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Satisfied

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Title:
Satisfied
Creator:
Trowbridge, Catharine M ( Catharine Maria ), b. 1818
Rainey, W ( William ), 1852-1936 ( Illustrator )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Gilbert & Rivington ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
S.W. Partridge & Co.
Manufacturer:
Gilbert and Rivington, Ld.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
7th ed.
Physical Description:
168, 20 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Satisfaction -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Young women -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Young women -- Religious life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Envy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Guardian and ward -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Inheritance and succession -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Youth and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courtship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Catherine M. Trowbridge ; with ten illustrations by W. Rainey.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026993015 ( ALEPH )
ALH9268 ( NOTIS )
248051138 ( OCLC )

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“IT OWE MUCH, VERY MUCH, To you” (g. 118).











































SATUS SIE D

BY

CATHERINE M. TROWBRIDGE

(a

f w i













































WITH TEN [ILLUSTRATIONS BY W. RAINEY

SEVENTH EDITION



LONDON
S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO., 8 & 9, PATERNOSTER Row.







LONDON:
PRINTED BY GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, Lw.,
ST. JOHN’S HOUSE, CLERKENWELL ROAD, E.G.






THIS LITTLE BOOK fy
Y WE

IS al

Dedicated ‘










TO ALL THOSE WHO, LIKE

ALICE GREY,



I~ 4 Hee
TPS ah : WAY TO BE
ie Hh Le

Ng

Ee
i
x

TRULY SATISFIED.











CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE

Tue FALLS, ' ‘ 0 5 . ' 2 P ’ » 9
CHAPTER II,

UNSATISFIED , a ’ A , . a * ’ . + 20
CHAPTER III.

An INVITATION i ' e . : , ' ’ , + 29
CHAPTER IV.

New ACQUAINTANCES , , . . . ’ ’ . » 40
CHAPTER V.

Mrs, CARROLL’S STORY. - 5 . . 2 . ’ » 52
CHAPTER VI.

Two BIBLE LEssoNs ; e 2 7 , ‘ ' ' > 62
CHAPTER VIL

A CALL UPON AUNT NANCY 5 ' . ’ ‘ , . 73

CHAPTER VIII.

CONFESSING CHRIST ; ‘ , A . : ‘ , . BE



viii Contents.

CHAPTER IX,

3 . PAGE
BENEVOLENT PLANS : . . yee : ' ‘ - gt

CHAPTER X.

Last WorpDs OF COUNSEL . . : 6 : 4 ’ + 100

CHAPTER XI,

DarK Days , . 5 6 4 ; ° . ears , 107

CHAPTER XII.

SEED BEARING FRUIT . : . . . , . ® . 114

CHAPTER XIII,

AN UNEXPECTED EXPLANATION , a i ‘ . fj » 122

CHAPTER XIV.

AN Hour IN THE SICK-ROOM x : 6 ; 4 ; - 128

CHAPTER XV,

THE HONEST Hour . . o 5 A . . ; » 138

CHAPTER XVI.

A New Patu OPENING : ; é : : 6 3 . 147

CHAPTER XVII.

WINNING SOULS. . . ° . . . . , - 156

CHAPTER XVIII.

A SURPRISE . ae , ° : . . > , . 167







S A702 Ss bol ub):

— -o-----

CHAPTER I,
THE FALLS.

It was the afternoon of a pleasant summer day. A carriage
was slowly ascending a steep hill, Within were two gentlemen
and a lady.

“Do you see that cloud?” said one of the gentlemen.

“Ves, I have been watching it,” said the other.

“Shall we have a shower before we can reach home?”
inquired the lady.

“Yes, we must make up our minds for that. Ifwe can reach
any place of shelter, we shall do well.”

“T noticed a house as we came up, with an open shed near
it,” said the gentleman who had first spoken. “If we can
reach that place, we can drive under the shed. I think it can’t
be far distant.”

“Tt is nearly a mile from here. It is the refuge I have been
proposing to reach, if possible, ever since I observed the
shower approaching.”

“Do you know the people who live there ?”

Satesfied. B



'O Visitors to the Falls.

“No, but I have no doubt its owner will be very willing that
we should take shelter there. We can’t hurry until we get up
this hill; then we will drive as fast as we-can.”

Just behind was another carriage, in which were three
young ladies. The occupants of the two carriages formed one
patty. As they wind slowly up the hill, we will improve the
opportunity to introduce them to the reader.

The gentleman who is driving in the first carriage is Mr.
Carver, whose home is about six miles distant. The gentle-
man and lady who are with him are Mr. and Mrs. Grey, friends
from the metropolis. In the second carriage, the young lady
who is driving is the daughter of Mr. Carver, and the other
two young ladies are nieces of Mr. Grey, and members of his
family.

The present excursion was planned by Mr. Carver and his
daughter for the entertainment of their guests. The place from
which they were returning was known in that vicinity by the
name of The Falls. They were modest falls, boasting of no
celebrity, yet they possessed a quiet, picturesque beauty of
their own, which the true lover of nature could not fail to
appreciate.

The clouds were now rolling up dark and heavy, but the
party soon reached the top of the hill, and hurrying on were
quickly insight of their place of refuge.

When they reached the open shed, they drew up and looked
round, to see if there was any one to bid them welcome to its
shelter. They were soon observed, and two young men left
the house and came towards them.

The taller of the two came forward, and bowing politely,
said pleasantly, “ You are just in time.”

“We shall be greatly obliged to you,” said Mr. Carver, “if
you will give us shelter until the shower is over.”

‘“‘With much pleasure,” said the young man courteously



“ What a Fine Young Man!” Il

“Permit us to assist you,” as he took charge of the horse
driven by Miss Carver, while the other assisted the ladies
to alight.

““T hope you will make yourselves quite at home here,” he
said, as he conducted the ladies to a neatly-furnished parlour.
““T must leave you for a little while, to assist the gentlemen
about the horses, and see that everything is safe through the
shower, which I think will be a hard one.”

As he left, Mrs. Grey and Miss Carver stepped out to the
portico to watch the clouds, and take a view of their surround-
ings. Mrs. Grey’s two nieces remained in the parlour, the
younger, because she felt no inclination to leave it, and the
elder, because she wished to improve the opportunity for a
few words with her cousin.

“What a fine young man!” was her first exclamation.
“ Don’t you think so?”

“Which ?”

“The taller, of course; the one who waited upon us
to the house. He is so stylish, and has such an air. Who
would have thought of finding one like him in this out-of-the-
way place! JI don’t believe he belongs here.”

‘“‘ He appears as if he were at home, more so than the other.
He offered us the hospitalities of the house as if he had a
right to.”

“Yes, I observed that. He is handsome, is he not?”

“Thardly know. Ihave but just seen him, and have thought
nothing about it.”

“JT dare say you haven’t. You are sucha mere child, it’s not
to be expected that you will notice such things,” said the elder
cousin, with an air which was an unspoken assertion of her
own undoubted claim to be a young lady, fully competent
to observe and judge of such matters.

The “mere child” did not seem at all disturbed by the

B 2



12 A Place of Shelter.

remark, Alice Grey—for this was her name—was indeed but
sixteen, and not, like some of her years, anxious to be thought
a young lady. Even had she been sensitive on this point,
she had heard similar remarks from her cousin, Mabel Osborn,
too often to take any notice of her words at this time.

Mabel was looking out of the window to see if she could
catch another glimpse of him who had won her admiration.

“T know you do admire him ; but you are such a sly puss
you pretend not to have taken any notice of him,” she said,
quite forgetting that she had just spoken of her cousin as a
mere child, too young for particular observation of those
whom she casually met. “I dare say, before we get away,
you will contrive to let him know that you are an heiress.”

Alice Grey, though so indifferent to the former remark of
her cousin, was now thoroughly aroused. Her eyes flashed,
and her whole face was suffused with the flush of indignation.

“Now, Mabel Osborn,” she said, “you know very well that
I never did such a thing, and would scorn to do it.”

There was not time for another word, for at this moment
Mrs. Grey and Miss Carver returned to the parlour, and ©
immediately after the young gentlemen entered, and also the
lady of the house, who kindly greeted her guests, and expressed
her pleasure that they could give them shelter through the
shower. Soon after the gentleman of the house also came in,
and the party seated themselves to await the end of the
shower.

Alice sat by a window apart from the rest, feeling no inclina-
tion to participate in the conversation, It was not bashful--
ness, for though young and modest, she had been too much
accustomed to society to feel either awkward or uncomfortable
in the presence of strangers. Besides, she had a natural con-
_ versational talent, which made it easy for her to converse with
those much older than herself. She had been greatly vexed



. Alice observes the Company. 13

by the last remark of her cousin, and had not recovered from
this vexation. It led her to feel disinclined for conversation
with any one, and particularly disposed to keep as far aloof as
possible from.the young man of whom her cousin had spoken
in such glowing terms. She was resolved to let Mabel know
that she did not care even to speak with him. Fora time
she was occupied with her own thoughts. Though not pleasant
ones, they were not altogether unfamiliar, for-many times had

similar thoughts and feelings been awakened in a manner not
very unlike the present.

After a while she began to be more observant of those
around her, and amused herself by watching the young
gentleman who was talking with Miss Carver and her cousin,
and trying to make up her own mind about him, simply as a
means of diversion for the hour.

Next her observations extended to the other young man,
who had been quite overlooked by her cousin. She had not
observed him long before she began to feel an increasing
interest in watching his movements. There was something
about him which interested her, though she hardly knew why.

“He may not be what Mabel calls stylish,” she said to her-
self, ‘but I am sure he is a gentleman.”

During these somewhat protracted observations Alice had
not encountered even a glance from the object of them, from
which she inferred that he was quite regardless of her presence.
But she was mistaken. His. observations had been quietly
made before hers commenced, while she was yet absorbed in
her own thoughts.

His attention was first attracted by the circumstance that
she was sitting quite apart from the rest of the party, and he
observed her more closely to see if he could discover the
cause. He soon made up his mind that it was not bashfulness,
for her whole appearance indicated want of interest rather than



14 “ Would you like to look at it ?”

want of courage. The study of faces, especially new ones,
had become a habit with him. He liked to see how much he
could discover in this way, and whether after-acquaintance
confirmed the conclusions thus formed.

He had ample time to study the face of Alice unobserved,
while she sat busy with her own thoughts. The first impres-
sion was certainly not altogether pleasing. The vexation
faintly shadowed there gave to the countenance an expression
which perhaps might be best interpreted by the word dissatis-
fied. ‘The young man could not make up his mind whetner
this was habitual or only transient. The face, on the whole,
puzzled him, and for that reason he studied it with the more
interest. He determined to improve the first opportunity to
approach her. While awaiting the favourable moment, he gave
his attention to the conversation of those around him, taking
part in it as occasion offered; and thus it was that Alice had
the opportunity to observe him, quite undisturbed.

At length there was a movement in the little party. The
elder gentleman stepped to the portico to observe the clouds.
Miss Carver's attention was attracted by a shell unlike any she
had seen before. The young man with whom she was con-
versing immediately arose, and taking it from the shelf handed it
to her for a closer examination. After that, it was passed round
to the other ladies ; and when they had examined and admired
it, the young man, who had been watching his opportunity to
approach Alice, took the shell to her, and said, “Would you
like to look at it?”

She thanked him, and after inspecting it, simply said, “It is
very curious.”

After replacing it on the mantelshelf, he drew a chair
to her side and sat down, commencing a conversation with
the very commonplace inquiry, “How did you like the
Falls?”



The Talk about the Falls. 15

Alice’s face brightened, and the air of indifference imme-
diately vanished.

“IT think they are very pretty,” she said, but immediately
added with a blush, “ Perhaps you will think that term inappro-
priate ; but they have nothing of the grandeur of Niagara or
even Trenton, for I have visited America.”

“Certainly not; they are very modest and unpretending.”

“Vet there is a quiet beauty about them,” said Alice. “In
some places the water bubbles softly over the rocks ; and where
it dashes down in cataract style, it is only a modest miniature
representation of its more pretending sisters.”

The young man smiled. The description of what the young
girl had seen and enjoyed was so correct, and given so simply
and artlessly, that he found himself interested, and much
inclined to draw her out still farther.

“T am glad you were so much pleased,” he said. “I have
taken great pleasure in visiting them. I have extended my
walk thus far every day during the week I have spent here.”

“JT was right in my impression that he does not belong
here,” thought Alice.

“TI suppose you saw them to-day for the first time?” he
continued.

‘«€ Ves, the first and the last, I presume. I never was in the
neighbourhood before, but I am glad that I could be here
this once.”

“You have reason to be. You have one more scene of
beauty to hang up in the picture-gallery of your memory.”

“T think all its surroundings are pleasant,” said Alice. “It
is such a lovely quiet nook. It makes one think of everything
that is calm and peaceful.”

Alice spoke with her usual freedom, for the enthusiasm of
her nature had been awakened by the enjoyments of the day,
and every vexation was now forgotten.



16 “ Are you Satisfied 2”

“T hope it will have a tranquillizing influence every time you
think of it,” said the young man with a smile.

“J should think it might exert such an influence, to have
one’s home amid some such surroundings. I thought, when J
was there to-day, it would be a nice place for a hermit, such as
T have read about.”

“Yet you would not desire a hermitage there,” said the
young man with a smile, adding, “ Doubtless you find many
bright and beautiful things in such a life as yours ?”

“That is true, yet I am not always satisfied, not even with
the bright and beautiful things.”

“ Would the hermitage satisfy you any better?”

“T presume not. I don’t suppose there is any such thing
as being satisfied in this world.” .

“ There is such a thing.”

“JT do not know any people who are so. All I know are
much dissatisfied sometimes, and some of them are, I think, a
little so all the time.”

“Very likely. Still there is such a thing as being satisfied,”
said the young, man, with a smile that went far to prove the
truth of his assertion.

Alice looked up just in time to catch the smile, and for a
moment her eyes rested upon the face. There was something
in its expression which led her without premeditation to ask,

“ Are you satisfied P” :

“Yes, I think so,” was the answer, so calmly spoken that
Alice felt an intuitive conviction of its truthfulness.

“What ! satisfied with yourself and all around you?”
. “No, not with either.”

“Then what are you satisfied with?”

“With that which is within.”

“What is the difference between being satisfied with your-
self and satisfied with that which is within?” inquired Alice,







ll:
a

Da

i

i it
ie































































































































‘fe TOOK OUT A MEMORANDUM BOOK AND WROTE”? (f. Ig).







The Bible Reference. 19

whose deep interest in the subject led her to put questions
which might have seemed bold, but for the unaffected modesty
with which they were asked.

“There is a great difference, but I have not time now to
explain it, and perhaps you would not care to look at the
question as I do, in the light of the Bible, though you
doubtless believe the Bible.”

“Of course I do,” Alice answered, somewhat lightly.

“T am very glad to hear you say that.”

Tt was not the words, but the tone which conveyed to
the mind of Alice the shadow of a reproof, as if he thought
believing the Bible a very weighty matter.

He took out a memorandum-book and wrote on a scrap of
paper :—‘ Luke xvii. 21.” Handing it to Alice, he said,—

“Will you find this passage in your Bible when you return
home, and see if you can make out any connexion between it
and the subject we have been talking about ?”

“Will it help me to understand what you have been saying?”
Alice asked.

“Tt will, if you get its true meaning.”

“What if I don’t understand it?”

“ Ask God to teach you what it means. That is what we all
must do if we would receive aright His message to us.”

There was time for no further conversation, for the rain was
over, and the little party were preparing to leave their hospi-
table refuge. Sincere thanks were returned for the shelter,
and all felt that they had spent a pleasant hour.







CHAPTER IL

UNSATISFIED,

MaseEL Osporn and Alice Grey were both orphans, and both
wards of their uncle, Mr. Grey. Mabel had been left an
orphan very young. She was but an infant when her mother
died. Two years later her father died also, so that she could
remember no other love, care, and guardianship than that of
Qer uncle and aunt.

For only one year had Alice Grey been an inmate of her
present home. Her mother had lived until she was six years
of age, so that she had some enduring recollections of maternal
love and tenderness—memories which sometimes seemed very
real, and at others dim and shadowy.

When Alice was twelve her father died also, leaving her
to the guardianship of his only brother, Mr. Lewis Grey, a
city merchant.

Alice was a girl of more than ordinary abilities. She had
a warm, affectionate nature, with a touch of enthusiasm.
She was one who could love devotedly and unselfishly. She
was not only affectionate, but sensitive also, even to a fault.
She could not find herself blamed, or even misunderstood,
without being rendered unhappy.

Unlike Mabel, she knew by experience the meaning of
parental love, and sorely missed the affection she had known



The Coustus. 21

for so brief a space. Her uncle and aunt were kind to her.
She had found in them all she had allowed herself to expect,
perhaps more ; but they were not her parents, and she realized
what it was to be an orphan without even fraternal ties, for she
had been an only child.

The remark was sometimes made to her that Mabel, dwell-
ing under the same roof, and herself an orphan, must be to
her like an own sister. But things are often quite unlike what
they are supposed to be by those not behind the scenes.’ Her
cousin was not to her at all like a sister. In fact, she was
the cause of no small portion of the trials of her present
situation.

Mabel Osborn was three years older than her cousin. She
had therefore reached the age of eighteen when the orphaned
Alice came to share the home which had been hers so long.
Could Mabel have opened her heart to receive her cousin with
a warm and generous affection, this event might have contri-
buted much to her happiness, and the two might have lived
together in‘a sisterly affection which would have proved a rich
blessing to both.

Mabel had inherited from her father a modest competence,
sufficient for the supply of every real need, and with it she
had been satisfied up to the time of the entrance of Alice into
the family. But Mabel was worldly and ambitious, and needed
only an exciting cause to become envious also; and this was
furnished when her cousin Alice became the ward of her Uncle
Grey.

The father of Alice was much more wealthy than Mabel’s
father had been, and when she, not unfrequently, heard her
cousin spoken of as the young heiress and the rich ward of
her Uncle Grey, envy awoke in her heart, and it was not long
before something very much like hatred began to manifest its
presence there.



22 The Return Home.

It must not be supposed that all this was open and undis-
guised even to Mabel herself, She would have considered
herself very much aggrieved had she been told that she often
envied and sometimes hated her cousin. Deep in her heart
these emotions were hidden, and only on rare occasions were
they perceptible in word or deed.

Alice Grey would gladiy have given her cousin the place of
an elder sister in her heart, but she was not long in discover-
ing that there was a barrier between her and Mabel.

Alice grieved over this in secret, and when Mabel was posi-
tively unkind, as she sometimes was, she was ready to think
that, at least for the present, the wealth which would one day
be hers brought more of unhappiness than of pleasure, and
almost to wish that she were poor, for she thought Mabel
would then be kinder to her. She could not see why her
cousin should feel so.

“I do not believe I should if I were in her place and she
in mine,” she thought. ‘“ Love is better than money, oh, so
much better! If I only had some one to love me, as I want
to be loved, as I know my mother loved me!”

After such thoughts Alice’s aching heart would try to relieve
itself in tears.

The day after the visit to the Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Grey,
with their two nieces, returned to their home in the city. The
next two or three days happened to be very busy ones with
Alice, and the little slip of paper, given to her by the young
man at the cottage, was not once withdrawn from the pocket-
book to which she had consigned it.

Alice had not been too busy to recall, many times, her visit
to the rural spot which had charmed her so much, and also
the hours spent in the cottage, and the conversation which
had so greatly interested her. She had felt a momentary
curiosity to know what the passage referred to could have to



A Day of Trial, 23

do with the subject of which she and the young gentleman
had been speaking. The fact that it was a Bible reference,
it must be owned, abated her desire to know what it was, for
Alice Grey had not learned to love that Book, so dear to the
‘heart of every true Christian.

Her uncle and aunt Grey were worldly people, paying out-
ward respect to the ordinances of religion, while strangers to
its life and power in thesoul. Mrs. Grey was coldly indifferent,
and Mr. Grey secretly sceptical, allowing his mind, in those
brief intervals when he had time to think at all, to entertain
doubts of the truth and reality of much to which he had given
outwardly respectful attention.

The mother of Alice had been an earnest Christian, and
her orphan child retained more or less distinct recollections
of her teachings concerning the great themes of religion—
memories which at times stirred within her soul thoughts and
longings not in unison with the wonted tenor of her life.
Her father, too, was a Christian, but his was one of those
reticent natures which are generally silent about the things
most sacredly cherished in the heart’s depths.

One evening early in the following week, Alice fled to her
room much earlier than her wonted hour for retiring. It had
been a day of unusual vexations. . Mabel had annoyed her
more than once, and to this not uncommon occurrence had
been also added other trials. It is the last straw that breaks
the camel’s back; so with Alice, it was the last grievance
which proved too much for her self-control, though she cer-
tainly would not have compared it to a straw, for its pressure
upon her spirits was no light one.

She was now alone in her chamber, in tears. Could she
have carried all her troubles to the feet of Jesus, and left
them there, with a humble and sincere prayer for His blessing,
not only for herself, but for all who had that day caused her



24 Lucy Stevens's News.

grief, His peace would have descended as dew upon the
tender herb, and her soul would have been at rest.

That afternoon Alice had received a call from Lucy
Stevens, a schoolmate of the previous winter. Her visitor
was taken up to her room, that they might have a school-girl
chat together.

After a little time Lucy said, “I’ve half a mind to tell you
some of the things I heard this afternoon.”

“Why half a mind? Why not a whole one?” said Alice.

“To tell the truth, I overheard these things, and some
might not think it quite fair.”

“ How was that?”

“Our teacher, Miss Grafton, called to see mamma. She is
a friend of mamma’s, you know. I was in the back parlour,
but they didn’t know it. At first I never thought of any harm
in being there, as I didn’t suppose anything would be said
they wouldn’t like to have me hear. After a while they began
to talk about our school, and Miss Grafton spoke much more
freely of some of the pupils than she would have done if she
had known that she had a listener.”

‘* And you sat and heard it all?”

“Why, yes. What else could I do? Besides, I own I
was curious to know what Miss Grafton would say. Would
you not have stayed, if you had been in my place?”

“Not without letting them know that I was there.”

Lucy flushed. “I dare say you would,” she answered, a
little tartly. “You have as much curiosity as any of us.”

“Perhaps I might, if I had been caught as you were,” said
Alice, not wishing to offend her visitor. “Whom did they
talk about ?” she asked, after a little pause.

“Ah, you would like to know,” said Lucy, caumvenantly
“The partaker is as bad as the thief. It seems that you are
auite willing to have a share of this stolen information.”



Miss Grafton’s Opinion of Alice, 25

“T own you have excited my curiosity, and I don’t think
there would be any great harm done if you should gratify it.”

“Mamma began it,” she said, “by making inquiries about
one of the girls ; and then they went on to speak of others.”

“They say listeners usually hear no good of themselves.
Was that the case with you?” inquired Alice, archly.

“I heard no ill; but probably this was owing to the fact
that my.mamma was a listener also,” replied Lucy, laughing,

“Did Miss Grafton say anything about me?”

“Yes, indeed, she had a good deal to say about you. In
fact, you were the young lady about whom mamma inquired.”

“What did she say?” asked Alice, somewhat eagerly.

“Perhaps I had better not tell you. I don’t think Miss
Grafton would like it, if she knew that I overheard it, and
then repeated it to you.”

“Now you have told me so much, you ought to tell me
the rest,” Alice urged. ‘It will not be fair if you don’t.”

“There’s something in that, to be sure; yet, after all, I
think I had better not tell you. If I should, you will very
likely be offended with Miss Grafton.

“Then she must have said something bad about me.”

“And something good also. Wouldn’t I be proud if she
had said anything half as complimentary about me! I will
tell you that part, now I have gone so far. She said that you
possessed more than ordinary abilities, that you had a decided
talent for music, and the ability to excel in many things. Are
you not satisfied with that?”

“But that’s not all. You must tell me the rest. I don’t
want to hear only half the story.”

“Then I suppose I must. She said that, notwithstanding
you had fine abilities, she doubted if you would ever really
excel, for though you took care to maintain a respectable posi-
tion in your classes, which you could easily do without much

Satisyied. Cc



26 Alice's Keen Anguish,

exertion, you were too much disinclined to close application to
put forth the effort necessary to the thorough acquisition of
any branch of study. She said that you needed some motive
sufficient to stimulate you to greater exertions. If you were
a poor girl, seeking to fit yourself for a teacher, or if your
heart and life were ruled by the higher motive of making the
best improvement of every talent given, she had no doubt
that you would soon become a fine scholar and an excellent
musician. I believe I have given you her very words.”

Lucy Stevens had been so intent upon giving her eager
listener an accurate report of what she had overheard, that
she had not noticed its éffect upon her companion; but now,
observing her more closely, she saw that her face was flushed,
and that tears just ready to drop stood in her eyes.

“Pshaw, Alice,” she said, “don’t take it in that way. I
should be delighted if she had said half as much in my favour
—‘uncommon abilities,’ and so on; and as to the last part,
it’s just like Miss Grafton. She’s always harping upon that
string, talking to us about our responsibility for the improve-
ment of the talents we have received. I would take the sweet
and let the bitter go.”

Alice did not follow this advice, but rather its opposite,
for she took the bitter right home to her heart. The bitter
is ofttimes more wholesome than the sweet, and though, per-
haps, Alice that night got no good from it, yet in after-months
and under more favourable circumstances the recollection of
it proved in no small degree salutary.

She felt most keenly these remarks, as reported to her by
Lucy; so keenly that all the previous vexations of the day
were well-nigh forgotten. She had fancied herself standing
much higher than this in the estimation of her teachers, and
it hurt her pride to be told that they regarded her as one
who was falling below the attainments she ought to make,



The Text referred to. 27

because unwilling to put forth the necessary exertions. She
also felt the allusion to the enervating influence of her ex-
pectations of future wealth, and all the more, because this
time it did not come from her cousin, but her teacher, and
could not spring from envy or dislike. Thus coming, it
forced her to admit that there must be in it more or less of
truth. ‘How vexatious!” she mentally exclaimed. “TI be-
lieve I am out of sorts with every one to-night. I am vexed
with Mabel for what she said to me in the morning, with
Miss Grafton for the remarks she made about me to Mrs.
Stevens, and with Lucy for overhearing and repeating these
remarks, But after all, I believe I am most vexed with my-
self. What business had I to listen to what Miss Grafton
said? And the worst of it is, that I am afraid there is some
truth in it. Is it not miserable to be so dissatisfied with
everything, even with one’s self?”

Dissatisfied. ‘The word recalled to her mind the interview
with the young man at the cottage, and what he had said
about being satisfied, and the Bible reference he had given
her, which she had not yet examined.

She opened her pocket-book and took out the slip of
paper, and then, opening her neglected Bible, she found the
passage and read, “ The kingdom of God is within you.”
Three times she read it slowly and thoughtfully.

. “Tam sure I do not understand it,” she thought.

The book she held in her hand was a reference Bible, and
she turned to the passages referred to, hoping they might
help to make it plainer. The first to which she turned was
this: “For the kingdom of God is not meat and drink; but
righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost.” “Joy
and peace,” she repeated, and something like a gleam of
light entered her mind with these words. “I think one
might be satisfied, who had joy and peace within. JI wonder

€ 3



28 Wearied and Heartsore.

if this is what that young man meant. How can the king.
dom of God be within one? I never found anything within
myself but myself”

Then she turned to the next reference and read, “To
whom God would make known what is the riches of the
glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ
in you, the hope of glory.” “Christ in you,” she repeated.
“This is called a mystery. How can I understand. it ?”

These thoughts recalled to her mind the reply of the young
man when she said:to him, “What if I do not understand
it?” Each word of that reply she now distinctly remembered :
“Ask God to teach you what it means. That is what we
all must do if we would receive aright His message to us.’

She mused on the words. Had God taught this young
man what seemed so plain to him, but was so dark to her?
Would He teach her if she asked Him? She tried to pray,
but of the prayer that asks and receives she as yet knew
nothing. There was no faith in that cry for help. She was
not able to realize the presence, or the love and mercy of
the Being she addressed. Yet around and within, though
she knew it not, was the ever-present Spirit, Even that
sense of need, of ignorance or darkness, was the call of His,
voice within her soul, arousing it from its sleep of death, and
guiding these first gropings after Himself.

Wearied and heartsore, Alice retired for the night, and
the occurrences of the succeeding day banished from her
mind both sad and serious thoughts. Yet questionings had
been stirred within her heart, which would not long be laid at
rest.







CHAPTER III,

AN INVITATION.

A Few days later, Mr. Grey came into the room where his
wife and elder niece were, holding in his hand an open
letter.

“Where is Alice?” he inquired.

“In her room, I believe,” said Mabel. “ Why do you
ask ?”

“T have here a letter from Maysville, from her Aunt Ward,
and within is one for Alice. Alice’s aunt wishes her to spend
some weeks with her this summer. What do you think of
the plan, wife? I am glad to have an opportunity to talk
the matter over with you before Alice knows of the invitation,”
he added.

“What do you think of it?” said Mrs. Grey, who usually
preferred ascertaining her husband’s opinion to giving her
own.

“T hardly know what to think of her going, just at this
time. Of course it will be best for her to visit her aunt some
- time, as Mrs. Ward is her mother’s only sister. But she
cannot go now unless she gives up going with us to the
seaside, and I hardly think she will wish to do that.”

.Mabel’s face brightened at this suggestion.
“T think this visit to Maysville will be just the thing,” she



30 The Letter for Alice.

said, with animation. “ Alice would be much better off with
her aunt, I’m sure.”

Her uncle looked at her keenly, and there was displeasure
in his tone as he replied,—

“The idea of going to the seaside without your cousin
seems to afford you satisfaction.”

Mabel blushed and looked not a little disconcerted. She
had been careful how she treated Alice in the presence of
her uncle, and she was chagrined to find that she had now
been so incautious, and revealed to him her envy and jealousy. -
Had her judgment been clear, she would have seen how
absurd it was to fear a rival in the modest, simple-hearted
girl of sixteen. But envy and jealousy are not clear-sighted,
and do not aid those influenced by them to see things as they
really are.

Though Mabel was disconcerted by her uncle’s words, she
quickly rallied, and said, “I don’t wish Alice not to go. I
thought she might like best to visit her aunt.”

This declaration did not deceive Mr. Grey, and the sus-
picion which had before arisen in his mind, that Mabel did
not feel towards her cousin altogether as she should, gathered
strength from this little circumstance.

“6 Alice shall herself decide the question,” he said. ‘‘If she
chooses to go to the seaside, it will give me pleasure to have
her with us; and I hope, Mabel, you will be more discreet
about showing what your own preference is than you have
been this morning.”

In a few minutes Alice entered the room.

“ Here is a letter for you,” said her uncle.

“ For me!”

“Yes, from Maysville ; from your Aunt Mary.”

“What do you think about it?” said her uncle, after Alice
had read the letter.



Alice’s Aunt Mary. 31

“About what?” said Alice, looking up.

“Your aunt’s invitation to visit her.”

“Then you know about that,” she said.

“Yes ; your aunt wrote me a few lines, expressing her wish
to receive a visit from you, Doubtless you will want to go
some time, but the question is will you want to go now, or will
you prefer to go to the seaside with us, and visit your aunt at
another time ?”

“I don’t know,” said Alice, thoughtfully.

“You can take time to think of it, and decide what you
will do. I want you to spend this vacation in the way that
will give you the most pleasure. If you prefer to go with us,
do so by all means, and I will make arrangements for you to
visit your aunt at some other time. But if you choose to go
now, you shall do as you wish.”

“Thank you, uncle, you are very kind;” and then, after a
pause, “I wish I knew more about my aunt.”

“You will after you have made this visit,” said her uncle,
smiling.

“T wonder if she is at all like my own dear mother!”

“‘T have seen very little of her. My impression is, that she
# quite different from your mother. She is called a nice
woman, and a very clever one. She has written to you before,
has she not?”

“Only once, after my father’s death. I wonder she
has not written more, when my mother was her only
sister.”

“I presume she is one of the many who are not much in
the habit of writing. She has been a hard-working farmer’s
wife, which, no doubt, is one reason why your Uncle Ward has
been so prosperous as a farmer. I-have been told that he has
left his farm and built him a very pretty house in the village
of Maysville, and furnished it nicely. I presume it is a



32 Maysville decided on.

pleasant home, and that you will enjoy a visit there sometime,
if you don’t go now.”

Alice at once took the subject into consideration. She was
no stranger to the watering-place the Greys were about to
visit, for she had been there several times with her father.
There was not, therefore, the charm of novelty in this pro-
posed trip. For her, there would be more of novelty in a few
weeks’ sojourn in a quiet country village, for it would be
unlike the surroundings of her past life. But it was not this
consideration which turned the scale in favour of a visit to
her relatives in Maysville.

“She is my mother’s sister,” she said to herself. “They
once were children together. How they must have loved
each other in those days! for I am sure, if I had a sister, I
should love her very much. I think Aunt Mary will love me
for my mother’s sake. She wants me to come and see her,
and I want to go; indeed I do.” And thus taking counsel of
her heart, she decided in favour of Maysville.

“T think I would like to go and see my aunt,” Alice said to
her uncle the next day. “If you and aunt were going there,
I should like it a great deal better than to go to the seaside.”

“Tf you really wish to go you shall not go alone,” said her
uncle, “J will go with you myself, and remain a day or two,
till you get acquainted with your relatives, so as not to feel
like a stranger. Will that do?”

“Vou are very kind, uncle. If you will go with me, I shall
be glad indeed to go.” ,

“Then it is all settled. I think you will have to go early
next week if I go with you, so that I can get back in time for
this seaside trip. You had better write at once to your aunt,
unless you prefer that I should write for you.”’

“JT would much prefer it, for they seem so like strangers.
When I have once been there it will be very different.”



U; uncle Wards Home. S9

“Very weil. It shall be as you desire, and I hope that you
will enjoy your visit so much that you will have no cause to
regret your decision. By the way,” he added, turning to
his wife, “has this young lady all she needs for her visit to
Maysville?”

“TY hardly know,” said Mrs. Grey, “but Iam inclined to
think that she is not as well prepared for Maysville as for the
seaside. Judging from what I saw during our late visit to the
country, I presume she will not be satisfied until she has ex-
plored every nook within walking distance. I don’t think she
has any dresses quite suitable for that purpose, but there is
hardly time to supply the deficiency.”

“Tf she has one dress suitable for such expeditions, it will
be all she will need during the few weeks she will remain
there,” said Mr. Grey. “Just purchase the material for such
a dress, and let her take it with her. I daresay she will find
some one in Maysville who can fit and make a dress of that
kind as well as it would be done here.”

“That will do very well, I think,” said Mrs. Grey. “TI will
purchase the goods the first time I go out, and Alice must get
the dress made as soon as she can.”

Early in the following week Mr. Grey and Alice took the
train for Maysville, which they reached in about four hours.
It was a pleasant secluded village, abundant shade-trees giving
it a cool, inviting appearance in the warm days of summer.
One of the neatest and freshest of its dwellings was the
residence of her Uncle Ward; and Alice thought, as she
approached it for the first time, that it looked very nice, quiet,
and inviting, at least for one who loved quiet. Alice herself
liked it pretty well, for a girl of her age, though she was some-
what apprehensive that she might here get too much of it.

The house was pleasantly situated on an elevation, com-
manding a fine view of groves and meadows, and a village



34 Departure of Uncle Grey.

beyond these about three miles distant. Alice was quite
charmed with this view, and thought she should not soon tire
of looking at it. It was only from the front of the house
that it could be seen. There were but two rooms in front—
the parlour and the guest-chamber above it. The other rooms
were so situated as to afford no view of anything but the

_ immediate neighbourhood.

Mr. Grey had promised to spend one day with Alice in
Maysville, so she had no fear that the next day would bring
home-sickness for her. It was very pleasant, and was spent
in walks, drives, and social intercourse, which Alice enjoyed
very much, for Mr. and Mrs. Ward spared no pains to enter-
tain Mr. Grey while he was with them. Alice knew that the
time of trial for her would be when her uncle should take his
leave.

The next morning she was called to a breakfast prepared
at an early hour for the accommodation of her uncle, who
wished to take the first train to his home. She was conscious
of a choking sensation in the throat when he bade her good-
bye, but she tried to be brave and not let her uncle and aunt
perceive how she felt.

She soon, however, found that the only way to keep her
secret was to make a hasty retreat to her own room till she
had gained a surer command of her feelings. After half an
hour spent in earnest, determined effort to put aside uncom-
fortable thoughts and feelings, she was so far successful that
she began to plan for spending the morning in the most agree-
able way she could think of.

Her Uncle Grey had advised her to take with her a good
supply of reading, as she might not find what she wanted in
Maysville ; and with his usual thoughtfulness, he had himself
seen that she was prov:ued with as many books and magazines
as it was convenient for her to carry. ‘These she had not yet



Alice's Plans upset. 35

taken from her trunk, but she now resolved to select the most
interesting she could find as the best diversion she could at
that time command.

Having made her choice, she descended to the parlour,
hoping she might enjoy the next hour or two, seated by one
of its pleasant windows, dividing her attention between the
book and the beautiful view she so much admired. The door
was closed. Pushing it gently open, she was not a little sur-
prised at the change which had taken place since she left the
room a little more than half an hour before. Every blind was
tightly closed and the curtains dropped. Every article which
had been in the least disturbed by the recent occupancy of the
room had been carefully restored to the place intended for it,
and seemed to say, “Who. dare touch me now?”

Alice ‘looked around quite disconcerted by the unex-
pected change. The room which had seemed so airy,
cheerful, and home-like, one hour before, now looked gloomy
enough.

Her first thought was that she would open a blind, draw a>
comfortable easy-chair near a window, and have a long read
of her book. But on second thoughts she decided this would
not answer. It was evident that her aunt had occupied the
first halfhour after the departure of her recent guest in
arranging everything as she now found it, and Alice reasoned
that she would not have left all the other work of the morning
to do this if she had not wished things to remain as she left
them. She would at least make no alteration without con-
sulting her aunt. Leaving the book on the parlour-table, she
went in search of her aunt, and found her busy with her
domestic cares.

“T see the parlour is all shut up, auntie,” she said.

Something in the manner of Alice led Mrs. Ward to suspect
that she was not pleased with this arrangement.



36 The Company Parlour.

“Of course it is,” she said; ‘I didn’t suppose you would
wish me to treat you as a stranger.”

“ Certainly not, auntie,” said Alice.

‘So I thought. You are to make us a long visit, and be
ani one of the family.”

“Yes, aunt; but don’t you ever open that pleasant room
except when strangers are here 2?”

“T never open it unless I have company. What would be
the use?”

“It’s so pleasant, I should think you would wish to enjoy
it yourself.”

“Ido enjoy having such a room for my company when
they come. Your uncle and I have worked hard enough to get
it to enjoy it. There’s not a pleasanter parlour in Maysville.”

With Alice, the feeling of personal annoyance was now
exchanged for one of curiosity to know how her aunt managed
these things; so she next inquired, “Do you have company
very often?”

“Often? No, indeed! at least not any one I think of
opening that room for. When folks come in a neighbourly
way, I never think of making such strangers of them. The
other rooms are quite good enough for all that sort of thing,
When I have a party, or when strangers like your Uncle Grey
come here, then of course I use the room, and am glad
enough I have it to use.”

“And how often do you have occasion to use it?” inquired
Alice.

“ Perhaps some half a dozen times a year.”

“Why, aunt,” said Alice, “you can’t mean that you don’t
use that pleasant room more than six times a year!’””

“JT do mean it. When people have worked as hard as
your uncle and I to get nice things, they know how to take
care of them.”



By the Hall Window, 37

Alice could not help thinking that they did not know how
to enjoy them; but she kept these thoughts to herself, fearing
she had already said too much on the subject.

Seeing that her aunt was very busy, she left the room.
Returning to the parlour for her book, she began to think
what disposition she should make of herself and of that for
the next hour or two. She concluded that she would go up
to the room her uncle had occupied, for as that was over the
parlour, she thought it must be very pleasant. She found the
door of this room closed, but opened it and looked in. The
room wore that peculiar air of desolation which is the usual
aspect of a guest-chamber after it has been deserted by one
guest and has not yet been prepared for the reception of another.

Alice hastily closed the door. She could not go there. It
would make her home-sick at once, and she was near enough
to that now. She would go to her own room, and if nothing
pleasant could be seen from its one window, it would make
little difference while she was engaged with her book. But
as she turned, she noticed the large hall window near which
she was standing. As it was a west window, it was very cool
and pleasant during the morning hour. She stepped up to it
and looked out.

“Ah, this is pleasant!” she exclaimed. “How absurd it
is,” she thought, “to do as Aunt Mary does. The house is
so situated that only the front is pleasant, yet all this part is
shut up—as gloomy as a prison, and of no use to any one
except on rare occasions. It is a strange way of enjoying
what one has worked hard to obtain. Iam glad there is one
little nook that I can enjoy. It shall be my reading-room
and boudoir, and I will make the most of it, for it is really
very pleasant, the pleasantest window in the house. I will
take away this stiff, hard chair, and bring the easy-chair from
my room to put in its place.”



38 A Model Housekeeper.

This arrangement was quickly made, and Alice seated her-
self, book in hand, with a more satisfied feeling than she had
known since her uncle left. The possession of this little nook
seemed to give her a comfortable home-feeling. It had been
chosen as a nice place to read, and yet she made little progress
in this, for she was more in the mood for thinking than for
reading. Her uncle and aunt came in for a large share of
these thoughts, and she tried to analyze the impression they
had made upon her during this brief acquaintance.”+ Her
uncle did not puzzle her much. She thought she understood
him, and liked him, too, not a little. He was social and kind,
a little blunt, perhaps, but with a playful, unexpected way of
saying things, that continually amused her.

When she thought of her aunt, her mind was in more con-
fusion. There was the disappointment she felt at finding her
so dissimilar to the recollections she had of her own dear
mother. Her Uncle Grey had in part prepared her for this;
still she had hoped to find more traces of resemblance. Her
aunt had received her kindly. She believed that she wished
her visit to be a pleasant one, and that she loved her for her
mother’s sake as much as it was in her nature to do; and’ yet
she felt disappointed in her aunt, without being able to tell
exactly why.

Mrs. Ward was what is called a model housekeeper.
Under her vigorous reign neither dirt nor disorder was
tolerated. A well-kept house is a great blessing, and the
trouble was not that Mrs. Ward was a thorough house-
keeper, but that she was so little besides. The heart that
might have blessed other hearts by its warm love and tender
sympathies, had been narrowed and dwarfed by a too exclusive
and selfish devotion to domestic duties.

Something of this Alice saw and felt, without being able to
define it.



Alice’s Determination. 39

The fit of musing into which she had fallen was at length
interrupted by the sound of her uncle’s voice downstairs.
As she was not inclined for reading, she determined to 20
down, feeling sure that he would have something cheerful to
say.







CHAPTER IV.

NEW ACQUAINTANCES.

Mr Warp was leaving the kitchen just as Alice entered,
but he suddenly turned back when he heard her step.

“‘ Where are you going this morning, uncle?” she said.

“Up to the farm,” he replied.

“Can’t I go with you? I should like it very much.”

“T don’t know about it. I shall have to get out the
carriage when I take. such a fine city lady as you to ride
with me, and this morning I am going in the old farm-
waggon, to get some early potatoes and one or two things
besides.”

“JT don’t mind going in the waggon. I think I should
like it better than the carriage. It would be more of a
novelty.”

“J dare say it would to you,” said her uncle, laughing.
“ Well, I will take you if you will go and put on a decent
dress.”

Alice looked down upon the light, delicate robe she called
her morning wrapper, and said in some surprise— Why,
uncle, what do you call a decent dress?”

“One suitable for the occasion on which it is worn is what
' Tcall a decent dress. That’s my notion of things, though it
may bea very old-fashioned one. Now that flimsy thing,











































**T DON’T MIND GOING IN THE WAGGON.”

Satiofen.







The New Dress. 43

though I can’t deny that it’s very becoming, isn’t suitable for a
ride in the old farm-waggon, and for a good ramble about the
old place when we get there.”

“But really, uncle, I have nothing more suitable. Aunt
Grey said I was not quite prepared to come out here, for she
knew I should want to explore every nook, and I had no dress
quite suitable for that kind of business. She purchased the
material for one, but that was all she had time to do. She
thought I might get some one here to make it.”

“Tf that is so, I would advise you to go about it this very
morning.”

“Let me go with you this morning, and wear the dress I
have on.”

“IT shall do no such thing,” said her uncle, in that good-
humoured, droll way of his, which enabled him to say almost
anything he chose without giving offence. “ ‘ Business before
pleasure’ is my motto. The first thing for you to do is take
that piece of goods up to Mrs. Carroll, and tell her that you
want a dress made as soon as possible. If you help her, I
dare say it can be finished in a day or two.”

“Why, uncle, I never put a stitch in a dress in my life.”

“TI should say it’s time you did, then. I believe in girls’
learning how to work, even if they do have lots of money. It
makes them feel comfortable and independent all through life,
let their circumstances be what they may. Money may be
lost, but if one is trained to be equal to any emergency, that
is something which can’t be lost. It’s a great deal surer than
bank stock or railroad bonds. There is the case of Mrs.
Carroll, the lady who I said would make your dress for you,
and do it well. Once she no more thought of sewing for a
living than you do. When she was a girl she had about all
she wanted, and expected always to have it, and it was much
the same after she was married. But things went wrong with

D2



44 Unele Ward's Advice.

her husband about money-matters, and after his death it was
found there was not much left for the widow and her son; so
the pleasant home was sold, and she took to dressmaking.
You see how things sometimes go in this world. But I mustn’t
stop to talk any longer, or I shall not get up to the farm or
you to Mrs. Carroll’s this morning. Your aunt will show you
where she lives.”

’ “But, uncle, I’m a stranger, and would not like to go alone.
I would rather wait until Aunt Mary is at leisure to go with
me. Aunt Grey always sees about such things for me.”

“Nonsense! What if you are a stranger? Your feet can
carry you there all the same, and your tongue can ask if she
will do the work for you. Your aunt has always such lots of
work on hand, that it takes her a long time to get started
anywhere. I would advise you not to wait for her. You're
old enough to begin to act for yourself, and you had better
begin this morning.”

If some other person had said all this to Alice, she would
have felt either offended or wounded, but her uncle had such
a way of saying it that she was neither. So she came to the
wise resolution to follow his advice; and as soon as he had
left for the farm, she went up to her room to get ready for the
walk. When she came down, her aunt went with her as far
as the gate, to point out the house.

After her aunt turned back and Alice was left to pursue her
walk alone, it must be owned that she felt a little shy and
uncomfortable, for she was not only a stranger in a strange
place, but this was nearly or quite the first time she had gone
out on an errand of business, so free had her life been from
the slightest pressure of care. But the feeling was not very
oppressive, for though the position was a new one, Alice had
been no recluse, and was not unaccustomed to meet with
strangers ; and, moreover, thoughts about herself were mingled



Visit to Mrs. Carroll. 45

with other thoughts, most prominent among which were those
that had reference to what her uncle had just told her about
Mrs. Carroll. It seemed to her that she must be very unhappy
after sustaining such bereavements and losses, and being com-
pelled to resort to the needle for her support, when she had
known what it was to have every want supplied. Alice
wondered a little what she could ever do, if such things were
to happen to her, and how she could bear it, and she quite
made up her mind that the woman whom she was about to
meet must wear a very sorrowful face, or at least a very dis-
contcnted one. E

When she reached the house, the door was open, and as
Alice stood on the step she was met by a somewhat rough-
looking man. She asked if Mrs. Carroll was at home, and
received the very laconic reply, “ Upstairs.” Mrs. Ward had
neglected to tell her niece what part of the house was occupied
by Mrs. Carroll. ;

Alice ascended the stairs, and when she reached the top was
met by a lady so unlike the picture her mind had formed of
Mrs. Carroll, that she at once decided she had not yet found
the person she was seeking. She soon, however, discovered
her mistake, for a voice sweet and gentle said,—

“TJ heard you inquiring for me at the door. This way, if
you please.”

Alice followed her conductor into a pleasant parlour, and
was seated by a window commanding much the same view
that she so admired from the front windows of her aunt’s
house.

After seating her visitor, Mrs. Carroll resumed her own seat
by another window, and took up the work she had just laid
down. Hardly had she done so, when some one called her
name, and she went out to meet a person who wished to speak
with her on the stairs.



46 Mrs. Carroll's Home.

While she was absent Alice improved the time by looking
around, both without and within. The scene without was not
new, at least that portion of it which she most admired, so her
attention was soon transferred to the scene within. The fur-
niture was not new, though it was quite nice and well pre-
served, and she at once concluded that it had been the purchase
of those better days of which her uncle had spoken. It was
very neatly arranged, and books and flowers and little adorn-
ments gave to the room an air of culture and refinement which
Alice was not, slow to appreciate. ‘There was nothing of the
touch-me-ifyou-dare expression which seemed to pervade her
aunt’s. shut-up parlour; but everything spoke of careful use
and wise enjoyment, and as the young girl looked around,
there came over her such a home feeling as she had not had
since she came to Maysville. She had no time then to analyze
it, for Mrs. Carroll had re-entered the room, and as soon as she
was seated Alice made known her errand, and was much
pleased when told that her dress could be done at once, as
work was not pressing at that season of the year.

“T have only this dress to finish,” said Mrs. Carroll. “I
wish to complete it before laying it aside, as it may be called
for at any time. Ican finish itin half an hour. Will it be
inconvenient for you to wait that time?”

“Not in the least,” said Alice, who was secretly glad of this
detention.

She soon found herself engaged in an interesting conver-
sation, suggested by surrounding objects. They talked of
flowers, of books, of the beautiful landscape which lay spread
out before them, and of the beauty of the country a: that time
of the year, and winding in and out of their conversation on
these subjects were the threads of Alice’s own secret thoughts
about Mrs. Carroll herself, and what her uncle had that morning
said of her past history.



Another “ Satisfied” One. 47

As Mrs. Carroll’s work required close attention, Alice
improved the opportunity to study the face which bent over
the work. Could that calm, serene face, that manner so
quiet and yet so cheerful, belong to one who had suffered the
losses and bereavements of which her uncle had spoken?

These thoughts suddenly recalled the conversation with the
young man at the cottage in which they had taken shelter from
the rain on their return from the Falls. She remembered the
very tone of the voice in which the one word “ satisfied” had
been spoken, and it now seemed to her that this word would
best describe the expression of the face before her. Here was
another satisfied one. Of this she felt sure. Yet why was it
so? It could not be from the things without, for only half an
hour before Alice had made up her mind that this woman’s
outward circumstances must necessarily make her very sorrow-
ful, if not discontented. If it was not from the things without,
then it must be, even as that young man had said, from some-
thing within. What could that something be? What was this
secret, this happiness springing neither from outward circum-
stances, nor yet from satisfaction with one’s self, and still giving
such calmness, sweetness, and serenity that even the counte-
nance and the very tones of the voice were the unconscious
witnesses of this inward composure ?

Very soon the dress was completed and laid aside, and
Mrs. Carroll told Alice that she was now ready to take up her
dress. Some conversation followed about the use for which it
was designed and the mode of fitting and making it.

“T shall have to detain you but a little longer,” said Mrs.
Carroll.

Alice was sorry to hear this. She had been too well enter-
tained to be in any haste to leave; besides, she had her fears
that:time might hang heavily on her hands after her return to
her aunt’s.



48 Alice helps with the Dress.

*\WWhen shall you want me again ?” she asked.

“Not until to-morrow.”

“T wish I could sew upon the dress,” said Alice; “but I
don’t know anything about working on dresses, though Uncle
Ward says it’s time I did,” she added archly, as she remem-
bered her uncle’s words.

Mrs. Carroll smiled. “I suppose you know something
about sewing ?” she said.

“Oh yes; I can sew some things neatly, but I have never
worked on dresses.”

“Tf you can sew well, you could easily do some parts of the
dress with the aid of a few simple directions.”

“Do you think so?” said Alice, with an eager look which
showed that the thought gave her pleasure.

“T have no doubt you would find itso. If you would like
to spend the rest of the morning here, I will prepare a part of
the dress for you and show you how it is to be done.”

“Thank you. I should like it very much,” said Alice,
pleased with the thought of helping forward the work,
and still more to have an excuse for remaining longer
with Mrs. Carroll, towards whom she felt herself strangely
drawn.

As they plied their needles Mrs. Carroll seemed at no loss
for subjects of conversation. Some incidental remark showed
Alice that she knew something of her past history, and when
the fact of her orphanage was touched upon, there was an
added gentleness on Mrs. Carroll’s part.

Alice saw and appreciated this. Never since the death of
her mother had she met with one who had so impressed her,
to whom she thought it would be so easy to give an almost
filial love and confidence. Her Aunt Grey, though kind, was
not one to win a large share of these. She had come to
Maysville with the secret hope of finding such a one in her



L[nutroduction to Miss Foster. 49

Aunt Ward. How easy it would be, she thought, to open her
heart to her aunt, if she were only like Mrs. Carroll.

Their conversation was presently interrupted by the entrance
‘of a young girl a little older than Alice, who came for the dress
Mrs. Carroll had just completed. She was introduced to Alice
as Miss Emma Foster.

“T hoped you would come this morning, Emma,” said
Mrs. Carroll, ‘that I might have the pleasure of introducing
you to Miss Grey, for I feel sure you will enjoy each other’s
society while she remains in Maysville.”

‘“‘T have been counting upon that,” said Emma, with a bright,
frank smile, which at once gave Alice a favourable opinion of
her new acquaintance. ‘Mrs. Ward told me, two days ago,
that she expected her niece to spend some time with her; and
I was very glad, for I think summer visitors make the place so
lively and cheerful, and, as Miss Grey is about my age, I had
a special interest in her arrival.”

Alice was well pleased to hear that any one had taken an
interest in her coming, and she felt sure that she should like
the young girl who seemed so ready to welcome her to
Maysville.

“My brother came last night,” continued Emma. “He wiil
be at home through all the long summer vacation. Shan’t we
have nice times?” she added gaily.

“T have no doubt you will,” said Mrs. Carroll, with that
ready sympathy which won for her so many youthful friends.

“We have such fine rides when he is at home,” continued
Emma. “By the way, we have one planned for this afternoon,
and we shall be very glad to call for you Miss Grey, if you will
accompany us;” to which informal invitation Alice gladly
assented.

“When shall I come again?” said Alice, as she was about
leaving Mrs. Carroll at noon.



50 Affairs Brightening.

“Would you like to sew more on the dress?”

“Indeed I should, if it is not too much trouble to give me
the necessary instruction.”

“Tt isno trouble, but a pleasure. You are engaged for this
afternoon. Come as early to-morrow as you like, and we will
spend the morning together.”

“Thank you,” said Alice; “that will be delightful.”

Alice returned to her aunt’s house feeling that everything
wis wearing a very different aspect from that which the morn-
ing had presented. She had much enjoyed the time spent with _
Mrs. Carroll, and she had there met with one of her own age,
who, she was sure, would prove an agreeable acquaintance.
She had before her the prospect of a pleasant drive that after-
noon, and the next morning was to be spent with Mrs. Carroll,
Certainly things were very much brightening. There was a
fair prospect that she might even yet enjoy herself in Mays-
ville, and have no cause to regret that she had chosen to come
there.

“T like Mrs. Carroll very much,” Alice remarked at the
dinner-table that noon.

“T am glad to see that you’re such a good judge of character,”
replied her uncle. “There isn’t a woman in Maysville more
highly esteemed than Mrs. Carroll. The course she has taken
since the death of her husband has won for her the esteem of
all sensible people. But how is the dress progressing? I feel
an interest in that.”

“Oh, finely. Iam to go there to-morrow morning and help
sew upon it.”

“That’s sensible, I’m sure. I told the people at the farm
that I should bring you up the next time I came; so I shall
hope to find you in readiness. They asked why I didn’t bring
you to-day.”

“What did you tell them?”



Uncle Ward's Humour. ; 51

“JT told them that you were like the heroine of a certain
popular ballad who had ‘nothing to wear,’” said her uncle,
with a comical smile.

“Why, uncle! what did they think?” said Alice, hardly
knowing whether to be amused or vexed.

“ Don’t trouble yourself about that,” said her aunt. ‘ They
have known your uncle some time longer than you have, and
know how to take him. He always will say just what he has a
mind to, and yet people never take it amiss.”

“I suppose that’s because they fail to discover any ‘malice
aforethought,’” said her uncle, laughing; and Alice was
strengthened in the previous impression that she should get
on very well with her Uncle Ward.







ay
SAK















CHAPTER V.

MRS. CARROLL'S STORY.

Nor long after breakfast the next day, Alice started for Mrs.
Carroll’s. She counted upon a very pleasant morning spent
with her, and was not disappointed. The ride of the after-
noon before was one of the first subjects of conversation, after
they were well settled at their work.

“TI suppose you had a pleasant time?” said Mrs. Carroll.

“Very pleasant,” Alice replied; and then went on to give
various particulars of their ride.

“We passed a cottage at the upper end of the village that I
admired very much,” she said; “it looks so neat and home-
like. I noticed it when I rode out with my uncles the day
that Uncle Grey spent here. There is something about it that
takes iny fancy. I think I should like to live in just such a
house in the country myself, at least during the warm season.”

Alice described the situation.

“TI ought to know the place well, for it was the home of my
married life,” said Mrs. Carroll, quietly.

“Ts it possible!” said Alice. ‘Was that delightful place
your home? and were you obliged to leave it?”

“Not quite obliged to, but I thought it best to sell it.”

“I am sure it must have made you very unhappy.”

‘“No, my dear. It was certainly a trial to leave a home I



' For Fesus’ sake.” 53

loved so much, but the circumstances were such that it would
have made me more unhappy to keep it.”

“ Flow could that be?”

“TJ will tell you. Perhaps you know that I have a son.”

“No,” said Alice, ‘*I did not know it.”

“TI have, and he is now at college. Arthur was at school,
preparing for college, when his father died. He gave himself
to God and His service at an early age, and it was his earnest
desire to spend his life in preaching the Gospel. ‘This was
also the desire of his parents, and what they had long hoped
and prayed for.

“‘My husband met with some serious losses not jane before
he died, and after his death it was found that very little
remained to us except our home. This we might have retained,
if Arthur had given up his studies and entered at once upon
some remunerative employment. But to this I could not
consent. By selling the place and taking the rooms I now
occupy, and in .part supporting myself in the way I now do,
Arthur would be enabled to pursue his studies without inter-
ruption, until he was prepared for the work on which we‘had
so wished that he should enter. I was not long in deciding
upon this course.”

“Then you gave up your home for your son’s sake,” said
Alice, deeply interested in the story.

Mrs. Carroll reflected for a moment, and then said rever-
ently, “No, not for his sake, but for Jesus’ sake. I am not
so sure it would have been right for me to give it up for
Arthur’s sake only.”

“Tt must nave been hard for you to leave that pleasant
nome ee

“It was indeed a trial, for I loved the dear place.”
“Tt was giving up a great deal,” said Alice.
‘God’s promise is,” said Mrs. Carroll, “that a hundredfold



54 The Dress finished.

shall be received for all that is given up for His sake. Our
self-denial was small compared with that of many others, and
yet I think we have already received the hundredfold. We
are both so much happier than we should have been, had we
come to a different conclusion, it is so sweet to think that
all we have and are is devoted to Christ’s service; and we are
both well satisfied.”

Alice looked up quickly as the last word was spoken, and
Mrs. Carroll saw that she was moved, but there was no time
for further conversation, for just at that moment they were
interrupted.

What was said that morning furnished food for many after-
thoughts and questionings with Alice—such thoughts as had
not been wont to visit the mind of the young girl, but, having
once found a place there, were not easily dislodged.

The next day the dress was finished. Alice was both glad
and sorry—glad to have it done, yet sorry that she should
now, as she thought, have no further excuse for seeing one
who had so won her regard and affection.

“Don’t be in haste to go,” said Mrs. Carroll; “I shall be
glad to have you sit avails with me, if you have no other
engagement this morning.”

During the hour thus spent, Alice took up a pack lying upon
the table, which she had not before seen.

“ Arthur sent it to me,” said Mrs. Carroll. ‘I received it
last night.”

Alice looked it over; and as she was fond of reading, soon
became quite interested in its contents.

Mrs. Carroll perceived this, and said, “You are quite wel-
come to take it home with you, if you would like to read it.
You must have a great deal of leisure for reading, and no
doubt you will finish it before I shall be ready to commence it.”

A sudden thought entered the mind of Alice. “If you



Visits to the Farm. 55

only had some one to read it to you while you were at work,”
she said, “you would not have to wait for leisure to enjoy it,
and I should enjoy reading it to you.”

“Indeed!” said Mrs. Carroll, with a heartiness that left no
doubt of her sincerity, “that is just the nicest plan possible,
and I have no doubt that we shall both enjoy it better than
to read it by ourselves. If you can come for an hour or two
in the morning, we shall not be liable to interruptions.”

Alice was well pleased with this arrangement. She would
now have an excuse for spending a part of each day with Mrs.
Carroll for some days to come; and when the book was
finished perhaps there would be another to read, or they
would become so well acquainted that she might venture to
call without any excuse for doing so.

That afternoon Alice went with her uncle to the farm, and
was conducted by him all round the place which had been his.
home for many years. She enjoyed it very much. She was
introduced to the people who lived on the farm, and found
them well-disposed and very agreeable.

The next Monday morning, when Alice went down to break-
fast, she found that it was waiting for her uncle.

“ He will be here in a moment, when he has put out the
horse,” her aunt said.

“You have taken an early ride, uncle,” said Alice, as her
uncle seated himself at the table.

“Yes, ’ve been to take the clothes up to Aunt Nancy, as
I do every Monday morning. You see your aunt is so parti-
cular that she can’t have a girl in the house. I tell her some-
times she has done hard work enough to take life easy now,
but she says that it would be more trouble to put things
straight after one of those girls than they are worth; and it
might-be so with her. But Aunt Nancy is so nice that even
my wife can find no fault with her work; so we employ her



56 Going to see Aunt Nancy.

for the washing and ironing every week, and I am not sure
but it’s on the whole the most comfortable arrangement that
we could have. By the way, you must make the acquaintance
of Aunt Nancy. She is the best woman in Maysville.”

“ Better than Mrs. Carroll?” said Alice.

Her uncle laughed. “ Well, to be sure they are not much
alike,” he said. “Mrs. Carroll is an intelligent, refined, and
cultivated woman, fitted to adorn any society, while Aunt
Nancy is poor and ignorant ; but if the Lord were to come to
Maysville to count up His jewels, I don’t believe that poor
old Aunt Nancy would be accounted as second to any of
them.” k

“Where does she live?”

“Very near the old place,” as Mr. Ward always designated
the farm on which he had lived so long. ‘The house is in
plain sight as we'go up there. Probably you did not notice it.
It is just a little way on the road that turns to the left. I will
take you with me when I go after the clothes, and then you
will have a chance to make Aunt Nancy’s acquaintance.”

“Thank you, uncle.”

A part of that morning and the next were pleasantly spent
with Mrs. Carroll in reading and conversation. In the after-
noon her uncle looked in, and inquired if Alice was ready to
go with him to see Aunt Nancy.

“ Are you quite ready?”

“No, but I shall be in two minutes.”

“JT will be ready in that time,” said Alice; and she was as
good as her word.

“There is the house,” said Mr. Ward, as they came to the
road turning to the left.

“What! the best woman in Maysville live in that little
tumble-down house!” said Alice, half seriously, half playfully.

“The Bible says. ‘Hath not God chosen the poor of this



Aunt Nancy's Home. 57

/

world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom?'” said Uncle
Ward.

“Rich in faith,” Alice repeated to herself; but to her it
seemed a very intangible kind of riches.

It was near sunset, and Aunt Nancy, weary with the day’s
toil, was resting for a little while. Busy with her thoughts, and
not.as quick to hear as she had been in her younger days, she
knew nothing of the approach of Mr. Ward and his niece
until they stood in the doorway. When she saw them, she
made an unsuccessful attempt to rise.

“ Don’t get up for us, Aunt Nancy,” said Mr. Ward. “It is
something of a job for you, and quite unnecessary. This is
my niece. I have brought her along, thinking you might like
to see a young miss arrived fresh from the great city.”

“Yes, indeed. The sight of young folks always does my
old eyes good, they are so bright and cheerful-like.”

“As to the last, I don’t believe any of them can beat you,”
said Mr. Ward, laughing.

“Maybe not,” said Aunt Nancy. “When I have so much
to make me cheerful, it would be a sin and a shame not to
be so.”

“So much to make me cheerful,’” Alice wonderingly re-
peated to herself, as she looked around upon the bare, unpainted
walls and scanty furniture ; but she had little time then to
think about it.

“J suppose the basket is ready,” said Mr. Ward. “TI will
leave Alice here while I go and speak to Mr. Leeds, who, I
see, is at work in the next field;” and in a moment he was
gone.

“IT have two or three light articles to lay on the top, and I
will do it now, as your uncle may be back in a few minutes,”
said Aunt Nancy.

Again she attempted to rise from her chair; but she tried

Satisfied. E



58 Honest Independence.

more than once before the effort was successful, and when she
was fairly out of it, her first steps were so tottering that Alice
sprang forward to her assistance.

“Never fear, young lady,” said Aunt Nancy, “I shall go
-well enough when I once get started. This rheumatism makes
me very lame and stiff, and yet I can goas long and do as much
work as any woman of my age in Maysville.”

“ But is it not very hard for you?”

“Not half so hard as not to be able to work. I don’t have
much pain this time of the year. In the winter, sometimes,
when I have to go out a good deal in the cold and snow, the
pain is mighty hard, nights especially ; so you see I know how
to be thankful for the long sunny days, when I am quite
comfortable-like.”

Mr. Ward now returned, and the basket being ready, Alice
had no opportunity for further conversation with Aunt Nancy
at that time and on that occasion.

“T don’t like to think that poor lame old woman has to
wash and iron for me,” said Alice, as they rode home.

“She seems to take it very cheerfully,” said her uncle.

“Ves, she seems to have a wonderful way of taking every-
thing cheerfully ; but it don’t seem as if one ought to give her
hard work to do.”

Mr. Ward laughed. “I don’t think she would consider it a
kindness to take away her work,” he said. ‘‘She has a good
deal of honest independence, and would consider it neither
pleasant nor right to eat the bread of charity, as long as she
can do anything for herself I do try to come round her a
little in this respect ; I pay her a certain sum of money every
week, and make up the rest by letting her have things raised
on the farm. When I carry her flour, potatoes, and other
vegetables, and she says, ‘It’s too much, Mr. Ward; I don’t
earn it,’ I always tell her she ought to be satisfied if I am,”





























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A good Friend to Nancy. 61

“She finds a good friend in you, I have no doubt,” said
Alice, who before this had discovered that her uncle was kind.
hearted.

“Jt would be a shame to Maysville if she did not find
friends among those who have known her so long.”

“Does every one here call her Aunt Nancy?” inquired
Alice.

“She is pretty generally known by that name.”







CHAPTER VI.

TWO BIBLE LESSONS,

Tuat week passed rapidly and pleasantly with Alice. She
enjoyed the morning readings with Mrs. Carroll, the rides
with her uncle to the farm and elsewhere, and pleasant
rambles through woods and fields with Emma Foster and her
brother, and other young people with whom she was becoming
acquainted. Every day she was more and more pleased with
her decision to come to Maysville.

But amid all this she did not forget the thoughts that fol-
lowed her home after her brief interview with Aunt Nancy,
together with similar thoughts which had been awakened by
other incidents of the summer. Never before had she enter-
tained such serious thoughts about the soul’s inner life, and
what constitutes true happiness. Very different are the
methods by which the soul is awakened to its first serious,
earnest thoughts about the things that concern its everlasting
peace. Some are aroused by a sense of danger, others are at
once convicted of the sinfulness of their hearts and lives.
Alice had been zon to serious thoughts on these subjects by
her converse with some of God’s dear children, who lived so
near to Him as to enjoy habitually the light of His counte-
nance and the joy of His salvation. The great lesson of her
own exceeding sinfulness and need of pardon and cleansing,



Alice's Difficulty. 63

she had yet to learn; but she had been led to feel that there
was a source of strength and peace and sweet content, of
which she knew nothing. She could not understand the
secret, yet there was in her heart a growing conviction that
she needed to know it.

The night she returned from Aunt Nancy’s she thought she
would tell Mrs. Carroll all about her call there, the next day,
but the book she was reading, and various subjects of conver-
sation, took up the time; and this continued for several days,
But on the morning when the book was finished, while Alice
still lingered, something was said that reminded her of the
call at Aunt Nancy’s, and she told her new friend all about it.

“Only think of her saying that she had so much to make
her cheerful,” said Alice. ‘To me it seemed as if she had
nothing ; and I can’t understand how any one can be so happy
without a great deal to make her so.”

“You are right about that,” said Mrs. Carroll. “No one can
be so happy without a great deal to make him or her so.”

“Do you mean that you think Aunt Nancy has a great deal
to make her happy?”

‘“T certainly do think so.”

‘* But she is very poor !”

“ And very rich also. Her riches are unseen and eternal.
Jesus said to Pilate, ‘My kingdom is not of this world,’ and it
is true of His followers now, that ‘the kingdom of God is
within’ them.”

Alice was almost startled by these words, so forcibly did
they remind her of the hour at the cottage more than a year
ago, on the way back from the Falls. After a moment’s
thought, she said—“I do wish, Mrs. Carroll, you would
explain that to me.” ;

“Explain what?” said Mrs. Carroll, who was not quite sure
that she understood the request.



64 The Story of the Falls retold.

“The meaning of that passage, ‘The kingdom of God is
within you.’ I cannot understand it at all.”

“Then you have tried to understand it?”

“Indeed I have; but I can make nothing of it.”

“Then I would most earnestly ees you to ask God to
teach you what it means.”

“This is indeed strange,” said Alice, more as if she were
speaking aloud her own thoughts than addressing Mrs. Carroll,

“What is strange?” inquired Mrs. Carroll.

“This is the second time I have been told just that.”

‘Will you tell me about the first time?” said Mrs. Carroll,
who hoped to draw from Alice something that would be a clue
to her thoughts on this subject, and thus aid her in giving
timely instruction and counsel.

“Do you remember my telling you about my visit to the
country with uncle and aunt and cousin Mabel, and our ride
to those charming little Falls ?”

“T remember it very well.”

‘On our return we were overtaken by a sudden and violent
shower, and were obliged to seek shelter in a cottage. We
found the inmates very hospitable, and also very intelligent
and agreeable people. There were two young men at the
house. After a time one of them drew a chair to my side and
entered into conversation with me. He began by talking
about the Falls, but soon the conversation took a strange
turn.”

“What do you mean by a strange turn?”

“I mean it was very unlike any conversation I ever had
before with any one, and some things were said that I shall
never forget, We were talking about being contented or
satisfied. I said that I believed every one was sometimes dis-
satisfied, and that there were really no contented people in
the world. He said that I was mistaken, that there was such



“ 7 don’t understand it.” 65

a thing as being satisfied, as he knew by experience ; and
when he saw that I seemed surprised, he wrote on a slip of
paper a reference to the very words we have just been talking
about, and asked if I would not some time look out the pas-
sage, adding that if I understood it it would help me to
understand what he had just said, and that if I did not I
must ask God to teach me what it meant. Now it seems
quite singular that you both should tell me the same thing.”

“Why?”

“J should think if any one himself understood the meaning
of these words, he might explain it to others.”

“Tf this young man did understand the true meaning of
these words, it was because God Himself had taught him.
He knew that none but God could teach him this, and that
none but God could teach you. It is the same with me, and
therefore I do not think it singular that we should both have
said the same thing.”

“ Alice was silent fora moment; then she said, “I begin
to believe there are a few people in the world who are really
satisfied —that is, they are contented and cheerful.”

She was thinking of the young man at the cottage, of Mrs.
Carroll, and Aunt Nancy, though she mentioned no names.
“JT don’t understand it, however,” she added. “There are
times when I am very much dissatisfied.”

“What is the cause of this dissatisfaction ?”

“Various things. My cousin often says vexatious things,
and sometimes things really unkind. I hoped she would be
like a sister to me, but I don’t find her so. Sometimes it
seems as if she really didn’t love me at all, and I half suspect
the reason, though it is something that isn’t my fault. Then
sometimes everything goes wrong, and I am for a while
thoroughly wretched.”

Mrs. Carel had so won the confidence of Alice that she



66 A Great Change needed,

opened her heart to her as she had never done to any one
since the death of her parents, and in this instance confidence
was not misplaced, as it so often is.

“Ts this wretchedness entirely the result of unkind words,
disappointments, and vexatious occurrences? Are these the
only cause of your unhappiness?”

“No,” said Alice, frankly. ‘After a time I begin to see
how foolish it is to let such things trouble me so much, and
how wrong some of my own thoughts and feelings have been ;
and then I end with being thoroughly vexed with myself, and
ashamed, too; and that’s the worst of the whole, for it’s the
most uncomfortable of all uncomfortable things to be out of
sorts with one’s self.”

“ That is very true, my dear,” said Mrs. Carroll.

“Indeed it is. It’s the very worst sort of dissatisfaction ;
and that’s what makes me think that I shall have to be very
much changed before I can be like those people.”

“This is true, too, my dear girl, and this change is a
much greater one than you have now, probably, any con-
ception of.”

Alice was not prepared for this answer; in fact, she was a
little startled by it, and began to wish that she had not been
quite so confidential with Mrs. Carroll.

“Do you think I am so.very bad?” she said, in a tone
that partly betrayed her feclings. “It’s very seldom that I
get out of sorts and all wrong in this way.”

“That may be,” said Mrs. Carroll, very gently, “but do
you therefore infer that all is right with you at other times?”

“Why, not exactly,” said Alice, hesitatingly. “I don’t
know what is the real truth about it,” she added, after a
moment’s thoughtful silence.

“We must go to the Word of God to learn that,” said
Mrs. Carroll, “From His Word we must learn whether we



Mrs. Carroll's T: yee Verses. 67

are wrong only occasionally, or whether this is true of every
day and hour.”

“Ts any one so bad as that?” asked Alice quickly.

“The true answer to that question must also be found in
God’s Word. There we learn what is required of us at all
times. If we meet those requirements, all is right; but
something is wrong with us every day and hour in which we
violate this just and holy rule of life. Shall I give youa
short Bible lesson on this subject? ”

Alice assented.

“Tt shall be short, only three little verses,” said Mrs.
Carroll, as she handed Alice a slip of paper on which she
had indicated the place where each verse was to be
found. ‘Study them some time when you are alone in
your room,” she said, “and ask God to teach you their true
meaning.”

There was a hard shower just before sunset that night,
which prevented Alice from going out, and she retired early
to her room. When there her thoughts soon recurred to her
conversation with Mrs. Carroll and the slip of paper she had ©
given her. She drew it from her pocket, and after glancing
at ita moment, took up her Bible to look out the passages
referred to. The first was in the twenty-third chapter of
Proverbs, the last clause of the seventeenth verse: “ Be thou
in the fear of the Lord all the day long.”

This did not seem to her so hard to understand as the
passage referred to by the young man at the cottage. She
thought it meant that all the day we should fear to disobey
or displease God. It was evident, however, that one could
not obey this precept unless God was much in his thoughts;
but certainly it was not so with her. Taking the previous
day, for example, she could not recollect that she had had
one thought of God, unless it was during the morning hour



68 The Text in Ephesians.

spent with Mrs. Carroll, who, though never obtrusive in the
mention of religious subjects, was habitually so full of God’s
Spirit and presence, that it was not often one could spend
an hour of familiar converse with her without being in some
way reminded of Him. For the rest of that day Alice felt
that all her thoughts, feelings, and purposes might have been
just the same, had there been no God in the universe. And
what was true of that day had been more emphatically true of
very many days in past weeks, months, and years. Before
‘she had done with that verse, she began to see that she must
abandon the thought that she was in the wrong only occa-
sionally. The subject was certainly wearing a serious aspect,
but she thought she would turn to the next verse, and perhaps
that would not so much condemn her.

This was in Ephesians, and finding it, she read, “Be ye
therefore followers of God, as dear children.” This certainly
was a sweet, gentle, loving admonition; but, as her thoughts
dwelt upon it, she felt that, if possible, it condemned her
more than the first had done. She had, she thought, some-
times been withheld from sinful words and acts by the fear
of offending the Lord, but never had she followed Him as a
dear child. She remembered well how she had loved and
obeyed the dear parents who had been taken from her; how
often, even now, her imagination pictured the life she would
have lived with them, could they have been spared to her;
how devoted her love would have been, and how constant
her efforts to please then. Something like that, she was
sure, must be meant by the precept to follow God as dear
children; yet never for a single day of her life had she felt
towards God anything of this spirit of filial love and obedience.
Yet she felt assured there were those who thus followed Him.
She believed that Mrs. Carroll was one of them, and Aunt
Nancy also. Ah, these living epistles, what a gospel they



Alice’s Heaviness of Heart. 69

often prove to those inquiring the way of life! Would that
there were more of them.

Alice sighed heavily as she turned to the next passage
marked by ‘Mrs. Carroll, and read, “Thou hast commanded
us to keep Thy precepts diligently.” There was no comfort
for Alice here. She knew these precepts were found in the
neglected Book she held in her hand, which often had not
been read at all for months together, or if read, it was in
the most careless and formal manner, leaving hardly an im-
pression upon her mind. She had not even read these pre-
cepts constantly, earnestly, diligently ; and certainly she had
not kept them. The Spirit of God was flashing conviction
through all her soul.

She recollected what Mrs. Carroll had said, that each one
was in the wrong every day and hour in which these just
and holy precepts were not obeyed. If this was so, and
reason and conscience told her it was, then surely she had
been in the wrong every day and hour of her life. The
longer she thought of these things, the deeper grew this
conviction. She began to see that there was a mine of evil
within her soul, the length, breadth, and depth of which were
known only to God. She no longer wondered that she had
so often been dissatisfied with herself; she only wondered
that she had not been continually thus dissatisfied. She
began to understand why Mrs. Carroll should speak of the
necessity of a very great change. “It must be a change

indeed,” were her thoughts. “Can such a change ever come
to meP Can I ever become like Mrs. Carroll and Aunt
-Nancy ?”

Alice retired that night with a heavy heart, and when she
arose the next morning it was not much lightened.

Mrs. Carroll had invited her to come often. “ Don’t stay
away because the book is finished,” she said. “ We can find



70 “ T have been all wrong.”

plenty to read and talk about. I shall be very glad of your
company while I sit here sewing.”

Alice had received this kind invitation gratefully, assuring
Mrs. Carroll that she would be very glad to come, for she
never enjoyed herself better than when with her, and she
found a good deal of leisure time in Maysville, especially
during the long summer mornings. She had intended to go
that morning, but now she hesitated. She wished to see her
friend, wished to tell her of all that was passing in her mind,
and yet was conscious also of a feeling of reluctance to do so.
For a time the two sentiments seemed evenly balanced, but at
last the latter prevailed, and Alice did not go to Mrs. Carroll's
that morning.

As the shades of evening drew on, she suddenly determined
that she would go. She thought the twilight hour just the
time to tell her friend of the dark and troubled state of her
mind, if indeed she could get courage to do so at all. She
received from Mrs. Carroll the usual cordial welcome.

“I expected you this morning,” she said, as soon as Alice
was seated.

“T thought of coming, but—I may as well own the truth at
once—I was so unhappy I did not care to see any one.”

“So unhappy?” said Mrs. Carroll, interrogatively.

“Ves,” said Alice; ‘those Bible verses made me so. Oh,
Mrs. Carroll, I never saw it so before. Instead of being, as
I thought, a little wrong sometimes, I now see that I have
been all wrong my whole life.”

The tears sprang to the eyes of Mrs. Carroll. “Iam very
glad,” she said; and her voice was very tender, yet there was
in it an undertone of deep gladness.

“Glad that I am so bad and miserable?” exclaimed Alice.

“No, not that, but glad that you are learning the truth about
yourself, and very thankful that God Himself is teaching you.”



The Second Bible Lesson. 71

“Teaching me !” said Alice, in a tone of surprise. “Thad
not thought of that. It was those verses I read that made me
see it all.”

“Have you not read those same verses before more than
once or twice ?”

“No doubt I have.”

“But you did not learn from them what you have now
learned.”

“ Indeed I did not.”

“ And the reason of the difference is this. God Himself is
now teaching you, by His Spirit, these most important, though
painful lessons. It is true, yet a blessed truth, that God will
enter such hearts as ours, to teach us lessons that of ourselves
we can never learn; for He is able, by His Spirit, to lead us
into all truth. Other lessons He will yet teach you, if you
will listen to His voice and yield yourself to His teachings.”

“ This has been a very sad one,” said Alice.

“Yes, but a most needful one. Shall I give you another
Bible lesson, a different one?”

“If you please,” said Alice.

‘ Here are three more verses for you to study this evening,”
said Mrs, Carroll, as she handed Alice another slip of paper.
“T know you will read them thoughtfully, and I ly hope
you will ask God to teach you their true meaning.”

On her return, Alice went directly to her room to study this
second Bible lesson, given to her by her end oe faithful
friend. She turned to the first verse, and read: ‘ Ask, and it
shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find ; ae and it
shall be opened unto you.” Then to the second: “For God
so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that
whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have ever-
lasting life.” Then she read the third: “ Come now, and let
us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be as



72 Thoughts and Struggles.

scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red
like crimson, they shall be as wool.”

_ Alice read these verses again and again, but they brought
neither help nor comfort. God had chosen another instru-
mentality by which to bring home to her heart the knowledge
of His abounding grace, even to the chief of sinners. Again
she retired for the night with a heavy heart.

Awaking next morning some time before the usual hour of
rising, she lay thinking of all these things, her heart full of con-
tending emotions. In a kind of half despair, she would
reason that she was too great a sinner to be saved, and next,
with the strange inconsistency of the unbelieving heart, was
- ready to murmur that God did not hear her cry, and grant to
her the mercy and grace which she had besought with many
prayers and tears. Then, falling into the mistake so often
made, of confounding feeling with believing, she would intensely
desire to /e/ that she was saved, forgiven, and cleansed, accord-
ing to the promise, and weary herself in the vain struggle ¢o
feel all this, instead of simply believing that God would surely
fulfil His word.

In such thoughts and struggles the early morning hours
were passed.











CHAPTER VII.

A CALL UPON AUNT NANCY.

ALICE was just debating the question whether she should spend
an hour with her friend Mrs. Carroll, when her uncle said to
her,—

“T’m going to the farm this morning. Will you go with
me?”

Suddenly Alice determined that she would go with him and
give Aunt Nancy a call. She did not, indeed, propose to
confide to her the secret struggles, doubts, and fears which
were rendering her so unhappy, yet, without stopping to reason
about it, she had a secret feeling that it might do her good to
see the good woman and hear her talk, even though she should
herself keep silence in regard to what was passing in her mind.

“T think I will call upon Aunt Nancy this morning, while
you go on to the farm,” said Alice to her uncle as they
approached the turn in the road.

“Just as you like. I see you're taking a fancy to our old
friend. You're not the only one. She’s such a cheerful body,
that one is almost sure to feel better for spending a few
minutes with her, and you look, this morning, as if you needed
something to brighten you up. I will call there for you as I
come back.”

As Alice standing in the open door bade Aunt Nancy good

Satisfied. F



74 Aunt Nancy's Question.

morning, the latter looked keenly at her for a moment, fur,
like many good people, she was not quick to recognise those
who were almost strangers to her.

“It’s Miss Alice,” she said after a moment. “I’m very glad
to see you.”

“T thought I would stop this morning, and sit with you while
uncle is gone to the farm.”

“That's right. I shall be glad to have you stop whenever
you can content yourself for a while in my poor old house.
I’m sure it must seem very poor and old to a young lady from
the city, who has been all her life used to fine things, though
it does not seem so to me.”

“You certainly contrive to be very happy in your home,”
said Alice,

“Why, yes, miss, indeed I am, and why shouldn’t I be?
I’ve spent many happy hours in the old place. Long ago my
Saviour used to make me a visit here now and then, but of
late years it just seems He stays all the while, and that’s a
happy home where He is, if it is a humble one.”

Alice listened with much interest, but not knowing very. well
how to bear her part in such a conversation, she remained
silent. Aunt Nancy continued,—

“Tt’s wonderful what a feast of love and grace God
spreads for us poor sinners, when we are willing to listen
to His voice and let Him come into our hearts. Will you
allow a poor old woman to ask if He has come into your
heart ?”

‘I don’t understand these things. I wish I could take a
lesson from you,” said Alice, in a tone which betrayed her
interest in the subject.

Aunt Nancy was quick to observe this, and looking wistfully
at Alice, said,—

“T can’t teach you, my dear young lady ; only the Lord can



“Tell Him all about it.” VAS

do that. He’s taught me, a poor, ignorant woman, and He'll
teach anybody who'll ask Him.”

“ But it is all dark to me, Aunt Nancy. I can’t understand
it.”

“Then go to Jesus and tell Him so. Tell Him just what
you've told me.”

Alice knew this was Aunt Nancy’s way of directing her to
pray, but it was so expressed as to give her new thoughts about
prayer. “Go and tell Jesus just what you have told me,” she
had said, as if prayer was just talking with Jesus. Alice could
not doubt it was that to Aunt Nancy. If it could only be
the same to her !

“ He Himself says,” Aunt Nancy continued, “‘ Behold, I
stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear My voice, and
open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him,
and he with Me. If you are willing to open the door, Jesus
will certainly enter your heart. I’m sure that He’s knocking
loudly. at this very time.”

“What makes you think so?” asked Alice in some
surprise.

“What youve said to me this morning. [ve seen young
ladies who had nothing to say when I talked about Him.
It’s because He is secking you, that you are so different from
them. You may be sure that He is now beseeching you to
open the door to Him. Will you not let Him in?”

“JT don’t know how,” said Alice, the tears filling her eyes.
“JT don’t understand what it means.”

“Then tell Him so; tell Him all about it. He always
hears the cry of poor lost sinners, and leads them out of
darkness into light. His word is sure; and that word is,
‘Whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be
saved.’” i

After a few more questions of this kind, and short Scripture

F 2



76 Dawn of the New Life.

answers from Aunt Nancy, new light began to break in upon

.- the mind of Alice; but there was not time for any long

conversation, for she soon heard her uncle’s voice, and knew
that he was waiting for her in front of the house.

Once more in her own room, Alice again opened the Bible
which she had so lately begun to study, with an earnest
purpose to find in it the way of life. And now she kneeled
and prayed that God Himself would teach her. She turned
first to the passages quoted by Aunt Nancy, and next to the
verses of the last Bible lesson given her by Mrs. Carroll.
Their meaning became more clear to her, and their fitness
to her own case. She saw and believed in God’s infinite
willingness to save, in the free, full offering of mercy to every
repenting sinner, in the infinite love which was waiting to be
gracious. It was, indeed, to her soul, a new revelation. It
was “the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the
face of Jesus Christ.”

As Alice sat in her room, shedding those tears which flow
at the soul’s first view of forgiving love, did not some angel
wing his way above, to bear the good news to the mother who
had left her child to the sure mercies of a covenant-keeping
God at the tender age of six years ?

The next morning, as Alice was preparing for a call upon
her friend Mrs. Carroll, whom she much wished to see, her
uncle came in to ask if she was ready for another ride to the
farm. Alice instantly accepted the invitation. She would
gladly call upon Aunt Nancy instead of Mrs. Carroll, feeling
that there was no one to whom she could more easily speak,
for the first time, of the new hopes and joys, the new life that
was dawning upon her soul.

As she sprang lightly into the waggon, her uncle said, “1.
am glad to see you looking so bright this morning. You have
looked rather downcast for two or three days, and I was



“Vou have found Fesus 1” 77

making up my mind that you were pining for the seaside and
sorry that you ever came to Maysville.”

‘Oh no, indeed; you are quite mistaken. Iam so thank-
ful I came here.”

There was a touch of feeling in the tone which led her
uncle to give her one of those keen glances with which he
sometimes seemed to read her very thoughts.

Alice wanted to tell him why she was so thankful, but
timidity prevented. She thought she could more easily tell
that story for the first time to Mrs. Carroll or Aunt Nancy.
As they neared the turn of the road, she said, “ Do you think,
uncle, that Aunt Nancy will get tired of me if I spend the
time with her this morning ?”

“No fear of that ; she likes to see the young folks.”

As Alice, after leaving her uncle, walked towards the house,
she began to think how she should tell the story of what the
Lord had done for her soul. She little thought that there
would be no need of words.

Aunt Nancy, after giving one keen glance at her visitor as
she met her at the door, exclaimed,—

“Oh, Miss Alice, you have found Jesus!”

“How can you know that, when I have not spoken one
word?” asked Alice in surprise.

“Your face tells the story. I’m sure I’m not mistaken.”

“Indeed you are not mistaken. Since I saw you last I
have found how ready God is to have mercy on every penitent
sinner. It is wonderful.” ;

The hour that followed was such a one as Alice had never
before spent, while the aged saint and the youthful convert
talked together of the love of Jesus and the blessedness of a
life devoted to His service.

That evening Alice again chose the twilight hour for a visit
to Mrs. Carroll This interview was a very precious one to



78 “ What can 1 do for Fesus?”

Alice, as were also many that followed. Her admiration for
this truly Christian lady, which had commenced with their first
meeting, had ripened into warm and confiding friendship on
the part of Alice, while Mrs. Carroll found that the gentle,
sensitive, and confiding orphan-girl was winning a large place
in her warm motherly heart.

Earnest desires were now awakening in the mind of Alice
to do something for Him who had given Himself for her, and
she began in some degree to realize that the true Christian
life on earth is a life of service; but she found some diffi-
culties in answering the practical question what she herself —
could do.

“What can J do for Jesus?” was the question she asked
of her friend, Mrs. Carroll, as they sat conversing one
evening.

“That question you must yourself ask Him every day,”
said Mrs. Carroll. ‘*‘ My sheep hear My voice, and I know
them, and they follow Me.’ These words of our Lord mean
‘a great dealto me. It is not a small thing for our naturally
wayward hearts to learn to follow Jesus by daily, simple,
child-like obedience to His Word and providence—to be
willing that He should lead us in every step of life. ae

“Some think that they are willing to do a great deal for
Jesus, but they want to do it in their own way. They want
to mark out their own course and form their own schemes, and
then have Jesus go with them in ¢Ae’y way and give success to
their plans. When His own dear children make this mistake,
He soon begins to teach them that they must follow, not lead.
Some are long in learning this lesson, and are taught it
through many sorrows and disappointments.

“ Never till it is learned can we be ‘followers of God, as
dear children.” When it is learned the Christian life takes
on those beautiful, child-like forms of simplicity and godly



Alice's Present Work. 79

sincerity, which so honour the Master, and render His
followers living epistles, ‘known and read of all men.’

“ This is the principle of the Christian life, ever to be kept
in mind, and is the first and most important answer to your
question. But I would also suggest that much of your
present work lies in preparation for future service, for you are
now laying the foundations of future character, influence, and
usefulness. What we are, and what we may become by the
diligent and faithful improvement of the opportunities God
has given us, are of much greater importance than what we
have, as the outward circumstances of our lives in this
changing world are liable at any time to change.

“ You have one grand opportunity now to improve. God
has given you the means of acquiring an excellent education,
and this is especially the work He is now giving you to do,
for your education may be not only of great value to yourself.
but a means of much usefulness to others. ‘ Knowledge is
power,’ and when used in the service of Christ, it becomes a
great power for good.” —

Alice looked thoughtful. These words reminded her of the
remarks of her teacher, which had been reported to her by
her schoolmate.

“T know I have not been as diligent as I might in the
past,” she said, frankly.

“ You have a new motive for diligence now, the best and
highest of all motives, and it should be the most powerful.”

“Tt certainly should be so,” said Alice, very thoughtfully.

“But while improving opportunities from which a rich
harvest may be reaped in the future, if such should be the
will of the Master, be careful not to live in the future, but in
the present.

“One great secret of a holy life is a simple, humble
obedience to the will of God, as it is daily and hourly made



80 A Mistake that is made.

known to us by His Word and providence. It is a great
mistake to neglect the smallest present duty, because the
mind is preoccupied with the future, and with that wider
field of usefulness which it is supposed that future may have

in store,”























CHAPTER VIII.

CONFESSING CHRIST.

Tur weeks passed rapidly, and the time spent in Maysville
seemed too short, when the summons came for Alice to return
to her uncle and aunt in the great city.

She had enjoyed much in Maysville, and she could not part
from it, and from those whom she loved there, without some
regretful feelings. She looked forward, however, to a renewal
of these pleasures and this friendly intercourse in the following
summer, for her uncle and aunt had said that she must then
visit them again, and remain as long as other engagements
would permit. This she had promised to do, and the anticipa-
tion made the present leave-taking far more cheerful than it
would otherwise have been.

When Alice reached town, she did not find her Uncle Grey
at the station. He was too busy, and sent in his stead George
Willis, one of the clerks in his employ. This young man had
been in his warehouse some two or three years. He was the
son of an old friend, and Mr. Grey treated him almost as one
of the family, inviting him to spend an evening with them
whenever he had leisure and inclination.

These evening calls, and the frequent special commissions
with which he was intrusted, led to his passing in and out
‘quite as one of the household, without a shadow of formality.



82 Uncle Grey's Questions.

As he had often acted as escort both for Mabel and Alice
when they had need of one, and their uncle was too busy to
fill the office in person, Alice was not at all surprised to find
that he was her uncle’s substitute on this occasion.

Her uncle, however, honoured her arrival by returning
home to dinner ten minutes before his usual time, and Alice
appreciated this mark of attention. She knew it meant
something from one who was always so busy, and who
understood the mercantile value of ten minutes in business
hours.

When Alice heard her uncle’s step in the hall, she ran down
to meet him. |

“Right glad to see you,” he said. “How bright you are
looking. I declare there are country roses on your cheeks.
I am sure you have enjoyed your visit to Maysville.”

“Indeed I have,” said Alice.

“TJ am glad to hear it, for I must confess that I have had
_ my misgivings. I was afraid you might regret that you did
not go with us; and had it been so, I should have regretted
it too.”

“T have not regretted it, unless it was the day you left me.
I have spent a very pleasant summer.”

“ Did you like your Aunt Ward so very much ? and did she
succeed in making it so pleasant for you?”

“Not exactly that,” said Alice, hesitatingly. “TI think Aunt
Mary was just as good to me as she knew how to be; but if I
had not a good deal besides to make it pleasant, I could not
have enjoyed it as I did.”

“What were the things that made it so pleasant ?”

“IT found some very pleasant people, and I enjoyed the
walks and rides very much. I explored every nook, just as
‘Aunt Grey said I would.”

“J daré say you did that,” said her uncle, laughing, and














































































































































(

|

| SS
Li HS \ N ae

























































































































































































— =

— =

SSE

= = SS —

SS == —— —





‘© HAVE SPENT A VERY PLEASANT SUMMER.”











“TI gave my Heart to God.” 85

seeming quite satisfied with the account given of the things
which had made the summer pass so pleasantly.

But if Mr. Grey was satisfied, Alice certainly was not. She
had given some reasons why she was glad that she had spent
the summer in Maysville, but had omitted the one which,
not only in reality, but also in her own estimation, far out-
weighed all the others. Was this frank and truthful? Was it
indeed anything less than being ashamed to confess Christ
before her uncle?

The heart of Alice recoiled with dismay from the thought
of such a beginning ; yet it was not easy to say what had been
left unsaid. If it had been Mrs. Carroll or Aunt Nancy, it
would have seemed the most easy and natural thing in the
world ; but to her uncle, a man of the world, who could not
have the smallest sympathy with the new life that had dawned
in her soul, it certainly was not easy to speak of it. Instantly
she lifted up her heart in such a cry for help as is never uttered
in vain. ;

So rapid is thought, that all this passed through her mind
almost before her uncle was conscious that there was a pause
in the conversation. Little thought he of the temptation, the
struggle, the prayer, the victory, which had preceded the words
when Alice said,—

““T have not yet told you the greatest reason I have for
being thankful that I went to Maysville this summer.”

“Tell me about that, by all means,” said her uncle, lightly.

Alice no longer hesitated, but said simply, ‘‘ I gave my heart
to God while in Maysville. It was there I found the Saviour ;
and I shall always be thankful I went there.”

“Ts the Saviour in Maysville more than anywhere else ?”
asked her uncle, in a tone half playful, half serious.

“No, uncle,” replied Alice, in a tone wholly serious. ‘“ He
is evervwhere ; but I think we never realize this till we receive



86 Alice's Forebodings.

Him into our own hearts, and this I never did until I went to
Maysville.”

There was time for no more words, as others now entered
the room, but there had been time for a transaction of the
utmost importance to Alice. It is hardly possible to over-
estimate the value to her of this first confession of Christ in.
her city home. Had the first step been wrong, what weak-
ness, darkness, and doubt might have been the result. But
she had not been ashamed of her Master. In the first hour
of trial she had proved loyal to Him, and had also proved
His power to give grace and strength in the moment of need.
Sweetly calm and peaceful were the remaining hours of that
day, in the blessed consciousness of a Presence that was with
her in her home at her uncle’s as well as in Maysville.

Before Alice left the country, her regret at parting with her
Christian friends there had not been unmingled with appre-
hension, as she thought how much she would need their
counsel and help amid the trials and temptations which must
await her in the city.

Something of these forebodings she at one time expressed
to Mrs. Carroll.

“ Christ will be with you there; and He is all,” was the
reply. ‘He can give you the counsel and aid of Christian
friends to assist you, or He can help and strengthen you
without them, just as He sees fit. But I have no doubt that
you will find Christian friends in your city home. There is a
heavenly attraction, by which such souls are drawn to each
other, and I shall be surprised if you do not find yourself
thus drawn to some whom you will meet.”

Alice soon proved the truth of these words. Among her
aunt’s friends was one, who, being a near relative of the
family, was quite an informal, if not a very frequent visitor.
Soon after the return of Alice, this lady, Mrs. Newman, calied



A Sad Case of Distress, 87

to spend an hour with the family. Alice soon found herself
observing the lady with an interest she had never felt before.
A remark dropped now and then, a something scarcely defin-
able in look and tone, touched a responsive chord in the
heart of the young Christian, and before Mrs. Newman took
leave that morning, Alice began to cherish the hope that
she would prove one of those Christian friends whom Mrs.
Carroll was so confident that she would find.

Nor was she disappointed in this expectation. In a few
days Mrs. Newman called again, this time, as she said,
on special business. Many were the visits she paid to the
homes of the sick, the sorrowing, and the destitute; and
when cases of need brought to her knowledge proved too
much for her own resources, she sought to enlist the sympathy
and aid of others.

It was on such an errand she.had come that morning. In
her visits of mercy she had found a family whose case moved
her deepest sympathies. The father, injured by a serious acci-
dent, had for months been laid aside from work, and though
slowly recovering, he was not yet able to labour. This misfor-
tune had reduced the family to poverty, and obliged them
to seek shelter in a miserable tenement with the most depress-
ing surroundings.

To these accumulated misfortunes had recently been added
the severe illness of the eldest daughter. She had been sick
with a fever, but now seemed sinking in a rapid decline.

‘Tt is my own opinion that the girl may be saved,” said Mrs.
Newman, “by removing the family to a comfortable tenement
and providing for their necessities until the father is once
more able to work.”

Alice listened to all this with deep interest. She was sup-
plied with a liberal allowance of spending money, though a
somewhat thoughtless use of it had left little in her hands at



88 The Visit to the Wretched Home.

the present time. She, however, instantly resolved to do what
she could.

Mrs. Newman was gratified at the sum placed in her hands
by the young girl, but still more by the warm interest mani-
fested in this tale of suffering. The latter prompted her to
ask Alice if she would not accompany her when she went to
visit the family the next day.

Alice hesitated, for she shrank from a visit to this wretched
abode and the sight of so much suffering ; but in a moment
she thought, “Ifmy Master was on earth, would He decline
such an invitation, and if I follow Him shall I not accept it?”
and without further hesitation she thanked Mrs. Newman and
told her that she would go.

Alice never forgot the lesson she learned during that after-
noon with Mrs. Newman, and that first visit to the wretched
abodes of city poverty. She found a personal visit a very
different thing from reading the reports of those employed to
seek out and relieve destitution, or even listening, as she had
sometimes done, to the verbal descriptions of those familiar
with such scenes. It gave her a very different conception of
the poverty and sorrow which, in a great city, everywhere
abound.

It was her only visit to that miserable abode. The next time
she went to call upon the family, they had been removed to
more comfortable quarters. Alice continued to aid in supply-
ing their need, often at the cost of some self-denial on her part,
until the good days Mrs. Newman had so confidently prophesied
dawned upon them: the father able once more to return to his
usual employments and the daughter restored to health, they no
longer had need of the helping hand without which they could
never have safely passed through the.dark days.

Alice found in Mrs. Newman a true and faithful Christian
friend. She found others also, as Mrs. Carroll had predicted.



Alice spcaks to: Young Wullis. 89

In the sanctuary, too, in the Sunday-school, and the weekly
prayer-meeting, she learned that there were green pastures and
still waters in her city home, as well as in Maysville.

Her thoughts often turned to the home-circle, with earnest
longings to see its inmates gathered, with herself, into the fold
of Christ ; but here she found little to cheer and encourage
her.

In the Sunday-school of which she was a member, was a
large class of young men. She seldom had her attention
drawn to this class without thinking of George Willis, and
wishing that he were a member of it. She had thought of this
many times before she found courage to speak to him on the
subject; but at last, seizing a favourable opportunity, she
summoned courage to do so.

“ Why do you not join Mr. Arthur’s Bible-class?” she asked.
“Tam sure you would like it. I have heard one or two speak
of him as the best teacher they ever had.”

“T dare say,” Willis replied, somewhat carelessly.

“T wish you would go,” persisted Alice.

“J will think about it,” said the young man.

For several succeeding Sundays Alice watched this
class, to see if George Willis was there, and each Sabbath
saw with regret that he was not among the pupils. She
resolved that she would not give up her desire without

_one more effort, though it cost her not a little to speak the
second time.

“T have looked for you in Mr. Arthur’s class, and I have
been disappointed not to see you there,” she said.

“Do you mean that you have cared so much about it, that
it has been a real disappointment not to see me there?” he
asked in some surprise.

‘“*T do indeed mean it.”

“Then, I will go, if it’s only to please you.”

Satisfied. G



90 One Point gained.

Young Willis was as good as his word, and the next Sabbath
found him in Mr. Arthur’s class.

Alice was pleased to have gained even this point, and perhaps
the more so, as it seemed to her the only influence for good
that she had been able to exert within the home-circle. She
could not get on at all with Mabel, who persistently turned the
conversation whenever Alice attempted to speak of those
things which now lay nearest her heart. As to her uncle and
aunt, it seemed to her that she could not even hope to do them
good, when their relative position was such, that they naturally
expected to lead and influence her, rather than to be led and
influenced by her. She little thought that the few words she
had spoken to her uncle on returning from Maysville had left
any impression.






ares

2 Fe |"

Los OF KNOWLEDGE,





CHAPTER IX.

BENEVOLENT PLANS,

A LARGE portion of the following summer was spent by Alice
in Maysville. It is unnecessary to describe this second summer,
in many respects so like the first. There were the rides with
her uncle to the “old place” and many other places, the hours
spent with her friend Mrs. Carroll, who constantly became more
dear to her, and the frequent calls upon Aunt Nancy when she
went with her uncle to the farm, besides many pleasant hours
spent with Emma Foster and other companions of her own
age.

When with Mrs. Carroll, Alice spoke freely of all that had
interested her during the winter. She told her how much more
she had enjoyed her school and her studies since, by increased
diligence and application, she had been able to master each
difficulty as it presented itself. She also spoke of the pleasure
she derived from the approbation of her teachers, and from the
consciousness that she was doing faithfully this part of present
duty.

She had also much to say of Mrs. Newman and her many
benevolent plans, and of her own interest in them.

‘“My first gift was from mere impulse,” she said ; “but when
I began seriously to look at the great work to be done in this
direction, I was tempted to feel that it was useless for me to

G 2



92 The Uncertain Future.

attempt anything while so little of my money was at my own
disposal. I began to indulge in many plans about the good I
would do when I could spend money as I chose. But then I
recollected what you had said to me about living in the present,
not in the future, and how you had spoken of the folly of
occupying the mind with plans and dreams, to the neglect of
what seems even the most unimportant of personal claims.
Then I saw clearly that, for me, the work of the present was to
do all in my power with the money now placed at my disposal,
for the poor and needy, by self-denial and shunning needless
expenses.”

“T am thankful, indeed,” said Mrs. Carroll, “if any words of
mine have helped you to take such right views of present duty.
Nothing can be more uncertain than the future, with all of us.
It would be sad indeed if, by trusting to that uncertain future
and neglecting present opportunities, however small, we should
at last fail to be found among those to whom the King will
say, ‘I was an hungred, and ye gave Me meat: I was thirsty,
and ye gave Me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took Me in:
naked, and ye clothed Me: I was sick, and ye visited Me: I
was in prison, and ye came unto Me. ... I say unto you,
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these My
brethren, ye have done it unto Me.’

«¢ ¢ every hour that fleets so slowly
Has its task to do or bear.
Luminous the crown and holy,
If thou set each gem with care,’”

For several years Alice spent a portion of each summer in
Maysville. Sometimes it was only two or three weeks, but
whether longer or shorter, these seasons were greatly enjoyed.

Nor was Alice the only one benefited by them. The
neighbours said Mrs. Ward was getting to be a different waman





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“ DOESN'T BENNY GROW ANY BETTER?” ALICE ASKED ({. 95).











Mrs. Draper and her Son. 95

since her niece spent so much time there; that a young person
in the house was just what she needed, At all events, Mr.
Ward was sure it was just what Ae needed, and these visits
were a positive delight to the cheerful, genial old man.

During the winters spent in the city, Alice did not lose her
interest in the needy and destitute, and by many a little self-
denial, known only to Him who searcheth all things, she did
what she could for the relief of these suffering ones.

One winter she became deeply interested in the case of a
poor widow, whose only son, a lad of about eight, had long
been ailing, and now seemed to be slowly wasting away.
There was much in Mrs. Draper that excited the sympathy
and regard of Alice. She was so patient and uncomplaining,
and showed such devoted mother-love for the feeble child who
was her all. She also gave proof of neat and orderly habits,
notwithstanding the disadvantages under which she laboured
in the very undesirable tenement which was the best she could
afford to occupy. She was a Christian, too, Alice felt sure, for
though she said little, she certainly manifested the grace of
Christian patience and resignation.

“Doesn’t Benny grow any better?” Alice asked one day
when she called to leave some toys, which she hoped would
help to while away the weary hours.

The poor mother shook her head sorrowfully. Benny was
himself too much occupied with a new picture-book to heed
what they were saying, and Alice went on. “ Can nothing be
done to help him?” she asked.

“J fear not,” said Mrs. Draper—‘at least, nothing that I
can do.”

“Ts there anything that would help him if you could
do 1t?” :

“Perhaps not, though the doctor says if I could take him
into the country it might save him ; but that I can’t do.”



96 The Summer Visit to Maysville.

“TJ wish it could be done,” said Alice, thoughtfully; but
Mrs. Draper only sighed, as she cast a loving glance at the
child, who, for the moment, had lost all sense of weariness or
pain in the delight afforded by the bright pictures of the book
whose leaves he was slowly turning.

As Alice left Mrs. Draper, she resolved that she would have
a talk with her friend, Mrs. Newman, on the subject. But
this resolution was not carried into effect. In a few days
Alice left the city for her usual summer visit to Maysville, and
several things conspired to render these days very busy ones,
so that she scarcely had time even to think of Mrs. Draper and
poor Benny, until she found herself quietly seated in the train
that was swiftly bearing her toward the country village which
had become dear to her.

The sight of the green fields and leafy woods brought back
a very vivid remembrance of the poor city boy and the wish
she had felt that he might find a home in the country. Some-
thing of selfreproach mingled with these thoughts, True, she
had been very busy, but if she had made the effort, she thought
she might at least have managed to call upon Mrs. Newman
and have a talk with her on the subject. She feared she had
been selfish in allowing her mind to become so engrossed with
her own affairs as almost to forget the poor widow and her
son, and she feared that Benny’s pale, wan face would haunt
her when she crossed the green fields or wandered in the
favourite groves of Maysville. But such thoughts were all put
to flight when once she reached her uncle’s house, and met the
warm greeting there awaiting her. There was too much to
hear and say to leave much room for thinking.

As Alice sat at the tea-table with her uncle and aunt, she
said, “I have not yet inquired after Aunt Nancy. How is she
getting along?” ,

“ Aunt Nancy is going down hill pretty fast,” replied her



Alice's Sudden Plan. 97

uncle, in a tone of unusual gravity. “I fear she had rather a
hard time of it last winter. It will never do. to let her live
alone in that house another winter. Some one must be found
to stay with her ; but who that can be, is what puzzles me.”

Suddenly there flashed upon the mind of Alice a plan to
meet this emergency, one that might help dear old Aunt Nancy
and some one else at the same time. It seemed so feasible
that even the thought of it lighted up her countenance with a
gleam of pleasure.

Then in rapid words Alice told the story of Mrs. Draper
and poor little Benny, and how the doctor had said that if the
boy could go into the country it might save him. She told
how patient and uncomplaining Mrs. Draper was, and how
devoted to her son, and then she unfolded the plan which had
so suddenly flashed upon her. She thought if Mrs. Draper
could live in Aunt Nancy’s cottage, Benny might get well, and
be a joy and help to his fond mother all her remaining days.
Mrs. Draper could do the work for the Maysville people, which
Aunt Nancy was no longer able to do, and Aunt Nancy could
have some one to live with her, and see that she did not suffer
When the cold weather returned again.

When Alice had finished what she had to say, she waited
for her uncle to speak, but he was so busy with his own
thoughts that he still remained silent.

“ Now, uncle, I hope you will not call all this the romance
of a young, foolish girl, who knows nothing about practical life,”
Alice went on to say. ‘1 will write to Mrs. Newman and see
_ what she thinks aboutit. She is very practical and judicious.”

“Would it not be better to consult Aunt Nancy first?” said
Mr. Ward, looking up with one of his arch smiles.

“T dare say I have hold of the wrong end,” said Alice,
laughing, “and if so, it’s not the first time.”

“«“ Well, I'll tell you how we will manage it. You shall take



98 Aunt Nancy consents.

hold of one end of the business, and I of the other, and see if
we can meet in the middle I will consult Aunt Nancy
myself. Ithink I can best manage this end. If she is in-
clined to favour the proposal, you can write to your city
friend and find out what she thinks of it.”

The next morning Mr. Ward went to see Aunt Nancy, and
Alice eagerly awaited his return.

“What did she say?” was her first eager question when her
uncle entered the house.

“T doubt if she thought favourably of ‘it at first,” said Mr.
Ward. ‘You know it would be a great change for her to take
in these-strangers from the city. But when I told her of the
miserable city home, where not a breath of what we call pure
air was to be had, and of poor Benny, who was pining for it,
and his sad mother, who watched him wasting away month
after month, with the bitter thought that she could do nothing
for him, Aunt Nancy suddenly exclaimed, ‘Who knows but
this may be the way in which God will provide for more than one
of His dear children?’ I do believe that she has already taken
poor Benny into her great loving heart. At all events, she is
quite willing that you should write to Mrs. Newman and see
what she thinks about it. Be sure you ask if she thinks Mrs.
Draper would be good and kind to Aunt Nancy.”

Alice lost no time in writing this letter, and the answer, so
eagerly expected, was not long delayed. Better still, it proved
very satisfactory. Mrs. Newman wrote that she knew Mrs.
Draper well, and had confidence in her as an honest, kind, and
Christian woman. Mrs. Draper herself was ready to do any-
thing that might benefit her child, and Mrs. Newman, on her
part, offered to see everything arranged in the great city, and
Mrs. Draper and her boy placed in the train for Maysville, if
Mr. Ward would undertake the charge of them when they
reached that place.



Benny benefited. 99

Alice soon had the pleasure of seeing everything satisfac-
torily arranged. Before she left Maysville, Mrs. Draper and
Benny were nicely settled in Aunt Nancy’s cottage, apparently
much to the satisfaction of all parties.

It did her heart good to see the boy sitting on the green
grass under the large oak, watching Aunt Nancy’s hens and
chickens and enjoying all country sights and sounds. Her
uncle assured her that he had no doubt Benny would make a
stout boy yet, able to work on a farm, where a boy was much
needed, and inthis way he would soon bea help to his mother.
On his own account he was very thankful that his sleep, the
next winter, would not be disturbed by the thought that Aunt
Nancy might be suffering through the long, cold nights, with
no one to care for her.





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'2011-12-22T12:25:28-05:00'
describe
'10668' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHE' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
fc018d51261ce507895c98d272ee50c8
29b7b3f992a5c5b7e7d161fc531eb292a465ec18
'2011-12-22T12:24:31-05:00'
describe
'362683' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHF' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
080e8268dfbc28190733d495a495d11b
357d703354a1e3a8a66fbbf31d6fc15fab7c17b0
describe
'99224' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHG' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
d8a91076468aae9c6d683dbf1c0c5912
09623d2f296ce2ebc750bdea8206e625b3051bf8
'2011-12-22T12:24:17-05:00'
describe
'4011' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHH' 'sip-files00005.pro'
23fc35e3485baf3875a8aef92cba5c66
a30758242b96659eab7bda568835fe7592570446
'2011-12-22T12:27:09-05:00'
describe
'26319' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHI' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
96f0e2681f628fac74807516deb43a7c
bbd300eed2c3b2b2725174948f446bd2e394a5b4
'2011-12-22T12:23:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHJ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
a2f0c0306570417320bef2a7408db4b5
71537d59aed6100dbce6b6653367980ce8ec64d4
'2011-12-22T12:25:13-05:00'
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHK' 'sip-files00005.txt'
b78274a46797e7be12ad57bf615923ab
f0c4d779f7ed609e82256341b0c78e4fed92c4ac
'2011-12-22T12:24:12-05:00'
describe
'7162' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHL' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
e2fac500f21486d5f5247d9d7fca576d
5e96ea40f947ae135d5bc00729f9533d02f9a04c
'2011-12-22T12:23:45-05:00'
describe
'362819' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHM' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
6c77d74a4519425b361f7f8abc17f93b
c137375bcfc905ee2df77a9eb4c33d6fe0a51b5e
'2011-12-22T12:24:09-05:00'
describe
'31753' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHN' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
5a940064c66f48afafb26463e722a2ca
e14235f8c07fb6a17b6709676c35a932e37d0579
'2011-12-22T12:28:03-05:00'
describe
'2532' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHO' 'sip-files00006.pro'
9fdf2f70a81f2472c079470c4557afe6
f5f17ce2d5376deab8af84029377ade5b65067f4
describe
'6143' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHP' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
967b13bc783a89f57657a9da1435d2ab
e745d8c5f93e61d36e8fe8e7e2d04915aa17edee
'2011-12-22T12:24:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHQ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
e1e4a51a4189f05b2bf6e4b44e72febd
d944be893535ed47292b152b67c31a34b8c9e54c
'2011-12-22T12:23:06-05:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHR' 'sip-files00006.txt'
06e5dd74d1f0e78b2305dd46288f7297
4c9ffb3f41477920ccd6341633864c9ba9baaf47
'2011-12-22T12:23:51-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHS' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
85957052088e221d9762a8c975ca7158
be96cea5a7d58814b7cbc343c799ff1961819e3f
describe
'362602' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHT' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
02ac30e6aaf5a235bca74d152b0d7681
52485a495d2132c5c2954a7785027cd0bfdf168c
'2011-12-22T12:25:32-05:00'
describe
'83739' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHU' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
55dc1065603b51604f18e29ed8ed8dd6
2e826019accc8d8f367c45d04159d9f0ef3fb188
'2011-12-22T12:28:07-05:00'
describe
'3342' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHV' 'sip-files00007.pro'
41354ab033cd08baabb44bc7ec0ae7ee
dbc25446f7106461515a9f1ae91b3b8e690e6187
'2011-12-22T12:27:58-05:00'
describe
'22614' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
da4ee63124e148e224f03723edaec541
b5ae89a6a5110462c767e3201719dd7a6a3400c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
b5ce3598e76121f0494b57c384c9d8a2
78b7cdac7f8fd6a75a48ce437a0bbb1598f8801f
'2011-12-22T12:24:24-05:00'
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHY' 'sip-files00007.txt'
8622a52bd3b266e23d24d758bb09092b
afa602584cbc935d449e4bf5c0adabb1b2688aec
'2011-12-22T12:23:10-05:00'
describe
'6347' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWHZ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
9f1780037dcbcbd14e2ca674cb01e60b
c5488d7d7a22b56d9d630747e201ce11b29acd21
'2011-12-22T12:24:44-05:00'
describe
'362709' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
f92e67d522cae0c17c9a67238e19772e
114ca251affa0d05a49a1f19ed9dbd1b34ce581b
'2011-12-22T12:27:31-05:00'
describe
'64586' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
b0f74d9a9c63c4cfa239c45059fe7144
108da7ebde9410df24f40c3e477cb2b40ac64490
'2011-12-22T12:23:25-05:00'
describe
'8744' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
a0ec2cbb85d71609c33305eddc2bc3d1
37724521107b39c4dc91323d583fa8bbc103bb13
'2011-12-22T12:25:22-05:00'
describe
'19494' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWID' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
4a314c3ac4d009c5f3dea7945f9700b3
0db42bc1551cf64a0cdaa58e089b7335eef45e92
'2011-12-22T12:28:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
5b1421d9ab126cd1eff4a4c6e933f10e
99093d7a2e74291158275e519f0e7e18812f6a9f
'2011-12-22T12:23:23-05:00'
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
6813836ecff541825b170737b6249af7
9e22226a1efffba99b83bf662ac290af55690493
'2011-12-22T12:25:54-05:00'
describe
'5898' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c4f2496f3e1f9e3aa038c5dbbb09244e
1e681cce7dd57afd81a46fdef43c9835bdbfa9d6
'2011-12-22T12:23:36-05:00'
describe
'353261' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
1be0074bc473104327fadb2860aaff2b
747a8433e685a64ca51a213b9cf74fd68204c0bc
'2011-12-22T12:27:28-05:00'
describe
'57997' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWII' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
caef9faac78b1140b39a41873154a85a
479855e1283212c2db98ef6cce928618eb75cfcd
'2011-12-22T12:27:14-05:00'
describe
'13505' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
36f85b421f3096bbb80f811a38d15458
0c1772a021b6cadc11a6350ef60ec968d44a3e80
describe
'17029' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1a2ed5d838a996b1f9c5aff0894e5747
17f9e95206ae0a61514e7802d48126b0d4d82709
describe
'2843332' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
dfda3733199e8d4a40179bc198855ca9
01d9bb5b7b5e90aa0cd8df0ed457ca9d8879869c
'2011-12-22T12:27:25-05:00'
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
25bd9df6a39c14d10b72e2fb4b38d698
2244e50360bec01375ef7d50364fc1c37151f7ee
'2011-12-22T12:23:28-05:00'
describe
'6106' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
5e747d9b8f272d3187727bec0fe43277
6b3293a01c301593d7f66ba340fc2c78edb3499c
'2011-12-22T12:28:01-05:00'
describe
'362870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
c7931bcef08d245cc4ded712caf97ba3
63325bdbf00604502674800897d21c1e9c43372e
'2011-12-22T12:23:22-05:00'
describe
'151774' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
8d09c0e90c43562751371995aec59fef
bfb932b22604ab03956574c4625c17ec9e2cb8cd
'2011-12-22T12:27:37-05:00'
describe
'20573' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d14e8ef4eb739f93c9f3dc0d11d161b8
e26a79f56b160eb96713cba25115aaa6dfc6087f
'2011-12-22T12:28:13-05:00'
describe
'55554' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
16826a20d1723ec67ac58a4e07047189
8c6999369b9abadc788fb3eb0f741b42468233ec
'2011-12-22T12:26:24-05:00'
describe
'2924380' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5dca2409ab7d8cf5b7bcd88dafd99b14
cfa4a50ccb877a9f822ed804d2c2788464b46914
'2011-12-22T12:24:33-05:00'
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
58d78511afa1e0a8916a5c5034e37a6e
dc05c4e1bb8cb3975391d9ff9161afc2358cdcd3
'2011-12-22T12:27:26-05:00'
describe
'29421' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7cf0d94ebd12227641a0d2c96f68dd55
01212c3f5767fb71467097403c8119166e9e6eaf
'2011-12-22T12:26:29-05:00'
describe
'362936' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
327675c86017e10ea54c6aaa7cf69f5f
20f0e04f86ef5c86c7081cdf76ef25a727f6fa37
describe
'139496' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d2bdc697bb8832851939f2d9bbf1a1a7
912d7bc71fff2beeee4bf4691361e20fc49a7868
'2011-12-22T12:27:44-05:00'
describe
'44989' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
b85eb4678580b5812d7bab0137b8a5fc
b61f16dcf946a0dd64802aade7eb197f5ca8a22e
'2011-12-22T12:23:17-05:00'
describe
'41824' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
4aa7e9395c8d816a0e2e36f6daf02c56
52005e87f37f9b094728a513088393181df06e61
'2011-12-22T12:23:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWIZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
13ad5a272bed24f8894df912233c13f7
91564860f348469fd8d37157adbcb6978e5ae5de
'2011-12-22T12:26:47-05:00'
describe
'1852' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
345ba6d81089e0936338b1b867c307a0
7a19b5d17d5ed29d70de3540a616979ccb9b1287
describe
'9888' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJB' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
ec10d48129ae1755268fc5ebb5f6be5c
b3a0cd22c29fef5a5d27d3cee4d27296f2d1e25c
'2011-12-22T12:25:24-05:00'
describe
'362903' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e646dc56061e777e96b9329d1e56eb72
eb4e56a5e7ce66cb00312c52bd3bb8d58ea8975e
'2011-12-22T12:23:08-05:00'
describe
'129153' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
d9217b31da1963081350e5ac70a80a74
cc4488b0ec95d780add97df1b5bf501be83c0e36
'2011-12-22T12:24:35-05:00'
describe
'42285' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
546c941e5ae57f754ab8400c46b6aa10
af95f682fd20077549b391147f747c7c54769d63
'2011-12-22T12:24:19-05:00'
describe
'39643' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8c08a788c8b3d0d56b67cd4fde960624
6afc3519d26cb8b7aeae1e6461d27579c260ec3e
'2011-12-22T12:28:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
8eb4a305310d3386c3b5c30e918b06fd
c024bbfe01d7277cf6cfac523cff9919b806d89b
'2011-12-22T12:23:50-05:00'
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
006642d033a9962302ce9b8d2b0aea80
31c0eebc6d1dd2342f5d0fa6cf7dbe978837475e
describe
'9217' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
0cb46a7cd9b378ca6d7f1329b620ed6d
4e7849e16c2fa76cbecdc0d89cd1c59e95518eb7
'2011-12-22T12:25:02-05:00'
describe
'362920' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
535e422f57c9e6a7f3c0acad4ac924f5
b3b3b2dce65bd1c1b296ca3c43c04b1f9077f3a5
'2011-12-22T12:28:22-05:00'
describe
'150483' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4f1cc1edb451f42e724a96a004405e0a
a18a144e6552b06b22e03d5b4b32b74e34a1b82d
'2011-12-22T12:27:08-05:00'
describe
'48559' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
f321969c6e45c7319a794def5ff6a666
2775b361e4de1792e7a3cdb9b2b37359b81ec85e
'2011-12-22T12:24:32-05:00'
describe
'45386' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
de97b8e467b71dabd78ba032edac7676
fb4f44541654b7e3d7f7f5242808af424daf43e3
'2011-12-22T12:28:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
86839a4a5503a01b1916983fcdf1e40b
e98bb11d52222a78bf2d5c735e616627c5090661
'2011-12-22T12:25:51-05:00'
describe
'2002' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJO' 'sip-files00014.txt'
2582087b610fd9f51eb284499b7e2800
f8c1357c137d10df421acccc8742742ddb1f1c0f
'2011-12-22T12:24:07-05:00'
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJP' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a5b5c97adee967b00ef726e4b1e7c205
cd3133ab6aeb371260d3da0b0d12be38a2b2c1bf
'2011-12-22T12:28:05-05:00'
describe
'362827' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJQ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
df0753f3ac174c22601d38e37f72600c
b9ae983a9ade9cfe522ee1dbed897564a0cdaf05
'2011-12-22T12:23:18-05:00'
describe
'144695' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c340dc58c1b78e088888aa46ee09f54e
897da3b0fcdb539769e7fdc18bcc51e0048976e9
'2011-12-22T12:24:34-05:00'
describe
'46904' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
58bfca1b45b35f7363aa018a0436f322
d58fe357b0977d00b443902f192aad5cb4bb8e33
'2011-12-22T12:28:15-05:00'
describe
'43836' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJT' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3c56d602ad0adb4dd2f422ae12d9893f
c405dacd9c588a7c19b9ece97d069db1b550bf61
'2011-12-22T12:28:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
c01ab29a14842c005bc690ce19c109c3
297913f3b16df67e7d169cb007345be4be8533a9
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
978ab1c4a5e98e53c9a4611aad611643
ff33b7454b73262a29b0b7c575de1ab4fc20f344
describe
'10020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
0de1ee01fa33aa4f93d9065647a0aaf9
bc6c69a5837e85705744bc56abf9ebd733dcfeed
'2011-12-22T12:26:06-05:00'
describe
'362875' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
916fdc8cfe5da499328a46b61b57bc75
3913eccf266924c328306a037fc09803018d7707
describe
'141728' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJY' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a42d555a62cb265fdc594f228f1f6e29
71eb407220dc5f325b4e3dceb9afa8d2ee800ce9
describe
'46405' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWJZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
64af3865e0df5ad22341f83c07ff920d
ade922d66957df7236553f3d845ef957f80182f0
describe
'43414' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
5e3453b082dbcbc9143e5ce87b4fa38c
91553e56b70400dc1939c08402f0bc2306162854
'2011-12-22T12:26:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a786a4c06e759d96db00da82602ab596
5333c4f01de3df264f0f52e66a9003fed48331fc
'2011-12-22T12:26:07-05:00'
describe
'1915' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a9882f6b886189cc8b2df5d89cff721d
6087a0f1f44c8aebef76ea63a463ac5c2239af2b
'2011-12-22T12:26:08-05:00'
describe
'10123' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7a2c6abd3756f543d6e7cc3d14beb1fb
bbe3daa792684dc6cf1a151fd10283a47181c063
describe
'362914' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
d81a274d337a467e8688bc3895e8db06
1c7e3c469d7c4da76d8fcb373bfc93aecd8534fc
'2011-12-22T12:25:48-05:00'
describe
'130399' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
265a64a2d90653c16744e69a4bca60b7
8a13519bcbb53604c3c4d3189f1027f9901fb7d8
'2011-12-22T12:27:06-05:00'
describe
'42820' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKG' 'sip-files00017.pro'
b252e4e5ffefe895e9638a6d3176d11c
7ae766d2227cfbe2d494340cc8c631ec0033cd51
'2011-12-22T12:24:18-05:00'
describe
'40053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKH' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
5dc7004da2897eb5458503f307c4ec71
c2fb7bac10520fb9f67b7854605dceba800f7a2d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKI' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9cf5c149483a9a0fdc19c718cc9aa066
a3cdde43bf9c7eb1d7a9d5b440343cbdd86222ae
'2011-12-22T12:23:32-05:00'
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKJ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
5d1755fc7937c48bcf42b8968227ffb1
f2311b4531e7f990110f59a285fd9e5747f88f3b
describe
'10036' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
04cd9abc27e23f833f8655988b149fd2
3585cab530dca3061e14354a89c3cd263e288f40
describe
'362918' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKL' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
7dfca617584357b54c4896d34ffcd036
033851a1ac97db178d1227c343711f0054a1cbc6
describe
'127344' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3dfc02774c6432a726813bfaa64f4ac9
aa9e226335a5800a7069e92af8f4aa098b18492b
'2011-12-22T12:23:46-05:00'
describe
'41357' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKN' 'sip-files00018.pro'
604353fb91ecf6f8243a5637fccd0d5f
f1c8e4ae17e4c2e541ce93f5eaf188f89a243b2f
'2011-12-22T12:24:50-05:00'
describe
'37518' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKO' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e92cba506c8ff993543326619da8a10d
d594e8fa74522bd9cd71503e9e99e7e069f35131
'2011-12-22T12:24:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
67f44f4774dcd0cf203d51c414d488ff
bb881cdc5b28efaf4cd3dcbd2f784e31a968af59
'2011-12-22T12:26:41-05:00'
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKQ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1560ef45c84e7bcb5feedc2ae6fffe45
4df7bc1a7b46de897ff5e3d3bf2f6dfae4b56b9a
'2011-12-22T12:26:39-05:00'
describe
'8986' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e3d9710bdb059e1ff7127fd7a22acadb
428216427222b08a2fa8246e7353ea96ae9f1fde
'2011-12-22T12:28:25-05:00'
describe
'362868' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
6ad7a97bd64c8986d726ba325ad3d1bb
8fc7b60adfe04e0500d71452f7eaf58f001e1d79
'2011-12-22T12:25:53-05:00'
describe
'186538' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
75c7948a9e2df94bb8af237e5c052ab9
6d61d577c71ef982cb426e8b35d8e161a3018ac8
describe
'3646' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0fb9845cf12c45108932ae07470398b4
dc5634d2ce2e3d2cde15f08638ee5bfea0b40ce6
'2011-12-22T12:28:02-05:00'
describe
'43746' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f59295afc16339e93e881037a3e19fff
464d5921006ea69b2d39cadcd066315ad053b206
'2011-12-22T12:25:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f8cc6f90b63cedaa4ca6df9fb80f0ca3
df2976f9b91c92e21905037d7b2ca50f433d47d4
'2011-12-22T12:24:56-05:00'
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
599f74600dd572852f131b274fb13124
c7f5ca28978f1389d867cb35fb6099f0cd05dbd6
'2011-12-22T12:23:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10394' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
27b11ef76d8dc020f8804aa09cef9c3a
10926b2f7cd5abcb32ed33e7d86804a83729ae23
'2011-12-22T12:24:08-05:00'
describe
'362771' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWKZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a58f1b62397f181d179df6c38e983a43
29bf7a97fe335957fc46f6b816c579461bcff82d
'2011-12-22T12:26:55-05:00'
describe
'15681' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4e2a7bff8d741324614c01ad1e9abd9b
efa7dde01a1cc51a59529fa7a2717545575e82b1
'2011-12-22T12:25:55-05:00'
describe
'3502' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
cceb018e809f4aec763f787ded7def46
412dbd8033b79d0dbf532e1a5ae25296dfa3f618
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
9667bab9ce20755a976860b9e07b5ed0
48418bc68a867ec158ff8ec7c7e58afd92fd5f11
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
3ed4f0b814d0f1a3286aebb17a85407d
fa079c4f019a327e3648db1d89c1a854e160ce99
'2011-12-22T12:27:17-05:00'
describe
'362935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4ef3bba8789c900421ddda8b7ab13cbb
7d81ead0b31402738cd075187196e4259103b3bf
'2011-12-22T12:25:36-05:00'
describe
'117520' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a3b71ce96c86a7e8e9f8da04e3698bb7
b0952ddfcf83597331b4e4aebda93c4a11135216
'2011-12-22T12:27:41-05:00'
describe
'35752' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
4d4af68a50a555eeba4bf48dd97879b5
827eec4a259d5322fdd8dd7d1cbb99274e436436
'2011-12-22T12:25:04-05:00'
describe
'34833' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4ca49ad104b766595aa50dbfa4d6bd16
7b3d18edacb0eb3efe6e8c28e0abe2f91d0cbca2
'2011-12-22T12:28:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
94e29a153aa737cc6a4c47321cced614
4e8a426a94c8cf5a939fd2802cd2022a277f0f3b
'2011-12-22T12:24:52-05:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
60879e6157533cd220dea88a97008808
f001e946e881c05aeb6729f509629dfd02a0e96f
'2011-12-22T12:23:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8598' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
61cd0e92942da6cadcd60a74945143c1
86301feb3bcd5416abf5ebaa9548a52b92622ff7
describe
'362938' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
97d99632a29dd1391f1acd5148ad57b4
87d6452d86b38df5cc06713515e58f0688990603
'2011-12-22T12:28:14-05:00'
describe
'173970' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
ff954331ea4e57efc21a54c14376e6a6
4b8be8c30ec60e01088de8055c53be7913a4fabe
'2011-12-22T12:24:29-05:00'
describe
'30975' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
88225867a0963ca282723765f55fb648
1651b19db2edca321b86496b8e3bcc1cc05653fa
'2011-12-22T12:27:03-05:00'
describe
'65119' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
659dc7129e62c17fc5db884dafb160bd
d1b411748551a63c2796644441048908610ee93e
describe
'2924948' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
893dba6080f41937b107dd0e569335f3
739afcacbafb84a97ed2d9284db7c505100bc9cb
'2011-12-22T12:25:06-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
470ddcdd6bc1afb9558fab215fefdfcb
3bdfe0e613550de5608875b7090086527f730213
describe
'31332' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
eb0ee013f93a3bbdff22279ce7525c3a
f7b70edd48b8773838ba6ed635999729bafbefa1
describe
'362858' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
b0a38acc1a54892fa55cbf6de5215215
99ac63b0c67ac20def3089186188e1a5cddf2c46
'2011-12-22T12:23:14-05:00'
describe
'139346' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
48c883bda89458f505de3578b2cdd72d
6dad4324cbc6b851752811fd7eae8baae6313ccd
'2011-12-22T12:27:35-05:00'
describe
'44694' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
ad9768999f9508a92bcb933499c6c706
9a24ba9949e87418f1b674ab59a43aeaea589dfc
'2011-12-22T12:25:11-05:00'
describe
'41486' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
972751df7baa77ef6b26d48ac4a01765
8b66dc8304c725a245ccf070f81a824c6e2ed01d
'2011-12-22T12:25:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
6f9dbd2608a3abbbcc8e5468302176f0
9c3e352e4c437a968678c1f2ce3e0a5c2a222f49
'2011-12-22T12:28:04-05:00'
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
055775f37d4393828ccf57240b4d19db
d7cb4f31b28a698d343f1186575f743b1687b7b3
describe
'9863' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d1913893b6c388ceaa8df30aafad2f45
73e0f2c7700a1a239f577c6a24cebedbf61f960b
'2011-12-22T12:24:38-05:00'
describe
'354881' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
70523337bff80c6409fcb73814b0bba7
f0b024d4d4215831e86b28b86e873335a65133e8
describe
'141584' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
1a6f05f3e508a1fa8705143731728240
0072be1e1b585e6f113e6ad34282c2036eb6213c
'2011-12-22T12:24:22-05:00'
describe
'47811' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
441ffcc96e9659010fe389f4ca8dee31
85539c01bf1cc76dfb6f2540bdb1b165a6b54798
'2011-12-22T12:27:12-05:00'
describe
'43186' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
7293811f2a9a3d1878b3ba850be922f7
7584f40e11efa92be3cc8045cf48c3f644a7f364
'2011-12-22T12:25:42-05:00'
describe
'2856164' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ec8f06ddac0145945fa3382cfb6ae0dc
1099726a9b706cac3d71eae2d39dffcfd68e3ef5
'2011-12-22T12:23:03-05:00'
describe
'1891' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWME' 'sip-files00024.txt'
6ec8ca11adcb8c1b186c5c13238af29b
8862ae9abf57aa73088571c8edff6180ae83921e
'2011-12-22T12:23:07-05:00'
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
45ea8174379a130d40c25b18a2ca0853
121325578a126f61316724aa9b08c70409e5eead
'2011-12-22T12:26:16-05:00'
describe
'362869' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
144f37e27e25043142a42e27795701f9
4de0c5ed6fe0a7bb1ec75386714bd01108f0852b
describe
'143747' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
7db9d984ee4f647c67ca926b6dbf7dc6
a6500b12dc814b959098e4cedb91725b06c69c1b
'2011-12-22T12:26:58-05:00'
describe
'47967' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
155bf9b3b35b02ee1dc41c5c7e583e58
f07dddefc60a6cfa80a45dc085fee915a1fc0bae
'2011-12-22T12:28:35-05:00'
describe
'44249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
db9be9f68b212064166820f9a1635bf6
a1b5811d524b79643b9af6c888751cb9be71c5ca
'2011-12-22T12:24:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1ab23ec7a60ba3051f8089dacf1eb4e9
e60720fba6d571a4f444873abe572a536370602f
'2011-12-22T12:28:18-05:00'
describe
'1988' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWML' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f6d9b76fe5341721dfe501a6f7ee6a95
255ff72270cfe398f66c97fb3ae5a76d143deb57
describe
'10164' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
90be565a6c34b8adaddb23444061af83
d2004d129e56636fb1cf4a030c493f49dee64845
describe
'362902' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
bcb5929118633a79b89bca0a356593ac
7bed04b6580bcb57f6b16b2bc8501518adc9a6e9
'2011-12-22T12:27:34-05:00'
describe
'188251' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
96a52b299a8411504b02d9ab4384f445
0a9853cebe5a6d319b025676693dd8cea3972a73
'2011-12-22T12:26:22-05:00'
describe
'45190' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2128083eee645d5d8b1ff9ce218c68ae
f101344469369a13820461e29e3276274db15da3
describe
'69845' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c5c05258fed3eb37040f20c0663d1dd9
6d6fcd556b747c8dda2bfffabbf63fc344fe571c
'2011-12-22T12:28:26-05:00'
describe
'2925200' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
bf3857f34d7331cb4e88c287c83bf7d9
298706193c026583c0aef79c5783ce4743030c6c
'2011-12-22T12:24:59-05:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
21e21d107da640cecba44723e30b1063
864d807321d21b22a65cbd58f99ed71fdd66dbcf
'2011-12-22T12:25:10-05:00'
describe
'32341' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6ce74b9662950b61c23de7b0d636ec6d
f235cee349c412cf752262de358626de3e4d4a0f
'2011-12-22T12:27:46-05:00'
describe
'362866' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
de7b30e621710d41a5887df06ed329a8
f7029d543518abadce200e1441780c9c876b3255
describe
'145610' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
91955cab980e6f7263b070b3d09ffc7a
d8b6413dcdddeb836fe0df446b8ba6f2eeff1c89
describe
'48684' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
dd88b18ffa43e3809e6fa49166e027f0
51c40ade7a86d514266fce68f377f0f7c79d5b9a
describe
'44112' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
91c0f8030ec1753c397de3c1254650a0
04933316c26ae995b4174753658c21c906ae472c
'2011-12-22T12:23:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3165c780c1bda49874722f5adacaaf72
084329e11013aa1833cd3a15d063dac02bfa90f0
'2011-12-22T12:26:12-05:00'
describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
16dff738eddc136a7b4b4d02023fd122
922140dc1295248abed52c2948626d572923c913
describe
'10408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
91dc6ae7975d5ffd9db6cefdeab2b78d
ca18df961c5a1462cd2ede03f4ff9e7df808b88b
'2011-12-22T12:26:00-05:00'
describe
'362895' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a9c71516503be9aacb5a37308aeadb38
e89aa9e12cdb6def93b5b822b255571637929c8e
describe
'152101' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
3dd10fa1e6826f3961f22e251547a192
78641f2a3732139c5846ea71dc690278968793ed
'2011-12-22T12:26:28-05:00'
describe
'49165' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWND' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b975f4c211fcd61a0f2c223f35aa6c8c
8db242c15242ae9760688ef711f925997d8cdebf
'2011-12-22T12:28:32-05:00'
describe
'46838' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
30eebf78b953282c1fc1df6f935c5a6b
2777bdc39c598908879d0f955af4017cee346613
'2011-12-22T12:23:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
030e0862a88b3171b4f4fa75dde933dc
eb8186c3ec5b6e518fbd0c9e4fa666e3bcc960c5
'2011-12-22T12:25:52-05:00'
describe
'2012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
573fd502f3e32ae5b24eeed6517dc2c5
b68105aa0fb1c1d74c56889ddd03ac27e60837b7
describe
'10401' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
b8e578a6686509ce63808fa9afdcee42
94cb4d00959294fbdcf5ec541d30b6657d5cd853
describe
'362820' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ac1ad8e0fd279e37296f21d912a6146c
5068b0d73132ba4b8981281c4683a9c183dc2962
'2011-12-22T12:23:54-05:00'
describe
'197355' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3c5d06e3081a6a64766d4ee379404b99
08613ec44717394e6b6e64d32c8b6018bfedab47
'2011-12-22T12:26:34-05:00'
describe
'47281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9d86ca087b466176de86eac673b323c8
a5170746114448a17ff487063be9ea0e35bca2c0
describe
'73489' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
3de88bbaff756aaeafd933dfd84cbae5
433fb0498a558be6974fa648b665200c57498cf5
'2011-12-22T12:25:08-05:00'
describe
'2925348' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
2961360c07650f3e5c1ec8ac5106db34
e8d212eb602a64b92d842075b267fb2ee01e5a57
'2011-12-22T12:25:38-05:00'
describe
'1932' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
94c501b1195bd7d4956c385e043fff62
9af309332752fcf07f3457e36b7e70ccafc9e4da
'2011-12-22T12:26:21-05:00'
describe
'32637' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
69092ee11aa4feb07df9ec4851afff6a
408c0da3a5a3c30d42aac04b37d275544f7fe20f
'2011-12-22T12:27:05-05:00'
describe
'362905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c4dfc62d1557794c357726444ff0ef01
2746a9ded26bf450125a9dfb95fa44bc1f7bc994
describe
'140743' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
e3b133628cc818492077ce2cc205de7f
0237b0187d5141e734fc931a32641a8750534a6a
'2011-12-22T12:27:52-05:00'
describe
'40739' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
21090616b35480fee07c6d419b7dae50
8c8d3a2e4571b968c25a7fc2ab98b834c0139903
describe
'40993' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1302f6e9a866897828365b662e649a91
1ca560aa1c74068d3cb3e3f8326d8cbe927f67d1
'2011-12-22T12:24:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
92c58fa0b25813814fdd3dff4658ba67
f8459e70aacd0e27ae1be3b1103eb4171ea7ac31
'2011-12-22T12:24:39-05:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c95cab1817a75aab6a04082ad734d37a
0d986acf3b331a9873fa54520369fb9d682cbc37
describe
'9662' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
dcfb8e8b07469ad9a62d4ecd2d200302
2454ced2f397b9f4b62604d19268bb3037e07c70
'2011-12-22T12:27:19-05:00'
describe
'362885' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f4c1b7bb30d13ddc3fedb13a815af902
503e42795b7e06cfc10d2b41562bd2a547976ea0
'2011-12-22T12:26:11-05:00'
describe
'124883' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
da2ab2bad87d840d78ff79f8c8882a8b
66246c8ae2b4fe60ab0949e58a46f66c36930752
describe
'27802' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4334ba5935d9162085e17dc81d2b9640
7e92400ff733667bf01bb1394af6b47860880d83
'2011-12-22T12:24:53-05:00'
describe
'34927' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b19faaa2474dd28e34db1ffef0daa070
bf7dd3bc68da3e2733d46df425a09b832d26994a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
cabd7159c467c3dee56cc1b94bb26e39
cfe1968133d9075b40d120509b1c1a3e39341f10
'2011-12-22T12:27:39-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
307feee5a6d6ee095850cd89f570bb5f
51ae266a1b14a6fb93fef83ac51ff3a153e5cf6c
describe
'8529' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
f7c9847ab650a77409454cb0356327ea
808e8e1d70f7293c4f4a3858e34bce887ac5cdb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e0b3c0ad30bc775d4d1b2d20d08fec9a
415b910d8f9ddec9deb1faa9086a98cbaea37159
'2011-12-22T12:26:14-05:00'
describe
'129974' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOE' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
443d0962d0fc83ed8bfabfb0059bf971
517e2f7f319c8f32b22ed709c864abb7d9f110f0
describe
'41312' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c499da8e08c7c914256cbc4038239ba0
191d7732fbd3c521ada2aa2c2819013bd3d5dc1c
describe
'39623' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
459778f71fde206a5b02c14b7c3d2e56
5e6e0bb671591b237944957b58d1f12deec90f7e
'2011-12-22T12:23:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
53b7df6b459726bd8aba542ba418ecee
0afe0fe65becbf460a108bb01b91534c630a5510
'2011-12-22T12:26:33-05:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
816560e2d328c0164fb9b86ad3ae15c4
a3c60c9b0a38c011dd0691f009df7640860f6c72
describe
'9429' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7af56903aeec76477c376f2d5e9ff246
87988e1dad3ac1f65d50c8ad9ffb8573c9713251
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
16cac376583a5deab1bde884896e9a22
1f7e5ed056e4baab7d5b8c42c14b6500b6603048
describe
'128417' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
925f1c069afbd7449a88d553a9daa268
014049eabb9dda13ab6b80f964b0179f65ae30c7
'2011-12-22T12:23:30-05:00'
describe
'42053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
4a1477725e5d147cf981c99fe01407d6
d8a0688792847ce9719299199fd76c8036995acc
describe
'39739' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWON' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6a25027711e11c7c416a3929d305e52f
e47712b7cc1a582de2264da2af73c7887860de17
'2011-12-22T12:23:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
4a221f28983a32e1fff6b80a087f3376
7d300a79ba10021b53d90c469995903b11f6673d
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
be3e5e8af149d11f8ef1c73bff23ae1c
cbe6a7bbc26174b6a469a6fafcf9a2fe5fb35b60
describe
'9249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
77cf369cf5f5131af64d3a4ce939d204
469b33534884c81f418ba994d9e4ff72a7bbe48b
describe
'362915' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
23cfdb9d974b27c13ba8b15b9808ca98
e3264efa917bde3f100bc43e692a74af154726ab
describe
'142721' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
10573e4f25c107153e01046c8502c64c
5c267ec6892cc91b10a661c99c6bf5696eac1dce
describe
'46724' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
1208a52c76dcb0ea2e57cd610c79fe3d
95add9f433495749c384426c23972e2526c835ad
describe
'43357' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f09e65d054ca8d6765714721e6141de8
7f1e902595b478c4842bbbbe57afd44c307d5fc6
'2011-12-22T12:28:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0a72a26463b29c707a831ef646191e3a
a2677e9bc41abf2159909da87ca7eef69c65a99f
'2011-12-22T12:25:23-05:00'
describe
'1926' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
c7358c2237634c3dd64cfabd0218f66b
2525a95dd09943221e6174b9b72aa191d09efe92
'2011-12-22T12:25:18-05:00'
describe
'9714' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
6af3aa79ad88b301e5298164049c0dba
64caf0d623a64068cb0ec085c039a6359afb289d
'2011-12-22T12:26:37-05:00'
describe
'362888' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
64de71b1e5d8b7d5311e6b183aa2bd5c
220e0bdcacd8474c184676a05e602a63126c837d
'2011-12-22T12:25:47-05:00'
describe
'148264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
271e94f2e69ab796353adf48a3b1f0b8
3643c517d2eff67fc5fa20fdc1d1cb8077c23804
'2011-12-22T12:24:15-05:00'
describe
'48147' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
9050ee844ad078691b6e1abd59aaf1c2
50486d3040e5c81d2e82236b05c323c049982e36
describe
'44251' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
0ec6f2e94ab4753ec92827721a34541d
a9bdb28240cc1a2e8ee67e54c4653757cd582216
'2011-12-22T12:23:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
48b3a76e6b82c10d6e9863014bf25fca
46741f45a9a0715963cac03e2f08bb0283fff53d
'2011-12-22T12:26:05-05:00'
describe
'2016' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPD' 'sip-files00035.txt'
28c79b450f537b1b69fbd257f951abbf
9c6a03057d41c9bad02abb833bfdb6d9d6550b00
'2011-12-22T12:23:42-05:00'
describe
'10090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
9d5f13fde3167fc860a06fa0b552f991
4826119f614ced4c9dd8b730ae5a98fdf38b84e9
'2011-12-22T12:25:31-05:00'
describe
'362892' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
64e20005f7562fb47e9bba644ad5b2dd
fb601a3914b6c716ac24b74f661c2184ef21b244
describe
'144772' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
8fc6e516790116d40820a7a94a56024d
6d257f7e7894e44e9f24d9e9a43b0b18c017f458
describe
'46249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e096e3b0fda860bf1ffbecdb0319f26e
cca752ecdfa3f7550cbb9d7b0c2082ae949e6e5b
describe
'44172' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a056363cb0678798a81d033f7b96138d
89c86093b0226279bd953acb8063e4bafc6849cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
18f519227c8511eb7a0b8f362085a579
ec478eccf04492d673ce14959f32dfdd0bc9bc7d
'2011-12-22T12:28:24-05:00'
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
f86e8fc0e491fb4a3e451c41a73aa795
29e9d44b6ee31872defdc2d0b968db2ace97dd1b
describe
'9573' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6c0e1ad109ffbf229b86a9c65b6c2dd4
2f66b644313778b4e3c4d2ee0a0ae8d69988564a
describe
'362805' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
dba8587e8f12b20cc07e1d38a83415a4
c9b2a61d3f4a7fd214eb5fdf1947eb2a509b023f
describe
'143013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
aa7504c7c3f89237275c4d61bf27407e
ecddf57c6698e114622547ba68ea9683081782f4
describe
'45799' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
ab86ae0b139078d5af1679cf5fc8b272
b50ebabb0e9485c65d7706b42a6f3c0e30dfbfe2
describe
'43291' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
31f50965fcdb2f80b8350cb4fbf1d5f2
af8e9d283354df31519dd06baf0b1176b240a024
'2011-12-22T12:27:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a32089d4216a0e4ee1c94b47b81e4f68
58cdd708a07344fc5eda6f1340ae40cfeeca7039
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d23dba77b61d2bab2f242c6f4581da25
f472c149d686617bcd6d9e15612bea710cf81a8a
'2011-12-22T12:27:29-05:00'
describe
'10041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
910502c8e17abf3a6d67cff4c7874813
71d84a0a9b31090d15e7cb9af87d72abe9e290d0
describe
'362878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
e6fbd591828ce38cb23af78e3ae68c5b
904fab25ca7c63cefa7343b1671b33679b873cbe
'2011-12-22T12:26:09-05:00'
describe
'127905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
836f425b184a8f6683136de7ac4ce837
7f9924264772d4a2ebe1c91e0e6b7684f9f0a59c
describe
'39006' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
261be13d02ec8fc547411166dfb5e461
c2aeeee628e1367d82679287da060433b5c03a65
'2011-12-22T12:26:59-05:00'
describe
'37586' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
522eb58173a61a1c05d94f1c7a0977f3
4af3b27a6a26dd4305456f86aae7f6b4ae5bbdae
'2011-12-22T12:24:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
d5b244e58e4e718ba713a136839a2cca
9ba39b8702bcc2cee69d0a6cb4b55726921f429c
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
27fffda60791b0c6abc97488528eaf90
c86bdbefb1a947329ffa50d103a26ff3378a4310
describe
'9151' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d7781e5d0e5f45600a437a25c2d9092b
e91eed0e4279f8af9ef8e5c1007176baf020e22f
describe
'362893' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
bb3181ea95a306f5605ae8455d0b5b0b
5f47906d8343c7f5e2acd66267a748536821f9c4
'2011-12-22T12:26:52-05:00'
describe
'150910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1cb9b7468dd0bb28e8fea8467e6b3b66
052fc7e7bc1f6422d0c332a28debe485fbeb5665
describe
'49692' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1b7ed7c4d81b9befe5312cc89cc5ef97
4dca802f2a5a53e0e3e968dca4eed28ca40609aa
describe
'44642' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
87ecd30007347e06b44b513e9eef4e85
f92f6fd01d35a855539c0cebe65e952865e5b12b
'2011-12-22T12:26:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
869544ccb71f6c00293fabd8aae82dd4
ce5cde38ecea9b930ac293a1dc07ef1c7e6d820b
describe
'1990' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
faed63b721a0df4bbc89df66f3f511be
2bb7e95d962eb0f7f0ae13210c58441b5907fb96
describe
'10307' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
798b5781f150ef1fd4fd071a7e9e61f5
c7a8ab4ef6119028a09379c211212fbd22ed93d2
'2011-12-22T12:25:09-05:00'
describe
'362815' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
6b205bd5ed32b78d05d93c432bf39cfb
ec1a647d93ed5c638fb642789030015609a7dda7
describe
'146488' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
518e5ade420abb72a1848d36801ce933
28faa8e0e39a091c3e8322c8218bc253b328defa
'2011-12-22T12:27:57-05:00'
describe
'46917' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
f861e16d729469ad6722ddc3c25b42d0
94dc0a21f10ae88633d886748af2c73b64bc46bb
describe
'44234' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
936d05e49e91d6772ed13ff3360434ac
f81be941fbe0e796cc59ca0dd369ab97b51cd37d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
cdddbfddc4daabfb4e9080de3fb5368b
2026ee3796f8949a689fdbbfd1a0d1ad04aa72da
'2011-12-22T12:23:24-05:00'
describe
'1936' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
394e38c08f440c0ad67b597fd79eb77f
96f0ec5461f0411bc93131bbc7f2bc66960e996f
describe
'9718' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
1c535111257ce7ae67afa3a8542d0419
4a44aef6f05ca8d8dac380c279d055088a5a566d
'2011-12-22T12:25:25-05:00'
describe
'362639' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
38e291d54b3534516c3f545d60e9dd87
b9cb2757d04c9688d6bd1fe8bfb6c2d3fb4f4c7d
'2011-12-22T12:26:54-05:00'
describe
'133604' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0abd083724cdd54f344e0a5d5315d44d
a8b15f2ab566cb8ea1c040670af4d770924b324b
describe
'8530' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
c356a364de00a70c2ae10ea1e88d2546
830b2132659822bf4a4b17559981774d280bbc6f
'2011-12-22T12:25:17-05:00'
describe
'32676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQR' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
88d97a8b621cd52758b7f609d8fd8bfc
694185d27985d6d371d45e0133915a27b8a87ce2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQS' 'sip-files00041.tif'
3c786acf7689470be891dfc3fbd3ac7c
1048b410f3a020dcbd4e4e89f4b89ede46363c1f
'2011-12-22T12:23:05-05:00'
describe
'511' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e9019a227867ff3a248f6137c9e796d8
09d13dafbffb80d665b78296636553cba06bb285
describe
'7796' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
87cd9764805ed47d2bfe19aab9dfb217
7109f8bf7c9392973ac6de382c93ae1180c3cdf6
'2011-12-22T12:23:47-05:00'
describe
'362901' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
fb1d4082cf65080b99b2ee12a0abf9df
20908bb4ddcf39ba3e2c5fd063a4ded634a9e1ce
'2011-12-22T12:26:32-05:00'
describe
'129521' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQW' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
fa47aa527d903f7996fa7e71f28ee55a
efb968f377de810714f50252e678bfd70dd2651b
describe
'27320' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
255a7c4e5fb73dd465bb7d27f5d7be7b
42522afb3dcee2fac6578ec3ba1ced9542e5974a
'2011-12-22T12:24:47-05:00'
describe
'35988' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
437fa1811344296d2cb8228afb8931cf
3129ba1c1ecd0e29fd8fd48ddb5ec9e8f61b7b8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5baafc5caa6f33b554fa6cbca83dd8a4
8be56d854312a717447a6fa773e2593c6675aec1
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
71389d8080c5ee3ceae840c1f0a39dbc
2ceba71de6ff83ebb53a6da5343538b24f0f3512
describe
'8774' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
eb737c4638cf207811a0244bb4b01980
16b54578bb842183c0d6ace87ac5ec06ac8a532e
describe
'362846' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
fa1971cc4c2608f7fa6d5bda63aaddcc
bf97052515867ba0afe55f782886fe0eaac5e82f
'2011-12-22T12:27:02-05:00'
describe
'177523' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c226d4e0938f596f6872799fae4be7a9
7c337aa65884738b5d328854bf231dea555a1926
'2011-12-22T12:27:38-05:00'
describe
'3056' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7d5318d5ff86cc6caaf615c51f0d25fb
f018ed3b11c400c25533ca2defa4ce51937a2ca3
describe
'43314' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
90d0e4db8788bef07cb6e20add08a58c
4224114e7bdf7455b81a6b260739e7f3f2eaa1c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
27540dd0fedd09ed49b17ebb627592e2
86d20f2ea3ae8c3765a555a6d525608532bc9cfa
'2011-12-22T12:24:43-05:00'
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e476a4d77183c4188895561d31ae8381
22e288370e825827c24b7e7d02cedb40c02c9e1d
'2011-12-22T12:28:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10605' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
ba1f78da937434dd8a9da862bb641fce
74086d08107ffc8d32cb7454e3b3a18091f72cae
'2011-12-22T12:25:43-05:00'
describe
'362734' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
07655c88d299c2122f61fdf69ee099a0
66835358359fefc735903b8febebd3e1f1657e08
describe
'26181' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b6687b2c9abec79478dd11a1483307a6
31f329a8a8ad307582073a208b8ba9e2fa8e471a
'2011-12-22T12:24:48-05:00'
describe
'4385' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRL' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
75099f4766c297df7db6dc3f7edd5eb8
9ac3ee754c14d08a409544ee55045dfef1c7adf5
'2011-12-22T12:24:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0aff0a54654aa7f60d618ec9aa32ccbc
53b6dabbb63f25dfe69a12ca61ed0d28c0dc6985
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
afedf9c5d0841cce0f4a5084698cb66c
251a5e1062d174744c313c70b1a961dfef74635d
'2011-12-22T12:25:12-05:00'
describe
'362862' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7d747276e2f6dce3c8ac6e917f8004cf
2a471ae0e07d3e978af21bce126f4c78e68a1fa4
'2011-12-22T12:25:21-05:00'
describe
'143797' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
44f96d184bffecfca7084b3fc2f33f4e
97e4911f5ebcdfad26b6c374cc6dd1271abe5186
describe
'48090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
75de1e27d58aa991f0ce0cc60ea3c123
3a9ee74e8c3d09854ab0badfce766957243c7903
'2011-12-22T12:28:12-05:00'
describe
'43227' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
bbbdb2610c20f48b78b2c59cec5b08f3
87879525b8f1efbb3d371068d50fb2ab20ba14bc
'2011-12-22T12:23:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
9d7195f6903c063f986610193f5bcbd1
326eb3517808109026228825c53c28b2dd74d5ae
describe
'1961' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
892816bf9d8f2b1ed58d5bad54216413
20500f7ce6317a9d11df1266b8157a0f512098ad
describe
'10189' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e25ad2ae2054018fc6d519acb33f856a
90bc7e6a60fc315d8eb34bb692219c6d87ffd606
'2011-12-22T12:25:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
3c949ad44a97f0aabfdf5e6c2c700298
ba444460d00ff43b315e53a179b1e90850b77056
describe
'147654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
21c0c8bdbcdca0b7818b96ec475194e7
6633aa16b05bdb822cbcc47911ec5fdcd1a2f1ab
describe
'47780' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
cb42f1a4a4652a3f7a00ae941c531d0f
048ac8c1966eddece128245172890c921433ef8f
describe
'45698' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
a0ab3b66cb264927abaeeed80e31386e
131b8c6b30f6b10d9279198f3e97fbb698d3d1ed
'2011-12-22T12:26:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c8a0c639b970bfd1c60860e96621d3f1
998c8c709f870b113feeef01e4658336bc586b7d
'2011-12-22T12:26:27-05:00'
describe
'1948' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
fd3a24e785b63b36f015431778ba0c66
9513637f95a4a19f826dbca3fe6f8cf013749879
'2011-12-22T12:26:50-05:00'
describe
'9989' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
5c5bf29714dd8a852a6d38d4d70c3139
6f07724aaadfc1c8274e794a2212efac14e5a137
describe
'362916' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2c63d559b1c6d985ea5f16c466a369fd
43713fe15884e8661f01e60bee1e5ff3bf3aca51
describe
'186935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
78bfccd5a0c7a7b4d50c55756935dea9
f554022662a9ba9212fbed4afcc5df6b869621c7
'2011-12-22T12:23:40-05:00'
describe
'43726' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a557be619e2d1cee17e025d70f15ecac
522246427882cba46cdd92cb6eecf6beefb0dd8e
'2011-12-22T12:27:00-05:00'
describe
'71368' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
fbfc3f6615ae9d2e27973e32261037a4
37ad316dbf7113743322cfcc6cf1eee415e373da
'2011-12-22T12:27:33-05:00'
describe
'2925396' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
7dc99fcc4a3b4058f16dc9f82d8cb409
bbc7401166396097b4e2c42520597fc1871f7f06
'2011-12-22T12:25:41-05:00'
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
e89fd1dee5a3204ef3de654ce8a4c348
db74eb6597073853fd636d46f25d98a448c2fc22
'2011-12-22T12:23:29-05:00'
describe
'32629' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5f82f5114fb6d33289ac5884c3d9fd6c
b5225ee0895b61ceb6926c030ce1658f6ff0bf37
'2011-12-22T12:27:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
ab716327ddd61632414dfb9ee1e552ab
d9b8b7451a2b52aeb0be770b9f54846dc5b8ece8
'2011-12-22T12:27:45-05:00'
describe
'149984' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1567f8c9d0fa9627fa2017f864a2a763
8df84bae7530aafb7d42f407dde424f542b9a88f
'2011-12-22T12:23:35-05:00'
describe
'49886' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
2e129985b1eb3dbca39282fffd7289f8
ec4efbfe85b0fcfcee0c96c6f316d8f458454374
'2011-12-22T12:25:15-05:00'
describe
'44445' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f0057f6374ba72a3db729ab1b9b2eca4
bfa7376e8219ebf7b6c4b3a3d5188eb35c55f2b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
4ec1d5b45b4cd25fb49d2467f96261c7
e0750f8fb8f76ec62ef76bb4d0f35ef1e24886ed
'2011-12-22T12:24:11-05:00'
describe
'1963' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
1af3ec565ba5f30d81cf214eb3527786
38314ca12b67c1415a122c5579a66834c2a78043
describe
'10382' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
0e145d3a2f66cb2892a9a3e3756265fa
1dddc82d8f89472875df673ad7f48cf100b9dc9f
describe
'362932' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
02b2aec29926fbcff2e457595b6803e1
7c301e4e59c5497aeddb5e37f0fe9c5f015e0060
describe
'197950' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
5122a31ead7307800e2a4a130bb7a8a0
a5a4082f949bcb6d4119cb5e22d732c1a41ca644
'2011-12-22T12:23:33-05:00'
describe
'49384' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3e959dab2c6a7670f459552c6af08bfb
9d0ed9835d7d13727ead608b58fe05811858c6fd
'2011-12-22T12:28:08-05:00'
describe
'72268' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWST' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
1eb93d4786e4823afafe19e04399dff8
80e337e5a23ce2b40d47dde406193547bd9cb63f
describe
'2925216' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
818af6949e21d55ce58a8623866a2942
4badb4a0622b5008fff7ea4ee5e17f731c92133e
'2011-12-22T12:28:33-05:00'
describe
'1974' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
9800281cfc948d0a4d2aa1b3911317f0
9e82984c7e1c322a43fbf769242d80c8459e840f
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
582c711fc152e8d05fa2bd7b891f7e1d
a64d2910943d0a78171a630bafcd5ef8dad63721
'2011-12-22T12:23:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
987758704ad473cabd147e7b02dfbc98
2873acf9754a309bb67ace1c5dfe1057f470755e
'2011-12-22T12:27:18-05:00'
describe
'137836' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
2923c40a9e4cb11dbbcf1f62115921ad
0940ebc362f0a6acc87c94fb0230e371a6d65e53
describe
'44465' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWSZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
4e8d65199ed420ecb72658630b930dfe
98629baa0d0aa7efd707e9fa6cee1212888a6b8d
'2011-12-22T12:24:37-05:00'
describe
'42264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
0a91b6e9a0955589ff000ba839f97340
f87d0afe14463a2011a87b5e1833142ecc969ab9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0f419cb6d88e89d92df81f4f48bf2c2d
eae47426c90b0bdb8694fbd9e6b1d22c364cf4bc
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
8ce9746bef674ca9987d4b3c756114fb
53d5483a2af29e3469e5ebcdbf1b0d87407cf2af
'2011-12-22T12:27:13-05:00'
describe
'10063' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
27eb4fa7daab870ee6c5ea19102e9a70
1ef15e4bf82524f0555d26af8c28b4d2218e28b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
537f662bf7e5a09847e9f7b006184bc5
cfcbbd9831b35cb629943376faaa21a7124d00d5
'2011-12-22T12:23:34-05:00'
describe
'189729' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
55f581c189f9681b722c15cebcc70fc6
9d01c98ace045d3a2ef513343762c697398538fe
describe
'45877' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
daa011a9ceb9b9a5c5a23d4c93e30af6
5cd59149735c2e8d231f5320f2b9a21c277ce627
describe
'71203' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
a3ce20bd0dc778a77de4bb8ad7228568
7a7ff3723718450cfc1701fb314a1c35cedee395
describe
'2925420' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
fd68e774b05fb86946ff41876b9fe89f
497f9d128b8562e5bed7afce988b9f9caacf0371
'2011-12-22T12:26:48-05:00'
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
213dd7fe21c31e74309d40eeb6bcd814
05ef6560c5f382c7162b3b6f4f603d2be6ee5e3c
'2011-12-22T12:27:11-05:00'
describe
'32688' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
eca8ddf1d05ab8c5c308af66170497d6
e06f5f9b660f48d6cc2eee56862ec507de1ea2c3
'2011-12-22T12:28:09-05:00'
describe
'362877' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
fbdad4a5e2b2446af6dd6b64c556f410
be2ebd0e6d82bf63574677a7f0443e9a610aab38
describe
'133677' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
8996beeba827a674338ced43bd78381e
bb5b121a07a1f52c738a07071453eb6459aedde6
describe
'42396' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
681721043863713bc96709c03fbcfe34
f24ac703138b2f99bbd7a5ce7b809384e4062ec3
describe
'39887' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
af609d068abbeb9ae9060526e95a1396
2e5fc58596da3cabe6f8d1abf5dc025c6a9364dd
'2011-12-22T12:24:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f9591e6f4c8385a9a0c3593b1a7c671b
4a693713b6124bd6140fbe28f67d712a6fd0d66b
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
ebc8b757d512e3f130c8280cb24c4fef
ffe5a832b0c629ef1ace7be808c16375270386de
'2011-12-22T12:25:27-05:00'
describe
'8910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f7ac386ba065d055945dc89f1026a2bd
863446fb2b8148b0d9bdc692ea9ddf2eb87acb53
'2011-12-22T12:26:30-05:00'
describe
'362910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
6f0b3ab09082cf502a25fa023c0414d9
7ddf2bd1f5e1b058444222f79fc739b5e2bea5ee
describe
'119224' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
2f1686f3e23d8655a8d9b1170c7018c7
4be29b79c819c308fc75a74b9c92bc1beee4c404
describe
'17720' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
16ca807d80a07ff0fba16470cf6401fa
112d99dea7e10feea9875947a0ba26f30882d56b
describe
'31105' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b397a44a8b8efcdf0e79056e1d41b141
f0ce3b83cea627c23bc04ee24ae8c0d2aba3fb83
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
e76e0bbe880997c459f78ea6929735a8
b7a8b6340e1b288dfc23da08f0ae4fb53688a91c
'2011-12-22T12:25:59-05:00'
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b15658c7534ecb1580c84c0511f81ddc
88da895975967021237b16a4719fa01e32da7616
describe
Invalid character
'7377' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
2d1f79ad60b34aa733e0b9470dccedc5
9da864ffa16481479405787851b357b98351921c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWTZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
255301394c61ff7e50e263f6feecbe09
0b363d849e97546c2290519e84b2107e0d7cd2e0
describe
'136191' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
66105709658f8e88c47f0726507ff35b
7700eb21c64985a88e425f80373af042f641cd77
'2011-12-22T12:25:07-05:00'
describe
'31007' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
199195eaee28faf2216c40685850bde3
0b9d117d27181abd76521862a9a387a1a1182e04
'2011-12-22T12:27:15-05:00'
describe
'39112' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
0875c24e82a4647e934b4a86bcd83282
faa0b095ccddf479d9a4e1fd6da7c49bd782b8dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3a6ccc40c34c8052296625eb9cf554dc
cdad4847d1ae0578330bf74b64add609000593c8
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1b5fb9d7b5b7ff32f62186e84ef2a6de
5dd54db0e27d2f712409421063bfc1dbdfd901d6
'2011-12-22T12:27:50-05:00'
describe
'9374' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8a14a703cc2ca1d19ee75c5c34cbae8f
5038a5ae3e66f12949ed3258980f5985f0391f73
describe
'362917' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6866890de75c39ec6bcb4fad603dcefb
8a88b0970207dc5cadf1e931a0791124f4d141d6
describe
'136934' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
903cc5c20482ac4f46b9ce3e8338759c
7e33e61272ff818526a07b60d1d571cbc60c2b71
'2011-12-22T12:24:27-05:00'
describe
'42112' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
aaad6e65cd9a0f06de5d48e84e42748e
dd93940f93f59d822bff7b752f530a9386b23f59
describe
'41007' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
e9a5ca5a117fcaa7801e46a0c311f760
6982fa3745f232ba23c8be582a76281a2cbf0251
'2011-12-22T12:23:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
19690302851990ac71775db69b5ad0df
14371e148427d359a025ad0a31d9d85775e0132c
'2011-12-22T12:27:21-05:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ddfea6bbd5cc33334d265d8001f98859
e969364933d85a032d2b42651aef0f11f1eb0a95
'2011-12-22T12:23:39-05:00'
describe
'9846' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
8d4f7927a729a6ee39628dfa33356105
adb714a40b25a2c656ad97a9d1823810b2eeaf9b
describe
'362911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
dd44cc183d08b386211e3270fe738e68
b5fd7215e806a45c605b5a30b1b55d8485751c09
describe
'143368' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0da9a3d564487cd78140ddd7c9f502dc
a461c73958eda8d29d40763f41b8c8fea5c69514
describe
'46270' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
2d2a494682340d3da08ceadcb806f9aa
21e5e8ec459b7387154ba4ee81921f932555745e
'2011-12-22T12:23:48-05:00'
describe
'42581' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
53b35c6ab71a2e75ca10c79918ec7d3a
5be48bdb874261c28324c7026b23ccb7719b9cef
'2011-12-22T12:25:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d761c2cbf41578986053fb72b4028e8f
188eebb0cc530c571d0fed7c8c42babe13e52e58
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b5be7ecd7d3e6e5d46e94da70ed99200
fa194c425006c031cd93d3a752f3fc83b1f50cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
4d9650ce42dbadec553bdcba171e1019
bebd244284598df18277c8f74f3c22d00f29ec5a
'2011-12-22T12:27:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
767b14614ad3738309d09498e60d8159
41c7ab2341529f2a6adde9f27c2236213ae18eeb
describe
'146106' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
c4bfcc5440c8b8a01704ab9fc43d702f
32305944a15df6597d52217e439278e6d0df5934
'2011-12-22T12:28:27-05:00'
describe
'45987' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
dc2f68111da43087b1e595dc2137075c
4e243ee112611d372b438a8072a12021b70afcc7
describe
'44686' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
79dc8a21354edcefe2fc26990603bcd9
dd8cbf27f14f1a36b7d7baf99842084a27ca1e3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
87c81d36e355753ebe60be002d75738b
c549a4bda923b804aae14135771acede27d9f09a
'2011-12-22T12:25:45-05:00'
describe
'1893' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWUZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
68eb8471300472ade82d887c0fe0e86e
41b861e20f11630493fddf5aaa06e8618d952a49
describe
'10199' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
acc5237e3f3fa7f2547122904684bfff
31631b412cc7b34e7d2d9bb8ca236b97b5cd795e
describe
'362856' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
329c0ec1f8769e8be61d59c6ddf6984f
1e4d0604a130b267a8bf5aeb50677f8d3b56b89a
'2011-12-22T12:28:10-05:00'
describe
'136023' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
3afac48d07612aeeafcf10dde49ec794
d8792b2212340b8b5f802a1e6a9ded7b97c7a331
describe
'43961' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
28850c769bd082a27ed9322fda55cf7f
124b322ce42f85856bf0dd9543efce3cfb2fb207
describe
'41021' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
edceb946312f223b165bf235c08c6e77
223acd195e3ff6edbbc7107f4e18e3563163caa7
'2011-12-22T12:26:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
71d2bf97e198fc400e361f05fcf22df1
a67d7dbd3fadbd52c5b820a9a7bf2586fd756234
'2011-12-22T12:27:47-05:00'
describe
'1759' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
72cd3272a695ef33d057642ef641bfbe
21511fcf49d836e291233b6d89c3a1d1ee7c8cd4
describe
'9803' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
71717f348e8e5b985a9d185de8e0b9e9
1f6d256c587fec92da7a1a25817233d8649c31f0
describe
'362933' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6026aa43dcdd4984f3b5777536f27af8
4a6c5f6130cfb319d0343d0af98f45be33062aa7
'2011-12-22T12:25:05-05:00'
describe
'135260' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
94982f086b90d337b9ad9ef6b73e4cd4
0f4b88755c55fb7889f32be06ac9d8ab7e740277
'2011-12-22T12:24:16-05:00'
describe
'42126' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c50218a015c87b6d8bd7a9ee824afde1
170c4812cdf20b2cfceb5f8d53f98d59b8166cdc
describe
'40740' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
413a8af1115a69b279057c8382eb3821
16989e0c925b0a4cec560e050825d031a56e65f7
'2011-12-22T12:27:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
562fee05beee0332f8324721660f5560
6bcc240c8db7899e816722e79824fcf6b97e5568
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
2d7d427e354b812dc8dfce42e36d09d8
c2a0a226f24d1dc504dfc92ce9b2f681f98b65ef
describe
'9896' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d3ebccafea26faa52d1395ecc2b0bfb8
ab8935928225109ca08e6afba9023356f83656bc
'2011-12-22T12:27:16-05:00'
describe
'362921' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
9c56084e8c45b60a117d052783642567
d9778a37922c5cbb7480b7b1bcadf400d4f148db
describe
'145998' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
73bb6edcd41164e71703047cc8f7bc0c
3f6a1779cc84f7af88c91dc0357d88dfa2ddb446
describe
'46240' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
8b33455fc90621bd3de413f33e71a623
0094802aca2782cda3a6bbbc74e2fc586bd15f60
describe
'43627' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f3f8948998e8bc4dbf29d000d0b066bf
053c0809d68006104cc93d05d2593c170ee6e416
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
626ad8bcfda64cbd8ce7551f800ee0c3
7aa7172a0777cdc7955dc745cd86a19b1bd249ec
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
599f3674395510f7e31a6f3218e235b5
11dc01ff4d511dd1614b6a1118f51619058f4050
describe
'9959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d74d121e9ccff2f2be77a6fc136c52f4
76f6c5ea020d006b03bedd87708e8431de7294a0
describe
'362841' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
9e3864db1c6e9e9d17762dc37b80f56c
a7f71d4332eed03828461edeac42ef623af02cbf
describe
'193868' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
2b623e41ad82f6d3d3357eafaa1c7396
b1b17d0bd5907bfa908a11088b776d69f709ee86
'2011-12-22T12:27:24-05:00'
describe
'3539' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
184d8dc661fc5a5909fe452330536bd8
d4f77c0405eb3e21fb43c3d1396f051de24d0811
describe
'45287' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWVZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ffb4015aafd2576057d937a07c1eff87
bf69a672408815bab89e011f3a931e2b7eaf8a87
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e68ddd7b4a0a0b899748cc96b5be3e10
7b9d82c04543d56725732a328494577089c814c4
describe
'223' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
11779a0f0099a3feb510e1e38ef4b079
5b95af574370844e0f94637e585d9b8dd43dfcda
describe
Invalid character
'10556' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3ff2d8d1949f12a846f650ba5b7bc5cb
0fba1ab80668f120921f5d3134aa4b361af473b2
describe
'362791' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
70c2e2d1f428b7dc4ade6a673c35b17f
3dbb19db2ab63d07ce986cfd94ef32168d1515a3
'2011-12-22T12:25:26-05:00'
describe
'22662' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
a3d1007796bbe27bc059f2ccdcc32bdb
c857fd1884411f8808d1c938923e39d7aa9d3b29
describe
'4160' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
d29a9d1bcfce000a1712d2ab17765147
24b2ae2ed6eeba9bfe75d46462cc10ee42fdd143
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
90802861c914c524c0d32bd1cd0a1097
a48fb45b0a99683f0605639aeebad18cbda15abd
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWH' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
35444eeb75049f4ef28b375fbd3dd35c
11f1858c35b48160f4bf15378bc26a10f06f661e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWI' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
814b40987e67ada11cf6e8e882801ecf
14346b7d2e02e9fafbf058e4522409732a89f670
'2011-12-22T12:25:03-05:00'
describe
'94945' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWJ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2b64845a4e9041fc61a670902d1d9a37
bc8daa48d468c39f38e65491f69b63b815c8c4b6
describe
'9392' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWK' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d1d2d8278d22257d9114786775fad091
6af542e649de72e65b83bc0774fb1250ec370fa6
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWL' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
cc0cad838e011f22e6ff44f40fe7daeb
5b7c1a78fedbf6ad42384167a36d8aa1ea577e6f
'2011-12-22T12:23:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
28792c78d370169a774ba6299780de81
08f4124ef6ebe04f757ecace65d0cbabeb820ee0
'2011-12-22T12:27:20-05:00'
describe
'426' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWN' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d0756faaf10689e40c54f800cc58aa0b
aa5aea75edd45c6ca120e4d207e317949dd86bd9
describe
'5922' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWO' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1f0103281ab27383ac6b92915ae55dd5
b423a9b848a87fd2c3325a50d38bed85fad67710
describe
'362874' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWP' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
9edac13de9c5b165b08acce3a763eb81
9234a37cea6f3d5dcbd1636117ca6dbd99100914
'2011-12-22T12:26:13-05:00'
describe
'138800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWQ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
53a7eb048817d00706db6ba24140c26c
917e2d65ad6863e36628ebc52b37119b5552a3ea
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWR' 'sip-files00064.pro'
70883d40a5d422009bf8535fb76f5150
619dceab9e07073223c1cb30c7363bab2aaef6c3
'2011-12-22T12:26:56-05:00'
describe
'39425' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWS' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
e53811bc3502dd46c9947e9bfbbcff68
74e81f25b3bf20b91e7f0525e1b68b0f44cddec7
'2011-12-22T12:24:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWT' 'sip-files00064.tif'
78c5dd2f2d1de78c1e2e736de8caabd9
80897f1afec9339f792aad258d232c56470c65ed
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWU' 'sip-files00064.txt'
ba7fabd4d3d7698f6bb031cd8010c206
43e95f9d7d254ff3d72d61b99a12e3ade903d3d5
describe
'9127' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWV' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e56bedec74e52c2060ec0100e9582066
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'2011-12-22T12:25:57-05:00'
describe
'362891' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWW' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
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'2011-12-22T12:26:42-05:00'
describe
'134314' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWX' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:26:44-05:00'
describe
'44451' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWY' 'sip-files00065.pro'
250f709eb3e81f1f12881ab81ec54c96
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describe
'40865' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWWZ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0566d1fc95b08ae48d870b2cc5bd44dd
a3e8a72a32a066912ddf8f4f6b1ad3088b1a030a
'2011-12-22T12:23:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
1ef1a791d7c3fef0e9b8aa9d35c932d1
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describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXB' 'sip-files00065.txt'
b66c4a0fbae47540fea117a64ec07acf
bcb4d5b560cf29ce2a66f81dbd043f015d4af644
'2011-12-22T12:26:53-05:00'
describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXC' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
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describe
'362907' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXD' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
404b868c4091cd9da6068ec9be055e39
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'2011-12-22T12:27:01-05:00'
describe
'135312' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXE' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
b3d8e044c7d84b4e451ef0a1b7c72a0d
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'2011-12-22T12:23:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
15a3a5ccbf01dbe878340c918658b984
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describe
'42156' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXG' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
7263cfac4ed9c7343e0046bce7322c59
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
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'2011-12-22T12:26:18-05:00'
describe
'1812' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
fa9413564091cfe29c07740b89cdf251
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describe
'9736' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
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describe
'139863' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a310e920dba8853077080aae7e7b62aa
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'2011-12-22T12:25:01-05:00'
describe
'44717' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
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describe
'42462' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:27:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
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'2011-12-22T12:24:21-05:00'
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
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describe
'10176' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
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describe
'138788' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
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describe
'45925' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
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describe
'41779' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
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describe
'1857' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
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describe
'9930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:26:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
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describe
'138545' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWXZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:27:53-05:00'
describe
'44191' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYA' 'sip-files00069.pro'
8f509e35d4750ffccb2a805cfb1057cf
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describe
'42257' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYB' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
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'2011-12-22T12:26:03-05:00'
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
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describe
'10316' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
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describe
'362937' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYF' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
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describe
'154605' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
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describe
'51496' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
83e1d9f708db90564bd1b4632873386b
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'2011-12-22T12:23:00-05:00'
describe
'46102' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYI' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
6b28700f11545b69ec1013f3ae40bca5
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYJ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
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describe
'2024' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYK' 'sip-files00070.txt'
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describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYL' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYM' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
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'2011-12-22T12:28:11-05:00'
describe
'144423' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYN' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
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describe
'45265' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYO' 'sip-files00071.pro'
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'2011-12-22T12:23:13-05:00'
describe
'44260' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYP' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
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describe
'1874' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYR' 'sip-files00071.txt'
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'2011-12-22T12:23:58-05:00'
describe
'10080' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYS' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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describe
'362850' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYT' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
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describe
'145912' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
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'2011-12-22T12:23:02-05:00'
describe
'44100' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYW' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:25:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYX' 'sip-files00072.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYY' 'sip-files00072.txt'
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describe
'10342' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWYZ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
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describe
'362859' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZA' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
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describe
'138433' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZB' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:24:23-05:00'
describe
'44705' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZC' 'sip-files00073.pro'
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describe
'40694' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZD' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
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describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZF' 'sip-files00073.txt'
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describe
'9618' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZG' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-22T12:26:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f50fcb0da493ea1aa94723d15a900e5b
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'2011-12-22T12:25:29-05:00'
describe
'136733' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZI' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
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describe
'32516' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
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describe
'38228' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZK' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
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describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
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describe
'9220' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZN' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
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describe
'362876' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZO' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
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describe
'126022' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZP' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
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describe
'30272' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
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describe
'37210' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZS' 'sip-files00075.tif'
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describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZT' 'sip-files00075.txt'
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describe
'8590' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZU' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
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describe
'362884' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
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describe
'133289' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZW' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
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describe
'41008' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZX' 'sip-files00076.pro'
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describe
'40439' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZY' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABWZZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
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describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
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describe
'9951' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAB' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
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describe
'362800' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAC' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
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'2011-12-22T12:27:43-05:00'
describe
'136085' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAD' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
881f5d7c7a18cbf425b97f3eea84ce3c
a8f98227b6ae288e8985de0b9bf8a29291e5183b
describe
'40940' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAE' 'sip-files00077.pro'
245575734e8225f7cd7c422333a8a3db
472e468529de13384f979ac27061dab315fd9b13
describe
'40937' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAF' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
8690506c3194b0cd87c3705231b2dace
c1abd006c037182a699b43dd2facb229ef8a6e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAG' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a5be25c599c7477785af350d723ff5a9
031ebcbf9bcba75919bbf3cb5eacc50c63885eb4
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAH' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4f62aa0323d010aed2d6e7a3804c596d
fd534cdb64e442df8b37726b465b3e087b5b8889
describe
'10239' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAI' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
241178fafdb6d28ce45dd9227b20675b
a1a6d88cb3a8efe919e8c21c9dabf82e48fc16aa
'2011-12-22T12:24:26-05:00'
describe
'362934' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
737991128dc8386bfe9200b81eb236de
694f013c2861092ff685a37c2ee628cdd272a26f
describe
'149098' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAK' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
0f94c7adb1487f5917cd79a8dfb89557
efa61ab95932481c733e5a17eb1cfc48a3052ed3
describe
'47729' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAL' 'sip-files00078.pro'
5d5fa15d1c66604d5d251a8f988e2811
242109587116afe043ff1d9cbfc11645b60f9767
describe
'44992' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAM' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b3cb31028749b8628c74daba0ccb2815
90508ba0b763a4bbbe9b4a57044deefc89e54ca4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAN' 'sip-files00078.tif'
4f87917fa2f876d3362c397ab189ae2c
42d940fc7df62c480f3edcaeeab08fb2f4d81c59
describe
'1957' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAO' 'sip-files00078.txt'
a282dfed2d67e594e8cc26a2f9b89ef6
0863381b43089589a6ccf64f63d71044f662810d
describe
'10247' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAP' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
72e25144cd0b74b3538d1c41e2601c34
6dab9c11250a08ffd391df5fd0a77f5125733363
'2011-12-22T12:27:23-05:00'
describe
'362872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
130537a270cdb57ff1e1026c5c85873c
7a6e18c50d6809a3170240729c554c123c944c9e
describe
'136059' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAR' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
86df03af59b6a58f59a584971a3a95a6
b4f4bc9b12f880b80333a8a9e7f923747a5c62f6
'2011-12-22T12:24:45-05:00'
describe
'42720' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAS' 'sip-files00079.pro'
748fcc0e371898eb7f117586cf69a908
c524d38e672e13877354cd4588f0c15bc7e1c31d
describe
'42375' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
3df85da6c75ea9b1be45b6ddc419ed7e
cf50d64f4681ebe1d72aee91b24d262a64b2c2f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
4d1736da2d3bf2647d957e3314bb02f2
409d803b7b741600345f7fa106e948ff181a66b4
describe
'1794' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAV' 'sip-files00079.txt'
403d03d29fc0d02024374e8e2fbb2dd6
fb6c8631338095f24da19e4414be0d37dcb90ab5
'2011-12-22T12:27:42-05:00'
describe
'10301' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAW' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2aeec2a51c890350df1ba131d21ddbb7
650add919c8f799050f9811baa065991d1a1eda2
describe
'362930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAX' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8939913c27f7ca01fbff7655b06f9234
2244b5611860bc6d91a1481ed2e05232e1fe02c2
describe
'145012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAY' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
fbb1b44b47fdfa95f6e8813e33f5c100
76897cce8b55dddcc131e945c565a0fe8da47f0e
describe
'46266' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXAZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
964cced8c8e4184b410b98ebc3af3f0f
c3afc0e81ca39c364453ff837f4a48e79c5c202a
describe
'44214' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBA' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
2a0f2b7a9c98fc5d149f7d081fd145d1
64f8bb0cba9356e02e276158bdc1b838606d1f48
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b951e5e7616a679c8e77704411960d1f
8c35c54a1fe311d02367a18b33782c5bce51dc74
describe
'1895' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBC' 'sip-files00080.txt'
5f8bbbbfc51fe10f5fd2ab7b195e1d0d
e0aac7e4072b4e94f18a6cadb3d0648104e1629a
'2011-12-22T12:26:01-05:00'
describe
'10297' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBD' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6b422f8c862c4e2e5b62b022bca11d08
cb17a76e2cf52c8b7ff1136bc1318483879f7055
describe
'362881' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBE' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ea5c302b4fc6ae72dd60b060590568e6
454d9072473096cec06fafb71c7feb3dbda91739
describe
'139720' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBF' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a16d86f9ba4af53d37d9f9de176d0e19
32c62005677b7ac658abccadef85f0f95fec720c
describe
'46613' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBG' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f00e4be0cab5eca327b6c3b19349aad9
2c8ebdffd4ceb112f3b88f01fbb5b7434a0ea710
describe
'42850' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBH' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
b5b5cb9c599e1b7750c1864d9c15a3f9
5d5b77c1a1546dda3792c4f3281afc3658955122
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBI' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ce5b8488fa0b27c8dcc1623556957b04
9348dbb312b8797207f8c689d81827f7b34d1db3
describe
'1873' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBJ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
ec08689943f11eef46d7d7182714ccf2
873eaa7e6cc4bdff5b3653b603b2aa6977dc67e4
describe
'10327' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBK' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
92bcd6d6426cb50383e9b0d072c39cbb
e0532648271f1f7ddab28e0647e958b1b23dd735
describe
'362826' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b247a66505bd9c12c600520e32fa255b
fe7d3edb0404e2ea2ac9ba6c88b7aa1fee75a3fa
describe
'107961' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a25590985095e1925958586e7ca43377
f0aa2baac56691ff3e6e0f8f1da622fa479766a9
describe
'13852' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBN' 'sip-files00082.pro'
9d1fd03ca22dbacec79799e788b04fb2
e8b444fd7e90b91d55f9a644a409fe783655c3f2
describe
'26376' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBO' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
edd67cb7bd6cad3ebf9ccba8cac036ec
e5c3a2dbba00629faa7f13cb8f2713b357799561
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
b2233544b4395be9bb752e9a6461b5cf
700f8275f773ed75aa5da7770c9ff75676b4bdff
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBQ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
138c77beec19358b1ac230a4590b1c3f
20310df9d387d8e585648816336cc2088d42e4ee
describe
'6170' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBR' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
3d9b0599aa561d21b989ca7da7a6f590
944b618a61d1b7678613892e11c116248ce9c660
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBS' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
86757a38bba09f6d2948ba7223652001
52ba266d5b35b6cfb9ac507be0899e5e24fcfffa
'2011-12-22T12:23:26-05:00'
describe
'134708' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
1345b28731c6f93f79702117613d4026
45df70028909367e774b9177999432802fe8b40d
'2011-12-22T12:27:10-05:00'
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBU' 'sip-files00083.pro'
98a73bc165c086cb06e956adf3990138
59efa3a82133065688111c4c8608763bf922f179
describe
'39033' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
d4bf83526cc3de90404b0f5ea6a575c9
3b0f5343c9aafda9391960194ad46f50929056be
describe
'2920332' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBW' 'sip-files00083.tif'
500382e7abd834fe815d4836de9354d4
3eb08f68036c192eb21bbaabfac2763e95ce4bf7
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBX' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3bc32f7ab0ff5bfc7168f508f6ff6602
eee0d6396d79a2c19e2aee109943b2fbf966ffe4
describe
'9088' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBY' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
2a465a986be93ec493346d142a737642
7d879259784009a20ecc3c1621c048b1474ae12c
describe
'362592' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXBZ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
5938cde662a14d3398dbe93c002154bc
3a8e01dc5a780f60c67c2fc3ee3f118ed957913f
describe
'136093' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
2783af02174863d8c9715c960648baab
d43f0c7d3f598b5dc78831dc76a68765e22947ae
describe
'43647' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCB' 'sip-files00084.pro'
e19435abeba60c5109d4ef3b5991d155
3c7caea9fc30827318f46886c7b73fab5269c047
describe
'41017' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4145f6725dd898c31c3ee096b315926c
7024c4361f3cc4bee19991394551cf19d66460c8
'2011-12-22T12:26:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
307787607755ad0975b4600c5a2a2a3c
6aa2df01912e7ce26f40ed3b5b652c1c042350a7
'2011-12-22T12:24:42-05:00'
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCE' 'sip-files00084.txt'
fe58c1b35a6372c23844ed24333cee19
10d4ad494d8bcdbd21667751bac44484ba8988c5
describe
'9981' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCF' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d81a35c87a5fad979dcbad2b42f41701
8605798e44f9329ca421a991570465a350fea7e9
describe
'362556' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCG' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
648d34a534269ad3774a3bfa42666385
7987afb76348d3e33fd2eb01658c76419e97fda8
'2011-12-22T12:28:31-05:00'
describe
'195157' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
150eed08fab63624808cf5521cadb207
8b631a2debb5d6b01f37f7e606665adcb3505302
describe
'4639' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCI' 'sip-files00085.pro'
35ccb02fac6eea48c9263e9187c28b18
641f6afda088f8af3e79e8cd04865cf0afbaa769
describe
'44865' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCJ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d8c72e6afc657e77f9d75e7c156d8d55
4f0d443df6614718d8552e2344a4c5dc5a81e3e1
'2011-12-22T12:27:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCK' 'sip-files00085.tif'
8ffadd7f3b3da66148689d3393a42a8e
b5015af309d8560be9df5b71f9187110c6fb05d9
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCL' 'sip-files00085.txt'
64dce5217800bb508e2c093c291cc59c
eb834ae30d487cdf6472a566bb7547897d9d459f
describe
'10220' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCM' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
00dd669b2d556532471476169db184bf
7e0e7aeb466e7e8e4f308144be4bfdf47bc7001f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
d9b5a04fd755d0a87f5ed40dd2e5b1ef
3638879f6ce74db11ec9e8dc2237ce22a96632a4
describe
'23006' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCO' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5f980c3766727362b566e7ebdfec8465
f1234eeb3245a0ddc67e7a39b70a1cf2ec43700e
describe
'4249' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
30d508d79f30107088e8f0542ec1fdf3
db74d729a7657eefc40e29cdedaa73276dd1f690
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCQ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7af1449fcdf70817651f54121dd7b0c3
22a8e92e25d07bd07ba45cf4aac2b0baaafffaa8
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCR' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8e1db139242a97099b9112ebf08d5488
d7efdc340f1b270a4dcd2b8e9043b6d2b2636a80
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCS' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1df8095278dd2c54a8177f83b8816dcc
d9a2f6177af53e0606ed3103523dda90aab142f4
'2011-12-22T12:25:58-05:00'
describe
'142494' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCT' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c72fab64e875d8d668fbda7cc1c035d7
cbc71cd9a4f75e934456d6c2d70b3ed4cc97fd42
describe
'46570' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCU' 'sip-files00087.pro'
a3adc65bc06266977b02bd8838a6ef02
72d1f2274f231d80d17dfa43f7301eaec5ff3262
describe
'43566' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCV' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
e2fe43f3edc4a29fa0b224e1f62fe6ae
e7a5ecc78c6115feb8cdf48369d8cad1ad860923
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCW' 'sip-files00087.tif'
e30cb8c654d0d0dcc0019f0ad4770b87
7b5ee8552fec3470176f7477e295a042481a5f9c
'2011-12-22T12:27:36-05:00'
describe
'1941' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCX' 'sip-files00087.txt'
3805fb4fe47a7211d7f3535678b3aad0
b17b308a9b879885f53295ff3b97d97e658df5b6
describe
'9575' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCY' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
c265301409dfb8df05c120853cff8ccf
052fccdabf1931be89a971086c9340090d3b1e5d
describe
'362883' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXCZ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
da5b3596ebf5d0df732254687b820741
cf57b3f4e831f822ea22a3ea27fc16e686ff4edd
describe
'146296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDA' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3fdd96e00626bcb442ac69ef1614d55c
071a51084e5e94b147ccbb2bc8ddbab66b18195c
describe
'48040' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDB' 'sip-files00088.pro'
3b8af87a64d71045c91ae22130110806
53a1b47bb9578dec2294b9a5b2bb310a9f2a9532
describe
'44306' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDC' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
5093631138033a466d089db41666fae4
6f85566a2682e279adde52acc8337603ca82d7ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDD' 'sip-files00088.tif'
441f024e2ddda9f872ffad0690d81205
e40664cc5afa1cd1362a925f392fc3ba5713a343
describe
'1920' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDE' 'sip-files00088.txt'
5c6abb4954b7eb6d2835477b84ae6c63
e09d47913bc2d390203190873223c2ef2d5caff7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
49564a7d194c4ba982d36a0c2f0e02da
1a9f348932500ea16f19d77c866d5d9e88588e94
describe
'362865' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDG' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
f8cbdf266d7b7f82a2134a3390514bfe
cb4a08e83bb1dbcf6cc666ed7505e737bf84e71f
describe
'148521' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDH' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1e56d1f2e7d7f338c2035f58b2275edb
f279265aaf605cc2362faf0f89b2f47ab0f69bb6
'2011-12-22T12:28:23-05:00'
describe
'48039' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
05a29048bdef3632df8685430397d752
eb823d48cde9259e55ad4fe7b476a21c2f51fe9a
describe
'44672' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
6142c8a62a98eb818c91b155f27f1483
7b5d4f3df916bce026a31478466b2988115e0800
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDK' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7f344c98e6c20cbb1d326a0addb08f5c
b25777dd6accf58fd39641636132176ced94302a
describe
'1898' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDL' 'sip-files00089.txt'
8e669cae5c7801088f61801f79235b50
969f2235ade9dc7261d496b606172ca46d4d96b0
describe
'10496' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDM' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
98dede578fd9014da8ff90727531fc4e
f64aca172541491699b324f846ce338fb5ec80d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDN' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7ff8156c3067a396e541a498f2e6bece
a416bb67ccfe738ecda4587f872344950be21ad5
describe
'147090' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2f7abc95a1427e04e4c25fa1586add5c
e713ea0e01bd0a2cb5e0361e59ce01ae2ab4ab68
describe
'46910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDP' 'sip-files00090.pro'
7d10197877662c0281c94ed6c28b148f
c9db8310277000d477eea4c77f9e2760d8849b4c
describe
'43710' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDQ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
bd620c22a5e5515f0bd4d9e5c09dc8f4
6d0eb9b6c40ea4c59f268e255969adf9dd294aec
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
44863694d21191ede9de8e1dce2c7ea7
5c601b18b3f346e6b3b4619005e91979512f231c
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDS' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2c692a090b41e940d7527e89ebd956e3
3ff635dc7138b899d13802c52b2d94b65eee43ad
describe
'9889' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDT' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e192490e2f27ad836503dab942270300
3228580c9f96fc38710163a6a48d78fe6a3a29d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d499905f7248d227130f67195cfe0ec2
dc6f2a6d209acfdbbbc4d01c3d44d48a57a74e72
describe
'138401' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
cf4a91c18712b9d3989994620daf9eaf
99bee2854a09750a786a1cb0a9a878bb212cc9ec
describe
'43749' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDW' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6cfae98d22f4c6b5b1c9d4a91b946121
e5928806ea51456845c4f802dc3a5af72471ca9f
describe
'40736' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDX' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
c98ed3883c4df77c833bc4dd580d2877
493fd4f97b311901b782000a74437035c1992f27
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDY' 'sip-files00091.tif'
99425e538879d54a5004e2dafe4cc260
e8738ee78b56b229bc35edaef572c9271b4ae9e4
'2011-12-22T12:25:35-05:00'
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXDZ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c5e4654dec4873f3905fa807d902553c
967cc7f680db2e6ce8bf242f7680464ffd8a2185
describe
Invalid character
'9878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEA' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
6afd47feea5964bc053b917e546cbb92
94547bab9e7cf45e90a3cb957e6737eb723c33dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEB' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
a78866da92e7f38a2285b29637055373
7dae8867d3206eae615d1b9afab2bb4a050de10c
'2011-12-22T12:25:34-05:00'
describe
'106405' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEC' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
dd456d3efa05d2358e9f1bdeeca7be5b
8598cf0c01bf34fc932785d76389d2fd1c6c148d
'2011-12-22T12:27:59-05:00'
describe
'20672' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXED' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a996b32843e70f65e5991dcd13eecfae
cc97b6c4d97d5418f624802c3d6d4befc7553d07
describe
'28536' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a78a09a9261e8d42896b6eb6ad95ca8f
eb275753205dcae7368c484e53437baf9ce71040
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEF' 'sip-files00092.tif'
f9526a88b7b86f2ef66b29c9076fac04
56ebd847dc09b0a58e861357711a044e35c114e4
'2011-12-22T12:25:39-05:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEG' 'sip-files00092.txt'
e2368a975c8931d8ababf0247c501e2a
d7cbc38fc96871e00671594c5bb6777fe10f3bf3
describe
'6703' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEH' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
a37f39565f37a9d758412c7d7cc89eb0
39b94652cdf30f0e8dde6b670d176b4c7d32cdbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEI' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e33b194de566733a02c1cd31050ec963
9e8267e342c24bb3a7c7b92beac52c49ee96cc6e
describe
'131252' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEJ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f283de4e9ffa2b636be3ad0a144193c3
de4cb56a215a12257a0b0d941d9c5c273cffbf15
describe
'31737' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEK' 'sip-files00093.pro'
1f281ff6536304875e37b9e2e7bc4528
c913fe4e9ef967d1a9f30ccc9e612283289b736b
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEL' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
84acd928cf740d4f2bbdc2a3915ed01f
606a8b56cda15402457132987133dd562ec94f61
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEM' 'sip-files00093.tif'
6eb67112ffc17fdc72a2300e1ac8dca6
f92fa8161d48728b6518d33f92ad296e01813cfe
'2011-12-22T12:24:40-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
4acfda53e66629e28bfa6c656d94d0f9
b46c3c0556384d5852c0cdae10e4af7480e07e37
describe
'8935' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEO' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b4cb5a3e584bd457620263bedfebc77d
41f611acd6d41311c698b0bb9e6d154a426879ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEP' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
f29506c113e51ad6b368d53ef0494691
fb0e2106a9c05ca2e0c91832e13bf06fa726daaa
describe
'141684' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEQ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
909114692fc156f70c250759c100093b
766abf91d31a5f58363dcf279063d295053bb9bb
describe
'44748' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXER' 'sip-files00094.pro'
bf81ddfe42c8f9084d08e7d40445e3c8
c22d633cd72b69d0d35435c8bff496638a89fb12
describe
'42015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXES' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
5a7577221932ae40802dae7a4ebfd8c2
fab152d81147dde91bd79570828d3abf2fc24db8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXET' 'sip-files00094.tif'
442b39833757c0c1b24a12e8c8f30099
39acf0c78c7009dd084d52379c0278730594c3ce
describe
'1917' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEU' 'sip-files00094.txt'
215afe42129ac99cae197b77b9db70e3
556b8f637abefb0caa55b206973f08a42d381009
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEV' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
1b7243000bda793b059662d75ca31bda
233012d19735363071f4366b616b7f6be988cbae
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEW' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
37c7db9b8fc405d14f966034b83345e6
b332d1edc97bd998f39e11acccea5a56b8ed7b85
describe
'189386' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEX' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c728b8222a065f5d4a86a3ca574333c8
e78d6a1f0251fb791128e398d3df9e72a8f2125d
describe
'4073' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEY' 'sip-files00095.pro'
465c44ff72cebc6f9681b7ebeaa77c08
2d254613edc4301c1abae3b2cd281032f91a6cd2
describe
'44282' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXEZ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
4b3a91206d53f9adc1074af9a0006bd5
63c07a45d6480e2401fd82408405cb10483eaa3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFA' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ee35482b70b26d3dba931546fd4e9bcb
f6147c31d43fe573271864828caaeced9f00390c
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFB' 'sip-files00095.txt'
c6bc0e0342a82a9ab7ff8b90b249d387
a60f1a1a898acffd81b66bc04e3eff615e86e4d4
describe
'10341' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFC' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
8768695d07fda11a05ab586d7924341b
004bc4608dc124bc7321a74bbe9b4b013a2275f2
describe
'362808' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFD' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
d3601d2cfa23c17c35fcf76fc61eb84a
ced26d8711209408e0157bca366c52c64e6bdd54
describe
'23209' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFE' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
f0d600960cb6b23c1aa2b17e249cc8d3
16e24d8f2032c3b11ab0bbe24f755c4e5cfd1e9d
describe
'4243' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFF' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d23307d9036990682d67790e5f51f9bb
5920ddbba2f29aec9d91325bb41abd2585cc3f44
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFG' 'sip-files00096.tif'
80f495caa7652cd97f895daf28106067
9427e6d5fd15c06c3dd589c79925cda4ebeec38c
'2011-12-22T12:25:49-05:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFH' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8885351c7818b048ec32e8f35c8b4992
32a9737dd04c180966c2719ba16b02ceff14c13b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFI' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9b443b8b7f7335a8ce074bc61d3f0ca2
fb46fe48d3c81e7303cf017127ad094d65983202
describe
'143659' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFJ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
58939819e45996be13ec046c7a2cbbbb
bf4fc1b8e24231134e1e9becad5c348969caf827
describe
'45244' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFK' 'sip-files00097.pro'
8aa9cfa56ffa7a4c45dcb6929cb94c20
2b17f44b210d31c697d25822135e59a795a2127b
describe
'43213' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFL' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
392f6802709904226525b142ab45e7a0
74f6d053065876bed6eb968a9e9af2ee2961b3c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFM' 'sip-files00097.tif'
19831e56bfefe43d68c79ded2a8a0013
1f1e85e0a01e0ce7e1253f05cd24c33c8a43a05b
'2011-12-22T12:26:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFN' 'sip-files00097.txt'
33371cca19d2fd94e7f48163d8150902
844c961064766c2dab7adbe5093ad54a4864a4c5
describe
'10072' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFO' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
b6b199b78c5f9d47271fa7becbfd0be2
b8c9f19263403d4180f491cdea82eb05dee61b33
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
e74706fe5cf73c8dd6d2b0e1337c34f4
1cdce7fe6383d6517b2982f52fce48f6b040c7f4
describe
'151372' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFQ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4c2c66c0f11d87091851896f4fbb3feb
505e2e12b50457fa8a66a0159446c0d00b19cb18
describe
'50212' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFR' 'sip-files00098.pro'
61fd3a49cef0526ada6938430d0afc68
90d98f1e54b109043c189bc8cca309e7f914ce80
describe
'44822' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFS' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b14d94a6ad5aa13b8b66a33b099ef503
d18616c464a387910846d5222042cb78979982ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFT' 'sip-files00098.tif'
054ef1ae3e3b17d0eb2446fe3163e75c
320763afccd15f859dd600c1052ba9696e15a137
describe
'1985' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFU' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4e849f7b3a38d9f4114901c63f8dc7cc
e699c6f460ae20ccbe11b4fb00501259a50de31a
describe
'10177' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFV' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
838a7eacd4cbc15578ae24325c7993c2
a4f9f3a53ea65cca7354c103c1c415be3bba1a32
describe
'362886' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFW' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
4bf1d8a86fbb1b7c132ff96f07cf0ff9
f9f407ab763db9202ff947b97d77adb05d29f4bf
describe
'147827' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFX' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
67648a4c338b67ec5ee741a32a7b98f7
31d999a7a34905073f8b1d8e2992dad13a80e5fb
describe
'49604' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFY' 'sip-files00099.pro'
d639f62e7c8fb56ef0b0adc14e565ce0
2ce7611fdbbf2b5a548dab30a6e63588a652eab5
describe
'44167' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXFZ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4968fc2f0e5f805d06df891fc6c1b69f
58764ce176548419775bea064c1fa05aaae429a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGA' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6beb3b515684f5df5b84916cc73292c4
b4d8be556ca161d4fb85a3f149a7f67a13082f06
describe
'1971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGB' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1015c9a1569701b9977f5df83436c263
c3d55e9851887646ed4714f813e583bae9998823
describe
'10198' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
403ac39e7acb0f64210bfb9672e0f8d4
7f1781ca30f89e99265402c79fd9cec11e79aa89
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGD' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
0b9e6c3972fcc3540e4d9406f7e6c640
dda57636e81de6c1d8333ccf7f45d2f84471ace7
describe
'149751' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGE' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
55e2243c8422a8c9c3421cce3edadae1
9c6713c255d781efacc5b94444e5450b9daf468f
describe
'47302' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGF' 'sip-files00100.pro'
84c0a93064b34d69f1e5bfd14ab7f5ef
7c942dbe1956f0249f86852c4566eed96066ec0a
describe
'44378' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGG' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6037974edaa9122712a93672df618fd8
4eb7b13e406e4958b97ecc2f2caf78834ca2e94e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGH' 'sip-files00100.tif'
762f55cfaed3147cb1ffaad573e2cd40
6372548aeda85f26dbf54b34720a63ffa2f48965
describe
'1943' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGI' 'sip-files00100.txt'
fa66e5d5cb4aaa47c69d81ebeb9c5126
20f9792b038591835bc6f8becc1a08c5a16ac54b
describe
'9893' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGJ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
4e4d08cb5a3d3a4c943fe5b776322340
8814b65c38e6b4ef7d46c4eb121085ee7cce4516
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGK' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
a1231a7dde1a77579930ea4d3191416e
d6b459657ad1e64c22b4e204f20665bfa5bceb73
describe
'102370' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGL' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
053e28eaf7777363046d4ecf95f1fe85
799ece4a0068d480c2c9e4305f27e3796b50ccc1
describe
'21822' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGM' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d8664b040c1d7b5b269827df0d3e27dc
82e82ec433bdd7d43b319ce982f86e6ae85881a7
describe
'27406' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGN' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
6b183d9fd81a0b92e9f2616e2fdafdfe
67ec48d5cba59569ca64c922f308082b166593a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGO' 'sip-files00101.tif'
014fd790bc15abb28163a886cbc1c18b
f39974991a65dec9575439ec07f94ba9f7aca954
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGP' 'sip-files00101.txt'
e197ca8def7bc05ee1fcd871757f2544
15502710972b3536024f76e2d2fcf74614d7fc91
describe
Invalid character
'6634' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGQ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
75d68d468a6dbc4d4ff4116fb317516f
d2f4e637cddd7c739db73e95808092329463effc
describe
'362851' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGR' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
d60bba7f9133157f81e3014a2343c371
54cc73107757d79f2659aacf206630ae5c3c3e4b
describe
'135414' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGS' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
6294743ce6a092120520018780453280
2847dfbf6c72e4a0ddf0626bea1eed24108e5ead
'2011-12-22T12:23:44-05:00'
describe
'32728' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGT' 'sip-files00102.pro'
0dc5db95d68e232807020492cfce8be6
6bc7a23bf79163597f7969b37350849d53f9ec3c
'2011-12-22T12:24:30-05:00'
describe
'39147' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGU' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
8f0a9d2f4388045b245287f13c335fa8
8a01533525fc1bd4938897fd011b3d9188bccbe4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGV' 'sip-files00102.tif'
a1c476f0e7a6d3955b050c39014cffe1
5ba9b54a59e471bf36146145590692a5e0ac2a37
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGW' 'sip-files00102.txt'
90d9afa7cb90dd2af026f1f4feaa1dce
a8530753ec7fa2d8c696825d4b86bb7b532be3b6
describe
'9003' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGX' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
f852883a857075e79b30c900ac1f9336
cabb3b588230bdde71e259bbe3d1f07d6628760d
describe
'362904' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGY' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b2b9ae85e8d8806295f9b97554c803e8
a0df8edaaa2087f89ed7500678f2225d889be562
describe
'140498' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXGZ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
1374895a8c107ea672fb97418b00c341
b4b0188bef447fa0b2368f859f72630b83a4ccdf
describe
'44718' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHA' 'sip-files00103.pro'
90f284d3c27fb2f2ec62429e6047704e
d46ed5a1cb4e8fa412404306733759d726c08d8b
describe
'42274' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHB' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ef4459784b0e5b1f4899ab4b1be370b1
4365d10a300dd7fd6f043dd5f63a6f2698321061
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHC' 'sip-files00103.tif'
b281d4fb0106f5fb6d1ccbe5396873d4
8333f82fae8a3f13fdcb72c675550fdc2eb2aa96
describe
'1875' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHD' 'sip-files00103.txt'
753b3a9240a0a9cd4320bdffe3cd5450
f129eb833aa60e504be25be2401e50e862388b14
'2011-12-22T12:27:48-05:00'
describe
'10113' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHE' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
3a104ef84c8bf01ffff810759a868d04
1e2e3cbf4cde6687fd81b1cb5435e57efda89fc2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHF' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
cda5461182558a07338f47ade6a93bbc
973deddab5c66e1e940e3e2642116cba85be01f0
describe
'141782' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHG' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0476b976b2cc7e9f7372a0ef14f8c968
ecce51dc5988bd0f8b76ca53723c6a4629d1ffc9
describe
'45379' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHH' 'sip-files00104.pro'
54140e573a02dda036e7c30ad63118a6
e70bfbafccf5650eb0e5e08f8c83b198d8868a3a
describe
'42654' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHI' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b2aced8cab02124a8efed20725a2804a
6c194135e4aad2b0e5688cc394401542ddd8e891
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHJ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
2de97da506813f64ab85a4e2412f253e
a2a23ea0f55e8aa9b27f8492604234ee50f73b59
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHK' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b49a2d6709d7bd92036855094a7c73ca
504c2af3104afc6f70849fb2f66f32a3256ef770
describe
'10505' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHL' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
d53c7ffebcef15ec2146d39054d1030b
07d78c3c6c2d2b96d20095f5270fbad941ab0f5b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHM' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
32942a75b1902eb0c1beb227439bc20f
1bd77221990db823d69ab168c59ba16fb217d511
describe
'193109' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHN' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c686bfd6bfa959d232472739687cccab
361a18d22e5a7021e5c50f2403dc0144678b550f
describe
'11000' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHO' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8ec0ff89a4d9b716267d3cccb0312c09
6be24b4f4b8dcc63441209d917abe2c2f3e0644d
'2011-12-22T12:26:49-05:00'
describe
'45405' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHP' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
6f963cb00cd3a6076f26a1c138edcc06
ecf0540ea31f8bcf6389590712eb4eaf9b937f81
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHQ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
5001b05f25669eef42c4eb34fa4e5e78
2a2b9e1934fefaa16884d07661bfb83f68fd8ea1
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHR' 'sip-files00105.txt'
7d2f3b2d1748c2637397c2bc8419abe5
0b34ae4099175c5c46fd3ab07eaf162650f66330
describe
Invalid character
'10429' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHS' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
0981ddf45e3a445434fae4a0c0fdb4a9
9533b0836dd98f979050cbdea439a32911dccb8f
describe
'362648' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHT' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2bc5bdbb58b936afa278fbbe9cf71762
e1d2f3b04f2c9ba3768dd3699dad8293e3ba6a23
describe
'26957' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHU' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
06db16e155986c52d52b9cdd47d0aff5
452d74db7b297938f5d4596c14e3bb40f9f95f72
describe
'4676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
890b40558e4c8aaa3e296db531b9d81a
e6624ab92fc53cfd06bc5d6aa5e1f45cbb1dbf75
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c120284953571fae1f783132cb173b0f
22592cf75c06df777b039cda7a354f8c87ec9671
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
f45f9062d65c9d00c12515f178d729f0
fc8c37076f412bc836cd87c2b8faf9e8971a6528
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6becb3113bf183da7aee15e07b30b04a
08c11e8a6890f3816b29539e27281ab0f8957459
describe
'139772' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXHZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
ab7dbdd490dc7664a62d215ee63b829b
0293861053ed2d84b4f79c52934a9cbcea41ed62
describe
'44556' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
1be923fddf967c3665dd9e152a084106
74734756f32587dbafe47bffb85cfd4276fd7a51
describe
'41510' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
9445624b0315c7162c26bbabb2f9a517
80f5abaf189575dde23b6545ce37246a1469e760
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
89c6ccf772c1dee95ea12a510c830111
a7b91ca7706a7fc04bd7e0342f670f44af21731b
describe
'1910' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXID' 'sip-files00107.txt'
39a22ca299d5406170b88e0525326069
034dd2f46fd0b4ae64361de843014947cc28c13f
describe
'10068' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
991de10b4460ea0a7c3282d426828b3a
e95c2dc05d2a63f72b8b1c4614a6e97818ecd207
describe
'362908' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
4336233a9301508217e47daea6e31c46
eb1c4cecd5ed39daa90dc75201eb7ea275587359
describe
'110035' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
7d12027489727d4832691809032d5c4d
42355a7ac5708e3a1b45ec1825ac3b523156ec2b
'2011-12-22T12:26:45-05:00'
describe
'24625' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b237fb2fe82e3a4583b5a2398735902b
24e0053b0003730c5d0186a09d92c405cb769750
describe
'30144' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXII' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
197592bb75d177a2cf39deff71808943
e87dc38d65cb44159cae9eb4e93d5b06f19d5644
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9d64cfd907e0041e3f46c09baa3aa022
2d939dcf15cf87ab5e187febf01c87294071d69a
'2011-12-22T12:26:10-05:00'
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
90b1f7c530067ccd1a3f46459755ebb8
5baf03083a457fb42e62184eafe07a8c0c8d16c2
describe
'7248' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
b4ad56611ccea9fdd6af5715846a6528
525757da3dc44d29f4d68a219abf5baafaf701df
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
5ab162eaa69cd7afccea6680f5cbf98a
cacaecbd8e8960b0cff432df5ae6f67ec4b37fe2
describe
'139959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
008a7e61bff55add45a18036dc30c253
e1867b77069854ed6bca6c8e62936ad0c5603090
describe
'33657' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
c44f8734a2ecacc0682b6d4fc89224ca
b01373bfe14fe2f397d30a929bc6ff01e3500c16
describe
'41138' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
ff3f166802266f841ca2d2d38a00a290
b9ca2f441b4d2ed9c2222f706724b88da98783dc
'2011-12-22T12:28:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f41132087accfd8ec0b2ed191800e489
0de386aefaa1a8f0dc5a97666d601c2297168627
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d4148d67aac2f2cc94f46826dd6d8891
5919924d51acc97ff5cc873b75bd52d5457bf0f3
'2011-12-22T12:23:09-05:00'
describe
'9313' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
188fc0120e870255a99a61d6d1e57054
bf815b2ba7e510926a573134d6f117b5732746dc
describe
'362847' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
082b5e9282d115d78414af8559e37cf1
707e6555d7160fb0b526ff007c45da58a856c684
'2011-12-22T12:26:15-05:00'
describe
'146830' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
40bf0a06bc6a1115f7c16631f660ded9
5828d512dc38fff950c0b04cf2b562102cc9d664
describe
'48843' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
1b5150bb97df429c983307facccb8b50
698d55a40d793254febd8f0c8d01049b94309d5e
'2011-12-22T12:28:06-05:00'
describe
'45077' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
cf84629f44500c99bad5e00e182244e1
61a1cfea04645a95644eb86ada9e4249c1ed1556
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
cec792b9d9bfa56e977c2ca14cb64483
c9c384cf2d8f02e8a417fd789bc86c4784750820
describe
'2021' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
324d40b752888473eaf545dbdceb3026
a38d193deb05f8138a6e5ddfa7bf15fc2628cd8a
'2011-12-22T12:23:56-05:00'
describe
'10192' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXIZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
ac0ea692a1e362b18df66a8c0abb2edb
5c001942372f875b34149c07534a1a7af742898a
describe
'362829' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9c77297bfaa65b4b402b39939f3504b1
305de0e748070f159da2e47db90a07363c4a599b
describe
'145144' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c6ba4d2494cff0b31400911cffba6e2a
5c114c9311821c8c438e8eda51528efa9960ca2e
describe
'48943' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
82f453c80333da0a16ac06929cddbf24
d709f10f835605c8cecb316dc62186c0ab4e0984
'2011-12-22T12:25:37-05:00'
describe
'44350' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJD' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
297f0464c169b5a558d2ed95015daecb
fb19f1ea0a1de45580a994df5772de74afcafe26
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9d8ca2345ae16055c1a0dbe45cdaa9f4
7dd7bf398439298f3faa66a24898d142372d2a15
describe
'2051' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
46095dd5ad824036257669ff756f2b45
4c592dc0183007c5395ec0890a53cfa1ac343838
describe
'10012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
0b7f3f31fb7b3bdab711c005fba9bf77
bf03c9deda2aaef00814d68f8111abf013ca8c00
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
4fb7913f0276b0d81821b6a213d65795
a6e6907688ecd5312a3a4f08e90421ea0add9454
describe
'143998' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
28477e098214f67f833c68d21f7580fa
d32a0ba4c4499b1535e4bfa598053e80297405d9
describe
'45416' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
28d06d6174a72ae35d806e6565075286
7be09924004c9b506b0572c599dc0b5e988caeb3
describe
'43327' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
48f60cac15ff811ad91f1f49c21948a6
c2eefdf33aae4368fc13f969a3194270292606c3
'2011-12-22T12:23:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
edcac928bfa6ae7a92cd6fbcd56952ec
599c1abcc51668354ea34cdd746d7e0f43256f8e
describe
'1872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
f9707d90ceccaa8b23f67ffc968ad739
4c73fd9fe15df7a3e5dc24efd33e0c3c726919bd
describe
'10331' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
4a0e3e56a0dccbdfe38c970d5d7cad5f
8630ed569c3331ccb27e3bf0bfce48c70eb4ff36
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3f2e482f5e9ad844633a96630454941b
2eb9f43c7ca395b2bac452c8529b9b6812813d97
describe
'148529' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
28ef66847fba0555b52c5ea0397ea582
d65917b74ee096a61f599818a799153c4605817e
describe
'48464' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
2d3400bfae794f340dc9e4bb98551e43
56ab73f0076d43ad364d761b8e741b6b55736000
describe
'44637' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJR' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
9b1d1145b9aae8d29902e383b61b5836
ef37811237d2afeb3d146cbc0aa379b33bef1354
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
cf269a8335acece1b6b6659daf823977
38db63c3c78ac8c17fd72619cf8d06d0de79856c
describe
'2043' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
39b1982d8860f5af0f8fe563f267f0ce
6c9346b7225381a77ccda4f9e530075e5a3aa43d
describe
'10046' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
6022afc829d5f6c36b8b3ba631926970
8aa2eeff4febaa898ae2061a66f05eb911022661
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
7299cda5505f040bfc3a513810c356bb
6c42ee7c3c05bae1235e779c47b391e2ba5940ac
describe
'131408' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
5b2382ba438aed14b0d89d91ee61c2f4
3b0d6275e957f7162fe0b69dfda195a76a59800b
describe
'43442' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
2a35eaa7d3997f00532f0b77af2920dd
42a8a3c27a7698070e24aca371056b6c7dc91564
describe
'38803' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
03f85601acdcd82ab9c5d636586df11a
859c41589e8aaf067b626db11099f8169c894e43
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXJZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
a8e43c429db6b72fa83fb13842d17cfb
958f7cf2a667d917638f7ab11c3a9cce0cc666f7
describe
'1863' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
de0290acf9291348317db35fe2ce3ffd
54b09bc4663af6f9655a4aae5312332254b54009
describe
'9264' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
80348a79e25b5ab8e3b50f53df6296b4
ea2354f6442ade8770e4ec53d8ca1bdc6a0cdccb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
be18c46d218b2c35e1f231bd37a83c89
475774b3d72261318fd99cb21581097de8a9ca9d
describe
'124735' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
4e5bff62f9d7cf85099e0e0371db5302
ab0533ded5257fc06239441d60ec434cd11821b0
describe
'39632' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
d6ee88b9e236d6b6049c23f11f0c9e87
553fd0a5a886d00b7858b5b8d9cf42f3d8ac1793
describe
'36237' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
a432642666f68fce6729d235fc727bd8
5a3aebc0addbf64508308a0aa3ed8161bff6a378
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
513db27e1ad5495a0d84cf52cf4be178
0997ab48e2ce4322e230eabf6cd389a611d6eeeb
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
7bb817d8afd44ddff69fef21b73dbcec
eaa5ffcda3507badface84627ffa439eb55fb2bd
describe
'9080' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
a1bd7ed9edfe961e6c42c23b4ac4a5d6
0729a2d4440850fcca2e106b5dafd251b04583c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
df1564fd49a23694c6e0691a80155d76
e881eeb319d5b3184adc624b03b4592ba1fb02e2
describe
'137477' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
57f2abfd1f81803d76a232f32c9c647e
9dcc3ef6985963a45e2ecbc425c31b4c37de682b
describe
'32335' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKL' 'sip-files00116.pro'
fb41eda886020cfba611c42b7c218c49
f3d588897a7ff4bd499de00be4031c6e44d57bbb
describe
'39587' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKM' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
ad3436ca9eaf41481a344bdcbdb6efec
86f23d79363ac493558022568c7ee6ec0851dc51
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKN' 'sip-files00116.tif'
6a8bda0de8936cfd7f66bfdedd2b6549
c835f78601c3d9016fb719a131df6b85d5a45046
'2011-12-22T12:24:57-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKO' 'sip-files00116.txt'
62d14f19e1ca31b6ce8fd48694286c7e
d0efc16cd17dfb959031a6aeea21f9b457da3647
describe
'9268' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d1d65ab8b7f78c24d6bb05f34f0dfeff
273a274952aacb142e73a89d30c8a140ef48c12f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKQ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
047236cf734b620ef1ecd217a0f310f1
565c3356ae296ee0a2490c00e47247ccc18143a4
describe
'139925' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
777ce0536a1ba561dd86a1e6e05ad9c2
2a1de82db4c4c4c133a0069b4018b0fc0f7000e9
describe
'45747' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKS' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5bb8dd48d0865cd6be07f788bbc25a85
fd2644e4cdcb21f417e81054f1e81bd507954c0d
describe
'43065' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKT' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ac15f859b07f86d1b05b9d68f2d83eb7
725a884fb0d58a2e4c11807db0c9fb59498fec86
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKU' 'sip-files00117.tif'
4f9903b61108b2ffdf21dc5f6a89cee0
9fbff7d8c0bd2eee95dff972e894a971ecc92aee
'2011-12-22T12:24:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKV' 'sip-files00117.txt'
c0ccb1f3bc7fa561e4f48ac22729d7a3
12e91dc5b30ae152b57656e5666d5721bb4ed6e1
describe
'9953' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
def97afd11d3c0688e883bd570bc6703
e08e74f80ea2efa7e859764700b26f86558066a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
4dbc80c699fe378deafefeb401e58951
5f51c7a270ad62e4d11d75acbf19f91bc750be19
describe
'141100' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKY' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b171926a564781052836504cbc2cdac5
af1dc655a06ea25ca710d9f9bd70117b8bbd4c97
describe
'46723' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXKZ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
6a3079333bc6364539243b4392846a63
392114bc2e5668be20fc32e919fb35582786cb20
describe
'43048' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLA' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9a73452b17c7bdd71882aa56b9fc0f0e
b4ff7dfa459dc219b61c97d4c9d1780628c55aad
describe
'2920328' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLB' 'sip-files00118.tif'
eb6270066b77437b6eaf6d85ef2feaa8
3ed34d549dd7274a83d85a46469d5b36cc2666a4
describe
'1850' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLC' 'sip-files00118.txt'
25b5e4ca5ab6541f81b9d59c02c34946
eae6c1aecc27016d01d7133b18d7118005f5ddc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLD' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
d500439fbc92f6310dbec7769553b245
ec37ea151826a0fe388bb2b2571e6910bd9945ac
describe
'362925' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLE' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
247f21cc176a1e497c1b97a6ff0d2149
887a724326a72dcb97253e52e5080e5c4f61d01b
describe
'137130' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLF' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c0c0293c3d0286ef077c8c4ee9a00dc7
3810b58c565eb22dd70c89fda259a8f6466213bd
describe
'42804' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLG' 'sip-files00119.pro'
5fdbf345e5daabf297ac2f2cea10a86a
a9a0eab2bbf1340e322c9a13cd4a6aced5587f59
describe
'40682' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLH' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
08ce82bcb7f71fd57bb3f98a86b1194d
e40dfc3fb2d9f880c28e5c9afda992ca6bf8d5eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLI' 'sip-files00119.tif'
92f62a4e4fc10cc7f19b810d4d9c1572
dad89c8e00c88a1a54f0175e5da800be3d2b2d25
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
4c3549a8442b03fa89f6721889e5830b
3462c64d399c023cc87d60d9433a014138ad583c
describe
'9737' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLK' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
554183039097b128f6fbaf83603024a4
def079cae6bb1796055104afe1dc884413b5699a
describe
'362852' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLL' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
f616671e75503396d0d5f44410690556
30ff9e30a3e2ff2335ec278d65deba3ebebec642
describe
'145111' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLM' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
40342f953df7042fc3dfaff43e4a859e
9835c3f1c758b0216cfbb63f2fb4264bf9f0a0d6
describe
'47676' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
83c57a013a2cb4e5ab75b3b4a780c630
62be09195dbef66ee39c93ca2143411ed9d1e876
describe
'43798' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
7be6b8cf7006f6521e854831031fdc8e
15171c7d304c03f25ac72c6b0a35cee8f82efd09
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLP' 'sip-files00120.tif'
2f3dc37bb6c2cd54c4b3865afaa3feff
6013b76f77f99ae073d1fa1879c76290f31a2267
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLQ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
083a40fdd384486498ec4e3cf79b1936
8efa253f729da24149577d5d3d2219b711a2f266
describe
'10568' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
5afd398a7b77beb77243ebe9f86d0dec
3fdb43c68b68d73706087ba5551228889870cc4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLS' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3e9a187cdee6823bc2fee355b3c500ee
aa43193119cb24273fe6f3015677e1facd210082
describe
'139678' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e2507263d6b1c027cf2cc5636b479599
2b0476ff73ffe9c3528b2eaa60f830ed37af6a83
describe
'45564' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLU' 'sip-files00121.pro'
b3d5cd83f3e5d9b1743d8296474d5274
cd61c4ec382f3b9ce30b4c64bfcc6bab3a379129
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLV' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
0cf74dc69e2ba50b5bc23799daf87198
c8635b3f7d456245d3db3efd702b440a322b3a6a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
2ef1fad00c5292c1f69f712d89d849de
754c0c9c4b15041d13542395e71e2774f71d8488
describe
'1890' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLX' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a105cbff4ec7284637211262e8d76b43
b3994f88613316da6a3bfe0a1ffe17fc6c0b7137
describe
'10087' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLY' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
f90f07c0692dff1dbbf245e919bbf7ae
594b85fad895edd0ad9e904a4560ff6f1ff5d47a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXLZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
6cb7186c7d5db0c9acb2ad0e6384c308
b5054fe135ffc4b051b8341feb6dd779a9d0a71a
describe
'147931' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
8d491881be79570db4032c236c482416
916d7ee1c7b711e07a57fbd2b983151a604faa17
describe
'48166' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
1c2e3d0526cbb35024d03f1ed6309c26
0acda8bdda716c23edd204dcc5d6bbe84e4d88b2
describe
'44356' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
9b43031ec428128ff598d4f8526e6cdc
5b3cdf3f4ecf9db4acfd6f618374be60c27522a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMD' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f281d7355b2ae0f234fdaf69df4d407f
ddda4fdade8c4345f8197dc352950c37b8afa27c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXME' 'sip-files00122.txt'
92f3a61f5b86e394ad7070769318e364
127a525134d7a7091955ca888eb1f3ffd18bc2a9
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMF' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
59afd10f97815da4c5008f8eec68733f
9a9de0bfe480a79178aa2b98e562a47178db4fea
describe
'362513' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMG' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
4065879ec36ae88ed58886405c0ec714
36fe5908e90f422c193875f274d93d948b6bd41c
describe
'109545' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
af03c0d2f14389a21fdd940ba54e1c88
39a294aca00e08de073d1d727834dc0cdfe54aef
describe
'19020' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
3adb71b5bf1305f919d9cda5cf1e9889
57cae84caa31a2a7c4815cf750ccdf6d15447a0c
describe
'28300' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
4468a4d253fde7af12afb9bfeb9d54fc
63b776eb3667a571e5e1702616a5d984168c0152
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMK' 'sip-files00123.tif'
b47140a153ac03573adffcf875ff3b55
c2c72f62e565f1bf9cced94e1e72a24aeb7a23ac
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXML' 'sip-files00123.txt'
2154556521826bdd84046004e920d8d1
d7f6f72102b87f50cebce18ff5857a5ed90c5443
describe
'6526' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
2f31ad79ab1713141113428295c2ee74
056747f556fbaaa74f10680f1f17ca502efe263b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMN' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
f30300da40255408c9e2f1929bbe4992
2c553449eb1e13db820680d4471a3ca84e12be65
describe
'132893' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
ab52a76bfb8832ff58bd5a178ad2b501
444cb6b7a88e33ccff71be2d6bc8c4f5f7a4708f
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
8d8ca3882ab82ee471b40a5c43dbb790
2797f7c3c48fb30f58a3afe737a3f99e14482e7c
describe
'37578' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1b27658e913989e64e3d011fcc125915
a82e4b9460f61ebc562043e2b5578d6140b219fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
ff546bb4845268f4ebb4b913385b425e
1d0283e6d806a91bbb2a951be45906b0bee7d596
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMS' 'sip-files00124.txt'
e89716d041e0f26a5e9a4fc14ef859b5
357bb6f388767834c9f4dfd1027f3fc8ccfa3651
describe
'8967' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMT' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
e2c9f2a7ba1fa5bef4ad9e47c416af02
ef45c85f6b651c2498be9dd2494a83cdb19daca5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
facbd6120099ee824fbc98965e37f184
5a6fdefb3bcdaf7a2576ec7eab5b63924c646123
describe
'126674' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
2078b8ded9b2bc04360fd076cf078537
fdfee2acee0e83a991a64238edd5fe68d44ee7b4
describe
'39531' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
206a6ad04295d25f1392a3105ea27698
643f1c1f0c8ec73ccffbfd0686e242c59b36289b
describe
'38647' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
c8beb618b1e5a589a1e70feb91783ab8
c86fc7e6d36d4b9695ff982be34ea8a3589465b4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
bef532281c83e1112cd43aa764a64668
45d2aacc153a3d004e0a1eda7a396e3efc611703
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXMZ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
43502279962830f0f95d6444b497cc11
cff7d0741c8a561b86f131fa3b91fc2795f2bb08
describe
'9163' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
45d7fd0b786995929b76c4cab13f5cca
05665aaae1505598f8c98eb4ee71494500e734e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNB' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
675278d82bda72133aa9d1cb310e6cec
fbabd1150a75b1dc273ae848313cd8ea1d823f89
describe
'136888' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNC' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
449f98ce4ed3c8b108bdffe879e99b50
0c61d39c7a261448ef6bf4913e89acc007889b28
describe
'41967' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXND' 'sip-files00126.pro'
2c5400a198139e422efedffe9fa6cc22
b015468bdfe333e9ad1b0d56002ad8e3267a06ff
'2011-12-22T12:27:54-05:00'
describe
'40732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNE' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9308878f753e36cad5420b7b4ad650d8
46f4a3b89661bafa10299a8a22b6e5016d679453
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
cf8db76e001fed18c98dd39f9657123f
493a9b00ad6e57f55688b476a96eb5d300e8fc63
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNG' 'sip-files00126.txt'
3a588dad8069176ea632b77c4d69802b
f75b6d7099a7cb08276a1622e45a68fc97e64ab5
describe
'9608' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNH' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
b8c25b0b1605409523d210d4cacc1548
ee0836f12831be3e9d0f1b92411ea7aced7878da
describe
'362864' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNI' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a1db13587972439f2ae689f915aeeb1c
3dffffd092c46acf657ba149387fd3606e0c5387
describe
'143149' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNJ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
33acc5a15c447062e65a9f5f1e8aa766
a08b30c1d5c19243d2fac7c3412db432b641cb36
describe
'46709' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNK' 'sip-files00127.pro'
edc93da2487a7ba9eb8f3a5602ee8338
20c7b19b90f359e31b8cd70479deaab6edd425a1
describe
'42754' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
8c43e495dbaf612bb03fa086877a2ce6
b8fb83f8e8d71a516e396b32a38c05223f320e68
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
5b745d08fb0170b8b6987d6a92cb39df
9727664c206afca52b4618d22062fe9c0c7333ed
describe
'1878' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c0b092379030e845a9b2a198b172ccc5
a3f7aefa662e4f848f0db552335b9a178d52a441
describe
'10057' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNO' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
9e49da7c1c6857b1dde65c0856536886
a5e3014a54fe169c580fee888eb70300689da061
'2011-12-22T12:24:46-05:00'
describe
'362842' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
d3a3aa512a9c7775e9b120bbb5cf1926
379e20b398f8c6f3f390adf837436e5f51f1910e
describe
'137446' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
0ca24660906aa943978ac1aa4a7fa0b3
557c3cc1a25bba420304d74874978efb64bbd4bf
describe
'45041' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNR' 'sip-files00128.pro'
e1104789d1251c9e0403b33f7fef8c9a
1371eec507713167a709521e46313cb6c52bf0ba
describe
'41071' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNS' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
6f9cdb1cb72d55991986abb84ae9dd5d
b5f29bde479f9d3a95880d48b22d7bac9c0b1073
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNT' 'sip-files00128.tif'
72ae7855b473171f9abaefe66eac9d52
f02ac2fb84c6ad1d7debdcb39e84f1b186ed181a
describe
'1809' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNU' 'sip-files00128.txt'
e3146cb3c6a22eb003e0528849932d8d
8e94a11ef855305a0ffcbd07ff159e3f12b9f958
describe
'9289' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNV' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
aa0db2b0db712926d84270d7878b6093
ff5c0f3fffbc744ade4b257d59651ef3ef5c5d9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNW' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
224137b10ca5e3bcc5911eddea9c6baa
4874ff2beca36d118174b19a70c4620283c5b71b
describe
'140889' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNX' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
36ad4af87342c00db37ccec29b923586
3c72b667c4f7662b631fe74595133b4909cc723a
'2011-12-22T12:24:28-05:00'
describe
'46271' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNY' 'sip-files00129.pro'
a478aabe88b6be7a42e6b43d85b81c21
a0d1a939a05048c0fd27b0ade711283b08d28a89
describe
'43244' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXNZ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
0e11ed230ea01658fbb5dd159a6148c0
0bd8574bc54bf09ffdc9e3c74427d84bc933838e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
cbae891a387801512cc1983599a14266
83adab37488c5c25f49065d95ea9e72ebe3a52b8
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
5429b50661a8cfd9456150db169893c6
6f660bba974308f758c025a870241ec4cda88ddd
describe
'10237' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d2b41e138d17f580898223207a45eae5
fcbc1d18a036f4407c3698d0ff5921b2ed984cb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOD' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
95baced78c410beb9f682aec2ce39f15
9c4c23e6b70cad6cf17449f38173cd18ed2844c0
describe
'136334' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
fbe892f28c82ccad52b072962b5dc890
bf4be6fce1953e393b4eec6ba6ca18460a38c537
describe
'30258' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOF' 'sip-files00130.pro'
3484b9675f5d7dfc8007ac3ca509e5c5
021c9f1ff51d19c6a981e36dbaf7941b4f5414cb
describe
'38203' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOG' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
4993b305ebb0a9a211ec963999e08bdb
b325adead390ad2331ce87cb413561431ba3cbc7
'2011-12-22T12:25:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
e718b49421a4d5c7f6f0028450e13ff1
17836163f5262867be4073375167849a4099e02a
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOI' 'sip-files00130.txt'
afa751ac494b3b94af0c7ac54843707a
5fea5a29c520b081cc5b1c597dfe1e62367f06cd
describe
'9172' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
4146a641ba5348f66c3cb7c7f43c9cb8
a20d6db9980b9c50e6ff9d821fd912435ee86c0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOK' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
6370b47e6c279ccc00f22056a4e09377
e883641b63dc74185f6f1d57f3997756b3a18be3
describe
'142919' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOL' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
6242533427ab3bac46b3f724ecf637ef
d8322f30e7634ce8527762081a0a6b8beb6964b7
describe
'44611' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOM' 'sip-files00131.pro'
58896c79cf3017b7d566ea08e7540af9
b1e38b2ea7ad0373f096d7d039ba19b82875bbca
describe
'42542' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXON' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
938ee3c46c21c64392d85e525d171821
1ce0d8d6f2ede9a3f259bbe92c6e2c9844a34c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOO' 'sip-files00131.tif'
ff89082f1a9dc38e692543781a1298fb
1971020af31b893e67d465721c07693f72f1d5f8
describe
'1883' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOP' 'sip-files00131.txt'
5c864cea1755b3a54899f2e38d6fbc4c
c3d7080c1b3bb0726912620f39071e7bda109a45
describe
'9978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOQ' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
3ce235b46ece0f6fafc341093a8bbc2d
84926539af87b758b5be0189fc2984eb70a9e40f
describe
'362817' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
611efc8568f547203334357ced35566c
f6f14e7a70dbfc4b6f0a31117fd9c1f28d1aa237
describe
'138767' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
bda1c4a42bfbadbeabb1de558e1636dd
3f3de1cb7d6a65e7194e0bdc1c22fba896a9eac3
describe
'43426' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
75adc5b53004509aa425f3d1372d3993
960d5b9b567ff33a66cc92f9e204e6abfa62bf61
describe
'42240' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
da710ed58036c880d2167e36dae63cbf
8f0ccf9c57c3dee1a5bdafbfa7062ebcb83de246
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6a541de41644aacac4db10db89443f36
96c31a44b21378aebb01ccc575510f9d20984fab
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
72deb1696a542549ecbcfd23ce766706
69f07b4e8601d170eaf2d8c330cd02490bc63df5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOX' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
841f65151c5723ee444d34cb97d841d2
d952055049fd9eea4512e601a5fc63ed3ec68378
describe
'362912' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
a31d0deb39e2e4bf301e11ae1a1b771a
77e120bdcb4a2958ebe4490bdf77f31146140be7
describe
'139943' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXOZ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a282f2a95641a8c26093b8345d1a6350
c06938028313bea58973920cfba4d4d0ddd67161
describe
'43856' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
ffa65b8941ad390dd5a1d883c5bdb7ea
59a3ccc81bc25cfdee607a33c524da9ad0455846
describe
'41734' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
bc0896839f9d1d4aa4c5fd5752e41542
5163785c627d480cac4c84044694cef5433ec27d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
d33987faeb53ed9f59b8385503751365
b3eb27c42df189fca1f25aa30807ef554e3dd7c5
describe
'1849' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
df9d0c1ae3d036572d249e0d4d54cc3e
ae52f930b812d9bc8fe1e00d8512874c62fb8651
describe
'9550' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPE' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
9c79fc46f653d8085b8affabd4ed1b9d
0963a677712834e802b335e3cc9b53ba72eb29e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
3b44a39d3f0761f995de168ff7f92cb1
691e1d344a628efc4897e36ea194534d900ec957
describe
'136330' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPG' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
067a2fff9e77b28deb674e19194bc0c5
3fc047f6ec86003b81232cc4eda075e47a2f83c6
describe
'43898' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPH' 'sip-files00134.pro'
4f1b5fb5fca53de83475257700a1db22
2919c48fe6155bfe09069c8f9bcc262dffa08a87
describe
'41028' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPI' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
ab5e0558fa579dc887a6340c2576aa12
9fbac6ed2c19ed2cf1b0892ed49e55d830b6245b
'2011-12-22T12:23:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
19187ea47cbfde1c47783b8740d858ee
77e1b69a88a2dcf910bda099e1283598d17c3ae4
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPK' 'sip-files00134.txt'
05f48b21a0e2d9e0980995da3469b516
2ac850cbd66844cec7461e09234ab68d19649796
describe
'9663' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPL' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
9f55ba2f8ad36e580c365ce7bc6d3a95
f86895c9007b7c520fe0e5058120144639f4f334
describe
'362679' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPM' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e42530a41068f8756f978fdd1d86e633
a1220fa58647d748154a70759bcbbe02b62e1f98
describe
'197368' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPN' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
62339dae1bc3cbb3161cfed11f7dab54
78cf22c360b386e6828b3d043163e8ba7a144bb4
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPO' 'sip-files00135.pro'
7c93914ceb9042c848b2a4a214a2e2cf
fa16b59ca6a04b6f8aa706acf8b7dbb61992c6e8
describe
'45387' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPP' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
0cc67eef95b06c18319686063db75239
1281dac662d08401a6b258800408538b57884bf9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPQ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
9f972a79b08b91689b69b0e9cbf56b0d
81d27138915824277c0966ab76bbeba2d9100eaf
describe
'118' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPR' 'sip-files00135.txt'
80be28e36c9409fab053a72ce21323a6
3e43451cc162568b0f8fc163d6a3d784b94ba88c
describe
'10356' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPS' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
b37941c89b029be709da73bd71632586
35e2e9b0132c318dae530c6b5bf5b3def4af3023
describe
'362832' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPT' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
549a7ff92b5a275b71014378bf815177
13d3fd5668f46b0d1c3f21c3e77ca16931d36107
describe
'25557' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
61d7288c9394fd26a115a843f97572e7
947c7aa20f725409e7a67c23520ab80467f4e17a
describe
'4608' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
a22d5feb484d07635d506bfdcc697310
f8e5fdaa866cfa5742942a6f90488a7cc986c8c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
532701ac0a042eaa5efa894bb5deaa77
6dd0cb94df8ef1ccad02e5ba239c2e8cba94a20e
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPX' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
eb05ca0693d3c5fc070d9e1f90843fd7
262fad59236ac4e789b9702c09e20f68abf0db74
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPY' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1b55613a36d7cbdda11cf219e73492da
5ae4db96b25cbed7f910e7174fe09c4a846dcb11
describe
'151254' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXPZ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
4cfc79ddf383dc522fee1b3e6af6a0fc
9fbcc9004f0a890f361d8b237e840afc75b77c97
describe
'50176' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQA' 'sip-files00137.pro'
15a0c1ac42374b89ee535fa9a9c2295c
729a27a46515e779ed80481d1551c4ea591de374
describe
'45809' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQB' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
83665f6c84a36d797936e3b76fc29ed2
ab2968098319d1d554902ed032c4dcaea7868d88
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQC' 'sip-files00137.tif'
c2e1af2b58c2daca5b5fd3cba298e777
82e31cffbd8d9ea675bb5b69fcec2480751a1f4c
describe
'2027' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQD' 'sip-files00137.txt'
5002a84121c514ea3bf4e53f01465bbf
f54b3d9b3d43944ec318dc6d96634d666e168e29
'2011-12-22T12:26:35-05:00'
describe
'10196' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQE' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
865c804a504239115cb362f4d3d86965
9784a1fd3264f654e1b8887f6a801299d77eaa00
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQF' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7b8dbfa89956b38b0ddaaa16d3bfb2c9
c4adcbaff05945d62d192818819e603f29be4113
describe
'128363' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQG' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
7a1d3d6b3492c830f681ecce87da5ad5
9b605ffa0da860cd9ec446661044dc21013db898
describe
'40623' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQH' 'sip-files00138.pro'
9d6faa33ed6fddb3e13d6b8c4de4c6e5
1de9c50a547bca17c4ad814a36eb0d04b4549491
describe
'37939' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQI' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
3ae1c1be329c2cff42bec8a63817edcf
79f027300499b961fd7f0e864fc634921ea4e41b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQJ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
1b2dd41773a140488ef5c7f975c4fd1c
3935dff9579ee1a388a9b757de3bc4c3d308748d
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQK' 'sip-files00138.txt'
fffc75ae14721d718fafa621c78aefbc
df2ce18abc78962867c3da84087f0ae140d1247d
describe
'9105' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQL' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
3ba962ab69a65a6897549b495f80bfb0
2b7cb735ffca6ba7631a26d96bd6a4e3b5302439
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQM' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
c5f781165779fe78a8061140d4767578
441c6a6829accf21a76f4e4a246e127d97ca9556
describe
'150059' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQN' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
f9aa3ac5e47f045e4518c26ecb52f1a3
38fccf7fbc4a5bd873a1fc9b267733ecd76733b6
describe
'47757' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQO' 'sip-files00139.pro'
c09eac5b20ad25a3fdf09153ccb5695c
15defc5082c3d41420a5ec834f259bf032ea46c3
describe
'44424' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQP' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
00101eddf69e87acbed2d9bea58ca434
dd1044f9d08f80e1c52469c638a13cada40defee
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQQ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
b72d32c5ae3707308a2ba224379a5b88
d497ff58c553ac459b0f83cd40494f21a4560897
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQR' 'sip-files00139.txt'
4b5367bac2bf3ad21ec421935cfd29ad
70f8b7c5a168555a7e006954261f4cbe64b651dc
describe
'10053' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQS' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
30e71598c9382c8cd804ee1fe1f4fb3e
7904ff0671bb368befd7d12314d7849cecd5dfc9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQT' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
5b1daf3d688ac8f2db52edac63ff215e
f8a014c55d14f827709a0b432ae442ba7df1659a
describe
'127852' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQU' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
32b7d902b19b44e2b0855f4e37d57a75
526442c58a5278e35ae8c6b9e9e63a3e74565488
describe
'32752' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQV' 'sip-files00140.pro'
14b3dbdf2be969816542e6babf2c1bc8
a509b15c99af9c74f517568d70046aee00d2d50b
describe
'37328' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQW' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8a3e6752f9933be41000b2b21b884acc
1c0649789b8732ed9a8a87991e93aab4f09172a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQX' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e2d4d90a7a33a4d29752f2c627bb87b9
34536c3c0d571b1ebf3375cd2cbc591b28f94718
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQY' 'sip-files00140.txt'
bf5853f950a9ae3d6a5d4717daf24fb9
78896c8687c0ef5030bf6498ad1c36bc2a3759c7
describe
'8571' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXQZ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
a5f1c7bbcfbaa38de71fe69fa24aaf44
a28c2e9a90155218124b9bdab3754319e717bcf2
describe
'362818' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRA' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
4d4bf49e3c2024d1a322e0c591a68ca5
d2181d495c9f6e2932729476880a88511577a024
describe
'144829' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRB' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
485ec13e79cda49e49805e85c8dc4c04
ceea634304ebf2390fe4484ccb22e915417cdaa7
describe
'46524' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRC' 'sip-files00141.pro'
f5f31a6752f96ee0acaeabc0f6c30226
f7c576c71a646e09bab0e77d97fae349741d3a8d
describe
'43557' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRD' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
e8e0ec0b1395dffc5f6ac99f92f92938
da46e6de3c3d9b6dfa58cf98a1552e1e979b95e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRE' 'sip-files00141.tif'
83a88d0ae9f0ecce5773f02f981134f3
e0afe93be560453372dabdd390b30de6044e3462
describe
'1942' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRF' 'sip-files00141.txt'
8dc15ccae2f5f50069c9a6dba2b0b1ad
8b38c9fa7250bfbd610606df7d97ba869001c274
describe
'10517' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRG' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
d8e41acde6cba74a4d9e38c2e5c9d788
97bcd1b3c0e38898a8e574fb6ff121f6b4d26bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1c97baa119d73cf1be1be2da0d495ecd
5df3a40af8e6dc99bb965d981c6f4c45f8ecf7a3
describe
'146493' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRI' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
f536b1d107d9b5da02deb2ef6eb49e5a
d199152d98ad4de2b0659eac9b9dcadcd36a6011
describe
'47549' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
7f10ac4dd841b37582cd2cf77a97791c
a977f549bacf750a6735be03494e2c3be7737af9
describe
'43181' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRK' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
7dd1a1d4ea956438034b016482c39399
9c728c50fc3d1ce12af55b72ce789b7aa46dbeb5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRL' 'sip-files00142.tif'
87f279bb83cdf6a33e3d4fe8f4f27f92
4d94634afa7e53be18a88ec1e46c50cd661cd943
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRM' 'sip-files00142.txt'
e526d7e2a83d939c2b28e9673a99eb99
3c013f320e9b4f788038d727a8d275ddf9722a7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRN' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a670aa1ac7c1f438b7c75a50828f1948
28746a806f7f52b65eed923e5ded3c983786e80b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRO' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
8147e3c34829e07bf1f0cee20857f5f3
de1aea45cd41fd527e2ba01e0ec9feade92b2470
describe
'144660' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRP' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
79372c6d2d714c443016de7be50ab1cd
13a15a5522516f3fa97866ef3da1bfc4f69a0402
describe
'45635' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRQ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
d54717427c58a9dbbebe9ffcc7348260
66bac3c60c28847c0fd651df932403f439b8c6e1
describe
'43401' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRR' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
56e65f90fd3713baa0958f415fef7cea
4feeeb3cb262ea0757c1a805b0834728bd4079a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRS' 'sip-files00143.tif'
bcb65115d4682c5f99490fb928a572d4
a7dcb7cb069d449c6988a101d009fd5812dc6c54
describe
'1914' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRT' 'sip-files00143.txt'
c5a2222cb6a4946a563fccdc8958037c
6e4b1439f3ec5c9c5d6a84fe3ffae3204c711c57
describe
'10223' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRU' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
69fdca48ee35db86fe48e0fc11406ecd
8c880317e284e9a0a3fc83a1b5d6d4a03882cbe3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRV' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
706bf2873ebac9804efc82d60b5486e4
f6ae24d1b43c4209916f145c8f15ceb8423bdfc4
describe
'150135' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRW' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
820a711641c044f1a609ea277c9b38f6
d24d792b55d689d825505a613d70b50a2123412a
describe
'48729' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRX' 'sip-files00144.pro'
81f26ad5af0af39d568a419e2421f59d
f70d15e5936ea28837df8aace1d642c56f01368b
describe
'45615' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRY' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
b5a3a41084478da7a6ecf1d85a063323
fb77e99e01ab95190476fc66b527c5b00e26e933
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXRZ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
e2b2276bcb026583854cbb3b2f1aae8d
24ba909978065cd638e7552eac8db226ee6d9ec7
describe
'2008' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSA' 'sip-files00144.txt'
83a4c93d4644ced8cddd6647992fde87
eafca4f9819f5f72ccfbf336109637a895abc1e1
describe
'10353' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSB' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
12dd0e74ff9809edbf727bc76a434cdb
4f871fc9d9bbc8e7dcc542d86cbc6c5003ab2cda
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSC' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
26e7f3226025a245e21f80816170e78e
c90f966cebfbcbc547e5cbb071135b491d984ad6
describe
'146152' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSD' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
078a8dcde7919a89599fa6c54c81d992
27aa4d84c9c4cfb249828e123bbe07197b0e622b
describe
'49869' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSE' 'sip-files00145.pro'
00c8e90800aa95a0f359c53a8150377a
00a3f8de2324c5a71fb4e3395266667563b0d9ad
describe
'43532' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSF' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
8739eaf11a21627bdb27edadf7222de5
851e9459ac2a84cb552979ca1e65140c07f12905
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSG' 'sip-files00145.tif'
b928f4f542f8069eb8e06e84a4bffb00
fb0cfe7f22f9d16d37e0cdd0cc8914285ba1638b
describe
'2013' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSH' 'sip-files00145.txt'
96848ddd22265b14439828f5317645ec
33437af3107a76f9870d75a394b2db72d96a5968
describe
'9904' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSI' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
2995120531c2898ccdb8728f9e906ef9
026462288aca604daf2364dd3557e3799f39b1d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSJ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
4acb5a585c90cfba261d5c1e48ee7dcf
715309a726ed6fe7e7ec990018a2c28d43e818ac
'2011-12-22T12:26:02-05:00'
describe
'147318' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSK' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
311f16c002539673a5a7b0d1e6b9a489
a1d4e449ee3a344fa058527420b7165a45d11d9d
describe
'46076' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSL' 'sip-files00146.pro'
64bc505d0d56bd711d3757b5320d5215
12648aff4d843ce4fc33870b8186655f161a06ad
describe
'43311' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSM' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e9b26af92e9b22deb2ab73c0e337e11d
5910bc231ebd816cd98785d796b826a03701ece5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSN' 'sip-files00146.tif'
9af3db88c5fff0891bdc94c955e99cb0
56c0754af71c0c5c46a4ae103464d3f810658fec
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSO' 'sip-files00146.txt'
59b5f811c6575216dad236dc3e906df0
8b592d1b9660ed26d4488af1180ec9c2e4b762ed
describe
'9894' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSP' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
9a4093893a494bf26617f9acae2e7f7d
57740b182f902ff33e36ba23c7fbe1f6777da794
describe
'362848' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSQ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
2de78899a49b9c9cff51548102ace213
db4a114b7a5dcc64b2ab968fe1ce7c9f5baac852
describe
'157733' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSR' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
e1cbc0259af93ee67d850b6497722c99
1e0fb6d76094e8137d4aa1452e8a13e074ade9a7
describe
'51575' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSS' 'sip-files00147.pro'
350c303d2fd7b24513e84634b9e8f943
8e8c9181483b1a9e0998e1730b61df61f78abfbc
describe
'46302' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXST' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9d4a7a49a24217b98f93ab5002a0f4c0
20896bcc1a3e8f2f4b31ed7a919306b2c17eca7b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSU' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ea0bfe7d9409bce3c1c10c84227efb93
95181457118403a635c0c99a8516ad68cc9c9684
describe
'2070' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSV' 'sip-files00147.txt'
99cc521e644b4977761c499e4fa5a6d7
b1f7b1a06f8dd342a36dc70bbb93e8f90446a9ef
describe
'10756' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSW' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
ed5ea31b494b9f5a63805c61f78754d6
6f49de3540d1c2093d828f28253095b13fdd9180
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSX' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
4455756b079ebcc8415de9e9d7908075
fa2109e3492f6b6799d3a2f34c55bb8520ebf9fb
describe
'149226' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSY' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
8df7da910e039fa74e191d82e75364cd
623db4f1a6b80262969fb696715d6d0bfed72473
describe
'47621' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXSZ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
fece6c1bb82e656c97c3dca5329ee7ce
764971c9b2569e987aa6a1362a5c93590511aa58
describe
'43938' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTA' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5b0d5f7eb020f88ea1711d0d92d7331f
aa76349b06ca0232119be3afa915dd24563fccff
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTB' 'sip-files00148.tif'
a15b6a6b8dcfb56516b4bef67abc3d23
ae97bc682437e89545f43a0fda5f33a278ea2539
describe
'1950' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTC' 'sip-files00148.txt'
e8e86a2052f0facaa53d5a3eaa8bc4a4
c1f4603198e3340c8810958fca44cb575cbd3077
describe
'10209' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTD' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
8eaa426b3cfec8922ed199eeaba703ea
a2b4ac7d96cb3445d1fb566d8117a6d8c1b036be
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTE' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
1aa31bd9f48fcb2a296302bf69a1dd53
e5f222d6dc116dd210ca52d91cd8afd30c160231
describe
'139905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTF' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
d0efe3d69f8f92d86a600d0796a756a4
bbd15c51160fb46a67950210b5513dc085116b0f
describe
'34030' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTG' 'sip-files00149.pro'
e79a181dbbf544062963bbee1d82d521
d0c4ccccd3525e84fb89716a639b224281e63ddb
describe
'39501' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTH' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
87d7378a9384f539a47ffee2318d1fc5
43f7333675797f6a1d1e5e0c1675cf304bd76e26
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTI' 'sip-files00149.tif'
d2bc8cc2d79f268c679d3b3581b58019
4f190e5fa73b566285c20fb853064973cd859cea
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTJ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
b120056cfae886ebc603e95e18a6b80b
1141d0327b785a5dedb2975677f2a5d8f7c67980
describe
'9349' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTK' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
009e8eef0d1e5bd1020c0c080f44b2da
f1536e2a1efc60f1546ea7dad3afe7094763df24
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTL' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
0eb7ce5a38650a93c1c376c0d94d6517
f4219e2ab6d67780b3b4e6f8cf23283f62fb45f4
describe
'160909' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTM' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7ab7989267503007a507bf8a72aa9b86
d5c6ebeb37e082dcd02b0394cdf1ce59a572df46
describe
'51505' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTN' 'sip-files00150.pro'
8a841e53ce8ca09e02c3bd77a7558c76
4ab02832740d96ce855f217391cc2065fcde7131
describe
'48285' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTO' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
27e43d125bf1b0c801d2d8c1b7419091
7d171536e3bde68f3160947f9e6be5262d2eb414
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTP' 'sip-files00150.tif'
1a1c042c14ab597fab3774f23238df01
f75ee4caae5a426ab13b5150f36044152525492d
describe
'2143' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTQ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
7be5777e3f06051c9a76294d07df9414
5b5d4708282faf3208efb322eaaf28502263e75a
describe
'10533' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTR' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
8ecadd1688c59403340de20c13024163
804243441a58384e0f31faf1e37542b19fc51134
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTS' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
940b8c927abbf56bd12b7191f3d2dcd9
e35f25f0f88fa9bec031ebf5b1de1d1e092578cb
describe
'148464' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTT' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
ef07f87fda837486991a26eecf8b2ac9
3e677a95cde83c19da5e39bcf8c85338509d96d8
describe
'47216' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTU' 'sip-files00151.pro'
2effe579dc3b44de3fc51c5eee450561
c02c9c78fbc15d79c628b5c507222a0c3e01e5db
describe
'44514' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTV' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
ffc56fb8dc962580f96a12a01b6b6ea4
9559b96c014aeb73ed256d092d0645ecd519860d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTW' 'sip-files00151.tif'
3ffc734f1bff23795dfc759463d725e7
89988f41144394cf4cd5d9041a302d5e286f2a0d
describe
'1987' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTX' 'sip-files00151.txt'
34a6df62f373b7eb4865559d989e96e7
7436581fc2859b76e2ad5be72b7fefcc6f0c8a94
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTY' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
c0a21cb7b7b4a6e3a54b31936fa0e269
5fca6b24d99d37c6c0a88790b9fcf71e067a5d7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXTZ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
d3a0fe4e5de66f5ba2573332bd6578c5
579baf70e343a56b172836da52220f0f392f2eec
describe
'140348' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUA' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
1291e87c47b533f576e7f7ca65570118
3f77bb7c86ce8a0f5b8754324616a54d98797a21
describe
'47051' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUB' 'sip-files00152.pro'
c1497e8f8c592491405008ae33830e6b
29af17d1ccaa90138ae0d46024ce5a46cb31aef6
describe
'42716' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUC' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
a9e5ebbc3f23958e619ed65175204194
ef9eea816e2b2a9d3dd67893edd174a9a0749ea3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUD' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d30ff8c7f7cc5929846c4ed1c7c5e0ff
f460a3500a794c28c50263cc7c106ea168e1b247
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUE' 'sip-files00152.txt'
246621d6f69feb694aad1998870f0cd6
b5fc101ba875aa52cb8406af7c7f3915421c572f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUF' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
1d5f919938fee8bc5c551920e3c70367
a43996853eaa00faaeefbccbcef6f2b6ffe581a0
describe
'362853' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUG' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
d2cceae15c1ca1315fb12848891535f8
98da8acdc9e39d1191b39e2d1c087ff44be74ba0
describe
'150626' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUH' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
49dba45f5e68477c812bb36e42161ffc
9bd7c23929945c5b7f8db796c2b01877da294cf9
describe
'50958' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUI' 'sip-files00153.pro'
6e977a9b202fe1687fcc8f7124494887
b31b35de8f124320a0c611c720211dfa379905d1
describe
'44844' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUJ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
43f1cba1e18cb232f4ede041240d9edf
65d2da34886f06685925d348a7135ac1e38a8ef9
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUK' 'sip-files00153.tif'
c4fbfbb83b61c1de54e3c0eccb6ab6ab
aaa077326de48d359ef0a5fb9bdb406ac5555a12
describe
'2052' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUL' 'sip-files00153.txt'
c116e7e6a84387bb043a3e505e1c6121
014b43220bdc5330c121d1b48c61ffa6b5369f78
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUM' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
5b22a80401ed79aa26db6bd2abcd6d7a
fe166d5d5f97dc0395a629fb0649f144d3d50ec5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUN' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
fa0d60c7bd264a0952dc6d46fd6df47c
f8bedb4aed8478a9d64d911dba50562f507564c5
describe
'149982' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUO' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
bafa372e7280da698a7994ceba86bc75
85c313a04fc9851e9d1dd72384795582e9120a36
describe
'46891' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUP' 'sip-files00154.pro'
808fddd2c1b060c4f3f0ef07063b5f47
823d02695615340640d094447c3179c57b8b7ce9
describe
'44222' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUQ' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
0937afbcc323318588fce30fad0f133d
4b6fd3cf00ad1191e218e6644b7ab5b7d86164a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUR' 'sip-files00154.tif'
24adc2bf017dd89e12771e7cefd0ec48
5ea582c84a1c3a6188bea89199ffa3cc2db1a365
describe
'1945' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUS' 'sip-files00154.txt'
81eb8e2a018092fcc65156c6c6d972fe
027ef974daa7918dfce93db3187025d6a8e1375e
describe
'10403' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUT' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a7bf87289fbbba075784e22a90f95109
48aa124602a2f385755d4dc8a49bea06e8ce679f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUU' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
3a8156bc2eb35c4ec8a1de3e5557101a
17a1384e58ddc7611cb5d367618ff9d208a1a6ad
describe
'192447' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUV' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
5047e8de2774a163847c2a1261b9012c
965d23031704618a18d785a3969f0032eccb77e5
describe
'3627' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUW' 'sip-files00155.pro'
085c3189268f2613f013e9901a67f12d
b8779c604dd32c97e2c6d0918464831b60cfa098
describe
'45722' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUX' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
763970cd97f92739bd1097a4c184290a
ed3a26b47795ee2febfbe2ab2f7e2c95ed216dbc
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUY' 'sip-files00155.tif'
6b217517d5425dd6e90c0c94dc172b00
f96dfc940cde9544cea31b0cdb4b39b6609fea2f
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXUZ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
cf145f438240a8f7f9fc538eaffa796b
7846801f8c09c5312da94cba4b44d1c795bb1e4e
describe
Invalid character
'10742' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVA' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
8adce171fd19f17a31e1e43b06c8b9c5
fc53782960392ae9cb28ac88949d4dc85c3441d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVB' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
bb971f80598a42662e9081e97a3c6f5f
5968dafc8e10ee15216e0940ef766e8d327d7937
describe
'28588' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVC' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
56deb65dad50cb9ed6c71b393f89e20c
a6991127f9b5805db97a70b4754d418571335975
describe
'5058' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVD' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
09e5e068a6a8974843b5c53a6c6ff2e9
5f15d52b4a47dca5709462390ac41933d30795f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVE' 'sip-files00156.tif'
1a1d2ecb5e51192e95c74b9e04b12294
f2439223d91efcfbb52bb263bc065d2ef9a1728d
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVF' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
2c821de3c0f2f52ba7c8340c84b98c8a
b00624d76e489ae8738bf290f6cd0307caeb77d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVG' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
15468f1e193589e732b74ad214a7ef45
bb2d727dbf3606736effabfb3107704d36d084a2
'2011-12-22T12:25:46-05:00'
describe
'141905' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVH' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
4d3a24f82d84fea43cd446ba3a21a97e
b9d29cacb4637d16ded92be5e4a6e907c29cef02
describe
'44157' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVI' 'sip-files00157.pro'
a66d7898dccfe99c4522f3812bd5541c
5e1d34089afbcf48f3e6aba11e53c1185a1374b0
describe
'43139' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVJ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
470227a9fa01b6b25a5a10a53f60ad36
52aded378a3a3b954f44b6414574c99e9e1cfd31
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVK' 'sip-files00157.tif'
5749de6ee9580e86a972dc7618d42708
c88255f4542b2012be4d9a7be2e21fba331ff939
describe
'1877' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVL' 'sip-files00157.txt'
ba8643588d7beeac923337d5f5a7363b
4427f16102c158263815b7a56fd46cd12898e885
describe
'9949' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
fd809630da6c1996d2eeb8b6e10bd1ed
ba1e1a167f85d4a50ad9a7ba1ff42f2d01c1130a
describe
'362928' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVN' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
27ad5465953d56587a5a75bae66f67e9
5d45df4408dfb063e3b49b9ab46e85dd19479a56
describe
'131100' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVO' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
b1eef717ff69a1ceb8279de725637d26
4d093610ca8def6e11c3afe0d9118ebc52a96fdb
describe
'31775' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVP' 'sip-files00158.pro'
f3e7174846bbaa345701ad102c8c60e9
7d2af6f1b58f86a9aff39673b18ec1953f6a0766
describe
'38517' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVQ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
20e3c13a7e7732887b9303e4ebc42a63
e4bdfbbe0c1cbcd0932421edb1528f202cc08cc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVR' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0218fedd333c34448ef255ffa9ef186f
91bc252435a1e1f4c3633299fa8478eb41f6c6c7
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
c2d9596f52c05b1ce76762ad9ac3625b
82fbe43fa73d0b52088b3c54e0ce9733e4cf848c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVT' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
4ea51a931f980ed6e91665f578e2a3f6
e69bef66f4977ba4b15c1d0859e763f30e7dc260
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVU' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
e8e28862e5d4fb84bbce681ab8f696ef
131b24e86ab632ec7e9554b6178db055d0ec1485
describe
'140566' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVV' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
00c761d6407c5f65b55588a56afbbe2e
c1358021c56a08ebd3705cae52f4260396f15f11
describe
'46366' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVW' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ee30f51830cdb640ffde92554d987ffc
b383c8aecb259840b4f717873dfc62282cd8850e
describe
'42047' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVX' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
36b2399eac2a49e20f2ef71985099236
73ad66733f1ccfd36044eceb7cf0e7c5248de3d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVY' 'sip-files00159.tif'
2abe870ded12dcd129476b1b0143f330
e3063755dddd16ca36680ce7a383c79a89829208
describe
'1949' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXVZ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
4a58384fcb339911c8d2540e4d7cf73a
cd350b1c3b90364a23aa2255859179075695ed10
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWA' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
4cd74fc7a5bf3e804db9c52c71b26ec9
9b8e2275f0d29f3c301ce16dd5eac2d19ef41442
describe
'362898' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWB' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
8745617a6c8300bf2120d18cb62115f0
fd04dbf690a1d30a37cdc885d17e31fb2136411c
describe
'143615' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWC' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
0eb909efabacabcba05f5b92a4b298c2
f763d262d277b5acb8c22488f321e2d0ae25473c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWD' 'sip-files00160.pro'
da700b3d7aa7cfc3420073f0e17bb88a
847bf08aafc948076fecdd6b9e53856d1a17a0f5
describe
'42863' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWE' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
41724776aa06ffce9323555b942babee
d9fb543a21e77ad992fdb3e5a98966beab701093
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWF' 'sip-files00160.tif'
924600de812d514fce36b086d2946621
717c48fa0cfd901fe8835be70c6d3ddab9d6cac7
describe
'1884' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWG' 'sip-files00160.txt'
f7041bccf38ce799ed9f3c73330e8804
5358d3b48dd32d05c48013b5c36df8705ee813d3
describe
'9960' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWH' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
00370b2fff5f028f8777cefca5a4042d
54237cbfc3f597e6ac459728522dbde2cd707f03
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWI' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
55f908786dd05e66697f64152f76b3c7
c7e91ab35d208adffe5999ab63bc5a00954743c3
describe
'150778' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWJ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
bd3f5e86c48407091afcce273e72d81a
7d24db585c25727e945d412d5124f83aeb5c72b8
describe
'48586' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWK' 'sip-files00161.pro'
6feebe1cdeb2c8f89f2a518a657022c3
8a2b4fc6f492fd76e51d900b11265684a4daa3b7
describe
'45055' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWL' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
721e38f8660ff8201d050b5de1b4dd27
1a746f91acf6a992c209f18da385b8a012bcebfd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWM' 'sip-files00161.tif'
b8468ebee88765fbb059bb1d42d56441
28a30e5ff17eb651aed5ef570d886c04061f15df
describe
'2025' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWN' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4b75509e77bc82c928a686e0643f0e64
669f07218f4e9a2c236532c1c88c2677bbe174c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWO' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
6281b3fc68a66aeb548dafaa219ccb21
2230d20cb1e0225930ddfaf182f0fc755084e3db
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWP' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
84b06b1319c97927d571a18998fd9032
134058dc821000e7fe946862bf20ef1ffb4be5d1
describe
'147716' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWQ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
bc9e47ef034431b169127f28bb1f3362
e18587cb4e040b6974f57b6d0a47b03d8e85b7ff
describe
'49160' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWR' 'sip-files00162.pro'
e3e8e302a7fb7671449f2d5537cc54f6
eb7460824f2b752ad681fb7a679d83c840331918
describe
'44899' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWS' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
7d79da571a2eed19d880794ae57838e3
c5b9b9edcd7bcf5755127808d1f1d011101e21be
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWT' 'sip-files00162.tif'
531174db7e7c86e6c29a2b25b66053f7
29917dd1317a73e503264e6322ccd23f9f0c6a8d
describe
'1959' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWU' 'sip-files00162.txt'
3834aa8750ad9ec89e67676c2ab75b27
80c92286d223b21d74d930ad2c2629cd9b589575
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWV' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
05372591e0bd7c269c74fe8b1767365c
f6cbd3bf199b8e354cfc5296c90438e8c75dd0fa
describe
'362894' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWW' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
d6d8b4bc390d70273a37b02f2b711eb5
486069cd6ab338996655af75323fa69f92fac9fe
describe
'146554' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWX' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
8a26595cf45b18e87e7bcf6e57fea42f
3bad3595382307b64963daa912453a2c230848d5
describe
'48073' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWY' 'sip-files00163.pro'
7d76a612f8de785e94dcfb54d8e21822
68219d8282fc591c9cb2ed7cae51f5eb146a3075
describe
'44398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXWZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
ca4343596a1adee1043bef5201579b70
79b7999b3481eb0636d7e861ec84aa12c2dca6c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXA' 'sip-files00163.tif'
7f6c4d7a30616e1cb2d3f28ca000dfdc
94842cd79004dbb4bb04d4132c0fcaf55df1f47b
describe
'1978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXB' 'sip-files00163.txt'
1af8d98d0c3c39db9923593b64439e4f
c0ffa78333bddf6dbe51ed3bb9fd51974a3c169e
describe
'10102' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXC' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a252f05dce016c30f84b60e853da734b
1ad26a7abd4f4cf5c8f012ed3a0c07654034cea7
describe
'362703' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXD' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
60a2f4cf764e11f96a72871ed4009e35
45afaa7a1cee3f8a175eaf65961b70b6c98b0248
describe
'145789' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXE' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
0766f7e3ce832f5d908c5b523838b99c
c72561344c2b6d22db71be43e7524712b2c40743
describe
'32645' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXF' 'sip-files00164.pro'
4e1366b010831644cc9d9dd114f7cede
6c87cef19c3a6f719ca8dabc254406d8e6de5442
describe
'41561' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXG' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
88baa83396f61219454aa7cf04cf9430
e0fdd4094a002b2c950cc5a9310a68e980a923d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXH' 'sip-files00164.tif'
266b65066fc9c61440e3a69d43cc666f
ea442ec9d55f8e2cc30a39fb94643977d2b257f8
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXI' 'sip-files00164.txt'
04fe070e87496278ff1fa5ff5ddde8f9
7e5e2fdedd23f4dbe0c6438abf243bd896b7bb7a
describe
'9426' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXJ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
dd534a2c4e662d668aa7736fe06156bd
43ba51ee49767ad1629f2a933680434c8cda14f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXK' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
6850484ee5c2b1afbca3d3e1121f8cc8
dfa1f5a62a137b56677afe6567514f7be397070c
describe
'149891' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXL' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
2741d66e44cd6c7596fd3a60b7cef999
7b15bdd80b2bc24eccc9dea0c0dc58d19393bfd2
describe
'47634' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXM' 'sip-files00165.pro'
ed42945fb1e7b6afddabdab6d959c712
7c5e0a0540bfcc995bef04f202f539050d27d969
describe
'44915' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXN' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
5aab59dbc3ae783840f8235186c13eb4
02ccac0f21a0e19b0252ea06f4a6e392a1c57329
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXO' 'sip-files00165.tif'
bc8ce35736b6079fc26f5a3743c54d80
96d38dc70fc3020e5c3b30c875dde26008709c71
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXP' 'sip-files00165.txt'
f998b08882dfb6de6e66a6d2c7724033
d2377bec60cc4db18a60faf1fb0bbc22a09cb45d
describe
'10234' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXQ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9c9a8a4c7ca5daa8216c4b24122c9f4a
67b5408ee296f1838c13749659db09b22399e72c
'2011-12-22T12:24:01-05:00'
describe
'362782' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXR' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
bbf7e0dea00160bfb96783ecbd58332a
bbbe6652580edb5a8aa860e5f7cfba120ecd77ff
describe
'138923' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXS' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
0d1e7db2eed51af6e91785107c4bfe37
d15df47dc2b8e962ce7e8df88daa1a777bcadf75
describe
'44335' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXT' 'sip-files00166.pro'
73c293dbb96b86f99bba555b9b4ca7c4
334b76a1268ad2725c4f8949b64712ee752bfea9
describe
'42296' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXU' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f6da1870ba3675fce6ee21da199d7d08
2db6308458dd174d5c1bb139880105558c325273
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXV' 'sip-files00166.tif'
ec67a581aa79bf3be18f065e93cefedf
7e5f4287cc12cff2225efdbe57fc1f4b0c1e5e23
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXW' 'sip-files00166.txt'
13682cd500f9b0895c9e3653b27f7f26
b0457a1898837956642bf6f1acdefd3077db017c
'2011-12-22T12:24:04-05:00'
describe
'10165' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXX' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
444ad73daed3a4507bb2b6fe85dd6186
77d413c8c109f6112233773071b1bc79ae882635
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXY' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
1f1cb800786e6e879985f14d5e3e531a
4bd71e12489f80852dcd72a1a157f980dc261935
describe
'189033' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXXZ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
feb0c02bcabdbc5740c590a1d26bd64f
59b4bb76fad8a42e84ac067639c872d78cdf4b8a
describe
'2950' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYA' 'sip-files00167.pro'
3482b2e2541ec0498250156259417278
60438f3fec0fbdb6092a78b3b5b8f6371d00f0ae
describe
'43672' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYB' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
382681a35b974749d3b32315d598b378
e238909a73bf8e8e27fcf1c3e74883f5353d5a3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYC' 'sip-files00167.tif'
1c5ecff4b8314ba419a6cdfd321cc422
d8de93efc3b86f4644a2d2ca050d73546a90a52f
describe
'164' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYD' 'sip-files00167.txt'
affc1fd3a2c4f119c22c2ceb8d0386cd
2833444d443d384486d15309ceba596b4fbb0a1f
describe
Invalid character
'10372' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYE' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
6e829e4b2b1ebf2d34a008beee7020df
b2a6733bbdc38fe50b663f59395a4cf26110ec38
describe
'362776' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYF' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b9b5629a842618c7efa005e93bc20416
3c8f2d1e6a19d9a25446eff2caaec99e0f910a40
describe
'28740' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYG' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
c3e5cf0bc4f4a73b873c741702643e37
5b0f6dfdd38e0cd77ed6c0d9c67a28e2eba63eb4
describe
'4896' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYH' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
fde35e7051ad06420aab5fe03e9b3466
de3608a19cd3d26cb7aa34edce7a2e6a4185201d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYI' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1a386ff031b42deaf051991843a39d94
fa50b491274a284f8c2e3d3411f1eda5075debf9
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYJ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
4453ac308490ed49d4cdb1a6912a4db2
fc9b95e651bd650cd80361e7cc5b70b1999558c6
describe
'362927' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYK' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
974802413de6da840734d85004dd6b7d
e4ae86a2303bcaa3f2c899936017b5169be34fc4
describe
'147325' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYL' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
7fff910171cbd039c0117e7a3d34a183
32dbafdfee1f831745d8835e9b8b50b623f62e2d
describe
'47354' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYM' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ca35688d8dcacd7589863262238cdbb1
10da344b8ff1e275558d6ca0047dff0c179cfb05
describe
'43707' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYN' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
87e4a37f29e9a200250d21b6b3adec22
3e5e5b5bc16ba011beb02f642b6f7f63bac6c199
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYO' 'sip-files00169.tif'
90816fba7804e7725f35aedb825999ab
ed1d34fd56e07fd61b04b5c33d1dfb1613c78544
describe
'1930' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYP' 'sip-files00169.txt'
48d5f1b4c68ebcf88707585ae4f0c086
af1665d36aba79183b6ddc4224abaa6b690eca79
describe
'10228' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYQ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
1c9f17c95df26bc896f2c6f716f95985
28eada41b0386fd4dea32454a289938fdd763800
describe
'362456' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYR' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
2b735a827a32e75cb19dbba5cb39a01a
9e2bd4f0bb7a7c215843672d818a7dc39d2cf1f3
describe
'93095' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYS' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
9f50426e9e8b0a6b88a163d21deb5fd2
9ef4829685f7c28e6d0226a542ea784c96d0f6de
describe
'20237' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYT' 'sip-files00170.pro'
8652fbca2ed94f8fd6f278d0191e324b
e1fa9fa08f8068f7b27540d58322b2bcda9bbffd
describe
'25907' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYU' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
364a209ddde9aa620f67c34e7fb6afd2
712009bc04441622242d63e2a7cb227661f504eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b17fa859c9876abfec0c82c82667e83a
542e65b6ab0c2bc8e45f82f85a615ded22b3d93a
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYW' 'sip-files00170.txt'
956c80f9e1ef8bc960085fa3b4bf142d
5b3b2da2ca84243e8a34b368730468dc68762cda
describe
'6159' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
baf0d4b46839008d230ee42918cc5d51
5cceed1538229c245ef525ebeb44af084c86c43a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYY' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
970931088e606861c9f4e7a7bbc6473a
ab7af5a0fab583ecc4fceefc4b2019781becef7e
describe
'127490' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXYZ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
6f8f9f3f34736ff581ce57b264fff914
f6d1e71801574685421cd79d98e4d3bb8507b585
describe
'37069' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZA' 'sip-files00171.pro'
e08a4d473051583ebfc683c30bbf66d1
89883f1aede71babc11333468e11401d0a2a80ef
describe
'40452' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZB' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
d76632610ada11905a005aefcb7edc89
c753aac8eb0aeec4ab986c884eed2081661e67cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZC' 'sip-files00171.tif'
f0f8ff4fd47306f99f91f0ecd6e4588a
09dd0d8e6ec79996abcb5ad1f1c08b34c96fdd4f
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZD' 'sip-files00171.txt'
4370cba5dad7b309643a57ccc2c2eef0
aa3ce8721a742efe5c01d6dddb8c1750f5f7e7b1
describe
Invalid character
'10622' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZE' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
2c28e589fe68b89209c76c1816bcb9b8
80e543de8c453256508a314f292163f17657f1eb
describe
'362809' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZF' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
0ea891f9055aaa3ba979e81bd0d0eb2a
e27c067392ed85eb797730b6b689c47715980a41
describe
'184989' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
aa44d21de51f44ccf1ff28aaac1b4c1c
6c0f4b4c2d70ff1eae586f16ab24b7c3a105aede
describe
'63872' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZH' 'sip-files00172.pro'
5b9f7c58f3a093f6a4e488f86179aa01
d48ab7201874190c17c59b9257804925936400b7
describe
'53535' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZI' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
20d27a8787149562a9ec5acda0f5fa38
60fb8469fbdde3417d008a357ae084b643ee894a
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZJ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
b25969fc02e525db709deb97c76f6608
a2acb4aa53fc27e18899fac82d1f8b27fe28d5b9
describe
'2774' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZK' 'sip-files00172.txt'
de646c2bece0962e7ba7d6c4c8ff075c
008443b6c772f606bf0bc9538f7c1ae11cb6f401
describe
'12600' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZL' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
d75956979363df32ae72b3562c132753
f28318f0d408bf79784859f75da26c07bf649029
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZM' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
c1ccca15bf114430572ffe392e00d434
0798e9728d221ca6f4edba932cb23f30a36f1d3a
describe
'184971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZN' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
def1ecdf28e784fe666b2301b565f7e6
a08f0dbde424cee0cdb4d0787aea0dcf5d7e0002
describe
'65971' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
93054799847db56f1f5893eb51295665
92a2bf65a398a4eec32aee05e6817f1e4e527e0d
describe
'49742' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZP' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1a1028fa6f97069f67d11a1988d0c71e
c25c0f674e4a3f522ab7b86b7206fbb215d60fae
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZQ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
51684cee326cb2400cc2f897788026ca
470ba5cbd4c3bbc9d1479b1355a45c9f8bd49f38
describe
'2893' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZR' 'sip-files00173.txt'
dfa5450d90cb8dcfaf27630c4efe4e49
93f44de4804ec139c4145ddb813d8f5135e3024e
describe
'11898' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZS' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
e14b9b00e6e08e5fee409ae696bc6164
4cd25ab364046fdf95c7e72261adaa2f008b3764
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZT' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
48561a563ac2ab53b973455be7d60746
c52e6ca9b4346805b26120ee159716c05de602ee
describe
'169918' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZU' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
b1ac20412311099d2cc032484d1da1d2
2808c1dcda3eb8cfa56212ee1fa9f020101d2c90
describe
'51253' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZV' 'sip-files00174.pro'
23aee0ceeb6ce920bba6ad04b20a379f
37f1e9afc3c482c7bd058b34366af066fb211fc9
describe
'47795' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZW' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
480a7962162f734f17978f9133330e24
db625595a9fe77af347824dfb56e22a3b800f9d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZX' 'sip-files00174.tif'
4dcc6c64de2819d1d4bc796892239244
8fba1872cf33b4cb2c27bc537c450a2399a90d52
describe
'2209' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZY' 'sip-files00174.txt'
c56917f035d0b1811f033e94acd474c7
9283314accab5c4a074bf334123cae4b7dd21d98
describe
'12012' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABXZZ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
0732e8ad161d74f967b8313335e80c92
66cace51003c52bea70ec8814523f323099f273c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAA' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
cbccc5a1e82614e953fe546366413caf
7832d78fd7b2440b434ff7e3275ed6029fade83d
describe
'167089' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAB' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
373d556a985a149a5c931149d607d2a1
362a1b4f94748ba340d130435c02867960d039a4
describe
'55443' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAC' 'sip-files00175.pro'
05ab814b9168c82c075404b242aaa990
6c26ab2919be6823c71773bafd0a54729cd74915
describe
'47731' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAD' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
a84d4908b826d1725b9c769ed67601e7
957de401de0e2af6d0fd830f2d7847f8e0731331
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAE' 'sip-files00175.tif'
2e2056505a01d7f4165f47da54f8d3d2
6e7cf9114f736b5326c5e0310bc6223ff1f94ae6
describe
'2387' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAF' 'sip-files00175.txt'
2ce938dd379f3fad8f0ee90e3de2762f
45f3521ee7513051626eb6a1899ca4152d48c165
describe
'11496' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAG' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
a634fbf2668a4b4e6b1b1db1d719ecd0
99777f3e925991cfa2e4108ff1dcfa71a58ff97c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAH' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
3d29230244a1c8a7f030ac071dc3ee35
b7a0aad90cfc9915dd135db967ec53009f1bd0c5
describe
'158034' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAI' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
a1f286f9be5e9f84958187af159c19d1
cfb56913507ec6db3b6599c1ffa00fe3b83586d4
describe
'42422' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAJ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c22ae46f7aefca29c243b49e277b5def
cf90c27dd515b1ea02eb83c770b2b892ef674f25
describe
'46276' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAK' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
51dfbbaf879e803cad1f99dfe9d897f4
a9daff41f044f16998ba180c03f4a42fadd0d96c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAL' 'sip-files00176.tif'
6b8ac0781b11b19113218dbece761b19
8ee965c1468710c8fb7da957b2d593b1ecd235d8
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAM' 'sip-files00176.txt'
607b838e5fa9017fefd2a0a1615fb1fb
b55af011c31e24c293df17b52fea80323180e3a5
describe
'11688' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAN' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
0a789c5ea1ac6e2f78f2b7d00918c631
3fa4b0f4f41f4b106ed0be6ed1d22eff8ffd9b83
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAO' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
f01ddcdf39a6df95e081874c5924fefd
954d71448ff8243d24093ebbdda5e2b92642f7c3
describe
'153714' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAP' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
96fc4e7c8d8cd1fe29dcc1c63ff9f8bb
b41fba6618dc0b89c1fd704437d3d8c6ad02a87c
describe
'42333' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAQ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
92c9a5b42abc4a5ce51f21c763e26ade
4c7071b8edb20a3bc80ac83b758ecf42cfbbca70
describe
'44761' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAR' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
419d9b5b1cc858c0899784d18687da57
492233e02214f62273932d47d8518cc2edcaffc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAS' 'sip-files00177.tif'
1caa4543064ba318a95fbab238e719ff
d432b8d40a7249224dc16e39e2fe8178591944bb
describe
'1840' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAT' 'sip-files00177.txt'
a0471767a7e952e205a62de95c26d3f8
6c4074528ab923298592c29007c33a7fd09bafd1
describe
'11068' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAU' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
66cc521b84ff91369d9214fc3c7fdfd2
184af248038ca26a983567c2638e464efd7e1506
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAV' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
509a3bb501c0501fe899b567ca4f5788
07325bffcb6305a497d7db5e158446cc469c9742
describe
'171589' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAW' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
78bd3c46504eb27ba4be4fc996ddb7d6
8f7f69f052ef933efd687b680cd734730739cb60
describe
'46392' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAX' 'sip-files00178.pro'
f241f88bb3db3204460442bec102ac5b
ba67f97510e08defffd17e8a356d6abc2d6d8015
describe
'50333' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAY' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
f47a9015d273fdf783834ab2aab6d724
25576f2f8badb88cffe8fcee3c182af4fac4fe89
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYAZ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
8db4a951d55e0791128e3f61a5df337b
ada30163d91c34eedca8a064aecba6cb24771d81
describe
'2007' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBA' 'sip-files00178.txt'
c3cb33ec6a4218f87d1a4856520a30da
71d567570f7c75f0c45cb22f93dca284c6852599
describe
'12248' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBB' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
df3590581b40fca9a21908f835560c38
aa76ffef1dc58091178a2e97f859ed0e652fc061
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBC' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
cf6167f757788278662a9bebff5af7b9
73201db2bb4c918aba4812fa6f291cb2a38e1905
describe
'171515' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBD' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
58051de7105f9e12b02a237327dbf46a
f4d7a7774438ce57673af369377fa346bd5a4f76
describe
'51670' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBE' 'sip-files00179.pro'
024b5eb1511ed22ed03a858e6bd3ba78
8161f5350a8f83e74dfde78bfaee28ac260d037e
describe
'48978' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
aabb580ca6484837b97da147aee94ec0
69c067b96b63d2c0940e9276b021b60d01e37950
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBG' 'sip-files00179.tif'
9c3f7962d31430fdd07a8880d79981f6
489847f8013e3eeb090a65258196df678ea5bb89
describe
'2210' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBH' 'sip-files00179.txt'
174a35778b58610a3d84b38bd34b4b87
94cb63c6fb99d11927b4a47435205e91061bec52
describe
'12042' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBI' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
886af5141f057549ace0b665f2242a27
4c63c67341b8e460b1d3b1bfb4b8795995db7f26
describe
'362923' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBJ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
ec02e1c6eb3c5f6eda6a75aeacf48093
1dbace81b49bdcce4dc3627844f7530183610931
describe
'145366' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBK' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
9c6c61a8136c3ac39a88b23d579870eb
f2a8ef0cd02f823767882146f6297401e6bfd094
describe
'41745' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBL' 'sip-files00180.pro'
7b950e1259d0353ee112f9f7a1c007fb
d4f6b7b2653091359e861cdfce6a677c2355ae79
describe
'41623' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBM' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
af25db4fbc14ef814dfcffc19c166a2e
c0de36b44cea47d8f37183f2017ac9e1f00dd83e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBN' 'sip-files00180.tif'
eabec41ab4a2bb57501ce5b1f2cc9f46
028b00ef7bf4bb2c1b0f4bc98e191b94b7a4cdd5
describe
'1841' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBO' 'sip-files00180.txt'
cef4bb7fd32d52ebb9f117358b5bebaa
bd5978b106aae5296101836fab2d648e0687dfc7
describe
'10314' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBP' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
bce967f1072de0aad10e9aac80c5fa7c
5e56e0b5e20b7afa600e7e82ba8180024bf3a352
describe
'362882' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBQ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
00ef3400a4cd46a46ddedc71c1331725
e768c6277e9fa62a45f8fb1deae9a872266e0545
describe
'173346' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBR' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
5adf0af942d3a967e5e7cb611545618b
51374cadb57a2ba25ea0c8b880825f78fdb0c1fe
describe
'53808' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBS' 'sip-files00181.pro'
fdd55baf904d0f1c3438c659fefd2e99
cce478e2ac810cf39a0066f5e9d8e7e4413035e3
describe
'49732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBT' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
778cf1b4a875a340992b390a05d2d232
b78b2a12e491d7c547b972b849811fa13e28b05f
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBU' 'sip-files00181.tif'
aabcf53d3934992e741fb122f16ffcf6
d52810fbede40914eb66814119b51c67837028ba
describe
'2282' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBV' 'sip-files00181.txt'
7f39976f8892e6da1267628193241f52
9c348c51bb075ee349e7274ca2483f3d96c8e754
describe
'11843' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBW' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
da78a4ed0db23385f7bad69353e31d9a
7915a9f8b044c071f50ca230f70ad2b1a627185b
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBX' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d07afc1463b84d9e21b7c0df59934244
7fc9197204786f062371a97c1f9bdc1294713fc6
describe
'164680' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBY' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
445e700958f8093310f9e711191b9d44
925e3979fcb3c49beb59ddf20f0f374ba40d81dd
describe
'49389' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYBZ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
67eab440428b63bb40fe262349a3ba2e
cafeaa57cfa7eca1b5bd1f79b1a7cce846c5c558
describe
'47270' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCA' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
5d6ab59462a6815a381ee4e04c256834
5067341f3cc08f4c680f90da35a59067517d0095
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCB' 'sip-files00182.tif'
e6f63a2d2aa91d274d7f9067551a9a13
b0469d08dd86e7e75a575b27992f72b5ffb258a0
describe
'2088' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCC' 'sip-files00182.txt'
989f1adcd8809316331eb0ab0bb4f2af
3769624bcf81582c36a455f5cabe67d2479d1509
describe
'12026' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCD' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0bfcb2640e2e807cbcd865f722cec868
c2c169c184326672a3ae149c4ac93bac5b4fd318
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCE' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
3a4dcd156da3e62b18b96873d731d6e0
34302447c62880a05a4ef0faddf1ba449a13a72b
describe
'184554' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCF' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
6bcce3d2cbf768d4791a4343cb708c8a
93cc109af452020244d87b914e2469832454b1e1
describe
'59952' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCG' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d63ac27e1ca28f04aee81627a0b1dbdb
6639f8036ff103224665bd1c2d4adb7583569d78
describe
'51735' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCH' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
d42da73b5b845405bd53d475422b137b
35f6fed760eb5f67ef61fc1d81c8c443edbc8438
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCI' 'sip-files00183.tif'
2270ebda5aa05f5ce297e5816d177559
07dedef7f15ba8efb36fb90024267afce83a32c5
describe
'2556' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCJ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
a8cf47568fda7d4050b7b54dc46934b5
b4dc28c25a61193a60a4443de9b842c041a2d010
describe
'12285' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCK' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
bb5ba5f2ea54372a3cb1618ef4f50865
f67f8ec98357b3f85e781973e6f02cc254842fe0
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCL' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
cee87a48d0ffe5ae46cc530c01f0dd50
9f7c50ef1816155430e007ea9ec767f585afd511
describe
'142987' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCM' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
9bb7ac819e3a296791befa6aa21cf42f
e7f715e7ab29e13f0e8681e97a293ea174302c0f
describe
'37952' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCN' 'sip-files00184.pro'
88ab0e6d7166deb34eed8b3d16365226
83a7a19a2372e650e46a5923bdbd38f036962c63
describe
'41913' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCO' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
8a263203a4b78b4f8228766d5c9de7d5
934f3ca9d227e13908c18c327f3219072ce3f14e
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCP' 'sip-files00184.tif'
350d5e1f5f666da5af6db38328030de8
3477221a6d4378db040f9672f7b39ac4611ff896
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCQ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
78319cf2a6965358eb35237ebbf6f6ff
ad5c3c8dc971a4028ca114e49db199dc3156ea05
describe
'11035' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCR' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
25249102c0f51db2bae24dcb3b2c1b08
b2684bbf1ef8e527086c784989aee729715b5a4a
describe
'362929' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCS' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
16c1b82e4ccc16af0b735286e43b2810
3b0c1037a0bde433e01edf48ba912f28a4f9797c
describe
'159627' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCT' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
a225f9e1f77f0539bacd80c3c22fde9d
0cfe4939c69662c3fbb1f73d716c194199944b9d
describe
'55734' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCU' 'sip-files00185.pro'
8119039ae9381ac57a8ea57432e6a1cc
432adb0a3e0ce495932228d914f7f8de063ad455
describe
'46015' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCV' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
334091af50c293dcb01992c171d63a51
705a862d42247daa99ac28904225a504a31124ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCW' 'sip-files00185.tif'
a21b243aa2432b4859c2d7b5a680350a
dda7a40066ab25934313189d78e1febd905278f4
describe
'2453' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCX' 'sip-files00185.txt'
71baca120bf1cc55390a8ea02ac5c59a
10d317b4d6ca330d7bcf9dd2ec0ee92127a5c6f1
describe
'11318' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCY' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
1e6d16cffbc985c08a2c683d986d1bfd
422e35efc64b79e508a6f5bbd379f59b991117d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYCZ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
450b8a78527e6826c4b6b726154d3c94
f1fb865ab1b214943848f16eda8d7e014b49ed57
describe
'169180' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDA' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
cb10743cec5df1c1b3c4ff9372c712ca
17f914aaa45ec4b97a4cb1c84eb97696c15e7d46
describe
'49931' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
8f2eccb880bafcea3d940bdd5232a4d2
340f73e3d70eeb978d0d42aaf3fea3f6fa63b12b
describe
'49393' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
45f47bda0875acf125bd345b9eff06d1
deb952d72819a4043306776b96a3ae659e1a57ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDD' 'sip-files00186.tif'
c7955fdcba2ab0f9a9faf625621f27b6
73eb53a7cfb0705ff6882fa8b206457a2b0aca31
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
22f16f45dc95c66f200b76306130c1b0
3b9d6ecaa624723062181abe9d4c9fa0e86b0627
describe
'12150' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDF' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
effabd7bbbef9878d88d72a02371458d
46b7993037eb411ee9f6093f62fa29bdd7cc12cd
describe
'362909' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDG' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
7b9cb50a4ee11c8eb24ab838c951a2bb
4985a7d1fd888be26ab9c92ceaa008d0be643e67
describe
'137521' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDH' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
d284c7690855f2b8d66c3207b1f0f566
d294f776683c92318cff308bed56801b05a1182c
describe
'36272' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDI' 'sip-files00187.pro'
83f26c4f73093859550f9607112ce381
903f22dd2688bfb85eb2013132ea7fb47b432296
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDJ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
87c0fcef147340c5f7e584734cb87d9f
f93c68ec04b5b5658a445100dcdaf14ce069a760
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDK' 'sip-files00187.tif'
8afc5e2186e0123fab1397c093fe85d8
fcc9dc8bda436bdc4f58dee48f9263be5e9e36d9
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDL' 'sip-files00187.txt'
4078072c766359e5c2068fc489a61e81
85ecc283f55b8afeb5fad4466a02e03050d5b3ff
describe
'10965' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDM' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
eb97559826a63327065aaffe61645bcc
16c92e1489356928f2040b1f9624ec009fb3f37c
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDN' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
f1c5502461ca55b7247f5d261066ef5e
947ed9608170aea683841b66bfaaf0b015f45082
describe
'138715' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDO' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
43566d8d780f3d7a044563ba1eb37e68
f258a5c4d2504a4d21e08da55dd6e865eab78f42
describe
'43024' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDP' 'sip-files00188.pro'
b5eea07f7eeda41dd583ba9a72f7e3b1
06ae797fc211f5d310bdb8470aa1ddce0a75151f
describe
'39980' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDQ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
6b12f176d021a5375a02dd0b1c267ff3
b2566ec3edd8dc16786d65f0f31463d7c63f2b26
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDR' 'sip-files00188.tif'
884bf61967fd9c489a809d2a10048c1e
248efa0d3c279c8c9a48f03c56909ede0b0e5c22
describe
'1918' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDS' 'sip-files00188.txt'
11914db4bbb3f23e4c74b4c77ab6a739
1ca55feb8877c77924a2134f5c8c63de3bd9d86e
describe
'9870' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDT' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
57c1f337ce0eec9c453c89c25b29ef4c
01ba2cc154e40ea45297ce32540efa89a44c4d5d
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDU' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
e173af8db0900534cbbd3268fc46a360
d0cbd73322acd7efeb653974bcd7d2e2c1dd8246
describe
'143538' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDV' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
89500a9a9ccc8b1231d2b1df5ed4470d
8a95d8209bede65f8fbc3c223cfd3c714a15fb11
describe
'48755' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDW' 'sip-files00189.pro'
8bb6a67949106f65a4dcd379f551b2a4
19960c3bb012fb9e014e05d50d061b3ab602df1a
describe
'41718' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDX' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
bfe0eae54198040373baf91e277fa5ff
6ae0b436cff36b3e47adb8cc780be27b8612d747
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDY' 'sip-files00189.tif'
cf1a499714397bc4b9967e8dc0c46100
ba03fd8d7af27f08781811e993a3f81861451010
describe
'2212' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYDZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
87a5e12a7b97a74ffb6f30cb6ac1143c
4197200f96149c02eaac6f5ac934689146a3770e
describe
'10855' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
ec8a35d295249bad7a29a98d4e40fcbe
3e96cbf80da57a57203d82b027cc9d1699c8e4fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEB' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
36d1e064ca7c8237995b82cea32768f3
b7af34301f9c3489c0ce45cbeebadf24088fd852
describe
'174007' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEC' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
3cbaf047ec223ed37bd1d71640962952
ba093cfb7e2b6908b23658e10efd2a016e1bcb58
describe
'51928' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYED' 'sip-files00190.pro'
c1e62275fa512ac39468f07c44766002
af96cbce305f4de5a199aeab46cd6dca7463a1f5
describe
'66887' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEE' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
312c3d9ae919c2f224825a3daabb8c44
1890546089c9c5a7c60959e5fce4b6ebbab25d87
describe
'2926428' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
b8cd557fc63f321082d33401d327d82e
8cd033e186d712eb7f96ad121c786fb496c3e3cd
describe
'2548' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEG' 'sip-files00190.txt'
1b944859900cbc052160f3726d04b455
c796d3b0e752a1acd0fcf021fcc4ab709e9ceaae
describe
'33732' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEH' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
d791fef40efa111ae51eb72e5fa89429
ef2994419c2831277fa7afc25fc28f6c54e13f8e
describe
'427198' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEI' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
6ff200133c03cec850a168a8b08a7f86
558982e3ad4bdf7ef5eb912e12f46a903ec7c677
describe
'146417' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEJ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
d31201bc57ba756951a2996ee0ccc74f
3dc397c5d3cdf2e35084344d1b73c515b5ad0a1e
describe
'34918' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEK' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
84b69ea3ef100b15edd037f513a1bb8b
b257645e4a9420e0ceaa2cd611d790de0e50f5fb
describe
'10262120' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEL' 'sip-files00191.tif'
18ea6440b2591f02069f529c17a4d430
f5203f72409a7a13490613603f67012f4dc6aea9
describe
'7122' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEM' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
894ad8668f742214115dc19a0b5ad507
fe91b7d12cfad8a73434d2173a28741c2c095216
describe
'432765' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEN' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
22b78544ff9b877ecd374cb6e943093a
6b21873718d6085d678f0e9a01c257a51e00d193
describe
'114098' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEO' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
2542ffe634b278fc3d404c97b36745df
4edb44991c71aa3d0c9bccc9eaee152a1d8d037c
describe
'21568' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEP' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
436dbd3ca9b9d21851a4394ed8d94567
88b08b8d783355d3651af0cc1f770a983cce76e2
describe
'10393344' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEQ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
fa2056b4501563bddd2dd22c2174faa8
2db4a0a2cfd57549fd81b6d50951bc6b87e98c7a
describe
'4809' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYER' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
cd164936d02530f19f374f5110bf5216
af659ba1297787e43b74dac2a8e3e2c2f989c924
describe
'81542' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYES' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
da4044b79b0e81998da4ea17d36a5c06
df59ee07dd1ca8b01b9d791943883a53e7212180
describe
'40444' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYET' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
7cb66f0c51c3c8b925f0f8a05b0b10ac
5dbc872f5e3963dd0b4b5cc0e75f5c6aaf811a48
'2011-12-22T12:26:26-05:00'
describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEU' 'sip-files00193.pro'
9e03fc478309323b052f055b2ab1ccfb
001c6966c8ce0c3784d942fcf077b0aaae8c81bb
describe
'9924' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEV' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
dc7311978c4061e7c3f5fb429afe47f1
c7ffdeeb986008fd8a7bdb003d481bba254c3680
describe
'1971696' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEW' 'sip-files00193.tif'
46c9079606a07d509d9d2adf4885e15b
022db072b7eaf7bcc9e148d62435b743c3f02472
describe
'294' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEX' 'sip-files00193.txt'
5e53995e7ab1ac4ebf196dc1b7df9ae3
dce995e6310a9c74ab9474d7c08c45fd80b70f52
describe
'3686' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEY' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
8b1f3e6230eaba494a87f8022ed2cb73
64dcfa03a12a830a4f3cbce88fa322371ff3db7d
describe
'88' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYEZ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
74be30cabb03e773b9652ac51aa5f18e
07cf1e9c80af28aa1db6f1b9f7399334d2f0a388
describe
'316739' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYFA' 'sip-filesUF00086690_00001.mets'
3029a8cf8aa4cab8f05861ac5bb1802f
a325200b6f43d3a95f5ad1c62b3bb449edf75724
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T06:29:39-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'410109' 'info:fdaE20081212_AAAAOCfileF20081214_AABYFD' 'sip-filesUF00086690_00001.xml'
4f867fad3358ee8991058ca521941167
5979072d8d1fd362c36c02dd2899a7492d8d9dcb
describe
'2013-12-14T06:29:35-05:00'
xml resolution





















































————
SS

SS ee




































































































































































































































































































































































“IT OWE MUCH, VERY MUCH, To you” (g. 118).








































SATUS SIE D

BY

CATHERINE M. TROWBRIDGE

(a

f w i













































WITH TEN [ILLUSTRATIONS BY W. RAINEY

SEVENTH EDITION



LONDON
S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO., 8 & 9, PATERNOSTER Row.




LONDON:
PRINTED BY GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, Lw.,
ST. JOHN’S HOUSE, CLERKENWELL ROAD, E.G.



THIS LITTLE BOOK fy
Y WE

IS al

Dedicated ‘










TO ALL THOSE WHO, LIKE

ALICE GREY,



I~ 4 Hee
TPS ah : WAY TO BE
ie Hh Le

Ng

Ee
i
x

TRULY SATISFIED.








CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE

Tue FALLS, ' ‘ 0 5 . ' 2 P ’ » 9
CHAPTER II,

UNSATISFIED , a ’ A , . a * ’ . + 20
CHAPTER III.

An INVITATION i ' e . : , ' ’ , + 29
CHAPTER IV.

New ACQUAINTANCES , , . . . ’ ’ . » 40
CHAPTER V.

Mrs, CARROLL’S STORY. - 5 . . 2 . ’ » 52
CHAPTER VI.

Two BIBLE LEssoNs ; e 2 7 , ‘ ' ' > 62
CHAPTER VIL

A CALL UPON AUNT NANCY 5 ' . ’ ‘ , . 73

CHAPTER VIII.

CONFESSING CHRIST ; ‘ , A . : ‘ , . BE
viii Contents.

CHAPTER IX,

3 . PAGE
BENEVOLENT PLANS : . . yee : ' ‘ - gt

CHAPTER X.

Last WorpDs OF COUNSEL . . : 6 : 4 ’ + 100

CHAPTER XI,

DarK Days , . 5 6 4 ; ° . ears , 107

CHAPTER XII.

SEED BEARING FRUIT . : . . . , . ® . 114

CHAPTER XIII,

AN UNEXPECTED EXPLANATION , a i ‘ . fj » 122

CHAPTER XIV.

AN Hour IN THE SICK-ROOM x : 6 ; 4 ; - 128

CHAPTER XV,

THE HONEST Hour . . o 5 A . . ; » 138

CHAPTER XVI.

A New Patu OPENING : ; é : : 6 3 . 147

CHAPTER XVII.

WINNING SOULS. . . ° . . . . , - 156

CHAPTER XVIII.

A SURPRISE . ae , ° : . . > , . 167




S A702 Ss bol ub):

— -o-----

CHAPTER I,
THE FALLS.

It was the afternoon of a pleasant summer day. A carriage
was slowly ascending a steep hill, Within were two gentlemen
and a lady.

“Do you see that cloud?” said one of the gentlemen.

“Ves, I have been watching it,” said the other.

“Shall we have a shower before we can reach home?”
inquired the lady.

“Yes, we must make up our minds for that. Ifwe can reach
any place of shelter, we shall do well.”

“T noticed a house as we came up, with an open shed near
it,” said the gentleman who had first spoken. “If we can
reach that place, we can drive under the shed. I think it can’t
be far distant.”

“Tt is nearly a mile from here. It is the refuge I have been
proposing to reach, if possible, ever since I observed the
shower approaching.”

“Do you know the people who live there ?”

Satesfied. B
'O Visitors to the Falls.

“No, but I have no doubt its owner will be very willing that
we should take shelter there. We can’t hurry until we get up
this hill; then we will drive as fast as we-can.”

Just behind was another carriage, in which were three
young ladies. The occupants of the two carriages formed one
patty. As they wind slowly up the hill, we will improve the
opportunity to introduce them to the reader.

The gentleman who is driving in the first carriage is Mr.
Carver, whose home is about six miles distant. The gentle-
man and lady who are with him are Mr. and Mrs. Grey, friends
from the metropolis. In the second carriage, the young lady
who is driving is the daughter of Mr. Carver, and the other
two young ladies are nieces of Mr. Grey, and members of his
family.

The present excursion was planned by Mr. Carver and his
daughter for the entertainment of their guests. The place from
which they were returning was known in that vicinity by the
name of The Falls. They were modest falls, boasting of no
celebrity, yet they possessed a quiet, picturesque beauty of
their own, which the true lover of nature could not fail to
appreciate.

The clouds were now rolling up dark and heavy, but the
party soon reached the top of the hill, and hurrying on were
quickly insight of their place of refuge.

When they reached the open shed, they drew up and looked
round, to see if there was any one to bid them welcome to its
shelter. They were soon observed, and two young men left
the house and came towards them.

The taller of the two came forward, and bowing politely,
said pleasantly, “ You are just in time.”

“We shall be greatly obliged to you,” said Mr. Carver, “if
you will give us shelter until the shower is over.”

‘“‘With much pleasure,” said the young man courteously
“ What a Fine Young Man!” Il

“Permit us to assist you,” as he took charge of the horse
driven by Miss Carver, while the other assisted the ladies
to alight.

““T hope you will make yourselves quite at home here,” he
said, as he conducted the ladies to a neatly-furnished parlour.
““T must leave you for a little while, to assist the gentlemen
about the horses, and see that everything is safe through the
shower, which I think will be a hard one.”

As he left, Mrs. Grey and Miss Carver stepped out to the
portico to watch the clouds, and take a view of their surround-
ings. Mrs. Grey’s two nieces remained in the parlour, the
younger, because she felt no inclination to leave it, and the
elder, because she wished to improve the opportunity for a
few words with her cousin.

“What a fine young man!” was her first exclamation.
“ Don’t you think so?”

“Which ?”

“The taller, of course; the one who waited upon us
to the house. He is so stylish, and has such an air. Who
would have thought of finding one like him in this out-of-the-
way place! JI don’t believe he belongs here.”

‘“‘ He appears as if he were at home, more so than the other.
He offered us the hospitalities of the house as if he had a
right to.”

“Yes, I observed that. He is handsome, is he not?”

“Thardly know. Ihave but just seen him, and have thought
nothing about it.”

“JT dare say you haven’t. You are sucha mere child, it’s not
to be expected that you will notice such things,” said the elder
cousin, with an air which was an unspoken assertion of her
own undoubted claim to be a young lady, fully competent
to observe and judge of such matters.

The “mere child” did not seem at all disturbed by the

B 2
12 A Place of Shelter.

remark, Alice Grey—for this was her name—was indeed but
sixteen, and not, like some of her years, anxious to be thought
a young lady. Even had she been sensitive on this point,
she had heard similar remarks from her cousin, Mabel Osborn,
too often to take any notice of her words at this time.

Mabel was looking out of the window to see if she could
catch another glimpse of him who had won her admiration.

“T know you do admire him ; but you are such a sly puss
you pretend not to have taken any notice of him,” she said,
quite forgetting that she had just spoken of her cousin as a
mere child, too young for particular observation of those
whom she casually met. “I dare say, before we get away,
you will contrive to let him know that you are an heiress.”

Alice Grey, though so indifferent to the former remark of
her cousin, was now thoroughly aroused. Her eyes flashed,
and her whole face was suffused with the flush of indignation.

“Now, Mabel Osborn,” she said, “you know very well that
I never did such a thing, and would scorn to do it.”

There was not time for another word, for at this moment
Mrs. Grey and Miss Carver returned to the parlour, and ©
immediately after the young gentlemen entered, and also the
lady of the house, who kindly greeted her guests, and expressed
her pleasure that they could give them shelter through the
shower. Soon after the gentleman of the house also came in,
and the party seated themselves to await the end of the
shower.

Alice sat by a window apart from the rest, feeling no inclina-
tion to participate in the conversation, It was not bashful--
ness, for though young and modest, she had been too much
accustomed to society to feel either awkward or uncomfortable
in the presence of strangers. Besides, she had a natural con-
_ versational talent, which made it easy for her to converse with
those much older than herself. She had been greatly vexed
. Alice observes the Company. 13

by the last remark of her cousin, and had not recovered from
this vexation. It led her to feel disinclined for conversation
with any one, and particularly disposed to keep as far aloof as
possible from.the young man of whom her cousin had spoken
in such glowing terms. She was resolved to let Mabel know
that she did not care even to speak with him. Fora time
she was occupied with her own thoughts. Though not pleasant
ones, they were not altogether unfamiliar, for-many times had

similar thoughts and feelings been awakened in a manner not
very unlike the present.

After a while she began to be more observant of those
around her, and amused herself by watching the young
gentleman who was talking with Miss Carver and her cousin,
and trying to make up her own mind about him, simply as a
means of diversion for the hour.

Next her observations extended to the other young man,
who had been quite overlooked by her cousin. She had not
observed him long before she began to feel an increasing
interest in watching his movements. There was something
about him which interested her, though she hardly knew why.

“He may not be what Mabel calls stylish,” she said to her-
self, ‘but I am sure he is a gentleman.”

During these somewhat protracted observations Alice had
not encountered even a glance from the object of them, from
which she inferred that he was quite regardless of her presence.
But she was mistaken. His. observations had been quietly
made before hers commenced, while she was yet absorbed in
her own thoughts.

His attention was first attracted by the circumstance that
she was sitting quite apart from the rest of the party, and he
observed her more closely to see if he could discover the
cause. He soon made up his mind that it was not bashfulness,
for her whole appearance indicated want of interest rather than
14 “ Would you like to look at it ?”

want of courage. The study of faces, especially new ones,
had become a habit with him. He liked to see how much he
could discover in this way, and whether after-acquaintance
confirmed the conclusions thus formed.

He had ample time to study the face of Alice unobserved,
while she sat busy with her own thoughts. The first impres-
sion was certainly not altogether pleasing. The vexation
faintly shadowed there gave to the countenance an expression
which perhaps might be best interpreted by the word dissatis-
fied. ‘The young man could not make up his mind whetner
this was habitual or only transient. The face, on the whole,
puzzled him, and for that reason he studied it with the more
interest. He determined to improve the first opportunity to
approach her. While awaiting the favourable moment, he gave
his attention to the conversation of those around him, taking
part in it as occasion offered; and thus it was that Alice had
the opportunity to observe him, quite undisturbed.

At length there was a movement in the little party. The
elder gentleman stepped to the portico to observe the clouds.
Miss Carver's attention was attracted by a shell unlike any she
had seen before. The young man with whom she was con-
versing immediately arose, and taking it from the shelf handed it
to her for a closer examination. After that, it was passed round
to the other ladies ; and when they had examined and admired
it, the young man, who had been watching his opportunity to
approach Alice, took the shell to her, and said, “Would you
like to look at it?”

She thanked him, and after inspecting it, simply said, “It is
very curious.”

After replacing it on the mantelshelf, he drew a chair
to her side and sat down, commencing a conversation with
the very commonplace inquiry, “How did you like the
Falls?”
The Talk about the Falls. 15

Alice’s face brightened, and the air of indifference imme-
diately vanished.

“IT think they are very pretty,” she said, but immediately
added with a blush, “ Perhaps you will think that term inappro-
priate ; but they have nothing of the grandeur of Niagara or
even Trenton, for I have visited America.”

“Certainly not; they are very modest and unpretending.”

“Vet there is a quiet beauty about them,” said Alice. “In
some places the water bubbles softly over the rocks ; and where
it dashes down in cataract style, it is only a modest miniature
representation of its more pretending sisters.”

The young man smiled. The description of what the young
girl had seen and enjoyed was so correct, and given so simply
and artlessly, that he found himself interested, and much
inclined to draw her out still farther.

“T am glad you were so much pleased,” he said. “I have
taken great pleasure in visiting them. I have extended my
walk thus far every day during the week I have spent here.”

“JT was right in my impression that he does not belong
here,” thought Alice.

“TI suppose you saw them to-day for the first time?” he
continued.

‘«€ Ves, the first and the last, I presume. I never was in the
neighbourhood before, but I am glad that I could be here
this once.”

“You have reason to be. You have one more scene of
beauty to hang up in the picture-gallery of your memory.”

“T think all its surroundings are pleasant,” said Alice. “It
is such a lovely quiet nook. It makes one think of everything
that is calm and peaceful.”

Alice spoke with her usual freedom, for the enthusiasm of
her nature had been awakened by the enjoyments of the day,
and every vexation was now forgotten.
16 “ Are you Satisfied 2”

“T hope it will have a tranquillizing influence every time you
think of it,” said the young man with a smile.

“J should think it might exert such an influence, to have
one’s home amid some such surroundings. I thought, when J
was there to-day, it would be a nice place for a hermit, such as
T have read about.”

“Yet you would not desire a hermitage there,” said the
young man with a smile, adding, “ Doubtless you find many
bright and beautiful things in such a life as yours ?”

“That is true, yet I am not always satisfied, not even with
the bright and beautiful things.”

“ Would the hermitage satisfy you any better?”

“T presume not. I don’t suppose there is any such thing
as being satisfied in this world.” .

“ There is such a thing.”

“JT do not know any people who are so. All I know are
much dissatisfied sometimes, and some of them are, I think, a
little so all the time.”

“Very likely. Still there is such a thing as being satisfied,”
said the young, man, with a smile that went far to prove the
truth of his assertion.

Alice looked up just in time to catch the smile, and for a
moment her eyes rested upon the face. There was something
in its expression which led her without premeditation to ask,

“ Are you satisfied P” :

“Yes, I think so,” was the answer, so calmly spoken that
Alice felt an intuitive conviction of its truthfulness.

“What ! satisfied with yourself and all around you?”
. “No, not with either.”

“Then what are you satisfied with?”

“With that which is within.”

“What is the difference between being satisfied with your-
self and satisfied with that which is within?” inquired Alice,




ll:
a

Da

i

i it
ie































































































































‘fe TOOK OUT A MEMORANDUM BOOK AND WROTE”? (f. Ig).

The Bible Reference. 19

whose deep interest in the subject led her to put questions
which might have seemed bold, but for the unaffected modesty
with which they were asked.

“There is a great difference, but I have not time now to
explain it, and perhaps you would not care to look at the
question as I do, in the light of the Bible, though you
doubtless believe the Bible.”

“Of course I do,” Alice answered, somewhat lightly.

“T am very glad to hear you say that.”

Tt was not the words, but the tone which conveyed to
the mind of Alice the shadow of a reproof, as if he thought
believing the Bible a very weighty matter.

He took out a memorandum-book and wrote on a scrap of
paper :—‘ Luke xvii. 21.” Handing it to Alice, he said,—

“Will you find this passage in your Bible when you return
home, and see if you can make out any connexion between it
and the subject we have been talking about ?”

“Will it help me to understand what you have been saying?”
Alice asked.

“Tt will, if you get its true meaning.”

“What if I don’t understand it?”

“ Ask God to teach you what it means. That is what we all
must do if we would receive aright His message to us.”

There was time for no further conversation, for the rain was
over, and the little party were preparing to leave their hospi-
table refuge. Sincere thanks were returned for the shelter,
and all felt that they had spent a pleasant hour.




CHAPTER IL

UNSATISFIED,

MaseEL Osporn and Alice Grey were both orphans, and both
wards of their uncle, Mr. Grey. Mabel had been left an
orphan very young. She was but an infant when her mother
died. Two years later her father died also, so that she could
remember no other love, care, and guardianship than that of
Qer uncle and aunt.

For only one year had Alice Grey been an inmate of her
present home. Her mother had lived until she was six years
of age, so that she had some enduring recollections of maternal
love and tenderness—memories which sometimes seemed very
real, and at others dim and shadowy.

When Alice was twelve her father died also, leaving her
to the guardianship of his only brother, Mr. Lewis Grey, a
city merchant.

Alice was a girl of more than ordinary abilities. She had
a warm, affectionate nature, with a touch of enthusiasm.
She was one who could love devotedly and unselfishly. She
was not only affectionate, but sensitive also, even to a fault.
She could not find herself blamed, or even misunderstood,
without being rendered unhappy.

Unlike Mabel, she knew by experience the meaning of
parental love, and sorely missed the affection she had known
The Coustus. 21

for so brief a space. Her uncle and aunt were kind to her.
She had found in them all she had allowed herself to expect,
perhaps more ; but they were not her parents, and she realized
what it was to be an orphan without even fraternal ties, for she
had been an only child.

The remark was sometimes made to her that Mabel, dwell-
ing under the same roof, and herself an orphan, must be to
her like an own sister. But things are often quite unlike what
they are supposed to be by those not behind the scenes.’ Her
cousin was not to her at all like a sister. In fact, she was
the cause of no small portion of the trials of her present
situation.

Mabel Osborn was three years older than her cousin. She
had therefore reached the age of eighteen when the orphaned
Alice came to share the home which had been hers so long.
Could Mabel have opened her heart to receive her cousin with
a warm and generous affection, this event might have contri-
buted much to her happiness, and the two might have lived
together in‘a sisterly affection which would have proved a rich
blessing to both.

Mabel had inherited from her father a modest competence,
sufficient for the supply of every real need, and with it she
had been satisfied up to the time of the entrance of Alice into
the family. But Mabel was worldly and ambitious, and needed
only an exciting cause to become envious also; and this was
furnished when her cousin Alice became the ward of her Uncle
Grey.

The father of Alice was much more wealthy than Mabel’s
father had been, and when she, not unfrequently, heard her
cousin spoken of as the young heiress and the rich ward of
her Uncle Grey, envy awoke in her heart, and it was not long
before something very much like hatred began to manifest its
presence there.
22 The Return Home.

It must not be supposed that all this was open and undis-
guised even to Mabel herself, She would have considered
herself very much aggrieved had she been told that she often
envied and sometimes hated her cousin. Deep in her heart
these emotions were hidden, and only on rare occasions were
they perceptible in word or deed.

Alice Grey would gladiy have given her cousin the place of
an elder sister in her heart, but she was not long in discover-
ing that there was a barrier between her and Mabel.

Alice grieved over this in secret, and when Mabel was posi-
tively unkind, as she sometimes was, she was ready to think
that, at least for the present, the wealth which would one day
be hers brought more of unhappiness than of pleasure, and
almost to wish that she were poor, for she thought Mabel
would then be kinder to her. She could not see why her
cousin should feel so.

“I do not believe I should if I were in her place and she
in mine,” she thought. ‘“ Love is better than money, oh, so
much better! If I only had some one to love me, as I want
to be loved, as I know my mother loved me!”

After such thoughts Alice’s aching heart would try to relieve
itself in tears.

The day after the visit to the Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Grey,
with their two nieces, returned to their home in the city. The
next two or three days happened to be very busy ones with
Alice, and the little slip of paper, given to her by the young
man at the cottage, was not once withdrawn from the pocket-
book to which she had consigned it.

Alice had not been too busy to recall, many times, her visit
to the rural spot which had charmed her so much, and also
the hours spent in the cottage, and the conversation which
had so greatly interested her. She had felt a momentary
curiosity to know what the passage referred to could have to
A Day of Trial, 23

do with the subject of which she and the young gentleman
had been speaking. The fact that it was a Bible reference,
it must be owned, abated her desire to know what it was, for
Alice Grey had not learned to love that Book, so dear to the
‘heart of every true Christian.

Her uncle and aunt Grey were worldly people, paying out-
ward respect to the ordinances of religion, while strangers to
its life and power in thesoul. Mrs. Grey was coldly indifferent,
and Mr. Grey secretly sceptical, allowing his mind, in those
brief intervals when he had time to think at all, to entertain
doubts of the truth and reality of much to which he had given
outwardly respectful attention.

The mother of Alice had been an earnest Christian, and
her orphan child retained more or less distinct recollections
of her teachings concerning the great themes of religion—
memories which at times stirred within her soul thoughts and
longings not in unison with the wonted tenor of her life.
Her father, too, was a Christian, but his was one of those
reticent natures which are generally silent about the things
most sacredly cherished in the heart’s depths.

One evening early in the following week, Alice fled to her
room much earlier than her wonted hour for retiring. It had
been a day of unusual vexations. . Mabel had annoyed her
more than once, and to this not uncommon occurrence had
been also added other trials. It is the last straw that breaks
the camel’s back; so with Alice, it was the last grievance
which proved too much for her self-control, though she cer-
tainly would not have compared it to a straw, for its pressure
upon her spirits was no light one.

She was now alone in her chamber, in tears. Could she
have carried all her troubles to the feet of Jesus, and left
them there, with a humble and sincere prayer for His blessing,
not only for herself, but for all who had that day caused her
24 Lucy Stevens's News.

grief, His peace would have descended as dew upon the
tender herb, and her soul would have been at rest.

That afternoon Alice had received a call from Lucy
Stevens, a schoolmate of the previous winter. Her visitor
was taken up to her room, that they might have a school-girl
chat together.

After a little time Lucy said, “I’ve half a mind to tell you
some of the things I heard this afternoon.”

“Why half a mind? Why not a whole one?” said Alice.

“To tell the truth, I overheard these things, and some
might not think it quite fair.”

“ How was that?”

“Our teacher, Miss Grafton, called to see mamma. She is
a friend of mamma’s, you know. I was in the back parlour,
but they didn’t know it. At first I never thought of any harm
in being there, as I didn’t suppose anything would be said
they wouldn’t like to have me hear. After a while they began
to talk about our school, and Miss Grafton spoke much more
freely of some of the pupils than she would have done if she
had known that she had a listener.”

‘* And you sat and heard it all?”

“Why, yes. What else could I do? Besides, I own I
was curious to know what Miss Grafton would say. Would
you not have stayed, if you had been in my place?”

“Not without letting them know that I was there.”

Lucy flushed. “I dare say you would,” she answered, a
little tartly. “You have as much curiosity as any of us.”

“Perhaps I might, if I had been caught as you were,” said
Alice, not wishing to offend her visitor. “Whom did they
talk about ?” she asked, after a little pause.

“Ah, you would like to know,” said Lucy, caumvenantly
“The partaker is as bad as the thief. It seems that you are
auite willing to have a share of this stolen information.”
Miss Grafton’s Opinion of Alice, 25

“T own you have excited my curiosity, and I don’t think
there would be any great harm done if you should gratify it.”

“Mamma began it,” she said, “by making inquiries about
one of the girls ; and then they went on to speak of others.”

“They say listeners usually hear no good of themselves.
Was that the case with you?” inquired Alice, archly.

“I heard no ill; but probably this was owing to the fact
that my.mamma was a listener also,” replied Lucy, laughing,

“Did Miss Grafton say anything about me?”

“Yes, indeed, she had a good deal to say about you. In
fact, you were the young lady about whom mamma inquired.”

“What did she say?” asked Alice, somewhat eagerly.

“Perhaps I had better not tell you. I don’t think Miss
Grafton would like it, if she knew that I overheard it, and
then repeated it to you.”

“Now you have told me so much, you ought to tell me
the rest,” Alice urged. ‘It will not be fair if you don’t.”

“There’s something in that, to be sure; yet, after all, I
think I had better not tell you. If I should, you will very
likely be offended with Miss Grafton.

“Then she must have said something bad about me.”

“And something good also. Wouldn’t I be proud if she
had said anything half as complimentary about me! I will
tell you that part, now I have gone so far. She said that you
possessed more than ordinary abilities, that you had a decided
talent for music, and the ability to excel in many things. Are
you not satisfied with that?”

“But that’s not all. You must tell me the rest. I don’t
want to hear only half the story.”

“Then I suppose I must. She said that, notwithstanding
you had fine abilities, she doubted if you would ever really
excel, for though you took care to maintain a respectable posi-
tion in your classes, which you could easily do without much

Satisyied. Cc
26 Alice's Keen Anguish,

exertion, you were too much disinclined to close application to
put forth the effort necessary to the thorough acquisition of
any branch of study. She said that you needed some motive
sufficient to stimulate you to greater exertions. If you were
a poor girl, seeking to fit yourself for a teacher, or if your
heart and life were ruled by the higher motive of making the
best improvement of every talent given, she had no doubt
that you would soon become a fine scholar and an excellent
musician. I believe I have given you her very words.”

Lucy Stevens had been so intent upon giving her eager
listener an accurate report of what she had overheard, that
she had not noticed its éffect upon her companion; but now,
observing her more closely, she saw that her face was flushed,
and that tears just ready to drop stood in her eyes.

“Pshaw, Alice,” she said, “don’t take it in that way. I
should be delighted if she had said half as much in my favour
—‘uncommon abilities,’ and so on; and as to the last part,
it’s just like Miss Grafton. She’s always harping upon that
string, talking to us about our responsibility for the improve-
ment of the talents we have received. I would take the sweet
and let the bitter go.”

Alice did not follow this advice, but rather its opposite,
for she took the bitter right home to her heart. The bitter
is ofttimes more wholesome than the sweet, and though, per-
haps, Alice that night got no good from it, yet in after-months
and under more favourable circumstances the recollection of
it proved in no small degree salutary.

She felt most keenly these remarks, as reported to her by
Lucy; so keenly that all the previous vexations of the day
were well-nigh forgotten. She had fancied herself standing
much higher than this in the estimation of her teachers, and
it hurt her pride to be told that they regarded her as one
who was falling below the attainments she ought to make,
The Text referred to. 27

because unwilling to put forth the necessary exertions. She
also felt the allusion to the enervating influence of her ex-
pectations of future wealth, and all the more, because this
time it did not come from her cousin, but her teacher, and
could not spring from envy or dislike. Thus coming, it
forced her to admit that there must be in it more or less of
truth. ‘How vexatious!” she mentally exclaimed. “TI be-
lieve I am out of sorts with every one to-night. I am vexed
with Mabel for what she said to me in the morning, with
Miss Grafton for the remarks she made about me to Mrs.
Stevens, and with Lucy for overhearing and repeating these
remarks, But after all, I believe I am most vexed with my-
self. What business had I to listen to what Miss Grafton
said? And the worst of it is, that I am afraid there is some
truth in it. Is it not miserable to be so dissatisfied with
everything, even with one’s self?”

Dissatisfied. ‘The word recalled to her mind the interview
with the young man at the cottage, and what he had said
about being satisfied, and the Bible reference he had given
her, which she had not yet examined.

She opened her pocket-book and took out the slip of
paper, and then, opening her neglected Bible, she found the
passage and read, “ The kingdom of God is within you.”
Three times she read it slowly and thoughtfully.

. “Tam sure I do not understand it,” she thought.

The book she held in her hand was a reference Bible, and
she turned to the passages referred to, hoping they might
help to make it plainer. The first to which she turned was
this: “For the kingdom of God is not meat and drink; but
righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost.” “Joy
and peace,” she repeated, and something like a gleam of
light entered her mind with these words. “I think one
might be satisfied, who had joy and peace within. JI wonder

€ 3
28 Wearied and Heartsore.

if this is what that young man meant. How can the king.
dom of God be within one? I never found anything within
myself but myself”

Then she turned to the next reference and read, “To
whom God would make known what is the riches of the
glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ
in you, the hope of glory.” “Christ in you,” she repeated.
“This is called a mystery. How can I understand. it ?”

These thoughts recalled to her mind the reply of the young
man when she said:to him, “What if I do not understand
it?” Each word of that reply she now distinctly remembered :
“Ask God to teach you what it means. That is what we
all must do if we would receive aright His message to us.’

She mused on the words. Had God taught this young
man what seemed so plain to him, but was so dark to her?
Would He teach her if she asked Him? She tried to pray,
but of the prayer that asks and receives she as yet knew
nothing. There was no faith in that cry for help. She was
not able to realize the presence, or the love and mercy of
the Being she addressed. Yet around and within, though
she knew it not, was the ever-present Spirit, Even that
sense of need, of ignorance or darkness, was the call of His,
voice within her soul, arousing it from its sleep of death, and
guiding these first gropings after Himself.

Wearied and heartsore, Alice retired for the night, and
the occurrences of the succeeding day banished from her
mind both sad and serious thoughts. Yet questionings had
been stirred within her heart, which would not long be laid at
rest.




CHAPTER III,

AN INVITATION.

A Few days later, Mr. Grey came into the room where his
wife and elder niece were, holding in his hand an open
letter.

“Where is Alice?” he inquired.

“In her room, I believe,” said Mabel. “ Why do you
ask ?”

“T have here a letter from Maysville, from her Aunt Ward,
and within is one for Alice. Alice’s aunt wishes her to spend
some weeks with her this summer. What do you think of
the plan, wife? I am glad to have an opportunity to talk
the matter over with you before Alice knows of the invitation,”
he added.

“What do you think of it?” said Mrs. Grey, who usually
preferred ascertaining her husband’s opinion to giving her
own.

“T hardly know what to think of her going, just at this
time. Of course it will be best for her to visit her aunt some
- time, as Mrs. Ward is her mother’s only sister. But she
cannot go now unless she gives up going with us to the
seaside, and I hardly think she will wish to do that.”

.Mabel’s face brightened at this suggestion.
“T think this visit to Maysville will be just the thing,” she
30 The Letter for Alice.

said, with animation. “ Alice would be much better off with
her aunt, I’m sure.”

Her uncle looked at her keenly, and there was displeasure
in his tone as he replied,—

“The idea of going to the seaside without your cousin
seems to afford you satisfaction.”

Mabel blushed and looked not a little disconcerted. She
had been careful how she treated Alice in the presence of
her uncle, and she was chagrined to find that she had now
been so incautious, and revealed to him her envy and jealousy. -
Had her judgment been clear, she would have seen how
absurd it was to fear a rival in the modest, simple-hearted
girl of sixteen. But envy and jealousy are not clear-sighted,
and do not aid those influenced by them to see things as they
really are.

Though Mabel was disconcerted by her uncle’s words, she
quickly rallied, and said, “I don’t wish Alice not to go. I
thought she might like best to visit her aunt.”

This declaration did not deceive Mr. Grey, and the sus-
picion which had before arisen in his mind, that Mabel did
not feel towards her cousin altogether as she should, gathered
strength from this little circumstance.

“6 Alice shall herself decide the question,” he said. ‘‘If she
chooses to go to the seaside, it will give me pleasure to have
her with us; and I hope, Mabel, you will be more discreet
about showing what your own preference is than you have
been this morning.”

In a few minutes Alice entered the room.

“ Here is a letter for you,” said her uncle.

“ For me!”

“Yes, from Maysville ; from your Aunt Mary.”

“What do you think about it?” said her uncle, after Alice
had read the letter.
Alice’s Aunt Mary. 31

“About what?” said Alice, looking up.

“Your aunt’s invitation to visit her.”

“Then you know about that,” she said.

“Yes ; your aunt wrote me a few lines, expressing her wish
to receive a visit from you, Doubtless you will want to go
some time, but the question is will you want to go now, or will
you prefer to go to the seaside with us, and visit your aunt at
another time ?”

“I don’t know,” said Alice, thoughtfully.

“You can take time to think of it, and decide what you
will do. I want you to spend this vacation in the way that
will give you the most pleasure. If you prefer to go with us,
do so by all means, and I will make arrangements for you to
visit your aunt at some other time. But if you choose to go
now, you shall do as you wish.”

“Thank you, uncle, you are very kind;” and then, after a
pause, “I wish I knew more about my aunt.”

“You will after you have made this visit,” said her uncle,
smiling.

“T wonder if she is at all like my own dear mother!”

“‘T have seen very little of her. My impression is, that she
# quite different from your mother. She is called a nice
woman, and a very clever one. She has written to you before,
has she not?”

“Only once, after my father’s death. I wonder she
has not written more, when my mother was her only
sister.”

“I presume she is one of the many who are not much in
the habit of writing. She has been a hard-working farmer’s
wife, which, no doubt, is one reason why your Uncle Ward has
been so prosperous as a farmer. I-have been told that he has
left his farm and built him a very pretty house in the village
of Maysville, and furnished it nicely. I presume it is a
32 Maysville decided on.

pleasant home, and that you will enjoy a visit there sometime,
if you don’t go now.”

Alice at once took the subject into consideration. She was
no stranger to the watering-place the Greys were about to
visit, for she had been there several times with her father.
There was not, therefore, the charm of novelty in this pro-
posed trip. For her, there would be more of novelty in a few
weeks’ sojourn in a quiet country village, for it would be
unlike the surroundings of her past life. But it was not this
consideration which turned the scale in favour of a visit to
her relatives in Maysville.

“She is my mother’s sister,” she said to herself. “They
once were children together. How they must have loved
each other in those days! for I am sure, if I had a sister, I
should love her very much. I think Aunt Mary will love me
for my mother’s sake. She wants me to come and see her,
and I want to go; indeed I do.” And thus taking counsel of
her heart, she decided in favour of Maysville.

“T think I would like to go and see my aunt,” Alice said to
her uncle the next day. “If you and aunt were going there,
I should like it a great deal better than to go to the seaside.”

“Tf you really wish to go you shall not go alone,” said her
uncle, “J will go with you myself, and remain a day or two,
till you get acquainted with your relatives, so as not to feel
like a stranger. Will that do?”

“Vou are very kind, uncle. If you will go with me, I shall
be glad indeed to go.” ,

“Then it is all settled. I think you will have to go early
next week if I go with you, so that I can get back in time for
this seaside trip. You had better write at once to your aunt,
unless you prefer that I should write for you.”’

“JT would much prefer it, for they seem so like strangers.
When I have once been there it will be very different.”
U; uncle Wards Home. S9

“Very weil. It shall be as you desire, and I hope that you
will enjoy your visit so much that you will have no cause to
regret your decision. By the way,” he added, turning to
his wife, “has this young lady all she needs for her visit to
Maysville?”

“TY hardly know,” said Mrs. Grey, “but Iam inclined to
think that she is not as well prepared for Maysville as for the
seaside. Judging from what I saw during our late visit to the
country, I presume she will not be satisfied until she has ex-
plored every nook within walking distance. I don’t think she
has any dresses quite suitable for that purpose, but there is
hardly time to supply the deficiency.”

“Tf she has one dress suitable for such expeditions, it will
be all she will need during the few weeks she will remain
there,” said Mr. Grey. “Just purchase the material for such
a dress, and let her take it with her. I daresay she will find
some one in Maysville who can fit and make a dress of that
kind as well as it would be done here.”

“That will do very well, I think,” said Mrs. Grey. “TI will
purchase the goods the first time I go out, and Alice must get
the dress made as soon as she can.”

Early in the following week Mr. Grey and Alice took the
train for Maysville, which they reached in about four hours.
It was a pleasant secluded village, abundant shade-trees giving
it a cool, inviting appearance in the warm days of summer.
One of the neatest and freshest of its dwellings was the
residence of her Uncle Ward; and Alice thought, as she
approached it for the first time, that it looked very nice, quiet,
and inviting, at least for one who loved quiet. Alice herself
liked it pretty well, for a girl of her age, though she was some-
what apprehensive that she might here get too much of it.

The house was pleasantly situated on an elevation, com-
manding a fine view of groves and meadows, and a village
34 Departure of Uncle Grey.

beyond these about three miles distant. Alice was quite
charmed with this view, and thought she should not soon tire
of looking at it. It was only from the front of the house
that it could be seen. There were but two rooms in front—
the parlour and the guest-chamber above it. The other rooms
were so situated as to afford no view of anything but the

_ immediate neighbourhood.

Mr. Grey had promised to spend one day with Alice in
Maysville, so she had no fear that the next day would bring
home-sickness for her. It was very pleasant, and was spent
in walks, drives, and social intercourse, which Alice enjoyed
very much, for Mr. and Mrs. Ward spared no pains to enter-
tain Mr. Grey while he was with them. Alice knew that the
time of trial for her would be when her uncle should take his
leave.

The next morning she was called to a breakfast prepared
at an early hour for the accommodation of her uncle, who
wished to take the first train to his home. She was conscious
of a choking sensation in the throat when he bade her good-
bye, but she tried to be brave and not let her uncle and aunt
perceive how she felt.

She soon, however, found that the only way to keep her
secret was to make a hasty retreat to her own room till she
had gained a surer command of her feelings. After half an
hour spent in earnest, determined effort to put aside uncom-
fortable thoughts and feelings, she was so far successful that
she began to plan for spending the morning in the most agree-
able way she could think of.

Her Uncle Grey had advised her to take with her a good
supply of reading, as she might not find what she wanted in
Maysville ; and with his usual thoughtfulness, he had himself
seen that she was prov:ued with as many books and magazines
as it was convenient for her to carry. ‘These she had not yet
Alice's Plans upset. 35

taken from her trunk, but she now resolved to select the most
interesting she could find as the best diversion she could at
that time command.

Having made her choice, she descended to the parlour,
hoping she might enjoy the next hour or two, seated by one
of its pleasant windows, dividing her attention between the
book and the beautiful view she so much admired. The door
was closed. Pushing it gently open, she was not a little sur-
prised at the change which had taken place since she left the
room a little more than half an hour before. Every blind was
tightly closed and the curtains dropped. Every article which
had been in the least disturbed by the recent occupancy of the
room had been carefully restored to the place intended for it,
and seemed to say, “Who. dare touch me now?”

Alice ‘looked around quite disconcerted by the unex-
pected change. The room which had seemed so airy,
cheerful, and home-like, one hour before, now looked gloomy
enough.

Her first thought was that she would open a blind, draw a>
comfortable easy-chair near a window, and have a long read
of her book. But on second thoughts she decided this would
not answer. It was evident that her aunt had occupied the
first halfhour after the departure of her recent guest in
arranging everything as she now found it, and Alice reasoned
that she would not have left all the other work of the morning
to do this if she had not wished things to remain as she left
them. She would at least make no alteration without con-
sulting her aunt. Leaving the book on the parlour-table, she
went in search of her aunt, and found her busy with her
domestic cares.

“T see the parlour is all shut up, auntie,” she said.

Something in the manner of Alice led Mrs. Ward to suspect
that she was not pleased with this arrangement.
36 The Company Parlour.

“Of course it is,” she said; ‘I didn’t suppose you would
wish me to treat you as a stranger.”

“ Certainly not, auntie,” said Alice.

‘So I thought. You are to make us a long visit, and be
ani one of the family.”

“Yes, aunt; but don’t you ever open that pleasant room
except when strangers are here 2?”

“T never open it unless I have company. What would be
the use?”

“It’s so pleasant, I should think you would wish to enjoy
it yourself.”

“Ido enjoy having such a room for my company when
they come. Your uncle and I have worked hard enough to get
it to enjoy it. There’s not a pleasanter parlour in Maysville.”

With Alice, the feeling of personal annoyance was now
exchanged for one of curiosity to know how her aunt managed
these things; so she next inquired, “Do you have company
very often?”

“Often? No, indeed! at least not any one I think of
opening that room for. When folks come in a neighbourly
way, I never think of making such strangers of them. The
other rooms are quite good enough for all that sort of thing,
When I have a party, or when strangers like your Uncle Grey
come here, then of course I use the room, and am glad
enough I have it to use.”

“And how often do you have occasion to use it?” inquired
Alice.

“ Perhaps some half a dozen times a year.”

“Why, aunt,” said Alice, “you can’t mean that you don’t
use that pleasant room more than six times a year!’””

“JT do mean it. When people have worked as hard as
your uncle and I to get nice things, they know how to take
care of them.”
By the Hall Window, 37

Alice could not help thinking that they did not know how
to enjoy them; but she kept these thoughts to herself, fearing
she had already said too much on the subject.

Seeing that her aunt was very busy, she left the room.
Returning to the parlour for her book, she began to think
what disposition she should make of herself and of that for
the next hour or two. She concluded that she would go up
to the room her uncle had occupied, for as that was over the
parlour, she thought it must be very pleasant. She found the
door of this room closed, but opened it and looked in. The
room wore that peculiar air of desolation which is the usual
aspect of a guest-chamber after it has been deserted by one
guest and has not yet been prepared for the reception of another.

Alice hastily closed the door. She could not go there. It
would make her home-sick at once, and she was near enough
to that now. She would go to her own room, and if nothing
pleasant could be seen from its one window, it would make
little difference while she was engaged with her book. But
as she turned, she noticed the large hall window near which
she was standing. As it was a west window, it was very cool
and pleasant during the morning hour. She stepped up to it
and looked out.

“Ah, this is pleasant!” she exclaimed. “How absurd it
is,” she thought, “to do as Aunt Mary does. The house is
so situated that only the front is pleasant, yet all this part is
shut up—as gloomy as a prison, and of no use to any one
except on rare occasions. It is a strange way of enjoying
what one has worked hard to obtain. Iam glad there is one
little nook that I can enjoy. It shall be my reading-room
and boudoir, and I will make the most of it, for it is really
very pleasant, the pleasantest window in the house. I will
take away this stiff, hard chair, and bring the easy-chair from
my room to put in its place.”
38 A Model Housekeeper.

This arrangement was quickly made, and Alice seated her-
self, book in hand, with a more satisfied feeling than she had
known since her uncle left. The possession of this little nook
seemed to give her a comfortable home-feeling. It had been
chosen as a nice place to read, and yet she made little progress
in this, for she was more in the mood for thinking than for
reading. Her uncle and aunt came in for a large share of
these thoughts, and she tried to analyze the impression they
had made upon her during this brief acquaintance.”+ Her
uncle did not puzzle her much. She thought she understood
him, and liked him, too, not a little. He was social and kind,
a little blunt, perhaps, but with a playful, unexpected way of
saying things, that continually amused her.

When she thought of her aunt, her mind was in more con-
fusion. There was the disappointment she felt at finding her
so dissimilar to the recollections she had of her own dear
mother. Her Uncle Grey had in part prepared her for this;
still she had hoped to find more traces of resemblance. Her
aunt had received her kindly. She believed that she wished
her visit to be a pleasant one, and that she loved her for her
mother’s sake as much as it was in her nature to do; and’ yet
she felt disappointed in her aunt, without being able to tell
exactly why.

Mrs. Ward was what is called a model housekeeper.
Under her vigorous reign neither dirt nor disorder was
tolerated. A well-kept house is a great blessing, and the
trouble was not that Mrs. Ward was a thorough house-
keeper, but that she was so little besides. The heart that
might have blessed other hearts by its warm love and tender
sympathies, had been narrowed and dwarfed by a too exclusive
and selfish devotion to domestic duties.

Something of this Alice saw and felt, without being able to
define it.
Alice’s Determination. 39

The fit of musing into which she had fallen was at length
interrupted by the sound of her uncle’s voice downstairs.
As she was not inclined for reading, she determined to 20
down, feeling sure that he would have something cheerful to
say.




CHAPTER IV.

NEW ACQUAINTANCES.

Mr Warp was leaving the kitchen just as Alice entered,
but he suddenly turned back when he heard her step.

“‘ Where are you going this morning, uncle?” she said.

“Up to the farm,” he replied.

“Can’t I go with you? I should like it very much.”

“T don’t know about it. I shall have to get out the
carriage when I take. such a fine city lady as you to ride
with me, and this morning I am going in the old farm-
waggon, to get some early potatoes and one or two things
besides.”

“JT don’t mind going in the waggon. I think I should
like it better than the carriage. It would be more of a
novelty.”

“J dare say it would to you,” said her uncle, laughing.
“ Well, I will take you if you will go and put on a decent
dress.”

Alice looked down upon the light, delicate robe she called
her morning wrapper, and said in some surprise— Why,
uncle, what do you call a decent dress?”

“One suitable for the occasion on which it is worn is what
' Tcall a decent dress. That’s my notion of things, though it
may bea very old-fashioned one. Now that flimsy thing,








































**T DON’T MIND GOING IN THE WAGGON.”

Satiofen.

The New Dress. 43

though I can’t deny that it’s very becoming, isn’t suitable for a
ride in the old farm-waggon, and for a good ramble about the
old place when we get there.”

“But really, uncle, I have nothing more suitable. Aunt
Grey said I was not quite prepared to come out here, for she
knew I should want to explore every nook, and I had no dress
quite suitable for that kind of business. She purchased the
material for one, but that was all she had time to do. She
thought I might get some one here to make it.”

“Tf that is so, I would advise you to go about it this very
morning.”

“Let me go with you this morning, and wear the dress I
have on.”

“IT shall do no such thing,” said her uncle, in that good-
humoured, droll way of his, which enabled him to say almost
anything he chose without giving offence. “ ‘ Business before
pleasure’ is my motto. The first thing for you to do is take
that piece of goods up to Mrs. Carroll, and tell her that you
want a dress made as soon as possible. If you help her, I
dare say it can be finished in a day or two.”

“Why, uncle, I never put a stitch in a dress in my life.”

“TI should say it’s time you did, then. I believe in girls’
learning how to work, even if they do have lots of money. It
makes them feel comfortable and independent all through life,
let their circumstances be what they may. Money may be
lost, but if one is trained to be equal to any emergency, that
is something which can’t be lost. It’s a great deal surer than
bank stock or railroad bonds. There is the case of Mrs.
Carroll, the lady who I said would make your dress for you,
and do it well. Once she no more thought of sewing for a
living than you do. When she was a girl she had about all
she wanted, and expected always to have it, and it was much
the same after she was married. But things went wrong with

D2
44 Unele Ward's Advice.

her husband about money-matters, and after his death it was
found there was not much left for the widow and her son; so
the pleasant home was sold, and she took to dressmaking.
You see how things sometimes go in this world. But I mustn’t
stop to talk any longer, or I shall not get up to the farm or
you to Mrs. Carroll’s this morning. Your aunt will show you
where she lives.”

’ “But, uncle, I’m a stranger, and would not like to go alone.
I would rather wait until Aunt Mary is at leisure to go with
me. Aunt Grey always sees about such things for me.”

“Nonsense! What if you are a stranger? Your feet can
carry you there all the same, and your tongue can ask if she
will do the work for you. Your aunt has always such lots of
work on hand, that it takes her a long time to get started
anywhere. I would advise you not to wait for her. You're
old enough to begin to act for yourself, and you had better
begin this morning.”

If some other person had said all this to Alice, she would
have felt either offended or wounded, but her uncle had such
a way of saying it that she was neither. So she came to the
wise resolution to follow his advice; and as soon as he had
left for the farm, she went up to her room to get ready for the
walk. When she came down, her aunt went with her as far
as the gate, to point out the house.

After her aunt turned back and Alice was left to pursue her
walk alone, it must be owned that she felt a little shy and
uncomfortable, for she was not only a stranger in a strange
place, but this was nearly or quite the first time she had gone
out on an errand of business, so free had her life been from
the slightest pressure of care. But the feeling was not very
oppressive, for though the position was a new one, Alice had
been no recluse, and was not unaccustomed to meet with
strangers ; and, moreover, thoughts about herself were mingled
Visit to Mrs. Carroll. 45

with other thoughts, most prominent among which were those
that had reference to what her uncle had just told her about
Mrs. Carroll. It seemed to her that she must be very unhappy
after sustaining such bereavements and losses, and being com-
pelled to resort to the needle for her support, when she had
known what it was to have every want supplied. Alice
wondered a little what she could ever do, if such things were
to happen to her, and how she could bear it, and she quite
made up her mind that the woman whom she was about to
meet must wear a very sorrowful face, or at least a very dis-
contcnted one. E

When she reached the house, the door was open, and as
Alice stood on the step she was met by a somewhat rough-
looking man. She asked if Mrs. Carroll was at home, and
received the very laconic reply, “ Upstairs.” Mrs. Ward had
neglected to tell her niece what part of the house was occupied
by Mrs. Carroll. ;

Alice ascended the stairs, and when she reached the top was
met by a lady so unlike the picture her mind had formed of
Mrs. Carroll, that she at once decided she had not yet found
the person she was seeking. She soon, however, discovered
her mistake, for a voice sweet and gentle said,—

“TJ heard you inquiring for me at the door. This way, if
you please.”

Alice followed her conductor into a pleasant parlour, and
was seated by a window commanding much the same view
that she so admired from the front windows of her aunt’s
house.

After seating her visitor, Mrs. Carroll resumed her own seat
by another window, and took up the work she had just laid
down. Hardly had she done so, when some one called her
name, and she went out to meet a person who wished to speak
with her on the stairs.
46 Mrs. Carroll's Home.

While she was absent Alice improved the time by looking
around, both without and within. The scene without was not
new, at least that portion of it which she most admired, so her
attention was soon transferred to the scene within. The fur-
niture was not new, though it was quite nice and well pre-
served, and she at once concluded that it had been the purchase
of those better days of which her uncle had spoken. It was
very neatly arranged, and books and flowers and little adorn-
ments gave to the room an air of culture and refinement which
Alice was not, slow to appreciate. ‘There was nothing of the
touch-me-ifyou-dare expression which seemed to pervade her
aunt’s. shut-up parlour; but everything spoke of careful use
and wise enjoyment, and as the young girl looked around,
there came over her such a home feeling as she had not had
since she came to Maysville. She had no time then to analyze
it, for Mrs. Carroll had re-entered the room, and as soon as she
was seated Alice made known her errand, and was much
pleased when told that her dress could be done at once, as
work was not pressing at that season of the year.

“T have only this dress to finish,” said Mrs. Carroll. “I
wish to complete it before laying it aside, as it may be called
for at any time. Ican finish itin half an hour. Will it be
inconvenient for you to wait that time?”

“Not in the least,” said Alice, who was secretly glad of this
detention.

She soon found herself engaged in an interesting conver-
sation, suggested by surrounding objects. They talked of
flowers, of books, of the beautiful landscape which lay spread
out before them, and of the beauty of the country a: that time
of the year, and winding in and out of their conversation on
these subjects were the threads of Alice’s own secret thoughts
about Mrs. Carroll herself, and what her uncle had that morning
said of her past history.
Another “ Satisfied” One. 47

As Mrs. Carroll’s work required close attention, Alice
improved the opportunity to study the face which bent over
the work. Could that calm, serene face, that manner so
quiet and yet so cheerful, belong to one who had suffered the
losses and bereavements of which her uncle had spoken?

These thoughts suddenly recalled the conversation with the
young man at the cottage in which they had taken shelter from
the rain on their return from the Falls. She remembered the
very tone of the voice in which the one word “ satisfied” had
been spoken, and it now seemed to her that this word would
best describe the expression of the face before her. Here was
another satisfied one. Of this she felt sure. Yet why was it
so? It could not be from the things without, for only half an
hour before Alice had made up her mind that this woman’s
outward circumstances must necessarily make her very sorrow-
ful, if not discontented. If it was not from the things without,
then it must be, even as that young man had said, from some-
thing within. What could that something be? What was this
secret, this happiness springing neither from outward circum-
stances, nor yet from satisfaction with one’s self, and still giving
such calmness, sweetness, and serenity that even the counte-
nance and the very tones of the voice were the unconscious
witnesses of this inward composure ?

Very soon the dress was completed and laid aside, and
Mrs. Carroll told Alice that she was now ready to take up her
dress. Some conversation followed about the use for which it
was designed and the mode of fitting and making it.

“T shall have to detain you but a little longer,” said Mrs.
Carroll.

Alice was sorry to hear this. She had been too well enter-
tained to be in any haste to leave; besides, she had her fears
that:time might hang heavily on her hands after her return to
her aunt’s.
48 Alice helps with the Dress.

*\WWhen shall you want me again ?” she asked.

“Not until to-morrow.”

“T wish I could sew upon the dress,” said Alice; “but I
don’t know anything about working on dresses, though Uncle
Ward says it’s time I did,” she added archly, as she remem-
bered her uncle’s words.

Mrs. Carroll smiled. “I suppose you know something
about sewing ?” she said.

“Oh yes; I can sew some things neatly, but I have never
worked on dresses.”

“Tf you can sew well, you could easily do some parts of the
dress with the aid of a few simple directions.”

“Do you think so?” said Alice, with an eager look which
showed that the thought gave her pleasure.

“T have no doubt you would find itso. If you would like
to spend the rest of the morning here, I will prepare a part of
the dress for you and show you how it is to be done.”

“Thank you. I should like it very much,” said Alice,
pleased with the thought of helping forward the work,
and still more to have an excuse for remaining longer
with Mrs. Carroll, towards whom she felt herself strangely
drawn.

As they plied their needles Mrs. Carroll seemed at no loss
for subjects of conversation. Some incidental remark showed
Alice that she knew something of her past history, and when
the fact of her orphanage was touched upon, there was an
added gentleness on Mrs. Carroll’s part.

Alice saw and appreciated this. Never since the death of
her mother had she met with one who had so impressed her,
to whom she thought it would be so easy to give an almost
filial love and confidence. Her Aunt Grey, though kind, was
not one to win a large share of these. She had come to
Maysville with the secret hope of finding such a one in her
L[nutroduction to Miss Foster. 49

Aunt Ward. How easy it would be, she thought, to open her
heart to her aunt, if she were only like Mrs. Carroll.

Their conversation was presently interrupted by the entrance
‘of a young girl a little older than Alice, who came for the dress
Mrs. Carroll had just completed. She was introduced to Alice
as Miss Emma Foster.

“T hoped you would come this morning, Emma,” said
Mrs. Carroll, ‘that I might have the pleasure of introducing
you to Miss Grey, for I feel sure you will enjoy each other’s
society while she remains in Maysville.”

‘“‘T have been counting upon that,” said Emma, with a bright,
frank smile, which at once gave Alice a favourable opinion of
her new acquaintance. ‘Mrs. Ward told me, two days ago,
that she expected her niece to spend some time with her; and
I was very glad, for I think summer visitors make the place so
lively and cheerful, and, as Miss Grey is about my age, I had
a special interest in her arrival.”

Alice was well pleased to hear that any one had taken an
interest in her coming, and she felt sure that she should like
the young girl who seemed so ready to welcome her to
Maysville.

“My brother came last night,” continued Emma. “He wiil
be at home through all the long summer vacation. Shan’t we
have nice times?” she added gaily.

“T have no doubt you will,” said Mrs. Carroll, with that
ready sympathy which won for her so many youthful friends.

“We have such fine rides when he is at home,” continued
Emma. “By the way, we have one planned for this afternoon,
and we shall be very glad to call for you Miss Grey, if you will
accompany us;” to which informal invitation Alice gladly
assented.

“When shall I come again?” said Alice, as she was about
leaving Mrs. Carroll at noon.
50 Affairs Brightening.

“Would you like to sew more on the dress?”

“Indeed I should, if it is not too much trouble to give me
the necessary instruction.”

“Tt isno trouble, but a pleasure. You are engaged for this
afternoon. Come as early to-morrow as you like, and we will
spend the morning together.”

“Thank you,” said Alice; “that will be delightful.”

Alice returned to her aunt’s house feeling that everything
wis wearing a very different aspect from that which the morn-
ing had presented. She had much enjoyed the time spent with _
Mrs. Carroll, and she had there met with one of her own age,
who, she was sure, would prove an agreeable acquaintance.
She had before her the prospect of a pleasant drive that after-
noon, and the next morning was to be spent with Mrs. Carroll,
Certainly things were very much brightening. There was a
fair prospect that she might even yet enjoy herself in Mays-
ville, and have no cause to regret that she had chosen to come
there.

“T like Mrs. Carroll very much,” Alice remarked at the
dinner-table that noon.

“T am glad to see that you’re such a good judge of character,”
replied her uncle. “There isn’t a woman in Maysville more
highly esteemed than Mrs. Carroll. The course she has taken
since the death of her husband has won for her the esteem of
all sensible people. But how is the dress progressing? I feel
an interest in that.”

“Oh, finely. Iam to go there to-morrow morning and help
sew upon it.”

“That’s sensible, I’m sure. I told the people at the farm
that I should bring you up the next time I came; so I shall
hope to find you in readiness. They asked why I didn’t bring
you to-day.”

“What did you tell them?”
Uncle Ward's Humour. ; 51

“JT told them that you were like the heroine of a certain
popular ballad who had ‘nothing to wear,’” said her uncle,
with a comical smile.

“Why, uncle! what did they think?” said Alice, hardly
knowing whether to be amused or vexed.

“ Don’t trouble yourself about that,” said her aunt. ‘ They
have known your uncle some time longer than you have, and
know how to take him. He always will say just what he has a
mind to, and yet people never take it amiss.”

“I suppose that’s because they fail to discover any ‘malice
aforethought,’” said her uncle, laughing; and Alice was
strengthened in the previous impression that she should get
on very well with her Uncle Ward.







ay
SAK












CHAPTER V.

MRS. CARROLL'S STORY.

Nor long after breakfast the next day, Alice started for Mrs.
Carroll’s. She counted upon a very pleasant morning spent
with her, and was not disappointed. The ride of the after-
noon before was one of the first subjects of conversation, after
they were well settled at their work.

“TI suppose you had a pleasant time?” said Mrs. Carroll.

“Very pleasant,” Alice replied; and then went on to give
various particulars of their ride.

“We passed a cottage at the upper end of the village that I
admired very much,” she said; “it looks so neat and home-
like. I noticed it when I rode out with my uncles the day
that Uncle Grey spent here. There is something about it that
takes iny fancy. I think I should like to live in just such a
house in the country myself, at least during the warm season.”

Alice described the situation.

“TI ought to know the place well, for it was the home of my
married life,” said Mrs. Carroll, quietly.

“Ts it possible!” said Alice. ‘Was that delightful place
your home? and were you obliged to leave it?”

“Not quite obliged to, but I thought it best to sell it.”

“I am sure it must have made you very unhappy.”

‘“No, my dear. It was certainly a trial to leave a home I
' For Fesus’ sake.” 53

loved so much, but the circumstances were such that it would
have made me more unhappy to keep it.”

“ Flow could that be?”

“TJ will tell you. Perhaps you know that I have a son.”

“No,” said Alice, ‘*I did not know it.”

“TI have, and he is now at college. Arthur was at school,
preparing for college, when his father died. He gave himself
to God and His service at an early age, and it was his earnest
desire to spend his life in preaching the Gospel. ‘This was
also the desire of his parents, and what they had long hoped
and prayed for.

“‘My husband met with some serious losses not jane before
he died, and after his death it was found that very little
remained to us except our home. This we might have retained,
if Arthur had given up his studies and entered at once upon
some remunerative employment. But to this I could not
consent. By selling the place and taking the rooms I now
occupy, and in .part supporting myself in the way I now do,
Arthur would be enabled to pursue his studies without inter-
ruption, until he was prepared for the work on which we‘had
so wished that he should enter. I was not long in deciding
upon this course.”

“Then you gave up your home for your son’s sake,” said
Alice, deeply interested in the story.

Mrs. Carroll reflected for a moment, and then said rever-
ently, “No, not for his sake, but for Jesus’ sake. I am not
so sure it would have been right for me to give it up for
Arthur’s sake only.”

“Tt must nave been hard for you to leave that pleasant
nome ee

“It was indeed a trial, for I loved the dear place.”
“Tt was giving up a great deal,” said Alice.
‘God’s promise is,” said Mrs. Carroll, “that a hundredfold
54 The Dress finished.

shall be received for all that is given up for His sake. Our
self-denial was small compared with that of many others, and
yet I think we have already received the hundredfold. We
are both so much happier than we should have been, had we
come to a different conclusion, it is so sweet to think that
all we have and are is devoted to Christ’s service; and we are
both well satisfied.”

Alice looked up quickly as the last word was spoken, and
Mrs. Carroll saw that she was moved, but there was no time
for further conversation, for just at that moment they were
interrupted.

What was said that morning furnished food for many after-
thoughts and questionings with Alice—such thoughts as had
not been wont to visit the mind of the young girl, but, having
once found a place there, were not easily dislodged.

The next day the dress was finished. Alice was both glad
and sorry—glad to have it done, yet sorry that she should
now, as she thought, have no further excuse for seeing one
who had so won her regard and affection.

“Don’t be in haste to go,” said Mrs. Carroll; “I shall be
glad to have you sit avails with me, if you have no other
engagement this morning.”

During the hour thus spent, Alice took up a pack lying upon
the table, which she had not before seen.

“ Arthur sent it to me,” said Mrs. Carroll. ‘I received it
last night.”

Alice looked it over; and as she was fond of reading, soon
became quite interested in its contents.

Mrs. Carroll perceived this, and said, “You are quite wel-
come to take it home with you, if you would like to read it.
You must have a great deal of leisure for reading, and no
doubt you will finish it before I shall be ready to commence it.”

A sudden thought entered the mind of Alice. “If you
Visits to the Farm. 55

only had some one to read it to you while you were at work,”
she said, “you would not have to wait for leisure to enjoy it,
and I should enjoy reading it to you.”

“Indeed!” said Mrs. Carroll, with a heartiness that left no
doubt of her sincerity, “that is just the nicest plan possible,
and I have no doubt that we shall both enjoy it better than
to read it by ourselves. If you can come for an hour or two
in the morning, we shall not be liable to interruptions.”

Alice was well pleased with this arrangement. She would
now have an excuse for spending a part of each day with Mrs.
Carroll for some days to come; and when the book was
finished perhaps there would be another to read, or they
would become so well acquainted that she might venture to
call without any excuse for doing so.

That afternoon Alice went with her uncle to the farm, and
was conducted by him all round the place which had been his.
home for many years. She enjoyed it very much. She was
introduced to the people who lived on the farm, and found
them well-disposed and very agreeable.

The next Monday morning, when Alice went down to break-
fast, she found that it was waiting for her uncle.

“ He will be here in a moment, when he has put out the
horse,” her aunt said.

“You have taken an early ride, uncle,” said Alice, as her
uncle seated himself at the table.

“Yes, ’ve been to take the clothes up to Aunt Nancy, as
I do every Monday morning. You see your aunt is so parti-
cular that she can’t have a girl in the house. I tell her some-
times she has done hard work enough to take life easy now,
but she says that it would be more trouble to put things
straight after one of those girls than they are worth; and it
might-be so with her. But Aunt Nancy is so nice that even
my wife can find no fault with her work; so we employ her
56 Going to see Aunt Nancy.

for the washing and ironing every week, and I am not sure
but it’s on the whole the most comfortable arrangement that
we could have. By the way, you must make the acquaintance
of Aunt Nancy. She is the best woman in Maysville.”

“ Better than Mrs. Carroll?” said Alice.

Her uncle laughed. “ Well, to be sure they are not much
alike,” he said. “Mrs. Carroll is an intelligent, refined, and
cultivated woman, fitted to adorn any society, while Aunt
Nancy is poor and ignorant ; but if the Lord were to come to
Maysville to count up His jewels, I don’t believe that poor
old Aunt Nancy would be accounted as second to any of
them.” k

“Where does she live?”

“Very near the old place,” as Mr. Ward always designated
the farm on which he had lived so long. ‘The house is in
plain sight as we'go up there. Probably you did not notice it.
It is just a little way on the road that turns to the left. I will
take you with me when I go after the clothes, and then you
will have a chance to make Aunt Nancy’s acquaintance.”

“Thank you, uncle.”

A part of that morning and the next were pleasantly spent
with Mrs. Carroll in reading and conversation. In the after-
noon her uncle looked in, and inquired if Alice was ready to
go with him to see Aunt Nancy.

“ Are you quite ready?”

“No, but I shall be in two minutes.”

“JT will be ready in that time,” said Alice; and she was as
good as her word.

“There is the house,” said Mr. Ward, as they came to the
road turning to the left.

“What! the best woman in Maysville live in that little
tumble-down house!” said Alice, half seriously, half playfully.

“The Bible says. ‘Hath not God chosen the poor of this
Aunt Nancy's Home. 57

/

world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom?'” said Uncle
Ward.

“Rich in faith,” Alice repeated to herself; but to her it
seemed a very intangible kind of riches.

It was near sunset, and Aunt Nancy, weary with the day’s
toil, was resting for a little while. Busy with her thoughts, and
not.as quick to hear as she had been in her younger days, she
knew nothing of the approach of Mr. Ward and his niece
until they stood in the doorway. When she saw them, she
made an unsuccessful attempt to rise.

“ Don’t get up for us, Aunt Nancy,” said Mr. Ward. “It is
something of a job for you, and quite unnecessary. This is
my niece. I have brought her along, thinking you might like
to see a young miss arrived fresh from the great city.”

“Yes, indeed. The sight of young folks always does my
old eyes good, they are so bright and cheerful-like.”

“As to the last, I don’t believe any of them can beat you,”
said Mr. Ward, laughing.

“Maybe not,” said Aunt Nancy. “When I have so much
to make me cheerful, it would be a sin and a shame not to
be so.”

“So much to make me cheerful,’” Alice wonderingly re-
peated to herself, as she looked around upon the bare, unpainted
walls and scanty furniture ; but she had little time then to
think about it.

“J suppose the basket is ready,” said Mr. Ward. “TI will
leave Alice here while I go and speak to Mr. Leeds, who, I
see, is at work in the next field;” and in a moment he was
gone.

“IT have two or three light articles to lay on the top, and I
will do it now, as your uncle may be back in a few minutes,”
said Aunt Nancy.

Again she attempted to rise from her chair; but she tried

Satisfied. E
58 Honest Independence.

more than once before the effort was successful, and when she
was fairly out of it, her first steps were so tottering that Alice
sprang forward to her assistance.

“Never fear, young lady,” said Aunt Nancy, “I shall go
-well enough when I once get started. This rheumatism makes
me very lame and stiff, and yet I can goas long and do as much
work as any woman of my age in Maysville.”

“ But is it not very hard for you?”

“Not half so hard as not to be able to work. I don’t have
much pain this time of the year. In the winter, sometimes,
when I have to go out a good deal in the cold and snow, the
pain is mighty hard, nights especially ; so you see I know how
to be thankful for the long sunny days, when I am quite
comfortable-like.”

Mr. Ward now returned, and the basket being ready, Alice
had no opportunity for further conversation with Aunt Nancy
at that time and on that occasion.

“T don’t like to think that poor lame old woman has to
wash and iron for me,” said Alice, as they rode home.

“She seems to take it very cheerfully,” said her uncle.

“Ves, she seems to have a wonderful way of taking every-
thing cheerfully ; but it don’t seem as if one ought to give her
hard work to do.”

Mr. Ward laughed. “I don’t think she would consider it a
kindness to take away her work,” he said. ‘‘She has a good
deal of honest independence, and would consider it neither
pleasant nor right to eat the bread of charity, as long as she
can do anything for herself I do try to come round her a
little in this respect ; I pay her a certain sum of money every
week, and make up the rest by letting her have things raised
on the farm. When I carry her flour, potatoes, and other
vegetables, and she says, ‘It’s too much, Mr. Ward; I don’t
earn it,’ I always tell her she ought to be satisfied if I am,”


























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A good Friend to Nancy. 61

“She finds a good friend in you, I have no doubt,” said
Alice, who before this had discovered that her uncle was kind.
hearted.

“Jt would be a shame to Maysville if she did not find
friends among those who have known her so long.”

“Does every one here call her Aunt Nancy?” inquired
Alice.

“She is pretty generally known by that name.”




CHAPTER VI.

TWO BIBLE LESSONS,

Tuat week passed rapidly and pleasantly with Alice. She
enjoyed the morning readings with Mrs. Carroll, the rides
with her uncle to the farm and elsewhere, and pleasant
rambles through woods and fields with Emma Foster and her
brother, and other young people with whom she was becoming
acquainted. Every day she was more and more pleased with
her decision to come to Maysville.

But amid all this she did not forget the thoughts that fol-
lowed her home after her brief interview with Aunt Nancy,
together with similar thoughts which had been awakened by
other incidents of the summer. Never before had she enter-
tained such serious thoughts about the soul’s inner life, and
what constitutes true happiness. Very different are the
methods by which the soul is awakened to its first serious,
earnest thoughts about the things that concern its everlasting
peace. Some are aroused by a sense of danger, others are at
once convicted of the sinfulness of their hearts and lives.
Alice had been zon to serious thoughts on these subjects by
her converse with some of God’s dear children, who lived so
near to Him as to enjoy habitually the light of His counte-
nance and the joy of His salvation. The great lesson of her
own exceeding sinfulness and need of pardon and cleansing,
Alice's Difficulty. 63

she had yet to learn; but she had been led to feel that there
was a source of strength and peace and sweet content, of
which she knew nothing. She could not understand the
secret, yet there was in her heart a growing conviction that
she needed to know it.

The night she returned from Aunt Nancy’s she thought she
would tell Mrs. Carroll all about her call there, the next day,
but the book she was reading, and various subjects of conver-
sation, took up the time; and this continued for several days,
But on the morning when the book was finished, while Alice
still lingered, something was said that reminded her of the
call at Aunt Nancy’s, and she told her new friend all about it.

“Only think of her saying that she had so much to make
her cheerful,” said Alice. ‘To me it seemed as if she had
nothing ; and I can’t understand how any one can be so happy
without a great deal to make her so.”

“You are right about that,” said Mrs. Carroll. “No one can
be so happy without a great deal to make him or her so.”

“Do you mean that you think Aunt Nancy has a great deal
to make her happy?”

‘“T certainly do think so.”

‘* But she is very poor !”

“ And very rich also. Her riches are unseen and eternal.
Jesus said to Pilate, ‘My kingdom is not of this world,’ and it
is true of His followers now, that ‘the kingdom of God is
within’ them.”

Alice was almost startled by these words, so forcibly did
they remind her of the hour at the cottage more than a year
ago, on the way back from the Falls. After a moment’s
thought, she said—“I do wish, Mrs. Carroll, you would
explain that to me.” ;

“Explain what?” said Mrs. Carroll, who was not quite sure
that she understood the request.
64 The Story of the Falls retold.

“The meaning of that passage, ‘The kingdom of God is
within you.’ I cannot understand it at all.”

“Then you have tried to understand it?”

“Indeed I have; but I can make nothing of it.”

“Then I would most earnestly ees you to ask God to
teach you what it means.”

“This is indeed strange,” said Alice, more as if she were
speaking aloud her own thoughts than addressing Mrs. Carroll,

“What is strange?” inquired Mrs. Carroll.

“This is the second time I have been told just that.”

‘Will you tell me about the first time?” said Mrs. Carroll,
who hoped to draw from Alice something that would be a clue
to her thoughts on this subject, and thus aid her in giving
timely instruction and counsel.

“Do you remember my telling you about my visit to the
country with uncle and aunt and cousin Mabel, and our ride
to those charming little Falls ?”

“T remember it very well.”

‘On our return we were overtaken by a sudden and violent
shower, and were obliged to seek shelter in a cottage. We
found the inmates very hospitable, and also very intelligent
and agreeable people. There were two young men at the
house. After a time one of them drew a chair to my side and
entered into conversation with me. He began by talking
about the Falls, but soon the conversation took a strange
turn.”

“What do you mean by a strange turn?”

“I mean it was very unlike any conversation I ever had
before with any one, and some things were said that I shall
never forget, We were talking about being contented or
satisfied. I said that I believed every one was sometimes dis-
satisfied, and that there were really no contented people in
the world. He said that I was mistaken, that there was such
“ 7 don’t understand it.” 65

a thing as being satisfied, as he knew by experience ; and
when he saw that I seemed surprised, he wrote on a slip of
paper a reference to the very words we have just been talking
about, and asked if I would not some time look out the pas-
sage, adding that if I understood it it would help me to
understand what he had just said, and that if I did not I
must ask God to teach me what it meant. Now it seems
quite singular that you both should tell me the same thing.”

“Why?”

“J should think if any one himself understood the meaning
of these words, he might explain it to others.”

“Tf this young man did understand the true meaning of
these words, it was because God Himself had taught him.
He knew that none but God could teach him this, and that
none but God could teach you. It is the same with me, and
therefore I do not think it singular that we should both have
said the same thing.”

“ Alice was silent fora moment; then she said, “I begin
to believe there are a few people in the world who are really
satisfied —that is, they are contented and cheerful.”

She was thinking of the young man at the cottage, of Mrs.
Carroll, and Aunt Nancy, though she mentioned no names.
“JT don’t understand it, however,” she added. “There are
times when I am very much dissatisfied.”

“What is the cause of this dissatisfaction ?”

“Various things. My cousin often says vexatious things,
and sometimes things really unkind. I hoped she would be
like a sister to me, but I don’t find her so. Sometimes it
seems as if she really didn’t love me at all, and I half suspect
the reason, though it is something that isn’t my fault. Then
sometimes everything goes wrong, and I am for a while
thoroughly wretched.”

Mrs. Carel had so won the confidence of Alice that she
66 A Great Change needed,

opened her heart to her as she had never done to any one
since the death of her parents, and in this instance confidence
was not misplaced, as it so often is.

“Ts this wretchedness entirely the result of unkind words,
disappointments, and vexatious occurrences? Are these the
only cause of your unhappiness?”

“No,” said Alice, frankly. ‘After a time I begin to see
how foolish it is to let such things trouble me so much, and
how wrong some of my own thoughts and feelings have been ;
and then I end with being thoroughly vexed with myself, and
ashamed, too; and that’s the worst of the whole, for it’s the
most uncomfortable of all uncomfortable things to be out of
sorts with one’s self.”

“ That is very true, my dear,” said Mrs. Carroll.

“Indeed it is. It’s the very worst sort of dissatisfaction ;
and that’s what makes me think that I shall have to be very
much changed before I can be like those people.”

“This is true, too, my dear girl, and this change is a
much greater one than you have now, probably, any con-
ception of.”

Alice was not prepared for this answer; in fact, she was a
little startled by it, and began to wish that she had not been
quite so confidential with Mrs. Carroll.

“Do you think I am so.very bad?” she said, in a tone
that partly betrayed her feclings. “It’s very seldom that I
get out of sorts and all wrong in this way.”

“That may be,” said Mrs. Carroll, very gently, “but do
you therefore infer that all is right with you at other times?”

“Why, not exactly,” said Alice, hesitatingly. “I don’t
know what is the real truth about it,” she added, after a
moment’s thoughtful silence.

“We must go to the Word of God to learn that,” said
Mrs. Carroll, “From His Word we must learn whether we
Mrs. Carroll's T: yee Verses. 67

are wrong only occasionally, or whether this is true of every
day and hour.”

“Ts any one so bad as that?” asked Alice quickly.

“The true answer to that question must also be found in
God’s Word. There we learn what is required of us at all
times. If we meet those requirements, all is right; but
something is wrong with us every day and hour in which we
violate this just and holy rule of life. Shall I give youa
short Bible lesson on this subject? ”

Alice assented.

“Tt shall be short, only three little verses,” said Mrs.
Carroll, as she handed Alice a slip of paper on which she
had indicated the place where each verse was to be
found. ‘Study them some time when you are alone in
your room,” she said, “and ask God to teach you their true
meaning.”

There was a hard shower just before sunset that night,
which prevented Alice from going out, and she retired early
to her room. When there her thoughts soon recurred to her
conversation with Mrs. Carroll and the slip of paper she had ©
given her. She drew it from her pocket, and after glancing
at ita moment, took up her Bible to look out the passages
referred to. The first was in the twenty-third chapter of
Proverbs, the last clause of the seventeenth verse: “ Be thou
in the fear of the Lord all the day long.”

This did not seem to her so hard to understand as the
passage referred to by the young man at the cottage. She
thought it meant that all the day we should fear to disobey
or displease God. It was evident, however, that one could
not obey this precept unless God was much in his thoughts;
but certainly it was not so with her. Taking the previous
day, for example, she could not recollect that she had had
one thought of God, unless it was during the morning hour
68 The Text in Ephesians.

spent with Mrs. Carroll, who, though never obtrusive in the
mention of religious subjects, was habitually so full of God’s
Spirit and presence, that it was not often one could spend
an hour of familiar converse with her without being in some
way reminded of Him. For the rest of that day Alice felt
that all her thoughts, feelings, and purposes might have been
just the same, had there been no God in the universe. And
what was true of that day had been more emphatically true of
very many days in past weeks, months, and years. Before
‘she had done with that verse, she began to see that she must
abandon the thought that she was in the wrong only occa-
sionally. The subject was certainly wearing a serious aspect,
but she thought she would turn to the next verse, and perhaps
that would not so much condemn her.

This was in Ephesians, and finding it, she read, “Be ye
therefore followers of God, as dear children.” This certainly
was a sweet, gentle, loving admonition; but, as her thoughts
dwelt upon it, she felt that, if possible, it condemned her
more than the first had done. She had, she thought, some-
times been withheld from sinful words and acts by the fear
of offending the Lord, but never had she followed Him as a
dear child. She remembered well how she had loved and
obeyed the dear parents who had been taken from her; how
often, even now, her imagination pictured the life she would
have lived with them, could they have been spared to her;
how devoted her love would have been, and how constant
her efforts to please then. Something like that, she was
sure, must be meant by the precept to follow God as dear
children; yet never for a single day of her life had she felt
towards God anything of this spirit of filial love and obedience.
Yet she felt assured there were those who thus followed Him.
She believed that Mrs. Carroll was one of them, and Aunt
Nancy also. Ah, these living epistles, what a gospel they
Alice’s Heaviness of Heart. 69

often prove to those inquiring the way of life! Would that
there were more of them.

Alice sighed heavily as she turned to the next passage
marked by ‘Mrs. Carroll, and read, “Thou hast commanded
us to keep Thy precepts diligently.” There was no comfort
for Alice here. She knew these precepts were found in the
neglected Book she held in her hand, which often had not
been read at all for months together, or if read, it was in
the most careless and formal manner, leaving hardly an im-
pression upon her mind. She had not even read these pre-
cepts constantly, earnestly, diligently ; and certainly she had
not kept them. The Spirit of God was flashing conviction
through all her soul.

She recollected what Mrs. Carroll had said, that each one
was in the wrong every day and hour in which these just
and holy precepts were not obeyed. If this was so, and
reason and conscience told her it was, then surely she had
been in the wrong every day and hour of her life. The
longer she thought of these things, the deeper grew this
conviction. She began to see that there was a mine of evil
within her soul, the length, breadth, and depth of which were
known only to God. She no longer wondered that she had
so often been dissatisfied with herself; she only wondered
that she had not been continually thus dissatisfied. She
began to understand why Mrs. Carroll should speak of the
necessity of a very great change. “It must be a change

indeed,” were her thoughts. “Can such a change ever come
to meP Can I ever become like Mrs. Carroll and Aunt
-Nancy ?”

Alice retired that night with a heavy heart, and when she
arose the next morning it was not much lightened.

Mrs. Carroll had invited her to come often. “ Don’t stay
away because the book is finished,” she said. “ We can find
70 “ T have been all wrong.”

plenty to read and talk about. I shall be very glad of your
company while I sit here sewing.”

Alice had received this kind invitation gratefully, assuring
Mrs. Carroll that she would be very glad to come, for she
never enjoyed herself better than when with her, and she
found a good deal of leisure time in Maysville, especially
during the long summer mornings. She had intended to go
that morning, but now she hesitated. She wished to see her
friend, wished to tell her of all that was passing in her mind,
and yet was conscious also of a feeling of reluctance to do so.
For a time the two sentiments seemed evenly balanced, but at
last the latter prevailed, and Alice did not go to Mrs. Carroll's
that morning.

As the shades of evening drew on, she suddenly determined
that she would go. She thought the twilight hour just the
time to tell her friend of the dark and troubled state of her
mind, if indeed she could get courage to do so at all. She
received from Mrs. Carroll the usual cordial welcome.

“I expected you this morning,” she said, as soon as Alice
was seated.

“T thought of coming, but—I may as well own the truth at
once—I was so unhappy I did not care to see any one.”

“So unhappy?” said Mrs. Carroll, interrogatively.

“Ves,” said Alice; ‘those Bible verses made me so. Oh,
Mrs. Carroll, I never saw it so before. Instead of being, as
I thought, a little wrong sometimes, I now see that I have
been all wrong my whole life.”

The tears sprang to the eyes of Mrs. Carroll. “Iam very
glad,” she said; and her voice was very tender, yet there was
in it an undertone of deep gladness.

“Glad that I am so bad and miserable?” exclaimed Alice.

“No, not that, but glad that you are learning the truth about
yourself, and very thankful that God Himself is teaching you.”
The Second Bible Lesson. 71

“Teaching me !” said Alice, in a tone of surprise. “Thad
not thought of that. It was those verses I read that made me
see it all.”

“Have you not read those same verses before more than
once or twice ?”

“No doubt I have.”

“But you did not learn from them what you have now
learned.”

“ Indeed I did not.”

“ And the reason of the difference is this. God Himself is
now teaching you, by His Spirit, these most important, though
painful lessons. It is true, yet a blessed truth, that God will
enter such hearts as ours, to teach us lessons that of ourselves
we can never learn; for He is able, by His Spirit, to lead us
into all truth. Other lessons He will yet teach you, if you
will listen to His voice and yield yourself to His teachings.”

“ This has been a very sad one,” said Alice.

“Yes, but a most needful one. Shall I give you another
Bible lesson, a different one?”

“If you please,” said Alice.

‘ Here are three more verses for you to study this evening,”
said Mrs, Carroll, as she handed Alice another slip of paper.
“T know you will read them thoughtfully, and I ly hope
you will ask God to teach you their true meaning.”

On her return, Alice went directly to her room to study this
second Bible lesson, given to her by her end oe faithful
friend. She turned to the first verse, and read: ‘ Ask, and it
shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find ; ae and it
shall be opened unto you.” Then to the second: “For God
so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that
whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have ever-
lasting life.” Then she read the third: “ Come now, and let
us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be as
72 Thoughts and Struggles.

scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red
like crimson, they shall be as wool.”

_ Alice read these verses again and again, but they brought
neither help nor comfort. God had chosen another instru-
mentality by which to bring home to her heart the knowledge
of His abounding grace, even to the chief of sinners. Again
she retired for the night with a heavy heart.

Awaking next morning some time before the usual hour of
rising, she lay thinking of all these things, her heart full of con-
tending emotions. In a kind of half despair, she would
reason that she was too great a sinner to be saved, and next,
with the strange inconsistency of the unbelieving heart, was
- ready to murmur that God did not hear her cry, and grant to
her the mercy and grace which she had besought with many
prayers and tears. Then, falling into the mistake so often
made, of confounding feeling with believing, she would intensely
desire to /e/ that she was saved, forgiven, and cleansed, accord-
ing to the promise, and weary herself in the vain struggle ¢o
feel all this, instead of simply believing that God would surely
fulfil His word.

In such thoughts and struggles the early morning hours
were passed.








CHAPTER VII.

A CALL UPON AUNT NANCY.

ALICE was just debating the question whether she should spend
an hour with her friend Mrs. Carroll, when her uncle said to
her,—

“T’m going to the farm this morning. Will you go with
me?”

Suddenly Alice determined that she would go with him and
give Aunt Nancy a call. She did not, indeed, propose to
confide to her the secret struggles, doubts, and fears which
were rendering her so unhappy, yet, without stopping to reason
about it, she had a secret feeling that it might do her good to
see the good woman and hear her talk, even though she should
herself keep silence in regard to what was passing in her mind.

“T think I will call upon Aunt Nancy this morning, while
you go on to the farm,” said Alice to her uncle as they
approached the turn in the road.

“Just as you like. I see you're taking a fancy to our old
friend. You're not the only one. She’s such a cheerful body,
that one is almost sure to feel better for spending a few
minutes with her, and you look, this morning, as if you needed
something to brighten you up. I will call there for you as I
come back.”

As Alice standing in the open door bade Aunt Nancy good

Satisfied. F
74 Aunt Nancy's Question.

morning, the latter looked keenly at her for a moment, fur,
like many good people, she was not quick to recognise those
who were almost strangers to her.

“It’s Miss Alice,” she said after a moment. “I’m very glad
to see you.”

“T thought I would stop this morning, and sit with you while
uncle is gone to the farm.”

“That's right. I shall be glad to have you stop whenever
you can content yourself for a while in my poor old house.
I’m sure it must seem very poor and old to a young lady from
the city, who has been all her life used to fine things, though
it does not seem so to me.”

“You certainly contrive to be very happy in your home,”
said Alice,

“Why, yes, miss, indeed I am, and why shouldn’t I be?
I’ve spent many happy hours in the old place. Long ago my
Saviour used to make me a visit here now and then, but of
late years it just seems He stays all the while, and that’s a
happy home where He is, if it is a humble one.”

Alice listened with much interest, but not knowing very. well
how to bear her part in such a conversation, she remained
silent. Aunt Nancy continued,—

“Tt’s wonderful what a feast of love and grace God
spreads for us poor sinners, when we are willing to listen
to His voice and let Him come into our hearts. Will you
allow a poor old woman to ask if He has come into your
heart ?”

‘I don’t understand these things. I wish I could take a
lesson from you,” said Alice, in a tone which betrayed her
interest in the subject.

Aunt Nancy was quick to observe this, and looking wistfully
at Alice, said,—

“T can’t teach you, my dear young lady ; only the Lord can
“Tell Him all about it.” VAS

do that. He’s taught me, a poor, ignorant woman, and He'll
teach anybody who'll ask Him.”

“ But it is all dark to me, Aunt Nancy. I can’t understand
it.”

“Then go to Jesus and tell Him so. Tell Him just what
you've told me.”

Alice knew this was Aunt Nancy’s way of directing her to
pray, but it was so expressed as to give her new thoughts about
prayer. “Go and tell Jesus just what you have told me,” she
had said, as if prayer was just talking with Jesus. Alice could
not doubt it was that to Aunt Nancy. If it could only be
the same to her !

“ He Himself says,” Aunt Nancy continued, “‘ Behold, I
stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear My voice, and
open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him,
and he with Me. If you are willing to open the door, Jesus
will certainly enter your heart. I’m sure that He’s knocking
loudly. at this very time.”

“What makes you think so?” asked Alice in some
surprise.

“What youve said to me this morning. [ve seen young
ladies who had nothing to say when I talked about Him.
It’s because He is secking you, that you are so different from
them. You may be sure that He is now beseeching you to
open the door to Him. Will you not let Him in?”

“JT don’t know how,” said Alice, the tears filling her eyes.
“JT don’t understand what it means.”

“Then tell Him so; tell Him all about it. He always
hears the cry of poor lost sinners, and leads them out of
darkness into light. His word is sure; and that word is,
‘Whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be
saved.’” i

After a few more questions of this kind, and short Scripture

F 2
76 Dawn of the New Life.

answers from Aunt Nancy, new light began to break in upon

.- the mind of Alice; but there was not time for any long

conversation, for she soon heard her uncle’s voice, and knew
that he was waiting for her in front of the house.

Once more in her own room, Alice again opened the Bible
which she had so lately begun to study, with an earnest
purpose to find in it the way of life. And now she kneeled
and prayed that God Himself would teach her. She turned
first to the passages quoted by Aunt Nancy, and next to the
verses of the last Bible lesson given her by Mrs. Carroll.
Their meaning became more clear to her, and their fitness
to her own case. She saw and believed in God’s infinite
willingness to save, in the free, full offering of mercy to every
repenting sinner, in the infinite love which was waiting to be
gracious. It was, indeed, to her soul, a new revelation. It
was “the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the
face of Jesus Christ.”

As Alice sat in her room, shedding those tears which flow
at the soul’s first view of forgiving love, did not some angel
wing his way above, to bear the good news to the mother who
had left her child to the sure mercies of a covenant-keeping
God at the tender age of six years ?

The next morning, as Alice was preparing for a call upon
her friend Mrs. Carroll, whom she much wished to see, her
uncle came in to ask if she was ready for another ride to the
farm. Alice instantly accepted the invitation. She would
gladly call upon Aunt Nancy instead of Mrs. Carroll, feeling
that there was no one to whom she could more easily speak,
for the first time, of the new hopes and joys, the new life that
was dawning upon her soul.

As she sprang lightly into the waggon, her uncle said, “1.
am glad to see you looking so bright this morning. You have
looked rather downcast for two or three days, and I was
“Vou have found Fesus 1” 77

making up my mind that you were pining for the seaside and
sorry that you ever came to Maysville.”

‘Oh no, indeed; you are quite mistaken. Iam so thank-
ful I came here.”

There was a touch of feeling in the tone which led her
uncle to give her one of those keen glances with which he
sometimes seemed to read her very thoughts.

Alice wanted to tell him why she was so thankful, but
timidity prevented. She thought she could more easily tell
that story for the first time to Mrs. Carroll or Aunt Nancy.
As they neared the turn of the road, she said, “ Do you think,
uncle, that Aunt Nancy will get tired of me if I spend the
time with her this morning ?”

“No fear of that ; she likes to see the young folks.”

As Alice, after leaving her uncle, walked towards the house,
she began to think how she should tell the story of what the
Lord had done for her soul. She little thought that there
would be no need of words.

Aunt Nancy, after giving one keen glance at her visitor as
she met her at the door, exclaimed,—

“Oh, Miss Alice, you have found Jesus!”

“How can you know that, when I have not spoken one
word?” asked Alice in surprise.

“Your face tells the story. I’m sure I’m not mistaken.”

“Indeed you are not mistaken. Since I saw you last I
have found how ready God is to have mercy on every penitent
sinner. It is wonderful.” ;

The hour that followed was such a one as Alice had never
before spent, while the aged saint and the youthful convert
talked together of the love of Jesus and the blessedness of a
life devoted to His service.

That evening Alice again chose the twilight hour for a visit
to Mrs. Carroll This interview was a very precious one to
78 “ What can 1 do for Fesus?”

Alice, as were also many that followed. Her admiration for
this truly Christian lady, which had commenced with their first
meeting, had ripened into warm and confiding friendship on
the part of Alice, while Mrs. Carroll found that the gentle,
sensitive, and confiding orphan-girl was winning a large place
in her warm motherly heart.

Earnest desires were now awakening in the mind of Alice
to do something for Him who had given Himself for her, and
she began in some degree to realize that the true Christian
life on earth is a life of service; but she found some diffi-
culties in answering the practical question what she herself —
could do.

“What can J do for Jesus?” was the question she asked
of her friend, Mrs. Carroll, as they sat conversing one
evening.

“That question you must yourself ask Him every day,”
said Mrs. Carroll. ‘*‘ My sheep hear My voice, and I know
them, and they follow Me.’ These words of our Lord mean
‘a great dealto me. It is not a small thing for our naturally
wayward hearts to learn to follow Jesus by daily, simple,
child-like obedience to His Word and providence—to be
willing that He should lead us in every step of life. ae

“Some think that they are willing to do a great deal for
Jesus, but they want to do it in their own way. They want
to mark out their own course and form their own schemes, and
then have Jesus go with them in ¢Ae’y way and give success to
their plans. When His own dear children make this mistake,
He soon begins to teach them that they must follow, not lead.
Some are long in learning this lesson, and are taught it
through many sorrows and disappointments.

“ Never till it is learned can we be ‘followers of God, as
dear children.” When it is learned the Christian life takes
on those beautiful, child-like forms of simplicity and godly
Alice's Present Work. 79

sincerity, which so honour the Master, and render His
followers living epistles, ‘known and read of all men.’

“ This is the principle of the Christian life, ever to be kept
in mind, and is the first and most important answer to your
question. But I would also suggest that much of your
present work lies in preparation for future service, for you are
now laying the foundations of future character, influence, and
usefulness. What we are, and what we may become by the
diligent and faithful improvement of the opportunities God
has given us, are of much greater importance than what we
have, as the outward circumstances of our lives in this
changing world are liable at any time to change.

“ You have one grand opportunity now to improve. God
has given you the means of acquiring an excellent education,
and this is especially the work He is now giving you to do,
for your education may be not only of great value to yourself.
but a means of much usefulness to others. ‘ Knowledge is
power,’ and when used in the service of Christ, it becomes a
great power for good.” —

Alice looked thoughtful. These words reminded her of the
remarks of her teacher, which had been reported to her by
her schoolmate.

“T know I have not been as diligent as I might in the
past,” she said, frankly.

“ You have a new motive for diligence now, the best and
highest of all motives, and it should be the most powerful.”

“Tt certainly should be so,” said Alice, very thoughtfully.

“But while improving opportunities from which a rich
harvest may be reaped in the future, if such should be the
will of the Master, be careful not to live in the future, but in
the present.

“One great secret of a holy life is a simple, humble
obedience to the will of God, as it is daily and hourly made
80 A Mistake that is made.

known to us by His Word and providence. It is a great
mistake to neglect the smallest present duty, because the
mind is preoccupied with the future, and with that wider
field of usefulness which it is supposed that future may have

in store,”




















CHAPTER VIII.

CONFESSING CHRIST.

Tur weeks passed rapidly, and the time spent in Maysville
seemed too short, when the summons came for Alice to return
to her uncle and aunt in the great city.

She had enjoyed much in Maysville, and she could not part
from it, and from those whom she loved there, without some
regretful feelings. She looked forward, however, to a renewal
of these pleasures and this friendly intercourse in the following
summer, for her uncle and aunt had said that she must then
visit them again, and remain as long as other engagements
would permit. This she had promised to do, and the anticipa-
tion made the present leave-taking far more cheerful than it
would otherwise have been.

When Alice reached town, she did not find her Uncle Grey
at the station. He was too busy, and sent in his stead George
Willis, one of the clerks in his employ. This young man had
been in his warehouse some two or three years. He was the
son of an old friend, and Mr. Grey treated him almost as one
of the family, inviting him to spend an evening with them
whenever he had leisure and inclination.

These evening calls, and the frequent special commissions
with which he was intrusted, led to his passing in and out
‘quite as one of the household, without a shadow of formality.
82 Uncle Grey's Questions.

As he had often acted as escort both for Mabel and Alice
when they had need of one, and their uncle was too busy to
fill the office in person, Alice was not at all surprised to find
that he was her uncle’s substitute on this occasion.

Her uncle, however, honoured her arrival by returning
home to dinner ten minutes before his usual time, and Alice
appreciated this mark of attention. She knew it meant
something from one who was always so busy, and who
understood the mercantile value of ten minutes in business
hours.

When Alice heard her uncle’s step in the hall, she ran down
to meet him. |

“Right glad to see you,” he said. “How bright you are
looking. I declare there are country roses on your cheeks.
I am sure you have enjoyed your visit to Maysville.”

“Indeed I have,” said Alice.

“TJ am glad to hear it, for I must confess that I have had
_ my misgivings. I was afraid you might regret that you did
not go with us; and had it been so, I should have regretted
it too.”

“T have not regretted it, unless it was the day you left me.
I have spent a very pleasant summer.”

“ Did you like your Aunt Ward so very much ? and did she
succeed in making it so pleasant for you?”

“Not exactly that,” said Alice, hesitatingly. “TI think Aunt
Mary was just as good to me as she knew how to be; but if I
had not a good deal besides to make it pleasant, I could not
have enjoyed it as I did.”

“What were the things that made it so pleasant ?”

“IT found some very pleasant people, and I enjoyed the
walks and rides very much. I explored every nook, just as
‘Aunt Grey said I would.”

“J daré say you did that,” said her uncle, laughing, and











































































































































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Li HS \ N ae

























































































































































































— =

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‘© HAVE SPENT A VERY PLEASANT SUMMER.”





“TI gave my Heart to God.” 85

seeming quite satisfied with the account given of the things
which had made the summer pass so pleasantly.

But if Mr. Grey was satisfied, Alice certainly was not. She
had given some reasons why she was glad that she had spent
the summer in Maysville, but had omitted the one which,
not only in reality, but also in her own estimation, far out-
weighed all the others. Was this frank and truthful? Was it
indeed anything less than being ashamed to confess Christ
before her uncle?

The heart of Alice recoiled with dismay from the thought
of such a beginning ; yet it was not easy to say what had been
left unsaid. If it had been Mrs. Carroll or Aunt Nancy, it
would have seemed the most easy and natural thing in the
world ; but to her uncle, a man of the world, who could not
have the smallest sympathy with the new life that had dawned
in her soul, it certainly was not easy to speak of it. Instantly
she lifted up her heart in such a cry for help as is never uttered
in vain. ;

So rapid is thought, that all this passed through her mind
almost before her uncle was conscious that there was a pause
in the conversation. Little thought he of the temptation, the
struggle, the prayer, the victory, which had preceded the words
when Alice said,—

““T have not yet told you the greatest reason I have for
being thankful that I went to Maysville this summer.”

“Tell me about that, by all means,” said her uncle, lightly.

Alice no longer hesitated, but said simply, ‘‘ I gave my heart
to God while in Maysville. It was there I found the Saviour ;
and I shall always be thankful I went there.”

“Ts the Saviour in Maysville more than anywhere else ?”
asked her uncle, in a tone half playful, half serious.

“No, uncle,” replied Alice, in a tone wholly serious. ‘“ He
is evervwhere ; but I think we never realize this till we receive
86 Alice's Forebodings.

Him into our own hearts, and this I never did until I went to
Maysville.”

There was time for no more words, as others now entered
the room, but there had been time for a transaction of the
utmost importance to Alice. It is hardly possible to over-
estimate the value to her of this first confession of Christ in.
her city home. Had the first step been wrong, what weak-
ness, darkness, and doubt might have been the result. But
she had not been ashamed of her Master. In the first hour
of trial she had proved loyal to Him, and had also proved
His power to give grace and strength in the moment of need.
Sweetly calm and peaceful were the remaining hours of that
day, in the blessed consciousness of a Presence that was with
her in her home at her uncle’s as well as in Maysville.

Before Alice left the country, her regret at parting with her
Christian friends there had not been unmingled with appre-
hension, as she thought how much she would need their
counsel and help amid the trials and temptations which must
await her in the city.

Something of these forebodings she at one time expressed
to Mrs. Carroll.

“ Christ will be with you there; and He is all,” was the
reply. ‘He can give you the counsel and aid of Christian
friends to assist you, or He can help and strengthen you
without them, just as He sees fit. But I have no doubt that
you will find Christian friends in your city home. There is a
heavenly attraction, by which such souls are drawn to each
other, and I shall be surprised if you do not find yourself
thus drawn to some whom you will meet.”

Alice soon proved the truth of these words. Among her
aunt’s friends was one, who, being a near relative of the
family, was quite an informal, if not a very frequent visitor.
Soon after the return of Alice, this lady, Mrs. Newman, calied
A Sad Case of Distress, 87

to spend an hour with the family. Alice soon found herself
observing the lady with an interest she had never felt before.
A remark dropped now and then, a something scarcely defin-
able in look and tone, touched a responsive chord in the
heart of the young Christian, and before Mrs. Newman took
leave that morning, Alice began to cherish the hope that
she would prove one of those Christian friends whom Mrs.
Carroll was so confident that she would find.

Nor was she disappointed in this expectation. In a few
days Mrs. Newman called again, this time, as she said,
on special business. Many were the visits she paid to the
homes of the sick, the sorrowing, and the destitute; and
when cases of need brought to her knowledge proved too
much for her own resources, she sought to enlist the sympathy
and aid of others.

It was on such an errand she.had come that morning. In
her visits of mercy she had found a family whose case moved
her deepest sympathies. The father, injured by a serious acci-
dent, had for months been laid aside from work, and though
slowly recovering, he was not yet able to labour. This misfor-
tune had reduced the family to poverty, and obliged them
to seek shelter in a miserable tenement with the most depress-
ing surroundings.

To these accumulated misfortunes had recently been added
the severe illness of the eldest daughter. She had been sick
with a fever, but now seemed sinking in a rapid decline.

‘Tt is my own opinion that the girl may be saved,” said Mrs.
Newman, “by removing the family to a comfortable tenement
and providing for their necessities until the father is once
more able to work.”

Alice listened to all this with deep interest. She was sup-
plied with a liberal allowance of spending money, though a
somewhat thoughtless use of it had left little in her hands at
88 The Visit to the Wretched Home.

the present time. She, however, instantly resolved to do what
she could.

Mrs. Newman was gratified at the sum placed in her hands
by the young girl, but still more by the warm interest mani-
fested in this tale of suffering. The latter prompted her to
ask Alice if she would not accompany her when she went to
visit the family the next day.

Alice hesitated, for she shrank from a visit to this wretched
abode and the sight of so much suffering ; but in a moment
she thought, “Ifmy Master was on earth, would He decline
such an invitation, and if I follow Him shall I not accept it?”
and without further hesitation she thanked Mrs. Newman and
told her that she would go.

Alice never forgot the lesson she learned during that after-
noon with Mrs. Newman, and that first visit to the wretched
abodes of city poverty. She found a personal visit a very
different thing from reading the reports of those employed to
seek out and relieve destitution, or even listening, as she had
sometimes done, to the verbal descriptions of those familiar
with such scenes. It gave her a very different conception of
the poverty and sorrow which, in a great city, everywhere
abound.

It was her only visit to that miserable abode. The next time
she went to call upon the family, they had been removed to
more comfortable quarters. Alice continued to aid in supply-
ing their need, often at the cost of some self-denial on her part,
until the good days Mrs. Newman had so confidently prophesied
dawned upon them: the father able once more to return to his
usual employments and the daughter restored to health, they no
longer had need of the helping hand without which they could
never have safely passed through the.dark days.

Alice found in Mrs. Newman a true and faithful Christian
friend. She found others also, as Mrs. Carroll had predicted.
Alice spcaks to: Young Wullis. 89

In the sanctuary, too, in the Sunday-school, and the weekly
prayer-meeting, she learned that there were green pastures and
still waters in her city home, as well as in Maysville.

Her thoughts often turned to the home-circle, with earnest
longings to see its inmates gathered, with herself, into the fold
of Christ ; but here she found little to cheer and encourage
her.

In the Sunday-school of which she was a member, was a
large class of young men. She seldom had her attention
drawn to this class without thinking of George Willis, and
wishing that he were a member of it. She had thought of this
many times before she found courage to speak to him on the
subject; but at last, seizing a favourable opportunity, she
summoned courage to do so.

“ Why do you not join Mr. Arthur’s Bible-class?” she asked.
“Tam sure you would like it. I have heard one or two speak
of him as the best teacher they ever had.”

“T dare say,” Willis replied, somewhat carelessly.

“T wish you would go,” persisted Alice.

“J will think about it,” said the young man.

For several succeeding Sundays Alice watched this
class, to see if George Willis was there, and each Sabbath
saw with regret that he was not among the pupils. She
resolved that she would not give up her desire without

_one more effort, though it cost her not a little to speak the
second time.

“T have looked for you in Mr. Arthur’s class, and I have
been disappointed not to see you there,” she said.

“Do you mean that you have cared so much about it, that
it has been a real disappointment not to see me there?” he
asked in some surprise.

‘“*T do indeed mean it.”

“Then, I will go, if it’s only to please you.”

Satisfied. G
90 One Point gained.

Young Willis was as good as his word, and the next Sabbath
found him in Mr. Arthur’s class.

Alice was pleased to have gained even this point, and perhaps
the more so, as it seemed to her the only influence for good
that she had been able to exert within the home-circle. She
could not get on at all with Mabel, who persistently turned the
conversation whenever Alice attempted to speak of those
things which now lay nearest her heart. As to her uncle and
aunt, it seemed to her that she could not even hope to do them
good, when their relative position was such, that they naturally
expected to lead and influence her, rather than to be led and
influenced by her. She little thought that the few words she
had spoken to her uncle on returning from Maysville had left
any impression.






ares

2 Fe |"

Los OF KNOWLEDGE,


CHAPTER IX.

BENEVOLENT PLANS,

A LARGE portion of the following summer was spent by Alice
in Maysville. It is unnecessary to describe this second summer,
in many respects so like the first. There were the rides with
her uncle to the “old place” and many other places, the hours
spent with her friend Mrs. Carroll, who constantly became more
dear to her, and the frequent calls upon Aunt Nancy when she
went with her uncle to the farm, besides many pleasant hours
spent with Emma Foster and other companions of her own
age.

When with Mrs. Carroll, Alice spoke freely of all that had
interested her during the winter. She told her how much more
she had enjoyed her school and her studies since, by increased
diligence and application, she had been able to master each
difficulty as it presented itself. She also spoke of the pleasure
she derived from the approbation of her teachers, and from the
consciousness that she was doing faithfully this part of present
duty.

She had also much to say of Mrs. Newman and her many
benevolent plans, and of her own interest in them.

‘“My first gift was from mere impulse,” she said ; “but when
I began seriously to look at the great work to be done in this
direction, I was tempted to feel that it was useless for me to

G 2
92 The Uncertain Future.

attempt anything while so little of my money was at my own
disposal. I began to indulge in many plans about the good I
would do when I could spend money as I chose. But then I
recollected what you had said to me about living in the present,
not in the future, and how you had spoken of the folly of
occupying the mind with plans and dreams, to the neglect of
what seems even the most unimportant of personal claims.
Then I saw clearly that, for me, the work of the present was to
do all in my power with the money now placed at my disposal,
for the poor and needy, by self-denial and shunning needless
expenses.”

“T am thankful, indeed,” said Mrs. Carroll, “if any words of
mine have helped you to take such right views of present duty.
Nothing can be more uncertain than the future, with all of us.
It would be sad indeed if, by trusting to that uncertain future
and neglecting present opportunities, however small, we should
at last fail to be found among those to whom the King will
say, ‘I was an hungred, and ye gave Me meat: I was thirsty,
and ye gave Me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took Me in:
naked, and ye clothed Me: I was sick, and ye visited Me: I
was in prison, and ye came unto Me. ... I say unto you,
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these My
brethren, ye have done it unto Me.’

«¢ ¢ every hour that fleets so slowly
Has its task to do or bear.
Luminous the crown and holy,
If thou set each gem with care,’”

For several years Alice spent a portion of each summer in
Maysville. Sometimes it was only two or three weeks, but
whether longer or shorter, these seasons were greatly enjoyed.

Nor was Alice the only one benefited by them. The
neighbours said Mrs. Ward was getting to be a different waman


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“ DOESN'T BENNY GROW ANY BETTER?” ALICE ASKED ({. 95).





Mrs. Draper and her Son. 95

since her niece spent so much time there; that a young person
in the house was just what she needed, At all events, Mr.
Ward was sure it was just what Ae needed, and these visits
were a positive delight to the cheerful, genial old man.

During the winters spent in the city, Alice did not lose her
interest in the needy and destitute, and by many a little self-
denial, known only to Him who searcheth all things, she did
what she could for the relief of these suffering ones.

One winter she became deeply interested in the case of a
poor widow, whose only son, a lad of about eight, had long
been ailing, and now seemed to be slowly wasting away.
There was much in Mrs. Draper that excited the sympathy
and regard of Alice. She was so patient and uncomplaining,
and showed such devoted mother-love for the feeble child who
was her all. She also gave proof of neat and orderly habits,
notwithstanding the disadvantages under which she laboured
in the very undesirable tenement which was the best she could
afford to occupy. She was a Christian, too, Alice felt sure, for
though she said little, she certainly manifested the grace of
Christian patience and resignation.

“Doesn’t Benny grow any better?” Alice asked one day
when she called to leave some toys, which she hoped would
help to while away the weary hours.

The poor mother shook her head sorrowfully. Benny was
himself too much occupied with a new picture-book to heed
what they were saying, and Alice went on. “ Can nothing be
done to help him?” she asked.

“J fear not,” said Mrs. Draper—‘at least, nothing that I
can do.”

“Ts there anything that would help him if you could
do 1t?” :

“Perhaps not, though the doctor says if I could take him
into the country it might save him ; but that I can’t do.”
96 The Summer Visit to Maysville.

“TJ wish it could be done,” said Alice, thoughtfully; but
Mrs. Draper only sighed, as she cast a loving glance at the
child, who, for the moment, had lost all sense of weariness or
pain in the delight afforded by the bright pictures of the book
whose leaves he was slowly turning.

As Alice left Mrs. Draper, she resolved that she would have
a talk with her friend, Mrs. Newman, on the subject. But
this resolution was not carried into effect. In a few days
Alice left the city for her usual summer visit to Maysville, and
several things conspired to render these days very busy ones,
so that she scarcely had time even to think of Mrs. Draper and
poor Benny, until she found herself quietly seated in the train
that was swiftly bearing her toward the country village which
had become dear to her.

The sight of the green fields and leafy woods brought back
a very vivid remembrance of the poor city boy and the wish
she had felt that he might find a home in the country. Some-
thing of selfreproach mingled with these thoughts, True, she
had been very busy, but if she had made the effort, she thought
she might at least have managed to call upon Mrs. Newman
and have a talk with her on the subject. She feared she had
been selfish in allowing her mind to become so engrossed with
her own affairs as almost to forget the poor widow and her
son, and she feared that Benny’s pale, wan face would haunt
her when she crossed the green fields or wandered in the
favourite groves of Maysville. But such thoughts were all put
to flight when once she reached her uncle’s house, and met the
warm greeting there awaiting her. There was too much to
hear and say to leave much room for thinking.

As Alice sat at the tea-table with her uncle and aunt, she
said, “I have not yet inquired after Aunt Nancy. How is she
getting along?” ,

“ Aunt Nancy is going down hill pretty fast,” replied her
Alice's Sudden Plan. 97

uncle, in a tone of unusual gravity. “I fear she had rather a
hard time of it last winter. It will never do. to let her live
alone in that house another winter. Some one must be found
to stay with her ; but who that can be, is what puzzles me.”

Suddenly there flashed upon the mind of Alice a plan to
meet this emergency, one that might help dear old Aunt Nancy
and some one else at the same time. It seemed so feasible
that even the thought of it lighted up her countenance with a
gleam of pleasure.

Then in rapid words Alice told the story of Mrs. Draper
and poor little Benny, and how the doctor had said that if the
boy could go into the country it might save him. She told
how patient and uncomplaining Mrs. Draper was, and how
devoted to her son, and then she unfolded the plan which had
so suddenly flashed upon her. She thought if Mrs. Draper
could live in Aunt Nancy’s cottage, Benny might get well, and
be a joy and help to his fond mother all her remaining days.
Mrs. Draper could do the work for the Maysville people, which
Aunt Nancy was no longer able to do, and Aunt Nancy could
have some one to live with her, and see that she did not suffer
When the cold weather returned again.

When Alice had finished what she had to say, she waited
for her uncle to speak, but he was so busy with his own
thoughts that he still remained silent.

“ Now, uncle, I hope you will not call all this the romance
of a young, foolish girl, who knows nothing about practical life,”
Alice went on to say. ‘1 will write to Mrs. Newman and see
_ what she thinks aboutit. She is very practical and judicious.”

“Would it not be better to consult Aunt Nancy first?” said
Mr. Ward, looking up with one of his arch smiles.

“T dare say I have hold of the wrong end,” said Alice,
laughing, “and if so, it’s not the first time.”

“«“ Well, I'll tell you how we will manage it. You shall take
98 Aunt Nancy consents.

hold of one end of the business, and I of the other, and see if
we can meet in the middle I will consult Aunt Nancy
myself. Ithink I can best manage this end. If she is in-
clined to favour the proposal, you can write to your city
friend and find out what she thinks of it.”

The next morning Mr. Ward went to see Aunt Nancy, and
Alice eagerly awaited his return.

“What did she say?” was her first eager question when her
uncle entered the house.

“T doubt if she thought favourably of ‘it at first,” said Mr.
Ward. ‘You know it would be a great change for her to take
in these-strangers from the city. But when I told her of the
miserable city home, where not a breath of what we call pure
air was to be had, and of poor Benny, who was pining for it,
and his sad mother, who watched him wasting away month
after month, with the bitter thought that she could do nothing
for him, Aunt Nancy suddenly exclaimed, ‘Who knows but
this may be the way in which God will provide for more than one
of His dear children?’ I do believe that she has already taken
poor Benny into her great loving heart. At all events, she is
quite willing that you should write to Mrs. Newman and see
what she thinks about it. Be sure you ask if she thinks Mrs.
Draper would be good and kind to Aunt Nancy.”

Alice lost no time in writing this letter, and the answer, so
eagerly expected, was not long delayed. Better still, it proved
very satisfactory. Mrs. Newman wrote that she knew Mrs.
Draper well, and had confidence in her as an honest, kind, and
Christian woman. Mrs. Draper herself was ready to do any-
thing that might benefit her child, and Mrs. Newman, on her
part, offered to see everything arranged in the great city, and
Mrs. Draper and her boy placed in the train for Maysville, if
Mr. Ward would undertake the charge of them when they
reached that place.
Benny benefited. 99

Alice soon had the pleasure of seeing everything satisfac-
torily arranged. Before she left Maysville, Mrs. Draper and
Benny were nicely settled in Aunt Nancy’s cottage, apparently
much to the satisfaction of all parties.

It did her heart good to see the boy sitting on the green
grass under the large oak, watching Aunt Nancy’s hens and
chickens and enjoying all country sights and sounds. Her
uncle assured her that he had no doubt Benny would make a
stout boy yet, able to work on a farm, where a boy was much
needed, and inthis way he would soon bea help to his mother.
On his own account he was very thankful that his sleep, the
next winter, would not be disturbed by the thought that Aunt
Nancy might be suffering through the long, cold nights, with
no one to care for her.








CHAPTER X

LAST WORDS OF COUNSEL.

Tue period which to Alice had seemed so long in prospect was
now passed. Her school-days were ended. She had passed
with high honour, and was now on the eve, not of a school
vacation for the summer, but of a new period of life, ignorant,
as we all are, of what the future might have in store for her.

The first event in anticipation was a visit to dear old Mays-
ville. It must be a very short one, for her Uncle Grey had told
her that he should depend upon her spending this suramer with
them at the seaside. Alice could not consent to give it up
entirely, for she so much wanted to see her uncle and aunt,
and dear Mrs. Carroll, who was becoming dearer every year,
and Aunt Nancy, too. Her desire to see the last-named of
these friends seemed most urgent of all, for she had been in-
formed that the aged saint was now failing fast, and so weak
that she was unable to leave her bed.

“J must improve the time, this visit is to be so short,”
said Alice to her aunt the day of her arrival. “I must call
upon Mrs. Carroll this evening, and go to see Aunt Nancy in
the morning.”

The next morning, as she approached the dwelling of Aunt
Nancy, she saw Benny in the yard amusing himself by drawing
a little waggon loaded with stones back and forth between the
Aunt Nancy's Thankfulness. 101

door and the gate. Alice was delighted to see in his move-
ments so much of strength and activity.

“Why, Benny! you are growing strong and well, are you
not?” she said.

“That I am,” said Benny, with a bright smile. ‘Mr. Ward
says I shall be strong enough to pick up potatoes by the
autumn, and next summer I can work on the farm and so help
mother.”

“ Where is your. mother ?”

“‘She’s gone to the shop to get some things, and she said I
mustn’t go out of the yard till she came back, for Aunt Nancy
might want something.”

Alice passed into the house, and when Aunt Nancy saw who
it was, her thin, pale face lighted up with pleasure.

“Oh, Miss Alice, is it you?” she said, with glad surprise.

“Tam sorry to see you so ill,” said Alice, sympathizingly.
“T heard at home that you were not able to sit up.”

“You know, Miss Alice, that the ‘earthly house of this
tabernacle’ must be dissolved before we can possess the ‘ build-
ing of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the
heavens.’ The taking down is hard, but the heavenly house
will never have to be taken down.”

“JT hope you have everything needful for your comfort,”
said Alice. “Is Mrs. Draper kind to you?”

“She is very good. It is wonderful how the Lord has pro-
vided for this time. I used to think about it years ago. It was
natural to think what would become of poor Nancy when she
was old and helpless, with neither kith nor kin to care for her.
But the Lord taught me years ago that it was His work to care
for me and all the rest of His children, and that it was sheer
presumption to be asking how He was going to do it, and thus
meddling with what is none of our business. After that, when
the devil asked me, as he sometimes did, if I knew how I was
102 Submission under Trial.

going to be taken care of in my old age, I just told him that I
didn’t know anything about it, but the Lord did, and that was
enough forme. When the time came, the Lord brought it all
about so easy, that it seemed the most natural thing in the
world. If I had thought about it, and contrived this way and
that for the last twenty years, I could not have managed it half
so well.

“And now, Miss Alice, I want to tell you one thing. You
have just entered, as it were, on the road, while I have travelled
it all over, and I want to say to you, never fear to trust the
Lord, whatever may come to you in this life. You will find
yourself in tight places before you get through this world. It
don’t make so much difference about that, whether one is rich
or poor. ‘The Lord trieth the righteous, and He tries every
one of them, too, for in His Word it says, ‘Whom the Lord
loveth He chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom He
receiveth.’

“When the trials and the chastening come, let your heart
put its trust in the Lord, and know assuredly that all is sent in
love, to draw you nearer to Himself and fulfil your heart’s best
desires.”

Mr. Ward now came in, and Alice had no more conversation
with Aunt Nancy that day, but when she took leave, she pro-

. mised that she would certainly call again before she returned
home, and though she found much to occupy her time, this
promise was not forgotten.

“Tt does my old eyes good to see you again,” said Aunt
Nancy. “T have forgotten a great many things, but I have not
forgotten the morning you came here with a face that told so
plainly, before you had spoken a word, that you had found
Jesus.”

“T can never forget that morning,” said Alice; “ but, Aunt
Nancy, I have not been such a Christian as I then thought


















“YoU ARE GROWING STRONG AND WELL, ARE YOU NOT?” (4. [01).

Walking in Christ. 105

I should be. [ thought I should be like you and Mrs.
Carroll.”

“ And what kind of a Christian have you been?” asked Aunt
Nancy, tenderly.”

“T have not been like that, It seems as if you and Mrs,
Carroll walked continually in the light of God’s countenance.”

“ And so may you, if you will.”

“Oh, Aunt Nancy! I desire it more than words can
express.”

“ But that’s a very different thing from doing it. You might
desire to return to the great city, but if you went no farther
than wishing, you wouldn’t see home this summer. We were
just speaking about that morning when you came here in the
joy of a new-found Saviour, and this makes me think of a text
which may help you to see what is wanted. It’s what Paul said
to the Colossian Christians: ‘As ye have therefore received
Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in Him.’ How did you
receive Christ that morning? Didn’t you feel that you were
wholly lost and undone, and couldn’t do anything to save your-
self? and didn’t you trust wholly in Him to save you?”

“Oh yes!” said Alice, with emotion; “that was just the
way I felt ; helpless, lost, and undone.”

“That’s the way in which we all receive Him, and it’s just
the way we ought to walk in Him every day and hour of our
lives. But many, in a little while, begin to trust partly in Him
and partly in their own efforts, struggles, and resolutions.
Then, indeed, they find a rough road, and grow troubled,
anxious, and almost discouraged.”

“T fear it has been so with me,” said Alice; “for though
there are times when I seem to be at rest in Him, I am often
anxious and troubled, yielding to temptation, and stumbling in
my Christian course. I wish you would teach me the blessed
secret of so walking in Christ.”

Sairafied. a
106 Death of Aunt Nancy

“God alone can do that, my young friend. He will do it, if
youask Him. But you must give up everything to Him, and
be willing that He should lead you in His own way. He is
leading you, I am sure. If your heart yearns for a closer
walk with Him, it’s because He Himself has awakened these
desires.

*¢ © When God inclines the heart to pray,
He hath an ear to hear.’ ”

These precious words of counsel were the last to which Alice
was permitted to listen from the lips of Aunt Nancy. Before
she again visited Maysville, this aged saint, so ripe for glory,
had been released from the trials of earth. She had, indeed,
like the great apostle, esteemed them “ light affliction,” bearing
them with heavenly patience ; and now that ‘ exceeding and
eternal weight of glory” was hers, which these afflictions ever
work out for those who “look not at the things which are seen,
but at the things which are not seen.”
















CHAPTER ‘XI.

DARK DAYS.

Tue next two or three years were very uneventful ones with
Alice. They were numbered among those quiet and peaceful
years which, though often most enjoyed, furnish few events
that seem worthy of record. Such years are the green and
level plains of life, easily travelled over, not rough and thorny
to the feet, yet in very many cases failing to supply all that is
needed for moral and spiritual culture and discipline, and the
full development of all the graces of the Christian character.
Therefore it is that in almost all lives there are times when
the even tenor of such a path is broken in upon by some
unexpected and startling event—a bereavement, a change of
circumstances, or a sore trial in some form, which stirs the
soul to its lowest depths, and fulfils the inspired declaration,
_“ The Lord trieth the righteous.” These are often the times
of real soul progress, when the soul passes through transition
states, which bring it out on a new plane of life, and by the
grace of God a higher plane, where less of the earthly and
more of the heavenly atmosphere is breathed.

Such days were approaching for Alice, when her outward
life would no longer flow in a peaceful current. The first
event which broke in upon her quiet was the illness of her
Uncle Grey. He had not long been sick when Alice became

H 2
108 Uncle Grey's Lliness.

convinced, from what she saw and heard, that not only her aunt,
but the physician also, regarded his illness as very alarming.

Alice’s whole heart went out in tenderness and sympathy
- for her uncle. She truly loved him, for in many things he
had been as a father to her since the death of her own
father. He was, indeed, like many men, so thoroughly en-
grossed with business, that he had little time or thought to
spare for home pleasures or the enjoyment of home affec-
tions. Yet he had been kind in word and act, in those
moments in which he had given his attention to her, and she felt
assured that he wished to promote her welfare and happiness.

There was often a cloud of care upon his face and a deep
abstraction in his manner, and Alice had of late observed
that the cloud grew heavier and the moments of abstraction
more frequent, and she had often wished that her uncle had
less business and more time for rest and recreation.

His severe illness brought into activity all the affection
Alice cherished for him, and her one absorbing desire was to
do all in her power for his help and comfort.

But her thoughts went far beyond the frail body and her
desire to alleviate its sufferings. She had long wished to
see her uncle a sincere and earnest Christian, and now that
his life was in such imminent danger, this strong desire grew
almost to agony of soul for him. In secret she wept and
prayed, while in the sick-chamber she sought with gentle
cheerfulness to minister to his comfort.

But just here came a most unexpected and bitter disap-
pointment and trial. It soon became evident to Alice that
her presence was not desired in her uncle’s room. At first
she was slow to believe this, but she could not long resist the
conviction that it was indeed so: In her presence her uncle
seemed restless and ill-at-ease, and she could not but see
that he availed himself of any pretext to send her away. It
A Bitter Trial for Alice. tog

was very evident that he much preferred Mabel’s attendance.
Mabel saw this, too, and it gratified her very much, nor was
she slow to express her triumph and satisfaction.

One day, when Alice left the breakfast-table to go to her
uncle’s room, Mabel rose also, saying, “I will go. It is very
plain that uncle prefers my nursing to yours. The rich are
not always the best nurses, you know.”

It was a cruel thrust for Alice. She did not go to her
uncle’s room that morning, but to her own, to spend the
time in tears and prayers and anxious questionings as to what
might be the cause of the present painful state of affairs.

Her eager questionings threw no light upon the subject. She
was, indeed, younger than Mabel, but she felt sure that as a nurse
she was the more experienced of the two, having had such
practice during her father’s protracted illness as Mabel had
never known. Why, then, should Mabel be preferred to her?

Whenever Alice was allowed to minister in the sick-room,
she redoubled her efforts to prove so acceptable an attendant
that her uncle would desire her presence. But it was all in
yain. It was too evident to be doubted, that her uncle was
best satisfied when she was absent; that he was even annoyed
by her expressions of interest and affection.

At this juncture she received a letter from her Uncle
Ward, containing a pressing invitation to make them another
visit.. Mr. Ward had become much attached to his niece, and
so much desired a visit at this time, that he undertook the
unwonted task of writing her a letter, in the hope that it
might procure him the wished-for pleasure.

The first decision of Alice was that she could not think of
leaving her Uncle Grey in his present state, even for a short
visit to Maysville; but second thoughts led her to ask if it
might not be best to go for a few days. She seemed of no use
where she was, and it was all so painful to her, that perhaps
110 The Invitation accepted.

this visit would in some way bring strength and comfort.
She needed a friend to whom she could open her whole heart,
and such a friend she had in Mrs. Carroll, whose wise and
Christian counsel would doubtless help her. She might go
for a few days, not staying long enough to be missed.

She told her aunt and cousin of the invitation, and that she
thought of going just for a few days, if she could be spared.

“You had better go,” said her aunt, kindly. “You can
be spared for a short visit, and it will do you good. Mabel
and I can do for your uncle all that is needed.”

“ Of course we can,” said Mabel. “ You can be spared as
long as you want to stay.”

Alice was grieved and hurt by these words. Mrs. Grey
cherished no unkind feelings towards her younger niece, yet she
was not quick to perceive the wounding nature of many of
Mabel’s speeches. Such was the case on the present occasion,
so she simply said, “Yes, we can spare her as long as she
wishes to stay.”

Her preparations were soon completed; yet it was with a
heavy heart that she sat watching for the carriage which
was to convey her to the station.

“J hope you will enjoy your visit,” said Mabel at parting.
“To be sure, I could not take a moment’s comfort to leave
Uncle Grey at this time; but people take things so differently.
I don’t suppose it will prevent your enjoyment.”

Under other circumstances Alice would have given way to .
tears, but the carriage was at the door, and she must go at
once. She had little time to think until she was quietly
seated in the train, and then the tide of bitter thoughts and
memories swept over her.

“Flow can Mabel be so unkind to me in this hour of sorrow
for us both?” she thought. “She must know how dearly I
love my uncle. and how such words wound me.”
The Sweetness of Trial. IIt

Aride of a few hours brought Alice to Maysville, and she
was soon at her uncle’s house. She received a very cordial
welcome from her uncle and aunt, which cheered her a little,
yet her heart was still heavy.

It was not long ere Alice had told Mrs. Carroll everything,
as the young and frank are apt to do when once they begin to
open their hearts to those whom they love and thoroughly trust.

Mrs. Carroll listened with the deepest interest.

“ My dear young friend,” she said, “this is indeed a time of
trial with you. Vou can feel the bitterness of such an hour,
but I think you have yet to learn its sweetness.”

“Its sweetness!” The tone was full of surprise and inquiry.

“Yes, my dear. It is not all bitter. The Christian who
has never been sorely tried knows little of the infinite tender-
ness and compassion of Him who was Himself ‘a man of
sorrows, and acquainted with grief’ Nothing brings us con-
sciously so near to His heart of infinite love as the sorrow He
sends to draw us near to Himself.”

“But I don’t find this nearness,” said Alice, sadly. “Iam
involved in a mist of uncertainty and perplexity, and sometimes
it is so dark that I can’t even realize the presence of Christ.”

“J don't doubt it. Such is the frequent experience of the
tempest-tossed soul. On that stormy night when the disciples
were on the sea in their frail boat, Jesus was not with them.”

“But He came to them.”

“ He did indeed; yet at first they knew Him not, but were
more afraid of the approaching Presence than of the heaving
waves. Jesus has many ways of drawing near to His disciples.
Sometimes He comes to them in providences which cause them
to cry out with fear. It is not often that His sweet and com-
forting presence is fully realized in the first hours of bitter grief.

“ Especially is this true of those who have not been taught
and chastened in the school of sorrow, but have all its
112 “ Nearer, my God, to Thee.”

precious lessons yet to learn. But if they will seek Him with
all their hearts, and trust Him even in‘the darkness and the
tempest, they will ere long bless Him for the sorrow that has
brought Him so near, and given them such new discoveries of
His infinite love and tenderness.

“You remember how often we have sung together, —

‘** Nearer, my God, to Thee,
Nearer to Thee ;
E’en though it be a cross
That raiseth me,
Still all my song shall be,
Nearer, my God, to Thee,
Nearer to Thee.’”’

“Yes, my dear Mrs. Carroll, 1 remember it well. I always
thought it was beautiful, but I fear I didn’t understand its true
meaning. I didn’t think much about the cross. I only thought
how sweet it would be to be brought nearer to God.”

“It isa great lesson to learn, to be willing that God should
bring us nearer to Himself in any way that He may choose.
Often we mark out a way for ourselves, and when He takes us
by the hand to lead us in His way, not our own, we draw back,
and in our hearts say, ‘Let it not be so.”

Tears started afresh to the eyes of Alice. “You are de-
scribing my case exactly,” she said.

“It is not strange if I am,” said Mrs. Carroll, with a tender
smile, “The pilgrim who has travelled the road all over may
well know how to describe it. ‘Ag in water face answereth to
face, so the heart of man to man.’”

“T believe you know where I am better than I know my-
self,” said Alice. “I know that I have not been willing to be
led in this way, it is so dark and mysterious. It is so trying
not to be allowed to prove my love for my uncle in this time
of sickness and sorrow. Day and night I torture myself in
Altce comforted. 113

vain to imagine what the cause can be, and go over all the
past weeks and months to see if I can find that cause in any-
thing that has occurred.”

“ All is darkness on that side; but there is light, there is
strong consolation, if you will reccive it, in the thought that
this is God’s way of bringing you nearer to Himself—God’s
way, not yours.”

““God’s way,” Alice softly repeated. ‘ What a thought that
is! Is there not light and comfort in that thought ?”
~ “Jndeed there is. Hold it fast, my dear young friend.
Your part is to let God take you by the hand and lead you in
His way. Let your heart say,—

*« «Fe knows the way He taketh,
And I will walk with Him,’ ”

“T have said little of that which is most in my thoughts,” said
Alice. ‘I have so much desired to see my uncle a Christian,
and this serious illness has added intensity to this desire. I
did hope there might be times when I should be permitted to
read to him God’s Word, if I could do no more : but even this
is denied to me, and there is nothing I can do.”

“You can pray for him.”

“That I have long done.”

“You know not but God may be preparing the way for a
gracious answer to these prayers by these very dispensations
that now seem to you so dark and trying.

““¢ Far, far above thy thought
His counsel shall appear,

When fully He the work has wrought
That caused thy needless fear,’ ”

“Alice was strengthened and comforted by this interview with
her friend, and led to exercise a more child-like faith in Christ,
and more entire submission to Him who doeth all things well.






CHAPTER XII.

SEED BEARING FRUIT.

ALIcE was glad that she had come to Maysville, but she could
not linger there. Even if permitted to do very little for her
uncle, she could not, by her absence at this time, give him any
just occasion to infer that he was otherwise than very dear to her.

Her uncle and aunt Ward were disappointed that they were
to have only a visit of three days, instead of the long one they
had hoped to receive ; yet they could not but admit that Alice
was right in feeling that she ought not to tarry, and therefore
forbore to urge her. 4

As her visit to them was to be so short, Alice would not long
absent herself from them, even to spend the fast-passing hours
with her dear friend Mrs. Carroll, Her next call, therefore,
was not made until the twilight hour of the second day.

“TI have been looking for you all the afternoon,” said’ Mrs.
Carroll. “Do you still intend to return the day after
to-morrow ?” ;

“Ido, I could not enjoy myself to remain any longer.”

“What would you say if I should propose to go with you?”

“That would be delightful. Do you really mean it?”

“Yes, my dear, I really mean it. This morning I received
a letter from Arthur. We have planned to spend a week or
two of his present vacation with a friend, who has kindly urged
The Return with Mrs. Carroll, 115

our doing so. In my son’s letter, received this morning, he
proposes that I should meet him in the city, as it will save
expense. I havea friend there with whom I would like to
spend two or three days. If I return with you, there will
be just time for this before Arthur will be ready to meet
me.”

“That will be such a nice plan for me,” said Alice.

“ Quite as nice for me as for you,” said Mrs. Carroll. “ To
tell the truth, I have travelled so little of late that I don’t
like the idea of going to the city alone.”

Alice went back to her uncle’s house greatly cheered by
the thought that her dear friend would return with her on her
journey. She would not only have her company for the ride
home, but she would see her at least once during her stay in
the city, for so they had together planned it. “ It will be such
a comfort,” she repeated to herself again and again. She was
beginning to learn how our compassionate Saviour, when His
infinite wisdom sees a need be that the bitter cup should be
given us to drink, delights to lessen its bitterness, ofttimes, by
some sweet drop of blessing, some gracious arrangement of
His providence, some mercy mingled with the trial.

To Alice it seemed an omen of good. Her soul began
to be relieved of a part of the weight that had borne it
down. All was as uncertain as ever, but the light of Christian
hope and trust and submission was gleaming athwart the
darkness.

“ May our dear Lord help and bless you,” were the last words
spoken to Alice by Mrs. Carroll before parting with, her when,
they reached their journey’s end.

“‘ Pray for me, my friend,” said Alice. “If I could only help
my dear uncle now—I mean, if I could only do anything to
lead him to Jesus—it seems to me that I would be willing to
give all I have, even life itself.”
116 An Unwelcome Reception.

“ Cast all your burden upon Jesus, my dear. He is mighty
to save. He loves your uncle far more than you can do.”

It was nearly night when Alice reached her home, but she
could not retire without going for a few minutes to her uncle’s
room.

“ Have you come back so soon ?” was his salutation.

The heart of Alice sank, for in the tones of the voice she
detected, not pleasure, but disappointment, and felt sure that
he was not glad to see her. But she said calmly,—

“Ves, uncle, Iam back again. I could not think of leaving
you long when you were so ill.”

“You might have stayed longer,” said her uncle. “JI am
sorry that you hastened back.”

The tears started to the eyes of Alice at this unwelcome
reception, and as soon as she could she retired to her own
room, there to pour out before the Lord her renewed sorrow
and grief. Again and again she repeated to herself, “This is
God’s way, God’s way. Though it is very dark, it is still His
way. O Father, take Thy child by the hand and lead me in
Thy way.”

The cry was not in vain. In the depths of her soul was
heard the tender voice of her Saviour saying, “It is I; be not
afraid.” A strange calmness came over her soul, a sweet, inex-
pressible delight in the thought that the will of Godwas supreme,
and that nothing could happen contrary to His own gracious
purpose concerning her. Instead of sinking overwhelmed in
the waves of sorrow, she seemed to be sinking into the sweet
will of God.

And yet the sorrow was not removed. God’s mighty arm
was her support, not to take her out of it, but to save her in it.
The floods were all about her, but did not overflow. She was
in the midst of the fire, yet was not burned. J all these
things she was more than conqueror, through the grace and
Interview with Willis. 117

love that are in Jesus Christ. Oh, blessed mystery of our holy
religion, known only to those with whom is the secret of the
Lord.

Alice never forgot that hour, its sacred, inexpressible nearness
to Christ, its new revelation of the ministry of sorrow and of
the infinite grace and power that in all these things can make
us more than conquerors.

The next morning she determined to go again to her uncle,
for she did not think it best to seem to understand that her
presence was wholly unwelcome. She would watch and wait
in the patient hope that the present state of things would not
long continue.

Just as she was about to go, George Willis came in, and went
to her uncle’s room. Alice knew that George was her uncle’s
confidential clerk, and the one on whom the chief responsi-
bility rested, now that Mr. Grey was absent from his business,
and she therefore did not think it strange that almost daily
interviews, relating to business, should take place between
them.

This interview was of unusual length. Alice was in the
parlour when Willis came down. Instead of passing directly
out, as she expected, he looked in, and seeing her there,
advanced towards her.

“Your visit to Maysville was a short one,” he said, after the
usual greetings.

“JT could not think of leaving my uncle long when he is so
ill,” was the reply.

“JT knew you would feel so,” said George; and after a
moment of hesitation, he added, “ Will you allow me to express
the sympathy I feel for you in this time of trouble ?”

Alice looked quickly up, and their eyes met. There was the
passing of a telegraphic message, which could not easily have
been translated into words, Alice felt much more than she
118 Williss Gratttude.

could interpret. It was not the words that were hard of inter-
pretation. These might refer only to her uncle’s illness, as
they seemed to do. But the air, the manner, and that quick
glance of the eye, seemed to her to bear another message.
: She felt as if he might have looked and spoken thus had he
: known the trial of the past three weeks. Could it be possible
that he did know more than she thought—that this young man,
her uncle’s confidant, possessed the key to that: which was
such a mystery to her? Something like this came like a flash
into the mind of Alice, and her eyes drooped and her face
flushed painfully. He, too, was evidently embarrassed.

For a moment there was an awkward silence. The young
man was the first to break the silence.

“Miss Alice,” he said, “I owe much, very much, to you,
and this morning I wish to express the gratitude I feel.”

“ What have I ever done for you?” Alice asked in surprise.

“This morning I have heard that an old associate of mine
has been committed to prison for defrauding his employer.”

Alice again looked up. She thought this a strange answer
to her question, but as she read the deep emotion visible in
the young man’s face, she felt sure that, in his mind, the ques-
tion and answer had a close connection, and she waited quietly
for him to explain.

“Do you remember the time when you asked me to. join
- Mr. Arthur’s class ?” he inquired, after a moment’s silence.

Alice remembered it well.

“That was the time when I began to associate with this
young man and others not unlike him. I was of a social dis-
position, craving companions, and in this way was coming
within the circle of a moral influence far from healthful, when
you kindly urged me to become a member of that Bible-class.
You seemed so much to desire it, that I resolved to go, if it
were only to please you. I also knew that it would please a
A Humble Service blessed. 119

dear mother and a sister at home, and for their sakes, too, I
went.

“Soon, from my acquaintance with the teacher and some of
the pupils, quite another class of influences began to sur-
round me. Aftera time, as you know, God’s Spirit in a special
manner visited our class, and, through infinite mercy, I was led
to consecrate all to Him who loved me and died for me.

“The first step to all this was my joining that class, and
this I probably should never have done, but for the kind manner
in which you pressed me to go. I tremble this morning to
think what the consequences might have been had I not done
so. Such pleasures and such a life as the young men with
whom I had been associating were pursuing lead to extrava-
gance, and extravagance leads to dishonesty. I dare not say
that I would not now have been where he who was once my
friend is, if a gracious Providence had not thus turned my feet
into a safer path.

“Vou see I have reason to feel that, under God, I owe
much to you. Will you permit me now to say, that if in this
present trial or in any future sorrow I can be of the slightest
assistance to you, it will be a source of great satisfaction to me
thus to manifest the gratitude I shall ever cherish? You will
remember this, won’t you?”

“Thank you,” said Alice; “TI shall never doubt that I may
trust you as a true friend.”

A moment more and he was gone, and Alice was left alone
to think of all he had said.

Her thoughts went back to the time when she had sum-
moned all her courage to enter upon the work of persuading
this young man to become a member of that Bible-class. She
felt truly grateful that the humble service, undertaken in weak-
ness, and not without some failing of heart, had proved a
blessing. It was another drop of comfort for this hour of
120 Another Disappointment.

trial, and she saw a kind Father’s hand in it all. It was
indeed sweet to think that she had been able to exert even
the smallest influence in turning the footsteps of a fellow-
creature from the paths of temptation and sin.

But after a little time her thoughts wandered from this back
to the questioning which had been awakened by the look and
manner with which George Willis had first addressed her that
morning. She tried to think it was mere imagination on her
part ; that he had alluded only to her uncle’s serious illness,
which he must suppose would be a sore affliction to one who
had so few relatives to whom her heart could cling.

But reason the case as she would, there still remained an
intuitive conviction that something more than this was in his
mind when he first addressed her, and when parting he spoke
of present and future sorrow. What could that something be?

Trials of patience and submission were before her that day.
After Willis left, she thought it best not to go to her uncle
that morning, as she knew he must be fatigued, and she could
not hope that her presence would soothe or refresh him.
Other hindrances also arose, so that only one brief visit was
made to the sick-room that day, during which he seemed
scarcely to notice her presence.

Another disappointment awaited her. After a cloudy morn-
ing it commenced raining very hard about noon, and Alice
was compelled to give up all thoughts of seeing her friend
Mrs. Carroll, as she had intended to do that afternoon. It
was a trial indeed, but she bore it patiently.

“This is God’s way,” she again whispered to herself, and
the thought brought sweet and trusting submission.

“My friend has helped me so much, because she has led
me nearer my best Friend,” she thought. “ Surely if I cannot
go to her, I may go directly to Him.”

Oh! blessed secret, this of going directly to Jesus! Hard
Peace within, 121i

may be the trials by means of which it is learned, but it will a
thousand times repay all the suffering, all the chastening which
for the present is “grievous,” but which afterward yieldeth this
blessed fruit. Alice was learning that the kingdom of God is
within. Something of this she had discovered already, but
she was now entering into its meaning as She had never
before done. The kingdom of God within her that day was
“righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost ;” and
in the midst of her sorrows, as she whispered to herself, “It is
God’s way,” she felt that she was SATISFIED: she possessed
the earnest of that “fulness of joy” for evermore which awaits
the believer when he awakes with God’s likeness,



Satisfied. I


FTN TTT



CHAPTER XIII.
AN UNEXPECTED EXPLANATION.

Tur next morning Alice heard her name called by her aunt,
and very promptly obeyed the summons she had received.

“ Are you at all busy this morning ?” her aunt asked.

“No, aunt, I am entirely at your service.”

“Then I would like to have you sit with your uncle for
half an hour. Mabel is obliged to go out, and I have a letter
to write which should be written immediately.”

Alice heard this request with much satisfaction. Perhaps
something might come out of it which would help to clear up
the mystery. Lifting up her heart for strength and guidance,
and expressing to her aunt the pleasure it would give her to
comply with her wishes, she went at once to her uncle’s room.

She spoke to him tenderly yet cheerfully. After a few
moments her uncle requested her to go and call Mabel. °

“Mabel has gone out,” said Alice.

“Then call your aunt, if you please.”

«“ Aunt is very busy writing a letter, and she wished me to
sit with you for half an hour. Can’t I do as well as Mabel?”
she asked with a beating heart.

_ “T think the letter can wait, and you had better call your
aunt.”

Alice felt that she must obey, but her heart was very full,
“ What have I done?” 123

It was very tender, too, and as she turned to leave the room,
she burst into tears. The sick man was evidently unprepared
for such a betrayal of feeling. Just as his niece laid her hand
upon the door knob he called, “ Alice.”

There was nothing for her to do but to turn her tear-stained
face towards him. iY

“ Alice, come here.”

She came to the side of the bed. Her uncle looked at her
intently for a moment, and then said, ‘ Alice, what are you
weeping for?”

She had no time to think of any evasion, even had she
wished it, no time for anything but the simple truth.

“Oh, uncle, dear uncle! it grieves me so that you do
not like me to do anything for you, that it seems to trouble
you even if I am in the room, I, your own niece, who loves
you so.’

For a moment the tears that would not be restrained were
so blinding that Alice could not see her uncle’s face, but when
they were a little checked, she was startled to see the look of
pain, even of anguish, which that face wore, such a look as
she had never before seen there.

“Oh, uncle! don’t look like that,” she exclaimed. “ What
have I done? What have I said?”

The question that followed, so commonplace as it was,
‘tended to restore Alice to calmness and self-possession: “ Did
you say that Mabel had gone out?”

“Ves, uncle.”

“ And your aunt will be occupied with her letter for the
next halfhour?”

“ Yes, uncle.”

“Then, Alice, I want you to stay with me. I have some-
thing to say to you, and now, when we shall be safe from
interruption, is the time to say it. Sit down here.”

I 2
124 Uncle Grey's Breach of Trust.

Alice did as she was bidden, and a painful silence followed.
Whatever the something was that her uncle had to say, it was
evidently not easy for him to say it. At last he broke the
silence.

“Tt is true, Alice,” he said, “ that it has troubled me when-
ever you have been in my room since my illness, but I was not
aware that I had so plainly manifested this feeling. I did not
intend that you should know it.”

“Oh, uncle! what have I done that my presence should
trouble you? I want to be a comfort to you, more than
words can express. What can I have done to forfeit your
love?”

“Nothing, my dear Alice. You have done nothing to
offend or grieve me, and I was never before so conscious of
my attachment to you as I am at this present moment. You
have been a dutiful and affectionate niece to me.”

Alice’s face brightened perceptibly, and these words would
have made her very happy, had she not seen the expression
of sadness in her uncle’s face, and felt sure that he was very
unhappy.

“What then is it, dear uncle?” she said.

“Tt is hard to tell you, and so abruptly, too; to have it
come suddenly, with no preparation. And yet I do not
know what I could say or do to soften the hard bitter truth,
and I suppose I may as well tell it at once. I have been un-
faithful to my trust, Alice, as your guardian. I have betrayed
the confidence reposed in me by those who have passed
away.”

“ Why, uncle! you have ever been kind and good to me.”

“Ves, to you personally, perhaps; but you well know that
a large sum belonging to you, quite a fortune indeed, was
intrusted to my care; and I have lost it; yes, Alice, lost it
all.”
Alice's Fortune gone. 12
&

Surprise kept Alice silent, for this was certainly something
she had not expected to hear.

“Do you wonder, now, that it was torture to me to have
you enter my room ?” her uncle asked.

This question aroused Alice from the stunning effect of the
information just received, and she said, “ You surely were not
to blame, uncle, You didn’t mean to lose it.”

“The last is true, but not the first. I did not mean to
lose it, yet I was to blame, greatly to blame. I had no right
to run any risk with that which was not my own. If I
chose to risk my own property, that was quite another
thing.”

“ And you have lost all that was your own ?”

“Ves, Alice, everything—at least, I have no doubt that so it
will prove when everything is settled up.”

“Tam sure you didn’t expect to lose it,” said Alice.

“No, Alice, I did not. Ihave had much success of late,
and it caused me to grow presumptuous, Everything in
which I engaged seemed to prosper. At first I used only
money that was strictly my own, but after a time I grew
venturesome, Some of the money I had recently invested
had doubled. ‘Why should I not double the fortune of my
niece?’ I reasoned. The idea gratified my pride. I would
like to have it said that my niece’s fortune had doubled in my
hands ; so I rashly removed it from places where it was safely
invested, risking a modest certainty for a brilliant uncertainty.

‘Had I been successful, I presume my conscience would never

have upbraided me. Success covers a multitude of sins, at
least in the business world, but failure has forced me to see
how wrong it was. Misfortune followed misfortune, and loss
was added to loss, until all was wrecked.”

“Tt will be as hard for others as for me,” said Alice,
thoughtfully. “My dear aunt, for instance.”
126 . Mabel’s Money safe.

“Yes, it will be hard for her; yet she has relatives who will
never see her want for anything, but you, my poor lamb, will
be left almost alone in the world, with no one on whom you
will feel that you have any right to depend.”

. Alice was not one to centre every thought upon herself, and
iy next concern was for her cousin. Had she too lost all?
She hesitated about asking her uncle this question, but at last »
she said interrogatively,—

“ And Mabel?” .

“‘Mabel’s money is all safe.”

“T am so glad,” said Alice. .

Her uncle looked at her in surprise. “ Glad!” he repeated
in a tone which also indicated surprise. :

“Yes, uncle, glad for her sake—and for yours, too,” she
added after a moment’s hesitation.

“ And you do not even demand an explanation of the fact
that her money is safe while yours is lost, when both were
committed to the same guardianship. That: is not much
like what Mabel would have done, were she in your place.
You may well say that for my sake you are glad hers is not
lost.

“ But the explanation you do not demand shall be given.
Your father, my own brother, trusted me so entirely that I
was left to do whatever I thought best with your money
without any restrictions as to the manner of. investment ; ‘but
Mabel’s father, my brother-in-law, had more prudence, and
though I was appointed guardian, it was under such restric-
tions that I could not have used her money as I have yours,
if I had wished it. It is just this which brings such keen self-
reproach: that I should have been so trusted, and betrayed
that trust, the most sacred trust in the world, that reposed by
the dying in those who are left behind !”

“Dear uncle, don’t reproach yourself so severely. You
The Uncles Proposal. 127

meant it for good, though you may have been mistaken.
Don’t for a moment suppose that I shall feel unkindly towards
you.

“ Hush, Alice, I can’t hear such words from you to-day.
Don’t tell me this morning that you forgive me. Wait till
you have well considered what it is that you have to forgive.
You cannot at once take it all in. You can hear the words,
‘All is gone!’ but you must have time for reflection before
you can take in their full meaning, and realize what it is to
be left alone in a hard, cold world, with nothing between
you and absolute want but your own personal exertions.
You must realize this, and that it all has come upon you
through the recklessness of your uncle and guardian, before
you can truly know what your feelings will be. I will have no
hasty words of forgiveness spoken this morning and repented
of to-morrow. Leave me now, and take at least twenty-four
hours to think of all this before you come to see me again.
Don’t speak now,” he said, as he saw that Alice was about to
do so. “TI insist upon your doing just as I have said; and if,
by this time to-morrow, you shall feel that you cannot forgive
me, I will not blame you, for I have indeed done you a great
wrong.”

“Tf at this time to-morrow my mind is unchanged—”
Alice began.

“Tf from the bottom of your heart you can then forgive,”
interrupted her uncle, “you may come and tell me so; but
if you cannot, I would rather that you should not be much
with me, for it will be painful for us both—Hark! I hear
your aunt coming up the stairs. - Now leave me without
another word, and remember that twenty-four hours must pass
before you again come to my room.”

Alice did as she was bidden, quietly slipping out of the
room just as her aunt entered it.








CHAPTER XIV.

AN HOUR IN THE SICK-ROOM.

BANISHED from her uncle’s room for the next twenty-four
hours, Alice sought her own chamber, there to think and pray
over all that had passed.

The cloud of the previous night, that cloud of mystery and
of fear that her uncle was displeased with her, had indeed
passed away; but another, dark and threatening, had arisen in
its place. Her uncle had spoken truly when he said, that
without time for reflection she could not take in the full
import of what she had heard that morning, and its bearing
upon her future life.

She had been reared in luxury, and in the full expectation
that the abundance of the past would continue to be her
portion without care or labour on her part. Now all was
changed. At one blow she would be deprived of the wealth
which had seemed so secure, and also of the care and
guardianship of her uncle, on which she had so much
relied.

It was indeed a bitter trial, and at first she could see on the
earthward side no light. But it was not in vain that she had
drawn near to God on the previous evening, and though for
awhile she seemed well-nigh overborne by the suddenness
with which the storm had burst upon her, the sweetness of
Alice confides in Mrs. Carroll. 129

full submission to the will of God soon poured its balm into
her heart.

“This way, so unexpected, so dark and thorny as it seems
in prospect, is still God’s way,” she said to herself. “ Surely
the tender and loving Saviour would never have led me in this
rough path could His infinite wisdom and love have chosen a
better. Ican trust Him, and I will praise Him that He has
given me a heart to do so.”

Thus trusting in the Lord, her spirit was reassured, and its
gloomy forebodings were dissipated. Gleams of light began
to shine even from the earthly side of this dark cloud, and
thoughts and plans for the future arose in her mind, leading
her to feel that many earthly blessings were still spared to her,
and that much still remained to be consecrated, as never
before, to Him who had given Himself for her.

On the afternoon of that day Alice called upon Mrs. Carroll.
It was her last opportunity, for on the following day her friend
expected to leave the city.

“My dear Mrs. Carroll, are you disengaged? Have you
an hour to spend with me?” asked Alice when they met.

“ Certainly, I shall be glad to give you more than that, and
we shall not be interrupted here.”

“Tam very glad, for I have so much to tell you. I feel as
if I had lived half a lifetime since I parted with you, if life
may be measured by the soul’s history, and the wide reaches
of mountain and vale through whick it travels.”

“J understand you,” said Mrs. Carroll, “There are few
whose lives have not known something of this, Tell me all
you can about it.”

Alice confided to this trusted friend all that had taken place
since they last met. She first spoke of the evening after her
return from Maysville.

“When I retired to my room that night, all was dark
130 | Mrs. Carroll’s Pleasure.

indeed,” she said. “I could only hear the roaring of the
wind and the dashing of the waves. But after awhile your
sweet words came to my mind, ‘It is God’s way.’”

She then proceeded to tell Mrs. Carroll of the next morn-
ing’s interview with her uncle, and the startling disclosures of
that hour.

“ This is indeed very unexpected,” said Mrs. Carroll, when
Alice had told herall. ‘Yet even this is God’s way. Could
you, my dear girl, still take the comfort of this to your heart
under a trial so sudden and unlooked for?”

“Tt was indeed, as you say, both sudden and unexpected.
When I first began to take in its full meaning, I trembled
lest I should be quite overwhelmed. But I could not so
soon forget-the refuge in which I had found such sweet-
ness and calmness. The earthly prospect seemed dark
indeed, but as I looked at the light beyond, it grew brighter
and brighter, and I felt that I could still say, ‘It is God’s
way.’

“But I have had many thoughts and feelings such as never
stirred my heart before. Things seemed so changed ; I used
to think I would do so much for Christ’s cause with my
money when it should be at my own disposal. Now I see
that it is myself He wants, my heart, my life, my all; and
He shall have them.”

“My dear girl, had you come to me to-day to tell me that
your fortune had been doubled, according to your uncle’s
ambitious desires for you, it could not have given me any-
thing like the pleasure I now feel in hearing these words.
Far beyond all else does our Lord value the heart and life
wholly consecrated to Him, yielded without reserve to His
will and service.”

“ All this has been made very clear to me since we last
met,” responded Alice.
Christ's Epistle. 131

“Do you remember what your parting words were at that
time ?” inquired Mrs. Carroll.

“TY remember, I think, that they were about my uncle.”

“And your ardent desire to be permitted to do even the
smallest thing which might be instrumental for good to his
precious soul.”

“God alone knows how I have desired that.”

“Who.knows but it may be in this very way that God will
graciously fulfil this desire? You have so craved the oppor-
tunity to read His Holy Word to your uncle, but if He gives
to you the grace to manifest a truly Christian spirit in this
trial, you may yourself be to your uncle Christ’s epistle—one
which he cannot but read, and which may touch his. heart
more than the reading of the written Word.” ;

Tears started to the eyes of Alice. “Such thoughts. seem
almost like presumption,” she said. ‘‘How can this be true
of one so unworthy as myself?” :

“T)o you remember the passage where Paul calls the
Corinthian converts the ‘epistle of Christ’? ”

“T do.”

“ And he adds words of deep significance, which cannot be
too prayerfully pondered, when he says, ‘ Written not with ink,
but with the Spirit of the living God; not in tables of stone,
but in fleshy tables of the heart.’ The Divine and all-power-
fal Spirit, and He alone, can make any of us epistles of Christ.
Remember this, dear Alice, and let all your hope be in Him,
and your prayer be for His continual indwelling.”

‘“‘T believe He teaches you to speak the ‘ word in season,’ ”
said Alice. ‘‘ You have so often spoken that word to me.”

“Tfany ofus are permitted to do that, we have indeed cause
to say, ‘Not I, but the grace of God which was with me.’”

Alice bade her friend good-bye with most sincere thanks
for her words of sympathy and help.
132 Words of Praise.

The next morning she intended to go to her uncle’s room as
soon as the time named by him had expired, but she was
unavoidably detained another hour. Light as was her step, it
reached ears that had been waiting to catch the sound, and a
faint smile passed over her uncle’s face as she entered.

“You have come,” he said.

“Ves, uncle. I wanted much to come before, but have
been hindered a whole hour; and now you will let me be
your own loving, helpful daughter, will you not ?”

‘Do you really wish it?” he asked, looking intently at her. .

“Indeed I do.”

“ Alice, you are a noble girl,” were the first words her uncle
uttered when they were left alone.

“T fear I have done nothing to merit that term,” said Alice,
gently.

“Ts it nothing so freely to forgive where there is so much to
be forgiven? ”

“You know, dear uncle,” said Alice, “that you have been
very kind to me. All you have done has been kindly intended,
though you inay have erred in judgment. If, instead of this,
you had been my enemy, seeking to do me harm, forgiveness
might then have been a hard and a noble thing.”

“ Do you think you could have forgiven in such a case as
that?”

“Tm sure I could not of myself, for ’m naturally. selfish
and resentful, and have many times resented very small
injuries ; but He who has given us His command, can give us
grace to keep it, and with the help of His grace we can forgive
and love even our enemies.”

“Pardon me, Alice, if I say that such talk has always
seemed to me like cant. It’s quite out of the range of my
comprehension. J can understand facts, but not fancies, -J
know that you are in this room because I see you.”




















































































































‘ALICE, YOU ARE A NOBLE GIRL.”



.

Personal Testimony. 135

‘ But you are not more sure of this than you are of the fact
that you love my aunt with a deep and strong affection. And
you would consider that man very unreasonable who should
regard this love not as a fact, but only as a fancy, because you
cannot show the love itself, though you may give very con-
vincing proofs of its existence.”

“That is very true,” said her uncle.

“So it is with me about those things of which we have been
speaking, as far as I have had experience of them. I know
that I was once resentful and easily offended. A thoughtless
remark of a schoolmate, a just reproof from a teacher, or some
taunt from Mabel, would arouse a perfect tempest of anger and
resentment. When it was past I would feel that I had been
foolish and unreasonable, and resolve never again to be over-
come by such feelings. But my resolutions were all in vain ;
they were indeed as ropes of sand.

“ But all has been much changed since I have learned that
Jesus is my help and strength. When J look to Him, He
gives me grace to overcome, and love and forgiveness drive
out resentment and anger. All this is a part of my inner
consciousness, and therefore I am as sure of it as you are of
the love of which we have been speaking.”

Silence fell between the two for a little while. Mr. Grey
was busy with his own thoughts, and so was Alice. Many a
time, in her anxiety for her uncle, she had imagined a con-
versation between them on this subject, but had tried in vain
to think of fitting words that might be spoken. She had now
spoken as freely and unconstrainedly as she would have done
on any other subject, even revealing something of her secret
heart-history, bearing her personal testimony to the fact that
she had found Christ able to save her. When it was all past,
it was not strange that it should seem like a wonder even to
herself. It was indeed one of the wonders of God’s rich grace.
136 “ All zs not Lost.”

Alice had given herself up to the Saviour to be led and guided
by Him, and to find in Him her strength and her all, and He
was fulfilling to her the exceeding great and precious promises
made to all who sincerely do this.

Her uncle was the first to break the silence. In a tone of
unwonted tenderness, he said,—

“T can never forgive myself, Alice, for my betrayal of the
trust reposed in me. Yet I must say that your forgiveness
and affection have comforted me more than I can express.
Perhaps it ought not to be so, for it don’t alter anything, or
undo what has been done.”

“That may be,” said Alice, gently ; “neither will it alter
anything for you to continue to make yourself miserable
about it.”

“That is true, my wise, sweet child,” said Mr. Grey, with a
half-smile.

“Then, dear uncle, promise me that you will do so no
longer.”

“Flow can I help it, when I remember that by my rash-
ness, my infatuation—for infatuation it was—all has been
lost?”

“No, uncle, all is zof lost. Indeed you are mistaken
there.”

“JT am not mistaken, Alice,” said Mr. Grey, with. much
gravity. ‘Everything is exactly as I stated to you yesterday
morning.”

“That may be, dear uncle, and yet there remains quite a
capital with which to commence a life-work.”

“T don’t understand you. Is this fact, or only fancy?”

“J am not dealing with fancies, but with facts, this morning.
This money, under your wise direction, has procured for mea
very thorough education. In this respect I have had all the
advantages that money could procure.”
Alice's Capital. 137

“T know you have, and have well improved them, too.”

“ This is my capital now. Many young ladies would con-
sider themselves well off with such a capital. In our school
there were young ladies toiling with this end in view, asking
only for an education that would fit them for desirable posi-
tions as teachers. All is not gone while this is left to me.”

“But teaching is hard work.”

“Tdon’t wish tobe a drone. I can’t be faithful to my Master
without earnest work of some kind; and as He has prepared
me for this, I think it is the work that He will give me to do.”

“You take a cheerful view of the subject ; I fear you don’t
realize the difficulty of finding desirable situations, and the
difficulty of filling them when found.”

“In regard to the first, I must tell you what the principal of
our school said to me just before I came away: ‘I almost
wish you were not an heiress, because, if you were obliged to
teach, and wanted a situation, I could recommend you so
heartily. You have been very thorough in all you have
undertaken, and your musical education is so complete, not
only in the practice, but in the science of music, that I could
easily obtain for you an excellent situation with a large salary.’

“T thanked him for the compliment, and told him that I
should be sure to apply to him for a recommendation, should
I have need of it. They were words lightly spoken on my
part, for I had then little knowledge of the uncertainties of
life, and the reverses to which all are exposed. But yesterday,
as I recalled his words, they gave me hope and courage for
the future. I would not have repeated them to you under
other circumstances, but now perhaps they may help to com-
fort you.”

Though her uncle did not in words admit that such was the
effect,.yet Alice had the satisfaction of seeing that he appeared
more cheerful.

Satisfied. K






CHAPTER XV.

THE HONEST HOUR.

Two or three days later, after the business of the day was over,
George Willis came in for an interview with his employer. He
was waiting below until Mr. Grey was ready to see him, when
Alice entered the room.

“J wished to speak with you while you are waiting,” she said.

“ Certainly,” said the young man; and then seeing that
Alice hesitated, he added, “Is there anything I can do ?”

“ My uncle has told me of his misfortunes,” said Alice, after
a moment of embarrassed silence. :

“Tt is very sad,” said the young man, at the same time
wondering if she had been told the whole truth.

After another silence, which showed that there was some-
thing upon her mind not easy for her to put into words, Alice
said, “I suppose that in my uncle’s illness much devolves
upon you, much of care and of responsibility also.”

“That’s very true, Miss Alice. I feel that I occupy a
responsible place for one so young and inexperienced ; but it is
my earnest purpose to fulfil every duty with Christian fidelity,
and my earnest wish that everything may be conducted in an
honourable and Christian manner.”

Alice looked up quickly, a grateful expression in her eye.
“That is just the thought, the desire, I have been wishing to
Mr. Willis’s Thoughts. 139

express,” she said ; “ but I hesitated to speak of it lest it might
seem to imply a doubt that such were your wishes and purposes.
I had no doubt of that, but I felt that it would be:a relief to
give expression to my desires. My uncle’s honour is very dear
to me. He has been unfortunate, perhaps imprudent, but I
should grieve much if any dishonour should attach to his name.”

At this moment Alice was called away, and the young man
was left to his own thoughts.

Can it be that Mr. Grey has told Alice the whole truth?” he
asked himself.

He recalled all that Alice had said.

There had been no allusion to herself, not a word that implied
the knowledge that she was a sharer in this misfortune. Could
it be possible that she knew it all, and yet, in her unselfishness,
had expressed only anxiety for the preservation of her uncle’s
honour, and of Christian integrity in the settling up of this
painful business ?

Perhaps she did not know. .Perhaps her uncle could not get
courage to tell her all, at once, and had told her of his misfor-
tunes as a preparation for the knowledge of her own. If this
were so, a trying ordeal was indeed before her. But if, on the
other hand, she did know all, the ordeal was passed, and she
had indeed come out like gold tried in the fire.

He had not long to think upon the subject, for he was soon
informed that Mr. Grey was ready to see him.

At the close of the interview, instead of going directly out, the
young man paused at the door of the waiting-room, and seeing
Alice sitting alone, he came to her side. “I have just learned
from your uncle that you know the whole truth. I was before
uncertain about that,” he said.

i\lice looked up. The face of the young man expressed more
than sympathy, and she was in no doubt as to what he meant
by the whole truth. She answered simply,—

K 2
140 The Crisis delayed.

“Poor uncle, he feels very badly about it.”

“Well he may,” was the reply.

‘There was a moment’s pause, and then Mr. Willis went on
to say, “ Miss Alice, I should have learned to-night, if I had
not known it before, how wholly you are to be trusted, and
I wish to ask permission to speak to you of your uncle’s affairs,
May I do so?”

“ Certainly.”

“T wish to tell you something of my present efforts and plans,
Within a few days some things have turned out more favour-
ably than has been expected. I do not mean that this will
affect the final result, but it may delay the crisis, so that it may
be some time longer before it will be necessary that the state
of affairs should become publicly known. It seems to me very
desirable to secure this result, and to this end I shall bend all
my energies. If present claims can be met, my hope is to keep
things along until—I mean for the present.”

Alice understood him. She well knew what would naturally
have followed that word “until.” How the lips shrink from
pronouncing the name of the dread messenger, from anything
more than a very indirect allusion to the great change which
must soon come !

Oh, it isa change indeed, winding up in a moment so much
that is closely linked to the life slowly ebbing away. On the
earthward side all is darkness. In that first bitter hour how
often does all the warmth, the brightness, the sunshine of life,
seem passing away with the last breath of the loved one.

There was silence for a moment, while the mind of each was
occupied with the sad thoughts that had been suggested.
George Willis broke the silence. -

“T think it is very desirable to accomplish this, if possible,”
he said in a tone almost as low and hushed as if the words had
been spoken in the chamber of death. ‘ Every business man
A Change manifest. 14

knows that if a man is taken away from his business at a critical
time, when things are going wrong with him, the result is often
insolvency, when it would be otherwise could he himself, with
the tact and experience gained by long acquaintance with the
business, have steered the ship through the breakers. Knowing
this, the business world is lenient in its judgment under such
circumstances.”

“ Do you think it can be done ?” said Alice.

“T do think so. I shall certainly use my best endeavours to
that end.”

“Tf it can be done, will it not prevent any shade of dis-
honour from falling upon my uncle’s memory?” Alice asked,

“Tt will certainly do much towards it,” replied the young
man, somewhat evasively, for he could not tell that noble girl,
to whom her uncle’s honour was so dear, that the one thing
which would not escape the world’s censure, when it should be-
come known, was the manner in which her money, held in trust
by that uncle, had been imprudently risked and lost.

From that time a great change was manifest in Mr. Grey in
regard to the presence of his younger niece in his sick
chamber. Instead of being manifestly annoyed when she was
there, it was now evident that her presence gave him pleasure,
and he was never more satisfied than when she was ministering
to his wants.

The first time Alice read to her uncle a chapter from the
Book which was so precious to her, it was at his own request.
How it thrilled her heart to hear that request.

“Do you remember our conversation the day after I found
courage to tell you all?” he said to Alice one morning.

Alice remembered it well.

“T could not get over the argument you that day used,”
continued her uncle. “Indeed it was not an argument, but a
simple relation of facts, the facts of your own experience. Very
142 Seeking Salvation.

modestly you told me what Christ had done for you, and that
was something I could not gainsay. I could not but feel that
you had found a source of strength to which I was a stranger.
But now, Alice, I want to find what you have found, if it is not
indeed too late.”

“Oh, uncle, do not think that,” said Alice, with emotion.

“Have I not heard ministers preach about seeking too late,
about the door being shut, and the season of grace past? I
have heard such things, Alice, many times, I think, though I
did not then much heed them.”

“T am no theologian, dear uncle, but I know the Bible says
that ‘whosoever will,’ may come, and that ‘every one that
asketh receiveth,’ and ‘he that seeketh findeth ;’ and I know
that this must be true in every case, because God says it is so.
If any have passed the day of grace, it must be that they have
reached a point where they will never, never come to Christ,
fer the promise is sure that ‘ whosoever shall call on the name
of the Lord shall be saved.’”

“ Find that promise and read it to me,” said Mr. Grey.

Alice found and read it, afterward reading others equally full,
rich, and free. It was soon very evident that the mind of Mr.
Grey was becoming deeply interested in the all-important sub-
ject which he had so neglected while engrossed in the multiplied
cares and schemes of business. Even his conversations with
his confidential clerk were not all confined to business matters.
Mr. Grey found that George Willis was an earnest, conscien-
tious Christian. In the responsibilities which had now so sud-
denly been thrown upon him, he had showed a wisdom,
prudence, and business tact beyond his years, which surprised
his employer, though his confidence in him had been great ;
and Mr. Grey, in his present thoughtful state of mind, began to
perceive that it was the strength of Christian principles which
had made the young man so worthy of confidence.
Mabel’s Unkind Speech. 143

Mabel had been well pleased to see that her presence in the
sick-room was preferred to that of Alice, though she was quite
ignorant of the cause. She was now quick to note the change,
and was not a little annoyed by it. She had, indeed, no cause
of complaint, for her uncle treated her as kindly as he had ever
done ; but when she began to see that the presence of Alice
now gave him pleasure, the old feelings of envy and jealousy,
so easily excited, were once more aroused.

One day when Alice was in the room, Mabel asked, “Shall
I not take care of you for the next hour, dear uncle? I have
come on purpose to do so, as my aunt is engaged elsewhere.”

“Thank you, Mabel,” said Mr. Grey, “but Alice has just
come in. You can take your turn another time.”

Mabel turned quickly and left the room. Alice, recollecting
something she wanted to say to her, followed her to the door.
At that moment the heart of Mabel was full of bitterness
towards Alice, and without pausing to reflect upon the un-
reasonableness of her present feelings, she gave vent to them
by saying, in an undertone not intended for any ear but hers,
“Tf I were the richer niece, I suppose I should be the
favourite,” and without giving time for a reply she darted away.

The next day, when Mabel was alone in the room with her
uncle, he said to her, “ There are some things I wish to say to
you, Mabel, and as I often do not feel able to converse much,
I will improve the present opportunity. Come and sit by my
side, will you not?”

Mabel promptly complied with this request.

“T think you have no doubt of your uncle’s love for you,
Mabel,” he said, looking earnestly into the face of his niece.

“Oh no, uncle, indeed I have not.”

“Then, for that love’s sake, I trust that you will listen
kindly to what I have to say. I heard some words of yours
yesterday which I am sure were not intended for my ears. I
144 “ What of my Money 2”

refer to what you said to Alice when you left the room
yesterday afternoon,” i

Mabel flushed to crimson, but she did not reply, for she
knew not what to say in self-defence. :

“Tam afraid you have envied your cousin many times,” said
Mr. Grey, not reproachfully, but tenderly and regretfully.

“Oh no,” said Mabel, unwilling to admit the fact,

“ Perhaps you are hardly conscious of it, but T feel persuaded
that I am not mistaken. I have seen evidence of it ever since
Alice came to live with us. But I must now tell you that, if
you have envied your cousin for her money, you will no longer
have occasion to do this,”

Mabel looked up in surprise, for she as yet knew nothing
even of her uncle’s misfortunes, The surprise was indeed
so great that it caused her, for the time, quite to forget the
‘nnoyance she had just felt at what her uncle had said to her.

“What do you mean, uncle?” she said,

“T mean that your cousin Alice has lost everything ; lost it,
too, through the imprudence of the uncle to whom she is daily
ministering with the most devoted love and care, though she
knows the whole bitter truth.”

Mabel seemed incapable of taking it allin. “Do you mean
that Alice has lost everything?” she said.

“Yes, everything, and so has your uncle.” ;

Mabel was silent for a moment, as if trying to comprehend all
that was involved in this startling intelligence ; then suddenly,
as a new thought entered her mind, she became first pale and
then flushed, and in atone which seemed to demand rather than
inquire, she said, “And what of my money? Is that lost, too?”

The manner of Mabel, rather than the question itself, caused
a faint flush to suffuse the pale cheeks of the sick man, and
there was a moment of silence while he strove for entire self-
control, after which Mr. Grey replied,—
Unconscious Selfishness. 145

““No, Mabel. For my sake as well as for your own, Iam
glad to be able to tell you that your money is quite safe.”

It is seldom that a person, acting under the influence of
thoroughly selfish feelings, is conscious of the selfishness often
betrayed in word and act. Thus it was with Mabel at this
time. Engrossed with the selfish fears which had, for the
moment, filled her mind, she but faintly realized the lack of
consideration for her uncle’s feelings which her manner‘had
betrayed, or the covert reproof that lurked in his reply.

“T don’t understand why all that was left to Alice should be
lost, while mine is safe,” said Mabel, after a short silence.

“Were you in the place of Alice, you might well demand an
explanation, but now that your own is safe, I do not see that
you have the right to call for any,” said Mr. Grey, with«some-
thing of the old manner with which he had been wont to repel
questions which he regarded as uncalled for.

Though Mabel too often acted from the impulse of wholly
selfish feelings, yet she was by no means incapable of more
generous emotions; and now that her selfish fears for the
safety of her own possessions were laid at rest, she was not
_ incapable of feelings of sympathy and regret for her uncle and
' for Alice. Her next words, after a thoughtful silence, were the
expression of such feelings. In a tone softened by these more
generous emotions, she said,—

“Tt is very hard for you, dear uncle, and for Alice also.”

“Ves,” said her uncle. “I have had great mental suffering
for the last few weeks. So far as it has been occasioned by these
misfortunes, the keenest suffering by far has been caused by
the thought that, through my imprudence, your cousin has lost
all. Alice has acted most nobly. Nothing could be more
delicate and considerate than every act and word of hers has
been, comforting me by the assurance that she knew I had
meant only kindness to her. I did indeed so mean it, but I
146 The Oncle’s Earnest Words.

bitterly regret my imprudence in running such risks, and
suffering past success to blind my mind, and turn it from the
due consideration of possible reverses.

“ Alice has, indeed, been a wonder to me for the last two
weeks. She has convinced me perfectly of one fact, and it is
of this I wish to speak. I am sure that she possesses some-
thing that you and I have not, and that we both need, Bear
' with me, Mabel, if I speak plainly to you on this subject, for I
am a dying man, and these are among my last words.”

“Oh, uncle, don’t say that!”

“Tt’s true, and why should I not say it? Surely only the
truth should be spoken by a man in my place. The subject
about which I now wish to speak is one of infinite importance,
not only to me, who have but a short time to live, but to you
also, my dear niece. I used to think that religion might be a
very good thing to die by, but was not needed to live by; but
I see now how great was my mistake. We all need religion
to live by. How sadly have I needed it!

“ Alice, too, has needed it, oh, how much! to enable her to
bear these painful reverses, and still maintain a calm, unselfish,
and Christian spirit, And she has not only needed, but she
has had it. I think you must be conscious, my dear Mabel,
that you could not have borne the trial as she has borne it,
had it fallen to your lot.

“Forgive me if I speak very plainly, for a dying hour is an
honest hour, an hour in which a man wishes to be honest, not
only with himself but with others also. I want to warn you
not to put off the subject, as I have done, until the hour when
you shall be prostrated with your last sickness.” His strength
was quite spent, and as he sunk back exhausted, he could only
add, ‘Think of these things, dear Mabel. Promise me.”

Mabel readily gave the required’ promise, for her heart was
much touched by her uncle’s earnest words.


CHAPTER XVI.

A NEW PATH OPENING.

Tur next few weeks brought to the troubled household such
changes as only combined bereavement and misfortune can
bring. Mr. Grey passed away from all the places which had
so long known him. 5

Alice deeply felt her uncle’s death; and yet with this bitter
cup of bereavement mercy was mingled. She was permitted
again and again to hear him express his humble yet steadfast
confidence in the Friend of sinners, and his heartfelt regret
that his long neglect of that Friend had deprived him of the
unspeakable privilege of devoting his life to His service.

George Willis had been faithful to the end, and had been
able to accomplish the work he had undertaken, so that it was
not until after the death of Mr. Grey that the public were made
acquainted with the true state of his affairs ; and then, through
the same unremitting diligence, everything was arranged to
give satisfaction to his creditors.

It was arranged that the family should leave the house soon
after the death of Mr. Grey, and that nothing should be changed
until after their departure, the creditors showing a most con-
siderate regard for the feelings of the bereaved family. Mrs.
Grey was going to her own family friends, by whom she would
be kindly cared for. Mabel had engaged board in the family
148 Alice’s Letter to her Teacher.

of one who had once been her schoolmate, and since those
days her particular friend. In this retreat she had reason to
expect a pleasant home and a life of independence, for though
the sum left her had been much less than that inherited by her
cousin, it was still sufficient for the supply of every real want.

Alice had received a pressing invitation to come to Mays-
ville, and this she had accepted, although in her own mind she
had purposed that it should be only a visit, and not a long
one. She had already written to her former teacher, remind- .
ing him of the conversation that had passed between them.

“Perhaps,” she wrote, “you will remember I then told you
that if I should ever be in need of a situation, I should cer-
tainly apply to you. I said it very lightly, little thinking that
such would ever be the case; for I was unacquainted with life’s
changes and with the reverses to which all are liable. But the
supposition has now become a reality. The loss of all my pro-
perty renders it necessary that I should use the education I
have acquired, not only as a means of pleasure and usefulness,
but also as a means of subsistence.” Then followed the
request that her old teacher would take her case into con-
sideration, and procure her a situation, if it was in his power
to do so. She also requested that the answer to this letter might
be sent to Maysville, which would for the present be her abode.

Alice did not leave her city home quite as soon as she ex-
pected when this letter was written. Ever thoughtful of others,
she proposed that Mabel and herself should remain until after
her aunt left, as this arrangement would be the least trying
one for her. Her aunt’s going had been delayed for two or
three days, and Mabel and herself had remained also.

On the morning of the day of which we write, Mrs. Grey
had left, bidding a tearful adieu to her old home and the nieces
who had shared it with her so long. Mabel and Alice had
completed their preparations for leaving, and were waiting for
At Maysville again. 149

the carriage that was to take them both to the railway station.
Mabel was to leave at once on reaching the station, while
Alice would wait half an hour for the train which she was to
take to Maysville. Both felt it to be a sad parting, but, like
all of earth’s scenes, it was quickly passed. Alice soon found
herself borne rapidly towards Maysville, and away from the
place which had been the scene of so much both of joy and
sorrow, and the school where her heavenly Teacher had been
disciplining and training her, not only for her final home above,
but also for years of future service for Him on earth.

From her uncle and aunt Alice received a welcome so
cordial that she might well be comforted by it.

“You will make us a long visit this time, I hope,” said her
uncle, as they were sitting down to the tea-table two or three
hours after her arrival.

“T don’t know how long,” said Alice. “It may be some
weeks in length.”

“ Weeks!” said her uncle. “I was not talking about a visit
of weeks, but of months or years.”

“Thank you, uncle ; but you know we have something todo
in life besides making such long visits,” said Alice, gently.

“J should like to know what you have to do more important
than to cheer up your old uncle and aunt. But this reminds
me of something I had forgotten until now; we’ve had so
much to say of things sad and things pleasant. There’s a letter
here which has been waiting for you these two days.”

« A letter for me !” said Alice, with a little start, which was

not unobserved by her keen-sighted uncle.

_ Yes; and, by the way, I wonder if this same letter has not
something to do with that important life-work which will not
admit of long visits,” said her uncle, with an arch look. ‘It’s
from a gentleman, that’s plain; some young fellow, no doubt,
who is trying to make you think that he needs you a great
150 The Teacher's Reply.

deal more than your poor old uncle and aunt. Don’t you
believe him, Alice.”

“T see you have not forgotten how to tease,” said Alice,
with a smile and a blush.

“But now, truly, can’t you guess whom the letter is from,
and don’t you want to see it very much ?” said her uncle.

“T can guess whom it is from, and I do want to see it very
much,” said Alice, laughing.

“TY think you had better stop teasing and give it to her,”
said her aunt.

“Tl do the first, but I shall not do the last until Alice has
finished her tea, for she’d fly directly to her room with it, and
you'd lose all the labour with which you have prepared her
favourite dishes in expectation of her arrival,” said her uncle,
glancing around the well-filled table.

Alice felt sure that if a letter had preceded her to Maysville,
it must have been sent by her teacher. Being confident of
this, she was indeed very desirous and somewhat impatient to
know its contents; but checking this impatience, she waited
quietly until tea was over, giving no outward sign of her desire
to have that time arrive.

As they rose from the table her uncle left the room, and in
a moment returned with the letter in his hand.

“ Here it is,” he said; “and now, if you want to run to your
room with it, you shall have full permission to do so.”

Alice glanced at the address, and recognised in a moment
the well-known handwriting. Was this prompt reply bringing
to her the realization of her hopes, or the reverse of all this?
It was her first venture in this untried field, in which so many
of her less fortunate sisters had had such large experience, and
she felt that she would prefer to be alone when she opened
the letter, which must bring -her first disappointment or her
first success in a life so new to her.
The Situation accepted. 151

“ Thank you, uncle; I will accept your permission and take
it to my own room,” she said, in a way which left her uncle
half suspicious that he had really hit upon the truth.

In the solitude of her room Alice sat down with her letter.
Knowing that what it contained might turn the whole current
of her future life, and feeling this sensibly, it was not until
she had lifted up her heart to her ever-present Friend in the
earnest petition to be prepared for whatever might await her
in life, that she found herself able to open it with calmness. A
hasty glance at its contents served to show her that it was suc-
cess, not disappointment, that it announced.

“Your letter was very timely. Only two days before, I
received an application for a teacher to fill a very desirable and
remunerative situation: I was undecided what reply to make,
as I could at the time think of no candidate who I felt confi-
dent would give satisfaction. I have the most entire confidence
in your ability to do this. Though feeling deep sympathy for
the changes which have led you to make this application, I am
glad that it is in my power to respond to it with the offer of
a situation so desirable.”

This introduction was followed by all necessary information
relative to the situation which was now awaiting her acceptance,
and a request for an early reply.

This called for immediate action, as there had been a delay
of two days already. After a few moments’ reflection, she
resolved to pen a reply, and send it that night if she could.
Taking out her writing materials, she wrote briefly a grateful
acceptance of the situation which was offered.

Having finished the letter, she put on her shawl and hat, to
take it at once to the office. As she ran down the stairs, she
saw her uncle sitting at the door with a paper in his hand.

“ The letter I have received requires an immediate answer.
Shall I be in time to send this to night?”
- 152 “Tam Proud of you.”

“T think so, though there will not be much time to spare.”

“T will be as expeditious as possible,” said Alice, as she
passed her uncle to hasten on her way to the office.

She was not too late, and was soon back again by her uncle’s
side.

“T must say that you have a very prompt way of answering
important letters,” said her uncle, with one of his arch smiles.

“J have half a mind not to tell you anything about this
business, to pay you out for teasing me so,” said Alice. “ I would
do so, if you were not so much older than I, and my uncle, too.”

“Y’m glad you have so much consideration for my grey
hairs and my uncleship,” said Mr. Ward, laughing.

“You shall read my letter for yourself,” said Alice, drawing
it out and placing it in his hands.

Without more words Mr. Ward put down his paper and
proceeded to read the letter. He read it twice, very deli-
berately, before he looked up, and then returned it to his
niece with an expression in which surprise, disappointment,
and pleasure were curiously mingled.

“Well, indeed,” he said, “and so it seems that this nice
little air-castle of mine, about having a niece to take care of
me in my old age, has all fallen to pieces. I never dreamed
that you would be up to any such thing, and so soon, too.
And yet, though I don’t like to acknowledge it, in the fresh-
ness of my disappointment, I must own I am proud of you.”

“ Proud of me, uncle?” said Alice, interrogatively.

“Yes, proud of the readiness with which you have accepted
the situation in which you have been so unexpectedly placed,
and so promptly laid your plans for a useful and independent
life. If I were not so proud of you, I would give you a good
hearty scolding for doing all this without even consulting
your poor old uncle, who would have been so glad to give you
a home for the rest of his life.”








































































































































































































































































ALICE POSTING HER ACCEPTANCE OF THE SITUATION,

Satigted L





The Uncle’s Disappointment. 155

A smile and a tear both came to Alice. ‘I know, dear
uncle, how sincere you are in the kindness you have medi-
tated, and also in your appreciation of what I have done, and
I am sincerely thankful for both.”

“Well, Alice, one can’t quarrel with you, even if he wants
to; so we shall have to make the best of things as they are,
and rejoice that we have such a niece, even if we can’t have
her all to ourselves, as we had fondly hoped. But when do
you go to this place ?”

“Tn four weeks, uncle; so you see I shall have those four
weeks to spend with you; and then, you know, there will be
long summer vacations to be disposed of in some way.”

“To be always spent with us; remember that,” interrupted
her uncle.

“See if I don’t manage it so that you will be very glad
that they are not still longer,” said Alice, gaily, for she saw
that her uncle was really disappointed, though his judgment
approved the course she had taken.

Mr. Ward smiled faintly. He was not in his usual mood
for enjoying a little pleasantry.

Alice saw this and said seriously, ‘‘ You know, uncle, I have
an excellent education, which I think ought to be put to
some good use. I shall have little money to do good with,
therefore I must be the more earnest to use in God’s service
all that remains.”

“No doubt you are right,” said her uncle, in that serious
tone which, when occasion required, took the place of the
light, bantering manner that was frequent with him. “I am
sure you will have tHe blessing of Him whose will you are
seeking to do. ‘You are fatherless indeed, and now doubly
bereaved, but you have a Father in heaven who never for-
sakes those who put their trust in Him, It’s plain to me that
He is guiding you even now.”

L2


CHAPTER XVII.

WINNING SOULS.

ALICE was very desirous to see her friend, Mrs. Carroll, to
whom she had so much to communicate, but she would not
leave her uncle and aunt on this first evening of her arrival.
Mr. Ward suspected this, and kindly opened the way for her.

“It is a beautiful moonlight evening,” he said; “a nice
time for you to call on your friend Mrs. Carroll. I am sure
you are longing to see her, and would like to give her a sur-
prise before she hears that you are here, so I think you had
better go. Now give me the credit of being a little unselfish,
won't you?”

“Yes, uncle, indeed I will. It seems hardly fair to leave
you and aunt the first evening, though I cannot deny that
I very much wish to see Mrs. Carroll.”

“ Off with you, then,” said her uncle, in his old playful
manner, “and you had better not give us too much credit for
unselfishness, for if we seem at all deficient in the opposite
quality to-night, you may be sure that you will see enough of
it for the next four weeks.”

The meeting of the two friends was full of tenderness. There
was that in the look, tone, and manner of Mrs. Carroll which
showed a continual mindfulness of all her young friend had
felt and suffered in the last few weeks, an unspoken sympathy
A Serious Change. 157

far more soothing and grateful than any mere words could have
been.

Alice had much to tell her of the events of deep interest
which had transpired since they last met; and as the past
was so vividly recalled, the present was for the time almost
forgotten. When it was brought to mind by some remark of
Mrs. Carroll, Alice told her of the letter which she had that
evening received.

“Tt was so much more than I have dared hope for,” she said.
“T know that some young ladies seek for a situation a long
time before they obtain one.”

“We must receive all these things as from the Lord,” said
Mrs. Carroll. “It has pleased Him to send you many trials,
and His loving-kindness delights to mingle mercies with trials.
It does not surprise me that He is doing so in your case.
He has also given you a heart grateful for the mercies,
instead of murmuring, as some would do, at these reverses.”

“TJ know,” said Alice, thoughtfully, “ that many speak of it as
a great hardship for me to be compelled to undertake the labour
of teaching, when, as they say, I have been brought up to such
different expectations. It does seem to me a serious change,
but I don’t think it is the hardship that makes it seem so, as
much as some other things.”

“‘ What things, my dear?”

“T don’t know that I can make these thoughts quite plain
to you, but I will try. Since I have given myself to Christ,
I have thought much about doing good with my money when I
should have the disposal of it. But now all that is changed. I
shall have little money to spend, and yet I feel that all my life
must be service for Him, so far as I can serve Him with my
personal efforts, my character, and my example.”

“ These,” said Mrs. Carroll, “are the offerings most precious

in His sight, far more so than gold and silver laid upon His altar.”
158 “ Keep near to Christ.”

“Tt may be so, and yet this view of life leads me most
seriously to feel my own deficiencies, my weakness and
nothingness.”

“Your weakness is in yourself, but your strength is in Him.
The Christian’s watchword should ever be, ‘I can do all things
through Christ which strengtheneth me.’ What is it that you
desire to do more than all besides ?”

“Win souls to Christ,” Alice answered reverently : “ but itis
just this which makes me feel so weak. I might have joyfully
given my money to aid those skilful in winning souls, but to
win them myself, oh, how can I do that, so weak and inex-
perienced, and with no gift to speak out in words what my
heart often feels?”

“You must not think, my dear Alice, that those only can
speak for Christ, and win souls to Him, who can preach an
eloquent sermon or are gifted in private conversation. A
single word from a yearning heart, a sentence earnestly and
feelingly spoken, has often been blessed of God to this end.
Keep near to Christ, and let His Spirit dwell in your heart ;
then watch for opportunities, with continual prayer that you
“may use them wisely. Do this, and your life-work will be one
that shall assuredly win the approval of the Master. Money
may be made a means of great usefulness, but if its possessor
puts the use of it in the place of personal service for Christ, he
' makes a sad mistake.”

“T might have made just that mistake, if this expected
wealth had come into my possession,” said Alice. “It may
be altogether best for me that it did not.”

“There is no ‘may be’ in the case, my dear young friend.
We can be absolutely sure that it is for the best, or it had
never been. ‘All things work together for good to them
that love God.’ There is no possibility of any exception to
that rule.”
Singing of the Saviour. 159

“T am very glad that I have had this conversation with you,
my dear Mrs. Carroll,” said Alice. “You have helped me, as
you always do. I shall not forget what you have said about
the blessing that may follow a few words for the Saviour. It
places the matter in a new light.”

It was indeed a seed of truth bearing fruit in the future.
Several months later, in a letter to this dear friend, Alice wrote:
“T must tell you of something that has interested me deeply !
One of my music pupils has a brother of whom she is very fond.
He was taken ill several weeks since, and the symptoms were
such as to awaken serious apprehensions. He is an interesting
young man, with qualities that have won for him a large circle
of friends. His Christian friends have been deeply anxious for
his soul’s welfare, and some of them would gladly have con-
versed with him on the subject had they been allowed to do so.
But the family feared that any conversation of this nature
might cause him to infer that his case was regarded as critical,
and thus lead to an excitement and agitation which would
prove injurious to him, for they still clung to the delusive hope
that he might recover.

“ Having met him several times, I was somewhat acquainted
with him. One day his sister asked me if I would not go home
and play for her brother, who was very fond of music. I con-
sented, and after prayer, resolved that if I could not speak to
him on the subject, I would at least sing to him of the
Saviour.

“ After playing several pieces, which were chosen either by
him or his sister, I sang and played a piece of sacred music
which, it seemed to me, was just suited to his case, as it was
full of the love of Christ. The young man listened attentively,
and when I left made me promise that I would come again.

“J did not long delay. ‘What shall I play this time?’
T asked, as I took my place at the piano. ‘I want to hear
160 Revival in the School.

what you played when you were here before,’ he answered 5
‘those are the songs for me; I do not care to hear any
other.’

“He has since sought conversation with Christian friends,
and manifested the deepest interest in the subject of his soul’s
salvation. It is now thought that he cannot live many weeks,
but his friends hope that he is prepared for an exchange of
worlds. I am very glad that I could sing to him of Christ at
a time when friends were forbidden to mention the ‘name
which is above every name.’ ”

Some months later Alice again wrote: “I told you, my
dear friend, in my last letter, of the work of grace, quiet,
yet deep, which has been going on in this school during the
latter portion of the winter, and in which so many of our
dear young ladies have hada share. I have also mentioned
our little prayer-meetings that have been so precious. I
must now tell you about the prayer-meeting of last evening.
The teacher who conducted it proposed that each of the
young ladies who had that winter consecrated all to Christ
should briefly relate something of the way in which she had
been led, and especially mention what was the first thing
that had directed her attention to the subject. Our little
meeting has always been one of great freedom, and the
young ladies readily responded to this request. I cannot
tell you what I felt when two of these dear girls mentioned
some little thing I had said as the first thing which had led
them to serious thoughts and purposes about this subject.
Never in my life have I felt more humbled. The instrumen-
tality was so feeble, and the grace seemed so wonderful that
could employ such means in the infinite work of saving souls.

“It made me think of the conversation I had with you
about winning souls for Christ. I must tell you more about
it, that you may with me give God all the glory. The first
Mary Carter and Lucy Lee. 161

who spoke was Mary Carter. She is an orphan, like myself.
This has very much drawn my heart towards her. One day
her room-mate had received a joint letter from her parents
which had given her great pleasure, so great that she wished
to share it with others ; and with a face aglow with happiness
she repeated a part of its contents to her room-mate and me.
I looked at Mary. Tears stood in her eyes. Seeing that I
observed them, and feeling that I would understand their
cause, she said mournfully, ‘I have no parents to write to
me.’ J knew how to feel for her. Placing my hand upon a
Bible which lay on a table by our side, I said, ‘ This is your
Father's letter to you, dear Mary. He has promised to be the
Father of the fatherless.’? This was all I said. It was little,
indeed, yet it pleased God to bless these few words spoken in
weakness, for last evening the dear girl said that from that
time she never rested until she could feel that God was indeed
her Father, and that the Bible was His letter to her.

“ The second was Lucy Lee. She is a warm-hearted girl,
and I seemed at once to win her love. In her warm, im-
pulsive way she said to me one day, ‘My dear Miss Grey,
you don’t know how much I love you.’ ‘My dear Lucy, I
said, ‘I am very glad, for I greatly prize your love. You
have a warm, loving heart, just such a heart as the Saviour
wants. Will you not give it to Him?’ Lucy mentioned in
the meeting last night what I then said to her, and the im-
pression it had made upon her mind.

“TI could not have written of this to any but yourself, but
Iam sure that you will not misunderstand me, and it is in
this assurance that I always write so freely to you. Besides,
it was you who led me to see that a word spoken in weakness
may be blessed of Him who is able to make the weak things
of this world show forth the riches of the glory of His grace
in Christ Jesus.”






CHAPTER XVIII,

A SURPRISE

THE time was drawing near for the long summer vacation, which
Alice expected to spend in Maysville with her uncle and aunt
and her dear Mrs. Carroll. Only a few weeks still remained of
the term, when she received a letter from Mrs. Carroll contain-
ing unexpected information.

“Two weeks since,” she wrote, “my son was appointed
minister of the church at Leyham, a pleasant village in this
county. There is a very neat parsonage. Arthur proposes
to take possession of this at once, and wishes me to leave
my home here and preside over the parsonage. Of course I
do not expect or wish to be its mistress long, for I think that
every pastor, both for his own sake and that of his parish,
should have a wife. But Arthur says that his home must, from
this time, be my home, We shall be well settled by the time
your vacation commences, and I shall insist upon your spending
the first week of it with me, as I cannot consent that my
leaving Maysville should deprive me of the pleasure of seeing
you during the coming holidays.”

Two or three weeks later another letter from Mrs. Carroll
informed Alice that they were snugly settled in the parsonage,
and were much pleased with their new home. The former
invitation was repeated with increased urgency. “You really
The Visit to Leyham, 163

must come,” wrote Mrs. Carroll. It will be such a comfort
to see you, now that I am so far from all my former friends.
Do not disappoint me. I fear that I shall find it hard to
forgive you, if you do, unless prevented by some obstacle
which cannot be overcome. I am sure you will be pleased
with our home, and it shall not be my fault if you do not
enjoy the visit. Write what day I may expect you, and I will
meet you at the railway station, which is only a short distance
from the parsonage.”

Alice could not resist an invitation so warmly pressed,
especially as it would be a great disappointment to her not to
see Mrs. Carroll during the vacation. She therefore arranged
to spend a week in Leyham, on her way to Maysville.

On reaching Leyham, a quick survey of the group on the
platform served to show that her friend Mrs Carroll was there,
waiting to receive her; and she no longer felt like a stranger
in a strange place.

“ You are really here,” said Mrs. Carroll, grasping her hand.
“ This is indeed pleasant. I was so desirous to see you that I
feared a disappointment. The distance is so short we shall
not need acarriage. I will give directions to have your trunk
sent up, and then we shall be ready to go.”

This was soon done, and Alice found herself making her
way through a pleasant street to the new home of her friend.

“ Arthur is gone,” explained Mrs. Carroll, as they walked
along; “so there is no one to meet and welcome you but
myself. I hoped that he would be here also, but yesterday he
was unexpectedly called from home, and will not return until
about this time to-morrow. There seems to be some fatality
about your meeting him. You have come near it several
times, and have just missed it, and now that you are here, he
is absent. Never mind, we will have the next twenty-four
hours all to ourselves ; and perhaps our little confidences will
164 The Meeting with Arthur.

be exhausted by that time, so that the presence of a third
person will be no interruption.”

Alice was well pleased to have her dear friend all to her-
self for a time, without the presence of a stranger.

The hours passed all too soon, so Alice thought, shrinking
from the meeting. She hardly knew why, but it seemed
almost awkward to meet asa stranger one who was so near
and dear to her own dear friend; yet mingling with this reluc-

‘tance was a feeling of no little interest to see one of whom
she had heard so much.

“The train is coming,” said Mrs. Carroll, “my son will soon
be here,” and she went to the door to meet him.

Alice’s cheeks glowed and her eyes betrayed unwonted
emotion, when, a moment later, she took the hand extended to
her by Arthur Carroll, and responded as well as she was able
to his cordial greeting.

The young minister, however, saw nothing of all this, except
that the blush with which the young lady received his greeting
was decidedly becoming; but his mother, who knew her
thoroughly, saw much more than this. She saw that the usual
quiet self-possession of her young friend was a little disturbed.
Never had she seen that expression in the eyes of Alice, except
when something had touched her feelings, and she much
wondered what was now in her thoughts. The mystery was
soon explained.

“T am happy to meet you at last,” said Mr. Carroll. “TI
have heard my mother speak of you so often that you cannot
seem like a stranger. I think it is strange that we have not
met before.”

The answer was most unexpected.

“Indeed, Mr. Carroll, we have met once before, and I have
good reason to remember that interview. Do you recollect,
years ago, a party visiting the beautiful Falls in the neighbour-
te

ISS

es

Li

















































































































iy
SHE TOOK THE HAND EXTENDED TO HER.”

An Old Acquaintance. 167

ing county, who. were driven to take shelter from the rain in
the cottage where you were a guest ?”

“I remember it well. The morning was very fine.”

“‘ Perhaps you remember that one of the party was a young
girl with whom you had some conversation.”

“TI do remember it. I have thought of that conversation
many times since. Can it be possible you are the young lady
I met at that time?”

“Tt is evenso. I recognised you the moment I saw you
coming up the walk, and it was a great surprise.”

“Vou must have changed very much,” said Mr. Carroll,
“ or else the recollection I have retained of your countenance
is much less distinct than of a part of our conversation that
day. I have wondered many times whether that young lady
had been taught of God the meaning of the passage to which
I then referred her.”

“That question is already answered,” said Mrs. Carroll.
“ Alice has told me of that interview and its enduring effect
upon her mind; but I little thought my own son was the young
man whose privilege it was to speak that word in season.”

“And Jas little thought that the seed then dropped would
afterwards be watered by the counsels and prayers of my own
precious mother. This is most gratifying news.”

“Tt has given a very unexpected character to our meeting
to-day,” said Mrs. Carroll. “ How thankful we ought to be
when we think of the wonderful ways in which God can make
us, in our weakness, a blessing to each other.”

Years had passed since the little seed was dropped by one
whose continual prayer was that he might be made wise to win
souls. Other seeds, too, had been dropped there by other
labourers in the vineyard, and all had been tended and watered
by the great Husbandman. In love He had drawn this soul
to Himself, and in love unfathomable He had employed the
168 United for Life.

ministry of sorrow to soften and purify and bring the heart to
a more complete consecration to Himself.

Tt surely was not strange that the young pastor watched with
interest the Christian character thus developed. As he saw
how the Lord of the harvest had fitted this young disciple to
work in His vineyard, there grew in his heart a strong desire
that she should be his helper in the field where he was called
to labour, that together, sometimes in joy and sometimes in
tears, they might sow the precious seed which, watered by the
dews of heaven, should spring up and yield fruit unto eternal
life,

Mrs. Carroll, who had tong ago given to Alice almost a
mother’s love, was weil prepared to share largely in the joy of
her son when this desire was granted,

THE END.


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Our Den. By E. M. Waterworth, Author of “ Master
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Raymond’s Rival; or, Which will Win? By Jennie
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Ronald Kennedy ; or, A Domestic Difficulty. By Evelyn
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Recitations and Concerted Pieces for Bands of Hope,
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Sweet Nancy. By L. T. Meade, Author of “Scamp and
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Twice Saved; or, Somebody’s Pet and Nobody’s Darling.
By E. M. Waterworth, Author of “ Our Den,” “ Master Lionel,” etc.

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Three Runaways. By F. Scarlett Potter, Author of
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Wna Bruce’s Troubles. By Alice Price, Author of

+“ Hamilton of King’s,” etc. Illustrated by Harold Copping.

Under the Blossom. By Margaret Haycraft, Author
of * Like a Little Candle ; or, Bertrand’s Influence,” etc.

Wait till it Blooms. By Jennie Chappell, Author of
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Who was the Culprit? By Jennie Chappell, Author
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14s S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO’S





Iss @ach (continued).
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Crown 8vo, well printed on good paper, and bound in attractive and
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Louie’s Married Life. By | Living it Down. By Laura M.

Sarah Doudney. Lane,

‘The Strait Gate. Eaglehurst Towers. By Mrs.
The Better Part By ope aS al

2 Seanee Annie | Without a Thought. \ ye
ar kag Descorousts S. Her Saddest Blessing. dents,

Yow,
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and For Lucy’s Sake. Courtenay. "By Emma Marshall.

The above can also be had in fancy cloth, price Is, 6d,



CHEAP: REPRINTS OF POPULAR STORIES FOR THE YOUNG.
Crown 8vo. 160 pages. Illustrated. . Cloth boards, is. cach.
*Rag and Tag: A Plea for the Waifs and Strays of

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Manchester House: A Tale of Two Apprentices.
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Like a Little Candle; or, Bertrand’s Influence.
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Violet Maitland ; or, By Thorny Ways. By Laura M. Lane.
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Is. each (continued).
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Bright Beams and Happy Scenes: A Picture
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Holiday Hours in Animal Land. (New Series.)
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Bible Jewels. | Bible. Wonders.
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The Giants, and How to Fight Them.
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16 CATALOGUE OF NEW & POPULAR WORKS.



Is. each: (continued).
The Master’s Gifts to Women. By Mrs. Charlotte
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CATALOGUE OF NEW & POPULAR WORKS. 1}



9d. each (continued),

Foolish Chrissy ; or, Discontent and its Consequences. By
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Giddie Gariend: or, The Three Mirrors. By Jennie
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Grandmother’s Child. By Annie S. Swan.

Jean Jacques: A Story of the Franco-Prussian War. By
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John Oriel’s Start in Life. By Mary Howitt.
Little Mother. By Margaret Haycraft.
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Letty; or, The Father of the Fatherless. By H. Clement,
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Love’s Golden Key; or, The Witch of Berryton. By
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Master Lionel, that Tiresome Child. By E. M.
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Man of the Family (The). By Jennie Chappell.
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Rosie Dimple’s Pictures and Stories for Tiny
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Playful Pussies’ Book of Pictures and Stories.

Little Snowdrop’s Bible Picture-Book.

This New Series of Picture Books surpasses, in excellence of illustration
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13 ss S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO?S°- Ae
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Gd. each (continued),

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A Great Mistake. By Jennie
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From Hand to Hand. By C.
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That Boy Bob. By Jesse Page.
Buy Your Own Cherries. By
J. W. Kirton.
Owen's Fortune.

est.
Only Milly ; or, A Child’s King-
dom

Shad’s Christmas Gift.
Greycliffe Abbey.

Red Daves; or, What Wilt Thou
have Me to do?

Harry’s Monkey: How it Helped

the Missionaries,

By Mrs. F.

Snowdrops; or, Life from the
Dead

ead.
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ord.
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The Pearly Gates.

Jessie Dyson,

Maude’s Visit to Sandybeach.
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The Pedlar’s Loan.

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Brave Boys.

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Wise to Win; or, The Master
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Echoing and Re-eehoing,
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Tip Lewis and His Lamp.
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Wise and Otherwise. i
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The Randolphs.

Mrs. Solomon Smith Looking

On.
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