Citation
Buz, or, The life and adventures of a honey bee

Material Information

Title:
Buz, or, The life and adventures of a honey bee
Portion of title:
Life and adventures of a honey bee
Creator:
Noel, Maurice
Sambourne, Linley ( Illustrator )
Arrowsmith, J. W ( Publisher )
Simpkin, Marshall and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Bristol [England]
London
Publisher:
J.W. Arrowsmith
Simpkin, Marshall & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
2nd ed.
Physical Description:
[6], 140 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bees -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Spirit -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Happiness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cooperation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- Bristol
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Maurice Noel ; frontispiece by Linley Sambourne.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026892355 ( ALEPH )
ALH5429 ( NOTIS )
143266220 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






iy
&
Fe)
4
ae
=
3
os
oo)
é





Carbs Tidus helmsley Lrtheg
. oe 1898. }



BUZ; OR, THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES

OLA HONEY! Bibi:






Copyright. Entered at Stationers’ Hall.









We

)
OR,

The Dife and Hodventures of a thoney Bee.

©

BY

MAURICE NOEL,

AUTHOR OF
‘“UNDER THE WATER,” ETC.

FRONTISPIECE BY LINLEY SAMBOURNE.



Second dition.



BRISTOL:
J. W. ARROWSMITH, Ir Quay STREET.

LONDON:
SimPKIN, MARSHALL & Co., 4 STATIONERS’ Hatt Court.











All rights reserved,



DEDICATED BY PERMISSION

TO
TE BeRONKSs BURDETTCOD Fis,

PRESIDENT

OF

THE BRITISH BEE-KEEPERS’ ASSOCIATION.





PREFACE.

a a. N this little story, the author ventures to hope
4 that he may succeed in interesting children
—perhaps even some big children—in the

habits. of bees, and in inducing them to



ae for themselves their most wonderful lives.

He has attempted to describe a few only of the many
operations with which all bee-keepers of the present day
are perfectly familiar, and has not introduced any mention
of the bar-framed hives, which make the manipulation of
bees comparatively simple. | |

His object has been to awaken interest rather than to
attempt instruction; but, at the same time, except for
such parts of it as are obviously imaginary, his story
describes nothing that he has not witnessed in his own
hives.

In case any of his readers should wish for practical
information on the subject, he may mention that a little
book, called Modern Bee-keeping, has been published for
the ‘‘ British Bee-keepers’ Association,” and contains the

collective experience of the best bee-keepers in the country.



COMI INES.

CHAPTER I.
Coming Out

CHAPTER II.
First Flights—Marrow Escape ...

CHAPTER III.
Dispute with a Peacock Butterflyp—The Snail settles it

CHAPTER Iv.
Swarming:

CHAPTER V.
Huilding Comb—Hn Accident—Storing thoney—A Surprise ...

CHAPTER VI.
H Second Swarm—Jdle thours—Sent Back

CHAPTER VII.

Discontented Whispers—A oe Bee Oe Massacre
of the Drones

CHAPTER VIII.
Death of hum—iRobbery—Restitution

CHAPTER IX.
Caught in a Cobweb—The Spider’s Plan

CHAPTER X.
BGattle—Victoryp—Death

PAGE

35

67

81

105

DIG

I3r



CHAPTER I.

Coming Ont.





4

i









elie CHAPTER I.

‘COMING OUT.





=a HE first thing Buz remembered
was having the cramp very badly
in two of her left legs, and not
being able to stretch them; for
she was so carefully packed up
in her cell that it was impossible
to move.

But she found there was a chance of getting through the
ceiling; so she bit and pushed, and pushed and bit, till she
could put her head out.

- This was satisfactory, as far as it went, but it had its
inconveniences.

A bee immediately ran across her face, and she shrank

back. She put it out again, and two bees, in a desperate

hurry, trod all over it, and she shrank back again.
2 *



4. BUZ—COMING OUT.

And so for some time she kept on trying to emerge and
being driven back, till at last, becoming accustomed to the
manners of the hive, and taking no notice of the pushes and
shoves, she scrambled out, and stood on the comb—a very
promising young bee.

Then up ran a couple of bees, one of whom straightened
out her. proboscis, or tongue, which was lying folded back,
and offered her honey; whilst the other caressed her with
her antennz, and stroked her with her fore feet.

‘“Much obliged to you, I’m sure,” said Buz, sucking
away.

“Stretch your wings and legs, and never mind thanking
us,” answered one of the bees.

“We all do our duty here,” said the other, ‘without
wanting thanks, We attend to you because it’s our place
to do it.” 3 :

‘You didn’t help me to scramble out of the cell,”
remarked Buz; ‘‘and what a scramble it was!”

‘It’s not our place to do that. A bee that couldn't get
out of her cell would be no good here.”

_ At this moment, a young bee, from the cell next to
that which Buz had just left, came out, very crumpled, and
received similar attentions.

Buz looked on with much interest, whilst the new arrival,
“who was named “ Hum,” was groomed and fed.

‘“ Now,” said one of the nurse bees, you two had better



BUZ—COMING OUT. 5

go out on the board in front of the hive, and sun yourselves.
You won’t work to-day, of course, nor to-morrow either,
unless it’s very fine ; and don’t forget,” added she, touching
first one and then the other with her antenne, ‘‘ that you
‘are called ‘Buz,’ and you‘ Hum.’ Now be off with you.”

‘But which is the way to the board?” asked Buz.

‘Find out,” replied the nurse who had last spoken, as
she ran off. ‘‘ Where’s your instinct?” demanded the other,
hurrying after her without waiting for an answer.

On being left to themselves, Buz and Hum began crawl-
ing down the comb, looking about them with great curiosity.
The cells they had just left were at the top of one of the
centre combs, and on their way down they did not meet
with very many bees; for as the day was warm and bright,
most of them were away from the hive, gathering honey and
pollen - but, as they approached the entrance, they found
themselves surrounded by streams of busy workers, hurrying
in every direction, some bringing in stores, and others, who
had just deposited their last loads, bustling off to work
again. But, however busy they might be, they all found
time to touch Buz and Hum with their antenne as they
passed; and these last, instinctively put their own forward
and returned the compliment; indeed, they felt as if it
would not be comfortable to pass within touching distance

_ of a single bee without that little recognition; it seemed



like saying ‘ All’s well,”



6 BUZ—COMING OUT.

Arrived on the floor of the hive, they stood still and
looked about them. After a little time they noticed that
the two combs between which they had just descended,
~ looked rather darker and dirtier than those on the outside,
and that it was towards the latter that the honey-laden
bees were hastening.

““T wonder why?” said Buz.

“Yes, I wonder,’ echoed Hum.

‘“What are you wondering about?” enquired a great
drone, who chanced to be passing lazily along, and who
overheard what Buz said.

‘We were wondering why some combs looked so much
blacker than others,” replied Buz.

‘‘Because they are used as nursery combs,” said the
drone. ‘Lots of young bees are born in them, and each
cell is used over and over again.”

‘Are they never used for honey?” asked Hum.

‘Only if there’s no room for it elsewhere; they always
like to put honey in a nice new comb, and then it’s called
‘Virgin honey.’ But,” he continued, ‘in an old hive, every
comb gets used for young ones, or grubs as we call them, in
time. This isn’t an old hive.” :

‘“You say ‘they,’ remarked Buz, rather timidly; ‘don’t —
you get honey yourself, then, and work like the others?”

“TI should think not!” replied the drone, with great
disdain. ‘‘ Work, indeed!” And he moved slowly away.







BUZ—COMING OUT. 4

Then the two young bees went on towards the entrance
~ of the hive, and, after being well jostled, and ever so much
pushed about and run over, all of which they didn’t mind a
bit, they reached the board outside, and looked upon the
world for the first time..

But they soon had to change their position, for they
were standing exactly in the stream of traffic.

‘Now then,” said a bee, who was waddling in with two
great lumps of pollen on her thighs, and who bumped
against Buz, ‘get out of the way, can’t you!”

‘¢ Come, come,” said another to Hum, ‘‘ you mustn’t
stand there, you know; which is it to be now—in or out?”

‘“‘T’d rather go out, please,” answered Hum.

‘“‘In fact, we ’ve been sent out to sun,” added Buz.

“Out with you then,” said the bee, ‘‘and ask one of the
fanners to show you where to stand.”

“What’s a fanner?” thought Buz. However, she
didn’t ask, for fear of being again told to find out; so
she passed on with Hum through the entrance. Just
outside, a bee was standing quite still, and as Buz passed
she felt the ends of her antennz very much whirred against
and tickled, and on looking up found that this was occa-
sioned by the wings of the bee in question, who was
moving them so fast that they were almost invisible; in
fact, she was nearly lifted by them off her hind legs—
sometimes quite—and seemed to have hard work to keep-



8 BUZ—COMING OUT.

: hersele down by clinging on to the board with the claws
of her front feet.

“T shouldn’t wonder if that was a fanner,”’ remarked
Buz to Hum.

“T’m a fanner, right enough,” said the bee, who had
overheard her. ‘What of that?”

“We were told to ask you where to stand,” answered
Buz. .

‘Get to the other side of me then, towards the edge of
the board, and out of the way.”

Buz and Hum did so, and were then able to look quietly
about, without getting so tremendously knocked against.
They soon noticed that, besides the fanner they had spoken
to, there were half a dozen more, all busy in the same way.

“What do you keep on fanning for?” asked Buz, who
was rather a bumptious young bee.

“What for?” replied the fanner. ‘“ Why, to give the
Queen and the nurses and all in the hive a little fresh air;
they would be stifled, this hot weather, if something wasn’t
done.”

See Aid ” said Hum, ‘I noticed a current of air as we
- came out.” :

“T should hope you did,” returned the fanner; ‘‘it
would be a pretty thing a us all to be working away like
this for nothing!”

At this moment a bee passed in with a splendid load of



BUZ—COMING OUT. 9

pollen on her thighs, the two great yellow balls she carried
being almost enough to prevent her from staggering along.

“Well done!” said the fanner encouragingly as she
passed. ‘Good again, old mate!” and then, turning to Buz
and Hum, she added—

“That bee came out of the cell next to mine, and we
were born almost at the same time, so we take an interest
in each other.”

‘Only an interest?” enquired Buz. “J should have
thought you wete great friends, like Hum and I mean to be;
eh, Hum?”

Hum touched Buz with her antennz in a friendly way. _

“There isn’t much time to be great friends here,”
answered the fanner; ‘‘we are always so busy, except in
the winter, and then we are too sleepy to be very affectionate.
Besides, we give all our love to the Queen; you haven’t seen
her yet, I suppose ? Wait till you do—you'll find it’s just
as I tell you. Now then! Where are you going? Look
out, there! Help! Intruder! Intruder!”

As she spoke, the fanner made at a bee who had just
alighted, and was passing in. She was joined by several
others, and they were about to seize the intruder, who, how-
ever, discovered the mistake, and flew off just in time.

‘What was all that about?” asked Buz, as the fanner
_returned.

“A bee from some other hive was trying to get into
3



To BUZ—COMING OUT.

ours,” replied the fanner; ‘‘but she found out where she
was just in time. If we had caught her, we should perhaps
have stung her to death.”

“How did you know she was a strange bee?” enquired
Hum.

“We can tell at once, by touching or smelling a bee,
whether she belongs to our hive or not; I don’t pretend to ~
explain exactly how it is, but we can.”

This quite satisfied the young bees, who now became
very much interested in watching the workers arriving from
every direction, and alighting on the board.

Some were laden with pollen, others had collected
nothing but honey, and all, the instant they arrived, set off
to run into the hive as fast as they could, without waiting
to look round or gossip.

They certainly were very much in earnest; any one
could see that at once. Some seemed very tired, and
nearly fell back off the board when they pitched on the edge
of it, and indeed could hardly crawl along with their booty.

““T know where that bee comes from,” remarked the
fanner, as one with peculiar coloured pollen on her thighs
passed in. ‘I know quite well.”

“Do you?” said Buz. “How?”

‘ By the look, and by the smell, and—in fact, I do know;
she comes from Cothelestone Hill. It’s a beautiful place
for bees, but rather a long way off.”



BUZ—COMING OUT. Il

“‘ How I should like to go there!” exclaimed Buz.

“Gently, gently,” said the fanner; ‘don’t bein such a
hurry.”

“Indeed,” added Buz, ‘‘I should like to try a short fly,
~ now, this moment.”

‘You had better not to- a. your wings will feel stiff
and cramped. Wait till you have had a good feed, and a
night’s rest, and then you’ll do very well. You see, the
danger is, that if you get below the level of the board you
may not be able to rise again; and if you have to spend the
night on the cold ground, I wouldn’t give much for your
chance of swarming, I can tell you.”

‘“What’s swarming?” asked Hum..

‘Oh, I can’t explain now; it would take too long. You'll
find out before the summer is over, I dare say.”

At this moment a big rain-drop came splash down on
the board, close to Buz, and astonished her immensely. It
was followed by another and another, and soon a smart
shower drove all the bees near at hand under shelter, and
Buz and Hum entered the hive with them.

‘“What’s happening?” asked Buz.

‘They've upset the watering-pot somewhere,” answered
the fanner; ‘‘we never can find out exactly where they
do it.”

“Then how do you ‘no it’s a watering- -pot?” enquired
Hum,
3 *



I2 BUZ—COMING OUT.

‘‘ Sometimes,” answered the bee, ‘when we are gathér-
ing honey in a bed of mignonette or other flowers, the
gardener comes along with his watering-pot and upsets it
over us, and then it feels so exactly like what’s going on
now, that we think it must be the same sort of thing, you
know.”

When the storm first began, a great many bees arrived _
from different directions, and crowded into the hive; and
as those within were prevented from starting afresh, and
were standing near the entrance, impatiently waiting for the
rain to stop, there was a great bustle, and some difficulty in
moving. Buz, however, kept near her friend and the fanner, 5
and said to the latter:

‘‘No more bees are coming in now; have they all
returned?” ie

‘‘Oh dear, no,” answered the fanner; ‘‘ those who were
too far off to get back before the worst of the storm have
found shelter ee but,” she added, ey ll soon
stop watering now.’

‘How do you know?” asked Buz.

“‘T can feel it,” said the fanner. ‘Any bee, after a little
experience, can tell; and when they are going to water for
a long time we do not go out in such numbers, or so far, as
we do before a mere sprinkle like this. Look! It’s just
over.”

This was quite true, and presently the sun shone



BUZ—COMING OUT. 13

brightly out, and the rain-drops flashed and sparkled, and
a clean fresh smell came from the earth, and the flowers
lifted up their heads and offered the sweets they contained
to the busy, happy bees, who now left the hive in great
numbers, and scattered themselves all over the kitchen
garden in which their hive stood, and over the pleasant
_ fields beyond.

“What fun!’ exclaimed Hum, as they stood on the
board again. ‘‘ What fun to go out! Oh, how I long for
to-morrow!”

Buz and the fanner looked at her with surprise. She
seemed such a very quiet little bee, that they were hardly
prepared to find she could become so enthusiastic.

‘“‘T cannot bear to be idle,” she continued; ‘I should
like to fill a cell with honey, all by myself; to be of some
use, you know, instead of standing and looking on whilst
others work.”

‘A very proper feeling, my dear,” said the fanner
approvingly ; ‘“but you must remember that the great thing
‘is to do your duty; and if your present duty is—as I tell you
it is—to do nothing, why, you are working very well and
profitably by just standing still and being Bey sunned,
ready for to-morrow, don’t you see?”

“Yes, I see,” answered Hum, more contentedly.

At the same time,” continued the fanner, ‘‘ there would
be no harm in your trying to fan, if you would like to prac-



14 BUZ—COMING OUT.

tise that; only stand well out of the way, and take care at
first not to work too hard.”

Hum, taking the permission without paying much atten-
tion to the caution, went to the side of the board and set to
work, but so vigorously, that she turned herself completely
over on her back, and would have lifted herself quite into
the air if she had not clung very tightly to the board with
her fore feet.

Buz was highly amused at this, and helped to set her
right ; and Hum, though exceedingly astonished, and a little
mortified at what had happened, set to work again at once,
and in a very short time was really able to fan.

‘That will be a useful bee,’’ remarked the fanner to Buz,
as Hum continued practising.

JT ’m sure she will,” said Buz ; ‘‘ but all bees work, don’t
they? 1 shall, I know.”

‘““Oh, yes; a lazy bee wouldn’t do here at all. But there
are different dispositions in bees all the same; for instance,
some will think only of how many cells they can fill with
honey, and will consequently never go far from the hive, so
as not to lose time; others are more adventurous, go further
afield, and try to get curious sorts of honey.”

“JT shall be one of that sort,” said Buz; ‘I know I
shall.”

‘Then again,” continued the fanner, ‘‘some bees are
good-tempered, and others are cross; for instance, I know



BUZ—COMING OUT. 15

one who won’t let any person but the gardener come near
the hive; if any one else does, she goes straight at him, to
sting or to pretend to sting him; and I must say it is very
amusing to see a person run. I say, do you feel hungry?”

Buz was rather astonished at the sudden manner in
which this question was asked, but replied, ‘‘ Why, yes, I
think I do.”

“Because it is about time,” continued the fanner, “ for
you and Hum to go back to your cells: young things ought
never to be long without food. You will find the nurses
somewhere about.”

“Thank you,” said Buz; and she went off to fetch Hum.

On their way into the hive Buz stopped, and said to the
bee, who was still fanning away as hard as ever, ‘“‘ Will you
tell us your name, please?”

“My name’s ‘ Fan.’”

‘What, because you fan?”

“Oh dear, no; certainly not! I don’t always fan, you
. know; I only take my turn.”

“J understand,” said Buz; and away went the two
young bees to find their nurses and get some food.







CHAPTER II.

First Flights—Marrow scape.











CHAPTER II.

FIRST FLIGHTS—NARROW ESCAPE.

se:
ee

eH XT morning, Buz and Hum were,



of course, in a great hurry to
leave the hive and try their
wings; but one of the nurses,
who happened to see them on
their way to the entrance very
early indeed, told them not to be
tempted out by the bright rays
of the sun, which had only just
risen, but to wait till the world was a little warmer. ‘“ Many
a young bee,” she added, “‘yes, and many an older bee who
ought to. have known better, has left this hive on a bright-
looking spring morning, and has never returned, because it was
really so much colder than it seemed that no bee could stand
it. The fact is, we cannot endure cold weather ; we should
like to be able to, but we can't, and so there’s an end of it.”



20 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

With these sagacious words the nurse took her departure,
and Buz and Hum, though they felt it was a great trial to
_ wait, agreed to do nothing foolish.

‘At any rate,” said the former, ‘‘we can stand out on
the board, and run in directly we feel cold.”

So out they went, and took a bee’s-eye view of the
garden.

It was certainly a lovely morning, and the sun shone
right into the mouth of the hive, which faced east, or rather
- south-east, as a hive should.

The garden in which it stood, ‘had a high wall all
round it; but, as the ground sloped away, Buz and Hum
could see the country beyond, and the end of the beau-
tiful lime-tree avenue which led from the old house near
at hand.

Such a comfortable, old-fashioned country-house it was,
with many gable-ends, and queer bits of building sticking out
from it in all directions. It didn’t belong to any particular
order of architecture, and didn’t want to. There was
nothing at all correct about it; and no architect, travelling
through the country to pick up hints, would have thought of
pulling out his book of plans to take a copy. You couldn't
copy it—that was just the beauty of it; but no artist could
possibly pass it without taking off a lot of sketches of odd
bits and corners here and there, or without being delighted
with the picturesque old place.



BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. aI

And inside! Was there ever such a place for children
to play hide-and-seek in! There were really no end of long
passages, and big cupboards, and tiny rooms; whilst, as for
stairs! they were here, there, and everywhere: almost every
room had two or three steps leading up to it, or two or.three ~
steps leading down to it; for the architect, or rather archi-
tects (there must have been a dozen of them employed at
different times), seemed to have said, ‘‘ No, we won't have
any two rooms exactly on the same level—not if we can
help it.” Some of the rooms had windows that looked down
into the old hall; others had managed to get so exactly into
the middle of the house that there was nothing for it but to
light them from the next room; but that didn’t matter a bit:
they did famously for keeping bandboxes and odd things in,
and there were heaps of rooms to spare. Nowadays,
people wouldn’t like to build in that sort of way, they are
so particular about turning every inch of space to account ;
and one might tell from a glance at the outside of a modern
house the situation of all the rooms within. Well, that
wasn’t the case with Heathercombe, at any rate; but, such
as it was, no one could have helped saying, ‘‘ What a dear,
comfortable old place! I wonder what its historyis? There
must be plenty of stories belonging to it.’ And so there
were, as even the old lime trees in the avenue knew quite
well.

The garden exactly suited the house, so it is hardly



22 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

necessary to say that there was nothing formal about it.
You couldn’t take in the whole pattern of the flower-beds at
once, as if you were looking at a Turkey carpet; for little
narrow paths, that twisted about as much as they possibly
could, led you to all kinds of odd nooks and out-of-the-way
corners, here passing a quaint bit of yew hedge, and there
_ rounding a clump of enormous shrubs; and in all the corners
and in every nook you would find a little flower-bed or two,
filled with dear old-fashioned flowers—moss roses, wall-
flowers, columbines, stocks, marigolds, and many others;
and hardly any of those eternal geraniums with dreadful
names, and calceolarias of high degree, which have to be
shown in stiff regimental order, and which look very lovely
in certain places, but wouldn’t have suited the old garden at
all. Then there were plenty of rustic seats and dear little
summer-houses, and, of course, an old sundial, so covered |
with moss that the figures on the dial were completely
hidden—that didn’t matter; it would have been a shame to
dream of utilising it—and on the summer-houses, sweetbriers
and honeysuckles crept and twined and hung as much as ever
they liked; and mignonette grew in patches all about the
place, and even the steps of the old sundial were covered
with musk.

What with all the sweet flowers, and what with the yew
hedges and tall shrubs, affording shelter from any wind that - -
might blow, it was the place of all others for bees.



BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. 23

‘But Buz and Hum knew nothing about this as yet, and
as they looked at the kitchen garden. they thought it was big
enough for anything. There were no fanners at work on the
board: the morning was too cool for them to be needed—so
cool that, though plenty of bees kept on walking to the edge
of the board and taking observations, it was some time before
any flew off.

At last, as the sun’s rays grew warmer, one or two were
hardy enough to start away on their long day’s work; but
just then Buz and Hum felt quite chilled, and had to run
into the hive, where they very soon got nice and warm
again.

“« Flow lucky it is,” said Hum, “that we didn’t ay off at
once!”

‘Why, yes,” replied Buz, “it is certainly colder than it
seemed at first; after all, I suppose it’s a Beod thing to take
advice.”

“Take advice,” repeated a bee who was standing near
the entrance, and who heard what Buz said; ‘I should think
it was, just. But what advice have you been taking?”

So Buz told her, and she seemed pleased, and said:

“I'll tell you what it is, if you two will stay with me I'll
let you know when I consider it warm enough for you to go
out ; and when I consider it so, it will be so.” ;

“Come,” thought Buz, ‘she doesn’t seem to mistrust
her judgment much.”



24 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

‘“‘T might perhaps be tempted,” continued the bee, ‘to
go out a little too soon myself, but when one judges for
others one is not led away by inclination; do you under-
stand ?” :

ee Yes, ” replied Buz, “you mean hat it does not matter
to you how long we have to wait, don’t you?”

‘‘ That’s about it,’’ said the bee.

‘But shan’t we keep you waiting ?”’ asked Hum.

“No; I’m not going out this morning. I shall fan when
it gets warmer: that’s my work to-day. Now, if you are
warm again, we’ll just step out and take a look round.”

So they all three went out, and even in the short time
they had been away they found that the sun had become
much more powerful.

But their newly-made friend would not let them start quite
at once, and took the opportunity of giving them several
hints about collecting honey, and so on. ‘‘ However,” she
added, ‘‘I won’t bother you any more now; for there is a
certain party to whom you are going to be introduced, who
will teach you more in a day than yon could learn from me
in a week.”

“Who?” asked Buz and Hum together.

‘‘Experience,’’ answered the bee, looking very wise
indeed.

And now at last the time came, and Buz and Hum were
allowed to try their wings.



BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. 25

‘“‘ Follow me,” said their friend; ‘“‘I can spare time to fly
a little way; and when I stop, you stop too.”

‘All right,” cried Buz, trembling with excitement.

Hum said nothing, but her wings began to move, almost
in spite of herself.

Away went the bee, as straight as a line from the mouth
of the hive, and away flew Buz and Hum after her; but at
first starting they both found it a little difficult to keep quite
straight, and Buz knocked against the board to begin with,
and ney oe herself, as she had not learned how to
rise.

The bee did not go far, and lit on the branch of a peach
tree which was growing against a wall hard by. Buz came
after her in a great hurry, but missed the branch and gave
herself a bang against the wall.

Hum saw this, and managed to stop herself in time; but
she did not judge her distance very well either, and got on to
the peach tree in a scrambling sort of way.

“Very good,” said their friend, as they all three stood
together ; “you will soon be able to take care of yourselves
now; but just let me see you back to the hive.”

So off they flew again, and alighted on the board in a
very creditable manner.

“Now,” said the bee, “I shall leave you; but before I
go let me advise you, as a friend, not to quit the garden to-

day; there are plenty of flowers, and plenty of opportunities
5



26 - BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

for you to meet with ‘ Experience,’ without flying over any of
the four walls. Good-bye.”

So saying, she disappeared into the hive.

‘‘Isn’t it too delightful!” exclaimed Buz to Hum.
‘Flying! why it’s even more fun than I thought!”

le . ” said Hum; “but I should like to get some honey
at once.’

‘Of course,” replied Buz, “only I should like to fly a
good way to get it.”

““T want to fill a cell quickly,” said Hum.

‘Oh yes, to be sure! What a delightful thing it will be
to put one’s proboscis down into every flower and see what’s
there! ! Do you know,” added Buz, putting out her proboscis,
“T feel as if I could suck tremendously; don’t you?”

“Yes, ye 1” cried Hum, “I long to be sucking; let’s be
off at once.’

So away they went, and lit on a bed of flowers.

Hum spent the day between the hive and that bed, and
‘was quite, quite happy; but Buz, though she too liked
‘collecting the honey, wanted to have more excitement in

getting it; and every now and then, as she passed to and
from the hive, a lovely field of clover, not far off, sent forth
such a delicious smell, as the breeze swept over it, that she
was strongly tempted to disregard the advice she had been
given, and to hurry off to it. :

At last she could stand it no longer ; and, rising high into



. BUZ—-FIRST FLIGHTS. 27.

the air, she sailed over the wall and went out into the world
beyond.

Yes, right out into the world; and very much did she
enjoy the sense of freedom, of going as high as she liked
and flying as fast as she could, and stopping exactly
when and where she felt inclined, with nobody to bother
her with good advice—which she was ready to admit was
all very well, though, at the same time, a person couldn’t
everlastingly be taking it. She had had quite enough for
one day, she was sure of that; and so she hadn’t told
Hum of her intention to leave that poky-old kitchen
garden: Hum might be giving advice next, and that would
be too absurd.

And so she reached the field of clover, and, flying quite
low over the flowers, was astonished to see what lots of bees
were busy amongst them—bumble bees without end, and
plenty of honey bees too; in fact, the air was filled with the
pleasant murmur that they made. ss

‘To be sure,” said Buz to herself, ‘this is the place for _
me! Poor dear old Hum! I hope she’s enjoying herself
as much as I am. I don’t mean to be idle either, so here
goes for some honey.

But the first thing to do was to pick out a flower to
settle on.

It seemed easy enough, for there were hundreds of
thousands to choose from. . That was just it: who was to

5 *



28 : BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

choose any particular flower out of such a lot! A dozen
_ times Buz was on the point of alighting on one, and a dozen
times she was attracted by another close by, which seemed |
a little fresher, or a little richer, or a little larger. This
wouldn’t do at all; she felt she was wasting time, and had
just made up her nnd to let herself fall anyhow into the
clover and begin on the first bit she touched, when she
caught sight of a splendid flower close to her. There was
no mistake about it this time; it was a king clover, she
thought, so tall and fine, and promising such a supply of
honey that she settled on it at once in triumph.

And she eagerly unpacked her proboscis and explored,
one after another, the cups of the many flowers clustered
together in the head.

But how dreadfully disappointing! Not a drop of
honey, not the least little drop, could she find in the whole
flower !

‘Well, I declare!” she said aloud, as she raised her
~ head at last in disgust, ‘it’s perfectly dry!”

At this the flower gave a low silvery laugh, and shook a
little on its stalk.

“Dry!” it repeated; ‘I should rather think I was;
sucked as dry as a brick, half an hour ago.”

‘“‘TIndeed!” said Buz.

‘Yes, my dear, indeed,” repeated the flower cheerily ;
‘“‘and so many bees besides yourself have been sold this



BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. 29

morning, that it’s really quite ridiculous! I suppose you’re
a young bee, eh?”

“Well, rather,” answered Buz. ‘ Why?”

‘You see, you young things always will pick out the
biggest and tallest of us, and wil/ waste your time in trying
us all over, quite forgetting that others before you have most
likely been attracted by just the same qualities that you
admire yourself. Now let me give you a bit of advice.”

‘More advice,” thought Buz to herself. ‘*Oh dear!”
However, she said politely enough that she would be glad to
have it.

“Then,” said the flower, ‘‘ pick out the blossoms that
are most hidden and most out of the way. Flowers that are
really almost troublesome to get at are generally worth
trying: you will find this the case nearly always; and
remember also, that if the first two or three cups of a head
like mine be dry, it is hardly worth while trying all the others,
for the same bee who cleared out the first will probably have
worked out every cup in the flower. Don’t you think so?”

‘Yes, I do,” replied Buz; ‘I know I should, at least.
Well, I’m much obliged to you for the hint, and I’ll be off
at once and take advantage of it.”

‘‘ All right,” said the flower. ‘‘ Good-bye.”

‘“‘ Good-bye,” answered Buz; and away she flew.

Not for more than a few yards though ; turning suddenly
back, she lit once more on the same flower.



30 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

“T thought I’d just ask you,” she said, ‘if it’s a fair
question, do you mind us bees taking away your honey; or
do you consider us so many robbers?”

‘Mind it!” replied the flower. ‘‘ Not at all; you do us
quite as much good as we do you, without being able to help
it any more than we.can.”

“Do we really?” said Buz. :

‘‘Of course you do,” answered the flower ; ‘‘look at your
legs. ;

Buz looked. _

““T can only see a little yellow dust on them.”

‘Well, that’s pollen ; and the pollen from one flower
fertilises others. But how is it toget tothem? It must be
carried, of course; and though sometimes the wind does this
for us, you bees are the means we chiefly depend on. In
short, without bees there would be a very poor look-out for
flowers ; and, of course, we are necessary to you: so, you see,
it’s a case of ‘tit for tat.’ Good-morning.”

‘‘Good-morning again, and thank you,” said Buz, as she
flew away. ;

And now it was high time to set to work in earnest; so
Buz was very diligent indeed, and, remembering what the
tall clover blossom had told her, she selected the most out-
of-the-way flowers she could find, and soon collected as much
honey as she could carry.

But by the time she had done this she found herself close



i

BUZ——FIRST FLIGHTS. | 31

to the further end of the clover field; and whilst resting for
a moment, before starting to carry her load to the hive, she

noticed a little pond in the corner. Feeling thirsty after her

hard work, she flew off to take a few sips; but just as she
reached the pond and was in the act of descending, a light
gust of wind caught her and turned her half over, and before
she could recover herself she was plunged far out into the
water |

Poor Buz! She was a brave little bee, but this was a
terrible accident; and after a few wild struggles she almost
gave herself up. The water was so cold, and she felt herself so
helpless in it; and then the accident had happened so sud-
denly, and taken her so utterly by surprise, that it was no
wonder she lost courage. Only fora moment though; just as
she was giving up in despair the hard and seemingly useless
work of paddling and struggling with all her poor little legs
at once, she saw that a bit of stick was floating near her, and
with renewed energy she attempted to get to it. Alas! it
was all she could do to keep her head above water; as for
moving along through it, that seemed impossible, and she
was tempted to give up once more. It was very hard
though; there was the stick, not more than a foot away from
her: if she could only reach it! At any rate, she was
determined it should not be her fault if she was unsuccessful;
so she battled away harder than ever, though her strength
began to fail and she was becoming numbed with the cold.



32 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

Just as she made this last effort another gust of wind swept
over the pond, and Buz saw that the stick began to move
through the water, and to come nearer and nearer to her.
The fact was that a small twig sticking up from it acted asa_
sail, though Buz didn’t know this. And now the stick was
quite close, almost within reach; in another moment she
would be on it. Ah! but a moment seems a long time
when one is at the last gasp, as poor Buz was.

Would she be drowned after all? No! Just as she was
sinking she touched the stick with one little claw, and held
on as only drowning people can; and then she got another
safely lodged, and was able to rest for a moment. Oh, the
relief of that, after such a long and ceaseless struggle !

But even then it was very hard work to get up on the
stick, very hard indeed. However, Buz managed it at last,
and dragged herself quite out of the cold, cruel water.

By this time the breeze was blowing steadily over the
pond, and the stick would soon reach the bank; but Buz
felt very miserable and cold, and her wings clung tightly to
her, and she looked dreadfully forlorn.

The pond, too, was overshadowed by trees; so there were
no sunbeams to warm her.

“Ah!” thought she, ‘if I can manage to drag reall
up into the sunshine, and rest and be well warmed, I shall
soon be better.’’ &

Well, the bank was safely reached at last; but Buz, all



-BUZ——FIRST FLIGHTS. 33

through her after life, never forgot what a business it was
climbing up the side. The long grasses yielded to her
weight, and bent almost straight down, as if on purpose to
make it as uphill work for her as possible. And even when
she reached the top, it took her a weary while to get across
the patch of dark shadow and out into the glad. sunlight
beyond; but she managed to arrive there at last, and
crawling on to the top, of a stone which had been well
warmed by the sun’s rays, she rested for a long time.

At last she sufficiently recovered to make her way, by a
succession of short flights, back to the hive. After the first
of these she felt so dreadfully weak that she almost doubted
being able to accomplish the journey, and began to despond.

“Tf I ever do get home,” she said to herself, “1 will tell
Hum all about it, and how right she was to take advice; in
fact, my story shall be known throughout the hive: it may
bea uséful warning to many young bees yet unhatched.”

Now, whether it was that the exercise did her good,
or that the sun’s rays became hotter that afternoon,
cannot be known; but this is certain, that Buz felt better
after every flight, and before she had reached the end of
the clover field she had almost determined to say nothing
about ‘her adventure, except, of course, to Hum. “ What’s
the use of being laughed at?” she thought. ‘I shouldn't
mind much if it would do any good; but would it ? that’s the

point. I fancy not; the young bees would only be amused
6



34 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

at hearing what a mess I had got into, but they never would
think of the story at the right time. No, I shall certainly
not make it public.”

So she sipped a little honey, cleaned herself with her
feet, and stretched her wings, and, with the sun glistening
brightly on her, looked quite fine again. Her last flight
brought her to the top of the kitchen-garden wall, from which
she was just about to start for the hive, when she thought |
how disagreeable it would be to meet Hum and tell her .
everything. ‘After all, what good can possibly come of
alluding to my adventure ?” she said to herself. “ It hurt
no one but me, and I’m all right again now; so I may say it
has done me good. No, I declare I'll say nothing at all
about it to Hum or anyone else: that will be the best way.”

So she opened her wings and flew gaily to the hive,
which she entered just as if nothing had happened.





CHAPTER ill.

Dispute with a Peacock Buttertly.

The Snail settles it.

6%











XY










<=
a
we

_BODe

\

\

WV
VS
VS
LL ¢ A tof
Lee
WS

{
N
\
NW
iy
Z

co
} oO,
ow
ALOr~ {
ww a
7 \
_

CHAPTER III.

DISPUTE WITH A PEACOCK BUTTERFLY.
THE SNAIL SETTLES IT.



OR a few days after her narrow
escape, Buz did not venture
far from the hive, and worked
steadily and well. She now
and then met Hum, and they
were always good friends; but
she found that what she had
heard was quite true, and that there was not much time
for anything but work. One morning, however, as they
were both waiting near the entrance of the hive till it
should be warm enough to go out, Hum asked Buz if she

had seen the Queen yet.
“T should think so!” replied Buz. ‘The first time I

met her, I was carrying in some honey, and was passing







38 BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

between two combs, when, without knowing why, I found
myself turning round to the right and bowing away like
anything ! ‘What’s the matter with me?’ thought I; ‘this
is quite ridiculous ’—but ridiculous or not, I did not seem to
be able to stop, and was actually getting angry with myself,
when I saw, in the midst of a circle of bees close to me,
one who I felt must be the Queen. She was so long in the
body and so graceful, and her wings were so much shorter
than ours, that no one could help seeing the difference at
once \ and, then, all the bees round were careful to keep
their heads respectfully turned towards her. She was busy
laying eggs, and I watched her for some time; but one got
tired of that, and so I squeezed out of the crowd. T sup-
pose you’ve seen her too?”

‘Oh, yes!” answered Hum, ‘‘and she noticed me quite
kindly; I’d do anything for her—anything !”

Certainly,” said Buz; ‘I suppose you feel that you
couldn’t do a stroke of work unless you knew that she was
in the hive, and all safe.”

“Yes,” answered Hum, ‘‘I quite feel so.”

‘With regard to that,” pursued Buz, ‘‘ every bee in the
hive is just the same.”

“ How do you know?”

‘A drone told me.”

““T have several times seen you talking to drones.”

‘“T always go to a drone when I want to know anything.”



BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. 39

“Do you really?”
““Yes, of course; bees who work hard like you, old Hum,

never have time to explain, but are always in such a hurry
to be off. Now drones are very lazy in every other way, but
are tremendous gossips, I find.”

“Ah!” said Hum; ‘‘I remember nurse telling we that
if I showed her a lazy person, she would show me a gossip.”

lshatss it! ” cried Buz. ‘‘ Well, a drone told me that
the custom we all have of touching each other with our
antennes whenever we pass, was introduced on purpose to
save the trouble of asking after the Queen. It’s merely a |
signal that everything is going on well with her.”

“T can believe that,” said Hum, ‘for it’s just what
Ieiecl

At this moment the sun peeped over a bank of morning
clouds, and called the bees to work; and out went Buz and
Hum with the rest, the former making her way to the old-
fashioned flower garden near the house.

Here she was soon busy amongst some early stocks and
mignonette which grew near the sundial, and had already
made several journeys to and from the hive, when she was
addressed by a peacock butterfly which she had noticed
flitting about, and which was now sitting on the top of the
dial itself.

“You seem to have something like an appetite this
morning!” said the butterfly.



40 BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERELY,

“What do you mean?” said Buz.
“But you’ll make yourself ill, you know,” continued
the butterfly.

‘‘T’m sure I shan’t!”? answered Buz, indignantly.

“Unless you’re like a snake,” persisted the butterfly in
an aggravating manner, ‘“‘and can take in enough food for
a week.” .

“You don’t know what you ’re talking about,” cried Buz,
turning angrily away.

‘Oh, yes, I do,” said the butterfly coolly; ‘I’ve been
watching you, and thinking. It’s the only thing I’ve been
doing.” Le :

“And you’ve done that wrong,” retorted Buz; ‘so it’s
a pity you weren’t asleep.”

‘“‘T’ve been thinking,” repeated the butterfly, as if she
hadn’t heard what Buz. said, ‘“‘that you bees are a greedy
lot ; and the more I think of it, the more I can’t remember
ever seeing a bee that was doing anything except what
you’re doing now.”

‘*Do you mind saying that again?” said Buz sarcas-
tically; “it’s a pretty sentence, very!”

‘Not at all,” said the butterfly. And she repeated it
all over again, word for word, and seemed quite pleased.

This bothered Buz, who didn’t exactly know what to
say ; when the butterfly continued in the calmest manner—

‘The simple truth is, you.’re always thinking of eating.”



_ BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. AT

“Why, you ignorant, conceited creature!” cried Buz;
‘‘how dare you tell me that?”

‘Because it’s a fact—come now, isn’t it?’ said the
butterfly.

“No! No!! No!!! It’s a most abominable story!”

“You seem a little put out,’’ said the butterfly, ‘‘ which
is foolish; people can’t always agree, you know. Now,
suppose you come here and talk the matter over with me
quietly. I’m sure you can spare a few minutes.”

Buz was at first inclined to refuse indignantly; but re-
membering what a triumph it would be to prove the butterfly
wrong in everything she said, consented.

“ That’s right,” said the butterfly, as Buz settled down
close to her. ‘‘ Now begin.”

“ How?” asked Buz.

“T made a statement that seemed to annoy you. You
must either admit it, or prove I’m wrong. My statement
was, that you bees are always thinking of eating.”

‘“‘T certainly don’t admit it.”

“Then disprove it.”

“To begin with, we don’t—but, I say,” said Buz,
suddenly interrupting herself, ‘why shouldn’t you prove
you’re right ?”

“ Anything you please; I won’t be particular with you.
Well then, I’ve observed, not you alone, but dozens of
other bees—not on this day alone, but on dozens of other

7



42 BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

days—and you have all been doing the same thing—always.
You have all been employed in sucking every drop of honey
out of every single flower you could get at; as for ever
resting, or playing about, or even stopping to talk—why
you know you never do. Those are the observations
I have made myself, and on those observations I base
my statement—I base my statement,” repeated the butter-
fly, speaking very slowly, and evidently rather proud of
herself.

‘Amongst your other observations,” said Buz, trying to
talk as calmly as the butterfly, ‘‘ have you ever noticed that

we are in the habit of leaving at intervals the flowers on

_ which we are busy, of flying rapidly away, and of returning
after a short absence?” _

‘“‘T have,” replied the pulceriy.

‘Can you tell me why we do so?”

“If you’ll promise not to be vexed, Ill tell you what
I’ve always thought.”

url promise,” said Buz.

‘“To get an appetite for a little more honey.”

‘Ah! then you’re just wrong—as wrong as ever you
can be.”

‘“Am I really?” said the butterfly. “Well, you know,
it was only a a and isn’t of the least consequence.”

‘But it is,” cried Buz, ‘of the greatest possible con-
sequence, and so you’ll be driven to admit when I explain



BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. 43

that we leave the flowers, on purpose to deposit the honey
we have collected, in our hive; and there it is stored up for
our use during the winter. So you see we don’t eat it at
all, or think of eating it—there! and so you’re wrong!”
concluded Buz, excitedly.

_ “Then you'd like me to withdraw my statement ?” asked
the butterfly.

“Of course; you must withdraw it, now you know that
I have hardly eaten any honey all this morning—not so
‘much as you have, I daresay.”

“Very good,” replied the butterfly; ‘‘but before I do
so, tell me if I am wrong in thinking you said the honey
‘was stored for your use during the winter.”

“ That ’s just what I said.”

“May I ask how you use it ?”

‘Why, we eat it, of course,” said Buz.

“Then all this morning you must have been thinking—
not of what you were eating, certainly—but of what you
are going to eat in the winter. Dear me! dearme! This
is even worse than I thought,” said the butterfly, almost
sadly. |

“But it isn’t greediness on our part,” said Buz; ‘‘we
call it, being provident.”

“Tt sounds greedy to me though,” said the butterfly.
‘According to your own account, you think all the summer
of what you are going to eat all the winter. You think of

{a3 , ;



Ad. BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

nothing else, and work like slaves, and never have any fun.
Well, I wouldn’t be a bee!”

Buz was rather disconcerted at the turn the conversation
had taken, and, more to gain time than for any other reason,
she asked the butterfly how she spent her time.

“T do exactly what I like all day long, and never
think of a moment beyond the present. If I feel hungry,
I eat, and directly I’m satisfied I think of food no
longer; af T.-am— hot, Igiy ain the: shades if cold 4
bask in the sun. When I feel lively, I dance gaily
up and down in the air, and the moment I’m tired,
I stop. I have a thousand companions as gay and
beautiful as myself, always ready to play with me, and
nothing can put me out, for I don’t care what happens
to me.” =

“But when the cold winter begins!”

“ Then I shall die,” said the butterfly, very cheerfully—
“‘at least, so I suppose; but what of that? Perhaps I shall
like it.”

“At any rate,” said Buz, ‘‘you have described a very
selfish, useless sort of life.”

‘‘And in what sense is yours useful?” retorted the
butterfly, “except to yourself perhaps. If you do not
. gather all the honey you talk about for your own use, you
at least expect a share of what the other bees in your hive
collect; so that in point of fact you only work hard in



BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. 45

order to keep yourself alive. I ask again, what’s the use
of your keeping alive?”

“To begin with,” said Buz, “I help to make the cells
in which we rear the young grubs, and to collect the food
with which we feed them—and in that way I am unselfishly
useful, you must allow.”

“Perhaps; but after all, what do you gain by working
hard to rear a lot of things as useless as yourself? I know
there will be dozens of young caterpillars—nasty things !—
crawling about some day, that will all come out of the eggs
I laid yesterday. Do you suppose I’m proud of that?
Certainly not.” -

Buz suddenly remembered what the clover flower had
told her with regard to the use of bees in distributing
pollen, and eagerly repeated it to the butterfly, who only
= said
Sl sincerely hope you don’t take any credit to yourself
for that. You surely are not proud of doing what you
couldn’t help doing, however hard you tried ?””

“T like to think I am useful, even if no praise is due to
me for being so. My life would not be spent in vain if I
were useful even against my will, and I still say that it is a
higher and nobler one than yours. I am convinced that
the consciousness of being usefully employed is



_“T deny the usefulness to anyone but yourself, mind,”
put in the butterfly.



46 ---« BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

‘Makes life far happier,” continued Buz, “than it can
possibly be in your case, who live only for self-indulgence ;
and, even if it be true, as you affirm it is; that my existence
is utterly in vain, the very fact of my longing to be of use, -
-and of your being unwilling to be useful even if you could,
makes me certain that it is better to be a bee than a
butterfly.”

“Pity we can’t agree!” said the butterfly. “Fine day,
"ane bth?

Buz was so annoyed at the flippant manner in which
the butterfly put an end to the conversation, in which she —
had really become interested, that she turned to leave
without saying another word, when she heard a thick,
muffled voice, so close to her that she quite started—

““T’m very old.” Then there was a pause. ‘Very old
indeed,” continued the voice, which Buz now found pro-
ceeded from a large snail, stuck close to the edge of the
sundial. ‘Hundreds of years, perhaps,” said the snail
slowly, as if he was reckoning up. 7

‘Thousands, I should say,” remarked the butterfly, in
a low voice. :

“And I know a lot.” Here there was a long pause.

‘“‘He knows how to keep silence, at any rate,” said the
butterfly to Buz.

‘Which is more than some people do,” retorted Buz.

“Tn here I think a good deal,” continued the snail. “I



BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT. 47

was once imprisoned in a rock for over a hundred years;
I thought a good deal then.” .

Buz didn’t know what to say, and even the butterfly
made no remark; the voice was so very solemn, and also
‘she felt that the snail wouldn’t have cared for any words
of hers. The latter soon continued—

‘‘T once considered the subject of your late conversation
(of which, I must tell you, I heard every word) for fifty
years at a stretch.”

‘‘ Did you get a headache after it ?” the cee couldn’t
help asking. But the snail didn’t seem to hear her, and
Buz took no notice whatever of the question.

‘And as,” said the snail, “you were both totally wrong
in the conclusions to which you came, I shall just put you
right. You bee,” he continued—suddenly shooting out the
horn nearest to Buz, and keeping it pointed towards her—
‘‘seem to despise the butterfly for not working, or taking
any care for the future, and for leading a vain and useless
life, as you call it. Don’t despise the butterfly. And you
butterfly ’—here he shot out his other horn, and pointed it
at the insect he addressed—“ appear to pity the bee because
she works hard during the summer, in order that she may
keep herself alive through the winter, instead of enjoying
herself whilst she may: Don’t pity the bee.”

The snail paused for a moment, and drew in both his
horns, and then continued in a very solemn manner—



48 BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT.

‘What is right for one person, is wrong for another. If
a bee were to lead the life of a butterfly, she would be
miserable; for she was created in order that she might
work, and no one can be really happy who is not fulfilling
the object of his creation. On the other hand, if a butterfly
were to attempt to work, she would fail, and be miserable
also. So let the bee work as hard as she can, without being
proud of doing what is only her duty—and she will be as
happy as the butterfly. Let the butterfly sit in the sun and
look beautiful, and enjoy all the pleasures of life and be
thankful for them: above all, let her never look down on’
those whose duty it is to work; let her always have a soft
heart and a kind word for such as are fagged and worn by
the toil she is not called upon to endure herself—and the
butterfly will be as happy as the bee. As for presuming”—
(here the snail became as stern as such a soft thing con-
veniently could)—‘‘as for presuming to settle which is the
nobler, or higher, or better life to lead, how dare you attempt
to do so! It is not for you to decide. In my opinion, who-
ever does the work he is given to do, best—whatever that
work may be—whatever that work may be, mind,” repeated
the snail emphatically, putting out both his horns, and
pointing one at each of the insects in a very slgnincant
manner—‘‘ leads the best life.”

At this moment the sun, which had been behind a cloud
for some time, shone brightly out, and the snail retired into



BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT. 4Q

his shell at- once, and rested on the cool soft moss which
grew over the dial. The two insects looked at each other
rather foolishly, and Buz was the first to speak:

“T’m glad that snail overheard us, and spoke out so
plainly; I seem to see things differently now, and retract
what I said about selfishness.”

‘And I,” answered the butterfly—who was really very
good-natured, and was apt to hurt people’s feelings only
from want of thought—‘‘ am very sorry indeed that I should
have laughed at you or your work; for I honour you in my
- heart, I do indeed. Now come,” she continued coaxingly,
‘do let us part friends; and if you would let me take one
of the hints given by that dear old snail, I should think it
so kind of you. If ever you feel tired or overworked, or
whenever things go wrong, do come and let me try to cheer
you up; now do!”

‘T certainly will,” answered Buz, ‘‘though at the same
time, I enjoy my work so much that I don’t expect to have
to trouble you often; however, it’s quite nice of you to
think of it,” she concluded, ‘‘and I hope we may frequently
meet. Now I really must be off. I don’t consider my time
here has been wasted, but I am perfectly rested, and have
plenty to do.”

‘“‘T won’t try to detain you,” said the butterfly ; ‘cand
mind, I shall always be most interested in hearing what
work you are engaged in, and how it is getting on,”

3°



50 BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT.

“And on my part,” answered Buz gaily, ‘it will always
bea pleasure to me to see you flying about and ae SO
pretty. Good- bye, dear!”

“Good-bye, good-bye!” echoed the ey, as Buz
— went off.

For some little time after this, the pretty butterfly sat
and thought, but at last, rousing herself with a merry little
laugh—‘‘I mustn’t become like ‘the ee ” she said to
herself; ‘that’s not my work, at any rate.’

So away she flew, in the highest possible ae in and
out, in and out, amongst the flowers and over the shrubs
that grew in the delightful old garden.





CHAPERR Tv.

Swarming.

8 *











CAC Pa RG Wie

SWARMING.

— NE morning early, Buz was on
the point of starting for the
top of Cothelestone Hill. She
had been there several times
already ; indeed it was a



favourite place of hers. She
so thoroughly enjoyed the long
flight to it through the air: it
was so glorious to mount high
up above the fields, and to see the dewdrops sparkling like
diamonds in the morning sun—to listen to the lark as he
took his first upward flight, and poured out his song for joy
that another day had come—to inhale the fragrance of
dawn, knowing that all the flowers which made it so sweet,
were waiting for her, and would be glad when they saw her
coming. This was delightful indeed. —



54 BUZ—SWARMING.

Then again, Buz always looked forward to interesting
conversations with the flowers she visited, and the insects
and creatures she met; and she had a sort of idea that the
further she strayed from the hive, the more curious would be
her adventures, and the more charming the stories she was
told. But this did not follow at all; and many of the
prettiest tales she heard, were repeated to her by flowers
which grew in the old garden near the hive, though it was
some time before she would admit this, even to herself.

On her way to the entrance on this particular morning,
she perceived that a most unusual bustle was going on all
through the hive; and, directly the first bee touched her,
she felt quite excited and disinclined to work, though she
didn’t exactly understand why. At this moment she saw a
drone—‘‘ What’s up now?” she cried, running to him in
a great hurry.

‘‘ Don’t fuss,’’ said the drone snappishly.

“Well, I only want to know what all this stir and con-
fusion means?” :

‘Tl tell you fast enough if you won’t fuss. I hate a
bustle; and there’s enough of that, I’m sure, without your
helping to make it worse.”

‘T’ll be as quiet as a grub,” said Buz, speaking in a low
voice and standing quite still, though she felt that she was
becoming more restless every moment. _

The drone looked at her for some time without saying a



BUZ—SWARMING. 55

word; and at last, in a provokingly indifferent manner,
asked if she had been fanning lately.

“Yes,” said Buz, “it was my turn yesterday, and it was
a very hot day, and so I fanned a great deal; and stupid
work it was.”

‘Did you observe that there were often great clusters of
bees hanging together, just by the board outside the hive ?”

“Of course I did,” replied Buz; ‘they were there till
the evening.”

‘Did you wonder why?”

“No; I heard lots of them say that it was dreadfully
hot inside, so I suppose they hung out to cool.”

“Exactly; do you know why it was so hot in the hive?
I can tell you: partly because the day was so warm, and
partly because there are such a lot of bees—too many bees,
that’s the fact. Well, the weather can’t be made cooler,
but some of the bees can go, and they will go too.”
“Dear me!” said Buz, “will they? What! leave the
hive ?—really leave this hive?”

‘Flow can they go without leaving the hive, stupid ?”
answered the drone.

‘Of course they can’t; but what will they do without
Queen?”

““Our present Queen will go with them; she knows
it’s too hot in the hive, so she will leave with a party
of volunteers.”



56 Ss BUZ—SWARMING.

“Volunteers!”? cried Buz; ‘“‘what fun! I’ll be one!
I'll go! I may, mayn’t 1?. Oh, I hope I may go!”

“Now, for honey’s sake, don’t fuss,” said the drone.

‘‘ Certainly not,” replied Buz.

But she was trembling with excitement. Anything for a
change, anything for novelty. She never wished to be idle,
and she liked all sorts of work; but put her to a different
job every day—then she was happy! She cared little for
danger, and explored all kinds of places that many bees—
Hum for instance—wouldn’t think of going near; and now
the thought of volunteering, and flying off with the dear old
Queen, and beginning life again as it were, was charming.
It suited Buz exactly; but, as she had still plenty of ques-
tions to ask the drone, shé kept as quiet as possible; and
he was much too lazy and indifferent to notice what an
effort this was to her.

“By the row that’s going on,” remarked the drone, “I
should say this would be a big swarm.”

“A swarm!” exclaimed Buz; “‘ then that’s what swarm-
ing is!”

‘A horrid noise, a hopeless confusion, a dreadful fuss,
and an intolerable bustle—that’s what swarming is,” repeated
the drone disdainfully. ‘I shall certainly be glad to have
the hive more empty,” he went on to himself; ‘‘ but why
can’t they go away quietly, and swarm one by one, I should
like to know?”



BUZ—SWARMING. 57

‘‘Do none of the drones intend to join the swarm ?”

‘“* Hundreds will, no doubt; I shan’t.”

‘Will you tell me, please,” asked Buz, ‘how you will
get on here without a Queen?”

‘You ask such stupid questions,” said the drone. ‘You
don’t think; you’re in such a hurry—that’s it.”

“‘ Flow is mine a stupid: question 2D ee
‘“Do you mean to tell me that you have never passed

the royal nurseries? Do you mean to say that you have

never heard of royal food? Do you wish me to understand
that you have never been told about the royal grubs?”
demanded the drone.

‘Of course I’ve heard of them.” Buz said this a little
impatiently—the drone spoke so very contemptuously.

‘Oh, you have, have you? Then you will not be as-
tonished when I tell you that royal grubs become -queens,
and that one of those in this hive is just ready to leave her
cell; but she won’t come out before the old Queen has left.
Oh, no! she’ll take care of that—or rather, the royal nurses
will.”

‘Indeed; why?”

‘Because the old Queen would try to get at her, and
sting her to death. You females are so jealous and spite-
ful!’ answered the drone.

“T ain't a female,” cried Buz.

“Yes you are, though; all you working bees are un-
9



58 BUZ—SWARMING.

developed females. Suppose now we had been in want of
a Queen, and we had picked you out asa grub, and enlarged
your cell and fed you on royal bread: why, you would have
become a Queen! Actually you!”

= Really

“Yes, really; but it’s too late now; no chance for you
now, my dear; so you needn’t be proud.”

“T’m not a bit proud,” cried Buz.

“No, I see you’re not; on the contrary, you are con-
descending enough to come and speak to poor me! I feel
the honour deeply, I assure. you.”

He said these last words in such a nasty, sarcastic
manner, that Buz determined to leave him. ‘Poor fellow!”
she thought, ‘‘this noise and excitement must have made
him cross.’’? And indeed the confusion and hurrying about
increased every minute.

“Good-bye, Mr. Drone,” said Buz. ‘I really am much
obliged to you for what you have told me.”

“T’m quite overwhelmed,” said the drone, getting
more disagreeable than ever. ‘‘ Your politeness is some-
thing imperial. Are you sure you didn’t get hold of any
royal bread? Are you suve you ain’t a Queen? Just make
certain of it—do! Fly out of the hive, and see if the other
bees won’t swarm round you. They may. And what shall
I do,” he went on, “to show my respect? Shall I stick
here waxed to the floor all the rest of my life, in case you



BUZ—SWARMING. 59

want to come back and ask any more questions? Only say
the word. What! going off in a huff, are you? That’s
right, follow your temper—and make haste, or you’ll never
recover it!”

These last words were thrown after Buz, as she hurried
away without trusting herself to speak. To tell the truth,
she was getting a little afraid of the drone, who seemed to
have lost all command over himself; and she was so excited
about the swarming, that his words affected her less than
they would otherwise have done; at the same time, it was
exceedingly disagreeable to be so misjudged. ‘‘ Though I
brought it on myself,” she thought; ‘(and it shows what a
mistake it is to keep on asking questions when you see a
‘person’s out of temper. I’ll never do it again, I’ll be
stung if I-do!”
| Saying this, she ran round the corner of a comb in a
great hurry, to see where the Queen was, and what might
be going on, and knocked up against a bee coming just as
hastily in the other direction. It was Hum !—positively
Hum! Only imagine her being excited about anything but
work! Buz was quite amused.

“Then you mean to swarm too, I suppose,” she said.

“Well, no,” answered Hum; ‘I think not. I couldn’t
very well, you know.”

- “Tm sure I don’t know,” said Buz.

“I’ve got into such a groove here, don’t you see, that
ae



66 BUZ—SWARMING.

I’m almost afraid I couldn’t bear to leave it. I know where
everything is now, and exactly where to go; and besides, I’ve
got a ” Here Hum stopped short, as if she had said
rather more than she meant to.

“Got a what?” asked Buz.

‘Well, dear, I’m afraid you'll think it foolish of me—
I know you wouldn’t consider it a reason yourself, and I



” and here Hum



daresay you’re right; but the fact is
fidgeted about nervously, as if she was a little ashamed,
“the fact is, I’ve got a cell that I am filling with honey
all by myself; it’s up in a corner, out of the way, and I
couldn’t bear to go before it was full. You understand,
don’t you?” concluded she, almost pleadingly.

“I think I understand what you feel, though I don’t
fancy I should mind leaving it myself. Well, I shall be
very sorry to part from you, for you’re the best bee in
the world. I really have half a mind to stay,” continued
Buz oy “T feel as if you would keep me out of
scrapes.”

“Oh, please don’t let me prevent you from going!”
cried Hum; ‘it would never do. I’m sure you are just
the sort of person to join the swarm; you are so bold and
_active. I shall often think of you, dear Buz, and long to
know how you are getting on; but we should seldom meet
here, you know, even if you were to remain.”

‘“That’s true,” said Buz, thoughtfully; ‘and after all,



BUZ—SWARMING. 61

something tells me I ought to join the swarm. But, I say,”
added she briskly, ‘‘what is the state of the case exacuye
for I hardly know?”

‘“T do,” answered Hum. “I came straight from the
Queen when we met.”

“Tell me all about it then.”

“Tt seems that even yesterday the Queen became rest--
less, and said something about changing her house. I have
it on good authority, for one of the royal attendants told
me as much.”

‘Told you she said that?”

“Well, hardly; in fact, it’s difficult to say exactly what
she did tell me. She kept on hinting: she said, ‘there
might be changes before long, and what should I think of
that ?’—and ‘the Queen might use her wings before long,
and what should I think of that ?’—and ‘because a certain
royal person chose to live a certain time in a certain house,
did it follow that that royal person was never to change her
residence ?’—and so on, you know.”

“JT hate that!” cried Buz. ‘Why couldn’t she tell you
outright, or leave it alone altogether?”

‘Tt does appear foolish, when one comes to think of it,”
said Hum; “especially when one recollects all the nods
and whispers; but at the time, I suppose, it makes a person
seem important; and I caught myself nodding mysteriously,
and whispering too: very silly of me, to be sure!”



62 BUZ—SWARMING.

“Why, yes,” said Buz. ‘I wish you had laughed at ©
her, or, at any rate, pretended not to understand; but it
can’t be helped. What’s the news this morning ?”

‘Nothing has actually happened yet, but the Queen gets
more restless every moment, and an old bee—one who has
been in a swarm already—told me that she quite expected
she would leave the hive to-day. I know I can’t settle
down to anything. It’s wretched work!”

“Come along,” said Buz; ‘‘I want to be near the On
and watch her.”

The two friends were separated before they reached the
royal presence, for great numbers of bees were crowding
round. Buz soon pushed her way into a good place, and,
just as she got there she heard the Queen say to herself,
“I’ve a very good mind to do it. Is it fine?” she asked,
turning to her attendants.

“Tt is, your majesty,” answered several.

““A very good mind,” continued the Queen to herself;
‘““my family is becoming inconveniently large, and this
house doesn’t do: it gets hot, much too hot. That’s one
reason, and there are two or three others.”

‘She means by that,” said a bee very softly to Buz,
“that there are two or three royal grubs just ready to come
out; but she doesn’t like alluding to them, even to herself.”

“Too proud?” asked Buz, in a whisper.

‘Too proud,” answered the bee, with a confidential nod.



‘BUZ—SWARMING. 63

The Queen was now close to them.

“T declare, I think I’ll do it to-day,” she repeated.
“Did you say it was fine?” she added aloud, turning to
her attendants.

”?

‘Very fine, your majesty,” said they.

“Fine enough, eh?” asked the Queen.

“Fine enough for anything, your majesty,” said the
attendants, who were prevented by court etiquette from
seeming to know what orders the Queen was about to give,
though every one knew perfectly well that every bee in the
hive knew all about it. Curious, perhaps; but the laws of
etiquette ave curious—very.

‘“‘T hear a great noise,” said the Queen. “What is it?”

It was no wonder she did. Thousands of bees were
darting backwards and forwards just at the mouth of the
hive, and the air was filled with a roaring sound. But the
attendants pretended to be quite astonished.

“We'll go and inquire, your majesty,” they replied.

They did so, and returning immediately, said, ‘‘A few
of your majesty’s subjects are loitering about near the en-
trance, your majesty; would your majesty wish them to
disperse ?”’

‘No matter,” said the Queen. ‘A few, did you say?”

“Well, more than a few, perhaps, your majesty,” re-
plied the attendants, looking one at another; ‘‘more than
a few.”



64 BUZ—SWARMING.

“Are there enough, do you think?” asked the Queen
carelessly. ‘‘Are there as many as there ought to be?”

“There are enough for anything, ‘your majesty.”

“And the day, you say, is fine enough?”

“For anything, your majesty.”

‘The excitement was becoming quite intense.

The Queen, after showing great restlessness and inde-
cision for several moments, suddenly grew calm, and
standing in the centre of the circle drawn respectfully
round her, gave a few shrill squeaks, and said, “I have
made up my mind to go. . Let all who wish to join me
wait outside, and be ready to swarm!!!” .

Directly she spoke the last word, there was an end to
all restraint. It was the word so anxiously expected all
the morning, and was now the signal for a general rush.
It was passed round the hive in no time, and Buz took it
up, and found herself repeating, like every one else, ‘A
swarm! a swarm!! a swarm!!!’ Meantime she pressed
forward to the entrance. It seemed to her as if she would
never reach it; but then, she was in such a desperate
hurry. At last her struggles were rewarded, and, with
dozens of other bees, she tumbled out of the hive—head
over heels! anyhow !—and joined the excited mob in front.

There she dashed backwards and forwards as madly as
anyone, but always watching the entrance ; always ready
to follow the Queen the moment she should appear,



BUZ—SWARMING. 65

She had not long to wait, for her majesty soon presented
herself, and, after looking about her, spread her wings and
flew slowly and steadily away.

By this time the noise was tremendous; such an angry ©
noise too! But Buz hardly heard it, she was so excited,
so bent on keeping the Queen in sight.

Her majesty, after taking a short flight round the garden,
just to pick out a good place, alighted on the under side of
one of the branches of a small standard pear tree, and was
immediately hidden by a cloud of about twenty thousand
bees, which settled on and round her.

Buz was one of the first to take up her position, but,
hardly liking to pitch on the Queen, attached herself to the
branch close to her, and was at once used by several other
bees as a convenient thing to cling to; these in their turn
were treated in the same way, till a lump of bees was formed
as big as a good-sized cabbage, and Buz found it rather
hard work to hold on.

“Tt must be uncommonly hot in the middle, though,”
she thought: ‘better be here than there.”

At this moment the gardener approached. His coat
was off, and his shirt-sleeves were rolled up. He knew the
bees would not sting him for shaking them into the new
hive he carried, but he had to roll up his sleeves for fear of
one crawling up and being hurt.

He now held the hive upside down under the swarm,

10



66 BUZ—SWARMING.

took hold of the end of the bough on which it hung, and
gave a sharp, strong jerk, which dislodged it and sent it
right into the hive. _There was no hesitation, no indecision
about him; it was all the work of a moment. Instantly, a
‘cloud of bees ascended all round him, and many alighted
on his arms, and some even on his face. Of these he took
no notice whatever; but, seeing that a great cluster re-
mained in the hive, he was satisfied that the Queen was
among them; he then turned it over in its right position and
stood it on four bricks placed ready on the ground, so
that the bees outside could easily join their friends within. —
Having protected the hive from the sun with a few freshly
cut boughs, he left the swarm alone till the evening. Buz
was right in the middle this time, holding on like ae
to the bee just above her.

When it grew dusk, the gardener came back; and finding
that every bee had entered the hive, he placed it on a flat
board, and carried it off to a stand which had been prepared
for it, close to the old hive from which the swarm had come.





CHAPTER V.

Building Comb. Hn Accident.

Storing honey, H Surprise.

10 *











CHAPTER V.

BUILDING COMB. AN ACCIDENT. STORING HONEY.
A SURPRISE.

manded Buz of a bee who
was clinging to her.
“For days,” answered
the bee shortly.
: “Come, 1 say,
Buz, ‘you don’t mean that, do you?” i
“If you don’t believe me, ask someone else.”
‘‘Oh, I believe you, but how slow!”
“T daresay,” remarked another bee, ‘‘that you have
heard of a Queen having a great many attendants hanging
about her at court ; now you know what it means |”

)

said





70 BUZ—BUILDING COMB.

At this moment the cluster of bees began to move, and
to spread about. :
The hive in which they had Beea taken was very aiferent

- to the old straw butt they had left, their new abode being a

square deal box without any bottom. Into the back of this
box a pane of glass had been introduced, through which the
bees might be watched at their work; and at the top of it
was a short narrow slit, closed at present, but capable of
being opened from without, by means of a zinc slide.
This box was placed in a wooden cupboard, which stood
on four legs, had a gable roof, and doors opening at the

_ back, and was large enough to contain three other boxes of

the same size. Horizontal apertures, about two inches long
and just high enough to admit a bee, were cut in the cup-
board at the bottom of its front, and epposite each of the
boxes within.

The floor of the cupboard, which was also the floor of
the boxes, was cut away about the eighth of an inch deep,
just underneath each of these apertures, and made to slope
up towards the interior, so that any rain driven into a hive
might run out again at once. This pleased the bees, who
hate damp beyond anything.

‘The swarm now began preparations for the great work
of forming the comb; and hung from the top, no longer
in a ball, but in sheets or strings, about which the bees
could freely pass.



BUZ—BUILDING COMB. 71

They formed, in fact, living scaffolding; and, as they
themselves produced material for the building, all the
trouble of hauling and carrying was saved.

Each bee, besides holding on as tightly and as patiently
as a postage-stamp, was busily employed in preparing
plates of wax.

These were secreted in A pockee on the under side of the
abdomen, from which the bees drew them when ready for
use, working and moulding them in their mouths.

““T wonder how you can all go on so long without
eating,” remarked Buz at length in a general sort of way
to the bees about her.

‘(Tn the same way that you can,” answered one of them.

“Oh, J took in as much honey as ever I could, just
before we swarmed,” said Buz.

‘““ Well, so we almost all did,” replied her friend; ‘‘it is
an instinct with bees.”

‘“‘T wonder why,” said Buz Shona,

“Tt’s simple enough,” returned the other. “If we do
not unload our honey, it is gradually formed into wax: so
that arriving in a new hive with honey is almost the same
thing as arriving with wax—and that we must have at once.
So that only those few bees who happened to join the swarm
without being full of honey have gone to work. The mo-
ment the honey you arrived with has become wax in your
pockets, you will pull it out, and munch away at it till you



72 BUZ—BUILDING COMB.

have munched and pulled it into good order. Then you
will place it in position, where you see it is wanted, and the
nurse or architect bees will work it into shape. Then you
will go out and get a fresh supply of honey, and again hang
yourself up till it turns into wax. It’s simple enough, as
I said before.”

Buz found that this was really the case, and in due
time she deposited her bricks of wax, and left the archi-
_tects at work, while she went off for a fresh supply of

honey. :

The architects began by attaching some wax to the roof
of the box, and fashioning therefrom hexagonal cells—by
employing which form, the greatest number can be arranged
in the smallest space. ae

Each comb consisted of two sets of cells placed back to
back. If the bottoms of these opposite sets of cells had
been exactly opposite to each other, they would have been
dangerously thin; and the architects, knowing this very
well, arranged that the bottom of each cell should be
opposite part of the bottoms of three cells on the other
side of the comb.

In this manner, the thin plate of wax forming the bottom
was in every case strengthened and supported by the bases
of three contingent walls behind it. For the bees, having
so well economised their space, were determined not to use
an atom more wax than was really necessary.



BUZ—AN ACCIDENT. — 73

Let us be consistent all through,” they said, ‘‘and ©
then we shall make a job of it.”

For nearly a week Buz stuck to her post, only going out
occasionally. At the end of that time so much of the comb
had been made, that she, with many others, was employed
in gathering honey.

It was the beginning of June, there were plenty of flowers
about, and the honey season was good. Things were looking
up. Fortune, however, delights in a practical joke, and
often, ‘so to speak, cuts a hammock down when the owner
is most comfortably asleep. A terrible accident happened
to the bees just at the time they seemed so prosperous.

Whether the heat within the hive became so great as to
melt the wax, or whether the top of the hive was too smooth
for the comb to be securely fastened thereto, it is impossible
to say; but, whatever might be the cause, one of the centre |
combs, nearly filled with honey, suddenly broke down, and
fell to the bottom of the hive.

The result was dreadful! Numbers of bees were crushed
to death or suffocated, the floor of the hive was deluged
with honey, for the comb had not been sealed, and there
was a barrier formed right in the line of traffic.

Luckily for her, Buz was away when the accident hap-
pened; and by the time she returned to the hive the bees
were beginning to repair the mischief.

Their first care was to collect all the honey that had

11



74 BUZ—AN ACCIDENT.

escaped, and to store it in the empty cells. After that they
began to clear away the broken pieces of comb, and to carry
out the dead.

_ “Of course we are not going to let that great comb stay
where it is?’ said Buz softly to an older bee.

“Of course we are though,” was the reply. “ Why,
what a waste of time it would be to carry all that wax away
and make a fresh comb!” :

‘“‘ But it’s so dreadfully in the way.”

“We shall manage to get over that difficulty,” said she
bee confidently.

“ How?” asked Buz.

‘‘Ain’t you supposed to be honey-gathering ?”’

ves: lam.

‘Gather honey then, do! You'll be able to see for
_ yourself, each time you come in, how we get on here. I
can’t waste time explaining.”

Away flew Buz, and got honey as near the hive as
she could, and worked particularly hard, so as to come
in often; for she was very much interested in what was
going on.

The fallen comb was leaning against an adjacent one,
the bottom being of course on the floor instead of a little
above it, thus impeding traffic. To obviate this, tunnels
were soon driven through the comb—beautiful arched tunnels,
with waxen pillars to support them—whilst little stays and



BUZ—STORING HONEY. 75

buttresses of wax were introduced wherever they were re-
quired, to make all firm and safe again.

“ Capital!’ said Buz approvingly, as she ran through
one of the new tunnels.

‘‘No honey to be stored in this side of the comb,” re-
marked a bee shortly.

“All right,” said Buz.

Now Buz had very nearly said “‘ Why,” instead of ‘All
right”; but she checked herself in time, remembering
that she had often asked unnecessary questions, and that
she had resolved to try to find things out for herself. In
this case she soon saw the reason why.

The comb was leaning over a little, and of course any
honey put into a cell on the side towards which it leaned,
would run out again. :

“I’m glad I didn’t ask,” thought Buz; “and now
that I’m about it, I’ll just examine one of the other
combs.”

She did so, and found that the cells on each side sloped
upwards, ever so little, but enough to prevent thick stuff
like honey from Ee out.

‘Tet me see,” said Buz to herself, as she turned away,
‘how will they use the side that can’t be employed for
honey ?”

_ Just at this moment there was a bustle close to her, and

she saw the Queen making towards the fallen comb.
aL



76 BUZ—STORING HONEY.

‘Oh, I know,” thought Buz: “the Queen will lay eggs
in it; it will do very well for a breeding comb, of course.”

Buz was right. The Queen, with ten or twelve attendants
round her, passed over the comb, examining each cell before
she deposited an egg within it. Whenever she rested, which
she frequently did, the members of her suite, who formed a
sort of screen round her, overwhelmed her with their atten-
tions and caresses, and offered her honey. In one cell the
Queen inadvertently deposited two eggs; the watchful at-
tendants, much too polite to call her majesty’s attention to
this, quietly took one out and ate it.

After Buz had looked on for some little time, she
asked one of the suite how many eggs the Queen could
lay in a day.

“A couple of hundred, or even more,’ was the answer.

‘Does she often have an egg-laying day ?”

‘She lays eggs every day—for months. She does no-
thing else.”

“Well,” thought Buz as she flew off, ‘‘no wonder there
are such a lot of us!”

For several weeks Buz worked very hard, and met with
no adventures. It was the busy time, and a fine lot of honey
was collected and sealed up.

One morning, as she was passing near the middle of the
hive, she saw a good many bees employed on a large cell,
which was attached to the comb only at one spot.



BUZ—A SURPRISE. 77

“Ah!” said Buz to herself, ‘I know what that is. That’s
a royal cell: I remember seeing some in the old hive.”

She stood and watched, and presently observed to one of
the workers, ‘‘What a lot of wax you are using, to be sure!”

“T should think so indeed,” was the reply. ‘(1 don’t .
suppose you’d wish us to be careful of our wax when we ’re
making a royal cell—that would be mean!”

“Oh, no!” cried Buz, ‘‘of course I shouldn’t; only it
seems funny, don’t you know. Ever since I swarmed I
have heard nothing but, ‘ Economise your space ; economise
your material’; and now, here you are, seeing how much
wax you can get rid of at once! I like it myself, mind,
only I can’t help observing that there is enough wax there
to make fifty ordinary cells.”

“Tf I didn’t think that there was,” returned the other,
‘‘T should feel quite ashamed to be on the job. Bees don’t
economise where royalty is concerned.”

She said this very stiffly, and walked away. Buz rubbed
her head and antennz with her fore legs, and felt rather
snubbed.

Just at this moment there was a sudden movement of
bees upwards, and Buz was off directly to see what was
the matter.

On reaching the top of the hive, she joined a number of
bées who were crowding through a hole in the roof, and
found herself at once in a fine open space above. Here a



8 BUZ—A SURPRISE.

bee was gesticulating excitedly with her antenne, and Buz
joined the group of listeners round her.

‘All I know is,” said the bee, “that I heel to be
at work on the roof just underneath where this hole has
.appeared. Everything was quite secure, nothing loose at
all. There was no passage up, not even a very little one—
that I’m sure of; and then, all of a sudden there was! I
heard a kind of a tearing, scraping sound, and it became
quite light! I saw this hole, ran up as fast as I could, and
found myself here. That’s all I can tell you.”

“But was there nothing moving near the top of the hole
when you came through ?” asked one of the bees.

“Certainly not: that’s the odd part of it. Everything
was as quiet as possible. Now, any one may account for it
who can. I can’t.” *

As the bee moved away after saying this, Buz ran off on
a tour of inspection. She found herself in a space about
half the size of the hive below; the walls and roof were
very slippery, and the light came through them.

She climbed up the side and got to the roof, but had
hardly reached it when she lost her footing and fell ae
a flop on to the floor.

As she stood rather confused for a moment, a friend of
hers came up and said, ‘‘Isn’t this a piece of luck! We

* The gardener had drawn back the slide at the top of the hive, and placed a
glass super in position for the bees to fill.



BUZ—A SURPRISE. 79

had nearly filled the place below with wax and honey, and
now here ’s room for lots more.”

“Yes,” replied Buz; ‘‘I1 was wondering’ the other day
what we should do for space; it was getting so hot, too.”

‘Oh, we should have been obliged to send off a swarm,
I suppose, when a young Queen was hatched; but now we
shall get on without that.”

‘What shall we do with the young Queen then?”
demanded Buz.

“Oh, let the old one kill her, ie suppose,” said the bee
anc oucemnedly. ‘Cor starve the royal grubs, or something.
I don’t know,” she continued, ‘if eggs have been laid in
the royal cells yet; I rather think not, in which case the
Queen won’t lay any at all now.”

As she spoke, something came down on her head with a
great bump. It was a bee, who, like Buz, had tried the
roof and had met with a similar mishap. The floor and
sides of the new space were by this time covered with bees,
and some were continually falling down.

‘‘T can tell you what,” said Buz sagaciously: ‘‘it will be
very difficult work, fastening up our comb.”

_ “Tt may be difficult, but it is not impossible. We shall
therefore manage it,” said the bee who had just fallen.
‘When we have fastened a few little specks of wax about,
to hold on to, we shall be able to manage. I wish it wasn’t
quite so light, though; I like working in the dark.”



80 BUZ—A SURPRISE.

She hard hardly spoken the words, when something came
down on the roof and round the walls, and in a moment the
place was quite dark.*

‘“There!” said Buz; “you ’ve got your wish ; but what
will happen next, I wonder ?”

‘“Whatever happens, I shall begin to work at once,” was
the reply: ‘so, come on.”

‘“*Come on,” said Buz.

* The gardener placed a cap of felt, or other thick material, over the super.





CHAPTER VL.

a Second Swarm. Sole tbhours.

Sent Back.















CHAPTER VI.

A SECOND SWARM. IDLE HOURS. SENT BACK.

B, NE day, when the heather was in
a bloom, Buz went off to Cot-
helestone Hill, and whilst she
was at work a sudden shower
came on.

This drove her for shelter
under a rock, where she nearly
ran against another bee, which had entered from the oppo-
site direction.

“‘Hulloa!” cried Buz.

“Hulloa!” said the other; ‘‘ where do you come from ?
I don’t know your smell.”

‘Very likely not,” answered Buz, who did not admire

the manner of the other bee; ‘what of that? I suppose

I have as much right here as you?”
12 *





84 BUZ—A SECOND SWARM.

“Don’t be waxy,” replied the other; ‘I said very
little.”

“But you didn’t say it nicely, I thought,” retorted Buz.

“Well, you ave particular!” exclaimed the other. ‘‘ How
I should like to know where you come from.”

‘““Oh, a long way from here,” said Buz: ‘from the valley
at the foot of the hill. We live in a garden, where there are
several other swarms.” :

‘“‘ How very odd!”

‘“ Why odd?” asked Buz.

‘Well, I suppose you’re always fighting; and that’s an
odd state of things, isn’t it?”

‘Tt would be if it were the case; but then you see it
isn’t.”

‘“‘That’s odder still. Now we ee fight Oy
if another swarm came near us.’

“Should you really?” asked Buz.

“ There’s a hollow tree not far from ours,” answered the
other bee significantly; ‘take it and try.”

‘A hollow tree!” oe Buz Cou mpiuously, “T should
be sorry to live in one.’

“What do you live in then?”

‘‘ A hive, to be sure.”

‘“* And what may that be?”

“Why, the house in which we were taken when we
swarmed.”



BUZ—A SECOND SWARM. 85

“Taken!” cried the wild bee. ‘Ah! I begin to under-
stand: I’ve heard of that sort of thing before; then you’re
a slave bee, I suppose?”

**You’re a rude bee, I’m sure,” retorted Buz.

“Am I? I only mean, that the honey you make is
not for yourselves, but for whosoever shook yeu into the
hive you seem so proud of.”

“‘T should just like to see anyone taking our honey,” said
Buz. ‘Whoever came to do it, would have to be very fond
of honey, or care very little about stings.”

“That sounds fine,” replied the wild bee; ‘‘but I have
heard some curious stories. Let me advise you to make a
few enquiries when you return. I may be wrong, of course;
but then, you know, I may be right.”

‘*T don’t mind asking about it,” returned Buz; ‘but
you must be wrong.”

‘Why so?” asked the wild bee.

“Because, if what you say is true, it is ridiculous to
suppose that any bees would live as we do now. We should
fly right away, of course, and even put up with a hollow
tree, perhaps.”

‘That ’s all very well,” answered the wild bee; ‘but
when people once get into a groove, they are slow to get out
of it: to make a one’s mind toa Uierous) change, requires
a deal of energy.”

“Don’t you call pe auins a thorough change?! de-



86 BUZ—A SECOND SWARM.

manded Buz. “I found no difficulty in Ae uP my
mind about that.”

“There you only followed an old custom, and did not
strike out a new line. However, as the storm is over, sup-
pose we go on with our work; mine being to gather honey
for myself, and yours to gather it—for someone else.”

“Put it as you please,” replied Buz: “always remem-
bering that I don’t want your opinion.”

‘‘In the same way,’? answered the wild bee, ‘ gather for
whom you please; always remembering that I don’t want
your honey. Good-bye.” And away she flew.

As Buz followed her example, and went to work again, »
she could not help admitting to herself that there was some-
thing in what had been said. “When I get back to the
hive,” she thought, ‘‘I’ll just talk the matter over.”

In the evening, therefore, she asked one of the older
bees whether what she had heard was true.

‘“No doubt it is,” was the answer. ‘“ This very spring,
a fine super of honey was taken from the hive next to ours,
and a lot of excitement it caused; surely you remember?”

‘““No, I don’t,” said Buz.

‘It must have been just before you were hatched then.”

‘‘But what were they all about?” cried Buz excitedly ;
‘‘why did they let their honey go? Couldn’t they sting ?”

“I heard one of them say that they tried at first, and
that something prevented them from getting near the



BUZ—A SECOND SWARM. 87

robbers—something soft; and besides, there was so much
honey running about, that they were very busy sucking it
up; and, what with the excitement and what with being
glutted with honey, very few of them felt like fighting.”

“Then my rude acquaintance at the top of the hill was
not very far from right after all,’”’ said Buz thoughtfully.

‘She was right to a certain extent, but there’s another
side to the question.”

“Indeed,” cried Buz; ‘‘I should like to know it.”

‘The tradition is, that those who rob us look after us
in the winter, and supply us with food if our honey runs
short; so we need never starve. Now, I have heard, that
after a bad honey season whole swarms of wild bees are
starved to death. Then again, our hive is much more con-
venient than a hollow tree: drier and warmer, and with a
better entrance. I’ve seen some pretty good hollow trees
in my time certainly; but there’s nothing like a hive after
all.”

Buz was somewhat consoled by this, but still felt in-
dignant at the idea of being liable to lose any of the beau-
tiful honey she had worked so hard for.

‘‘Wait till some one tries it on with us,” said she to
herself. ‘‘Not sting, indeed! We’ll see about that.”

Soon after this, Buz began to find her present hive almost
as inconveniently crowded as the one she had left; the super
was nearly filled with comb, and that was half full of honey ;



88 ' BUZ—A SECOND SWARM.

the Queen had laid a great many eggs in the hive below, and
the young bees were daily emerging from their cells.

Some of the grubs, also, in the royal cells were nearly
ready to come out.

A feverish excitement, similar to that which she re-
membered on a former occasion, began to set in, and the
Queen frequently squeaked. |

This time, however, Buz made up her mind to remain
where she was.

“T’m getting too old,” she told herself, ‘for knocking
about; let the youngsters do the swarming.” |

But although she was inclined to be patronising towards
the “youngsters,” she could not help feeling surprised at
her disinclination for change and excitement; she was even
a little sorry for herself.

The fact is, she had become a middle-aged bee, and was
beginning to go down the hill—a fact which it is not always
. pleasant to look in the face.

And now the Queen became more excited than ever,
and sometimes attempted to tear open the royal cells
and kill the poor little princesses. She was prevented
from doing so by the royal nurses, who were respectful,
but very firm.

“Though it’s a tremendous thing, mind you,” said one
nurse to the other, “to find oneself tackling the Queen
herself, and preventing her from doing what she likes,”



BUZ—IDLE HOURS. 89

‘Tt certainly is,” said the other; ‘‘but she knows it is
only our duty.”

Opinions in the hive began to differ as to whether it
would be better to let the Queen kill the young ones, or
to send off aswarm. Some thought it was too late in the
year; others declared that anything would be better than
being so crowded.

A particularly hot day settled the question, and those
who were in favour of a swarm ‘“‘had it.” Then began the
same sort of orderly confusion described before, and away
flew the Queen, with many of her loving subjects, but with-
out Buz.

After the swarm had left, the latter felt disinclined to
work: she was a little upset, and wanted a gossip.

There was no difficulty in finding a bee similarly dis-
posed, for work in the hive was slack that afternoon.*

‘‘ Bother the pollen,” grumbled a bee, as she was passing
Buz; ‘how it does stick to one, to be sure; but this is the
last lot I bring in this blessed day. My name is ‘easy’ for
the rest of the afternoon.”

‘And so is mine,” cried Buz; ‘‘let us go to the garden,
and sit in the sun.”

“All right,” said the other; ‘Just wait till I unload ;
I won’t be a minute.”

* It is a fact that bees do not work so hard after a swarm has left; and it is
sometimes necessary to send it back to the hive, in order that a half-filled super may
be completed. If the Queen be caught and removed, the swarm will return.

13



go BUZ—IDLE HOURS.

As soon as she returned, the two bees flew off together.

‘We are not the only ones who are taking it ‘easy,’
observed her friend to Buz, as they settled comfortably on
a cucumber frame in a corner; “I heard several bees say
they intended to knock off work.” fs

“After all,”. she continued, ‘‘why should we ‘take
any more trouble? We had nearly made honey enough
to carry us‘ through the winter, and now we shall not
want so much, in consequence of that swarm having
gone off.” |

“Exactly so,” replied Buz; ‘‘we have enough, and to
spare. I don’t mean to say,” she continued, after a pause,
“that I intend to do nothing at all—that wouldn’t suit me;
but Ido mof mean to hurry up. I’ve worked pretty well
all through the summer, though I say it myself, and made
honey enough to support half a dozen drones. By-the-by,
talking of drones, why should I make honey for those lazy
fellows?” - ne

Can't say,” replied her fered ‘‘T don’t see the fun of
it myself. But, do you know,” ie continued, sinking her
voice, ‘I hear they are not likely to eat ae more honey
in our hive.”

‘‘ What do you mean ?” asked Bue ny The Sapi great
things are always hungry. ‘The i I do, the.more I want,’
seems, in fact, to be their motto.’

“Well, what I tell you is quité between ourselves, of



BUZ—SENT BACK. : gi

course,” said her friend; ‘‘but, mark my words—we shall

get rid of them, and that before long.”
‘Oh, my queen!” cried Buz. ‘‘ You.astonish me! How
shall we manage it?”
‘‘The working bees will rise against hem and turn
ee them out of the hive; see if they don’t. Why should we
keep them - all “throught ne winter? That’s what I want to
know.” | :

‘““ Why indeed ¢ 2” said Buz ay, and. then continued
after a pause: “If we do get rid of them, there is all the
‘more reason for our taking a. lee holiday now; for we
shall have plenty of honey.”

‘My sentiments exactly,” returned Hee friend ; ay as
_I feel inclined for a little on my own account, I ail have
_a turn at the flower-beds. What do you say?”
... Come-on,” said Buz, and away they flew. s

Later ‘ori; when they returned to the hive, they were
surprised. to.see a great commotion, and eiomies of bees
pouring in. ; Sea

“What is all this bustle about?” asked Buz of the first
bee she encountered. ‘Is anything the matter?”

“Ever so much,” was the answer. ‘‘ There has been an
accident, and the swarm that left so lately is returning.”

“Indeed!” cried Buz; “but what accident could pos-
sibly induce the old Queen to come back?”

‘Nothing would ever have induced her to do such a
13 *



Q2 BUZ—SENT BACK.

thing,” replied the other; ‘‘ but ’’—and here she spoke very
impressively —‘‘ she has disappeared !”’

‘“‘ Disappeared!” echoed Buz. ‘‘Oh, how? Do tell me
more about it.” :

“Tf you want to know the particulars, ask one of those
who joined the swarm: I didn’t.”

- Buz lost no time in following her advice.

“T’ll tell you all I know,” said the bee she ques-
tioned, “but I can’t quite understand it myself. Our
poor Queen settled on a branch of a small apple tree,
and we all clung round -her of course; and there we
hung in a big bunch—in such a big bunch, that I really
thought the branch we were on would come off. After
a short time, something gave such a jerk that we all
fell off into something, and it was very uncomfortable.
Most of us kept crawling: about, not liking to leave
the Queen; but some flew up, to see what was the
matter.”

‘“‘T should have been one of those,” put in Buz.

“Well, so was I, my dear; and I found that the thing
that had done it was the man we always see about the
garden, and the thing he had shaken us into was a kind of
box like this.” ;

“T know,” said Buz; ‘that’s just what happened to
me. Well?” cee

‘Well, the man carried us off to where something large



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081212_AAAAOS' PACKAGE 'UF00086836_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-12-15T07:34:52-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:40:48-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299342; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T05:14:00-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '653347' DFID 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZQ' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 3cc11270aa1d64d2dfa1f0e159ac921f
'SHA-1' a7c5c7ddcfef7a4d135f393591b19f651f83e1d6
EVENT '2011-12-22T12:17:55-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'163960' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
9734bafb5da425b6a16d33ce2f085a55
3be3032c8d7c1e0e90f28ef3f0fca4f9ce38f5ed
'2011-12-22T12:19:14-05:00'
describe
'8737' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00001.pro'
9b7e5c52cec2c93addaed678d0a17643
6f543a56abbe7b5b330fb13c8f3be1e4814db113
'2011-12-22T12:20:09-05:00'
describe
'37333' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
decb83b7ced2f8da451b6eb68d4f5b08
6171c7b1f1436788fc321f25f1a3dbe2277e2793
'2011-12-22T12:22:45-05:00'
describe
'15692932' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00001.tif'
3bd720c2c486d656fbc78f373dbabe52
754539f6e44452736de86588cfa26bcae8284938
'2011-12-22T12:22:15-05:00'
describe
'443' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00001.txt'
26e23c218196af1ce823749a7df89ab4
97659f020c70b78cdd159061ee75999bdc59e257
'2011-12-22T12:22:42-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'9070' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
d17160189338f6e20799b7f7de9ef6e8
52fcb782623cdf6a2d24a9747936c68690f6196d
'2011-12-22T12:17:47-05:00'
describe
'652202' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c617c8a067a83e6fa1948da50f30ddf2
e385cbd57a7bcd01af4035b2fa390cac493ee812
'2011-12-22T12:20:40-05:00'
describe
'55765' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
d5c452011a90b211102f00228e866473
ea980672af2c613ffce1306e9ee0a4b32384df7c
'2011-12-22T12:19:25-05:00'
describe
'2010' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
70b283131b7743d37ae5089d5bcd862c
9a8a2971a000d46cf69098d32967623a0267003b
'2011-12-22T12:18:10-05:00'
describe
'12783' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
ad5ee10768d95eda1a04857c84331c76
498fd33f2cbf2f8eca2c2e2278a0f0a942c147c4
'2011-12-22T12:22:59-05:00'
describe
'15658628' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00002.tif'
56175c0d24b8ee0eff0d25dfd4a33ed7
f7c1cac2d532d81e2865cb8f9ad3d032c630d1be
'2011-12-22T12:20:47-05:00'
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00002.txt'
2bf5cc4525958e2c29b5ad33ec0613ed
3ecbb609bcb5aab12bb698e811850164f1af84f6
'2011-12-22T12:20:32-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3514' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
b4c3d6222e5970a87a554e1acdf309c9
6c1b5c2ade6b4ec5a72197be8c6de169089add25
'2011-12-22T12:18:26-05:00'
describe
'533938' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
65c965028e62489b0e30867b3a6618a8
880d8fa32cb5a16e7ae3a0400ef908a37dcf8c0d
'2011-12-22T12:21:08-05:00'
describe
'62281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
f23404c13435a5de149c2f7f0025c840
031a3565ac17507f856049ef1f52fdb94f13df7e
'2011-12-22T12:22:24-05:00'
describe
'15267' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
71341e50b309d6fdc1c8932023db60fb
43ec3ad71c1736e70ab6ed558a4bbc51967c0d32
'2011-12-22T12:20:34-05:00'
describe
'12821916' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00003.tif'
83dcc770dbceca0ca23d74f01a18eed1
c0bd8858cac97245ec35e9f492467efcc1877840
'2011-12-22T12:18:28-05:00'
describe
'4177' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
034ac960c43abe648eeb029926486365
225e6db7b5a2e8effd2667664c7b8a46d3832954
'2011-12-22T12:19:19-05:00'
describe
'533847' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
01e761a3f85034f1775acbd13e1a5fff
4e716b0a847a179c6a923122a59d23f0f058d3b2
'2011-12-22T12:20:56-05:00'
describe
'15890' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
bed5b13a2e928842f21f1ec73900243a
463aa15c1eea998d63aff1c4e2a96fe853ea9591
'2011-12-22T12:19:35-05:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00005.pro'
2877bebf4088590ec866ff49489e0ce0
7266e7357aacf87de94bc7784112756f75f26ff2
'2011-12-22T12:21:50-05:00'
describe
'4373' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
d6e9648f2a5a63067cf123d5d3459703
20a07c5fdf142daffd0d0b8ad93d1aed48796f16
'2011-12-22T12:22:32-05:00'
describe
'4288800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00005.tif'
df9cc3b9f9e934a43bc586d1dcc49ff7
8f5b96d47ad369aac350627f8c2a127d52daa939
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00005.txt'
ba946ae7f53a338ea44a6a2d6cc4c744
22f694fa6e88aab1d77fd18001457e0838be96d2
'2011-12-22T12:18:41-05:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
1a86d188072c61af9df634dc77705cf8
e5859ec1d78be660cd76ab3b1c36802dec55ab1d
'2011-12-22T12:19:57-05:00'
describe
'533875' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e387cfd8052a23a23292297d5a2edacc
c5053a4a1e37197ffd8a7ede7b304bf12b0b40fb
'2011-12-22T12:18:02-05:00'
describe
'137573' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
0eee8271029a2473bcce7e3718609e8b
44ca81f03de139a4900c8308506b2f492781a7d7
'2011-12-22T12:20:30-05:00'
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00008.pro'
00198a990abf434cba700f273f4ce65b
5831e36dfc59d38daa394e869dae56a96bb7d468
'2011-12-22T12:20:28-05:00'
describe
'30307' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c56c6ef39e3c175110b2dba202a66cda
b8f2c7a87f9308251026d8bf5c5145cf1d7985d6
'2011-12-22T12:20:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9eeec9716fdec99c0c7caa63cd20c6c8
7f9da9bcbdb53027d5e4193a5474e9d6f6080fbe
'2011-12-22T12:22:31-05:00'
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00008.txt'
72dc72d28c0f1bec03297f964d86b9fd
e7b458f2de6e160cfd955122ca04e7d33cdfa96b
'2011-12-22T12:22:55-05:00'
describe
'6922' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
af9ed18cdfe64047fb12b52943e239b6
12047e3198455baca4da64080769811993912597
'2011-12-22T12:22:52-05:00'
describe
'533937' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
6df541c49f17f56616e6a50a76f7eca0
8055860da339f696eddc40ece1ae87a1dcdb65b9
'2011-12-22T12:18:24-05:00'
describe
'39965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
26c6fee2b577eca36fc7489ce99eee52
e23f884adf6534eb41d4ae5474351a110de11689
'2011-12-22T12:19:50-05:00'
describe
'8684' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
2c1650da6cee0af2beb2368427c3fad5
0c4e76ba8174df8968df5d4ceacad03643784a88
'2011-12-22T12:19:52-05:00'
describe
'11460' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
563f6a50b2a8ae19f9284433254e7e3d
8c7c67067d543f16199190a0144956219796ef7e
'2011-12-22T12:19:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
cd46d1e0a0b6198beb2f78f95fb3429d
0a1443daa9c886fc8419395099d04a915a18a355
'2011-12-22T12:21:51-05:00'
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00011.txt'
78ee37435e3a03bfa9e0e6f063aeac21
abb935165c0440345fcaa49b4a39f43f0910b78f
'2011-12-22T12:19:00-05:00'
describe
'3471' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
812b399788e6f06b6ab5eb2fe2940f5c
9d4bf5b6309e3c0c1e54e5ef1137e9d008f1e313
'2011-12-22T12:18:47-05:00'
describe
'533856' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
0914acd7138b4836cd34ca850efe2fac
ef669ddf9bad6b58be7b1114209de4f955bbf266
'2011-12-22T12:20:33-05:00'
describe
'35732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
fc88ab619c2d624b16d4d15610b346df
730beadb33e02801047e95a32e5f3cff9778d5a6
'2011-12-22T12:20:54-05:00'
describe
'3285' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b6409be9135ccab881a6c5d4e4e5f487
495b926dd1cdd65ed58144554b8f440eaaea79a6
'2011-12-22T12:22:36-05:00'
describe
'7791' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
55f0950cd60033b6a4f5fcbf9eb21b45
69c852c6801bc910d2999909f859498befdb3fc8
'2011-12-22T12:18:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1310e4a1f46a8aafe2a11e1be63309e9
516d551bbb30b0f55e93ecc1ed2bcc24c62fefe1
'2011-12-22T12:19:02-05:00'
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7f06e17f92c009e55e4ba90e45aa0fc9
5b6b9717a122ae0b8f014914182af5326df4d004
'2011-12-22T12:21:37-05:00'
describe
'2340' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3904d2ac8bbcbad57037e9ee7b33c524
455f1ff768df0c2b7a73bbabe97d07510eae2708
'2011-12-22T12:21:53-05:00'
describe
'533996' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8b6ac0d721e9cafe85c9723c139f33f5
9636ffe042caeb3f5f49682c24124926ccbbda6c
'2011-12-22T12:23:00-05:00'
describe
'85606' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b3d660af1f3786cea82458487bcb27be
934515280cece29b109eb4f2d06d9ae869b29417
'2011-12-22T12:19:38-05:00'
describe
'26396' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
75c7a56aa93afa7f3349d5b6d5c8c298
b2764eff802b642a997a98f287af03889b9d49c2
'2011-12-22T12:20:13-05:00'
describe
'26007' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
45b5e7b6b93b0f2814c12642023a0e6a
1fd814701deab1e258f109c74951c27ca104e1da
'2011-12-22T12:18:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00015.tif'
73eb05386be3057262b6b43fef7ba6bc
edc21225eee33b9487e3adffed506ba1601b4968
'2011-12-22T12:22:21-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ff6135fc02dbf8a24884107bad5580e1
eba69c1ba36a8e577276fca08955b2590b3603bf
describe
'6430' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
de833d4e1d2c619e5f269da1ab203c3b
0e6852e5a005c113f8a5288b08cd4e584b1d7ece
'2011-12-22T12:22:18-05:00'
describe
'533924' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
01148a76f1c52ea2489184edabb308a0
61bf8af2a758e7bf5adbe77553199aeb95982494
'2011-12-22T12:17:57-05:00'
describe
'59003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
27dfcf60e12867b35ffed164ca7682e5
4caa51037ef7375a984729c2938e43d98b52c6e5
'2011-12-22T12:18:29-05:00'
describe
'20310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00016.pro'
20398ef8cfe41e3ae176c071fdae5407
5f340b5ec6714f4ccabc65da5587b920582973f5
'2011-12-22T12:21:05-05:00'
describe
'15122' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
39429b235c5e3bc768d20f908bae0781
4e469d6fa6c465b3e748854b5e414dd673605d0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00016.tif'
07910db03abec5382e412cf817c6555f
cf81d7e25df3bc3c1b42c103dcb07d3c2020e24c
'2011-12-22T12:19:54-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00016.txt'
87a2ccfb5149d6e26fbb753e92a179a4
c843773f774b23e6bd911b1cd1f5b48fe830f1c6
'2011-12-22T12:20:10-05:00'
describe
'4241' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
8715fee06b6b93247f689460f00ad412
a90de6900d1d1d14dd29891812dab60ea1da6584
'2011-12-22T12:18:19-05:00'
describe
'533985' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3e93e9fa4956962ed87182c564110e76
00322eb17db381bc65002f45846631f2a7ea3f7e
'2011-12-22T12:18:50-05:00'
describe
'36698' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c119c11f56fcc13759552094d866e97f
45e6916df22b38f49027a3a11994627873fd7452
'2011-12-22T12:19:05-05:00'
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
a4ac62c058259de324dc796e4189be62
a28e005e66495e0cb557658d1546c9ad67ffbbd6
'2011-12-22T12:18:15-05:00'
describe
'7018' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCC' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
ac89c40045d8e6fbef5897e6595c0517
3938515bff27e17cef487507663321d8ba614028
'2011-12-22T12:19:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
cab5fee14b50abe6bddac39c01d113f8
5dcc0b9c73ccd4bb1809a986333816567190b1cf
'2011-12-22T12:19:30-05:00'
describe
'73' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
8d213f4151eb42f475e0b45ca2dfa30a
b54eb07369da6a5ca615d5593558fb2cdd920816
describe
'1848' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d294b49b13209b419066840ff73ab6ba
963b7e8e2b2aa4a17fa475e94b7e8fa9cbe94667
'2011-12-22T12:18:34-05:00'
describe
'533973' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
202c8d4e6dc50f96531da2f8716d4688
65e7ceea456ddfdc4804b3d42921b5c03b2d3835
'2011-12-22T12:21:47-05:00'
describe
'115031' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
29819c96cd6dc40fd15062a97a0765b1
d5b514a029f9e2e515dee912c007b77d8a16df61
'2011-12-22T12:22:37-05:00'
describe
'16944' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00019.pro'
227c0cc76561d0b717a55693fab2d634
77c1e73a00fd6e55959a6158ced9970da9e48094
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
41d9335f75e16fb2c3458f43f851751a
e9adac60bd738f216622e3561e94a3824cec407d
'2011-12-22T12:20:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00019.tif'
454742f4426ed491ba2c007dbe43d257
7ccef6852465794507b8bfbea6bceb524b400b54
'2011-12-22T12:21:43-05:00'
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4665744c98c268f3874b63f8c03c6414
d984ab2e5fa7a1d7471e2ba7b3b670d7706dbff2
describe
'7426' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
23a45efa515e1bb2abe61335149a48f1
3b7c5d639380849352da86067c32006b318c6165
'2011-12-22T12:19:09-05:00'
describe
'533930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
197ea124ab9ec0f12664f28a6c081e29
f5ecad9f63beed5732d064b406e4db34101d4d53
'2011-12-22T12:18:14-05:00'
describe
'110924' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
2ab6f1f631d9af9912bddf1a2eecb1dd
0d075fa3a8619b7c9701a04f2de5b251144a6853
'2011-12-22T12:18:05-05:00'
describe
'32916' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4dea9db40044268f71b784579b355b4b
66dd3a25d1e05fe9d26cf57b34f51f9ce4b360a2
'2011-12-22T12:21:35-05:00'
describe
'31212' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
9c55ac8270779f64d9e561562a13f8d4
e47965ecc3bac41cdc83f7b830da568b9a6177f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
931581f09faadb127aacae878daae8e6
078a6e740bf3af918c96693ee70f0dbb47730e6e
'2011-12-22T12:21:46-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
3617eb7debee54bfe617b139a58b4fea
c475d7c54726ecb03686352315cb2754af365996
'2011-12-22T12:20:16-05:00'
describe
'7702' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
728bf3fa16f20b7d32d312795457831f
02a139510243861ae147554de6fe04e73fad7c4b
'2011-12-22T12:22:10-05:00'
describe
'533899' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
3ffa924cb5e80e447215f1318920b8d5
74057ce70696ff0d476eeee6897742458d23e26f
'2011-12-22T12:18:43-05:00'
describe
'130212' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a106b61831f37d721db779f1a252e745
af605f2f8276d3e4f60e82c1b9866a3fcbc1b7dd
'2011-12-22T12:22:41-05:00'
describe
'38926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a892d6d463f4101ae63b8f3df1a972f2
582596834af238a47906eebbd89729aab9c353b4
'2011-12-22T12:18:30-05:00'
describe
'36159' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
715196ae353e270aa72db5ba7028cb04
a6b2ad82f911b3c60f733dabcaf347eb22b68490
'2011-12-22T12:21:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ad95f73da4098b2cbc449072e9e0f111
25d11421e9dd58ddc9cd7ca9ca96e78fcfd43bc8
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVCZ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5c031f15002200f3d82ed48c675cdaa4
2081e16e2cb50ff545b882328b093cbd6d235524
'2011-12-22T12:22:57-05:00'
describe
'8090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
77ad4fde42c33c83714819c5903d44aa
1777bddf042584fb3903c6ee5b07f93965cc3a40
'2011-12-22T12:17:49-05:00'
describe
'533932' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
bac5d5846f3f5e16fb4662bad20e3161
ec4c61919a0d98dd7587aa9d5a5c94dcee3c4cc7
describe
'111899' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
ae6e8e76d5102b5656ede8bb5cec9e76
ad57cf1d561c69afb84f1c6adc7577728065f261
'2011-12-22T12:19:58-05:00'
describe
'33410' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
529cf3da55c684fa4e4bf75142c578b3
a8e2ec87f56e687d7b688979de0d780905775510
describe
'32093' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c38340dfe2872e8ae2436bddecb124d5
a3681c96250f223570ae9069335ad8ca0b9cb1a0
'2011-12-22T12:20:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
2919f24ce523ca62f9bad5bcdf99eb38
21715bbd8657bfe144e02cfda7112b0de470fcc1
'2011-12-22T12:20:08-05:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
232b332bc50ebaf4ee86f97944332b63
a5df6b0499d2b2ca31f722d893c1a589555e84e5
'2011-12-22T12:20:43-05:00'
describe
'7452' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDH' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
95f3ea2081d423f74a4d47c5d69ebeba
44de8dbb53f2d9ce203454b3be4245b9f471adb7
describe
'533983' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
90462d730f099e97ef60bbfdf1ed3b97
a8ed1e7f4672f1386be0abe8324e383d32287bf7
describe
'120172' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
eb33bce368fe9e2373d3f23127c9c15e
9233af62de70692f440fbb5847672e149a0ccbf7
describe
'36165' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
498016f97601e06878b00d344e4945eb
0a1c84ec41f9c24fcccfd2762a563b3a24be7ef6
'2011-12-22T12:19:45-05:00'
describe
'35384' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
700bb36a077043299e30a16315c7dfd5
54b1a945cf86050102e863ce9071ca4d9109b6d9
'2011-12-22T12:18:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5e97ae62a38e706a650b51b69b0d8e66
78ac801d76c968b6dff495ebf7bff4706033ff39
'2011-12-22T12:21:30-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c98b677e74c3fd9a6b050953dfac3bcb
911698681d42170c9648d17f792bed5e4d8234af
'2011-12-22T12:19:40-05:00'
describe
'8282' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
467d9f9334bd3a7169102976564d3b6c
07f540b6f3efc5333d5d7ce88f9546db7de67717
'2011-12-22T12:21:48-05:00'
describe
'533967' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
d24c783fc6db5b82153ffb2adf1f8dc7
57897fd19c0739139233cbba4c222d08c256f1c4
'2011-12-22T12:21:49-05:00'
describe
'104622' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d37634bc52a1fe1b73096b31d32897b9
290db67ef2aa8af9d32e1fd468e4f4f1ca176fc7
'2011-12-22T12:19:37-05:00'
describe
'29964' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a5b4d954915ca5e804e9f1a3f4fb0fbf
1ae792667812cdea363efd8ee8865d41ee01fdbe
'2011-12-22T12:18:45-05:00'
describe
'28833' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
894ac3ed61f20a286ca4b031ba25c069
53930b3e794e504b9687d6f611e8b6df778d7604
'2011-12-22T12:22:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
dd030efbdcec8938d95144d6ad23a8eb
fa1d61eb2580986173cf27684d8ae3a3bd333822
'2011-12-22T12:18:21-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
d97b17ccf4c196d0d02d4bf2437f4c4d
2b1c4f878253896b28de80d8652e7e0102f63adb
'2011-12-22T12:20:11-05:00'
describe
'7395' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
612f6d0b45966a2d2b6213189566a49c
d0b4b695bc33562fcd6c70af65e0a55f3120dade
'2011-12-22T12:22:46-05:00'
describe
'533986' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDW' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
dfea30c81699ddbfd13e9d429ad6901e
23a01137def4d6982e1fc09dcc2eb0e40ded4fd5
'2011-12-22T12:19:33-05:00'
describe
'112601' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDX' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
39f4dffad05b9e89ccd159869367a37f
33880b105a4f8414e6fbf073f619dfedd93f7fc9
describe
'33983' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDY' 'sip-files00025.pro'
9c9f0f7661fce54251327db843d60a2f
32cad9d6a8d9416b0166129128ccafe64f710564
'2011-12-22T12:21:55-05:00'
describe
'32128' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVDZ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
85f8b908ad463088a8907e485aeb3bbb
690308769fa33e884174aea3fa3bd3d3f1046883
'2011-12-22T12:18:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEA' 'sip-files00025.tif'
309b77af5e48603f2de97af33f433ec9
cdb575ed9ee4f973a7b94bac3ef55b9ae0976b07
'2011-12-22T12:18:06-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEB' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ba6ec95b7aafe20473e3626f3bfc7aff
f72cab7fc829de97fb43bea9463a5f35b079cbfb
describe
'7627' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEC' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
8160283bcd3273f603a8855ad8ca6a4b
b794a9885322db5e5b695418bfdb9ba5164a098b
'2011-12-22T12:23:03-05:00'
describe
'533962' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVED' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a96e976211369f3cfdb345c71e05e483
265935cae3ebc24cf1d7df809cc45a043f0aea75
'2011-12-22T12:22:06-05:00'
describe
'115304' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8d6d4e0580b996303b6e919a0c3cb9e1
1a03095a8b49580506b293a8aa8a529db5aa9a27
'2011-12-22T12:21:23-05:00'
describe
'33632' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEF' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a0ecddbff43a69a9cc9686c6aac0b7e6
2669e7cc91ad1d0d92f7754dc77d87f109b25ccd
'2011-12-22T12:22:39-05:00'
describe
'32778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEG' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c0de19a48fab72cc47851aeeafd91716
999a0a6c140dd168d54358637a4eb25f6279469c
'2011-12-22T12:18:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
1cf7f86c44b08c4ebfa57c00828bc755
8e91f634546fa4d236d7738f893b55cfcee6a8f1
'2011-12-22T12:20:27-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEI' 'sip-files00026.txt'
cefc46e28e9bbf66a7085f8e338fcdbe
45d40483e076a5d85c1e5cbe1ef8823103458dba
'2011-12-22T12:20:12-05:00'
describe
'7769' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d146a692eaf74c000e8dd6fdb4807cbe
9c89185a98b0b87ad867faffbb6a3c28160b2089
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a1bf3e7a43672e8602f371dd4154a420
63c63dfed521376db2f29a4e14c3741515765bb4
'2011-12-22T12:19:44-05:00'
describe
'107579' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEL' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
16b8e55b93cfdbc0b845d16b64817790
32321244399e7efe6ad3f20a90f9cb65452bbff1
describe
'31613' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEM' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0d60f971b12a69f6c27ce8c2c615ace0
2ea1f081e43a26aa86b9556aa334a8391619ab31
'2011-12-22T12:21:42-05:00'
describe
'31026' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1dfea700893054274b7545c50a11693b
750a6f42b31d46d3fcf5dbee6855dc22b1cd3182
'2011-12-22T12:19:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
8e4c8a4868517cf3066e8b1bc322ad7c
7b1b54cc5c53f29a9979500442916a0cc4cc68d6
'2011-12-22T12:18:23-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
f964f88398ab4b89f7d7df297d9bdfdf
86114e4219be65bc4299e10c907f7c15ec375b7d
'2011-12-22T12:20:29-05:00'
describe
'7437' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEQ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
94b888949dee04d4e95fb0fe52ef9a8a
346ff41d164ce1188e43bb96181d1a439693db19
'2011-12-22T12:17:58-05:00'
describe
'533982' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVER' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6bf251bee1d7ee4f0b6baceae96ee469
89b7600a11d7cf37ac6115898f6eee5c2e505743
'2011-12-22T12:20:39-05:00'
describe
'112571' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVES' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
202bde1707e5359899e148d647f9267f
9dc00f1a9bffcb02aec3543da04a94e86b84c5c0
describe
'33209' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVET' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e332abea1ad92e97459de51dee3a2aef
d44b5548f4e64a5aaecaba437aa0372a369b5388
'2011-12-22T12:20:22-05:00'
describe
'31813' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
bc1fc292fc33b7b58b87eb5317b9b0f0
bc136f95f98257c20e130ca8b93c289f6a54b93c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
379e9c594371e7fcec74446bbd7385d8
a7dc205a62df7ad6620ed970bc283ca1cf9bcfe4
'2011-12-22T12:17:48-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
32105701fab6901d6d62938cb252b4de
49ec82f6543e91035b8ecdd0d5b09d94e3a4fa09
'2011-12-22T12:20:42-05:00'
describe
'7878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
a996f654b3fc0647972c4b194d252c17
8337fe582f7537b9dc559a69cd192170759655f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a01e895f1205af1b44e96376f9dda175
4ba9e1d138e7b9e85bcfe3b82bbcf36c7c85881b
'2011-12-22T12:19:34-05:00'
describe
'118116' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVEZ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
dd021ed2c6fba5ff823430e65cc65a41
179699555be53e784537de241acb38cca7bd9f57
'2011-12-22T12:18:51-05:00'
describe
'34949' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ccbae0ac9ce5f0a19a7e65f08d699d6b
07750d5284f9c5f59e897ddf5368d2a8d19a3a8f
describe
'33627' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
552cef7efe7399e2a533d189a68069f6
4e1765982c358b52ff05c9feff6c44a63bc208d8
'2011-12-22T12:18:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
83d3c59c85f389a8245f9077cd5d105f
fbc1cdf7fc466c92a811837e0e2280612c2501a8
'2011-12-22T12:22:47-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFD' 'sip-files00029.txt'
290aaa8ee453a9fd28e42185f252fd5a
7aeef68a34298ce1ac52f57fe9af0789a620b6ce
'2011-12-22T12:20:57-05:00'
describe
'7624' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFE' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f740e16d597c6a4aa7bd31cfd0fa1e40
1e3dec67751973b57776ba7b4f45accecbf066e3
'2011-12-22T12:21:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFF' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
8a4af6f8741d28986c7471621f275244
720fdec0701a7bc3f8e9eaaab439c5165ff9b1ee
'2011-12-22T12:22:13-05:00'
describe
'114002' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
0cd18de88d5144439a3606afd21ab850
aeb50003ccc68775fce681275fe335aebcf70a56
describe
'35034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
01e4c488abb70c051110f9cbe8e941e1
9e1d842a4766b5d1c9b9224414353c5235166fe7
describe
'32828' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
c91226a17761f3b3578b745fa0bc4086
6eee98adc6ba66958e4544ea99219e0b8fc1de2f
'2011-12-22T12:18:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f1f9a9ed36ca14da2fecbe358ec6eebb
3f46b3358431b628c110123051194c378efab142
'2011-12-22T12:18:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFK' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f3152a60e4a8d42d06ad7e3c66146db8
c307c808e4e97b013b299b9fc994b5780f0b2597
'2011-12-22T12:20:03-05:00'
describe
'7836' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFL' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
135334c65a1c12be57e965f457852431
e0d71aed06007f8528f3f5bffff0b77ec97a34fd
describe
'533936' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8692f22d318eea98a11155940939af25
cc827126dea92891a25233b15213630839825d22
describe
'93639' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFN' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3a84316f664a6f3a6353ae8a790bca35
41ae532bdb5820c3e42c0776dc9ff47ea11d6c0f
'2011-12-22T12:22:58-05:00'
describe
'26027' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
112abbdf1169016a9142dbf0fa8da516
a63441a16c34402232d3e5c8500901e19c332fee
describe
'25335' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
490f34e6553453ecb6e049b35e241c33
dcee71eb77f5b8e7227eafda386b8d57103d7775
'2011-12-22T12:20:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
3dfc46721015f4513c46814394039b83
f459468b6b5c7e358d55c176e5471fffd297663e
'2011-12-22T12:22:56-05:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFR' 'sip-files00031.txt'
1afe5ea856b69a979a4157f274544f9c
d02a60ef8ed39968c0560e9cc1a7d672e4682ece
'2011-12-22T12:20:36-05:00'
describe
'5783' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFS' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b24b47a9e26553b3fddf70aee9c35252
fdbf750a9863c88fc21abea6006e1580594c6004
describe
'533654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFT' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3f3392742b745a09d1c524d482f0b666
5e4799426891bed20700377eb92218f0e8e7ad63
describe
'33949' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFU' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
c8b9d886aaabdf4328102589023f55a9
12c84760b5289b5e93a1b8b13dcc48b4c71808a3
describe
'5922' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
965a3cf58c968d236f8b8302d8be39b6
31047639dbd2990a61052f7dc743cbc6d683a202
'2011-12-22T12:19:13-05:00'
describe
'4288792' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4693529e2693e5cb9de29fa63534c17e
ca595a817995dfda4dfdb18b41f2de89a2115c06
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFX' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
217b939ad6fd5c5a8d76a66c82a6f5d4
38aa091f229fb6f7ab0d4f52340238b38143f3c9
'2011-12-22T12:21:20-05:00'
describe
'533684' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFY' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c85023b9d3b1f85e4de724ec6f90b9af
5b86e7e4026083a01e8185b655645534b46583e2
'2011-12-22T12:22:38-05:00'
describe
'34651' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVFZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
34be495688f37a328bb68f2cc5fe033d
64113a2fe8b6741eea1d607647a4d13b1cf716b7
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
7f84e0c5d6a3c9286c51e2c5335f7116
9f3c32e2a7fea9e08de77cec3a8ba0c039230017
'2011-12-22T12:22:28-05:00'
describe
'6333' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
04b5204b0ff90d35da4b8d7f25798fd6
2221e4dd050f4d789a0c1bfe4bca9b7070684543
'2011-12-22T12:18:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGC' 'sip-files00033.tif'
07a0778962d4e49a48720eee6254be63
ebc86528b31061dbdeb30a8601eaa88828b256f3
'2011-12-22T12:18:35-05:00'
describe
'94' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGD' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6d56110770c672cce4486cdf1b91a797
53b3669e74733cb393016f3e126c652687b662b3
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGE' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c5eb4e05acece4d4fe341138d7a5c7b7
e6b0ab8ae199617e50ca4d1f4087e2c0e26daacb
describe
'533868' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGF' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b974508385846e94c9d49aa6742e6808
2f3963d72b20c09c24adede8c870af12f784acf1
'2011-12-22T12:19:15-05:00'
describe
'33178' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGG' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
1bd5ad05d0b5a344eb5c097177e0c11a
cc9a212a18573df1ac94e5a085113f393c4e34bf
describe
'5656' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGH' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
d76cae9ac408b93b0d07dbb2eadf2a30
3bb8dcfd3b677b0aa4af8f675a695a41961916f5
'2011-12-22T12:21:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGI' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2543154cb4839ee473fadad585d4f865
a70454eaa7691bdcaece417d4adc497bdad50582
'2011-12-22T12:19:27-05:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
89fce3bdbbc905aa1d96bd553b235732
e6468e750ad8d789285c60cdba754a226b1317c0
'2011-12-22T12:20:45-05:00'
describe
'533980' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
0b5d608aff61affce3b439f87280ed38
8212724b800e45f91facd0fb374c969cd07843e8
describe
'123915' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
250cdee4da271b4ac5cc4a7220742a8c
496ee57e94d903722357128a5ac11f980f1a2033
'2011-12-22T12:21:27-05:00'
describe
'20215' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
c77259e27a3dc164c83ace26e1d8e75d
f79fcd07d5185bbf4e1ab2a99378bbad93a83d86
'2011-12-22T12:20:19-05:00'
describe
'32680' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
0876ca466fbca27bb73b15061bb65852
8c60c372d2a72aa7271183a210ef70b3d8bb36fd
'2011-12-22T12:19:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a138767353a8a17feda49d553ff8e1f8
58dc9b1bd377cb52f19922856ccdcb61fee10aed
'2011-12-22T12:21:38-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c144ad3f355d4336c7055a776ada58c0
cf75fba61fb0b118b59db36a5f721e26084073e9
'2011-12-22T12:22:40-05:00'
describe
'7728' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
d0a45b3d06fbea5a6113a94551028008
a905270f95e577af1be121f55c3682290dae9a8f
describe
'533997' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
515bc3f4c16309d29d98ea958b787a8f
b24a257c119b7777dfbef23dd0c8c922ad80b6be
'2011-12-22T12:19:39-05:00'
describe
'111396' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
bc88c15855c913ac0cab5a29eab8ec92
2af443f51eb6fff451bb3f3dfe616b35169c49ec
'2011-12-22T12:21:14-05:00'
describe
'35128' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
36fe15965f55f0f2bb18dd2e77636203
8e58ae49f84036d02af5ab71cfec2387022309a5
describe
'31406' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c9fe817427f48e703428c44c04bf5f31
c1a2ec67389d31dd73192c49610c101bffa52123
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
532cf54ef7571148ade5306ff355d433
51795375f5f78e8acd54e45b65c830168aa820d9
'2011-12-22T12:21:28-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3ee18543e5c5b12b56cab1be2ba56397
a6abe181c5c365a3d3d1366800e09e8264168cfb
describe
'7419' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
5b04c505ed57a5c32e70e8a6a678b77b
9b69dac8b7559c975cdf930807336d2497600f1d
'2011-12-22T12:19:47-05:00'
describe
'533989' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e4365f3a114b0e30e6ad3a99bbab2feb
baca99af46759c7fcb473f89cfe96a7744704704
'2011-12-22T12:18:27-05:00'
describe
'121509' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
82dfb10f953c0a48e511a2749800b03e
62b9124483638ebcd8fd9e6f90cdbcc57413b4c8
describe
'39198' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
956e5f3829020b35fa163760eff94be6
ffd55f903891d1ed1ed2305bb3836d12b204c9b8
'2011-12-22T12:20:50-05:00'
describe
'34601' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b2e05379c98d7b18ccb3cedd73aad358
618d80a86c4a2cf68cc6d196979999be9fc71705
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c925602f13d0d6a28261de846b6338cd
5132ec91c234bcc8e8bbde008f74c6e33ad594bb
'2011-12-22T12:21:36-05:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
7d7d1dbf066239438d1c12ecf51d1a0b
b33f09301a95d34074162f146db541d66ce19a01
describe
'7991' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHE' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
297bfe3784ad25d2ede3e0c6401ed0df
e4941864255c46d9ba2ff768e688475263f14ab7
describe
'533716' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
28b16aa5e1617dcfb4d765777fbbbd76
b820902a7f687d31732b5f049ca1cbfdd539205f
'2011-12-22T12:18:54-05:00'
describe
'127849' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ad292724e8842ed1becab1be72e04928
ea929edaa2dfc16be5dcd14a61bb2a37e4f519d7
describe
'39310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a47883919e091ca87a84363248f5cd35
df0998e5b6cacf319ce6ba1ba5dd60d34bb447b4
describe
'35993' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
89d050d5eefa3661634b44839eaff4df
c175104b64caef8ae75542b19c42ae658d324f84
'2011-12-22T12:22:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c85ad01197e1ad53a96e56cd117f91da
749f0276bb5184dbf5440006f0cb9c059520bd5a
'2011-12-22T12:18:16-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
21d0a6168dec26f354b7aa013fd9a7ef
cdd744ca8c482e5e2ec62ebe8b23e9596ee44dd4
'2011-12-22T12:21:13-05:00'
describe
'8115' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
5862ad38b3ae9cba9bba3df9d0d5a956
befad49ad3e80b6d6ce2b047e555942427c08b28
describe
'533978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2354e9a0d16d5a60133d63125432ee9e
900902bc40c14e534c859f72547536fbd87b52ea
'2011-12-22T12:21:11-05:00'
describe
'113404' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
be8adc534ce78d446949fccd1863e446
0011ae27869d7c71fbd97353212d80caf8333c71
'2011-12-22T12:19:59-05:00'
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
200bbf909a38440b662ef31491c1a952
875efecfd7f08232b2673ebac4768cbab43b102f
describe
'31801' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
235b3836193075da0616c5a8008fe24a
3ac1b43623f8525e8c6148c6142e208f03f8d273
'2011-12-22T12:20:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9e1d1724ac993006656124698d2671b3
e4de0cde12da0ff704249eed79e80f623cf50c66
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c296e09f81d30297bcb9f55530c9fb6d
84554b878a3a60b501f2ff282d83fcd14088d7f1
describe
'7412' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3f79359360cefb512f515e8bbf5c22aa
6feb5116f50661fa86b5f729f2bd0cd2aa634946
'2011-12-22T12:22:49-05:00'
describe
'533825' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
e2bfcbb5e8dd64cc91dd34d2bb2ecf4a
1bca6c2088409c1c444e5376450971ce791cc50b
'2011-12-22T12:18:13-05:00'
describe
'108657' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
2a561cbd398a27cf95b133fab235180d
63e530551453b6cfb47088c888b42d41f0102642
describe
'31937' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
cccd031652fff8bf8ae2f3cda1420c38
73aa327ed3d6b40257157880b212975fab95ac82
'2011-12-22T12:19:28-05:00'
describe
'31999' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
2c4c6e28a657195689cf84d3e144724d
d9cd565ec2555d7d255b714a37a78fedbbc5bd0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
35b2091f9066ab7c7f7df5b62d9ab4ee
ee7a5c222f02376213fe2956c984aa635ac16d51
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
28703361ba57d79368b6c60bbabdf4c5
f89cc09e49a5b1369eee56c3b1f0ffb1fcafcac5
'2011-12-22T12:19:12-05:00'
describe
'7619' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
c4b45e3c0021fb82371dc170767b22b5
f48bbf98f8444a39fcb442c4e399f39d71494836
describe
'533896' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4154c31c091eb12e6f03e5c16584a385
2c3ea66f9e776a76a95acce041077e0262a751a0
describe
'116682' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c4225ec8e258650e9294f11d2c90e409
5ffd63d8f04a917888b7d29dccb22d3da3322554
describe
'35631' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
93712564504b6ba4f5214705066fd417
4e954f95c3df6e38545716632017c7638a895e00
'2011-12-22T12:23:01-05:00'
describe
'32069' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVID' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
dfb2de42b34d0c1b2df2c303c28eba28
c219d057d5a77602313b6c89549b727b2a2b7e29
'2011-12-22T12:19:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
5a46430d033dd7d55089dd6a8a5dd8c9
ddd0f03382dd7b3e64ce4930ffa159ff72b88765
'2011-12-22T12:22:07-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIF' 'sip-files00041.txt'
dfdd2ec331db355872be0edccd6992be
adcfbe73a09ccc60fca017394fa24b244509c6fb
describe
'7763' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIG' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
8b6719d43680496993db353b192c8395
e16bd017919e76e06dd989e33ac9b3ba7b5e62ac
'2011-12-22T12:20:55-05:00'
describe
'533987' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
8ae2b9880b82bd18023ad0a033431bb5
9b73a579ddf45a87182c8223d27d87f96fd2d008
'2011-12-22T12:18:09-05:00'
describe
'114481' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVII' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8d97aa584d625abc70e19871b48b5ffe
fb383bb5bd078015745029e6edec6d2432abb1f9
describe
'34134' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
47c9f1d898489fe33aaae1ea09b8c9da
32dce3fedc6464216eae236c40a3f0e62a589ea0
describe
'31895' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
47ea25a98ba4f17bfe8bafb4d1ae3240
0b8e1ab647a1a83658e4b408fbaf1356f284ed01
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
fe9f13129034954286486ebfafeab741
d31c08ba5aba01e4fb5d5a3769ff3a1d909faa36
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
9bf56c05fd57aad2d6716d64dbca3c5f
654036cbc43bf4eb2cc64bb4f13c8dc71b421c08
'2011-12-22T12:22:20-05:00'
describe
'7531' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIN' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
51fcc406c6259fd264da500f0165156e
3742fa8f6d7fe43de37ab26d87281b81538ab884
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8cd25051b4e87707a529d300c1547964
c7ff65fd3975e815c6b63cd802092c2941a550f4
'2011-12-22T12:18:53-05:00'
describe
'112453' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIP' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
dd9f1aabda502ced33ed6919001fddda
ebe993b5455eedf1ef3956be3f77090e2ed1790e
describe
'34023' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
6edb144e8786cf7f4b707dd938215913
c8149f502d45d73ac49bd7ef0eb046e945d1adb5
'2011-12-22T12:17:59-05:00'
describe
'32340' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
660ffb61601ae1fe02af38b7316bb1d2
ce1c93f0aec0f66fb2b5cb930eb6d27ebc612fff
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d7f389ba240ef82ed812ac07a60092b4
874c41594cd072baf72c0ff0aa67abd8bcd51c3f
'2011-12-22T12:19:17-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIT' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a672f9d2c3cd3e0456c63868308cb085
88e9bfe08334b52289cd0ed88474c8030c60f587
describe
'7780' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
905e6dc4b3387bde32e47b2fb430cf2e
c1e86c537c4c77fbc89cdca219544fb672dbcfd8
describe
'533950' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIV' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
14bc4dcc8ea99ccef4ac54c30a6782b1
baf34dcceadda41ebc84aa2e38d6f9a65e57ce28
describe
'116470' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
de6ff084c9fa34afb3ee7a2e5b3c8f03
ff1eede09fad2a11876b18ea0e58d99a954b5c20
describe
'34788' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIX' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c363dac13632769882a82011db044e8e
905173e49799d67fa9cc141951c1ffde954e1e90
describe
'32959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIY' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
1377aa7c46a4ab8b12df2bba582e85b7
7b0e31d2cb83d83540966faf5945daa3d8812e46
'2011-12-22T12:22:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0c50df66a5c47cf99c2745b1d2ae4db6
ff255b6d8d10b60cffca432fead9b04335fa8274
'2011-12-22T12:21:44-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJA' 'sip-files00044.txt'
a01ada755b37a3ed153302c36186c6c4
af8c6ae2c6f0e32dc80724447bb65326de237b7f
'2011-12-22T12:22:12-05:00'
describe
'7690' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
5f30db609ba83aaa53a053736fd5d97b
c40439ac12a79ba4b066a632e721a27d7a206e7a
describe
'533994' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
bae20e49a497124935e685e81cdf216e
2600d5d65190de08a3bbae8b5f1b88b40f14e0ec
'2011-12-22T12:19:22-05:00'
describe
'116132' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJD' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7f867b51ebe6db0bb7599910d5bccc9f
de5cc01d5c9f1f6a8fc95ddbc6e41b16bf96fa26
'2011-12-22T12:20:38-05:00'
describe
'36003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJE' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3d7bda025681166a842493d0ede5edfb
82c8522d7f0f726194454b8c22b0239d68c1dbea
'2011-12-22T12:22:03-05:00'
describe
'32930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJF' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
9f16ff85721fe7fe31b97ab0477b0d9d
7055284f205ee90eb6eb9bf37a59c2a720e9f0c3
'2011-12-22T12:19:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJG' 'sip-files00045.tif'
93379c87550a549b77882cd3e9a7d034
47ac8969204fd86b827c1864c9fd4e0c0eb2fc0a
'2011-12-22T12:19:46-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJH' 'sip-files00045.txt'
8fa3ff1a73342215bcd60e348d6a6e01
879ca65c58d4b947c818f32c7dfe4feb86bd13b5
'2011-12-22T12:20:07-05:00'
describe
'7694' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
65315cb707fd92e41982c67c8f73e73b
aa6b5e9c36008e2613f60085ad041837b6f3e311
describe
'533955' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
1bbaa1281efc24ac97f75e4845599f17
c42498c56b4779b5587a1374e4f71098a8294777
describe
'111271' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJK' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3180eb7ceafe90f3f282999339a7fd2b
a9d096fa0bb05cc7b3f41d6cfb9350ce58d011c3
describe
'33089' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJL' 'sip-files00046.pro'
44eaf73f1b37c2efba6ada1076e9155a
5e77387f4fb0d5abd948801655bee0b85a6d9440
describe
'30887' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
9c1784a0a2d07a4ec4c6d9c7339c8f92
6fc1e2a539a1ac807c97fb9c6cec717b63eaedec
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJN' 'sip-files00046.tif'
9d33909241110dc74c2b66d33cea032e
25dc24baef58170e174509097f0a9063a19bd830
'2011-12-22T12:18:37-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJO' 'sip-files00046.txt'
653b270088170176cc9ec69d64c1b9c7
27578f34ef670bf614a5b4754498e0add00b43bb
'2011-12-22T12:21:26-05:00'
describe
'7250' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJP' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
02bd18a10fabd5fe1970df2758ba9c3a
a760d0da6bb1884a18aa9ab34d510df603d1166b
'2011-12-22T12:20:06-05:00'
describe
'533957' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
44bd9daa26193ce49b147062a3057a55
80bbb7a51f267a1809895c3b272f8aab68f25e37
describe
'124232' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJR' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
7f412a787c707face7057e7abb851bca
2ab5835f674e0cee2723c15cdb4d2d522da24bb7
'2011-12-22T12:22:48-05:00'
describe
'39831' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJS' 'sip-files00047.pro'
60854c7d7a757cc4bed16be341715237
08ad7a20bad81cb7b66714f2be7a12304f010bfe
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJT' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
87f99988573e15da73109b11b5a56439
b82ccc08b659fa736ec7015000165b1b45561715
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJU' 'sip-files00047.tif'
607f2876fd6b287dfacdab891f00b6c8
5aa45be43fac5dda1212f0c892d7d25420d9b8c2
'2011-12-22T12:21:18-05:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2b1b74bc8a0b7cd6a8a2ab6410cee131
8dd2de192e8c67d4849bc4f8822cc279150fc9be
describe
'7841' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJW' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
b953f3c28202ea18a7532ba4bb8d672f
8ee31be47ea42659d696cf85b7149bd3a561bc6e
'2011-12-22T12:20:05-05:00'
describe
'533988' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c62a643ec49fa795d4a667c95194e1b1
7672a9508733f947c597819973189210505f1cef
describe
'120057' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
67affa5c555e3b18fd44cefab8a97014
3c06ed91f14327dad84c2696a07c4e427dd49f77
describe
'36842' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
f57d702b7be0fd1cacd5a5b72fe0226f
88a240a579b407ca0646c29059a8e2c53fdf6335
describe
'34481' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
eb5b875102ca2bba001f080eb00cd6bd
903030ae4cbffe02f506c8aa0dfe47eee412efea
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d36defaa163f3d2af705fd552884c31a
842b4b5551ad1dd9747653cb54272af3b755d90d
'2011-12-22T12:17:52-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
3252dc1b4e37d9191f7310e13581dace
b840bb8b65667e836e0c6f31af14dfcf5abe4578
describe
'7831' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKD' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
611cba9038f8a6663f5d9a610fa89d13
3c804101c14e227a08690efecc2e44fd6add14fd
describe
'533971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
bb4e35b60c9475ba3fc0218fc634a192
0d81b28cf9a90382c140b3b4c4b6fdcca14bb2a6
describe
'120793' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKF' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7eb6809edc8713f916ba3fb0e0b02a7e
c023083bef957c7990bdf727ee633b306bf958d3
describe
'40034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKG' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0f83612af7d5e12e9318152bcd1fbc0e
7da7416f4eedd2ad0499625486f1d9a1e24de731
describe
'35358' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKH' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
52dfc5127ab18a0e826f31d6bb9c72a2
0623649edab012ff3a6252346e2511e955366491
'2011-12-22T12:18:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKI' 'sip-files00049.tif'
ae37dfa1dd8f296130559d4626cdeaed
986e53d312915e15c88d5640a27124c41d249a11
'2011-12-22T12:18:00-05:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0bbfc6cd64ef0f6c532277697233fe6b
545c51022f071a8cd24a5f66d9c56a32d07c6f68
'2011-12-22T12:22:33-05:00'
describe
'7985' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
068420244094ef604ed41dd32eeadd85
184da198bf17c70f20269a8c081925fc5965ec8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKL' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b0cfdc8d62ffe868e6bfb6976cd9eb6e
e55058a29ae38cbd952167c569198f56a96ec2cd
'2011-12-22T12:18:44-05:00'
describe
'87036' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKM' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
0b82f9f90c26ed7bae1772461db53ca8
0fd1b67776da403066a387ab7ed27eee5862627a
describe
'24047' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKN' 'sip-files00050.pro'
91e4d50853f2b4921a5fdd76fe4c4184
9385eb0253e00de70d4bfb66ca1261872be4ebef
'2011-12-22T12:21:16-05:00'
describe
'24441' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d9cc9323dc23bb6bcf496ed58f1175a8
d71107cf36a3b1ca9a8c2d87070dff4b98009247
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKP' 'sip-files00050.tif'
25fd3a9de59b2677766076e516cfea84
8aa07cf7b0c2a4d858798513bb5cbbd602704880
'2011-12-22T12:18:25-05:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a37b8ccb6fbf3f62717649fda8690e59
e2528e589db44a4fc1dda91c67fbc1858880838a
'2011-12-22T12:20:37-05:00'
describe
'5488' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6154d593f464524e6ee5d4239a2d7dba
e3b51276db8ce71b0116a83634f01c53ac022530
describe
'533970' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
58142202a9245b73dbb74224bb8b3969
5d2c2ed6a3b96a46718e51a506a730125869031b
describe
'32292' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ae1e8f25d6607d0281deeb33f52ca84a
c133a2f2f2e076072f100ead36933e9d19472562
describe
'2320' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
8278a479a94a0f5f80813b5376c66f77
fe03ab0c0bcfdfa58119be3fe430d4eaa82f597f
describe
'6264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3fe20de810138bc12549150e7ab29542
532877b4d7ff60291724036bc17b3da170d68c29
'2011-12-22T12:22:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
da0392e519da66f82c753edcf3002dcd
e74b03fa272ea441b609e9b739d9cce31fd321df
describe
'122' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
659a159488d64263bd8cb8162019e1d1
9671ee09871e745e715a54711ab5fdd04e49fd68
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
7e870e9a450cea756521957706e17b43
2dc82529fb622d126be0ad917cae5330d891c923
describe
'533879' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVKZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e381477a5fd08c3ae4c0aeca1df8dc09
0458280c82cacf4f3540b9dd9b0ac7d7fea5b043
describe
'27098' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
9203895c4513aa51f642c8c4877a482e
322bb09468f5d09af895c804b0b000b68bf44581
'2011-12-22T12:21:33-05:00'
describe
'4478' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
66a695ece1b61ef29f9aa55c9a1505ad
652a0a8939a8380900081e83a187c33bab5ffa14
'2011-12-22T12:20:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8106ce5bc5199ec560fcf3a4059e185e
1eab0b8a2f0fdf8a0d3cb4e0e581139e435f0695
'2011-12-22T12:20:02-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLD' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
00a6e9d0c7f235f815822039ddc0a817
b4ab5112f6e0ed104459b96e54cae5383808ea11
describe
'533945' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
0b6dd772046e5e75107d6699507c98fc
0c389269b347d48580f1c90b79f91d099af5f6f8
describe
'112135' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dce4638b15ea043486d67530f8e5c58b
7317170e12481e9525c235828adea3610b1f3db2
describe
'17892' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLG' 'sip-files00053.pro'
214062b7b09fdcca5f2eedffe1813261
eabcabd0b16732dc4f2badb8282dd925d822115b
describe
'30011' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
a1ddeaffc8d9b5dcdc2ab9a0eee02537
67a128368b63acd0fdf2d8376b0066ad8f23deb4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLI' 'sip-files00053.tif'
16e43638739713cd706f7e4c35e0e0bb
637f60f89a8d96321f240edc86b5dbda8a33af28
'2011-12-22T12:20:00-05:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLJ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d9fac1e62387bb416a5c4754ab260654
dc2ec17f34ab79d82a3bb4b9c9aad301f9aecc59
'2011-12-22T12:22:17-05:00'
describe
'7408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLK' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
5ce8969f394f17bd8b90b3e5ec061046
49a7a640e452a21cb5a857746adcfc0dca3214af
describe
'533992' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLL' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
8a6e8e9c55a78eb3e8e7c9ec4866a02c
46cee74eb39a0aaa8f53b19e73f195048df0eadf
describe
'112152' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
5f918796899a39638994bb3bd4216903
072b202907dfc927792d3252f890fba3b4fe6335
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLN' 'sip-files00054.pro'
f575527e603f381dd05a844d1a5a6708
3c6a3bd8d3e035bb83ff33339c31893c60fb8043
describe
'32043' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
11aa9ff0d26932e0694f8f05353a072a
c8faf61863222851d493eb0356d4f7217e12efab
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8266b68317be0e8521cf10efd943650f
c5aba825388202bf7bc7946ade69d38f682d27d0
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLQ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
238cbf3f24cf5bbc0b81a9c91f42c2ca
0caa176c26a8e02be37caa0a46535371b588a101
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLR' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
141a47457bce919f1a916944ea59ffc2
f8286eebd1de91373d5a5cf6f6c8753d85638722
'2011-12-22T12:19:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLS' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
43239bdf7a17ad9b1766375d8ce4c44b
f30dbdb9f87ff5e4594d9597e53d0ca2d623f18b
'2011-12-22T12:18:20-05:00'
describe
'109566' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLT' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e8d87822de88057a24565b16411f8be5
bb31b86731f614ff999901856b5172239fb24884
describe
'34053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLU' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6db37c400dd158735b9771b8e634779c
8f595f22726b2d287c133a5dc12dca2f3d0394ae
describe
'31873' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
dcaf74e1d7b82bbf1fbf2fbda5e91998
49da2ba4c0c7b156632edcca9090f696e04d118e
'2011-12-22T12:20:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLW' 'sip-files00055.tif'
501bef425a38eaffd35a2ee2d3f6beee
3dc199e9ee43dd16334fa1a5844b303840d8112b
'2011-12-22T12:20:59-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLX' 'sip-files00055.txt'
cb578fa7265aa7f8a07872ae5fdd8ab4
f5ce8e76abba1d82581ffed7dca3181bcd09abcb
'2011-12-22T12:22:26-05:00'
describe
'7393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLY' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
fd714be1d63367e65e10050640c31a64
6eacbe66ce63b1f53b615dc5f71179e89386e0a3
describe
'533951' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVLZ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
a73bec529e135e1d7acb9ed71358176e
a5e69a9c88d1336429b7b3393172b37cdf79bcc3
describe
'102222' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMA' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
127558e1bf2a7e1aa3aa22c7491c8d4c
1283abcbade48318a6ec1f5bb43360ff88ba87cd
describe
'31762' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMB' 'sip-files00056.pro'
01801524564511edbc1453725a5b724b
e539cd5714f360174fa855b466cb38c0335e9249
describe
'29432' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
4335ea1527fa351178b9e4b1c8383410
ce6d1bc7fe7136f383e17f2f9b609e5070abb30c
'2011-12-22T12:19:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
96546c8a062b39582db948a3c9f15679
840e335ec53dc96657fcdbdb6ed981f37ee6c866
'2011-12-22T12:22:27-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVME' 'sip-files00056.txt'
907c4c2e3018add841a93813155b4a2d
e7272a3ff5e8e9545e29b7e5430c9c943d6d4f04
'2011-12-22T12:19:43-05:00'
describe
'7457' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMF' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
42cb85b51ebbdf98279b88ee1d0c0572
ee06744768563239316e21b748499597811203c1
describe
'533965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e0fe824956b629ecd7ff681132af25cb
bfb29e19163f5b8211c9ce22550466ab0d6839b7
'2011-12-22T12:22:34-05:00'
describe
'103506' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
fdcf8f809741ed22b4087bf170bb2181
c72b70b622b72eb0445f90205b8a09e2ad0559f7
'2011-12-22T12:21:21-05:00'
describe
'31616' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
94bc75216c217e7cc82b3b5ff3e744a4
b951e43f7b074b031e66be9b71b67e06d278a362
describe
'29223' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMJ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
e29f5273c2cf65020e27f24fce910724
2c7efe7a808b2116af6f9df4cbbb0ef4c2c3e639
'2011-12-22T12:18:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
a56056b15ccb7f8127152455f75ec297
24fb65b0423c7e407ce0664b71823dc0b011c881
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVML' 'sip-files00057.txt'
57ef260efb1b5264a9217c3ce2ab9f27
79a78c6839584633f6772ad55ab87feb06042eca
'2011-12-22T12:18:42-05:00'
describe
'7364' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMM' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c5ec80cfa17f4bbb411ebc4d11a05072
f0ca2dcccd388119679fdd49d534a1272699abd3
describe
'533810' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
9a967cd5bba8dc65b32f829d344e0bde
800cfd93792e7750bf81da9f52d68e17c1cb1743
describe
'106484' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e86befac1b25f75011edf17226a06c86
836ed8b78bab08efedc214dbf74f384aee4a2817
describe
'32964' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
732b45867d36f4f13af464bfa15c4f19
532b3cd70bcef4a3b12e40a71d1188bd41d156f6
describe
'29951' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMQ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b8b4979e592d29ecf5cf9d104e522f46
478cd4c62726e67fce35704395fd07f61482cb51
'2011-12-22T12:19:04-05:00'
describe
'4288796' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ba81be115dc54c4b362ff5c2200e1dce
375bb057de48a0899d85923ba2a7cb4c3e5c5c8c
'2011-12-22T12:21:59-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMS' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e67d038e779cca8217201d1619265b04
6e2282afaebdd0cf9bd38ae85be3c2c1c7e8bc36
describe
'7256' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMT' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3d89344f7fdf369a34d1753a34af6cb9
169f87e6fda0a14d70ce3e2b1f40cac3dc7b39ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6861540cc276ccb4ae795fa5eacfe095
46c1ccd89eee3d0e52b06fa3663b34fbf180a534
'2011-12-22T12:19:48-05:00'
describe
'105529' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f12b8032dcfb0b4fe32d8cf5c8bff399
35ee45e215c955861f670a73d9aac13f65467c1c
'2011-12-22T12:22:11-05:00'
describe
'32543' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
575b0e901e8303580ff88491a1cf4e5d
1132aaec6340a18e4cd46b023de42c58454274c3
describe
'29439' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a641425297ff3662ccd752c657c5eddf
550a42fb72357bdf10069b46cef59f104336e5b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
8999717ce06e4b8fa7269bbef0b556e1
99c9124d4547bb5f9f8049c70c5ba4005fdabd6d
'2011-12-22T12:22:08-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVMZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
3a892e6eecea83d7bd2c90f346424d1c
db873cd75616fe305510e5d6b18a969ca103ca05
'2011-12-22T12:22:43-05:00'
describe
'7015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
f9e486e58a473b476a2cc92b60542966
4ee2a80058e568fa748054401dab83eede10f42c
describe
'533953' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
357be7079b113a061343919ef9df5310
5c63ac640de1134654dda7ea2cbf812bb8b80f36
describe
'108211' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
fb669af99460bb9de8121cae543b9bab
80017961ff4dacadf721710cb2d0c592425b1221
describe
'34197' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVND' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7ff059bacb5dbac1711de5c57bd84599
c21e4841a2aeda70f48a75366539f0ce28f45aab
describe
'30969' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
fb958ac09a291ca928932879f22a9f7f
d18c43139eda4b2d1fc8f2d03ef93b3c1f200824
'2011-12-22T12:22:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ff2097154f618e1d99afe1f6fe5219ec
889a14cb60aedc34dddee15539e0e22747019f82
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNG' 'sip-files00060.txt'
2233fa4e37639108ec4748ea56d984c9
dcdeef1e8538b224ae0d8e673f5b63d0658211d5
describe
'7919' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a95abd6a24e4d32734b7005c3f32c6df
519b4d389cd8f72594355bc4d8451f6ce773aaaf
describe
'533935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNI' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
63f54e1865afacf3628d4ebb8b678d86
e24212d8046e6a3d218e56817aa423403c945e9d
'2011-12-22T12:21:12-05:00'
describe
'108318' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNJ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
d3412f9c894627abb7d2923d19797355
6e5d45b73803bd8730a1e0c214a169a608c70900
'2011-12-22T12:21:41-05:00'
describe
'34336' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNK' 'sip-files00061.pro'
379832b90aad6d1ede65ef46754aabcb
33c114e65afcf16bf136cdb274010f0d00aec397
'2011-12-22T12:18:39-05:00'
describe
'31308' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNL' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f737e56aee9c0c12add5d07e42515497
c7ad0cc6a90263853ae75ef514961f47eb5ff57f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f52404ef02fd90738c9911c5fb1fd7ea
a919e15098960ca81ff69d8c238c8c2f9ec4fdd5
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNN' 'sip-files00061.txt'
1bd86f52fccae57db7f64030aad2945d
65a27260bc76662c0a574ff816661bc66457296b
'2011-12-22T12:21:22-05:00'
describe
'7475' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
b75803c004d2c7e43fe52719426181c7
adf3afbc26aa221409149852a5370b440486d21e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNP' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
16b45c39753aed480e90c21a4a271789
5b8c2d71b4f7669604dd95f348698d7c93e97784
describe
'111187' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNQ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
aa00e83f2562e48fd1e37092cfb0c9ec
6e22ae5810dfcdd1e290f74112902cfd0797aaf7
describe
'34119' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
07996ad1f71da540e8cffc4e9504b848
206700c2dc271917a62891b35dc9a099fd26b344
describe
'32231' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNS' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a74e98dd8d2fe7765df3bb9fdebf72e7
12c8c14419696a6308d631cafe0cb9ca013b8119
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNT' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c7e650d6a23ecc90ad52d3f0bb0d8827
614eb4b9938a8afc8ef0c590b4602e98efbb9e79
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNU' 'sip-files00062.txt'
143e701a2df508923eeb29e7d7030369
54f386f53623cf9ac47de2d73fefc34fbbb28745
describe
'7612' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNV' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6dafff459f1539f0da2d33446c6721f7
c45659288d68e3c8443b69cb9f8e281e49b5c3a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNW' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
79ec53f24fef8702e2b076730f147a2a
028a2771af4da244048ec8d5bd7f457c9d7d44f6
'2011-12-22T12:20:35-05:00'
describe
'114908' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNX' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
86d2141f64efb77479c931ec601e5919
5d0ae61af78f891e21164c3c58d40de3455ee297
describe
'36913' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
cca910d54073f4ba3e33ba4d64c7185c
e737e93e069be252e4386c957ee653aca48701a8
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVNZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
77c9e3118e3867da4d27caa977943813
6b1adb892585f5c4b3edf3f405bc2770ad51ba3e
'2011-12-22T12:19:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c4ac27a715ebc820a1f60ed245235056
2b0d66b155063cd65133d77c40a271c29ee4ce10
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
1631ec2b2bfe9cedae9af5af1cd6580a
5462146ba05565b49b16a0af3171ac01b14d6484
describe
'7961' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
76ec66a32ad615a4b1caeeb5e43cfafe
d54a7413e159766925227d54273497bef6eee30b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f27689d8cf231507cfff261ef04fdf31
5eef3d3a8e463414cfdc28cc1828eaa402c7633c
'2011-12-22T12:21:04-05:00'
describe
'123487' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d8e3dddbce804c9d664e2db10f6a7254
43017e53491963edf18ffc8a77c4adbd882ea47c
describe
'39933' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
699821748365ebcb117bd478a59fd03e
18d5c321c1dd9a5e1e132fbdc72606c33223ffd2
describe
'35375' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
53ecf71b840dc4c5d0e80565229ae326
b4ded1ec1a80b5ce4709ea437b9037308af9ab8f
'2011-12-22T12:19:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
18aabad64b5470f041bf9d6721b4c08f
82e5eccbe2f96e9ea3422ad55c87c603527ed454
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOI' 'sip-files00064.txt'
95cd59f3ca608c576d4f6daeccfd7f27
41e611f2dfd6e52b4310534c56341a94ad9649f7
'2011-12-22T12:18:56-05:00'
describe
'8201' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
5fd0c4266b8ed23a72ea82bbe841a000
a2062e8a95dc66dc94a33b3fbe6efefee11ca7b3
describe
'533964' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
1ecf75d0128900e1851fe3fabe5991e3
dbe52b4b6d1ae3767dc6dbc177c39800ed765a5d
'2011-12-22T12:18:55-05:00'
describe
'116735' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOL' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
5d2fcbec11e10e51f2d9e4ca47ae4a06
aba7c6a900eeedf598c88ffa51caed92bd34d338
describe
'36971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOM' 'sip-files00065.pro'
bbac0f993e2c56d95a252a218f2d34fa
8c1fcb5bb3d00f9a2b3521c4830abbf821319d17
'2011-12-22T12:18:22-05:00'
describe
'34140' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVON' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
420e4b4e734ad05dfb39be3666603919
67532b88eadf26e3b4eaff5edb16c877539abe8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOO' 'sip-files00065.tif'
0d390fc0d336eb061776e0ba7933e78e
e02db355c73d4df119972e5997d65d41d8502faa
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOP' 'sip-files00065.txt'
d421095f8659efe66127c9c2ac51c76a
7919e3b1fda6f2cffd90825c9d9e80ee2380ad3c
describe
'8069' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
ea78606247d9bf48ba20623432271a7f
744eaa76c4a13b24a89b207ec89504ffd94846c1
describe
'533931' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a7218fdf17742cce63cf35c6f2c5ab76
487d71a5b8569233854ab3dd805da245bf104fae
describe
'69434' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOS' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
30b73ca3866b01d715aded53ef765a17
c9874b82c2c15411d43342014f4adb804f9b9466
'2011-12-22T12:20:53-05:00'
describe
'16061' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
ba936a52310ec3914437b631061d7c68
d8ed67cc7565ce8d1f73b1718dfc71960e5fb639
'2011-12-22T12:19:42-05:00'
describe
'17911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2dd3dc01be16178202e2880113810127
1eeab128344ea382eb4b99e783049e616953d88b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
0e8bed81f85fa67713e5ff4deec15176
7103c9335bf6e8c6fec70353753962d471931e73
describe
'646' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
adc78231a3b1ae86c64515215a631db5
7c158cd735068f926b3a9c495cb71213de25dfe0
describe
'4556' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
08a22aa3806e73ed4a345db069c10a2b
23d572ccc34cf352c2deaebfbd74c0e9d626c19e
describe
'533645' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
969a4a5e4b57b83f22ea328e8a87ff83
b40e134f8e909211d4bc5b8a187ef1493737f04b
describe
'30380' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d0e3a52873203fe1914616fb339d92ed
5d843e46e8e44dc1cb121248d5c6e6cf0ae18727
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b10a57450a53edc62ab335eeba4f115a
51b51b17cf3087ebcd84bd6bcdef1fd2d4620dc0
'2011-12-22T12:19:01-05:00'
describe
'5475' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
4fd2a87d565b537bc5c8a3d468e717b6
941451502c4adbe43a334e11ef6db5f80e893cc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
e66998f6b2ae8fb7a972ee710dc22f25
373d204efa42e41de1d57af3010539dc19a2f842
describe
'70' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPD' 'sip-files00067.txt'
106ec47f5b4e823e6c5a1eb71e10609f
17a2b4f1b06906d4a41bd9f0db56bb8b44802358
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPE' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
39dd5ed6160d31f9d601b167b9602b04
3acec01173c03d6e1c8f0abcb4a20a04411d7328
describe
'533765' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
f944f7123619c0e39aea9c814fc49521
672905050f9f642fddd087dd33d82175cf02f1fd
describe
'31623' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4f1ec038d5a6fa6cfdcbe8addd551e17
67f0f74fcb5c977ccc1f403b201f202577451239
describe
'5284' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPH' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ef0bab33b42767054e7b7fd468914942
a232fe161f021702cad8272491b52cf468f1d8c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPI' 'sip-files00068.tif'
c34157a1df51dd02003d039d366e6f91
e832de983f20fed25d3215fbfd95ef804f52fb6c
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
c5add62d1740de9025ade49d3e799e9b
7a5975fe41a755e45f8e52725b5608860f7888b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
792dff5b2ba466febb5c89daaf036264
79ade35375102eb7c54e36dd5c2e223f38eb055b
describe
'121506' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
c99f2f0940255ed8d7999f1531d482d6
4e69bd1e887de1cce65edba0a2f614b43a84d12d
describe
'18048' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
8d64afc45a8a196794685ea8b42498d7
0b8459604280c026877b87afe95075c0e158f0a2
'2011-12-22T12:21:19-05:00'
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
24515599dbade7dc4e10a5c90c19d682
ba0bf80ef7d2eb976bbc7d249a52973fcdade57e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
62ccb7beb945198aa0bb06f464c813e8
d314d2504266d94c7693687ba035d1f811ca505b
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1ddcefa435aaedc378b8b054c815bfa9
0b7f0fc6024edd2ffa1ab584ff2b9755be306afd
'2011-12-22T12:21:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5ffd3d969a7e1e0fc2bae1cb91b86b43
b70c055d8c0a8b1318f03e11cc55ac23d09cdbf2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
d8789945a7ed950c81f65d9f069f6efd
5ec779a98d64c7f5a585644e853498621e47f3f4
describe
'114042' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6201f801be24bfcd02a381caf7465432
5ce57d8b2bc93730395213e4c6b894a671b50b75
'2011-12-22T12:20:21-05:00'
describe
'35828' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPT' 'sip-files00070.pro'
20691b9c8dbb6bb5b06ac7a7e91bb78b
edef6b4966c1a11a91aa9f3abccbbe4803bfda30
describe
'33646' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
acd2106fab44df8dd8092f2d0f382d0b
b684b2074f210561626476135a191cf8e4f2023a
'2011-12-22T12:18:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
ff9fff15e408c1dfa97fef45a245bbb7
ad87db5add7500e96dd032443f857bb10f3107a9
'2011-12-22T12:19:32-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
501159f441ec26b9597a2ce4ada3d08a
9027d1b12c42cb674ff7e0f31c0404ef0b633cb5
'2011-12-22T12:21:25-05:00'
describe
'7930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b747dec928e45c283976abf271418dc7
c3c0540064f6a87459006b08798a747bf458bfd2
describe
'533940' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e37655dad104287ebd6ce2407a5b5a12
861614ecdc4c2198f61d24b91ae6a8619442f0b5
describe
'101790' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
18d5037622517c810c7d1189922a864e
2a8d4f6f1908b62c0ef9155ef475630102e25c1e
describe
'31128' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQA' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4fc2a29ca8a3c1c5e8d2c2d6846a4cb8
0c16d47365fc939a6943e7fceb91ae19dd305da5
describe
'29397' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
0071bc4d7c5604a129731c796b0e5547
6438edc620eba5a3ef9af519fcc5af614dd624fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
32477f251541f23fc1db4d60dc097b65
24e3500c93ebfc6fd0b3323c731be0c7dacb6060
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQD' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2dd8030bdb92a9214ea7baf37c0b14ff
bb54481fe65eaa2d288b6a75944c16e95f769485
describe
'7041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
1f1fbc8a5a07897df00b4a3042250bdb
bbc4fee97daadb2c42b3dc8f75dc73409c806820
'2011-12-22T12:17:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
cd52a1ce20739d1320e0c7b7a00006f7
8398e1a76f43ac93cb3a3dd2329dc35fabcb3128
describe
'112979' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQG' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5f16ec94dcedaf8391f5d4401f8fe07c
c70aadddec4cf775b064a9cf413e86a1ae511abf
describe
'34872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c067ede1ef1226a4ac4a156de1acf35e
e3c05ec71c4e73cff1e7a428a211e9b773ee677e
describe
'32512' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQI' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
bd9efa0352f0d5b12f8fd3fbad10430a
d360bf9b9bab186bb3ffca100ed727006cad9251
'2011-12-22T12:21:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e8a7f34491ddfcec139a99a3eb4f779a
d885e566675a07967c406743db931432df91c243
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
2e61e342d9cc7d2905e066d41619bc0e
3d128d73ea65c9ad704cf3810ff33e459d22336d
describe
'7541' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQL' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
c0495b36d02308bc810bbf865e2f2e47
7ff163a55ebc6c5d41c53b9a394a12dff1d5ed0e
'2011-12-22T12:19:16-05:00'
describe
'533995' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
833ee31382da18954e5e8f8d8ca90dc8
41a07f41f8ae9f10f7a603a1f33f603746d09026
describe
'101784' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
581d81e96b1c7c7a1e1a0f01ed27add2
7f6d77b1012faf19be567555c96af88ccf8ece53
'2011-12-22T12:21:03-05:00'
describe
'32033' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c7cb65d674c68de2e66effac83c2fbab
abfa5e6862139b497c05b73504555b7bec495248
describe
'29353' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
a05e648d9d556dde661e737bae75b279
838bca2edcb509f0ae322fcce495837b90628f4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
1c77938ce530db81de029ad83bb8e17e
db202cc27346863bc4865d46e7d5acbe92791eed
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQR' 'sip-files00073.txt'
1d3f1094549234381459dbfa8f54b822
1840668440d57a216f4855742f4c77bba181bc62
'2011-12-22T12:18:33-05:00'
describe
'6838' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
db3f18e0bbbd1591008bdabd208ea61a
2e99534200201c3053927fe743eca86109a3bc4e
'2011-12-22T12:17:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
17ff33285277bd4df62b29b7d5d82d05
7ab9c524b9ffde1dc870ac0776b8e4c81ecc6d5f
'2011-12-22T12:20:31-05:00'
describe
'107782' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
710f125e497ba98de94bf08854f8f2a5
337fe47852ee53c8df19d6d5443995854aaadfe3
describe
'34058' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
acddabf4a95ba012087fc22059a29869
8e782b8196ccdde4d269c47087911261b11daf85
'2011-12-22T12:19:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3c94c9ffc2453e0c109fedf8c6b5c267
cbe5470e4a64e2fa96dac239112d7d6ef8c8f5f3
'2011-12-22T12:20:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
15f1f74d6bf962006f64ed951241729d
3aede8bc79cf0d209022b63d0103d9ca54d8b84a
'2011-12-22T12:20:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1e48bf21331ec16df0e32c5f77a6c8c9
c3611f390ac027e8ada8a7800de8b8d1f1ff0f93
describe
'7503' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9e436b8f46b6e74a5c262153cb88c7e4
5beed0514d56e3f40e8677f1222a312620a39986
describe
'533975' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
f8fc240f881872d5eaae0269da70f5e3
350f2f15380aaeba679781763665b47b0e9cb812
describe
'107803' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b8b3a1af182cda5c8c8131a8bd703486
64eca45ae310601ed9ba9a2d6f841d0d523a462b
describe
'34731' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
665fb4edee7e243c27f818b9eeefea70
3f204ff5352de191ba1b131e8ab4adcadee02876
'2011-12-22T12:22:54-05:00'
describe
'31771' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
3f9a3882188241c4111548ca6b0d2687
ea79ff1859d6da1f6baf26c43eb2e22eddf0f4bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1c57bca59dfdfd7d09c4379f229a6bef
de7871d7bdbf1787ae359f4d628a43edbcdcb9f3
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
43b56af15a741673aaaf4327c0d76d8b
6de862256fa3e92178f9a39df240f16798bbe575
describe
'7524' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
a7581c8738cc8c69accb49811a7835dd
7b76d672d0edce426ecf179079a961d82d3e73fd
describe
'533914' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
51f7a92d43daa357443f60ab6cd6793c
9ab0f8c33e9ca835a1bbbda222a8e353f331912b
describe
'110650' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c0cf129804107d5385a080b680db3fbb
e302f47079c284de49baf72cb325c72b30d98450
describe
'35860' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
36c3f4584f0d5921f6187c7c4ea36b1d
38c1b8d156675e7496d4e3aec2c440ce48f8a709
'2011-12-22T12:18:59-05:00'
describe
'32102' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
42cc1567a6aadf28187db7256726ac8a
3e2fcbd1e337d2017576e0f2427da99a6d5f9967
'2011-12-22T12:22:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
0d5dddbab2a7e9f7679a1fd0e302aa3b
cc86cb228528b3da695a799a69f9b428d9faa1fa
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRM' 'sip-files00076.txt'
3fff7727f7ee2b1b3ebac6dd1e4cf262
418c7fd39e768933c400a166cdc5f53fc43e252c
describe
'7650' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
3900111a6fe00b539ce107052c1564e5
2ed3ab4dc81fd43171cdcbd046b6af2812d16387
'2011-12-22T12:21:00-05:00'
describe
'533870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
2ec606e0d79ede441bcdb31a8c0e6dcc
0f7252e0c761412d37997ed0bdc4a9809a8a2a7a
'2011-12-22T12:21:31-05:00'
describe
'102927' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
15e6a8eb619784412f4bd1202dee787b
e4dd850fcee6394b8af3df70f0b0fe099c0fc414
describe
'34117' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
3ebcfe8f74f49bfeafe5a7d2dd0a9a7e
2e6c186b6ca28596103033d6e3edb8b40e097834
describe
'29891' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRR' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b9395e390acef86cec7b4c53602359cf
a33780a58c505f5a3b5bbefa57b86ebea6a8a307
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
84cbf7dcd7a0ea30942a9691579572ce
ce814c477bdebe0bdb400ae21fd4ed161ce5d2ad
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRT' 'sip-files00077.txt'
dbbe06ae3f9bad540cd388b8816b48bf
d4b153d6d676ca176d5c78517f7226eff89947f2
'2011-12-22T12:18:46-05:00'
describe
'7087' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
b97e3812c603815a9df5d978b9af18b4
cf99a61e5743252e1361a8798853063507fe4956
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f2ecb59b755200911698f6be8b4395dc
70a75e6cea634ef186cd771e65774dd4194e1433
describe
'113135' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9d487fc6df56d4759ed0a9f5db700b22
c9293543125c492326e5eb9f8dd3e48f600e52da
describe
'35274' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
35b77cad4d463f8f7a6b1b9824eb3c1d
80889b1754a3c48800f85dc7d8048e2b379e7ae3
describe
'31883' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
eb194ea7f2de05bf547da7e88c84f53f
c0b053031af6a25e528194f09dc818d6d147fe57
'2011-12-22T12:20:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
52989c6cfd089fc4846bcb39aac8e129
adb3ebcb87eea4f080b26c2be97f93b36dc6095b
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
0e8ea3eea36c0ca8779c43596dc70b6b
38400d25c7a59591f3dbbbf056c0257a23c48a3e
'2011-12-22T12:21:34-05:00'
describe
'7609' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
5eece54049cd87a9c9ed20079468ee93
33e9450e7bbd596850d51d4e972be1771cc6fe34
describe
'533943' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSC' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
d8a35d914069078acd35146cd97bbaff
0fba412b675c32260b79d7252140038835ba42bc
describe
'102509' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSD' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
11ffc12d97c07e2e7fa1747ca0ace717
a66a5d3c191695c1b485a27f7e1fd0dc0467d568
'2011-12-22T12:21:24-05:00'
describe
'32351' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
fe04158eefa962e3f25d4ccd8a4a6d5b
0e6fa9093269b1786194626db10d0c030b39d5cb
describe
'29871' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSF' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
db61c54b78e111bd975ebfd8c7ec880e
3b3c958fb278578349c106808db486bc08b1a2d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2497e6d9c14ff1cc586964fe5ee4676c
6303d2baea307dc39a1a84845bf6ef8f2960fd85
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b5adf476c280782bbdd5e7b4cff36fb4
d70ec2e917cb304036ab4bc52cdd4458b1139092
describe
'7281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
66740d1dbc640bd88f24d165e3d334da
ccda547730684c2caf5e0d8bd6c33d6ec56c28d4
describe
'533974' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
4e1c8f1b0b8d0296f1fcfee39b8600af
c971e721e4f4853d4c081d05785c689563e308e9
'2011-12-22T12:22:53-05:00'
describe
'112824' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
45760930ea6ab7a58cd07b2064b06938
1e877c608726b20505f10dd0176a2f19668391f3
describe
'36102' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSL' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9e9be690a32906bb4829bad7ead7033e
1bd39bdd057e7db8c26ec1341e707d5d393a7764
'2011-12-22T12:22:05-05:00'
describe
'32290' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSM' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
3d8ba0e2047d2626d3a86a9b513cd721
82864ee2a15898542ca66d87117ffeaa00334406
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
108249a88cb2c338b51495311e50f383
55b0b7794998296e5626341894e7e8396becaefd
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSO' 'sip-files00080.txt'
2041964a210399cd0ef8436282dc462d
761bf633d661a3fcfe4e1b319ec2cf03573f9140
describe
'7548' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
ab297614f3e22b85b6588e85ad362632
0c6e22c95e26c5d6bd817d7d0aeae398b9725c96
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
18b3be36527905181c99cd5ed6317a90
955acca92a9047d9fc36c3d15d974b88e854202e
describe
'112471' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
504e5937188ac5559a4a4add5407eba1
80fed1fd365f704bbf5e055a194f5eecbab7e121
'2011-12-22T12:21:15-05:00'
describe
'35948' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSS' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a6a70a01694212c3249f4d505712f5bb
afef0c20e669e5b5bdbc1a8f99df1364a2d83027
describe
'32808' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVST' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
19141e24932fc1c707d4ba3ee0f77c83
be47b6c352818b163f96ae52f759ff2214ebf54e
'2011-12-22T12:22:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
eb90ac383e5161b73c89b3b8ac2cbb62
a44690840d0db7af74b92e170446e730428c226d
'2011-12-22T12:21:29-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSV' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a93c42e9d567d3595f70bf70f94e9307
097b94c14e6ec952cc210e613fc9fbc07a7848f7
'2011-12-22T12:18:17-05:00'
describe
'7520' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
15b45ff14b61dd36e7287b14d1a0705b
850ca56086777acdb7d477699b18cf7413a12504
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
6243e1daf7b73347855bd7a1440dc9c7
5f8682b9ca9096e36f803dff49743010cf9d4149
describe
'101041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
cb19839421483298129fc8bed440430f
edcc2219a8e23f1142e4fe754b84dea6ce1359e6
describe
'28905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
77788c67161a620827b2e86ccc7e6771
f1fb617ef1675f3a86a405cc58a652a83fbeafaf
describe
'27674' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
dbe5e718ea94b9a24a8cb5d241a726a8
44ef3df94f28f68b2cdd4e078ee32e97e4cf9593
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
e7f3bc7ef2c37805bc40a7210df2fc42
ec2c4e8a520e9c7dd83e8e7b735e3717dadae60e
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
224fefbaab3fd536fcd0257323534bfe
845b48bb3b2bba5fa8afe90ac71aec1f0be1f107
describe
'6344' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
f62e4d939703fcb62b95528465dd218a
48f0e8666e15371995a56b43f8c3da28869e666d
describe
'533778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
7cc1f03aa65e56910419131d9f199bc9
7bdff1b69d6546c432a998b1f7f4bdfd276e1410
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
87de16fbf4722322663fbab6c2825f81
61ea016c5d01c2877d713411b20a56b58702027f
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
14a3d51582b897892cda1edd5430de24
1dee784ee44847ba43b677376924e6c3ea2ed037
describe
'6405' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2e9b3465989a84398effae0ff4cb9724
c616724690af3f66de8d1a90c61a71fa8dcf77bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2fe4d27d9b2d1ce2fd4bc0120ff0d7b8
32d9fffaa7442b37879696ebebcb98daccc290b8
'2011-12-22T12:20:41-05:00'
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
44ad74a574780d692cea1b5e91bfd252
61215827c58c0428d42a92d3b902e5613fac554d
describe
'1953' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
02ab413c5051c6016f2ef58696bd90c2
3d7ae8be0efd91782bc687d077bbd255359b691f
'2011-12-22T12:19:03-05:00'
describe
'533977' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
5af69ace2b0c14f30a60456dec8df7a3
a4294c060f8377adb5ceba0db5d36ffc2f51e638
describe
'28738' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d5ec623121a10b1569b3136cf329bcdf
9ed26f51533f59c47d3ad6e53c9f528f4daa7007
'2011-12-22T12:18:48-05:00'
describe
'4743' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTN' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c3607acb26dd7d51e39d0b73d95e42cd
f6e5888d725b9354bea413e8e82e708ac3d9cd13
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTO' 'sip-files00084.tif'
c1e21c12f5153c0b6b53c6ffc66161fb
1b1386e34f890a48cf66eb37c2c05c7e2fe117b2
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d75f4e761dd428165682686668d40bab
4e92886a2cd2cbebcc27e8173fcc02c0ae891cf0
describe
'533959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5617e7e5396064f1f0a0fa5be51bf643
e81d21e6e300abc55a53c40d0faafc2fac7c5ea3
describe
'109408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9072080221e6c4a2ce12aad552a0dd45
1377f1a135e190e2f006edf548fd7b4bb73c3bdd
describe
'14870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d7a1e8a3573182ff610b475819fa394a
998b78462eaeb4c7495d1a33c6715a919183cd3f
describe
'28121' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1f941c5d0df5100a3378ab1d1f3e7e62
3e27df6e86ca88f02ea0688869bee0ca3f5d88b4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5221c39f88b8a6384fd4a0d1222319fd
1e1764aa0a46a79e4db93f5bd8d17727b5b59df9
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
7e0984d3676eb5a8d0817c560d4eba6a
6fec816db23fc5d853fcb0bd4366759e61d38e8e
'2011-12-22T12:21:39-05:00'
describe
'6647' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
6e746bc812112fb24047ed7b65500679
524898f12ca8e6e0152995b4a0915d6d0aa85331
describe
'533884' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
5ef7ad877d849c810212ea5b17f7091a
239dc9d42e5f0f43840f363abcdc644d4c42bf4b
'2011-12-22T12:18:32-05:00'
describe
'112498' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
77532badf62c70f8ff0e4c36972fdd9e
9e4953af2802e964c9f803a05053a5e838df9760
describe
'35824' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b5ac92b61f4c02add2498361bf902b17
8f72ce6fc5b81884320716c3f03c7dee5a404948
describe
'32540' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
f12c09750143bf546628599db38a1b59
d08c2d62b1933456be2f87c8081c77571fd70770
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
a069c875908e3b07b9e937ca339a4b42
573f9019ddb7fafe8195bc8ea9f5ce2f274988b2
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
9ea80f9c567d9d9cf033a7e9bf1c2926
8e0528e66116f94aabbd82a2898352ba39d422fb
'2011-12-22T12:22:19-05:00'
describe
'7509' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUD' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
7f842010e62b763ff9162f7dcc9ac69e
d87acd9dc6270f3fc74792e4a48fc80286fbc908
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
bbedcdb2b9ba4b66e532db15772ac9b9
d3691173e2625baeab70cf8742370602397daca4
describe
'106248' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
f919a53a05254550ca2651a6b2b36aa7
c030bf3f9cfc021705ec4c1284d1012fbef469a2
describe
'34373' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
f2ead35aabc3682655f1d63e3388d919
32016006d8164224d806a63f72ecdb8cd7c91aa7
describe
'31455' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
e4e1a17907b2f95e8d0d0385af71d770
1d3a5bb956cfb5f1313f4724399e1b8ea9284dfe
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
1c17b20d9b0f6c9f4ea147388336b496
ca7e56fa3a12ab23fde0479e2a1e23bb2a47df0f
'2011-12-22T12:19:53-05:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
96393d79ded024b41e37e973e50cd06c
3d7505087ba5b83978b11319041fc77405b37058
describe
'7300' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
a9eaaa5e438a0149290cff62d71b0bef
189df82ae2b59b3be9d7f1d8442c8d4be86dd476
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
8e9e57f36a989b68c6330571ee3e1e08
6a474b8c630ff449a9880cb6585a20cfa8f6cf94
describe
'109264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
56bb6924bcaaa49b72225928eed315b9
ef4ae34ac8841d2a7e3d1414fd2473e700531e43
describe
'35086' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
a04a947a47bb9cf892b18536ce1d19b3
f0f53ddebed176d3fa29d1cf20f84bc151992e6d
describe
'31882' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
ef05b336d24dfdb0afe10db51140289e
b5e7848f3772bdd3b75249795467c46d594923df
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
e4625cfcdd7e612044fc8515c7aad14c
a07c606f1112db92fca34f4b637a7f088f0e6037
'2011-12-22T12:22:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
797ccb8aec9dab66961413bad880afcd
c019351ae76d975770bf5bec36b3732734d57496
describe
Invalid character
'7616' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4f6f96c2e08782b61fab0894afbc5dfd
651ea70b834526c8debd47966886cdaedfb4d771
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e0f24af52859db643ca14474c74ed9ec
84d6ee76f7c9559b5c8d2de2e42cfc62f6158723
describe
'113491' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
bbe3dd0f6a615d3df83bb5e58bfdf570
b83eafc93676b9ba3a995f093cb62be5ca278de0
describe
'36676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
c7cd3b15c54c99b0a8896442a7239d69
7f57ba87b13df228a50f1a16372f639ce04fd54f
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f17baea583707a0bc024c60559a9943e
6176dae7a08a4211f23fb6e45192a1e73fca2e84
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
27f91ec9be55d5aba54c91859e799cf7
26786384ccc1d7480902916353d630773c86563a
'2011-12-22T12:20:49-05:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9341800acc86499b895da3219a48be9e
5a8bdc597560402a3f07ff892b4cb4200d74ca18
'2011-12-22T12:17:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUY' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
27ddd47a8c830db93556a1bf0f3dbf58
9b01ed9f665364d2f57dd544f7d1266daf2f0e37
'2011-12-22T12:19:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
20789f0a5296c06f3acd4cd163a274e4
557c8a0154661691fcb5b8ec6273b2f71d7709ab
describe
'101995' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c2e673b43d51c2d6f5ee56a21f290738
d589a798421e7784eacad06b37c1b5bc7c65f14a
describe
'31199' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
69b0bc7db06085b8ba98bb54507475ff
b0372a1f83517a4dc1e92f23ecc9f33a8a50370d
describe
'29387' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
142851915fe00373ceaf672387fb9745
fa3ae89e457041b648d6d78d3e2858a79829363c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVD' 'sip-files00090.tif'
51f0518ffad547a807fef6d9bc1c8196
16bb5167618301f34f57d29c306f923b81e4861c
'2011-12-22T12:19:18-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
55637b6b2fe01e07c513ba32cad15ffd
18d914b994e375a7aabeba30b4f073490a6df6d6
describe
'7099' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
912c381a6f22c81e2e77f2c2b2f42fda
d99bc5a012173eb6451400993319b3e1b06df3ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
a993a788a6590582956b6ecaf97d314e
241b261bee99f0717d65e40ff33d0948332b53f8
describe
'99850' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b9938f1d9b6a1bec4a686eb57a5f5242
a3ae0a4dcfe9a17c190e6d2d65e9d8ffc9087535
describe
'31119' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVI' 'sip-files00091.pro'
5639494896a5b8088ea1bd9b51ee5532
5abef43e419440f17eacece3263f7c1fcd063be4
'2011-12-22T12:19:29-05:00'
describe
'28986' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
68cd092e7bb92a7c88878312d177d5ba
e9104b4a1fd48d9358949a33816c7a6bc71a0b19
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
03559fb130083d74b4c2e8fa9daac4e8
b07360c90c0404b03d63e187ef1ff102c644a0c9
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
dfd6b91b1858a023e7818e0de942fa7d
5f39ee05e515a04fa6ebc82ea689d9a865999d38
'2011-12-22T12:18:57-05:00'
describe
'6911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
4831f50387851130ff3bc2f0be1b838e
8844d148ffafcceead49aa4d802b37f2d2abd320
describe
'533894' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4fae1c161130643c9967e1a32d88eaad
9f2005df2c5a92b901f2c36a35e7ff377d2259a8
describe
'109628' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
849a0960cb4c3fc71094408f57ce1f95
91a2f349c2651f2d21f36ff87bbf4e42d7e3b1e3
describe
'34409' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVP' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a6f6b3e50014a48928c1d6c4b671de60
1a7924c46ab246944398a812694f46f13d71b5f9
describe
'31565' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ca0d6179891d03301bd74988193202f1
eda3afb33316d71056bfdf5bfc8073ce4abbd023
'2011-12-22T12:21:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVR' 'sip-files00092.tif'
765f1a767893c146299528878d6b7b43
790a9fe31a992719d11817a77e4048f1f5915c21
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVS' 'sip-files00092.txt'
09924fcc69cc6ec9797e2b57403e22d8
38c559812120f47b3de1489870aa26041f65aff3
describe
'7207' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3206d4e44118883b10fa0e96d755a335
1132b64578e332ea4a9dd53c15dc8cfd22b37899
'2011-12-22T12:18:07-05:00'
describe
'533976' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
7aa44e64b3ff3619c0f0319d6ab58cb3
34e4f80eafedcf31ce15ec017423b86812978a78
describe
'110939' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1aeb9fd38120f759fcca20da67f65b6e
094e13b44e7ac2717cb444ca51cfb64e6cafd390
describe
'35098' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
ef2072ac22f7e9983bef1b20027c07ec
32e57bcb3ccb3826875147c57030c1affe769b6b
describe
'31858' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
d5ff2ccdb80d3a854543ede2b96697b8
623d5158cfd04e50dbfd1348e29d2fd535ec45fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVY' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e3682ac53276362c16c9931b422396e7
494172a5d8cd5c94a3039a8adb6aa88f8d0cdc8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
467aa1c49c7db0480247f03f21f3d04c
31465a66cba3501f65520ff26238cbb608961ba9
describe
'7511' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6d27fce900d0de7e71d97e87fb691f9a
213e26cfdcd3d8209f3aaa0b935257585f11bdcd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWB' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
42a4cb5db95825070e3b82b938b123fd
82ed908bd7aea61bc7aaa2ff65ae9c33157ea6b7
'2011-12-22T12:21:40-05:00'
describe
'112283' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWC' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f78955e043cc663e245d9fa5c4e71833
d8b5a8ba5a788fd20cfa14aa9311ad351c2b1c3e
describe
'36525' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
2789740b10bcdc50a8113596704ed0db
8dd90e77f42df8c6c9e598561f1e8a413055c782
describe
'31594' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWE' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
9e65564f7a7c085a31e1cfc92066d9f5
c8a1a5bcede3606b21fa192d4f36bde0b7205e88
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
5184a7ea321b24e5a0ea4044fc6045ad
dbdb5cde4b1a1eed9da05f10e82cef79f8b9c81e
'2011-12-22T12:19:51-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1793884e314bac4ef03e7032b0c1057a
98f2b3b331a900746c74e02f017fdd6901803375
describe
'7401' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWH' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
beb9d3a223521f14c9c2e039d44d4d82
88a882e7dc6d728fba0dceb6c837c7de7bba947b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
83b1e234620fbf8f9df3200b7b9544c4
e6f76f7fe79cbd53e208f34309b64cce8f4d2074
describe
'110229' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
009006e841da38e449d755937367beb6
1bf966e3dd3784cc50bfba75e209911761271c76
describe
'35105' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWK' 'sip-files00095.pro'
93d56a346512ed97eed14f0dc81a0fff
21cf4d643a714434b6d533535d3788506bf125e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWL' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
7e89d78209e20c8d26a7e9e4b0498b52
9655e1fd225ee953434c957e42aa263b4ffbb6c0
'2011-12-22T12:19:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
2635e191f03fe398961f8acc30b4fa06
b0ce8fc82b7f54474c6cf4c9a1d953f4d81cc6b8
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
c1a6bf2ff1ef5b6843c2478218106218
7beb727a504d746df08fd855c2d6afbc4713b05a
describe
'7575' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0e3ec8f050d91f2b63602cdd34f1125f
51a6f2d040be488b1c74a3c5911e5921d131bd1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ecdd10acdd7353c733b885752bb1af42
3f3e99e4ae9f3a67e68c34867d862576ec58c19c
describe
'55317' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
bf0fc55e57dfdb6e1a01d01f52bd2d9a
9b356482bb2a4d5b8017c58e1003f6d5b24ade57
describe
'11196' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWR' 'sip-files00096.pro'
a80662f4eaabc53356b6ae7206e2a320
2ae207a6af05aa015397946983cd4138892a2f9f
describe
'12747' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWS' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
134480bca935662cc142a3d0d3442e4a
33aebcd3b7970ce836a7e68f5b9cbd017f952b5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWT' 'sip-files00096.tif'
f1d4ea3f537622e3a25a55f50fd9268f
8e91dd5f1c9a228c3c1117a5a8b538e9468d7186
describe
'462' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
9c0e5c146636b80dbb71979822be488e
7638f452ccfc042181cc7c5e404a4538d1813d6b
'2011-12-22T12:20:51-05:00'
describe
'3389' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
2635d2a9571addee47003a432bc75200
d81715a298d72840a61f9334c4b25c176de28f86
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
006fa07884c6aea08b2b12d11d598328
42f840679c74998ca68dade2f0b9cd908d4a8304
describe
'31456' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
82d15325e45b298e9a6508c9cd677c6b
c624947af2c138bbda36460f909e8d816e0f8af5
describe
'1966' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c0b89318613ae51f9d6ba8bb054e91fc
4285bd45e1b3fd174825bb8838a1bd78f2885099
'2011-12-22T12:21:09-05:00'
describe
'6168' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8d3fa7aec85a0f35b591b18b8ec847ea
8ab4745603a32f50ca13c43ee54507b1d0c0aa9d
'2011-12-22T12:21:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
d787824ce7e774ac266eda23a5c7bfc4
8d93398a5f5b352f6961ab63b7211c404e3e61d8
'2011-12-22T12:20:26-05:00'
describe
'132' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a7ba920ed2e5f3642077c134bbbf6de4
a56abe851c471bce5a65770dba1cc1e37198e658
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
737c871155fc9864580abbe25d35a96f
e2db6a63901cfd5c8626d2d091cf197b04547676
describe
'533888' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
1dd89f0af33e490aebdf3399065180b9
e4cbbca68ad4f7538dfded3311067aa1b7f2e708
'2011-12-22T12:19:26-05:00'
describe
'27970' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
3f8055005b6a9315bb6036aa52046009
1854fa74e16c6b0090efccff1cb8cbe95bb3c9ff
describe
'4648' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
831d7adde9609d16b5c3611625cbb08d
cbfd13bfcccc376bf0e9c0f26d5ec17842bb1032
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
a1fb783a11329e0590012073db47cfe2
b2ad232a1f68b96083bc02a23e7cdc53bcf8113f
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
58d27b4e5b5990332aa1b2e14e69fc67
9ca5e787d8f9cbd581660fcb88b6d303d2e4a9c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
ff14a8754135089d5fa00ca579f1d4c4
5c510660b1e8aee929fd413cfb6e217c2233fe91
describe
'102603' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0e6d82269a7124468ec0b183ad97efc9
bda031ae5565f842594d6af07315c073d5203370
'2011-12-22T12:22:04-05:00'
describe
'15024' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
102fcf800eb1268ffa3c2a5d1666c09a
c0689abab068cea7f8012feb710af82fd3541d42
describe
'27399' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
7a0c6bc8137539d1f3e4a3da87bc9d88
5791a1b724a127e99ad83c5403e4dc85dbed4cad
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
686149bf43fff00bee1837ad97881f4a
b436e6e0664d114b19dde69c699445a9edcda722
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
52da931b79416ca491c4e306641318cb
48450550cf5bcb7f5bbd9369ccedb4a34d63e631
describe
'6830' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
85753ea85c4dace59e58395952445781
f0680b827a508359be9487d91a28ea804fe7a12e
'2011-12-22T12:22:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
78ca6b77745ee3a070f174e3e8b8188b
dc03f0df6a462adaf5fe0ec47a790e39468e8278
describe
'93622' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
218aed023f5c17015a85549bbcfff67a
5692cacc17689261de142698c3bcae7b87cc3cb3
describe
'26916' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXR' 'sip-files00100.pro'
b280e89178fabbf78280107591cd1966
216c5432bf9c23147fc7a7646b46ebeaf6ed640c
describe
'26737' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXS' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
41f0e3175c5a8fe85a4388100794e46c
63f51e364b5e98155b9fbb7df57447a0d28ebaaf
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXT' 'sip-files00100.tif'
8b862f844e9f63e482055777a1787b94
f12d1e84db5ec76dadffed41931be2a4416e0291
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
a2005478c3973ccb2c1bb78ae3c50e4c
3d4a1cf8565e81059eb7be1071ba659bd426911f
describe
'6407' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXV' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
02a2728178684f8f1775efcd59a45391
3ef553ab14a667d5f2921e35e75ad7c2d37a503a
'2011-12-22T12:22:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
9f5e67b9775842d3c6c380f8ab49d056
7548f2e0c103b3ed5d11c53cc63893a51ce109dc
'2011-12-22T12:21:32-05:00'
describe
'103035' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
dd737ba7bba519a433ff8b473d4e1490
329791db259fd482407b7ee5ad28d85263545432
describe
'32805' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXY' 'sip-files00101.pro'
ec672562d6eefa110a670694965ee37a
8c1acaa94a96ea6216c15bef173146249125cae2
describe
'29647' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
a43509162c6526078464a3d318c8d500
e6bf21ebc7601bc50d16fefdfef0e2fe183a966a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
bca9622efe2de470920b77990a6634a3
807cc5069bee61a791a53dd79edc4b6580de4c8e
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
05e89ddd2090348fd29837babc3b8337
0038f704db69a9418e2d6a6e441508ff8c151c17
describe
'7213' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
76dd49112eeff62dd37053775e02e90e
5ad9362d6e342db3af8c27b4882cfd7e7b7d830c
describe
'533794' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYD' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
85508b13deaac9e1aa0883a98244100c
74b1fad9b46844fea0727aa32a3058dbde648cb3
describe
'113696' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
a01a7852f46f20ac2eaab47f19a6d6e0
e150e0600efe4bdedd174d03916a3b139ae54ee0
'2011-12-22T12:23:02-05:00'
describe
'35634' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
37a0657fc9a293b2b2c60184ba52788c
943cacc8c8942cfc32a1f258db83b1833ac41bed
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a3604974dfc37c3685d8cea71b0c2097
7a43b4ded5e6e3d363307f1d55acf72b88a49a75
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
13498fd7367f7ce4059f71b9ba3a1817
c9fa156ed44deafe78e339f5f343837f4cadaac1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
54f21fba7cfa73a823abfad60e88029f
e9637068f4e8d77b5264fe3c8bd303facd11d815
describe
'7657' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
7f71aeeeb00ef61c9ad4d2fada686a6d
a94543f65a3741b876293bae865b2abb721d22cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e40ca25d435034feca569ba109f651dc
48006211eef4ff1cf219526b2ec40840bd89ce41
describe
'113465' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYL' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
25da7ee5ca4c3a31ecf12aa92fc507aa
550045410dafc1ce25468d30d962bbf1c162f5ef
describe
'36843' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
f200b181b63d9da0e8ed92c01325dd4e
f6f3adaed15a4fb783933740a504d45fbdf3ec06
describe
'33529' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYN' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
88931b82d1b8114b1de689702c3f8069
21496662ed318551356da933ae81ed1c8313efa6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
73b6461f5ebcd1234ee0f7b7f9525756
97b0b01a63718bd8f894284d14511f4842b1da59
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
8a3ea9babf24790e64b40fec5f25c370
644e8fcc51f79c9cb143dd5c54149f981fd27d9c
describe
'7884' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
0eede3970ae54b207a4f4bc4a5040819
ce79b9f164ddf659b5201864b0bde2fe420308e3
'2011-12-22T12:22:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
83e3e3ba311a8d139a9f5ba21273174f
a7399e1f2f2a575f765798a80134fc56777f1e53
describe
'110370' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c09c348301716e1aa63ea4cf6e9d248e
453318c4b942181d66a10f7b67e129bed201c04e
describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYT' 'sip-files00104.pro'
a20c9fef8db483dba16883701e3570b1
4c577c3dffd31e9ed948462ab989689778e6c4a8
describe
'32484' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
d5223de745d3b4f7e698d89de1445c6f
8c6d92783783d573ebf12606b9a732cb365c18e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
cb8851e31b536aed1c417d70ba575bc7
01cbc3c034904a1e54b1d5845ff77518e5b25900
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
112412d612d83dd231fcc60ce2412b72
277eed67656525ade1faf6b4689882026245d653
describe
'7610' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYX' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
97f80d9c2b61c288793129bdb5821555
582ae076e0629b1488af7a391ee598e709f75792
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
3ed63598099dd0eea95075edbfcc3a80
a3ebf6a116417e6e6a3be6e4d6332a2e9aa7835d
describe
'107651' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
9b1a5402d524c4bbc83be70fa702cf9d
7a3b5c62043c4ea715fdab60bccce8524d82dcc7
describe
'36510' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZA' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d9b780517d78ca8b2887471a081e1b46
97b88839d33f6ee5933737b7e27cea06a24b5a9e
describe
'30869' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZB' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
3fc0c4523ff8edf7a92a7e67d2fa22ff
b7e2950d9a0da22fb3c93e725e96b8a53097e328
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
be949a3cbfb82e231bdd762bf209270a
024682f52576ebb895d903bf1430c43fda6eaab7
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZD' 'sip-files00105.txt'
82f7541a3b34605e7fc5077cf007b059
a87614a5f28fb719a47243f6502e172a6659d799
describe
'7280' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZE' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
034810a8f71697460716a05d9fbdefe0
5b467402cad716e9c3a36053aab8ac2c7b914682
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZF' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
63439d19ad2b441e46a3451a0a32340f
1ad3c1dc21a0e4107a8ead6bc6e53d924b77b4bb
'2011-12-22T12:22:23-05:00'
describe
'109604' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
18481424071e7ae9b401a1ef0467066b
cae03b9b94f4447e66f6ef7e9b9cdd19fef98a47
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZH' 'sip-files00106.pro'
47907672d5bd6cb2fd843e978581b858
7f3accdec17055013a78a4fea38b2109a722bb6f
describe
'31741' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZI' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
330046c4f8844396e288e5ae5f255d47
c9457d1881c9972c7f8419b07a58af1ffa5ca1fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
88231b8f96fe1ca9e979c0d67978a2e6
921b9f91ee299839c4a849350996a1082d75c6e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
4da40b92e2088bd6960ab4b5bb145b61
91dd18f614fde565ad5cdbd0165fdd8f8c4fabe6
describe
'7390' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZL' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
bf162ab5362ca036c65fb9e39d004c7d
edb600258b1a3b288db05afe8b6b09cc87368c73
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
0acb97642c906dbc93ce5aa5494f1d61
bb73ed5f60a692b8dd70c675c87256797ba1786c
describe
'104537' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
725e70ce10de7b3e80256d588c2750ed
8d36224c3f2e342a5fa47c20a3262f8852307caa
describe
'33055' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZO' 'sip-files00107.pro'
c0a75d816bad7b2c4fb4979004668860
a460ffe7dee5e50a6d3b02c10169176c55f2a708
describe
'30462' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
54edd336140898415adc6be7692d685b
b6af24e2e704b1bcdf875729e8a8baaaeaf206ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
1826769994c8a0f55ee8e77181dc16b2
e090d93c34ea5bd7cebc64209c536bef485e2d32
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZR' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ffaac086c9b50f2eb24c78ba6a3adf89
d07905bf2041eee11ab80dc438c72dd3eaaff312
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
33a75b3524e203ebf6b603e6ca9a72b5
824b2f175e707a6d796d898f7ece5ad6bf8cd2c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZT' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
8b78ba7e903a2dad2092ae87413cd8c6
cec7b86031f5b7848e4945a8cc65bb1e39d890f6
describe
'102397' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
7dd36c5fb4442736020a17eea83560d4
3f661c924ad6373f1c71e7fadaa17380d1895816
describe
'31725' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
538660c13d20443c88d943f697757c69
74ecacbd8a38aa8328ae3d23519c23bda6e3a77e
'2011-12-22T12:22:01-05:00'
describe
'29150' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6ae665ea79c8b22cbfac7bbef9168421
9b9d414f8df968cea0d31e59486f6dee1801f5be
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
dd91d1881fa77bc8dc389b3eaf6b1d13
55e6b7c96725315ccb56f1bee8c57affd7119ff5
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
e0d201ec3d826077e46984738599aeee
9f8bd2a3a16c28f3a3b0c05f7df5abd553dd08d9
describe
'7336' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1284e946775acc9500f77ef53a5d9e5b
370b9ce3bddab155b75904a599a9df31d74400d2
describe
'533984' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
abdc951d47059f15a10b657994a32d5c
bd901679c236f4ecb0cd62126b08839301a51286
describe
'108560' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
af1e63bff6ccc5c3ce5f44e4cc981014
51edb1ccbfc54f044d224a2d0dbf37a7fd6f74d2
describe
'35406' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d78e9d25c4696f894e5c30343ef55a74
06267db7c60a62225febf313e5b278554b50c5b9
describe
'30778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
f3c2e82750029a166f9eed0aa47a8804
c39b86ee219a4c3b202c1de2b74c04c8ccef5eca
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAE' 'sip-files00109.tif'
4b565423f8ee672a73e6e09c9ba28433
2bf512f99bb0b19f41e057c947c75780ee24544c
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
526f608e86f61ea8ab880f9c5a78352c
0625c26c9d6e5d6ba10744e86a61d175a7015eb8
describe
'7578' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAG' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
5bab4bc292a52f4020ca4acd335fb450
f04523ee3ec4143de51f9f5b42df2e3fb2dc9790
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAH' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
b0119a3df5d135b268fffb0c3aefba33
48dfd3f96c962cf7ea9eff6c9c91226677f15d2a
describe
'92059' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAI' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
dfda722081417c756cff22a07ab09e68
0728b6316cfdb6e1fe9fefef38a5d44287bf5ba7
describe
'26939' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
2478254050f971974d5adaf0c1fd8d77
3d39b571ab76dab4ab96f9e61cec562a9cb3c116
describe
'25750' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAK' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
92f566149e947801b9caaad8cfe62a08
3ee616bd9fb62eb0bf62f96c1b765e9d30f18436
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
329d1d4c37629cb93becbed85568806b
d01e68e3f028d0d137575c12f3512ff2d9a38ac3
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
e510269730794b698f3df6ac4aba352b
cf57a568054c808e752e77833036b63e44ce0af0
describe
'6192' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAN' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
93a5e6bb3600541643b1ea542edc6c47
eb2deb97064ac1226b2733d7c08958b021c3a47d
describe
'533795' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
83c5ce48bbdd53dae5b137d190e5adb1
0b923cad9851f552dcffe6060c5faa02c0a46b49
describe
'33496' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
5b808170d3437840e8e2c844d8f6ae47
5103e69184fe46864e6927a6e26473987eb7757a
describe
'2456' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
a9b9ff88b1156738913b30eca71b4ef3
bfc782c589c59bb07badd93e3e0782a76a5dab96
describe
'7596' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
68f85178541c9549602686d9b5b5992a
ceca7ac48a79e0a6e0155e12fd5fd62fa2b62bca
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
df04e78456160f694ab473b95445f2ce
bc731b8c92378d7618f3d68283c15752ad19e286
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
df259236b451427e172294aa52af5f83
4a930caad62a35fd7058cbed512fdc317bee24d5
'2011-12-22T12:18:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
bc26b86f3121e5d68e29b3d981855ed2
55fc34665f81864008c542a4c531cc150361e736
describe
'533739' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
6bce0a721b881fe0724ab3eb24cd67ef
fc494d0835f4b1ff19c31ec180b4b1401e3c511c
describe
'28644' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
4274210cf1c9f322313c4754d48c8326
544418ba845aff6f4f55c2f81e6a4acd033a2855
'2011-12-22T12:17:56-05:00'
describe
'4806' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAX' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
705a1bc07455a4d161febf6bbaf0405b
23ad96e657a154484899521179e8d6fb6365aa9d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
a55e7cdf98ddc9f0cedbac254eaac303
64861a4d8722b50dbb46156d0e058dfe0f5086fd
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
723f71789722f9e82a32a8b3121e0e77
d1d1ee0e6d1d9ad88a3771f99daa08fe073822eb
describe
'533640' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1822970fbbbd0b88cc3c0165af27827f
18005b47f3f014222e696f88ff7589bc4d510c59
'2011-12-22T12:20:24-05:00'
describe
'114740' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
287b7d63b25cbb18bea253072fad2509
b81ca11666fc3a0603ef42e9b453384deaaf2366
describe
'16567' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3bba8fc6019b3b298f9377abb9757357
1f4065b16d8ae461869dd7712c52379304f1b1ba
describe
'29928' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
769a2a0f49c77f29a4be550857ea65ed
b734a712d8320d3275ce52669aaec2a86fa9c3a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBE' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5b3004ca532bacea201e24801443fec0
d366e535b1a34844a063b963fef70bc8c935a47c
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
ec45acbc7fef3cfb05971272dfb0a300
4dde49df6cf09b234eff0e7811293fa5f6269aba
describe
'7051' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBG' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
caf94eadfa862565bf127bc4b3c1a6d9
aea6d9669adc18d39d66f1574696e55ef91f1f0c
'2011-12-22T12:20:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3e7b07af28ee66892ae5dea3ca714f99
c4b047b027426b6ac3c06015eff718942170d0ec
describe
'105051' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
23457d6bec25d5e54930a9245a43aace
42dd8f6ecdbd8a03c68317122e69043b9366957e
describe
'32422' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
7262078613d7921a6cf797b3a3dfff4c
269f59c00fc25b220e5f747651bce8624998cd1b
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
9829c068c46d4c150f82211c0ec2a8f9
0a478d9698a4f28f91063f2ac04d24222432c25f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
21338c9f9d6fbf41858690deb861c6ca
f6d77005492469d6bb470d8dd10f1fd5a03241ee
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBM' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d2eae38805af874417ca87174e96fabf
31dbb79f02ce23452cd5cf50963b4d12bc01cb2f
describe
'7088' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
dc3469c6111892a16f7cc8811db752cd
6842276e0cdf2dfb940b63a0865813cb7a425496
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBO' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1488c7ccc5d05b8623fd8ca0abc397a9
6386427555bd9a167487e06bc60c71ece20ca4f3
describe
'98573' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBP' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
bc0e0f2ef03ca0baaf23da6639373f4b
76e31e1a5792f80a5d22f91f9b75dabd529141cd
describe
'31413' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
0fb3aea1452b2b961135272ba0483b00
79106b09c60b0f0441380faebffae6d81c4ca5fd
describe
'28379' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBR' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
9121a77f0d8622d218728ff9faa98c00
2da8a3691416e41bccb5de904fd63ed7302f91b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBS' 'sip-files00115.tif'
a355a3d81a1275e6b64c62caaa252d55
958f5e60fbc81189534f160dfde460e62b2dc339
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBT' 'sip-files00115.txt'
dfee0d4ad6d2755d680c1bb6f5e35b70
f19ac9cf7e35e9b5d5c2007e1fd5f5d240000713
describe
'6885' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBU' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
0531758d974c14db6edbac0a1cfedc54
b5bbfec7e0415aa963f8806be6c0f55eac508fc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBV' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
34d79aae45f759ee892c16485353e435
62281a85b3177e75491a97c9fc47a5dfa057a3ff
describe
'103874' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBW' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1877355e6da62091646e6446c9eeecb7
61ebeb2efef3160f059e5e0d1999b7e535f0c581
describe
'32751' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBX' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3662a2716d35143990abaa0f9133b189
1d2844029adb8f3a90b6e517ebd0be26094b77c7
describe
'29788' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBY' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
b3827cb128ad08f42515faa7a1d210fe
3307f8f8230e469848fb08bfa590efec016a7bff
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
09c8a21df5041e4aa6270aa4b6d53a94
3af4c4b2cd71948291bab50481e002e02753621e
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCA' 'sip-files00116.txt'
7fe15934314f23f2f85252fa00c3f895
c81940bfe9f8cab6fa320da018bbff5b8923ccd4
describe
'7347' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCB' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
bc143daf341c8291885b2885162cc850
cc3df79c118718e1beb0a2f37e2beb049065f2bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCC' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
b7cd498015a35be49b9cd02c406f9023
642d1cb1ca42e2af19d7cd134afc9b55423dd7fe
describe
'101127' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCD' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
352cf35d89a582d360b57801bbda82d7
6421a7334300cd76180d10b48d3be0b4ce950d1b
describe
'31289' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCE' 'sip-files00117.pro'
a7518ec8490cc2d5abfaae4947b15095
344054470901d65d91ccfa446b268902bdef9ee7
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCF' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
6af5055e44053703b78de55fb5dff49d
b15a650a8d88e36213e6c431b51ca5896fa65785
'2011-12-22T12:17:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCG' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d117a107ed2405b770f51291d249d9b0
c91c604fb64b6315d1680712aad230a32f22062f
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCH' 'sip-files00117.txt'
9322a633ca4296ecfe595148a1d8a03a
0482565eefa0e0d333e3a71eca38de6c5ac65651
describe
'7059' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCI' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
9cc533d7176c7de764a65e464359d8ec
63afccc133183ddd555b8ff13afaa81d9d2217d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
19bd8c9914a568c4b5506b33d09188c5
cffb236597cfbade93642e41ea76ea9ad25ce40f
describe
'99406' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCK' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a77bbd520b6e5440b406aa0b3c7128a1
05a37561e07fe308dabfe90a8cf9f39ccf95c8c5
describe
'34283' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCL' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b71f6156b04ff03d5709b4e75032a780
2753599ba3e260ef1304459992d5951ce04247f3
describe
'29213' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
7836e9555473c21e2cfae10386c3996a
86e0258e219c55d060427fad7b701fbba4611b38
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCN' 'sip-files00118.tif'
18a689df244f4d2e1c7dc35560543f57
2fac74e0e1a72e2960fa2bf62d9e914127f4d84f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCO' 'sip-files00118.txt'
efdb6991f09ea725caa6fc1228b3ab4f
d7d5c14f33ed6d07377a554d8dc987274ced7174
'2011-12-22T12:19:41-05:00'
describe
'7389' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCP' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
516c1a83ce74d69400f24d1680160713
099f9e4fab4c6112037a38e18d5ee3129b135cac
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
fabc8b90658f7fc76f5d53cc0e446dd0
03530a8118444107bb8fa4e2ccd1e623aae24fe4
describe
'92231' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCR' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
7cdc1f79ed64cfe7356fcba8424ea3cf
a8d49dd57df47f8676e18c3c3e58021410be7968
describe
'32393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCS' 'sip-files00119.pro'
5c001bb9a96b551c5d8ba60bb40c8cf6
fa49d70bb6c5f3627b7dc2879597c599e3c8b09b
describe
'28731' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCT' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
632ea19ebd1693edea51657c31d68455
94c2c06400a4a382e12e2e0959d98525f2eba0fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCU' 'sip-files00119.tif'
8770136256fe7ee6050728730cb680e2
19348825ca5a6b99e84fba500d54e550129611b8
'2011-12-22T12:22:51-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCV' 'sip-files00119.txt'
bfd43e41314a4b220f50769e64938432
ec9f3574672b920cc016c2f98013df31fa4af4fd
'2011-12-22T12:19:10-05:00'
describe
'6867' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCW' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
01792548ec90926e35fd9ca633ff2315
7fcd00f0ecbfcbcf5a277ae832a0be4a70a0f92b
describe
'533862' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7c5a1398f031d36e925250e60cd4176b
ef53c50defd56c2ec2f4ce6ffa851434dbb7196f
describe
'64454' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
58038b02786642ba4e692d1cac1b5942
0890c419c033a8208b5e2afa58444f2fde12555a
describe
'18317' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWCZ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
0b38fb9e80e74398d24ff65c101c0a84
d35323baa52412ae120bbd3dd0f5a17640f470e1
describe
'18481' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDA' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
78196a5863935e6ed0a0dca234a2dc44
601f9b61d43d27dea7c8d92802c779d598e7d55b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDB' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ab37eaac490b4de832c9b76223bcd5b6
9a6c1d4dab1858b9a4a63926c16de7e7256b1d50
describe
'728' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDC' 'sip-files00120.txt'
158e0772bc5ee71fecdfe48573075d1c
385f5ad40de9d85685e001dbbd84dcd5d16b05e8
describe
'4589' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDD' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
90b55e4ea37c44f9c5e4629e1376a9de
51cebfe56debb6e4396298477f4c86c911aa0ed3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDE' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
366e6fbdf9c13894a52429a80c363990
9cac0ba3d9659511b0234279316bdd442ca5aa9f
describe
'18798' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDF' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
9f9300172099566cf84deb5c30cd656a
eb5ec6abb316ac635a2118ee3b3e85b5d298bd05
describe
'2039' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDG' 'sip-files00121.pro'
303c17070c411e63bbc49dbc68dc59f5
b482e2422c48bdde046da794d3e463cf9a92acc8
describe
'4844' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDH' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
584b1cd003ea80e59e160e23ec6d7467
1c839065f565bcf1268674e10eb5de1323a10183
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDI' 'sip-files00121.tif'
54bc5444abd842c0531f57109a682722
8265d07ac53f15d8dabf0c65bd0fcfe36bd91b7d
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDJ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
6d6d9b290ad0b1c5cd5aeb915dadd957
ca4f91127f44e614ace95999869383c860ae7c58
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDK' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
01dcc1deeb96cb9e9463ac23c0d0266f
b27fa3ce411895f27f3fbd3d7bfd79ec6c8e6e8c
describe
'533915' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDL' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
c9e935f785cf88afc5ee1aa070b4151d
112fb42eb3a89a501963ebf7791206d039af7e3f
describe
'14582' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDM' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
146e0a2bcce5e5e6a5ffba6494cda588
353d939f692d6211e0a653e94388ee1ac96e33ed
describe
'3425' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDN' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
3c82fd432ff15f85ad3f37cc8b272809
df439d04380bc67f77cd8067ab6e5ee440a8603f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDO' 'sip-files00122.tif'
131f794b9d262a2664d26c11bcc9fbfe
62ea825f128af7b7a50de1e85d35a755fc9439ad
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
943798c25fd6a84a7c8147953d44446b
713a547760268553ce40636ec0b4d0c0c6b2a947
describe
'533960' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDQ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
f7b59b081de639d96774f2ea544e1dcf
7dc5eead86d30903242c0255755b4d1b83e67d2c
describe
'114606' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDR' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4be83d5c070dd5f8372f016fa875329f
b8b1b648c0eb84f587246ff24a0e213ae18f105b
describe
'19544' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDS' 'sip-files00123.pro'
8e6088e40b286acb4ca41f9e863699b3
cb36a6cc069b1d71082a1bbf9eb1c56199eabd01
describe
'31509' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
df7c868c5c3351accfa791898f78493a
d8fb41eaedeb0cdf62527b5c25eccccf781a7b78
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDU' 'sip-files00123.tif'
9e57e1154fb60b6db100c284502d2e2d
ed84ac4c267521e835bcdd80fd28b928b20cc172
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDV' 'sip-files00123.txt'
149c7006c7d405ec29a588cce262631f
dedf438d01481374e54dfd79fac17f4d69cbda9c
describe
'7641' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDW' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
c3a234e66fc9f4116a20452df2c992c2
0c19323cf2dc584e9c935d3c9e034993e9256caa
'2011-12-22T12:22:22-05:00'
describe
'533961' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDX' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
a8b7d88d22158daf721dfe236a5e7260
0f12f5adba2039489fa79729c43bfb2a9d121220
describe
'114326' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
d6526de78dce60abb88976d864d33c2a
8c798a4dd828b92557b49c2d416cc84df90b634c
describe
'37339' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWDZ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
b4199a7f2afd4fe3ecdc1896b18caa74
72b06253524e2153c6041ceadd8c16d117c0506c
describe
'33548' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
f06046bf5b91a33a2427cb9cb49374f1
cf5dd35906f0b8d7b3b522ff970dd31d0e47eb1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEB' 'sip-files00124.tif'
1197e774300b62f52ce083fc6fc4252f
3909546f500d46a8e61710eadcabc49587f4133e
'2011-12-22T12:18:18-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEC' 'sip-files00124.txt'
5349183e69bb95e56aa61cc49b209f18
bd69b4524c789f573606518f392a094f8ebad743
describe
'7603' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWED' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
fcdc0314d456389d29ae42525f37e07f
5de18379b897c354345ee9d4d80033829e1e26e3
'2011-12-22T12:21:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEE' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
80266c2acd8276539694f9f5bb711a89
4de0f92ed9612bf5c4df71bb9948960407731c44
describe
'98391' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEF' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
7c605c79571516bc2fcb536dfa357b1e
0932c394465d8c25b8dad910e63a26b5688af0dc
describe
'33849' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEG' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b2b4967dc31dcc210edf9e2cee366666
761814ae4fa768bd4c518c54170946c472d3f7c9
describe
'30222' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEH' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
795dafd817514f91b75ff77c9bff3388
c48fd45b202678a53588e3e1db7b6ea163fd47dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEI' 'sip-files00125.tif'
1f279581b83bf61b98a650c6f527e927
1363801880450b9578a9c5915b8999adede73a13
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEJ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
fdd16b741035521bffc501d40f052ed0
9ae12898f086f6a3bbb933b65456f8a7d26b028a
describe
'7469' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
04087dec29a036ce4983afdc7077ac5e
5ab0b0fe22c220980000f8404fa39ff7a09b50ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
22f1486a97428ee835f7363cf00b183b
25d11be551d770d0d2f425b869bc9b93fc12cf98
describe
'112020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
ba31ece5607c078c1bde05f4b8a81f0a
55d716d042f0a5fa9313740061f259072529952e
describe
'36353' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
8e0e8e90488e935dadcf468bb044c508
1d20d99d6aa6fbe3874a271b54d27ab863e41a8c
describe
'33605' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
ac09127b043e8ea3d79d4e8277f4a6a4
c077390ebd0732b560ec3ebb06a72f463f2adcb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6e06914590bd9765a9ab9e45d7178d99
f96da9393ef1cc87f87f838cff6fc4d62da8e66b
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
44bdf212c2388757657fe373a73a3127
dbbd578fbd059f369b9faa94adad0cb3ac4b40ae
describe
'8036' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWER' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
f438d5038b9c354c58c15522140c7207
e36d6ad0b543e737b4a64d6343cc735c174b7028
describe
'533993' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWES' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
e938577c89e6ced7073f355304e69043
8cc8c50a03f0b8eacae09363780a5ffa20a52003
describe
'104904' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWET' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
04264dc737a1b0c36be0d2ee93b7ac2b
753c7993470b3d78b2e83414f607b6644d7ed7fe
'2011-12-22T12:20:01-05:00'
describe
'34857' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
5ebd15306ae483e50f77ea80e6e73d59
5c3174853ad36dd1f53b23d9698f7e135eabf347
describe
'32348' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
5679f529dd969998ed80cb0a44be0396
cdb51bb83705cd1111f73795766a84c135de096f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
94f1da3b5f2ab66bc94621c641dbfedc
b3ef056dc98edff992da120834fdbb29591bd029
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEX' 'sip-files00127.txt'
4f43cd16723cc0f85704cdec9485f3d7
373a01ddf6f0eda8db64ea1aaacaf2d3dbd453d9
describe
'8224' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
21db4b8d85997eda95ebe518b436b386
a21b004864c77b430b91ee12fcc9e43174252434
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWEZ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7eddc549c6e2bf4bbd0143be1a008cac
23ff306af84918e186ab3bd88d35d061d22aa251
describe
'97779' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFA' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
779240856f449a7d5d919bb70d857740
c167a51cb5772471afeb3fbe0320451e55f72656
describe
'31610' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
1d53f3aa80e31a72e9ff87f8e9c6ca76
646089594a3cd993ec7e2e026f50ac5572d328de
describe
'29954' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
1f3f708652581b8d8131680720dcbd81
0eb1d7529add4fd8ccaa818f1bf6d2127e0a67c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
241e0caf1ccd96da7871a97f93d45a9b
1e2c66123f704ee6b3943c744394ae2935d33059
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
159787222645195c1c9cf239e8442334
65899678d820b0036fe90cddd747b6afec998fa9
describe
'7515' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
a2ee864bc5ef79bd2511ea4b509b3eb5
9645ff9f8c97c8994b9c45f42c29fb31328ecdd4
describe
'533785' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
c7fd16dc36bc97453fd3954121f6baba
f73270620ab7064f8299fc275fc0639df6db846f
describe
'91586' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
7c4824755da031a578d21d70bdc8e059
0af8827ccbe305fb36ec5f4dea8fdea0217a5a9e
describe
'31081' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
957e86eea618c1fc5aa40aa2bd65d72a
d744cedec56c13c3395df13dd42776f378149641
describe
'28398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
ca60348491d6a78183e44c7dfbfd62f0
a8569ca9c2192cdddd90a65b3027db0ac69a1122
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFK' 'sip-files00129.tif'
6ed392345de059a38cd0d802ee3f8165
1c0adef987fa051fb92418c0f48e7a0acef5db42
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
272126c2095aaa58e3f4a0a0b2245a28
eda2ccae4091c7745a76cbe991ab90b58d87977d
describe
'7150' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFM' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
4b73b7ae5553ec527f76bfca79d059ee
1361cb852dbf9ca80240e877ed91cd6276f879a9
describe
'533942' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFN' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
224ecd9c28d886fd65d43fc64619212e
5c96e8f26bb7221aa9dbc9d0f04243f7018fb1e8
describe
'108299' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1fc14e09661b3248b18c28864dc23af0
afcca189531c778fa6b94a45bea49c8590cedcfb
describe
'36511' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d108cd2ecf8926a946ba99d1b4804188
2cac1bbc9d4b49f0ff473c45396e02aaccc3aa78
describe
'32815' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b6f1d6c0b81240d889fe5c80338be029
c0d20898e9ba0ed61d64371b1d46ae452da09b7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d6d4bfe4c9b0a8534b470c1204d91638
947859bfeef6133323c58f8984896b8c6eea36f7
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
ec5f77ff805acf960f1cd221ba509798
44125477cb56989281d0730979422bdf7095d166
describe
'7737' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ce1eb54e4c378b14cb09dddad7e87406
38cf5e2df878477db98f62944a946e680b902db2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1ce596a17d12233b92553ae2ea99cc62
d87a4ed266cf02efc7644be35334887f04179a98
describe
'90660' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
cd13990b44c8a6680e82f2dca59b8067
2fb43fc03822a59a3dccce9c7f706be5e6eaf885
describe
'30216' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
883aae998f8471414f58de2d1f381b75
8e00e65149ab9da5a5f1c652ad5056b1cebff05c
describe
'27852' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFX' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
8d5c41ba81a57d6a44811758add8231d
7ca34d140ed8443012a50014cbc8b84361965226
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
5faa084a96dd697780ca6705b04a6e19
092e49657b6cd93f643f81cdf50d35db35e7f5be
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWFZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
baac1fd7edad37b3a30d4136aaf353b4
8fee0efa9e9a23339999cfd81bcb373b6efe809d
describe
'6882' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
fe7ac559ab8d332ae2e626b20816eba7
af6903d15753eee591e51275b2335906bdbd1c90
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGB' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
dd7f0f8d1f01c113980c217f564d149f
39ae3c2fb8592ae7b4c545786a5b4895b1a420d6
describe
'96184' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
e0876a78686fc0877330c6129aa5f989
2047b1e370325ebece054d2761a96dd53885e708
describe
'32844' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGD' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3243ee20de48b7ad6d093b13e794740b
029a2a2f956a2500b8c936c1aef55828d7a91bb4
describe
'29776' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGE' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
15767931e450c2cb7d8c701771567480
83f13ad6c13ef64890c757dc07f7cde090a6bf4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGF' 'sip-files00132.tif'
68e4d5fb32881d284b0959dc9e32613b
bfd5ec622797bbd4e7ead9fc3ce4aec2dd6761d7
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGG' 'sip-files00132.txt'
46c88903a3e614c8c0a8ce5b9db23358
7d8c70b03e0d6488bfaf96fcc7558db5e2786c36
describe
'7381' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGH' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
532cdf22d065febc13d5839cbf54e37c
79811a6b40a5bf46225e12d6820bb7d4d2271829
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
ef830f0888da0c740419c9c7891fb877
9e2193d3e2db8c759a8dfa9c67a842be17532205
describe
'101968' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
52a0236e51d8008a3cd65b25070e915c
c3d0eace13b51958c2b8c4a54f9cf4e66df7431e
describe
'34727' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
484b0f0c08a5ef2a0ae83fad20fc7e18
2e4adc90296258d04a9e035a8dcd94306edbe212
describe
'32053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
3dff30624ace37098f569bd858df6342
c4d47f8723ae655d40d9e5de6aae4ac485351ae0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
00c6c317dc2546c180d53253df574843
f0bc4eff794bcaf4e0228e2934d527ab8592a2b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
2b91fbaca87c17c0bc03318c0d7bba11
2dbbfd7e2e5d9a429b8dac0961fd9c3f55a90f85
describe
'7517' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
6f928576ca52490fe29dcd03c4418212
da0b94463959b642ffc29a8094dff4fef2bccb48
describe
'533966' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
97569ea0767f3f23a3529953f0fb5b77
a975af8b089cd0aea19332772bdd5db6d06aa84f
describe
'90245' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
caecaa4820e2b4a4417f6db35f0e37bc
2431a0c971ae5052f3923ba9a258adb5c333168f
describe
'31680' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
9d3d019638034be63ccf48207e4656c9
45c598e9bca466d2d88c48adc94aef20635b8c4d
describe
'26688' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
cea0a4add17df9a7e6394805b54acfc7
af5ddb5d5905626da4809af3339c0f9106147b95
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ec69de05a43ca027bc7ac8c84240d374
196974b141e0fa89758a925b8b6597f4732937ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
82a4415e2ad6dd172b57d7f64a705436
51c5c31d2c4044d8000f3fbf17e157d52b6cddc3
describe
'6669' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
0c401e1325a2b88581272ed3982840f4
0bdc62adfe62e758fb409373ac1d8e99349f25f9
describe
'533889' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8b546c4f9f9e2ee29b5a43c65b3b40ed
e875de0124ef9c77333e17ccf60f39e50a160bf7
describe
'19694' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
b2985cc2d48beeb185d0eb48f7f362fb
edc744ce25ec994f0b1118f500fa8297b298481f
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
884a3206fbe4f39454f60467a60fa314
bd604995f0afa3a7f98dc214935410d5657eb4b4
describe
'4649' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWGZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
d23aa92c48af161b147dfff167cf5b8c
b41f876dfcb9d93f30b0f505336a93ef834a8fe7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
46f5d8f7c967c79f81a65db667d94978
8c2934788868813040bc2a7c093bdeef001a3b19
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
71f18038131d36e7a0f273d731046ab8
318a72a5b8c24df3adec50fcd94602d60b97ab48
'2011-12-22T12:21:02-05:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
0c551117384cae8b43f4f405bae36d14
e1bb0ebc061bbf7c0493ac2da6f590f457b52219
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHD' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
108a070a8c77184206516675aa297c5b
497ee96aba904afe40aecd19b16933dc6c3978cd
describe
'14596' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e18b87f3262e3f80cc178660cc99445a
00a2dfdc5bb3d57d0f676c4fe15a29ad134a9fc6
describe
'3020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHF' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
8e2a4356b50083067810d3b7c3b7c1d9
b9e94120c45974ac566cb3cc4fcc62e41ff7b33f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHG' 'sip-files00136.tif'
3accf0165654dc7920f779a48c298e4a
0b30e5cd54f005ca3f00068c085f2041e1259997
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHH' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
70453ed77affc508963533372a9c558a
29b58c55d8016c1fbccc6a15edab6aaf80dc88d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHI' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
0d8b0db57bf5df73a248b15df88c1a10
b53c3261960c749dce2e4105e88548439e633f8b
describe
'107455' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHJ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
617436c2e8e0f3f8c964c1a1b9741ca0
346ac4758fc5932f83747bfd6798b50f4f6b0fba
describe
'18215' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHK' 'sip-files00137.pro'
ef6eebcb1ea32577112edc6b683de1de
ade150668c7bd07020af336a669f8358a8151902
describe
'29765' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHL' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
1f5ffa71d272c0f4de3272e08f4b8ba5
8d02e3a62f60e954aedb9819b6e7f05bf47a368c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
4430e9e8e0e7b6446e7c63786f990ef4
30563e83affaa62ab4cb1a8f3c7e689fa199726b
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHN' 'sip-files00137.txt'
4af112de1db2824dbb6e6b576945e3da
70300074e4184878ae8657b0d84eaeebf5ae4820
describe
Invalid character
'6984' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHO' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
a11719c3600ab3ccdc94b7c8cd7d5561
71f2a0c6f7129345d0fe764f2ff43ba9b8c31401
describe
'533905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
a4382d9a747432644393cf517b9e5b96
3066fece65de8d6af4d48d69283841b9a751fb5b
describe
'111565' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHQ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
9cabea0d55c161ad5c82085f013dbfc7
9da9b2ef37f8af313e837d0318a924c7bee5854b
describe
'37769' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHR' 'sip-files00138.pro'
a153b01af26fee9933f79acde5b04190
610796bb895f5ad06ab73a0e1255f557c938a9e4
describe
'32913' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHS' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
4495625b94b301bd977bbc598b9de4b9
d0e8fdcba4b5d2a1235bebcca59c1d83e8f1a0ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHT' 'sip-files00138.tif'
42bf95f6a9e6e5956f706a9feaa85463
0cfcdbdde96f2b88a3b24d3c95f8ef2cd277aada
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHU' 'sip-files00138.txt'
c5688e917480bfbf4c3e0bda91fec9cb
07f03a9f74d83a264a77710a7ee611e3455afa30
describe
'7802' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHV' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
bb133125eb692575b0467b53ee7652c7
62025b0bf05310b0dce21de8eb2e4a2405bfba11
describe
'533979' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHW' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
5b91d4bc5e76c1b25a023d58f1590dc4
4c8a8ed35d036bef844377a0fc31a26483ffea79
describe
'97975' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
fd8039eab935e9a05360b5e1d4dc4f60
6582d59bdb1fed7e70fa5cdf8bb0e148daaae68a
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
7ba129c5996c54d037c47008557e9bd4
6f55a6b252f9caccea1f9dd94a81b9c48f4f7d1d
describe
'29895' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWHZ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
6349653ba3b5c9b6b15df8692a0b6232
edf59eab5717306c3ee6dab62f033f4352f4e571
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIA' 'sip-files00139.tif'
724ac9ba5de0a803ad4be7e79fd31f44
7cc20f6965abf6bda07257cbe6ac228d83da7921
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
f0f938e401f3bdccecc6c8e01c4b5f92
b6314ffbb7fa46b9c63a5dfb5a31579252129880
'2011-12-22T12:21:58-05:00'
describe
'7190' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIC' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
73563245b89ce7ecd91471d4c82a6a0c
453f6662740d3b653de833c37d974d884cd6c695
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWID' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
ee5945c2bdad6c29ce382db4a8bdaae2
e757d564a9abe052a9e9764c1d8630655ea1d20e
describe
'102593' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
df54a457220e4923a87864be29e14e2f
58edc16533f2b0b958988d252a278d7acbf8fccf
describe
'35010' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
9fe0c76c19afa23d162d012865e5f31a
0f70d91c8038fdb70408ab5b6808114d5b602c28
describe
'31266' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIG' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
909cdaa186dec8d89be93af1516d5e5c
d6ca542f4deb72e1d98f6e3d83ad89b7430f4d4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
aa6d0ab5e86ab9b19d39ac713dc876ab
b615e1e96540c7161a40d34c453aa568a69a5318
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWII' 'sip-files00140.txt'
139655c2a65913646fc508564212e45e
96d5fc6e95aa9210910708c5958a44937e3f077f
describe
'7554' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIJ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
14742f4a76582ba26ec7c60fbcc27d93
b9d5e824da713258219cf22cc1983e9fbc974ef7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
3ffcbd2fa5afc0054ded7237d116f1dd
ac929a348ff0778b95d04a9d5ca2302a04034990
describe
'99695' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
0295b651c7f5996181a52c0a52729d73
1a3d09477d40e252ad2e0bc04e6c67bdce8fe0fc
describe
'34555' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIM' 'sip-files00141.pro'
746bc3b50b514769307807bb2a43d81f
980caba65c8360f2ca6adf4d32d075653ea1b813
describe
'30900' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIN' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c28349ce62012a408d8fc788cdf2009b
69119139f1a3f7e27c6374e0c44511474966358a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
a8650970d04994af36ab820718411b66
99f03e33ef9471472eb3f70b979ec24694b34b1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIP' 'sip-files00141.txt'
6bae857678189c9ffe29351c60d0e569
f7d5f11abc2f44da8e5824a0d716667fac0bbaf7
describe
'7586' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIQ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
68b9b06b7420c42fcf7d47078b7347fc
0f1885c7ffcb0c3479925895d6b22015c1f062d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIR' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
13973453be9871ea73c4abbda7ad2583
9c2bff5488b05bc85106aced76da8155b91d1570
describe
'97316' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIS' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
f6527dd435481f6253bc47269d3666a7
fa32aae00c37dc4dd373e762c18c5368dc6fda17
describe
'31369' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIT' 'sip-files00142.pro'
cc17e1762ef2775d6d68a8cd34c33f39
c6bfd0241e7d5dab553e5e7ce62ba73a3b70d828
describe
'29626' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIU' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
bffc7d673b5d62e09511c620776eae19
0d22da3534b420c4fc807b3228d1f3e54fac8475
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIV' 'sip-files00142.tif'
8e953ba49ac1b26856a35b8554effbd2
e81221511091a8e0ba4e6b6444540d01416a72fd
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIW' 'sip-files00142.txt'
26a4f4d419f7b045fc885692b62ffd65
e96fa35dc15a0931d5b562a2b46cece30f1089fd
describe
'7240' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIX' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
11d3a60bed42b2a5519425c8f01eae06
4f2c7cb2930e7105c5c779dee10db39b7b25b098
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIY' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
e2594b557fb50ea1ad5a5f2d81f72f62
0765dbc8292e4718dc14f72efc92d125ea037fe3
describe
'96664' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWIZ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
c91cf371e83f2e4516614e96425ee87f
441eb6daea860ee9d76a2f9bf6e01c1a21a526e0
describe
'32371' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJA' 'sip-files00143.pro'
3df162e90f478125c57c784ae1f1756a
7ea4e54d59f4519e44b087e97aea8d486561cbea
describe
'29654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJB' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
994e04b5414191d4e04a0fc9c2d34fbe
7005a3dbad6ca96ed697fad8a515c2d84d7e576d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJC' 'sip-files00143.tif'
31af042d27a6bcbe9b90cd9bf2631649
5999e52515bc146b6c58b0b74bf747b3a4eedd65
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJD' 'sip-files00143.txt'
163658244a0f3cfe553dbae0ac35c67e
d586f9fc07278c373157217387f8533dcbdc3ebf
describe
'6870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJE' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
57154f3755dcd66c3cc78d4261767900
831c366e9011c3317ef6f00a56d44d7ab78abe4f
describe
'533981' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJF' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
739fb9e40f6b984fd3feab759a5e3279
435c7d8c3afe4ba72b4556c8c0058da797d71455
describe
'104312' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJG' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
d2bb5ad227e92e9d12fd5c210fe89695
a648cb2096287ae214c1473c5e30eb11aa951699
describe
'36162' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJH' 'sip-files00144.pro'
6b47c3c53bbdde3836a39d4c8c758af2
2ee47f5dd3b1846b42f467afdf046a00850ed018
describe
'31150' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJI' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
0498ae8ea9abd28f8a82c75cccff4a85
d2c253becc2f984885a1844fa28a742be0d41d8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJJ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
0c8b664c55093f4025e939398bbdf752
a58ef307a254de634d60338e930539b3b5267058
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJK' 'sip-files00144.txt'
4e3bb4dfd84f6a30881c2bc0ebb6f8f9
436bea5a48bd321c5f735da3d04520684bb0037c
describe
'7458' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJL' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
1f50e48f3c72ea26bb0f34556acd19ef
513d4d5a9fbfb415225dccb17a5a0e37481078df
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJM' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2beeca882a913ef880e3659dde880c99
301699e3e220a073ed5cd2c632c3cb8dac406b26
describe
'104800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJN' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d090555a5c4851ab49e8ac4d8c336a14
519c2209c6e335e14111782caad494e3b1e1f2ce
describe
'36281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJO' 'sip-files00145.pro'
c541db8eed073d35388bb2a0143c1aaa
85d9a890ce14baa8d9d061a264684d40feda7f21
describe
'32096' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
1d597b14558bb6519cec904e2ecdfad6
acbf08c56a00894ce8fa4ca06eb02f529419c871
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJQ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
ab82e99aa9f9d9efd3094c1e596cf727
3993c8e9220b4e48c490b5477617c9f4d3842de9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJR' 'sip-files00145.txt'
7233648e2058a1dd4b5a77fde0787901
9c23084c34ef514e3facdf091a0a770ed76b312e
describe
'7823' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJS' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
35cfbfd7c61c0b0698708124cedc776f
5464856fba8f8d8786290923b49ccb3174a9177b
describe
'533773' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJT' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
760a6e05bcecfd3998acf6aaa368d713
6b0cff806e5b9605692baf9cbe15a71f7f6efa09
describe
'59654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
36211922d5713807f7a3e2af2a252b3e
ef95f223a0b078ecd5d7f927d69e7755fc2ff81d
describe
'16123' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJV' 'sip-files00146.pro'
e7d0c2f38e6a2b90fafac58ba6f6a9dd
b9b2bc12db8e234a0afd544d8a3df0e9bda1f37e
describe
'17153' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJW' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
beed6af298ab9cbf15398b8e80256b46
fe807ff7e6d5dfd6b249e0c47096a417bc5c0374
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJX' 'sip-files00146.tif'
1f5aaf38d436e334243e9654d85d204d
4299ddbb2ee3d3f83fa66bf0347ab0afc41cde7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJY' 'sip-files00146.txt'
064e61295950b034fca363018dc79656
51f21026ba75a1a0bf162d6694c9af6ff17c1721
describe
'4481' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWJZ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
9c61661813ac88aa4be9a619648c1cbd
41df930c480d5f52670284df37e58827b0a19828
describe
'533835' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKA' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
39c20181596d23ed3cf0d18f76093ef1
fa33ad46d7554bbebda82c3db123276702084765
describe
'18167' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKB' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
97107372b5ef509a3968cccb0f735f8b
51d011b4aa9e5f8ded5e9f579aa93c56f677dbb9
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKC' 'sip-files00147.pro'
36c8f8bdf0137a9a04df7ed84b995838
8688f37a9ca74acb64e66b8593ca82baeb437d7d
describe
'4295' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKD' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
1e81a64f13a6a408a873f454c861c872
11413c9ff83733599c06b1535f42fcb6990c3e89
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKE' 'sip-files00147.tif'
dfda402346e860bc586453e8bb66c989
8f9d39b1d302a201c82fb5e44d5aef3390b0dd54
describe
'90' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
9b787e8c7c94d7d0141c1514983f9427
ace34140d87c4b9ef110f193416e4318fe0df001
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKG' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
7e165e1707c60430c92660821369e052
7d3721d5ba86f510637f7222006091e4729abc91
describe
'533911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
593d1f8a77ddbc1ad848182d7f6adc29
30318d6fb41fb04abfbf3c7c47045b293623c1ac
describe
'14043' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKI' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
9223ea292d72ed8e9d2135e5fbca1a5f
8f7c72ab73bf96a4cd513cde9ec5b7fcb05bc4e7
describe
'2938' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKJ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
4c12741ce92ce855223b910a01cbf344
b35db17c0b73120d3f220376a71e0c7dc6bb293b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKK' 'sip-files00148.tif'
89cd712ba1c3d9c93feec32cbcfefa20
61dd06e95dac731dad68849fadd65098b7c7cdde
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKL' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
da7082306c02e84d2707b9218dc863fc
0744e33bac8258a4eda18cca122ee5fd40a7f36f
describe
'533944' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKM' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
f63a2ec8c4c26705ac79b801f179f044
8f90cac13e1fe6c167d2e56504fb59be659b6a08
describe
'111810' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKN' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
6b7ac13536382ac0c2a5bd31c3e95727
9bb6adf2c31e6e6c251f6366239c525ae5a9ed17
describe
'17498' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKO' 'sip-files00149.pro'
3dbd2f28ffe51698f2b82e6435e3344b
92839b55fee1b344522511ad52a0c962fc2e608c
describe
'31018' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKP' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
f51bc45a42fc4e0cb61dc1b36a9624b4
630dbf06b01cf5363ce96e93517bd18bfadb6cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e56c67c79831a239af6578c5eabc3fb4
fc8442c8e2b6913b8e99548eb2c98cb176d3663e
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKR' 'sip-files00149.txt'
a4cb0d09c7a433af228565416e1b3aa0
1b6219380b91de6c4c2c6309b1a246c12a25e71a
describe
'7518' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKS' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
24decc1e3a069f5fbdbad0803e7901b0
8b705667e7f106dbf76c7899b82376806cd04e5b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKT' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
deb95eac7f0c0686306fd1933c4995f7
31ba21afc3e82bc258cd8d4343fb4373312e6e9b
describe
'96019' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKU' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
6acfbdc92cf4be1d6578afe3bcb60fab
40bec6d41504874b221c926595f6aeae17bf18f3
describe
'31342' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKV' 'sip-files00150.pro'
1572993d8cfe6e70b1b1ed31733e15a0
042b4c7fc59e91b95f7b2ce39633279c2f745a5d
describe
'29695' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKW' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
7e4e197dbb05060726496b649d4f1ec4
25a237a347e13c0f2088c000c815909915069562
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKX' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d8d61c6c4411417d4762264291d3283f
2c05e6a9bfcdd4cb7ea495162e1cb96bc141903e
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKY' 'sip-files00150.txt'
2764532a62e792f29b92af91b0632f79
65025eb5379956351cb38e88f51ceaf0e320a8c8
describe
'7065' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWKZ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
833e3de70758ebf99a89b35b5ff7588e
2fb517b506f21fc06c55c6ab89d9c8081415a0ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLA' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
e572f5edc61dc342f3fa178ff84b3b38
0b3a8abb7f5612231074d1a991552cf27d920b0d
describe
'98421' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLB' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
5bbb9ac662542c8638ef32e1a9472bb0
c9575dded25bba57275010bbd4eae659ba6cc93d
describe
'33096' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLC' 'sip-files00151.pro'
a8784b33d2cc5025694d290343b486e2
4ec8c9a6ba40cb2d83379550f844c2af0ec6df58
describe
'29611' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLD' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
e63611ccf21172341c8265edd933baec
8daeb81f802a32f990c4fbe603bc9680675a5087
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLE' 'sip-files00151.tif'
4a0828afd320791da235d4ce17aa8801
24491b85b8fa64fd8fa045008e6944c260b016aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLF' 'sip-files00151.txt'
3c50e4f434cb5566378eda0b9a79d7e7
255c9de1d4a841d06726385e39e137f9031efc42
describe
'7304' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLG' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
83a264f901567d695a5c67058854ea8c
9ef2f7ba305e6f2234ea634486184d84089f2e02
describe
'533922' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLH' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
3a98b543919895123d43501504c15b99
c8b89db2bfa4256cacf02954425daefba3b76102
describe
'103926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLI' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
5e499ee3df37ba46b0605e1bd546b8c3
12ddd02592a8774f5a55dd4978ac0045c237596b
describe
'35338' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLJ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
17b7dfb7f862800539d0dafc607adf19
68df360636577c73fa09dc97089e8704e3c1d156
describe
'31411' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLK' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
8fdedd6d370f8b4f81063339b93e1e53
bffe02eaaea29dd8e067357da3c831d233b792b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLL' 'sip-files00152.tif'
11f8ce96f83ddfd4faccc56adff13a2b
6c7c63e7b232eb8517a5a35cc9658f19f83685db
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLM' 'sip-files00152.txt'
cd1741699e31534d6e76359cbe786088
841fbc84c5e86ce5a64daa45c921d297f9b56c53
describe
'7400' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLN' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
420325ff5abcc1ebd385c8824534ba41
b9491a8fe2a3d8317feb68508a2328c615718301
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLO' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
1c1af69185bfe8057680173e2fa18f66
a740b7617620f64209a4b80e585b61d0ea9e1a8b
describe
'97473' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLP' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
3b877ed1accfd3eeaf4780d526ce58e0
4086a37bfe517621bdc4c487a2e7ad71e7c0664d
describe
'33441' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLQ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
683ced03e5a463e72932567e2bf9527a
1a516510cd4cfb7ac176de932941a6d1298c1641
describe
'30489' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLR' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
d2c01ac0d32e7b0e3d78655938beae8c
5108c735d03bfc21a7aae2ec60cfd00b57a373b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLS' 'sip-files00153.tif'
7584acf89a82ad69d9a917d07b3cbf81
4d449a154884992e7181df713639a960054d4494
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLT' 'sip-files00153.txt'
02151108a7d74b2878854141973735d1
eb4b62af7ea6fef6607673c1b550a52b4746e1cc
describe
'7266' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLU' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
489844d2b763ffc6c276446104cdab40
e32aba97590144069181f71cba9f9934e6b4955f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLV' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
5569bb84e163d4b0094f8c72c9104dd5
5708b99d8b1149497046e37675a1c9b5bc686cc4
describe
'99501' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLW' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
b3bfecaddaaad0e7168190a5fa30905b
50af1283e4c8507551daecdcbaa6a948b1f1dc3e
describe
'33913' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLX' 'sip-files00154.pro'
7b097ba829a6c9880f257d20e1339aeb
2713851860e79ea7dddc26e5152bdc36973c352d
describe
'29783' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLY' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
d767c60fd2a531f0edb5166ed7968d5b
5cd8f9acc15507b73c613ea06362b49e6795061e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWLZ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
2052c3384ce6806af20944f0e346b348
e8099fd2a2f0d026d9472547af787d7c48c9ab28
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMA' 'sip-files00154.txt'
2bde2b11b05b8b0dffc8979ae98cd368
1af3ac434e342baf979c5180a1e996175bb76f72
describe
'7203' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMB' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a9aef3b468b5f3f8cbdf70285974cbaf
551f38c35cc16d27dddedf371c6ad39c9b792ecd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMC' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
553299cf72b05ad5219209fdd6fe0378
b362c0a274a0d19f52932e152dc07f7d8ca2be9f
describe
'99617' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMD' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
15e5c5261dc69e79894be197a6afa8c6
a64ae9c7115ae6660783c8f213767c6768e2a60b
describe
'34199' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWME' 'sip-files00155.pro'
e1f3a9685e6cc58208c3163889e148d6
c4916d03124bffa173a22f3e5fa1ffb8e1cc9fb2
describe
'30340' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMF' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
0b9bb3bc8cb2674a2409feed8f2215e1
5baf68f15ac23d090081587754b78a170d022a77
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMG' 'sip-files00155.tif'
89e9c500e8015c55ac4f2aaeaf9bfd27
e488508280c922edad1cfcad87819d9ec6abd7f6
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMH' 'sip-files00155.txt'
53e1b6cfe3cd5ee56a694923a6d54ee8
9cee0076c8891ccfd1a9bb197773e867801a81b5
describe
'7301' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMI' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
afd484d286577ceaa1b3b3ee5d542cab
5cccc916d18ed27e988afb94809d9f0af525fe3a
describe
'533872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMJ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
37f458d3c2a07201d5c93040f7a99673
55939d9f99b34b20c6b43f22239d3f74d3caab6d
describe
'53446' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMK' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
3e0a7fc9c9840b3fb0c7e614a9af7ebb
a6b786e7660914feff4b6ad4aa1c441f67bff1d9
describe
'15594' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWML' 'sip-files00156.pro'
cd3c557909cedec6bcf38e4ee014d0b4
b05594f110f03912e8db413adb905aed521c4309
describe
'15361' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMM' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
b09f6313b8d38a41f3aedeed64211d5f
b50527ab84386ce6b126c10a2cf16b266f7463b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMN' 'sip-files00156.tif'
8a9dc5cb96012bb6962d16bd566f0c80
b9d6d27ecd9ff1aba493c9dd5da69474638188ad
describe
'676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMO' 'sip-files00156.txt'
dc420b4ffdc98372e9f1b3500fb752d0
f49cbaeb6a6a4e5d94f9a4de5d320abe9e979b05
describe
Invalid character
'4136' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMP' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
ae763d1aa31fc390f56735758a4e4481
79601bfd54c5a41ab30526428de3b8782df4d679
describe
'641935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
7f5644f75fc80a5afa5a5b28d1d5c98b
b70fd2176079dbb2a4da4c1dd9dc996f195b240d
describe
'54880' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
2932f488d344848f3ecc322ad51c97a9
42d28a454cfe754f3f9bb0068441767c52602266
describe
'12343' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMS' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
2cb0d99336db354310b3917be03e4b9b
5759ca706c2f25be3222a96d2766a9c258d4807f
describe
'15413404' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMT' 'sip-files00159.tif'
5ab29344e5910c4ac0a171b06b727ef0
33e6f2089f84bbd69e7a169c69be7b5f47ec3b78
'2011-12-22T12:20:52-05:00'
describe
'3366' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMU' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
144ba9af1727346c8e97a88346d1ddb0
98d5ab4926ba4184227205289023d8888579b1c6
describe
'658689' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMV' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
a69b94e0dab9f32376678778ffc31365
a5006d4a568e10c7a4d7be09aa3e3cc95b8d621c
describe
'85594' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMW' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
658706c6bc45ff92f46b6ee28d682cd1
78fde56a203cbd4990c601569770716e78e02219
'2011-12-22T12:23:04-05:00'
describe
'19071' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMX' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
730a3777d4ceb66d96b27ec28fc6c7a7
25c2303452f2915d9a1ca9b009f4fa137075f25a
describe
'15814648' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMY' 'sip-files00160.tif'
b943c0ecd3016e6701dfaeda911b4b05
63a2817dd39723a75d449fd98a1bfbfaa1a70f51
describe
'4876' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWMZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
4624691dbb7357805a41069611826535
1f3f286b06a777e4c6b5c61704b2446f30956cef
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWNA' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
df6e10e55ae08a48a049906f21319f44
1e0ed1d69856e636c77572e5b5398a9b0fb57b4e
describe
'245631' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWNB' 'sip-filesUF00086836_00001.mets'
54d7ae5da69e994de1301b02395a1a83
532ae5521ba79459bd9b4ad236ef56af3ffc546a
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T05:03:54-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'318101' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOSfileF20081215_AAAWNE' 'sip-filesUF00086836_00001.xml'
3f56922133274d5a65ebb953079d8010
52a2c59d90f45a4b8fc828af78380d98cf359578
describe
'2013-12-14T05:03:56-05:00'
xml resolution





iy
&
Fe)
4
ae
=
3
os
oo)
é


Carbs Tidus helmsley Lrtheg
. oe 1898. }
BUZ; OR, THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES

OLA HONEY! Bibi:
Copyright. Entered at Stationers’ Hall.









We

)
OR,

The Dife and Hodventures of a thoney Bee.

©

BY

MAURICE NOEL,

AUTHOR OF
‘“UNDER THE WATER,” ETC.

FRONTISPIECE BY LINLEY SAMBOURNE.



Second dition.



BRISTOL:
J. W. ARROWSMITH, Ir Quay STREET.

LONDON:
SimPKIN, MARSHALL & Co., 4 STATIONERS’ Hatt Court.











All rights reserved,
DEDICATED BY PERMISSION

TO
TE BeRONKSs BURDETTCOD Fis,

PRESIDENT

OF

THE BRITISH BEE-KEEPERS’ ASSOCIATION.


PREFACE.

a a. N this little story, the author ventures to hope
4 that he may succeed in interesting children
—perhaps even some big children—in the

habits. of bees, and in inducing them to



ae for themselves their most wonderful lives.

He has attempted to describe a few only of the many
operations with which all bee-keepers of the present day
are perfectly familiar, and has not introduced any mention
of the bar-framed hives, which make the manipulation of
bees comparatively simple. | |

His object has been to awaken interest rather than to
attempt instruction; but, at the same time, except for
such parts of it as are obviously imaginary, his story
describes nothing that he has not witnessed in his own
hives.

In case any of his readers should wish for practical
information on the subject, he may mention that a little
book, called Modern Bee-keeping, has been published for
the ‘‘ British Bee-keepers’ Association,” and contains the

collective experience of the best bee-keepers in the country.
COMI INES.

CHAPTER I.
Coming Out

CHAPTER II.
First Flights—Marrow Escape ...

CHAPTER III.
Dispute with a Peacock Butterflyp—The Snail settles it

CHAPTER Iv.
Swarming:

CHAPTER V.
Huilding Comb—Hn Accident—Storing thoney—A Surprise ...

CHAPTER VI.
H Second Swarm—Jdle thours—Sent Back

CHAPTER VII.

Discontented Whispers—A oe Bee Oe Massacre
of the Drones

CHAPTER VIII.
Death of hum—iRobbery—Restitution

CHAPTER IX.
Caught in a Cobweb—The Spider’s Plan

CHAPTER X.
BGattle—Victoryp—Death

PAGE

35

67

81

105

DIG

I3r
CHAPTER I.

Coming Ont.


4

i









elie CHAPTER I.

‘COMING OUT.





=a HE first thing Buz remembered
was having the cramp very badly
in two of her left legs, and not
being able to stretch them; for
she was so carefully packed up
in her cell that it was impossible
to move.

But she found there was a chance of getting through the
ceiling; so she bit and pushed, and pushed and bit, till she
could put her head out.

- This was satisfactory, as far as it went, but it had its
inconveniences.

A bee immediately ran across her face, and she shrank

back. She put it out again, and two bees, in a desperate

hurry, trod all over it, and she shrank back again.
2 *
4. BUZ—COMING OUT.

And so for some time she kept on trying to emerge and
being driven back, till at last, becoming accustomed to the
manners of the hive, and taking no notice of the pushes and
shoves, she scrambled out, and stood on the comb—a very
promising young bee.

Then up ran a couple of bees, one of whom straightened
out her. proboscis, or tongue, which was lying folded back,
and offered her honey; whilst the other caressed her with
her antennz, and stroked her with her fore feet.

‘“Much obliged to you, I’m sure,” said Buz, sucking
away.

“Stretch your wings and legs, and never mind thanking
us,” answered one of the bees.

“We all do our duty here,” said the other, ‘without
wanting thanks, We attend to you because it’s our place
to do it.” 3 :

‘You didn’t help me to scramble out of the cell,”
remarked Buz; ‘‘and what a scramble it was!”

‘It’s not our place to do that. A bee that couldn't get
out of her cell would be no good here.”

_ At this moment, a young bee, from the cell next to
that which Buz had just left, came out, very crumpled, and
received similar attentions.

Buz looked on with much interest, whilst the new arrival,
“who was named “ Hum,” was groomed and fed.

‘“ Now,” said one of the nurse bees, you two had better
BUZ—COMING OUT. 5

go out on the board in front of the hive, and sun yourselves.
You won’t work to-day, of course, nor to-morrow either,
unless it’s very fine ; and don’t forget,” added she, touching
first one and then the other with her antenne, ‘‘ that you
‘are called ‘Buz,’ and you‘ Hum.’ Now be off with you.”

‘But which is the way to the board?” asked Buz.

‘Find out,” replied the nurse who had last spoken, as
she ran off. ‘‘ Where’s your instinct?” demanded the other,
hurrying after her without waiting for an answer.

On being left to themselves, Buz and Hum began crawl-
ing down the comb, looking about them with great curiosity.
The cells they had just left were at the top of one of the
centre combs, and on their way down they did not meet
with very many bees; for as the day was warm and bright,
most of them were away from the hive, gathering honey and
pollen - but, as they approached the entrance, they found
themselves surrounded by streams of busy workers, hurrying
in every direction, some bringing in stores, and others, who
had just deposited their last loads, bustling off to work
again. But, however busy they might be, they all found
time to touch Buz and Hum with their antenne as they
passed; and these last, instinctively put their own forward
and returned the compliment; indeed, they felt as if it
would not be comfortable to pass within touching distance

_ of a single bee without that little recognition; it seemed



like saying ‘ All’s well,”
6 BUZ—COMING OUT.

Arrived on the floor of the hive, they stood still and
looked about them. After a little time they noticed that
the two combs between which they had just descended,
~ looked rather darker and dirtier than those on the outside,
and that it was towards the latter that the honey-laden
bees were hastening.

““T wonder why?” said Buz.

“Yes, I wonder,’ echoed Hum.

‘“What are you wondering about?” enquired a great
drone, who chanced to be passing lazily along, and who
overheard what Buz said.

‘We were wondering why some combs looked so much
blacker than others,” replied Buz.

‘‘Because they are used as nursery combs,” said the
drone. ‘Lots of young bees are born in them, and each
cell is used over and over again.”

‘Are they never used for honey?” asked Hum.

‘Only if there’s no room for it elsewhere; they always
like to put honey in a nice new comb, and then it’s called
‘Virgin honey.’ But,” he continued, ‘in an old hive, every
comb gets used for young ones, or grubs as we call them, in
time. This isn’t an old hive.” :

‘“You say ‘they,’ remarked Buz, rather timidly; ‘don’t —
you get honey yourself, then, and work like the others?”

“TI should think not!” replied the drone, with great
disdain. ‘‘ Work, indeed!” And he moved slowly away.




BUZ—COMING OUT. 4

Then the two young bees went on towards the entrance
~ of the hive, and, after being well jostled, and ever so much
pushed about and run over, all of which they didn’t mind a
bit, they reached the board outside, and looked upon the
world for the first time..

But they soon had to change their position, for they
were standing exactly in the stream of traffic.

‘Now then,” said a bee, who was waddling in with two
great lumps of pollen on her thighs, and who bumped
against Buz, ‘get out of the way, can’t you!”

‘¢ Come, come,” said another to Hum, ‘‘ you mustn’t
stand there, you know; which is it to be now—in or out?”

‘“‘T’d rather go out, please,” answered Hum.

‘“‘In fact, we ’ve been sent out to sun,” added Buz.

“Out with you then,” said the bee, ‘‘and ask one of the
fanners to show you where to stand.”

“What’s a fanner?” thought Buz. However, she
didn’t ask, for fear of being again told to find out; so
she passed on with Hum through the entrance. Just
outside, a bee was standing quite still, and as Buz passed
she felt the ends of her antennz very much whirred against
and tickled, and on looking up found that this was occa-
sioned by the wings of the bee in question, who was
moving them so fast that they were almost invisible; in
fact, she was nearly lifted by them off her hind legs—
sometimes quite—and seemed to have hard work to keep-
8 BUZ—COMING OUT.

: hersele down by clinging on to the board with the claws
of her front feet.

“T shouldn’t wonder if that was a fanner,”’ remarked
Buz to Hum.

“T’m a fanner, right enough,” said the bee, who had
overheard her. ‘What of that?”

“We were told to ask you where to stand,” answered
Buz. .

‘Get to the other side of me then, towards the edge of
the board, and out of the way.”

Buz and Hum did so, and were then able to look quietly
about, without getting so tremendously knocked against.
They soon noticed that, besides the fanner they had spoken
to, there were half a dozen more, all busy in the same way.

“What do you keep on fanning for?” asked Buz, who
was rather a bumptious young bee.

“What for?” replied the fanner. ‘“ Why, to give the
Queen and the nurses and all in the hive a little fresh air;
they would be stifled, this hot weather, if something wasn’t
done.”

See Aid ” said Hum, ‘I noticed a current of air as we
- came out.” :

“T should hope you did,” returned the fanner; ‘‘it
would be a pretty thing a us all to be working away like
this for nothing!”

At this moment a bee passed in with a splendid load of
BUZ—COMING OUT. 9

pollen on her thighs, the two great yellow balls she carried
being almost enough to prevent her from staggering along.

“Well done!” said the fanner encouragingly as she
passed. ‘Good again, old mate!” and then, turning to Buz
and Hum, she added—

“That bee came out of the cell next to mine, and we
were born almost at the same time, so we take an interest
in each other.”

‘Only an interest?” enquired Buz. “J should have
thought you wete great friends, like Hum and I mean to be;
eh, Hum?”

Hum touched Buz with her antennz in a friendly way. _

“There isn’t much time to be great friends here,”
answered the fanner; ‘‘we are always so busy, except in
the winter, and then we are too sleepy to be very affectionate.
Besides, we give all our love to the Queen; you haven’t seen
her yet, I suppose ? Wait till you do—you'll find it’s just
as I tell you. Now then! Where are you going? Look
out, there! Help! Intruder! Intruder!”

As she spoke, the fanner made at a bee who had just
alighted, and was passing in. She was joined by several
others, and they were about to seize the intruder, who, how-
ever, discovered the mistake, and flew off just in time.

‘What was all that about?” asked Buz, as the fanner
_returned.

“A bee from some other hive was trying to get into
3
To BUZ—COMING OUT.

ours,” replied the fanner; ‘‘but she found out where she
was just in time. If we had caught her, we should perhaps
have stung her to death.”

“How did you know she was a strange bee?” enquired
Hum.

“We can tell at once, by touching or smelling a bee,
whether she belongs to our hive or not; I don’t pretend to ~
explain exactly how it is, but we can.”

This quite satisfied the young bees, who now became
very much interested in watching the workers arriving from
every direction, and alighting on the board.

Some were laden with pollen, others had collected
nothing but honey, and all, the instant they arrived, set off
to run into the hive as fast as they could, without waiting
to look round or gossip.

They certainly were very much in earnest; any one
could see that at once. Some seemed very tired, and
nearly fell back off the board when they pitched on the edge
of it, and indeed could hardly crawl along with their booty.

““T know where that bee comes from,” remarked the
fanner, as one with peculiar coloured pollen on her thighs
passed in. ‘I know quite well.”

“Do you?” said Buz. “How?”

‘ By the look, and by the smell, and—in fact, I do know;
she comes from Cothelestone Hill. It’s a beautiful place
for bees, but rather a long way off.”
BUZ—COMING OUT. Il

“‘ How I should like to go there!” exclaimed Buz.

“Gently, gently,” said the fanner; ‘don’t bein such a
hurry.”

“Indeed,” added Buz, ‘‘I should like to try a short fly,
~ now, this moment.”

‘You had better not to- a. your wings will feel stiff
and cramped. Wait till you have had a good feed, and a
night’s rest, and then you’ll do very well. You see, the
danger is, that if you get below the level of the board you
may not be able to rise again; and if you have to spend the
night on the cold ground, I wouldn’t give much for your
chance of swarming, I can tell you.”

‘“What’s swarming?” asked Hum..

‘Oh, I can’t explain now; it would take too long. You'll
find out before the summer is over, I dare say.”

At this moment a big rain-drop came splash down on
the board, close to Buz, and astonished her immensely. It
was followed by another and another, and soon a smart
shower drove all the bees near at hand under shelter, and
Buz and Hum entered the hive with them.

‘“What’s happening?” asked Buz.

‘They've upset the watering-pot somewhere,” answered
the fanner; ‘‘we never can find out exactly where they
do it.”

“Then how do you ‘no it’s a watering- -pot?” enquired
Hum,
3 *
I2 BUZ—COMING OUT.

‘‘ Sometimes,” answered the bee, ‘when we are gathér-
ing honey in a bed of mignonette or other flowers, the
gardener comes along with his watering-pot and upsets it
over us, and then it feels so exactly like what’s going on
now, that we think it must be the same sort of thing, you
know.”

When the storm first began, a great many bees arrived _
from different directions, and crowded into the hive; and
as those within were prevented from starting afresh, and
were standing near the entrance, impatiently waiting for the
rain to stop, there was a great bustle, and some difficulty in
moving. Buz, however, kept near her friend and the fanner, 5
and said to the latter:

‘‘No more bees are coming in now; have they all
returned?” ie

‘‘Oh dear, no,” answered the fanner; ‘‘ those who were
too far off to get back before the worst of the storm have
found shelter ee but,” she added, ey ll soon
stop watering now.’

‘How do you know?” asked Buz.

“‘T can feel it,” said the fanner. ‘Any bee, after a little
experience, can tell; and when they are going to water for
a long time we do not go out in such numbers, or so far, as
we do before a mere sprinkle like this. Look! It’s just
over.”

This was quite true, and presently the sun shone
BUZ—COMING OUT. 13

brightly out, and the rain-drops flashed and sparkled, and
a clean fresh smell came from the earth, and the flowers
lifted up their heads and offered the sweets they contained
to the busy, happy bees, who now left the hive in great
numbers, and scattered themselves all over the kitchen
garden in which their hive stood, and over the pleasant
_ fields beyond.

“What fun!’ exclaimed Hum, as they stood on the
board again. ‘‘ What fun to go out! Oh, how I long for
to-morrow!”

Buz and the fanner looked at her with surprise. She
seemed such a very quiet little bee, that they were hardly
prepared to find she could become so enthusiastic.

‘“‘T cannot bear to be idle,” she continued; ‘I should
like to fill a cell with honey, all by myself; to be of some
use, you know, instead of standing and looking on whilst
others work.”

‘A very proper feeling, my dear,” said the fanner
approvingly ; ‘“but you must remember that the great thing
‘is to do your duty; and if your present duty is—as I tell you
it is—to do nothing, why, you are working very well and
profitably by just standing still and being Bey sunned,
ready for to-morrow, don’t you see?”

“Yes, I see,” answered Hum, more contentedly.

At the same time,” continued the fanner, ‘‘ there would
be no harm in your trying to fan, if you would like to prac-
14 BUZ—COMING OUT.

tise that; only stand well out of the way, and take care at
first not to work too hard.”

Hum, taking the permission without paying much atten-
tion to the caution, went to the side of the board and set to
work, but so vigorously, that she turned herself completely
over on her back, and would have lifted herself quite into
the air if she had not clung very tightly to the board with
her fore feet.

Buz was highly amused at this, and helped to set her
right ; and Hum, though exceedingly astonished, and a little
mortified at what had happened, set to work again at once,
and in a very short time was really able to fan.

‘That will be a useful bee,’’ remarked the fanner to Buz,
as Hum continued practising.

JT ’m sure she will,” said Buz ; ‘‘ but all bees work, don’t
they? 1 shall, I know.”

‘““Oh, yes; a lazy bee wouldn’t do here at all. But there
are different dispositions in bees all the same; for instance,
some will think only of how many cells they can fill with
honey, and will consequently never go far from the hive, so
as not to lose time; others are more adventurous, go further
afield, and try to get curious sorts of honey.”

“JT shall be one of that sort,” said Buz; ‘I know I
shall.”

‘Then again,” continued the fanner, ‘‘some bees are
good-tempered, and others are cross; for instance, I know
BUZ—COMING OUT. 15

one who won’t let any person but the gardener come near
the hive; if any one else does, she goes straight at him, to
sting or to pretend to sting him; and I must say it is very
amusing to see a person run. I say, do you feel hungry?”

Buz was rather astonished at the sudden manner in
which this question was asked, but replied, ‘‘ Why, yes, I
think I do.”

“Because it is about time,” continued the fanner, “ for
you and Hum to go back to your cells: young things ought
never to be long without food. You will find the nurses
somewhere about.”

“Thank you,” said Buz; and she went off to fetch Hum.

On their way into the hive Buz stopped, and said to the
bee, who was still fanning away as hard as ever, ‘“‘ Will you
tell us your name, please?”

“My name’s ‘ Fan.’”

‘What, because you fan?”

“Oh dear, no; certainly not! I don’t always fan, you
. know; I only take my turn.”

“J understand,” said Buz; and away went the two
young bees to find their nurses and get some food.

CHAPTER II.

First Flights—Marrow scape.





CHAPTER II.

FIRST FLIGHTS—NARROW ESCAPE.

se:
ee

eH XT morning, Buz and Hum were,



of course, in a great hurry to
leave the hive and try their
wings; but one of the nurses,
who happened to see them on
their way to the entrance very
early indeed, told them not to be
tempted out by the bright rays
of the sun, which had only just
risen, but to wait till the world was a little warmer. ‘“ Many
a young bee,” she added, “‘yes, and many an older bee who
ought to. have known better, has left this hive on a bright-
looking spring morning, and has never returned, because it was
really so much colder than it seemed that no bee could stand
it. The fact is, we cannot endure cold weather ; we should
like to be able to, but we can't, and so there’s an end of it.”
20 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

With these sagacious words the nurse took her departure,
and Buz and Hum, though they felt it was a great trial to
_ wait, agreed to do nothing foolish.

‘At any rate,” said the former, ‘‘we can stand out on
the board, and run in directly we feel cold.”

So out they went, and took a bee’s-eye view of the
garden.

It was certainly a lovely morning, and the sun shone
right into the mouth of the hive, which faced east, or rather
- south-east, as a hive should.

The garden in which it stood, ‘had a high wall all
round it; but, as the ground sloped away, Buz and Hum
could see the country beyond, and the end of the beau-
tiful lime-tree avenue which led from the old house near
at hand.

Such a comfortable, old-fashioned country-house it was,
with many gable-ends, and queer bits of building sticking out
from it in all directions. It didn’t belong to any particular
order of architecture, and didn’t want to. There was
nothing at all correct about it; and no architect, travelling
through the country to pick up hints, would have thought of
pulling out his book of plans to take a copy. You couldn't
copy it—that was just the beauty of it; but no artist could
possibly pass it without taking off a lot of sketches of odd
bits and corners here and there, or without being delighted
with the picturesque old place.
BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. aI

And inside! Was there ever such a place for children
to play hide-and-seek in! There were really no end of long
passages, and big cupboards, and tiny rooms; whilst, as for
stairs! they were here, there, and everywhere: almost every
room had two or three steps leading up to it, or two or.three ~
steps leading down to it; for the architect, or rather archi-
tects (there must have been a dozen of them employed at
different times), seemed to have said, ‘‘ No, we won't have
any two rooms exactly on the same level—not if we can
help it.” Some of the rooms had windows that looked down
into the old hall; others had managed to get so exactly into
the middle of the house that there was nothing for it but to
light them from the next room; but that didn’t matter a bit:
they did famously for keeping bandboxes and odd things in,
and there were heaps of rooms to spare. Nowadays,
people wouldn’t like to build in that sort of way, they are
so particular about turning every inch of space to account ;
and one might tell from a glance at the outside of a modern
house the situation of all the rooms within. Well, that
wasn’t the case with Heathercombe, at any rate; but, such
as it was, no one could have helped saying, ‘‘ What a dear,
comfortable old place! I wonder what its historyis? There
must be plenty of stories belonging to it.’ And so there
were, as even the old lime trees in the avenue knew quite
well.

The garden exactly suited the house, so it is hardly
22 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

necessary to say that there was nothing formal about it.
You couldn’t take in the whole pattern of the flower-beds at
once, as if you were looking at a Turkey carpet; for little
narrow paths, that twisted about as much as they possibly
could, led you to all kinds of odd nooks and out-of-the-way
corners, here passing a quaint bit of yew hedge, and there
_ rounding a clump of enormous shrubs; and in all the corners
and in every nook you would find a little flower-bed or two,
filled with dear old-fashioned flowers—moss roses, wall-
flowers, columbines, stocks, marigolds, and many others;
and hardly any of those eternal geraniums with dreadful
names, and calceolarias of high degree, which have to be
shown in stiff regimental order, and which look very lovely
in certain places, but wouldn’t have suited the old garden at
all. Then there were plenty of rustic seats and dear little
summer-houses, and, of course, an old sundial, so covered |
with moss that the figures on the dial were completely
hidden—that didn’t matter; it would have been a shame to
dream of utilising it—and on the summer-houses, sweetbriers
and honeysuckles crept and twined and hung as much as ever
they liked; and mignonette grew in patches all about the
place, and even the steps of the old sundial were covered
with musk.

What with all the sweet flowers, and what with the yew
hedges and tall shrubs, affording shelter from any wind that - -
might blow, it was the place of all others for bees.
BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. 23

‘But Buz and Hum knew nothing about this as yet, and
as they looked at the kitchen garden. they thought it was big
enough for anything. There were no fanners at work on the
board: the morning was too cool for them to be needed—so
cool that, though plenty of bees kept on walking to the edge
of the board and taking observations, it was some time before
any flew off.

At last, as the sun’s rays grew warmer, one or two were
hardy enough to start away on their long day’s work; but
just then Buz and Hum felt quite chilled, and had to run
into the hive, where they very soon got nice and warm
again.

“« Flow lucky it is,” said Hum, “that we didn’t ay off at
once!”

‘Why, yes,” replied Buz, “it is certainly colder than it
seemed at first; after all, I suppose it’s a Beod thing to take
advice.”

“Take advice,” repeated a bee who was standing near
the entrance, and who heard what Buz said; ‘I should think
it was, just. But what advice have you been taking?”

So Buz told her, and she seemed pleased, and said:

“I'll tell you what it is, if you two will stay with me I'll
let you know when I consider it warm enough for you to go
out ; and when I consider it so, it will be so.” ;

“Come,” thought Buz, ‘she doesn’t seem to mistrust
her judgment much.”
24 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

‘“‘T might perhaps be tempted,” continued the bee, ‘to
go out a little too soon myself, but when one judges for
others one is not led away by inclination; do you under-
stand ?” :

ee Yes, ” replied Buz, “you mean hat it does not matter
to you how long we have to wait, don’t you?”

‘‘ That’s about it,’’ said the bee.

‘But shan’t we keep you waiting ?”’ asked Hum.

“No; I’m not going out this morning. I shall fan when
it gets warmer: that’s my work to-day. Now, if you are
warm again, we’ll just step out and take a look round.”

So they all three went out, and even in the short time
they had been away they found that the sun had become
much more powerful.

But their newly-made friend would not let them start quite
at once, and took the opportunity of giving them several
hints about collecting honey, and so on. ‘‘ However,” she
added, ‘‘I won’t bother you any more now; for there is a
certain party to whom you are going to be introduced, who
will teach you more in a day than yon could learn from me
in a week.”

“Who?” asked Buz and Hum together.

‘‘Experience,’’ answered the bee, looking very wise
indeed.

And now at last the time came, and Buz and Hum were
allowed to try their wings.
BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. 25

‘“‘ Follow me,” said their friend; ‘“‘I can spare time to fly
a little way; and when I stop, you stop too.”

‘All right,” cried Buz, trembling with excitement.

Hum said nothing, but her wings began to move, almost
in spite of herself.

Away went the bee, as straight as a line from the mouth
of the hive, and away flew Buz and Hum after her; but at
first starting they both found it a little difficult to keep quite
straight, and Buz knocked against the board to begin with,
and ney oe herself, as she had not learned how to
rise.

The bee did not go far, and lit on the branch of a peach
tree which was growing against a wall hard by. Buz came
after her in a great hurry, but missed the branch and gave
herself a bang against the wall.

Hum saw this, and managed to stop herself in time; but
she did not judge her distance very well either, and got on to
the peach tree in a scrambling sort of way.

“Very good,” said their friend, as they all three stood
together ; “you will soon be able to take care of yourselves
now; but just let me see you back to the hive.”

So off they flew again, and alighted on the board in a
very creditable manner.

“Now,” said the bee, “I shall leave you; but before I
go let me advise you, as a friend, not to quit the garden to-

day; there are plenty of flowers, and plenty of opportunities
5
26 - BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

for you to meet with ‘ Experience,’ without flying over any of
the four walls. Good-bye.”

So saying, she disappeared into the hive.

‘‘Isn’t it too delightful!” exclaimed Buz to Hum.
‘Flying! why it’s even more fun than I thought!”

le . ” said Hum; “but I should like to get some honey
at once.’

‘Of course,” replied Buz, “only I should like to fly a
good way to get it.”

““T want to fill a cell quickly,” said Hum.

‘Oh yes, to be sure! What a delightful thing it will be
to put one’s proboscis down into every flower and see what’s
there! ! Do you know,” added Buz, putting out her proboscis,
“T feel as if I could suck tremendously; don’t you?”

“Yes, ye 1” cried Hum, “I long to be sucking; let’s be
off at once.’

So away they went, and lit on a bed of flowers.

Hum spent the day between the hive and that bed, and
‘was quite, quite happy; but Buz, though she too liked
‘collecting the honey, wanted to have more excitement in

getting it; and every now and then, as she passed to and
from the hive, a lovely field of clover, not far off, sent forth
such a delicious smell, as the breeze swept over it, that she
was strongly tempted to disregard the advice she had been
given, and to hurry off to it. :

At last she could stand it no longer ; and, rising high into
. BUZ—-FIRST FLIGHTS. 27.

the air, she sailed over the wall and went out into the world
beyond.

Yes, right out into the world; and very much did she
enjoy the sense of freedom, of going as high as she liked
and flying as fast as she could, and stopping exactly
when and where she felt inclined, with nobody to bother
her with good advice—which she was ready to admit was
all very well, though, at the same time, a person couldn’t
everlastingly be taking it. She had had quite enough for
one day, she was sure of that; and so she hadn’t told
Hum of her intention to leave that poky-old kitchen
garden: Hum might be giving advice next, and that would
be too absurd.

And so she reached the field of clover, and, flying quite
low over the flowers, was astonished to see what lots of bees
were busy amongst them—bumble bees without end, and
plenty of honey bees too; in fact, the air was filled with the
pleasant murmur that they made. ss

‘To be sure,” said Buz to herself, ‘this is the place for _
me! Poor dear old Hum! I hope she’s enjoying herself
as much as I am. I don’t mean to be idle either, so here
goes for some honey.

But the first thing to do was to pick out a flower to
settle on.

It seemed easy enough, for there were hundreds of
thousands to choose from. . That was just it: who was to

5 *
28 : BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

choose any particular flower out of such a lot! A dozen
_ times Buz was on the point of alighting on one, and a dozen
times she was attracted by another close by, which seemed |
a little fresher, or a little richer, or a little larger. This
wouldn’t do at all; she felt she was wasting time, and had
just made up her nnd to let herself fall anyhow into the
clover and begin on the first bit she touched, when she
caught sight of a splendid flower close to her. There was
no mistake about it this time; it was a king clover, she
thought, so tall and fine, and promising such a supply of
honey that she settled on it at once in triumph.

And she eagerly unpacked her proboscis and explored,
one after another, the cups of the many flowers clustered
together in the head.

But how dreadfully disappointing! Not a drop of
honey, not the least little drop, could she find in the whole
flower !

‘Well, I declare!” she said aloud, as she raised her
~ head at last in disgust, ‘it’s perfectly dry!”

At this the flower gave a low silvery laugh, and shook a
little on its stalk.

“Dry!” it repeated; ‘I should rather think I was;
sucked as dry as a brick, half an hour ago.”

‘“‘TIndeed!” said Buz.

‘Yes, my dear, indeed,” repeated the flower cheerily ;
‘“‘and so many bees besides yourself have been sold this
BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS. 29

morning, that it’s really quite ridiculous! I suppose you’re
a young bee, eh?”

“Well, rather,” answered Buz. ‘ Why?”

‘You see, you young things always will pick out the
biggest and tallest of us, and wil/ waste your time in trying
us all over, quite forgetting that others before you have most
likely been attracted by just the same qualities that you
admire yourself. Now let me give you a bit of advice.”

‘More advice,” thought Buz to herself. ‘*Oh dear!”
However, she said politely enough that she would be glad to
have it.

“Then,” said the flower, ‘‘ pick out the blossoms that
are most hidden and most out of the way. Flowers that are
really almost troublesome to get at are generally worth
trying: you will find this the case nearly always; and
remember also, that if the first two or three cups of a head
like mine be dry, it is hardly worth while trying all the others,
for the same bee who cleared out the first will probably have
worked out every cup in the flower. Don’t you think so?”

‘Yes, I do,” replied Buz; ‘I know I should, at least.
Well, I’m much obliged to you for the hint, and I’ll be off
at once and take advantage of it.”

‘‘ All right,” said the flower. ‘‘ Good-bye.”

‘“‘ Good-bye,” answered Buz; and away she flew.

Not for more than a few yards though ; turning suddenly
back, she lit once more on the same flower.
30 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

“T thought I’d just ask you,” she said, ‘if it’s a fair
question, do you mind us bees taking away your honey; or
do you consider us so many robbers?”

‘Mind it!” replied the flower. ‘‘ Not at all; you do us
quite as much good as we do you, without being able to help
it any more than we.can.”

“Do we really?” said Buz. :

‘‘Of course you do,” answered the flower ; ‘‘look at your
legs. ;

Buz looked. _

““T can only see a little yellow dust on them.”

‘Well, that’s pollen ; and the pollen from one flower
fertilises others. But how is it toget tothem? It must be
carried, of course; and though sometimes the wind does this
for us, you bees are the means we chiefly depend on. In
short, without bees there would be a very poor look-out for
flowers ; and, of course, we are necessary to you: so, you see,
it’s a case of ‘tit for tat.’ Good-morning.”

‘‘Good-morning again, and thank you,” said Buz, as she
flew away. ;

And now it was high time to set to work in earnest; so
Buz was very diligent indeed, and, remembering what the
tall clover blossom had told her, she selected the most out-
of-the-way flowers she could find, and soon collected as much
honey as she could carry.

But by the time she had done this she found herself close
i

BUZ——FIRST FLIGHTS. | 31

to the further end of the clover field; and whilst resting for
a moment, before starting to carry her load to the hive, she

noticed a little pond in the corner. Feeling thirsty after her

hard work, she flew off to take a few sips; but just as she
reached the pond and was in the act of descending, a light
gust of wind caught her and turned her half over, and before
she could recover herself she was plunged far out into the
water |

Poor Buz! She was a brave little bee, but this was a
terrible accident; and after a few wild struggles she almost
gave herself up. The water was so cold, and she felt herself so
helpless in it; and then the accident had happened so sud-
denly, and taken her so utterly by surprise, that it was no
wonder she lost courage. Only fora moment though; just as
she was giving up in despair the hard and seemingly useless
work of paddling and struggling with all her poor little legs
at once, she saw that a bit of stick was floating near her, and
with renewed energy she attempted to get to it. Alas! it
was all she could do to keep her head above water; as for
moving along through it, that seemed impossible, and she
was tempted to give up once more. It was very hard
though; there was the stick, not more than a foot away from
her: if she could only reach it! At any rate, she was
determined it should not be her fault if she was unsuccessful;
so she battled away harder than ever, though her strength
began to fail and she was becoming numbed with the cold.
32 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

Just as she made this last effort another gust of wind swept
over the pond, and Buz saw that the stick began to move
through the water, and to come nearer and nearer to her.
The fact was that a small twig sticking up from it acted asa_
sail, though Buz didn’t know this. And now the stick was
quite close, almost within reach; in another moment she
would be on it. Ah! but a moment seems a long time
when one is at the last gasp, as poor Buz was.

Would she be drowned after all? No! Just as she was
sinking she touched the stick with one little claw, and held
on as only drowning people can; and then she got another
safely lodged, and was able to rest for a moment. Oh, the
relief of that, after such a long and ceaseless struggle !

But even then it was very hard work to get up on the
stick, very hard indeed. However, Buz managed it at last,
and dragged herself quite out of the cold, cruel water.

By this time the breeze was blowing steadily over the
pond, and the stick would soon reach the bank; but Buz
felt very miserable and cold, and her wings clung tightly to
her, and she looked dreadfully forlorn.

The pond, too, was overshadowed by trees; so there were
no sunbeams to warm her.

“Ah!” thought she, ‘if I can manage to drag reall
up into the sunshine, and rest and be well warmed, I shall
soon be better.’’ &

Well, the bank was safely reached at last; but Buz, all
-BUZ——FIRST FLIGHTS. 33

through her after life, never forgot what a business it was
climbing up the side. The long grasses yielded to her
weight, and bent almost straight down, as if on purpose to
make it as uphill work for her as possible. And even when
she reached the top, it took her a weary while to get across
the patch of dark shadow and out into the glad. sunlight
beyond; but she managed to arrive there at last, and
crawling on to the top, of a stone which had been well
warmed by the sun’s rays, she rested for a long time.

At last she sufficiently recovered to make her way, by a
succession of short flights, back to the hive. After the first
of these she felt so dreadfully weak that she almost doubted
being able to accomplish the journey, and began to despond.

“Tf I ever do get home,” she said to herself, “1 will tell
Hum all about it, and how right she was to take advice; in
fact, my story shall be known throughout the hive: it may
bea uséful warning to many young bees yet unhatched.”

Now, whether it was that the exercise did her good,
or that the sun’s rays became hotter that afternoon,
cannot be known; but this is certain, that Buz felt better
after every flight, and before she had reached the end of
the clover field she had almost determined to say nothing
about ‘her adventure, except, of course, to Hum. “ What’s
the use of being laughed at?” she thought. ‘I shouldn't
mind much if it would do any good; but would it ? that’s the

point. I fancy not; the young bees would only be amused
6
34 BUZ—FIRST FLIGHTS.

at hearing what a mess I had got into, but they never would
think of the story at the right time. No, I shall certainly
not make it public.”

So she sipped a little honey, cleaned herself with her
feet, and stretched her wings, and, with the sun glistening
brightly on her, looked quite fine again. Her last flight
brought her to the top of the kitchen-garden wall, from which
she was just about to start for the hive, when she thought |
how disagreeable it would be to meet Hum and tell her .
everything. ‘After all, what good can possibly come of
alluding to my adventure ?” she said to herself. “ It hurt
no one but me, and I’m all right again now; so I may say it
has done me good. No, I declare I'll say nothing at all
about it to Hum or anyone else: that will be the best way.”

So she opened her wings and flew gaily to the hive,
which she entered just as if nothing had happened.


CHAPTER ill.

Dispute with a Peacock Buttertly.

The Snail settles it.

6%





XY










<=
a
we

_BODe

\

\

WV
VS
VS
LL ¢ A tof
Lee
WS

{
N
\
NW
iy
Z

co
} oO,
ow
ALOr~ {
ww a
7 \
_

CHAPTER III.

DISPUTE WITH A PEACOCK BUTTERFLY.
THE SNAIL SETTLES IT.



OR a few days after her narrow
escape, Buz did not venture
far from the hive, and worked
steadily and well. She now
and then met Hum, and they
were always good friends; but
she found that what she had
heard was quite true, and that there was not much time
for anything but work. One morning, however, as they
were both waiting near the entrance of the hive till it
should be warm enough to go out, Hum asked Buz if she

had seen the Queen yet.
“T should think so!” replied Buz. ‘The first time I

met her, I was carrying in some honey, and was passing




38 BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

between two combs, when, without knowing why, I found
myself turning round to the right and bowing away like
anything ! ‘What’s the matter with me?’ thought I; ‘this
is quite ridiculous ’—but ridiculous or not, I did not seem to
be able to stop, and was actually getting angry with myself,
when I saw, in the midst of a circle of bees close to me,
one who I felt must be the Queen. She was so long in the
body and so graceful, and her wings were so much shorter
than ours, that no one could help seeing the difference at
once \ and, then, all the bees round were careful to keep
their heads respectfully turned towards her. She was busy
laying eggs, and I watched her for some time; but one got
tired of that, and so I squeezed out of the crowd. T sup-
pose you’ve seen her too?”

‘Oh, yes!” answered Hum, ‘‘and she noticed me quite
kindly; I’d do anything for her—anything !”

Certainly,” said Buz; ‘I suppose you feel that you
couldn’t do a stroke of work unless you knew that she was
in the hive, and all safe.”

“Yes,” answered Hum, ‘‘I quite feel so.”

‘With regard to that,” pursued Buz, ‘‘ every bee in the
hive is just the same.”

“ How do you know?”

‘A drone told me.”

““T have several times seen you talking to drones.”

‘“T always go to a drone when I want to know anything.”
BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. 39

“Do you really?”
““Yes, of course; bees who work hard like you, old Hum,

never have time to explain, but are always in such a hurry
to be off. Now drones are very lazy in every other way, but
are tremendous gossips, I find.”

“Ah!” said Hum; ‘‘I remember nurse telling we that
if I showed her a lazy person, she would show me a gossip.”

lshatss it! ” cried Buz. ‘‘ Well, a drone told me that
the custom we all have of touching each other with our
antennes whenever we pass, was introduced on purpose to
save the trouble of asking after the Queen. It’s merely a |
signal that everything is going on well with her.”

“T can believe that,” said Hum, ‘for it’s just what
Ieiecl

At this moment the sun peeped over a bank of morning
clouds, and called the bees to work; and out went Buz and
Hum with the rest, the former making her way to the old-
fashioned flower garden near the house.

Here she was soon busy amongst some early stocks and
mignonette which grew near the sundial, and had already
made several journeys to and from the hive, when she was
addressed by a peacock butterfly which she had noticed
flitting about, and which was now sitting on the top of the
dial itself.

“You seem to have something like an appetite this
morning!” said the butterfly.
40 BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERELY,

“What do you mean?” said Buz.
“But you’ll make yourself ill, you know,” continued
the butterfly.

‘‘T’m sure I shan’t!”? answered Buz, indignantly.

“Unless you’re like a snake,” persisted the butterfly in
an aggravating manner, ‘“‘and can take in enough food for
a week.” .

“You don’t know what you ’re talking about,” cried Buz,
turning angrily away.

‘Oh, yes, I do,” said the butterfly coolly; ‘I’ve been
watching you, and thinking. It’s the only thing I’ve been
doing.” Le :

“And you’ve done that wrong,” retorted Buz; ‘so it’s
a pity you weren’t asleep.”

‘“‘T’ve been thinking,” repeated the butterfly, as if she
hadn’t heard what Buz. said, ‘“‘that you bees are a greedy
lot ; and the more I think of it, the more I can’t remember
ever seeing a bee that was doing anything except what
you’re doing now.”

‘*Do you mind saying that again?” said Buz sarcas-
tically; “it’s a pretty sentence, very!”

‘Not at all,” said the butterfly. And she repeated it
all over again, word for word, and seemed quite pleased.

This bothered Buz, who didn’t exactly know what to
say ; when the butterfly continued in the calmest manner—

‘The simple truth is, you.’re always thinking of eating.”
_ BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. AT

“Why, you ignorant, conceited creature!” cried Buz;
‘‘how dare you tell me that?”

‘Because it’s a fact—come now, isn’t it?’ said the
butterfly.

“No! No!! No!!! It’s a most abominable story!”

“You seem a little put out,’’ said the butterfly, ‘‘ which
is foolish; people can’t always agree, you know. Now,
suppose you come here and talk the matter over with me
quietly. I’m sure you can spare a few minutes.”

Buz was at first inclined to refuse indignantly; but re-
membering what a triumph it would be to prove the butterfly
wrong in everything she said, consented.

“ That’s right,” said the butterfly, as Buz settled down
close to her. ‘‘ Now begin.”

“ How?” asked Buz.

“T made a statement that seemed to annoy you. You
must either admit it, or prove I’m wrong. My statement
was, that you bees are always thinking of eating.”

‘“‘T certainly don’t admit it.”

“Then disprove it.”

“To begin with, we don’t—but, I say,” said Buz,
suddenly interrupting herself, ‘why shouldn’t you prove
you’re right ?”

“ Anything you please; I won’t be particular with you.
Well then, I’ve observed, not you alone, but dozens of
other bees—not on this day alone, but on dozens of other

7
42 BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

days—and you have all been doing the same thing—always.
You have all been employed in sucking every drop of honey
out of every single flower you could get at; as for ever
resting, or playing about, or even stopping to talk—why
you know you never do. Those are the observations
I have made myself, and on those observations I base
my statement—I base my statement,” repeated the butter-
fly, speaking very slowly, and evidently rather proud of
herself.

‘Amongst your other observations,” said Buz, trying to
talk as calmly as the butterfly, ‘‘ have you ever noticed that

we are in the habit of leaving at intervals the flowers on

_ which we are busy, of flying rapidly away, and of returning
after a short absence?” _

‘“‘T have,” replied the pulceriy.

‘Can you tell me why we do so?”

“If you’ll promise not to be vexed, Ill tell you what
I’ve always thought.”

url promise,” said Buz.

‘“To get an appetite for a little more honey.”

‘Ah! then you’re just wrong—as wrong as ever you
can be.”

‘“Am I really?” said the butterfly. “Well, you know,
it was only a a and isn’t of the least consequence.”

‘But it is,” cried Buz, ‘of the greatest possible con-
sequence, and so you’ll be driven to admit when I explain
BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. 43

that we leave the flowers, on purpose to deposit the honey
we have collected, in our hive; and there it is stored up for
our use during the winter. So you see we don’t eat it at
all, or think of eating it—there! and so you’re wrong!”
concluded Buz, excitedly.

_ “Then you'd like me to withdraw my statement ?” asked
the butterfly.

“Of course; you must withdraw it, now you know that
I have hardly eaten any honey all this morning—not so
‘much as you have, I daresay.”

“Very good,” replied the butterfly; ‘‘but before I do
so, tell me if I am wrong in thinking you said the honey
‘was stored for your use during the winter.”

“ That ’s just what I said.”

“May I ask how you use it ?”

‘Why, we eat it, of course,” said Buz.

“Then all this morning you must have been thinking—
not of what you were eating, certainly—but of what you
are going to eat in the winter. Dear me! dearme! This
is even worse than I thought,” said the butterfly, almost
sadly. |

“But it isn’t greediness on our part,” said Buz; ‘‘we
call it, being provident.”

“Tt sounds greedy to me though,” said the butterfly.
‘According to your own account, you think all the summer
of what you are going to eat all the winter. You think of

{a3 , ;
Ad. BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

nothing else, and work like slaves, and never have any fun.
Well, I wouldn’t be a bee!”

Buz was rather disconcerted at the turn the conversation
had taken, and, more to gain time than for any other reason,
she asked the butterfly how she spent her time.

“T do exactly what I like all day long, and never
think of a moment beyond the present. If I feel hungry,
I eat, and directly I’m satisfied I think of food no
longer; af T.-am— hot, Igiy ain the: shades if cold 4
bask in the sun. When I feel lively, I dance gaily
up and down in the air, and the moment I’m tired,
I stop. I have a thousand companions as gay and
beautiful as myself, always ready to play with me, and
nothing can put me out, for I don’t care what happens
to me.” =

“But when the cold winter begins!”

“ Then I shall die,” said the butterfly, very cheerfully—
“‘at least, so I suppose; but what of that? Perhaps I shall
like it.”

“At any rate,” said Buz, ‘‘you have described a very
selfish, useless sort of life.”

‘‘And in what sense is yours useful?” retorted the
butterfly, “except to yourself perhaps. If you do not
. gather all the honey you talk about for your own use, you
at least expect a share of what the other bees in your hive
collect; so that in point of fact you only work hard in
BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY. 45

order to keep yourself alive. I ask again, what’s the use
of your keeping alive?”

“To begin with,” said Buz, “I help to make the cells
in which we rear the young grubs, and to collect the food
with which we feed them—and in that way I am unselfishly
useful, you must allow.”

“Perhaps; but after all, what do you gain by working
hard to rear a lot of things as useless as yourself? I know
there will be dozens of young caterpillars—nasty things !—
crawling about some day, that will all come out of the eggs
I laid yesterday. Do you suppose I’m proud of that?
Certainly not.” -

Buz suddenly remembered what the clover flower had
told her with regard to the use of bees in distributing
pollen, and eagerly repeated it to the butterfly, who only
= said
Sl sincerely hope you don’t take any credit to yourself
for that. You surely are not proud of doing what you
couldn’t help doing, however hard you tried ?””

“T like to think I am useful, even if no praise is due to
me for being so. My life would not be spent in vain if I
were useful even against my will, and I still say that it is a
higher and nobler one than yours. I am convinced that
the consciousness of being usefully employed is



_“T deny the usefulness to anyone but yourself, mind,”
put in the butterfly.
46 ---« BUZ—DISPUTE WITH A BUTTERFLY.

‘Makes life far happier,” continued Buz, “than it can
possibly be in your case, who live only for self-indulgence ;
and, even if it be true, as you affirm it is; that my existence
is utterly in vain, the very fact of my longing to be of use, -
-and of your being unwilling to be useful even if you could,
makes me certain that it is better to be a bee than a
butterfly.”

“Pity we can’t agree!” said the butterfly. “Fine day,
"ane bth?

Buz was so annoyed at the flippant manner in which
the butterfly put an end to the conversation, in which she —
had really become interested, that she turned to leave
without saying another word, when she heard a thick,
muffled voice, so close to her that she quite started—

““T’m very old.” Then there was a pause. ‘Very old
indeed,” continued the voice, which Buz now found pro-
ceeded from a large snail, stuck close to the edge of the
sundial. ‘Hundreds of years, perhaps,” said the snail
slowly, as if he was reckoning up. 7

‘Thousands, I should say,” remarked the butterfly, in
a low voice. :

“And I know a lot.” Here there was a long pause.

‘“‘He knows how to keep silence, at any rate,” said the
butterfly to Buz.

‘Which is more than some people do,” retorted Buz.

“Tn here I think a good deal,” continued the snail. “I
BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT. 47

was once imprisoned in a rock for over a hundred years;
I thought a good deal then.” .

Buz didn’t know what to say, and even the butterfly
made no remark; the voice was so very solemn, and also
‘she felt that the snail wouldn’t have cared for any words
of hers. The latter soon continued—

‘‘T once considered the subject of your late conversation
(of which, I must tell you, I heard every word) for fifty
years at a stretch.”

‘‘ Did you get a headache after it ?” the cee couldn’t
help asking. But the snail didn’t seem to hear her, and
Buz took no notice whatever of the question.

‘And as,” said the snail, “you were both totally wrong
in the conclusions to which you came, I shall just put you
right. You bee,” he continued—suddenly shooting out the
horn nearest to Buz, and keeping it pointed towards her—
‘‘seem to despise the butterfly for not working, or taking
any care for the future, and for leading a vain and useless
life, as you call it. Don’t despise the butterfly. And you
butterfly ’—here he shot out his other horn, and pointed it
at the insect he addressed—“ appear to pity the bee because
she works hard during the summer, in order that she may
keep herself alive through the winter, instead of enjoying
herself whilst she may: Don’t pity the bee.”

The snail paused for a moment, and drew in both his
horns, and then continued in a very solemn manner—
48 BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT.

‘What is right for one person, is wrong for another. If
a bee were to lead the life of a butterfly, she would be
miserable; for she was created in order that she might
work, and no one can be really happy who is not fulfilling
the object of his creation. On the other hand, if a butterfly
were to attempt to work, she would fail, and be miserable
also. So let the bee work as hard as she can, without being
proud of doing what is only her duty—and she will be as
happy as the butterfly. Let the butterfly sit in the sun and
look beautiful, and enjoy all the pleasures of life and be
thankful for them: above all, let her never look down on’
those whose duty it is to work; let her always have a soft
heart and a kind word for such as are fagged and worn by
the toil she is not called upon to endure herself—and the
butterfly will be as happy as the bee. As for presuming”—
(here the snail became as stern as such a soft thing con-
veniently could)—‘‘as for presuming to settle which is the
nobler, or higher, or better life to lead, how dare you attempt
to do so! It is not for you to decide. In my opinion, who-
ever does the work he is given to do, best—whatever that
work may be—whatever that work may be, mind,” repeated
the snail emphatically, putting out both his horns, and
pointing one at each of the insects in a very slgnincant
manner—‘‘ leads the best life.”

At this moment the sun, which had been behind a cloud
for some time, shone brightly out, and the snail retired into
BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT. 4Q

his shell at- once, and rested on the cool soft moss which
grew over the dial. The two insects looked at each other
rather foolishly, and Buz was the first to speak:

“T’m glad that snail overheard us, and spoke out so
plainly; I seem to see things differently now, and retract
what I said about selfishness.”

‘And I,” answered the butterfly—who was really very
good-natured, and was apt to hurt people’s feelings only
from want of thought—‘‘ am very sorry indeed that I should
have laughed at you or your work; for I honour you in my
- heart, I do indeed. Now come,” she continued coaxingly,
‘do let us part friends; and if you would let me take one
of the hints given by that dear old snail, I should think it
so kind of you. If ever you feel tired or overworked, or
whenever things go wrong, do come and let me try to cheer
you up; now do!”

‘T certainly will,” answered Buz, ‘‘though at the same
time, I enjoy my work so much that I don’t expect to have
to trouble you often; however, it’s quite nice of you to
think of it,” she concluded, ‘‘and I hope we may frequently
meet. Now I really must be off. I don’t consider my time
here has been wasted, but I am perfectly rested, and have
plenty to do.”

‘“‘T won’t try to detain you,” said the butterfly ; ‘cand
mind, I shall always be most interested in hearing what
work you are engaged in, and how it is getting on,”

3°
50 BUZ—THE SNAIL SETTLES IT.

“And on my part,” answered Buz gaily, ‘it will always
bea pleasure to me to see you flying about and ae SO
pretty. Good- bye, dear!”

“Good-bye, good-bye!” echoed the ey, as Buz
— went off.

For some little time after this, the pretty butterfly sat
and thought, but at last, rousing herself with a merry little
laugh—‘‘I mustn’t become like ‘the ee ” she said to
herself; ‘that’s not my work, at any rate.’

So away she flew, in the highest possible ae in and
out, in and out, amongst the flowers and over the shrubs
that grew in the delightful old garden.


CHAPERR Tv.

Swarming.

8 *





CAC Pa RG Wie

SWARMING.

— NE morning early, Buz was on
the point of starting for the
top of Cothelestone Hill. She
had been there several times
already ; indeed it was a



favourite place of hers. She
so thoroughly enjoyed the long
flight to it through the air: it
was so glorious to mount high
up above the fields, and to see the dewdrops sparkling like
diamonds in the morning sun—to listen to the lark as he
took his first upward flight, and poured out his song for joy
that another day had come—to inhale the fragrance of
dawn, knowing that all the flowers which made it so sweet,
were waiting for her, and would be glad when they saw her
coming. This was delightful indeed. —
54 BUZ—SWARMING.

Then again, Buz always looked forward to interesting
conversations with the flowers she visited, and the insects
and creatures she met; and she had a sort of idea that the
further she strayed from the hive, the more curious would be
her adventures, and the more charming the stories she was
told. But this did not follow at all; and many of the
prettiest tales she heard, were repeated to her by flowers
which grew in the old garden near the hive, though it was
some time before she would admit this, even to herself.

On her way to the entrance on this particular morning,
she perceived that a most unusual bustle was going on all
through the hive; and, directly the first bee touched her,
she felt quite excited and disinclined to work, though she
didn’t exactly understand why. At this moment she saw a
drone—‘‘ What’s up now?” she cried, running to him in
a great hurry.

‘‘ Don’t fuss,’’ said the drone snappishly.

“Well, I only want to know what all this stir and con-
fusion means?” :

‘Tl tell you fast enough if you won’t fuss. I hate a
bustle; and there’s enough of that, I’m sure, without your
helping to make it worse.”

‘T’ll be as quiet as a grub,” said Buz, speaking in a low
voice and standing quite still, though she felt that she was
becoming more restless every moment. _

The drone looked at her for some time without saying a
BUZ—SWARMING. 55

word; and at last, in a provokingly indifferent manner,
asked if she had been fanning lately.

“Yes,” said Buz, “it was my turn yesterday, and it was
a very hot day, and so I fanned a great deal; and stupid
work it was.”

‘Did you observe that there were often great clusters of
bees hanging together, just by the board outside the hive ?”

“Of course I did,” replied Buz; ‘they were there till
the evening.”

‘Did you wonder why?”

“No; I heard lots of them say that it was dreadfully
hot inside, so I suppose they hung out to cool.”

“Exactly; do you know why it was so hot in the hive?
I can tell you: partly because the day was so warm, and
partly because there are such a lot of bees—too many bees,
that’s the fact. Well, the weather can’t be made cooler,
but some of the bees can go, and they will go too.”
“Dear me!” said Buz, “will they? What! leave the
hive ?—really leave this hive?”

‘Flow can they go without leaving the hive, stupid ?”
answered the drone.

‘Of course they can’t; but what will they do without
Queen?”

““Our present Queen will go with them; she knows
it’s too hot in the hive, so she will leave with a party
of volunteers.”
56 Ss BUZ—SWARMING.

“Volunteers!”? cried Buz; ‘“‘what fun! I’ll be one!
I'll go! I may, mayn’t 1?. Oh, I hope I may go!”

“Now, for honey’s sake, don’t fuss,” said the drone.

‘‘ Certainly not,” replied Buz.

But she was trembling with excitement. Anything for a
change, anything for novelty. She never wished to be idle,
and she liked all sorts of work; but put her to a different
job every day—then she was happy! She cared little for
danger, and explored all kinds of places that many bees—
Hum for instance—wouldn’t think of going near; and now
the thought of volunteering, and flying off with the dear old
Queen, and beginning life again as it were, was charming.
It suited Buz exactly; but, as she had still plenty of ques-
tions to ask the drone, shé kept as quiet as possible; and
he was much too lazy and indifferent to notice what an
effort this was to her.

“By the row that’s going on,” remarked the drone, “I
should say this would be a big swarm.”

“A swarm!” exclaimed Buz; “‘ then that’s what swarm-
ing is!”

‘A horrid noise, a hopeless confusion, a dreadful fuss,
and an intolerable bustle—that’s what swarming is,” repeated
the drone disdainfully. ‘I shall certainly be glad to have
the hive more empty,” he went on to himself; ‘‘ but why
can’t they go away quietly, and swarm one by one, I should
like to know?”
BUZ—SWARMING. 57

‘‘Do none of the drones intend to join the swarm ?”

‘“* Hundreds will, no doubt; I shan’t.”

‘Will you tell me, please,” asked Buz, ‘how you will
get on here without a Queen?”

‘You ask such stupid questions,” said the drone. ‘You
don’t think; you’re in such a hurry—that’s it.”

“‘ Flow is mine a stupid: question 2D ee
‘“Do you mean to tell me that you have never passed

the royal nurseries? Do you mean to say that you have

never heard of royal food? Do you wish me to understand
that you have never been told about the royal grubs?”
demanded the drone.

‘Of course I’ve heard of them.” Buz said this a little
impatiently—the drone spoke so very contemptuously.

‘Oh, you have, have you? Then you will not be as-
tonished when I tell you that royal grubs become -queens,
and that one of those in this hive is just ready to leave her
cell; but she won’t come out before the old Queen has left.
Oh, no! she’ll take care of that—or rather, the royal nurses
will.”

‘Indeed; why?”

‘Because the old Queen would try to get at her, and
sting her to death. You females are so jealous and spite-
ful!’ answered the drone.

“T ain't a female,” cried Buz.

“Yes you are, though; all you working bees are un-
9
58 BUZ—SWARMING.

developed females. Suppose now we had been in want of
a Queen, and we had picked you out asa grub, and enlarged
your cell and fed you on royal bread: why, you would have
become a Queen! Actually you!”

= Really

“Yes, really; but it’s too late now; no chance for you
now, my dear; so you needn’t be proud.”

“T’m not a bit proud,” cried Buz.

“No, I see you’re not; on the contrary, you are con-
descending enough to come and speak to poor me! I feel
the honour deeply, I assure. you.”

He said these last words in such a nasty, sarcastic
manner, that Buz determined to leave him. ‘Poor fellow!”
she thought, ‘‘this noise and excitement must have made
him cross.’’? And indeed the confusion and hurrying about
increased every minute.

“Good-bye, Mr. Drone,” said Buz. ‘I really am much
obliged to you for what you have told me.”

“T’m quite overwhelmed,” said the drone, getting
more disagreeable than ever. ‘‘ Your politeness is some-
thing imperial. Are you sure you didn’t get hold of any
royal bread? Are you suve you ain’t a Queen? Just make
certain of it—do! Fly out of the hive, and see if the other
bees won’t swarm round you. They may. And what shall
I do,” he went on, “to show my respect? Shall I stick
here waxed to the floor all the rest of my life, in case you
BUZ—SWARMING. 59

want to come back and ask any more questions? Only say
the word. What! going off in a huff, are you? That’s
right, follow your temper—and make haste, or you’ll never
recover it!”

These last words were thrown after Buz, as she hurried
away without trusting herself to speak. To tell the truth,
she was getting a little afraid of the drone, who seemed to
have lost all command over himself; and she was so excited
about the swarming, that his words affected her less than
they would otherwise have done; at the same time, it was
exceedingly disagreeable to be so misjudged. ‘‘ Though I
brought it on myself,” she thought; ‘(and it shows what a
mistake it is to keep on asking questions when you see a
‘person’s out of temper. I’ll never do it again, I’ll be
stung if I-do!”
| Saying this, she ran round the corner of a comb in a
great hurry, to see where the Queen was, and what might
be going on, and knocked up against a bee coming just as
hastily in the other direction. It was Hum !—positively
Hum! Only imagine her being excited about anything but
work! Buz was quite amused.

“Then you mean to swarm too, I suppose,” she said.

“Well, no,” answered Hum; ‘I think not. I couldn’t
very well, you know.”

- “Tm sure I don’t know,” said Buz.

“I’ve got into such a groove here, don’t you see, that
ae
66 BUZ—SWARMING.

I’m almost afraid I couldn’t bear to leave it. I know where
everything is now, and exactly where to go; and besides, I’ve
got a ” Here Hum stopped short, as if she had said
rather more than she meant to.

“Got a what?” asked Buz.

‘Well, dear, I’m afraid you'll think it foolish of me—
I know you wouldn’t consider it a reason yourself, and I



” and here Hum



daresay you’re right; but the fact is
fidgeted about nervously, as if she was a little ashamed,
“the fact is, I’ve got a cell that I am filling with honey
all by myself; it’s up in a corner, out of the way, and I
couldn’t bear to go before it was full. You understand,
don’t you?” concluded she, almost pleadingly.

“I think I understand what you feel, though I don’t
fancy I should mind leaving it myself. Well, I shall be
very sorry to part from you, for you’re the best bee in
the world. I really have half a mind to stay,” continued
Buz oy “T feel as if you would keep me out of
scrapes.”

“Oh, please don’t let me prevent you from going!”
cried Hum; ‘it would never do. I’m sure you are just
the sort of person to join the swarm; you are so bold and
_active. I shall often think of you, dear Buz, and long to
know how you are getting on; but we should seldom meet
here, you know, even if you were to remain.”

‘“That’s true,” said Buz, thoughtfully; ‘and after all,
BUZ—SWARMING. 61

something tells me I ought to join the swarm. But, I say,”
added she briskly, ‘‘what is the state of the case exacuye
for I hardly know?”

‘“T do,” answered Hum. “I came straight from the
Queen when we met.”

“Tell me all about it then.”

“Tt seems that even yesterday the Queen became rest--
less, and said something about changing her house. I have
it on good authority, for one of the royal attendants told
me as much.”

‘Told you she said that?”

“Well, hardly; in fact, it’s difficult to say exactly what
she did tell me. She kept on hinting: she said, ‘there
might be changes before long, and what should I think of
that ?’—and ‘the Queen might use her wings before long,
and what should I think of that ?’—and ‘because a certain
royal person chose to live a certain time in a certain house,
did it follow that that royal person was never to change her
residence ?’—and so on, you know.”

“JT hate that!” cried Buz. ‘Why couldn’t she tell you
outright, or leave it alone altogether?”

‘Tt does appear foolish, when one comes to think of it,”
said Hum; “especially when one recollects all the nods
and whispers; but at the time, I suppose, it makes a person
seem important; and I caught myself nodding mysteriously,
and whispering too: very silly of me, to be sure!”
62 BUZ—SWARMING.

“Why, yes,” said Buz. ‘I wish you had laughed at ©
her, or, at any rate, pretended not to understand; but it
can’t be helped. What’s the news this morning ?”

‘Nothing has actually happened yet, but the Queen gets
more restless every moment, and an old bee—one who has
been in a swarm already—told me that she quite expected
she would leave the hive to-day. I know I can’t settle
down to anything. It’s wretched work!”

“Come along,” said Buz; ‘‘I want to be near the On
and watch her.”

The two friends were separated before they reached the
royal presence, for great numbers of bees were crowding
round. Buz soon pushed her way into a good place, and,
just as she got there she heard the Queen say to herself,
“I’ve a very good mind to do it. Is it fine?” she asked,
turning to her attendants.

“Tt is, your majesty,” answered several.

““A very good mind,” continued the Queen to herself;
‘““my family is becoming inconveniently large, and this
house doesn’t do: it gets hot, much too hot. That’s one
reason, and there are two or three others.”

‘She means by that,” said a bee very softly to Buz,
“that there are two or three royal grubs just ready to come
out; but she doesn’t like alluding to them, even to herself.”

“Too proud?” asked Buz, in a whisper.

‘Too proud,” answered the bee, with a confidential nod.
‘BUZ—SWARMING. 63

The Queen was now close to them.

“T declare, I think I’ll do it to-day,” she repeated.
“Did you say it was fine?” she added aloud, turning to
her attendants.

”?

‘Very fine, your majesty,” said they.

“Fine enough, eh?” asked the Queen.

“Fine enough for anything, your majesty,” said the
attendants, who were prevented by court etiquette from
seeming to know what orders the Queen was about to give,
though every one knew perfectly well that every bee in the
hive knew all about it. Curious, perhaps; but the laws of
etiquette ave curious—very.

‘“‘T hear a great noise,” said the Queen. “What is it?”

It was no wonder she did. Thousands of bees were
darting backwards and forwards just at the mouth of the
hive, and the air was filled with a roaring sound. But the
attendants pretended to be quite astonished.

“We'll go and inquire, your majesty,” they replied.

They did so, and returning immediately, said, ‘‘A few
of your majesty’s subjects are loitering about near the en-
trance, your majesty; would your majesty wish them to
disperse ?”’

‘No matter,” said the Queen. ‘A few, did you say?”

“Well, more than a few, perhaps, your majesty,” re-
plied the attendants, looking one at another; ‘‘more than
a few.”
64 BUZ—SWARMING.

“Are there enough, do you think?” asked the Queen
carelessly. ‘‘Are there as many as there ought to be?”

“There are enough for anything, ‘your majesty.”

“And the day, you say, is fine enough?”

“For anything, your majesty.”

‘The excitement was becoming quite intense.

The Queen, after showing great restlessness and inde-
cision for several moments, suddenly grew calm, and
standing in the centre of the circle drawn respectfully
round her, gave a few shrill squeaks, and said, “I have
made up my mind to go. . Let all who wish to join me
wait outside, and be ready to swarm!!!” .

Directly she spoke the last word, there was an end to
all restraint. It was the word so anxiously expected all
the morning, and was now the signal for a general rush.
It was passed round the hive in no time, and Buz took it
up, and found herself repeating, like every one else, ‘A
swarm! a swarm!! a swarm!!!’ Meantime she pressed
forward to the entrance. It seemed to her as if she would
never reach it; but then, she was in such a desperate
hurry. At last her struggles were rewarded, and, with
dozens of other bees, she tumbled out of the hive—head
over heels! anyhow !—and joined the excited mob in front.

There she dashed backwards and forwards as madly as
anyone, but always watching the entrance ; always ready
to follow the Queen the moment she should appear,
BUZ—SWARMING. 65

She had not long to wait, for her majesty soon presented
herself, and, after looking about her, spread her wings and
flew slowly and steadily away.

By this time the noise was tremendous; such an angry ©
noise too! But Buz hardly heard it, she was so excited,
so bent on keeping the Queen in sight.

Her majesty, after taking a short flight round the garden,
just to pick out a good place, alighted on the under side of
one of the branches of a small standard pear tree, and was
immediately hidden by a cloud of about twenty thousand
bees, which settled on and round her.

Buz was one of the first to take up her position, but,
hardly liking to pitch on the Queen, attached herself to the
branch close to her, and was at once used by several other
bees as a convenient thing to cling to; these in their turn
were treated in the same way, till a lump of bees was formed
as big as a good-sized cabbage, and Buz found it rather
hard work to hold on.

“Tt must be uncommonly hot in the middle, though,”
she thought: ‘better be here than there.”

At this moment the gardener approached. His coat
was off, and his shirt-sleeves were rolled up. He knew the
bees would not sting him for shaking them into the new
hive he carried, but he had to roll up his sleeves for fear of
one crawling up and being hurt.

He now held the hive upside down under the swarm,

10
66 BUZ—SWARMING.

took hold of the end of the bough on which it hung, and
gave a sharp, strong jerk, which dislodged it and sent it
right into the hive. _There was no hesitation, no indecision
about him; it was all the work of a moment. Instantly, a
‘cloud of bees ascended all round him, and many alighted
on his arms, and some even on his face. Of these he took
no notice whatever; but, seeing that a great cluster re-
mained in the hive, he was satisfied that the Queen was
among them; he then turned it over in its right position and
stood it on four bricks placed ready on the ground, so
that the bees outside could easily join their friends within. —
Having protected the hive from the sun with a few freshly
cut boughs, he left the swarm alone till the evening. Buz
was right in the middle this time, holding on like ae
to the bee just above her.

When it grew dusk, the gardener came back; and finding
that every bee had entered the hive, he placed it on a flat
board, and carried it off to a stand which had been prepared
for it, close to the old hive from which the swarm had come.


CHAPTER V.

Building Comb. Hn Accident.

Storing honey, H Surprise.

10 *





CHAPTER V.

BUILDING COMB. AN ACCIDENT. STORING HONEY.
A SURPRISE.

manded Buz of a bee who
was clinging to her.
“For days,” answered
the bee shortly.
: “Come, 1 say,
Buz, ‘you don’t mean that, do you?” i
“If you don’t believe me, ask someone else.”
‘‘Oh, I believe you, but how slow!”
“T daresay,” remarked another bee, ‘‘that you have
heard of a Queen having a great many attendants hanging
about her at court ; now you know what it means |”

)

said


70 BUZ—BUILDING COMB.

At this moment the cluster of bees began to move, and
to spread about. :
The hive in which they had Beea taken was very aiferent

- to the old straw butt they had left, their new abode being a

square deal box without any bottom. Into the back of this
box a pane of glass had been introduced, through which the
bees might be watched at their work; and at the top of it
was a short narrow slit, closed at present, but capable of
being opened from without, by means of a zinc slide.
This box was placed in a wooden cupboard, which stood
on four legs, had a gable roof, and doors opening at the

_ back, and was large enough to contain three other boxes of

the same size. Horizontal apertures, about two inches long
and just high enough to admit a bee, were cut in the cup-
board at the bottom of its front, and epposite each of the
boxes within.

The floor of the cupboard, which was also the floor of
the boxes, was cut away about the eighth of an inch deep,
just underneath each of these apertures, and made to slope
up towards the interior, so that any rain driven into a hive
might run out again at once. This pleased the bees, who
hate damp beyond anything.

‘The swarm now began preparations for the great work
of forming the comb; and hung from the top, no longer
in a ball, but in sheets or strings, about which the bees
could freely pass.
BUZ—BUILDING COMB. 71

They formed, in fact, living scaffolding; and, as they
themselves produced material for the building, all the
trouble of hauling and carrying was saved.

Each bee, besides holding on as tightly and as patiently
as a postage-stamp, was busily employed in preparing
plates of wax.

These were secreted in A pockee on the under side of the
abdomen, from which the bees drew them when ready for
use, working and moulding them in their mouths.

““T wonder how you can all go on so long without
eating,” remarked Buz at length in a general sort of way
to the bees about her.

‘(Tn the same way that you can,” answered one of them.

“Oh, J took in as much honey as ever I could, just
before we swarmed,” said Buz.

‘““ Well, so we almost all did,” replied her friend; ‘‘it is
an instinct with bees.”

‘“‘T wonder why,” said Buz Shona,

“Tt’s simple enough,” returned the other. “If we do
not unload our honey, it is gradually formed into wax: so
that arriving in a new hive with honey is almost the same
thing as arriving with wax—and that we must have at once.
So that only those few bees who happened to join the swarm
without being full of honey have gone to work. The mo-
ment the honey you arrived with has become wax in your
pockets, you will pull it out, and munch away at it till you
72 BUZ—BUILDING COMB.

have munched and pulled it into good order. Then you
will place it in position, where you see it is wanted, and the
nurse or architect bees will work it into shape. Then you
will go out and get a fresh supply of honey, and again hang
yourself up till it turns into wax. It’s simple enough, as
I said before.”

Buz found that this was really the case, and in due
time she deposited her bricks of wax, and left the archi-
_tects at work, while she went off for a fresh supply of

honey. :

The architects began by attaching some wax to the roof
of the box, and fashioning therefrom hexagonal cells—by
employing which form, the greatest number can be arranged
in the smallest space. ae

Each comb consisted of two sets of cells placed back to
back. If the bottoms of these opposite sets of cells had
been exactly opposite to each other, they would have been
dangerously thin; and the architects, knowing this very
well, arranged that the bottom of each cell should be
opposite part of the bottoms of three cells on the other
side of the comb.

In this manner, the thin plate of wax forming the bottom
was in every case strengthened and supported by the bases
of three contingent walls behind it. For the bees, having
so well economised their space, were determined not to use
an atom more wax than was really necessary.
BUZ—AN ACCIDENT. — 73

Let us be consistent all through,” they said, ‘‘and ©
then we shall make a job of it.”

For nearly a week Buz stuck to her post, only going out
occasionally. At the end of that time so much of the comb
had been made, that she, with many others, was employed
in gathering honey.

It was the beginning of June, there were plenty of flowers
about, and the honey season was good. Things were looking
up. Fortune, however, delights in a practical joke, and
often, ‘so to speak, cuts a hammock down when the owner
is most comfortably asleep. A terrible accident happened
to the bees just at the time they seemed so prosperous.

Whether the heat within the hive became so great as to
melt the wax, or whether the top of the hive was too smooth
for the comb to be securely fastened thereto, it is impossible
to say; but, whatever might be the cause, one of the centre |
combs, nearly filled with honey, suddenly broke down, and
fell to the bottom of the hive.

The result was dreadful! Numbers of bees were crushed
to death or suffocated, the floor of the hive was deluged
with honey, for the comb had not been sealed, and there
was a barrier formed right in the line of traffic.

Luckily for her, Buz was away when the accident hap-
pened; and by the time she returned to the hive the bees
were beginning to repair the mischief.

Their first care was to collect all the honey that had

11
74 BUZ—AN ACCIDENT.

escaped, and to store it in the empty cells. After that they
began to clear away the broken pieces of comb, and to carry
out the dead.

_ “Of course we are not going to let that great comb stay
where it is?’ said Buz softly to an older bee.

“Of course we are though,” was the reply. “ Why,
what a waste of time it would be to carry all that wax away
and make a fresh comb!” :

‘“‘ But it’s so dreadfully in the way.”

“We shall manage to get over that difficulty,” said she
bee confidently.

“ How?” asked Buz.

‘‘Ain’t you supposed to be honey-gathering ?”’

ves: lam.

‘Gather honey then, do! You'll be able to see for
_ yourself, each time you come in, how we get on here. I
can’t waste time explaining.”

Away flew Buz, and got honey as near the hive as
she could, and worked particularly hard, so as to come
in often; for she was very much interested in what was
going on.

The fallen comb was leaning against an adjacent one,
the bottom being of course on the floor instead of a little
above it, thus impeding traffic. To obviate this, tunnels
were soon driven through the comb—beautiful arched tunnels,
with waxen pillars to support them—whilst little stays and
BUZ—STORING HONEY. 75

buttresses of wax were introduced wherever they were re-
quired, to make all firm and safe again.

“ Capital!’ said Buz approvingly, as she ran through
one of the new tunnels.

‘‘No honey to be stored in this side of the comb,” re-
marked a bee shortly.

“All right,” said Buz.

Now Buz had very nearly said “‘ Why,” instead of ‘All
right”; but she checked herself in time, remembering
that she had often asked unnecessary questions, and that
she had resolved to try to find things out for herself. In
this case she soon saw the reason why.

The comb was leaning over a little, and of course any
honey put into a cell on the side towards which it leaned,
would run out again. :

“I’m glad I didn’t ask,” thought Buz; “and now
that I’m about it, I’ll just examine one of the other
combs.”

She did so, and found that the cells on each side sloped
upwards, ever so little, but enough to prevent thick stuff
like honey from Ee out.

‘Tet me see,” said Buz to herself, as she turned away,
‘how will they use the side that can’t be employed for
honey ?”

_ Just at this moment there was a bustle close to her, and

she saw the Queen making towards the fallen comb.
aL
76 BUZ—STORING HONEY.

‘Oh, I know,” thought Buz: “the Queen will lay eggs
in it; it will do very well for a breeding comb, of course.”

Buz was right. The Queen, with ten or twelve attendants
round her, passed over the comb, examining each cell before
she deposited an egg within it. Whenever she rested, which
she frequently did, the members of her suite, who formed a
sort of screen round her, overwhelmed her with their atten-
tions and caresses, and offered her honey. In one cell the
Queen inadvertently deposited two eggs; the watchful at-
tendants, much too polite to call her majesty’s attention to
this, quietly took one out and ate it.

After Buz had looked on for some little time, she
asked one of the suite how many eggs the Queen could
lay in a day.

“A couple of hundred, or even more,’ was the answer.

‘Does she often have an egg-laying day ?”

‘She lays eggs every day—for months. She does no-
thing else.”

“Well,” thought Buz as she flew off, ‘‘no wonder there
are such a lot of us!”

For several weeks Buz worked very hard, and met with
no adventures. It was the busy time, and a fine lot of honey
was collected and sealed up.

One morning, as she was passing near the middle of the
hive, she saw a good many bees employed on a large cell,
which was attached to the comb only at one spot.
BUZ—A SURPRISE. 77

“Ah!” said Buz to herself, ‘I know what that is. That’s
a royal cell: I remember seeing some in the old hive.”

She stood and watched, and presently observed to one of
the workers, ‘‘What a lot of wax you are using, to be sure!”

“T should think so indeed,” was the reply. ‘(1 don’t .
suppose you’d wish us to be careful of our wax when we ’re
making a royal cell—that would be mean!”

“Oh, no!” cried Buz, ‘‘of course I shouldn’t; only it
seems funny, don’t you know. Ever since I swarmed I
have heard nothing but, ‘ Economise your space ; economise
your material’; and now, here you are, seeing how much
wax you can get rid of at once! I like it myself, mind,
only I can’t help observing that there is enough wax there
to make fifty ordinary cells.”

“Tf I didn’t think that there was,” returned the other,
‘‘T should feel quite ashamed to be on the job. Bees don’t
economise where royalty is concerned.”

She said this very stiffly, and walked away. Buz rubbed
her head and antennz with her fore legs, and felt rather
snubbed.

Just at this moment there was a sudden movement of
bees upwards, and Buz was off directly to see what was
the matter.

On reaching the top of the hive, she joined a number of
bées who were crowding through a hole in the roof, and
found herself at once in a fine open space above. Here a
8 BUZ—A SURPRISE.

bee was gesticulating excitedly with her antenne, and Buz
joined the group of listeners round her.

‘All I know is,” said the bee, “that I heel to be
at work on the roof just underneath where this hole has
.appeared. Everything was quite secure, nothing loose at
all. There was no passage up, not even a very little one—
that I’m sure of; and then, all of a sudden there was! I
heard a kind of a tearing, scraping sound, and it became
quite light! I saw this hole, ran up as fast as I could, and
found myself here. That’s all I can tell you.”

“But was there nothing moving near the top of the hole
when you came through ?” asked one of the bees.

“Certainly not: that’s the odd part of it. Everything
was as quiet as possible. Now, any one may account for it
who can. I can’t.” *

As the bee moved away after saying this, Buz ran off on
a tour of inspection. She found herself in a space about
half the size of the hive below; the walls and roof were
very slippery, and the light came through them.

She climbed up the side and got to the roof, but had
hardly reached it when she lost her footing and fell ae
a flop on to the floor.

As she stood rather confused for a moment, a friend of
hers came up and said, ‘‘Isn’t this a piece of luck! We

* The gardener had drawn back the slide at the top of the hive, and placed a
glass super in position for the bees to fill.
BUZ—A SURPRISE. 79

had nearly filled the place below with wax and honey, and
now here ’s room for lots more.”

“Yes,” replied Buz; ‘‘I1 was wondering’ the other day
what we should do for space; it was getting so hot, too.”

‘Oh, we should have been obliged to send off a swarm,
I suppose, when a young Queen was hatched; but now we
shall get on without that.”

‘What shall we do with the young Queen then?”
demanded Buz.

“Oh, let the old one kill her, ie suppose,” said the bee
anc oucemnedly. ‘Cor starve the royal grubs, or something.
I don’t know,” she continued, ‘if eggs have been laid in
the royal cells yet; I rather think not, in which case the
Queen won’t lay any at all now.”

As she spoke, something came down on her head with a
great bump. It was a bee, who, like Buz, had tried the
roof and had met with a similar mishap. The floor and
sides of the new space were by this time covered with bees,
and some were continually falling down.

‘‘T can tell you what,” said Buz sagaciously: ‘‘it will be
very difficult work, fastening up our comb.”

_ “Tt may be difficult, but it is not impossible. We shall
therefore manage it,” said the bee who had just fallen.
‘When we have fastened a few little specks of wax about,
to hold on to, we shall be able to manage. I wish it wasn’t
quite so light, though; I like working in the dark.”
80 BUZ—A SURPRISE.

She hard hardly spoken the words, when something came
down on the roof and round the walls, and in a moment the
place was quite dark.*

‘“There!” said Buz; “you ’ve got your wish ; but what
will happen next, I wonder ?”

‘“Whatever happens, I shall begin to work at once,” was
the reply: ‘so, come on.”

‘“*Come on,” said Buz.

* The gardener placed a cap of felt, or other thick material, over the super.


CHAPTER VL.

a Second Swarm. Sole tbhours.

Sent Back.









CHAPTER VI.

A SECOND SWARM. IDLE HOURS. SENT BACK.

B, NE day, when the heather was in
a bloom, Buz went off to Cot-
helestone Hill, and whilst she
was at work a sudden shower
came on.

This drove her for shelter
under a rock, where she nearly
ran against another bee, which had entered from the oppo-
site direction.

“‘Hulloa!” cried Buz.

“Hulloa!” said the other; ‘‘ where do you come from ?
I don’t know your smell.”

‘Very likely not,” answered Buz, who did not admire

the manner of the other bee; ‘what of that? I suppose

I have as much right here as you?”
12 *


84 BUZ—A SECOND SWARM.

“Don’t be waxy,” replied the other; ‘I said very
little.”

“But you didn’t say it nicely, I thought,” retorted Buz.

“Well, you ave particular!” exclaimed the other. ‘‘ How
I should like to know where you come from.”

‘““Oh, a long way from here,” said Buz: ‘from the valley
at the foot of the hill. We live in a garden, where there are
several other swarms.” :

‘“‘ How very odd!”

‘“ Why odd?” asked Buz.

‘Well, I suppose you’re always fighting; and that’s an
odd state of things, isn’t it?”

‘Tt would be if it were the case; but then you see it
isn’t.”

‘“‘That’s odder still. Now we ee fight Oy
if another swarm came near us.’

“Should you really?” asked Buz.

“ There’s a hollow tree not far from ours,” answered the
other bee significantly; ‘take it and try.”

‘A hollow tree!” oe Buz Cou mpiuously, “T should
be sorry to live in one.’

“What do you live in then?”

‘‘ A hive, to be sure.”

‘“* And what may that be?”

“Why, the house in which we were taken when we
swarmed.”
BUZ—A SECOND SWARM. 85

“Taken!” cried the wild bee. ‘Ah! I begin to under-
stand: I’ve heard of that sort of thing before; then you’re
a slave bee, I suppose?”

**You’re a rude bee, I’m sure,” retorted Buz.

“Am I? I only mean, that the honey you make is
not for yourselves, but for whosoever shook yeu into the
hive you seem so proud of.”

“‘T should just like to see anyone taking our honey,” said
Buz. ‘Whoever came to do it, would have to be very fond
of honey, or care very little about stings.”

“That sounds fine,” replied the wild bee; ‘‘but I have
heard some curious stories. Let me advise you to make a
few enquiries when you return. I may be wrong, of course;
but then, you know, I may be right.”

‘*T don’t mind asking about it,” returned Buz; ‘but
you must be wrong.”

‘Why so?” asked the wild bee.

“Because, if what you say is true, it is ridiculous to
suppose that any bees would live as we do now. We should
fly right away, of course, and even put up with a hollow
tree, perhaps.”

‘That ’s all very well,” answered the wild bee; ‘but
when people once get into a groove, they are slow to get out
of it: to make a one’s mind toa Uierous) change, requires
a deal of energy.”

“Don’t you call pe auins a thorough change?! de-
86 BUZ—A SECOND SWARM.

manded Buz. “I found no difficulty in Ae uP my
mind about that.”

“There you only followed an old custom, and did not
strike out a new line. However, as the storm is over, sup-
pose we go on with our work; mine being to gather honey
for myself, and yours to gather it—for someone else.”

“Put it as you please,” replied Buz: “always remem-
bering that I don’t want your opinion.”

‘‘In the same way,’? answered the wild bee, ‘ gather for
whom you please; always remembering that I don’t want
your honey. Good-bye.” And away she flew.

As Buz followed her example, and went to work again, »
she could not help admitting to herself that there was some-
thing in what had been said. “When I get back to the
hive,” she thought, ‘‘I’ll just talk the matter over.”

In the evening, therefore, she asked one of the older
bees whether what she had heard was true.

‘“No doubt it is,” was the answer. ‘“ This very spring,
a fine super of honey was taken from the hive next to ours,
and a lot of excitement it caused; surely you remember?”

‘““No, I don’t,” said Buz.

‘It must have been just before you were hatched then.”

‘‘But what were they all about?” cried Buz excitedly ;
‘‘why did they let their honey go? Couldn’t they sting ?”

“I heard one of them say that they tried at first, and
that something prevented them from getting near the
BUZ—A SECOND SWARM. 87

robbers—something soft; and besides, there was so much
honey running about, that they were very busy sucking it
up; and, what with the excitement and what with being
glutted with honey, very few of them felt like fighting.”

“Then my rude acquaintance at the top of the hill was
not very far from right after all,’”’ said Buz thoughtfully.

‘She was right to a certain extent, but there’s another
side to the question.”

“Indeed,” cried Buz; ‘‘I should like to know it.”

‘The tradition is, that those who rob us look after us
in the winter, and supply us with food if our honey runs
short; so we need never starve. Now, I have heard, that
after a bad honey season whole swarms of wild bees are
starved to death. Then again, our hive is much more con-
venient than a hollow tree: drier and warmer, and with a
better entrance. I’ve seen some pretty good hollow trees
in my time certainly; but there’s nothing like a hive after
all.”

Buz was somewhat consoled by this, but still felt in-
dignant at the idea of being liable to lose any of the beau-
tiful honey she had worked so hard for.

‘‘Wait till some one tries it on with us,” said she to
herself. ‘‘Not sting, indeed! We’ll see about that.”

Soon after this, Buz began to find her present hive almost
as inconveniently crowded as the one she had left; the super
was nearly filled with comb, and that was half full of honey ;
88 ' BUZ—A SECOND SWARM.

the Queen had laid a great many eggs in the hive below, and
the young bees were daily emerging from their cells.

Some of the grubs, also, in the royal cells were nearly
ready to come out.

A feverish excitement, similar to that which she re-
membered on a former occasion, began to set in, and the
Queen frequently squeaked. |

This time, however, Buz made up her mind to remain
where she was.

“T’m getting too old,” she told herself, ‘for knocking
about; let the youngsters do the swarming.” |

But although she was inclined to be patronising towards
the “youngsters,” she could not help feeling surprised at
her disinclination for change and excitement; she was even
a little sorry for herself.

The fact is, she had become a middle-aged bee, and was
beginning to go down the hill—a fact which it is not always
. pleasant to look in the face.

And now the Queen became more excited than ever,
and sometimes attempted to tear open the royal cells
and kill the poor little princesses. She was prevented
from doing so by the royal nurses, who were respectful,
but very firm.

“Though it’s a tremendous thing, mind you,” said one
nurse to the other, “to find oneself tackling the Queen
herself, and preventing her from doing what she likes,”
BUZ—IDLE HOURS. 89

‘Tt certainly is,” said the other; ‘‘but she knows it is
only our duty.”

Opinions in the hive began to differ as to whether it
would be better to let the Queen kill the young ones, or
to send off aswarm. Some thought it was too late in the
year; others declared that anything would be better than
being so crowded.

A particularly hot day settled the question, and those
who were in favour of a swarm ‘“‘had it.” Then began the
same sort of orderly confusion described before, and away
flew the Queen, with many of her loving subjects, but with-
out Buz.

After the swarm had left, the latter felt disinclined to
work: she was a little upset, and wanted a gossip.

There was no difficulty in finding a bee similarly dis-
posed, for work in the hive was slack that afternoon.*

‘‘ Bother the pollen,” grumbled a bee, as she was passing
Buz; ‘how it does stick to one, to be sure; but this is the
last lot I bring in this blessed day. My name is ‘easy’ for
the rest of the afternoon.”

‘And so is mine,” cried Buz; ‘‘let us go to the garden,
and sit in the sun.”

“All right,” said the other; ‘Just wait till I unload ;
I won’t be a minute.”

* It is a fact that bees do not work so hard after a swarm has left; and it is
sometimes necessary to send it back to the hive, in order that a half-filled super may
be completed. If the Queen be caught and removed, the swarm will return.

13
go BUZ—IDLE HOURS.

As soon as she returned, the two bees flew off together.

‘We are not the only ones who are taking it ‘easy,’
observed her friend to Buz, as they settled comfortably on
a cucumber frame in a corner; “I heard several bees say
they intended to knock off work.” fs

“After all,”. she continued, ‘‘why should we ‘take
any more trouble? We had nearly made honey enough
to carry us‘ through the winter, and now we shall not
want so much, in consequence of that swarm having
gone off.” |

“Exactly so,” replied Buz; ‘‘we have enough, and to
spare. I don’t mean to say,” she continued, after a pause,
“that I intend to do nothing at all—that wouldn’t suit me;
but Ido mof mean to hurry up. I’ve worked pretty well
all through the summer, though I say it myself, and made
honey enough to support half a dozen drones. By-the-by,
talking of drones, why should I make honey for those lazy
fellows?” - ne

Can't say,” replied her fered ‘‘T don’t see the fun of
it myself. But, do you know,” ie continued, sinking her
voice, ‘I hear they are not likely to eat ae more honey
in our hive.”

‘‘ What do you mean ?” asked Bue ny The Sapi great
things are always hungry. ‘The i I do, the.more I want,’
seems, in fact, to be their motto.’

“Well, what I tell you is quité between ourselves, of
BUZ—SENT BACK. : gi

course,” said her friend; ‘‘but, mark my words—we shall

get rid of them, and that before long.”
‘Oh, my queen!” cried Buz. ‘‘ You.astonish me! How
shall we manage it?”
‘‘The working bees will rise against hem and turn
ee them out of the hive; see if they don’t. Why should we
keep them - all “throught ne winter? That’s what I want to
know.” | :

‘““ Why indeed ¢ 2” said Buz ay, and. then continued
after a pause: “If we do get rid of them, there is all the
‘more reason for our taking a. lee holiday now; for we
shall have plenty of honey.”

‘My sentiments exactly,” returned Hee friend ; ay as
_I feel inclined for a little on my own account, I ail have
_a turn at the flower-beds. What do you say?”
... Come-on,” said Buz, and away they flew. s

Later ‘ori; when they returned to the hive, they were
surprised. to.see a great commotion, and eiomies of bees
pouring in. ; Sea

“What is all this bustle about?” asked Buz of the first
bee she encountered. ‘Is anything the matter?”

“Ever so much,” was the answer. ‘‘ There has been an
accident, and the swarm that left so lately is returning.”

“Indeed!” cried Buz; “but what accident could pos-
sibly induce the old Queen to come back?”

‘Nothing would ever have induced her to do such a
13 *
Q2 BUZ—SENT BACK.

thing,” replied the other; ‘‘ but ’’—and here she spoke very
impressively —‘‘ she has disappeared !”’

‘“‘ Disappeared!” echoed Buz. ‘‘Oh, how? Do tell me
more about it.” :

“Tf you want to know the particulars, ask one of those
who joined the swarm: I didn’t.”

- Buz lost no time in following her advice.

“T’ll tell you all I know,” said the bee she ques-
tioned, “but I can’t quite understand it myself. Our
poor Queen settled on a branch of a small apple tree,
and we all clung round -her of course; and there we
hung in a big bunch—in such a big bunch, that I really
thought the branch we were on would come off. After
a short time, something gave such a jerk that we all
fell off into something, and it was very uncomfortable.
Most of us kept crawling: about, not liking to leave
the Queen; but some flew up, to see what was the
matter.”

‘“‘T should have been one of those,” put in Buz.

“Well, so was I, my dear; and I found that the thing
that had done it was the man we always see about the
garden, and the thing he had shaken us into was a kind of
box like this.” ;

“T know,” said Buz; ‘that’s just what happened to
me. Well?” cee

‘Well, the man carried us off to where something large
BUZ—SENT BACK. 93

and white was lying on the ground, and upset us on to it,
and we all began to run about.’’*
~“Hulloa!” interrupted Buz: “that didn’t happen to

meee

‘‘T had joined the others in the box,” continued the bee,
‘‘just in time to be upset; and found myself close to the
Queen, who did not attempt to fly, but kept on crawling
in underneath us, wherever we were thickest. Presently
the man began to paddle amongst us with his hands,
and he rolled us about a good deal, I can tell you; but he
was not rough enough to hurt us, and we really were too
much astonished to be angry. This went on for some time,
when all of a sudden I missed the Queen. I ran about
asking everyone, ‘Have you seen the Queen? Have you
seen the Queen?’ And presently I came across others
asking the same question. We didn’t know what to do,
or what to think, and there we were, hunting round and
round. At last, a bee who had been near the Queen at the
moment, told us that she had seen her caught up between
two great things, and that she had eS all in a
moment—that was all she could tell us.’

“But what was that bee about?” cried Buz. ‘Surely
she did something?”

‘She said it was all so sudden and unexpected, that she

* The gardener had spread a sheet on the ground, on which to shake out the
bees, in order the more easily to find the Queen.
04 BUZ—SENT BACK.

didn’t know what to do. She thought it must be the man;
but he was walking quietly away, and by the time she had
recovered herself, and made suve that the Queen was gone,
it was too late to do anything.”

‘(Oh dear! but this is all very bad,” said Buz. ‘‘ What
next ?”

‘Why, the next thing we did was to come back here.
You see,” added the bee apologetically, ‘‘we had no Queen,
no honey, and no hive; so what were we to do?” |

‘*T don’t know,” answered Buz; ‘but I should have felt
‘ashamed to return.’

“So did we; we felt very ah ashamed, and have had
-to listen to” all sorts of disagreeable remarks since; but

What were we to do, you know—no Queen, no honey, and
no hive! What on earth were we to do?”

The bee moved off as she said these words, and went
away grumbling to herself: “It’s all very well; but what
were we to do, I should like to know?”

Buz, having no answer ready, let her go, but felt a good
deal put out by what had happened, and very much inclined
to do something to somebody. 7
CHAPTER Vil.

Discontented Whispers. H Stormy Dispute.

The A‘Massacre of the Drones.







CHAPTER VII.

DISCONTENTED WHISPERS. A STORMY DISPUTE.

THE MASSACRE OF THE DRONES.



N the following morning, the
hive seemed to Buz very
inconveniently crowded; and
not being in the best of
tempers, she was disgusted to
find the passage along which
she was hurrying between the
combs, nearly blocked by a lot of drones.

‘Bother the lazy things,” said she to herself, as she
pushed past them; ‘‘I’ve no patience with them.”

‘‘No more have I,” cried another bee, who happened to
overhear her, ‘“‘and I’m glad to find you’re of the same

opinion, I can tell you what it is,” she continued, when
14
98 ' BUZ—DISCONTENTED WHISPERS.

they had reached the entrance, ‘‘there is quite a strong
feeling growing up against them, and they had better look
out for themselves.”

“Ah!” said Buz; ‘I’m not surprised at what you say ;
indeed, I heard only yesterday that they were likely to have
a bad time of it soon.”

“Tt is getting to be the common talk of the hive,” said
the other; “and now that the swarm which left us yesterday
has returned, we shall want more room and more honey
than we expected.”

‘As for honey,” said Buz, “that’s very true. I had not
intended to work much more; but now, I suppose we must
fill every bit 6f comb we have made.” ss

‘‘And as for room,” said the other bee, ‘(I think I can
tell you how we shall get that.”

She spoke very slowly and deliberately, and tapped Buz’s
antennz with her own in a very meaning way.

‘“‘T understand you,” said Buz. ‘ Down with the drones,
Saye =

‘“When the time comes,” replied the other, mysteriously.

‘Just so,” assented Buz; ‘when the time comes.”

With this understanding they parted, and Buz began
work again in earnest, stowing the honey she collected
in the glass super. All the other bees did the same,
and were as busy as ever they had been before the swarm
went off,
BUZ—A STORMY DISPUTE. 99

Every day, however, honey became more and more
difficult to get, and the combs filled slowly.

This, again, was bad for the drones; for the scarcer
honey was, the more valuable did the stores already col-
lected appear to the bees, who at last could hardly bear
to see a drone go near a honey-cell.

The latter, however, appeared not to observe how
unpopular they were becoming, and went about the hive
as usual.

But the time expected came at last! One day, as Buz,
who had just returned to the hive with some honey, was
storing it away in the super, she overheard a dispute between
a drone and a working bee. .

‘No, you shall not,” cried the latter; ‘‘not whilst I am
here:”’

“Get out of the way, can’t you,” answered the drone.

‘T can, but I won’t,” replied the other.

“Do you suppose I care for you?’ cried the drone.
‘‘T want some honey, and I mean to have it.”

“Then take it from a cell already opened,” answered
the working bee, ‘(and don’t break into a new comb.”

‘“‘T shall take it,” said the drone deliberately, ‘‘ from any
comb and from any cell I choose.”

“Tf you can,” retorted the other.

“ Who’s to prevent me, I should like to know?”

‘J, for one.”
; 14 *
100 BUZ—A STORMY DISPUTE.

“You, indeed!” cried the drone angrily. ‘‘ How dare you’
talk in that saucy way to one of the Queen’s husbands?” |

‘“‘Queen’s fiddlesticks!” replied the other contemptuously.
“The Queen does not want a lot of idle, good-for-nothing
fellows like you loitering about the hive, I can tell you. Go
and ask her.”

‘No, I shall not,” replied the drone sulkily.

‘‘T knew you wouldn’t; you dare not go near her; she
never takes any notice of you now, and is tired of your idle
habits, as indeed, we all are.”’

Here there was a hum of approval from a small crowd
of workers, who had collected as the dispute went on.

“Well, I don’t care,” cried the drone. ‘I’m tired of
standing here, that’s all I know; so ‘out of the way,’ I say
again, for I mean to have the honey.”

‘Out of this cell, which I have just sealed up, von don’t
get it,’”’ returned the other firmly.

‘For my part, I don’t see why he should get it from any

op

cell in the hive,” remarked a bee who was standing near
Buz.

“ Fulloa!” cried the drone, turning angrily round on
the last speaker; ‘‘and pray who may you be?”

‘‘One who earns her honey before she eats it,” was the
reply. |

‘Well said, indeed!” cried the bee with whom the drone _
had been disputing.
‘

BUZ—A STORMY DISPUTE Tot

As the drone turned indignantly round again, he bumped
against Buz, who instantly ran at him, and gave him a
good push, which sent him against another bee.

‘“‘ Now then, where are you shoving to?” cried the latter,
pushing him back. ‘‘ Get out of the way.”

‘“‘He’s always in the way!” cried one.

‘‘And always eating !’’ said another.

“Why don’t you go out and get your own honey?”
demanded a third.

‘“T don’t choose to leave the hive, except in the very
finest weather,” replied the drone.

‘‘Here’s a pretty fellow for you,” cried Buz; ‘he doesn’t
choose, indeed!’’ And she gave him another push.

““T vote we turn him out,” cried another bee, pushing
him back.

“Yes, and keep him out,” said a third.

“Out with him!” cried several bees at once.

“Down with the drones! Out with them! Turn them
all out !”’ was the general cry.

And the drone, now beginning to be really frightened,
was pushed backwards and forwards in the midst of a crowd
of workers. At last, in answer to the cries, Buz and another
bee caught firmly hold of the drone, and began dragging
him towards the entrance.

But he was strong and heavy, and did not want.to go at
all, and struggled hard.
102 BUZ—MASSACRE OF THE DRONES.

-“ Push> behind there,’ ” cried the bee who was: helping
Buz. ~
‘Not all of you, ote Praddedets 7am ae te tee no
other drones in the hive?”

This produced new cries of, “Out with cont 1? Down
in the drones!” ‘Turn them out!” and parties of bees,
hastening in every direction through the hive, fastened on
the drones, and dragged them towards the entrance.

As he was being pulled and pushed round a corner, the
drone with whom Buz was occupied got such a firm hold,
that he resisted for a long time all efforts to dislodge him.

“Tf nothing else will do,” panted the bee who was help-
ing Buz, “I'll just slip my sting into him: that will soon
settle the fellow.”

“Oh, give the poor wretch a chance,” said Buz. “It
seems a shame to sting him, as he has no sting himself.”

‘All right then,” returned her friend; ‘but we shall be
a long time clearing the hive at this rate.”

“Now,” cried Buz, ‘all together!” and, making a grand
effort, they dislodged the drone, and got him on to the floor
of the hive. Thence, by dint of pulling and pushing, and
tumbling over and dragging him, they at last reached the
footboard outside. |

‘“Now,” said they, “clear off!”

‘“ Where?” said the drone. ‘Oh, dear me! .Where?”

‘Anywhere you like,” was the reply. ‘‘ You want honey,
BUZ—MASSACRE OF THE DRONES. 103

don’t you? There’s the whole world before you, and veo
of flowers in it; so be off.”

SSI eu oe ” cried the drone, ‘when it gets dark and
cold, what shall I do then ?”’

“Whatever you like,” answered the bees. ‘We don’t
seem to care very much.” .

“ But I shall die! I shall die; I know I shall!” cried
the drone piteously.

‘Very likely; but that isn’t our business, so good-bye.
We really can’t stand here arguing with you all day.”

‘Please let me in again; do let me in,” pleaded the
drone. ‘I would creep away into a corner, and do nobody
any harm.”

‘Oh, yes, you would; for, oadhorte being of any use, you
would take up a certain amount of room, and eat a certain
amount - honey, and we have none of either to spare.
Now go.”

But the drone seemed too much overcome to move, and
lay helplessly down, close to the edge of the footboard.

Buz and the other bees pushed him over, and, hardly
making an effort to fly, he fell to the ground and remained
there.

At this time the scene was most exciting: there were
parties of bees in every direction. Some were carrying the
dead bodies of drones who had made so much resistance,
that, losing patience with them, their captors had stung
I04 BUZ—MASSACRE OF THE DRONES.

them to death. Others dragged along unresisting victims ;
and others again were engaged with obstinate drones, who
fought and tumbled the whole way. Some of the drones
took wing of their own accord the moment they were re-
leased on the footboard; others behaved like the. one that
Buz had first taken out; and, allowing themselves to be
pushed over the edge a the footboard, lay amongst the
bodies of those that had been killed.

At last the hive was quite cleared of them.

‘“‘ Double the sentries, and admit no drones,” were the
orders given. .

But none dared to return; the night came on cold and
wet, and before the sun rose next morning every drone was
dead.


CHAPTER VIII.

Death of thum. ‘Robbery.

‘Restitution. .

pelo






CHAPTER VIII.

DEATH OF HUM. ROBBERY. RESTITUTION.



i)

Eye “BOR the next few days Buz kept

; j steadily at work, and the combs
in the super were at last filled
and sealed up. They were quite
beautiful! clean, regular, and of
a golden straw colour: the wax
was thin and transparent; and
“as no eggs had been laid in the



super, it was all virgin honey—a perfect picture !

Buz had now plenty of leisure, but she spent a good
deal of her time in the hive; for the days began to get
short, and the nights long and.cold, and the sun himself
was lazy about getting up in the morning.

And Buz began to feel that the bright beautiful summer
of her life was over too; and she remembered with tender-

ness the lovely mornings she had known, when the sun,
| © :
108 | BUZ—DEATH OF HUM.

streaming early into the hive, had tempted her away ‘to
flowery fields and pleasant gardens; when the dew-drops,
sparkling so brightly on the gossamer webs, seemed strings
_ of fairy diamonds; and when the flowers, fresh from their
night’s rest, lifted up their heads and shook out their petals,
and offered her all their store of honey; and then she
thought of Hum, dear. gentle Hum, in whose company
she had enjoyed her first experiences.

“T declare I will go to the old hive again, as soon as
I can,” said she to herself, ‘‘and try to find out how she is
getting on. They won’t let me in, I suppose; but I may
hear something of her. I quite long to see her once more.”

_So the very next day, when the sun shone out for a time,
. Buz paid a visit to her former home.
What was her disappointment, however, to find that the
old hive was gone! :

As she approached, and was about to alight on the foot-
board, a sight met her eyes that caused her to dart aside.
On the board itself, and lying in heaps upon the ground
beneath, were thousands of dead bees. Pieces of breeding-
comb were lying about, and a sickly smell filled the air all
round. It was a hideous wreck—a pitiable end!

‘“What horrible thing can have happened?” thought
Buz, as she flew wildly about. ‘And what can have be-
come of poor dear Hum! When I remember the orderly
life we used to lead here, the busy work, the watchful
BUZ—DEATH OF HUM. ~ 109

sentries, the combs full of promising grubs, and the rich
stores of beautiful honey, how terrible this change appears!
It is too sad—too dreadful!”

But after the first feeling of terror, her anxiety to find
out something about Hum overcame every other con-
sideration, and she alighted on the footboard. Tremblingly
she approached a heap of bees—they were indeed dead!
—stiff, cold, and. in many cases clogged with honey that
had escaped when the hive was torn from its stand. —

But not all dead—not quite all. Here and there she
saw a faint motion, as a bee gave a weary struggle with
her legs, or moved her antenne. Hurrying from one to
another, Buz came at last to a bee which had evidently
crept into an empty cell to die; and a thrill passed through
her as she touched her antennz, and discovered the object
_ of her search.

Yes, it was indeed Hum! and she was not too late to
say “good-bye,” for Hum recognised and feebly caressed
her. ;

“Oh, Hum!” cried Buz; ‘‘dear Hum! What has
happened? What can I do for you, my poor darling?”

And she began to lick her with her tongue, and to stroke
her softly.

“Dear old Buz,” whispered Hum faintly; ‘how good
of you to come! I shall die quite happy now, if you will
stay with me for a little time—such a little time.”
IIo BUZ—DEATH OF HUM.

“T will zever leave you!’ cried Buz impetuously. ‘‘ Let
me die with you, if you must die; but surely it isn’t so bad
as that. I cannot bear to lose you. Let me get you some
honey; let me do something for you.”. .

“You can do nothing, dear: I am past eating; only
come close to me. There! I want nothing more now.”

‘“‘But what has happened, Hum? My dear, dear Hum!
Who can have been so cruel? Are you strong enough to

tell me?”
: “T will try,” answered Hum; ‘I should like: you to
know. Last evening I was out late, for I wanted to finish
filling the very last cell there was to be filled. A shower of
rain came on, and I crept into a hole for shelter. This
made me later still, and when I got back, I found the
entrance of the hive closed, and smoke coming out from every
crevice. Two men were standing close by; the smoke
made me feel sick and giddy; presently the men pulled the
hive from the board. Oh, Buz! it was dreadful to see
them shake out the dead bees in heaps. Some of the
honey came out, and they pulled out the breeding
comb. Only to think how many grubs, which would soon
have become busy bees, have been destroyed! Only to |
think how much honey they would have collected next
spring! It is very, very sad. For myself, dear, I think
I had done my work; I am getting to feel quite old, and
could hardly have expected to live through the winter.
BUZ—DEATH. OF HUM. ser isigt

Ah!” she continued more faintly, “how long and cold the
night has been! I found this empty cell, and crept into it,
or I must have died hours ago. A few other bees, who, like
me, had not returned before the hive was filled with smoke,
were going about at first, but I have seen none moving
lately. Where are you, Buz, dear? Where are your
-antennz? It is so dark, and so cold.”

““T am quite, quite close to you, my poor Hum!” said
Buz. ‘Can’t you see and feel me?”

‘“No, no,” answered Hum in a whisper; ‘‘it is too dark
and cold for that. I am going, dear—I am going fast. You
have been so often in my thoughts; you make me so happy
now. Good-bye, dear! good-bye!”

As she ceased, a shiver convulsed her for a moment, her
antennze quivered once more, and—her busy, useful life was
over. ;

For some time Buz remained by her side;.she could
not bear to leave her friend; but at last she flew sorrowfully
away. ne

“Tt would do poor Hum no good,” she thought, “if I
stayed in that miserable place. What a sad story it is!
and how cruel! Not only hundreds of bees, that have
worked hard all their lives, are rewarded by thus being
killed, but hundreds of grubs are prevented from ever doing
the work they would have done so well. If I meet the
wild bee again, I shall not have much to say. I begin
II2 BUZ—ROBBERY.. _

to understand that there may be advantages in a hollow »
tree, after all.”

So saying, she went disconsolately home.

But misfortunes never come singly, and Buz had hardly
settled herself in a corner of the super, when she became
aware, by a sudden commotion amongst the bees near the
aperture which led down to the hive below, that something
unusual was taking place. —

Buz ran down the comb at once, and founda ed of
bees collected round the place oe the aperture had been:
there was no aperture now!

A zinc slide, worked from the outside, had been pushed
‘across, cutting off all communication from below; and a
bee, who had been ascending at the time, had been caught
and crushed to death. ,

At this moment the covering of the super was removed,
and a flood of light admitted.

Then there was running and bustling indeed! Every
part of the glass was explored again and again, and each
bee continually revisited the slide, in hopes of finding it .
removed. |

But no—they were completely cut off! The only way

out of the super had been through the hive oe and —
that way was closed.

The bees grew very angry—particularly Bee!

“Ah, my fine fellow!” said she to oe as she ran
BUZ—ROBBERY. s IT3

up and down, looking through the glass at the gardener
outside, ‘just you wait till I’m out; I’ve something more
than honey for you!”

_ The more angry and excited the bees becdme, however,
the hotter grew the hive.

Many of them began to fan violently; but that did no
good, because no cool air from the outside could be obtained.

‘‘T shall be choked,” said a bee to Buz, as she passed
her; ‘I know I shall.”

“T shouldn’t mind what happened to me afterwards,”
cried Buz, almost beside herself, “if I could go at that
man, and make him run.”

It became hotter and hotter.

The bees began to get frightened, and feral knew what
they did.

Many of them went to the honey for consolation, and
_ate as fast as they could.

Even Buz, in spite of her fury, couldn't help feeling
anxious.

The man outside now passed a thin, sharp knife between
the edge of the super and the top of the hive on which it
stood. He was obliged to do this, because the bees, when
they first took possession of it, had cemented it down with a
kind of resin. In spite of all his care, some little honey
escaped, and one or two bees were injured.

Now Buz, although she had determined to take no

16
IIt4 BUZ—ROBBERY. |

honey, found it impossible to keep her resolution when she
saw it actually running at her feet, and, in a feverish ex-
cited way, she began to suck it up. This made her feel a
little less spiteful, but she still kept her eyes on the enemy
outside.

The latter, having by this time loosened the super, lifted —
up one side of it, and inserted a small wedge of wood, which
gave the bees an opportunity of getting away.

Some of them, being still frightened, darted off at once,
and entered the hive as usual. Others took a turn round,
and then went back to the super, irresistibly attracted by
the honey. cs ae

But Buz, the instant she was free, flew as straight as
she could and as hard as she could at the man’s nose,
meaning to give him the full benefit of her sting. What
was her astonishment and indignation on finding herself
stopped, when close to his face, by something soft and
yielding, which she had not noticed at first, and which she
could hardly see, even when close to him!

Again and again she flew at him—at his ears, his chin,
his nose—and each time she was prevented from getting
within stinging distance. The most provoking part of it |
was, that the man did not take the least notice of her
efforts, or seem even to know that she was trying to drive
him away. One or two other bees had joined Buz in
her attack on him, but, as he was quite safe behind
BUZ—ROBBERY. ; IT5

his veil, they at last left him alone, and even Buz gave
tan :

By this time the greater part of the bees had left the
super; but a good many stragglers still remained, and
feasted to excess on the honey.

In order to get rid of these, the gardener removed the
super to some little distance, turned it upside down, and
with a soft feather gently dislodged them, and though it
took him some time, he at length persuaded the very last.
bee to fly heavily home.

Then he carried off the super in triumph.

Buz, on meeting a friend near the entrance of the hive,
eagerly talked the matter over.

‘“‘Here’s a pretty thing!”’ she exclaimed. ‘‘ Were you
up above when it happened?”

‘‘No; I was down here.”

“Why didn’t you all come out and help, then,’
Buz, ‘‘or do something ?”’

’ said

“We couldn't think what had happened; we have only —
one way of getting up, you know, and we kept on trying
that. How we did try, to be sure!”

“Well,” said Buz; “between us all, we managed it
about as badly as we could. Of course you know they
have taken away that beautiful honey?”

‘Ves, and very provoking it is; still, it’s a mercy we
have so much here.”

16 *
116 BUZ—RESTITUTION.

‘Yes, indeed,” answered Buz; ‘things might be worse
than they are, I suppose.” For she remembered what had
happened to poor Hum, and to her old home, and felt that
she had still something to be thankful for.

Soon after this, came a week of wet weather, and the
bees were obliged to fall back on their stores.

‘I do wish,” said a bee one day, who was working near
Buz, “that we hadn’t lost all that honey. I declare I’m
almost afraid to eat at all now.”

‘We have enough to last for a long time, at any rate,”
replied Buz; “and I have heard that food is sometimes
supplied.” = .

“Indeed!” said the other. ‘Who supplies it?”

“Ah!” replied Buz, with an important air—she was

(

rather proud of being able to give information now, instead —
of, as formerly, always asking questions herself—‘ You will
be surprised to hear that.”

“The only thing that surprises me is that wy one
‘should supply it.”

““T was told,” said Buz, ‘‘by a bee who had heard it
from a very old friend of hers, that the man who stole the
honey will very likely try to make up for it, by giving us
some other food.”

“That would be curious, I must say,” admitted the
other. ‘I wonder why he does it. Perhaps,” she added,
‘“he thinks we like it better than honey.”
BUZ—RESTITUTION. II7

Or, perhaps,” answered Buz, with superior wisdom—it
was a very young bee to whom she spoke—‘“‘he likes our
honey better than the stuff he brings. Why, whatever is
the matter with you?” she continued quickly, addressing
a bee who had stopped, in passing, to rub her forelegs over
her head, and to lick and clean herself. ‘You are all
sticky and shiny, and there is such an odd smell about
you.”

‘“‘T hardly know myself,” was the reply; ‘‘ but something
has happened up above, at the hole by which we used to
get into the top part of the hive.”

‘Something is always happening up there!” cried Buz
pettishly. ;

‘‘Now, keep your sting in!” returned the other. ‘As
far as I can make out, there is no need to grumble; though
I got more than I want of whatever it is, I can’t say it’s
bad.” She began to lick her forefeet again.

““T suppose,” remarked Buz, ‘‘ you wish me to under-
stand something; can’t you explain ?”
’ answered the
other impatiently. ‘(I was standing close to where the hole
used to be, when there was a sudden movement, and the

‘“‘T know very little about it, I tell you,’

light came through. I was running up to see what was
going on, when something soft and sticky came down on
top of me; I was half-smothered for a moment, and could
not get away. At last T-crawled off, and now I’m cleaning
118 -BUZ—RESTITUTION.

myself. And I still say,” she added, as she passed her feet
over her head and antenne, ‘‘that it’s by no means bad
stuff.”

Buz went at once to see what had happened. She found
that the aperture, instead of being covered by the slide, was
now filled up with a soft material, which bulged out in the
middle, and was covered with drops of something sticky.*

Several bees were already sucking at these, and Buz
followed their example. Whatever it might be, there was
certainly no harm in it—it was sweet and pleasant to eat.

The best of it was, that as fast as the bees sucked
up the drops, more were formed on the surface of the
material; but the latter was too thick to allow them to fall
right through: they only hung on, ready to be sucked.

‘“Come!” said Buz; ‘‘if this is how they supply us, we
shall do very well: a ne notion, I call it, if et will
only keep it going!”

With this addition to their stores, the bees were able to
look forward without apprehension to the long winter, which
was so rapidly approaching.

* A wide-necked bottle, containing a thick syrup of sugar and water, with a piece
of flannel tied over the mouth, had been placed, inverted, over the hole.
Ci Seri ix.

Caught in a Cobweb. The Spider’s Plan.






C

CHAPTER IX.

CAUGHT IN A COBWED. THE SPIDER'S PLAN.



HE days now began to grow
very short; and when the rain
fell, as it often did, it chilled
the sodden ground, and was
followed by cold, unhealthy
fogs, instead of by the warm
“= sweet smell that rises from the
‘earth after a summer shower. The wind wailed dismally
through the trees, stripping them of their many-coloured
leaves, and preparing them for rougher weather to come—
as sailors take in canvas before the approach of a gale.

The few flowers that -were left, were fading quickly
away, and the bees could hardly find enough honey for
their own eating, during the short excursions they were
able to make, : :

17
I2Z2 BUZ—CAUGHT IN A COBWEB.

But there were still occasions when the clouds were con-

tent to linger along the horizon, and let the sun take a peep
at the world; and although his rays were comparatively
weak and watery, they were sometimes pleasant enough to
tempt the bees out of their hive. —

Buz seldom neglected such opportunities, and was fond
of exploring places which she hardly had time to notice
during the busy season of the honey harvest.

There was a pretty old cottage, with a thatched roof,
standing a little way back from the lane leading from the
manor house to the village.

It stood by itself, some way from any other habitation,
and in front of it there was a little garden, beautifully kept.

Buz had often visited it during the summer, and had
‘always fancied that its flowers were particularly sweet and
full of honey. No wonder if they were, for the poor old
man who lived in the cottage was very fond of them.

He kept them free from weeds, and watered them daily,
in hot weather, with the sparkling water of a little spring
just across the lane, which was almost hidden by ferns and
mosses, and which sent down a tiny rill, wandering through
watercresses and marsh marigolds and long waving grasses,
to join the merry mill-stream at the bottom of the hill.

One day, Buz, after taking a sip of water at the spring,
flew to the top of the little garden gate, and thence right
into the cottage through the open window.
BUZ—CAUGHT IN A COBWEB. 123

This she did because hér wings happened to carry her
there. ;

It was the first time she had ever entered a room omens
after taking a turn round, the’sight of so many things which
were new to her caused her to feel nervous, and she made
for the window. Unfortunately, however, there were two
windows in the room, and Buz darted to the wrong one,
which was shut! Against this she flew at such a pace,
that for a moment she was quite confused, and taking
another turn, came back and bumped herself once more,
though not quite so hard.

Hard enough, however, to make her feel a little cross;
and so she buzzed noisily about, going over every pane
several times—more slowly and carefully as she went up,
but coming down again in a great hurry.

“Well!” said Buz to herself; ‘this is a nasty jar! I
came in here—that I know for certain—and as I came
in, I suppose I can get out. I will get out—I won’t be
sealed up like this!”? And in a sudden fit of impatience,
she buzzed so fiercely against the window that she turned
herself head over heels once or twice, and came to the
bottom anyhow.

There she remained for a moment, rubbing her antenne,
and considering matters.

Then off she went again, Fale up to the top of the
window.

17 *
124 ‘-BUZ—CAUGHT IN A COBWEB.

“I'll explore every corner,” she said. “I'll try over
and over again! I will not be beaten! 171] ——”’

Here there was a most tremendous buzzing ; for, right
up in one of the top corners, she was caught in a large
and dusty cobweb! :

Never in her life had Buz been so angry and indignant!
She lost all control over herself, and buzzed, and bit, and
struggled, and felt all round for something to sting.

There was nothing, however, but the soft, yielding cob-
web; and the more she struggled, the more it stuck! and
the more she turned, the more it twisted! and the more
she rolled, the more it wrapped round her! and the angrier
she got, the more aggravating it became!

At last she was quite exhausted, and lay still.

Now when she had cooled down a little, she began to
see that she had not gone the right way to work.

‘‘ How foolish of me!” said she to herself. ‘Just what
a great drone might have done! If I had taken it quietly -
at first, I might perhaps have got out; but what will
happen now, I can’t think. What a fool I have made of
myself, to be sure!”

‘‘Ho! Ho!” cried a deep sarcastic voice close by.

Buz looked round, startled, and saw a great big spider
near her on the web.

He was horrible to look at, with his cruel, bloodthirsty.
expression, but seemed perfectly composed, and fixed his
BUZ—CAUGHT IN A COBWEB. 125

wicked, hungry eyes steadily on Buz. For a moment the
latter was quite paralysed with fear, but, recovering a little,
made some frantic efforts to free herself. These, however,
were unsuccessful, and she again lay still, exhausted by her
struggles. :

“Ho! Ho!” cried the spider again.

By this time Buz had recovered from her first shock of
horror, and her blood was up. Besides, she felt quite a
match for the spider, if it came to a fight.

“Ts that all you’ve got to say?” asked Buz scorn-
fully.

“Ho! Ho!” repeated the spider, for the third time.

He said it in such a cold-blooded manner, and seemed
so triumphant and confident, that a thrill of horror again
ran through her; but, shaking off the feeling, she said:

‘I suppose you made this nasty web, didn’t you?”

The spider answered never a word.

“Tn any case,” continued Buz, ‘‘ you might as well un-
wind me. I’m nota poor fly, you know, that you can kill
and eat. Besides, your web is all torn,” continued she, as
the spider sat without moving or speaking—only watching ;
‘and you’ll have to mend it, you know, if you want to
catch anything. You can’t mend it whilst I am here; I'll
take care of that!”

The spider neither moved nor spoke. This continued
silence disconcerted Buz very much, and made her feel
126 BUZ—CAUGHT IN A COBWEB.

dreadfully helpless ; but she presently cond as briskly
as she could:

‘‘Come, come; I’m sure we can arrange matters in a
sensible way, without any professions of friendship. You
want to mend your web; very good. I’m not anxious to
stay in it, and you can do nothing whilst Iam here. Give
me your assistance then, and I will go quietly away without
hurting you. Come, what do you say?”

The spider partly opened his mouth, as if about to
speak, but ended by saying nothing.

‘His appearance, however, was so terrifying, and his
fangs looked so cruel, that Buz could hardly prevent her
voice from trembling as she continued, ‘“‘Have you any
argument against what I propose? Tell me that, at any
Gatens

The spider spoke at last, and as he slowly moved his
jaws, his fangs swept round like scythes. j :

“You are my prisoner,” said he: ‘‘ that’s my argument.”

He spoke with such contemptuous confidence, that
Buz was struck dumb for the moment, and could think
of nothing to say.

“A good argument, too,’ continued the spider; “good ©
enough for me.”

There was a long pause, during which Buz struggled
hard to throw off the feeling of dismay mae had crept
over her.
BUZ—THE SPIDER’S PLAN. 27 e

‘“At any rate,” she said at last; ‘if I am unable to get
out, you, on the other hand, dare not come near me; so
I don’t know which of us would get the worst of it in the
endey

‘I do,” returned the spider, ‘‘and you will before
long.”

He said this with such a sneer, that Buz’s brave little
spirit rose, and she answered quite sharply: “You seem
very well satisfied with your own opinion, Mr. Spider; but
mine may be just as good—perhaps better. And I say that
Ican go quite as long without food as you can, and that
you dare not come near me. No, you daren’t, you brute!”
she continued, as the spider again half opened his mouth
without speaking.

‘You hungry-looking wretch!” she went on, ‘if you
were not afraid of me, you would have rushed upon me
long ago, and dragged me into your den; but you are
afraid, you sneaking coward!”

“If I could only put him in a passion,” she thought,
‘so as to make him come at me, we might fight it fairly
out, and I could bear whatever pappeneds but to lie help-
lessly here is oo ie



‘‘My plan is ” remarked the spider, after a long
silence. ‘ By the way, would you like to know what it is?”
“Not I!” cried Buz disdainfully. ‘What are your

plans to me?”
128° BUZ—THE SPIDER’S PLAN.

The spider said no more, but moving off to his den,
which was close by, settled himself at the mouth of it,
and remained perfectly motionless, with his eyes fixed on
Buz. a
The latter was silent for some time, but although she
tried to keep it out of her head, she could not help won-
dering what the spider’s plan was. This thought returned
again and again, and each time with greater strength, till at.
last it became a perfect torment to her. Several times she
was on the point of asking, but just manaped to prevent
herself from doing so.

At last she could restrain he inclination no ee and
said, though as defiantly as she could:

‘“‘T might be able to show you the folly of your ce as
you call it; so you had better tell me what it is, after all.”

“‘Tf you ask me as a favour, I’ll tell you,” replied the
Spider ot else.

‘“‘Tndeed, I shall ask no favour from you!” cried Buz.

The spider making no reply to this, there was a pro- .
longed silence; but at last, the feeling of anxiety to know
the worst, overcame her pride, and Buz said more humbly,
‘Well then, I ask you as a favour.” .

‘My plan is,” said the spider, speaking very slowly and
deliberately, ‘‘to do nothing yet myself, and to leave you to
do what you can. It will answer very well, because you
will soon get too weak for mischief, and then I shall kill you
-BUZ—THE SPIDER’S PLAN. 129

and suck you dry, and tear. you limb from limb. That’s my
plan.”

“Pray, how do you know,” said Buz, “that I shall get
weak sooner than you?”

‘““ Flow foolishly you talk!” replied the spider. ‘Why,
you are nearly exhausted, and half choked already; you
are in a terrible fright, and well you may be, for you have -
nothing to look forward to but death. Iam quite comfort-
able, even enjoying myself, watching you; and I look forward
to dinner: it makes a good deal of difference.”

Buz felt that this was only too true, and her heart began

to fail her, brave as she was.
| ‘‘ Besides,” continued the spider, ‘‘ 1 dined well yesterday
on a fat fly, whose wings you can see here at the mouth of
my den, as you call it; so I can easily wait for you. I shall
not have to wait very long.”

Buz could not help trembling at these cruel words, and.
after a pause, she said, in a weaker voice, ‘“‘I suppose it
would be in vain to appeal to your generosity—to your i

“To my generosity!” interrupted the spider. ‘‘ Ho!
Ho! That’s good, that is! Why, I have never, in all my
life, granted an appeal, or a favour, and I never mean to.
It is true,” he continued, ‘“‘that I told you my plan, as a
favour, but I only did so in order to punish you for the
ridiculous airs you gave yourself at first. The punishment
has already begun, I see. I knew it would ! And you

18


130 _BUZ—THE SPIDER’S PLAN.

begged me to tell you as a favour! That’s good, that is!
lal! slo 1 ®

The malicious cruelty ah which he spoke was enough
to freeze her blood; but even at that moment poor little
Buz did not lose ne pluck.

‘““He shall not triumph over me,” she thought, ‘‘ more
than I can possibly help. I will not say another word,
nor attempt to move him to pity. Let the worst come
to the worst, I can but die! And if he ventures near me
before I am quite gone, let him look out for himself!”

So she remained perfectly still; and the spider sat
motionless at the mouth of his den, watching.


CH Pal bin x

Battle. Victory. Death,

1S




CHAPTER X.

BATILE. VICTORY. DEATH.

HE nice tidy little old man
who lived in the cottage, had
a nice tidy little old wife.
They had no children, and
as he had earned good wages
all his life at the mill down
below in the village, they





2 had put by a nice tidy little
sum of money. A
Of this, the kind old people had promised to give
twenty pounds to their nephew Jack, who was on the point
of leaving the old country, and going off to seek his fortune
as an emigrant. |
As it had been arranged that Jack should call for his
money next day, the old man had been over to the neigh-
bouring town to draw it out of the Savings Bank; and whilst
134 BUZ—BATTLE.

poor Buz remained a prisoner in the cobweb, the old couple
sat by the fire, counting out the yellow gold which it had
taken them so long to collect, but which they were giving
away with such ready generosity.

It looked so bright and beautiful—quite tempting!

Tempting? Yes, indeed; too tempting by far!

For as they were counting it over, a face appeared at
the window outside.

It was an evil face, deeply carved by many vices—
drunkenness, cruelty, theft, and even bloodshed having
stamped their ugly marks upon it.

It was the face of a convict recently discharged from
prison, who, coming to the cottage to see what he could
pick up, was having a stealthy look round before knocking
at the door.

As his cruel, cunning eyes peered into the room, they
suddenly caught sight of the money, which had been
counted out on a small round table in front of the
fire,
The instant he saw it, he crouched down, hiding: himself
as well as he was able, and devouring the gold with hungry
eyes.

After a time, the old man took up the pieces one by
one, and dropped them into a stocking, which ns placed
under the pillow of the bed.

Directly the convict had seen where the stocking was
BUZ—BATTLE. 135

hidden away, he dropped on his hands and knees, and
crept to the garden gate, opening which as quietly as he
could, he slunk out into the lane and stole away un-
observed.

But before he had gone far he stopped, and clenching
his hands, swore a horrible oath that he would have the
gold that night, even if he did murder to obtain it.

Meanwhile, the cruel spider was getting very hungry;
for when he told Buz that he had lately eaten a fat fly,
he told her what was false. .

The fact is, he had eaten nothing for a very considerable
time, and the wings he had pointed out were those of a
miserable victim devoured long since.

So now he was becoming impatient, and had twice left
his den to see if Buz was yet weak enough to be attacked
with impunity.

-On both occasions, however, she had seen his approach,
and had made such a struggle to free herself, that he had
been frightened back.

But the third time he came, Buz lay perfectly still, and
to all appearance dead. Several times the spider made
ready to attack her, but each time his heart failed him.
At last—desperate with hunger—he rushed upon her, and
seizing her in his jaws, began to drag her towards his den,
taking the greatest care not to put himself within reach
of her sting.
130 BUZ—VICTORY.

But Buz was not nearly so weak as he had thought her,
and had only remained quiet in order to deceive him.

The moment, therefore, that he made his attack, she
clung tightly to him with her forelegs to prevent his getting
away. Then began a fearful struggle! The spider tried to»
hold her down with his terrible fangs, and to prevent her
from twisting her body round; and she, though weak and
half-strangled, never lost heart, but battled bravely on,
seeking for an opportunity. |

_ After some time, she managed to break one of the
threads which held her, and then another, and at last,
turning over with a great effort, she brought her body
alongside the spider, and shooting out her sting sideways,
‘she drove it fairly into him.

The effect was instantaneous! The spider let go his
hold, and curled completely up; then, as the poison took —
effect, his limbs again relaxed, and he lay dead, almost at
the mouth of his own den.

Dead! where he had killed so many victims himself.
Dead! where he had so lately mocked at Buz in. her
misery !

Just at this moment, the good wife, need. by ce
sound of the struggle, during which Buz had made a sharp
whirring with her wings, approached the window and called
out to her husband, “‘ Well, to be sure! if there isn’t a poor
little bee in a spider’s web! Come and look, John.”
BUZ—VICTORY. 5137)

‘So there be,” said John, as he came up.

‘‘And only see, John, she’ve a killed the spider, I do
declare !’”

“Well done!” said John; ‘‘so she have, I see.”

‘Poor little creetur!’’ said the old woman, as she re-
leased Buz with a feather, and put her on the window-sill.

For some time they watched Buz, who at first was too
much exhausted to free herself from the web which still
clung to her; but, gradually recovering her strength, and
receiving occasional help from the feather, she was able
to do so at last.

p Pherene said sthe-oldiman; Slee her bide lleto-
morrow morning. The room is nice and warm, and ’tis
too late to turn her out to-night.”

So they left her there, and drew the curtains, and put
the kettle on, and had tea, and in due time went to bed.

Buz crept about a little to stretch her legs, and finally
settled herself for the night on the handle of the lattice
window. eek

Ten o’clock sounded from the belfry of the old church
down in the village—eleven o’clock—midnight—and the
old couple were sleeping soundly. But if they had been
awake soon after midnight, they would have heard a
stealthy, scraping sound! What was it?

It was the convict, engaged in removing the lead round
one of the panes of glass close to the handle of the window.

19
138 BUZ—DEATH.

The knife that he was using was curved, and strong, and
sharp; and in his hands, and close to the cruel face that
was bending over the work, it had a murderous look.

A hammer with a long handle, such as is used for
breaking stones, stuck out from his coat pocket.

He wore no mask—that was not necessary; for if either
of the old people woke when he was once in the room,
there should be no one left alive to give evidence against
him—he had quite made up his mind about that. And as
he could hardly draw the stocking from under their very
pillow without waking them, he meant murder!

Murder was plainly written on his scowling face, and
expressed in every motion of his body.

Oh! for something to wake the old man, before it .
should be too late!

But he slept quietly on.

And now the villain removed a small pane of glass,
large enough to admit his hand; he had only to open the
window, climb into the room—and then

But in turning the handle gently, he began squeezing
Buz, who had settled there, and who, resenting such dis-
turbance, planted her sting deeply in his thumb. -With a
dreadful oath, the man hastily withdrew his hand, but in
so doing, swung ay open the window he had just



unfastened.
The latter, coming against a Mowek: -pot standing on the
BUZ—DEATH. 139

window-ledge, threw it with a crash upon the ground. This
woke the old man, who realising what was going on, got
out of bed as quickly as he could, seized the poker, and
made for the window. |

Startled by the sudden pain of the sting, the noise he
had himself made, and the shouts of the old man, the
would-be murderer hesitated what to do, and thus gave the
former more time to get to the window.

Now, to strike down a poor old couple in bed, or to cut
‘their throats, was one thing; but to climb througha window
guarded by a man who, however old he might be, was armed
with a stout poker, was quite another matter.

On the whole, the cowardly ruffian thought it best to
sneak away as quietly as possible, without letting his face
be seen.

But the old people went to sleep no more that night,
and were very glad next day to hand over to nephew Jack
_ the money that had so nearly cost them their lives.

And Buz, brave Buz! the instrument by which their
lives had been saved, lay dead upon the ground outside
the window; for on feeling her sting, the man had
given a eae pressure of his thumb, which had calcd
her instantly.

Perhaps it was as well after all.

She could not have withdrawn her barbed sting from the

horny hand of the man, as she had from the soft body of
19 *
I40 BUZ—DEATH.

the spider; and in losing their stings, bees always receive
a fatal injury.
She was therefore spared the pain of a lingering death.
And even if she had returned to her hive without any
adventure, she would probably have died before the sweet
soft springtime came round again. © The life of a bee is
very short, and one born as Buz was, early in the year,
seldom survives the winter.
So perhaps she could hardly have died at a better time.
She had been useful all her life, and was useful even in
her death. :

ae EN Dp.



J. W. ARROWSMITH, PRINTER, II QUAY STREET, BRISTOL.

ee
23h /3956 |

G1)
Vv














o {
md
&
e ~
/
5
‘
)
q
f
4,
\
\ ? be i
A " {
y
ey
‘ cx} é “
box 4 Ns pee
: i
|
‘
Al