Citation
Bulbs and blossoms

Material Information

Title:
Bulbs and blossoms
Creator:
Le Feuvre, Amy
Lance, Eveline ( Illustrator )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Butler and Tanner ( Printer )
Selwood Printing Works ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
Butler & Tanner ; Selwood Printing Works
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
48 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Easter -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Death -- Religious aspects -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Gardens -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Intergenerational relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Frome
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Amy Le Feuvre ; illustrated by Eveline Lance.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026843991 ( ALEPH )
ALH3305 ( NOTIS )
14483814 ( OCLC )

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CHAPTER I
The Ugly Flower Pots

was five o'clock in the afternoon. Miss
Hunter, a tall, dignified-looking woman,
was presiding at the afternoon tea-table
in the ‘drawing-room of Chatts Chase.
Miss Amabel Hunter stood at the window
in a rather muddy riding-habit, and she

was speaking in her sharp, short tones to



her twin sister Hester, who lay back in
the depths of a large armchair, a novel
open in her lap. Sitting by the cheery wood fire was the
. youngest of the sisters, a frail and delicate invalid. She was
turning her face anxiously towards the speaker, and now put in
her word very gently.

‘We only thought, Amabel, that it would have comforted the
poor children if you had returned with them in the brougham.
An aunt would naturally have been more acceptable to them
than a strange maid.’

‘But I tell you, Sibyl, they ate with their own nurse, and
Graham will be far more likely to put them all at ease than
I should. They will hear that “Miss *Unter is the missis, and

?
o



8 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

lets every one know she is. Miss "Ester keeps the maids on
their legs all day long because she won’t use hers. Miss
H’Amabel does the sporting gent, and is never indoors except
to meals; while Miss Sibyl—well, there, she is not much ’count
in the fam’ly, for she can’t say bo to a goose, and doesn’t mind —
how people put on her!”?

“You saw the children, I suppose?’ questioned Miss Hunter
gravely.

“Of course I did. I rode down fo the station for that express
purpose. They are two skinny, puny little monkeys, enveloped
in bundles of wraps. I packed them all up comfortably in the
carriage, and rode on to tell you of their arrival. I don’t seem
to have done the right thing, as usual; but that is always the
way. Here is the carriage lumbering up the drive. Now you
had all better go out on the steps and overwhelm them with
kisses and caresses. Only may I ask that they should be taken
straight up to their nursery, and not brought in here?’

‘One would think, to hear you talk, that you hated children,
murmured Miss Sibyl; ‘it is a good thing that Percy and his
wife cannot hear you.’

Miss Hunter left the room at once, and curiosity drew Sibyl
and Hester after her, to see the little nephew and niece who
had been sent to them from India from their only brother.

The four Miss Hunters lived very comfortably together,
though they were all, with the exception of Sibyl, rather self-
willed, opinionated women.
and grey hairs plentiful between them, they had earned the dis-



THE UGLY,FLOWER POTS 9

tinction of being looked upon as ‘old maids, and some wag
having one day obliterated the ‘h’ in Chatts Chase, the house
was now familiarly called ‘Pussy’s Chase. This did not dis-
turb the good ladies when it came to their ears, for they had
large souls, a keen sense of humour, and too much interest in
life to be fretted by village gossip.

They were now full of plans and purposes regarding the two
small children about to be placed in their charge, and no two
visitors could have caused more excitement and preparation in
the quiet household than did this little couple from India.

‘Well, asked Miss Amabel, as, after a great deal of bustle
and talk in the hall, the sisters came back to the drawing-room,
‘and what are your impressions of the kids?’

‘Poor little mites!’ said Miss Sibyl; ‘they seem so very white
and sickly in appearance, that we were quite astonished at the
way they scampered upstairs. I am thankful they were sent
back in charge of an English nurse. Those ayahs are always
so unsatisfactory.’

Before many days the children astonished their aunts still
more by their agility and ingenuity in mischief of all sorts.
Roland, a fair, curly-haired little fellow of seven, led his smaller
sister Olive into every kind of audacious escapade. Their
“Spirits were unflagging, though at times their frail-looking little
bodies seemed to droop under their activity.

Miss Hunter came upon little Olive one afternoon sitting on
the stairs in a breathless, exhausted state, and Roland was re-

monstrating with her.



10 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘You've only run up twenty-five times, Olive, and youve |
tired already; it’s a mile race, and you must go on,

‘She must do nothing of the sort, Roland, said Miss Hunter
sternly. ‘I will not let you tear up and down stairs all day in
this fashion. What do you mean by it?’

‘We can’t be idle, auntie, said Roland, shaking his curls back,
and speaking with decision. ‘Nurse has the toothache, and
won't take us out. Father says people can be idle very easily,
and put it down to the climate, and “idle hands find mischief,”
he says, and father is never idle. If we don’t run up and down

stairs, where can we run? We like





the stairs best, because we never have
stairs in India’

“Send them into the garden, Marion,
called out Miss Amabel, from the gar-

den door; ‘I am going to the





















































































































































‘ a stables, and then I will look
*y after them,
Ny i: pete Little Olive jumped
jf ~S PS i . §Oh, let us go
y Fe ioe ‘th, out, auntie, and
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AA ON ah ees si He ie flowers.’
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Tae UG hrEOWE R POT s II

Go quietly upstairs, and ask nurse to wrap you up well, as it
is rather cold out.’

And then Miss Hunter, who found children rather a per-
plexing problem, ,walked back to her book and her fireside, and
thought no more about them.

Roland and Olive danced out of doors a little time after, in
delight at finding themselves unattended.

‘Now, said Roland peremptorily, ‘we're going for a walk,
Olive, and you are not to get tired. And we'll go and find
those big iron gates first of all; they’re down this road.’

Down the avenue trotted the children; it was fully half a mile
long, and the thick shrubberies on either side rather alarmed
the little girl.

‘You're guzte sure there isn’t a tiger in the bushes?’ she
asked repeatedly.

And Roland in superior tones replied,—

‘I’ve told you the English people caught all their tigers long
ago, and put them in a garden in London. Father told me so’

‘And what’s outside the big gates, Roly—a jungle?’

‘No, I think the trains are. I want to go and see them.
Come on!’

They reached the gates, but found them shut, and as Roland
was exerting all his strength to open them, an old man stepped
out of the pretty little lodge close by.

‘Why, where be ye off to, little master?’ he asked with a
beaming smile. ‘Isn’t your nurse with you this afternoon ?’

‘No; we're taking a walk. Open the gates, please.’



12 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

But this the old man did not seem willing to do.
‘Won't ye come into my little parlour here, and pay me a
visit? My niece, Jane, is away to market to-day, and I be

very lonely. Old Bob has a lot of pretty things in his room,’

,



Roland hesitated, but when Olive with sparkling eyes ran in
at the open door, he followed, saying,—
‘We always like to pay visits, so if you’re a good and nice —

man we'll come in. Mother only likes us to talk to very nice











THE UGLY FLOWER POTS ae

people; but I s’pose every one in England is nice, because. °
they’re white, and it’s only the blacks that don’t know better.’

The old man laughed, and his quaint, old-fashioned room,
with a cheery’ fire and bright coloured prints round the walls, ’
delighted his little guests.

‘What are those ugly pots in your window without. any
flowers ?’ asked Roland presently.

Old Bob gave a little sigh and a smile.

‘Ah, you've hit upon my greatest treasures,’ he said. ‘You
won’t call them ugly pots when Easter comes.’

‘What is Easter?’ asked both the children.

‘The happiest time in the whole year to me,’ said Bob, shaking
his head; ‘but another day Dll tell you the tale of those pots—
not to-day,’

‘And have you got a garden?’ asked Roland eagerly. ‘Olive
and me love flowers, but England doesn’t seem to have any out
of doors.’

‘Come and see my garden, said the old man proudly; ‘it’s
the joy of my life, next to them there “ugly pots” !’

He led the way to the back of the house, where was a good-
sized cottage garden; but the children’s faces fell considerably
_when they saw the barren desolation, for Bob had no evergreen
shrubs, and only some rows of cabbages and broccoli showed
signs of life.

“It’s all brown earth and dead things—no flowers at all!’
they exclaimed.

‘But this is the wrong time o’ year, Bob said apologetically ;



16 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘there be heaps o’ beautiful stuff all under the earth, awaitin’ to
* come up in their time.’

‘But why don’t you make them come up now? What’s the
good of a garden without flowers? In India we have lovely
flowers.’

‘Winter is a-comin’ on, my dears; you won’t see my pretty
flowers just yet. They’re fast asleep bidin’ their time; no frost
or cold can touch ’em—bidin’ their time!’ .

Bob’s face looked wistful as he gazed at his empty flower
beds.

‘What’s winter?’ asked Olive curiously.

‘Bless the little dear, has she never known a winter? ’Tis
the dreary dark time of waitin’, the sunless, joyless bit o’ all the
year, when the singin’ birds fly away, the butterflies and flowers
die, and the very trees sigh and moan in their bareness and
decay. ’Tis an empty bit o’ ‘life, when all that makes life sweet
falls to pieces and fades away.’

This was not quite intelligible to the children; but they
shivered a little at the gloom in the old man’s tone, and Olive’s
blue eyes filled with tears. :

‘I don’t want to stay here in winter, she said; ‘let’s go back
to India, Roly!’

Roland stood with knitted brows considering.

‘Who makes the winter?’ he asked. ‘Does the devil? Be-
cause God only makes beautiful things, doesn’t He?’

Old Bob raised his hat, and looked up into the grey autumnal

sky with a smile.





THE UGLY FLOWER POTS 17



































Gig ==FUnY

— at
7, 4a



‘Nay, little master, the devil wouldn’t have wished to give us
such a lesson as winter teaches us. ’Tis God Almighty in His
love that gives us winter, to try our faith and patience, and teach
us hope’s lessons. If we had no winter, we should have no
Easter, and ’tis well worth the waitin’ for!’

“And does everything die in winter >?’ asked Roland in a
mournful voice.

His question was unanswered, for Miss Amabel appeared on
the scene.

‘Oh, you children!’ she exclaimed breathlessly. ‘What a
chase I have had after you! If I had known you were in such
safe quarters, I would have spared myself the trouble of looking
for you. Have they been here long, Bob?’

. ‘Nigh on a quarter o’ an hour, Miss Amabel. They was for
going out at the gate, but I ’ticed ’em in to my place.’

‘Much obliged to you. Now, chicks, remember this, you're
never to go outside those gates alone. Come back to the house
with me, and say good-bye to Bob.’

‘

* *



18 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

Olive lifted up her little face to be kissed by the old man,
and Roland held out his hand.

‘Good-bye, Mr. Bob. We will come and see you again, and
you will tell us about your ugly pots.’

Then as they walked up the avenue by the side of their
aunt, Roland said to her, pointing to the leafless trees above
them,—

‘We don’t have ugly trees like that in India. Why don’t
you cut them all down? They're quite dead, aren’t they?’

‘No, indeed, replied Miss Amabel briskly; ‘they'll all come
to life again next spring.’

‘Is spring Easter that Mr. Bob was telling us about?’

‘Yes, Easter comes in spring,

‘And does everything dead come to life in spring?’

‘A good many things in the garden do, said Miss Amabel
carelessly.

‘Why does God make winter in England, and not in India?
Is He angry with the people in England ?’

‘Bless the boy! What a curiosity-box! Keep your questions
for Aunt Sibyl—she will appreciate them. And as for winter, |
couldn’t do without it, for there would be no hunting then,
and I should feel half my enjoyment gone in life.’

‘Do you like winter, Aunt Am’bel?’ asked Olive.

‘Yes, I love it; and so will you when you become hardy and
rosy, like English boys and girls!’

The children looked very doubtful at this statement, but did -
not dispute it.








t ae

Byeeaee
:

CHAPTER II
Under the Earth

HE next day was still colder, but the children, in com-
pany with their nurse, found a delightful retreat in the
garden, and this was in the conservatory. James, the
old gardener, was always glad of some one to talk to, and he
and nurse were soon fast friends. He took them into the
vinery, then into the fern house, and lastly into the conserva-
tory next the house, which was a brilliant mass of bloom and
blossoms.
Olive clapped her hands in delight.
‘We are back in India, Roly. Oh, how nice and warm !’
‘We will always come and play here, said Roland. Then,

looking up at the old gardener, he said,—

19



20° BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘You never let winter come here, do you?’

‘Not if I can help it, said James with a dry chuckle. ‘Me
and Jack Frost have had many a fight, but I gets the better
of him generally.’

‘Who is Jack Frost?’

‘Ha! ha! Not heerd o’ Jack Frost? Well, unless Pm
much mistaken he'll pay us a visit to-night, and then you'll
feel him as well as see him.’

Olive looked puzzled, but Roland’s mind was working too
busily to heed Jack Frost. He walked round and round the
flowers, then he remarked abruptly, ‘If you don’t have winter
here, you won’t have a Easter—Mr. Bob said so!’

‘Oh, there!’ said nurse with a laugh, ‘don’t heed his curious
talk, Mr. Jenkins; he’s such a dreadful child for arguing.’

She and James continued their chat, and the children sat
down on a low wicker seat, playing with the fallen fuchsia
buds, and comparing their present life with the one they had
so lately left. |
-*] wish Mr. Bob had a nice glass house like this, said Olive
thoughtfully. ‘Why doesn’t he, Roly?’

‘We'll ask him next time we see him. I expect he is too
poor.’

‘And, Roly, do you think Jack Frost is a thief who tries to
steal James’s flowers?’

‘IT don’t know.’

A little later, when nurse was taking them into the house,

Olive inquired again, rather anxiously, ‘Nurse, I hope Jack



UNDER THE EARTH 21

Frost won’t come to us when we're in bed ; James seemed to
think we should feel him

_ No, no, Miss Olive; Tl tuck you up too warm for that.
There will be no Jack Frost in our nursery, I can tell you. I
keep too big a fire.’

But the little girl was anxious and ill at ease, till at last she
'unburdened her mind to Miss Sibyl, when she went to wish
her ‘ good-night’ in the drawing-room.

‘Why, Olive dear, Jack Frost isn’t a man; that is only a
joke. When it is very cold the air freezes, and the pretty dew-
drops on the grass and flowers all turn to ice. Have you never
seen a frost?’

‘No, never,’

‘Frosts kill all the flowers—that is why James does not like
it coming; but it is the flowers out of doors that feel it
most.’ i

‘But, said Roland, edging up to his aunt, ‘there are no
flowers to kill; there are only bare, dried-up trees and dark
bushes. Mr. Bob told us they had all gone to sleep under the
ground,’

“So they have, but it is frost and cold that has killed them
off?

‘I don’t like England,’ said little Olive mournfully ; and when
she was comfortably tucked up in bed that night, she said
sleepily, ‘If I had a nice garden of flowers, I wouldn’t leave
them all-out in the cold and dark to die, and I’ll never live

in England when I grow up, for winter is a dreadful thing!’



22 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

The children soon found out what frost and cold meant; but
the novelty of the small icicles outside their windows, and the
beauty of the hoar frost glittering on the trees and bushes in
the sunshine, more than compensated for the uncomfortable
experience of cold hands and feet.

They soon paid a visit to old Bob again, and this time he



took them into the old-fashioned churchyard, which lay just
outside the lodge gates on the other side of the road.
‘This is my other garden, he said gravely, ‘for I gets. so
much from the rector every year for keeping the ground tidy.’
Roland and Olive looked round them with much interest.
Old Bob took them to a quiet corner soon, and’ pointed out

five grassy mounds all in a row.





UNDER THE EARTH 23

‘There!’ he said, his old face quivering all over; ‘under-
neath them mounds are my dear wife and four children, all
taken. from me in less than one month.

‘Did they die?’ asked Roland with solemn eyes.

‘The Lord took ’em. ’Twas the scarlet fever was ragin’ in
our village; little Bessie, our baby, was the first one to take it.
She were only five year old, and as merry as a cricket; then
Rob and Harry, big lads o’ twelve and thirteen, were stricken
next, and then Nellie, her mother’s right hand; and the poor
wife nursed ’em all through herself, and just lived to see the
last o’ the four buried, and then she follered them, and I were
left in the empty house alone.’

Little Olive squeezed the old man’s hand tightly.

‘I feel as if I was going to cry,’ she said. ‘Why did God make
them die, Mr. Bob?’

Bob raised his face to the sky above him.

‘He didn’t tell me why, he said; ‘but He’ll tell me one day.
*Twas just at this time o’ year they were taken. Ah,dear! That
were a terrible winter for me! It all seemed dark and drear, and
not a gleam of sunshine in sight. But thank the good Lord I got
my bit o’ cheer when Easter came. And it have come reg’lar and |
fresh like every Easter since. Do you mind them “ugly pots”
in my window? Now you come back with me, and I'll tell you
their story. ’Tis too cold for us to be standin’ here, but don’t
forget my five grassy mounds in this corner when I tells the
tale!’

As the children turned “away to follow him, Roland said



\

$24 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

thoughtfully, ‘They’re all under the ground, just like you- say
the flowers are!’

Old Bob smiled. :

‘That's it, Master Roland! That’s my comfort. You've hit
upon ‘the very thing I was agoin’ to explain!’

And then.a few minutes after, taking little Olive upon his knees,
and making Roland sit in a small chair on the opposite side of the.
fireplace, the old man began,—

‘My dear wife were powerful fond o’ flowers, and she were quite
as clever at rearing ’em as ever I were. She would get cuttin’s
from James Green up at the house, and in summer our garden was
just a pictur’ Just before she were a taken ill, James had sent her
down a lily bulb, a beautiful pure white one, and she’d putit in a
pot in our cellar, and says she to me, “Bob, I means to bring that

1

_ lily out by Easter ; with care I’m sure I shall do it Then when '
she were near her end, and she seed me a-frettin’ my heart out,
she calls me to her bed. “ Bob,” says she, “take care o’ my lily,
and, Bob dear, when Easter comes-and you See it a-burstin’ out
in all its beauty, then think o’ me and the children.” “So also is
the resurrection of the dead. . . . It is sown in dishonour, it is
raised in glory.; it is sown in. weakness, it is raised in power.”
“For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them
also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him!” Them were
the very two tex’s she said to me, and then she says: “The nex’
time you'll see me, Bob, will be in my body o’ glory! Unless you’
foller me first, but I can’t help thinking,” she says, “that the

Resurrection mayn’t be far off!” And so she left me!’











a



UNDER THE EARTH 27

There was a pause. Bob wiped his eyes with his handkerchief,
then put Olive down from his knees and walked across to his
flower-pots.

The children followed him silently, and peeped over the edge of
the pots, only to see bare brown earth, and their faces fell at the
sight.

Bob turned to them with a smile: ‘This here big pot in the
middle is my wife’s lily ; I set to work when she went, and got four
other o’ the same kind ©’ bulb and planted them in these smaller
pots. This one is Bessie’s, that one is Nellie’s, and the others are
just Bob’s and Harry’s. Well, all that winter I goes to my graves
in the churchyard, and comes back to these pots, and I shakes my
head over them all, and couldn’t get no comfort nohow. But shall
I ever forget a-comin’ into my kitchen on Easter Sunday, and seein’
the sun shine in upon five pure white lilies! I just fell a-sobbin’
on my knees beside them. “Lord,” I says, “I knows as certain
sure as I sees these lilies now, and
remembers all the silence and darkness
that came upon them from the time
they were put in the earth, that Thou

wilt give me back my dear ones ten




thousand times more beautiful than

ever I saw ’em here! And if their Easter



will come a little later, ’tis just as sure!”
Ay, little ones, and for three years the

Lord has delighted my soul by bringin’ up



_ these lilies at Easter time, just to tell me



28 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

that my graves is goin’ to be opened like the Lord’s Himself,
and I’m a-goin’ to see my family again. The devil himself may
tempt and try one in the winter, but away he goes in the spring,
when every bit o’ this blessed earth is preaching the resurrection
to us!’ |

Much of this was above the children’s heads, but Roland
said, after a minute’s thought, ‘Will dead people come up out
of the ground like the flowers?’

‘Ay, Master Roland, the flowers are a very poor picture of
the glorified body,’

‘And they go to sleep in the winter time?’ the boy went
on; ‘and how often does Easter come?’

‘The flowers have their Easter every year, but we have to
wait a little longer for ours. I ofttimes think that when the
Lord do come down from heaven with a shout, He will choose
Easter Sunday to wake the dead, for ’tis the day He rose
Himself!’

Old Bob did not say much more, and Roland and Olive went
back to the house thinking busily.

The next day was Sunday, and they went to church with
their aunts; but directly the service was over, Roland, who was
walking with ‘Miss Hester, pulled her by the hand towards
Bob’s five graves in the corner.

‘Do just let me look at them again! Have you got .any
graves here, Aunt Hester? I wish I had some. Poor Bob has
too many, hasn’t he?’

Miss Hester gave a little shiver.



UNDER THE EARTH 29

‘What an extraordinary child you are! You don’t know the
meaning of graves, or you wouldn’t talk so!’

“Yes, I do, said Roland earnestly; ‘the earth is full of
graves in winter; these graves in the churchyard belong to
dead people, but the dead flowers are everywhere, and they’re
all coming up at Easter—Mr. Bob said so.’

‘Bob fills your head with a lot of nonsense; come along.’

The boy felt snubbed, and said no more; but that afternoon,
when he and his little sister came down
to the drawing-room, the subject was
opened afresh.

Their aunts found Sunday afternoon
long and tedious, especially as now a
heavy downpour of sleet and rain had set
in, and it was in the hope of being amused
that Miss Hunter sent for the children.

Miss Hester was on one of the sofas

half asleep; Miss Amabel standing on



the hearthrug with her back to the fire;
whilst Miss Sibyl and Miss Hunter were
both trying to read books of a religious character, and feeling
very dull and bored.
'. ‘Now come and talk to us, said Miss Amabel briskly, as
the children appeared ; ‘we are all bored to death, and we want
you to entertain us.’

Roland sat down on a footstool, and clasped his knees in an

old-fashioned way. Olive ran to Miss Hunter and climbed into



30 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

her lap. She was accustomed to be petted, and looked upon
grown-up people’s knees as her rightful privilege.

‘What shall we talk about?’ asked Roland.

‘Let’s ask Aunt Marion to tell us the story of Easter Sunday,’
suggested Olive. ;

‘Yes, nurse doesn’t know it properly—she makes it so short.’

Miss Hunter looked helplessly at her sisters.

‘Tm not good at Bible stories, she said; ‘I forget them so.’

‘You tell us what you know about it, said Miss Amabel.

Roland puckered his brows for a moment, then he began,—

‘Jesus was dead—quite, quite dead. He had been hung on
the cross, and killed by wicked, cruel men; and all His friends
were crying and sobbing, and He was put in a grave, and
soldiers stood outside.’

‘All His friends were crying and sobbing, repeated Olive,
shaking her little head mournfully at Miss Hunter, ‘and they
thought they were never going to see Him again; never,
never \’

‘And then,’ continued Roland, ‘suddenly, bang! bang! the
great stone grave broke open, and two beautiful angels flew
down from heaven, and Jesus Christ came rising up from the
grave quite well and strong again, and the soldiers ran away,
and the good women came near.’

‘And the good women were sobbing and crying,’ put in Olive
again, ‘and they thought they were never going to see Him
again, ever}?

‘And then one of them, called Mary, saw some one in the

\



UNDER THE EARTH 31

garden, and she didn’t quite know who it
was; and then He called out her name,
and then she saw it was Jesus Himself?

‘Jesus Himself, quite well and strong,
and wasn’t she glad!’ repeated little
Olive.

‘And that’s what happened on Easter
Sunday,’ said Roland.

There was silence. The children’s
soft, earnest voices and the sweet Bible
story touched the hearts of those who
heard it.

‘And how long will it be before



Easter?’ asked Olive, after a pause.

‘Oh, a long, long time. Why, we haven’t come to Christmas !
We don’t want Easter to come yet.

‘Mr. Bob says Easter is the happiest time in all the year; he
likes it better than Christmas.’

‘Yes, and so will we, when we sce the dead flowers come up,
and all the dead people too!’

‘Oh, don’t get them on the subject of “dead people” and
graves, murmured Miss Hester sleepily ; ‘they can talk of nothing
else at present.’

‘Tell us about your life in India, Roland,’ said Miss Hunter,
quite willing to change the subject ; and the boy instantly obeyed,
whilst his little sister, with knitted brows, was trying to puzzle

out in her small mind why Aunt Hester did not like graves.





32 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

But when they left the drawing-room an ‘hour afterwards, she
said to her brother, ‘All our aunties like the winter. It is only
Mr. Bob who says Easter is best.’

‘They haven’t got any graves like Mr. Bob,’ responded Roland
thoughtfully, ‘nor lilies buried in flower-pots. If they had, they

would like Easter quite as much as he does.’



CHAPTER III

Signs of Life

and celder, and the children were loth to




leave their nursery with its warm fire, and
La. sally out into the cold December air for
3 ) ‘ their constitutional walk with nurse. Only

the thought of old Bob at the lodge kept

LAL i
ya

f

Pe



their spirits up, and if they were allowed
to have a word or two with him occasion-
ally, their walks were ,more cheerfully taken.
The conservatory was their chief joy, and
often would they steal down from the nursery, and be found by
one of their aunts comfortably established with their toys and
picture-books ‘in a corner of it.

‘I never thought Indian children would hate the winter so
-much as these two mites do,’ said Miss Hunter one evening at
dinner; ‘they seem to look upon it as a regular curse. I should
have thought the very novelty would have attracted them,’
‘They seem to have such ridiculous theories about it) said
Miss Hester. ‘I fancy Bob has been stuffing their heads with

his gloomy views.’



34 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘I always think Bob looks as happy as can be,’ put in Miss
Amabel briskly. ‘I don’t think the children were prepared for
the barrenness and dreariness of an English winter. They have
come from the land of brilliant flowers and sunshine, and
naturally feel the difference.’

‘Yes, remarked Miss Sibyl gently. ‘They told me this after-
noon, when I found them in the conservatory, that they were
pretending it was summer. And Roland added shrewdly, “ You
see, Aunt Sibyl, James shuts out the winter in here, doesn’t he?
And so he makes it easy for us to forget it. We pretend there
is no cold, and no dead trees and flowers and graves, when we
are here. Don’t you think it a good plan?” I told them I
thought it a very good plan. It is the same game we older
people play at sometimes. We shut out from our minds and
thoughts what we would rather not remember.’

‘Sibyl is turning into a parson, said Miss Amabel with a laugh.

Miss Sibyl did not mind the laugh.

‘The children are unfolding a parable to
me, she said quietly, ‘and I am getting the
benefit of its interpretation.’

Christmas came and went, and Roland
and Olive, with the delights of a Christmas
tree, and a party, and all the brightness
attending that festive season, were a little
shaken in their views upon -an English
winter. They went down to the lodge to
talk it over with old Bob.





SIGNS OF LIFE 35

‘I don’t think Easter can be much nicer than Christmas!’ said
Olive, as she climbed up on the old man’s knees. ‘Don’t you
like Christmas, Mr. Bob?’

‘Yes, Miss Olive, I loves the Christmas in the Bible; but not
as some folks make it here. ’Tis very nice for you little ones, with
all your bright spirits; but when you get old, you somehow never
feel so sad as when every one round you is extra happy. I’m a
lonely old man, and I miss my dear ones at these times.’

‘It seems years since we came to England, said Roland, his
thoughts taking another direction, ‘and it has been winter ever
since we came from India. I can’t think how it will ever look
any different. You're quite sure we shall see all the gardens full
of beautiful flowers at Easter, Mr. Bob? I don’t see how it is
going to happen.’

‘No more do any of us,’ said Bob, with shining eyes; ‘we just
hope and wait, and the good Lord never fails. You won't see the
garden at its best at Easter, perhaps, Master Roland, but you'll
see the beginning of it all, like “the shining light that shineth
more and more unto the perfect day.”’

So time passed, and then one day when the children were
passing by the lodge, Bob called them in with a mysterious
face.

‘Look inside my dear wife’s pot,’ he said.

Eagerly the little faces peered down into it, and then little
Olive laughed and clapped her hands.

‘A dear little tiny weeny green stem! It’s coming up at

last !?





305 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘And look ! In two






other pots I can see some-
thing!’ exclaimed Ro-
land excitedly.

‘Ay, I remember
the first sight I
ketched of it after
my loss, said Bob.
‘I were very broken-
hearted, but it
seemed to bring a tiny spark
of hope to my heart, to see
what I had only believed by
faith was goin’ en underground.
It’s grand to see the Lord’s workin’s ;
but mind, you little ones, that there
plant is just as much alive before it
shows itself. There is a deal goin’ on in the silence and
darkness that we knows nothin’ about, but it’s fact all the
same.’

The children could talk of nothing else .all that day, and little
Olive was found by her nurse standing over Bob’s graves, giving
them most careful scrutiny a short time after.

‘What are you doing here?’ asked nurse. ‘I’ve been looking
for you everywhere.’

‘Mr. Bob's lilies have come through the earth at last, nurse,’



SIGNS OF LIFE 7

oo

said Olive, raising her blue eyes earnestly to her nurse’s face; ‘so
I came to see if these graves were cracking yet. They'll be like
Jesus’ grave in the garden, you know, at Easter,’

Only a few weeks after this, both Olive and her brother lay
prostrate in their beds with a severe attack of measles. Their
aunts had been so Jong unaccustomed to children’s ailments, that
perhaps they may have exaggerated the danger; still, even the
family doctor looked grave and talked about ‘Indian constitu-
tions, ‘no stamina, etc, etc, and the old house that had so
lately rung with childish voices and laughter
now lay hushed and silent in the sweet
spring sunshine.

‘They’re too precocious, said Miss Hunter
with tearful eyes, as she came down from
the sick room one day; ‘it is always the
good precocious children that die young.

Roland has just said, in his little weak,



quavering voice, “ Auntie, perhaps Olive and
I are going to die and be put in a grave.”
And when I told him that wasn’t likely, and he mustn’t think —
of such things, he said in quite a cheerful tone, “Oh, well
we shall come up at Easter, you know. If it isn’t this Easter,
it will be another one, and you'll have our graves to look after,
like Mr. Bob. Jesus will take care of us till we come up, like
Mr. Bob takes care of his lily pots.” I don’t half understand
their talk.



38 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘I do, said Miss Sibyl, with a wistful smile; ‘and I believe
they are going to get well, and give us more of faith’s lessons _
to learn and understand.’

They did get well, though their recovery was somewhat
slow; and Easter, late as it came that year, was close at
hand before they were quite convalescent:

It was a lovely spring morning when, wrapped up in shawls,
the two little invalids were brought out of the house to take
their first airing,

Never as long as they lived would the children forget the
scene before them! The budding trees, the singing of the
birds, and the sweet scents that came to them were only part
of the great surprise that awaited them. Golden sheets of
daffodil and white narcissus bordered the dark evergreen
shrubberies ; edging the old lawn were clumps of violets and
primroses. Hyacinths, tulips; and other bulbs were making
the flower beds a mass of bright colour, and the lilac and
laburnum trees seemed overweighted with their bloom.

Roland could hardly find voice to express his delight, but
Olive trotted here and there, breaking out into happy peals of
laughter.

‘It’s better than ever I thought! It’s lovelier than India!
It’s all true, and Easter is here at last!’

Then, after their admiration had worked itself out, they
implored to be taken down to the lodge.

‘No, no, said nurse; ‘you have been out long enough



SIGNS OF LIFE 39

You must get stronger before you can take that walk. Be
_ good children and come indoors now.’

‘When does Easter Sunday come?’ asked Roland, as he
and his sister were enjoying their basins of beef-tea at the
nursery table shortly afterwards.

‘It is only a week to-morrow, was the reply. °

Roland nodded across at his sister.

‘ That’s the. proper real Easter, he said; ‘that’s when Mr.
Bob’s lilies will be out.’

‘How glad the flowers must be, now the winter is over!’ said
Olive dreamily. ‘What a long, long time they’ve been under
the ground! If Mr. Bob hadn't told us about them we
shouldn’t have known they were there, should we? This is
nicer than India, Roly!’

‘Much nicer. When we get quite well we will stay out in
the garden always. We shan’t want James’s flowers now.’

‘And we'll go and see Mr. Bob’s lilies to-morrow, and we'll
see his graves too, won’t we?’

‘I don’t think, Roland said slowly, pausing between his
spoonfuls. of beef-tea, and regarding his sister with serious
eyes, ‘I don’t think Mr. Bob said his graves would open for
certain this Easter. They may; but perhaps he will have to
wait?

‘He said his lilies were sure to come up, and that made’
him sure.about his graves, said Olive, with disappointment in |
her tone.



40 _. ’ BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘Yes; but I think he meant his graves might take longer
than his lilies. I think he told us that, Olive,’ .

‘Well, we'll ask him all about it to-morrow’

But they were not allowed to go down the avenue on the
next day, nor yet the day after, and Easter Eve arrived before

they had been able to visit their old friend.



CHAPTER IV
Easter Morning

T was indeed a lovely morning for Easter Sunday; the
sky was a cloudless blue, and the birds awoke the
children early by their jubilant thanksgiving.

Nurse was in good spirits as she dressed the children. She
had received a pair of new kid gloves ‘from a gentleman
friend, and ‘of course, she said to the children, ‘it would be
very bad luck not to have something new on Easter Sunday !’

‘And what have we got new?’ asked Olive with great interest.

Nurse showed her a little white serge frock, and put into
Roland’s hands a new tie and a pair of gloves.

‘Your Aunt Marion brought the frock up to the nursery
last night, and ‘said that you were to put it on. So I looked
out a fresh tie and gloves for Master Roland, so that he might
not be left out. And if it keeps fine, you can go down to
the lodge to-day.’

‘But we shall go to church, shan’t we?’

‘Oh no, your aunt said she couldn’t hear of it. But if you're
good children, I'll take you down that way this afternoon, and
you can peep in and see the pretty flowers. James says it is

lovely, and he has sent a lot of flowers himself’

41



42 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS_

Roland and Olive went downstairs









to greet their aunts in great excite-
ment. They were to have breakfast
in the dining-room for .a treat, and
_when- they caught sight of the
glittering glass and silver, with
grcat bowls and vases of golden
daffodils in the centre of the
table, Olive exclaimed,—

‘It’s going to be a lovely
day, Roland, from the very
beginning! I wish our break-
fast table in the nursery was
like this !’ .

‘Olive looks very well in that little serge frock, remarked
Miss Amabel presently, looking across at her little niece with
approval in her eyes; ‘she is getting quite a pink colour in
her cheeks, and has lost that pinched, peaky look. I really
think the measles did them both good !’

‘And does Roland look nice too?’ asked Olive quietly, being
quite. accustomed to personal remarks from her aunts, ‘because
he has got a new tie on. It’s a pretty blue one.’

‘Does everybody wear something new on Easter Sunday?’
Roland asked quickly. ;

‘It’s an old superstition, dear; no, everybody does not.’

‘Why ought we to wear new things?’ demanded Olive.

‘Why, Olive, of course it’s because it’s the proper time,



, EASTER MORNING 43

answered Roland. ‘Easter is when people get their new
bodies, and the flowers are all new.’

Olive was quite satisfied with this explanation.

Miss Sibyl, who did not seem quite as bright as usual, looked
at them with wistful eyes. After breakfast was over she took
Olive into the garden with her. The child begged to be told
the ‘Easter story,’ and Miss Sibyl tried to oblige her, saying
as she did so, ‘But you know it much better than I do’

When she had finished her rather halting narrative, Olive
looked up and added,—

‘So everybody dried their tears and were very happy, because
they knew Jesus would never die again.’

Then after a pause she asked, ‘Why didn’t Jesus always stay
down in the world, Aunt Sibyl? Why did He go back to heaven
so soon?’

‘I think He told us He had finished His work, my dear’

‘What work?’

‘Well—dying on the cross for us. He came. down from
heaven to do that. When He had died for our sins, He went
back to heaven.’

‘But He came out of His grave first!’ said the child triumph-
antly.

Their conversation was interrupted by Roland, who came
flying out of the house. ,

-©Aunt Marion has changed her mind; she says we'can go to
church, Olive. Come along and tell nurse!’

Olive scampered into the house, and Miss Sibyl walked along,

\



44 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

thinking deeply. For some weeks past she had been anxious
and ill at ease. She realized how fruitless and empty her life |
had been, but could not see how to remedy it. Her own words
to Olive came back to her,—

‘He had finished His work. When He had died for our
sins He went back to heaven,’ |

‘Has He indeed died for mine?’ she murmured. ‘Can I
trust Him ‘like these innocent little ones to “wash me and
make me whiter than snow”? Oh, I wish I could, I wish I
could !’

She was very silent on the way to church; not even the glee
of the children couid distract her thoughts.

Roland and Olive thoroughly enjoyed themselves; the sweet
spring flowers in the church, the joyous Easter hymns, and the
‘familiar story read once again by the rector, satisfied their little
souls. They sat with radiant faces in the family pew, and when
they caught sight of Bob singing away with tearful eyes and a
happy smile in the village choir, they nodded across at him with
great satisfaction.

Miss Sibyl came into church with a burden upon her soul;
but when the Easter anthem fell upon her ear, she listened
with more interest than she had ever felt in it. before. ‘ Like-
wise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin: but
alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” What did it _
mean? And then with a burst of triumph the words came to
her: ‘For as in Adam all die: even so in Christ ‘shall all be

made alive























. \ a







EASTER MORNING 47

Like a flash of light Miss Sibyl saw it all,and then and there
her poor dead soul reached hold of its Saviour, and life—that
‘life more abundant,—flooded the empty corners of: her anxious
heart.

The service over, the children begged their aunt’s permission
to speak to Bob. é

Seizing hold of his hands, they led him to his graves.

‘Let’s come and see them, Mr. Bob, first, and then we'll see
your lilies. Do tell us. Have they come out? We have been
ill such a long time, and they wouldn’t let us come and see you
before. Isn’t it a lovely day? And hasn’t it all come true
about the flowers? We never thought England could have such
pretty ones. Oh, I hope the winter will never come again !’

‘Eh, my dears, how you run on! Old Bob has missed you
sure enough, and as for his lilies, well, you shall see them, for
*tis my custom to do the same every year,’

He paused as they came in sight of those grassy mounds,
and the children pressed forward with eagerness. There on
each mound stood one of the ‘ugly flower pots, but the pot
itself was sunk in a bed of moss, and a lovely pure white lily
raised its glorious head in the sunshine. Five lilies stood on
the five graves, and old Bob, gazing at them through a mist of

- tears, said in a solemn tone, ‘“ And white robes were -given unto
every one of them, and it was said unto them that they should
rest yet fora little season.” Life out of death, my dears. That
is the lesson of those lilies. The good Lord has never failed to

teach me from them every Easter.’



48 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

The children stood awed and silent, then Roland © said
timidly,— :

‘But this Easter hasn’t brought the dead people to life, only
the flowers.’

‘It has brought a dead soul to life, which is even better.’

The old man and the children turned at the murmured voice ;
but Miss Sibyl passed them quickly by, and tears were dropping

as she went.

FINIS.



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CHAPTER I
The Ugly Flower Pots

was five o'clock in the afternoon. Miss
Hunter, a tall, dignified-looking woman,
was presiding at the afternoon tea-table
in the ‘drawing-room of Chatts Chase.
Miss Amabel Hunter stood at the window
in a rather muddy riding-habit, and she

was speaking in her sharp, short tones to



her twin sister Hester, who lay back in
the depths of a large armchair, a novel
open in her lap. Sitting by the cheery wood fire was the
. youngest of the sisters, a frail and delicate invalid. She was
turning her face anxiously towards the speaker, and now put in
her word very gently.

‘We only thought, Amabel, that it would have comforted the
poor children if you had returned with them in the brougham.
An aunt would naturally have been more acceptable to them
than a strange maid.’

‘But I tell you, Sibyl, they ate with their own nurse, and
Graham will be far more likely to put them all at ease than
I should. They will hear that “Miss *Unter is the missis, and

?
o
8 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

lets every one know she is. Miss "Ester keeps the maids on
their legs all day long because she won’t use hers. Miss
H’Amabel does the sporting gent, and is never indoors except
to meals; while Miss Sibyl—well, there, she is not much ’count
in the fam’ly, for she can’t say bo to a goose, and doesn’t mind —
how people put on her!”?

“You saw the children, I suppose?’ questioned Miss Hunter
gravely.

“Of course I did. I rode down fo the station for that express
purpose. They are two skinny, puny little monkeys, enveloped
in bundles of wraps. I packed them all up comfortably in the
carriage, and rode on to tell you of their arrival. I don’t seem
to have done the right thing, as usual; but that is always the
way. Here is the carriage lumbering up the drive. Now you
had all better go out on the steps and overwhelm them with
kisses and caresses. Only may I ask that they should be taken
straight up to their nursery, and not brought in here?’

‘One would think, to hear you talk, that you hated children,
murmured Miss Sibyl; ‘it is a good thing that Percy and his
wife cannot hear you.’

Miss Hunter left the room at once, and curiosity drew Sibyl
and Hester after her, to see the little nephew and niece who
had been sent to them from India from their only brother.

The four Miss Hunters lived very comfortably together,
though they were all, with the exception of Sibyl, rather self-
willed, opinionated women.
and grey hairs plentiful between them, they had earned the dis-
THE UGLY,FLOWER POTS 9

tinction of being looked upon as ‘old maids, and some wag
having one day obliterated the ‘h’ in Chatts Chase, the house
was now familiarly called ‘Pussy’s Chase. This did not dis-
turb the good ladies when it came to their ears, for they had
large souls, a keen sense of humour, and too much interest in
life to be fretted by village gossip.

They were now full of plans and purposes regarding the two
small children about to be placed in their charge, and no two
visitors could have caused more excitement and preparation in
the quiet household than did this little couple from India.

‘Well, asked Miss Amabel, as, after a great deal of bustle
and talk in the hall, the sisters came back to the drawing-room,
‘and what are your impressions of the kids?’

‘Poor little mites!’ said Miss Sibyl; ‘they seem so very white
and sickly in appearance, that we were quite astonished at the
way they scampered upstairs. I am thankful they were sent
back in charge of an English nurse. Those ayahs are always
so unsatisfactory.’

Before many days the children astonished their aunts still
more by their agility and ingenuity in mischief of all sorts.
Roland, a fair, curly-haired little fellow of seven, led his smaller
sister Olive into every kind of audacious escapade. Their
“Spirits were unflagging, though at times their frail-looking little
bodies seemed to droop under their activity.

Miss Hunter came upon little Olive one afternoon sitting on
the stairs in a breathless, exhausted state, and Roland was re-

monstrating with her.
10 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘You've only run up twenty-five times, Olive, and youve |
tired already; it’s a mile race, and you must go on,

‘She must do nothing of the sort, Roland, said Miss Hunter
sternly. ‘I will not let you tear up and down stairs all day in
this fashion. What do you mean by it?’

‘We can’t be idle, auntie, said Roland, shaking his curls back,
and speaking with decision. ‘Nurse has the toothache, and
won't take us out. Father says people can be idle very easily,
and put it down to the climate, and “idle hands find mischief,”
he says, and father is never idle. If we don’t run up and down

stairs, where can we run? We like





the stairs best, because we never have
stairs in India’

“Send them into the garden, Marion,
called out Miss Amabel, from the gar-

den door; ‘I am going to the





















































































































































‘ a stables, and then I will look
*y after them,
Ny i: pete Little Olive jumped
jf ~S PS i . §Oh, let us go
y Fe ioe ‘th, out, auntie, and
AW \ eA vl fate i see the pretty
AA ON ah ees si He ie flowers.’
mucins WDE ifs von mos
Vat Ma lt 4. mY be. very good



SS
es

children then.
Tae UG hrEOWE R POT s II

Go quietly upstairs, and ask nurse to wrap you up well, as it
is rather cold out.’

And then Miss Hunter, who found children rather a per-
plexing problem, ,walked back to her book and her fireside, and
thought no more about them.

Roland and Olive danced out of doors a little time after, in
delight at finding themselves unattended.

‘Now, said Roland peremptorily, ‘we're going for a walk,
Olive, and you are not to get tired. And we'll go and find
those big iron gates first of all; they’re down this road.’

Down the avenue trotted the children; it was fully half a mile
long, and the thick shrubberies on either side rather alarmed
the little girl.

‘You're guzte sure there isn’t a tiger in the bushes?’ she
asked repeatedly.

And Roland in superior tones replied,—

‘I’ve told you the English people caught all their tigers long
ago, and put them in a garden in London. Father told me so’

‘And what’s outside the big gates, Roly—a jungle?’

‘No, I think the trains are. I want to go and see them.
Come on!’

They reached the gates, but found them shut, and as Roland
was exerting all his strength to open them, an old man stepped
out of the pretty little lodge close by.

‘Why, where be ye off to, little master?’ he asked with a
beaming smile. ‘Isn’t your nurse with you this afternoon ?’

‘No; we're taking a walk. Open the gates, please.’
12 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

But this the old man did not seem willing to do.
‘Won't ye come into my little parlour here, and pay me a
visit? My niece, Jane, is away to market to-day, and I be

very lonely. Old Bob has a lot of pretty things in his room,’

,



Roland hesitated, but when Olive with sparkling eyes ran in
at the open door, he followed, saying,—
‘We always like to pay visits, so if you’re a good and nice —

man we'll come in. Mother only likes us to talk to very nice


THE UGLY FLOWER POTS ae

people; but I s’pose every one in England is nice, because. °
they’re white, and it’s only the blacks that don’t know better.’

The old man laughed, and his quaint, old-fashioned room,
with a cheery’ fire and bright coloured prints round the walls, ’
delighted his little guests.

‘What are those ugly pots in your window without. any
flowers ?’ asked Roland presently.

Old Bob gave a little sigh and a smile.

‘Ah, you've hit upon my greatest treasures,’ he said. ‘You
won’t call them ugly pots when Easter comes.’

‘What is Easter?’ asked both the children.

‘The happiest time in the whole year to me,’ said Bob, shaking
his head; ‘but another day Dll tell you the tale of those pots—
not to-day,’

‘And have you got a garden?’ asked Roland eagerly. ‘Olive
and me love flowers, but England doesn’t seem to have any out
of doors.’

‘Come and see my garden, said the old man proudly; ‘it’s
the joy of my life, next to them there “ugly pots” !’

He led the way to the back of the house, where was a good-
sized cottage garden; but the children’s faces fell considerably
_when they saw the barren desolation, for Bob had no evergreen
shrubs, and only some rows of cabbages and broccoli showed
signs of life.

“It’s all brown earth and dead things—no flowers at all!’
they exclaimed.

‘But this is the wrong time o’ year, Bob said apologetically ;
16 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘there be heaps o’ beautiful stuff all under the earth, awaitin’ to
* come up in their time.’

‘But why don’t you make them come up now? What’s the
good of a garden without flowers? In India we have lovely
flowers.’

‘Winter is a-comin’ on, my dears; you won’t see my pretty
flowers just yet. They’re fast asleep bidin’ their time; no frost
or cold can touch ’em—bidin’ their time!’ .

Bob’s face looked wistful as he gazed at his empty flower
beds.

‘What’s winter?’ asked Olive curiously.

‘Bless the little dear, has she never known a winter? ’Tis
the dreary dark time of waitin’, the sunless, joyless bit o’ all the
year, when the singin’ birds fly away, the butterflies and flowers
die, and the very trees sigh and moan in their bareness and
decay. ’Tis an empty bit o’ ‘life, when all that makes life sweet
falls to pieces and fades away.’

This was not quite intelligible to the children; but they
shivered a little at the gloom in the old man’s tone, and Olive’s
blue eyes filled with tears. :

‘I don’t want to stay here in winter, she said; ‘let’s go back
to India, Roly!’

Roland stood with knitted brows considering.

‘Who makes the winter?’ he asked. ‘Does the devil? Be-
cause God only makes beautiful things, doesn’t He?’

Old Bob raised his hat, and looked up into the grey autumnal

sky with a smile.


THE UGLY FLOWER POTS 17



































Gig ==FUnY

— at
7, 4a



‘Nay, little master, the devil wouldn’t have wished to give us
such a lesson as winter teaches us. ’Tis God Almighty in His
love that gives us winter, to try our faith and patience, and teach
us hope’s lessons. If we had no winter, we should have no
Easter, and ’tis well worth the waitin’ for!’

“And does everything die in winter >?’ asked Roland in a
mournful voice.

His question was unanswered, for Miss Amabel appeared on
the scene.

‘Oh, you children!’ she exclaimed breathlessly. ‘What a
chase I have had after you! If I had known you were in such
safe quarters, I would have spared myself the trouble of looking
for you. Have they been here long, Bob?’

. ‘Nigh on a quarter o’ an hour, Miss Amabel. They was for
going out at the gate, but I ’ticed ’em in to my place.’

‘Much obliged to you. Now, chicks, remember this, you're
never to go outside those gates alone. Come back to the house
with me, and say good-bye to Bob.’

‘

* *
18 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

Olive lifted up her little face to be kissed by the old man,
and Roland held out his hand.

‘Good-bye, Mr. Bob. We will come and see you again, and
you will tell us about your ugly pots.’

Then as they walked up the avenue by the side of their
aunt, Roland said to her, pointing to the leafless trees above
them,—

‘We don’t have ugly trees like that in India. Why don’t
you cut them all down? They're quite dead, aren’t they?’

‘No, indeed, replied Miss Amabel briskly; ‘they'll all come
to life again next spring.’

‘Is spring Easter that Mr. Bob was telling us about?’

‘Yes, Easter comes in spring,

‘And does everything dead come to life in spring?’

‘A good many things in the garden do, said Miss Amabel
carelessly.

‘Why does God make winter in England, and not in India?
Is He angry with the people in England ?’

‘Bless the boy! What a curiosity-box! Keep your questions
for Aunt Sibyl—she will appreciate them. And as for winter, |
couldn’t do without it, for there would be no hunting then,
and I should feel half my enjoyment gone in life.’

‘Do you like winter, Aunt Am’bel?’ asked Olive.

‘Yes, I love it; and so will you when you become hardy and
rosy, like English boys and girls!’

The children looked very doubtful at this statement, but did -
not dispute it.





t ae

Byeeaee
:

CHAPTER II
Under the Earth

HE next day was still colder, but the children, in com-
pany with their nurse, found a delightful retreat in the
garden, and this was in the conservatory. James, the
old gardener, was always glad of some one to talk to, and he
and nurse were soon fast friends. He took them into the
vinery, then into the fern house, and lastly into the conserva-
tory next the house, which was a brilliant mass of bloom and
blossoms.
Olive clapped her hands in delight.
‘We are back in India, Roly. Oh, how nice and warm !’
‘We will always come and play here, said Roland. Then,

looking up at the old gardener, he said,—

19
20° BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘You never let winter come here, do you?’

‘Not if I can help it, said James with a dry chuckle. ‘Me
and Jack Frost have had many a fight, but I gets the better
of him generally.’

‘Who is Jack Frost?’

‘Ha! ha! Not heerd o’ Jack Frost? Well, unless Pm
much mistaken he'll pay us a visit to-night, and then you'll
feel him as well as see him.’

Olive looked puzzled, but Roland’s mind was working too
busily to heed Jack Frost. He walked round and round the
flowers, then he remarked abruptly, ‘If you don’t have winter
here, you won’t have a Easter—Mr. Bob said so!’

‘Oh, there!’ said nurse with a laugh, ‘don’t heed his curious
talk, Mr. Jenkins; he’s such a dreadful child for arguing.’

She and James continued their chat, and the children sat
down on a low wicker seat, playing with the fallen fuchsia
buds, and comparing their present life with the one they had
so lately left. |
-*] wish Mr. Bob had a nice glass house like this, said Olive
thoughtfully. ‘Why doesn’t he, Roly?’

‘We'll ask him next time we see him. I expect he is too
poor.’

‘And, Roly, do you think Jack Frost is a thief who tries to
steal James’s flowers?’

‘IT don’t know.’

A little later, when nurse was taking them into the house,

Olive inquired again, rather anxiously, ‘Nurse, I hope Jack
UNDER THE EARTH 21

Frost won’t come to us when we're in bed ; James seemed to
think we should feel him

_ No, no, Miss Olive; Tl tuck you up too warm for that.
There will be no Jack Frost in our nursery, I can tell you. I
keep too big a fire.’

But the little girl was anxious and ill at ease, till at last she
'unburdened her mind to Miss Sibyl, when she went to wish
her ‘ good-night’ in the drawing-room.

‘Why, Olive dear, Jack Frost isn’t a man; that is only a
joke. When it is very cold the air freezes, and the pretty dew-
drops on the grass and flowers all turn to ice. Have you never
seen a frost?’

‘No, never,’

‘Frosts kill all the flowers—that is why James does not like
it coming; but it is the flowers out of doors that feel it
most.’ i

‘But, said Roland, edging up to his aunt, ‘there are no
flowers to kill; there are only bare, dried-up trees and dark
bushes. Mr. Bob told us they had all gone to sleep under the
ground,’

“So they have, but it is frost and cold that has killed them
off?

‘I don’t like England,’ said little Olive mournfully ; and when
she was comfortably tucked up in bed that night, she said
sleepily, ‘If I had a nice garden of flowers, I wouldn’t leave
them all-out in the cold and dark to die, and I’ll never live

in England when I grow up, for winter is a dreadful thing!’
22 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

The children soon found out what frost and cold meant; but
the novelty of the small icicles outside their windows, and the
beauty of the hoar frost glittering on the trees and bushes in
the sunshine, more than compensated for the uncomfortable
experience of cold hands and feet.

They soon paid a visit to old Bob again, and this time he



took them into the old-fashioned churchyard, which lay just
outside the lodge gates on the other side of the road.
‘This is my other garden, he said gravely, ‘for I gets. so
much from the rector every year for keeping the ground tidy.’
Roland and Olive looked round them with much interest.
Old Bob took them to a quiet corner soon, and’ pointed out

five grassy mounds all in a row.


UNDER THE EARTH 23

‘There!’ he said, his old face quivering all over; ‘under-
neath them mounds are my dear wife and four children, all
taken. from me in less than one month.

‘Did they die?’ asked Roland with solemn eyes.

‘The Lord took ’em. ’Twas the scarlet fever was ragin’ in
our village; little Bessie, our baby, was the first one to take it.
She were only five year old, and as merry as a cricket; then
Rob and Harry, big lads o’ twelve and thirteen, were stricken
next, and then Nellie, her mother’s right hand; and the poor
wife nursed ’em all through herself, and just lived to see the
last o’ the four buried, and then she follered them, and I were
left in the empty house alone.’

Little Olive squeezed the old man’s hand tightly.

‘I feel as if I was going to cry,’ she said. ‘Why did God make
them die, Mr. Bob?’

Bob raised his face to the sky above him.

‘He didn’t tell me why, he said; ‘but He’ll tell me one day.
*Twas just at this time o’ year they were taken. Ah,dear! That
were a terrible winter for me! It all seemed dark and drear, and
not a gleam of sunshine in sight. But thank the good Lord I got
my bit o’ cheer when Easter came. And it have come reg’lar and |
fresh like every Easter since. Do you mind them “ugly pots”
in my window? Now you come back with me, and I'll tell you
their story. ’Tis too cold for us to be standin’ here, but don’t
forget my five grassy mounds in this corner when I tells the
tale!’

As the children turned “away to follow him, Roland said
\

$24 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

thoughtfully, ‘They’re all under the ground, just like you- say
the flowers are!’

Old Bob smiled. :

‘That's it, Master Roland! That’s my comfort. You've hit
upon ‘the very thing I was agoin’ to explain!’

And then.a few minutes after, taking little Olive upon his knees,
and making Roland sit in a small chair on the opposite side of the.
fireplace, the old man began,—

‘My dear wife were powerful fond o’ flowers, and she were quite
as clever at rearing ’em as ever I were. She would get cuttin’s
from James Green up at the house, and in summer our garden was
just a pictur’ Just before she were a taken ill, James had sent her
down a lily bulb, a beautiful pure white one, and she’d putit in a
pot in our cellar, and says she to me, “Bob, I means to bring that

1

_ lily out by Easter ; with care I’m sure I shall do it Then when '
she were near her end, and she seed me a-frettin’ my heart out,
she calls me to her bed. “ Bob,” says she, “take care o’ my lily,
and, Bob dear, when Easter comes-and you See it a-burstin’ out
in all its beauty, then think o’ me and the children.” “So also is
the resurrection of the dead. . . . It is sown in dishonour, it is
raised in glory.; it is sown in. weakness, it is raised in power.”
“For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them
also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him!” Them were
the very two tex’s she said to me, and then she says: “The nex’
time you'll see me, Bob, will be in my body o’ glory! Unless you’
foller me first, but I can’t help thinking,” she says, “that the

Resurrection mayn’t be far off!” And so she left me!’





a
UNDER THE EARTH 27

There was a pause. Bob wiped his eyes with his handkerchief,
then put Olive down from his knees and walked across to his
flower-pots.

The children followed him silently, and peeped over the edge of
the pots, only to see bare brown earth, and their faces fell at the
sight.

Bob turned to them with a smile: ‘This here big pot in the
middle is my wife’s lily ; I set to work when she went, and got four
other o’ the same kind ©’ bulb and planted them in these smaller
pots. This one is Bessie’s, that one is Nellie’s, and the others are
just Bob’s and Harry’s. Well, all that winter I goes to my graves
in the churchyard, and comes back to these pots, and I shakes my
head over them all, and couldn’t get no comfort nohow. But shall
I ever forget a-comin’ into my kitchen on Easter Sunday, and seein’
the sun shine in upon five pure white lilies! I just fell a-sobbin’
on my knees beside them. “Lord,” I says, “I knows as certain
sure as I sees these lilies now, and
remembers all the silence and darkness
that came upon them from the time
they were put in the earth, that Thou

wilt give me back my dear ones ten




thousand times more beautiful than

ever I saw ’em here! And if their Easter



will come a little later, ’tis just as sure!”
Ay, little ones, and for three years the

Lord has delighted my soul by bringin’ up



_ these lilies at Easter time, just to tell me
28 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

that my graves is goin’ to be opened like the Lord’s Himself,
and I’m a-goin’ to see my family again. The devil himself may
tempt and try one in the winter, but away he goes in the spring,
when every bit o’ this blessed earth is preaching the resurrection
to us!’ |

Much of this was above the children’s heads, but Roland
said, after a minute’s thought, ‘Will dead people come up out
of the ground like the flowers?’

‘Ay, Master Roland, the flowers are a very poor picture of
the glorified body,’

‘And they go to sleep in the winter time?’ the boy went
on; ‘and how often does Easter come?’

‘The flowers have their Easter every year, but we have to
wait a little longer for ours. I ofttimes think that when the
Lord do come down from heaven with a shout, He will choose
Easter Sunday to wake the dead, for ’tis the day He rose
Himself!’

Old Bob did not say much more, and Roland and Olive went
back to the house thinking busily.

The next day was Sunday, and they went to church with
their aunts; but directly the service was over, Roland, who was
walking with ‘Miss Hester, pulled her by the hand towards
Bob’s five graves in the corner.

‘Do just let me look at them again! Have you got .any
graves here, Aunt Hester? I wish I had some. Poor Bob has
too many, hasn’t he?’

Miss Hester gave a little shiver.
UNDER THE EARTH 29

‘What an extraordinary child you are! You don’t know the
meaning of graves, or you wouldn’t talk so!’

“Yes, I do, said Roland earnestly; ‘the earth is full of
graves in winter; these graves in the churchyard belong to
dead people, but the dead flowers are everywhere, and they’re
all coming up at Easter—Mr. Bob said so.’

‘Bob fills your head with a lot of nonsense; come along.’

The boy felt snubbed, and said no more; but that afternoon,
when he and his little sister came down
to the drawing-room, the subject was
opened afresh.

Their aunts found Sunday afternoon
long and tedious, especially as now a
heavy downpour of sleet and rain had set
in, and it was in the hope of being amused
that Miss Hunter sent for the children.

Miss Hester was on one of the sofas

half asleep; Miss Amabel standing on



the hearthrug with her back to the fire;
whilst Miss Sibyl and Miss Hunter were
both trying to read books of a religious character, and feeling
very dull and bored.
'. ‘Now come and talk to us, said Miss Amabel briskly, as
the children appeared ; ‘we are all bored to death, and we want
you to entertain us.’

Roland sat down on a footstool, and clasped his knees in an

old-fashioned way. Olive ran to Miss Hunter and climbed into
30 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

her lap. She was accustomed to be petted, and looked upon
grown-up people’s knees as her rightful privilege.

‘What shall we talk about?’ asked Roland.

‘Let’s ask Aunt Marion to tell us the story of Easter Sunday,’
suggested Olive. ;

‘Yes, nurse doesn’t know it properly—she makes it so short.’

Miss Hunter looked helplessly at her sisters.

‘Tm not good at Bible stories, she said; ‘I forget them so.’

‘You tell us what you know about it, said Miss Amabel.

Roland puckered his brows for a moment, then he began,—

‘Jesus was dead—quite, quite dead. He had been hung on
the cross, and killed by wicked, cruel men; and all His friends
were crying and sobbing, and He was put in a grave, and
soldiers stood outside.’

‘All His friends were crying and sobbing, repeated Olive,
shaking her little head mournfully at Miss Hunter, ‘and they
thought they were never going to see Him again; never,
never \’

‘And then,’ continued Roland, ‘suddenly, bang! bang! the
great stone grave broke open, and two beautiful angels flew
down from heaven, and Jesus Christ came rising up from the
grave quite well and strong again, and the soldiers ran away,
and the good women came near.’

‘And the good women were sobbing and crying,’ put in Olive
again, ‘and they thought they were never going to see Him
again, ever}?

‘And then one of them, called Mary, saw some one in the

\
UNDER THE EARTH 31

garden, and she didn’t quite know who it
was; and then He called out her name,
and then she saw it was Jesus Himself?

‘Jesus Himself, quite well and strong,
and wasn’t she glad!’ repeated little
Olive.

‘And that’s what happened on Easter
Sunday,’ said Roland.

There was silence. The children’s
soft, earnest voices and the sweet Bible
story touched the hearts of those who
heard it.

‘And how long will it be before



Easter?’ asked Olive, after a pause.

‘Oh, a long, long time. Why, we haven’t come to Christmas !
We don’t want Easter to come yet.

‘Mr. Bob says Easter is the happiest time in all the year; he
likes it better than Christmas.’

‘Yes, and so will we, when we sce the dead flowers come up,
and all the dead people too!’

‘Oh, don’t get them on the subject of “dead people” and
graves, murmured Miss Hester sleepily ; ‘they can talk of nothing
else at present.’

‘Tell us about your life in India, Roland,’ said Miss Hunter,
quite willing to change the subject ; and the boy instantly obeyed,
whilst his little sister, with knitted brows, was trying to puzzle

out in her small mind why Aunt Hester did not like graves.


32 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

But when they left the drawing-room an ‘hour afterwards, she
said to her brother, ‘All our aunties like the winter. It is only
Mr. Bob who says Easter is best.’

‘They haven’t got any graves like Mr. Bob,’ responded Roland
thoughtfully, ‘nor lilies buried in flower-pots. If they had, they

would like Easter quite as much as he does.’
CHAPTER III

Signs of Life

and celder, and the children were loth to




leave their nursery with its warm fire, and
La. sally out into the cold December air for
3 ) ‘ their constitutional walk with nurse. Only

the thought of old Bob at the lodge kept

LAL i
ya

f

Pe



their spirits up, and if they were allowed
to have a word or two with him occasion-
ally, their walks were ,more cheerfully taken.
The conservatory was their chief joy, and
often would they steal down from the nursery, and be found by
one of their aunts comfortably established with their toys and
picture-books ‘in a corner of it.

‘I never thought Indian children would hate the winter so
-much as these two mites do,’ said Miss Hunter one evening at
dinner; ‘they seem to look upon it as a regular curse. I should
have thought the very novelty would have attracted them,’
‘They seem to have such ridiculous theories about it) said
Miss Hester. ‘I fancy Bob has been stuffing their heads with

his gloomy views.’
34 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘I always think Bob looks as happy as can be,’ put in Miss
Amabel briskly. ‘I don’t think the children were prepared for
the barrenness and dreariness of an English winter. They have
come from the land of brilliant flowers and sunshine, and
naturally feel the difference.’

‘Yes, remarked Miss Sibyl gently. ‘They told me this after-
noon, when I found them in the conservatory, that they were
pretending it was summer. And Roland added shrewdly, “ You
see, Aunt Sibyl, James shuts out the winter in here, doesn’t he?
And so he makes it easy for us to forget it. We pretend there
is no cold, and no dead trees and flowers and graves, when we
are here. Don’t you think it a good plan?” I told them I
thought it a very good plan. It is the same game we older
people play at sometimes. We shut out from our minds and
thoughts what we would rather not remember.’

‘Sibyl is turning into a parson, said Miss Amabel with a laugh.

Miss Sibyl did not mind the laugh.

‘The children are unfolding a parable to
me, she said quietly, ‘and I am getting the
benefit of its interpretation.’

Christmas came and went, and Roland
and Olive, with the delights of a Christmas
tree, and a party, and all the brightness
attending that festive season, were a little
shaken in their views upon -an English
winter. They went down to the lodge to
talk it over with old Bob.


SIGNS OF LIFE 35

‘I don’t think Easter can be much nicer than Christmas!’ said
Olive, as she climbed up on the old man’s knees. ‘Don’t you
like Christmas, Mr. Bob?’

‘Yes, Miss Olive, I loves the Christmas in the Bible; but not
as some folks make it here. ’Tis very nice for you little ones, with
all your bright spirits; but when you get old, you somehow never
feel so sad as when every one round you is extra happy. I’m a
lonely old man, and I miss my dear ones at these times.’

‘It seems years since we came to England, said Roland, his
thoughts taking another direction, ‘and it has been winter ever
since we came from India. I can’t think how it will ever look
any different. You're quite sure we shall see all the gardens full
of beautiful flowers at Easter, Mr. Bob? I don’t see how it is
going to happen.’

‘No more do any of us,’ said Bob, with shining eyes; ‘we just
hope and wait, and the good Lord never fails. You won't see the
garden at its best at Easter, perhaps, Master Roland, but you'll
see the beginning of it all, like “the shining light that shineth
more and more unto the perfect day.”’

So time passed, and then one day when the children were
passing by the lodge, Bob called them in with a mysterious
face.

‘Look inside my dear wife’s pot,’ he said.

Eagerly the little faces peered down into it, and then little
Olive laughed and clapped her hands.

‘A dear little tiny weeny green stem! It’s coming up at

last !?


305 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘And look ! In two






other pots I can see some-
thing!’ exclaimed Ro-
land excitedly.

‘Ay, I remember
the first sight I
ketched of it after
my loss, said Bob.
‘I were very broken-
hearted, but it
seemed to bring a tiny spark
of hope to my heart, to see
what I had only believed by
faith was goin’ en underground.
It’s grand to see the Lord’s workin’s ;
but mind, you little ones, that there
plant is just as much alive before it
shows itself. There is a deal goin’ on in the silence and
darkness that we knows nothin’ about, but it’s fact all the
same.’

The children could talk of nothing else .all that day, and little
Olive was found by her nurse standing over Bob’s graves, giving
them most careful scrutiny a short time after.

‘What are you doing here?’ asked nurse. ‘I’ve been looking
for you everywhere.’

‘Mr. Bob's lilies have come through the earth at last, nurse,’
SIGNS OF LIFE 7

oo

said Olive, raising her blue eyes earnestly to her nurse’s face; ‘so
I came to see if these graves were cracking yet. They'll be like
Jesus’ grave in the garden, you know, at Easter,’

Only a few weeks after this, both Olive and her brother lay
prostrate in their beds with a severe attack of measles. Their
aunts had been so Jong unaccustomed to children’s ailments, that
perhaps they may have exaggerated the danger; still, even the
family doctor looked grave and talked about ‘Indian constitu-
tions, ‘no stamina, etc, etc, and the old house that had so
lately rung with childish voices and laughter
now lay hushed and silent in the sweet
spring sunshine.

‘They’re too precocious, said Miss Hunter
with tearful eyes, as she came down from
the sick room one day; ‘it is always the
good precocious children that die young.

Roland has just said, in his little weak,



quavering voice, “ Auntie, perhaps Olive and
I are going to die and be put in a grave.”
And when I told him that wasn’t likely, and he mustn’t think —
of such things, he said in quite a cheerful tone, “Oh, well
we shall come up at Easter, you know. If it isn’t this Easter,
it will be another one, and you'll have our graves to look after,
like Mr. Bob. Jesus will take care of us till we come up, like
Mr. Bob takes care of his lily pots.” I don’t half understand
their talk.
38 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘I do, said Miss Sibyl, with a wistful smile; ‘and I believe
they are going to get well, and give us more of faith’s lessons _
to learn and understand.’

They did get well, though their recovery was somewhat
slow; and Easter, late as it came that year, was close at
hand before they were quite convalescent:

It was a lovely spring morning when, wrapped up in shawls,
the two little invalids were brought out of the house to take
their first airing,

Never as long as they lived would the children forget the
scene before them! The budding trees, the singing of the
birds, and the sweet scents that came to them were only part
of the great surprise that awaited them. Golden sheets of
daffodil and white narcissus bordered the dark evergreen
shrubberies ; edging the old lawn were clumps of violets and
primroses. Hyacinths, tulips; and other bulbs were making
the flower beds a mass of bright colour, and the lilac and
laburnum trees seemed overweighted with their bloom.

Roland could hardly find voice to express his delight, but
Olive trotted here and there, breaking out into happy peals of
laughter.

‘It’s better than ever I thought! It’s lovelier than India!
It’s all true, and Easter is here at last!’

Then, after their admiration had worked itself out, they
implored to be taken down to the lodge.

‘No, no, said nurse; ‘you have been out long enough
SIGNS OF LIFE 39

You must get stronger before you can take that walk. Be
_ good children and come indoors now.’

‘When does Easter Sunday come?’ asked Roland, as he
and his sister were enjoying their basins of beef-tea at the
nursery table shortly afterwards.

‘It is only a week to-morrow, was the reply. °

Roland nodded across at his sister.

‘ That’s the. proper real Easter, he said; ‘that’s when Mr.
Bob’s lilies will be out.’

‘How glad the flowers must be, now the winter is over!’ said
Olive dreamily. ‘What a long, long time they’ve been under
the ground! If Mr. Bob hadn't told us about them we
shouldn’t have known they were there, should we? This is
nicer than India, Roly!’

‘Much nicer. When we get quite well we will stay out in
the garden always. We shan’t want James’s flowers now.’

‘And we'll go and see Mr. Bob’s lilies to-morrow, and we'll
see his graves too, won’t we?’

‘I don’t think, Roland said slowly, pausing between his
spoonfuls. of beef-tea, and regarding his sister with serious
eyes, ‘I don’t think Mr. Bob said his graves would open for
certain this Easter. They may; but perhaps he will have to
wait?

‘He said his lilies were sure to come up, and that made’
him sure.about his graves, said Olive, with disappointment in |
her tone.
40 _. ’ BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

‘Yes; but I think he meant his graves might take longer
than his lilies. I think he told us that, Olive,’ .

‘Well, we'll ask him all about it to-morrow’

But they were not allowed to go down the avenue on the
next day, nor yet the day after, and Easter Eve arrived before

they had been able to visit their old friend.
CHAPTER IV
Easter Morning

T was indeed a lovely morning for Easter Sunday; the
sky was a cloudless blue, and the birds awoke the
children early by their jubilant thanksgiving.

Nurse was in good spirits as she dressed the children. She
had received a pair of new kid gloves ‘from a gentleman
friend, and ‘of course, she said to the children, ‘it would be
very bad luck not to have something new on Easter Sunday !’

‘And what have we got new?’ asked Olive with great interest.

Nurse showed her a little white serge frock, and put into
Roland’s hands a new tie and a pair of gloves.

‘Your Aunt Marion brought the frock up to the nursery
last night, and ‘said that you were to put it on. So I looked
out a fresh tie and gloves for Master Roland, so that he might
not be left out. And if it keeps fine, you can go down to
the lodge to-day.’

‘But we shall go to church, shan’t we?’

‘Oh no, your aunt said she couldn’t hear of it. But if you're
good children, I'll take you down that way this afternoon, and
you can peep in and see the pretty flowers. James says it is

lovely, and he has sent a lot of flowers himself’

41
42 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS_

Roland and Olive went downstairs









to greet their aunts in great excite-
ment. They were to have breakfast
in the dining-room for .a treat, and
_when- they caught sight of the
glittering glass and silver, with
grcat bowls and vases of golden
daffodils in the centre of the
table, Olive exclaimed,—

‘It’s going to be a lovely
day, Roland, from the very
beginning! I wish our break-
fast table in the nursery was
like this !’ .

‘Olive looks very well in that little serge frock, remarked
Miss Amabel presently, looking across at her little niece with
approval in her eyes; ‘she is getting quite a pink colour in
her cheeks, and has lost that pinched, peaky look. I really
think the measles did them both good !’

‘And does Roland look nice too?’ asked Olive quietly, being
quite. accustomed to personal remarks from her aunts, ‘because
he has got a new tie on. It’s a pretty blue one.’

‘Does everybody wear something new on Easter Sunday?’
Roland asked quickly. ;

‘It’s an old superstition, dear; no, everybody does not.’

‘Why ought we to wear new things?’ demanded Olive.

‘Why, Olive, of course it’s because it’s the proper time,
, EASTER MORNING 43

answered Roland. ‘Easter is when people get their new
bodies, and the flowers are all new.’

Olive was quite satisfied with this explanation.

Miss Sibyl, who did not seem quite as bright as usual, looked
at them with wistful eyes. After breakfast was over she took
Olive into the garden with her. The child begged to be told
the ‘Easter story,’ and Miss Sibyl tried to oblige her, saying
as she did so, ‘But you know it much better than I do’

When she had finished her rather halting narrative, Olive
looked up and added,—

‘So everybody dried their tears and were very happy, because
they knew Jesus would never die again.’

Then after a pause she asked, ‘Why didn’t Jesus always stay
down in the world, Aunt Sibyl? Why did He go back to heaven
so soon?’

‘I think He told us He had finished His work, my dear’

‘What work?’

‘Well—dying on the cross for us. He came. down from
heaven to do that. When He had died for our sins, He went
back to heaven.’

‘But He came out of His grave first!’ said the child triumph-
antly.

Their conversation was interrupted by Roland, who came
flying out of the house. ,

-©Aunt Marion has changed her mind; she says we'can go to
church, Olive. Come along and tell nurse!’

Olive scampered into the house, and Miss Sibyl walked along,

\
44 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

thinking deeply. For some weeks past she had been anxious
and ill at ease. She realized how fruitless and empty her life |
had been, but could not see how to remedy it. Her own words
to Olive came back to her,—

‘He had finished His work. When He had died for our
sins He went back to heaven,’ |

‘Has He indeed died for mine?’ she murmured. ‘Can I
trust Him ‘like these innocent little ones to “wash me and
make me whiter than snow”? Oh, I wish I could, I wish I
could !’

She was very silent on the way to church; not even the glee
of the children couid distract her thoughts.

Roland and Olive thoroughly enjoyed themselves; the sweet
spring flowers in the church, the joyous Easter hymns, and the
‘familiar story read once again by the rector, satisfied their little
souls. They sat with radiant faces in the family pew, and when
they caught sight of Bob singing away with tearful eyes and a
happy smile in the village choir, they nodded across at him with
great satisfaction.

Miss Sibyl came into church with a burden upon her soul;
but when the Easter anthem fell upon her ear, she listened
with more interest than she had ever felt in it. before. ‘ Like-
wise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin: but
alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” What did it _
mean? And then with a burst of triumph the words came to
her: ‘For as in Adam all die: even so in Christ ‘shall all be

made alive

















. \ a




EASTER MORNING 47

Like a flash of light Miss Sibyl saw it all,and then and there
her poor dead soul reached hold of its Saviour, and life—that
‘life more abundant,—flooded the empty corners of: her anxious
heart.

The service over, the children begged their aunt’s permission
to speak to Bob. é

Seizing hold of his hands, they led him to his graves.

‘Let’s come and see them, Mr. Bob, first, and then we'll see
your lilies. Do tell us. Have they come out? We have been
ill such a long time, and they wouldn’t let us come and see you
before. Isn’t it a lovely day? And hasn’t it all come true
about the flowers? We never thought England could have such
pretty ones. Oh, I hope the winter will never come again !’

‘Eh, my dears, how you run on! Old Bob has missed you
sure enough, and as for his lilies, well, you shall see them, for
*tis my custom to do the same every year,’

He paused as they came in sight of those grassy mounds,
and the children pressed forward with eagerness. There on
each mound stood one of the ‘ugly flower pots, but the pot
itself was sunk in a bed of moss, and a lovely pure white lily
raised its glorious head in the sunshine. Five lilies stood on
the five graves, and old Bob, gazing at them through a mist of

- tears, said in a solemn tone, ‘“ And white robes were -given unto
every one of them, and it was said unto them that they should
rest yet fora little season.” Life out of death, my dears. That
is the lesson of those lilies. The good Lord has never failed to

teach me from them every Easter.’
48 BULBS AND BLOSSOMS

The children stood awed and silent, then Roland © said
timidly,— :

‘But this Easter hasn’t brought the dead people to life, only
the flowers.’

‘It has brought a dead soul to life, which is even better.’

The old man and the children turned at the murmured voice ;
but Miss Sibyl passed them quickly by, and tears were dropping

as she went.

FINIS.



Butler & Tanner, The Sclwood Printing Works, Frome, and London,







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db4a1fdd6ab490a74ef08d78cb45881a
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describe
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describe
Invalid character
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-25T13:26:15-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-25T13:27:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCED' 'sip-files00012.tif'
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describe
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'2011-10-25T13:26:49-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-25T13:26:47-04:00'
describe
'41077' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-25T13:26:57-04:00'
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
33dbda24639ffb87de23391e5860e74b
92c2e631309f84f71d1e0612d1082fe49ab34982
describe
'6620' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7b43106ffca6f08dbb0d08eef059dad0
d1e765b2ddd46fe80d69f4bbe55b97c5beed381c
describe
'539424' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
7fac4abdf983d8c8b7db040fe3a2c82c
6cc0cfd1f81f3683c44ce0cf224c9af60e1b8ec6
describe
'92639' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEO' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
2f666435ed8839a99bbba3596d4b7adb
832333097a5536df259a201dd0ba97f33a72a44a
describe
'28616' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEP' 'sip-files00014.pro'
91ff944f44e3d041a1d6e713fb107736
c333c799a3e218e0f143bc9f3922fe56f854f58c
describe
'25991' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0904404ba4ed3f10760990ed54474904
8778177c6368faf41bfae10372521081d642920d
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCER' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c014d150602a898163517e1062ed71a3
64b8230fb8f215a73a2004b69035c9943cc386e2
'2011-10-25T13:26:13-04:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCES' 'sip-files00014.txt'
50b8bcf14db63a17be5b45217bcd76a3
c189f5260585d84cdc91958ebecc541f044bed1d
describe
'6497' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCET' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
09e02554d6f1c95108c91d8159f5c2b1
f6d2c447c17a573373bc4a9af328045be90d2280
describe
'539485' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEU' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9b3880cbb33c5a09b5a451b9d1dd3d60
39cd8b8bf371f18ba003ad0ea5aadbef4b1ae094
describe
'79724' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEV' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b9bb4e1db4a2389d5feccf8584e35349
2f2f3b49c7f13b5821e2f81a818eb504a96cf0b2
'2011-10-25T13:26:53-04:00'
describe
'36101' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c44a370609a75ff247c694ec200e8c1b
f268217be55dd7d4ac75becf0d88cea6d4e11a9d
'2011-10-25T13:26:25-04:00'
describe
'24065' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEX' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
5ca2cce657b1dcae3d3760b73927d4cd
40329862646e8a3db4c9c4ab4ab0cda4d2c36e23
'2011-10-25T13:26:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEY' 'sip-files00015.tif'
4bac156c7cdbb3d52956a136d0ad1c5d
5c6bbc55ee5de026d7f76c732551bfcdb591dd11
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
30d55a24d170b1bf4a1877b4c2964228
bea2245ae4b3c6677688ab62aaea4af2eeea6720
'2011-10-25T13:27:08-04:00'
describe
'6017' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
e56afcf95a2ab081e044fa08866b54e0
4b7a824c62c407c22d0e8b75e1167874307b4df7
describe
'530488' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
4c103ef93f7819d22a31f12b999de834
82fc1a182cd2399866e4ebe0a9774e973fb7c9bf
describe
'81943' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
d23f5fb850ebf0dd5e3a37412e0c9178
6460834700347ccc62adb7c9c64a30d0387472ec
describe
'13186' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFD' 'sip-files00016.pro'
cdb599ee4e75c23adc8cbdc0e9951b02
fe95fd8f36a67cf50557818eee98bd1219b23bea
'2011-10-25T13:26:32-04:00'
describe
'22181' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFE' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0055e4279f4948c42205e20fb9c74c40
1b5f9a20cd4e9c001f7302ac9e3590951edb91f4
'2011-10-25T13:26:48-04:00'
describe
'4260612' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
67f5096b46305a1e0e551eb129ca3ab3
0ae32fbbbc6949efe34fb9e668334eeca25d6519
describe
'531' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
78850d78f6c6bbd69d2f863643221703
76aac449738d53171b3843077076db2fe69eb28b
describe
'5757' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFH' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
ceecddc90677b10e24061cf5f125411b
fba5e22356c92c0aaf2aacead0d24b3b0fd61310
describe
'539432' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a036d98d0f875dc7b0960baf74612b7e
321d58f0197802df36311fb55d37910fa882f2bd
describe
'10808' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
0aaed89e6ef3b8163a58ccd430123c25
584d2ecffa44cb2099c4c75c1abda1a078a16c90
describe
'2596' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFK' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
285341da269f86792b8e543ab2e876ef
0b7bfdd78911fcaed800142823b22c6a4cca2812
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
98b8e03199d3b4effa1e067c7c200c7d
1c0bfe574571b40f78bf4284002053cad4a392d4
'2011-10-25T13:26:45-04:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFM' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
3652ad1f3adb2ddb0b0f172636fbdc1b
494a75221bbda16a3bb911287997315f0c11c57b
describe
'539450' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
46d0f7e5321643c40b77d9c9399a4554
dcb9943cdc91598497ac27cd482392a987427047
describe
'110793' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFO' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
dd2e42648f0c131a9c5ceb48697784e6
935e31e72551b86bb101da3de2ee901f026f1dab
describe
'26790' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b0228d1be13d2b0caaca26c1e150b73b
bbff591fd9a66028b360d79accdd70c76b384e57
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1f0b334c28945e9be903fd375dc6d825
d95fcb97d12d53773abff262417ccf4554a1a9a2
describe
'6845' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
899f5640c6a49556a51da37c4164044b
50debe5bf7258614a690e2e6e4dc1e3daac871c7
describe
'539453' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ad5a14414261e2b9c4144bd4f7ea3c8a
4ef98e0e2e223d5be541a66ebcb753f05377c1c7
describe
'81520' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
374f65a6e819038293c7f507bedf207a
ac14bdc130bba40f6f2febf2374941b676492fe5
describe
'35971' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
515bab44a24fb8667c5641a908cc0dbf
e2916fbc77a537692f4a155d9b388fb7ac4cb8bc
describe
'26312' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
9a3400bbf5a062e5998a59219294b840
f1f1c935c025daeea92187babeb53734c0b1e7f2
'2011-10-25T13:26:24-04:00'
describe
'4332244' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0f9909842e54913f0e838d19c94e844f
7d2c17637e47a8aa4f358784b058f03f66e10474
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
069d2d2e3d97224dfbdf89df1556fae8
ae749cbe84e6b846576405a31fe0fd8bdadea4e3
'2011-10-25T13:27:03-04:00'
describe
'6062' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
56e0eee0fb734f8e8e6125ea4cdb96b7
765b319624967d9ca010e8d83a869811d3f8c494
describe
'539478' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
adba7081918a6406b1f45d7166bf724b
b83d052d2ebaf11673e87a716e975bd0a3ff7447
'2011-10-25T13:27:16-04:00'
describe
'80176' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
bb5d86a76d2cf9fbb30b6396d88e8412
7fb4fe67809767155ce1369eae9c4f802e09fe78
describe
'35285' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
7147526ce9c35984a11d9871b8758b3a
d2544cebb71356b413923cccb85247aa24ecc3d7
'2011-10-25T13:26:33-04:00'
describe
'24836' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
706d3a96badbebf1b3d6a53c90d471c4
3687248edb57b8c5e7012ad782c0e264165fbadd
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
fc6a29743d0b40e32370b206868c00a2
78fccf36d0522219ea23d34571432e172d2f4118
'2011-10-25T13:27:01-04:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b9fb9f2253e27a1f6e9833d4e0a42aaf
069777a8fe2e936776442536ee344a8199684009
describe
'6241' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
1b097e92847488776a864d5b5e60e7d9
44cb646c661f6ecb75b619827a15f84126896858
describe
'539458' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9e9dcb43320de6191de298f701f01f0a
2943787a9278cf99f376d84a28b2f44bea0168ca
describe
'78253' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
2baac11a523dbb469f08038eb0e7292c
dbde4a10060ef406e76d3c1edd3e47653cf3326a
describe
'25842' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
80e867dca1ac9a6f48b9f9bad7e58fb1
16890737cecac0fe2ab9acbfef7b0c15d7778c54
describe
'23154' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8e722e82973654494dc24671ad63a1db
d5cfce136fc889b5b9b5c98a113d8825f4bc9124
'2011-10-25T13:26:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7c9609f4a251bd50f85e83acc2659093
cddfc40b0d5c0ce58911d610dbb31ce2226e25fe
'2011-10-25T13:26:17-04:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
250d059d4bf5ac0c84fb191827288e5a
31a598b7358b3e4a35c097165f5b38c3c00deb7a
describe
'6074' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5307b24e219de1f7bf27760c3243e05a
83996f605daf2ee88b7a997f06be7313f421518e
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
b413c713d5f3485277c20801ac19d3e2
526fa0b7102c7b5b2862b2c64e9679abb123b09f
'2011-10-25T13:27:02-04:00'
describe
'78900' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
88d22155970871f49d3ab407411d3159
486b8b8081687eaf373317c2ec494163916aed92
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4bbca0237ad50d221218b98bb976f885
48a90dd19dbb74e3cf7dd1fd133e078274a4bd4c
'2011-10-25T13:26:52-04:00'
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7434162c2e89bf6f3f20f695697a0ca7
2bb74993151f5f4cd8dae59b2f9c6e7eaaeaa6df
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9b4bd86f12192a0b50717df35c80a5bd
fd731a6e1d05a816b8c2e401fe6e490f4b657444
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
38fccfc5d33f1db1c33c843fb2190095
f57ccfcb16f423a0181e7ff4531667e94885da2c
describe
'5893' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGT' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e2d0e18674e129f81629d171e29a918a
9fa7b2e9c2380cec2e8aba32b4224335ce68edf1
'2011-10-25T13:27:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
dcfa70d5b501f3aa3a9c806472519e21
ac3efe004a6cedac3c6f913831857e1f71503df9
describe
'63797' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
12697384dfe2f16c5bb4650044ece437
f09ac92b85561226b95d855f18b06ab2c1e9a50c
describe
'17423' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c16f182050a34b1f011f0904977d8fd7
ae521db88d5c849390997abc6b2b7a2585a0b509
'2011-10-25T13:26:38-04:00'
describe
'18609' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
4a3054b57e87e720a0284dc1f718e2d0
4b9bbe6cc88d98d3921c1c28f2e2981d29406dd5
'2011-10-25T13:26:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
3523010d6c42fcc28aabe8ba945b436a
f27d2d12e5453d992d6709803790eabb9ab8d850
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
74f01836039dd56481106ea500cb625c
5d6ae241fc616d5e2cba5fd11040266bf2c67233
describe
'4858' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHA' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
e6dfbf7748957ebc2d41b010f364b040
f5349b4f17e1ba82f29092aa6283a1e2c5124d33
describe
'539465' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5193ee0323bcd6a69da1dc6cc7305cfb
2332d62f536f18cf529503a791726cc4830546c4
describe
'80039' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
0cad09f29e28d6b09a90dae6a28d38a5
2532f10a4ce5c5a0fe65c9bb5e41c535385aeb37
describe
'34350' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHD' 'sip-files00024.pro'
4c253c744833dd71edcf3e8f472d4ec7
2775d3c45bf98e8d8a5c185c035f722d39b487d5
describe
'24773' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d7784b4e30cebe3bbb7097105b130362
021a0d4a30610b80ca52a65ae5a56d4be4979a2f
'2011-10-25T13:26:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
327d68b99bdfcecc77cc39c4f2715283
7bce7742e4afc90348a2175d2300d98e4b2c94f5
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
75abc338e28f8dbe7aec1ce39c5555d3
49269cb581e7086a492d7f46580a1b8e349fe2d8
describe
'6099' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a496d4005f323ed2ae64fa766c417e09
a1bd8d6f3215d12fcfaede693ab239bfa52236c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
cb5c77b9117c379f951957b4e4616616
547408653baf825dfdc3b73a691e151bc468ae55
describe
'76230' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4db0f8cf0bd83baec4097aeb877de199
bd1b6bd41fef75ace303c1fada5ce8cf5bd4761f
describe
'34822' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
eac882bf8aca173f59999f79b433b4c1
92284ef063d8f79ff4000deb4b90e6514e6bd620
describe
'24379' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
17e9e72ccc00787ed9cc92c15b1b8af7
bfd4068f2557c08b516c593132bce93a36695bc4
describe
'4332248' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
a4b3caec229cf27d341e0d61e9911fab
197f5f67e990a662c1ea1c1a290891f0d65200e3
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHN' 'sip-files00025.txt'
369320091521a1b2e624921acc0240cb
dd0ed9827d1175f31cc37e22fec3fc482362caf4
'2011-10-25T13:27:19-04:00'
describe
'5946' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHO' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
88825f421d71a51610b0ce4b5595006f
ca2b675e5950d7378417314b93f9a4b05c22219a
describe
'539487' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHP' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c83cc5986b9adf65bb0c1bff3a594c31
efcd7b589ddabc82382fb8b9acc8cb0e1048959e
describe
'78570' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
9105052a3b52ba5ff359c0eb70da63c6
93e7061cfa1c004634ec85db6173a926a55ab9bf
describe
'20066' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHR' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c0558549354eadf557985784a0581668
641d0c804d164a7e02c4acebc57d518f3a5c4b95
describe
'22929' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6c1e0c6a9a08800ae24bff18c29f9364
c817760b62ed184090578a35f729ab4fe8e7049f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f3f3e1fae3acd4dfd38edc7c57d18824
2e4183e23b1f4d18e289cd96bcd0f22c9219acfa
'2011-10-25T13:27:05-04:00'
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
b75b1ce4fe5097b6b0bf44838b9808c6
2943fd17448191b5cdf7b2f6b8e0e96b3a10f789
describe
'5806' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6af354150dfefc8a843af19cf9af0791
5b37e9b2eb343f611e8fd8b2dff42bdaecf3f334
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e1619b18938316d1dde803534b8ba451
574646815733c6646afc3e0cb9ab2c5dc4f3dce4
'2011-10-25T13:27:04-04:00'
describe
'89305' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHX' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
27db0f3a0be1c18ca106ec35648582b9
a71d5e00e8564a0c5ef9d74c1d288ec209cafdae
'2011-10-25T13:26:20-04:00'
describe
'39611' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
863fd1c811859f5a9f15eab8348ac442
f11311e0415068124838805bf0ad2e3c82860566
describe
'27160' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
6a0ce89cd4f628b1d515af8b73d81f5b
980f56c2d23fd31e24721b5e46051a21b5ce3fcb
'2011-10-25T13:26:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e1acd0d7b19e68b4a323a04a140ba915
085866a1d5aaf2ffdeaa5163a8e6badbeddbdc32
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6f12cad57803c32780d68a8955115c92
826a0e23bd27603b60ef822ee690a6155caad3a6
describe
'6628' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
983ef32d8e6cd4c37b5f264943fee2c8
7817991b3650dd19339a30b4188247ca93f1c4e4
describe
'539418' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCID' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
df833b45c34e81c9ad46e18592d920c0
35274e8c51ec5228c706bfc240463fcf9f6cd2eb
describe
'97783' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
75e6829b9f8bd586f4ef022d643de8d8
bc6ae25e7d5c6f94e0c7a4489098ad7da69baa33
describe
'43179' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c4db6199bde3581077741bf5b71a997b
cdcdaf38cf376a4e73f3205e628afbb1e3a4007b
describe
'29738' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7881dee2fc33b60c39b62f7bd905f119
53da6a3e9af9a7f28ed060f7c44b4ee739bf7137
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c4d62133aa1f2a0a8e55b19bd8b17d65
edf8ee7d7710be9aee68114adc2c036797cebb24
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCII' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ea2812bb989edb8576932bf0f1a1a257
38794003b425fe1c5ee36436d5bdcfde8c141371
describe
'6713' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
32aab0ae3a9e600b04f1ce32580007bf
3c507827ff891b274f3758cacf6a0f8bf020a613
describe
'539358' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d71b126f4772d11cb501a6a37756f541
0653353400506b877ab70d0e71fa35a23a0c4e67
describe
'113540' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0d60fc1a387c527449fd0ef9a516dde7
3bf18d4576ed828c676fcbb57e144ae0c13f03a8
describe
'26288' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c569666356f8d82364fccc35402b5e1a
352823e6149102246e9d5bdc029480bec926d403
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8da82cd91ec35ce5d7f2a1eee79409a7
72d7e0be4cef79fec98ac97794e3810a0d6ec7bc
describe
'6294' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d80cf34bb9a00d275149d491bd6fc20c
321f9802231d5e124f0bb815e4baf2a81088ca57
describe
'539469' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
30ad38f19fd8ba747a21a750a12457bc
721ecc00095bdaacfa34966a823f54c1b5b766be
describe
'17256' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
aa2c410dec312fbdb7a96b706d1ef371
260678533378af6dc7fa9b360125d5fd7bf7a9df
describe
'3856' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIR' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
8ebeb5d384ae9ea2731c556554f6a58b
167ac55a558e29c7080d1082b76bce03fca9c5b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIS' 'sip-files00030.tif'
8f8382272f602b774ed75dfcfff41729
317871139ba92583399826aef869d2f524f5e43b
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1e8a844c61b61db84db532a40284567e
aff9c94ac56b862d5e0d77c78ac40bcef896de2d
describe
'532335' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1314609dfb90f1b589f2dadb7ae90eaa
cdb7cd56373fc582b9fde072fab1d78a8c101d6c
describe
'95952' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f4b47de36e77f9cd80ca7687fd1daae1
f9551dbc4aedf30bce88bd9d65c23754d3581b72
describe
'36616' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
ee34d89362d855d0c8994e9ee805fb35
a961d6ad1cf3ba2c4bc87a164d050733187047ea
describe
'28561' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a9f4db09cdbd08facc432e2f79462d70
487876b835ed0b33fce26fee083ffa3cced566f5
describe
'4274940' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
4afce2e3306ac0a0d28e66e505606ecf
af552a95d0503f199cb452b0045c34e63247c5e0
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
e4bdb7524067c4f508028544fee704d9
e92d1c6b5f5ed732575f090c5a933c39dfb6c698
describe
'6879' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1b5bd677b50078eaf5948b70ade511a2
619518eee31e57b5a7b506cf622e92b23f7a2c7e
describe
'539445' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
752d665080d6e7134e2d345986c772f7
bb974595918f8a7d15e62da11ba7af4b02ff80c5
describe
'82277' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
566a9ba14ff6ef1317ab98f95ee4fbaf
67f3f4163f85f84adb1a01d354d4cdb6d4ae3d47
describe
'35141' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
0e0f25a1e3d2855e716b4c9a95bd416f
6e8f7381d3f7f3af40bcea018814f7b2c627fe10
describe
'25727' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
267c339789302425a9d633e9a99381bf
f6f54ebb4728db098f1fffbedafce551cdc7abdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8841fe7d99b020f23939fb53a4a66d3f
d8082c4e4e23c4dcf052296a6705b0eed7f89708
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e4cfcdd5463f97384aeecb5206f4b437
4cfde1604e4c20ec20ee0a65e16e68938c6badc8
describe
'6375' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
693b9732a2f3f788f6a3e6a381fc9adf
12df322eb9fcd6f5ec63f9203b00a3b988cf8d50
describe
'530518' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJI' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
706720002d9011086ad35e772feca934
a63ea53942a5db50b3694a8167248d1917bd681f
describe
'88266' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d94352e9639b35bfcc3722a273402c88
43fe7836ed03606fbb38926b9471040d0321288a
'2011-10-25T13:26:21-04:00'
describe
'33548' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3b84374b25bdc6896f5561bc498abdbd
25f39efcfa57a54b3e517507b6cba298c6da3551
describe
'26848' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a921df0be831f9a17942614278fadb05
cd8be0dfddb1b3ea4d314728d5dd7465fd6864d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
1eb5546bc603ff8ae660c3cc97d1a7aa
d68e8b1d088a7179fa601de35333a6cfd1694f3e
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ef18e7b30d486d2cbad18a4e43e70a61
23a32309b3a5034e547caf562ed2ac0c3be676ef
describe
'6608' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
130ffb712f7340d2f6af61c98468a456
ec6d40a163619c973b265163bace11f109bfefb5
describe
'532326' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f8493b9b66fdc787db9c9acdc9d884d1
d08556ff7c1dba8aa642dcd93be28801ec50c038
describe
'82980' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9f64fa39700beb4b96545764f84274a2
f4f359e92f76dc2c626148ce953defae60e203a0
describe
'36438' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJR' 'sip-files00034.pro'
fcdefa694663cd6e0a5bbbf273eb2536
2b6e2d39900ca59ce6d20ea1df89be4514050a85
describe
'25889' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJS' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a98af06334fd957644ba4afbede14a24
3a200f6c04fcd3800c2e1e06ec8e1cf016598708
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c6c4a2d9ee2b302e2639a3fad595275d
42c4779f9ebd383bca59c5299e02de47fb6e7dc5
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJU' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3d51cd885605a8387ec44eeebd1c094b
4d051ee1d764a0e37803c588333615265b520bde
describe
'6209' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJV' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
678ad056511f3167542553328d3eec4b
d81216e8184e2ca050030a4643cfd61dff2ba244
describe
'539472' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJW' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2089d84b0ed8b15358b30d2cfb3d075d
bb2db0406744810e51062712b6b60f79a8436880
describe
'85888' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c42b3e81d95bdf815a50778c3e5fda63
30bbd91f2cff61aeadbddce80542e3c2488e51c8
describe
'31680' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJY' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0cc198b0d0854febab49cd82c651c574
eedcc3523eff3b9a04c3f34d814209b564a4c9e4
describe
'25481' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCJZ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
6b51fc82ca47471d79df3c037ccc0fba
aa15696122b79800bd21eb9386028228ae4698ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKA' 'sip-files00035.tif'
4647fbce8f59387d299b86fb8695396b
3e70e92ba860649fdf7b20878e5cc4027ec2c91f
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ab1c78e6478aa56b7846bf47db024fc3
21098725acae6ad2e055e260aacfe6995ad8e431
describe
'6624' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
85e6550b0ad9c813b427589d174a654b
c301c88ec158117dbf718201a2393a419226e2fe
describe
'532252' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
05d7fe96bfae51c5656871f462cad3fb
28a4d2a63aa7c70222474c7b4e9e97ce5ae142a0
describe
'32928' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
74c7df01663c9bffd11c3b9d9335f1db
e5854659b6179d61c8c55b3386b3384a1b07072a
describe
'9806' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d1407582603288c72c7818ce37c38b61
5b2bac29d527b3d7672e4e4c4216abc45ff03c19
describe
'9356' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b153e25d86472aa091f19a7b2c9a894d
b0e174041af82570d450c5cb0759f68f3ea4da69
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
901bdfbb2a4f35350ef434f9a12959b0
07d82aef33ad4e57a317c00512fc2c3ba050e723
describe
'399' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
efbeecaa1e18bf8b0dc2de8008635284
5c7b1e4d8ee29b6ceaff4e8fd136ea8a6b05ef86
describe
'2621' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2fe5283a3420b72710857f634773747a
37055adb0757e27519a0a66992fc759002b3aa13
describe
'526946' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
afb891c50d726017275afa55c064a844
fa13833c397ffaa2453a1672f93ad674c0073dc4
describe
'75483' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e064336761eb3859ba79d348596195c3
4d21942509026786282b376eba89455b5c4336b3
describe
'27077' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
5190b289c58da1e12c9b68bd50b45b6a
f809ace080dc84860c7a1b47a648298c26c29ef6
describe
'23122' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f48abb06e8690b32ed9397c230bb04b7
457edc7f3df767f8a588199ab6201630c4f568c3
describe
'4231956' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
d89ec770aebddec5339de1deee9cecb0
86dde152aaa31a39221a9758a048e765698567b8
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
e082ce6b7ce48d26c00e841b761d910b
630d09871431a9bd38226165dfd9b7427944c448
describe
'5482' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
9b3e783a98f08bde241e0f8eb0b24e73
2ede203626f91af76da066b8711342d91cd96641
describe
'537702' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0d16d304b4520cbccc6ac97fd7aa33ee
5a008a019159555b149e485a8d592a293fc8bc91
describe
'91315' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3fc403a1444231507c1505f5e312977c
02793f41ec8ec3ee926835a9da5d28da680905d5
describe
'37816' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4cb39098880f775168ba7a839b301ebf
fa15dedb782fcd9bdca3847817d10abd87fc570e
describe
'27236' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b6b0acd8976184947bc4bca301d3c4ee
5188aaea1fd04d149a54a745d62d4eec923a6e87
describe
'4317924' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
427e91317e44ae415e77ecf7d7f7f688
e9bcd36c1ccd1a94eb3817a6a977ed14f6693911
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
15461e63e1221d580bb7aa1c05214a98
0d611b70b599a5aac1e19c925c235095c0b8e4b5
describe
'6428' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
3d54f2794e97232b2ea0b787a3c81a56
e1f63adff5a756049e78aa54b85093920570cbc5
describe
'539486' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
26a21b72305b49c143ecb156d4a6adc2
eeec39ebdab9649594dd86a80d7c430a283a27cc
describe
'83946' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
93126b3437769e90be98d48abd22b277
2c8803eb32d3ccb6e9171b9bf6c1c2d8cd324a86
describe
'38112' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
fb08fca6ae7cf5664c73242d5d4aa5b1
d9085b18e1816625313fb28cef7cc814be0b2ce6
describe
'25272' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
741e07c7b29b38e1caac9108262144d5
aebf31f92f7827096b9d1f06f2eae9d545d2f88f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b21bf7d5570835f424e56f6685fd6fec
ff6ea56b6995f4e7849b3333500897a511b07434
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
1e7df8f75f9c1c6640362cf0924fb833
09829e84e35066d2d25d2baf68c35e83b485f385
describe
'6279' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
da0748bb03050fb52ee43d3ad4a9517e
fa3b4f70d6597313ff9331a36c507c6f63d1a7e5
describe
'532313' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1669c0c8da19a1ccb64233fa9fa10528
924b77f917fe54ebeb918e6a08349cd364ea8327
describe
'89895' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f309f3da239b0b25ee6f372e0ada9c48
22fa9e9f4648fc8ea66162eceec7dd8094d1b369
describe
'24566' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
85ab05d2690a6f6fb00cfe20f6f03014
ab870c0b4149cf325bbf48b638af9731e48d4a2b
describe
'25561' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d17bdc13b06d0bafed8dfb823041b81f
5f89c025c764f43ce86bf12a338c702c4a1531b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ed1bc133bf336dee98ddb9f1b25e8cdc
0de34f116fadb128d5a5c3de9c612b9a91f279d6
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
ffa8495d862c266f836aa60979d8cc3a
d99151e890e809d6fb0bc65573001f65dbd41385
describe
Invalid character
'6397' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
dd70632351795468c80711661623d59e
2c1b6a3a748c3939382f5d83ba95467be7b61ec3
describe
'539176' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
709395f1097bdcbe45df8168e81539a1
03a584252b0819a733abfb2295c5e0f983021c7f
describe
'86210' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c0af8134af54fcbca2ab8fc627152606
27cff297f0b047bc462044a890bba9f57314ee23
describe
'36592' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
47a5803c544758ffd213730093ee6cb8
7be375535f0d0ca3ae43ef1ef6f677b8172d4015
describe
'25543' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c9d8647d57428f13cd040f7c9fc18afe
bac323bdd511074694b1ed6209040bcb2d1f316d
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a8f8e43dc78a578350f6faef3e0c48bb
793680bc3914b2a578099597c705274104698292
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f05c36219549dbb08eb1079232bd8c56
5cac8cf3ccf34be9221db655f6c0fc5453e80efc
describe
'6211' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
45926597b993bea7f231dfa5e8fa3c60
89eec2858ed4cecb6e2613206a8921c6a97de0c3
describe
'535918' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
d0f8a60bd9dc8718f2b77e33017dcb86
a771bde6517f3ee426648f07d2880e9104a1863a
describe
'83059' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
bc83fd49834eff7df12e0e911f3af27e
795938e993c1c6e4b8b80120948e13bbe3d954c7
describe
'36501' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
aec06002e146f19f3e98390e8747cff2
1f3518ac2eb1385947ab7bb6ab8811aec218d8ce
describe
'25281' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e142b094623decd60e6c2c222a583080
a933f6281fa6f801f610ec1e83ca8062934dfd5c
describe
'4303596' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a8c64a7001b604c7313fbb30ae9792e3
4eaccfa7cc1d70977983f117bbbf69697e41c55b
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
c9f4b7426b54c7bc012c110652550e1c
b29c78a853ebf6264202705b2ef32a2f0815a30b
describe
'6289' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCLZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
0585c46fb0b53debf8a0c2183c7ac843
9f1b6bd0f39adab260b08b193c07d885b9a4f4fd
describe
'526948' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2761ba0b3245b320f32bf5bf4420bc6d
3a92087f2f35f9777f4d7f44cfd77e38532f7739
describe
'77445' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
258991e81ba5235e8e171853cc3f22eb
4f4e7e25a8c2fef8d62c79d6d6db35b760deab92
describe
'33494' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
851f28397a03cd640a1ab6b839cc2e61
ff4a46a77f8676c0c9d6f6aba607260cc2a2c13a
describe
'24992' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
9922e9c8da4ea81a7672c29293f808ff
f9e05472a31fc61c56c09ed0e50f604f70b61efa
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCME' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f807b58e5f191d784578fb6c64351ef4
10ded25415abbad247179eef96485589c4c35b5a
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
df621e3663e786caf97f9a32ffae874d
6c3fb7d752c2d791a6d913300551134ebc4718e0
describe
'6059' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b0c61716f257301798d66de17471fbfc
2107db7b3fb861528b31da685cc7873743d1f1ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
84d923a284288551cea205b54df1cfba
9d8c329dccdef160e154ca2c9d2c02f6abd2f8ff
describe
'30843' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
119b013f377943a8a7d768b79b7de53d
717271a04d183fb6c268910ddb9ccabd24602a0a
describe
'9350' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
cac4fc55db3190ac3590fd902f4633fe
bee481150c9ba07d5143649b02f8df3735c7b5c7
describe
'9138' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
4c16737541551c1e691678638018b0ce
29919993f025b99ca0a5484dac3a80005c7d1ae2
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCML' 'sip-files00044.tif'
902120def4ef6e02afa6341b25e13d08
ddfe9a1df8b6c2e65710b4b93112714eecea2517
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1cdb9936ebcd5f0fd31b1a4427a758b4
53eb7adbd3ffa1c2749fa1a00a521c83e02b129b
describe
'2521' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f36d664fa38aefd0ac6c506bc11dea9e
2a45c04b59653fef4bce7cf10d7326c536ca8d1c
describe
'539476' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
3e5e184be48f2bf5b62e14feb99df04c
972608946ffed6f29d88eb0a4278d1ed3f7a1c9b
describe
'75860' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
0269ad213b4e0ed915d294c801be43f8
56f8f2f196a72f2215b3145fd467038f58e62e65
describe
'29674' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
55a9a62341826a98dab608a6fdfdb805
ebaf51bd6db343217f253acdf8d16d30c4b0e2b9
describe
'23223' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d6a48f099fbbeaae9a58d05cd8e86200
4a8199cf66a98f1146bf2460b93f8a8172c1e2b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
2b334e379eebd69144fc467834228f3b
58c2f39633c0ab09458cbcb8dc801fd1ab1c8663
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
63405c688e6cc35616cd0194f290c726
6aee667364b906776e88afa28e0474fa9af29f37
describe
'5556' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
bd4406bf3995a21f1016d57ee6ece865
278e0ad902fcf4b1b2c42f98ca4564306955534b
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a674117f2eeda0e6ac5dbcf6009f0ff1
5d93633cf69b365fefcf50f27adb245bd51c5660
describe
'94322' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
64a03c6be70edbd22304501b644c8eb2
d805287d14314d9fb3bb9d78003580aa69bb7826
describe
'31448' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
72279febfe9c22915a45418f2fa61a22
a6255d2b1f3c133bee4cf6f7b990a97d98ba31ac
describe
'27555' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
4a57af781362612dacec62022135b786
9e1c67b70b2c70e6ee08b548ca579e2ed34572b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCMZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f929cf9fd6dbbfb7895c820ddbf9d628
18c73770e940421077e342a4d2b1091c0776ad94
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
108672e67973b17caa647f438de6fc6a
235e23ca6fc346a2b079d792bd6021daed5bab32
describe
'6519' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c285134c7e634374cc9a278fa1532245
48ddcaa54c223b796872c39898092c9d913c115f
describe
'539448' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
c1ab7c1823c0ba754b24557e3fb2c74a
ec86862249d98cf5007e3dc7678b982db78995fd
describe
'79306' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCND' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
dccaf54ebee7b20fa2c94025dd5fe467
cd01b0684127fc7de59f82ac4c36152f742f492d
describe
'34045' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1f81d1383054b4fecea0100e31573e50
0fb575de9c9cb2da4a11d35bfacc04860915f74e
describe
'23297' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c741ab8c74507c51d6e395a77dd7f89a
833b612b99a38683bacc33fc44c2b188c8d0ef4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c095124c07a7e9ec84930a1b823d0364
8c3cc4222d002efa9151c5403787e00ae52528f1
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
1dee08ee466b54f4ae0a168395fbaa15
13b2221d81ef7022800dd1ab09e563deb65bde5d
describe
'6298' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0bd7781a6e1169f088ef707c67db4f35
68a782c65556735f2177e25e5bb817764897f4ab
describe
'539490' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0bee22f3a50331164bd4673349892f69
1a8d4067ad6827b957d0e75e483e426d8dbf1132
describe
'87250' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
bac7d6c35cfd420e0f3de838445c548d
f62da0e5cf042a7f438227bc92711fce67df3272
describe
'38239' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
80d63d12350e042735cdfa672d80eba7
a578d2f19624a8f7c1c2cb521114cc77dd61a06f
describe
'26513' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
bfae194c7abafc01850ac84cead8d316
e90d0ab77e74e181d5754e3f07a9a4e4a33c8dd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
b3b832168a9ead7bb565aec9d4fb1f30
dc88cdb8264bce0edadc62f7fe41919fdf476b35
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
258a665bef2189734ef43b470a1204a3
5b69139c5562855be3a34b98b7965ceb83df0ba1
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
73105afc85ecbca44b4c2b178a2a49ef
7b63b4665e4b0527448907a86e0ba56fdb6453da
describe
'539293' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2481bf483f039cb84c540f881a1e35cb
e099d6ae02242e31bb2a91131116c12a1a227707
describe
'106485' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
faf6839bfd8f7e20729a58c5713cd303
8dfc10e02698f4b040ac0cf537d9b7b9fe073018
describe
'24968' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
747375aa7b44b2e2f159dd5982ef8eac
6886201fb3e046af2ce2bb946779614640b56882
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNT' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4695875104c1c5650a057ddbc519fb72
1c353680eaf930a389470d75db592453b5effaee
describe
'5981' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNU' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6b4509f0816256ca9b9c229283483c0b
b625f80a9001f1049363396a6fdefd821ef77d7e
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f53ae27b059747ce60dca72d3aca1c47
e3e06fc21f7d411884591b0ef9a5878de88355c6
describe
'17275' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNW' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
edfb188d1cfc317acf2e1f91618da33b
006e31b869607c63d5db44461fac84b7e9cef3ed
describe
'4025' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNX' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
5e78fb5f1b153327d7fd5601b4695082
3e2e3697e128839c37922256e9864be9e3f2f964
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
521e152f81049109986890d8499cbd37
399b46bf05af6cd040167b286bd8cc959c18bed0
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCNZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
15cf7f6f52c8e530803d44e3da9813d2
c5afb3173e711d3ce0348da0fc176e526c5296ab
describe
'526955' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOA' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
f5a4fddf997068ead73b5a06a51ef272
7f3cc75c9528328c9664e4ec1872f1a701800fab
describe
'97704' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2112a30932709f56cf557cadb2d49bf2
8a039ead2c4f291ba546e381ace071b8112ca77b
describe
'40394' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a2bd16039e549969866b811c3ddbe310
649bd7ee6aa01e8d0c10a66cd93cb836a9e9d95b
describe
'29396' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ac4b40966c6df409c50a74a6c641f2b6
4e68323178518bc24de6b9142683ef7fdf8ecdef
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
90cdbe79dacaa517e38d75a2801039ab
58aee219d19bd21512c786874586f7697916dfbd
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a743744b16201d25f3b9b8fe20b3c276
413bf5bb302c829d91378c78658b7299ea46489e
describe
'7009' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
19ed745b193df02791e6b7b84c6f9a48
57134548de19b385029247138a9f0a1e9a88a9cf
describe
'514358' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
61edc88b83531bd81794f7286b9f4a02
acc747982a4ef13bc56133c4f5bc7b07015178b7
describe
'61736' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
351719ad6b857949438ceaca6e1aaff2
99ea9c2fc8a8a31cfacfa1a513f9fc6def1915fb
describe
'11554' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOJ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
acc9ba077d57e5e6399e4a3e476c7ed1
2427c3ee33d3d476cf207b96aa7a11fca2fb3e0f
describe
'17156' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e236dcb6e92f27feb25bff3566347122
f16f82e1d55add7dabec613ee0170af57397f4e8
describe
'4131660' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
4b062fd38a080df8d984a5cbcd10f6f7
93bfb491e56a1ba2ccfbde8ae6fddb5c362b7dc9
describe
'509' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOM' 'sip-files00052.txt'
09be7c896c496422b3bbea4e583f554e
ddab901ccc7ceeafa945999d46fa1c74eba7362d
describe
'4443' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCON' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
2b9f5f35a9a8aebfa7586f17beb2b3ce
e4ff8d205b12f096cd3b5c94d6484e94e64d00cc
describe
'599732' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
0f6490249c3159668cc4244a7fcdc62a
848de6d6a41be41d5ab740b160e8bb52ac4d3cc4
describe
'91133' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f5339d88ea568c06f9e8a955d644ba83
d58e384cb675d22b68091722e0d382583f4ff846
describe
'34066' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
79679e7e55dd452f95a2a811f0a6e29f
6036f118bebb676fd5803b6eaaeefa3fb19d25d7
describe
'14417800' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
662a84140a01844ab904581297b6acc8
68a896dbfd337c0d8c2353ae0f407b2cbcd08eb7
describe
'22740' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
671167acca4ac5b837acf67c5632c97e
2bd0b1a2e5646ce48f317158add056aa604a99a1
describe
'609530' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
74ec9365dc2dcad8c99bc18dc4c93f16
927477e0a406621c9c628f76fbb01d34053886a7
describe
'157924' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
04bbd8e64bb88ca97036becc80decb82
bb400e0ef2ecf185a00d1d3d9592ce44aef32e2f
'2011-10-25T13:27:18-04:00'
describe
'42719' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOV' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3276e8631452761961be2cc8e69398a3
9a25cbeb85ff8e7065df88e2e9064fa2e564ac53
describe
'14650240' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOW' 'sip-files00054.tif'
67b8fe786508d75c1ba856e11fb338a0
23c8a91351da4c7a518f4bc8d5eb8caff1c26fd4
describe
'24411' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOX' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8c1bd6f284d3af956901ec7eb1ff311b
9f0917a2163f5e0a9a6da81ae39e9ddc7bf1cfc1
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOY' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
2d66f5da2d57ac26b4ec807045f82fab
5b4ff26fd5abcad88470d9e3d47e7ca9b316835a
describe
'84750' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCOZ' 'sip-filesUF00086680_00001.mets'
02fd84cd8501da63e14d91a128817203
9858e0cd4f21ff8da24abf092e64780cc92e00ac
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T15:09:33-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'107739' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABASfileF20081124_AABCPC' 'sip-filesUF00086680_00001.xml'
59ad832d2e090ffe2e944d7492598f27
6f7c719b9dc473b32afaff69788bafbcae54e436
describe
'2013-12-14T15:09:32-05:00'
xml resolution