Citation
Match-box Phil

Material Information

Title:
Match-box Phil
Series Title:
White lily series
Creator:
Allen, Phoebe
Nash, J., 18--- ( Illustrator )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) -- Committee of General Literature and Education
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
E. & J.B. Young & Co ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Brighton
New York
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
E. & J.B. Young & Co.
Manufacturer:
William Clowes and Sons, Limited.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
156, [3] p., [3] leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Hunger -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Theft -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cruelty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Brighton
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- Beccles
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Phoebe Allen ; illustrated by J. Nash ; published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education, appointed by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026563985 ( ALEPH )
ALG1327 ( NOTIS )
41293518 ( OCLC )

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Frontispiece. PHIL AND THE VICAR. Page 73.



MATCH-BOX PHIL.

BY

PHCEBE ALLEN,

AUTHOR OF
GILMORY,” ‘THE BLACK WITCH OF HONEYCRITCH,”
“WANTED A CAMEL,” ETC.

“ASAPH Woop,” ‘

ILLUSTRATED BY J. NASH.

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE COMMITTEE
OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION APPOINTED BY THE
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.

LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,

NORTHUMBERLAND AVENUE, W.C.;
43, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, E.C,

BRIGHTON : 129, NORTH STREET.
New Yorx: E. & J B. YOUNG AND CO.



TO

Gyr







MATCH-BOX PHIL,



CHAPTER I.

IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY.

** Scarce a glimpse of azure heaven
Gleamed above that narrow street.”
A, A. PROCTOR.

was a perfect day in the very heart
of summer, with an almost cloudless
sky overhead, and one long uninter-
rupted reign of golden sunshine.
To thousands of boys and girls it meant a
day for picnics and boating parties, for long
rambles in shady lanes, or butterfly hunts, or
romps in the hayfields, or games of cricket to-
wards sunset, when the long shadows of the trees
grow yet longer on the grass, and the evening
air is heavy with the scent of the countless
summer flowers.

But to the ragged, white-faced, hungry-eyed
boys and girls, who were dragging out an exist-





4 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

ence, too mournful for words, in a miserable court
known as Flowerdew Alley—in one of those
wretched London districts built over the dank,
sodden marshes of the Thames—that summer
day, which to country children meant only a
wealth of flowers and fruit and all the joys that
sunshine always brings, brought nothing but
choking dust and foul smells and a larger share
of suffering to the sick, and an increase of
weariness to those who had never known what
it was to enjoy the bright spirits and untiring
energy of childhood.

_ Ah! my child-readers, you “who can wander
at will where the works of the Lord are revealed ”
in your pleasant country homes, and to whom
all the joys and delights of country life come as
a matter of course—you will never realize the
existence that thousands of men and women,
and, saddest of all, little children, are condemned
to drag out in the hidden courts and alleys of
our great cities.

It is hard for you and me, who have never
known what hunger and destitution mean, to
picture those terrible haunts, where grim poverty
and ignorance and vice meet one on every side,
where, instead of pure fresh air and lovely views
and the singing of birds, evil smells and heart-
breaking sights and ghastly sounds take their
place, till even the faces of the little children,
with their keen eyes and sharpened features,
become stamped with the universal degradation



IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY. 5

and misery, and seem to reflect the terrible
surroundings in which the whole of their sad,
short lives have been spent.

On the summer day on which our story
opens two small boys, about nine years old,
were to be seen talking eagerly to each other in
one corner of Flowerdew Alley. They were
both ragged, thin, and white-faced, but yet, even
. to a cursory observer, they were far too unlike
each other to be taken for brothers. One was
dark-haired, with large brown eyes; whilst
the other rejoiced in a thick thatch of the
most brilliant red hair, and a pair of light-blue
eyes.

A few yards off from them a group of squalid
children were quarrelling over a dead cat; a
little further on, some rough lads were playing
tricks with an unlucky poodle, which one of
their number had managed to steal from its
owner that morning; whilst close at the boys’
very elbow, an old woman was hawking a basket
of rotten gooseberries, and inviting all the in-
mates of the court to purchase her “ fresh-
gathered fruit at a halfpenny a pint!”

At any other time each and all of these
goings-on would have proved attractive to our
two little friends, but to-day they had no eyes
or ears to spare to their surroundings.

“T tell yer, Phil, it’s easily done, if yer only
have the sense of a sparrer,” Dan, the red-haired
boy, was saying. “T’ll tip yer the wink, and the



6 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

lady what teaches us will never spot yer, if only
yer'll stick close to me, and duck up and down
as I tell yer. None of the other coves will split
on yer, you bet. They’re in too great a funk
of me for that,” added the boy, doubling a bony
little fist as he spoke, which certainly did not
look very formidable.

“T’d like to come; I’d like to chance it,” said
Phil; and the look of wistfulness in his large .
dark eyes was positively mournful. “Oh, Dan,
wouldn’t it be a lark if I could do it, and take
’em in?”

“Yer will, if yer ain’t an ass,” was Dan’s
rejoinder. “Look here, Phil! Come on with
me now, and [ll show yer just where we shall
have to stand to-morrer to be counted over.”

“Not I; I can’t come along with yer now,”
said Phil, standing up and shouldering a large
package of newly made match-boxes. “I’ve got
to pitch these in at Jenkins’s, and she'll make it
hot for me, if I’m home after time.” So saying,
the boy began to move on, but presently he
stopped short and looked back. “Dan,” he
called. “Dan, I say, look here! I won’t say
‘no’ any more. I wi go along with yer to- |
morrow, and take my chance.”

“In course yer will,” said Dan; “and a good
time we'll have of it. My wig! won’t yer open
your eyes when you once get behind bellowing
Billy, and see all there is to be seen!”

“Yes, if only some one don’t nab me first,” .



IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY. 7

said poor Phil in a less hopeful tone, as he went
on his way with his load of match-boxes,

So ended the dialogue between Dusty Dan—
so called from a corruption of his nickname,
“Brick Dust,” to which his brilliant colouring
had given rise—and Phil, otherwise known as
“Match-box Phil,” he being rarely to be seen
unencumbered by several gross of newly finished
match-boxes, either piled on his head, or slung
at his back, or tucked under his arm, on hio
daily rounds to the warehouse to deliver them.

Poor Phil had absolutely no belongings, being,
as he would have told you, an “orphing,” and,
indeed, looking into his old child’s face, you
would have found it hard to believe that mother’s
lips had ever kissed those pinched, sharpened
cheeks, or that mother’s hands had ever smoothed
the rough, tangled, dark locks from the deeply
lined forehead. No, he had never belonged to
anybody in the sense of being an object of value
to any person.

The dimmest recesses of his memory held the
picture of an old woman, whom he had once
called “Granny,” and who had sometimes given
him kind words, but more often hasty blows ;
but his recollections concerning her were very
vague, which was but natural, seeing that for the
last five years—more than the half of his little
life—Phil had been at the mercy of one Mrs.
Styles, who had-never found it necessary to tell
him any of his own history, or to explain to



8 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

him the terms on which they stood with each
other. ;

Only one fact poor Philip knew well—for
that knowledge had come to him through years
of neglect and ill-treatment—namely, that he
was “no flesh or blood of hers,” and that he was
nothing but an “orphing,” who wasn’t worth the
salt he ate.

That information, emphasized more often
than not by a shower of cruel blows, had been
hurled so constantly at Phil, that he had ceased
to attach any importance to it. Early, very
early in life, his baby feet had grown used to
treading only the stony places in life’s rugged
road, and he had become so accustomed to Mrs,
Styles’s treatment of him, that it would have
seemed quite unnatural to Philip if she had
altered her usual behaviour to him.

As he often said to his friend Dan, he knew
pretty well now what to expect from “the old
girl,” and had learnt the worst of her.

Poor Philip! Ay, pity him, my readers, but,
at the same time, don’t be too hard upon the
wretched woman who made the misery of the
child-life dependent upon her. She was one of
those weary toilers who, if they will not starve,
must work harder than any beast of burden.
For fourteen hours every day, Sunday included
—for, for these white slaves of our great cities
there is no day of rest,—poor Mrs. Styles worked
on at the task allotted to her, making a gross



IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY. © 9

x
of match-boxes—that is, a dozen dozen outsides
and a dozen dozen insides for twopence half-
penny, and out of that payment finding her own
paste, and earning at the end of her week of
unremitting labour something a little under six
shillings !

What wonder if, with her weary, exhausted
frame, her one long monotony of grinding toil,
poor Mrs. Styles grew ill-tempered, and even
cruel to those dependent upon her. Besides
Phil, she had an invalid husband and a bed-
ridden mother to share the one corner of the
wretched room—for which she paid no less than
eighteenpence a week—and the scanty stock of
food which the remainder of her earnings
supplied.

Her husband had once been in good work at
the docks, but a fall down a ship’s hold had
resulted in an injury to his spine, and paralysis
had supervened, reducing him to a state of utter
helplessness, Like the poor, bedridden old
mother, who was entirely crippled with rheu-
matism, John Styles would lie hour after hour
watching his wife’s swiftly moving hands, and
sighing with that weary patience which seems
the special heritage of the suffering poor, that he
was forced to lie still and starve.

Neither the man nor the old woman were
ever unkind to Phil, and sometimes, indeed, the
former would raise his voice in remonstrance
when the boy fell a victim to more than his



Io MATCH-BOX PHIL.

usual share of ill-treatment ; but with the best
will in the world, poor souls, they could not
have done much to improve his circumstances,
and the one little gleam of light which found its
way into Phil’s troubled life did not come from
either John Styles or his mother-in-law.







CHAPTER II.

A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. |

‘*Ffere some Christ-like spirit, pure and gentle,
Sheddeth moisture on the desert spot.”
Mrs, ALEXANDER,

GyStOOKING at that squalid room which

ect} Phil had learnt to call “home,”
sf, and of which only half belonged

5 to the Styleses, no one could have
supposed that Phil’s bright spot, of which we
spoke in our last chapter, could have been found
within those four bare walls. And yet so it was.

In the corner opposite to that inhabited by
the Styleses, lay, day and night, winter and
summer, a pale, hump-backed, crippled boy. He
was a match-box maker, like the rest of his
room-fellows, and from early dawn till far into
the night poor Seth’s hands, so thin and claw-
like, were moving ceaselessly. Only now and
again, at rare intervals, when overtaxed nature
gained the mastery, Seth’s head would fall back
against the wall—pillows he had none—and his
eyes would close for very weariness. At such
moments as these—strange as it may seem in





12 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

such surroundings—a smile would flicker across
the drawn white face, like a pale, watery sun-
beam, and on these occasions, if Phil happened
to be at hand, he would creep up to Seth and
whisper, “Are you seeing them beautiful things
now, Seth? Tell me about ’em again—do.”
For Seth Reid had not spent all his life in
those sin-defiled haunts of prayerless lips and
ruined souls. He was seventeen when our story
begins, but till within the last five years he had
been a thorough country boy, without a wish or
a thought beyond the happy village and pleasant
lanes where his lot had been cast. Seth had
never been able to join in other boys’ games,
but his intense love of nature, his keen interest
in all the birds and insects and flowers which
came within even his limited reach, had more
than compensated him for the privations which
his crippled limbs inflicted upon him. Almost
unconsciously, Seth was as entirely devoted to
the worship cf Nature as were those old-world
folk of long, long ago, who, knowing very little
about themselves, and nothing of the things they
saw around them, fancied that everything had
the same kind of life which they themselves had.
To watch either sunrise or sunset was a daily
source of delight to him, and at times, when he
had been too ill to leave his bed in the little
cottage at home, Seth had been quite happy
observing the clouds as they floated past his
window, his fancy fashioning them now into



A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 13

grand old giants seated on monstrous thrones of
snowy vapour, now into splendid warriors on
huge, dragon-like steeds, or again into vast
flocks of fleecy sheep scudding across the sky,
whilst the smaller, more transparent cloudlets,
Seth always loved to fancy were the white-
winged angels, speeding to and fro on their
loving errands.

As for the flowers, they seemed to be Seth’s
own heritage. There was not a bank or a copse
within his reach—and on good days with his
crutches Seth could walk a fair distance—of the
flowers of which he could not have given you an
inventory. He knew where to look for any rare
specimen of flower, fern, or moss; he could
literally put his finger on the spots on the chalk
hills where, the bee orchises grew; and if any
one, from the old flower-loving vicar downwards,
wanted information about any uncommon local
plant, Seth Reid was always the person referred
to. His father was a bricklayer, who might
have done well enough had he been content to
remain in his native village and rest satisfied
with the moderate wages which he earned there.
He had only one other child besides Seth, a
little girl, ten years younger than her brother,
and devotedly fond of Seth. Soon after Nannie’s
birth, Reid’s wife had died, and, as so often
happens, the mother’s death was followed by
the break-up of what had till then been one of
the happiest homes in the village.



14 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

Tempted by the prospect of higher wages, and
no longer restrained by his wife’s remonstrances
against sacrificing the children’s welfare, Reid
had sold up his small possessions and started
off to London before Nannie was two years
old. At first he had done fairly well, but after
a-time, owing to slackness of trade, he fell out
of work, and at last was reduced to taking em-
ployment in a stoneyard at the rate of nine-
pence a day.

On first going to London, the Reids had
rented three little rooms, which it had been
Seth’s pride to keep as neat as his mother would
have done, but by degrees they had sunk from
one poor locality to.a still worse one, till at last
one corner of the wretched room in Flowerdew
Alley was all the semblance of home that was
left to them. By that time want of food and
insufficient clothing and foul air had done their
work upon Seth, and reduced him to the feeble,
helpless cripple he now was. And yet perhaps
in all that great city there was no life which, in
proportion to the means at its command, shed
more gentle sunlight on its immediate ‘surround-
ings than did poor Seth’s. To Nannie, he was
her whole world, the centre upon which her very
being hung; to Philip, he was nothing less than
a hero, for he had seen so much with his own
eyes of which Phil had only dreamt; whilst to
those other poor souls who shared the con-
finement of that squalid prison-like room, Seth



A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 15

was a soothing, refining influence, of which they
themselves were vaguely conscious.

No one in that room was tired of hearing
Seth talk of his country home and all its joys
‘and beauties ; and when the boy would describe
his happy wanderings through the springtide
copses, all blue and yellow with their carpets of
hyacinths and primroses, and how he listened for
the first “jug, jug” of the nightingales or the ©
cry of the dear old cuckoo, or when he spoke of
the summer lanes with their wealth of wild
roses and honeysuckle, or of the harvest field
with the golden corn, all ready for the reapers’
sickle,—the wearied, worn faces of his listeners
would grow a shade less hard, hearing Seth’s
stories of a better land, and now and again they
would declare—those who had not always dwelt
in that house of bondage—that they fancied
almost they could see the meadows, with the
fresh green grass all white and gold with the
daisies and buttercups, and could hear once
more the creaking of the waggons and the songs
of the reapers bringing home their harvest.

And if, indeed, the pictures of that sweet
country life contrasted all too grimly with the
sad reality of their own, so that tears would
well up in their heavy, care-dimmed eyes, I do
not think those’ tears did harm to those who
shed them, but served rather as refreshing dews
to:keep one last spot soft and green in the .
weary desert of their parched and barren hearts,



16 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

_In those happier days of his, Seth had been a
Sunday school boy, and now the only treasure
which he could really call his own, and which,
alas! none of his companions wished to dispute
with him, was a tattered Prayer-book, in which
he still read in his rare moments of leisure, and
from which he taught Nannie her catechism.
He had tried to teach Philip too, but with very
little success; and though the boy had learnt
to say “Our Father,” and would repeat it at
-Nannie’s bidding, it had been from the child
and not her brother that Phil had learnt this
simple prayer. Phil would always come over to
Seth’s corner and listen for hours to tales of the
latter’s life at Thorndale, but the sight of the
tattered Prayer-book would invariably send him
flying to the further end of the room. He was
not a good little boy in the sense of saying. his
prayers or wishing to be taught about God or
heaven. No one but Seth had ever spoken to
him on such subjects; and though Phil had often
promised him that he would go along with
“Dusty Dan” to the Sunday Ragged School in
an adjoining alley, he had never got further
than the door of the class-room. He had never
been taught to say his prayers, kneeling at his
mother’s knee. No one had ever tried to raise
his thoughts. above the loathsome sights and
sounds of the squalid places in which his childish
ideas had taken root, or to talk to him of that
other kingdom of which he was an inheritor;



A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 17

no one, indeed, had ever troubled themselves to
tell the boy whether he were even baptized
or not.

And what to Seth seemed the saddest part of
it all was, that Phil cared very little about it
himself, and declared that anyway now it
wouldn’t make much difference to him.

“Ah! if you could only get down to Thorn-
. dale and be taught for a bit in the Sunday
school,” Seth would say when overcome by.
despair of trying to teach Phil himself, “you
would understand it all then, fast enough.”

“T’d like to go to Thorndale,” Phil would
answer; “but catch me going to any of your
Sunday schools. It’s the cherry orchards I’d
make for, you bet, or some old cove’s fruit
garding. My wig, won't it be a lark if I ever
gets down there!”

For Philip’s projected flight to Thorndale was
a favourite topic of whispered conversation
amongst those three ragged children, Seth,
Nannie, and Phil, as they sat huddled together
in their dingy corner ; for Phil had quite resolved
that somehow or other on the first favourable
opportunity he would, as he termed it, “cut the
concern” and “make tracks” for the country.
When he was once outside London, he was
quite sure it would be an easy matter to find
the road to Thorndale, for Seth assured him
that in the country there was no huge network
of long streets, with great tall houses blocking

Cc
fe



18 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

out the distant view; there were no rattling
cabs and omnibuses to run you down, if you
stood still in the middle of the road to think
which way you would take; there was no police-
man to bid you move on, if you wished to rest
for a bit by the way. Only fresh green grass
‘beneath your feet and tall shade-giving trees
overhead, and plenty of moss-grown banks or
snug corners in overgrown copses, where the
weary wayfarer might rest all night, with the
- nightingales to sing you to sleep and the stars
of heaven to gleam down upon you, instead of
the flaring gaslamps at the corners of the street,
and all the jarring sounds which always filled the
night in Flowerdew Alley and made it hideous.

When Phil had once reached Thorndale, he
was to go to a certain long, low thatched house
at the top of the village, with a large yard and
a pond in front of it, and which was known far ©
and wide as May Farm, and where, Seth assured
him, the kindly housewife would give him a
welcome, if Phil said that Seth Reid had sent
him. She was the children’s aunt; and though
the Reids had long ago lost all connection with
their old friends and relations, yet Seth felt
sure, knowing his aunt’s nature, that the sound
of his name, coupled with the sight of Phil’s
wan white face, would ensure him kindly treat-
ment at her hands,

It was always part of the programme that
Phil should time his arrival at May Farm for



A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 19

either haymaking time or harvesting, so that he
should at once be taken on as an extra hand.
“And then,” said the boy, “won’t I work just
about and make ’em that satisfied, that chances
are they’ll nab me for ever after as a regular
hand.”

Anyway, he was to earn enough money to
bring him back to London to fetch Seth and
Nannie and give them a good time in Thorndale.

Oh, the sunny threads, which: the exercise of
a little imagination may weave into the tapestry
of the darkest clouds of life!







CHAPTER III.

HATCHING A PLOT.

“© Beneath the loveliest dream there coils a fear.”
THEODORE WATTS.

5; EVER before had Phil so quickly
accomplished his errand to the great
match-box warehouse as on this
summer evening on which our story



opens.

In spite of the heavy sultriness, which made
most people feel so weary and listless, Phil sped
along as if he had wings to his feet, only bent
on delivering his match-boxes as soon as possible,
so that he might fly back to Seth and Nannie,
and tell them how that their long-dreamt dream
was really about to be fulfilled, and that before
another sunset he would actually be treading the
lanes and meadows of that happy land of which
Seth had talked so much.

But with the caution peculiar to those poor
children whose natural dove-like innocence has
long ago been choked by this world’s wisdom,
Phil was very prudent in imparting his informa-



HATCHING A PLOT. 21

tion. It was not till he felt quite sure that all
the other inmates of the room were either asleep
or entirely absorbed in finishing their daily tasks,
that he crept over to Seth’s side and began a low
conversation with him and Nannie.

At first both children made sure that Phil was
dreaming.

“Tt couldn’t never be true,” said little Nannie ;
and there was a pathos in her wistful, eager tone
which would have gone to your heart.

Over and over again Phil had to explain how it
was all Dusty Dan’s planning, and how Dan had
promised that if Phil came along with him to
the station at eight o’clock next morning, he
would manage somehow to smuggle him in
amongst the two hundred and odd ragged
children who were going down into the country
for their yearly school treat.

“You've only to duck down at the right
moment, and you'll be right enough, you bet,”
Dusty Dan had declared. “ Joe Hart got smug-
gled in that way last year; and though! to be
sure, he was spotted when we’d got out of the
first tunnel, teacher hadn’t the heart to turn him
back again.”

“ And,” continued Phil, “if so be I was spotted
at the station, I wouldn’t be worse off than I am
now. The parson and the ladies might jaw me
a bit, but that wouldn’t break no bones, and Ill
only have to make a better sort of a try next
time.”



22 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“That's true,” said Seth; “but do you know
what part of the country youre going to,
Phil?”

“ What part!” echoed the boy. “ Why, ’tzs the
country, That’s enough, isn’t it? I expect, when
T am once there, I’ll manage to find Thorndale.”

“But the country is ever so big,” said Seth,
“and Thorndale was reckoned but a small
village, and maybe you're going ‘quite opposite
ways.”

“Don’t matter; if Thorndale’s in the country,
and I’m going into the country, Pll be bound
to find it anyhow,” said Phil, to whose mind the
term country represented a monster kind of .
street, in which he had only to seek for Thorn-
dale as he would have sought the number of a
house in any given street.

“ Ah,” sighed Seth, “if only I could go along
with you—just to put you in the right way, you
know. Shute is the name of the station, and
that’s better than three miles from ,Thorndale ;
and it’s up ever so steep a hill you go for most
of the way, till youcome to the toll-bar. There’s
a big cherry tree grows close against the gate.
The fruit will be about ripe now, and Jerry, the
old man what keeps the toll, has got a patch
over one eye— But there, you’re not minding
a word I’m saying, Phil,’ broke off Seth, be-
coming suddenly aware that Philip’s thoughts
were clearly not following his description of one-
eyed Jerry.



HATCHING A PLOT. 23

“T was thinking,” said Phil, “how on earth I
could let you know, and Nannie too, how I gets
on, for you'll both be ever so anxious to hear
about me.”

“Oh yes,” said Nannie, “for we'll have to be
getting ready for you to fetch us away, ’cause
you wz come for us again—won’t you, Phil?”

“Tn course I will,” he answered; and then, after
a moment’s thought, he added, “Well, anyway
Dan’s in the secret, and he’ll come and tell you,
soon as ever he comes back here, how I manages
about getting lost. [ll have to look sharp and
dodge behind some ’bus when the ladies ain’t
looking, or try——”

“But there ain’t no ’bus in the country,”
broke in Seth; “you'll have to hide behind a
haystack, or in a ditch more likely.”

“Well, Pll hide in something, you bet,” said
Phil.

“And you'll remember May Farm, and Mrs.
Brailey our aunt,” said Seth; “and you'll tell
her about us, and how we want bad to come
back again.”

“Yes,” chimed in Nannie, “and you'll tell her
how Seth says I’m grown handy enough to do
many an odd job, and p’raps when I’m a bit
older take a turn at the milking,” she added,
quite forgetting that she had never, to her
knowledge, seen a live cow in her life,

“JT would like to be going up that Thorndale
hill once more,” sighed poor Seth. “ You'll think



24 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

of me, won’t you, Phil, as you goes along between
the high hedges? They'll be all aglow with the
dog-roses and foxgloves now ;” and he turned
his face to the bare dirty wall,and closed his
eyes, as though to shut out the sight of his
miserable surroundings, whilst he stole away
from them all in fancy to the pleasant scenes of
his childhood.

Nobody heeded the two great tears which
presently rolled down his sunken cheeks, not
even little Nannie, she was so absorbed in
thinking of all that lay before Philip. His
flight. into the country had been talked of so
much and so often by these poor little exiles,
that now that he actually stood on the threshold
of his enterprise Nannie felt quite bewildered,

“Tt seems awful queer like ; and when I think
about it all, something seems to choke me just
here,” she said, putting her hand to her throat,
whilst a troubled look came into her face which
was akin to pain rather than pleasure.

“ Ay,” said Phil, whose spirits were rising, “it
will be an awful spree. I’ll have a lot to tell you,
Nannie, when I come back again ;” and, in the
exuberance of his glee, Phil promptly stood on
his head, as only a gutter boy can.

But this time he had gone too far, anda sharp
reprimand from Mrs. Styles, who bade him come
and lie down in his own corner and have done
with them tomfooleries, had the effect of sobering
him, and, with a whispered promise to Nan that



HATCHING A PLOT. 25

he would bid her good-bye first thing next n morn-
ing, Phil went off to sleep.

Nor was he the first to awake next day. The
pale grey light of early morning was only just
beginning to steal into the room, when a gentle
touch on his forehead roused him, and Phil saw
little Nan standing beside him.

In one hand she held a tiny screw of news-
paper, in the folds of which lay a small ragged
lock of her yellow hair.

“Take it along with you, Phil,” she whispered,
“just for a something to remember us by, for
maybe if you’ve nothing at all, when you comes
into that beautiful place yonder, you'll forget
all about Flowerdew Alley, and Seth, and—me”
—and here the corners of her mouth quivered
ominously—“ but if you'll always keep that,
chances are ’twill mind you now and then about
us, and how we be waiting here ever so long,
a-hoping for you to come back and fetch us.”

“Never you fear. I won't forget you, Nan,”
said Phil, but he took the fold of paper all the
same, “I'll come back for you just as fast as
ever I can,”

“Ay, and you'll find us waiting and wanting
you ever so bad,” said Nan. And then, after a
moment’s hesitation, she went on, “And, Phil, I
wanted to ask you one thing more : when you're
away from us, will you—will you promise just
to say ‘Our Father’ when you gets up first thing
inthe morning? Seth says we can’t expect God



26 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

to take no care of us if we don’t ask Him, you
know. And Id like to think that when we are
saying ‘Our Father’ here, Seth and I, you is
saying just the same out in the beautiful country.”

“Tl never remember to say it all through,”
said Phil, “not by myself; ’tis different when, I
say it with you and Seth.”

For a minute Nan looked perplexed; then, her
face suddenly brightening, she suggested, “I know,
then. You say just ‘Our Father’ every morning
regular—only them two words; you’ll remember
them, Phil—and then tell God, ‘Nan will finish
the rest,’ and I’ll say it always a double time—
once for us, and once for you. That'll be fine,
won't it, Phil?” a

“ Ay,” he said, no asioee his head. “I eee
that, and I won’t forget.”

And so those children parted that summer
morning.

To the oldest, most world-worn man there’s a
kind of magical charm in the sound of a former
playfellow’s name; but how much tenderer is
the link that binds us to those whom we may
call our misery-fellows! “Tears that we have
shared with another make the best cement for
friendship,” says a French writer; and so it had
proved in the case of these three poor garret
children.

“Tt’s our only friend that is gone; ’tis that
what makes me feel so badly,” said Nannie some
hours later to Seth, by way of excuse for the



HATCHING A PLOT. 27

tears that would come in sudden showers all
through that morning. “We'll miss him terribly.”

“ Ay; but he’s coming back again,” said her
brother. “He promised to come back again to
us, certain sure.”

“ He promised to say ‘ Our Father,’” said little
Nan, as if the thought of ¢hat promise gave her
the most comfort,







CHAPTER IV.

THE FIRST STEP.

‘*And ail above, broad summer day !
And all below, bright summer land!”
Lorp Lyrron,

2 MONGST all the bright-faced, eager-
hearted children who were gathered
together at one of the great London
stations on this golden summer
morning, ready to start on their country ex-
pedition, no heart beat faster, no breath came
shorter, than did poor Match-box Phil’s, as he
dodged first behind one child and then another,
trembling in every limb, lest some one should
see him, and discover that he was not one of the
invited guests.

There stood the long line of third-class
carriages, specially engaged for the accommo-
dation of the small holiday-makers, drawn up
close to the platform. There was only one step
—and such a little step too—from where Phil
was standing to these tempting vehicles of
escape; if only he could once be smuggled





THE FIRST STEP. 29

through the ordeal of counting heads, if only
he could once find himself being carried down
the line with the rest of his ragged comrades,
all would be well.

The success of his venture meant to Phil
glorious freedom and unclouded happiness in
the unknown country, so fondly dreamt of;
failure meant a sorrowful return to the dreary
city home—which was no home to him—and
Nan’s and Seth’s bitter disappointment as well
as his own.

Phil had taken his place in the crowd of little
ones close beside Dan, and he was so over-
excited, so ready to laugh or cry at a moment’s
notice, that when his friend gave him a sharp
poke in the ribs, accompanied by the informa-
tion that “’twasn’t their regular teacher as was
taking them, but some other old girl, whom
Dan had never seen before,” Phil could not
collect his scattered wits sufficiently to under-
stand that this change of superintendents could
in any way influence the success of his enter-
prise.

“ She’s a new hand at it all, and we'll do her
yet,” muttered Dick by way of explanation.
“She’s awfully out of it,’ added the gutter boy.

And “awfully out of it,” indeed, did that poor
good lady feel, as she stood on the platform,
with a long register of names in her hand, short
of sight, and still shorter of memory, and re-
gretting bitterly in her inmost soul the good



30 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

nature which had prompted her to place herself
in this trying position. The truth was that her
niece, who should have been in charge of Dusty
Dan’s class that day, had fallen ill at the last
moment, and her distress at the thought of her
unshepherded flock had been so great, that her
elderly aunt had volunteered to go on the
expedition in her stead. But though she had
been fully instructed as to the right number of
children—some fifty—for whom she would be
responsible, and had been directed to call them
over singly by name, and make each answer in
turn, she had likewise received such a volume
of instructions not to let Tom Miles put his
head out of the carriage window, or Fred Smith
frighten the others in the tunnels, and to be sure
and not allow Charlie Brown to eat his neigh-
bour’s share of cake as wellas his own,—that by
the time poor Miss Sandars arrived on the scene
of action, and found herself surrounded by the
troop of wildly excited children, she was so
bewildered and so nervous, that, though she did
go through the name-calling and did feebly
endeavour to number her charges, Phil could
not have attempted his escape under more
favourable circumstances.

The names had been called, the counting was
over, and Phil had escaped detection, when all
at once a voice was heard close to Phil’s elbow,
saying in very loud tones, “Teacher, I say, this
’ere cove don’t belong to us;” and a grimy little



THE FIRST STEP. 31

paw, belonging to one Hal Jones, was pointed
towards Philip.

The attack from this quarter was so un-
expected, and took Phil by such surprise, that
for the moment he gave himself up for lost, and
began stammering out some helpless sort of
excuse. But Dusty Dan came to the rescue
manfully. He was grand in the emergency,

“Chain up, you duffer,” he whispered to Phil;
and then, with the utmost promptitude, he dealt
such a sudden blow to a small boy who stood
between himself and Hal Jones, that he sent the
former tumbling head foremost over the latter,
so that the next minute both lads were sprawling
together on the platform, and so busy abusing
each other, that Phil was no longer made the
object of attention. They were still squabbling
by the time both Dan and his friend had been
safely packed into one of the well-filled carriages,
sitting side by side.

“T telled yer it would be all right,” whispered
Dusty, with a broad grin; and then, when the
guard had whistled and the train had puffed
out of the station, and the children with one
consent had burst out into a long ringing cheer,
poor Phil’s delight and excitement were almost
beyond his control.

It was all so strange, so wonderful—the rapid
motion of the train, the sight of the rows of
houses as they passed by them, and which
seemed ‘to Phil to be moving as fast as they



32 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

were moving themselves; then the gradual
gliding from the outskirts of the great, smoky
city into the greener suburbs, with their pic-
turesque little villas and trim gardens,—it was all
so bewildering to the poor gutter child that, as
he said afterwards, he had to keep “a-pulling of
his hair and a-pinching of his self” to make sure
that it was he, Match-box Phil, that was really
sitting on the carriage seat, looking out at all
these new and beautiful sights. It happened to
be a very pretty line of country through which
they were travelling ; but had their journey led
them through the barest downs and dreariest
marshes, it would all have seemed fairyland to
Phil. Close by the window he sat, his eyes
fixed hungrily on the different scenes through
which they were passing so rapidly. Now it was
a sunlit meadow, with cattle basking lazily in
the shade of the clumps of trees, or standing
knee-deep in some reed-fringed stream; now
they were hurrying past long stretches of forest-
land, with here and there an opening in the
glades, where pheasants were strutting in the full
beauty of their summer plumage, and hares were
scurrying to and fro amidst the thick urider-
wood ; or, again, the train would carry them
close to some pretty village, which, like its rustic
inhabitants, seemed to have run down to the
very edge of the line for the express purpose of
viewing the passing travellers,

“You like it fine, don’t you, Phil?” whispered



HE FIRST STEP. 33

Dan, when two-thirds of the journey had been
got over, and Philip’s unwonted silence was
beginning to make his friend doubtful of the
success of the undertaking.

“Just about,” answered Phil in a tone which
carried conviction ; but still he did not turn his
face from the window, perhaps because just then
two great tears had gathered in his eyes.

What had brought them there at such a time,
do you think? The train was just carrying
them past a pretty bit of woodland, intersected
by a sandy road, overhung with birches and
oaks. The trunk of a fallen tree lay half across
the pathway, and on it was seated a little girl,
her lap full of summer flowers. The sunlight
- filtered down through the branches on the
child’s yellow hair—for her calico bonnet lay at
her feet, and two red admiral butterflies were
hovering over it—and the face which she lifted
from her nosegay was a picture of rosy round-
ness, sadly unlike the pale, pinched cheeks of
the poor little maidens in Flowerdew Alley, and
yet the sight of that country child in the sun-
shiny copse brought a sudden pain to Phil’s
heart, reminding him of that other little girl,
whom he had left behind in rags and dirt and
squalor, and between whom and himself such a
whole world seemed now to lie.

“Oh, Nan, Nan, however shall I find you
again?” he murmured.

Tt seemed a lifetime to Phil since Nan had
D



34 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

stood beside him in the early grey of the morn-
ing, and thrust the lock of tangled hair into his
hand, which was to serve as a talisman in his
distant wanderings.

“Where is Thorndale, I wonder?” he thought.
Had they passed it, or were they coming to it
now?

Up till now, in the midst of his excitement,
Phil had entirely forgotten that he had a special
mission, and that Seth and Nan had sent him
out for the express purpose of finding Thorndale,
but the glimpse of that little girl had recalled it
all to him now.

Of course it was no good asking any of his
companions if they had ever heard of Seth’s
home; but all at once Phil screwed up his
courage to address Miss Sandars, Growing
crimson to the roots of his hair, and starting
out of his place, he stammered out an inquiry
as to whether the lady knew where Thorndale
was.

“Thorndale!” No, she had never heard of
such a place, and she bade Philip sit down again
quietly, adding that they would soon be leaving ©
the train now.

Poor Phil! his first endeavour to fulfil his
mission had certainly not been successful; but
perhaps, he thought, some of those gentlemen
who wore the coats with silver braid and buttons,
and who appeared to know everything about
everybody, and who seemed to Phil to sprout



THE FIRST STEP. 3e

out of all the platforms, would be able to en-
lighten him. At any rate, he would ask then
at the earliest opportunity.

But now the train stopped, and a deafening
cheer from all the line of carriages announced
that Stourton, the goal of their railway journey,
had been reached.







CHAPTER V.

ROOKHURST.

‘Tt was the time when lilies blow,
And clouds are highest up in air.”
TENNYSON.

three miles distant from the little
village of Rookhurst, where the
London children were to be enter-
tained, it was quite evident that even at Stourton
their arrival had been duly expected and pro-
vided for. The station-yard was crowded with
vans and open waggons drawn up in readiness
to transport the little holiday-makers to the
scene of the feast.. Not only the squire, who
was to be their host, but several good-natured
farmers had lent their teams and waggons for
the occasion, and a pretty sight it was to see
the strong, glossy-coated horses standing two
abreast in the large open vans, with branches of
roses and poppies in their ears and their tails
plaited up with straw and crimson braid, whilst
each time they tossed back their heads the air
was filled with the music of their tiers of bells.





ROOKHURST. 37

And what a hurry all the children were in to
exchange the close, shut-up railway carriages
for the wide, roomy waggons. But even in
the short transit from the platform to the station-
yard Phil found time to pluck at a porter’s arm
and ask if he knew the way to Thorndale.

. Never heard tell of such a place,” said the
man shortly, brushing past Phil.

Nor did the latter dare linger to explain Aner
for, close at his heels, Hal Jones was following,
and again Phil heard his horrid squeaky voice
saying—

“That ’ere chap don’t belong to us, eachern
_ “No, that he don’t,’ echoed another small
voice ; and Phil began to quake.

Happily, however, both remarks were drowned
in the hubbub and bustle occasioned by the
packing away of all the children into the various
conveyances,

Never to his dying aay will poor of Phailic forget
his impressions as he drove along through the
narrow lanes, shut in on each side by the tall
hedges. To have the pure blue sky overhead,
undimmed by the clouds of murky smoke; to
have soft green banks on either side instead of
rows of squalid houses ; and in the place of the
dirty, broken pavement underfoot, the country
road, with its fringe of grass and wayside flowers,
was indeed like passing from darkness to light.
True, those roadside blossoms were dusty enough
after the fashion of all wayfarers, but that did



38 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

not tarnish the gold of the dandelions or dim
the green of the grass to eyes all unused to feast
on Nature’s commonest gifts. At the foot of
the first long hill—and there were several between
Stourton and Rookhurst—most of the elder
children were turned out to walk; but the
experiment was not repeated after the first
attempt.

Once on their own feet, they were simply like
mad creatures. Off went their hats to serve as
nets for the butterflies, which most of them
believed were only “flowers what could fly ;”
whilst dozens of little legs, which never till now
had climbed anything but garret stairs, went
clambering up the banks, only, as a rule, to slip
back again with more or less of a tumble into
the dusty road below.

High on the dry, sunny hedgerows the fox-
gloves were hanging out their crimson bells on
their tall firm stalks, serving as regular decoys
to the eager little crowd below. Of course, every
one was crazy to secure one of those glorious
spikes for themselves, until their enthusiasm
was suddenly quenched.

Phil, who was leading the storming party,
had reached his goal; he was just grasping one
of the strong, downy stalks with its peals of
bells, when all at once, over the hedge and
almost into his very face, came the head of a
great red cow, scattering dismay and confusion
beyond description among the city-bred boys,



ROOKHURST. 39

With a piercing shriek of terror, Phil staggered
backwards, and, like a shower of loose stones
which had suddenly been dislodged, down into
the road the motley crew came tumbling, wide-
eyed and panting with fright ; indeed, so alarmed
were some of them that they set off running
down the hill with their faces towards the station
and their backs to the waggons as fast as they
could go. The sight of that terrible beast—she
was a very sleepy, mild-eyed old cow—had been
enough to make them willing to decline all
further acquaintance with the country, and it
required no little persuasion and coaxing on the
part of their teachers to prevail on them to turn
back and allow themselves to be safely placed
into the vans again. ,

After that it was agreed that there should be
no more getting in or out on the road until
Rookhurst was actually reached. So they
drove along at a steady pace, the good-natured
waggoners declaring afterwards that it was for
all the world like having a May swarm of bees
behind them, for the children kept up a perpetual
buzz of wonder and admiration.

Now they shrieked with delight as they drove
under a group of elder trees and watched the
small white starry blossoms coming down in a
shower amongst them, and then they fairly
screamed with joy at the sight of a scarlet clover
field upon which the midday sun was blazing
right royally.



40 MATCH-BOX PHIL

The corn-fields, too, standing nearly ready

for the harvest, and stained here and there with
the red poppies, evoked shouts of admiration ;
whilst, when they actually entered Rookhurst,
the cottagers, standing at their garden gates to
watch the arrival of the vans, trembled for the
safety of those fruit trees whose branches over-
hung the roadway. So many little hands were
outstretched to strip the boughs of their tempting,
albeit unripe, bounty, so many eyes were turned
greedily upon them, that the drivers whipped up
their horses into a brisk trot, and so the whole
cavalcade reached the manor in grand style.
_ And the welcome which greeted them there
was more than enough to make the children
forget the forbidden fruit left behind in the
village, and even the terrible wild beast which
had scared them down from the foxglove hedge.
All the Rookhurst school-children were drawn
up on either side of the long chestnut avenue
which led to the house, each armed with huge
nosegays and garlands to be given to their city
guests, 0. ee 32

“Oh, if Nan and Seth could have but half of
these!” thought Phil, gazing down on the bunch
of roses and honeysuckles which had fallen to
his share; and when, along with the others, he
was marshalled into his place at the long dinner-
table, spread under the trees in the park, his
bewilderment reached its height. He had never
in all his life been to a school-feast before, so



. ROOKHURST. Al

that the mere fact of being surrounded by plenty
of good things was a great novelty to him. At
first he felt as if he could neither eat nor drink,
and sat staring helplessly at his piled-up plate
and the flowers which lay beside it, thinking
wistfully of two wan white faces in the dreary
garret in Flowerdew Alley, till something seemed
to rise up in his throat and nearly choke him.

“T say, tuck in, Phil, I tell you,” said Dan at
his elbow; “tuck as much inside you as you
can, and then bag the rest, for if you’re going to
give ’em the slip, you’d best pocket all you can
ley hands on, for I’ll be bound you won’t get
such a blooming chance of blowing yourself out
again.” naar :

That was sound, practical advice, and in
another minute Phil was acting on it. When
they were once. tasted, the mutton-pies and
plum-puddings were so good that Phil found it
no hardship to obey Dan’s orders to the letter ;
and when he had eaten his fill, his conscience
was elastic enough to allow him to stuff all he
could lay hands on into his pocket. . The meat
was very greasy and the plum-pudding was very
sticky, but Phil was not very particular in these
matters. . ; :

After dinner began. all manner of romps and
races, for which prizes were given with no
grudging hand, interspersed occasionally with
scrambles for nuts and sweets in the long green
grass.



42 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

It was a most entrancing afternoon—the sky
was so blue, the flowers were so bright, the good
folk at Rookhurst were so kind, and every ont
was so happy, that though Phil had agreed with
Dan that he’ should seize the first opportunity
after dinner “to make a bolt of it,” when tea-
time came round he was still laughing amongst
his play-fellows, unwilling to tear himself away
from all the fun and the feasting. Moreover,
he had gained three glittering halfpence in the
races, and the longing to carry them back with
the flowers to Seth and Nannie, made him waver
in his purpose of running away still further into
the country. Besides, after all, making his
escape was not such an easy matter as Dan had
represented. Dan had talked of their being
turned into the hayfields to wander about
amongst the new-cut grass as they liked, but
the haying was long ago over; and though, when
he discovered this, Dan had cheered Phil by
promising they would be taken to a copse to
gather blackberries, it soon dawned on them
that that too was a vain hope, for if it was too
late in the year for haymaking, it was too early
for blackberrying, and Phil felt that as long
as they remained in the park he could not
get outside the gates without attracting atten-
tion.

“Dan, I say, Pll have to wait and make a try
for it from the station,” Phil said, as they got ug
from tea,



ROOKHURST, 43

“Then you may as lief chuck it up altogether,”
replied Dan, “for you won't get off there, I can
tell you. My wig!”—Dan was very, fond of
invoking that fiery part of his person—* my wig !
I believe as it is you've meee your chance
altogether, sure as eggs are eggs.”

And poor Phil began to think so too, and now
that he feared it was too late he began to feel
very sad. He wondered if he could make friends
with any of the country children and persuade
them to hide him away; but, to the sharp-
witted town child, those little rustics seemed so
hopelessly slow of comprehension, that after a
time he determined “ they’d be no go.”

Presently, however, a ray of hope burst through
his cloud of despair. It only wanted an hour to
six o’clock, the time for home going, but the list
of pleasures provided for them was not exhausted
yet. The children were all to go in various
detachments to the farmhouses close round
Rookhurst and see the cows being milked, and
each drink in turn a mug of new milk. Phil,
being one of the biggest, was told off for the
most distant farm, the road to which lay through
a long grass meadow, from which a stile led into
a corn-field—where the wheat was growing so
thick and high that the golden ears were actually
taller than some of the children—and then, lastly,
through a small but thickly wooded copse. The
teachers in charge of the party were very careful
to count their children both coming and going



44 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

through that bit of woodland, for more than one
small deserter had been known to hide. in its
tangled glades; but from the corn-field they
apprehended no danger, which was well for Phil.

And when, two hours later, the wearied though
happy children were counted over at the station,
every one answered duly to the names entered
‘on the roll, and their keepers and guardians
stepped into the train with a self-congratulatory
sigh that for once in a way no one was missing
from their ragged regiment.

“My eyes! he’s given ’em the slip, and no
mistake,” muttered Dusty Dan, rubbing his
hands together in silent glee, as he screwed
himself into the corner of the third-class carriage,
“Lorks, but I'd like to have known how he
did it.”







-CHAPTER VI.

ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND. .

“ Quick ! let me fly, and cross into yon farther field!”
MATTHEW ARNOLD.

that Philip had hidden himself, but
in a deep dry ditch which ran along

“at the bottom of the field and at the
foot of the hedge, which served as a division
between the field and a long stretch of wood-
land on the other side.

Into this ditch Phil crept on all fours, but he
was too shrewd to remain there one minute
after he had seen the last straggler of the party
disappear from sight. Then, quick as thought,
he scrambled up the bank and through the
hedge, caring nothing, London-bred though he
was, for the thorns and briars, into the wood
beyond.

_ He had no fixed plan of action, no intention
of going in any special direction; his one and
only idea was to fly, as fast and as far as he could
from the road which led back to Stourton Station,





46 - MATCH-BOX PHIL.

He was only vaguely conscious of two facts
which might help to guide him in shaping his
course. On his right hand, he knew, was the
farm from which he had just come; on his left
was the park; he must therefore make for a ~
middle way between the two. So he plunged
into the thickest part of the wood, carefully
avoiding anything that looked like a footpath,
and battling bravely with the boughs and bushes
which impeded his every step. How long he
actually took to work his way through the wood
Phil never knew, but it seemed to him nearly a
lifetime before he observed that the underwood
began to disappear and the trees to grow at
greater intervals from each other, and discovered
that his progress had brought him to the limits
of the wood and to the edge of the high-road.
After the shelter of the copse, with its thick
overhanging boughs, the broad white road seemed
terribly public to Phil, as he stood_on the margin
of the wood and looked out timidly on his strange
surroundings.

It was still much too light, he felt sure, to
make it safe for him to venture on to the high-
road, so he determined to look out for a snug
hiding-place in the wood and wait there till the
evening twilight should enable him to continue
his wanderings unobserved in this unknown
country. Before long he fixed on a comfortable
spot at the foot of a big fir tree, where the
bracken was growing so high that he could lay



( mt Le IGE zy



ES AND FELL FAST ASLEEP,

+ PROMPTLY CLOSED HIS EY.

PHIL. .

Page 47.



ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND. 47

his small person down in safety, with no chance
of any passer-by discovering him.

“And I'll just bide here till tis time for lamp-
lighting,” thought Phil, “and then I'll sneak out
and bolt up the road as fast asI can go. I'd
like to ask the first person PIl meet where-
abouts Thorndale is, but Pll wait till I get a
good way off from here, ’cause else some one
might a I Peltor to the feasting lot, and
split on me.’

So, curling himself up in the bracken, and
reflecting with satisfaction that one pocket held
three-halfpence in hard cash and that the other

“was crammed with pudding and pies, Phil, with
the firm intention of keeping wide awake so as
to be ready to pursue his flight at the first
favourable opportunity, promptly closed his eyes
and fell fast asleep. The sound of the heavy
rumbling waggons as they went by on the road
close at hand could not disturb his dreams, all
used as he was to the hideous noises of a night
in the East End; but what did rouse him at last
was the soft touch of a little fluffy rabbit rubbing
against his hand as he lay sleeping at the foot
of the fir tree. Then poor Phil started up in
utter bewilderment, and took full five minutes to
remember where he was and how he had come
there. A distant clock was striking twelve. The
sky was overcast with thick clouds, and had Phil
been in the least bit weatherwise, he would have
known that a thunderstorm was just beginning ;



48 - MATCH-BOX PHIL.

but he only thought that now, at any rate, it
was dark enough to make it safe for him to
venture on to the road. Dim and overcast
though it was, the road still showed white
enough to enable Phil to find it easily, and when
he had once reached it he was conscious of a
sense of freedom at being no longer surrounded
by the tall trees, which looked so weird and
gigantic in the semi-darkness of the summer
midnight.

“T’ll get on fine now,” thought Phil, to whose
pavement-worn feet the soft grass fringe by the
roadside seemed like beautiful velvet. There
were no cottages in sight; but he hadn’t gone
far before the sound of wheels made him turn
his head, and presently a light cart drove up .
carrying two red lamps. As it overtook Phil
the wheels stopped, and when a man’s voice
called out to him, asking what he was doing on
the road at that time of night, poor Phil was so
terrified that instead of attempting to answer,
he took to his heels and ran for his life. But
the faster he went, the faster came on the cart,
till at last, dead beat, he dropped down by the
bank, prepared for the worst consequences, and
only knowing that he could not run another step
to save his life. In his own mind, he never
doubted: that the man who was pursuing him
was one of the bobbies, whom the missus had
set to catch him, and as he lay gasping on the
bank, with the thunderstorm bursting in fury



ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND. 49

round him, visions of beatings worse than he had
ever yet known and grim pictures of prison cells
rose up before his closely shut eyes. But he
was not going to be captured without making
one desperate struggle, and when a heavy hand
came down on his shoulder, he mustered all his
failing strength and struck out at the figure
bending over him. But, to his surprise, the blow
was not returned; he was only set on his feet
with rather a rough shaking, whilst his pursuer
repeated his question good-naturedly enough,
as to what Phil was about at that time of
night. :

Somewhat reassured, Phil muttered that he
was going to see his grandmother—Dusty Dan
had told him that a grandmother was always
a useful person to quote on emergencies—and
that he had lost his way.

“¥’m, I don’t think much of the grandmother,”
replied the man. “Grandmothers are mighty
handy pegs for hanging lies on ; but, anyway, ’tis
pouring wet, and you're but a bit of a shaver to
be out at this hour; so get you up along with
_me in the mail-cart, and I’ll drive you as far as
I’m going, at any rate,”

The offer was a tempting one, but Phil’s early
education had made him suspicious and taught
him to be always on the look out for traps.
His hesitation, however, was cut short, for without
more ado the mail-man hoisted him into the cart,
tucked him round in a waterproof rug, and then

E



50 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

drove on at a brisk rate to make up for the ten
minutes’ delay. The man’s manner was kind for
all his roughness, and if Phil could only have
felt sure that he was not a bobby in disguise,
he would gladly have accepted his invitation to
screw himself into a corner and go to sleep;
but as it was, he only replied, with more candour
than politeness—

“Not I; I ain’t so jolly green as all that.”

He was not in the habit of receiving kindness
from strangers, and the real state of the case
would never have entered his head, namely, that
Amos Lee, the Stourton mail-man, was so afraid
of his nightly drive of thirty miles through the
lonely roads, that, as his wife confidentially
assured her neighbours, “Amos would give a
sovereign to any two-year-old who'd sit up in
the cart along with him.”

In spite of Phil’s ungracious rejoinder, his
companion did not leave him alone, and the boy’
had hard work to answer his string of questions
without betraying his real history. Happily for
him, Amos’s wits were even duller than those of
most rustics, so that it never struck him to connect
the ragged urchin beside him with the party of
City children who had passed through Stourton
that day, and between whose appearance and
Phil there was a striking family likeness.

In course of time Philip took courage to ask
if they were near Thorndale, and if anything was
known of Mrs. Brailey, of May Farm.



ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND, 51

“And in what part of the country may that
be?” asked the mail-man. '

“What part!” echoed Phil ; “ why, it’s in the
country, I tell yer.”

“Bless yer heart! but the country’s as good
as nowhere,” was the reply. “Whereabouts in
the country is it?”

' “Oh, as to that, I don’t know for certain,”
said Phil. “But it can’t much matter ; the
country is the country, sure.”

“Well, if you ain’t the queerest little cure!”
exclaimed worthy Amos, “I’spose, now, you've
never been out of London before.” Then, after
a pause, he added, “But how, in the name of
fortune, did yer manage to get so far as this ?”

This was getting on very dangerous ground,
but Phil was spared the necessity of finding
an answer, for at that moment the mail-cart
stopped in front of the Norgate post-office, and
Amos Lee suddenly remembered that here he
must part company with his little friend.

“Unless maybe you'd like to drive back
again,” he said rather maliciously.

“No, no, thank yer,” said Phil, scrambling
down from the cart, and reflecting with pleasure
on the many miles which he had now put between
himself and his. friends, ;





















CHAPTER VII.

MOVING ON.

: ts Thou through the fields and through the woods dost stray,
Roaming the country-side, a truant boy.”
MATTHEW ARNOLD.

VORELL, Nan, zs it all right?” The
} speaker was Seth, and though the



audible whisper, he was quivering
with ee excitement.

“Tt’s aff right,” returned Nan in the same low
tone. “I’ve seen Dusty, and he says Phil got
left behind in a big yellow field, and he expects
he’s ever so far up the country by now; and
Dusty says——” But here Nan broke off and
grew suddenly silent, for just then she was
aware that Mrs. Styles’s eyes were fixed upon
her, and Nan was terribly afraid of arousing her
suspicion in any way.

There had been a tremendous hue and cry cn
the previous evening when no Phil had appeared
at the usual hour to fetch his daily load of
match-boxes ; and though Mrs. Styles did not
actually accuse the two trembling children in



MOVING ON, 53

the opposite corner of being connected with
Phil’s disappearance, yet she found a vent for
her rage by promising the whole room in general,
and Seth and Nan in particular, that every bone
in Phil’s body should be beaten as fine as saw-
dust soon as ever he came within arm’s-length
of her. She’d teach him to run away again;
that she would. Having heard nothing of the
day’s outing to Rookhurst, it never entered Mrs.
Styles’s head that Phil’s wanderings had led him
beyond London.

“Seth, I hope he’s happy,” whispered Nan
after a long interval of silence.

“No fear; he’s bound to be jolly enough if
he’s in the country,” replied her brother.

“But it seems so long since he went away,”
said the child, and her large blue eyes were
bright with unshed tears, “and maybe he’s got
amongst strangers who ain’t good to him, and
maybe he’s longing after all to be here again.”

But that was very far from being the case.
Just at that moment Phil was sauntering through
a lovely country lane, drinking in all the beauties
of a summer sunrise, in a way that those who
are country-bred and born can hardly under-
stand. The heavy thunder shower, which had
soaked Phil’s. poor little ragged clothes, had
freshened up the dusty leaves and parched
banks, and washed the honeysuckle and dog-
roses, which grew in rich luxuriance all along
- that pleasant lane. Phil was so deeply interested



54 MATCH-BOX PIIIL.

in his surroundings, that he quite forgot to think
of the effect which he might produce on the
passers-by, and when more than one rustic, on
their way to their morning’s work, paused and
looked round at the ragged little figure shambling
along under the hedge, it never struck him that
there could be anything unusual in 42s appear-
ance to attract their attention. There were
such hundreds and tens of hundreds like himself
“spilt like blots about the city” whence he
came, that Phil never deamt of appearing re-
markable. Country children are martyrs to
self-consciousness, whereas the street arab is
never troubled by any such feeling.

It was about nine o’clock when Phil entered a
small, straggling village, and stood still to watch
a group of children on the green outside the
school-house. He had never seen cricket going
on before, and the game was so fascinating to
Phil that when, at the sound of a loud bell, bat
and ball were thrown aside, and the boys ran off
to the school-house, Phil could not forbear
exclaiming aloud—

“Oh, my eye! what a blooming sell!”

“TI say, look out for that gipsy chap,” said
one of the bigger boys; “he'll bag the stumps,
if we don’t take care.”

But Phil had already moved on, and was half
way down the village street by then. Most of
the cottage doors were standing open, and into
all of these he thrust his unkempt head, with



MOVING ON. 5s

his ragged cap set all awry over one ear, thereby
startling more than one worthy cottager. Nor
did he greatly reassure them by his answer to
their inquiry as to what he wanted, namely, that
he only wished “to spy at ’em a bit.”

Now and again Phil lingered to ask if they
could direct him to Thorndale, and though the
answer was always “No,” he did not lose heart ;
he felt sure that, sooner or later, he must find it,
and, meanwhile, life under these new conditions
was very charming to him. The rain had soaked
the remainder of his stolen goods from yester-
day’s feast, but yet, as he sat under a wayside
ash tree, and fished out the sodden, broken meat
from his very moist pocket, Phil thought it all
tasted uncommonly good.

“Tl have to spend one of my halfpennies on
a bit of bread for to-night’s supper,” he said to
himself as he concluded his repast, “and another
to-morrow morning for breakfast. That'll only
leave one halfpenny; and what will I do when
that’s gone?” Then all at once Phil’s hands
went up over his eyes, and muttering, “Oh,
Nan, I'd nearly quite forgot,” he did his best
to stumble through the Lord’s Prayer. “I
expect I'll get on fine now,” he reflected,
“though I wouldn’t like Nan to know how I
all but clean forgot it, and first go off too. My

_eye! I wonder how old Mother Styles and her
match-boxes is getting on. Catch me sweating
over them again.” Then, as his hand touched a



56 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

little fold of paper in his other pocket, Phil’s
face grew a shade graver, and he murmured,
“Ah, poor Nan! T’ll have to go back and fetch
her, anyway.”

After his rest under the ash tree, Phil trudged
bravely on. Nearly every one on that sultry
June day was groaning with the heat; but to
Phil, whose whole life had been passed in stuffy,
evil-smelling courts and alleys, with never a
breath of pure air to correct the unwholesome
atmosphere, the green lanes, even though the
midday sun was pouring down full upon them,
were paradise.

Every now and again he stopped to peep
through park palings, or over the garden gates
of the various gentlemen’s houses that he passed,
and more than once he was sorely tempted to
steal inside the drives, and take a nearer survey;
but there was something in the trim, well-kept
gravel sweeps that awed him, and it was only
into the garden of a small, low-thatched cottage
that he did finally venture to make his way.
But though it was a very tiny pleasure-ground,
it was perhaps as tempting as any that Phil had
passed that day. All the front of the cottage.
wall was hidden from view by a wealth of
Banksia roses, their tender yellow. blossoms con-
trasting well with the deep red buds of the
Austrian briar ; whilst the tidy beds and borders
were perfect pictures, with their groups of tall
white lilies and clumps of fiery poppies and



MOVING ON, 87

rows of golden-hearted daisies, interspersed with
velvet pansies of every hue, from the palest blue
to the richest purple, and dear, old-fashioned
snapdragons and nodding columbines filling up
every nook and cranny.

Just as Phil leant over the gate, a tidy young
woman came out of the cottage with a wide-
necked, empty bottle in her hand, which she
proceeded to fill, in the most ruthless fashion,
with the blossoms of the tall white lilies, bruising
their snowy petals in her hands, and then crush-
ing them into the bottle.

“Oh, I say, missus, hold hard!” shrieked
Phil, starting forward and seizing her arm; “it’s
downright murder to use ’em beautiful things
that way. Why, it would send our Nan just oft
her head for joy to have only ove. of ’em white
flowers for her own.”

As Phil’s dirty little fingers closed round her
wrist, and startled the good woman so that she
nearly let fall the bottle, her first impulse was to
say something sharp, but the earnestness of the
boy’s tone and the reproachful look in his great
dark eyes went straight to her motherly heart.

“Eh! and where on earth have you come
from, my lad?” she asked, scanning him from
top to toe. “Nowhere from here about, I’ll be
bound, or you’d know the good of these lily
‘flowers when you gets bad cuts and_ bruises.
Bless yer! I’m not a-wasting of them. I’m
going to spill a drop of spirits on them, and



58 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

make ’em into ever so fine a lotion. ’Tis from”
some big town you come, I warrant.”

“Ay,” said Phil, “from a very big town, ever
so far away, where we’d think all the world of
them beautiful things as you is squeezing up
anyhow.”

_ “Well, you shall have a whole big stalk full
of blossoms to carry home with you if you like,
and welcome,” said the woman.

_ “But I’m not going home—at least, not just
yet,” said Phil; and then, gaining courage from
the interest which was evident in his new friend’s
kindly face, Philip blurted out his whole story,
though ten minutes ago, before he had found
his way into that garden amongst the lilies and
roses, he would, as he would have expressed it,
been “blowed” sooner than tell any one the
truth.

“So you're a runaway laddie, are you?” said
the woman; and there were tears in her eyes
now. “Well, come along indoors, and let me
scrub your hands and face a bit, and I’ll give
you a mouthful of dinner. You're sure, guzte
sure,” she added, holding Phil’s face between
her hands, “that there ain’t no mother a-waiting
for you at home, and a-wondering why you
don’t come back?”

“No fear,” said Phil, looking up at her so
frankly that she felt she could trust him. “I’ve
never known father or mother all my life, and
there’s no one in the whole world as would ever



MOVING ON. 89

want to set eyes on me again, ’cept little Nan
and Seth. Soon as ever I’ve found Thorndale,
Pll tramp back again to them, and I'll bring
’em here, that I will, and Nan shall have a pull
for herself at ’em tall white things,” he added,
as if he were making a very magnificent promise
_ to his hostess.

“But don’t you know nothing about where
Thorndale is?” asked the latter. “Seems such
a wild-goose chase, i you don’t know no more
than just the name.”

“But ’tis in the country,” said Phil, “and it’s
nigh some. station too; but I can’t mind the
name of that just now, but, you bet, I’ll find it
in time. My! is all that for me?” he con-
tinued, as his new friend placed a great pile -of
bread and dripping before him, and invited him
to make a good meal.

He needed no second bidding, and it was
with real pleasure that Mrs. West watched the
food disappearing ; “for sure,” she reflected, “ if
ever there was a starveling in this world, that’s
one.”

“Well, now,” she said aloud, “I wonder if
you'll remember my name—Mrs. Abel West;
and the name of the village is Merely, and if
- you should get into trouble and find you can’t

get along, come back to me, and I expect our
.good vicar will give you a helping hand. He
comed out of London hisself, and often talks to
us about you poor gutter children, and I’ll be



60 : MATCH-BOX PIIIL.

bound he’d know what to do for you if, after all,
you wanted to get back to your friends.”

“F’m! Vl remember,” said Phil, nodding his
head; “but I ’spect Mrs. Brailey will do our
job for us. My! what a blow out I’ve had!”
he continued, getting up and stretching himself.
“Well, I'd best be making tracks, I suppose.”

“Ay, but take this along with you against
supper-time comes,” said Mrs. West, putting up
two slices of bread, with a shaving of fat pork
between them, which Phil tucked into his
pocket.

“Cracky !” cried Phil, “if only Nan and Seth
was here!”

“Good-bye, laddie,’ said the kind-hearted
woman, and her hands rested tenderly on his
ragged cap, “and I wish you good speed on
your journey, that I do.”

“And thank yer ever so much,” said Phil,
turning slowly away. But before he had reached
the garden wicket he was back again, holding
an old match-box, which had been thrown out
on the path. “They takes a world of trouble to
make,” he said, putting it down carefully on the
window-ledge.









CHAPTER SV EM.
AS SCAPE-GOAT,

**T come to pluck your berries,”
Lycidas.

Ww WX BOUT five miles beyond Merely, and
a aN —f screened off from the road by a high
ENS hedge of closely clipped yews, stood
ay a large red-brick pile of buildings,
known to all the country round as Winterton’s
Grammar School. It was so called after its
founder—a very benevolent individual, most
people would have told you, provided they did
not happen to be any of the farmers whose
fields and orchards adjoined the grammar
school grounds, for to these latter the name of
Winterton was only one degree less abhorrent
than the two hundred boys themselves, who
had been brought into their midst by the
liberality of the deceased wealthy merchant.
And they had some excuse for not blessing
_ his memory, as perhaps he himself would have
admitted could he have seen one half of the
damage wrought in various ways by these









62 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

incorrigible youths at different seasons of the
year. It was in vain that the head-master intro-
duced fresh rules prohibiting all trespassing on
neighbouring grounds, and invented fresh penal-
ties for the transgressors of such bye-laws; in
some way or other the rules were evaded, and
the penalties escaped, till, in the bitterness of
their soul, the farmers declared that the masters
were nothing better than a pack of old women,
_and quite unfit to keep school. Just now the
cherry orchards were, in more senses than one, a
fruitful ground of complaint. It was a splendid
cherry year, and the trees were so laden that
many of the branches had actually to be propped
up, lest they should be broken by the weight of
their own fruit. And as Phil, worn out with his
afternoon’s tramp, sat down on the top of a stile
leading into one of these tempting orchards, he
thought he had never seen anything so perfectly
beautiful before. He was just considering
whether those cherries were placed so near the
road for the benefit of the passers-by, when he
heard a great rush of feet behind him, and
helter-skelter over the stile and through the
hedge came about a dozen boys, all flying in
one direction, as if for their lives. The first
comer toppled poor Phil off the stile into the
dusty road, whilst another spilt a whole cap full
of cherries over him, and never, to Phil’s sur-
prise, turned back to pick them up.

“Well, if I ever,” said Philip, getting up from











































“(LL BE BOUND YOU’RE ONE OF THE LOT THAT STOLE MY FOWLS LAST
NIGHT.” Page 63



AS SCAPE-GOAT. 63

the road and beginning to cram the cherries
into his mouth, “Well, if I——” But his
soliloquies were cut short.

“Oh, you’ve been trying your hand at it too,
have you?” said a loud, angry voice, and two
heavy hands came down upon Phil’s shoulder.
“Well, Pll make an example of you, anyhow,”
and therewith the owner of the cherry orchard
swung Phil over the stile as if he had been a
wisp of straw, and led him into a backyard,
scolding and shaking him at every step. “And
I'll be bound you're one of the lot that stole my
fowls last night,” went on the farmer ; “so speak
up and tell the truth, or ’twill be the worse for
you.”

“Tve not got no lot,” said Phil, “and I never
stole nothing.”

“Oh, didn’t you!” said the farmer. “ Well,
then, you can just bide in there till you happen
to remember what you dd steal, and the sooner
you do that the better for you.” And so saying,
he opened the darkest and dingiest of coal-holes,
and, thrusting Phil in head foremost, fastened
the door on the outside, and left him to his own
very miserable reflections,

Whatever was going to happen to him next?
he thought. Would he be left there to die?
There was a small hole, cut high up in the wall,
and through the three iron bars, which were
placed perpendicularly, Phil could see a streak
of blue sky and a branch of a big elder tree,



64. MATCH-BOX PHIL.

which grew close by, otherwise all was dark.
He was looking up at this hole in despair,
wondering if he could anyhow climb up and
squeeze himself through the narrow slits between
the bars, when the elder bough was suddenly
swayed to one side, and a boy’s face appeared
at the little opening.

“Don’t howl out,” said the new-comer ; “ but
look here, you young Tatter-Jack, it was hard
luck on you to leave you to old Blake’s mercy,
when it was us that bagged the cherries, so look
here. Can you read?”

“No,” said Phil.

“Well, it doesn’t matter. You catch hold of
this paper, and show it to the old chap when he
comes to bully you again, and I promise you
he'll let you go fast enough; he won’t want to
keep you five minutes in his company, when he
has once read that. But don’t for the life of
you let out how you came by it, or the game
will be spoilt.” So saying, the speaker threw
down a slip of paper, which fell at Phil’s feet,
disappearing himself from view at the same time.

Wondering much what magic charm those
few words scrawled upon a half sheet could
contain, Phil picked up the paper and put it into
his pocket, and then waited anxiously for a
chance of showing it to his gaoler, and testing
the worth of his unknown friend’s help.

It was growing unbearably hot in that stuffy
coal-hole, and Phil began to think he must be



AS SCAPE-GOAT. 65

suffocated. He heard the sound of many foot-
steps going to and fro in the yard, some light
and quick, others slow and heavy; but none
stopped at his prison door—every one passed
him by. A clock close at hand struck six, seven,
eight, and then by degrees the sounds in the
yard ceased, and poor Phil began to fear that
every one had gone indoors fo the night, and
that he was doomed to remain in his stifling
cell, at any rate, till next morning.

For the first time in the last forty-eight hours
Philip wished himself back again in Flowerdew
Alley, with the load of match-boxes on his
back, and Mother Styles’s rasping voice and
sharp blows, for, at any rate, he knew the worst
of all that. And then, unable any longer to
bear the dark and the loneliness and the terrible
feeling that some awful punishment was hang-
ing over him, Phil burst into a loud fit of crying.
Presently, however, he checked his sobs to listen
to the sound of some one fumbling with the
fastening of his door. In another minute it had
been opened very cautiously, and a little head
Bp peated in the narrow crack,

“Boy,” said a childish voice, trembling with
excitement, “don’t cry any more. Father has
sat down to supper, so I’ve jumped out of bed,
~and I’ve come to let you out.” And then, as
the door opened wider, Phil saw a very small
girl standing on the threshhold, with little bare
feet peeping out’ from the edge of a shawl, in

F



66 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

which she had evidently wrapt herself round
in haste to conceal her scanty toilette. “You
must make haste,’ she went. on, and as Phil
seemed rather slow in availing himself of this
chance of escape, she came a step nearer and
pulled him towards the door.

But once outside his dark hole in the cool
twilight, Phil recovered the use of his wits,
though his limbs felt sadly cramped and stiff
from his long confinement in such close quarters,

“You haven’t a minute to lose,” whispered
the child. “You must fly through the black
gate opposite, then keep close against the hedge
all down one side of the meadow. There’s a pond
at the bottom, so look out till you come to the
new haystacks ; and if you get behind them and
feel about, you'll find a hole or two in the hedge
where you can creep through into the road, and
when you're once there you'll be safe enough.
Only don’t stop and look back, for any sake;
run just as hard as you can, even if you hear
people running behind you, for mind, if you’re
once caught it will be all up with you.”

She lingered for one moment to make sure
that Phil had got through the door safely, then
she stole indoors again, back into her little bed.

Phil found the first part of the child’s direc-
tions very easy to follow. Very cautiously he
crept through the gate, and then, once in the
meadow, ran as fast as he could under shelter
of the hedge, But he hadn’t gone far before he



AS SCAPE-GOAT. 07

became aware of steps following him closely.
Nearer and nearer they came, stopping when
Phil paused for a moment in his headlong flight
to listen, and make sure that ’twas not his fancy,
and then coming on again when he started
afresh. He did not dare look round, he only
felt in his pocket to make sure that that won-
derful bit of paper was safe, and then on he
sped, stumbling over mole-hills, and striking
himself against trees and palings, and very
nearly slipping into the big pond at the end of
the field, of which the little girl had warned
him. And still the steps followed closer and
closer, and now Phil seemed actually to hear
the heavy breathing of his pursuers—for he felt
sure that more than one pair of feet were behind
him—by the time he had reached the haystacks,
behind. which he was to seek for a way of escape
through the hedge. But Phil’s tired legs were
failing beneath him, whilst those of his fol-
‘lowers seemed to be gaining strength and
swiftness.

“Tf youre once caught it will be all up with
you,” the little girl had said, and the words rang
and roared in Phil’s ears, compelling him to
push on, though he felt as if he must drop to
the ground. He had rounded the haystacks
now, and he was groping in the uncertain light
‘to find an opening—no matter how small—in
the quick-set hedge, when the dreadful steps
stopped immediately behind him, and some-



68 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

thing wet and soft was thrust into his neck ; and
then a sound, which to Phil’s terrified ears.
resembled nothing he had ever heard before,
broke on the evening stillness. Oxe being could
never have produced such an awful noise;
nothing less than a whole band of raving lunatics
could have produced such an unearthly com-
bination of shrieks, groans, and shouts. Phil
felt quite convinced of that, and, nearly mad
-with terror, he dashed through the hedge,
scratching his face and tearing his poor rags,
and alighted on the high-road. Immediately
opposite to him was a low wall, over which Phil
promptly clambered, arriving in what seemed to
him a most extraordinary place. It was not
quite a field, nor yet quite a garden, and, as far
as he could see in the dim light, there were
queer-looking shapes, both grey and white,
dotted about, but whether they were men or
women Phil could not tell. And all the time
that fearful noise on the other side of the hedge
was still going on. It was clear he could not
afford to stand still. He made one step forward,
stumbled over a mound, picked himself up again
and blundered on, not knowing where he was
going, but only bent on flying beyond the reach
of the awful monster or monsters behind him.

If only Phil had looked back he might have
seen that at that moment, at any rate, no one
was following him, for Farmer Blake’s donkey,
which had been the cause of his terror, had



AS SCAPE-GOAT. 69

finished his. braying; but, alas! for him, he
looked neither behind nor before, and the con-
sequence was that all at once the ground
beneath his feet gave way, and in another
second Phil had fallen head foremost into an
open trench,







CHAPTER IX.

EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST IIIM.

‘* Now it is the time of night,
That the graves all gaping wide,
Every one lets forth his sprite
In the churchyard paths to glide.”
. SHAKESPEARE,

ON my word, there’s a set-out in the
churchyard, and no mistake. Just
you come and see, Sam ;” and the
speaker, the sexton’s wife at Ever-

shot, beckoned to her husband to join her in the
doorway of their cottage. “The children are
getting too owdacious,” she went on. “ Look at
em now, a-crowding round old Master Brown’s
open grave, and he nat so much as in it himself,
poor fellow!”

Surely, in the circumstances, “poor Master
Brown” was hardly to be pitied for chaz.

“Well, if he ain’t there, some one else is,”
returned the sexton, shading his eyes and look-
ing intently across his bit of cabbage garden
into the churchyard beyond, which had been the
scene of his grave-digging labours on the previous





EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 71

evening. “Tell you what it is, wife. Some of
the young rascals have got into the hole; for
do you see that handful of stones as was chucked
up from below? And a fine mess they must be
making of my tidy job; but Pll let them know
what I think of them, and no mistake.”

Therewith the gouty old sexton hobbled off
towards the churchyard, with stick uplifted and
many muttered threats; but before he reached
the grave, which was’at the furthest corner from
the gate, the young vicar had already preceded
him, and at his approach the score of boys and
girls had dispersed like a flight of sparrows
suddenly disturbed.

“Beg pardon, sir,” called out the sexton, “but
have they done much damage to my inside?”
(He meant the inside of Master Brown’s grave.)
He was surprised to see the vicar kneeling down
on the grass and looking intently into the open
trench.

“Not much, I think,” answered Mr. Palmer.
“But come and lend us a hand, Dodd. There's
a small trespasser here, who seems in a bad
way.”

“And sarve him right too,” growled Dodd,
whose interest in the unfortunate being was so
small that before complying with the vicar’s
request he began deliberately to examine the
extent of the damage which his handiwork
above ground had sustained. “Sarve him
right,” he went on, treading down various lumps



72 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

of loosened earth with the heel of his boot, “ and
if I had the making of laws, whoever jumped
into a Aopen grave should be made to stop
. there.”

“Ay, but he didn’t jump in,” said Mr, Palmer.
“He fell in, poor lad, and our children have
‘been ill-treating him shamefully, that’s clear.”
Then, stretching down into the opening and
taking Phil’s hand, he went on, “ That’s right,
my boy, hang on. Now, Dodd, look out that I
don’t fall in head foremost myself.”

- Then for the first time the sexton con-
descended to look at his strange foe; and cer-
tainly a more utterly forlorn little object or one
more fit to appeal to any one’s compassion,
could not have been presented, even to this
vengeance-thirsting old tyrant. His face and
hands, blackened from his sojourn in the farmer’s
coal-hole, his clothes plastered with the moist
clay at the bottom of the newly-made grave,
and his nose bleeding from a recent blow from
a sharp stone, poor little Match-box Phil looked
a living appeal to pity. At first he had been
stunned by his fall, then, after recovering himself
sufficiently to make a few vain attempts to get
out of his strange new quarters, he had fallen
asleep in his narrow bed, with the newly cut
earth closing him in on either side, and only a
strip of starry sky overhead. And thus the
weary little waif had slept sweetly enough, in
spite of his surroundings, till a troop of children



EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 73

—drawn to the churchyard, as village children
always are, by the attraction of a new-made
grave—had discovered Phil lying there. At
first they were frightened; then, their love of
bullying the helpless gaining the upper hand,
first one and then another had thrown a handful
of dust and small stones down on him, till at
last they had not only thoroughly woken Phil,
but they had likewise roused a spirit of retaliation
in him, so that as fast as one set of missiles
reached him, another handful flew back again
amongst his assailants. At stone-throwing the
gutter boy was quite as much of an expert as
any of the country children.

And the battle was waxing so warm between
both parties that, if the vicar had not come up
when he did, real injury might have befallen
poor Phil, seeing that he had only one chance
against so many. Nevertheless, with his in-
domitable pluck, no sooner was he safely landed
on the upper ground, than, slipping from Mr.
Palmer’s grasp, he flew off through the church-
yard gate, to have a regular “mill,” as he would
have termed it, with his enemies.. These were
all assembled on the green, and into their midst
Phil rushed, striking out right and left, and
using, I am afraid, very ugly words.

But here. again the vicar came to the rescue.
..He was greatly touched by the boy’s deplorable
plight, and at the same time equally amused by
the spirit he displayed. Ragged, bony, and



74 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

bleeding, he looked little better than a live
skeleton, standing amongst the stout, rosy-
cheeked rustics, but the great dark eyes, which
looked out of his pinched face, were all aglow
with indignation and excitement.

It required more force than Mr. Palmer ex-
pected to drag this pugnacious little waif from
his own destruction ; nor was Phil at all grateful
to him for his interference. Besides, as the vicar
. collared him and led him off to the vicarage, he
did not feel at all sure that he was not going
back into some black hole again. He felt
reassured, however, when his new friend led the
way into a comfortable room, where the morning
sun was pouring in, and where he was told to
sit down, and that some breakfast should be
brought him.

“You'll want something hot to eat and drink
after your cold, damp bed,” said the vicar
kindly. “I mustn’t wait a minute now ”—he
had been on his way to a sick person when the
uproar in the churchyard had caused him to
turn aside—“but Patty, my old housekeeper,
will take care of you, and when I come back
you must tell me how you found your way into
our churchyard.”

Thereupon Mr. Palmer went in search of his
housekeeper, and it was well for Phil’s peace of
mind that he did not overhear their conversation,

“Look here, Patty,” began her young master,
“there’s a poor little lad in the parish room who



EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 75

has evidently had some rough usage from the
world at large and from our school-children in
particular. I’ve brought him in to have some
breakfast, and just keep your eye on him till I
come back, for if he can, I’m quite sure he'll
give you the slip and be off to fight the village
boys again. Be sure you don’t let him go till I
come back. The lad interests me, and I want
to hear his history.”

“Gracious me, Master Hugh!” said Patty, a
sour-visaged old dame, who, when she wished to
rebuke her master, always pretended to forget
that he was out of petticoats, “you don’t mean
to say that you've brought a rank, raw stranger
into the house? Why, he’s most likely stole all
the silver spoons and forks by now. Well, if I
ever did! What would your poor mamma say?”

“ Now, nonsense, Patty,” said Master Hugh
good-temperedly. “He is a waif and a stray,
and avery dirty one; but that'll please you all
the better, because you can scrub him to your
heart’s content. But he’s not a thief, ?m sure
of that; he is too plucky to be a sneak.”

s Oh, I dare say!” said Patty, with a sniff.
“T suppose the next thing will be that you'll be
keeping him on as an odd boy, or mee as
your own page.”

“ Ay, that’s a good idea, now; you ral have
. him to train, Patty,” said Mr. "Palmer, with a
malicious smile. “But, now, just go and look
after him, and remember to keep him indoors.”



76 " _MATCH-BOX PHIL.

With anything but a benignant countenance,
Patty bustled into the parish room. Nor did the
sight of poor Phil’s battered condition go far
towards softening her crusty temper. It was
only when, after tasting his bowl of porridge, he
fixed his eyes upon her, remarking solemnly, “I
say, missus, this is 7us¢ about good stuff,” that
the compliment to her own cookery touched her
heart; and, looking at him a little more atten-
tively, she began involuntarily to feel an awaken-
ing interest in Master Hugh’s ragamuffin, and
by the time Phil had eaten three relays of
porridge, and drunk a huge cup of milk, she had
made up her mind to question him a little as to
his personal history.

When she returned, however, from delivering
his breakfast things to Dinah, the kitchen-maid,
with special injunctions “to wash ’em up in a
double lot of soda, for nobody could tell what
they might have caught from such as he,” Patty
found Phil, with his head laid down upon the
sunny window-seat, fast asleep.

“Poor little lad!” she said almost tenderly,
bending over him to draw down the blind.
“Well, I'll just let him sleep on quietly till ’m
through with my work.”

But. somehow, though it was jam-making
morning, and, as a rule, nothing could move her
from her big preserving-pan, to-day Patty could
not rest quietly in her kitchen. Backwards and
forwards to the parish room she went, peeping



EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 77.

in at the door to see if Phil were still asleep,
and then stealing away on tiptoe, only to return
to the charge a few minutes later.

“Soon as ever he wakes up,” she said to
Dinah, “T’'ll give his hands and face a good
scrub ; so fill your big black kettle and put it on,
for we won’t stint the water, anyway.”

Well-trained Dinah did as she was bid, and
put the kettle on; but that hot water was
never used—at least, not for Phil; for on
the occasion of Mrs. Patty’s twentieth excur-
sion to the parish room her eye fell upon a
slip of paper which had evidently fallen out
of Philip’s pocket on to the floor. Seeing
that it was written upon, Patty, with woman-
like curiosity, immediately pounced on it, and
examined it. But she had scarcely had time to
read the score of words scrawled on it, before
Phil was roused by her shrieks of dismay, and
awoke to see the housekeeper backing out of
the room away from him as fast as she could,
and vociferating to him to get through the open
window into the garden, and then fly from the
place as fast as his legs could carry him.

“Go, I say! go, go!” she cried, “or I'll have
you put in prison, or ¢ransplanted”—she pro-
bably meant transported—“ or—or—— ”

But Phil did not wait to hear the full measure
_of her promises. He was beginning to get used
to enforced flights now; and when the vicar
returned home a little later, he found not only



78 ' MATCH-BOX PHIL.

no trace of his poor gutter-boy, but Mrs. Patty
walking about the ground floor of his house,
with her petticoats tucked up very high, and a
huge mop in one hand and a large bucket of
disinfecting fluid in the other.

“My good Patty, what is happening?” he
asked,

“What's going to happen’ you’d better ask,
Master Hugh,” was the grim reply. “If we're
not all dead corpses by to-morrow or the day
after, my name ain’t Patty Stone. Only just
step outside and look on the stump of the old
apple tree—'tis all dead atop, so it won’t have
no fruit to be hurt by it—and you'll see fast
enough the sort of customer you've brought in
amongst us all.” —

Mr. Palmer did step out, as requested, and
there, hanging from the tree, where Patty had
nailed it—having first shielded her hands in
double gloves, which she buried with the tongs
afterwards—was poor Phil’s wonderful talisman ;
and on it, writ large in schoolboy writing, stood
the following statement :—

“Tm the last left alive of a family of nineteen
children, all of whom, with father and mother,
died last week of small-pox. Kind Christians,
give me a home.”





CHAPTER X,

CRUEL SPORT.

A crash, a cry of agony, and that was all we heard.”
PAYNE,

since he went away,’ whispered
Nan. She never dared say Phil’s
name now. There had been a
terrible commotion in that wretched, over-
crowded room when the fact that Phil had really
run away became a certainty, and Mrs. Styles’s
impotent rage leading her to seek some victim
on whom to wreak it, she had turned upon
Nan and Seth, and a storm of blows and bad
words had fallen to the lot of Phil’s poor little
accomplices. “However, ever will he come back
to fetch us away?” Nannie had sobbed, holding
her poor bruised hands before her face. “Oh,
Seth, I wish we had gone along with him, that
I do.”

“So we would have gone if we could,” said
the elder brother soothingly ; “but ’twouldn’t
have been very far that any of us would have





80 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

travelled at that rate,” and he looked down at his
crutches with a weary sigh.

“Will many, many more weeks have to go
by before he comes back, do you think?” Nan
asked. “It didn’t take Dusty Dan more than a
day to go into the country and come back again.”

“Nay,” said Seth, “but then he hadn’t to hunt
about to find Thorndale; and, you see, ’tis no
good Phil’s coming back till he’s found aunt.”

_ “Praps he'll forget us; p’raps- we'll never,
never see him again,” said Nan, with a whole
world of wistful sorrow in her blue eyes. “I
wonder where he is now. I wonder whether he’s
happy, and if he is thinking of us.”

Thinking of Nannie, Phil certainly was at that
moment, but he was not happy. After his
sudden expulsion from the rectory, he had trudged
on through the lanes and villages and occasional
towns for four days and nights, sleeping under
hedges and once in an empty outhouse belong-
ing to a wayside farm, sometimes picking up a
little broken meat from some charitable cottager.
Once he had held a doctor’s carriage outside a
house for more than an hour, and had earned
sixpence thereby, and this had been a veritable
windfall to poor Phil, and had kept him from
starving outright.

But on this evening, whilst Nan was specula-
ting on his whereabouts, he was, as the saying
is, “very down on his luck.” He had spent
his last penny, and though since daybreak



CRUEL SPORT. 8I

he had been on the look out for a job which
might enable him to earn something, no one
had come in his way to want a gate opened
or a horse held, and now at this sunset hour
poor Phil found himself alone on a desolate bit
of waste common ground, feeling very tired, very
‘hungry, and terribly lonely. To him it seemed
much more than a week since he had crouched
beside Seth’s squalid couch in the twilight
room and discussed the whispered plans for his
flight into the country. He had grown tired of
asking people the way to Thorndale; no one
seemed to have heard of such a place, and
he began to feel sure that after all the name of
the village had been changed, just as the names
of streets sometimes were.

He had not eaten anything since midday,
and, high-spirited boy as he was, his poor little
heart was beginning to fail him. In another
minute he would have sought relief in a
burst of tears, when suddenly a fresh turn
was given to his thoughts by the arrival on
the scene of four village lads, about the same
age as himself. One of them, the biggest,
was carrying a bag, whilst each of the three
others was holding a mongrel cur by a string.
Presently they came to a dead stop not many
yards from where Phil was sitting, half hidden
by an enormous gorse bush. There was some-
‘thing in their faces and in the guilty manner in
which they looked all around them, evidently to

G



82 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

make sure that no one was at hand to see them,
that instantly awakened Phil’s suspicions. They
were up to no good, he felt sure, and, prompted
by curiosity to see what would follow, he came
out from his hiding-place and joined the
group.

At first seeing him, the boys hesitated, but
a whispered, “That little chap don’t matter a
straw,” from the one who had the bag, and who
- was evidently the ringleader, reassured them.

“ Now, look out, you fellows,” said the big lad ;
“keep the dogs well in till I give the word ; and
now here goes.” So saying, he loosened the
string of the bag, and amidst a chorus of “hisses”
from the boys, a miserable cat leapt out, almost
frantic with fright and seeming to understand
perfectly that those three low-bred curs would
presently be let loose to hunt her.

Phil had once seen Nan’s tabby cat, the
only treasure which the child had ever called
her own, worried to death by dogs, and his blood
_ boiled at the prospect of this poor animal’s fate.
Forgetful of his footsoreness and weariness, he
threw himself between the cat and her tormentors,
and his sudden interference so surprised the
village boys that for an instant they stood
motionless, still holding the dogs in check whilst
the poor cat’s ginger tail was fast disappearing
in the distance. But their stupefaction only
lasted for a few moments; then, disappointed of
their cruel sport, the lads turned round and,



CRUEL SPORT. 83

setting the dogs upon Philip, went to work to.
chase 4zm, Against one or even two boys, and
as many dogs, Phil would have been ready to try
his strength hand to hand, but with four op-
ponents, all bigger than himself, and these backed
up by three ill-looking dogs, anything like a fair
fight was out of the question.

“TY must make a bolt of it,” thought Phil; and,
swift as an arrow, he faced round and fled past
his tormentors, thus disconcerting them at start-
ing, for they had fully expected that he would
fly in front of them.

But Phil knew well what he was about. The
path before him was unknown ground, but on
the road he had just travelled over he remem-
bered that there was a field to the right skirting
the back of several farm-buildings, and he felt
certain that if he could once find himself in that
meadow, he should be safe from his pursuers ;
for there would be sure to be some one about
who would ‘protect him from them. But the
field was much further off than Phil had fancied,
and though at first he had had something of
a start of the boys and dogs, yet now they
were on his heels, and he felt that he could
not go much farther. His poor, tired feet were
cut and bruised by the sharp stones, which
he had no time to avoid; his breath was almost
-gone; the blood was hammering in his ears
like short, sharp blows; and the green hedges
and the white road seemed all to be whirled



84. MATCH-BOX PHIL.

into one confused mass before his fainting senses.
And all the time the dogs came nearer and
nearer, urged on by their cruel masters, and
now the foremost was scarcely a dozen feet
from Phil.
“Tf they once lay hold on me they’ll kill me
outright,” thought Phil, still struggling on with
failing limbs and panting breath, Then as the
conviction that he could go no further overcame
“him, his eyes were gladdened by the sight of the
field he had had in view. Gathering up all his
little strength for one supreme effort, he bounded
over the stile and ran straight across the meadow.
He heard the boys’ voices behind him, shouting
loudly, “Stop, sof, I say;” but, of course, he
never turned his head, never slackened his pace.
Had he done so, it might have struck him
that the tones were those of warning, rather thar
threatening,
A minute later the sound of a crash, followed
by a piercing cry, reached the lads as they too
clambered over the stile, and the little flying
figure, which till then had been full in view of
them, had now suddenly disappeared.

What had happened? Had the earth opened

- her mouth and swallowed him up? It looked
very like it; but those boys, with faces grown all
at once ashy white, knew better. Exchanging
looks of unutterable dismay, and too aghast to
speak, they flew from the field, and never ceased
running till they had put a long stretch of road



CRUEL SPORT. 85

and nearly all the common between themselves
and the scene of the disaster.

Then one of the boys spoke for the first time.
“Tt’ll be brought in murder,” he said, his teeth
chattering as he spoke, “and we'll all swing
for it. Ifany of the Priory lot was on the look
out, we're as good as hanged now.”







CHAPTER XI.

A CHANGE OF SCENE,

&¢ Their diet was of wheaten bread,
And milk and oats and straw,
Thistles or lettuces instead,
And sand to scour ¢he¢r maw.”
Cowper.

7

=x HE Priory wasa picturesque old man-
‘7 sion, built of red brick, and half
timbered, with dark roofs, flecked
here and there with patches of lichen,
and high, quaint chimneys. A wide green lawn
stretched in front of the house, set round with
lime and elm trees, through whose branches, on
the July evening of which we write, the rays of
the sinking sun were falling in shafts of golden
light.

There was not a creature stirring in the large
well-kept garden, and from the look of the house
you might have supposed that all its inhabitants
had either run away or fallen asleep; the blinds
were drawn down in most of the windows, and
no one was to be seen at any of the others,





A CHANGE OF- SCENE. 87

The truth was, that the master of the Priory, old
Squire Oswell, a Justice of the Peace and a
very mighty man in his own neighbourhood,
was at that moment eating his seven o'clock
dinner in the library at the other side of the
house, where a bad fit of gout was imprisoning
him, whilst his two little grandchildren, who
with himself represented the household, were
amusing themselves after their own fashion in
the meadows that skirted the kitchen garden.

It was in vain that their nurse exhorted them
“to play prettily like little ladies and gentle-
men,’ in the flower garden or on the long lime
avenue, instead of “rampaging about the fields
and woods, like any cottager’s children for all
the world.” Little Gertrude and Hector Oswell
turned a deaf ear to her admonitions, and no
sooner was leave given for play, than off they
flew to their beloved “Long Meadow,” which,
with its fringe of old walnut trees at one end
‘and a half dried up fish-pond at the other, made
a most delightful playground.

Here, in a disused shed, Gertrude and Hector
kept their rabbits ; that is, by night, for by day
their hutches were carefully carried under the
walnut trees, in order to give them all the fresh -
air and sunlight possible. It was wonderful
what a deal of occupation, and consequently
amusement, these bunnies gave their owners.
They were four in number. Brighteyes was
Gertrude’s pet, a large white one; then there



88 MATCH-BOX' PHIL,

was Sepoy, a splendid black fellow, without a
single white hair in his soft jetty coat; whilst
the third rabbit, a brown one, claimed special
notice from the fact of his having only three legs,
He had lost the fourth, in very early youth,
through coming into close contact with a
treacherous gin; but this disaster, though at
first it cost his protectors many bitter tears,
because they feared that every one would vote
for his death, turned out, after all, to be no such
great calamity. The remnant of the shattered
limb healed itself up very satisfactorily, and the
mutilated hero learnt to hop about so blithely
on his curtailed allowance of legs, “that now,”
said Hector, “that it doesn’t hurt him any more,
it’s rather fun for a change to have a three-legged
rabbit.” And as at the time of his accident
Gertrude had just been reading in her Greek
history about the three-legged stool on which the
Delphian Oracle sat, she proposed, and Hector
strongly seconded, that Brownie, as he had
been hitherto called, should henceforward be
known as Tripod.

_ The fourth rabbit was a new-comer, and as
yet was hardly looked upon as a member of
the family. He had come to them, as Hector
explained, “under rather odd cirstances.” The
fact was, that on Hector’s last birthday he had
chosen for a present a new rabbit-hutch. He
had particularly asked for a double one, because,
as he confided to Gertrude, he thought the



A CHANGE OF SCENE. 89

bunnies ought to have a day room, as well as
sleeping rooms; but, alas! the obstinate bunnies
could see no advantage in this arrangement, and
all of them kept pertinaciously to their own
little corners, where their troughs were always ~
placed.

““T Hl tell you what,” said Gertrude. “It seems
a pity to waste half a hutch; let’s write a board
and put it up to say the other half is to let.
There are lots of rabbits running about in the
woods ; one of them might like to come and take
lodgings.”

This proposal found great favour with Hector,
and so, after due consideration, a board—it was
the bottom of a night-light box with the sides
torn away—was erected over the new hutch,
inscribed as follows :—

“ Lodging for a singel rabit ; a wood one may
aply.”

On the second day, however, finding that
some mischievous person had turned “ wood ” into
“wooden,” Gertrude took down her notice-board
and changed the word into a “wild” one. In
spite of this liberality as to the sort of candidate
who might be considered eligible, no one did
apply, till one fine morning, the very day, in fact,
before this July evening, Gertrude and Hector,
on going to their hutch, found a little grey, long-

eared tenant sitting up in their hitherto unlet
room. How he managed to let himself in, and
shut the door so carefully after him, was a



90 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

' mystery which neither brother nor sister could
explain.

Perhaps if they had caught sight of old Martin,
the gardener, who, in his blue apron, was watch-
ing them from behind a haystack, with a broad
grin-on his face, they might have found some
clue to the puzzle,

“Tt was zustink, I expect,” said Hector.

“P’raps it was reason,” said Gertrude.

-Anyway, there he was, and the next thing to -
be done was to celebrate his arrival by making
a grand feast in his honour.

All that morning Gertrude was busy writing
notes of invitations to the rabbits, which Hector
posted in the weedy pond, whilst the afternoon
was devoted to preparing the banquet. It was
to be spread under the walnut trees, and to
begin precisely when the great gong sounded
indoors for grandpapa’s dinner. Ruth, the
housemaid, had lent a duster for a table-cloth,
whilst a large old pickle-bottle filled with
peonies made a great feature in the centre of
the spread, which was certainly composed of
rather odd dishes. There was a little trough of
bran mash for each rabbit to begin with, and, to
give this course a festive appearance, Gertrude
had stuck a double daisy in the middle of the
moist bran; then there was an evtrée of parsley,
succeeded by slices of raw carrot ; whilst a very
choice dish of lettuces soaked in milk closed and
crowned the banquet,



A CHANGE OF SCENE, gI

“It was rather disagreeable of the rabbits,”
Hector remarked, “not to sit still in their places
at the edge of the duster, and to drag their food
all over the grass.”

But still, on the whole, the feast went off very
satisfactorily, and Hector was just making a
“ sood-night ” speech to his guests, in which he
bade them to treat the new bunny kindly, and
exhorted the latter not to be too uppish as he
was only a new-comer, when Gertrude uttered a
cry of dismay. With one skip and a bound, the
grey rabbit had turned his little white tail on
the assembled company, and had disappeared
through a hole in the hedge to the meadow
beyond.

“ And it’s the field where we mustn’t go,” said
Gertrude mournfully.

“Oh, nonsense!” cried Hector. “I don’t care
if I do get punished; I shall go and look for
Greycoat,”

But just at that moment Betty, the nursery-
maid, came running down the long meadow,
with the unwelcome news that they had over-
stayed their bedtime, and that nurse would be
ever so angry if they did not come indoors
di-rectly.

Nurse’s orders were never disobeyed, so sadly
and slowly the three o/d rabbits were restored

-to their hutches, whilst as the children turned
indoors they cudgelled their brains for the best
means to adopt to recover their lost Greycoat.



92 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“Hector, I know,” said Gertrude, as they
climbed upstairs together. “I'll wake up ever
so early to-morrow morning, and Pll come and
call you before any one’s awake, and then we'll
go out and hunt for our poor rabbit. It’s naughty
to go, I suppose, because we have been forbidden ;
but still, that bunny must have been sent to us
for us to take care of it, and we oughtn’t to mind
getting scolded for trying to save his life, a bit
more than fathers and mothers in story-books
mind suffering all sorts of things just to save
their own children,”







CHAPTER XII.

A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS.

**Child, I see thee! child, I’ve found thee
*Midst of the quiet all around thee.”
: Keats.

bed, for I’m sure I shan’t sleep a
wink all night, wondering where
poor Greycoat is,” Hector had
declared as he bade Gertrude good night.

Nevertheless, when next morning before five
Gertrude stole noiselessly into his little room, she
found him so sound asleep, that it took a great
deal of shaking and loud whispering to awaken
him. It was only by frequently reminding
him that if they did not make haste, nurse would
be sure to get up and come and look for them,
that Gertrude at last succeeded in rousing him.

Once out of bed, Hector’s dressing was soon
accomplished, but when it came to the point of
saying his prayers, he was perplexed.

“Tt seems rather funny,” he said, “to ask to
be made good all day when we know we're
going to do a rather naughty thing.”





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'1455' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
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008854f40c70d56f33c2a41125e37a4c8f3f6ad5
'2011-12-22T12:16:40-05:00'
describe
'9785' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
c90b542416d75d026cbe679d46c8e7a7
854bd810c0af3ff3cbd1de366f01b43424056af1
'2011-12-22T12:21:24-05:00'
describe
'328956' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
23fa3deb966bee2726487dd1b62df780
048bfa8e2230a196ba29be255c747802ef8b49f7
'2011-12-22T12:17:56-05:00'
describe
'127656' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5b6cc762406d9d13c2c5ded2fd37957f
35e2071fbde4d7ca31735ac3d57a5097ec7230b7
'2011-12-22T12:17:49-05:00'
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
fb4968afd3105f0c94f648fc02fefdd1
fc9d9b711a3cace6f72f12969e57505a5e61d574
describe
'41589' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
45dcf5250686c9423fae24aab0c26d4c
a094fdc0561d06e8e6a4108b252e80f3e8c3a5a4
'2011-12-22T12:16:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
624e8938af65294f374ef707cdb2b920
565407451e0fa80e366fc72c7cbe3105aee9510c
'2011-12-22T12:17:40-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a1bf7a98b1e4b83f5b478926b1696c8e
fdc34df1ce9387d3567cc52b1864e59805b64d83
'2011-12-22T12:20:09-05:00'
describe
'10132' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f30364591fff6f2d4efc74d41dc6dd27
971679bc8434da2607c7716d739b04843df015d2
'2011-12-22T12:19:45-05:00'
describe
'328971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
03c13222ec0dbe69b0395106fde9e26e
8d42f4b6a4c791b54c68746fcca6e0a677469073
'2011-12-22T12:19:05-05:00'
describe
'126126' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
53d013e73b58e9481b96ccfcd5bf05b5
c652ea727b21051629c14c24fd17bf8a7f42ac1e
'2011-12-22T12:21:12-05:00'
describe
'36034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
bb87cbf9c80b8d37cc1dbe75c25b9fd2
79e5549ee274743058b5ac17d6dec52c52c76aac
'2011-12-22T12:16:51-05:00'
describe
'40579' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ca65129d395f6e3546a25d5dd61895a9
6f9b29a8bfe9b3e6b1117f6a9880dba4068c8d45
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6742c31867c363d15fee6dcdf2958d1e
b13042ccbd7562ccb665058dfe8b3fe718f376bc
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
05aaa12706fb5ada1f92a76860c6057f
7cea53adf2795f59dad3b82918af29cdb5b283ed
'2011-12-22T12:20:19-05:00'
describe
'9684' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
416d0e08032e0f4303cac24b02211569
a83598d6461ca7d49fd874dce1649ed6fea962c2
'2011-12-22T12:21:39-05:00'
describe
'329031' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSST' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
5f896e4e59b1074aea7b46642ca0264f
591377dce41f26582fb5cf977b1750e5d7120ff4
'2011-12-22T12:19:28-05:00'
describe
'135580' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
e60a7dc1610b191c5ba3c6ec0c726cf0
fdaaf19ede2d87524efa74a80d3efa1a20d02d9a
'2011-12-22T12:17:07-05:00'
describe
'37324' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
94c53083302defae9217eb10f04940b7
61bfc90c291fc8c12b351dfb6255475dba6ace9a
'2011-12-22T12:18:14-05:00'
describe
'43821' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a771a50c076617eb20528bf010986347
dcc533d23b156e17b6417fef23232d565d9bf3a9
'2011-12-22T12:19:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
6af069d64e7b613e53533a0a460251ee
87a87f6534c4a372d3e39355636885aa6d55db00
'2011-12-22T12:16:15-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
982a90a60d2c29939450267b017cc364
43090b699c7c38c865edf18b42de9547b0b6a7c3
'2011-12-22T12:21:35-05:00'
describe
'9998' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSSZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
44404c901ead3f70f0eb4148f17be14b
d8f564f6651501ce1dfbba5ad3ed5e07f85b37de
'2011-12-22T12:21:19-05:00'
describe
'329010' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
486816aa6d5695fdf56d4ab0cbeb83a7
88044801af1060097a47298deeddbb2dd880750b
'2011-12-22T12:20:15-05:00'
describe
'127416' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1d7aa26f86e749afa8afa366d1b53bd6
c81a9a054f1dffd89a55b3da4dc587206944e41c
'2011-12-22T12:19:23-05:00'
describe
'34878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b1fb228b3560b9e958e3af592866ccee
e4003567d97ea9d07944100b5b94289bad0c78ff
'2011-12-22T12:21:28-05:00'
describe
'41460' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b8a76798258d2758368b5c924054d85b
c8b0336333499c779b654a01518c4b2a273e677e
'2011-12-22T12:20:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ee60b0a4d9b576db65a642fd3ea3b1a8
53e286dfa27b891954681f9515d5d147ccbfeb5c
'2011-12-22T12:16:46-05:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
a10c7ee5fc21a8024a61b0fe93a4b1a2
561ba01ec965f9158e86769475b9ecd7eb81a07b
'2011-12-22T12:16:14-05:00'
describe
'9928' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
a7a6b8f36366ee4849c820beb07a95b8
924674a604713f263a111573c0d8fd61793abfb8
describe
'329033' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
a509dc5169f43a5df3a1ef242a85f638
00039139c03170c4733f97bc3b8fc86747ec8dd8
'2011-12-22T12:17:46-05:00'
describe
'127741' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
62dbac05657b8c9681b54ff5d86b2659
b5b0a21b71c2ffc62081be6ed60c64a94ed0f5ac
describe
'34162' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
33db372fc4534082e6ff50ef668160b0
e1586b558fb65d4fae252f1fbe9f5da343cda81a
'2011-12-22T12:18:35-05:00'
describe
'41870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1677cd03e18213b06934478d3073b712
8d30b8caafe233c6800d120884a5d14f11e09bd4
'2011-12-22T12:21:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
478fc837ab13c01012794a670e00f0cf
d038b3520bdb6a9791706ff07e6bbe61abc9fc9a
'2011-12-22T12:17:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f286a96899d8cbd524c2622cbf8bb509
03939117bdbca43577b5d7f7fa9a35dbe679fed3
'2011-12-22T12:18:44-05:00'
describe
'9864' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ad3159c86273e18988ed489c94d8d528
637e4d18e2c330a4db9031f5a37af8a74d2841fd
'2011-12-22T12:20:35-05:00'
describe
'329016' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
a12c2d50c3b98b4e29b263a97e0a489e
a1e60eb7d471c009caff50bb0463667b68c7270e
'2011-12-22T12:20:58-05:00'
describe
'40437' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f1f39a297fd644a1fcd900a9ad77dab8
ed5804070c144a5f02cdd17c7aa7afab16dc43f1
describe
'8093' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7251c671fd7cfd0b2932b04468f0c01a
a8728872ae1b25983e1c823d5cc74a750027a191
'2011-12-22T12:17:06-05:00'
describe
'12627' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
da233a1ced1656aabd16e74754740ac9
ac2febd5401cc5a7d5eb24f5a8c310847bcc3ad7
'2011-12-22T12:18:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0907d4678c2e6faaedf1525189cddcc5
1e2819dc21945a2ca6bfc73feabfeaa43ec372d1
'2011-12-22T12:21:40-05:00'
describe
'328' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
a7e9c4cd9e5ef1a24274dfb4cf7cfe07
a84f0ea57839438429ed31d7ed3f343317accc73
'2011-12-22T12:18:06-05:00'
describe
'3296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
3046572a45c5239e008aad8dc65a34ae
c93aeadeb7d54e838285aedfb2c0b6c735fcda32
'2011-12-22T12:17:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
ef5518dd87db2d03838a6bf983e8cda4
548031eb9a0c90da6ee287fcebc7492f74b686dc
'2011-12-22T12:17:55-05:00'
describe
'115178' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
1ef5385a6284a5fef1ef76ad697067ad
4050869b9fb0a0360015a9809d5e1be240add591
'2011-12-22T12:16:36-05:00'
describe
'25599' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5b047a21dfec1414a7828f4fbbf50bef
3c0d8e38f5c2d0290858cca437d67f733b5b284e
'2011-12-22T12:21:18-05:00'
describe
'35965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e50523be03374159d5f20145d73858a5
ab94d78ae0cc1d3c1af660507434da07255f5563
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSTZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5c5839247fc38fcba850091044e98c9d
95158c4a6d006b84b8ae80843137c65317594a9f
'2011-12-22T12:16:13-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d4b8ded3b23ed0863ec11219181572f6
0f9dee5164e1b43b0a01eed9b16bf1252a7b7fc2
'2011-12-22T12:17:01-05:00'
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
80e914207558ef410fc37eecfe7645e8
b04ce757cf09b561cf094646b3010808d99f1132
'2011-12-22T12:18:57-05:00'
describe
'328939' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a6296e103d70e5c93fc9ca163b98e19b
d7c4a31e57cec416b672bd56b82dbe496b1cd757
'2011-12-22T12:17:12-05:00'
describe
'133765' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fd5d8ca122b79032e3fbd2152e51189e
1eabb053351bf42435caa224b85118a5e2ce54e9
'2011-12-22T12:18:23-05:00'
describe
'37125' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a5f583768f9e49e0c721b3f775151701
30dbab3cc361ff774ccee4973e7ea3bd7d30d3b9
'2011-12-22T12:19:59-05:00'
describe
'42539' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
673f873286b401a5346d263a30887d41
a31dd099572150d9ede8f257dc621a0828f37e3e
'2011-12-22T12:16:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
42ec3251bd706408b551d8c9fb02122d
7510ba575c6216bb0f2728c1264d47c08a932777
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
ab8b705932544c4d213f48369f57fab2
f38708f664a633e213eb87aeff548573b886ede6
describe
'9975' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3b91e7116dbfb38325ffcfd7d0593f25
8b8a001854d79bd3f0136d2387282074489b4a10
describe
'328968' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
67f10c9b5e216baaa176b0983ccce855
a3ac7ffbae9c48c7c679eebb3059d5d19152a9e9
'2011-12-22T12:17:50-05:00'
describe
'133634' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
6e4c83f67cafb9906cdee27d1283f225
c5f7601a43595e6e1b6070a1c0ad50c9a96fd1ad
'2011-12-22T12:20:49-05:00'
describe
'37096' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
40716ef0a83ff47f8471d26417aa520b
a8ee73caf217a899cd289d60a922bf0df94ea790
'2011-12-22T12:17:47-05:00'
describe
'42651' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
7c7d8bb63c137d4d1f376c7418927e23
fee63d49f76bf98645cba42083f3c9dcbf49e00e
'2011-12-22T12:20:23-05:00'
describe
'2648512' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e8b714ac1459e9a6bcb2a1fe4e70ac73
2e6cbf8c037bf1470ec16ad7230e2d05d32f53df
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
51552a3c365ff14d7fc502226c38c234
8a339bc72de85dbf5f8bbaabc8676a5180885546
'2011-12-22T12:17:35-05:00'
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6efbbe508e28574c9e45074a88a73a25
9800c1db0c3c661683d1decb588e3e97629eeb43
'2011-12-22T12:19:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
e046614846c02fe254bead03874a0a7f
7a3e1da504af59c5665cf86fde6a6e1be3b885d5
describe
'134403' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ab89d164ddbde56c5fcf6e18db9bcc45
4e09fe8a9eb0f813411b92e989be0d1fa07a739e
'2011-12-22T12:21:05-05:00'
describe
'37848' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
15ad2f178749c26e39f859559defdc2b
3bf17298dfed7e7ad72746078affef420bcce433
describe
'43727' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
fda72e31062f15eb3f0adbf3ce19bd81
6dd3309d2d886b096b934e77e532582c360c1ca8
'2011-12-22T12:17:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ef4d4e061b5efbe63c87f5e076d18355
04bb26e5fc6fc27c298884bdd594d9670880a948
'2011-12-22T12:17:00-05:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
e8aaf8fb0d6aea8d912c58ad0925a54d
4ece63149f23e44f8bebea6f92e3819ad6ce7e3a
describe
'10086' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
abdde925ad93347ea6d93f091733e0a4
9ac207050979f88061bf4a6649e6fcb615ed4488
'2011-12-22T12:19:15-05:00'
describe
'329000' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
60910479af0dff75f0095c72bb1cc9eb
527ceae12e3f6a4a5b79c2ed0a66051e3bae7cbf
'2011-12-22T12:20:29-05:00'
describe
'135441' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1db1258f7415b3a90d6c65b22925e3f3
aeb7b3f4d564615710066e205949fd44dfc1d276
'2011-12-22T12:20:38-05:00'
describe
'37785' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSUZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
37de643f7ee747565125adc64944fa31
88325f2fc7d8ea70de2ab0cec457782b73adfbb6
describe
'42897' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
15c45bfd38100fffb37a95ce5685c238
2a6e0137a50b9a3b037a05061c708f42908bb9b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
da2f562852693d2a5282fb18f816fe3a
a469fe1b9b841a8614dda9685b7ce8b61cf952b1
'2011-12-22T12:20:21-05:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
30eb02fb876bb2ad63d2ba8284f26a21
d76e1d20864679d550e98036e8923405f34da9e9
'2011-12-22T12:19:57-05:00'
describe
'10098' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3082f12cc180f3a914d8a8906e31d311
f2d61c3ec52e82b32fc2c85fb8440ba29c457630
'2011-12-22T12:20:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
5cfd65e174844f5e9fd2f2b91cfb428c
dadb21e0e3945cf40c8d0fe47840c4e4a08e0aa1
'2011-12-22T12:19:48-05:00'
describe
'133914' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
047bf961085c8cb5f3e298ce7849e2d9
6451ecb1c84cfcf890754f04f5f5ac4853e3ded8
'2011-12-22T12:19:47-05:00'
describe
'37908' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ce78ac9d8476d08700fcf2aaf1dbcd9a
3e8d452934aaa6d16b09b8221568efc90a70169c
'2011-12-22T12:16:00-05:00'
describe
'42615' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
248e733f7b6a9de62def12686848b502
917c0a4c1139c23fa4f3460cabb414c61d54eb5e
'2011-12-22T12:16:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
20adfddd0a67cfc36e7bba2da671ab72
d59247b09d45af1a85e4b8c00bcd422a8f989641
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ad6977fb2d5edfc02d5b07e48d29e740
465697f599b67146496c28555ced307161bd3e84
describe
'10153' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
bb09c08810cc9bfc4e147bdd51d0c837
32ef184692ed5d34e992db98395041dd65a685e1
'2011-12-22T12:20:01-05:00'
describe
'329014' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
69c248889c937db7ef2e21887994d3df
9c8b76ac4157dfbe051ddd81ae0b3c4b24287156
'2011-12-22T12:17:03-05:00'
describe
'127039' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
871f805f75334c2055f318378ca614f3
7bedf8051ef0b078f5d32d5509b48c9d59daeaaa
'2011-12-22T12:18:33-05:00'
describe
'35359' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
8986c74a187fc45d150811a2d58a9d56
f1fd81c2bd3120a43858ac34c2505cf4c4daa125
describe
'40619' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
466afd80cd9ea10f6896e4cec2e25dfc
70f61a88bb12555ffb274e000bb7b1a6dfae640a
'2011-12-22T12:16:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f58e585376cd3257f2ee78638410b673
1d7795f373c5d81cb37f74b97a7522e7ae1cc218
'2011-12-22T12:17:45-05:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
68f7cb4bb2927145ea61687ea6f8b850
2a6e0bfe5329fbe3f4ea35365519cdf7029c0b37
'2011-12-22T12:20:17-05:00'
describe
'9962' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
80bfe80a245d6e25cdb0bdbccdac66a3
0fac979845d41a420fb88844d93155d85933b6ef
describe
'329018' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ec0c4bd65c7887657a2bf582be1b6508
d4ecfee9eff142a538726c9a8cccd1bf2b4947ed
describe
'131522' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
693afe735121b8a72fd75b6ead5994c8
af0877670296e10417311741dca3c3d93150c98e
'2011-12-22T12:20:54-05:00'
describe
'37478' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
d7470847eda52ac56553d8b6acac4cf2
41c551bddba16ed67dae87efeac1f1ec396455d9
'2011-12-22T12:18:12-05:00'
describe
'42832' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
354b547dea897e54213ed9bdb2836f95
0e576936992f8d39c492e837d4b34aa50cdb3fb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
485713b9ee491c12e4a595d380b9b863
653128f7e33b76f36fb18280131242949fa58e51
'2011-12-22T12:21:37-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f8b547b2ca56f96623213d6682c403c1
e41316734a20dbd5a9152579758843fea694ec44
'2011-12-22T12:16:43-05:00'
describe
'9855' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
cd59bf63ce046cbcb7e345c2c50f2ca5
e47273d434057725a67cf59e56e0629136f9aa2a
'2011-12-22T12:18:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSVZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
69e0198f772f39ded5ce452fa9985907
9cbe9abc2518b1f82dcc66b1d2e3cd7bf1b32305
'2011-12-22T12:20:30-05:00'
describe
'59705' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8ce5659fae5ef39879f4e849ea6940d0
9e43b30f2265097752bfe023db395c6a9d38b148
'2011-12-22T12:20:33-05:00'
describe
'13853' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
dd85976f099f03ae62030b7cb4dc0830
886549ff90144ee0fa985a2529e23f5a38aece56
'2011-12-22T12:16:25-05:00'
describe
'19041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
5f25f7b91230fd9e3e29fd0e07924901
d764084f8236a2da76d132c90ca9fd30971bc77d
'2011-12-22T12:21:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
50e2ed38a23e6727612182d9ecf330d8
fea1dc2c55d0b9a8d590b5ff9e72bd065040e730
describe
'570' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
2f092c72ca5f76eda7d1a543e0517a32
da98966dcd0c3f7462c7f0f6b186038f3c166c3e
'2011-12-22T12:20:18-05:00'
describe
'4946' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
3e14b1abac07f358f65aba984dfd8209
74ea66a331f305da4d6a266f7cfbe02122d7cb9f
'2011-12-22T12:18:48-05:00'
describe
'328998' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
12d092a26cd4be0cd2356e0a5422a28b
1b68ef0cdfbf9e65779b8d7170910b2aba636b1b
'2011-12-22T12:16:31-05:00'
describe
'107830' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9a0d861b9ada7082310a347518a841e3
da97bf48d2e35e26ab684e7002ecc50bd4cf53d6
'2011-12-22T12:16:03-05:00'
describe
'23254' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
859a5e94a89ff09356fec98c7aa27ab6
5b2978a7720900d9049f1ed9cea82f0ee1b18b08
describe
'34502' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3e1ded7fda910c1b99d233f19746476a
66c937bf85b5094f0f76836c5ab6909ec00572ee
'2011-12-22T12:17:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
244512b153f6624226c0ff011568a463
c536b8e18ba1f3d6e6c0b0d92c915209d5dffbf7
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a56c5a64aefcf77277e584ae575d9a7a
2a78f916cd1435529a06b88494a8af9e375c38c4
'2011-12-22T12:20:41-05:00'
describe
'8738' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
ad510ab1452bb464c0b50e10fc7a3c43
2b11bd1d7c3ea6a317472f5a7ceebb563eb129de
'2011-12-22T12:16:24-05:00'
describe
'329013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9f1ccf64bc2d1203983815d1d9c9e95b
69e7cae9007d6f22d8de5409a6c420d298e224b9
'2011-12-22T12:17:31-05:00'
describe
'124017' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
59f04ff25b7904151c1400695b5e31f4
307a3135063ae49294086a3ab8021468e2ef9c27
'2011-12-22T12:18:59-05:00'
describe
'34662' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
6e864bb5c34f70d6fa37f9b299cec7aa
efa9cd4f2546b029016930ee15a0d2e86066a11a
'2011-12-22T12:19:37-05:00'
describe
'40290' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
1a5d7d757ac3d772edcd9042e4cf2730
0b15660914f445ceab51b0557688771522a8c5f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
6cc2fdc4cb4fbaae9f4acfb1a96a21e2
9edcf2fe9ad26a86418627c6cf1b930bf297af22
'2011-12-22T12:17:48-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ea8fa9c473910e2bfe1320aff5d79a1c
660678eb7dab5324a98b99eb2f3fbc76d13ced7a
'2011-12-22T12:18:34-05:00'
describe
'9763' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
935a100833aa84697ede41be5820e167
e7e003eb4ab1bdb38b3e4815c9a0b0a808b1eb4a
'2011-12-22T12:20:57-05:00'
describe
'329020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
df0810fe5c55a53873ed1208ee629cee
2de35f804e8e52b2d17e9164b77b0df98fd781b3
'2011-12-22T12:20:48-05:00'
describe
'124859' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2b01f4e46a6640b63a8998d271675d22
3d32c7bc5e8a4f8fca5c462e19344309736b41b4
'2011-12-22T12:17:18-05:00'
describe
'34948' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
740b81baf83e937940b1a954b773c508
80aed25fe61ee61861eb80a5bf6f9a7af2fc06a9
describe
'40146' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4a7b233202540f9e28d0d3c0fd6bd452
a1ba1fc2fb34b47875f5ce3880235d46438f7bf4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
47541d5c5cd7227173c12da101ab77e5
b46a0e5986f77dd70e875ab538f477cf636dcb77
'2011-12-22T12:16:09-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSWZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
a0973d03d21a9473039775a066f1f9a2
66bd9b81cc3e5f826a05cf661e9279c0498a442e
'2011-12-22T12:17:34-05:00'
describe
'9757' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
14aa08f555ce60421c45da06b8b38f84
f08bc67830140a77d9b59fa367fd39fc5056545f
'2011-12-22T12:21:00-05:00'
describe
'329017' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1ed761f2694bd426788ef94e29389610
defe664a05a9b4d48a84d420f1692c3e358e5162
describe
'119978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
88de7f2723a3be0b861e21a243f317cf
091461628f34db013cb5a6db8451a8679b0eb970
'2011-12-22T12:20:25-05:00'
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
923048c4d2011d6ec04ec2811587ee1e
b115561ac50bb6002fb76f410f317ca8cbef8834
describe
'38965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
86b2de4c87d9953785fe75cc6370e815
255e4efdd082fa20671954d670c9622bdc09d2b4
'2011-12-22T12:19:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
fa94738aba9cd70e38b3ec9a6b0a65e5
cf134e1c9ec7af49a82b9996e51b8960a3b93444
'2011-12-22T12:21:03-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c57597e8774c1d20d9e73f57e0e9cfd2
6e578d1656ac83a3d76c0af4a4a94318211b4ada
'2011-12-22T12:19:29-05:00'
describe
'9691' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
813f564a8dbff74f53c43132896d98ec
011ee5488219511b164283a7a63cec350c07559d
describe
'329015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
66fe117644ff9a366c3434ab4f9dc5b6
9374c5710e47e9e7464af8cbb5fb574604f34b3c
describe
'131469' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a38577487a869b331616d162c10a660c
b9fe4313934f4db1dee3f218f25f0ca28a6201d5
'2011-12-22T12:20:42-05:00'
describe
'37484' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
75e54b8f9e52e66784756b25e502bd5b
8416717c1a08d325d80d41ae08b010cecc4969c2
'2011-12-22T12:16:53-05:00'
describe
'42743' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9b9506e747be246f162ae2f71ba259e5
856050109d6000e605d3c1a377037af3f75847cd
'2011-12-22T12:20:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
89a8e7b8e66c5f4174d87c85d8bc0445
094c5fd2d00159d2a7cb2692df0ebaeaf736a36b
'2011-12-22T12:16:05-05:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3d72f0af5f758160a41aa94914acb90f
c1b2c92a5f26c332c853b8dbb62451bd09e96cde
'2011-12-22T12:18:39-05:00'
describe
'9869' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
314bdfc3a1eeb8081e97b0e7f3b4ea05
8ead1c9ee556fbe2ffa2f23c958920f5b4d493c7
describe
'329032' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
2fd566b24c4602869c521a1bf6fc880d
34ba4201c5a484d1e7875f3a4bc662da4e95d51e
describe
'126301' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
08446660d9a619c8cdde93673f5158bc
4ea46244ee916b9b8ef621452c33b57cfb724dd1
'2011-12-22T12:17:53-05:00'
describe
'35877' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXR' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4f46845196a7f79bc6be04eb778bd714
945cae19a711d1e761084b6ad9741f336d32625c
'2011-12-22T12:19:44-05:00'
describe
'40973' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
ca7118db4a19d02c4665eadc58b28b0d
61553987fab18d64ead41e92ddf62fada420fbe8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3554c7c52ba8a5bf4a3c411976a48ac3
7627283bdeec6eafa63eddac423321e208261a58
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ce75df5c47825bed4cb012e67e68f0d4
5ac3ef39f18cfe1fefce2b3764cf90c50ec9f783
describe
'9698' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3b820517baf05ac78aaeda4cb09f3502
3b8f427bead1f2de1e922f6449ba09bae4f48a61
'2011-12-22T12:18:24-05:00'
describe
'328992' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4911728097174f2d324b5c93ce5bf283
95176c58520ddfa2f7b1ef3c578eddb44817207c
'2011-12-22T12:16:42-05:00'
describe
'122854' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
705ab660224bc2214f2451f52c548653
282089cbd9b2324f3fa6a9555303729fe3e7f8ce
describe
'34721' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
23328c5b9bebb86067001697704d2bcd
e0532b5ecdef40fb0f2b69749cc98cbf06cee29e
describe
'40624' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSXZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
56a320c8d812517d41dd59e979f2856a
437549e6e1873550a645a6702a6f3f08587dacf2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fcf9630aea41e1b6e3a827a35b2d176f
81f83e300c55ef02d32156db851ca8e4f48ad95c
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
70689cd43271e79846027caa166f70a3
677f93e846946ee16115a5c26d0b4d2bf06a7a5f
'2011-12-22T12:20:12-05:00'
describe
'9583' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d37137dc0b8fe86b54867e5ac879c98a
8bc653be2304208e496d2a50cb7984e8c33ff861
describe
'328932' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2b3d34734d516f908f81c9c4cf58a8e3
6d588a79dacad3640e43f2c7678c6131a111584f
'2011-12-22T12:16:35-05:00'
describe
'46578' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
306665e60ae7380c6c41738dd2adb159
1c352e3bec49505cc6f787c5877609ce1e5c93e0
'2011-12-22T12:16:18-05:00'
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f3107e67937309a35e202f7945a40e11
5a13e01f15059ac548f3165822e5e87657883dc5
describe
'14231' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYG' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d42fed3eb8ea30eaa66d031ed6a81f7b
d31ed305a62529bf91719054609553d95ac4011b
'2011-12-22T12:16:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
fc4f3a4f5962e78619d91e440f6a7ab3
48d4ccc1ae86bc9bad758ff789c537cc9bd81db5
'2011-12-22T12:21:15-05:00'
describe
'386' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
e0eefa983e9a6aea3c308880f8c32801
a0c451f7521604df3224267c4b17b816d558cbe1
'2011-12-22T12:19:52-05:00'
describe
'3936' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
8c79e546e4ef297220dd5caadada5c9d
669b597eae1749bd13687a3900b7b0e6c3fb9964
describe
'329001' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
a201099751c4d4577446b9589a26b777
da39f6749f51f70ba9b0abd67933ab5433c1d6c5
'2011-12-22T12:17:22-05:00'
describe
'103971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
93dedb58315fa47c73d11ef8a2984a9b
f71de84c18dc22012e96bd8d07e3e2b028a3ad4a
'2011-12-22T12:16:08-05:00'
describe
'22646' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
fa7863b7f55b592586d04a0e575354bc
9ba424b66bc8fe1905bea4f2fbba133af8147797
'2011-12-22T12:16:12-05:00'
describe
'32731' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c31796a48ab381a4bde5c8a61e6a98ae
33806683b8cbc4162eae91d8dc6f1224b7d55e9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d22d2f67c045cd6e62a7097d76b02ebb
bbac1018d89c78873845d3d499452624885e1334
'2011-12-22T12:17:41-05:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
0b3c114ed9fdbb2fe2ef4d391e1faf7f
d7bd8be84526a6fd8dd4c43b9ef5b80d2111efe3
describe
'8240' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
79adbd24a1cc09c3a420d602eb348c90
d9734d33ca0b2eb9673b6d36cd716654d41c3d38
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9fe9ad3f6089699a33cda0d0725fbc44
502672d5199fe2cfaf005896ad4658246dc0ca73
'2011-12-22T12:19:16-05:00'
describe
'125250' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
de44c724a0b125bffbf0a16e481305c8
63283aecb00584fe0e74794c640a9a403b66107d
'2011-12-22T12:19:58-05:00'
describe
'35123' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9b8705505cad9d8e52a6826263036c3c
461053c7142ed92c507e293f2d343615329b5c95
describe
'41398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c24f6e8349e1537a33ad57d3aad2fe8a
018b2653a32fe3059b9eca136f0f17a55f164312
'2011-12-22T12:19:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
31e542cb91831bf183fb8c23dec3e73a
95590536481f7893f5a29d6c59393a35eedfa0ff
'2011-12-22T12:20:50-05:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ed1f41d3d4e604cef66125e47ff022aa
1a55453af6877c1f34aad248a26a73319c0cb640
'2011-12-22T12:18:40-05:00'
describe
'9896' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7293c730e612e2f741d53f1dadb555bd
a7e51f70f07c0dadd03ebf0b26564aec8c7d30f1
'2011-12-22T12:18:05-05:00'
describe
'328986' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
514b1f711223dc01ee019937b36aac9e
cb85fa2d4395fd3d2f4a65fc0199e86338c74b59
'2011-12-22T12:17:51-05:00'
describe
'134426' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSYZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
00d42337add06e3e04dc4bbcd6c252de
fc75f27c64bdd7d525eede1cfa7feee1400f9995
describe
'37840' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
83eb96f3ab566fd284820db45df6d386
a046c1165e86b88d3a1f8bc704a153f48f58a5c0
describe
'42771' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8ce4e52faada82958871b2497af858a8
349c64d6903a5f458476a9cfbe2036634fdba232
'2011-12-22T12:19:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZC' 'sip-files00042.tif'
bde3a30ce4afdba52e6341644ddbada3
b690e1956da859cbf4333a8e13fb733d6ae6e6aa
'2011-12-22T12:18:38-05:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
387783010a13935137907a3134158d75
382041b264636a86614cd0723de45779af0b584a
'2011-12-22T12:19:26-05:00'
describe
'9957' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ce02f438d4f8f124472070de7e629c32
6ebcfe85b19b81d30d5fdab88e8bf3317e38377b
describe
'328990' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
52fa41f5072d2e703eafb513b0f4c4b7
c4eb6284d6a557dc724a5c37c4760b548a27c20e
describe
'127549' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZG' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
fa6d7e2bbe6cdead0d8d88066f7cca47
1b407e043a4b31b8c7e4e86a0b35be18dac8e4ba
describe
'35609' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d4afdc6e61ad68f3ad0ddc044eae5742
fd393fef76fcf18a949b089ea3fc14ae05bb8996
describe
'41367' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZI' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
abefdf9643154515a4f8ef8aeaa13fa6
b00d71c2d83b654489f9e2cf11ce5343fd6dc5f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d3075df76f9860374a4bd3624eac1179
ae04cd5c4efbeb721698a76956f9c4c74afc784f
'2011-12-22T12:16:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
33f97f4b0c3ac0675d5d984a471b1f7d
b6a9b3a5df3d6b9cb30539b8d9494d972ff72f2f
describe
'9630' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZL' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
7bfaf40b0687c1051db01370fad91d28
517497d00fb83c84eef6dd245e47906998c65585
'2011-12-22T12:21:14-05:00'
describe
'328973' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f2ac12ce6ce61ed93c22abd4ef9d41ea
125131fbc408a49e69864cf624eb7bda14893f69
'2011-12-22T12:17:19-05:00'
describe
'133619' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
0128cecc973549e0dc4e99d84061971d
b3cdbc126fbf77431dc447a9ecd88bba49c07e52
describe
'38605' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c58ba92a8adb6dd7ea6995321f5525eb
2ee6b8afbe152ee71535c282711d848fa4a18500
describe
'43315' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
edb609fc79b44fe66411f4d81d7c983a
60fdc8bda83e6423bf177be5522aaa41470fccf6
'2011-12-22T12:17:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZQ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
3843a51aec12862ae2a865c02cdfb40b
032c1e80ed6da4aea7c8aa0b59d1d9eeaebb0aaf
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ec212a67960ab434424366413196121f
d9c880650bcd296de4660933cde029fa666d335c
'2011-12-22T12:17:58-05:00'
describe
'9881' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZS' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f187838eaa52849299d21ea16ef9f87d
8c2bb42d1d20892e00317c2f0ed3fcc2ab3b2b7f
describe
'328996' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZT' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d83f620c012b565678a51169abe5f954
46572015b12d3f2eb45797e4b25c7fd1df0e8877
describe
'127709' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5f0eae9a508dac070c4e800ba3681bf4
6f55fbe6d4ecade1704abb47a70e7af39158b1a2
describe
'36189' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZV' 'sip-files00045.pro'
29f2dfed215bb1844d12838709672575
2275f45a020d9e87c54c2895d827812091b05679
'2011-12-22T12:18:13-05:00'
describe
'42055' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
cef7b114eb18d40554f5af5f88b08050
971841f5ccf1779ebb51f0f54fe1061cb67bc7c0
'2011-12-22T12:20:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
13ff3462e5f25b14d23c404dc8c465aa
8bec3ec1ef39137fef1a28dbb5197c5f83e9253f
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ca7d9eb3f96593a68c77f0718185641d
3b728bcf5df81edf10de0c14ed2d25ef1dc3c07c
'2011-12-22T12:17:17-05:00'
describe
'9890' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABSZZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
67b68fa324e98b2fa868178a7241e0cd
6ea4e3c7e8f6e020bb1e6117bf35106604c34aaa
describe
'328949' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9d21236128eb12c4bb544bd465fa79b0
146f4db57d2f818952895f468cb755e9a3918c3a
'2011-12-22T12:20:03-05:00'
describe
'122335' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
22ceee1cebbb7833c09cba07ea8266ce
a8c2337cc87200f7c1dbef96e219c43e0ad89061
'2011-12-22T12:19:03-05:00'
describe
'33640' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
43bac71e67dc85adb3c3738eccac2109
dbfd10dcc93f6d396725309f7d32856caf51c10b
describe
'38020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
0c7482c930186d8115448203734508f6
d7dcecf42f0f3b65e5062a5bf81c711c48a1f28d
'2011-12-22T12:17:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAE' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b8b49a7189f6d9da6e5eb2f9fadec527
652e35a343bdfc284e104e1ea3a4e95589fdddbc
'2011-12-22T12:21:17-05:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
a4df43c41630979d9183352277f453cd
3ec191923b59f30d860e52c6ccfdfe217e58daa0
describe
'9618' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f03184a061c3e347dd0af92176e93e31
8696dbb1e4955047e3578e8756e45a2626282f98
'2011-12-22T12:16:26-05:00'
describe
'328667' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
507c6c85cb59110d69a63c5973535592
8c0eecc4e6011362b1c661502e31a32a3529fcf7
describe
'43798' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6cc1df64bdf6c81279b242c8eb8c7788
f32139abdffe86aa0be27ebdb4469f7870ee1b69
describe
'8187' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
de397e0ed8d44cf6ce15dfed70b7e1c1
af324479a6be0d1cd0e2514246ab5caef4c8b304
describe
'13070' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
fb9a23f2ebae1c8f3e2f789fbcd8370a
a104630abe8ab96f6a27e807ef3f6acd7b7a4140
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
453fbab8c5cb13f5474093f202397449
c56be36e131d16c651fc65aaf52115a035917df4
'2011-12-22T12:21:25-05:00'
describe
'366' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
4a798d31c2785e34e672c258b43a7678
656486e8a5ae3956ccda189bb7cb707066badae9
'2011-12-22T12:21:06-05:00'
describe
'3485' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
08433b09d46a07102fe0c8dc7705b483
3831ea3fc07b9d1ebc87dd729e9f33c5032bcc52
describe
'329027' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
a65b107e03d12601a1481f0a16e269d4
ba490b88b8537860ba0b2bfb7a7f728c8d36e4e5
describe
'113430' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
bb9f3af104879955abbe6ff242bf9381
307ba07836e265727311dd741cf6f009e13ac3df
'2011-12-22T12:21:09-05:00'
describe
'24926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
6869f5fad47aaf5a32abde4a5b26526d
486bdf4504e01601f13595de9bd85934f0d47dd2
describe
'35862' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
63d2c435bfa0da96dee24548ee92e040
1f1a699cbc15eb940be69b67a53a630e4af3e6ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ed9d09fd570d3b56b6c6b0c973974026
d1c567cbf2d20357c73b707a75bcb57672936284
'2011-12-22T12:18:29-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
34efdbcca4584f4817b2a63dff396c9a
8526325d698d14d1ce68c6dd820f65a5cbf3e904
describe
'8857' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
340cc89ceb0445fd6c558f4412873042
78e5f90a5402b7e879e645609c236a28d8493c20
describe
'328967' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
228c4da5922545aeadfc4aaa28c71b2f
a6522db39d6397d9d755732f9a6d4aceb1b75091
describe
'128390' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
218ce39063cf215f0177528262d4f3f2
a1411ef442db69793e886033a730aa44b03c30c5
'2011-12-22T12:20:08-05:00'
describe
'35676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
78cd43d80a15ea60c751b2666230560c
01aec2f60715acc9de39e2eb28c2148dcd394a8a
describe
'41697' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
182abbd65a5da0264136ffdde5cd94f8
54c633fb95849a0f098b03f59f84c0d99a4f14dc
'2011-12-22T12:21:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTAZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3721e6c37bf7016549ccdb37721534dd
7816e35fd3043ccc3142bb4b024825d988ea3b67
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ac1842f8ae5551dfb8a233a93b9c5cc5
4ed0f8649470b472b1335d8988507346d829e18b
describe
'10068' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
35a25975eab47e4141d95bc2408943ae
6e63759f4427da7a78aedd8fcc88f34ecce0cf2b
describe
'329004' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2d2f682b66010d85e3cf9a239624ca4f
28be6b4c20cc79ceb7c30ef9ee12c7e6ae367d4a
'2011-12-22T12:17:39-05:00'
describe
'127415' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
3a60d781bb1ee8142263d23b6a9ebd51
c1f46ea87d4f8171d32c5757e9488cea371f2f7e
'2011-12-22T12:18:07-05:00'
describe
'35956' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
06928d109b80ce9bc597fc7d513e23e6
32fbba576a6a0b83e452e3fac54a47ad752cd6c5
'2011-12-22T12:19:09-05:00'
describe
'41537' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
eab49f720566f4ee3683df7b9f0275e8
330fba1e31a3b7397633e993cf2cf6ca71d82c4e
'2011-12-22T12:20:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBG' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5c4775ac431a8996286322b1c3d9e861
d76a02189d9cbd01d6de552986844678b69b28da
'2011-12-22T12:17:08-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBH' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ceccd11e8ea89db846bad6d545cb5668
de24641d23dce99882d4003fd082b8bd16d453c3
'2011-12-22T12:16:47-05:00'
describe
'9910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
cb1eaa110ed912795856b62cf5117702
60156a3059be0680098563c2b321646a24f9e5d9
'2011-12-22T12:16:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
8ad64f854184dd62b0f80044d4c58472
a9a0b603979a1792ddf07ae95ff1a94a3a79d218
describe
'131295' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
82a7b3eeae8a233c602042a8d23d7ae5
677ab2caa04c1ec9a89d37fb11a7c2fb81ea0684
'2011-12-22T12:20:28-05:00'
describe
'36117' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a501305712ed0e94b830e87d09ed05ea
1b6c58e84fc612f3dc89c21eb0ffab890cbe78ca
describe
'42474' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
6b5a605bd4651d72d061502b31274cda
275b1670ce79048b582bd04d40cd88bd4777eff5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
633b7dcda0252e0f9a6be6f4f2a91d5e
da272782c66e025864ef15ed78f9aba67d4d7b65
'2011-12-22T12:18:10-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9e794bcb2c412bb874c0fef7fef904b6
2ba6ed27d26d9aaf30e4edb2b4b3871907ec3f47
describe
'9842' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
3615e786c6692c9706468a6b9b175576
524b1cdef57e19659e02feca208e74c10d38aa52
'2011-12-22T12:20:06-05:00'
describe
'329030' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
495ede5f7941a7e8f506ec149d757373
f327e01aee376373e5961346f5ce8d0a07de58f3
describe
'133825' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBR' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
6ed538055f0b2b7b02b372b203917fa5
3bbe01e87fdbdc2ac4618a0da3eacd243fbae98a
describe
'36219' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
95d7f47451d92355d3bff8abf330d483
288f7220d8071be22efdd38de46475a5ed3987c6
describe
'42321' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
0e577bbf7418855d3f7e761b541e4474
7200808d6ba58b63b044a44db0b8fe0d56ef5538
'2011-12-22T12:17:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
fe7501b2f2bb9854647dd03d9134b67d
9f70195f2c25711b2a7205771ed2119f3601026d
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
1b2691c072c5a94c1f8b0155da69de18
ac4109e8ddaeeb68ef0733c97c8330d0cde9e76a
describe
'10021' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b99e51135fdbbb29d23e12d67e7df7dd
1d15affa298ffc6b58be5a5a6c6c991795099832
describe
'328978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
28609e42c44e47db2fc25cbc2ccac2f6
37da443105d1d6880632504260ab69ab95233616
'2011-12-22T12:21:26-05:00'
describe
'125659' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
09661967b739d4b5cfc5f5eedf015110
23828e0fd1e61622e6e5ca661073a15193602738
'2011-12-22T12:20:20-05:00'
describe
'35555' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTBZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8a9974a7ffc66365a91202a1ed221255
acb30a885e2041e119e5301f30ab9bd9099a4b19
'2011-12-22T12:19:38-05:00'
describe
'40740' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3675d014c303c1452659c8c30e8fedaf
66d319aa4faaf563bbee2a909fee9e95c51f36fc
'2011-12-22T12:18:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
1dc980e76178306eaca8d46a02d2952f
08fc4b1b5da518452f23ce2d2dab98dfc4a6f1e4
'2011-12-22T12:17:26-05:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
087b5a9ec33021cc201050e77c022f88
9760a446c234af673766a06633f3e5808bbe5f8f
describe
'9669' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCD' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1df83a71c16fcf193a91e896c08bcf76
0377bd40261534bc4d9bce9627bce2227f70edee
describe
'328983' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7f390f46dec0d625efb3ae36ff681e17
9b443129b3f805a0b13e2c0003703993017705aa
'2011-12-22T12:17:11-05:00'
describe
'130778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fd65b520245a3578fb892dd04c3349bc
f786774fb4ad968c1a63187269daaedc4da3ce57
'2011-12-22T12:19:34-05:00'
describe
'36269' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
1ccf128b97181255364da006282efc34
e7176c39138abf187f3260cab4c8273906b76511
describe
'42358' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ee4aebfbff9aeffa4f1e38b4404098e7
2f91f8a858a7bcaf6256c308eb649dec5589936e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
be1c45633d850991a195f9f9ca578b1d
312c376ffac487c313e1ea49bbd1d72335704543
'2011-12-22T12:16:16-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
efd94bbbb93805c14dc029bad49df88f
9b17ff4764938af758f94576122bd2b82c7301a1
'2011-12-22T12:18:22-05:00'
describe
'9743' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
c32222a2bffcfc66933580c733d143a6
94ea037702c2378cf6ead212a6f65c77d989a758
'2011-12-22T12:15:59-05:00'
describe
'328937' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
520b927e86df2d2052c150b3df3d2396
14edf3ff5f233d4d04677e3b119e3275fceee76e
describe
'136576' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCM' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1cfffdcdae1314d1f40704824542fbdc
bfd0d3782391f727ccdbc9d0588ebf1f12d1b83a
'2011-12-22T12:18:19-05:00'
describe
'38077' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
07a4954f43a6864a60b0738531dffde5
e4c91bd8742c3615809c8ea0331c5bca06ab0c21
describe
'43932' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c7d887f76c05918283360196011e7741
1acd7a3a4fdead24d20f7ad3083ee52649532a29
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e8b8044fb3d304edd21b15743c772f78
8218bc2df363477e2aec126a6bdc9d342e294262
'2011-12-22T12:20:16-05:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1f2840aac1336119a4c6d1dcd7595188
b90c6a7c44f0c8b4b207857eb82a3a1f840f3cff
'2011-12-22T12:20:10-05:00'
describe
'10122' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
29eb07a99491d28be7fc99422716170c
d8a069752429f94e5d601d52d9af20701aafdd01
describe
'328943' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8a8e7cc1bc657cf0a126f95ebc868baa
352f243460ff04de497905f1f6e96588faae704a
'2011-12-22T12:21:08-05:00'
describe
'81142' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCT' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
43f5fe731c22ab0b389991e2b397d747
ffcbe1384c84e3bcc0ec5448ff8bfd2435c11bd7
describe
'19128' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
9a968609f98f811b54732266fe1a036d
936ec99fb1e7747ec5514531f96f888bf7de71ed
'2011-12-22T12:20:02-05:00'
describe
'25307' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
184ae44e024fa10f6c424bcee2986392
7558b2696825b28956daa1ef6fc6762c8a1d06a5
'2011-12-22T12:19:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
a3879202324eb9ebccb37de4dcc99eac
b096d3b0f3c1d1d5a3b11aa3b2421e109c0b6d95
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7b18c0f75c9c213a45cdf0a069ff8a82
dc37eda605cbfca56db466576047ba92a4eeed3a
'2011-12-22T12:18:31-05:00'
describe
'6393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
f04ec1e2d28a4fe473995ec04f66c8ae
04614ad0dc9802a7cc88897be82fd97c3aed5401
'2011-12-22T12:21:31-05:00'
describe
'329028' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTCZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
aa37a868d6456582eb3883de891ecd90
1411f0eab6fee00f9017046699a75ecbedfbcf89
describe
'109543' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3cdab97b3f08ca2c96f4603a5e815d58
5ce9a94563683dddff8158b6032d70280265c171
'2011-12-22T12:19:55-05:00'
describe
'23525' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
06938a8428a459c5089f765ac7b3d669
b1d36507f177588bdb789d5bdd0c6841a4fc7a49
describe
'34198' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
42c33b2f2f9632d310bfbcfd794eba91
b2e9a19f8660fff58251fb1a9a5fcd3a2e7e9264
'2011-12-22T12:19:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
97007edb0bd09fae6acee2a792964bc4
9f6a93ca7c3ed930ed01271f07e7b429e58f570d
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
e02e4f09dde8c27796ca7bb06bf05410
b542a07ee6297ab5940db786a05cdf9d750c8bc0
describe
'8446' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b77974c3b719b3bd91bb4c689cc605db
104e8f0d367a13813351715900fffa02b57b4920
describe
'329002' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f4d08c03d9bc0ac8a4628efc3af5cad5
6c7f05476bfdd72760d18af359ef6bb8957f16d2
'2011-12-22T12:18:30-05:00'
describe
'134069' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7e88bf968d907dc8e430a497aeef940a
6ba9c9c7ec789c5e06733b9587ea1ba4227925d0
describe
'37476' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
70ebe175eb3648d47c667aebba3bcba1
0b63910dfd0a560b458b684524b4de75242367ac
describe
'42933' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ab16914497d141bc637deae4019d611f
5194ffa6b83b5947b47e1bd06d02c2d8ee7ad644
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
539d2b11ade0ce3e3d822880b4350aa5
a3fb269c8362b06f34cb88759b9f42f0e5d3664c
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
24494a9a52dc60b3576f1b99aa5c571f
c7a641e3b21176d8c611ea8f489d92e38a01e080
'2011-12-22T12:18:49-05:00'
describe
'10054' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b492560aa6c78a706a3b658fa02eb50d
b837286e49fc8b49855c002add3b6b59ebaa5e48
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDN' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
e72e05faf64dbf73450117de44c6fec2
ed2668d09775bd7c436ba50a16471a902be416bc
'2011-12-22T12:18:53-05:00'
describe
'205349' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDO' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
6c58dbc438494f737427b2adde106eff
d38fc7aa2004e1b5c66b8a394921e0cd0d65b5be
'2011-12-22T12:20:07-05:00'
describe
'4066' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDP' 'sip-files00060.pro'
47006724a4d20d49cfd2fccaa52f9b14
32a8662f21adf9d097e12a5638e74c58d1a3de41
'2011-12-22T12:18:47-05:00'
describe
'49657' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDQ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
ee4ab600aec2f5930894d745273ec5ee
4a301c35923bbf23077e2a405b664343df7ff46c
'2011-12-22T12:16:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDR' 'sip-files00060.tif'
aca6eefb9c2e654c0160b10c54cf409e
88092f729cedf5f4238075a461e294fac2cffbe1
describe
'246' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDS' 'sip-files00060.txt'
4a6b28f46fc3087c8a44fb52f8407012
d2a3ab7c5640a59b9c319268ae7a5cf6bca261db
'2011-12-22T12:19:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDT' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
1d367e77ea9d216e44535b7f971740fc
c35f162ca431d935f90218ca68cca880b7028b72
'2011-12-22T12:19:40-05:00'
describe
'311065' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDU' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
db81eadd0d9f021a6dee3fc5c2c35d13
7c89bd319cbc01cc6753b99060eb68e9002e6cf6
describe
'136537' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDV' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
04f15a521bf5fb51df710bcbdea78904
037b089d94b0cafa70e579f99ca0266b5638738e
describe
'37926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
85d049c91118d7b2259a123b7181ba0c
dac0b71c59887e9437b02844e71b82fd74410de6
describe
'43898' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDX' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f1c50fbf347fcb6fe3c959005f3d2ded
43cad21246bbcfc74fed82c30eabcf643c8cd07d
'2011-12-22T12:19:30-05:00'
describe
'2505056' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
b71fd46e5ccd7fe2cda30ae741566b9d
f69d594c12f0b0b9351d8d1cb6f39bb47be44c6f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTDZ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
5b4d55ac9483c7a0376079d09ab26b7c
0c5c522d0fc1c7653cea698b19883953b252a9b2
describe
'10752' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEA' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
13aa321f8132c557366955db6635ea53
846afe9a68491bb41e536a4b327669eaa95c4a25
'2011-12-22T12:20:40-05:00'
describe
'328987' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEB' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a25a4597fce0386c22d2ed9ee97b8bfb
6e097621291977aef382db3c91eef2ac8efad67a
describe
'130075' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEC' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
9a76cb877e4c264f461b6b418dfd31a8
5c3fbd5cdfc097bec70ef78380489884769e163f
'2011-12-22T12:16:06-05:00'
describe
'36892' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTED' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9df95abed5b3289e358a876384e520bd
ce7983c9366d85fb06bde7db36222cff384a3f64
describe
'42732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEE' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
224460168ecced085cfa71c194c5e518
362d60ebac910a71fafeb28ab254673c859dcb5a
describe
'2648516' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEF' 'sip-files00062.tif'
1d4c23e51222caac928a7a070ba30aea
6b9fab3f647947b109423f3269a4390b9f1b67e1
'2011-12-22T12:21:20-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEG' 'sip-files00062.txt'
550363a81ecfb3776bd52f1250f0edc8
a43f553d879ed9024b8299892d2ed37877608fb3
describe
'10041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEH' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6df34f5e5e8b9bf9aa8889e444c17ddb
82401cf7fdb41eff968eab1807f251a9c6198a2c
describe
'328946' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEI' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7b9bb178e8f84a5651184d367ef1ca62
9dcb2b8be5bff94eadb2a294182c8a4d3cab9a31
'2011-12-22T12:19:53-05:00'
describe
'130790' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEJ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
73b8f2dbe77439760b4f9aab32f72bea
1de591f13c310a45cd7762b2ed6b3099e51613c1
describe
'36310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEK' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ec0512fcd1cba060ef81753df78c909c
9c371be20c6764c452a41756484c39e386d3a419
'2011-12-22T12:21:43-05:00'
describe
'42475' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEL' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
70f60b41a82de06a08a75bc083c1738b
63b35a808a472e706b02a3aae4c2d05bdf0a7932
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
e5184c111f4382f7993a0cdf85e327f5
62aa1c30dc385ab5d9393c28c220bd69a10cf434
'2011-12-22T12:16:41-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEN' 'sip-files00063.txt'
ccb142cda7a69b46905336c0cd69c8cc
3893b8de3d97ba2a36855dfd59109e208aba4bfd
describe
'9904' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEO' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
5af3c33cfb5bbb241e83a8f49f4a92de
2c43f4e98a5d3029000db51cac2621af5b2098f6
'2011-12-22T12:20:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEP' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
85d5953919de3c5cc9bdca70d61e3d45
448a1c3c3a08e4bef08311427387ac724ad4545b
'2011-12-22T12:16:30-05:00'
describe
'131353' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEQ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
762d4462897e578c70f02242df402b7f
da66f7e214dabb3420e410ed2c63420ef8b7613d
'2011-12-22T12:17:24-05:00'
describe
'37078' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTER' 'sip-files00064.pro'
321c817df609a4e53dc8e32b2e7613e0
2dfe5bd234af7680e5a6acbf423dbe4d13f1aa26
describe
'42691' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTES' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
822489c32440919449da83b5d40b67c9
d04ae3457a235892829877b565316701bcfc5cf8
'2011-12-22T12:17:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTET' 'sip-files00064.tif'
eb35dbe6d70ed69893b351d1f618eb4a
0e814880c6cdfed3a422fbf8a13e5b7f0e1bbe91
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEU' 'sip-files00064.txt'
483bb10bdf654cf0795f05fcecb2b852
9cca173cdaefc714ea4dd10f6750a0dc39ce444b
describe
'9868' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEV' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ebb45ac1cb3e6b3f3b814fa7ba4872a8
68e59d2a241f899a474a087d8e065810a1af7ac2
describe
'328970' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEW' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
bf809b29163834fb9188df4550fac098
e7186a24e46912a94477ba5d380079684724e26a
'2011-12-22T12:19:24-05:00'
describe
'107019' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEX' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
724575d1c890256d43bd4efa03e428c0
ded954ca04c3fc3cad6b101a972eaf29f1378a79
describe
'29625' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEY' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d870c627c53e95131d33f12818d2cd0b
a90d28867b50024481c30418a4170e57f6e7fd84
describe
'35226' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTEZ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
aa0f3a65075c1a0cd8071ea23bb9871d
83ca62511e17c3d5f7f338cec303283ec46760f0
'2011-12-22T12:18:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
305f6a6209f87a5c2978c95476975bcb
fb1fbd6b8772fee912c1a3f0e92541f7c3a3d66b
'2011-12-22T12:19:43-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFB' 'sip-files00065.txt'
a822145f22d6621845d798972769b041
d8449b9036d1a426dac234e9d948037cdc66ab34
describe
'8540' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFC' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
c9067e5ad94297bd80d07118386d73ca
dc6a817e724ae95087494d2ab8c0c0f6b775b336
describe
'328969' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFD' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
b86ecc9c0736cc37386e14e343fe5226
896abd792899d7f3629336064af31b0d9780c553
describe
'109507' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFE' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
abead8421e823137f8f8b20867ed6b67
206afd76398bb9f54f7300b62204ed703fd221bb
describe
'24142' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f6190b83213c0d355abc46aed8402746
257aa9c4405fc31719f7ee4ccac2389d4383afd8
describe
'34904' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFG' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
dfb6f41f9702ffb0b9a47e9a2f01c1a7
3ea25338eb4102e3cff0d025233c1a508e72bc8f
'2011-12-22T12:19:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a37502d86aad77e27b473e82e93e0749
8321c40d16d8e1ab13e7c9cb0887c58ab6b39daf
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
14f962629e5363cc17e7034e3e23b999
db2d6c4b27b6cd8df0b1d2953e23749723fcf27b
describe
'8505' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
07aa75f6741a14364a3286b6d9ce5d26
d529c7d9ad8c9189fd8ccc5c27c4adeb1fc0bfb5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2fce937851907cd6bbdfded925559e2a
0dd71bf3c8458a33bdc966674e15ec6416add078
'2011-12-22T12:20:44-05:00'
describe
'130179' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
271a9394e86246101d9926d65313af3b
c3de1364100788f5bfeab7ebefbe925b29873fea
describe
'36511' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
949ac8458ff30fccf79c1723ffc21ef8
cf013fa17647e4d10180cbeeefd1ea407f68e3ad
'2011-12-22T12:18:03-05:00'
describe
'41836' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
ba38e4eacaf52fb2b77a26dbb9745961
29fbc3d778a6217b06f1766c047d2bc7052127c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
d21202b84a49a5913a93d6c0a676fa47
1312a120f1e766c4db053fb23c9e9ee24f259098
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3d138b3591178399c0edfbb5870a058c
caf32b696ba4e1744a3da0b1c6918ce578f187ee
describe
'9718' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
452c30efb1cea19f18f588fda06cf81d
a949e2c509abd345b180484524b79c2d83f8ed55
'2011-12-22T12:17:28-05:00'
describe
'328929' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0a243e46614e9740a42444b8a229119d
2dc3668020bcb0e534738cf696b7beeed35399f1
'2011-12-22T12:16:10-05:00'
describe
'131230' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
eeedd6024f50daa2b03aa3fa42ff17b7
4b0f950b6d5e242431256cf5941338bf070bedc9
describe
'36578' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
7f80373d469de030d78cb63987e0d433
bf67de02d4882ff6827c0ec6e6b8d6687d05d339
describe
'42912' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
d2c407a02411a7cd30845db8ba0f00e5
50f5e7a330a3fc1449ffee2b1e2041168b8ab3c4
'2011-12-22T12:17:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
3b443e6d812ab64bdc4b4ddebde2d2c0
d7f71af4f5b5deb0348800b6f2a7ce66daaea948
'2011-12-22T12:17:43-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8093705f4747525c13ea04f09ec2c830
b08552d0f2f4529f2fd1a234c46253cf992cbe44
'2011-12-22T12:17:57-05:00'
describe
'9959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
116918d034bd038c1b5a467599efe807
5a6329e93571634ae3d451f8b50621212a282e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e81b07a7ea590d92619b5330f64e1468
fb149720c64572783310222e9bc7920319ac167a
'2011-12-22T12:18:27-05:00'
describe
'134271' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTFZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
64712636ca23cd259eca7c4d1924cbef
5cdca1411d8b3390a1763c7be9a7042d5e70c97d
describe
'37578' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGA' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e3d24d8d866478bfa3d87f2ab0a15d84
b6293233380e9d6f8175a98b4caed149e380a25f
describe
'42705' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGB' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
9f3483e788edfd71b11bc3508383f975
de5b6a5150a39dd4e6e835d2a838d35998e6e5f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
feef26b8c65a04e9f6680261c7d87d3d
4e1528743ee5700be1d2223ba95f7e470e430b82
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b6e66e09ec4225daa282a94463089279
fbd36687daa6f0e5bd132bb7fec607962679a41c
'2011-12-22T12:19:13-05:00'
describe
'9911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
08ec46c09ecb08f75ca45712825a7b1f
23f9c507f5afb6fab3b55fe6d77df9a24be38a8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGF' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5af5148014c45bddec77d884e8186cd6
8bab0a57ca65dd7a3c37a5f79abd2e8936eec9f2
'2011-12-22T12:21:32-05:00'
describe
'130037' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
4e0a7ca1c43e14ed25f871e54d173ba3
f27cf65a1f982f85e1d351c398ae761e2df2eb3b
describe
'36521' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
15328eff2d1d1859646878d6fa97fecf
81a8a115ffcf3cec348e5ddea603892b33ec0642
describe
'42313' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGI' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ed8cd7f015584867740fab2d54babc4d
b97b3e0f1033b716dc822609e63556a0280473bc
'2011-12-22T12:17:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGJ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
52dcd56b7b1759a3fa1158feae029581
de31c266808ae42157265ab2e938084a55959097
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGK' 'sip-files00070.txt'
9f6ff3b0244c342e0cb9f78c5e955d3b
fbdf01675a122e6e219259496a120abd38f025d5
describe
'9867' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGL' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
29fd5ca8a7dd890fc75b2c5ac9513cbf
8610a0b85f7c0b89ec7e81b8fe6c26ed6664d0e9
'2011-12-22T12:20:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGM' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6ddf70e9b9b17d3969e7b821036782be
f206b5289123b1a4cfd4115f9f36f15935f32dc0
describe
'129641' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGN' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c4e3d26885377380db45b30a69bbc6e7
a37656af9f702895270e9ac8251bb5aaa5d5411d
describe
'35910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGO' 'sip-files00071.pro'
2bc9d06b00b21523dfa0262c782360d1
db4ad8a3ed308d77a5948942e74b71ce3ec0ef91
describe
'41796' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGP' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d099af340e8ea2c736cbe6722cfdd46d
3f10f412c9a733d8982c2431c7c76bafa2bc8c70
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
0694289cd5e2e7b1a0b42c10a0aa32d0
52b1454c78741fb5003433132c2a3cb63c7257c5
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGR' 'sip-files00071.txt'
038a5e2c9dc30085a8f1fe828d7cea72
5513d4ebaf841768232485f14159f26c6927567a
describe
'9734' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGS' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
c193c6795ce02007ae310627d41f0825
d79a7ab5425d2869e90a746bbcc48c9bde332cfd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGT' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a7cccd7df4855d37767dbe8228efcaeb
0130ce6ded04dc5e720ba2019bdb2d6dc0bc6f6d
describe
'123930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5e00fcf64761d027fed80e2a403383b6
1b90ee5366f70944ed31ffd72d8b6cf87fac3558
'2011-12-22T12:19:00-05:00'
describe
'34855' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
3ebc95b1217deb0d93fda68db9de30e4
23f550343f3fd295b3701de9ceb79fce8019ff0a
describe
'40634' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGW' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2edd77b930ab2e3d01c09be63a7b1759
623a4297fae56a9969b095254cb24773e2bee6d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGX' 'sip-files00072.tif'
83d5f39d9e44e451875eafa95129f399
a55a1ab0b9cba5b4ef19da3aed49e65258990b7a
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGY' 'sip-files00072.txt'
66b26a485f1b8a3b926afaaa43905f4b
e1167b7d261bc791919fdbe0c5f85297bfcb35b4
describe
'9895' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTGZ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
1bf45a456d2f2dae83f126a3a58e249f
47a198bf671490abb78c4a4dd46e31cb1b446ebf
describe
'329009' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHA' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
5cee2142e431edbb2bf0516c0a1ed462
d91fc95a806ff0042fdd435ee5bc5b913e97d885
describe
'123926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHB' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4ea803b198c180a905b6d6a4378ec0ef
27760d15871946f771969b72743ba6fa169fd134
describe
'34752' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHC' 'sip-files00073.pro'
dcc9ab663537093881ae76d12699e4e5
601156cada14b175bd249f0574d294231051deea
describe
'40682' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHD' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
5560e579ae0d273883c44b3aba344175
d94288f1d65e6f906c6e3c5aa84e7f5aaf99e67c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
94457aed27a64537a5fab4984cb9a5e0
f6ea93e0e3051f72ea695327b4022600d1781739
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHF' 'sip-files00073.txt'
916e30474c863a4542f4fa1a7c48effb
9bc1f3defeacc18ad3dbff6d308fb712c28359a9
'2011-12-22T12:18:32-05:00'
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHG' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
3f64e39687450080110882c9c86fdfc1
eac2c26c3ff888a7a43f7416c9a47f4bcacb3235
'2011-12-22T12:18:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
dc7edf269b802393600690df7eb107e8
457c8cca39c712f882dbcebcec0d609b1c2b68f6
describe
'105024' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHI' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
2dab52b6227349878b3a6e36bf1f5168
0e2a01d4951160f909699208735b811d4210613a
describe
'27057' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ff239924893fec7ff9566ff71d11263c
0d1a66b701a03554930581559f9c7aaa50217581
describe
'33692' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHK' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
11dd21b2005a27010c51e93cf555a1fb
87ed69bee642dc77de7d440b7f96bd7741c644fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1396dd1a18c61afc67026ec34d86f2c1
648da9060b9857599fc05a89ce50694d8eb5c0fc
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f8e1e912eec8047d569d49147f65b3fc
48efea07fcbbb6a3f5f3862f957952b2e6d1d16c
describe
'8212' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHN' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
1b4be6e7d1617c8f0c29cb042578343f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHO' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
874b4d1bacf2a03e0a833c4e1904b6fc
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describe
'111805' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHP' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6eba0112ba4580d591a7a57e019ba67b
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describe
'23097' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ae3f12811301309659bdafe88826c03a
f9675884ed140e063967b672fbf29d3ffe3c67ad
describe
'34828' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
1a99c8faae2860ad422df7de216b8e79
42cc7274ad6307511ce55a77bb061be43c5ba787
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHS' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d96e721b5930c038ac4e69eb813cef2f
39b95e6ffff89af57a917ccd9a388a067608d2ed
'2011-12-22T12:19:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHT' 'sip-files00075.txt'
6299682843d067ac453f0dad3188f99f
976ca12b54394c24386a802b7291dca894f26c4d
describe
'8570' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHU' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
efb313347b74ae735280f7564e841177
d5a4d314f7c78b83fe0669502bbc23244a251f85
describe
'329029' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
38053c22e480c41ac7eaf7c58fa5f14a
4456d14f9d6de494d3334e818c21f56b78c39d7d
describe
'136601' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHW' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d533367264ced7f995228fda23c5d279
1ec88ed08e5246108326ceaacc7150c73b7e4be0
describe
'38931' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHX' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0b39011433cd3eb7491088335eca071c
811b2b7928cb6736664c93dcb59c917cfa0f982e
describe
'43868' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHY' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
11ccdef0a619deff919ce2caf2bfffa1
6b3d4066a9e8f805a4dc65187212117162c44f3f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTHZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
56005aee9cdcb6e3f833676ed768ce2e
bc5f59357d3438d1eb24ad93f73cd231e9fd92df
'2011-12-22T12:21:34-05:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b257b94eab679aa394863e8c918c9f3b
4fd70624385fae102cf9000011f894b4d42371d2
describe
'10055' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIB' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
3501ef73b87fb0f0dd208402c4b64d17
322b336e4143e28878658dbef6e78f7330461b0c
'2011-12-22T12:21:30-05:00'
describe
'328980' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b15b243bb99feda4099d270589be56e9
22d2be6baa3edb0101662b66d3c87c033c96ae7e
describe
'154824' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTID' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
ab1916f941a14086d5d1c5c0dba10711
c8ddb82cbde4b8de92228611436b78518b9da6b9
'2011-12-22T12:16:48-05:00'
describe
'4145' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1a6df5ffd682bd31dee33c624a8c6888
623fb03d41802f62b44a00f4b38d291d81b1b642
'2011-12-22T12:17:21-05:00'
describe
'40090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
284ac3d83cadf18445994fe5c5982b99
5bcac4594140bf6d1b511959160a6ed9956c7138
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
a7f212d0b3848fe9d7bd1b6a72adf57a
e9186dfeb11a831328490430f57ee31f7a1013b9
describe
'251' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
56e31383267199bcb4a7dbb828596db6
fec37e4add3f7016adc4bb35bee321dcc9fceece
describe
Invalid character
'10258' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTII' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
9e433cc9511ccf42d086901e00f67ac5
d5e4559ea0a2e291b0b33a130e2aba282451ca5a
'2011-12-22T12:18:17-05:00'
describe
'329012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
51e80982655ef3aa222308ae6f6b9452
8e1734c2a0adbd8d5ef2a40e889715007f1fc179
describe
'126444' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3a5a0641a5f0e3cc1aa933d52b8afc03
04aa23949657fdb0830d1ab7dadf4cc69d469485
describe
'35380' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
5169d457cef8845994cc4bb05137d3bc
bae70006ad15f3ced24088e0c51feaf82d899962
describe
'40000' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
83e83f2e42cdf32e1159d67d895522cb
e3b3d7b56af7299edb3e6043f546ccb61a96c484
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ee810484a115e8de40ea83d7f8996268
9c6c8fd85d3551382619fb0b9d577b9d49bc3eb5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
9c9365efcf923107d585843ed6a332cf
a23be9b125e37152b40e57c9254f2be6abba9c33
describe
'10011' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
f4008174d893f90499c649b64986a643
5c311784b888726397c94b5256dc4201caead9fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
34962ba11247f6e1c61081fd2efdb8b5
0be42818a9b5bdfbb7cdedd1cb28f8384188e960
'2011-12-22T12:18:18-05:00'
describe
'127038' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
7144eea30b2e9ff019e32388cc2fc1b7
405632f1dd40320e789b8a9ffacdca87e72619b4
describe
'35767' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
98d805c0fa720a8e7a84921aece8aab0
9cc27abb83e9e44def6a9f041d66e013ad409dbd
describe
'42090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0fa251a66ac31d9376221e607f7e1265
7178ef798d7bca81386a2c8cd15918e6adbff5ec
'2011-12-22T12:21:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIU' 'sip-files00080.tif'
fc065822a6c27a9e8dfd1dddd36b7990
757892a16275177cc5686a16e40c86eabb1b3ea2
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
071c45281fef0a06916d09eebd784917
c6b843758e2ce2993bcf733bbff6c6e0d7eb19b9
describe
'9719' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
480934f6c00b0642b03a179e5d3a94a4
ad630fc31536ef9ee5973ce388a5472408de2168
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
20e803e349a598a1dcdc9593b495ade8
4ad6133c645d13bf1b411f2a9068332fcee500f3
'2011-12-22T12:17:25-05:00'
describe
'134508' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7f5ec1ce32cb09b68cbb7485258f2d81
db53f41be94569ee6ca9f1357363170cf7e069c3
describe
'37528' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTIZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
45ae5d0eb17ac5e88202f01c160edd20
f27795d5acd0fbbf32e16efcab62db8efd56f55e
describe
'43115' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
8afc2dccec7a0b01cf6f5522d4165d9e
b4ed63cb6e5bf86b5c2e1f6441413dd182152db4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
024a5c946b9596fd5738e7a98b376d5c
3c68e61d8de970722c076dcae81281582aa16e2d
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
09c60325221412b0c62a3616fee1bf14
ca48584080b028920747fcf316a24e54c42bb20a
describe
'9822' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJD' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
12dda6614d604629fb30f5d0b697e83c
a3b5583ce88a8caf2abf141fa8c15c5283f6c6ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c5ba6108fb5fd805ebb3f1075aa4cdbf
e87d2acbbac86eba2ae4ad77153ab0500b9bdd1c
describe
'133142' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
958c0f9ae2b03949f2705d91f16a899c
852b6ee3b63cdc981cf477e464c26a7a339ff221
describe
'37722' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJG' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6ce6320f8fa1451ae02d2c3b0015516d
b6c8023281d777c0428ac926d274578a4ee3f978
describe
'43483' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
52e0a797420d233f069da9e08db9029b
ca6bcf499991db78df07c80afa358ff2277c29fa
'2011-12-22T12:19:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d2e2be0ce01b44650e33cea62d969d72
00d75b569905ba842b6fadf80bd8e92e550c7b33
'2011-12-22T12:18:37-05:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
410df4bd9925141346672d53bb8f9641
7f7d10e3eeb7d7f502cba07c66782c2e520f9007
describe
'10108' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJK' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
5f00cad4d4c7ef602e6b23b8bff26144
cb4148be12cb5dea19f5cabbf176c5e03b5f7506
describe
'328993' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
ec2cafa02334c7462913dbc97823ad4b
ce7bbc2196ca8e6cb6b0823b8bdeeed9619e18ad
describe
'130212' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
eec3fb7ff1be5a3e9326f39e58046de1
ba0f69d92d2a4c90ee8a835c08506af126e73e98
describe
'35840' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJN' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b2cc7b5fbe4f34fc95a3bd3118d71d58
e1008e7cc8a4c9cdf229b02126dc9c1d9dfd2b72
describe
'42781' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
1c75b42903afb7a58bea39ffb7045242
90b85c8fc7225151a140fc1e845a104bb20fff30
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
bc016685dd5ecc38ec9e4e6c489d82e1
c963025c601709be919600ac5dae8cf7cdb14e90
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
430569ae20379b479e2f7e1086f72b6e
2f038a7c7fe3c085dd47cc80b0f32e23d71e2566
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJR' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
5a6793d87c205429e4e66b8744465ac3
708390abb20004373f18562179c8d3b18f7abc32
'2011-12-22T12:21:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJS' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
486924b6ace79d16a8bd8475a8fa0659
0ff00322bd0eab1157c428acbd66fd28f91c5b06
describe
'133222' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJT' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
bd15bdf875046298c70cd906553160bf
8c86fce77cd3dc41cc4ac7d5a387ea6651c579cb
describe
'37760' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJU' 'sip-files00084.pro'
80012c67e2aab20cd6ebf8d92d466438
ef951ef94a1b1b023f48da1a1fc50a4b139f4449
describe
'42537' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
6a1f3896ffd3d2d770e2698adb3f6f4f
c44f4674b3ab708b64a4b613fc516ed04700d96d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
bf0ae4787e89fe0a0c83f4a2d9a8444e
7ab065ea969b732705139e1e35e8952b7058e9f7
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJX' 'sip-files00084.txt'
06d87595b0fc0b069dd11096b6db20e1
7c142d7cad39ea8f667ca83b9deb3adde0656100
'2011-12-22T12:18:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
1cd9e4ad2144f7b517fc392a18296f17
117844891f10100b8efeb6a91e05d177bd4b74d6
describe
'328720' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTJZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
aeab6fb4c3147cd8990e56b5c4ebb328
8968a040a9c684eaad2d3cba880c26f80afaf56b
describe
'37091' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKA' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
7117900a31bf1b7907786a79493f9675
898c3bcb70178c084dcfca6a11984f660461b675
describe
'6800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKB' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f87d18c6e3f690b70993987502c1b67d
e6f5e2807f0fd935d2f8e9a25050e689dc9ee51d
'2011-12-22T12:20:24-05:00'
describe
'11711' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKC' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c4a4b2366173d3e47b9780a723d698f6
d479010b5683472760f3c13b003ead7cf13c40d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
e3f5517c423454a2ffb629ae08b555e6
61e2a1261c59f15036df60a344a6d8878e0d516d
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ecfd34376b901fce42df1a6c8a180ec7
bba0e87b0926419e822c15ce6df747cdc9817b15
describe
'3265' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
4146bd2e54e836016d4a1e0bdfb89f9d
f1e8b6e51c4492917baafdf36ad533c07347cf59
'2011-12-22T12:20:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
3b4270805c585e8726b73e6a615b6f92
5a9941f84f8ccfe1dfdc10d5820d4ac9afc98571
'2011-12-22T12:18:21-05:00'
describe
'107869' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
0f702698802199ddbdbba7f0057728fe
a463bbfbebdfe63c3e81b8c00c72c5a09faaadb8
describe
'23782' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKI' 'sip-files00086.pro'
99f53a59aaed61b53a9073b8c4d23f71
de795968448f62c81e81dbb8f0e2fd82f6aeba23
describe
'33398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
5024c7a54e0c1508ee77d7d339aecdf3
ced2ad64c67884988c82b9eef53c8ab7d01b3da7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
49b4339f32490e704fc25c3c06cf83d4
767c8edff88ec22b1687001f20804392b2c5dc1e
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2c1d279771c4faef2e4d0214cddf5bf2
47ed23ac02019d86b418996c4311baba41bef1d3
describe
'8230' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e12e55edceb59c025e5781d073fee83f
a6edaf52cd2c6fe7b62065128cf54ea9f13e1efb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKN' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9cdc74b26820a618dbfa11b8e170a4db
0b09269194a1bd407f5b66cfaa04a17b00ceaf7d
describe
'126817' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
eaa3fa8479ecf1464b40ca3c03e59726
e8259fa60d2f998b2e4296275aa6f09eb0484727
describe
'35054' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKP' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5704c24505db2f87faaeddd881a77e35
505f8c9e745cff544147be170d76f7d95c556e1f
describe
'40707' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
59fcb3c68f0283423576b7cdc71ec0a5
9fbdee662a4df1ed139a81241997fa723c370bd4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKR' 'sip-files00087.tif'
0bed07d886cd014a4f87cd5d1d085588
bbde63a61622a181b990c02237c551683c6362e4
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKS' 'sip-files00087.txt'
41db5152d2d8e4d71344b40f211b3fc6
7f93de4b4007650927fe7786cd8e9e08d47eafff
'2011-12-22T12:19:06-05:00'
describe
'9935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
5b07b1d1a0dd2b8861cf42db1580a024
cd081f7db4670de87ed6ba4876a579d4cde716e8
describe
'328940' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKU' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
38dbd70f7e7d949c4164ab60856dd6ed
373e45f92725d3e1ce20ca8ebb05e0780358b98e
'2011-12-22T12:17:33-05:00'
describe
'129833' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKV' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
4e247c6655a0d8150c1905bb2bfa0d63
8c2d7e53e6fdf3b91f38c4954da01da364f80d65
describe
'37211' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKW' 'sip-files00088.pro'
9f10bb23e2d51e407afd73d9fdb7a5ce
38da592d55387c3f3ee7bc74c76688ccac50cdea
describe
'42368' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKX' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0132555e14e0dafe2655629b7ad3060e
01c5722a6c9908c963c0e8efb73fa9378a8bc853
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKY' 'sip-files00088.tif'
0e24651f9cf63e04f95a2438722e8f2d
fcde3964d34bf5604f40d9191f15d558eb2f0e62
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTKZ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d98397400a0bf9efefc7279eeb0fcf51
62fff4e8d9c2f1f6e60fd22510434776ab19917a
describe
'9862' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLA' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
067c6a5ae7476c92ae9aefb3c6fada96
b5627795cf09418f4a2685c8fb30544adf09734f
describe
'328975' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
cf0d646fd26e20534d3d7f4dce417c4a
481aba99c17d4216ccdac09d5cd6e1375b8c27cd
describe
'134905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLC' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
5192579b80db466bb6b65fc78e4256a7
ab026675a3bac09958f714f872ccd87250f3998e
describe
'36566' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
09a0180e936bdfa6a4007573b03dcad0
fe1a816deed46adbded884947c0aceab7a141293
describe
'43131' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
4cb1094e1008551dc482485e374fd7d6
63b8910407628cababf68fd12f9f716c06130e5b
describe
'2648624' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLF' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7c4e25c70c957038c9bd5a8895ea9401
7708471059d731ac8dd56448317e4d232a417a4e
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
1506939e0d5fd6e0f145753d1274eff4
4a3faa36d110de82347354a56bd55455734f6113
describe
'10136' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
f119a99b605866357936a81a3031dd1a
dc04b65e329f6ecd79bf4e54c99abe1313acf57c
describe
'329024' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLI' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5ff5090bcc3263b00db2340414a75915
cbeb2a6ceb6304bd97c199348db24bb9086aea6c
'2011-12-22T12:16:57-05:00'
describe
'127126' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLJ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
de1b6b1c655f4ea1ee042d49f92f9b36
7ccfaa510baedebd06ebd86a8e77ea9d4721a18a
'2011-12-22T12:19:04-05:00'
describe
'36064' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLK' 'sip-files00090.pro'
ad4807b741b333eed691700b88e5d966
0b263f8aa49a5863c0fe288ccdffd8e3930986ce
describe
'40887' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLL' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
84795d2c6d45a1cda19ab10245ee21cb
fd8045e84bcbf5095ba19e223b2e77a750a4e469
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ddcd78a9d330d795bb66aba13cacb5dd
69df3cd72adfaaba4de76276706b69f48e172337
'2011-12-22T12:19:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d0adbe75d87e471f59f308be7c8d93f7
2d688d0ad6a7b852859d8c50b95b3db545aeff82
describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLO' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
58c3ceb4fb5b82ef3edfbc6381e9a921
4b36823d7c544f55df24c36a35a3a390baf807d7
describe
'329005' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
6bead6516cfe3885cff05fccb71b6fdb
e001074536183c4476892004731f21ff7ca8324c
describe
'130510' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
ee847d73d516a2b6fa8808a12801e40c
1b33f7c89faff0d754c44533677000cda63cc030
describe
'35695' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLR' 'sip-files00091.pro'
a3d277377cca0ab45e782a0d7be95f6a
d6d188f30560bb162381972e0e0a0cd344aafccd
describe
'42865' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
05dfdb80eabdda90164f970d9485c546
9d821b3cbd183fee6ce493357ab1085e0049dde8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
da61a2ec733a5b281ca4853bde243f46
68574d4d40b16862ee2c06976e3252ed7661ad80
'2011-12-22T12:21:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
21b7ab169c7f24268d56bcf1b895c6af
f6730152f1aa1ffff02cd578de5093dc25a7f0b8
describe
'10060' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
36857386e501c7e0e9386149472edd9f
74b7c168ec558a330b3c7da538f7567f0ad75eaa
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLW' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
6a0a20108238dd1de011689a9c6d988e
83ef9859e31bbcff0a4d1df0f43813692351c68a
describe
'131217' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLX' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
4abf1f625ebae7aabe5658d313ca51ef
9be344d73855668d682eaaf81f8694441bdc776c
'2011-12-22T12:19:07-05:00'
describe
'36967' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLY' 'sip-files00092.pro'
ae36fbe1ef2f8b078a39e57c0392c3ac
96efdc388fae323c8e799ffa8e856790f820f476
describe
'42398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTLZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
1348b861c680f85561879f029a2460b1
cefb863141a64c781c5016df6ebd8c31a3ef8207
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMA' 'sip-files00092.tif'
12f2b1c394ea961a84e2fc262a655dd0
00243267df7b011339913f3c53b58ddeb5936399
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
fe69e3313153b7197d4f181866c88d50
50d2a02f9dcbe60c7525cde31a785d406812a8fe
describe
'9790' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMC' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
8196ef21fb6f86a50966e9f7aeb40771
604ae2488f380e0800aa2c4c3b7bab4033975c9a
describe
'328994' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMD' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
29cf225ed1a20f2a16d54ec7eb414496
1d69b99f3ea9ca0070c8f752811178c765823c89
describe
'129663' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTME' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
7d5ba7ed4fbcf1b24cd267d47f1aaad2
6dd5af7d995351b0ea8b165c0d4c3d3215e56c94
describe
'37244' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c934fcc4441b572fd767689db7ebb986
0eca743c3a49c7d4c32072a72065a9924e30ee71
describe
'42482' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMG' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
282413af2d0bd4f30ce57f4a7090550a
f2e1a185b2c24ac919b56c7d222186988df7af2f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMH' 'sip-files00093.tif'
0171a8fd8f63e4d8ffea7cd5f492e7b3
baa86ec4d839bc71f430f8746d0bb3d1e10367f6
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMI' 'sip-files00093.txt'
14f1e7f4a26c893968d35f731b3e293d
1cfeb92341d11934cd893e3d0928fbb715f2982c
'2011-12-22T12:18:09-05:00'
describe
'9853' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMJ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7f5efc3d12d2cf09b81bb145ad571f7d
881e2c7809020b40dc02c17df7d7fe63f8965d6e
describe
'329034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMK' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
bed07da252024f64a7a6109a1e10dc23
c1010084a0836dca9da4210b59e953ebb2ee0f8a
describe
'108546' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTML' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
daab54ecbe603c0a6e6f4e4e6d729200
ba6cdb2c74c5b857abe2e39a23ee1dae82b96090
'2011-12-22T12:21:02-05:00'
describe
'29676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMM' 'sip-files00094.pro'
27647701ef22b567e69cfd6ea8648682
75babcda4ac1dbf08bf705a78ef0f2de728037a1
describe
'34827' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMN' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
d2216371388654be10016827a8153689
c032c5084c1fbd7f9b1c00838ba01f977b03c6a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b57d8bacb7c42cba7a26c3cc7cdf32d1
d9fbd593c9009dc03b61c2ae93546f4babf1c36c
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMP' 'sip-files00094.txt'
dae0d9a91df8bc2af2e8a3b01b183d85
8bf838e385913ca176d10990ed760283e92046d2
'2011-12-22T12:19:22-05:00'
describe
'8624' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMQ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
674dfa8a5a8fbbdcd199f5631915c425
0c32d452d9b57c9e30b7f8976896587668139bb0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMR' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
b3146af234f2ee06e1ee9494172c1be1
04d1b595dfacd7237588d1b93fd529adb11f328d
describe
'108482' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMS' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e6e8be9c2e5e583302725f4cfb89cdd1
b810e4ae926dbba8eda3826b93bd945db088adb3
describe
'22601' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c6a3e30b4c038cd96e68147d2d0eef06
ac2b51b688f528df76fe73909e082d84176a2e8b
describe
'33852' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMU' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
1c94a3619eb61d5190d4942d05ec4fe1
4aa1dd36a22ed40639dcc2c0330acce5c9e28016
describe
'2649096' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMV' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0e417cd51a4527e4cc7452ee0ce466d5
2b906452194fcf2f6bba49bdf54e9615272b2626
'2011-12-22T12:21:13-05:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
54bd7c07a2e75b031a9fd8d5014dba9d
a1b7912ae1021a78666ae629ba836a6d1e4c5f34
'2011-12-22T12:18:36-05:00'
describe
'8588' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMX' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
80131db4d18991fa3baa7b31cbaea5bf
421398deed6728a1de9e8be05a0d0b5bbc6de833
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
3f4f6c14e204610ff0ac998764eff1b7
1cb6ffa34242510dbb3d008453bdf7ec7cb15f88
describe
'130472' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTMZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a0702d4e9ed734dc4de8c07708d9a2c1
53302bf0f50797e924b8d699ffde14167ce9f125
describe
'36648' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNA' 'sip-files00096.pro'
ff4a4024971e550424d01eab368e09ae
0a727ca0112c3563fcbaf93e99648230eda5414a
describe
'41834' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
702c6205fd4517327650f6ccf7b06198
687d18875200b9948a618f2e23221d5f78be9e14
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
71acd74be961cba4eaf9ee64e05bdb21
15ee5981598a293f6aa72eac42cf2de26655439e
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTND' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f0c93ed94b46d29a7cd610d25364141f
4cc104fd379934304e5435875c659f80d2b203cc
describe
'9745' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8b3f7b754c7550732d9a31342acbc9af
593d7f29c0638751778a163285261285ffce141a
describe
'329007' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNF' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
4556133a1cb0c4476948fbca37c9333e
900811004b2ecb48b32ab64830edc7d7841671bd
describe
'129557' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNG' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c58cd051340a99e4ddc4e8989a77702c
e9191f8a4f093ee2ae8768c762e9d2f5f806fee9
describe
'36431' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
4b0894fbadbf3d836760757c7b3fdf02
f954d5566564d1792bd27771f780054e89c4890c
describe
'41671' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
3ac46e2527e63cc100d3bd2600817edf
a3c2a18464088f65d4fd53221b3e0518377608ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
89e0c963188bb0008ff6f142eaf6c57b
8bfd1d22264686c366560ead00f0e3fb4a67b9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
79896c232a45559fe462d7a453bf4d2b
ceed1d214cb59e61a252031d89b219aab9a9932f
describe
'9894' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNL' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
208c60419695ab3448911d14cc2a30ce
62a908f9170f5a43573383c8ac1163be25f46add
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
43a88f493be79d98e1ff3c5f912a4ba9
97bf14236233b475f3680f4b28d30762ef6cae23
describe
'132336' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNN' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
02adcd1b259049fe67dbbbe4923c2bfb
2ad7fffa1ff8801c404165033227ede04a019a12
'2011-12-22T12:21:21-05:00'
describe
'37507' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNO' 'sip-files00098.pro'
34d75b2342471356c52cbb2120bbc16b
5b90e60bb9319932f288ecd9d99a76337cb02b55
describe
'43001' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNP' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
55734e7a6ee622535f8dda550391e353
27303e8e67b781128018565a7ad1870e87ccbc5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNQ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
e7c9f20a0cdd9222307e116b96ec40d3
e6c7191ad097d60307b30057a67616342f7c8e9d
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4f8b649f22a262de96e232628a0d6b6f
703397f205560c38d2f0867554994e12c0742cc6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNS' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
c837366742b50e2290c130f0e0eceef6
35f28987a5f05e0a8bc2712267f0753af2229e0a
describe
'329021' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNT' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
02ff9c1904de556233065e200a557de2
059673fb5123c982edb85445bb94cdb36252dc81
describe
'134010' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNU' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
56afdf03c661a2d69ad28e199a1cb442
45065b71c0431efe24b5ce99a13180d03bc91778
describe
'37222' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
028d464ebb4e4f9443e0d649fb766215
9632900db6ee75d598b588b093d27b3bef70c619
describe
'43127' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNW' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f575d021178a6cd6f0cd6a3d3ca99476
c7f221432247f0e884f126ece5da0bc3e8e52578
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
a0e36be3d1706a667ee7f0e797f5368a
cdced270b8e84b71aacaed6d0a351d162b941594
'2011-12-22T12:19:35-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
67a72741fce595303f259ef3be925c6b
3f68a8cd286463a0c1b2cfbd62dfc0f5cad72280
describe
'9994' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTNZ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
9b9b8907a8573a789a51f9912c013df5
79879183adc54bf69a4784dadc6620d602919bab
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOA' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
105e457554fe28fcf382cb71cc768209
ba0603f9a83b8b08d79381b04aedc7234557fb93
describe
'129170' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
e7175e839fc692a54090f568049cfefe
a6de3dc3435b2d8ca76775c0be82c984e8e72960
describe
'36706' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOC' 'sip-files00100.pro'
0803bc1d97c9616e11d6b0d39e3d7a1c
d0cfd24c7b48bd8309c9d270d9a456324bb161de
describe
'41927' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3ef891b33bbb8629a9b03e6ebb1768c1
b3e5a768b45b170180dd88526c076adda2d815c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOE' 'sip-files00100.tif'
e4926512e4aed490eb585ac78b06c498
3202e7d32969c96112c13ffefa7a85bdd833d5df
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOF' 'sip-files00100.txt'
76808969736a01d14b9ad8943996e930
2a39bc1cf7fab2b55d82e62874f03df55d095563
describe
'10080' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOG' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
977884e86ccd690de13e56a06e151f51
e4f5f6e21d5a9d320b993ef66705362335eca3df
describe
'328925' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
bcc6dbd333345a49653f442670b63a74
2ffb213afc2bcc7c11709537e09c1f1727f5bcac
'2011-12-22T12:18:43-05:00'
describe
'41013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOI' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
d5c3d02554b8c3e959eda201114d4017
1a169da5804202f9e39e7ad1b9c0d1110c6030c5
describe
'8679' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
71410af1cfd7e0ba4f0e5122e37dcf89
24da4dbf124da76ae8e06461358c589d7d027ff5
'2011-12-22T12:20:27-05:00'
describe
'13194' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
3dfd29048833a8e9c4f8a44b7fac8d21
43b8afa49810ad99a91f9a791daa65b62d7c9b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
89a69cff58a6156925f4d19dec6db818
cdb5344993a0ff743a6d10c80b1e01468da09709
'2011-12-22T12:18:26-05:00'
describe
'370' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOM' 'sip-files00101.txt'
1d24400d8d166faf0a99c89ec72d1b1b
fb35152159696ef06900ac33a1c746f38f5d1c4a
'2011-12-22T12:16:58-05:00'
describe
'3340' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTON' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
2476c6dfbfe08a40019cee50b414b737
c689884bd2e61b5c2f06984521ca99316c0b5baa
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOO' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
12848597ec94a513f2061df424d21adc
323900b7440e38bbe804267626fd55da3854c769
describe
'102028' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOP' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
502b10bd6c5aac96d53abb301f952c79
2ecdfcfccddc5dc41b8f05f1920974fa066930c7
'2011-12-22T12:16:11-05:00'
describe
'22092' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
751edf079f641b2e6051e6c4a2703cf1
6e2bef302ae8d43626a2a6f2adb269c897d41a70
describe
'31153' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5a97456192987409f0a4d3e780c7f5e7
de23d166029d610b7d42dd4b0a1d692845435491
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOS' 'sip-files00102.tif'
0f6627c3be4d02190e243a07359a1c00
4a00ed7f5f2e42fdf2b68fff1c7660d3deb37eba
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOT' 'sip-files00102.txt'
80944a34987dcea497de37b9ff5ec6c5
58f451b81acc1f166bb8e44728c823093811dc6f
describe
'7660' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
d300498383ae6556067ec9a255a08a71
26e4e06d0010c73bfd986401ce8529ee71eaa080
'2011-12-22T12:18:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
8a21fa648032ddb82e779ea99b32f7c7
ebd5071a16f17d377be906af8f6d95a427dc1294
'2011-12-22T12:20:05-05:00'
describe
'135242' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOW' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3b9595b13bea50f517b52a09b624bf4c
f8338ec0218cc0976d4ae72f67c0f612e913e1a2
'2011-12-22T12:15:58-05:00'
describe
'37656' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
e471fd58859882957215722971c31224
83591c9144de73a6bc60cb5ec45e0ff1a081e62c
describe
'42945' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOY' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
c25d2a82ffdd482022738fccd78a0138
4ab42437586b8fb399b7e00d394f1b733d41ae52
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTOZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
384129625f0ce6083615110be65a5b7e
b4934b1c929ab4850c3e221aa0cf3af3986d0384
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPA' 'sip-files00103.txt'
9dc505f0aa0d6b63dd07f7729d6d343d
b1b1b9413d91ec618a6f5c0b048d71122caa48b9
describe
'10221' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPB' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
4d13111172244bfed5c10b398b06103f
e4f60d661766cbe24587a1e59fdc9752cc5d9247
describe
'328991' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2e8a8e78bb95fee2eb7bae3816378b32
b9caeb5b3244baada57ce7dd0eb7d907c01a2e14
describe
'134204' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPD' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
f7cf6e5ca190053f202fbaeb17a016b3
943519dc2eff53cd61819eeb938ac2e58f4e5bae
'2011-12-22T12:19:14-05:00'
describe
'37533' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPE' 'sip-files00104.pro'
23ad15f73696c4cea15b02624277b23b
5b776316eea1c8e1f96f30126bb956e147a19cda
describe
'42746' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
7e34c3c5c35704a50b20d46bc239198e
166a81787d0a9127c555364fe9b4c570186335bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPG' 'sip-files00104.tif'
de18a468e5443fc92271f9a6e24b6830
decf1d425261fef3e50aee90f4119700b0e09ee8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
2b813f927496c91146d1111fef0bdf05
749b4e8d96472cc1f75111778912dfa857bef049
describe
'9989' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPI' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9085abdd343c27f66f11dee3b7941aa4
f4db2b7b9522d44a3359b2976929002ea60ba29b
describe
'328999' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPJ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
266a0754628a46b768890025dbf02d96
3b7a70852967bccf434477244822b27463c47087
describe
'124900' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPK' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
7884654c8c4bcc0db44feda024a3c5ce
cba1cd20abdd1cd06ed8bbac41860401a4da4ce4
describe
'35152' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPL' 'sip-files00105.pro'
818005aea32b12910828bc18015b700e
80b05c861e2bfa588fe205c08bad80fcba2130cd
describe
'40408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
389b5fd214a7f5f6d36b2886d9e8f501
8df640c705516bceff0f8206bb996f587fa47cf0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPN' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b0028a87ab8e4eaa2e6879b62c7abb2f
59ad0afa96df0adf970db4cb088bdfd70c0c03df
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
6b98a501bf4f493f22960a037f7df448
f3c44a7868edc963857028dcee86949cf317af0e
describe
'9728' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
0903b6eae242eeac4de3af6572f3c80d
da17f90c8a068ce801159888906ecd6d74d9d32a
describe
'328894' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
da1d7b16806fd988a934fe2e325172d4
4888eeaccd54e0986aa71968d282f9ed4b211af2
describe
'126669' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPR' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
7d6695c3eb02f897ffbfc33f71355848
e0b66fb6d9a9885ce4c730bd0189f4f30d1e067e
describe
'35310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
dcf0dfedf87db8007b76db9a03b36011
b627b27f552c7be9625b59cc50dde918281f12d4
describe
'40013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d8057937ff722c4d4e7e2308ac85c2b8
09254f40be3febe8885287b823adf61952fe6e19
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPU' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c1a876a1d93bf7a11713e6377d21b573
c3eba3f1971689a6529a32301d927745fe9e87db
'2011-12-22T12:16:39-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPV' 'sip-files00106.txt'
b2f07124705f8e256ebcbcc455aa73f4
ec6c939ac3ed66c5dca50368b07b8b7ee75a64b0
describe
'9780' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPW' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e2070ed65c9314d3610297322dfd6ae7
282cb26e2533f793085929b53518d705fa3b8384
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e5c3025b76f67debdbc0ccd0d2e7bbd0
6205d34f6ec8f9264935ea9ef58990cd332242e2
describe
'123458' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
b420195809f45c4599f3e90c883fe55c
8f1349ba2e957857535ef0e7b298b5a1a3f40435
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTPZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
4a134ccbb24935ba0410f8147950aa97
c933b9ec34d81b26bf60b3ae8c866dd262815383
describe
'39425' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
00234f8495d97d05a49aff4e90b1011f
cdf5055e919fd4e5d48eb88e9e255456851b862c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
57b9032c96713e65b6438fb6eb1d90af
76df0cde951fe4164956ac2472ed3c88f8204601
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQC' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1d781a99ae6a47f93988684bf65a9ec3
b0c71a6ec2f707cfaf3ed1bfae06caf76c7032ca
describe
'9805' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQD' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
9bdb071399d07a771b0303381efbc1aa
e12201aac1093d4d95b0a35c8a6dbbe8081fe78e
describe
'328738' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f2f2b73bcf0df0783e823f7c0a9a1095
f4199dfad62583b6c6c2fc6d59377049a2954ef0
describe
'64271' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQF' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
03b9cbc51c8a57a4c0b12a209e1ed1d7
dfef4ca2161189cf993079545c93880b61e892bb
describe
'14567' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQG' 'sip-files00108.pro'
105fcfc8a6ce822ee4b6da86e7eecf4b
3d175ce4101075e8e4c324a003d78ec26a65b005
describe
'19660' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
977b39fb5c443ee83d30fb8fec3eac74
a9e11ff692e7ab791c995ae0766ea43fc932d9b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQI' 'sip-files00108.tif'
48adacba797ce41b4f9453d016053c1f
b1570490454f7cff422c45a8b70a146379e28228
describe
'604' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a705c810cff14802b830b1525f6c03eb
bfa3641d849d1fa96547e9e19be7d88364f14a53
describe
'4875' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQK' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
c09866ab92404d5309e07c03c8af4dd9
f5f0f600cf68ddeeef6dc0c7be925dff39c329d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0b5391b46475bcc6fa4f6eafe8f877cc
6f60e9a573aa65227e938b914b5c0f37ecc9c214
describe
'115171' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
65d9d896de35dcf96c4a7dcb018201ce
a5e80078106043a163f0bfa429181a63f54c5af4
'2011-12-22T12:16:01-05:00'
describe
'23987' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQN' 'sip-files00109.pro'
24250418b789292b76c129746d0e2d84
bbeffaa0a9e701a082e6f0b9e328926e40c3a17b
describe
'35183' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQO' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
12c99ac084fc86f58bb6b0f24a5166b3
95e3324d00373dbe12a259313edbe8a53ffaff50
'2011-12-22T12:18:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQP' 'sip-files00109.tif'
73d239babd6a1064605b63246aa5df5d
a56fb8eca8aec3c00d4d2986987f376028d2f11e
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
61171459153734f776d68acc964dffb2
fa41a9435193daf141a42f2ac795dde632741456
describe
'8567' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQR' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
07d7fe1255210aa0408cc4988ea8dab9
2ffb4f3d7300ac6e37c88191dba8e77b838c3efb
describe
'328944' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQS' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
c1c5721d9c3f25af6a80081dbbf75626
e19d6f9b782a8580abdab38fa71a563547114ed4
describe
'131340' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQT' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
95af65b23a4bae74972284a3b144552a
95a71426c793eab811109a214bc226c454806b8c
describe
'36766' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQU' 'sip-files00110.pro'
5eeb39b7eb480b6e17b29a1d7c73a42c
adc8f1fec13142c9d38531e7c2c809bbe92a1e35
describe
'42638' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
cc35c5dbcd6c41f365daab5597e23a78
68fb3f75d06c16427d80950d9a73f270a844cbfc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
9466499e2c27122ed90618a3de3b3bb0
1be2fbb0314f9573ec7d214f5c027774f6db70d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3647bd76a389c9d92b599fc4a96f4bd8
931929071f5b45fd8ea240df15929ea0bc648817
describe
'9836' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
dfe43198e20332a09acc274d82c17d31
8d34a1bf5374a09407ee42a77c74b7bb2b16ef80
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTQZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
70e269715d4313b0f6d30ed9f88fe22e
ff665a65e5ddba282149891a2fe4563c62cf1bbe
describe
'131678' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
beef5af3c4122ca618730546312107ea
6c9046826e892816984dc3892595aa7ccc79a2fa
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRB' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e76a0037313835aff7d54e2df2aaa985
8960e6abd51ce4fb1ddff3f42f4a1c498491a1c8
describe
'41938' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d7f36d4e5bc5785dbb486b34c37ab835
a09590ef4c39eae1930436bf9095ed47132c4ccf
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRD' 'sip-files00111.tif'
261b6878c91c2f471ec24943b656f72e
16267960952ad367e27a4e9f05e3e221028fbaa5
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0cba1bf9144e3bde6880eda9cbd8d306
3eff9d229e79351d6e8bfbf6abd26a5470417510
'2011-12-22T12:20:32-05:00'
describe
'10143' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
0a2a29d396fc021486e698ce0c8fb76f
24963e26137e8cf63d2203820067272dc9857c2b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRG' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
c47a3054d9db4ff0fa629c1dd646123c
36e4fb563977bc6a640c80e7fe72b6366506c10d
describe
'126641' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRH' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
85f37c4be996b5e2b0c679b93d54bdf3
45de0fd1cb918466996d265483a6bc974bd9b60a
describe
'35801' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRI' 'sip-files00112.pro'
4620696d0883fa30885d2b880d787c5e
68788ac66f33a842a0aca7de8040d28f585cd8b0
describe
'40115' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
2dc3eb5ab9354341e2330b4e359bbd9f
4c32cf5b7c01d7f5853c6c6086d2ed8829fc70f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
f74815c6c9f7855bfde51be5e2d261d8
caa97e6156574719ebea934048714ec41b871e47
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
0c2118d2ce7e95b0ca95fba1611564c1
9116cd97e0694337f5a4c5cbf8f3ab397bb5e91c
describe
'9733' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
831b996ea213d71cf7f22111cc544b32
f526abc4c4bc922e93d054ba991e9dc7858d7322
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3cf5fdc9088b37640f7e19e18d47c9da
5113fe1eaa09e11ea101b616b6afdf398d9a1269
describe
'133453' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
59e03dfad0c895698bf70f02b17fea5e
5c711ec53380aa80e9223734d3819c7312a546e2
describe
'36697' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
d5ef46798acae5b5c588ee987e73af53
38e87d53c9430cdf125323a7583f14a459497c5a
'2011-12-22T12:19:46-05:00'
describe
'42616' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
578f4031e59344cb8c959cd4ae0bfd8e
bcb4d3b73a13711af6e8ac938f13cdef5a216363
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
59f6925160353d7623d377a45e546aee
04cc02d273f5faf635a92857b7a6b56844128ff5
'2011-12-22T12:19:50-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
cd26f6bbc395139f988711daa9c7dc71
c2f88be6bda65243447a4dbc30532f24245c34ec
describe
'10091' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
d4f81c93e7416a453c1ff0278963e4fb
f88f6e8f50b50f926edce7dca32387d33bd2d047
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
c2bff5796db91ac3349df277c4059b89
267aa2729224e1c817338bce1998754efc5c49cb
'2011-12-22T12:19:12-05:00'
describe
'117947' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
2f3b3130de0d49a718c40c8853bbc611
f7c850b51e8a1674d7b205bef6ea5da9c45ad920
'2011-12-22T12:17:59-05:00'
describe
'32963' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
3abccf541ce326e27141699135de8b6c
5ee8c5ead8a124abfefe1bc8d165aa1197f07ab3
describe
'38377' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRX' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
e9c24d45405c8e468c971b8d1ab63211
ef4a9da0e7cc4e680578a66f467fce9fa410b370
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
fd5a044c30ab8843afd79d7ab1a85301
9b07864c7141457c210194dc66d9e5de11c077ef
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTRZ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
953c66141519a7bec22dea2c3281a8c9
710951529fc5c6412a7ffd8ed4ab4451aa5599a9
describe
'9614' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSA' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
bb03361184476e5b597cfbf87d197176
e4fe56be338ee902c85971d0127c996b228d7ba8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSB' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b8ff27177e61472e22c93ce249e138c7
430f1d154bb6f09f9a1bc55985fb3e473ad279fa
describe
'126083' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
597bb2f7d78b3bcad0a19e0b3f650c1e
53ca918e2af40847611d25fe52831269d2254cc6
describe
'35835' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
b9f2d7618fc5b9fd1696ff22e63509d7
bfbccc98cea8b0d591dda7b2bca59fbe5687ac73
'2011-12-22T12:20:14-05:00'
describe
'41316' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
4b355b7d14c34b01d70367b0bcdeb485
96707bc95ba97c86d20714462b6fcceeeb3d444b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c3e327c9e3276e32161d1eb8e9938fed
213598012032a23f20eec64d940d2666d8062b0c
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSG' 'sip-files00115.txt'
c2247753eeb77b1f2a061c4d92e92e70
841beb4870be68b15de91fc8abb309d6f22ced1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
89ad78b87767ad5614b0518c60ec5c5a
766bfe735fdac46f3442d3666199d8d25fa43dd7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
e46951bb1fec88aeae12f8c308fe6dcc
00f3c03188fcc9f0738c5d3599acb0595166c71b
'2011-12-22T12:16:44-05:00'
describe
'124948' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f38bea10c2b167a2f4665a6ec0fa1aa3
f7541a227845e6eb71f704cdbb3c83d8ea11cdaf
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8e6231dae984129dc8d74a2aa0f131b7
83172d7dbcf7024083e592dff3f62e20f3026c7f
describe
'40352' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
915d3ab8d27d59434ee685e3f02dd951
0a0a365ed1efa6a9ada80ab952af389569ad2b69
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSM' 'sip-files00116.tif'
ce715e45d0832bca3bb393f86761898a
75beded6ed86c239c2daef73cbf56793404a7ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSN' 'sip-files00116.txt'
99a7bd7849e3920041909bd6a52f4523
242f0e9eedb76354bc93e372da39855050ee9f40
describe
'10079' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSO' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
e91dd1064a69fee591ad890984fff1d8
650fef5cdaa3bd84b46cc649775dd8a028ff3816
describe
'328928' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
48d52ad84755a2eb5a14a340167b528c
c512c675fc446d7ea0f0a26b75097ede488a4c46
describe
'133006' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
67d9279791c2f46d54644e5c2a88ca80
e1ad253150950328f66e4004420de789e0c573f0
describe
'37445' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSR' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5c4d97f2f51b25f0a43dfa24921c4e2f
1d3a982294a1f2461a104f6206835e5d91810b26
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSS' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
696047f397d0ca570d78a7261c3c6f9c
ac115525378925fe21b1436e1eb7cdc68ec58d0e
'2011-12-22T12:18:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTST' 'sip-files00117.tif'
356a53238973158aac5f5db4e6b98366
484ddd90a7ff61fc4520cd4caf6a6421d07ead6f
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
76fb340eb6a21f79cb9206cec1f4bb68
a5965e10797e18db46cf6eb9cd918069282a3a83
'2011-12-22T12:21:10-05:00'
describe
'9830' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
9dab0f5faa27c751d270bdd39e3e5e84
bc8698939459b4626aed84837e4efdd19277bb7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSW' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
dcfdededcfc259032f9e50a908c66f89
11f1a1a376b24128b86041ac78b00bf7a6c7111e
describe
'126286' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSX' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
08d34ac8dc0f602e8b3ca3088226af32
f270af1976010de34a672676e21213859e904e4d
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSY' 'sip-files00118.pro'
44bb551c31633d80ee4fab1ced14dba9
c4a1f3a14d11ba1fd56fc2323ef95c44f95fb81d
describe
'41811' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTSZ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
e32fd789e1756ea626c37cc5a4e91460
ac9ee5a8da41a5962d499f7192824eabc475f66c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTA' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c3c642a7e4642f92f2af774e9d60115a
c49b271e4a2d7502043007611d156e60ab97cab9
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTB' 'sip-files00118.txt'
999a1ea5f4b896058ec5f3c187bfb2ac
9f86a17f3ba36018aa2b5c1e1474b8a9b90918c3
describe
'9978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
17905414d14fb89e111d205fa54b79c7
ff9eecacca7a93b4f3c1bcd5e807d1ea1fa3c0aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTD' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
54d6eaa14dda3148982846eb59c14e72
aa5b022b605ed0e8e39ce590888bf5b676dd755c
describe
'124362' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTE' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
e89db7c1dbc575c714a561979e05472c
c26e709660d91024ed2fe9f75304f2aa09c25c9d
describe
'33575' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
b216f5b3ee4f541bf61de63cc29be8d5
aea0c1b40d9590974d0657870994071c92f52290
describe
'40763' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTG' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
de983b4afa1dfa3fd6f1eeb11d27e646
bee59e38e6d9f17c3379e0b61b674ce4b6599c44
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTH' 'sip-files00119.tif'
4f3781414cc8987699758276faf7d633
10cfd8e681c1d4b44c931bbacc97a5b248cc796f
'2011-12-22T12:19:41-05:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTI' 'sip-files00119.txt'
312a49bbfb7c0d1155d76bdd83f14d82
f3daa7cc850745b482c85529191648d5ae4c5dd6
describe
'9927' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTJ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
ab2d4319adae1e626131da2690363c70
969381d7e53b40c93b5c247c81fdaabb5595be87
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
f7faf54d739228cd754eeebf857e273e
e90be5a0f88466a6b0c675d30232bd756c35ab86
describe
'117030' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
6d1aeb8cc6ac795ab8fb6d9be3117b28
e28f612887219f22f51da046af7d06223c728f96
describe
'32901' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTM' 'sip-files00120.pro'
d0261e7ef433c68525191875d7bac611
9c4b19ef714220f78010248314fc5035b0e498d1
describe
'38026' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTN' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
1abec4a9ff538353d884d43df35fafeb
69b1081ea35a3fb437ad5cfbe1d9d6e7f0ff517c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
0c47acc9ba8bf810885ed5c5d8a4996a
e210f437f81f50c19337b02c67d1fddbc7023da6
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
54f2e7d5de28e934ed467a9366b72d2c
49f4ef5a963d7051dd0fffb0aa00650549c69414
describe
'9404' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTQ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
405977a2af9a8eed4c7b028639bb2def
9e8818fea97dd23f8de45bef2d0b9566273c2c0c
describe
'329003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTR' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
731a8cb04be0d0d6b6cb7e471813baad
dcdab432aead2062f6fc757efde604df7b492f46
describe
'113968' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTS' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
b9c62d4f28133f8565254e68a94293a7
8550958340f18202adfd61c0917c71e8a82abba3
describe
'24272' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTT' 'sip-files00121.pro'
e6b6cde5b7fe5c322d9ca2f5fe0a493c
64b2e2f454cd8f241880811a2c0dbaed454f2d0c
describe
'34926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTU' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
8a0c623ad0a2175089b506cb4d7cbe87
d8e31b68e854c4f7128a6bac1d981870f7256a3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTV' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d8513f5555d434dfa89211b18c8203b7
f1f8fee00a7cca65c52423ebe159b782b51f5884
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
57f91a01cd150fd009e2c3f6392e7b80
ca4b858460ed2311c308869f290111ec992f2386
describe
'8521' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTX' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
23557322dede6974d418eb7af11dc55c
4a3286dc448fd8124b0a841353410648f9ab6abd
describe
'328879' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTY' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
43be091554392b46cbd44d172f06bfb0
61e636ec570add02b018b39ac05dd53fc3b837c3
describe
'136561' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTTZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
7c194f9b014c686df5270ccd87335460
92df5d6fd7189c4cba3dd4d3ee9c1d2c3b3733fb
describe
'38103' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUA' 'sip-files00122.pro'
1b6579ff2d7f6df4b0e6317dd08751f8
ee8f19af414af1d48a4dc51d710bfed6d0293aa7
describe
'43647' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUB' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
b2721fc0a101fe48cd2cf413b5d1cd68
e19db744a0d11038d52f19e2c9cd0ada52c28ac2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUC' 'sip-files00122.tif'
852985642ab477a4f5b15fda19c48c4c
76b0bd561d43aeb35a937891b45ab175e35911b6
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUD' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a4e4716193c6e5cc1a74ecefd68f9c74
cd2f3654855fa1c24bac7172ce65db8e876214bc
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUE' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
2e3e2b2a0accf995080402852c9f9453
34c054544d26ad32cbb4749379f2b530defcdd6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUF' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
d6cc380e3d93218cf13c6daa6ec2e8c4
b4a64c7ce965752f723dc8cd58a7ae00203d8fa9
describe
'136085' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUG' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
8c2b2cb4d6f14ff312087a202a5a7cc2
cf3c8ddbba6147aee51d2102b46f4defa92f676e
describe
'37446' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
b418c20e2d90e08d9fb19b6752a38c6a
08d142d431d4fa48079f01230875fc222797b578
describe
'43428' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
0e92907a48a4fa3130f30e74ad50407b
49236b4a293d0ac614c344bd5edb0d685fe56521
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
831dc4c8c80e7d88babd15ef9eea9d8e
7db6a528b6e0d37c573fbfddba899ea06ed3e6ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
d528817bab60810cb62eed6ffea48fb0
223ef40bdc7914142651bfe82a9de773d97add92
describe
'9970' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUL' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
c093d7a337c44e17aea5070d26edc4d8
3e00274295ae7cd87c824811490f0031967cd574
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUM' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d33ea95fe51bbc89aebb799a78585c64
814e6cd2277a3279d5e5736cab1fb3de24dc3c83
describe
'131167' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUN' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
65a786246bb7dff0863c2f498b89c9ac
d1badd4c145af4b713b02b13a7699009f97d2849
describe
'36928' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUO' 'sip-files00124.pro'
a37240092b3de08ff0541626e779ed7f
eb5b409ad5c9f30b52af31485a61aa0d70c2dbe4
describe
'43409' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUP' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
58ae6764ba0a5e4bc8f27f7d457669b6
4f29e8973361b9e858b2343fed68c78917d3ef74
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUQ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
0c49309525411f4db27f81127ebd65fb
d6f9b268bcb10bfa7d40eb56cd72a75552d17b9f
'2011-12-22T12:17:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUR' 'sip-files00124.txt'
b97d9153a051d111a625e906f989a44c
4dcb04d4ec89b8143c5e6fc108601080ddb796c6
describe
'10044' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUS' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
436f5383e7f147f91aaa0f830e59aebc
127edc7ceb6537d55348cdd360bc3ca27ebddf30
describe
'328962' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUT' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3be9eb881c144796392a970b9cabfec0
78ee1fda10f7e49bcf13701ad3a9d5e7c3bc456d
describe
'125820' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUU' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
957c852314cd492d1be42c126f9b6246
e25be78d81ce5b63624f4b2644bb9337fcd0b8d0
describe
'34015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUV' 'sip-files00125.pro'
c0691f0ab89977169fd7dbdc1977a028
b6ee03e3ff841e5c2a3860c0fb7371aa6f765719
describe
'40639' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUW' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
c6139f8eded8f9d9c2b7c414aa2c846a
d6b0ea359b7a31e4cef3a2f9d3be6d29bf9dd17d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUX' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f31829f194275c72a9682eb9d7876229
ec1bbe6d2fc8551086bd2910ee75819042d25ee8
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
280cd5b5a94e6fab8faaf36b6808cf58
56c2b2c2ec64300c3986901181f1c6055d08169a
describe
'9421' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTUZ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
8e3371cd0c2655fb9f4e3dff642c5980
6c8c3b12f6e6a5430bc9d4b28fb50f9f87900d1f
describe
'328853' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVA' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7fbfdf1963bf947039090fbe462f92d0
720c6552f6f0bf40b4b371981aeca0ecf12004e5
describe
'135090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
374aa079383286940f4d1d059d8c9e2d
5d5de87262ca8efac1a7025b8a91510c84a296cf
describe
'38655' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
97de55b779322ae1102dc385515a25aa
8142758d43ae52c9d96ead1882f15f475814706e
describe
'43495' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
b29ea9440b5ea515b7379c6cf54e02b2
30d75aae2cb53eaa7e8a2941c12d3b1fe8bc5f36
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVE' 'sip-files00126.tif'
b338450ea6800bef41d2b26089f8728f
16fbb36b7dbe47d0c5fc0192dda59c1d8df67799
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVF' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d8ac7c960b39fcdda2407de73e6f0802
a3e48233ad16bcbd39f7aa8d72e5d6cc74a44e18
'2011-12-22T12:16:52-05:00'
describe
'9750' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVG' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1eb184fd6101027de31f9133662e39d6
2af577725b4f8888a2d07e069c6fdfb40ef7c667
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d6f59c22fec4c5f1bd36ada0c4af89c0
99925ea5776129d9322fe263dea81ef1736a6d90
describe
'114265' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVI' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
7e4cb222cc84af7acf4a0fc1ba959781
e8a537b76cc4238f1c357da698522db5b6d9f7c3
'2011-12-22T12:21:04-05:00'
describe
'30535' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVJ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
65b17e7d6b80697de75181e528a07878
2c399d998c994cb705fc75c7fb7e0c1a58085a2d
describe
'36039' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
fe09ec4727ba77c189e35b3b0c8a1999
7f97d127aa6b64b3ba993c0bc85780e2a5dcb410
'2011-12-22T12:16:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVL' 'sip-files00127.tif'
5863e6b44716715faaa10bb3d6c09b28
af813a1d60f64e0fe591c5510b4aca9149059142
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c8580df320862eb38ea9fa95973a6638
d3d273d498f5f51288a37fcd5eac0bcf5c7c6d59
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
86dc6354f15dc717a1e89be921819107
2b2154ad54dab18770363bab14f235759cc4b4b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVO' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
fbc797572f87896220511a978bd971b3
15bdde64701ee61cafa5c560e68da6f4d00513b3
describe
'110828' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
855d1005c351a36224b36239ead73e56
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describe
'24115' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
753242657cd3035b425a03bb7d09eeab
2ada9e3a80d0e8b8e15f49cf19d7960b78703d47
describe
'34066' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVR' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4727ec2255a581a3d0e66a85c71962d9
026ee9a06d151f1a1fda3dd8b27399eb985c6f39
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
abdc2830e2d2dff64c60a5c261e493a3
885e521b1e369f765ffae2b734884b7f2f65b31f
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVT' 'sip-files00128.txt'
0f4152390edbdc3eaf2d0c74aed950cc
3db057f68455b7167d4d7d93cb54ed495585d512
'2011-12-22T12:21:07-05:00'
describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
abf058c15620d0a1df72dfeafa459986
f0e3f5547c5cbacd3d494db3d0e9246bfddd7ae7
describe
'328921' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
58bf2f1a6d10023b52910f98d893c395
6c4d967721f14377cae637b418aa0aff27407790
describe
'132959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVW' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
6afb6ec42b7949943ec800628cdf9c50
d1b219240dfe0540a43c89fc6bf38060060865dc
describe
'36532' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVX' 'sip-files00129.pro'
edb7393568d6e6d36a3908a1d4486753
3308d8a8115554ba3e8912b68164ab21dc0f352f
describe
'42549' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVY' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
4fc9b242376e58b72295ea1a1cb7af59
26df35050ec2e3ae2a6266649f499ba0ee8015d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTVZ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
8a7978c08c3abc8bc62a1163883a35be
2d7587349465a252461011d594aa403384a2b128
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWA' 'sip-files00129.txt'
437ed34349ec2d224c69827069d68bfa
79f0c3d9d38fc505b71ca1c76580a51facafef16
describe
'9960' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWB' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
623fffa6751ab399f9a95dfb661e0e5a
8993565b99bd570679d82cad06834e2231c4be12
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
29c7b2cf34e0b09e92811f86178860f5
0ba57fd7936cce1a98c84e4f8ab81376b2645cf4
describe
'112384' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWD' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
29aafa7d27f8bf95dac9924c1eca4225
9a23d3752c256cf59ce4a705d10d4ed03d443185
describe
'32454' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWE' 'sip-files00130.pro'
a01267c515d69113cdbb5cefcb5a1d96
b7a8335eb26b9e465c5222b44c1d941392ecff68
describe
'35579' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWF' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b61d25f3b58fa97cc00d675e120bd96b
ef6653f832603215fada8bed1596e5ae395c9f3f
describe
'2649088' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWG' 'sip-files00130.tif'
f42deabbdeba806c68450cbc46966000
f86baf4e80700a82eeffcf9fc875272672d5bf29
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
d01fe895a255e183b5727abe1e5c561a
65d5c319e8136aa9e8cf55eb3e2bf3611711fa7d
describe
'8607' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWI' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ad3f2d00700988e9fde16304ee6b9070
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describe
'328950' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWJ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9577fd8eda8db9f612dd65077f42b4f1
f0d8e3dd86180e98b27dee131bd25848c4d17281
describe
'126745' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWK' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
175ccbdd06a9b09eb99fdbbd7447e725
ca41442365534049b47228cf23b6d7311c5d1f45
describe
'34865' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
4e0af7871d4d1d410b33f6a57d66fecc
b367de618a255f6fd35abb0eb651247910eb11fd
describe
'40312' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWM' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
68bddcd267571d2434a1d462be706036
e0a129885eb5f3ef32b85f530737c42cd779b07f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWN' 'sip-files00131.tif'
ae8803c098980f4249414391aa4f6bd4
8853d0d13fe719a40a2b137acec7bb68a85ef235
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWO' 'sip-files00131.txt'
49aed57156e73cc60bfc2c560fdeef42
44142d163da6e94845e15f4aaee3c5c109d0f050
describe
'9591' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
a400684c904c563050de4680392b4a48
c84ebf08d650a139c3bf16baa7468540f27dd6fe
'2011-12-22T12:19:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWQ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
3cacf178f654f35b5bf65eceb72ce687
8bb72ebf7c109e1e867c0ffa957745049e3236a6
describe
'131020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWR' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
c42cff0aa363a6d669ea65c8cc6d2a20
c09d23b715697809e6b710f7bfe3f2d147f74188
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3a3ac114c81455c1f70012513653ddef
594104b401090f2e8540312465b729bda10f3878
describe
'42110' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWT' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
3b1dca7a1f7be3ceb0373164992ec8ef
09a57cd6fcd1c85b8c0a96eb5f85e5c9d900cdc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWU' 'sip-files00132.tif'
b233ba1c969f4ac2d27727c073b10c87
871f66e57e2f971dda2b449f9c48bc0c74f0bd75
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWV' 'sip-files00132.txt'
6ee72cec347ac9b6472638f0585d912d
21d77b2333d7666923f083086e7c49127ed6ede4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWW' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
8c032013fdcb2978c763607185284aa0
1c9b97b85f990c585384cc2fbc861f841783d74b
describe
'329011' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
91d24ca45fdcb8d0a765f30bb4ed6cf5
348aa53bf5ff2c1dfb1a766b0b29eb53d8d53fd7
describe
'134576' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
222c873301d26815b0a9f5df4043be02
1fcfa80a774695bf1423aa25292b6f8da32ae361
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTWZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
02a80da3d5615622d59195d6a446d92c
bbcb041817e065c8a3edbeb5ae995e66d246d0e2
describe
'42501' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
5d4dd09e1e4c218ef4d4bfd87042cbed
44272e85005cda52fbb837abfff07d0bd84ef95f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
f664afc726c7249ac50ba867fcb31c17
4e045ab9218dfc372e8d8e045ee414fa5784c1ff
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
58d04dfbf11d6373dd2af806aaaddbac
6237869ddc1e19a192a383c434a1b53c0c537fa3
describe
'10156' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXD' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
ca4ff7c56c31c9e9a914e97e4df28fd5
2702c47eb44412321ba79bbdd38b9f6a2a2eafe7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXE' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d3e7ce9da8d135a4f459cf42ea683899
36a919f07dc30029f5a25aafae42d09e5ad63637
describe
'130515' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
2d56fab3694a6105655984b84f2c6a3d
c9ed35f76b698c8efe3fb80aea7310da63fc133e
describe
'36639' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXG' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e51af57f7a2b8178eaaaf0275b0c1cc3
ec8727096b58f1cf4c6588bb0533761dadfaf9b3
describe
'41857' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXH' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
26c4a6bd62643048b85c98625ae72cad
df55ffeaf9f06b3c7f4c4132992fb1ba3d38fba8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
3684f13c77ea82376f35ec76fc33cb64
5b8c472c193c6b5a39103ee0e3d8865d7b9e6297
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
89996ef491542340d0002eb16fce5f56
39639ad290ff60305252b84c9bb7ae849afc922f
describe
'9754' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
c8fdbc250511f6141d02acdb3f4e72e1
763907cb1d602275d1c3a3729d75f1280cf62892
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
c45a30ffd7d9f37c49933ffc0f4c59d2
4b8c71e2fd21cfd2b5c0ca48944a7c144802f75e
describe
'125447' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
c3f9a522991dcdc51bf926e97611b29f
438644c4e50d0eb1b96ad1b6c58afa89d7534112
'2011-12-22T12:19:31-05:00'
describe
'35250' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXN' 'sip-files00135.pro'
eb90e3a4be045189d9cea024cc2221aa
45f33b56e50767b7171f521ff78f6858d693ef72
describe
'39575' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXO' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
c8837fe14886416b32613baa2fcc5f67
2048a37ac010c1a74c6518b169ba6a066f873649
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXP' 'sip-files00135.tif'
6c4d331b93ad32d15406d601f371166f
e9e9e14ae6063f12cfa62d06d2981031b2df7c29
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXQ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
ead4889f325cc5c7dd6f2e1973d1eda2
38008c9e441aa0146731d4073a36b6af50360f4f
describe
'9561' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXR' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
b96e762e0fb1ba3e0e83b238d3b56c17
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describe
'328995' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXS' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
cc22244b52a8009c8d57f3d9149144fd
72394e3f1384e79bd76a8660743d2f0df0a2e0d0
describe
'70107' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXT' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
be75041f8b60859e30f38f83f1caeb75
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describe
'15003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXU' 'sip-files00136.pro'
eaa32b4fc08a11b683ae26d04068d368
a914ff11bd1f4aa2b74738a3d2552f5d5abd3479
describe
'21793' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7856b5d3d4481a8cdbf0717c451d32d2
521ac35bade83f061c45935124ff3b6a2b862b21
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
b19b42dc47f5c9d1c42546c92943e08e
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describe
'610' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXX' 'sip-files00136.txt'
72b9583340622d39b8a87867f54c94e3
c007493a9c10a342193712c0b1ceff4b3ceebaf9
describe
'5502' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
0d8b3f6d80f7387c2e5e248ce6803d6e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTXZ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
2a902a70ec756677945805f97ca6c07f
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describe
'114894' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYA' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
0e2288f447978f26d6bacb03fc044d75
300b809837c440195788ef36b6cc237c742d545d
'2011-12-22T12:18:55-05:00'
describe
'24648' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYB' 'sip-files00137.pro'
005ba8bc8e6d42445f7f1273266595c5
ff19b741c700d675ae42ac89355e328700cdcc7d
describe
'35974' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYC' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
a890cec36db05de7b4c79886be76298c
7c0fee06928a5772451f836c8577dbce23bbcb57
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYD' 'sip-files00137.tif'
4e1b8f79956168c5292b045ce4779934
9a2c67b4949f2e70b5c994e8c550ea1b8e7835ea
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYE' 'sip-files00137.txt'
dbd180d378c58de536abd91a4ded793b
9a7d6b1940720c073022670dcef5a8f78a13228f
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c15e0f6e715da273ff5e86a5fa5ceef4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYG' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
1adad4c55a9b39cb1c857e4755b8ca7d
472582bcefb5775081690abbe1a87ad7ed64f3ad
describe
'130182' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e22a6c1a5ad7f9936838e0622596e63f
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describe
'35868' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYI' 'sip-files00138.pro'
18523ab1ffba5f822327c130ea530d1e
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describe
'41052' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYJ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
7c32b3448efe4a512853adb3ab10c968
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYK' 'sip-files00138.tif'
97c4f6db33c345a83b851f28f3bad34c
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describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYL' 'sip-files00138.txt'
de5c3464a44f7f3f18bef25a6e4235bf
123715a8eb93ec898978ad18922937eb27a10c9a
describe
'9739' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
b741731391cb9842091c96e50e22d9f3
cd9b31fff4804c601c14a2ba5eaae568fdc4f28d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYN' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
aaf303112da64235de192a8d0b192579
b7bde5e7d31d1cad8c28a55b4b043a8acb13a0f6
describe
'127951' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
4f5b4463cc59329b8784cf0be5329475
1eca5dba0b1d2cbcee9b36ba786fe0e330eb062b
describe
'34965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYP' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b4b6d3392ef3410b4a0a22cdf72dc0da
cd71193413a2e3897ae70787205f6b1c20a72409
'2011-12-22T12:20:55-05:00'
describe
'40641' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
b5064ef5ce4ae004065c9fc3aded1923
824b26a63972d78db777ed3ee479ff9b1b14a3d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYR' 'sip-files00139.tif'
308060af2dc6ae4ee158a1cbaf075699
09205e1a1094516aedd7d1f25c5b5f2c2e3f6c1d
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYS' 'sip-files00139.txt'
86d86dcd792ea16e4102883ac6651480
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describe
'9679' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYT' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
54183224229785480dc1577973547c57
05166276cd2d342faf9d307e31ea37834b383b55
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
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describe
'130119' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
42f349d195eb8f7fce0b369bc37e1b42
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describe
'35465' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYW' 'sip-files00140.pro'
7757fa9148cfb78df7f49ce2604597c4
d67fcd41dbca56824e0f1f25305e02bf73673b1f
describe
'41953' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
cda04a866a6633a55ab2cb0408fb518f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYY' 'sip-files00140.tif'
455e3bd5df005e6c09f2f9f9f3175dcc
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describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTYZ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
d6d2c02075774e068c735edcffd7c9e3
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describe
'10008' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZA' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
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describe
'328989' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZB' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
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describe
'131694' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZC' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
23f4a5187c7631a94ca65105716d1a15
bbf176e860eb54beccc129eedf982f73543e7b42
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZD' 'sip-files00141.pro'
aba17c051ff60acac6b250a6c8c54ca9
089d427dc8eb050029ab9a422b50555d94d05e4e
describe
'41585' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZE' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
f7aaf3d306130bbee417a350f09cd3b6
c4db96f0d778a002ca37ad3b0886c453dd19e0aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZF' 'sip-files00141.tif'
db143520669b8344f7ea38a2c76d8bb9
c5e99c0f7da50c12751660381d2507f10e550957
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZG' 'sip-files00141.txt'
be39665dd6833a3950c91d90840a406a
d1c81ca5838008a36fbebccacb17a38d29cf2d41
describe
'9635' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZH' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
a08ef7efe37b9f8ec7c6885dbdcfb18b
6c29a64e9f02adb8b59e8110fdd932f223062ee1
describe
'328860' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZI' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
6f25d89dc5692f956c8e364bfe0a0c7f
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describe
'135153' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZJ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
f7523e959e0cfbd6f4fdd77380d84945
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describe
'37330' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZK' 'sip-files00142.pro'
285da5aef4adcec7eaf97d0a94c10aa3
f44647102e7e4146aba142e12558dabfba740968
describe
'43902' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZL' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
69697e5d65748a59d2f03148362fc7d3
1a364e315a70f9f139fa6aba804061cb08a97c9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZM' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0fb9f56e8cc2230271468923a5a1de5c
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describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZN' 'sip-files00142.txt'
42380544dee1707115098ef9890df894
412b49bf8afd4f5f7cd18dfc869ad76dc11ae993
describe
'10150' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZO' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
b938959ab657895f8ab26e3843c8b225
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
693e94ba048e69306b54682d27e1a642
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describe
'123599' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZQ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
12d4ba2d49e566bfae0256025e80ab82
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describe
'34810' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZR' 'sip-files00143.pro'
88940624ae309670cfdf5fda891e465e
93cc219d90bb03a7bb36797f16e6b0744edde662
describe
'40433' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZS' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
cf3ead0bd820ff80e03ab2abe85549f6
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZT' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f08b636589dd4c204dd9d61c2ee96f64
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describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
73baeb44822539a81eec4cfd2b0b863d
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describe
'10074' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
2c005cd8ca39236ed07899ffaf43eaf7
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describe
'328959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZW' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
d697c8cb8c5c5d50f072ca7fc855289c
287c5b3b86694a86b7a56b7b42a43c6fb5c2344f
describe
'128886' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZX' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2f8cc4e1de303045ffa6d6227933401b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZY' 'sip-files00144.pro'
bda9581ba7359dc7ac272c03c5358819
e83a15b01bed530a10f0bbce51ab219555eb0d6f
describe
'42218' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABTZZ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
5b6d4be23a430efe2314a59b47c076ae
f466bd3689f1edf2c6abe9bcfddd3a379632a9b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAA' 'sip-files00144.tif'
10fd6b3870152560b14c85f8f5fbc939
db888b704f8c907056df3971d72cf06b2c1bd559
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAB' 'sip-files00144.txt'
7afe653124b75a912f847ad19747480d
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describe
'10051' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAC' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAD' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
bc08bea503c0ab8ccb8b8d192c961df5
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describe
'132141' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAE' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
0a60f65151649fc724993a52974186c8
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describe
'37287' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
c8c846500afd43d694a6ac618042f176
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describe
'43137' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAG' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
fe9d3c832e6d9b1aca3cd8879d16f7f0
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAH' 'sip-files00145.tif'
92da921609b658a26b7762d4cc38596d
b07f53ac28ee8a4abba69d2d0881e3425a253bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAI' 'sip-files00145.txt'
13860f89684f24988d7ec00314cee320
5144ea7ba777fbce49ce1b63798b61b9dd1d9d14
describe
'9985' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAJ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
35e7e5b7fe1aa58491352730bb7a62fc
c0034de86af64879fc4005bcaabe0586317772b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAK' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
25b1790ef2932c752cbea2cd8cbbe327
6a16cb5bd43afb3eecb1cf030ce431487aac14b7
'2011-12-22T12:20:39-05:00'
describe
'137456' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAL' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
9b4a46a7ffe865ab881ba619796e19f5
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describe
'37865' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAM' 'sip-files00146.pro'
2557070ed87dc5aafdcbcdd361422576
d47833708f3e04eaa4832cbefad4d28b34d76bfd
describe
'44882' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAN' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
7f77404f7676e9a4972ac77f70823248
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAO' 'sip-files00146.tif'
c1f2eba73fd0e294abac325bd6587f15
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describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
ede4ff747dc370ce057b012ce6910cba
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describe
'10491' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAQ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
30b7ba633918ca4559d75fb779cf740a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAR' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
ad4e18eaaefdf511afa769f17c11030f
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describe
'135649' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAS' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
e9115e2276bf89c864d4cc9100cac1bf
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describe
'37179' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAT' 'sip-files00147.pro'
a46f3095eb1ddabff3eaf224a38197ce
da4cfa21eff6bd3b338ac7c585be0ea267d29310
describe
'43039' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAU' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
15651b60839a34d04874751be99c04ee
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAV' 'sip-files00147.tif'
7b12c5d60c71f3b832f15d6c459dc70e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d7b7ee447d3f33d0e24e1f96e2215de8
c53f936444d45701f1c2502b82ebaf31e8358cca
'2011-12-22T12:21:38-05:00'
describe
'10023' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAX' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
dc67d3f51d4a9c4abb82fdc2e8b2358e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
1f6179735c8389cba06a7cca20c7912f
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describe
'136523' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUAZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
2d696b0043bc9740ae8c075350e7986d
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describe
'37650' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBA' 'sip-files00148.pro'
3dfef77fd65346cae7e3e88f54ef50a1
3c9cc6b53a3ad1727326437c6f9c9228f54cb763
describe
'45458' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
fd877fa5e0ab7cdb65647174ec259857
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBC' 'sip-files00148.tif'
14654e115ae4cdf7c7a1b9c1cd64f042
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBD' 'sip-files00148.txt'
64faead8670d957ea12589451133765d
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describe
'10319' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBE' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
70787fbaba3ad124dc4a8a0fb1ec6cc8
0156e51dffac4ac91499eb013ce4e284d2fd8f9d
'2011-12-22T12:18:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
68fbffc0bae9638b20fdc2a005caf3d6
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describe
'115228' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBG' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
8d77a4a6c8dda024f554fa7f2b04f7cd
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describe
'30925' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
a01f4b98a7a631679ad40541ea65d47c
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describe
'37719' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
b149eb356d72fb87ad1dff0fefb1547f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
7360570a40f38eec10394ed451bed4fe
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describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
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describe
'8936' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBL' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
e4245b4006a500967395316c13756943
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describe
'112721' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBN' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
65112a658066fb72c39eb2b2d56eb731
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describe
'22355' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
75c0810a09786de4da12c606f0e11cfa
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describe
'34648' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBP' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
93eadf43d1bcedd90f4c7b51138aaa10
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBQ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
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describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
050658b360b0ef6f68cbb478a3da6f54
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describe
'8264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBS' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBT' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
c2c710ed62e4fc45591d9f14ff94cd6c
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describe
'125767' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
e43d790fe23563fad51918c9df8ef28c
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describe
'33053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBV' 'sip-files00151.pro'
be0e97514bd77d413f4aa8422fb6ab2d
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describe
'40732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBW' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
d132893b7b01a146b4dc5f3222355840
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
a4b20feb5db9efa884747b8ffd3808b7
bed3ec1eb493e31990ce04e3f1bb8f9a6d335f6a
'2011-12-22T12:20:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
b2d2413e2abf0ebced82d0eba5c06768
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUBZ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
5cce77f7ed4b75a316f698f5a4a0a365
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describe
'329006' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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describe
'128954' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
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describe
'35733' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCC' 'sip-files00152.pro'
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describe
'41631' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
c72ce1f89cc459969816f640adb587af
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCE' 'sip-files00152.tif'
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describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCF' 'sip-files00152.txt'
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describe
'9650' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
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describe
'328974' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
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describe
'132341' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
c9c359442d361e00ac26ff85552d3f7a
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describe
'36839' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
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describe
'42046' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
ce93ee6b0598bcb476b572f9d24aa694
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCL' 'sip-files00153.tif'
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describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCM' 'sip-files00153.txt'
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describe
'9941' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
'328942' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
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describe
'130708' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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0bc6b1be9c91101e3a5950255d91ed5f2539721d
describe
'35456' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
01a59b9abd722d92e23f207b838caf93
10b93a0f2853950904a42c731742c798af72d846
describe
'41654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
de592a43bfa5d71d2c888cb711f0bf47
99af6f9b5495eac37dd688a5647a9e6127264b90
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
d764ae88fe925c327985769bcea3b516
0c5f25b1c045735984d3146945060617bc55ba79
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
1037f913f3b7246565180d47259c38d9
e6f0909f262bc82a4542686797060028852bb22c
describe
'9760' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
3d3b01ee5dfac247a583b5e2ea8e9d3f
382d517d4937803b5e70253277034e2855787d0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
0c3439589d1c89fedb77314ebc9d03df
533a637036ce15b47e3ee872b552f53324e3a867
describe
'114790' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
592df5f3c31577d046bd0ed2ae7a5892
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describe
'24876' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
6cee27aff16f2bd0228ac2bdd61dfc17
6054ae13afd403bf3de9149b77bb23c7d2a2cdc0
describe
'35597' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
0187b1e240fa6e2b1e153c4ef42f87f9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUCZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
edf4ef7704de0cf9e92fa76a18615dc4
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describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
22ff3e8c16e0ae03d80f0a2c6c0bee18
ee076cf90dd50ab961c0bb802e25c8a064c5979d
describe
'8742' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
12107fa9af9b6c9a006a65dc3e078d69
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
d1b37612aa42892141ed3d3372f33860
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describe
'121424' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
60efb3bc360e44ae3afe04ffde030f85
854f939a2f33d44c5a098f2163ff3604db257a5e
describe
'34099' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
eba2a29665de5d4d905f9814f1447b4a
f7c52d4ab9a2b486e611bb48231e4f5c284a5370
describe
'40590' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDF' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
4b037c5f787a0692a62ff9e97b362db8
5812f29cfeffb8bdb871d6ae300444278b3078ef
'2011-12-22T12:18:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
5cccdf2c0c74db735009db79a06377eb
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describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
9a3a5929c0380be43de24acabcc8bd92
47f488fb3eba7540104b888feabd233da5349479
describe
'9385' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDI' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
0f8549aadf40da5ede70183a6c06c391
e50577504298a9378f7be7b3682b27009055e874
describe
'328935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDJ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
874a8dc6099b0ef22d6668f1930ca341
5dc0b36286629a24f7eda0c0f033b0377efb367d
describe
'130899' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDK' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
bdde4646fb787ac67e5b93af7d396630
ecefd24d56f27aacf6fe46c2218736a04c4579cf
describe
'36249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDL' 'sip-files00157.pro'
1380a2687436e3ecfacb142930fb7a8c
eb72e2867ce9b3422ae7da6c71e0d50e694c4c36
describe
'42443' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
6fa13ea1d165ee9eefafea08bed7571d
9a3cc2ff34e1efd187b15f7cf031c2d5ceed3db2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDN' 'sip-files00157.tif'
03a43884939bccb56513d46ce9f0c1e4
8184834ef852adbf8eb265a811a23acb106e14d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDO' 'sip-files00157.txt'
6a9938d04f272949f28d31f0589c446e
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describe
'10099' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
c5d1eb41474742586211b88feeb6404e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
68dddf0d035ba20ce300eb9cf9e27fed
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describe
'124234' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
eb082d44ad60a0dfff111ad1fddec613
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describe
'33957' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
6be66ec31ce9c0a86bc1dd6aa6934c95
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describe
'40551' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDT' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a725d783c36420f51f9a060dc8caea90
b8dc3495d765585353c4768772d7375cb66445d8
'2011-12-22T12:20:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDU' 'sip-files00158.tif'
625901a63db85bc7c06b6ccdf1ce7503
aae7def1e25d02f41ab2971725d518b8db87342f
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDV' 'sip-files00158.txt'
73a9abe8d6abc86d2c0d64e82997c869
a808e65f682551ed090a75c485cec337c4b692dd
describe
'9992' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDW' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
baed33adebc6045430c351d6c16e4322
ac54abe51042f01b17bfb252b93485d45439096d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
9c416c1b1fd25d039a8b950c01d49b1d
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describe
'127581' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'35639' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUDZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
47b206438c2aa68c5f0f95547ca396c8
3661508b93033b6ae152f0de646edb2b47260c71
describe
'42275' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
0852f384749bd83bce699378d6c36aec
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
f83bd624a6d2aaf5026a363289af5f17
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describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
dc91327b20dde356445815b8a23f87b7
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describe
'10113' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUED' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
a1534993af6c24249b07aca81d04e44d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEE' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
36481e153216a1bb5ef44e8c277eb622
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describe
'128626' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEF' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
242ae9d17ce83726fdac770c96c624e2
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describe
'35453' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEG' 'sip-files00160.pro'
02a1b239cf82240d7c417b6d9c151dda
0ee1191b4c98b1269d48dcfdf1f58f4087a06170
describe
'41649' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEH' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
fc1d6e3ff4ef6e715966ce7aac4b2084
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEI' 'sip-files00160.tif'
212911cf16a16ef27dc2c909bac5d6ba
9897cdc952fba1b708d17e430a9845bede81833d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
c1df592cf33dab79d97a0317781b374f
7ae2ae8dcf3ca85954390eb3fd338d0445ee9db6
'2011-12-22T12:20:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEK' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7f2216ad32a82a08248bb1323078a495
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describe
'329022' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
c32ed38475fcffbc3ebf4b5f2e9ca32f
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describe
'127179' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
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describe
'34771' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEN' 'sip-files00161.pro'
e8146ac9a0c55fce950cb3bc650ccd9c
fbdcf3650add86acc92298921801c57da7eb4357
describe
'41455' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
e58ee661fd7d79e67ccd572e6de0587a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
814a53268b39e9d04bc057b317f42401
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
465c13912ac4530bed8eeab639f7ccef
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describe
'9870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUER' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
9877d6d4d65e29067177771a8a68c161
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUES' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
c1022cce8664d48971dc598c1844ef38
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describe
'97058' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUET' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
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describe
'23296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
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describe
'30781' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
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describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
cf07527f8e4f4162b175f8d4ee2190f4
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describe
'7426' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUEZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
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describe
'106385' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
f0ca43104675a0829dae90b99747ac42
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describe
'22136' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
1fe8a44fa62049a0f698c9da4792580b
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describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFC' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
ca139c8a5ce17d274979d3d5778fdc49
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFD' 'sip-files00163.tif'
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describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFE' 'sip-files00163.txt'
0145a20a7fc6e24b6796e9f8de7c37ba
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describe
'8394' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
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describe
'328913' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFG' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
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describe
'132721' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFH' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
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describe
'36461' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFI' 'sip-files00164.pro'
09e734048ed33292d36fa24f32cd03ea
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describe
'42942' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
bdda8564125a0fa7ce3783d0d3bd4a2e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFK' 'sip-files00164.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFL' 'sip-files00164.txt'
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describe
'9872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
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describe
'328985' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
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describe
'132391' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1dc3e0b1f4ec7ee3b23e8bfd5d4e0cb3
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describe
'36519' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFP' 'sip-files00165.pro'
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describe
'42327' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
91de32a038d1dbf5ee8e8d90430d0310
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFR' 'sip-files00165.tif'
26a66609876bf1cfb55a516d98eaedb8
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
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describe
'10256' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFT' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
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describe
'123501' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
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describe
'34203' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFW' 'sip-files00166.pro'
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describe
'41387' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFX' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
13defad72a7b7cddd0fe7a05f1f35f69
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFY' 'sip-files00166.tif'
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describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUFZ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
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describe
'9786' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGA' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
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describe
'129351' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGC' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
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describe
'34601' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
79a14795b94452e2dfe71af2c1e7b1e3
7fa699df776d9b7e4b084bb4bde25ff8f1256ccb
describe
'41790' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGE' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
fa8f005ae6b7df14a1d224829d63fb10
9dc7e92949bfd2a79dab9e40f21857af5a065634
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGF' 'sip-files00167.tif'
5477f75d67b29f17e354db341fb89356
3ea4cb49e757625f0b53f125dae7b557c6fc6bc8
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGG' 'sip-files00167.txt'
95e50a6326fb60af4a0d5ddc87ad6e51
412bcdfa2fb6aa446ee7dcbeaa738a9ed816340c
describe
'10233' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
940bb272ae29c14cbe2867740183d95d
0068b14bd7eb4bb6c2cbe2646bd20eddf2acfdbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGI' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
3ee4314ecad78059ff6258e21b521274
582eaa2d39bca6ab89367d5f48585da2e266303d
describe
'130167' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGJ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
524ee7916d5ffde2633ba111b92d759d
b24d5ee7fe7ee9d37dc13e4141a95bad051ddc63
'2011-12-22T12:20:26-05:00'
describe
'36382' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
11bbc820824231fc951b73741e12ab09
f883dfc87ebdc8ff91a40cf16eae5b70fa4300ed
describe
'42527' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGL' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
090f3aedd3a41a8a722aa0569bc1088c
6446c79a276e784c288c3e7604ef3e64226caeec
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGM' 'sip-files00168.tif'
05143adeb76a8630b4554211f6f7a737
4bd7e5229a08b7ec3dde8e5f423fc03660f27b6b
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGN' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ef74033610b5c61cb14d74ca510ebab6
71cd477bc6f5c34af9a108244065cff751d86750
describe
'10014' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGO' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
76bef69ffb9d65c49ef6c4071c9412ef
5345ee3c8d1ec03b0976836e22697ed373f8e45d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
e0b1cc11a7341b6db9df23873769e8fe
8a6d59099ef0f86b94ca3d293f0ea87ca399620d
describe
'127694' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
7804916f0bdebb8cdedcdbe3b5011e43
100ac66088fade061533556a5b54cdda81615ee8
describe
'35477' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGR' 'sip-files00169.pro'
b6d7d927f26201ff8ba9b9a860c474ae
350fd9b1bf4e9f2683f9bedcfdeaf73d0f5ac565
describe
'41417' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
314ff94fbf9877481dac71f84e12c7af
f30c15fc01a75c984acb24f1c4a602bac08e87f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGT' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d48fa84006afba9cb28a2d62534119ff
74711234b8a7c37d8c3f0b17cee2078b766412a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
f9d5fedf64532949b248d075e66ca6dd
8231d99c217e71b4089a6dc222c74ea704e45c71
describe
'9972' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
fb6c7761c4e04e9ab3c75285b0660d82
ec7cafb409317f328551246e796ea4fb214ec282
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGW' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
84f351669572093973019856c34f92e3
ef72f6323f2ed3340c0dfabf525ebc0650d37396
describe
'133329' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
02ed5d1243ca19065c73529d6f917ef4
8b5294c10b719bcd27e94d1bf819bc6fda704d49
describe
'37003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
ed42a3d8ef58163cfe40b8e355c548e6
efa2cb1442acf04fac5ad3f6a64eb7fdab722bf8
describe
'43304' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUGZ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
9bd7e1ea99db818f34fe568c38f21648
0a8c2117f4708eae5af9982417586ec63a906d8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHA' 'sip-files00170.tif'
f587d732ace78b9f944e6a4907ee43e4
65e1d3dc1ca0f7836f9461678831efac356886c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHB' 'sip-files00170.txt'
b0dcd9cf82ee284db10a8caa3580fb89
c203ec876658b4baa0af94d47091f158a02540b3
describe
'10031' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHC' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
2cc9e023982e0d8a24b35dd98742994d
e4d3b8efff65cd94408391a322575b727c29de91
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHD' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
c383b1820e2be7c1f85bb42b7eb8ee91
92867dcae3385aa09a3ff1f6e484ae6156e872c2
describe
'123284' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHE' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
95583dbcbd986d0a498985aff2b6914e
7d48005100a446928af1c21bc25343e47c17df53
describe
'34059' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
b2b9dfbbeac1f7a5dda02ea6fdb0d02e
96279257294db52d98e8081c65616b8d6c11bf9f
describe
'41282' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
42b85c8659f268cc0bfb4ebbbac572eb
734591f272a736bb968c5f4332c348e59905e01e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHH' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e4d9bad0242c41d9389e0b5e4503eed2
988e1e479137560b75be0b3ac35f7c91b5a3e53e
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
3a79f92d951d0f58fff3f63c5bef300f
511cce11b1c08987b9545789cdc30c765570323f
describe
'10034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHJ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
ccd8fb163aa67df491da1060663a7cb4
d25961e682e4e159d816a0e5b7576cfbc550543b
describe
'328979' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHK' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
c28af1135c5a0805b60ffea7879e6196
9f8fdd49dd5a430550d515cb058788ba2481a862
describe
'113603' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
9f137ca82863fb0bd7ae8aadea86cdee
f480627fd7239065a5d63ff42d1dcd955ec4c9df
describe
'31408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHM' 'sip-files00172.pro'
519584bb64ca74f5ec6900d9bf371e1c
8e68e39e07c5c5bfb4b38e61efee1cae038f4bda
describe
'36850' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHN' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
66cbd788fb1548a743166f00ca3109ee
3ebd6f894340120c01df848bd123f559372f1e2e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
66340fe12d4031d436cb484592d42ae8
59f3143d01f04579c81b826996c2ba2f4bd47924
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
c7bebaf0840766d52722c05ba93501e2
e51109f584dbc5ac5b9fc6ced49f1f9ec60db239
describe
Invalid character
'9270' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
6ca8ab3cfe2643a8d3f92673060e175a
83460654f552dc839bc784272e363f04c47c903c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHR' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
01464ddb03928fe785d841f02322b3bc
c8ed5e1851a93f617ac0c7df10adb88f805e6c37
describe
'70935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
61db4f716704638d08e7640ded1334b7
4c9610e79f5d25330dbd4ac3d916a65ced43bbc4
describe
'18851' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHT' 'sip-files00173.pro'
51b9aaa82388bae09c21574e89c9cfaa
de1ed1afbd1faf759700f869cbc78b3497c57ed1
describe
'24956' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHU' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1aac7f139a10e1cae42260ef08728b66
a48a0c7e1b7200f3b99c8b0495ff7973fcf862c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHV' 'sip-files00173.tif'
6cc85e42dada97ddd83b7a4760eaf1d3
f11bb9f3b95c9f0c9273c84020fdae5cda022e68
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
ca2d29a1c861968b722eb6efa92a6e6a
745cec1b0f549505f15459abf5e3d2efa61f3a45
describe
'7741' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHX' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
7d9649f3e68418a369d0476054bbdc0f
563c09e141ef0dc3e9fa1f29c81adae3a867fd42
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHY' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
960ebc471b5e79eb0dee6c51af3b6835
7a9f8b534fe8489a2d519455c6e765e187a0b323
describe
'111589' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUHZ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
64cd4845d47a07e613ea0f3ebc7798a0
b55a623c0c57ee691bc9dc514c0a8dfdd98e758d
describe
'38064' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIA' 'sip-files00175.pro'
bd13dbef716790a35d69ae48e0688e35
541382ece5d533d6e5d473d0f5d710e7975efb16
describe
'33579' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIB' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
1b10a74ebeb0071463e15278b2dfcfa3
49245da86e19a96287e45c87af94445e20534a78
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIC' 'sip-files00175.tif'
86c6d56939520ac4a2c465953a9fc314
b78f1db38e265422bfafb324c2562ebf78a41d15
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUID' 'sip-files00175.txt'
83d6d3243aabf58cb39a958aecab9648
31a7ace55f3d30704a45357042c56967a558ddf8
describe
'8691' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIE' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
fea887b905b57ee9416ee4bcfdd480db
2f9738c8ad6c39a497a2899dc33138dc0412be67
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIF' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
992c30408db4708351cc7d28501b8996
f52ba6fa943762c07a3ecbda9093f3e1de7c1ad0
describe
'124926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIG' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
5c3962265cb5222678366747e39e09f3
826aa04eb2fc1df896b464de2ea31320cb6e2cc2
describe
'43081' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIH' 'sip-files00176.pro'
69b85b875b10038f7dcb8bb8cb3ff830
033df6f647da34ca6e76fd0a4b346fd154b5e301
describe
'40388' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUII' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ec390a8936172eacd50f72e370d3c7be
bd9bbb0044b708a677cd3b612c04da989ad31e9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
f1ec5f4373183093919da3dd07ac57fc
b2dee6eb3a418b7e7b63484b63c404d870dad093
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIK' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ceb165e49bf4a0e66e25a4519e05a97b
cc8be5e7b408d73e8de0d2b435c8c57b36345cb7
describe
'9812' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIL' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
e19c7b3bd0827030487f5beb074f617f
10cd6c307af14e5602aacfa095d7f08da4e10a0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIM' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
9f2601677136454acfd37ddcfc306d0c
a25e7d5de1961f74359380ad9092c0a3f60a9c9f
describe
'128725' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIN' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
96aa4b0c4b8d08c9f5cebb6cc7c59966
0c535352f422a3dae185c74b105ef1baa58c1a39
describe
'31605' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
d9add1ca14c66e81b86b66328564f429
bea31c101d522f378a814989dab89b87a73daa06
describe
'7903440' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
484c50ef4d482376248d20493ebcdf90
6e45860fefbddd1a1f1025d5541f08e098f15393
describe
'7563' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIQ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
509a4ddfcc49cd988d09e849c933071d
9f4ce3b3eea7cd683aca8916c235d42c5fc862dc
describe
'414789' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIR' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
72c8dfc21b49d692fbff065c3180030c
06b3ba4dd51afe998b9eb62288976349122cf33b
describe
'172737' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIS' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
d32acdf44d00a0a9c93dd57c58859528
c31e59844cbf17d3d68736bd6262d81d834a7663
describe
'42667' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIT' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
725f0b6e0e306a71b6e9b78bed269445
915385fde2cadae88e085ac933867cab093b7ab6
describe
'9965244' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIU' 'sip-files00179.tif'
cfb6d918ceaf4965badf0b98ca890f62
bd05dd753aa7f9e0141b316c0f84562d0bf0230d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIV' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
f351cc1830d86cb9b6ef817967327022
c024ce9630ed74c368c85e1de15e6e3bbdc7de29
describe
'401526' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIW' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
f66dabea7b4d5d1846c20754d667e94b
e3558937f31cc5f1e3416654ef039ba4e5a4bd5e
describe
'91388' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIX' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
4893bbfc93591f52bb39e451ffc56132
286dbae050f4ac8feb2226d63be7216da09454e9
describe
'15574' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIY' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
fa01433de3254be22e0f46d87c76db04
151771c7e2fda918f9df258c1e3f20a62abe9cf1
describe
'9647568' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUIZ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
234e344a4e3aee26c517379a05931f34
9fa237a79cc2ed669bf7fd077c13e590e5fec5ea
describe
'3577' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJA' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
2c86f9d896cbded7639c5d1788b539af
7474ca7740c0583f5c50c22bad3cef3b8238b8f8
describe
'78643' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJB' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
7fab4c0a8f6840160d6fd8cab593dea7
046ed57e0f7862a24df9120363310c860e876753
describe
'32576' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJC' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f2f2878cb54b317f9a7f693000f1f5b5
d8c77f79ea96c0f2bb32292aef677816b4bb1e00
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJD' 'sip-files00181.pro'
bc62fe487dce094ac50335daa8cc6e5d
bcd7b94818db3576ba049bb32f21c479cbf819e6
describe
'7963' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJE' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
40662581fef1fbadf4d1b29d48e8ddc9
79c90baa5f98e6ae22575a64c3705ab850cb35c3
describe
'1892520' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJF' 'sip-files00181.tif'
45a86e2b7370a7a309f28ae0e1dd6c6a
108a1c0b33abb922843edb89223c1a6297b7d7ab
describe
'3227' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJG' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
c22169b078dd57b98669b54e1246b672
a994666a9d85902b7de9398fd702e8d8528214a8
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJH' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
19ce0060cd6500055d37d99160266201
5c84f2d1b305a2d7436e1e2f132b4495c75bc15c
describe
'284704' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJI' 'sip-filesUF00086696_00001.mets'
9f5e7f68e5c1ba8dc220f1663f0546f9
e41dc781ca16339faad8cc449c53050ba86f14f6
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T06:04:12-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'367140' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOAfileF20081214_AABUJL' 'sip-filesUF00086696_00001.xml'
6d3e36f1a2c490f9634b0719e9a3de05
ff6a81afbdb5f827d3392612ce015360066b07a3
describe
'2013-12-14T06:04:10-05:00'
xml resolution




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“ASAPH Woop,” ‘

ILLUSTRATED BY J. NASH.

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Gyr




MATCH-BOX PHIL,



CHAPTER I.

IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY.

** Scarce a glimpse of azure heaven
Gleamed above that narrow street.”
A, A. PROCTOR.

was a perfect day in the very heart
of summer, with an almost cloudless
sky overhead, and one long uninter-
rupted reign of golden sunshine.
To thousands of boys and girls it meant a
day for picnics and boating parties, for long
rambles in shady lanes, or butterfly hunts, or
romps in the hayfields, or games of cricket to-
wards sunset, when the long shadows of the trees
grow yet longer on the grass, and the evening
air is heavy with the scent of the countless
summer flowers.

But to the ragged, white-faced, hungry-eyed
boys and girls, who were dragging out an exist-


4 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

ence, too mournful for words, in a miserable court
known as Flowerdew Alley—in one of those
wretched London districts built over the dank,
sodden marshes of the Thames—that summer
day, which to country children meant only a
wealth of flowers and fruit and all the joys that
sunshine always brings, brought nothing but
choking dust and foul smells and a larger share
of suffering to the sick, and an increase of
weariness to those who had never known what
it was to enjoy the bright spirits and untiring
energy of childhood.

_ Ah! my child-readers, you “who can wander
at will where the works of the Lord are revealed ”
in your pleasant country homes, and to whom
all the joys and delights of country life come as
a matter of course—you will never realize the
existence that thousands of men and women,
and, saddest of all, little children, are condemned
to drag out in the hidden courts and alleys of
our great cities.

It is hard for you and me, who have never
known what hunger and destitution mean, to
picture those terrible haunts, where grim poverty
and ignorance and vice meet one on every side,
where, instead of pure fresh air and lovely views
and the singing of birds, evil smells and heart-
breaking sights and ghastly sounds take their
place, till even the faces of the little children,
with their keen eyes and sharpened features,
become stamped with the universal degradation
IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY. 5

and misery, and seem to reflect the terrible
surroundings in which the whole of their sad,
short lives have been spent.

On the summer day on which our story
opens two small boys, about nine years old,
were to be seen talking eagerly to each other in
one corner of Flowerdew Alley. They were
both ragged, thin, and white-faced, but yet, even
. to a cursory observer, they were far too unlike
each other to be taken for brothers. One was
dark-haired, with large brown eyes; whilst
the other rejoiced in a thick thatch of the
most brilliant red hair, and a pair of light-blue
eyes.

A few yards off from them a group of squalid
children were quarrelling over a dead cat; a
little further on, some rough lads were playing
tricks with an unlucky poodle, which one of
their number had managed to steal from its
owner that morning; whilst close at the boys’
very elbow, an old woman was hawking a basket
of rotten gooseberries, and inviting all the in-
mates of the court to purchase her “ fresh-
gathered fruit at a halfpenny a pint!”

At any other time each and all of these
goings-on would have proved attractive to our
two little friends, but to-day they had no eyes
or ears to spare to their surroundings.

“T tell yer, Phil, it’s easily done, if yer only
have the sense of a sparrer,” Dan, the red-haired
boy, was saying. “T’ll tip yer the wink, and the
6 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

lady what teaches us will never spot yer, if only
yer'll stick close to me, and duck up and down
as I tell yer. None of the other coves will split
on yer, you bet. They’re in too great a funk
of me for that,” added the boy, doubling a bony
little fist as he spoke, which certainly did not
look very formidable.

“T’d like to come; I’d like to chance it,” said
Phil; and the look of wistfulness in his large .
dark eyes was positively mournful. “Oh, Dan,
wouldn’t it be a lark if I could do it, and take
’em in?”

“Yer will, if yer ain’t an ass,” was Dan’s
rejoinder. “Look here, Phil! Come on with
me now, and [ll show yer just where we shall
have to stand to-morrer to be counted over.”

“Not I; I can’t come along with yer now,”
said Phil, standing up and shouldering a large
package of newly made match-boxes. “I’ve got
to pitch these in at Jenkins’s, and she'll make it
hot for me, if I’m home after time.” So saying,
the boy began to move on, but presently he
stopped short and looked back. “Dan,” he
called. “Dan, I say, look here! I won’t say
‘no’ any more. I wi go along with yer to- |
morrow, and take my chance.”

“In course yer will,” said Dan; “and a good
time we'll have of it. My wig! won’t yer open
your eyes when you once get behind bellowing
Billy, and see all there is to be seen!”

“Yes, if only some one don’t nab me first,” .
IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY. 7

said poor Phil in a less hopeful tone, as he went
on his way with his load of match-boxes,

So ended the dialogue between Dusty Dan—
so called from a corruption of his nickname,
“Brick Dust,” to which his brilliant colouring
had given rise—and Phil, otherwise known as
“Match-box Phil,” he being rarely to be seen
unencumbered by several gross of newly finished
match-boxes, either piled on his head, or slung
at his back, or tucked under his arm, on hio
daily rounds to the warehouse to deliver them.

Poor Phil had absolutely no belongings, being,
as he would have told you, an “orphing,” and,
indeed, looking into his old child’s face, you
would have found it hard to believe that mother’s
lips had ever kissed those pinched, sharpened
cheeks, or that mother’s hands had ever smoothed
the rough, tangled, dark locks from the deeply
lined forehead. No, he had never belonged to
anybody in the sense of being an object of value
to any person.

The dimmest recesses of his memory held the
picture of an old woman, whom he had once
called “Granny,” and who had sometimes given
him kind words, but more often hasty blows ;
but his recollections concerning her were very
vague, which was but natural, seeing that for the
last five years—more than the half of his little
life—Phil had been at the mercy of one Mrs.
Styles, who had-never found it necessary to tell
him any of his own history, or to explain to
8 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

him the terms on which they stood with each
other. ;

Only one fact poor Philip knew well—for
that knowledge had come to him through years
of neglect and ill-treatment—namely, that he
was “no flesh or blood of hers,” and that he was
nothing but an “orphing,” who wasn’t worth the
salt he ate.

That information, emphasized more often
than not by a shower of cruel blows, had been
hurled so constantly at Phil, that he had ceased
to attach any importance to it. Early, very
early in life, his baby feet had grown used to
treading only the stony places in life’s rugged
road, and he had become so accustomed to Mrs,
Styles’s treatment of him, that it would have
seemed quite unnatural to Philip if she had
altered her usual behaviour to him.

As he often said to his friend Dan, he knew
pretty well now what to expect from “the old
girl,” and had learnt the worst of her.

Poor Philip! Ay, pity him, my readers, but,
at the same time, don’t be too hard upon the
wretched woman who made the misery of the
child-life dependent upon her. She was one of
those weary toilers who, if they will not starve,
must work harder than any beast of burden.
For fourteen hours every day, Sunday included
—for, for these white slaves of our great cities
there is no day of rest,—poor Mrs. Styles worked
on at the task allotted to her, making a gross
IN FLOWERDEW ALLEY. © 9

x
of match-boxes—that is, a dozen dozen outsides
and a dozen dozen insides for twopence half-
penny, and out of that payment finding her own
paste, and earning at the end of her week of
unremitting labour something a little under six
shillings !

What wonder if, with her weary, exhausted
frame, her one long monotony of grinding toil,
poor Mrs. Styles grew ill-tempered, and even
cruel to those dependent upon her. Besides
Phil, she had an invalid husband and a bed-
ridden mother to share the one corner of the
wretched room—for which she paid no less than
eighteenpence a week—and the scanty stock of
food which the remainder of her earnings
supplied.

Her husband had once been in good work at
the docks, but a fall down a ship’s hold had
resulted in an injury to his spine, and paralysis
had supervened, reducing him to a state of utter
helplessness, Like the poor, bedridden old
mother, who was entirely crippled with rheu-
matism, John Styles would lie hour after hour
watching his wife’s swiftly moving hands, and
sighing with that weary patience which seems
the special heritage of the suffering poor, that he
was forced to lie still and starve.

Neither the man nor the old woman were
ever unkind to Phil, and sometimes, indeed, the
former would raise his voice in remonstrance
when the boy fell a victim to more than his
Io MATCH-BOX PHIL.

usual share of ill-treatment ; but with the best
will in the world, poor souls, they could not
have done much to improve his circumstances,
and the one little gleam of light which found its
way into Phil’s troubled life did not come from
either John Styles or his mother-in-law.




CHAPTER II.

A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. |

‘*Ffere some Christ-like spirit, pure and gentle,
Sheddeth moisture on the desert spot.”
Mrs, ALEXANDER,

GyStOOKING at that squalid room which

ect} Phil had learnt to call “home,”
sf, and of which only half belonged

5 to the Styleses, no one could have
supposed that Phil’s bright spot, of which we
spoke in our last chapter, could have been found
within those four bare walls. And yet so it was.

In the corner opposite to that inhabited by
the Styleses, lay, day and night, winter and
summer, a pale, hump-backed, crippled boy. He
was a match-box maker, like the rest of his
room-fellows, and from early dawn till far into
the night poor Seth’s hands, so thin and claw-
like, were moving ceaselessly. Only now and
again, at rare intervals, when overtaxed nature
gained the mastery, Seth’s head would fall back
against the wall—pillows he had none—and his
eyes would close for very weariness. At such
moments as these—strange as it may seem in


12 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

such surroundings—a smile would flicker across
the drawn white face, like a pale, watery sun-
beam, and on these occasions, if Phil happened
to be at hand, he would creep up to Seth and
whisper, “Are you seeing them beautiful things
now, Seth? Tell me about ’em again—do.”
For Seth Reid had not spent all his life in
those sin-defiled haunts of prayerless lips and
ruined souls. He was seventeen when our story
begins, but till within the last five years he had
been a thorough country boy, without a wish or
a thought beyond the happy village and pleasant
lanes where his lot had been cast. Seth had
never been able to join in other boys’ games,
but his intense love of nature, his keen interest
in all the birds and insects and flowers which
came within even his limited reach, had more
than compensated him for the privations which
his crippled limbs inflicted upon him. Almost
unconsciously, Seth was as entirely devoted to
the worship cf Nature as were those old-world
folk of long, long ago, who, knowing very little
about themselves, and nothing of the things they
saw around them, fancied that everything had
the same kind of life which they themselves had.
To watch either sunrise or sunset was a daily
source of delight to him, and at times, when he
had been too ill to leave his bed in the little
cottage at home, Seth had been quite happy
observing the clouds as they floated past his
window, his fancy fashioning them now into
A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 13

grand old giants seated on monstrous thrones of
snowy vapour, now into splendid warriors on
huge, dragon-like steeds, or again into vast
flocks of fleecy sheep scudding across the sky,
whilst the smaller, more transparent cloudlets,
Seth always loved to fancy were the white-
winged angels, speeding to and fro on their
loving errands.

As for the flowers, they seemed to be Seth’s
own heritage. There was not a bank or a copse
within his reach—and on good days with his
crutches Seth could walk a fair distance—of the
flowers of which he could not have given you an
inventory. He knew where to look for any rare
specimen of flower, fern, or moss; he could
literally put his finger on the spots on the chalk
hills where, the bee orchises grew; and if any
one, from the old flower-loving vicar downwards,
wanted information about any uncommon local
plant, Seth Reid was always the person referred
to. His father was a bricklayer, who might
have done well enough had he been content to
remain in his native village and rest satisfied
with the moderate wages which he earned there.
He had only one other child besides Seth, a
little girl, ten years younger than her brother,
and devotedly fond of Seth. Soon after Nannie’s
birth, Reid’s wife had died, and, as so often
happens, the mother’s death was followed by
the break-up of what had till then been one of
the happiest homes in the village.
14 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

Tempted by the prospect of higher wages, and
no longer restrained by his wife’s remonstrances
against sacrificing the children’s welfare, Reid
had sold up his small possessions and started
off to London before Nannie was two years
old. At first he had done fairly well, but after
a-time, owing to slackness of trade, he fell out
of work, and at last was reduced to taking em-
ployment in a stoneyard at the rate of nine-
pence a day.

On first going to London, the Reids had
rented three little rooms, which it had been
Seth’s pride to keep as neat as his mother would
have done, but by degrees they had sunk from
one poor locality to.a still worse one, till at last
one corner of the wretched room in Flowerdew
Alley was all the semblance of home that was
left to them. By that time want of food and
insufficient clothing and foul air had done their
work upon Seth, and reduced him to the feeble,
helpless cripple he now was. And yet perhaps
in all that great city there was no life which, in
proportion to the means at its command, shed
more gentle sunlight on its immediate ‘surround-
ings than did poor Seth’s. To Nannie, he was
her whole world, the centre upon which her very
being hung; to Philip, he was nothing less than
a hero, for he had seen so much with his own
eyes of which Phil had only dreamt; whilst to
those other poor souls who shared the con-
finement of that squalid prison-like room, Seth
A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 15

was a soothing, refining influence, of which they
themselves were vaguely conscious.

No one in that room was tired of hearing
Seth talk of his country home and all its joys
‘and beauties ; and when the boy would describe
his happy wanderings through the springtide
copses, all blue and yellow with their carpets of
hyacinths and primroses, and how he listened for
the first “jug, jug” of the nightingales or the ©
cry of the dear old cuckoo, or when he spoke of
the summer lanes with their wealth of wild
roses and honeysuckle, or of the harvest field
with the golden corn, all ready for the reapers’
sickle,—the wearied, worn faces of his listeners
would grow a shade less hard, hearing Seth’s
stories of a better land, and now and again they
would declare—those who had not always dwelt
in that house of bondage—that they fancied
almost they could see the meadows, with the
fresh green grass all white and gold with the
daisies and buttercups, and could hear once
more the creaking of the waggons and the songs
of the reapers bringing home their harvest.

And if, indeed, the pictures of that sweet
country life contrasted all too grimly with the
sad reality of their own, so that tears would
well up in their heavy, care-dimmed eyes, I do
not think those’ tears did harm to those who
shed them, but served rather as refreshing dews
to:keep one last spot soft and green in the .
weary desert of their parched and barren hearts,
16 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

_In those happier days of his, Seth had been a
Sunday school boy, and now the only treasure
which he could really call his own, and which,
alas! none of his companions wished to dispute
with him, was a tattered Prayer-book, in which
he still read in his rare moments of leisure, and
from which he taught Nannie her catechism.
He had tried to teach Philip too, but with very
little success; and though the boy had learnt
to say “Our Father,” and would repeat it at
-Nannie’s bidding, it had been from the child
and not her brother that Phil had learnt this
simple prayer. Phil would always come over to
Seth’s corner and listen for hours to tales of the
latter’s life at Thorndale, but the sight of the
tattered Prayer-book would invariably send him
flying to the further end of the room. He was
not a good little boy in the sense of saying. his
prayers or wishing to be taught about God or
heaven. No one but Seth had ever spoken to
him on such subjects; and though Phil had often
promised him that he would go along with
“Dusty Dan” to the Sunday Ragged School in
an adjoining alley, he had never got further
than the door of the class-room. He had never
been taught to say his prayers, kneeling at his
mother’s knee. No one had ever tried to raise
his thoughts. above the loathsome sights and
sounds of the squalid places in which his childish
ideas had taken root, or to talk to him of that
other kingdom of which he was an inheritor;
A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 17

no one, indeed, had ever troubled themselves to
tell the boy whether he were even baptized
or not.

And what to Seth seemed the saddest part of
it all was, that Phil cared very little about it
himself, and declared that anyway now it
wouldn’t make much difference to him.

“Ah! if you could only get down to Thorn-
. dale and be taught for a bit in the Sunday
school,” Seth would say when overcome by.
despair of trying to teach Phil himself, “you
would understand it all then, fast enough.”

“T’d like to go to Thorndale,” Phil would
answer; “but catch me going to any of your
Sunday schools. It’s the cherry orchards I’d
make for, you bet, or some old cove’s fruit
garding. My wig, won't it be a lark if I ever
gets down there!”

For Philip’s projected flight to Thorndale was
a favourite topic of whispered conversation
amongst those three ragged children, Seth,
Nannie, and Phil, as they sat huddled together
in their dingy corner ; for Phil had quite resolved
that somehow or other on the first favourable
opportunity he would, as he termed it, “cut the
concern” and “make tracks” for the country.
When he was once outside London, he was
quite sure it would be an easy matter to find
the road to Thorndale, for Seth assured him
that in the country there was no huge network
of long streets, with great tall houses blocking

Cc
fe
18 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

out the distant view; there were no rattling
cabs and omnibuses to run you down, if you
stood still in the middle of the road to think
which way you would take; there was no police-
man to bid you move on, if you wished to rest
for a bit by the way. Only fresh green grass
‘beneath your feet and tall shade-giving trees
overhead, and plenty of moss-grown banks or
snug corners in overgrown copses, where the
weary wayfarer might rest all night, with the
- nightingales to sing you to sleep and the stars
of heaven to gleam down upon you, instead of
the flaring gaslamps at the corners of the street,
and all the jarring sounds which always filled the
night in Flowerdew Alley and made it hideous.

When Phil had once reached Thorndale, he
was to go to a certain long, low thatched house
at the top of the village, with a large yard and
a pond in front of it, and which was known far ©
and wide as May Farm, and where, Seth assured
him, the kindly housewife would give him a
welcome, if Phil said that Seth Reid had sent
him. She was the children’s aunt; and though
the Reids had long ago lost all connection with
their old friends and relations, yet Seth felt
sure, knowing his aunt’s nature, that the sound
of his name, coupled with the sight of Phil’s
wan white face, would ensure him kindly treat-
ment at her hands,

It was always part of the programme that
Phil should time his arrival at May Farm for
A GLEAM AMIDST GLOOM. 19

either haymaking time or harvesting, so that he
should at once be taken on as an extra hand.
“And then,” said the boy, “won’t I work just
about and make ’em that satisfied, that chances
are they’ll nab me for ever after as a regular
hand.”

Anyway, he was to earn enough money to
bring him back to London to fetch Seth and
Nannie and give them a good time in Thorndale.

Oh, the sunny threads, which: the exercise of
a little imagination may weave into the tapestry
of the darkest clouds of life!




CHAPTER III.

HATCHING A PLOT.

“© Beneath the loveliest dream there coils a fear.”
THEODORE WATTS.

5; EVER before had Phil so quickly
accomplished his errand to the great
match-box warehouse as on this
summer evening on which our story



opens.

In spite of the heavy sultriness, which made
most people feel so weary and listless, Phil sped
along as if he had wings to his feet, only bent
on delivering his match-boxes as soon as possible,
so that he might fly back to Seth and Nannie,
and tell them how that their long-dreamt dream
was really about to be fulfilled, and that before
another sunset he would actually be treading the
lanes and meadows of that happy land of which
Seth had talked so much.

But with the caution peculiar to those poor
children whose natural dove-like innocence has
long ago been choked by this world’s wisdom,
Phil was very prudent in imparting his informa-
HATCHING A PLOT. 21

tion. It was not till he felt quite sure that all
the other inmates of the room were either asleep
or entirely absorbed in finishing their daily tasks,
that he crept over to Seth’s side and began a low
conversation with him and Nannie.

At first both children made sure that Phil was
dreaming.

“Tt couldn’t never be true,” said little Nannie ;
and there was a pathos in her wistful, eager tone
which would have gone to your heart.

Over and over again Phil had to explain how it
was all Dusty Dan’s planning, and how Dan had
promised that if Phil came along with him to
the station at eight o’clock next morning, he
would manage somehow to smuggle him in
amongst the two hundred and odd ragged
children who were going down into the country
for their yearly school treat.

“You've only to duck down at the right
moment, and you'll be right enough, you bet,”
Dusty Dan had declared. “ Joe Hart got smug-
gled in that way last year; and though! to be
sure, he was spotted when we’d got out of the
first tunnel, teacher hadn’t the heart to turn him
back again.”

“ And,” continued Phil, “if so be I was spotted
at the station, I wouldn’t be worse off than I am
now. The parson and the ladies might jaw me
a bit, but that wouldn’t break no bones, and Ill
only have to make a better sort of a try next
time.”
22 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“That's true,” said Seth; “but do you know
what part of the country youre going to,
Phil?”

“ What part!” echoed the boy. “ Why, ’tzs the
country, That’s enough, isn’t it? I expect, when
T am once there, I’ll manage to find Thorndale.”

“But the country is ever so big,” said Seth,
“and Thorndale was reckoned but a small
village, and maybe you're going ‘quite opposite
ways.”

“Don’t matter; if Thorndale’s in the country,
and I’m going into the country, Pll be bound
to find it anyhow,” said Phil, to whose mind the
term country represented a monster kind of .
street, in which he had only to seek for Thorn-
dale as he would have sought the number of a
house in any given street.

“ Ah,” sighed Seth, “if only I could go along
with you—just to put you in the right way, you
know. Shute is the name of the station, and
that’s better than three miles from ,Thorndale ;
and it’s up ever so steep a hill you go for most
of the way, till youcome to the toll-bar. There’s
a big cherry tree grows close against the gate.
The fruit will be about ripe now, and Jerry, the
old man what keeps the toll, has got a patch
over one eye— But there, you’re not minding
a word I’m saying, Phil,’ broke off Seth, be-
coming suddenly aware that Philip’s thoughts
were clearly not following his description of one-
eyed Jerry.
HATCHING A PLOT. 23

“T was thinking,” said Phil, “how on earth I
could let you know, and Nannie too, how I gets
on, for you'll both be ever so anxious to hear
about me.”

“Oh yes,” said Nannie, “for we'll have to be
getting ready for you to fetch us away, ’cause
you wz come for us again—won’t you, Phil?”

“Tn course I will,” he answered; and then, after
a moment’s thought, he added, “Well, anyway
Dan’s in the secret, and he’ll come and tell you,
soon as ever he comes back here, how I manages
about getting lost. [ll have to look sharp and
dodge behind some ’bus when the ladies ain’t
looking, or try——”

“But there ain’t no ’bus in the country,”
broke in Seth; “you'll have to hide behind a
haystack, or in a ditch more likely.”

“Well, Pll hide in something, you bet,” said
Phil.

“And you'll remember May Farm, and Mrs.
Brailey our aunt,” said Seth; “and you'll tell
her about us, and how we want bad to come
back again.”

“Yes,” chimed in Nannie, “and you'll tell her
how Seth says I’m grown handy enough to do
many an odd job, and p’raps when I’m a bit
older take a turn at the milking,” she added,
quite forgetting that she had never, to her
knowledge, seen a live cow in her life,

“JT would like to be going up that Thorndale
hill once more,” sighed poor Seth. “ You'll think
24 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

of me, won’t you, Phil, as you goes along between
the high hedges? They'll be all aglow with the
dog-roses and foxgloves now ;” and he turned
his face to the bare dirty wall,and closed his
eyes, as though to shut out the sight of his
miserable surroundings, whilst he stole away
from them all in fancy to the pleasant scenes of
his childhood.

Nobody heeded the two great tears which
presently rolled down his sunken cheeks, not
even little Nannie, she was so absorbed in
thinking of all that lay before Philip. His
flight. into the country had been talked of so
much and so often by these poor little exiles,
that now that he actually stood on the threshold
of his enterprise Nannie felt quite bewildered,

“Tt seems awful queer like ; and when I think
about it all, something seems to choke me just
here,” she said, putting her hand to her throat,
whilst a troubled look came into her face which
was akin to pain rather than pleasure.

“ Ay,” said Phil, whose spirits were rising, “it
will be an awful spree. I’ll have a lot to tell you,
Nannie, when I come back again ;” and, in the
exuberance of his glee, Phil promptly stood on
his head, as only a gutter boy can.

But this time he had gone too far, anda sharp
reprimand from Mrs. Styles, who bade him come
and lie down in his own corner and have done
with them tomfooleries, had the effect of sobering
him, and, with a whispered promise to Nan that
HATCHING A PLOT. 25

he would bid her good-bye first thing next n morn-
ing, Phil went off to sleep.

Nor was he the first to awake next day. The
pale grey light of early morning was only just
beginning to steal into the room, when a gentle
touch on his forehead roused him, and Phil saw
little Nan standing beside him.

In one hand she held a tiny screw of news-
paper, in the folds of which lay a small ragged
lock of her yellow hair.

“Take it along with you, Phil,” she whispered,
“just for a something to remember us by, for
maybe if you’ve nothing at all, when you comes
into that beautiful place yonder, you'll forget
all about Flowerdew Alley, and Seth, and—me”
—and here the corners of her mouth quivered
ominously—“ but if you'll always keep that,
chances are ’twill mind you now and then about
us, and how we be waiting here ever so long,
a-hoping for you to come back and fetch us.”

“Never you fear. I won't forget you, Nan,”
said Phil, but he took the fold of paper all the
same, “I'll come back for you just as fast as
ever I can,”

“Ay, and you'll find us waiting and wanting
you ever so bad,” said Nan. And then, after a
moment’s hesitation, she went on, “And, Phil, I
wanted to ask you one thing more : when you're
away from us, will you—will you promise just
to say ‘Our Father’ when you gets up first thing
inthe morning? Seth says we can’t expect God
26 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

to take no care of us if we don’t ask Him, you
know. And Id like to think that when we are
saying ‘Our Father’ here, Seth and I, you is
saying just the same out in the beautiful country.”

“Tl never remember to say it all through,”
said Phil, “not by myself; ’tis different when, I
say it with you and Seth.”

For a minute Nan looked perplexed; then, her
face suddenly brightening, she suggested, “I know,
then. You say just ‘Our Father’ every morning
regular—only them two words; you’ll remember
them, Phil—and then tell God, ‘Nan will finish
the rest,’ and I’ll say it always a double time—
once for us, and once for you. That'll be fine,
won't it, Phil?” a

“ Ay,” he said, no asioee his head. “I eee
that, and I won’t forget.”

And so those children parted that summer
morning.

To the oldest, most world-worn man there’s a
kind of magical charm in the sound of a former
playfellow’s name; but how much tenderer is
the link that binds us to those whom we may
call our misery-fellows! “Tears that we have
shared with another make the best cement for
friendship,” says a French writer; and so it had
proved in the case of these three poor garret
children.

“Tt’s our only friend that is gone; ’tis that
what makes me feel so badly,” said Nannie some
hours later to Seth, by way of excuse for the
HATCHING A PLOT. 27

tears that would come in sudden showers all
through that morning. “We'll miss him terribly.”

“ Ay; but he’s coming back again,” said her
brother. “He promised to come back again to
us, certain sure.”

“ He promised to say ‘ Our Father,’” said little
Nan, as if the thought of ¢hat promise gave her
the most comfort,




CHAPTER IV.

THE FIRST STEP.

‘*And ail above, broad summer day !
And all below, bright summer land!”
Lorp Lyrron,

2 MONGST all the bright-faced, eager-
hearted children who were gathered
together at one of the great London
stations on this golden summer
morning, ready to start on their country ex-
pedition, no heart beat faster, no breath came
shorter, than did poor Match-box Phil’s, as he
dodged first behind one child and then another,
trembling in every limb, lest some one should
see him, and discover that he was not one of the
invited guests.

There stood the long line of third-class
carriages, specially engaged for the accommo-
dation of the small holiday-makers, drawn up
close to the platform. There was only one step
—and such a little step too—from where Phil
was standing to these tempting vehicles of
escape; if only he could once be smuggled


THE FIRST STEP. 29

through the ordeal of counting heads, if only
he could once find himself being carried down
the line with the rest of his ragged comrades,
all would be well.

The success of his venture meant to Phil
glorious freedom and unclouded happiness in
the unknown country, so fondly dreamt of;
failure meant a sorrowful return to the dreary
city home—which was no home to him—and
Nan’s and Seth’s bitter disappointment as well
as his own.

Phil had taken his place in the crowd of little
ones close beside Dan, and he was so over-
excited, so ready to laugh or cry at a moment’s
notice, that when his friend gave him a sharp
poke in the ribs, accompanied by the informa-
tion that “’twasn’t their regular teacher as was
taking them, but some other old girl, whom
Dan had never seen before,” Phil could not
collect his scattered wits sufficiently to under-
stand that this change of superintendents could
in any way influence the success of his enter-
prise.

“ She’s a new hand at it all, and we'll do her
yet,” muttered Dick by way of explanation.
“She’s awfully out of it,’ added the gutter boy.

And “awfully out of it,” indeed, did that poor
good lady feel, as she stood on the platform,
with a long register of names in her hand, short
of sight, and still shorter of memory, and re-
gretting bitterly in her inmost soul the good
30 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

nature which had prompted her to place herself
in this trying position. The truth was that her
niece, who should have been in charge of Dusty
Dan’s class that day, had fallen ill at the last
moment, and her distress at the thought of her
unshepherded flock had been so great, that her
elderly aunt had volunteered to go on the
expedition in her stead. But though she had
been fully instructed as to the right number of
children—some fifty—for whom she would be
responsible, and had been directed to call them
over singly by name, and make each answer in
turn, she had likewise received such a volume
of instructions not to let Tom Miles put his
head out of the carriage window, or Fred Smith
frighten the others in the tunnels, and to be sure
and not allow Charlie Brown to eat his neigh-
bour’s share of cake as wellas his own,—that by
the time poor Miss Sandars arrived on the scene
of action, and found herself surrounded by the
troop of wildly excited children, she was so
bewildered and so nervous, that, though she did
go through the name-calling and did feebly
endeavour to number her charges, Phil could
not have attempted his escape under more
favourable circumstances.

The names had been called, the counting was
over, and Phil had escaped detection, when all
at once a voice was heard close to Phil’s elbow,
saying in very loud tones, “Teacher, I say, this
’ere cove don’t belong to us;” and a grimy little
THE FIRST STEP. 31

paw, belonging to one Hal Jones, was pointed
towards Philip.

The attack from this quarter was so un-
expected, and took Phil by such surprise, that
for the moment he gave himself up for lost, and
began stammering out some helpless sort of
excuse. But Dusty Dan came to the rescue
manfully. He was grand in the emergency,

“Chain up, you duffer,” he whispered to Phil;
and then, with the utmost promptitude, he dealt
such a sudden blow to a small boy who stood
between himself and Hal Jones, that he sent the
former tumbling head foremost over the latter,
so that the next minute both lads were sprawling
together on the platform, and so busy abusing
each other, that Phil was no longer made the
object of attention. They were still squabbling
by the time both Dan and his friend had been
safely packed into one of the well-filled carriages,
sitting side by side.

“T telled yer it would be all right,” whispered
Dusty, with a broad grin; and then, when the
guard had whistled and the train had puffed
out of the station, and the children with one
consent had burst out into a long ringing cheer,
poor Phil’s delight and excitement were almost
beyond his control.

It was all so strange, so wonderful—the rapid
motion of the train, the sight of the rows of
houses as they passed by them, and which
seemed ‘to Phil to be moving as fast as they
32 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

were moving themselves; then the gradual
gliding from the outskirts of the great, smoky
city into the greener suburbs, with their pic-
turesque little villas and trim gardens,—it was all
so bewildering to the poor gutter child that, as
he said afterwards, he had to keep “a-pulling of
his hair and a-pinching of his self” to make sure
that it was he, Match-box Phil, that was really
sitting on the carriage seat, looking out at all
these new and beautiful sights. It happened to
be a very pretty line of country through which
they were travelling ; but had their journey led
them through the barest downs and dreariest
marshes, it would all have seemed fairyland to
Phil. Close by the window he sat, his eyes
fixed hungrily on the different scenes through
which they were passing so rapidly. Now it was
a sunlit meadow, with cattle basking lazily in
the shade of the clumps of trees, or standing
knee-deep in some reed-fringed stream; now
they were hurrying past long stretches of forest-
land, with here and there an opening in the
glades, where pheasants were strutting in the full
beauty of their summer plumage, and hares were
scurrying to and fro amidst the thick urider-
wood ; or, again, the train would carry them
close to some pretty village, which, like its rustic
inhabitants, seemed to have run down to the
very edge of the line for the express purpose of
viewing the passing travellers,

“You like it fine, don’t you, Phil?” whispered
HE FIRST STEP. 33

Dan, when two-thirds of the journey had been
got over, and Philip’s unwonted silence was
beginning to make his friend doubtful of the
success of the undertaking.

“Just about,” answered Phil in a tone which
carried conviction ; but still he did not turn his
face from the window, perhaps because just then
two great tears had gathered in his eyes.

What had brought them there at such a time,
do you think? The train was just carrying
them past a pretty bit of woodland, intersected
by a sandy road, overhung with birches and
oaks. The trunk of a fallen tree lay half across
the pathway, and on it was seated a little girl,
her lap full of summer flowers. The sunlight
- filtered down through the branches on the
child’s yellow hair—for her calico bonnet lay at
her feet, and two red admiral butterflies were
hovering over it—and the face which she lifted
from her nosegay was a picture of rosy round-
ness, sadly unlike the pale, pinched cheeks of
the poor little maidens in Flowerdew Alley, and
yet the sight of that country child in the sun-
shiny copse brought a sudden pain to Phil’s
heart, reminding him of that other little girl,
whom he had left behind in rags and dirt and
squalor, and between whom and himself such a
whole world seemed now to lie.

“Oh, Nan, Nan, however shall I find you
again?” he murmured.

Tt seemed a lifetime to Phil since Nan had
D
34 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

stood beside him in the early grey of the morn-
ing, and thrust the lock of tangled hair into his
hand, which was to serve as a talisman in his
distant wanderings.

“Where is Thorndale, I wonder?” he thought.
Had they passed it, or were they coming to it
now?

Up till now, in the midst of his excitement,
Phil had entirely forgotten that he had a special
mission, and that Seth and Nan had sent him
out for the express purpose of finding Thorndale,
but the glimpse of that little girl had recalled it
all to him now.

Of course it was no good asking any of his
companions if they had ever heard of Seth’s
home; but all at once Phil screwed up his
courage to address Miss Sandars, Growing
crimson to the roots of his hair, and starting
out of his place, he stammered out an inquiry
as to whether the lady knew where Thorndale
was.

“Thorndale!” No, she had never heard of
such a place, and she bade Philip sit down again
quietly, adding that they would soon be leaving ©
the train now.

Poor Phil! his first endeavour to fulfil his
mission had certainly not been successful; but
perhaps, he thought, some of those gentlemen
who wore the coats with silver braid and buttons,
and who appeared to know everything about
everybody, and who seemed to Phil to sprout
THE FIRST STEP. 3e

out of all the platforms, would be able to en-
lighten him. At any rate, he would ask then
at the earliest opportunity.

But now the train stopped, and a deafening
cheer from all the line of carriages announced
that Stourton, the goal of their railway journey,
had been reached.




CHAPTER V.

ROOKHURST.

‘Tt was the time when lilies blow,
And clouds are highest up in air.”
TENNYSON.

three miles distant from the little
village of Rookhurst, where the
London children were to be enter-
tained, it was quite evident that even at Stourton
their arrival had been duly expected and pro-
vided for. The station-yard was crowded with
vans and open waggons drawn up in readiness
to transport the little holiday-makers to the
scene of the feast.. Not only the squire, who
was to be their host, but several good-natured
farmers had lent their teams and waggons for
the occasion, and a pretty sight it was to see
the strong, glossy-coated horses standing two
abreast in the large open vans, with branches of
roses and poppies in their ears and their tails
plaited up with straw and crimson braid, whilst
each time they tossed back their heads the air
was filled with the music of their tiers of bells.


ROOKHURST. 37

And what a hurry all the children were in to
exchange the close, shut-up railway carriages
for the wide, roomy waggons. But even in
the short transit from the platform to the station-
yard Phil found time to pluck at a porter’s arm
and ask if he knew the way to Thorndale.

. Never heard tell of such a place,” said the
man shortly, brushing past Phil.

Nor did the latter dare linger to explain Aner
for, close at his heels, Hal Jones was following,
and again Phil heard his horrid squeaky voice
saying—

“That ’ere chap don’t belong to us, eachern
_ “No, that he don’t,’ echoed another small
voice ; and Phil began to quake.

Happily, however, both remarks were drowned
in the hubbub and bustle occasioned by the
packing away of all the children into the various
conveyances,

Never to his dying aay will poor of Phailic forget
his impressions as he drove along through the
narrow lanes, shut in on each side by the tall
hedges. To have the pure blue sky overhead,
undimmed by the clouds of murky smoke; to
have soft green banks on either side instead of
rows of squalid houses ; and in the place of the
dirty, broken pavement underfoot, the country
road, with its fringe of grass and wayside flowers,
was indeed like passing from darkness to light.
True, those roadside blossoms were dusty enough
after the fashion of all wayfarers, but that did
38 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

not tarnish the gold of the dandelions or dim
the green of the grass to eyes all unused to feast
on Nature’s commonest gifts. At the foot of
the first long hill—and there were several between
Stourton and Rookhurst—most of the elder
children were turned out to walk; but the
experiment was not repeated after the first
attempt.

Once on their own feet, they were simply like
mad creatures. Off went their hats to serve as
nets for the butterflies, which most of them
believed were only “flowers what could fly ;”
whilst dozens of little legs, which never till now
had climbed anything but garret stairs, went
clambering up the banks, only, as a rule, to slip
back again with more or less of a tumble into
the dusty road below.

High on the dry, sunny hedgerows the fox-
gloves were hanging out their crimson bells on
their tall firm stalks, serving as regular decoys
to the eager little crowd below. Of course, every
one was crazy to secure one of those glorious
spikes for themselves, until their enthusiasm
was suddenly quenched.

Phil, who was leading the storming party,
had reached his goal; he was just grasping one
of the strong, downy stalks with its peals of
bells, when all at once, over the hedge and
almost into his very face, came the head of a
great red cow, scattering dismay and confusion
beyond description among the city-bred boys,
ROOKHURST. 39

With a piercing shriek of terror, Phil staggered
backwards, and, like a shower of loose stones
which had suddenly been dislodged, down into
the road the motley crew came tumbling, wide-
eyed and panting with fright ; indeed, so alarmed
were some of them that they set off running
down the hill with their faces towards the station
and their backs to the waggons as fast as they
could go. The sight of that terrible beast—she
was a very sleepy, mild-eyed old cow—had been
enough to make them willing to decline all
further acquaintance with the country, and it
required no little persuasion and coaxing on the
part of their teachers to prevail on them to turn
back and allow themselves to be safely placed
into the vans again. ,

After that it was agreed that there should be
no more getting in or out on the road until
Rookhurst was actually reached. So they
drove along at a steady pace, the good-natured
waggoners declaring afterwards that it was for
all the world like having a May swarm of bees
behind them, for the children kept up a perpetual
buzz of wonder and admiration.

Now they shrieked with delight as they drove
under a group of elder trees and watched the
small white starry blossoms coming down in a
shower amongst them, and then they fairly
screamed with joy at the sight of a scarlet clover
field upon which the midday sun was blazing
right royally.
40 MATCH-BOX PHIL

The corn-fields, too, standing nearly ready

for the harvest, and stained here and there with
the red poppies, evoked shouts of admiration ;
whilst, when they actually entered Rookhurst,
the cottagers, standing at their garden gates to
watch the arrival of the vans, trembled for the
safety of those fruit trees whose branches over-
hung the roadway. So many little hands were
outstretched to strip the boughs of their tempting,
albeit unripe, bounty, so many eyes were turned
greedily upon them, that the drivers whipped up
their horses into a brisk trot, and so the whole
cavalcade reached the manor in grand style.
_ And the welcome which greeted them there
was more than enough to make the children
forget the forbidden fruit left behind in the
village, and even the terrible wild beast which
had scared them down from the foxglove hedge.
All the Rookhurst school-children were drawn
up on either side of the long chestnut avenue
which led to the house, each armed with huge
nosegays and garlands to be given to their city
guests, 0. ee 32

“Oh, if Nan and Seth could have but half of
these!” thought Phil, gazing down on the bunch
of roses and honeysuckles which had fallen to
his share; and when, along with the others, he
was marshalled into his place at the long dinner-
table, spread under the trees in the park, his
bewilderment reached its height. He had never
in all his life been to a school-feast before, so
. ROOKHURST. Al

that the mere fact of being surrounded by plenty
of good things was a great novelty to him. At
first he felt as if he could neither eat nor drink,
and sat staring helplessly at his piled-up plate
and the flowers which lay beside it, thinking
wistfully of two wan white faces in the dreary
garret in Flowerdew Alley, till something seemed
to rise up in his throat and nearly choke him.

“T say, tuck in, Phil, I tell you,” said Dan at
his elbow; “tuck as much inside you as you
can, and then bag the rest, for if you’re going to
give ’em the slip, you’d best pocket all you can
ley hands on, for I’ll be bound you won’t get
such a blooming chance of blowing yourself out
again.” naar :

That was sound, practical advice, and in
another minute Phil was acting on it. When
they were once. tasted, the mutton-pies and
plum-puddings were so good that Phil found it
no hardship to obey Dan’s orders to the letter ;
and when he had eaten his fill, his conscience
was elastic enough to allow him to stuff all he
could lay hands on into his pocket. . The meat
was very greasy and the plum-pudding was very
sticky, but Phil was not very particular in these
matters. . ; :

After dinner began. all manner of romps and
races, for which prizes were given with no
grudging hand, interspersed occasionally with
scrambles for nuts and sweets in the long green
grass.
42 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

It was a most entrancing afternoon—the sky
was so blue, the flowers were so bright, the good
folk at Rookhurst were so kind, and every ont
was so happy, that though Phil had agreed with
Dan that he’ should seize the first opportunity
after dinner “to make a bolt of it,” when tea-
time came round he was still laughing amongst
his play-fellows, unwilling to tear himself away
from all the fun and the feasting. Moreover,
he had gained three glittering halfpence in the
races, and the longing to carry them back with
the flowers to Seth and Nannie, made him waver
in his purpose of running away still further into
the country. Besides, after all, making his
escape was not such an easy matter as Dan had
represented. Dan had talked of their being
turned into the hayfields to wander about
amongst the new-cut grass as they liked, but
the haying was long ago over; and though, when
he discovered this, Dan had cheered Phil by
promising they would be taken to a copse to
gather blackberries, it soon dawned on them
that that too was a vain hope, for if it was too
late in the year for haymaking, it was too early
for blackberrying, and Phil felt that as long
as they remained in the park he could not
get outside the gates without attracting atten-
tion.

“Dan, I say, Pll have to wait and make a try
for it from the station,” Phil said, as they got ug
from tea,
ROOKHURST, 43

“Then you may as lief chuck it up altogether,”
replied Dan, “for you won't get off there, I can
tell you. My wig!”—Dan was very, fond of
invoking that fiery part of his person—* my wig !
I believe as it is you've meee your chance
altogether, sure as eggs are eggs.”

And poor Phil began to think so too, and now
that he feared it was too late he began to feel
very sad. He wondered if he could make friends
with any of the country children and persuade
them to hide him away; but, to the sharp-
witted town child, those little rustics seemed so
hopelessly slow of comprehension, that after a
time he determined “ they’d be no go.”

Presently, however, a ray of hope burst through
his cloud of despair. It only wanted an hour to
six o’clock, the time for home going, but the list
of pleasures provided for them was not exhausted
yet. The children were all to go in various
detachments to the farmhouses close round
Rookhurst and see the cows being milked, and
each drink in turn a mug of new milk. Phil,
being one of the biggest, was told off for the
most distant farm, the road to which lay through
a long grass meadow, from which a stile led into
a corn-field—where the wheat was growing so
thick and high that the golden ears were actually
taller than some of the children—and then, lastly,
through a small but thickly wooded copse. The
teachers in charge of the party were very careful
to count their children both coming and going
44 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

through that bit of woodland, for more than one
small deserter had been known to hide. in its
tangled glades; but from the corn-field they
apprehended no danger, which was well for Phil.

And when, two hours later, the wearied though
happy children were counted over at the station,
every one answered duly to the names entered
‘on the roll, and their keepers and guardians
stepped into the train with a self-congratulatory
sigh that for once in a way no one was missing
from their ragged regiment.

“My eyes! he’s given ’em the slip, and no
mistake,” muttered Dusty Dan, rubbing his
hands together in silent glee, as he screwed
himself into the corner of the third-class carriage,
“Lorks, but I'd like to have known how he
did it.”




-CHAPTER VI.

ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND. .

“ Quick ! let me fly, and cross into yon farther field!”
MATTHEW ARNOLD.

that Philip had hidden himself, but
in a deep dry ditch which ran along

“at the bottom of the field and at the
foot of the hedge, which served as a division
between the field and a long stretch of wood-
land on the other side.

Into this ditch Phil crept on all fours, but he
was too shrewd to remain there one minute
after he had seen the last straggler of the party
disappear from sight. Then, quick as thought,
he scrambled up the bank and through the
hedge, caring nothing, London-bred though he
was, for the thorns and briars, into the wood
beyond.

_ He had no fixed plan of action, no intention
of going in any special direction; his one and
only idea was to fly, as fast and as far as he could
from the road which led back to Stourton Station,


46 - MATCH-BOX PHIL.

He was only vaguely conscious of two facts
which might help to guide him in shaping his
course. On his right hand, he knew, was the
farm from which he had just come; on his left
was the park; he must therefore make for a ~
middle way between the two. So he plunged
into the thickest part of the wood, carefully
avoiding anything that looked like a footpath,
and battling bravely with the boughs and bushes
which impeded his every step. How long he
actually took to work his way through the wood
Phil never knew, but it seemed to him nearly a
lifetime before he observed that the underwood
began to disappear and the trees to grow at
greater intervals from each other, and discovered
that his progress had brought him to the limits
of the wood and to the edge of the high-road.
After the shelter of the copse, with its thick
overhanging boughs, the broad white road seemed
terribly public to Phil, as he stood_on the margin
of the wood and looked out timidly on his strange
surroundings.

It was still much too light, he felt sure, to
make it safe for him to venture on to the high-
road, so he determined to look out for a snug
hiding-place in the wood and wait there till the
evening twilight should enable him to continue
his wanderings unobserved in this unknown
country. Before long he fixed on a comfortable
spot at the foot of a big fir tree, where the
bracken was growing so high that he could lay
( mt Le IGE zy



ES AND FELL FAST ASLEEP,

+ PROMPTLY CLOSED HIS EY.

PHIL. .

Page 47.
ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND. 47

his small person down in safety, with no chance
of any passer-by discovering him.

“And I'll just bide here till tis time for lamp-
lighting,” thought Phil, “and then I'll sneak out
and bolt up the road as fast asI can go. I'd
like to ask the first person PIl meet where-
abouts Thorndale is, but Pll wait till I get a
good way off from here, ’cause else some one
might a I Peltor to the feasting lot, and
split on me.’

So, curling himself up in the bracken, and
reflecting with satisfaction that one pocket held
three-halfpence in hard cash and that the other

“was crammed with pudding and pies, Phil, with
the firm intention of keeping wide awake so as
to be ready to pursue his flight at the first
favourable opportunity, promptly closed his eyes
and fell fast asleep. The sound of the heavy
rumbling waggons as they went by on the road
close at hand could not disturb his dreams, all
used as he was to the hideous noises of a night
in the East End; but what did rouse him at last
was the soft touch of a little fluffy rabbit rubbing
against his hand as he lay sleeping at the foot
of the fir tree. Then poor Phil started up in
utter bewilderment, and took full five minutes to
remember where he was and how he had come
there. A distant clock was striking twelve. The
sky was overcast with thick clouds, and had Phil
been in the least bit weatherwise, he would have
known that a thunderstorm was just beginning ;
48 - MATCH-BOX PHIL.

but he only thought that now, at any rate, it
was dark enough to make it safe for him to
venture on to the road. Dim and overcast
though it was, the road still showed white
enough to enable Phil to find it easily, and when
he had once reached it he was conscious of a
sense of freedom at being no longer surrounded
by the tall trees, which looked so weird and
gigantic in the semi-darkness of the summer
midnight.

“T’ll get on fine now,” thought Phil, to whose
pavement-worn feet the soft grass fringe by the
roadside seemed like beautiful velvet. There
were no cottages in sight; but he hadn’t gone
far before the sound of wheels made him turn
his head, and presently a light cart drove up .
carrying two red lamps. As it overtook Phil
the wheels stopped, and when a man’s voice
called out to him, asking what he was doing on
the road at that time of night, poor Phil was so
terrified that instead of attempting to answer,
he took to his heels and ran for his life. But
the faster he went, the faster came on the cart,
till at last, dead beat, he dropped down by the
bank, prepared for the worst consequences, and
only knowing that he could not run another step
to save his life. In his own mind, he never
doubted: that the man who was pursuing him
was one of the bobbies, whom the missus had
set to catch him, and as he lay gasping on the
bank, with the thunderstorm bursting in fury
ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND. 49

round him, visions of beatings worse than he had
ever yet known and grim pictures of prison cells
rose up before his closely shut eyes. But he
was not going to be captured without making
one desperate struggle, and when a heavy hand
came down on his shoulder, he mustered all his
failing strength and struck out at the figure
bending over him. But, to his surprise, the blow
was not returned; he was only set on his feet
with rather a rough shaking, whilst his pursuer
repeated his question good-naturedly enough,
as to what Phil was about at that time of
night. :

Somewhat reassured, Phil muttered that he
was going to see his grandmother—Dusty Dan
had told him that a grandmother was always
a useful person to quote on emergencies—and
that he had lost his way.

“¥’m, I don’t think much of the grandmother,”
replied the man. “Grandmothers are mighty
handy pegs for hanging lies on ; but, anyway, ’tis
pouring wet, and you're but a bit of a shaver to
be out at this hour; so get you up along with
_me in the mail-cart, and I’ll drive you as far as
I’m going, at any rate,”

The offer was a tempting one, but Phil’s early
education had made him suspicious and taught
him to be always on the look out for traps.
His hesitation, however, was cut short, for without
more ado the mail-man hoisted him into the cart,
tucked him round in a waterproof rug, and then

E
50 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

drove on at a brisk rate to make up for the ten
minutes’ delay. The man’s manner was kind for
all his roughness, and if Phil could only have
felt sure that he was not a bobby in disguise,
he would gladly have accepted his invitation to
screw himself into a corner and go to sleep;
but as it was, he only replied, with more candour
than politeness—

“Not I; I ain’t so jolly green as all that.”

He was not in the habit of receiving kindness
from strangers, and the real state of the case
would never have entered his head, namely, that
Amos Lee, the Stourton mail-man, was so afraid
of his nightly drive of thirty miles through the
lonely roads, that, as his wife confidentially
assured her neighbours, “Amos would give a
sovereign to any two-year-old who'd sit up in
the cart along with him.”

In spite of Phil’s ungracious rejoinder, his
companion did not leave him alone, and the boy’
had hard work to answer his string of questions
without betraying his real history. Happily for
him, Amos’s wits were even duller than those of
most rustics, so that it never struck him to connect
the ragged urchin beside him with the party of
City children who had passed through Stourton
that day, and between whose appearance and
Phil there was a striking family likeness.

In course of time Philip took courage to ask
if they were near Thorndale, and if anything was
known of Mrs. Brailey, of May Farm.
ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND, 51

“And in what part of the country may that
be?” asked the mail-man. '

“What part!” echoed Phil ; “ why, it’s in the
country, I tell yer.”

“Bless yer heart! but the country’s as good
as nowhere,” was the reply. “Whereabouts in
the country is it?”

' “Oh, as to that, I don’t know for certain,”
said Phil. “But it can’t much matter ; the
country is the country, sure.”

“Well, if you ain’t the queerest little cure!”
exclaimed worthy Amos, “I’spose, now, you've
never been out of London before.” Then, after
a pause, he added, “But how, in the name of
fortune, did yer manage to get so far as this ?”

This was getting on very dangerous ground,
but Phil was spared the necessity of finding
an answer, for at that moment the mail-cart
stopped in front of the Norgate post-office, and
Amos Lee suddenly remembered that here he
must part company with his little friend.

“Unless maybe you'd like to drive back
again,” he said rather maliciously.

“No, no, thank yer,” said Phil, scrambling
down from the cart, and reflecting with pleasure
on the many miles which he had now put between
himself and his. friends, ;


















CHAPTER VII.

MOVING ON.

: ts Thou through the fields and through the woods dost stray,
Roaming the country-side, a truant boy.”
MATTHEW ARNOLD.

VORELL, Nan, zs it all right?” The
} speaker was Seth, and though the



audible whisper, he was quivering
with ee excitement.

“Tt’s aff right,” returned Nan in the same low
tone. “I’ve seen Dusty, and he says Phil got
left behind in a big yellow field, and he expects
he’s ever so far up the country by now; and
Dusty says——” But here Nan broke off and
grew suddenly silent, for just then she was
aware that Mrs. Styles’s eyes were fixed upon
her, and Nan was terribly afraid of arousing her
suspicion in any way.

There had been a tremendous hue and cry cn
the previous evening when no Phil had appeared
at the usual hour to fetch his daily load of
match-boxes ; and though Mrs. Styles did not
actually accuse the two trembling children in
MOVING ON, 53

the opposite corner of being connected with
Phil’s disappearance, yet she found a vent for
her rage by promising the whole room in general,
and Seth and Nan in particular, that every bone
in Phil’s body should be beaten as fine as saw-
dust soon as ever he came within arm’s-length
of her. She’d teach him to run away again;
that she would. Having heard nothing of the
day’s outing to Rookhurst, it never entered Mrs.
Styles’s head that Phil’s wanderings had led him
beyond London.

“Seth, I hope he’s happy,” whispered Nan
after a long interval of silence.

“No fear; he’s bound to be jolly enough if
he’s in the country,” replied her brother.

“But it seems so long since he went away,”
said the child, and her large blue eyes were
bright with unshed tears, “and maybe he’s got
amongst strangers who ain’t good to him, and
maybe he’s longing after all to be here again.”

But that was very far from being the case.
Just at that moment Phil was sauntering through
a lovely country lane, drinking in all the beauties
of a summer sunrise, in a way that those who
are country-bred and born can hardly under-
stand. The heavy thunder shower, which had
soaked Phil’s. poor little ragged clothes, had
freshened up the dusty leaves and parched
banks, and washed the honeysuckle and dog-
roses, which grew in rich luxuriance all along
- that pleasant lane. Phil was so deeply interested
54 MATCH-BOX PIIIL.

in his surroundings, that he quite forgot to think
of the effect which he might produce on the
passers-by, and when more than one rustic, on
their way to their morning’s work, paused and
looked round at the ragged little figure shambling
along under the hedge, it never struck him that
there could be anything unusual in 42s appear-
ance to attract their attention. There were
such hundreds and tens of hundreds like himself
“spilt like blots about the city” whence he
came, that Phil never deamt of appearing re-
markable. Country children are martyrs to
self-consciousness, whereas the street arab is
never troubled by any such feeling.

It was about nine o’clock when Phil entered a
small, straggling village, and stood still to watch
a group of children on the green outside the
school-house. He had never seen cricket going
on before, and the game was so fascinating to
Phil that when, at the sound of a loud bell, bat
and ball were thrown aside, and the boys ran off
to the school-house, Phil could not forbear
exclaiming aloud—

“Oh, my eye! what a blooming sell!”

“TI say, look out for that gipsy chap,” said
one of the bigger boys; “he'll bag the stumps,
if we don’t take care.”

But Phil had already moved on, and was half
way down the village street by then. Most of
the cottage doors were standing open, and into
all of these he thrust his unkempt head, with
MOVING ON. 5s

his ragged cap set all awry over one ear, thereby
startling more than one worthy cottager. Nor
did he greatly reassure them by his answer to
their inquiry as to what he wanted, namely, that
he only wished “to spy at ’em a bit.”

Now and again Phil lingered to ask if they
could direct him to Thorndale, and though the
answer was always “No,” he did not lose heart ;
he felt sure that, sooner or later, he must find it,
and, meanwhile, life under these new conditions
was very charming to him. The rain had soaked
the remainder of his stolen goods from yester-
day’s feast, but yet, as he sat under a wayside
ash tree, and fished out the sodden, broken meat
from his very moist pocket, Phil thought it all
tasted uncommonly good.

“Tl have to spend one of my halfpennies on
a bit of bread for to-night’s supper,” he said to
himself as he concluded his repast, “and another
to-morrow morning for breakfast. That'll only
leave one halfpenny; and what will I do when
that’s gone?” Then all at once Phil’s hands
went up over his eyes, and muttering, “Oh,
Nan, I'd nearly quite forgot,” he did his best
to stumble through the Lord’s Prayer. “I
expect I'll get on fine now,” he reflected,
“though I wouldn’t like Nan to know how I
all but clean forgot it, and first go off too. My

_eye! I wonder how old Mother Styles and her
match-boxes is getting on. Catch me sweating
over them again.” Then, as his hand touched a
56 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

little fold of paper in his other pocket, Phil’s
face grew a shade graver, and he murmured,
“Ah, poor Nan! T’ll have to go back and fetch
her, anyway.”

After his rest under the ash tree, Phil trudged
bravely on. Nearly every one on that sultry
June day was groaning with the heat; but to
Phil, whose whole life had been passed in stuffy,
evil-smelling courts and alleys, with never a
breath of pure air to correct the unwholesome
atmosphere, the green lanes, even though the
midday sun was pouring down full upon them,
were paradise.

Every now and again he stopped to peep
through park palings, or over the garden gates
of the various gentlemen’s houses that he passed,
and more than once he was sorely tempted to
steal inside the drives, and take a nearer survey;
but there was something in the trim, well-kept
gravel sweeps that awed him, and it was only
into the garden of a small, low-thatched cottage
that he did finally venture to make his way.
But though it was a very tiny pleasure-ground,
it was perhaps as tempting as any that Phil had
passed that day. All the front of the cottage.
wall was hidden from view by a wealth of
Banksia roses, their tender yellow. blossoms con-
trasting well with the deep red buds of the
Austrian briar ; whilst the tidy beds and borders
were perfect pictures, with their groups of tall
white lilies and clumps of fiery poppies and
MOVING ON, 87

rows of golden-hearted daisies, interspersed with
velvet pansies of every hue, from the palest blue
to the richest purple, and dear, old-fashioned
snapdragons and nodding columbines filling up
every nook and cranny.

Just as Phil leant over the gate, a tidy young
woman came out of the cottage with a wide-
necked, empty bottle in her hand, which she
proceeded to fill, in the most ruthless fashion,
with the blossoms of the tall white lilies, bruising
their snowy petals in her hands, and then crush-
ing them into the bottle.

“Oh, I say, missus, hold hard!” shrieked
Phil, starting forward and seizing her arm; “it’s
downright murder to use ’em beautiful things
that way. Why, it would send our Nan just oft
her head for joy to have only ove. of ’em white
flowers for her own.”

As Phil’s dirty little fingers closed round her
wrist, and startled the good woman so that she
nearly let fall the bottle, her first impulse was to
say something sharp, but the earnestness of the
boy’s tone and the reproachful look in his great
dark eyes went straight to her motherly heart.

“Eh! and where on earth have you come
from, my lad?” she asked, scanning him from
top to toe. “Nowhere from here about, I’ll be
bound, or you’d know the good of these lily
‘flowers when you gets bad cuts and_ bruises.
Bless yer! I’m not a-wasting of them. I’m
going to spill a drop of spirits on them, and
58 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

make ’em into ever so fine a lotion. ’Tis from”
some big town you come, I warrant.”

“Ay,” said Phil, “from a very big town, ever
so far away, where we’d think all the world of
them beautiful things as you is squeezing up
anyhow.”

_ “Well, you shall have a whole big stalk full
of blossoms to carry home with you if you like,
and welcome,” said the woman.

_ “But I’m not going home—at least, not just
yet,” said Phil; and then, gaining courage from
the interest which was evident in his new friend’s
kindly face, Philip blurted out his whole story,
though ten minutes ago, before he had found
his way into that garden amongst the lilies and
roses, he would, as he would have expressed it,
been “blowed” sooner than tell any one the
truth.

“So you're a runaway laddie, are you?” said
the woman; and there were tears in her eyes
now. “Well, come along indoors, and let me
scrub your hands and face a bit, and I’ll give
you a mouthful of dinner. You're sure, guzte
sure,” she added, holding Phil’s face between
her hands, “that there ain’t no mother a-waiting
for you at home, and a-wondering why you
don’t come back?”

“No fear,” said Phil, looking up at her so
frankly that she felt she could trust him. “I’ve
never known father or mother all my life, and
there’s no one in the whole world as would ever
MOVING ON. 89

want to set eyes on me again, ’cept little Nan
and Seth. Soon as ever I’ve found Thorndale,
Pll tramp back again to them, and I'll bring
’em here, that I will, and Nan shall have a pull
for herself at ’em tall white things,” he added,
as if he were making a very magnificent promise
_ to his hostess.

“But don’t you know nothing about where
Thorndale is?” asked the latter. “Seems such
a wild-goose chase, i you don’t know no more
than just the name.”

“But ’tis in the country,” said Phil, “and it’s
nigh some. station too; but I can’t mind the
name of that just now, but, you bet, I’ll find it
in time. My! is all that for me?” he con-
tinued, as his new friend placed a great pile -of
bread and dripping before him, and invited him
to make a good meal.

He needed no second bidding, and it was
with real pleasure that Mrs. West watched the
food disappearing ; “for sure,” she reflected, “ if
ever there was a starveling in this world, that’s
one.”

“Well, now,” she said aloud, “I wonder if
you'll remember my name—Mrs. Abel West;
and the name of the village is Merely, and if
- you should get into trouble and find you can’t

get along, come back to me, and I expect our
.good vicar will give you a helping hand. He
comed out of London hisself, and often talks to
us about you poor gutter children, and I’ll be
60 : MATCH-BOX PIIIL.

bound he’d know what to do for you if, after all,
you wanted to get back to your friends.”

“F’m! Vl remember,” said Phil, nodding his
head; “but I ’spect Mrs. Brailey will do our
job for us. My! what a blow out I’ve had!”
he continued, getting up and stretching himself.
“Well, I'd best be making tracks, I suppose.”

“Ay, but take this along with you against
supper-time comes,” said Mrs. West, putting up
two slices of bread, with a shaving of fat pork
between them, which Phil tucked into his
pocket.

“Cracky !” cried Phil, “if only Nan and Seth
was here!”

“Good-bye, laddie,’ said the kind-hearted
woman, and her hands rested tenderly on his
ragged cap, “and I wish you good speed on
your journey, that I do.”

“And thank yer ever so much,” said Phil,
turning slowly away. But before he had reached
the garden wicket he was back again, holding
an old match-box, which had been thrown out
on the path. “They takes a world of trouble to
make,” he said, putting it down carefully on the
window-ledge.






CHAPTER SV EM.
AS SCAPE-GOAT,

**T come to pluck your berries,”
Lycidas.

Ww WX BOUT five miles beyond Merely, and
a aN —f screened off from the road by a high
ENS hedge of closely clipped yews, stood
ay a large red-brick pile of buildings,
known to all the country round as Winterton’s
Grammar School. It was so called after its
founder—a very benevolent individual, most
people would have told you, provided they did
not happen to be any of the farmers whose
fields and orchards adjoined the grammar
school grounds, for to these latter the name of
Winterton was only one degree less abhorrent
than the two hundred boys themselves, who
had been brought into their midst by the
liberality of the deceased wealthy merchant.
And they had some excuse for not blessing
_ his memory, as perhaps he himself would have
admitted could he have seen one half of the
damage wrought in various ways by these






62 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

incorrigible youths at different seasons of the
year. It was in vain that the head-master intro-
duced fresh rules prohibiting all trespassing on
neighbouring grounds, and invented fresh penal-
ties for the transgressors of such bye-laws; in
some way or other the rules were evaded, and
the penalties escaped, till, in the bitterness of
their soul, the farmers declared that the masters
were nothing better than a pack of old women,
_and quite unfit to keep school. Just now the
cherry orchards were, in more senses than one, a
fruitful ground of complaint. It was a splendid
cherry year, and the trees were so laden that
many of the branches had actually to be propped
up, lest they should be broken by the weight of
their own fruit. And as Phil, worn out with his
afternoon’s tramp, sat down on the top of a stile
leading into one of these tempting orchards, he
thought he had never seen anything so perfectly
beautiful before. He was just considering
whether those cherries were placed so near the
road for the benefit of the passers-by, when he
heard a great rush of feet behind him, and
helter-skelter over the stile and through the
hedge came about a dozen boys, all flying in
one direction, as if for their lives. The first
comer toppled poor Phil off the stile into the
dusty road, whilst another spilt a whole cap full
of cherries over him, and never, to Phil’s sur-
prise, turned back to pick them up.

“Well, if I ever,” said Philip, getting up from








































“(LL BE BOUND YOU’RE ONE OF THE LOT THAT STOLE MY FOWLS LAST
NIGHT.” Page 63
AS SCAPE-GOAT. 63

the road and beginning to cram the cherries
into his mouth, “Well, if I——” But his
soliloquies were cut short.

“Oh, you’ve been trying your hand at it too,
have you?” said a loud, angry voice, and two
heavy hands came down upon Phil’s shoulder.
“Well, Pll make an example of you, anyhow,”
and therewith the owner of the cherry orchard
swung Phil over the stile as if he had been a
wisp of straw, and led him into a backyard,
scolding and shaking him at every step. “And
I'll be bound you're one of the lot that stole my
fowls last night,” went on the farmer ; “so speak
up and tell the truth, or ’twill be the worse for
you.”

“Tve not got no lot,” said Phil, “and I never
stole nothing.”

“Oh, didn’t you!” said the farmer. “ Well,
then, you can just bide in there till you happen
to remember what you dd steal, and the sooner
you do that the better for you.” And so saying,
he opened the darkest and dingiest of coal-holes,
and, thrusting Phil in head foremost, fastened
the door on the outside, and left him to his own
very miserable reflections,

Whatever was going to happen to him next?
he thought. Would he be left there to die?
There was a small hole, cut high up in the wall,
and through the three iron bars, which were
placed perpendicularly, Phil could see a streak
of blue sky and a branch of a big elder tree,
64. MATCH-BOX PHIL.

which grew close by, otherwise all was dark.
He was looking up at this hole in despair,
wondering if he could anyhow climb up and
squeeze himself through the narrow slits between
the bars, when the elder bough was suddenly
swayed to one side, and a boy’s face appeared
at the little opening.

“Don’t howl out,” said the new-comer ; “ but
look here, you young Tatter-Jack, it was hard
luck on you to leave you to old Blake’s mercy,
when it was us that bagged the cherries, so look
here. Can you read?”

“No,” said Phil.

“Well, it doesn’t matter. You catch hold of
this paper, and show it to the old chap when he
comes to bully you again, and I promise you
he'll let you go fast enough; he won’t want to
keep you five minutes in his company, when he
has once read that. But don’t for the life of
you let out how you came by it, or the game
will be spoilt.” So saying, the speaker threw
down a slip of paper, which fell at Phil’s feet,
disappearing himself from view at the same time.

Wondering much what magic charm those
few words scrawled upon a half sheet could
contain, Phil picked up the paper and put it into
his pocket, and then waited anxiously for a
chance of showing it to his gaoler, and testing
the worth of his unknown friend’s help.

It was growing unbearably hot in that stuffy
coal-hole, and Phil began to think he must be
AS SCAPE-GOAT. 65

suffocated. He heard the sound of many foot-
steps going to and fro in the yard, some light
and quick, others slow and heavy; but none
stopped at his prison door—every one passed
him by. A clock close at hand struck six, seven,
eight, and then by degrees the sounds in the
yard ceased, and poor Phil began to fear that
every one had gone indoors fo the night, and
that he was doomed to remain in his stifling
cell, at any rate, till next morning.

For the first time in the last forty-eight hours
Philip wished himself back again in Flowerdew
Alley, with the load of match-boxes on his
back, and Mother Styles’s rasping voice and
sharp blows, for, at any rate, he knew the worst
of all that. And then, unable any longer to
bear the dark and the loneliness and the terrible
feeling that some awful punishment was hang-
ing over him, Phil burst into a loud fit of crying.
Presently, however, he checked his sobs to listen
to the sound of some one fumbling with the
fastening of his door. In another minute it had
been opened very cautiously, and a little head
Bp peated in the narrow crack,

“Boy,” said a childish voice, trembling with
excitement, “don’t cry any more. Father has
sat down to supper, so I’ve jumped out of bed,
~and I’ve come to let you out.” And then, as
the door opened wider, Phil saw a very small
girl standing on the threshhold, with little bare
feet peeping out’ from the edge of a shawl, in

F
66 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

which she had evidently wrapt herself round
in haste to conceal her scanty toilette. “You
must make haste,’ she went. on, and as Phil
seemed rather slow in availing himself of this
chance of escape, she came a step nearer and
pulled him towards the door.

But once outside his dark hole in the cool
twilight, Phil recovered the use of his wits,
though his limbs felt sadly cramped and stiff
from his long confinement in such close quarters,

“You haven’t a minute to lose,” whispered
the child. “You must fly through the black
gate opposite, then keep close against the hedge
all down one side of the meadow. There’s a pond
at the bottom, so look out till you come to the
new haystacks ; and if you get behind them and
feel about, you'll find a hole or two in the hedge
where you can creep through into the road, and
when you're once there you'll be safe enough.
Only don’t stop and look back, for any sake;
run just as hard as you can, even if you hear
people running behind you, for mind, if you’re
once caught it will be all up with you.”

She lingered for one moment to make sure
that Phil had got through the door safely, then
she stole indoors again, back into her little bed.

Phil found the first part of the child’s direc-
tions very easy to follow. Very cautiously he
crept through the gate, and then, once in the
meadow, ran as fast as he could under shelter
of the hedge, But he hadn’t gone far before he
AS SCAPE-GOAT. 07

became aware of steps following him closely.
Nearer and nearer they came, stopping when
Phil paused for a moment in his headlong flight
to listen, and make sure that ’twas not his fancy,
and then coming on again when he started
afresh. He did not dare look round, he only
felt in his pocket to make sure that that won-
derful bit of paper was safe, and then on he
sped, stumbling over mole-hills, and striking
himself against trees and palings, and very
nearly slipping into the big pond at the end of
the field, of which the little girl had warned
him. And still the steps followed closer and
closer, and now Phil seemed actually to hear
the heavy breathing of his pursuers—for he felt
sure that more than one pair of feet were behind
him—by the time he had reached the haystacks,
behind. which he was to seek for a way of escape
through the hedge. But Phil’s tired legs were
failing beneath him, whilst those of his fol-
‘lowers seemed to be gaining strength and
swiftness.

“Tf youre once caught it will be all up with
you,” the little girl had said, and the words rang
and roared in Phil’s ears, compelling him to
push on, though he felt as if he must drop to
the ground. He had rounded the haystacks
now, and he was groping in the uncertain light
‘to find an opening—no matter how small—in
the quick-set hedge, when the dreadful steps
stopped immediately behind him, and some-
68 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

thing wet and soft was thrust into his neck ; and
then a sound, which to Phil’s terrified ears.
resembled nothing he had ever heard before,
broke on the evening stillness. Oxe being could
never have produced such an awful noise;
nothing less than a whole band of raving lunatics
could have produced such an unearthly com-
bination of shrieks, groans, and shouts. Phil
felt quite convinced of that, and, nearly mad
-with terror, he dashed through the hedge,
scratching his face and tearing his poor rags,
and alighted on the high-road. Immediately
opposite to him was a low wall, over which Phil
promptly clambered, arriving in what seemed to
him a most extraordinary place. It was not
quite a field, nor yet quite a garden, and, as far
as he could see in the dim light, there were
queer-looking shapes, both grey and white,
dotted about, but whether they were men or
women Phil could not tell. And all the time
that fearful noise on the other side of the hedge
was still going on. It was clear he could not
afford to stand still. He made one step forward,
stumbled over a mound, picked himself up again
and blundered on, not knowing where he was
going, but only bent on flying beyond the reach
of the awful monster or monsters behind him.

If only Phil had looked back he might have
seen that at that moment, at any rate, no one
was following him, for Farmer Blake’s donkey,
which had been the cause of his terror, had
AS SCAPE-GOAT. 69

finished his. braying; but, alas! for him, he
looked neither behind nor before, and the con-
sequence was that all at once the ground
beneath his feet gave way, and in another
second Phil had fallen head foremost into an
open trench,




CHAPTER IX.

EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST IIIM.

‘* Now it is the time of night,
That the graves all gaping wide,
Every one lets forth his sprite
In the churchyard paths to glide.”
. SHAKESPEARE,

ON my word, there’s a set-out in the
churchyard, and no mistake. Just
you come and see, Sam ;” and the
speaker, the sexton’s wife at Ever-

shot, beckoned to her husband to join her in the
doorway of their cottage. “The children are
getting too owdacious,” she went on. “ Look at
em now, a-crowding round old Master Brown’s
open grave, and he nat so much as in it himself,
poor fellow!”

Surely, in the circumstances, “poor Master
Brown” was hardly to be pitied for chaz.

“Well, if he ain’t there, some one else is,”
returned the sexton, shading his eyes and look-
ing intently across his bit of cabbage garden
into the churchyard beyond, which had been the
scene of his grave-digging labours on the previous


EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 71

evening. “Tell you what it is, wife. Some of
the young rascals have got into the hole; for
do you see that handful of stones as was chucked
up from below? And a fine mess they must be
making of my tidy job; but Pll let them know
what I think of them, and no mistake.”

Therewith the gouty old sexton hobbled off
towards the churchyard, with stick uplifted and
many muttered threats; but before he reached
the grave, which was’at the furthest corner from
the gate, the young vicar had already preceded
him, and at his approach the score of boys and
girls had dispersed like a flight of sparrows
suddenly disturbed.

“Beg pardon, sir,” called out the sexton, “but
have they done much damage to my inside?”
(He meant the inside of Master Brown’s grave.)
He was surprised to see the vicar kneeling down
on the grass and looking intently into the open
trench.

“Not much, I think,” answered Mr. Palmer.
“But come and lend us a hand, Dodd. There's
a small trespasser here, who seems in a bad
way.”

“And sarve him right too,” growled Dodd,
whose interest in the unfortunate being was so
small that before complying with the vicar’s
request he began deliberately to examine the
extent of the damage which his handiwork
above ground had sustained. “Sarve him
right,” he went on, treading down various lumps
72 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

of loosened earth with the heel of his boot, “ and
if I had the making of laws, whoever jumped
into a Aopen grave should be made to stop
. there.”

“Ay, but he didn’t jump in,” said Mr, Palmer.
“He fell in, poor lad, and our children have
‘been ill-treating him shamefully, that’s clear.”
Then, stretching down into the opening and
taking Phil’s hand, he went on, “ That’s right,
my boy, hang on. Now, Dodd, look out that I
don’t fall in head foremost myself.”

- Then for the first time the sexton con-
descended to look at his strange foe; and cer-
tainly a more utterly forlorn little object or one
more fit to appeal to any one’s compassion,
could not have been presented, even to this
vengeance-thirsting old tyrant. His face and
hands, blackened from his sojourn in the farmer’s
coal-hole, his clothes plastered with the moist
clay at the bottom of the newly-made grave,
and his nose bleeding from a recent blow from
a sharp stone, poor little Match-box Phil looked
a living appeal to pity. At first he had been
stunned by his fall, then, after recovering himself
sufficiently to make a few vain attempts to get
out of his strange new quarters, he had fallen
asleep in his narrow bed, with the newly cut
earth closing him in on either side, and only a
strip of starry sky overhead. And thus the
weary little waif had slept sweetly enough, in
spite of his surroundings, till a troop of children
EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 73

—drawn to the churchyard, as village children
always are, by the attraction of a new-made
grave—had discovered Phil lying there. At
first they were frightened; then, their love of
bullying the helpless gaining the upper hand,
first one and then another had thrown a handful
of dust and small stones down on him, till at
last they had not only thoroughly woken Phil,
but they had likewise roused a spirit of retaliation
in him, so that as fast as one set of missiles
reached him, another handful flew back again
amongst his assailants. At stone-throwing the
gutter boy was quite as much of an expert as
any of the country children.

And the battle was waxing so warm between
both parties that, if the vicar had not come up
when he did, real injury might have befallen
poor Phil, seeing that he had only one chance
against so many. Nevertheless, with his in-
domitable pluck, no sooner was he safely landed
on the upper ground, than, slipping from Mr.
Palmer’s grasp, he flew off through the church-
yard gate, to have a regular “mill,” as he would
have termed it, with his enemies.. These were
all assembled on the green, and into their midst
Phil rushed, striking out right and left, and
using, I am afraid, very ugly words.

But here. again the vicar came to the rescue.
..He was greatly touched by the boy’s deplorable
plight, and at the same time equally amused by
the spirit he displayed. Ragged, bony, and
74 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

bleeding, he looked little better than a live
skeleton, standing amongst the stout, rosy-
cheeked rustics, but the great dark eyes, which
looked out of his pinched face, were all aglow
with indignation and excitement.

It required more force than Mr. Palmer ex-
pected to drag this pugnacious little waif from
his own destruction ; nor was Phil at all grateful
to him for his interference. Besides, as the vicar
. collared him and led him off to the vicarage, he
did not feel at all sure that he was not going
back into some black hole again. He felt
reassured, however, when his new friend led the
way into a comfortable room, where the morning
sun was pouring in, and where he was told to
sit down, and that some breakfast should be
brought him.

“You'll want something hot to eat and drink
after your cold, damp bed,” said the vicar
kindly. “I mustn’t wait a minute now ”—he
had been on his way to a sick person when the
uproar in the churchyard had caused him to
turn aside—“but Patty, my old housekeeper,
will take care of you, and when I come back
you must tell me how you found your way into
our churchyard.”

Thereupon Mr. Palmer went in search of his
housekeeper, and it was well for Phil’s peace of
mind that he did not overhear their conversation,

“Look here, Patty,” began her young master,
“there’s a poor little lad in the parish room who
EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 75

has evidently had some rough usage from the
world at large and from our school-children in
particular. I’ve brought him in to have some
breakfast, and just keep your eye on him till I
come back, for if he can, I’m quite sure he'll
give you the slip and be off to fight the village
boys again. Be sure you don’t let him go till I
come back. The lad interests me, and I want
to hear his history.”

“Gracious me, Master Hugh!” said Patty, a
sour-visaged old dame, who, when she wished to
rebuke her master, always pretended to forget
that he was out of petticoats, “you don’t mean
to say that you've brought a rank, raw stranger
into the house? Why, he’s most likely stole all
the silver spoons and forks by now. Well, if I
ever did! What would your poor mamma say?”

“ Now, nonsense, Patty,” said Master Hugh
good-temperedly. “He is a waif and a stray,
and avery dirty one; but that'll please you all
the better, because you can scrub him to your
heart’s content. But he’s not a thief, ?m sure
of that; he is too plucky to be a sneak.”

s Oh, I dare say!” said Patty, with a sniff.
“T suppose the next thing will be that you'll be
keeping him on as an odd boy, or mee as
your own page.”

“ Ay, that’s a good idea, now; you ral have
. him to train, Patty,” said Mr. "Palmer, with a
malicious smile. “But, now, just go and look
after him, and remember to keep him indoors.”
76 " _MATCH-BOX PHIL.

With anything but a benignant countenance,
Patty bustled into the parish room. Nor did the
sight of poor Phil’s battered condition go far
towards softening her crusty temper. It was
only when, after tasting his bowl of porridge, he
fixed his eyes upon her, remarking solemnly, “I
say, missus, this is 7us¢ about good stuff,” that
the compliment to her own cookery touched her
heart; and, looking at him a little more atten-
tively, she began involuntarily to feel an awaken-
ing interest in Master Hugh’s ragamuffin, and
by the time Phil had eaten three relays of
porridge, and drunk a huge cup of milk, she had
made up her mind to question him a little as to
his personal history.

When she returned, however, from delivering
his breakfast things to Dinah, the kitchen-maid,
with special injunctions “to wash ’em up in a
double lot of soda, for nobody could tell what
they might have caught from such as he,” Patty
found Phil, with his head laid down upon the
sunny window-seat, fast asleep.

“Poor little lad!” she said almost tenderly,
bending over him to draw down the blind.
“Well, I'll just let him sleep on quietly till ’m
through with my work.”

But. somehow, though it was jam-making
morning, and, as a rule, nothing could move her
from her big preserving-pan, to-day Patty could
not rest quietly in her kitchen. Backwards and
forwards to the parish room she went, peeping
EVERY MAN’S HAND AGAINST HIM. 77.

in at the door to see if Phil were still asleep,
and then stealing away on tiptoe, only to return
to the charge a few minutes later.

“Soon as ever he wakes up,” she said to
Dinah, “T’'ll give his hands and face a good
scrub ; so fill your big black kettle and put it on,
for we won’t stint the water, anyway.”

Well-trained Dinah did as she was bid, and
put the kettle on; but that hot water was
never used—at least, not for Phil; for on
the occasion of Mrs. Patty’s twentieth excur-
sion to the parish room her eye fell upon a
slip of paper which had evidently fallen out
of Philip’s pocket on to the floor. Seeing
that it was written upon, Patty, with woman-
like curiosity, immediately pounced on it, and
examined it. But she had scarcely had time to
read the score of words scrawled on it, before
Phil was roused by her shrieks of dismay, and
awoke to see the housekeeper backing out of
the room away from him as fast as she could,
and vociferating to him to get through the open
window into the garden, and then fly from the
place as fast as his legs could carry him.

“Go, I say! go, go!” she cried, “or I'll have
you put in prison, or ¢ransplanted”—she pro-
bably meant transported—“ or—or—— ”

But Phil did not wait to hear the full measure
_of her promises. He was beginning to get used
to enforced flights now; and when the vicar
returned home a little later, he found not only
78 ' MATCH-BOX PHIL.

no trace of his poor gutter-boy, but Mrs. Patty
walking about the ground floor of his house,
with her petticoats tucked up very high, and a
huge mop in one hand and a large bucket of
disinfecting fluid in the other.

“My good Patty, what is happening?” he
asked,

“What's going to happen’ you’d better ask,
Master Hugh,” was the grim reply. “If we're
not all dead corpses by to-morrow or the day
after, my name ain’t Patty Stone. Only just
step outside and look on the stump of the old
apple tree—'tis all dead atop, so it won’t have
no fruit to be hurt by it—and you'll see fast
enough the sort of customer you've brought in
amongst us all.” —

Mr. Palmer did step out, as requested, and
there, hanging from the tree, where Patty had
nailed it—having first shielded her hands in
double gloves, which she buried with the tongs
afterwards—was poor Phil’s wonderful talisman ;
and on it, writ large in schoolboy writing, stood
the following statement :—

“Tm the last left alive of a family of nineteen
children, all of whom, with father and mother,
died last week of small-pox. Kind Christians,
give me a home.”


CHAPTER X,

CRUEL SPORT.

A crash, a cry of agony, and that was all we heard.”
PAYNE,

since he went away,’ whispered
Nan. She never dared say Phil’s
name now. There had been a
terrible commotion in that wretched, over-
crowded room when the fact that Phil had really
run away became a certainty, and Mrs. Styles’s
impotent rage leading her to seek some victim
on whom to wreak it, she had turned upon
Nan and Seth, and a storm of blows and bad
words had fallen to the lot of Phil’s poor little
accomplices. “However, ever will he come back
to fetch us away?” Nannie had sobbed, holding
her poor bruised hands before her face. “Oh,
Seth, I wish we had gone along with him, that
I do.”

“So we would have gone if we could,” said
the elder brother soothingly ; “but ’twouldn’t
have been very far that any of us would have


80 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

travelled at that rate,” and he looked down at his
crutches with a weary sigh.

“Will many, many more weeks have to go
by before he comes back, do you think?” Nan
asked. “It didn’t take Dusty Dan more than a
day to go into the country and come back again.”

“Nay,” said Seth, “but then he hadn’t to hunt
about to find Thorndale; and, you see, ’tis no
good Phil’s coming back till he’s found aunt.”

_ “Praps he'll forget us; p’raps- we'll never,
never see him again,” said Nan, with a whole
world of wistful sorrow in her blue eyes. “I
wonder where he is now. I wonder whether he’s
happy, and if he is thinking of us.”

Thinking of Nannie, Phil certainly was at that
moment, but he was not happy. After his
sudden expulsion from the rectory, he had trudged
on through the lanes and villages and occasional
towns for four days and nights, sleeping under
hedges and once in an empty outhouse belong-
ing to a wayside farm, sometimes picking up a
little broken meat from some charitable cottager.
Once he had held a doctor’s carriage outside a
house for more than an hour, and had earned
sixpence thereby, and this had been a veritable
windfall to poor Phil, and had kept him from
starving outright.

But on this evening, whilst Nan was specula-
ting on his whereabouts, he was, as the saying
is, “very down on his luck.” He had spent
his last penny, and though since daybreak
CRUEL SPORT. 8I

he had been on the look out for a job which
might enable him to earn something, no one
had come in his way to want a gate opened
or a horse held, and now at this sunset hour
poor Phil found himself alone on a desolate bit
of waste common ground, feeling very tired, very
‘hungry, and terribly lonely. To him it seemed
much more than a week since he had crouched
beside Seth’s squalid couch in the twilight
room and discussed the whispered plans for his
flight into the country. He had grown tired of
asking people the way to Thorndale; no one
seemed to have heard of such a place, and
he began to feel sure that after all the name of
the village had been changed, just as the names
of streets sometimes were.

He had not eaten anything since midday,
and, high-spirited boy as he was, his poor little
heart was beginning to fail him. In another
minute he would have sought relief in a
burst of tears, when suddenly a fresh turn
was given to his thoughts by the arrival on
the scene of four village lads, about the same
age as himself. One of them, the biggest,
was carrying a bag, whilst each of the three
others was holding a mongrel cur by a string.
Presently they came to a dead stop not many
yards from where Phil was sitting, half hidden
by an enormous gorse bush. There was some-
‘thing in their faces and in the guilty manner in
which they looked all around them, evidently to

G
82 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

make sure that no one was at hand to see them,
that instantly awakened Phil’s suspicions. They
were up to no good, he felt sure, and, prompted
by curiosity to see what would follow, he came
out from his hiding-place and joined the
group.

At first seeing him, the boys hesitated, but
a whispered, “That little chap don’t matter a
straw,” from the one who had the bag, and who
- was evidently the ringleader, reassured them.

“ Now, look out, you fellows,” said the big lad ;
“keep the dogs well in till I give the word ; and
now here goes.” So saying, he loosened the
string of the bag, and amidst a chorus of “hisses”
from the boys, a miserable cat leapt out, almost
frantic with fright and seeming to understand
perfectly that those three low-bred curs would
presently be let loose to hunt her.

Phil had once seen Nan’s tabby cat, the
only treasure which the child had ever called
her own, worried to death by dogs, and his blood
_ boiled at the prospect of this poor animal’s fate.
Forgetful of his footsoreness and weariness, he
threw himself between the cat and her tormentors,
and his sudden interference so surprised the
village boys that for an instant they stood
motionless, still holding the dogs in check whilst
the poor cat’s ginger tail was fast disappearing
in the distance. But their stupefaction only
lasted for a few moments; then, disappointed of
their cruel sport, the lads turned round and,
CRUEL SPORT. 83

setting the dogs upon Philip, went to work to.
chase 4zm, Against one or even two boys, and
as many dogs, Phil would have been ready to try
his strength hand to hand, but with four op-
ponents, all bigger than himself, and these backed
up by three ill-looking dogs, anything like a fair
fight was out of the question.

“TY must make a bolt of it,” thought Phil; and,
swift as an arrow, he faced round and fled past
his tormentors, thus disconcerting them at start-
ing, for they had fully expected that he would
fly in front of them.

But Phil knew well what he was about. The
path before him was unknown ground, but on
the road he had just travelled over he remem-
bered that there was a field to the right skirting
the back of several farm-buildings, and he felt
certain that if he could once find himself in that
meadow, he should be safe from his pursuers ;
for there would be sure to be some one about
who would ‘protect him from them. But the
field was much further off than Phil had fancied,
and though at first he had had something of
a start of the boys and dogs, yet now they
were on his heels, and he felt that he could
not go much farther. His poor, tired feet were
cut and bruised by the sharp stones, which
he had no time to avoid; his breath was almost
-gone; the blood was hammering in his ears
like short, sharp blows; and the green hedges
and the white road seemed all to be whirled
84. MATCH-BOX PHIL.

into one confused mass before his fainting senses.
And all the time the dogs came nearer and
nearer, urged on by their cruel masters, and
now the foremost was scarcely a dozen feet
from Phil.
“Tf they once lay hold on me they’ll kill me
outright,” thought Phil, still struggling on with
failing limbs and panting breath, Then as the
conviction that he could go no further overcame
“him, his eyes were gladdened by the sight of the
field he had had in view. Gathering up all his
little strength for one supreme effort, he bounded
over the stile and ran straight across the meadow.
He heard the boys’ voices behind him, shouting
loudly, “Stop, sof, I say;” but, of course, he
never turned his head, never slackened his pace.
Had he done so, it might have struck him
that the tones were those of warning, rather thar
threatening,
A minute later the sound of a crash, followed
by a piercing cry, reached the lads as they too
clambered over the stile, and the little flying
figure, which till then had been full in view of
them, had now suddenly disappeared.

What had happened? Had the earth opened

- her mouth and swallowed him up? It looked
very like it; but those boys, with faces grown all
at once ashy white, knew better. Exchanging
looks of unutterable dismay, and too aghast to
speak, they flew from the field, and never ceased
running till they had put a long stretch of road
CRUEL SPORT. 85

and nearly all the common between themselves
and the scene of the disaster.

Then one of the boys spoke for the first time.
“Tt’ll be brought in murder,” he said, his teeth
chattering as he spoke, “and we'll all swing
for it. Ifany of the Priory lot was on the look
out, we're as good as hanged now.”




CHAPTER XI.

A CHANGE OF SCENE,

&¢ Their diet was of wheaten bread,
And milk and oats and straw,
Thistles or lettuces instead,
And sand to scour ¢he¢r maw.”
Cowper.

7

=x HE Priory wasa picturesque old man-
‘7 sion, built of red brick, and half
timbered, with dark roofs, flecked
here and there with patches of lichen,
and high, quaint chimneys. A wide green lawn
stretched in front of the house, set round with
lime and elm trees, through whose branches, on
the July evening of which we write, the rays of
the sinking sun were falling in shafts of golden
light.

There was not a creature stirring in the large
well-kept garden, and from the look of the house
you might have supposed that all its inhabitants
had either run away or fallen asleep; the blinds
were drawn down in most of the windows, and
no one was to be seen at any of the others,


A CHANGE OF- SCENE. 87

The truth was, that the master of the Priory, old
Squire Oswell, a Justice of the Peace and a
very mighty man in his own neighbourhood,
was at that moment eating his seven o'clock
dinner in the library at the other side of the
house, where a bad fit of gout was imprisoning
him, whilst his two little grandchildren, who
with himself represented the household, were
amusing themselves after their own fashion in
the meadows that skirted the kitchen garden.

It was in vain that their nurse exhorted them
“to play prettily like little ladies and gentle-
men,’ in the flower garden or on the long lime
avenue, instead of “rampaging about the fields
and woods, like any cottager’s children for all
the world.” Little Gertrude and Hector Oswell
turned a deaf ear to her admonitions, and no
sooner was leave given for play, than off they
flew to their beloved “Long Meadow,” which,
with its fringe of old walnut trees at one end
‘and a half dried up fish-pond at the other, made
a most delightful playground.

Here, in a disused shed, Gertrude and Hector
kept their rabbits ; that is, by night, for by day
their hutches were carefully carried under the
walnut trees, in order to give them all the fresh -
air and sunlight possible. It was wonderful
what a deal of occupation, and consequently
amusement, these bunnies gave their owners.
They were four in number. Brighteyes was
Gertrude’s pet, a large white one; then there
88 MATCH-BOX' PHIL,

was Sepoy, a splendid black fellow, without a
single white hair in his soft jetty coat; whilst
the third rabbit, a brown one, claimed special
notice from the fact of his having only three legs,
He had lost the fourth, in very early youth,
through coming into close contact with a
treacherous gin; but this disaster, though at
first it cost his protectors many bitter tears,
because they feared that every one would vote
for his death, turned out, after all, to be no such
great calamity. The remnant of the shattered
limb healed itself up very satisfactorily, and the
mutilated hero learnt to hop about so blithely
on his curtailed allowance of legs, “that now,”
said Hector, “that it doesn’t hurt him any more,
it’s rather fun for a change to have a three-legged
rabbit.” And as at the time of his accident
Gertrude had just been reading in her Greek
history about the three-legged stool on which the
Delphian Oracle sat, she proposed, and Hector
strongly seconded, that Brownie, as he had
been hitherto called, should henceforward be
known as Tripod.

_ The fourth rabbit was a new-comer, and as
yet was hardly looked upon as a member of
the family. He had come to them, as Hector
explained, “under rather odd cirstances.” The
fact was, that on Hector’s last birthday he had
chosen for a present a new rabbit-hutch. He
had particularly asked for a double one, because,
as he confided to Gertrude, he thought the
A CHANGE OF SCENE. 89

bunnies ought to have a day room, as well as
sleeping rooms; but, alas! the obstinate bunnies
could see no advantage in this arrangement, and
all of them kept pertinaciously to their own
little corners, where their troughs were always ~
placed.

““T Hl tell you what,” said Gertrude. “It seems
a pity to waste half a hutch; let’s write a board
and put it up to say the other half is to let.
There are lots of rabbits running about in the
woods ; one of them might like to come and take
lodgings.”

This proposal found great favour with Hector,
and so, after due consideration, a board—it was
the bottom of a night-light box with the sides
torn away—was erected over the new hutch,
inscribed as follows :—

“ Lodging for a singel rabit ; a wood one may
aply.”

On the second day, however, finding that
some mischievous person had turned “ wood ” into
“wooden,” Gertrude took down her notice-board
and changed the word into a “wild” one. In
spite of this liberality as to the sort of candidate
who might be considered eligible, no one did
apply, till one fine morning, the very day, in fact,
before this July evening, Gertrude and Hector,
on going to their hutch, found a little grey, long-

eared tenant sitting up in their hitherto unlet
room. How he managed to let himself in, and
shut the door so carefully after him, was a
90 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

' mystery which neither brother nor sister could
explain.

Perhaps if they had caught sight of old Martin,
the gardener, who, in his blue apron, was watch-
ing them from behind a haystack, with a broad
grin-on his face, they might have found some
clue to the puzzle,

“Tt was zustink, I expect,” said Hector.

“P’raps it was reason,” said Gertrude.

-Anyway, there he was, and the next thing to -
be done was to celebrate his arrival by making
a grand feast in his honour.

All that morning Gertrude was busy writing
notes of invitations to the rabbits, which Hector
posted in the weedy pond, whilst the afternoon
was devoted to preparing the banquet. It was
to be spread under the walnut trees, and to
begin precisely when the great gong sounded
indoors for grandpapa’s dinner. Ruth, the
housemaid, had lent a duster for a table-cloth,
whilst a large old pickle-bottle filled with
peonies made a great feature in the centre of
the spread, which was certainly composed of
rather odd dishes. There was a little trough of
bran mash for each rabbit to begin with, and, to
give this course a festive appearance, Gertrude
had stuck a double daisy in the middle of the
moist bran; then there was an evtrée of parsley,
succeeded by slices of raw carrot ; whilst a very
choice dish of lettuces soaked in milk closed and
crowned the banquet,
A CHANGE OF SCENE, gI

“It was rather disagreeable of the rabbits,”
Hector remarked, “not to sit still in their places
at the edge of the duster, and to drag their food
all over the grass.”

But still, on the whole, the feast went off very
satisfactorily, and Hector was just making a
“ sood-night ” speech to his guests, in which he
bade them to treat the new bunny kindly, and
exhorted the latter not to be too uppish as he
was only a new-comer, when Gertrude uttered a
cry of dismay. With one skip and a bound, the
grey rabbit had turned his little white tail on
the assembled company, and had disappeared
through a hole in the hedge to the meadow
beyond.

“ And it’s the field where we mustn’t go,” said
Gertrude mournfully.

“Oh, nonsense!” cried Hector. “I don’t care
if I do get punished; I shall go and look for
Greycoat,”

But just at that moment Betty, the nursery-
maid, came running down the long meadow,
with the unwelcome news that they had over-
stayed their bedtime, and that nurse would be
ever so angry if they did not come indoors
di-rectly.

Nurse’s orders were never disobeyed, so sadly
and slowly the three o/d rabbits were restored

-to their hutches, whilst as the children turned
indoors they cudgelled their brains for the best
means to adopt to recover their lost Greycoat.
92 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“Hector, I know,” said Gertrude, as they
climbed upstairs together. “I'll wake up ever
so early to-morrow morning, and Pll come and
call you before any one’s awake, and then we'll
go out and hunt for our poor rabbit. It’s naughty
to go, I suppose, because we have been forbidden ;
but still, that bunny must have been sent to us
for us to take care of it, and we oughtn’t to mind
getting scolded for trying to save his life, a bit
more than fathers and mothers in story-books
mind suffering all sorts of things just to save
their own children,”




CHAPTER XII.

A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS.

**Child, I see thee! child, I’ve found thee
*Midst of the quiet all around thee.”
: Keats.

bed, for I’m sure I shan’t sleep a
wink all night, wondering where
poor Greycoat is,” Hector had
declared as he bade Gertrude good night.

Nevertheless, when next morning before five
Gertrude stole noiselessly into his little room, she
found him so sound asleep, that it took a great
deal of shaking and loud whispering to awaken
him. It was only by frequently reminding
him that if they did not make haste, nurse would
be sure to get up and come and look for them,
that Gertrude at last succeeded in rousing him.

Once out of bed, Hector’s dressing was soon
accomplished, but when it came to the point of
saying his prayers, he was perplexed.

“Tt seems rather funny,” he said, “to ask to
be made good all day when we know we're
going to do a rather naughty thing.”


04. MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“Not at all,” said Gertrude decidedly. “It’s
only one of xurse’s laws we're going to break,
it’s not like one of the Commandments. And
we'll tell grandpapa when we come in, and if he
says we must be punished, then we shall have to
put up with it; and I’m sure,” added Gertrude
heroically, “if we do manage to find Greycoat,
and put him back safely into his hutch, I shan’t
mind suffering for it.”

“N-no, not if we don’t get shut up on bread
and water,” said Hector a little doubtfully.

So the prayers were duly said, and then, with
their shoes in their hands, the children crept
down the back stairs, and, as ill-luck would have
it, were met at the foot by Rhoda, the dairymaid.
But she was a good-natured girl, and, like others
in that household, often pitied these two little
victims to nurse’s iron rule ; so, though she knew
they must be up to some mischief, she consider-
ately glanced over her shoulder, and let them
glide out of the back door without so much
as speaking to them. (Between ourselves, my
readers, she did hasten into her dairy, to make
sure these young people had not risen at that
early hour to try experiments in butter-
churning.)

How fresh and beautiful it was! Outside in
the garden the dew was hanging on the plots
of sweet-william, and gemming the columbines
and roses in the pretty, old-fashioned straight
walk in the kitchen garden ; but the children, as
A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS. 95

they flew down it, had no time to take heed of
either leaf or flower.

Trembling with excitement, they scrambled
through the hedge, and never drew breath till
they actually found themselves on the other
side, and standing on the forbidden ground.

The grass was longer here than in their own
meadow, for the fact was that that little pad-
dock was scarcely ever tenanted save by an
occasional cow or donkey. :

“We shall never find Greycoat in all this
wet grass,” said Hector, with a sigh. “Oh, isn’t
it, Ger, and hasn’t it made our boots shine!”

“Yes,” said Gertrude, glancing down rather
ruefully at the hem of her little print skirt, which
already looked sadly draggled by its contact.
with the high, dewy grass, “Well, we had better
set to work at once; you go all along that side
of the field, and I'll take this end, and you must
be sure and call out directly you see Greycoat.”

“What a pity it is,” said little Hector, “that
he doesn’t know we’re coming to look for him,
because then, you see, /e could call out, and save
us a deal of hunting.”

“That's silly,” said Gertrude rather severely ;
“of course, rabbits never speak.”

In less than three minutes, however, she did
not feel quite so certain on that point, for Hector
hhad come flying from the other end of the field,
too excited to explain himself clearly, but only
bent on dragging Gertrude to a certain spot,
06 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

4

where he declared you could hear Greycoat call-
ing for help. And sure enough, at rather long
intervals, came the sound of a little weak voice,
crying plaintively, “Help! help!” from what
seemed to be the very bowels of the earth.

At first the children were fairly scared. They
were all alone in this quiet country scene, for no
one appeared to be astir yet at that early hour,
and the strange little far-away cry, coming from
no one knew where, sounded at best very
uncanny.

“Ts it a little earth man, do you think?”
asked Hector with bated breath. “Or is it ”—
as a bright thought suddenly struck him—“ is it
a baby burglar, do you think?”

“There are no such things as baby burglars,”
said Gertrude decidedly.

“Then are burglars always born grown up?”
asked Hector in all good faith.

“ Hush, do,” said Gertrude; “there it is again.
I believe—yes, I do, really—that it’s some little
boy or girl calling. But where caz they be?
We must hunt about till we find them.”

And therewith they set to work to part the
long blades of grass, and examine. every tuft of
clover, as if the owner of that mysterious voice
must be hidden like a lady-bird in a leaf.
Guided by the sound, however, they drew near
at last to a small round opening in the field,
which was so nearly hidden by a thick fringe of
grass, that Hector almost tumbled into it.
A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS. 97

“Take care,” cried Gertrude. “Don't you know
that must be the old well, and it’s because of that
that we’re never allowed to come in here; but
it’s generally covered over with a bit of board.”

“There's no board now,” said Hector,
“and——” But he broke off.

For now quite clearly and distinctly from the
bottom of this dark deep hole came the cry
again, “Help! help!”

“Oh, Hector, some one has fallen into the
well!” cried Gertrude, and all the pretty pink
colour died out of her face, and she shuddered
as she knelt down on the grass and tried to scan
the depths of that long-disused well. But it
was much too deep and too dark to reveal any
thing or any one that might be hidden there.

“Tt’s Farmer Denne’s field, so we had better
go and tell him at once,” said Gertrude, running
at full speed to the great farmyard, where Molly,
the poultry woman, was collecting her feathered
charges round her, and a sleepy looking cowman
was leisurely pecling a stick before starting out
to the meadows to drive up the herd of pretty
Alderneys for the morning milking.

“Well, if 1 ever did!” cried Molly, so struck
with amazement at seeing “the Priory little
“uns” out of doors at that hour, that she dropped
her corn measure and all its contents on the
ground. “Sure and Mrs. Watson don’t know
what you young gentlefolks are at,” she added.

“Molly, Molly, there’s somebody down the

H
98 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

well!” gasped Gertrude. “Do come quick,
and see.” ;

“ Down the well in the fea/d?” asked Roger,
the cowman, in his broad provincial dialect.

“Yes, yes, close by,” said the children eagerly.
“Oh, do come quickly, or they may get tired
of calling.”

“I must go after my cattle,” said Roger
stolidly, closing his clasped knife and viewing
his peeled stick with much complacency.

But happily for all parties, Molly was more
impressionable. :
“ Well, well, I'll come along with you,” she
said, striding in front of the children, but never
believing for one instant that there was any

foundation for their statement.

But, before she had reached the well the sad
little cry had smote on her ear, and in another
second Molly was flying back to the farm, call-
ing loudly for help.

Amongst the first to respond was old Farmer
Denne himself, who was just mounting his cob
for his morning’s ride of inspection, and soon
there were so many farm hands collected round
the well at his bidding, that Gertrude and Hector
found themselves thrust aside, and were only
able to guess vaguely at what was actually
going on.

“ Ay, ay, that’s what ’em must have done,”
said one; “stepped on him lid, as was worm-
eaten all through, and gone to the bottom,”
A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS. 99

“Lucky there ain’t a teacupful of water in
the well, or them had been drowned, sure -as
eggs,” said another. “It'll be twenty-five feet
every inch that them’s fallen.”

Meanwhile, by the use of ropes and harness,
the poor little victim at the bottom of the deep,
dark well was reached. But at first it was not
so easy to explain to Phil at that distance how he
was to avail himself of the means of escape. At
length, however, he did understand that he was
to slip the long noose at the end of the rope
under his shoulders, and thus allow himself to
be drawn upwards. And so at last a ringing
cheer from those above ground announced to
Gertrude and Hector, who waited breathlessly
outside the circle of helpers, that they had
begun to draw him up.

“Steady, steady, lads,” said Farmer Denne,
as.a cry of unmistakable pain was heard ; “have
a care, or you'll knock him against the sides of
the well.”

“It can’t be more than a little chap, any-
way,” said one of the men; “for he ain’t heavier
than a cowslip ball.”

In another minute, which seemed an hour to
the childen, poor Phil’s brown head and ghastly
face became visible above the opening; then
the second burst of cheering, which should have
greeted his final rescue, died all at once at the
onset, and some one in the group cried out—

“Good Heavens! the boy is dead!” and then,
100 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

amidst a sudden silence, Phil’s seemingly lifeless
form was laid upon the grass.

A sorrier sight it would have been hard .to
find than this poor little bundle of tatters, coated
from head to foot with thick mud, laid there
amongst the daisies and buttercups, with the
morning sun shining down full upon his fast-
closed eyes, above which a huge gaping wound
showed clear and ghastly.

‘A stifled sob from Hector was the first sound
to break the silence, the next was Farmer
Denne’s voice, bidding Molly take the. squire’s
“little uns” away ; “’twasn’t no place for them.”
Obedience was second nature to the children,
so they suffered Molly to lead them from the
paddock, and though Hector tried to sob out
some inarticulate sound, Gertrude was too awed
to utter a single word. It was only when they
found themselves alone in the long flowery path
in the kitchen garden, that they seemed to come
to their senses.

“Let’s go and tell Miss Cheriton all about it,”
said Hector.

So they turned and went through the garden
gate out into the road. -

Miss Cheriton was a dear old lady, who lived
in a pretty little cottage known as Lilac Lodge,
on the opposite side of the road to the Priory.
She had been governess to Gertrude’s mother,
and dearly loved by her pupil, for whose sake
Miss Cheriton was perfectly devoted to the
A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS. IOI

children, and never wearied of telling them
stories of the fair young mother, who, six years
ago, soon after Hector was born, had been laid
to rest in the churchyard close at hand.

Miss Cheriton always protested that she was
too old to take charge of the children’s educa-
tion, and tried to persuade the squire that they
needed a younger and more competent teacher
than herself; but though Mr. Oswell used to
promise that he would look out for “some new-
fangled governess,” who should come and live
at the Priory, no such person had been hitherto
forthcoming, and every morning Gertrude and
Hector went over to Lilac Lodge for two hours
of lessons, and one hour of play, with their
“dear, dear Cherry,’ as Hector always called
her out of school time.

In spite of the early hour, Miss Cheriton was
up, and quite ready, though rather surprised, to
receive such literal sornzng callers. It was very
seldom, except to go to church, that she ever
ventured beyond the little garden, but by the
time the children had finished their story, which
was not a very coherent one, Miss Cheriton had
already tied on her bonnet, and, promising she
would soon return, started off to the paddock.

But it seemed a weary while to the children
till she came back again, and indeed a whole

hour went by before they saw her hurrying
down the lane in a state of great agitation,
strangely unlike her usual calm manner,
102 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

“He’s not dead! the little boy’s not dead!” _
she cried ; “but he’s in a very bad way, and the
saddest part of it all is, that no one seems to
know anything about him, or where he came
from.”

“ But he came out of the well,” said Hector.

“Yes, my dear; but he was not born and
bred there,” said Miss Cheriton. “Of course he
must have tumbled in, and, lucky for him, poor
little man, that his fall was broken by a thick
bed of mud at the bottom, or he must have been
killed. outright. But his head has been badly
hurt. They think that happened when he was
being drawn up.”

“Where is he now?” asked Gertrude.

“Lying in Farmer Denne’s kitchen,” said
Miss Cheriton ; “and the doctor has just been
and set his leg, which was broken, and bandaged
his head; but he is quite insensible still, only
now and then he groans, as if he were in great
pain. But you see,” went on Miss Cheriton,
speaking to herself rather than to the children,
“the difficulty is, to know what to do with him.
The Dennes won’t keep him at the farm, so
there is only the workhouse infirmary, and that’s
nine miles away. And so—but oh, dear me, I
wonder what Susan will say ;” and here the old
lady broke off suddenly, and, bustling out of
the room, she opened: a door which led to the
kitchen regions, and called “Susan!”

“Yes, ma’am,” and a middle-aged, ‘cross-
A VOICE FROM THE DEPTHS. 103

looking woman appeared in answer to the
summons.

“Oh, Susan,” began Miss Cheriton in a
nervous, half apologetic manner, “do you think—
I mean, could we put the little iron bedstead
into the box-room, and turn the boxes out into
the passage? I mean,” continued her mistress,
waxing bolder, “that’s what I want you to do
now, directly; if Sam has done cleaning the
knives, he can help you.”

“Move the boxes out of the box-room! and
whatever for?” asked Susan in an anything but
encouraging tone.

“ Because—because,” said the poor old lady,
trembling before her domestic tyrant, “there’s a
little boy—who has nowhere to go—and so I—I
told Farmer Denne they might bring him to us.
He will be here most likely in another half-hour,
Susan ; so please don’t lose any time.”

Susan’s answer was to turn her back on Miss
Cheriton, and slam the kitchen door.

“Nasty, grumpy old thing!” said Hector;
whilst Gertrude added—

“But you zz/ have the little boy all the same,
Miss Cheriton ?”

“Yes, yes, my dears,” was the answer. “You
see, Susan doesn’t mean anything ; it’s only a
little way she has when her temper gets up.
Now I must go and smooth her down, and you
-must be running back to your breakfast, or nurse
will be wondering what has become of you.”
104. MATCH-BOX. PHIL.

- But, as it happened, nurse had not even dis-
covered that the children were missing, for the
old squire’s fit of gout had become so serious,
that she had been down in his room ever since
early dawn, and had had no time to think of
her little charges.

So, as soon as they had swallowed a hurried
breakfast they were free to run back to Lilac
Cottage, where they arrived just after poor
Philip had been duly installed in Miss Cheriton’s
box-room.

“Dear Cherry, is Susan still very cross?”
asked Gertrude under her breath.

“No, my dear,” was the reply. “It was with
the blackest face in the world that she helped to
put the poor little man to bed; but no sooner
had he opened his eyes—such big brown ones
they were—and looked up in her face, than a
change came over Susan all at once, and she
actually bent down and kissed the poor lad.
And though she never said a word, I don’t seem
to think that she will ever be troublesome about
him again, for there was something in her face
which I have never seen there before. I think
that somehow the child must have touched her
heart.”

“But nurse says she is quite sure that Susan
never had a heart,” said Gertrude. ;

“Then, p’raps some one has given her one,”
said matter-of-fact Hector.


CHAPTER XIII.

AT LILAC COTTAGE,

«He did not come ; I waited hour by hour.”
Mrs, SEWELL.

1O3 DON’T suppose we shall keep him
eof here for more than a few days at
the most,” Miss Cheriton had said
to Susan, by way of encouraging
her to receive Phil kindly. “ Somebody is sure to
turn up to claim him.” But, as events proved,
Miss Cheriton was left in undisputed possession
- of her poor little guest, not for a few days, but for
many weeks, and no one dd turn up to relieve
her of him, so that when Hector’s birthday
came, on the ninth of September, Philip was still
to be found at Lilac Cottage.

In the first three weeks after the accident he
was so ill with a sharp attack of fever, that no
one but Miss Cheriton and Susan were allowed
to go near him, and even when he grew better,
and was able to sit out in the little verandah,
propped up with pillows, nurse’s jealous care for
her children prevented Gertrude and Hector for


106 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

a long time from doing more than peep through
the garden gate with wondering and sympathiz-
ing eyes at the little pale-faced stranger, who
looked more like a phantom to be blown away
by the first breath of wind, than the dangerous
gutter-bred pickpocket, whom nurse always repre-
sented him to be.

Consequently it was only very gradually that
the children were admitted to anything like
intimacy with Phil; indeed, on week-days, when
they went to Miss Cheriton for their lessons,
they never saw him; but on Sunday afternoons,
when they came to say their catechism, and hear
a Sunday story read aloud, Phil was allowed to
be present, and it was wonderful what interest he
took in the two children. At first he was very
silent, but after a time, when, the reading being
finished, the children would talk to their hearts’
content, Phil soon learnt to chime in, and would
ask questions about different facts in country life
or natural history, which Hector and Gertrude
delighted to answer. But, as regarded himself
and the people he had lived amongst, Phil was
very reserved ; and if by chance he let slip the
names of either Seth or Nannie, he instantly
caught himself up, and would glance stealthily
towards Miss Cheriton, to see if she had heard
him. Yet surely,he could not have forgotten
them. The many associations which he had
in common with his fellow-sufferers in the dreary
city garret, with whom he had shared his tears
AT LILAC COTTAGE, 1O7

and his hardships, could not have faded so
entirely from his memory and left no trace.

No; nor had they. Now and again, when
the light fell on Gertrude’s golden hair, the
remembrance of another small yellow head,
all rough and unkempt though it had always
been, would rise to Phil’s mind with a pang
which sometimes brought a rush of tears to his
eyes. Or when the children would bring him
baskets of blackberries or handfuls of ripe nuts,
poor Seth’s stories of that golden age in his life,
when he had been free to rob the hedges and
woodlands of their bounty, would come back to
Phil and give an ugly taste to the juicy berries,
and spoil all his pleasure in the business of
“shucking” and cracking the nuts, in which
Gertrude and Hector so delighted.

If six months ago some one had warned
Philip that the time would come when, having
reached the happy country himself, he would
forget his promise to those he had left behind in
the house of bondage, he would have been the
last to have believed it. And, in sooth, he had
not forgotten them ; there lay the sting. Often
and often, when Gertrude came to surprise him
with some little gift or pleasure, which she had
taken infinite pains to procure for him, though
he thanked her civilly enough, Phil would gladly
have given away all she brought him, if only he,
could have changed the pretty little lady who

stood before him, fresh and bright as a dew- \

\
108 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

washed rosebud, for the ragged child in Flower-
dew Alley, with her thin, piping voice and
begrimed face and hands.

When Phil first fell ill, his thoughts had run
so continuously upon the last incidents preceding
his accident, the recollection of having been
hunted down by the boys and dogs so haunted
him, that it had always been of these latter that
he had raved in his wild, feverish talk, and had
made no mention of Seth or Nan. It was only
as he grew better, and when, owing to Miss
Cheriton being summoned from home for some
weeks, Phil was left entirely to Susan’s charge,
that he opened his heart to the latter, and for
days could talk of nothing else but his anxiety
to return to Flowerdew Alley, and bring his
friends away from all their misery. He was
continually asking Susan how soon she thought
he would be well enough to start out on his
travels again, till at last she rebuked him so
sharply for not knowing when he was well off,
and for not being content accordingly, that poor
Phil burst into a flood of tears. His eyes were
still so red and swollen with crying when the
doctor came to pay his usual visit that, on
leaving Lilac Cottage, the latter thought well to
remark to Susan—

“The boy doesn’t get on as he ought. It
seems to me as if he were fretting about some-
thing, and if you don’t manage to cheer him up
a little, Miss Cheriton will not think he does
AT LILAC COTTAGE. Iog

either of us any credit when she comes back
again.”

“Well, sir, I’m sure Pll do my best to liven
him up,” said Susan; and she kept her word.

For the future, instead of snubbing Philip
when he spoke of Seth and Nan, she helped
him to build up grand castles in the air—of how,
as soon as he was well, they would go together
to Flowerdew Alley, and bring Seth and Nan
away, and how all three children should come
and have a good time together at Lilac Cottage.
“For missus,” so Susan declared, “was such a
kind lady, she’d be sure to welcome them and
give them a holiday.” These glowing schemes
worked a magical cure upon Phil; from the
moment Susan encouraged these dreams he
rapidly improved, and if ever he seemed wearied
or a little out of spirits, Susan had only to refer
to these golden plans to produce an instantaneous
change in him.

But the day before Miss Cheriton returned,
when Phil was sitting in Susan’s pantry, watch-
ing her as she rubbed up the contents of the
plate-basket, preparatory to her mistress’s home-
coming, and talking more earnestly than ever
about his projects for Nannie, Susan cut him
short all at once.

“Look here, my boy,” she said, stopping in
the midst of cleaning her silver, “mind you
one thing; it won’t do for you to say nothing
to the missus about those friends of yours up in
110 — MATCH-BOX PHIL.

London. It’s as much as you can expect if she
puts up with you here, but it’s not likely she
would have any more little street children down,
and chances are, if you begin fretting for them,
she'll send you straight away, and then you'll be
in a pretty pickle.”

Susan’s tone was not as unkind as her words.
She was really fond of Philip—for reasons you
cannot guess, my readers—but she was still
fonder of herself, and she knew quite well that
Miss Cheriton would never forgive her for having
deceived poor Phil with all sorts of schemes and
plans which she knew could never be carried out.
True, she had meant it kindly, and she had
thought at the time that it did not matter much,
as long as she managed to amuse Philip, whether
it were with stories about Nan and Seth, or with
tales out of the fairy-books; it was only when
she realized that Philip had believed every word,
and was prepared to quote her promises to Miss
Cheriton, that poor silly Susan felt that she had
made a terrible rod for her own back. The idea
of adding two more gutter children, and one of
them a helpless cripple, to their small household
was, of course, altogether preposterous. It was
out of the question, and therefore her only course
was to induce Phil to give up thinking any more
about it, and the best means of accomplishing
this was to make him understand that he was
serving his own interests by doing so.

“Yes, yes,” she went on, seeing his crestfallen
AT LILAC COTTAGE, 11t

face, “I know we've talked no end of it; but,
bless you, it was only to amuse you like whilst
you were ill, I gave you them stories just as I
gave you your medicine, but you must leave off
both now. Now, don’t begin crying, there’s a
good lad. I don’t say but what, when you're
quite strong and well, we mightn’t see what
might be done, but don’t for any sake go talking
about your Seth and Nan to missus, or the little
gentlefolk either, or, take my word for it, they'll
get in such a way for fear of the sort of riffraff
you may be wanting to cart down here, that
they'll think it’s high time to send you packing
before anything worse comes of it.” .

Phil sighed heavily, but he took the hint. As
we have said before, his early training had made
him shrewd and calculating beyond his years,
and, though he had been most anxious to share
his present pleasant home with his friends, he
was not prepared to give it up for their sake.
So that was the secret of his silence as regarded
the two poor children, who, as days grew into
weeks and weeks into months, watched and
waited in their dreary garret for the friend who
never came back again.


ae

AT Ee 38 =



CHAPTER XIV.

“WOULD YOU FORGET ANY ONE?”

‘* Thus sometimes hath the brightest day a cloud.”
Henry VI,

ELL, that is the beautif//est thing
I ever saw,” said Philip, as on one
Saturday afternoon in the early
autumn he watched Gertrude as
she sat in Miss Cheriton’s little verandah,

_making a cross for her mother’s grave. It was
the child’s pride and pleasure, whatever the
season might be, to lay a fresh flower cross
there every Sunday, and the one she was making
to-day was certainly lovely enough to win praise
from a more critical judge than Phil. She had

gathered some deep crimson sprays of Virginian
creeper, and had coaxed old Martin to cut his

last tea-roses, and these, intertwined with some
of the dark purple blossons of the clematis, and
edged all round with a feathery border of white
silky traveller’s joy, looked quite beautiful.

“But ’tis a sight of trouble to take just for

nothing,” added Phil.


“WOULD YOU FORGET ANY ONE?” 113

' “Oh, but it’s not, just for nothing!” ‘said
Gertrude, looking up. -“I like to think that
mother knows that we love her grave still, and
that we save all our best flowers for it.”

“She don’t know that,” said Philip bluntly
“ she’s dead now, and has forgotten you.”

“She’s gone home to God,” said Gertrude
reverently ; “but mother has not forgotten us,
Miss. Cheriton says she hasn’t. Miss Cheriton
says she believes mother’s thinking and praying
for us still, just the same as father does, who is
out in India, you know.”

» “Then she'll be wanting bad to come back to
you,” said Phil; “just as you said your father
was.”

“Qh no, no! I shouldn't like to think that,”
said Gertrude. “She will be glad when we go to
her; but no one who has gone home to God
a rest in Paradise until the Resurrection Day,
when God will gather His own elect to Himself
in héaven—could want to come back to this
world.. I often think,” and Gertrude’s busy
little hands grew still, whilst the half finished
cross lay untouched upon her knees, and a soft,
faraway look came into her bright, brown eyes,
“when they are singing hymns about all the
beautiful flowers in that heavenly country, how
happy that great Easter morn will be when I
shall meet mother there, and wall hand-in-hand
with her again, as I used to do long, long ago,
when I was quite a little girl, I wouldn’t like

I
LI4 MATCH-BOX PHIL. |

to die; no, I’d be sorry to leave Hector, and
Cherry, and Brighteyes; but I would like to go
to heaven, if I was only good enough.”

“But I can’t see for why gentlefolks should
want to go to heaven,” said Phil, “when they’ve
plenty of victuals, riches, and fine clothes, and
no match-boxes to make.”

“Ves, that’s all true,” said Gertrude, gently ;
“but, you see, poor Phil, I don’t suppose you
have ever heard much about heaven, or you
would know that there is nothing upon earth
that we can ever compare with it ; because, you
see, everything in heaven is perfect. I wish, Phil,
you'd try and learn some hymns ; they'd teach
you a lot.”

“Not I,” said Phil. “I never heard one that
I cared about, except”—and his voice shook a
little—-“ one that a little un in our place used
to say sometimes about roses and seas of
glass ; but I don’t mind how it was put together
now.” ;

“Oh, but that’s my favourite one, ’m sure,”
cried Gertrude; “it’s all about the city God
hath made— ,

‘In the midst of that dear city,
Christ is reigning on His seat,
And the angels swing their censers
' Ina ring about His Feet.
There are roses and carnations,
_ There the honeysuckles twine ;
There along the river edges
Golden jonquils ever shine 5
“WOULD YOU FORGET ANY ONE?” 115

There the water-lilies open,
Lying on the sea of glass ;

There the golden crocus glimmers
Like a flame amidst the grass.”

“Ay, that’s it,” said Phil, with a sigh, He
was thinking how. little Nan loved that hymn,
which she had learnt at the Ragged Sunday
School. “It do sound fine; but I expect-as
soon as ever any one gets there, they would be
that happy, that they would forget all those
down here.”

“Oh, but no,” cried Gertrude, her eyes filling
with tears. Though it was only a. poor little
untaught gutter. boy who was advancing this
theory, she could not bear the thought of being
forgotten by mother, either here or hereafter,
“Why, Phil, only think ; supposing you had left
any one you loved very much in Flowerdew
Alley, you wouldn’t forget them mow, though
you say you have never been in such a happy
home before. Why, I’m sure you'd always be
thinking of them, and longing for them to come
away from that miserable place, and be happy
with you; now, wouldn’t you, Phil?” Then,
noticing how Philip flushed and hung his head,

_Gertrude’s tender conscience smote her, and,
going up to him, she added softly, “Poor Phil,
I didn’t mean. to hurt you; I forgot that you
had never had any one to love you.”

Before he could answer, Hector came bound-
ing into the garden, with a rabbit tucked under
116 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

each arm, and a fresh turn was given to the
conversation. But not to Phil’s thoughts, how-
ever, That night when Susan looked into his
room the last thing, she found him with his face
buried in the pillow, sobbing his heart out.

_ Well, whatever is the matter now?” she
asked, sitting down on Phil’s bed.

-“Oh, Susan,” came the answer, in a oe
choked voice, “I can’t help it, but I want little
Nannie and poor Seth so bad. -It ain’t no good ;
I tries to be happy and forget them, but it’s no
use. . Whenever things seem specially nice, the
thought of them two as is wanting me ever so
bad comes sort of way straight into my throat,
and chokes me all but. I don’t want to get
turned away from here, but I expect I'll have to
go. I feel that sneaky’stopping on here, when
I promised ’em, certain sure, I'd never forget
?em ;” and therewith Phil burst into tears afresh.
2 “Well, I did hope I wasn’t going to hear any
more of that nonsense,” said Susan sharply.
“Why, ’tisn’t as if they belonged to you ; oe re
no flesh and blood of yours.”

“No,” said Philip simply; “ but we've heen
awfully miserable together. ’Tis that that
makes coves stick:to each other.”

_ “But ’tisn’t as if you’d do ’em any good by
going back to them, or by going on with your
wild-goose chase after the Thorndale place,”
said Susan. “It’s just this, my boy—if you
can’t manage to make yourself happy without
“WOULD YOU FORGET ANY ONE?” 117

them, you'll lose the chance of a good home,
and they won’t be a bit the better for it; for
’twas only to-day that missus said to me,
‘Susan,’ she said, ‘now that Philip has got well
again, every one is saying that I ought to be
sending him away, and that I can’t afford to
keep him on here ; and besides that, it’s a grave
responsibility to take any one who has absolutely
no belongings of their own. But that’s just
where I don’t agree with them; it’s because
there will be clearly no chance of any dis-
reputable relation turning up to be an annoyance
to me that I shan’t be afraid to keep the boy,
and so I am determined that he sha// have a
home with me as long as he behaves well.
After Michaelmas he shall begin going to school
regularly, and out of lesson hours you. must
train him into being a handy boy to take
Sam’s place” There, now, that’s what missus
said to me, and what do you think she’d say if.
she Heard about these two little ragamuffins
you are whimpering after? Why, she'd say the
sooner you and they went off together the
better, or; if she didn’t say it, /’d say it for her ;
and you must know by this time there ain’t
room in this house for more than one voice to
be heard, and that voice az#’¢ Miss Cheriton’s:
Well, cry on now, if you will,” wound up Susan,
_ when only sobs came in answer to her long
hatangue; “’twon’t do nothing any harm but
your pillow, for, thank goodness, tears don’t
118 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

stain; but just you remember what I’ve said,
and wake up to-morrow a wise lad.”

Upon that Susan departed to her own room,
but instead of hurrying into bed, she set down
her candle on her chest of drawers, and, sitting
down on the edge of her bed, she indulged in a
fit of thinking.

“Tt’s downright contrary, and that’s what it
is,” she muttered. “Just when I thought it was
all comfortably settled, and that the load which
has made my life a burden to me all these years
was going to be took off my shoulders at last.
Bother those gutter brats! But, there, after all,
boys are as changeable as the weather, and he
will forget them fast enough if I give him time.”

And really it looked as if Susan opined cor-
rectly, for in the days to come Fhil not only
ceased to worry her about Seth and Nan, but
he grew gradually brighter and altogether more
-contented. It was zof, however, because he had
forgotten his friends. On the contrary, it was
because he had learnt to remember. them in the
best way.

On the morrow of his tearful talk with Susan,
he had gone to the children’s service, where the
lesson for the day had been on prayer, and the
vicar had spoken so simply and yet so im-
pressively to the children on the duty of pray-
ing for themselves and for each other, and had
pointed out how it was the best way of helping
our friends to pray for them, that his words set
“WOULD YOU FORGET ANY ONE?” 119

Philip thinking. And when, later on in the
afternoon, Phil had an opportunity of speaking
quietly to Gertrude, he seized it at once to ask
“if the parson had meant what he said about
prayer for aM sorts of children?”

“But of course he did,” said Gertrude, “Why,
our Father in heaven is everybody’s Father,
and He can hear everybody’s prayers.”

“Yes, but do He give everybody what they
ask for?” inquired Phil.

“Tf they ask for it properly, and if it is good
for them to have it,” said Gertrude. ‘“Some-
times people ask for very silly things—very
often that happens when they are in a temper,
you know—which they had much better not
have, and then God is kinder to them than they
are to themselves, and does not answer their
prayers. Once, you know, when nurse made
Hector wear tight boots, Hector prayed God to
give him wooden legs and feet like our rocking-
horse’s, but you can’t think how dreadfully
frightened he was afterwards, for fear his prayer
would be answered.”

“Hm, that would have been odd!” said Phil.
“But,” he went on, “how’s a chap to know if he
is praying properly for a thing or not?”

Gertrude thought for a moment, then she said,
“The safest way is always to say, ‘If it be Thy
will?”

“T see,” said Phil; and then the conversation
was interrupted, and not resumed again.
120 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

But from that day on’ Phil nevér rose in the
“morning or lay down to sleep at night without
repeating a prayer, which he had composed on
this wise—

“Our Father, please let Nan and Seth and
me have a good time together, if it be Thy will ;
and be pleased, our Father, to let it be Thy ne

And he thought that in saying this prayer he
was serving Nannie in the best way he could,
and, his firm faith, imbibed from Gertrude, that
‘God would certainly hear him, comforted Phil,
and soothed the bitter pangs of conscience
which had haunted him of late.




CHAPTER XV.

A CONFESSION.

“* My conscience hatha thousand several tongues.”
King Richard I1f, |

HY, here’s my old friend who was so
scared by Farmer Blake’s donkey
Ven that he tumbled into an open
grave. Well, I’m very glad to
have met with you again ;” and Phil, who was
coming home from school one rather dull
November afternoon, suddenly found himself
face to face with Mr. Palmer. “I heard that
my aunt had picked up a small wayfarer,” went
on the latter; “but I never guessed it was you.
-Comeé now, it was worth while taking this couple
of days’ holiday, to make your acquaintance
again. Shall I find Miss Cheriton at home? us
“Oh yes, sir, she’s at home, I know,” said
Phil; “but please, sir’”—and here he grew very
‘crimson and his words came out with great
difficulty—* please, sir, I’ve never, never said a
word about that churchyard business, ‘cause,
rcause— Please, sir, why did that old lady hunt
me out of your house that way?”


122 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“Tt wasn’t your fault, my boy,’ said Mr.
Palmer good-naturedly. “You wouldn’t have
been ‘hunted out,’ as you call it, from my house
if I had been at home. It was all through a bit
of paper that Patty picked up which frightened
her out of her wits. There was some writing on
it. Was it yours or somebody else’s?”

“’Twasn’t mine, sir—I hadn’t been learnt to
write then—but ’twas a young gent gived me
that paper when I got shut in the farmer’s coal-
hole. He passed it down through the winder-
bars to me, and he said if I showed it to the
old chap next time he came a-bullying me, he’d
be sure to let me go fast enough then. I suppose
it tumbled out of my pocket, and your old lady
saw it.”

“Ves; and now I see what it all meant,” said
Mr. Palmer, laughing. “Of course, I knew it
was a hoax of some,sort. Well, here we are at
Lilac Cottage. How. surprised Miss Cheriton
will be to find that we are old friends.”

And so she was; indeed, the good old lady
was so flustered between her delight at seeing
her nephew, and her anxiety to make him com-
fortable on such short notice, that the whole of
the Lilac Cottage household seemed in a whirl.

“Now, my dear aunt, don’t fuss yourself,”
said Mr. Palmer. “I can’t have you running
about and wearing yourself out. You're not
looking at all well, by the way.”

“Oh, I’m quite well,” was the answer.
A CONFESSION. 123

But though her nephew did not continue the
point further, before he left Lilac Cottage he
took care to speak to Susan on the subject.

“ Susan,” he began, “I think your mistress is
looking very worn and worried. It’s all very
well to do charity, but she ought not to be
allowed to burden herself with that boy.” Susan
_ flushed crimson, but Mr. Palmer went on,—*“ At
her age it is a great responsibility, and with her
scanty income it means a great addition of
expense. She confessed to me that his illness
and the doctor’s bill alone came to more than
twenty pounds.”

“ Quite true, sir,” said Susan; “but then that
was out of the way; he ain’t likely to have a
time like that over again for the rest of his
life.”

“T don’t suppose he’ll fall into a well again,”
said Mr. Palmer ; “but who can tell what mayn’t
happen to him in the way of illness or accident,
or into what kind of trouble he may not get
himself or others? and you know quite well,
that whatever does go wrong with him, the
whole burden will fall upon my aunt.”

“He’s a very good lad, sir, I’m sure of that, x
remarked Susan.

“No doubt he is, poor little fellow! I lice
the boy’s face; he interested me from the moment
I saw him. But even were he perfection itself,
your mistress’ circumstances are not easy enough
to allow of her taking the whole charge of him ;
124 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

and besides, I can see the responsibility 1 is telling
upon her health. a

“Then “do you mean, sir, that the boy ought
to be turned out on the toads again?” asked
Susan. There was so much temper in her tone,
that Mr. Palmer was quite surprised.

“IT mean nothing of the sort, ” he answered 3
“but I’m going to make inquiries about a very
good home for orphan boys near London, and if
I find there is a vacancy for Philip, I shall try
and persuade Miss Cheriton to send him there,
and I hope, if you have any regard for your
mistress’s comfort in her old age, you will do
your best to help me in doing so. She could
still keep an interest in’ the boy, and could
always have him down here for a holiday when
she liked; but she would not be worried by
feeling that he had no one in the world to
depend on but herself. By the way, what is
-Philip’s surname?”

"Susan hesitated for a moment, and when she
-did speak at last it was in a short, jerky way.
“That was the difficulty, sir,’ she said, “when
he came to be entered on the school books.
He’d only heard himself called ‘ Match-box Phil,’
and had never heard that he had any other
‘name; but little Miss Gertrude over at ‘the
Priory begged so hard that he might be called
-Flowerdew, as he came out of Flowetdew Alley,
‘that ’tis as Philip Flowerdew he’s entered in
‘the school register.”
_A CONFESSION. 125

- “Jt sounds well enough,” said Mr. Palmer;
and then Phil himself interrupted _ the conversa-
tion with a message from Miss Cheriton, to say
there was not a minute to be lost in star ting for
the train.

‘All that day Susan seemed like one in a
dream. She moved about her work so slowly,
and when - Miss Cheriton came out to speak
about making the Christmas mincemeat, which
was usually a matter of vital importance with
Susan,. she was so dull and silent, re: her
mistress asked if she were le
: “No, ma’am, thank you,” ‘said Susan ; ae
least, ma’am, I don’t know that I am particularly
well; at any rate, I’ve been thinking, ma’am, if
you could get Mrs. Smith to come in here for a
few days, I’d be glad if I could have a holiday.”

“A holiday, Sncaa |? cried Miss Cheriton. If

she thad asked for an elephant her mistress
would not have been more astonished. “Why,
it’s the first time you've asked for a holiday in
all the seven years you've lived with me!”
_ “No, ma’am, I’ve never wanted one before ;
but I do now, if you please,” said Susan, so
shortly that Miss Cheriton gave the permission
and refrained from asking further questions.
- And Mrs. Smith being found available as her
substitute, Susan set off the next day, promising
to be back in a week’s time, but not saying
where she was going,

_ Miss Cheriton’s. friends, were cor at a loss
126 MATCH-BOX PIIIL.

to understand why she should have burdened
herself with such an ill-tempered, disobliging
servant as Susan usually was.

“My dears, though she is surly by nature, she
has her good points,” Miss Cheriton would say.
“ And besides, she has had so much trouble.”

Yes, that was really why the kind-hearted old
lady bore so patiently with her. Eight years
ago she had first met with Susan at a small
seaside place called. Rock View, where the
latter was keeping a very good lodging-house,
in which Miss Cheriton stayed one whole winter.
The house belonged to Susan’s brother, who was
a widower, and who was already in the last
stage of consumption at the time that Miss
Cheriton was lodging there. What with the
heavy expenses of her brother's illness, and the
injury done to the town by a panic of bad
drainage, which scared all the usual visitors
away from the place, poor Susan’s hitherto very
prosperous business began to go down, and so
rapid was its decline that when in the following
year Miss Cheriton drove over to Rock View to
engage her rooms again, she arrived at the
Eversleys’ house to find a scene of ruin indeed.
Poor Susan, once so careful in her dress and
person, met Miss Cheriton in the dismantled
hall in a shabby old gown, with a pale, worn
face and swollen eyelids, and told her in a low,
broken voice, that her brother was dead and
that she was a bankrupt. The house with every
-A CONFESSION. 127

stick of furniture was to be sold up to satisfy
the creditors,

“And as for myself, ma’am, Pll have to turn
round and go out to service again, soon as ever
I can get a place, though it won’t be an easy
matter to find one after the long years I’ve been
out of service. Oh, ma’am”—and here poor
Susan quite broke down—“it will be a hard
change to go back again to be a servant one’s
self, after one has kept two or three of one’s
own.”

It certainly was a sad case, and Miss Cheriton
was touched by the poor woman’s distress,
which had been brought about by no fault of
her own. She had always thought well of Susan,
and had liked her for her quiet, respectful
manners, and her unselfish devotion to her
brother ; and, as she was just then very dissatis-
fied with her own servant at home, she proposed
to Susan to come and live with her at Lilac
Cottage. Though she couldn’t offer her high
wages, Susan, as the saying is, “jumped at the
offer.” .

It was the very situation she would have
chosen, where she would only have her mistress
to please and her kitchen all to herself. And so
the agreement was made, and a few weeks later
Susan came to take up her abode at Lilac
Cottage, from. which she had not absented
herself for a single day till the present time.

- Miss Cheriton might be excused, therefore, if
128 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

she felt her curiosity excited when, on the
evening of Susan’s return from her mysterious
absence, she informed her mistress that she
wished Phil to be sent to bed early, as she had
something very important she wanted to say to
Miss Cheriton.

sal Oped Susan, it is no ill news that you have
to tell me,” said the old lady; “but you don’t
look as if you had enjoyed your holiday much ;
you're looking wretchedly worn,’

oOL slot know what I may be looking like,
ma’am,” said Susan; “but I know ees
happier now than I've felt ever since you've
known me, ma’am, Yes, I mean it,” she added,
noting Miss Cheriton’s look of surprise. “ von
think I was happy enough when you first came
to Rock View, and all seemed going prosperously
with our house; but I wasn’t, ma’am, for I was
haunted then, as I’ve been haunted ever since,
by an evil conscience, by the. feeling that I’d
done a bitter wrong to two of my fellow-
creatures. It’s a long story, ma’am, but I'll
make it as short as I can.
“When John—that was my brother—and I
first set up our lodging-house, there wasn’t a
happier pair than we two. He’d been butler in
the same family where I was living as cook, and
when the master died and the establishment was
broken up, John, who had saved a good bit of
money—he was ten years older than me—made
up his mind to take a lodging-house, and I
A CONFESSION. 129

settled with him to come and be housekeeper.
And for a time all went well enough. Then one
fine day John told me, all of a sudden, that he
was going to be married, but that it wouldn’t make
any difference to me, for there’d still be room in
the house for me, and that Miriam—that was her
name—would be only the same as another sister
to me. She was an orphan, he said, with no
relations in the world but a brother, who was in
the colonies, but she had a little money of her
own, and, wound up John, ‘what was more, she
was the prettiest, sweetest woman he had ever
come across.’ Ah, if only he hadn’t added that,
I think I would have borne it better, but ’twas
the first time in my life. Pd ever heard him
praise a woman that way, and—— But there,
ma’am, the long and the short of it was, I was
deadly jealous of poor Miriam, and though truly
a better, gentler creature never lived, I made
her life hideous to her. Ah me! there are some
things one cannot talk about—they smart like
bad wounds one oniy came by an hour ago,—
but Miriam did not stay long with us to trouble
us. Before the end of the first year she passed
away, leaving a baby boy, whom she prayed me
to love and cherish for her sake.

“Vou never loved we, Susan,’ she said with
failing voice, as she lay dying, ‘but have pity on
my. baby. Don’t make his life as sad as you
made mine this last twelvemonth. Promise me,
you'll be good to him,’

K
130 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

“And I promised it, ma’am, and I meant it
then ; but somehow, when Miriam was gone, I
couldn’t abear the sight of that child. He had
her eyes, her great brown, pitiful eyes, and every
time he looked up at me he seemed to be saying,
plain as plain, ‘Don’t make zs life as sad as you
made mine.’ So the end of it was I persuaded
John that ’twasn’t no good trying to let our
apartments with a baby in the house, as would
be always screaming and crying and disturbing
the lodgers, who were mostly invalids. And,
though at first John turned a deaf ear to me,
I worried him into giving way in the end; and
when Phil—I mean the baby—was about six
months old he was put out to nurse with a
woman who undertook the care of babies, some-
where near London. As long as he lived,
which was about three years longer, John went
up at regular times to see after the child, and
was very particular about paying the money for
his board; but when he died and I became
bankrupt, there was no ready cash forthcoming,
and I said to myself, ’twas no fault of mine that
I could do nothing for the boy, but that he
must just be left to take his chance. And I did
my best to forget all about him; but, ma’am,
I never could. At night I’d dream he was
standing by my bed, looking at me with his
big, sad eyes, and saying, in a voice which always
seemed to be his mother’s, ‘No wonder that your
lodgings failed and you came to misfortune, when
A CONFESSION, 131

you broke your promise and drove a motherless
babe from its own home.’

“Once—'tis five years ago now—I did write
up to the place where I knew he was, but I got
back my letter with ‘Present address unknown’
on it, and so, I thought, where was the good of
troubling any further. But there, ma’am, by
this time you will have guessed the end of my
story. That morning last summer, when little
Phil was brought in here, he had no sooner
opened his eyes than I seemed to see Miriam ~
before me, and felt almost sure that that poor
little homeless waif was the child whom J had:
first turned out upon the world. There, ma’am,
you will think I’ve acted deceitfully in keeping
this from you all these months; but I couldn’t
feel certain sure about it all till I had made a few
inquiries, and.somehow I never seemed to have
the courage to do that.. It was only when Mr.
Palmer came talking: to me about putting Phil
away in some home that I felt I couldn’t bear
that, and that, anyhow, I would prove that he
belonged to me, and that I had some voice in
settling what became of him. ‘So I started off
for Flowerdew Alley. I’d made out from Phil
that ’twas close to Jenkins’s great match manu-
factory, so I hadn’t much difficulty in getting
directed to the right locality; but a hard job I
had to find Flowerdew Alley, and a still harder
one to persuade any decent person to come
along with me to show me the way.
132 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

- “Qh, ma’am, your heart would bleed could you
see those terrible streets, with one miserable row
of squalid houses after another. As I tramped
through them I couldn’t believe that I- should
ever find my way out of them, back again to
fresh air and green lanes, Well, I found Mother
Styles, as. Phil calls the woman from whom he
ran away; and a deal of abuse I had to endure
from her; but, after a shilling or two, I got her
calm, and she told me what she knew about
Phil. It seems that the woman who first had
charge of him died when he was about three,
and he got handed over to some wretched old
woman who lodged in the same house as the
Styleses. She used to turn a penny by letting
him out to the street beggars; he was just a
child for the purpose, they. said, for his small
white face and great pitiful eyes always brought
the pennies. But one day, when her rent had
been long over due, this miserable creature
disappeared, and when Phil was brought home
by the sham widow woman who had hired him,
there was no one to take charge of him. Then
Mrs, Styles took him up—she was living in a
more respectable street then—chiefly, as she
owned herself, because she got credit from the
clergyman and district visitors for doing an act
of charity, and they got up ever so large a
subscription for her, and altogether she made
a good job out of it. And so she kept Phil on,
and soon made him handy in helping her in the
A CONFESSION, ¥ 133

match-box trade ; and besides, she said, she had
always understood that he had some rich re-
lations, who might turn up any day toclaim him,
and so she looked forward to reaping a harvest:
then.”

“But he has no relations but yourself, I
suppose,” said Miss Cheriton, speaking for the
first time.

“Ay, but he has, ma’am,” was the answer ;
“for afterwards I went on to Alston, which was
poor Miriam’s native place, and there I found
that her brother, Robert Moore, had come back
from the colonies in order to bring one of his
daughters to be trained here in England as a
governess—for he’s ever so rich, they say, and
the child is crazy to turn teacher. He had been
making inquiries everywhere for Miriam’s boy,
and he was downright glad to hear all I could
tell about him; and now, ma’am, he’s set on
taking him back tothe colonies. Their only son
—he was a Philip too; ‘twas his grandfather's
name—died last year, and he says ’twill do him
and his wife good to have another boy about the
place. And so, ma’am, if you’ve nothing against
it, Robert Moore would like to come down here
next week and see Phil, and thank you for all
~ your goodness to his nephew.”


CHAPTER XVI

DARK DAYS.

S* A little maiden at Thy Feet,
Before Thy throne I fall;
I open wide my childish heart,
And simply tell Thee all,”
7 E/DWARDS.

dew. Alley far behind her that she
suddenly remembered that she had
intended to make inquiries for Seth
and Nan, so that the next time Phil worried
about his friends she might be able to give him
news of them. But during her interview with
Mrs. Styles her thoughts were so occupied with
Phil’s concerns, that she entirely forgot the



existence of Seth and his sister, and indeed

there was nothing in the room to remind her
of them.

“For certain,” she reflected, “they couldn't
have been there, or I’d have seen them in that
wretched little den. There wasn’t room for a
cat to hide itself, and not a stick of furniture
behind which any child could creep out of
DARK DAYS. 135

sight. For sure, they couldn’t have been
there.”

. Nor were they. For the past ten days, Seth’s
and Nan’s places in that woeful lodging in
Flowerdew Alley knew them no more.

One dark dismal day in November, a Satur-
day, when father should have brought home the
week’s money, which had been sadly scant of
late, the cripple boy and his sister watched
vainly for his return, wondering, as the hours
went by, what could make him “so late to-
night.”

With all his failings, Reid was a kind father,
and. although, through his wish to grow rich
quickly, he had reduced himself and the children
to little better than beggary, he had not in this
respect done more wickedly than scores of his
superiors, who are ruining homes every day
through the mere love of speculation.

“Tf only Phil was here, he would run down to
the stone- "yard and look for father,” said little
Nan wearily.

“Phil!” echoed Seth, “ Why, whatever made
you think of him just to-night, Nannie ?”—she
had not mentioned his name for so many weeks.

“T think of him every day,’ she answered,
- turning her wan face away to the window,
whilst the tears gathered in her eyes, “but it’s
just at these sort of times that one wants him
so badly.”

“Best give up wanting him,” said Seth bit-
“1360 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

terly, “for he'll never come back to us any more;
he has forgotten all about us, long ago.”

“He mayn’t come back to us,” said Nan,
softly, “but he hasn’t forgot us. Oh no, I know
Phil hasn’t forgot us.”

“Poor Nan, I’m afraid you don’t really know
much about it,” said Seth, kindly, stroking her
little rough head.

“ Oh, but I do,” said the child earnestly, fixing
her eyes upon Seth’s face. “I 2vow Phil can’t
forget us, because every day I ask God to make
him remember us, and teacher says God always
hears our prayers. But oh, dear Seth, I do wish
father would come; he promised to be home
extra early to-day and take me for a turn down
the Saturday market.”

“Maybe he was kept overtime for a pressing
job,” said Seth; “he'll be in, chances are, in
another hour.”

But another hour, and yet another, went by,
and still the father tarried. The lamps had been
lit ever so long, and the owners of the double
row of motley stalls, with their flaring lights and
miscellaneous goods, which always found their
way into Flowerdew Alley on Saturday even-
ings, were beginning to think it was about time
to shut up shop, when some one with a heavy
step, and still heavier tidings, came up the stairs
to the poor garret, where the two children were
keeping their anxious midnight watch. The news
was soon told. Some one has said that our


DARK DAYS. . ‘137

greatest misfortunes take the fewest words to tell.
There had been an accident in the stone-yard just
as the men were leaving off work, and Reid and
another man had been so seriously injured, that
both had died soon after reaching the hospital.-

“Poor things!” said their compassionate
room-fellows; “then there’s nothing left to them
but the ‘House”” And then Mrs. Styles and
the other lodgers fell to discussing the ghastly
details of the accident, and speculating whether
the sufferers had been served fairly or not at
the hospital.

But neither Seth nor Nan heard a syllable of
what was passing around them ; Seth was think-
ing of the utter desolation which the future held
now for himself and Nannie; whilst she, poor
child, cowering down on the wretched strip of
‘matting, which represented her bed, thought
only of father lying stiff and cold in that
terrible black box, such as she had grown
familiar with through the many pauper funerals
which were constantly taking place in Flower-
dew Alley. To the children of our crowded
cities, death and its circumstances are presented
in their crudest, most material form. And
there was no one at hand to comfort her with
holier, happier thoughts, no one to teach her
how the grave is but the gate of life, and how—

; In God’s gracious keeping
We here may close our eyes,

And pass beyond death’s portals
To God’s own Paradise.”
138 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

The next day came the relieving officer and
one of the Poor Law Guardians, to make in-
quiries about the orphans and their circumstances
They asked a great many questions, wrote down
a few entries in their pocket-books, and then
went their way, leaving Seth and Nan wonder-
ing together as to what their future fate was to
be. But they were not left long in doubt.

When Saturday came round again it found
little Nan in the Union uniform, in one of the
-wards of a great London workhouse, She was
better clothed, better fed, and better housed
than she had ever been within her own recollec-
tion, yet she was only longing for her portion of
rags and gnawing hunger back again, so that
she might be with Seth once more; for Seth
‘was in an altogether different block of buildings,
in the infirmary. Once a week, the matron told
Nan, she would be allowed to see him if she
behaved well, and the thought of that brief half-
hour’s visit on Sunday was the only thing which
kept poor Nan alive. No, not guzte the only
thing either—for she had spoken out of the
fulness of her heart, and with all the trustfulness
of her firm childish faith, when, bidding Dusty
Dan farewell, she had exhorted him to keep
untiring watch for Phil’s return. “For I know
he wz come back again,” she had said, “ for
I know God will not let him forget us.”


CHAPTER XVII

SUNSHINE AND SHADE,

“And all 4¢s hopes were changed to fears,
And all zs thoughts ran into tears, :
Like sunshine into rain.”
ALDRICH.

aw, H, Gerty, only think!” cried Hector,
bursting into the nursery one snowy
day in- December, about a week
ae - after Susan’s return to Lilac Cot-
tage. “Only think. Phil’s uncle has been
down to see him, and he’s ever so rich, and he’s
given Phil a suit of new clothes, and a silver
watch, and a golden sovereign, all for his own
self; and he’s going to take Phil over the sea to
his beautiful home in Australia, and Phil is to
have a horse of his own to ride, and he'll go out’
shooting antelopes every day, and he’s to have
a splendid new gun to shoot them with; and he
isn’t Phil Flowerdew at all, but Phil Eversley!”
“What a lot to tell me all at once,’ said

Gertrude, who had been kept at home from her
daily lessons by a bad cold. “Is it really all
true, and did you see the uncle?”


I40 : MATCH-BOX PHIL.»

“No; he came down yesterday evening, and
he went back this morning,” said Hector. “ And
I only: saw Phil for a minute; he had been
to the station to see his uncle off, and he only
came home just as J had finished lessons; but
he looks awfully happy, Gerty, and keeps turn-
ing over on his head, like our tumbler dolls.”

“Then is he going away directly?” asked
Gertrude.

“Oh no; not till the spring, because his
uncle isn’t going back to Australia till then ;
so Miss Cheriton said she’d like to keep Phil
as long as she could. And, oh yes,” went on
Hector, “that’s another funny thing, Gerty—
Susan is Phil’s aunt, and that’s why his name is
Eversley.”

“Then is Susan a very rich lady in dis-
guise?” asked Gertrude, whose appetite for the
marvellous had been so stimulated that she was
ready to believe anything now.

“Susan a rich lady, indeed!” broke in nurse
indignantly. ° “What nonsense will you talk

next, Master Hector?”
_ “Tt’s not nonsense, nurse,” retorted Hector ‘.
“it’s all quite true—every word of it.”

“ Oh, I dare say,” said nurse, with a contemp-
tuous sniff; “about as true as the fairy tales in
your big red book.”

But nurse was wrong, and Hector was right,
and perfectly accurate in all the details he had
given, down to the silver watch and the golden
SUNSHINE AND SHADE, I4I

sovereign and Phil’s delight, which had taken
the outward form of a series of somersaults, all
over Miss Cheriton’s little bit of snowy lawn.

“The boy is simply off his head,” said Susan,
looking out of her kitchen window ; “and yet
he seemed to take it all quietly enough when
Moore was here. Whatever could have sent it
all up into his head in this way?”

. But her curiosity was soon satisfied, for pre-
sently Phil came bounding in from the garden
leaving dirty wet marks all over Susan’s spot-
less kitchen flagstones, for which misdemeanour
she forgot to-day to rebuke him.

“Oh, Susan,” he cried—he had not yet
learnt to call her aunt—“have you ever felt
just bursting all over for joy? Id like to go
bang through that window ; I’d like to smash
every plate and dish on your dresser, just be-
’ cause I feel so topsy-turvy inside me, that I’d
like to make everything else all round me topsy-
turvy too!”

“Does the thought of going over the sea
please you so much, then?” asked Susan.

“No, no,” shouted Philip; “it’s because I’ve
told uncle all about Seth and Nan, and he says
he'll come here after Christmas, and take me ‘to
London himself, and we'll go to Flowerdew
Alley, and fetch Seth and Nan away; and we'll
find out Mrs. Brailey, and p’raps we'll get poor.
Seth into a good hospital, and then when I've
grown ever so rich in Australia, Pll come back
142 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

to England and fetch Nan and Seth away to
_ be with me in my own beautiful home, where
there’ll be no match-boxes to make, and Seth
can have a garden all full of -his favourite
flowers, and Nan can do whatever she likes from
morning till night. Soon as ever I see Seth,”
went on Phil, “I shall give him my watch, for
he was always wanting to know how the time
went, poor Seth; and Nannie shall have the
golden sovereign—I’ll get plenty more in the
new country—and my! what a sight of things
she'll be able to get with it.” :

“Tt won't be no good your going to Flower-
dew Alley,” said Susan; “Nan and Seth ain’t
there any longer.”

“Not there!” cried Phil, and all the sunshine
died out of his face. “ How do you know?”

“Because I’ve been there, and I’ve seen
they’re not there with my own eyes,” said
Susan; and she went on to describe her visit
to Mrs. Styles, and the inmates whom she had
seen in the room there.

“Oh!” groaned poor Phil, and he hid his.
face on the kitchen table. “Oh, Nan! oh,
Seth! Why didn’t you wait for me?”

. “ Chances are,” said Susan, ‘‘that their friends
remembered them at last, and came and fetched
’em away, and p’raps they’re happy enough by
this time.”

“ Ah, maybe,” cried Phil, cheering up. He

was so happy to-day, that he was easily per-
SUNSHINE AND SHADE. 143

suaded to see only the brightest side of every-
thing. “I never thought of that. Then I know
what we will have to do. We'll write a letter
to Mrs. Brailey at Thorndale, and ask if Nan
and Seth be there.”

“But there ain’t no post town of Thorndale,”
said Susan. “I got Mr. Old at the post-office,
back in the summer, when you was worrying so
about going there, to look for it in the ‘Postal
Guide, and we couldn’t find no such place.
Depend on it, you’ve made a mistake in the
name altogether; and it’s something quite dif-
ferent, if you could only think of it. But, there,
why do you go fussing about it now? Can’t
you be happy, thinking about your kind new
uncle, and all the beautiful presents you've
got?”

““But ’tis just because I want to give the
presents to Seth and Nan that I must find
’em,” said loyal-hearted Phil; “and I won’t go
away, no, that I won't, till I’ve seen ’em, and
said good-bye to them.- But I expect uncle’ll
know how to find them. When people is rich,
they can do anything;” and so saying, Phil
went off again to cut a few more capers in the
freshly fallen snow in the garden.

Never before in his life had the poor little
castaway been a prey to such joyous glee, and
now even his anxiety about Seth and Nan could
not quench his bright spirits. How he whistled
and sang all through that day; how, when the
144 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

evening came, he sat planning all the pleasures
and surprises which he would shower upon his
friends!’ Nor was Dusty Dan forgotten. His
uncle had promised Phil a real good pocket-knife
and another sovereign if by the new year he
could read and write fairly well; and Phil was
determined to win the double prize, for both
should be handed over to poor Dusty.

_ And, to crown Phil’s delight, after patient
searching through many gazetteers and clerical
directories, Miss Cheriton at last discovered,
on Christmas Eve, the existence of two villages
of the name of Thorndale, one in Lincolnshire,
and one in the east of Kent, so that now it only
became a question as to which village May
Farm was likely to belong.

“Of course, to Kent,” said Miss Cheriton
promptly, when she heard of the cherry orchards
and hop gardens, which had always figured so
largely in Seth’s recollection. “If so, it’s in the
next county to us, for we are only just over the
border of Kent.”

“Could I walk there, ma’am?” asked Phil
eagerly ; “I’d run all the way.”

. “Hardly, I think,” said Miss Cheriton, smiling;
“it would take you some little time to get there
by rail. But now I will write to Mrs. Brailey
at once, and ask her if she can give us any
news of Seth and Nan, and you shall go and
post the letter.”

_ “Oh, letter, do go as quick as you can, and
SUNSHINE AND SHADE. 145

say how bad I want an answer,” said Phil, as he
' dropped it into the letter-box.

All the next day, which was Christmas Day,
he was far too anxious and excited to care the
least about Susan’s grand dinner, and all the
oranges and figs and nuts which fell to his
share were laid by carefully on a shelf in the
kitchen for little Nan.

It was not till the fourth day that an answer
came from Thorndale; and then, as both Miss
Cheriton and Susan had secretly feared, it was
only to say that nothing was known of Seth’s
and Nan’s whereabouts, though their aunt would
be sincerely glad to hear anything about the
poor children.

In Phil’s own mind he felt certain that only
in one of two places could Seth and Nan be—
either in Flowerdew Alley, or May Farm; and
as it was proved that they were in neither, it
must mean that they were dead.

“Boys and girls die off so quickly up there,”
he sobbed, “and no one thinks nothing about
it;” and then he flung himself face downwards
on the floor of his little room, and refused to be
comforted.

Yes, he felt sure, he knew now exactly all
that had happened. Seth had died (Mrs.
Styles and every one else had always said he
had one foot in the grave), and poor Nannie had
not been able to hold up her head when he was
gone, and with Phil, too, no longer there to

L
146 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

comfort her, and so she had died also, and they
had both been put away in that dismal burying-
place into which Phil had sometimes strayed, and
where only broken brickbats and old flower-pots
marked the resting-place of the pauper dead.

And now they would never come back again
to share all his good things, and they would
never, never know that he had not forgotten
them, and that every one of his presents he had
saved to give them.

It was in vain that Miss Cheriton and Susan
tried each in turn to console him, and to coax
him to try and eat something. To their words
of comfort he turned a deaf ear, and left untasted
all the tempting food that Susan brought him.

And the only sound that alternated with his
choking sobs was Phil’s heart-breaking cry,
“Oh, Nan, Nan, if you Aad but waited ; if you
could but have known that I was coming back
to you!”










(ZI,
feo)

NA y




CHAPTER XVIII.

“WHEN SHALL WE THREE MEET AGAIN?”

***T wish that he were come to me,
For he will come,’ she said.
‘ Are not two prayers a perfect strength,
_ And shall I feel afraid?’”
Rossetti.

I s
“ Although he did eat a little yester-
day just to please me, one can see
that he has entirely lost his appetite, and his
spirits are quite gone. Even little Master Hector
is quite struck by the change in him.”

“Tt’s downright contrary of him to go fretting
after those others,” said Susan crossly. “It’s
always the way with boys, never to be contented
with what they have got.”

© No, I don’t agree with you there,” said Miss
Cheriton, “I shall be very grieved if poor Phil
mopes himself into an illness; but I like him all
the better for being true to his old friends. If J


148 " - MATCH-BOX PHIL.

had only heard about them sooner when it was
warmer weather, I would have made an effort to
goand see Mrs. Braileyand hear more about them
from her ; as it is, when the days grow a little
longer, I shall send for her to come over, and we
may be able to trace the children by advertising
for them: But, in the mean while, I wish we
could find something to distract poor Phil and
brighten him up; I can’t think what to do for
him.”

But that morning’s post came to her help, for
it brought Miss Cheriton a letter from Mr.
Palmer, begging her to come and spend a few
days with him, to assist at a grand feast and
Christmas-tree, which he was giving to his
school-children on Twelfth Night. “And if
convenient,” wrote Mr. Palmer, “bring your
small boy with you, as Patty wants to see him
again, and you may promise him that neither
Farmer Blake nor his alarming donkey will be
amongst my guests.”

The prospect of a railway journey, though it
was not a very long one, did cheer Phil a little,
for he thought that perhaps he might hear some-
thing of Nan and Seth by the way; so that he
set off with Miss Cheriton in better spirits, and
when he arrived at Evershot and found himself
in the midst of all the preparations for the feast,
and everybody round him so happy and excited,
Phil caught some of the infection from his
surroundings, and worked away with right good-
“WHEN SHALL WE THREE MEET AGAIN?” 149

will at the easier parts of the decorations for
the schoolroom. But the monster Christmas-tree,
which was curtained off at one end of the long
schoolroom, Philip was not allowed to see.

“No, no; if you’ve never seen a Christmas-tree
in your life,” said one of the lady helpers, “ you
mustn’t see this one till it is all lighted up.”

And so Phil turned away conscientiously from
the forbidden sight, but longed for the moment
when the bell should ring which was to summon
the children to the feast.

The entertainment began with a tea, which
Phil, who was not at all hungry, thought would
never cease, such plates and plates of cake and
bread and butter were eaten, and such jugs of
tea poured out and swallowed. And he grew
tired of scanning the strange faces of the
children, in the hopes of seeing some one
amongst them who would remind him a little bit
of Nan, or perhaps turn into Nan herself.

It did seem hard, he thought, that Nan could
not have been one of those happy children.
And then as the tears rose into his eyes, Phil
chid himself for indulging in such foolish
thoughts, for was he not quite convinced in his
own mind that Nan’s blue eyes had been closed
here for ever, and that neither she nor Seth
would ever meet him again face to face in this
world P

The sound of the children singing their
grace at the end of tea broke the thread of his
150 : MATCH-BOX PHIL.

melancholy reflections, and then came a general
rush to the further end of the toom.

“We're going to get our presents now,”
whispered the excited little ones.

In another minute the curtain was drawn
aside, and the beautiful Christmas-tree shone
forth in all its glory of gleaming tapers and
glistening gifts, and the children circling round
’ broke out into their joyous carol of “ Ring the
bells, the Christmas bells.”

But Philip’s eyes were blind to the fairy-like
splendours of the tree, his ears were deaf to the
children’s singing, only before the last echo of
their carol had died away, and just as the vicar
was about to address the prize-winners, a frantic
scream of “Nan! Nan!” ran through the whole
schoolroom, and, to the astonishment of all who
stood by, Miss Cheriton’s quiet, well-dressed
little boy made one bound to the girls’ side of
the room, and flung his arms round a small
sickly looking child.

“Whoever is ¢hat poor little misery?” said
one,

“She’s a stranger here,” said another.

“She’s one of the ‘boarded out’ from the
London workhouse,” said a third, who in those
few words told much of poor Nan’s past and
present history.

Yes, that was how she came to be there.
Only a week ago Nan had been sent down from
_ the great City poorhouse, to board with a tidy
“WHEN SHALL WE THREE MEET AGAIN?” I51

old: woman, who, for the sake of giving her a
treat, had waded through the snowy lanes from
_ her home, which was on the outskirts of the
large parish, grumbling at herself all the way
for her folly in doing so, seeing that, after all,
the child didn’t seem to care greatly about it.
But now a harder heart than that old woman’s
would have been touched by the meeting
between Philip and Nan.

Little they recked of the many curious eyes
that were fastened upon them, no ears had they
for the score of questions rained down from all
quarters ; they were grasping each other’s hands,
they were looking into each other’s eyes, they
were hearing the tones of each other’s voice.

“Oh, Nan, my Nan, I thought I should never
see you again,” said Philip.

“Oh, Phil, I 2zew we'd meet. I knew God
wouldn’t forget us,” sobbed Nan.

* * * * = *

The snows of Christmas have melted long
ago, and at May Farm the meadows are growing
golden with the nodding cowslips, and the blue-
bells are carpeting the woodlands, and the
cuckoo is telling every one that summer will
soon be here,

Nan is quite at home at May Farm now, as
you would think could you see her scattering
grain to the fowls, each of which she knows by
name, or standing on tip-toe in the cool dairy
to take her first lessons in milk-skimming, or
152 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

trotting into the kitchen after her aunt to help
in various housekeeping duties.

To-day is a very grand day, for Miss Cheriton
is coming over from Lilac Cottage with the two
little gentlefolk from the Priory, who think it
doubles the fun of an expedition to start away
at five in the morning, and who want to share
Phil’s last day in England. Yes, that is the
cloud in Nan’s otherwise blue sky. Phil is
coming to bid farewell to her and Seth (for poor
Seth in his invalid chair forms part of the May
Farm household now), before starting for the
distant country, whither he has sent on such
brilliant dreams before him.

“Here they are! here they are!” cries Nan,
catching the first distant sound of the carriage
wheels, and flying down to the garden gate.

Oh, as Phil and Seth and Nan sit talking
together in the old-fashioned ivy-covered porch,
with the brilliant tulips and anemones all break-
ing into blossom around them, how far, far
away seems Flowerdew Alley and the dreary
lodging which they once called home!

Indeed, it all seems to lie so entirely outside
their present life, that Nan and Seth can hardly
believe that Philip has been there only two days
ago, and found Mrs. Styles still toiling on at the
weary match-box making, and poor Dusty Dan
still filling up his leisure moments by turning
coach-wheels on the broken pavement in -the
narrow street.
“WHEN SHALL WE THREE MEET AGAIN?” 153

“TI couldn’t somehow go away,” said Philip,
“without bidding old Mother Styles goodbye;
for though she beat me a lot, yet she did look
after me when there was no one else to do it,
and when uncle said he would come with me
and give her something for her trouble, I wasn’t
a bit afraid to go. But the old room did look
queer with both of you gone.”

“ And was she glad to see you, Phil?” asked
Nannie.

“She was glad to see uncle's money,” said
Phil, with a laugh; “but she didn’t give me a
welcome like poor old Dusty did. Oh, wasn’t
he just about glad to see me! and that was
before I gave him the knife and the sovereign.
When he got those he really did go nearly mad.
I left him standing on his head, and I expect
he’s standing there still.”

“Poor Dusty!” said Seth; “after all, he was
* the very first to help us into the country.”

“Yes, and I'll never forget it,’ said Philip ;
“and uncle says p’raps some day he'll be able to
give him a job out in the new country, for he
took a fancy to Dan’s face. But, anyway, 7
always remember I owe him a good turn, and
I won't rest till I have paid it back.”

“But, Phil,” said Nan, who loved to hear of
all his adventures now that they were happily
_ past, “you must have had a dreadful bad time
after you first ran away.”

“Same of it wasn’t nice,” answered Phil; “but
154 MATCH-BOX PHIL.

I’ve been thinking that I got off much better
than I deserved, ’cause after all it was a sneaky
thing to do, to squeeze myself in amongst the
other children and pretend I was one of them
when I wasn’t. I wouldn’t do it now, but I
didn’t see any harm in it then; only since Miss
Cheriton has taught me better, and how that we
can’t expect God to take care of us if we’re not
honest and straightforward, I’m most ashamed
to think what a trick I played on the poor old
lady who had charge of Dan’s class. I’m sorry
I did it now; but it didn’t seem a bit wrong to
me then.”

And now the dinner-bell rang, and Mrs,
Brailey came to summon her guests to the
pretty flower-decked table, which, at the children’s
special request, had been spread under the great |
walnut tree in front of the house. And a very
happy meal they had, drinking toasts at the end
in Mrs. Brailey’s home-brewed cowslip wine,
first to Philip’s success in the new world, and
then to his speedy return ; and then, just as a
third, to the general health and prosperity of all
the company,had been proposed, Hector Oswell’s
small voice was heard, suggesting that some one
ought to drink to the health of Greycoat.
“J mean,” he added, growing rather confused,
“to his health if we could find him, because, you
know, we never did find him again; but Gertrude
said he was lost that Philip might be found, so
we weren’t to mind,”
“WHEN SHALL WE THREE MEET AGAIN?” 155

Hector’s. maiden speech ‘was received with
shouts of applause, and a very generous toast
including ai the Priory rabbits concluded the
dinner.

The rest of the happy day went by all too
quickly, and the evening seemed to come terribly
soon, bringing with it the moment of saying
good-bye.

“Ah, I wonder what we'll all be like,” said
little Nan, “when we three meet again?”

“JT expect Phil will have grown into such a
grand gentleman,” said Seth, laughing, “that he
won’t care to notice us.”

“Not I,” was the answer. “I'll never be too
grand not to like the sound of ‘ Match-box Phil’
better than any other name under the sun.
Write it sometimes on the top of your letter,
Nannie, because isla Il be no one out there
who'll ever call me so.”

“Come, Philip, come,” called Miss Cheriton’s

voice from the gate, “or we shall miss the train.”
- “Good-bye, Seth; good-bye, Nan,” he said;
“and promise me you'll never forget me, how-
ever long it may be before I come back again.”
And then, though he had meant to be ever so
brave, poor Phil’s voice was lost in a loud sob.

“Don’t cry, Phil; /’m not crying,’ said Nan,
“and I’m only a girl. It’s nothing like as bad
as the last good-bye, and God took care of us
all then.”

She was standing under the drooping branches
156 MATCH-BOX PHIL,

of a laburnum tree, with the golden blossoms
falling about her head and neck; but as Philip
looked at her through a mist of tears, he seemed
to see nothing but the little ragged Nan of a
year ago, who had stood beside him in the grey of
the early morning whispering, “Good-bye, Phil,
good-bye; and promise to say ‘Our Father.’”

And, strange as it may appear, that recollec-
tion, mournful as it was, seemed to infuse new
life and courage into Phil’s drooping spirits and
to dry his tears as quickly as a sunbeam drinks
up the dew.

“Yes, yes, you're right, Nan,” he said; “God
will take care of us, if we trust Him. Good-
bye, good-bye.”

And the last glimpse Philip caught as the
carriage turned the corner of the road which led
from May Farm, was Nan waving her white
sun-bonnet, and the last echo which rang in his
ears was Nan’s voice, borne soft and clear on
the evening air, “Good-bye, good-bye, Match-
box Phil.” é

“ And say, ‘Come back again soon,” Seth had
said.

But Nan had shaken her head. “No need
to say that,’ she answered, “for I am suve he
will come as soon as he can.”

And so, my readers, am I.

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