Citation
The professor's children

Material Information

Title:
The professor's children
Creator:
Fowler, Edith Henrietta, 1865-1944
Burgess, Ethel Kate ( Illustrator )
Longmans, Green, and Co ( Publisher )
Aberdeen University Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publisher:
Longmans, Green and Co.
Manufacturer:
Aberdeen University Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[4], 254, [1] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tales -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nurses -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Home schooling -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
College teachers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Interpersonal relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- London (England) ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
Family stories ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Scotland -- Aberdeen
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Edith Henrietta Fowler ; with twenty-four illustrations by Ethel Kate Burgess.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026773921 ( ALEPH )
ALH0264 ( NOTIS )
15505476 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
_ PROFESSOR’S

E.H.Fowler





The Baldwin Library

University
mB x2
Florida





THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN







BY THE SAME AUTHOR. |

PRICE 6/- |

THE YOUNG PRETENDERS; |
A STORY OF CHILD LIFE.

With 12 Illustrations by Philip Burne-Jones.

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON,
NEW YORK AND BOMBAY.

ABERDEEN UNIVERSITY PRESS,



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“Now, MY LOVES, AND HOW DO YOU ALL DO 2??? EXCLAIMED MRS. OAKLEY.
[See page 155.



PAE KOnE SsOkes ChInKEN

BY

EDITH HENRIETTA FOWLER

AUTHOR OF “‘THE YOUNG PRETENDERS”

WITH TWENTY-FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS
BY

BEBE KATE: BURGESS

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON
NEW YORK AND BOMBAY

1897

All rights reserved



ISIE OW NL IOS RA EONS,

PAGE
““ Now, my loves, and how do you all do?”’ exclaimed Mrs. Oakley Frontispiece

Oliver was standing in his favourite attitude resting his hands on his knees 5
‘Once upon a time there was a woodcutter’’ . . , . . ; 9
‘My scrap-book is importanter than yours”? . . : : : nase 2S
“‘T’se not Oliver, . . . I’se pretending I’se a little boy what doesn’t ring

bells ”’ 6 0 : : 5 , : , . i 6-319
‘It’s werry big—and werry stern,”’ he said softly. . , . ano
Cook found Roger fast asleep in the study armchair , , . E70

‘Will he bite?”’ : : i . , 7 . ; fs , 77)
“The spring is commencing, )

x » 82
It is, it is” )

Jack, who had just arrived home from school " , » 96
‘T only got into one rattling old row last term,” began Jack . a + 100
‘‘And Mike went walking a vedy long way”. ‘ 2 : 7 ae 2O
‘“They’se vedy unbedient,”’ said Mike impressively . . . . . 126
So the three children set off ina great hurry. . . , D » 134
“This flower won't pick,” remarked Oliver 7 . . A . + 40
Great was the love lavished on rats and rabbits. . . 6 eel 57;
-And there was the donkey too . r . . , , d 6 » 163
‘* Mike upsetted it and a vedy great spill came running out”. ‘ eeaL75
‘‘It seems a werry big pity not to finish doing what you have begun” . 183
Roger was waiting for the tooth-glass fi . a 6 . 6 » 196
‘*T do like sourness werry much,” he observed thickly. " . etzOr
‘*T’se on’y sittin’,” pleaded the baby meekly. . 5 , 5 . 222
‘‘T do love my sea werry much!” exclaimed Oliver . 6 ‘ " . 238

‘Oh don’t let her yove me so much!” begged Mike F - . + 250



Tabs ekORESSOKS: CHILDREN.

CHAPTER I.

Tuey lived in a wonderful world of their own, far
away up the steep stairs of a narrow London
house. A little shabby nursery with small, high
windows, through which a glimpse of the sky
could be seen up between the chimney-pots, as
well as a peep into the dark, dull street below.
But we, who only saw the chairs and table, the
worn old ottoman and capacious toy-box, had little
idea of the possibilities of play which the children
found within those four dingy walls.

‘Tf it wasn’t for lessons and bed-time and nurse
and being washed, and horrid things like that, we
might have time to get on with our playing pro-
perly,” said Peggy sadly, as she was dragged out
from under the sofa, where she and Roger had just
decided to spend the rest of their lives, pretending
they were rabbits in a hole. Only nurse always -
was so interfering just when the games were most
interesting, and she never could understand how
trying it is to the temper to be washed more often

I

G
G



2 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

.
than is absolutely necessary, even if the floor is
a little dirty or the window-ledge covered with
smuts.

There were four of them altogether, counting
the baby, but then, as the others would always tell
you, the baby did not count properly. He was
only two years old, and could not join in many
of the games or understand the real pretending.
Still he was useful sometimes in taking unimpor-
tant parts in the plays,—such as an invading army,
or a herd of wild elephants, or a bloodthirsty
robber; and “perhaps,” as Roger said with
thoughtful condescension, “he might count as a
half until he’s big enough not to be always going
to sleep, or crying, or tumbling down”.

Peggy was the eldest, and she was eight and a
half. Then came Roger of seven, and they were
both a great deal older than Oliver, who was barely
five.

“Peggy!” exclaimed Roger eagerly, one foggy
winter’s afternoon as they were learning their
lessons, “don’t you think we might play now till
tea-time ?”

His sister was curled up on the window seat
poring over a book to catch the last gleams of
the fading light. In the toy-box corner of the
room the baby sat cheerfully contemplating the
beloved countenance of an india-rubber lamb,
whose squeak had long ago been squeezed out



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 3



of him by Mike’s practical demonstrations of
affection.

“Tt is too dark to read any more by the out-
side light,” assented Peggy, getting down, “and
the fire isn’t big enough to make reading light,
so we might pretend we are Red Indians.”

“Oh, yes!” cried Roger, “and we'll live in a
wigwam, which can be the dirty clothes-basket,
while nurse is downstairs.”

“Tse R’indyan,” observed the baby, beaming all
over, ‘‘an’ [| bite!”

‘““Red Indians don’t bite,” corrected Peggy ;
‘you'd better be a bear.”

‘They do their food,” interrupted Oliver, who
was always ready for an argument. He was a
very slow, solemn boy, and dreadfully obstinate
about arguing, which is a most irritating thing to
other people, as Roger and Peggy well knew.
But nobody ever convinced Oliver against his
will. Even his father, who was a_ professor,
would give it up, baffled—and nurse, whose
temper was inclined to be short, would be obliged
to put him to bed in disgrace as the only way of
ending the discussion.

“T don't yike bears,” the baby whimpered,
but then Roger interfered -—

“Peggy and I will be Red Indians and Oliver
and Mike hostile tribes who live in the night-
nursery and they must invade”,



4 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘An’ I bite,” repeated the baby.

“You can’t bite,” persisted Peggy. “I told
you Red Indians don’t. And he mustn’t, must
he?” appealing to Roger.

“He can his food,” said Oliver, with an obsti-
nate look on his face.

“Oh, he’s too little to play properly,” said
Roger loftily, “let him bite if he wants to.”

Mike uttered a shriek of temper, and his face
flushed scarlet.

‘“T’se not too yittle. Tse vedy big boy. An’
I bite!” he added more calmly. For the baby
was a person of one idea.

Oliver took his hand.

“You shall bite, baby,” he said soothingly ;
“but come on!” And the “hostile tribes”
trotted obediently into the night-nursery and
crept under nurse’s bed.

“T will go hunting,” continued Roger, ‘and
the dolls shall be the people we kill and
eat.”

Just then a piercing scream from the night-
nursery indicated that there was a civil war
among the hostile tribes.

Oliver was standing in his favourite attitude
resting his hands on his knees, and the baby
was kneeling down with his head on the ground,
which was his usual way of being offended.

“That is my ball,” Oliver was repeating de-



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 5



liberately, ‘and you can’t play with it ever any
more!”

The baby had not thought about the ball until
thus challenged.

“You must not tease Mike,” exclaimed Peggy



OLIVER WAS STANDING IN HIS FAVOURITE ATTITUDE RESTING HIS
HANDS ON HIS KNEES.

reproachfully, “or I shall have to tell nurse what
a naughty little boy you are.”

When any of the others were naughty it
always made Peggy a little managing and strict,



6 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



but that came of being the eldest and the only
girl.
"Red Indians do bite their food,” observed
Oliver, ‘‘’cause if they didn’t they'd never grow
up, like the boy what wouldn’t bite his potatoes
nurse told us about.”

Peggy and Roger did not always quite believe
nurse’s stories, still sometimes they seemed so
true that they could not help making the children
a little thoughtful if not exactly frightened.

“Peggy, come quick!” shouted Roger from
the day-nursery, ‘‘an awfully exciting thing has
happened. The littlest china doll has tumbled
into the coal-box and | am pretending it is a
real coal-pit, and am going to let down a rope
with the toy crane.”

The other children rushed in, and they all had
a delightful time playing with the coal-box. The
baby so entered into the spirit of the game that
he flung his cherished lamb into its grimy depths.
In fact it was one of those delightful games that
never would have palled if nurse had not suddenly
come upstairs, and spoiled everything by her un-
reasonable interference.

“T never did see such children in all my life!”
she exclaimed wrathfully. ‘“ Such naughtiness
and such daring too! My back only turned for
five minutes ”—nurse’s five minutes were longer
than any one else’s—“ and you to get in such a



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. F



mess. You'll come into the night-nursery this
minute, and,” with increased severity, “be well
washed—all of you.” :

Mike hastily removed a gutta-percha ring, which
he was in the habit of incessantly sucking, from
his dirty litthe mouth to make way for a scream,
and Oliver began to whimper. He did so hate
the feeling of soap and water.

‘“] think it’s very wrong to wash your face be-
tween meals,” muttered Peggy.

But they all had to submit to such a scrubbing
as nurse thought fit, both from a personal and a
punitive point of view. Then they were marched
back into the nursery, and nurse dared them in
her severest voice to do anything except behave
themselves while she went downstairs to get the
tea.

Having their faces washed in the middle of the
afternoon naturally made the children feel very
serious. Indeed Oliver was positively sorrowful
as he sat nursing an old woollen shawl with a
piece of string tied round its waist, which he
invariably called “his brother,” though its real
name was Week.

“ Let’s tell tales,’
cleaner than playing.”

“Tm werry clean,” said Oliver, gloomily look-
ing at his fingers.

‘“My yamb vedy clean, too,” echoed the baby,

d

suggested Peggy; “it'll be



8 THE PROFESSOR'’S CHILDREN.



smiling, for nurse had also given it a scrub: ‘it
tastes yike soap when I bite it.”

“T have thought of a new story,” said Roger,
beginning to jump about. Roger always jumped
about wildly during his flights of imagination,
which made him a little difficult to hear at times
owing to his breathlessness.

“Once upon a time there was a woodcutter,” he
began, “and he was very poor.”

Peggy sat clasping her legs and resting her chin
on her knees, and the baby lay flat on his back
and waved his boots in the air.

‘“Werry poor?” asked Oliver.

_ “Awfully poor. His name was Mr. Jenkins,
and he suffered many things because of his poor-
ness.”

‘“ How werry poor was he?” persisted Oliver,
who always would sift the matter thoroughly, and
there was no possibility of putting him off.

“So poor that he never had anything to eat,”
continued Roger, standing still for a moment to
get his breath.

‘“ How horrid!” Peggy softly observed.

“And he lived in a wood ‘cause of being a
woodcutter. One day the cat ——”

“What cat?” Oliver wanted to know.

“The Jenkins’ cat of course,—jumped into the
larder and quickly ate up all the food that was
there







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THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. Teh



‘“A bitin’ cat!” remarked the baby, suddenly
sitting upright and listening attentively.

—‘ And Mr. Jenkins began to beat the cat, and
he beat it and beat it till all its bones was broken!
When suddenly ””—here Roger paused and his
small pale face fairly glowed with excitement—
“the wolf rushed in and killed Mr. and Mrs.
Jenkins quite dead and ate them all up in a
minute.”

“He bited them!” murmured the baby.

“After Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins was dead and
buried —.—”

“But the wolf swallowed them, you know,”
corrected Peggy, “so they couldn’t be buried as
well.”

“It's my story, and they was buried,” said
Roger with dignity. “In course the wolf didn’t
swallow quite all of them. So their heads, and
their boots, and,” reverting to his own toilet,
“their braces was buried, and when the funeral
was finished the cat married the wolf.”

“But the Jenkins was werry poor-—-too poor
to have things to eat—so why was there any food
in the larder?” began Oliver, who had been
meditating on the opening part of the story.

“Don’t bother so!” said Peggy impatiently.

“But I want to know,” persisted her little
brother. “If they was too poor to have any food
they was too poor to have a larder to keep it in.”





12 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘“And soon the wolf ate up all the cat’s
friends,” continued Roger excitedly.

“Tt was silly of the cat to marry the wolf,”
Peggy thought.

‘“No it wasn’t,” argued Roger. ‘“ It was quite
wise.”

‘Not if it ate up all its friends. J] can’t think
how a good cat could be so silly.”

“Was it a big larder or a werry little one?”
asked Oliver, but the others could not attend to:
him. He would go on asking questions about
that larder for a week.

“Tt wasn't silly,” answered Roger, getting
rather cross. ‘The cat loved the wolf so very
much.”

‘But the wolf couldn’t have loved the cat or it
wouldn’t have eaten all its friends!”

Roger thought for a moment before answering :—

“The wolf did not love the cat”.

“Then why did he marry her?” asked Peggy
triumphantly.

‘hle married wher in “a ft of good) nature,
announced the historian slowly. And there was
not another word to be said on the subject,
especially as at that moment nurse appeared in
the doorway with the tea-tray.

“My brother wants his tea werry bad,” said
Oliver, looking lovingly at the old woollen shawl,
“and I may have him in my chair during tea,















THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 13



mayn’t I, Nanny dear?” And Oliver smiled his
rare smile that seemed to come curling over his
sober, round face.

That was another rather remarkable thing about
Oliver. He was so fond of nurse. She was
really a very good person in spite of being so
strict, but nobody would ever have thought of
calling her “dear” except Oliver. And being
put in the corner or even sent to bed by her, never
made Oliver love her a bit the less; but that was
perhaps because he never changed his mind about
anything.

‘“‘T wish it wasn’t tea-time,” said Peggy sadly,
‘’cause the tale was getting so exciting, and I’m
not a bit hungry. Are you, Roger?”

“Tm not quite bread-and-butter hungry,”
answered the boy; “but we can pretend things
to make it nicer.”

‘Let's pretend,” suggested Oliver, “that we’re
eating slugs and snails.”

“Me too,” cried Mike; “let me have s’ugs
and snails too.”

‘“T am pretending that my bread is a snow
heap,” said Roger, ‘and my tea rain puddles.”

“Tea is like rain puddles—just the colour of
the puddles in the street,” exclaimed Peggy.

‘Why is the rain like water on the window and
like tea in the street ?” asked Oliver thoughtfully.

‘‘ Because the dry mud is like tea in the caddy,



14 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



and the mixing changes the colour,” answered
Peggy.

‘“Tt’s fun pretending it is puddles,” said Roger
with a little laugh. ‘ And I’m pretending I’m a
. sparrow drinking it.”

“Then hold your head back till it drops down
your throat,” commanded his sister. ‘‘ That’s how
birds drink, you know.”

Instantly Oliver and the baby adopted this sug-
gestion, which ended in such violent choking all
round that nurse interfered, and the sparrow pre-
tence was forbidden.

“We couldn’t have done it properly,” observed
Roger, ‘’cause birds never choke.”

“¢ Now then, finish your teas like good children.
And why you can’t eat your meals properly with-
out all this pretending rubbish I can’t imagine,”
added nurse crossly. And that was just one of
the simple things that nurse never did understand.
She could not see that eating proper things is so
dull, while if only you pretend they are such un-
usual things as mud and puddles, or slugs and
snails, it makes it so interesting and appetizing,

After tea there were lessons to be learned.
Both Peggy and Roger had quite long ones to
prepare for Mademoiselle, and even Oliver fetched
out a book and began to practise his reading. |

“ B for bread and butter, R for Roger, I for
ink-pot, T for toast-rack, I for ink-pot again, S



eT

HERA Siti ide ek ile) a gad Ale SR La tices

Y
i



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 15



for slugs and snails, H for hansom—what does
that spell?” he asked wonderingly.

“T don’t know,” said Peggy; “your way of
spelling is so muddling.”

“Tt isn’t!” argued Oliver; “it is werry un-
muddling. D for donkey, O for Oliver, G for
gentleman, spells dog, you know.”

“TI can only tell by looking,” persisted Peggy ;
‘but do be quiet and don’t bother. I never shall
learn these verbs,” and she began rocking herself
to and fro as if to catch their rhythm.

“My spelling is werry unmuddling,” repeated
Oliver, and then, as he was generally an obliging
little boy, “but I won't bother you. I will sit
in the window-seat and play with Week. An’ he
won't talk nor disturve you,” he added, climbing
up and clasping the woollen shawl tightly in his
arms.

“ Shall I tell you a story, my dear?” he asked
it softly. And as silence proverbially gives con-
sent, he began in whispered tones :—‘‘ Once upon
a time there was a great big giant what had no
little children ’cause he eated them all up. An’
his whiskers was so werry long that he treaded on
them walking up the stairs, and tumbled down and
was killed quite dead. An’ father’s friend, what
stuffed the eagle, stuffed the giant and took him
to the Museum in a cab. Peggy, may I play with

Sundial Sampson if I’m werry careful?”



16 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



His sister good-naturedly lent him a dilapidated
doll.

‘“T didn’t know both her eyes has tumbled back-
wards inside,” he observed sorrowfully.

“That’s the wretched thing about real eyes,”
said Peggy; “they will tumble inside.”

“Real eyes don’t always tumble backwards,”
Roger joined in. ‘‘ Ours don’t, you see.”

“They might,” argued Oliver; ‘and I ’spect
they will too.”

““ Now, Master Oliver, come to bed,” exclaimed
nurse, making her appearance after the baby had
been safely disposed of. And for a while there
was profound silence in the nursery.

“ Let's pretend I’m father making a lecture,”
cried Roger as he slammed the last lesson book
on the table and climbed on to the window seat,
“and it shall be about a phllos’pher killing a
tiger.”

“And I'll be students,” assented Peggy eagerly.
‘Father always has students when he makes
lectures.”

“ Ladies and gentlemen,” began Roger grandly.

“It’s only ladies now,” interrupted his sister.
‘“What a pity nurse couldn’t let the gentlemen
sit up any longer! Oliver does so well for
gentlemen.”

“Oh, bother! get some dolls for gentlemen—
there must be some, you know.”





THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 17



‘““They’re all ladies too. We must only pre-
tend gentlemen.”

‘All right. Ladies and gentlemen, this is a
lecture, and once upon a time a ph’los’pher went
hunting in the jungle——’”

“ Now, children,” said nurse, ‘“‘ come to bed!”

‘Oh, nurse,” cried Peggy, ‘‘and the lecture
hasn’t even got to the tiger, which is the most
exciting part.”

“T can't help that. And it’s my opinion you
children tell too many exciting tales, especially
just before going to bed.”

“But, nurse,” argued Roger, “ father likes us to
tell them. He's always dreadfully interested in
the tales we make up, and writes pieces of them
down in his note-book.”

‘Master Oliver couldn’t sleep the other night
for some giant rubbish,” observed nurse.

‘““That’s because he’s so little,” Roger said dis-
dainfully. ‘I think about giants and wild beasts
and battles all night long, and they all get mixed
up with lessons in my dreams.”

“Shall we do a drawing-lesson with father
in bed to-night?” asked Peggy.

“The master has not come in yet,” answered
nurse.

When the children were all safely in bed nurse
went downstairs. The door was open between

the little boys’ room and its dressing-room, which
Yi g
2





18 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



was Peggy's, so that a conversation could easily
be held. The baby’s cot was in nurse’s room at
the back.
“T are awake,” said Oliver, ‘only we must
talk a werry great lot ’cause I are sleepy.”
“And you must be awake when father

comes up, you know,” commanded Peggy
severely.
‘Of course you must,” added Roger. “I’m not

sleepy. Id tell you a story if I could run and
jump about, only it’s too cold. Oliver,” he
suddenly shouted, ‘“‘don’t lie down like that or
youll be sure to go off!”

Oliver lifted his heavy little head from the
pillow, and opened wide his big grey eyes.

“T aren't werry sleepy,” he asserted bravely,
but in a far-away voice.

“You are! you are! cried Pegey. (i) can
hear it in the way you speak.”

“And it does vex father with a great disap-
pointment to come up and find you asleep,”
chimed in Roger reproachfully.

“Tell me a story then—a werry exciting one—
‘cause that will make me more wide-awaker.”

“Once upon a time,” began Roger in a great
hurry, bouncing up and down till his bed fairly
rattled, “there was a great hunter who shot his
wife quite dead in the night.”

“Why did he?” asked Oliver sitting up.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 19



“He did not mean to shoot her,” explained
Roger; “he mistook her for a mouse. But when
he came before the judge there was not time to
explain about the mouse, and so the judge did not
understand it was only a mistake, but he hanged
the hunter quite dead.”

“ And what happened to the mouse?” Oliver
wanted to know.

“Tt escaped in great safety,” explained Roger.
“You don’t feel sleepy again, I hope?”

‘“‘ Not werry sleepy—on’y I do wish father would
come quicklier.”

“T hear him! I hear him!” shouted Peggy.

“Father, father!” called three little eager
voices; ‘‘we are all quite awake!”

The professor had been hard at work all day.
So deep was he in the solution of certain problems
that he forgot to put on his overcoat, and it only
struck him as he entered his own home that he
was very cold and thoroughly wet. The house
was very gloomy downstairs. It had been so
ever since the children’s mother went away one
night and left Baby Mike in her place. He
fumbled about for a match and lighted the gas,
which showed a small, shabby room littered all
over with papers and books, and with only a
handful of fire in the grate, for coal was expensive
that winter in London. A friendly lamp-post
gleamed in through the uncurtained window, and



20 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



winked its eye in the blasts of wind at the doleful
prospect within.

The professor picked up one of the books on
the table and stood looking into it, forgetful of
his wet clothes or the evening meal, which was
already overdue.

But happily the servants never waited for the
bell to be rung in that house. They settled what
food was suitable for their master, and one of
them stood over him until he had duly disposed of
it. Soa little while after the click of the latch-
key had been heard in the door, nurse appeared
together with a loaded tray, and insisted on the
professor’s putting on dry clothes before he sat
down to it. It was therefore later than usual
when the children heard their father’s footstep on
the stairs.

“J are awake, father !” said Oliver triumphantly.

“What shall we draw to-night?” asked Peggy
eagerly jumping on to the end of the boys’ bed,
and tucking her toes up under her little red
dressing-gown.

The professor was deeply ieresed in the
development of the esthetic aptitudes in child-life.
-He believed that every child properly educated in
that direction would be, in different degrees, an
artist, and this was one of the many experiments
which he intended to try on the little people who
belonged to him. It was really the greatest



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 21



advantage, the professor thought, to be able to
prove his theories by such intensely interesting
illustrations as his own children.

“ Suppose you each draw me a cruel man,” sug-
gested their father. He knew how they would,
after their own fashion, design a man; but the
term cruel would be more difficult to express.

For some time there was profound silence, the
children’s heads being bent low over their work,
and then Oliver looked up with a more solemn
expression even than usual.

“ How do you draw cruelness?” he asked.

“ You must draw it as you think best,” answered
the professor, smiling for the first time that day.

“Pye done mine,” called Roger, triumphantly
displaying a huge-headed figure with fewer fea-
tures than is customary.

“ That is a man,” said his father; ‘but I told
you a cruel man.”

“He is a cruel man,” explained Roger; “he
shot his wife dead. | telled a tale about him.”

“ But how do you know from the drawing that
he is cruel?” asked the professor.

“Oh, I pretended that,” answered his son coolly.
And then Peggy produced the picture of a man in
which her father detected a really unfavourable
expression by means of a very drawn-down mouth
and narrow, slanting eyes.

“ He looks rather cruel, doesn’t he, father?”



22 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Me, now!” observed Oliver. And his man
was very quaint and unformed, with a little
scribble up at the top of the paper.

‘“ That is the man,” he explained slowly ; ‘and
that,” pointing to the scribble, “is the cruelness.”

“Very good, very good,” said the professor,
“you have all done nicely. Now I must say
good-night.”

And he left three very wide-awake, excited little
people upstairs when he went down to write in his
note-book the psychological conclusions of the last
drawing-lesson.



23

CHAPTER II.

Tue trouble began with its being the day for clean
clothes, which, as everybody knows, are very
prickly and irritating things. Then Roger would
argue about his shirt and say it was too tight
round the neck, and he pulled the button off—
on purpose, nurse said. Anyhow it put her into
a thoroughly bad temper so that she brushed
Peggy’s hair very severely and kept catching the
tangles in the teeth of the comb. But nobody
was really naughty before breakfast except the
baby, who was having his bath when nurse had to
leave him while she stitched the button on for
Roger. Now Mike loved soap, and would always
try to eat as much as he could of it when nurse
was not looking; so directly she went away he
picked up the cake of brown Windsor and began
to suck it eagerly. Unfortunately nurse looked
round at that very moment, and as she could not
leave the button she said quite sternly :-—

‘Put down the soap directly, you naughty boy.
And you are not to suck it again!”

The baby looked up solemnly for a minute, and



24 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



then he deliberately took another large bite before
it was too late.

Of course, for such dreadful disobedience as
this, Mike had to be punished by several wet slaps,
which made him scream and cry all during the
process of washing and dressing, and nurse said
“she hoped it would be a warning to the
others not to be so naughty themselves”.
Which altogether made it very gloomy in the
nursery.

Being Saturday there were no lessons,and Peggy
was in a very irritable mood all the morning. A
perfectly clean pinafore and a head rather sore
from having a lot of tangles combed out of your
hair do rather upset the temper. And Roger
turned out so aggravating over pasting things in
the scrap-book that it made it worse.

‘Give me the brush,” she said impatiently, for
they had only a pot of paste and one brush
between them.

“ve not done with it yet,” answered Roger.
‘“T must finish my picture.”

“Oh, bother! I do wish you wouldn't always
paste when I do.”

‘“My scrap-book is importanter than yours ”—
Roger was becoming a little put out too—‘ and
the brush is most mine.”

‘No, it isn't! It’s most mine ’cause I’m the
eldest.”





i : Sx = == = 5
7 = \



ae a



“MY SCRAP-BOOK IS IMPORTANTER THAN YOURS.”







THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 27



‘“You’re not the eldest of father. And father
gave me half the brush.”

“Let me have it,” cried Peggy, stamping her
foot ; ‘‘this is the morning I settled for pasting.
There! you have spilled it. Your book will be all
spoiled and horrid.”

Roger began to cry angrily.

‘No, it won't!” he screamed ; “‘ yours is spoil-
eder and horrider much. And you shan’t have
the brush—you shan’t—you shan’t!” as Peggy
attempted to snatch it from him. In the middle
of which skirmish the pot of paste was upset, and
the noise brought in nurse from her bedroom in
great wrath.

So Peggy and Roger were put in different cor-
ners, and the atmosphere was gloomier than ever.
Oliver only appeared to enjoy it; and, looking
up from his play, he remarked in a self-satisfied
manner which the others found extremely
irritating :—

“Tare good—werry good!”

‘* Me dood too, now,” echoed the baby.

Peggy could not help giving vent to her feel-
ings in a surreptitious kick out at Oliver when
she thought he seemed to be within reach. For
nurse never would allow any looking round while
the children were standing in a corner.

In the afternoon, having all been made ready
for their weekly treat of tea downstairs with their



28 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



father, they climbed up on the window-seat to get
the first glimpse of him on his return home.

“T do wish father wasn’t quite so much of a
professor,” said Peggy, flattening her nose against
the window-pane. ‘It takes up all his time.”

“ Let’s pretend he isn’t,” suggested Oliver.

“Oh, yes! let’s pretend he is a fairy prince, and
that when he goes out it is to fight the great
battles of his kingdom,” exclaimed Roger.

“And that this is his palace,” added Peggy.

“T will be the soldiers of the fairy prince. And
will you be a white cat, Oliver? Ma’mselle told
me a story about a fairy prince and a white cat.”

“T don’t like catching mice,” objected Oliver.

‘Nor me don’t yike mice,” echoed the baby.

“Would you mind much if they were kind
mice?” asked Peggy.

“T wouldn’t like a mouse so big as it couldn’t
come in through the door,” said Oliver thought-
fully.

“Oh, no! But the sort of mice that are made
out of sugar with string tails?”

“Werry well. And a cat needn’t be always
catching mice. Our black one never does.”

“And s’pose we pretend nurse is a witch,”
’ continued Roger—‘‘a very wicked one.”

“ My Nanny is not a wicked witch,” said Oliver
with a very determined expression. ‘She is
werry good, and I love her.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 29



‘TI yove her,” repeated Mike, removing the
india-rubber ring and putting the lamb’s head in
his mouth- by way of a change of diet.

‘“What other people shall we pretend spon
Roger wanted to know.

“s ‘We don’t know no others,” answered Peggy

“Oh, we do! There’s cook, and the policeman
at the end of the street, and ma’mselle, and the
man at the museum, and the bootshop woman.
We know hundreds of people.”

‘““T knewed a conductor in an omdibus once,”
interrupted Oliver. ‘“ He had a big match-box
round his neck with a bell in it.”

‘We know the Sampsons,” said Peggy, allud-
ing to a dearly-beloved imaginary family who were
supposed by the children to reside in the boot
cupboard.

“You see, Sundial Sampson was out walking
one day,” began Oliver, ‘and she met a kind
lion what was dressed in a petticoat, an’ he say
to her: ‘Come on, my dear, I going shooting’.
And they shooted a werry wicked mouse, and a
cruel mongoose, and a naughty boy what was a
thief.. They did!” impressively.

“Tm awful glad to-day is Saturday, cause
father will be home early and we'll have tea
downstairs,” cried Roger suddenly.

“P’etending tea or live tea?” asked the baby
eagerly.



30 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“T thought to-morrow was Saturday—nurse
said yesterday it was,” observed Oliver.

“To-day is Saturday,” snapped Peggy.

‘Then is to-day to-morrow?”

“Oh you silly!” began Peggy, but just then
the top of their father’s hat was visible, and
soon afterwards nurse appeared to conduct the
children downstairs in safety.

The professor was sitting smoking and a
stranger. was with him.

‘How do you do?” said Roger, going up to
him instantly with outstretched hand. — For
though Peggy was much more managing in
the nursery, when there were strangers down-
stairs Roger seemed to take the lead.

“This is my eldest son,” said the. professor
proudly, laying his hand on Roger’s curly head,
‘and a child of unusually developed faculties.
Indeed the artistic temperament is already so
abnormally conspicuous that I am_ hopeful of
germs of genius behind it.”

“And this is our eldest daughter,” re-
marked Roger, drawing Peggy forward by her
hair.

“We've been pretending you are a fairy prince,
father,” said the little girl, hanging on to his
sleeve.

The professor caught sight of his own reflection
in the looking-glass—the pale, thought-lined face,



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 31



the stooping shoulders, the threadbare clothes and
dishevelled hair—and he smiled half sadly.

“The imagination of a child is absolutely
creative,” he said slowly. ‘‘ Ours is apt to be
built on some foundation of fact or idealism, but
theirs rests solely on wings.”

“Which develops earlier, the boy or the girl
mind ?” asked the stranger, peering at the children
through his spectacles.

“ Accarding to ordinary platitudes the girl’s,
but from my own observation I have found in
Roger the more active thoughtfulness of the two.
But perhaps he is the exception rather than the
rule. The little ones will prove it.”

‘“Me’s hundry,” observed the baby emphatically
—the nourishment provided by the gutta-percha
ring suddenly failing.

Roger had been listening to his father with his
head on one side like an eager bird.

“ How do I be the exception-rather-than-the-
rule?” he asked quickly. ‘Tell me, father, how
doi

“There, you see,” said the professor triumph-
antly, ‘“‘the boy’s mind is so quick to pick up an
idea.”

“The reasoning faculty is stirring strongly,”
added the stranger. ‘At what age did you first
notice it?

‘The kettle is purring werry loud. It'll spit



32 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



soon,” said Oliver, who was standing with his
hands on his knees steadily regarding it. ‘There,
I said it would!” as a sudden fizz on the hob
indicated that the water was boiling aggressively.

“Oh, yes! I forgot all about tea,” answered
the professor; “perhaps we had better have
some.”

‘“ How do I be it, father?” persisted Roger.

‘Be what, my son?”

“What you said.”

“Tt is unconsciously owing to the structure of
your mind. Did you say sugar, Carson?”

“Me say sudar!” echoed the baby. ‘‘ Two, free,
nine, sixteen pieces.”

“T don’t understand,” said Roger, wrinkling up
his forehead. “I do wish there wasn’t quite so
many puzzling things.”

‘““The conscience develops earlier in a girl,”
continued the professor. ‘“In fact I noticed
Peggy’s sense of right and wrong and general
sensitiveness to the moral law were apparent at
a very early age. But the children’s nurse, who
is in all other respects a most valuable and ex-
cellent person, is apt to injure my observations in
this matter by the introduction of most absurd
punishments. And this penal system blunts,
even if it does not entirely destroy, the develop-
ment of the innate sense of right and wrong,
which I specially desire to notify.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 33



“That is a deeply interesting point,” said Dr.
Carson, “and it is a pity to have it in any way
interfered with by these paltry punishments.”

Here Oliver put down his cup, over the rim of
which he had been steadily regarding his father’s
friend for some time. The other children always
wondered how Oliver could take quite such long
drinks out of a small cup of milk.

“Peggy and Roger was werry naughty this
morning ; and Mike was too in his bath. On’y
me was quite good,” he said slowly.

‘“We weren't exactly very,” argued Roger,
‘but only corner-naughty.” :

‘““ Nurse is so hardened,” observed Peggy sadly.

“There you see,” said the professor, “some
ridiculous nonsense about a corner is made to de-
termine their limits of wrong-doing. I want to
see the working of their untrammelled minds con-
cerning the question of right and wrong itself. |
really must forbid these senseless punishments.”

A slight diversion was then caused by the
baby’s putting both his feet on the table.

“Don’t be naughty, Mike,” said Peggy
severely.

“Tt is not naughty,” corrected the professor ;
“only a little unusual. By the way, that is an in-
teresting point. How early in child-life do laws
of custom predominate ?”

«Some way between your daughter and your
y y 8 y
3



34 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



youngest son apparently,” answered Dr. Carson.
“The exact time is unknown to me.”

“We might prove it,” continued the professor,
rubbing his hands. ‘ Roger, you can draw a
pattern with treacle on the table-cloth.”

“Really, father?” asked the boy incredulously.

“Ah, there you have him, Maxwell! It is
below that age.”

‘No, not you, Roger. But you can, Oliver.”

“ Shall I draw a cruel man again?” asked the
child, deliberately lifting the spoon so that a thin
line of treacle was at his command.

“What fun!” screamed Peggy. ‘And may I|
upset my tea, father?”

“You see her enjoyment springs from the viola-
tion of the law,” continued the professor. ‘‘ That
is a very old point, and a very new one, too. Eh,
Carson?”

It was more than boy nature could stand to see
a mess and be out of it, so Roger hastily threw
a loaf into the air as he had no tea left to play
with.

“ Dear me,” exclaimed their father in a helpless,
puzzled way; “how quickly children become excit-
able! It makes it so difficult to demonstrate with
them effectively. There, there, you had better all
get down. But the age we wanted is certainly
between Roger's and Oliver’s. Shall we say six
years old?”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 35



‘TI don't yike this uggy table-cloth,” whimpered
Mike; “it makes me tired.”

“Do you take note of that?” asked the pro-
fessor delightedly. ‘“ For some physical reason
the child suddenly feels an unusual exhaustion,
and fails to connect the effect with the cause.
Still he unconsciously knows that effect must be
the result of cause, and attributes what he feels to
such an absurd fact as the pattern of a table-cloth.
The instinct is true, but the reasoning impos-
sible.”

‘“When did you first notice his instincts?”

“T had a fine collie dog when Roger was a
baby,” continued the professor, while the tea went
cold; ‘‘and it was an interesting experiment to
compare the instincts of the child and the dog.
Up to eight months old the dog was distinctly in
advance, to fourteen months they ran an equal
race, and after that the child gained ground
rapidly : the human characteristics then beginning
to assert themselves.”

By this time the two elder children had dragged
a favourite old natural-history book out of the
shelf, and were poring over its well-worn pages.
The baby was dipping his lamb’s head in the
treacle and then sucking it, and Oliver was stand-
ing solemnly on the hearth-rug.

‘Light your pipe again, Carson. Why, there
are no matches here. Oliver, ring the bell,” said



36 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



the professor, pushing his chair back from the
table.

The boy stood still, a sudden look of obstinacy
sweeping over his small, round face.

“T’se not Oliver,” he said slowly. ‘‘I’se pre-
tending I’se a little boy what doesn’t ring bells.”



“sz NOT OLIVER, ... I’SE PRETENDING SE A LITTLE BOY
WHAT DOESN’T RING BELLS.”

“Now that is ingenious!” exclaimed Dr.
Carson.

“Yet I think it portrays a sense of moral re-
sponsibility, in so much as it required an assumed



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 37



change of identity to shift the responsibility,”
observed the professor. ‘I think I will make a
note of that,” and he rang the bell on his way to
the writing-table.

‘Please, sir, cook bought these oranges as a treat
for the children,” said nurse when she appeared
with the matches.

Wild delight instantly followed, for there were
not many treats in this grim, grey house in
Bloomsbury.

‘Oranges are splendidly interesting things,”
said Roger; “the taste is so interesting, and the
peel ’cause of making a pig and a set of false
teeth, and the pips can be planted, and you can
play at ball with it before eating. There is only
one bad thing about oranges.”

‘What is that?” asked Dr. Carson.

“They make your pocket-handkerchief smell
so nasty for several days. You see orangey
smell isn’t nearly so jolly as orangey taste, and
you get a little tired of it every time you blow
your nose.”

“I should say,” began the professor, looking
up from his note-book, ‘that the conscientious
and the affectionate faculties develop earlier in a
girl—the reasoning and ambitious ones in a boy.”

“And continue the strongest all through life,”
added his friend.

The little boys had been running round the



38 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

table, but a piercing shriek from the baby indi-
cated that the game had come to an abrupt
termination.

‘““He can’t be my horse any more,” said Oliver,
looking down calmly at Mike.

“Why not?” asked his father, and the baby
stopped in the middle of a scream to lear the
reason.

“He has so many sudden sits,” explained
Oliver, “and in course it spoils my driving.”

“A child’s expression of its ideas is a very
interesting study,” said Dr. Carson, but the baby’s
renewed crying stopped the conversation.

“Me don’t have so many sudden sits,” he
sobbed. ‘‘Me on’y tummel down a vedy few
tummels.”

‘Dear me!” exclaimed his father looking at
the pitiable little object on the hearth-rug, “ the
child seems inclined to be fretful this evening. I
wish nurse would come for him.”

‘Shall I ring for her?” suggested his friend.

ON eS yes, dO. Nhateistaavery., coodsidea
Nurse,” as she appeared in the doorway, “will
you take the baby? He seems a little tired and
irritable. Perhaps he is not quite well.”

“He has caught cold, sir, I’m afraid,” she said
as she carried him off.

‘Now, I was speaking,” continued the pro-
fessor, “about the heart and head qualities of the



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 39



boy and girl. Let me give you an illustration.
You will imagine that the donor of the oranges
finds equal favour in the eyes of these two. Look
here, children,” he added speaking directly to the
two on the floor, “cook has had her nose knocked
off.”

“Our own cook?” exclaimed Peggy in tones of
intense anxiety.

“How was it knocked off?” asked Roger in
deepest interest. ‘‘ Did she fall on something or
did something fall on her?”

‘Where did she put it after?” Oliver wanted
to know. ‘In the kitchen drawer ?”

“There, you see,” said the professor, turning to
his friend, ‘the affectionate faculty in the girl—
the reasoning in the boy.”

‘“Where is it now?” repeated Oliver.

‘“And about the conscientious faculty? You
were saying that that is more strongly marked in
the girl,” continued Dr. Carson.

‘‘It was apparent earlier at any rate. I must
observe its intensity later. Oh, here comes nurse
again—how fortunate! I will ask her. Nurse,
will you tell me which is the naughtier, Peggy or
Roger ?”

Nurse brightened up wonderfully.

‘Indeed, sir, I did not like to trouble you,
especially before a visitor, but both Miss Peggy
and Master Roger’s been that contrairy all day,



40 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



though for real naughtiness Miss Peggy was the
one as began it.”

‘The old story,” observed Dr. Carson softly,
“dating from Eve herself.”

“And I do hope, sir, that you will speak to
them yourself.”

“JT speak to them!” exclaimed the professor ;
‘whatever about? It is not by speaking to
them, Carson, but by observing them silently
that one learns most.”

“Tt would make them less naughty, sir, I’m
sure, if you would,” pleaded nurse.

“But, my good woman, I don’t want them to
be less naughty. I want them to be.more so.
The natural tendencies which I am observing will
then be more definite.”

Nurse wrung her hands in despair. Her master
was at times almost more than she could civilly
endure; but her sense of duty and decorum
triumphed, and she sadly observed that it was
past Master Oliver’s bed-time.

“T will tell you a werry nice story now,” said
the child persuasively, laying his head on_ his
father’s knee.

“2 Ones yes eeelet suSeshave 1tea1exclaimedual)
carson,

So nurse was told to wait for a few minutes,
and Oliver sat down on the hearth-rug with his
legs sticking straight out in front of him. |



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 41



“Once ’pon a time,” he began deliberately, so
as to postpone bed-time, “there was a werry kind
lady what was named Mrs. Sampson, an’ she had
no children, only grandchildren.”

“That was a singular case,” observed the pro-
fessor.

Oliver lifted his solemn eyes to his father’s
face.

“Tt was a werry sing’lar case,” he repeated
impressively. ‘And one day Mrs. Sampson
went riding on a tiger to see the beautifullest
princess. And the princess was dressed in an
emerald dress and a diamond petticoat.”

“There, there, Master Oliver,” interrupted
nurse. ‘We don’t talk about ladies’ petticoats in
the dining-room.”

Oliver regarded her with an amount of scorn.

“In course I shouldn’t talk bout just a common
flannel petticoat like you wear, but a diamond
petticoat is werry grand, isn’t it, father?”

“T should imagine its grandeur would outweigh
its utility,” remarked the professor.

“If you please, sir, Master Oliver must come
to bed now,” pleaded nurse in the last stage of
exasperation.

‘Dear me, how unfortunate! I do wish, nurse,
you would alter the children’s bed-time,” exclaimed
the professor impatiently.

And then as she disappeared with her prey :-—



42 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘Shall we hear Roger now? I am making
some rather elaborate notes on the development
of a child’s power of narrative, and I get a good
two years between these two styles. Look here,
my boy, I want you to tell us a story now.”

Roger jumped with alacrity from the engrossing
natural-history book and began to run about the
room.

‘Shall it be a bloodsheddy story?” he asked
eagerly. . ‘‘ They are my favourites.”

“Yes, yes ; just what you like.”

‘“ Well, once there was a man, called Mr. Shelley,
and he was put in Newgate prison ’cause he was
the prime minister.”

‘Notice the local colouring of the last history
lesson,” whispered the professor.

“Why was he in prison?” asked Dr. Carson ;
‘your present reason seems hardly adequate.”

“One of his friends told him to pass a law-bill
before the queen, and she said: ‘I'll pass it into
parliament’. But what should happen to the bill,
but it passed through the prime minister’s pocket
through a hole, and was lost! So the queen
popped him in prison.”

“And then?” queried his father.

“He suicided himself,” said Roger, ‘and
there was a gunpowder treason against Queen
Elizabeth.”

‘A very historical style,” said Dr. Carson.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 43



“The wicked treason-people shoved the queen
down the coal-cellar, and stifled her with sealing-
wax,” continued the boy, clapping his hands.

‘“So was that the end of Elizabeth?” asked
the professor.

“No; it was not,” cried Roger delightedly.
“She escaped suddenly. And the wicked people
said she was such a fiery queen, that they would
prepare a fiery dinner to aggravate her, and a fiery
plum-pudding. So Queen Elizabeth’s mouth was
set on fire, which was put out with great difficulty,
and required a great operation made.”

Here nurse appeared again, observing resign-
edly that it was nearly nine o’clock.

“T have not done with the children yet,” said
the professor. ‘ Really, Carson, if that woman
had her way I should have no time for verifying
my observations. She is always bothering about
their bed-time or some such nonsense.”

“I do love Saturdays!” exclaimed Peggy ;
‘’cause I can have such lovely, long, peaceful
reads.”

“She is much fonder of reading than the
others,” explained her father. ‘A book will
always keep her quiet and happy. But the child-
imagination is thereby somewhat swamped. She
does not tell tales like the others, though she
learns her lessons more quickly.”

“ Mike can tell tales too,” observed Roger ;



44 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“though, of course, they have to be three years
shorter even than Oliver's, ‘cause he’s on’y two.”

“ T should have liked to have heard one of his
also,” said Dr. Carson, “for the subject of child-
imagination is of special interest to me both in its
dawn and its development.”

“Shall I fetch him? Do let me, father,” cried
Peggy eagerly.

‘“ Not if he is asleep,” said the professor thought-
fully ; “(a sudden awakening would confuse his
faculties. And, Peggy, see that he is wrapped up
warmly,” he called, as the little girl was already on
her way upstairs.

‘Baby, baby!” she shouted, rushing into the
bedroom, ‘“‘you aren’t asleep, are you ? ’cause father
wants you downstairs to tell a story. Come on!”

Mike sat up in the sudden fright of waking.

“Is it mornin’ or a giant?” he asked confusedly.
And then nurse came in and wrathfully interfered.

“Father wants him,” repeated Peggy, “and
he's to be sure and put on warm things. Oh! here
is father coming upstairs, and father’s friend.”

“T forgot he had a little cold,” the professor
had explained to Dr. Carson; “if you don’t mind
the trouble I think we had better go to him
upstairs.”

The baby began to scream and cry.

‘His cold seems turning a little croupy,” said
nurse severely.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 45



“Me dot two yittle pussies in here,” wailed the
baby, pointing to his wheezing chest, ‘‘and they
crying.”

‘Ah, that is good! Did you hear him, Carson?
A child’s comparisons, in order to express his
feelings satisfactorily, are most original. I am
very sorry he cannot tell us a tale now. I am
afraid we must give it up for to-night. The child
seems a little upset. It is unfortunate just the
night you are here. Put the children to sleep
now, please, nurse. I shall not require them any
more. And, Carson, I want you to read and give
me your opinion on the last observations I have
entered in my note-book. My next series of psy-
chological lectures will be based on them,” he
added, as they went downstairs.



46

CHAPTER III.

Tue baby’s cold was‘a very severe one indeed; then
Oliver and Peggy caught it, and they gave it to
Roger, so that altogether they had a rather rough
time of it. And when all the sneezing and sniffing
and coughing were over, the children looked so
thin and white that nurse marched off to the
chemist’s, and returned with a huge bottle of cod-
liver oil with which to restore them to their usual
health.

Now neither Peggy nor Roger disliked the
taste of cod-liver oil.

“It might have been senna, you know,” said
the little girl solemnly. And they resigned them-
selves thankfully to the inevitable. Nor did the
baby object to these daily doses. In fact, he had
never been known to object to eating or drinking
anything, and would apparently relish sucking
whatever came in his way, such as a Noah’s ark
animal or nurse’s prayer-book. But with Oliver
it was different. The first spoonful he slowly
rolled round in his mouth in spite of nurse’s admo-
nition to swallow it quickly, and then he made up








“7's WERRY BIG—AND WERRY STERN,” HE SAID SOFTLY.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 49



his mind that he would have no more of it. From
which day there was trouble in the nursery.

The mere sight of nurse and a spoon would
clench Oliver’s teeth with a pressure which it was
a wonder such little comfit-like teeth could pos-
sibly stand ; and then there would follow scream-
ing and crying that could be heard all over the
house, for nurse was a person of practical resource.
So after a few struggles, in which Oliver was
worsted, a desperate resolve took possession of his
small soul. He determined to break the bottle.

It happened one day when Peggy and Roger
had gone out again with mademoiselle, and the
baby was having his mid-day sleep, nurse being
safely engaged with clean clothes downstairs, that
Oliver decided that the hour had arrived for the
execution of this terrible design.

The bottle was safely put away on a high shelf,
so there was no hope of knocking it over by acci-
dent, but when Oliver had climbed on to a chair
he found he could quite easily reach his enemy.

For a long time he stood up there trying to

_muster courage to do the dreadful:deed. For

Oliver was not really a naughty little boy on the
whole—only very determined and obstinate about
his opinions.

“It’s werry big—and werry stern,” he said
softly, ‘an’ it looks a bit like nurse too. I don’t

think I can quite break it. But I will spit out
4



50 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



the next spoonful,” he added as he finally aban-
doned the attempt. Just then he heard a footstep
outside, and in turning round quickly to get off
the chair, his big pinafore sleeve caught the
bottle, knocked it over, and the deed was
done.

Oliver burst out into frightened tears, and
nurse seeing the spilled oil immediately suspected
him of the mischief.

“ Did you knock the bottle over on purpose ?”
she asked severely.

“No! Yes!” cried the child.

“Come now, no and yes can’t both be true,”
continued nurse crossly, and giving him a little
shake. ‘You tell me the truth this minute.”

But Oliver only cried the harder, and nurse,
remembering her master’s recent order that he
would deal with the next case of evil-doing in the
nursery, carried the screaming child downstairs
into the dining-room, where the professor was
writing out a lecture and eating a sandwich dinner
at the same time.

“Tf you please, sir, you told me to come to you
the next time one of the children was naughty. —
And here’s Master Oliver has broke the cod-liver
oil bottle on purpose, and is telling stories about
it after like anything.” And nurse deposited the
weeping culprit on the floor.

“T didn’t! I didn’t!” he wailed.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 51



“Dear me! This is unfortunate, for | am very
busy,” said the professor, wrinkling his forehead.

‘Well, sir, those were your orders!” observed
nurse rather huffily, “and he deserves to be well
punished.”

“Yes, yes! of course,” answered the professor
hurriedly. ‘And besides,” with a sudden brighten-
ing of his face, “it will be a good opportunity for
the opening of my chapter on the Primitive Atti-
tude towards the Moral Law. You did quite right,
nurse. Leave Master Oliver to me.”

The professor eagerly fetched out his note-book
and then looked at the pitiable little object on the
floor. .

“T wish the child would not keep on crying,”
he said half to himself, “it gets on my nerves.
Only perhaps that is part of the attitude.”

““What was it she said you did, my boy?” he
asked presently, pencil in hand.

‘“ Breaked the cod-liver oil bottle on the pur-
pose,” explained Oliver through his tears; ‘‘on’y
I didn't.”

‘“You did not break it then?” asked his father,
fearing that the case was falling through.

“Yes I did. I don’t know!” gasped the cul-
prit with another big sob.

‘Dear me, how strange! the child’s memory
seems defective.” And the professor made a note
in the book. ‘‘ The fact is,” he thought to himself,



52 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“T believe all this crying confuses the faculties.
I must cheer him up a little, and finish my notes
when he is calmer. Look here, my boy,” he said,
holding out his hand, ‘I don’t want you to cry
any more. Will you leave off to please
father?”

“T might if I eated a sandwich,” said Oliver
thoughtfully.

“ A capital idea,” said the professor delightedly,
“the mental is wonderfully dependent on the
physical. But it is remarkable for such a mere
infant to have fathomed that. I wonder how he
arrived at the conclusion? Are you happy, Oliver,
when you are hungry ?”

“No!” in a voice muffled with sandwich.

‘Are you good when you are hungry ?”

nN One

“What are you then?”

‘“Werry empty,” explained Oliver, helping him-
self to another sandwich, while the professor began
writing again in his note-book.

At last when the sandwiches were finished and
Oliver’s usual cheerfulness was fully established,
his father returned to the subject of the cod-liver
oil bottle.

“Did you knock it over, my child?”

“Yes, I knocked it over.”

“ And did you mean to knock it over?”

Oliver thought for a long time.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 53



“JT meant to knock it over while I didn’t, and
then I meant not to and | did.”

“ Stop, stop! that is good!” cried the professor,
picking up his pencil. Then after a considerable
pause, during which Oliver employed himself in
burying a disused pen in the salt-cellar, he con-
tinued :—

“ And why did you mean to knock it over?”

“That,” explained the culprit solemnly, ‘ was
the naughtiness. I climbed on to the chair to do
it, on’y then I was frightened ‘cause the bottle
looked so stern, And when I was jumping down
in a hurry it fell over and breaked.”

“The child touches the mainspring of the
delinquency from the most subtle moral view,”
murmured the professor; ‘that is an intensely
interesting point, and a most valuable observation.
Perhaps it was your conscience, little one?” he
added aloud.

“P’raps it was my conscience, but p'r’apser it
was my elbow,” admitted Oliver truthfully.

The professor wrote on for a few moments and
then looked at his watch.

«“T had no idea it was so late!” he exclaimed,
jumping up. ‘Run to nurse now, my child, for
I must be off immediately. I am almost afraid
now that I shall be late.” And he was half way
down the street before Oliver quite realised that
he had gone.



54 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



When the little boy went upstairs again he found
Peggy and Roger full of interest in his adventure.
Nurse had told them in her severest tones that
she had taken Oliver to his father to be punished,
and they were almost breathless with excitement
when the victim himself appeared at the top of
the stairs.

‘Was father angry?” asked Peggy in an awe-
stricken voice.

‘1 don’t know,” said Oliver after a few moments’
icesileeroin, Il Wornexets, ”

“What did he do to you?” Roger wanted to
know.

‘He gived me a sandwich and writed a lot.”

‘But did he punish you?” persisted Roger.

‘““T don’t know.”

‘“What did he say?” continued Peggy.

Oliver stood still with a puzzled look on his
round face.

“T can’t memember,” he owned at last.

‘But had he a stern face?”

‘Oh no! but he had a werry writin’ face. An’
I like sandwiches for my dinner better’n pota-
toes.”

“T expect he forgived you?” suggested Roger.

Oliver shook his head.

“T don’t memember,” he repeated doubtfully.

But somehow even the cod-liver oil did not
seem to make the children quite well again. It



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 55



was so cold and foggy out of doors, and so stuffy
in the little nursery with the gas lighted nearly all
day, and the thick yellow air creeping in from out-
side. Only the baby kept rosy and fat during the
winter, but the other three drooped as flowers will,
shut in from the light and air. Roger especially
felt the strain of the long days full of lessons, and
his curly head grew heavy with the burden of
knowledge that was being continually crammed
into it. ;

“JT do hate jography,” sighed Peggy, “and the
trade-winds are the horridest part of all.”

“T don’t hate jography,” argued Oliver. “I
like Turkey in Greece.”

“You mean Turkey and Greece,” corrected
Peggy, tossing back her heavy hair from her
flushed little face.

“No I don’t,” said Oliver, with an obstinate
look. ‘It’s in Greece, and I like it werry much.”

“You know nothing at all about it,” snapped
his sister. She was so tired, and there were so
many lessons to be learned, and really it was very
irritating of Oliver to argue about things of which
she knew he was ignorant.

“ Turkey is werry nice in Greece,” he repeated
impressively.

“ Where’s the turkey?” asked Mike suddenly,
joining the fray.

“There is no turkey, baby,” said Peggy.



56 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“My Turkey is in Greece,” persisted Oliver.

The baby solemnly peeped up the chimney.

“Me see ole Mr. Turkey sitting on his nest,”
he said confidently, nodding his head.

Oliver crept under the sofa.

‘“T are pretending to be Turkey in Greece,” he
stated; and the interest of the game kept him
absorbed for quite ten minutes.

All this time Roger had been toiling at his
sums. Nobody was watching the boy, and one
by one the big tears fell splash on to his smudged
slate.

“Tcane- remember! = 1 cangel al can-t! 2 he
suddenly cried, and Peggy looked up in surprise.

‘“What’s the matter?” she asked with interest.

‘“T don't know,” said Roger with a sob. “It’s
my lessons. I can’t do them. It’s all such a
muddle. I’ve lost something!” he added with a
frightened cry.

“What?” demanded his sister.

“Oh, I don’t know! Something that makes
me know how to do things. Why can’t I remem-
ber?” he exclaimed hopelessly.

— “Tsn’t it disgustin’ when dolls’ shoes and stock-
ings are on’y painted and won’t take off?” remarked
Oliver from under the sofa, where he had acci-
dentally met with a doll of Peggy’s.

“I understood it all this morning,” continued

)

Roger, “and it was so easy then !



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 57



‘“Never mind,” said Peggy soothingly, ‘‘I will
show you how.”

‘Ma’mselle will give you a bad mark I ’spect,”
observed Oliver, creeping out of his hiding-place in
order to more thoroughly understand what was
going on; ‘‘p’raps sixteen ones,” he added cheer-
fully.

“T don't care! J don’t care!” cried Roger ex-
citedly, “only why’can’t I do it? Why can’t [?”

“You forgetted like I did always L-for-looking-
glass when I was little.”

‘Never mind,” repeated Peggy, leaving her
unfinished geography, “ I’ll do it for you, dear.”

The elder sister’s responsibility and motherli-
ness always came to the rescue when her brothers
were in real trouble.

“Your crying makes pools on the slate,” she
continued cheerfully ; “you make rivers joining
them, and I'll use my slate ’cause one side is
clean.”

“Tve found Turkey in Greece,” observed Oliver,
gazing intently at the atlas ; but Peggy deigned no
reply this time. She was too much engrossed in
Roger’s sums.

At last the lessons were finished.

“Let’s pretend we are in a hay-field making
hay like the children in the picture,” she suggested.
And instantly there was a rush for the two dirty
antimacassars, which did very well for hay.



58 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“ And the sun was shining, and the sky blue all
over, ‘stead of strips up between the houses, and
the fairies were all helping to hay-make,” shouted
Roger, jumping on to the arm of the old horse-
hair sofa, and gazing round the dingy room as if
indeed he saw the scene he was picturing.

“An it was awfully lovely and warm,” cried
Oliver.

“An? there was quenty turkeys eatin’ up the
hay-make, an’ one ole bunny rabbit,” added the
baby, sitting down rather suddenly on an imagi-
nary hay-cock.

‘Oh, father!” they all shrieked as the pro-
fessor opened the door; ‘“we’re having such a
splendid pretending !”

“ This is hay-making !” explained Roger, point-
ing to the torn antimacassars.

“And I’m buried in it,” said Peggy, whose face
was covered.

“Would you like to hay-make too, father?”
asked Oliver.

But the professor was in a hurry to get down-
stairs to his note-book, in which he wrote :—

‘“ The power of a child’s imagination is limitless.
Two dirty antimacassars can create all the beauty -
of a genuine hay-making—blue sky, sunshine,
field and all. Are the two antimacassars the in-
spiration or the incidents of such an imagination ?”

And he never saw the wet slate that told of



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 59



Roger’s trouble, nor would he have understood
why nurse, on coming into the room directly after-
wards, watched the children’s play with something
of a sigh, and then sprinkled a bit of brown sugar
on their bread and butter for supper.

‘“Mademoiselle,” called the professor, as the
children’s French governess passed the study
door next morning, ‘I want you to specially
devote your time to Roger’s creative faculties.
Teach the boy to derive his pleasure, indeed I
might say his whole intellectual life, from that
which is drawn out of him, not that which is put
into him. Encourage his delight in telling tales
instead of allowing him to depend for mental ex-
hilaration on those which others may read to
him.”

“And Peggy, too, is of a wonderful intelligence,
monsieur—so quick and bright.”

“Ah! but there you are confusing the types.
I was afraid of this. Peggy, as you say, has any
amount of talent; but in Roger I suspect the ex-
istence of a germ of genius, and the two kinds
require perfectly different treatment. I want your
attention directed to the education, in the literal
sense of the word, of the boy’s thought-power.
Make him think rather than learn, and express
his ideas rather than repeat his lessons. You
understand me? I am making a very close study
of Roger.”



60 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Qui, oui, monsieur. I will observe your
wishes.”

“Oh, ma’mselle!” cried Roger as she entered
the schoolroom, ‘‘what shall I do? I have a
great lump of tiredness in my mind that makes all
my lessons puzzling, and all my stories muddled
up. And yet I have so many to tell that I can’t
make them up in words quick enough, and they
are all tumbling about together in my head.”

‘He was too tired to do his sums, so | did,”
added Peggy.

‘“An’ I found Turkey in Greece in the atlas,”
remarked Oliver very slowly, and glancing side-
ways at Peggy.

“Do read me quite a new something,” begged
Roger, ‘so that I might only just listen. A quite
new history-battle would do.”

“Yes, do!” pleaded the other children.

‘The boy and his father do not wish the same,
but we must obey monsieur the professor,” said
mademoiselle a little sadly.

Lesson-time however flagged in a manner most
unusual with Roger; and day by day a listlessness
of mind seemed to be creeping over him, and his
flashes of interest and excitement became gradually
fewer.

“The child is over-tired,’ mademoiselle de-
cided ; so she trotted downstairs one day when the
professor was at home and told him her opinion,



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 61



“ Tired of what?” asked his father.

“All the lessons, and thinking, and being kept
in the house for the cold and bad weather. I do
think Roger needs a diversion.”

“ Why, the boy’s life is full of diversion. If you
had studied him as closely as I have, you would
know in what a wide and varied world of imagina-
tion he lives.”

«Ah, well, monsieur! I only make the sugges-
tion of a little treat to cheer him up.”

“A treat!” repeated the professor; ‘what an
old-fashioned word! It makes me feel as if I were
a boy again myself. I had forgotten about such
things. It is a very good idea of yours, ma’m-
selle ; the children would enjoy a treat, I feel sure.”

“And you will remember it, monsieur ?” pleaded
the kind-hearted little Frenchwoman.

“‘T will indeed,” he answered, smiling his rare
smile. ‘And thank you sincerely for your care of
my little ones.”

“Children!” he called up the stairs after the
governess had gone home, and immediately there
was a rush from the nursery at the unexpected
summons.

“T am going to give you a great treat,” con-
tinued their father, looking lovingly at their up-
turned faces. |

‘A real treat!” exclaimed Peggy, hanging on
to his sleeve.



62 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“What kind of a treat?” Roger wanted to
know. And Oliver stood listening silently with
wide-open eyes.

“T will take you out with me on Friday night.
I am going to a most interesting lecture, and there
will be big magic-lantern pictures.”

‘One of your lectures, father, and shall we be
students ?” asked Peggy.

“No, child. A lecture by the greatest man |
know—in fact one of the greatest men in the
whole world; truly a giant among his fellow-
men! I shall be a student myself.”

‘How splendid!” screamed the children.

And looking at their bright eyes and flushed
faces the professor came to the conclusion that
mademoiselle was mistaken.

“Still it is a good idea, and prompted by
thorough kindness. And I daresay they will be
all the brighter for a treat, although I never saw
Roger looking more eagerly intelligent than he
does at this moment,” thought the professor to
himself.

Until Friday came, nothing was talked of by the
children but the one absorbing topic of the lecture.

‘““T shouldn't have thought he'd be a real giant,
only father said truly,” observed Peggy eagerly ;
“but there are giants sometimes at circuses, nurse
says. Only [ didn’t know lectures and circuses
were the same.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 63



‘The greatest man in the world, father said!”
exclaimed Roger. ‘ Why, it will have to be a
’normous great circus to hold him.”

“ How big’ll he be?” asked Oliver ; “as big as
an omdibus ?”

“Oh! bigger than that,” laughed Peggy, who
had begun to pretend an adventure with the giant ;
“T expect he'll be as big as Blundebore himself.”

“Will he be as fat as a omdibus too?” repeated
Oliver.

‘He might be as big as a church steeple,” Roger
thought ; “’cause you see you have to be a good
bit bigger than anybody would imagine when you
are the biggest man in the whole world.”

“You aren't going to the circus, baby,” said
Oliver soothingly to Mike, who stood listening,
sucking his india-rubber lamb.

“Tare! I are!” shrieked the baby. ‘Aren’t me
goin’ too?” appealing to Peggy.

“Oh, Oliver, how naughty you are to tease
Mike!” said his sister severely.

“But he isn’t going, you know,” persisted Oliver
in that determined way which really was extremely
irritating.

Here the baby’s tears had to be dealt with by
nurse ; and nothing but the pleasure of licking his
soapy hands in the bath succeeded in cheering him
up again. -

“Will there be anything else ’cept the giant at



64 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



the circus?” asked Roger with a vague hope of
wild animals.

‘Only the lecture,” Peggy thought.

‘There’s one uncertain thing about giants,” ob-
served Roger gravely ; ‘‘they always might eat
little children.”

“Oh, not when their fathers are with them!
Eating us would be a thing father would never
allow.”

“A giant as big as an omdibus could swallow
lots of little children,” added Oliver rather gloomily ;
“and I shall take my brother,” clasping his be-
loved woollen shawl, ‘‘ to see the circus.”

“Will the lecture be about the giant, or just
fairy stories ?” Peggy wondered.

“Tt will be about all the great deeds of the
wonderful giant,” cried Roger, racing up and down
the room, “and the battles that he conquered, and
the wicked people that he ate. And his mouth
will be as big as a cave,” continued the boy, his
imagination on fire, ‘‘and his nose like a mountain.
Oh! I wish it was time to start!”

“Taking the children out at this time of night,
and their colds only just better! What next, I do
wonder, to be sure!” sighed nurse as she closed
the front door.

It was tremendously exciting in the omnibus
because the gas was lighted. Peggy and Roger
were by this time past speech; they sat silent in



THE PROFESSOR’'S CHILDREN. 65



utter abandonment to the joy of looking forward.
Oliver was muffled up in a comforter, and was
holding his woollen “ brother” so tightly that he
could not talk much either, but his great eyes
simply glowed with the excitement of the excur-
sion.

When they arrived at the hall, the professor
established the children on three chairs in one of
the front rows, and then went off behind the
scenes to have a word with the great lecturer.

“Tt seems almost too wonderful and splendid
that we should really see the giant to-night!”
whispered Roger.

‘“What a great ’normous counterpane!” Oliver
exclaimed, pointing to the magic-lantern sheet.

‘Tt is the giant’s counterpane, of course, so you
see how big his bed is,” said Peggy triumphantly.

“| hopes father will come afore the giant does,”
observed Oliver.

‘‘ Perhaps he will come standing on the giant's
hand. Look, Peggy, behind. What hundreds of
millions of people!”

‘‘Almost all the people in the world, I expect,
‘cept nurse and cook. Oh! here is father.”

‘““We are enjoying the lecture awful much,
father!” exclaimed Roger.

“Why, it has not begun yet, my boy. Now
you must not whisper, for the lecturer is
coming.”



66 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“The giant!” murmured the children in sub-
dued tones of rapture.

And a little man in spectacles and with longish
hair brushed back over his ears walked on to the
platform.

“Where’s the giant?” whispered Peggy, and
Roger pulled his father’s coat sleeve in an agony
of apprehension.

“ The giant—where is he?” he asked in sharp,
anxious tones, for the smart of a great disappoint-
ment was stinging him.

“ Hush, hush!” answered the professor a little
impatiently, for he was engrossed in the lecturer’s
opening remarks.

“He’s ony as big as a p'rambulator,” said
Oliver scornfully ; ‘‘not a bit as big as the littlest
omdibus.”

“Hush!” repeated his father almost sharply.

The children looked at one another in dismay.
Peggy’s eyes were full of tears, and Roger's lips
were perceptibly quivering, when the lights were
suddenly turned out, and a great, incomprehensible
moon appeared on the magic-lantern sheet; so
their grief stood still in the midst of this new
wonder.

“That is the moon,” explained the professor
in low tones.

‘No it isn’t,” said Oliver decidedly, ‘‘’cause |
saw the moon up in the sky as we camed.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 67



“Tt’s all full of nothingness,” whispered Roger,
‘and it’s got no light in it!”

“Tt isn’t the moon,” repeated Oliver, ‘and I
don’t like these big ugly pictures, and I don’t
want the room to be all full of darkness.”

“Oh look!” whispered Peggy, “if you turn
backward you can see a long sunbeam coming
out of a little box right up at the end of the
room.”

“You must not talk, children,” said the pro-
fessor.

So Peggy fought the lump in her throat in
silence, and Roger gave himself up to the con-
templation of the wonderful sunbeam which he
imagined came straight down from fairyland, and
down which he waited to see the fairies sliding.
Oliver, overcome with sleep, leaned his head
against his father’s arm, and was soon beyond
the reach of disappointment.

At the end of the lecture, the professor took the
children with him, when he went to speak to the
lecturer.

“Rather young students,” said the great man,
smiling at their tired little faces; and then—‘I
forgot to mention the man in the moon, my dears.
There is one, you know.”

Oliver looked steadily at him.

‘“You are dreadfully little for a man what isn’t
a giant,” he began. But his father hurried him



68 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



off; and by the time they had found the right
omnibus he was half asleep again.

The next morning everything seemed rather
gloomy in the nursery.

“ Roger,” said Peggy sadly, “I don’t like treats.
Do you?”

“Not much,” answered her brother doubtfully ;
“they seem a little too long when they last all
night, as the lecture did.”

“JT don’t like big dark lectures,” whimpered
Oliver, who was decidedly peevish and poorly,
‘and father telled stories ‘bout the moon.”

“Oh, Oliver!” said Peggy reprovingly, “it is
very naughty to say father tells stories. Even if
he does, you know,” she added thoughtfully, as she
remembered a certain discrepancy between the
statement he made about the giant and the dis-
appointing reality.

“And the great man; did he speak to you?”
asked mademoiselle, when they told her all about
it. ,

Sree isnitey Create: sconmected Novena he as
quite little, almost as little as you.”

“He on’y telled us one thing, and that was a
thing we knewed before,” said Oliver.

“That was a pity,’ observed mademoiselle
smiling, ‘considering the many things he knows
and the few ones you do.”

“And such an easy old thing too,” chimed in



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 69



Peggy disdainfully, “about the man in the moon
that we have always known ever since we were
quite little.”

“We don’t none of us like treats,” added
Oliver; ‘they make us werry tired.”

“They are much nicer to imagine about be-
fore,” Roger decided.

“T’ve got sticks coming in my throat,” an-
nounced Oliver, resting his heavy little head on
the table; ‘‘I ’spect they dropped out of the
moon.”

That night there was consternation upstairs.
Peggy had to put the baby to bed, and Roger was
sent downstairs with an important message.

“Father,” he began as he opened the door,
‘nurse told me to—-— Oh! whats that you’re
drawing? Is it a spider?”

“It is a psychological chart, my boy. You will
understand it when you are older.”

“Couldn't I understand it now if you ’splained
it properly ?”

‘“ Hardly, I’m afraid. These lines denote ten-
dencies.”

“Let me draw one too. I know I could. It
looks quite easy.”

“Ah, my boy, things that look easy are not
always easy to do. What do I mean by that?”

“T know, I know,” cried Roger excitedly after
amoment’s thought. ‘It looks quite easy to fly



70 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. |



like a sparrow, but it’s awfully difficult really. I
know because I tried to fly off the table the other
day, and Oliver did. Oh, I say, I forgot nurse
told me to tell you Oliver's got the croup.”

His father was drawing a very important line
just then, and could not look up.



COOK FOUND ROGER FAST ASLEEP IN THE STUDY ARMCHAIR.

“Poor little fellow!” he said somewhat ab-
stractedly.
“And nurse said if you didn’t send for the
doctor soon she thought he might very likely die.
Oh, father, what a crooked line!”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 71



The professor jumped up in a great hurry and
rushed out of the room. .

“T will try to draw one my own self,” murmured
Roger; “father won't mind.”

And for a long while the boy sat engrossed by
his pencil and paper. He hardly noticed the
noise of the doctor’s arrival, nor the fact that
everybody in the house seemed to have forgotten
his own existence. It was so delightful being
allowed to sit up late and play without prohibition
in his father’s study, that Roger enjoyed himself
very much. He was only sorry that Peggy had
missed the fun by having to stay with Mike while
nurse was so busy; and it was vexing that he him-
self could not help feeling a little sleepy after a
time, though he tried manfully to beat down the
unwelcome sensation which spoiled his pleasure.

And upstairs Oliver was fighting breath by
breath for his life.

It was after eleven o'clock when the doctor
assured the distressed father that his little son had
won the battle, and cook found Roger fast asleep
in the study armchair.



72

CHAPTER IV.

THE next interesting thing that happened was the
freezing of the pipes during a long and severe
frost.

Oliver had soon recovered from his dangerous
attack ; the only thing left by it being a slight
weakness, which made him more inclined to be
cross than was at all necessary, and ready to cry
about things directly he began to argue. Even
nurse noticed it ; because he never used to bea
crying boy, only very determined and obstinate.

“| think Master Oliver needs a tonic, sir,” she
said one night to his father; ‘for he seems that
cross and peevish since the croup that there is no
doing anything with him.”

The professor looked up with quick interest.

“A new development,” he said thoughtfully ;
‘“T must observe this, and examine these fresh
tendencies to, what did you say, nurse?”

‘The child is always crying, sir, and seems so
quickly put out in one way or the other.”

‘‘Doubtless it is the dawn of the influence of
conflicting impulses in his raw, untrained nature.



a NT

THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 73



The inclination to follow the wrong, and the con-
sciousness of the opposing right, would create a
ruffled state of mind that might easily come under
the term peevishness.”

“]’m sure I don’t know, sir,” remarked nurse ;
‘only it is my opinion the doctor might give him
something strengthening.”

“The doctor, did you say? I hardly think it is
a case for him. But I am just writing a chapter
on the Initial Stages of Wrong-doing in Child-life,
and their effect on the general moral condition, the -
theories of which will be a great help in Oliver’s
case. For I am inclined to think that this is the
cause of that of which you complain,” continued
the professor musingly.

‘| thought it my duty to mention it, sir,” said
nurse rather grimly.

“ You are quite right—quite right,” he repeated ;
and then half to himself: ‘“ Otherwise I might
have been inclined to overlook this practical illus-
tration of the contending forces which are dis-
cernible even at such an early age”.

So the professor returned to his note-book, and
nurse, on her own responsibility, wrote a letter
asking the doctor to call round the next day.

“Father!” cried Roger, rushing in through the
door, and followed by Peggy leading Oliver, who
was in tears, by the hand, ‘we've been telling
Oliver the story of Joseph in the pit, ’cause it’s





74 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



Sunday, you know, and he will keep on crying.
Do ’splain to him.” .

“T don’t want Joseph to be put in that werry
nasty pit,” he sobbed.

“How extremely unfortunate!” said the pro-
fessor helplessly ; ‘‘for that matter was settled a
considerable number of years ago.”

“But perhaps he didn’t mind, did he, father?”
chimed in Peggy. ‘I’ve kept saying he didn't
mind, ‘but Oliver will keep on thinking he did.”

“That is a good idea,” said the professor ad-
miringly. ‘Really, Peggy, you have an intelli-
gence rich in resource. Don’t cry, my child,” he
continued, “for, as your sister happily suggests,
I dare say Joseph did not mind it at all

“But do you really think he enjoyed it?”
asked Oliver, checking his tears.

”

“Possibly he enjoyed it,” repeated the pro-
fessor, lifting Oliver on to his knee; and then he
added to himself: ‘‘ For one can never accurately
gauge the boy-mind, and at that time Joseph was

-probably a boy”.

“Tf he enjoyed it 1 won't cry no more,” Oliver
promised.

‘Was it a pit in the pavement for the coals?”
Roger wanted to know.

“It was the kind of pit a boy would enjoy
most,” answered his father quickly, watching
Oliver’s showery face.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 75



“Not a dark one?” the little boy asked
anxiously. ;

“Certainly not!” the professor hastily assured
him, “a most light and cheerful pit.”

So Oliver's woe was assuaged, and the pro-
fessor wrote down in his note-book :—

“The sentiment of pity in the child-mind is
more easily evoked by narrative than by visible
suffering. My son, aged nearly five years, cried
bitterly with sympathy over the story of Joseph
in the pit, but regards the sight of a funeral as a
most interesting and diverting entertainment, tell-
ing me afterwards with a delighted laugh—‘ An’
we saw a grown-up woman crying quite properly
with a real pocket handkerchief!’”

But this happened a week or so before the
pipes froze, and it was fortunate that, thanks to
the doctor’s tonic, Oliver was quite himself again
and able to enjoy with the other children this
tremendously interesting state of affairs.

It seemed a pity that nurse did not derive
equal pleasure from the circumstance ; it was just
one of those things which she might have enjoyed
so much, but never did. Having the sweeps was
another of them,—but nurse was a difficult person
to understand. The children had given her up
long ago, for any one who will always sit on a
chair instead of the floor, who prefers regular
meals to feasts and picnics, and chooses to go for



76 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



a straightforward walk instead of playing about,
is surely in a hopeless case. At least so the
children thought.

“T do love the plumber!” exclaimed Peggy,
clasping her hands, ‘and I wish the pipes would
freeze every day.”

co Amiel dorm sadded Roce lesletame: stit
the white lead this morning, and hold the screw-
driver.”

‘He's got a werry nice smile,” said Oliver.

‘“Vedy nice ’mile,” echoed the baby.

“J mean to be a plumber when I’m a man,”
Roger decided on the spot.

“{ thought you were going to be a ph'los’pher,”
said Peggy, ‘‘and that you and father had settled
ia

“T was,” answered Roger impressively, ‘‘ but ]
have changed my mind.”

“1 wish there could be a lady-plumber,” and
Peggy sighed, ‘“’cause it’s just what | should like
to grow into. It seems such a kind thing to be!”

“Children, I want you,” called the professor ;
‘“T have a new friend come to spend a few days
here, and he is a poet.”

“Will he bite?” asked Mike suddenly as he
was going downstairs step by step.

‘Not more than is absolutely necessary for pur-
poses of mastication. I think you will all like
him.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 77



And their father was right. The poet turned
out to be a most delightful man who knew endless
fairy stories which the children had not heard
before, and also he kept acid-drops in his waistcoat
pocket. Before the evening was over both Peggy
and Roger had decided to be poets.

“You are sure girls can be it too?” asked



“WILL HE BITE?”

Peggy a little anxiously, as they were making their
final plans.

“Certainly, my dear. And now I propose that
we all begin to be poets this very night.”

“It’s frightfully exciting turning out to be what
you never expected,” cried Roger, jumping wildly
up and down on the sofa. Oliver and Mike did
not care for poets much, as poets; though any one
who dispensed acid-drops found favour in their



78 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

sight. Moreover they had been carried off to
bed quite early by nurse.

“You can’t begin to be one, because you are
one, you see,” said Peggy.

‘No, I can only finish being one now,” answered
the poet. ‘But you and Roger have a great step
before you. Suppose you each make up your
mind to write a poem during my visit here? It
would be a good beginning.”

“It seems to me,” said Roger, pausing to take
breath, “that being a poet is more exciting even
than telling and imagining stories.”

“JT have not found it the most exciting of
callings, but then it is the only one I have tried,
so I am hardly a fair judge.”

“ Does being a poet make you so very under-
standing to talk to, and not laugh when there’s
nothing funny being said, like lots of grown-ups
do?” asked Peggy lucidly.

‘““T believe it does,” answered the poet gravely ;
‘at any rate it ought to.”

“Then,” concluded Peggy, “I shall be a poet
more particularly when I’m grown-up even than
now.”

‘““T would,” replied her friend.

‘7 think it would help us a good lot in writing
poetry if we hadn’t only one lead pencil between
us all four,” said Roger persuasively to his
father.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 79



“And that'll only write just after a suck,” ex-
plained Peggy ; “ we take it in turns, you know.”
“To write with or to suck?” asked the poet.

“ Both,” said Peggy simply.

“T can hardly imagine being a poet myself
under the circumstances, so | will stand two new
pencils.”

And the children felt that the millennium was at
hand.

‘“‘Good-morning, big poet,” said Roger, appear-
ing downstairs at a most unusual hour a day or
two afterwards.

‘“ Good-morning, little poet,” replied his friend.

““Ma’mselle is waiting, but I wanted to ask
you whether you generally say ‘to begin’ or ‘to
commence ’.”

‘“‘T usually prefer ‘ begin’ myself.”

“But ’spose it was in poetry and ‘begin’
wouldn’t rhyme?”

“Ah! that is a different matter.”

“And ’spose ‘commence’ seemed almost as
good a word to say what you want, I mean, as
if it hadn’t to be poetry at all?” continued Roger.

“T should be guided by inspiration.”

“Oh!” said the boy doubtfully; and then
brightening up a little, “I think I will ask
cook.”

“T would if I were you,” agreed the poet.

On Thursday the three elder children were in-



80 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



vited down to tea, and afterwards Peggy and
Roger produced a somewhat soiled piece of exer-
cise paper as the fruits of a week's labour.

“ There’s one very awkward thing happened,”
began Roger solemnly; ‘“we’re both only one
poet, you see.”

“How is that?” asked the poet. The pro-
fessor was dreadfully busy writing out lectures,
so that he could not attend to the children quite
as much as usual, but he looked up from his desk
and laid his open note-book on the table to await
Roger’s explanation.

“Could two children be one poet?” asked
Peggy anxiously.

“What zs almost invariably can be,” remarked
the professor.

“Well, you see, it’s like this,” continued Roger,
“Peggy and me both wanted the same rhymes,
and that made us inclined to quarrel.”

“And there didn’t seem quite enough rhymes
for both of us,” Peggy chimed in, ‘‘so we thought
it would be better to be one poet between us.”

“’Specially as nurse was rather cross, and said
she would take both the pencils away if we didn’t
give over squabbling,” added Roger.

“ They was werry naughty,” Oliver observed,
“and Roger called nurse ‘an ole goose’.”

“Oh, Oliver!” said Peggy reproachfully, ‘‘ how

can you? He only just whispered it very softly,”











“THE SPRING IS COMMENCING,
IT IS, IT IS.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 83

she explained, ‘‘and nurse was aggravatinger than
usual.”

‘So one half of me is going to be a poet with
Peggy, and the half that’s over shall be a plum-
ber,” was Roger’s decision.

““A very good arrangement,” observed the
poet, lighting his pipe. ‘And now, let us hear
the poem.”

Peggy shook back her hair and cleared her
throat, then she read all in one breath, while
Roger’s lips moved silently with the rhythm :—

“ The spring is commencing,

It is, it is;

And green is the fencing,
It is, it is;

The thrushes are singing,
They are, they are;

And the bluebells are ringing,
They are, they are.

‘¢ The summer was boiling,
It was, it was ;
The flowers were spoiling,
They was, they was ;
The dusty road thirsted,
It did, it did;
And all the buds bursted,
They did, they did.
“The dead leaves want raking,
They do, they do;
The corn-crakes stop craking,
They do, they do.



84 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



It’s time for the reapers,
It is, it is,

To open their peepers,
It is, it is.

“The cold winds are wheezing,
They are, they are;

The pipes they are freezing,
They are, they are.
There’s plenty of plumbing,
There is, there is ;

And Christmas is coming,
It is, it is.”

“Tt’s werry silly,” remarked Oliver, who had
been listening with a most bored expression.

“Tt isn't, is it?” cried Peggy, appealing both to
her father and the poet.

“Tt is just splendid,” exclaimed the latter; “1
must shake hands with such a poet immediately,”
and he took both their hands in his.

“You see now it had to be ‘commencing,’” said
Roger, jumping up and down with excitement ;
“and besides, cook said she thought it sounded
more genteel.”

“Tt is perfect!” the poet assured them. “I
congratulate you both.”

“T shan’t be a poet when I’m growed up,” an-
nounced Oliver. ‘I shall be a sweep.”

“And what are your reasons, my boy, for
choosing such a profession ?” asked his father.

‘What say ?” interrupted Oliver.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 85



‘Why do you want to be a sweep ?”

‘“’Cause he’s never washed,” replied Oliver
triumphantly.

“Tt strikes me,” suggested the poet, ‘that even
the poetic genius would be all the better for a
little excursion in the fresh air. Suppose we all
go as far as the park to-morrow ?”

Roger and Peggy clapped their hands.

“T can’t spare time to go,” said the professor ;
‘but, not being a poet, perhaps I am not wanted.”

“Oh, father, you are!” cried Peggy loyally ;
‘and we shan’t be quite all poets, ’cause of the
plumber-half of Roger.”

“Yes, make time for once, Maxwell,” urged his
friend ; “ you are paler even than the children, and
need a breath of fresh air quite as much. These
stuffy streets don’t count for air.”

During this conversation Oliver's face had been
gradually growing redder, he was also blink-
ing a good deal more than usual, and his mouth
was not quite steady.

‘““T aren’t a poet,” he said gloomily, “nor |
shan’t be when I’m growed up, but—but——”
and he looked up very piteously at his father.

‘Could not an embryo sweep be included?”
asked the professor.

“Certainly,” agreed the poet; “we will not be
too exclusive. So well have your father and
Oliver, won’t we, children ?”



86 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“We will, we will!” they shouted, capering
about wildly.

Most fortunately the following day was a lovely
one, with a bright blue sky anda tingling taste of
frost in the air.

“ We will all sit still in the train,” suggested the
poet as they entered the underground station ; “ it
is the custom, you know.”

“T would rather like to be an engine-driver tf
I wasn’t a poet,” said Roger thoughtfully.

“ And when we get to St. James’s Park we will
walk across to Hyde Park. I am greedy of grass
in London.”

“Tm greedy of jam,” announced Oliver. “ Mike
is greedy of everything.”

“T am very anxious about this new book of
mine,” said the professor to his friend, ‘for I feel
that few students of the psychological aspects of
childhood have to their hand such practical illus-
trations as I have in my children. I can watch
and follow closely each new development, and
their varied characteristics make the study more
complete.”

“ Poor little psychological problems !” murmured
the poet softly.

The professor wrinkled his forehead.

“They are not at all poor problems I can assure
you. You makea mistake in supposing that. But
of course an outside observer only might think so.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 87



You can havé no idea of the depth and intricacy
of these child-problems.”

“T’m beginning to feel,” said Oliver slowly,
‘that I’ve sat still just as long as ever I can. If
we don’t get out soon I must begin to move
about.”

‘‘ Fortunately the next station is ours,” the poet
assured him.

They had a lovely walk through the park and
over the bridge, though, as the professor sug-
gested, it might have been more appropriate to
have gone round by Westminster as they were
such a distinguished company.

‘And seen Poets’ Corner,” added his friend
smiling.

‘Is that where naughty poets are put?” Roger
asked with great interest.

‘Occasionally good ones too.”

‘““ How unfair!” exclaimed Peggy indignantly.
‘“T do hate corners!”

‘“ There’s a horrider thing even than corners,”
continued Roger; “I mean bed during the
day.”

“You seem to have a wide and varied ex-
perience of the penal system. Is it your nurse,
or your governess, or your father, who is so
Simchas

“Qh, not father!” laughed the children; ‘he’s

the spoilingest of them all!”



88 THE-PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Our nurse very quickly punishes,” Peggy ex-
plained.

“T don’t think she can help it, poor thing!”
added Roger kindly. ,

‘No, poor thing!” echoed Oliver, “but she’s
dreadful when the clothes is clean, only I do love
her werry much.”

“Nurse says it’s worse than heathens to have
clean clothes on Saturdays, but ours have to go
to the wash then,” said Peggy.

““Which day do you have clean clothes?”
Roger asked the poet. ‘We ought to know,
‘cause of us being a poet now.”

“T am afraid I cannot tell you.”

“ Father,” whispered Oliver, “might I go close
up to that big ’normous soldier-man and look at
imei

They were passing the Knightsbridge Bar-
racks.

“Certainly, if you like.”

So the little boy went up to the tall, still senti-
nel, and regarded him solemnly for a few seconds.
Then he laid his small hand on the soldier’s tunic,
but the man took no notice.

“He’s dead. I thought he was!” said Oliver
decidedly.

When they reached the Albert Memorial great
was the children’s delight. Oliver dreadfully
wanted to have the golden man to take home



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 89



with him, and his father’s refusal of so simple a
little request made him very obstinate.

‘Why mayn’t I have it?” he kept repeating.

The professor was delighted with a new obser-
vation.

“You see,” he said slowly, as he wrote down
something on the back of an envelope, ‘the
child-mind is unconscious of size. It is absolutely
lacking in the element of proportion.”

“T want the golden man,” persisted Oliver.

The poets were amusing themselves by seeing
how many steps they could jump down at
_ once.

“‘T propose,” said the big poet, when they were
at last torn away from this entrancing amusement,
“that we go into a confectioner’s and have some
buns, on our way home.”

The children clapped their hands with delight.

“J wish I could have all my meals in a shop!”
cried Peggy enthusiastically ; “don’t you?”

“I have a preference myself for a club,” re-
plied the poet.

“T’ve never been to a club. I s’pose it’s as
jolly as a shop?”

‘“‘Pretty much the same thing.”

The professor suggested tea, but Roger had
caught sight of ginger-beer bottles; and every-
body can guess how much more of a treat ginger-
beer would be for tea on a cold winter’s afternoon.



go THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



The poet gave a little shiver and ordered three
bottles to be opened.

“Tt makes my face flash!” exclaimed Oliver
with a startled expression.

“They must be awfully rich people,” said
Peggy to her father, ‘‘to have even their com-
mon tables made of marble!”

“Retail trade is a lucrative calling,” observed
the professor drily.

“T wish I could eat just another bun!” sighed
Roger ; ‘‘’cause it’s such a splendid chance. But
I can’t,” he added sorrowfully.

It was a pity such a perfect afternoon was
obliged to come to an end; and that home and
bed-time followed on so closely. But when the
nursery was reached, the children were still full of
delight and excitement, in which the baby joined ;
for his father had remembered to buy a small
paper bag full of farthing buns for his particular
consumption. And Mike did not mind a bit the
fact that the professor, having then forgotten all
about them, had crushed them quite flat in his
coat pocket.

“Tt has been a lovely time lately!” cried Peggy,
dancing about in her little petticoat during the
process of undressing; ‘“ what with the pipes
freezing, and the darling plumber, and this splen-
did going-out to-day !”

“And the poet coming, and us being poets,



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. gi

too!” added Roger, wriggling out of nurse’s
grasp.

“I would have liked the golden man in my
bath!” said Oliver in an injured tone.

“And the jolly tea of ginger-beer and buns in
the shop!” continued Peggy ; ‘wasn’t it lovely,
nurse P”

But nurse did not agree with Peggy. She
would actually rather have dull tea, and bread and
butter, in a warm room during the winter, than
ginger-beer and buns on a marble table in a shop.
The children pitied her profoundly ; and it did
seem unfortunate that grown-up people who might
continually enjoy themselves in such glorious ways,
should be too stupid to do so.

“When I’m a man, I shall live on ginger-beer
and buns, and jump down the Memorial steps all
day,” was Roger’s final decision before going to
sleep.



92

CHAPTER V.

THEN came the whooping-cough. A horrid thing
which lasted for weeks and weeks, and tired all
the children so much that they felt they could never
again enjoy rushing up and down stairs for hours
at a time, pretending they were wild deer on a
mountain, or having a pillow fight when nurse had
gone down to her supper, or any pleasures of that
kind. And when the whooping-cough had ex-
hausted itself, and its little victims into the bar-
gain, the hot weather began—such glaring, baking
sunshine beating down upon the houses and stone
pavement, and heating seven times hotter the
stuffy, airless streets.

The professor had, moreover, arrived at the con-
clusion that the children ought to be learning
German as well as French; so what made things
worse was the advent of a new, dull, strict Fraulein
in the place of dear little Mademoiselle, whom the
children all loved very much.

“TI do hate whooping-cough and German!”
sighed Peggy, looking up from a hot, sticky exer-
cise, and resting her tired head on her little inky
hand.



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 93



“ Fraulein’s werry cross and ugly!” added Oliver
solemnly ; ‘‘and she talks nonsense too.”

“Tt isn’t nonsense; it’s German,” said Roger
languidly. ‘Oh, I’m so hot!”

‘“My dinner’s sore!” remarked the baby, with
rather a red face.

“Did you swallow the stones?” asked Oliver
with interest. ‘‘ 1 wanted to, on’y nurse wouldn't
let me.”

“ Not let me too,” said the baby sadly.

But just when the children were most tired and
overdone—when the weather seemed at its hottest
and the professor was fullest of work—a really
wonderful and unexpected thing happened. The
postman brought a letter from a far-away and
almost unknown Uncle Robert, saying that he and
his wife would be so glad if the professor and the
four children and nurse would come down and
spend the rest of the summer at his country
rectory. And there was a dear little letter en-
closed from their Aunt Isabel, telling them how
much she wanted to have them now she was
settled down at home again after being between
two and three years abroad.

“Tt’s very kind of Robert, I’m sure,” murmured
the professor, thinking what a lifetime it seemed
since he had last met his wife’s brother. ‘‘ But of
course we cannot go.”

“Oh, father!” cried Peggy with a gasp, for this



Full Text
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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:39:53-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299298; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
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FILES
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MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 254447b05e9152fcd50e9f5ddcb27dba
'SHA-1' 6df19d017fc8a04979cbf1c495343caed664cc50
EVENT '2011-12-29T07:00:36-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-14T08:30:14-05:00'
xml resolution
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describe
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'2011-12-29T06:59:12-05:00'
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d0d27a3acd45a6530fbc248a70084b31
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describe
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'2011-12-29T07:01:06-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-29T07:00:17-05:00'
describe
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describe
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70d2ce87ae2488219a9f3b666f9dc234
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'2011-12-29T06:56:30-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGVY' 'sip-files00020.txt'
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describe
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1e482cafe59d2a656ef85141ab310fe8
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'2011-12-29T06:57:23-05:00'
describe
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describe
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e92456176730186e1d10e4490ee6d0e6
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'2011-12-29T07:00:47-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWC' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d06f3067339ce1c1f94a44512ed00044
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'2011-12-29T07:01:39-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ed802eb34c246bc99160dad68c0e6852
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'2011-12-29T06:56:28-05:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d2935d471795e9df83eb688d6b941d38
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'2011-12-29T06:55:45-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-29T07:01:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWI' 'sip-files00031.txt'
20734e5ca380c4f2a7833dc2f81dc7d0
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'2011-12-29T06:57:44-05:00'
describe
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345a1dde62c09abe017ab17ac0cf07a0
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'2011-12-29T06:59:50-05:00'
describe
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91865d046ac9ac6cfd39f8508617c6d5
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'2011-12-29T06:58:49-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
20a86c6f587e55e5979a222ea47d3939
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'2011-12-29T07:00:33-05:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
61bc020b0b3d390c28444f8124e2f11e
040edeb3f0fb6528141dc94359ba127af331a210
'2011-12-29T07:00:35-05:00'
describe
'559' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
4e7bbcfd89117c12000d982049b8cbc2
0eebfef595777b6421f07da6f5b17348278dabcb
'2011-12-29T06:57:02-05:00'
describe
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31ca33fe03bcc24c3852b6742891bae3
bb0cb2e74dda6a4c9f6a65475206e742239ab14c
'2011-12-29T06:56:47-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWP' 'sip-files00038.txt'
87fcb05c47f4e438b6a4e173b3c2b781
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'2011-12-29T06:56:19-05:00'
describe
'73' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWQ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
0b915a9ea2a05bb576f01e4569d8031c
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'2011-12-29T06:57:36-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
84f220c4f683205a8de0bc0af61186b5
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'2011-12-29T07:00:59-05:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
80ef61eac5fe339ef1ab1ffe447e64ef
317701bc80dfb629b97b533927aea6c85efa4dc0
'2011-12-29T06:59:58-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1261' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWT' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f6e9a484407d075eda296d8f0096fe5c
a0bc5a18559e7f8dbf95cd74331572fd9383bbfb
'2011-12-29T06:58:17-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
cc8f4fca7585cc698b3cc311bfb8ea36
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'2011-12-29T06:56:23-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWV' 'sip-files00045.txt'
b3a0e1056f4dce939bf83f71ed5ee8f6
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'2011-12-29T06:56:14-05:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
90993bb9aabc8a5f5188ffc03f361e2f
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'2011-12-29T07:01:18-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWX' 'sip-files00047.txt'
bca3e3e95af23f5db57c353d4787ae94
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'2011-12-29T06:59:44-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
932813a7845af7c3e2310a82606d704b
e12ff5a887bad9e0ee4c5702a929e374daa14c5d
'2011-12-29T07:00:12-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGWZ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
bfb514cae16dd78afa58de711c4b25b7
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'2011-12-29T06:59:42-05:00'
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXA' 'sip-files00050.txt'
e41f435bf696de8fd5f093fef0bc2bb5
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'2011-12-29T06:57:09-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXB' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a40234aa498f1234fa9fdc592e0f3e0e
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'2011-12-29T06:55:59-05:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXC' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8cb61d9ca5487bf5460698f797430e66
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'2011-12-29T06:58:41-05:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXD' 'sip-files00053.txt'
497091ff0fd0356a4337a5af4b6b8428
d4331ba6ecfc8b35383e84aa2017818a3bfadbc9
'2011-12-29T06:58:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7578791c1b55b01ecdfeabd9ad8f1964
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describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
4e45ce040031e5c7f8cb1adb79ac383d
19628e21fb4058fd62c2f244bd442e6c3ad389fc
'2011-12-29T06:56:15-05:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXG' 'sip-files00056.txt'
85e210516efa3bc1f31a8d19639aefa4
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'2011-12-29T06:58:23-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f8a8881401e45b96f81cb56ee76e8c0d
ddea4a581c314406c39cf8de5ff61b5d2b3803ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7300f9895262fcb779648f43eb20a3c4
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'2011-12-29T07:01:41-05:00'
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXJ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
426acd93823f223288fe93af41d69e1f
a30c7d2bae497735ee8d176e322fe94cd4a68d99
'2011-12-29T06:57:35-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
36cd8dc4c563be9fd196932be9193842
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describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
eb79eb3586f799f019e955aafd076d28
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'2011-12-29T06:56:17-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXM' 'sip-files00063.txt'
6cd29819c47135f9cc734e4674560221
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'2011-12-29T07:00:49-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXN' 'sip-files00064.txt'
55139a04ba5b1d7be7e5f16442de2a55
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'2011-12-29T06:56:12-05:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXO' 'sip-files00065.txt'
70f3726e1609275844ec0289ff56f45f
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'2011-12-29T07:00:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXP' 'sip-files00066.txt'
02188ec3590a7ed0546a64423c471188
2e91813fe7dd7107a761735f4171bd0cd5e009b7
'2011-12-29T06:57:49-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d8b65377311a5750af905e39e3d89e23
aa955636a2b9ade64cedf244c41d103378e3b74e
'2011-12-29T07:01:54-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXR' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e9fdf434818d552883a7dc3f8ea2f1cd
d876f09f73671422fdf2baa0f98352f1b435edd1
'2011-12-29T06:55:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
4bd450a67c03bf6ed69bf45369b46db1
e2d14d15237d9aea36a61e5a96d96c62c6ef23cc
'2011-12-29T06:58:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4cc626632ea48b4c563b88ed215d31de
220b66ca454677f68bc3ea4162ff716768bef1c1
'2011-12-29T06:59:29-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXU' 'sip-files00071.txt'
1d00eaa8a9be7d2583e934342d897973
0c9781028ac73889a52c8f4e7be3fc829e4014f8
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXV' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d289e0eec668f85a7394835d07d24746
05c6ae7ce34f1d71dd1ed8084118541efba0f4fe
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXW' 'sip-files00073.txt'
2313f1448dbc88f695546075c0294485
d511047f7a330180b0c45df5dcdb85a609495531
'2011-12-29T07:01:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXX' 'sip-files00074.txt'
58c4cd8241b33e79593bd0380baaa111
b5ba41bb920ec6e3a699ac2e405fffee525fbb7a
'2011-12-29T06:56:41-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
a65c08ddb5b054e4eb02b95bd4718d61
a35b5949d4684393bfb382c327de6d3b9f5d515d
'2011-12-29T06:58:11-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGXZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
4e1cebc6ad8d707e6f3e3d757fd32dd2
e7a77f40b36203ac39f08783bfa6c2c6191c93c5
'2011-12-29T06:58:10-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
0dfa71897dd3b1023376ff7ed38090d8
deea3e8ca8a429606fda8be0bf0e33b3fab30353
'2011-12-29T06:59:16-05:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYB' 'sip-files00078.txt'
79beba04a4e9762abb6030b89cf40472
7a764debd55fa09531e928eb20072b85b1cbd5a1
'2011-12-29T07:00:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
d65036b4f3e24f09295d89c2dc41208b
3af267391aa2fd2b855616b873bc42739fccb7d6
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
85666a2d371e48164fca438dfb5ad16a
09fbabd1101170f955acd3a1acfb6f51268ba7f1
'2011-12-29T06:59:56-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYE' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8e38a53dc12ffde66704f9dd6e80714a
c4f09fcf9a9aadc32dd4b9856c0607480a9fbedb
'2011-12-29T06:57:43-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
b4dde9a010dca4fe6c0f9d2c82ef4baf
cc45abe7a91ed2c95a8f4094bfa8049c76958899
'2011-12-29T06:57:20-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1c2a3dbb6e620bc8415a366a2d46e8aa
f97f6c34b99fc6cf6f8ca14387d0380fafa7617e
'2011-12-29T06:56:27-05:00'
describe
'630' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
55d959fcd29c906299e5a80b886de7fb
26ac985bd807f7bb5f787d43be19f52042be250b
'2011-12-29T07:01:08-05:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
8c7a966ba43f2e1f9f33a83cad640152
74cb8e59f1ae2277fc54c3150691df58294609ec
'2011-12-29T06:57:37-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
0f967932242b59fd35a76b8507946a5d
03a7fea83a9e018644dd161c161c693bb4e69510
'2011-12-29T06:57:26-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
da269cc3da4789a2f9cbdf5e54ea2788
4083acddc70601843406788f02dcde22ff188faf
'2011-12-29T06:58:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
8488654825c0260c03db29812e61be28
d13f285f1efaa9d3586c744952f9a6425c91fdb9
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
e4c41200204e0f01a3238b2fee35ce42
7e984469e0bdc12cbe70a8fc97a6d0ee405c6163
'2011-12-29T06:58:48-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
41c33355153c124f441499bc2d47522e
9e4e7ea097b0081125d41f92154f5bb6f375ec09
'2011-12-29T07:00:52-05:00'
describe
'848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYO' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b15245a7d34e66dbdd8e22a6c365b8cf
9c78da38d7d9eac56cac6a32b3756e3f6b46d42d
'2011-12-29T06:56:43-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYP' 'sip-files00092.txt'
9a88227708a702d9d487451e0260e366
a6b3c90a57048a80395b2edd99908772eff7dbac
'2011-12-29T06:57:30-05:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
14e3cd575f3dad6503d62503c6f64c9e
e65196736e6f44323f559ef528763217a6f177f6
'2011-12-29T06:59:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYR' 'sip-files00094.txt'
065a4b6637f505e04771e4928c7084d6
75ddca4198f4791fb670a7f0e9758de974a87fe0
'2011-12-29T07:00:02-05:00'
describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
6a92573636446d9e5de26090746f77dc
add7eb21fec084fe7538e1cb869c205632d607f2
'2011-12-29T07:00:11-05:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
6725664ca98e4c5ff4eb13a02e056200
5922acf0f687ed4b49f681e426a71f8fcad0cb05
'2011-12-29T06:56:52-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYU' 'sip-files00098.txt'
5e2a6edfd60a4bef171d9ae2bf9a7a23
45fa79f347903d20879d6403caa7c9ab53e5c342
'2011-12-29T06:57:57-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYV' 'sip-files00099.txt'
76c2a6b750bf0d014874d61c021344d2
39a40520b847e4bdd95684c3e0ec6c94ef238681
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYW' 'sip-files00100.txt'
b7eeaefa5352173e9a2c2dc911e5ae9d
d64525d03eda61d94adbf272a09e7fb5c069df5a
'2011-12-29T07:01:01-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYX' 'sip-files00101.txt'
954d97a8993e1535bafae1c1d61c274e
b151b0eab98ddbbb85f3233dceae5c009e063b0f
'2011-12-29T06:58:21-05:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
09ed26977a1822b6c4022f40b6cf215a
1b1f4f33471f4ea363e2129542b5f6cd1f3b8544
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGYZ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c02c0b9de33f0e04e0f8a7d059894fb4
2b45adf0c65595d51816f44ae3646906620e73d3
'2011-12-29T06:55:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZA' 'sip-files00104.txt'
d6d7dcfd9b6538940e9b6ca82056ef70
ff06f792526a62b4c4f0e63923326d1561ffd84b
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZB' 'sip-files00105.txt'
f7eb14137d89f4ad3710d7296dd73686
e5311c7d38497d4b5a80e4867f9ec836a0ab27b0
'2011-12-29T06:58:15-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
fe7a1503348cf467586e5ad048035c2d
35a121a68fd36efd5e4b1feb7531ebfcf6c49ad8
'2011-12-29T07:00:31-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1826f9cfe5c861f581daf47e71638259
ea1d012fac813fa95be570bf72c1b49673b15ef9
'2011-12-29T07:01:46-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZE' 'sip-files00108.txt'
2a18fc241f40d2594a0010b4a31e3e60
70c6b9a3113b5106d03ab97b15073591afb8121d
'2011-12-29T07:01:44-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
81358f256195144b47175b30b608fbc6
9b846ac8e726c3d4b36d3cd2c5d142ed6f276824
describe
'589' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
08d4764302907cb21e9f0cf193f0b7c4
5234def54d688a664e862decb36c7f21d50d41a0
'2011-12-29T06:58:42-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZH' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e7b154ecc1788f0ae4628fdb56c5c4ff
907b53151773bf200456bc8bb29cad724054be3d
'2011-12-29T06:59:33-05:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZI' 'sip-files00112.txt'
5bb648ea239234ae709a2baddbf8d778
1d6a50b4cf3c575073136a3255f2c51c2f7517e8
'2011-12-29T06:57:42-05:00'
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZJ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
c5a5eb52577edc9a1fc0e3b17c3e83ac
06ff2234a4e733bd5058f1f2590646ab8fd7e643
'2011-12-29T06:57:59-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZK' 'sip-files00115.txt'
5632757ce0ef32316ef1b5caaf954e47
b4854969784d33c55bd26e763ad0a86cadf5bc26
'2011-12-29T06:57:13-05:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZL' 'sip-files00116.txt'
07dd7619c7b5de4d63def88355c0f774
015fecdff3e92ecc140c665140c8ef392af60c64
'2011-12-29T06:57:15-05:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZM' 'sip-files00117.txt'
9dcf540bcf25761d4e5a94c3f33efa4c
6723b8500c3a75a0459a4c00d2aedc27194c84a5
'2011-12-29T06:57:03-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZN' 'sip-files00118.txt'
365a285eff4e576af9b803fd1f3387bd
63f6b4cae3db5a8896cbc2ac68203c7247f23efb
'2011-12-29T06:59:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZO' 'sip-files00119.txt'
9066763a3319041c64980ea15e5f2b13
4d6f52a59de366e5613b3cc919757c6e620cf042
'2011-12-29T06:59:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
09ced58c70a247627a535307f51f9b9c
452ed7beef22b44dcfa67743cbc59063a4845cc6
'2011-12-29T07:00:58-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZQ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
3dc8b5930e372fd776c892add6be1edd
39327e63fb5da5b83ebf3093592e9f04d3ed51f8
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZR' 'sip-files00122.txt'
fa78c78f7131d38a2d9b57a1bb466a85
069efee90352207b0f4bafcf9fe0adcbb0aa67f4
'2011-12-29T06:55:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZS' 'sip-files00123.txt'
fe0775692418d233efc409f3b2813b42
4c86450b09a772e0ffa156a15924ae41c879aaa4
'2011-12-29T06:57:10-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f6e1da6816181fe65f3aff7ec9f7c087
d28ecb831ef6f50dff1fc69b02e977672f8e0170
'2011-12-29T06:56:10-05:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
07f8d82a98516075db196ac1363988a2
f12bc485387f5473a9565f6733efd799026cb191
'2011-12-29T06:57:40-05:00'
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZV' 'sip-files00126.txt'
07ac5f737894d8167d3099c2c4e26453
7e73e8faaef937b505ca6f291a92e08e754eb149
'2011-12-29T06:59:07-05:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZW' 'sip-files00127.txt'
22e590accf4a035bc8a1edb174609515
7175e97163b8a7f9abcb57d253fd3e3354081773
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZX' 'sip-files00128.txt'
8c53c91ba363524bac41419825c5f794
8e3408d6155baaf0204cae197669deb1102e35ba
'2011-12-29T07:00:19-05:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZY' 'sip-files00129.txt'
886ed2c1f943be39157d5828273ee27f
f1904c9244ec42766310c45ad2a2ddb922e71102
'2011-12-29T06:58:22-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABGZZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
400d1fb2078ed1884be097282081a36c
37e54306e67f0aa4b5c8e22054c317ce93926775
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAA' 'sip-files00131.txt'
31b90136b9dead53aeff3f24b4be58f3
ef9e07770885e9c71db85c31ca8ac47691e8519a
'2011-12-29T06:59:02-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAB' 'sip-files00132.txt'
95fb3c090d4a4a903ea412457ab1dacb
799266b0d7248f54e697d4e17e6c6586f65a4e05
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
67330b5e8c7f40574683ef9adf1883ca
c1603f804dd99edae5a3ba76215ca171c75ca42c
describe
'587' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAD' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e64745b50783b5e81a39ee5de8356d94
08e4cc937e8639d422ef7688825f63f843ddaf01
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
a18e679778b68a5e37c81bbde747e294
4fa5c2eb36867138e55712a26463fc8c4d0c3c0e
'2011-12-29T06:56:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAF' 'sip-files00136.txt'
bdb6ecfdba9d64b4a5d3a3c66a0a690a
f549eea8e267da067f9e2db66c3be918ddd451d7
'2011-12-29T07:01:37-05:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
3f848010ea6aa8a159f0d3e5f9a80886
4cbdde9476ce13bc73ba2dc7b55a988d3f09e2b7
'2011-12-29T06:59:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAH' 'sip-files00138.txt'
390f2184e99e1b2911229576b7c6b32a
65f3061e09be9314c72613569347e9047d3d1d47
'2011-12-29T07:01:35-05:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAI' 'sip-files00139.txt'
af19d2e8d23a73d89495be53fa3898d9
452223bd169bad46679962c98f262b113c8a8814
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAJ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
0f2419071c545b6787692534ed45a375
4e3500a4fafc2421883799a679f2aa5a3fb42399
'2011-12-29T06:58:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
856dbbefac2a51579110221305e80ae8
eed346bd4d5737f1599ecd817965da29a04de764
'2011-12-29T07:01:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1df5f03218caca993abd1992968b5aa4
c2fc843f7d8711dc986dcc87da817776096f767e
'2011-12-29T06:55:49-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAM' 'sip-files00143.txt'
f1b5c34f9e57f116611e9337e1b86c9e
c7b3ab78bdf904e8081d44a0f84075b3aa24373c
'2011-12-29T07:00:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAN' 'sip-files00144.txt'
03e0461d177c812f1e3f768b7c7a51b6
d1e36fb7b4e0810628da77e48ab08c799144cb93
'2011-12-29T07:01:00-05:00'
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAO' 'sip-files00145.txt'
591c1e9f29ff0322eb07f387870b2a3d
2e0e4481954e93e8014322be99a769d54c2808a2
'2011-12-29T06:57:14-05:00'
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
216d325a95c994537bde0f2dfa6fe8b0
80f49bde25ef4162600b144c023cc1930fbd9fe8
'2011-12-29T06:57:39-05:00'
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAQ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
ffb21996903cacc10c6ef1909625ca7d
42ee35ec75a98bf829bc1d037793d8abce07d11b
'2011-12-29T06:56:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAR' 'sip-files00149.txt'
638ac1dbf81334f9f3284a9e2996ebb4
711bde303902e6b49a24e1e68ae4411134fb23da
'2011-12-29T06:57:11-05:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAS' 'sip-files00150.txt'
56b337d1928e4dee00c136dd6daf059e
119e1ab1f83d1533313071252b7a7ede45d572ad
'2011-12-29T06:56:03-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAT' 'sip-files00151.txt'
2e99eab1ce370cc4352fe8bff26b4e95
d83c07c7d4f5cf487285bfc65f254023cc10ae93
'2011-12-29T07:00:43-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
2a05cfd284024acf458bffc16b3fbb24
704820a3bddd88a2de6ac5f7eab1ba87228eeb83
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAV' 'sip-files00153.txt'
c31d94f8341ff2342aae26deff09ad45
603b95f73a49c99933d3ee7e9ec9a8c9048c1e55
'2011-12-29T06:56:13-05:00'
describe
'447' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAW' 'sip-files00154.txt'
071335ddbad2dae7070c1708fc6e5705
360001f644e2fc655ce9ed70ff6f8de5e252e942
'2011-12-29T06:56:42-05:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAX' 'sip-files00155.txt'
ec9468c9585fd0ce5ec87cbad9f844e7
1f5ce892ff5bc3f48d397ec63b9aecebf050c1d4
'2011-12-29T06:57:21-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAY' 'sip-files00156.txt'
51e3caa3516fadf5e73910058b576ce9
e5b0b475a40b1af6e40b3c85f8bba0a005a4c28f
'2011-12-29T06:56:32-05:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHAZ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
bd92a590ccbfc1be6835644eb9138bf2
a5facc5ea7a9359d8b4abd1c8c01878deabf998f
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBA' 'sip-files00158.txt'
cb6913f92358c12780b7ae1fb9e11f37
08437365aa7e9d49a94b409f3d100e1c19080f7a
'2011-12-29T07:01:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBB' 'sip-files00159.txt'
8f28943fad4f3a7fcb9000659e25e238
a70e8ea776a831331062ba3bb5a763ed4fac606d
'2011-12-29T06:58:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBC' 'sip-files00160.txt'
f213846e475976d17e8975663549bbf9
7c51244c08777b416431e40340d1bad8da69e5c7
'2011-12-29T06:59:32-05:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBD' 'sip-files00161.txt'
28fdd67213010169bbcaf1d029c09205
a0ad5cf0b4404fca10fd9a40302cbc2047aaa3c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBE' 'sip-files00162.txt'
7d0c458bdb2f654e16fd92562e694ebe
4d02b0262158f2c37c44ece5fcb0c7086620cc55
'2011-12-29T06:59:41-05:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBF' 'sip-files00163.txt'
b85f729944318f2d7faba6585a0e91fb
1e668edba4b803f5ee714a4ff6bfcd7f21e09d06
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBG' 'sip-files00164.txt'
300e5ba57416f407eb59fe7d8d1e409c
575c47a39c46240196b917d4eb71c46c08d97c7a
'2011-12-29T06:56:53-05:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
be0f540585ac1b9097135a6cdc2ce45c
973d31b6ca51419ea5d92c6e90441d76018ef664
'2011-12-29T07:00:22-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBI' 'sip-files00166.txt'
4d1f94d6a305bd48f9feef4f418a93d3
d19d56e4cf090af291a8ad17f3c955cb7d2d81e9
'2011-12-29T06:58:50-05:00'
describe
'643' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBJ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
6e9dbaef22be05bd56f4ea4743e633ca
6444147a231667abbff6c54a61ce659b4db809f5
'2011-12-29T07:00:05-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBK' 'sip-files00168.txt'
0d1c86f60463cc94d7e879148964c677
335d05261d6250a546dafb5d6e3c2addabd28553
'2011-12-29T06:59:40-05:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBL' 'sip-files00169.txt'
f002b057861e39799b73f90748f80ca9
31c855904950920ab6d184ce09b274cbb23b9787
'2011-12-29T06:57:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBM' 'sip-files00170.txt'
0907c98a39a2f0b82ec2af87dc67d5e0
a91ee83a6d6890627e89c5694822c9a3229158fe
describe
'523' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBN' 'sip-files00171.txt'
c2f6e3dec25152067458d1b350b8f3b0
d71b309f1ffefb7be8172092fa3b680ffd1d63fc
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBO' 'sip-files00172.txt'
7a0dcab56c758b0b7eeedde5651b766a
6ce9eb9ffc60112aead22c57074ec3619850730b
'2011-12-29T06:56:24-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBP' 'sip-files00173.txt'
468740538badef23e0ac96ddf09aaedd
e396aa570877ea50300cc02e5654b558ccc5c68f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBQ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
d06a36d53aeb5cef803de5c1d64ec288
75671a32be483c3d3afe313344615c7fe28c8f59
'2011-12-29T06:57:34-05:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBR' 'sip-files00175.txt'
421cd8f894de55ee52c52c5f081ce9ea
38f8c36dc7ee0f6ddeb8debb3d3c77a143ad6867
'2011-12-29T07:01:29-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBS' 'sip-files00176.txt'
83c18862b52e6cf6e2f2b56815dea57a
e8e90307c480343f5d2e2745d030230e6698b5aa
'2011-12-29T06:58:01-05:00'
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBT' 'sip-files00177.txt'
72e83d13908399e792fd3e839bbd6df4
19d912b6c779aa5fb6c73830c7d2998d183d3032
'2011-12-29T07:00:48-05:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBU' 'sip-files00179.txt'
be089ed1eb084c824dbcafd2ef45a979
5feb8dca708b17cfa90c366d4acc8b2ed7a2bcce
'2011-12-29T07:01:42-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
f93666fd948bdc1721150125f0611f7e
6772d175ef044147bb18248e2b9d7ba09becc545
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBW' 'sip-files00181.txt'
bf83edf1196ec0f1f085815a67ce54d4
a980746596cb9f83b5df0216e5676850e67085a6
'2011-12-29T06:58:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBX' 'sip-files00182.txt'
a416b93edf41eb3d8e80775408116fb8
88c978771647936315ffbece8c55ce3cf4df6845
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBY' 'sip-files00183.txt'
881bf96fe2baad4d4fe0ba36d3dadd70
ee4ac944cee6da225a833aab4c71512222e78b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHBZ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
9cfbdd75be810aafeec83aaaef91c2f9
a751912b0221f64c455849d13d3f1c2ebbd872e8
'2011-12-29T06:55:48-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCA' 'sip-files00185.txt'
dad9547fe2497aaa8abf20bc9a616b0d
17cea86ed0def52519c72346cb7fe693eadb75be
'2011-12-29T06:59:14-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCB' 'sip-files00186.txt'
f3ab061f3f5fac04f286afa81334d714
dbf7e0036779fc2fc8977f69fec7f41cf72ff8e5
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCC' 'sip-files00187.txt'
3e21210675ca9e10e96f442cf5a12a48
50e7ae688df859beb09e09239c6c8897864ff80d
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCD' 'sip-files00188.txt'
f07ae4cb6391941042df0777806a5aef
a6fda22d6c74e1796290e2cb15409caa101833f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCE' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e2a6bf6dbfb4d02c06f20e2333583ee8
6e0b2db4e697e114fd8c9bc867adec81488a0f54
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCF' 'sip-files00191.txt'
8d86730f14ec29fa86576fd8d0b317e3
2e80fc6b1c5c249405d8b72ec84498c3f4261456
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCG' 'sip-files00192.txt'
3aa6be4b3be8d85dfe63a55b12f1cab7
7937eed61c949d665f036e382a0da939daca5a33
'2011-12-29T06:56:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCH' 'sip-files00193.txt'
21ac79898eae1a58f630f82037869d89
74d5b8eb609684571d9a4f3d0c97be20aec1f258
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCI' 'sip-files00194.txt'
85c1d84fb51128f5f339c181e797b79e
6b215ef5384bad69ae8fe3ffc191061df2fef14f
'2011-12-29T06:56:16-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCJ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
0b669d0bd79f0535a12c68b4c0d1ec9e
b25f05e12ba3428a08929870517c36aed0a549ec
'2011-12-29T06:58:35-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCK' 'sip-files00196.txt'
1969c422c09d59dccc2ec2674ac61ef9
c179549e37ce898b3bcc464764d89617f071b08d
'2011-12-29T06:59:36-05:00'
describe
'601' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
42881b52faad6c3c6c4c0bdd3bbf5fe9
a7c33891362effe65574e9f6142866cbfbcd9228
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCM' 'sip-files00198.txt'
6a98c9e2c4a640eddae3abb270aee86a
d3f086f68d066aa38cacb5f7b98c9b280f5ca37a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCN' 'sip-files00199.txt'
016e4d3fc87b06b9f2ea71c83d0c4583
ddd01acb786ff8fe447654aac2d2d28abcea26c9
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCO' 'sip-files00200.txt'
b362ffa48e276a47e9b027d3a2505e37
edbfd4ac28ceb7debb12565bc1a4e5ede203e3cc
'2011-12-29T06:59:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCP' 'sip-files00201.txt'
f0fbafcd804ab10e1881b3405c68de41
238ff5734782987f9f82d065196f7dad8cb2a272
'2011-12-29T07:01:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCQ' 'sip-files00202.txt'
567c4857c47a68f3e84c7a938ebf1b63
dd11ee82ae64ac6d264767a02528fae99df1c3f7
'2011-12-29T07:00:30-05:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCR' 'sip-files00203.txt'
e331e457e8625fa47f6f2fe3106d2461
75eae1b742544029d5ecb9a8b809258837e5ec66
'2011-12-29T06:59:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCS' 'sip-files00204.txt'
1b72e6285d2482eb5cfc4c3f7c41a2e3
2221889a7941b1b6cd6bd967579f00758a34f468
'2011-12-29T07:00:50-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCT' 'sip-files00205.txt'
8b9068ef96ee9e7affd22ca72c6f89a1
4c982273cc1842a72a365b35a3ace325cf221c8d
'2011-12-29T06:58:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCU' 'sip-files00206.txt'
3c7cbf6ef3fb92156bac5eb52276188b
7f31abffc9645d9ac1f88b27ce4740ca4f6c5e76
'2011-12-29T06:57:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCV' 'sip-files00207.txt'
598404f6db59dc05fa44cf3d694cca66
6742c6c5406a5c82bc48617df0facd0b93c16d1a
describe
'642' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
d26f6bdb53a786f0829ba3ba89ac0b64
27f532a1d8246db572fa28c610b9e3fbc14148d7
'2011-12-29T06:57:41-05:00'
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCX' 'sip-files00210.txt'
2344cb83c558488b2534a3c614e014b1
ddc3caae2d0bc4046be3b0872fc56ef00e6d3cd3
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCY' 'sip-files00211.txt'
b3ea102da416e557909ada1c8c2b3b41
429afcbe559dc83d3200ff59397919629b2cf13c
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHCZ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
cbc634abeaaa88dd917d669bc09dc7a5
cc7a8871268057b7cda8ad38fdd178c7e4c7f5a8
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDA' 'sip-files00213.txt'
7e77b3ccaf11e9e561cb98bc1c85c1be
ba37633ce93d720c3dc05dcc6db92c571864b9cb
'2011-12-29T07:00:57-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDB' 'sip-files00214.txt'
acf82078c8c3b71b8c8544ed66414552
f884743ab07aa5c4bc3c9cc8f955ed4c5c6164fe
describe
'490' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDC' 'sip-files00215.txt'
a2e52dd54e2244525f0a6950542519ea
85d18731b81772b2a42a8793a1b16c08cb56363c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDD' 'sip-files00216.txt'
148bbf3cdf1f8485d2468f74f3fdfc8f
5df3de15b1a5fa67cc6f06955594949156cd2723
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDE' 'sip-files00217.txt'
ac45baed46f582bf022ceb2302a8f9a9
e4187a71f6cc454a50cfdcd9124c546b159714ff
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDF' 'sip-files00218.txt'
30fb702daeedd2f0effea0b012bed3c6
e07b62b9e2120a1b1cfeb5013730bc10d47c18a9
'2011-12-29T07:00:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDG' 'sip-files00219.txt'
a4cfbab57072a1809c57dbd6fe867a38
413765dc66cea2f7fb684f904b6f78c8f8374596
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDH' 'sip-files00220.txt'
365f41d84bb996adfbd27ab650b203ba
ee30bd2f09a5f44b1bc01fc6d14d31353c644ead
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDI' 'sip-files00221.txt'
ba27771faaceb2866e754309dba30ab8
c3423d412701ab95d5fc70fad81b4bacab520644
'2011-12-29T06:59:39-05:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDJ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
84dfaade3c33f8d103191b5ab059854d
da21a688fcf6375bdd249c70abc562eeb385796d
'2011-12-29T06:58:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDK' 'sip-files00223.txt'
76d3983ccfdd6d9c8019be2d4c4fdf57
ab641c37ad2426dd40c71b931b7d9b2975731de3
'2011-12-29T06:56:00-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDL' 'sip-files00224.txt'
0441bed1d77b78c36740244b267d05ed
4b76a4a32a897d9d21eb36718c93666e666a63d7
'2011-12-29T06:57:16-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDM' 'sip-files00225.txt'
55215f6322b2eee1de95529d85dcfb5f
3ec2bc5640fbd03cf35e48a71725ae1f8f7cbdbd
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDN' 'sip-files00226.txt'
cdb642d403cc0b630c62ff28783f4342
32ae833d42f53a9285f2ee594f0dee8ca6a218ec
'2011-12-29T06:55:58-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDO' 'sip-files00227.txt'
77137c823c3c6a7cf440a70d5d1c4976
648fae26301d0a0127a4584f52cb07b278b7a938
'2011-12-29T07:01:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDP' 'sip-files00228.txt'
02956494f82a500d95f1787699c0f85a
764cb9b503601243decf2c18f0802d10f5b0d442
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDQ' 'sip-files00229.txt'
f64e5b73424c616b866e392cee7e5d02
18f278a4de6202329fbb50b165f337e34ac274d0
describe
'260' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDR' 'sip-files00230.txt'
320e46d9e9bdd2a778658d6d13a2c209
44494aee27663b98ed02f894a4348bc7ea50a2e5
'2011-12-29T06:56:25-05:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDS' 'sip-files00231.txt'
64fa70b4684f424b4e1630d4e5322d3f
3d63cade6f1e49027819a161eb51945c74e3fd0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDT' 'sip-files00232.txt'
473be9cc47688f3ab36c2cc48081546d
da08446fde6ef95349b1cc161c9aa77a727f63e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDU' 'sip-files00233.txt'
8459f7e4748a3071cb6178f009f3d1de
f04df223141dfb636c9cb4b40e3ac476d77b1882
'2011-12-29T06:57:00-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDV' 'sip-files00234.txt'
1718161c0193c71578d6e90745c02bbc
80eca31461851beab69959e1dde26ff6a0bd5165
'2011-12-29T06:56:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDW' 'sip-files00236.txt'
11dd7c3273d3f52acbe5f7a5536e25ca
0038c41fb454226a99485b08364978d58646d0c4
'2011-12-29T06:56:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDX' 'sip-files00237.txt'
5512739cef427bb52df4ac3ba69a2b85
3866dfad3b00358d72ab9c5f862019024e184598
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDY' 'sip-files00238.txt'
d9152d899f6bc7cf8466e4d5ccc0cfd1
1d434c12a2783ba267ffbb9912ad866de7cbea9e
'2011-12-29T06:58:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHDZ' 'sip-files00239.txt'
8d75138f425d946077103de939b410f1
502af2663a8dbc026f44dbecba59ab02c27aea8c
'2011-12-29T06:59:31-05:00'
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEA' 'sip-files00240.txt'
f655fdac787afad6735bf6c15378fe52
6e33c89d61edb0040fdccc4bced01ed32e27a2a3
'2011-12-29T07:00:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEB' 'sip-files00241.txt'
c568ce38cac85ec163305fbe5fa83154
d3944d898f95b1ec93eac6a21abdee15635810cf
'2011-12-29T06:55:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEC' 'sip-files00242.txt'
2aaed8f16516d229c9f47b330f72af8b
2338eb464fb997f3c29a8ac9a349c642fbc833f0
'2011-12-29T06:59:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHED' 'sip-files00243.txt'
9cebc4e43aa187092a732934a2f03e23
863754a35c42d5befc3871aa455eb476163b4e49
'2011-12-29T06:59:22-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEE' 'sip-files00244.txt'
b7b92012a740ba766d5ba74137b0d063
cbaef5bf3193f4a765e61519fc702b3e688c716f
'2011-12-29T06:58:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEF' 'sip-files00245.txt'
36b2c9d60400dc93d407589e3fb979e8
ff452dd3468fa665119da60b70293fd74f4eb182
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEG' 'sip-files00246.txt'
998b388afc06c10006a5a59337bd2a44
8c6f8052fc199c01fb1e229d43e3d5925affd15e
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEH' 'sip-files00247.txt'
e426c8d7b82012000c8cf1dcdf65e565
3fce33dbecc0cd47726b11b79954e7049bf2c0c6
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEI' 'sip-files00248.txt'
4f16dbaae8ec463d8769c8e2f70640ef
cc84c79ba6f5444e334423ac632a84c946ca9dd0
'2011-12-29T07:00:07-05:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEJ' 'sip-files00249.txt'
8b0f4c70c301842cc6dabc6c76aa4776
1c67dfdee355a913eb0ad11c64f6014d31816d8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEK' 'sip-files00250.txt'
d7fb9224f1c0f8dbb72ea646746e97af
47c53e7cb9dc7af08dee573556752fc45fe56ed9
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEL' 'sip-files00252.txt'
ad8cee658e67a17371b280e7f1d48f29
aa0fb8da36e9d63dfc3fa4fc23ffb1e9fef2e7e3
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEM' 'sip-files00253.txt'
706a1c7013df8a038c981b9ed00dd9ad
867889d8f4d554b33d69467787360ce1a7508de0
'2011-12-29T06:58:12-05:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEN' 'sip-files00254.txt'
4d822ad757eab0e434374bfc1295756c
33e15c3d5cdc20d3825e50e38607a3fc817924d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEO' 'sip-files00255.txt'
19625ea39a112b41b78a04736bd448da
2ba69fcbc431cf2bb63aa68b1d20a5db4b7b4bdb
'2011-12-29T07:00:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEP' 'sip-files00256.txt'
c04aecda5380fcacde6336a00fc06964
7fe0cc5edbf53e405c24c8056ce6bfb907f78cf1
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEQ' 'sip-files00257.txt'
471f482d97efd39544adc6f536c942c2
059ae0cd50a7b7e69ef83a9138946b449144fa79
'2011-12-29T06:56:09-05:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHER' 'sip-files00258.txt'
ea80c91ac6531ae586d4ea1a3131654b
8a0d726dfbbf293cf2695501eb3a3689572b5f9e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHES' 'sip-files00259.txt'
b35a51f3377a7909d1e40cde140389e0
37a73495778b973528845318aec27cd8e0a47612
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHET' 'sip-files00260.txt'
cc98cae8154d676d6df08309f25c8a64
4f10a3e721630bb3acda4429882925340a90ba46
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEU' 'sip-files00261.txt'
eacb90f1cc106d740529ce00b8c9c794
9e32f10b39f5494004332085f097b979a91a43a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEV' 'sip-files00262.txt'
43e5b37cdea8fe0ff09774f8871c589c
31b562d7c851871906fb79fefa69e37d4a5a7cfc
'2011-12-29T06:56:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEW' 'sip-files00263.txt'
2f0d23e0466373c8bddb9eb17e62c4b8
e3b0e299ed3e6c886ce0c63ccf48b3e92bf5af77
describe
'515' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEX' 'sip-files00264.txt'
e7ca1a86d52e9bbacbe712ae42d39f7c
2c703a95733b3b6768d302d827ad40f90cac3f0c
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEY' 'sip-files00265.txt'
3ddabfbcc5e8650e658a245171a3babb
86da879036c7d38d9cedc1ea9b4f6c57c6ad2270
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHEZ' 'sip-files00266.txt'
4fce79356c4fa25b97b09b92cdcd6602
9cf46c01ce3f044ed6199bd210321bbecbed9f84
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFA' 'sip-files00267.txt'
81137c379ffd9acdb64f751bdc4c0987
db2c0f366f6054f312305c6ecb9c87fbc3b49c4c
'2011-12-29T07:00:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFB' 'sip-files00268.txt'
9f17a1ce8d834c42116a20e77abadb6b
872cc1ebd1f311048dcc88017698da8918822864
describe
'263' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFC' 'sip-files00275.txt'
578780b26a4b04554ea6b3c7c386f5ec
9bdd7e48831a3d556ecfbebc04b534ee5bc4d51e
'2011-12-29T06:59:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFD' 'sip-files00001.pro'
c1b58c72cb875e54268ac05dd603e5a2
7e2390bb2e1fb9a3c2c000f1e5c4df53a11a1220
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFE' 'sip-files00005.pro'
afb76ff867505e8e33732c1fe38e771f
fd94292219038441d79828e314dbe2e724b697f7
describe
'6149' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
3c8271ec944bde71bcd6115dee84a255
6c571648cac7eb252132d6d08db4826b1305b44f
describe
'2273' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFG' 'sip-files00008.pro'
ef284cf5826ca84abf10ce7ecf36d8e8
2f948547e3a109b48e424f43884d2f3edcea3719
'2011-12-29T07:01:04-05:00'
describe
'6314' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
5f7d12827aa970921b3e5f010f853de4
b0d4e0eb73070252c684b4a687f5176723ebc596
describe
'42074' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
00d707c29c8797e13d8c878df306c362
33ea7612cae32be7d0f8801a560ed306847cf956
describe
'26448' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
66f83af9c84b129dabf04f71c909d668
e9c28d544c4662038516243c0fcff5ecdf4c77aa
'2011-12-29T06:59:49-05:00'
describe
'33810' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFK' 'sip-files00016.pro'
89deb964191dec44a9687de3baed7562
65ea40e23856c4014ba3fab7b3bb334b90f143b3
'2011-12-29T07:01:09-05:00'
describe
'31834' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
fc03dc85c0e9544a7ecf0402ec22a082
347bbd0209676daf521261f9fbe144b925bd0463
describe
'29945' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
77a02ee3ab3ee64299e3e6bb0d878a93
9c732ba9ac4a736a5ad5f17a28365999fd5be831
describe
'11742' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8230e912e29866cd54c671a1a4ba322c
07f83bd809fb50855e309501b30191f6b3b66c08
'2011-12-29T06:58:45-05:00'
describe
'34243' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
32c0200adbab0886389cbb15a264a11c
a286ab8f008ebfc6ca3aed33d02c66f8f6a3806a
'2011-12-29T06:56:02-05:00'
describe
'32016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
9fa3047e7a46d104f9aa99de18c534cd
4555efd83da52a878d5e00b415a2524959420065
'2011-12-29T06:57:25-05:00'
describe
'31018' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
5c9980711447f63b3d7019877d62ea03
45fc72ec81eb47979ff10c05db628454f957cf74
'2011-12-29T06:59:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFR' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a2f4e6678cd426389e11d8bb4476a59b
2604114963c636f9866840fa2e5e780629987074
describe
'32281' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f30df2229cfa18a8881eecb65668b638
dbc57532f4a32aa30f355ad7fb4da7b1e76c5ac0
'2011-12-29T07:00:01-05:00'
describe
'30133' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
acaff3fe16dc632852a2d575b9b581de
df4c389c879b00d95c0f1aaafb00d744a41d7c15
'2011-12-29T07:00:21-05:00'
describe
'32460' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
78342ea167d5ba604cc836fa7d3f5c38
f70ff54526f1ea49a9236a99c58e8ddc6448f32b
describe
'34104' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFV' 'sip-files00028.pro'
08aed25b73de9cd9530b876bb2eb4695
eb5c90c53b7168917e07493455ead03f2c79bd24
describe
'34354' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ddbb4b57bf85d3c73e1709885f70ffc4
95835d6e900bb1468270753ea80e024a8c1a77a0
describe
'30469' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bd804bfdb35df75fc3b572a6305de723
d667c3f2ece6e9c5f56c82c269621433c6300af2
describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c63f817c54ad0dea6c0ac70f2f49afdc
62f28dd8be187ccb7660c209be6315523c1e11fe
'2011-12-29T07:00:37-05:00'
describe
'31042' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHFZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
54648bc93ebe203751c2e3a950e3cbe1
b5ef376de02cc7c1308e4f22bb5ab8db476d6c72
'2011-12-29T06:57:58-05:00'
describe
'33415' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ef0f8cec2838e349611c5f1764500bb9
ffb1ecc6a87d8acda30aad9d6a646e5c3a46bf5e
'2011-12-29T07:00:08-05:00'
describe
'34472' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8c8fd11c021e2b2cfb3f4e7af2ab6519
0c09847e414261bf94c5488e0c6a7f656ad0f94b
describe
'33650' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
92f233aaa61ed8256e0efb723ae04e1f
0ea860e0f984306d1f09801cee59be092d19c191
describe
'13934' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
9f02fa5a87cfea8f899c8da0938c45fe
a9dae9952ebf6b25cb220bc6666f703be50f55dd
'2011-12-29T07:00:29-05:00'
describe
'27264' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGE' 'sip-files00037.pro'
276ff5a2816a53da528cfa2a5d3b5de5
beb9e732d47343339398217b5ab0bac101833b5a
describe
'30746' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
87b944aca3f69f61ae0731f13161a49d
21723f77cb69cccf9a57d4b8283494ddafe7aa85
'2011-12-29T06:57:06-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGG' 'sip-files00039.pro'
696607083859e2bb73e848c9c5df0007
af4cde34b1f4dbe7c537e5958010676322ec4b16
'2011-12-29T06:58:02-05:00'
describe
'32191' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGH' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f40238507181a8b6068122be5bdaf9e5
f6ce38ee7d13c29c796731765fa1886a0805db10
'2011-12-29T06:58:29-05:00'
describe
'33602' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGI' 'sip-files00042.pro'
0af75bc04260a22838802ff3c015c3cf
6ef6c919f6475c68fe1c408062b215e711850464
'2011-12-29T07:01:36-05:00'
describe
'31512' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
03c81c989546dcdd06330061233ae4b7
8273fcad88138bd90029d658db223781edfc693b
describe
'30956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGK' 'sip-files00044.pro'
28549e5e2c0cb3873456d506013a72ba
256bef51b6ad61917490a6387071872e13741da9
'2011-12-29T07:01:53-05:00'
describe
'31625' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
88103015d67346b7c76a0816dfc86ab5
b1860e77ef0cadedbbe637247209b9d7822fbf9e
'2011-12-29T07:01:32-05:00'
describe
'32535' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGM' 'sip-files00046.pro'
6407eea5cdd4d6b02ad6eae684929a92
1f88c42dc3e5084d1e4b76f29b42b408800144c9
describe
'33649' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGN' 'sip-files00047.pro'
f91c37ce501553b4414490a362440032
64d480b3be5d8f9bb0ec19f7e538230c7a5cd76f
'2011-12-29T06:55:39-05:00'
describe
'32115' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
eaf4bd7d31ed19041d38912fc747f8a9
b10460eb6d95207efd4283ebfee486ec4102a98e
'2011-12-29T07:00:53-05:00'
describe
'34657' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
eefa6d1b3440b74c7595872acb0c7912
8c3d94464bd42f37e869d211b97bb7d2e9a3b5d9
'2011-12-29T06:56:40-05:00'
describe
'13448' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
67d214623d5a8a2cb488e5f2cdf97f11
5ebf662a8d27045b2bf3c12d80fc7a2ef745e4d9
describe
'32202' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
3d867ce8ac4acb1eac9e219acf107995
f42574f2a266a65f36488f4185e683fe061b4f9a
'2011-12-29T07:00:20-05:00'
describe
'31588' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
e8ec29d348f539f5890b4059a67c7fe2
35cd622053a92c8f9cdfee6ba8a84a53b4b518b0
describe
'31761' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8bcc610fae5a55cd573a72de56da7999
0958155cd0fa3f8b334f217a6284b4686a054188
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGU' 'sip-files00054.pro'
f7896cc130cd4e5704926fec6fddcfc3
b66c33aad52f1fa12382cba9a19eb363e99e3f23
describe
'31552' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
7133f15cc37f062b0500cd281eaa726e
5dba32f0a4636ea684c2fa0699219c8300b8973b
'2011-12-29T06:57:27-05:00'
describe
'31770' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
976ad36be1a87ce0848417e5f2fe1c1b
b5faf70c4f8267ee92f712acb9c1d4c86b551667
describe
'33315' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
886a5ad5c0f2be51114a6acf03f324ca
2af8cb5d4f559c1afb39c80fd154788a4f1b0c25
describe
'33605' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGY' 'sip-files00058.pro'
8250c7850b6232673ec7d4dcef4b46f6
8938781171862f1c08055ee60834d42959e7b6f9
describe
'19634' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHGZ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
05c24b24347798fdc6d50c32cb73565b
b914d76fe5a2ca9b32578e7b043f318f85048391
'2011-12-29T07:01:19-05:00'
describe
'26899' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
1c41a067b1eb9b116725b046c6bd1514
e6d0c9398f7d961d49e0c39ac16c678bea0a1a4a
'2011-12-29T06:56:50-05:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHB' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6fd9c503de9dd16c80801dc30f9a6cb2
216c13fe6bad6f71218e1f94987015fcef03665b
'2011-12-29T06:58:05-05:00'
describe
'35944' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHC' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d97deb78affdf9798aa8485f1f344b50
2772ee64038cb938fe7b35d2847fb5d8042229ca
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
8394e045ab964e210f4560b27bc45555
16df9b30049328beb2cef61ee68196d00e5991a4
describe
'32934' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHE' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4aa4bd0216dd409861e8968ba66fda5d
ed1403cbe0a4a164fda6169b72544ca0edb039ed
'2011-12-29T06:59:05-05:00'
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1da64ebd0647917f59d11ca21ca44831
25b6530132e40cdfc538008f38ee2664de8db959
'2011-12-29T06:57:22-05:00'
describe
'32757' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
dca28bd5599c64668a1b49c2d65327e3
f9a920d1d88f5565e5c20fbe27fbf4322036515a
describe
'28900' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
0d1576ad333c64f3c7f9637cff53f7da
81ff33491ce858a07708459cd7d8d8848f463d3d
describe
'32562' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
3c643f63543a92a8de57ab246e7bf5e4
34e61d1377b4fe449fa1687a21911cadcb5c9c49
'2011-12-29T06:56:04-05:00'
describe
'32103' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
d11fc29b00008a1d771edabc7cd27b94
7036a914b958254f1f3ab1d9f3047cfb8c1b6b3d
describe
'32131' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHK' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4f631478cca6eaddac8334819a97c2f8
b9777b0a89fe1619b1ef0b9c5b26b1f55871ce5c
'2011-12-29T07:00:03-05:00'
describe
'32159' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHL' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ce86c5036e382201a20c967c7d3cbd97
506f3f6f07d9de35b8e229cc187a98b8df826e4f
'2011-12-29T06:59:35-05:00'
describe
'34599' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
fd7008f15bae34e5bc8004f9ae72209a
baa8d006a7b797949cd01e68adcee970e18fd6a3
'2011-12-29T07:00:09-05:00'
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
3331b4cd76bfadbea2d14f72d2ab0b0d
4c014da34f566381276b636bf751b09dfe55df5b
describe
'31785' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
02eea94a5f34a158f19103c7f96d2f3c
3e3b98bf2d2be7e012226bb26f8d330944865372
'2011-12-29T06:59:10-05:00'
describe
'32592' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
e8825a281d8652dde67683ed9be2ba13
a1a8f5c249eed13181005a4dc26db6d67f0c8579
describe
'31853' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
72a83ec46e6883a9710e55a06738a47e
64ef3605af6bf8a0b67888ef1def96fccf4671ac
'2011-12-29T07:01:15-05:00'
describe
'32713' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHR' 'sip-files00078.pro'
80150fdd7cfd905381d49adf1931cb66
db1602f7ae2939fe41fe5df2fa45ab9fce88be09
'2011-12-29T06:58:28-05:00'
describe
'31611' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHS' 'sip-files00079.pro'
83edb4b65e9554fb204b123ec17331c4
4c9afa77e2506a84aea743b1ae460b6a2950fe5e
describe
'30606' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
c50c5cbef035fb5faa89cc7bd8f28fc1
1f658f29448f3e7157510876a78ce9a78b7334df
describe
'31487' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c56fd7f9e9a7c742e3ab2e645f9b8e44
4b9a8564c70d8753e7677ea79cc6c69d798b6863
describe
'31083' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
16152a14cf0d37f1f22aa818e5ddd82e
038dc6f8801f109d6aac5864186d7ea022fe20d8
describe
'29517' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
bb64186397441ab426cd399f99686f10
2d8742c5f5cadea145a9b22bf28c2e69809b10a2
describe
'14410' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHX' 'sip-files00084.pro'
ca88d990d1244ab4f79444ede6c4ce40
8399de826c696d095ddcd3c60623296eead07793
'2011-12-29T06:59:11-05:00'
describe
'27302' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHY' 'sip-files00085.pro'
dd9921925252fee334192732554bb7be
f812d5b1bcc3fa864fd7d38037952a2392ff955c
describe
'26183' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHHZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b2849d6809a2bb8fae821bfc5e8c0492
6f54211db3cd0cce57f0463ed13a4b8628fb8be6
describe
'35257' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIA' 'sip-files00087.pro'
6286558708dfd11e3b58ab2778490407
8302d509e237bd34eda30dbf887a5125ad1308b9
describe
'31663' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIB' 'sip-files00088.pro'
7df91b7a6277ce99c0506981b530a5b7
b966b961310298d27f81aa4aa440cbc80f6e0f77
describe
'34922' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIC' 'sip-files00089.pro'
647620437773aaf979cb1b6d7ca55ddb
7da77986aeb61a8ff3535394b8646294eb98c37f
describe
'29671' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHID' 'sip-files00090.pro'
88fb28e6a4ceb9da9e463b0c2e444b86
1960a6f116d8e074dfd5b39e1928f57a8a374c54
describe
'19912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
27f38db8f661da53203ed7065731b693
6eb568d62c3afd840e288881ad80f57686af013a
'2011-12-29T06:56:49-05:00'
describe
'30881' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
5909c05cbbd26c465b71e8bdb35f0f26
8bcc96c81a59b5562e223120792d35ac1e590e1f
describe
'29087' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
ad956fb2173925cf692132864e398d9e
be93d136d6eb2ceeefdfb4c5a7150e8d53006a36
'2011-12-29T06:57:33-05:00'
describe
'32759' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIH' 'sip-files00094.pro'
1a0676cdd215668d3b09a7b88533028b
ba05c4a1a4ca4ef927bac519ae8222e6cf46fe73
'2011-12-29T06:55:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHII' 'sip-files00096.pro'
7bc8357331bea7482f846f80cd2f5448
f2ade2aa9578b6072ac8a34634aecdd2bc440202
describe
'23546' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIJ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
e5616c1b9daba5b87ee622eebe23e1a3
6301a99226fe05b16973d3843f74dda6318fc1d9
describe
'27174' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e7294b43202e5eff461ed107a653ea77
44e6aad34344cc8157d43165c2f4212ecde5e785
'2011-12-29T06:59:25-05:00'
describe
'32284' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
799e651f484a119c989c8f4a8d081806
07677851795ad77938bb4259141d0c414690e250
'2011-12-29T07:00:23-05:00'
describe
'31883' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
7efc12b242a407703b8b2f4706324167
af9fab36eae2d0b24111c5f813d235aa47d1e15b
'2011-12-29T06:57:01-05:00'
describe
'28148' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIN' 'sip-files00101.pro'
93b48a5938aded1f906fd14de3ca0d7b
4e1c6c45f8f9b65245ca65234008fd7175ec9b4a
describe
'28774' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIO' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1dbf7aa3a634f9e221d8b784e4cd824d
04735df72b7a6843671f3d4a752363a2ab1dc372
describe
'31288' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIP' 'sip-files00103.pro'
775fd231931500664d4124855233743d
25fb424a77d01f4cda2a743646f4a158b188afa9
'2011-12-29T06:59:03-05:00'
describe
'32813' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ee511556ff1f429fe5301dd050036ba5
dac8629adcd982baf28a31484213b10e0a43421d
describe
'20609' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
4ecf0c1ac9e2b02275a72cefda3281f2
9c862ced498cf3b1dfff6e50fdb1bc396563603c
describe
'27679' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
0afbe82102a9535ae9e4680f2b5d2ca5
9c06ed99e6eb9c4dcf238b4b8226698b4486c547
describe
'32989' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIT' 'sip-files00107.pro'
b657acf559fd51304378033c36faed24
c28de4c7bf8b200f976326529fa5d6ddf55768c8
'2011-12-29T06:56:06-05:00'
describe
'33405' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIU' 'sip-files00108.pro'
eedc0160d2bed553fed6a61954516ad2
f2b8a290c86bdf0a272f2982592ea4e0ed419ad8
describe
'33977' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
e04e8077bd4451dff48c1965d66b6bf3
28b905873575adcfb4a5272a3e0e67d9677f83a6
'2011-12-29T06:58:51-05:00'
describe
'14848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
619d983f164791113cefa55bf9fa3537
f73f9d6e050fe4fa1cabab70c149e9b325060c11
describe
'35105' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
01a21d2dc592eac3a489ff8db6875a08
1733a768b0e2951f4271307b180e68b9c2f0ffa9
'2011-12-29T06:57:53-05:00'
describe
'30948' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
26b6696c20743e4a2438f4a4c0a1f58d
45d3804ad94aced7c08b8127dee52c807c4aed91
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHIZ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
82298292908afc1758c08ae82a3f14dc
51b2d3dd26f354820a62a2f5e15d3df598769fb8
describe
'33172' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJA' 'sip-files00115.pro'
85fe670aaa61ec6c4d613dacd0d73f07
de9183f696edb0b9acd0fd9e582ccc0e9a7816f4
describe
'31155' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJB' 'sip-files00116.pro'
db99bbb3cf5b91977fcf8844056c1332
e8217f013a534523c6b6bfcb589b2abfdf8a5329
describe
'33863' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJC' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5d914d86a1dac76c0f20f7b640c3259b
3dd8282dcbc1d0282964f403fb266b0f57ef6bb4
'2011-12-29T07:00:15-05:00'
describe
'32350' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJD' 'sip-files00118.pro'
d76f165faf16c2f6f1314dbcb28e7fcd
effb9a2515d76e48ceab2e009e78db36aa4cb171
describe
'32356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJE' 'sip-files00119.pro'
426c137f4d1e09cdeacbd47468f0ec56
4922daeaae3c9e3d960e100c1d83c10f14e62ed0
describe
'32558' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJF' 'sip-files00120.pro'
09f4e26c14da541bf0fd96baebf6bde7
13d460cf5766af6ffc9ee2646c8951debf3ed662
'2011-12-29T06:55:56-05:00'
describe
'31699' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJG' 'sip-files00121.pro'
3b6a8dea2ad68a827208da94cf72cdb0
d4079b49cbf74118678eec8ab8aabc067a421aae
describe
'30763' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJH' 'sip-files00122.pro'
ca03e19171a11b42ec775ccc070c4e5b
7424238cb49bcf9114cf98a4fa546f62a4efc8a6
describe
'30897' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
556aeb283d4ebb1d32aae83838ef3583
44c92aefa2f0f065d109bff92bc831fbbe3962d9
describe
'32779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJJ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
2ccbe8faf5f74efd93d3e0caef17df26
6ae332cd96fcaf680d64818b675dfa56a1c7f0cc
describe
'31711' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
ac1d2927d706ff7dcad3c5f12f02e70e
a948fce1b77e8d680d406221e4cf5218b447bae4
describe
'20431' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJL' 'sip-files00126.pro'
eaf34ef7bb2720f4b2faf983a7776f71
707979810e18e4e98664c28587a1740bdc6dcd2e
'2011-12-29T06:56:58-05:00'
describe
'26115' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
43bb420727db17e88e0190c7c6ea9a59
af79815aa0d97c4915f7c28979cf7cf2b05a3d26
describe
'30667' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJN' 'sip-files00128.pro'
aa91b935ed8c27a70cb159de2fec05a8
f4169affd547d3527c13a56750c8ab41011da434
describe
'31247' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
9363acc8a344a6deb378d7126ce2f6c2
3fc0d24a72c61c34e1b1ae491fbbda9a134cd306
describe
'28790' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
a8cdd7f8211b2ccfc3247e06fa1f3612
567c75ea6ebb986e8e9d53f0f69f639329d84f87
describe
'30908' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
27770a6e9f44a0c7cb06103debcba239
32e8a3e4c85135ee34ed4c20bc49db8d0db14da4
describe
'36035' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJR' 'sip-files00132.pro'
61592b59aad5cd863b8ded511a70240e
6145626fd314abe56e7dfde66cc6e103f9383572
'2011-12-29T07:01:38-05:00'
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
8be5b289a4becfe2358ce868ac1aaad9
1ca7d12e78299c5b7c9c84067d9d1987a7c1c1ff
describe
'14839' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJT' 'sip-files00134.pro'
fc96050ef319009e41af4cb820155cfb
ef52bf013b6478408ea1aa3126a29a1d38494ed9
describe
'34605' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJU' 'sip-files00135.pro'
8a430807dbff01080ac59299cbbf339e
e7f78ba1785115990b2323a8ac5327f703514456
describe
'32229' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJV' 'sip-files00136.pro'
b6b406c1efa7840b591439efeef0836e
48eed6caf49dc1e9559066ac0822d790e25688e8
'2011-12-29T07:00:54-05:00'
describe
'27478' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJW' 'sip-files00137.pro'
e729a52a6b72763688af302e49d247fc
abe19bf80529cc0f5f485b0593393f3575b754b7
describe
'30093' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJX' 'sip-files00138.pro'
4221cbd4c60577ab356b6f6d096fe683
78046996e0455409fbca734e1b0f4ef5d5833b97
describe
'31803' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
988c05226c8e2cb6a65f0d13cb72f731
294f6980e60f8972219c6281eba9aa049634992e
describe
'19382' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHJZ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3e9339529eb113340915690761dce19b
bed553d45426a79b90ac7aca90aecda9cee94e54
'2011-12-29T07:00:26-05:00'
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKA' 'sip-files00141.pro'
fa28a8327d226a3709b48d3f4c5d2281
f7973886592665a31051c7b207c2c4e353e17942
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
4b4191bdac0ff9d3ff993f06960e98d8
318098b3e1323a46fd53c033bb1967c86434e60d
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKC' 'sip-files00143.pro'
b80a9c13e7d0bb6dd3f11346319fa5b4
2f84088394dd760117268acf782649878eac9f2b
'2011-12-29T07:01:07-05:00'
describe
'31389' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKD' 'sip-files00144.pro'
7dc85992d826d2094b81c26c1991f8fd
22c8f94fdf3e976f87152184cb28431f986ded49
describe
'14612' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKE' 'sip-files00145.pro'
2291d061ef695fcbf85fa9beb48d9c0f
3615a7a61b6b59a38479b739984764814f77bafd
describe
'22621' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKF' 'sip-files00146.pro'
3cfc1b7b51e427f998be4739f2b3b125
a8555353fc822293504dd59ac4bca9fdb452287f
'2011-12-29T06:58:31-05:00'
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKG' 'sip-files00148.pro'
348ddb5d9e25c209486deb552ad3c698
bfc664de45132a9d8a9fade7c1747c1196b29b6b
'2011-12-29T06:59:46-05:00'
describe
'29747' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
3e600fb4f31d4262098fd854cb73ca52
c9fd4e754fc7e2112966da1b06d17b743a8ed5b7
describe
'31158' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKI' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d7a70763ec883f9c18da7f4cceefbeb8
0b68adb75fc97cf3a1cf3fec37bbeca35a39f2f1
'2011-12-29T06:58:59-05:00'
describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKJ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
56ee17fa7f20057a0d652296b1a645e2
77afae33cff9041e55f8b0adc95dbf893afeddfa
describe
'32238' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKK' 'sip-files00152.pro'
59ec1059b4f8863aa6a800b5e0baef4c
4ee13fb7edab48c09f62dc2267e8fa182f49fb0d
'2011-12-29T06:57:52-05:00'
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKL' 'sip-files00153.pro'
18de64832e7cc7d4567dcd88c2a40212
1f019f08d35ee5389ce6268e51e0dc15c3cf0807
describe
'10957' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKM' 'sip-files00154.pro'
be52ce26cf1015118687e29ce53adb74
66a4bff6fd56f7fe351c5babfe6f79129d24885b
describe
'32511' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKN' 'sip-files00155.pro'
bfedb3c5f1285d1d8d21bad74204d386
cb2c04840b81837029b61bd667424371c73f954c
'2011-12-29T06:59:30-05:00'
describe
'36397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKO' 'sip-files00156.pro'
640d5e50d7f2ffc97b4aee41258cf7b4
567a54b861fcc28a89663d85c3fef0e201cdbe70
describe
'28784' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKP' 'sip-files00157.pro'
250ae9b692460523f3c9cd2b604bfe90
643c65e6fa0365e4c83ff0cac3191467ab9ac676
'2011-12-29T06:57:19-05:00'
describe
'29983' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKQ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
95108433c9eed4f2d6aa24acc2bbcfbe
1bbb01baec7f750ab0fb40180b6cc96807b1fad2
'2011-12-29T06:58:08-05:00'
describe
'31439' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKR' 'sip-files00159.pro'
3b75e6947fff1470aaeca15a6604ba89
fed1b712968411e1febd4310b70e0184f24da3b7
'2011-12-29T06:57:31-05:00'
describe
'33819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKS' 'sip-files00160.pro'
3f462abc279e20d0c69c297714118872
c24afdafb3d8d3a5015c62d5fd58828e4a292593
'2011-12-29T06:57:47-05:00'
describe
'30646' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKT' 'sip-files00161.pro'
225f692963651bf764f902a5ff12772d
858a839d67e8e88862efbec084b05ac44bafbdcc
describe
'31833' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
b174d0089698118c15951a1af15014b3
7951b0ab14f761724a0bbe05c6f9af37103d81b3
describe
'35607' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKV' 'sip-files00163.pro'
dcbae02ed41ed610c723e71cdb722dda
3f35a17f6ebc4bc44f237b3ff75f3d5aac186cd6
describe
'30357' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKW' 'sip-files00164.pro'
51b57f46aa01f21416df69e2ccfa568a
6efd446b0345fa1c3faed0520c376ef3bd483a71
describe
'30995' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKX' 'sip-files00165.pro'
3d643e1937f3e52fbdf77374377f90f0
ef4ce3ba3e9a594e10f936a4007c27b1a877e04f
'2011-12-29T07:01:14-05:00'
describe
'27863' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKY' 'sip-files00166.pro'
bac89745098ece5318bf99292b723573
476dde157a54cd80ff98274485e5ac591092753e
describe
'15622' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHKZ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
2ce9d28bb75c214cc2356a96f09be648
8bbf384002839cdce5c4487c00ff43fdd0e2a35f
describe
'24339' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLA' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4a220e56682a1ede5e8e1284bd2f1c84
5f3328dccbf04c4b392477cdda34edaa6d5bbef4
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLB' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ba31a839ca751cb37b753284296ddc2e
2822c1534e1af2ff655dbcac5fdc7398e5259e5a
'2011-12-29T07:01:49-05:00'
describe
'31079' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLC' 'sip-files00170.pro'
26da14cfa90705851752549a959d4cc8
4d624a624b76bdd5492cdcd91b753abe64629214
'2011-12-29T06:57:50-05:00'
describe
'12328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLD' 'sip-files00171.pro'
14808088905118db23c0cd06ee792b25
cadbae3e9d1a436d600fa00ee4d4abff1b58b6c6
describe
'30957' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLE' 'sip-files00172.pro'
f1aeec04b472cf0807e59dc286470375
84321ca0c41d211f9349e6d040a73be58ae9166c
describe
'32370' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLF' 'sip-files00173.pro'
a959957a8b1bcd47a245cf8fb30f6209
f803881c022d072518ce0e7c069aed9fb9a6a5c1
describe
'31046' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLG' 'sip-files00174.pro'
113016626b5390ef95c3b7b00ccc26f9
685b9a9a7c3fe090a675f6147a3fe82ac6359aac
describe
'35751' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLH' 'sip-files00175.pro'
b94464ccf4b2661e91ac08c703570e42
24a8834c3bceb6094e3be04f72ca82256fc0c9f6
'2011-12-29T06:58:55-05:00'
describe
'33618' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLI' 'sip-files00176.pro'
fdce448aa2cd12413c4112ef378f313a
741f81b921eba07013c23c599f37d57fe10094b6
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLJ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
b9074f6bbf9b6a709a0e296b3c658ab3
dd6dea5621e621172675db846ad85a045aa5c949
describe
'30060' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLK' 'sip-files00179.pro'
e791541fad0ad25088d135998b9e1e89
cb739b9e290211eaaf1758c1273090e2ab5f7047
describe
'29918' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLL' 'sip-files00180.pro'
f5f58170eb5584e35117bbcb5975d71c
48e77289939cb5a539a79be56f55e556a59c493b
describe
'34032' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLM' 'sip-files00181.pro'
771975f3c4c5dac88d4441f7bde23b34
2dc0f40be4ddbf1c5698cf29596fa30ad66f87cb
'2011-12-29T06:56:56-05:00'
describe
'32520' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLN' 'sip-files00182.pro'
ddbc225fc83e41baae3f75a72e79fab9
11784b8ac66c0bbf4b60c4f85eee6d6a073d2fe3
describe
'31351' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLO' 'sip-files00183.pro'
e99c77dff7add367bc04972e89312e42
09ddadf062025b2106801d069fed4828550fb2ae
'2011-12-29T06:57:48-05:00'
describe
'28255' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLP' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ecd95caf2c85040cc16d61ffd4c8a048
f6b2437a535779505a7e97b88ef1dd9464157a23
describe
'29761' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
652e5852d72b1dafba4103f62b66ae1a
f3afa3956885b10697551a1108c914b323cfb86c
describe
'23422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLR' 'sip-files00186.pro'
93803b67e046e7502e8254d061030bac
a55b13e9d23e917b3e7d1fd8126e0e7fe5f9b8ba
describe
'25761' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLS' 'sip-files00187.pro'
a6279c4a6998e6c3de5d47f879518809
285170643718d02ce6e8d312a46b70beed6ca359
describe
'31683' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLT' 'sip-files00188.pro'
3604bd0cb9ecd6b8bd00ff327bee7d15
c20065d71abb5e72b87728ff4ce4fa32c65d91ff
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLU' 'sip-files00189.pro'
08fcbeb587bce743814c4fc0044c4afd
b58d62c0b699f030b90203af1807b4997ec105b2
'2011-12-29T06:57:24-05:00'
describe
'32688' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLV' 'sip-files00191.pro'
131179064a141b447f92af4fe796f995
c54c2582e85ebe73d90d4c567146baf06981a30c
describe
'32138' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLW' 'sip-files00192.pro'
0285a3ec6dfe029fab73455c0e4c01a1
eb1146cb7675b3197694bad3a0c025bc59735291
'2011-12-29T07:01:03-05:00'
describe
'30502' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLX' 'sip-files00193.pro'
8671c518a06da5f4a4d874eec4c94bc0
cc1e43960b1b330b8e803ab7867db85390e9f0b9
describe
'31315' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLY' 'sip-files00194.pro'
896ea404f226114c327d9d312a9a7edf
ee800d73540893c7b3c2fd3c26e2e6bf7c85e678
describe
'33942' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHLZ' 'sip-files00195.pro'
d3dc8bd2a3138b278bf51ba21559e526
069135fa132774956fd026f832bbbb63bd83d9d9
describe
'34350' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMA' 'sip-files00196.pro'
fab2a978384c4f23d5dcbd86ca102ba9
706826240914a434824c2950e9417f973321e63a
'2011-12-29T07:01:02-05:00'
describe
'13237' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMB' 'sip-files00197.pro'
2c22273435b0918cae88b6b1d6b5c3ef
ff4e508b96a607cca720238e646b7921855aae10
'2011-12-29T07:00:34-05:00'
describe
'33460' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMC' 'sip-files00198.pro'
b2dee2f99d3543fe928cf98109cb6fd5
b86de071b733a3d05f192141695e37e5b7701363
describe
'31416' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMD' 'sip-files00199.pro'
4ef8d677212ce0af4718b98170b4e9de
1b63974f4f4c0774426cb36c2d991859e617abe3
describe
'29867' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHME' 'sip-files00200.pro'
5b43dea26e0d183cc2948f941d70700b
0a741f2147a35ac760c710506a68dab4da44d74d
'2011-12-29T06:58:36-05:00'
describe
'30440' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
266e91441db736f467d973222dc317f7
6b787b4010715e0a7112405f667e2fe1b00e1665
describe
'32951' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMG' 'sip-files00202.pro'
7310611de7d344ba427bd6c17538fc95
f80d2e46017b8d7e7356e6d8a2a846961ce48577
describe
'31586' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMH' 'sip-files00203.pro'
7bba423548e43ac557ed40293038d07a
16bab7fa01fa76bf9647f337c2ea4685d34abc20
describe
'31713' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMI' 'sip-files00204.pro'
150675db62e95efad69b4054247a1a71
461945256dc57e8acfb76d5456ad97ad4a6ee58f
describe
'33586' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMJ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
e26d9147b86d7810142e8652608f7467
c635c1f7f4d612c2bf11f3fab1a9782cc67ec3e6
describe
'32307' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMK' 'sip-files00206.pro'
39427823756a336f69d2e35a6a3d9d53
4bf7067efafdd029c14a83b13de491624ed1f1d2
describe
'31476' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHML' 'sip-files00207.pro'
1c1d1e0ee839ab9645aebcdf81d605c0
1b044e043605b2e104479604f31632678643656e
'2011-12-29T06:57:38-05:00'
describe
'15753' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMM' 'sip-files00208.pro'
8e3db8269c0bdeab10ac3bc4b3d8b02c
8a37c75e2b089e23d28ce2497a2b8461b8a37fcd
'2011-12-29T07:00:41-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMN' 'sip-files00210.pro'
1b7f4c304c09d4afbd351f972ebbe186
1b328b1d10c001a27c1b5903ef264cd1c3595525
describe
'25678' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
ea17e2d8dd7ee04a6357e8502ccd8884
6aa84f600556ff9d006c5166fd64d480cead6271
describe
'30257' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMP' 'sip-files00212.pro'
f8d6e91d507865d18d488178c9dd3f5b
936cc9b2b51ad276bb45e412b21d52ac377d7790
describe
'33598' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMQ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
34f0460088fae3c90acdb86f2b9d052f
63991c94f303a90bee4830b90ee551569d8846e9
describe
'30624' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMR' 'sip-files00214.pro'
aca7ebb9b2f1176f18c3f2940fd63b5b
23b9646b2b2e1b793f2dd05c1c45182608dc79bb
describe
'12000' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMS' 'sip-files00215.pro'
c60dd1f9a4d4d7a5bd202727e7935573
9e1648435bd3370ece595feda4dbafe8d6178d35
'2011-12-29T06:59:43-05:00'
describe
'30386' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMT' 'sip-files00216.pro'
6dfa2b4a107ab3714091e5bdcac82511
6b5d5cc3a14141613960a9d21f16cf0ee550b92a
describe
'28950' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMU' 'sip-files00217.pro'
9beb4c871aee58b302c3dbd5cf027324
a2a017cf67f143d69bf40cba363e87cd23c620ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMV' 'sip-files00218.pro'
1a75da828c419f1961ea515aaa78dd52
9ff18932bd30a7fffd97c4f6487718c94769d305
'2011-12-29T07:00:14-05:00'
describe
'28627' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMW' 'sip-files00219.pro'
c95ca2ac371b169bdab5f7fdd9e1102f
5d22a65b296f9f1496c2e7b2ca90862e621bfc38
'2011-12-29T06:58:09-05:00'
describe
'30262' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMX' 'sip-files00220.pro'
e0886f21c0d3f81f142a4263fc54f450
6636cf16ffb3130df6fdcb1b18c3a8526d466508
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMY' 'sip-files00221.pro'
a7f28d9cee16c5c7bbeb84984ae5fc36
821b08e41c9d626a3ad6054b3683b70b21adc179
'2011-12-29T06:55:50-05:00'
describe
'31320' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHMZ' 'sip-files00222.pro'
306910f4f5f93155ec6b7790fb50b8ff
c7741b89a847fcc2fab85baaacd54330f6870e37
'2011-12-29T06:55:42-05:00'
describe
'31203' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNA' 'sip-files00223.pro'
9870775b8a7f84592f08b5e2c77ea3d0
e4948ce3ab9c65c21b219d01809a90b82e5f2e3b
'2011-12-29T06:58:56-05:00'
describe
'32165' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNB' 'sip-files00224.pro'
2651e92f7881f2a04a93a685066aadc1
c1be805fe62c08ac17e17a3068227d432d5b6b99
describe
'33384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNC' 'sip-files00225.pro'
a5d5d39b6e31a55c42e7b1b054991ad0
de5853cf512ee71dc2e503f1a29397009a2a4ee4
describe
'30416' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHND' 'sip-files00226.pro'
29d3477c2c58462bf2765ebdd6ebc3d7
d651737cfba77c94092e89508cd77453cf201d52
describe
'30641' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNE' 'sip-files00227.pro'
e9fc38604399b76499a320c7cd0c79e8
b91506e0938e9587d5f08980f1188439fc40b2fb
'2011-12-29T07:01:43-05:00'
describe
'31887' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNF' 'sip-files00228.pro'
d414e6a644d47b87752dec53b33a57c8
b35797225ab39ae0e291bfba17f8ed4335c7db7b
describe
'33773' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNG' 'sip-files00229.pro'
24880721f883fe8a4986f71142396311
7ad901cf2f9485d11994cc6572b109987fdfb502
'2011-12-29T06:56:57-05:00'
describe
'6400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNH' 'sip-files00230.pro'
75615b8851d6362eff709afd3b5077b5
103e8928a674ca0f19b1e9f599ff7771e7473a80
describe
'24502' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNI' 'sip-files00231.pro'
71d6dbf2d24175ab0ff9c9d676f00f49
58becf0df097572f4c568c360b7780712f2f6e35
'2011-12-29T07:00:25-05:00'
describe
'34126' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNJ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
1fb4409417f1d6e83851668fafd84e5d
ce77c1d797ffddb8467619bc818ffde4262f8924
'2011-12-29T06:56:20-05:00'
describe
'31982' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNK' 'sip-files00233.pro'
fc2d3a145858f8137c1a18c63b39ff1b
fbfb74479bee802f50239d553fc68c3551649609
describe
'36028' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNL' 'sip-files00234.pro'
4a7d5238de0fb1c075e17aaf9a7477ce
a34a0d8d551e52503170f26ee3f05c93861678af
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNM' 'sip-files00236.pro'
ed6d8e9fc7a7de7e2045a5f3d0a58555
ae99251f3fd54ebcfce58f6dc5b9fe8a631a363c
'2011-12-29T07:01:22-05:00'
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNN' 'sip-files00237.pro'
aa487cafbec9ac8d5355a1bcc159dd6a
db23efa55b3e0599dc22a1a766e177a48d7363b1
describe
'32121' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNO' 'sip-files00238.pro'
bf8859aa3a0fc7720b528f13c0aa1b27
d4735391ca704d63f397665168d2e8c488ca38b3
'2011-12-29T07:00:13-05:00'
describe
'29966' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNP' 'sip-files00239.pro'
bfbb128ba17622e363bd5a1932191bfe
4fa0072ad599254b19c7dd6ae8c777bb0901d8e7
describe
'35956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNQ' 'sip-files00240.pro'
78895ff825bdccce95a243906fa68474
e5496d684978116eb66fdedea4f417f8aa5e1e62
describe
'30343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNR' 'sip-files00241.pro'
86eef829cb0916744468011e103c8e3e
f87de695c91e6b582b9f76506495d2ef3b4c8559
describe
'30455' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNS' 'sip-files00242.pro'
84294a1738b602d2f35c7af5b6944530
2da0619245ded2650066d598917261ad21b0ac72
'2011-12-29T06:59:08-05:00'
describe
'33959' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNT' 'sip-files00243.pro'
cf28fb4503af689d436ea5d413c606ee
c2f3c234007b1633382f6a545525281ab2a69b4f
describe
'31706' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNU' 'sip-files00244.pro'
4b40f89a1a729028b1b535009cc09a40
b9a221dd002aa823ee599656dc9e19d94e145a1a
'2011-12-29T06:56:05-05:00'
describe
'31377' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNV' 'sip-files00245.pro'
e946dd0567b0579a53f9dfd006e46f6e
5e6ef5be5c3bf833e69821dfd91cad00b7f32c44
'2011-12-29T06:59:28-05:00'
describe
'33752' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNW' 'sip-files00246.pro'
a57b619784e69c97cb06c4192f0f7636
5a4f4ba816069be977ae8b9ef79b41055a39df28
'2011-12-29T06:58:40-05:00'
describe
'29463' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNX' 'sip-files00247.pro'
9b9f5a94ecc6902d7a60acd57f9b8461
84293c5676e7fb3c44443c8f7bee7bda4f1f9025
describe
'31613' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNY' 'sip-files00248.pro'
7c32bb592c454170c0e7b9bdc1367313
0d00d725851c0384dfeae232bab5e50133adb73c
'2011-12-29T07:01:30-05:00'
describe
'33317' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHNZ' 'sip-files00249.pro'
7ec3839bc73cc58ade98eb794a8dc496
c352f34ec81409ab32f95186125ec86554211f95
'2011-12-29T06:57:12-05:00'
describe
'30153' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOA' 'sip-files00250.pro'
63608c28e68f81f4bfdff876c65341b9
d322d12ac8afa47f6a4eef40717fe6cbad73bd8d
'2011-12-29T06:58:25-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOB' 'sip-files00252.pro'
cea586e517c662eb49718147e1272608
886a60d8f39458abc29a8d3f6c6361f5aa3c345a
describe
'27597' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOC' 'sip-files00253.pro'
2c30064c1c1d830e89a4ca8c5d114d17
993182ff5f568b0d77940ac89164324919363870
describe
'32852' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOD' 'sip-files00254.pro'
868129ca6d2151a29faaa14e7bb8a851
fe8faac595bfb93f66d9cabd778ff266d34c5475
describe
'33764' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOE' 'sip-files00255.pro'
b7207177ed4c82ae553383b95470d84e
4db4d4647bbddc2e15250df688fde0fa91175955
describe
'32758' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOF' 'sip-files00256.pro'
9c0ac8d968d2ed842cb230556472665d
b6e86832f49d5697e87b690f011f16505b7bce18
describe
'30521' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOG' 'sip-files00257.pro'
fe39fd7d075bce9b08f6524ba52a3c67
07fe311b10f7520fefcf5cd9c8d31ba85ec9e419
describe
'29435' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOH' 'sip-files00258.pro'
f8e08fe4e2d0c337403a227a3872a04d
9dd50a937db3e5f04bee3e28bbe33aab22506f17
'2011-12-29T07:01:23-05:00'
describe
'32982' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOI' 'sip-files00259.pro'
839fdb995784d4c0dd4be16b23c14f33
3614a7884ac8665aa98f5c3f604aa4ab304b54f0
'2011-12-29T06:59:04-05:00'
describe
'32166' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOJ' 'sip-files00260.pro'
a00ceac2d2342200434cc0636a9d19a1
29dac7f1ed98491f9913e83c44f0ec0d5338ff9e
describe
'31424' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOK' 'sip-files00261.pro'
cf39c7cffbf9f01a5c7f8e4382cd27a1
adf9e54bfa8c6e4b560cac8c6adcf8dbdccbfd51
describe
'29457' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOL' 'sip-files00262.pro'
836a344d5b5e687306b783f4c5f49f27
c072a52d537621902d7e22f6bf0f02ca1cc54879
describe
'32272' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOM' 'sip-files00263.pro'
d69f3a05250776c7be430a55d1731dd0
cf5373117905800001c749e75eb3efb0a5fcb175
describe
'12508' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHON' 'sip-files00264.pro'
8e98b9d4c2ab35c5393328a1e691f5d4
f03a17e87999f38a9faaac1dc9548f12e1d07c5a
'2011-12-29T06:57:55-05:00'
describe
'31841' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOO' 'sip-files00265.pro'
0a50d2854d29b08a09503b81c65f8328
9c83522dee3681da1e779050ac92081a334a9427
'2011-12-29T07:01:17-05:00'
describe
'29733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOP' 'sip-files00266.pro'
d4b89f8c9702e198871b511ce5756de3
c1a9d3c48b5d62bb4ddbbf91cd07624bfe5b07f5
describe
'30435' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOQ' 'sip-files00267.pro'
3b78ccb1f86a479ee724cf5b1e4a4ac6
bfe1d5e690f837d94ddc4f9f15afed76f6b8cd68
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOR' 'sip-files00268.pro'
f5a5f7cd9eb25771523e7742b3a8d21c
5dcac5a54a2884d4e60854c7cffad7b657ec2af8
'2011-12-29T06:56:45-05:00'
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOS' 'sip-files00275.pro'
f1096d5deccb29d97556414a26fc737f
5a7983b4041ec9eabad1909a3ac5c5a6394e9fad
describe
'496592' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOT' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
3d7645114db4a9ac0df0bd855745e868
b3a28fde1cd6b13d8fb2d37b96449cf89100ee38
'2011-12-29T07:01:40-05:00'
describe
'488027' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOU' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
38d7dcf246149430fb05dfb142dd0e38
d56f076b9047e56dd49602ae9fecee48954d031f
'2011-12-29T06:59:17-05:00'
describe
'427779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOV' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
5f1b684a9a5f77ac2425087c68b2b17a
8fa1402dbc2313156ba9cea3c5393ba7d68cfc72
'2011-12-29T06:56:51-05:00'
describe
'421131' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOW' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
8163d4dd42ba3244ed2e5fff3cc5577e
7c8bd66bc1a718533576a7be20b48b9874e5e059
describe
'418058' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOX' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
35921bb1394693a5e40907b1058d8131
fde27df5ef82f0eaab519228af13d3e822200200
describe
'423577' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
88761befd3335b81ba2680f13e3c2305
f87b78c05ec167f158f4bfff2e50042c3af68435
describe
'418186' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHOZ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e9650f85ad898fb0dc778b0f056eb90e
05725621c9a5b688ac913bd165f4a534ce401a47
describe
'418653' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPA' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d8aef39e6f67e325545068ea02059b7f
6c4c050f31d1660fa2df3644aae93a6db284c4d9
describe
'414410' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
77a85608cb177b6f6e5aa8e7cf8d4dc0
245aa6ffc6f86aa7c66677cca7909dbfddd50a4e
'2011-12-29T06:58:27-05:00'
describe
'417602' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
2a85b1803ab2b0c62fa31bd5cf3a7932
6900aa84a86492a0badd5d90610e7aa331bb6721
describe
'407584' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
92952661e9ba774712c9f257c7aa68b8
7cab2cf10221c6f933a1fad7b03150b45dea36fb
describe
'417401' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPE' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
02f72f25712262575558dec623e46a89
6f3cf937cd4d34abdc10df536971dea382cacc76
describe
'429433' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1b614c077bb9b513fe69c281813b334f
10b315b7db6570edc6f983d8bf5fa4b89d2e27e7
'2011-12-29T07:01:16-05:00'
describe
'423637' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cec2445bfc774db3868760d83fe7f83b
407f4fe7d403a8ced0eebea7cbf1425254341995
'2011-12-29T06:59:26-05:00'
describe
'429528' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPH' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
62033e4ca2a1cad055104fd6460790c5
142df1b4377aa83f237a1eeea5a402b30d7fe990
'2011-12-29T06:58:53-05:00'
describe
'422515' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
333e1f8a0fb8891f198a50dee568051a
d2162ab70aa8bafcdbe3d84a744e1aff4da5f526
describe
'429127' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPJ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
9986a18d735776bf286de4063d90913d
5474749e1b473e1723c9ce12f83073d4a3079aaa
describe
'418049' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
01ae2585ce51c1861e68bb15541140f4
6cbf83da3557b011eb3508f9efa39690a0c36858
describe
'415401' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPL' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d24f04ad6e2832c278848c637a4fa477
b4e96997a67c08256222057ce0f11964caa9a3e4
describe
'426497' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPM' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
8e7b7a99f4dbca9c9a4959a933dcac69
512c3333cd5e75b2bf68477dfefd0ce2bfc0db8e
'2011-12-29T06:55:46-05:00'
describe
'424509' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
fa402266476c213e646b5ecac5cbc23d
3ae3d0724830e698b52ffc728e1d88d9979c9a1f
describe
'432611' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ebeecfd3630a66fc7a2865e96a1412eb
e3b6e4c6986914a88b4a7adc3656a444a4334160
describe
'420889' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
2040f11687eade799e1cdbf6f50b7447
d66ddcf171240cb4337eefa75f1326161b10a282
describe
'415442' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ed26270f636483b3b08524a7e2f614e4
ff8890be002c5a08f860ed98c26e6db64e38d4f0
describe
'413170' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPR' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6e3350047b2ae0b4d837a8387481bd06
99889d756efb2fef7a828fffbf845d798ebf5cf5
describe
'427187' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
0634d3f9025a321104fede5a1575997c
ebde1fd3ed21261ff3b3d8db19b3985ad67324f9
describe
'416926' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPT' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ff129abd872e85384df8d0e4b6148b54
e47f072b3264ef0d11ebb062d2b0cad5f3c8531e
describe
'427454' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
3ef30d9d946731f1344268281228fa53
cb55c68598ea046994a4730f8112020120838ae5
describe
'430651' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPV' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f0c2e043d78dfc2c42d9395ef16f0461
aa3d94c6c5f7b923538c7c811a148850f99c2093
'2011-12-29T06:56:37-05:00'
describe
'429547' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
2085f6ccf6e937433b97e7922a33c1ef
8c148dfbeaac4ebbd8edb72fdbe2d4a1443a6979
describe
'434261' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPX' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
7a64cf65685098fc72eecc4575a8d035
8d67a1fcab2cb3eca476fbada28c6ff552d713ef
'2011-12-29T06:57:08-05:00'
describe
'433084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
bbf61caf4d9dcfe96b9f6b4de940d231
a62cf412de472af1ab688dfc6a40ec64302099c7
describe
'421821' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHPZ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
05740ad1354d91326bdd1ad0b56ce934
a4d8358929cf122e5b0a48d206a9cc970e5d08fb
describe
'430711' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
408db58bd800f10f3a4e6ad750bf6876
23844171bb60f3c83512f80ba30460b8d4d70a65
describe
'431713' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
6fbc20e2c2e5de732dacfc2292607fad
35b0710b6c192aaee2eeeda7383287f0c38b7be8
describe
'429346' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7208dbcaa7297d6b1294f5ed7810d8a2
a95880de69e92925513c03e4d80bb097f8f6ea5c
'2011-12-29T06:58:38-05:00'
describe
'437794' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4da2ea30b45f341f634f5bb1ecd107af
46a1a3475066171457c906157a01dac0dc2089bf
describe
'428398' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
653de72e16e31e0bafb5ef9a73d22482
8c0a4617408837a1c16762b79831e777d3649553
describe
'428382' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0a3061986b576822c953b979ea696853
49cdde3a403246d397549130487f755f80468ed9
'2011-12-29T06:59:15-05:00'
describe
'431662' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
ab0b4d37808df5cee563030be58e4096
d3e3cd973333df58b561550493c7ae1d12ae9596
describe
'430575' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
b286df4d65016e38683a931665547823
4c13d7b5c912f4aa4140d0cf9e1e2527a9fb3d26
describe
'433114' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQI' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9a6ba80c6e518774ece3b53284ed4753
bdf73a12fc8e0831d65f93b007b1d452826fd191
describe
'429582' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
43cecd864014fc9f8ba21ed74a7fc8f0
b01bea8c2995737586f4b71f0e82f01d8e23a111
'2011-12-29T07:00:39-05:00'
describe
'431916' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQK' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
8981f833dd4d3c156dfaba4a73ed7591
00da46a7bdc7ca58b81d36bd9a453740dbd2262b
describe
'435402' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
d3456ea732f568d4f3b7337a25d69d8a
be322fba771f832057cb2615508c263c2ea862ed
describe
'429371' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
87a27943744e5ac24f85d02689a0809e
29de32aa2f324917901aef65ef47d6eb7730b6c2
describe
'431893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9349dd98b3e11822073c7de788950fe4
816a0f672665c5bcf3df51af82438850fe7351a7
'2011-12-29T06:58:06-05:00'
describe
'428205' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c67e12407f00992b7f2995009622f524
c77423ffe11d2c3176b37a8b306201059154a56a
'2011-12-29T06:59:06-05:00'
describe
'428349' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQP' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
54fdff384879496893d41f6ce5ad30f7
ec46aaf69aa781c10b949cf99a179b392696feea
'2011-12-29T06:58:39-05:00'
describe
'427195' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
98b99602c08fed73ecf0e2b182631e34
5333693542e81d3888c15f4e407a8477dae342ea
describe
'426016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQR' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
2b4825c5f846dffee3296ef6fa8b934a
23e8aa895cd06550f6e53bd7244f53c281f2befb
'2011-12-29T07:01:34-05:00'
describe
'430487' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
785e7326564b120b2a693716dc2e46dd
ce327dd166144deb3933fac3bd3f3580b905bfc8
describe
'428377' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQT' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
26c434e5eb952d655128a2349ff40481
d498cab2d0debfba05fa0265ce7c421836d5281a
'2011-12-29T07:01:20-05:00'
describe
'429574' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQU' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
c67dbf6e20f19411943c2940954d5f81
62f71d7a38b764ef3270bdaf1e8e4f779e8c70f7
'2011-12-29T06:58:16-05:00'
describe
'434143' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQV' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5d0e0e08a97d7efaec6644dd07279716
94059a93cf3fafc680b960cdbedf58742eea4ea9
'2011-12-29T06:55:40-05:00'
describe
'420117' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQW' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7d20d109ac60931c8e5a9801513a8277
a06989ef10b80694ee1077901bdbf57c8103b0d9
describe
'426038' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQX' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
7d9da842d6b82b8ab2094d09c94d5246
db48ed46dccfa1f7060acaaf292b0a0002b0c370
describe
'427219' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5c3505c07a72b76a05bc891a9894a2e0
15abfff9985dda9feb49849140e25475826c58bb
describe
'429542' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHQZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e9247393e2d28d2149dc6356dc28397c
f3d7b7e6f4d6c2cb25ab9b4393c3af53b3d71f96
'2011-12-29T06:59:09-05:00'
describe
'427209' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRA' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4c17bc6af562830fb55fb047b6dde94e
192a588a7b0ca75c3dbcfe5a6f7146e1a9c74fac
describe
'428370' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
1a00cc916459d666482acbe3115a20b9
f318df84e5452e6d6bd21ab3ebdcff604b7daf19
describe
'430683' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a9804b87a24a3615960220533fdfd0c3
952273a8ce1ea6be43b6e6343c9a300d4250ab0a
describe
'434281' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRD' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
588f77a90d9b9c21f98266dd0e3b4eda
845f1ad7101fafd86c80582fc18fe25b6ded41b7
describe
'433115' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRE' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6807bb82c7665813bd3c379c89bfeb54
5ae8c7b3921ef900466eda3c7be1c9381cb26a0b
describe
'423677' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
75cfd8841e14cb344791a89481aabfd4
e7279229ace6034b0f9de50ea608a44b11c476ab
describe
'433098' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRG' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
907da44cb46beaee9aeb40dae76782f0
4ffcb9e979ef35f79e8e1f71b7f7d752557803c0
describe
'430755' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
88e209869ebc084db9d0750e91dfce44
fac4943cf84d4a4adc2e8803c588198b75cefa90
describe
'424865' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRI' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
eef17e793c3053d33edbb6b9f3e0fa94
287d2346d824b2b66aab4d5f872c1b4fe3f1b753
'2011-12-29T06:58:54-05:00'
describe
'427221' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
cc65eb932c1eff8ca5f17bbc332550cb
526aabbf8a493f20c48cbfb29d3d9a77b8773651
describe
'422505' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRK' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
88b46e65c39e8e1ca3b8aaab79eafa5d
dff244177d00387601fa069afc43ea33a2e95322
describe
'420895' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
07898345fa5c7473e442c2a005ed8148
5e52b7846ccbff115410ad610f03dd62191955b0
describe
'428379' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e40f24806c58088913d86270c74795e6
6ef721434ba613ac3a6a55ad7dc7d1c2668ca668
describe
'420372' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRN' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
98f30d4c584a48a447da157aba031025
a7197808b97d59659284aacb71ba2ef2cf760c8a
describe
'428346' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
34909f87d66aac0c8785769d0fc448b9
f209d15d9cdf8b6307e7242128de2dc35fbf5957
describe
'431084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRP' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
45ec2cb7c22c9e37bccb48368ce8de35
257b99c31de0ce7fe43637d0fcbc78232e6d651a
describe
'430732' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRQ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
e1ba1049d2f59ffcf5b60783277b9f01
75f697907a830e5e59cc6589a2ebc09cd3910e28
describe
'424451' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRR' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
9a2f77dbcbcae9f2c56e3f5813238d2b
0be333f41d6c28d714dd06f27e734de3ded36a67
'2011-12-29T07:01:11-05:00'
describe
'428365' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
1f575d703e3bdc15fafa17ce4f7f385e
891fbf5b2d0d0bd6f016f6e3a726e51cd493fca5
'2011-12-29T06:57:54-05:00'
describe
'426477' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRT' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
534cbe318ee740a748153324baab8d35
5b27f05d207d2beee8341fb86a195d77a03326a0
describe
'429549' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRU' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0ab1702c92441ae2393308763a927987
72a57cd79a60528ed521fda4b604c8b8fbcdc8e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
cfacc3c4cb3e476daaa7d5919491fafe
9e3ece559b320f593a86b9d3bbaca79bbdde2a61
describe
'429537' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRW' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7014174058fc51a47d61fbf74240e72a
5a390cbe2e394cc4e2473f4c751324f34b50ba90
'2011-12-29T07:00:42-05:00'
describe
'423056' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRX' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
04e3299f41607b70b333c3206932c852
a16adddbd2093999e61e7c5fe84bc4c000fa78cd
'2011-12-29T06:57:56-05:00'
describe
'422023' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
0c497d90b3b372b67057857cd9b708c2
f35b305a1b175a095160b0f69dbae8206bde8c2d
describe
'419228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHRZ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
86492066c6c3ec38636fa738d91d697a
49d9d43bdfc54fa30614afe3348ffc738122ca38
describe
'422036' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSA' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
1dc92c7fb89c506f8aaf11891a35846a
3cd493df8ab22b07cad91cf509fe29f30d2b65fd
describe
'423174' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSB' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
367403ca3902266f8b663fb0ac827202
af6d14d75b3b21c1c3a808c9f33670b1f1650ca0
describe
'433009' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSC' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
e469a53a6f36c8dfea002ad861e8f51a
71155e801bf0c649d8a6914d9bc9d28e72e5703f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSD' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
8cdf4d16d94f870ceb85d5f2f858a240
3a70ee3a17eede232a95b776871fd9373551cde1
describe
'431936' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSE' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
5448ea438dffcb4bd611f98899bd0165
1dbf9c3adfc3b9ec1133aac3cdf4e306fd5e7171
describe
'422983' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSF' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
904457799cd540d9c4d2f82ea3391692
da0e6ff70d2b35db3d420f806e4eca99326e039d
describe
'430709' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
11f8781c6c53d0566425ab1c08f096a9
2cb74fe1a500afe475a8a4a8be00ce985ac907f6
describe
'424815' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSH' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
1720637c04e5984502d0414d11b482a7
a7ec32040fdfe88f2bb0484a292b6a0725bafd07
describe
'415246' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
85f78d7fc48b31de01693fee0aa255e9
4dd16f33b95287ba9faa3df883c36cd36e419014
describe
'407514' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSJ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
cd92f8637aba1b7b16fe91c15b569d57
69f014086c210303ffac6e1df534c8b48a360c5e
'2011-12-29T06:58:26-05:00'
describe
'431899' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
1b1b78be3cb96a750f7ee36aff4b45af
b49973ab547a08336c7cfb7ea22129a89185e4b5
describe
'423175' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
ced2767f3b8e3f563b5a3436a5d52982
01c001a5f0558db2ff8036a605a45c3fbe376ea2
describe
'430760' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSM' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
1854c6f2e73abdaf23bfed22154b86cf
f1b42ff71e8ea53509bc92bb836ea4b007960c8c
'2011-12-29T06:57:45-05:00'
describe
'416893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSN' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
63293bfa11489d0eedf37324500f082a
16efd2d7cb932d376734146c2f24caf365f43da4
describe
'428361' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSO' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
71402d8aa71f2a04ec053ea62fca222d
a4b3fcd9aed66eff081f908fa78811c24007cfbd
'2011-12-29T06:59:13-05:00'
describe
'422527' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSP' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
c30ff63b83dec8d21ebbb49682da751a
99239a280eb145be96ecfaceacc4426237120973
describe
'437803' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
709823787f97274ede8294da41d4b123
165e22c6d2a8b108da735892f30edcc4c5945df7
describe
'417562' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSR' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
842ef1aa64a09d211d780a82683729df
008d028c9f35382e7a41f921d8315d3e231c2f44
describe
'428400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSS' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
f85ecb18f8be5365c0db685455d4a1fc
d7bdb2bb18df8ee68cd14bc4ec1308e62233bb0f
describe
'424110' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHST' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
24f431fd6dd3a01e00eb84e2b3a0b083
b23f3d6d7b0022d83c85a2713497a15bca619b33
describe
'437749' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSU' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3cba54fa7f65cd25420500b27b4a8aa9
7dc73f262b489f1e9e03b196389593a592c6af49
'2011-12-29T07:01:51-05:00'
describe
'417383' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8c3a2bfa4127c49a851726e80faef25d
c1511a43727d29eb30b4b0ba1ec2920fd6c6a2f9
'2011-12-29T07:00:51-05:00'
describe
'421471' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSW' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1a9bcdca23b2a831d5a7630b687b5296
6bb760b470adc8477c4b34d80cd3bc866e12723c
'2011-12-29T07:01:21-05:00'
describe
'437791' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSX' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
2ddb69e1292625d4369dd89ae65c27f5
9f8ba48cadc9ac807ec133856028e402b7b4f8c5
describe
'424836' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSY' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
31eaa8360b2aa5f5719fa1602519f01a
a8697c23a1ad5d7033adf0d6abf608c089b19b94
describe
'433107' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHSZ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7a222ca3aeab66c0bfd1088db5d0963d
97a8f4e82f99bab61d469cf2766901efc8da501f
describe
'433110' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTA' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0447882914413547d5f6d3b7e32c4f43
1b88ce974fad0015e4deb5be8aadfb84da7790ea
describe
'422038' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1e1da83843bb9ab5447710bb6dda1340
5b029417d5e96174e72d38c302326c025b8af581
describe
'424658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTC' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d33b35635278568c0370c9c71983d015
3ac09dd9ea08755a6b4a94ec962368e1af7039cf
describe
'415703' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
f9777eed2f5e8d7cd4f10ce5d59d68a2
555409298c318db3245fac71c848796bdcae92ca
describe
'431841' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTE' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
b23ea3da99c29ac2982e774b7d0cabff
5d395290f9a3ca2298b06c898757c241fb7f6c0f
'2011-12-29T06:59:00-05:00'
describe
'426069' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTF' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
a9873484efaf70d8fd242427125f3775
335fc941ca026862af368c17e974186d97f1efa5
describe
'426949' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTG' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
9d4796d353fe482e781270694698f6db
f9f83679aec380b1360a169c5fe5a44f3ef77680
describe
'426276' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
05a25fcc562ff9c87f1444ba18bec66e
137e7ae12288f4be62b00efa38edc221164a71a6
describe
'426492' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTI' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
b95769578d2d464958a521e7468da6c8
cc43d74e0f68bed3063c1081a8ccc4f564f340ec
describe
'423668' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTJ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
8a59a01f02916f7ee7a13cac03b511ab
12cadca4771f666982b4a10c7bfdefdfaba986ed
describe
'431897' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTK' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
72041b8dced62fb0fdc5390a674b0019
9ced1d86e1ec1c382a82aae267e1db9f1ab20a60
describe
'432885' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTL' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
7462ceadfb1b8a6bdd11ebf58d2be4b9
4bdd0fa3e51a9d421667d5c3056a43705a04249d
describe
'433092' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b380cf50716c09ce6a88821ffb573927
64ee44a29340f0cd6d96c4a441e10869ec864309
describe
'432968' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTN' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
9dcbe3cb74b89972839dd2c2ed46e7ca
f2dae240beabd6330a9a8ebf64a5665e06f4366d
describe
'430696' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTO' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
61e52f4fc5599b42ff5ca88135e31f89
362eff8c99bb7c4e906b41bd8a062790fc5b524a
describe
'431914' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
01be72885a92794115d61b94db511ef5
c54c30aab0fdaca8e0ad038b17fe8ea12fc67c87
'2011-12-29T06:59:55-05:00'
describe
'426009' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTQ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
7f440171c9cf4881b93b2bfae02e4b7a
86af976504b42a686fb6992f844c9e38bd20beb8
describe
'430754' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTR' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
65bae69999d7c24d8bae0b5a7faa0238
20cd29d7cb57b5c4aca08b4cc9ac07e81f5a4b83
describe
'428336' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTS' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
97960ea4f2498bec11b675697be92646
45b6e02584161c7dfa73bafeb05a77fe52f2ca83
'2011-12-29T07:01:25-05:00'
describe
'429577' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTT' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
72642b9a4235a34340f206ef2f5a0278
eb5ffc365c00aff5e233771fca26ac0219116ec1
describe
'429545' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTU' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
257f481c0366b41acbef01b1d0903a65
b1ffc18f4fdfa06e3715bc4613d5b4fadb1e23c2
describe
'431927' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTV' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
f993286f0f85f390e1a3f0958a660269
bb4342a0e472b3f7e1b2519bbf558028a7a863bc
describe
'427222' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTW' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
e24a5641eee8c2ff24bfc6a8d52c6c51
a3a7986a4745bb1aefff8d622220a49f17ceb076
describe
'426040' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTX' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
6e8962da01568d21f341b939373010a3
803a7f7d093a9cbd68a85ded0cdbc966da7ca3c9
describe
'429576' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTY' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
f2029a920b7ed47c2bc3a81716a20769
c211b0b5988688ec263566f1ef401870d901e8f4
'2011-12-29T06:57:32-05:00'
describe
'429580' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHTZ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
a3ba543f44ac155735924e34561d6235
8d438b9a3c878939e0bc7bd365c8c50fc4c5b238
describe
'429553' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUA' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
dbb2b7aeecbcf62d5ccc7e273665099c
124999fc672442f51cc226978f6061266086ce5e
describe
'427216' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUB' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
da3683de7149686257dabdf65fd43e79
64a1640c3c728d32978a427ea2abe186a6b93852
describe
'433093' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUC' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b4f9a5a8f8d18325beaaf72f0aa37341
d58e6b3198dd9361a1a23c7d0cccf0941e26c394
'2011-12-29T06:56:36-05:00'
describe
'424847' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUD' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
b8da9d9006a22fa4a671322a2b1276e1
f1fcf62c2ee44941a2d91f5b09594c4a12550e49
describe
'437813' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUE' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
ff3e91afe470a0eaf15fb03676ee3061
1c3231ea476b14589f34fb45ee44a4bdfb0dde99
describe
'428391' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUF' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
de06493ae5c84d7f8d5fda127f9e3de0
876235a6662eb7585f64e4131ac0ef36298f34c4
describe
'437829' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUG' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
3e3a6f7d332536deb982a2932ead620e
d869ae6d570e9631714b7a8a98be8dabb50d43ef
describe
'430737' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUH' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ef18da6d8d714ccecd24e775dab9b5da
83ddf06eca8b30a001c972a8aab7c736e459969e
'2011-12-29T06:56:33-05:00'
describe
'437808' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUI' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
c60c6cb15c4e5d2ef151ae32b680fbaf
55b0a53fe0923c0698d36124026f39557e8224f1
'2011-12-29T07:00:24-05:00'
describe
'427199' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUJ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
8b882ffde917966bb8e68217c1fba37f
454c0bef7c77a0dd70c4766fa81dd776eeaf2c34
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
ec13e39d8a76cb872ec1237a6e1dd15c
63a5775ed5efc1368c9ef8d3b6f88e4e9f2c5d00
describe
'429565' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUL' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
8be8ae681a575cbab5db642d3d32e6cd
75f514c204da508f627634f51633a1a800656f05
describe
'437819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUM' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d808294c20536a809999dfaefddf7f5c
b28c1d5a3368d5d30070be75bdbbe90fc2ef4ba8
describe
'421319' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUN' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
26ecb2136104bbc77b568a744703a30e
5b40e70ba73a387fadc9bbdcd487ec55b918dfd8
describe
'437826' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUO' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
be4cb1cb260113d7cbf9981b04708287
fef9b88a6d9b5be44217b45cc9c5cea90a373070
describe
'437828' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUP' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
dc21536d130b4efb758e1a417ab376a9
95655ba52bd27d62253f9f080eb44c04f5dd1795
describe
'429557' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUQ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
6a47d0a5f566f0e252b480ed8cf0dcad
4813ff102a8f9703d3f7f12c85d4afb7c14f2042
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUR' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
4f28644cebd031307c53979cc0c60341
490fd7854a745a0d85d6c857b21dc54581d33ace
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUS' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
1d6f187d7969e48a7914ee4e856d4a35
94f65c22b2db7990817da5ca32213d12a88d4d1b
describe
'437770' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUT' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
f3b578b8501325f510218068b30b7119
20f0a691fa5ce2815eaa9e3e8072433ab9edc32f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUU' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
22739042ab9b743fbd2b1963b0b8f818
c96ab1ea9c71b45a1b6986cdbf4da4f3d5ffbeec
'2011-12-29T06:58:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUV' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
9641aeddb485ad266eedfdabe682b9df
9b18c4e1adcc867e67d6f4a253343ffe6565ebd5
describe
'431865' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUW' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
36db4fd872e4b62a17a67153005cc4b6
72e6d7ac1039af50fdba28e8cda7d90a7bb8b456
describe
'429504' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
6950337f6f9cffa079774c9b94b8e407
79f70e114cdbc49fcb321c37593f6c46f693dec0
'2011-12-29T06:59:53-05:00'
describe
'431923' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUY' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
0ca5d1460ac2a9f35f5ae8534096581e
1695b2fe83b82eaa0b500045389e035f819af018
'2011-12-29T06:55:52-05:00'
describe
'430751' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHUZ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
480d7ea7a26cfeaef9771070d86f14fb
1e3a58cf3f4da978d72ff8f348ef0dcc5cc2783a
describe
'433054' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVA' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4d2e2e94a75e0847668b1fe52b87e107
e84b96d2a73be3e36067f561a88a10d853af59ad
describe
'430738' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVB' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
c7c7fa0cbd8ac19a4227987423297491
094459b0c83e56a335df02466eabf36ed03e5ad8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVC' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
8fdbf8d9b2342702e08732a8ef9d50ef
e560968207eccd71727ad31cef46cf7bbd0468ff
describe
'429548' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVD' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b47132b71abc058dd6d2673557a8b679
fd97ec6ed54ad6aae8c181586bba5d5de52758f5
'2011-12-29T06:58:37-05:00'
describe
'430662' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVE' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
e59a5a5b846bc39ee06891cc88c29d13
de4312bc52744aa70066465e2ebeff5cc61870a9
describe
'430719' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVF' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
eaf5d6afc0ebd54ed5bd3c8527aee3ee
e1bb6a95965da5f685744f406a8516a3ac9b5ab5
describe
'431718' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVG' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
775785a22e2c66037a9a0d964d610b28
cbc17916b5c112207a1827cd05123022b1e67845
describe
'430557' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVH' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e77439536e6fe56d9d416db53f1fbdeb
0a20f026fd8c049707f7dede13cd0f7041d78a13
describe
'431851' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVI' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
56264403fb5332fb1d48cf7d8c61f8ef
fe9bfa1c844b5cc2e443dc4e73851818d00ad11e
describe
'429331' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVJ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
1c2835612df92c205364e4cfde9b189e
b388de598cf9c29509093e9f238a749a897bf574
describe
'435458' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVK' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
49788cd9a3b4d62860d1f2b770920861
3beec7070f8e49c50be766d4b4276f517c6d5656
describe
'430712' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVL' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
4e7840f52413e0a2d26ff2ff1783413b
876da9013768fb10af4937dac53767b82fcdffeb
describe
'430758' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVM' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
18f8fa3e1580f05d715c99091792a645
2cc402a00fdf00971853a3642a3ea5e3f931a500
describe
'431937' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVN' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
c5ff77539bfda2530901e9f9e6366a77
6bd65c91e615aca48266f3b7d46a4ba571155aeb
describe
'431814' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
97508551ad3da523281e659c013fdbf6
100f5432de726666f86ea9cd8580b44f8bfc7abd
describe
'426855' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVP' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
491e2fa878fabe4f360f81fe915e7871
d2b08b870277ca660b5cfce206d3ac5993d3cfcc
describe
'430902' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVQ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
0dfd78ea9438eeb5575d295e15e5bb9c
2e4b31f8d6fd49a9d00ab2c6eed11a731d18543d
describe
'428308' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVR' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
6ee735a9f8dadbf6b7c74ae81ca68e91
e864f102280ddf07dd3ade6eaf9eecc3a17f2ea1
describe
'437733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVS' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
b849b2b9a9c4ce133de9061bfe793fec
50ebbbf4b1b73355548fe69d4ac1354613a62652
describe
'421178' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVT' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
baa66aadfa5207084f7146b3e519e9a4
61843353a6e681d9c51b30f96717109793e79508
describe
'424770' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVU' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e90fad24a5a8c012d19c759d79c1b3e9
4c63e9339efc3ffb07748d17727d47377577d467
describe
'414269' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVV' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b237014b9873b8888017d116bb7e4e7c
17f268d70d594ccac40285b185a6d2dd9e12710f
'2011-12-29T07:00:10-05:00'
describe
'429488' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVW' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6cbea124c61d0405e66d9758a3a0a168
660a0d5e2d3b6b750d2515a343ac94c79ffad023
describe
'417370' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVX' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
058c6a5bd7e358e9d4b0f9dd234ce481
6cf21a3cba8c24485e9a84348f2fe44491e8268b
describe
'433028' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVY' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
caed15ee23abbea0f78a18439cf3f8bd
277ee46179a719a274ef0fc0e0a463e179cfa354
describe
'423020' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHVZ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
9dafd1ae9b016a3196048555bf85e5a4
74a79e26c5719418823fa1abd5081221b58d6024
describe
'430752' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWA' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
d15de0e8a5d8df9015dc55a97449290d
0e4aecec3a16e1f4bc4a57b67d00288c17b986cf
describe
'431868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWB' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
f38b42cd6070558fbea189cdd6483106
9b99fcb78308720efc892eaa923796e8e3b4b2ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWC' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
3c59ffd7e4e294a16745604f83a3254e
8bf98fc7a382f05fd4e534e92ac7ab13dbc9b91c
'2011-12-29T06:56:35-05:00'
describe
'424074' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWD' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
35c3f2a1e227385489cc8f5efbb0466a
27c937fc18bbcf8a47df806609a36894c6863bc4
describe
'429531' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWE' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
07e3844c73d667dde77bb18ad5ea0e81
2bc831bedebe951944add889f3b1a4f5bcbaedba
describe
'430705' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWF' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
ac16c0f1549217362da6c5df84f4043c
dda0932aa6bc76aa513de77a9e530973b6f19d6a
'2011-12-29T06:58:30-05:00'
describe
'429532' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWG' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
992ff33c59ac3f4d18c6d146a2b81ea1
38673fe46215e8a0ec865ac612e101c23871464a
describe
'418503' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWH' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
b0080fd0d518c8fbff861914ae52be8f
89d66fb49bdddaa193d72012ba2b2192e88ab0d5
describe
'423681' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWI' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
4a9529d9756a4aff92211ff22c6e370f
2cbbaf418fde75b8aee6276d9e895215c7ad30cf
describe
'418520' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWJ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
4aaa6b39439f85ac100350ad02802b97
35bf760bb2e9fb23622d9ee6544e9bd6322d8056
'2011-12-29T06:59:57-05:00'
describe
'416551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWK' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
56d79f990cb8f1c8dc105beb4eac7479
b3c093075f33eb65626f9dd3373b67d9221f3ef0
describe
'411505' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWL' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
7c18cff386ed2249306b75b14bfea29c
fb533c179059c96dc8bf66beeb857532be84dadf
describe
'431823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWM' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
60b236afda5e7a4e201797ded4bebf37
4bf6d74b29df50b0e2296666adc045fc63e9f847
describe
'419144' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWN' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
d84450405678046fb6a14bdafc5c64a4
10393bf44a178a2968056fc62b3cc281b5040405
'2011-12-29T07:00:04-05:00'
describe
'426501' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWO' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
47322140b77b18ecbe501f28f8e1c4f4
b469712164644bb20b7c9fad4290ae28912623f0
describe
'421353' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWP' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
5c6eecac2fdd735df41cc0f7367e10bc
1f5978bf30564ed99bc9ec25f553af54e744b006
describe
'426450' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWQ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
174502e4c405e7b08ea4f2fc5255b719
1159d27a1bd17ed882fece06b0aa2c5620a502f0
describe
'417073' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWR' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
4ca5bc0821c63970efa1bf99fc3d655c
e0391749707b42b21f7094848de092bc52380413
describe
'422714' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWS' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
573f57e07bef316d3c9ee83d51e31968
118a736a309cf6ab31e932849668121684c364b5
'2011-12-29T06:56:11-05:00'
describe
'412618' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWT' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
2c6ab73b2867ca47210b038a59b77616
97e571f3f88bee71db23a8211fc24a7d17f16156
describe
'422029' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWU' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
ec63bdfaf870c042567bf3f124939c69
3f521486c826893486e68f1099ee4b154b1e8673
describe
'416939' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWV' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
1f70fab05a70040b24aae2846ce804aa
ed495d3ec2ec3788113ac97a15d99bb14c401299
describe
'428354' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWW' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
d4ff4b0ebc3b0422b6aded98a5dd1116
6f27e8caad758bb92657caf1136d1baffe6a699e
describe
'408750' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWX' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
c07682312614dcc5bcb46253e366fb35
1ccc493f3f36c5b7f34fef50210457b0555ccb10
'2011-12-29T06:56:59-05:00'
describe
'428396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWY' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
9f8792332414fb106836faf445b7a626
ded79855293e8d2a5509827670dfb1107c5b07a3
'2011-12-29T07:00:44-05:00'
describe
'417522' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHWZ' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
32fed5dde13ea81c0763026513b6d916
90aae7dd7538458b77a1c882b209d12b345386c1
describe
'429483' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXA' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
01b1f4e9cdbb67b9f6e150fb94a434c9
80c8d5d6cd6c4b00a7b41ed58e7e3b567dda5920
describe
'416886' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXB' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
b020a1a554493a449d584f730beaa2ce
184e100edcfea6b17dec500728075911c1db0b8f
describe
'430757' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXC' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
54f7f6c51762f35c325438e7e7914fb9
ac2769be4cb2d77081c1972b9b0dc56e637fdf3d
describe
'424715' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXD' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
6dbe9f9ed93ddd0d13f65338145ee3df
fbe6ab7c783ed5aa47c64d960ba67f887b9df247
describe
'433065' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXE' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
7e6b1198dec54b7d5eabac668ec59475
d885e8721da6eeaca8a568a3a127ec65fa86f949
describe
'413153' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXF' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
0a0ef065fcf4e366e54b042603aa76dc
9bba4600eb79aa9e4de4e8853c8242ffe820bc8e
describe
'423655' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXG' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
cafcee7b934031e40fcfa387c8114784
89276cb42592a6a129c406b588dfb80a8beb3656
describe
'419460' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXH' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
21805d5ed2ef7f0e52c9bebdda6972c5
0e1079b46dda7938561544cac5ba58cdd1cbbbe0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXI' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
75dcb90028f6bdf9410e9d2637b67c6c
00a82b4c2a4b439ccef0d7383875281376eb9c8f
describe
'424164' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXJ' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
39c7c0f570bc0bfc9e40fa1b9fbe9291
ab74cc835b5831d3884c26c81a16f3d4779112eb
describe
'428355' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXK' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
7b84bff9a18bd8f8e2e00a12c3ecad83
6b71181c5cb758341f328778968d875d98c89c9e
describe
'415235' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXL' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
e507c3722d09a7e42cd31f83204b2993
d8b4b18bda9c50e24c7afab00cebd18f75edea21
describe
'428281' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXM' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
4a09cfc8d1237ae99e7ffaf8c359ecd6
8386ac9145badc2f1a415c102441eb16442998b8
describe
'421482' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXN' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
03a3619507afe6f3754e3656361055ad
7616a7f477740d4ab415390e3cdc767a33a1dd5c
describe
'427212' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXO' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
d578701467e6b71abf78ca97813e1081
059f70db8a81497504dee406edbe5a6b532bb2c8
describe
'416934' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXP' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
2fc8d47219ddcd6c2ef456d608e03f74
bf867ae31a8a359622c189b9fdd1229553681aff
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXQ' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
986da16bcfa149955173f559b11e3049
23e51f99929101ef38db300029fa132e3b092d6c
describe
'420377' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXR' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
03f60466822c41c7336c4e9e0df5a9fd
5191241542b9d1ee5beb29eb927b8b6c155cbaf4
describe
'430724' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXS' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
73665de3d31d3e6b5c2516f7103bacc4
8c1e4cb26aa500aee5a353f95b995a2be184a8fe
'2011-12-29T06:58:07-05:00'
describe
'433030' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXT' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
20c0dc57b9e78deb35afc861e68d3979
537132a68ca067516962b6b7d5059d238773f2b0
describe
'429540' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXU' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
7486d4458b22293b70ee0faf1c9b7107
dbed820ddcff0a58c286e0ab759511e1b0931444
describe
'422503' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXV' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
a53e397791e95bda348ec2a5c1dae11d
45a2a1d65147b4ed6b95943ce14c1ed334ebfa8e
'2011-12-29T07:01:52-05:00'
describe
'428374' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXW' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
47cd46dfe03cff5659ccb591c6c5f2bb
4684bdf86b03e3c5d3ac760dc9bd9688a3e55861
describe
'426480' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXX' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
7f6478e60854920deb1e5b7679744fb9
b13d56e23c367bca6590e0d9684b3fc17d3f98cc
describe
'433068' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXY' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
ded355209dfa038be0bb565a1ef57f07
338269f62cc5e10d4851f614747259d46402b384
describe
'431939' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHXZ' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
38c6a38f5fa49c9703d9b3ab3dd44c5d
ad83925c9b305335fe13f9e5dfd520fb1fca02a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYA' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
dae5fca23ca449d9e6d9e56697857c2e
7b96f69c74b364cda358df821a467cccfe582375
describe
'428328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYB' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
d8844d8b3841a134a6e78086bc52a64b
d135e80f7300af4963daa54242ed7924480006bd
describe
'429524' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYC' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
9aa188e0fb992ac5460998affcabc390
352f9b95c3a497993a0cfe56b8e781179db3716a
'2011-12-29T06:59:45-05:00'
describe
'431772' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYD' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
cadcc575a0574587b92a18204a190535
4f4c105c9c78c7318e6d422f2e9444c270280af4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYE' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
ac438b8e979db95c599a5fcc3b80eb08
60384752389ab4a85c40bff93693e801fa9ff508
describe
'427103' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYF' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
48abbf80b31d7d4a183525b7388bae8b
f55c1e9924378b0e4a0bf5210b603e30385eb0a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYG' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
b822712a08721c6a1a7b5f038a94c2d4
04c545bcb3399f116e5ec7a7903e3bebce3d524e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYH' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
d243a3c2d8bbb1da236ae2e1943599fe
55828944f2f667a97d0ef8b8dfead1cdd685f05d
describe
'437820' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYI' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
7070a1bf166546ff8e1fb5d89b8f8460
3f1084e24b28d33f1ef34d4cb8bf04a811251791
describe
'430746' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYJ' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
63c9138775d49e7e18e3eb937c4638fa
b4892b4a113afd8de6cd73e5e9b3e79f9a78259e
describe
'430727' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYK' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
c666f1c515d93eaad21f0b4f3d97e331
5c5cb076814a38335c45fad8424082bac848905e
describe
'435422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYL' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
e117a4e7934a6da3f0c5117c4e5138a1
89ba9edd9acb9ea1b95ce4bd045c5d91670564e8
describe
'431918' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYM' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
16fedba5cd0a131aacf2da8ed4327e0d
8f5df8501dcfa05156d82445f329d64d8366e53b
describe
'436532' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYN' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
89399dcb7790a19e0e5561f692e00e9c
893d34dc97c7b05bf59c1c874d8165a87a45668b
'2011-12-29T06:56:18-05:00'
describe
'437762' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYO' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
2f21939e5bad0771b8ddd40e2c4388b3
2fdb5e4a509a7e60e4fd0449f18ef3ef164d5f09
'2011-12-29T06:58:52-05:00'
describe
'429519' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYP' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
3e45bb4bca1411b691899527e8c942c9
6b1b3e55508d0f833e058ad0cc42ea362bed8fce
describe
'437822' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYQ' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
33d64b44bb22e042379b330252ef41ae
69075fa269cac4b3bb849a5b2c2b32db469f5d3c
describe
'431919' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYR' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
08c456423e0fa20fa2819772dc59090f
c77926dc81311a2c67c9968a6a037908d65d080c
describe
'437761' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYS' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
b755424b0b02fdb46a822e547014cff3
af6c20db08f2077b357e30455eb22d9b22920cf0
describe
'431921' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYT' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
ab7cc63ffe2868102829a6efd4cfd518
da78ac609a077835f1949d54b8354d7a69f4ce33
describe
'437619' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYU' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
120497020bfc059c97e37f7faabc7cd7
476b36c4096556c65091cdb883d9f6304b1fc19f
describe
'487709' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYV' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
8d076bcd2c9a64adb2bf0a717feb42eb
0fa59be3680b8d1076f95d68e11aa15cb467c445
describe
'489013' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYW' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
a6ada9692ac1cddc3584666b747e1178
1e6f450c5fff52b81fe8e34d1b83b34208c94df7
describe
'104276' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYX' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
d820f0ecfb061dfc6b92c3cd5d522ea9
83cd4a73a24cbfa3afa52b3a7d1a420afea0a71b
'2011-12-29T06:57:07-05:00'
describe
'11926404' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
09e7a5e2561b5f00a989263677921e0a
d6a3e77801a29af76bdf4f6bcae6adf65ec9d533
describe
'11718676' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHYZ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
734a1bcb14aa2dbcfe976fb7f6cc28fb
26f3ca47b9b7aa2039ed5139e0c8285349df0a0a
describe
'3439224' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZA' 'sip-files00005.tif'
2a2bf11e402e92226d371e55eea40d76
9ca1189418182c47f06507110cbf9cb2a0dd3640
'2011-12-29T07:01:33-05:00'
describe
'3387956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
b088aa6fae92869c0e856578df1117ce
29f2ce45204aa34f232718f3d007493983224628
'2011-12-29T06:58:24-05:00'
describe
'3361632' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZC' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8d6a27dd09092f6e599af281e4ff06a9
2a30632c963cedc52c3b3135ebd83186e6d80499
describe
'3406368' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZD' 'sip-files00011.tif'
43adb2da7baeb90973fdac495e924e14
93c33f249a063aeffc6d1f98f5bd606e0e0000f0
describe
'3362696' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
41227440efc4eab7d5cbb57b680798c4
2cf76fe606fa7af984fe2d94fb1c52d578562b62
describe
'3366788' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
553dc7b1978e207b4eb12bf051b8a6ee
b0c08c8558bcfb42906a434564a14be5dffb63ba
describe
'3332232' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
3a47e8d4f83c5451375fefe43caaf4cf
00422dd8b58938d70d782de6eccaf4b67f9e64d8
describe
'3357648' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c819a2d15512e6a2e07b907d3105752d
c01ea5ce9cead5248b3647caebcf0cb42f3cc92d
describe
'3278036' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
84bcb55f3fa8f71beb2051b7b0605384
51c301edf989a9e4819ed008ea63bdb661a3e739
'2011-12-29T06:56:48-05:00'
describe
'3356336' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
4ea0cc325299290e8cd59ff6b36d65e2
81021b4bc3d9e34b718d50827bf880d82ca551c0
describe
'3452600' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d379c88707cd76d937cf7ddfbdf3df2d
9a497787cebfd0ce0809be609a2a0282af36554b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c7b092ba1607fc70c650ee47ae97ee2c
e2e6cf317b5696ec0cedfee0c892a9eacdb89d27
describe
'3453488' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
8c5449e87a5ca06cea8a87e8f182844e
23a58d6bac04fbba708aeedad19212ce8b85ae70
describe
'3397124' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
bdeb3159aa9700e7b659dbe2049399c5
819d45f34d4eccf7c52a51f8c29e52587c5c61f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
3803702ca0bf9a99a52e390f1017184e
3150ad07cc735a65c50606a6e437776cf425f4e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b181fd546d5d19e4dc91e1e6c3a6c772
e11a94d7ca529c6edd279a6ce133ab1b59fab9a0
describe
'3340400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
91c989e2ffd8ad9f081b8cada2104aa0
b3393e08ca89da693bed42e970ff92ac9f5bd988
describe
'3428840' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
da32a59de7d437de13ffbc199d7544f3
ab3941268e3824a167197d87342d14e7c0f25f2d
'2011-12-29T06:56:01-05:00'
describe
'3415616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZS' 'sip-files00028.tif'
4e5e2c6acd3f9abdb46cd17a636822f9
e73ed5c1b908599e1d224b3488916dff82c5cc6f
describe
'3477924' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZT' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f51ee16ce94d04b49b29a33c96ee7524
d0f3a1e9c46bed80a4dff1264e18e1d3c0d34c4e
'2011-12-29T06:59:48-05:00'
describe
'3383964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
6e60c9da8ff10981614a2a3d5780c786
1f5132ff3155b97a26d835674d110b260c628ba6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
552a198d4dd528cc2f9cd1344f17bbc5
a605f27d9f9deacd7422e76b0b8cc44b94ad27d3
describe
'3323004' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4d20cc9ef3b3120197386158e2fa7f67
9c231606503f4c3a22c377d68ff7e59233c39f77
describe
'3434636' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
34a34b96e47536f5dad6911e4e38a9bf
271f0ea6bb1ef3fabc2a47ac1c909786312e08c5
describe
'3352460' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f0e8ca6b21697fb0ebb172ad70e44d26
a26fc34e4c7b6b4064ca6b2f95c7f5f8f06f5864
describe
'3436596' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABHZZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
889e816c23ca379e978d16ea7605d115
61c8a4a45d2e9b294d6e49d95eb7d5ea6576c924
describe
'3462912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
92e615131110d93bdf298b699f9abc8b
2295f2499424e328169002431bf939b040c4537c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b6b4d4df14fca6b95b3519c43c106fe6
744d0aea2a372977b5fe398aabda01c84c862574
describe
'3491192' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
8c4a815851cb3865c475ffe94c79df65
333cbc7dc1f1dad8ce53d098f1c87ea758411181
describe
'3481764' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
387b190ad5647809aab1d18d66015a8a
f3bd5b64b3f1204c70c2e731901c9f67320c56a5
describe
'3391716' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
b74707cacefd6e1fc43d59d7fca7241d
d5d052da0def43140800c7a5dc480d365664cc0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAF' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e75c22f4905ed335f22ed5068a9ec678
3c462415918ca52c7c41d2cf295d65ddb4142b1f
describe
'3472340' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAG' 'sip-files00042.tif'
424c6d87ecc471a88d3408b5e2ae15e4
2e33b2404cde6ace1d9502cb1da64260266fde24
describe
'3453484' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7e2c694d5610569e4adc3e29466cc17d
68c8ea2aa264244067a9c9f7773e27f8e34102b7
describe
'3519468' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
6446a80a78efabccf69b5be76d711753
1cbba26de17190693e210fdfde579b3088497a06
describe
'3444060' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
34e59991b090b603a4e7f6f98084a7ba
789c82101c110f0b47b4d8aa4900528d3ad08203
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2895d6e55199ca5778df26606f8e4e51
83b1e422eae52faae913eb400ff106a26b738b6f
'2011-12-29T06:56:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
dcd00cb3b42d6072d8821988ba89e388
d2fe158efc15c90d1102eb37946cd368a187a5f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
1b8fab5ebf141f05e50d9fecfe874a48
6e614439f657f29a5f58b61883a69d7b5ec2e0b4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAN' 'sip-files00049.tif'
15aa94ab98ea71ad2feca14cee47f275
0451166dccef401ac0d1b6d6b5fad2008d163df0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
bfdf904be5fea83a42bd09b5b72a2346
55929a3eaac72f145e56353ca077517cc89989b6
'2011-12-29T06:57:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
57cf356bc541e9b7989bf10b53fcfc30
f5fb7c225875850e67525bce076c2d3c9447347e
describe
'3500616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d70609d35c386b5a383addb97940f89c
6c57eb18000c55e5f584e99d873cd929f0e0a95e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
7e949e86de4e49b557210f2703692070
b59a9c6eefdb0c2d7a7e2518200d480be1f3918f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAS' 'sip-files00054.tif'
899c5c0a98f59f40c2772f5522b2dfe3
65fdb644510a46d5483113aec28335e77b9737fa
'2011-12-29T06:56:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
bed76d11246366ab6248701b108b3e07
0210159bbbfdf87e3f93291c1345c29e6899572f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b32ab8459a5527d55100c1adb87efbc8
958522d97785a13ca587d2e5dd6f95e21aa8aa30
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
9a44e9b7636410b6b89e71dffec056c8
089414cfa612b9dbfdb858f7393f4a07c18a2f11
describe
'3425208' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5c64037166a0415bb754d3556603b592
7243c6fd33a947a5c467216343b3325fcf0862df
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAX' 'sip-files00059.tif'
82e2f1ed4c2891205305a28096c0ea11
a76de59d68bd7a56bc7a95c9adea90363c0ab6c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b3f6e9194d90135ae67c1181d342f9be
1be3086102f27626ae38399457377130d882a5b8
'2011-12-29T06:58:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIAZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
3d3188a8a682878bc600e5fc69d77b51
202aadd5172f1a69a6578a2b306d7abadb81bf01
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBA' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d8bebac7db027091d05cde0c217b1b34
5cbf3d57ed084198095714ed1828a47a97c2ddfc
describe
'3378080' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
820495e02dc0bc7384ce7285294df445
3597d20df1064f10962af5842cb1a084d906f08d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
c5e689fe8faa3d77ffec1f8a4d8daa03
08e73504eef950c213b3f5b4c48212efdc149cb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7ec7dd03f2e69cd28ec2dffd2dc5030a
af86b7307424b05fd06b35406b239155a385a1af
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBE' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9e3494a2374ff0ccc7309234ecfb3fa6
fca2cda5a5d7c6e799f22122830d34b57b5a2f3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBF' 'sip-files00067.tif'
ae441ded9268c8c2d72d49f52cf6ad92
9d782139cbbbcbd00a5c7560a7afac82b3597e6c
'2011-12-29T06:55:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBG' 'sip-files00068.tif'
8307c9203254722325ec1cb4cd471fa3
38f49883550834855af6156f1f93219856a54959
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
223987a50e89c4758e5525d48d4b28e5
04de82b9f679f9687d5de32133cd7e2dadaf01c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
987dfc382985f43a0f6122ee4fc67db7
0ad06fdc6d4495c4823c505492a5fb8a5104ad9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
5a4eb892bfdee84d29a62e0424ffa726
c349d3b35ed988e6bbd6b71f9bb0a670c8fb2228
'2011-12-29T07:01:27-05:00'
describe
'3406356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBK' 'sip-files00072.tif'
34bbbc1f8c687ab89bb903169d1de33a
1a670224501df3e1001f7319ac3672ee4c90a5c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a4060f8e3ae4f3e7045b9848bfe0f323
301f6852e45911b46c95438192b8f454d0951626
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3e24d784dc28c8e458998b1ff59ff2ab
77d84b55171ee37295fd7b426bbc1719c234530c
describe
'3415784' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBN' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6695dacc4e11e770bd14e2411931701e
e0f1b6b38440fb9da3aef6b39828afe0659d3a7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
75a02d446c4e36d71e981cb741a2434d
3b7a09f78ebb0e6eff9d7af91480728440636bb7
describe
'3396932' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
6c79aeadf5d5a2d74aef6d8520968d41
5984e1c324ac0a077f8f1567267802ba000be7c9
describe
'3384024' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBQ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
4a637164463d2765c975eba2cc22e86c
a081f6198672b411c27c5d18118c9bdcfc703359
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBR' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7f3cd730a3f9b5dcc53ee98a73114e59
55c3f6dfdbf1c262c3912b6a4c77e34e3c4ba6a3
describe
'3379980' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBS' 'sip-files00080.tif'
a20e691d790668cdbfbae508cf510eba
6b5c56a9afc5a9421b964f5de9dcaf824ad821bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBT' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ba387fbd7a5fea7cca91a02311e12c20
34e0daa0f34c7fb1b5f9cb9cacbe41c462a93d63
describe
'3465972' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
458ccebfb48da8984b7bdf289817c057
a4a2452b4dcddfb3993b0bc6e5edca14935783c8
'2011-12-29T07:01:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
11a13a593ce093c02602906f52da285d
08b29d19eb55247492d41da0ed6c7f7f5c9a3d2b
describe
'3412476' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
89d4f43f9bae464dc4eda43c6a2f73aa
a080131a8af06b1917e7cde0e6408cc7a880a95b
'2011-12-29T06:55:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBX' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2fa9e5db8ce206cce7b03ef9a7926c1b
5e0067984d73234a7622599a3838d87bee8a4093
describe
'3428844' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ae14eb3886453c70132d1caad39cc0c3
90820ce3becd544941d43f22ae504442a656fd94
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIBZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a34b54098e56eac3498a606bc55b5a05
a3c5f732ebcf173a354872c189eec024307f2da9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICA' 'sip-files00088.tif'
8bad2aaaf35f04233998d28eaea1eb1e
25c03e50148f18d5b6ffabb27b74e1aa20de66e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
1a0d9ac052458abf8bab7a7584a13d68
8b3f0c7c3d557c541aaedb66277d86e4e9552345
describe
'3402384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
148b804bdd8c6ec4b5949e6e5083475d
8c44b07539645c41853adc8b6ad70e7fcba75ed2
describe
'3393176' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICD' 'sip-files00091.tif'
ee01a2290e26ed1c051fad36c1a86dd9
52ffbd9704eaa6a4d2afcaa6481db5e8af8c9b44
'2011-12-29T06:57:51-05:00'
describe
'3370808' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICE' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7a68b50a21fc469b4593b14bce414511
632d843d9866f3dec7b2a0ec2d176de25d561912
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICF' 'sip-files00093.tif'
ad98246cde4d2c7ec9d40d9c2d429b2e
32a577f784ef467d629a20f5c90c47430628d77b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
865e7d8321ca1b3333854dbc0704dac5
117507b8863106e530b8c9869a4fc7e80baaaea3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
2309c7e9d6faaa7eb564f0529c25fee7
fc6113f106d26ccd1f91e431c211791f62ae7a71
describe
'3445952' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8d8aadb1b519a7756da37b1391342eea
25d5213acc51eef3d62dfecacff9c512bb5a4858
'2011-12-29T07:00:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
2ff9e5fbc1f6f31409a896b988bdba30
05811fdb4bae8d6fc625ac300583d58e4c8ca859
describe
'3401000' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICK' 'sip-files00098.tif'
4a14d8854897c0632752c94bd9e25f36
6bd2563dfe1fb59f5d08d89b25deb9ec857a2a49
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
938b795418e85cb41ef59e1f860e8533
edb56d6c2b45d06a084c993ba7452a8f24090d09
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
a3b532d7a68f2fc7af046fe3c1f470a1
0cd2173ee0da5668b3fcfbb25d67458557897983
describe
'3339372' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICN' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5b7e7c315d374fcc7a119a4cc3417041
9174fb3d56fa98e5efa0597796fbc792226ac830
describe
'3276936' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
708cd22750f0adab468b4c29bc55a7b2
14306d06ac13a4313536eef4841a8136d65e01a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3cb29a9fe94f31b01b3de02f37cb9bbb
0e97c153d4ac2b4e586f81ac9b88973f65cf19e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICQ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b722c3f45bbe7728b3ca0a2970ae504c
c3b7fac1b8da4fa5767554b52c85b10edfef3fad
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICR' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f2a9af928163a93938f5873019d57f2e
05ad7b518635e946c288b43646672099c2c9c1fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICS' 'sip-files00106.tif'
61b9b7fa87d5688a5efe855c324a364d
f91ae884b13857bc189a21fe594ff6971847a6b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICT' 'sip-files00107.tif'
a96c791d04abe7abdfbc8a3381a152b0
beaa3ebe07c51e566617de3fe16644379aafb85c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
91ba04594aae6eeae80673035e08d3d1
bd5a66ecd5f244658541bbfb25f07e3544f72704
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
51a0e622c4aba6ec2ee06a7bd539f443
ef07fc95b21dcff9e51175de413987a99d05ed15
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
160de1ef9c14e4a6220434306ca43167
6abb123f4fc613f7f23012c52596ed197867bf24
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICX' 'sip-files00111.tif'
f7a19ab3717dd85bec68bb26f06623a3
1fdf8da4694d516ada4cd9ee10169682e9815650
describe
'3410280' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
bcd832244979bacd46d155edcb2629f3
42164286d330efaba1fca03dc82973e87299810e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABICZ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
01113041beb442d3cf9133d1de2b247b
07d134896e0ce6eb31a6aaea024d91930c3142c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
2a31bc8340c66de458ee62d04df0893c
1070ea8ed4b92b6152e99bdcf55d75097bd215c6
describe
'3389156' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
3a7a0315e6d535d52ea24a086c3cb63a
8d51e2d8944e9966dbb1862af5fbf8b3114c04ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
79b0ad9be501703af479ee047e0ccb9d
e6e48c132f47cfc1a78785149586848c5f85b7bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
047d0138120a2f136da488a30a434634
a6ce83546baf136b72241022ed07cf1a7177be0b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
11cf7e02a9229893707d834be9dfbf0d
789a9998f46181b3ec9f52efa2271d9fd40b7f48
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDF' 'sip-files00119.tif'
7ac9223b5da2e776a090a3fdb784cf0d
add36c15b6c317dfdfd3d17abe40babd392257ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDG' 'sip-files00120.tif'
dbc8731a3511de80bd29ed8272c500ce
8b2b8f3a948e90cef7764c2e9c550813068b4de1
describe
'3414120' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
cf9aeeedb68e0eef7caed62ac41f7573
2736cda694c8e4f5e637dcdd10bde09e1a40e3f1
describe
'3343284' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDI' 'sip-files00122.tif'
d5c9c8f317fa50bf632b5f4af80ac740
3bc6d7f18123c7aae2120ba9f532a75b246c5b66
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0f9708468cd200b1850ef71801d9c1ca
fe955bbd6049a96b4310136abfe85410171819b3
'2011-12-29T06:59:27-05:00'
describe
'3425852' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDK' 'sip-files00124.tif'
72e2c7da6ed75c9d08d7f65bbc6d2e2a
0dacd192e465a2a05e1d7a56878601cae4538aed
describe
'3432756' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a474c092deeecbb6aa7df10c8ae89ebc
0bae0897bcf02a30058ef5bae72583ab24895dd1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDM' 'sip-files00126.tif'
875395bd3f3f9d26eaeb472a735fb300
2c04eb7699ee887abbfadd3528652da07ee5681c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
d25b840200db7459b30eb3d489f12fa5
15f077722bd133c5abe804d414a6ae1fbb1a5e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
52af228a693df6f095cadcc986f5859c
67e8d1fb95dd03b612a4f48d29f6313112f091a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
ed3610260b951a663b8941831600f139
05335b4e906b793763b193093ebaa92dba5ab5c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDQ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
c72c578aa5ebe174b40d8f6df672450f
0a01e5a46c0eface6c9fc125c5c75cace8acebd8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
9b70709cfa35ee8cf6a9f76e6fac3744
33f47527988e5860bc47d75fcbe20fa1fd3c6e83
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDS' 'sip-files00132.tif'
fd46983eeabbc89a242192f7ebba9000
2dc5bdfdfd57815a5e6028e58234efd414d942e4
'2011-12-29T06:55:38-05:00'
describe
'3462908' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
2e0c0a28b14fd1d8410757abc63b682c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDU' 'sip-files00134.tif'
76f8b276bffe038adbfa698900a78c32
b57b7022ec4f48f9bbb10a3b8eb2f0d79c099dba
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDV' 'sip-files00135.tif'
51c8ff7130f7ffb34bd19dd5c1c52b38
b9f80f6373106e9a59aced2950a11e8cc807ab66
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
4ed1b4f76627f9f10438d135e95b5da7
7115c260414dcdfec20b7597b8003143ae3df967
describe
'3444056' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDX' 'sip-files00137.tif'
a73907e8103d9a4379479c6c58941d00
fe05b68f7e3c70a7716cc4d6116cfcd768999993
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDY' 'sip-files00138.tif'
5b62af3be9de70717bc7b911a471fbcb
b264fd7353ca56ed244b8764faaa75a71c1181c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIDZ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
6815a5e031f63428d7cdc9a165144ce4
5d7cc252050d6da6cb04d977611ef6192c867a1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
ac05ddf1e1ca21a22506852b8fb21efa
4f065ff81c88bb7e8813b6b59e45a43c199298ef
'2011-12-29T06:57:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEB' 'sip-files00141.tif'
f81ad4fd35551c4a8c70a15e1db95bd3
a88b5b05465216b5dff1a5b529703940967ca5cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
c880b9fce10d57e71d22aa972f54b3c3
f3314d65e2e429b590bf65eb6f386c0005e5bbb4
'2011-12-29T06:55:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIED' 'sip-files00143.tif'
91ce81039c32c96261ee9978f137a61c
db489c4b24e0c20565eda93df0386da2cc678458
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
cf78e951b274c04c9d1952c13614ff8d
a0a7237cec275f5f3b0bce551c227118a026fc25
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c9718ceca2dc9f419ea58ef45b2a6e32
28683f41e160f0e64a1ba685625c818a85fbdf6f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e05c3fb827c4c2773966477b5dd1a9c2
324078a3f12155330829130b86946e444b6feb69
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEH' 'sip-files00147.tif'
2cc9451472411e386f66748fd749b742
b392aa53800a6ab068c1fd76e0009d637b2070ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
fa27ac715a67bd84059e3d30c108878e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
4f06cbca292f817b2210656fe3de8d0e
8a7916331f0b5a1bd21f6b637c0365c493b5ab43
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEK' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d73d8c2dac4de15c6e716e3201a3364e
d5bca6d481b8e7c3b8843da8f9b183c33f263afd
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
473af8386f9981fadb2e90b0c65427dc
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describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEM' 'sip-files00152.tif'
09602f88f0757ce649a3a867088180d4
cb941cea93c250ab65bbb98014db775592bfa4ad
'2011-12-29T06:59:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
8d38f9240e8e059f0d90367c543c0351
7074d5691a88e075fd2925af25a5bbf68f7e0f95
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEO' 'sip-files00154.tif'
30f2c11c23b4a470aea878bc76b204f0
d41e8f60d5b4c5e87b2070d91772a7b7780d7172
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d7a92ec21458747b55ef4916d864b065
e2ccab04337dd52b359ac6cf9a4fb2bd09577aab
'2011-12-29T06:58:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEQ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
edaff17d166fec9f5fe8acebc68fa8c5
5cf5aa0facdc898e41b46a8bad899e8f80440189
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIER' 'sip-files00157.tif'
c6fc13ecd7bfaddb9c253f5c8d76152a
1416106662f9d40fe991e355933f67d8dd7eafc2
describe
'3387876' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIES' 'sip-files00158.tif'
41d1e9e50b72259dd087fbc8fb9b6a92
aa4349a1b0c09bdf054c57a890508ee05369c38c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIET' 'sip-files00159.tif'
1757df05fdb22d9043abeaa86367f8c8
8e081d8ae49608dba20c5f78a5f0fc57204c951e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEU' 'sip-files00160.tif'
3fd2cad021b9e1227d6fc01451e90ff2
97416c95419b53546145347aaa28fb193135b208
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
6022063048b4fee7b0efade1b5985b7f
3fb62b7347c55674159829b0d4b35613985113f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
eaab7ccab1107b99f608c3f2fc93898b
939dbd1c982edd26476de42e5d19c15b82f0b303
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
88625f630ccb0ada0de96909238fef3c
8d8ac9e448bebf0c7a9d4e46606b5fcb81ba025e
'2011-12-29T07:01:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
346136311c39671ac670078b98c676c1
8bcb0ac9c93a8825ab1b4b8b71b891b6ad3dfe02
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIEZ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
f59f1a11495127cb97bf88ec90cb4c74
10abe6f8d528149ee2a27cfa726db2aaaefe3092
'2011-12-29T06:59:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
e4fd38d8ab4ac45e4e59f8553aaaa9f4
e1f70b99499baa3f701078a7d51777a873c2c047
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
4ac718b33da92afe278fb56538faa771
495104c22c53a595745797272cc97d6ecb136525
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
5e259caad7a7ddbed802d5fe913f9c6f
84aae444af963502ef22447564d768ade9091aef
describe
'3464356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFD' 'sip-files00169.tif'
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describe
'3454868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFE' 'sip-files00170.tif'
645843d989741b6d4884136edec4aa5a
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describe
'3473736' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
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describe
'3454940' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFG' 'sip-files00172.tif'
8ed4d41fafc89b2d979e7c608b3d2f16
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describe
'3445236' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
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describe
'3445592' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFI' 'sip-files00174.tif'
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describe
'3455016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
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describe
'3455028' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
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describe
'3464796' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
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describe
'3452616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFM' 'sip-files00178.tif'
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describe
'3464076' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
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describe
'3445396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
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describe
'3492608' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
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describe
'3454848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFQ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
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describe
'3454960' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFR' 'sip-files00183.tif'
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describe
'3464360' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFS' 'sip-files00184.tif'
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describe
'3464180' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFT' 'sip-files00185.tif'
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describe
'3426044' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
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describe
'3456224' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFV' 'sip-files00187.tif'
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describe
'3436104' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
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describe
'3511668' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFX' 'sip-files00189.tif'
8fa9b4c1de60f3bc1b9b0ac08da3f920
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describe
'3377560' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFY' 'sip-files00190.tif'
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describe
'3407612' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIFZ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
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describe
'3323256' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
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describe
'3445460' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGB' 'sip-files00193.tif'
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5ee3a08cc533c7f1a18fb3fa1c6774ab72fc018b
'2011-12-29T06:56:38-05:00'
describe
'3349544' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGC' 'sip-files00194.tif'
76ccb4ac8faac3797054e6c3f5397ce8
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describe
'3473836' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGD' 'sip-files00195.tif'
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describe
'3392920' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGE' 'sip-files00196.tif'
c30b3eca1cd7c64b5fa4da3f55031688
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describe
'3454792' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGF' 'sip-files00197.tif'
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describe
'3464328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGG' 'sip-files00198.tif'
8d1d266d7596f8099fe9137d9ff49e02
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describe
'3436224' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
8f242b9d1c9937fd33af77dba8359cfa
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describe
'3402176' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGI' 'sip-files00200.tif'
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describe
'3445428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGJ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
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ca0d4cdec3f7ab2441c359c2e327cab6f31a3efb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGK' 'sip-files00202.tif'
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describe
'3445504' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGL' 'sip-files00203.tif'
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describe
'3357604' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGM' 'sip-files00204.tif'
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899b5c73d545d5b62fea31faa4f3daebc0eeeca0
'2011-12-29T07:01:10-05:00'
describe
'3398476' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGN' 'sip-files00205.tif'
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describe
'3357668' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGO' 'sip-files00206.tif'
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describe
'3341460' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGP' 'sip-files00207.tif'
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describe
'3300524' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGQ' 'sip-files00208.tif'
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'2011-12-29T06:58:13-05:00'
describe
'3462052' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGR' 'sip-files00209.tif'
4042b191a14788cf764e7cd1093c043f
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describe
'3363052' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGS' 'sip-files00210.tif'
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describe
'3420456' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGT' 'sip-files00211.tif'
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describe
'3379624' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGU' 'sip-files00212.tif'
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describe
'3420976' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGV' 'sip-files00213.tif'
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describe
'3345352' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGW' 'sip-files00214.tif'
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describe
'3390796' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGX' 'sip-files00215.tif'
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describe
'3309888' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGY' 'sip-files00216.tif'
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describe
'3384840' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIGZ' 'sip-files00217.tif'
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describe
'3344456' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHA' 'sip-files00218.tif'
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describe
'3436132' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHB' 'sip-files00219.tif'
7a4bba3aef39d3e1f3d94b92e5ba5f85
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describe
'3278928' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHC' 'sip-files00220.tif'
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describe
'3436152' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHD' 'sip-files00221.tif'
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describe
'3349728' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHE' 'sip-files00222.tif'
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describe
'3445456' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHF' 'sip-files00223.tif'
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'2011-12-29T07:01:05-05:00'
describe
'3344596' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHG' 'sip-files00224.tif'
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describe
'3455108' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHH' 'sip-files00225.tif'
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describe
'3407356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHI' 'sip-files00226.tif'
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describe
'3473684' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHJ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
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describe
'3314176' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHK' 'sip-files00228.tif'
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describe
'3398628' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHL' 'sip-files00229.tif'
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'2011-12-29T06:56:55-05:00'
describe
'3363340' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHM' 'sip-files00230.tif'
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'2011-12-29T07:01:28-05:00'
describe
'3454384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHN' 'sip-files00231.tif'
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describe
'3402360' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHO' 'sip-files00232.tif'
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describe
'3436144' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHP' 'sip-files00233.tif'
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describe
'3331384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHQ' 'sip-files00234.tif'
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describe
'3433684' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHR' 'sip-files00235.tif'
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describe
'3381296' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHS' 'sip-files00236.tif'
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describe
'3426928' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHT' 'sip-files00237.tif'
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describe
'3344388' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHU' 'sip-files00238.tif'
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describe
'3454968' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHV' 'sip-files00239.tif'
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describe
'3372068' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHW' 'sip-files00240.tif'
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describe
'3455288' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHX' 'sip-files00241.tif'
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describe
'3473860' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHY' 'sip-files00242.tif'
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describe
'3445680' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIHZ' 'sip-files00243.tif'
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describe
'3389220' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIA' 'sip-files00244.tif'
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describe
'3436168' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIB' 'sip-files00245.tif'
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describe
'3420828' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIC' 'sip-files00246.tif'
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describe
'3473832' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIID' 'sip-files00247.tif'
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describe
'3464452' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIE' 'sip-files00248.tif'
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describe
'3455240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIF' 'sip-files00249.tif'
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describe
'3436016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIG' 'sip-files00250.tif'
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describe
'3443140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIH' 'sip-files00251.tif'
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describe
'3464936' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIII' 'sip-files00252.tif'
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describe
'3445240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIJ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
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describe
'3426180' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIK' 'sip-files00254.tif'
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'2011-12-29T06:57:28-05:00'
describe
'3389396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIL' 'sip-files00255.tif'
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describe
'3473872' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIM' 'sip-files00256.tif'
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describe
'3511516' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIIN' 'sip-files00257.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-29T06:58:18-05:00'
describe
'117870' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIMB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'147132' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIME' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'150809' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPM' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
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describe
'140893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPN' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
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describe
'156897' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPO' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
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describe
'156474' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
476c5012af52befc20c9c734d4237ba6
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describe
'157633' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPQ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
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describe
'61190' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPR' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
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describe
'141431' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPS' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
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describe
'140928' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPT' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
1cc002f047425b3a8f3f76a40ca0d237
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describe
'155228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPU' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
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describe
'150705' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPV' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
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describe
'149786' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPW' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
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describe
'143102' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPX' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
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describe
'143694' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPY' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
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describe
'123882' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIPZ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
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describe
'136214' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
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describe
'150088' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQB' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
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describe
'146578' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
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describe
'65302' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQD' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
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'2011-12-29T06:59:47-05:00'
describe
'154956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQE' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
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describe
'159223' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQF' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
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describe
'146899' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQG' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
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describe
'150050' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
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describe
'150565' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQI' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
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describe
'156435' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQJ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
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describe
'128796' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQK' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
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describe
'150831' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
ecf0feacda21d1b787fee76e2000836e
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describe
'149179' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQM' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
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describe
'145658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQN' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
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describe
'141153' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQO' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
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describe
'146317' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQP' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
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describe
'145507' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQQ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
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describe
'151431' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQR' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
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describe
'158527' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQS' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
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describe
'153534' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQT' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
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describe
'153979' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQU' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
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describe
'110664' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQV' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
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describe
'60843' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQW' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
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describe
'139894' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQX' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
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describe
'136549' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQY' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
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describe
'144641' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIQZ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
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describe
'157191' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRA' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
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describe
'148598' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRB' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
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describe
'139301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRC' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
5da0cb053c0d75178794249bd6148fbd
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'2011-12-29T06:59:01-05:00'
describe
'147881' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRD' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
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describe
'145653' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRE' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
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describe
'148596' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRF' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'152414' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRH' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
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describe
'149473' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRI' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
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describe
'151301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRJ' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
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describe
'152084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRK' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
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describe
'157216' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRL' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
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describe
'160744' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRM' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
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describe
'148132' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRN' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
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describe
'144122' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRO' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
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describe
'159664' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRP' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
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describe
'162558' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRQ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
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describe
'83018' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRR' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
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describe
'129940' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRS' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
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describe
'160819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRT' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
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describe
'157091' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRU' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
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describe
'157178' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRV' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
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describe
'57816' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRW' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
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describe
'137595' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRX' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
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describe
'158341' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIRY' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'143925' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISA' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
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describe
'170654' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISB' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
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describe
'158487' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISC' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
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describe
'150964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISD' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
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describe
'153210' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISE' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
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describe
'153062' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISF' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
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describe
'151960' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISG' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
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describe
'155873' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISH' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
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describe
'142796' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISI' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
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describe
'144717' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISJ' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
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describe
'150991' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISK' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
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describe
'145891' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISL' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
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describe
'61261' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISM' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
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describe
'155862' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISN' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
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describe
'144126' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISO' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
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describe
'163351' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISP' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
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describe
'166866' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISQ' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
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'2011-12-29T07:00:16-05:00'
describe
'155213' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISR' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
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'2011-12-29T07:01:55-05:00'
describe
'144832' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISS' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
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describe
'146884' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIST' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
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describe
'150860' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISU' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
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'2011-12-29T07:00:56-05:00'
describe
'144195' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISV' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
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describe
'150626' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISW' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
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describe
'139865' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISX' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
969f64626bf2f30aedd4dc6b42310e65
55b29040c212bc700c9563b34de23944e26769ae
describe
'149463' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISY' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
a2a8c1a13ae3cdca037bbedd3f8cfb3b
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describe
'129017' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABISZ' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
1d92ff1ba3769528a777c6ef630f0d22
8ea3002679ff0afe2b3ab72629cacd66a02a411e
describe
'145505' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITA' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
6d0cb3129f58b67a05f3c30f81383f62
a3d2d599ef498233ce2807a9401377b5bd2d4be8
describe
'147256' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITB' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
ac7e03568d2597f871975b460cb6fd78
96661df6d070e1c4d059b91c6867d329b005c798
describe
'148942' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITC' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
c1bc231a2f9c239d45aac6b84cba14ae
209a90e1e8eb5d12ccc519965ace333c9ea622e2
describe
'157033' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITD' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
9ed6ba549bcda7ca4c7c967b717f5980
ddf155db6cb06c1ad7457cf6f4ea9f8708081d40
describe
'79127' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITE' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
ae2f494aa9b1d4a3f6bde0eeb7334aef
0e73ea8f1c510978de4f15b44661be4f185e567d
describe
'147236' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITF' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
dd011b9cdf518cf85c6c44174b3e5f6e
b71025632db32c11b852153fe68af364c433202f
describe
'135842' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITG' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
05d49cd28441eb6fb511f491994ef7e5
38fe117982a701c29092343f32767fc4a6c96952
describe
'61848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITH' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
818dbe797e008a01bc4254dae9f0dd6f
04a2bc709b7172095ec85368ed886d5e8d928c8e
describe
'17535' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITI' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
5774dbb71da9eed6b1c22d775d2c3aef
f803e29f35fb47034e4c794ddb608765c236c36b
describe
'42951' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITJ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
2c93315a4e9073d375b156740635298a
d6dd09d318ff6828d806efb3485345c34934dd45
describe
'28153' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITK' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
e13407b4419b2d71b0dc474212e07cbc
dd152f91b94d7bbaa98b9ae4a39bfeb87598c602
describe
'12359' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITL' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
7d7e3c23f9ad532b166c16e566d4a606
e3bdba8d80318e393c1f8f3b464d371cffa80b05
describe
'24535' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITM' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
bd9803efb9b8084c4d30c6c0c59a1e48
44a7477d36e2b895620cff5ead8cea677c6a9b5c
describe
'19521' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITN' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
91decb875d0e880557ed5222f96f6357
ec2c4082e8dd3e9d50c8ea22937cda7f8c450d6a
describe
'26718' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITO' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
289af31ae324fbc6010a826c6e22bdab
930749e4d126e3911eae785869aa496e316306e3
describe
'19815' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITP' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
df5f24e7ff0825b57c64d9ffa13d9b86
0dd3e463d4cb8b72eb79ededac85289cde8a1e50
describe
'55512' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITQ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
e7976fd152474ae80651065608443deb
22d73030d01b1e45996dd4c331c857e5101d269a
describe
'26757' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
28e436c0b7846ed9d190891a217dcc4a
c6a78b4ec1a4b16714da6d9b0ac0d35a9aed2cbc
describe
'29242' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITS' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
fd37596e9a58bc7a293d2c2a0b0a599f
1d1d22836089209b83a03a9a578b10f53f7cb3c6
describe
'20414' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
2cec77ffadd96b3659ad8990f95b5a8b
dbad2de95d93c8fcf5fa8d4fe79ba312eaa477b1
describe
'42086' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
31904861a5f6fd4c625ef8389c5b060a
badd93f341e403b0365c0ce90df0b95ef4232de1
describe
'23044' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
0050a2f5f50e257cdfa907389833abd6
6a0586ba12ef27fe3ebfc5f76095a0e154b40081
describe
'50436' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
101157f8378659246f64f733b0ec93ed
4ad9c3a7ca3568a0061eb99b5343bf4e9351bd73
describe
'24352' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
77e9de10b84fee0df04f41aadd36617e
273e3e81a8b2d18cbc722dc8b57fb715e3e9c603
describe
'58761' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
6a6c52081df033aea58b61c3739ad8b6
b8dd37e5bf2a60a000e362af7b2d8275b38d4823
describe
'26290' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABITZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
1a9f48d83e13d0d431ea35336a870995
2746b00d8c9745441f55a433acb9cb50561b4afc
describe
'56511' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
a3fdd40afebaa83974762488e599502f
124d0b7922394b0b59aa75393ad26bf9605ca82e
describe
'26059' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUB' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
ccc751536fea666c526a946a00bac953
e8f451f5a498fb2d6649f616262af228e94a054f
describe
'54992' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ed65048013917302088b4e2cf66cbe2c
99ff150a42bf51677880c2aad650da5ee62be513
describe
'25816' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUD' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
02e6c50451380271763a8f48e38dbfee
f24b7b642d0b88fa9a08869230aeea66fd577fa8
describe
'47965' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUE' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
67e90477916eae16d3ad38ade5b15e9e
0762a4767ecbab24808a91b13807c63b421cb1ff
describe
'25488' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2db9d6f2309b10d1d9874ac97b61d221
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describe
'57160' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b5f212fab4b0b8898f21f0b96b5aed8c
3a73d956ee18d1dae42fba640eb01db82fc4dac9
describe
'25794' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
3e5ee55631e81672820b38a10b04e349
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describe
'55374' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
841c82fcac171bf683f4fed49a2779d9
cca951cd235741286f60b062737b363899fbce80
describe
'25817' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUJ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3ab79ce8707982d73cc27b359926dba7
5b594fbcd0a7b0d1377fcf682ffe3629dd30bc7d
describe
'52270' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7a2ccb5fca07adf516baaf37b1516f88
daa8c39e2f3ffac9707fefb5513194e7794101dd
describe
'25203' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
093210d5dfccfc5875e14f1cffcb9b9a
4ced94e879ec763a3cbad2b75737931e568c367f
describe
'49523' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
7b3b1f18ed825fc52da4f3d261492a08
72a67feb00567b7a5841c58db69d7722e04c68ed
describe
'25377' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
96d25eff17d25e78bd1ec5bd83f70799
6806df9d3a205558900de062da6c29f83ddb5b7b
describe
'19979' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
95f405bcb78c0504f1270bdf0049375e
9fdc046feb4567750f04c90a22fd4d17e9dfa5c6
describe
'18122' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUP' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ec43f4c6440f6ff3b6234aa6446bd6ca
2922f0397b027c8282bfacdb417efea7c38752de
describe
'56566' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUQ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
8e98529558458ae79ad6bd7d42253bf9
590d92cd7de5a90be084c0873330b1912e41106a
describe
'25747' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
83dcce84806d365883093ae9530dcfa5
8d6f472e66cda80a8df6c407ca3a7c671c8769e7
describe
'54154' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
cfecc74c736dece27a00bd04a2c83bee
f0f582a081d9801c6a4453dab520ad4978059103
describe
'25662' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6303efa81eef3997c0cb041b9ed17089
7a06a8b3b6a80a468e6db29ee9df7716a533bee1
describe
'56113' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
809fec755e885f42492fc3b41fb1aea4
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describe
'25887' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c48184be045856f6c6969542686517de
63a2556c3a647a3371880a90d516da6280237d8b
describe
'56582' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUW' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
372451335e01914e581da8fbc7182183
47d7c87dd03e6b6f9bde0785c4b288d308caa23c
describe
'25865' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
7e666a982e869bfb38cf4a9e0fa08c8e
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describe
'57594' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUY' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
dcd1f8909397a3efe77ac27767ece0e5
04e62fd7ebc969a2adf5ba8a54d4b375d3ed8a5c
describe
'25808' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIUZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
0e04bf356dde251c49d5aa8e95eed658
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describe
'54214' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
b9bad25a9050e7e3c813cc6b3ab0e234
2589ea833dd704902c9cce756370fbe3f10288a5
describe
'25506' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
260024be1eb4c6e2b426e6c454d48249
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describe
'56356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6560098916eb64d188e19aac925e2344
a104eb1a6fc457114c89dc94320bc5c5c46da4db
describe
'25974' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
63cac8486198edf3c7b452fd98196aeb
2cf120352301b9095a3a499fc080c2587418df13
describe
'55144' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d687420eeed10681cfda963fe1015463
fb08c4179b4940ed2ea608b5890fb47f825dfce5
describe
'25643' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVF' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
d047a10c250addb91f148623f399813b
544f565cea834ce8ce74552eea5056e1fbd92218
describe
'56600' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVG' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
f959e7e169216c039acdaf0e6498928f
05d4e316513263ed2b942b4d3ec94e22f62fc587
describe
'25773' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVH' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
6d11d0d25872a5fa2a4514de9bef3e28
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describe
'57852' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVI' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
bb0ba321012aaef530d9cdd34ed3fd6b
16ff5676633d00e02e078b5644548e70e66a4277
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
747a2a58f637ae7caf01b613535cac78
a9610a6ef879461c37dab32500febef56a83e0e8
describe
'54870' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
7c7ce3bc4b6b3649486e52512ba14245
2899a2d864c8f247b241bf99f9d8d82b99dd25ae
describe
'25332' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVL' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
9f779add9e01d96d2989102e3d93fb06
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describe
'34560' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVM' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
54f29f85b0ec76505baf7846bfdf865e
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describe
'21449' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVN' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
bc57760df968fecfde6d6b40bed999bb
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describe
'47422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
775eae63ce226f01ccae2ae08303438f
e2dedaaa2839737775e2ac39370072994335947f
describe
'24130' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
95f31c8c79e82a269132c30def86a55f
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describe
'52037' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
33e145adc950ccc5e6fe61d84ce01c95
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describe
'24955' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVR' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
6b046f136b76e59cb3b0120c695143c5
32736136111956adea0e5b5157145cdb92f817b2
describe
'40199' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d5a283f015445860beef287d9423703e
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describe
'23356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVT' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
d871134d8985917187b398c16f74f532
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describe
'19397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
7ea54796523ea214c379e66bcc647f7b
157678a7289cf91ecd797f3abef27037d278782d
describe
'17953' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d623c39cc4b2e25e94555eea32bfe3f7
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describe
'53028' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
ec76a30ca093281e604210b3cd0cd7c7
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describe
'24956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
1f7fb53f4438333ee13f36efdd6ac5d1
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describe
'54457' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
551b87a61ea408efe7e81268682389dc
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describe
'25218' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIVZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
fe534777fb92ade611219f8a520096dd
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describe
'53899' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e160c7f4e51b1a609a0e7afcb6363ccf
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describe
'25061' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
5a8d830c6c780421c61c98d6a98efa8b
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describe
'54207' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e1f2e246688d80add3e6ee0d711bb9ec
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describe
'25370' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
8b22fc9e4db0ac99231b15267d405ee3
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describe
'52381' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
80b47819ab9dcd25f8fe389fc483fcd5
cd179e3755af4d96dc58274b05a041a0e0210488
describe
'25257' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWF' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
1ac8adbb694c9071964c0f0d78277f3b
250ca68d57fee847a908edfb0cba430f38b3d545
describe
'54441' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
d816c8c32b035484d0c2473aee8acf51
7653639f868e94ded7ada3ba84f63e82ca8dc630
describe
'25271' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7295544e99c10ad05ead897bbe466cf2
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describe
'54899' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6e8919dde6f61ae5f3af3c912bd37a27
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describe
'25086' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
c4b53fbadaffdeddd5bbf5295c1ce5f2
1a061b39d4dc5c23cc82f8a3c83522fd973e623b
describe
'51727' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
da88f35111e78907f3d133ba528bf195
5516c15aa205889da3f95526cc7478522d2dc793
describe
'25125' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
016797af11abd256547ae395405ea762
e828f4783f7a50ab145f2c6f8c6438d28052c842
describe
'55594' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ff4045dfd308d4a5c41bd521d5469a36
920190736559193c4d3e6a2feea03d15de23d6b7
describe
'25305' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b2c4d575ac6cb893e593db18f9d8202c
009f67fac5d7d7be91de48f25914e76ce2c08e0d
describe
'39910' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
eeae7f22241a2232997fb3fa823335d2
2e17c7f677a1ab15a2bab23eef877e71f70ddef0
describe
'23303' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWP' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
31f0f2639f56ba9566d76c2d6a6fcd49
90df6df688ed8fabd28679edbdcd56f1926fadf9
describe
'53478' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWQ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
79c8450a17c0e4ad47fc1fc0780d3e69
8451e6b5b4700dce0ba431d2fc1b0526a8873208
describe
'25322' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
799e703db97b466740dd56c372d70b31
8289de8c1b90c6ef57794725355e5430fb157a73
describe
'52659' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWS' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
40ebd04205aa00371e1a6acb25e24bd8
e167b6594b858435f29a8f7d09e935bf0c8f1b47
describe
'25194' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
70e51f1e17e7b5806422006426dcadb7
a2b793b8ff97b117ddbd29ebe2a77ce56207d32f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
012cb94764d2232b4e4d6b28eb70a622
5021c79ea7b22f4f284a95d88c30101cf7ba98ab
describe
'24765' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
662d003e85a7eed26753cff15d24a30f
9bd217e13f7673e6e124e8d5f2e37636d90d5ef5
describe
'50504' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
43e4507a4f346cd75650d403c4be7085
8d03e1a1277844f4070babcaa0db9f32e6be9bd8
describe
'24869' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWX' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
7d8e584e9b9dcc7e8a43c35f3e684b2c
59ae0692a1202866e52855060e1fd593d481cc49
describe
'54180' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWY' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6558a86fc12a335fbaba0d87cfafcb91
b7f3ec69095dcb9b36fc4891ac9ee967c787cdf8
describe
'25157' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIWZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b6239e846e7d3434c228fe46090ab9a3
244eaed1d857785a5f6e08cdb3fcad6d6a04e0ec
describe
'51858' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6f8ebba1eaff82a4a3c414901d2f08eb
7a05d66591a32bbda173da7754e005e2d907a027
describe
'24990' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
49385fc81d2ad9040663f06d5661df12
51baca5ac73c54f1e9db77073c3183f1bfaad132
describe
'54822' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
041f1f02958b477189c1a1e742fbca0c
94275a58e131c7cabc25d27a8d7eaf1a1644be6e
describe
'24988' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
2d85ce2b45ae9d142ba36b868a0da4c3
15c639313ec36edef90c91aa2e4b073dc8e98413
describe
'51814' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e17f031e11629e78c78c1815886d84b1
a71a434040bd6c99385e032e129275d25c00a03e
describe
'24901' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3a2199c970dba1e3e43a9926b8bbc2f3
9c76a31d2b293e54610232bab7d14c5dbb7bc44b
describe
'40138' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXG' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5055d733a70391a0f7d4ddfcbb8d96f3
ae489bd03b36b2a07f53720ce4e78d9496070d91
describe
'22182' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXH' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
9903f05dcda05cf68a8d939488023927
9a3b1cc6cf3ea8097fab96dee5239bb523fbb0c0
describe
'46822' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
e31e10355aa69f75efcd5502b61a0314
366e84aa40dcdd885fcb2bfc5a2589cb3a89801a
describe
'23964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXJ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
41f654f9fb404424951c73987546730c
c8db02c9ade79f120e1868203b6a6500943904de
describe
'19270' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXK' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
17870c9da702bf1389ea86d15bd0517f
ee006a69c633ce38ec0de0e983423d1a16c5a31d
describe
'17962' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXL' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
21358094253b02777b18ce227a174317
ea7e859c640e695cc74c70e1009d3f103930a8f0
describe
'42439' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXM' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
25764024cce43f3da46e734a3927449b
c859384dca0db196d53b326f80aeedc18709441a
describe
'24068' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXN' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5aa67d9745bb0afe9e4cca3eb6b2ed28
234a810e1c46e7d96c68d784df1358978338a901
describe
'57959' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXO' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
acb6be76f5575efe85e425373ded2f4a
7a503ec337ea8a554daaab00e449597c7e19371e
describe
'25886' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
8a6a6ba8e9593672653a53c263db9c73
5c719eda794c05621d7b7850159628b533f05ea0
describe
'53362' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
6c37e8ae403e91c40ce3b9143a888a21
fa7414be4129c8f730088df78dd5e347971f4105
describe
'25153' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
cac7c5ec08c60bb3f03a1f2ce963ab60
13501d4a88fae2faee90b14fe7a9e54343036550
describe
'54251' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4f489a90825bff0b219c8a90713e5826
cbe9a3d586d83fe5661f34467e2fa324ec838dcf
describe
'25503' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXT' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
260f04acf525037d46c7c08c8125ac0b
93c6df2a23f25d8d10160a4f3b0dcfa3b7470d2c
describe
'49413' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
392716e2dbd24446f60c5284b835ac3b
06795748835565acd5b830f5e6d1de856eabaac9
describe
'24631' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
0d5b67b5e81ea23f04f7ebaf78b6bef4
99ef74cd05cd7d3986389ffddb65d796447ab381
describe
'52866' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
2180e75c246986614b12929bb62404d5
98bdee0fd22bbae563e608d5947f4356533f2652
describe
'24954' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXX' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
b767f07379a2fc11dc341e430551d568
b2ec3af2e6e7a5364e6f838418a3941cea6a1760
describe
'50577' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXY' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7af78ebbcc34ed5707518378162524de
beac50a87dc705ad3d6f2d993578c49d0b35e5cd
describe
'24907' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIXZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
0e89012c8a353242a1c60de2d27c60fb
35f4392c8e6d23cea94e67fc4504febe58219f87
describe
'52205' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
940fc3bed7a1f2d7bd24deb112dbc24a
2325e19f8938eb779fd8934443ef58e9eb3c09c8
describe
'25108' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYB' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
4cd7e9b2aa3a135d473c8cca411f9867
1dfec0f77deb0284f9d0d68772a0225d1695aaf7
describe
'52546' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1d6a33dd6644af6f929bebb60dd95ed1
7b442cd77ddc83a75ecfababec266341cad7232f
describe
'24999' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYD' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
2d33cab56466c9bb5d63238ee7405160
63eacd6b78e401295ab1b5bb4b0e493f80ad7370
describe
'51612' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
245b98ae71afcea84f7d7ea84048b47a
36c6c2759358d1b27efe1fa9fdf12a595c0e28d9
describe
'24902' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYF' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e72c6935d29b280466982fcc3eea1948
e9a7c66b43abd1b9417e22fa7641a8350b822c14
describe
'54178' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
74e01f6acedcac53742f86d7ebb1e95c
8c9c84ca30db1b30f5c513e9bb73a8e0086372b6
describe
'25585' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e427187213d90a2ed929f8239b4cb057
f8aa43852d968493af95dbe82c3884daeedabdce
describe
'56193' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c65bfc96df482982bc8f5aab00ea6078
5c5f82d071d8bfb432f2140955a27d4cfaac850b
describe
'25229' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYJ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
2b6f8e18972cb61509494edbdcb9e6fe
762da69eb4803215205aeb7e908736fbaf3b3e38
describe
'51237' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYK' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1d662dbe990517b0521ff1d47e9e1366
bb57b12c109019c628ec89ca6796072cc820afdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c1e39a6470df8c65e39ecf3646cb523e
86b65c0fd6e76341dd83affa8aba0df0114b80e6
describe
'51117' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYM' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
3fb415f4a1a0ca529956f1a3d10ed495
ffa7c02b0f3f0c319dcc23e73ac88ad361df8b01
describe
'24878' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYN' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
d9468adaa3d58837f1781ef77f79116c
060c24493f2f4391dae7f0080638541586cc41aa
describe
'53295' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYO' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
3f0191c2cb3a21f6e1d9fa9bc5655f23
15879ef30b74d29a77b23378ecfae05742b35540
describe
'25195' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYP' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
8625de63b132163f8af10006d69e1233
c7762447095563269d0cbe5f3a76b65bd949f103
describe
'54571' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYQ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
6b8ae52c4ab9f287a4f0d4a4cd9f6aed
6e706f8d24ed91310afa284634016813719c90e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYR' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
c4bdb03ff9662476dedfd2b2c697ab46
1d6cc90f57a1a2dc9d0825f6621e8e6499f6dfc1
describe
'53644' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYS' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
923afae0312b45cace1b657b39bbcf32
15b29b422b6c58504e4721047f0dda0e821dc28d
describe
'25362' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYT' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
86153657234a999cdb3fb528957f53e8
e40b667f2349af7d0833d671390391c6f5ddd875
describe
'54147' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5ea110683dd8e368c183052a7fa7bc48
d9fd8920cd66fd5666dbabf7e45b1943a04567b6
describe
'25163' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYV' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
7fd3192a57bb3af0b794e724c4ec501e
f2cb999694ca5941a59dd83f80729e14cf9c7230
describe
'53137' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
684cd56309aee409c2bdadceafe93a9f
c6c13cee4e3448af20db90b50fbe84129f2fe203
describe
'25449' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYX' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a015704c5ac88f7244ecd3ca79a54d97
972b455787092e942a8f36f98ae92abbbba7fc0f
describe
'53158' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYY' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
91971e10799fb54e7f790608e5f988d6
d7fa756bf62ce6b3e6518281203dfea851ba2eae
describe
'25065' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIYZ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
8c791f319b188342bf768bb02f6fcce2
73bbe89e7c88e7d72d59cb7474e93c577ba14bbb
describe
'53811' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
02e0b577fc213c1005be8071fff6fd98
213175c4f374a8da2118c5946fe82366ecc7124d
describe
'25265' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
70d7fb9b0f7af48086949428a6344d8f
fb182b82016517d0c6ae6ed2e864fb5c3deff8b2
describe
'50684' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
47d7c3ca3f8090c867b7556c1b089f8b
83c1904090651743cf4dc665194cfddef041876b
describe
'24971' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
c6f42eaa91d2d44fdec16f8cc814ec3d
b38c4610086824a03376089c4e247df4ef17d4cc
describe
'48268' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e96642772bd1a00324a897c59fe22e9d
96e36eb5074275f4aed7752e4b5fba0a6506db02
describe
'25144' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZF' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
9361127857b85c48c409b0474d051fd7
5e27f3d845afb8117650d53fa35a57bb5fa95ea2
describe
'48338' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZG' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7e86f07ba8e80e00364bd62e82c7a1f9
6c3cda9adf7ce668d50f5968c37cbc375dac89dc
describe
'24057' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZH' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
93faf18ea7d068baa75fe34efec13f62
ba6c635cdeae327486dd4a4cb5620273041f8f06
describe
'49389' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZI' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b5d1fb1334a77b081839b28fc8fa0904
832afee434ebf91ac9a9a43d7e508523087443f2
describe
'24197' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZJ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
3c8e700d3d57557d13102705bcde5a3c
db4af41a0d09d2e553d621b24e6120e6f6aa1843
describe
'57624' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZK' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
6f29aa63470b002427d6524b5a5a4e58
1ec744ce59418fad45215ac14e5b58a83e51fc6a
describe
'25944' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZL' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
25b83370746f6d1dec76811bbc628777
d62bff69aab87a42257672e1aa61b09a87601b8d
describe
'54069' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZM' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0453682082a8390f9bf112abf4dea868
b463b1f86cb6cc10785eae1adc9870b0aa32bec3
describe
'25624' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZN' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
7e0106d6fb97eac9422de8ebc7d1328b
99b57e9853069109d23c2116a6c0c0f9534438f7
describe
'58189' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZO' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f22cf2ac81b297dd6bb328221c4a6db8
3e28558d27b9a77e614a57988c4c2af354953fd3
describe
'25644' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
045ff8b6a981a95bd9beb2f596ecb86b
0f52a671f0914a54860cd89c79214614320fbf25
describe
'50861' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZQ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d1ec5465bc95b9064db222f281746007
a518f385472c0468c814df0bb098f44a57592ddf
describe
'25032' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZR' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
05066cf92de62cd271af111a05f8906d
83f4aa1c5a3c209325941e1cc083be886b69167d
describe
'47469' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e0adc347bba846cf5beb6ce8bd4b074e
b573f2f8b41c73695c09da856584b53781c8ed48
describe
'24047' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZT' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
4a66c31ac470ac72125ff4d78c6a5a39
6d83123bec2b11e7721f5e32c78ac9fb70cffdea
describe
'51772' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZU' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
6f53cd61b2ba2b312a30962ee8fdcac8
42ae4e8df499e25e65531354a97d156aca276bb1
describe
'25429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
558ba4fc9d35becbab9f94787ea5f689
e34fe16d49da688914084887e82abe142e0cbfc2
describe
'51795' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
650f00ada8c0868d24a73188a485de9e
dac9492ed192d51e6819c2f4cb32803d7a590eaa
describe
'25264' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZX' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8430dc106e9726e7d35b3cfdc825b2e1
a6f74c11d7a921cf8b9a5c11b61f0525bb691074
describe
'55817' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZY' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
cf7251840973a1ef15f76532a8491f8d
572fc621a8abe8ce3fcf6f8140c44f1b9fb3e388
describe
'25415' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABIZZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
2f0818ffba09cd4475cf0befc7b417a9
3e5f343aae972575c928af82ccc9d6c588ce9bb0
describe
'21152' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
9f99eca44648552fb5146f4ebc9b9a9d
c0591e4713d33f65fc149669fa0bfbdf49e73cd2
describe
'18354' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAB' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
f2e97a70141f7cfc2ab1e8c8c9f5790c
bb726f4fc5d219b85556c3f818c045ae46e22573
describe
'45454' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
aed760d1a98e2ea8a1af007a78ef7f38
6de383368483ea9de47d363bc8a4ae11f1e5c592
describe
'24801' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAD' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
a8ce446273e9ad085c1b8f8b834a1f3f
75da1a1a25b46e8dc36d5e8ae0e35e724e017d06
describe
'41297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAE' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
afccc57679a796af46a57412d543a444
4230b585b9602e155cb0771c7a6183ed84d2fb0b
describe
'22938' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAF' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
5db3d897d430bb4cae13cd2599fc6935
fbb6fc9975f47dbf2aadd3d09f81da64d48c2859
describe
'46607' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5ca1dd81a82337f204f3dc28e867d221
34cf3cdb7598735407f06ca3154fbd3869a43575
describe
'23830' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
93d04dd4abd96bfb317f67c996a663de
ed44c2ddc57aa4bcb97655b5ce713185b8194781
describe
'52949' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
7c08f2b74077b1dff260ac63ab4e0653
bb2ec165eb779d0d318684492296e7ae3d5470cb
describe
'25279' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAJ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
841c0d329360139e8be4a7397ba03e8f
2e0f17e1a4601263cf54ea0a98ae7d03d6fb2993
describe
'53576' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAK' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ca1881716f6d92fce179a553c038639b
067799508e34a4f530045a877b833cb986a3020b
describe
'25209' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAL' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
3fc9de6ce9333348dca2fc6c826eaefa
8a4eda65afcabdccd34c42f25c5e99e8bc3f7c96
describe
'51797' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAM' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d90c6959979e290e075316cf9527642e
a5f9ed5b1995efb81ddb6e6ac032e7e35c36d9bf
describe
'25540' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAN' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
aae9c77f55d09480f62ae38c8679f749
379064d84368c33e6e27c541720fe9ec2a261068
describe
'52202' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAO' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a419b37a79c3b3c551c7ed3c081880ea
6b6b3770582548246a523c8ae9a928467b84968d
describe
'25407' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAP' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
02bb2e4d1abbf904ca790756d4d5d239
fca7ff585973720ed050eda50f8c84e66f5e1f40
describe
'52744' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAQ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f95819dfa58ea6d2b875516e61f3c8d9
284dd5a9c044a09b88f0a3954e2e2134331a38ed
describe
'25041' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
ef5162e29ee845a875ec54560b5308b6
589938aa9fd8672fb390a785b1d42fbed72e143f
describe
'55372' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAS' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a5c4c28beed70bcbb2c9e93a931e87d7
5ac6d66418cc8e1d225dfbbaee6e272177427f4f
describe
'25692' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAT' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e0e7a956011dc87fde942c2cc71ed95a
b3e5d4cf81d7faff28c624c528df38463194a0e8
describe
'41334' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAU' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
f577d5aa3a623655fb4db70aa450c901
c351ae82f6b04f0646cf25807e0ae068122dc43d
describe
'22501' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
7e1fc29f27cfefcfa0ed9ba8a64ee987
09fda0dcca4c7edee576da7a93a8aef3038a0ab5
describe
'50432' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAW' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
cb326cc909d5cf28b24cbd35e6b417a1
e8322c10d196d72741f27b6d31be23c963719d4c
describe
'24204' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
892d5325c88c7c775c5ea29e217270ab
42b8331bc9ede71607122c83946f4bf2b31fab93
describe
'55716' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAY' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
250731b19c94d4884686cd2523baee26
563a3145f9af8d164fa4a03ce2418fa4ef997072
describe
'25396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJAZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
482a4e6325d60d9fa911b619c2404f1e
95117e0cce3435914fc98a48c62821fb6af5a773
describe
'54556' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBA' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
46cb997960a1be5db8a0c94254b6e4cc
05163f3d1085e1b45f0b79b62dfd056fa3ce0d00
describe
'25313' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBB' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
049eb1a79f1625b42421123b8f30f6cd
4b1bf6d91e398078b663baa03f83967107132449
describe
'56965' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBC' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
766409ded1f7867d46c72c6ff854e91d
b3637d8b545a60e87261b6855c6f2838c4f95bbb
describe
'25326' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBD' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
436c34c8ba054be3b672447818dc8c74
ce9c8b25111a0acf0ae98a1febf55b229a3711d3
describe
'46524' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
b3c55f0a7e1023eb6e3400eb7677bcaf
6c0db088290774ee25e28cb2ea81efe3660d55b8
describe
'24157' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBF' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
26b37e90d153451c6181f0dd24ba88e4
879844c6a95a631e7436b24318cb45e562fa7ff2
describe
'56324' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBG' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
92fa5ca0637dee9c5f8309e2b70d335b
886754a5e131d8834592c0a4ed31b64c7f88eff7
describe
'25778' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d0dff4698a02670cde76c5eb59214171
4239e515aef3af252ff7d6dc5c8f56f9a790fe9e
describe
'52639' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBI' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
8724a77a6abc9e4a75d0db59ff36ecb7
caa6edf6e3386f1785e21a17e3bbd2c404641002
describe
'25118' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBJ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
2e22d977d02fcecb52c76bc98a12215e
2c2247e30042d64d15aa9b082b6a3df3cd61dc13
describe
'19935' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBK' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
75ee9f55c0ec65243018245645909686
0aa49e5e8a0d3039c1e6c3c88d0d04dbf01c78b5
describe
'18147' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBL' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
8f7d0941e33d4a38370ece209ab4c2fe
b9758c547eb75334d8b2311f1abfd5c933046821
describe
'53261' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBM' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4999d248f5311a2cd45f851519cdd460
e453646e075964ba28a9901de9cfe0589602d590
describe
'26173' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
daa2e7d7f71fd353795b24b4334272bb
43c3bb4dbfb0cabd893c20e85bb84ecf157706e5
describe
'56745' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBO' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ad0876326a7c2c1975fcedc52cd00be3
aad284927b2be3ff0d492db8cee9079998b79012
describe
'25833' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBP' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
815c7f97ca91f04fb7bbc4f4ce5d04e8
1364ead933f6cde2e4e29bbc47cb4bb6a3c1205d
describe
'51938' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
39fbdfd60b1da6bbccaf7fd81b4fe8ec
1dc6e2170c3d2dfcfa9504d1efb97d88280c8cbf
describe
'25423' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBR' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2dbf6ee3651823107d0902d515d477a6
171895369d43fdc2b4e80bc022b6bc1c77c27a9d
describe
'57001' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBS' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
3a7f9b07010e68aee275c19446b0be39
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describe
'25648' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBT' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ae549d7c745c081851218250777701e7
c27eb0ec528d49d46df789043b013618daf35534
describe
'53800' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBU' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
21b626d2ca272d686fa4444c68f94785
c72c9a121efd8453fb7530b08b39e447312b4be7
describe
'25288' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBV' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
6c542a6f5fef87be18c903aa1dd7781a
58bf1c93567d3047d07a6df0ae7eccc675df86eb
describe
'54878' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
59ab44485a86ba990c2f452c9252bdaa
b9aca5f7c9b47d28b666240c1b1b3472ea39e3a6
describe
'25612' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBX' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
c8656629da78bf97459715d73e4b0772
d7dd66090c01ca92dff01766d684d7b40438cb14
describe
'54840' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBY' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
b613c8f22517f085ca6a13075108deaf
c70a27834bdb794d4e33443ee6e8e896a3940313
describe
'25551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJBZ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
48abcd20829c4b0395130eb897c8b3ea
07975fcffeb34d48c94acc23a8eec8b64e77e646
describe
'52835' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCA' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
e5963aebec17ad3817778d9ea244e202
afc47aa1cebf6e0cd934b453bd1343e353afb30b
describe
'25433' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCB' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
40a4681890aebbd691cdb22725fc92ad
f0f4627e65bbbbaae26ce8e655702003ec00edca
describe
'54142' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
dcc8af3458561611cebd7a530a72b6eb
cb3d31429e60bfc26723fbcd79a6e32927a12be9
describe
'25364' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCD' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
4fef13a51ab14383d49adf97dfb826ec
1a186f2a8199e5c7865f647660abf0665c23668c
describe
'52815' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
9c02855427e8a15b760330178a67cd57
052846d6df860de2701991effe478edb2baa3b48
describe
'24893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCF' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e4fc0360f0dd206c57d028d8a6498b1e
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describe
'54843' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCG' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
e0e5d30899877ddb1b7123a86d531429
9a46eb8ec9509710cb867ef22b0cc5a06de73896
describe
'25807' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b017ecd709207135fefaa1de9327b5b7
0bdbfa266814640473fd0c9ef3a0b238a1ff0177
describe
'53214' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCI' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
01aae9841547d290a8d172bb8b8134d8
61fec31dd1b3a9fa318a0249a6edb3dcc3da120e
describe
'25018' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCJ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
db8efc05ea3ecb0e72baa5e1baa8c6b2
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describe
'42324' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
dd17b397895a2ad781f4a7360c3b46de
f4d2cf014d5791054ec100291be9a20d7ae90741
describe
'22951' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCL' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
e074e5edb9065242cd394b24f2ad8c04
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describe
'47669' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
283bbe2f021fcd708a08f7668d963807
2adbe1b668497e006fa8f60101d2aad63f06cced
describe
'23749' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
8abf57786beb5994699da334dfa9c091
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describe
'53887' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f4d1d6a54f4243b703eebebf459b28d2
98629724c8d0c2adacdc24859c8d5aa36f4596ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCP' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5d0b94a27080924e0053a14ce8d5bdf3
42ee390d8adf69bc4f6c6a0020db597a971dff4c
describe
'52234' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCQ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c51078c7c136d5a9ab3ea1f7ee22edab
54df97c2aa2e0b219abf5e77ae45e3ea18298b34
describe
'24977' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCR' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
0f6b03712a0e362ac929d3cbb927485f
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describe
'51552' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCS' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
f5d53c9d7c8ba732cd1d66904313c599
90092c26a76200b0276fb12315c1326a29d0f4c6
describe
'25092' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
108cea050acf4d6d10be141feaf5c8ce
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describe
'51863' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCU' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
6e9dbac863d731488f7a88b61f153b77
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describe
'25104' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCV' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
b698bc323016e8fe09834c1d484aa4b3
de9ff3d4d1a03281d2f027a0cccfe340466f7c49
describe
'57372' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
373526fa0ae1a7e346d7e64b5e0a5fae
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describe
'25574' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCX' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b5b45ab4258d081a99e2dbfb060942b1
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describe
'56422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCY' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
38292bc29e20bf64d891a2d206b396a7
4813b59454d39f63124609dcf39dbe4a388472c7
describe
'25546' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJCZ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
2292b053c05f943dff0b192a2078db1e
5364f84b08f260c56e6e0d4331bca102d476f7e5
describe
'47168' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDA' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
8287eb84084969bf2dd490087b829500
ff3f6cd94845bf0fbed77cd8db8c93507b992b19
describe
'24686' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDB' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
abe9336dcb0cc6d0da51ea0e17e20f1f
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describe
'56378' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDC' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
9adaa530826c84c50e91a25022abce13
89a1456defd2bc85a369f662163fd69a71d6bdc8
describe
'25405' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDD' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
278dbe0530c330461a6347be8be7a0f2
2a4f7e8937ac3b06ff234c3551496ac5305730d1
describe
'52458' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDE' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
04d332bd2285ad488d01b6bb7532c919
df5c22a04216410f824be382d63a07183fa037e0
describe
'25183' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDF' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
a1e24717fbfbe1ef52735b0d6431bde0
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describe
'47802' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDG' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
805a4319ab50cbfc13b08af00942180d
bc6714eb0c066ec1a1bf845e0d2d1dd519d3a06d
describe
'24457' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
cd5d1363ae92df104b9fea7568775e53
0f680c1d4ae217aa054070be3bbbf9208fd54d0d
describe
'51249' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDI' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
9d8e9c6a44ea3fae56a002ef8a3ed856
d56ba985e4ceff86714375eca617a593716cf5e9
describe
'25119' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDJ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
8fc9d5d8dd56467e07abc4dd1f0e1678
ad24c038935e3c547724c7bf2f7f4484934f1dc2
describe
'53161' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDK' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
5bfade90c467a103fe4179c9e2ea81dc
9bdb049c5ba5e7cdcb800cadcf75ddab84b955a7
describe
'25331' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDL' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
1ab7a02567b3c6fa7d8824ef6ec28d6b
e99bfef30f8b55b0b1c1f65dba821789971ec633
describe
'51059' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDM' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
a7c95b3570d4ba0c1eb4a8a20aafc5f6
e866c2f9c03718609d64fd58663e16842d4638d4
describe
'25301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDN' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
eed92d881bbdcc5e85be2d4402568f2a
b1cba97e7d5a9a8b453594ad74949da56dfe8e6d
describe
'53605' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDO' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
e74107093ff68a2fe6682e0340fcf5a7
33bc59cba4c32ac637a84068bf7aa79b1767d8a4
describe
'25659' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDP' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
3625bcb17667f2c2df8e487acffc7475
330d3eec5ded50241747f90c2b84703cb54d5334
describe
'53207' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDQ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
861e95738a5157ab986ba3caea419097
a0ca0f13a05c8460d1e1c632cdb7d2a2867a4a66
describe
'25205' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDR' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
796b0254b723a3f95ddfbe97d6a02638
de8758b546f507e480afcd21c533511caa9f49ff
describe
'55930' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDS' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
c4267f6722133a1d866401a44558c8b7
a7c38e630b583218b5d1b1257cfbb00a040f5284
describe
'25439' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDT' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b463ae1f913190797a18a07c51c325e6
32269b0058ecdf3e5c4a89ce065f9809c1bc7d6d
describe
'52417' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDU' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
cf5381d1427ea28499acb49b9ef30b11
cd4c5e3daa708561aed54d18d9ba94b35cade1c3
describe
'24998' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDV' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
dc03a1b9344585e40a3f89b99b623211
9dccc7574650cffc34cfeb11b57c72a03b3d3999
describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDW' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
5e33bd9e4412ac7891361153cc1287d8
05f4f7f610c97a9ee1d625f8e09e0501a14b0beb
describe
'21487' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDX' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
1f80cbc105c8c120020cadbe2d520c6d
31ef25783751494150c14d100c98f4b4bad030e8
describe
'43613' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDY' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
913427b9d1f47bc9a2e8f33ee00d1a0f
0ec423c687de7e031f0422569cf4ddbc5c52b725
describe
'23352' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJDZ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
5e36b7b3ab6cd5bd2d33357a52409c2d
c8e5e1d3cded533a99dc4d50ad66e2f808dcafa4
describe
'19522' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEA' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
50011720a03a3db9ff47fe6e16aa3421
96cd22b2af17ef7bdfb77a22c4ef41cea0984430
describe
'17938' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEB' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
7e1874e7366d7dea93e1647f2f82c828
0b27455980596c6df34fe70cf0bc30afea5621a6
describe
'48661' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEC' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
88049c125ad26df0bbad308a08b14d69
89abad0ccf99c28922519ddf4a551dd6df8f2a48
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJED' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
8a8f8e2f3b344b84e532b23912eed456
b57865c26ff20c4e1590ed9f42a62154fa19eb60
describe
'52558' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEE' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
e19f5da6784df73562968c86e0866444
1550f2db0044a03bf5bc0a2eb2fff0e1e351fe20
describe
'25154' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEF' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
86e3806bbfaba6ceda1425da7e54c3d6
448c9418cbdf03b87719cd04db17b9cc6a0b7247
describe
'51748' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEG' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
cd5fa4093fab5afb5eb91ce688c10f77
84f5bf07ebaed288b4a939cfc61b0716de5dd0dd
describe
'24874' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
9b9b68d19f782dfdbb88ebd746e78559
bec8da9a84be091181321ac3f277c2e7909cc91d
describe
'50882' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEI' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
37c488c4bccbb4bad1da8ca2ac838407
30c878b19d5f435d6fee7b5a55efdf83da3558e9
describe
'24811' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEJ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
3599197df735c8c396a0b0219f0720dd
2e370928e626d3ec6374d3ae284fbca3647de66f
describe
'54331' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEK' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
e7bce2bba112d2477ec43a737ab8fa88
96de8fdba66fb3c19081d70d946d0ad1d1ef9466
describe
'25343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEL' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
6ddb1d53dc295c94b11954564bb8511e
e7208ea34ecd2ab69ea5b9aa1b6dbc90ef527b13
describe
'53305' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
6d7de782389f1d9ee58873e36efcacce
fb4d15f33f900aeebb76450c09da50dbefd9793e
describe
'25077' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
3de09673236475d320aa799effb16205
46c2aeb44e995d5a612f084b7f5ed46ac0e21b1c
describe
'43267' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEO' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
91186f9fa0e7a82a57d5de108a39aec9
13c250bb1afe01a1cbf1b91c95ef5517be7573d0
describe
'23850' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEP' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
41cdfaee2b9345e613bfbcce916bdb56
0729284be07b8d6f91ea2d58d173cc4a8b592269
describe
'55385' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEQ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
fe0d7897723127c3cbbc84a83d6c633b
b8d7dd706bd7946e8a0f9f45b4b58f687e6f8c9d
describe
'25382' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJER' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
94aad068a236b07f7f5af4d905271d14
209bedd6b737033091b00c7c45eef16918b1a65b
describe
'56628' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJES' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
ff29a3181e5c1769b37d5c9578dd0946
7822ec6d12826ae968dfe92b6fc28a44e2f26ef4
describe
'25106' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJET' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
2e546fbecdafd83e875a7cf5ae020c84
03650fa5919a6988419c31c2b7d9d5af0cd38bdd
describe
'52174' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEU' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
68d6ffef5afc60ea2f4b683497e12603
b3bba2a781cedea56c82bc88c9380205b4623a60
describe
'25224' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEV' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
7551c791a92aa36abaa30fac9fcdf609
2c718e9be6eeb496b525b5b963ac0263ec4de6c8
describe
'50879' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEW' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
20e97f06c0325bc7f689dc0a5524c8a0
10086c0216d494941f0364079349d2015fc7d148
describe
'25039' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEX' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
db9351ce3ad8550d660e5dfdc71e9287
7e1911ab97ff70ee552ea6fe2e915c218e9548d9
describe
'52852' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEY' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
2f1f55dde9413df2089b798e27817cab
d6f327527b17c893525bfe68166983055e84b250
describe
'25181' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJEZ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
aa8851d3fe0194c37164dea52d75f34e
57c1db1613a369a03b01376472b404d879779a24
describe
'55410' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFA' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
660e029fb312374ee6745f16d3bf04f6
efaac19209ddfafbcd375cddb279a626d64b1dd7
describe
'25380' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFB' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
e474d1ff65767f201bab01d0f272e078
fe480ab809aaec38cc766e5ebbceb286930bdf7f
describe
'52823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFC' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
81f8312653fb31c2e3c904345f80e8eb
b839037764d5d7875b4c4f5595899c027755ffac
describe
'25174' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFD' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
9457a0262efa176cf4230638dd9ec41e
1129d052bea7eaddcfe6c642b7f1a062519fa04c
describe
'52890' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFE' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
3117794965f5c4af3d5f09274c82c44c
df35be5d477850c2f06e3ba384a2ed18d5679bf5
describe
'25464' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFF' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
1c43d25653a0444791237937a25d7f70
fee82b5b7f2229611c3875ac60c07f389607ca2a
describe
'57862' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFG' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
22fc00d9dda4933128eca7b4ec36032b
5f72d9b10d0e25244128e1cba735027b4f0eea71
describe
'25668' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFH' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
b234072f5cdb7d8f3307e903082dc6f1
b94b295c6338135f196d644a7d835fc60cb197a9
describe
'52610' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFI' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
28a4b0620c784fac7904743d56e336af
61db630a5dbfa59d2c6fb5d8fbd010d6586b80fb
describe
'25040' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFJ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
f26aefd57db15452abc6204347304b89
53558be3c873f830c718f913d19c0a9965c335b9
describe
'51461' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFK' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
5e8608f438ef8ad67f2384bfce29eac4
dbc1bc3498abc198d51b729093460fb272c3bbbc
describe
'24740' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFL' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
16de7dcafa6cd5191a316cf827274ca6
eeb213729628d70c9f2443c99d932912630be349
describe
'49056' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
25f7fea49be756a1699ade09a3e5b3dd
ab98273b04ecc09a0d9736bc56e4440350e22e00
describe
'24992' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFN' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
5e1fb318bece10e4fa28ba7b1912c05f
37f0d2ed14b00adc7e482ec4f1725f09fc60fe8f
describe
'36658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFO' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
4be8870944cf09e98ab89f9b63cc72ef
69f35f1a1a87e65f324ee87293c709c1be8b42c6
describe
'21674' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFP' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
2dd21849601ae2bd03b6ece74c5b4735
dcdf39d325b914fb4ae92efe2c7992437f57ab91
describe
'43367' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFQ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
fdcc1ee050665386ff103a0dcbc381c1
9c2cd107cc567e57d30f18eeca242708ddd3304f
describe
'23127' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFR' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
f820ea1d4ca8d0d5689b34c67f6ea870
162b3014c5af7c38545b84e4793c0466d6a802ee
describe
'49889' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
7be61122b250971a4823b5cab80cb211
4c4bbb7c06d850c4e23e941ed4e876e7058f8fd9
describe
'17233' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFT' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
27762af807d5d2c40ea78c7f96d73642
6fbd288f6fdd6f6db0e63810ff4e7ee4210e329a
describe
'46795' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFU' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
99ab1d2b8aec876d57a531bf81999e12
d26e66b82a8eafadd190189b84f83a258f0372d9
describe
'17206' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFV' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
d9ce83e70cc1a78e6bcbdb43a66a57ea
134f519f86a4a343dfd074ebe7ecbfddb8157fe9
describe
'44023' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFW' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
8a6e717a63a0c99b4cfe21b49c4412ea
4f625aa606de6d535e95cc195c019a3c93175b58
describe
'17016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFX' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
47f0455468971f3b7bdf68a958c96d1a
b72dd81a749a4a0bba5b97c2803f32372926ff9a
describe
'45551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFY' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
5f367b84715d583b493d1dc091cb39b3
401e471e47885a8381ff97b418c53a969303d470
describe
'17054' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJFZ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
b8fae907b3715d23911895d1714ade4f
4d8dad848785facbb984ca8f4466cdb67021b103
describe
'46230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGA' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
325686413743f144c6990246e086f96e
23e77359f36529f8076d1acca8147009bbff148e
describe
'16148' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGB' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
14b4bf6aa0bb1d9e97a21eb5d035c13c
4dbf785454386384312d608d480985c2ebc89fd9
describe
'44728' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGC' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
fe0beb014db1899a5fb03ed4a96a5b9d
9e62dafbb8492af82e79fedb1bdb89d604ba14cd
describe
'17160' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGD' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
50495ec09e98d2a17f62b8364401dfb2
500468e14cde00548c36c2958cbb112d027d2875
describe
'49184' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGE' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
3665866956ba5f8ac9224248613b831b
b85b0c1ce85548ebf2b06a50aff9d5c85306344a
describe
'17116' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGF' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
903c4d165021702b2b42cf1b47d7683a
edf643a3fb48639c218e98d5e0dc84dd8db045f9
describe
'47798' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGG' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
11dc3ea060c867e0b997d5c37853fdc0
7676909afc42af9ca514bb72a7d0275814cf9e63
describe
'17293' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGH' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
13990343a30253e58295b3c7f462c65e
1832241980ebb6f331dbf41ec4dd243d69430c27
describe
'45331' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGI' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
9e258c4b39210ac935690bd2565fa177
b6e8f6b3000c4dd49fe9cecbb139be87917a0e80
describe
'17784' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGJ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
09867a50cafe7c63f1a898395bace679
37f56745f6f9600f0b49f07280e3adcfaa323820
describe
'14986' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGK' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
df68326f61abfb2cf2e61d93697bb051
ed046171fac93d11b2388f2132a295d0166c58f8
describe
'8616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGL' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
8e259ac8a3db1a45f323655a53f8a2bc
93b97cc5aa7eacf2017d6cf3722496ef18bec0e0
describe
'44244' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
ecd71583ab92d73509e0c58a77c62040
2166b896c6a201c656bd00ed3bf23d40e0e20c99
describe
'16351' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGN' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
68e818bc444e70df7c4a9241677b5064
1e90a8552201cfbcb8797b7c5cb0e40f5adf1f8d
describe
'44323' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGO' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
fa7e4616d9f5cc08e7844edc92b1b1b3
9ea8b6255e43b9be8e2556f6d03a675eee7d9d85
describe
'16752' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGP' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
779909400bcdb3c7eb2ed8c1cf62aa96
eee96f125d789fadbdd1c0cc2e51557295408f4a
describe
'48576' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGQ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
ed923220125030932bc84a8a6e1c58a5
a9a5f25adb2ecb9683a894466d7ba3e7c5729dfc
describe
'16976' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGR' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
e9647ae1a1a1df8ef5fc43ac10f58518
03bbf6abbb43b80b6f5a05a9702130d0a1d14792
describe
'47337' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGS' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8d1cf7cc9036ed94bf04b5a44c8e53a9
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describe
'17131' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGT' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
e3729db1be2bce0063c85a36a9c13b8b
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describe
'46452' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGU' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
8726cef9ced0ba52e08f99f92f25849a
a5d1d9ee5147c72f4f32ab8877f425d2e089d4ff
describe
'16926' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGV' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
1c5a644475f5e480f0a9cddbd1034cc4
38f0da2f07f90e0784435e230364921d6c1ed940
describe
'44166' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGW' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
38ad322f4fde6de1fc6319eb6b5c46ab
6d1ee6f6b6a6ae7516c6a6fda0489b48b1de4abf
describe
'17179' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGX' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
3e8e753972983690d4fa806b23bac0b9
2b717d359a441d0a7c1588664fa378d98fafdfd6
describe
'44426' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGY' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
52fe7c624e3d9c283bfc30a3ae6e1f05
6467fa05bc61136acddac4696a9fcc162085f100
describe
'16604' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJGZ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
9e15a23cae41d83909d495a1ee91da46
0dc85708dc365f2526946a4bb27ebc0ddebd0d73
describe
'37990' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHA' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
596ec928f7f5e7a1dd984494eba38ce8
958416c7d5fd5cdd980dbf20fdf00772dd269136
describe
'14921' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHB' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
7c16e0f45bf1e103d8aa83e756bc9738
0919e14029acff3823cd3eee60c13ba54c2ac901
describe
'41683' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHC' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
234d8a2aefeab4d55e8451fbc37c6c5d
a4c0b699ab2810fa92babb540dd85678dc7fb71e
describe
'15484' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHD' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
88d229508f75c1ef62d59420159dbd02
713bfe2b94dce4451bb54adc55895e3604b1d266
describe
'46019' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHE' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
9b9e1f602dbeaf376974199c49485de8
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describe
'16953' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHF' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
2cfcb6d64d431d9be8672f1eef71c04d
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describe
'42208' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHG' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
af2cd714e3ab8dbe35c10bb19f110b50
49648fad7cced6ab2c76c9e583b3c7226d4d1a67
describe
'17137' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHH' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
74e82fb41b1f665db62f7f1166939269
c74d16d003c6006bdf498ecab228800ee6ed38fe
describe
'15946' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHI' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
dd3723caf055f7a4b08a6cdc0545c16a
927f06995aed894da7c4e60c1ae2b4e0852382bb
describe
'8715' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHJ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
3ae773a553a7d8447049505fb2e78547
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describe
'49371' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHK' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
2b284536304c4d60a9b0276439dd8c85
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describe
'17084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHL' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
45526f599d1627130bfc118d52870f6b
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describe
'50666' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHM' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
0683c2a79458497e71ec353e62eadd46
640b445a9411882c8a6f2590d5a1aa9c97733a7d
describe
'17703' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHN' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
adc64b8032704f03541281d5b5c6213f
1a0bdc1c45f22bda502e6c15d1c326521d3f5489
describe
'46116' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHO' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e49ca9d1bb41d924df317a6953c410c8
421f8ec1af7593d2ec83dffde9a1dfe481a426c2
describe
'16823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHP' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
ad1c771eeabfdc3712a24f0496597e15
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describe
'48240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHQ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
30e799c5afa4823408fd647a8cf3d51d
945532969bc287c01ec7856877e6b3061f957396
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHR' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
b5816ca21887a782f0443a8d00e81a43
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describe
'48457' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHS' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
af5a27108d8042dd831bc1cf3d173c4b
fb9208fe200a917a55986d3026fe40bd4d0cc5b2
describe
'17450' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHT' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
28a1a5c859e8ae33eb748dcf24ca13f9
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describe
'48515' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHU' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
bd2f841b119ce8de8b1356865bcffeb8
faec26eaa240f9c8cf2e28d5ae7c581675605523
describe
'16859' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHV' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
664bae78736e62bedebcb968a906d895
9793962856b8d8569c86062615c954368c0245fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHW' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
8ed66dcdd5b7623449b385061b6b4157
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describe
'16142' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHX' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
33897b128d78f03e919e96d6136734f3
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describe
'47787' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHY' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
5076470e2d60654cd689d043688f5a5b
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describe
'17067' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJHZ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
4a298c980e8f0d32cc8e9588fe4089a9
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describe
'47768' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIA' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
244aa641104bae43e2a781a00b1c09c3
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describe
'17286' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIB' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
34206094cdbee90a2d278ed8df376267
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describe
'45347' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIC' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
084be083e9006d543ade22378ebaf937
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describe
'17008' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJID' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
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describe
'44698' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIE' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
21518a99ddc318b0e7b5726b553317c3
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describe
'16837' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIF' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
70373e6e42902607f0cc4cff8a2bab7f
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describe
'46838' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIG' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
fbad19f4fcb1bd9c0d8d996fac781b71
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describe
'17364' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIH' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
170e6c06ecc6a8d2e4affaf1e0c89566
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describe
'45817' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJII' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
567272dd0e22816c8af5984debbc5a7d
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describe
'17095' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIJ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
dd301bb78cbf5ab3d36d75b8eef44768
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describe
'48166' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIK' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
09e26f1099410f47c146dacca092778c
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describe
'17511' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIL' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
4efd0c8ce4798dde64518df413db9b6a
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describe
'49612' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIM' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
dac6e5c45411655bad8c423d548cf0bc
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describe
'17440' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIN' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
b5fac6777485fa28685b8e315c810e67
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describe
'48973' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIO' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
b6bf47e0fcda238690c8998d5156bb02
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describe
'17616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIP' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
16d563f3dd8a5ede6a3f4c82ed6c8b2d
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describe
'49455' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIQ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
2b9620157cef69e4c642de0586d4ef7e
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describe
'17528' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIR' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
f20a040d4d0020638d2f3c46e2442ec4
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describe
'32217' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIS' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
d8d91ec0d27fdaff0f41ad24f8b325ab
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describe
'13122' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIT' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
4897b210a26a1db4c43a1f81c2d1e1a7
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describe
'15730' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIU' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
ca8a03ba057aa796b8285fc5de12bb1f
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describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIV' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
246e9926a290b9c48e0ce6033bbb50c8
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describe
'42318' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIW' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
ef79472f4d176a3888ab8957757ff2e3
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describe
'17426' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIX' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
e576cb9bca0ebd616d90e491ca340e0b
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describe
'41340' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIY' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
59f64c7be9dee8093118ac9604c2496e
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describe
'15489' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJIZ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
4c9e4bea9c47bb337de5e650aa3529cf
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describe
'44593' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJA' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
7ad9330e7090486eb1265cecc69abfa2
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describe
'16508' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJB' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
3eec9442ba29f61b90eda5334302b319
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describe
'49481' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJC' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
c8f9eb0a4a58e5293427cac4cc857485
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describe
'17515' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJD' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
5864286db9fc2fbe6e2a4f23a56fcc03
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describe
'46716' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJE' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
031f1a34fc6a1648e74c8a731941e1dc
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describe
'16927' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJF' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
4f2ee2d5f978517165e09f376dd8b277
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describe
'41152' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJG' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
ce17876f1a08f45b8b72734d678a7e6a
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describe
'16476' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJH' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
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describe
'45306' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJI' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
4e2945d9883fc00ba3333613b1fd3cd0
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describe
'16674' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJJ' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
194b68de36fb27ae14a63da83bfe438f
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describe
'45837' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJK' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
2cb723d4ad952d879c81070e35031f33
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describe
'16344' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJL' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
491c4ccb63cb94e2be26c8a8ddea79e5
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describe
'45995' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJM' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
12f67037a2ec5dc5eea5e99ed9c3dada
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describe
'17040' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJN' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
0179984cd9a5647080fea2dfd4211e74
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describe
'45650' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJO' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
6dc11821062d603da513624bb1e6e26b
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describe
'16933' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJP' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
f8b7e55063baf0e6582a894149c8cbdb
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describe
'48068' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJQ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
eaeed91f463bd8db6612169d3840b739
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describe
'17393' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJR' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
a407398f63edc86313cf08fd664f9f7c
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describe
'47144' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJS' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
1af7d5fffe4b99710bc871111cab14f9
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describe
'17256' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJT' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
28a0e6f759752be13d1a8fd835776f7f
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describe
'48802' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJU' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
f1741a2121241a7f407bb6c12f565bc3
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describe
'17869' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJV' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
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describe
'46864' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJW' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
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describe
'17029' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJX' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
2bd8816ecf4630871a0f6d0b682656ac
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describe
'49140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJY' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
41bbb613e066b99c1c1dccf35aa5e897
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describe
'17523' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJJZ' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
a2d9be1dfd10ecbad36c9ac7245e3834
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describe
'49848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKA' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
e313bb4cbfdd1061e9cb4f11bfa3898d
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describe
'17587' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKB' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
865dbfc8362141b33071d30692e167f1
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describe
'45368' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKC' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
0f3259cd446cb285c52a2e16eef72f1f
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describe
'16656' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKD' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
fbfa74719d0fd10b51aa9a69600c8a7a
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describe
'45547' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKE' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
0076b65ed10bc42398133fb049e6f769
cdc4bc6824d4718e269cf5b0097fbe885e8d9b87
describe
'16637' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKF' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
250cd64620f87dc28332e0aca2638f51
e16f2195eda6a3310c830ed968d36abf09f8b5eb
describe
'50055' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKG' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
192b6a3a771305dc645cc6c45d4c8907
2474307dcc2ae7727642e3fec96822610568ca78
describe
'17812' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKH' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
d4a632b895743f04da71f86a1a54bf14
5987c51a62fde6da9cab3fa4f38fa020f0d7cc65
describe
'49812' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKI' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
33d2733b7a39d67c19ac22144b16deb8
0f9be183c9947d42c220521213e14b40f99dae4f
describe
'17674' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKJ' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
d7ba946919ffe346f638b2c8bcff0c94
76f5d5ce27ccecb887e66e4f83b169a30ac76b87
describe
'22213' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKK' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
9fc0e13db8cb185facf9303a91eb7a6a
66b6aee827e6ab8d4547fbf47508a02f2800a625
describe
'10508' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKL' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
ec22764a8f51d11be6e8eeca7ad0d76a
b92d4000569e513578203f32bf2e3fc34d8342b3
describe
'39529' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKM' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
cad35818a4ef048493b99016720a431b
5a6b23f5a2ba305b3dbb6e99b69d8b2f3b7e72d2
describe
'14985' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKN' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
ab2296c7812fb2134e1fc31bc054ba08
76e8298eac6d72f05eb83fb3c999c2d6330a2900
describe
'49871' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKO' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
6f676f3477aa102b541a0f64f202007b
1c94b8230635b331cf1717ca0775a443193cb561
describe
'17420' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKP' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
fe5c94476e8a31f139119d1e4a56e4ac
c38ae3106fbf70527b940fce8ff051afa353fe11
describe
'47581' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKQ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
0413b2bbd850a6f940f6ab779111919f
0cc8bd5c970c01ddb27482114f5fb2511b7227ce
describe
'16981' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKR' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
36f8158b664a7e522cb90e6f972696a9
7770df739ee78d12543010fbb08255f054f20ce3
describe
'51431' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKS' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
d3cacad5faea0e2d6e18ce06609ecc2e
404a530c5d73112d0b6f1e7941d72f4312bd9327
describe
'17529' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKT' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
086d3eee9ae25479eea99ac194f2e5e5
30b91324c9293574f826749770639b0b019268af
describe
'14790' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKU' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
a69ac5798e090cc026bc67e1ed907f53
a4323d952a340ec3efcd01bfd78ef50b2bcb7e10
describe
'8405' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKV' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
c6bf2e92928e300baa491071dec878ca
86d9bf20f774a6c1378c4041ccd3be9b8026294f
describe
'40977' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKW' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
6b9d400fad9362fde1ccbdb17ed9be81
7e78b57e55bf3f1049947b119091ed274e32bdb1
describe
'17026' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKX' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
17ae0bda4b743fafa65b7e87ad25d3d0
1c37392a908975f10ce959ec5918c0ae770450d1
describe
'49359' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKY' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
f0b07df168ff1f98f96fc6d835bcde5e
1d0f1632d1de5f43925cd60e35060199faa6b8fc
describe
'17759' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJKZ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
3d211a6288944678358a752e91c926c8
7614793a9b2870be0e25b2200f58c64a018b014c
describe
'47514' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLA' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
616ce9b821d47df6e481a2685771f601
763767715f9044166fdf4730349863473dad0060
describe
'17221' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLB' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
d09592bc626e8745c71d03e91cc4464f
06c586de22ab6d860b2ca6e6f263c89ac6fbc14c
describe
'47040' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLC' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
80e9207e48f26bd3874a235476bbf7c3
12abe24f7c59692e3f4cf2d737f66ab26d15da3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLD' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
98a152757ae2c1451f47ff276083f22e
0e3ded553b10a3934ab975efd9ecbe1f4d0e1984
describe
'52718' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLE' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
8d224e3622750e6c8704203127af224e
3fb08b0531bc60fa5e1b418faa373fa1cfc6afee
describe
'17866' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLF' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
f5117f342715ae812332bebbc06067ad
b00d1423ef212a7b08195050464d6a0de077f24f
describe
'49301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLG' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
4ab4213b71c058596b40f1a5676bfc13
d1cb65d35b346a073c145d5e2bc24b6e9e9216a3
describe
'18151' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLH' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
72fd1d0443434ee23ec3d947907f9255
c56f3f948865f7f9ba30d7342cffb33098d373b5
describe
'47346' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLI' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
a668c6cd066862bc78532a873ceb1ae0
85f45a05be595a9d796cf037313cd1b3062f87ce
describe
'17200' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLJ' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
b6bccc5823e9650beea6fe328961d494
e4cb7c2c7a959320d243279619c2ea78d1c6f443
describe
'49159' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLK' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
c0aa958b6136c53b1d6faca1f6f34524
04669a97cc322c20679a55873f9de9281c9434dd
describe
'17320' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLL' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
7ca974a8aee9276bb5c30dcedcaaf7c3
aa66b7b76e294ba2fc93e12051f888d1a63b5788
describe
'48300' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLM' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
36326f71795929ea83f63adb39bcf58b
194cac8735125e1e2fc8b9b81e0af5e7b38d3095
describe
'17525' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLN' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
c3f1a383429e32d1574dd2398542dfd5
f75cc77d5b6cae4ae5df4a0f762abdb069c6ebbb
describe
'48405' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLO' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
e1c42750afed72bcbe708da391b502fc
95094b98476b80f564d39cb3baf8ccc8dec45afb
describe
'17465' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLP' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
d27153573c238a7a597a2b5dce4d2dee
86bcebf75fac049ecfe3b0febaa811c3ce0387a8
describe
'49086' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLQ' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
7e85a836c87537e2c6fe87aa7770eb5e
beddd47f99a182888ed7969e432ca95e52c71b5e
describe
'17464' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLR' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
3180cbf5a2bae044cec7137a6dac7096
0b35113e00cdb453d6786f2ff0b67ce27391ca86
describe
'45926' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLS' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
a3b50b77ee95ee65a6e74a2593346236
45b7b3a369a2b72802f33e760a3000a8f4d9997f
describe
'17289' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLT' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
a75f9d9e7a9381c5ba610fe4000e737f
e7824796942f109c469b52e25bef846e5d659cf2
describe
'46150' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLU' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
b983057775bd9ffcd1b8976be32458c4
82811f7876077333d18d324456ab2b29c5c0fe75
describe
'17536' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLV' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
e832a333738eccc70e21870d6800a18a
6134eaaf6a25d43c4fe22ba2ab53ac35d1697d73
describe
'48735' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLW' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
b69c69700c74fdeac93b530911b76ce8
605e613a02c130f72526d72233401fc5f1442378
describe
'18230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLX' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
7b67a7f5c9289a0e71a6c685522ef398
b913b8e731b935e2c2c5675080ffb8639e488ed8
describe
'45269' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLY' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
6efd76394ebeb59c4a1cb01a1ef9163a
c140908945344435ff494ad3393193a5369a24a4
describe
'16663' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJLZ' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
3bba32ef343c32784fa494f909fcdf6a
b99c260ad89c34c80e55226162528082e07e65a3
describe
'15253' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMA' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
fc5eca7fc9f10b547d589c35e952c3b8
f5536c9ee30980cb4bf8157af6594f326f1f9363
describe
'8664' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMB' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
01c56342c2bafd3c4cc3777172f817e8
3fddea47ff8d1553230dc54676dff9b9f0c94b5e
describe
'45893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMC' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
bac33c1d2bb7de1a2090624442f1e46f
43314ee4830bfc1b6d37ac7248d3de21aeeca979
describe
'18301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMD' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
c8d3dd65e2043b466d270033d306ab5d
36e4df79856cebac00034c0ddb62e79adfbddfa8
describe
'44230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJME' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
2581500fe7a87d4c959e7ddcc4c7d269
0cc61ebe05780d0d0eaed82ecbdfd9e4083e7781
describe
'15805' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMF' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
46e37e3316e532a2c658db9790d480b8
e9a012df5a89b44931bac2052c20212bf83ac5cb
describe
'51539' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMG' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
4d8e2054d4deeaf5c4f9775fad65442a
4e093089dc566d83e7ea73ffec0abd311fd244b0
describe
'18059' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMH' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
f30d33ed209e3e4df87db1658d47542d
b31804e53878eed57b70e307646b6bce9842ba85
describe
'51976' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMI' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
fbdff2f4e72e5e8910e8cd5eac40bf9e
d572c8f5df82a5e2709a22dc4f2d50fd7502bbbe
describe
'18165' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMJ' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
594e6cd4a8ac1bf219a637b07e770b59
8de21f7d7c8f197b381a6a253b7c3edc02dfa0a9
describe
'49384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMK' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
726546af31b168b461c787195d5a575d
844e0c1441e3acbde8c8a184147d8741f05ab9b4
describe
'17407' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJML' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
10737518d30be272f2c3e85f3367f897
99070b4f191efc8f684f95d14624be8868be2e51
describe
'47193' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMM' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
44e9a717d46b63f74efc39673d743208
8aed5826d4c85a6192c9776a7461d6dc55ea9000
describe
'17389' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMN' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
dcd6e7b211a453c50ee4855bb395539e
72067e656c64cd7d29ca2cb8aa4e302182018425
describe
'45658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMO' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
28501ad32eb0b8d8870e2ca1e72697e8
f97cdfbd6fab6f7e0df3d01b997b6f843833d052
describe
'17121' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMP' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
7c0a4e8c5d1e273428707ecc1e3f63dc
3481747cd9d23da15e74b07aa968991f049d711c
describe
'48910' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMQ' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
da95d39337bca13c0026b6ec01854505
2e58da5f0b3f952b346967748528873b60ce194e
describe
'17815' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMR' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
195f81fa7e7004b577ddcad4276ddb9f
fecab739b0b08553255f3d3b8fa73bdd24e52205
describe
'46033' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMS' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
17d3ff5269018cb519c929ac035b6d66
919e58a1c9d32b501591389de49ebfd244e8cc93
describe
'17028' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMT' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
87cc5035ac65e1c384f52d43efe955cf
2d81843409a840c69ceee6f49699d23b3903d6b0
describe
'47297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMU' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
94593a6806cc7ad78841d7ca44b720cf
2c020ceb04aac3845fa1a8e63fd6f5ddd5f40d83
describe
'17343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMV' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
743316447579cdf7db8d224e542161e7
4ab92b5e43e2d97fd9201e693755b2f4b2b1ffc3
describe
'44793' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMW' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
4b3e2eb5c911a68987a97713a8081232
f531bd232a95c7ffef14cf1d09961d0985207f01
describe
'16757' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMX' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
209f196a0a92b22a5d34fb796f0679fb
d406b87a5bd9eeb1563e92ab9e71f5a7da6d87b6
describe
'47595' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMY' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
ef6a296c6c65ff86b264a391c3336985
eacf14770af2793618308b867e5a3f63bf0fc504
describe
'17309' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJMZ' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
24977170546e9118a16cb7a63395fb57
86564f8fe565efc34a54b5bbcaf3963cacf87ab4
describe
'39610' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNA' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
07278153827765efc5c9303a20cd1bba
f6bd3ffd484fe69265d3ee713990a61667743195
describe
'16686' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNB' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
fbcbd59e9c1666f0f1f5b4df61630b8e
5ba1d6203f52d0b0b1a1ea70be742e57047675b8
describe
'45904' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNC' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
93a723ea1745b56049fbb7b01ba64c58
39d4ab35ba164d8b7b5c6450b1ae1d5005f7ea57
describe
'17329' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJND' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
30f51710e9b1dd9b9b2e6c650a4bb3b1
d4f5da0d4f61aaa85a4a0361517e03ee46aa83de
describe
'45192' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNE' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
f3377e2b7ff295926cda28bbdf7e0b24
e83b4015efae93f716ef0c64f16f2473b894662f
describe
'16894' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNF' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
c24291391fbfe7c5792ff42993354997
bf37f6f0838663b93baf0611a91e88532d803106
describe
'46884' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNG' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
6113bded833014865298302e1b3390ef
ecedbc0da319530eb99413dd1b8ff84ecdbfc063
describe
'17412' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNH' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
f5c845ae7051e516ed6ff8c749becdee
8aba4f90b01e03d5aa1314ff08491a03aae9e537
describe
'48567' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNI' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
0d09d0937b8ceb8d4cae63d10fff9cef
a07b884f92de3817ba789dac7a839642bb1d63c7
describe
'17079' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNJ' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
3bc205af2104b98a736b90ad0faae7ac
de0c59c97ccd0c029aaaae099d755183f4c545a7
describe
'21357' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNK' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
2ef5ab1b6f870abae577eaf7b425fd7b
3a1ca3ee44752272f37bf5b5d21d2e2aa68c3923
describe
'10808' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNL' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
ab976b1b3e117249643940f2c71134af
adad3def76e635ff54da99050b824bf8181dcdc0
describe
'31858' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNM' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
f8ce0c8eabc7b98a6ec9b8d43d3f3d75
10103e7cdbd87c671b07d17af76cd4fc5f1d507d
describe
'12723' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNN' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
442d4f86eb7ae2ebcd06ba23be3dcaef
f0fd37d7f2b8e7d8743a575f8ab209c9b3e666c3
describe
'26701' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNO' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
0d5c90d037bb84bf45396f2fbc6cca94
d4a04db9af50121096c7e61b11c803d857e34f97
describe
'12093' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABHfileF20081202_AABJNP' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
a3878d4dd5d80dc0a125633b31d68527
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_ PROFESSOR’S

E.H.Fowler


The Baldwin Library

University
mB x2
Florida


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN




BY THE SAME AUTHOR. |

PRICE 6/- |

THE YOUNG PRETENDERS; |
A STORY OF CHILD LIFE.

With 12 Illustrations by Philip Burne-Jones.

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON,
NEW YORK AND BOMBAY.

ABERDEEN UNIVERSITY PRESS,
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“Now, MY LOVES, AND HOW DO YOU ALL DO 2??? EXCLAIMED MRS. OAKLEY.
[See page 155.
PAE KOnE SsOkes ChInKEN

BY

EDITH HENRIETTA FOWLER

AUTHOR OF “‘THE YOUNG PRETENDERS”

WITH TWENTY-FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS
BY

BEBE KATE: BURGESS

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON
NEW YORK AND BOMBAY

1897

All rights reserved
ISIE OW NL IOS RA EONS,

PAGE
““ Now, my loves, and how do you all do?”’ exclaimed Mrs. Oakley Frontispiece

Oliver was standing in his favourite attitude resting his hands on his knees 5
‘Once upon a time there was a woodcutter’’ . . , . . ; 9
‘My scrap-book is importanter than yours”? . . : : : nase 2S
“‘T’se not Oliver, . . . I’se pretending I’se a little boy what doesn’t ring

bells ”’ 6 0 : : 5 , : , . i 6-319
‘It’s werry big—and werry stern,”’ he said softly. . , . ano
Cook found Roger fast asleep in the study armchair , , . E70

‘Will he bite?”’ : : i . , 7 . ; fs , 77)
“The spring is commencing, )

x » 82
It is, it is” )

Jack, who had just arrived home from school " , » 96
‘T only got into one rattling old row last term,” began Jack . a + 100
‘‘And Mike went walking a vedy long way”. ‘ 2 : 7 ae 2O
‘“They’se vedy unbedient,”’ said Mike impressively . . . . . 126
So the three children set off ina great hurry. . . , D » 134
“This flower won't pick,” remarked Oliver 7 . . A . + 40
Great was the love lavished on rats and rabbits. . . 6 eel 57;
-And there was the donkey too . r . . , , d 6 » 163
‘* Mike upsetted it and a vedy great spill came running out”. ‘ eeaL75
‘‘It seems a werry big pity not to finish doing what you have begun” . 183
Roger was waiting for the tooth-glass fi . a 6 . 6 » 196
‘*T do like sourness werry much,” he observed thickly. " . etzOr
‘*T’se on’y sittin’,” pleaded the baby meekly. . 5 , 5 . 222
‘‘T do love my sea werry much!” exclaimed Oliver . 6 ‘ " . 238

‘Oh don’t let her yove me so much!” begged Mike F - . + 250
Tabs ekORESSOKS: CHILDREN.

CHAPTER I.

Tuey lived in a wonderful world of their own, far
away up the steep stairs of a narrow London
house. A little shabby nursery with small, high
windows, through which a glimpse of the sky
could be seen up between the chimney-pots, as
well as a peep into the dark, dull street below.
But we, who only saw the chairs and table, the
worn old ottoman and capacious toy-box, had little
idea of the possibilities of play which the children
found within those four dingy walls.

‘Tf it wasn’t for lessons and bed-time and nurse
and being washed, and horrid things like that, we
might have time to get on with our playing pro-
perly,” said Peggy sadly, as she was dragged out
from under the sofa, where she and Roger had just
decided to spend the rest of their lives, pretending
they were rabbits in a hole. Only nurse always -
was so interfering just when the games were most
interesting, and she never could understand how
trying it is to the temper to be washed more often

I

G
G
2 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

.
than is absolutely necessary, even if the floor is
a little dirty or the window-ledge covered with
smuts.

There were four of them altogether, counting
the baby, but then, as the others would always tell
you, the baby did not count properly. He was
only two years old, and could not join in many
of the games or understand the real pretending.
Still he was useful sometimes in taking unimpor-
tant parts in the plays,—such as an invading army,
or a herd of wild elephants, or a bloodthirsty
robber; and “perhaps,” as Roger said with
thoughtful condescension, “he might count as a
half until he’s big enough not to be always going
to sleep, or crying, or tumbling down”.

Peggy was the eldest, and she was eight and a
half. Then came Roger of seven, and they were
both a great deal older than Oliver, who was barely
five.

“Peggy!” exclaimed Roger eagerly, one foggy
winter’s afternoon as they were learning their
lessons, “don’t you think we might play now till
tea-time ?”

His sister was curled up on the window seat
poring over a book to catch the last gleams of
the fading light. In the toy-box corner of the
room the baby sat cheerfully contemplating the
beloved countenance of an india-rubber lamb,
whose squeak had long ago been squeezed out
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 3



of him by Mike’s practical demonstrations of
affection.

“Tt is too dark to read any more by the out-
side light,” assented Peggy, getting down, “and
the fire isn’t big enough to make reading light,
so we might pretend we are Red Indians.”

“Oh, yes!” cried Roger, “and we'll live in a
wigwam, which can be the dirty clothes-basket,
while nurse is downstairs.”

“Tse R’indyan,” observed the baby, beaming all
over, ‘‘an’ [| bite!”

‘““Red Indians don’t bite,” corrected Peggy ;
‘you'd better be a bear.”

‘They do their food,” interrupted Oliver, who
was always ready for an argument. He was a
very slow, solemn boy, and dreadfully obstinate
about arguing, which is a most irritating thing to
other people, as Roger and Peggy well knew.
But nobody ever convinced Oliver against his
will. Even his father, who was a_ professor,
would give it up, baffled—and nurse, whose
temper was inclined to be short, would be obliged
to put him to bed in disgrace as the only way of
ending the discussion.

“T don't yike bears,” the baby whimpered,
but then Roger interfered -—

“Peggy and I will be Red Indians and Oliver
and Mike hostile tribes who live in the night-
nursery and they must invade”,
4 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘An’ I bite,” repeated the baby.

“You can’t bite,” persisted Peggy. “I told
you Red Indians don’t. And he mustn’t, must
he?” appealing to Roger.

“He can his food,” said Oliver, with an obsti-
nate look on his face.

“Oh, he’s too little to play properly,” said
Roger loftily, “let him bite if he wants to.”

Mike uttered a shriek of temper, and his face
flushed scarlet.

‘“T’se not too yittle. Tse vedy big boy. An’
I bite!” he added more calmly. For the baby
was a person of one idea.

Oliver took his hand.

“You shall bite, baby,” he said soothingly ;
“but come on!” And the “hostile tribes”
trotted obediently into the night-nursery and
crept under nurse’s bed.

“T will go hunting,” continued Roger, ‘and
the dolls shall be the people we kill and
eat.”

Just then a piercing scream from the night-
nursery indicated that there was a civil war
among the hostile tribes.

Oliver was standing in his favourite attitude
resting his hands on his knees, and the baby
was kneeling down with his head on the ground,
which was his usual way of being offended.

“That is my ball,” Oliver was repeating de-
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 5



liberately, ‘and you can’t play with it ever any
more!”

The baby had not thought about the ball until
thus challenged.

“You must not tease Mike,” exclaimed Peggy



OLIVER WAS STANDING IN HIS FAVOURITE ATTITUDE RESTING HIS
HANDS ON HIS KNEES.

reproachfully, “or I shall have to tell nurse what
a naughty little boy you are.”

When any of the others were naughty it
always made Peggy a little managing and strict,
6 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



but that came of being the eldest and the only
girl.
"Red Indians do bite their food,” observed
Oliver, ‘‘’cause if they didn’t they'd never grow
up, like the boy what wouldn’t bite his potatoes
nurse told us about.”

Peggy and Roger did not always quite believe
nurse’s stories, still sometimes they seemed so
true that they could not help making the children
a little thoughtful if not exactly frightened.

“Peggy, come quick!” shouted Roger from
the day-nursery, ‘‘an awfully exciting thing has
happened. The littlest china doll has tumbled
into the coal-box and | am pretending it is a
real coal-pit, and am going to let down a rope
with the toy crane.”

The other children rushed in, and they all had
a delightful time playing with the coal-box. The
baby so entered into the spirit of the game that
he flung his cherished lamb into its grimy depths.
In fact it was one of those delightful games that
never would have palled if nurse had not suddenly
come upstairs, and spoiled everything by her un-
reasonable interference.

“T never did see such children in all my life!”
she exclaimed wrathfully. ‘“ Such naughtiness
and such daring too! My back only turned for
five minutes ”—nurse’s five minutes were longer
than any one else’s—“ and you to get in such a
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. F



mess. You'll come into the night-nursery this
minute, and,” with increased severity, “be well
washed—all of you.” :

Mike hastily removed a gutta-percha ring, which
he was in the habit of incessantly sucking, from
his dirty litthe mouth to make way for a scream,
and Oliver began to whimper. He did so hate
the feeling of soap and water.

‘“] think it’s very wrong to wash your face be-
tween meals,” muttered Peggy.

But they all had to submit to such a scrubbing
as nurse thought fit, both from a personal and a
punitive point of view. Then they were marched
back into the nursery, and nurse dared them in
her severest voice to do anything except behave
themselves while she went downstairs to get the
tea.

Having their faces washed in the middle of the
afternoon naturally made the children feel very
serious. Indeed Oliver was positively sorrowful
as he sat nursing an old woollen shawl with a
piece of string tied round its waist, which he
invariably called “his brother,” though its real
name was Week.

“ Let’s tell tales,’
cleaner than playing.”

“Tm werry clean,” said Oliver, gloomily look-
ing at his fingers.

‘“My yamb vedy clean, too,” echoed the baby,

d

suggested Peggy; “it'll be
8 THE PROFESSOR'’S CHILDREN.



smiling, for nurse had also given it a scrub: ‘it
tastes yike soap when I bite it.”

“T have thought of a new story,” said Roger,
beginning to jump about. Roger always jumped
about wildly during his flights of imagination,
which made him a little difficult to hear at times
owing to his breathlessness.

“Once upon a time there was a woodcutter,” he
began, “and he was very poor.”

Peggy sat clasping her legs and resting her chin
on her knees, and the baby lay flat on his back
and waved his boots in the air.

‘“Werry poor?” asked Oliver.

_ “Awfully poor. His name was Mr. Jenkins,
and he suffered many things because of his poor-
ness.”

‘“ How werry poor was he?” persisted Oliver,
who always would sift the matter thoroughly, and
there was no possibility of putting him off.

“So poor that he never had anything to eat,”
continued Roger, standing still for a moment to
get his breath.

‘“ How horrid!” Peggy softly observed.

“And he lived in a wood ‘cause of being a
woodcutter. One day the cat ——”

“What cat?” Oliver wanted to know.

“The Jenkins’ cat of course,—jumped into the
larder and quickly ate up all the food that was
there




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THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. Teh



‘“A bitin’ cat!” remarked the baby, suddenly
sitting upright and listening attentively.

—‘ And Mr. Jenkins began to beat the cat, and
he beat it and beat it till all its bones was broken!
When suddenly ””—here Roger paused and his
small pale face fairly glowed with excitement—
“the wolf rushed in and killed Mr. and Mrs.
Jenkins quite dead and ate them all up in a
minute.”

“He bited them!” murmured the baby.

“After Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins was dead and
buried —.—”

“But the wolf swallowed them, you know,”
corrected Peggy, “so they couldn’t be buried as
well.”

“It's my story, and they was buried,” said
Roger with dignity. “In course the wolf didn’t
swallow quite all of them. So their heads, and
their boots, and,” reverting to his own toilet,
“their braces was buried, and when the funeral
was finished the cat married the wolf.”

“But the Jenkins was werry poor-—-too poor
to have things to eat—so why was there any food
in the larder?” began Oliver, who had been
meditating on the opening part of the story.

“Don’t bother so!” said Peggy impatiently.

“But I want to know,” persisted her little
brother. “If they was too poor to have any food
they was too poor to have a larder to keep it in.”


12 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘“And soon the wolf ate up all the cat’s
friends,” continued Roger excitedly.

“Tt was silly of the cat to marry the wolf,”
Peggy thought.

‘“No it wasn’t,” argued Roger. ‘“ It was quite
wise.”

‘Not if it ate up all its friends. J] can’t think
how a good cat could be so silly.”

“Was it a big larder or a werry little one?”
asked Oliver, but the others could not attend to:
him. He would go on asking questions about
that larder for a week.

“Tt wasn't silly,” answered Roger, getting
rather cross. ‘The cat loved the wolf so very
much.”

‘But the wolf couldn’t have loved the cat or it
wouldn’t have eaten all its friends!”

Roger thought for a moment before answering :—

“The wolf did not love the cat”.

“Then why did he marry her?” asked Peggy
triumphantly.

‘hle married wher in “a ft of good) nature,
announced the historian slowly. And there was
not another word to be said on the subject,
especially as at that moment nurse appeared in
the doorway with the tea-tray.

“My brother wants his tea werry bad,” said
Oliver, looking lovingly at the old woollen shawl,
“and I may have him in my chair during tea,












THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 13



mayn’t I, Nanny dear?” And Oliver smiled his
rare smile that seemed to come curling over his
sober, round face.

That was another rather remarkable thing about
Oliver. He was so fond of nurse. She was
really a very good person in spite of being so
strict, but nobody would ever have thought of
calling her “dear” except Oliver. And being
put in the corner or even sent to bed by her, never
made Oliver love her a bit the less; but that was
perhaps because he never changed his mind about
anything.

‘“‘T wish it wasn’t tea-time,” said Peggy sadly,
‘’cause the tale was getting so exciting, and I’m
not a bit hungry. Are you, Roger?”

“Tm not quite bread-and-butter hungry,”
answered the boy; “but we can pretend things
to make it nicer.”

‘Let's pretend,” suggested Oliver, “that we’re
eating slugs and snails.”

“Me too,” cried Mike; “let me have s’ugs
and snails too.”

‘“T am pretending that my bread is a snow
heap,” said Roger, ‘and my tea rain puddles.”

“Tea is like rain puddles—just the colour of
the puddles in the street,” exclaimed Peggy.

‘Why is the rain like water on the window and
like tea in the street ?” asked Oliver thoughtfully.

‘‘ Because the dry mud is like tea in the caddy,
14 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



and the mixing changes the colour,” answered
Peggy.

‘“Tt’s fun pretending it is puddles,” said Roger
with a little laugh. ‘ And I’m pretending I’m a
. sparrow drinking it.”

“Then hold your head back till it drops down
your throat,” commanded his sister. ‘‘ That’s how
birds drink, you know.”

Instantly Oliver and the baby adopted this sug-
gestion, which ended in such violent choking all
round that nurse interfered, and the sparrow pre-
tence was forbidden.

“We couldn’t have done it properly,” observed
Roger, ‘’cause birds never choke.”

“¢ Now then, finish your teas like good children.
And why you can’t eat your meals properly with-
out all this pretending rubbish I can’t imagine,”
added nurse crossly. And that was just one of
the simple things that nurse never did understand.
She could not see that eating proper things is so
dull, while if only you pretend they are such un-
usual things as mud and puddles, or slugs and
snails, it makes it so interesting and appetizing,

After tea there were lessons to be learned.
Both Peggy and Roger had quite long ones to
prepare for Mademoiselle, and even Oliver fetched
out a book and began to practise his reading. |

“ B for bread and butter, R for Roger, I for
ink-pot, T for toast-rack, I for ink-pot again, S
eT

HERA Siti ide ek ile) a gad Ale SR La tices

Y
i



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 15



for slugs and snails, H for hansom—what does
that spell?” he asked wonderingly.

“T don’t know,” said Peggy; “your way of
spelling is so muddling.”

“Tt isn’t!” argued Oliver; “it is werry un-
muddling. D for donkey, O for Oliver, G for
gentleman, spells dog, you know.”

“TI can only tell by looking,” persisted Peggy ;
‘but do be quiet and don’t bother. I never shall
learn these verbs,” and she began rocking herself
to and fro as if to catch their rhythm.

“My spelling is werry unmuddling,” repeated
Oliver, and then, as he was generally an obliging
little boy, “but I won't bother you. I will sit
in the window-seat and play with Week. An’ he
won't talk nor disturve you,” he added, climbing
up and clasping the woollen shawl tightly in his
arms.

“ Shall I tell you a story, my dear?” he asked
it softly. And as silence proverbially gives con-
sent, he began in whispered tones :—‘‘ Once upon
a time there was a great big giant what had no
little children ’cause he eated them all up. An’
his whiskers was so werry long that he treaded on
them walking up the stairs, and tumbled down and
was killed quite dead. An’ father’s friend, what
stuffed the eagle, stuffed the giant and took him
to the Museum in a cab. Peggy, may I play with

Sundial Sampson if I’m werry careful?”
16 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



His sister good-naturedly lent him a dilapidated
doll.

‘“T didn’t know both her eyes has tumbled back-
wards inside,” he observed sorrowfully.

“That’s the wretched thing about real eyes,”
said Peggy; “they will tumble inside.”

“Real eyes don’t always tumble backwards,”
Roger joined in. ‘‘ Ours don’t, you see.”

“They might,” argued Oliver; ‘and I ’spect
they will too.”

““ Now, Master Oliver, come to bed,” exclaimed
nurse, making her appearance after the baby had
been safely disposed of. And for a while there
was profound silence in the nursery.

“ Let's pretend I’m father making a lecture,”
cried Roger as he slammed the last lesson book
on the table and climbed on to the window seat,
“and it shall be about a phllos’pher killing a
tiger.”

“And I'll be students,” assented Peggy eagerly.
‘Father always has students when he makes
lectures.”

“ Ladies and gentlemen,” began Roger grandly.

“It’s only ladies now,” interrupted his sister.
‘“What a pity nurse couldn’t let the gentlemen
sit up any longer! Oliver does so well for
gentlemen.”

“Oh, bother! get some dolls for gentlemen—
there must be some, you know.”


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 17



‘““They’re all ladies too. We must only pre-
tend gentlemen.”

‘All right. Ladies and gentlemen, this is a
lecture, and once upon a time a ph’los’pher went
hunting in the jungle——’”

“ Now, children,” said nurse, ‘“‘ come to bed!”

‘Oh, nurse,” cried Peggy, ‘‘and the lecture
hasn’t even got to the tiger, which is the most
exciting part.”

“T can't help that. And it’s my opinion you
children tell too many exciting tales, especially
just before going to bed.”

“But, nurse,” argued Roger, “ father likes us to
tell them. He's always dreadfully interested in
the tales we make up, and writes pieces of them
down in his note-book.”

‘Master Oliver couldn’t sleep the other night
for some giant rubbish,” observed nurse.

‘““That’s because he’s so little,” Roger said dis-
dainfully. ‘I think about giants and wild beasts
and battles all night long, and they all get mixed
up with lessons in my dreams.”

“Shall we do a drawing-lesson with father
in bed to-night?” asked Peggy.

“The master has not come in yet,” answered
nurse.

When the children were all safely in bed nurse
went downstairs. The door was open between

the little boys’ room and its dressing-room, which
Yi g
2


18 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



was Peggy's, so that a conversation could easily
be held. The baby’s cot was in nurse’s room at
the back.
“T are awake,” said Oliver, ‘only we must
talk a werry great lot ’cause I are sleepy.”
“And you must be awake when father

comes up, you know,” commanded Peggy
severely.
‘Of course you must,” added Roger. “I’m not

sleepy. Id tell you a story if I could run and
jump about, only it’s too cold. Oliver,” he
suddenly shouted, ‘“‘don’t lie down like that or
youll be sure to go off!”

Oliver lifted his heavy little head from the
pillow, and opened wide his big grey eyes.

“T aren't werry sleepy,” he asserted bravely,
but in a far-away voice.

“You are! you are! cried Pegey. (i) can
hear it in the way you speak.”

“And it does vex father with a great disap-
pointment to come up and find you asleep,”
chimed in Roger reproachfully.

“Tell me a story then—a werry exciting one—
‘cause that will make me more wide-awaker.”

“Once upon a time,” began Roger in a great
hurry, bouncing up and down till his bed fairly
rattled, “there was a great hunter who shot his
wife quite dead in the night.”

“Why did he?” asked Oliver sitting up.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 19



“He did not mean to shoot her,” explained
Roger; “he mistook her for a mouse. But when
he came before the judge there was not time to
explain about the mouse, and so the judge did not
understand it was only a mistake, but he hanged
the hunter quite dead.”

“ And what happened to the mouse?” Oliver
wanted to know.

“Tt escaped in great safety,” explained Roger.
“You don’t feel sleepy again, I hope?”

‘“‘ Not werry sleepy—on’y I do wish father would
come quicklier.”

“T hear him! I hear him!” shouted Peggy.

“Father, father!” called three little eager
voices; ‘‘we are all quite awake!”

The professor had been hard at work all day.
So deep was he in the solution of certain problems
that he forgot to put on his overcoat, and it only
struck him as he entered his own home that he
was very cold and thoroughly wet. The house
was very gloomy downstairs. It had been so
ever since the children’s mother went away one
night and left Baby Mike in her place. He
fumbled about for a match and lighted the gas,
which showed a small, shabby room littered all
over with papers and books, and with only a
handful of fire in the grate, for coal was expensive
that winter in London. A friendly lamp-post
gleamed in through the uncurtained window, and
20 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



winked its eye in the blasts of wind at the doleful
prospect within.

The professor picked up one of the books on
the table and stood looking into it, forgetful of
his wet clothes or the evening meal, which was
already overdue.

But happily the servants never waited for the
bell to be rung in that house. They settled what
food was suitable for their master, and one of
them stood over him until he had duly disposed of
it. Soa little while after the click of the latch-
key had been heard in the door, nurse appeared
together with a loaded tray, and insisted on the
professor’s putting on dry clothes before he sat
down to it. It was therefore later than usual
when the children heard their father’s footstep on
the stairs.

“J are awake, father !” said Oliver triumphantly.

“What shall we draw to-night?” asked Peggy
eagerly jumping on to the end of the boys’ bed,
and tucking her toes up under her little red
dressing-gown.

The professor was deeply ieresed in the
development of the esthetic aptitudes in child-life.
-He believed that every child properly educated in
that direction would be, in different degrees, an
artist, and this was one of the many experiments
which he intended to try on the little people who
belonged to him. It was really the greatest
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 21



advantage, the professor thought, to be able to
prove his theories by such intensely interesting
illustrations as his own children.

“ Suppose you each draw me a cruel man,” sug-
gested their father. He knew how they would,
after their own fashion, design a man; but the
term cruel would be more difficult to express.

For some time there was profound silence, the
children’s heads being bent low over their work,
and then Oliver looked up with a more solemn
expression even than usual.

“ How do you draw cruelness?” he asked.

“ You must draw it as you think best,” answered
the professor, smiling for the first time that day.

“Pye done mine,” called Roger, triumphantly
displaying a huge-headed figure with fewer fea-
tures than is customary.

“ That is a man,” said his father; ‘but I told
you a cruel man.”

“He is a cruel man,” explained Roger; “he
shot his wife dead. | telled a tale about him.”

“ But how do you know from the drawing that
he is cruel?” asked the professor.

“Oh, I pretended that,” answered his son coolly.
And then Peggy produced the picture of a man in
which her father detected a really unfavourable
expression by means of a very drawn-down mouth
and narrow, slanting eyes.

“ He looks rather cruel, doesn’t he, father?”
22 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Me, now!” observed Oliver. And his man
was very quaint and unformed, with a little
scribble up at the top of the paper.

‘“ That is the man,” he explained slowly ; ‘and
that,” pointing to the scribble, “is the cruelness.”

“Very good, very good,” said the professor,
“you have all done nicely. Now I must say
good-night.”

And he left three very wide-awake, excited little
people upstairs when he went down to write in his
note-book the psychological conclusions of the last
drawing-lesson.
23

CHAPTER II.

Tue trouble began with its being the day for clean
clothes, which, as everybody knows, are very
prickly and irritating things. Then Roger would
argue about his shirt and say it was too tight
round the neck, and he pulled the button off—
on purpose, nurse said. Anyhow it put her into
a thoroughly bad temper so that she brushed
Peggy’s hair very severely and kept catching the
tangles in the teeth of the comb. But nobody
was really naughty before breakfast except the
baby, who was having his bath when nurse had to
leave him while she stitched the button on for
Roger. Now Mike loved soap, and would always
try to eat as much as he could of it when nurse
was not looking; so directly she went away he
picked up the cake of brown Windsor and began
to suck it eagerly. Unfortunately nurse looked
round at that very moment, and as she could not
leave the button she said quite sternly :-—

‘Put down the soap directly, you naughty boy.
And you are not to suck it again!”

The baby looked up solemnly for a minute, and
24 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



then he deliberately took another large bite before
it was too late.

Of course, for such dreadful disobedience as
this, Mike had to be punished by several wet slaps,
which made him scream and cry all during the
process of washing and dressing, and nurse said
“she hoped it would be a warning to the
others not to be so naughty themselves”.
Which altogether made it very gloomy in the
nursery.

Being Saturday there were no lessons,and Peggy
was in a very irritable mood all the morning. A
perfectly clean pinafore and a head rather sore
from having a lot of tangles combed out of your
hair do rather upset the temper. And Roger
turned out so aggravating over pasting things in
the scrap-book that it made it worse.

‘Give me the brush,” she said impatiently, for
they had only a pot of paste and one brush
between them.

“ve not done with it yet,” answered Roger.
‘“T must finish my picture.”

“Oh, bother! I do wish you wouldn't always
paste when I do.”

‘“My scrap-book is importanter than yours ”—
Roger was becoming a little put out too—‘ and
the brush is most mine.”

‘No, it isn't! It’s most mine ’cause I’m the
eldest.”


i : Sx = == = 5
7 = \



ae a



“MY SCRAP-BOOK IS IMPORTANTER THAN YOURS.”

THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 27



‘“You’re not the eldest of father. And father
gave me half the brush.”

“Let me have it,” cried Peggy, stamping her
foot ; ‘‘this is the morning I settled for pasting.
There! you have spilled it. Your book will be all
spoiled and horrid.”

Roger began to cry angrily.

‘No, it won't!” he screamed ; “‘ yours is spoil-
eder and horrider much. And you shan’t have
the brush—you shan’t—you shan’t!” as Peggy
attempted to snatch it from him. In the middle
of which skirmish the pot of paste was upset, and
the noise brought in nurse from her bedroom in
great wrath.

So Peggy and Roger were put in different cor-
ners, and the atmosphere was gloomier than ever.
Oliver only appeared to enjoy it; and, looking
up from his play, he remarked in a self-satisfied
manner which the others found extremely
irritating :—

“Tare good—werry good!”

‘* Me dood too, now,” echoed the baby.

Peggy could not help giving vent to her feel-
ings in a surreptitious kick out at Oliver when
she thought he seemed to be within reach. For
nurse never would allow any looking round while
the children were standing in a corner.

In the afternoon, having all been made ready
for their weekly treat of tea downstairs with their
28 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



father, they climbed up on the window-seat to get
the first glimpse of him on his return home.

“T do wish father wasn’t quite so much of a
professor,” said Peggy, flattening her nose against
the window-pane. ‘It takes up all his time.”

“ Let’s pretend he isn’t,” suggested Oliver.

“Oh, yes! let’s pretend he is a fairy prince, and
that when he goes out it is to fight the great
battles of his kingdom,” exclaimed Roger.

“And that this is his palace,” added Peggy.

“T will be the soldiers of the fairy prince. And
will you be a white cat, Oliver? Ma’mselle told
me a story about a fairy prince and a white cat.”

“T don’t like catching mice,” objected Oliver.

‘Nor me don’t yike mice,” echoed the baby.

“Would you mind much if they were kind
mice?” asked Peggy.

“T wouldn’t like a mouse so big as it couldn’t
come in through the door,” said Oliver thought-
fully.

“Oh, no! But the sort of mice that are made
out of sugar with string tails?”

“Werry well. And a cat needn’t be always
catching mice. Our black one never does.”

“And s’pose we pretend nurse is a witch,”
’ continued Roger—‘‘a very wicked one.”

“ My Nanny is not a wicked witch,” said Oliver
with a very determined expression. ‘She is
werry good, and I love her.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 29



‘TI yove her,” repeated Mike, removing the
india-rubber ring and putting the lamb’s head in
his mouth- by way of a change of diet.

‘“What other people shall we pretend spon
Roger wanted to know.

“s ‘We don’t know no others,” answered Peggy

“Oh, we do! There’s cook, and the policeman
at the end of the street, and ma’mselle, and the
man at the museum, and the bootshop woman.
We know hundreds of people.”

‘““T knewed a conductor in an omdibus once,”
interrupted Oliver. ‘“ He had a big match-box
round his neck with a bell in it.”

‘We know the Sampsons,” said Peggy, allud-
ing to a dearly-beloved imaginary family who were
supposed by the children to reside in the boot
cupboard.

“You see, Sundial Sampson was out walking
one day,” began Oliver, ‘and she met a kind
lion what was dressed in a petticoat, an’ he say
to her: ‘Come on, my dear, I going shooting’.
And they shooted a werry wicked mouse, and a
cruel mongoose, and a naughty boy what was a
thief.. They did!” impressively.

“Tm awful glad to-day is Saturday, cause
father will be home early and we'll have tea
downstairs,” cried Roger suddenly.

“P’etending tea or live tea?” asked the baby
eagerly.
30 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“T thought to-morrow was Saturday—nurse
said yesterday it was,” observed Oliver.

“To-day is Saturday,” snapped Peggy.

‘Then is to-day to-morrow?”

“Oh you silly!” began Peggy, but just then
the top of their father’s hat was visible, and
soon afterwards nurse appeared to conduct the
children downstairs in safety.

The professor was sitting smoking and a
stranger. was with him.

‘How do you do?” said Roger, going up to
him instantly with outstretched hand. — For
though Peggy was much more managing in
the nursery, when there were strangers down-
stairs Roger seemed to take the lead.

“This is my eldest son,” said the. professor
proudly, laying his hand on Roger’s curly head,
‘and a child of unusually developed faculties.
Indeed the artistic temperament is already so
abnormally conspicuous that I am_ hopeful of
germs of genius behind it.”

“And this is our eldest daughter,” re-
marked Roger, drawing Peggy forward by her
hair.

“We've been pretending you are a fairy prince,
father,” said the little girl, hanging on to his
sleeve.

The professor caught sight of his own reflection
in the looking-glass—the pale, thought-lined face,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 31



the stooping shoulders, the threadbare clothes and
dishevelled hair—and he smiled half sadly.

“The imagination of a child is absolutely
creative,” he said slowly. ‘‘ Ours is apt to be
built on some foundation of fact or idealism, but
theirs rests solely on wings.”

“Which develops earlier, the boy or the girl
mind ?” asked the stranger, peering at the children
through his spectacles.

“ Accarding to ordinary platitudes the girl’s,
but from my own observation I have found in
Roger the more active thoughtfulness of the two.
But perhaps he is the exception rather than the
rule. The little ones will prove it.”

‘“Me’s hundry,” observed the baby emphatically
—the nourishment provided by the gutta-percha
ring suddenly failing.

Roger had been listening to his father with his
head on one side like an eager bird.

“ How do I be the exception-rather-than-the-
rule?” he asked quickly. ‘Tell me, father, how
doi

“There, you see,” said the professor triumph-
antly, ‘“‘the boy’s mind is so quick to pick up an
idea.”

“The reasoning faculty is stirring strongly,”
added the stranger. ‘At what age did you first
notice it?

‘The kettle is purring werry loud. It'll spit
32 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



soon,” said Oliver, who was standing with his
hands on his knees steadily regarding it. ‘There,
I said it would!” as a sudden fizz on the hob
indicated that the water was boiling aggressively.

“Oh, yes! I forgot all about tea,” answered
the professor; “perhaps we had better have
some.”

‘“ How do I be it, father?” persisted Roger.

‘Be what, my son?”

“What you said.”

“Tt is unconsciously owing to the structure of
your mind. Did you say sugar, Carson?”

“Me say sudar!” echoed the baby. ‘‘ Two, free,
nine, sixteen pieces.”

“T don’t understand,” said Roger, wrinkling up
his forehead. “I do wish there wasn’t quite so
many puzzling things.”

‘““The conscience develops earlier in a girl,”
continued the professor. ‘“In fact I noticed
Peggy’s sense of right and wrong and general
sensitiveness to the moral law were apparent at
a very early age. But the children’s nurse, who
is in all other respects a most valuable and ex-
cellent person, is apt to injure my observations in
this matter by the introduction of most absurd
punishments. And this penal system blunts,
even if it does not entirely destroy, the develop-
ment of the innate sense of right and wrong,
which I specially desire to notify.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 33



“That is a deeply interesting point,” said Dr.
Carson, “and it is a pity to have it in any way
interfered with by these paltry punishments.”

Here Oliver put down his cup, over the rim of
which he had been steadily regarding his father’s
friend for some time. The other children always
wondered how Oliver could take quite such long
drinks out of a small cup of milk.

“Peggy and Roger was werry naughty this
morning ; and Mike was too in his bath. On’y
me was quite good,” he said slowly.

‘“We weren't exactly very,” argued Roger,
‘but only corner-naughty.” :

‘““ Nurse is so hardened,” observed Peggy sadly.

“There you see,” said the professor, “some
ridiculous nonsense about a corner is made to de-
termine their limits of wrong-doing. I want to
see the working of their untrammelled minds con-
cerning the question of right and wrong itself. |
really must forbid these senseless punishments.”

A slight diversion was then caused by the
baby’s putting both his feet on the table.

“Don’t be naughty, Mike,” said Peggy
severely.

“Tt is not naughty,” corrected the professor ;
“only a little unusual. By the way, that is an in-
teresting point. How early in child-life do laws
of custom predominate ?”

«Some way between your daughter and your
y y 8 y
3
34 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



youngest son apparently,” answered Dr. Carson.
“The exact time is unknown to me.”

“We might prove it,” continued the professor,
rubbing his hands. ‘ Roger, you can draw a
pattern with treacle on the table-cloth.”

“Really, father?” asked the boy incredulously.

“Ah, there you have him, Maxwell! It is
below that age.”

‘No, not you, Roger. But you can, Oliver.”

“ Shall I draw a cruel man again?” asked the
child, deliberately lifting the spoon so that a thin
line of treacle was at his command.

“What fun!” screamed Peggy. ‘And may I|
upset my tea, father?”

“You see her enjoyment springs from the viola-
tion of the law,” continued the professor. ‘‘ That
is a very old point, and a very new one, too. Eh,
Carson?”

It was more than boy nature could stand to see
a mess and be out of it, so Roger hastily threw
a loaf into the air as he had no tea left to play
with.

“ Dear me,” exclaimed their father in a helpless,
puzzled way; “how quickly children become excit-
able! It makes it so difficult to demonstrate with
them effectively. There, there, you had better all
get down. But the age we wanted is certainly
between Roger's and Oliver’s. Shall we say six
years old?”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 35



‘TI don't yike this uggy table-cloth,” whimpered
Mike; “it makes me tired.”

“Do you take note of that?” asked the pro-
fessor delightedly. ‘“ For some physical reason
the child suddenly feels an unusual exhaustion,
and fails to connect the effect with the cause.
Still he unconsciously knows that effect must be
the result of cause, and attributes what he feels to
such an absurd fact as the pattern of a table-cloth.
The instinct is true, but the reasoning impos-
sible.”

‘“When did you first notice his instincts?”

“T had a fine collie dog when Roger was a
baby,” continued the professor, while the tea went
cold; ‘‘and it was an interesting experiment to
compare the instincts of the child and the dog.
Up to eight months old the dog was distinctly in
advance, to fourteen months they ran an equal
race, and after that the child gained ground
rapidly : the human characteristics then beginning
to assert themselves.”

By this time the two elder children had dragged
a favourite old natural-history book out of the
shelf, and were poring over its well-worn pages.
The baby was dipping his lamb’s head in the
treacle and then sucking it, and Oliver was stand-
ing solemnly on the hearth-rug.

‘Light your pipe again, Carson. Why, there
are no matches here. Oliver, ring the bell,” said
36 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



the professor, pushing his chair back from the
table.

The boy stood still, a sudden look of obstinacy
sweeping over his small, round face.

“T’se not Oliver,” he said slowly. ‘‘I’se pre-
tending I’se a little boy what doesn’t ring bells.”



“sz NOT OLIVER, ... I’SE PRETENDING SE A LITTLE BOY
WHAT DOESN’T RING BELLS.”

“Now that is ingenious!” exclaimed Dr.
Carson.

“Yet I think it portrays a sense of moral re-
sponsibility, in so much as it required an assumed
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 37



change of identity to shift the responsibility,”
observed the professor. ‘I think I will make a
note of that,” and he rang the bell on his way to
the writing-table.

‘Please, sir, cook bought these oranges as a treat
for the children,” said nurse when she appeared
with the matches.

Wild delight instantly followed, for there were
not many treats in this grim, grey house in
Bloomsbury.

‘Oranges are splendidly interesting things,”
said Roger; “the taste is so interesting, and the
peel ’cause of making a pig and a set of false
teeth, and the pips can be planted, and you can
play at ball with it before eating. There is only
one bad thing about oranges.”

‘What is that?” asked Dr. Carson.

“They make your pocket-handkerchief smell
so nasty for several days. You see orangey
smell isn’t nearly so jolly as orangey taste, and
you get a little tired of it every time you blow
your nose.”

“I should say,” began the professor, looking
up from his note-book, ‘that the conscientious
and the affectionate faculties develop earlier in a
girl—the reasoning and ambitious ones in a boy.”

“And continue the strongest all through life,”
added his friend.

The little boys had been running round the
38 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

table, but a piercing shriek from the baby indi-
cated that the game had come to an abrupt
termination.

‘““He can’t be my horse any more,” said Oliver,
looking down calmly at Mike.

“Why not?” asked his father, and the baby
stopped in the middle of a scream to lear the
reason.

“He has so many sudden sits,” explained
Oliver, “and in course it spoils my driving.”

“A child’s expression of its ideas is a very
interesting study,” said Dr. Carson, but the baby’s
renewed crying stopped the conversation.

“Me don’t have so many sudden sits,” he
sobbed. ‘‘Me on’y tummel down a vedy few
tummels.”

‘Dear me!” exclaimed his father looking at
the pitiable little object on the hearth-rug, “ the
child seems inclined to be fretful this evening. I
wish nurse would come for him.”

‘Shall I ring for her?” suggested his friend.

ON eS yes, dO. Nhateistaavery., coodsidea
Nurse,” as she appeared in the doorway, “will
you take the baby? He seems a little tired and
irritable. Perhaps he is not quite well.”

“He has caught cold, sir, I’m afraid,” she said
as she carried him off.

‘Now, I was speaking,” continued the pro-
fessor, “about the heart and head qualities of the
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 39



boy and girl. Let me give you an illustration.
You will imagine that the donor of the oranges
finds equal favour in the eyes of these two. Look
here, children,” he added speaking directly to the
two on the floor, “cook has had her nose knocked
off.”

“Our own cook?” exclaimed Peggy in tones of
intense anxiety.

“How was it knocked off?” asked Roger in
deepest interest. ‘‘ Did she fall on something or
did something fall on her?”

‘Where did she put it after?” Oliver wanted
to know. ‘In the kitchen drawer ?”

“There, you see,” said the professor, turning to
his friend, ‘the affectionate faculty in the girl—
the reasoning in the boy.”

‘“Where is it now?” repeated Oliver.

‘“And about the conscientious faculty? You
were saying that that is more strongly marked in
the girl,” continued Dr. Carson.

‘‘It was apparent earlier at any rate. I must
observe its intensity later. Oh, here comes nurse
again—how fortunate! I will ask her. Nurse,
will you tell me which is the naughtier, Peggy or
Roger ?”

Nurse brightened up wonderfully.

‘Indeed, sir, I did not like to trouble you,
especially before a visitor, but both Miss Peggy
and Master Roger’s been that contrairy all day,
40 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



though for real naughtiness Miss Peggy was the
one as began it.”

‘The old story,” observed Dr. Carson softly,
“dating from Eve herself.”

“And I do hope, sir, that you will speak to
them yourself.”

“JT speak to them!” exclaimed the professor ;
‘whatever about? It is not by speaking to
them, Carson, but by observing them silently
that one learns most.”

“Tt would make them less naughty, sir, I’m
sure, if you would,” pleaded nurse.

“But, my good woman, I don’t want them to
be less naughty. I want them to be.more so.
The natural tendencies which I am observing will
then be more definite.”

Nurse wrung her hands in despair. Her master
was at times almost more than she could civilly
endure; but her sense of duty and decorum
triumphed, and she sadly observed that it was
past Master Oliver’s bed-time.

“T will tell you a werry nice story now,” said
the child persuasively, laying his head on_ his
father’s knee.

“2 Ones yes eeelet suSeshave 1tea1exclaimedual)
carson,

So nurse was told to wait for a few minutes,
and Oliver sat down on the hearth-rug with his
legs sticking straight out in front of him. |
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 41



“Once ’pon a time,” he began deliberately, so
as to postpone bed-time, “there was a werry kind
lady what was named Mrs. Sampson, an’ she had
no children, only grandchildren.”

“That was a singular case,” observed the pro-
fessor.

Oliver lifted his solemn eyes to his father’s
face.

“Tt was a werry sing’lar case,” he repeated
impressively. ‘And one day Mrs. Sampson
went riding on a tiger to see the beautifullest
princess. And the princess was dressed in an
emerald dress and a diamond petticoat.”

“There, there, Master Oliver,” interrupted
nurse. ‘We don’t talk about ladies’ petticoats in
the dining-room.”

Oliver regarded her with an amount of scorn.

“In course I shouldn’t talk bout just a common
flannel petticoat like you wear, but a diamond
petticoat is werry grand, isn’t it, father?”

“T should imagine its grandeur would outweigh
its utility,” remarked the professor.

“If you please, sir, Master Oliver must come
to bed now,” pleaded nurse in the last stage of
exasperation.

‘Dear me, how unfortunate! I do wish, nurse,
you would alter the children’s bed-time,” exclaimed
the professor impatiently.

And then as she disappeared with her prey :-—
42 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘Shall we hear Roger now? I am making
some rather elaborate notes on the development
of a child’s power of narrative, and I get a good
two years between these two styles. Look here,
my boy, I want you to tell us a story now.”

Roger jumped with alacrity from the engrossing
natural-history book and began to run about the
room.

‘Shall it be a bloodsheddy story?” he asked
eagerly. . ‘‘ They are my favourites.”

“Yes, yes ; just what you like.”

‘“ Well, once there was a man, called Mr. Shelley,
and he was put in Newgate prison ’cause he was
the prime minister.”

‘Notice the local colouring of the last history
lesson,” whispered the professor.

“Why was he in prison?” asked Dr. Carson ;
‘your present reason seems hardly adequate.”

“One of his friends told him to pass a law-bill
before the queen, and she said: ‘I'll pass it into
parliament’. But what should happen to the bill,
but it passed through the prime minister’s pocket
through a hole, and was lost! So the queen
popped him in prison.”

“And then?” queried his father.

“He suicided himself,” said Roger, ‘and
there was a gunpowder treason against Queen
Elizabeth.”

‘A very historical style,” said Dr. Carson.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 43



“The wicked treason-people shoved the queen
down the coal-cellar, and stifled her with sealing-
wax,” continued the boy, clapping his hands.

‘“So was that the end of Elizabeth?” asked
the professor.

“No; it was not,” cried Roger delightedly.
“She escaped suddenly. And the wicked people
said she was such a fiery queen, that they would
prepare a fiery dinner to aggravate her, and a fiery
plum-pudding. So Queen Elizabeth’s mouth was
set on fire, which was put out with great difficulty,
and required a great operation made.”

Here nurse appeared again, observing resign-
edly that it was nearly nine o’clock.

“T have not done with the children yet,” said
the professor. ‘ Really, Carson, if that woman
had her way I should have no time for verifying
my observations. She is always bothering about
their bed-time or some such nonsense.”

“I do love Saturdays!” exclaimed Peggy ;
‘’cause I can have such lovely, long, peaceful
reads.”

“She is much fonder of reading than the
others,” explained her father. ‘A book will
always keep her quiet and happy. But the child-
imagination is thereby somewhat swamped. She
does not tell tales like the others, though she
learns her lessons more quickly.”

“ Mike can tell tales too,” observed Roger ;
44 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“though, of course, they have to be three years
shorter even than Oliver's, ‘cause he’s on’y two.”

“ T should have liked to have heard one of his
also,” said Dr. Carson, “for the subject of child-
imagination is of special interest to me both in its
dawn and its development.”

“Shall I fetch him? Do let me, father,” cried
Peggy eagerly.

‘“ Not if he is asleep,” said the professor thought-
fully ; “(a sudden awakening would confuse his
faculties. And, Peggy, see that he is wrapped up
warmly,” he called, as the little girl was already on
her way upstairs.

‘Baby, baby!” she shouted, rushing into the
bedroom, ‘“‘you aren’t asleep, are you ? ’cause father
wants you downstairs to tell a story. Come on!”

Mike sat up in the sudden fright of waking.

“Is it mornin’ or a giant?” he asked confusedly.
And then nurse came in and wrathfully interfered.

“Father wants him,” repeated Peggy, “and
he's to be sure and put on warm things. Oh! here
is father coming upstairs, and father’s friend.”

“T forgot he had a little cold,” the professor
had explained to Dr. Carson; “if you don’t mind
the trouble I think we had better go to him
upstairs.”

The baby began to scream and cry.

‘His cold seems turning a little croupy,” said
nurse severely.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 45



“Me dot two yittle pussies in here,” wailed the
baby, pointing to his wheezing chest, ‘‘and they
crying.”

‘Ah, that is good! Did you hear him, Carson?
A child’s comparisons, in order to express his
feelings satisfactorily, are most original. I am
very sorry he cannot tell us a tale now. I am
afraid we must give it up for to-night. The child
seems a little upset. It is unfortunate just the
night you are here. Put the children to sleep
now, please, nurse. I shall not require them any
more. And, Carson, I want you to read and give
me your opinion on the last observations I have
entered in my note-book. My next series of psy-
chological lectures will be based on them,” he
added, as they went downstairs.
46

CHAPTER III.

Tue baby’s cold was‘a very severe one indeed; then
Oliver and Peggy caught it, and they gave it to
Roger, so that altogether they had a rather rough
time of it. And when all the sneezing and sniffing
and coughing were over, the children looked so
thin and white that nurse marched off to the
chemist’s, and returned with a huge bottle of cod-
liver oil with which to restore them to their usual
health.

Now neither Peggy nor Roger disliked the
taste of cod-liver oil.

“It might have been senna, you know,” said
the little girl solemnly. And they resigned them-
selves thankfully to the inevitable. Nor did the
baby object to these daily doses. In fact, he had
never been known to object to eating or drinking
anything, and would apparently relish sucking
whatever came in his way, such as a Noah’s ark
animal or nurse’s prayer-book. But with Oliver
it was different. The first spoonful he slowly
rolled round in his mouth in spite of nurse’s admo-
nition to swallow it quickly, and then he made up


“7's WERRY BIG—AND WERRY STERN,” HE SAID SOFTLY.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 49



his mind that he would have no more of it. From
which day there was trouble in the nursery.

The mere sight of nurse and a spoon would
clench Oliver’s teeth with a pressure which it was
a wonder such little comfit-like teeth could pos-
sibly stand ; and then there would follow scream-
ing and crying that could be heard all over the
house, for nurse was a person of practical resource.
So after a few struggles, in which Oliver was
worsted, a desperate resolve took possession of his
small soul. He determined to break the bottle.

It happened one day when Peggy and Roger
had gone out again with mademoiselle, and the
baby was having his mid-day sleep, nurse being
safely engaged with clean clothes downstairs, that
Oliver decided that the hour had arrived for the
execution of this terrible design.

The bottle was safely put away on a high shelf,
so there was no hope of knocking it over by acci-
dent, but when Oliver had climbed on to a chair
he found he could quite easily reach his enemy.

For a long time he stood up there trying to

_muster courage to do the dreadful:deed. For

Oliver was not really a naughty little boy on the
whole—only very determined and obstinate about
his opinions.

“It’s werry big—and werry stern,” he said
softly, ‘an’ it looks a bit like nurse too. I don’t

think I can quite break it. But I will spit out
4
50 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



the next spoonful,” he added as he finally aban-
doned the attempt. Just then he heard a footstep
outside, and in turning round quickly to get off
the chair, his big pinafore sleeve caught the
bottle, knocked it over, and the deed was
done.

Oliver burst out into frightened tears, and
nurse seeing the spilled oil immediately suspected
him of the mischief.

“ Did you knock the bottle over on purpose ?”
she asked severely.

“No! Yes!” cried the child.

“Come now, no and yes can’t both be true,”
continued nurse crossly, and giving him a little
shake. ‘You tell me the truth this minute.”

But Oliver only cried the harder, and nurse,
remembering her master’s recent order that he
would deal with the next case of evil-doing in the
nursery, carried the screaming child downstairs
into the dining-room, where the professor was
writing out a lecture and eating a sandwich dinner
at the same time.

“Tf you please, sir, you told me to come to you
the next time one of the children was naughty. —
And here’s Master Oliver has broke the cod-liver
oil bottle on purpose, and is telling stories about
it after like anything.” And nurse deposited the
weeping culprit on the floor.

“T didn’t! I didn’t!” he wailed.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 51



“Dear me! This is unfortunate, for | am very
busy,” said the professor, wrinkling his forehead.

‘Well, sir, those were your orders!” observed
nurse rather huffily, “and he deserves to be well
punished.”

“Yes, yes! of course,” answered the professor
hurriedly. ‘And besides,” with a sudden brighten-
ing of his face, “it will be a good opportunity for
the opening of my chapter on the Primitive Atti-
tude towards the Moral Law. You did quite right,
nurse. Leave Master Oliver to me.”

The professor eagerly fetched out his note-book
and then looked at the pitiable little object on the
floor. .

“T wish the child would not keep on crying,”
he said half to himself, “it gets on my nerves.
Only perhaps that is part of the attitude.”

““What was it she said you did, my boy?” he
asked presently, pencil in hand.

‘“ Breaked the cod-liver oil bottle on the pur-
pose,” explained Oliver through his tears; ‘‘on’y
I didn't.”

‘“You did not break it then?” asked his father,
fearing that the case was falling through.

“Yes I did. I don’t know!” gasped the cul-
prit with another big sob.

‘Dear me, how strange! the child’s memory
seems defective.” And the professor made a note
in the book. ‘‘ The fact is,” he thought to himself,
52 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“T believe all this crying confuses the faculties.
I must cheer him up a little, and finish my notes
when he is calmer. Look here, my boy,” he said,
holding out his hand, ‘I don’t want you to cry
any more. Will you leave off to please
father?”

“T might if I eated a sandwich,” said Oliver
thoughtfully.

“ A capital idea,” said the professor delightedly,
“the mental is wonderfully dependent on the
physical. But it is remarkable for such a mere
infant to have fathomed that. I wonder how he
arrived at the conclusion? Are you happy, Oliver,
when you are hungry ?”

“No!” in a voice muffled with sandwich.

‘Are you good when you are hungry ?”

nN One

“What are you then?”

‘“Werry empty,” explained Oliver, helping him-
self to another sandwich, while the professor began
writing again in his note-book.

At last when the sandwiches were finished and
Oliver’s usual cheerfulness was fully established,
his father returned to the subject of the cod-liver
oil bottle.

“Did you knock it over, my child?”

“Yes, I knocked it over.”

“ And did you mean to knock it over?”

Oliver thought for a long time.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 53



“JT meant to knock it over while I didn’t, and
then I meant not to and | did.”

“ Stop, stop! that is good!” cried the professor,
picking up his pencil. Then after a considerable
pause, during which Oliver employed himself in
burying a disused pen in the salt-cellar, he con-
tinued :—

“ And why did you mean to knock it over?”

“That,” explained the culprit solemnly, ‘ was
the naughtiness. I climbed on to the chair to do
it, on’y then I was frightened ‘cause the bottle
looked so stern, And when I was jumping down
in a hurry it fell over and breaked.”

“The child touches the mainspring of the
delinquency from the most subtle moral view,”
murmured the professor; ‘that is an intensely
interesting point, and a most valuable observation.
Perhaps it was your conscience, little one?” he
added aloud.

“P’raps it was my conscience, but p'r’apser it
was my elbow,” admitted Oliver truthfully.

The professor wrote on for a few moments and
then looked at his watch.

«“T had no idea it was so late!” he exclaimed,
jumping up. ‘Run to nurse now, my child, for
I must be off immediately. I am almost afraid
now that I shall be late.” And he was half way
down the street before Oliver quite realised that
he had gone.
54 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



When the little boy went upstairs again he found
Peggy and Roger full of interest in his adventure.
Nurse had told them in her severest tones that
she had taken Oliver to his father to be punished,
and they were almost breathless with excitement
when the victim himself appeared at the top of
the stairs.

‘Was father angry?” asked Peggy in an awe-
stricken voice.

‘1 don’t know,” said Oliver after a few moments’
icesileeroin, Il Wornexets, ”

“What did he do to you?” Roger wanted to
know.

‘He gived me a sandwich and writed a lot.”

‘But did he punish you?” persisted Roger.

‘““T don’t know.”

‘“What did he say?” continued Peggy.

Oliver stood still with a puzzled look on his
round face.

“T can’t memember,” he owned at last.

‘But had he a stern face?”

‘Oh no! but he had a werry writin’ face. An’
I like sandwiches for my dinner better’n pota-
toes.”

“T expect he forgived you?” suggested Roger.

Oliver shook his head.

“T don’t memember,” he repeated doubtfully.

But somehow even the cod-liver oil did not
seem to make the children quite well again. It
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 55



was so cold and foggy out of doors, and so stuffy
in the little nursery with the gas lighted nearly all
day, and the thick yellow air creeping in from out-
side. Only the baby kept rosy and fat during the
winter, but the other three drooped as flowers will,
shut in from the light and air. Roger especially
felt the strain of the long days full of lessons, and
his curly head grew heavy with the burden of
knowledge that was being continually crammed
into it. ;

“JT do hate jography,” sighed Peggy, “and the
trade-winds are the horridest part of all.”

“T don’t hate jography,” argued Oliver. “I
like Turkey in Greece.”

“You mean Turkey and Greece,” corrected
Peggy, tossing back her heavy hair from her
flushed little face.

“No I don’t,” said Oliver, with an obstinate
look. ‘It’s in Greece, and I like it werry much.”

“You know nothing at all about it,” snapped
his sister. She was so tired, and there were so
many lessons to be learned, and really it was very
irritating of Oliver to argue about things of which
she knew he was ignorant.

“ Turkey is werry nice in Greece,” he repeated
impressively.

“ Where’s the turkey?” asked Mike suddenly,
joining the fray.

“There is no turkey, baby,” said Peggy.
56 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“My Turkey is in Greece,” persisted Oliver.

The baby solemnly peeped up the chimney.

“Me see ole Mr. Turkey sitting on his nest,”
he said confidently, nodding his head.

Oliver crept under the sofa.

‘“T are pretending to be Turkey in Greece,” he
stated; and the interest of the game kept him
absorbed for quite ten minutes.

All this time Roger had been toiling at his
sums. Nobody was watching the boy, and one
by one the big tears fell splash on to his smudged
slate.

“Tcane- remember! = 1 cangel al can-t! 2 he
suddenly cried, and Peggy looked up in surprise.

‘“What’s the matter?” she asked with interest.

‘“T don't know,” said Roger with a sob. “It’s
my lessons. I can’t do them. It’s all such a
muddle. I’ve lost something!” he added with a
frightened cry.

“What?” demanded his sister.

“Oh, I don’t know! Something that makes
me know how to do things. Why can’t I remem-
ber?” he exclaimed hopelessly.

— “Tsn’t it disgustin’ when dolls’ shoes and stock-
ings are on’y painted and won’t take off?” remarked
Oliver from under the sofa, where he had acci-
dentally met with a doll of Peggy’s.

“I understood it all this morning,” continued

)

Roger, “and it was so easy then !
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 57



‘“Never mind,” said Peggy soothingly, ‘‘I will
show you how.”

‘Ma’mselle will give you a bad mark I ’spect,”
observed Oliver, creeping out of his hiding-place in
order to more thoroughly understand what was
going on; ‘‘p’raps sixteen ones,” he added cheer-
fully.

“T don't care! J don’t care!” cried Roger ex-
citedly, “only why’can’t I do it? Why can’t [?”

“You forgetted like I did always L-for-looking-
glass when I was little.”

‘Never mind,” repeated Peggy, leaving her
unfinished geography, “ I’ll do it for you, dear.”

The elder sister’s responsibility and motherli-
ness always came to the rescue when her brothers
were in real trouble.

“Your crying makes pools on the slate,” she
continued cheerfully ; “you make rivers joining
them, and I'll use my slate ’cause one side is
clean.”

“Tve found Turkey in Greece,” observed Oliver,
gazing intently at the atlas ; but Peggy deigned no
reply this time. She was too much engrossed in
Roger’s sums.

At last the lessons were finished.

“Let’s pretend we are in a hay-field making
hay like the children in the picture,” she suggested.
And instantly there was a rush for the two dirty
antimacassars, which did very well for hay.
58 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“ And the sun was shining, and the sky blue all
over, ‘stead of strips up between the houses, and
the fairies were all helping to hay-make,” shouted
Roger, jumping on to the arm of the old horse-
hair sofa, and gazing round the dingy room as if
indeed he saw the scene he was picturing.

“An it was awfully lovely and warm,” cried
Oliver.

“An? there was quenty turkeys eatin’ up the
hay-make, an’ one ole bunny rabbit,” added the
baby, sitting down rather suddenly on an imagi-
nary hay-cock.

‘Oh, father!” they all shrieked as the pro-
fessor opened the door; ‘“we’re having such a
splendid pretending !”

“ This is hay-making !” explained Roger, point-
ing to the torn antimacassars.

“And I’m buried in it,” said Peggy, whose face
was covered.

“Would you like to hay-make too, father?”
asked Oliver.

But the professor was in a hurry to get down-
stairs to his note-book, in which he wrote :—

‘“ The power of a child’s imagination is limitless.
Two dirty antimacassars can create all the beauty -
of a genuine hay-making—blue sky, sunshine,
field and all. Are the two antimacassars the in-
spiration or the incidents of such an imagination ?”

And he never saw the wet slate that told of
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 59



Roger’s trouble, nor would he have understood
why nurse, on coming into the room directly after-
wards, watched the children’s play with something
of a sigh, and then sprinkled a bit of brown sugar
on their bread and butter for supper.

‘“Mademoiselle,” called the professor, as the
children’s French governess passed the study
door next morning, ‘I want you to specially
devote your time to Roger’s creative faculties.
Teach the boy to derive his pleasure, indeed I
might say his whole intellectual life, from that
which is drawn out of him, not that which is put
into him. Encourage his delight in telling tales
instead of allowing him to depend for mental ex-
hilaration on those which others may read to
him.”

“And Peggy, too, is of a wonderful intelligence,
monsieur—so quick and bright.”

“Ah! but there you are confusing the types.
I was afraid of this. Peggy, as you say, has any
amount of talent; but in Roger I suspect the ex-
istence of a germ of genius, and the two kinds
require perfectly different treatment. I want your
attention directed to the education, in the literal
sense of the word, of the boy’s thought-power.
Make him think rather than learn, and express
his ideas rather than repeat his lessons. You
understand me? I am making a very close study
of Roger.”
60 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Qui, oui, monsieur. I will observe your
wishes.”

“Oh, ma’mselle!” cried Roger as she entered
the schoolroom, ‘‘what shall I do? I have a
great lump of tiredness in my mind that makes all
my lessons puzzling, and all my stories muddled
up. And yet I have so many to tell that I can’t
make them up in words quick enough, and they
are all tumbling about together in my head.”

‘He was too tired to do his sums, so | did,”
added Peggy.

‘“An’ I found Turkey in Greece in the atlas,”
remarked Oliver very slowly, and glancing side-
ways at Peggy.

“Do read me quite a new something,” begged
Roger, ‘so that I might only just listen. A quite
new history-battle would do.”

“Yes, do!” pleaded the other children.

‘The boy and his father do not wish the same,
but we must obey monsieur the professor,” said
mademoiselle a little sadly.

Lesson-time however flagged in a manner most
unusual with Roger; and day by day a listlessness
of mind seemed to be creeping over him, and his
flashes of interest and excitement became gradually
fewer.

“The child is over-tired,’ mademoiselle de-
cided ; so she trotted downstairs one day when the
professor was at home and told him her opinion,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 61



“ Tired of what?” asked his father.

“All the lessons, and thinking, and being kept
in the house for the cold and bad weather. I do
think Roger needs a diversion.”

“ Why, the boy’s life is full of diversion. If you
had studied him as closely as I have, you would
know in what a wide and varied world of imagina-
tion he lives.”

«Ah, well, monsieur! I only make the sugges-
tion of a little treat to cheer him up.”

“A treat!” repeated the professor; ‘what an
old-fashioned word! It makes me feel as if I were
a boy again myself. I had forgotten about such
things. It is a very good idea of yours, ma’m-
selle ; the children would enjoy a treat, I feel sure.”

“And you will remember it, monsieur ?” pleaded
the kind-hearted little Frenchwoman.

“‘T will indeed,” he answered, smiling his rare
smile. ‘And thank you sincerely for your care of
my little ones.”

“Children!” he called up the stairs after the
governess had gone home, and immediately there
was a rush from the nursery at the unexpected
summons.

“T am going to give you a great treat,” con-
tinued their father, looking lovingly at their up-
turned faces. |

‘A real treat!” exclaimed Peggy, hanging on
to his sleeve.
62 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“What kind of a treat?” Roger wanted to
know. And Oliver stood listening silently with
wide-open eyes.

“T will take you out with me on Friday night.
I am going to a most interesting lecture, and there
will be big magic-lantern pictures.”

‘One of your lectures, father, and shall we be
students ?” asked Peggy.

“No, child. A lecture by the greatest man |
know—in fact one of the greatest men in the
whole world; truly a giant among his fellow-
men! I shall be a student myself.”

‘How splendid!” screamed the children.

And looking at their bright eyes and flushed
faces the professor came to the conclusion that
mademoiselle was mistaken.

“Still it is a good idea, and prompted by
thorough kindness. And I daresay they will be
all the brighter for a treat, although I never saw
Roger looking more eagerly intelligent than he
does at this moment,” thought the professor to
himself.

Until Friday came, nothing was talked of by the
children but the one absorbing topic of the lecture.

‘““T shouldn't have thought he'd be a real giant,
only father said truly,” observed Peggy eagerly ;
“but there are giants sometimes at circuses, nurse
says. Only [ didn’t know lectures and circuses
were the same.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 63



‘The greatest man in the world, father said!”
exclaimed Roger. ‘ Why, it will have to be a
’normous great circus to hold him.”

“ How big’ll he be?” asked Oliver ; “as big as
an omdibus ?”

“Oh! bigger than that,” laughed Peggy, who
had begun to pretend an adventure with the giant ;
“T expect he'll be as big as Blundebore himself.”

“Will he be as fat as a omdibus too?” repeated
Oliver.

‘He might be as big as a church steeple,” Roger
thought ; “’cause you see you have to be a good
bit bigger than anybody would imagine when you
are the biggest man in the whole world.”

“You aren't going to the circus, baby,” said
Oliver soothingly to Mike, who stood listening,
sucking his india-rubber lamb.

“Tare! I are!” shrieked the baby. ‘Aren’t me
goin’ too?” appealing to Peggy.

“Oh, Oliver, how naughty you are to tease
Mike!” said his sister severely.

“But he isn’t going, you know,” persisted Oliver
in that determined way which really was extremely
irritating.

Here the baby’s tears had to be dealt with by
nurse ; and nothing but the pleasure of licking his
soapy hands in the bath succeeded in cheering him
up again. -

“Will there be anything else ’cept the giant at
64 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



the circus?” asked Roger with a vague hope of
wild animals.

‘Only the lecture,” Peggy thought.

‘There’s one uncertain thing about giants,” ob-
served Roger gravely ; ‘‘they always might eat
little children.”

“Oh, not when their fathers are with them!
Eating us would be a thing father would never
allow.”

“A giant as big as an omdibus could swallow
lots of little children,” added Oliver rather gloomily ;
“and I shall take my brother,” clasping his be-
loved woollen shawl, ‘‘ to see the circus.”

“Will the lecture be about the giant, or just
fairy stories ?” Peggy wondered.

“Tt will be about all the great deeds of the
wonderful giant,” cried Roger, racing up and down
the room, “and the battles that he conquered, and
the wicked people that he ate. And his mouth
will be as big as a cave,” continued the boy, his
imagination on fire, ‘‘and his nose like a mountain.
Oh! I wish it was time to start!”

“Taking the children out at this time of night,
and their colds only just better! What next, I do
wonder, to be sure!” sighed nurse as she closed
the front door.

It was tremendously exciting in the omnibus
because the gas was lighted. Peggy and Roger
were by this time past speech; they sat silent in
THE PROFESSOR’'S CHILDREN. 65



utter abandonment to the joy of looking forward.
Oliver was muffled up in a comforter, and was
holding his woollen “ brother” so tightly that he
could not talk much either, but his great eyes
simply glowed with the excitement of the excur-
sion.

When they arrived at the hall, the professor
established the children on three chairs in one of
the front rows, and then went off behind the
scenes to have a word with the great lecturer.

“Tt seems almost too wonderful and splendid
that we should really see the giant to-night!”
whispered Roger.

‘“What a great ’normous counterpane!” Oliver
exclaimed, pointing to the magic-lantern sheet.

‘Tt is the giant’s counterpane, of course, so you
see how big his bed is,” said Peggy triumphantly.

“| hopes father will come afore the giant does,”
observed Oliver.

‘‘ Perhaps he will come standing on the giant's
hand. Look, Peggy, behind. What hundreds of
millions of people!”

‘‘Almost all the people in the world, I expect,
‘cept nurse and cook. Oh! here is father.”

‘““We are enjoying the lecture awful much,
father!” exclaimed Roger.

“Why, it has not begun yet, my boy. Now
you must not whisper, for the lecturer is
coming.”
66 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“The giant!” murmured the children in sub-
dued tones of rapture.

And a little man in spectacles and with longish
hair brushed back over his ears walked on to the
platform.

“Where’s the giant?” whispered Peggy, and
Roger pulled his father’s coat sleeve in an agony
of apprehension.

“ The giant—where is he?” he asked in sharp,
anxious tones, for the smart of a great disappoint-
ment was stinging him.

“ Hush, hush!” answered the professor a little
impatiently, for he was engrossed in the lecturer’s
opening remarks.

“He’s ony as big as a p'rambulator,” said
Oliver scornfully ; ‘‘not a bit as big as the littlest
omdibus.”

“Hush!” repeated his father almost sharply.

The children looked at one another in dismay.
Peggy’s eyes were full of tears, and Roger's lips
were perceptibly quivering, when the lights were
suddenly turned out, and a great, incomprehensible
moon appeared on the magic-lantern sheet; so
their grief stood still in the midst of this new
wonder.

“That is the moon,” explained the professor
in low tones.

‘No it isn’t,” said Oliver decidedly, ‘‘’cause |
saw the moon up in the sky as we camed.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 67



“Tt’s all full of nothingness,” whispered Roger,
‘and it’s got no light in it!”

“Tt isn’t the moon,” repeated Oliver, ‘and I
don’t like these big ugly pictures, and I don’t
want the room to be all full of darkness.”

“Oh look!” whispered Peggy, “if you turn
backward you can see a long sunbeam coming
out of a little box right up at the end of the
room.”

“You must not talk, children,” said the pro-
fessor.

So Peggy fought the lump in her throat in
silence, and Roger gave himself up to the con-
templation of the wonderful sunbeam which he
imagined came straight down from fairyland, and
down which he waited to see the fairies sliding.
Oliver, overcome with sleep, leaned his head
against his father’s arm, and was soon beyond
the reach of disappointment.

At the end of the lecture, the professor took the
children with him, when he went to speak to the
lecturer.

“Rather young students,” said the great man,
smiling at their tired little faces; and then—‘I
forgot to mention the man in the moon, my dears.
There is one, you know.”

Oliver looked steadily at him.

‘“You are dreadfully little for a man what isn’t
a giant,” he began. But his father hurried him
68 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



off; and by the time they had found the right
omnibus he was half asleep again.

The next morning everything seemed rather
gloomy in the nursery.

“ Roger,” said Peggy sadly, “I don’t like treats.
Do you?”

“Not much,” answered her brother doubtfully ;
“they seem a little too long when they last all
night, as the lecture did.”

“JT don’t like big dark lectures,” whimpered
Oliver, who was decidedly peevish and poorly,
‘and father telled stories ‘bout the moon.”

“Oh, Oliver!” said Peggy reprovingly, “it is
very naughty to say father tells stories. Even if
he does, you know,” she added thoughtfully, as she
remembered a certain discrepancy between the
statement he made about the giant and the dis-
appointing reality.

“And the great man; did he speak to you?”
asked mademoiselle, when they told her all about
it. ,

Sree isnitey Create: sconmected Novena he as
quite little, almost as little as you.”

“He on’y telled us one thing, and that was a
thing we knewed before,” said Oliver.

“That was a pity,’ observed mademoiselle
smiling, ‘considering the many things he knows
and the few ones you do.”

“And such an easy old thing too,” chimed in
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 69



Peggy disdainfully, “about the man in the moon
that we have always known ever since we were
quite little.”

“We don’t none of us like treats,” added
Oliver; ‘they make us werry tired.”

“They are much nicer to imagine about be-
fore,” Roger decided.

“T’ve got sticks coming in my throat,” an-
nounced Oliver, resting his heavy little head on
the table; ‘‘I ’spect they dropped out of the
moon.”

That night there was consternation upstairs.
Peggy had to put the baby to bed, and Roger was
sent downstairs with an important message.

“Father,” he began as he opened the door,
‘nurse told me to—-— Oh! whats that you’re
drawing? Is it a spider?”

“It is a psychological chart, my boy. You will
understand it when you are older.”

“Couldn't I understand it now if you ’splained
it properly ?”

‘“ Hardly, I’m afraid. These lines denote ten-
dencies.”

“Let me draw one too. I know I could. It
looks quite easy.”

“Ah, my boy, things that look easy are not
always easy to do. What do I mean by that?”

“T know, I know,” cried Roger excitedly after
amoment’s thought. ‘It looks quite easy to fly
70 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. |



like a sparrow, but it’s awfully difficult really. I
know because I tried to fly off the table the other
day, and Oliver did. Oh, I say, I forgot nurse
told me to tell you Oliver's got the croup.”

His father was drawing a very important line
just then, and could not look up.



COOK FOUND ROGER FAST ASLEEP IN THE STUDY ARMCHAIR.

“Poor little fellow!” he said somewhat ab-
stractedly.
“And nurse said if you didn’t send for the
doctor soon she thought he might very likely die.
Oh, father, what a crooked line!”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 71



The professor jumped up in a great hurry and
rushed out of the room. .

“T will try to draw one my own self,” murmured
Roger; “father won't mind.”

And for a long while the boy sat engrossed by
his pencil and paper. He hardly noticed the
noise of the doctor’s arrival, nor the fact that
everybody in the house seemed to have forgotten
his own existence. It was so delightful being
allowed to sit up late and play without prohibition
in his father’s study, that Roger enjoyed himself
very much. He was only sorry that Peggy had
missed the fun by having to stay with Mike while
nurse was so busy; and it was vexing that he him-
self could not help feeling a little sleepy after a
time, though he tried manfully to beat down the
unwelcome sensation which spoiled his pleasure.

And upstairs Oliver was fighting breath by
breath for his life.

It was after eleven o'clock when the doctor
assured the distressed father that his little son had
won the battle, and cook found Roger fast asleep
in the study armchair.
72

CHAPTER IV.

THE next interesting thing that happened was the
freezing of the pipes during a long and severe
frost.

Oliver had soon recovered from his dangerous
attack ; the only thing left by it being a slight
weakness, which made him more inclined to be
cross than was at all necessary, and ready to cry
about things directly he began to argue. Even
nurse noticed it ; because he never used to bea
crying boy, only very determined and obstinate.

“| think Master Oliver needs a tonic, sir,” she
said one night to his father; ‘for he seems that
cross and peevish since the croup that there is no
doing anything with him.”

The professor looked up with quick interest.

“A new development,” he said thoughtfully ;
‘“T must observe this, and examine these fresh
tendencies to, what did you say, nurse?”

‘The child is always crying, sir, and seems so
quickly put out in one way or the other.”

‘‘Doubtless it is the dawn of the influence of
conflicting impulses in his raw, untrained nature.
a NT

THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 73



The inclination to follow the wrong, and the con-
sciousness of the opposing right, would create a
ruffled state of mind that might easily come under
the term peevishness.”

“]’m sure I don’t know, sir,” remarked nurse ;
‘only it is my opinion the doctor might give him
something strengthening.”

“The doctor, did you say? I hardly think it is
a case for him. But I am just writing a chapter
on the Initial Stages of Wrong-doing in Child-life,
and their effect on the general moral condition, the -
theories of which will be a great help in Oliver’s
case. For I am inclined to think that this is the
cause of that of which you complain,” continued
the professor musingly.

‘| thought it my duty to mention it, sir,” said
nurse rather grimly.

“ You are quite right—quite right,” he repeated ;
and then half to himself: ‘“ Otherwise I might
have been inclined to overlook this practical illus-
tration of the contending forces which are dis-
cernible even at such an early age”.

So the professor returned to his note-book, and
nurse, on her own responsibility, wrote a letter
asking the doctor to call round the next day.

“Father!” cried Roger, rushing in through the
door, and followed by Peggy leading Oliver, who
was in tears, by the hand, ‘we've been telling
Oliver the story of Joseph in the pit, ’cause it’s


74 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



Sunday, you know, and he will keep on crying.
Do ’splain to him.” .

“T don’t want Joseph to be put in that werry
nasty pit,” he sobbed.

“How extremely unfortunate!” said the pro-
fessor helplessly ; ‘‘for that matter was settled a
considerable number of years ago.”

“But perhaps he didn’t mind, did he, father?”
chimed in Peggy. ‘I’ve kept saying he didn't
mind, ‘but Oliver will keep on thinking he did.”

“That is a good idea,” said the professor ad-
miringly. ‘Really, Peggy, you have an intelli-
gence rich in resource. Don’t cry, my child,” he
continued, “for, as your sister happily suggests,
I dare say Joseph did not mind it at all

“But do you really think he enjoyed it?”
asked Oliver, checking his tears.

”

“Possibly he enjoyed it,” repeated the pro-
fessor, lifting Oliver on to his knee; and then he
added to himself: ‘‘ For one can never accurately
gauge the boy-mind, and at that time Joseph was

-probably a boy”.

“Tf he enjoyed it 1 won't cry no more,” Oliver
promised.

‘Was it a pit in the pavement for the coals?”
Roger wanted to know.

“It was the kind of pit a boy would enjoy
most,” answered his father quickly, watching
Oliver’s showery face.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 75



“Not a dark one?” the little boy asked
anxiously. ;

“Certainly not!” the professor hastily assured
him, “a most light and cheerful pit.”

So Oliver's woe was assuaged, and the pro-
fessor wrote down in his note-book :—

“The sentiment of pity in the child-mind is
more easily evoked by narrative than by visible
suffering. My son, aged nearly five years, cried
bitterly with sympathy over the story of Joseph
in the pit, but regards the sight of a funeral as a
most interesting and diverting entertainment, tell-
ing me afterwards with a delighted laugh—‘ An’
we saw a grown-up woman crying quite properly
with a real pocket handkerchief!’”

But this happened a week or so before the
pipes froze, and it was fortunate that, thanks to
the doctor’s tonic, Oliver was quite himself again
and able to enjoy with the other children this
tremendously interesting state of affairs.

It seemed a pity that nurse did not derive
equal pleasure from the circumstance ; it was just
one of those things which she might have enjoyed
so much, but never did. Having the sweeps was
another of them,—but nurse was a difficult person
to understand. The children had given her up
long ago, for any one who will always sit on a
chair instead of the floor, who prefers regular
meals to feasts and picnics, and chooses to go for
76 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



a straightforward walk instead of playing about,
is surely in a hopeless case. At least so the
children thought.

“T do love the plumber!” exclaimed Peggy,
clasping her hands, ‘and I wish the pipes would
freeze every day.”

co Amiel dorm sadded Roce lesletame: stit
the white lead this morning, and hold the screw-
driver.”

‘He's got a werry nice smile,” said Oliver.

‘“Vedy nice ’mile,” echoed the baby.

“J mean to be a plumber when I’m a man,”
Roger decided on the spot.

“{ thought you were going to be a ph'los’pher,”
said Peggy, ‘‘and that you and father had settled
ia

“T was,” answered Roger impressively, ‘‘ but ]
have changed my mind.”

“1 wish there could be a lady-plumber,” and
Peggy sighed, ‘“’cause it’s just what | should like
to grow into. It seems such a kind thing to be!”

“Children, I want you,” called the professor ;
‘“T have a new friend come to spend a few days
here, and he is a poet.”

“Will he bite?” asked Mike suddenly as he
was going downstairs step by step.

‘Not more than is absolutely necessary for pur-
poses of mastication. I think you will all like
him.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 77



And their father was right. The poet turned
out to be a most delightful man who knew endless
fairy stories which the children had not heard
before, and also he kept acid-drops in his waistcoat
pocket. Before the evening was over both Peggy
and Roger had decided to be poets.

“You are sure girls can be it too?” asked



“WILL HE BITE?”

Peggy a little anxiously, as they were making their
final plans.

“Certainly, my dear. And now I propose that
we all begin to be poets this very night.”

“It’s frightfully exciting turning out to be what
you never expected,” cried Roger, jumping wildly
up and down on the sofa. Oliver and Mike did
not care for poets much, as poets; though any one
who dispensed acid-drops found favour in their
78 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

sight. Moreover they had been carried off to
bed quite early by nurse.

“You can’t begin to be one, because you are
one, you see,” said Peggy.

‘No, I can only finish being one now,” answered
the poet. ‘But you and Roger have a great step
before you. Suppose you each make up your
mind to write a poem during my visit here? It
would be a good beginning.”

“It seems to me,” said Roger, pausing to take
breath, “that being a poet is more exciting even
than telling and imagining stories.”

“JT have not found it the most exciting of
callings, but then it is the only one I have tried,
so I am hardly a fair judge.”

“ Does being a poet make you so very under-
standing to talk to, and not laugh when there’s
nothing funny being said, like lots of grown-ups
do?” asked Peggy lucidly.

‘““T believe it does,” answered the poet gravely ;
‘at any rate it ought to.”

“Then,” concluded Peggy, “I shall be a poet
more particularly when I’m grown-up even than
now.”

‘““T would,” replied her friend.

‘7 think it would help us a good lot in writing
poetry if we hadn’t only one lead pencil between
us all four,” said Roger persuasively to his
father.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 79



“And that'll only write just after a suck,” ex-
plained Peggy ; “ we take it in turns, you know.”
“To write with or to suck?” asked the poet.

“ Both,” said Peggy simply.

“T can hardly imagine being a poet myself
under the circumstances, so | will stand two new
pencils.”

And the children felt that the millennium was at
hand.

‘“‘Good-morning, big poet,” said Roger, appear-
ing downstairs at a most unusual hour a day or
two afterwards.

‘“ Good-morning, little poet,” replied his friend.

““Ma’mselle is waiting, but I wanted to ask
you whether you generally say ‘to begin’ or ‘to
commence ’.”

‘“‘T usually prefer ‘ begin’ myself.”

“But ’spose it was in poetry and ‘begin’
wouldn’t rhyme?”

“Ah! that is a different matter.”

“And ’spose ‘commence’ seemed almost as
good a word to say what you want, I mean, as
if it hadn’t to be poetry at all?” continued Roger.

“T should be guided by inspiration.”

“Oh!” said the boy doubtfully; and then
brightening up a little, “I think I will ask
cook.”

“T would if I were you,” agreed the poet.

On Thursday the three elder children were in-
80 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



vited down to tea, and afterwards Peggy and
Roger produced a somewhat soiled piece of exer-
cise paper as the fruits of a week's labour.

“ There’s one very awkward thing happened,”
began Roger solemnly; ‘“we’re both only one
poet, you see.”

“How is that?” asked the poet. The pro-
fessor was dreadfully busy writing out lectures,
so that he could not attend to the children quite
as much as usual, but he looked up from his desk
and laid his open note-book on the table to await
Roger’s explanation.

“Could two children be one poet?” asked
Peggy anxiously.

“What zs almost invariably can be,” remarked
the professor.

“Well, you see, it’s like this,” continued Roger,
“Peggy and me both wanted the same rhymes,
and that made us inclined to quarrel.”

“And there didn’t seem quite enough rhymes
for both of us,” Peggy chimed in, ‘‘so we thought
it would be better to be one poet between us.”

“’Specially as nurse was rather cross, and said
she would take both the pencils away if we didn’t
give over squabbling,” added Roger.

“ They was werry naughty,” Oliver observed,
“and Roger called nurse ‘an ole goose’.”

“Oh, Oliver!” said Peggy reproachfully, ‘‘ how

can you? He only just whispered it very softly,”





“THE SPRING IS COMMENCING,
IT IS, IT IS.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 83

she explained, ‘‘and nurse was aggravatinger than
usual.”

‘So one half of me is going to be a poet with
Peggy, and the half that’s over shall be a plum-
ber,” was Roger’s decision.

““A very good arrangement,” observed the
poet, lighting his pipe. ‘And now, let us hear
the poem.”

Peggy shook back her hair and cleared her
throat, then she read all in one breath, while
Roger’s lips moved silently with the rhythm :—

“ The spring is commencing,

It is, it is;

And green is the fencing,
It is, it is;

The thrushes are singing,
They are, they are;

And the bluebells are ringing,
They are, they are.

‘¢ The summer was boiling,
It was, it was ;
The flowers were spoiling,
They was, they was ;
The dusty road thirsted,
It did, it did;
And all the buds bursted,
They did, they did.
“The dead leaves want raking,
They do, they do;
The corn-crakes stop craking,
They do, they do.
84 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



It’s time for the reapers,
It is, it is,

To open their peepers,
It is, it is.

“The cold winds are wheezing,
They are, they are;

The pipes they are freezing,
They are, they are.
There’s plenty of plumbing,
There is, there is ;

And Christmas is coming,
It is, it is.”

“Tt’s werry silly,” remarked Oliver, who had
been listening with a most bored expression.

“Tt isn't, is it?” cried Peggy, appealing both to
her father and the poet.

“Tt is just splendid,” exclaimed the latter; “1
must shake hands with such a poet immediately,”
and he took both their hands in his.

“You see now it had to be ‘commencing,’” said
Roger, jumping up and down with excitement ;
“and besides, cook said she thought it sounded
more genteel.”

“Tt is perfect!” the poet assured them. “I
congratulate you both.”

“T shan’t be a poet when I’m growed up,” an-
nounced Oliver. ‘I shall be a sweep.”

“And what are your reasons, my boy, for
choosing such a profession ?” asked his father.

‘What say ?” interrupted Oliver.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 85



‘Why do you want to be a sweep ?”

‘“’Cause he’s never washed,” replied Oliver
triumphantly.

“Tt strikes me,” suggested the poet, ‘that even
the poetic genius would be all the better for a
little excursion in the fresh air. Suppose we all
go as far as the park to-morrow ?”

Roger and Peggy clapped their hands.

“T can’t spare time to go,” said the professor ;
‘but, not being a poet, perhaps I am not wanted.”

“Oh, father, you are!” cried Peggy loyally ;
‘and we shan’t be quite all poets, ’cause of the
plumber-half of Roger.”

“Yes, make time for once, Maxwell,” urged his
friend ; “ you are paler even than the children, and
need a breath of fresh air quite as much. These
stuffy streets don’t count for air.”

During this conversation Oliver's face had been
gradually growing redder, he was also blink-
ing a good deal more than usual, and his mouth
was not quite steady.

‘““T aren’t a poet,” he said gloomily, “nor |
shan’t be when I’m growed up, but—but——”
and he looked up very piteously at his father.

‘Could not an embryo sweep be included?”
asked the professor.

“Certainly,” agreed the poet; “we will not be
too exclusive. So well have your father and
Oliver, won’t we, children ?”
86 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“We will, we will!” they shouted, capering
about wildly.

Most fortunately the following day was a lovely
one, with a bright blue sky anda tingling taste of
frost in the air.

“ We will all sit still in the train,” suggested the
poet as they entered the underground station ; “ it
is the custom, you know.”

“T would rather like to be an engine-driver tf
I wasn’t a poet,” said Roger thoughtfully.

“ And when we get to St. James’s Park we will
walk across to Hyde Park. I am greedy of grass
in London.”

“Tm greedy of jam,” announced Oliver. “ Mike
is greedy of everything.”

“T am very anxious about this new book of
mine,” said the professor to his friend, ‘for I feel
that few students of the psychological aspects of
childhood have to their hand such practical illus-
trations as I have in my children. I can watch
and follow closely each new development, and
their varied characteristics make the study more
complete.”

“ Poor little psychological problems !” murmured
the poet softly.

The professor wrinkled his forehead.

“They are not at all poor problems I can assure
you. You makea mistake in supposing that. But
of course an outside observer only might think so.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 87



You can havé no idea of the depth and intricacy
of these child-problems.”

“T’m beginning to feel,” said Oliver slowly,
‘that I’ve sat still just as long as ever I can. If
we don’t get out soon I must begin to move
about.”

‘‘ Fortunately the next station is ours,” the poet
assured him.

They had a lovely walk through the park and
over the bridge, though, as the professor sug-
gested, it might have been more appropriate to
have gone round by Westminster as they were
such a distinguished company.

‘And seen Poets’ Corner,” added his friend
smiling.

‘Is that where naughty poets are put?” Roger
asked with great interest.

‘Occasionally good ones too.”

‘““ How unfair!” exclaimed Peggy indignantly.
‘“T do hate corners!”

‘“ There’s a horrider thing even than corners,”
continued Roger; “I mean bed during the
day.”

“You seem to have a wide and varied ex-
perience of the penal system. Is it your nurse,
or your governess, or your father, who is so
Simchas

“Qh, not father!” laughed the children; ‘he’s

the spoilingest of them all!”
88 THE-PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Our nurse very quickly punishes,” Peggy ex-
plained.

“T don’t think she can help it, poor thing!”
added Roger kindly. ,

‘No, poor thing!” echoed Oliver, “but she’s
dreadful when the clothes is clean, only I do love
her werry much.”

“Nurse says it’s worse than heathens to have
clean clothes on Saturdays, but ours have to go
to the wash then,” said Peggy.

““Which day do you have clean clothes?”
Roger asked the poet. ‘We ought to know,
‘cause of us being a poet now.”

“T am afraid I cannot tell you.”

“ Father,” whispered Oliver, “might I go close
up to that big ’normous soldier-man and look at
imei

They were passing the Knightsbridge Bar-
racks.

“Certainly, if you like.”

So the little boy went up to the tall, still senti-
nel, and regarded him solemnly for a few seconds.
Then he laid his small hand on the soldier’s tunic,
but the man took no notice.

“He’s dead. I thought he was!” said Oliver
decidedly.

When they reached the Albert Memorial great
was the children’s delight. Oliver dreadfully
wanted to have the golden man to take home
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 89



with him, and his father’s refusal of so simple a
little request made him very obstinate.

‘Why mayn’t I have it?” he kept repeating.

The professor was delighted with a new obser-
vation.

“You see,” he said slowly, as he wrote down
something on the back of an envelope, ‘the
child-mind is unconscious of size. It is absolutely
lacking in the element of proportion.”

“T want the golden man,” persisted Oliver.

The poets were amusing themselves by seeing
how many steps they could jump down at
_ once.

“‘T propose,” said the big poet, when they were
at last torn away from this entrancing amusement,
“that we go into a confectioner’s and have some
buns, on our way home.”

The children clapped their hands with delight.

“J wish I could have all my meals in a shop!”
cried Peggy enthusiastically ; “don’t you?”

“I have a preference myself for a club,” re-
plied the poet.

“T’ve never been to a club. I s’pose it’s as
jolly as a shop?”

‘“‘Pretty much the same thing.”

The professor suggested tea, but Roger had
caught sight of ginger-beer bottles; and every-
body can guess how much more of a treat ginger-
beer would be for tea on a cold winter’s afternoon.
go THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



The poet gave a little shiver and ordered three
bottles to be opened.

“Tt makes my face flash!” exclaimed Oliver
with a startled expression.

“They must be awfully rich people,” said
Peggy to her father, ‘‘to have even their com-
mon tables made of marble!”

“Retail trade is a lucrative calling,” observed
the professor drily.

“T wish I could eat just another bun!” sighed
Roger ; ‘‘’cause it’s such a splendid chance. But
I can’t,” he added sorrowfully.

It was a pity such a perfect afternoon was
obliged to come to an end; and that home and
bed-time followed on so closely. But when the
nursery was reached, the children were still full of
delight and excitement, in which the baby joined ;
for his father had remembered to buy a small
paper bag full of farthing buns for his particular
consumption. And Mike did not mind a bit the
fact that the professor, having then forgotten all
about them, had crushed them quite flat in his
coat pocket.

“Tt has been a lovely time lately!” cried Peggy,
dancing about in her little petticoat during the
process of undressing; ‘“ what with the pipes
freezing, and the darling plumber, and this splen-
did going-out to-day !”

“And the poet coming, and us being poets,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. gi

too!” added Roger, wriggling out of nurse’s
grasp.

“I would have liked the golden man in my
bath!” said Oliver in an injured tone.

“And the jolly tea of ginger-beer and buns in
the shop!” continued Peggy ; ‘wasn’t it lovely,
nurse P”

But nurse did not agree with Peggy. She
would actually rather have dull tea, and bread and
butter, in a warm room during the winter, than
ginger-beer and buns on a marble table in a shop.
The children pitied her profoundly ; and it did
seem unfortunate that grown-up people who might
continually enjoy themselves in such glorious ways,
should be too stupid to do so.

“When I’m a man, I shall live on ginger-beer
and buns, and jump down the Memorial steps all
day,” was Roger’s final decision before going to
sleep.
92

CHAPTER V.

THEN came the whooping-cough. A horrid thing
which lasted for weeks and weeks, and tired all
the children so much that they felt they could never
again enjoy rushing up and down stairs for hours
at a time, pretending they were wild deer on a
mountain, or having a pillow fight when nurse had
gone down to her supper, or any pleasures of that
kind. And when the whooping-cough had ex-
hausted itself, and its little victims into the bar-
gain, the hot weather began—such glaring, baking
sunshine beating down upon the houses and stone
pavement, and heating seven times hotter the
stuffy, airless streets.

The professor had, moreover, arrived at the con-
clusion that the children ought to be learning
German as well as French; so what made things
worse was the advent of a new, dull, strict Fraulein
in the place of dear little Mademoiselle, whom the
children all loved very much.

“TI do hate whooping-cough and German!”
sighed Peggy, looking up from a hot, sticky exer-
cise, and resting her tired head on her little inky
hand.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 93



“ Fraulein’s werry cross and ugly!” added Oliver
solemnly ; ‘‘and she talks nonsense too.”

“Tt isn’t nonsense; it’s German,” said Roger
languidly. ‘Oh, I’m so hot!”

‘“My dinner’s sore!” remarked the baby, with
rather a red face.

“Did you swallow the stones?” asked Oliver
with interest. ‘‘ 1 wanted to, on’y nurse wouldn't
let me.”

“ Not let me too,” said the baby sadly.

But just when the children were most tired and
overdone—when the weather seemed at its hottest
and the professor was fullest of work—a really
wonderful and unexpected thing happened. The
postman brought a letter from a far-away and
almost unknown Uncle Robert, saying that he and
his wife would be so glad if the professor and the
four children and nurse would come down and
spend the rest of the summer at his country
rectory. And there was a dear little letter en-
closed from their Aunt Isabel, telling them how
much she wanted to have them now she was
settled down at home again after being between
two and three years abroad.

“Tt’s very kind of Robert, I’m sure,” murmured
the professor, thinking what a lifetime it seemed
since he had last met his wife’s brother. ‘‘ But of
course we cannot go.”

“Oh, father!” cried Peggy with a gasp, for this
94 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



was the last straw; and then she threw herself
sobbing on to the floor.

‘Dear me, what can have upset the child so?”
exclaimed her father. And then, as she refused
to be comforted, he sent for nurse.

“The grief of childhood is abnormally acute,”
he wrote down in his note-book meanwhile ; ‘“‘and
were it not for its evanescent character the fragile
tissues of the child’s emotional nature would un-
doubtedly prove unequal to the strain.”

Then nurse came in and heard the story; and,
wonderful to relate, she took the children’s part in
a manner which caused Peggy’s tears to dry up
suddenly on her cheeks, and was the subject of
an inexhaustible astonishment in the nursery after-
wards.

“The children must go, sir,” said nurse de-
cidedly.

‘“What!” exclaimed the professor in amaze-
ment. ‘ What did you say?”

“Well, you see, sir, the whooping-cough’s left
them that peeked and poorly, and the hot weather
coming on the top of it will be the death of them
all if they have another couple of months of it.”

‘Wasn't it lovely of nurse to say that about our
deaths?” said Peggy enthusiastically, when she
was telling the others all about it.

‘But I am too busy,” argued the professor ; “I
could not possibly leave London now.”


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 95



‘TI can take the children, sir,” persisted nurse,
“and you can follow us.”

‘But my psychological work. I use the chil-
dren so much for purposes of deduction.”

‘“T won’t answer for the consequences of their
remaining here,” said nurse to her master ; but she
expressed herself by “ pack of rubbish!” to cook
in the kitchen.

So it came to pass that the professor sadly
packed up his note-book, and the children started
with nurse on their glorious journey into that
unknown region called “the country”.

“Its werry wide!” observed Oliver impres-
sively, as they stood on the little platform of the
far-away station and looked over the vast view
that seemed to reach right up to the sunset.

It was all a whirl of delight to Peggy and
Roger. The fresh scenes, the cheerful creeper-
covered rectory, the flower-filled garden, the kind
uncle and aunt, and, above all, a real live cousin
of their own called Jack, who had just arrived
home from school to spend the long holidays.

And next morning there dawned with the new
day a wonderful, undreamed-of, ideal summer for
the children.

‘There never was anybody quite so big and
clever as Jack in the eyes of Peggy and Roger
and Oliver. He was turned eleven, and a school-
boy, so he really seemed to them very big in-
g6 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



deed. He wore trousers on Sundays with an
Eton jacket and a top-hat, which distinction filled
Roger’s seven-year-old soul with an envying ad-
miration that knew no bounds. For when you
have to wear a knickerbocker-suit with a holland



JACK, WHO HAD JUST ARRIVED HOME FROM SCHOOL.

pinafore over that, it does seem as if you never
would be old enough for a top-hat and a silver
watch-chain made in links like a real grown-up
man’s gold one.

And Jack could whistle through his fingers,
and climb almost any tree. He could stand on
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 97



his head for quite a long time if his feet only just
touched the wall. He could make ducks and
drakes across the pond with four and sometimes
five bounces, and with his catapult he had been
known to hit several sparrows. At least he was
sure he had hit them from the uncomfortable
manner in which they flew away.

In fact there was nothing which really mattered
that Jack could not do. Stupid, senseless things
like lessons of course did not count. At first Roger
was a little surprised to find that his cousin did
not know the French for “window,” and such like
simple words, and also that he was more ignorant
still of German; but after Jack assured him that
French was all rot, and nobody ever bothered
about it at school, Roger was duly impressed,
and soon became thoroughly ashamed of his own
fluent French and faultless accent.

“T say, make haste,” shouted Jack from the
bottom of the back stairs one morning after they
had been a week or so at the rectory. ‘Iam
going into the wood.”

‘“We’re coming. Oh do wait!” shrieked three
anxious little voices from the nursery.

“Shall we bring Mike?” asked Peggy in
muffled tones, which resulted from her efforts to
lace her own boots. When you have long thick
hair which tumbles all over your eyes and goes

tickling down each side of your face, it does make
7
98 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



it difficult to see exactly the right holes through
which to thread the laces.

‘Are his boots on?” answered Jack.

“Yes; he was done first, cause we always
leave him behind if he isn’t,” called Roger.

“Then bring him, Jack decided) “Come
on!”

And away they went, bumping down the
boarded staircase close on each other’s heels,
and away across the lawn and garden into a
wonderful forest, about half an acre in extent,
which was the children’s favourite play place.

‘“T say,” said Jack, ‘it’s a jolly lark having you
all here.”

“We do love it awfully!” exclaimed Peggy ;
‘‘T never knew there was anywhere half so nice
in the world.”

“It’s a pity the boys are so little and you only
a girl,” continued her cousin frankly ; “ but you’re
a lot better than nobody, you know.”

‘Who did you use to play with?” asked Roger.

“Oh, Mr. Fairfax,” referring to the curate,
‘‘was awfully jolly to me; and since I have been
at school I’ve had some of the boys to stay with
me, or else been to them at home. There was an
old locum te. here, you know, while father and
mother were abroad.”

“T would like to go to school,” said Roger
thoughtfully.

















‘Tl ONLY GOT INTO ONE RATTLING OLD ROW LAST TERM,”

BEGAN JACK.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. rot



“Tell us bout what you do,” implored Peggy,
whose admiration for Jack was unbounded.

“Yes, do,” begged the others. Roger regarded
his cousin as a kind of serial story, the interest of
which was never exhausted, and Oliver listened
untiringly to the wonders of Jack’s career. They
had never come into contact with any other chil-
dren before, to say nothing of a full-fledged school-
boy.

“T only got into one rattling old row last term,”
began Jack, who was lying on his back, with his
straw hat tilted on to his freckled nose. ‘It was
ago!”

“Do tell us "bout it,” begged the others.

“Well, you know, Mr. Cardew—that’s where |
go to school—asks all the chaps into tea with him
one day for certain, and it was beastly awkward
that it turned out on the same day.”

“What did?” asked Peggy, who liked to
thoroughly understand everything as she went
along.

“Why, the row. You know Packford and
Raynor and Assheton Minor and me were all
gated, and Miss Violet Eliot, who is a stunning
sort of girl, and lives with an old cat of an aunt,
asked us four to tea cause her aunt was going out.
And of course it would have been rather low of
any of us to tell that the others were gated, and
besides, Mr. Cardew was going to see Martin's
102 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



governor that afternoon, who lives twelve miles
off, and we thought we’d better risk it and not dis-
appoint Miss Vi. So we went, and we did have
a high old time. The coffee was that prime sort
you taste all night, you know, and we ate black
currant jam with our eggs, and there were two
fowls and loads of grub,” and Jack’s face literally ~
glowed with enthusiasm at the mere remembrance
of such a feast.

“Was they boiled fowls or roasted ones ?”
Oliver wanted to know.

‘Oh, cold! And it was all our beastly luck,
Mr. Cardew never went. We did lick old Martin
for having such a sneaky governor as to go and
telegraph for him not to come after all. So we
were caught, and had to go up to his study next
day at four, and his tea-party was at six, and of
course we knew we should get it pretty hot.”

“ Get what?” asked Roger innocently.

Jack opened his big brown eyes much wider
than usual.

“Why licked, stupid, of course. And we all
felt jolly sick, I can tell you, waiting for it all
day.”

‘“Was the fowls cold roasted ones or boiled?”
persisted Oliver.

_‘ What happened next?” said Peggy breath-
lessly.

“Why, he jawed us, and then he licked us.


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 103



And it was rather low of him to give it us half on
the right hand when we had got to go shaking
hands at his old party all evening.”

“Did you cry?” Peggy asked solemnly.

“Cry!” exclaimed Jack scornfully. ‘But it
brings the tears into your eyes like anything,” he
added candidly.

‘“ How dreadful!” gasped Peggy.

“ But when we went in to tea he was awfully
jolly to us, and, what was the best go of the lot,
Miss Eliot and Miss Vi were there too. And the
old girl told Mr. Cardew that she had left two
fowls in the larder the day before, and the cat had
got in and eaten them while she was away. And
we all nearly burst, and Miss Vi choked, and Mr.
Cardew looked at us so jollily that we roared,
and forgot about the licking ; only when the others
had all gone and we said good-night, Raynor and
I told him we were awfully sorry, and we wouldn't
do it again, and—why, what’s Mike got?” And
Jack jumped up suddenly to see.

“ T’se finded a vedy big ole mister rat,” said the
baby, proudly exhibiting a dead stoat.

“How jolly!” exclaimed Jack. ‘I vote we
stuff it. It’s awfully easy. Packford was going
to stuff an owl last term, only he was stopped.
But he told me how to do it.”

“Oh yes! Let’s!” cried Peggy and Roger,
who had unlimited faith in Jack’s powers.
104 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“You have to bake it first and draw it after, like
a rabbit—or else you draw it first and bake it
after, I forget which. . What a bother!”

< vuivene did the boy at school do?” asked
Roger wisely.

“Well, he couldn’t bake it, you see, ’cause there
was no oven he could use, but he was going to
draw it, only the matron found it inside his best
hatbox, where he had hidden it, and she told Mr.
Cardew.”

“Was he very angry?” asked Peggy eagerly.

“Ohno! He was awfully decent to Packford
about it, and he only made him bury it that after-
noon instead of giving him lines.”

Just then, unfortunately, nurse appeared upon
the scene, and she so often made things suddenly
disagreeable.

‘Now, Master Jack, what’s that you’ve got?
Throw the nasty thing away this minute.”

“It’s my vedy own ole mister rat,” explained
the baby kissing it fondly, which seemed to irritate
nurse in an inexplicable way. She seized Mike
and shook him severely, and then carried him in-
doors screaming, where she washed him-—just as
a punishment, the children supposed.

‘“‘T don’t want to be naughty,” observed Roger,
“but I do wish we might hope nurse would be
drowned.” :

“Oh, Roger!” exclaimed Peggy reproachfully.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 105



And then: “In the river did you mean?” she
added with interest.

Oliver had gone off to give his woollen shawl
a ride in the doll’s perambulator, which generally
stood on the lawn. It proved a convenient
receptacle for any of the treasures which the
children might find out of doors, as well as ac-
commodating an old one-eyed doll of Peggy’s,
whose limbs stood out in the unyielding manner
peculiar to its inexpensive genus.

Occasionally Mike carried it by the hair, which
changed its identity into that of a rabbit, and
lately, False Alarm, for such was the extraor-
dinary name Oliver had bestowed upon it, had
been somewhat neglected by its mother, for
Peggy preferred going about with Jack. And
the only notice he ever took of dolls was to
torture them, or paint them scarlet, or bury them
alive, or throw them into the river for the dogs
to bring out.

“T’ve drawn it!” cried Jack triumphantly, com-
ing back to the others, ‘‘and the stuffing’s quite
easy after that.”

The unpleasant object which he carried in his
pocket-handkerchief had once been the stoat.

‘How splendid!” cried Roger, and then Pegg
added :—

“Tt isn’t a very stoaty shape yet”.

“The stuffing 71] do that,” said Jack con-
106 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



fidently, “and boot buttons will make jolly
eyes.”

_ “Shall you put it in the drawing-room when
it's done,” asked Roger, “under a big glass ?”

Jack looked doubtful.

“I’m not sure if itll be up to the drawing-room.
But anyhow it'll be jolly for the school-room, and
it won’t matter then if it does smell a little.”

‘Of course not,” agreed the others loyally.

“Trl make it more interesting,” observed
Peggy. But deep down in his soul Jack could
not go quite as far as that.

“It won’t smell—much!” he said cheerfully.

‘‘T’se goin’ to ’mell the pity Powers!” remarked
the baby, who had escaped from nurse’s clutches ;
and he trotted off on a little expedition of his
own, selecting those flowers which were growing
almost on the ground, and bending in a wonder-
fully-balanced way until his tiny nose brushed
against the blossom and was just on a level with
his little brown boots.

“Your nurse is a peppery old customer!” ob-
served Jack as they went off to coax the gardener’s
boy into baking the deceased stoat in the green-
house stove.

“It’s always just the most interesting things
that she’s cross about,” said Peggy sadly; “we
have noticed it often.”

“Oh, women are always fussy!” exclaimed


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 107



Jack: loftily, “and nurses the worst of the whole
shoot.”

‘‘T do wish we could have a curate instead of a
nurse!” continued Peggy thoughtfully. ‘A nice
curate just like Mr. Fairfax for our very own.”

‘Oh, girls have to have nurses,” announced
Jack. “It must be awful to be only a girl!” he
added with a pitying look.

After dinner the children went into the garden
again.

“T say,” said Jack, “did you hear what father
said? Mrs. Arnold’s baby is going to be chris-
tened this afternoon.”

“How lovely!” cried Peggy. ‘‘Couldn’t we
go?”

“Tt would be rather fun,” assented Jack, “if
the service is quite short and the baby squeals.
If ’'m a clergyman when I’m a man J shall always
pinch them till they squeal.”

“Tell be werry like what you told us ‘bout the
pig being killed,” said Oliver slowly.

“Oh, it won’t be half as jolly as that!” replied
Jack. “But still it'll be better than nothing.”

The christening was quite a success from the
children’s point of view—though the rector had
been somewhat disconcerted to see them occupy-
ing the best seats when he began the service.
The baby screamed until it was purple in the
face, and wriggled so fiercely that Mr. Anstruther

em
108 THE PROFESSOR'S CHILDREN.



could hardly hold it. So altogether the children
enjoyed themselves immensely, and were quite
sorry when it was over.

“Mr. Arnold wanted to ask us to tea,” Jack
remarked as they walked back through the church-
yard. “J saw him whisper it to Mrs. But I
suppose she wouldn't, because she didn’t.”

‘How horrid!” said Peggy.

“T know what the baby was thinking about
what made it squeal so,” observed Roger, whose
brain had been busily working out this problem.
“Tt thought Uncle Robert was going to drown it.”

“Like cook does the kittens,’ Oliver said
gravely. ‘It squealed werry loud.”

“T feel,” said Roger after a while, ‘‘as if we
might very likely do something naughty this
afternoon. The christening has put it into my
head.”

“It is a bit dull,” Peggy thought, ‘after being
so dreadfully exciting.”

“T tell you what!” exclaimed Jack; “I’ve
thought of a rattling good thing. Let’s scrub the

_ barn floor!”

“That'll be lovely,” cried Peggy enthusiastic-
ally; ‘it'll be so useful and interesting and
wet |”

“Me sc’ub too!” echoed Mike. And Oliver
began turning up the wristband of his pinafore in
a thoroughly business-like way.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 10g



Then they had a delightful time! Jack fetched
two buckets of water, into one of which Mike un-
. fortunately tumbled head first. But Peggy pulled
him out, and wiped his head as well as she could
with Jack’s pocket-handkerchief. And as acci-
dents will happen, it is no use bothering about
them. Then they all took fair turns with the
scrubbing-brush, though the bit of soap Oliver
had been sent to fetch secretly out of the night-
nursery would not quite go round.

“Tt’s a jolly lot more sloppy than when Lydia
scrubs,” said Jack, sitting down on an old hamper
to cool.

‘And not werry clean yet,” observed Oliver.

“ Of course a barn floor is much dirtier than a
house floor ever is to begin with!” said Peggy
hopefully.

“Tt’s almost like paddling in the brook, on'y
with our shoes and_ stockings on,” thought
Roger as he cheerfully contemplated his soaking
boots.

-“T don’t think the floor will ever be werry
clean,” repeated Oliver.

“T say,” said Jack suddenly, “we're all about
wet enough I should think. And ‘it’s nearly tea-
time.”

“How nurse will scold!” remarked Peggy re-
signedly, ‘““‘and just because we’ve had such a
nice afternoon!”
ILO THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“She will scold werry much!” added Oliver
gloomily.

“T expect she'll be punishing-cross,” continued
Peggy, wringing a little of the water out of Mike’s
pinafore. ‘ More than just scolding-cross.”

“Oh, never mind!” said Jack cheerfully ;
“we're all in the same mess—and she’s only an
old woman after all. You'll think nothing of
her when you've been to school. You catch it
jolly well there I can tell you!”

“But not if youre good?” argued Roger.

“Oh, don’t you?” announced Jack decidedly ;
“that’s all you know! Why, I meant not to get
into one scrape last term, and I tried awfully—but
before a fortnight was over I was in a regular
old row through only eating a jam-puff in bed
which Assheton Minor had bought. It was a
beastly shame, but then a jam-puff is an awfully
awkward thing to eat in bed. We smacked little
Assheton’s head well after for buying such rotten
things.”

“We're all as werry wet as each other, aren't
we?” asked Oliver anxiously.

Nurse certainly was punishing-cross when the
bedraggled little party made its appearance in the
nursery.

“T never did see such naughty children; no,
never!” she said wrathfully, as she changed their
clothes in a great hurry. ‘And ten times worse
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. III



now than you ever were in London, and you were
bad enough there in all conscience! You'll have dry
bread for tea, and go to bed half an hour earlier.
And you being such a big boy, Master Jack,
ought to know better than lead the others into
such mischief. Why, it was only yesterday, when
you had nearly drowned Master Mike after them
horrid sticklebacks, that I heard the rector tell
you not to let the little ones play with water, and
now look at them !”

(S @liasleesay a lumecawtully: sonmyse ss torgon!
Mother,” he added as Mrs. Anstruther came into
the nursery, “I’m awfully sorry, but I forgot
about the water, and we all got soused.”

“Oh, Jack! You have not been taking your
little cousins fishing again, have you?” said Aunt
Isabel, picking up some of Mike’s dripping gar-
ments.

“No! but this did not seem quite like water,
only Mike fell into it and Oliver sat down. I’m
awfully sorry !”

“But I don’t understand. Where was the
water ?”

“Tn a bucket. We scrubbed the barn floor
after the christening was over. And of course it
isn’t very dry work.”

His mother laughed.

“You are a dear goose!” she said, stroking
his rough head. ‘But I’m so afraid of the chil-
Ii2 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



dren’s getting ill again before Uncle Dick comes
that you will be as careful as you can, won't
you?”

“Rather!” promised Jack. “And I say,
mother, I think I’d better have dry bread too.
It would seem sneaky not to.”

So Jack joined in the punishment, and was so
full of fun that the big dry slices quite failed to
depress the culprits, and even nurse herself smiled
once or twice, though in rather a grim way.

“Still you see,” said Peggy admiringly, “1
never knew anybody make nurse smile in the
middle of her sternness before!”

“Everything’s werry nice in the country,” ob-
served Oliver, swallowing his last crust, ‘‘and I
don’t even mind punishments here a bit.”

Which, however, nurse seemed to consider a
distinct disadvantage.
113

CHAPTER VI.

ANOTHER wonderfully interesting thing that the
children discovered about this country village
was that it had so many more people in it than
London. Not perhaps according to statistics, but
statistics are only facts after all; and everybody
knows how much more important feelings are
than facts, even after one is a little older than
Jack and Peggy and Roger. Mr. Fairfax, the
curate, was really a splendid person. He always
could find time to play with the children, and he
was never angry when Jack put a tame rat in his
pocket, or Peggy hid his hat in the boot cup-
board, or any simple little joke of that kind. The
children were delighted when they heard he was
coming to dinner.

“JT say, are you going to preach to-morrow
morning?” Jack asked, when the meal was fairly
started and Mr. Fairfax had got over the alarm
of finding a toy snake curled up in his tumbler.

“‘T believe I am.”

“Pm so glad!” exclaimed the children in a
chorus, and then Peggy added fervently -—

8
II4 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘IT do love your sermons, Mr. Fairfax!”

“ Rather,” chimed in Jack; “they’re a rattling
good sort!”

Both the rector and Mrs. Anstruther were a
little surprised at such appreciation, for as a rule
neither Jack nor his cousins were enthusiastic
about sermons, and the curate looked quite
pleased.

“We like them better every time you preach,”
continued Jack; ‘“‘they’re so jolly short. And
they seem to grow shorter and shorter!”

All the grown-ups laughed.

‘Ts it wicked when a boy does not like his
father’s sermons?” asked Roger, looking solemnly
atea|iacke

“No,” answered his uncle; ‘it is not in the
least wicked. It is quite sensible if he doesn’t
understand them, I suppose.”

“Do you like your own sermons, Uncle
Robert?” Peggy wanted to know.

“Mr. Fairfax does his,” Jack volunteered,
‘because the other evening when I was there
he slammed up his book and said, ‘There, that’ll
do first-rate!’ as if he liked it awfully.”

The curate blushed up to the roots of his hair.
He was one of those fair young men who blush’
very easily.

‘I shall preach when I’m a man,” began Oliver
slowly, putting down his mug, ‘‘all ’bout a kind
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. II5





lion and a wicked boy
added impressively.

“About Daniel and the lions’ den,” suggested
his uncle conventionally.

The rector did not know how to talk to chil-
dren. He poked at them mentally with his um-
brella, and they thought him a dull, stupid man,
and pitied him accordingly. They suffered him
gladly, however, for the sake of his unwavering,
though clumsy, kindness.

‘‘T shall not preach ‘bout Daniel and the lions’
den,” answered Oliver, with that obstinate look
which the others knew so well. “I shall make
up things my werry own self to preach.”

‘“T shall come and hear you, Oliver,” said Aunt
Isabel.

‘““What fun!” laughed Peggy.

“I can’t preach,” explained Roger, “’cause I’m
going to be a poet, you know.”

PlOwarnonhicl put intes jackal 1 edomhate
poetry. We always have it for a holiday task,
and it’s beastly!”

Roger opened his grey eyes to their fullest
extent, and his pale face flushed a little.

‘Poets are very nice men,” he said loyally.

“We have a dear one,” added Peggy, “ who’s
our own poet as well as being father’s friend.”

‘He may be a good chap besides, but poetry
is all tommy rot,” persisted Jack.

a werry wicked boy,” he
116 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Tt isn’t!” cried Roger hotly.

“Poentry is werry silly,” said Oliver; “I don't
like it. Nor I don’t like preaching ’bout Daniel
and the lions’ den.”

“J think it’s time we changed the subject,”
said Aunt Isabel.

“The bishop is going to dedicate the window
they have put up to old Lady Eardley this after-
noon,” remarked the rector; ‘are any of you
children coming?”

‘“‘Oh, please not!” came the doleful chorus.

“Tt is such a lovely afternoon!”

“ An’ we never go to church on weekdays, ’cept
for christenings, and not then on Saturdays!”

“And J want to ride Mr. Fairfax’s bicycle.”

“ And we really needn’t, need we ?”

So the rector shook his head, and was pro-
foundly thanked.

‘Are you going to have the flag up?” Aunt
Isabel wanted to know.

“T think not. You see it is a memorial service.”

“Why not have a black flag then, father?”
Jack suggested. ‘It would make it jolly like
a hanging.”

“Was old Lady Eardley hanged?” asked
Peggy with interest.

The curate, remembering the stately and vir-
tuous dowager recently deceased, burst out

laughing.
THE PROFESSOR'’S CHILDREN. II7



“I won't never preach bout Daniel ——” began
Oliver again, but as dinner was over and the
others all jumped down he had not time to finish.

“Will you play with us after you come back
from the service?” Peggy was begging Mr.
Fairfax.

“And let me ride your bicycle while you are in
church?” besought Jack.

‘An’ tell us a story ?”

‘An’ swing me werry high ?”

The curate was so extremely obliging that he
acquiesced in all these suggestions. He came
back into the garden to the children directly after
the bishop’s departure, and did literally every-
thing they asked him except shirk evensong at
five o'clock.

“If it wasn’t for being a clergyman Mr. Fair-
fax would be a perfect curate!” said Peggy en-
thusiastically, when he had at last fled in response
to the church bell.

“The services are a jolly tie to a chap,” as-
sented Jack; ‘but his bicycle’s a stunner.”

‘“ Mike,” said Oliver, standing in his favourite
attitude with his hands resting on his knees,
“there was once a werry wicked preaching-man
what preached ’bout Daniel in the lions’ den, and
he was hanged dead.”

“Was it Uncle Yobert?” asked the baby,
smiling pleasantly.
118 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Tt might have been him,” answered Oliver
slowly ; ‘I ’spect it was.”

Another of the children’s grown-up friends was
Lydia the housemaid. She was just the sort of
person to say “ Bo” to from behind the door, and
on to whose back it was quite easy to jump, and
retain your seat there too, if you only clutched her
tightly enough round the neck. She knew end-
less games of a physical rather than an intellectual
order, and was always experiencing what she de-
scribed as ‘‘a turn” in her dealings with the
children. These “turns” of Lydia’s were Jack
and Peggy’s chiefest joy. A frog in her work-
basket, or a book balanced on the top of a door
that was ajar so that it fell upon her head, or one
of the tame rats slipped into her pocket, or any
little simple thing of that kind would bring them
on, and the children’s delight knew no bounds.

“TLet’s ask Aunt Isabel to let Lydia go with
us into the hayfield,” suggested Peggy one hot
summer’s day. Lydia was quite at her best in a
hayfield, and this was the last one that was left
uncarried. The others were delighted at the
thought, and after obtaining their aunt’s consent
they flew off to find Lydia.

She'was discovered at last cleaning the win-
dows, and Jack was helping her.

“Now, Master Jack, do give over,” she begged
for the hundredth time as her apron, the strings of
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 119



which Jack had secretly untied, fell out of the
window and was caught on the creeper below, just
out of reach. A skirmish followed, in which the
wet wash-leather wielded by Lydia proved a more
effective weapon even than Jack’s sponge.

‘Aunt Isabel says you can come with us into
the hay,” announced Peggy, clinging round
Lydia’s waist and hanging her whole weight
therefrom.

The remaining windows had to be content with
a dry polish, for Lydia loved playing with the
children almost as much as they loved playing
with her. And then they set off—the merriest
little troop imaginable—to the small hayfield on
the other side of the road. It was such a great
treat to go off with Lydia while nurse and the
baby were left at home. Poor Mike was treated
a little shabbily on such occasions, but he was a
very contented person, and had a quaint world of
his own in which he was usually quite happy.

When alone Mike usually talked in the third
person, adopting the style of Julius Cesar; and
as he trotted about on the lawn, a little figure
that seemed all hat and pinafore, he crooned
aloud his baby play :—

“And Mike went walking a vedy long way,
an’ he see a funny ole bunny”. The presence of
the rabbit was indicated by a few moments’ silent
nibbling. ‘An’ the bunny say, ‘I goin’ to see
120 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



my nanny,’ and Mike say, ‘I goin’ to see my nanny
too, and have my dinner’. An’ ole mister bunny
say, ‘What for Mike’s dinner?’ Brown fish and
minky pudding, and then it'll soon be tea-time,
an’ then supper-time, an’ then b’ekky, an’ then



‘AND MIKE WENT WALKING A VEDY LONG WAY.”

dinner-time adain. I see a cocky,” he continued,
suddenly pointing up at some rooks, while his hat
slipped from the very back of his head on to his
shoulders, ‘‘ two, free, nine cockies!_ Mike go flyin’
up in the ’ky to see ole mister moon. An’ the
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 121



funny moon say, ‘How do, my dear?’ and Mike
kissed the moon an’ come back to his nanny.
Mike all gone,” he shouted violently, as nurse
came out through the garden door.

“Tm a g’eat, savage, naughty polar bear, an’
I bite.” he added fiercely, just touching nurse’s
hand with his soft little mouth.

Nurse sat down with her work, but as she un-
intentionally alighted upon the old india-rubber
lamb which Mike had put “to s’eep” on the
garden-seat, a sudden violent scream and crimson-
ing cheeks indicated that the baby was annoyed ;
while as hard a kick as such tiny boots could
bestow upon nurse’s shin was the forcible ex-
pression of this annoyance.

“My word,” said nurse sharply; ‘“what’s the
matter now?” And she caught him by the arm.

“My yamb, my vedy own yamb!” he shrieked.

“Your lamb is all right,” said nurse in her
sternest voice, setting him on her knee with a
regular thump of severity, ‘‘and you are a very
naughty little boy indeed to kick nurse. I shall
give you a good whipping if you ever dare to do
so again. Do you hear me?” with a little shake
before putting him down.

Mike clasped the india-rubber lamb very tightly
in his chubby hands, and instantly knelt down
with his head on the ground to show how offended
he was. Nurse went on with her sewing, and
122 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



there was a few moments’ profound silence. Then
the baby remarked without moving :—

“The ole horse kicked very bad in the stable
last night. He kicked his leg right off.”

“Has Mike been naughty?” said Aunt Isabel,
coming on to the lawn and finding the baby still
in the same attitude.

“I are dood now,” he announced, getting up,
with a sudden burst of sunshine in his expres-
sion. °

“Did nurse whip you?” asked his aunt, seeing
traces of tears on his fat, flushed face.

‘“ Did you whip me, nanny ?”

““No, but I shall next time,” answered nurse
grimly; ‘so don’t you forget.”

“She s’all next time,” said the baby cheerfully,
““so don’t me fordet.”

The others had a delightful time in the hay-
field, and came home full of their adventures.

“We buried Lydia six times!” shouted Peggy.
They were trying to tell Mr. and Mrs. Anstruther
all about it, only as everybody talked at once it
made the account a little confusing.

‘An’ I did one of my best mischief tricks,”
cried Roger, hopping first on one leg and then on
the other; “I came behind her very softly and
blew in her ear, and she thought it was a ghost.”

“And she and Jack threw hay at each other!”

‘An’ we had a werry big battle!”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 123



‘“Pegey and Jack ’gainst Lydia and Oliver and
mae

‘““ Ar’ we won, father.”

‘Oh no, Jack, we winned!”

‘Lydia makes a splendid colonel in a battle.”

‘An’ we found a nest of field-mice.”

‘An’ put them in Lydia’s hat.”

‘An’ she screamed werry loud

“Tt was such fun!”

‘An’ the mother mouse bit Jack.”

“Tt didn’t hurt much.”

“T do wish you had been with us, Aunt
Isabel.”

“And you, Uncle Robert. Only perhaps it
might have made Lydia a little solemn.”

“TLydia’s never quite so jolly when you're
there, father.”

And the rector was glad she was not.

‘““We winned the battle,” repeated Oliver to
himself as he climbed the stairs ; and then, seeing -
his uncle on the landing, he continued :—

“T won’t never preach ’bout Daniel and the
lions’ den; it’s so werry nasty.”

“You are a very obstinate little boy,” exclaimed
‘Mr. Anstruther.

“T aren’t a werry obstinate little boy,” said
Oliver, scowling up at him, and standing so stiffly
that even his pinafore looked stubborn.

“If you were my son I should punish you,”

pe
124 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



continued his uncle, with an old-fashioned kind
of severity in both face and tone.

“You are a werry nasty man! I don’t love
you,” replied Oliver with a still more fearful
frown.

“Hush, hush! You must not say that,” said
the rector gravely. He was really shocked by
such infant depravity, and it seemed to him quite
a serious matter. ‘Come, say you are sorry at
once.”

‘“‘T aren’t sorry,” answered the child resolutely ;
“T are werry glad.”

Just then Peggy came rushing out of the
nursery.

‘““What’s the matter?” she asked quickly,
seeing that something unusual was going on.

“Your little brother is extremely naughty and
obstinate,” Uncle Robert explained.

“T aren't!” repeated Oliver loudly.

“It’s no use if he looks like that,” Peggy con-
fided in her uncle. “Nothing will change him
till he grows good of hisself.”

‘What would your father do?” asked the
rector, who felt that he was bound to be guided
thereby in his present position of authority over
the children.

‘“He would write a lot in his note-book,” said
Peggy glibly, ‘‘and be pleased. Father always
enjoys Oliver’s naughtiness very much.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 125



“IT cannot say | agree with him,” observed
Uncle Robert dryly.

‘Perhaps you are more like nurse,” suggested
Peggy; “it is punishing that she enjoys.”

“Tt is not a question of enjoyment, my dear.”

“T aren’t sorry a bit,” Oliver remarked again ;
‘“T are werry glad.”

Then the rector went downstairs and confided
to his wife how dreadfully Dick seemed to be
bringing up his children, and Oliver walked into
the nursery, where he indulged in silent obstinacy
for about half an hour, and then, finding it a little
dull, he joined Mike in administering severe chas-
tisement to two old dolls that went by the names
of Grubby and Topsy.

‘“They’se vedy naughty!” explained the baby,
resting his tired arm.

“What did they do?” Oliver wanted to know.

“They’se vedy unbedient,” said Mike impres-
sively, ‘‘so paps we'd better put Grubby in the
waste-paper basket with her head down and her
legs stickin’ up.”

“And go on whipping Topsy,” added Oliver.
Which employment exactly suited his frame of
mind.

It was rather a warlike evening altogether, as
Jack found when he and the children went out
after tea with a basket to gather cherries.

There was a big cherry tree overhanging the
126 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



hedge that ran between the rectory garden and
the village green, and Jack always maintained
that the cherries were the property of any of the
inmates of the rectory who could climb up and
gather them. But the village boys thought dif-
ferently. So a secret war was being continually
waged. Jack did not ask his father’s advice, for



“THEY’SE VEDY UNBEDIENT,”’ SAID MIKE IMPRESSIVELY.

the rector had once expressed his opinion that if
legally the tree did belong to Jack, he surely
might be generous enough to let those boys share
the cherries who had no big gardens with plenty
of fruit trees of their own.

The cherries were unusually plentiful and ripe
that year, and though Jack was generally content




THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 127



with as many as he could carry away inside, cook
had enlarged on the glories of a cherry tart till
Jack promised to supply her with the raw
material.

What was his indignation then to find the
butcher’s boy already in possession of the tree!
“You come out of that!” he shouted angrily.

“You come and chuck me out!” retorted the
butcher’s boy contemptuously.

“Tf you want to fight come down and do it.
[ll teach you to go bagging other people’s
cherries.”

‘Oh, don't fight!” pleaded Peggy with clasped
hands.

“The rector don’t mind us having ’em,” said
the butcher’s boy. And he had the advantage
there.

“It’s very wicked to steal things!” announced
Roger, who was jumping about wildly with crim-
son cheeks and eyes glowing with excitement.

‘“Werry wicked!” repeated Oliver solemnly.

‘Oh, don’t be wicked!” cried Peggy, who was
in tears.

“You daren’t fight!” exclaimed Jack scorn-
fully, and taking no notice of his little cousins.
“Of course a lout like you is afraid of a licking.”

The butcher’s boy came down with a run.

‘Look ’ere, you shut up. I’m no more afraid
than you are. An’ if you want to fight, why, ’ere
128 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.





goes!” and he began to pull off his blue linen
coat.

Jack’s blood was thoroughly up, and off came
his jacket too.

“Don't kill each other,” implored Peggy, seizing
her cousin’s arm. But he shook her off.

“For killing is wickeder much than stealing,”
added Roger in an agony. “Oh, do be careful!”

Oliver stood watching the scene with grave in-
terest, and when the two combatants rushed at
each other a satisfied smile swept over his solemn
round face. Peggy covered her eyes with both
hands, and kept begging them between her sobs
not to fight any more.

‘It was not a very scientific nor a very blood-
thirsty fray. The butcher’s boy hit the harder,
but Jack was a smart, well-built little fellow, and
while he evaded the attacks of his adversary
pretty successfully he planted one or two telling
blows on that youth’s somewhat prominent nose.

“Look, look!” shouted Roger in intense excite-
ment, “Jack is winning, and the butcher’s boy is
bleeding to death.”

“Oh, Jack!” sobbed Peggy, “why have you
killed him? I know Uncle Robert will be
vexed.”

“JT ain’t killed,” the butcher's boy explained
angrily in a pause for breath.

“JT like battles werry much. ’Specially bleedin’
acepenneeeeneeees

THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 129



ones!” observed Oliver, rubbing his hands up and
down the sides of his pinafore.

“Then it is very wicked of you,” wailed his
sister, “and wickedness is a dreadful thing.”

Just then the fighters fell down in a confused
heap. After which both claimed the victory, and
both went home with the satisfied feeling that
their rights were vindicated, and with about an
equal soreness of eyes and noses.

But the children were tremendously impressed,
and exalted their cousin into a hero of the greatest
magnitude. Which on the whole he found pecu-
liarly soothing, though he made light of it at the
time. Even Peggy wiped her tears on her pina-
fore when she found that everybody was still
alive, and joined in the reverent adulation of such
a conqueror.

‘“’Twasn’t anything,” said Jack gruff. But
for the moment he wished Peggy were his own
little sister so that she could be always at hand to
admire his valiant deeds.

“Oh, Jack, it was fearfully brave of you!” she
replied in an awe-struck voice.

‘The fellow had no business to cheek me like
that,” continued the hero in lofty tones.

“ He did speak impudently,” chimed in Roger.

“No, he didn’t,” argued Oliver. “He on’y
said Uncle Robert lets him gather the cherries,

and he does. Jack telled me so yesterday.”
9
130 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Vou shut up!” snapped Jack.

“He might speak in an unimpudent voice,”
said Roger decidedly, “but he really was as im-
pudent as could ever be.”

“ Of course he was,” agreed Peggy. “ And im-
pudence is wicked. So is obstinateness,” she
added, shaking her head severely at Oliver.

“T couldn’t be a soldier when I’m a man even
if | wasn’t a poet,” announced Roger solemnly as
they reached the house.

“Why not?” asked Jack.

Then Roger's face flushed all over.

“Pm frightened of being hurt,” he owned
bravely.

“You are a baby!” exclaimed his cousin.

“Tm not!” pleaded Roger with rising tears.
“But it makes me shiver.”

“You are always jawing about adventures and
things,” persisted Jack, “and wanting to havethem.”

“Tt’s somehow quite different to imagine things,”
said Roger sadly. ‘I can’t help it really.”

“T suppose not,” answered Jack rather indiffer-
ently. His head was aching and his lip was so
very sore that he found it impossible to be quite
as pleasant as usual.

“T would like to fight werry much,” said Oliver
deliberately ; “and if it hurted dreadful I would
keep on fightin’ till Daniel in the lions’ den was
killed quite dead.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 131



“He's at that old thing again!” exclaimed
ck. 2 lark at hime

“] will be a fightin’ man when I’m growed up,”
continued Oliver, ‘“‘and I will fight Fraiilein and
nurse and Uncle Robert.”

“Oh! no,” said Peggy reprovingly. ‘You
must only fight really wicked people.”

‘“ Like the butcher’s boy,” added Roger.

“ And savages, you know.”

“J will fight Uncle Robert too,” was Oliver’s
final decision, and nothing could alter it before
nurse carried him off to bed. His little fist was
even clenched after he had fallen asleep.
132

CHAPTER VII.

Rocer began it in this way.

“T feel inclined,” he said eagerly, “‘to go to
India this afternoon and search for wild animals,
and kill thousands of them.”

“Well then, you can’t,” answered Peggy prac-
tically.

“But mightn’t we have a real adventure?”
pleaded Roger. ‘A splendid big adventure of
our very own.”

Peggy thought that perhaps they might. She
too was feeling it a little dull, for Jack had gone
away for the day to play in a cricket match, and
directly after dinner Aunt Isabel had driven over
to Great Heyford, the nearest town, and taken
nurse and the baby with her to do some shop-
ping.

“We might go and find a ogre,” suggested
Oliver.

“Tt would be interesting to go where we have
never been before and to explore,” Peggy thought.

“Tt would be interestinger to find the North
Pole and pretend we are Arctic explorers, like



yi : : i =i WA
Veil ih NS Ht =| | ki

SO THE THREE CHILDREN SET OFF IN A GREAT HURRY.










THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 135



Uncle Robert was telling Jack about yesterday,”
said Roger.

“We can go over there as far as we can see,
‘cause there’s lots of time,” observed Oliver, point-
ing out into the distance with his dirty little fore-
finger, “and I ’spect a ogre lives in the werry
farthest off field.” ;

So the three children set off in a great hurry,
taking the direction that led into the country in-
stead of going towards the village.

By-and-by an empty hay-cart overtook them.

“T would like a ride werry much,” Oliver sug-
gested.

This idea delighted the others, and Peggy at
once accosted the old man who was leading the .
horses.

‘Will you give us a ride, please, ’cause we are
walking this way?”

“Eh!” exclaimed the old man, who was very
deaf.

“He seems a little stupid,” whispered Roger to
Oliver, while Peggy was trying to make herself
heard. After a good deal of shouting the old
man seemed dimly to understand. He lifted the
three children into the cart, and then apparently
forgot all about them.

“ This is a great adventure!” exclaimed Peggy
delightedly.

“And just like an Arctic explorer,” added
136 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN,



Roger. Though wherein the likeness lay on that
sunny August afternoon was a little doubtful. -

“Its liker being in a big ship,” observed
Oliver. “A werry strict ship,” he added with
a gasp as the waggon lumbered over some rough
stones.

‘That makes it better for the Arcticness,” cried
Roger. ‘“ Won’t Jack be surprised if we really
find the North Pole?”

“ An’ a ogre climbing up it,” said Oliver.

“A polar bear climbing up it would be more
likely,” Peggy thought.

“Polar bears can’t climb,” argued her little
brother; ‘they on’y walks backwards and _for-
wards werry quick.”

“But they might climb just for once.”

‘No, they mightn’t. It’s on’y brown bears and
ogres what can climb poles.”

“ The sea is frightfully jumpy!” broke in Roger,
who had just sat down unexpectedly owing to a
sudden lurch.

‘“T feel sick,” announced Oliver solemnly, after
they had gone a considerable distance.

“Oh, Oliver, that is naughty of you!” said
Peggy. ‘It’s not as if you'd been eating rich
things either,” she added severely.

“Werry sick!” repeated Oliver gloomily.

“Tt makes it all the more like a ship,” and
Roger clapped his hands. “I ’spect you are sea-
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 137



sick. How jolly!” And he jumped up and down
enthusiastically.

“Tt isn’t. It’s werry unjolly. An’ I do wish
the cart would stop, or the sun be cooler, or
something !”

Fortunately just at that moment the horses
pulled up at the door of a little way-side inn,
and, after the man had disappeared within, Oliver
begged the others to get down.

“It seems rather rude to go away without
thanking him,” said Peggy.

“But he might want us to go straight home
again,” suggested Roger, “ before we have found
the North Pole.”

‘Or the ogre,” added Oliver sadly.

“That would be a pity!” Peggy thought.

So they threw politeness to the winds, and ran
across the road into a big, shady wood which
seemed just the place for an adventure.

“TJ would like it to be a cool adventure,” said
Oliver, fanning himself with his pinafore.

“T don’t see the North Pole yet,” exclaimed
Roger, looking up into the air; ‘but this is a
splendid place, and quite as new as India.”

“And there may be wild beasts, you see.”

“Oh no, Peggy!” And big tears welled up
in Oliver’s eyes. ‘I don’t want there to be any-
thing at all wild. On’y a ogre—a werry kind
one.
138 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Tt’s a regular jungle!” shouted Roger, rushing
on in front, plunging down into the hollows and
fighting his way through the thick under-
growth,

Then they came to a dear little bubbling brook,
and Oliver took a long drink out of his sailor hat,
which did quite nicely for a cup, excepting its
tendency to leak. And that did not matter at all,
because a wet pinafore was so cool and pleasant
to wipe his face with afterwards. So the sickness
went quite away, and he felt much happier and
better.

“You rest a bit,” suggested Peggy in motherly
tones, and she found a nice grass bank for him to
sit upon.

“Polar bears can’t climb poles, on’y ogres,” he
observed dreamily, as he leaned back and watched
the others run about. Then he looked up into
the thick green leaves through which tiny bits
of blue sky peeped here and there, and gradually
everything grew farther and farther away, and the
others’ voices sounded all confused, and there
seemed to be music like the organ in church
played very softly, and then Oliver was fast
asleep.

When next he became conscious Peggy was
shaking him violently.

“Wake up, wake up this minute!” she was
shouting. “It’s suddenly turned into evening;
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 139



and the sun is getting right down on to the
ground, and we must go home.”

“There are two things to think about the sun,”
observed Roger raptly; ‘‘one is that a golden cup
is ready to catch the golden ball, and another is
that old Mother Earth comes and puts him to
bed. I am inclined to think there is a golden
cup.”

“Don’t bother so about the sun!” snapped
Peggy, who suddenly felt a little anxious. ‘‘ We
must make haste home!”

“Which is the way?” asked Oliver, rubbing
his eyes with his knuckles.

That was the difficulty! None of them had

the slightest idea which was the way home.
- They ran and jumped and scrambled and
crawled, but there seemed no end to the wood.
At last, however, the trees became thinner, and
they reached the open on exactly the opposite
side from that at which they had entered.

“Now, we shall soon be there,” announced
Peggy with more confidence than she felt.

“We haven't found a ogre yet!” said Oliver,
standing still with a most determined expression.
“T are going to.”

“You can’t, then!” commanded Peggy.

“Tt seems almost as far away as India,” Roger
observed delightedly. He did so enjoy anything

that was exciting or uncommon.
140 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Be quiet!” exclaimed his sister crossly. She
was beginning to be afraid; and when you are
afraid it is very irritating of other people to be so
cheerful.




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?

“THIS FLOWER WON’T PICK,’? REMARKED OLIVER.

“This flower won’t pick,” remarked Oliver,
tugging at an obstinate stalk until his face was
crimson. ‘I wanted it to give the ogre.”

“I do love adventures!” exclaimed Roger.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 141



“T hate them!” And Peggy’s tone was very
fierce.

“I want my tea ’fore I find the ogre,” continued
Oliver, looking a little depressed.

‘Don't be so greedy,” said Peggy reprovingly,
but she turned out her pocket in the hopes of
finding something with which to appease his
hunger. A damp and rather warm acid-drop
was fortunately discovered in a dusty corner,
which Oliver sucked contentedly as he trudged
on after the others.

But all the walking you can accomplish will not
take you home if you are going in an exactly con-
trary direction, so by the time the twilight came
stealing across the hills the children were farther -
away from the rectory than ever.

“T’m beginning to think this adventure is a
little too long,” said Roger, who was growing
tired.

‘“T do wish we'd never come,” sighed Peggy,
with a slight catch in her voice.

‘I’m werry glad we came,” chimed in Oliver,
who seemed much revived by the acid-drop,
‘cause I wanted to find a ogre, you know.”

At home there was great consternation about
the children’s absence. Nobody seemed to know
anything about them except that they had gone into
the garden at three o’clock, and yet they were not
to be found in any of the places within reach.
142 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



Jack, who had returned from the match, hurriedly
changed out of his flannels, and he was the only
person who derived any pleasure from the search.
That his father and mother were full of anxiety he
did not notice, nor would he have understood it if
he had. For when you are a boy as big as eleven,
you know that being found out and punished are
the only things that anybody could possibly be
anxious about. Of course the little ones have
babyish troubles of their own, but you have quite
outgrown them yourself. You only come in con-
tact with the real sorrows of life, such as canes and
impositions. So it is a fine thing to be a boy like
Jack.

When old Hendy came back with the cart he
was able to throw a good deal of light on the
matter. He was not very intelligent nor very
sober, but the rector extracted from him the in-
formation that the children had ridden in his cart
as far as the old turnpike, and then had “ dis-
appeared like”. So Jack and his father set off in
the trap, and the first clue they found was Oliver’s
hat lying beside the brook. Then after searching
through the wood a gleam of white was seen
among the furze bushes which turned out to be
Peggy’s pocket-handkerchief. Jack flew about in
great excitement waving his lantern, and suddenly
the rector, hearing a little voice which he recog-
nised, stood still to listen.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 143



“Flush!” he whispered.

“The fairies are coming. I see them! I see
them!” Roger was calling.

“Oh, I wish it would be somebody real in-
stead!” answered Peggy wearily.

Jack uttered a cheering shout.

“Here we are! Here we are! As right as
ninepence!”

Such a shriek of joy from Peggy as she rushed
into her uncle’s arms!

“We were lost. It is my fault!” And she
began to cry.

“Oliver has been asleep most of the lost time,”
explained Roger, ‘‘and he felt rather sick during
the adventure time.”

The little boy was sitting up bewildered. After
you have been asleep it is so perplexing not to
find yourself in your own cot when you awake.

“T tried to take care of him,” sobbed Peggy,
‘‘and we made a bed of our two pinafores.”

‘“‘T wanted to find a ogre,” said Oliver slowly,
‘‘on’y the night came too quick.”

“Weren't you frightened?” asked Uncle
Robert.

“I wasn’t,” answered Roger eagerly, ‘‘’cause
it’s so very new and wonderful to be really out
of doors in the dark, and expecting the fairies to
come every minute.”

“T was frightened,” Peggy owned up bravely
144 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



through her tears; “I really couldn’t help it, but
I s'pose it’s being only a girl,” and she looked
meekly at Jack. But her cousin was in a
generous mood.

“’Tisn’'t your fault you're a girl,” he said
kindly.

“I’m very sorry!” she repeated penitently.

Then their uncle took them to where the trap
was waiting, and bundled them all in, well wrapped
up in shawls.

“We started to find the North Pole,” said
Roger.

“Polar bears can’t climb poles, can they ?”
Oliver asked his uncle.

“T don’t think so.”

‘“‘T knewed they couldn’t!” exclaimed the little
boy, looking triumphantly at Peggy. But she,
poor child! had no more spirit left in her. What
with the adventure, and the responsibility, and
the sense of inferiority of sex, she was thoroughly
overdone. And when they reached home she
had to sit on Aunt Isabel’s knee and be com-
forted for quite a long time. The boys were
all wild with excitement and hunger, and even
nurse forgot to scold them, to Roger's great
_ surprise.

“She on’y kissed me one werry hard, stern
kiss,” announced Oliver, when they were discuss-
ing this wonder on the following day.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 145

‘““Were we naughty, Aunt Isabel?” Peggy
wanted to know.

“Of course not,” replied her aunt, but Uncle
Robert quickly added :—

‘Possibly you did not mean to be, but you
must never go off again like that by yourselves ”.

“We went for an adventure. Roger wanted
to go to India, but I wouldn’t let him, cause that
is a little far, you know.”

“That was very wise of you, dear,” began
Aunt Isabel, but Uncle Robert interfered again.

‘You must not do so again, remember. I for-
bid it.”

“Are you angry?” Peggy asked a little anx-
iously and in a very low voice.

“Oh! no, your uncle is not angry, dear.”

“You see it was one of the things that turn out
rather naughty unexpectedly,” continued the little
girl; ‘“‘we often find they do like that with nurse.”

“T am not angry now, but I shall be the next
time,” said Uncle Robert.

“Not the next adventure, you don’t mean?
’Cause we do so love adventures, and Roger is
always searching for them. He and Jack have
gone to ride the old pig now ’cause Roger thought
it would be a good adventure, and they might
pretend it was a wild boar.”

“Oh, no! Not just adventures. They will be

all right!” Aunt Isabel assured her.
Io
146 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



The next adventure that the children had was
a thoroughly enjoyable one, because, as Jack said,
“Tt was father’s own fault, and so you had all the
fun and none of the scolding”

One morning Mr. Anstruther most fortunately
left his bath running. His dressing-room was
over the schoolroom, and nobody thought of
going into the schoolroom in the holidays, ex-
cept perhaps to fetch things. So when Roger,
who remembered that his kite had been left
there, opened the door he found a miniature
deluge.

seine OORyA Jack, Aunt Isabel, come quick!” he
shouted. “It is raining in the middle of the
house, and everything’s swimming.”

In rushed the other children, and they were all
delightfully wet before the bath was turned off
and the flow of water stopped.

“ This is the adventure of a flood like Noah’s,”
exclaimed Roger.

Lydia and coe arrived immediately with mops,
and their skirts pinned up, to assist in restoring
the elements to their proper places. Jack and
Peggy helped them most efficiently with a hearth-
brush and Lydia’s best broom, and the three little
ones pretended the ark from the top of the table.
The representation was somewhat spoiled owing
to Mike’s insisting on going out himself every
few minutes to see whether, as Roger quoted,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 147



“the waters were ’bating,” instead of despatching
an imaginary dove.

“T do wish,” said Jack, “that Roger hadn’t
found it out till the room was quite full of deep

Nis22:

water

“And all the chairs and tables and beds had
been drownded,” added Oliver.

‘And it had poured down the staircase like a
cackrat!” was Roger’s modest desire.

“A cataract you mean,” corrected Peggy.

“We might have shooted the rapids,” con-
tinued Roger, taking no notice of his sister.

“Now, Master Jack! adone with you!” ex-
claimed Lydia, twirling the mop in his face. For
Jack had stealthily unpinned Lydia’s dress, which
had consequently fallen into the wet. As cook
had departed to see after what she termed
“the roastesses,” Jack seized her disengaged
mop, and a regular hand-to-hand mopping match
followed.

“T do wish there was floods every day!”
sighed Roger, when the water and the excite-
ment had both abated.

“T am very glad there are not,” replied his
aunt emphatically.

“What a good thing you didn’t quite forbid
adventures, isn’t it, Uncle Robert?” exclaimed
Peggy. ‘‘Because you yourself made this splen-
did big one of the flood. What would have
148 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.
happened if you had? You can’t be angry with
yourself, you know.”

“Oh! can’t you?” answered the rector dryly.

‘It makes adventures much nicer when there's
no punishing to come after them!” said Roger.
“It’s often so very disagreeable in the nursery
when they’re over.”

“T do hope you'll make another very soon,
Uncle Robert?” pleaded Peggy.

“Perhaps you might set the house on fire
next?” suggested Jack. ‘That would be no
end of a lark!”

But his father hastened to nip this idea in the
bud.

The next adventure was Mike’s.

The children had arrived at the conclusion that
they would all very soon be cast on a desert island,
and the baby became thoroughly imbued with this
idea.

Of course when such a thing as this is likely to
happen it is well to be prepared. So Roger and
Oliver began to collect the things they thought
would be useful on a desert island, such as tin-
tacks and chestnuts, string and envelopes and
hair-pins. The baby was also anxious to con-
tribute his share of the spoils, so he nobly offered
his fondly-loved india-rubber lamb, which Peggy
carefully hid with the rest of the store in a little
corner of the garden close to the churchyard gate.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. ° 149



Life, however, without the toy lamb was impos-
sible to Mike. He missed it in bed and in his
bath, in the nursery or out of doors ; everywhere
was the sad blank. And at last he could stand it
no longer. He resolved to find and fetch the
lamb from the treasure-house on his own responsi-
bility. So accordingly one afternoon when the
others were all having a cricket match with Lydia
and the cook, Mike trotted off on this little mission
of his own. When the baby was in a hurry he
always sat down rather often during his running,
which hindered him a good deal. But being too
wise to fret over the inevitable, he slowly got up
again every time without a frown, and before long
he reached the hollow tree and pulled out his old
india-rubber friend in triumph. The delight of
having the lamb once more to walk about with
encouraged him to take a turn in the churchyard,
and having pointed out the “pity fowers” to his
beloved toy, he suddenly perceived that the church
door was open.

“Mike go in and find the big music,” he ex-
plained to the lamb, and was very much astonished
not to hear the organ playing.

‘Mike walk ‘long the vedy big passages,” he
continued, threading his way through the pews,
and stolidly climbing over every hassock, ‘and
find a long-clothes baby in the water,” he observed
as he passed the font.
150 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



But when he reached the door on his way home
again, alas! it was shut.

‘Mike no go out,” he remarked sadly. ‘Oh
dear, dear, what a pity!” for the baby could not
open doors himself. Then he slowly walked
back to the foot of the pulpit stairs and called
loudly :—

“Uncle Yobert, tum down!”

But as naturally nobody answered, he looked
round in rather a mystified way, and observed :—

“Uncle Yobert all gone! Music all gone!
Evv’ybody all gone! an’ Mike all by hisself!”

His lip began to quiver and the big tears to
roll down his cheeks, when suddenly he remem-
bered the restored treasure which he held in his
hand, and a smile broke out over his baby
face.

‘“Mike’s vedy own yamb tum back!”

Then he sat down on the floor of one of the
pews quite contentedly and played with the lamb
till he fell asleep.

“Oh, Aunt Isabel! we’ve had such a splendid
cricket match!” cried Peggy as the children rushed
in to tea.

“Cook is a regular W. G.,” added Jack enthu-
siastically. “She made thirty, and if her apron
hadn’t caught the wickets she’d have been in
now !”

“And Lydia’s very good at fielding,” chimed


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. I51

in Oliver, ‘‘’cause she kneels down when the
ball’s coming, and her petticoats stop it, you
see.”

“T can’t play cricket very well,” Roger owned.
“T don’t like it so well as pretending games and
adventures.”

“He's no idea of throwing a ball, mother,”
explained Jack pityingly, “and is a regular butter-
fingers over a catch. Oliver has twice as much
idea of it, and even Mike.”

“Where is Mike?” somebody asked. But
nobody knew.

“Tf he’s lost again it will be another adventure!”
cried Roger, beginning to jump up and down with
excitement.

‘He couldn't go far!” said Aunt Isabel, running
into the garden to look for him, and the children
scampered about in all directions. As a last re-
source they peeped into the church, and, seeing a
little fat leg coming out into the aisle, they soon
found the baby fast asleep, with his head on a
hassock, and the lamb clasped close to his
heart.

As he was being lifted up Mike awoke.

“Uncle Yobert preached a vedy long preaching.
I fought he was never tummin’ down again! Is
it Sunday ?” he asked sleepily.

The others could not make much out of Mike’s
adventure, his recollections were so vague.
152 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“The big music is killed kite dead,” was his
principal conclusion.

‘“Baby’s adventure of being lost wasn’t nearly
as big as ours,” said Roger proudly.

“Tt was quite big enough!” exclaimed his aunt.

‘The desert island will be a werry big one!”
observed Oliver.

‘What is that?” asked Aunt Isabel quickly,
scenting a fresh danger.

‘Another adventure—the next one!” cried
Roger.

“We only thought we might be cast on a desert
island,” explained Peggy, ‘‘so we were getting
ready. But only in case,” she added, seeing her
aunt looked anxious.

“That’s the splendidest thing about the coun-
try!” continued Roger. ‘It’s so full of adven-
tures.”

“And there aren’t any in London, you see,”
chimed in Peggy.

“There isn’t werry many things in London,”
announced Oliver ; “‘on’y streets and lessons.”

“You forget the Museum,” Roger reminded
him.

“T don’t like it werry much, ’cause it makes me
think one of those big bones might come walking
after me in the night.”

‘It's the great animal skeletons he means,”
Peggy explained.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 153



‘““We did go to the Zoo once,” said Roger,
“when Oliver was little.”

“‘T rided acamel. He hada werry warm back.”

“And we saw polar bears and brown ones.”

The obstinate expression came creeping over
Oliver’s face.

‘Polar bears can’t climb poles,” he said very
deliberately, ‘‘on’y brown ones—an’ ogres.”

“ But I like fields much better than museums,”
announced Peggy thoughtfully.

“So do I!” exclaimed Aunt Isabel, and the boys
quite agreed with them. So indeed would every-
body else. At least everybody who was as sen-
sible as Peggy and Aunt Isabel.
154

CHAPTER VIII.

“ Dear Farner,

“Tam very happy. Jack gave mea garden
for my very own. I have a row of peas, two
brockleys, one carrot and two paths.

“Your loving son,
‘ ROGER.”

So ran the important letter which Aunt Isabel
had to stamp and direct to the professor, and then
the children took it down to the post-office them-
selves so that there should be no mistake. It was
a dear, funny little post-office, not the least like
those in London, but a great deal nicer; for
together with the letter-department was a small
miscellaneous shop, both kept by a great friend of
the children’s called Mrs. Oakley. You could buy
sweets and bootlaces and ginger-bread and reels
of cotton and _ sticking-plaster and beads and
mustard and things of that kind at the shop end ;
and behind was the cosiest little kitchen imagin-
able, with a wonderful big old clock in the. corner
which always cleared its throat before striking,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 155



and had a moving moon at the top that Roger
was never tired of watching.

And Mrs. Oakley herself was such a delightful
person. A round-about little old lady with a fat
face, and a fat smile, and fat curls bordering her
cap at the sides, and a fat brooch full of the de-
parted Mr. Oakley’s hair, arranged as a weeping-
willow, to fasten her handsome lace collar. There
were fowls in her back garden which always laid
eggs specially for the children’s breakfasts ; there
was a fine white cat which always had a supply
of kittens for the children to play with ; there was
an unfailing plate of home-made plum-cake on the
dresser, slabs of which Jack was wont to consume
between meals; but above all these attractions,
there was a wonderful little white plaster church,
with coloured-paper windows, in which a lighted
candle could be put after dark, and which the
children thought to be the most beautiful work of
art they had ever seen.

“Now, my loves, and how do you all do?”
exclaimed Mrs. Oakley, beaming on the little
company which had come to post the letter.

‘“Will you be sure and send my letter to Lon-
don?” asked Roger seriously.

“Tt’s werry portant!” added Oliver, standing
with his hands behind him.

‘Hark now at that!” cried Mrs. Oakley,
“pretty dear.”
156 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘“‘] aren’t a pretty dear,” argued Oliver, “I are
a werry big boy.”

‘Well now, to be sure! And shall we just go
into the hen-house and see if there isn’t some
fresh bantam eggs for your breakfasses?”

“Will it be safe to leave my letter?” Roger

wanted to know.

“Aye that it will, ny loys and papa will get it
to-morrow morning.’

Of course four eaueful little bantam eggs were
found for the four younger children.

“The hens might ha’ known the exact number
as was wanted,” exclaimed Mrs. Oakley; ‘“ and
now for a duck’s egg for Master Jack.”

“Will my egg be ripe enough to eat to-
morrow ?” asked Oliver anxiously.

“Well, I never now. Hark at him!” ejaculated
the old lady.

“He couldn’t eat his egg this morning,” ex-
plained Peggy.

‘“Cause it wasn’t ripe. I knewed it wasn’t,”
continued Oliver. “ An’ I don’t like eggs full of
milk. I like them full of egg.”

“T yike ’em full of egg!” echoed Mike.

Just then a tapping on the counter indoors
compelled Mrs. Oakley to return to her duties,
and the children went back to attend to the pet
animals which lived chiefly in the nursery and the
barn. Jack very kindly allowed his cousins to
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 157



share in the proprietorship, and great was the love
lavished on rats and rabbits, newts and mice.

A pair of piebald rats perhaps ranked highest
in the children’s affections.

“ They are such darlings, Aunt Isabel!” Peggy



GREAT WAS THE LOVE LAVISHED ON RATS AND RABBITS,

exclaimed reproachfully. ‘Why don’t you like
nursing them?”

“T’m not very fond of rats,” Mrs. Anstruther
explained.

“But these are not just common rats which
158 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



you might not like. They are awfully loving and
dear, and they never bite unless you really vex
them.”

“They do seem wonderfully tame!”

“ Let me put this one just up against your hair.
Do, Aunt Isabel, ’cause it'll think it is hay and so
enjoy it!”

“Oh no, dear! And I don’t much like your
bringing them into the drawing-room.”

“Jack has taken the other one out in his pocket
to get a little fresh air, and this darling seemed so
lonely that I thought it might cheer it up to bring
it to see you.”

“T hope it will, ?’m sure,” laughed her aunt ;
“but I think it would be quite cheerful enough in
the nursery.”

“Oh! but the little ones’are there and it might
not like them. They are rather young for a real
rat to play with. Look how it loves creeping
round under my hair!”

“Well, do take care, dear, that you don’t get
bitten. Some rats are very savage.”

‘Oh, Aunt Isabel, not if you love them! You
see you don’t really love rats, do you? So you
can’t quite understand about them like Jack and
I do.”

Then there was the colony of mice, in which
Roger and Oliver had a share. The mice were
most delightful creatures, only occasionally im-
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 159



mense catastrophes overtook their domestic
arrangements, which rent the children’s hearts.

“Oh, oh!” screamed Peggy and Roger, rushing
downstairs, ‘‘Uncle Robert, Aunt Isabel, Jack!
come quick—such an awful thing has happened!”

Mrs. Anstruther came flying out of the dining-
room and the rector out of his study, both pale
with the fear that Mike had fallen into the fire
or Oliver tumbled downstairs.

“What is the matter?” they cried, catching
hold of the breathless bearers of such evil tidings.

‘Oh! the mother mouse has eaten ten of her
children,” sobbed Peggy, “and they were such
darlings |”

“Three of them were mine,” said Roger sadly,
“and I loved them so very much.”

“Never mind, dears!” said Mrs. Anstruther
with a gasp of relief, “you can have some
more.”

“But, Aunt Isabel,” continued Peggy, ‘do
think how awful for her to have eaten them! I’m
afraid she will die of grief when she wakes up and
finds she has only two children instead of twelve.”

“J should think she would be more likely to
die of indigestion,” said the rector.

When Jack came in and was told the sad news
he took a different view of the matter.

‘She is a bad mouse and she must be punished,”
he said severely.
160 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

The others cheered up at this suggestion, it
seemed as if it would be exciting.

“Tt is the worst badness she could have thought
of,” observed Roger gravely, ‘“‘so she must have
the worst punishment.”

“That is being caned,” Jack announced.

‘‘P'raps she’s werry sorry,” suggested Oliver,
who always took the opposite side.

“When you eat ten of your children,” said
Peggy—“ straight off!” she added impressively,
as if thereby the crime were considerably enhanced,
‘caning is not any too big a punishment, is it,
Jack?”

“Tf it had only been one or two of them,”
announced the judge, “I might have let her off.
But when you get to ten it must be put a
stop to.”

So Jack fetched a cane out of the hall, and,
armed with justice, he solemnly approached the
mouse’s cage.

The culprit was somewhat sleepy, owing to the
heavy meal it had just disposed of.

“You make it sit up, Peggy, and hold out its
hand.”

“Its hands are a little small for caning,” said
Peggy anxiously, seizing the mouse’s foreleg.
The cane descended, but unfortunately hit Peggy
on the knuckles instead of the mouse. With a
scream she dropped it and there was a frightful
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 161



skirmish among the little boys as they tried to
catch the escaping criminal. It eventually ran
behind the wardrobe, and Peggy, sucking her
knuckles, was soon ready to take her part on the
side of justice. The cane proved more effective
in poking at the mouse than in punishing it; and
at last, after a long and heating hunt, the guilty
matron was restored to her cage and the children
sat down to rest and discuss future penalties.

“Tm thinking,” said Roger, wiping his hot
little face with the hem of his pinafore, “ what
happens to all the wickedest people in the story
books. And I know,” he added suddenly, getting
up and beginning to jump about, “the wicked
robber was thrusted into a dark dungeon and left
in cruel irons to bemoan his fate.”

““Sometimes wicked people is eat by a ogre,”
suggested Oliver, frowning at the mouse-cage.

“Tt isn’t a bad idea about the dungeon,” said
Jack, ‘‘let’s build a pitch dark one with the bricks,
if nobody’ll hold it while I cane it again ?”

Nobody volunteered to do so.

“Tt’s awfully awkward caning such small things,”
continued Jack. ‘“ Last term Packford tried to cane
a canary, only it flew away. He vowed it shouldn't
get off by that ; and that, when it was caught, he
would cane it publicly, barring he wasn’t stopped.
Only he was.”

It was great fun building the dungeon, into
Il
162 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



which the mouse was finally bundled and left there
to repent of its sins at leisure.

“Tt used to be such a werry good mouse,” said
Oliver solemnly.

‘Nurse says, if you begin to do wrong things,
you often go on quickly doing worse ones,” ob-
served Peggy morally. And eating ten of its
children for breakfast was certainly a very fair
beginning.

In the barn there was a large rabbit-hutch, and
on the nursery window-ledge a bowl full of newts.
The newts were Mike’s favourites of all the pets,
because there was no fear of their biting, or indeed
displaying any opposition, when he carried them
about, squeezed tightly in his chubby hand, or
stuffed head foremost into his blouse pocket. In
fact he had a love for the whole reptile genus,
and would go grubbing about for snails, which he
occasionally stuck on to his fat cheeks, shells and
all.

“Ole mister slimy-slug” was a very important
person in the baby’s world, and one about whom
he seemed to think absorbingly, judging from the
frequent references to it in his rare fits of conversa-
tion.

And there was the donkey too. Such a dear,
gentle, good donkey, provided he was not called
upon to canter. Jack always wanted him to canter,
which resulted in rather strained relations between















AND THERE WAS THE DONKEY TOO.

THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 165

them. But when you are playing at hunting, or
steeple-chasing, or being Martius Curtius, or any
really exciting game like that, you do want a
donkey to go a little faster than a slow
trot.

Whether it was owing to the caning, or to so
much exercise on the top of such a heavy meal, or
the dark dungeon, or, as the children were inclined
to think, grief caused by the contemplation of its
crime, the mouse did not long survive its ten
children.

“Tt makes it werry solemn in the mouse-cage,”
observed Oliver gravely at breakfast.

“We shall have to play with the new white
mice now,” said Peggy with a sigh, ‘and as they
only came last Tuesday they can’t be quite such
dear friends yet.”

“T’ve an awful thought about those mice,” an-
nounced Jack solemnly.

“Oh, what?” cried the others.

‘“They’re growing!”

“ But why should not they grow?” the rector
wanted to know.

‘Tf, when you're the size of a grown-up mouse,
you still keep on growing, it’s jolly likely that you'll
end in turning out to be a rat!”

“Oh, Jack, how awful!” cried Peggy.

‘And the rat-cage is not nearly big enough for
all those mice.”
166 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN,



“T don’t like rats’ tails,’ said Roger, “ they seem
so very like dry worms.”

‘But I like dry worms much better’n wet ones,”
argued Oliver.

“T don’t like any sort of worms,” Roger con-
tinued.

“| do yike worms,” suddenly remarked the baby,
lifting up his cherub face from his basin of bread
and milk. ‘I yike to skeeze them till the juice
comes out.”

“Oh, Mike,” said Aunt Isabel with a smothered
laugh, “‘ you must never do that. It is very cruel
and naughty !”

The baby looked surprised, but directly he
had swallowed a huge spoonful of bread he re-
peated :—

“1 do yike worms vedy much”.

“But they are a little dull as pets, aren’t they,
Jack?” said Peggy.

‘“Nobody would be fond of worms but a werry
silly little baby of a boy like Mike,” remarked
Oliver slowly.

The baby’s face flushed crimson.

‘’se not a vedy silly yittle baby of a boy yike
Mike!” he screamed in passion, and flung his
spoon across the table at Oliver’s head. Before
Aunt Isabel could come to the rescue Mike climbed
down off his high chair and instantly knelt on the
hearth-rug almost balancing himself on his head.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. ; 167

“They are very insubordinate children, these
two little boys!” said Uncle Robert in amaze-
ment.

“They are darlings!” laughed Aunt Isabel,
taking them with her to feed the fowls in a
state of restored and abnormal amiability. Then
Oliver had to visit his tortoise, and induce it to go
for a walk, a proceeding which involved infinite
patience and untiring affection on Oliver's part.
He loved this tortoise very dearly, and it was his
great ambition to take it to bed with him. Peggy
invented a scheme with a pocket-handkerchief one
day, and together they smuggled it under the
pillow. When nurse found it, there was trouble
in the nursery. Oliver was put in the corner
promptly, as it was his tortoise and was found in
his bed. But then Peggy owned up to her share
in the matter and was doomed to dry bread for
tea for three days afterwards.

“Nasty beast!” exclaimed nurse wrathfully.
“Tye half a mind to throw it in the coal-
hole.”

“Oh, my darling tortoise!” sobbed Oliver.

“Never mind,” said Peggy soothingly, ‘she
doesn’t ever really do anything she’s half a mind
to. I’ve often noticed it. And I expect it would
have been a little hard and uncomfortable in the
night,” she added by way of consolation.

“Poor thing!” continued Oliver in great grief.
168 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“It won't never know now the comfort of a proper
bed, like I wanted it to so werry much.”

‘I expect when you're as hard as a tortoise
you like hard beds best,” suggested Peggy wisely,
“so perhaps it'll be really happier in the green-
house.”

“ Do you think it’s werry disappointed, Peggy ?
You might go out and bring me word how it
seems.”

So Peggy good-naturedly ran off to the green-
house, while Oliver sobbed softly in the corner,
and she brought back the astonishing information
that the tortoise’s head was poking out, a thing
which very rarely happened.

‘That shows it’s werry upsetted,” wailed Oliver.
“T never knewed it put out its head between meals
before.”

But when the corner time had expired and
Oliver had gone downstairs, Aunt Isabel, to whom
he told the whole story, was very sympathetic.

“Don't you really think it minded werry much?”
asked the little boy with a dawning hope.

Mrs. Anstruther’s knowledge of tortoises led
her to believe that there are few things which
they do mind much, so she assured Oliver that it
was now quite happy, and there was no need for
any more crying.

““ There’s one very comforting thing I’ve noticed
about grown-up ladies,” said Peggy thoughtfully,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 169



‘they can so soon make there to be no need for
any more crying.”

‘What grown-up ladies do you know, dear?”
asked her aunt.

“Only you, Aunt Isabel,” answered the little
girl simply. ‘And we do love you very much,
you see.”

“Werry much!” echoed Oliver solemnly.

The two children did not quite understand why
Aunt Isabel said :—

“Only me, poor darlings!” or why she hugged
them so tightly afterwards.

“Your kisses are wetter’n what they generally
are,” said Oliver rubbing his cheek. And then
they all went off to visit the tortoise.

‘Father hasn’t sent me a letter back,” said
Roger at breakfast a few days afterwards.

“T have a letter from him, dear,” replied his
aunt. ‘He is coming here to-morrow.”

‘“Oh, what fun!” cried the children.

“Tt seems a thorough break-down,” observed
Uncle Robert handing back the letter, ‘for the
doctors to forbid his looking at a book, or making
a note even, for three months.”

“ Take care,” whispered Aunt Isabel warningly.

“The gist of the matter is in cypher,” continued
the rector, ‘‘and beyond their intelligence. [am
afraid the illness will be a protracted one.”

“Oh, he'll be all right after a thorough rest,”
170 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



said Aunt Isabel ; ‘the doctors assure him of this,
you see.”

‘Should you be very disappointed if father
were to die in London?” asked Roger with
interest, putting his elbows on the table and lean-
ing his chin on his hands.

‘“My dear child!” exclaimed his aunt, and then
she quickly continued :—

‘“We must all help your father to learn country
games, and not let him touch those nasty diffi-
cult books while he is here ”.

“There isn’t ever anything for father to do
except read and write and make notes,” said
Peggy. :

“Oh, but he must learn! All of you, and Jack
and I, and Uncle Robert and Mr. Fairfax will
teach him. Let us think of things. I will teach
him to fish.”

“And I will to play cricket,” chimed in
Jack.

“And Mr. Fairfax can teach him golf,” sug-
gested Pegey.

“And me to find adventures,” cried Roger.

“J will teach him to eat things in the garden,”
was Oliver’s decision.

“Capital!” exclaimed his aunt. “And I will
to eat things in the house.”

“And you can teach him to ride your bicycle,”
Jack suggested to the rector.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 171



“T always thought father knew everything of
himself,” said Peggy thoughtfully.

“Oh, but that was only in London,” interrupted
Roger; “the country makes a great difference.
You can learn easy things in London like lessons
and lectures and things, but though the country is
so much nicer, it is much difficulter too.”

‘Your father will find it so, I expect,” observed
Uncle Robert.

‘“‘T have a letter every day,” said Oliver, watch-
ing his aunt put hers into the envelope. ‘It’s
from a frog, you see.”

“And what does he say?” Roger wanted to
know.

‘““He’s took old Mrs. Frog to the dentist's ’cause
she’s got a bad glue in her mouth.”

‘“There’s no such thing,” laughed Jack.

“There is. Nurse got it. She telled me her
own self.”

“He means gum,” explained Aunt Isabel.
‘Don’t you, Gear?”

Oliver looked doubtful. The word sounded
better somehow, and for a moment he wavered.
But then his little mouth tightened in expression,
and he repeated obstinately :—

“No I don't. I means glue.”

“Mother,” said Jack anxiously, following her
into the garden, ‘Uncle Dick won't ask me
questions, will he?”
172 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘“What sort of questions? I don’t quite under-
stand.”

“Oh! youknow. Horrid ones about arithmetic
and Latin and things like that. Father says he
will, and itll make it so beastly ’cause I shan’t
know them, and that'll be sure to end in rows.”

‘“No, I don’t think so,” his mother assured
him. ‘Uncle Dick is coming to rest here, for the
doctors say he has been overworking himself
terribly.”

‘T wish he wasn’t a professor,” sighed Jack.

“Aren't you glad father is coming?” Peggy
asked her cousin.

“T s'pose he’s frightfully clever?” said Jack
doubtfully.

“Oh, no, he isn’t! Not half as clever as you
are. He can’t do anything but write books, you
know.”

“ But he’s werry kind,” chimed in Oliver loyally.

And when the professor arrived in the country
he found that Peggy was quite right in her asser-
tion that he was not half as clever as Jack.
173

CHAPTER IX.

“Now, Dick, you are to go out of doors this
minute, and only come in with the children to
meals,” said Aunt Isabel decidedly, as she went
into the study where the professor was examining
the rector’s bookshelves.

“But there is nothing to do out of doors,”
sighed her brother-in-law.

“Go and sit on the lawn and light your pipe.
You'll be all right then. And the children are
somewhere about.”

So the professor obediently bowed to her de-
cree. And it really was rather nice sitting still
in the sunshine and looking out on the gorgeous
summer world through a cloud of tobacco-smoke.

The baby was the first person who appeared to
distract his attention from the restful nothingness
which the doctors had prescribed. Mike came
slowly across the lawn with a most gloomy ex-
pression of countenance and dragging a toy cart
upside down, which he had not “apparently the
spirit to set right.

“Mike’s got a clean frock,” he said sadly.
“Nurse has just putted it on.”
i74 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Asa penal dispensation?” inquired his father.

‘An’ a clean pinny,” added the baby, recount-
ing his woes with an increased depression.

“Why, little one?”

““She’s vedy cross!” explained Mike, sitting
down and sticking his legs straight out in front
of him.

“ Roger,” called the professor, seeing his eldest
son running out of the house, “what is the matter
with Mike?”

“ He upset nurse’s glass of beer, what she has
for her lunch, all over himself. He was going to
taste it, you know.”

“ Mike pee it and a vedy great spill came
running out,” observed the baby.

“ Why i is there such a little lot of beer in a glass,
father, and when it’s upset it is such a great lot
more?” asked Roger thoughtfully.

The professor was delighted.

“Bravo, my boy! 1 must take a note of that,”
and he dived into his pocket for a pencil and his
note-book. Then a half-sad, half-amused expres-
sion swept over his face.

“They have made me lock up my note-book,”
he said ruefully, “and I believe your Aunt Isabel
has picked my pocket of its pencils too! What
can I do without them, Roger ?”

‘Never mind, father,” said the boy kindly,
laying his little bronzed hand on the professor's




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“MIKE UPSETTED IT AND A VEDY GREAT SPILL CAME RUNNING OUT.”



THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 177



shoulder. ‘‘There’s heaps of things to do in the
country, you know. You won't want pencils and
paper like you did in London.”

‘Oh, shan’t I?” exclaimed his father.

“You haven’t time for it, you know,” con-
tinued Roger. ‘I’ve had to leave off being
a poet even, “cause there’s no time in the
country.”

‘Then what are you going to be when you are
aman? I ought to know of your change of plans,
if you have made any.”

“Tm going to begin with being a hay-making
farm boy, like we saw lots when we came here
first; and then | shall grow into a man to drive
the corn-cutting machine, and a plough after, when
the corn’s all over. Jack says he’d rather be a
master of hounds if he was me. He’s going to
be one himself if Uncle Robert will let him off
being a clergyman.”

““Your own decision is the more practicable, it
seems to me,” said the professor smiling; ‘“ but
why have you given up being a philosopher as
as well as a poet?”

‘Well, you see, father, being a ph’los’pher is a
little dull when you might be driving a plough or
cutting corn, isn’t it? I didn’t quite understand,
you know, when I was little and in London.
Lydia’s got a brother who is the splendidest

man you ever saw. He's going to take me
12
178 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.
ridin’ on the machine when he cuts the corn
next week. You don’t know Lydia, do you,
father ?”

“T have not that pleasure,.my son.”

“She's awfully nice, and plays with us! And
she looks lovely on her Sunday out!”

“And don’t you ever think about lessons now?”
asked the professor with rather a wrinkled look
across his forehead.

“Oh, no!” laughed Roger. - ‘We've almost
forgotten we ever did any. Jack says it makes
him sick if Peggy or me says anything in French.
I must go now, father, ‘cause I’m on my way to
the farm. Jack and Peggy and me are going to
have a rat hunt there, with Lydia’s brother. He’s
awfully clever, you know, at exciting things like
that. Only don’t tell Oliver. We don’t want any
one at all little”

And Roger ran off in a great hurry.

‘T’se not at all yittle,” observed the baby, who
had been listening intently. ‘ But I’se vedy
clean,” he added with welling tears.

“You need not continue so,” suggested his
father to cheer him up. ‘You can play about
now and get as dirty as you like.”

Mike beamed with sudden joy and trotted off
in great delight towards the wood. In a few
minutes he returned and proudly displayed a
patch of soil on his little pink palm.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 179



“That is the beginning of the dirt,” he ex-
plained triumphantly.

“Here, Mike!” called Oliver, “here’s your
cake!” and he appeared with two large slices of
a delicious home-made kind, which was specially
adapted for the children’s lunch.

‘The baby took a big mouthful and then care-
fully picked out a piece of candied peel, which he
handed to his brother.

“Here, Oliver, take this. I don’t yike bacon
in my cake.”

“’Tisn’t bacon,” said Oliver scornfully as Mike
went off again by himself.

‘“Where have you been all this time?” asked
the professor. “I haven’t seen you since break-
fast.” :

“T have just been speaking a werry long speak
with old Green ’bout flowers and rain and things.”

“Most appropriate subjects for a gardener.
You have a sense of the fitness of things, my
son, even though adaptability is not one of your
most marked characteristics.”

“Nurse says genklemen have half-moons on
their finger-nails. But old Green hasn’t. I looked
to see.”

“Nurse has her limitations. By the way, the
limitations of childhood would be a good subject
to introduce into my book. I must make a note.
of that when I go indoors.”
180 ° THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

“] was in the field before then,’ continued
Oliver, “I wanted to catch a sheep, on’y I
couldn't.”

“What disobliging animals!”

“JT telled them many times I weren’t going to
kill them, on’y they wouldn’t wait.”

“ Their discernment, as well as their faith, was
at fault.”

“And I haven’t quite finished yet,” said Oliver
slowly, “so I’m going now to try again.”

“Won't you stay and talk to me?” begged his
father. ‘They have taken away from me all my
books and I am a little dull, you know.”

“The country is werry undull,” Oliver assured
him. ‘If on’y you'd run about.”

“J will to-morrow,” the professor promised.
“ But stay with me for a little now.”

Oliver looked longingly towards the fields, and
then he said slowly :—

“T will stay and tell you a werry short story,
and then I will finish catching my sheep.”

“Don’t you ever sit still in the country,” con-
tinued his father, “as you used to in the study at
home?”

“No, never!” replied his son solemnly.
“There’s no time here to sit still, you see.”

“This change of scene seems to have had a
remarkable effect on their development,” mused
the professor. ‘It would be interesting to note
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 181



the why and wherefore of this. I can see the
same influence working on two such different
characters as Roger and Oliver, and I have no
doubt—— _ But this is forbidden fruit,” he added
aloud. ‘‘Come, Oliver, tell me your story, and be
assured you have the most obedient of fathers.”

“Fathers can’t be obedient,” said the boy
stolidly. “It’s werry silly to say they can.”

“Perhaps it is. But I have to leave off being
wise. At least so they tell me.”

Oliver could not understand much of what his
father said, but he repeated deliberately : “ Fathers
can't be obedient. I knewed they couldn’t.”

‘Nor can all sons,” observed the professor.

“Once ’pon a time,” began Oliver, who felt that
the question was settled, “there was a wicked
lady, a werry wicked lady. She wore her best
clothes on Monday!”

“ How shocking!” remarked his father gravely.

“Her husband tried to make her know better,
on’y she wouldn’t, so the p'liceman took her to
prison in a cab.”

“You have the makings of a disciplinarian in
you, my boy. And it doesn’t seem likely that
you will err on the side of leniency.”

“And she went to sleep in the cab and when
she waked up she was dead,” continued Oliver im-
pressively. ‘And now I think I had better go
and finish catching my sheep.”
182 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Wait a little longer!” pleaded the professor.,

“JT don’t know no more stories, you see.”

“JT had an impression that London was the
busiest place in the world. 1 appear to have been
mistaken in not comparing it with Little Heyford.”

Just then the baby came up quietly behind
Oliver and knocked him over gleefully.

‘Oh, Mike!” cried his brother, “‘ you’re werry
naughty; you frightened me out of my wits!”
And Oliver slowly got up again with a flushed
face and a reproachful expression.

‘“Go back to your wits and let me f’ighten you
again!” begged the baby, who was delighted with
the success of his exploit.

But Oliver did not intend being trifled with.

“Tt seems a werry big pity not to finish doing
what you have begun,” he observed wistfully,
looking towards the distant sheep.

“And yet one of the commonest experiences of
life,” said his father. ‘“ My own, for instance, at
present.” And his face saddened as he thought of
the broken work and half-written book which he
had left behind him in London. Then he smiled
at the resolute little face and questioning eyes.

‘Go finish your sheep-catching, my child, if
you can. Far be it from-me to play the tyrant.”

“Mike can stay with you,” suggested Oliver,
‘and | will bring you my sheep to see, when he’s
caught.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 183



“‘ Mike can’t stay with you,” said the baby after
Oliver had safely climbed the hurdles, ‘‘’cause he’s
vedy busy diggin’ for worms. An’ the funny
worms say ‘All gone, my dear,’ but Mike digged
an’ digged with his fingers till he finded ole mister



“IT SEEMS A WERRY BIG PITY
NOT TO FINISH DOING WHAT
YOU HAVE BEGUN.”

eh

worm.” And the baby trotted o
hurry.

“Tt seems strange,” thought the professor, “ for
me to be the only one of my family who is not

busy !”

in a great
184 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDKEN.



“T’m afraid you are dreadfully dull,” said Aunt
Isabel, who had come out to see how he was
getting on.

‘Oliver assures me I| should be very ‘ undull’ if
only I would run about. As I don’t feel inclined
for that, I am exercising my mind in discovering
my own mistakes. I was actually under the im-
pression that there was nothing to do in the
country, and I find my family far too busy to at-
tend to me for more than a few hurried minutes.”

“Of course there’s lots to do, only you don’t
know how to do it,” laughed -his sister-in-law.
‘But that is just what we are going to teach you.
I mean to take you fishing myself this afternoon.”

“Oh! but, my dear Isabel, you really need not
trouble.”

“Tt will be no trouble to me, I assure you.”

“But I am afraid it will to me,” replied the pro-
fessor ruefully. ‘‘ The destructive genius has been
denied me.”

“You must do as you are told. I have under-
taken to cure you, and cure you | will, whether
you like it or not.”

The professor held out his hand. “I am the
better already for this morning’s rest. I had
forgotten how good it is sometimes to look at
things straight through one’s eyes and not through
the black and white reflection of books.”

“You have never learned how to play, you
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 185



know,” said Aunt Isabel gently. ‘We must
teach you that, when you are not quite so tired.”

“T’m a stupid, blind fellow in spite of the letters
after my name. But I’m not too blind to see how
much this visit has done for the children in the
way of turning white faces into red and brown
ones. There is a pretty powerful something in
the country, even if I’m not very clear as to what
It is.”

“You will be soon,” said Aunt Isabel smiling.
“Oh, here is Robert! And good gracious, he has
got Jack with him covered with mud from head to
foot |”

The rector was speaking half angrily.

“Look here, did you ever see such an object ?
I picked him out of the worst ditch in the whole
place. Go in and change your things at once,
you good-for-nothing boy,” he added by way
of severity.

“Tm not good-for-nothing,” Jack answered
indignantly. “I’m good for jography. Mr.
Cardew says so.”

His mother began to laugh.

‘Run in and have a bath, dear. Make haste,
for it’s nearly dinner-time.”

‘You spoil that boy shamefully,” observed the
rector in an aggrieved tone. ‘He had no
business to have gone near that place at all.”

“T’m so thankful the others weren’t with him!”
186 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



exclaimed Aunt Isabel. ‘‘ Here they come, quite
dry and fairly clean.”

‘We've been enjoying ourselves right and left,’
cried Peggy enthusiastically. “It was a rat hunt
in the barn.”

“There wasn’t a rat to be found anywhere.
Only it was awfully exciting waiting and watch-
ing,” added Roger.

“] was just a little afraid I might have felt sick
if there had been a live rat killed,’ Peggy told her
father, ‘‘so it made it much nicer and safer not
finding one. Only Jack was rather disappointed
and went away.”

“Father,” said Roger hanging on to the pro-
fessor’s sleeve as they went in to dinner, “ Jack
says ‘arc-en-ciel’ is the French for archangel, but
it isn't, is it?”

“Not generally speaking.”

“But don’t say anything about it when he
comes,” pleaded Peggy, ‘“‘’cause French gives
him a headache.”

“Oh no, Peggy,” interrupted Roger, “it is
Latin that gives him a headache. French only
makes him sick.”

“We will avoid both these contingencies,” the
professor promised.

In the afternoon they all went fishing.

“We will take father and Mike,” said Roger
kindly. “Jack says he doesn’t mind.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 187



“That is very nice of Jack,” observed the pro-
fessor, ‘but I rather wish he did.”

“We will all go and we will all fish,” Aunt
Isabel settled. “I have actually collected enough
rods for everybody.” :

“Mike fish too!” chirped the baby, beaming on
the general company.

“T will look on,” suggested the professor when
they reached the river. ‘JI can’t fish, you know.”

“Oh but, Uncle Dick, it’s jolly easy!” said
Jack. “And you must. Mother says so. Here’s
a worm.”

The professor stood looking helplessly at the
wriggling morsel, and then he consulted the baby.

“Mike, what do you generally do with worms?”

“[ kiss ’em. I do yove worms vedy much!”

“T am not a demonstrative man,” continued his
father smiling whimsically. ‘“ Here, Oliver, what
shall I do with this worm?”

‘Catch fish with it,” answered Oliver practically.
“T caught a werry big fish one day.”

“Oh yes, father!” cried Peggy; “it was a young
pike. He was using Jack’s rod.”

“Tt had a dreadful face,” chimed in Roger,
“and was almost savage.”

“Tt had a werry nice smile,” said Oliver. “J
liked its face.”

“Now, Dick, are you ready?” asked Aunt

Isabel.
188 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“But you haven’t a rod yourself,” exclaimed
her brother-in-law eagerly, in the hopes that she
might take his.

‘“‘T have to hold on to the two little boys behind.
Otherwise half your family would be drowned.”

“Here, Uncle Dick, I'll start you.” And Jack
skilfully manipulated the worm and adjusted the
float. ‘“ Now watch it till it bobs, and then land
him not too quick or you'll lose him.”

‘Jack, you are a wonderfully clever boy. I
bow to your superior knowledge. Only be patient
with your ignorant uncle. I'll do my best. I will
indeed. Watching an inert top till it bobs, I think
I can manage; but afterwards! Well we shall
see!”

And the professor pulled his cap to shade his
eyes, and leaned back against a thick old tree
which grew close beside the river.

“Tt’s a float, not a top,” corrected Jack, and
then with slightly flushed cheeks he looked up at
his uncle and confidentially explained: “ I’m not
really a bit clever, you know. There’s only one
fellow in the school lower than me, and he’s my
chum Packford. We never can remember the
answers to things!”

“T thought you were very good at geo-
graphy?”

“T forgot that. But it only comes from reading
adventure books and travels and things. I like
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 189



them, you know; so it doesn’t count as clever-
ness.”

“Oh! What you like doesn’t count as clever-
ness! My dear boy, you and I are in the same
box, and we will cheer each other up. We
are both of us only clever in the things we
like. They perhaps differ, but the principle is
the same.”

Jack looked a little puzzled. But when the
professor held out his hand the boy shook it
heartily, and from that moment uncle and nephew
were the best of friends.

Oliver was much the ablest fisherman of the
party. Peggy and Roger grew impatient so
quickly and moved on to try another place. But
from the moment Oliver's float was steady, he
_ stood perfectly still with his large eyes fixed upon
it, and nothing outside this immediate business
could distract his attention.

‘Look, father, quick!” cried Roger, whose rest-
less gaze covered all the floats, ‘‘you have got a
bite.”

“I have watched it most conscientiously till it
bobbed,” said the professor. ‘In fact I was
watching it too intently to perceive the bobbing
at first. That is a link between ours and the
child-mind. I have made a note--—”

“ Hold still, Uncle Dick, or you'll lose it. Pull
him out but don’t jerk him off!”
Igo THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“J had quite forgotten the fish!” explained the
professor, lifting up the rod so suddenly that both
bait and fish had disappeared.

“Tam so sorry!” he said penitently, and with
a guilty look at Jack. “It’s no use! I am incor-
rigible, as the school reports say.”

“Did yours say so too?” asked Jack with
interest. ‘“ Mine often do. It does make it rather
horrid with fathers, doesn’t it?”

“Paternal parents are unreasonable beings!”

replied his uncle. ‘‘ And now, please, will you let
me off fishing?”
“No, no!” cried Aunt Isabel. “You shan’t

go home till you have caught something. Put on
a fresh bait, Jack.”

“T shan’t go home till morning then,” sighed
the professor. ‘Oh, Isabel, what a disciplinarian
you are! And I might have had such a nice after-
noon if only I could have studied my family in
peace.”

“But you mustn’t study anything, you know,
Dick.”

Here violent shrieks from the baby indicated
that he was the proud possessor of a minnow.

“Mike eat it for his vedy own dinner, and
b’ekky too, an’ tea, an’ supper.”

“Will you give me some?” asked his father.

“Mike give you a vedy big piece, and Aunt
Is’bel, and Uncle Yobert, and nurse, and Yydia,”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. Igl



added the baby, who was in a more generous mood
than the minnow justified.

“Tt is, you know, absurd on the face of it,” con-
tinued the professor, “for six and a half intelligent
people—I count Mike as a half—to waste a whole,
long, glorious afternoon, standing in silence watch-
ing small pieces of painted wood ; the probable
result of which may be what could be bought with
no trouble for sixpence at the fishmonger’s. Really,
Isabel, I do wonder——. Oh! my top is bobbing
again. Jack, to the rescue!”

“‘Can’t come,” shouted his nephew, ‘‘ I’ve got a
bite too. Wait till he’s on this time.”

The professor watched the tug of the line tll
the float had almost gone under, and then he care-
fully switched the rod back over his head and
landed a fine perch in an overhanging tree.

The children screamed, but the fish was restored
with Roger’s help, and made a fine show in the
basket.

“That was very stupid of me,’
fessor, wrinkling his forehead. ‘‘I ought to have
judged the distance more accurately. But I will
do better next time.” And he threw his float

d

said the pro-

again.
“My fish is a werry long time bitin’,” said
Oliver sadly. ‘I’ve stood till I’ve got a werry

bad toothache all ‘long my arm.”
‘Rest a little,” suggested his aunt.
192 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Got no time,” answered Oliver, frowning at
such a self-indulgent suggestion. ‘‘ But I do wish
the fish would bite quicklier.”

‘Mike got a fish his own self!” remarked the
baby, hugging his minnow. He insisted on keep-
ing it in the lap of his pinafore so that it should
be safer than in the public basket.

‘“Aunt Isabel,” said Peggy, coming back with
Roger from the bend of the river where they had
been standing, ‘please may Roger not pull my
hair?”

“JT did it to tease her,’ explained Roger,
‘’cause it is a little dull, you see, not to tease
anybody when you’ve been fishing a whole after-
noon and not caught anything.”

“So it is,” agreed Aunt Isabel soothingly.
“But we must think of something much more
amusing than pulling Peggy’s hair. Especially as
she doesn’t like it.”

‘““He’s spoiled my fishing,” grumbled Peggy,
‘and I did want to fish as well as Jack, ‘cause
I’m nearly as big.”

“ Everybody big likes such real things,” sighed
Roger, shaking his head over his sister’s am-
bition. “I like pretending things best, you
know.”

“7 think it is almost tea-time,” said Aunt Isabel,
getting up; ‘I perceive the dawn of fractiousness
among the unsuccessful members of the party.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 193



‘Oh, wait a little!” exclaimed the professor, “ I
almost had a bite then.”

“We will go on,” said Aunt Isabel smiling,
‘and you and Jack can follow when you like.”

‘“] aren’t ready yet too,” observed Oliver, ‘‘my
fish won’t bite werry quickly, you see.”

‘All right, you can stay with your father. See
that he doesn’t tumble in, Dick.”

“Tl be werry good,” promised Oliver. And
he stood like a little statue. For Oliver’s
promises were to be relied upon.

Nearly an hour later the three arrived at the
rectory.

‘“‘ Awfully sorry we're late,” said Jack, ‘ only
Uncle Dick wouldn’t come before.”

“T caught a fish my own self, as Mike says,”
boasted the professor. ‘And I landed him with-
out a catastrophe. Moreover Jack has praised
me as an embryo fisherman of the highest order,
and he is going to take me with him again to-
morrow. I shouldn’t wonder though I was soon
able to even manage the worm myself.”

Oliver looked very gloomy.

“T kept on fishing and fishing but nothing
never bited.”

‘Poor little fellow,’ said Aunt Isabel, ‘‘ you
must be very tired!”

“T are werry untired,” replied Oliver frowning.

“ An’ I will fish all to-morrow and all the next
13
194 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



day and all the next. Till p’r’aps I might catch a
werry big whale!”

“Father,” interrupted Roger, “what did Jonah
eat while he was swallowed by the whale?”

« Ask your uncle,” replied his father.

“T should think he might have caught a sardine
as it slipped down,” continued Roger thoughtfully
as the rector was not in the room.

“Tm jolly -hungry,” exclaimed Jack helping
himself to jam.

“Well, now you mention it,” observed the pro-
fessor, ‘the thought of food is not ungrateful.”

“ Hurrah!” cried Aunt Isabel waving the toast-
rack. ‘‘ The cure has begun!”





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ROGER WAS WAITING FOR THE TOOTH-GLASS.
197

CHAPTER X.

OLIVER was naughty. There was no doubt about
it. It first began over cleaning his teeth, for
nurse told him to be quick as Roger was waiting
for the tooth-glass, and that seemed to make him
as slow and long as he possibly could be, just out
of perversity.

Then nurse, who was inclined to be short in -her
temper, slapped him, and in revenge he swallowed
some tooth-powder, which really annoyed him far
more than it did her, as it had a very gritty and
bitter taste in spite of its enticing rose-kind of
smell. So by the time the breakfast-bell rang,
Oliver was simply stiff with obstinacy and in such
a tiresome, arguing mood that there was no doing
anything with him.

“What is everybody going to do to-day?”
asked Aunt Isabel.

“T’m going to show Uncle Dick how to throw
a fly,’ said Jack. “Its such a jolly lot better
sport than fishing with a worm!”

‘“T used to be under the impression that fishing
was the same thing as catching fish,” observed the
198 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



professor gravely, ‘‘but Jack has shown me my
mistake. My only doubt now is as to whether it
is a science or a fine art.”

“Peggy and me are going to fly a kite,” an-
nounced Roger. “And Lydia’s going to help us
when she’s dressed.”

“That I should imagine would go without
saying,” said his father.

“Then you’ imagine wrong,” laughed Aunt
Isabel. ‘‘‘ Dressed’ in nursery parlance indicates
a thick frock instead of a thin one.”

“And in drawing-room parlance it indicates a
thin one instead of a thick one. The paradoxes
of our current language would be an interesting
study.”

“T aren’t going to fly a kite,” said Oliver slowly.
“T are going to eat green apples in the orchard.”

“You are not,” exclaimed his uncle quickly.
“They are most indigestible things, and fearfully
sour.”

‘“T are werry fond of sourness,” argued Oliver.

“Well, you are not to eat those apples,” re-
peated the rector decidedly.

“JT like green apples what are full of juice and
sourness,” continued his small nephew.

The professor laughed, but Uncle Robert seemed
dreadfully shocked.

‘Little boys must do as they are told,” he said
severely.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 199

“T are a werry big boy and not a bit little,”
answered Oliver, looking more obstinate than
ever. ‘An’ I like sourness werry much.”

“Don’t you think it would be as well to break
off this discussion?” suggested Aunt Isabel.

“Intervention is sometimes also better than
cure,” the professor remarked, as he pushed back
his chair. “ But, oh dear! I am hungry for my
note-book.”

“T are hungry for sourness,” repeated Oliver,
frowning at his uncle.

His father took hold of the little brown hand.

“¢ Alas, my brother!’” he said, with a whim-
sical look, “ only you happen to be my son.”

They all went their different ways, but Oliver’s
way was not to be so easily disposed of. He
tucked up his pinafore so that he could get his
hands into his knickerbocker pockets, and, with
his hat stuck on the very back of his head, he
deliberately set off for the orchard. He whistled
as he went, to show what an independent person
he was, and occasionally he picked up a stone and
threw it at nothing just to prove how happy and
grown-up he felt.

Such a quaint little figure he looked in the old-
fashioned orchard. The professor, who was on
his way to the river, caught sight of him and stood
still and smiled.

‘A dirty holland pinafore and a battered straw
200 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



hat are in keeping with the picture,” he said softly.
‘*A Sunday suit would have spoiled it.”

“What?” exclaimed Jack.

“Do you see Oliver over there? I was noting
the fact that, though it is a picture, it is not a
Sunday one, either as regards the dress or mood,
I imagine.”

Jack looked slightly bored.

“He'll catch it if father sees him there,” he said
practically.

And the rector did see him there owing to his
having gone expressly to look. He was amazed
at such youthful depravity, and he moreover came
to the conclusion that, if strong measures were not
taken to check the downward career of this
five-year-old culprit, terrible would be the end
thereof.

“Oliver, how dare you?” he said angrily.

His nephew paused with puckered face in the
middle of a bite.

““T do like sourness werry much,” he observed
thickly, owing to his mouth being full.

“You are an exceedingly naughty, disobedient
little boy!”

Oliver’s face flushed crimson at hearing himself
so sternly spoken to, but he bravely blinked back
the rising tears.

‘And I shall tell your father and see that you
are properly punished,” continued Uncle Robert.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 201

“Meanwhile you will come back with me and
wait in my study.”

Oliver uttered a piercing defiant shriek, but,
before he could afford time to burst out crying
properly, he deliberately took another bite out of
the apple.



““T DO LIKE SOURNESS WERRY MUCH,” HE OBSERVED THICKLY.

When the professor came home with the trium-
phant news that he could now make a cast pro-

perly, he was met with the sad story of Oliver’s
sin.
202 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



‘A true son of Eve,” he observed smiling.

But Uncle Robert thought it was no smiling
matter.

“You must whip him, Dick. Indeed you
must,” he said earnestly. ‘It is the only way
to correct such a fault.”

““T whip him!” exclaimed the professor incredu-
lously. ‘‘I couldn’t possibly, my dear fellow. I’m
not at all good at that kind of thing.”

‘But why not?” urged the rector.

“T might hurt him, you know.”

“But the infliction of a little pain would have a
most salutary effect, I feel sure.”

The professor shook his head.

‘““ He’s such a little chap! And besides he has
no mother,” he added quietly.

“Well, I told him I should speak to you. He
is in my study. Will you go to him?”

The professor wrinkled his forehead.

‘“What on earth is the good of scenes like this
if I can’t make notes on them?” he muttered to
himself; and then a sudden smile swept over his
face. ‘I, too, will be disobedient for once,” and
he picked up a pencil and a sheet of writing-
paper.

Oliver was sitting on the floor with a tear-
stained face and a gloomy expression.

“Uncle Robert’s werry horrid!” he explained
to his father.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 203



“The Effect of Conventional Correction on the
Child-Mind,” wrote the professor in a great hurry.
“Why is he horrid?” he asked absently.

‘“He speaks so shouting stern. An’ I do like
sour apples werry much!”

“ Forbidden fruit, you mean. So do I, my boy,
just now.”

An’ he said you'd whip me!” scornfully.

The professor dropped his pencil and picked up
his son.

“Do you think I shall?” he asked smiling.

Oliver leaned his head against his father’s
shoulder. He was feeling a little tired with so
much obstinacy and naughtiness.

“You wouldn’t know how, would you, father?”
he answered confidently.

‘“‘T must own that I should not!”

“T knewed you wouldn't.”

The professor looked at the sheet of paper, with
its paragraph of writing under the heading, and
then he looked at the little figure in his arms.
For the first time the child seemed to him more
important than the conclusions it afforded, and
he wondered whether he was dealing well with
Oliver.

“‘T- have been rather naughty too,” he said in
almost a whisper.

An’ T was. It makes Uncle Robert look
werry dark.”
204 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“J am sorry,” continued the professor.

“T are sorry too!” echoed Oliver.

“ Then that is all right!” said his father cheer-
fully, ‘and we don’t want whipping after all.”

‘“‘T knewed we didn’t,” agreed his son.

The next morning when the letters were brought
in Jack had one all to himself.

“Oh!” he exclaimed sadly. ‘‘ What a bother!”

“What is the matter?” inquired Mrs. An-
struther.

“Mr. Cardew’s mother’s got well again!”
replied Jack gloomily. ‘ Packford was always
afraid she would!”

“Mr. Cardew’s mother appears singularly lack-
ing in consideration,” observed the _ professor,
“but will you explain why she should not have
got well?”

“We should have had another week’s holiday
of course,” answered Jack, “if only she hadn't!
And now I’ve got to go back on Friday.”

“Oh, Jack! not next Friday?” exclaimed Peggy
and Roger in a breath.

“Rather! It’s a beastly bore!”

Whether Jack referred to the reassembling of
the school, or to old Mrs. Cardew’s recovery, was
somewhat doubtful.

“ But why did you build so upon her uncertain
decease ?” inquired the professor.

“Well, you see, when you hope a thing awfully,
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 205



you get to look forward to it somehow,” explained
his nephew. ‘At least 1 do. Last term I looked
forward awfully to winning the junior handicap
220 yards, and I made a wooden bracket to keep
the prize on-—it was a jolly cup, you know—and I
only came in third after all, and got a dirty little
pepper-pot. That's just like Mr. Cardew’s mother
over again.”

“To you refer to the pepper-pot?” his uncle
wanted to know.

Jack laughed.

“I make rather an ass of myself, I know,” he
frankly owned, “only I can’t help it.”

“But what shall we do without you, Jack?”
_said Peggy sadly.

‘““T never thought the holidays could be over!”
sighed Roger.

“T’ve had another letter from the frog,”
announced Oliver.

“What does he say?” everybody wanted to
know.

“He has got a new long-clothes baby called
Eva, and he’s going to Russia by train. I ’spect
he’s forgot the wolfs what are there. They'll eat
him, I’m werry afraid.”

“And is Mrs. Frog going too?” asked the
professor.

“Yes she is, on’y I shall write and tell them
they better hadn’t ’cause of the wolfs. Mrs. Frog
206 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



has eat so much tea she is quite hard,” added
Oliver impressively, patting his pinafore. ‘She
would have coffee and sandwiches and bacon for
tea, and so much of them is werry hardening.”

“Tt will be horrid without you, Jack!” con-
tinued Peggy in despair.

“Don’t fuss so!” answered her cousin im-
patiently. He did not feel quite cheerful enough
himself to bear with equanimity the condolences
of others.

“Oh!” exclaimed Roger suddenly. ‘I have
just had a thought full of dreadfulness and
sorrow.”

“Let us hear it,” suggested his father.

‘And we can very likely help you to put it all
right,” added Aunt Isabel.

“Does Jack going back to school mean us
going back to London?” asked Roger with a
flushed face and tearful eyes.

‘Indeed it doesn’t!” replied his aunt quickly.

‘You are very good,” interrupted the professor,
“but look how unfitted my children are becoming
for their practical environment.”

‘‘What’s a practical vironment, father?” Roger
wanted to know.

Once upon a time the professor would have
rejoiced in the explanation. Now he only
said :—

“Nothing you could understand. Run out of
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 207



doors and play now, my boy. And don’t bother
your head over metaphysical problems.” —

“T won't never go back to London,” observed
Oliver decidedly. ‘It’s so werry nasty and ugly.”

“But must I go back alone then,” asked his
father, ‘‘ when that sad time arrives?”

Oliver deliberately nodded his head. And then
a happy thought struck him.

“Uncle Robert can go back with you,” he said
cheerfully, ‘an’ we won’t want no Uncle Robert
here. You might have Mike if you like,” he
added kindly, “but he wouldn’t be werry good
enough without his nurse, you see.”

‘And couldn’t you spare nurse too?”

~ “No. I do love my nurse werry much when
she isn’t stern. I don’t like stern things. I
wouldn’t like even a stern mouse.”

‘“T have never met with one yet.”

“Nurse is very stern over dirtiness, and doing
what we're told not, and answering back,” chimed
in Peggy, who had heard the end of the conversa-
tion. “ And it does make it rather difficult for us
all four not to be doing either thing generally,”
she added lucidly.

“Come on!” shouted Jack. ‘We've got to
do heaps of things to-day ’cause the time’s so
short.”

“T shall sink back into a state of ignorance,”
sighed the professor, ‘(and all because you are to
208 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



be sacrificed to the fetich of education! My dear
Jack, what will become of me? I can’t stick on a
bicycle, and I only know the golf clubs by sight
at present. Who will teach me when you are
gone ?”

“Mr. Fairfax will. He’s been away on his
holiday since youcame. He’s a stunner at games.
No end of a swell in the Varsity sports, you know.
You should just see his silver cups.” And Jack
whistled to express his admiration.

‘Tt was distinctly reprehensible on the part of
Mr. Cardew’s mother!” continued the professor
looking very grave. ‘I tremble to consider her
deserts.”

Here Jack was heard to mutter something which
sounded rather as if he were referring to an elderly
pussy.

“Ah yes! as you were saying, your old catapult !
I would be glad to borrow it in your absence. |
actually hit the trunk of a tree yesterday when I
was trying it.”

Jack looked up sharply at his uncle.

“T didn’t say my old catapult,” he began to ex-
plain with crimsoning cheeks, but the professor
interrupted him.

‘“Never mind what you said. Let us go and
fish on the upper lake. When you have gone |
shall have to return to the less exciting and more
homely worm.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 209



‘You made some jolly good casts yesterday.”

‘“The worst of it is,” added the professor, ‘that
the day is gone before you have properly begun
to fish with a fly ; it is one of the latest phenomena
of the country which I have noticed.”

On Jack’s last afternoon there was a tea-party
in his honour on the lawn.

‘““A best-clothes party?” asked Peggy a little
anxiously, for best clothes did rather interefere
with the pleasure of things in the children’s
opinion.

“Certainly,” replied nurse severely, opening the
drawer wherein lay Peggy’s newest white frock
and the pink silk sash, which Aunt Isabel had
brought from Great Heyford.

“So much cleanness is the worst of parties,”
said Roger sadly, “for cleanness is nastier even
than best clothes.”

‘Best clothes are pinchy and stiff though, too,”
interrupted Peggy.

“But cleanness hurts most,” added Roger,
“especially when it gets to finger-nails, like
nurse always will make it for parties.”

“When I’m a man,” observed Oliver, ‘and
give parties my own self, they will be werry dirty
ones.”

Mike cried three times before he was finished,
and then nurse carried off Oliver bodily for a

similar sacrifice.
14
210 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

The children did so long to be as big as. Jack,
who washed his own face. They were always
trying to persuade nurse to let them try now, but
she would not hear of it.

‘“‘T can do it my own self. Dolet me!” begged
Oliver, seizing the sponge. He knew it was no
use asking but still he always did.

‘Now then, no nonsense!” said nurse severely ;
“stand still and keep your mouth and eyes
shut.”

“But I’m speaking,” argued Oliver, “and my
mouth can’t shut in the middle of my speak.”

Nurse gave him a little shake.

“Be quiet, you naughty boy!”

“Don’t hold me so werry tight.”

“Then keep your head still.”

“Oh, not my ears!” pleaded Oliver. “You
did them all this morning werry enough!”

But nurse was not to be hindered in the execu-
tion of her design. She washed Oliver till he
cried, and then she rubbed him dry, and put him
in the corner till he was wanted.

‘‘T knew how it would be,” said Roger wisely.
“Just Sunday makes nurse stern over the washing
and dressing, but parties make her dreadful.”

‘It’s horriblest for me,” groaned Peggy, ‘‘’cause
of the tangles in my hair as well.”

““T wish Uncle Robert would wash your face,”
said Oliver defiantly to nurse as she was putting
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 211



on his best shoes. It had taken him all the
corner-time to think out this scheme of revenge.

‘“Now then, none of your imperence. There
they all are on the lawn. So be off, and see that
you behave properly. Why, even Master Jack
has got on his Eton suit.”

“T would not mind any sort of suit,” explained
Roger, “if only I could put it on myself.”

“And tea-parties would be nicer if all the after-
noon before wasn’t full of washing and punishing,”
Peggy confided to her brother. And then they
went downstairs looking so fresh and sweet and
clean, that the professor caught them all in his
long arms and would not let them go unless they
paid kisses for toll.

“Mike vedy good now,” observed the baby,
beaming round on the assembled company.

““Take note of the zow,” remarked the pro-
fessor; “it implies more than a mere statement
of time.”

““T am behaving werry properly, aren’t I?”
asked Oliver, pausing in the middle of a bun.

“You are indeed,” answered Aunt Isabel.

“Tt is weighing on my spirits,” said his father.
“‘T can never rise to the supernatural.”

‘Even though this is such a delicious party,
with two kinds of jam and Mr. Fairfax, I can’t
feel quite happy,” explained Peggy. “It is be-

cause Jack is going to school.”
212 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“Nor I don’t,” Roger hastened to add. “ But
that I think is moet because my clean collar is too
tight, and makes it pinchy to swallow.”

“JT shall ea to school when I’m growed a werry
bit bigger,” announced Oliver, “and I shall know
my lessons the rightest I can, else the school-man
might whip me with a little broom.”

“T expect he will anyhow,” suggested Uncle
Robert.

Oliver frowned fiercely.

““T ’spect he won't,” he said stubbornly, “cause
I shall be so werry good. Gooder than what you
know of.”

“T feel better,” observed the professor. ‘“‘ Less
anxious on account of my second son.”

“He won't whip me,” repeated Oliver with
decision.

“T have had a splendid time at St. Ninian’s,”
Mr. Fairfax was telling Aunt Isabel. ‘I went
round the links twice every day, and sometimes |
got in a third round.”

“T want you to teach my brother-in-law golf,”
the rector suggested.

“Tt seems a popular game,” said the professor.
“ That, I suppose, arises from its not being too
difficult.”

“Tt is quite difficult enough,” exclaimed the
curate. “And it is more than a game, it is a
science,” he added enthusiastically.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 213



“Then I am your man. Whatever I may or
may not be, Iam a man of science. I therefore
trust I shall take to it easily.”

“T daresay you will,” replied Mr. Fairfax con-
fidently. ‘Jack has a very good drive.”

‘But I am not as clever as Jack, you know. I
am only a man of science. He is an all-round
Englishman. I think I would like Roger to be
an Englishman and a schoolboy, too. He can be
a philosopher, or a poet, or a—ploughman after-
wards.”

“Mr. Fairfax will coach you first-rate,” said
Jack. “Such a lot depends on getting into a
good style to begin with.”

‘That I should live to be coached!” exclaimed
his uncle. “ Really, Isabel, you are renewing my
youth with a vengeance down here.”

‘There is a professorship vacant at St. Ninian’s
University. You ought to go in for it,” suggested
the curate.

“ Of golf?” inquired the professor.

‘No, of psychology, I think.”

“I used to be good at that in the old days—a
month ago in London.”

“Oh, Dick! do write!” cried Aunt Isabel.

The professor shook his head and wrinkled his
‘forehead.

“My work is in London, and my opportunity
lies there too. You country folk underrate the
214 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



stimulus of being at the very heart of the world,
and with your hand on its throbbing pulse. Don't
think me ungrateful; I am enjoying my holiday
immensely, but my work is my life, and they are
both waiting for me in London. I could not live
out of touch with Bloomsbury.”

“This is a good party after all,” broke in Roger.
“T have had some of everything, which is a thing
nurse neyer would have allowed.”

‘“T’se reached grace,” observed the baby with a
sigh of contentment.

“It’s very wicked to say grace out of doors,”
said Roger reprovingly.

The professor raised his eyebrows.

“Are you going to be a theologian, my son?”
he asked dryly. ‘This is your influence,” and he
turned to the curate, who flushed up to the roots
of his hair.

Everybody laughed. Even Jack, though it
was only a mirthless kind of chuckle he had at
his command.

“TI won’t go to a school what’s got a little
broom,” announced Oliver slowly. “An I will
be good—werry good.”

‘“As a point of obstinacy I think you might,”
replied the professor. ‘“ Not otherwise.”

“We're all a little tired of sitting still,” sug-.
gested Roger, “and being clean. Mightn’t we
have our pinafores on now and run about ?”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 215



“Tt would be a good plan,” answered his aunt.

And the children soon carried out Roger’s
admirable suggestion. The rector went away and
took Mr. Fairfax with him, and Aunt. Isabel had
to write some letters. The professor sat alone
with his pipe on the lawn.

“JT couldn't entertain the thought of giving up
my London professorship,” he was saying to him-
self. ‘‘It would mean the sacrifice of my whole
career, and the extinction of all my ambition. I
am rather home-sick now for my study and my
lecture-room and my friends up there!”

Just then a wild little party rushed round the
corner. Jack was wheeling Mike in the wheel-
barrow, and racing Peggy, who was driving Roger
and Oliver. Their hats were off, their faces bright
and rosy, their hair all rough and tumbled by the
fresh evening breeze.

The professor saw another picture as they
rushed by. A small, dingy, London nursery,
where the children, pale and tired, sat toiling
over their lessons.

“What would the St. Ninian’s professorship
mean to them!” he whispered in his heart, and
thought of the bracing north-east coast compared
with the narrow Bloomsbury street.

And then he smiled a rueful smile.

“There are four of them and there is only one
of me. What is my arithmetic coming to, if |
216 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



can’t see that four to one is more than a practical
working majority? I will go in and write to St.
Ninian’s to-night. And they may refuse to have
me after all. Anyhow, as the children say, I can
hope it.”
217

CHAPTER XI.

‘GIVEN a man, a stick and a ball; given alsoa
distinct intention on the part of the man to hit the
ball with the stick, it does seem an utterly in-
explicable problem why the said man should not
be able to do so.” And the professor rested his
tired arms and glanced hopelessly at the clean
white ball which remained untouched in the centre
of a piece of mangled turf.

The curate laughed.

“Tt is a knack,” he explained. And then with
apparently little effort he swung round his club
and the ball flew away through the air like some
swift bird, and fell a tiny white speck in the dis-
tance,

‘A knack!” exclaimed the professor scornfully,
“it is a miracle. Or rather it is a couple of
miracles. A miracle when | don’t hit it, and a
miracle when you do.”

“You should not try to hit the ball at all. Just
get your swing properly and the ball will go right
enough.”

So the professor tried again and again, and just
218 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN,



when he was within an inch of despair, he suc-
ceeded beyond his wildest hopes. A sharp, clean
click, and he turned in bewilderment to his in-
structor.

“Well done!” cried Mr. Fairfax. “Look! it
has gone almost as far as the trees.”

The professor breathed a deep sigh of satisfac-
tion.

‘This is power!” he observed raptly.

And from that day he could think of nothing
but golf. He and the curate walked miles and
miles over amateur links, and then, as his play im-
proved, they borrowed the rector’s trap and drove
over to the nearest club links. And when they
came home with the twilight they talked entirely
of drives and bunkers, lies and puts. If
occasionally some of the parishioners of Little
Heyford were inconsiderate enough to require the
curate’s presence at their christenings, marriages
and burials, the professor shook his head over the
follies and frailties of mankind, and played against
his own record until Mr. Fairfax was ready for
the real business of life again, in the shape of
another match.

Aunt Isabel smiled to herself as she saw a faint
brown burning itself into her brother-in-law’s white
cheeks, and the straighter set of his shoulders,
which indicated a return of health and strength.

‘There's one thing I should like to know,”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 219



said Roger thoughtfully, “which is the impor-
tantest—to write books as father used to, or to
play golf matches as he does now ?”

“You had better ask him,” suggested Aunt
Isabel with a little laugh.

“My dear boy,” said the professor gravely,
though a smile was hovering round his mouth,
“the most important thing is to possess a correct
sense of proportion, and then you can accurately
gauge the importance of other things. Unfortu-
nately your poor father is singularly lacking
therein. Once upon a time, he was convinced of
the paramount importance of an occult science ;
now, the number of strokes for the next hole
seems an all-important consideration. He is
blameworthy but content.”

‘Which is the importantest ?”” repeated Roger
with a puzzled look.

“The thing that comes next, I suppose,”
answered his father.

‘But I don’t understand !”

‘“Never mind, my son. It is a great mistake
to understand anything too soon. Come out with
me and | will teach you how to hold a club. It
seems a pity to be talking indoors while it is fine
and light outside.”

‘Oh, Dick! what a credit you will be to Little
Heyford!” exclaimed Aunt Isabel.

Before the summer quite went away, at least
220 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



that lovely little postscript of summer which folks
attribute to St. Luke, Mike had a birthday. Now
birthdays had never been much of a success in
London, but this was to be quite different. Aunt
Isabel promised, if it was fine and warm, that
Mike should have a picnic away on the real golf
links, where the professor and Mr. Fairfax could
join them, and everybody decided to give the baby
a birthday present, which made plenty of interest-
ing thought and planning beforehand. Indeed, .
poor Mike was so hurried out of the way of the
conspiring donors and so shunned by them alto-
gether, that he began to feel even the glories of a
birthday could be dearly bought.

“Go away, you naughty boy,” said Peggy
severely, as a wistful little face peeped in at the
pantry door. She and Lydia were making a plan
about a present and of course secrecy was un-
avoidable. But Mike could not help feeling a
little depressed as he clambered up the stairs and
made for the nursery. At the sound of his ap-
proach the door was slammed in his face.

‘You can’t come here!” cried Roger.

“We're in the middle of a werry big secret,”
shouted Oliver; “go away!”

“T keep goin’ away,” said the baby sadly,
‘nobody won't let Mike stay,’ and he sat down,
a forlorn little heap, on the top of the back stairs.

A few minutes afterwards, Oliver looked out.





“SE ON’Y SITTIN’, PLEADED THE BABY MEEKLY.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 223



“He's a werry wicked, listening boy!” he
announced in an outburst of righteous wrath.

“T’se on’y sittin’,” pleaded the baby meekly.

Oliver frowned at him severely.

“You're listening an’ telling stories bout it
after. And once,” he added impressively, nodding
his head to enforce the lesson, ‘there was a werry
wicked baby what listened and telled stories, and
he was eat by a ogre and smacked and pinched
till he died. He was werry like you.”

‘He wasn’t a bit yike me!” cried Mike, whose
spirit was becoming roused.

“He was just the same as you then, so
that there wasn’t no difference at all,” argued
Oliver in a superior and supremely irritating
manner.

‘“He wasn’t! he wasn’t!” shrieked the baby,
flying at his brother like a minute turkey cock.
Oliver hit back and repeated angrily :-—

“He was eat by a ogre, and his bones was all
cracked by teeth”.

Such a noise of screaming and crying on the
landing brought nurse in haste upstairs. Roger
was in the nursery, calmly continuing the cutting
out of pictures to be pasted on the new kite for
Mike and humming a little tune to himself, quite
unmoved by the noise outside.

‘““My word! here’s a pretty kettle o’ fish!”
said nurse, seizing the combatants by their
224 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



pinafores and dragging them asunder. “How
dare you both be so naughty ?”

“He said I’d be eat by a ogre,” explained the
baby through a flood of tears.

“ An’ you will, ‘cause you're so werry wicked,”
repeated Oliver loudly.

“ Be quiet this minute,” continued nurse severely,
and she bundled them into two opposite corners
with a little slap apiece.

“Now you'll both stay there till you're sorry.”

“T aren’t sorry,” said Oliver sulkily, ‘‘’cause a
ogre will eat him ——”

“Do you want me to give you a good whipping
and put you to bed?” asked nurse in her most
threatening manner.

Oliver’s very ears looked obstinate, but he
thought it prudent to say no more.

“Tt's very solemn in the nursery,” said Roger,
running into the drawing-room. ‘Two corners
are full and nurse is bursting with sternness.”

“T shall stay down here then,” replied Peggy
wisely, “for one thing I’ve often noticed is, that
when nurse is in a stern mood, naughtiness is
generally found in everybody.”

“And there are two more corners,’ added
Roger, ‘what are still empty. I suppose people
who have more than four children have nurseries
with more than four corners.”

“Tt must be rather awkward if there are ten
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 225



children,” said Peggy thoughtfully. “I never saw
a room with ten corners.”

“Are you sorry now?” asked nurse, addressing
the culprits after a silent half-hour.

‘““Mike vedy sorry!” replied the baby, “ an’
good boy now—all over.”

“Then you may come out!” and nurse wiped
his tear-stained face and put him on a clean pina-
fore.

‘Are you sorry, Master Oliver?”

“A ogre will crack his bones. I knewed he
would,” answered Oliver, deliberately ignoring
nurse’s question.

“Very well!” she replied severely. ‘‘ There
you'll stay till you say you are sorry, you naughty
boy! And if you speak about that ogre-rubbish
again, youll be put straight to bed. So now you
know.”

Oliver whispered something into his hands, but
nobody could hear what it was, and nurse showed
great discretion in not inquiring.

However he stood there so long without any
indications of penitence, that nurse was afraid he
would be physically exhausted, so she supplied
him with a small hassock on which he sat instead
with his face still to the wall.

When - tea-time came she made another
attempt.

“What are you thinking about all this long
15
226 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



while?” she asked more persuasively. ‘Isn't it
that you are sorry for being a naughty boy ?”

Oliver looked slowly round.

‘““T was thinking ‘bout a ogre, and what would
be the taste of Mike,” he answered sturdily.

Of course nurse was dreadfully angry.

She picked him up and carried him off to bed,
and all during the process of undressing, she told
the sternest possible stories about naughty little
boys who would not say they were sorry, and the
dreadful things that happened to them in conse-
quence. Oliver cried a little at first, but, after he
had disposed of a slice of bread and a cup of milk
and been tucked into his cot with penal severity,
he cheered up considerably. Such a funny little
figure he looked with his round face and solemn
eyes, sitting bolt upright on the pillow and tracing
imaginary pictures with his fore-finger in the air.

‘She asked me!” he muttered to himself, ‘‘an’
I was thinking ’bout the ogre and what would be
the taste of Mike.”

A few days previously the professor had tried
to check a habit among the children of telling tales
to him, or any one downstairs, of the sins of the
others. But to-night the temptation was terrible.
Roger struggled with it for a time and then his
quick wits suggested a solution.

‘“There’s trouble in the nursery!” he observed
in an impersonal and nonchalant way.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 227



“What kind of trouble?” asked his father, im-
mediately falling into the trap.

Roger rubbed his hands with satisfaction.

“Oliver is dreadfully naughty. It was only
corner-naughtiness most of the afternoon, but he’s
been put to bed now.”

“It’s a warning to us, nurse says,” added Peggy,
““not to never say we’re sorry ourselves.”

“Sorry for what?” inquired the professor, who
was cleaning his golf clubs.

Nobody seemed to know, so the baby was
fetched and consulted.

‘‘He was in the beginning of the naughtiness,
you see,” explained Roger; “it was on the back
stairs.”

‘‘Mike vedy sorry!” repeated the baby.

“What for?” asked his father.

Mike’s bright face clouded over with bewilder-
ment.

‘“‘Fordet what for,” he said at length.

“T think it was his birthday present,” suggested
Roger, “but I was busy and not listening.”

“Tl go up and have a look at Oliver,” said the
professor, folding up his sand-paper.

And he found a very solemn little son perched
up on the pillow.

“She asked me and | on’y telled the truth,”
was his defence. ‘“‘ Mike telled stories. He said
he was on’y sitting and he was listening too.”
228 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

“How do you know?” asked the professor.
Oliver continued to draw his imaginary pictures.
‘“‘T knewed he was!” he answered slowly.

His father smiled.

“Well, look you, little one. Aren’t you a tiny
bit sorry even?”

“No,” replied Oliver, ‘I are werry glad I telled
the truth.”

“For which I suppose you are to be highly
commended. Well, good-night, my boy. I am
going a round with Fairfax before it is dark.”

‘Isn't it werry wicked not to say Mr.?” asked
Oliver, who was simply inflated with self-righteous-
ness.

The professor laughed and went downstairs.

“There’s only been two quarrels and three
punishments over Mike’s birthday,” Peggy calcu-
lated on the eve of that important day.

“And one accident,” added Roger ; ‘‘ breaking
the tooth-glass with the boiling water for the
glue.”

‘“‘T haven't kept count of the cryings.”

“I ’spect there would be quite a hundred of
them, ’cause Mike ae cried so often over not
knowing the secrets.”

= lem getting a little tired of secrets,” continued
Peggy, ‘it’s so difficult not to tell them!”

The day itself was a great success,

So many presents loaded Mike’s plate at break-
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 229



fast that his small three-year-old head was fairly
turned.

A Noah’s ark from the professor, a kite from
Roger and Oliver, a gorgeously-dressed nigger
doll from Peggy and Lydia, a woolly lamb from
Aunt Isabel, a book from Uncle Robert, and a
pair of knitted reins from nurse. Then there was
a dirty birthday-card by post from Jack, and a
splendid cake baked by cook, with Mike’s initials
on in pink comfits, and two white sugar mice with
string tails. Mr. Fairfax brought a whip with a
whistle, and Mrs. Oakley sent a real live white
kitten for Mike’s very own.

The baby stretched out his fat arms as if to
embrace the whole world in a spirit of gratitude,
and held up his flower-face promiscuously for
kisses of thanks.

“Tt makes it a werry little bit dull for those
people whose birthdays it isn’t,” observed Oliver
somewhat gloomily, as he stood with his hands on
his knees, looking down on the crowded hearth-
rug where Mike sat in state.

“ But we are all going to the picnic,” said Aunt
Isabel soothingly, “in fact it will be quite difficult
to find out whose birthday it really is, because the
treat will be equally for all.”

Oliver smiled reluctantly. He always looked
as if he were pleased under protest, and was
obliged to smile against his will.
230 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



”

‘‘T wish there could be a birthday every day !
cried Roger enthusiastically.

Peggy thought the matter over and then
announced :—

‘““T do wish father had three hundred and sixty-
five children, and then there would be, you know!”

The professor groaned.

“What have I ever done to you, my daughter,
that you should-wish me such a doom ?”

“Don’t you like your children then, father?”
asked Roger in amazement.

“T do, my boy. But it is possible to have too
much of a good thing.”

“Ts it?” said Roger doubtfully. ‘1 should
like just to try and see for myself, without nurse
being always there to say we’ve had enough when
we've only just begun.”

‘She is so strict about helps,” chimed in Peggy.
“That's why we always so enjoy having meals
with you, father dear. You never seem to notice
and count up the number of helps.”

“YT am profoundly sorry for that kitten!” ob-
served the professor, looking at Mike. ‘ The cat
that is loved by a child has a chequered existence.”

‘““What’s a chequered existence?” Roger wanted
to know. ‘“ Do’splain to me.”

“Something you ought to know nothing about
yet, my son. But I am rather afraid you do, and
that it has been my fault.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 231



“You don’t ’splain things nearly so well as you
used,” said Roger. “I s’pose it’s with getting so
old. Nurse always says that when we ask her
questions.”

“ No, she doesn’t,” argued Oliver, “she says it’s
‘cause she’s got a bone in her leg.”

“Oh, no!” corrected Peggy, “that’s about run-
ning and climbing—a thing we always wonder
she doesn't like to do.”

“Do you think me so very old then?” asked
the professor.

“Oh, awfully!” exclaimed the children in a
breath.

The picnic was frightfully exciting. It began
directly after dinner, because the days were grow-
ing short, Aunt Isabel said, though the children
themselves had not noticed it.

They had never imagined anything so delight-
ful as picking the sticks and making a real fire
themselves, and when the kettle actually boiled,
loud were the shouts of delight.

The professor and Mr. Fairfax finished their
first golf match just in time to participate in the
great picnic, and then to get in a second round
afterwards before dark.

Uncle Robert was doing the curate’s work at~
home. It was part of the conspiracy, which he
and Aunt Isabel had joined in, to make the pro-
fessor quite well again.
232 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“You don’t like bacon in your cake, I remem-
ber,” said his father, removing a piece of citron
from Mike's slice.

“T yike lean in my bacon,” announced the baby
cheerfully. And then he breathed a deep sigh of
satisfaction as Aunt Isabel dropped one of the
sugar mice into his lap.

““T am enjoying the memories which haunt the
taste of a bun,” remarked the professor. ‘It is
years since I met a bun, much less ate it in the open.”

‘““Why does everything taste so much deliciouser
out of doors?” Peggy wanted to know. ‘We
have noticed it,—even with cough lozenges.”

“’m werry fond of lozengés,” observed Oliver.
‘““T would like one now for my tea.”

“Tam afraid I didn’t provide them for the pic-
nic,’ Aunt Isabel owned.

Just then a great disturbance was caused by the
baby’s sitting down suddenly upon the tea-pot.
Whether as an experiment, or by accident, nobody
knew. By the time his tears were dried, Aunt
Isabel thought they must be packing up again,
so as to get home before it grew cold.

‘When it’s my birthday, where shall we be?’
asked Oliver gravely.

“I cannot tell you that yet,” replied his father,
“for your birthday is in the winter.”

‘I will have a picnic too—an’ lozenges,” added
Oliver, with a reproachful look at his aunt.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 233



But the best birthday present of all lay awaiting
Mike in a thin orange envelope on the hall table
at the rectory. And it was not even addressed
to him, but to his father, whom it announced to
be the newly-appointed professor of psychology in
the University of St. Ninian’s. The children did
not know anything about it till the professor came
home.

“Tt will be nice telling them!” he said softly to
Aunt Isabel, as he entered the room.

“Look you, little ones. Would you rather go
back to live in London or have a new house in
the country ?”

“Oh, not London!” they cried imploringly.

“T have accepted a new appointment,” began
the professor, but Peggy interrupted him.

“Are you the next postman?” she asked
eagerly. ‘‘The one here has been given a
higher place, you know.”

Her father shook his head.

‘“My new professorship and your new home
will not be in London but at a place called St.
Ninian’s.”

‘Near here?” asked Roger.

‘““No, my boy. In a new country away by the
Seam

“The sea!” exclaimed the children in rapt
amazement, and then Oliver smiled all over his
round face.
234 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“It'll be werry nice to have the sea’ in our
garden!” he said slowly.

“We've never seen the sea,” observed Peggy
in an awe-struck voice.

“Tt is a fine playfellow,” her father told her.

‘Oh, how splendid!” cried Roger, clapping his
hands and beginning to jump about wildly. ‘I
never imagined anything quite so glorious and
lovely as having the sea for our own.”

“Are you going to be a fisherman, father?”
Peggy asked with interest.

“Ttll be werry nice,” repeated Oliver with
solemn satisfaction, rubbing his hands slowly up
and down the sides of his pinafore.

‘““T do hope nurse won't get drowned ” continued
Roger, in a tone of flickering fervency, such as
grown-ups are sometimes wont to use concerning
the possible calamities of their friends.

‘Does the sea last long enough to be ours_
always, or will it sink away like some of the
pools?” said Peggy thoughtfully.

‘Tt will last your time, little one,” her father
assured her.

‘‘ Shall we live there always, father ?”

‘“T shall take a house for seven years to start
with, my boy.”

“Will that be over before the summer comes
again?” asked Oliver anxiously.

The baby had not understood all this talk, he
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 235



was so sleepy and tired after the excitement of the
day. But the others tried to shout the glad news
into his muddled little brain.

“Uncle Robert won’t go with us, will he?” and
Oliver looked rather sober again.

‘“Nor Aunt Isabel,” added the professor.

‘Nor Jack?” asked Peggy anxiously.

‘We'll have Jack to come and see us in the
holidays,” the professor promised, ‘‘and Mr. Fair-
fax as well as your uncle and aunt. We will have
great fun!”

‘Oh, father! how splendid of you to be going
to live there ’stead of London,” cried Peggy,
clasping her hands. ‘It makes us almost too
happy to eat our suppers.”

“Must you go soon?” asked Aunt Isabel, when
the children had gone to bed in a state of mad ex-
citement.

“Yes, I shall start on Monday. I intend to
take over the last professor's house,—stock, lock
and barrel, and then I shall be glad to move the
children before the cold weather begins.”

“And do you feel quite strong now, Dick?”

“T am a young man again,” said the professor,
holding out his hand to her, “and it is your and
Robert’s doing. I owe you more than I can
say for all you have done for me and the children.
I want to thank you, Isabel, in their name and my
own-—and Hers!” he added in a low voice,
236 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



Aunt Isabel looked away with tear-filled eyes.

“T am so glad!” she whispered tremulously.

For the next few days all was bustle and con-
fusion. Then nurse went away to London, to
pack up, and from there to Scotland to make
ready the new home.

The children could talk and think of nothing
but the great move, and their sorrow at leaving
the rectory was quite swallowed up by the new
and joyful excitement.

“It is very good of you, Dick, to have given up
London for the children,” said Uncle Robert, as
he bid him good-bye.

“There are compensations,” answered the pro-
fessor smiling. ‘‘ Here are some of them,” and he
shouldered his case of golf clubs.

‘Good-bye, good-bye!” sang Aunt Isabel, as
the cab door was shut.

“Tm werry glad we’re going to our own sea,”
observed Oliver, mechanically kissing his hand,
“but I hope Mike will be good, or else he’ll werry
likely be drownded dead !.”

‘““Shan’t vedy yikely be drownded dead!” re-
torted the baby with spirit, and it required great
diplomacy on the part of the professor to avoid a
passage of arms in the somewhat restricted arena
of a four-wheeled cab.





















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““T DO LOVE MY SEA WERRY MUCH!” EXCLAIMED OLIVER.
239

CHAPTER XII.

Tue professor sat correcting his manuscript for
the press. He smiled a little ruefully over some
of his old notes, and drew his pencil through many
of his scientific observations.

He was very well and very happy in his new
life at St. Ninian’s. The bracing air of the north-
east coast brought physical strength and vigour,
such as he had never dreamed of in Bloomsbury ;
and the splendid exercise of his daily round on
the golf links kept him fresh and healthy in mind °
as well as body.

The children were running on the sands. Those
glorious, dry, hard sands which the sea swept and
rolled every day, as it crept up to kiss the feet of
the proud little town which had looked down upon
it for so many hundred years. And what such
sands would be in the summer to play on, the
child-imagination could hardly grasp. They were
splendid enough now, though it was too cold to
stand about and dig and paddle.

“I do love my sea werry much!” exclaimed
‘Oliver, holding out his arms towards the big waves
which were tumbling in from the north.
240 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.

‘“And I yove the cockies,” added Mike, point-
ing to the numberless sea-mews which waddled
about in the bed of the brook that came down
from the land to the sea.

‘“‘T love my new school!” cried Peggy. ‘“ There
are such lots of girls only as big as me, and they
don’t know nearly as much,” she added proudly.

“T don’t like my school werry much,” argued
Oliver, ‘it has such a nasty lady.”

_ ‘That is a very naughty thing to say,” corrected
his sister, “and rude, when I daresay she’s quite
nice.”

‘“No, she isn’t. She's werry nasty and savage,”
Oliver continued impressively.

‘Going to school is heaps jollier than having
on’y a Ma’mselle or Fraulein to ourselves as we
did at home,” was Roger’s opinion. “I might
even get a prize this term, Mr. Macdougal
says.”

‘“And you are the littlest boy in the class,”
Peggy reminded him with elder-sisterly pride.

“But I’m the most freckled,” boasted Roger,
whose ambition it had always been to rival Jack
in this respect.

‘“She’s a werry horrid lady,” repeated Oliver.
‘She makes all the children stand in a quantity ina
row and then she points about with questions what
we've all forgotten. She puts us to stand on the
form when we don’t know things always, and the
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 241



next boy to you gener'ly pinches your leg. I
think she’s werry nasty.”

“You're so naughty, I expect,” said Peggy.

“T aren't naughty hardly ever. I’m going to
be a sailor soon,” he announced decidedly, turning
again towards the sea. ‘And if Miss Crosby
comes in my ship when I’m a sailor, I shall push
her into the sea,” he added with determination.

“That would be most unhonourable,’ said
Roger reprovingly. ‘Mr. Macdougal says we
mustn’t ever do such rude things to ladies as we
do to each other. He said it about a boy throw-
ing a snowball at a lady. And drowning her
would be much ruder.”

‘‘T shall push her into the sea if I am a sailor
and she sails in my ship,” repeated Oliver obsti-
nately, ‘I’ve settled it in my mind.”

And then he walked on with his head so high
in the air to show his determination, that he did
not see where he was going and fell down, through
treading on a slippery piece of sea-weed.

‘“‘Serves you right for being so unhonourable!”
cried Roger teasingly.

Oliver slowly picked himself up.

“T like tumbling down werry much,” he said
deliberately. And then he walked on without
deigning to rub the sand off his pilot coat. Of
course this made nurse a little disagreeable when

they reached home. She always was so fussy
16
242 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



over trifling things such as sand on the carpet or
jam on the table-cloth, and the new home seemed
to have made her much worse than ever.

The professor had a caller downstairs ;—one of
the other professors, who was very kind to the
children and generally made them so excited that
they were naughty as well. Indeed Roger became
so noisy and mischievous that afternoon that his
father could not do with him downstairs.

‘““There’s one thing I’ve often noticed,” said
Peggy thoughtfully, “excitedness turns quickest
to naughtiness of everything.”

“T’m sorry,’ owned Roger penitently, ‘‘ and
now Dr. Urquhart has gone.” And he rested his
hot little head on the staircase balustrade.

“You did not behave at all well this afternoon,
you know,” the professor told him when they went
down to say good-night.

Roger looked serious.

“T will apologize,” he said suddenly; “can ]
go now, father, to Dr. Urquhart’s ?”

“Certainly not, as it is nearly eight o’clock.”

“Then T’ll go to-morrow morning before
school. Mr. Macdougal says, to apologize is
what gentlemen do to put things all right when
they’ve been horrid.”

“Please yourself, my son,” said the professor,
stroking back the boy’s rough curly hair caress-

ingly.
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 243



“You don’t write nearly so many notes ’bout
us as you used, do you, father?” observed Peggy,
“but you kiss us much oftener, and play splendid
games, and generally understand things now, you
know.”

“Is your book nearly finished?” asked Roger,
catching sight of the manuscript on the table.

“T’m afraid not. I made so many mistakes
that I have to write most of it again.”

“ Like we have to our exercises, when there’s
more than twelve mistakes.”

“There are more than twelve in mine,” said
her father smiling.

The next morning, directly he was dressed,
Roger seized his topcoat and hat and started for
Dr. Urquhart’s. Breakfast was half over when
he came back.

“You did not stay long,” remarked the pro-
fessor.

“When you go to apologize you feel too shy
to stay long, you see,” explained Roger, “so an
apologizing call must be rather a short one.”

‘“What did you say to Dr. Urquhart?”

“T told him I was sorry for being rude, and-

that it was quite an accident, and that I’d come
to apologize. It was a little difficult to talk
much about other things after that, so I came
home.”

‘Bravo, my boy! You are going to be an
244 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



English gentleman first. We will settle about
the philosopher or the ploughman afterwards.”

‘{ feel rather like nurse when she’s got on her
spectacles,” continued Roger.

“‘ How is that ?”

‘Why, seeing things clearly, you know. Apolo-
gizing made me see my rudeness as clearly as
spectacles would.”

“T should have hated to have gone,” said
Peggy. ‘It was very good of you, Roger.”

‘““It was because of honourableness, which Mr.
Macdougal says is the importantest thing for
boys.”

“ Perhaps it isn’t so important for girls?” Peggy
hoped.

‘‘T shall call on this new master of yours, my
son. I owe him something.”

“Much?” asked Peggy a little anxiously.

ONS

‘“As much as eight and fourpence?”

so More?

** When shall you pay it, father?”

‘Never. It is more than I can ever repay.”

“Tt must be quite twenty pounds!” Roger
decided, and the professor did not contradict him.

“T’ve writ to the frog,” announced Oliver, look-
ing up from his porridge, ‘an’ he says it was all a
mistake, you know, about going to Russia. He’s
going to live at the sea and learn his long-clothes
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 245



baby how to swim. He’s got two other children
‘sides Eva. Their names is Willie and Vase-
line.”

“T should not be surprised if you were to turn
out the literary man of the family after all,” said
the professor. ‘‘ There is a solidity about your
imagination which the others lack.”

“Shall I read you my letter?” asked Oliver,
holding a piece of writing-paper up before his face.

‘“Do, please,” begged his father. ‘‘ There is
plenty of time before you need start for school.”

Oliver began in a sing-song voice :—

“When the stars had gone down and the light
had come, and the angels and cows were just
walking out, little Vaseline was given by her
nurse the beautifullest piece of lace with nothing
the matter with it. The day because she put it
on was Sunday, and which was werry nice she
hopped to church.”

And Oliver peeped over the top of the paper
with a satisfied smile.

“T am deeply interested,” exclaimed the pro-
fessor. ‘‘ Pray go on.”

“Now Lizzie Frog, which was the mother, had
a nice long-clothes baby which she loved im-
mensely. She liked the baby quite as much as
the ribbon and werry beautiful lace which she kept
in a drawer who pinched her. Directly Willie
was going out he saw a raven among the trees,
246 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



and when he went to stroke the raven it beaked
him. His nurse was werry stern, you know.”

‘* How stern?”

‘About my nurse when we're dirty. So what
do you think they saw?” he continued in his
narrative voice, and then without waiting for an
answer :—

‘A tiger with a basket. So fetching nurse’s
sword they killed the tiger and brought the skin
to make a werry Sunday coat.”

“Tt is a long and diversified letter,” observed
the professor ; “I am enjoying it very much.”

“] knewed you would,” said Oliver confidently.

“Isn't there any more?” asked his father.

“Just this: Willie thought Vaseline was a cat
‘cause she was sitting up, you know. And he said
‘What’s ever this?’ And his nurse said ‘ Good-
ness me, it’s not! How ridic’lous of us to say it is
a cat when it is little Vaseline Miss!’ So they
had a funeral after dinner—a nice big one like
those we enjoyed so werry much at Little Hey-
ford when Uncle Robert wore his night-gown out
of doors. And there’s no more.”

“Thank you, my son. Your style is inimit-
able.”

‘Good-bye, father dear,” said Peggy, looking in
at the door, “I am going to school now. What
time is your golf match to-day ?”

“Ten o'clock, little one.”
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 247



““Mind you're not late.” And Peggy swung
her bag of books over her shoulder and ran down
the road as happy and healthy a little girl as could
be found in the whole kingdom from John o’
Groat’s to Land’s End.

“Come, Oliver,” called Roger, “we must go
now. I shall come and meet you after twelve,
father, if I don’t stop to play with any of the boys,
or if Sandy Ogilvie doesn’t ask me to have a ride
on his pony, or if I don’t know my lessons nor
turn out naughty by accident and get kept in.”

“ Allright. The contingencies upon which your
promise rests make its fulfilment a little uncertain,
I'm afraid.”

“T think Miss Crosby’s werry nasty,’ said
Oliver, trying to force one more book into his
satchel than it could possibly hold; “she shaked
me when I| squealed a pencil across my slate. |
did it on the purpose.”

“That was not specially good of you, you
know.”

“T would ratherer go to Roger’s school,” con-
tinued Oliver, “’cause [I’m _ werry big, you
Seem

‘Oh, no! you're only pinafore size,” said Roger
scornfully. Since he went to a proper boy’s school
three weeks ago, he had discarded that livery of
the nursery.

Oliver could not deny the imputation.
248 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



“But they’se werry big pinafores,’ he said
gloomily.

When the boys had started, Mike trotted down-
stairs to see his father. He had a box of little
tea-things under his arm, and his sunny face was
quite serious with the earnestness of his
plans.

“Sit me on,” he demanded, coming up to the
high chair by the table. .

The professor obediently lifted him up, and he
at once began to unpack his box.

“se got all the family,” he explained, pulling
out the tea-pot and sugar-basin. “ Here it is, an’
all the yittle cups and saucers. It’s all the family,
you see.”

“We will have an extra breakfast of our own,”
suggested his father, filling the tiny jug with real
milk.

Mike clapped his hands.

“Tt’s the nicest b’ekky I ever heard,” he ex-
claimed enthusiastically. ‘Now Mike going to
wash up. Will you turn the tap for me?”

“Can’t you turn it yourself?”

“Oh, but it’s so fierce when Mike turns it,” the
baby owned with a grave face, “an’ makes a vedy
quick spill.”

“All right. And I suppose you are going for
a walk this morning ?”

Mike ran to the window and stood looking out


THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 249

over the wide, wave- Soccer sea, and up towards
the cloudless heavens.

“ Not raining,” he announced at length. No
hole in the sky for the rain to come out.”

“Tt’s a lovely day, my child. And now I must
be off to the links. Good-bye.”

In the middle of Mike’s walk he and nurse
called at the school for Oliver, an attention which
annoyed that youth extremely.

“T don’t want to go with you and Mike,” he
said sulkily. ‘I hate walks!”

“Little boys shouldn’t say ‘hate’. And come
along directly. I want you to be measured for a
new pair of boots.” 3

Oliver kicked the gate post with a fervency
that implied his wish that it was nurse’s shin.
And then he dragged slowly after her as she
walked off towards the town. A herd of cattle
was the only excitement, and Oliver’s scorn was
thoroughly aroused by nurse’s insisting on their
all going inside a gate until the cows had gone by.
In the boot shop they met a neighbouring nurse
and a little girl with whom they sometimes went
to tea. A good, gentle, little thing who adored
Oliver and ‘Mike, and was on the whole treated
fairly well by them.

While Oliver was being measured, the little
girl embraced the baby so enthusiastically that he
cried.
250 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN,



‘“What’s the matter?” asked nurse, looking up
from the boots.

‘Oh don’t let her yove me so much!” begged
Mike.

‘‘We must go now,” said the little girl’s nurse.
“Say good-bye, my dear, and come along.”



N
Wie et
iE HT

i



ce
pi

“OH DON’T LET HER YOVE ME SO MUCH!”’ BEGGED MIKE.

The little girl obediently saluted Mike again,
and he bore it resignedly, but when she ap-
proached Oliver with the same docile intention,
he gave her a violent push which hurt her arm
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 251



and her feelings so much that she was instantly
dissolved in tears.

“ Now, now!” exclaimed nurse severely, “that’s
not the proper way for a gentleman to say good-
bye toa lady. Kiss her nicely this minute. Do
you hear ?”

Oliver sulkily complied.

‘““She’s a werry silly little girl,” he said loudly
as they left the shop, “and I don’t like playing
with girls.”

“You are a very rude boy,” corrected nurse.

“No I aren't, old frightened-at-cow !” retorted
Oliver, who was hurried in his selection of an ap-
propriate term of derision.

“Very well, Master Oliver. Dry bread for tea
this evening, remember.”

‘“T like dry bread werry much. It’s my favourit-
est thing to eat,” observed Oliver, pushing his
sailor hat on to the very back of his head, and
putting his hands into his pockets just to show
nurse how little he cared for her punishments.

“Father, what shall I do with the hoofs of my
pony when he is dead?” Roger suddenly asked
after dinner.

‘“‘T did not know you had a pony, my son.”

‘““T haven’t yet. But I’m saving up my money
to buy one. I’ve got sixpence halfpenny towards
it. Mr. Macdougal has an ink-pot made out of a
horse’s hoof. My pony would make four ink-
252 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



stands, you see, but that is rather many for one,
father, isn’t it?”

“You might give Peggy one, and the two little
boys.”

‘““T couldn’t come to meet you after all, you see,
‘cause I was kept in.”

“What for?”

“Not doing my sums. Fractions are very un-
easy things, aren’t they, father?”

“‘T don’t find them so.”

“Oh, but then you’rea man. And everything
is easy for a real man to do.”

“Indeed!” remarked the professor dryly.

‘Now I like French history,” continued Roger,
whose thoughts and limbs were equally restless ;
‘‘only there’s one thing I notice. All the kings
were not exactly very good men, which is a
thing you would expect with kings.”

“Well, not exactly,” said the professor, who was
arranging his papers.

‘“T like about Napoleon. He was such a great
conquering man. But do you think it’s quite
right to be a usurpater? I asked one of the boys,
but he only said, ‘Shut up shop’. He was a little
vexed, you see, ’cause I got top marks in Napoleon
and he was lowest but one.”

“What: did you say?” asked his father ab-
sently.
““T see your thoughts are turned inwards,” said
THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN. 253



Roger wisely, “so I won’t stay and bother
you.” ;
“You never bother me,” answered the pro-
fessor, looking up with a smile from his work.
“But I am rather busy just now. I am going to
give a big lecture this afternoon on the Psycho-
logical Aspect of Child Life.”

“How horrid it sounds!” exclaimed Roger
frankly.

“ But it won't be,” chimed in Peggy confidently.
She had just entered the room with Oliver.

‘“ How do you know ?” asked her father.

‘Oh, because everything’s so much nicer here
than it used to be in London, so your lectures
will be too, of course.”

“T wish I were sure of that!” said the pro-
fessor.

“But I am sure, father,” Peggy eagerly im-
pressed upon him. ‘“ Look how much nicer this
place is, and out of doors, and school, and playing,
and you, too, father dear. Everything is heaps
and heaps nicer!”

‘Nurse is not nicer,” interrupted Oliver. ‘‘She’s
werry un-nicer. But. I do like dry bread for my
tea werry much,” he added with his most obstinate
expression.

The lecture-hall was crowded that afternoon
with the university students in their picturesque
coloured gowns, and most of the residents of the
254 THE PROFESSOR’S CHILDREN.



old Scotch city. Their new professor was so dis-
tinguished a man that every one was anxious to
hear his inaugural address.

It was a long lecture, full of profound thought
and wide learning. It cast the light of science on
the initial stage of life, as it dawns in the cradle
and slowly develops during the expanding years
of the child. It traced the phases which are
of psychological importance throughout that de-
velopment, and touched with a master hand the
subtle points of that most delicate problem.

“So do we see,” said the professor in conclu-
sion, ‘‘that this psychological study of childhood
brings us not only to the deeper significance which
its simplicity hides, but to the fuller knowledge of
all mental and moral development, as it begins in
the baby and slowly Boy, through the bay into
the man.

“The charm of childhood we are all conscious
of, but there is a deeper knowledge underlying its
artistic beauty which science alone can reveal.

‘Ladies and gentlemen, I have given you my
precepts, but,” and the professor looked up with
his whimsical smile, “my examples, which are far
better, are playing in the nursery at home.”