7c9f5a2f6d9
4a512217c440936063886457fa7346dbd861b6cf
'2011-12-29T21:22:25-05:00'
describe
'87896' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f1a652a63c54bd80375fd4ea10357494
db2c4cdf96d4fc46de3c3f8281d689b091c427a7
describe
'23847' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARM' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a7a2713c58af249dfac27c53268d4145
160035a747b717885436710bfbd4375302e562c5
'2011-12-29T21:31:51-05:00'
describe
'26067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARN' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
686057f052dd3cd4f3b7af6978dadcb8
492efa58e46f2f5fc807e1bf636719c74e2edaab
'2011-12-29T21:30:59-05:00'
describe
'2758504' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARO' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e6774f88c891297f4d20295aca6382c7
c4a4b718a8fbb89698f61d11c297ffe671967874
'2011-12-29T21:24:17-05:00'
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARP' 'sip-files00084.txt'
8fd3df0084622931667bda6a0f4df990
fb23893738f3e8b6537db3534b3a9c1db82d3cfc
'2011-12-29T21:31:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6846' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARQ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
1c00cb42e60e4277a2ed6df114ca0a53
64db5d6c0623bbafdaacf2e32d9f1007a345ec0e
describe
'342665' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARR' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
2e874ef23dd0d159fedfe5333f05fd86
24a6973eb66cf24774db9204dbf487977368af13
describe
'107987' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARS' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
059ce4c74d78550df08cd52f400f6966
310dd118891e3619ef918881468a66f1d44f990b
describe
'30590' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACART' 'sip-files00085.pro'
537b1e35be0e1fa79a3b6d6a1b21c5b6
6c8cac0ea1ce188d02b9f4f034fc2bc081139447
describe
'33699' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARU' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9e34004575d69b06b00aee48e3c5d62c
b3eb89f604b82cbad2a0aaff68b5cdb1a196ed8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARV' 'sip-files00085.tif'
e7d7eef6e69684a37647348cffbab6f8
1222684c7290a89437e15f3c5ceb5cf3103c2127
'2011-12-29T21:26:13-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARW' 'sip-files00085.txt'
44ec485e1d35780ff8c504c503fb8708
2fe89f4568f683a2891b461cc494aae6ab66a0e2
'2011-12-29T21:30:29-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARX' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0e2074d1a2413283f0ca63f39b4ad32d
fe5def7e741fe87e542fa1ff31e4522ab1c88767
describe
'342631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARY' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
c58ba2fdb74f6577be1e4d1e1b2aa13f
47f1eb5a8344ef16e5bd48c78a052d50632fe242
describe
'112727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACARZ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
6b6038b78ec387d726987947cc0dbb55
64f243bb450e5975259ebf883daca8ffb03b4be6
'2011-12-29T21:29:29-05:00'
describe
'32731' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASA' 'sip-files00086.pro'
94361a8a6cbaa00624a5aa66b662e601
2882d0eaad1425dd748ee6ddd5e6d335dd09c9ce
describe
'35807' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
39c8b991b6721b8d4ae856bb5aae7c9d
99a34025d1d4e91e82cb0568272b21a676d590bf
'2011-12-29T21:25:43-05:00'
describe
'2758508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASC' 'sip-files00086.tif'
de1ff306a0200a183e648f43eceffcb0
75fd020917603069b69a8aee1db6828884321670
'2011-12-29T21:23:26-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASD' 'sip-files00086.txt'
76ee770e62598aa2e1be42db7896266e
5d63ef87b02468c077fcb5eb40296dd8021f56b7
describe
Invalid character
'8831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASE' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
3b88dbe030d95c8286e333715c4b88f8
b54f56dedb212258c2bf1014315cf6a0281d84f6
'2011-12-29T21:25:28-05:00'
describe
'342749' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASF' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
cea6ffd1b9556be75bb3ecc39ca659c1
14bf3ae086d816e75c87bd27b139329dec418044
'2011-12-29T21:22:23-05:00'
describe
'123421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASG' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3c59f854dbef95dcd84a02319a076bc7
54f883885597944ddc624ff053ba649a87a7edc7
describe
'35272' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASH' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4fb6dc1eb085e77daf521f1c0a0d2d99
c159718bc93efd9f894134dbe5ff4c3ddf292985
describe
'37713' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASI' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b8f90e3de430f6051cab81a157755bc8
457d2e60ceae1efed906311b4022d26d0a29cec9
'2011-12-29T21:23:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASJ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
aa848786a3745d3ffd31e6d6254a96c6
059622c3fae5e2105cdca9c7f1ff724b16853739
'2011-12-29T21:30:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
10bd04e9da359fd0dfead0b40572da83
84fa1a16885f74afc8a7e0fb1e8361508ef053dc
'2011-12-29T21:26:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASL' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
aabac972f745f1b51b5545008884f4b6
39d4fccc298788e9714c93bf1bcfff582effd553
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
9ccd993f6ad5b8e9d1bbf11ab1d75fce
fc28da6be03436a0ad3550c9f9a7391ebc5320e7
describe
'118041' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASN' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7d0189bb0e8977dd36b4394d9f1cd8c8
d439b4a844e74c319681a0e00042e32bc5080169
'2011-12-29T21:24:09-05:00'
describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASO' 'sip-files00088.pro'
bea5a72a44210a4ea4820a1cd1a44ef0
c51b89c14e72e837de93b222124ebf5b9483760c
'2011-12-29T21:31:27-05:00'
describe
'35963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASP' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
594b5149b32df9d1d00472af5c9d290c
45fe46bb9851acafa1c989e50ca016495715d3b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASQ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
b0f25e132985a0942536b4ec750ad6bf
e9815394f7c25f573aef1aae6700db214ef9d443
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASR' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d0f9a98e8672a6da764170327ae15d81
f50b4e3fb3f6948c08888bfecc6a5a7f0bed3a48
'2011-12-29T21:29:23-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9111' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASS' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3699ba17569b36c76b841e3e74bd8982
211df884d6191bd7d4438a396f4f99ecb932598a
'2011-12-29T21:22:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAST' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b78f9750e8d2fa11018dd468d0d4a7af
2fefec5ec9a4796fd05268a2a63903b553bde793
'2011-12-29T21:29:53-05:00'
describe
'114379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
66bc4ac5998450ae73358c3cf5335bad
59ddc03a01c86aa69e7c6cbc69c8243eee42ce3b
describe
'33204' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
8278e7c9e16b829b4ceefbb71c96ea72
610cdd52ac9587af98a1ad4ee55d93312e3a7e51
describe
'35991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASW' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2c90708c2ef66bf2f9354f5204bb2b2b
1100604261b809d6a65536926accc2f8d0237910
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASX' 'sip-files00089.tif'
b577b6546d3245f9a70c99f5b6f1366c
82e1469492443b45bc49b553d94da86496701557
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
fea0ab6a1c6a2c5b3a08a76098a719bc
dde035ef2a63feade95e980b2b7960278b08d698
describe
Invalid character
'8981' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACASZ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
7bb9e47ecc47e77705f46f9ccf7ab501
ab449a5439bc5764c781ee1e5ac3d61c4faea1fb
describe
'342768' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATA' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e1a9e4a5bef0fb9d15d14447f78c2dac
f020c8544ab877d78b688bf424b4071b728a5cf4
describe
'122570' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
47a24c8f8f97a8b78680dc19307c340f
3d116e2497c005121b2549db8599cf3842e384af
'2011-12-29T21:30:58-05:00'
describe
'35598' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
d69b54db1503329ccb8799accbbdcd12
195756be69584a43aa2f47f0b264f263e0e10689
describe
'37768' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATD' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f85129c1c8bfc749589e52feb3a48924
d6af85ea26046609b1624a8d3497ac43979dbb78
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATE' 'sip-files00090.tif'
7330ca00c4e265e5ac9939c023b7c12b
7a1535028569875a98c1e357f540ce62ff523ce2
'2011-12-29T21:23:56-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATF' 'sip-files00090.txt'
9c5a2ddf70cb4fd68c92bf4ed1bd7b9e
a97a7b82fa5c972bbb671611fb0543bd4a28ada3
describe
Invalid character
'9380' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATG' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
4d84513861404d762a4f0c1ac3c08885
1dc1d078e43a3423335acda1117e86b3ee273199
'2011-12-29T21:25:30-05:00'
describe
'342762' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATH' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d8540f21cf5e1c1a392982b8db9522cd
35bc406af49ccd449cb4b74f23c82d7ae8a3317f
'2011-12-29T21:29:15-05:00'
describe
'117087' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATI' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
955f79863bbfe3ce9189bb25400c16f4
7f1b9b4291cffaa9e7b755d928f5e01e4d213f44
'2011-12-29T21:27:02-05:00'
describe
'33081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATJ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c1240f0f71c12595ab6f3f621bc584fc
9f8e99779dad3c5ed909ffb3bfaf359cb551bb25
describe
'35691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATK' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
82b63218c567b7742d6244c3b6d96b1b
6860d3c60a7cbf9603d66233596cc9031b2ea369
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATL' 'sip-files00091.tif'
3e28ea6e40e9a25e6c3a3275845e9b59
51165d0ea526d734b88d15c98d79d41ddf0255cb
'2011-12-29T21:21:56-05:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATM' 'sip-files00091.txt'
afdcbda8debbea49cd2e4a75529f076a
0cc0aaf332eb6841bd9151e54d1e70e9740530b8
'2011-12-29T21:28:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9175' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATN' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
adf71fc84fe1557e90974f601b76f65f
7c680200222be854035518822dec40d701941707
'2011-12-29T21:29:01-05:00'
describe
'342776' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
ff1adb88c6d2ecc0bd45b6573017cf78
f5acff737c67b889aaefa49381bc9a364615a2e9
describe
'115212' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATP' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
aa50c011bbf7318ec876430021f766b7
fa3365df5c1423f2489ec74ad5ddaf61d812fd30
describe
'34080' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
0b1c64bf661dbbff41a4e11db6f84e19
b530204e9719abce7299efacd09213cfc86e35d7
'2011-12-29T21:31:13-05:00'
describe
'35191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATR' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
4b44fc775a326ffa18d540c7121f895d
b52e4c88e8960f8ca6bf79b1377e92fb57c02d95
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATS' 'sip-files00092.tif'
35147bb54d3053437987dbe9231112c1
5ef96c452ab409630f185ac9b6d2800c1cb102e4
'2011-12-29T21:31:54-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATT' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7e58bc77044c9bf05287e393e1054860
e7ccd7bcfefd0ae437984fa9caefdad70b3f1a35
'2011-12-29T21:27:32-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8866' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATU' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
8d0ae4dd66f01ad51d5ea2aa91d88cb9
8639383ed548b8c647c83fad991eab37bda2bcc4
'2011-12-29T21:23:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e83515d1c53e899336ac9df0ef77e0d2
2a6057410955efd3da1bde9aa7df8d209d4cbad9
'2011-12-29T21:22:49-05:00'
describe
'114963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
6de62062829047b50bc5b79dbe3d68a5
735bc7ea433c97f25e357d7b2852d34116bd8cff
'2011-12-29T21:24:10-05:00'
describe
'33737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATX' 'sip-files00093.pro'
fa9f13e2667d608a117ea08b05910c5e
c2fb96580b36427df98c3e62533661d289ffd414
describe
'35551' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c223f82786964de42bf60bf4dbd5000c
abecd7e6f106b8ae9b653c6a63003ed45e4cad05
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACATZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
780dd025a50aff4524fae7702a4ec5f6
eb0066438366cd89d153f784c4ab2227c4aff125
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
8fdadf76df79e829da56191351a2188e
f95a29a1e2f448a3d589d4b3b6d3c5d38ba2ac90
'2011-12-29T21:24:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUB' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
32dfdd7879d82393d1cb17ee63f7aaf6
99b1907f9e39361c1c68accf392419715991cce3
'2011-12-29T21:26:27-05:00'
describe
'342653' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
8d92b60446b81e95612c5086520ee011
7abfab250aa04267fd8b635f8c6d42f83d8d4d6e
describe
'111589' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
10e08aa2ba7984ace0b889da3c53a966
2544e5cca902bf7d43d896ec1f46e78b4a5d0c46
'2011-12-29T21:24:16-05:00'
describe
'34096' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUE' 'sip-files00094.pro'
c2c7ef2bd53b9fcb06e83d8daea67247
3b6ada7c889f98903a4fed09806ea8974978d045
'2011-12-29T21:31:07-05:00'
describe
'35140' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUF' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
d69339dca911bcb76ea303f0da994008
54403855e5fef8bc5dff110d8aedbebe0cc6cff8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
9974b965a9f83b1ffc1c91c1cff0d3f2
5689bc3473e52c428fe967e04d3f63af3d6f7946
'2011-12-29T21:29:56-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUH' 'sip-files00094.txt'
8f1d26bfc26b94bace5099364888319b
e580e0517bc90d2f483354dc6587fc5d151db0d0
'2011-12-29T21:25:01-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9107' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUI' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
2013b1715072e6f09ecd5bfadeb626eb
cf8f75453e571ebfc7a01aa2abacc9b6fd769d97
'2011-12-29T21:31:01-05:00'
describe
'342752' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUJ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d31416ec1d4181cef855d59b4f4770c0
38d5ce154a0c1e12ad3fab8413608fbe0a4f63a1
'2011-12-29T21:25:56-05:00'
describe
'119599' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUK' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
f674df70afa1b7a7d0e12bb56f5e5f46
e4f6375ca07e0c6f015c75a3e1cecdb6bae49cd3
describe
'35203' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUL' 'sip-files00095.pro'
f2b3d1d040e6e4602b2bae5824d8bdbf
629640574aa18f70a34eca6a7b919bbdddcb4baa
'2011-12-29T21:23:52-05:00'
describe
'37373' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUM' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
f66aff25c211454a916b2456331d6543
be30cc24686de18d1cafafd712001580b1253ef1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUN' 'sip-files00095.tif'
4e59a3f6ef8c670287fb62df9ed3897e
341f245e2e9d04b7fb7273d8644c285af7155fef
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUO' 'sip-files00095.txt'
09e01c065a669798c3b2154c846c33a2
bf530a4440c110151fa24f0562812d549b7c1b08
'2011-12-29T21:26:18-05:00'
describe
'8868' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUP' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
83456359bc1b856be0231393ede87518
36f801bbae06c40078e3ce211e8dfa6f2bf117c6
describe
'342721' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUQ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
18cafc886f3631775f5d8dd231a99296
30d59a2bc8413b3fe5640a013fdf74f7f23b7228
describe
'111753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUR' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
9dc33ac0053f72bd7a6c867787e7a6a5
bc96106fda6e0c0e3d922bd02a55b94dae9b845b
describe
'33689' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUS' 'sip-files00096.pro'
82c54e95906fb99b63f877f462ba3344
273608bf23ad41a80a0af2ff8dbfc3d0bf470b56
describe
'35137' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
3300e1d241d6eeaab7d074c1472dbd56
815e5a81bf43246e036c48c53e0eebfebbf09ca0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
93b9c22e20b408329ae6e1f92e5eac75
dd6797cf0a11d554a7e59ac97041cee03618a4cd
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUV' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a1511434b0a29a63f1bfe9639f26281a
1df221c6dc794cfcb5d8b4cafe08ae024e1e4cb4
describe
Invalid character
'8539' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
b2af773c500b38d27c84654f081fcf68
c4f40a881cbd4122cbbf60138f3990735a4d03cc
describe
'342641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f75050aad2fa40ab50db90c610d06d24
da623b0ddb31636ab24fd30002c2742030f5eae5
describe
'43673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
fbfea9e0b844c37714f110e16286da92
bf48114d8c4bb9f48cdf06443462c3f85a1117ef
describe
'8421' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAUZ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
7f38cf45c08b8539ee2128dcdc04b797
3026cf7ef5e9757b8de8a8626e8107d0da522404
describe
'11454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVA' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8ff1549ddf4dd3bbcd6e2bafc83a9d74
da9327b031c5bfb9e39a0511d3fb342ddd6023c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVB' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e2b0bf789a6b97b531d1c2bf8470a0fa
3eae012f5d939a4aa2736cfcce2adcd8e2559d01
'2011-12-29T21:23:25-05:00'
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVC' 'sip-files00097.txt'
8f1a5afd218c249a580b8fc71265d8a5
aab6f3c84dc4be45c6596a88a912e9e7899af43e
describe
'3065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
6f0be451af3b427e1a02a6ba192de19b
c7ab8f25199baf30673dcfb04b7e7b396f70a0d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVE' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
5bb71be519bdedb3812ff286b54a51d7
8074b1a6380c48ee012eac7dc6a8e8b7bb545987
describe
'93126' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVF' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
1779ca77369577b80443340eab338a96
4fb613f411e9ec5d979fb0fc3e538f9cb5e5b8bc
'2011-12-29T21:29:34-05:00'
describe
'25401' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVG' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6916fe87a8f02ea0873a8498e54dd22e
fd03c818f9a423a228159b331656daee4243fa5a
describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVH' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
870b8787d6deab461dd06772a4bed9e8
9f72db9deda165dc4cce49988d919de45912059f
'2011-12-29T21:31:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVI' 'sip-files00098.tif'
458bc5805ca0e39ddbdf752bcf465ea5
fc8dc14791839b4046e931c20290cce3f590cab5
'2011-12-29T21:26:01-05:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVJ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
8cad59a93ba8d8e5358abe2a2bb8950c
33e6dc35819fa7634c703548512871b481880942
'2011-12-29T21:28:23-05:00'
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVK' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
e81b48ad2a896bd2aec3df24d4f58d91
16d3f2f016e849eca72eb3d7bf9b46d0a806543c
'2011-12-29T21:30:09-05:00'
describe
'342722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVL' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
318e2c714b02a60dba2801339caa6a34
dc50828cbd59d52a7919eab9f95a2c2ee4091bc9
describe
'124168' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVM' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ed32e44a221fcb5062a0df757245d2dd
1cb47bcc789aea3d5f022f5ca91cf5c62e45a72f
describe
'34456' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVN' 'sip-files00099.pro'
aecb71bfa2594ca9f0c57f50b301c880
4a034040dde9493a64fcf33bd6ef00a6bbba71e6
describe
'38678' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVO' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
e7388b06ac587ec4ef70c7872a02a5fe
adc1e07222e01eb9bb35694d7ce5c6ba11fe9c31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVP' 'sip-files00099.tif'
db761dd1d1b3792b9c4bd7c36a39529e
5db9fa66c9303bb35e8a1b245d4782cd305a5437
'2011-12-29T21:25:23-05:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVQ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6d3e787becc25d9e2dd07bb2c0fd1ede
9efb535fae9de6f5aa572780917e2deb022e5b2b
'2011-12-29T21:31:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVR' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
94c0dbbf8fb7597477b54a8d888770b8
6dfb5192d5d62b8d536d66bab059e52a19ebaf81
describe
'342763' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVS' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
d1abfacea7f6b602e30282662cdec9f0
77f8b79ca1b9ab227d76acf269dfd930db97ecc6
describe
'126187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVT' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
3be3d4663571a0f7275200894c29c55e
de391215c9cf4558362a4766ae787b08d477413a
describe
'34616' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVU' 'sip-files00100.pro'
06634340ac43772a0031a965f13e4020
207659d571ba381e2db38f8e98c317aa8e6dfda9
'2011-12-29T21:31:31-05:00'
describe
'39485' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVV' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
a48a20509f969c83aa3c6b2bc8262a31
8374ca0bea5ef3df4bc0586bdc3dac4fb1b7d9ad
'2011-12-29T21:31:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVW' 'sip-files00100.tif'
e413d2cde54da6b35763fd9e47ec9121
e1b356882314fa618a5c451e65f4bd7245993951
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVX' 'sip-files00100.txt'
56a2aa3ecc46eb6ba893602003bded71
36e3c9866e115e5678306c4ab7f8e23dbade75bf
describe
'9902' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVY' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
1313ae3fcbafe7c558e1e1763bdd3dd3
9a60fb113a0b7b9069cc17bc14062b064f84091e
describe
'357038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAVZ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e839e59b85cdaa80d5e986fda0f29fa7
44a789d27a6dd88efa2e7c24b56a7076e98dafce
describe
'73515' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWA' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b113a73ee53dd852763532a040143501
de86db867e19bbfb8469efd1fd6ef0ded5a4fee5
'2011-12-29T21:26:50-05:00'
describe
'2233' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWB' 'sip-files00101.pro'
b2e23ae93e9a2ff1881dce36525cead6
a99cf0145a500ba9ba65a2f2242f6cffa416a972
'2011-12-29T21:28:22-05:00'
describe
'18381' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWC' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d33b9c76016530a645fd67e5048cb3cd
f48455dfa02ca2dd197ac4c9df90b061d2fe6bcc
'2011-12-29T21:29:39-05:00'
describe
'2873536' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWD' 'sip-files00101.tif'
c6f9e2e932f39084764050fab92d05dd
603ba3505ec63400c609577ef9582f7932cabbd8
'2011-12-29T21:23:31-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWE' 'sip-files00101.txt'
89d5b33ab93f5e61af4723c3eec116bd
cbab975235656f24daf030dd9c7f8ec404a052c5
describe
'5710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWF' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
71fbb8a99bc1129c3e5ece0c4c58577e
a27e6482d3ad42debd723855615d505bb87730ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWG' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
73148e482b525f35d656d378507bdca4
d5945043819d8b1cb117eebf804d2dc406e142e8
describe
'18654' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWH' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
7f903abb759ee1c5ab3f46efa5f36a74
63c960ed94efb48e9df9c755bc7578e1fa456bf9
describe
'3464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWI' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
28d05e4e04b3a4da458275b4f58ab507
91dd9e101d4d882beb5b07c8b5732580737a66ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWJ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
63709dcdbb31626c55e45d805c2bd0ed
6ade68b2a7d625a58390e0fd69e7ec5468175554
'2011-12-29T21:22:54-05:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
882abc21870d4161e9c2dd9300b8e3f4
67157553723ebb5307fa12b46d5f17a11bbfd02d
'2011-12-29T21:26:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
db32a6d5990471183f96738fc1f04e3a
6596248fc2535613700ec2fbea9f83e5a79ae662
'2011-12-29T21:28:05-05:00'
describe
'119193' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
20ddf53708b7242cefda73489135d6b4
43b824519c549b28166545cdbfdcefcf3a31623b
'2011-12-29T21:29:11-05:00'
describe
'35931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
6aea6c7badc5337df856461da88d1048
3536ac1693ec07e16cc9a68bce85444f04e1eda2
describe
'37641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e2b1581a53a6d99ad02b1ca9ba571eef
105d7646cc4d266c7fa3836b02e3aef1bccad1a8
'2011-12-29T21:22:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
fb2bad44305a9a678fafd971fe308b06
b229f9d60009b3bfa94119a3c8eb1f4cf3bd8978
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6e2b60f741d7299baf06d4932d635ec1
63cb19685a6a6f09bbf6d090ca5aba62506e7d1c
'2011-12-29T21:28:18-05:00'
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9f964b89ff0195a287ecffde073fac9f
52bc0594240d7d53f06c45de0edce374b68a2644
'2011-12-29T21:25:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d447219137495075db4bb58e437cad0a
1ecff678e1329321639caaff2d186ef2546c727a
describe
'113983' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
7db1e0ba68388687d8c19eb0a2fbbae9
2c30348b3a505b681c7993c2bfe2665fba54abe0
'2011-12-29T21:28:28-05:00'
describe
'33363' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
c56b032bd9d5bec28f28635a840bebd1
18033dbe28df8ee12ebcf2a338a8b7e32d85e090
describe
'35483' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
935b395fe4b3ed6c4c5489a86290cad7
f64f020f0458dd069747f25e632cbc5d96e4b026
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
ab18205a0ba9f55bd078a9a1d53e81e2
030beba41541bc6c931a813a93e2e1b2a15eb323
'2011-12-29T21:27:42-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
425cec5a4c0f21f6fa15c03351ba9ed0
72d91e1d6d7b516824c64611adde7fb0494806b0
describe
Invalid character
'9121' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e98e6c1aaa0cd3af7105aca18e53443d
967a2f49fbe3d057308c6e086873a0db047db7d2
describe
'342680' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAWZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
a3ee1b9ac645085c342646b25492c4d9
7933c94ed2772287b48563d0b0887b171832fa74
describe
'119782' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
ffd4ea5b226fae9f1677b7d22180e54d
ed80bf203e104938d4ec0645462a822ee0ff86ed
describe
'34344' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
b5dfe3b4b2870c026ae60a8e88fc69c3
e6ee387769ed1ce6e69581f1a561cbcdda155c8e
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
5df8cd6b7158baef5f4ea1164cc33fd4
25c3064ee6f6473497a61a31e7c61f204066ddac
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b9be77fff9297ec41d102c5e3df7558f
b77162073d2be8f27bfb8760ae1e62455d63dc1e
'2011-12-29T21:21:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
76d6f0f53f3bf53f903b69d77472424c
b67abc97f0ebdf69cdc48d1ab485ca64efcc56e3
describe
'9378' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
42250a273b2ea4dc0426b3b1a9b3a817
57742d1f581d2b681c447df9de0a01033b8ca21d
'2011-12-29T21:29:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
851141b0bc32b3814a069b13722414aa
21eafc17ab7119920e1bb7f56ae61dc397acd391
describe
'107863' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
2cb75328bb90e34338bdcd0824331579
69844e92035bff17b61de409269188d5bacc54b7
describe
'31838' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
9ee89e6bc662d77241c73283e9f068ec
3732a5b83922adc498780df54d9c60062bb6b6d9
describe
'33586' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
79fbeb0f8a26c107f70555848915c7ed
7cd58a3bd0089af18623f453113c8460f33ca595
'2011-12-29T21:31:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4c90f98f4946f311136988edbc0ff003
d512f31ce80dc06181ca615cf5da8a8bf8bcfa25
'2011-12-29T21:31:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
2f364f115bf9fabd14f5f9c0cb9de9c9
369d5afdbca700aff2c86db808bd3a22da3284aa
'2011-12-29T21:27:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
a5bde3bcd30051c8c2f79b2d8c183c71
6ca082d2e3cb3c11994d0c6a03ba66fbf509724e
describe
'342756' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d27e10fb095dd3091cf70eaa524702b5
dc85e874eda283dd51d2698d60cb357ccdf7666d
describe
'117205' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
3c7a2950b445d1ef4964ecbb32da7c63
718baf2f096de7c053f04e05f844d1de02c71b00
describe
'34966' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
f23d40111234768462043c888845c514
a3f0546ab8de5e32d7760e3d6213720d8a2f8ee2
describe
'36422' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
e5ceec6fa14e90681a82b3d70d5aba3b
56fda9c478817cd73c35322d9a49e135a229697d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4461ce0fb8d11afc4aab8cc9785d8b30
d86910f8a6e765d700b21a438d937c06afa47d7a
'2011-12-29T21:28:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
d33534f4c936ed77fc1496414c217ecb
f9a596e0120f9bbccd55906d277886d27d721e41
'2011-12-29T21:29:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8935' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
d74d163b847ac0ae139ad31b35afa9f4
d7243d53b49a179777d96b208a48777f545b4c11
'2011-12-29T21:28:56-05:00'
describe
'342681' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
49bc7821d8035ca32476af075b3beb9f
d9f0b1f51d4028123681a4a3c4b77f1c9566b740
describe
'111092' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
efcab899ead34d918c4f0f1dc9b6b178
edd25c512335a5bd65f6966d98f8741c99055a77
describe
'32001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
54a0197c2d338ed5da0b409622dfda96
719dfa5d9d3b2c4eaedc7758208d81d6647a366f
describe
'34117' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
03d2a48fd7ed396a3a26defaaaee5fda
df07e7f9b0a678e3bcbf527e9b11070b65ae389d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
4d13fd82f9a1637d4df9413257be40db
8489d8395dcf65315cbed916b20e612773bc9a1c
'2011-12-29T21:30:45-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAXZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3aaf2ff0d7ad383ef1055d685342f2cb
98fe510440b7a45f3ce69675421e2a7d1cc99aa1
'2011-12-29T21:24:18-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
5076d15773679c666ae7482aff54448e
af3162dd2d1c0e6a755c540977d1c5d6501f5f5c
describe
'342675' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0bf77bd2b65a695122e4e73581af5eae
797200359130147e93e78dbaea04a0737e98d01d
describe
'115739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
382307b8b4e40fd6b418c9c07991f7db
a003e3a55f06810d525e3dad3f18f8b65d683330
describe
'33255' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
612bffa018d0247958c70d62c7e8c44f
29a9130f31bc2c0bce1de4e6107cdbd12f9d1252
describe
'36103' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
2b5038feb977437fc42494ce5d3ae065
fb0ef49342eeed72ab5a5a7d6ce6e30c014baeae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
b4803338a0d3ba0b85f6ef66ee233617
c48c6879ff4f203ca0510a2e384b64da0babd662
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
30711346c55907ab33794f786db75c9d
9645d2728b54aa4ce0b21e88bd4c3a49d07a508f
describe
Invalid character
'8704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
dc6fc358b5beada79ed4e5903a748309
209bcc5d7ccd63ead6c6ea2f0bf05a4049a2b7cb
'2011-12-29T21:24:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
4d68811b428ea51962084e97e492c63d
c5cff83e208b81134d2d7405909c5bc72f7f2fb1
describe
'116285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
2764e01134abfd4c61fb32bccc5b0a7f
a5da5ad8a165c412efea369c391224b574116aa2
describe
'33638' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYK' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8142e1eb85c5436a4946cd8cfa338534
94f7d37afeb196fb09c8ce76759fd03ca3079962
'2011-12-29T21:28:38-05:00'
describe
'36436' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYL' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
1d1d8c1717a90ac29b929692d583d13b
16d6f0aecd7461fb44147dbd1fb19e617d6f99cf
'2011-12-29T21:29:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYM' 'sip-files00112.tif'
6ab8e5c1aff853dea39a5ff5c8d33a77
887e2ffc050929346b417b665f107f4b310d092f
'2011-12-29T21:22:48-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
62e3306ec73d56615d8e935e0303b8dd
4cefd5a72e3a385fac21654f56edafe252b7c45e
'2011-12-29T21:27:23-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9120' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
da8d63cde147cd13a8fc7b2a1af50192
5071ab57ac9f8056d3a74448f0d3a16814adfc19
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
25926042dec42d7dc8504324f6fc1dfe
26c4286e652e9598ba079d25e09be0452592e8fe
describe
'115918' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYQ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
a548f0c441a9908efe604c4d4338c1b7
4d1085f938b1229a83f9b29907b9ac27b4bdd48d
'2011-12-29T21:30:16-05:00'
describe
'34729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYR' 'sip-files00113.pro'
43a65fdc83ab29d443056ed774e45c62
59de2ffa50be488962f92048fec54cd7931ca933
'2011-12-29T21:26:45-05:00'
describe
'35979' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYS' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b537bbad716a91c8872019d4a6dc22d5
f4ce1f3dec9063cb46c9049ca3ad90f93ff8e262
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYT' 'sip-files00113.tif'
cc927f365b6995f3fb6ef5427b39a9b9
eafed4a7a64e92668e38cbc5a375aa50c65dd507
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYU' 'sip-files00113.txt'
20135442bf3f05ae69a465a2ec1b6fb5
a547b9db877a2eb985c857d43ad12a298f7cef0f
'2011-12-29T21:25:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8795' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYV' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
73d5a42ec18d92a5fe0a8f6218ec9214
6ea024e69715b2daee08d540875575a5b3051d78
describe
'342711' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYW' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a613947423d5f20cfe02b90d538f7ad9
b0e4256918753b3fbdf7a749a85d919455a410fd
'2011-12-29T21:26:04-05:00'
describe
'42683' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYX' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
bd592939b9d5714569cbe8e4e90546fd
9ef6776dac56c803d2f9475d4b52d0841fee9fed
'2011-12-29T21:28:01-05:00'
describe
'7072' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYY' 'sip-files00114.pro'
cc45355169349235002e45fb8d14811e
434f47fc0278c81e573f617f40d5aeea4ab28ec1
'2011-12-29T21:27:16-05:00'
describe
'11023' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAYZ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
0c91ec218d0cecdff49c51d0339c4fae
4ce6aa097aa8bd659819a298fc4cd4847f1d55b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
2b7b7c4d2e7c51cc7c4c474db04bdb61
89bb079335b5452c1c27bb90a5204b615e9a336e
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d4e4894b610dc9e9c38e59841893dccd
f00cdfb3a9bb875e590e740f77d90bd62f7f6906
'2011-12-29T21:31:18-05:00'
describe
'2792' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZC' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
843fa5016f3f03bbd2b81b861813a8dc
18e1e462e2f542eccb2ef2b4ad936c749a2bfbaa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZD' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a2b65ea6b4a01bed6c4c0a715d57aa85
608699212a64388a27258e68e4289fd21fdd703b
describe
'96452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZE' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ce87c86aa13f74a8dc7fdeff7eb664f9
8b4c7d77413830ad283ecb407c7b63a4411a8fcc
describe
'26133' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZF' 'sip-files00115.pro'
fea34d6be5b82afc6176602e16442c5e
2a5ef6f2486e5dba9429d25ac3c32b037a30a421
'2011-12-29T21:31:21-05:00'
describe
'29536' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
b5acb59874ac992149309be6537f0335
f524d1df4caa42bc1ed5885fa1f1172b902a41b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
5959ae9eb66b1faa5be45542fddffdf5
bf71df6c07ff9000e06c8f4f2620cf533910de98
'2011-12-29T21:28:58-05:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
e5dcbe8f1c6ad029993e0c79014b1bc3
6b9dfb91cbeed55c8679949a0c22334830d2b89a
describe
'7203' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZJ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ff693e9f44f9932523217964c320f546
52a1ee9c713e44bfb5b278f78b6dbdbe35e403fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZK' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
79e63722f0a0234ce69ab8a8af91ed68
21ad27083a562ef07f0079b0ab8420c203d790b1
describe
'114050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZL' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f34e12e1e0bb48ab8f4aead9e5f5d477
458ae8fd11e48ad15229d9c3449d6b617f31fdb1
describe
'33983' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3f9d8ad1421dac36217ec4493350db0e
ec0b3728d8816644f5f64a784700b552eecbac6c
describe
'35754' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZN' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9b7432392e21e8b15b4b72993a9f5668
e1f100376207fe6a709a13d091404e13c86f7c5b
'2011-12-29T21:26:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3f96fe25ea795387426663960ca81bf0
6081b5a576ab7fe18ba7fae2abcd0e7b4184bca6
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
e5d447074a0678d209e317aa1cfa9913
5f8bf64502e26457ce1f676dc0006b35ab28a1e5
describe
Invalid character
'9086' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d573b4c5255f9b7820b2c3393f8219f1
98a9d593740e925db31497a8a07d5489a3f39b01
describe
'342690' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
9075f58d18470660f0ae4dbcb7625881
dd9730eb1ca3646cb2c09ea60a11b1af2a1eba0b
'2011-12-29T21:23:44-05:00'
describe
'113011' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
35c7cdfab719a64031498a147dfbd46f
23518d1fe569184cb3f3342742e6fdbdc3da6db7
'2011-12-29T21:26:51-05:00'
describe
'34040' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
8583cf1728b96cfc39324046651c3140
442697612cd2f5db85f60d9c1076710d3440a498
'2011-12-29T21:23:55-05:00'
describe
'35326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
84e1efe902dc90e34cd2407e71867fca
666ee87c9dc5ffaea0c047c761d4a53a1cdc2afb
'2011-12-29T21:28:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
c3d738ef19984e3e3f92004cfa703c7b
11d65951b8fab32f79de2f90a68a6e277a383109
'2011-12-29T21:26:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
5e59337e70394a0b6225a973df8e178a
10c7bebee34ea7ed69363e186bf7ff6a3dcf3a59
describe
'9051' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
286e78207afc76f8ef6c288654862013
3ef1a4a9c0f8a9d2b640f2c1cf6e36887ad1cc0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ee92dc657326e34835aa24af5e08edb7
121875464892a68fef7b94b6c382c2c75eda98e4
'2011-12-29T21:26:36-05:00'
describe
'113161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACAZZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d4917ae31c9a54a836595a64103feba3
120becaffb937261e136847a8974d09107195f0c
'2011-12-29T21:22:10-05:00'
describe
'33289' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ae0effe64a8c2c18267bd0d6860d60e6
ccc4b84d67875888546ffed7d37014e8e3cfbac9
describe
'35264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
8e2d9c3b99ec7e31b2cdb7950d0f93a2
9c672c219fe526ac29d5871b5a35736f78301b05
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
6f1b54244a56fb73acfb721645935718
1ae9ecd0c8ecb25c660ee04aaf5b09570d9f3297
'2011-12-29T21:29:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
46406de2c0f6969f73cc606b4be39585
5ea37dc2e5f77dc3ab4e67d680c23f21d179067c
'2011-12-29T21:26:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9034' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
cbe32501dc33a1750f2c88af2765ac4a
272a2f54663388863795e702978d25804fabb556
describe
'342437' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
6d0b01c112232976a6b817a3ea1c32bc
d7058f8b32b3518747b915eb1003b416b6eb2b98
describe
'114242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
9bb7df36e9777010f99ab85aeb321a9a
01b9a94a68cb205efad2ad8d1cc5729f724d5317
describe
'33715' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
7663d5c87e444e769b35769886682d25
1d775a41eded3f6f7a58bcf27deff805c2e3c9ce
'2011-12-29T21:30:20-05:00'
describe
'35605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
613304e90a6d22da3bd145968d18f821
18d08ba308daa197db5297bf78cdc0f5f739076d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
69fbaf8b2ceb64d9b436de29d7724a6b
624932955c6b14fc1aee7f1a4d096c3451502cdf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
2379a7ebc6be9c3666a69e65712093e8
2b1abbc8bccb6af24e798f2dab977ddb94194c4a
describe
Invalid character
'8724' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
087ff0c21317ac43e0bfb6aaf2597606
93bc44d7963baac982450a72046840657840e7d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5371d036516785ce8afbbb80f800ea26
7371fc98f2d870e13a47445537330634a7c7e7d1
describe
'107618' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
60a9ed5500f6c430f96cfe1164c59dc8
070b67f5afee9bd1fd7bc4f0f8a8275f91592f21
'2011-12-29T21:30:34-05:00'
describe
'31908' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
525861c445071357f89d8d76407c51f4
52336a718ce647132e8d94279183198fb342714e
describe
'33874' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0db3ff98926f367f533fafd20d90db47
4105e9088f588aa4dbff6cbbae83025ae49f73cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
e283af868383ff59dd0d1d70c4d20420
6edb6b025d57179fdbb46f7ad194d79cf8084cb4
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
557f5337527f9f125defd8b2191276a1
396b8313a919813e64512633176db8f9ec2f9fc9
describe
Invalid character
'8558' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f90029f2c65acad6e91f6db8300e38be
7e229772bb695b45c0e3688db2bff34be0b5c6db
'2011-12-29T21:25:52-05:00'
describe
'342728' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
f0c50af3911c9681f0f6806324ff6e7a
47078585da56ee4efe7759f0b8746904c124f6c2
'2011-12-29T21:28:17-05:00'
describe
'117925' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e4b1bc1850d496b1f48dabd238e29f06
6aa307d27aeb0fdbfd471bcc22af0b33020091db
describe
'34809' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
e904033872222ea49511e0513a109da5
9271bd95d8eb2a34b13fcf8431c46c0fefb732e9
describe
'37210' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
9d653ddf7c46b07186c6d0e10ed0e024
ef0c8c1ef247fc4c93f375f4de3b8a7245e0ea51
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
404e466077f2de432c7662a86d996712
c61ee934db8e64793acc89f22d956ceff8f5ea4f
'2011-12-29T21:24:26-05:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
f8e1e268e8085baf578d43eca359d799
59f020e8b9f3494f6c52921ce44a4819254afb47
describe
Invalid character
'9241' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBAZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
040056ffd9f196e26417c50bb7c02555
e8323656efcb8993c1058710d8e4ee0b2a7e4205
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5179429de75a37ee8e0200e1ba8675b8
82b855a32afc6b1430a59fcf7809a12ba261e973
describe
'114447' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
b506633cfd2023afdf02c03410d68788
8a4394e6691e26f61533affd4863c0923e4dcc7b
describe
'34088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
557cf52ac8278d9111ac4768cda9d668
7916faa9ede4330dc53d057ea18fcb344afb7071
describe
'34629' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
a6c73c9325b9df1219a318abfa8f4f9f
095c7adc10abc6a684f34eed032ff46a9c2dff27
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
20e8a59f7152216cb0171db42b7f38d0
7e8c8af558e1a0d45620412dff05e61913d5d745
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
030567d4b850d21c72f3c0e97e49cc07
964f79f91d3237497055ef8dfe56ade7b57b75ef
describe
'9018' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
5e4af1d2c5357b105e5deaa3521c973f
6a550762d5d83604338cbc11fe38bf68836fd0a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
63e7b853824ccd4646cffdffc21cb67f
97b9bf0efbef7fe30a38aa0a10020127436c1442
describe
'116925' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
13a2a78cc824c712cba23bb7211072f8
1ff91f04823b670ebe3be3bea21bedb830bb18bf
describe
'33611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
60efaaefc42f1f40df9bee5c155cff82
6e37d5299f6cc61d65a342992a6be243e1ce0fbd
'2011-12-29T21:24:11-05:00'
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
5f9f0235e2fff09ab5ef053831bb93ce
e0ab4f0203125b7c345ae57b368cdd2bad13c10b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
4886ffad2039744ba104beb2f7fcbe04
d2b14c99354651a193110c341f9e50c83313c8e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
71f04aa92200259a5fd24cb0c67eba7b
6a78afda1b40079973b74cdf38b27ff48c71c888
describe
Invalid character
'9045' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
cc5fcaac0d9d2e7d62284b1a0bd3ba74
00fa881f70484f0685c1f39463deb40f452397a6
'2011-12-29T21:22:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
81402b75a49742c92fd497fcaaeb7721
55d6f015b524aff2e5dbeb0b87813ade49d5f357
'2011-12-29T21:27:26-05:00'
describe
'109785' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
aab122bc2aa859210c1b558c6ed28f32
f8a8d2090d765050b82714dd85122d2a26384f4d
'2011-12-29T21:26:49-05:00'
describe
'31977' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
9513b51e0d5d758a5c91c4b32befa964
c2342c5f6ccc514ff2a42789d559ba9117b9035f
describe
'34858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d3b35b997b4203dddca0dded2adf5619
d9c375bfd3eb0ce33f9a66e4022f9032c2f6f63a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f61c0a8c23428f639e9d36a37b1b9934
4d75c3454cb7b1e36b3e76b481be095fe0f00742
'2011-12-29T21:31:19-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3e4179e318e04b1f3c058257a0aff603
81836376fedc8bc35c17a23d1caf7c4516063292
'2011-12-29T21:22:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8485' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b817c62a3c0a95dca674b78720f32e7c
f5fbb2fbb1a7823515271bf3dd48f6e9b819ac28
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
072349e063012bff77193a1f525d8da5
4ea0917ae9bed513c0f423df20231b04f5f78930
describe
'109109' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
afe7dd3e769506790b0c0b5b65429056
708e1757b0eced5e3a3c715f63c901663b467d8f
describe
'31249' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
ac5b403f0ba7f15d324120bdd8131047
db48fa23470d2d5dbcfba052d5b3c49bf6725fd2
describe
'33376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
874870ef910ea3a541b8067c6853e55e
df3b674684a0eef0b075f292fa18083bfc5477d1
'2011-12-29T21:23:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBBZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6a0b8f3167e46f2f37f244fc8e7c6500
2c84f8e28a31144b5304905552d54a8793419762
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
75a63d4be27c5c2cfdc229068710c312
e0ce47affc7987a08f79122d924d4ee03e2c350f
describe
Invalid character
'8357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
d35076b080ae192ccd7952be911c301e
d21aaacb602f843b475cdda1ce060e691b37021a
describe
'342746' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0221d6a5fff4609454a32e32335bb88b
dd5b221a17b536ad783227611d625b825b37f785
describe
'100676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
fd007f66607fbe983f8fe697a1250782
71d6ccf480469c81557d267499552846eec634e6
describe
'27464' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
2a99c4192d2a78582d0e8601b8c93434
eee1a2d46bf93b0d589cbb1d8d13a51f5d42f38b
describe
'30641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
569fe1fd653cf632d59b9e57ae16c72c
0d8e91800cf905f6c7093744126c09e5c7dd65dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
67fbd65bd7e58390adec2f87c683141b
15c8d3d9725154c05e99a530c03dcfa3bfdeb3a6
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
3e346b9fb377002a9bcfba600ae9d8d1
0cd34ddd78f5952229a559a19ee6fb11b60cd367
describe
Invalid character
'7611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
eb39feef2009c8220986c099d9bb8a77
a790abc53b2458dc56cd9d097a2b911cd23c73c3
describe
'342718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
23c4b9935ab430311e7cb44c96740a70
ab4c35ba7830bdbad53bd88d50cb71b4aa2a09e2
'2011-12-29T21:21:55-05:00'
describe
'122949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
51ace2ac30b297b444d9959ed8abb7f9
30a653e009623096a71c1154b346e8e74b50c262
describe
'35149' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
879aa62a40911d60f0751036a0241c8d
74566519e9b3a83d7df9ef631f3e051158e20f55
describe
'37306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
01b5e1279f3f90efbdbd6e24487cad17
bfda9b939de002f02a963fe74dab9b392ae9d65c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
368f3b51328ee07207e2aa3efe206a06
8743d2a6d0df527931319cacc44d8a5dcff117bb
'2011-12-29T21:25:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c60ff2b4a0dd83ebf349c15f953be458
52bc76870bda0a04f6b6aba42a1b50a3c3306bf9
describe
'9296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
69790d5bf7d7659daed813d3c8f3c373
e429d5d75936afa19250ee9bed76cb92dd5d4d5b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
2d318f37accf551188a794d56184d608
ee5cfa2e48a58a2c4b36152302da0bdc5316e4b1
describe
'113862' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
febc97ef60ee2bb3415c098b04636bdf
b249e4d5b48713b697b5e0252bff29798fcaec7b
describe
'34510' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
e54f302e0e5f89807f9f28781e230309
7d23467343630c5d46fd9421974fc9c5016e3dcb
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
514e82ee1aefa7faa6389c0486067808
e2ec33cba9bf8aa23873865db6b9ee07cbafa7b8
'2011-12-29T21:28:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
192dace26e346a655de89ec6dda5508c
6a7e510f5b2b149d7f66886e588b1ce265894678
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
0955d419b267fefa64c657a470c74f0f
3f517a785a5d7a9602fe0dabceeb73f07ca399fb
describe
Invalid character
'8743' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
0ae0e88f7764eb4c03f5bfc37b6eb05d
c729aea8b317aa46b1d60af3fbdfcd487aec1042
describe
'342744' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
08d45da17758af628206e7a80e3593c5
23f958a819d24777365932ec11110c71438d5b63
describe
'116076' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
2033f9fe483fd14e877d72e04a64447c
90f2cc0e424c7f6d643419fba8c4329d9fcc7abf
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBCZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
a8858d0490737e1934ee900892f814f6
7e894f43550dea6cdaffdb10331fdda45a496f37
describe
'36252' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
dd9c675cc5f86847e4e2e0b0c8fafa52
c4bb54278bfd2675ecca98e1bf2f425bb8eb6591
'2011-12-29T21:25:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
3a4fc3c56dbe934e8d14b5321656be42
20ac05af7d4b56b2aadca46ed66ce3ba48c8b3c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
ebad6537305b0bcd11313f8c658f119c
2f860026c03114fe6ac7f3d12870728c10a8c22b
'2011-12-29T21:25:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9128' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
74ba684f94c0c521e316ededa4622b81
0733f315b6b127d60702b052d0bba9abe5d3f51f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
f4855c1a646fa7e5bc3357e6bdddc71a
23e680e7b9183d627833f32218d988a0cf4b9800
describe
'118911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
835f86e55543d2d2dca77fd0af869318
6ed7fbe9020969d44bc8ed3a9e2cfe320729120e
describe
'34404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
7123a6e0d10f867229989225e79c765b
2485ff72b47a805b6254494c05e61a91ff4dd804
describe
'36187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
3711829b06ff94b5bec8f449ac982960
ef878ed98f4e24bbc230e190d338caddf725ebc0
'2011-12-29T21:23:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
b2fbf14fd56f7b23f210f7a73a614490
ad37e5ffa3c8982c65ca30005efb11ea2dfba8aa
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6868b878ec2e6668596ac83dd5eb0b28
745553cb597b9437990276ebb813e1f8a66eccc0
describe
Invalid character
'9071' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
67f913646d466d48c8fdc052d001aff8
7567c5c704fb57ec88622aa26143d07f71525c2d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
38c291f1d25a014f97bd00a2000c45a6
a91b069d31a258dbfbcaf906fd537ffe31727924
describe
'123043' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
13e2db74b22a914dd9c557f24403b613
f2f4ebfa56d2f1d2d658926dee6c215fb865a779
describe
'36164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
b975685c15a054419f0192e802532e25
1332a4d7d787bf5688d82afc3289259c1aa289d4
describe
'38075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
c4f3de608e3b0405c58ec6be3ad613d3
38043c049b34a9d9c9630cbe372007cb06ce9f0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c6943bc7b898a73a3d96cf1f045330e0
51f63bf97add44b805d069b883c89ec1659f3a2c
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4e0c46f9329710ddcdeeccb2248a04dc
a4460a9d200c5f211c04b07e620158dc2e1195d5
describe
Invalid character
'9401' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDR' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
fe056efdb57763a6632e5bfde9678224
70faf407d05b40225cd305469455b957656543d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDS' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
22a21d35c9b90177b0dc805e54f4e1c9
8abbe0781d196d1876e4726c87f4e7b6e059b0af
describe
'118433' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDT' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
77faa265b66cdcc4082bc16dc2246f47
716cb6a74440a948f364f4bbf168fc866ae036ae
describe
'35602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDU' 'sip-files00132.pro'
c925838e8bd226155caa18affb96bfd4
df9e7be92c1cedf401691814bedba380dfa44516
describe
'37639' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
ba136371191ab3113f1f7679feca465e
eb95ca8fb478bdd5a56ceb5b4f758fdfc47070c8
'2011-12-29T21:27:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6a8d3abc7562f6df54a86916800228fc
d469e1a4cd4f521e15ead1bf8e549da5c42a494f
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
5ae5f18e059fe73efcb86980fd982724
c8d925af01502ab733b756c376bb7e7af65c0a8a
describe
Invalid character
'9124' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
bae85e7c190e74c61df3dfb96e999621
a16560c9ceadee509faf8c4bf5d40d879f36d824
'2011-12-29T21:25:22-05:00'
describe
'342751' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBDZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
0e1005666ba4a4bc86a15e49c0166448
35a1616abe9d97b6ec3a96f10c5920ec2db2dccb
describe
'114714' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
fca350965dcf135d3cef662509dbe276
a60cabfd618b31f13f1d852889d19c5f80fb3f57
describe
'34488' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
097f571bd5c1efbf1a8504cde55f5e62
cf088ff4214808efea372434f467b120832ecb22
'2011-12-29T21:22:12-05:00'
describe
'36196' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
6a5abd302f75abffd0af8bfea73cb9bd
16f8959d5f584941c74f460b339ae6b5b694314c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBED' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0ecc8cfd8e385ac5918befd84c105900
a9911743a04a55e66dea653c99cc76e31265c75b
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c0bbf00af5bd5b96d37d8908a76e33cd
2f008b9d2f8e78f0ee19cf2905253710dc3c8dbb
describe
Invalid character
'9102' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
61d6503012d068218d08f9b38a8a499f
76d22ee146eee96112f1752599b15b5314d2a463
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
63bc66e76d484cf9a968041067947ac2
c3a989b8bb7bfa3f5ccbdd623fd70b88498ecacd
describe
'114650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
7af0cea35095d8faeaccee825ea7e4d2
f1eb2e51be5cfa80eda0f8425896e07d21bffc70
describe
'32972' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
a65eda1bc13d73879cb751bd3e12b206
1b56ba20a4bfbcd177d5ad588cf18d06a545a0d5
describe
'35380' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
82a1e45c95d78c930e77419b295d53ba
61c85a790488153767db9de57b2e82388acbbebe
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
8992b63eafc2f4749eba0929e57983c3
98e2a1326fd344ce46dcb66d4e5d2b2a5f23588e
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
6662b380b573145b02ee27a346ca3d32
b833b7e5af1e155f422d426cecb247649fec97dd
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
be0b27153e231d81cb5b9b836f2ccd14
a54bf55e9f688ce28ad54ff40a24479cbaee9813
'2011-12-29T21:28:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
ef8f3ca96e867396c7da6702f594bc6d
97a4d176029f0a7381362ab2ce71bc2c4e700e4b
describe
'122345' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
93b0a05dd086be7c84002da75da337e8
c4c35c3c44252a0f9a2016ead5bfbedaddc3bb29
describe
'35591' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
d895c744a7a34bba473aabcff7191a98
889475eb62c3e716db8c3cdf27274f58639a5b4b
describe
'37610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
cfcc702d64bdf668bd395a552c21ed27
015941bf27bf585848ffd684ef9c6f6c760fa878
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBER' 'sip-files00135.tif'
554388fb73a3f6cc8c9a12f4a1c6759b
16aaf025ea1b9b19317617caad433a2a1ef36397
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBES' 'sip-files00135.txt'
8f80d22ef04f52fc639b6f03c978f755
7275baf5f49c2ad575356d7ab5a0777bbd18a9d9
describe
Invalid character
'9522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBET' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
af250aa4c9c5cfeeb33b16011efc6376
cc75771c3b95c98805ba0ff954c5f5f82c007733
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
78d5997e65ed30f824ec25dee018be03
e6e30f460546f53b65cbb355115de00befb4431d
describe
'118398' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
2352235a6b9b0b4220771f412657f05c
ace408d12bed0a6b7ef6e33ea26869e1f5e00a56
describe
'35406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
857cdd2e536ecc328d287f774c32e63c
3317b0f91f3bc7eb17ca3ede9698c221b31ce88a
'2011-12-29T21:24:57-05:00'
describe
'37785' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
af89ae97224bb76faa6b5fa2265b62f9
fc35d4efc58c81db7dda77f17b2c0ebe6eacaa99
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
8ddd69bf2c85113133b776f5d833a23a
609d1b0fd35308fa8786128734763d8a205bf530
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBEZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
a1a97e9c7b459d83b4d3a3e632d4336e
9412d7da24c9d9cdc7af5ddf65e48d88aa93657c
describe
Invalid character
'9060' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5087137c8de1014d9f58d5531e04239e
d09873d3ed0f716e0a0627131694661aad42c82d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
3a2e9c964f3320868b887bfc618ac2c8
1eb4de99f3aa5171e590a2e871326dbaff54a1b0
describe
'118082' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
ca532671ba67ad7e5c22977794911d6c
2d3620689d415df4b1f79e0814810d26f1154f1e
describe
'34932' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
f75e45bb87158d807f4e82b759d0973e
2f6e71b53c7748cfe83f89b4942d41b945184236
describe
'37406' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
adf39a2e282f80e1991b09cd4054d0bd
bd555e806f68a5bb4094dadd14376e33a7a55c31
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7810bc6130891045bf56147fc21f51ab
68cb2df1a7c7d2da413ff15b822b774d1d79cbc2
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
fa734e12f83bffb36ea428d93daf8059
eb6eb41134cd5b6ee2d0ddcec99e35fcb29d7771
describe
'9199' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
f38bf91314754b0b6e197166c23c09a2
82638c196c87185b54c7eababf0b9d8d3820dbe7
'2011-12-29T21:26:20-05:00'
describe
'342671' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
17b3ce6d0a323b688bb97f94ec21c085
a4ba628f1cdf636cd2eef64eff255e5db531c380
describe
'43583' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
6e2455cbf4dfbafee3b2c739d1b9fe24
ee8fe09d3fa7515c3d058b636fc95ae3d41ac6b7
describe
'8203' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
fcdf03d944d21a01df7e874a6360f855
97d9ac9f70155cabc61c555fe80840553349b440
describe
'12038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
9ad30a54d79109657023c55df3f08133
44123d0d1c0bbff89d56ab95637f388458b18e72
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
0c1c54e5b96679a827bb3c54da595070
6ed8634d61b436cc72d607e2b6c2dec17a8985f3
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
8066635f08b93b82fcf8a484a18e0a4c
1eb02979f83e7690fbd8f814063aadfa1616685e
describe
'3119' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
8052d967e3e3dcab642917772fc5152c
c1808dfe921649740fad2a5230cdcdebaa73f8ae
describe
'342759' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
d7df88000f33c19a216887f01aecb869
74deecc65bb286fa0ea83b4cb818e79eade3d358
describe
'99931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
7c133cc9592118c7843f8a6d5c9d8fcf
9daf8119bf9008ab2bc6a679d5be3cb49c626d02
'2011-12-29T21:26:00-05:00'
describe
'27146' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
f778a250b4097fcba30bac2734f8fbe8
2b15c7b104e19a223ac53560d87b04ce80e5b7f3
describe
'30880' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
da03951e75fc0ffcd9d3189a7d96937d
fadb33b2c9fe753f971f73df3973422ae8831ba2
'2011-12-29T21:23:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c32825bd605c1dda8398bec56c3316ef
0869c87c41f2d4c0e723819a771947a5d40ce137
'2011-12-29T21:30:01-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
f2abca6051b445d7872dc9f7a0f58037
dfe068f879e49d6e0cf7935158211e0c0072cc53
describe
Invalid character
'7595' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
4e87b44688876f9bad4c629e69c836ff
4cadfb3eee4c132de88bfd447691675e0d11b469
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
dec4076df42f2ddd0b65af2e6263439d
af273460897bed60e05299ffeca7260deee5981b
describe
'120346' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
fb339ae64ef042d6389eea17af8256e0
48e2e9ce50289ebd9725d69cc4cdd756ab19a750
'2011-12-29T21:31:50-05:00'
describe
'36470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
e58c308173f7aa0e347b323777024285
2d78e90a0fd9e0bfcdf2f98d5af29e5278ded494
'2011-12-29T21:26:33-05:00'
describe
'37606' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBFZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
c30e5326477a1977c4c2e41206965494
18c654d3bd53a7b2e14221274ddc001dec31d3ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
a24607ef4620545e21648db647bd30f8
5e984823eb2a2c491b026eb5bb2dd5e6e7e4f9c5
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
e9c66afcfac49b65dd704607c29b1dab
c7f0aeba01a371ff01e940961e5cfdfd29d70b94
describe
Invalid character
'9216' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
67fca8ab0b7f5ae6197ecee19f00ee02
abb5a7bb763f3cc044a1a89574aa0072232af41d
describe
'342740' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
99e60672d6adc7267816cf457a862145
a05e84b27708e2da7622315630189d2dabc0da63
describe
'123961' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
ba244ef5884d01771cee2c7fe761b0ca
4bc2c38f6b468cadcb49c64f730b402b3138dc23
describe
'35442' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
a182d1c8ace20ec0f0a4b2b9f48ff369
783022fafa2fc8ceb433362ec835bf0e5cadfa03
describe
'38103' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
1ca1ef92d2554fbdf129761c678a5697
643a3ab3b8db8c0b0c272a6fd840a54431f981ac
'2011-12-29T21:29:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
09997f5f13ecd252288d1dd2f00dc66d
a8d54a30af8143a2a37115fac3776c163a068f7c
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
ecc205397ca2df9a503a226774e272c9
c069c222d8fd75cad51d98c0d0f50f97609b09b6
describe
Invalid character
'9165' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
292ee5a51a180e76646d33d8376391a5
7759647e5f9738e1fefee433893d59203b018ea6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
63f207658b82a9d66e5e403e616462ca
233149c3726f45c4547afc45e44e68797080c614
describe
'121082' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
ee4ba270a7c518fd056484f0b2f358d3
ea935128240e4f7a6e03ef1c8e2503b81fc250fb
'2011-12-29T21:28:46-05:00'
describe
'34770' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
c4dd9ff13ad79bfc7d0b8681f1028e20
15a7d5f06f0ea5558803721fdefd831170a61f13
describe
'36869' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
6d1055233bf10e2b97cb58305dc2099d
d453790cde00bf01f99775bba0514b016f86f0b4
'2011-12-29T21:24:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
91dc25fccb9516d91acabc21c30b109a
98882d30b4f1aaa6f0eaffb279ba09b36033925c
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
a4ff3910b554c5412bfc508e35e89196
7240d115e5e7b82272f974da56f0b420ea638d04
describe
Invalid character
'9285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
8b3e04e6bfe8f72aa7bf007c81ad8e4d
a9aafae9f4e25c9ea11abd9805939df1331f7c3f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
d6dffe029879d45e125c99c28d402599
16e417c43433444ff3e129770822f3518ff8e6b7
'2011-12-29T21:28:49-05:00'
describe
'119551' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
27310e46c9e5fda6c79b7bd10dae1b37
a10cf17c3e6f89a9198f048c5fe02bbc7a844711
describe
'34409' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
39833a0c10340ddef84d8eeca1936c2b
c062880eab4eb946d5b9f6edcbdd7c8f179de65a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
3db75203378f8c3449058dae5b5c5125
24abed6bc0b7e6cfb6419bb84019cff9f14016b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
85011f95bbff1db585c32c608f2bb83f
1fc47bf8472afa714885d8003bc05b4cbd7b6bf7
'2011-12-29T21:24:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
6a2303dc409510ea3445d2e1b467d76d
915291903c860eb0124e71d0c45bc2069dc5dbfa
describe
Invalid character
'9024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
a644fe024cb4c0da2a1f5b2498d2d2ec
5a4489b7ce10e3d5e46f22cba2587011a727b09b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
4556d6e34e0fd5d53a027fe128c6f2db
d337a4887b1b5745b63a1bf9ee453feae906909b
describe
'122318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBGZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
4c7cec1d0747920b40583adfb6b833bb
3080a78a4b1ae0e3a9d612e58bdcb7e7242475f8
describe
'34983' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2f5ff1854cf794e528869d91550a28f1
6e673edb8ff7cb4fc066a4f5bed223b69d5930c0
describe
'37808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
074e60b85a7d121e502ccd4060280263
38fda08d77db6682c98c4d9f16a3357c9fa892d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
f302d51db2033feaee65c743569e874b
26e5b3a7f5feb123cdb7873528a7d18cd9d67626
'2011-12-29T21:26:53-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHD' 'sip-files00144.txt'
a3ffa9d8b0c200373e8c784c1e526422
ab913883284ee9c9c9eca1a420ec16bc86ff0265
describe
'9379' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
a26630939931a2c057b2d9984511ae1c
9833273ea6bc1e404ff8a526c15c1301fabacc61
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
3ba1a9b3b54ea690df7a31a7e613aba2
87707ea5ef8713b30db2af28a44ec13ea1f2aa2e
describe
'120478' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
679850ee04ae057f81d9972ec99f0848
1525a159febb2d6d226ea52fd335d161fa1e0a63
describe
'34784' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHH' 'sip-files00145.pro'
547f11816946b63afc664b9c079d8084
2ba8f178e12c7942f917bfb703074bd9b030e441
describe
'37459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHI' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
59194f888d76ba9104fb05e7d5d144e2
eb965cce0732b39a0e072e6b9f254317df739095
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
008a9f6e72e1bb37662689bcda807acd
d036435cda981e538aa9a267b1f5b9d6bbcad6b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHK' 'sip-files00145.txt'
a4788cb6f3bc71f4745690f84292f710
2d298142715f9d74b7b4e6136c3357acbfb8e065
describe
'8999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHL' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
9ac89411b7277091ddffd43b575971ad
1dd976502cd13bf2927d8a5723acd4d2d77f4c4e
'2011-12-29T21:31:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
60e0e64a5f920578ab118ac69f0ab44e
ddd582df11eb05738935fcb2db39d7140dbf2a53
describe
'123739' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHN' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
18819c65434d8f3408768bdea7fd59b7
169e30c8e0f0257ac5e95f3c7dbbd234096f4393
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
a3079e7d28c6ddf23fc2a59d8fa52aaa
9565e73d6ba4251e6e4e27815849c82b1dd962ff
describe
'38998' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHP' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
c559f20e64ac37552f6fdf49f187e66b
3edc90113760e87c52066913dc3d4c66d28ee20b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHQ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
673447f64e68bbec7bf1b3c58e7dcb58
ba52811725bb4c33b190c66a1bb25ef7f238933d
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHR' 'sip-files00146.txt'
d0c342d030fa3fbe11e157af3759ef52
d6b3358bb6e167095a37862cc5111e1b8772af29
describe
'9551' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
39bf247656eb646ec0495306504c6238
0a2ab46ad5a29f3244f8ac113284101c3210fdd5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHT' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5192b0f6419e8dddbb7442b35cdc594d
36970230b7800c7ab5063afb61c907eb677dfa6e
describe
'120077' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHU' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
a2a497e53c8d25a96a2d69670e35b16a
5e976855a5dc067591113e39b4abe294f1b10ea2
describe
'34325' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHV' 'sip-files00147.pro'
c608b4dbd911fbb02071e2cf3201c652
55d06b7893c93dd8597f03f1dacac252e3ada649
describe
'37480' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHW' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
748d345c55c84e7c2eb3f93e9500920d
5fb5e2133b3b4843a514331eb8dd301f56d79b23
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHX' 'sip-files00147.tif'
8348e94a45a0b0bf0cdf236c77669341
e9ea333324e81899096d7d3fd6d857b46c1e4555
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
3677e0f93360bed9ed7a862e055ac3c6
6719b1d747c5f50e557411f57f6d507ac12f1633
describe
Invalid character
'9148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBHZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
aaa46f583f694d763bb8b6beaf77d7c3
33712bb4948155fb0e6adcfb91a491dd391ec6a1
describe
'342688' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIA' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
cf6ebebe0ff2bf789d84f5c5f281cc4f
eb4a1a2761a83ec68d92a1c3a30386935f71fcba
describe
'118411' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIB' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a4c37b384361a3223c65aa8ade7090a6
df2fd3ab24f933cecac99419b309454b89dd1b90
'2011-12-29T21:29:55-05:00'
describe
'35014' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIC' 'sip-files00148.pro'
ad8cb0920551f1a704791f1800faabef
7a8a91442eb8e392bda17387318aaea93423595d
describe
'37078' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBID' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
568d2a820ab21f1cc471c1936f811b51
35a9f305b0f07c831baaf9b611e6ad3366af700f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIE' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c17fba655c564234ace2e2139f34ed19
a1b3a6e7da360a4f5391b50ae0fe53d895ddc200
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIF' 'sip-files00148.txt'
2b9724abbff325e51c7174211dac02bc
6dd675507ef89ab8b8ac4db22c1894ff69e73157
describe
Invalid character
'9452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
a15fea9bbc9ab833e206011f5db5a378
d2b06ada2c2918ad3c516bbff3e0ab715d5c51c6
'2011-12-29T21:25:49-05:00'
describe
'342766' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIH' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
e0da22273acc2cece4b4527f684db363
5511503327c7e64df22a2066901fb8158ddb88d0
describe
'59110' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBII' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
42f763aacb0cb2da2daec684cec2a659
99d75c7d55758524b5c7e9270781772a65133c47
describe
'13699' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
922a5c13268346aae9dc43c93e66b647
d7b767b43a933b0bafa9a3c3949c98e7eb81be40
'2011-12-29T21:27:53-05:00'
describe
'17338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIK' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
0a59af561772649a443f3097cb658c5d
022d2cd21e8b042983b1fca06e727061153bac8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
50225e8a9014c7d2095ae5e62435aafe
51fda10d9dd44bcc7534d321199916060c01ac9e
'2011-12-29T21:29:26-05:00'
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIM' 'sip-files00149.txt'
18ee6f09daead77abd557115041ab160
26ff3935533e813fed22531d9903a6e0ec29fc7e
describe
'4759' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIN' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
57750a1588ba9f36c187065e976b2a0d
f1c955e3f2998e042844db42da546454066b3509
describe
'342712' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
9bf3ea8af2d6484b382ae31db6f676e7
e99b92774a020a4ce7687e2f3c2e7f6e2e3d3237
describe
'93074' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIP' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
680196f6b5a32c6eac1a0d0cd6d59e03
60830a380a7adc513fdda80ff1673173df9b3db6
describe
'25397' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIQ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
7371e3ec022415ac6ecca28de4b5c597
06d41b54b6657e76ce55fa437db70818dacf6ec6
describe
'27999' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIR' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
1adbde60a7675e21de6ef449a4f28219
7048f4a5f5885770f2b877fc6ed6df22219ea2ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIS' 'sip-files00150.tif'
12f27dab4aff995603b105078c31c877
2130539c19f070c6ad874a849d60ab27417ce711
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIT' 'sip-files00150.txt'
0d7d6bced2c05dbe6e6dd442e82ada46
d11dc34056f1fcbdcbcdf9399ce1a0bb9832c94e
describe
'6750' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIU' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
ce4850fa5aa6d5e2111bade709a8fa86
947bf4903e4cfdcb5f102e4aa551b06c15a003fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIV' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
b321a6bdcb7896d2499d3871c756f4cd
df2b5be40d6d6378632769c6251aed2c69347204
describe
'118183' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIW' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
e6842b16293f9135dfe2963cbd0cc9b5
c7f93e54c61cf963861cc220bf4d3cc7a13fe1eb
'2011-12-29T21:29:06-05:00'
describe
'34320' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIX' 'sip-files00151.pro'
5fcc5c1acfca55bfd0d75d2540f02c27
763a8658e8dd9fad62ffe0d16948d9a9ead22d70
describe
'36991' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIY' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
65526a51dd05556c43c5b319f04c50f4
4177dd5ea642d1b73def354508dc45b3e1a09a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBIZ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
942e4b944edd78c0bcb136b3a4ce4f99
0bae89093826abb7955b493fdc1c6dde1b81e5a9
'2011-12-29T21:28:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
bb8c6af1b292bf97ca1ff5a8d545f93d
dab03924c9ce606b9b84718d3ee11bbab5d92699
'2011-12-29T21:23:21-05:00'
describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJB' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
53359facf08546b44dec75cb6fad5501
6d5f323a114c38979291cc25fff1b56ec6afbd4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJC' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
365a90e0ad0999c425dab5599484ad80
c78e9de7d7e85da96eb0cb9eeecc575089257cd2
describe
'113727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
90dcc5b0cca4c183682b680ceb1281f2
5c22fb4f27da7ced1fa96dbf56c4a3d96decc7b0
describe
'33508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJE' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d119e5bb42214382e176678f745e55ff
a0a3cf1da951bd244a1e54e2cad75e41f8f228fc
describe
'35921' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJF' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
f03d4390a4e51537d3655337eea6ecb1
f4f1262d9cd69cd92e66752434771bc074f86dc3
'2011-12-29T21:27:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
983e61d89a8c0727489267350d3f12e9
2c7c928b136063e654a69e71095d2f789852663e
'2011-12-29T21:25:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
33e0a6f8d6795b5e0379bb57309b6ed5
e355be249d6a364b9ae639a908dffea3cd2c2bc0
describe
'8870' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
892cb3695abf08b98768a6c36ddf041a
287982adb8c88122535f5d17f8abaf6c0b99ffc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJJ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
46bd35d6e94c8be92619729c84721a14
bc6c65a384f0753c92647cc2104bd0685d771278
describe
'119847' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
497b15ecf68b53f89ccdc868ae3c5cf7
ce01bff7fb167288bf396dc2b0d8186711971536
describe
'35628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJL' 'sip-files00153.pro'
16490cf2fc7d33933269f2a89864774f
96454fc13e6c7c66ad0ff4c1924ffdeb3049cf56
describe
'37575' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
2186aaf348a43b9e0625c7da5ea8c2d3
bc2e5ebb017cad12b6d50373383ca46c2a841321
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
2ede71051fecac1ac75126293fccb16c
753c6b47b625d38f053b545cfca158fd8acef645
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
12e9f794c5952a13ddb1891816562b4b
63c71f96db9dc841f6001a3b7e4dd681892ae454
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
b9246dce3e8df583039b12e175671930
610d2b55bc9174a70394643b724ca09a8509aae7
'2011-12-29T21:27:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9f5b6c40f74141a58a2b07c24c4635d6
0db787e990d9b64328e8d6c24b414b924e243b67
describe
'115061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJR' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
84ca12bf071613d69d62d88ed56ab991
84924dc008466d3a2473d28d42600c6bed6ab08e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJS' 'sip-files00154.pro'
0252535e238505325cff9a96525d8a60
f04c4fd363d7ea4272863004c4b605832efbc413
describe
'35930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJT' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
1a4981a1490349b65be26d4d80db23d3
dde4486fbc4d978825c30feb2f34a88ea68bd3d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJU' 'sip-files00154.tif'
4b1bd66d04a9e083332c03a08e54dbee
b05ff42f26dbd45af29f19d26842e3bbb3ff566c
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
2bc20dbba537eb465abb0ef2bdf74309
1a2a4be9729caabc039226d88046a9ef7b11d90f
describe
Invalid character
'8731' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJW' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
7b03a1c0c254041230700c14c318d04c
d0b6d7796c5624b4d05f0d6fe35cfe6cde157f5f
describe
'342703' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJX' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
cb573d08ff303a53a5da5dc530027614
60fea249321d002afae6a57a01c96b5f8ef39a03
describe
'123244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJY' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
b07c7ce29de0627f760396007c574582
1d2b289606e552cab2b5510d458c97b14cdceab5
describe
'35638' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBJZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
69eeefb37a03af144a5d9adef3985307
efa256c08abb9f1dbe5faaa3514ac95a43551139
describe
'38482' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKA' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
3c94bf504b8e85c062782f276d621b0c
c8ce821bbbf6f4aeecade4add83180ff22f30f2c
'2011-12-29T21:28:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKB' 'sip-files00155.tif'
c46db0812eb384aef04c18fd9a1dcaf0
1b6ea3e25beb8029c196e2b30b6d9bba0d778e26
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKC' 'sip-files00155.txt'
7b1f381528c2b943f4c5abab6c6195dd
7fbd594b198ce8f8716381ea6a7d7ec402459ff6
describe
Invalid character
'9182' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKD' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
d3a5a712712a5eca7969673d5bd0eab2
b4a84b02bfd0ba5fb1f1a477c9174bca8a55513b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKE' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
c917f60423377418f371852753568da5
ff28173a690e971427ccb00f38287cb3890793fb
describe
'121431' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
9b49eb948b1d3cc4dcfd869f8a34d3a5
54facac525c6c1004fea22c11c18f2ff9b445416
'2011-12-29T21:26:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKG' 'sip-files00156.pro'
74d77f623ba66fd2296ff96a69e25c17
98173d3e68776a9d75f9e202ed33392eed61ce91
describe
'38321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKH' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2184e2b0c55677e31e30f480525ede32
d0a7ba4a5450c1e9749c32a6d10ee937cd10a09e
'2011-12-29T21:30:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKI' 'sip-files00156.tif'
db8c71076857cb66ede6b96b626504d3
486672531a0ad5d328a16ac9afa83ac6f7f5b9e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKJ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
2b5786174fac6a588bfcf4810ee0a10e
354b2097a54aad65e73a744c4821dae118c53f7e
describe
Invalid character
'9350' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
5e6d2c4a5dcb49c844c464d162d69afc
f94be966c1428cf20fa68df281beddbe46c2bb06
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
fb5a198d2a19dadf357c30a229d1bb3a
37b7d9095dcfe78f4d39fea11c9be814c86b719e
describe
'122952' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
87da6935b93ab2d523c85fb2f406d397
7d2b99ae94394251c45492a4b54f0b5c8aee6daf
describe
'33958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
6c2796e1f900d2a1dc67935f0fb112bc
470bbef57b7f69052027fee91e792b4babe855c1
describe
'37940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
8f22e3a65fb88f54d309e271af253ae9
a5cc04b60c8a1a64c81c23afe64268ceca6989d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKP' 'sip-files00157.tif'
9c7535b4d86ce147c1ce0e79c7471464
11630a520a13cde310b9e68538dd1a62dc9e9f4b
'2011-12-29T21:22:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
8e047476d7dc1ca85930fc609078c9c5
ab9953f466f9584282a1729cbed3227e10f55c2c
describe
'9290' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKR' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8e5ddf252bcc7c99657ebf082a9e87e8
cc3d5772337eece8909bb65a4e32a3bb08a3e903
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b0b5bc4a206ccf86d48ffc0e0ebe6b75
b2195e071d9156a2dfa0dc036adbc54d197b42c8
describe
'133858' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKT' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
06a7731ae2dc3a64f3460b7ac38310b3
c08dffea92205a49e1f11c7c52d0abd20632a145
describe
'33803' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
9b7ef17fc441aa2794a45a74c18e0526
d52aca8281da5319f0ffd07760869c52d40a20ad
describe
'40754' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
1e717063982a59eb6581a18b3d007922
1ef26dfba599321c79eff19a259d4b9068aafd09
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKW' 'sip-files00158.tif'
675e868510b214933dc39a24c3687e49
2fe3958b2e74a8ecb6790eb9f492e0a88efc6274
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKX' 'sip-files00158.txt'
6061b6240044da997c013890036f224d
8ccbfeed19b270c2d6054be3ac9e96e1ec1fbd98
describe
'10658' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKY' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
e8694d4e6fc80fd4e68e028a78583ce8
32b3379be4fbcf986e2fe31be9d31cf74e9ba91b
describe
'342679' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBKZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
3db33029d1de33dcdd4a67e91f37a887
0fcca6da77eac345f9defaf155f8fe2c8bcb8a9c
'2011-12-29T21:31:04-05:00'
describe
'171931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLA' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
b5c2b302bbef81ae25fc77a52e176a42
1461b35ea0bdf3f780bb1400ada49a77d384f33f
describe
'545' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLB' 'sip-files00159.pro'
59096315041d4921adc1bbf0175a9a1d
0e34ce0478c538fc407f3eef555a467455230b0a
describe
'35821' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLC' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
9a75cd257b8e18f710e0bc16c7c061b7
47cbbff250941609523596aa3b458730257bc989
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLD' 'sip-files00159.tif'
ff783ae63f98fa56a3b7447cea3a20f5
b4fe705e8507caca00ed6f8cfa0ff3e615c0fa8b
describe
'11' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLE' 'sip-files00159.txt'
6578613ebd33e8d5cfa342e6840622ad
baf058ba326882fdfea3e9299e03f67c63fe6487
describe
'9136' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLF' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
ef59cb4e6b4b6ee8d405d58c23889ae8
101f6e84b8b27f92147810c3db563cf8ca6047c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
055fcb2b82f58e685327c1d80a7bcdfc
d208f38027e541fa6f0bd972ae03eaa5f9976ff5
describe
'15998' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
dac3b0ce2b9149c24f631ed61173aed3
1e4cbe49b10eaa7fcaa190fa783919322a07c7ea
describe
'3166' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLI' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
2b84cd24642b4675ec22a299c32f4e96
8a1ef761ca31a1f83db0786aa89c4958e7955364
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLJ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
7c1d9d23f8b47c6a567982a423646c7d
6f78effa3c81529951229497eab1209630829718
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLK' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
22f8873a225356f5711ab155011d3bb3
5d6d4e8f08ccc3e44e45668a40a3e11229805e03
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
54b52c53e046789a23fdcc5a779860cb
a8cd79c9ffa3615e8913ef66304ba45e54f9cea2
describe
'101134' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
d471125d5989ed93469d2f9c0c46561f
c9edfe0730a0244879d6d471f795bf06cfd8a602
describe
'27425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLN' 'sip-files00161.pro'
0c426ddddd6591612964611b02ddb2b2
37f5dacbc98f724ab7a3e2314c8c49c9d4f13b59
describe
'30831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
8ed1dbf4026e22b2a4fbdc9c915e1440
c11aa00aaccd3ba566d81912f99985c06c0af5d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
1d151a6f761c1fb7d2d5e9da2560277b
c87c2b4552ad9cc6727d972232efb344b109e1b8
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4dcbe3025e2e825d5c24e3fb54f89032
7d43a51737648b8a066fb7b8571669253a8a7a51
describe
Invalid character
'7526' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLR' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
a8a87de7b2df329570273114c0b82e4e
8666418c6e15524cd53e68768f8fbc76ce81d070
'2011-12-29T21:30:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLS' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
728d3b7929147aa46e4a35827b409acb
b40e6117878711ec4b316280ec4110a83bd1667c
describe
'92726' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLT' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
8d218b15b933810708304a5a80b54684
ccd033bcc2a4f5a828c7d5421330895c7e70a3c8
'2011-12-29T21:29:49-05:00'
describe
'25512' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
7dbc706073c4452d596cde9541bbee28
7b6c4277feed9729e930c0b889fbf3796d3caa8d
describe
'28789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
4eefb1196e3da1f830911c6aedc9efe4
813498ec3de567af8cc2485014fb0f61f2f9a6cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
92942166f1165816cd0aea6abc6fc2b0
96fd081403b0419288f2dddcfbbce9b0f7d4bc5c
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
6c6e3a540b2af1fff23990a980a83182
561f073f4fdce1cd3a54823f93a45c5bdac7ad8f
describe
'7349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
d2ff47ea31fac6e5a27646617b2c82d8
892a098449f225d31d896592feec9b6dd6db2043
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBLZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
45afcb2412be3e423109fd28a413763f
a4e0c87a2966983df25a57ec77319116bc81b148
'2011-12-29T21:27:13-05:00'
describe
'109523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
e4b4e2d7bf743ae79297022077c5eced
6f2a11572c411e5fb0cf0de7b31540d808b95349
describe
'31389' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
331af0c67a4c4703c66d02285b0fcc7e
91d655824902f2f15d4cbaa836587055837980e4
describe
'34795' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMC' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
9671dcf69896744dc7a9b2f9585f4a1a
ddd689a50ec567bbc645a6f41410d269ba861593
'2011-12-29T21:26:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMD' 'sip-files00163.tif'
a1e66e56fa10b57fccea7a5adb02d264
5a94fd6e4d925d0a5e86b1e36ba58667ad29c571
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBME' 'sip-files00163.txt'
933123cee175463c65971d48683739c0
613126ded572d36e8771287275faa75346283905
'2011-12-29T21:25:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
6bbfbebebab3d019409c353178dea2f8
ce33b967559add1bafff415ca8b2f83b7f1ff11c
describe
'342726' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMG' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
04df881536e5f07b27a1d1262cb050a5
5a43225e63ad1acd5fd79edf58920869f8edaa04
describe
'114306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMH' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8068745a2419d148c3788457becd92a1
7e9751cf60183df54d8de7880473fefe12c742cf
describe
'33292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMI' 'sip-files00164.pro'
634c332f9de935192b8ca32c669b8978
84af2a501c6e165e7b56b98fe72c77fe7656014d
describe
'34490' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
d1f9d29c7fb32d14570ef4f16697b705
cbb1b47ea8beffec45200498ab998026bc2d0d3f
'2011-12-29T21:23:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMK' 'sip-files00164.tif'
0a1b027f4729dbf4be1c01805fcaa0e9
3ec107628512a19b7f409e6e20be7d959799d857
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBML' 'sip-files00164.txt'
336123ed5d0abfab9186844b24dcbb13
1598c4b40e0ee211e3f3b06764f041ac84cb4ba5
'2011-12-29T21:27:30-05:00'
describe
'8848' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
99bcb572348474b0145bcf2d7658b616
06dca7194302d0b92b1bbefb5e0be36dcdb1d481
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
b321d5a850319891e19812da7155185c
04d5ee2925e0d069d8c0a1aa3093d13737aec2ed
describe
'115508' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
3a17c7972f32d6e59fc045b0d0601ae2
9a19f16fea1882de92d0bf4b516a422e696b861d
describe
'33146' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMP' 'sip-files00165.pro'
9a331677bee929ec3d935f249b83fd39
0218664e11b19b3e5883453d5816936887e03179
describe
'35937' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
ecb85484accc1f1b3449effd7122b483
91da2a2d9d6f82a505d9fd3861c896032412834b
'2011-12-29T21:28:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMR' 'sip-files00165.tif'
a16bd305a6c4468ce4a4bb7efa9ef3ec
17142e225e6104eaa830df37d38a1bff92274c8e
'2011-12-29T21:24:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
05cac0b52f6fe51fad63c8a441712de0
428ce29a16e5e064ea2d3505ed4ad203b4010a1b
describe
Invalid character
'8867' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMT' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
88f8221e7bbe25471b901f8b9aec8708
26add549a86180616164aad037de481cd9f9348a
'2011-12-29T21:24:58-05:00'
describe
'342695' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
c15486f635ad131a5f6f4eda1bbe15e8
56d750efaee2bd83b998c3642d3cb2b11063cc16
describe
'111100' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
396737e2d4088c62c9ad8d3ebb7a5dc5
2c9f9a3c818e7b618b477ed5a88f471b53bb234a
describe
'32830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMW' 'sip-files00166.pro'
a1f7bd50dd3a8f10f506c8e278ce7a9c
3c605ec105c620f03a18ab637153f581e93edc24
describe
'35942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMX' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
a7d4bac357a5daf46ab152670d865bc9
7cf260b2b00d6152d185210daf7a569d90cc267b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMY' 'sip-files00166.tif'
66d2e148973914b31a264774978de8ce
dfef37105f5bb34ce5cdc4d77ef3b3cca17b1e8c
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBMZ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
70403c855cbb136605fb3408e8b68f7f
c07a9d5fb5f97c27da74c1eb510478e5ec898c2a
describe
Invalid character
'9081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNA' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
513d13d5706578fa4e51f92885efdeff
3c9c7ce989d0e9afc5f90810324d7f6b21a5564b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b1c2e59fe86d637ecf450d589ffffb9b
18934a76767e9376b4be57ad8441b638af76a2b2
describe
'110930' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNC' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
0d41a58db62ab6302c8b773079ddab79
11cbc0652692a060f6647a46862d6591692bed25
describe
'32095' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBND' 'sip-files00167.pro'
9b6fd0f9cbd0b6493d6847b2e54c2005
8376ba72a119d305f96ad1dc8af6f80542579e07
describe
'35048' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNE' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
964e7bb48d8df2763317c185b5ee93dd
c007023932fffb57608a81a6db01592fc80f1e58
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNF' 'sip-files00167.tif'
dfb47906b220a4aadb081500d5757384
6e89c7cfe00cca3be73bab78c8d5abd5e3d7566c
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNG' 'sip-files00167.txt'
08f57d89a52c8e50034b372ea90ca5fb
7bea55c2d031b8e428b257fe75a807e042cb0324
describe
Invalid character
'8910' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
c39af5229dde7ad6a923fe025cdc5eaa
c2503cb2b98ceaca708338b121950440629a77a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNI' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b25a8e00464a14c42009680f14561448
33e3c0a2c9a6f4f0112db637e8b2ecca8885ff33
describe
'115818' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNJ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
ee72d56caa94fcee969a38037c4061c0
9ae58792afdfe3f6bd2d5e0b8e3fae0df20d836a
describe
'32759' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
f87c98cd99ad54e7d5128c70aee4ead0
a4d8f80a11131e9917918b4147a5326dedef8031
describe
'35575' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNL' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
4ca80b3a29de4939ce20eff1cc1cb52a
3a967510d21155e72aecd228db52224e0b82639b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNM' 'sip-files00168.tif'
7a79266d583f57f72bd842a1da7bce53
33521a76053817d7cebcc4cc758dfba25b3cce9e
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNN' 'sip-files00168.txt'
793acc2288022474ab65e4001bc77326
dafba696d82ee5f8170289ace94a4b8137f4537a
describe
Invalid character
'9012' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNO' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
6eb8ef130ae1abd72ac994c016013362
16233a2e74e74e0df367e5186e3e537a7aa679b4
describe
'342587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
46be534cdff50cfeba37afed611d92ca
1e0893167e17441398a507859319fe3c40722aa7
describe
'116292' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
207d4876a0aafe3ae0634b025cbe75ec
393e1688d9163db2f6dbd5468ce216fbd8a4f3a6
describe
'31710' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNR' 'sip-files00169.pro'
3e9b01ae94f0f29e0a6b100867aa1d77
a1429bfb8a774d522d1b018c585ac61aae886626
describe
'36177' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
61da43f01bc0a61b50c4c9bf256ffc6f
e2d56f230a6b2bc3aa54badaf1ab0e15416460c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNT' 'sip-files00169.tif'
ae77594b38482c1fc6170fa8e0ceb0a7
290ac448d4e24ff4c95c31dc62c35dc23686b2f6
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
17f02bda1ec7310f3a02efed8fd10966
b2b150a5c3c6f2ec92d6bd33d9fd718e00ba1554
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
d86ad1355bc1630dfe8884a17b438770
663d8587bd96070d395a253bedb31b8b0de1843f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNW' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
f8ba94a2feb0aaa60b2af5e2a4482a2d
1d9d97708421bb279c2c626e3458d6e3a8de75fd
'2011-12-29T21:22:05-05:00'
describe
'112197' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
828c867715fbdd76e07c0f7cc69ddefb
9c1e87273964510d756bd1831428da6cc643b1fc
describe
'31959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
d0102bfd78e72c3ccdf29e87a89c006b
bf464d4064091742485c3b7ab58576ccf105ee26
describe
'35697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBNZ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
6d0870cb0ba945f31e1a7b4686e68a26
af71df84e94f71a99f1245e3f177c8d44b0abaff
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOA' 'sip-files00170.tif'
3e8c279a2590acd460bde00556e11c31
6476e45d24123803fb0e89c6e571115bcbf02374
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOB' 'sip-files00170.txt'
5503d9c55cd9708cf545ad850b7c9d73
d3dd4caeb51e876090df18338882d86aa2b9b5c6
describe
'8822' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOC' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
5660747d93dbcd122e8ce34ce3777c34
3b86219b4ff12394818a2316336cf18c2c46f489
describe
'342697' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOD' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
2352b0657d2f60a88fe350c6bcd703cb
e1fea7aaba1278c811326e8466a55f54d9315614
describe
'112038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOE' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
715bad49504b074dc9d22691e344547b
67d715b5f84971bba61fc8e31329aadb79783684
describe
'31075' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
e419bf3f0ee58e0179a2699c8b7227bd
da271414057d3f173e0a9e3f3c543cf078c2998a
describe
'35752' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
055ff9b83e949198b55df2be85437e44
ec758fe3599339baa962f9292c529dc4a21b6390
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOH' 'sip-files00171.tif'
7ef5c2d8874ac1d6c3c567f1e29fa435
ef90acd01ccb9a48e3104af9ef72b8b3db8dc363
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
d2e93f60166fef82f564fd4852c11028
3890933e5e158a4be217edcf6121de090138e37f
describe
Invalid character
'8738' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOJ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
77ac302fd78c3a6692629487a4b19cf8
89e01bebeffa5f0929de0e132afc4bfa8b0af304
'2011-12-29T21:28:54-05:00'
describe
'342704' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOK' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
33679a7c08bbb1bc2e0b053e4eacf114
730d15dd49b31b594b6c1c97d8f95dc0b05955cb
describe
'96783' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
aed0e9ff879040a703f4e459001afe48
f1f76f544c0ccadf1f59e8366dbf14e080793b69
describe
'26438' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOM' 'sip-files00172.pro'
7b8e315a66117b1883d56f9712093518
c78953bf859f95348019896f550890682178205c
describe
'28898' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBON' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
6aa7ce86ae8c672e49a431f26cc08398
49f4cbfc1c4e855e623000b945b2e6dd55cf3f7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
61cf88848262e3e74d2773a4d0cf49b0
9c93c96c9e69f67e645b7255e9b3cb0253cbe553
'2011-12-29T21:31:52-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
50b2ab59ae9883eebb04e93c84c19f13
d4d0327c77fe8460cf8229ae46bdf8ed5546af2f
describe
Invalid character
'7280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
1ed7034ad8eb44dad912c473f5522fb3
f42cd53916ce4cfd84a311badc635dd48f3de490
describe
'342701' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOR' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
00ddafbd75bf99561c6d007abb339b3d
cb01857ef80a32859207c216171644d1f846ca33
describe
'122162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
57fcf26b0edda3d852d9bbdab3fce639
87214fe903992e5bec868178d2a01ec41627c342
describe
'35234' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOT' 'sip-files00173.pro'
10a9ab1a645dc18554edde6f88c84fbd
87d9d3f24fdd213395321963f2d3a715a4a0cfbd
describe
'36822' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOU' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
93d6f4df33550546d1da1633cb178f2b
fba12c674519b48281ed98b750d41355ddfe5288
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOV' 'sip-files00173.tif'
5246ec667a76a1905bcd7b7017621970
0e405fb691c361625282689e35b63d54e56c4eab
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
428a6e18b93ca4b3795c04c27528dca9
01a2104b21f27ad1791dc167251f0f20a0f356bc
describe
Invalid character
'9188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOX' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
b3dbf8c1d49db3349515cdae808acb1c
6ba8d9d08f8dd845b303d1a1510f1acd79530973
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
c79214acf0f33d736cc8706b6e6322ce
f41d77cdc5da7a53876acac10251ed4b18daeeb7
describe
'116936' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBOZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
bda929a79d288d763ecabc238441dddb
90c61c397d18644b22b8d15b9e52580f7a5795ca
'2011-12-29T21:30:13-05:00'
describe
'33806' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPA' 'sip-files00174.pro'
ab9ea50b8b724ca73b8c1d3957774735
8a8135d66c11bb25bc14012d9672c82ddbdfa581
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
3132e0b2bfafe956980377b237e4bb37
b865e029e55e64f97a6ac4b87f967755cf99f1cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPC' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ca8d6c32fba632f5daeb90747ae5ef9b
1163eff24da65088e7f230da16bb59f5e9dbb19b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
96440736cbfddc9105202d974515b926
7f38a9953b31a974bc2da5c1e07770493df8e891
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPE' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
cbc2cf5a6dba5399449133ad4c873461
d26b9cc499851840125fc1010dd488b9d8734613
'2011-12-29T21:25:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPF' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
7d7e3061671ff2e90067ae4bf5377a2b
b3aa741f20925f3e65c9198ba8d3b16d8a879d1f
describe
'117673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPG' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
6e4232623f8ea5091dee45e7ef08ef07
e77594b940ad4bdb8ae42442057d7b153d778aa5
describe
'34483' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPH' 'sip-files00175.pro'
5ab635da42e8f5e136ca5936be2d4146
1e9ebc2fe053de669fbd505a181aa87f2f7f82d4
describe
'35790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPI' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
7378e4a0e9215b756331a41718b85aae
7eb386f205301d3849bede5f82ae1fc5553d846d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
780a87ef14a84cde64cb1be8a438f228
579dfc54f3a4254ee20abe4b5dde096722f89fb7
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
1c129777d7768dddadc3714c1977546b
35914a1a4feb6daf3292ae6dcf7f20fec6b8fa56
describe
'8700' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPL' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
a6c48aec4b515545e2562e72d44c0890
5190979af7eee845a8e19035ce739e05d7ef1483
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
3afcab5a9581c328cf5dd3ba772e19ae
1c96929b2db32edef398f3eed4e1e5138c3c6c0e
describe
'117727' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPN' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
270467936d9ca7b3dd588f09f3517358
883f9a00a4aaff92afe7347e740ee4ca2d02f279
describe
'34295' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPO' 'sip-files00176.pro'
cfb1a07a2400f7a0d7ad512509951e42
06de9546d26f77449ca79768ca042ad41955b26a
describe
'35938' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPP' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
b4de7a08fe0c379f67d91cd00ca591d2
2b7ed8cefebc72a6a0b452a56b82717c445350a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPQ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
9c98030a1732da6215f417e4b92d1e9a
c1de54e2a1e3011067cfe6d89b5dcd648bc8af8b
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPR' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ce5ecd05318113903f1d20b8a15dc60e
622dfc9520a71e909ba0b73b92b67d7ee812aa42
describe
'8839' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPS' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
01a5ff48b445153f2cca5a2330e64e3b
ebaac1f3a5dc164a46d40cccf8069a2a97349255
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPT' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
d01133bd7400fb5ad046eb3d59185cc7
59a7ade6547ed90d92c8eb464cf46b185cfc1594
describe
'114158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPU' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
de1f57ec010808d2c358972816716514
99681aa583f42e77a3eee68282cc8d7ce977df7e
describe
'32540' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPV' 'sip-files00177.pro'
fe217d921f61232c65173d57cfe4320a
db58f536838b628e625b20f0bfbecde085de4c47
describe
'34860' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPW' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d22a4a1eb4366e85c45f8cc64d35c9e1
cd17f36b683be95143cf39489c0efd83a5b9ab40
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPX' 'sip-files00177.tif'
615c913d062004fce3b00a6050bd0ca7
32b5e47d4682c9c8c564b517d54ab5852d30c638
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPY' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b45e62fed7d181ba22300883079a63f0
2f8aacee5a6a9845cf3fddb924a3f4657ff3f8f4
describe
'8954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBPZ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
4a719876940e4410c4393a200d3943bd
4b432bf0b26760dcaa5384bb1f815ea9d10002f4
describe
'342649' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
66defcb5352953d4190e5eb3ba4e0874
b1c3cef3c093d539b832791df686adde0d093f51
describe
'108645' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
3de30adc2f965f5cfdd0ea6e65df78a4
9120941b28c904e607378d8c8e05b9ab432c68e8
describe
'31892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQC' 'sip-files00178.pro'
b91ce7d9cc4f611298c8e847511f0ea0
8bab42735800d889e4c7dd3f1a2846b650d4f614
describe
'34007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
4b47e7267fcc76fee71376053c76d954
15e8b99c58c542a7392afe76b20a09a9cc9dbb0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQE' 'sip-files00178.tif'
6a425cae1ec1d6c3df94c81943645272
ce1bd6edbebbc2bc259a39b636a589201a0fde13
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQF' 'sip-files00178.txt'
b9a5b46b0ebd0ac9dfa8224851d59e5d
57074d1216e582caf21af845988fd950983520fe
'2011-12-29T21:26:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8893' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQG' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
af1c386ff7ac2c922a1dc5b6701f3195
a5c8c3729310dd4770dd27338825356047c8b6aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQH' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
998099067e3f1fe81d4d510a368976ed
6bde3aaf948c38d1de1c63a03a793c0bc41955b3
describe
'117242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQI' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
82080e5500bdbf8855ce8862c61ae33b
0803272b312e9113ef03b834f8a0f4bec825727f
describe
'34588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQJ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
d0cd9e181e98021305022e5bd0a9c5a7
378fe8cbd94aa1273910b089600b01d5005038a7
describe
'36331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQK' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
32797bb9334a10fc706a907fae90a711
0f6e6da78cadb49b2f5070e8176ba68b963d3a1a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQL' 'sip-files00179.tif'
0139ac415ca1503f10ec955a56633315
6fff880fb8858414f224e4f18393c440679a61ec
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQM' 'sip-files00179.txt'
e0f6e1e5d8e342c191c395a78b67a054
aea5c19d76f66bf893113033b0b4efeea3f6af49
describe
'9002' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQN' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
60a2e14eecc08d109e30db8cf858a56f
efa379667876f642f9ebe53f0dedc2f7543aafb0
describe
'342626' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQO' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
d0aacd288b07b89d49389eee557cbcde
6f6d378f0ec783d85a76f9875dc358a156725331
describe
'106390' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQP' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
119d5b656afece3081b7f82821fa85e7
da0bcf3f891c19cb5b6210de5a741d0c2633c805
describe
'30814' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQQ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
f0fdea356fe53c1e0d6c9a68fdfae0ae
6ec144991158e5c216a5c625f73fdced64c023a8
describe
'33031' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQR' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
89ffee5ddb1e34fb858a24170c7f3b16
0c36fec50125e2b0dd72ac2a78f79ca0b97c6c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQS' 'sip-files00180.tif'
4fdd0a96c9c2c820ab12165f22a1f6bf
0e267ad53154e2584757486ebd47a7479bfc6bdc
'2011-12-29T21:28:53-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQT' 'sip-files00180.txt'
16b4f6c398ef418a13592d61067bd739
4ecbe1cab38c90e0a1511d79d1fc872f44414205
describe
Invalid character
'8396' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
a7c913e0ea26fc91265c968734ac33fb
fed9f8aa3d9da094a18eb17410a613d93f8e6567
describe
'342517' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQV' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
7354ea4efa996f674e33065d81fd99f8
e420567f98142a62d69f0fffe5c7093600a4f24e
describe
'69481' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQW' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
bd017ee2bd9c3a724e3adaea6b901256
e767880c08ae5d7a3e3335b4ead0ae4dabd5e757
describe
'17156' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQX' 'sip-files00181.pro'
0d927ca57de094ab897ae9a92f7f33f5
049ce3760f3ac1b46dcc372ab4bd61d8a8c38e38
describe
'20300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQY' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
4c1990aea43f2ddffb23112968c83744
abe0f45eeae6d13ae1b1b0326052d3afcc3b03b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBQZ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
c3f18d489333b3e8908911dbe69a13c2
ca8bf5accbe0595c25ebf6c1d5fac4f2f8a004c9
describe
'627' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRA' 'sip-files00181.txt'
cba7684372958b4c47766bbbf489f0ca
1929ecfcfd5514d3e3fe51fd0ca8a04bdee1b6bc
describe
'5227' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRB' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
706f4b35a06bc45f0d7d3870486f16ef
edd663e634e9f41c8128746f2c484c7cb2f3c6e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d78806ffd5fe91d342fdd8090d0fdaee
42fcc1ef444d47fc1039a431a90e1573342a0ec8
describe
'94084' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRD' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
4e8f720b5faa07bb17bdbe0ce22412bd
43600baf7cc488e2141956f89ad19fb52e830993
'2011-12-29T21:31:55-05:00'
describe
'25971' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRE' 'sip-files00182.pro'
552528de8e3870a85464165dbc156b0c
6f371f7cdeba2e3ec6140c82fabe4ed3904df89d
describe
'28957' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRF' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
fad5215778130407f15eccbf31fd01dc
ec1107feb3c40504cf539f50354d73979dff7573
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRG' 'sip-files00182.tif'
48d5618d2315344935040cd428498406
689a3f0511d74173cfb2869d5cad4bf068d1e8a0
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
22777c21338ba45401e776703fb146e1
12d603847238bdc58fe39b05b77d6946d3378b92
describe
Invalid character
'7523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRI' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
a8000b3d7288b1d4f9b8572e54cee7bc
70ea1f470d8f4ee5e81dbda2772cbefd8faf87b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRJ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
c6eeb4a142275d078fb1370c81411a68
b41568bb749de211f9bc87225a12cc2bebc9d2f6
describe
'120470' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRK' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
e25f1a69eba5c87244435c7c1597949c
876f1521a1fb4985d542964f2ec6351c14696528
'2011-12-29T21:29:33-05:00'
describe
'35232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRL' 'sip-files00183.pro'
8d1d93a7b3f5abc8b751a42c04271a94
f9dcaf7900fecef07684974a710dd1f72ccdc464
'2011-12-29T21:28:55-05:00'
describe
'37191' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRM' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
5feb9771d045fec719dd7ef9e657eb25
aa6eb879d9a2d887d977ec56b50c755cc1fb1eaa
'2011-12-29T21:23:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRN' 'sip-files00183.tif'
343da331609eeab80bc04c1ecb71d884
082cfe7d1a60bda71248ec989e8219a05aa6c4f0
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRO' 'sip-files00183.txt'
a989b49ca5a65cba937a2766446a712b
f4b23d3b60a74c97a9fb94908ef37fbaa3e3f834
describe
Invalid character
'9314' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRP' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
2cca72e925d6efb5cc37326aa0905634
e2ba72f5d680b3388cdd39b966352863ada7cfa0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRQ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
b30396ca9256ec938655f230ec1fe274
0d3464d3416d08230048af7ee8e93c719e2c1127
describe
'115894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRR' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
c5898f9a275871d37a8a04c1f050ada1
96602d88e092c7a0b0bda815181442b50cd49916
describe
'33192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRS' 'sip-files00184.pro'
077b80ea93835655102ca548ddced4f3
ceb0a7548e09326c2083a98133be70efa4ccfde7
describe
'35802' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRT' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
3d525545885202d456ba62dea2ac76f6
e2838ed752f445b6bca58d948d9b1b8883b8dea2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRU' 'sip-files00184.tif'
1b95790a6b399b93b096911fdca4f4ab
89479694e291ca15b9eb91f8002254cd7b3a3342
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRV' 'sip-files00184.txt'
6dbf0dc7aa492fbb5d32f9739d07f6f7
2ec3375dfc27eb284b2f9b93ad90e7723d61123e
describe
'9061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRW' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
7c146102462c67a1da403f6ba561b8d7
f665b300ee4113df73967de77e77165a0f9bd8ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRX' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
77c04293194a82fa84757e0e8801ed85
a253c553c9574fd42514a13480e0f94b1443e3f8
describe
'120579' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRY' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
31aa1a77ebd1a1304ba12d1af69d5833
9136fbce2a3aeee08f3a2a128c3cd28510c587f4
describe
'34674' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBRZ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
234720f89a52bfd36222e87d1ad6d5bc
b05818ad6a13f3a60417aad65d66ad74f986fd64
describe
'37181' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSA' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
ceae0378f71676ede4e25617d264eae6
b32bbfedf7b5cbd98633f6cbc68393e581dce1e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSB' 'sip-files00185.tif'
463d03691113e6638e0ced954a7e7a31
455631646dc07a4f666591093ae2bf4bc4d77f77
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSC' 'sip-files00185.txt'
b7e4c2ef50a558ac131488a4598f0f9c
76810801d72f8063ccc354df75c1a8f162c5650b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSD' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
8900dc8659982c5895c37fed750162b2
285e893878b5a18bdc65ad2ab1a2ac778708b743
describe
'342730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSE' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
c329882207db91d7412afd0ed5afac92
a40c342affbd06482a7e03a4476822f48da3ae78
describe
'116694' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSF' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
d11b00b004d926ac9a100a8bc007614e
bc636b8b2cbfaf25236e368a53bec2b0d024282d
describe
'34865' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSG' 'sip-files00186.pro'
44360d742a336765b5d3e72c4aadc6e0
e1bbf2bb55feeb794e600189da4f48b3398ef725
describe
'36332' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSH' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
eb4fad7cc191a21fa1807e2cc21c64db
d5d27a5276b9ef9c19a2e34567095ddae896343d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSI' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f075ed2ee3cb9100adc9c739c9461f3c
fa3924e991bd56d4163ef3a6cf2e48b3b1e46b20
'2011-12-29T21:29:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSJ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
6cf15faa70484fb6e05ed40a89b7b59b
494ce7c1b2db4f87eda0eb162b31b31998cddfa2
describe
Invalid character
'8845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSK' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
ddd7548390f26da2680d053ec053bbf8
1f92f9ba8dbfd1eb0eee6e174ab08999ccad55c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSL' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
9c88cebf6250f0f476b7342164a2d33a
6b03d6d8b3cfc6e915499877cf433c894a685b7f
describe
'117913' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSM' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
25bd1eccdc14a9798c3839ddfbb8aee8
ce984f4e40b19ac6c3179fbffecbd48e0ca63f26
describe
'33939' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSN' 'sip-files00187.pro'
e48ea69ecf9cfcacee5c11219401cd31
6f0b9d28a9379e5ef20d3fe0aa8a12bffadf4e78
describe
'35951' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSO' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
8aeec0afd05c5b3e3bbec209940d28d7
8ec8c73bbbde4d351d283117e0ad5822dd70af28
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSP' 'sip-files00187.tif'
64fe407d53b6a8b2d4f8862760ff1c57
8c13cabb3246eb7726d7979d315362d7fe5d1c8f
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSQ' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f91e4c9112351c9faa5e34e64ec2a076
a4c0838bdb63a986ae5e57837f1f4eed81c7e30a
describe
'9297' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSR' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
0b1484ad11ef9b93c097436a06a94004
665ae67421c37756505eceee1d3e99fefcbbc2ea
describe
'342709' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSS' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
4d4b4d7810f95205b6c6cb58acc62cf8
ff9cedb8b0e3a8aabd334beb882d915e6ea01a74
describe
'125943' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBST' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
32a7cc61837d8118f82dd886b4ec1730
abf54ac159ad210cc2e42e43171e22887b1e0212
describe
'35635' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSU' 'sip-files00188.pro'
157d60aca2a8420b8cd29d4c46691067
aa8d7fdf515f752f820bf06e6422fc9c96dc9b7a
describe
'39108' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSV' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
19f443cd595afdf7849d90a56ef5357e
830a7b82a789ac3473810e52fedf8f8fbaeb92ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
4fd9fd3fbfc9fd95f69ce51cb6129ced
1e4fef7c97f75363c5893c5234db1e7120e4bfc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSX' 'sip-files00188.txt'
dade860e080a22e3713c872151d70dcd
e33915bda3f83700ea3cf333c39edcdd17c6cdd4
describe
'9461' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
251fd551c6de619264d03d1215928efb
7dd4401abefe93a45162f4528ad5fb03c1aff06c
describe
'342678' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBSZ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
7ceb5f109d4497c7ccf8c7b168c67600
1ec2b85c9725ac450f7922c3dd4a787a1824b653
'2011-12-29T21:30:32-05:00'
describe
'126257' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTA' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
2ed7d115cf5892fc1e8171a98ac229c4
1de54f27f3d6cb6ff5db07ed3631fb6afe6c937d
describe
'35418' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTB' 'sip-files00189.pro'
0499696c8788d776c50fcabe10eb959f
317265eea5fffc8ae1e03264ec5f9871b511a54d
describe
'39479' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTC' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
babe59876c87ba8e40dd34da332cb8a0
991b865c543cd3e85cae00d66af7147a3111f180
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTD' 'sip-files00189.tif'
83b97a131524b0f3f55bcb7c47e32146
26e4eec5bf670b44e4f1d4130bb207c68b6ca08d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTE' 'sip-files00189.txt'
87ba8d8c51de9110b12bf6a102679e23
3f05c3d6a3a4a74059bcbfd29fa81d925351c5fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTF' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
7b721784bc04fcb9dc5f84f92cd2cef5
3db67b0f33145522fdd07eebf5c13ec76e2f19e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTG' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
45309153783f0b77b47a182fbb5b4684
f6b24061946ec853e0b80a3e45ac55d918b1ab08
describe
'100790' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTH' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
9328be37698e40484ac7938a259a3557
769257a3a0d8b27149e744719cdc140dd26ad0a7
describe
'27410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTI' 'sip-files00190.pro'
3155dadd97b7161857f6cf596de236aa
a148e5651add01084416080f59aef44fd10bd6b0
describe
'30043' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTJ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
597a0bd01069e6b93a54360acfa78618
72807556cb7590b6075ae06fd2e840e55de38ec6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTK' 'sip-files00190.tif'
28047a2c630c6d8c7a906c42a17c126f
e10134a1b6a9180d56336eed94ec09bf396b641e
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTL' 'sip-files00190.txt'
d15b06b9ade8165b599cac70195d98a6
194cbc072f125704772288ebe7113d695bd5970f
describe
Invalid character
'7541' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTM' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
cde5e3633c8ee50cfb6e661cbc731762
63dfb07de2aa62ad94f66a02ffe95c3a25fd9d8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTN' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
3aacf02831928e240fd8f03aa6b91904
cb51dd8a1eb5054fc3f8f7f5c322f457a07d3e0e
describe
'99538' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTO' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
489836dfd1aad7fdc17045cd4c216c3f
9e673d50bb156dbc18610bb530d636b171dd0f31
describe
'25472' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTP' 'sip-files00191.pro'
3d5b2f05eb5f428ecc9514e2c9d933c2
05282b9a03272f317c160d97675f69e1c4212d0e
describe
'29349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTQ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
b7f7ba0954aea5b67aa4199e80941663
df3151cd9e183ce2406dac0185182e827a4ed686
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTR' 'sip-files00191.tif'
2a3e8c4459819303eca50397fd0955bd
08ceb671f214bc9ab0e3a47a7048c97a5871226a
'2011-12-29T21:26:08-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTS' 'sip-files00191.txt'
04cc1772063b0ce26e71a9fa1725427e
9b75db2a7fa5dcda8015801e37e095f5f1a79e48
describe
Invalid character
'7148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTT' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
157699595b7db09d2a3202e28ad4bf5a
5c62fcc7be163e8f5199e82ac9d30b0fecc3903f
describe
'342735' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTU' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
1cd193a52487b9d1cdf3e3b09e8ca696
a31fe4f87ea025b7cdd8bb8c45036790d8eb7f3c
describe
'122247' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTV' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
045d4c1894930de147e997434d685a16
b2933df380235d061dba46556f445974b7256a82
describe
'34791' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTW' 'sip-files00192.pro'
88e243a603e56943dc15b0c6b8074768
dcd67922e2dbe08343d5558030cb1dd42945e2c8
describe
'37329' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTX' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
6b20d431b58172de95a0d567d6797a69
7607587ad793955b0fbd8340b47a87adb7880df8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTY' 'sip-files00192.tif'
9e52f6e80fe3eefcfa233d18057385e4
fb1e9ce97c753ae36a88ee9533d23c07a5f74344
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBTZ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
1b7a54291c4433d06a15a6fcd2273238
501beff6f36435fd5fd287d62fb26e7be479cef5
describe
'9346' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUA' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
1f42ca324376a62a8ce98f9250ecdf28
ced9bb342fc4c3102c7ecba5a07615a9992cbd23
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUB' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
efd0c7fef97b6d92a757cc3d153077b7
b4ad1dfc1c0f35b32f536db82490bcd87343d50b
describe
'118375' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUC' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
b5ec16c35291f89a5dd48121eea687b7
180d4429d6c654aa9d698978b1dde4e65a7361b5
describe
'33565' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUD' 'sip-files00193.pro'
03b4159d559dfe459b5e6448edbe45c9
a8391194dc55bfc9665a0402208c9931adbd94b9
describe
'36539' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUE' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
ff4049a9b01fbf9350f5e85aefcd5f7c
0c47dc6e9a5c99690e890d99265acc509c1db365
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUF' 'sip-files00193.tif'
aedf5363492a7d6fe403aec4d1965db5
82bfb72d1e1807d767bf11d57c9a971b91414345
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUG' 'sip-files00193.txt'
a2071379e6e4f2624936a7ca0a0e096f
6bbf62642b96593145efa21940975b91d34f72d5
describe
'8905' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUH' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
301daa13d99b6f899adddcd6dc29f5a1
7464fdd730c103229bbef228d4b989d5060046c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUI' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
7ff3633d314cb83db8383ff065d34482
be4c6177f34a5bb35f60846e9626b9ed4af3b345
describe
'112855' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUJ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
dfb26ad35c3b765ff2e342f3060e3513
4851f41b8db26a5ca4cb0ecff1a89bc66e59b789
describe
'32778' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUK' 'sip-files00194.pro'
e553d88d742fb6341d6be964c1595755
68ca374f9b4d3f66e2bd51875acd74f5e1f1a658
describe
'34403' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUL' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
870274008516d965805d2327f03c3cdb
05c0b3b43fe45330db8f53a4a47ebe400ad1b4dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUM' 'sip-files00194.tif'
72d3d84dce124b3641f287203624a073
3a8b2193c87f3dd3fdf36db971314d1dac3a228d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUN' 'sip-files00194.txt'
5dcc65b3aa01e87929d1110dac07f822
238532305d5b8583e4bd62de1af944f034833fbb
describe
'9280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUO' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
eda120251c6ed112434532acfc4a4bc5
d3807fe8ff26f74e121949d3f43fd17751fc13d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUP' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
e1520ce1da16962ef122368daceb3dcb
2a71a3cbae0053b1eb498cd074e91b23ec5b5b7a
describe
'110758' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUQ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
ccdf1a19d842a86837225e54d668acfc
35ae1de536980c12ea6475cd349da8a0e9ac4474
describe
'31631' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUR' 'sip-files00195.pro'
571be81add2e89bb72d1dafd8830dd1b
7bf39f96943ce240046af7f66325fc659f34d6b8
describe
'34399' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUS' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
8f4c83c655d19fcabd41f1a9bf9994cf
2a392cc6e18113dc4221e6e9fce74dc6896123e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUT' 'sip-files00195.tif'
aa979effae505168296c7b45f04a2a9e
4867248a97600d1dcf533d9351467603609e1824
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUU' 'sip-files00195.txt'
f4babc4edbd7adc39d5634da2bed6b55
90f14bac165aa7aa09a4c992862a9bfff783a56d
describe
'9069' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUV' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
2fd2b6f79d52334a9ff268354304dd2f
e0be7fcb8bd436d9523775596c89b341c9b550a6
describe
'342523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUW' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
2a80073832fbcf82c0aa5ac00b51c880
3a4d9b1cc00b4a89c925b66e1bdbb1ab620a73d2
describe
'133167' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUX' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
cd688a4a992bdbd1c14d09f4aa08d25c
31ea1c09fd3b9fca38272230df7f9c97f38c53c0
describe
'33840' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUY' 'sip-files00196.pro'
8859051bee40682311a50b381aab7666
739c6cc38408b0b1091e1bd1f01f73704a6a20ee
describe
'41024' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBUZ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
a7ffdfb1a7b94c757f4e56fcd502adc8
277fa53a5a8133ed7a896762ebc04716279ebd07
'2011-12-29T21:23:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVA' 'sip-files00196.tif'
6e7d05d35d4c06bfc865cbe3ba42c3c1
da3ac715587de1d19b49a05a256fc345b6a047a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVB' 'sip-files00196.txt'
39a9588f98e0953846cf985975557baa
e825ac051bd8805b4091f7314d51ae7d81177c2a
describe
'11028' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
457d571a3b4e75d31b2927be117e8a1b
8049536a60aca9f6fc62a152b492999413795b78
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVD' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
8d319691db23921d47289f5d505f1bb0
126446d858edc05e005e62eef7378064c5831bc9
describe
'79404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVE' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
ea14485cbba0ead10034f9aaff797ddb
64003b16b29f903695e808305e114580b0da799f
describe
'4331' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVF' 'sip-files00197.pro'
95b1c998de7c88ecccdc971c22e5350e
3ff58398f44d1d248d9e07bbaf90eb5215c33b73
describe
'20360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
4cbf801a29d300819b6e4eb5ab1960f1
b78f71685e3cdefc0d9550c1f1fdc9bb2ec465d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVH' 'sip-files00197.tif'
0c513f5caaafbf7abc168a10a5f447b8
fffc02db4c9948f71899981bf429146e193bf7c4
describe
'45' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVI' 'sip-files00197.txt'
c0dadc39a0263679c3a2714accea11ea
c3ac15c0f8acb3ed1eb2047a20cc5ffaef498030
describe
'5516' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVJ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
cbfb8c0260fa6d0b792114d33958d3b9
246229e95847a0d2fc376defddc3702b511ffe35
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVK' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b3c8f9190ae2572a874de777986380ce
9a2679e36deadf8af8d67add687437d379caac3c
describe
'18856' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
60c7e77f0eee277b6e84202a0ed931b4
2a3bc1f6b885019a43938a3384a6a7ca12b50ca9
describe
'3433' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVM' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
41e73e80cf6cc3c3faf58773a8d91d32
e85ddd6a95e5d1ab4669548341dc731f3633f05f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVN' 'sip-files00198.tif'
9903a46f80285ae25dc7bc1707d110a8
9a5fd1ed278e95f88aaf283dd9e25a2a3f9de123
'2011-12-29T21:29:22-05:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVO' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
fbfecc25230d41f117d25c8b3a6b18d1
163a96d9e81b11fb0f6f2e3729d2bf596fa506bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVP' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
86480f9f479ba798be4804e22a34ffe6
7528dd32ab04685a28312058841d546475afc958
describe
'118924' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVQ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
f825b23c8dc2c30374e0603760fbda8e
f83705cf6608127c9b31ad641f37b8726a49fbc6
describe
'34109' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVR' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3dd0ea48de4b20a12a3b4c9a1746b565
de9062ac36eeb943b6ce984003f6dcc65da7490e
describe
'36354' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVS' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
dd9af2a4c9c691ab86c2fae4256bc991
77958f88d6bf3a9051b99d039b0db4c33fe8f9df
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVT' 'sip-files00199.tif'
0064107d27c17aaac21909954e1a91c0
4522f4849bcf3d8e45889f01cd954745f603bd2d
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVU' 'sip-files00199.txt'
e71627811022e38850aafecff8291a94
ca49a5e7123c445641a7e87c2729d7e080c01244
describe
Invalid character
'9070' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVV' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
ab93d48e4d304e043291284a70d1454d
d5b393709d777245cdcd480ba1ae5a418db0fe5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVW' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
a1fa5c2dc839f8c846987f71242cdcd4
f7c9e87f0ad8188c39acfc8f58731655f0a97340
describe
'117683' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVX' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
c94cfd07e650172c6b073b634098a0ca
0814808937bafac2e114d667185360cb69120593
describe
'35370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVY' 'sip-files00200.pro'
1f4b96e982ea4b34bf79d7fab53d503c
99e1eb6fa8f9d862f06a9b212ec599121b9daeb6
describe
'36894' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBVZ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
4f42330f5a321619e23bf1e99ded59c2
7dbac63758babe2967b3445a3bf5a2b92d73f84c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWA' 'sip-files00200.tif'
8e4573903eb8c1054ff2dfa244bb8ab6
896e7cfa2657250de4dbc85183cebfd110295018
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWB' 'sip-files00200.txt'
975eb4b7974be58e36d47a19706f6207
372b4d92bf420e69d0f34efb32b9126b43e5fa6e
'2011-12-29T21:29:00-05:00'
describe
'8887' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWC' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
8c8b381d825e0fa0071ed5976c243f35
b5b8b4dadb93c79372b6243f85f7799d25439a70
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWD' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
5d39ae8a54660fd892cf120ef56fef9d
1e35928bde6454c534c11dcf46e45b35d2116d68
describe
'123729' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWE' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
3ed2d967c330385fd1531d1e78b0d048
4b2de2879ce6c69059023c471a3584eddbec622a
describe
'35296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
4ac01a2dacaebd0db5ec6aae8e66309f
bc3577507cd5a0cf41a19778ab547bb2d625c05d
'2011-12-29T21:27:49-05:00'
describe
'38547' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWG' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
94ba2303ddca980c65b6f5e1bc7258d9
4ab3604cb6ab15e2662ccdea302c75f0858284b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWH' 'sip-files00201.tif'
ba23c13ad7d33c0f18fa1bed865404df
44dfb1d86fca9350911fbeea783cdc3f6945ee84
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWI' 'sip-files00201.txt'
ae6a73d28ac691f16f2bc67f0b66021b
afe587c269f5873cad007f0eb0b0f3f03245bd41
describe
'9368' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWJ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
6c182f038db78c2c9781daf03cdc1ba8
3e5bd22f69b9dfea679acdf086af4a69e8afea5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWK' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
11fbf682ff238327d7408c332a3e6112
72eef118a29b323df3f8945698131f3efa15846f
describe
'81952' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWL' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
cf4b2fcb0bb5ec103baea33c6eba6df2
d321d14956d8233f79809ddfecb5d4c6da1f3d02
describe
'20957' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWM' 'sip-files00202.pro'
48230168409b45a8dbd42dddaa839b3c
0f5ea98df1442f19e445f9a243783d9058aa16eb
describe
'23523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWN' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
e837af09921cdee2386cf2ed8adeea8d
18e67a92fb98ce353e44c027d157f7fdc46b2fb8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWO' 'sip-files00202.tif'
9f7a51417702b18cc4a7945d5806aa2f
408c7ad61dce1f4d7119060d234518134c8ecd83
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWP' 'sip-files00202.txt'
05132450f26a6193bb733db0ace2fccc
dc6ec6111474ba10590cf63c372a8b37410113a4
describe
'5794' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWQ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
c07dbe5dd28a1f1c3863665ef23ebe15
d44705105f177e4e929129648d0020831c0ef145
describe
'342601' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWR' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
bfa08a7545382157741f24705bf3383e
1e18a2291858ff16b50ba8c4a1c533f45057fb3f
describe
'95186' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWS' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
402b76f6f289291cf02ca7f086075f25
06ce02dd632301facf28095a17954359ca0d0660
describe
'24945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWT' 'sip-files00203.pro'
5bcb55e66bdf4663c1e1a9614a1e6b2e
389f7682c1985d36a7c8f0f4d649580c346a937b
describe
'28326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWU' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
6d1ce4cd62c85dcf0752a95edd98d72e
16a81d4c1b93e0bd326cbbeccf078d71305f6196
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWV' 'sip-files00203.tif'
983e63cb2cb43278051b4b635140e195
e6fd4426c00040860c3fdbd200576115eccc1a25
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWW' 'sip-files00203.txt'
be560a4d762123996d053d356de42b9d
e06d282e49cff0944ad5f583935d6c91973e987b
describe
'7187' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWX' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
c3d6abd9a1aac16ef23508137b9f744a
be6d60fb8426a467f536148d7d7f1cd8e4813de6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWY' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
8fdf0476d7e32f3b68fbd483b2f994c4
d585ead8b7fb0ac699e9d3040b228f977d9ae85b
describe
'114455' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBWZ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
e8dbc7cdbbee0d35fd1b157844bb4fe3
93219712283543f6c42fa5856d40c13512f72157
'2011-12-29T21:29:12-05:00'
describe
'33608' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXA' 'sip-files00204.pro'
926e3eba9a49b16700ed3e9203803f0a
5b8483fe9e23061ecf6bac379ef08c51e87b5872
describe
'35460' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXB' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
8dedb9126b9c9c162b504c40af9f05e7
8546b6a4029939c4db58471a1a7883c6126fb230
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXC' 'sip-files00204.tif'
d235f0ccbfe14b9fbf47c59a00cface3
cd67d85729b95930e4a02ecdff98994e160c3ee8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXD' 'sip-files00204.txt'
bb08f22166261a7a8a5b2185beadcaf3
3b37d730e35ec5fe8e4eee556ec7179b13775ed1
describe
Invalid character
'8688' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXE' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
4902e199ec38cad664653b60b7fd1f8f
1b66ac2b7860041d555930a4978d411a82a70931
describe
'342754' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXF' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
b2547763ce26f39ee2a52c6ba5efcf6f
aa78ded3dc78dc49ef05b7ff8f0bd0c713e7533d
describe
'114804' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXG' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
bddead32405ca22cc6f7e2dbbb7c3a40
5496bc14ef63634f2b14005d66f01c79680797d2
describe
'32441' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXH' 'sip-files00205.pro'
a6f6e2c163675e3f8f2c1f06dfd28d9a
4426e1c7f0de25251f63dee6aa9db9ee0aa37d5b
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXI' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
01833476a2aa4d299ca8a35f9cef4bde
7f16dd4988b65d996df4943fb53f042a8358777b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXJ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
1420d6afe420588e0c902c37fb3eca71
a3bb58d9483e02a14366a02e798529dc9e5471b9
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXK' 'sip-files00205.txt'
b5ce000d3371d70b856258178c48b748
41aea02abb72d1cd3b2dc266dea62791dcb388e9
'2011-12-29T21:26:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXL' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
6e7c805729489516960f78ec4c961040
b665c294e76301c4fed775e83603c9639b6c4871
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXM' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
9f2015966ab7b3e4b97466ac823146ab
b1eb74c83ca1ea0afad1d303d154f627107f5154
'2011-12-29T21:29:58-05:00'
describe
'117693' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXN' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
d0fde062133ed970c975a50baeaa5f49
2bf5f90afe0d4a8fa0e20d8c4d2493a8f0d6cffc
describe
'34091' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXO' 'sip-files00206.pro'
9760b7739a4ec28bb14ca189e9edb2b1
be9f8cf5f0521f7c79d55493bc714d74035c4f35
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXP' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
d018e942d18d5fed97eb0f5d040f1142
87a16dfe68d5e673d0bd855e37d0e4cf271b66ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXQ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
397f2a10b6eea02e0d3f0b9ca6b0b697
73cdf159afd5273b95ed444a3f9768d0ee4a479c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXR' 'sip-files00206.txt'
81eda57a3c0cd4b04d80804333749585
1350c3f3b7d927a58141fd6d450dce1ca78f24d0
describe
'9135' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXS' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
fd5a597f695c12ccc7862795a752771c
3e01ba7e3baa2efc89f3d948546ca8fb1d695cff
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXT' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
fb54bd422bb5ffa5cea37bd9d78e38d3
f4e6198cc9178077cbd77b891a443a491dd66014
describe
'116385' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXU' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
be61fc0e0f159309aaf745afc8f05de7
6519ddce698697a13d16f5a6995187b177837941
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXV' 'sip-files00207.pro'
95bd88b98d83a2d4252fef9398a8b30e
56c77ae9e33caaf279982ae2f63e77f0e51b2bb1
describe
'35081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXW' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
fcdc9a88af65838f43044ecdece00b32
c84b86fb8b391cacbe49874f6c28e2d33800075e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXX' 'sip-files00207.tif'
c3c1f3432a4d7148dc97ad7081be733f
702cdb083de64fe576133093354c69cae527792f
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXY' 'sip-files00207.txt'
c50d19bc8a963ef4fdc678879f568778
7891dd882290d822163dadb0615ec8d246d42dc4
describe
'8452' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBXZ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
e9027976710bf8c1ee2b8ccf964db336
9436f1be91c68e5a08e743a15b09754a68c6394e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYA' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
dfe08eacc8e15f4b95b71f6b85a51b85
d60e31d27557d6585ccc36cb74790aee72a9aa3d
describe
'112009' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYB' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
92acc641b32348e2efa2b9224128109a
fde170f91c80d83689bd97971616dc7975e4ad1a
describe
'33414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYC' 'sip-files00208.pro'
6599db8f700c4330b1c702c89c0e85c3
058ae35d5d9a3ba6f271de01f548f8962ea319fe
describe
'35059' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYD' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
9674a35d373f04f6f7feed9538b69a23
316c6838b476d99c927b0ba24be1a23ed85979d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYE' 'sip-files00208.tif'
39b2ca4519638dac652baba2a8d9d3ac
3d1ae530af901327e156c1a99b1d3797119d60a3
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYF' 'sip-files00208.txt'
dad94b9d4baffebd8aeaba240bea9ca8
0fc65e44fde683abd5398b60a634d65cb237948a
describe
Invalid character
'8387' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYG' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
d767e8d4e19606979c5afb0b3920a65a
95f6d606f9fb0d86f955e869a04352d005863401
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYH' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
e1f1e2a279e08d8e55e555a0c7c490aa
061d799b0c9a39131fcf3374b4c1704dbfe66cd0
describe
'115831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYI' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
6aec9fcc2d3a5e63927fa1453fedd81e
e6330235ba83e74b615fc23f091e4c815eaa69e4
describe
'33066' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYJ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
7349717da299382378d4f598843e5a79
a9d675c1fd90a5252da88bc656a4bd72f1d0c465
describe
'36554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYK' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
3ee981257f227c5a15f097620b59872e
c8069fd986001e8b00b0daeabe387619ddfb0c08
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYL' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d0832bc3f3bcb47e47bbf631c74f98ad
99401c4554741c2aa2ee90f3ab2615fd076b0910
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYM' 'sip-files00209.txt'
7f8c1c0a48dba3994a714b7052d5d966
5832906608c77b23813e44aad00f6f08b2762611
describe
'8673' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYN' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
81dce9bad79cd733db56e26dda014b70
49f97f61eec67cd381dd754c54755978172b9163
'2011-12-29T21:24:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYO' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
5724b39d2909746b15dadce3994b8a4e
0bdd7bbcb76b205ece9eb80fa1ef72b9c57d2f15
describe
'114808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYP' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
9e996077884ba9f66f10175cd95a616a
0b951deacc64e4ca3b34d974dc8c936cd5878794
describe
'34016' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYQ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
fefcae432e6f9f5968572a27988d258a
8941e0d209e52a0ae3aaaaa06b7e3b373b75be75
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYR' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
2ae58516b9bd055135bb0a3bd055dee8
7e67fd76f9ca1e58097c3dbf4a6b3525628c30be
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYS' 'sip-files00210.tif'
f959075164db7ffb72e59c000e6403fd
d92efd2da1a88a183364a6c26e10609ac7f09b2e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYT' 'sip-files00210.txt'
265aac4104c5ef21b44d065bec003b7c
422e1c74c576d76432efa6bba1f840a52cbc4457
describe
'9174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYU' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
6d0ac0e70fb044aabf8f19939076c6a1
aa6fae98632e06c09de471ded3be9b5db33b9dc5
describe
'342717' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYV' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
bf92814da5e841a5ca2a09aeb65273f9
a0b9055fc2370c249339e1f7cdfc3c4875a595c6
'2011-12-29T21:31:17-05:00'
describe
'122998' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYW' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b16f1f16de3bf5989eea48e7de4f4e3e
58ddb4eb0423e03d213be73cf74a3eed0f27fe7a
describe
'36078' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYX' 'sip-files00211.pro'
3235c7fde4a01fe657f25c16c7e71cf6
36a523b531249fa7b4e1f5918899085049f21dd0
describe
'37718' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYY' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
ffb301bf3e13a47f27086d3720319e05
06bfd13e892ece7360063b395b3008f203a84028
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBYZ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
5cd3e09b63fcc3dda1550bb739b3d7e7
23bedf365c9ec37d401e639a82e7591d46d2d4a1
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZA' 'sip-files00211.txt'
7eb34ff0f969d5bdd764ed9b3ff228eb
e2ab1570cd76355e2f9470e1c71c47e031d7a706
'2011-12-29T21:30:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZB' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
597afe32da0600baf8b24c9133cd6601
05c6e1e3d7eca11e53a92eff9dd2bc03ff87e85e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZC' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
a585c8146770e72a6ef92dbe1c86f22d
e1b182a3c6dec6c563fed7b72b832e5af06eb9d5
describe
'37736' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZD' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
46edef3720e1c15ee6762b9e62792611
d9ee0c7129effd14d0782529f8185973ab00c36c
describe
'6835' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZE' 'sip-files00212.pro'
ed2517391f9190840c13388d11c51ae1
0bfa602b99f4856f14d653cc75eb1b857e8ee90b
describe
'9945' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZF' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
21df6ae854c5dc3eba005cea31e62a35
ef5c7dff5d234e22ad7c39380c3865f43a4edf8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZG' 'sip-files00212.tif'
34df9ea7a5af23b7cd3cf323a1f046d3
d3516f235f3683d6c98e8a979819588c6d02fe39
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZH' 'sip-files00212.txt'
ae2538787bdba7fd37f440a4a8d02e4e
7de6f6044b87976652b50d8d73d15bc701c241fb
describe
'2604' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZI' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
310151490c819f3d66c25b19b0a8c1c6
24fefe93e84a4a2ec61bca756b301c478972a33c
describe
'342699' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZJ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
ec3d975defb2c9b61b77f929f022eb02
864b2ca720739b0fd286992061f86ff076c8ceec
describe
'98482' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZK' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
93bc3a4d4fc27f3f3dc66ca58b2dbe88
7e329c807b4704058259ab57e3802bee4eccac69
describe
'26583' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZL' 'sip-files00213.pro'
fbc8239ca26fddf6d5771717d04ad46d
994694fd823b725244e1fbc2b6a0a582fcdea02c
describe
'30554' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZM' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
429d89d02ae8e0ae53313cd82a40d2c5
beb800d5ebadef72739e5c8b175032aa439be77f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZN' 'sip-files00213.tif'
f93b49e64f0b5de0ec7b3956465a8928
f30fab90a5e65a85f41c4589adb5d4fbc0e752d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZO' 'sip-files00213.txt'
f3c86b4d95c87249467372dd9b9033e5
bd26b5aa9635d838058c6447a5371cc461ba7dab
describe
'7668' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZP' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
f91058b3795344547a08d35a2e20fd5f
30c33fec02c82bcc91c031451b9a40ecfb928ae2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZQ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
fbe1691375db24c2d7abcd812a7e25c1
1380f3276a25cc62576b4c1fd3431ff10f2e7ce3
describe
'115312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZR' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
e174e38e180b43faa3836ed2c0979216
faa889bad66a908c20a7a5004e8c1402633ad4d7
describe
'33321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZS' 'sip-files00214.pro'
488d03573cd1106307b0dc4214bd8fa1
f8f732e4a5d667057167ef7df8f22ad62676bdc6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZT' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
0427bbeea2d782b70dd256ba436956a3
a4c4486b222f4b39b6e63e236e305f24878ff11e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZU' 'sip-files00214.tif'
3d305021131c2b7e16e06014f3a587fd
3ee90194859133391d0e4b3e43bbe95ed65abe63
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZV' 'sip-files00214.txt'
f0839e1f20f569681339a9314ab53a28
0f845d3557d5f2dea58257b973603e8ee2450a1c
describe
Invalid character
'9181' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZW' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
509362c019476a5e318547e8830385a7
19e3989b7148fb59bec602c8393d38d55a34729e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZX' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
d87c85d225e18c26283249798f8414dd
a41613e32c01fac998b2d3fa1d5f62aaca4b97b6
describe
'122891' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZY' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
09a1ff999ce1ae1c69d819d959e4760e
d20d9fcbbe8763f34ca502c2c6e75ac46542ade8
describe
'34049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACBZZ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
f9024bf7a55134c23dae3fb0d7d22791
5656d18a47baa209e6f04a6070e096e33726be7d
describe
'36799' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAA' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
91cd19accfc0019c08e2def8782d325e
abc26b199b81da78026af082d70e6efc238d3168
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAB' 'sip-files00215.tif'
547df130b15ee8638f89316bfcac18ba
6cca601eb9fe6f43ffabebf797cca2ca456b7284
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAC' 'sip-files00215.txt'
dab4edd8f48a2b8fe5c8ce42c3f035b8
499da3f4f8cda86a8bb38cbd6d9b0e616b503daa
describe
'9440' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAD' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
b65bd939332637388f2aff65052bf876
00c3f658991466138b1d11d66dd817ea99e3df29
describe
'342557' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAE' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
dbcdb63f8a356a2362a0a0d219328a7e
049ca5a08a0f46cfd0a3eeffdf9d75d5ff874ad8
describe
'134349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAF' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
0871be6bc35c84e6bd01c0e88aad0a12
eeb64cac222cf8de3b4b9ed12b21153c5b4d3bb7
describe
'36057' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAG' 'sip-files00216.pro'
8e6f4b55629adb630e7e65cb90eab0fb
be5c21842ae83527ce27c998f7c31d3ee0c5116a
describe
'42722' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAH' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
8bd58135a3fe69d9c695276829f6217d
bc73537257431e6b69bc4dda324d281a5b35ac49
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAI' 'sip-files00216.tif'
208a8eefd67098c5d4d65c9e2db2a61b
7cba82cb3f07fc64d52009cb8ac659547dc02054
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAJ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
4b038e10f4f695806cefc3cdb3a92011
5077043dd68aeb5b6bf8b2fd9776ef60a7d5b58d
'2011-12-29T21:27:44-05:00'
describe
'11164' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAK' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
be1f16acb1450b5f8a0c98d5103c8923
7d89d2f2c8a051d31ec5efa9195f517ec3baca03
'2011-12-29T21:31:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAL' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
228fa206fd0804a71fe33445eeaab4da
0e324d7701906f900d1d3cd3b8606786d68fa648
'2011-12-29T21:27:50-05:00'
describe
'173992' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAM' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
5c1c2a13763deb6a05403fcbfa89d4da
a69ff291f2f232d289629362f14dbe0046ace2bb
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAN' 'sip-files00217.pro'
25da3340f3fb77ce054f2b9a2f9406e3
0e30554f79620f324f778dd1165bbbfffd2af23a
describe
'38958' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAO' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
d505aefdf293d74449532218f3da00f8
bbf0b731a727397d9a5e5eb4dc3174a114117431
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAP' 'sip-files00217.tif'
714c56c990d5e5b990399913d628b47b
5d741c8de573b49913d6238e0351ad596f632d81
describe
'31' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAQ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
515caf49f66a258a32e6128e1ce16078
872de57a74a7faf79649e3c9cfce7a326a56e287
describe
'10307' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAR' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
d971d4edf7e907e9b1947354be7c1873
b97720085d6d3f64fe07e5f62ed7a3015e19c209
'2011-12-29T21:27:29-05:00'
describe
'342613' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAS' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
5c6dcd5fda4b2b98611b250d8fcd2e28
79d2aedb531d4e3490d4c46927e7b790e00f7401
describe
'16933' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAT' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
801594fdfca6c5a2e3830b75822eea45
7e9782d360701fa963350ba3cf2c2cf718b0a466
describe
'3341' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAU' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
58f2a3888eb8f46f350e2ecbfeb39824
f35ba9f64dc25ce478b08195ea8d6025911bab7b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAV' 'sip-files00218.tif'
ec35918627c3da8109243109759df441
b994d33e7f1907e3b1d51efbc8abbda7cef7ad9a
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAW' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
da58fb239a31d23f1bc57d766a904a6f
5d12e5de380634d78b373d5b44b047d5309bde82
'2011-12-29T21:30:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAX' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
60a48149f5d61967154405eeca282130
e8faa0a5160da206f1b8bca73c8f6d6236a74c7a
describe
'116262' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAY' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
95bd8d199579e0c764cfe163ac7116b5
f2ccb0adca40965b4e87a04381d5ffb4a8f63449
describe
'33526' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCAZ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
7380bb521c695de31ec050c97e27832e
b5f574ac78270bd7c99b9579ff6d02886f7bba3d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBA' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
9d6a751359b0faa05aa62cf9773526a3
119929b756d1dac538547cb158f1666af1634157
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBB' 'sip-files00219.tif'
a47a95a8749f6277fc5d92fd72671df3
4cafa9fb42d691a111496fb946e00744b00ce714
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBC' 'sip-files00219.txt'
ca8a742f818bf0b7d1b3a1ab8de4cf2b
ebcd6662caa8ba71b70de8ac76f00e364cbcec7e
describe
Invalid character
'9058' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBD' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
23b1c5597a28e1418908679c0f7e6671
4bce58c70cab7cbbd0c07f4e4382a695b93fbeaf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBE' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
a3a948c761322dbb0c66185b4e3c6496
a5b1130b2f7a8874111758e95f7f102ab4a71c9f
describe
'114081' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBF' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
f02ddf29fdaf54756d590764a17289bc
de2068f0dd8dfa2dd17d109b01b6a9394bd38805
'2011-12-29T21:24:35-05:00'
describe
'33963' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBG' 'sip-files00220.pro'
f197d79e559a9dc0b4114f00ae36e71e
e574328a375a0e2caad2f1d7c2794623f8e2029b
'2011-12-29T21:30:07-05:00'
describe
'36553' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBH' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
c09511b25cfb099fc4f4dd3114edef0f
cc98dc7490d926c7f8d17ea8956502ddddeaac95
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBI' 'sip-files00220.tif'
c99ad76649785a9d32a33d790b580738
567c2a1eeafb34fa699fbbef9f12aeebdf20be96
'2011-12-29T21:30:46-05:00'
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBJ' 'sip-files00220.txt'
c1d77134d3a82b675e5e45b5770e3f8a
28d724df9d00c2bf664a6d0d42e0bde61eaa0ded
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBK' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
4737a716a52e524b9a1176be4baedbf1
43d7a168c51f4a701be739c70e9ab4599e4d830f
'2011-12-29T21:28:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBL' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
66c212cb28f72a9aab3f32ad1ff8294c
190ad864268e8c678ce33f6f2210cf341eeb4021
describe
'119698' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBM' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
e4cfe54f283dd8e431931c475c9681d4
c742fb66d1e6a7bfda0139948df75a61eac3fbbb
describe
'35058' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBN' 'sip-files00221.pro'
9111a4dfd49bb1b888d1203628e23576
c197aae2c034a5cb4d0439455b770568802891b4
describe
'37157' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBO' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
7c2dd446833db1bfd22b3e47ca8ef3cd
d89bc40e9488d027b74e2203952eb4005a60f328
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBP' 'sip-files00221.tif'
8ae37e177867254c4b61c8a379b2e1c5
317992c1674c8c6abf813a183c17afa41227bceb
'2011-12-29T21:30:10-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBQ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
cb81ed77c196fd350b964810edcbc65c
48c5069be82f19c35d737e20595ea5b7cf560b6c
describe
Invalid character
'9184' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBR' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
6d70f4aa9a43a7a76ddb91426f82735d
966aeff4ce64a7970b0a1194010910f772bfcbd6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBS' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
86e34f8ba1f3ed6d3a16eb63170cfb4e
4834775a5c691bb9ccd2a90270af80a70728d944
describe
'114625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBT' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
f4e728a3e1a27e5b68d066e68d1facc9
c00ee0098963a6e19822a096885d3905d77e0b45
describe
'34061' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBU' 'sip-files00222.pro'
67a289f629ea7c188b900e685b212b02
ec99bc2fe8b7f117fe350dd426801725bbbfc968
describe
'36522' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBV' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
d2f3ab14eabdaf2a240a816d429a660f
9948ef74c9819e5182d0bf051765652954f78f4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBW' 'sip-files00222.tif'
2e34989c344b9787efd89204add19c66
d185e4c668ebb17961f4a9ec67a2cac66de0670d
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBX' 'sip-files00222.txt'
bd01b8e23bd9dfbcfbf48a7ff6782add
40844b21fc75ccee22fef79aecdf2fa7924bac4c
describe
'9162' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBY' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
48c30ccfed26d0bcd0e6533a7a091f80
3ed72710ff68f58989ea1e056f52464fe8c42d72
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCBZ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
aa9c94805ca9e0d65838e89b492a21d2
7edeb14d611e42ef8df2db642becfeba6b178b8a
describe
'118494' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCA' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
70414781ef00307374d7eece1d5c08c0
df157adc6c3852c96f90afe60964a84845577928
describe
'35103' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCB' 'sip-files00223.pro'
3ad6b14240a74764e58d2894a9e9b631
22cc0043a6c0ca85d460b624b436e3e00c04354b
'2011-12-29T21:28:12-05:00'
describe
'37067' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCC' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
5f9ed3ae3ae84afcd3381e20c2d84a66
bee873036fb3788210d452a429e927f938df3bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCD' 'sip-files00223.tif'
e49b01d57cc768ba3517a083591b4c8e
4c4091d72836ef00b0558bf88970b6d48f501434
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCE' 'sip-files00223.txt'
b28dcddb901a8090f283321e94930e8c
df37e91f616ab687e23b78deffa3783e004cd5db
describe
Invalid character
'9328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCF' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
97a32086638cddd6fac80224ee28e069
a0086fae7e067ce6228bba70d8818ab155ce5d60
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCG' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
660a73fc12767436fef48f01884b871d
1b41b9a3492f569403fbfb9e04652122e631a31a
describe
'103112' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCH' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
ab879dbce354abb3a69de36499c675e7
5110bd7242faf83d8a8f3183d0624c59818bc5fc
describe
'28770' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCI' 'sip-files00224.pro'
4743c1e50766a20315d93eacfa4e3e5f
f34c0a7a5469907edf12b11fd4a117eeb7d3b9cc
describe
'31376' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCJ' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
00ca5ad6ea5c70a6ffeab45d8cb97fdb
39412e9aa21d840ff28d65257ec8885cf6f9723c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCK' 'sip-files00224.tif'
960384edc92deee179e5ae07e7623aeb
c9572818e31b7da80e2213d8965818a446ccc087
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCL' 'sip-files00224.txt'
918b0f7d71a9a66db6f3232d4b5b4e5e
6f0ef7419d11b593b67d220c8fb7ac1fba81662b
describe
'7988' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCM' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
c69ca3786c55a169765fb3ef463e597b
c1ea323e18476018f82c1c40ac0b51daa31bdfc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCN' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
f6ffe65ea9e62512faaeeabdd05a1eb4
04e0f72c56a0127f827e0aa4879d6109b7709344
describe
'98302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCO' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
3793e5faa48d29dccae60e2b07da93e8
369aba47b7682d64a66df08d44c89aae625b30bc
describe
'25595' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCP' 'sip-files00225.pro'
62c8f18ef8ac69b956d90f2f64fe43f0
6a74a9e275787d9b870ccddc21fa54793197ef25
'2011-12-29T21:31:47-05:00'
describe
'29474' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCQ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
7caa60e535fab78b66c40cfecd9d4613
e81c912819e15faf63cbfeaba347747289258b08
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCR' 'sip-files00225.tif'
bb634ad837ce59743d69e59b7d77937d
a349c28b639a9ae4035a3d624fc4959cfa2b5d32
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCS' 'sip-files00225.txt'
f8f09818b7dae30468d207e9083f214c
5436026ab1242037014f852d52367a12688482a9
describe
'7939' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCT' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
4d4ff982b306f4265f26690f5f9481be
04d0590c7765350520ed0ebf84696b3e6b473afb
describe
'342611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCU' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
4034540b2b9df3adb44f0c83f3bcfd7a
bbdd99b6311570630c623188b614fdd363007b74
describe
'123720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCV' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
4b10939330da5d64460a49298d8c7d4b
13b81710b97ef79e652c71471f32d0ecb959271d
describe
'35707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCW' 'sip-files00226.pro'
b50bc0527371f815fa4efb5c679df1f9
eff9ff0a81c4d56f9bc3866e64b113031a2bebba
describe
'38293' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCX' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
df73922c62a967e78c770337dc0287f5
72cc6320ba3c7d2ea1b67dfe9ac722fe6ad32916
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCY' 'sip-files00226.tif'
93cf9e91cca3544347265e93cf8d9fb7
5d900d0d29a29e9ad728c6e855778d64505e7d1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCCZ' 'sip-files00226.txt'
382f1bc91162c7d0c114fa96be0e9cbe
2de5de63492282b909d1586102c68c01dc992775
describe
'9602' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDA' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
3b56b1a5b2a18bf982fa691eb562b24f
4b74cc59e682e144eea5cfe7f11614fadd52b2fe
describe
'342755' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDB' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
a2f54464b0d48d3fcae04eba85afb72b
a0ab464c455991877d4f9b0463837a6390e602fe
describe
'125371' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDC' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
2ff2c5426af2324be8a2a25ac63475e7
73c90370977ebc8a388322d6844710d19d5c2263
describe
'35809' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDD' 'sip-files00227.pro'
1d26bcc50b59979fbad02121353b82b8
3a46993e986b382ef61e7447217c953ee491625a
describe
'38834' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDE' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
bff8a02b3c40aa91f2cc63d9f3b40fc1
bcfa48c498a3e761f87b4efffdb840ddcb38fdcc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDF' 'sip-files00227.tif'
95d7e1d5c848315aab45418ab55515c6
dc65a2c6520a7185bb38faf4ba62e124388fdbdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDG' 'sip-files00227.txt'
b48bd751d97e1409f247dff0310aa19e
c1a0245dc83af1e399adf3994c08270892f47949
describe
'9275' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDH' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
da2c49a4923418c5378655705877f044
8bbba863708ff5ff00994fe73b41d8f1a237ae66
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDI' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
66db1f4fddbed1e36ea75cf33579a186
736a91b44e92f6e4f0922b869b8be8cb3944d293
describe
'124410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDJ' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
07fc86dcb63e3fba01e7390effd183de
19ccf7406a2fb6c0b11bd3a9264aaa6a96cb5349
describe
'35899' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDK' 'sip-files00228.pro'
44d955e43dc6cf5efe41743167a5f1f1
f541ae0a13722d797695656fab8fc29e1c2719db
describe
'37874' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDL' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
62782861415eb623347e5ec148b120e1
9c227002d3b457059961a05853c423c8f69f3cbd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDM' 'sip-files00228.tif'
7fbd64850ef1164fddd42f2bcec1cb16
f219a8aadf8690a3dff1b240e81a9d1c8d7bc509
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDN' 'sip-files00228.txt'
9a8370321d15987a2bab986ac7fb1597
a0430578c8796092ed1f7a59931863e9467ff10a
describe
Invalid character
'9454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDO' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
f5dfcd54d07cef47f616156bd40e71ea
8ee95a61ed0b2a304e8e473df2f1b47e97b5d315
describe
'342741' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDP' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
5bbf8eaecde18d600083f9895c0a3ee2
24c7e8aedcad3aed1b5be394ab1d698176dbfce2
describe
'125337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDQ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
59422212f5b55f6ea6de76d0a5b653e8
1dcd7ef5bd854005797ab8e8669e3bab0caa8900
describe
'36789' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDR' 'sip-files00229.pro'
148edbd1d031c1085fdf0b4eaeb24da8
61830c071b64ed4ea8c966d3f5f1a013956b2af7
describe
'38636' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDS' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
418976dededa17c988ab1f18d4485822
80a71c76c4deeac783cae327444dbf0cb84b7e98
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDT' 'sip-files00229.tif'
e09a68e89c309d5cf1a227b0a6fc3ff7
41a4e10ec97eda526dd3c4c18c667a276a3f54de
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDU' 'sip-files00229.txt'
4e527f9b582ec974669987358701b4a5
b681d6b0afe24a898ddafb7f9855f988362eaf41
describe
'9493' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDV' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
953ecf5f0f28d1eb02b540dc701f4753
a003eaaaf5b9146a115fad62b682e0ed0d656a19
describe
'342650' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDW' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
b5d388d94ba4941f1b6d85c095b2b339
a62e34f87f4a2d275889a29157d709e36a8b0b66
describe
'122065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDX' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
8a0eda7ffdd871879c8fdb172904effa
d197303a7e739fba0e5d543bc8ae7d59dcd0ac6a
describe
'36627' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDY' 'sip-files00230.pro'
00688a115c800f464e7e2b1dcb43dd10
ad4395edcaaef72ad0163e05dfced00ac3396172
describe
'38926' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCDZ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
7b0e7afaa23356a66d6b143ff137f043
c5d6ed2e498ec616b91fe814819aee0d41e853e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEA' 'sip-files00230.tif'
33ff7635641daea0254e08fe2e3df957
5509299936fa9338d45986c5192e34e086965245
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEB' 'sip-files00230.txt'
1be3e954567296a0847de36a85d4d1dc
526291aaba5f75080b4d51bb29d03707b9d81949
describe
'9685' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEC' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
7fa23cf89f37893796af9256eaba8ef1
bf4bf4867d1cf2553c3067323b4d10aafb69870a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCED' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
201e593481a640c427fa7841ffb9d33f
39630fae4ea68ff9fb0d0d6028020c603e6e1c18
describe
'123183' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEE' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
ddca823f9f14059033a30095c5378815
d62a87ba6e9407d986893cdf5d7b71b78040bc0f
describe
'35914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEF' 'sip-files00231.pro'
649c562dca9a4643297c62731e555d97
6d3a83e75fd6e3c0b75f00125b5b7fa086303c31
describe
'38005' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEG' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
cbc7d6f81f5f50ae8187455d87c1e1ca
db4ce3f023681d20c55f15b82db0bc60d64109a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEH' 'sip-files00231.tif'
b1e6b0ce3a362c07a1728af08f095a7e
7bbe8110a7406b5588e6869a3e6ed8b9f8060c62
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEI' 'sip-files00231.txt'
360182520bfad241eeba92c2659bc4a0
0f768989c663f637c00b6f1dcb64724ffb9b0371
describe
'9358' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEJ' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
e214d309fe7ed2449d4625dce247f306
1ccba0f40e8228f53c92f8050045a88a67385a1d
describe
'342625' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEK' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
954d7a8a61188e802200f80a0f93586c
a4b3fd845032f24e9a5558d026c4cdeec4e44a74
describe
'107289' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEL' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
496bc3f15f6f1ce2a7dd6ca48dfd849a
ea14388fbbc68b581c4abbc16ba8d734972719bb
describe
'31532' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEM' 'sip-files00232.pro'
1ed5c445243ead7bc521f22178722893
f8d2e0d64ecd3a3d9d40c0d3d81c349463338c5f
describe
'32708' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEN' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
72289770d5239ad79ef32496e744b83e
f82ca29717ff3242e84138f6f8e695ca83b972b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEO' 'sip-files00232.tif'
45dd51b5efc31d8239bf6310874a3f6c
737fc8841cfe4d733fc0e291fd8056e735bc1bde
'2011-12-29T21:31:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEP' 'sip-files00232.txt'
886346d8cd97718c28652e4416b65297
30aca05544e1108892cbed2fcc3d4188f6958df1
describe
Invalid character
'8414' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEQ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
becd32ed4744efc023195352d705ed2d
c86798d3e84f80e16ac74798f479478a6815c773
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCER' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
e8c97e7bf62aa28329acf41ea3246b47
c1c2e31f149c67dd99edc624de675dea178b0be6
describe
'111440' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCES' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
8f66061eb836937795e8a14ba17a998a
bc3290021781d48330dcc5a0ec374513856c9fb3
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCET' 'sip-files00233.pro'
37e7a29c557fb348319c245a5d05a1db
004f295444977adc93375eff302daf0678071fef
describe
'33633' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEU' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
8cb701a78a4dfc28e3dcdd4a3f75a830
47312aa736d6fecf31ba4b60483a8cb4a93e9f6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEV' 'sip-files00233.tif'
a1c58d29a14e72fb4f3096c67e5a60c5
f7e6961851a80f2a4ca4bdf02fdcf5f0d11c8b23
'2011-12-29T21:30:44-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEW' 'sip-files00233.txt'
49b94a4ef2086a69c435b390508e295b
6268514dd92ad401afa74e36788b4b179130065c
describe
Invalid character
'8737' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEX' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
3e2a5e101014beb9999caa15c97dcbce
f5da9dd76cf9a3d3b00726ce06575098830a7e14
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEY' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
0e8a55afc5cff01e597e4e7cf85921ce
886136ee331bf3a6a76f9bf209e356eb83965b95
describe
'90402' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCEZ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
fb2bcfb1c7abd9fccced0b39291f256e
1268fbdeac4311ed446e46836d6dc48dcd2c9491
describe
'25584' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFA' 'sip-files00234.pro'
696edb2568dcd3525841b461334175ec
9243238eda0667b97891e7fcc19d64b5821c4910
describe
'27505' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFB' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
8acc9a5f1d13d74dbed953c0f21ca239
46bf24650c10e803c4c1b2515c47d69c3f8e8ca7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFC' 'sip-files00234.tif'
fa4bd34b31377e0f91ef0982549e002d
2fe2361a398ce6931f7c04f2ef0002827e3b5ba7
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFD' 'sip-files00234.txt'
951098de30a24e3dc548365fda4fc2e6
67a673ae24cb8daaa008f0b321777fc68eb307be
describe
'6909' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFE' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
d194ad8a58e71e2ff4e67114fb926159
a50e684ece5ec5eb94343febd6fd914f96541112
describe
'342723' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFF' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
48b8f4ea68d774c8bd22b3f763e91814
c5394903cdb550a8eb3fe0f5a1eed684a75b8e09
describe
'94925' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFG' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
cdf2dcd5b79fbb8bb2ee0a3aafeca93d
a65e5e78b2e0061ac1437ce2e0e6b8c184678081
describe
'26501' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFH' 'sip-files00235.pro'
c1710f4484742dc6ad4cc2a3e2ebd399
a4a42fdb92fca4b0564e075c7456a0e7ac255c74
describe
'28513' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFI' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
2b74db06d46277bde5156771d5da5e5e
3d32fd465f48ea8ba57e9b434eb53b6915d8a6a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFJ' 'sip-files00235.tif'
e1c14e5b186345c0311926cd4327af4b
a56325fface388c67b8058f76e09a917aa0f1d7c
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFK' 'sip-files00235.txt'
50dac8ec1bd47a0bd27423887b5670a5
71f3688874b6dc5eacacc13eefac4878f623e3b5
describe
'7248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFL' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
e1b6e896a2cc0fbc812959beca3c68e0
27a312fe2c4a82eeb7435937a4c3282ca2ee7055
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFM' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
ce9e4a4dc0dd3e31fa54356fbe85d43b
25d287a74bf6f32df009c73367fba6c392cfdcb4
describe
'118628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFN' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
067a31522a99459151e3e210c7ca3c6f
a142759ec3288fa2cacf4caba39ac1105de3c0b2
describe
'34659' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFO' 'sip-files00236.pro'
4eaa53a1984765247e291e73a7d5e751
9269fc9d7b7fa4bc871056c57cbe99d48613d37e
describe
'37223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFP' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
91815f01b31ad5b4bce2f0abb36d31cb
b985d058d1057b1849006aa6e7f71beca39a4280
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFQ' 'sip-files00236.tif'
660651e0bd5185b4a9d1d2797a9cb2e5
a9dc0d801563ea7e19c7a56fdf893b83685afc02
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFR' 'sip-files00236.txt'
8c733cdfa21ce701967ac9c1b2859e61
c0cfab9d32098ad3faed4c57b3570a27d2fd74d7
describe
'9151' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFS' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
e99acd62211f887c6c61aa78245b508a
cafcbd2302cd9d931cf4e73c5a7d15f1d80d65cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFT' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
97a0f38c95fdaba18a8f0bd4b1e337d6
524e35415d61f88cd9cfc6aedd84e2ea1d754b56
describe
'123884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFU' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
55d4a4a9a1c8bd60eb384520ce38db66
b6a0e0247ee265b7e0ec06d77d912fe8bff13e2b
describe
'35830' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFV' 'sip-files00237.pro'
0589676086cbf91f5dc082ea2297da9a
f1979994c9ea769c0ef5363ec8ace7667901163e
describe
'37873' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFW' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
69abef9edcb81cba6e5995bc6f046e45
c24bdc535ef853b27ca45a05f018e212f86ee974
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFX' 'sip-files00237.tif'
192ba8668f62ab697e14931fa864bd51
080153e6f8bfd1a6ba71a897835cdebbef90c779
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFY' 'sip-files00237.txt'
d1df6134ef2c1ecba53150c4027a6504
559019ea2fecb689d2d96a7c92546cc92980531a
describe
'8890' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCFZ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
90d22a535cb8a07a34ce72bef36fd546
4b0aea79c485dac307a7a2de5fd62afc909d6a53
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGA' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
800d608265452fb689984d3cb03f9a5b
5e075477cb7555d1188861a499200d813a387676
describe
'119628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGB' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
7701bdf7ebe8b261a443afd74fa3bba5
73faff951eb13a61564e3d1c7fd62e840ce03312
describe
'35916' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGC' 'sip-files00238.pro'
3af7d75814dfe97a35cdced9522e4cc1
1e32600821f1652d78000a4bb02b4dad7afb4b7e
describe
'37669' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGD' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
112227030f1cad75437a92e13305d4a7
f59d4792a01b19ec754126e5903c9f0132a2d295
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGE' 'sip-files00238.tif'
2fd5df34365a7d35b2df22303413eee4
b19f8d813bbe05a1fc6edc52b61201ac97f3548f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGF' 'sip-files00238.txt'
9024ee10761c64d046c35c0476b8b79a
de066b9a5263e6c9495478035a04e4875dbbdc4a
describe
'9194' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGG' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
c9a7f81dce105cbb0d92ca1e8a68b1a7
5b640bd3eb3d6290672d89e60c995cbb9f99d1db
describe
'342742' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGH' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
d6898b3b05341a15596557082ca9bad3
3d3e3cc395adae5e40ba8d1c892732b4382f425d
describe
'118884' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGI' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
0fd9eebcc031e8263466f94c6aed059d
31b09704118f5b549aeda10e02eb89bd69f26c37
describe
'34974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGJ' 'sip-files00239.pro'
93af79d7e6467e258c0712acac544093
1d8e53b523e0b3dbb4df26eb296f9918ae2fac12
describe
'36904' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGK' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
dc33a6b74fce0261b6b1e897236566d4
71a5a794941b387fd74ef854c42d980c4c088d95
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGL' 'sip-files00239.tif'
b650bc443bb31697131c653bfa04fed0
13e7b9e073c0f3eb4211573fdedc62b0f76032b2
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGM' 'sip-files00239.txt'
e71da17b7fad18a880fd62e80da79867
731c2aa149d3e12b0d9e8375edb760254e8ae525
describe
Invalid character
'9243' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGN' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
bea3674ba335c6b2c97ae8a7ac8d22c7
3f581d9a681154784cb61bee21c9b89e1d0eec49
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGO' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
aac36b222b53d6fe3d45559098ec7202
ea6008f3117cfdf4b4427256815e11927439d493
describe
'135083' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGP' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
fcba70074f5497ac82bce22d344b688f
1ca2c241033796af0b2e2e2ed3ca5beb0fa967b5
describe
'34907' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGQ' 'sip-files00240.pro'
0cd339c022843d7a530cb2503ae05e69
3238e19a4d9ac7605bd54860f596936c70db6f7d
describe
'41225' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGR' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
49ce8d4999e0ff40b62194af4cf4aa16
4ab62058a66a28a9abff66af8f767a7e40f3a73c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGS' 'sip-files00240.tif'
64a168f5ed5085dabdcfdfe5ecbed696
a39256ca297de15c52f028c676e1f86a825f6f8b
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGT' 'sip-files00240.txt'
c82e0ef4a44b64c9de210b9410cc0f4c
3c842a412081877e9bfa80f083f11b3b6256de01
describe
Invalid character
'10669' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGU' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
03ad9796cc07136803afbda0ccf4b111
61b371565dbaa4a78dfcc7eb167d42e78af171d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGV' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
a9671fd4386f128d1d08ef05d84a1259
fc574a5c1e1ea11de3acce58c2452946330be3b9
describe
'169126' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGW' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
e6030217670fb77abbd517f7c34b22a2
682afca8e53e0c020d76c7ee44570a65704f4e01
describe
'2536' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGX' 'sip-files00241.pro'
d6a2899a0d3238ca562b523d1b3b7f86
fa8542698c69b762f2c91ef6f4a808dc1f13147c
describe
'36181' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGY' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
10014e652f36857a72cb5143c440dc39
7e3174de3eeb436ba52b7fad3845b46167d787ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCGZ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
788027c70b620fec43a0958ef2b47ad2
e6206950b675d34e217d8e1841c281055bd6175d
describe
'9321' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHA' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
15a69f8f1ef4d572a6896b7309e963b0
6152e39231767ff156a6828e253bd6fffcea0e0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHB' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
8d821eaf703a2e2522ec8798a61a1c8d
0996ef18efdea978224fb4d1d1ad883fd1a500c8
describe
'16604' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHC' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
ce2f7ed6921674f5e4f25e05ceec6df3
d3d38bf9347c8875a07d1bef2d22022e0d8b34b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHD' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
02d539c07aba76c7f9e69217f9a17cb1
74e1c69536ce7bc1fb013a7d59c423a8842b8a7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHE' 'sip-files00242.tif'
02f9571cb3e2d9aad7a02af35dbd243b
0a3cdc0b90e21ef4aae1a167a7f36404ea1a4d0a
'2011-12-29T21:26:29-05:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHF' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
5ff9e62b60bc8505eda3589c90848d31
d2d0abe5511874b618b0c0fd5da57e401b9192fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHG' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
c90913912f5894d58f387ac6fd7f45d4
d59312f2f482a909d4b5dffcf5636aedd1c2c638
describe
'117505' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHH' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
dfbefc7949cdb1456dd2cfc29fc3c48d
644040a23850795b4aac95724826bced13752bf9
describe
'34161' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHI' 'sip-files00243.pro'
cd82e4e9c105838ee3bfcd6fc9dd697e
6a88093e7d21a286fb76b728a137a58978f12a17
describe
'36746' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHJ' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
5aafe3ece4100a4321e4c058d3bdb641
57575b63f4e2d236da0e0a16a67e852c6b32da91
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHK' 'sip-files00243.tif'
f35cd346142feda4e5ebaef7c3067fc8
f9c175efbbed1b16c5eaf187a6703f14c1bb797f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHL' 'sip-files00243.txt'
7f8633d3f6bd67ba444f68ac8ed77266
8795fc7e1db98c92fafa47db3ab2ac2ab5be61a5
describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHM' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
511ecc74ee9c39838914074d180f62c2
b9b41c3aa2e5c6fd0eac2591fed881badb14112a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHN' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
249e9e5fdd1796918800447af7caaf86
2a7be0fc7c1e7710ca9b0c37b12011cc9b1532ff
describe
'116960' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHO' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
76440edf81377a597c7acf65af16b9c9
abf10d12fa19916b48c7cd7c2743582ab47ddbbb
describe
'35372' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHP' 'sip-files00244.pro'
8fbad9c8ed71a290dce3eb24687d461c
448c3173356e96d278d7ffb6ffdf572ff9f5c01b
describe
'36338' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHQ' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
b55b62928a2722e303a5a3960e1f3575
643f707166daefb8890dde39dcd6b777faad1434
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHR' 'sip-files00244.tif'
df4535c8feb0cc4fbf70ffb59e082a18
96054fbc22f4234beb812587654002b715ec978f
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHS' 'sip-files00244.txt'
3c3eced2017e073279ec70c94bfafc73
fcdbe973c8fd40ceacde7d393da76dc7147a4053
describe
Invalid character
'8810' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHT' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
dd892c1d099ace2b19294be42a1c98a4
5a95bd5fc8c67afbfd36494a173a8caf2613318b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHU' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
3d15094e5499c487e2eebbd2899dcf28
b48b188240e6136667b434858f679029e85b27f2
describe
'110588' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHV' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
581186d0a5e4a4517e3f9b0915a15a92
a013209262de4582d16c106bb99e25a37594e1d3
'2011-12-29T21:30:08-05:00'
describe
'32172' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHW' 'sip-files00245.pro'
4eee10c0add1dbbe053ccc3ee552cfc2
dc3a4c029588c47baf1b9a6cfd58a26cbbd95f77
describe
'34410' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHX' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
23ae748a49472869c0c15dd2a35899ce
ba13d6b1c1ccf16d04ab046048429730ffe383cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHY' 'sip-files00245.tif'
8b7ef47b744beca173403f9b8a9623f8
e41d9f58f3aecd6eb1872b4bb8fe3e14b748beb0
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCHZ' 'sip-files00245.txt'
9bdc98e88db05863f34c9e5fe91f1d79
99a3454020a9bd090895e800ec22f73682f9f0b9
describe
'8419' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIA' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
a2a5b07443da98183a5cc2e3ff54b15b
4c7fe38528312ec2f21a37cd807bc7aac7bb2364
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIB' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
d75fdb99b0ab338c09b7e685d0558b48
e0cc41ea11b0e16d7dc6490880e711ea8099ab3a
describe
'109326' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIC' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
228e23af01c9c8ac65f2e071ded3ae69
af25b7e74bc7a1a99a421d303f3e5f61d3a0d092
describe
'32114' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCID' 'sip-files00246.pro'
c091ce284fc7198273b407ec72898a3f
1887f5a5f1313a4fc25288deb9a7794e2e58c315
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIE' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
31b85206808baf9558d2e60bc841d949
b4b80c9d5e3b8e3af123c41b3dab49293acb7ed7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIF' 'sip-files00246.tif'
e7b99389226c1d2be46d383a0b640c16
b2f76c7258249c4a0756eeba8222e0b2a0903620
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIG' 'sip-files00246.txt'
7ceb1591455aa49e78ecf92320781d6d
c7524ee16fb374f1f4af2c7df8aa7a5fcfd009c2
'2011-12-29T21:31:14-05:00'
describe
'8425' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIH' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
fec6f864167207a9e38109420ed6e4b5
0940856c9655821c563716e252034176342dbdfb
describe
'342689' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCII' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
78d007ce509263c07d83e6311df08954
b2bee703b9b8caf935136728e276203d7d458c03
describe
'98038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIJ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
c98fc25c12697a2a6ba3f58bc7a1331b
f7a22da4aaa72256f49318048bad9205ddd4f3cf
describe
'26098' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIK' 'sip-files00247.pro'
8d0c8eaa20d7e9ac7cb70d8b86aab535
ef079e5600243351c7612db39c589d08fcbd53d5
describe
'29876' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIL' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
9024354586a660fcb3ae5b38ef819741
42f438f1fa894b509541cf29c04fca03b2ef4a7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIM' 'sip-files00247.tif'
6a6e316a497a3cca5b417f262fdbf35b
8e3cdd591b2a3ea3402a4066a90c5ec351be9452
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIN' 'sip-files00247.txt'
25d62b19a1c39c732d019042d4daa87f
08c4dced3ec8ef509f471c907b843a43f403f0e9
describe
'7400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIO' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
eb87b7985e8fa7787b90911599e0281c
d758b55c21306b396f3b942f576baaed9f9ab272
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIP' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
24f1ec8247afb644a19f8c828555487e
bae3dd24c3f223c1d332dafb6c68b37d6626d671
describe
'120450' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIQ' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
a696d1119a87c59aba22680df5b2dc6b
816e3b6048b70c3a320f631ecc122374c3dcb7ac
describe
'36062' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIR' 'sip-files00248.pro'
3498658113faac62faa45ccad7619f97
91a597f2304be7fec49d881d73739fa7bad5d684
describe
'37263' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIS' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
88fb627fbe33d14de784940bfc1b7e9f
6ebc28cf55d4bb049bb9e4069ba7e2546c22e493
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIT' 'sip-files00248.tif'
a9ff1a67c451bfd3ea89cbb63b0d05f2
e02c927f4499194ab4cae44ce9b3c6dbf13713f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIU' 'sip-files00248.txt'
0f0b7d647f9879bbed5e81e8f04fff9e
14d11540f2a14baf27b7b6843339ee02a7f4f8bc
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIV' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
7164099015382f0b4dec125ed12296e4
fcfef62c6f8247ebc9f43624517f0842a73b4552
'2011-12-29T21:27:56-05:00'
describe
'342642' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIW' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
50db65fcde98e8ceb3162994c7f45b0d
83f2858a17da1bb899668c71e021c7a73640fb3e
describe
'118027' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIX' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
78ba9bf42c0ba3f9aece190a5c4dcf1d
c661c503b0183a954cfce991eeef985255ae90ad
describe
'34676' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIY' 'sip-files00249.pro'
3328930e7ce5117b39c61b3de9aba430
752bff05589e0df4be3dcddd1a6793df9fb60c26
describe
'36764' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCIZ' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
3b2477740e8f551d39ced321e4ca83ed
6ff29b262dfce5bb11c00a7f08414889da6bcc79
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJA' 'sip-files00249.tif'
d402f372358af2459b402507aafb0ed4
25ac0f747816742701c2a4d17c9b1c576cf10321
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJB' 'sip-files00249.txt'
ae04ebbd97a1761db0a02c9ce8197686
072a7846a771f84e924cdcbb2f72b29419c1d8dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJC' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
d399010b7a37d5e3e43a846cfa404197
c9e425e340c3b3d2be2176cab90a8a914aac41e9
describe
'342714' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJD' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
2100f969d108a4ebcc9b87ff2551f9e1
f1cfa4b806d7a678341978a7bc2355519a6f9821
describe
'118495' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJE' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
a743c1c0e00964feaec5cea2c262ad05
c0adbab5132461b500a9f9dea2427efefee6c51f
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJF' 'sip-files00250.pro'
e34d3d0192f13c6ba27fe3c2a5c79f8e
12c577adfca7d474e333afd4c3be01ce7f75480d
describe
'36888' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJG' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
00e7b40d720193b63bb13a2cc3ec3e0c
d419786e526d246ed73ceb2040ff8cff71c19697
'2011-12-29T21:22:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJH' 'sip-files00250.tif'
5b78246d4241fc70ad85a212759b6af2
0fa6a93f29bc5d968de824404f8072a647ce0d42
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJI' 'sip-files00250.txt'
30fa4c8e382d886f04d9349ea9d07b88
05ebe3817c829a0b25754eb93a473ac5e8311bec
describe
'9411' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJJ' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
c2cf7d211f06391d5966cb148923faf4
dcf39e5828958dff75b7974f458223d5767a1ef4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJK' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
3d06263e0574ab725ac0946cc5a9a96a
ba83fc6e8d9acc44b6c806e68e1a36d09d4cb06e
describe
'121467' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJL' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
346aec8305f00b4dfaa3ad8927b30338
97ae3d0cf6c008f1ccb74e9e33714b8349fcb4d4
describe
'34817' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJM' 'sip-files00251.pro'
4090deec0caa75c8123996909c214e5f
7dee05efe4f67e8a9f5dbbaebcef4a89bcbf26df
describe
'37438' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJN' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
dedb311a89252a97a518ee7ced7f0323
e629795b7719a0a6c7b48aa05df39459609d854e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJO' 'sip-files00251.tif'
7171f484fdff2078e946f320be59cd1c
8ced7a1965e2f521a6d4859147f40c835631d7c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJP' 'sip-files00251.txt'
71178927c14e659f5f0acf7f3d5fecf2
a959f731c0a9b6ef1c80c1d9510dcda189c4e581
describe
'9646' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJQ' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
9c901b457c5f3dc3ce73725cfcf5e39d
9018ea532c20ad4de2a23b4b5df37e678274b43a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJR' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
2d3f970ebf99b7b3f4a2adf56e0fa37d
a7f220b3498cc83e089875f5b7f3e937646c72bf
describe
'117681' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJS' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
daf017c3028e51099d52f9e87714d6b7
21d042d277b56ffdddcc1c23996d259a10142f66
describe
'36064' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJT' 'sip-files00252.pro'
97bb8c5c970b97a4f938f6c32a761440
494fa3c26eae60798dce9d7d07eacee80fac403a
'2011-12-29T21:31:38-05:00'
describe
'37006' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJU' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
f6535e4ad993b385a9d4cb50faaf3ca2
c9d222aa386b737784d43355e37509f3a3ae6768
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJV' 'sip-files00252.tif'
794870c19f4ea8bf599fa68835b347fb
2fad8cd4eb0e7214c67ef21aa808802b43cd3ba8
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJW' 'sip-files00252.txt'
2f9d2feb8ffa45057ac92d279f5c1039
4b4dd3cdc3d9a2af9d5c1d69d634d3e9b7d0b464
describe
Invalid character
'9192' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJX' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
e1a7396fd93a084313debef051d090af
16cbd599f9b8b91f2672b3e258081306e35dcbe9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJY' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
edd4e45643d7dd86829b89727c0c3c71
f4208cfcb8f7b75b79cb851c2f2a38e364a3da2d
describe
'122583' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCJZ' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
d64b8c10b5d2eaf30c112f9bd414e32a
34ff5a44e6cf8006d5dd979cb9bd59cfb217efd9
describe
'36940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKA' 'sip-files00253.pro'
7c55955d993be90950a4595911920ec9
c09254ae5cf8e373223ff8658ab7a1bececea1cb
describe
'38576' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKB' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
0f5c52bc8ea3cbe8f6a843f8c8d63092
e10602881875ad3a3fcf9a9172d1e21255696afe
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKC' 'sip-files00253.tif'
bc5e3ed4be9bf0e96dc6898dfb0c062f
a45edd1b31c8cabe522bf3b157768c84ddc4b75b
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKD' 'sip-files00253.txt'
9ed6c5672c3e690ba4440d6256e5d732
1377278749cc146105558e51c74617276a49f788
describe
'9457' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKE' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
ff1c9771f6eae6074f593d67e7d33dc0
9c7793575bd9d34c29a838a1963c060d5775c5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKF' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
c5784369809cde1fe790dd69b4dfe8bd
69e99d0ff305d5ce62a75b7fb411accb45ee6505
describe
'120740' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKG' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
1040b8f2f3d663132c36fbacb97c4d32
88a7c35bb14d46db2226940c411160bb11ce9ac5
describe
'35064' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKH' 'sip-files00254.pro'
7842ef56bc1b2738f0ce0a4343aa6e1e
bbae3861746d176ce537fe3dfdfb6081f0e9409b
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKI' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
551b0295448291039c953e3dec854b18
b2d4920ec12990152732b1616e603e80d791f283
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKJ' 'sip-files00254.tif'
153a46a5e310d099b1bd072adee94070
e081889e6080d0b54dcb4187f5b8df94f173ae98
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKK' 'sip-files00254.txt'
1d20f7eb5fbfbf3e3b7611ca0749d5cf
58650b423dc5a5a49c90f715f004567d75bd991c
describe
Invalid character
'9324' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKL' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
c9faf98b5d4b0153f6b5ebaf12bf6c1a
92010703c636e0527bf721bd6307b1a12e765928
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKM' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
96e180d7e08e425ea223dbded3e9ec8c
c4d4a38aa5c30d7aacddb42a2b31431bbf900e68
describe
'118033' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKN' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
03cbca4c8be5f35bb8d53ff4c8b50ed6
e0ca190cf3013f816edd72cded8c1a18b68d155f
describe
'32892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKO' 'sip-files00255.pro'
44770e2a6b75b25d293715b0f1d5f686
a900f76c82f6f25e01ff76ed31d0c82f49d1a13d
describe
'36088' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKP' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
fc38ffdea259d70699710244d0605530
a4d942f2f1e3a91d225bffdf622947f5cba934d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKQ' 'sip-files00255.tif'
970d1f7d84ff983902fefb65ccad365e
bb7daea654455ef48a9088a001ed686ecf994def
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKR' 'sip-files00255.txt'
721bb02ea1dfb6e17ccf1f21a040f007
4f88ef4420b96e103d93f8471b154083b4c4d9ce
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKS' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
be44e8415d42b28172be041a3b2cbb5e
4989799a2f7f48370865d3954f55b2c2b5a4ba7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKT' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
a5eb0655885617da3e3922e7bc8b4455
f3e48fba512b80f1ba38da11f14268f181412847
describe
'67049' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKU' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
9ef01a4ba669e758d6022ddb62b3710e
8db4643980a897227aa417ecbdf34df2506e5446
describe
'17443' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKV' 'sip-files00256.pro'
fe1c1cd37590391464afaccb35155bd5
4d715a1bad150f7fe887d999823828b78dac3d56
describe
'20133' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKW' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
cdd7f92b32871d305d2001e4e48c292f
4bc6cb55c8e49785d4536002c738cd70538d1239
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKX' 'sip-files00256.tif'
cda24b3025403c278ed32773077c05cd
8bf8aae60d2e2234b6aca25c8d01d68ef21d0d67
describe
'636' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKY' 'sip-files00256.txt'
a179823e57a4bbcf2daa872f908f0b93
11550ff8e3446aefa41bb30be120c02979a16af9
describe
Invalid character
'5367' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCKZ' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
ccb0e6e0dc2695a13deee55dea8408a2
e4c9a21d159802d48051e3845bb1e297a4458b01
describe
'342715' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLA' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
68bb178326fa2b21cab0c279c730daf4
394594938fa93012937b7bcb10c5ab9b00c9e56b
describe
'94728' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLB' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
d4a26f5b59e2767356c773ab8fe49119
a54dae4516c7e736e18102859d3807774a1f48ed
describe
'26189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLC' 'sip-files00257.pro'
77b9786f2c88aa8682579b710d6f24cf
25e00c56be1eb90894207588f16e679eeedb6850
describe
'28605' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLD' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
9e5d305cf960408e830cf0bbb0e0111c
37146d90530689c6beccac766e87f845522709ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLE' 'sip-files00257.tif'
2847fe4ff0ce99e541cc39e22a6b494d
1937dc75d121d01e24f9c32463f957dc9c60fc1a
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLF' 'sip-files00257.txt'
aabeb5e479a6d514acc05115bddc836b
5c48dfe76c596c555ac1e535560f833379df5ce9
describe
Invalid character
'7039' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLG' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
0a7cfdb722895a235425fdcce98a8c73
5b90fa449a1ef507e5ce5c853d33dafb3865368a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLH' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
2308acf1fc9c21a16338f8b7c2a6fdb0
226810e1ca837359076124f296bf098f3b45b8f4
describe
'121221' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLI' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
7de5c2d64ddc6ef88bfad183e5b802e0
91938e633bd421c4ab2e0dcdf1ef3839810ca68f
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLJ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
6bd614e23142311f8cab2019ae53bdda
6fef82232892156480c5e54783f4400f0aa4d43b
describe
'37154' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLK' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
6a3ef48a2f26fdbcdf44434308bd2c0e
a8733716d6fa98645bfd8b4c444abc2e811f32be
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLL' 'sip-files00258.tif'
e6e308004fc013a4e5e284b8810aa6e1
a4f388495c093484d194504feb24b76c1a559099
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLM' 'sip-files00258.txt'
edad35cf4aa974ba24899f19c7f7cc6b
7e6e95b6609d5878530753960ff3e60a167d9586
describe
Invalid character
'9459' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLN' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
ab952e30300a49a9472cd9b2a025d193
17a585a034fa949ba63ecb6ef78fbe545996b5a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLO' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
79c8fc3c0f94b4dfd88cea4aaf8c7e26
b7c1d7e431c2cf8accacd429675335468e61b5d1
describe
'120954' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLP' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
fb687cf26c08a41b2fc467d50e445841
62155cccee0fd9fb32b6e351e85d632131f18e40
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLQ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
be3b1d7fb6ca76f53f35f78f628e21d2
d224e4f5ebb8c854895bb8f466204cbefb3178dc
describe
'37201' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLR' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
26f5e06a02b08bc884f0a307a906c6b4
8fc48f8491dce4f5b8188aebfb2dd8d1d2e33715
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLS' 'sip-files00259.tif'
73b2701717d834e82c2620e80cb28835
8ed69e8de03245d2d0a483e17a3e08f88520e952
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLT' 'sip-files00259.txt'
09444a220d13052c33fe2b108e6dfb17
57c7121e18ee18c10217ff5b5709918940547b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLU' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
a81722449dfd7751bae64a2d19223fea
c1a4ba62ed9693da1c9fdbc0ede97ab776417840
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLV' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
a08a7367f8a3af99dc1f70de0fbfee06
d6586962695b2d62a5e9d24c5a76b45ed11e65d4
describe
'116136' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLW' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
e715c9cef2d2aba1e560edecdfa1b461
693500df6137977aa82bb03e06e05a09f6079895
describe
'34451' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLX' 'sip-files00260.pro'
29cbf3ac8e6849068c06a5ff7c3cda38
2eb76225b33c5d6ed7c56ad388f8501fc60b2e43
describe
'37174' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLY' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
5331550fdfbf7825b724aa3d2fd43745
3023cebd79d96c85032d559c9b079f0c835b0f3d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCLZ' 'sip-files00260.tif'
8f1febbbe38f077c96885e233f120e20
ba1d8dc82544e33d7b74691888b9f8232d94c2e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMA' 'sip-files00260.txt'
6b739e967403bc499cd45a5293bd6365
cddd257bd1c08aa0de7dbe5b974028cc8f91061d
describe
'9244' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMB' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
91f30942896c75f0f513526fc73896b0
dafdb5a14139963347fddebebf2073fa8b16952a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMC' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
7d3274e71c5f49f8658fbe29696acbeb
ebc4c80fa7d04fa79548bce3d095e96ddbc51a89
describe
'120190' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMD' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
520b0a50f46297a17f65104ccd43c05f
e544abbdd812acb2a06a6e7ab68a02f99a21eecf
describe
'35050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCME' 'sip-files00261.pro'
815ad71b17d2314d323961ebe07c7ce6
7d4628ad2c90524a0b633c2917ac0b919938864c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMF' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
e36d9596c67ae953f47b241f58af9504
12de2aa08cc1002127307ceb184ff034ee0741f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMG' 'sip-files00261.tif'
2ac037c596249adaeaa1b7413d3044fc
b07437ac78d89df0fcd9490087e03b9a4977b3b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMH' 'sip-files00261.txt'
33afb5ff519472a65ac6ac931d612684
3f7dcd1eaba80754dbdfec070a6168a48381f844
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMI' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
920b1eaab274fa431411a055b8691b43
9a3d6df90795070758e1aacf62c8374d1852cd8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMJ' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
7110a1a4a58bb7bd2fd3757f39e97317
08833532a2e4cc123591d43218ff5d64fb8d3b73
describe
'118223' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMK' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
19d72fd24a1ad2a0977b36579cf2912c
1b2efa503ac1548828d64d93780ed01b89650307
describe
'34587' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCML' 'sip-files00262.pro'
974553e3b404be43578bc6de9c4dd0fa
a2e6414abe588428fef4d022bd70d382375a2ce9
describe
'36556' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMM' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
3e8c07ccfd34d9e4124abd2752f14466
9087279b4105338f0e9aa9a9d4e07cf7468591ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMN' 'sip-files00262.tif'
7c9782fde016a5413304e8b4e78bd407
8a8dcbe030699826b0d5b16b045b31c2cda3719f
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMO' 'sip-files00262.txt'
a114fb2bef335af1dde9c4fcb97ddb6e
4c44f37d0fc2839cc5853f4e842ae54a3cef0637
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMP' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
62af37ace23b8d01f771f2902d9bb2db
714a07f2b4ed58adc27002d7bb58c8ccca7004c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
285a340de47319af930db5292fa87e26
94a9e4bd994ac100a8e6f567f5229f2bdca53471
describe
'117528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMR' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
21a6415521fc318f082ae667efc087cd
34ef4fd6ab5791f42701533658c919f34fb07dc3
'2011-12-29T21:30:18-05:00'
describe
'33980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMS' 'sip-files00263.pro'
cac1babe9bb3283a313f6aa64b2f4ce9
7e6eef7fc257b5da826e065cb75eb6726890913e
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMT' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
384cfb839f5eb6dbe4d68daacd1a2128
dd19ba4b4efaf2b2edb193b4e059810fdae91775
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMU' 'sip-files00263.tif'
a50d40ea197d55e6c84acbedcb335472
ab999facf7d0cc43782759ed346ff4ae490518a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMV' 'sip-files00263.txt'
56b0050a72560f16abbe9fbe41c88aa6
e32be214ec906b5f135a9b326e58cda545047a21
describe
'9189' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMW' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
ce66347e9114355831fb107030e74bf1
7bfe6da3e826604c9cf988d27caffb1225030523
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMX' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
5abddeb41d7bc30a15d3c12a362ea0cf
f1e1e9492dd386faac5444fcfebe591a41874c2f
describe
'118953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMY' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
8b8e86eb9332083e7cf9f73cd166bf43
e635cabe201346a8ec3069d5535a7f05081828c9
describe
'34442' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCMZ' 'sip-files00264.pro'
65b81e915a7952efed8fdb043cd4ce98
072d04d311e977da4de4ee29a6d7f6301be7c464
describe
'37398' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNA' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
418fe27497911bf427b6dc48ea077b46
30336eadc2fcd7275c8de58c93d5e71bf514164c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNB' 'sip-files00264.tif'
cb231a89ba374af1c03bf028fdf0e5c6
4879370f6ca4b041cfb17ffeaf7e3c5b96abee4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNC' 'sip-files00264.txt'
8ea7e8022ddc2b040f3bb2372e531e17
9f6956b816a58adf3730dc97c49da5833125c42e
describe
'9037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCND' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
c3f71fa467f272fc9b60499a5e506f93
1f162a40fd115e85f01e1a641de5c401d05bdf02
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNE' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
99541b2ca5dfe1ac285552a733fc060d
aab5541c17a27897e6d6bdb82ca06963bc80c327
describe
'119567' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNF' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
4cd19ead99b3e7636b74113b143b18ee
7fbdfb8ef189bcea31fefddc21ac8857c11ab4b9
describe
'35188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNG' 'sip-files00265.pro'
03969601c458f1d39a825bb675ec7a67
55732ae742d116a0f16184076596a77cd8815197
describe
'36870' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNH' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
cfcca2056a4c98668dc2423c2aa4dc9d
f200cad4b67f06fcddc48806982859449d9d98f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNI' 'sip-files00265.tif'
7fee6ac07c3631e4775d1c6fb30096ae
df504deefe8a1a3524215493633e351e0ea9ef27
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNJ' 'sip-files00265.txt'
547db3d1399b8c92628f6b8bfef7ce5d
192e64f6787effb4a4904648ea37077e70adcc2e
describe
'8678' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNK' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
c0bd251ca6875096d306ebd0d1f9468d
6169b4387a99320a3c9726a51ad3d194b72ac8b1
describe
'342758' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNL' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
4941d1307f27461f64e44ae94ce80d8d
1038a206cba7255e9daa939dd7436608e229542c
describe
'122931' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNM' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
b3ae818f299539c9005ab2950a14089e
2fae19878ee9913678db9503bf43616a9a4743d5
describe
'35490' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNN' 'sip-files00266.pro'
c78854373140f407eafd394430e18a0f
5ba7bfbdd57267f3ce3ee5c9df4a294bf6cd7c74
describe
'37477' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNO' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
64b65e7aff30e774c96624f608364ad6
e02e37ec5518692e6807fbedd614b3b066b85708
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNP' 'sip-files00266.tif'
6b97ba13713c6deba52e3293f5d04772
2dc0484b133fce1d2828782a47fcdb609d2e3d46
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNQ' 'sip-files00266.txt'
3f090881f025e4bc2a3bdc5cbc2d406c
2e07b58bdd8b5c9d20b38cf40e0c8734b483bc03
describe
'9349' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNR' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
17dae8ed7c257d0fcc0344e8d99d9ce8
3efcfa93f2e9cff6aac89abd3807cba62bf3db4f
describe
'342610' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNS' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
073eceff228d0b60e58b653c62697977
5003ab1504ca76bea7efdf7539270f58e13c8efb
describe
'39953' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNT' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
7d01f5f8e58c1ad8488b5cd5334194e6
9c96c6f0bf2678d3bf3c7f82b8e837eadfc3c8d0
describe
'5831' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNU' 'sip-files00267.pro'
cf3481040842f56658da3317127f45f2
d075284ef092568f602fc0f14917320f93e15a2e
describe
'9713' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNV' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
5f46c7bd419f9b415e062dd217379bd2
e39980c3239bd3e0e943f63e2b26106a17a4aa18
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNW' 'sip-files00267.tif'
9ecdd5ad42b7d870a6003c68546066e5
e4179b52cee4a9a75073204c94ea4a95165df6e1
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNX' 'sip-files00267.txt'
46137fa875d098b53ce5909d27ea6e95
525d2cd45d53057c854aab3bca0512daa7a894d2
describe
'2641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNY' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
c758d209e21009724a197893ba725c1a
af64c222d5ce4359d27b3967f51e462311ad4c4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCNZ' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
84cc948de12a5384bfe647422cc46332
5e8c95344e940c6729c4244814b4312913d4cae9
describe
'92647' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOA' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
c24b63523d36655e3ecfa45b84b22c95
5b841b6946a8b6092f909e0a541fcbcb117c9616
describe
'25404' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOB' 'sip-files00268.pro'
0be5f191b4ca689f66d75e64e850f09f
3fd6ddd89812665e382dffa03c449fb81904c14f
describe
'28033' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOC' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
c7d265396b3b8dfc9f772ad9554296f8
b53851392d47a70c546b37f45a58f6c273c606d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOD' 'sip-files00268.tif'
9ef3894f0466b7be686725e146b4bd74
3384e624083baf13adf088cea590ef1bdd9f1089
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOE' 'sip-files00268.txt'
006514bab83ebabf5f06a0b7d88332e0
8a3026143b2f3c55165047c965b9621fa4be338f
describe
'7252' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOF' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
753e6f1abdf7bad82e0817624cd0062e
6cb8ee7a0064864cba9b9fd56e4e8735d92d4861
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOG' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
26ae772e6cf6a1424dd8aa7d32de4105
eb520d31316fdc501b5336320e0ade1d22de8127
describe
'118171' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOH' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
8e557b07153c7d42d1607c86b14ecb0c
2002c46525809607e5621e1014c3453929430d8e
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOI' 'sip-files00269.pro'
c1837695233a530b3f23a1bdf10966ee
ad87eb1483957961a7129eb2b931fa6164f0f19d
describe
'36823' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOJ' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
fd89b6f76f0f60ab00fe3e7b8989a61f
d6419d2277d11f547fc5d1c7d41846820c9017cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOK' 'sip-files00269.tif'
42203824099991c6db2c0f7d84066b7a
4e3a421f487968c86cf396a6db092b742a3b2040
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOL' 'sip-files00269.txt'
b97e7159ad224df54a05545e8f54267b
1a517b552450d9150a303790f44f3db03c7f5e9b
describe
'8772' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOM' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
27225fcad3bcfa15bc45b64848ad2abb
d46feecc62e0cc4f712730300a0d1d433b9d4151
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCON' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
91debe40ae2106275bae00a808bef61a
a2b04106d7f42fbdc74651e679842df4dc214410
describe
'121707' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOO' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
e059cd3f972d06f1d747021f0aeb0eac
77eb0d98f4434c1181aadf278cd132b90be73a9e
describe
'35136' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOP' 'sip-files00270.pro'
4a8afd8029edaac0275b23f006404bdb
8d6fa10d77ed291fa4a57275d2b629abc0d6d6b2
describe
'37214' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOQ' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
0a6431eba2c60f3cd2d1b578db9b5f00
8fa3b41d5c526023cb622560948f97bcac7d3719
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOR' 'sip-files00270.tif'
4a60fd51d9763286e7401c04c93d8757
04ef6ca9d901bc7e0f997236d1eee5a7483b9435
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOS' 'sip-files00270.txt'
b515be158899e6dc7170a32a42ea71c5
b200eb94fe566d34271730b27266b8834c03ec2b
describe
Invalid character
'9259' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOT' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
eb8bc27bb306b8cfba2bc52157587f16
c502cdfedbad89f287435b0264f56bb9dc593e4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOU' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
881783912a748310c367921c0fdc296f
33cc596980fa556ac5059024deda27505ae977e0
describe
'116577' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOV' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
2d43d57c6693860bd02fc5e233e8da59
8c0e48a58429d983c39fb32fa0bb46631f22d5dd
describe
'33523' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOW' 'sip-files00271.pro'
19e49a2eb1d1870a39dc0406ee94d07d
97f21a5c8703398bc4b148f477d45196f7c6afb3
describe
'36841' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOX' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
57d4e064d78fa084b35046173119a9d7
56c838f69ed3ba4c34faa180c2fe8d2b7a00579f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOY' 'sip-files00271.tif'
69951c21912026f848a62b905d068a49
629477c2b5aceea10ef3509a1ca774a40d447fe0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCOZ' 'sip-files00271.txt'
ea329b00f9554acbf1a0fcfc7074060d
f2ba973d0bf337811dcf64f9d5f66a17e421a683
describe
Invalid character
'8997' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPA' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
9dbfe8b3ae184558403d4d1d0a635073
6dd80f5f7f61877412b09701a6aa7010e8ed45ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPB' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
c5fc48cd6d9ff3a10cfbe0eff94843e5
2cd53cfb9c19509fac80a59d5ab89ba296d69de6
describe
'113634' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPC' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
c23f0319d48ae3a991b1c4b714091604
dc728b56f4543ceb1a92993bd5d42981a00de9ec
describe
'33256' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPD' 'sip-files00272.pro'
77fb7af5eb93d87e05ef292358c0580e
e60488f4d1f2f72bb144a87e8a31bf79b3312db9
describe
'35949' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPE' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
7c0fbb8bc407176cabea936f89641a86
3d8c6efb396fd56e621b23f716be71d6d57bc86a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPF' 'sip-files00272.tif'
8539d1ff46fe29c2493708b618efea1c
8acddd249b7a61a13e9e869efc5bfb251b1d7fa5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPG' 'sip-files00272.txt'
224a48c196b600dbf424f021345cebb8
cb6babf5c45d3d0345f08215f17a86c75a2219ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPH' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
26f856dd313a93bfffc05f3387287d84
9cb1e3ac805ed6c50787b042b6a104f2a3889e13
describe
'342691' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPI' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
0a68f6bf53e6a6de71d76943420fcf13
ddbc4bf37de79adde447b16db5255b324673f0f5
describe
'117741' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPJ' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
6ba36216e3554dd53ab6750977995515
40db31daa27847fed033186d95f690dba6a723e7
describe
'35318' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPK' 'sip-files00273.pro'
c3173d5e2c128a5629bc9b24e581f3c8
cc8dee122224429cbda0b04c6f244dc948e81787
describe
'36665' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPL' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
613c5c83bb9d6deded53f83fa787326f
4ab7276c8b64560fa474ea9dda02d16b3ce3bdc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPM' 'sip-files00273.tif'
da5b20abd60ac8dd887a00f678f6a9d3
8a134d3ea6c3a5c2304afe8ef843950257ba4ca0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPN' 'sip-files00273.txt'
99850d7fa13f5e7958e3e3213c6e92bf
b0f44b650a242385c2febe8eef1a1763d59f11f3
describe
'9115' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPO' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
32dcb366ee3bb7b4c4cf4de9cf070623
749218e10af351ea85d9bb9cbc3682af8aab545d
describe
'342694' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPP' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
bff9bafa6866a629ae21b3bfda91fb72
265bec615d135cd16a07222b8c1c137a5d36e0e5
describe
'120026' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPQ' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
b361fdad5b81399dfb453d65b5806314
ba4e823ddc6bec3a2131b706c960ed50deeebf29
describe
'34204' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPR' 'sip-files00274.pro'
433a54df60e7a0fbb3df3d2e7db19161
bee5b0581de723d3515fb0798f4edbf40e5af464
describe
'36065' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPS' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
c3b46b52a4cdf2c3a73cd0306b38a072
36b8b4415862d1f7c39457d9b96f881003cac6fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPT' 'sip-files00274.tif'
69e0d4d1985603038cf449bccf08f3be
d81cd5ff29732f2ed05d2fc2c0f6444c1d9c020f
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPU' 'sip-files00274.txt'
282c51700f8eb5a29b66c421ab8a5c09
2d6b40b411e884a53e10d1de5f26a9ef40eada5e
describe
Invalid character
'8679' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPV' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
6cf2a410063005fd4ff8d4c888ea5b37
6d5ebd02eaab58832dc79e02351a22e68b2d4dcf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPW' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
5da02e0dadefe3c94ee3c72d6c91c067
a6f748c55e2e35c875d2069e88c524ee25b5162e
describe
'121334' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPX' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
b66aa1d2d218d387acde8e32461d02f4
01bdd565b4570e7be40f2cd5079af9d0216b25d3
describe
'34539' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPY' 'sip-files00275.pro'
3f74dd49e24b5f3ea0da686a71c726aa
679962496af9bb44e6b9a163f3f4bfd46b37fd35
describe
'37449' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCPZ' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
d39358ddd6f1aaaf8a9281a0b6b88f17
9424aca86a00c823cc9b4dc01e6321094aa517b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQA' 'sip-files00275.tif'
0425d4e7888479de3022a2a3ac067b10
7213052e8045fced05ecb5955bc57cc8c74a8eba
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQB' 'sip-files00275.txt'
5ec4ccf9947b50728a218a0922b20955
585e210df044d1aea9dc5759e0c16c4c0b6b614d
describe
'9397' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQC' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
2867f68ac18e75f7aca35f666080c2d1
6addd57512be048f61abbd0494bdbe46e69609b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQD' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
55b1304c4ed7246caf202415d55c487a
1e8222ef1c3983a9339a770fce44d63aa6143a24
describe
'117544' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQE' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
4076d66d6d4a264674b27fd373e6eaf2
d5cdb767f5a3a91362762ba8233dad2bd4b50cbd
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQF' 'sip-files00276.pro'
bb60034608b88fcd4f9c6810fef08d52
ffce579a8fbfa3ca741e73cd0293911a885143bc
describe
'36038' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQG' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
70a2f1225b66e86c8bf5744bf253c804
35e83b7fe520a1e8079110f89ee2ce25fc8df2b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQH' 'sip-files00276.tif'
139239f0b4af25e00a431379b88881c9
495a49ed3036d8d6d2114d82593ac6c044b927c2
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQI' 'sip-files00276.txt'
e988b7aa8f3215edf2b7247729c5d492
4f000a18c4de34dcd472c26831ba6e2605fdf9dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQJ' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
e87c96dd981aee269e2348f4c2c01f6a
9f0f7df5bbb195dba57e04cfbb6cdb45a3afead9
describe
'342720' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQK' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
a5fb516dcd19bad774b132d127742b52
9398553f20a4cef233a86f37a9e5471c2c0a0529
describe
'86307' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQL' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
f988ec2c2fd3fd6aedfaa933d97a616a
9a0d74319ee3af8b4d89888502ba998fb341a724
describe
'24328' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQM' 'sip-files00277.pro'
c582dd34dae84da4a05ce1f6da67e82a
d797b7756edc5622bdca4fc05e9bb5fe1733bf34
describe
'25624' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQN' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
b6d11d16b223bff4eae7a51b188ec8c1
898c86a4feeda8f4549cd69d2cfea3c5710d8a06
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQO' 'sip-files00277.tif'
a730fe443f6c695b3ff7d9b17ff98d31
e18158d986dc7577e1a2dd505779a5aa787ac8a4
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQP' 'sip-files00277.txt'
b3a74705d585087dfde3c89b78a204be
f23fbaafce79d75de12387b3d854fea183a5b86f
describe
'6101' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQQ' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
3fbe58ac1ce3a52a9371c4c470bf174d
9efeb354b9c3f2cd5aa14787a1056ee9db9c62e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQR' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
276a9f222c7001b2335bd5d41e9cb970
3643c3a0c1484e83dab1f09073ccc496b11102f2
describe
'86586' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQS' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
5fdfe9653e191c4f76b5a2cf332bfb2a
895ea3279536c38bd4e30084c743469832a59571
describe
'25050' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQT' 'sip-files00278.pro'
31415e2d0f64fef1782de671859340b8
023ee0aecdbac04ed2700c8664be4780d047ecfe
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQU' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
c49f2297655e8ca3ab7fabf96583c3f3
8265d0b5de6b8fcdc43d01f9774f4a90ad430ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQV' 'sip-files00278.tif'
353807e36dd618b8265dfd6742f7e77a
a516f7127d4afb3c4cb6912cacb29c39767742c5
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQW' 'sip-files00278.txt'
4fcc40b09c75177992fd3d2b3c33644d
1239899f10a6d14a36551c578a9a4fff6efd0824
describe
'7137' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQX' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
2217e6a67ee8d5014186d85853dd3714
ffed51de8140a5dd600f0c00ecabd64eb090084b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQY' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
69485944fedc8e21fda0abdf8c76b370
0f22c30aede24a1b0e59f468648f7a221113e8e6
describe
'115845' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCQZ' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
316d318969d0eedb81bb2d831d8fae9f
fac91899e65acf49ed699e39c189e1d4a900f04f
describe
'34919' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRA' 'sip-files00279.pro'
b79233e4634af50c9a741947bc93d313
b3f8eaab08552fe1e5f9dedc3ea6d654f2569005
describe
'36730' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRB' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
6465ba3cf43a4690f0e1885d8886cdc0
bf4274f27d4ac18d11a3a00c05983a9741db7bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRC' 'sip-files00279.tif'
efc3a614e50345d07c51aa6a595b5ba2
e77d7a224a40826b134f71f1d9cf492489548482
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRD' 'sip-files00279.txt'
140bed671f02c3fe9e5087a59607bb1a
3679517b8bfc2cecc06e4345b12c341b731e5964
describe
'9094' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRE' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
272778bde7a656767ef164a4303c315b
3822d1c3f783c13e15d41212861baf4e18bb85b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRF' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
301717655ac031673c468fe70a23e572
49715b16a2c39465709c1e10c519048383a113f1
describe
'114573' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRG' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
a183fae56695fa84afff61c0df93cc96
1f829cb70f00e1f0a69f73ceb6ea18dfe05b1b3a
describe
'34270' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRH' 'sip-files00280.pro'
9df9795e1a4a138934d456482e08c195
419d9b77d069b9f929e10e575f0547dee0c9ba6c
describe
'36636' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRI' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
0ba16badf7ba79507ca0ba9203889e51
51a089ca7b08f81dd8b005353201207a0f74464c
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRJ' 'sip-files00280.tif'
a96cffc1128fb50c07f752230bf6e64f
9556bdb5f218f362698b3c2a0d81c2f1745efcfb
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRK' 'sip-files00280.txt'
d828ddece5611e064ed0f4a4d96d57e0
523c057b54f9b1c129461f05fe5b35f65250ab0c
describe
'8904' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRL' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
c06fb4877ce66ffceed0c4a3438d1a5d
4a29f945bbfd4069415990cb55dee56d0e62d198
describe
'342733' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRM' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
ff9e02208ef4a8b2252b064518f8f101
6e6b4ffdd054c01c7eb11ee116ce05783ea3a3c5
describe
'117989' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRN' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
e6c3ded7694963ee8eba1e73a8f80b0d
2ae59382f2e0f5ec18c1f6581b7a930bb243ec78
describe
'34037' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRO' 'sip-files00281.pro'
9b306aa3134fe61b4aed61839084c09e
3bc54ee1bb31f5226bc73d64ee86bb0474b033f3
describe
'36222' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRP' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
902211078d1d5a8accebfe11e3fd9005
d000c85bdc3e4ea24191e10400c66425136add92
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRQ' 'sip-files00281.tif'
eb61c8e02dcbbd8488b9a70887bc118b
91fe0cd7ee650b0b1e0dc075a04680442ef2805d
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRR' 'sip-files00281.txt'
2ed850f498ae7c472cd86e673dc1ad80
4225e6f6aeb9c74af6bb65d210ec4271e5f81930
describe
'8995' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRS' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
3ec27d84515a24b689181651249a3601
235a72d00e3146cc8fece7a7413417c075078768
describe
'342661' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRT' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
8c360fb387d4da140409ba1ba28c3c8b
af847b76df628b198aa919465bf9394586b45f20
describe
'109810' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRU' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
8c59242dc587831f6cbb61a6d4241511
d1b9995100884c1e24a9804a3420ae520111ea6f
describe
'34499' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRV' 'sip-files00282.pro'
43865fa4248a9b2c1958446397df5964
b23887adca0a49fddc0f2988a8311400bf53403a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRW' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
46425dbbae3fa1bad2f6f9112854943e
413e1433dce425a83a3ca1ec8012ecb1288ab66a
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRX' 'sip-files00282.tif'
6a39820e885a42b647fe60e1e11bb3ce
6af0c5071b3e89e6e65f6a2ed81dfb12b169e540
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRY' 'sip-files00282.txt'
1295b27cce6ca4ce78bc6b25cddf7d4d
4c5bd5710e63a2a60af39b13e2ebd8e5839d7df8
describe
Invalid character
'8940' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCRZ' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
17886d87bf89a9b0de35792d5dcac60c
723015d1b4555737293373280d8b2335c56c5789
describe
'342734' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSA' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
140005bfc0d5e619904c1c0a717889ce
2e8d38fd177db68ee0969f21389f0d16135df18b
describe
'113883' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSB' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
c881c2cc2780e98c6fc35b3da5c9909b
9c52d8244c3934eeeac1a77c7ce9e4dc20df0a22
describe
'34158' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSC' 'sip-files00283.pro'
f0e5cdbf1da7a77c3a898b8d4f1dfba6
8a999ddba0e1056b34a4176bcf9f92b30de47f46
describe
'35959' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSD' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
e8fa1787e47c5f5f26d35b584f3e1b19
c2c8bdedc8b7a0adf2b329f899d670f21ab11e29
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSE' 'sip-files00283.tif'
a4a0027e2eb0d2674e4203e3bc18687b
f01f6376f34723ecae53f2a5ff7acf83b3f35127
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSF' 'sip-files00283.txt'
b309922a1286ab03cbf9f47d2fe5139f
5ce6bcd958708f17b5acf3384cefd809b6f6490f
describe
'8785' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSG' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
6958f0464b573b1dd7a8aac5d4775380
96ce07d777054c5a32f867b54fd20feb0c430dd0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSH' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
a476746834815d2e72c5e63cdaccbd58
260adf92f4ad2f965474571eb2b040a00c236d19
describe
'113267' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSI' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
364a06b02395c54792b863d5de9ad58a
b2ad85c05548507a534de5531f0c5e2d7df236e8
describe
'33839' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSJ' 'sip-files00284.pro'
8b4d3b64ed6ea4fada6d0df31939290e
d6365eee8ac672df8a9290829dda3d0bc1e4a349
describe
'35400' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSK' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
420ed307a2af6b6b24381a11ab00b12c
8f51a42605715d67f3670b7c57b8dbd0ebb1bfd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSL' 'sip-files00284.tif'
d3eeef0b323100c9ab63d02d9beac0b7
2c0fa7ae0ec4b3413d18d469d6f37469316ddcce
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSM' 'sip-files00284.txt'
cd42595ca765fd134933d8240fb95030
b745e49b6c0b6db45292679b67e1d2b95610c1be
describe
'8973' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSN' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
4bf29c55780e35a0fc59381172129297
bb886e5996247c209af093d80c63af21a7a42d89
describe
'342553' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSO' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
fc3ac9539b964de7cc931f249db7ec26
ccdccdc69c89da9a478eeb97aca23b9edbe0e45a
describe
'108805' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSP' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
1c2ca535f6d001c0a83bfd3ffbf4cf6a
8b9e5ba7aa3331785dd417af223e0b8cf3d57cef
describe
'31536' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSQ' 'sip-files00285.pro'
78fb575f2034df59c88a46473ef7fc01
ad9b437f4a009c84519bb77ff889aae8c05710d5
describe
'34253' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSR' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
fc7457ff71dfab3f08fd5803f5325531
67ef0a695a2b7933c34a1bab1b74765e41368aa5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSS' 'sip-files00285.tif'
186a0c58b46d989c4a674f3f4f470043
d838c1b89502de4bb2187ece9dc159717d4fe23e
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCST' 'sip-files00285.txt'
aaccceb4fbf9a02c17e5b0412aa4c343
72e05bf4b63579e194f8e7886b396e2ebaeab4b7
describe
Invalid character
'8647' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSU' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
0a1cbfa9324e47ecd4d8c7ed0cfc0671
21a8176869144c6e583b3a61e1fb4ffe5b301a57
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSV' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
20d351cf77996abd3c52e4441e2b12cb
8b07c2a276436b7f29fb755424bf23536edf3db4
describe
'125622' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSW' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
f641aacbed906fc8861e91e94b7e60be
e35e237809088e0781659738f952fc09daad4500
describe
'33637' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSX' 'sip-files00286.pro'
e9dac2b3e7fe0d07ae3f0e1ff75c23c4
aad6f894ee7bb2563e2c60ec9fba4ebc785f13cb
describe
'37169' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSY' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
d47ee11dc3029bd0a3f0fede62c902c5
7284117d7c3ec9b16d74c346309710ab8985d477
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCSZ' 'sip-files00286.tif'
fa176875f0fee2845ad532d967a561c5
4c34dfe05d93e2348572f7ae30d3e34065f889a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTA' 'sip-files00286.txt'
3501e15d1900c9fd164a172c4cf3c99a
d7b4b6bf38a65697e321f971bbc0f6f51053af39
describe
Invalid character
'9990' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTB' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
1eceb9b9f12567590ed8a27e6561bdf1
3b0eaef19c77e391704cdf1c769e6cb6991955de
describe
'361705' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTC' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
b3100c99f1f959bcc1e7b0540da0463b
94499f1130735545c4414c06ed8ad1a8f6f171ce
describe
'90911' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTD' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
a57403679c3abf46834bc5dd1fde8eb6
b616e4b1fcc39d45198b786a10497efee12b7a67
describe
'7530' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTE' 'sip-files00287.pro'
5a2f5a0e6475925c03486c3041fea976
af98c44378a8bf62fcdfb23efd1af7bad22dd2c2
describe
'21578' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTF' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
99933816009c288010b9efaec3369d5e
013a4fe4ae4e89923c7c0a13446838f94e28abb3
describe
'2911552' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTG' 'sip-files00287.tif'
71a8046561f5ce1f6b27ab3dd6e53c81
c27bc3ba302a0cd0eee5c8dbe9a7234451bf501d
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTH' 'sip-files00287.txt'
af82ae9748b8d6b8c65d7122ae35d747
93be6e1d0d53f4c55fc1aa1cddffa6a9d1d115ed
describe
'6144' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTI' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
65c3e6ab157cece119dd65ff3f1008e2
4aed8945acc9b29d5fa621b2a3ac3e96e290b015
describe
'342340' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTJ' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
52077623a8dc88871643959c0cf22f0d
d5d8a5fc5ec2158815215927f999ec74cac40a24
describe
'16423' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTK' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
851153c4ba782826141d77e75b08ae73
694ca5b7ff9cdb8c6767c312a6e1978e39334195
describe
'3198' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTL' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
c2c8254a245c1efe8ef6fec42f30fde1
a66f72dceb0cae5f23936962d55800e8cfb45c20
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTM' 'sip-files00288.tif'
f8890d7879250430f4e746e75b180879
9a39813a64077ec4e94c375660c09a0f9505572b
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTN' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
d2b729c7fadfe03cd1897c093051bfaf
90fe70981c6b4c030cec0e2da4be51f3f33d0b41
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTO' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
dbba943cc1c454d547904453295252aa
8d01bf0656263777d8caef243fc0bb31aba3c0ce
describe
'97656' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTP' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
9f523eb893c7933d11fdc4e405d1f932
7363971f5a1d6be59532ac059c9e74c11623c013
describe
'26883' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTQ' 'sip-files00289.pro'
b4fc6f1c9839f365ab8d557f97c1204f
be66cb3d3b7547ec466545f5164dd6ede3dba347
describe
'28512' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTR' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
95a99626446498754d6f32f5cb2014d4
770a069856473f8417c575f44100226c0fc83aab
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTS' 'sip-files00289.tif'
422581d65bd32724166aed3b56d24eae
50157bb83807261b511a8adcd7969851ad2850aa
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTT' 'sip-files00289.txt'
f77c88fbb8032cde56ff53b6cdbfab25
bb96fbe91586438a730420952ccf1fb7984b06d9
describe
'7006' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTU' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
93440ac58e2f705bab70be834088670e
0cc3adb1e035703093d7ddc708211240082d319b
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTV' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
5c5e63ffe423ac87c5986595a84baac8
5473602ee891dfe9d041baedcad6d33854c6aec4
describe
'91559' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTW' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
02ab73236fb47c6c7efc3307e15da9d7
183161348f7cb208fd2ae197b00a959e515bc892
describe
'25614' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTX' 'sip-files00290.pro'
dac8d40ae5c0a9bacac3dc932e0eb317
ac079be1f15677c7717699b31b3200bc22014640
describe
'27753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTY' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
e9d92c5a2afc296e1fbecf08487145cf
8b37658751089a0c69260b84000673f3924a3ad6
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCTZ' 'sip-files00290.tif'
e6171efa08e57fa600ff66bc264f0e3d
b349b51798b2de9de76e8964edc9943e59795d5b
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUA' 'sip-files00290.txt'
384ba30d40b0511689d77d254e6cef1d
f41400d3c95883da624a9c46b02cb7f3a2e66e9b
describe
Invalid character
'7010' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUB' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
e7af678913bde28c89a52ed0dfaab8db
2b078424b3c4f5e19fbbbdefad79c79186bf7427
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUC' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
153432889bf77f64949c33f55fc8dc2c
9bed0f4a50b3f9e7f16d5f450fcbdaf17f198e38
describe
'114001' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUD' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
0a42c29f00cb1c26ef81cf7dc8a0e81c
fff4f8efcacf2d45b46011bf3ea437f71e89b94a
describe
'34968' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUE' 'sip-files00291.pro'
8302663cb9bf18e3135c48191d9c04d8
fc0419e9a0c13eb3d5c9e2cb936f32e7b1f66d5d
describe
'35537' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUF' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
9678c4aec14a52d68f8b01c2f123717a
16a61b30bb28522397c51c1f76ef9a5c8ef34184
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUG' 'sip-files00291.tif'
ca69339ddbd57bae2416d5ce051e1f59
b69c4b8f023fba1f96a4f882bd75b2e6695190df
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUH' 'sip-files00291.txt'
9b76859c9b68bd47e54a8f9f5b614dbd
2cdc28abc5815213f9a9f82ece371d295d152c21
describe
Invalid character
'8528' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUI' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
7cc785e7e37f9dc13d0f4035f22922ac
a10ec31bb9d330ce52acbc196a2202c30c81d8d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUJ' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
feaf352d91d87c9463eccabeac436ad3
32b683bb9de78f81bbe8a4482842501f6f414920
describe
'116212' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUK' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
504c34b1b88c656222e5b1bc99f76864
9f0351508e54cd87d7287201c2b35c44370d87ac
describe
'34914' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUL' 'sip-files00292.pro'
432ade2ef78953c4e2ec64fed6f55d20
fbd905cf33bae7c4a4f5a563dcbf116d02d24204
describe
'34652' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUM' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
04851497b1085e60e1b9c00a89c17b27
0b0cb87bf2f625c92950e2be908c2c5247ae0afa
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUN' 'sip-files00292.tif'
a79f611ad2a4607cfca9575f6de38628
5bc783fb71233200d186a90ce7a1648ae884172b
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUO' 'sip-files00292.txt'
6ee225c5cb99e1f8bb25039b4b7aa70c
181d80385e0f815576565097e75c103048d7888f
describe
'8680' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUP' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
db055c53905434ac0d7f39bd2907d9b7
a41562188dee870e8a4dba3617394bd8264b7640
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUQ' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
d80da3a21446992c297abfd71cd6ff20
ce9ef221568db9842f28129ee2e341ffc9430615
describe
'118148' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUR' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
e3f570073d3d2285606f4f499ab789f1
0b46a2ab36b10ca930d23b8470f035cc06d5b371
describe
'34375' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUS' 'sip-files00293.pro'
c12cfedc6b53791d83f9fda0ba9d06cd
ef5705669f9314a489cdf48b858c783b534a72f7
describe
'36628' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUT' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
c7bd6b35ee578d805f8d573c7cd5d2b9
93170546f6d4c67eb153b7f515b2749f79d5a518
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUU' 'sip-files00293.tif'
50477518ba8a5b6c38d21093018fff96
e28978de21fb65f411de7b39a767856e99482ce5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUV' 'sip-files00293.txt'
bca28bd915fd9284bc119477ca8cfacd
86e8f54d535d2ed3857490cadbb75c0e4c454a37
describe
'8740' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUW' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
7cd4b9270fefd9b1447eb35f69d027b5
cc70bac857aef2f09eaa6ced0ea7c295a6d58b06
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUX' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
e46ddf7bedefbc9bb45a0a611229b01b
05fc67bc253a2c16b8c71d127eaee8f2b4edee63
describe
'111117' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUY' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
577e26c5f47ac6e32821a5c8ea6f77f4
c557dfb5337e8ac9fa53786fd1c239085f804c45
describe
'33296' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCUZ' 'sip-files00294.pro'
3da44ee46d74e2e13912ab25444981a1
4ae8e809a6c889399990c52c9f6c817313d4fc7f
describe
'34928' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVA' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
5b8e867963d412a06d880bffaa2ec428
0d4d8f9ae214d6ea967ddd3d2424b7a3dae11ed5
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVB' 'sip-files00294.tif'
758d083baadc15039fdffbcb8e368b17
75cc52c2cea5a4863fddad0341c34f9a091cbc11
'2011-12-29T21:30:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVC' 'sip-files00294.txt'
7db6df1bc7e939252b25ab627dad95d9
3e936b06d018c565f5f61541401003faf5180d2e
describe
'8583' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVD' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
63ebb284b2db6f6e01bcab1d5eadaf34
9a18055fac7c1f4fd202b11f1af0f183e62113f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVE' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
5ecf2254e86b17a8ffe20fce6efe2b69
2e111a6fb1c88e1e74ea81c7c7fb3ed4a39b415f
describe
'117641' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVF' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
1193b683c5eef140f7fdd3172ab315ca
a6dbc538cc8fba1172125b2496ec5c8bf0f45948
describe
'33966' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVG' 'sip-files00295.pro'
3785dfaf44848ef8ee632b2e8da454e1
c2ad698294a6d24b7d3ee955c744ff1b80321f5d
describe
'35872' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVH' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
f4b3c84b52f25d6a505ac52d1ac78227
ef9b36b97ba903364c00b3dce0d0f56b96a06dff
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVI' 'sip-files00295.tif'
9e8443d65376eb5da03e65d30e77316b
8ba675a81f8b9df00d65062c96171f6947bce859
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVJ' 'sip-files00295.txt'
628872c4393c7a6a79dd69abf8ac7328
a6adf147466972e1857598283eb53e11ddc5e965
describe
Invalid character
'8526' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVK' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
3064752f61a652573a2cadb76660668e
2be5d926f94e34657c37abb66a688395de54eaaf
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVL' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
53f49070be569714149724882020bdc0
1b1f8a75791eceb124edf059edfe45e8f12e27ad
describe
'115355' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVM' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
a0f0c089474dd4f789c7fba2e2e35dea
d7699ea394b24c68c2f32d0704fc2b85ce132f53
describe
'34300' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVN' 'sip-files00296.pro'
18734e623efd752e197c6e4330a66671
fe98bfc877c3a4eb769642f70099f2ef54b78ec5
describe
'35611' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVO' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
5fb988676df2ccf4463dff583dc8c4ab
f7d7cfbb5c30f5ad94514dd1070f64c4997a9a41
describe
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVP' 'sip-files00296.tif'
c54c1a0de5180e12d91f569a38fbfac6
2de3e5f658feb4a242189aea08384b63ae011dc0
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCVQ' 'sip-files00296.txt'
802fcfab03b2ef6c1e5cb1190b3f96d4
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describe
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Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCWF' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
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Invalid character
'7113' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCXA' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
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describe
Invalid character
'6753' 'info:fdaE20081224_AAAADGfileF20081224_AACCXH' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-20T13:10:12-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
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http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
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TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
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describe
'2013-12-20T13:10:07-05:00'
xml resolution


Ttiett

bathed

AN


The Baldwin Library

University
RmB wc
Florida
















































es gn









HE FELT THE JUDGE’S



STERN EYES FIXED UPON HIM. (See paee 68.)
REUBEN’S HINDRANCES

AND .

HOW HE MADE THEM HELPS TOWARD
PROGRESS

Q Story for Bovs

CLANS S eve w

(Mrs. G. R. ALDEN)

AUTHOR OF “ESTER RIED,” ‘ WANTED,” “OVERRULED,”
“THE PRINCE OF PEACE,’? ETC.

ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY
COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY

LoTHRoP PUBLISHING COMPANY.

All rights reserved.

PANSY.

TRADE-MaRK REGISTERED JUNE 4, 1895,
CHAPTER

I.

II.
Til.
IV.
Vv.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.

CONS NaS:

PAGE
HINDERED BY FIRE .- 0. 3 0. 3 oss ee 9
IAS EOSTS SUPRPE Reactive aioe ir ool or ee ee
“ONs0UP Omen ioe oo quo: bo dno. Gg oh Son Y/
ACBEWILDEREDSROV eo) r= ee ee
CROSS“OQUESTIONED = eee ee 00
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. . .. =... + 778
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. . . . . - + « 92
FLOWERS AND THORNS . . . . . «© + + + 107
‘© WHAT MAKES THINGS HappEN?’? . . . . 118
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. ... . .- + « « I31
IX GG CleU NCE Gg GG co os Oo oo
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. . . . . . + « 154
PAWSIN IS Wee WV ORiGD teeeteoeeseete stearate eve cars Orel OA:
MRIVMPHSWAND a PUZZIEES soe. oie een ores A)
THE Way GROWS PLEASANTER . . . . . « 183
GHRISTMASUREANS#. 6 teniuset eeu (entare tccu meu fe TOS
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. . « « « «© « + 205
6s A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!”? . . . 2...» 217

5
6 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE
OTN CS2SIRATIN GT IME oes yt ols cs iiursgg sei tera) ol 227,
XX. ‘*CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS”? . . . . . « 239
XOX NAN CYS = CHANGE Gy Gage cette Sedans ier ee 24

SXSXMT AINE Wis WORLD ass a rot in tenor oll on eet gst ZOO

XOXTM Ts SAR ROUGH MRAM Haase cag sired Hel ee ona ee tenuate 2/70

OMIT ZR IDS aig Boe gan ao oa ace 6 hw
List OF ALEUSPRANIONS:

He FELT THE JUDGE’s STERN EYES FIXED UPON HIM,

frontispiece

PAGE

REUBEN CAME TO A SUDDEN HALT. . ...... 15
Nancy HARDMAN WAS OUT ON THE PORCH. . . . . 43

WHILE REUBEN WAITED, HE TOOK UP A BOOK AND

PREWAN Mga rot ese ott gehen ee een OS
(©) NegIETITIS VPA ic tector otecn ree epee techie ee eect sree GT

“ WE ARE GOING PAST YouR OLD Hog,” saip ALIcE, 189

REUBEN STOOD STILL IN THE ROAD . .... . . 209
GMEAgeS By Wb ae i209 VND Gs 8 ol suctos og 6 ol ol oY)
He BURIED His Fack In His HANDS. . . ... . 279

REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER I.
HINDERED BY FIRE.

T was November, but the weather wouldn’t have
told you so; the grass was green, and the
roses and tulips and all manner of bright flowers
were in bloom; and there was sunshine every-
where. Groups of girls in white dresses and no
wraps walked leisurely along the streets ; occasion-
ally one fanned herself with her broad-brimmed
hat, and said, “ How hot it is!” Yet it was almost
Thanksgiving Day.

Oh! it snowed in some parts of the world that
day ; the papers told about an unusually heavy fall
of snow, —about sleet, and drifts, and sharp, cutting
winds. The girls in white would have laughed at
the thought of such athing ; they could not imagine
frost and snow anywhere; they lived in Florida
— away down on the peninsula, where snow never
comes, and even the frost just touches the flowers

9
Io REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

once ina while; almost like a kiss, for lightness, is
his touch in that part of the world — and the girls
may wear white. dresses and flower-wreaths at
Christmas as well as at Thanksgiving, and are lia-
ble at any time through the year to be complaining
of the heat.

Out inthe country, at least two miles away from
the groups of merry young people in their white
dresses and flower-trimmed hats, was Reuben Stein,
hurrying along as fast as tired feet would take him.
A hurried boy was Reuben, nearly always. He
worked for his beard and clothes at Mr. Hard-
man’s; and though the board was so poor that
Reuben often went hungry, and his clothes were
of the poorest, and worn until he felt ashamed to
be seen on the street by daylight, they seemed to
cost a great deal; for work as he might all day and
every day, he was constantly told that he was not
worth the salt which it took to season his food.
When Reuben was younger, he might have sea-
soned his food with his tears, had they been shed
at the right time, and not saved up until he was safe
in his bed for the night ; but as he grew older, and
reached the age of fourteen, he made up his mind
that tears did no good — only unfitted him for his
work the next day, and that he would brave it out
and do the best he could; one of these days he
would be old enough to run away, and then the
HINDERED BY FIRE. II

Hardmans would never see him again. Just how
old he would have to be before he ran away, he had
never quite decided—nor how he was going to
manage it, since he had long before settled it that
he would never be a tramp ; but when he ran, would
wear good clothes and have enough money in his
pocket to pay for his food, and a decent place in
which to sleep. A respectable, gentlemanly sort
of runaway Reuben meant to be.

It would not, however, be right to leave you to
suppose that Mr. Hardman was cruel, or that he
intended to half starve Reuben. The truth is, the
Hardmans were very poor, and had a trying time
themselves ; they worked hard every day of their
lives, not excepting Sundays. Often it was as much
as they could do to get themselves enough to eat.
Often the older children went hungry, too, though
it was Reuben’s turn oftener than it was the others’.
Perhaps that was but natural; Reuben felt this
himself, and would not have minded the hunger,
or the ragged clothes, half so much if he had not
been scolded and grumbled at every day of his life.
Still, in their way, the Hardmans had been good to
Reuben Stein; they thought they had been very
good. When his father and mother died, both in
the same week, during that awful yellow fever year,
were they not the ones who came forward and of-
fered him a home until he could do better? And
12 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

while they had grown poorer each year, had Reu-
ben ever been able to do better?

Reuben, as he hurried along on this November
afternoon, went over the story of the years, as he
so often did, and wondered if there would ever be
a way out. While he owned to himself that the
Hardmans had been as good to him as perhaps
people like them could be, and told himself for the
hundredth time that when he got to be a man, and
had a home, and money, he would be sure to re-
member them — nevertheless, he told himself, also,
that he did not believe he could stand it much
longer; and that if he did not get this place in
view, he believed he should die. He felt the more
sure of this because he had strong hope of secur-
ing the place. Only the night before, hé had seen
in the village paper the advertisement of a North-
ern gentleman who was boarding at a farm-house
three miles out. He wanted a strong boy of twelve
or fourteen to go North with him as an attendant
and caretaker of a little invalid lad who needed
somebody with him all day. One who applied must
know how to read and write, and must be willing
to give his whole time during the day to his charge.

Now, it happened that Reuben was what is called
a natural reader; though really I do not think there
was any “happen” about it. His mother had been
a good reader, and had taught him when quite
HINDERED BY FIRE. 13

young to read carefully and with expression. Since
he had been left alone in the world he had had very
little to read; the Hardmans were not people who
cared much for any sort of reading, and besides
had no money to spend for even a weekly paper.
The consequence was, that Reuben read and re-
read the few books and magazines that had been
given to him when the home was broken up; and
because they were well worth reading, he learned
more, perhaps, than he would if he had had plenty
of books and papers. When the advertisement
called for somebody who knew how to read, his
heart beat faster over the hope that here was his
chance. What more reasonable than to suppose
that part of the duties of the place would be to
read to the invalid boy? Of course books would
be provided, and it was possible that among them
might be some of the very ones about which his
mother had talked, and which he had so longed to
read. Whether they were or-not, Reuben was sure
to like whatever was to be read; so fond of it was
he that he enjoyed reading the very advertisements
as he went along the village streets. As for the
writing, he chuckled to himself as he remembered
how his mother had prided herself on the clear,
round hand which he wrote, and told him that per-
haps it would make his fortune some day. What
if the time had come for his fortune to begin? As
14. REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

he hurried over the road he told himself that he
had been very “lucky” to get hold of that paper
last night, and see that advertisement. If it had
not been for his having to trudge back to the gro-
cery after the saleratus that Nancy forgot to tell
him about when he went for the meal, he shouldn’t
have seen it; and he also told himself that he would
never grumble again about having things go wrong,
as he did all the way back to the grocery. At this
point he came to a sudden halt. He was passing
a young orange-grove, whose small, straight trees
were leaved in lovely green. It was not the trees
which arrested his steps, but the fence, or rather,
what was going on at the foot of the fence. Ac-
tually a fire! and looking for all the world as though
it had been set; for there was a little pile of pine
boughs near by, as though they had been brought
there to feed the fire. It was burning briskly now,
and as the fence was largely made of pine, would
be likely to burn briskly. “It will go all around
the grove!’’ said Reuben to himself, “and worse
than that, it will creep along the bushes to the
young trees and ruin them. Why, it might even
reach the house and burn it. I must put it out.”
Suiting the action to the thought, he began to pull
away the wood from around the fire, and to separate
the parts which were then burning, and smothered
the blaze, It was still a small fire, having evidently




































REUBEN CAME TO A SUDDEN HALT.

HINDERED BY FIRE. 17

been started but a few minutes. A little vigorous
pulling and beating left only smoking embers, which
Reuben separated so far from each other that they
could not act as feeders. He would have been bet-
ter satisfied with his work if he could have poured
a few pails of water on it, but the house for which
he had had fears was far back in the grove, and had
the appearance of being shut up. “The folks are
not at home,” said Reuben, still talking to himself,
as he strode through the grove and looked carefully
at the closed blinds. ‘I don’t believe I could get
in to get any water ; and I don’t believe it is neces-
sary. I guess I have put it all out; and I’ve got
to hurry if I get there before four o’clock. ‘Apply
at the Portland farm before four o’clock on Tues-
day ;’ that is what it said. I’m pretty near a mile
from there this minute, and by the looks of the sun
it isn’t far from four o’clock. What if I should be
too late!”

The thought lent wings to his feet ; although at
the same time he really had little fear of being too
late. He knew the neighborhood pretty well, and
did not think of another boy besides himself —
who would be likely to care for such a chance as
that — who could meet the requirements. There
was Vick Brasier who wanted a place, and who
had been threatening all summer to run away if
nothing opened; but Vick was a horrid reader, and
18 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

as for writing, he could not write his own name
so he could be sure of it himself an hour after-
wards. There was little to be feared from that
source. Still, the Portland farm was only four
miles away from the next village, and there might
be boys there whom he did not know. Anyhow, it
would not do to be late. He was speeding over the
ground again, having decided that his fire was safe,
when, as he turned the corner to reach the road
which led directly to the Portland farm, he made
another full stop. Those scamps, whoever they
-were, had started another fire around this side. It
had failed them, to be sure, but not before it had
done a little harm, and some of the embers still
-had a good deal of life in them; and there was
more danger on this side than on the other, for the
breeze which was already sprung up, always came
from this way, and might fan those embers into
flames. Reuben looked at the sun and felt sure _
it was almost four o’clock. He had tried to get an
earlier start, but it seemed as though Nancy Hard-
man wanted more things done for her that after-
noon than ever before. He looked toward the
house in the distance; it was as much shut up on
this side as on the other, and besides, he had seen
Mr. Fenning’s carriage pass early in the afternoon
with Mr. Fenning himself and three ladies in it.
And Ann Jones, who lived next door to their house,
HINDERED BY FIRE. 19

told Nancy, in the morning, that she and Mrs. Fen-
ning’s cook were going to the circus that after-
noon. He felt sure there was nobody at home,
but he would run up there and knock. The boy
who did chores might be around somewhere. So
he ran with all speed, and knocked hard, and re-
ceived no answer. He came back and looked at
the fire. Should he go on and leave it to take care
of itself? No, there was really danger here ; those
embers had more life in them than he had sup-
posed ; one had broken into a blaze while he was
gone; and all along was a trail of pine boughs
which contained a good deal of pitch. Moreover,
half-burned bits were scattered along close to the
fence; it was very dry, and there was no telling
how soon they might blaze ; in fact, some of them
were blazing now. There was no help for it; he
must make it safe for the people who lived in that
house before he took another step. It was harder
work than before; the fire would break out in an-
other place after he thought he had entirely con-
quered it. If there was only some way to get
water! But that was not to be had without get-
ting into the locked house; he must depend on
sand and beating. At last, after a full hour of
busy work, during which all the dangerous-looking
bits of pine were gathered and carried to a safe
place, Reuben felt that he could go on with a clear
20 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

conscience. He took the precaution to run around
the grove this time to make sure there were no
more attempts at setting it on fire, and then made
what speed he could-to the Portland farm, much
troubled all the way by two thoughts: First, would
he be too late to have his trip do any good? Sec-
ondly, what would Mr. Hardman say to him for
being gone so long? Of course it would never do
to say anything about the Portland farm to Mr.
Hardman ; he believed that Reuben’s only errand
this afternoon was to see if the Sedgwick boys
could come with their team and help Mr. Hardman
plough his grove the next day. Now, the Sedgwick
boys lived a half a mile this side of the Fenning
place. What kind of a story could he tell Mr.
Hardman? If he explained about the fire, which
was really what had delayed him,—for by run-
ning every step of the way, he had calculated that
he could get back from the Portland farm in about
the time that he would be expected to take, — he
would of course be asked what he was doing near
the Fenning place. There is no denying that
matters looked gloomy to Reuben Stein. Never-
theless, he meant to visit the Portland farm before
he went home that night.

It was a very pleasant farm-house, with long,
wide piazzas running all around. The house itself
was set in an orange-grove, whose beautiful dark
HINDERED BY FIRE. 21

foliage made a dense shade. On the south piazza
was a wheel-chair of a peculiar shape, and lying
back among its cushions was a fair-faced boy of
about Reuben’s age, though he was so slight and
pale that he looked to Reuben much younger.
Beside him, in an arm-chair, sat a middle-aged man
with an open book in his lap, from which he had
evidently just been reading; though he laid it
down to watch Reuben as he hurried, out of breath,
up the long carriage-drive.

“ Only see how fast he can walk,” said the sick
boy, watching Reuben with keen interest.

“Yes,” said the man cheerily, “that is the way
you will be walking through the world when you
get well and strong again.”

The boy’s only answer was a faint smile; he
did not believe in his heart that he would ever
walk in that way or any other, again; but he did
not tell his father so.

“Is this Mr. Oliver?” asked Reuben ; and then,
all but breathless with the haste he had made, as
well as with anxiety, he told his errand.

“TI am sorry, my boy,” said Mr. Oliver; “but
you are—let me see,” and he drew a- handsome
gold watch from its pocket, “yes, you are exactly
fifteen minutes too late. It is just that length of
time since the boy whom we have decided to try,
went from the door. He wasn’t in all respects
22 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

satisfactory ; but as this is the third time we have
advertised, and we could not delay our journey
longer, we decided to try him.”

“© father!” exclaimed the invalid, a little pink
flushing into his cheeks.

His father turned and looked at him inquiringly.
“You like the looks of this boy better than the
other, Charlie? To tell the truth, so do I. But
we promised to try him, you know; we must keep
our word, must we not?”

“T suppose so, sir,” said Charlie wearily.

“TJ am really very sorry,” said Mr. Oliver ; “if
you had only been fifteen minutes earlier.”

There was no occasion for staying longer; yet
Reuben lingered, partly because it seemed to him
that he could not go back home. He found, now
that it was all over, that he had built very strong
hopes on this chance. If it had not been for that
fire he would have been in time. Mr. Oliver
seemed much interested in him, asked many ques-
tions, and so did Charlie. In fact, they were so
sympathetic that he found himself telling about
the fire, and the trouble he had putting it out.
« And I put myself out by the means, it seems,”
he said mournfully.

“Well,” said Mr. Oliver, “I'll tell you what,
my boy; we will take your name and address, and
keep you in mind; something might occur very
HINDERED BY FIRE. 23

soon which would make it desirable for us to make
a change. Who knows? We are sorry not to
have seen you earlier, but at the same time I can-
not be sorry that you stopped to put out the fire.
Nobody loses anything in the end by doing right.
That is my doctrine.”
24 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Cla Ath sly eeen le
A LOST SUPPER.

S soon as Reuben was far enough down the

road to make it safe to appear, two boys

dodged out of the woods where they had evidently
been hiding, and looked about them.

« Yes, sir, he’s done it!”’ exclaimed one of them
in an excited tone as he stooped and examined the
remains of the fire. “Put it all out ; every spark!
there isn’t the ghost of a chance to start it again
without matches, and I haven’t got a single one
left. The mean little coot! What right had he
to interfere with us, I’d like to know. I'll pay him
for this, see if I don’t.”

“ He didn’t know it was us,’ ventured his com-
panion.

“Well, what if he didn’t! He knew it was
somebody — and he hadn’t any cause to interfere.
What are you saying that for?” he added in an
angry tone; “are you trying to stand up for
him?”

“No, I ain’t,” said the other, looking injured.
A LOST SUPPER. 25

“T’m only thinking you better be careful, talking
as if he knew it was us. And you can’t pay him
off without being found out; that’s what I’m
thinking of.”

“Trust me for that. I’m not green, I guess —
your business is to do as I tell you, and let me take
care of the rest. What I say is, that fellow has
spoiled our plan, and he shall pay for it, or my
name ain’t Joel Potter.” :

That his name was Joel Potter the teacher in
his ward of the public school could have testified
to her sorrow. Nobody knew any good of him,
nor, indeed, of any one of his name. What excuse
a boy has for going wrong, Joel Potter could plead.
His father had been out of the penitentiary but
six months, and those who knew him best proph-
esied that he would soon be back there.

His mother was a broken-spirited woman, who
kept her house in filth, and her children in rags,
and cared little where they were, so they did not
“bother” her.

Joel inherited from his father, among other evil
things, a revengeful spirit ; if a person was so un-
fortunate as to excite his anger in any way, he
could not rest until he had, as he said, “ paid him
off.” The last person who had crossed his path
was Judge Fenning.

The Judge had come upon him at the school-
26 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

house door one morning when he was in the act of
setting a snare for the unsuspecting feet of his
teacher, which would be likely to trip her up the
moment she attempted to cross the threshold. It
is an old trick, I know, but Joel made no pretence
at smartness. Old tricks, so that they were mean
enough, suited him perfectly. And he chuckled
at the thought of Miss Benson “sprawling flat on
the ground ” — which was the refined way in which
he pictured the scene to himself.

Judge Fenning, who was a trustee of the build-
ing, had been examining one of the rooms that
needed repairing, and came in contact with Joel on
his way out. He discovered the fine wire just in
time to save himself from a fall; and his words to
Joel were sharp and to the point. He not only
ordered the wire up, but waited to see his order
obeyed — and went away presently, with the wire
in his pocket, and a threat to Joel to give him what
he deserved if he ever heard of such pranks being
played.

It was for this reason that Joel, whose wrath
rose steadily the longer he nursed it, contrived the
plan of firing Judge Fenning’s fence. I should
not say he contrived the plan; the truth is, he got
it out of a wretched dime novel which he had been
reading. It was especially unfortunate for Joel to
get hold of a book with anything evil in it, because
A LOST SUPPER. 27

he was one of those boys who always copied the
bad and let the good alone. One thing ought to
be said for him ; he was too ignorant to know, and
too heedless to think, whether or not the fire would
do other damage than that of burning down the
fence ; that was as far as his intention went. Pos-
sibly he might even have planned some other way
of being revenged if he had thought of the house
burning down, for instance; but that he did not
think of it when the idea occurred to Reuben Stein
the minute he saw the fire, shows what sort of a
boy he was in that respect. As for his compan-
ion, he was one of those hopelessly weak boys who
seem compelled to follow the example of those
with whom they are for the moment. If Bennie
Wilcox could have been fastened all his life to a
good and true boy, he might really have made
somebody, for he was willing to copy good as
well as bad examples. What a pity that the bad
ones were so much more easy to find than the
good! What a pity, also, that the good boys who
might have helped him were so thoughtless and
indifferent ; often passing him by with a good-na-
tured, half-contemptuous “hello,” and leaving him
in the very midst of temptation, when a few words
from them, and a few minutes spent in winning
him, might have saved him. Such boys will have
a great deal to answer for, one of these days. Yet
28 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

after all, I confess to having very little patience
with Bennie Wilcox. Hadn’t he a mother at home
who cried over his wrong-doings, and begged him
each morning, when he left her, to be a good boy
that day? And hadn’t he promised his father
when he lay dying, that he would try to grow up
to take his place, and always be good to his mother?
Why need a boy who had made such a promise
allow himself to become the tool of a fellow like
Joel Potter?

«Yes, sir,” said Joel, walking around the scene
of his late fire, “that fellow has upset the whole
of it; we won’t have time — hello! I don’t know
but we will if you will lick it around the corner to
Colonel Payton’s and borrow some matches, we
might get the thing to going again before old
Fenning gets back.”

“Oh, no!” said Bennie, who was already tired of
his part of the work, which had been to wait on
Joel without the prospect of getting any fun out of
it; they couldn’t even stand around and see the fire
burn, lest they should be caught and suspected.
«There wouldn't be time; it is getting late now;
let's let it go till another time. I say, Joe,” in a
changed and excited tone, “ what if that should be
Judge Fenning coming down the road !—TI hear
horses coming.”

Sure enough ; Joel had just time to turn and look,
A LOST SUPPER. 29

and then to run for the woods without waiting for
another word. Judge Fenning’s horses were com-
ing at a rapid rate. Bennie, with shorter legs and
stouter body, ran as fast as he could, but was not
sure that the friendly trees hid him in time for
Judge Fenning’s keen eyes to escape him.

«We ’most got caught,” he said, dropping into a
little heap and panting for breath; “I dunno but
he saw us after all.”

« We!” said Joel, with exasperating calmness ;
“speak for yourself, little chap. He didn’t see
me; and if he did, what of it! Haven't I as good
a right to be rambling through the woods as the
next one? Don’t besuchaninny! Somebody has
been firing Judge Fenning’s fence, and we stopped
to look at the damages ; that was all.”

Bennie regarded him with open-mouthed wonder,
and then laughed. He actually thought that this
was a sign of smartness in Joel. It had not oc-
curred to him until that minute that he could tell
a lie, and so escape being blamed for the fire.
Poor, weak Bennie! It is very sad to think what
an apt pupil he was.

«What in the world has been going on here!”
said Judge Fenning, looking about him in surprise
as the burned fence caught his eye. “Hold on,
Caleb, look at the fence.”

Caleb was looking, making his eyes large with
30 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

astonishment. “What do you make out of that?”
asked his master at last. ‘ Has some stray spark
from a careless cigar set it on fire?”

“Tt is my opinion, Judge,” said Caleb, with the
gravity of a judge on the bench, “ that that there
ain't got no accident about it. It have been set afire,
or my name ain’t Caleb Joshua Abram Peters.”

“Oh! please drive on,” said Mrs. Fenning, put-
ting her head out of the carriage window; “I’m
so afraid Alice will reach home before us. The
child would not know what to think at finding us
all gone.”

« Alice is all right,” said Judge Fenning ; “ but
look at the fence, Fanny.” Nevertheless, he gave
the order to drive on up the avenue. As soon
as the ladies were helped out and had vanished
inside the door, he returned with Caleb to the
burned fence. They drove slowly around the
grove, and discovered evidences of fire on the
south side, also, and noted the fact that some
effort had been made to clear a space. Caleb
called attention to this. “Somebody has done
took away a heap of brush, Judge, since morning.
I was noticing it when I was down this way.
‘Pete, says I, ‘there’s a heap of stuff on the
south side that would feed a fire this dry weather,
first rate.’ Says I, ‘it ought to be took away,’
but Pete he allowed that he couldn’t do it to-day
A LOST SUPPER. 31

nohow, ’cause he must plough around them trees
at the other grove; but somebody done took it
away.”

«J wonder who?” said the judge thoughtfully ;
«and I wonder who could have started a fire here
in the first place — always supposing it was started
intentionally. I have no enemies that I know of.”

«Dar ain’t no accident, ‘pend upon that!” said
Caleb again with marked earnestness ; “accidents
don’t start up just alike twice in one afternoon ;
two sparks from cigars don’t start in two places
on the same fence, nohow; accidents don’t go that
way.”

Judge Fenning admitted to himself the force of
this; and then something happened which put all
idea of the fire out of his mind. Miss Geraldine
Carleton, who was visiting at the Fennings, and
had been to town with them, now came running
down from the house, calling eagerly : “Oh! Mr.
Fenning, Alice has fallen down the back stairs and
hurt herself dreadfully, we are afraid. Mrs. Fen-
ning wants you to come as quick as you can, and
send Caleb for the doctor.”

Whereupon Judge Fenning gave the order in
quick, sharp tones, and then went with all speed to
the house.

Not long afterwards, Reuben Stein made his
way rapidly down the road toward the Hardmans.
32 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

He glanced at the sun anxiously as he walked.
Mr. Hardman would be sure to question him as to
this afternoon’s work; for he was certainly late.
If it had not been for that fire, he could not only
have secured the situation, but have got back in
time to have had his absence unnoticed, but what-
ever he said must be truth. He had not decided
what to say. Mr. Hardman, without being what
could be called cruel, was often severe. If he
should send Reuben to bed without his supper,
the boy half believed he should starve ; his dinner
had been none too hearty.

“T never saw a fellow with such luck as mine,”
he murmured, although it was not two hours since
he had determined never again to grumble at his
luck.

Arrived at the Hardman home, what was his
surprise to find it in silence and darkness.

Not even a light in the out-kitchen, where
Nancy was generally at work at this hour of the
day. It was gude dark, for they have no twilight
in that part of the country ; almost as soon as the
sun disappears from the sky, unless the moon has
taken his place, darkness settles over the earth;
and it seems to come ina moment of time. When
Reuben passed the Fenning place the sun was still
shining ; he remembered it, because, hurried as he
was, he had paused and given a careful look about
A LOST SUPPER. 33

to make sure that no further harm had come from
the fire. Yet when he reached home, he stumbled
through the dark kitchen, and had much trouble in
finding matches and lamp. What could have be-
come of all the folks? It did not seem possible
that they could have gone to bed so early as this,
although they were given to early hours. Having
nothing to read, and but little sewing to do, time
hung heavily on the hands of even Nancy, after
dark. Having lighted the smoky little lamp, Reu-
ben held it high and gazed about him. No signs
of supper, unless a hump on the corner of the
kitchen table with a tin basin turned over it might
stand for something to eat. Wait; what was that
pinned to the wall near where his own small lamp
stood, with just oil enough in it to get him to bed,
if he made all speed after it was lighted. A piece
of paper with some writing on it; Nancy’s square,
business-like hand. It must be intended for him
to read. He unfolded it with a curious feeling tug-
ging at his heart. Something must have hap-
pened. He was not in the habit of having notes
written to him. Holding the paper to the dim
light, he read : —

“You've got paid for your laziness, for once! Uncle
Kastor has come for us all to go there to supper and toa
merry-making in the evening. We sha’n’t be at home till
late. You'll find your supper under the tin on the table, if
34 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

you get home in time to eat any. Uncle Kastor asked for
you, and offered to wait a spell for you, but father told
him you had been gone long enough to be back three times
over, and it served you right. Take care of the lamp, and
don’t'do any mischief of any sort; just eat your supper and
leave the matches where we can find them, and get yourself
off to bed as quick as you can.”

The note was not signed, and needed no sign-
ing; Reuben would have known Nancy’s style
anywhere. He folded the paper, and stood like
one stunned. How persistently his luck had fol-
lowed him. “Uncle Kastor” was his one friend
in all this world. A jolly, warm-hearted man ;
Mrs. Hardman’s own brother, and as unlike her
husband as a man could well be. Poor he was,
but with a different sort of poverty from that of
his brother-in-law. Some way or other, his large
family always managed to have enough to eat ;
and they all, from the father down to the youngest,
contrived to have good times. Money was almost
as scarce there as it was at Mr. Hardman’s, so Un-
cle Kastor, with the best intentions in the world,
could never help his sister’s family in that way ;
but he had a fashion of swooping down upon them
once in two or three months, and carrying them all
off to supper in his log cabin, three miles away
through the woods. And what a jolly supper it
always was! Wild turkey, which one of the boys
A LOST SUPPER. 35

“had the luck to shoot the other day;” fish, that
another of them “happened to catch ;” sweet po-
tatoes, cooked as only Uncle Kastor’s wife knew
how to cook them; and better than all, to Reuben’s
hungry heart, merry faces, and much laughing, and
hearty, kindly words, for him as well as for the
others. In fact, Uncle Kastor, having only words
to offer, bestowed them with special care on Reu-
ben, seeming to have a dim realization of his lone-
liness and homesickness. Next to the misery of
having lost his one chance of getting away out
of the country, no bitterer trial could have come
to him than to have lost this evening at Uncle
Kastor’s. If it had not been for that fire, he
could have reached home in ample time. No
doubt Uncle Kastor waited for him as long as he
could; he knew his kind heart. And now they
were probably just sitting down to the table, with
everything smoking hot, and smelling, oh so deli-
cious! and a place left vacant where he would have
been tucked in. Uncle Kastor always contrived
to have the table large enough for him to sit down
with the rest. Despite his fourteen years, and his
determination to be manly, Reubén put up his
smoke-begrimed hand and brushed away great hot
tears. By and by, he went toward the tin basin ;
he was very hungry. Two biscuits, large and
heavy, and yellow with soda, lay waiting for him,
36 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

and beside them, half of a cold sweet potato.
This was all. There are boys who would have -
scorned to touch such a supper. But Reuben was
too hungry for that. Besides, he had sense enough
to know that Nancy had done the best she could
for him. They lived in a country where milk was
a luxury, and butter hardly less so. And Nancy
did not know how to make biscuits. Reuben ate
every crumb; he even looked hungrily about him,
and wished that he had another; but not for any-
thing would he have opened the pantry door and
tried to find more. After that, there was nothing
to be done but to follow Nancy’s advice, and get
himself off to bed. And his pillow, if he had had
one, would have been wet that night with tears.
THAT OTHER BOY. 37

CHAPTER III.
THAT OTHER BOY.

HE week following Reuben’s disappointment
was a hard one for him. It seemed impos-
sible for him to forget that he had been so near to
good fortune and lost it. “As the days passed,
this feeling seemed to grow stronger, rather than
lessen, as he hoped it would. He made himself
miserable by asking over and over again why it
had to be as it was. Why, for instance, need that
fence around the orange-grove have taken fire just
when it did? Or, if it must needs burn, why did
he have to see it and stop, and be hinderéd long
enough to lose his chance? Not only that, but he
must lose his chance of a visit at Uncle Kastor’s.
And not only that, but both of these losses were
connected with another.

When the Hardman family came home, which
was not until the next day, Uncle Kastor brought
them; and from him Reuben learned that a man
whom he called “well to do,” had been looking for
a boy to spend the winter with him, and do chores
38 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

-and go to school; Uncle Kastor had thought at
once of Reuben, and been resolved to give him
the chance. “I didn't say anything about it,” he
explained, “ because it would look like trying to
get you away from my brother's folks, don’t you
see? but all the same I knew you hankered after
school, and it seemed to me that you ought to have
the chance; and I told the man I would bring you
along down with me, and he could see what a likely
chap you were. And I knew he would take a no-
tion to you, and make you an offer. That is the
very reason I swooped down on the folks that
day ; and lo and behold, you weren’t home at all!
I tried my level best to have them wait till you
came, but they felt sure you wasn’t coming back till
after dark, since you'd staid so long; and I didn’t
think Mr. Peters would wait much after dark.
And I couldn’t explain things, you know, so there
was nothing for it but to drive off without you ;
but I tell you I kind of hoped all the way that you
would get back just after we started, and run on
and overtake us, and I drove as slow as I could —
and Peters, he waited till the moon came up, to see
you. I guess I could have got him to wait till to-
day, if a shack of a boy hadn’t come along within
an hour after we got home, looking for a place;
and Peters, who always likes to do things up in a
hurry, took him.”
THAT OTHER BOY. 39

This story had been very hard for Reuben to
listen to, It did seem discouraging, that a second
time in one day he should be so near the end of
his ambition and yet should fail. All this because
some wicked man, or boy, chose to set fire toa
fence. “If I only knew what rascal did it!” said
Reuben to himself, setting his lips firmly the while,
«T’d like to choke him ; mean old wretch! Spoil-
ing all my chances in life just for the sake of hav-
ing a little fun!” Work at Mr. Hardman’s never
seemed so hard as it did during those trying days.
It was almost more than he could do to get through
the weary round that he hated, not so much be-
cause it was hard, as because it seemed as though
he accomplished almost nothing, and because it
was always accompanied with sharp, or at least
cross words.

One evening, nearly a week after his trip to the
Portland Farm, he sat in the kitchen before his
untasted supper; it was only a piece of corn-bread
and a dish of molasses —and his appetite seemed
to have deserted him. He had been late in getting
home that evening, through no fault of his. Old
Dingle, the sorrowfullooking cow which the Hard-
mans kept, had seen fit to stray much farther away
than usual, and had led him a long, tiresome walk
through sand and across patches of woods. When
at last, very tired, he succeeded in bringing her
40 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

safely home, Mr. Hardman had scolded as though
it had been Reuben who had run away, instead of
the cow — even going so far as to give him a box
on the ear, which tingled with the blow, but not so
much as his nerves did over the thought of it. His
mother had never boxed his ears, and it was a form
of correction that he hated ; while Mr. Hardman
apparently enjoyed administering it. Of course
it did not make matters any cheerier for Reuben
to reflect that he had done nothing that called for
punishment of any sort ; on the contrary, he had
stoutly resisted the inclination to come back with-
out Dingle, and declare that he could not find her ;
and had gone on and on, until it seemed that his
feet could carry him no farther, before he caught
the sound of her bell in the distance.

I said it was harder for Reuben because he did
not deserve blame; but, after all, I cannot see why
a sensible boy could not have got comfort out of
that thought. If one could only realize how much
better it is to be blamed for nothing than for some-
thing, one could take such things better. Reuben,
however, realized nothing of the kind; his heart .
was swelling with indignation, and there was such
a lump in his throat that it seemed to him he would
have choked if he had tried to swallow a mouthful.
He had torn his blouse in a scramble through some
of the low bushes. He had stepped on the sand
THAT OTHER BOY. Al

spurs with bare feet until they felt full of thorns,
and he was so tired that even the effort of carrying
the corn-cake to his mouth seemed too much for
him. He leaned his elbow on the corner of the
kitchen table which was free from dishes, leaned
his head on his hand, and let one or two great tears
roll slowly down his sunburned, dusty cheek. You
will remember that he did not often cry in these
days ; that he did so this evening was a proof of how
utterly tired and discouraged he was. He had just
been telling himself that he hadn’t a friend in the
world.

It did seem sad and strange that in all this great
world there was not only no one to help him, but
no one to care whether he ever found any better
life than this.

Nancy Hardman was out on the porch, looking
at nothing in particular, and waiting for Reuben
to finish his supper, so she could put away the
things.

“Come, hurry up!” she said sharply. “ You
are going to be as long eating your supper as you
were getting home.” She turned as she finished
the sentence, and was in time to see those two
tears, and to note the utterly discouraged look on
the boy’s face. Nancy, although she had a habit
of speaking sharp, harsh words, and was always
dashing around and making others uncomfortable,
42 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

had not an ugly heart ; there were times when she
actually felt sorry for Reuben —when her father
was especially hard on him — though no one would
have been more astonished than Reuben himself
to have known this. She felt sorry for him at this
moment ; she knew he was probably not to blame
for being late, but she had a strange way of show-
ing sympathy.

«What are you crying about?” she asked se-
verely, coming in at the door as she spoke, and
standing in front of Reuben, so that he could not
even brush away the tears without being seen.
“Before I would spend my time in crying like a
baby, such a great boy as you are! You ought to be
too old to cry, especially when you ain't got nothing
to cry for. If you had real trouble, now, you might
talk ; there’s lots of trouble in this world, Reuben
Stein, and you'd better be glad that it doesn’t come
to you— instead of growling and snivelling because
you have to work for your living. Who doesn’t, I
should like to know! All the folks around here —
unless it is the Fennings and a few such — have a
hard time to keep soul and body together; I am
sure of that.”

It was such a new thing to hear Nancy Hard-
man moralize that Reuben, in spite of himself, was
" somewhat interested. He shaded his eyes with one
hand, and looked through it at the hard-featured








































































































NANCY HARDMAN WAS OUT ON THE PORCH.

THAT OTHER BOY. 45

girl; there was nothing comforting in her tone, and
her words were certainly not very sympathetic, but
for some reason they made him feel more as though
he had to do with human beings than he generally
felt with Nancy.

She busied herself about some work, occasion-
ally glancing at the boy as if to see what effect
her words were having on him. “Lots of trouble,”
she repeated after a moment’s silence. “People
who have beds to sleep in and things to eat, better
not grumble. There’s been an awful accident on
the railroad, and ever so many killed outright —
to say nothing of the folks that have lost legs
and arms. I don’t know but I'd rather be killed
than to lose my legs, for instance, so I couldn’t go
around. My! what would become of this family,
then?”

« When was the accident ?”’ asked Reuben drear-
ily ; he had not much interest even in this — peo-
ple lived, and travelled, and died, and he knew
nothing about it. What did it matter that some
of them were killed? they were nothing to him;
he had not been to the village for seven days, so
had heard no news.

- “Tt was last Thursday night ; the express ran
into a freight-train, and smashed two of its sleep-
ing-cars all to bits. Well! what’s the matter with
you now?” for Reuben’s hand had been suddenly
46 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

withdrawn from his face, and he sat up straight,
his eyes full of anxious interest.

“Last Thursday night,’ he repeated. “O
Nancy! are you sure?”

“Why, of course I am; you don’t suppose I’ve
been making it up, do you? Where have your ears
been that you haven’t heard it? Everybody is talk-
ing about it. Why, what makes you interested all
of a sudden?”

“Did you ever see the people that boarded at
the Portland.Farm, Nancy? There was a lame boy
and his father. They went North last Thursday
night. Oh! I wonder if’ —

“Yes, I saw him out riding one day with his
boy ; but they won't go out riding any more ; they
were both killed!”

«“O Nancy! are you sure?” Reuben’s tone was
so full of pain that Nancy forgot to be vexed with
him for questioning the truth of her news.

«Why yes, I am; I heard Mr. Fenning telling
Uncle Kastor all about it; he stopped here this
morning while you were up in the swamp-lot. He
said that man and his boy were both killed out-
right, and” —

“ Nancy,” interrupted Reuben, his face pale with
excitement ; “there was a boy went North with
them; he was from Weymouth, down below here,
you know ; did you hear anything about him?”
THAT OTHER BOY. 47

Nancy nodded her head. “He was killed too;
and his folks are going to have him taken to his
uncle’s in the North, because they can’t afford to
have him brought back here. How came you to
know so much about these folks?” she asked with
sudden sharpness. ‘“ How did you know they took
a boy North with them? did you know the boy?”

«“ T heard about it,” said Reuben evasively. “No,
I didn’t know him; but it seems strange to think
that he is dead.”

«Well, he is,” said Nancy, speaking almost as
though she enjoyed the news. The truth is, she
lived such a starved, lonely life that excitement of
any sort, even though connected with a railroad
accident, was in a sense a relief.

Reuben finished his supper like a person dazed.
Nancy, dashing around washing and putting away
the plate and saucer which he had hardly used, went
on with her story, telling all the particulars she
knew, and making comments that were meant to be
impressive. It was very new business for Nancy
to talk to Reuben, but she had so much news to-
night that it seemed as though she must tell some-
body. He became a very unsatisfactory listener ;
he had no comments to make, no exclamations even
over the harrowing parts. She grew provoked at
last, and, forgetting her momentary astonishment
over his excitement, said, —
48 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“You take it cool, I must say! one would think
you had been mixed up with railroad accidents all
your life; I'd show a little more feeling —as if I
wasn’t made of wood. You can sit and cry over
yourself, with nothing in the world to cry for, and
you haven't even a sigh for the folks that are in
such trouble to-night. Think of that woman who
won't ever see her boy again, and he was all she had,
too. He wasn’t much comfort to her, I s’pose —
boys never are; but then I dare say she will miss
him.”

“Yes,” said Reuben; the lump in his throat had
grown so large that he could not say another word.
He said that in such a way that Nancy thought he
did not care. She went into the other room, and
told her father that she didn’t believe Reuben was
more than half-witted ; he had no more feeling than
a stone.

“He's ‘witted’ enough,” said her father signifi-
cantly. “He has himself to think about, and it
takes all his time.”

Reuben went up to bed—there was nothing
more to be done that night, and he would not for
anything have stayed down-stairs and run the risk
of being spoken to about the accident, or of hear-
ing more about it. He had heard enough —too
much. He never felt so strangely in his life.
How very near he had been to death! What if
THAT OTHER BOY. 49

that fence around the orange grove had not been
set on fire that day, and he had reached the Port-
land Farm in time! Mr. Oliver would have been
sure to have engaged him, for didn’t he and the
lame boy both say that they liked his looks, and
were sorry he was too late?) Then he would have
been the one to be buried somewhere in the cold
North, instead of that boy whom he had been al-
most hating because he had been ahead of him ;
now he was dead! How did it seem to be dead!
Reuben shivered at the thought. He felt of the
pulse at his wrist ; he laid his hand on his steadily
beating heart, and wondered what it would be like
to have it still. He did not want to be dead, al-
though he had wished himself so a great many
times; it was one thing to make the wish when
every nerve in his body was quivering with life,
and quite another to think of it with death almost,
at the door. “There is but a step between us
and death’ — somewhere, sometime, Reuben had
heard that verse; he knew it was in the Bible, but
he could not remember where or when he had
heard it. It seemed to repeat itself to him now in
slow, solemn tones. What if he were being buried
now, to-night — and the Hardmans were sitting in
the room down-stairs talking about him. Nancy
would tell all the particulars just as she did about
that other boy; she could tell more about him ;
50 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

she would go over that last day before he went
away, and tell what he had said and done. Then
the excited and nervous boy tried to remember all
the things he had said and done that day when the
Olivers went North. Would the words sound well,
repeated? He slammed the door, he remembered,
when Nancy sent him the third time after wood,
which was not to be found, and she had told him
to take the door along with him the next time,
hinges and all; would she tell her part, he won-
dered, if she were going over those last things
about him? and where would he be if it really
were he? Was it possible that he might be where
he could overhear all the talk ? Would he like to
have them go over his past, and remember the
things he had done and left undone? No, he
couldn’t hear it; he would be buried under the
ground— but then, there was the soul — they
didn’t bury souls; what became of them? Good
people went to heaven—but he was not good.
Oh! he was by no means ready to die; he would
never wish himself dead any more —he had not
realized what it was before. Suppose God should
take him at his wish, and make him dead that very
night. People died who were not on the cars — he
must not die; he could not! And here poor Reu-
ben buried his head under the clothes ; not to cry,
but to shiver and tremble, and feel hot and cold
THAT OTHER BOY. SI

by turns. It seemed to him that he had never
come so near to death — not even when his mother
died; he was such a little boy then and had not
realized it ; but that boy of about his age whom he
had envied —it was so strange—so terrible to
think of him being gone out of the world!

By and by he grew calmer, and ceased to trem-
ble, but he was very wide awake, and found himself
unable to get away from his thoughts; unable to
think of anything but the accident and his narrow
escape. Gradually his thoughts took form about
one idea. He wished that he did not care so
much about dying —no, not that, exactly. He
was a sensible boy, and realized that so great a
change one, not an idiot, must care about. What
he meant was, that he wished he did not care
about it in such a frightened, awful way. There
was such a thing as being ready to die, and think-
ing and talking about it calmly, even though you
thought it very near. The last time he had visited
at Uncle Kastor’s he remembered hearing him tell
about a neighbor who was very sick and going to
die; how he said that night when Uncle Kastor
called to see how he was : —

“Well, neighbor, tell the friends that I’m almost
home, and feel very safe and glad.”

For the first time in his life, Reuben coveted
such a feeling, and wondered how it was secured.
52 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

The last thing he remembered on that eventful
night was a determination to find out for himself
—and if it was a possible thing make himself
ready for any possible accident that could come to
him.
A BEWILDERED BOY. 53

CHAPTER IV.
A BEWILDERED BOY.

EUBEN was splitting wood the next morning
when Mr. Fenning’s carriage drew up before
their door; the pine stump had to wait a few min-
utes while Reuben admired the silken coats of the
span of horses, and watched to see how they curved
their necks, and took dainty steps in the sand, even
while they waited; for Mr. Fenning, after discover-
ing that Mr. Hardman was at home, had gone into
the family sitting-room—thereby putting Nancy
Hardman into a state of consternation. There was
not a chair in the house which she thought fit to
offer to such a great man. Horses like his were
not seen often in that part of the world; most of
them had as much as they could do to plod through
the sand with slow, discouraged steps and heads
bowed, and had no strength to waste in restless
steppings about when they were left to stand.
“JT wonder what he came for?” said Reuben to
himself as he watched the horses. “What if he
wanted to take me out riding!” and he chuckled
54 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

over the folly of his thoughts. “Td like it first-
rate to ride in such a rig as that; but I don’t
believe I could go this morning —I haven't got
time!”

If he could have heard what was going on in
the Hardmans’ front room, what would he have
thought? Nancy, in the bedroom which opened
from it, with the door ajar, lost the first of the talk,
though she tried her best to hear. Mr. Fenning
seemed to think it necessary to speak very low.
Her father’s. reply was plain enough.

“JT shouldn’t wonder at all—boys are always
getting into scrapes—and this one is no better
than he should be. What has happened, Mr. Fen-
ning?”

Once more Mr. Fenning’s words were so low
that Nancy only caught one now and then, and
could make nothing of it. “I want to know!” said
her father. “It doesn’t seem possible that Reuben
would do such a thing. How do you say you
found out that he was the one?”

This time Nancy fixed the door so she could
hear.

“JT am not sure of it, of course, Mr. Hardman ;
one ought to have very good evidence to accuse
a boy of a thing like that. My informant is not
altogether trustworthy. You know the Potters, I
presume ?—their boy Joel came to me of his own
A BEWILDERED BOY. 55

accord to give information. That in itself looks
badly — or would in another boy. Iam not sure
but that it is so much Joel’s nature to try to
get other people into trouble that he watches for
chances. He came to me the morning after the
fire, and wanted to know what I would give him to
tell me all about it. I was vexed with the fellow,
and told him I would arrest him as an accomplice
in mischief ; which would doubtless give him what
he deserved. Over that, he looked injured; said
he didn’t want anything, of course, but had come
because he thought he ought to tell, seeing he hap-
pened to know all about it. Then he told some-
thing like a straightforward story about being in
the woods with another boy, hunting for a certain
kind of air-plant which a man stopping near them
wanted — and he saw your Reuben come down the
road. He said he was going slowly, and looking
about him as if afraid of being seen; and his man-
ner attracted the two boys, so they determined to
watch him. According to them, he gathered brush,
and pine-knots, and everything he could find of
that character — heaped it against the fence and
set fire to it. Not content with that, he went
round to the other side, where the wind was more
brisk, and set still another fire close to the fence —
planning it so skilfully that there was soon a big
blaze ; and as soon as he was safely away, they
56 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

came out of their hiding-place and worked like
beavers, scattering the fire, and stamping out the
sparks. Now, of course, I don’t know that there
is a word of truth in this; I only know that my
fence was on fire that day, and burned quite briskly
for a few minutes, and must have been started by
some one, because —as my man observed —an
accidental fire doesn’t generally choose two places
on different sides of the same ground on the same
afternoon. And it was evidently put out by some-
body who took a good deal of pains to do it; for
the brush, of which there was some lying around
loose, had all been carried to a safe distance. And
there were other evidences of somebody being at
work there. These boys came to me with their
story, the morning after the fire, as I said, and I
promised to look into it; but my little daughter;
who had a fall that same day, occupied so much of
my attention at first, as to put other things out of
my mind; then I was called away by business, and
have only recently returned. But I mean to find
out the truth of this if possible; for a boy with
such tendencies is hardly safe to have around us.”

“T should think not!” said Mr. Hardman ex-
citedly ; “he ought to be flogged within an inch of
his life; and if you don’t do it, Judge Fenning, I
shall. For that matter, I shall anyhow. To think
of my feeding and clothing such a scamp as that!”
A BEWILDERED BOY. 57

At that moment the bedroom door was thrown
wide open, and Nancy Hardman came into view.

“ Father,” she said, “I don’t believe a word of
that story. Reuben is.aggravating enough —all
boys are; but he ain’t of that sort, and I should
think you would know it. He doesn’t do things
for mischief, if he does blunder a good deal, because
his wits are somewhere else instead of on his work;
but when he can keep his mind to it, I do say for
him that I think he does the best he knows how.
As for setting anything afire on purpose, to spoil
other folks’ things, it ain’t in him.”

Judge Fenning turned toward the excited girl
with a pleasant smile on his face. “I am glad to ~
hear you say so,” he said. “I never heard any-
thing ill of the boy before —and I am slow to be-
lieve this. It seems so utterly uncalled for; so
far as I know he can have nothing against me; I
never spoke to him that I can remember; but for
the boy’s sake as well as my own, I mean to look
into it very thoroughly, and to find the guilty one
if possible.”

“ Of course, of course!” said Mr. Hardman,
“he ought to be found; and if it proves to be
Reuben, he will have reason to remember it before
I get through with him. I won’t stand any non-
sense like that, Judge Fenning, you may well be-
lieve. Nancy seems to think he couldn’t have
58 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

done it—and it doesn’t sound like him, I think
myself ; but then somebody did it, and what would
that boy have told such a story for, if there wasn’t
any truth in it? Nancy, do you know what Reu-
ben was about the day it happened ?”’

“Yes,” said Judge Fenning ; “if we could prove
that Reuben was quietly at home that afternoon it
would go a great way toward establishing his inno-
Cence:y.

“T should think it would,” said Nancy. «Well,
when did it happen? I can count back — most
days ; there’s always something to mark the time.”

«The fire must have been started last week, on
Thursday afternoon between the hours of two and
five; I was at home just before two; and back
again about five. The fence was all right when I
left, and burned when I returned.”

“Last week, Thursday,” repeated Nancy, and
her face grew gloomy.

“Can you think, Nancy, where the boy was that
afternoon ?” asked her father.

“Yes, I can. That was the day Uncle Kastor
came for us and we all went up to his house and
stayed to supper.”

“And did Reuben go along?” asked Judge Fen-
ning in a tone which said, “I should be only too
glad if it should prove that he was miles away at
the time.”
A BEWILDERED BOY. 59

«No, he didn’t,” said Nancy sharply. She felt
vexed and disappointed over what she must now
own. “He wasn’t at home, and he didn’t come
home until—we don’t know when. We waited
awhile for him, and then father wouldn’t wait any
longer, and we went off.”

“TI remember,” said Mr. Hardman. “That
doesn’t look very well for the scamp, Nancy, after
all you have said. He was out that way as sure as
fate, Judge Fenning; at least, he was out to the
Sedgewick place; I sent him there on an errand,
and he was gone long enough to go there and come
back twice over. I remember it well, for Uncle
Kastor wanted to wait for him —he has taken a
kind of notion to the boy; I don’t know why, I’m
sure, though I never thought he was much worse
than other boys. But Uncle Kastor wanted to
wait and take him; and we did, for a spell—until I
said they needn’t wait any longer on his account,
because he shouldn’t go if he came, to pay him
for being so long doing an errand. What he was
about all that time is more than I know. I tried
to get something out of him the next morning, but
I remember now he had very little to say for him-
self.”

Judge Fenning sighed. “I am afraid some-
thing tempted him to indulge in this piece of mis-
chief,” he said gravely.
60 REOUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“IT don’t see why you should say that!” put in
Nancy sharply. “Because a boy was gone on an
errand longer than he ought to have been, it does
not follow that he was at work setting fences on
fire ; there are other things he might have done.”

Judge Fenning smiled again. “That is true.
Well, trust me to see that only the truth is dis-
covered. I’m glad the boy has a good friend in
your daughter.”

How astonished Reuben would have been if he
had heard that Nancy Hardman was his friend !

“What I suggest is,’ continued the judge,
“that you allow me to take him away with me
now, to my house, for a quiet talk. I should like
to see him entirely alone, and have a first word
with him before he has a chance to hear of the
suspicion from any other person. You are willing,
I suppose, to trust him tome?” ~

“ Of course, of course,” said Mr. Hardman. «I
know you will do the right thing, Judge Fenning.”
Nor did either gentleman heed Nancy’s muttered
protest that it was taking a mean advantage of a
boy to carry him off like a prisoner before he had
heard anything about it. They went out together
to the yard where Reuben was struggling with the
. pine-stump.

“ Good-morning, my boy,” said Judge Fenning
kindly. “You have a tough job before you, haven’t
A BEWILDERED BOY. 61

you? I wonder if you would be willing to leave
it for a while and take a ride with me?”

This question so astonished Reuben, coming as
it did after the thoughts he had had on the sub-
ject, that all he could do was to stare, until re-
called to his senses by Mr. Hardman’s sharp voice.
“Why do you stand there staring like an idiot,
and keeping the judge waiting! Don’t you know
enough to get into a carriage when you get a
chance?”

“Yes, sir,” said Reuben; and dropping the axe,
he took long strides toward the carriage which was
waiting at the gate, opened the door and sprang in.
If this was all a huge joke, the point of which he
could not understand, at least he would have the
pleasure of seeing how those great plump cushions
felt. He had often wondered, and never expected
to know.

Judge Fenning smiled gravely; and, lifting his
hat to Mr. Hardman as though he had been the
first gentleman in the land, followed Reuben with-
out more words, and Caleb drove away; Nancy .
watching from the window, a curious, choking sen-
sation in her throat, and a feeling of indignation at
both Judge Fenning and her father in her heart.
Why had not her father spoken up for Reuben,
and told the great man that somebody else fired
his fence? Why had not the man sense enough to
62 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

see that Reuben was not one of that sort? Above
all, why did she care so much about it all? Was
she really fond of Reuben Stein? She had not
suspected it.

The judge tried to enter into conversation with
his companion ; asked several questions about his
work and his plans. But Reuben, who under al-
most any other circumstances would have been
only too glad of a chance to tell Judge Fenning
his plans, so far as he could be said to have any,
in the hope of getting some help from him, was ~
now so overcome by the strangeness of his posi-
tion as to be unable to do other than to answer
with the briefest “yes sir,” and “no sir;” his mind
full meantime with the question — “What did it
all mean?” Why was he being taken at such
speed over the road? Where were they going?
Was it possible that the judge wanted some work
done that he could do, and had asked Mr. Hard-
man to lend him? But that was nonsense—
gentlemen did not come after their workmen in
a carriage ; still it was positively the only explana-
tion he could think of. At last he ventured a
question,

“Has Mr. Hardman hired me out to work for
you, Judge Fenning?”

“Qh, no,” said the judge, smiling at the idea.
Then he glanced at Caleb, who was so short a dis-
A BEWILDERED BOY. 63

tance in front of them, with all the carriage win-
dows open. Caleb had remarkably sharp ears, and
had been much tried by his master’s slowness
in looking into the matter of the burned fence.
Judge Fenning did not know whether or not Caleb
had heard the Potter boy’s story ; he took care to
say nothing about it himself, and he meant not to
prejudice Caleb against Reuben if he could help
it. “Oh, no!” he said again after this moment of
thought, “I wanted to have a little talk with you
about some matters, quite alone ; and I asked Mr.
Hardman to let you ride home with me, to give
me a chance.” And then Judge Fenning knew by
the swift glance which Caleb gave them that he
had heard the Potter story.

“Yes, sir,’ said Reuben, wondering still more.

“Do you go to school?” asked the judge; and
Reuben explained —his face red the while, that
he used to go, but he couldn’t manage it very
well.

“That is unfortunate,” said the judge. “We
have a better school here this fall than ever before ;
a new teacher, you know. Have you seen him?”

No; Reuben had not even seen him, except on
the street —at a distance. “We live out quite a
stretch, you know,” he explained ; “and folks don’t
generally come that way.”

“And you are too busy to spare time for school?
64 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

I shouldn’t think Mr. Hardman would have enough
work to keep a boy of your age busy all the time.
He has no orange-grove, he tells me.”

«“ No, sir —it isn’t that,” said Reuben, his face
growing redder. It seemed a disgrace to have to
explain what it was — but there was no help for it.
“The fact is, sir, my clothes gave out, and it was,
a hard season, you know, and we couldn’t manage
to get any more.”

“Is that it?” and Judge Fenning gave him a
swift glance. His clothes were patched and were
too short in the sleeves, and too narrow on the
shoulders. Yes, he did look rather shabby ; still,
there were boys in school who looked worse. Was
this an excuse for a fellow who was glad to get rid
of the restraints of school, or was it the self-re-
spect of a boy who had been used to better things ?
Judge Fenning was much away from his South-
ern home, and knew little of what was going on
in the neighborhood. He dimly remembered hav-
ing heard about the boy who lived at Hardman’s,
but could not now recall whether what he had
heard was good or bad.

Reuben struggled with his pride, and resolved
to explain. It was dreadful to have a man like
Judge Fenning think that he didn’t want to go to
school. “I tried every way I could think of to
earn some money this summer, so I could buy
A BEWILDERED Boy. 65

some decent clothes, but I couldn’t. Then I tried
to get a chance to go North, and had one, almost
— but it failed.”

“ Did you, indeed? What made you want to go
North?”

“Well,” said Reuben, hesitating — «I don’t quite
-know, unless it was because we came from there,
and I seemed to think if I could get back I could
earn enough to get an education; people in the
North seem to go to school.”

“Not all of them,” said the judge, smiling.
«So you want an education. Did you ever hear
the old proverb —‘ Where there’s a will there’s a
way’ ?”

«Yes, sir,” said Reuben gravely. “ Mother used
to say so; but I haven’t found any way yet —
maybe I will.”
66 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER V.
CROSS—QUESTIONED.

HEY had been making swift time over the

road while this conversation was going on,

and with Reuben’s last word Caleb drew up before

the Fenning gateway. Before he knew what was

being done, Reuben was out like a cat, and swung
the gate open.

«Well done,” said the judge, smiling ; while Caleb
showed all his white teeth in thanks.

« You are quick-motioned, I see. Will you climb
in again, or walk to the house?”

Reuben chose the latter; and taking the short
road, was standing by the steps when the carriage
wound around the avenue. He had often won-
dered how that handsome house looked inside —
now he would have a chance to see. Perhaps,
though, the judge would take him to the carriage-
house, or the stable, for his talk.

No; he took him to his own handsome library,
and seated him on one of the elegant leather-
covered chairs. “Now,” he said, taking the great
CROSS-QUESTIONED. 67

arm-chair, ‘we are comfortable, and can have our
little talk. So you are from the North?”

Reuben could not help staring in reply. Had
Judge Fenning brought him in his carriage away
out here merely to ask such questions as that?
There seemed to be no reply to make, as he had
already answered the question ; but the judge had
others.

In the course of the next few minutes he learned
all that Reuben knew himself about his journey
down there in search of health for his mother ; and
how both father and mother were, only a year after
their coming, victims of yellow-fever—and the
Hardmans took him home with them because Mrs.
Hardman’s mother had known them in the North.
Reuben grew so interested in going over the old
times to somebody who was listening and seeming
interested, that he almost forgot the strangeness of
his present position, until suddenly brought back
to it by a question.

“Now, Reuben, you seem to have a very good
memory — can you tell me where you were, and
what you were about, two weeks ago to-day — say
between two o’clock and five?”

Then Reuben’s face flamed red, up to his very
temples. Why, he could not have told, save that
he knew at once that it was the day on which he
made his visit to the Portland Farm and planned
68 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

his desperate effort to get North once more.. Ina
flash of thought it came to him that Mr. Hardman
must have heard of his attempt and been angry
about it, and appealed to Judge Fenning to have
him punished; perhaps it was against the law for
a boy who had been fed and clothed by a family for
three years to try to get away from them — and
Judge Fenning was a great lawyer. Reuben knew
very little about law, just enough to fill him with
awe of it. He felt himself trembling from head
to foot, and his anxiety and actual terror grew
stronger as he felt the judge’s stern eyes fixed
upon him. Yes, the eyes of the judge were grow-
ing stern. “This boy has been deceiving me; he
talked like an honest, outspoken, well-meaning boy
who wanted to make something of himself, but
directly I mention that afternoon, he turns crimson
and trembles like a culprit. He thought he was not
found out, and now he thinks he is. What could
have been his motive?” These were some of the
thoughts which filled the mind of the judge.
“Well,” he said, while Rebuen tried to speak,
and felt that his voice trembled so that he did not .
dare trust it ; “has your memory played you false
at last? Perhaps I could help you. Were you
over in this direction ? — Yes,” he said to himself,
“he undoubtedly did it.”’ For Reuben had opened
his lips, and stammered something not understood
CROSS-QUES TIONED. 69

—then closed them again ; he certainly acted like
one afraid to speak. It may seem strange to you
that a boy of fourteen could get into such a state
of terror for so slight a reason, but you must re-
member that Reuben was very much alone in the
world, and about some things as ignorant as a child ;
then, too, his nerves had been unsettled by the rail-
road accident, and his narrow escape from death.
There were times when he told himself that it must
have been very wicked for him to try to steal away
from the Hardmans, and that God meant to punish
him for it. However, as a rule he was a boy of a
good deal of courage; if he had not been utterly
taken by surprise with Judge Fenning’s question,
he would not have shown such fear. As it was, he
soon got control of himself. He decided that he
certainly had not intended wrong ; the Hardmans
had told him more than once that they kept him out
of charity, and he knew they were too poor to do
it ; he had honestly meant to relieve them, as well
as himself, although he knew that in some things
it would be harder for them if he were away. He
decided that the thing for him to do was to tell a
plain story of where he was, and exactly what he
was about —and frankly say that he meant no
wrong. |

« Yes, sir,” he said suddenly; “I was by here.
I went to the Portland Farm; there ‘was a man
7O REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

boarding there named Oliver, and I saw in the
paper that he wanted a boy to go North with him,
and I went for the place; that is what I meant
when I told you I tried to go North once, and
didn’t succeed ; I was fifteen minutes too late, and
another boy got the place. Ididn’t want to say any-
thing about it, because I didn’t tell the Hardmans
—the fact is, sir, I meant to run away.” Here
Reuben unconsciously lowered his voice, as though
he were telling a great secret. “Perhaps I ought
not to have done so, but I did not know it was
against the law. They are really nothing to me,
and they have fed me for three years; and, while
I work as well as I can, they have often told me
they could not afford to keep me, and I don’t think
they can. If I did wrong I am very sorry — but
it didn’t amount to anything, you see, sir; and I
am ready to promise not to do it again, if it is
against the law.”

Was this acting? Had the boy really no knowl-
edge of the burned fence? Judge Fenning felt
very much puzzled. He found himself wondering
if Reuben had been near the Portland Farm that
afternoon; perhaps he had heard of the railroad
accident, and knowing that Mr. Oliver and his boy
were both killed, it had occurred to him that no-
body could dispute such a story —he would tell it
and account for his time in that way.
CROSS-QUESTIONED. 71

“Do you know where Mr. Oliver is now?” he
asked gravely.

“Oh, yes, sir! — or I mean I know he is dead;
he was killed that very night — and the boy who
got the place was killed too; and I should have
been if I had gone. That was one of the things
that made me think perhaps it was wrong to do
Lt

Judge Fenning could not help smiling over such
queer logic; the boy seemed to be a curious mix-
ture of man and child. He did not know what to
say next.

“ How came you to be late that day?” he asked,
more to gain time than because he thought it made
any difference why he was late.

A sudden light broke over Reuben’s face; curi-
ously enough this was the first time he had thought
of the burned fence since the questions began.
What he considered the graver matter had driven
the other out of his mind.

“Oh! aevery strange thing hindered me,” he
said eagerly. ‘“Haven’t you noticed a piece of
your fence burned, Judge Fenning? It was burn-
ing when I passed here on my way to the farm —
at least it had been burning, and had kind of died
out; but I was afraid it would get started again,
and there was lots of brush, and leaves, and things
around it, so I had to stop and clear them away.
72 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Then.I ran around to the other side, and found
it on fire too, and it looked worse than it did in
front; it took quite a little time to get all the
knots and brush away, and to stamp out every
spark ; it took more than fifteen minutes, sir —
and that is the reason I was late.”

The judge studied his face thoughtfully. “Who
helped you in putting out this fire?” he asked.

“ Nobody helped me, sir. There wasn’t a person
around; not even any one passing by—if there
had been, I. should have run away and left them to
do it, for I was in an awful hurry.”

“ But I should suppose it would have been the
most natural thing in the world to have run to the
house for help.”

“Oh, I did! and knocked and knocked, but there
was nobody to answer; I made up my mind you
were all away.”

«What is your opinion about that fire, Reuben ?
How came it to be on fire?”

«Why, I’m sure I don’t know, sir; I thought
perhaps somebody with a cigar had been careless,
but I don’t know.”

“Did it strike you that there was more brush
lying about than there would have been on a well-
kept place ?”’

“JT don’t know, sir; I didn’t think much about
it. You see, I was in such a hurry that all I
CROSS-QUESTIONED. 73

thought of was to get it where I could leave it as
soon as possible.”

«“ Why didn’t you leave it, and go on?” i

« Sir?” said Reuben, looking bewildered.

«T mean, how came you to take so much trouble?
It wouldn’t have been your fault if the fence had
burned down.”

« Why, it would if I could have helped it, I sup-
pose; and it wasn’t only the fence, sir ; the wind was
blowing just in the right direction, and I was afraid
for the house —I thought I ought to see to it —
I mean I thought that was the right thing to do.”

« And you always try to do right, do you?”

«No, sir,’ said Reuben, his face crimsoning.
There came to him suddenly the memory of times
when he had shirked work which Nancy Hardman
wanted done; to be sure, many of her wants
seemed unreasonable to him, but he knew very
well that he ought to have obeyed her. “No, sir,
I don’t always; but I tried to, that day.”

“Well, Reuben,” said Judge Fenning, after what
seemed to the boy a long silence — “to tell you
the plain truth, I brought you out here to-day to
hear your story of the fire. Perhaps it is only fair
to tell you that I have heard another which doesn’t
match with yours at all.’ He looked steadily at
Reuben as he spoke, but the boy returned the
look only with one of interest.
7A REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

«J don’t see what it could be,” he said, “ because
there wasn’t a living soul within sight or hearing.
I called two or three times as loud as I could
shout, in the hope that I could make somebody
hear, and come and help me. And if anybody
knows how it got started, I should think he would
have tried to be there to put it out.”

“ Reuben, did it occur to you at all, that perhaps
the fire had been started on -purpose?” asked
Judge Fenning, his keen eyes watching the boy as
though they would read his very thoughts.

« Ves, sir,’ said Reuben, “that was the first
thought I had ; things were so kind of heaped up,
‘as though they had been fixed on purpose; but
after I came to think it over, it didn’t seem sen-
sible, and I decided that it might have been a
cigar —as I told you — or I thought maybe some
very little boys had been playing with matches —
though I don’t know of any boys around here who
are little enough not to know better than to start
a bonfire right by a fence.”

Judge Fenning became silent again, and this
time considered so long that it gave Reuben a
chance to look about him and admire some of the
wonders of the beautiful room.

“Well,” he said at last, and this time he arose
from his great leather chair, “I think I will let
Caleb drive you home—and come again to-morrow
CROSS-QUES TIONED. ns

to see me. At that time I will try to have here
the persons who have told me the other story. I
want you and them to put the two stories together
to make them match. How should you like that?”

“T should like it first-rate,” said Reuben, with-
out the least hesitation. “I have thought a good
many times that Pd like to know just how that
fire commenced, and all about it. But I can walk
home, Judge Fenning — Caleb mustn’t go back for
just me.”

Judge Fenning smiled. “Caleb has to go to
the village on an errand for me,” he said, “and it
will take him but a few minutes to set you down at
home; if you don’t like a ride with a couple of fast
horses better than a walk through the sand, you
are different from any boy I ever saw.”

«Oh, I like it!” said Reuben, his eyes twin-
kling; “I’ve often wondered how those cushions of
yours felt, and to-day I had a chance to find out.”

“Very well, you may try them again. I will send
a note to Mr. Hardman, making arrangements with
him to have you call here to-morrow at twelve
o'clock. And now I have a request to make of
you. I should be very glad if you would promise
not to talk to any person about the burned fence,
between this time and to-morrow morning when we
meet here. Not only that, but I would rather you
would not talk about this interview we have had,
76 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

nor explain in any way what was wanted of you.
Are you willing to promise?”

“TI don’t know,” said Reuben. “Iam willing to
promise not to talk about it more than I can help;
but Mr. Hardman and Nancy Hardman will ask
ever sO many questions, and I don’t see how I am
going to help telling them what you wanted of me.”

“What did I want of you?” asked the judge;
and his face was so kind that Reuben, to his own
after astonishment, laughed outright as he said, “I
don’t know, sir, ’'m sure, unless it was to give me
a nice time.”

“Then you wouldn’t have a very clear story to
tell, after all, would you? But what I mean is, that
I ask you not to talk about this matter more than
you can help. If direct questions are asked, which
you feel it your duty to answer, of course your
promise will not bind you.”

“Oh! I can promise that,” said Reuben promptly.
“J will not talk more than I can help.”

Five minutes afterwards he wondered if Judge
Fenning knew what a talker his coachman was.
During that swift drive homeward, Caleb used his
utmost skill to discover just how much Reuben
knew about the burned fence. He began as they
were driving down the avenue.

«See that hole in the fence? We don’t com-
monly have no such holes around our place.”
CROSS—QUESTIONED. 77

“No,” said Reuben, “I suppose not.”

«How do you suppose that hole got there?”

«Holes are sometimes broken in fences,” said
Reuben, with the air of a sage.

«Yes, and holes are sometimes burned,” said
Caleb, fixing his large, solemn eyes on the boy,
who wanted to laugh but didn’t. “That there hole
was burned just two weeks ago to-day; I reckon
you ain’t heard of that before?”

“T saw it,’ said Reuben, “as we thane in,’

“Oh, you did! Well, I reckon you don’ know
nothing about how it happened, nor why?”

Reuben, not knowing how to answer this after
his promise to Judge Fenning, decided to say
nothing. Caleb eyed him suspiciously, and con-
tinued to talk about the fire and the fence, and the
boys, and mean people, in what he thought was a
most expressive way. And Reuben listened and
smiled, and sometimes looked grave, and wondered
what the fellow meant.
78 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER VI.
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS.

“CHO!” said Caleb at last, “there’s no use talk-
ing to poor white trash —they don’t know
even enough to answer when they are spoken to.”
Two hours later, Caleb, who had just finished
giving his master an account of his errands, added:
“Tt’s my opinion, Judge Fenning, that I had the
pleasure of taking the boy who burned the fences
a ride in the carriage this very morning.”

“Indeed!” said Judge Fenning, “what leads you
to suppose so?”

«Well, Judge Fenning, my knowledge of boys is
consid’able ; and in my opinion that boy acts like
the very one.”

« How does he act?”

«Why, Judge, he hasn’t got nothing to say for
himself. Won’t talk, you know—not about the
fences nor the fire. I gave him mo’ than a dozen
chances, and he was just mum. Didn’t even have
no curiosity to know how such a thing happened.
It looks bad, Judge ; it does, so!”
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 79

The judge smiled. So far, at least, Reuben had
followed his instructions.

There was a second sensation that day at the
Hardmans’, when Reuben was brought home in the
carriage.

“Well,” said Mr. Hardman, almost before the
boy had sprung out like a deer, and hurried up the
walk, “seems like you go and come in style! You
don’t feel quite so fine as when you went away,
I reckon? I wonder-that he let you come back.
I would have locked you up, if I had been he. I
don’t want to harbor no such around me, I can tell
you. And when he gets through with you, I want
you to understand that you'll have to answer to
me.”

“What do you mean, sir?” asked Reuben, his
face flushing a dark red. “What can you suppose
I have been doing ?”’

“Oh! dear me, how innocent you are! You
can’t come no such tricks on me, and you needn’t
try. They may go down with Judge Fenning, and
even Nancy —but I’m too old to be caught that
way.”

“TJ am sure I do not know what you are talking
about,” said Reuben, with severe dignity. “Here
is a note which Judge Fenning wished me to bring
you. Now shall I go on with the wood?”

Mr. Hardman had no answer ready; he was
80 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

already devouring the note. A letter for his eye
alone, from Judge Fenning, was certainly distinc-
tion; but he did not find it quite to his mind.

“How lofty he can be!” he said in a discon-
tented tone; “I'll talk as much as I please; my
tongue’s my own, I guess. What do you stand
there staring for? Why don’t you go to work?
Isn’t it enough that you have wasted the whole
morning ?”’

Reuben waited for no further orders, but con-
cluded that the pine-stumps must be his work, and
went at them with a will.

Just then Nancy appeared. “ What have you
got, father?” she asked; “what does Reuben
say?”

« He says nothing, just as he usually does when —
he ought to speak,” said. Mr. Hardman crossly.
«And Judge Fenning has laid down his orders to
us as though we were slaves, and he owned us.
We are not to question the boy, if we ‘please,’
until after he sees him again. What if I don’t
‘please’ — what right has he to order me?”

“J don’t see but the note is nice enough;”’ said
Nancy, glancing it through. “He says ‘ Dear sir,’
and ‘yours truly,’ just as gentlemen do to each
other; and I wouldn’t ask questions if I were you,
so long as he don’t want you to. There’s likely
some reason. There’s no use quarrelling with a
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 8I

man because he’s rich and drives around in his
carriage. I sha’n’t say a word to Reuben, though
I am dying to know what happened.”

Mr. Hardman, though he grumbled more or
less, apparently came to a like conclusion. The
day passed, and Reuben was asked no questions.
However, both father and daughter had said
enough. Some of Nancy’s words floated back to
Reuben between the blows of the axe, and added
to those which Mr. Hardman had spoken, made
his face grow troubled and puzzled, and then finally
gather into a frown, as for the first time it dawned
upon him that not only the Hardmans, but Judge
Fenning, actually believed that he set the fence on
fire —or helped it along in some way! No such
thought had occurred to him while talking with the
judge, or even with Caleb. Secure in conscious
innocence, he had been slow to take the hints
which Caleb’s words might have conveyed. But
the more he thought about it, the more he realized
that herein lay the explanation of some things that
Judge Fenning said. Probably that was the “en-
tirely different story”? which he had heard. From
whom? Who could suppose for a moment that
he would do such a thing? Why should he do it?
and why should anybody think he would? Was
hea boy to amuse himself with mischief? Had he
ever gone prowling around seeing what he could
82 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

do to trouble others, as some boys he knew of did?
Had he not during all the years he had spent in
this part of the world — and they seemed to Reu-
ben many and long—been faithful to his work,
and honest in his ways? What right had Judge
Fenning to suppose for a moment that he would
be guilty of such an act? As for Mr. Hardman,
of course he would believe the worst of him. “And
be glad of the chance, I suppose,” said Reuben to
himself, with a swelling heart; “it is hard, I de-
clare, that a fellow who has done his best to make
something of himself, should not only have no
chances, but be hindered all the time by things
which he can’t help, and then be told lies about in
the bargain. I might as well give up and be the
sort of fellow they think Iam. But I never will,”
he added after a few minutes of bitter thought ;
«T’ll be somebody yet, in spite of them all.”

Nevertheless, it was a very hard day. Reuben
always looked back to it afterwards as one of the
hardest he remembered. Mr. Hardman did not
ask any questions, but he did worse.

“Let the matches alone!” he said roughly to
Reuben, when in the course of the afternoon he
came for some to light the kitchen fire. ‘The less
you meddle with matches, the better. We don’t
want to be burned out of house and home, either
from carelessness or wickedness.”
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 83

‘Reuben’s face was white with anger; but he
turned away without a word, and went off to the
kitchen.

“Well,” said Nancy, who was waiting for the
matches, “ did you stop to make them ?”

“No; your father told me to let them alone.
He seems to have grown suddenly afraid to trust
me with matches.”

Nancy uttered an exclamation which he did not
catch, and rushed after them herself. “ Father,”
he heard her say, “seems to me I wouldn’t be a
goose, if I could help it. Reuben didn’t set that
fence on fire any more than I did; and I don’t be-
lieve in treating him as if he did. That isn’t the
way Judge Fenning would want you to do, I can
tell from his note.”

“I’m not Judge Fenning’s slave, nor yours
either,” said Mr. Hardman, who was in unusual ill-
humor that day, for several reasons. In the first
place, several plans of his own had gone wrong ;
and in the second place he had been drinking hard
cider — more of it than usual — and it had the ef-
fect which hard cider has on some brains; it made
him cross without reason. But for the first time
in his life the voice of Nancy Hardman sounded
like music in Reuben’s ears. Here was one who
believed in him in the face of all suspicion. And
he admitted to himself that since Judge Fenning
84 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

could suspect him, it was not unreasonable, per-
haps, for the Hardmans to do so. He must have
told them some story in the morning to base sus-
picion on; but despite it all, Nancy Hardman be-
lieved in him! A few days before, Reuben would
have laughed at the idea that it made much differ-
ence to him what Nancy Hardman thought about
anything. “I'll always remember it of her,” he said
to himself gratefully. ‘After this, I'll fill her tubs, -
and bring her pine-knots, and split her kindling-
wood without having to be told, and I’ll do every-
thing I can to help her. To think that she should
speak up for me in that way — I can hardly believe
my ears!’’ The memory of it softened the rest
of the day for him. On the whole, he bore Mr.
Hardman’s unreasonableness much better than he
had feared he should. But he looked forward to
the next morning with mingled feelings of anxiety
and indifference, while he worked hard with his
hands, and spent hours of thought trying to puzzle
out who could have gotten up the story about him.
Was it possible that somebody had seen him work-
ing hard to put the fire out, and had supposed that
he was, instead, trying to build it? “But nobody
passed,” said the poor fellow —‘“not a soul. I
was too anxious to have help to let anybody escape
Tee oe

Meanwhile Judge Fenning, though a very busy
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 85

man, gave a good deal of thought to the honest-
faced boy whom he had questioned that morning,
and at the tea-table made known his perplexities.
«Tm a good deal puzzled just how to manage the
callers whom I expect to-morrow.”

“Callers?” said Mrs. Fenning inquiringly ; and
Alice looked up from the orange she was sipping,
to ask, “ Who are they to be, papa?”

“Three boys,” said the judge; “and I fancy
they will not care to meet. The more I think
about that manly-looking fellow who was with
me to-day, the more sure I feel that he told
the truth.”

Alice was interested at once. ‘“O papa!” she
said, “did you have a trial right here in your
study ? How nice! tell me about it — please,
papa.”

«“ Why, it was about the fence that was burned,”
said the judge. Then he looked. up suddenly at
his wife, remembering that they had agreed not to
_ say anything about that before Alice until she was
quite strong again. Mrs. Fenning laughed at his
startled look. <‘‘ Never mind,” she said, “Alice is
well enough now, I think, to hear about the-fire.
It happened the day you were hurt, darling,” she
continued ; ‘the fence around the grove took fire
in some way, and quite a-hole was burned. We
did not mention it before you, lest it might excite
86 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

you when you were weak, as it happened the very
day you were hurt.”

Alice looked excited now; her cheeks glowed,
and her voice was eager. ‘“O papa! I know about
the fire; it was that which made me go up those
ugly back stairs in the dark—so they could not
find me if they got into the house—and I was
coming down again when I fell. Why! isn’t it
strange that I forgot all about it?”

No, they did not think it very strange. In the
fall she had hurt her head, and had been burning
with fever and delirium for several days; then, as
she grew better, the doctor would not allow her to
be questioned about the accident, lest it might ex-
cite her ; and for the same reason the accident to
the fence had not been mentioned in her presence.

“Never mind,” said Judge Fenning anxiously,
when he saw her glowing cheeks. And he asked
himself how he could have been such an _ idiot
as to mention the boys in her hearing. “ Never
mind, the fire was over so long ago it is no
wonder you forgot it ; and it wasn’t much of a fire,
anyway.”

“Oh! but, papa, I know all about it. Let me
tell you ; it won’t make me excited. I was silly to
be afraid then —I can’t think how I happened to
be such a dunce! but it seemed queer to be in the
house alone, you know; and then to see those boys
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 87

burning sticks and things, and setting fire to them
right close to the fence, did look dreadful. I
thought perhaps the kitchen door was unlocked —
I had not thought to look — and that they might
come in and try to steal things ; so I locked all the
doors in the front part of the house, and took the
keys, and ran away up those back stairs where I
was sure they couldn’t find me. How silly I was,
wasn’t 1? How could they have got to me in any
of the rooms after I had locked the doors? but I
seemed to want to get as far away from them as
possible.”

Poor little girl! the utmost they had thought
was that a desire to rummage in some of the boxes
in the back attic had come to her; and here she
had been frightened into making the journey! No
wonder she had been delirious all night, —and for
two or three nights, indeed, — and imagined that all
sorts of people and things were coming after her!
Judge Fenning began to look not only grave, but
stern. The boys who had by their wickedness per-
illed the life of his darling would not have fared
very well at his hands just then. But Alice was
quite herself again, and it could do no harm to ask
her a few questions.

“Were there two boys, daughter?” he began
quietly.

“Oh! yes, sir. One was a good deal smaller
88 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

than the other. They worked hard for quite a
while — at least it seemed a long while to me —
getting ready for the fire. I could not think what
they were about. I had a mind to run down and
tell them they must go away — that my father did
not like to have boys playing around there. But
when they made a blaze, it frightened me so that
I thought of nothing but thieves. Papa, I had
read a story only a few days before about some
men who set fire to a house, and burned it down
so they could steal things. Wasn't it strange that
I should have read about it just before it seemed
to be going to happen ?”

“T don’t wonder that you were frightened,” said
her mother gravely.

«Yes ; but then it was silly to run up those old
back stairs. Oh! well, I had another reason for
going ; don’t you know, papa, from that back attic
window you can see away down the road? I
thought I could keep watch what they did next,
and could see the first glimpse of the carriage
when it turned the corner; oh! but wasn’t I glad
to see it? Just the minute it turned the corner, |
started to run down; and then my feet caught and
I fell —and that is the last I know.”

«Were the boys there all the time you stayed
"up in the attic?” asked her father.

«Oh! no, sir. Why, there is ever so much more


AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. 89

to tell. They went off into the woods, and there
came another boy along ; he was going by real fast,
as though he was in a hurry, but when he saw the’
fire burning, he stopped and looked at it a minute,
then he began to pull the sticks away and stamp
on them, and I knew he was going to put out the
fire. After that I didn’t feel half so much afraid:
I thought of starting down to tell him how it got
afire, and to ask him if he knew who those boys
could be; but while I was deciding whether I dared
go and talk to him, he ran around to the south side
where I couldn’t see him, and very soon after-
wards you came.”

“Well,” said Judge Fenning, after a thoughtful
silence, during which Mrs. Fenning questioned
Alice as to some other particulars which she had
wondered over during her illness ; “well, I begin to
understand. Alice, do you think you would know
those boys again if you should see them?”

“ T think I should, papa. You see, I sat up there
and watched them quite a while; and the big boy
especially, who put out the fire. I’m most sure I
should know him again; I felt so grateful to him,
you know, I wanted to run down and tell him how
glad I was that he came along just then; oh! I’m
most sure I should know him.”

“ Mamma,” said Judge Fenning, “do you think
it would hurt Alice to come into my office to-mor-
go REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

row morning for a few minutes, and see if she will
recognize the boy?”

«QO papa! did the boy come to see you who
said he put out the fire? How nice! I wish I
had seen him to-day. Did you give him some-
thing nice, papa?”

“No,” said her father, with a grave smile, “I
asked him to come again and see me to-morrow ;
if mamma is willing, you and I will have a little
talk with him.”

After that, Judge Fenning felt almost certain
that Reuben had told the exact truth. Several
little words which Alice had let slip confirmed his
story. For instance, “that tall boy,” she had
called him; and he remembered with satisfaction
that Reuben must be considerably taller than the
Potter boy. But what could have been that Potter
boy’s motive for such conduct ? If it were pure
mischief — the desire to harm something that be-
longed to others—a desire which some boys
seemed to have born with them — surely he need
not have carried it to such an extent as to come
of his own accord to accuse an innocent person.
«But that might have been in self-defence,’ he
added, continuing, after the manner of a lawyer, to
think the case out carefully on both sides ; “if his
guilty fears troubled him, he might have thought
to forestall all inquiries by furnishing the boy who
AN UNEXPECTED WITNESS. gI

had done the mischief. If this proves to be the
case, Joel Potter is a dangerous character to have in
the neighborhood; he had better be sent away to
a reform school, or something of that sort, before
he grows too old to be reformed. Well, we shall
see what they will say to-morrow.”
92 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

VIL.
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD.

ROMPTLY at ten o'clock Reuben Stein was

at Judge Fenning’s piazza door. Caleb eyed

him in no friendly way, and said in a discontented

tone, “ What do you want now? ’Pears to me if

I had a safe place to stay in, I would stay there

if I were you, and not come prowling around here
so much.”

“ Judge Fenning directed me to be here at ten
o'clock,” said Reuben stiffly. He began to under-
stand that Caleb didn’t believe in him. Reuben’s
heart was very sorrowful this morning. Mr. Hard-
man had not got over his ill-humor. The truth is,
it irritated him to think of Reuben being mixed up
with a secret which he was not at liberty to talk to
him about ; he had grumbled over it a good deal
the evening before.

“ Like as not the fellow will get me into trouble!”
he said crossly to Nancy. “If there is a trial, as
of course there will be, I shall be dragged in as a
witness and have to answer all sorts of questions,
&

HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 93

and go to nobody knows how much expense. I
wish we had let him go to the poor-house, instead
of getting ourselves mixed up with him.”

“Oh! now, father,’ Nancy had said, “what is
the use of borrowing trouble? we have enough and
to spare, I think, without borrowing any. I don’t
believe there will be any kind of a trial; if Judge
Fenning isn’t smart enough to find out the truth
from an honest boy like Reuben, he isn’t fit to be
a judge. As for being a witness, I’d like the
chance myself; I’d like to witness to the fact that
Reuben Stein is as honest and above-board as the
sun is at noon. ‘There isn’t a deceiving streak in
him. Why, father, you know we've always been
able to trust to Reuben’s word.”

The only reply Mr. Hardman could make was to
say: “You never can tell what turn a boy like
him will take; he’s smart enough to tell any sort
of story if he took a notion.” His distrust in, and
annoyance with Reuben showed in every word that
he spoke to him. And the boy had hard work to
keep from making disrespectful replies, and was
relieved rather than otherwise when the time came
for him to start for Judge Fenning’s. It was hard
to be looked upon with suspicion. He had thought
of his mother oftener than usual since these troubles
came upon him. How sure she would be to know
that he spoke the truth —and perhaps it would
94 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

not be possible for him to convince Judge Fen-
ning that he did. If Mr. Hardman, who had
known him well for years, could so easily give up
all belief in him, what was to be expected of a
stranger?

It was not Caleb’s business to answer the door-
bell. A trim mulatto girl did that, who smiled on
him and asked: “Is your name ‘Reuben’? If it
is, you are to go into that little room there, where
the door is open, and wait until Judge Fenning
sends for you.”

Into the “little room” he went. Such a pretty
room! There was white matting on the floor, and
in the centre a thick green rug; there was a soft
couch in one corner, covered with some puffy green
stuff which looked to Reuben’s eyes like velvet ;
then there was an easy-chair or two, and in the
low, wide window-seats, half-hidden by long white
curtains, vases of flowers were standing. The ta-
ble in the middle of the room was strewn with
papers and books, and the walls were lined with
shelves reaching half-way up the ceiling and filled
with books. Troubled as Reuben’s heart was, he
could not keep the brightness from his eyes at the
sight of so many books; and venturing to take
up one while he waited, he soon became so inte-
rested in it as to almost forget where he was and
for what he was waiting. Just the other side of
WHILE REUBEN WAITED HE TOOK UP A BOOK READ,





HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 97

the hall, in the large library, sat Judge Fenning in
his leather-covered arm-chair ; and three feet away
from him, seated on chairs which had been placed
for them, were Joel Potter and Bennie Wilcox.

«“ Now, Joel,” said the judge, “I want you to be-
gin at the beginning, and tell me the exact truth
about the burned fence; put in every detail as
nearly as possible, and give me the whole story
without being questioned.”

« Why,” said Joel, looking injured, «I told you
the exact truth the other day, Judge; what is the
use of going over it again?”

« But if I want to hear it, you have no objection
to going over it, have you? If your story is true,
it cannot be much trouble to tell it.”

“Oh, no!” said Joel, returning to the saucy air
which was habitual; “if you want to hear it again,
I suppose I can tell it.” And he went over with
great apparent care the account of his discovery of
the fire, and his effort to put it out. The judge,
who had made a shorthand report of the same story
as given a few days before, glanced from time to
time at the paper which lay near him, and noted
that in several particulars the two accounts contra-
dicted each other. Once he called the boy’s at-
tention to it. “Look here, Joel, didn’t you tell me
the other day that you didn’t notice the fire on the
south side of the grove until you had put out the
98 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

other? And to-day you say that you saw the fire
on the south side.”

“Oh! no,” said Joel glibly, “I didn’t say that ;
you have mixed me up with somebody else; of
course I saw the fire around on the south side first
—that is where I had the hardest time getting it
out.”

“ Indeed,” said the judge, looking all the while
at his paper where the former story was written,
not in the least like this. Joel, who was looking
at it too, made sure that there was no writing on
it, and repeated his statement very confidently.
He hadn’t an idea that those queer little dots and
marks were writing. When Judge Fenning was
satisfied that Joel did not mean to tell the truth,
and that the little fellow by his side was too much
under his power to do other than agree to all he
said, he directed the boys to wait there a moment,
and crossed the hall to speak to Reuben. It
seemed to give him pleasure to find Reuben so
busy reading that he did not hear a footfall. «That
does not look like guilt,” said the judge to himself;
then he spoke : —

“Good-morning! you have found something that
interests you, I see.”

«Yes, sir,’ said Reuben, dropping the book and
springing to his feet ; “ I found something about a
meeting in New York, and it felt like home. I
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 99

have been in the hall where it was held, and I’ve
seen the man who made the speech; he used to
come to our Sunday-school quite often and talk to
us.” Then there seemed to come suddenly the
remembrance of why he was there, and his face
grew red. “Perhaps I ought not to have touched
the book, sir,” he said; “but I saw the picture,
and took it up without thinking.”

“That is all right,” said the judge heartily. “I
am glad you enjoyed it; that is a picture of a good
man whom we all honor. Now are you ready to
hear that other story I told you of?”

“ Yes, sir, as ready as I can be,” said Reuben
with a very faint smile. “I can’t imagine who
knows anything about it besides myself; because
if there had been anybody within sight or hear-
ing, they must have heard me call for help.”

“ Before we go in,” said the judge, glancing at
the small note-book he held in his hand, “let me
ask you again about the fire, that I may have your
story freshly before me.” Then he questioned him
as he had done Joel, keeping his eye on the note-
book as Reuben answered, The two stories agreed
in all important points. Once Reuben hesitated.

“T don’t know,” he said; “I can’t think whether
that was before or after I went around on the
south side.”

“ Never mind,” said the judge, smiling ; “it is of
100 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

no consequence which it was.” He found himself
pleased to think that Reuben could not remem-
ber; it would have been so easy to have “re-
membered” if the story were being made up.
« Well,” he said, making some more little marks
in his note-book, “I think we are ready now to
meet our friends in the other room.”

Joel Potter gave a start of surprise, and a look
which the judge thought was dismay appeared on
his face as he caught sight of Reuben. As for
Reuben, he, too, looked surprised.

“You here?” he said, by way of greeting ; then
Joel recovered himself and grinned vindictively.

“Yes,” he said, “I’m here; you didn’t expect
me, did you? I’m around quite often when folks
don’t know it.”

“Joel,” said Judge Fenning, “you may begin at
the beginning, and tell Reuben the story of that
Thursday afternoon.”

“Oh, my!” said Joel; “I’ve told that story
often enough ; he knows about it without my tell-
ing it.”

“See. here, sir,” said the judge sternly, «I
want you to do as I tell you without more words
than are necessary. Tell Reuben Stein exactly
what you have already told me.”

So Joel, looking a trifle frightened over the
judge’s stern tone, began his story —telling it
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 101

awkwardly enough, with Reuben’s eyes fixed upon
him ; it was altered in more than one important
particular from the other versions which he had
given. Judge Fenning had his note-book before
him, and made the usual little marks which no one
but he understood.

« Well, sir,’ he said to Reuben when Joel finally
stopped, “what do you think of that story?”
He looked at Reuben when he spoke, and the boy
burst forth in answer, —

“T think it is the most astonishing story I ever
heard! What in the world does the fellow mean?
If he saw me at all, he saw me working away for
dear life to put that fire out; but I can’t imagine
where he was; he couldn’t have been around when
I called for help. Where were you? and why in
the name of sense didn’t you come and try to stop
me? then you would have discovered that I was
working to save the fence, instead of burning it!”

Judge Fenning was greatly puzzled ; the more
he saw of these boys, the more he felt like believ-
ing that Reuben was telling the truth. But he had
expected him to fly into a passion, and call Joel
Potter all the ugly names he could think of ; in-
stead, he was evidently trying to piece the two
stories together as if both of them might be true;
if this was acting, it was being done very cleverly.
Just then he bethought himself of Alice. It was
102 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

not probable that the. girl would be able to tell
which boy she saw putting out the fire — she was
so far away at the time; it would be very easy, he
thought, to mistake one boy for another ; it was
hardly fair to Reuben to apply such a test. Still,
he had promised Alice she should come in. Joel
had certainly not told the entire truth to him, yet
it hardly seemed possible that his story could be
all false. He would not have had the courage to
look straight at Reuben and get it all off. On the
whole, he decided to hear what Alice had to say ;
then he should probably send all the boys away
and consider further.

« Reuben,” he said, “ oblige me by opening that
door at your left.”

Reuben did so, and Judge Fenning called,
“ Alice.”

“Here I am, papa,” said a clear voice, and a
bright-eyed little girl came tripping into the room.
She was all in white, and looked to Reuben’s eyes
like a flower that might have been picked that
morning from the judge’s garden. The moment
her eyes rested on Reuben, she gave a little ex-
clamation of satisfaction.

«You are the very boy!” she said, “aren’t
you?”

“What boy?” asked Reuben, smiling in spite
of himself ; though, truth to tell, he had felt very
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 103

little like smiling. It had not occurred to him
to believe that Joel Potter could be telling a
downright falsehood. He had had little to do-
with boys, having been kept much with his mother
while she lived, and very hard at work since she
died ; what few boys he used to know were not of
the sort who would lie; so thinking it over, he could
only believe that this boy Joel, hidden away some-
where in the woods, had mistaken him for some
boy who had set the fence on fire; if this was so,
how could he hope to make Judge Fenning be-
lieve his story? He had no friends to speak for
him; and even Mr. Hardman, who knew him best,
evidently believed that he did it. Life looked
all but hopeless to Reuben just then, yet he
smiled on Alice Fenning ; how could any one help
it?

«“ Why, the boy who worked so hard to put out
the fire,’ she said eagerly. “How you did stamp
and tug! I wanted to come and help you; but I
did not dare for fear those others would come
back — and there were two of them. Where are

they?”
She wheeled around as she spoke, and caught
sight of Joel and his miserable companion. “Oh!

here you are,” she said; “what made you work
so hard to set papa’s fence on fire? Where did
you hide while the other boy was putting it out?
104 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Down under that clump of trees? I thought you
did, but I couldn’t quite see you from my win-
dow.”

«What are you talking about?” asked Joel sul-
lenly, though his face had grown both red and pale
since Alice began to talk.

She laughed gleefully, and turned toward Reu-
ben. “Shouldn’t you suppose he would know?”
she said; “though, after all, I don’t suppose he
knows much; he must be a very silly boy to think
he could build a bonfire so near a fence without
doing harm. Upon which. she turned to Joel
again. ‘When you found out the fence was going
to burn, why didn’t you make a fuss about it, and
go to work like a sensible boy to try to undo the
mischief, instead of hiding like a coward ?”

Joel’s face was pale now with dismay. What an
easy way out of it all he might have had if he had
only kept still! Here was Alice ready to believe
that the fire was made just for play, and that he hid
away afterwards from fright. Oh! to be able to
take back those stories he had told to Judge Fen-
ning ; but there was no hope of any such plan now.
Yet even then he tried to brave it out.

«J don’t know what you are talking about,” he
said, looking down at the matting, and speaking
sullenly. You needn’t try to make out that I had
anything to do with that fire —only what I said;
HINDERED BY FALSEHOOD. 105

Judge Fenning knows all about it ; I told him just
how it was a good while ago.”

“Look here,” said Judge Fenning sternly ; “do
you suppose you are deceiving me all this time, my
lad? You haven’t been telling the truth, and you
are such a bungler that you cannot even tell the
same falsehood twice in succession. On this paper
in my hand is written down the story you told me
first, and beside it the second version ; and in some
important particulars they are not alike —as I will
prove to you if you care to have me read them. I
have known for some time that you were not speak-
ing the truth ; and I have given you three different
opportunities to repent of your attempt to injure
an innocent boy who was trying to save my
property, but it has been in vain. Had you even
at this late hour tried in any way to right the
wrong you have done, my plan of action in regard
to you might have been different from what it now
will be.”

Just what Joel would have said or tried to say
will not be known, for poor little Bennie Wilcox
did not give him a chance to speak. He burst into
a loud wailing cry and sobbed out, “I didn’t want
to do it, I didn’t, I didn’t; and I’ll say it if he
knocks me down. I told him it was mean, and I
wouldn’t; and he said I must.”

It was very pitiful; Alice Fenning looked as
106 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

though she was going to cry, and turned anxiously
to her father. «You won’t punish him, papa, will
you? He is so small, and such a coward. He was
afraid of that big boy all the time, I suppose ; oh!
say you won't do anything to him!”
FLOWERS AND THORNS. 107

CHAPTER VIII.
FLOWERS AND THORNS.

Y daughter,” said Judge Fenning, “ cannot
you trust your father?”

The words and the look which accompanied them
seemed to recall Alice to her senses. “ Why, of
course, papa,” she said; “what was I thinking
about? You always do just right, don’t you?”

The judge smiled on her. “At least I try to,”
he said. “Now, Alice, you may take Reuben, and
go to the garden until I call you. I want to have
a word alone with these two boys.”

Thus dismissed, Alice led the way with great sat-
isfaction to the lovely rose-garden, talking eagerly
as she went. “Did you ever hear such a story as
that big boy told? I don’t see how he could sit
there and talk to papa, and not say a true word.
Seems to me I should have to tell just the truth
to papa, whether I did to other people or not ; his
eyes would look right through meif I didn’t. But
O Reuben! I am so glad that I saw you that day.
Wasn’t it strange that I should have been looking
108 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

out of the window at you all the time, and you
never knew it? Reuben, doesn’t that seem a little
bit like God? I mean, doesn’t it make you think
of Him? He sees everything, you know; and we
don't think of such a thing, very often —at least
Tidonit | d

«J don’t, either,’ said Reuben humbly. “I
thought about Him to-day, though, when I was feel-
ing discouraged for a few minutes because there
wasn’t anybody to be a witness for me in any way.
I felt kind of glad to remember that He knew all
about it, and knew I was doing right and had
spoken the truth.”

«“ Of course you did,” said Alice confidently ; “you
always do, don’t you? Seems to me I should know
that by just looking at you. O Reuben! why
don’t you go to school? We've got such a nice
school now; such a nice teacher — not a bit like
old Miss Jenks. She is just as pretty! and the
man is nice too; I suppose you would be in some
of his classes, but I’m not; I’m in the smaller
room— I’m a good deal of a dunce,” she added
gravely. “I've been sick a good deal, and had to
stay at home when other girls were learning.”

“I’m a regular dunce,” said Reuben sadly. “I
have to stay at home all the while and work ; and
I don’t know when it will end. I thought Mr.
Hardman would surely let me go to school through
FLOWERS AND THORNS. 109

the winter months; but here it is almost Christ-
mas, and I haven’t heard anything about it.”

“JT never heard of such a thing!” said Alice in-
dignantly. “Of course you ought to go to school.
I'll ask papa to speak to Mr. Hardman about
dite

“Qh, no!” said Reuben in alarm. “I shouldn’t
like to have you do that. It would look too much
like begging. Besides, if Mr. Hardman was ever
so willing there are reasons why I couldn't go;
and I suppose, when one thinks of it, they are the
very reasons why he doesn’t send me.”

«“ What can they be?” asked Alice seriously.
«JT cannot think of a single reason why a boy who
is well, and wants to learn, should not be in school
every day.”

But Reuben did not like to tell her that he had
on at that moment the best clothes he had in the
world, and she could see for herself that they were
too small in every way, besides being patched in
all shapes and shades; so he called her attention
to a curious flower, and asked its name; and Alice,
who was very fond of the flowers, and knew them
all intimately, went off into a description of some
of the rarest. Still, they could not long keep their
thoughts away from the scene in the library, and
the events which had brought it about. They
went over in detail every step of the way. Alice
IIo REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

graphically described her feelings on that eventful
day when the fence was burned.

«J felt queer enough at finding myself alone in
the house,” she said; “I am seldom left alone.
They expected to get home earlier, but papa was
detained. If they had, they would have found you
at work, wouldn’t they? And all this trouble would
have been saved — no, they would have found the
burning fence, wouldn’t they? And you wouldn’t
have had to ne ee were you going, Reu-
ben?”

«J was going to the Portland Farm,” said Reu-
ben gravely; “and if I had not stopped for the
burning fence, I suppose I would not be here to-
day.”

“No,” said Alice; “that is what I say, and I
wouldn’t have had a chance to know you. I am
almost glad it burned, aren’t you? because now we
know each other, and can be good friends.”

«But I mean,” said Reuben, “that I wouldn’t
have been anywhere, or — of course I don’t mean
that, but — well, Pll explain, and you will under-
stand what I’m talking about.’ So the story of
his hopes and plans on that day which seemed so
long in the past, was gone over. He explained
how sure he would have been of getting the place
but for the burning fence, and how dreadfully he
felt about it, and what a-sorrowful evening he had
FLOWERS AND THORNS. II!

all alone, mourning over his failure. Then he ex-
plained who the man was who would have hired
him, and who went in his place, and what had hap-
pened.

Alice exclaimed over this, her face pale with
sympathy. “Oh; dear! . Isn’t it strange and won-
derful? Now we must be glad about the fire;
but we mustn’t be glad that that horrid Joel Pot-
ter did a wicked thing, I suppose. I don’t know
how to fix it; but I am glad you are here, aren't
you?”

“Yes,” said Reuben gravely, “I’m glad I’m not
dead. I don’t think I am ready to die yet.”

Alice looked at him timidly. “Do you mean
you are afraid?” she asked; “I am too. And
sometimes I feel awfully about’ it. Some of the
girls at school like to go to funerals. They coax
their mothers to let them stay from school when-
ever there is going to be one, so they can go.
But I wouldn’t go to one for anything; and I
always run away up-stairs to a part of the house
where I can’t see the road, when I know a funeral
procession is to pass. Do you feel like that ?”

Reuben shook his head. “No, I don’t know as
I ever felt just like that; I never thought much
about death, except when my mother died — then
I wanted to die myself, fora while. But that night
after the accident I thought a great deal about it.
II2 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

I knew of course that sometime I should have to
die, and that people who were as young as I, often
did” —

“TJ know it,” interrupted Alice, a shiver running
through her delicate little frame. ‘“Isn’t it dread-
ful that everybody has got to! I don’t like to
think anything about it. It makes me cold when
I do.”

« But not thinking about it won’t keep it away,”
said Reuben gravely ; “and that is what I thought
that night. I knew some people were not afraid
to die —that they rather looked forward to it, and
wished for the time to come.”

“Oh! but, Reuben, that is when they get to be
old.”

Reuben shook his head. “That doesn’t make
the difference. Don’t you know that old Mr.
Judkins who lived down near Mr. Hardman’s? He
was so old that his teeth were all gone, and he was
lame, and almost blind, but he was awfully afraid
to die. Even Mr. Hardman, who isn’t afraid of any-
thing, said he never wanted to live through another
such night as he had with him.”

“Don't!” said Alice, almost crying; “what
makes you talk about such dreadful things?”

«But, Alice, I thought perhaps you would like
to hear something nice about it. I made up my
mind that night that if there was anything that
FLOWERS AND THORNS. 113

would keep me from being afraid to die when the
time came, I would get it. There were things my
mother had taught me to do, but I had seemed to
forget them. I began to pray again, just as I did
when I was a very little boy; and I read every
night in mother’s Bible; and—I don’t know how
it was, but after a while, when I thought of dying,
it didn’t seem such a dreadful thing. I began to
like the thought of being in heaven with father
and mother, you know, and everybody. It makes
a great difference, Alice.”

“Does it?” she said, looking earnestly at him ;
«T don’t see how it could. Praying doesn’t make
any difference with me; I’ve said my prayers al-
ways. I never go to bed without them; but I
don’t feel the least bit different about things, and
I’m sure I never want to die, never!”

She spoke with a great deal of earnestness, and
with as much decision as though her not wanting
to-do a thing made it sure that she would not.

Reuben opened his lips to remind her that she
would have to die, whether she wanted to or not,
but thought better of it. What was the use in
making the little girl unhappy? He did not know
how to explain to her what she must do to make
matters different, although he knew very well by
experience that to say one’s prayers and to pray
were two quite different things.
114 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Just at that moment Judge Fenning’s voice was
heard calling them, and Alice ran eagerly forward.
“© papa!” he heard her saying as he reached the
piazza, “are those boys gone? What did you do
with them? I think that eldest one is horrid!
He ought to be sent to jail.”

Her father smiled gravely. “You think he
ought to be sent to jail for life, and the other one
ought to be given a stick of candy and Cee 2
Is that the idea, daughter?”

“QO papa! it isn’t at all; but don’t you think
that Joel coaxed the little one into doing wrong?”

« Undoubtedly he helped to lead him astray, but
people need not be coaxed into doing what they
ought not, Alice.”

«Oh! I know it; but it is pretty hard some-
times. Where are they, papa?”

«“T have looked after them, dear, and will ex-
plain to you at another time. I suppose Reuben
isin haste to get home. My boy, I have written a
line to Mr. Hardman which I will ask you to de-
liver; and in addition to it, you will tell him, of
course, whatever you please about this whole mat-
ter; my request to you to keep silent is now with-
drawn. And I want to say that since my very
first talk with you I have had almost no doubt of
your entire truthfulness. I have been slow and
cautious in order to give the other boy the utmost
FLOWERS AND THORNS. II5

possible help in righting himself if he could. As
it is, I am quite convinced that you saved my
orange grove for me, and probably my home. I
shall not forget it; and one of these days I may
have something more to say to you. I ought not
to keep you any longer this morning, as Mr.
Hardman hinted to me that he could ill spare
you.”

It seemed to Reuben that he flew rather than
walked home. His heart was very light, and he
had never in all his experience been quite so eager
to get over the ground. There was a sense of
triumph in the thought of the letter which he car-
ried in his pocket ; so many things had been hinted
at during the last twenty-four hours, it was cer-
tainly a triumph to have come out of his trouble
not only without blame, but actually commended
for faithful service. What would Mr. Hardman say
now? It also gave him a great deal of pleasure
to remember that Nancy would be glad —she might
not say anything of the kind to him. “Nancy is
queer,” he said. She had kept her kind feelings
for him so entirely to herself that he had not so
much as suspected them. But it was very pleasant
to feel that he had a friend.

« Well,” said Mr. Hardman, greeting him with a
scowl, “so you are back, are you? I didn’t much
expect to see you again.”
116 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

«Yes, sir,” said Reuben respectfully ; then he
handed out the note without more words.

Nancy Hardman, who seemed to be always
within hearing, now came to the door. “ What is
all that?” she asked; and without further cere-
mony looked over her father’s shoulder.

«Humph!” said Mr. Hardman as he read.
Reuben stood with his cheeks aglow and his eyes
shining. He had not the least idea what was in
the note, but it did not matter. Of course it told
that he was not’a suspected boy any more, and it
was possible that it explained the part which he
really had taken in the fire.

«Humph!” said Mr. Hardman at last, “fine
words.”

«JT think as much!” exclaimed Nancy, “and
nothing else. Do you mean to say, Reuben Stein,
that he hasn’t given you a cent, when he says that
you saved his grove and house for him? I didn't
think anybody would be as mean as that!”

«J didn’t want pay for putting out a fire,” said
Reuben, his cheeks glowing now for a different
reason.

“Oh, you didn’t!” said Mr. Hardman angrily.
“Well, suppose you didn’t ; that is no reason why
a man as rich as Judge Fenning shouldn't have
done something handsome. Words are cheap. I
am not so well off as you—I wouldn’t be above
FLOWERS AND THORNS. 117

taking a little of his plenty. And the time you
spent fussing around his fences belonged to me,
Ireckon. I don’t suppose you thought of that. I
wonder now if you could have been such a fool as
to refuse to take anything,’ he added quickly as
this new thought struck him. “If you have, you
deserve a whipping.”

«J wasn’t offered anything,” said Reuben; “I
never thought of such a thing;” and he turned
away, all his pleasure gone for the time. After all,
there was nobody to care that he had got out of his
trouble and been proved to be an honest boy.

“ Well,” said Nancy, “I think it was mean in the
judge not to give you something, I must say; but
it has turned out just as I expected. I knew you
hadn’t got into any such scrape as that, and I told
him so to his face.”

Reuben looked back to smile. “Thank you,” he
said; “I am glad you believed in me.” Then he
went out to the back yard to set to work mending
the door of the hen-house, with as much energy as
though he had not spent part of the morning in a
lovely flower-garden, talking with one of the fair-
est flowers that grew. For in his fancy Reuben
called Alice Fenning one of her father’s flowers.
118 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER IX.
“WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?”

HE day passed much as other days had done,
except that Mr. Hardman threw out no more

hints that Reuben was in disgrace, and treated him
with as much kindness as he knew how to show.
He seemed to be ashamed of his outburst about
the judge, and made no more reference to him or
to the late excitement. He took care to keep Reu-
ben almost busier than usual, to “make up for lost
time,’ he said; and the work was of a kind which
had no interest in itself for the boy; but he worked
faithfully, and was tired enough at night to throw
himself down on the lowest step of the back piazza,
after everything was done, to rest himself with the
quiet and beauty of the evening before he went up
to his dreary little room. It had been a beautiful
summer-like day, although November was past, and
in a very short time it would be Christmas. The
little boy Reuben used to be very fond of Christ-
mas, and to look forward to it months ahead ; but
this old Reuben —for sometimes he felt very old —
“ WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?” I19Q

cared little about the holiday. He never had any
presents; and it was not different from other days,
unless he felt more lonely because there was less
to be done. Last Christmas, he remembered, the
family had gone to Uncle Kastor’s ; but he had been
left at home to guard the house, because there was
a report that tramps were around, forcing their way
into any old house that was left deserted, and help-
ing themselves to whatever they fancied.

“We haven’t got much that even a tramp would
want,” Mrs. Hardman had said ; “ but, such as it is,
we can’t get along without it, and you'll just have
to stay.”

The Christmas before, Uncle Kastor’s folks had
been there to dinner ; but he had the mumps, and
was banished to his little ugly room, and forbidden
to so much as look down the cracks, for fear some
of Uncle Kastor’s boys would catch the disease.
So Christmas had no pleasant memory for him.
He thought of it to-night, and counted just the
number of days there were before it would come,
and wondered what would happen this time to keep
him from joining in the family frolic. Probably
there would be none; for there was sickness at
Uncle Kastor’s this year, and Mrs. Hardman had
been there for a week.

Nancy came out, and sat down on the upper step
of the piazza, while Reuben lay, rather than sat,
120 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

on the lower one. “Well,” she began, “I suppose
you couldn’t tell anything about the house out
there, for the world. I reckon you saw the inside
of it, didn’t you; or did they talk with you out at
the barn, or hen-house, or some such place?”

Now, Reuben had been in the habit of answering
Nancy’s questions in as few words as possible.
She never talked about anything which interested
him, and he had never cared to take the trouble to
satisfy her curiosity ; but to-night it was different.
Had not Nancy believed in him when everybody
else doubted? He turned himself on the step,
leaned his elbow on the step above him, and spoke
briskly.

“Oh, I was in the house! In a little room —
at least, they called it little; I thought it was
pretty big, but not so big as the library, where I
went next. They are beautiful rooms, pictures on
the walls, and flowers all around, and books — oh,
my! so many books.”

«Pictures and flowers,” said Nancy with a dis-
dainful sniff. “Is that all therewas? Didn't they
have any carpets, or curtains, or things to sit on?”

«Why, of course,” said Reuben; and he launched
forth on a description of the rooms which must
have astonished Nancy; he had never described
anything to her before. She gave a sigh of satis-
faction when he came to a period.
“ WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?” 121

“T’d like to see such rooms,” she said. “I’ve
read about them in books; but I never was in a
fine house, and I don’t suppose I ever shall be.
Lots of books, you say? I'd like some of them.
I think it is mean that we can’t ever get hold of
anything to read. We used to have; there was a
family lived here when I was a little girl, before
you came, that lent me books. I carried eggs and
things to them, and they had a new book or a
magazine or something for me every time I went
there. They moved away, and I haven’t had any-
thing since.” Nancy sighed again, and Reuben
looked at her in sympathetic surprise. He had
not known that she cared for reading.

«JT wish for books too,” he said timidly. He
did not know but she would resent his having the
same wish as hers. “Mother had only a few, but
we read them over and over until I almost knew
them by heart. I might let you have them, if you
would care.”

Nancy looked her astonishment. “I didn’t know
you hada book!” she said. “ You have kept them
dreadful close. What are they? story-books?”

“No,” said Reuben thoughtfully. “I don’t
think they would be called story-books exactly,
though they have a good many stories in them.
One is called by a very long name, — ‘ Encyclope-
dia,’ —and it is full of very short accounts of peo-
122 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

ple and things; mother said they were all true.
But they are as good as stories, I think. And
there are some Harper's Magazines; they have
some stories in them, but not many. And the
numbers I have of them are odd ones. A January
number, you know, and then a June one, and an
October one of another year; and the stories are
sometimes chapter fourteen, and sometimes chap-
ter twenty-nine —and different stories at that ; but
I’ve read them all, and imagined beginnings and
endings to them.”

« Well, I’d like them,” said Nancy with energy ;
“J would read a dictionary, I guess, if I had one;
I do get so tired doing nothing, and having noth-
ing to read.”

Reuben found his interest in this young woman
growing every moment. He had not imagined
that she ever thought of a book. “I would like
to lend them to you,” he said heartily. “I never
thought of offering them, because” — then he was
silent fora moment. It would not sound well to
tell her that he did not know she ever read any-
thing. He began witha fresh sentence. “I think
everything of the books, because they were mother’s,
and because they are all the reading I’ve got ;- but
I shall like to have you read them if you want to.”

“There isn’t much use in wanting things,” said
Nancy gloomily. “I’ve wanted so many things


“WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?” 123

that I couldn’t get, that ve about given up. I
reckon you wouldn’t suppose that I’ve wanted all
my life to go to school, would you?”

“No,” said Reuben, with a touch of respect in
his voice such as he never gave to Nancy Hard-
man before. If she had really wanted that thing
on which his heart was so earnestly set, they must
be something alike after all.

' «Well, I have,” said Nancy, feeling the change
in his tone, and being unconsciously made more
communicative thereby. ‘When I was a little girl
I did go; and I learned to read and write, and such
things, and got a start at figures. I think it is
figures I would have liked; they seemed to come
natural to me. I can keep father’s accounts now
— when he has any to keep — better than he can,
and he went to school all the time when he was a
boy. But you see we are too awfully poor to have
chances to do anything ; and then I’m getting such
a big girl I don’t suppose I’d be willing to go to
school now, if I had the clothes, which I haven’t,
nor the books. Id have to begin away down with
the young ones, and I shouldn't want to do that.
But I’ve tried a good many times since you’ve been _
here to plan ways for you to go. I don’t suppose
you knew it, but I have. Father says I’ve just
pestered him about it; but we couldn’t manage it.
You know as well as I do that it takes all we can
124 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

rake and scrape together to live; and that was
what made me so mad at Judge Fenning. He’s got
lots of money; and if he had just given you some
decent clothes you could go to school for a while,
anyhow ; and there, he doesn’t do a thing!”

«T thank you very much for thinking about it,”
said Reuben gratefully ; “I didn’t think you cared.”

«Well, I just thought I’d let you know how it
was,” said Nancy; “folks care for things some-
times, even when they don’t talk about them.
What about Mrs. Fenning, did you see her? Well,
it isn’t any loss, I guess,” she added, as Reuben
shook his head; “she isa stuck-up piece; I know
by the way she holds her head when they ride by.
She wouldn’t have anything to do with such com-
mon trash as you and me, and the little miss is
like her, I suppose.”

“Oh, no!” said Reuben; “ or, that is —the little
girl isn’t proud a bit. I saw her, and had a long
talk with her. Why, she is the one who helped
me out ;” and then, much to his own astonishment,
he began at the beginning, and told Nancy the
entire story about the fire; since she had been
confidential, why should not he be? She was an
interested and appreciative listener, and expressed
her opinion of Joel Potter in very plain English.

“He ought to be sent to State prison! That is
where he belongs. Little scamp! He wasn’t con-
“WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?” 125

tent with being evil himself, but must try to get a
decent boy in trouble!”

« About the reading,” said Reuben, lingering
even after he had risen to go up-stairs ; “there is
another book that I read a good deal in nowadays,
and that is my mother’s Bible.”

« A Bible!” repeated Nancy in curious tones.
“Do you read that? We've got one ourselves, but
I never thought about it. It’s pretty dull reading,
isn’t it?”

«Oh, no!” said Reuben; “not when you remem-
ber that it is all true, and that a great deal of it
means us, and is about what is coming.”

Nancy stared at him thoughtfully. “ You area
queer boy, I guess,” she said at last. “A great
deal queerer even than I thought you were. But
it is kind of strange, now I come to think of it,
that folks don’t read the Bible more. I believe it ;
I never was one of the infidel kind. I believe
every word it says; but I don’t know as I ever
thought of its really being about me, though I sup-
pose it is. Whereabouts do you read?”

“J pick out verses,” said Reuben timidly. He
hardly knew how to talk to Nancy of his Bible-read-
ing. “I don’t know how to read it very well; I
only began just a little while ago ; but I find verses
that I like almost everywhere. Some of them seem
real strange. There was one last night —I felt
126 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

awful last night. I saw that your father didn’t be-
lieve in me, and I didn’t know how to prove that
I had told Judge Fenning the truth; it seemed as
though there wasn’t anybody to help me. At first
I thought I wouldn’t read in the Bible; I’d give
everything up and go to bed. But I had promised
myself that I would read a little every night, and
I didn’t want to break my promise; so I opened it
anywhere, and found this verse, without looking.
‘This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and
delivered him out of all his troubles.’ ”

“Well, Ido say!” said Nancy admiringly; “ seems
as though ’twas meant for you, didn’t it? If you
ain’t a man yet, you are on the road to being one.
But then I don’t suppose you was crying, was
you?”

“Oh! but you know,” said Reuben, surprised out
of his timidity by such dense ignorance, “that
means praying — crying to God.”

“ Did you do that ?” Nancy asked.

“Yes,” said Reuben quietly. “I asked him to
help me out.”

“And you think he did? Well, now I don’t
think so. I think it just happened.”

“What makes things happen?” asked Reuben,
with which unanswerable question he turned away.

“ Here,” said Nancy, dashing after him when he
was half-way up the back stairs, “take this lamp, if
“WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?” 127

you are going to sit up half the night to read. I
guess there isn’t more than a drop of oil in the one
in your room.”

Reuben received it gratefully. A dim, smoky
little lamp, but very much better than the one
he usually had; and then it was so kind and so
strange in Nancy to offer it! He sat with his un-
opened Bible in his hand for some minutes, and
thought of this strange day he had lived — not the
least surprising part of it being his conversation
with Nancy Hardman. The idea of his really
talking to her, describing things to her as though
she had been a friend; and above all, telling her
about his Bible-reading and praying! How did he
come to do that? He did not understand it. If
anybody had told him, when she came out and sat
down on the steps, that before he left her he would
have said all that he did, he would not have be
lieved it. Somehow he “ad to tell her; talking
about the other books, and saying nothing of his
Bible, seemed mean and small, especially after find-
ing that verse the night before. To be sure, he had
not trusted it very much, but had gone to Judge
Fenning’s very much cast down. However, to-
night he could feel that it helped him;,and it
seemed someway as though Nancy ought to know
it. But he had not meant to say a word about
the praying; that had grown out of Nancy's un-
128 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

dreamed-of ignorance. But how kind she had been,
and how strange it was that she had suddenly
seemed to grow kind! Perhaps she had been bet-
ter all the time than he had supposed. Perhaps
if he had taken the least trouble to tell her any-
thing interesting they might have had pleasant
talks together long ago. “Maybe it is I who
am more than half to blame for all my dreary
times,” said Reuben, as at last he opened his
Bible,

The day’s excitement, as well as a good deal of
hard work that had been put into it, made him feel
unusually tired; and he decided to stop with a look
at a single verse, and to let the Bible open where
it chose. “Ill take the first verse I glance at, no
matter what it is,” said this boy, who evidently did
not know how to read the Bible. What if the first
verse he had “happened” to see had been a list of
names? But what he found was this: “If it had
not been the Lord who was on our side, when men
rose up against us.” This fitted his expectations
so exactly that he felt as though he must read
another verse: “Then they had swallowed us up
quick, when their wrath was kindled against us.”
“Yes,” he said aloud, “that is so. Joel Potter
wanted to ‘swallow me’ —TI don’t know why, I’m
sure, but he is certainly my enemy.” He could
not help reading on, stopping for some seconds
“WHAT MAKES THINGS HAPPEN?” 129

over the verse: “Blessed be the Lord, who hath
not given us as a prey to their teeth.”

“JT wonder what Nancy would say to this?” he
thought. «I told her the book was about us; and
here it is, just what I’ve been through this very
day. ‘Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the -
snare of the fowler: the snare is broken, and we
are escaped.’

«Yes, sir, we are!” said Reuben in much ex-
citement. “Joel Potter made as nice a snare for
me as he ever used to catch a mocking-bird with ;
and it is all broken to pieces, just because one little
girl, that he didn’t know anything about, was look-
ing out of an attic window. No, I suppose it was
because God planned to have her there, and to
make it all come out just as it has. ‘Our help
is in the name of the Lord, who made heaven and
earth’ Nancy may say what she likes about
things ‘happeniag,’ I believe my help was from
the Lord. He took care of me.”

««¢ This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him,
and delivered him out of all his troubles.’ That is
as true as anything can be. I’ve read the whole
Psalm, and I only meant to read a verse. Hold
on! what is that next verse, ‘They that trust in
the Lord shall be as mount Zion, which cannot be
removed, but abideth for ever.’ I'll take that verse
too, and it shall belong to me; I’m one of them.
130 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

From this hour Reuben Stein means to trust in
the ‘Lord, and do just as he tells him, as far as he
knows how. Now I’ve saidit. I’ve kind of meant
it all along, ever since that night when I first be-
gan toread; but this is downright earnest. From
this minute I belong to him.”
HINDERED BY HIMSELF, 131

CHAPTER X.
HINDERED BY HIMSELF.

E felt very grave as he closed the Bible and
dropped upon his knees, —felt older, indeed,

than he ever had before. He knew exactly what he
was about. He was not, like Nancy Hardman, ig-
norant of Bible language, and of the way to Christ.
His mother had been a good woman, and had care-
fully taught her boy the way to become a Christian,
though she had made the mistake of supposing that
he would not understand it until he was older, and
had therefore never looked or hoped to see him a
Christian boy before she left him alone; nor had
Reuben given the matter a serious thought until
the railroad accident which seemed to bring him
so close to death. Before he went to sleep that
night, you remember, he resolved to find out how
to live so as not to be afraid of death. The very
next day the Bible-reading and praying had begun,
because. Reuben, being well taught, knew that
prayer was a necessary part of Christian living.
He had meant it all, and yet someway this evening
132 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

was the final settlement of the whole matter. It
was almost too much like a business contract per-
haps you will think, and yet it was very sensible
reasoning. God had taken care of him that day —
brought him out of trouble as he had promised to
do. He had done, indeed, more than he promised,
because Reuben confessed to himself that he had
been far from trusting fully, yet God had done his
part. Now he would fully and forever give him-
self up to the God who had cared for him, and who
promised to care for him forever.

“J must do my part, though,” he said aloud, when
he rose from his knees, “and I must find out what
my part is; I suppose it is all there, in that big
book, and it will take me a good while to find it all
out; but as fast as I find it, I must carry it out;
that’s common sense. If I had hired out to a man
who was to send me to school, and board and clothe
me in return for certain work that I was to do for
him, I wouldn’t expect him to keep his bargain if
I didn’t do my part. Or no, it isn’t like that, after
all. It is like a father, a good father, who takes
care of his boy, of course, because he loves him ;
but the boy would be mean and low, and not de-
serve a father, who wouldn’t do his best to please
him. I'll try hard for my part.”

A few minutes afterwards he began to whistle ;
not a very loud whistle —he did not want to dis-
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. 133

turb the Hardmans. But it was a very merry note.
What ! a boy who had just been reading in the
Bible and praying, go to whistling? Certainly.
Who ought to feel more like it? Yet Nancy Hard-
man didn’t understand. She heard the merry note,
and curled her lip in the darkness, and said, —

«“ That is what I supposed; much his Bible-read-
ing amounts to!”

There are some people who seem to think one
ought to be long-faced, and cry a good deal, if one
makes a daily habit of Bible-reading and prayer.
They are the people who know nothing about it by
experience. The actual fact is, that the boy who
can afford to be happy all the time is the one who
knows not only that God is his Father, but that he
is trying to please his Father every day. Suddenly
the whistling stopped, and Reuben’s face grew
grave. It came to him as a new thought that
Joel Potter knew nothing about a good father.
He himself was an orphan; but his father had
been good and kind, and had done the best for his
boy that he could. Reuben understood that now
better than he did when his father was living. So
often he told himself mournfully that he was such
a little fellow then that he did not know how hard
life was for his father and mother, and did not seem
to himself to have helped them as he might. But
Joel Potter’s father was a disgrace to a boy. How
134 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

could Joel be expected to be a good boy? Who
had taught him anything?

“J wish Judge Fenning would forgive him,” he
said aloud; “perhaps he would if he had known I
wanted him to; I am the one who has suffered
most from him. Oh! of course there is the burned
fence; but then, punishing Joel Potter won’t pay
for that, and perhaps he will be a better boy after
having had such a scare. I wonder if I dare ask
the judge to let him go this time. I might get
Alice to, she would be willing to, I guess, if she
thought I was — though she felt anything but sorry
for him this afternoon. Well, I didn’t either; but
to-night it seems as though he hadn’t had half a
chance.”

He was surprised and not a little pleased with
himself over this change in his feelings. Only a
very short time ago he had felt nothing but anger
in his heart toward Joel, now he actually wanted
him forgiven. He got down on his knees again,
and prayed very earnestly for the boy whose father
had taught him wrong ways instead of right ones,
and who knew nothing about the Father in heaven.

Contrary to his expectations, the next day was
a trying one to Reuben. The truth is, that, having
got so happily out of his great trouble, he had
rather fancied that life would be bright for him ©
all the way through; but the actual fact was, that
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. 135

almost everything went wrong. Mr. Hardman had
some anxieties of which Reuben knew nothing, and
they did not serve to sweeten his temper. He
scolded Reuben without the slightest reason for
doing so, except that he was there to be scolded,
and found fault with everything he tried to do.
Nancy, too, seemed to have got over the genial
mood of the evening before. She spoke sharply
to Reuben, bidding him not “move like a snail,”
when he was simply being careful lest he should
spill water over her clean floor. She called him
stupid for dropping the sharp knife into the dish-
pan, when it was her elbow that had jostled him
so that the dropping could not be helped. She
reached the climax at last, when she told him that
if he had not sat up so late to read his Bible, he
wouldn’t be so stupid. She believed in people liv-
ing, rather than talking.

Without a word in reply, Reuben set down the
pail of beans he was sorting for her, and marched
out of the room —sure that if he stayed a minute
longer he should say words which he would after-
wards regret. He did not think he slammed the
door; but Nancy called after him. “There now,
bang yourself away ina rage. Great religion that
is! I’ve seen more than I want of that kind al-
ready.”

Reuben went out to the hen-house, which seemed
136 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

to be always in need of repairs, and set about the
unfinished job of yesterday with a swelling heart.
It was hard to be scolded and insulted when he had
not done a thing to deserve it.

Nancy Hardman was certainly very provoking,
if she Aad stood his friend through his trouble. He
even told himself that there was nothing so very
astonishing about that. Nancy knew he wouldn't
do a mean thing, and when she was good-natured,
she was willing to say so; but she was so seldom
good-natured that there was no use in trying to
have her for a friend. “And poor Reuben felt,
someway, more friendless that morning than ever
before. The memory of the beautiful garden where
he had walked but yesterday, and the pretty white
flower who had walked and talked with him, made
him feel sick at heart over the thought of the dreary
life which stretched out before him.

As the day drew toward its close his loneliness
and discontent deepened. In his secret heart, he
had had a belief or a feeling that he should hear
from Judge Fenning during the day. Just why he
should, or just why he wished to, he did not try to
explain even to himself. Perhaps it was an eager
wish, rather than a belief. The judge had been so
kind to him, and had thanked him so heartily for
saving his grove, was it silly to think that perhaps
he would drive that way and speak a pleasant word
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. 137

to him? or at least bow as he passed? He did not
expect a present he told himself scornfully ; and
it made him angry to have the Hardmans repeat,
as they did several times that day, their opinion of
the man for not giving him anything. But despite
his not wanting it, there lurked in his heart a mis-
erable feeling of disappointment that the day passed
just as other days. So did three more, during which
Reuben was quite as miserable as he had ever been
in his life, and Mr. Hardman was fully as trying, if
not more so. :

At the end of that time Reuben took himself
sharply to task. Was it possible that he was such
a mean fellow that a few kind words and a walk in
a pleasant garden had spoiled him? If a little
brightness had such an effect on him as that, no
wonder that he was not allowed to have any bright-
ness in his life! He sat in the darkness, and
thought it all over. Since that one evening, when
Nancy had given him a lamp which would burn,
she seemed to have repented her goodness; and
the one he had this evening went out almost as
soon as he lighted it.

Never mind, he could think in the dark. Was
he the same boy who had whistled a few nights
ago, and been sorry for Joel Potter? He had a
feeling now that he could not afford to be sorry
for anybody but himself. But he had the grace
138 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

to be ashamed, and to realize that there were ever
so many boys worse off in the world than he.
Wasn't there a Bible verse that ought to help him ?
In the days when he went to Sunday-school he
used to learn Bible verses; why, once he learned
an entire chapter. How many times he had said
it to his mother! How did it commence? ‘“ There-
fore, my son, be strong in the grace that is in
Christ Jesus.” Although he had not thought of
it for some time, he found that he could recall
nearly all the verses. ‘There were many of them
that he did not understand; but he stopped long
over this one, “Thou, therefore, endure hardness
as a good soldier of Jesus Christ.” When he was
a very little fellow, the desire of his heart had been
to bea soldier. He remembered that he was never
happier than when his father’s old military belt
was fastened around his waist, and he was march-
ing up and down the yard, with a stick thrust into
the belt, which he imagined looked somewhat like
_asword. Well, he was ambitious still; here was
a chance to be a soldier, and the first direction
was to “endure hardness ;”’ if he thought his life
hard, it was only what a soldier must expect. Then
a voice seemed to sound out of his little past to
help him: “A good soldier is always proud of his
commanding officer, if he has a good one.” How
often he had heard his father say that. And here
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. 139

was he, enlistéd asa soldier of Jesus Christ ; how
proud he must be of his Commanding Officer! and
he must show that he was. Had he shown it to
Nancy Hardman, for instance, during these last
few days?

Then the other verse which he took to himself
was, “Study to show thyself approved unto God:
a workman that needeth not to be ashamed.” ‘The
last part of the verse, about “ rightly dividing the
word of truth,” he did not understand; but that
about a workman not being ashamed, he did. That
very day, in fixing the kitchen window, he had
done it in so bungling a manner that he said to
himself at the time, “If Mr. Hardman knew how
to fix such things, or cared how they were done, I
should be ashamed of that; but it doesn’t make
any difference.”

He blushed now as he thought of it. Here was
proof that it did make a difference. He was a
soldier of Jesus Christ, and all his work had to be
approved or disapproved by him; even the kitchen
window his Commanding Officer knew about —
knew that his soldier had not fixed it as well as he
could! Altogether, perhaps that half hour Bible-
reading in the dark was the most profitable that
Reuben-had ever done. Before he went to bed,
he settled it that soldiers enlisted not for bright
days spent in gardens, but for war. And he, Reu-
140 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

ben Stein, enlisted for life under the command of
Jesus Christ, meant to be faithful— meant to be at
all times, and in all places, a workman who would
not need to be ashamed.

He resolved not to think of Judge Fenning any
more, or to hope for help from him. A soldier
should look to his commanding officer for the help
he needed to do his duty.

Perhaps some boy thinks this was all fancy, and
that by the next morning, when Reuben was out
in the yard with the hens, feeding them, and clean-
ing their houses, all idea of being a soldier had
been put away. Such a boy is mistaken. It was
not fancy, but actual fact. Reuben Stein had
enlisted. He realized it now more fully than be-
fore; that is, he realized that the decision had to
do with every little step of his daily life; and he
meant business. The consequence was that the
days began to grow better. The work was fully
as hard, sometimes harder than usual. Mr. Hard-
man had hours of such utter unreasonableness that
it was not possible to please him; and Nancy, who
was apt to reflect her father’s moods, was often
disagreeable, and not an interesting thing would
happen from morning until night; yet Reuben
whistled over his work when he was where he
thought it would disturb no one, and drove every
nail, and hoed every spot, as well as he possibly
HINDERED BY HIMSELF. IAI

could. Also he kept a thoughtful watch of
Nancy’s water-pails and wood-pile, and in the
course of five days’ time wrung from her the
words, “ You’ve been amazing good to-day, any-
how. I guess you've been reading that Bible
again, haven't you?”

“J read it every night,’ said Reuben with a
cheery smile, as he turned away with her ever-
empty pail on his arm. There was a spring at
quite a distance from the house where that pail
had to be filled.

That very evening something “ happened.”
142 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER XI.
A’ “ CHANCE.”

HE first person Reuben saw, on his return

from the spring, was Uncle Kastor, whose
cheery face seemed to light up the entire kitchen.
He brought good news. Alvira Jane was better,
and Mrs. Hardman had sent word that by the first
of the week she thought she could be spared to
come home. It is true that Nancy grumbled, de-
claring that “next week” was a long way off;
there was time for them all to get sick before
that; but Uncle Kastor was used to her grum-
bling. He laughed good-naturedly, and said they
had all decided that they would keep well, for a
change; he thought himself than Alvira Jane
would be quite chirk by Christmas. The doctor
said he must expect the getting well to be slow,
but that would be slow enough, he was sure; but
he told mother this morning that they would have
the fattest turkey and the jolliest Christmas yet,
if Alvira Jane pulled through all right. Then he
turned to Reuben,
A “ CHANCE.” 143

“Halloo, young man! I hear you’ve been get-
ting famous since I saw you. Been took up and
took down again, eh? Or is it the other way, took
down and took up again? I guess that’s it, ac-
cording to all I hear.” And he laughed a laugh
which seemed to fill all the space about him, so
loud and jolly was it. “lLet’s see,” he added, «I
believe they call it arson up North, don’t they?
The idea of a man having no more sense than to
suppose a boy like you would do that kind of
thing! Why, I’d know, just to take one good
look at you, the folly of it. What's the use of
being a judge, if he can’t do better than that?”

Reuben immediately felt it necessary to speak
for the judge. “He believed in me from the
first, Mr. Hansen; he told me he did; but it was
to help find out who did it, and to give another
boy the chance to tell the truth if he would, that
he had me come again and see him. He was very
kind to me in every way.”

“Yes,” said Nancy, “Reuben is ready to fall
down at his feet and worship him: because he didn’t
send him to the penitentiary for saving his old
grove for him!”

« He thanked me, just as any gentleman would,”
said Reuben stiffly. He might feel a little sore
at heart because the judge, and especially the little
white flower who had called herself his friend, had
144 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

so quickly forgotten him, but he did not like to
have others speak of it.

“Oh, thanked /” said Nancy with a disagreeable
toss of her head; “words don’t cost anything. If
I had as much money as Judge Fenning, and you
had done for me what you did for him, do you sup-
pose I’d stop with words ?”

“TJ didn’t want to be paid for putting out a
fire,’ said poor Reuben once more, his face getting
red. This was really growing to be a sore subject
to him.

“No more you didn’t; I believe you,” said
Uncle Kastor soothingly. “I believe you; but all
the same I think, as Nancy says, it wouldn’t have
hurt him to make you a little present. Still, big
folks don’t often think of nice little things to do;
I’ve noticed that before. Well,” rising from the
old-fashioned splint-bottomed chair as he spoke,
“J must be attending to business, and be getting
home again, though I can’t go till the doctor gets
his powders and things ready. It takes a power-
ful lot of medicire to keep us running lately ; and
it makes one kind of shake all over to think of the
bill there will be to pay one of these days; but we
don’t let on about that to Alvira Jane, you may
believe.

«“¢Pa,’ she says to me last night, ‘how ever will
you pay the doctor’s bill?’ and your ma, Nancy,
A “ CHANCE.” 145

she spoke up before she thought, I suppose, and
says she, ‘Sure enough! won't it be a big one,
though ?’ — ‘Sho, now,’ says I, ‘the idea of think-
ing about that! Why, I’m that grateful to him,
that if his bill reached from here to the North I'd
be kind of glad; I'll risk but that we'll pay it all
right. Ain’t the turkeys getting fatter every day?
And isn’t Christmas coming? And as for the
chickens, I believe they know they must get them-
selves ready for chicken pies. The doctor will
take some of his pay in chickens, I'll be bound,
and be glad to get them.’ That’s what I said
before Alvira Jane, and I mean it too; only I
wouldn’t have her know, for the sake of having
the mortgage on my place paid up to-morrow, what
a big bill it is likely to be. She’s been too sick
to count, you see, and don’t know how many times
he’s been there, and so we can keep it from her;
there’s mercy in all things, ain’t there?”

Reuben could not help laughing a little over this
curious mercy; but as he looked at Uncle Kastor’s
kind old face, the thought came to him, “ How
much I should like to help him pay that bill. Oh!
if I only had money what nice things I could do;
and he has been so good to me.”’

“It does beat all,” said Uncle Kastor, “how I
run on about my own affairs, and forget the most
important thing I came for—no, I didn’t exactly
146 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

forget it either, I was kind of waiting to see how
to put it. The fact is, Reuben, I’ve struck luck
at last for you, I do believe.”

«What is it?” asked Reuben, his eyes aglow
with interest.

“Why, I came across the new teacher this
afternoon. A nice man he is; the nicest spoken
Northerner there is around here, to my thinking.
Do you know him, Reuben?”

The boy shook his head, but did not speak. He
was too anxious to hear what Uncle Kastor had to
say to delay him by a word.

«Well, I seem to know him pretty well. He is
one of those fellows that acts like he was your
friend the second time you meet him. When I
was coming out of the doctor’s the third time —
I’ve been there three times in all to-day —he’s
powerful busy, the doctor is, and wasn’t at home
till the last time — well, as I was going out for this
third time to wait for him to get the things ready
to send for Alvira Jane, I met Mr. Kensington,
that’s his name,— queer name, isn’t it? sounds
like a city, somehow, — and he asked me if I knew
of any boy hereabouts who would like to come and
live to his house, and do the chores and things,
and go to school, That makes your eyes flash,
doesn't it? Yes, sir, I thought of you in a twin-
kling! It didn’t take me long to tell him all about
A “CHANCE.” 147

you, and to promise to come and see you while I
was waiting for the doctor, and to tell you if you
wanted the place you were to call and see him this
evening at seven o’clock, and talk it over. There
ain't no doubt but what you will go, is there?”

Uncle Kastor finished this sentence with a loud
laugh. He was very much excited—almost as
much as Reuben himself... The kind-hearted old
man had taken this boy so entirely into his heart,
and been so anxious to do something for him, that
to think he had actually succeeded made him feel
very happy. When he thought of this, in addition
to the fact that his dear girl, Alvira Jane, was get-
ting better, he felt as though there could not be a
happier man in the country than he.

As for Nancy, her surprise over the news was
mingled with a little touch of envy and dismay.
How strange that anybody living in their part of -
the world should want a boy! Such a thing had
not happened during all the time Reuben had
lived with them. And how were they going to do
without Reuben? He was a nuisance, of course,
—all boys were. Hadn't she said this a hundred
times? And he ate more than his work would be
worth, even supposing they needed help, which
they didn’t ; for father could do all he had to do if
he only thought so. But after all, they were used
to having Reuben around. He was handy to make
148 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

fires, and look after the hens, and milk the cow,
and carry the milk, and hoe the garden, and bring
water from the spring — why, the more she thought
about it, the more she felt as though he could not
be spared. Besides, why should such luck come
to him? MHadn’t she wanted to go to school all
her life? And nobody ever appeared who wanted
a girl to do chores and be paid in that way. Just
because Reuben was a boy, all sorts of nice things
must happen to him —that was always the way!
Yes, it cannot be denied that poor Nancy was
jealous.

After Uncle Kastor went she dashed about the
kitchen, working very fast, and slamming the
dishes so hard when she set them on the table,
that Reuben, who had meant to have a talk with
her over his good fortune, decided it would be wise
not to say a word, and took refuge among his
friends, the hens, until he was called to supper.

Of course at the supper-table nothing was said
about it. Mr. Hardman was silent and stern-look-
ing, and Nancy was silent and gloomy ; so Reuben
ate his corn bread and molasses in utter silence,
and wondered how to get permission to go out at
seven o'clock to make his important call.

There are boys at fourteen to whom this will
sound like almost an impossible thing ; yet it is a
fact that Reuben had never been on the street
A “ CHANCE” 149

after seven o'clock in his life. While his mother
lived, there had been no occasion for his going,
and he was too fond of her to be other than glad
that she wanted to keep him close beside her until
bedtime. Since he had come to live at the Hard-
mans’, one of the first things he had learned was
to be in the house for the night by seven o'clock,
and in bed by eight. “He would have no loafers
from his house prowling the streets and getting
into mischief,’ Mr. Hardman had said; and Reuben
had not cared for the streets, because he knew no
boys, and had nowhere to go. But tonight he
must surely get away, and he could not think how
it was to be planned. Mr. Hardman looked in the
mood to say “no” to anything asked of him. But
sullen as Nancy looked, she had her plans, and
presently brought them out in an angry tone.

“Reuben, if you should ever happen to get
through eating, you are to take a pint of milk
over to old Mrs. Bascom below the sawmill.”

Mr. Hardman looked up in as much surprise as
Reuben felt. «Why in the world didn’t you send
it before?” he asked. “It is almost seven o’clock
now, and Mrs. Bascom lives at the other end of
the town.”

«“ What if she does? Reuben isn’t a baby who
is afraid of the dark, I should hope! There’s no
sense in a great boy like him not doing an errand
150 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

in the evening if anybody wants him to. There
are reasons why he couldn’t go before, and why he
has to go now. I don’t suppose you'll be scared,
will you?”

“No,” said Reuben. And he smiled at her
gratefully. To get to old Mrs. Bascom’s one had
to pass the house where the. new teacher lived.
He began to understand Nancy.

No sooner was he gone with the pint of milk
than Nancy undertook to tell the news to Mr.
Hardman, and was not much surprised to discover
that he liked the idea no better than she had.
Reuben had been a very useful boy to him, and
he was beginning to realize it in his own fashion.
In fact, he took the news much worse than Nancy
had. At first he was angry with Uncle Kastor,
and wondered what right he had to come meddling
with his affairs, and getting his boy away. But
his daughter soon spoiled that kind of talk by
reminding him of the number of times he had
told Uncle Kastor that he could ill afford to feed
Reuben, and only kept him out of charity.

Then he said there wasn’t any sense in Reuben
running off that night; morning would have done
just as well. If he had known what the errand
was, he would have told him he could not go.
This was precisely what Nancy had foreseen when
she planned the errand to Mrs. Bascom, but she
ON HIS WAY.





A “ CHANCE.” 153

was wise enough not to say so; and only replied
coldly that business was business, and that when
a boy was told to come to a place at seven o'clock,
he ought to be there at seven. But Mr. Hardman
kept getting into a worse humor every minute.
He declared that Reuben was an ungrateful dog!
He had always known it, and this proved it, —
rushing off the very minute he heard of a place
which suited him better, after all that had been
done for him. Hadn't they clothed and fed him
for nothing for three years.

“You've told him so often enough,” said Nancy
angrily ; “what would a boy of any spirit do but
leave the first chance?”

No excuse can be offered for Nancy Hardman’s
very improper way of speaking to her father, ex-
cept the weak one that it was all that could be
expected of her. The poor girl had never received
right training from any one, and she had been
trained to be sharp and rude with her tongue.
When it was not used against him, her father ad-
mired its sharpness, and had shown her more than
once that he did.
154 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER XII.
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE.

N point of fact, Mr. Hardman had been right
in his statement that the morning would have
done just as well for Reuben’s errand, or that is
the way it looked to short-sighted people. Mr.
Kensington was not at home. He had left word
that if a boy called he was to be told that a mes-
sage had come for him from a very sick scholar
whom he must see at once, and that the boy might
return the next morning.

«“Humph!” said Nancy, “he’s one of the kind
that wants other folks to be on hand, and he will
do as he likes about it himself.”

Her father had gone to bed, disgusted with her
and Reuben, and all the world, so she was free
to make her comments on that side if she chose.

«“T don’t suppose he could plan to have the boy
get sick at some time that would be more con-
venient,” said Reuben, resolved to stand up for
the teacher, though he was sorely disappointed,
and in a quiver of fear lest something should
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. 158

happen before morning to make him lose the
chance.

“ He ain’t a doctor as well as a teacher, is he?”
snarled Nancy. “What good will his going do the
sick boy?” ;

“T don’t know,” said Reuben gravely. “Maybe
he is a good man, and the boy is going to die, and
wants to see him.”

“Humph!” said Nancy again, “I don’t see no
use in thinking all the time about dying; it is hard
enough work to live.”

Neither of them knew that the first question
Mr. Kensington asked when he reached home was,
«Did the boy come?” and on being told that he
did, he smiled and said, “So far, so good. He
is a boy who can do as he is told, and be prompt
about it. If I had known that I could return so
early, he might have waited. It is only a quarter
after seven now.”

The clock had not finished striking eight the
next morning when Reuben appeared at the side
door asking for Mr. Kensington. Nancy had taken
care to see that her father did not forbid his going
that morning, by starting him off on one of her
errands before that gentleman was up — early
rising not being one of his virtues.

Reuben was shown at once to the dining-room,
where the family were at breakfast, — a pleasant-_
156 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

faced lady with gray hair, two young ladies, one
of them with so bright a face that Reuben found
himself tempted to stare at her, and Mr. Kensing-
ton himself. ‘

« Ah!” said Mr. Kensington, glancing around as
Reuben slipped quietly in, “here is my boy whom
I disappointed last night, I suppose. I generally
keep my appointments, young man, but it was un-
avoidable last night. Have you breakfasted ? i

“Oh, yes, sir!” said Reuben quickly; and he
thought of the slices of corn meal mush which
Nancy had hastily fried for him. They were out
of molasses she had explained, but she had given
him some pork gravy, and Reuben had made a
good breakfast. On this table was a dish of toast,
another of eggs, and a plate of muffins. The coffee
also seemed very unlike that which Nancy made.
And the beautiful glass dishes which stood at each
plate were piled full of some golden-colored fruit
which Reuben did not recognize. Certainly this
was a very different breakfast from his, but he was
not hungry.

«Very well, then,” said Mr. Kensington ; “take
that chair by the window, and we can talk while I
eat mine. What can you do, my boy?”

« Sir?” answered Reuben, bewildered. How in
the world was he expected to answer such a ques-
_ tion as that?
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. 157

« Why, I learned from your friend who talked
with me yesterday that you wanted a place where
you could earn your board, and have a chance to
go to school. Now, I ask what can you do toward
earning your board — isn’t that plain?”

“Oh!” said Reuben. “ Well, sir, I can do —
or, at least, I can ¢ry to do — what I’m told.”

Both Mr. Kensington and the elderly lady
laughed. “If you can,” said the younger woman,
who was not pretty,.“ you are the first boy I ever
knew who could.”

Then the pretty lady, “ Edward, do take him.
He will be such a contrast to Billy that we shall
be sure to like him. Don’t you know Billy’s weak-
ness was never to do quite as he was told about
anything.”

A number of merry words passed between them.
But presently Mr. Kensington turned again to Reu-
ben, and began to question him closely as to what
he knew, and did not know, and wanted to know.

«¢ Well,” he said at last, pushing back his chair,
“Tam inclined to think we will try one another —
that is, if it strikes you favorably, mother and Clara.
How is it, Clara — shall we make the trial ?”

«“ We can but try,” the young woman said some-
what gloomily. Reuben was afraid, as he looked
at her, that he could not suit her. She might be
even as hard to suit, in a different way, as Nancy
158 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Hardman was. Mr. Kensington turned toward
him with a smile.

« This lady,” he said, “has had a very hard time
with boys. I look to you to redeem her opinion
of the entire race. Now, my boy, there is one
thing which must be settled if I undertake to try
you, and I think I will, —I shall want you to come
at once, say to-morrow morning, or this evening.
How would this evening after school do? Could
you come then?” :

«“T think I could, sir,’ said Reuben. “I have
not spoken to Mr. Hardman, and I do not know
that he even knows that I have a chance; but he
has been wanting to get rid of me for so long that
I don’t think it can make any difference to him
how soon I go.”

Mr. Kensington laughed again. “You are frank,
at least,” he said. “Very well; then we will say
this evening ; you may come at seven o’clock again,
if that will suit. The question is, can I depend
upon you? There is another boy who wants the
place, and I promised to give him a final answer
this noon. If I had the slightest idea that you
would change your mind and disappoint me, I
would take him at once. I am a busy man, and
have no time to waste.”

“T’ll come, sir,” said Reuben confidently. He
could hardly help smiling at the idea of the man
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. 159

being anxious lest he shouldn’t keep his word, when
here he had been for more than a year looking for
just such a chance as this, and was so eager to
get the place that he could hardly wait for night
to come.

“Very well,’ said Mr. Kensington. “As to
school, it is near the close of the term, but that
need make no difference — you may as well begin
at once. You would like that, I suppose?”

«Yes, sir,’ said Reuben, his face flushing.
« At least, I am very anxious to go to school ; but
I don’t know how I can manage it until I can con-
trive some way to get some clothes.”

Mr. Kensington gave him a swift glance, and
noticed that every garment he had on was patched
and worn, and was much too small for him.

“You will probably have to take your Sunday
suit for every day,” he said cheerily. “ After a
time we can perhaps manage another suit.”

But now Reuben’s face seemed to him to fairly
blaze. ‘I have none,” he said.

«Have no Sunday suit, do you mean? What
other clothes have you, my boy?”

“T have none at all, except another shirt like
this — only it is a little smaller, and I can’t very
well get into it,” replied Reuben.

“J should think not!” said Mr. Kensington ;
and he laughed outright.
160 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“Ts it possible?” said the lady who was not
pretty.

“Poor boy!” said the gray-haired lady. «“ Ed-
ward, we must fix him up right away. I think
some of Chester’s clothes will do, with a little
fixing.”

“We will manage the question of clothes, I
think,” said Mr. Kensington very kindly. And
then Reuben was dismissed.

He made all speed homeward, to find Mr. Hard-
man waiting for him, and very cross. He sneered
at everything which was told him about Mr. Ken-
sington, and said that Reuben would find himself
no better than a slave. These Northern teachers
were tyrants — every one of them; and that Reu-
ben was in a dreadful hurry to get away from
them. Why had he not said that he could not go
for a week yet? At least it would have been no
more than decent, after all that had been done for
him, to wait until the extra work was done.

Poor Reuben stared at this, and began to realize
for the first time that Mr. Hardman actually con-
sidered him useful. On the whole, the day was
along one. Mr. Hardman was more difficult to
please than usual, and Nancy gave them very little
of her company, and looked glum when she was
there. By five o'clock he began to feel glad that
there were only two hours more of this kind of
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. 161

life. Almost any change, he decided, would be
better. And then came suddenly a vision which
for several days he had watched and hoped for,
but of late had given up.

Judge Fenning’s carriage wheeled around the
corner, and drew up before the gate; and Judge
Fenning alighted and came into the house, leaving
Caleb in charge. The little “flower” sat daintly
among the cushions. Reuben dropped his axe, and
went out to her.

“Oh, here you are!” she cried out. “ Papa has
gone in to see Mr. Hardman. I am so glad you
are not in there. I wanted to be the first to tell
you. O Reuben! don’t you think, you are com-
ing to our house to live! and go to school with me
every morning ; and papa says when the weather is
not pleasant you can drive me in and keep the pony.
Oh! won’t we have such fun together? Papa has
always disliked to have me go to school alone, and
sometimes he can’t take me. Papa has been away,
or it would all have been settled long ago. I was
in such a hurry! I thought he would never get
home. Why don’t you laugh and dance, Reuben?
Aren’t you very glad?”

Said Reuben, speaking slowly and with great
gravity, “I can’t come.”

“Why, Reuben Stein,! how can you say such a
thing? Why can’t you?”
162 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

« Because I have promised Mr. Kensington to
be there at seven o’clock this evening; and he let
another boy go who wanted the chance, because
he trusted me.” ;

Then did the little flower sit up very straight
and talk eagerly. Papa would make that all right,
she was sure. Reuben must not lose such a
chance. Papa wanted to help him to get an edu-
cation, to pay for saving the grove. Mr. Kensing-
ton would not hold him to his promise when he
heard all about: it.

But Reuben was firm. He was sure a boy
ought not to break his word simply because a
better place offered. Just then the door opened,
and Judge Fenning came out, followed by Mr.
Hardman, who had evidently told him of Reuben’s
prospects.

« Well, sir,” said the judge, “I see my little
daughter has explained our errand to you. What
have you to say?”

Poor Reuben! It seemed like taking a beauti-
ful gift which was within his reach, and dashing
it with his own hand to the ground. But he an-
swered firmly that he was very sorry, but believed
himself bound in honor to Mr. Kensington. What
was Alice’s dismay and chagrin to learn that her
father thought the same! In vain she argued,
and even cried. Judge Fenning declared that he
HINDERED BY CONSCIENCE. I 63

thought with Reuben that for a boy to begin life
by breaking his word to one man because he con-
sidered another offer better was not the way to
expect to win success and honor.

“T like your decision, my boy,” he said, “and
your firmness. I am sorry not to be able to carry
out my plans as I proposed; but this may be even
better for you. Mr. Kensington is a fine man,
and is always at home, while I am much away.
And now I must not detain you any longer. I
shall see you again soon, I hope. Good-by.” And
the carriage rolled away.

“Tf you hadn’t been in such a hurry, sneaking
off before anybody was up,’ snarled Mr. Hard-
man, “you wouldn’t have lost the best chance
that will ever come to you. But boys who choose
to manage for themselves, without asking advice
of their elders, must take the consequences.”

“T must say I think you are both awfully par-
ticular,” said Nancy. “It ain’t likely that Mr.
Kensington would have cared; there are other
boys in the world.”

Poor Reuben! all the while he was swallow
ing his last supper to be eaten in the Hardman
kitchen — and Nancy had made it as good as she
could — he was saying to himself: “I wonder why
God let me lose such a Jovely chance?”
164 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER XIII.
A NEW WORLD.

T was as bright a December morning as is often
found even in Florida, — that one on which
Reuben Stein opened his eyes in his new home
at the Kensingtons’. The first thing he did, when
he was enough awake to realize anything, was to
raise himself on his elbow and look about him. A
greater contrast between this room and the place
at the Hardmans’ in which he had slept could
hardly be imagined. It was not large ; but it looked
so to Reuben, because there was space for two
windows, and a great deal of furniture — I mean,
Reuben thought there was a great deal. The floor
was covered with white matting; there was a
bureau and a washstand, all in white, as was the
bedstead. There were two chairs, one a rocker,
white like the rest. White curtains fluttered in
the morning breeze from both the open windows.
Reuben, lying there gazing about him with an air
of bewilderment, decided that it was much the
nicest room he had ever seen. There could not be
A NEW WORLD. 165

anything more beautiful than this, even at Judge
Fenning’s.

As for the bed, he had heard of covers made of
down, and that they were very soft and delightful
—he wondered if they made mattresses out of the
same material. Nothing like this had ever rested his
tired limbs before. He looked down at the spread
which covered him, and patted it tenderly, telling
it that it was white and beautiful; the question
was, why had he been put into a room like this to
sleep? He thought about it for a few minutes,
and decided that this was what people called a
spare room. His mother had told him about the
spare chamber there used to be in grandfather’s
house, ready always for guests. Undoubtedly he
had been slipped into one, for one night of his life.
He had come earlier than Mrs. Kensington had
supposed a boy was going to, and his own place
probably wasn’t ready. He felt dismayed when he
thought of it. Perhaps he ought to have offered
to have slept in the attic, or the woodshed, or any-
where. They might have given him an old com-
forter for a bed, then he need not have spoiled such
loveliness. He was glad to remember that he had
had no opportunity to say anything after seeing
his room. Mr. Kensington had kept him busy,
examining how far he had been in arithmetic, until
the rest of the family had disappeared, and then
166 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

had merely opened the door of this room, and told
him to get to bed as soon as he could. Perhaps
he would have felt less troubled about spoiling the
beauty of the room if he had known how simple
and inexpensive the furnishings were. The bureau
and washstand which he admired so much were of
the commonest wood, and the tops were covered
with white oilcloth neatly tacked on. The window
curtains cost but five cents a yard, and were looped
back with bits of bright cambric. As for the bed-
spread, which Reuben scarcely dared to touch,
Miss Clara had bought half a dozen of them at a
dollar apiece, because she said they would wash as
easy as sheets.

While Reuben was considering the beauties of
his new stopping-place, there came a knock at the
door, and a moment after Mr. Kensington opened
it and peeped in. The idea of his knocking at the
door! Mr. Hardman had been in the habit of
walking into Reuben’s room whenever he chose.

“Excuse me,” said Mr. Kensington, “I thought
perhaps you were sleeping.”

“No, sir,” said Reuben, his cheeks growing very
red; “but I just waked up, and I’m afraid ?m
very late.”

“Oh, no! it is not late yet; but if your sleep is
over, you may as well get up. We are rather early
risers here; Miss Clara likes to get the morning
4A NEW WORLD. 167

work well under way before the sun is very high.
I am going to the other end of town on an errand.
When you are ready, you may go down to the
kitchen, and see what you can do for Miss Clara.
You will find some new clothing on this chair,
which my mother has been getting ready for you;
she would like to have it tried on this morning.”

Reuben said not a word. Afterwards he was
much ashamed of this, but at the time his aston-
ishment was so great that there seemed to be no
words which would fit the occasion. The idea of
Mrs. Kensington, that grand old lady, getting
clothes ready for him to wear!

He looked over at the chair where the neat pile
lay; then, giving a sudden spring, he landed in
front of it, and began to examine in earnest. A
pair of trousers, a white shirt, and a shirt-waist
with collar and cuffs, a pair of stockings, and some
trim-looking shoes. Very plain and simple clothes
were these; but there was something about them
which made a choking feeling in Reuben’s throat,
and set him to winking hard to keep tears from
falling. He had not had on a real shirt with collar
and cuffs since the day his mother died; and as
for stockings, he had almost forgotten how they
felt.

The business of dressing took more time that
morning than it ever had before in Reuben’s life.
168 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

In the first place, he felt dreadfully about using
the pure whiteness of the washstand. A basin
filled by himself at the pump and set on the bench
beside the pump, for washing, was the utmost he
had expected; behold here were two towels, a
white one with a bright border, and a heavy rough
one such as his mother had used for rubbing his
father. Reuben thought he must be intended to
take a bath, and he took it; and spattered water
on the white washstand, and was dismayed, and
then was delighted to discover that the whiteness
was made of oilcloth from which drops of water
being wiped off would show no sign.

When at last he was dressed from head to foot
in the new garments, he stood looking at himself
in the mirror, and decided that Nancy Hardman
even, well acquainted as she was with him, would
not know him. Who could have imagined that
clothes would make such a change? Then he was
in distress as to what should be done next. It
could not be possible that they meant him to wear
those wonderful clothes all day! Yet Mr. Ken-
sington had said that his mother wanted to see
how they fitted. At last he decided that the way
for him to manage, was to make all haste to the
kitchen and show himself, then hurry back and
get into his every-day clothes and be ready for
work,
A NEW WORLD. 169

The kitchen was bright with shining tins, and a
pleasant gurgle of sound was coming from various
pans and kettles on the stove. The young lady
who was not pretty was bending over one of these
kettles, carefully stirring a mixture. She looked
up as Reuben entered, and said, “Good-morning.
Did you have a good night’s sleep ?”

Then Reuben decided that he had been mis-
taken in her; she was pretty. How could any
one with so pleasant a voice be other than pretty ?

He replied promptly that he had slept splendidly ;
and added that he was afraid he had slept too
long. He did not understand why he had not
awakened earlier.

“Tt is early enough for the first morning,” she
said kindly. “When you get acquainted, you may
get up and make the morning fire for me, and
bring water from the spring to the tea-kettle. Do
you know how to make fires?”

“Oh, yes, indeed!” Reuben said. He had made
the fires for Nancy Hardman, and set the table,
and almost got breakfast.

Miss Kensington laughed. It was evident she
did not think that a boy could get breakfast for
her. Reuben laughed too; her laugh sounded so
pleasant that he could not help it. Then he made
bold to ask a question.

“Mr. Kensington said your mother wanted to
170 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

see these new clothes. Do you know if she would
be ready to see them now, so I can get them
changed ?”

«“ Mother isn’t down-stairs yet,” said Miss Ken-
sington, smiling again. “I think you will have to
wait a while. Do you wish to take them off, did
you say? Are they not comfortable?”

“Oh! yes, ma’am; yes, indeed. I never had
any on that felt nicer. And it is years and years
since I had on any such clothes; but I wanted to
save them, you know.”

« Save them for what?”

«Why, I thought ’’ — said Reuben in some con-
fusion, for the lady had turned toward him, and
her eyes were very bright, and the light in them
seemed to dance. “I thought they must be kept
nice for Sunday.”

«Oh! I don’t think you will have work to do
to-day which will injure them ; and as you are to



commence school this morning, you would better
keep them on. I think mother intends to have
you wear those clothes to school.”

The shining of Reuben’s eyes was pleasant to
see. He was actually to go to school well dressed!
What would Alice think of him? What if Nancy
Hardman could see him? The more he thought
about this last question, the greater it grew. He
felt an almost burning desire to run away and
A NEW WORLD. 171

show himself just for a moment to Nancy. Miss
Kensington watched him, the smile on her face
growing sweet and kind. She liked the face of
the boy. In his new clothes he looked better to
her than he had the night before. She had been,
as her brother said, much tried with boys. Per-
haps this one was really going to be different.
"She continued to watch him as she went briskly
about her work.

“What can I do to help?” he had asked tim-
idly ; and added, “ Shall I strain the milk?”

“Oh, no!” she said quickly; and after a mo-
ment she added, “Is that one of the things you
used to do for Nancy? I always attend to the
milk myself. I think the fire needs some more
wood ; if you go out of that door, down the gravel
walk, you will find a woodshed.”

« Yes’m,” said Reuben, and vanished. He came
back presently with his arms full of wood. He put
it in the box prepared for it, without noise or dust ;
selected with skilful eye two sticks which he felt
sure would fit the state of the fire, and mended
it. Then he observed the empty water-pail, and
inquired for the place to fill it. Returning with
a brimming pail, he was just in time to see Miss
Kensington in the act of lifting a heavy kettle from
the fire. It was the work of a second to spring to
her side, and with deft fingers set it in its place.
172 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“Really!” said Miss Kensington, “you can be
quick-motioned, on occasion, can’t you? I’m not
sure but you are a handy boy.”

Before breakfast was ready she was quite sure
of it. The number of little things which Reuben,
by keeping eyes and wits on the alert, contrived
to discover needed doing, were surprising. They
surprised Miss Kensington. ;

“Now,” she said, as she set a dish of smoking
oatmeal on the table and brought a generous jug
of cream from her ice-box, “we are ready. This
is your seat, at my right. I think I will call you
my right-hand man. You certainly have been
that this morning. You have set the chairs, I see.
I think you will like that straight-backed one bet-
ter for yourself.”

But now Reuben stopped half-way across the
room and looked at her, his face aflame, his eyes
bewildered and questioning.

«“ Well,” she said kindly,. “what is it?”

« You don’t mean, of course, ma’am, that I am
to sit there now!”’

“Certainly ; that is, as soon as you have rung
that bell, and my family have obeyed its summons.
Why not ?”

« But, ma’am, I did not think —I mean, I thought
—why, I am to wait, of course, until you are
through?”
4 NEW WORLD. 173

“Oh, no! we do not keep any of that kind of
help in our family. We like to have well-behaved,
self-respecting boys who will sit at the table with
us and be one of our number. We all work, in
this family. My brother and sister work in school,
and I work at home, and mother takes care of and
directs us all. As for you, you are to be helper
in general to the entire family ; a most important
post, you see; and I actually think you will be a
help and not a nuisance. Now you may ring the
breakfast-bell.”

As Reuben rang it, he said to himself that the
lady he had said was not pretty was the most
beautiful woman in the world.
174 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CLARET BR xany;:
TRIUMPHS AND PUZZLES.

EUBEN STEIN had been in his new home
about three weeks. Sometimes, when he
thought it over at night, he almost decided that
he had been there for years. Not that the time
by any means seemed to pass slowly ; instead, the
davs fairly flew away; but he had lived so much,
seen and heard and felt so many new things, that
at times it hardly seemed possible that all these
experiences had been crowded into three weeks.
In the first place, he was quite settled in school;
began to feel like an old scholar— one who must
be on the lookout for new scholars, and help to
make them feel at home. He thought he knew
just how to treat new scholars, but the term was
so near its closing that he had not been tested.
Some things about his own entrance had been
hard. He was such a little fellow when he left
school, and such a tall boy now, that his face grew
red more than once at the thought of how far
behind the others he should be,
TRIUMPHS AND PUZZLES. 175 -

That first day he will never forget. The boys
stared at him as though he were a being from some
other world than theirs. Two fellows of about his
age, who sat just behind him, whispered to each
other that that was the boy who was bound out to
“old Hardman,” they believed. How did he hap-
~ pen to get dressed up? and was it possible that
“old Hardman” meant to let him come to school !

Others gathered in groups at recess, and talked
about him; some of which talk he overheard.
“No, he was not the boy who was bound out to
‘old Hardman ;’ at least, if he was, he had been
‘unbound ;’ he was living at Professor Kensing-
ton’s, working for his board and schooling.”

«“H’m!” said some of the boys, and looked at
Reuben doubtfully. These were boys who had
not been well brought up, and who had got the
notion from some ignorant person that there was
some disgrace connected with working out for one’s
living. For a while Reuben was left to himself.

Very soon after recess Professor Kensington
came into the room, and it appeared that he had
what was called the class in elocution. Reuben
had not the slightest idea what this hard word
meant, and was much astonished to discover that
it seemed to be simply a reading-class. A very
interesting article was being read; and the pro:
fessor had the same sentence read over half a
176 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

dozen times, to illustrate what a difference could
be made in the sense by the method of reading it.
Reuben forgot himself, and listened with the keen-
est interest. He felt that he should like to try
that sentence himself, and had just decided that
he should read it differently from any he had yet
heard, when he was startled by a summons to join
the class.

“Come and try this paragraph, Reuben,’ Mr.
Kensington said pleasantly, quite as though he had
been reading in the class for weeks ; “perhaps you
will give us a new idea on it.”

Then Reuben, with cheeks the color of the dam-
ask rose in the professor's button-hole, went for-
ward, accepted the book some boy held out to him,
and read the sentence as he had planned he would.
Great was his pleasure on being assured that it
was just as the professor himself would have read
wits

The remainder of the hour was a delight to Reu-
ben. For the first time in his life he had a lesson
in reading; and then in language. The large dic-
tionary was turned to, and each boy asked what
questions as to meaning he would like to ask ; and
the professor read the wisdom of the dictionary to
them when he chose, explaining and adding to it
until it was not possible for them to misunder-
stand.
TRIUMPHS AND PUZZLES. 177

When at last, to Reuben’s deep regret, the sound
of a bell in the distance seemed about to spoil all
this pleasure, Mr. Kensington turned to him and
said, “I think, Stein, you will need to join this
class. We read and talk over reading-matter of
some sort at this hour every morning; I was di-
vided between this and the next lower class in the
same line, but I have concluded that this will be
your place. It is our highest class in elocution.”

The highest class! When Reuben graduates
from college, as perhaps he will, I doubt if the
sound of the college president's voice as he con-
fers his diploma will bé any sweeter than was Pro-
fessor Kensington’s that morning. Reuben had
feared that he would find his place in the lowest
classes.

Another comfort was in store for him. He did
not know much about rules, but he had a natural
taste for figures; and it came to pass that instead
of being in the lowest class in arithmetic, he was
placed with boys, yes, and girls, fully his size and
age, and in the mental operations held his own
with them. :

But the crowning joy of the morning came when
the entire older portion of the school was given a
twenty minutes’ exercise in spelling, Professor Ken-
sington himself giving them ten words to write on
slips of paper ; then the papers were gathered, and
I 78 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

three teachers looked them over; and behold, Reu-
ben’s was the only slip which was entirely perfect!
Reuben knew he could spell. He never glanced
at a newspaper, or passed a sign, that he did not
notice by a sort of instinct how any new words
which caught his eye were spelled, and try to de-
termine how he would have spelled them had he
heard, instead of seen them.

No, this was not quite the crowning joy; that
came when Alice Fenning, who was in the lower
department; skipped up to him as the scholars were
passing out, and caught both his hands in hers,
with an eager “ Good-morning,” and an assurance
that she had been watching for a glimpse of him
all the morning. And then Judge Fenning, whose
carriage was at the door waiting for Alice: “ Ah,
my boy, good-morning ; how are you to-day?” and
actually held out his hand to Reuben!

After that, all the boys, even those who had
said “Hm!” and looked doubtful, decided that it
would not be beneath their dignity to own Reuben
Stein as a schoolmate; especially since he was
such a “tip-top reader and speller.”

After that first day, school life became rose-color
for Reuben Stein. He wanted to study, and he
had the opportunity. What more could a reason-
able boy want? Oh! he had his troubles, of
course ; some of the boys were simpletons — there
TRIUMPHS AND PUZZLES. 179

are always simpletons in all schools, I think ; some
of them were fond of fighting, and tried to pick
quarrels with the new boy; but Reuben was so
busy from morning till night that he had not much
time for the sneers of the simpletons, and as for
the fighters, he told one of them good-naturedly
that he had too much wood to get in that afternoon
to waste any of his strength on fighting, and then
ran away whistling.

What was the use of trying to make a boy angry
who whistled so much, and laughed when he was
expected to knock ?

Meantime, everything was going smoothly with
him at home. To his great surprise he was still
occupying what he had thought was the spare
room. When at last he gathered courage to speak
to Mr. Kensington about it, that gentleman laughed
pleasantly, and assured him that he was in the
room that belonged to him; that he might bring
his treasures there, and call it home, and arrange
it in any way he pleased. Reuben had no treas-
ures except his Bible, and a few things in his
trunk, which had been his mother’s, and he would
not have changed one little thing in that perfect
room for the world; but he took such care of it
as no-boy of Miss Kensington’s acquaintance had
ever done before.

Daily he grew in the good graces of that lady.
180 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

She :aughed at first over his careful watch of her
water-pails and wood supply, and quoted to her
mother the old proverb, “A new broom sweeps
clean.” Reuben overheard it once; but it being
quite new to him, he had not the least idea what
it meant, and looked thoughtfully around at the
half-worn broom with which he had just swept the
back piazza; it was far from new, yet he certainly
had made the piazza clean. But after three weeks
had passed, and the pails were as carefully watched
as ever, and the supply of wood never failed, and
the fire was always burning brightly when she
came into the kitchen in the morning, and the
kettle filled, and every possible step which Reuben
could think of taken to save hers, Miss Kensing-
ton began to admit that perhaps they really had
at last found a boy who was not “more trouble
than he was worth.” She had not the least idea
how grateful Reuben was for her kind words and
kind smiles. She was not acquainted with Nancy
Hardman, and so did not understand.

Now it was Saturday afternoon, and in two more
days it would be Christmas. Reuben stood in the
kitchen doorway considering. His chores were
done, all that could be done until later, and he
had along afternoon for study. Before that, how-
ever, he must think. The question was, how was
he going to get some clothes? Twice he had
TRIUMPHS AND PUZZLES. 181

been to church with the Kensingtons. They
seemed to expect it as a matter of course. “Just
brush your clothes well that you have worn dur-
ing the week, and with a clean shirt they will do
nicely,” Miss Kensington had said. So they cer-
tainly had. Reuben felt more dressed up than
ever in his life before; but the thing which trou-
bled him was, that Miss Kensington invariably
added to such sentences the words, “ By and by
you will be contriving a way to get a Sunday suit,
before these begin to grow too rusty; but in the
meantime, they will do very well.”

Now the question was, how was Reuben to con-
trive any such thing, if he was to keep up with
his classes in school, and certainly Mr. Kensington
expected that? He kept a close watch, and gave
help where help was needed, and would not have
been a comfortable man to meet had Reuben not
studied faithfully. But if he was to continue to
give as much time as this to study, how was he
to earn some clothes? For that matter, where
could he get anything to do with which to earn
clothes, even supposing he had the time? He had
lived long enough in that part of the world to
discover that “chances” were not plentiful. He
would take the utmost care of his clothes, and
make them last just as long as he could; but when
they began to grow shabby, what was to be done?
182 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

He could certainly never go to church walking
beside Miss Kensington and her sister, as they
directed him to do now, with Mrs. Kensington in
her beautiful black silk dress just ahead of them,
leaning on her son’s arm, if he were in the least
shabby. And he should hate, oh! how he should
hate, to stay at home all day Sunday, now that he
had found how nice it was to go.

“TI wonder,” he said slowly and thoughtfully to
himself, “if it would be wrong to pray about such
a thing as that? Why should it be? If he is my
Father, — and that is what Jesus told us to call
him, —and I need clothes, why shouldn't I ask
him about them, and get him to help me plan out
a way to get them? I would do it in a minute if
I had a father down here. Why not try it? Peo-
ple don’t seem to pray that way exactly ; and yet,
I don’t know; the minister asked last Sunday that
we might learn to ‘cast all our care on him;’ and
that is my care. It can’t be wrong, anyhow; and
it wouldn’t do any hurt to try. I don’t know what
else to do.” a
THE WAY GROWS PLEASANTER. 183

CHAPTER XV.
THE WAY GROWS PLEASANTER.

Y which reasoning you will see that Reuben
did not yet know very much about the Chris-
tian life, else he would have been sure that the
right way was to take every care to his Father in
heaven. Still, perhaps he knew as much as many
Christians. Only the other day I heard a woman
who has belonged to the family of Jesus Christ
for more than thirty years say that she was very
much perplexed about a certain matter; she really
could not decide which of two things should be
done.

« Have you prayed about it?” asked a very inti-
mate friend, who yet had been separated from her
so that they had gone their separate ways for years.

« Prayed about it!’’ the lady answered, wonder-
ment in eyes and voice; “why, no! one can’t pray
about such trifles as that.”

But the more Reuben thought, the more sure
he felt that he had a right to pray, even about
such trifles as clothes. So.sure was he that, with
184 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

out waiting even to go to his room, he leaned his
head against the door-post, and shading his eyes
with his hand, offered this simple prayer, “ Father
in heaven, if I need some new clothes to look nice
in in church, will you show me how to get some,
for Jesus’ sake?”

Never perhaps was a simpler prayer ; yet there
have been shorter ones. Do you remember Peter's?
“Lord, save, or I perish!” Reuben never forgot
his prayer that December afternoon.

It was the sound of wheels and of horses’ feet
that made him open his eyes, and in the near dis-
tance was the Fenning carriage. The wheels made
no noise in the sand, but in crossing the bridge
just above they did. Could Reuben help wonder-
ing whether, supposing he had not promised Mr.
Kensington, and so had gone instead to live at
Judge Fenning’s, he should be driving those horses
now? Perhaps only the pony would have been put
in his care; but it was barely possible that Caleb
might have allowed him to drive the carriage
horses, at least with him sitting beside him. Caleb
was managing the splendid span now in his mas-
terly way, and Alice was quite alone in the roomy
carriage. Where could she be going? Barely time
for this thought, when Caleb, with a grand flourish,
drew up before the Kensington gate, and Alice’s
bright head leaned out.
THE WAY GROWS PLEASANTER. 185

“© Reuben, I’m so glad you are at home! I
was afraid you would be gone after mistletoe and
magnolias with the other boys. Why don’t we
say mistlezoes, I wonder? Reuben, you are to go
home with me and stay to tea; you can, can’t you?
Mamma said so. She wants to see you particu-
larly, and so does papa. You are to come in the
carriage with me; and I have three errands to
do for mamma, one of them is two miles away.
Won’t that be fun? Can you come right away,
so we can get back before tea?”

Reuben’s face was a study. “What a lovely
thing!” he began eagerly; “but then, I can’t go,
you know. I don’t belong to myself; and there
are chores to do, besides studying. I was to get
three hours of study in this afternoon.”

“Oh, study /”’ said Miss Alice in her most con-
temptuous tone; “on this beautiful Saturday, and
Christmas coming on Tuesday. What do you mean,
Reuben ! it is vacation!”

“T know; but I am behind in my lessons, you
see. I want to get into the other history class just
awfully; and the grammer class too. Mr. Ken-
sington said if I would study hard during vacation
he thought I might manage it; and I tell you I’m
going to try.”

«Oh, well,” said Alice, “I would. I like to have
you in the big classes; it is such fun to be even
186 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

with the boys and girls who looked down on you;
but I don’t want you to begin this afternoon.
Where is Professor Kensington? I’ve got a note
for him from papa.”

Saying which she opened the carriage door, and
hopped out like a canary-bird before Reuben could
help her, and was shown to the professor’s study.
He received his callers with a smile, though Reu-
ben was dismayed at the idea of interrupting him.
Alice was in no wise disturbed, however; a note
from her papa she considered sufficient excuse for
interrupting anybody.

“Well, my boy,’ Mr. Kensington said, looking
up from the note, which, though short, seemed to
take some time to be read, “I think we shall have
to make an exception to our rules for once, and
send you back with this young lady. Judge Fen-
ning has a special reason for wishing to see
you.”

“But what about the cow, sir?’ asked Reuben
quickly, his eyes shining. ‘It wouldn’t do to milk
her before I went, would it? Or could I leave her
until I got back?”

“Neither plan will work very well,” said Mr.
Kensington, laughing a little; “but I think we
can manage that. The man who lives just around |
the corner from here used to milk the cow for me
before you came; we will press him into service
THE WAY GROWS PLEASANTER. 187

for to-night ; and you may stay as long as Judge |
Fenning desires.”

“T thank you very much,” said Reuben, his face
one glow of pleasure.

“Now, hurry!” said Alice, as the study door
closed after them; “you are all ready, aren’t you?
How nice you look nowadays, Reuben; not a bit
like the boy who set our grove on fire.”

She laughed merrily over her little joke, but
Reuben was already on his way to the kitchen.
“T must lay the fire before I go,” he said, “and
see that the pails are full of water; then I’ll just
set this table for Miss Clara, so she will have as
little trouble as possible.”

“Dear me!” said Alice, “do you set the table?
how funny!”

“Tt isn’t my work,” Reuben explained, moving
briskly about the kitchen as he talked. “That is,
I mean she never told me to; but one day I did
it, and she seemed pleased, and since that I have
done it whenever I had time. Miss Clara is so
nice that I want to help her all I can.”

« She doesn’t look so pleasant as our Miss Ken-
sington,” declared Alice, whereupon Reuben spoke
with energy in favor of the one whom he had but
a short time before mentally named “the cross
lady.”

Never was ride more thoroughly enjoyed than


188 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

that which was taken in the Fenning carriage that
sweet December day. The air was as mild as a
Northern day in June, and sweet with the breath
of roses everywhere. Alice was in a flutter of
happiness, and had interesting things innumerable
to talk about. ;

«Drive down the Hawley road, Caleb,” she
directed. Then, to Reuben, “We are going past
your old home. Does it begin to seem funny that
you ever lived with the Hardmans? It must be
so different at Professor Kensington’s. Have you
been there since you left? I mean, out to the
Hardmans’; mamma says, for a girl who studies
grammar, I mix sentences dreadfully. I suppose
you will talk beautifully after this because you are
in Professor Kensington’s grammar class. Papa
says that for a boy of your opportunities you speak
unusually correctly. O Reuben! there is Nancy
Hardman standing in the door. Isn’t she a cross-
looking girl?”

Reuben turned his head quickly. He had by
no means forgotten Nancy. Indeed, he was sur-
prised to think with what. grateful feelings he re-
membered her. How kind she had been to him
that last night! contriving an excuse for getting
him off down-street; and then she had gotten
him such a nice supper for the last one. He had
meant to go and see her just as soon as he could.


‘©WE ARE GOING PAST YOUR OLD HOME,’’ SAID ALICE.



THE WAY GROWS PLEASANTER. IQ!

He took off his hat, much as he had seen Mr.
Kensington and Judge Fenning do, and bowed
low, as the carriage rolled past. How did Nancy
Hardman receive this courtesy? I grieve to tell
you; but she actually curled up her nose, and
pushed out her lips, and made a disagreeable face!

“Why!” said Alice, in intense astonishment,
“did you see what she did? What a queer girl!
What do you suppose is the matter with her?”

Reuben knew instinctively. Poor Nancy re-
sented his riding by in a carriage, neatly dressed,
and with apparently nothing to do but enjoy him.
self, while her life was so hard. But how should
he explain to Alice? It is one thing to feel the
reason for things, and quite another to explain
them to somebody else.

« She doesn’t mean to be — rude,” he said, hesi-
tating for a word, “or—that is—she doesn’t
think how it will look. She isn’t a very happy
girl; she wants, oh, ever so many things, and
sometimes it makes her feel badly, and she can’t
help looking cross. Don’t you think, she has
never been in a carriage in her life!”

“Oh, my!” said Alice; and if you had heard
the tones in which both spoke, you would have
thought that to have never been in a carriage
expressed the sum of human misery.

“Yes,” said Reuben, answering the exclamation,
192 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

«she told me so; and she likes pretty things, and
never sees any ; and they don’t have very much to
eat, except when they go out to Uncle Kastor’s.
If I had any money I should like to make Nancy
Hardman a Christmas present. She never has
any presents.”

“Poor thing!” said Alice, “how queer! But
then I don’t think she ought to have made a face
at you just because you bowed to her as politely
as though she were a grand lady. But we don’t
know what we would do if we had to live with Mr.
Hardman all the time; do we? But you did live
- with him, till only a little while ago; and that didn’t
teach you to make up faces and look cross. But
then, he wasn’t your father, and that makes a dif-
ference, doesn’t it?” Alice could answer her own
questions, before others had a chance to do so.

The carriage drive was by no means the only new
experience which Reuben had that day. What a
thing it was to sit down at Judge Fenning’s tea-
table! It was not in the least like the Kensington
table. That was white and neat and beautiful ;
but even a boy as inexperienced as Reuben saw
that the china and silver and glass on this table
were very different. Moreover, the teas which Miss
Kensington prepared were quite simple; choice
bread and butter, and sauce of some kind, and
generally a nice piece of cake, and occasionally a
THE WAY GROWS PLEASANTER. 193

fresh egg; royal suppers Reuben thought them ;
but here there was stewed chicken, and little round
brown balls of potatoes, which Alice called “ cro-
quettes,”’ and several dainty dishes of which he did
not even hear the name, and coffee which Reuben
owned to himself smelled very different from that
at the Hardman table; but he had never tasted
coffee, so cannot be called a judge of its merits.
He expected to be a good deal frightened at the
fine table, but if he had only known it, he con-
ducted himself very well. The napkins were larger
and finer than those which the Kensingtons used,
but Reuben’s quick eyes saw that they were man-
aged in much the same way ; and for the rest, he
had not taken his meals under Miss Kensington’s
eyes three weeks for nothing. Mrs. Fenning smiled
her approval on him when he carefully applied his
fork to the dainty piece of cake which had been
served to him ; evidently he was a boy from whom
Alice need not at least learn bad manners.

For one as “stuck up”’ as Nancy Hardman con-
sidered her, that lady was certainly very kind. She
said several pleasant things to Reuben about his
new home, and his school life, and then she left
him to carry on a conversation with Alice in lower
tones, while she talked with Judge Fenning. On
the whole, Reuben, having gotten through with his
excellent supper and away from the table, without
194 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

spilling a drop of milk or sauce or gravy on the
beautiful cloth, gave a little sigh of relief and sat-
isfaction. It had all been beautiful. What would
Nancy Hardman have thought of it, he wondered?
Wouldn't she believe that Judge Fenning had done
something “handsome” for him now? For Reu-
ben believed that he was being invited to tea at
this fine table because he had helped to save
the orange-grove; and he considered it quite re-
ward enough. When therefore, soon after supper,
while he and Alice were sitting together on the
piazza talking over school life, Judge Fenning came
to the door and said, “Reuben, my boy, Mrs.
Fenning would like to see you a moment in her
sewing-room,” he arose wondering and a trifle em-
barrassed. What could she want of him ?
CHRISTMAS PLANS. ] 195

CHAPTER XVI.
CHRISTMAS PLANS.

HE sewing-room was pretty enough for a par-

lor, at least in Reuben’s eyes; but he had

no time to examine it in detail. Mrs. Fenning sat

beside a chair that was piled high with garments

of some sort, and the moment he entered she
addressed him.

« Alice wanted to wait for Christmas Day, Reu-
ben ; but we thought that since to-morrow will be
Sunday, you might possibly like to have part of
Christmas come before. I think the things will
fit; we borrowed some measurements from Mrs.
Kensington to make sure of it.”

Behold, on the chair was an entire new suit of
clothes! Even to the handsome new collar and
necktie, everything was complete. When it finally
dawned upon Reuben that they were all for him,
the effect upon him was peculiar. Instead of
going into raptures of delight, as would have been
Alice Fenning’s nature, and as she expected from
him, he stood for an entire minute gazing down at
196 . REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

them, speaking not a word, his breath meantime
coming faster and faster, and his eyes actually
filling with tears.

To Alice it was a most extraordinary time to
choose for crying, and her amazed face recalled
Reuben to an attempt at speech.

“Tt is so very sudden, you see,” he stammered
out. “It seems to almost scare me, and I don't
know what to say.”

«Never mind,” said Mrs. Fenning kindly, pitying
his embarrassment. ‘You need not say any thing.
We understand how boys say ‘thank you.’ Here
is the box in which the clothes were packed when
they came from the tailor’s. It was almost a pity
to unpack them, but Alice wanted to see each in
dividual pocket and button. Tl place them in the
box again for you, and you can take them home
with you to-night. If anything needs altering, I
will have them attended to.”

« T wish I knew how to thank you, ma’am,” began
_ Reuben in great earnestness ; “JT needed to get a
new suit of clothes; and I was trying to plan; and
only this afternoon — but it was so very sudden.
I didn’t. dream of its coming so suddenly, you see.”

Reuben knew exactly what he meant, but cer-
tainly no one else did. Then Alice, with great
tact or else great heedlessness, broke suddenly
into his words, with a change of subject.
CHRISTMAS PLANS. 197

“Mamma, Reuben wants to get Nancy Hardman
a Christmas present. Don’t you think, she never
had one in her life, and she is a great big girl,
—a woman almost! How old is she, Reuben?
Mamma, she is as big as Katie. Couldn’t we give
her a present, Reuben and I?”

«Oh, ma’am!” exclaimed Reuben in deepening
distress, “I did not mean that; I did not think of
such a thing! I only said to Alice that if I had
any money I should like to get her a present be-
cause she liked pretty things, and never had
any.”

«T understand,” said Mrs. Fenning, laughing at
the young people did not know what. “It is some
of Alice’s heedlessness. She always jumps into
the middle of things. We will have to see what we
can do. There ought to be pretty things enough
to go round, at Christmas time at least. But, my
dear, we must not delay Reuben. I suppose he
thinks it time he was starting for home. Caleb
is going to drive to town, and Reuben and his box
can ride with him.”

When the judge and his wife were alone, Mrs.
Fenning told about Reuben’s desire to get Nancy
Hardman a Christmas present, because she never
had anything pretty.

Judge Fenning leaned back in his chair, and
laughed heartily over the idea. “The poor thing
198 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

is forlorn enough, certainly,” he said when his laugh
was over. “Did you ever see her, my dear? As
dreary a looking girl as can be imagined. I think
she cannot be more than sixteen or seventeen, and
yet her face looks drawn and worn enough for a
woman of thirty. And to judge from what I have
seen of the girl, her wardrobe is extremely limited
and unbecoming. You need not be at a loss what
to get her for Christmas.”

«But the time is so short,” objected his wife.
«“ Tuesday will be Christmas, you know. I don’t
see what I can doin one day. I might buy some
ready-made clothing. Alice is quite resolved upon
her having a white dress, but I do not know her
size. I confess I would like very much to have
the girl dressed for Christmas. Alice has some
queer fancies; what do you think she wants to
do?”

“T haven’t an idea. When Alice and Reuben
put their heads together I fancy there is a team.”

Mrs. Fenning laughed. “Alice wants you to let
Reuben take the carriage on Christmas Day, and
take Nancy Hardman to ride. She says Nancy
thinks Reuben feels above her because he has
gone to the Kensingtons’ to live, and that Reu-
ben wants to do everything he can to let her
know it isn’t so; and Alice thinks that if he could
take her to ride that would be doing a good deal
CHRISTMAS PLANS. IQQ

towards it. Reuben tells her that Nancy was
never in a carriage, and looks with envy upon
ours. Moreover, it appears that the poor thing is
to be deprived of her usual Christmas treat. There
is an uncle living eight miles or so out of town
who plans to have the family with him on Christ-
mas Day; but there has been a sick daughter, who
it seems is not so well as they had hoped, and the
doctor has ordered a very quiet Christmas; so the
Hardmans must all stay at home. Reuben met the
uncle on the street yesterday, and got this piece
of news, and he is very sorry for Nancy. That
is what suggests the Christmas ride. But Alice
admits that unless I succeed in getting Nancy
some new things, she will hardly ‘match the car-
riage.”

The two laughed again; but Judge Fenning’s
face became grave in a moment, as he asked, “Is
this Reuben’s plan, do you think? Has he ar-
ranged that Alice shall ask for the carriage?”

«Oh, no, indeed! Reuben knows nothing about
it. Alice has arranged everything in her own wise
brain; but she had sense enough not to say a
word to Reuben until she won our consent. I do
not think there is anything presuming about the
boy.’”

“No,” said the judge; “I believe there isn’t.
He seems singularly humble; but I was afraid I
200 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

was going to be disappointed in this case. I could
not imagine our little mouse getting up such a
queer scheme. But after all, why not? Weare to
be away all day, and the horses will need exercise,
and Caleb is a wise attendant. It is an original
idea, certainly, yet I do not know but it is a good
one. What do you say?”

“Tt seems,” said Mrs. Fenning, “when one
thinks of it, a very strange thing that there has
been a family so poor and neglected as these
Hardmans apparently are, living so near us all
these years, and this homeless boy is the only
one who has thought of doing them a_ kind-
ness.”

«That is true,’ said Judge Fenning; “I have
known Hardman ever since we came down here,
but it has not occurred to me to inquire into his
affairs much. I know he is very poor; he isn’t
particularly prepossessing, however —the sort of
person whom one forgets as soon as one can. I
am much afraid you will find Nancy of the same
sort, though I was pleased with the decided way
in which she took Reuben’s side. Well, my dear,
what can you do for her?”

“T am sure I don’t know,” said Mrs. Fenning
in a musing tone; “if I could see the girl, I think
I could get some idea of how to manage. Can you
not plan some business with Mr. Hardman, and
CHRISTMAS PLANS. 201

drive there on Monday on our way to the train?
Then I might get a glimpse of the girl.”

«Oh, yes,” said Judge Fenning; “that is easily
managed. I want to see him about a certain breed
of hens which I understand he has.”

It was this which brought Judge Fenning’s car-
riage to stand at an early hour on Monday morning
before the Hardman place. Nancy herself an-
swered Caleb’s knock; and Judge Fenning’s glance
having so informed his wife, she alighted in haste
from the carriage, to Nancy’s astonishment and
dismay, and walked towards her.

“ Good-morning,” she said pleasantly ; “I want
to get a nearer view of this vine. Can you tell
me what it is?”

It was a very pretty vine, a golden bell, which
clambered over the side of the Hardman cabin;
the only pretty thing in or about the place. Nancy
made her reply as short as possible; but Mrs. Fen-
ning thought of more questions to ask, detaining
her with them while she studied her shape and
height, and even made a mental measurement of
the latter as Nancy leaned against the side of the
house.

“T think I can manage it,’ she said compla-
cently to her husband as the carriage whirled away ;
“aren't these lovely?” and she held up a spray
of golden bell for his admiration. “That poor
202 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

girl interests me. Alice says she has a cross face ;
but I think it is more sad than cross; she looks
like a girl who has always been repressed. .I shall
quite like to experiment with her a little in the
matter of dress. She leaned against the house in
the most satisfactory manner ; it gave me a chance
to calculate her height within an inch or so. I
think she is just about the size of Katie, and I have
all her measurements in my shopping-book.

“Oh! I can get Miss Nancy ready for a Christ-
mas ride, I-am sure. Wouldn’t it be fun to see
them drive away in their new suits? Reuben
looked every inch a gentleman in his yesterday.
I am very much interested in your protégé, Judge
Fenning, but still I think it will be rather pleasant
to have one of my own.”

“Tt is a pity she is not a few years younger,”
said Judge Fenning; “then you could plan about
them together.”

Mrs. Fenning laughed, and declared that she
had no such foolish plans as that in mind. And
then the carriage drew up at the station just in
time for the morning express.

For Mrs. Fenning to undertake a thing was
equal, her daughter Alice believed, to having it
accomplished. The afternoon express brought out
a box carefully packed and addressed to Miss
Nancy Hardman, which contained everything a
CHRISTMAS PLANS. 203

young lady might need for a most careful toilet.
Not only a pretty white lawn dress, which was
just the dress for a Christmas ride in that part of
Florida, but neat and tasteful undergarments that
matched the dress. Even shoes were not for-
gotten. was sure would delight the girl’s heart, were packed
in a small box of their own. Another box con-
tained a hat, which for neatness and daintiness
might have satisfied a much more particular girl
than Nancy Hardman. There were also a pair of
mitts, which Mrs. Fenning felt compelled to choose
instead of the gloves she wanted, because she re-
flected that it was really very hard to fit a person
to gloves of whose hand she knew so little. The
mitts would do very well, if they .were a trifle
large. On the whole, she was well pleased with
her purchases. It astonished and almost saddened
her to think how many really pretty things she
had been able to get for what was to her a very
small sum of money. Less by many dollars than
she was in the habit of spending for one dress for
herself. As she whirled along on the express, two’
thoughts occupied her. First, how should she
get the gifts to the girl, and get them accepted ?
Secondly, how should she plan more sensible
clothes for her for every-day wear? Probably it
would have been better to buy some neat prints
204 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

instead of the white lawn; but Alice’s heart was
set on white.

She had a happy thought just as the train
reached her station, which settled the first perplex-
ity. The other must be left to be studied over at
some future time.
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. 205

CHAPTER XVII.
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES.

HE way out of her perplexity which had pleased
Mrs. Fenning was to let Nancy’s gifts come
from Reuben himself. With this purpose in view,
she directed Caleb, as he drove her from the sta-
tion, to call at Mr. Kensington’s. Reuben was
in the back. yard milking the cow, but he came
promptly at her call. As he listened to her plan,
the astonishment which he felt showed in his face.
«But, Mrs. Fenning,” he said earnestly, “how
can I give them to her? She knows I have no
money to buy things with. I should have to tell
her they were from you. Can’t I do that, ma’am ?
I should like nothing better in the world than the
chance to carry her something pretty ; but, indeed,
I do not see how I could possibly pretend that they
were presents from me.”

Mrs. Fenning laughed pleasantly. “What shall
we do with this boy?” she said to Miss Kensing-
ton, who came to the door just then ; “he is so pain-
fully honest that I cannot even make use of him to
206 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

carry ou. a Christmas plan. Never mind, Reuben,
honesty is not such a common thing that we can
afford to make fun of it. Ill tell you how it is.
The things in this box are yours. They do not
in the slightest degree belong to me any more. I
give them to you to do exactly what you like with.
You may borrow a wheelbarrow, and cart them over
to the lake and toss them in, if you want to; I
shall not call you to account for it inany way. Or
you may give them to Miss Kensington here, if
you choose, or keep them up in your trunk, or
do what you will with them. You have the very
largest liberty. How will that answer?”

Reuben’s eyes twinkled. “That will do beauti-
fully, ma’am,” he said; “I know exactly what I
shall please to do. Tl borrow a wheelbarrow, and
cart them out to Mr. Hardman’s, and tell Nancy
that one of the best and kindest ladies in the world
gave them to me, and was thinking of her when
she did it.”

There was a general laugh over this answer.
Mr. Kensington had also appeared in the door,
and joined in it, as he said, —

“Flow will that do for a reply, Mrs. Fenning?
It strikes me that Reuben has been almost a match
for you.”

Reuben was as good as his word. That very
evening he borrowed Mr. Kensington’s wheelbar-
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. 207

row and set out for his old home. He had not so
much ‘as had a peep at the things which the box
contained. He had been busy with the chores un-
til the last moment, and had been obliged to make
all speed lest the Hardman household might have
retired before he reached there; and as it was
Christmas eve, of course it would not do for the
package to be tardy. Before Mrs. Fenning left
she had explained to Reuben that he might have
the use of the carriage and horses, with Caleb to
drive, for three or four hours the next day. .The
family were to be gone all day, and would rather
the horses were used than not; and Alice had ex-
pressed her desire to give Nancy Hardman a ride
in a carriage.

“How would it do,” Mrs. Fenning had asked,
“for you and she to drive out to the uncle’s, and
call on the sick cousin? Caleb says that is a good
road, and that you could have time for a pleasant
call, and get back before dark.” Certainly nothing
could have suited Reuben better. His face fairly
beamed with delight as he told Mrs. Fenning that
if he only knew how to thank her, he would be
glad.

As he made rapid strides over the road to the
Hardman cottage he had but one anxiety. In what
mood would he be likely to find Nancy? No one
understood better than he that she was entirely
208 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

capable of refusing to have anything to do, either
with the gift, or the day of pleasure which had
been planned, should she choose to do so. It
would not be the first time that he had seen her
go exactly contrary to her own interests for the
sake of indulging her illhumor. What if she
should receive all Mrs. Fenning’s kindnesses in
a way which would disgrace her in the eyes of
that good woman? Reuben stood still in the road,
his heart thumping an accompaniment to his dis-
may over this thought. He was almost tempted
‘to turn back, and beg Miss Kensington to find
some one else to perform the errand; some one
to whom Nancy would be afraid to express herself
freely, and commit herself against the gift, should
she happen to be in ill-humor. Perhaps the strong-
est reason why he did not do so, was his inability
to think of any person before whom Nancy would
be afraid to express herself freely, if she felt like
it. There was nothing for it but to try; so he
took up the handles of his barrow and hurried on.
Soon the little old house came in sight, with its
one dreary lamp burning on the dreary table.
How desolate that room looked to Reuben! How
much he should like to make it bright and pleas-
ant, like the sitting-room at the Kensingtons’!
What would Mr. Hardman think of a shaded lamp
“to read the paper by, that he borrowed once in a


REUBEN STOOD STILL IN THE ROAD.



CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. 211

long time from his nearest neighbor? And Mrs.
Hardman, who so often sat and darned laboriously
over their clothes to keep them from falling to
pieces, — she could do it so much better and easier
if she only had a good light.

“Tf ever I get five dollars of my very own that
do not have to be spent for things which I must
have to eat and to wear, I'll buy a nice lamp
for that table, and a little rocking-chair for Mrs.
Hardman, see if I don’t.” With which firm re-
solve Reuben knocked at the door. Neither Mr.
nor Mrs. Hardman was in sight; but he could
see Nancy moving restlessly about, as though un-
certain. what to do with herself this Christmas
Eve.

“Dear me!” she said, throwing wide the door
in answer to Reuben’s knock; “if this isn’t my
lord Reuben himself, in his best new suit, come
to see if his old acquaintances will recognize him!
How did you find the way? I supposed you had
quite forgotten the road here. Or did you come in
the carriage? That must be it, of course. Won't
you have the table-cloth, or a sheet, or something
to spread over those precious horses while they
stand?”

“JT came in a wheelbarrow,” said Reuben good-
humoredly, “or behind one. I’ve been wanting to
come ever since I went away; but I have a good

”
212 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

many chores to do evenings, after school ; and then
I have to study every evening. How do you do,
Nancy? And how are your father and mother?
' Are they at home?”

“No; they aren’t,” said Nancy shortly. “There
isn’t a soul in the house but me. I had a mind
not to open the door, for fear it was some old
tramp. Father and mother have both gone out
to Uncle Kastor’s. Mr. Rizley was going within
a mile of. there, and he took them; and they’ll
have to walk back that mile to be ready to come
home with him. Mother will be all tuckered out ;
but we haven’t heard from there in ’most a week
now, and she would go. I wanted to go myself
dreadfully, but of course I couldn’t. There wasn’t
hardly room for them to squeeze in. When did
you ever know me to have a chance to do things
that I wanted to?” ;

“I know a chance that I hope you will want,”
said Reuben, resolving to plunge at once into the
middle of his wonderful errands. “I want you to
go to-morrow and take a Christmas ride with me.
I’ve got permission to be gone for three or four
hours, and we can drive out and see Uncle Kastor,
and wish them all a Merry Christmas. If it is
a pleasant day, I’ll come for you at exactly one
o’clock. You'll go, won’t you, Nancy?”

But Nancy only stood and stared at him. The
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. 213

greatness of the invitation seemed to take from
her the power of speech. At last she said, —

«What will you come in— the wheelbarrow?”

“No,” said Reuben with a burst of laughter ;
“there isn’t room for us both in the wheelbarrow.
I’ve got it all planned, Nancy; say you will go.
I haven’t been to Uncle Kastor’s in ever so long ;
and I want to see them all again. And, Nancy,
I’ve brought you a Christmas present. It is out
in the wheelbarrow. I’m going to bring it in in
a minute, and then I must hurry back. I was so
late in getting started that I have not time to
stay. This isn’t my Christmas present, though
Iam to call it so. I did the wishing, Nancy, and
Mrs. Fenning did the rest. I said to Alice that
I should like to get you something pretty for
Christmas, if I had any money; and Alice told
her mother, and they got it up; and then Mrs.
Fenning gave it to me to do what I liked with,
and of course I liked to bring it to you. I don’t
even know what is in the box; only I think it is
sure to be something pretty.”

He talked as fast as he could, not giving the
astonished Nancy a chance to put in a word. If
she should be tempted to declare that she would
have nothing to do with Mrs. Fenning or her
presents, as he more than half feared, he knew
her obstinate nature well enough to be afraid that
214 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

he could not get her to alter that resolution. The
safest way was not to let her make it; so before
she could recover from her amazement long enough
to say more than, “ Well, I never !” he had dashed
out of the house, and was bending over the pack-
age in the wheelbarrow. It was a box large
enough to add to the utter astonishment of Nancy.
She had seized the smoking lamp, and brought it
to the door with a view to helping Reuben; and as
he lugged in the treasure, she exclaimed again,
« Well, I never!” but this time added ; “what in
all creation can there be in there? Is it heavy?
What ever possessed you to want to make me a
Christmas present? I never have Christmas pres-
ents, nor any other kind. I suppose it is some
of her worn-out clothes and things that she has
picked up. You can just take them back where
they came from, Reuben Stein ; we may be poor,
but we are not beggars, and we don’t want any of
Mrs. Fenning’s old duds poked off on us as
presents.”

But Reuben had set the box on the table, and
was already at the door. Nancy’s storm of words
had come, but they had taken a line of which he
had not thought.

«“T don’t know what is in the box, Nancy,” he
said eagerly; “but I don’t think there is an old
thing there. At any rate, I cannot take them back
CHRISTMAS EVE SURPRISES. 215

to Mrs. Fenning, for she told me they were mine
to do what I liked with; that I might dump them
into the lake if I wanted to. And I wanted to
give them to you; so if there is nothing there that
you like to keep, you can throw them into the lake
yourself ; you are nearer to it than I am. Good-
night ; I am coming for you at exactly one o’clock
to-morrow.”

And then he made all haste down the road, fear-
ing all the time lest he should hear Nancy call-
ing him back. He felt sure it would not be wise
to linger another minute. Nancy, alone with the
treasures he was certain that box must contain,
might have a gentler spirit come to her; but with
him looking on it would be almost sure to take
the form of indignation over something. As he
trundled his empty barrow along the road, and
thought of how much perhaps hung on the way in
which Nancy received that gift — for if a woman
like Mrs. Fenning was willing to become her friend,
what might not be done for her? there came to
him the memory of the prayer he had timidly
offered, leaning against the door-post on Satur-
day afternoon. It had been about a new suit of
clothes; and on the very next day he had gone
to church clothed from head to foot in a new suit.
Had his prayer anything to do with that result?

“The clothes had already been ordered from
216 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

the tailor, and were in Mrs. Fenning’s room hours
before you prayed at all; so how could the prayer
have had anything to do with them?” a miserable
little enemy inside of him named Unbelief whis-
pered in the darkness.

“What of it? Did not God know that you
meant to pray about them hours and weeks before
you did pray? And couldn’t he plan, if he chose,
to have the clothes there, ready for your prayer?”
This the friend who wanted to live with him al-
ways, and whose name was Faith, murmured in
reply to Unbelief’s little sneer.

«That is true,” said Reuben. “If I had over-
heard somebody wish for a thing, and had got it
ready for him before he asked me anything about
it, wouldn’t I be answering his wish just as much
and more than if I had waited until afterwards.
I believe God gave me the clothes because I
asked him for them. I’m going to trust him-about
little things after this as well as big ones. I’m
going to ask him this minute to make Nancy like
the things in that box so much that she can’t
help Being them, and ee friends with Mrs.
Fenning.”
“4A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!” 217

CHAPTER XVIII.
“A CHRISTMAS PRESENT (ee

EUBEN was right in his estimate of Nancy’s
disposition. Had he remained, she might
have gone on talking until she had worked herself
into such a belief of ill treatment at the. hands of
people who thought them paupers as to refuse to
look at her gift; but left alone with that large
box before her on the table, and the knowledge
that its contents were hers if she would have them,
she could not resist the temptation to peep.

«JT won't keep them,” she said scornfully, “not
arag of them, if they are old clothes, and of course
they are; but I can pack them back in the box
just as I find them, and I would like to see what
she has condescended to pick up for me, the stuck-
up thing!”

Then she untied the wrappings, and brought to
view the lawn dress in its exquisite whiteness, with
its delicate lace at throat and sleeves. So fair and
pure it looked that Nancy uttered an exclamation
almost of awe, then stood and gazed, without an
218 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES... °

attempt to touch it. Then, curiously enough, her
eyes began to dim with tears; she could not have
told why. The thought that somebody had chosen
anything so perfectly white and pure and beautiful
for her made a strange lump come in her throat.
At last, first rubbing her clean hands carefully on
her apron, she gathered courage to lift the beauti-
ful thing from its box, and shake out its folds and
hold it up before her ; long and full and carefully
made. “No skimping anywhere,” she said with
a note of exultation in her voice. There had been
always “skimping” about every garment she and
her mother had ever tried to make.

The white skirt, which she allowed herself to
shake out next, was almost as pretty and fully as
bewildering as the dress. After that she gave
full rein to her fingers, and drew the treasures forth
one after another in almost breathless eagerness.
What would have looked to Reuben Stein like
commonplace enough white cloth had such a charm
for Nancy as only those girls can understand who
have daintily made and exquisitely trimmed under-
garments fashioned for them by a mother’s careful
hand. Nancy had never had them, yet her heart
yearned for them. Here were some as pretty as
she had ever imagined, prettier than had hung on
her line that winter her mother did fine washing
for some boarders in town; and they were her
“A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!” 219

own! When she opened the box that contained
the pretty hat, Nancy’s feelings gave way entirely.
She made a loud, queer noise which was an effort
to repress.a sob, but it would not be suppressed ;
and very much astonished that it was so, Nancy
Hardman dropped in a limp heap on the floor, and
lifted up her voice and cried. That such a hat as
that should be for her to wear, and that it should
have such a dress, yes, and such mitts, and slippers
to match it, were almost beyond belief, and quite
beyond composure.

“The tears did not last long; in truth, the girl
was much ashamed of them, and extremely grate-
ful to Reuben for hastening away. Though she
assured herself that she would not have cried if
he had stayed, not by a long sight! Hark! Were
her father and mother coming? She sprang to
her feet at the thought, brushed away the tears in
extreme haste, and began to return the treasures
to their boxes and papers. Nobody but herself
should feast their eyes upon them to-night. Mother
and father would have enough to occupy their
minds telling about their trip; for one blissful
night Nancy would hug her beautiful secret, and
gloat over her wonderful gift. No thought of re-
turning the things was upon her now. Instead, for
perhaps the first time in her life, she felt a strong
sense of gratitude. This was no cast-off finery,
220 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

crushed and faded and: torn, huntéd for in some-
body’s attic as useless things which had been stowed
away for the rag-man or for beggars. These were
new, zew/ They had just been planned and se-
lected and bought for Aer’ It seemed almost
beyond belief. Why should Mrs. Fenning, who did
not. know her, and. for.whom at times she had felt
almost hatred because she rode always in a car-
riage and lived such a charmed life, have thought
of her at all? Then she remembered. It was
Reuben who had thought, and she had planned and
given for his sake. Well, that was reasonablt ;
Reuben had saved their house and their young
grove for them he ought to have been well paid
for it; but how queer in him to choose to have
what belonged by right to him, come to her, who
had nothing to do with it! She had never been
very good to Reuben, although she had often ad-
mitted to herself that he was a good boy, and she
liked him; but no one knew better than she how
cross and disagreeable, sometimes how positively
hateful, she had been to him —and this was her
reward! It was beyond her understanding.

Good sleeper though Nancy Hardman generally
was, for that one night excitement got the better
of her; she tossed and turned on her hard bed,
and shook her poor little pillow, until, if there had
been any possibility of putting life into the feath-
“A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!” 221

ers, she would have accomplished it. .When she
finally slept, it was only to dream that she put on
her elegant white dress over the old green calico
which she had worn every day for a month, and
drew her faded and soiled gray sunbonnet over the
dainty little hat with its sprays of exquisite bloom.
She awoke in a fright at last, while trying to put
her pretty new slippers on her father’s large feet.
She turned over once more, and said aloud, “ Who
‘would have supposed that I could be such a fool! I
believe I haven’t slept an hour. And such dreams!
Dear, dear! One time I thought it was all a dream,
and that I hadn’t any new things ; but I have; the
box is under my bed this blessed minute! I won-
der what mother will say to it? I wonder what
she and father will think when I tell them that
I’m going to take a ride. That’s queer too; what
can Reuben be going to take? Mr. Kensington
don’t keep a horse, but he gets Mr. Marshall's lit-
tle fat pony and low wagon to take his mother
out riding ; I s’pose that is what Reuben has got;
likely Mr. Kensington asked the Marshalls to lend
them to Reuben. That boy beats all. It ain’t
like any boy I ever heard of to fuss around after
a horse to take a girl out riding who is so much
older than he is, and who was never nice to him
in her life. There’s lots of things I might have
done to make his life easier while he was here,
222 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

and I didn’t do’em. I’m awful sorry. If I hada
chance to do it over again, I believe I’d be differ-
ent. I’ve a great mind to be different now, and
show him that I can act like other folks. Maybe
it will come natural to act like nice folks when
I get on my new clothes; who knows? Oh, my
sakes! I ought to send some word to Mrs. Fen-
ning about them. How will I ever do that? If I
could write a letter to her, that would be some-
thing like ; but every word would be spelled wrong
if I tried it, and the capitals and commas and
things would be sure to go just where they weren’t
wanted. Besides, I ain’t got any paper or pen;
I can’t write to her, and that’s the whole of it. I
might get Reuben to do it for me. I wonder how
that would do? I reckon I’ll ask him about it this
afternoon; perhaps he has been living with quality
folks long enough to know the right way of doing
things. The fact is, he is kind of quality folks
himself; I always knew it, and that is one of the
things that used to make me feel mad at him.”
After relieving her mind of all these thoughts,
Nancy did contrive to get a little sleep. When
next she awakened it was broad daylight, and she
made all speed into her every-day clothes; she knew
she must by this time be expected in the kitchen.
She had by no means slept off her excitement.
There was a pretty pink glow on the cheeks which
“A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!” 223

were usually sallow, and her eyes were so bright
that Reuben would have been astonished at a sight
of them. Her mother was astonished when at last
the girl made her way to the kitchen.

“Well!” she said, glancing at her, then turning
and giving her a careful look, “what is the matter
with you? You look as though you had had a for-
tune left you. You need one, I must say. How
that dress is worn out, to be sure! What be you
going to do for clothes, child? You haven’t any-
thing that’s decent to wear. Uncle Kastor wanted
you to come out as soon as you could, but I don’t
know how you are ever going there or anywhere
else, nor what is going to become of us; times
keep growing harder and harder.” The sentence
ended in a weary little sigh, and Mrs. Hardman
bent again over the mixture she was stirring.
Nancy’s ordinary way would have been to answer
in a snappish tone, words to the effect that she
neither knew nor cared what was to become of
them; they would go to the poor-house, of course ;
the way other folks did when they got to the end
of their rope. Instead of this, she said with
actual cheerfulness, “Oh! Ill get clothes some-
how, mother; don’t you fret. Queer things hap-
pen sometimes, when folks least expect them.”
She meant to hug her delicious secret a little while
longer ; it was such fun to have a box full of lovely
224 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

clothes lying that very minute under the bed in
her room, and nobody but herself knowing any-
thing about it. All the while she was frying the
pork for breakfast, her heart was singing a merry
little tune. She did not know how to sing, at
least she thought she didn’t, never having had any
opportunity to learn. She could imitate the mock-
ing-birds a little ; and sometimes tried it, but never
except when she was quite alone. Now she sang
in her heart, keeping time to the frizzling of the
pork. The words she sang were :—

“Pye got a new dress, new dress, new dress,
And a hat, and a hat, and a hat,
And shoes for my feet, and mitts for my hands,
And I’m going a-riding to-day.”

No, it didn’t rhyme, except in her thoughts ; but
that did not matter; it was a gay little song, and
thrilled through all her nerves, keeping her eyes
bright and her voice pleasant.

By way of telling her wonderful piece of news,
she began in a way that was characteristic of her,
inthe middle =~

“T’m going ridin’ this afternoon,” she remarked,
just as her father was helping himself to a second
piece of pork.

“ Ridin’ ?” repeated her mother. “How? I'd
like to know; on a wheelbarrow? Uncle Kastor
“A CHRISTMAS PRESENT!” 225

can’t come in, not in a— well, he don’t know when
he can come; one of his horses is lame. You
better go a-walkin’. I should think a great strong
girl like you could walk out to Uncle Kastor’s. I
never used to think much of eight miles for a
walk, when I was of your age. Seems to me the
girls we have nowadays are kind of worthless
critters.”

“Td rather ride,” said Nancy, with a toss of her
head. “I’m going out to Uncle Kastor’s this af-
ternoon ; going to make a call.” She giggled a
little as she spoke, and her father and mother
stared.

“ There’s nothing to take you that I know of,”
said her father, “except the big rooster, and he
won't stand no harnessing.” Said her mother, -
«What do you mean? why don’t you speak
out?”

“T did speak out ; it’s just as I said. I’m going
out to Uncle Kastor’s with Reuben ; he is coming
after me at one o'clock, and we are going to make
a call; he says so.” The sentence ended with an-
other giggle. It was funny; she could fully appre-
ciate her father’s and mother’s bewilderment.

“My, my!” said Mrs. Hardman, “how that boy
is coming on! He will be having a team of his
own next. Where did he get a horse ?”’

“ Borrowed it, I spose; he said he had permis-
226 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

sion. 1 didn’t ask him, but I reckon it is the fat
pony from Marshalls’; they’ve got a little light
wagon, you know, that Mr. Kensington gets to
take his mother out riding. The Kensingtons
seem to think lots of Reuben; and I s’pose they
have got him permission to take the pony, and the
wagon, and me, for a Christmas ride.”

«Well, I never!” said Mrs. Hardman again.
She stopped at that point, seeming to be unable
to express -her feelings in words. Mr. Hardman
received the news with a contemptuous sniff which
cannot be spelled ; but Mrs. Hardman, after a min-
ute’s silence, began again:

“Reuben’s a great deal better boy than he had
the name of being, I believe. I always sort 0’
liked him.”

Said Nancy, “I always knew he was a good boy,
and I told you so; but that isn’t all the news. He
brought me a Christmas present.”

« A Christmas present!’ Her mother’s voice,
as she repeated these wonderful words, was full of
interrogation points.
“*TAIN’T ME!” 227

CHAPTER XIX.
‘TAIN T ME!”

cs ES, he did!” said Nancy, “and it 1s a stun-

ning one, too; I reckon you never saw
anything like it, mother. You see,’ she added,
plunging headlong into her story, for she felt that
the time had come to tell it, “the way it came
about was, Mrs. Fenning made up her mind that
she wanted to give Reuben a present for saving
their house and grove for them, you know; it is
about time she thought of it, I think. Well, as
near as I can understand it, she had Reuben there
and talked with him about what she should give
him, or something of that kind. Anyhow, he told
her that he would like first-rate to give me a Christ-
mas present; he said I liked pretty things, and
never had any, and he would like to give me one.
So what does she do but go and buy a lot of
things for him to give to me! She told him that
the box*was his to do what he liked with; he could
throw it in the lake if he wanted to, or he could
give it to anybody that he pleased; so he bor-
228 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

rowed the Kensingtons’ wheelbarrow, and trun-
dled it out to me; now, if there isn’t a boy for
you, I'd like to know where there is one!”

“Humph!” said Mr. Hardman, “it would have
been more honest if he had taken a notion to give
it to me; if I know anything about it, it is I who
fed and clothed hini for years, and never got so
much as a ‘thank you’ for it.”

Nancy giggled; her father’s determination to
believe that he had fed and clothed Reuben for
nothing, often made her indignant ; but to-day she
could not afford to be anything but amused.

«The things wouldn’t fit you, father,” she said
pertly, “so there’s no use in talking about your
having them. The prettiest rig that ever I laid
eyes on; it doesn’t seem as though they fitted me,
but I suppose I ought to wear ’em, seeing they are
a present, and came just as they did.”

«What in the world are they?” asked Mrs. Hard-
man, “and where are they? Why didn’t you show
them to us last night ?”

“ There wasn’t any chance. You got home so
late, you know, and kept talking about Uncle Kas-
tor’s folks. I thought morning would be time
enough.” Then she arose suddenly, and began to
dash the few dishes together and to make sudden
trips to the out-kitchen, so that it would not be
convenient to question her further. Not for the
“*TAIN’T ME!” 229

world would she have let her father and mother
understand that, on the evening before, her heart
had been so full of a strange feeling that she could
not look at or even think of her new things with-
out the tears gathering in her eyes ; how queer it
would have been for her, Nancy Hardman, to have
been caught crying!

There was more or less excitement throughout
the Hardman family that day. Even the father,
disappointed, irritable man that he was, with a
habit for grumbling so fixed upon him that he
could have found occasion for it, even though his
life had become a sunny one, found himself deeply
interested in the new clothes. He criticized them,
it is true, and said, what it may be feared was cor-
rect, that they were not suited to Nancy’s needs,
that there wasn’t a place in the house to keep them,
and nowhere for her to go to wear them. It would
have been a good deal more sensible, in his opinion,
if Mrs. Fenning had given her two or three strong
calicoes, and kept her finery to herself.

“Oh! I don’t know, pa,” said the wife sooth-
ingly, “pretty things is worth something in this
world; and Nancy she hasn’t had none of them. I
can’t help feeling kind of glad that she’s got one
pretty rig from head to foot. I own I’m ina kind
of a hurry to see her in them. Nancy, if I were
you, I would curl my hair ; I would, so; it would
230 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

curl easy enough if you would let it; it always
wants to twist up in little rings around your face.
When you was a little bit of a thing I kept your
hair curled all the time. My! how sweet you
looked. Folks used to stop on the street and look
after you; you was little for your years, then, and
awful cunning.”

“Dear me!” said Nancy, “how I must have
changed.” But she slipped away up-stairs in the
course of that forenoon, and put her hair into curl-
papers; it would curl, she knew very well, if she
could leave it up for an hour or so. She wouldn't
have been such a “silly” as to do it of herself, she
declared, telling the square of broken mirror in her
room all about it ; but since her mother had spoken
of it, why, that was another matter.

If I had a photograph of Nancy Hardman just
as she looked when she was finally ready for her
drive, I should like extremely well to show it to
you. Her hair, as her mother had said, needed
only a hint to curl, and the difference that it made
in her face to have the hair in soft rings about
it, instead of being stretched straight back and
braided in two fat braids, needs to be seen in order
to be understood. Her white dress fitted to per-
fection, the bit of lace at the throat refining and
softening her face in a manner that was truly mar-
vellous to her. The pretty hat set on top of the
“°TAIN’T ME!” 231

soft curls completed the picture, and seemed to fit
her face exactly.

«’Tain’t me!” she said solemnly, surveying her-
self as well as she could in the bit of glass, behind
which she had stuffed her small towel in order to
make it tip forward as much as possible — “’Tain’t
me! I don’t know who it is, I’m sure; nobody
that ever I see before. It is the queerest thing
that putting on some clothes will take you away,
and put somebody else in your place! I wonder if
folks ain’t themselves, anyhow ; nothing but their
clothes? I wonder what is choking my throat up
so? I feel exactly as though I was going to cry
again. What in the world should I cry about? I
won't, so there! It seems an awful pity to get into
that wagon, and sit down on that little tucked-up
seat with all these nice clothes on; it will muss
them awful. But there! if there’s room enough
for Mr. Kensington and his mother to sit down, I
should think there ought to be for Reuben and
me. Mrs. Kensington wears soft silk things that
don’t stand out and take room; but I like the
stand-out ones better. I just wonder what mother
will say to me. Dear me! What’s that in that
paper? I’ve got everything out, and there’s a
piece of tissue paper that looks as though it had
something wrapped in it.”

She dived after it, and, with nervous. trembling
232 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

fingers, undid its folds, to find a long pink ribbon,
which, at first, she gazed upon with a sort of awe.
It was so delicate and pure, and yet so bright.

«Tt is to wear around my waist!” she exclaimed
at last, in a tone that would have gone to Mrs.
Fenning’s heart, it was so suspiciously near to
tears; but the girl swallowed them down with a
resolute air; no tears should dim the sparkle of the
eyes she saw in her broken mirror. She told her-
self that when she got home, and had taken off and
folded away her good clothes, and was in her own
room and it was dark, she would have a downright
good cry, and get all the lumps out of her throat ;
but there was no time for crying now. Reuben
had said that he would be there at one o'clock,
“sharp,” and he had always been a boy who had
done things just when he said he would. She
must go down-stairs at once. She knew how to
arrange the sash, —trust a girl for that, —and it
gave the touch to her dress which pleased her gay
taste. Then she hurried away to show herself to
her mother.

The effect upon Mrs. Hardman was curious.
She had no desire to cry; her amazement was too
great for such a feeling. Her thought, if she had
expressed it, might have been much like the one
which Nancy had of herself :—

«Jt ain’t her at all.’ But she did not put the


(a3
*TAINT ME!’ SHE SAID,

“°TAIN’T ME!” 235

thought into words; they would have seemed im-
proper words to say to this beautifully dressed
young lady. However, her second thought was:
“It’s my girl, and nobody’s else; and she is just
as pretty as a picture, too; if I do say it, that
shouldn’t! If she’d only had chances, what a girl
she would have made! Nobody ever knew she
was pretty before!” She stood at a little distance,
with hands on her sides, and gazed, and thought,
but had not a single word to speak aloud.

« Well,” said Nancy at last, “can’t you say what
you think of me?”

«“N-o,” said Mrs. Hardman, bringing herself
slowly back to speech. “I ain't got no words that
fit. It does beat all what a difference it makes,
Nancy!”

«“«Fine feathers make fine birds,” quoted Mr.
Hardman, appearing in the doorway, with a sneer
on his face; “I supposed you knew that.” But
he came nearer, and took a critical survey of the
girl as she posed before him; and though he said,
once more, that there was no place for her to go
where she could wear such a rig, there was, never-
theless, a little gleam of satisfaction in his eyes as
he studied her. It was interesting to think that
such a stylish creature belonged to him.

The truth was, both father and mother had a
curious feeling that a certain degree of respect was
236 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

due to this new daughter, and there seemed to be
nothing which it was quite the thing to say to her.
A visible embarrassment was settling upon them.
Just how it would have been gotten over no one
will ever know, for at that moment their excite-
ment took a new form.

The clock on the kitchen mantel struck one,
and the Fenning carriage rolled up to their door,
with one of Caleb’s most skilful flourishes. Al-
most before the horses had come to a halt, Reuben
had opened the carriage door, and sprung out.

“ Good-afternoon,” he said respectfully to Mr.
Hardman, who still filled the doorway. “Is Nancy”
—then he stopped, for behold! just back of her
father was a vision, a girl in white, with cluster-
ing curls about her face, and a hat which belonged
to the curls, and a sparkle in her eyes such as
Nancy Hardman’s had never worn before. It
wasn’t possible that that could be Nancy!

There was a single moment of hesitation ; in
the next, Reuben had taken off his hat. “I beg
your pardon,” he said, trying not to laugh. “I
don’t think I knew you, not for the first second.”

“It’s no wonder,” said Mrs. Hardman; “I don’t
know her myself; I don’t more than half believe
it’s my girl. Them curls look kind of natural,
though; I used to fix’em just so when she was a
little bit of a thing. I don’t know why she had
“OTAIN’T ME!” 237

a notion of stretchin’ her hair straight back always,
just as though it was made of sticks. Well, if you
ain’t got the big carriage! You do beat all, Reuben
Stein! How did you manage that ? and where are
you going to?”

«We are going out to Uncle Kastor’s,” said
Reuben gayly; “and I didn’t manage it, Mrs.
Hardman, it managed itself.” Then he gave his
hand to Nancy as nearly as possible in the way he
had seen Judge Fenning do to ladies; and before
Mrs. Hardman could think of further questions to
ask, they were off.

She stood in the doorway, and gazed after the
fast-disappearing carriage. ‘Well, if that don’t
beat all that ever I saw!” she burst forth; “our
girl riding off in the Fenning carriage, looking as
fine as the best of them. What do you think of
that, pa? I wonder what Uncle Kastor will say
when he sees them?”

“He'll say we are a couple of fools, letting her
get notions into her head that will do her no good ;
and he will be about right, I reckon,” said Mr.
Hardman.

“T don’t think any such thing,’ was Mrs. Hard-
man’s sturdy reply. There were times when she
stood up ‘for her own views.

“Nancy has had dreadful few chances in the
world, the land knows. I never expected her to
238 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

have one like this; nor to have any of ’em come
through Reuben Stein, I must say. But I don’t
care how they come, so it’s honest and decent.
She never had a ride in a carriage in her life, not
since she was old enough to remember it ; and I’m
just glad to have her have one good lark. She
looked as pretty as a picture, too. I never did
think Nancy was pretty, not since she was a little
girl six years old; it is just amazing what a differ-
ence clothes make. But it can’t be all clothes,
after all. Clothes don’t make her eyes bright, and
her cheeks red, and her lips all in a pucker of
smiles. Well, the clothes help, of course; but
they couldn’t do it all. I reckon they’ve got to
have cheeks and eyes and lips to work on. I don’t
know as we’ve any cause to be more miserable
than is necessary. We better take streaks of nice
when we can get ’em; they are scarce enough.
Half of your misery has been because you couldn't
do nothing for Nancy ; and now, here’s one little
nice spot for her. Why don’t you take the com-
fort of it?”

How astonished Nancy would have been, could
she have heard them! It had never entered her
mind that her father, cared for any “little nice
spots” in her life.
“CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS.” 239

CHAPTER XxX.
“CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS.”

OW am I going to describe to you the feeling

it gave Nancy Hardman to be skimming over

the road behind such horses as Judge Fenning’s,

managed by a driver like Caleb? Her memory

of driving was all connected with Uncle Kastor’s

worn-out, discouraged team as they toiled slowly
through the sand.

“ Pesky roads!” Uncle Kastor called them, and
laid his slow progress largely to their condition.
But these horses seemed to think nothing of sand.
They held their heads high, and danced along as
though it was pure fun simply to go. Then the
carriage cushions were so soft! softer than Nancy
had imagined possible ; and she had imagined them
a great many times. Her dress seemed to her to
fit in with the soft grayness about her. She laid a
bit of her pink sash ribbon on the pretty gray of the
cushions, and flushed with delight over the effect.

“Look at that, Reuben,” she said. ‘Those
two things put together make a picture.”
240 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Reuben looked and laughed. He did not see
the picture ; he had not Nancy’s eye for color.

«You will have to say that kind of thing to
Alice Fenning,” he said; “ she is the greatest
one to see pictures! She finds them in the stones,
and the grass, and I don’t know where not. Alice
would have enjoyed taking this ride with us; she
likes to go into the country over new roads. If
she had been at home to-day perhaps she might
have come with us. But then,” he added with a
laugh, “if she had been at home I don’t suppose
we could have come at all. It is because they are
all away that they did not need the horses.”

Nancy echoed the laugh as she said she was glad
they were not at home. In her heart she added
that she wouldn’t have had that stuck-up little
Alice Fenning along for anything; in fact, she
wouldn’t have gone a step with her. But she did
not say it aloud. In truth, this Nancy, whom Reu-
ben was taking to ride, appeared to be new inside
as well as out. Apparently she had put away her
ill-humor and discontent with her old clothes. She
leaned back in the carriage, and looked as much
like a fine lady as she could, and talked and laughed
in a way that astonished her companion. She was
bent on carrying out her resolution to show him
that she could be “like other folks when she had
a chance.” It was very surprising and almost dis-
“CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS.” 241

appointing to see how fast they got over the road.
Caleb’s horses made nothing of doing in an hour’s
time what would have taken Uncle Kastor’s the
whole of the short Florida afternoon. At Uncle
Kastor’s they made fully as great’a sensation as
they had expected to; but it was entirely a pleas-
ant sensation. Uncle Kastor was jubilant over
them. He rested his rough hands on his worn
blue trousers, and laughed so long and loud that
the people at work in the yard stopped to listen
and laugh with him.

«Well, well, well, my girl!” he said to Nancy.
«“¢Fine feathers make fine birds,’ eh? I should
say they did!” How very different the quotation
sounded from what it had when her father said it.
“You do look fine, and no mistake. Fits you too,
somehow. Don’t it, Jane? And so you came away
out here in the splendid carriage with the dancing
horses? Dear! dear! And you, too, Reuben ;
you look like a professor, or the minister.”

At these words Nancy turned and looked full at
her companion for the first time that day. She
had been so thoroughly occupied with herself as
to actually forget to examine him critically. Now
she made up for it.

« A new suit of clothes, from head to foot,” she
said; “and I’ve come away out here without tak-
ing them in! Oh! I knew you looked awful nice,
242 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

but someway I didn’t think to see what it was
made you look Bond

“Tt beats all,’ said old Aunt Kastor, as she
waddled about, in haste to treat her guests to huge
pieces of cold strawberry shortcake. Yes, I know
it was Christmas Day ; but they were in Florida,
you will remember, and in that curious country the
very day of all others to enjoy strawberry short-
cake made of freshly picked strawberries just be-
ginning to prime, may be Christmas Day.

“Tt beats all what a difference fixing up makes!
Here I’ve known Nancy ever since she was born,
and had her in my arms the first one; and I’ve
been most as well acquainted with Reuben as any
of ’em; and I stood in the door and see that car-
riage come along and says I, ‘ Here’s a fine young
lady and gentleman taking a ride out this way ; I
wonder who they can be?’ and I didn’t know you
from Adam!” Nancy laughed; it was pleasant
to be so entirely unlike her old self as not to be
recognized.

When the strawberry shortcake had been eaten,
and the invalid had aroused herself and examined
in an interested way every article of dress which
Nancy had on, and Reuben had told Uncle Kastor
all about his work and his school, it was time for
them to go. The starting away caused an excite-
ment. The sick girl’s couch was wheeled to the
“ CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS.” 243

window that she might watch Nancy enter the car-
riage, and uncle and aunt stationed themselves on
the doorstep for the same purpose. Nancy, with
the glow on her cheeks deepening, lifted her dress
with remarkable skill in one hand, rested the other
on Reuben’s arm, and stepped in as though she
had been all her lifetime used to entering car-
riages. She had not watched Mrs. Fenning for
nothing.

“Clothes is great things,” said Uncle Kastor in
a meditative tone, as he stood still on the doorstep,
and watched until the carriage was a speck in the
distance.

The ride home was more quiet than the coming
out had been, at least upon Nancy’s part. Seeing
that she did not want to talk, Reuben exerted him-
self to try to entertain her. He told her stories of
their school-life, of how splendid certain boys were,
and how mean others were, and how wonderfully
Mr. Kensington managed them all ; and what large
girls Miss Kensington had in her classes, and
everything else he could think of which would be
likely to interest a girl. But all the time he was
feeling disappointed to notice that the old lines of
discontent were gathering on Nancy’s face again.
Was it not possible for her happiness to be made
to last even through one afternoon? He had tried
so hard to make it bright! As if in answer to his
244 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

thought, she broke into the midst of one of his
school stories with a question.

« After all, what's the use, Reuben Stein? Don’t
you think I was a kind of a fool to rig myself up
in this way and go off riding? I'll have to go
back home, and to-morrow morning — to-night, for
that matter — take off all this finery, put on my old
duds, and go to work at the same old things ; and
to-morrow will be just like any other day. What
was the use in being rigged up for one day? It
is just as father said ; the clothes don’t fit me. I’ve
got no place to wear them to, and none to take
their place when they wear out ; and they'll wear
out awful quick. I’m just nobody, and there isn’t
any sense in pretending. I wish I had sent these
clothes back, and stayed at home this afternoon,
and been just myself.”

Reuben decided that the time had come for plain-
speaking. “Nancy,” he said earnestly, “that isn’t
the way to look at it; I know, for I have tried it.
There was a while that I felt just as you do; it
was when I lived at your house. Things didn’t go
right, and I couldn’t please your father, do what I
would ; and there didn’t seem to be any use in try-
ing to be anybody, so I just gave up. I did the
things I had to do, not as well as I could, but well
enough to get along, and I didn’t touch a thing
unless I was told. I remember all one day walking
“ CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS.” 245

around an old stick that had tumbled down and was
in everybody’s way, because I hadn’t been told to
pick it up. I went on in that kind of way for three
or four days, and was never so miserable in my life.
I felt mad at everybody, and I couldn’t keep from
showing it all the while. Then, all of a sudden, I
made up my mind that that wouldn’t do ; I couldn't
live along so. I knew my mother would have been
ashamed of me if she had been there, and I was
ashamed of myself. It seemed a pity not to get
any comfort even out of myself, and I decided on
a change. I said to myself, ‘I’ll do the very best
I can every day of my life; Pll keep my eyes wide ~
open, and I'll plan my work in the way to get it
done the quickest, and I'll help everybody I can;
and I’ll study the books I’ve got, and I'll keep on
the lookout all the while for something better.’
Well, you see how it worked. The ‘something
better’ came in a little while. If people are de-
termined to learn, and to make the most of them-
selves, I don’t think they caz be hindered. No
matter how much trouble they get into, they get
out again somehow, if they do their best. See
here, Nancy, don’t you think I might help you a
little? You said once that you liked books, and
such things ; you know I could lend you books now,
and I could show you about them, and tell you the
way we recite in school, and all that. You could
246 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

_study at odd times, you know, and learn a good
deal. Wouldn’t you like to?”

“T should like it well enough,” said Nancy
gloomily, “if I thought it would ever come to any-
thing. But things get worse and worse with us,
and father grows gloomier and crosser all the time,
and I don’t know what is going to become of us.
It is all well enough for you, Reuben ; you haven’t
got a father and mother to think about.” She
spoke exactly as though “father and mother” were
burdens of which Reuben had gotten rid. He
could not help getting that thought from her words.
He gave a quick little sigh, and then, in a tone
which he had not used before, asked, —

«What do you suppose I would give, Nancy, if I
had a father and mother to think about? It is
true I am all alone in the world, but in spite of that
I am going to do the very best Ican. And if I, all
alone, and with nobody in particular to care, can
accomplish something, you, with parents to take
care of, ought to be able to do a good deal more.”

This was a new way of looking at things. It
made Nancy feel a little ashamed of her words.
She began to be ashamed, too, of letting her ill-
humor come back even while she was taking a ride
in that beautiful carriage, and Reuben was doing
his best for her. She laughed a little, and her face
cleared as she said, —
“ CLOTHES IS GREAT THINGS.” 247

«Well, there’s no use in talking; I’ve had one
good time, anyhow, and I won’t borrow trouble
about to-morrow, if I can help it. It was awful
good in you, Reuben, to get this all up for me;
and I sha’n’t forget it.”

This was a good deal for Nancy to say; more
than many extravagant words would have been in
some others, and Reuben understood her well
enough to know it.

After the milking had been done that night,
and the fire laid for morning, and everything that
Reuben could think of planned for Miss Kensing-
ton’s comfort, he still lingered in the kitchen,
where she was busy at her cooking-table about
some dainty work. Her sister, the teacher, had
been out there with her, leaning against the side-
board, and talking earnestly about matters which
did not interest Reuben. Now she had gone, and
Reuben, lingering, wished very much that Miss
Kensington would ask him some questions about
Nancy. There were things concerning the girl
which he would like to tell her. Presently his wish
was gratified.

“ Well, Reuben,” she said with her bright smile,
«did your Christmas Day turn out as you planned
it should ? Did you have a pleasant ride, and was
your friend agreeable ?”

“ Yes’m,” said Reuben gratefully. “We had just
248 _REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

as good a time as anybody could have; and Nancy
was nicer than I ever knew her to be. You can’t
think how different she looked, Miss Kensington ;
why, for the first minute I didn’t know her! I
never supposed that clothes could make such a dif-
erence in people.”

Miss Kensington gave him a swift glance from
head to foot, and smiled; she did not know Nancy
Hardman, but clothes had certainly made a great
difference with him.

Reuben’s face had, however, taken on a shade
of gravity, and there was a mournful touch to his
voice as he said, —

« But Nancy needs other things as much as she
did clothes; I wish I knew how to help her.”
NANCY’S CHANCE. 249

CHAPTER XXI.
NANCY'S CHANCE,

43 HAT sort of help does she need?” asked

Miss Kensington. ‘This was just the very
question Reuben wanted. It opened the way for
his story. He began at the beginning of his ac-
quaintance with Nancy Hardman, and told all he
knew about her, trying several times to cut his
story short lest he might be taking too much of
Miss Kensington’s time, but being started afresh
at intervals by her thoughtful questions, and made
bold by her evident interest.

“Well,” she said at last, as, her pretty prepara-
tions done, she washed the dough from her hands
at the sink, “we'll think about this, you and I,
Reuben. It does seem as though there was some-
thing in her that would be worth helping. I'll talk
with mother, and see if she has anything to suggest ;
it takes mothers to have ideas, my boy— did you
know that ? Meantime, I wonder if you know one
thing that you might do for her? The most impor-
tant thing that anybody can do for anybody else?”
250 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“Oh! you must mean praying,” said Reuben,
his face bright in an instant. “Oh, yes’m, I know
about that! I pray for Nancy every day ; and I’ve
had answers too. I prayed for something pretty
for her, and it came so quick it almost scared me.
I didn’t pray for clothes, I didn’t think of them ;
I only asked for something pretty for Christmas ;
something that a girl would like very much —
and I believe she liked them better than she would
anything else, and needed them more.”

Miss Kensington laughed pleasantly. ‘So the
answer ‘almost scared you,’ did it?” she asked.
«You see, you spoke to One who understood Nancy
and her needs. That is the advantage we have in
praying. The Lord knows just how to reach her
in the quickest way; and as you and I don’t ex-
actly know how to do for her, I think we would
better ask him again. Let us talk to him very
especially about her to-night, and get him to show
us ways of helping her.”

After that, Reuben went to his room with a very
happy heart. It was but the morning before that
he had found and been much struck by the verse:
“If two of you shall agree on earth as touching
anything that they shall ask, it shall be done for
them of my Father which is in heaven.” He had
read it again and again, and thought sorrowfully
that he had nobody to join him in asking. It was
NANCY’S CHANCE. 251

of no use to talk to Alice about these things ;
interested as she was in his plans, and eager to
help him carry them out, she seemed to have no
interest in praying, and no idea that anything
could be accomplished thereby. He felt that he
must be willing to pray alone until such time as_
he could find a friend who would be in sympathy
with him. And behold! here was one who had
herself proposed that they two should ask that
very night about ways of helping Nancy!

In view of all this, Reuben received his next
direction from Miss Kensington with a very bright
face. I mean his next very special direction. A
day had passed since the compact they had made,
and nothing had been said about Nancy; but after
breakfast on the second morning she gave him
orders about the morning work, and added: « And
Reuben, sometime to-day, whenever there seems
to be a time that you are not needed, suppose you
skip out to your friends the Hardmans, and see if
you can get Nancy to come and help me for a few
days. You may tell her that I expect a woman in
the house to do some sewing for us, and that I
shall need a little help about the cooking, and the
dish-washing, and the sewing, and I hardly know
what else.. A sort of general helper I want for a
few days, you understand.”

«“Yes’m,” said Reuben, with a flash of intel-
252 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

ligence in his handsome gray eyes, “I under-
stand.”

“Very well. If she cares to come for two or
three days, or possibly longer, and help me, I will
pay her, of course, and then we shall see what we
shall see.” The two exchanged smiles, and felt
that they understood each other. Reuben’s faith
was strong. Nothing could have convinced him
that this was not in response to the “asking” in
which they two had agreed.

Nancy Hardman was having a trying day; she
had made some weak resolutions in the morning,
but they had faded out before noon. She was
finding it almost impossible not to be more dis-
contented than usual with all her surroundings ;
and her father’s grim hint, that her ride and her
fine feathers had had exactly the effect he expected
they would, had not helped her any. Perhaps one
of the hardest features of her lot was that she
really had nothing with which to occupy her time.
Had there been hard work for her to dash at with
all her strength, she would have hailed it with a
sense of relief; but in a household where there
was very little to cook, and very few dishes with
which to cook it, and where even soap and rags
for scrubbing were scarce and must be used spar-
ingly, there was little to be done. It seemed to -
the poor girl that she was never more glad of any-
NANCY’S CHANCE. 253

thing in her life than she was of the cheery sound
of Reuben Stein’s whistle that December after-
noon, Mr. Kensington had kept him busy all the
morning, and it was not until he came down town
for the daily mail that he found time to do the
important errand of the day. Even then he was
in haste, and must do his errand as promptly as
possible. So he made it known without delay,
and Nancy’s cheeks grew scarlet as she considered
her answer. The Hardmans had all the silly false
pride belonging to ignorant people, especially in
the South, about “working out” for a living.
Mrs. Hardman had been known to affirm that they
had seen hard times in their day, and that things
were getting harder, but that they had never got
to the pass yet that her girl had to be anybody’s
servant, and while she had a live bone in her body
they never would. Nancy was supposed to share
all her prejudices; yet she stood there with eyes
aflame and cheeks aglow, and evidently considered
her answer while the mother talked.

“JT must say, Reuben Stein, I thought you knew
better than that! My girl don’t go out to do house-
work for no folks. She never has, and I don’t. ex-
pect as long as I’m above ground that she ever
will. We may be poor, but we are respectable,
and we mean to keep so.”

«“ Why,” said Reuben in wide-eyed astonishment,
254 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“T don’t mean anything of that kind, Mrs. Hard-
man. I didn’t think of such a thing as this not
being one of the nicest chances in the world.
Miss Kensington doesn’t keep any servant. She
does the work herself ; all the work in her kitchen —
cooking and baking, and everything. She wanted
Nancy to come and help her just a few days, be-
cause there is to be a woman to sew.”

“Oh, yes,” said Mrs. Hardman, with a toss of
her head, “I know well enough how that will be.
‘Help her!’ humph! She will put on her best
gown and sit in the parlor and entertain company,
and Nancy will drudge in her kitchen. She sha’n’t
do it, and that’s the whole of it.”

“ Look here, mother,” said Nancy, in her most
decided tone, “I’m going. There isn’t anything
to do at home, and I’m sick and tired of lazing
around doing nothing. It will be a chance to earn
a little something, perhaps. I don’t care if it is
working out; they treat Reuben decently, and it
is likely they will me. Anyhow, I’m going to do
teas

“Nancy Hardman!” said her mother, planting
her hands on her sides and gazing at her daughter,
partly in dismay, and partly, let it be confessed, in
a secret feeling of pride over the spirit of the girl ;
“I never heard the like in all my days! Nobody
need ever try to tell what you may take into your
NANCY’S CHANCE. 255

head to do next!” She had spoken, before, almost
entirely for the girl’s sake. She had supposed that
she was dumb with indignation, and that her
mother must take her part. ‘It is the last thing
I thought you would ever consent to,” she added,
in a lower tone, dropping her arms like one who
had failed. “You must want money bad, I do say,
to be willing to get it that way.”

“T do,” said Nancy; “I want everything ‘bad.’
I want to go somewhere and see how folks live;
what they have to eat, and how they cook it, and
put it on the table, and everything. I’m tired to
death of the same old way. You said yourself
that the way was to take all the chances you could
get. This is a ‘chance’ of one ind: just ey
as much as a ride in a carriage was.’

«“ That’s it,” said Reuben eagerly; “that’s ex-
actly what it seemed to me. I think it is a first-
class chance to be with Miss Kensington. She
isn’t like most folks that work in kitchens, I guess.”
This might have been a dangerous speech to
make had anybody been listening closely to him,
for the only people who “worked in kitchens”
that Reuben had known intimately were Mrs.
Hardman and her daughter; but they were too
busy now-in. making their plans to heed what he
said.

A difficulty had arisen in regard to the matter
256 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

of dress. Nancy had declared, almost as soon as
she finished her argument in favor of going, that
she didn’t believe she could, after all, because she
hadn't a decent thing to wear. Then her mother,
as interestedly as though she had made no objec-
tion to her going, began to consider that point,
affirming that the green calico the girl was then
wearing, washed and mended, would be nice enough
for anybody's kitchen; and that there would yet
be time enough that day to wash, iron, and patch
it. Nancy looked down at the faded green gown
in infinite disdain, but knowing it to be her only
resource, unless she wore the white lawn, finally
settled the matter by beginning to hunt for the
old kettle which did duty as a wash-boiler, while
she told Reuben to say to Miss Kensington that
she would be on hand bright and early the next
morning.

Then began an experience for Nancy Hardman
almost as interesting in its way as Reuben’s had
been to him. True to her word, she appeared in
the back doorway of the Kensington house the
next morning, just after the family had scattered
from the breakfast-table, leaving Miss Kensington
alone.

“Good-morning,” that lady said to the red-faced,
rather frightened creature in the doorway, who, in
a faded and patched and starched dress which had
NANCY’S CHANCE. 257

once been, and was still, in spots, a vivid green, did
not look like the girl whom Reuben had taken to
drive. “You are Nancy Hardman, I presume?
Come in; you are just in time. Do you like muf-
fins? Here are two or three nice ones that must
have been left for you.” Certainly this was a dif-
ferent greeting to bestow upon “hired help” from
any which Nancy had imagined. She came for-
ward into the room, awkwardly enough, muttering,
however, that she had had her breakfast. But to
this Miss Kensington paid no attention. She set
a chair in front of a plate and knife and fork which
lay on the white-covered table very near to a vase
of roses, poured a cup of coffee, sugared and
creamed it carefully, and pushed the little wire
basket with its freshly boiled eggs closer to the
plate and motioned Nancy forward.

« Sit down here,” she said, ‘and eat a muffin or
two and a fresh egg, and take a cup of my coffee.
You drink coffee, I suppose? Well, try a cup of
this ; even if you have had your breakfast, after so
long a walk on this warm morning, you must be
ready for a second one.” In the course of her
cross-questionings of Reuben, she had come to the
shrewd conclusion that a breakfast at the Hardman
home could not be a very appetizing or nourishing
thing, and was the more pressing of her hospitality
on that account.
258 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

Nancy wished she wouldn’t. She was afraid
to eat before this elegant lady; but on being hard
pressed, she broke one of the delicate muffins, put a
tiny crumb of butter on the smaller piece of it, and
managed to get it to her lips. The first taste set-
tled the matter ; she mws¢ eat those muffins, fright-
ened and ashamed though she was. She might
not have known that she was hungry, but never,
it seemed to her, had such a delicious morsel been
in her mouth. Miss Kensington watched her with
an interested smile, then brought an egg-cup and
broke and prepared an egg, rightly judging that
Nancy’s timidity would be too great to allow of her
performing such a service for herself, even suppos-
ing she had known how.

The muffins disposed of, which were really so
small and delicate that it would have taken a good
many to satisfy hunger, Miss Kensington produced
a large slice of bread, with the remark, “ Now you
must try my brown bread; Reuben is so fond of it
that I think you may like it too.”

Undoubtedly she did; especially when it was
spread with such butter as she had not known ex-
isted. She grew less timid with each mouthful,
and managed to make every crumb of the bread
speedily disappear. So this new acquaintance in
the Kensington home began with a delicious break-
fast. And when one has breakfasted for many
NANCY'S CHANCE. 259

mornings on wads of baker’s bread, dipped in
strong cheap coffee made without milk and sweet-
ened with the cheapest brown sugar, this is not
a bad way in which to commence a new experi-
ence.
260 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER Xx XIt:
A NEW WORLD.

ts OW,” said Miss Kensington, “if you are

through, we will wash these dishes, and get
the morning work out of the way as quickly as we
can. I have a sewing-woman, and the more help
we can give her the better.” It was evidently no
part of her intention to leave Nancy to herself in
the neat kitchen. There might have been two
reasons for this. Miss Kensington was very par-
ticular about her work, and in her heart she did
not believe that Nancy Hardman would know how
it should be done; but there was a deeper reason.
She wanted Nancy Hardman’s help a little, but she
wanted a great deal more to help her.

“TI must do it,” she had said, when mother and
sister and even her brother had exclaimed over her
announcement that she had sent for Nancy Hard-
man to come and help her.

«What can have happened?” said Mrs. Ken-
sington, lifting up her hands in surprise; “I am
almost alarmed. As hard as we have coaxed you
A NEW WORLD. 261

to have some help; and nothing we could all of
us say would induce you to let anybody into your
immaculate kitchen.”

“And now she is going to let in a Hardman
girl!” laughed her sister, who had seen Nancy on
two or three occasions. “It really looks, my dear,
as though you had lost your wits.”

“TI must do it,’ Miss Kensington had replied
with energy. “I feel ashamed every time I think
of it. Here is a family who has been living neigh-
bor to us one may say ever since we came South;
living in ignorance and poverty and hopeless dis-
couragement, and we never so much as thought
of lifting our hands to help them. Nobody has, so
far as I know, save this poor, homeless, friendless
boy, who has received nothing but ill-temper and
neglect at the hands of that family, and who needs,
we think, help in every imaginable way himself ;
yet he is the only one who had a thought or a care
for that girl. If I did not try to do something for
her now, I should feel disgraced in his eyes.”

“There is truth in that,” her brother said —
thoughtfully, looking upon his sister with those
appreciative eyes of his, which told her that she
would have an ally in him in whatever she under-
took to do.- As for the sister, she said, with a
merry toss of her head, “Oh, if Reuben has de- ©
manded it, that is a full explanation. Miss Ken-
262 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

sington, the boy-hater, has gone over to the enemy,
body and heart; what Reuben Stein wants is to
be done.” They all joined in the laugh; yet they
were all interested in the sister's new effort, and
stood ready to help.

Nancy watched like one in fairyland while the,
to her, curious preparations were made for. wash-
ing dishes. In the first place, Miss Kensington
wheeled into the room a table, or box, on legs —
Nancy did not know what to call it. There were
four legs of light wood crossed in a way to add
strength, supported on heavy roller casters ; and
resting on them, or rather setting securely in the
niche arranged for it, was something like a large
drawer, with many compartments lined with tin.

“Here,” explained Miss Kensington, “is where
I put every article from the table which needs
washing. See, it is divided into compartments to
receive them. Here is the place for the cups, this
is for platters and large dishes; here go the plates,

and this is the silver department. I gather the
spoons, and lay them in first, so there will be no
disturbance from them. Now, you see, they can-
not fall on the floor and make trouble, and on the
other hand, the forks cannot scratch them.”

“What a funny thing!” said Nancy; “I never
heard of anything like it.”

“Perhaps few people have,” said Miss Kensing-
A NEW WORLD. 263

ton; “I do not think they are in the least com-
mon; but my brother’ has seen to it that I have
every convenience for doing work swiftly, and with
the least trouble to myself. Now, Nancy, you may
put all the dishes in their places here, while I am
putting away the eatables; then I will show you
where to roll the closet.”

It was very simple and very swift work. Nancy
admitted to herself that it was certainly an im-
provement on running back and forth with arms
full of dishes ready to fall and smash themselves
on the slightest provocation. When everything
was ready, almost a touch of the hand rolled the
queer machine into the neat, cool kitchen. Yes,
it was cool, although the morning was warm —
warmer than perhaps could have been found else-
where in the United States in the month of De-
cember. The only visible sign of heat came from
a single jet of flame which was doing duty in an
oil-stove, for the purpose of keeping the water
hot.

Nancy regarded the oil-stove as a curiosity.
“Don’t you burn wood?” she asked.

“Oh, yes, I have a range; it is in that other
kitchen; but this morning was so warm that I
would have nothing to do with it. It happened
that my plans were such as could be carried out
on my oil-stove. You are wondering what that big
264 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

black thing in the corner is, aren’t you? That
is a dish-washer. Did you ever hear of such a
thing?”

« Only the kind that has two hands,” said Nancy
with a touch of her natural grim humor. Miss
Kensington laughed pleasantly.

“T like this kind better,” she said; “it saves
my two hands a great deal of work. If you never
saw one, you will enjoy seeing it perform. It is
great fun to wash dishes with it. I suppose you
are not over-fond of washing them in the usual
way? Young girls hardly ever are, though I con-
fess I don’t understand why. It always seemed
pleasant enough work to me. I like to make
soiled things into clean ones. It takes a good
deal of power to be able to do that. Don’t you
think so?”

“IT don't know,” said Nancy, not sullenly, but
in the tone of one who was in a new world and
was not sure of anything. She could only look
on in silent amazement while Miss Kensington’s
swift, skilful fingers managed those dishes. All
the heavier dishes were piled into a deep pan, soapy
water was poured over them, and they were hur-
riedly “rinsed,” with more carelessness than even
Nancy herself was in the habit of using. Truth
to tell, as she watched the strange process, she
said to herself, with an air of great satisfaction,
A NEW WORLD. 265

“Tm neater than that, anyhow, if Aunt Kastor
does think I’m not particular enough.”

But Miss Kensington’s next movements were
so astonishing that Nancy stopped thinking about
herself, and gave attention to them. As fast as
the dishes were rinsed in this careless way, they
were set into little wire niches which seemed to
have been prepared expressly for them, in the
aforesaid big black box. Vegetable dishes, sauce
dishes, meat dishes, pitchers, bowls, all had their
places. Next came the plates, each plate standing
up by itself, not another dish touching it. Then
what Nancy called to herself the “down-stairs
doors’”’ were closed, and cups, saucers, glasses,
spoons, knives, forks, every imaginable kind of
table furniture in need of washing, went into little
apartments prepared for them.

“The house was built a purpose for ’em, and
they’re all moving in!” exclaimed Nancy glee-
fully, forgetting in her excitement where she was,
and that she was afraid of Miss Kensington. What-
ever Nancy Hardman had been in the past, it was
certain that she had not been very gleeful; her
life had been too hard for that. Next came a
large pailful of boiling water, into which a spoon-
ful of soap powder had been stirred. Miss Ken-
sington poured this into the lower part of the
dish-house, and shut down the cover. Then she
266 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

turned a crank with swift, skilful movements, per-
haps a dozen times, while Nancy looked on in
dumb amazement. When the cover was raised, a
perfect foam of hot soapsuds was found to be
spread over all the dishes. A faucet below was
opened, and out poured the white foam into a pan
waiting for it. Swift, silent movements upon Miss
Kensington’s part ; another pailful of water boiling
hot, which, to Nancy’s horror, was dashed over
the dishes. At least she knew better than that.
“You'll break the tumblers!” she exlaimed in
great excitement; but Miss Kensington smiled
and shook her head. ‘“No—no danger of that ;
they are too thoroughly and evenly heated now to
break. You noticed that I poured the other water
below to prevent any accidents of that kind; but
this pailful can be dashed over them without the
least danger.”

The process of turning the crank was repeated,
and the water drawn off as before. Then the cover
was lifted, and the dishes, smoking hot and shining
beautifully, were exposed to view. “There!” said
Miss Kensington, satisfaction in her voice; “our
dishes are washed. Here is the drying-cloth — you
may dry the silver and the glasses. I like better
to have them dried at once and put away; but the
other dishes will take care of themselves. I washed
the few cooking-dishes that I needed this morning,
A NEW WORLD. 267

as soon as I had used them; so in a very short
time we will be ready to go to the sewing-room.”

Said Nancy, “Well, I never! I’ve washed
dishes ever since I was born, but I never see any
washed like that before. Why, it’s nothing but
fun! Does that crank go hard, Miss Kensington?”

“No, not particularly hard for a strong-handed,
willing-minded person. Do you know how much
easier hard things go if one is willing minded?
Half the discomforts of housework come because
people don’t know how to do it in the best ways,
and have no desire to learn. I quite enjoy my
housework. I like to plan ways of doing it more
skilfully, and at the same time more quickly.
Nearly every morning I have some new little
motion about my work which interests me. . You
may drop the cover of the dish-washer now, and
sweep the room; then, when you have swept and
dusted, raise the cover again, and leave the dishes
exposed to the air. When we come out by and by
to make preparations for dinner, we shall find them
all dry and shining; then those of them that are
needed on the table for the next meal can be moved
into their other house, and wheeled into the dining-
room. It is a very nice arrangement; don’t you
think so?”

“Tt is lovely!” said Nancy with the deepest
interest. None of her work had she hated more
268 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

than her dish-washing, perhaps because she did
not know the best ways of doing it.

“Tt is such nasty, mussy, dirty work!” she had
said to her mother more than once, in a disgusted
tone, and added that there was one thing to be
thankful for anyhow ; “they hadn’t many dishes to
wash.”

On the whole, Nancy Hardman’s first day from
home was one that she might well remember in
after life. Almost every movement which was
made in this refined household was new to _ her.
The very names and uses of the dishes which she
was required to set on and off the table had to
be explained in detail. The way in which she set
that table for dinner so astonished Miss Kensing-
ton that she had to turn away quickly in order not
to utter an exclamation that might have humiliated
Nancy. She walked into the pantry, and busied
herself refilling her salt-dishes while she consid-
ered. When she came back there was no laughter
on her face, and her voice was quiet and pleasant.
“TJ ought to have shown you how to arrange the
dishes ; you haven’t them quite as we place them.
Different people have their different ways of doing
things, you know. TIl show you how ‘to place
them in my way; then, if you stay with me for a
few days, you will remember and do it in that way,
won't you?”
A NEW WORLD. 269

«T’'ll try for it,” said Nancy emphatically ; and
she resolved then and there to do in everything
possible exactly as Miss Kensington did. After a
moment she added frankly, “We don’t have no
dishes to speak of to our house; I don’t suppose I
know nothing about them.”

She looked on in admiring silence while Miss
Kensington rearranged almost everything on the
table, changing its entire appearance as if by magic,
and making a picture out of the dining-table.

“Tt looks nice,” said Nancy with satisfaction.
“Jt makes as much difference as it does to put
another kind of dress onto folks ;” and she thought
of her beautiful white dress and all its dainty be-
longings. Miss Kensington laughed pleasantly.
«“ That is an original idea,” she said. And although
Nancy did not in the least know what she meant,
she liked the sound of the words, and felt that for
some reason she had been approved.
270 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER XXIII.
A ROUGH PATH.

HEN the Kensington family gathered at the
dinner-table, Nancy Hardman had another
lesson in home life. She was’ seated with them,
opposite Reuben. Now, although she had consid-
ered this very question, and was prepared to be
properly indignant if she should not be so treated,
she was nevertheless a very much scared girl ; and
confessed to herself that it would have been much
more comfortable for her to eat her dinner alone
in the kitchen.

However, she made an heroic resolve to do her
very best ; and longed exceedingly to appear what
she called “nice.”

It surprised and half vexed her to see how en-
tirely at home Reuben seemed to feel at this table
which was to her elegant. How easily he man-
aged his napkin and his forks! and how “nice” he
was in waiting upon other people! Nancy could
not see but that he was fully as well-mannered as
was Mr. Kensington himself. She copied some of
A ROUGH PATH. 271

his movements in a stealthy way, as well as she
could, and thought she was unobserved. Miss Ken-
sington looked on, greatly amused, and decided that
it would not take long to make a reasonably well-
mannered girl of Nancy Hardman. She certainly
had the gift of imitation.

In fact, before that day was done, Miss Kensing-
ton had become very much interested in her new
study, and had resolved to keep Nancy with her
for a few weeks at least, provided she chose to
remain.

She need have had no anxieties upon that ground.
As Nancy, tired but happy, went over in her mind
all the varied experiences of that day, it seemed to
her that she had been in a sort of fairyland. If
this was “ working out for a living,’ she assured .
her mother that she should want no better living
in this world than to be able to work out with folks
like Miss Kensington. No; she didn’t know how
much they were going to give her, and she-didn’t
care. If she got nothing but her board it would
be worth it, to live like folks for a little while.
Miss Kensington had given her a white apron to
put on, and set a little white rocking-chair for her
by the window, and showed her how to baste the
seams of adress ; and she had learned more in that
one day than she ever had before in her life. Yes,
indeed, she was going back in the morning, and
272 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

was going to stay just as long as they would keep
her.

In the solitude of her own room Nancy walked
around its little space gleefully, and said aloud:
«“T’ve sot down to a table like folks, and had a
napkin and a butter-dish and a silver fork, and
been helped to pie like any lady. Whatever comes
in this world after this, I’ve been a lady for once.”

After this first experience, you will not be sur-
prised to be told that the days lengthened into
weeks, and still Nancy Hardman remained at ser-
vice. The Kensingtons were much amused that
the heretofore almost too careful housekeeper had
at last found, not only a boy, but a girl, that she
was willing to tolerate in her kitchen. “And such
a girl!” exclaimed Miss Mary Kensington. “Reu-
ben, now, is gentlemanly by nature; but what can
be said in favor of Nancy Hardman ?”

«A great deal,” said Miss Kensington good-
humoredly. “In the first place she is more anx-
ious to be a ‘lady’ than she is to be anything else
in the world, I am afraid ; and in the second place
she succeeds in imitating the people about her to
an almost alarming extent. It fills me with a queer
mixture of amusement and dismay to find some of
my blunders as carefully copied as my accomplish-
ments. Oh! we shall be proud of Nancy Hard-
man yet.”
A ROUGH PATH. 273

And Mother Kensington, who always had some-
thing good to say of everybody, remarked that
Nancy had real bright eyes; and that for her part
she was glad to see her daughter willing to take
what help she could get, instead of doing every-
thing herself this warm weather.

And so it came to pass that Nancy had been
trudging to and from the Kensington home every
day for four weeks, and had been paid a dollar a
week in money for her services, and had learned
more in that time than she had ever dreamed of
knowing, and had been three times to church on
Sundays, twice in the lovely white suit, and once,
when it rained, in a neat brown dress of Miss
Kensington’s which that good lady, with her moth-
ers help, had taught Nancy how to fix over for
herself, and in which she looked, as her parents
said admiringly, “every inch a lady,’ when some-
thing happened in the Kensington family of such
grave importance as to put all other interests into
the background for a time. It was while they
were seated at the breakfast-table that Reuben,
who had been sent to mail an important letter,
came in with a yellow-covered envelope which he
handed to Miss Mary Kensington.

«“T met the messenger-boy at the gate with it,”
he explained to Mr. Kensington. “Shall I sign
for it and pay him, sir?”
274 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

When he returned, after attending to this, he
found that his yellow-covered letter had brought.
trouble. The entire family had risen from the
table in various stages of excitement. Mys. and
Miss Kensington were both talking at once, the
one eagerly, the other soothingly, to Miss Mary, who
seemed to be in an agony of grief and haste, and
all but wild with excitement. Mr. Kensington had
taken a time-table from his pocket, and was intently
studying it. Nancy, who stood in doubt which
way to turn, undertook to explain in undertone to
Reuben, “There was bad news in it; some one is
awful sick — going to die; she’s the one that cares
the most. I don’t know who it is.’ Then Mr. Ken-
sington spoke, —

« Mary, if you make all possible speed, you may
be able to reach the eight-twenty train. Reuben,
you could get a carriage, and drive her to the sta-
tion in time for that train, I am sure. Shall it be
attempted, Mary?”

«Oh! canI do it? You said it was too late for
that train. Ready? I can be ready in two min-
utes!" She dashed from the room as she spoke,
followed by mother and sister; and Mr. Kensing-
ton issued his orders to Reuben, —

“Make all speed to the livery, Reuben, I am
sure I can trust you to do that; it is a matter of
the gravest importance to Miss Mary to reach that
A ROUGH PATH. O75

train. Tell Mr. Giles to give you a safe team.
Get back here as quickly as possible, and wait for
Miss Mary. Meantime, I will go directly to the
station and learn about the route, and secure a
ticket and sleeping-berth if possible. There is not
a moment’s time to be lost. Tell Miss Mary that
I will meet her at the station, and give her all need-
ful directions. She would better not stop for a
trunk; we shall have to express one toher. Nancy,
you may as well finish your breakfast ; the rest of
us will be too busy for some time to give it any
attention.”

While he spoke he was hastily drawing on his
rubbers and mackintosh, for a steady rain was fall-
ing; and in less time than it has taken to tell it,
Nancy was left alone to do what justice she could
to a very excellent breakfast. Miss Kensington
mentioned it afterwards as a proof of how thought-
ful she had become, that instead of attending to
her own wants, she carefully disposed of the break-
fast in a way to keep hot what should be hot,
and to protect from heat what should be served
cold.

In an incredibly short space of time, considering
the distance that he had to go, Reuben was at the
door with-a carriage, and Miss Mary came rushing
down-stairs, followed by Nancy tugging at a satchel
which had been hastily packed.
276 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

“ Drive fast!” said Miss Mary. “QO Reuben! if
I should miss that train, or if my brother should
not be there! I haven’t money enough to buy my
ticket.”

«You won’t miss it,’ said Reuben. “There are
seven minutes yet; I looked at the clock as we
passed. And Mr. Kensington will be there, and
have everything ready ; he always does.”

«“T know it; I am wild with anxiety, and cannot
do anybody justice. Reuben, the very best friend
I have in the world is lying very low; he may not
live until I reach there.”

“Oh!” said Reuben, a world of pitiful sympathy
in his voice. Then, after a moment’s silence, he
added timidly, “We can pray to God to let him
live. I think it is such a comfort to remember that
he will do it if it is the best thing.”

“Do pray, Reuben; pray for him all the time,
and forme. I need everybody’s prayers, I am sure.
I won’t forget it of you. Iam glad you are such
a good boy, Reuben, and will be at home to help
take care of them. I came off in sucha hurry that
I did not even kiss mother good-by ; tell her how
sorry I was about that. I don’t know what will be-
come of my school, I am sure. But my brother
thinks of everybody’s comfort but his own. It will
make him a great deal of trouble.”

« Mr. Kensington will manage, ma’am,” said Reu-
A ROUGH PATH. 277

ben, in a voice full of assurance; “he always can,
you know.”

At two o’clock of that same day, as Reuben,
seated in the schoolroom, was struggling with a
troublesome example, Mr. Kensington summoned
him to the desk.

“TI find, Reuben, that I have left my record of
the week’s work at home — the little red book, you
know, that I use in class. It is probably lying on
my desk ; if not, it will be in the left-hand drawer.
You know the book, do you not?”

“Yes, sir,” said Reuben.

“Then I think I shall have to ask you to go for
it; and I need not tell you to be as quick as possi-
ble, I suppose?”

“No, sir,” said Reuben, answering the smile
on his teacher’s face. He prided himself greatly
on his promptness in doing errands. Mr. Kensing-
ton smiled again when he returned with the book.
« You go on swift feet, Reuben,” he said. And the
smile lingered with Reuben for many a weary day ;
for it chanced that it was the last one he received
for a long time. That very evening, while he sat
in his room hard at work over those puzzling ex-
amples, there was a knock at his door, and Mr.
Kensington entered.

«“ Reuben,” he began abruptly, “I sent you to
my room this afternoon, you remember?”
278 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

«Yes, sir.”

“Where did you find the book I sent you for?”

«Lying on the desk, sir, just where you said.”

« And what else was lying on the desk?”

“Jet me think,” said Reuben, leaning an elbow
on his little study table, and resting his head on
his hand, — “the inkstand was there, and a pen,
and a pen-filler, and a foot-rule, and a paper-weight.
I don’t remember anything else.”

“Don’t you, indeed ! ” said Mr. Kensington, in
a peculiar tone. “A boy with so good a memory
as yours ought, it seems to me, to. remember some-
thing else—something of greater importance than
-any of the articles you have mentioned.”

Reuben looked up at him with bright, fearless
eyes. “Ido not, sir,” he said respectfully. «There
might have been something else, of course; but
when I shut my eyes, and try to bring the picture
of the desk before me, those are the only things I
can see. I didn’t set out to remember anything
about it, you know ; those just put themselves into
my mind. I don’t know why, but there won’t an-
other single thing come.”

“JT am very sorry,’ said Mr. Kensington, and
his tone was so peculiar that it made a-flush spread
over Reuben’s face. Was it possible that Mr.
Kensington thought he was not speaking the truth ?
His voice sounded like that.


HE BURIED HIS FACE IN HIS HANDS.



A ROUGH PATH. 281

“Tf you would tell me what else was there,” he
said earnestly, “I think I could be sure whether I
saw it or not; but if I did, it has gone out of my
mind entirely now.” a

“I repeat,” said Mr. Kensington, “that I am
very sorry indeed, more sorry than I can tell you.
What should you say if I should tell you that I
know there was a piece of money there?”

Reuben shook his head resolutely. “I did not
see any money ; I am very sure of that. Of course
it might have been there; but if it was I should
have thought I would have seen it.”

“So should I,” said Mr. Kensington, and with-
out another word he turned and left the room.

Poor Reuben! It was of no use to try to bring
his mind back to those examples. He leaned
both elbows on the table, and buried his face in
his hands, and lost himself in the most painful
thoughts he had had for many a day. How sud-
denly this bright world had turned black for him !
Only a little while before he had been so happy ;
and now, he was actually thought to be a thief!
282 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

CHAPTER XXIV.
AT LAST.

\ J HILE Reuben was brooding over the trouble
which had suddenly shut down upon him,
Mr. Kensington was seated in Judge Fenning’s
library, talking with him about that very thing.
«The truth is,’ Mr. Kensington was saying
mournfully, “I may have unwittingly put tempta-
tion in the boy’s way ; it never occurred to me but
that he was perfectly honest, and I have treated
him as though he were one of us.”
«Do you think, then, that you have discovered
dishonesty in the boy?” Judge Fenning asked.
“Why —I am afraid so, Judge; the circum-
stances are peculiar. Let me tell you the story
in brief. I have already explained in regard to
my sister’s sudden call from home. Of course it
required some rushing on the part of all of us to
get her off, and there was more or less confusion,
Before I started for the station to see about her
ticket I went to my room, unlocked a drawer which
contains money that I drew from the bank yes-
AT LAST. 283

terday. I counted out what I wanted, then laid
a ten-dollar bill under a paper-weight on my table,
intending to leave word for Mary to take it with
her, lest she might not be supplied with money for
incidental expenses. But I regret to say that I
forgot to mention this to my mother or sisters
as I intended, and did not think of it again until,
when I went to my room, I saw it lying under the
paper-weight where I had placed it. I was then
in haste; and as I am in the habit of keeping my
door locked during my absence, on account of
chemical apparatus there which it would not be
wise to have handled, I concluded that the money
was as safe there as anywhere, and left it. Iam
afraid you will think me culpably careless; but I
had forgotten it entirely when I gave Reuben my
key this afternoon, and sent him home for a book.
But even if I had thought of it, I presume I should
have done the same —I trusted him so entirely.
Now, the sad part of it is, Judge, that he is the
only one who has had access to the room, and the
money is gone.” .

«And you are quite sure that no other person
could have had access to your room?”

«Entirely sure. I gave the key to Reuben, and
he returned it to me in a remarkably short time;
moreover, I have questioned my mother and sister,
and they did not even know of Reuben’s presence
284 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

in the house at the time. There has been no
other person at our house to-day; the young girl,
Nancy Hardman, who is staying with us, went
home early in the forenoon for the day. Of course
I have gone over every possibility before accusing
the boy, even in my mind. Iam methodical in my
habits ; and I know to a penny how much money I’
have, and how I have spent what is gone. I have
counted and calculated it all at least a dozen times
since making this discovery without the variation
of a penny. My accounts will not balance with-
out that ten-dollar note which I know I left on my
desk.”

«There is no way of communicating with your
room, you say, save by this one door?”

“Why, yes; there is another door which opens
into the room that my sister who has gone away
occupied. But that door is almost never used; in
fact, there is a heavy piece of furniture against it.
And besides, there was no one to enter the room
save the members of my own family and Reuben.
Still, I thought of that door, and questioned Miss
Kensington ; and she assures me that she locked
my sister’s door before going down-stairs to see her
off, lest the aforesaid Nancy might be tempted to
investigate; and there has been no one in that
room besides herself, she says, to-day.”

“ Tt looks like a very straight case,” said Judge
AT LAST. 285

Fenning; “and I fear you will think me a very
poor lawyer when I tell you that nevertheless I do
not believe Reuben knows anything about the lost
money. Let me tell you how my acquaintance with
the boy began.”

Whereupon the judge told the story of the
fire, and the careful investigation that followed.
«“ Through it all,” he concluded, “ Reuben, under
great provocation and with splendid opportunity
for deceiving, held as strictly to the truth as it
was possible for a person to do. I kept a short-
hand record of his various statements, and it was
curious to note afterwards how every small partic-
ular matched. I have watched him since with a
good deal of. interest, and inquired here and there
as opportunity happened to offer ; and you will find,
if you look into it, that every one has confidence
in him. Even Mr. Hardman, who has not much
faith in anybody, admits that he believes Reuben a
boy to be trusted.”

“TJ hope it is so,” said Mr. Kensington with a
faint smile. “As I told you, I have trusted him
myself implicitly; but what is one to think?”

He found on his return home that both his
mother and sister were ready to echo Judge Fen-
ning’s opinion. They could not imagine what had
become of the money, and they owned that it was
very strange; but they were as sure of Reuben as
286 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

they were of themselves. And Nancy had been
sent for just as Mary was starting, and had re-
mained at home all day, so she was outside of
suspicion.

A great deal of thought and prayer were given
to Reuben’s case during the night. By morn-
ing Mr. Kensington had decided what to say to
him.

“T shall have to confess, Reuben, that things
look suspicious for you. I am a very methodical
man, with not a great deal of money, and I take
utmost care of what I have, so there is really no
hope of my being mistaken; my accounts balance
to a penny, including the missing bill. Neverthe-
less, your previous record for honesty and truth-
fulness counts for a good deal. Mrs. and Miss
Kensington believe that you are as innocent as
they are; and strange as it appears to me, I am
inclined to think so myself. What I mean to do
is to let the matter rest. We will try to be in all
things as we were before this happened; and in
the meantime, if you or I can ferret out the
mystery in any way, I am sure we will do so.”

It was all very well to say, “ We will try to be
in all things as we have been before ;”’ poor Reuben
knew that this could not be. He turned away
with a sigh that had a touch of hopelessness in it,
and a mournful, “Thank you, sir!”
AT LAST. 287

Mr. Kensington echoed the sigh when he was
left alone, and told himself that he would rather
have seen the boy indignant. If he were entirely
innocent, why did not his eyes flash with righteous
indignation ?

If it was indignation that he wanted, Nancy could
have supplied any amount. Nobody had intended
to tell her the story ; but in some way she got a hint
of trouble, and Reuben himself explained. Then
did Nancy’s righteous anger burst forth. The Ken-
singtons were all a “mean, low-lived set.’’ She
would not work for them, not she! She would.
rather starve than eat their victuals another day!
What did their education amount to, if it could
not show them what she knew with her eyes shut,
—that Reuben never took a penny which did not
belong to him!

“OQ Nancy, don’t!” said Reuben, to whom this
outburst was made, when it had continued until
he felt that the girl was beside herself with rage.
« Think what you are saying. Mr. Kensington is
a good man; they are all as good as gold. Almost
any other man would have sent me to prison, or
sent me out of the house anyway. Do not spoil
your own good chances, Nancy, by being unjust to
them. I do not, for my part, see how he can help
feeling that I took the money. He has not known
me very long, and he knows I am a poor boy and
288 REUBEN'S HINDRANCES.

need money. Besides, what could have become
of it?”

“Oh, ‘become of it!’” mimicked Nancy, in
uncontrollable wrath. “I am out of all patience
with you too, Reuben Stein! You talk exactly as.
though you were trying to convince yourself that
you took it! The next thing you will be confess-
ing it, just to please Mr. Kensington.”

Reuben shook his head. ‘No,’ he said mourn-
fully, “I will not tell a lie, of course, even to please
Mr. Kensington ; and I’m going to believe that this
thing will ‘work together for good’ to me, some-
how. I’m sure I can’t see how; but God has prom-
ised it, and I’m going to believe it.”

Now, it happened that Miss Kensington over-
heard this entire conversation. She could hardly
help hearing the beginning. Nancy’s loud, excited
voice arrested her steps just as she was entering
the kitchen ; and after hearing a few words she re-
solved to listen to what Reuben had to say in reply,
in the hope that his words might throw some light
on the puzzle. The result was that, as she repeated
the substance of the conversation to her brother,
she said: “ You see Reuben is just as innocent as
we have believed him to be, all the time. I am
glad I never doubted him for a moment. If I
had, I should have felt ashamed of myself this
morning.”
AT LAST. 289

Mr. Kensington smiled, and shook nis head ; and
that afternoon he took down and put back again
every book on his study shelves with a vain hope
in his heart that he might in a fit of absentminded-
ness have shut the bill into a book, although, as he
told himself, he Azew that he did not. In like
manner he went through his drawers and boxes,
with no result.

The days passed, apparently, much as usual.
Reuben went to and from school, and did his work
as faithfully as he could, and tried to keep his
violent friend, Nancy, within bounds, and tried in
every way to do his duty. Mr. Kensington was
uniformly kind, but Reuben could feel, rather than
see, that there was a difference in his manner; and
the shadow of a great sorrow seemed to be always
hanging over the boy. He neither whistled nor
sang at his work, and often when he thought he
was unobserved had the air of one hunting for
something.

Meantime Miss Mary Kensington remained away.
At first there came only sorrowful news from her.
Her friend was very low indeed; the doctor had no
hope of his rallying. Then, after a few days, he
was no worse, and that in itself was encourage-
ment; then, he was just a trifle less weak ; and at
last, “really rallying.” There followed days of
anxiety lest this should be a false hope. Then he
290 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

was pronounced to be steadily gaining, and a jour-
ney to the mountains was planned which was to
include Miss Mary. She had failed under the
steady strain of watching and anxiety, and the doc-
tor thought it was almost as important for her as
for his patient to have change and rest. Her place
had been supplied in the schoolroom, and the sub-
stitute could be retained until the term closed; and
the family at home united in urging her to accom-
pany her betrothed husband and his mother and
sister to: the mountains. And so it came to pass
that it was just eight weeks from the day that Miss
Mary left them that Reuben met her at the station.

Her first words to him were, “ Why, Reuben,
you have grown thin and pale. What is the mat-
ter with you? We shall have to send you to the
mountains next. See how young and strong it has
made me;” and she sprang gleefully into the car-
riage without waiting for his helping hand.

It was when they were seated, three hours later,
around the tea-table, enjoying to the utmost this
family reunion, that Miss Mary said, turning to her
brother, —

«By the way, Edward, did you miss anything
valuable after I left? If you did, I suppose you
guessed who was the thief ; but it seems queer that
I have never thought to mention it from that morn-
ing to this.”
AT LAST. 291

Mr. Kensington glanced at Reuben, whose face
crimsoned to his very forehead, then grew deathly
pale, while he dropped his fork and stared at Miss
Mary, as though his very life depended upon her
next words. Then he said to his sister, with what
calmness he could, “ What does that mean, Mary?
You speak in riddles.”

«“Why, that morning that I went away in such
a rush, I found I had almost no money in my
pocket-book. I had moved my secretary only the
day before from where it always stood, in front of
the door, you know, that leads into your room ; and
I rushed in through that door to ask you about it,
just as mother called to me that you had gone to
the station to get my ticket, and would mect me
there. And I saw a ten-dollar bill lying under a
paper-weight on your table, and pounced upon it,
thinking I would have so much money about me,
anyway. Of course I intended to speak of it when
I saw you at the station, and ask for some more,
but I didn’t; and I haven’t mentioned it since,
although I suppose I have thought of it a dozen
times after my letters were sealed. Why! what
is the matter with all of you? Did anything dread-
ful result from my carelessness ?”

“Ves,” said Mr. Kensington gravely, “something
dreadful. My dear boy, don’t! you will break my
heart!” For Reuben, the composure with which
292 REUBEN’S HINDRANCES.

he had borne up under his trial having utterly for-
saken him, had buried his curly head in both trem-
bling hands, and was sobbing like a child.

«T reckon that there is the best day’s work that
ever happened to him yet,’ said Uncle Kastor
sagely, when the story, in many chapters and much
detail, was given to him by the still-excited Nancy.
“Mr. Kensington will never forget it of him,
never! And he'll find it ‘works together’ for lots
of good, or I’m much mistaken.”

And Uncle Kastor was not mistaken.

THE END.
DR HHH WH HHH RO
HOD MY AN HWN HO

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